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Sample records for out-of hospital cardiac

  1. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    Sondergaard, Kathrine B; Hansen, Steen Moller; Pallisgaard, Jannik L

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: Despite wide dissemination of automated external defibrillators (AEDs), bystander defibrillation rates remain low. We aimed to investigate how route distance to the nearest accessible AED was associated with probability of bystander defibrillation in public and residential locations. METHODS......: We used data from the nationwide Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry and the Danish AED Network to identify out-of-hospital cardiac arrests and route distances to nearest accessible registered AED during 2008-2013. The association between route distance and bystander defibrillation was described using...... in public locations, the probability of bystander defibrillation at 0, 100 and 200meters from the nearest AED was 35.7% (95% confidence interval 28.0%-43.5%), 21.3% (95% confidence interval 17.4%-25.2%), and 13.7% (95% confidence interval 10.1%-16.8%), respectively. The corresponding numbers for cardiac...

  2. Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Denmark

    Wissenberg Jørgensen, Mads

    challenges, due to the victim’s physical location, which brings an inherent risk of delay (or altogether absence) of recognition and treatment of cardiac arrest. A low frequency of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and low 30-day survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest were identified nearly ten...... years ago in Denmark. These findings led to several national initiatives to strengthen bystander resuscitation attempts and advance care. Despite these nationwide efforts, it was unknown prior to this project whether these efforts resulted in changes in resuscitation attempts by bystanders and changes...

  3. Current practice in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest management

    Proclemer, Alessandro; Dobreanu, Dan; Pison, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    AIMS: The purpose of this EP wire is to examine clinical practice in the field of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) management, with special focus on in-hospital diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. METHODS AND RESULTS: Fifty-three European centres, all members of the EHRA-EP Research network......, completed the questions of the survey. A dedicated strategy for OHCA management is active in 85% of the centres. Shockable tachyarrhythmias such as initial OHCA rhythm are reported in >70% of the patients in 64% of the centres. In-hospital therapeutic hypothermia was applied in >50% of the patients in 53...... management strategy, including coronary angiography/PCI and implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy, while therapeutic hypothermia appears to be underused....

  4. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in children and adolescents

    Rajan, Shahzleen; Wissenberg, Mads; Folke, Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is insufficient knowledge of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in the very young. OBJECTIVES: This nationwide study sought to examine age-stratified OHCA characteristics and the role of parental socioeconomic differences and its contribution to mortality in the young...... population. METHODS: All OHCA patients in Denmark, ≤21 years of age, were identified from 2001 to 2010. The population was divided into infants (adolescents/young adults (16-21 years). Multivariate logistic regression......-school children, school children and high school adolescents were 11.5, 3.5, 1.3 and 5.3 per 100,000 inhabitants. Overall bystander CPR rate was 48.8%, and for age groups: 55.4%, 41.2%, 44.9% and 63.0%, respectively. Overall 30-day survival rate was 8.1%, and for age groups: 1.4%, 4.5%, 16.1% and 9...

  5. Community involvement in out of hospital cardiac arrest

    Shams, Ali; Raad, Mohamad; Chams, Nour; Chams, Sana; Bachir, Rana; El Sayed, Mazen J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a leading cause of death worldwide. Developing countries including Lebanon report low survival rates and poor neurologic outcomes in affected victims. Community involvement through early recognition and bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can improve OHCA survival. This study assesses knowledge and attitude of university students in Lebanon and identifies potential barriers and facilitators to learning and performing CPR. A cross-sectional survey was administered to university students. The questionnaire included questions regarding the following data elements: demographics, knowledge, and awareness about sudden cardiac arrest, CPR, automated external defibrillator (AED) use, prior CPR and AED training, ability to perform CPR or use AED, barriers to performing/learning CPR/AED, and preferred location for attending CPR/AED courses. Descriptive analysis followed by multivariate analysis was carried out to identify predictors and barriers to learning and performing CPR. A total of 948 students completed the survey. Participants’ mean age was 20.1 (±2.1) years with 53.1% women. Less than half of participants (42.9%) were able to identify all the presenting signs of cardiac arrest. Only 33.7% of participants felt able to perform CPR when witnessing a cardiac arrest. Fewer participants (20.3%) reported receiving previous CPR training. Several perceived barriers to learning and performing CPR were also reported. Significant predictors of willingness to perform CPR when faced with a cardiac arrest were: earning higher income, previous CPR training and feeling confident in one's ability to apply an AED, or perform CPR. Lacking enough expertise in performing CPR was a significant barrier to willingness to perform CPR. University students in Lebanon are familiar with the symptoms of cardiac arrest, however, they are not well trained in CPR and lack confidence to perform it. The attitude towards the importance of

  6. Association between dental caries and out-of-hospital cardiac arrests of cardiac origin in Japan.

    Suematsu, Yasunori; Miura, Shin-Ichiro; Zhang, Bo; Uehara, Yoshinari; Ogawa, Masahiro; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Nonogi, Hiroshi; Nagao, Ken; Kimura, Takeshi; Saku, Keijiro

    2016-04-01

    Oral infection contributes to atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. We hypothesized that dental caries may be associated with out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) of cardiac origin, but not non-cardiac origin. We compared the age-adjusted incidence of OHCA (785,591 cases of OHCA: 55.4% of cardiac origin and 44.6% of non-cardiac origin) to the age-adjusted prevalence of dental caries between 2005 and 2011 in the 47 prefectures of Japan. In both the total population and males over 65 years, the number of cases of dental caries was significantly associated with the number of OHCA of total and cardiac origin from 2005 to 2011, but not those of non-cardiac origin. In the total population, the age-adjusted prevalence of dental caries was not significantly associated with the age-adjusted incidence of OHCA (total OHCA: r correlation coefficient=0.22, p=0.14; OHCA of cardiac origin: r=0.25, p=0.09; OHCA of non-cardiac origin: r=-0.002, p=0.99). Among male patients over 65 years, the age-adjusted prevalence of dental caries was significantly associated with OHCA of total and cardiac origin, but not non-cardiac origin (total OHCA: r=0.47, p<0.001; OHCA of cardiac origin: r=0.37, p=0.01; OHCA of non-cardiac origin: r=0.28, p=0.054). While oral hygiene is important in all age groups, it may be particularly associated with OHCAs of cardiac origin in males over 65 years. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Young man presenting with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Huang, Hans David; Lombardi, William L; Steinberg, Zachary Louis

    2018-06-22

    A man in his early 30s with remote history of a febrile rash as a toddler presented to the emergency room following an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest while riding his bicycle. He received bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and one shock from an automatic external defibrillator, successfully restoring sinus rhythm. On arrival, he was haemodynamically stable without ECG evidence of ST segment changes to suggest active ischaemia, and an initial troponin I was mildly elevated at 0.10 ng/mL (normal <0.04 ng/mL). A CT angiogram (CTA) was obtained showing a normal-appearing aorta and no abnormal extracardiac findings. Urgent coronary angiography was performed; images are shown in figure 1A-C. Echocardiogram revealed a mildly reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (45%) with a hypokinetic inferior wall.heartjnl;heartjnl-2018-312966v1/F1F1F1Figure 1(A) Right coronary artery angiogram in the left anterior oblique cranial projection. (B) Left coronary artery angiogram in the right anterior oblique caudal projection. (C) Left coronary artery angiogram in the right anterior oblique cranial projection. CAUD, caudal; CRAN, cranial; LAO, left anterior oblique; RAO, right anterior oblique. What is the next best step in the management of this patient at this time?Complete revascularisation via percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).Referral for coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG).Initiation of high-dose steroids.Initiation of dual-antiplatelet therapy without planned revascularisation. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. Return to Work in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Survivors

    Kragholm, Kristian; Wissenberg, Mads; Mortensen, Rikke Normark

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data on long-term function of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors are sparse. We examined return to work as a proxy of preserved function without major neurologic deficits in survivors. METHODS AND RESULTS: In Denmark, out-of-hospital cardiac arrests have been systematically repo...

  9. Outcome of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest--why do physicians withhold resuscitation attempts?

    Horsted, Tina I; Rasmussen, Lars S; Lippert, Freddy K

    2004-01-01

    To describe the outcome of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) with a focus on why physicians withhold resuscitation attempts.......To describe the outcome of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) with a focus on why physicians withhold resuscitation attempts....

  10. Prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation and outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    Rajan, Shahzleen; Folke, Fredrik; Kragholm, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    AIM: It is unclear whether prolonged resuscitation can result in successful outcome following out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA). We assessed associations between duration of pre-hospital resuscitation on survival and functional outcome following OHCA in patients achieving pre-hospital return...

  11. Electronic registration of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests

    Nielsen, Niels Dalsgaard; Dahl, Michael; Gade, John

    2007-01-01

    of cardiac arrest. 83 of those (28 %) received first aid. The first aid was provided by layman (68 %), physicians (11 %), nurses (11 %) and first-aiders (4 %). In 6 % the identity of the first aid provider was unknown. The majority of the patients (n = 177 (58 %)) had asystole upon ambulance arrival. 37 (12...... patients according to whether they received first aid, the identity of the first aid provider and the initial cardiac rhythm as diagnosed by the patient monitor.   Results: 18,666 patients where in contact with an emergency ambulance in the study period. Of those 296 (89/100,000/year) met the definition...... a considerably higher incidence rate for OHCA, than documented by the analogue nationwide registry. Further we discovered a high rate of first aid to OHCA-patients. Finally our data showed a high occurence of asystolia in patients who met the official criteria for OHCA....

  12. Association between prehospital physician involvement and survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    Hamilton, Annika; Steinmetz, Jacob; Wissenberg, Mads

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Sudden out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is an important public health problem. While several interventions are known to improve survival, the impact of physician-delivered advanced cardiac life support for OHCA is unclear. We aimed to assess the association between prehospital physician...

  13. GLP-1 analogues for neuroprotection after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    Wiberg, Sebastian; Hassager, Christian; Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig

    2016-01-01

    one-to-one fashion to a 6-hour and 15-minute infusion of either Exenatide or placebo. Patients are eligible for inclusion if resuscitated from cardiac arrest with randomization from 20 minutes to 240 minutes after return of spontaneous circulation. The co-primary endpoint is feasibility, defined......Background: Attenuating the neurological damage occurring after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is an ongoing research effort. This dual-centre study investigates the neuroprotective effects of the glucagon-like-peptide-1 analogue Exenatide administered within 4 hours from the return of spontaneous...... circulation to comatose patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Methods/design: This pilot study will randomize a total of 120 unconscious patients with sustained return of spontaneous circulation after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest undergoing targeted temperature management in a blinded...

  14. Outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest treated by basic vs advanced life support.

    Sanghavi, Prachi; Jena, Anupam B; Newhouse, Joseph P; Zaslavsky, Alan M

    2015-02-01

    Most out-of-hospital cardiac arrests receiving emergency medical services in the United States are treated by ambulance service providers trained in advanced life support (ALS), but supporting evidence for the use of ALS over basic life support (BLS) is limited. To compare the effects of BLS and ALS on outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Observational cohort study of a nationally representative sample of traditional Medicare beneficiaries from nonrural counties who experienced out-of-hospital cardiac arrest between January 1, 2009, and October 2, 2011, and for whom ALS or BLS ambulance services were billed to Medicare (31,292 ALS cases and 1643 BLS cases). Propensity score methods were used to compare the effects of ALS and BLS on patient survival, neurological performance, and medical spending after cardiac arrest. Survival to hospital discharge, to 30 days, and to 90 days; neurological performance; and incremental medical spending per additional survivor to 1 year. Survival to hospital discharge was greater among patients receiving BLS (13.1% vs 9.2% for ALS; 4.0 [95% CI, 2.3-5.7] percentage point difference), as was survival to 90 days (8.0% vs 5.4% for ALS; 2.6 [95% CI, 1.2-4.0] percentage point difference). Basic life support was associated with better neurological functioning among hospitalized patients (21.8% vs 44.8% with poor neurological functioning for ALS; 23.0 [95% CI, 18.6-27.4] percentage point difference). Incremental medical spending per additional survivor to 1 year for BLS relative to ALS was $154,333. Patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest who received BLS had higher survival at hospital discharge and at 90 days compared with those who received ALS and were less likely to experience poor neurological functioning.

  15. Bystander efforts and 1-year outcomes in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    Kragholm, Kristian; Wissenberg, Mads; Mortensen, Rikke N.

    2017-01-01

    changes in bystander interventions and outcomes. RESULTS Among the 2855 patients who were 30-day survivors of an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest during the period from 2001 through 2012, a total of 10.5% had brain damage or were admitted to a nursing home and 9.7% died during the 1-year follow-up period...

  16. Defibrillation probability and impedance change between shocks during resuscitation from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    Walker, Robert G.; Koster, Rudolph W.; Sun, Charles; Moffat, George; Barger, Joseph; Dodson, Pamela P.; Chapman, Fred W.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Technical data now gathered by automated external defibrillators (AEDs) allows closer evaluation of the behavior of defibrillation shocks administered during out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We analyzed technical data from a large case series to evaluate the change in transthoracic

  17. Genetic, clinical and pharmacological determinants of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    Blom, M T; van Hoeijen, D A; Bardai, A

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a major public health problem. Recognising the complexity of the underlying causes of OHCA in the community, we aimed to establish the clinical, pharmacological, environmental and genetic factors and their interactions that may cause OHCA. ME......-reviewed journals and presented at relevant scientific symposia....

  18. Quality of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation during real-life out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    Gyllenborg, Tore; Granfeldt, Asger; Lippert, Freddy

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can increase survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). However, little is known about bystander CPR quality in real-life OHCA. AIM: To describe bystander CPR quality based on automated external defibrillator (AED) CPR process data during OH...

  19. Circumstances and causes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in sudden death survivors

    de Vreede-Swagemakers, J. J.; Gorgels, A. P.; Dubois-Arbouw, W. I.; Dalstra, J.; Daemen, M. J.; van Ree, J. W.; Stijns, R. E.; Wellens, H. J.

    1998-01-01

    To study the circumstances and medical profile of out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) patients in whom resuscitation was attempted by the ambulance service, and to identify causes of SCA in survivors and factors that influence resuscitation success rate. During a five year period (1991-95)

  20. Anxiety and depression among out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors

    Lilja, G; Nilsson, G; Nielsen, N

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) may experience psychological distress but the actual prevalence is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate anxiety and depression within a large cohort of OHCA-survivors. METHODS: OHCA-survivors randomized to targeted temperature o...

  1. Early Head CT Findings Are Associated With Outcomes After Pediatric Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Starling, Rebecca M; Shekdar, Karuna; Licht, Dan; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Berg, Robert A; Topjian, Alexis A

    2015-07-01

    Head CT after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is often obtained to evaluate intracranial pathology. Among children admitted to the PICU following pediatric out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, we hypothesized that loss of gray-white matter differentiation and basilar cistern and sulcal effacement are associated with mortality and unfavorable neurologic outcome. Retrospective, cohort study. Single, tertiary-care center PICU. Seventy-eight patients less than 18 years old who survived out-of-hospital cardiac arrest to PICU admission and had a head CT within 24 hours of return of spontaneous circulation were evaluated from July 2005 through May 2012. None. Median time to head CT from return of spontaneous circulation was 3.3 hours (1.0, 6.0). Median patient age was 2.3 years (0.4, 9.5). Thirty-nine patients (50%) survived, of whom 29 (74%) had favorable neurologic outcome. Nonsurvivors were more likely than survivors to have 1) loss of gray-white matter differentiation (Hounsfield unit ratios, 0.96 [0.88, 1.07] vs 1.1 [1.07, 1.2]; p pediatric out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Select patients may have favorable outcomes despite these findings.

  2. Mobile-phone dispatch of laypersons for CPR in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Ringh, Mattias; Rosenqvist, Mårten; Hollenberg, Jacob; Jonsson, Martin; Fredman, David; Nordberg, Per; Järnbert-Pettersson, Hans; Hasselqvist-Ax, Ingela; Riva, Gabriel; Svensson, Leif

    2015-06-11

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) performed by bystanders is associated with increased survival rates among persons with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We investigated whether rates of bystander-initiated CPR could be increased with the use of a mobile-phone positioning system that could instantly locate mobile-phone users and dispatch lay volunteers who were trained in CPR to a patient nearby with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We conducted a blinded, randomized, controlled trial in Stockholm from April 2012 through December 2013. A mobile-phone positioning system that was activated when ambulance, fire, and police services were dispatched was used to locate trained volunteers who were within 500 m of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest; volunteers were then dispatched to the patients (the intervention group) or not dispatched to them (the control group). The primary outcome was bystander-initiated CPR before the arrival of ambulance, fire, and police services. A total of 5989 lay volunteers who were trained in CPR were recruited initially, and overall 9828 were recruited during the study. The mobile-phone positioning system was activated in 667 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests: 46% (306 patients) in the intervention group and 54% (361 patients) in the control group. The rate of bystander-initiated CPR was 62% (188 of 305 patients) in the intervention group and 48% (172 of 360 patients) in the control group (absolute difference for intervention vs. control, 14 percentage points; 95% confidence interval, 6 to 21; PCPR was associated with significantly increased rates of bystander-initiated CPR among persons with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. (Funded by the Swedish Heart-Lung Foundation and Stockholm County; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01789554.).

  3. Association of Ambient Fine Particles With Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests in New York City

    Silverman, Robert A.; Ito, Kazuhiko; Freese, John; Kaufman, Brad J.; De Claro, Danilynn; Braun, James; Prezant, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular morbidity has been associated with particulate matter (PM) air pollution, although the relation between pollutants and sudden death from cardiac arrest has not been established. This study examined associations between out-of-hospital cardiac arrests and fine PM (of aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 μm, or PM2.5), ozone, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and carbon monoxide in New York City. The authors analyzed 8,216 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests of primary cardiac etiology during the years 2002–2006. Time-series and case-crossover analyses were conducted, controlling for season, day-of-week, same-day, and delayed/apparent temperature. An increased risk of cardiac arrest in time-series (relative risk (RR) = 1.06, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02, 1.10) and case-crossover (RR = 1.04, 95% CI: 0.99, 1.08) analysis for a PM2.5 increase of 10 μg/m3 in the average of 0- and 1-day lags was found. The association was significant in the warm season (RR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.15) but not the cold season (RR = 1.01, 95% CI: 0.95, 1.07). Associations of cardiac arrest with other pollutants were weaker. These findings, consistent with studies implicating acute cardiovascular effects of PM, support a link between PM2.5 and out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. Since few individuals survive an arrest, air pollution control may help prevent future cardiovascular mortality. PMID:20729350

  4. Improving outcomes from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in young children and adolescents.

    Atkins, Dianne L; Berger, Stuart

    2012-03-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is an unusual but devastating occurrence in a young person. Years of life-lost are substantial and long-term health care costs of survivors can be high. However, there have been noteworthy improvements in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) standards, out-of hospital care, and postcardiac arrest therapies that have resulted in a several-fold improvement in resuscitation outcomes. Recent interest and research in resuscitation of children has the promise of generating improvements in the outcomes of these patients. Integrated and coordinated care in the out-of-hospital and hospital settings are required. This article will review the epidemiology of OHCA, the 2010 CPR guidelines, and developments in public access defibrillation for children.

  5. Intravascular versus surface cooling for targeted temperature management after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    Glover, Guy W; Thomas, Richard M; Vamvakas, George

    2016-01-01

    , maintenance and rewarming phases in addition to adverse events. All-cause mortality, as well as a composite of poor neurological function or death, as evaluated by the Cerebral Performance Category and modified Rankin scale were analysed. RESULTS: For patients managed at 33 °C there was no difference between......BACKGROUND: Targeted temperature management is recommended after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and may be achieved using a variety of cooling devices. This study was conducted to explore the performance and outcomes for intravascular versus surface devices for targeted temperature management after...... out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. METHOD: A retrospective analysis of data from the Targeted Temperature Management trial. N = 934. A total of 240 patients (26%) managed with intravascular versus 694 (74%) with surface devices. Devices were assessed for speed and precision during the induction...

  6. Evaluation of intensified prehospital treatment in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    Frandsen, F; Nielsen, J R; Gram, L

    1991-01-01

    During a period of 3 years three different types of emergency medical service (EMS) systems were evaluated in a city with about 238,000 inhabitants/population density of 570/km2. Included were 393 out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients in whom prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation was provid...... survive and the more patients survive with good cerebral function. However, the ambulances with specially trained paramedics were only effective in the area with 340 inhabitants/km2....

  7. Epinephrine in Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest: Helpful or Harmful?

    Shao, Huan; Li, Chun-Sheng

    2017-09-05

    Epinephrine is the primary drug administered during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to reverse cardiac arrest. The evidence for the use of adrenaline in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and in-hospital resuscitation is inconclusive. We conducted a systematic review on the clinical efficacy of adrenaline in adult OHCA patients to evaluate whether epinephrine provides any overall benefit for patients. The EMBASE and PubMed databases were searched with the key words "epinephrine," "cardiac arrest," and variations of these terms. Data from clinical randomized trials, meta-analyses, guidelines, and recent reviews were selected for review. Sudden cardiac arrest causes 544,000 deaths in China each year, with survival occurring in CPR. There is currently insufficient evidence to support or reject epinephrine administration during resuscitation. We believe that epinephrine may have a role in resuscitation, as administration of epinephrine during CPR increases the probability of restoring cardiac activity with pulses, which is an essential intermediate step toward long-term survival. The administration of adrenaline was associated with improved short-term survival (ROSC). However, it appears that the use of adrenaline is associated with no benefit on survival to hospital discharge or survival with favorable neurological outcome after OHCA, and it may have a harmful effect. Larger placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized control trials are required to definitively establish the effect of epinephrine.

  8. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation duration and survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients.

    Adnet, Frederic; Triba, Mohamed N; Borron, Stephen W; Lapostolle, Frederic; Hubert, Hervé; Gueugniaud, Pierre-Yves; Escutnaire, Josephine; Guenin, Aurelien; Hoogvorst, Astrid; Marbeuf-Gueye, Carol; Reuter, Paul-Georges; Javaud, Nicolas; Vicaut, Eric; Chevret, Sylvie

    2017-02-01

    Relationship between cardiopulmonary arrest and resuscitation (CPR) durations and survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remain unclear. Our primary aim was to determine the association between survival without neurologic sequelae and cardiac arrest intervals in the setting of witnessed OHCA. We analyzed 27,301 non-traumatic, witnessed OHCA patients in France included in the national registry from June 1, 2011 through December 1, 2015. We analyzed cardiac arrest intervals, designated as no-flow (NF; from collapse to start of CPR) and low-flow (LF; from start of CPR to cessation of resuscitation) in relation to 30-day survival without sequelae. We determined the influence of recognized prognostic factors (age, gender, initial rhythm, location of cardiac arrest) on this relation. For the entire cohort, the area delimited by a value of NF greater than 12min (95% confidence interval: 11-13min) and LF greater than 33min (95% confidence interval: 29-45min), yielded a probability of 30-day survival of less than 1%. These sets of values were greatly influenced by initial cardiac arrest rhythm, age, sex and location of cardiac arrest. Extended CPR duration (greater than 40min) in the setting of initial shockable cardiac rhythm is associated with greater than 1% survival with NF less than 18min. The NF interval was highly influential on the LF interval regardless of outcome, whether return of spontaneous circulation (padvanced techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Infectious complications after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest-A comparison between two target temperatures

    Dankiewicz, Josef; Nielsen, Niklas; Linder, Adam

    2017-01-01

    -to-treat population. Five-hundred patients (53%) developed pneumonia, severe sepsis or septic shock which was associated with mortality in multivariate analysis (Hazard ratio [HR] 1.39; 95%CI 1.13-1.70; p=0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of infectious complications between......BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that target temperature management (TTM) increases the probability of infectious complications after cardiac arrest. We aimed to compare the incidence of pneumonia, severe sepsis and septic shock after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in patients with two...... complications were recorded daily during the ICU-stay. Pneumonia, severe sepsis and septic shock were considered infectious complications. Procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive-protein (CRP) levels were measured at 24h, 48h and 72h after cardiac arrest. RESULTS: There were 939 patients in the modified intention...

  10. Therapeutic hypothermia after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in children.

    Moler, Frank W; Silverstein, Faye S; Holubkov, Richard; Slomine, Beth S; Christensen, James R; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Meert, Kathleen L; Clark, Amy E; Browning, Brittan; Pemberton, Victoria L; Page, Kent; Shankaran, Seetha; Hutchison, Jamie S; Newth, Christopher J L; Bennett, Kimberly S; Berger, John T; Topjian, Alexis; Pineda, Jose A; Koch, Joshua D; Schleien, Charles L; Dalton, Heidi J; Ofori-Amanfo, George; Goodman, Denise M; Fink, Ericka L; McQuillen, Patrick; Zimmerman, Jerry J; Thomas, Neal J; van der Jagt, Elise W; Porter, Melissa B; Meyer, Michael T; Harrison, Rick; Pham, Nga; Schwarz, Adam J; Nowak, Jeffrey E; Alten, Jeffrey; Wheeler, Derek S; Bhalala, Utpal S; Lidsky, Karen; Lloyd, Eric; Mathur, Mudit; Shah, Samir; Wu, Theodore; Theodorou, Andreas A; Sanders, Ronald C; Dean, J Michael

    2015-05-14

    Therapeutic hypothermia is recommended for comatose adults after witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, but data about this intervention in children are limited. We conducted this trial of two targeted temperature interventions at 38 children's hospitals involving children who remained unconscious after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Within 6 hours after the return of circulation, comatose patients who were older than 2 days and younger than 18 years of age were randomly assigned to therapeutic hypothermia (target temperature, 33.0°C) or therapeutic normothermia (target temperature, 36.8°C). The primary efficacy outcome, survival at 12 months after cardiac arrest with a Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, second edition (VABS-II), score of 70 or higher (on a scale from 20 to 160, with higher scores indicating better function), was evaluated among patients with a VABS-II score of at least 70 before cardiac arrest. A total of 295 patients underwent randomization. Among the 260 patients with data that could be evaluated and who had a VABS-II score of at least 70 before cardiac arrest, there was no significant difference in the primary outcome between the hypothermia group and the normothermia group (20% vs. 12%; relative likelihood, 1.54; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.86 to 2.76; P=0.14). Among all the patients with data that could be evaluated, the change in the VABS-II score from baseline to 12 months was not significantly different (P=0.13) and 1-year survival was similar (38% in the hypothermia group vs. 29% in the normothermia group; relative likelihood, 1.29; 95% CI, 0.93 to 1.79; P=0.13). The groups had similar incidences of infection and serious arrhythmias, as well as similar use of blood products and 28-day mortality. In comatose children who survived out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, therapeutic hypothermia, as compared with therapeutic normothermia, did not confer a significant benefit in survival with a good functional outcome at 1 year. (Funded by

  11. Bystander Efforts and 1-Year Outcomes in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Kragholm, Kristian; Wissenberg, Mads; Mortensen, Rikke N; Hansen, Steen M; Malta Hansen, Carolina; Thorsteinsson, Kristinn; Rajan, Shahzleen; Lippert, Freddy; Folke, Fredrik; Gislason, Gunnar; Køber, Lars; Fonager, Kirsten; Jensen, Svend E; Gerds, Thomas A; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Rasmussen, Bodil S

    2017-05-04

    The effect of bystander interventions on long-term functional outcomes among survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest has not been extensively studied. We linked nationwide data on out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in Denmark to functional outcome data and reported the 1-year risks of anoxic brain damage or nursing home admission and of death from any cause among patients who survived to day 30 after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We analyzed risks according to whether bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) or defibrillation was performed and evaluated temporal changes in bystander interventions and outcomes. Among the 2855 patients who were 30-day survivors of an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest during the period from 2001 through 2012, a total of 10.5% had brain damage or were admitted to a nursing home and 9.7% died during the 1-year follow-up period. During the study period, among the 2084 patients who had cardiac arrests that were not witnessed by emergency medical services (EMS) personnel, the rate of bystander CPR increased from 66.7% to 80.6% (Pbystander defibrillation increased from 2.1% to 16.8% (Pbystander CPR was associated with a risk of brain damage or nursing home admission that was significantly lower than that associated with no bystander resuscitation (hazard ratio, 0.62; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.47 to 0.82), as well as a lower risk of death from any cause (hazard ratio, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.50 to 0.99) and a lower risk of the composite end point of brain damage, nursing home admission, or death (hazard ratio, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.53 to 0.84). The risks of these outcomes were even lower among patients who received bystander defibrillation as compared with no bystander resuscitation. In our study, we found that bystander CPR and defibrillation were associated with risks of brain damage or nursing home admission and of death from any cause that were significantly lower than those associated with no bystander resuscitation. (Funded by Tryg

  12. Temporal variation of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in an equatorial climate.

    Ong, Marcus Eh; Ng, Faith Sp; Yap, Susan; Yong, Kok Leong; Peberdy, Mary A; Ornato, Joseph P

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to determine whether there is a seasonal variation of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) in an equatorial climate, which does not experience seasonal environmental change. We conducted an observational prospective study looking at the occurrence of OHCA in Singapore. Included were all patients with OHCA presented to Emergency Departments across the country. We examined the monthly, daily, and hourly number of cases over a three-year period. Data was analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA). From October, 1st 2001 to October, 14th 2004, 2428 patients were enrolled in the study. Mean age for cardiac arrests was 60.6 years with 68.0% male. Ethnic distribution was 69.5% Chinese, 15.0% Malay, 11.0% Indian, and 4.4% Others. There was no significant seasonal variation (spring/summer/fall/winter) of events (ANOVA P = 0.71), monthly variation (P = 0.88) or yearly variation (P = 0.26). We did find weekly peaks on Mondays and a circadian pattern with daily peaks from 9-10 am. We did not find any discernable seasonal pattern of cardiac arrests. This contrasts with findings from temperate countries and suggests a climatic influence on cardiac arrest occurrence. We also found that sudden cardiac arrests follow a circadian pattern.

  13. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in a Danish health region.

    Fjølner, J; Greisen, J; Jørgensen, M R S; Terkelsen, C J; Ilkjaer, L B; Hansen, T M; Eiskjaer, H; Christensen, S; Gjedsted, J

    2017-02-01

    Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (ECPR) has emerged as a feasible rescue therapy for refractory, normothermic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Reported survival rates vary and comparison between studies is hampered by heterogeneous study populations, differences in bystander intervention and in pre-hospital emergency service organisation. We aimed to describe the first experiences, treatment details, complications and outcome with ECPR for OHCA in a Danish health region. Retrospective study of adult patients admitted at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark between 1 January 2011 and 1 July 2015 with witnessed, refractory, normothermic OHCA treated with ECPR. OHCA was managed with pre-hospital advanced airway management and mechanical chest compression during transport. Relevant pre-hospital and in-hospital data were collected with special focus on low-flow time and ECPR duration. Survival to hospital discharge with Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) of 1 and 2 at hospital discharge was the primary endpoint. Twenty-one patients were included. Median pre-hospital low-flow time was 54 min [range 5-100] and median total low-flow time was 121 min [range 55-192]. Seven patients survived (33%). Survivors had a CPC score of 1 or 2 at hospital discharge. Five survivors had a shockable initial rhythm. In all survivors coronary occlusion was the presumed cause of cardiac arrest. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation is feasible as a rescue therapy in normothermic refractory OHCA in highly selected patients. Low-flow time was longer than previously reported. Survival with favourable neurological outcome is possible despite prolonged low-flow duration. © 2016 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Platelet aggregation during targeted temperature management after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    Jeppesen, Anni Nørgaard; Hvas, Anne-Mette; Grejs, Anders Morten

    2017-01-01

    Some studies conclude that mild hypothermia causes platelet dysfunction leading to an increased bleeding risk, whereas others state that platelet aggregation is enhanced during mild hypothermia. Therefore, the aim of this study was to clarify whether standard or prolonged duration of targeted...... temperature management affected platelet aggregation. We randomised 82 comatose patients resuscitated after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest to either 24 hours (standard group) or 48 hours (prolonged group) of targeted temperature management at 33±1°C. Blood samples were collected 22 hours, 46 hours and 70......® decreased by 14% (95% CI -8%;-20%), p management....

  15. Sinus bradycardia during hypothermia in comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig; Hassager, Christian; Bro-Jeppesen, John

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bradycardia is a common finding in patients undergoing therapeutic hypothermia (TH) following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), presumably as a normal physiological response to low body temperature. We hypothesized that a normal physiological response with sinus bradycardia (SB...... the hypothermia phase of TH had a 17% 180-day mortality rate compared to 38% in no-SB patients (phypothermia was directly associated with lower odds of unfavorable...... neurological outcome (ORunadjusted=0.42 (0.23-0.75, phypothermia is independently associated with a lower 180-day mortality rate and may thus be a novel, early marker of favorable outcome in comatose survivors of OHCA....

  16. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survival in rural Northwest Ireland: 17 years' experience.

    Masterson, Siobhán

    2011-05-01

    SAVES, the name used to describe a register of survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), was established in rural Northwest Ireland in 1992. From 1992 to 2008, 80 survivors were identified (population 239,000 (2006)). Most incidents were witnessed (69\\/70) and all were in shockable rhythm at the time of first rhythm analysis (66\\/66). Of 66 patients who could be traced, 46 were alive in December 2008. Average survival rates appeared to increase over the lifetime of the database. SAVES has also contributed to the development of a national OHCA register.

  17. Impact of Early Vasopressor Administration on Neurological Outcomes after Prolonged Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Hubble, Michael W; Tyson, Clark

    2017-06-01

    Introduction Vasopressors are associated with return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), but no long-term benefit has been demonstrated in randomized trials. However, these trials did not control for the timing of vasopressor administration which may influence outcomes. Consequently, the objective of this study was to develop a model describing the likelihood of favorable neurological outcome (cerebral performance category [CPC] 1 or 2) as a function of the public safety answering point call receipt (PSAP)-to-pressor-interval (PPI) in prolonged out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Hypothesis The likelihood of favorable neurological outcome declines with increasing PPI. This investigation was a retrospective study of cardiac arrest using linked data from the Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival (CARES) database (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [Atlanta, Georgia USA]; American Heart Association [Dallas, Texas USA]; and Emory University Department of Emergency Medicine [Atlanta, Georgia USA]) and the North Carolina (USA) Prehospital Medical Information System. Adult patients suffering a bystander-witnessed, non-traumatic cardiac arrest between January 2012 and June 2014 were included. Logistic regression was used to calculate the adjusted odds ratio (OR) of neurological outcome as a function of PPI, while controlling for patient age, gender, and race; endotracheal intubation (ETI); shockable rhythm; layperson cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR); and field hypothermia. Of the 2,100 patients meeting inclusion criteria, 913 (43.5%) experienced ROSC, 618 (29.4%) survived to hospital admission, 187 (8.9%) survived to hospital discharge, and 155 (7.4%) were discharged with favorable neurological outcomes (CPC 1 or 2). Favorable neurological outcome was less likely with increasing PPI (OR=0.90; PCPR, and ETI were not independent predictors of favorable neurological outcome. In this evaluation, time to vasopressor administration was significantly associated with

  18. Survival after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Nursing Homes

    Pape, Marianne; Rajan, Shahzleen; Hansen, Steen Møller

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Survival among nursing home residents who suffers out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is sparsely studied. Deployment of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) in nursing home facilities in Denmark is unknown. We examined 30-day survival following OHCA in nursing and private home...... residents. METHODS: This register-based, nationwide, follow-up study identified OHCA-patients ≥18 years of age with a resuscitation attempt in nursing homes and private homes using Danish Cardiac Arrest Register data from June 1, 2001 to December 31, 2014. The primary outcome measure was 30-day survival....... Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to assess factors potentially associated with survival among nursing and private home residents separately. RESULTS: Of 26,999 OCHAs, 2516 (9.3%) occurred in nursing homes, and 24,483 (90.7%) in private homes. Nursing home residents were older (median 83 (Q1...

  19. Bystander defibrillation for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Public vs Residential Locations

    Hansen, Steen Møller; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Folke, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    Importance: Bystander-delivered defibrillation (hereinafter referred to as bystander defibrillation) of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) remains limited despite the widespread dissemination of automated external defibrillators (AEDs). Objective: To examine calendar changes...... in bystander defibrillation and subsequent survival according to a public or a residential location of the cardiac arrest after nationwide initiatives in Denmark to facilitate bystander-mediated resuscitative efforts, including bystander defibrillation. Design, Setting, and Participants: This nationwide study......, 2016. Exposures: Nationwide initiatives to facilitate bystander resuscitative efforts, including bystander defibrillation, consisted of resuscitation training of Danish citizens, dissemination of on-site AEDs, foundation of an AED registry linked to emergency medical dispatch centers, and dispatcher...

  20. Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in relation to sex

    Wissenberg, Mads; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Folke, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    ); and in females (4.8% in 2001 to 6.7% in 2010), psexes in patients with a non-shockable rhythm (OR 1.00; CI 0.72-1.40), while female sex was positively associated...... characteristics in females with a lower proportion of shockable rhythm. In an adjusted model, female sex was positively associated with survival in patients with a shockable rhythm.......AIM: Crude survival has increased following an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We aimed to study sex-related differences in patient characteristics and survival during a 10-year study period. METHODS: Patients≥12 years old with OHCA of a presumed cardiac cause, and in whom resuscitation...

  1. Electrocardiographic Findings in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome Presenting With Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Sarak, Bradley; Goodman, Shaun G; Brieger, David; Gale, Chris P; Tan, Nigel S; Budaj, Andrzej; Wong, Graham C; Huynh, Thao; Tan, Mary K; Udell, Jacob A; Bagai, Akshay; Fox, Keith A A; Yan, Andrew T

    2018-02-01

    We sought to characterize presenting electrocardiographic findings in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACSs) and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). In the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events and Canadian ACS Registry I, we examined presenting and 24- to 48-hour follow-up ECGs (electrocardiogram) of ACS patients who survived to hospital admission, stratified by presentation with OHCA. We assessed the prevalence of ST-segment deviation and bundle branch blocks (assessed by an independent ECG core laboratory) and their association with in-hospital and 6-month mortality among those with OHCA. Of the 12,040 ACS patients, 215 (1.8%) survived to hospital admission after OHCA. Those with OHCA had higher presenting rates of ST-segment elevation, ST-segment depression, T-wave inversion, precordial Q-waves, left bundle branch block (LBBB), and right bundle branch block (RBBB) than those without. Among patients with OHCA, those with ST-segment elevation had significantly lower in-hospital mortality (20.9% vs 33.0%, p = 0.044) and a trend toward lower 6-month mortality (27% vs 39%, p = 0.060) compared with those without ST-segment elevation. Conversely, among OCHA patients, LBBB was associated with significantly higher in-hospital and 6-month mortality rates (58% vs 22%, p presenting ECG resolved by 24 to 48 hours. In conclusion, compared with ACS patients without cardiac arrest, those with OHCA had higher rates of ST-segment elevation, LBBB, and RBBB on admission. Among OHCA patients, ST-segment elevation was associated with lower in-hospital mortality, whereas LBBB was associated with higher in-hospital and 6-month mortality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The time dependent association of adrenaline administration and survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Ewy, Gordon A; Bobrow, Bentley J; Chikani, Vatsal; Sanders, Arthur B; Otto, Charles W; Spaite, Daniel W; Kern, Karl B

    2015-11-01

    Recommended for decades, the therapeutic value of adrenaline (epinephrine) in the resuscitation of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is controversial. To investigate the possible time-dependent outcomes associated with adrenaline administration by Emergency Medical Services personnel (EMS). A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from a near statewide cardiac resuscitation database between 1 January 2005 and 30 November 2013. Multivariable logistic regression was used to analyze the effect of the time interval between EMS dispatch and the initial dose of adrenaline on survival. The primary endpoints were survival to hospital discharge and favourable neurologic outcome. Data from 3469 patients with witnessed OHCA were analyzed. Their mean age was 66.3 years and 69% were male. An initially shockable rhythm was present in 41.8% of patients. Based on a multivariable logistic regression model with initial adrenaline administration time interval (AATI) from EMS dispatch as the covariate, survival was greatest when adrenaline was administered very early but decreased rapidly with increasing (AATI); odds ratio 0.94 (95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.92-0.97). The AATI had no significant effect on good neurological outcome (OR=0.96, 95% CI=0.90-1.02). In patients with OHCA, survival to hospital discharge was greater in those treated early with adrenaline by EMS especially in the subset of patients with a shockable rhythm. However survival rapidly decreased with increasing adrenaline administration time intervals (AATI). Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Chest compression rates and survival following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Idris, Ahamed H; Guffey, Danielle; Pepe, Paul E; Brown, Siobhan P; Brooks, Steven C; Callaway, Clifton W; Christenson, Jim; Davis, Daniel P; Daya, Mohamud R; Gray, Randal; Kudenchuk, Peter J; Larsen, Jonathan; Lin, Steve; Menegazzi, James J; Sheehan, Kellie; Sopko, George; Stiell, Ian; Nichol, Graham; Aufderheide, Tom P

    2015-04-01

    Guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation recommend a chest compression rate of at least 100 compressions/min. A recent clinical study reported optimal return of spontaneous circulation with rates between 100 and 120/min during cardiopulmonary resuscitation for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. However, the relationship between compression rate and survival is still undetermined. Prospective, observational study. Data is from the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium Prehospital Resuscitation IMpedance threshold device and Early versus Delayed analysis clinical trial. Adults with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest treated by emergency medical service providers. None. Data were abstracted from monitor-defibrillator recordings for the first five minutes of emergency medical service cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Multiple logistic regression assessed odds ratio for survival by compression rate categories (compression fraction and depth, first rhythm, and study site. Compression rate data were available for 10,371 patients; 6,399 also had chest compression fraction and depth data. Age (mean±SD) was 67±16 years. Chest compression rate was 111±19 per minute, compression fraction was 0.70±0.17, and compression depth was 42±12 mm. Circulation was restored in 34%; 9% survived to hospital discharge. After adjustment for covariates without chest compression depth and fraction (n=10,371), a global test found no significant relationship between compression rate and survival (p=0.19). However, after adjustment for covariates including chest compression depth and fraction (n=6,399), the global test found a significant relationship between compression rate and survival (p=0.02), with the reference group (100-119 compressions/min) having the greatest likelihood for survival. After adjustment for chest compression fraction and depth, compression rates between 100 and 120 per minute were associated with greatest survival to hospital discharge.

  4. Prognostic value of relative adrenal insufficiency after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Pene, Frédéric; Hyvernat, Hervé; Mallet, Vincent; Cariou, Alain; Carli, Pierre; Spaulding, Christian; Dugue, Marie-Annick; Mira, Jean-Paul

    2005-05-01

    To assess the prevalence of relative adrenal insufficiency in patients successfully resuscitated after cardiac arrest, and its prognostic role in post-resuscitation disease. A prospective observational single-center study in a medical intensive care unit. 64 patients hospitalised in the intensive care unit after successful resuscitation for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. A corticotropin-stimulation test was performed between 12 and 24 h following admission: serum cortisol level was measured before and 60 min after administration of tetracosactide 250 microg. Patients with an incremental response less than 9 microg/dl were considered to have relative adrenal insufficiency (non-responders). Variables were expressed as medians and interquartile ranges. 33 patients (52%) had relative adrenal insufficiency. Baseline cortisol level was higher in non-responders than in responders (41 [27.2-55.5] vs. 22.8 [15.7-35.1] microg/dl respectively, P=0.001). A long interval before initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation was associated with relative adrenal insufficiency (5 [3-10] vs. 3 [3-5] min, P=0.03). Of the 38 patients with post-resuscitation shock, 13 died of irreversible multiorgan failure. The presence of relative adrenal insufficiency was identified as a poor prognostic factor of shock-related mortality (log-rank P=0.02). A trend towards higher mortality in non-responders was identified in a multivariate logistic regression analysis (odds ratio 6.77, CI 95% 0.94-48.99, P=0.058). Relative adrenal insufficiency occurs frequently after successful resuscitation of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, and appears to be associated with a poor prognosis in cases of post-resuscitation shock. The role of corticosteroid supplementation should be evaluated in this setting.

  5. Ambulance cardiopulmonary resuscitation: outcomes and associated factors in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Rosell Ortiz, Fernando; García Del Águila, Javier; Fernández Del Valle, Patricia; J Mellado-Vergel, Francisco; Vergara-Pérez, Santiago; R Ruiz-Montero, María; Martínez-Lara, Manuela; J Gómez-Jiménez, Francisco; Gonzáez-Lobato, Ismael; García-Escudero, Guillermo; Ruiz-Bailén, Manuel; Caballero-García, Auxiliadora; Vivar-Díaz, Itziar; Olavarría-Govantes, Luis

    2018-06-01

    To assess factors associated with survival of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in patients who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) during ambulance transport. Retrospective analysis of a registry of OHCA cases treated between 2008 and 2014. We included patients who had not recovered circulation at the time it was decided to transport to a hospital and who were rejected as non-heart-beating donors. Multivariate analysis was used to explore factors associated with the use of ambulance CPR, survival, and neurologic outcome. Out of a total of 7241 cases, 259 (3.6%) were given CPR during emergency transport. The mean (SD) age was 51.6 (23.6) years; 27 (10.1%) were aged 16 years or younger. The following variables were associated with the use of CPR during transport: age 16 years or under (odds ratio [OR], 6.48; 95% CI, 3.91-10.76); P<.001)], witnessed OHCA (OR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.16-2.26; P=.004), cardiac arrest outside the home (OR, 3.17; 95% CI, 2.38-4.21; P<.001), noncardiac cause (OR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.07-2.02; P=.019], initially shockable rhythm (OR, 1.67; 95% CI, 1.17-2.37; P=.004), no prior basic life support (OR, 3.48; 95% CI, 2.58-4.70; P<.001), and orotracheal intubation (OR, 1.93; 95% CI, 1.24-2.99; P=.003). One patient (0.38%) survived to discharge with good neurologic outcome. Ambulance CPR by a physician on board is applied in few OHCA cases. Young patient age, cardiac arrest outside the home, the presence of a witness, lack of a shockable rhythm on responder arrival, lack of basic life support prior to responder arrival, noncardiac cause, and orotracheal intubation are associated with the use of ambulance CPR, a strategy that can be considered futile.

  6. Resuscitation outcomes of reproductive-age females who experienced out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Hagihara, Akihito; Onozuka, Daisuke; Hasegawa, Manabu; Nagata, Takashi; Abe, Takeru; Nabeshima, Yoshihiro

    2017-03-01

    Although some studies have shown that women in their reproductive years have better resuscitation outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), conflicting results and methodological problems have also been noted. Thus, we evaluated the resuscitation outcomes of OHCA of females by age. This was a prospective observational study using registry data from all OHCA cases between 2005 and 2012 in Japan. The subjects were females aged 18-110 years who suffered an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Logistic regression analyses were performed using total and propensity-matched patients. There were 381,123 OHCA cases that met the inclusion criteria. Among propensity-matched patients, females aged 18-49 and 50-60 years of age had similar rates of return of spontaneous circulation before hospital arrival and 1-month survival (all p>0.60). In contrast, females aged 18-49 years of age had significantly lower rates of 1-month survival with minimal neurological impairment than did females aged 50-60 years of age (after adjusting for selected variables: Cerebral Performance Category scale 1 or 2 (CPC (1, 2)), OR=0.45, p=0.020; Overall Performance Category scale 1 or 2 (OPC (1, 2)): OR=0.42, p= 0.014; after adjustment for all variables: CPC (1, 2), OR=0.27, p= 0.008; OPC (1, 2), OR=0.29, p=0.009). Women of reproductive age did not show improved resuscitation outcomes in OHCA. Additionally, women in their reproductive years showed worse neurological outcomes one month after the event, which may be explained by the negative effects of estrogen. These findings need to be verified in further studies.

  7. Prevention of deterioration of ventricular fibrillation by basic life support during out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    Waalewijn, Reinier A.; Nijpels, Marië A.; Tijssen, Jan G.; Koster, Rudolph W.

    2002-01-01

    Survival of cardiac arrest is improved by basic life support (BLS). This study investigated the relationship between ventricular fibrillation (VF) characteristics and survival. In a 2-year prospective study out-of-hospital witnessed non-traumatic cardiac arrests were observed. The probabilities of

  8. Serum Potassium Changes During Therapeutic Hypothermia After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest-Should It Be Treated?

    Soeholm, Helle; Kirkegaard, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Background: Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is associated with adverse events, for example hypokalemia and arrhythmias. In the present study, we report the impact of serum potassium changes related to the rate of cardiac arrhythmias, and the advantages...

  9. Therapeutic hypothermia following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest; does it start in the emergency department?

    Galloway, R; Sherren, P B

    2010-12-01

    The use of therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest is a well-practised treatment modality in the intensive care unit (ICU). However, recent evidence points to advantages in starting the cooling process as soon as possible after the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). There are no data on implementation of this treatment in the emergency department. A telephone survey was conducted of the 233 emergency departments in the UK. The most senior available clinician was asked if, in cases where they have a patient with a ROSC after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, would therapeutic hypothermia be started in the emergency department. Of the 233 hospitals called, 230 responded, of which 35% would start cooling in the emergency department. Of this 35%, over half (56%) said the decision to start cooling was made by the emergency physician before consultation with the ICU. Also, of the 35% who would begin cooling in the emergency department, 55% would cool only for ventricular fibrillation/ventricular tachycardia, 66% would monitor temperature centrally, and 14% would use specialised cooling equipment. There is often a delay in getting patients to ICU from the emergency department, and thus the decision not to start cooling in the emergency department may impact significantly on patient outcome. The dissemination of these data may persuade emergency physicians that starting treatment in the emergency department is an appropriate and justifiable decision that is becoming a more accepted practice throughout the UK.

  10. Laryngeal tube use in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest by paramedics in Norway

    Sunde Geir A

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although there are numerous supraglottic airway alternatives to endotracheal intubation, it remains unclear which airway technique is optimal for use in prehospital cardiac arrests. We evaluated the use of the laryngeal tube (LT as an airway management tool among adult out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA patients treated by our ambulance services in the Haukeland and Innlandet hospital districts. Methods Post-resuscitation forms and data concerning airway management in 347 adult OHCA victims were retrospectively assessed with regard to LT insertion success rates, ease and speed of insertion and insertion-related problems. Results A total of 402 insertions were performed on 347 OHCA patients. Overall, LT insertion was successful in 85.3% of the patients, with a 74.4% first-attempt success rate. In the minority of patients (n = 46, 13.3%, the LT insertion time exceeded 30 seconds. Insertion-related problems were recorded in 52.7% of the patients. Lack of respiratory sounds on auscultation (n = 100, 28.8%, problematic initial tube positioning (n = 85, 24.5%, air leakage (n = 61, 17.6%, vomitus/aspiration (n = 44, 12.7%, and tube dislocation (n = 17, 4.9% were the most common problems reported. Insertion difficulty was graded and documented for 95.4% of the patients, with the majority of insertions assessed as being “Easy” (62.5% or “Intermediate” (24.8%. Only 8.1% of the insertions were considered to be “Difficult”. Conclusions We found a high number of insertion related problems, indicating that supraglottic airway devices offering promising results in manikin studies may be less reliable in real-life resuscitations. Still, we consider the laryngeal tube to be an important alternative for airway management in prehospital cardiac arrest victims.

  11. Improved survival after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest using new guidelines

    Steinmetz, Jacob; Barnung, S.; Nielsen, S.L.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is associated with a poor prognosis. We hypothesized that the implementations of 2005 European Resuscitation Council resuscitation guidelines were associated with improved 30-day survival after OHCA. METHODS: We prospectively recorded data on all....... Treatment after implementation was confirmed as a significant predictor of better 30-day survival in a logistic regression analysis. CONCLUSION: The implementation of new resuscitation guidelines was associated with improved 30-day survival after OHCA Udgivelsesdato: 2008/8...... patients with OHCA treated by the Mobile Emergency Care Unit of Copenhagen in two periods: 1 June 2004 until 31 August 2005 (before implementation) and 1 January 2006 until 31 March 2007 (after implementation), separated by a 4-month period in which the above-mentioned change took place. RESULTS: We found...

  12. Recognising out-of-hospital cardiac arrest during emergency calls increases bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and survival

    Viereck, Søren; Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Initiation of early bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) depends on bystanders' or medical dispatchers' recognition of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The primary aim of our study was to investigate if OHCA recognition during the emergency call was associated...... with bystander CPR, return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), and 30-day survival. Our secondary aim was to identify patient-, setting-, and dispatcher-related predictors of OHCA recognition. METHODS: We performed an observational study of all OHCA patients' emergency calls in the Capital Region of Denmark from...... the association between OHCA recognition and bystander CPR, ROSC, and 30-day survival. Univariable logistic regression analyses were applied to identify predictors of OHCA recognition. RESULTS: We included 779 emergency calls in the analyses. During the emergency calls, 70.1% (n=534) of OHCAs were recognised...

  13. Bystander Defibrillation for Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Public vs Residential Locations.

    Hansen, Steen Møller; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Folke, Fredrik; Rajan, Shahzleen; Kragholm, Kristian; Ejlskov, Linda; Gislason, Gunnar; Køber, Lars; Gerds, Thomas A; Hjortshøj, Søren; Lippert, Freddy; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Wissenberg, Mads

    2017-05-01

    Bystander-delivered defibrillation (hereinafter referred to as bystander defibrillation) of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) remains limited despite the widespread dissemination of automated external defibrillators (AEDs). To examine calendar changes in bystander defibrillation and subsequent survival according to a public or a residential location of the cardiac arrest after nationwide initiatives in Denmark to facilitate bystander-mediated resuscitative efforts, including bystander defibrillation. This nationwide study identified 18 688 patients in Denmark with first-time OHCA from June 1, 2001, to December 31, 2012, using the Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry. Patients had a presumed cardiac cause of arrest that was not witnessed by emergency medical services personnel. Data were analyzed from April 1, 2015, to December 10, 2016. Nationwide initiatives to facilitate bystander resuscitative efforts, including bystander defibrillation, consisted of resuscitation training of Danish citizens, dissemination of on-site AEDs, foundation of an AED registry linked to emergency medical dispatch centers, and dispatcher-assisted guidance of bystander resuscitation efforts. The proportion of patients who received bystander defibrillation according to the location of the cardiac arrest and their subsequent 30-day survival. Of the 18 688 patients with OHCAs (67.8% men and 32.2% women; median [interquartile range] age, 72 [62-80] years), 4783 (25.6%) had a cardiac arrest in a public location and 13 905 (74.4%) in a residential location. The number of registered AEDs increased from 141 in 2007 to 7800 in 2012. The distribution of AED location was consistently skewed in favor of public locations. Bystander defibrillation increased in public locations from 3 of 245 (1.2%; 95% CI, 0.4%-3.5%) in 2001 to 78 of 510 (15.3%; 95% CI, 12.4%-18.7%) in 2012 (P bystander defibrillation increased in public locations from 8.3% (95% CI, 1.5%-35.4%) in 2001/2002 to 57

  14. Improvements in logistics could increase survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Sweden.

    Strömsöe, A; Afzelius, S; Axelsson, C; Södersved Källestedt, M L; Enlund, M; Svensson, L; Herlitz, J

    2013-06-01

    In a review based on estimations and assumptions, to report the estimated number of survivors after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was started and to speculate about possible future improvements in Sweden. An observational study. All ambulance organisations in Sweden. Patients included in the Swedish Cardiac Arrest Registry who suffered an OHCA between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2010. Approximately 80% of OHCA cases in Sweden in which CPR was started are included. None In 11 005 patients, the 1-month survival rate was 9.4%. There are approximately 5000 OHCA cases annually in which CPR is started and 30-day survival is achieved in up to 500 patients yearly (6 per 100 000 inhabitants). Based on findings on survival in relation to the time to calling for the Emergency Medical Service (EMS) and the start of CPR and defibrillation, it was estimated that, if the delay from collapse to (i) calling EMS, (ii) the start of CPR, and (iii) the time to defibrillation were reduced to <2 min, <2 min, and <8 min, respectively, 300-400 additional lives could be saved. Based on findings relating to the delay to calling for the EMS and the start of CPR and defibrillation, we speculate that 300-400 additional OHCA patients yearly (4 per 100 000 inhabitants) could be saved in Sweden. © 2013 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  15. Assessment of muscle tissue oxygen saturation after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Orban, Jean-Christophe; Scarlatti, Audrey; Danin, Pierre-Eric; Dellamonica, Jean; Bernardin, Gilles; Ichai, Carole

    2015-12-01

    Pathophysiology of cardiac arrest corresponds to an ischemia-reperfusion syndrome with deep impairment of microcirculation. Muscular tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) is a noninvasive method of evaluation of microcirculation. Our study was aimed at assessing the prognosis value of muscular StO2 in patients admitted for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and treated with hypothermia. We conducted a prospective bicentric observational study including OHCA patients treated with therapeutic hypothermia. Baseline StO2, derived variables (desaturation and resaturation slopes), and lactate levels were compared at different times between patients with good and poor outcomes. Prognosis was assessed by the Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) score at 6 months after admission (CPC 1-2, good outcome; CPC 3-5, poor outcome). Forty-four patients were included, 17 good and 27 poor outcomes at 6 months. At admission, StO2 and lactate levels were lower in good outcome patients. Desaturation and resaturation slopes did not differ between groups. After an OHCA treated with therapeutic hypothermia, StO2 was correlated with outcome. Further research is needed to better understand the pathophysiological process underlying our results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest risk attributable to temperature in Japan

    Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito

    2017-01-01

    Several studies have estimated the associations between extreme temperatures and mortality and morbidity; however, few have investigated the attributable fraction for a wide range of temperatures on the risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We obtained daily records of OHCA cases in the 47 Japanese prefectures between 2005 and 2014. We examined the relationship between OHCA and temperature for each prefecture using a Poisson regression model combined with a distributed lag non-linear model. The estimated prefecture-specific associations were pooled at the nationwide level using a multivariate random-effect meta-analysis. A total of 659,752 cases of OHCA of presumed-cardiac origin met the inclusion criteria. Overall, 23.93% (95% empirical confidence interval [eCI]: 20.15-26.19) of OHCA was attributable to temperature. The attributable fraction to low temperatures was 23.64% (95% eCI: 19.76-25.87), whereas that of high temperatures was 0.29% (95% eCI: 0.21-0.35). The attributable fraction for OHCA was related to moderate low temperature with an overall estimate of 21.86% (95% eCI: 18.10-24.21). Extreme temperatures were responsible for a small fraction. The majority of temperature-related OHCAs were attributable to lower temperatures. The attributable risk of extremely low and high temperatures was markedly lower than that of moderate temperatures.

  17. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrests and outdoor air pollution exposure in Copenhagen, Denmark.

    Janine Wichmann

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death globally and air pollution can be a contributing cause. Acute myocardial infarction and cardiac arrest are frequent manifestations of coronary heart disease. The objectives of the study were to investigate the association between 4 657 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA and hourly and daily outdoor levels of PM(10, PM(2.5, coarse fraction of PM (PM(10-2.5, ultrafine particle proxies, NO(x, NO(2, O(3 and CO in Copenhagen, Denmark, for the period 2000-2010. Susceptible groups by age and sex was also investigated. A case-crossover design was applied. None of the hourly lags of any of the pollutants were significantly associated with OHCA events. The strongest association with OHCA events was observed for the daily lag4 of PM(2.5, lag3 of PM(10, lag3 of PM(10-2.5, lag3 of NO(x and lag4 of CO. An IQR increase of PM(2.5 and PM(10 was associated with a significant increase of 4% (95% CI: 0%; 9% and 5% (95% CI: 1%; 9% in OHCA events with 3 days lag, respectively. None of the other daily lags or other pollutants was significantly associated with OHCA events. Adjustment for O(3 slightly increased the association between OHCA and PM(2.5 and PM(10. No susceptible groups were identified.

  18. Antipsychotics and associated risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Weeke, P; Jensen, A; Folke, F; Gislason, G H; Olesen, J B; Fosbøl, E L; Wissenberg, M; Lippert, F K; Christensen, E F; Nielsen, S L; Holm, E; Kanters, J K; Poulsen, H E; Køber, L; Torp-Pedersen, C

    2014-10-01

    Antipsychotic drugs have been associated with sudden cardiac death, but differences in the risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) associated with different antipsychotic drug classes are not clear. We identified all OHCAs in Denmark (2001-2010). The risk of OHCA associated with antipsychotic drug use was evaluated by conditional logistic regression analysis in case-time-control models. In total, 2,205 (7.6%) of 28,947 OHCA patients received treatment with an antipsychotic drug at the time of the event. Overall, treatment with any antipsychotic drug was associated with OHCA (odds ratio (OR) = 1.53, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.23-1.89), as was use with typical antipsychotics (OR = 1.66, CI: 1.27-2.17). By contrast, overall, atypical antipsychotic drug use was not (OR = 1.29, CI: 0.90-1.85). Two individual typical antipsychotic drugs, haloperidol (OR = 2.43, CI: 1.20-4.93) and levomepromazine (OR = 2.05, CI: 1.18-3.56), were associated with OHCA, as was one atypical antipsychotic drug, quetiapine (OR = 3.64, CI: 1.59-8.30).

  19. Comorbidity and favorable neurologic outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in patients of 70 years and older

    Beesems, Stefanie G.; Blom, Marieke T.; van der Pas, Martine H. A.; Hulleman, Michiel; van de Glind, Esther M. M.; van Munster, Barbara C.; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; Tan, Hanno L.; van Delden, Johannes J. M.; Koster, Rudolph W.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced age is reported to be associated with lower survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We aimed to establish survival rate and neurological outcome at hospital discharge after OHCA in older patients and evaluated whether pre-OHCA comorbidity was associated with favorable

  20. Comorbidity and favorable neurologic outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in patients of 70 years and older

    Beesems, Stefanie G.; Blom, Marieke T.; van der Pas, Martine H. A.; Hulleman, Michiel; van de Glind, Esther M. M.; van Munster, Barbara C.; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; Tan, Hanno L.; van Delden, Johannes J. M.; Koster, Rudolph W.

    Introduction: Advanced age is reported to be associated with lower survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We aimed to establish survival rate and neurological outcome at hospital discharge after OHCA in older patients and evaluated whether pre-OHCA comorbidity was associated with

  1. Effects of adrenaline on rhythm transitions in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Neset, Andres; Nordseth, Trond; Kramer-Johansen, Jo; Wik, Lars; Olasveengen, Theresa M

    2013-11-01

    We wanted to study the effects of intravenous (i.v.) adrenaline (epinephrine) on rhythm transitions during cardiac arrest with initial or secondary ventricular fibrillation/tachycardia (VF/VT). Post hoc analysis of patients included in a randomised controlled trial of i.v. drugs in adult, non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients who were defibrillated and had a readable electrocardiography recording. Patients who received adrenaline were compared with patients who did not. Cardiac rhythms were annotated manually using the defibrillator data. Eight hundred and forty-nine patients were included in the randomised trial of which 223 were included in this analysis; 119 in the adrenaline group and 104 in the no-adrenaline group. The proportion of patients with one or more VF/VT episodes after temporary return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) was higher in the adrenaline than in the no-adrenaline group, 24% vs. 12%, P = 0.03. Most relapses from ROSC to VF/VT in the no-adrenaline group occurred during the first 20 min of resuscitation, whereas patients in the adrenaline group experienced such relapses even after 20 min. Fibrillations from asystole or pulseless electrical activity, shock resistant VF/VT and the number of rhythm transitions per patient was higher in the adrenalin group compared with the no-adrenalin group: 90% vs. 69%, P adrenaline had more rhythm transitions from ROSC and non-shockable rhythms to VF/VT. © 2013 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Dispatcher-assisted bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Hagihara, Akihito; Onozuka, Daisuke; Shibuta, Hidetoshi; Hasegawa, Manabu; Nagata, Takashi

    2018-04-19

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is critical to the survival of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). However, it is unknown whether bystander CPR with or without dispatcher assistance is more effective or why. Thus, we evaluated the association between dispatcher-assisted bystander CPR (vs. bystander CPR without dispatcher assistance) and survival of patients with OHCA. This is a retrospective, nonrandomized, observational study using national registry data for all OHCAs. We performed a propensity analysis. Patients with OHCA of cardiac origin were 18-100 years of age and received bystander chest compression in Japan between 2005 and 2014. Outcome measures were bystander rescue breathing, return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) before hospital arrival, and survival and Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) 1 or 2 at 1 month after the event. During the study period, 1,176,351 OHCAs occurred, and 87,400 cases met the inclusion criteria. Among propensity-matched patients, a negative association was observed between dispatcher-assisted bystander CPR and outcome measures in a fully-adjusted model [odds ratio (OR) (95% CI) for ROSC = 0.87 (0.78-0.97), P < 0.05; OR (95% CI) for 1-month survival = 0.81 (0.65-1.00), P < 0.05; OR (95% CI) for CPC 1 or 2 = 0.64 (0.43-0.93), P < 0.05]. OR of survival for dispatcher-assisted bystander CPR tended to decrease as the emergency medical services response time increased. Survival benefit was less for dispatcher-assisted bystander CPR with dispatcher assistance than without dispatcher assistance. Low quality is hypothesized to be the cause of the reduced benefit. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Bystander Automated External Defibrillator Use and Clinical Outcomes after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    Holmberg, Mathias J; Vognsen, Mikael; Andersen, Mikkel S

    2017-01-01

    Aim: To systematically review studies comparing bystander automated external defibrillator (AED) use to no AED use in regard to clinical outcomes in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), and to provide a descriptive summary of studies on the cost-effectiveness of bystander AED use. Methods: We...... randomized trials, and 13 cost-effectiveness studies were included. Meta-analysis of 6 observational studies without critical risk of bias showed that bystander AED use was associated with survival to hospital discharge (all rhythms OR: 1.73 [95% CI: 1.36, 2.18], shockable rhythms OR: 1.66 [95% CI: 1.54, 1.......79]) and favorable neurological outcome (all rhythms OR: 2.12 [95% CI: 1.36, 3.29], shockable rhythms OR: 2.37 [95% CI: 1.58, 3.57]). There was no association between bystander AED use and neurological outcome for non-shockable rhythms (OR: 0.76 [95% CI: 0.10, 5.87]). The Public-Access Defibrillation trial found...

  4. Cost-utility analysis of treating out of hospital cardiac arrests in Jerusalem.

    Ginsberg, Gary M; Kark, Jeremy D; Einav, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) initiates a chain of responses including emergency medical service mobilization and medical treatment, transfer and admission first to a hospital Emergency Department (ED) and then usually to an intensive care unit and ward. Costly pre- and in-hospital care may be followed by prolonged post discharge expenditure on treatment of patients with severe neurological sequelae. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of treatment of OHCA by calculating the cost per Disability Adjusted Life Year (DALY) averted. We studied 3355 consecutive non-traumatic OHCAs (2005-2010) in Jerusalem, Israel, supplemented by hospital utilization data extracted from patient files (n = 570) and post-discharge follow-up (n = 196). Demographic, utilization and economic data were incorporated into a spreadsheet model to calculate the cost-utility ratio. Advanced life support was administered to 2264 of the 3355 OHCAs (67.5%) and 1048 (45.6%) patients were transferred to the ED. Of 676 (20.1%) patients who survived the ED and were admitted, there were 206 (6.1%) survivors to discharge, among them only 113 (3.4%) neurologically intact. Total cost ($39,100,000) per DALY averted (1353) was $28,864. The current package of OHCA interventions in Jerusalem appears to be very cost-effective as the cost per averted DALY of $28,864 is less than the Gross Domestic Product per capita ($33,261). This paper provides a basis for studying the effects of potential interventions that can be evaluated in terms of their incremental costs per averted DALY for treatment of OHCA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Work factors associated with return to work in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors.

    Descatha, Alexis; Dumas, Florence; Bougouin, Wulfran; Cariou, Alain; Geri, Guillaume

    2018-07-01

    Although the survival rate after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) has increased over time, little is known about the return to work of OHCA survivors. We aim to evaluate prevalence and factors associated with return to work (RTW) in OHCA survivors. All consecutive OHCA survivors aged 18-65 years and discharged alive from a Paris tertiary intensive care unit between 2000 and 2013 were included. Pre-hospital care, in-hospital care, and after-hospital discharge data, such as work description (work location, job classification, nature of the job) were compared relative to work status and RTW. Factors associated with RTW were evaluated using multivariable logistic regression. 153 OHCA survivors were included in the analysis. Among them, 96 (62.8%) returned to work an average of 714 days after OHCA (SD 1031); mostly to the same job (n = 72, 75%). Six patients changed jobs (4%) and 12 reduced their activity (10.6%). Factors associated with RTW were younger age (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 3.64 [1.10; 12.02]), being managers and professionals, and service and sales workers (compared to technicians and associate professionals, clerical support workers, respectively aOR 3.43 [1.05; 11.22] and 4.69 [1.14; 19.37]), and workplace occurrence (aOR 11.72 [1.37; 99.93]). Two thirds of OHCA survivors, in the present study, returned to work. Patients with a higher-level job, and with the arrest occurring in the workplace, were more likely to return to work. Further research should include more details of job contents, evolution, financial consequences, as well as prevention practices related to work location. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Full recovery two months after therapeutic hypothermia following cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a patient with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    Ahn, J.; Cha, K.S.; Oh, J.H.; Lee, H.C.

    2013-01-01

    Neurologic impairments are very common among patients who get a recovery of spontaneous circulation after suffering from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Therapeutic hypothermia is established as a standardized therapeutic strategy for those patients in whom it decreases mortality rate and improves neurologic outcome. Herein, we report a case of patient who experienced out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with ischaemic heart disease and ventricular arrhythmia and got a full recovery without any neurologic impediments 2 months after being managed with therapeutic hypothermia. (author)

  7. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: the prospect of E-CPR in the Maastricht region.

    Sharma, A S; Pijls, R W M; Weerwind, P W; Delnoij, T S R; de Jong, W C; Gorgels, A P M; Maessen, J G

    2016-02-01

    The current outcome of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients in the Maastricht region was analysed with the prospect of implementing extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (E-CPR). A retrospective analysis of adult patients who were resuscitated for OHCA during a 24-month period was performed. 195 patients (age 66 [57-75] years, 82 % male) were resuscitated for OHCA by the emergency medical services and survived to admission at the emergency department. Survival to hospital discharge was 46.2 %. Notable differences between non-survivors and survivors were observed and included: age (70 [58-79] years) vs. (63 [55-72] years, p = 0.01), chronic heart failure (18 vs. 7 %, p = 0.02), shockable rhythm (67 vs. 99 %, p < 0.01), and return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) at departure from the site of the arrest (46 vs. 99 %, p < 0.01) and on arrival to the emergency department (43 vs. 98 %, p < 0.01), respectively. Acute coronary syndrome was diagnosed in 32 % of non-survivors vs. 59 % among survivors, p < 0.01. Therapeutic hypothermia was provided in non-survivors (20 %) vs. survivors (43 %), p < 0.01. Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) was performed in 14 % of non-survivors while 52 % of survivors received PCI (p < 0.01). No statistical significance was observed in terms of gender, witnessed arrest, bystander CPR, or automated external defibrillator deployed among the cohort. At hospital discharge, moderately severe neurological disability was present in six survivors. These observations are compatible with the notion that a shockable rhythm, ROSC, and post-arrest care improve survival outcome. Potentially, initiating E-CPR in the resuscitation phase in patients with a shockable rhythm and no ROSC might serve as a bridge to definite treatment and improve survival outcome.

  8. The Extent of Myocardial Injury During Prolonged Targeted Temperature Management After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    Grejs, Anders Morten; Gjedsted, Jakob; Thygesen, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study is to evaluate the extent of myocardial injury by cardiac biomarkers during prolonged targeted temperature management of 24 hours vs 48 hours after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. METHODS: This randomized Scandinavian multicenter study compares the extent of myocardial...... injury estimated by hs-cTnTAUC of prolonged targeted temperature management of 48 hours vs 24 hours, although the CK-MBAUC was significantly higher during 48 hours vs 24 hours. Hence, it seems unlikely that the duration of targeted temperature management has a beneficial effect on the extent...... injury quantified by area under the curve (AUC) of cardiac biomarkers during prolonged targeted temperature management at 33°C ± 1°C of 24 hours and 48 hours, respectively. Through a period of 2.5 years, 161 comatose out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients were randomized to targeted temperature...

  9. Recognising out-of-hospital cardiac arrest during emergency calls increases bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and survival.

    Viereck, Søren; Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær; Bækgaard, Josefine Stokholm; Claesson, Andreas; Hollenberg, Jacob; Folke, Fredrik; Lippert, Freddy K

    2017-06-01

    Initiation of early bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) depends on bystanders' or medical dispatchers' recognition of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The primary aim of our study was to investigate if OHCA recognition during the emergency call was associated with bystander CPR, return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), and 30-day survival. Our secondary aim was to identify patient-, setting-, and dispatcher-related predictors of OHCA recognition. We performed an observational study of all OHCA patients' emergency calls in the Capital Region of Denmark from 01/01/2013-31/12/2013. OHCAs were collected from the Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry and the Mobile Critical Care Unit database. Emergency call recordings were identified and evaluated. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were applied to all OHCAs and witnessed OHCAs only to analyse the association between OHCA recognition and bystander CPR, ROSC, and 30-day survival. Univariable logistic regression analyses were applied to identify predictors of OHCA recognition. We included 779 emergency calls in the analyses. During the emergency calls, 70.1% (n=534) of OHCAs were recognised; OHCA recognition was positively associated with bystander CPR (odds ratio [OR]=7.84, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.10-12.05) in all OHCAs; and ROSC (OR=1.86, 95% CI: 1.13-3.06) and 30-day survival (OR=2.80, 95% CI: 1.58-4.96) in witnessed OHCA. Predictors of OHCA recognition were addressing breathing (OR=1.76, 95% CI: 1.17-2.66) and callers located by the patient's side (OR=2.16, 95% CI: 1.46-3.19). Recognition of OHCA during emergency calls was positively associated with the provision of bystander CPR, ROSC, and 30-day survival in witnessed OHCA. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest attributable to sunshine: a nationwide, retrospective, observational study.

    Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the population attributable risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) from non-optimal sunshine duration and the relative contribution of daily sunshine hours. National registry data of all cases of OHCA occurred between 2005 and 2014 in the 47 Japanese prefectures were obtained. We examined the relationship between daily duration of sunshine and OHCA risk for each prefecture in Japan using a Poisson regression model combined with a distributed lag non-linear model, adjusting for confounding factors. The estimated associations for each prefecture were pooled at the nationwide level using a multivariate random-effects meta-analysis. A total of 658 742 cases of OHCA of presumed cardiac origin met our inclusion criteria. The minimum morbidity sunshine duration varied from the 21st percentile in Okayama to the 99th percentile in Hokkaido, Gifu, and Hyogo. Overall, 5.78% [95% empirical confidence interval (eCI): 3.57-7.16] of the OHCA cases were attributable to daily sunshine duration. The attributable fraction for short sunshine duration (below the minimum morbidity sunshine duration) was 4.18% (95% eCI: 2.64-5.38), whereas that for long sunshine duration (above the minimum morbidity sunshine duration) was 1.59% (95% eCI: 0.81-2.21). Daily sunshine duration was responsible for OHCA burden, and a greater number of OHCA cases occurred in patients who were only exposed to sunshine for short periods of time each day. Our findings suggest that public health efforts to reduce OHCA burden should take sunshine level into account. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests During the Japanese Professional Baseball Championship Series.

    Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito

    2018-03-14

    Because the Japan Professional Baseball Championship Series (Japan Series) is a stressful sports event, it is possible that watching Japan Series matches may increase the risk of cardiovascular events. Therefore, we investigated the potential association between the Japan Series and the incidence of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) events. National registry data for all cases of OHCA between 2005 and 2014 from 47 prefectures of Japan were obtained. We used a time-stratified case-crossover design with a conditional Poisson regression model to compare OHCA events during the Japan Series with those events that occurred during the periods except for dates of the Japan Series. The estimated associations for each prefecture were pooled at the nationwide level using a random-effects meta-analysis. In total, 666,020 OHCAs of presumed cardiac origin were reported during the study period. On days of Japan Series matches, the pooled relative risk of OHCA was 1.033 (95% confidence interval 1.012 to 1.055; p = 0.002; I 2  = 3.5%, P for heterogeneity = 0.405). Stratified analyses by gender revealed that the substantial increase in OHCA during the events was observed for men, whereas we found no significant increase for women. We also found a considerable rise in OHCA among patients aged ≥65 years; however, there was no significant evidence of increased risk in those aged 18 to 64 years. In conclusion, stressful baseball match is associated with an increased risk of OHCA. Prevention measures for severe emotional stress-related OHCA should be implemented, particularly for elderly men. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A second chance at life: people's lived experiences of surviving out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Forslund, Ann-Sofie; Jansson, Jan-Håkan; Lundblad, Dan; Söderberg, Siv

    2017-12-01

    There is more to illuminate about people's experiences of surviving out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and how such an event affects people's lives over time. This study aimed to elucidate meanings of people's lived experiences and changes in everyday life during their first year after surviving OHCA. A qualitative, longitudinal design was used. Eleven people surviving OHCA from northern Sweden agreed to participate and were interviewed 6 and 12 months after the event. A phenomenological hermeneutic interpretation was used to analyse the transcribed texts. The structural analysis resulted in two themes: (i) striving to regain one's usual self and (ii) a second chance at life, and subthemes (ia) testing the body, (ib) pursuing the ordinary life, (ic) gratitude for help to survival, (iia) regaining a sense of security with one's body, (iib) getting to know a new self, and (iic) seeking meaning and establishing a future. To conclude, we suggest that people experienced meanings of surviving OHCA over time as striving to regain their usual self and getting a second chance at life. The event affected them in many ways and resulted in a lot of emotions and many things to think about. Participants experienced back-and-forth emotions, when comparing their present lives to both their lives before cardiac arrest and those lives they planned for the future. During their first year, participants' daily lives were still influenced by 'being dead' and returning to life. As time passed, they wanted to resume their ordinary lives and hoped for continued lives filled with meaning and joyous activities. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  13. Surviving out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: just a matter of defibrillators?

    Zorzi, Alessandro; Gasparetto, Nicola; Stella, Federica; Bortoluzzi, Andrea; Cacciavillani, Luisa; Basso, Cristina

    2014-08-01

    Out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a leading cause of death all over the world. Although the outcome of OHCA resulting from 'nonshockable' rhythms (asystole and pulseless electrical activity) is poor regardless of resuscitation efforts, 'shockable' rhythms such as ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation may carry a good prognosis if early defibrillation is performed. At present, simplified cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques (hands-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation) and automated external defibrillators (AEDs) offer lay people the possibility to provide lifesaving treatment to OHCA victims in the critical minutes before the arrival of the emergency medical system. Programs aimed at increasing provision of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and use of AEDs by lay people have been set up in different countries, including Italy, and have contributed to improve survival rates. However, success of these programs critically depends on appropriate planning and design, and on cultural predisposition of witnesses to undertake immediate measures of resuscitation in the case of OHCA. Placement of a large number of AEDs may carry high costs and little benefits if it is uncoordinated and not preceded by educational campaigns to spread widely the 'culture of resuscitation' in the population.

  14. Drones may be used to save lives in out of hospital cardiac arrest due to drowning.

    Claesson, A; Svensson, L; Nordberg, P; Ringh, M; Rosenqvist, M; Djarv, T; Samuelsson, J; Hernborg, O; Dahlbom, P; Jansson, A; Hollenberg, J

    2017-05-01

    Drowning leading to out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and death is a major public health concern. Submersion with duration of less than 10min is associated with favorable neurological outcome and nearby bystanders play a considerable role in rescue and resuscitation. Drones can provide a visual overview of an accident scene, their potential as lifesaving tools in drowning has not been evaluated. The aim of this simulation study was to evaluate the efficiency of a drone for providing earlier location of a submerged possible drowning victim in comparison with standard procedure. This randomized simulation study used a submerged manikin placed in a shallow (drone transmitting video to a tablet (intervention). Time from start to contact with the manikin was the primary endpoint. Twenty searches were performed in total, 10 for each group. The median time from start to contact with the manikin was 4:34min (IQR 2:56-7:48) for the search party (control) and 0:47min (IQR 0:38-0:58) for the drone-system (intervention) respectively (pdrone was 3:38min (IQR 2:02-6:38). A drone transmitting live video to a tablet is feasible, time saving in comparison to traditional search parties and may be used for providing earlier location of submerged victims at a beach. Drone search can possibly contribute to earlier onset of CPR in drowning victims. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Debriefing bystanders of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is valuable.

    Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Fjordholt, Martin; Pedersen, Birgitte Dahl; Østergaard, Doris; Lippert, Freddy K

    2014-11-01

    To explore the concept of debriefing bystanders after participating in an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest resuscitation attempt including (1) bystanders' most commonly addressed reactions after participating in a resuscitation attempt when receiving debriefing from medical dispatchers; (2) their perception of effects of receiving debriefing and (3) bystanders' recommendations for a systematic debriefing concept. Qualitative study based on telephone debriefing to bystanders and interviews with bystanders who received debriefing. Data was analyzed using the phenomenological approach. Six themes emerged from analysis of debriefing audio files: (1) identification of OHCA; (2) emotional and perceptual experience with OHCA; (3) collaboration with healthcare professionals; (4) patients outcome; (5) coping with the experience and (6) general reflections. When evaluating the concept, bystanders expressed positive short term effect of receiving debriefing and a retention of this effect after two months. Recommendations for a future debriefing concept were given. Debriefing by emergency medical dispatchers to OHCA bystanders stimulates reflection, positively influencing the ability to cope with the emotional reactions and the cognitive perception of own performance and motivates improvement of CPR skills. Importantly, it increases confidence to provide CPR in the future. Implementation of telephone debriefing to bystanders at Emergency Medical Dispatch Centres is a low complexity and a low cost intervention though the logistic challenges have to be considered. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Colorimetric end-tidal CO2 detector for verification of endotracheal tube placement in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Hayden, S R; Sciammarella, J; Viccellio, P; Thode, H; Delagi, R

    1995-06-01

    To evaluate the ability of a disposable, colorimetric end-tidal CO2 detector to verify proper endotracheal (ET) tube placement in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, and to correlate semiquantitative CO2 measurements with the rate of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Prospective, observational study using a convenience sample of intubated out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients. A disposable, colorimetric end-tidal CO2 detector was attached to the ET tube after intubation. In the absence of a colorimetric change, the paramedics reassessed the tube placement and could reintubate the patient. Tube placement was verified at the hospital. Paramedics were instructed to contact the base station and report the colorimetric change upon hospital arrival. ROSC was defined as restoration of a self-sustaining pulse until hospital arrival. Between December 1990 and May 1993, ET tubes were placed in 566 victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. 541 of the 566 intubations (95.6%) were associated with a color change. In one case with a color change and out-of-hospital clinical evidence of proper tube placement, the tube was determined to be in the esophagus at the hospital. Correct placement of the remaining 565 of 566 (99.8%) tubes was verified. Of the 566 patients who had a colorimetric change, 91 (16%) had ROSC vs one of 25 (4%) patients who did not have a color change. In one subgroup (n = 179), the degree of color change was highly associated with ROSC (p = 0.004). A disposable, colorimetric end-tidal CO2 detector appears reliable in verifying proper ET tube placement in victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The degree of color change correlates with the probability of ROSC.

  17. Effects of bystander CPR following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest on hospital costs and long-term survival.

    Geri, Guillaume; Fahrenbruch, Carol; Meischke, Hendrika; Painter, Ian; White, Lindsay; Rea, Thomas D; Weaver, Marcia R

    2017-06-01

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is associated with a greater likelihood of survival to hospital discharge after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). However the long-term survival benefits in relationship to cost have not been well-studied. We evaluated bystander CPR, hospital-based costs, and long-term survival following OHCA in order to assess the potential cost-effectiveness of bystander CPR. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of consecutive EMS-treated OHCA patients >=12years who arrested prior to EMS arrival and outside a nursing facility between 2001 and 2010 in greater King County, WA. Utstein-style information was obtained from the EMS registry, including 5-year survival. Costs from the OHCA hospitalization were obtained from the Washington State Comprehensive Hospital Abstract Reporting System. Cost effectiveness was based on hospital costs divided by quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) for a 5-year follow-up window. Of the 4448 eligible patients, 18.5% (n=824) were discharged alive from hospital and 12.1% (n=539) were alive at 5 years. Five-year survival was higher in patients who received bystander CPR (14.3% vs. 8.7%, pbystander CPR. The average (SD) total cost of the initial acute care hospitalization was USD 19,961 (40,498) for all admitted patients and USD 75,175 (52,276) for patients alive at year 5. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio associated with bystander CPR was USD 48,044 per QALY. Based on this population-based investigation, bystander CPR was positively associated with long-term survival and appears cost-effective. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Differences between out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in residential and public locations and implications for public-access defibrillation

    Folke, Fredrik; Gislason, Gunnar H; Lippert, Freddy

    2010-01-01

    The majority of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) occur in residential locations, but knowledge about strategic placement of automated external defibrillators in residential areas is lacking. We examined whether residential OHCA areas suitable for placement of automated external defibrillat...... defibrillators could be identified on the basis of demographic characteristics and characterized individuals with OHCA in residential locations....

  19. Assessment of quality of life and cognitive function after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with successful resuscitation

    van Alem, Anouk P.; Waalewijn, Reinier A.; Koster, Rudolph W.; de Vos, Rien

    2004-01-01

    This prospective cohort study evaluated the impact of the time-related elements of the "chain of survival" on the quality of life of patients, taking their characteristics into account. Between 1995 and 2002, consecutive, out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients from Amsterdam and the surrounding

  20. Diagnostic value and prognostic implications of early cardiac magnetic resonance in survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Zorzi, Alessandro; Susana, Angela; De Lazzari, Manuel; Migliore, Federico; Vescovo, Giovanni; Scarpa, Daniele; Baritussio, Anna; Tarantini, Giuseppe; Cacciavillani, Luisa; Giorgi, Benedetta; Basso, Cristina; Iliceto, Sabino; Bucciarelli Ducci, Chiara; Corrado, Domenico; Marra, Martina Perazzolo

    2018-03-15

    In patients who survived out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), it is crucial to establish the underlying cause and its potential reversibility. The purpose of this study was to assess the incremental diagnostic and prognostic role of early cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in survivors of OHCA. Among 139 consecutive OHCA patients, the study enrolled 44 patients (median age 43 years; 84% male) who underwent coronary angiography and CMR ≤7 days after admission. The CMR protocol included T2-weighted sequences for myocardial edema and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) sequences for myocardial fibrosis. Coronary angiography identified obstructive coronary artery disease in 18 of 44 patients in whom CMR confirmed the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease by demonstrating subendocardial or transmural LGE. The presence of myocardial edema allowed differentiation between acute myocardial ischemia (n = 12) and postinfarction myocardial scar (n = 6). Among the remaining 26 patients without obstructive coronary artery disease, CMR in 19 (73%) showed dilated cardiomyopathy in 5, myocarditis in 4, mitral valve prolapse associated with LGE in 3, ischemic scar in 2, idiopathic nonischemic scar in 2, arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy in 1, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in 1, and takotsubo cardiomyopathy in 1. In this subgroup of 26 patients, 6 (23%) had myocardial edema. During mean follow-up of 36 ± 17 months, all 18 patients with myocardial edema had an uneventful outcome, whereas 9 of 26 (35%) without myocardial edema experienced sudden arrhythmic death (n = 1), appropriate defibrillator interventions (n = 5), and nonarrhythmic death (n = 3; P = .006). In survivors of OHCA, early CMR with a comprehensive tissue characterization protocol provided additional diagnostic and prognostic value. The identification of myocardial edema was associated with a favorable long-term outcome. Copyright © 2018 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation of out-of-hospital traumatic cardiac arrest in Qatar: A nationwide population-based study.

    Irfan, Furqan B; Consunji, Rafael; El-Menyar, Ayman; George, Pooja; Peralta, Ruben; Al-Thani, Hassan; Thomas, Stephen Hodges; Alinier, Guillaume; Shuaib, Ashfaq; Al-Suwaidi, Jassim; Singh, Rajvir; Castren, Maaret; Cameron, Peter A; Djarv, Therese

    2017-08-01

    Traumatic cardiac arrest studies have reported improved survival rates recently, ranging from 1.7-7.5%. This population-based nationwide study aims to describe the epidemiology, interventions and outcomes, and determine predictors of survival from out-of-hospital traumatic cardiac arrest (OHTCA) in Qatar. An observational retrospective population-based study was conducted on OHTCA patients in Qatar, from January 2010 to December 2015. Traumatic cardiac arrest was redefined to include out-of-hospital traumatic cardiac arrest (OHTCA) and in-hospital traumatic cardiac arrest (IHTCA). A total of 410 OHTCA patients were included in the 6-year study period. The mean annual crude incidence rate of OHTCA was 4.0 per 100,000 population, in Qatar. OHTCA mostly occurred in males with a median age of 33. There was a preponderance of blunt injuries (94.3%) and head injuries (66.3%). Overall, the survival rate was 2.4%. Shockable rhythm, prehospital external hemorrhage control, in-hospital blood transfusion, and surgery were associated with higher odds of survival. Adrenaline (Epinephrine) lowered the odds of survival. The incidence of OHTCA was less than expected, with a low rate of survival. Thoracotomy was not associated with improved survival while Adrenaline administration lowered survival in OHTCA patients with majority blunt injuries. Interventions to enable early prehospital control of hemorrhage, blood transfusion, thoracostomy and surgery improved survival. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Sex differences in the prehospital management of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Mumma, Bryn E; Umarov, Temur

    2016-08-01

    Sex differences exist in the diagnosis and treatment of several cardiovascular diseases. Our objective was to determine whether sex differences exist in the use of guideline-recommended treatments in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We included adult patients with non-traumatic OHCA treated by emergency medical services (EMS) in the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium Prehospital Resuscitation using an IMpedance valve and Early versus Delayed (ROC PRIMED) database during 2007-2009. Outcomes included prehospital treatment intervals, procedures, and medications. Data were analysed using multivariable linear and logistic regression models that adjusted for sex, age, witnessed arrest, public location, bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and first known rhythm of ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation. We studied 15,584 patients; 64% were male and median age was 68 years (interquartile range 55-80). In multivariable analyses, intervals from EMS dispatch to first rhythm capture (p=0.001) and first EMS CPR (p=0.001) were longer in women than in men. Women were less likely to receive successful intravenous or intraosseous access (OR 0.78, 95% CI 0.71-0.86) but equally likely to receive a successful advanced airway (OR 0.94, 95% CI 0.86-1.02). Women were less likely to receive adrenaline (OR 0.81, 95% CI 0.74-0.88), atropine (OR 0.86, 95% CI 0.80-0.92), and lidocaine or amiodarone (OR 0.68, 95% CI 0.61-0.75). Women were less likely than men to receive guideline-recommended treatments for OHCA. The reasons for these differences require further exploration, and EMS provider education and training should specifically address these sex differences in the treatment of OHCA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Solar radiation and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Japan.

    Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito

    2017-11-01

    Although several studies have estimated the effects of temperature on mortality and morbidity, little is known regarding the burden of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) attributable to solar radiation. We obtained data for all cases of OHCA and meteorological data reported between 2011 and 2014 in 3 Japanese prefectures: Hokkaido, Ibaraki, and Fukuoka. We first examined the relationship between daily solar radiation and OHCA risk for each prefecture using time-varying distributed lag non-linear models and then pooled the results in a multivariate random-effects meta-analysis. The attributable fractions of OHCA were calculated for low and high solar radiation, defined as solar radiation below and above the minimum morbidity solar radiation, respectively. The minimum morbidity solar radiation was defined as the specific solar radiation associated with the lowest morbidity risk. A total of 49,892 cases of OHCA occurred during the study period. The minimum morbidity solar radiation for each prefecture was the 100th percentile (72.5 MJ/m 2 ) in Hokkaido, the 83rd percentile (59.7 MJ/m 2 ) in Ibaraki, and the 70th percentile (53.8 MJ/m 2 ) in Fukuoka. Overall, 20.00% (95% empirical confidence interval [eCI]: 10.97-27.04) of the OHCA cases were attributable to daily solar radiation. The attributable fraction for low solar radiation was 19.50% (95% eCI: 10.00-26.92), whereas that for high solar radiation was 0.50% (95% eCI: -0.07-1.01). Low solar radiation was associated with a substantial attributable risk for OHCA. Our findings suggest that public health efforts to reduce OHCA burden should consider the solar radiation level. Large prospective studies with longitudinal collection of individual data is required to more conclusively assess the impact of solar radiation on OHCA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Population density, call-response interval, and survival of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    Ogawa Toshio

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the effects of geographic variation on outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA. The present study investigated the relationship between population density, time between emergency call and ambulance arrival, and survival of OHCA, using the All-Japan Utstein-style registry database, coupled with geographic information system (GIS data. Methods We examined data from 101,287 bystander-witnessed OHCA patients who received emergency medical services (EMS through 4,729 ambulatory centers in Japan between 2005 and 2007. Latitudes and longitudes of each center were determined with address-match geocoding, and linked with the Population Census data using GIS. The endpoints were 1-month survival and neurologically favorable 1-month survival defined as Glasgow-Pittsburgh cerebral performance categories 1 or 2. Results Overall 1-month survival was 7.8%. Neurologically favorable 1-month survival was 3.6%. In very low-density (2 and very high-density (≥10,000/km2 areas, the mean call-response intervals were 9.3 and 6.2 minutes, 1-month survival rates were 5.4% and 9.1%, and neurologically favorable 1-month survival rates were 2.7% and 4.3%, respectively. After adjustment for age, sex, cause of arrest, first aid by bystander and the proportion of neighborhood elderly people ≥65 yrs, patients in very high-density areas had a significantly higher survival rate (odds ratio (OR, 1.64; 95% confidence interval (CI, 1.44 - 1.87; p Conclusion Living in a low-density area was associated with an independent risk of delay in ambulance response, and a low survival rate in cases of OHCA. Distribution of EMS centers according to population size may lead to inequality in health outcomes between urban and rural areas.

  5. A smartphone application for dispatch of lay responders to out-of-hospital cardiac arrests.

    Berglund, Ellinor; Claesson, Andreas; Nordberg, Per; Djärv, Therese; Lundgren, Peter; Folke, Fredrik; Forsberg, Sune; Riva, Gabriel; Ringh, Mattias

    2018-05-01

    Dispatch of lay volunteers trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and equipped with automated external defibrillators (AEDs) may improve survival in cases of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The aim of this study was to investigate the functionality and performance of a smartphone application for locating and alerting nearby trained laymen/women in cases of OHCA. A system using a smartphone application activated by Emergency Dispatch Centres was used to locate and alert laymen/women to nearby suspected OHCAs. Lay responders were instructed either to perform CPR or collect a nearby AED. An online survey was carried out among the responders. From February to August 2016, the system was activated in 685 cases of suspected OHCA. Among these, 224 cases were Emergency Medical Services (EMSs)-treated OHCAs (33%). EMS-witnessed cases (n = 11) and cases with missing survey data (n = 15) were excluded. In the remaining 198 OHCAs, lay responders arrived at the scene in 116 cases (58%), and prior to EMSs in 51 cases (26%). An AED was attached in 17 cases (9%) and 4 (2%) were defibrillated. Lay responders performed CPR in 54 cases (27%). Median distance to the OHCA was 560 m (IQR 332-860 m), and 1280 m (IQR 748-1776 m) via AED pick-up. The survey-answering rate was 82%. A smartphone application can be used to alert CPR-trained lay volunteers to OHCAs for CPR. Further improvements are needed to shorten the time to defibrillation before EMS arrival. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Use of implantable cardioverter defibrillators after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a prospective follow-up study

    Parkash, Ratika; Tang, Anthony; Wells, George; Blackburn, Josée; Stiell, Ian; Simpson, Christopher; Dorian, Paul; Yee, Raymond; Cameron, Doug; Connolly, Stuart; Birnie, David; Nichol, Graham

    2004-01-01

    Background Survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest are at high risk of recurrent arrests, many of which could be prevented with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). We sought to determine the ICD insertion rate among survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and to determine factors associated with ICD implantation. Methods The Ontario Prehospital Advanced Life Support (OPALS) study is a prospective, multiphase, before–after study assessing the effectiveness of prehospital interventions for people experiencing cardiac arrest, trauma or respiratory arrest in 19 Ontario communities. We linked OPALS data describing survivors of cardiac arrest with data from all defibrillator implantation centres in Ontario. Results From January 1997 to April 2002, 454 patients in the OPALS study survived to hospital discharge after experiencing an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The mean age was 65 (standard deviation 14) years, 122 (26.9%) were women, 398 (87.7%) had a witnessed arrest, 372 (81.9%) had an initial rhythm of ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation (VT/VF), and 76 (16.7%) had asystole or another arrhythmia. The median cerebral performance category at discharge (range 1–5, 1 = normal) was 1. Only 58 (12.8%) of the 454 patients received an ICD. Patients with an initial rhythm of VT/VF were more likely than those with an initial rhythm of asystole or another rhythm to undergo device insertion (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 9.63, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.31–71.50). Similarly, patients with a normal cerebral performance score were more likely than those with abnormal scores to undergo ICD insertion (adjusted OR 12.52, 95% CI 1.74–92.12). Interpretation A minority of patients who survived cardiac arrest underwent ICD insertion. It is unclear whether this low usage rate reflects referral bias, selection bias by electrophysiologists, supply constraint or patient preference. PMID:15505267

  7. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: determinant factors for immediate survival after cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Daniela Aparecida Morais

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to analyze determinant factors for the immediate survival of persons who receive cardiopulmonary resuscitation from the advanced support units of the Mobile Emergency Medical Services (SAMU of Belo Horizonte.METHOD: this is a retrospective, epidemiological study which analyzed 1,165 assistance forms, from the period 2008 - 2010. The collected data followed the Utstein style, being submitted to descriptive and analytical statistics with tests with levels of significance of 5%.RESULTS: the majority were male, the median age was 64 years, and the ambulance response time, nine minutes. Immediate survival was observed in 239 persons. An association was ascertained of this outcome with "cardiac arrest witnessed by persons trained in basic life support" (OR=3.49; p<0.05; CI 95%, "cardiac arrest witnessed by Mobile Emergency Medical Services teams" (OR=2.99; p<0.05; CI95%, "only the carry out of basic life support" (OR=0.142; p<0.05; CI95%, and "initial cardiac rhythm of asystole" (OR=0.33; p<0.05; CI 95%.CONCLUSION: early access to cardiopulmonary resuscitation was related to a favorable outcome, and the non-undertaking of advanced support, and asystole, were associated with worse outcomes. Basic and advanced life support techniques can alter survival in the event of cardiac arrest.

  8. Unmanned aerial vehicles (drones) in out-of-hospital-cardiac-arrest.

    Claesson, A; Fredman, D; Svensson, L; Ringh, M; Hollenberg, J; Nordberg, P; Rosenqvist, M; Djarv, T; Österberg, S; Lennartsson, J; Ban, Y

    2016-10-12

    The use of an automated external defibrillator (AED) prior to EMS arrival can increase 30-day survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) significantly. Drones or unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) can fly with high velocity and potentially transport devices such as AEDs to the site of OHCAs. The aim of this explorative study was to investigate the feasibility of a drone system in decreasing response time and delivering an AED. Data of Global Positioning System (GPS) coordinates from historical OHCA in Stockholm County was used in a model using a Geographic Information System (GIS) to find suitable placements and visualize response times for the use of an AED equipped drone. Two different geographical models, urban and rural, were calculated using a multi-criteria evaluation (MCE) model. Test-flights with an AED were performed on these locations in rural areas. In total, based on 3,165 retrospective OHCAs in Stockholm County between 2006-2013, twenty locations were identified for the potential placement of a drone. In a GIS-simulated model of urban OHCA, the drone arrived before EMS in 32 % of cases, and the mean amount of time saved was 1.5 min. In rural OHCA the drone arrived before EMS in 93 % of cases with a mean amount of time saved of 19 min. In these rural locations during (n = 13) test flights, latch-release of the AED from low altitude (3-4 m) or landing the drone on flat ground were the safest ways to deliver an AED to the bystander and were superior to parachute release. The difference in response time for EMS between urban and rural areas is substantial, as is the possible amount of time saved using this UAV-system. However, yet another technical device needs to fit into the chain of survival. We know nothing of how productive or even counterproductive this system might be in clinical reality. To use drones in rural areas to deliver an AED in OHCA may be safe and feasible. Suitable placement of drone systems can be designed by using GIS models

  9. Characteristics and outcome among patients suffering from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: Factors associated with survival

    Trpković S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to define factors associated with an improved outcome among patients suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA using the Utstain style data collection. We examined 200 patients suffering from OHCA in a prospective study in a two years period. We determined survival from cardiac arrest (CA to discharge from hospital and the factors associated with survival. 78% of CA patients had a cardiac aetiology, 65% occurred at home, 3.7% received bystander CPR. 36% were found in VF/VT, 64% in asystole/PEA. 52% of patients were intubated in the field, survival to discharge from hospital was significantly higher among patients who were intubated in the field. The mean response time was 6.6 minutes. 66.7% of patients were given the shock after 4 minutes. 131 (65.5% were pronounced dead in the field, 69 patients were transported to the hospital. 53 (76.8% patients of them died during the transport or in the ED, 7 died after hospital admission and 9 survived to hospital discharge. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that variables significantly associated with survival to hospital discharge were: age, endotracheal intubation in the field and mean response time. The outcome of CPR was better in patients who were younger, who were intubated in the field and when the response time was shorter.

  10. Factors Associated With Successful Resuscitation After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest and Temporal Trends in Survival and Comorbidity

    Søholm, Helle; Hassager, Christian; Lippert, Freddy

    2015-01-01

    (multivariate odds ratio [OR]=3.9; 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.1 to 5.0), witnessed arrest (multivariate OR=3.5; 95% CI 2.7 to 4.6), and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in a public area (multivariate OR=2.1; 95% CI 1.6 to 2.8), whereas no comorbidity (multivariate OR=1.1; 95% CI 0.8 to 1.45), sex...

  11. The value of arterial blood gas parameters for prediction of mortality in survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    Katharina Isabel von Auenmueller

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Sudden cardiac death is one of the leading causes of death in Europe, and early prognostication remains challenging. There is a lack of valid parameters for the prediction of survival after cardiac arrest. Aims: This study aims to investigate if arterial blood gas parameters correlate with mortality of patients after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Materials and Methods: All patients who were admitted to our hospital after resuscitation following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2013, were included in this retrospective study. The patient's survival 5 days after resuscitation defined the study end-point. For the statistical analysis, the mean, standard deviation, Student's t-test, Chi-square test, and logistic regression analyses were used (level of significance P< 0.05. Results: Arterial blood gas samples were taken from 170 patients. In particular, pH < 7.0 (odds ratio [OR]: 7.20; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.11–16.69; P< 0.001 and lactate ≥ 5.0 mmol/L (OR: 6.79; 95% CI: 2.77–16.66; P< 0.001 showed strong and independent correlations with mortality within the first 5 days after hospital admission. Conclusion: Our study results indicate that several arterial blood gas parameters correlate with mortality of patients after out-of-hospital resuscitation. The most relevant parameters are pH and lactate because they are strongly and independently associated with mortality within the first 5 days after resuscitation. Despite this correlation, none of these parameters by oneself is strong enough to allow an early prognostication. Still, these parameters can contribute as part of a multimodal approach to assessing the patients' prognosis.

  12. Early Outcomes of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest after Early Defibrillation: a 24 Months Retrospective Analysis

    Paolo Terranova

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cardiovascular disease remains the most common cause of death in the United States and most other Western nations. Among these deaths, sudden, out-of-hospital cardiac arrest claims approximately 1000 lives each day in the United States alone. Most of these cardiac arrests are due to ventricular fibrillation. Though highly reversible with the rapid application of a defibrillator, ventricular fibrillation is otherwise fatal within minutes, even when cardiopulmonary resuscitation is provided immediately. The overall survival rate in the United States is estimated to be less than 5 percent. Recent developments in automated-external-defibrillator technology have provided a means of increasing the rate of prompt defibrillation after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. After minimal training, nonmedical personnel (e.g., flight attendants and casino workers are also able to use defibrillators in the workplace, with lifesaving effects. Nonetheless, such programs have involved designated personnel whose job description includes assisting persons who have had sudden cardiac arrest. Data are still lacking on the success of programs in which automated external defibrillators have been installed in public places to be used by persons who have no specific training or duty to act. Materials and Methods: All patients who had an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest between January 2003 and December 2004 and who received early defibrillation for ventricular fibrillation were included. We conducted a 24 months retrospective population-based analysis of the outcome in our population. Results: Over a 24 month period, 446 people had non–traumatic cardiac arrest, and in all of them it was observed to be ventricular fibrillation. In a very few cases, the defibrillator operators were good Samaritans, acting voluntarily. Eighty-nine patients (about 19% with ventricular fibrillation were successfully resuscitated, including eighteen who regained consciousness before

  13. Clinical predictors of shockable versus non-shockable rhythms in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    Granfeldt, Asger; Wissenberg, Mads; Hansen, Steen Møller

    2016-01-01

    Aim To identify factors associated with a non-shockable rhythm as first recorded heart rhythm. Methods Patients ≥18 years old suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrest between 2001 and 2012 were identified in the population-based Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry. Danish administrative registries were...... used to identify chronic diseases (within 10 years) and drug prescriptions (within 180 days). A multivariable logistic regression model, including patient related and cardiac arrest related characteristics, was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) for factors associated with non-shockable rhythm. Results...... compared to patients with shockable rhythm. In the adjusted multivariable regression model, pre-existing non-cardiovascular disease and drug prescription were associated with a non-shockable rhythm e.g. chronic obstructive lung disease (OR 1.44 [95% CI: 1.32–1.58]); and the prescription for antidepressants...

  14. Is hospital care of major importance for outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest? Experience acquired from patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest resuscitated by the same Emergency Medical Service and admitted to one of two hospitals over a 16-year period in the municipality of Göteborg.

    Engdahl, J; Abrahamsson, P; Bång, A; Lindqvist, J; Karlsson, T; Herlitz, J

    2000-02-01

    To describe patient characteristics, hospital investigations and interventions and early mortality among patients being hospitalized after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in two hospitals. Municipality of Göteborg, Sweden. All patients suffering an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest who were successfully resuscitated and admitted to hospital between 1 October 1980 and 31 December 1996. All patients were resuscitated by the same Emergency Medical Service and admitted alive to one of the two city hospitals in Göteborg. Of 579 patients admitted to Sahlgrenska Hospital, 253 (44%) were discharged alive and of 459 patients admitted to Ostra Hospital, 152 (33%) were discharged alive (P percentage of patients admitted to Sahlgrenska Hospital underwent coronary angiography (P < 0.001), electrophysiological testing (P < 0.001), Holter recording (P < 0.001), echocardiography (P = 0.004), percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA, P = 0.009), implantation of automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator (AICD, P = 0.03) and exercise stress tests (P = 0.003). Inhabitants in the catchment area of Ostra Hospital had a less favourable socio-economic profile. Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest may be affected by the course of hospital management. Other variables that might influence survival are socio-economic factors and cardiorespiratory status on admission to hospital. Further investigation is called for as more patients are being hospitalised alive after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

  15. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: Probability of bystander defibrillation relative to distance to nearest automated external defibrillator.

    Sondergaard, Kathrine B; Hansen, Steen Moller; Pallisgaard, Jannik L; Gerds, Thomas Alexander; Wissenberg, Mads; Karlsson, Lena; Lippert, Freddy K; Gislason, Gunnar H; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Folke, Fredrik

    2018-03-01

    Despite wide dissemination of automated external defibrillators (AEDs), bystander defibrillation rates remain low. We aimed to investigate how route distance to the nearest accessible AED was associated with probability of bystander defibrillation in public and residential locations. We used data from the nationwide Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry and the Danish AED Network to identify out-of-hospital cardiac arrests and route distances to nearest accessible registered AED during 2008-2013. The association between route distance and bystander defibrillation was described using restricted cubic spline logistic regression. We included 6971 out-of-hospital cardiac arrest cases. The proportion of arrests according to distance in meters (≤100, 101-200, >200) to the nearest accessible AED was: 4.6% (n=320), 5.3% (n=370), and 90.1% (n=6281), respectively. For cardiac arrests in public locations, the probability of bystander defibrillation at 0, 100 and 200m from the nearest AED was 35.7% (95% confidence interval 28.0%-43.5%), 21.3% (95% confidence interval 17.4%-25.2%), and 13.7% (95% confidence interval 10.1%-16.8%), respectively. The corresponding numbers for cardiac arrests in residential locations were 7.0% (95% confidence interval -2.1%-16.1%), 1.5% (95% confidence interval 0.002%-2.8%), and 0.9% (95% confidence interval 0.0005%-1.7%), respectively. In public locations, the probability of bystander defibrillation decreased rapidly within the first 100m route distance from cardiac arrest to nearest accessible AED whereas the probability of bystander defibrillation was low for all distances in residential areas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. GLP-1 analogues for neuroprotection after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Wiberg, Sebastian; Hassager, Christian; Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig; Frydland, Martin; Høfsten, Dan Eik; Engstrøm, Thomas; Køber, Lars; Schmidt, Henrik; Møller, Jacob Eifer; Kjaergaard, Jesper

    2016-06-30

    Attenuating the neurological damage occurring after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is an ongoing research effort. This dual-centre study investigates the neuroprotective effects of the glucagon-like-peptide-1 analogue Exenatide administered within 4 hours from the return of spontaneous circulation to comatose patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. This pilot study will randomize a total of 120 unconscious patients with sustained return of spontaneous circulation after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest undergoing targeted temperature management in a blinded one-to-one fashion to a 6-hour and 15-minute infusion of either Exenatide or placebo. Patients are eligible for inclusion if resuscitated from cardiac arrest with randomization from 20 minutes to 240 minutes after return of spontaneous circulation. The co-primary endpoint is feasibility, defined as the initiation of treatment within the inclusion window in more than 90 % of participants, and efficacy, defined as the area under the neuron-specific enolase curve from 0 to 72 hours after admission. Secondary endpoints include all-cause mortality at 30 days and Cerebral Performance Category as well as a modified Rankin Score at 180 days. The study has been approved by the Danish National Board of Health and the local Ethics Committee and is monitored by Good Clinical Practice units. The study is currently enrolling. This paper presents the methods and planned statistical analyses used in the GLP-1 trial and aims to minimize bias and data-driven reporting of results. 1) Danish National Board of Health, EudraCT 2013-004311-45. Registered on 25 March 2014. 2) Videnskabsetisk komité C, Region Hovedstaden, No. 45728. Registered on 29 January 2014. 3) Clinicaltrial.gov, NCT02442791 . Registered on 25 of January 2015.

  17. Systematic downloading and analysis of data from automated external defibrillators used in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    Hansen, Marco Bo; Lippert, Freddy Knudsen; Rasmussen, Lars Simon

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Valuable information can be retrieved from automated external defibrillators (AEDs) used in victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We describe our experience with systematic downloading of data from deployed AEDs. The primary aim was to compare the proportion of shockable...... rhythm from AEDs used by laypersons with the corresponding proportion recorded by the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) on arrival. METHODS: In a 20-month study, we collected data on OHCAs in the Capital Region of Denmark where an AED was deployed prior to arrival of EMS. The AEDs were brought...... to the emergency medical dispatch centre for data downloading and rhythm analysis. Patient data were retrieved from the medical records from the admitting hospital, whereas data on EMS rhythm analyses were obtained from the Danish Cardiac Arrest Register between 2001 and 2010. RESULTS: A total of 121 AEDs were...

  18. Age × Gender Interaction Effect on Resuscitation Outcomes in Patients With Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Hagihara, Akihito; Onozuka, Daisuke; Ono, Junko; Nagata, Takashi; Hasegawa, Manabu

    2017-08-01

    Although an interaction between gender and age has been shown to influence resuscitation outcomes in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), this interaction has not been investigated in Asian populations. In this prospective, observational study, data from all cases of OHCA in Japan between 2005 and 2012 were obtained from the Japanese National Registry. We determined the relative excess risk due to interaction and the ratio of odds ratios (ORs) to assess the interaction effect of gender and age on the incidence of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) before hospital arrival, 1-month survival, and neurologically intact survival 1 month after OHCA. Male gender was associated with decreased ROSC and lower 1-month survival rates in patients with OHCA of presumed cardiac origin. Older age was associated with lower 1-month and neurologically intact survival rates in male patients with OHCA of presumed cardiac and noncardiac origin and with increased ROSC in male patients with OHCA of presumed cardiac origin. The relative excess risk due to interaction for ROSC in patients with OHCA of presumed cardiac origin was statistically significant (OR 0.19, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.06 to 0.32). The ratio of ORs for ROSC was statistically significant in patients with OHCA of presumed cardiac origin (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.47) and of noncardiac origin (OR 0.40, 95% CI 0.17 to 0.92). In conclusion, the interaction effect between age and gender on ROSC was positive in OHCA cases of presumed cardiac origin and negative in those of noncardiac origin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Prolonged closed cardiac massage using LUCAS device in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with prolonged transport time

    Edouard Matevossian

    2009-04-01

    angiography. After a 16-day period of hospital convalescence, with preventive implantation of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator and several weeks of rehabilitation, the patient was able to return home with no evidence of health impairment.Keywords: resuscitation, cardiac arrest, cardiac massage, LUCAS

  20. The association of emergency department administration of sodium bicarbonate after out of hospital cardiac arrest with outcomes.

    Chen, Yi-Chuan; Hung, Ming-Szu; Liu, Chia-Yen; Hsiao, Cheng-Ting; Yang, Yao-Hsu

    2018-03-05

    Sodium bicarbonate administration is mostly restricted to in-hospital use in Taiwan. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of sodium bicarbonate on outcomes among patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). This population-based study used a 16-year database to analyze the association between sodium bicarbonate administration for resuscitation in the emergency department (ED) and outcomes. All adult patients with OHCA were identified through diagnostic and procedure codes. The primary outcome was survival to hospital admission and secondary outcome was the rate of death within the first 30days of incidence of cardiac arrest. Cox proportional-hazards regression, logistic regression, and propensity analyses were conducted. Among 5589 total OHCA patients, 15.1% (844) had survival to hospital admission. For all patients, a positive association was noted between sodium bicarbonate administration during resuscitation in the ED and survival to hospital admission (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 4.47; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.82-5.22, p<0.001). In propensity-matched patients, a positive association was also noted (adjusted OR, 4.61; 95% CI: 3.90-5.46, p<0.001). Among patients with OHCA in Taiwan, administration of sodium bicarbonate during ED resuscitation was significantly associated with an increased rate of survival to hospital admission. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Chest compressions before defibrillation for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled clinical trials

    Meier Pascal

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current 2005 guidelines for advanced cardiac life support strongly recommend immediate defibrillation for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. However, findings from experimental and clinical studies have indicated a potential advantage of pretreatment with chest compression-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR prior to defibrillation in improving outcomes. The aim of this meta-analysis is to evaluate the beneficial effect of chest compression-first versus defibrillation-first on survival in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Methods Main outcome measures were survival to hospital discharge (primary endpoint, return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC, neurologic outcome and long-term survival. Randomized, controlled clinical trials that were published between January 1, 1950, and June 19, 2010, were identified by a computerized search using SCOPUS, MEDLINE, BIOS, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts database, and Web of Science and supplemented by conference proceedings. Random effects models were used to calculate pooled odds ratios (ORs. A subgroup analysis was conducted to explore the effects of response interval greater than 5 min on outcomes. Results A total of four trials enrolling 1503 subjects were integrated into this analysis. No difference was found between chest compression-first versus defibrillation-first in the rate of return of spontaneous circulation (OR 1.01 [0.82-1.26]; P = 0.979, survival to hospital discharge (OR 1.10 [0.70-1.70]; P = 0.686 or favorable neurologic outcomes (OR 1.02 [0.31-3.38]; P = 0.979. For 1-year survival, however, the OR point estimates favored chest compression first (OR 1.38 [0.95-2.02]; P = 0.092 but the 95% CI crossed 1.0, suggesting insufficient estimate precision. Similarly, for cases with prolonged response times (> 5 min point estimates pointed toward superiority of chest compression first (OR 1.45 [0

  2. Commence, continue, withhold or terminate?: a systematic review of decision-making in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Anderson, Natalie E; Gott, Merryn; Slark, Julia

    2017-04-01

    When faced with an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patient, prehospital and emergency resuscitation providers have to decide when to commence, continue, withhold or terminate resuscitation efforts. Such decisions may be made difficult by incomplete information, clinical, resourcing or scene challenges and ethical dilemmas. This systematic integrative review identifies all research papers examining resuscitation providers' perspectives on resuscitation decision-making for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients. A total of 14 studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria: nine quantitative, four qualitative and one mixed-methods design. Five themes were identified, describing factors informing resuscitation provider decision-making: the arrest event; patient characteristics; the resuscitation scene; resuscitation provider perspectives; and medicolegal concerns. Established prognostic factors are generally considered important, but there is a lack of resuscitation provider consensus on other factors, indicating that decision-making is influenced by the perspective of resuscitation providers themselves. Resuscitation decision-making research typically draws conclusions from evaluation of cardiac arrest registry data or clinical notes, but these may not capture all salient factors. Future research should explore resuscitation provider perspectives to better understand these important decisions and the clinical, ethical, emotional and cognitive demands placed on resuscitation providers.

  3. Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests and Outdoor Air Pollution Exposure in Copenhagen, Denmark

    Wichmann, Janine; Folke, Fredrik; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    -of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) and hourly and daily outdoor levels of PM(10), PM(2.5), coarse fraction of PM (PM(10-2.5)), ultrafine particle proxies, NO(x), NO(2), O(3) and CO in Copenhagen, Denmark, for the period 2000-2010. Susceptible groups by age and sex was also investigated. A case-crossover design...... was applied. None of the hourly lags of any of the pollutants were significantly associated with OHCA events. The strongest association with OHCA events was observed for the daily lag4 of PM(2.5), lag3 of PM(10), lag3 of PM(10-2.5), lag3 of NO(x) and lag4 of CO. An IQR increase of PM(2.5) and PM(10......) was associated with a significant increase of 4% (95% CI: 0%; 9%) and 5% (95% CI: 1%; 9%) in OHCA events with 3 days lag, respectively. None of the other daily lags or other pollutants was significantly associated with OHCA events. Adjustment for O(3) slightly increased the association between OHCA and PM(2...

  4. Eccentric apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy unmasked by multimodality imaging: an uncommon but missed cause of out of hospital cardiac arrest

    Towe, Eric; Sharma, Saurabh; Geske, Jeffrey; Ackerman, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    A woman in her late 50s experienced a witnessed, sudden out of hospital cardiac arrest. Initial workup included coronary angiography, transthoracic echocardiogram and a CT scan of the chest to rule out pulmonary embolus. She was subsequently discharged home without an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) or a life vest. On follow-up at another facility, an ICD was placed and a Holter monitor showed no ventricular ectopy. Further transthoracic echocardiographic images were obtained, which were suggestive of apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. A limited transthoracic echocardiogram with contrast was performed, which did not elucidate the hypertrophy. However, eccentric left ventricular apical wall hypertrophy was visualised by a coronary CT scan. PMID:26153133

  5. Recognition of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest during emergency calls - a systematic review of observational studies

    Viereck, Søren; Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Rothman, Josephine Philip

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The medical dispatcher plays an essential role as part of the first link in the Chain of Survival, by recognising the out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) during the emergency call, dispatching the appropriate first responder or emergency medical services response, performing...... in compliance with the PRISMA guidelines. We systematically searched MEDLINE, Embase and the Cochrane Library on 4 November 2015. Observational studies, reporting the proportion of clinically confirmed OHCAs that was recognised during the emergency call, were included. Two authors independently screened...

  6. Association of public health initiatives with outcomes for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest at home and in public locations

    Christopher B., Fordyce; Carolina M., Hansen; Kragholm, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    Importance  Little is known about the influence of comprehensive public health initiatives according to out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) location, particularly at home, where resuscitation efforts and outcomes have historically been poor.Objective  To describe temporal trends in bystander...... cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and first-responder defibrillation for OHCAs stratified by home vs public location and their association with survival and neurological outcomes.Design, Setting, and Participants  This observational study reviewed 8269 patients with OHCAs (5602 [67.7%] at home and 2667 [32.......3%] in public) for whom resuscitation was attempted using data from the Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival (CARES) from January 1, 2010, through December 31, 2014. The setting was 16 counties in North Carolina.Exposures  Patients were stratified by home vs public OHCA. Public health initiatives...

  7. Recognition of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest by medical dispatchers in emergency medical dispatch centres in two countries

    Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Andréll, Cecilia; Viereck, Søren

    2016-01-01

    in two steps; registry data were merged with electronically registered emergency call data from the emergency medical dispatch centres in the two regions. Cases with missing or non-OHCA dispatch codes were analysed further by auditing emergency call recordings using a uniform data collection template......INTRODUCTION: Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remains low. Early recognition by emergency medical dispatchers is essential for an effective chain of actions, leading to early cardiopulmonary resuscitation, use of an automated external defibrillator and rapid dispatching...... of the emergency medical services. AIM: To analyse and compare the accuracy of OHCA recognition by medical dispatchers in two countries. METHOD: An observational register-based study collecting data from national cardiac arrest registers in Denmark and Sweden during a six-month period in 2013. Data were analysed...

  8. Advanced life support therapy and on out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients: Applying signal processing and pattern recognition methods

    Trygve Eftestøl

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available In the US alone, several hundred thousands die of sudden cardiac arrests each year. Basic life support defined as chest compressions and ventilations and early defibrillation are the only factors proven to increase the survival of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, and are key elements in the chain of survival defined by the American Heart Association. The current cardiopulmonary resuscitation guidelines treat all patients the same, but studies show need for more individualiza- tion of treatment. This review will focus on ideas on how to strengthen the weak parts of the chain of survival including the ability to measure the effects of therapy, improve time efficiency, and optimize the sequence and quality of the various components of cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  9. Impact of in or out of office hours at admission time on outcome in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients.

    Genbrugge, Cornelia; Viaene, Els; Meex, Ingrid; De Vadder, Katrien; Eertmans, Ward; Boer, Willem; Jans, Frank; De Deyne, Cathy; Dens, Jo; Ferdinande, Bert

    2017-08-01

    In out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), neurological outcome is determined by the severity of neurological injury, early percutaneous coronary intervention, and application of neuroprotective temperature management. As this is a very time-intensive and manpower-intensive protocol, we hypothesized that there would be a difference in outcome between OHCA patients admitted during and out of office hours. We prospectively collected demographic data of OHCA patients in two hospitals. All patients included were treated at 33°C for 24 h, followed by a rewarming phase until 36.6°C. During office hours were defined as arriving between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. on weekdays. Neurological outcome at 180 days was assessed following the Cerebral Performance Category scale. Forty-seven (31%) patients were admitted during office hours and 105 (69%) out of office hours (P=0.199). Patients admitted during office hours were significantly older, respectively, 66±14 and 59±15 years (P=0.014). There was no significant difference between both groups in the number of patients who underwent coronary angiography, door to angiography time, and number of affected vessels. The median time spent in the target range of PaO2, PaCO2, and lactate was also not significantly different. We found no significant difference in survival until 180 days between both groups (P=0.599), even after adjustment for age (95% confidence interval: 0.44-1.90, hazard ratio: 0.912). Survival until 180 days between OHCA patients admitted during office hours or out of office hours was not significantly different in two hospitals with a fixed protocol for neuroprotection and 24/7 streamlined access to coronary angiography.

  10. Is the pre-hospital ECG after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest accurate for the diagnosis of ST-elevation myocardial infarction?

    Salam, Idrees; Hassager, Christian; Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current guidelines recommend that comatose out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients with ST-segment elevations (STEs) following return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) should be referred for an acute coronary angiography. We sought to investigate the diagnostic value of the pre......-hospital ROSC-ECG in predicting ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). METHOD: ROSC-ECGs of 145 comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, randomly assigned in the Target Temperature Management trial, were classified according to the current STEMI ECG criteria (third universal definition...... interval (CI) 62-84), specificity of 65% (95% CI 53-75) and a positive and negative predictive value of 65% (95% CI 54-76) and 73% (95% CI 61-83) in predicting STEMI. Time to ROSC was significantly longer (24 minutes vs. 19 minutes, P=0.02) in STE compared with no STE patients. Percutaneous coronary...

  11. Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is hampered by interruptions in chest compressions-A nationwide prospective feasibility study

    Krarup, Niels Henrik; Terkelsen, Christian Juhl; Johnsen, Søren Paaske

    2010-01-01

    Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a critical determinant of outcome following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The aim of our study was to evaluate the quality of CPR provided by emergency medical service providers (Basic Life Support (BLS) capability) and emergency medical service...... providers assisted by paramedics, nurse anesthetists or physician-manned ambulances (Advanced Life Support (ALS) capability) in a nationwide, unselected cohort of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest cases....

  12. Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is hampered by interruptions in chest compressions--a nationwide prospective feasibility study

    Krarup, Niels Henrik; Terkelsen, Christian Juhl; Johnsen, Søren Paaske

    2011-01-01

    Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a critical determinant of outcome following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The aim of our study was to evaluate the quality of CPR provided by emergency medical service providers (Basic Life Support (BLS) capability) and emergency medical service...... providers assisted by paramedics, nurse anesthetists or physician-manned ambulances (Advanced Life Support (ALS) capability) in a nationwide, unselected cohort of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest cases....

  13. Association of Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Survival According to Ambulance Response Times After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Rajan, Shahzleen; Wissenberg, Mads; Folke, Fredrik; Hansen, Steen Møller; Gerds, Thomas A; Kragholm, Kristian; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Karlsson, Lena; Lippert, Freddy K; Køber, Lars; Gislason, Gunnar H; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2016-12-20

    Bystander-initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) increases patient survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, but it is unknown to what degree bystander CPR remains positively associated with survival with increasing time to potential defibrillation. The main objective was to examine the association of bystander CPR with survival as time to advanced treatment increases. We studied 7623 out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients between 2005 and 2011, identified through the nationwide Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association between time from 911 call to emergency medical service arrival (response time) and survival according to whether bystander CPR was provided (yes or no). Reported are 30-day survival chances with 95% bootstrap confidence intervals. With increasing response times, adjusted 30-day survival chances decreased for both patients with bystander CPR and those without. However, the contrast between the survival chances of patients with versus without bystander CPR increased over time: within 5 minutes, 30-day survival was 14.5% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 12.8-16.4) versus 6.3% (95% CI: 5.1-7.6), corresponding to 2.3 times higher chances of survival associated with bystander CPR; within 10 minutes, 30-day survival chances were 6.7% (95% CI: 5.4-8.1) versus 2.2% (95% CI: 1.5-3.1), corresponding to 3.0 times higher chances of 30-day survival associated with bystander CPR. The contrast in 30-day survival became statistically insignificant when response time was >13 minutes (bystander CPR vs no bystander CPR: 3.7% [95% CI: 2.2-5.4] vs 1.5% [95% CI: 0.6-2.7]), but 30-day survival was still 2.5 times higher associated with bystander CPR. Based on the model and Danish out-of-hospital cardiac arrest statistics, an additional 233 patients could potentially be saved annually if response time was reduced from 10 to 5 minutes and 119 patients if response time was reduced from 7 (the median

  14. Effects of modifiable prehospital factors on survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in rural versus urban areas.

    Mathiesen, Wenche Torunn; Bjørshol, Conrad Arnfinn; Kvaløy, Jan Terje; Søreide, Eldar

    2018-04-18

    The modifiable prehospital system factors, bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), emergency medical services (EMS), response time, and EMS physician attendance, may affect short- and long-term survival for both rural and urban out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients. We studied how such factors influenced OHCA survival in a mixed urban/rural region with a high survival rate after OHCA. We analyzed the association between modifiable prehospital factors and survival to different stages of care in 1138 medical OHCA patients from an Utstein template-based cardiac arrest registry, using Kaplan-Meier type survival curves, univariable and multivariable logistic regression and mortality hazard plots. We found a significantly higher probability for survival to hospital admission (OR: 1.84, 95% CI 1.43-2.36, p rural group. In patients receiving bystander CPR before EMS arrival, the odds of survival to hospital discharge increased more than threefold (OR: 3.05, 95% CI 2.00-4.65, p rural areas, patients with EMS physician attendance had an overall better survival to hospital discharge (survival probability 0.17 with EMS physician vs. 0.05 without EMS physician, p = 0.019). Adjusted for modifiable factors, the survival differences remained. Overall, OHCA survival was higher in urban compared to rural areas, and the effect of bystander CPR, EMS response time and EMS physician attendance on survival differ between urban and rural areas. The effect of modifiable factors on survival was highest in the prehospital stage of care. In patients surviving to hospital admission, there was no significant difference in in-hospital mortality or in 1 year mortality between OHCA in rural versus urban areas.

  15. Similar long-term survival of consecutive in-hospital and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients treated with targeted temperature management

    Engsig, Magaly; Søholm, Helle; Folke, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The long-term survival of in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) patients treated with targeted temperature management (TTM) is poorly described. The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of consecutive IHCA with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients treated with TTM. DESIGN...... SETTING AND PATIENTS: Retrospectively collected data on all consecutive adult patients treated with TTM at a university tertiary heart center between 2005 and 2011 were analyzed. MEASUREMENTS: Primary endpoints were survival to hospital discharge and long-term survival. Secondary endpoint was neurological...... time to return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Survival to hospital discharge was 54% for OHCA and 53% for IHCA (adjusted odds ratio 0.98 [95% confidence interval {CI}; 0.43-2.24]). Age ≤60 years, bystander CPR, time to ROSC ≤10 min, and shockable rhythm at presentation were associated with survival...

  16. Post-hypothermia fever is associated with increased mortality after out-of-hospital cardiac arres

    Bro-Jeppesen, John; Hassager, Christian; Wanscher, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Post-cardiac arrest fever has been associated with adverse outcome before implementation of therapeutic hypothermia (TH), however the prognostic implications of post-hypothermia fever (PHF) in the era of modern post-resuscitation care including TH has not been thoroughly investigated. The aim...

  17. Systematic downloading and analysis of data from automated external defibrillators used in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Hansen, Marco Bo; Lippert, Freddy Knudsen; Rasmussen, Lars Simon; Nielsen, Anne Møller

    2014-12-01

    Valuable information can be retrieved from automated external defibrillators (AEDs) used in victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We describe our experience with systematic downloading of data from deployed AEDs. The primary aim was to compare the proportion of shockable rhythm from AEDs used by laypersons with the corresponding proportion recorded by the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) on arrival. In a 20-month study, we collected data on OHCAs in the Capital Region of Denmark where an AED was deployed prior to arrival of EMS. The AEDs were brought to the emergency medical dispatch centre for data downloading and rhythm analysis. Patient data were retrieved from the medical records from the admitting hospital, whereas data on EMS rhythm analyses were obtained from the Danish Cardiac Arrest Register between 2001 and 2010. A total of 121 AEDs were deployed, of which 91 cases were OHCAs with presumed cardiac origin. The prevalence of initial shockable rhythm was 55.0% (95% CI [44.7-64.8%]). This was significantly greater than the proportion recorded by the EMS (27.6%, 95% CI [27.0-28.3%], p<0.0001). Shockable arrests were significantly more likely to be witnessed (92% vs. 34%, p<0.0001) and the bystander CPR rate was higher (98% vs. 85%, p=0.04). More patients with initial shockable rhythm achieved return of spontaneous circulation upon hospital arrival (88% vs. 7%, p<0.0001) and had higher 30-day survival rate (72% vs. 5%, p<0.0001). AEDs used by laypersons revealed a higher proportion of shockable rhythms compared to the EMS rhythm analyses. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of initial lactate level on short-term survival in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    Tuba Sarıaydın, MD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study evaluated whether serum lactate levels (SLL at admission in patients with cardiac arrest (CA can predict successful return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC or short-term survival, especially within the first 24 h. Materials and methods: This prospective, observational study was conducted in the emergency department (ED of a training and research hospital from April 2015 through February 2016. It included all patients older than 18 years who presented to the ED during the study period with non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA. The study measured two outcomes: whether ROSC was achieved and whether short-term survival was achieved. ROSC was defined as the presence of spontaneous circulation for the first hour after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. Survival was defined as having survived for a minimum of 24 h after ROSC. Results: The study included 140 patients who were admitted to the ED with OHCA. ROSC was achieved in 55 patients (39.3%, and survival for 24 h following CA was achieved in 42 patients (30%. The mean SLL in the ROSC (+ and ROSC (- groups were 9.1 ± 3.2 mmol/L and 9.8 ± 2.9 mmol/L, respectively. The mean SLL in the survivor and non-survivor groups were 8.6 ± 2.9 mmol/L and 10 ± 3.1 mmol/L, respectively. These differences were not statistically significant (p = 0.1. A multivariate regression model assessing the factors that predicted both ROSC and 24-h survival showed the odds ratio (OR of initial SLL was 1.3 (95% CI: 1.05–1.6 and 1.1 (95% CI: 0.9–1.3, respectively. Conclusions: This study showed that in OHCA patients, SLL on admission was not associated with increased ROSC achievement or 24-h survival. Keywords: Cardiac arrest, Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA, Return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC, Serum lactate, Emergency department

  19. Antidepressant Use and Risk of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    Weeke, P; Jensen, Aksel Karl Georg; Folke, F

    2012-01-01

    being the most frequently used type of antidepressant (50.8%). Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs; odds ratio (OR) = 1.69, confidence interval (CI): 1.14-2.50) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs; OR = 1.21, CI: 1.00-1.47) were both associated with comparable increases in risk of OHCA.......17-12.2). An association between cardiac arrest and antidepressant use could be documented in both the SSRI and TCA classes of drugs....

  20. Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation for Refractory Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: The State of the Evidence and Framework for Application.

    Grunau, Brian; Hornby, Laura; Singal, Rohit K; Christenson, Jim; Ortega-Deballon, Ivan; Shemie, Sam D; Bashir, Jamil; Brooks, Steve C; Callaway, Clifton W; Guadagno, Elena; Nagpal, Dave

    2018-02-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) affects 134 per 100,000 citizens annually. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR), providing mechanical circulatory support, may improve the likelihood of survival among those with refractory OHCA. Compared with in-hospital ECPR candidates, those in the out-of-hospital setting tend to be sudden unexpected arrests in younger and healthier patients. The aims of this review were to summarize, and identify the limitations of, the evidence evaluating ECPR for OHCA, and to provide an approach for ECPR program application. Although there are many descriptions of ECPR-treated cohorts, we identified a paucity of robust data showing ECPR effectiveness compared with conventional resuscitation. However, it is highly likely that ECPR, provided after a prolonged attempt with conventional resuscitation, does benefit select patient populations compared with conventional resuscitation alone. Although reliable data showing the optimal patient selection criteria for ECPR are lacking, most implementations sought young previously healthy patients with rapid high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Carefully planned development of ECPR programs, in high-performing emergency medical systems at experienced extracorporeal membrane oxygenation centres, may be reasonable as part of systematic efforts to determine ECPR effectiveness and globally improve care. Protocol evaluation requires regional-level assessment, examining the incremental benefit of survival compared with standard care, while accounting for resource utilization. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Factors Promoting Survival After Prolonged Resuscitation Attempts: A Case of Survival With Good Neurological Outcome Following 60 Minutes of Downtime After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Bell, Douglas; Gluer, Robert; Murdoch, Dale

    2018-03-01

    Sudden cardiac arrest is a significant cause of death affecting approximately 25,000 people in Australia annually. We present an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) with prolonged down time and recurrent ventricular arrhythmias treated with extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation. The patient survived to hospital discharge with good neurological outcome. The patient's excellent outcome was a result of immediate good quality CPR, high level premorbid function, reversible cause of arrest and rapid access to an ECMO centre. Copyright © 2017 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Epinephrine in Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest: Helpful or Harmful?

    Huan Shao

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: The administration of adrenaline was associated with improved short-term survival (ROSC. However, it appears that the use of adrenaline is associated with no benefit on survival to hospital discharge or survival with favorable neurological outcome after OHCA, and it may have a harmful effect. Larger placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized control trials are required to definitively establish the effect of epinephrine.

  3. End-tidal carbon dioxide and defibrillation success in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Savastano, Simone; Baldi, Enrico; Raimondi, Maurizio; Palo, Alessandra; Belliato, Mirko; Cacciatore, Elisa; Corazza, Valentina; Molinari, Simone; Canevari, Fabrizio; Danza, Aurora I; De Ferrari, Gaetano M; Iotti, Giorgio Antonio; Visconti, Luigi Oltrona

    2017-12-01

    Basing on the relationship between the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and the responsiveness of VF to the defibrillation we aimed to assess whether the values of ETCO2 in the minute before defibrillation could predict the effectiveness of the shock. We retrospectively evaluated the reports generated by the manual monitor/defibrillator (Corpuls by GS Elektromedizinische Geräte G. Stemple GmbH, Germany) used for cases of VF cardiac arrest from January 2015 to December 2016. The mean ETCO2 value of the minute preceding the shock (METCO2 60 ) was computed. A blind evaluation of the effectiveness of each shock was provided by three cardiologists. A total amount of 207 shocks were delivered for 62 patients. When considering the three tertiles of METCO2 60 (T1:METCO2 60 ≤ 20mmHg; T2: 20mmHg 31mmHg) a statistically significant difference between the percentages of shock success was found (T1: 50%; T2: 63%; T3: 78%; Chi square p=0.003; p for trend CPR, monitored via ETCO2, and suggest ETCO2 monitoring as an additional weapon to guide defibrillation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Assessment of cardiopulmonary resuscitation practices in emergency departments for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims in Lebanon

    Samar Noureddine

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The survival rate of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA victims in Lebanon is low. A national policy on resuscitation practice is lacking. This survey explored the practices of emergency physicians related to the resuscitation of OHCA victims in Lebanon. Methods: A sample of 705 physicians working in emergency departments (EDs was recruited and surveyed using the LimeSurvey software (Carsten Schmitz, Germany. Seventy-five participants responded, yielding 10.64% response rate. Results: The most important factors in the participants' decision to initiate or continue resuscitation were presence of pulse on arrival (93.2%, underlying cardiac rhythm (93.1%, the physician's ethical duty to resuscitate (93.2%, transport time to the ED (89%, and down time (84.9%. The participants were optimistic regarding the survival of OHCA victims (58.1% reporting > 10% survival and reported frequent resuscitation attempts in medically futile situations. The most frequently reported challenges during resuscitation decisions were related to pressure or presence of victim's family (38.8% and lack of policy (30%. Conclusion: In our setting, physicians often rely on well-established criteria for initiating/continuing resuscitation; however, their decisions are also influenced by cultural factors such as victim's family wishes. The findings support the need for a national policy on resuscitation of OHCA victims.

  5. Adrenaline for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest resuscitation: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Lin, Steve; Callaway, Clifton W; Shah, Prakesh S; Wagner, Justin D; Beyene, Joseph; Ziegler, Carolyn P; Morrison, Laurie J

    2014-06-01

    The evidence for adrenaline in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) resuscitation is inconclusive. We systematically reviewed the efficacy of adrenaline for adult OHCA. We searched in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library from inception to July 2013 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating standard dose adrenaline (SDA) to placebo, high dose adrenaline (HDA), or vasopressin (alone or combination) in adult OHCA patients. Meta-analyses were performed using random effects modeling. Subgroup analyses were performed stratified by cardiac rhythm and by number of drug doses. The primary outcome was survival to discharge and the secondary outcomes were return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), survival to admission, and neurological outcome. Fourteen RCTs (n=12,246) met inclusion criteria: one compared SDA to placebo (n=534), six compared SDA to HDA (n=6174), six compared SDA to an adrenaline/vasopressin combination (n=5202), and one compared SDA to vasopressin alone (n=336). There was no survival to discharge or neurological outcome differences in any comparison group, including subgroup analyses. SDA showed improved ROSC (RR 2.80, 95%CI 1.78-4.41, padrenaline. There was no benefit of adrenaline in survival to discharge or neurological outcomes. There were improved rates of survival to admission and ROSC with SDA over placebo and HDA over SDA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in relation to sex: a nationwide registry-based study.

    Wissenberg, Mads; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Folke, Fredrik; Lippert, Freddy K; Weeke, Peter; Karlsson, Lena; Rajan, Shahzleen; Søndergaard, Kathrine Bach; Kragholm, Kristian; Christensen, Erika Frischknecht; Nielsen, Søren L; Køber, Lars; Gislason, Gunnar H; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2014-09-01

    Crude survival has increased following an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We aimed to study sex-related differences in patient characteristics and survival during a 10-year study period. Patients≥12 years old with OHCA of a presumed cardiac cause, and in whom resuscitation was attempted, were identified through the Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry 2001-2010. A total of 19,372 patients were included. One-third were female, with a median age of 75 years (IQR 65-83). Compared to females, males were five years younger; and less likely to have severe comorbidities, e.g., chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (12.8% vs. 16.5%); but more likely to have arrest outside of the home (29.4% vs. 18.7%), receive bystander CPR (32.9% vs. 25.9%), and have a shockable rhythm (32.6% vs. 17.2%), all p<0.001. Thirty-day crude survival increased in males (3.0% in 2001 to 12.9% in 2010); and in females (4.8% in 2001 to 6.7% in 2010), p<0.001. Multivariable logistic regression analyses adjusted for patient characteristics including comorbidities, showed no survival difference between sexes in patients with a non-shockable rhythm (OR 1.00; CI 0.72-1.40), while female sex was positively associated with survival in patients with a shockable rhythm (OR 1.31; CI 1.07-1.59). Analyses were rhythm-stratified due to interaction between sex and heart rhythm; there was no interaction between sex and calendar-year. Temporal increase in crude survival was more marked in males due to poorer prognostic characteristics in females with a lower proportion of shockable rhythm. In an adjusted model, female sex was positively associated with survival in patients with a shockable rhythm. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Analysis of bystander CPR quality during out-of-hospital cardiac arrest using data derived from automated external defibrillators.

    Fernando, Shannon M; Vaillancourt, Christian; Morrow, Stanley; Stiell, Ian G

    2018-07-01

    Little is known regarding the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) performed by bystanders in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We sought to determine quality of bystander CPR provided during OHCA using CPR quality data stored by Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs). We used the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium database to identify OHCA cases of presumed cardiac etiology where an AED was utilized. We then matched AED data to each case identified. AED data was analyzed using manufacturer software in order to determine overall measures of bystander CPR quality, changes in bystander CPR quality over time, and adherence to existing 2010 Resuscitation Quality Guidelines. 100 cases of OHCA of presumed cardiac etiology involving bystander CPR and with corresponding AED data. Mean age was 62.3 years, and 75% were male. Bystanders demonstrated high-quality CPR over all minutes of resuscitation, with a chest compression fraction of 76%, a compression depth of 5.3 cm, and a compression rate of 111.2 compressions/min. Mean perishock pause was 26.8 s. Adherence rates to 2010 Resuscitation Guidelines for compression rate and depth were found to be 66% and 55%, respectively. CPR quality was lowest in the first minute, resulting from increased delay to rhythm analysis (mean 40.7 s). In cases involving shock delivery, latency from initiation of AED to shock delivery was 59.2 s. We found that bystanders perform high-quality CPR, with strong adherence rates to existing Resuscitation Guidelines. High-quality CPR is maintained over the first five minutes of resuscitation, but was lowest in the first minute. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Neighborhood characteristics, bystander automated external defibrillator use, and patient outcomes in public out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Andersen, Lars W; Holmberg, Mathias J; Granfeldt, Asger; Løfgren, Bo; Vellano, Kimberly; McNally, Bryan F; Siegerink, Bob; Kurth, Tobias; Donnino, Michael W

    2018-05-01

    Automated external defibrillators (AEDs) can be used by bystanders to provide rapid defibrillation for patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Whether neighborhood characteristics are associated with AED use is unknown. Furthermore, the association between AED use and outcomes has not been well characterized for all (i.e. shockable and non-shockable) public OHCAs. We included public, non-911-responder witnessed OHCAs registered in the Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival (CARES) between 2013 and 2016. The primary patient outcome was survival to hospital discharge with a favorable functional outcome. We first assessed the association between neighborhood characteristics and bystander AED use using logistic regression and then assessed the association between bystander AED use and patient outcomes in a propensity score matched cohort. 25,182 OHCAs were included. Several neighborhood characteristics, including the proportion of people living alone, the proportion of white people, and the proportion with a high-school degree or higher, were associated with bystander AED use. 5132 OHCAs were included in the propensity score-matched cohort. Bystander AED use was associated with an increased risk of a favorable functional outcome (35% vs. 25%, risk difference: 9.7% [95% confidence interval: 7.2%, 12.2%], risk ratio: 1.38 [95% confidence interval: 1.27, 1.50]). This was driven by increased favorable functional outcomes with AED use in patients with shockable rhythms (58% vs. 39%) but not in patients with non-shockable rhythms (10% vs. 10%). Specific neighborhood characteristics were associated with bystander AED use in OHCA. Bystander AED use was associated with an increase in favorable functional outcome. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A low body temperature on arrival at hospital following out-of-hospital-cardiac-arrest is associated with increased mortality in the TTM-study

    Hovdenes, Jan; Røysland, Kjetil; Nielsen, Niklas

    2016-01-01

    categorized according to their recorded body temperature on arrival and also categorized to groups of patients being actively cooled or passively rewarmed. RESULTS: OHCA patients having a temperature ≤34.0°C on arrival at hospital had a significantly higher mortality compared to the OHCA patients...... with a higher temperature on arrival. A low body temperature on arrival was associated with a longer time to return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and duration of transport time to hospital. Patients who were actively cooled or passively rewarmed during the first 4h had similar mortality. In a multivariate......AIM: To investigate the association of temperature on arrival to hospital after out-of-hospital-cardiac arrest (OHCA) with the primary outcome of mortality, in the targeted temperature management (TTM) trial. METHODS: The TTM trial randomized 939 patients to TTM at 33 or 36°C for 24h. Patients were...

  10. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation versus conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation in adults with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a prospective observational study.

    Sakamoto, Tetsuya; Morimura, Naoto; Nagao, Ken; Asai, Yasufumi; Yokota, Hiroyuki; Nara, Satoshi; Hase, Mamoru; Tahara, Yoshio; Atsumi, Takahiro

    2014-06-01

    A favorable neurological outcome is likely to be achieved in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients with ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VF/VT) on the initial electrocardiogram (ECG). However, in patients without pre-hospital restoration of spontaneous circulation despite the initial VF/VT, the outcome is extremely low by conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Extracorporeal CPR (ECPR) may enhance cerebral blood flow and recovery of neurological function. We prospectively examined how ECPR for OHCA with VF/VT would affect neurological outcomes. The design of this trial was a prospective, observational study. We compared differences of outcome at 1 and 6 months after OHCA between ECPR group (26 hospitals) and non-ECPR group (20 hospitals). Primary endpoints were the rate of favorable outcomes defined by the Glasgow-Pittsburgh Cerebral Performance and Overall Performance Categories (CPC) 1 or 2 at 1 and 6 months after OHCA. Based on intention-to-treat analysis, CPC 1 or 2 were 12.3% (32/260) in the ECPR group and 1.5% (3/194) in the non-ECPR group at 1 month (P<0.0001), and 11.2% (29/260) and 2.6% (5/194) at 6 months (P=0.001), respectively. By per protocol analysis, CPC 1 or 2 were 13.7% (32/234) in the ECPR group and 1.9% (3/159) in the non-ECPR group at 1 month (P<0.0001), and 12.4% (29/234) and 3.1% (5/159) at 6 months (P=0.002), respectively. In OHCA patients with VF/VT on the initial ECG, a treatment bundle including ECPR, therapeutic hypothermia and IABP was associated with improved neurological outcome at 1 and 6 months after OHCA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Relationship Between Emergency Medical Services Response Time and Bystander Intervention in Patients With Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Goto, Yoshikazu; Funada, Akira; Goto, Yumiko

    2018-04-27

    The response time of emergency medical services (EMS) is an important determinant of survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We sought to identify upper limits of EMS response times and bystander interventions associated with neurologically intact survival. We analyzed the records of 553 426 patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in a Japanese registry between 2010 and 2014. The primary study end point was 1-month neurologically intact survival (Cerebral Performance Category scale 1 or 2). Increased EMS response time was associated with significantly decreased adjusted odds of 1-month neurologically intact survival (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] for each 1-minute increase, 0.89; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.89-0.90), although this relationship was modified by bystander interventions. The bystander interventions and the ranges of EMS response times that were associated with increased adjusted 1-month neurologically intact survival were as follows: bystander defibrillation, from ≤2 minutes (aOR, 3.10 [95% CI, 1.25-7.31]) to 13 minutes (aOR, 5.55 [95% CI, 2.66-11.2]); bystander conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation, from 3 minutes (aOR 1.48 [95% CI, 1.02-2.12]) to 11 minutes (aOR 2.41 [95% CI, 1.61-3.56]); and bystander chest-compression-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation, from ≤2 minutes (aOR 1.57 [95% CI, 1.01-2.25]) to 11 minutes (aOR 1.92 [95% CI, 1.45-2.56]). However, the increase in neurologically intact survival of those receiving bystander interventions became statistically insignificant compared with no bystander interventions when the EMS response time was outside these ranges. The upper limits of the EMS response times associated with improved 1-month neurologically intact survival were 13 minutes when bystanders provided defibrillation (typically with cardiopulmonary resuscitation) and 11 minutes when bystanders provided cardiopulmonary resuscitation without defibrillation. © 2018 The Authors. Published on behalf of the

  12. Regions of High Out-Of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Incidence and Low Bystander CPR Rates in Victoria, Australia.

    Straney, Lahn D; Bray, Janet E; Beck, Ben; Finn, Judith; Bernard, Stephen; Dyson, Kylie; Lijovic, Marijana; Smith, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remains a major public health issue and research has shown that large regional variation in outcomes exists. Of the interventions associated with survival, the provision of bystander CPR is one of the most important modifiable factors. The aim of this study is to identify census areas with high incidence of OHCA and low rates of bystander CPR in Victoria, Australia. We conducted an observational study using prospectively collected population-based OHCA data from the state of Victoria in Australia. Using ArcGIS (ArcMap 10.0), we linked the location of the arrest using the dispatch coordinates (longitude and latitude) to Victorian Local Government Areas (LGAs). We used Bayesian hierarchical models with random effects on each LGA to provide shrunken estimates of the rates of bystander CPR and the incidence rates. Over the study period there were 31,019 adult OHCA attended, of which 21,436 (69.1%) cases were of presumed cardiac etiology. Significant variation in the incidence of OHCA among LGAs was observed. There was a 3 fold difference in the incidence rate between the lowest and highest LGAs, ranging from 38.5 to 115.1 cases per 100,000 person-years. The overall rate of bystander CPR for bystander witnessed OHCAs was 62.4%, with the rate increasing from 56.4% in 2008-2010 to 68.6% in 2010-2013. There was a 25.1% absolute difference in bystander CPR rates between the highest and lowest LGAs. Significant regional variation in OHCA incidence and bystander CPR rates exists throughout Victoria. Regions with high incidence and low bystander CPR participation can be identified and would make suitable targets for interventions to improve CPR participation rates.

  13. Associations of day-to-day temperature change and diurnal temperature range with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito

    2017-01-01

    Background Although the impacts of temperature on mortality and morbidity have been documented, few studies have investigated whether day-to-day temperature change and diurnal temperature range (DTR) are independent risk factors for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Design This was a prospective, population-based, observational study. Methods We obtained all OHCA data from 2005-2013 from six major prefectures in Japan: Hokkaido, Tokyo, Kanagawa, Aichi, Kyoto, and Osaka. We used a quasi-Poisson regression analysis with a distributed-lag non-linear model to assess the associations of day-to-day temperature change and DTR with OHCA for each prefecture. Results In total, 271,698 OHCAs of presumed cardiac origin were reported during the study period. There was a significant increase in the risk of OHCA associated with cold temperature in five prefectures, with relative risks (RRs) ranging from 1.298 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.022-1.649) in Hokkaido to 3.893 (95% CI 1.713-8.845) in Kyoto. DTR was adversely associated with OHCA on hot days in Aichi (RR 1.158; 95% CI 1.028-1.304) and on cold days in Tokyo (RR 1.030; 95% CI 1.000-1.060), Kanagawa (RR 1.042; 95% CI 1.005-1.082), Kyoto (RR 1.060; 95% CI 1.001-1.122), and Osaka (RR 1.050; 95% CI 1.014-1.088), whereas there was no significant association between day-to-day temperature change and OHCA. Conclusion We found that associations between day-to-day temperature change and DTR and OHCA were generally small compared with the association with mean temperature. Our findings suggest that preventative measures for temperature-related OHCA may be more effective when focused on mean temperature and DTR.

  14. Within-summer variation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest due to extremely long sunshine duration.

    Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito

    2017-03-15

    Although several studies have reported the impacts of extremely high temperatures on cardiovascular diseases, no studies have examined whether variation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) due to extremely long sunshine duration changes during the summer. We obtained daily data on all cases of OHCA and weather variations for all 47 prefectures of Japan during the summer (June to September) between 2005 and 2014. A distributed lag non-linear model combined with a quasi-Poisson regression model was used to estimate within-summer variation in OHCA due to extremely long sunshine duration for each prefecture. Then, multivariate random-effects meta-analysis was performed to derive overall effect estimates of sunshine duration at the national level. A total of 166,496 OHCAs of presumed cardiac origin met the inclusion criteria. The minimum morbidity percentile (MMP) was the 0th percentile of sunshine duration at the national level. The overall cumulative relative risk (RR) at the 99th percentile vs. the MMP was 1.15 (95% CI: 1.05-1.27) during the summer. The effect of extremely long sunshine duration on OHCA in early summer was acute and did not persist, whereas an identical effect was observed in late summer, but it was delayed and lasted for several days. During summer periods, excessive sunshine duration could increase the risk of OHCA. Timely preventive measures to reduce the OHCA risk due to extremely long sunshine duration are important in early summer, whereas these measures could include a wider time window of several days to reduce the risk in late summer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cognitive function in survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest after target temperature management at 33°C versus 36°C

    Lilja, Gisela; Nielsen, Niklas; Friberg, Hans

    2015-01-01

    assessed with tests for memory (Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test), executive functions (Frontal Assessment Battery), and attention/mental speed (Symbol Digit Modalities Test). A control group of 119 matched patients hospitalized for acute ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction without cardiac arrest...... was more affected among cardiac arrest patients, but results for memory and executive functioning were similar. CONCLUSIONS: Cognitive function was comparable in survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest when a temperature of 33°C and 36°C was targeted. Cognitive impairment detected in cardiac arrest...... performed the same assessments. Half of the cardiac arrest survivors had cognitive impairment, which was mostly mild. Cognitive outcome did not differ (P>0.30) between the 2 temperature groups (33°C/36°C). Compared with control subjects with ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction, attention/mental speed...

  16. Association between bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and redeemed prescriptions for antidepressants and anxiolytics in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors

    Bundgaard, Kristian; Hansen, Steen M; Mortensen, Rikke Nørmark

    2017-01-01

    AIM: This study aimed to examine rates of redeemed prescriptions of antidepressants and anxiolytics, used as markers for cerebral dysfunction in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survivors, and examine the association between bystander CPR and these psychoactive drugs. METHODS: We included all....... Among survivors who received bystander CPR, prescriptions for antidepressants and anxiolytics were redeemed in 11.1% [95% CI 9.2-13.3%] and 6.3% [95% CI 4.9-8.0%] of the cases, respectively, versus 17.2% [95% CI 13.9-21.1%] and 13.4% [95% CI 10.5-17.0%], respectively, among patients who had not received...... bystander CPR. Adjusted for age, sex, year of arrest, comorbidity, witnessed status and socioeconomic status, bystander CPR was associated with significant reductions in redeemed prescriptions for antidepressants, Hazard Ratio (HR) 0.71 [95% CI 0.52-0.98], P=0.031; and anxiolytics, HR 0.55 [95% CI 0...

  17. Targeted Temperature Management for 48 vs 24 Hours and Neurologic Outcome After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    Kirkegaard, Hans; Søreide, Eldar; de Haas, Inge

    2017-01-01

    Importance: International resuscitation guidelines recommend targeted temperature management (TTM) at 33°C to 36°C in unconscious patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest for at least 24 hours, but the optimal duration of TTM is uncertain. Objective: To determine whether TTM at 33°C for 48....... Secondary outcomes included 6-month mortality, including time to death, the occurrence of adverse events, and intensive care unit resource use. Results: In 355 patients who were randomized (mean age, 60 years; 295 [83%] men), 351 (99%) completed the trial. Of these patients, 69% (120/175) in the 48-hour.......5%; 95% CI, -16.1% to 3.1%; RR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.59-1.11; P = .19). There was no significant difference in the time to mortality between the 48-hour group and the 24-hour group (hazard ratio, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.54-1.15; P = .22). Adverse events were more common in the 48-hour group (97%) than in the 24-hour...

  18. Forest Fire Smoke Exposures and Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests in Melbourne, Australia: A Case-Crossover Study.

    Dennekamp, Martine; Straney, Lahn D; Erbas, Bircan; Abramson, Michael J; Keywood, Melita; Smith, Karen; Sim, Malcolm R; Glass, Deborah C; Del Monaco, Anthony; Haikerwal, Anjali; Tonkin, Andrew M

    2015-10-01

    Millions of people can potentially be exposed to smoke from forest fires, making this an important public health problem in many countries. In this study we aimed to measure the association between out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and forest fire smoke exposures in a large city during a severe forest fire season, and estimate the number of excess OHCAs due to the fire smoke. We investigated the association between particulate matter (PM) and other air pollutants and OHCA using a case-crossover study of adults (≥ 35 years of age) in Melbourne, Australia. Conditional logistic regression models were used to derive estimates of the percent change in the rate of OHCA associated with an interquartile range (IQR) increase in exposure. From July 2006 through June 2007, OHCA data were collected from the Victorian Ambulance Cardiac Arrest Registry. Hourly air pollution concentrations and meteorological data were obtained from a central monitoring site. There were 2,046 OHCAs with presumed cardiac etiology during our study period. Among men during the fire season, greater increases in OHCA were observed with IQR increases in the 48-hr lagged PM with diameter ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5) (8.05%; 95% CI: 2.30, 14.13%; IQR = 6.1 μg/m(3)) or ≤ 10 μm (PM10) (11.1%; 95% CI: 1.55, 21.48%; IQR = 13.7 μg/m(3)) and carbon monoxide (35.7%; 95% CI: 8.98, 68.92%; IQR = 0.3 ppm). There was no significant association between the rate of OHCA and air pollutants among women. One hundred seventy-four "fire-hours" (i.e., hours in which Melbourne's air quality was affected by forest fire smoke) were identified during 12 days of the 2006/2007 fire season, and 23.9 (95% CI: 3.1, 40.2) excess OHCAs were estimated to occur due to elevations in PM2.5 during these fire-hours. This study found an association between exposure to forest fire smoke and an increase in the rate of OHCA. These findings have implications for public health messages to raise community awareness and for planning of emergency

  19. Hospital costs and revenue are similar for resuscitated out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and ST-segment acute myocardial infarction patients.

    Swor, Robert; Lucia, Victoria; McQueen, Kelly; Compton, Scott

    2010-06-01

    Care provided to patients who survive to hospital admission after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OOHCA) is sometimes viewed as expensive and a poor use of hospital resources. The objective was to describe financial parameters of care for patients resuscitated from OOHCA. This was a retrospective review of OOHCA patients admitted to one academic teaching hospital from January 2004 to October 2007. Demographic data, length of stay (LOS), and discharge disposition were obtained for all patients. Financial parameters of patient care including total cost, net revenue, and operating margin were calculated by hospital cost accounting and reported as median and interquartile range (IQR). Groups were dichotomized by survival to discharge for subgroup analysis. To provide a reference group for context, similar financial data were obtained for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients admitted during the same time period, reported with medians and IQRs. During the study period, there were 72 admitted OOCHA patients and 404 STEMI patients. OOCHA and STEMI groups were similar for age, sex, and insurance type. Overall, 27 (38.6%) OOHCA patients survived to hospital discharge. Median LOS for OOHCA patients was 4 days (IQR = 1-8 days), with most of those hospitalized for Financial parameters for OOHCA patients are similar to those of STEMI patients. Financial issues should not be a negative incentive to providing care for these patients. (c) 2010 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  20. Similar long-term survival of consecutive in-hospital and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients treated with targeted temperature management

    Engsig M

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Magaly Engsig,1 Helle Søholm,2 Fredrik Folke,3,4 Peter J Gadegaard,1 Julie Therese Wiis,5 Rune Molin,6 Thomas Mohr,1 Frederik N Engsig7 1Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hellerup, 2Department of Cardiology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev, 3Department of Cardiology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hellerup, 4Pre-Hospital Emergency Medical Services, Capital Region of Denmark, Ballerup, 5Department of Intensive Care, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, 6Department of Anaesthesiology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hillerød, 7Department of Infectious Diseases, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark Objective: The long-term survival of in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA patients treated with targeted temperature management (TTM is poorly described. The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of consecutive IHCA with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA patients treated with TTM. Design, setting, and patients: Retrospectively collected data on all consecutive adult patients treated with TTM at a university tertiary heart center between 2005 and 2011 were analyzed. Measurements: Primary endpoints were survival to hospital discharge and long-term survival. Secondary endpoint was neurological outcome assessed using the Pittsburgh cerebral performance category (CPC. Results: A total of 282 patients were included in this study; 233 (83% OHCA and 49 (17% IHCA. The IHCA group presented more often with asystole, received bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR in all cases, and had shorter time to return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC. Survival to hospital discharge was 54% for OHCA and 53% for IHCA (adjusted odds ratio 0.98 [95% confidence interval {CI}; 0.43–2.24]. Age ≤60 years, bystander CPR, time to ROSC ≤10 min, and shockable rhythm at presentation were associated with survival to hospital discharge. Good neurologic outcome among survivors was achieved by 86

  1. The effect of targeted temperature management on coagulation parameters and bleeding events after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of presumed cardiac cause

    Jacob, Marrit; Hassager, Christian; Bro-Jeppesen, John

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Targeted temperature management (TTM) is part of the standard treatment of comatose patients after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) to attenuate neurological injury. In other clinical settings, hypothermia promotes coagulopathy leading to an increase in bleeding and thrombosis tendency......, thrombelastography (TEG), bleeding, and stent thrombosis events. Platelet counts were lower in the TTM33-group compared to TTM36 (p=0.009), but neither standard coagulation nor TEG-parameters showed any difference between the groups. TEG revealed a normocoagulable state in the majority of patients, while...... approximately 20% of the population presented as hypercoagulable. Adverse events included 38 bleeding events, one stent thrombosis, and one reinfarction, with no significant difference between the groups. CONCLUSIONS: There was no evidence supporting the assumption that TTM at 33°C was associated with impaired...

  2. Effectiveness of dispatcher training in increasing bystander chest compression for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients in Japan.

    Tsunoyama, Taichiro; Nakahara, Shinji; Yoshida, Masafumi; Kitamura, Maki; Sakamoto, Tetsuya

    2017-10-01

    The Japanese government has developed a standardized training program for emergency call dispatchers to improve their skills in providing oral guidance on chest compression to bystanders who have witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs). This study evaluated the effects of such a training program for emergency call dispatchers in Japan. The analysis included all consecutive non-traumatic OHCA patients transported to hospital by eight emergency medical services, where the program was implemented as a pilot project. We compared the provision of oral guidance and the incidence of chest compression applications by bystanders in the 1-month period before and after the program. Data collection was undertaken from October 2014 to March 2015. The 532 non-traumatic OHCA cases were used for analysis: these included 249 cases before and 283 after the guidance intervention. Most patients were over 75 years old and were men. After the program, provision of oral guidance to callers slightly increased from 63% of cases to 69% ( P = 0.13) and implementation of chest compression on patients by bystanders significantly increased from 40% to 52% ( P = 0.01). Appropriate chest compression also increased from 34% to 47% ( P = 0.01). In analysis stratified by the provision of oral guidance, increased chest compressions were observed only under oral guidance. We found increased provision of oral guidance by dispatchers and increased appropriate chest compressions by bystanders after the training program for dispatchers had been rolled out. Long-term observation and further data analysis, including patient outcomes, are needed.

  3. Resuscitation and post resuscitation care of the very old after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is worthwhile.

    Winther-Jensen, Matilde; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Hassager, Christian; Bro-Jeppesen, John; Nielsen, Niklas; Lippert, Freddy K; Køber, Lars; Wanscher, Michael; Søholm, Helle

    2015-12-15

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is associated with a poor prognosis. As comorbidity and frailty increase with age; ethical dilemmas may arise when OHCA occur in the very old. We aimed to investigate mortality, neurological outcome and post resuscitation care in octogenarians (≥80) to assess whether resuscitation and post resuscitation care should be avoided. During 2007-2011 consecutive OHCA-patients were attended by the physician-based Emergency Medical Services-system in Copenhagen. Pre-hospital data based on Utstein-criteria, and data on post resuscitation care were collected. Primary outcome was successful resuscitation; secondary endpoints were 30-day mortality and neurological outcome (Cerebral Performance Category (CPC)). 2509 OHCA-patients with attempted resuscitation were recorded, 22% (n=558) were octogenarians/nonagenarians. 166 (30% of all octogenarians with resuscitation attempted) octogenarians were successfully resuscitated compared to 830 (43% with resuscitation attempted) patients <80 years. 30-day mortality in octogenarians was significantly higher after adjustment for prognostic factors (HR=1.61 CI: 1.22-2.13, p<0.001). Octogenarians received fewer coronary angiographies (CAG) (14 vs. 37%, p<0.001), and had lower odds of receiving CAG by multivariate logistic regression (OR: 0.19, CI: 0.08-0.44, p<0.001). A favorable neurological outcome (CPC 1/2) in survivors to discharge was found in 70% (n=26) of octogenarians compared to 86% (n=317, p=0.03) in the younger patients. OHCA in octogenarians was associated with a significantly higher mortality rate after adjustment for prognostic factors. However, the majority of octogenarian survivors were discharged with a favorable neurological outcome. Withholding resuscitation and post resuscitation care in octogenarians does not seem justified. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Direct transport to a PCI-capable hospital is associated with improved survival after adult out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of medical aetiology.

    McKenzie, Nicole; Williams, Teresa A; Ho, Kwok M; Inoue, Madoka; Bailey, Paul; Celenza, Antonio; Fatovich, Daniel; Jenkins, Ian; Finn, Judith

    2018-05-02

    To compare survival outcomes of adults with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) of medical aetiology directly transported to a percutaneous-coronary-intervention capable (PCI-capable) hospital (direct transport) with patients transferred to a PCI-capable hospital via another hospital without PCI services available (indirect transport) by emergency medical services (EMS). This retrospective cohort study used the St John Ambulance Western Australia OHCA Database and medical chart review. We included OHCA patients (≥18 years) admitted to any one of five PCI-capable hospitals in Perth between January 2012 and December 2015. Survival to hospital discharge (STHD) and survival up to 12-months after OHCA were compared between the direct and indirect transport groups using multivariable logistic and Cox-proportional hazards regression, respectively, while adjusting for so-called "Utstein variables" and other potential confounders. Of the 509 included patients, 404 (79.4%) were directly transported to a PCI-capable hospital and 105 (20.6%) transferred via another hospital to a PCI-capable hospital; 274/509 (53.8%) patients STHD and 253/509 (49.7%) survived to 12-months after OHCA. Direct transport patients were twice as likely to STHD (adjusted odds ratio 1.97, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13-3.43) than those transferred via another hospital. Indirect transport was also associated with a possible increased risk of death, up to 12-months, compared to direct transport (adjusted hazard ratio 1.36, 95% CI 1.00-1.84). Direct transport to a PCI-capable hospital for post-resuscitation care is associated with a survival advantage for adults with OHCA of medical aetiology. This has implications for EMS transport protocols for patients with OHCA. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. No Benefit in Neurologic Outcomes of Survivors of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest with Mechanical Compression Device.

    Newberry, Ryan; Redman, Ted; Ross, Elliot; Ely, Rachel; Saidler, Clayton; Arana, Allyson; Wampler, David; Miramontes, David

    2018-01-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a major cause of death and morbidity in the United States. Quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has proven to be a key factor in improving survival. The aim of our study was to investigate the outcomes of OHCA when mechanical CPR (LUCAS 2 Chest Compression System™) was utilized compared to conventional CPR. Although controlled trials have not demonstrated a survival benefit to the routine use of mechanical CPR devices, there continues to be an interest for their use in OHCA. We conducted a retrospective observational study of OHCA comparing the outcomes of mechanical and manual chest compressions in a fire department based EMS system serving a population of 1.4 million residents. Mechanical CPR devices were geographically distributed on 11 of 33 paramedic ambulances. Data were collected over a 36-month period and outcomes were dichotomized based on utilization of mechanical CPR. The primary outcome measure was survival to hospital discharge with a cerebral performance category (CPC) score of 1 or 2. This series had 3,469 OHCA reports, of which 2,999 had outcome data and met the inclusion criteria. Of these 2,236 received only manual CPR and 763 utilized a mechanical CPR device during the resuscitation. Return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) was attained in 44% (334/763) of the mechanical CPR resuscitations and in 46% (1,020/2,236) of the standard manual CPR resuscitations (p = 0.32). Survival to hospital discharge was observed in 7% (52/763) of the mechanical CPR resuscitations and 9% (191/2,236) of the manual CPR group (p = 0.13). Discharge with a CPC score of 1 or 2 was observed in 4% (29/763) of the mechanical CPR resuscitation group and 6% (129/2,236) of the manual CPR group (p = 0.036). In our study, use of the mechanical CPR device was associated with a poor neurologic outcome at hospital discharge. However, this difference was no longer evident after logistic regression adjusting for confounding variables

  6. The number of prehospital defibrillation shocks and 1-month survival in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Hasegawa, Manabu; Abe, Takeru; Nagata, Takashi; Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito

    2015-04-17

    The relationship between the number of pre-hospital defibrillation shocks and treatment outcome in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) presenting with ventricular fibrillation (VF) is unknown currently. We examined the association between the number of pre-hospitalization defibrillation shocks and 1-month survival in OHCA patients. We conducted a prospective observational study using national registry data obtained from patients with OHCA between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2012 in Japan. The study subjects were ≥ 18-110 years of age, had suffered from an OHCA before arrival of EMS personnel, had a witnessed collapse, had an initial rhythm that was shockable [VF/ventricular tachycardia (pulseless VT)], were not delivered a shock using a public automated external defibrillator (AED), received one or more shocks using a biphasic defibrillator by EMS personnel, and were transported to a medical institution between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2012. There were 20,851 OHCA cases which met the inclusion criteria during the study period. Signal detection analysis was used to identify the cutoff point in the number of prehospital defibrillation shocks most closely related to one-month survival. Variables related to the number of defibrillations or one-month survival in OHCA were identified using multiple logistic regression analysis. A cutoff point in the number of pre-hospital defibrillation shocks most closely associated with 1-month OHCA survival was between two and three (χ(2) = 209.61, p < 0.0001). Among those patients who received two shocks or less, 34.48% survived for at least 1 month, compared with 24.75% of those who received three shocks or more. The number of defibrillations (odds ratio [OR] = 1.19, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.38), OHCA origin (OR = 2.81, 95% CI: 2.26, 3.49), use of ALS devices (OR = 0.68, 95% CI: 0.59, 0.79), use of epinephrine (OR = 0.33, 95% C: 0.28, 0.39), interval between first defibrillation and first ROSC (OR = 1.45, 95

  7. Genetic, clinical and pharmacological determinants of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest : rationale and outline of the AmsteRdam Resuscitation Studies (ARREST) registry

    Blom, M T; van Hoeijen, D A; Bardai, A; Berdowski, J; Souverein, P C; De Bruin, M L; Koster, R W; de Boer, A; Tan, H L

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a major public health problem. Recognising the complexity of the underlying causes of OHCA in the community, we aimed to establish the clinical, pharmacological, environmental and genetic factors and their interactions that may cause OHCA.

  8. Early cardiopulmonary resuscitation and use of Automated External Defibrillators by laypersons in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest using an SMS alert service

    Scholten, Annemieke C.; van Manen, Jeanette Gabrielle; van der Worp, Wim E.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Doggen, Catharina Jacoba Maria

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate an SMS service (SMS = short message service = text message) with which laypersons are alerted to go to patients with suspected out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and perform early cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and use an Automated External Defibrillator (AED). This study is the

  9. Age-specific prognostication after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest - The ethical dilemma between 'life-sustaining treatment' and 'the right to die' in the elderly.

    Sulzgruber, Patrick; Sterz, Fritz; Poppe, Michael; Schober, Andreas; Lobmeyr, Elisabeth; Datler, Philip; Keferböck, Markus; Zeiner, Sebastian; Nürnberger, Alexander; Hubner, Pia; Stratil, Peter; Wallmueller, Christian; Weiser, Christoph; Warenits, Alexandra-Maria; van Tulder, Raphael; Zajicek, Andreas; Buchinger, Angelika; Testori, Christoph

    2017-03-01

    While prognostic values on survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest have been well investigated, less attention has been paid to their age-specific relevance. Therefore, we aimed to identify suitable age-specific early prognostication in elderly patients suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in order to reduce the burden of unnecessary treatment and harm. In a prospective population-based observational trial on individuals suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, a total of 2223 patients receiving resuscitation attempts by the local emergency medical service in Vienna, Austria, were enrolled. Patients were stratified according to age as follows: young and middle-aged individuals (85 years). There was an increasing rate of 30-day mortality (+21.8%, p 85-year-olds. Frailty was directly associated with mortality (HR 1.22, 95% CI 1.01-1.51, p = 0.049), showing a 30-day survival of 5.6% and a favourable neurological outcome of 1.1% among elderly individuals. An initially shockable electrocardiogram proved to be a suitable tool for risk assessment and decision making in order to predict a successful outcome in elderly victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. However, the outcomes of elderly patients seemed to be exceptionally poor in frail individuals and need to be considered in order to reduce unnecessary treatment decisions.

  10. Ventricular ectopic burden in comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest treated with targeted temperature management at 33°C and 36°C

    Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Graff, Claus

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Life threatening arrhythmias are increasingly frequent with lower body temperature. While targeted temperature management (TTM) with mild hypothermia following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is generally considered safe and has been suggested as a potential antiarrhythmic add-on t...

  11. A prospective, randomised and blinded comparison of first shock success of monophasic and biphasic waveforms in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    van Alem, Anouk P.; Chapman, Fred W.; Lank, Paula; Hart, Augustinus A. M.; Koster, Rudolph W.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Evidence suggests that biphasic waveforms are more effective than monophasic waveforms for defibrillation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), yet their performance has only been compared in un-blinded studies. Methods and results: We compared the success of biphasic truncated

  12. Apples to apples or apples to oranges? International variation in reporting of process and outcome of care for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    Nishiyama, Chika; Brown, Siobhan P.; May, Susanne; Iwami, Taku; Koster, Rudolph W.; Beesems, Stefanie G.; Kuisma, Markku; Salo, Ari; Jacobs, Ian; Finn, Judith; Sterz, Fritz; Nürnberger, Alexander; Smith, Karen; Morrison, Laurie; Olasveengen, Theresa M.; Callaway, Clifton W.; Shin, Sang Do; Gräsner, Jan-Thorsten; Daya, Mohamud; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming; Herlitz, Johan; Strömsöe, Anneli; Aufderheide, Tom P.; Masterson, Siobhán; Wang, Henry; Christenson, Jim; Stiell, Ian; Davis, Dan; Huszti, Ella; Nichol, Graham

    2014-01-01

    Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) varies between communities, due in part to variation in the methods of measurement. The Utstein template was disseminated to standardize comparisons of risk factors, quality of care, and outcomes in patients with OHCA. We sought to assess whether

  13. The influence of scenario-based training and real-time audiovisual feedback on out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality and survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Bobrow, Bentley J; Vadeboncoeur, Tyler F; Stolz, Uwe; Silver, Annemarie E; Tobin, John M; Crawford, Scott A; Mason, Terence K; Schirmer, Jerome; Smith, Gary A; Spaite, Daniel W

    2013-07-01

    We assess whether an initiative to optimize out-of-hospital provider cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) quality is associated with improved CPR quality and increased survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. This was a before-after study of consecutive adult out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Data were obtained from out-of-hospital forms and defibrillators. Phase 1 included 18 months with real-time audiovisual feedback disabled (October 2008 to March 2010). Phase 2 included 16 months (May 2010 to September 2011) after scenario-based training of 373 professional rescuers and real-time audiovisual feedback enabled. The effect of interventions on survival to hospital discharge was assessed with multivariable logistic regression. Multiple imputation of missing data was used to analyze the effect of interventions on CPR quality. Analysis included 484 out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients (phase 1 232; phase 2 252). Median age was 68 years (interquartile range 56-79); 66.5% were men. CPR quality measures improved significantly from phase 1 to phase 2: Mean chest compression rate decreased from 128 to 106 chest compressions per minute (difference -23 chest compressions; 95% confidence interval [CI] -26 to -19 chest compressions); mean chest compression depth increased from 1.78 to 2.15 inches (difference 0.38 inches; 95% CI 0.28 to 0.47 inches); median chest compression fraction increased from 66.2% to 83.7% (difference 17.6%; 95% CI 15.0% to 20.1%); median preshock pause decreased from 26.9 to 15.5 seconds (difference -11.4 seconds; 95% CI -15.7 to -7.2 seconds), and mean ventilation rate decreased from 11.7 to 9.5/minute (difference -2.2/minute; 95% CI -3.9 to -0.5/minute). All-rhythms survival increased from phase 1 to phase 2 (20/231, 8.7% versus 35/252, 13.9%; difference 5.2%; 95% CI -0.4% to 10.8%), with an adjusted odds ratio of 2.72 (95% CI 1.15 to 6.41), controlling for initial rhythm, witnessed arrest, age, minimally interrupted cardiac resuscitation

  14. Reduced in-hospital survival rates of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims with obstructive pulmonary disease

    Blom, M T; Warnier, M J; Bardai, A

    2013-01-01

    ) had comparable survival to ER (75% vs. 78%, OR 0.9 [95% CI: 0.6-1.3]) and to hospital admission (56% vs. 57%, OR 1.0 [0.7-1.4]). However, survival to hospital discharge was significantly lower among OPD patients (21% vs. 33%, OR 0.6 [0.4-0.9]). Multivariate regression analysis among patients who were...... with obstructive pulmonary disease (OPD) have a lower survival rate after OHCA than non-OPD patients. METHODS: We performed a community-based cohort study of 1172 patients with non-traumatic OHCA with ECG-documented VT/VF between 2005 and 2008. We compared survival to emergency room (ER), to hospital admission...... admitted to hospital (OPD: n=100, no OPD: n=561) revealed that OPD was an independent determinant of reduced 30-day survival rate (39% vs. 59%, adjusted OR 0.6 [0.4-1.0, p=0.035]). CONCLUSION: OPD-patients had lower survival rates after OHCA than non-OPD patients. Survival to ER and to hospital admission...

  15. Association between bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and redeemed prescriptions for antidepressants and anxiolytics in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors.

    Bundgaard, Kristian; Hansen, Steen M; Mortensen, Rikke Nørmark; Wissenberg, Mads; Hansen, Malta; Lippert, Freddy; Gislason, Gunnar; Køber, Lars; Nielsen, Jimmi; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Rasmussen, Bodil Steen; Kragholm, Kristian

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to examine rates of redeemed prescriptions of antidepressants and anxiolytics, used as markers for cerebral dysfunction in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survivors, and examine the association between bystander CPR and these psychoactive drugs. We included all 30-day survivors of OHCA in Denmark between 2001 and 2011, who had not redeemed prescriptions for antidepressants or anxiolytics in the last six months prior to OHCA. Main outcome measures were redeemed prescriptions of antidepressants and anxiolytics within one year after OHCA. Among 2,001 30-day survivors, 174 (8.6% died and 12.0% redeemed a first prescription for an antidepressant and 8.2% for an anxiolytic drug within one year after arrest. The corresponding frequencies for redeemed prescribed drugs among age- and sex-matched population controls were 7.5% and 5.2%, respectively. Among survivors who received bystander CPR, prescriptions for antidepressants and anxiolytics were redeemed in 11.1% [95% CI 9.2-13.3%] and 6.3% [95% CI 4.9-8.0%] of the cases, respectively, versus 17.2% [95% CI 13.9-21.1%] and 13.4% [95% CI 10.5-17.0%], respectively, among patients who had not received bystander CPR. Adjusted for age, sex, year of arrest, comorbidity, witnessed status and socioeconomic status, bystander CPR was associated with significant reductions in redeemed prescriptions for antidepressants, Hazard Ratio (HR) 0.71 [95% CI 0.52-0.98], P=0.031; and anxiolytics, HR 0.55 [95% CI 0.38-0.81], P=0.002. Relative to no bystander CPR, redeemed prescriptions for antidepressants and anxiolytics were significantly lower among 30-day survivors of OHCA who received bystander CPR, suggesting a cerebral dysfunction-lowering potential of bystander CPR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Barriers and facilitators to public access defibrillation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a systematic review.

    Smith, Christopher M; Lim Choi Keung, Sarah N; Khan, Mohammed O; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; Fothergill, Rachael; Hartley-Sharpe, Christopher; Wilson, Mark H; Perkins, Gavin D

    2017-10-01

    Public access defibrillation initiatives make automated external defibrillators available to the public. This facilitates earlier defibrillation of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims and could save many lives. It is currently only used for a minority of cases. The aim of this systematic review was to identify barriers and facilitators to public access defibrillation. A comprehensive literature review was undertaken defining formal search terms for a systematic review of the literature in March 2017. Studies were included if they considered reasons affecting the likelihood of public access defibrillation and presented original data. An electronic search strategy was devised searching MEDLINE and EMBASE, supplemented by bibliography and related-article searches. Given the low-quality and observational nature of the majority of articles, a narrative review was performed. Sixty-four articles were identified in the initial literature search. An additional four unique articles were identified from the electronic search strategies. The following themes were identified related to public access defibrillation: knowledge and awareness; willingness to use; acquisition and maintenance; availability and accessibility; training issues; registration and regulation; medicolegal issues; emergency medical services dispatch-assisted use of automated external defibrillators; automated external defibrillator-locator systems; demographic factors; other behavioural factors. In conclusion, several barriers and facilitators to public access defibrillation deployment were identified. However, the evidence is of very low quality and there is not enough information to inform changes in practice. This is an area in urgent need of further high-quality research if public access defibrillation is to be increased and more lives saved. PROSPERO registration number CRD42016035543. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions

  17. Daily FOUR score assessment provides accurate prognosis of long-term outcome in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Weiss, N; Venot, M; Verdonk, F; Chardon, A; Le Guennec, L; Llerena, M C; Raimbourg, Q; Taldir, G; Luque, Y; Fagon, J-Y; Guerot, E; Diehl, J-L

    2015-05-01

    The accurate prediction of outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is of major importance. The recently described Full Outline of UnResponsiveness (FOUR) is well adapted to mechanically ventilated patients and does not depend on verbal response. To evaluate the ability of FOUR assessed by intensivists to accurately predict outcome in OHCA. We prospectively identified patients admitted for OHCA with a Glasgow Coma Scale below 8. Neurological assessment was performed daily. Outcome was evaluated at 6 months using Glasgow-Pittsburgh Cerebral Performance Categories (GP-CPC). Eighty-five patients were included. At 6 months, 19 patients (22%) had a favorable outcome, GP-CPC 1-2, and 66 (78%) had an unfavorable outcome, GP-CPC 3-5. Compared to both brainstem responses at day 3 and evolution of Glasgow Coma Scale, evolution of FOUR score over the three first days was able to predict unfavorable outcome more precisely. Thus, absence of improvement or worsening from day 1 to day 3 of FOUR had 0.88 (0.79-0.97) specificity, 0.71 (0.66-0.76) sensitivity, 0.94 (0.84-1.00) PPV and 0.54 (0.49-0.59) NPV to predict unfavorable outcome. Similarly, the brainstem response of FOUR score at 0 evaluated at day 3 had 0.94 (0.89-0.99) specificity, 0.60 (0.50-0.70) sensitivity, 0.96 (0.92-1.00) PPV and 0.47 (0.37-0.57) NPV to predict unfavorable outcome. The absence of improvement or worsening from day 1 to day 3 of FOUR evaluated by intensivists provides an accurate prognosis of poor neurological outcome in OHCA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Antiarrhythmic Drugs for Nonshockable-Turned-Shockable Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: The ALPS Study (Amiodarone, Lidocaine, or Placebo).

    Kudenchuk, Peter J; Leroux, Brian G; Daya, Mohamud; Rea, Thomas; Vaillancourt, Christian; Morrison, Laurie J; Callaway, Clifton W; Christenson, James; Ornato, Joseph P; Dunford, James V; Wittwer, Lynn; Weisfeldt, Myron L; Aufderheide, Tom P; Vilke, Gary M; Idris, Ahamed H; Stiell, Ian G; Colella, M Riccardo; Kayea, Tami; Egan, Debra; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; Gray, Pamela; Gray, Randal; Straight, Ron; Dorian, Paul

    2017-11-28

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) commonly presents with nonshockable rhythms (asystole and pulseless electric activity). It is unknown whether antiarrhythmic drugs are safe and effective when nonshockable rhythms evolve to shockable rhythms (ventricular fibrillation/pulseless ventricular tachycardia [VF/VT]) during resuscitation. Adults with nontraumatic OHCA, vascular access, and VF/VT anytime after ≥1 shock(s) were prospectively randomized, double-blind, to receive amiodarone, lidocaine, or placebo by paramedics. Patients presenting with initial shock-refractory VF/VT were previously reported. The current study was a prespecified analysis in a separate cohort that initially presented with nonshockable OHCA and was randomized on subsequently developing shock-refractory VF/VT. The primary outcome was survival to hospital discharge. Secondary outcomes included discharge functional status and adverse drug-related effects. Of 37 889 patients with OHCA, 3026 with initial VF/VT and 1063 with initial nonshockable-turned-shockable rhythms were treatment-eligible, were randomized, and received their assigned drug. Baseline characteristics among patients with nonshockable-turned-shockable rhythms were balanced across treatment arms, except that recipients of a placebo included fewer men and were less likely to receive bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Active-drug recipients in this cohort required fewer shocks, supplemental doses of their assigned drug, and ancillary antiarrhythmic drugs than recipients of a placebo ( P discharge ( P =0.24). No significant interaction between treatment assignment and discharge survival occurred with the initiating OHCA rhythm (asystole, pulseless electric activity, or VF/VT). Survival in each of these categories was consistently higher with active drugs, although the trends were not statistically significant. Adjusted absolute differences (95% confidence interval) in survival from nonshockable-turned-shockable arrhythmias

  19. Effect of adrenaline on survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: A randomised double-blind placebo-controlled trial.

    Jacobs, Ian G; Finn, Judith C; Jelinek, George A; Oxer, Harry F; Thompson, Peter L

    2011-09-01

    There is little evidence from clinical trials that the use of adrenaline (epinephrine) in treating cardiac arrest improves survival, despite adrenaline being considered standard of care for many decades. The aim of our study was to determine the effect of adrenaline on patient survival to hospital discharge in out of hospital cardiac arrest. We conducted a double blind randomised placebo-controlled trial of adrenaline in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Identical study vials containing either adrenaline 1:1000 or placebo (sodium chloride 0.9%) were prepared. Patients were randomly allocated to receive 1 ml aliquots of the trial drug according to current advanced life support guidelines. Outcomes assessed included survival to hospital discharge (primary outcome), pre-hospital return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and neurological outcome (Cerebral Performance Category Score - CPC). A total of 4103 cardiac arrests were screened during the study period of which 601 underwent randomisation. Documentation was available for a total of 534 patients: 262 in the placebo group and 272 in the adrenaline group. Groups were well matched for baseline characteristics including age, gender and receiving bystander CPR. ROSC occurred in 22 (8.4%) of patients receiving placebo and 64 (23.5%) who received adrenaline (OR=3.4; 95% CI 2.0-5.6). Survival to hospital discharge occurred in 5 (1.9%) and 11 (4.0%) patients receiving placebo or adrenaline respectively (OR=2.2; 95% CI 0.7-6.3). All but two patients (both in the adrenaline group) had a CPC score of 1-2. Patients receiving adrenaline during cardiac arrest had no statistically significant improvement in the primary outcome of survival to hospital discharge although there was a significantly improved likelihood of achieving ROSC. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Association of prehospital advanced airway management with neurologic outcome and survival in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Hasegawa, Kohei; Hiraide, Atsushi; Chang, Yuchiao; Brown, David F M

    2013-01-16

    It is unclear whether advanced airway management such as endotracheal intubation or use of supraglottic airway devices in the prehospital setting improves outcomes following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) compared with conventional bag-valve-mask ventilation. To test the hypothesis that prehospital advanced airway management is associated with favorable outcome after adult OHCA. Prospective, nationwide, population-based study (All-Japan Utstein Registry) involving 649,654 consecutive adult patients in Japan who had an OHCA and in whom resuscitation was attempted by emergency responders with subsequent transport to medical institutions from January 2005 through December 2010. Favorable neurological outcome 1 month after an OHCA, defined as cerebral performance category 1 or 2. Of the eligible 649,359 patients with OHCA, 367,837 (57%) underwent bag-valve-mask ventilation and 281,522 (43%) advanced airway management, including 41,972 (6%) with endotracheal intubation and 239,550 (37%) with use of supraglottic airways. In the full cohort, the advanced airway group incurred a lower rate of favorable neurological outcome compared with the bag-valve-mask group (1.1% vs 2.9%; odds ratio [OR], 0.38; 95% CI, 0.36-0.39). In multivariable logistic regression, advanced airway management had an OR for favorable neurological outcome of 0.38 (95% CI, 0.37-0.40) after adjusting for age, sex, etiology of arrest, first documented rhythm, witnessed status, type of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation, use of public access automated external defibrillator, epinephrine administration, and time intervals. Similarly, the odds of neurologically favorable survival were significantly lower both for endotracheal intubation (adjusted OR, 0.41; 95% CI, 0.37-0.45) and for supraglottic airways (adjusted OR, 0.38; 95% CI, 0.36-0.40). In a propensity score-matched cohort (357,228 patients), the adjusted odds of neurologically favorable survival were significantly lower both for

  1. Evaluation of an impedance threshold device in patients receiving active compression-decompression cardiopulmonary resuscitation for out of hospital cardiac arrest.

    Plaisance, Patrick; Lurie, Keith G; Vicaut, Eric; Martin, Dominique; Gueugniaud, Pierre-Yves; Petit, Jean-Luc; Payen, Didier

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this multicentre clinical randomized controlled blinded prospective trial was to determine whether an inspiratory impedance threshold device (ITD), when used in combination with active compression-decompression (ACD) cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), would improve survival rates in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Patients were randomized to receive either a sham (n = 200) or an active impedance threshold device (n = 200) during advanced cardiac life support performed with active compression-decompression cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The primary endpoint of this study was 24 h survival. The 24 h survival rates were 44/200 (22%) with the sham valve and 64/200 (32%) with the active valve (P = 0.02). The number of patients who had a return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), intensive care unit (ICU) admission, and hospital discharge rates was 77 (39%), 57 (29%), and 8 (4%) in the sham valve group versus 96 (48%) (P = 0.05), 79 (40%) (P = 0.02), and 10 (5%) (P = 0.6) in the active valve group. Six out of ten survivors in the active valve group and 1/8 survivors in the sham group had normal neurological function at hospital discharge (P = 0.1). The use of an impedance valve in patients receiving active compression-decompression cardiopulmonary resuscitation for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest significantly improved 24 h survival rates.

  2. Target Temperature Management after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest--a randomized, parallel-group, assessor-blinded clinical trial--rationale and design

    Nielsen, Niklas; Wetterslev, Jørn; al-Subaie, Nawaf

    2012-01-01

    Experimental animal studies and previous randomized trials suggest an improvement in mortality and neurologic function with induced hypothermia after cardiac arrest. International guidelines advocate the use of a target temperature management of 32°C to 34°C for 12 to 24 hours after resuscitation...... from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. A systematic review indicates that the evidence for recommending this intervention is inconclusive, and the GRADE level of evidence is low. Previous trials were small, with high risk of bias, evaluated select populations, and did not treat hyperthermia...... in the control groups. The optimal target temperature management strategy is not known....

  3. Does Pre-hospital Endotracheal Intubation Improve Survival in Adults with Non-traumatic Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest? A Systematic Review

    Ling Tiah

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Endotracheal intubation (ETI is currently considered superior to supraglottic airway devices (SGA for survival and other outcomes among adults with non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA. We aimed to determine if the research supports this conclusion by conducting a systematic review. Methods: We searched the MEDLINE, Scopus and CINAHL databases for studies published between January 1, 1980, and 30 April 30, 2013, which compared pre-hospital use of ETI with SGA for outcomes of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC; survival to hospital admission; survival to hospital discharge; and favorable neurological or functional status. We selected studies using pre-specified criteria. Included studies were independently screened for quality using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. We did not pool results because of study variability. Study outcomes were extracted and results presented as summed odds ratios with 95% CI. Results: We identified five eligible studies: one quasi-randomized controlled trial and four cohort studies, involving 303,348 patients in total. Only three of the five studies reported a higher proportion of ROSC with ETI versus SGA with no difference reported in the remaining two. None found significant differences between ETI and SGA for survival to hospital admission or discharge. One study reported better functional status at discharge for ETI versus SGA. Two studies reported no significant difference for favorable neurological status between ETI and SGA. Conclusion: Current evidence does not conclusively support the superiority of ETI over SGA for multiple outcomes among adults with OHCA. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(7:-0.

  4. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrests during exercise among urban inhabitants in Japan: Insights from a population-based registry of Osaka City.

    Kiyohara, Kosuke; Sado, Junya; Matsuyama, Tasuku; Nishiyama, Chika; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Kiguchi, Takeyuki; Hayashida, Sumito; Kitamura, Yuri; Sobue, Tomotaka; Nakata, Ken; Iwami, Taku; Kitamura, Tetsuhisa

    2017-08-01

    The patient characteristics, pre-hospital interventions, and outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) occurring during exercise, have not been sufficiently investigated among the general population. OHCA data from 2009 to 2015 were obtained from the population-based OHCA registry in Osaka City, Japan. Patients who suffered OHCA, which occurred during exercise before the arrival of emergency medical service personnel, were included. The primary endpoint was one-month survival with a favourable neurological outcome after OHCA, defined using the Glasgow-Pittsburgh cerebral performance category scale 1 or 2. During the 7-year study period, 16,278 OHCAs were observed, and 52 (0.3%) occurred during exercise (male, n=41 [79%]; median age, 62 years). These incidents occurred mainly during running activities (n=14), followed by swimming (n=8), dance/social dance (n=6), tennis (n=4), and weight training (n=3). Within these exercise-related OHCAs, 47 (90%) were of cardiac origin, 45 (87%) were bystander-witnessed cardiac arrests, 49 (94%) received bystander-initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and 30 (57%) received public-access defibrillation (PAD). Overall, 56% (29/52) had one-month survival with a favourable neurological outcome after OHCA, which was significantly higher among OHCAs of cardiac origin with PAD (77%, 23/30) than among those of cardiac origin without PAD (35%, 6/17) and among those of non-cardiac origin (0%, 0/5) (pexercise represented a small subset of the overall OHCA burden, but occurred during a wide variety of exercise activities. Patients with OHCA of cardiac origin had a good prognosis, and PAD played an important role in improving patient outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Importance of the first link: description and recognition of an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in an emergency call.

    Berdowski, Jocelyn; Beekhuis, Freerk; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Tijssen, Jan G P; Koster, Rudolph W

    2009-04-21

    The content of emergency calls for suspected cardiac arrest is rarely analyzed. This study investigated the recognition of a cardiac arrest by dispatchers and its influence on survival rates. During 8 months, voice recordings of 14,800 consecutive emergency calls were collected to audit content and cardiac arrest recognition. The presence of cardiac arrest during the call was assessed from the ambulance crew report. Included calls were placed by laypersons on site and did not involve trauma. Prevalence of cardiac arrest was 3.0%. Of the 285 cardiac arrests, 82 (29%) were not recognized during the call, and 64 of 267 suspected calls (24%) were not cardiac arrest. We analyzed a random sample (n=506) of 9230 control calls. Three-month survival was 5% when a cardiac arrest was not recognized versus 14% when it was recognized (P=0.04). If the dispatcher did not recognize the cardiac arrest, the ambulance was dispatched a mean of 0.94 minute later (P<0.001) and arrived 1.40 minutes later on scene (P=0.01) compared with recognized calls. The main reason for not recognizing the cardiac arrest was not asking if the patient was breathing (42 of 82) and not asking to describe the type of breathing (16 of 82). Normal breathing was never mentioned in true cardiac arrest calls. A logistic regression model identified spontaneous trigger words like facial color that could contribute to cardiac arrest recognition (odds ratio, 7.8 to 9.7). Not recognizing a cardiac arrest during emergency calls decreases survival. Spontaneous words that the caller uses to describe the patient may aid in faster and better recognition of a cardiac arrest.

  6. Is Distance to the Nearest Registered Public Automated Defibrillator Associated with the Probability of Bystander Shock for Victims of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest?

    Neves Briard, Joel; de Montigny, Luc; Ross, Dave; de Champlain, François; Segal, Eli

    2018-04-01

    Introduction Rapid access to defibrillation is a key element in the management of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs). Public automated external defibrillators (PAEDs) are becoming increasingly available, but little information exists regarding the relation between the proximity to the arrest and their usage in urban areas. This study is a retrospective, observational, cross-sectional analysis of non-traumatic OHCA during a 24-month period in the greater Montreal area (Quebec, Canada). Using logistic regression, bystander shock odds are described with regards to distance from the OHCA scene to the nearest PAED, adjusted for prehospital care arrival delay and time of day, and stratifying for type of location. Out of a total of 2,443 OHCA victims identified, 77 (3%) received bystander PAED shock, 622 (26%) occurred out-of-home, and 743 (30%) occurred during business hours. When controlling for time (business hours versus other hours) and minimum response delay for prehospital care arrival, a marginal negative association was found between bystander shock and distance to the nearest PAED in logged meters (aOR=0.80; CI, 0.64-0.99) for out-of-home cardiac arrests. No significant association was found between distance and bystander shock for at-home arrests. Out-of-home victims had significantly higher odds of receiving bystander shock up to 175 meters of distance to a PAED inclusively (aOR=2.52; CI, 1.07-5.89). For out-of-home cardiac arrests, proximity to a PAED was associated with bystander shock in the greater Montreal area. Strategies aiming to increase accessibility and use of these life-saving devices could further expand this advantage by assisting bystanders in rapidly locating nearby PAEDs. Neves Briard J , de Montigny L , Ross D , de Champlain F , Segal E . Is distance to the nearest registered public automated defibrillator associated with the probability of bystander shock for victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest? Prehosp Disaster Med. 2018;33(2):153-159.

  7. Influence of mannan-binding lectin and MAp44 on outcome in comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    Bro-Jeppesen, John; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Thiel, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    as an endogenous inhibitor of MBL-mediated activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible association between MBL deficiency, MAp44 levels and outcome in comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Methods: In a single center post hoc analysis of the prospective multicenter...... assessed by Cerebral Performance Category (CPC1-2) and modified Rankin Scale (mRS0-3) 180 days after OHCA. Results: Patients with MBL deficiency (defined as plasma levels ≤100 ng ml-1 at baseline) (n = 22) carried a 30-day mortality of 41% compared to 32% in MBL sufficient patient (n = 147), p = 0...

  8. Target temperature management of 33°C and 36°C in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with initial non-shockable rhythm

    Frydland, Martin; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Erlinge, David

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Despite a lack of randomized trials in comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) with an initial non-shockable rhythm (NSR), guidelines recommend induced hypothermia to be considered in these patients. We assessed the effect on outcome of two levels of induced hypothermia...... in comatose patient resuscitated from NSR. METHODS: Hundred and seventy-eight patients out of 950 in the TTM trial with an initial NSR were randomly assigned to targeted temperature management at either 33°C (TTM33, n=96) or 36°C (TTM36, n=82). We assessed mortality, neurologic function (Cerebral Performance...... Score (CPC) and modified Rankin Scale (mRS)), and organ dysfunction (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score). RESULTS: Patients with NSR were older, had longer time to ROSC, less frequently had bystander CPR and had higher lactate levels at admission compared to patients with shockable rhythm...

  9. Hemodynamics and vasopressor support during targeted temperature management at 33°C Versus 36°C after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    Bro-Jeppesen, John; Annborn, Martin; Hassager, Christian

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the hemodynamic profile associated with different target temperatures and to assess the prognostic implication of inotropic/vasopressor support and mean arterial pressure after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. There is a lack of information how different target temperatures...... may affect hemodynamics. DESIGN: Post hoc analysis of a prospective randomized study. SETTING: Thirty-six ICUs in 10 countries. PATIENTS: Nine hundred twenty patients (97%) with available vasopressor data out of 950 patients from the Target Temperature Management trial randomly assigned patients...... to a targeted temperature management at 33 °C or 36 °C. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Mean arterial pressure, heart rate, and lactate were registered at prespecified time points. The population was stratified according to cardiovascular Sequential Organ Failure Assessment = 4 defining...

  10. Evaluation of pre-hospital administration of adrenaline (epinephrine) by emergency medical services for patients with out of hospital cardiac arrest in Japan: controlled propensity matched retrospective cohort study.

    Nakahara, Shinji; Tomio, Jun; Takahashi, Hideto; Ichikawa, Masao; Nishida, Masamichi; Morimura, Naoto; Sakamoto, Tetsuya

    2013-12-10

    To evaluate the effectiveness of pre-hospital adrenaline (epinephrine) administered by emergency medical services to patients with out of hospital cardiac arrest. Controlled propensity matched retrospective cohort study, in which pairs of patients with or without (control) adrenaline were created with a sequential risk set matching based on time dependent propensity score. Japan's nationwide registry database of patients with out of hospital cardiac arrest registered between January 2007 and December 2010. Among patients aged 15-94 with out of hospital cardiac arrest witnessed by a bystander, we created 1990 pairs of patients with and without adrenaline with an initial rhythm of ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VF/VT) and 9058 pairs among those with non-VF/VT. Overall and neurologically intact survival at one month or at discharge, whichever was earlier. After propensity matching, pre-hospital administration of adrenaline by emergency medical services was associated with a higher proportion of overall survival (17.0% v 13.4%; unadjusted odds ratio 1.34, 95% confidence interval 1.12 to 1.60) but not with neurologically intact survival (6.6% v 6.6%; 1.01, 0.78 to 1.30) among those with VF/VT; and higher proportions of overall survival (4.0% v 2.4%; odds ratio 1.72, 1.45 to 2.04) and neurologically intact survival (0.7% v 0.4%; 1.57, 1.04 to 2.37) among those with non-VF/VT. Pre-hospital administration of adrenaline by emergency medical services improves the long term outcome in patients with out of hospital cardiac arrest, although the absolute increase of neurologically intact survival was minimal.

  11. Locating Automated External Defibrillators in a Complicated Urban Environment Considering a Pedestrian-Accessible Network that Focuses on Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests

    Pil Kwon

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Automated external defibrillators (AEDs are portable devices that defibrillate and diagnose sudden-cardiac-arrest patients. Therefore, AEDs are widely installed in public places such as airports, schools, sport complexes, etc., and the installation of AEDs is required by law in these places. However, despite their usefulness, AEDs are mostly installed indoors with limited coverage outdoors. Hence, this study conducts research in the placement of AEDs in outdoor locations. This study considers a complicated urban environment using a pedestrian network dataset and network barriers. We draw on the Teitz and Bart’s (1968 heuristic method that was built in the location-allocation solver in ArcMap. The results of this study found that a total of 455 AEDs, including 227 pre-installed AEDs, could be placed in the study area, thus providing an additional 228 devices. Compared with 10 different installation methods that were set as experimental groups, our test results found that additional installations were able to cover 10% to 30% more actual out-of-hospital cardiac-arrest cases. The main contribution of this study is the proposal of a new method in locating AEDs in optimal areas while considering complicated urban environments. We predict that the cardiac-arrest-related mortality rate would be reduced through implementing the findings of this study.

  12. No fate but what we make: a case of full recovery after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Miranda, Mafalda; Sousa, Pedro J; Ferreira, Jorge; Andrade, Maria J; Gonçalves, Pedro A; Romão, Cristina

    2009-12-11

    An 80 years old man suffered a cardiac arrest shortly after arrival to his local health department. Basic Life Support was started promptly and nine minutes later, on evaluation by an Advanced Life Support team, the victim was defibrillated with a 200J shock. When orotracheal intubation was attempted, masseter muscle contraction was noticed: on reevaluation, the victim had pulse and spontaneous breathing.Thirty minutes later, the patient had been transferred to an emergency department. As he complained of chest pain, the ECG showed a ST segment depression in leads V4 to V6 and laboratory tests showed cardiac troponine I slightly elevated. A coronary angiography was performed urgently: significant left main plus three vessel coronary artery disease was disclosed.Eighteen hours after the cardiac arrest, a quadruple coronary artery bypass grafting operation was undertaken. During surgery, a fresh thrombus was removed from the middle left anterior descendent artery. Post-operative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged seven days after the procedure. Twenty four months later, he remains asymptomatic.In this case, the immediate call for the Advanced Life Support team, prompt basic life support and the successful defibrillation, altogether, contributed for the full recovery. Furthermore, the swiftness in the detection and treatment of the acute reversible cause (myocardial ischemia in this case) was crucial for long-term prognosis.

  13. Association of National Initiatives to Improve Cardiac Arrest Management With Rates of Bystander Intervention and Patient Survival After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    Wissenberg, Mads; Lippert, Freddy K; Folke, Fredrik

    2013-01-01

    resuscitation was attempted were identified between 2001 and 2010 in the nationwide Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry. Of 29 111 patients with cardiac arrest, we excluded those with presumed noncardiac cause of arrest (n = 7390) and those with cardiac arrests witnessed by emergency medical services personnel (n...

  14. Detailed statistical analysis plan for the target temperature management after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest trial

    Nielsen, Niklas; Winkel, Per; Cronberg, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Animal experimental studies and previous randomized trials suggest an improvement in mortality and neurological function with temperature regulation to hypothermia after cardiac arrest. According to a systematic review, previous trials were small, had a risk of bias, evaluated select populations......, and did not treat hyperthermia in the control groups. The optimal target temperature management (TTM) strategy is not known. To prevent outcome reporting bias, selective reporting and data-driven results, we present the a priori defined detailed statistical analysis plan as an update to the previously...

  15. A comparison of the universal TOR Guideline to the absence of prehospital ROSC and duration of resuscitation in predicting futility from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Drennan, Ian R; Case, Erin; Verbeek, P Richard; Reynolds, Joshua C; Goldberger, Zachary D; Jasti, Jamie; Charleston, Mark; Herren, Heather; Idris, Ahamed H; Leslie, Paul R; Austin, Michael A; Xiong, Yan; Schmicker, Robert H; Morrison, Laurie J

    2017-02-01

    The Universal Termination of Resuscitation (TOR) Guideline accurately identifies potential out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survivors. However, implementation is inconsistent with some Emergency Medical Service (EMS) agencies using absence of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) as sole criterion for termination. To compare the performance of the Universal TOR Guideline with the single criterion of no prehospital ROSC. Second, to determine factors associated with survival for patients transported without a ROSC. Lastly, to compare the impact of time to ROSC as a marker of futility to the Universal TOR Guideline. Retrospective, observational cohort study. Non-traumatic, adult (≥18 years) OHCA patients of presumed cardiac etiology treated by EMS providers. ROC-PRIMED and ROC-Epistry post ROC-PRIMED databases between 2007 and 2011. Primary outcome was survival to hospital discharge and the secondary outcome was functional survival. We used multivariable regression to evaluate factors associated with survival in patients transported without a ROSC. 36,543 treated OHCAs occurred of which 9467 (26%) were transported to hospital without a ROSC. Patients transported without a ROSC who met the Universal TOR Guideline for transport had a survival of 3.0% (95% CI 2.5-3.4%) compared to 0.7% (95% CI 0.4-0.9%) in patients who met the Universal TOR Guideline for termination. The Universal TOR Guideline identified 99% of survivors requiring continued resuscitation and transportation to hospital including early identification of survivors who sustained a ROSC after extended durations of CPR. Using absence of ROSC as a sole predictor of futility misses potential survivors. The Universal TOR Guideline remains a strong predictor of survival. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Myocardial infarction is a frequent cause of exercise-related resuscitated out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in a general non-athletic population.

    Søholm, Helle; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig; Bro-Jeppesen, John; Lippert, Freddy K; Køber, Lars; Wanscher, Michael; Hassager, Christian

    2014-11-01

    Performing exercise is shown to prevent cardiovascular disease, but the risk of an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is temporarily increased during strenuous activity. We examined the etiology and outcome after successfully resuscitated OHCA during exercise in a general non-athletic population. Consecutive patients with OHCA were admitted with return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) or on-going resuscitation at hospital arrival (2002-2011). Patient charts were reviewed for post-resuscitation data. Exercise was defined as moderate/vigorous physical activity. A total of 1393 OHCA-patients were included with 91(7%) arrests occurring during exercise. Exercise-related OHCA-patients were younger (60 ± 13 vs. 65 ± 15, p<0.001) and predominantly male (96% vs. 69%, p<0.001). The arrest was more frequently witnessed (94% vs. 86%, p=0.02), bystander CPR was more often performed (88% vs. 54%, p<0.001), time to ROSC was shorter (12 min (IQR: 5-19) vs. 15 (9-22), p=0.007) and the primary rhythm was more frequently shock-able (91% vs. 49%, p<0.001) compared to non-exercise patients. Cardiac etiology was the predominant cause of OHCA in both exercise and non-exercise patients (97% vs. 80%, p<0.001) and acute coronary syndrome was more frequent among exercise patients (59% vs. 38%, p<0.001). One-year mortality was 25% vs. 65% (p<0.001), and exercise was even after adjustment associated with a significantly lower mortality (HR=0.40 (95%CI: 0.23-0.72), p=0.002). OHCA occurring during exercise was associated with a significantly lower mortality in successfully resuscitated patients even after adjusting for confounding factors. Acute coronary syndrome was more common among exercise-related cardiac arrest patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Prehospital randomised assessment of a mechanical compression device in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (PARAMEDIC): a pragmatic, cluster randomised trial and economic evaluation.

    Gates, Simon; Lall, Ranjit; Quinn, Tom; Deakin, Charles D; Cooke, Matthew W; Horton, Jessica; Lamb, Sarah E; Slowther, Anne-Marie; Woollard, Malcolm; Carson, Andy; Smyth, Mike; Wilson, Kate; Parcell, Garry; Rosser, Andrew; Whitfield, Richard; Williams, Amanda; Jones, Rebecca; Pocock, Helen; Brock, Nicola; Black, John Jm; Wright, John; Han, Kyee; Shaw, Gary; Blair, Laura; Marti, Joachim; Hulme, Claire; McCabe, Christopher; Nikolova, Silviya; Ferreira, Zenia; Perkins, Gavin D

    2017-03-01

    Mechanical chest compression devices may help to maintain high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), but little evidence exists for their effectiveness. We evaluated whether or not the introduction of Lund University Cardiopulmonary Assistance System-2 (LUCAS-2; Jolife AB, Lund, Sweden) mechanical CPR into front-line emergency response vehicles would improve survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Evaluation of the LUCAS-2 device as a routine ambulance service treatment for OHCA. Pragmatic, cluster randomised trial including adults with non-traumatic OHCA. Ambulance dispatch staff and those collecting the primary outcome were blind to treatment allocation. Blinding of the ambulance staff who delivered the interventions and reported initial response to treatment was not possible. We also conducted a health economic evaluation and a systematic review of all trials of out-of-hospital mechanical chest compression. Four UK ambulance services (West Midlands, North East England, Wales and South Central), comprising 91 urban and semiurban ambulance stations. Clusters were ambulance service vehicles, which were randomly assigned (approximately 1 : 2) to the LUCAS-2 device or manual CPR. Patients were included if they were in cardiac arrest in the out-of-hospital environment. Exclusions were patients with cardiac arrest as a result of trauma, with known or clinically apparent pregnancy, or aged CPR groups [193/2819, 6.8%; adjusted odds ratio (OR) 0.86, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.64 to 1.15]. Survival with a CPC score of 1 or 2 may have been worse in the LUCAS-2 group (adjusted OR 0.72, 95% CI 0.52 to 0.99). No serious adverse events were noted. The systematic review found no evidence of a survival advantage if mechanical chest compression was used. The health economic analysis showed that LUCAS-2 was dominated by manual chest compression. There was substantial non-compliance in the LUCAS-2 arm. For 272 out of 1652 patients (16.5%), mechanical

  18. Prognostic value of electroencephalography (EEG) after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in successfully resuscitated patients used in daily clinical practice

    Søholm, Helle; Kjær, Troels Wesenberg; Kjaergaard, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    background frequency, and PD, suppressed voltage or burst-suppression) was associated with higher mortality (HR=1.62(1.09-2.41), p=0.02) after adjustment for known prognostic factors (false positive rate: 9%). CONCLUSION: EEG may be useful in work-up in prognostication of patients with OHCA. Findings......BACKGROUND: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is associated with a poor prognosis and predicting outcome is complex with neurophysiological testing and repeated clinical neurological examinations as key components of the assessment. In this study we examine the association between different...... were used. EEG reports were analysed according to the 2012 American Clinical Neurophysiology Society's guidelines. RESULTS: A total of 1076 patients were included, and EEG was performed in 20% (n=219) with a median of 3(IQR 2-4) days after OHCA. Rhythmic Delta Activity (RDA) was found in 71 patients...

  19. The Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Analog Exenatide Increases Blood Glucose Clearance, Lactate Clearance, and Heart Rate in Comatose Patients After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    Wiberg, Sebastian; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Schmidt, Henrik

    2018-01-01

    the first 6 hours from study drug initiation: lactate level, blood glucose level, heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and combined dosage of norepinephrine and dopamine. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: The population consisted of 106 patients receiving either exenatide or placebo. During the first 6 hours...... from study drug initiation, the levels of blood glucose and lactate decreased 17% (95% CI, 8.9-25%; p = 0.0004) and 21% (95% CI, 6.0-33%; p = 0.02) faster in patients receiving exenatide versus placebo, respectively. Exenatide increased heart rate by approximately 10 beats per minute compared......OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effects of the glucagon-like peptide-1 analog exenatide on blood glucose, lactate clearance, and hemodynamic variables in comatose, resuscitated out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients. DESIGN: Predefined post hoc analyzes from a double-blind, randomized clinical...

  20. Diurnal variations in incidence and outcome of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest including prior comorbidity and pharmacotherapy: a nationwide study in Denmark.

    Karlsson, Lena I M; Wissenberg, Mads; Fosbøl, Emil L; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Lippert, Freddy K; Bagai, Akshay; McNally, Bryan; Granger, Christopher B; Christensen, Erika Frischknecht; Folke, Fredrik; Rajan, Shahzleen; Weeke, Peter; Nielsen, Søren L; Køber, Lars; Gislason, Gunnar H; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2014-09-01

    To investigate diurnal variations in incidence and outcomes following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). OHCA of presumed cardiac etiology were identified through the nationwide Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry (2001-2010). Time of day was divided into three time periods: daytime 07.00-14.59; evening 15.00-22.59; and nighttime 23.00-06.59. We identified 18,929 OHCA patients, aged ≥18 years. The median age was 72 years (IQR 62-80) and the majority were male (67.5%). OHCA occurrence varied across time periods, with 43.9%, 35.7% and 20.6% occurring during daytime, evening and nighttime, respectively. Nighttime patients were more likely to have: severe comorbidity (i.e. COPD), arrest in private home (87.2% vs. 69.0% and 73.0% daytime and evening, respectively), non-witnessed arrest (51.2% vs. 48.4% and 43.7%), no bystander CPR (75.9% vs. 68.4% and 66.1%), longer time interval from recognition of OHCA to rhythm analysis (12 min vs. 11 min and 11 min), and non-shockable heart rhythm (80.1% vs. 70.3% and 69.4%), all p<0.0001. Nighttime patients were less likely to achieve return of spontaneous circulation on arrival at the hospital (7.5% vs. 14.8% and 15.1%) and 1-year survival (2.8% vs. 7.2% and 7.1%), p<0.0001. Overall, the lower 1-year survival rate persisted after adjusting for patient-related and cardiac-arrest related characteristics mentioned above (OR 0.47, 95%CI 0.37-0.59; OR 0.51, 95%CI 0.40-0.65, compared to daytime and evening, respectively). We found nighttime patients to have a lower survival compared to daytime and evening that persisted when adjusting for patient-related and cardiac-arrest related characteristics including comorbidities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The addition of voice prompts to audiovisual feedback and debriefing does not modify CPR quality or outcomes in out of hospital cardiac arrest--a prospective, randomized trial.

    Bohn, Andreas; Weber, Thomas P; Wecker, Sascha; Harding, Ulf; Osada, Nani; Van Aken, Hugo; Lukas, Roman P

    2011-03-01

    Chest compression quality is a determinant of survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). ERC 2005 guidelines recommend the use of technical devices to support rescuers giving compressions. This prospective randomized study reviewed influence of different feedback configurations on survival and compression quality. 312 patients suffering an OHCA were randomly allocated to two different feedback configurations. In the limited feedback group a metronome and visual feedback was used. In the extended feedback group voice prompts were added. A training program was completed prior to implementation, performance debriefing was conducted throughout the study. Survival did not differ between the extended and limited feedback groups (47.8% vs 43.9%, p = 0.49). Average compression depth (mean ± SD: 4.74 ± 0.86 cm vs 4.84 ± 0.93 cm, p = 0.31) was similar in both groups. There were no differences in compression rate (103 ± 7 vs 102 ± 5 min(-1), p=0.74) or hands-off fraction (16.16% ± 0.07 to 17.04% ± 0.07, p = 0.38). Bystander CPR, public arrest location, presenting rhythm and chest compression depth were predictors of short term survival (ROSC to ED). Even limited CPR-feedback combined with training and ongoing debriefing leads to high chest compression quality. Bystander CPR, location, rhythm and chest compression depth are determinants of survival from out of hospital cardiac arrest. Addition of voice prompts does neither modify CPR quality nor outcome in OHCA. CC depth significantly influences survival and therefore more focus should be put on correct delivery. Further studies are needed to examine the best configuration of feedback to improve CPR quality and survival. ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00449969), http://www.clinicalTrials.gov. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effectiveness of mechanical chest compression for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients in an emergency department

    Ching-Kuo Lin

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: No difference was found in early survival between standard CPR performed with MeCC and that performed with MaCC. However, the use of the MeCC device appears to promote staff availability without waiving patient care in the human power-demanding emergency departments of Taiwan hospitals.

  3. The combined use of mechanical CPR and a carry sheet to maintain quality resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients during extrication and transport.

    Lyon, Richard M; Crawford, Anna; Crookston, Colin; Short, Steven; Clegg, Gareth R

    2015-08-01

    Quality of manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) during extrication and transport of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims is known to be poor. Performing manual CPR during ambulance transport poses significant risk to the attending emergency medical services crew. We sought to use pre-hospital video recording to objectively analyse the impact of introducing mechanical CPR with an extrication sheet (Autopulse, Zoll) to an advanced, second-tier cardiac arrest response team. The study was conducted prospectively using defibrillator downloads and analysis of pre-hospital video recording to measure the quality of CPR during extrication from scene and ambulance transport of the OHCA patient. Adult patients with non-traumatic OHCA were included. The interruption to manual CPR to during extrication and to deploy the mechanical CPR device was analysed. In the manual CPR group, 53 OHCA cases were analysed for quality of CPR during extrication. The median time that chest compression was interrupted to allow the patient to be carried from scene to the ambulance was 270 s (IQR 201-387 s). 119 mechanical CPR cases were analysed. The median time interruption from last manual compression to first Autopulse compression was 39 s (IQR 29-47 s). The range from last manual compression to first Autopulse compression was 14-118 s. Mechanical CPR used in combination with an extrication sheet can be effectively used to improve the quality of resuscitation during extrication and ambulance transport of the refractory OHCA patient. The time interval to deploy the mechanical CPR device can be shortened with regular simulation training. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Distance to invasive heart centre, performance of acute coronary angiography, and angioplasty and associated outcome in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a nationwide study.

    Tranberg, Tinne; Lippert, Freddy K; Christensen, Erika F; Stengaard, Carsten; Hjort, Jakob; Lassen, Jens Flensted; Petersen, Frants; Jensen, Jan Skov; Bäck, Caroline; Jensen, Lisette Okkels; Ravkilde, Jan; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Terkelsen, Christian Juhl

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate whether the distance from the site of event to an invasive heart centre, acute coronary angiography (CAG)/percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and hospital-level of care (invasive heart centre vs. local hospital) is associated with survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients. Nationwide historical follow-up study of 41 186 unselected OHCA patients, in whom resuscitation was attempted between 2001 and 2013, identified through the Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry. We observed an increase in the proportion of patients receiving bystander CPR (18% in 2001, 60% in 2013, P acute CAG/PCI (5% in 2001, 27% in 2013, P acute CAG/PCI annually in each region was defined as the CAG/PCI index. The following variables were associated with lower mortality in multivariable analyses: direct admission to invasive heart centre (HR 0.91, 95% CI: 0.89-0.93), CAG/PCI index (HR 0.33, 95% CI: 0.25-0.45), population density above 2000 per square kilometre (HR 0.94, 95% CI: 0.89-0.98), bystander CPR (HR 0.97, 95% CI: 0.95-0.99) and witnessed OHCA (HR 0.87, 95% CI: 0.85-0.89), whereas distance to the nearest invasive centre was not associated with survival. Admission to an invasive heart centre and regional performance of acute CAG/PCI were associated with improved survival in OHCA patients, whereas distance to the invasive centre was not. These results support a centralized strategy for immediate post-resuscitation care in OHCA patients. © The Author 2017. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  5. Dynamic effects of adrenaline (epinephrine) in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with initial pulseless electrical activity (PEA).

    Nordseth, Trond; Olasveengen, Theresa Mariero; Kvaløy, Jan Terje; Wik, Lars; Steen, Petter Andreas; Skogvoll, Eirik

    2012-08-01

    In cardiac arrest, pulseless electrical activity (PEA) is a challenging clinical syndrome. In a randomized study comparing intravenous (i.v.) access and drugs versus no i.v. access or drugs during advanced life support (ALS), adrenaline (epinephrine) improved return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) in patients with PEA. Originating from this study, we investigated the time-dependent effects of adrenaline on clinical state transitions in patients with initial PEA, using a non-parametric multi-state statistical model. Patients with available defibrillator recordings were included, of whom 101 received adrenaline and 73 did not. There were significantly more state transitions in the adrenaline group than in the no-adrenaline group (rate ratio = 1.6, pAdrenaline markedly increased the rate of transition from PEA to ROSC during ALS and slowed the rate of being declared dead; e.g. by 20 min 20% of patients in the adrenaline group had been declared dead and 25% had obtained ROSC, whereas 50% in the no-adrenaline group have been declared dead and 15% had obtained ROSC. The differential effect of adrenaline could be seen after approx. 10 min of ALS for most transitions. For both groups the probability of deteriorating from PEA to asystole was highest during the first 15 min. Adrenaline increased the rate of transition from PEA to ventricular fibrillation or -tachycardia (VF/VT), and from ROSC to VF/VT. Adrenaline has notable clinical effects during ALS in patients with initial PEA. The drug extends the time window for ROSC to develop, but also renders the patient more unstable. Further research should investigate the optimal dose, timing and mode of adrenaline administration during ALS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Efficacy of vasopressin-epinephrine compared to epinephrine alone for out of hospital cardiac arrest patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Zhang, Qiang; Liu, Bo; Zhao, Lianxing; Qi, Zhijiang; Shao, Huan; An, Le; Li, Chunsheng

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a meta-analysis to evaluate the efficacy of vasopressin-epinephrine compared to epinephrine alone in patients who suffered out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Relevant studies up to February 2017 were identified by searching in PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, Wanfang for randomized controlled trials(RCTs) assigning adults with cardiac arrest to treatment with vasopressin-epinephrine (VEgroup) vs adrenaline (epinephrine) alone (E group). The outcome point was return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) for patients suffering from OHCA. Heterogeneity, subgroup analysis, sensitivity analysis and publication bias were explored. Individual patient data were obtained from 5047 participants who experienced OHCA in nine studies. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated using a random-effects model and results suggested that vasopressin-epinephrine was associated with higher rate of ROSC (OR=1.67, 95% CI=1.13-2.49, Padrenaline can improve ROSC of OHCA from Asia, but patients from other regions who suffered from OHCA cannot benefit from combination of vasopressin and epinephrine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of team-focused CPR vs standard CPR in resuscitation from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: Results from a statewide quality improvement initiative.

    Pearson, David A; Darrell Nelson, R; Monk, Lisa; Tyson, Clark; Jollis, James G; Granger, Christopher B; Corbett, Claire; Garvey, Lee; Runyon, Michael S

    2016-08-01

    Team-focused CPR (TFCPR) is a choreographed approach to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with emphasis on minimally interrupted high-quality chest compressions, early defibrillation, discourages endotracheal intubation and encourages use of the bag-valve-mask (BVM) and/or blind-insertion airway device (BIAD) with a ventilation rate of 8-10 breaths/min to minimize hyperventilation. Widespread incorporation of TFCPR in North Carolina (NC) EMS agencies began in 2011, yet its impact on outcomes is unknown. To determine whether TFCPR improves survival with good neurological outcome in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients compared to standard CPR. This retrospective cohort analysis of NC EMS agencies reporting data to the Cardiac Arrest Registry for Enhanced Survival (CARES) database from January 2010 to June 2014 included adult, non-traumatic OHCA with presumed cardiac etiology where EMS performed CPR or patient received defibrillation. Exclusions were arrest terminated per EMS policy or DNR. EMS agencies self-reported the TFCPR implementation dates. Patients were categorized as receiving either TFCPR or standard CPR. The primary outcome was good neurologic outcome at time of hospital discharge defined as Pittsburgh Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) 1-2. Of 14,994 OHCAs, 14,129 patients were included for analysis with a mean age 65 (IQR 50-81) years, 61% male, 7.3% with good neurologic outcome, 24.3% with shockable initial rhythm, and 71.5% receiving TFCPR. Of the 3427 (24.3%) with an initial shockable rhythm, 739 (71.9%) had a good neurological outcome. Good neurologic outcome was higher with TFCPR [836 (8.3%, 95%CI 7.7-8.8%)] vs. standard CPR [193 (4.8%, 95%CI 4.2-5.5%)]. Logistic regression controlling for demographic and arrest characteristics revealed TFCPR (OR 1.5), witnessed arrest (OR 4.3), initial shockable rhythm (OR 7.1), and in-hospital hypothermia (OR 3.3) were associated with good neurologic outcome. Mechanical CPR device (OR 0.68), CPR

  8. Genetic, clinical and pharmacological determinants of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: rationale and outline of the AmsteRdam Resuscitation Studies (ARREST) registry

    Blom, M T; van Hoeijen, D A; Bardai, A; Berdowski, J; Souverein, P C; De Bruin, M L; Koster, R W; de Boer, A; Tan, H L

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a major public health problem. Recognising the complexity of the underlying causes of OHCA in the community, we aimed to establish the clinical, pharmacological, environmental and genetic factors and their interactions that may cause OHCA. Methods and analysis We set up a large-scale prospective community-based registry (AmsteRdam Resuscitation Studies, ARREST) in which we prospectively include all resuscitation attempts from OHCA in a large study region in the Netherlands in collaboration with Emergency Medical Services. Of all OHCA victims since June 2005, we prospectively collect medical history (through hospital and general practitioner), and current and previous medication use (through community pharmacy). In addition, we include DNA samples from OHCA victims with documented ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation during the resuscitation attempt since July 2007. Various study designs are employed to analyse the data of the ARREST registry, including case–control, cohort, case only and case-cross over designs. Ethics and dissemination We describe the rationale, outline and potential results of the ARREST registry. The design allows for a stable and reliable collection of multiple determinants of OHCA, while assuring that the patient, lay-caregiver or medical professional is not hindered in any way. Such comprehensive data collection is required to unravel the complex basis of OHCA. Results will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at relevant scientific symposia. PMID:25332818

  9. Prehospital sodium bicarbonate use could worsen long term survival with favorable neurological recovery among patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Kawano, Takahisa; Grunau, Brian; Scheuermeyer, Frank X; Gibo, Koichiro; Dick, William; Fordyce, Christopher B; Dorian, Paul; Stenstrom, Robert; Straight, Ronald; Christenson, Jim

    2017-10-01

    Sodium bicarbonate (SB) is widely used for resuscitation in out-of- hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA); however, its effect on long term outcomes is unclear. From 2005-2016, we prospectively conducted a province-wide population-based observational study including adult non-traumatic OHCA patients managed by paramedics. SB was administered by paramedics based on their clinical assessments. To examine the association of SB administration and survival and favorable neurological outcome to hospital discharge, defined as modified Rankin scale of 3 or less, we performed a multivariable logistic regression analysis: (1) within propensity score matched comparison groups, and; (2) within the full cohort with missing variables addressed by multiple imputation techniques. Of 15 601 OHCA patients, 13,865 were included in this study with 5165 (37.3%) managed with SB. In the SB treated group, 118 (2.3%) patients survived and 62 (1.2%) had favorable neurological outcomes to hospital discharge, compared to 1699 (19.8%) and 831 (10.6%) in the non-SB treated group, respectively. In the 1:1 propensity matched cohort including 5638 OHCA patients, SB was associated with decreased probability of outcomes (adjusted OR for survival: 0.64, 95% CI 0.45-0.91, and adjusted OR for favorable neurological outcome: 0.59, 95% CI 0.39-0.88, respectively). The association remained consistent in the multiply imputed cohort (adjusted OR 0.48, 95 CI 0.36-0.64, and adjusted OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.38-0.76, respectively). In OHCA patients, prehospital SB administration was associated with worse survival rate and neurological outcomes to hospital discharge. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparison of health-related quality of life and functional recovery measurement tools in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors.

    Andrew, Emily; Nehme, Ziad; Bernard, Stephen; Smith, Karen

    2016-10-01

    Although a number of validated health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) instruments exist for critical care populations, a standardised approach to assessing the HR-QOL of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survivors has not been developed. We sought to compare the responses of 12-month OHCA survivors to three HR-QOL and functional recovery instruments, and assess instrument validity. The Victorian Ambulance Cardiac Arrest Registry invited 12-month OHCA survivors to participate in telephone follow-up between January 2011 and December 2015. Responders provided answers to the 12 Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-12), Three-Level EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D-3L) and the Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended (GOSE). The SF-12 was also used to derive the SF-6D. Responses were used to assess the interpretability and construct validity of the instruments. A total of 1188 patients and proxies responded. Large ceiling effects were observed for the EQ-5D-3L (patients=46%, proxies=23%). Substantial variability was also observed in SF-6D responses for patients who reported full health according to the EQ-5D-3L. For patient responders, the strongest correlations were observed between the EQ-5D-3L index score and SF-6D (ρ=0.65, pGOSE outcome and lower or upper good recovery (pGOSE suggest that these may be useful measures of HR-QOL and functional recovery in OHCA survivors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Public awareness and self-efficacy of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in communities and outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: A multi-level analysis.

    Ro, Young Sun; Shin, Sang Do; Song, Kyoung Jun; Hong, Sung Ok; Kim, Young Taek; Lee, Dong-Woo; Cho, Sung-Il

    2016-05-01

    This study aims to test the association between capacity of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) at community level and survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Emergency medical service (EMS)-treated OHCAs with cardiac etiology in Korea between 2012 and 2013 were analyzed, excluding cases witnessed by EMS providers. Exposure variables were five indexes of community CPR capacity: awareness of CPR (CPR-Awareness), any training experience of CPR (CPR-Any-Training), recent CPR training within the last 2 years (CPR-Recent-Training), CPR training with a manikin (CPR-Manikin-Training), and CPR self-efficacy (CPR-Self-Efficacy). All measures of capacity were calculated as aggregated values for each county level using the national Korean Community Health Survey database of 228,921 responders sampled representatively from 253 counties in 2012. Endpoints were bystander CPR (BCPR) and survival to discharge. We calculated adjusted odds ratios (AORs) per 10% increment in community CPR capacity using multi-level logistic regression models, adjusting for potential confounders at individual levels. Of 29,052 eligible OHCAs, 11,079 (38.1%) received BCPR. Patients were more likely to receive BCPR in communities with higher proportions of residents with CPR-Awareness, CPR-Any-Training, CPR-Recent-Training, CPR-Manikin-Training, and CPR-Self-Efficacy (all pCPR-Awareness, 1.10 (1.04-1.15) for CPR-Any-Training, and 1.08 (1.03-1.13) for CPR-Self-Efficacy. For survival to discharge, AORs (95% CIs) were 1.34 (1.23-1.47) per 10% increment in CPR-Awareness, 1.36 (1.20-1.54) for CPR-Any-Training, and 1.29 (1.15-1.45) for CPR-Self-Efficacy. Higher CPR capacity at community level was associated with higher bystander CPR and survival to discharge rates after OHCA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Neurologic outcome in comatose patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with prolonged downtime and treated with therapeutic hypothermia

    Kim, Won Young; Giberson, Tyler A.; Uber, Amy; Berg, Katherine; Cocchi, Michael N.; Donnino, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous reports have shown that prolonged duration of resuscitation efforts in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is associated with poor neurologic outcome. This concept has recently been questioned with advancements in post-cardiac arrest care including the use of therapeutic hypothermia (TH). The aim of this study was to determine the rate of good neurologic outcome based on the duration of resuscitation efforts in OHCA patients treated with TH. Methods This prospective, observational, study was conducted between January 2008 and September 2012. Inclusion criteria consisted of adult non-traumatic OHCA patients who were comatose after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and received TH. The primary endpoint was good neurologic outcome defined as a cerebral performance category score of 1 or 2. Downtime was calculated as the length of time between the patient being recognized as pulseless and ROSC. Results 105 patients were treated with TH and 19 were excluded due to unknown downtime, leaving 86 patients for analysis. The median downtime was 18.5 (10.0–32.3) minutes and 33 patients (38.0%) had a good neurologic outcome. When downtime was divided into four groups (≤10 min, 11-20 min, 21-30 min, > 30 min), good neurologic outcomes were 62.5%, 37%, 25%, and 21.7%, respectively (p=0.02). However, even with downtime >20 minutes, 22.9% had a good neurologic outcome, and this percentage increased to 37.5% in patients with an initial shockable rhythm. Conclusions Although longer downtime is associated with worse outcome in OHCA patients, we found that comatose patients who have been successfully resuscitated and treated with TH have neurologically intact survival rates of 23% even with downtime > 20 minutes. PMID:24746783

  13. Neurologic outcome in comatose patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with prolonged downtime and treated with therapeutic hypothermia.

    Kim, Won Young; Giberson, Tyler A; Uber, Amy; Berg, Katherine; Cocchi, Michael N; Donnino, Michael W

    2014-08-01

    Previous reports have shown that prolonged duration of resuscitation efforts in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is associated with poor neurologic outcome. This concept has recently been questioned with advancements in post-cardiac arrest care including the use of therapeutic hypothermia (TH). The aim of this study was to determine the rate of good neurologic outcome based on the duration of resuscitation efforts in OHCA patients treated with TH. This prospective, observational, study was conducted between January 2008 and September 2012. Inclusion criteria consisted of adult non-traumatic OHCA patients who were comatose after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and received TH. The primary endpoint was good neurologic outcome defined as a cerebral performance category score of 1 or 2. Downtime was calculated as the length of time between the patient being recognized as pulseless and ROSC. 105 patients were treated with TH and 19 were excluded due to unknown downtime, leaving 86 patients for analysis. The median downtime was 18.5 (10.0-32.3)min and 33 patients (38.0%) had a good neurologic outcome. When downtime was divided into four groups (≤10min, 11-20min, 21-30min, >30min), good neurologic outcomes were 62.5%, 37%, 25%, and 21.7%, respectively (p=0.02). However, even with downtime >20min, 22.9% had a good neurologic outcome, and this percentage increased to 37.5% in patients with an initial shockable rhythm. Although longer downtime is associated with worse outcome in OHCA patients, we found that comatose patients who have been successfully resuscitated and treated with TH have neurologically intact survival rates of 23% even with downtime >20min. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Therapeutic Hypothermia for Asphyxial Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Due to Drowning: A Systematic Review of Case Series and Case Reports.

    Suen, K-F; Leung, Reynold; Leung, Ling-Pong

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this review was to summarize published evidence of the effectiveness of therapeutic hypothermia in patients with drowning-associated asphyxial out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and to explore any preliminary favorable factors in the management of therapeutic hypothermia to improve survival and neurological outcome. Drowning may result in asphyxial OHCA or hypothermic OHCA, but the former does not provide any potential neuroprotective effect as the latter may do. Electronic literature searches of Ovid Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, and Scopus were performed for all years from inception to July 2016. Primary studies in the form of case reports, letters to the editor, and others with higher quality are included, but guidelines, reviews, editorials, textbook chapters, conference abstracts, and nonhuman studies are excluded. Non-English articles are excluded. Relevant studies are then deemed eligible if the drowning OHCA patient's initial temperature was above 28°C, which implies asphyxial cardiac arrest, and intentional therapeutic hypothermia was instituted. Because of the narrow scope of interest and strict definition of the condition, limited studies addressed it, and no randomized controlled trials (RCT) could be selected. Thirteen studies covering 35 patients are included. No quantitative synthesis, assessment of study quality, or assessment of bias was performed. It is conjectured that extended therapeutic hypothermia of 48-72 hours might help prevent reperfusion injury during the intermediate phase of postcardiac arrest care to benefit patients of drowning-associated asphyxial OHCA, but this finding only serves as preliminary observation for future research. No conclusive recommendation could be made regarding the duration of and the time of onset of therapeutic hypothermia. Future research should put effort on RCT, particularly the effect of extended duration of 48-72 hours. Important parameters should be reported in detail. Asphyxial

  15. A Smartphone Application to Reduce the Time to Automated External Defibrillator Delivery After a Witnessed Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Randomized Simulation-Based Study.

    Hatakeyama, Toshihiro; Nishiyama, Chika; Shimamoto, Tomonari; Kiyohara, Kosuke; Kiguchi, Takeyuki; Chida, Izumi; Izawa, Junichi; Matsuyama, Tasuku; Kitamura, Tetsuhisa; Kawamura, Takashi; Iwami, Taku

    2018-04-13

    We developed a new smartphone application to deliver an automated external defibrillator (AED) to out-of-hospital cardiac arrest scene. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether an AED could be delivered earlier with or without an application in a simulated randomized controlled trial. Participants, who were asked to work as bystanders, were randomly assigned to either an application group or control group and were asked to bring an AED in both groups. The bystanders in the application group sent a signal notification using the application to two responders, who were stationed within 200 meters of the arrest scene, to carry an AED. The primary outcome was the AED delivery time by either the bystander or his/her responder. In total, 61 bystanders were eligible and randomized to either the application group (32) or the control group (29). The 52 with time data were available and analyzed. The AED delivery time by either the bystander or his/her responder was significantly shorter in the application group than in the control group [133.6 (44.4) seconds vs. 202.2 (122.2) seconds, P = 0.01]. In this simulation-based trial, AED delivery time was shortened by our newly developed smartphone application for the bystander to ask nearby responders to find and bring an AED to the cardiac arrest scene (UMIN-Clinical Trials Registry 000016506).This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

  16. Impact of community-wide police car deployment of automated external defibrillators on survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Myerburg, Robert J; Fenster, Jeffrey; Velez, Mauricio; Rosenberg, Donald; Lai, Shenghan; Kurlansky, Paul; Newton, Starbuck; Knox, Melenda; Castellanos, Agustin

    2002-08-27

    Disappointing survival rates from out-of-hospital cardiac arrests encourage strategies for faster defibrillation, such as use of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) by nonconventional responders. AEDs were provided to all Miami-Dade County, Florida, police. AED-equipped police (P-AED) and conventional emergency medical rescue (EMS) responders are simultaneously deployed to possible cardiac arrests. Times from 9-1-1 contact to the scene were compared for P-AED and concurrently deployed EMS, and both were compared with historical EMS experience. Survival with P-AED was compared with outcomes when EMS was the sole responder. Among 420 paired dispatches of P-AED and EMS, the mean+/-SD P-AED time from 9-1-1 call to arrival at the scene was 6.16+/-4.27 minutes, compared with 7.56+/-3.60 minutes for EMS (P<0.001). Police arrived first to 56% of the calls. The time to first responder arrival among P-AED and EMS was 4.88+/-2.88 minutes (P<0.001), compared with a historical response time of 7.64+/-3.66 minutes when EMS was the sole responder. A 17.2% survival rate was observed for victims with ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VT/VF), compared with 9.0% for standard EMS before P-AED implementation (P=0.047). However, VT/VF benefit was diluted by the observation that 61% of the initial rhythms were nonshockable, reducing the absolute survival benefit among the total study population to 1.6% (P-AED, 7.6%; EMS, 6.0%). P-AED establishes a layer of responders that generate improved response times and survival from VT/VF. There was no benefit for victims with nonshockable rhythms.

  17. Prompt prediction of successful defibrillation from 1-s ventricular fibrillation waveform in patients with out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest.

    Endoh, Hiroshi; Hida, Seiji; Oohashi, Satomi; Hayashi, Yusuke; Kinoshita, Hidenori; Honda, Tadayuki

    2011-02-01

    Ventricular fibrillation (VF) is a common cardiac arrest rhythm that can be terminated by electrical defibrillation. During cardiopulmonary resuscitation, there is a strong need for a prompt and reliable predictor of successful defibrillation because myocardial damage can result from repeated futile defibrillation attempts. Continuous wavelet transform (CWT) provides excellent time and frequency resolution of signals. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether features based on CWT could predict successful defibrillation. VF electrocardiogram (ECG) waveforms stored in ambulance-located defibrillators were collected. Predefibrillation waveforms were divided into 1.0- or 5.12-s VF waveforms. Indices in frequency domain or nonlinear analysis were calculated on the 5.12-s waveform. Simultaneously, CWT was performed on the 1.0-s waveform, and total low-band (1-3 Hz), mid-band (3-10 Hz), and high-band (10-32 Hz) energy were calculated. In 152 patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, a total of 233 ECG predefibrillation recordings, consisting of 164 unsuccessful and 69 successful episodes, were analyzed. Indices of frequency domain analysis (peak frequency, centroid frequency, and amplitude spectral area), nonlinear analysis (approximate entropy and Hurst exponent, detrended fluctuation analysis), and CWT analysis (mid-band and high-band energy) were significantly different between unsuccessful and successful episodes (P centroid frequency and total mid-band energy were effective predictors (P < 0.01 for both). Energy spectrum analysis based on CWT as short as a 1.0-s VF ECG waveform enables prompt and reliable prediction of successful defibrillation.

  18. Effect of rescue breathing by lay rescuers for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest caused by respiratory disease: a nationwide, population-based, propensity score-matched study.

    Fukuda, Tatsuma; Ohashi-Fukuda, Naoko; Kondo, Yutaka; Sera, Toshiki; Yahagi, Naoki

    2017-06-01

    The importance of respiratory care in cardiopulmonary resuscitation may vary depending on the cause of cardiac arrest. No previous study has investigated the effects of rescue breathing performed by a lay rescuer on the outcomes of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) caused by intrinsic respiratory diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate whether rescue breathing performed by a lay rescuer is associated with outcomes after respiratory disease-related OHCA. In a nationwide, population-based, propensity score-matched study in Japan, among adult patients with OHCA caused by respiratory disease who received bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation from January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2010, we compared patients with rescue breathing to those without rescue breathing. The primary outcome was neurologically favorable survival 1 month after OHCA. Of the eligible 14,781 patients, 4970 received rescue breathing from a lay rescuer and 9811 did not receive rescue breathing. In a propensity score-matched cohort (4897 vs. 4897 patients), the neurologically favorable survival rate was similar between patients with and without rescue breathing from a lay rescuer [0.9 vs. 0.7 %; OR 1.23 (95 % CI 0.79-1.93)]. Additionally, in subgroup analyses, rescue breathing was not associated with neurological outcome regardless of the type of rescuer [family member: adjusted OR 0.83 (95 % CI 0.39-1.70); or non-family member: adjusted OR 1.91 (95 % CI 0.79-5.35)]. Even among patients with OHCA caused by respiratory disease, rescue breathing performed by a lay rescuer was not associated with neurological outcomes, regardless of the type of lay rescuer.

  19. Reactions and coping strategies in lay rescuers who have provided CPR to out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims: a qualitative study.

    Mathiesen, Wenche Torunn; Bjørshol, Conrad Arnfinn; Braut, Geir Sverre; Søreide, Eldar

    2016-05-25

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) provided by community citizens is of paramount importance for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) victims' survival. Fortunately, CPR rates by community citizens seem to be rising. However, the experience of providing CPR is rarely investigated. The aim of this study was to explore reactions and coping strategies in lay rescuers who have provided CPR to OHCA victims. This is a qualitative study of 20 lay rescuers who have provided CPR to 18 OHCA victims. We used a semistructured interview guide focusing on their experiences after providing CPR. The study was conducted in the Stavanger region of Norway, an area with very high bystander CPR rates. Three themes emerged from the interview analysis: concern, uncertainty and coping strategies. Providing CPR had been emotionally challenging for all lay rescuers and, for some, had consequences in terms of family and work life. Several lay rescuers experienced persistent mental recurrences of the OHCA incident and had concerns about the outcome for the cardiac arrest victim. Unknown or fatal outcomes often caused feelings of guilt and were particularly difficult to handle. Several reported the need to be acknowledged for their CPR attempts. Health-educated lay rescuers seemed to be less affected than others. A common coping strategy was confiding in close relations, preferably the health educated. However, some required professional help to cope with the OHCA incident. Lay rescuers experience emotional and social challenges, and some struggle to cope in life after providing CPR in OHCA incidents. Experiencing a positive patient outcome and being a health-educated lay rescuer seem to mitigate concerns. Common coping strategies are attempts to reduce uncertainty towards patient outcome and own CPR quality. Further studies are needed to determine whether an organised professional follow-up can mitigate the concerns and uncertainty of lay rescuers. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group

  20. Mobile phone technology identifies and recruits trained citizens to perform CPR on out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims prior to ambulance arrival.

    Ringh, Mattias; Fredman, David; Nordberg, Per; Stark, Tomas; Hollenberg, Jacob

    2011-12-01

    In a two-parted study, evaluate a new concept were mobile phone technology is used to dispatch lay responders to nearby out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs). Mobile phone positioning systems (MPS) can geographically locate selected mobile phone users at any given moment. A mobile phone service using MPS was developed and named Mobile Life Saver (MLS). Simulation study: 25 volunteers named mobile responders (MRs) were connected to MLS. Ambulance time intervals from 22 consecutive OHCAs in 2005 were used as controls. The MRs randomly moved in Stockholm city centre and were dispatched to simulated OHCAs (identical to controls) if they were within a 350 m distance. Real life study: during 25 weeks 1271-1801 MRs trained in CPR were connected to MLS. MLS was activated at the dispatch centre in parallel with ambulance dispatch when an OHCA was suspected. The MRs were dispatched if they were within 500 m from the suspected OHCA. Simulation study: mean response time for the MRs compared to historical ambulance time intervals was reduced by 2 min 20s (44%), pMobile phone technology can be used to identify and recruit nearby CPR-trained citizens to OHCAs for bystander CPR prior to ambulance arrival. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Usefulness of Serum B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Levels in Comatose Patients Resuscitated from Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest to Predict Outcome

    Frydland, Martin; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Erlinge, David

    2016-01-01

    N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic (NT-proBNP) is expressed in the heart and brain, and serum levels are elevated in acute heart and brain diseases. We aimed to assess the possible association between serum levels and neurological outcome and death in comatose patients resuscitated from out......-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Of the 939 comatose OHCA patients enrolled and randomized in the Targeted Temperature Management (TTM) trial to TTM at 33°C or 36°C for 24 hours, 700 were included in the biomarker substudy. Of these, 647 (92%) had serum levels of NT-proBNP measured 24, 48, and 72 hours after return...... of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Neurological outcome was evaluated by the Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) score and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at 6 months. Six hundred thirty-eight patients (99%) had serum NT-proBNP levels ≥125 pg/ml. Patients with TTM at 33°C had significantly lower NT-proBNP serum...

  2. Termination of Resuscitation Rules to Predict Neurological Outcomes in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest for an Intermediate Life Support Prehospital System.

    Cheong, Randy Wang Long; Li, Huihua; Doctor, Nausheen Edwin; Ng, Yih Yng; Goh, E Shaun; Leong, Benjamin Sieu-Hon; Gan, Han Nee; Foo, David; Tham, Lai Peng; Charles, Rabind; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock

    2016-01-01

    Futile resuscitation can lead to unnecessary transports for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The Basic Life Support (BLS) and Advanced Life Support (ALS) termination of resuscitation (TOR) guidelines have been validated with good results in North America. This study aims to evaluate the performance of these two rules in predicting neurological outcomes of OHCA patients in Singapore, which has an intermediate life support Emergency Medical Services (EMS) system. A retrospective cohort study was carried out on Singapore OHCA data collected from April 2010 to May 2012 for the Pan-Asian Resuscitation Outcomes Study (PAROS). The outcomes of each rule were compared to the actual neurological outcomes of the patients. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and predicted transport rates of each test were evaluated. A total of 2,193 patients had cardiac arrest of presumed cardiac etiology. TOR was recommended for 1,411 patients with the BLS-TOR rule, with a specificity of 100% (91.9, 100.0) for predicting poor neurological outcomes, PPV 100% (99.7, 100.0), sensitivity 65.7% (63.6, 67.7), NPV 5.6% (4.1, 7.5), and transportation rate 35.6%. Using the ALS-TOR rule, TOR was recommended for 587 patients, specificity 100% (91.9, 100.0) for predicting poor neurological outcomes, PPV 100% (99.4, 100.0), sensitivity 27.3% (25.4, 29.3), NPV 2.7% (2.0, 3.7), and transportation rate 73.2%. BLS-TOR predicted survival (any neurological outcome) with specificity 93.4% (95% CI 85.3, 97.8) versus ALS-TOR 98.7% (95% CI 92.9, 99.8). Both the BLS and ALS-TOR rules had high specificities and PPV values in predicting neurological outcomes, the BLS-TOR rule had a lower predicted transport rate while the ALS-TOR rule was more accurate in predicting futility of resuscitation. Further research into unique local cultural issues would be useful to evaluate the feasibility of any system-wide implementation of TOR.

  3. Association of Bystander Interventions With Neurologically Intact Survival Among Patients With Bystander-Witnessed Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Japan.

    Nakahara, Shinji; Tomio, Jun; Ichikawa, Masao; Nakamura, Fumiaki; Nishida, Masamichi; Takahashi, Hideto; Morimura, Naoto; Sakamoto, Tetsuya

    2015-07-21

    Neurologically intact survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) has been increasing in Japan. However, associations between increased prehospital care, including bystander interventions and increases in survival, have not been well estimated. To estimate the associations between bystander interventions and changes in neurologically intact survival among patients with OHCA in Japan. Retrospective descriptive study using data from Japan's nationwide OHCA registry, which started in January 2005. The registry includes all patients with OHCA transported to the hospital by emergency medical services (EMS) and recorded patients' characteristics, prehospital interventions, and outcomes. Participants were 167,912 patients with bystander-witnessed OHCA of presumed cardiac origin in the registry between January 2005 and December 2012. Prehospital interventions by bystander, including defibrillation using public-access automated external defibrillators and chest compression. Neurologically intact survival was defined as Glasgow-Pittsburgh cerebral performance category score 1 or 2 and overall performance category scores 1 or 2 at 1 month or at discharge. The association between the interventions and neurologically intact survival was evaluated. From 2005 to 2012, the number of bystander-witnessed OHCAs of presumed cardiac origin increased from 17,882 (14.0 per 100,000 persons [95% CI, 13.8-14.2]) to 23,797 (18.7 per 100,000 persons [95% CI, 18.4-18.9]), and neurologically intact survival increased from 587 cases (age-adjusted proportion, 3.3% [95% CI, 3.0%-3.5%]) to 1710 cases (8.2% [95% CI, 7.8%-8.6%]). The rates of bystander chest compression increased from 38.6% to 50.9%, bystander-only defibrillation increased from 0.1% to 2.3%, bystander defibrillation combined with EMS defibrillation increased from 0.1% to 1.4%, and EMS-only defibrillation decreased from 26.6% to 23.5%. Performance of bystander chest compression, compared with no bystander chest compression

  4. Prehospital critical care for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: An observational study examining survival and a stakeholder-focused cost analysis.

    von Vopelius-Feldt, Johannes; Powell, Jane; Morris, Richard; Benger, Jonathan

    2016-12-07

    Survival rates from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remain low, despite remarkable efforts to improve care. A number of ambulance services in the United Kingdom (UK) have developed prehospital critical care teams (CCTs) which attend critically ill patients, including OHCA. However, current scientific evidence describing CCTs attending OHCA is sparse and research to date has not demonstrated clear benefits from this model of care. This prospective, observational study will describe the effect of CCTs on survival from OHCA, when compared to advanced-life-support (ALS), the current standard of prehospital care in the UK. In addition, we will describe the association between individual critical care interventions and survival, and also the costs of CCTs for OHCA. To examine the effect of CCTs on survival from OHCA, we will use routine Utstein variables data already collected in a number of UK ambulance trusts. We will use propensity score matching to adjust for imbalances between the CCT and ALS groups. The primary outcome will be survival to hospital discharge, with the secondary outcome of survival to hospital admission. We will record the critical care interventions delivered during CCT attendance at OHCA. We will describe frequencies and aim to use multiple logistic regression to examine possible associations with survival. Finally, we will undertake a stakeholder-focused cost analysis of CCTs for OHCA. This will utilise a previously published Emergency Medical Services (EMS) cost analysis toolkit and will take into account the costs incurred from use of a helicopter and the proportion of these costs currently covered by charities in the UK. Prehospital critical care for OHCA is not universally available in many EMS. In the UK, it is variable and largely funded through public donations to charities. If this study demonstrates benefit from CCTs at an acceptable cost to the public or EMS commissioners, it will provide a rationale to increase funding and service

  5. The Effects of Public Access Defibrillation on Survival After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Systematic Review of Observational Studies.

    Bækgaard, Josefine S; Viereck, Søren; Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær; Lippert, Freddy; Folke, Fredrik

    2017-09-05

    Despite recent advances, the average survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remains 50%. Accordingly, placement of automated external defibrillators in the community as part of a public access defibrillation program (PAD) is recommended by international guidelines. However, different strategies have been proposed on how exactly to increase and make use of publicly available automated external defibrillators. This systematic review aimed to evaluate the effect of PAD and the different PAD strategies on survival after OHCA. PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library were systematically searched on August 31, 2015 for observational studies reporting survival to hospital discharge in OHCA patients where an automated external defibrillator had been used by nonemergency medical services. PAD was divided into 3 groups according to who applied the defibrillator: nondispatched lay first responders, professional first responders (firefighters/police) dispatched by the Emergency Medical Dispatch Center (EMDC), or lay first responders dispatched by the EMDC. A total of 41 studies were included; 18 reported PAD by nondispatched lay first responders, 20 reported PAD by EMDC-dispatched professional first responders (firefighters/police), and 3 reported both. We identified no qualified studies reporting survival after PAD by EMDC-dispatched lay first responders. The overall survival to hospital discharge after OHCA treated with PAD showed a median survival of 40.0% (range, 9.1-83.3). Defibrillation by nondispatched lay first responders was associated with the highest survival with a median survival of 53.0% (range, 26.0-72.0), whereas defibrillation by EMDC-dispatched professional first responders (firefighters/police) was associated with a median survival of 28.6% (range, 9.0-76.0). A meta-analysis of the different survival outcomes could not be performed because of the large heterogeneity of the included studies. This systematic review showed a median overall

  6. Demographics and Clinical Features of Postresuscitation Comorbidities in Long-Term Survivors of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A National Follow-Up Study

    Chih-Pei Su

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The outcome of patients suffering from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA is very poor, and postresuscitation comorbidities increase long-term mortality. This study aims to analyze new-onset postresuscitation comorbidities in patients who survived from OHCA for over one year. The Taiwan National Health Insurance (NHI Database was used in this study. Study and comparison groups were created to analyze the risk of suffering from new-onset postresuscitation comorbidities from 2011 to 2012 (until December 31, 2013. The study group included 1,346 long-term OHCA survivors; the comparison group consisted of 4,038 matched non-OHCA patients. Demographics, patient characteristics, and risk of suffering comorbidities (using Cox proportional hazards models were analyzed. We found that urinary tract infections (n=225, 16.72%, pneumonia (n=206, 15.30%, septicemia (n=184, 13.67%, heart failure (n=111, 8.25% gastrointestinal hemorrhage (n=108, 8.02%, epilepsy or recurrent seizures (n=98, 7.28%, and chronic kidney disease (n=62, 4.61% were the most common comorbidities. Furthermore, OHCA survivors were at much higher risk (than comparison patients of experiencing epilepsy or recurrent seizures (HR = 20.83; 95% CI: 12.24–35.43, septicemia (HR = 8.98; 95% CI: 6.84–11.79, pneumonia (HR = 5.82; 95% CI: 4.66–7.26, and heart failure (HR = 4.88; 95% CI: 3.65–6.53. Most importantly, most comorbidities occurred within the first half year after OHCA.

  7. Potential association of bystander-patient relationship with bystander response and patient survival in daytime out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Tanaka, Yoshio; Maeda, Tetsuo; Kamikura, Takahisa; Nishi, Taiki; Omi, Wataru; Hashimoto, Masaaki; Sakagami, Satoru; Inaba, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    To investigate whether the bystander-patient relationship affects bystander response to out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and patient outcomes depending on the time of day. This population-based observational study in Japan involving 139,265 bystander-witnessed OHCAs (90,426 family members, 10,479 friends/colleagues, and 38,360 others) without prehospital physician involvement was conducted from 2005 to 2009. Factors associated with better bystander response [early emergency call and bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (BCPR)] and 1-month neurologically favourable survival were assessed. The rates of dispatcher-assisted CPR during daytime (7:00-18:59) and nighttime (19:00-6:59) were highest in family members (45.6% and 46.1%, respectively, for family members; 28.7% and 29.2%, respectively, for friends/colleagues; and 28.1% and 25.3%, respectively, for others). However, the BCPR rates were lowest in family members (35.5% and 37.8%, respectively, for family members; 43.7% and 37.8%, respectively, for friends/colleagues; and 59.3% and 50.0%, respectively, for others). Large delays (≥ 5 min) in placing emergency calls and initiating BCPR were most frequent in family members. The overall survival rate was lowest (2.7%) for family members and highest (9.1%) for friends/colleagues during daytime. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the effect of bystander relationship on survival was significant only during daytime [adjusted odds ratios (95% CI) for survival from daytime OHCAs with family as reference were 1.51 (1.36-1.68) for friends/colleagues and 1.23 (1.13-1.34) for others]. Family members are least likely to perform BCPR and OHCAs witnessed by family members are least likely to survive during daytime. Different strategies are required for family-witnessed OHCAs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Association of initial rhythm with neurologically favorable survival in non-shockable out-of-hospital cardiac arrest without a bystander witness or bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Fukuda, Tatsuma; Ohashi-Fukuda, Naoko; Matsubara, Takehiro; Doi, Kent; Kitsuta, Yoichi; Nakajima, Susumu; Yahagi, Naoki

    2016-05-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) has a predominantly non-shockable rhythm. Non-shockable rhythm, and the absence of a bystander witness or bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) are associated with poor outcomes. However, the association between the type of non-shockable rhythm and outcomes is not well known. To examine the association between the initial rhythm and neurologically favorable outcomes after non-shockable OHCA without a bystander witness or bystander CPR. In a nationwide, population-based, cohort study, we analyzed 213,984 adult OHCA patients with a non-shockable rhythm who had neither a bystander witness nor bystander CPR. They were identified through the Japanese national OHCA registry data from January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2010. The primary outcome was neurologically favorable survival. Among 213,984 patients, the initial rhythm was Pulseless Electrical Activity (PEA) in 31,179 patients (14.6%) and Asystole in 182,805 patients (85.4%). The neurological outcome was more favorable in PEA than in Asystole (1.4% vs. 0.2%, padvanced airway management, time from call to contact with patient, and calendar year, PEA was associated with an increased neurologically favorable survival rate (odds ratio 7.86; 95% confidence interval 6.81-9.07). In subgroup analysis stratified by age group (18-64, 65-84, or ≥85years), the neurologically favorable survival rate was ≥1% in PEA, even for patients aged ≥85years, but <1% in Asystole among all age groups. PEA and Asystole should not be considered to be identical to non-shockable rhythm, but rather should be clearly distinguished from each other from the perspective of quantitative medical futility. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Prognostic value of electroencephalography (EEG) after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in successfully resuscitated patients used in daily clinical practice.

    Søholm, Helle; Kjær, Troels Wesenberg; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Cronberg, Tobias; Bro-Jeppesen, John; Lippert, Freddy K; Køber, Lars; Wanscher, Michael; Hassager, Christian

    2014-11-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is associated with a poor prognosis and predicting outcome is complex with neurophysiological testing and repeated clinical neurological examinations as key components of the assessment. In this study we examine the association between different electroencephalography (EEG) patterns and mortality in a clinical cohort of OHCA-patients. From 2002 to 2011 consecutive patients were admitted to an intensive-care-unit after resuscitation from OHCA. Utstein-criteria for pre-hospital data and review of individual patients' charts for post-resuscitation care were used. EEG reports were analysed according to the 2012 American Clinical Neurophysiology Society's guidelines. A total of 1076 patients were included, and EEG was performed in 20% (n=219) with a median of 3(IQR 2-4) days after OHCA. Rhythmic Delta Activity (RDA) was found in 71 patients (36%) and Periodic Discharges (PD) in 100 patients (45%). Background EEG frequency of Alpha+ or Theta was noted in 107 patients (49%), and change in cerebral EEG activity to stimulation (reactivity) was found in 38 patients (17%). Suppression (all activity <10 μV) was found in 26 (12%) and burst-suppression in 17 (8%) patients. A favourable EEG pattern (reactivity, favourable background frequency and RDA) was independently associated with reduced mortality with hazard ratio (HR) 0.43 (95%CI: 0.24-0.76), p=0.004 (false positive rate: 31%) and a non-favourable EEG pattern (no reactivity, unfavourable background frequency, and PD, suppressed voltage or burst-suppression) was associated with higher mortality (HR=1.62(1.09-2.41), p=0.02) after adjustment for known prognostic factors (false positive rate: 9%). EEG may be useful in work-up in prognostication of patients with OHCA. Findings such as Rhythmic Delta Activity (RDA) seem to be associated with a better prognosis, whereas suppressed voltage and burst-suppression patterns were associated with poor prognosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland

  10. Association of bystander interventions and hospital length of stay and admission to intensive care unit in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors.

    Riddersholm, Signe; Kragholm, Kristian; Mortensen, Rikke Nørmark; Pape, Marianne; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Lippert, Freddy K; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Christiansen, Christian F; Rasmussen, Bodil Steen

    2017-10-01

    The impact of bystander interventions on post-arrest hospital course is sparsely studied. We examined the association between bystander interventions and length of hospital stay and admission to intensive care unit (ICU) in one-day survivors after OHCA. This cohort study linked data of 4641 one-day OHCA survivors from 2001 to 2014 to data on hospital length of stay and ICU admission. We examined associations between bystander efforts and outcomes using regression, adjusted for age, sex, comorbidities, calendar year and witnessed status. We divided bystander efforts into three categories: 1. No bystander interventions; 2.Bystander CPR only; 3. Bystander defibrillation with or without bystander CPR. For patients surviving to hospital discharge, hospital length of stay was 20days for patients without bystander interventions, compared to 16 for bystander CPR, and 13 for bystander defibrillation. 82% of patients without bystander interventions were admitted to ICU compared to 77.2% for bystander CPR, and 61.2% for bystander defibrillation. In-hospital mortality was 60% in the first category compared to 40.5% and 21.7% in the two latter categories. In regression models, bystander CPR and bystander defibrillation were associated with a reduction of length of hospital stay of 21% (Estimate: 0.79 [95% CI: 0.72-0.86]) and 32% (Estimate: 0.68 [95% CI: 0.59-0.78]), respectively. Both bystander CPR (OR: 0.94 [95% CI: 0.91-0.97]) and bystander defibrillation (OR: 0.81 [0.76-0.85]), were associated with lower risk of ICU admission. Bystander interventions were associated with reduced hospital length of stay and ICU admission, suggesting that these efforts improve recovery in OHCA survivors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Association of bystander interventions and hospital length of stay and admission to intensive care unit in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors

    Riddersholm, Signe; Kragholm, Kristian; Mortensen, Rikke Nørmark

    2017-01-01

    for bystander defibrillation. 82% of patients without bystander interventions were admitted to ICU compared to 77.2% for bystander CPR, and 61.2% for bystander defibrillation. In-hospital mortality was 60% in the first category compared to 40.5% and 21.7% in the two latter categories. In regression models.......76-0.85]), were associated with lower risk of ICU admission. CONCLUSIONS: Bystander interventions were associated with reduced hospital length of stay and ICU admission, suggesting that these efforts improve recovery in OHCA survivors....

  12. Interaction of defibrillation waveform with the time to defibrillation or the number of defibrillation attempts on survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Hagihara, Akihito; Onozuka, Daisuke; Ono, Junko; Nagata, Takashi; Hasegawa, Manabu

    2018-01-01

    Early biphasic defibrillation is effective in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) cases. In the resuscitation of patients with OHCA, it is not clear how the defibrillation waveform interacts with the time to defibrillation to influence patient survival. The second, and any subsequent, shocks need to be administered by an on-line physician in Japan. Thus, we investigated the interaction between the defibrillation waveform and time to or the number of defibrillation on resuscitation outcomes. This prospective observational study used data for all OHCAs that occurred between 2005 and 2014 in Japan. To investigate the interaction effect between the defibrillation waveform and the time to defibrillation or the number of defibrillations on the return to spontaneous circulation (ROSC), 1-month survival, and cerebral performance category (CPC) (1, 2), we assessed the modifying effects of the defibrillation waveform and the time to or the number of defibrillation on additive scale (i.e., the relative excessive risk due to interaction, RERI) and multiplicative scale (i.e., ratio of odds ratios (ORs)). In total, 71,566 cases met the inclusion criteria. For the measure of interaction between the defibrillation waveform and the time to defibrillation, ratio of ORs for ROSC was 0.84 (0.75-0.94), implying that the effect of time to first defibrillation on ROSC was negatively modified by defibrillation waveform. For the interaction between the defibrillation waveform and the number of defibrillations, RERI and ratio of ORs for CPC (1, 2) was -0.25 (-0.47 to -0.06) and 0.79 (0.67-0.93), respectively. It is implied that the effect of number of defibrillation on CPC (1, 2) was negatively modified by defibrillation waveform. An increased number of defibrillations was associated with a decreased ROSC in the case of biphasic and monophasic defibrillation, while an increased number of defibrillations was related to an increased 1-month survival rate and CPC (1, 2) only in the case of

  13. Level of consciousness on admission to a Heart Attack Centre is a predictor of survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Deakin, Charles D; Fothergill, Rachael; Moore, Fionna; Watson, Lynne; Whitbread, Mark

    2014-07-01

    The relationship between the neurological status at the time of handover from the ambulance crew to a Heart Attack Centre (HAC) in patients who have achieved return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and subsequent outcome, in the context of current treatment standards, is unknown. A retrospective review of all patients treated by London Ambulance Service (LAS) from 1(st) April 2011 to 31(st) March 2013 admitted to a HAC in Greater London was undertaken. Neurological status (A - alert; V - responding to voice; P - responding to pain; U - unresponsive) recorded by the ambulance crew on handover was compared with length of hospital stay and survival to hospital discharge. A total of 475 sequential adult cardiac arrests of presumed cardiac origin, achieving ROSC on admission to a HAC were identified. Outcome data was available for 452 patients, of whom 253 (56.0%) survived to discharge. Level of consciousness on admission to the HAC was a predictor of duration of hospital stay (Pa shockable rhythm, 32.3% (120/371) were 'A' or 'V', compared with 9.1% (9/99) of those with non-shockable rhythms (PA or V) compared with those with non-shockable rhythms. Most patients who are conscious on admission to the HAC will survive, compared with approximately half of those who are unconscious (P or U), suggesting that critical care is generally appropriate at all levels of consciousness if ROSC has been achieved. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Ventricular ectopic activity is reduced in comatose survivors of out of hospital cardiac arrest treated with target temperature management at 36 degrees C compared to 33 degrees C

    Thomsen, J. H.; Kjaergaard, J.; Graff, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The classification of myocardial infarction (MI) into five types was introduced in 2007 as a component of the Universal definition. However, data outlining clinical symptoms in different MI types are limited. Purpose: To describe the presenting symptoms in patients with type 1 MI vs....... type 2 MI. Methods: During January 2010-January 2011 unselected patients admitted to a single hospital with a catchment area of 300.000 residents were studied. All patients having cardiac troponin I measured on clinical indication were considered and had a supplementary history taken with focus...

  15. Collaborative effects of bystander-initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation and prehospital advanced cardiac life support by physicians on survival of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a nationwide population-based observational study.

    Yasunaga, Hideo; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Tanabe, Seizan; Akahane, Manabu; Ogawa, Toshio; Koike, Soichi; Imamura, Tomoaki

    2010-01-01

    There are inconsistent data about the effectiveness of prehospital physician-staffed advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) on the outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Furthermore, the relative importance of bystander-initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation (BCPR) and ACLS and the effectiveness of their combination have not been clearly demonstrated. Using a prospective, nationwide, population-based registry of all OHCA patients in Japan, we enrolled 95,072 patients whose arrests were witnessed by bystanders and 23,127 patients witnessed by emergency medical service providers between 2005 and 2007. We divided the bystander-witnessed arrest patients into Group A (ACLS by emergency life-saving technicians without BCPR), Group B (ACLS by emergency life-saving technicians with BCPR), Group C (ACLS by physicians without BCPR) and Group D (ACLS by physicians with BCPR). The outcome data included 1-month survival and neurological outcomes determined by the cerebral performance category. Among the 95,072 bystander-witnessed arrest patients, 7,722 (8.1%) were alive at 1 month, including 2,754 (2.9%) with good performance and 3,171 (3.3%) with vegetative status or worse. BCPR occurred in 42% of bystander-witnessed arrests. In comparison with Group A, the rates of good-performance survival were significantly higher in Group B (odds ratio (OR), 2.23; 95% confidence interval, 2.05 to 2.42; P < 0.01) and Group D (OR, 2.80; 95% confidence interval, 2.28 to 3.43; P < 0.01), while no significant difference was seen for Group C (OR, 1.18; 95% confidence interval, 0.86 to 1.61; P = 0.32). The occurrence of vegetative status or worse at 1 month was highest in Group C (OR, 1.92; 95% confidence interval, 1.55 to 2.37; P < 0.01). In this registry-based study, BCPR significantly improved the survival of OHCA with good cerebral outcome. The groups with BCPR and ACLS by physicians had the best outcomes. However, receiving ACLS by physicians without preceding BCPR significantly

  16. Oxygen titration after resuscitation from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a multi-centre, randomised controlled pilot study (the EXACT pilot trial).

    Bray, Janet E; Hein, Cindy; Smith, Karen; Stephenson, Michael; Grantham, Hugh; Finn, Judith; Stub, Dion; Cameron, Peter

    2018-04-20

    Recent studies suggest the administration of 100% oxygen to hyperoxic levels following return-of-spontaneous-circulation (ROSC) post-cardiac arrest may be harmful. However, the feasibility and safety of oxygen titration in the prehospital setting is unknown. We conducted a multi-centre, phase-2 study testing whether prehospital titration of oxygen results in an equivalent number of patients arriving at hospital with oxygen saturations SpO2 ≥ 94%. We enrolled unconscious adults with: sustained ROSC; initial shockable rhythm; an advanced airway; and an SpO2 ≥ 95%. Initially (Sept 2015-March 2016) patients were randomised 1:1 to either 2 litres/minute (L/min) oxygen (titrated) or >10 L/min oxygen (control) via a bag-valve reservoir. However, one site experienced a high number of desaturations (SpO2 titrated arm and this arm was changed (April 2016) to an initial reduction of oxygen to 4 L/min then, if tolerated, to 2 L/min, and the desaturation limit was decreased to titrated (n = 37: 2L/min = 20 and 2-4 L/min = 17) oxygen or control (n = 24). Patients allocated to titrated oxygen were more likely to desaturate compared to controls ((SpO2 titrated: 90% vs. control: 100%) and all patients had a SpO2 ≥ 90%. One patient (control) re-arrested. Survival to hospital discharge was similar. Oxygen titration post-ROSC is feasible in the prehospital environment, but incremental titration commencing at 4L/min oxygen flow may be needed to maintain an oxygen saturation >90% (NCT02499042). Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Pediatric out-of-hospital deaths following hospital discharge: a ...

    Background: Out-of-hospital death among children living in resource poor settings occurs frequently. Little is known about the location and circumstances of child death following a hospital discharge. Objectives: This study aimed to understand the context surrounding out-of-hospital deaths and the barriers to accessing ...

  18. Atrial Fibrillation Following Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest and Targeted Temperature Management - Are We Giving It the Attention it Deserves?

    Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig; Hassager, Christian; Erlinge, David

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Atrial fibrillation has been associated with increased mortality in the general population and mixed populations of critical ill. Atrial fibrillation can also affect patients during post-cardiac arrest care. We sought to assess the prognostic implications of atrial fibrillation follow...

  19. The impact of serum potassium-influencing antihypertensive drugs on the risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest : A case–control study

    Alharbi, Fawaz F; Souverein, Patrick C.; de Groot, Mark C.H.; Blom, Marieke T.; de Boer, Anthonius; Klungel, Olaf H.; Tan, Hanno L.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is a complex multifactorial event and most commonly caused by ventricular tachycardia/ fibrillation (VT/ VF). Some antihypertensive drugs could induce hypokalaemia or hyperkalaemia, which may increase susceptibility to VT/VF and SCA. Objective: To assess the

  20. The impact of serum potassium-influencing antihypertensive drugs on the risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: A case-control study

    Alharbi, Fawaz F.; Souverein, Patrick C.; de Groot, Mark C. H.; Blom, Marieke T.; de Boer, Anthonius; Klungel, Olaf H.; Tan, Hanno L.

    2017-01-01

    AimsSudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is a complex multifactorial event and most commonly caused by ventricular tachycardia/ fibrillation (VT/ VF). Some antihypertensive drugs could induce hypokalaemia or hyperkalaemia, which may increase susceptibility to VT/VF and SCA. ObjectiveTo assess the association

  1. Out-of-Hospital therapeutic hypothermia. A Systematic Review

    María Nélida Conejo Pérez

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated therapeutic mild hypothermia improves neurological outcome of patients after suffering an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.Other studies in animals suggest that the sooner hypothermia is started after return of spontaneous circulation, the lower neurological symptoms are suffered by patients.The aim of this work is to know the efficiency of the therapeutic moderated hipotermia after the cardiopulmonar resuscitation realized extra hospitable.Methods: We made a literature search in Medline (Pubmed, Cinahl, Cuiden, Cochrane Library and the Joanna Briggs Institute, combining mesh and free terms; and searched in the journals Circulation, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine Journal manually last year. We selected systematic reviews and randomized and nonrandomized clinical trials which had contrasted in-hospital and out-of-hospital TMH with over 18 years patients.Results: Only 5 articles met the inclusion criteria of the 35 selected: four randomized clinical trials and one nonrandomized. They were then subjected to a critical methodological evaluation (CASPe and statistic evaluation (IDIPaz.Conclusions: Pre hospital TMH is an effective and safe technique in comatose patients after being resuscitated from cardiac arrest, improving the neurological status at hospital discharge.

  2. Distance to invasive heart centre, performance of acute coronary angiography, and angioplasty and associated outcome in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    Tranberg, Tinne; Knudsen Lippert, Freddy; Christensen, Erika F

    2017-01-01

    (OHCA) patients. Methods and results: Nationwide historical follow-up study of 41 186 unselected OHCA patients, in whom resuscitation was attempted between 2001 and 2013, identified through the Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry. We observed an increase in the proportion of patients receiving bystander CPR...... (18% in 2001, 60% in 2013, P return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) (10% in 2001, 29% in 2013, P 

  3. Single versus Serial Measurements of Neuron-Specific Enolase and Prediction of Poor Neurological Outcome in Persistently Unconscious Patients after Out-Of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest - A TTM-Trial Substudy

    Wiberg, Sebastian; Hassager, Christian; Stammet, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    were included from sites participating in the TTM-trial biobank sub study. NSE was measured at 24, 48 and 72 hours after ROSC and follow-up was concluded after 180 days. The primary end point was poor neurological function or death defined by a cerebral performance category score (CPC-score) of 3 to 5...... of the biomarker neuron-specific enolase (NSE) in combination with other predictors of outcome in patients admitted after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). This study sought to investigate the ability of NSE to predict poor outcome in patients remaining unconscious at day three after OHCA. In addition....... RESULTS: A total of 685 (73%) patients participated in the study. At day three after OHCA 63 (9%) patients had died and 473 (69%) patients were not awake. In these patients, a single NSE measurement at 48 hours predicted poor outcome with an area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC...

  4. Impact of time to return of spontaneous circulation on neuroprotective effect of targeted temperature management at 33 or 36 degrees in comatose survivors of out-of hospital cardiac arrest

    Kjaergaard, Jesper; Nielsen, Niklas; Winther-Jensen, Matilde

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Time to Return of Spontaneous Circulation (ROSC) has a plausible relation to severity of hypoxic injury before and during resuscitation in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest (OHCA), and has consistently been associated with adverse outcome. The effect of Targeted Temperature Management (TTM) may...... not be similar over the full spectrum of time to ROSC. This study investigated the possible beneficial effect of targeting 33°C over 36°C on the prognostic importance of time to ROSC. METHODS: In predefined sub-study of the TTM-trial (NEJM 2013) we investigated the relationship between time to ROSC, level of TTM...... and mortality and neurological outcome as assessed by the Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) scale and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) after 180 days. RESULTS: Prolonged time to ROSC was significantly associated with increased mortality with a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.02 per minute (95% CI 1.01-1.02). Level of TTM...

  5. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation by trained responders versus lay persons and outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: A community observational study.

    Park, Yoo Mi; Shin, Sang Do; Lee, Yu Jin; Song, Kyoung Jun; Ro, Young Sun; Ahn, Ki Ok

    2017-09-01

    The study aims to compare bystander processes of care (cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and defibrillation) and outcomes for witnessed presumed cardiac etiology in OHCA patients in whom initial resuscitation was provided by dedicated trained responder (TR) versus lay person (LP) bystanders. Data on witnessed and presumed cardiac OHCA in adults (15 years or older) from 2011 to 2015 in a metropolitan city with 10 million persons were collected, excluding cases in which the information on TRs, bystander CPR, defibrillation, and clinical outcomes was unknown. Exposure variables were TRs who were legally designated with CPR education and response and LPs who were bystanders who witnessed the OHCA by chance. The primary/secondary/tertiary outcomes were a good cerebral performance category (CPC) of 1 or 2, survival to discharge, and bystander defibrillation. A multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to calculate the adjusted odds ratio (AOR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusting for potential confounders. Of 20,984 OHCA events, 6475 cases were ultimately analyzed. The TR group constituted 6.4% of the cases, and the patients showed significantly better survival and a good CPC. From the multivariable logistic regression analysis of the outcomes, by comparing the TR group with the LP group, the AOR (95% CIs) was 1.49 (1.04-2.15) for a good CPC, 1.59 (1.20-2.11) for survival to discharge, and 10.02 (7.04-14.26) for bystander defibrillation. The TR group witnessed a relatively low proportion of OHCA but was associated with better survival outcomes and good neurological recovery through higher CPR rates and defibrillation of adults older than 15 years with witnessed OHCA in a metropolitan city. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Myocardial infarction is a frequent cause of exercise-related resuscitated out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in a general non-athletic population

    Søholm, Helle; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig

    2014-01-01

    -athletic population. METHODS: Consecutive patients with OHCA were admitted with return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) or on-going resuscitation at hospital arrival (2002-2011). Patient charts were reviewed for post-resuscitation data. Exercise was defined as moderate/vigorous physical activity. RESULTS: A total...

  7. Use of cardiocerebral resuscitation or AHA/ERC 2005 Guidelines is associated with improved survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Salmen, Marcus; Ewy, Gordon A; Sasson, Comilla

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether the use of cardiocerebral resuscitation (CCR) or AHA/ERC 2005 Resuscitation Guidelines improved patient outcomes from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) compared to older guidelines. Systematic review and meta-analysis. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library databases. We also hand-searched study references and consulted experts. Design: randomised controlled trials and observational studies. OHCA patients, age >17 years. 'Control' protocol versus 'Study' protocol. 'Control' protocol defined as AHA/ERC 2000 Guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). 'Study' protocol defined as AHA/ERC 2005 Guidelines for CPR, or a CCR protocol. Survival to hospital discharge. High-quality or medium-quality studies, as measured by the Newcastle Ottawa Scale using predefined categories. Twelve observational studies met inclusion criteria. All the three studies using CCR demonstrated significantly improved survival compared to use of AHA 2000 Guidelines, as did five of the nine studies using AHA/ERC 2005 Guidelines. Pooled data demonstrate that use of a CCR protocol has an unadjusted OR of 2.26 (95% CI 1.64 to 3.12) for survival to hospital discharge among all cardiac arrest patients. Among witnessed ventricular fibrillation/ventricular tachycardia (VF/VT) patients, CCR increased survival by an OR of 2.98 (95% CI 1.92 to 4.62). Studies using AHA/ERC 2005 Guidelines showed an overall trend towards increased survival, but significant heterogeneity existed among these studies. We demonstrate an association with improved survival from OHCA when CCR protocols or AHA/ERC 2005 Guidelines are compared to use of older guidelines. In the subgroup of patients with witnessed VF/VT, there was a threefold increase in OHCA survival when CCR was used. CCR appears to be a promising resuscitation protocol for Emergency Medical Services providers in increasing survival from OHCA. Future research will need to be conducted to directly compare AHA/ERC 2010

  8. Effects of the administration of 2,3-butanedione monoxime during conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation on ischaemic contracture and resuscitability in a pig model of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Lee, Byung Kook; Jeung, Kyung Woon; Choi, Sung Soo; Park, Sang Wook; Yun, Seong Woo; Lee, Sung Min; Kim, Nan Yeol; Heo, Tag; Min, Yong Il

    2015-02-01

    Ischaemic contracture compromises the haemodynamic effectiveness of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and resuscitability. 2,3-Butanedione monoxime (BDM) reduced ischaemic contracture by inhibiting actin-myosin crossbridge formation in an isolated heart model. We investigated the effects of BDM on ischaemic contracture and resuscitation outcomes in a pig model of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). After 15min of untreated ventricular fibrillation, followed by 8min of basic life support, 16 pigs were randomised to receive either 2mlkg(-1) of BDM solution (25gl(-1)) or 2mlkg(-1) of saline during advanced cardiac life support (ACLS). During the ACLS, the control group showed an increase in left ventricular (LV) wall thickness from 10.0mm (10.0-10.8) to 13.0mm (13.0-13.0) and a decrease in LV chamber area from 8.13cm(2) (7.59-9.29) to 7.47cm(2) (5.84-8.43). In contrast, the BDM group showed a decrease in the LV wall thickness from 10mm (9.0-10.8) to 8.5mm (7.0-9.8) and an increase in the LV chamber area from 9.86cm(2) (7.22-12.39) to 12.15 cm(2) (8.02-14.40). Mixed model analyses of the LV wall thickness and LV chamber area revealed significant group effects and group-time interactions. Spontaneous circulation was restored in four (50%) animals in the control group and in eight (100%) animals in the BDM group (p=0.077). All the resuscitated animals survived during an intensive care period of 4h. BDM administered during cardiopulmonary resuscitation reversed ischaemic contracture in a pig model of OHCA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Are regional variations in activity of dispatcher-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation associated with out-of-hospital cardiac arrests outcomes? A nation-wide population-based cohort study.

    Nishi, Taiki; Kamikura, Takahisa; Funada, Akira; Myojo, Yasuhiro; Ishida, Tetsuya; Inaba, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    Dispatcher-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation (DA-CPR) impacts the rates of bystander CPR (BCPR) and survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs). This study aimed to elucidate whether regional variations in indexes for BCPR and emergency medical service (EMS) may be associated with OHCA outcomes. We conducted a population-based observational study involving 157,093 bystander-witnessed, resuscitation-attempted OHCAs without physician involvement between 2007 and 2011. For each index of BCPR and EMS, we classified the 47 prefectures into the following three groups: advanced, intermediate, and developing regions. Nominal logit analysis followed by multivariable logistic regression including OHCA backgrounds was employed to examine the association between neurologically favourable 1-month survival, and regional classifications based on BCPR- and EMS-related indexes. Logit analysis including all regional classifications revealed that the number of BLS training course participants per population or bystander's own performance of BCPR without DA-CPR was not associated with the survival. Multivariable logistic regression including the OHCA backgrounds known to be associated with survival (BCPR provision, arrest aetiology, initial rhythm, patient age, time intervals of witness-to-call and call-to-arrival at patient), the following regional classifications based on DA-CPR but not on EMS were associated with survival: sensitivity of DA-CPR [adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence intervals) for advanced region; those for intermediate region, with developing region as reference, 1.277 (1.131-1.441); 1.162 (1.058-1.277)]; the proportion of bystanders to follow DA-CPR [1.749 (1.554-1.967); 1.280 (1.188-1.380)]. Good outcomes of bystander-witnessed OHCAs correlate with regions having higher sensitivity of DA-CPR and larger proportion of bystanders to follow DA-CPR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation or uncontrolled donation after the circulatory determination of death following out-of-hospital refractory cardiac arrest-An ethical analysis of an unresolved clinical dilemma.

    Dalle Ave, Anne L; Shaw, David M; Gardiner, Dale

    2016-11-01

    The availability of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation (E-CPR), for use in refractory out-of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), is increasing. In parallel, some countries have developed uncontrolled donation after circulatory determination of death (uDCDD) programs using ECMO to preserve organs for transplantation purposes. When facing a refractory OHCA, how does the medical team choose between initiating ECMO as part of an E-CPR protocol or ECMO as part of a uDCDD protocol? To answer these questions we conducted a literature review on E-CPR compared to uDCDD protocols using ECMO and analyzed the raised ethical issues. Our analysis reveals that the inclusion criteria in E-CPR and uDCDD protocols are similar. There may be a non-negligible risk of including patients in a uDCDD protocol, when the patient might have been saved by the use of E-CPR. In order to avoid the fatal error of letting a saveable patient die, safeguards are necessary. We recommend: (1) the development of internationally accepted termination of resuscitation guidelines that would have to be satisfied prior to inclusion of patients in any uDCDD protocol, (2) the choice regarding modalities of ongoing resuscitation during transfer should be focused on the primary priority of attempting to save the life of patients, (3) only centers of excellence in life-saving resuscitation should initiate or maintain uDCDD programs, (4) E-CPR should be clinically considered first before the initiation of any uDCDD protocol, and (5) there should be no discrimination in the availability of access to E-CPR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Chest compression-only versus conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation for bystander-witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of medical origin: A propensity score-matched cohort from 143,500 patients.

    Kitamura, Tetsuhisa; Kiyohara, Kosuke; Nishiyama, Chika; Kiguchi, Takeyuki; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Kawamura, Takashi; Iwami, Taku

    2018-05-01

    Current cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) guidelines do not define the optimal type of CPR (chest compression-only CPR [CCCPR] or conventional CPR with rescue breathing [CCRB]) to be performed by bystanders when they witness someone collapse. Using a nationwide database of 1.17 million patients who underwent out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in Japan, we enrolled consecutive bystander-witnessed OHCAs of medical origin with resuscitation attempts from January 2005 through December 2014. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to assess the association between the type of bystander CPR and the OHCA outcome after one-to-one propensity score matching for CCCPR versus CCRB. The primary outcome measure was one-month survival with a favorable neurological outcome, defined as a cerebral performance category of 1 or 2. Among 143,500 eligible patients with bystander-witnessed OHCAs receiving bystander-initiated CPR, 71.4% received CCCPR and 28.6% received CCRB. In the univariate analysis, the proportion of one-month survival cases with favorable neurological outcome was lower in the CCCPR group than the CCRB group (5.6% [5749/102,487] vs. 6.5% [2682/41,013], odds ratio [OR]; 0.85 [95% confidence interval {CI}; 0.81-0.89]). However, in the multivariate analysis, the CCCPR group showed a more favorable neurological outcome than the CCRB group (adjusted OR 1.12, 95% CI; 1.06-1.19). In the propensity-matched cohort, the CCCPR group also showed a more favorable neurological outcome than the CCRB group (7.2% [2894/40,096] vs. 6.5% [2610/40,096], adjusted OR 1.14, 95% CI; 1.09-1.22). CCCPR is an acceptable resuscitation technique for lay-rescuers responding to bystander witnessed OHCA of presumed medical origin. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Impact of time to return of spontaneous circulation on neuroprotective effect of targeted temperature management at 33 or 36 degrees in comatose survivors of out-of hospital cardiac arrest.

    Kjaergaard, Jesper; Nielsen, Niklas; Winther-Jensen, Matilde; Wanscher, Michael; Pellis, Tommaso; Kuiper, Michael; Hartvig Thomsen, Jakob; Wetterslev, Jørn; Cronberg, Tobias; Bro-Jeppesen, John; Erlinge, David; Friberg, Hans; Søholm, Helle; Gasche, Yvan; Horn, Janneke; Hovdenes, Jan; Stammet, Pascal; Wise, Matthew P; Åneman, Anders; Hassager, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Time to Return of Spontaneous Circulation (ROSC) has a plausible relation to severity of hypoxic injury before and during resuscitation in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest (OHCA), and has consistently been associated with adverse outcome. The effect of Targeted Temperature Management (TTM) may not be similar over the full spectrum of time to ROSC. This study investigated the possible beneficial effect of targeting 33°C over 36°C on the prognostic importance of time to ROSC. In predefined sub-study of the TTM-trial (NEJM 2013) we investigated the relationship between time to ROSC, level of TTM and mortality and neurological outcome as assessed by the Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) scale and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) after 180 days. Prolonged time to ROSC was significantly associated with increased mortality with a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.02 per minute (95% CI 1.01-1.02). Level of TTM did not modify the association of time to ROSC and mortality, pinteraction=0.85. Prolonged time to ROSC was associated with reduced odds of surviving with a favorable neurological outcome for CPC (p=0.008 for CPC 1-2) and mRS (p=0.17, mRS 0-3) with no significant interaction with level of TTM. Time to ROSC remains a significant prognostic factor in comatose OHCA patients with regards to risk of death and risk of adverse neurological outcome. For any time to ROSC, targeting 33°C in TTM was not associated with benefit with regards to reducing mortality or risk of adverse neurological outcome compared to targeting 36°C. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Augmented survival of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims with the use of mobile phones for emergency communication under the DA-CPR protocol getting information from callers beside the victim.

    Maeda, Tetsuo; Yamashita, Akira; Myojo, Yasuhiro; Wato, Yukihiro; Inaba, Hideo

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the impacts of emergency calls made using mobile phones on the quality of dispatcher-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation (DA-CPR) and survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) that were not witnessed by emergency medical service (EMS). In this prospective study, we collected data for 2530 DA-CPR-attempted medical emergency cases (517 using mobile phones and 2013 using landline phones) and 2980 non-EMS-witnessed OHCAs (600 using mobile phones and 2380 using landline phones). Time factors and quality of DA-CPR, backgrounds of callers and outcomes of OHCAs were compared between mobile and landline phone groups. Emergency calls are much more frequently placed beside the arrest victim in mobile phone group (52.7% vs. 17.2%). The positive predictive value and acceptance rate of DA-CPR in mobile phone group (84.7% and 80.6%, respectively) were significantly higher than those in landline group (79.2% and 70.9%). The proportion of good-quality bystander CPR in mobile phone group was significantly higher than that in landline group (53.5% vs. 45.0%). When analysed for all non-EMS-witnessed OHCAs, rates of 1-month survival and 1-year neurologically favourable survival in mobile phone group (7.8% and 3.5%, respectively) were higher than those in landline phone group (4.6% and 1.9%; pmobile phone calls were associated with increased 1-month survival in the subgroup of OHCAs receiving bystander CPR (adjusted odds ratio, 1.84; 95% CI, 1.15-2.92). Emergency calls made using mobile phones are likely to augment the survival from OHCAs by improving DA-CPR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Use of a geographic information system to identify differences in automated external defibrillator installation in urban areas with similar incidence of public out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a retrospective registry-based study.

    Fredman, David; Haas, Jan; Ban, Yifang; Jonsson, Martin; Svensson, Leif; Djarv, Therese; Hollenberg, Jacob; Nordberg, Per; Ringh, Mattias; Claesson, Andreas

    2017-06-02

    Early defibrillation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is of importance to improve survival. In many countries the number of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) is increasing, but the use is low. Guidelines suggest that AEDs should be installed in densely populated areas and in locations with many visitors. Attempts have been made to identify optimal AED locations based on the incidence of OHCA using geographical information systems (GIS), but often on small datasets and the studies are seldom reproduced. The aim of this paper is to investigate if the distribution of public AEDs follows the incident locations of public OHCAs in urban areas of Stockholm County, Sweden. OHCA data were obtained from the Swedish Register for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and AED data were obtained from the Swedish AED Register. Urban areas in Stockholm County were objectively classified according to the pan-European digital mapping tool, Urban Atlas (UA). Furthermore, we reclassified and divided the UA land cover data into three classes (residential, non-residential and other areas). GIS software was used to spatially join and relate public AED and OHCA data and perform computations on relations and distance. Between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2014 a total of 804 OHCAs occurred in public locations in Stockholm County and by December 2013 there were 1828 AEDs available. The incidence of public OHCAs was similar in residential (47.3%) and non-residential areas (43.4%). Fewer AEDs were present in residential areas than in non-residential areas (29.4% vs 68.8%). In residential areas the median distance between OHCAs and AEDs was significantly greater than in non-residential areas (288 m vs 188 m, p<0.001). The majority of public OHCAs occurred in areas classified in UA as 'residential areas' with limited AED accessibility. These areas need to be targeted for AED installation and international guidelines need to take geographical location into account when suggesting

  15. Payment of hospital cardiac services.

    Unger, W J

    1991-01-01

    This report describes how acute-care community hospitals in the United States get paid for services when their patients either are entitled to Medicare or Medicaid benefits or subscribe to a Blue Cross or Blue Shield plan, a commercial insurance plan, a health maintenance organization, a preferred provider organization, or some other third-party payment mechanism. The focus of this report is on cardiac services, which are the most common type of inpatient services provided by acute-care community hospitals. Over the past three decades, extraordinary advances in medical and surgical technologies as well as healthier life-styles have cut the annual death rate for coronary heart disease in half. Despite this progress, cardiovascular disease remains the number one cause of hospitalization. On average nationwide, diseases and disorders of the circulatory system are the primary reason for 17 percent of all patient admissions, and among the nation's 35 million Medicare beneficiaries they are the primary reason for 25 percent of all admissions. In the United States heart disease is the leading cause of death and a major cause of morbidity. Its diagnosis and treatment are often complex and costly, often requiring multiple hospitalizations and years of medical management. To focus management attention and resources on the immense cardiology marketplace, many hospitals have hired individuals with strong clinical backgrounds to manage their cardiology programs. These "front-line" managers play a key role in coordinating a hospital's services for patients with cardiovascular disease. Increasingly, these managers are being asked to become active participants in the reimbursement process. This report was designed to meet their needs. Because this report describes common reimbursement principles and practices applicable to all areas of hospital management and because it provides a "tool kit" of analytical, planning, and forecasting techniques, it could also be useful to hospital

  16. [Out of hospital deliveries: incidence, obstetrical characteristics and perinatal outcome].

    Zur, M; Hadar, A; Sheiner, E; Mazor, M

    2003-01-01

    Traditionally, women used to deliver their babies at home. In 1927, in England and Wales, 85% of births took place at home. By 1970 the position was reversed. The move from home to institutional delivery has been accompanied by changes in the institutions themselves and in the type of care provider. There are two kinds of out-of-hospital deliveries: 1. Planned home deliveries--women who decide to deliver in their home with the assistance of midwives or other consultant obstetric facilities. Few cases from this group, however, end up in the hospital; 2. Unplanned home deliveries or delivery en-route to the hospital--when women enter the active phase of labor rapidly, resulting in accidental out-of-hospital deliveries. The study aims to review the available literature and to describe the incidence, obstetrical characteristics and perinatal outcome of out-of-hospital deliveries.

  17. Neurologic Function and Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients Following Targeted Temperature Management at 33°C vs 36°C After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Cronberg, Tobias; Lilja, Gisela; Horn, Janneke; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Wise, Matt P.; Pellis, Tommaso; Hovdenes, Jan; Gasche, Yvan; Åneman, Anders; Stammet, Pascal; Erlinge, David; Friberg, Hans; Hassager, Christian; Kuiper, Michael; Wanscher, Michael; Bosch, Frank; Cranshaw, Julius; Kleger, Gian-Reto; Persson, Stefan; Undén, Johan; Walden, Andrew; Winkel, Per; Wetterslev, Jørn; Nielsen, Niklas

    2015-01-01

    Brain injury affects neurologic function and quality of life in survivors after cardiac arrest. To compare the effects of 2 target temperature regimens on long-term cognitive function and quality of life after cardiac arrest. In this multicenter, international, parallel group, assessor-masked

  18. Neurologic Function and Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients Following Targeted Temperature Management at 33°C vs 36°C After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    Cronberg, Tobias; Lilja, Gisela; Horn, Janneke

    2015-01-01

    from analysis for a total sample size of 939. INTERVENTIONS: Targeted temperature management at 33°C vs 36°C. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Cognitive function was measured by the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and assessed by observers through the Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline...... summary score was 46.8 (13.8) and 47.5 (13.8) (P = .45), comparable to the population norm. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Quality of life was good and similar in patients with cardiac arrest receiving targeted temperature management at 33°C or 36°C. Cognitive function was similar in both intervention groups......IMPORTANCE: Brain injury affects neurologic function and quality of life in survivors after cardiac arrest. OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of 2 target temperature regimens on long-term cognitive function and quality of life after cardiac arrest. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS...

  19. Cardiac Arrest and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Outcome Reports: Update of the Utstein Resuscitation Registry Templates for Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest A Statement for Healthcare Professionals From a Task Force of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (American Heart Association, European Resuscitation Council, Australian and New Zealand Council on Resuscitation, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, InterAmerican Heart Foundation, Resuscitation Council of Southern Africa, Resuscitation Council of Asia); and the American Heart Association Emergency Cardiovascular Care Committee and the Council on Cardiopulmonary, Critical Care, Perioperative and Resuscitation

    Perkins, Gavin D.; Jacobs, Ian G.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Berg, Robert A.; Bhanji, Farhan; Biarent, Dominique; Bossaert, Leo L.; Brett, Stephen J.; Chamberlain, Douglas; de Caen, Allan R.; Deakin, Charles D.; Finn, Judith C.; Gräsner, Jan-Thorsten; Hazinski, Mary Fran; Iwami, Taku; Koster, Rudolph W.; Lim, Swee Han; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming; McNally, Bryan F.; Morley, Peter T.; Morrison, Laurie J.; Monsieurs, Koenraad G.; Montgomery, William; Nichol, Graham; Okada, Kazuo; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock; Travers, Andrew H.; Nolan, Jerry P.; Aikin, Richard P.; Böttiger, Bernd W.; Callaway, Clifton W.; Castren, Maaret K.; Eisenberg, Mickey S.; Kleinman, Monica E.; Kloeck, David A.; Kloeck, Walter G.; Mancini, Mary E.; Neumar, Robert W.; Ornato, Joseph P.; Paiva, Edison F.; Peberdy, Mary Ann; Soar, Jasmeet; Sierra, Alfredo F.; Stanton, David; Zideman, David A.; Rea, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Utstein-style guidelines contribute to improved public health internationally by providing a structured framework with which to compare emergency medical services systems. Advances in resuscitation science, new insights into important predictors of outcome from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, and

  20. Out-of-hospital noninvasive ventilation: epidemiology, technology and equipment

    John Scott Baird

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Noninvasive ventilation has been utilized successfully in the pre- and out-of-hospital settings for a variety of disorders, including respiratory distress syndrome in neonates, neurologic and pulmonary diseases in infants and children, and heart failure as well as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in adults. A variety of interfaces as well as mechanical positive pressure devices have been used: simple continuous positive airway pressure devices are available which do not require sophisticated equipment, while a broad spectrum of ventilators have been used to provide bilevel positive airway pressure. Extensive training of transport teams may be important, particularly when utilizing bilevel positive airway pressure in infants and children.

  1. Why persons choose to opt out of an exception from informed consent cardiac arrest trial.

    Nelson, Maria J; Deiorio, Nicole M; Schmidt, Terri A; Zive, Dana M; Griffiths, Denise; Newgard, Craig D

    2013-06-01

    We sought to characterize persons who requested to opt out of an exception from informed consent (EFIC) cardiac arrest trial and their reasons for opting out. At one site of a multi-site, out-of-hospital, cardiac arrest EFIC trial (September 2007 - June 2009), persons who did not want to participate in the study could request an opt-out "NO STUDY" bracelet to prevent trial enrollment. We surveyed all persons who requested a bracelet by phone interview, web or mail. Opt-out bracelets were advertised in all public communication about the study, including community consultation and public disclosure efforts. Survey questions included demographics, Likert scale items about attitudes toward the trial and research in general, plus open-ended questions. We used descriptive statistics for standardized questions and qualitative analysis to identify common themes from open-ended questions. Sixty bracelets were requested by 50 individuals. Surveys were completed by 46 persons (92% response rate). Seventy percent of respondents agreed emergency research is important, but 87% objected to any research without consent. In the qualitative analysis, 5 overlapping themes emerged: questioning the ethics of EFIC research; concerns about how the study would impact end-of-life preferences; subjective emotions including sarcasm, anger, and allusions to past unethical research; negative reference to unrelated public health controversies; and objections to the study protocol based on misinformation. A primary reason for opting out from this EFIC trial was opposition to all research without informed consent, despite stated support for emergency research. Understanding the demographics and beliefs of persons opting out may aid researchers planning EFIC studies and help provide clarity in future EFIC-related community education efforts. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Out of hospital emergencies towards a safety culture].

    Cano-del Pozo, M I; Obón-Azuara, B; Valderrama-Rodríguez, M; Revilla-López, C; Brosed-Yuste, C; Fajardo-Trasobares, E; Garcés-Baquero, P; Mateo-Clavería, J; Molina-Estrada, I; Perona-Flores, N; Salcedo-de Dios, S; Tomé-Rey, A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to measure the degree of safety culture (CS) among healthcare professional workers of an out-of-hospital Emergency Medical Service. Most patient safety studies have been conducted in relation to the hospital rather than pre-hospital Emergency Medical Services. The objective is to analyze the dimensions with lower scores in order to plan futures strategies. A descriptive study using the AHRQ (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality) questionnaire. The questionnaire was delivered to all healthcare professionals workers of 061 Advanced Life Support Units of Aragón, during the month of August 2013. The response rate was 55%. Main strengths detected: an adequate number of staff (96%), good working conditions (89%), tasks supported from immediate superior (77%), teamwork climate (74%), and non-punitive environment to report adverse events (68%). Areas for improvement: insufficient training in patient safety (53%) and lack of feedback of incidents reported (50%). The opportunities for improvement identified focus on the training of professionals in order to ensure safer care, while extending the safety culture. Also, the implementation of a system of notification and registration of adverse events in the service is deemed necessary. Copyright © 2014 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Treatment of out-of-hospital supraventricular tachycardia: adenosine vs verapamil.

    Brady, W J; DeBehnke, D J; Wickman, L L; Lindbeck, G

    1996-06-01

    To compare the use of adenosine and the use of verapamil as out-of-hospital therapy for supraventricular tachycardia (SVT). A period of prospective adenosine use (March 1993 to February 1994) was compared with a historical control period of verapamil use (March 1990 to February 1991) for SVT. Data were obtained for SVT patients treated in a metropolitan, fire-department-based paramedic system serving a population of approximately 1 million persons. Standard drug protocols were used and patient outcomes (i.e., conversion rates, complications, and recurrences) were monitored. During the adenosine treatment period, 105 patients had SVT; 87 (83%) received adenosine, of whom 60 (69%) converted to a sinus rhythm (SR). Vagal maneuvers (VM) resulted in restoration of SR in 8 patients (7.6%). Some patients received adenosine for non-SVT rhythms: 7 sinus tachycardia, 18 atrial fibrilation, 7 wide-complex tachycardia (WCT), and 2 ventricular tachycardia; no non-SVT rhythm converted to SR and none of these patients experienced an adverse effect. Twenty-five patients were hemodynamically unstable (systolic blood pressure fibrillation). Recurrence of SVT was noted in 2 adenosine patients and 2 verapamil patients in the out-of-hospital setting and in 23 adenosine patients and 15 verapamil patients after ED arrival, necessitating additional therapy (p = 0.48 and 0.88, for recurrence rates and types of additional therapies, respectively). Hospital diagnoses, outcomes, and ED dispositions were similar for the 2 groups. Adenosine and verapamil were equally successful in converting out-of-hospital SVT in patients with similar etiologies responsible for the SVT. Recurrence of SVT occurred at similar rates for the 2 medications. Rhythm misidentification remains a common issue in out-of-hospital cardiac care in this emergency medical services system.

  4. Compression force-depth relationship during out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Tomlinson, A E; Nysaether, J; Kramer-Johansen, J; Steen, P A; Dorph, E

    2007-03-01

    Recent clinical studies reporting the high frequency of inadequate chest compression depth (compression depth in certain patients. Using a specially designed monitor/defibrillator equipped with a sternal pad fitted with an accelerometer and a pressure sensor, compression force and depth was measured during CPR in 91 adult out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients. There was a strong non-linear relationship between the force of compression and depth achieved. Mean applied force for all patients was 30.3+/-8.2 kg and mean absolute compression depth 42+/-8 mm. For 87 of 91 patients 38 mm compression depth was obtained with less than 50 kg. Stiffer chests were compressed more forcefully than softer chests (pcompressed more deeply than stiffer chests (p=0.001). The force needed to reach 38 mm compression depth (F38) and mean compression force were higher for males than for females: 29.8+/-14.5 kg versus 22.5+/-10.2 kg (pcompression depth with age, but a significant 1.5 kg mean decrease in applied force for each 10 years increase in age (pcompressions performed. Average residual force during decompression was 1.7+/-1.0 kg, corresponding to an average residual depth of 3+/-2 mm. In most out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims adequate chest compression depth can be achieved by a force<50 kg, indicating that an average sized and fit rescuer should be able to perform effective CPR in most adult patients.

  5. Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest in the Elderly

    Yu-Jang Su

    2008-06-01

    Conclusion: The elderly OHCA cases had an anemic status. The elderly had a higher ROSC rate in cases with relative hyperglycemia and ACS-related OHCA. This finding provides us with the theory of trialing administration of glucose water during resuscitation in OHCA cases.

  6. Therapeutic Hypothermia after In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Children.

    Moler, Frank W; Silverstein, Faye S; Holubkov, Richard; Slomine, Beth S; Christensen, James R; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Meert, Kathleen L; Browning, Brittan; Pemberton, Victoria L; Page, Kent; Gildea, Marianne R; Scholefield, Barnaby R; Shankaran, Seetha; Hutchison, Jamie S; Berger, John T; Ofori-Amanfo, George; Newth, Christopher J L; Topjian, Alexis; Bennett, Kimberly S; Koch, Joshua D; Pham, Nga; Chanani, Nikhil K; Pineda, Jose A; Harrison, Rick; Dalton, Heidi J; Alten, Jeffrey; Schleien, Charles L; Goodman, Denise M; Zimmerman, Jerry J; Bhalala, Utpal S; Schwarz, Adam J; Porter, Melissa B; Shah, Samir; Fink, Ericka L; McQuillen, Patrick; Wu, Theodore; Skellett, Sophie; Thomas, Neal J; Nowak, Jeffrey E; Baines, Paul B; Pappachan, John; Mathur, Mudit; Lloyd, Eric; van der Jagt, Elise W; Dobyns, Emily L; Meyer, Michael T; Sanders, Ronald C; Clark, Amy E; Dean, J Michael

    2017-01-26

    Targeted temperature management is recommended for comatose adults and children after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest; however, data on temperature management after in-hospital cardiac arrest are limited. In a trial conducted at 37 children's hospitals, we compared two temperature interventions in children who had had in-hospital cardiac arrest. Within 6 hours after the return of circulation, comatose children older than 48 hours and younger than 18 years of age were randomly assigned to therapeutic hypothermia (target temperature, 33.0°C) or therapeutic normothermia (target temperature, 36.8°C). The primary efficacy outcome, survival at 12 months after cardiac arrest with a score of 70 or higher on the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, second edition (VABS-II, on which scores range from 20 to 160, with higher scores indicating better function), was evaluated among patients who had had a VABS-II score of at least 70 before the cardiac arrest. The trial was terminated because of futility after 329 patients had undergone randomization. Among the 257 patients who had a VABS-II score of at least 70 before cardiac arrest and who could be evaluated, the rate of the primary efficacy outcome did not differ significantly between the hypothermia group and the normothermia group (36% [48 of 133 patients] and 39% [48 of 124 patients], respectively; relative risk, 0.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.67 to 1.27; P=0.63). Among 317 patients who could be evaluated for change in neurobehavioral function, the change in VABS-II score from baseline to 12 months did not differ significantly between the groups (P=0.70). Among 327 patients who could be evaluated for 1-year survival, the rate of 1-year survival did not differ significantly between the hypothermia group and the normothermia group (49% [81 of 166 patients] and 46% [74 of 161 patients], respectively; relative risk, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.85 to 1.34; P=0.56). The incidences of blood-product use, infection, and serious adverse

  7. What accounting leaves out of hospital financial management.

    Boles, K E; Glenn, J K

    1986-01-01

    As PPS and other fixed-price initiatives replace cost-based reimbursement in the hospital industry, the burden of assuming the risk for business success or failure shifts from the payor to the hospital. As a consequence, theories of risk to the business firm which have found application in other industries now deserve attention by hospital management. Incorporating such risk concepts into hospital strategies and actions requires a view of financial management that goes beyond the generally accepted accounting principles of managing and assigning costs for maximum revenue and profitability. This article examines the financial theory of risk in business firms, illustrates the various components of risk as they apply to a hospital business, and discusses how the hospital management strategies of cost-reduction, marketing, diversification, and multiorganizational affiliation can alter the risk characteristics of a hospital business.

  8. High-Dose Citalopram and Escitalopram and the Risk of Out-of-Hospital Death.

    Ray, Wayne A; Chung, Cecilia P; Murray, Katherine T; Hall, Kathi; Stein, C Michael

    2017-02-01

    Studies demonstrating that higher doses of citalopram (> 40 mg) and escitalopram (> 20 mg) prolong the corrected QT interval prompted regulatory agency warnings, which are controversial, given the absence of confirmatory clinical outcome studies. We compared the risk of potential arrhythmia-related deaths for high doses of these selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) to that for equivalent doses of fluoxetine, paroxetine, and sertraline. The Tennessee Medicaid retrospective cohort study included 54,220 persons 30-74 years of age without cancer or other life-threatening illness who were prescribed high-dose SSRIs from 1998 through 2011. The mean age was 47 years, and 76% were female. Demographic characteristics and comorbidity for individual SSRIs were comparable. Because arrhythmia-related deaths are typically sudden and occur outside the hospital, we analyzed out-of-hospital sudden unexpected death as well as sudden cardiac deaths, a more specific indicator of proarrhythmic effects. The adjusted risk of sudden unexpected death for citalopram did not differ significantly from that for the other SSRIs. The respective hazard ratios (HRs) for citalopram versus escitalopram, fluoxetine, paroxetine, and sertraline were 0.84 (95% CI, 0.40-1.75), 1.24 (95% CI, 0.75-2.05), 0.75 (95% CI, 0.45-1.24), and 1.53 (95% CI, 0.91-2.55). There were no significant differences for sudden cardiac death or all study deaths, nor were there significant differences among high-risk patients (≥ 60 years of age, upper quartile baseline cardiovascular risk). Escitalopram users had no significantly increased risk for any study end point. We found no evidence that risk of sudden unexpected death, sudden cardiac death, or total mortality for high-dose citalopram and escitalopram differed significantly from that for comparable doses of fluoxetine, paroxetine, and sertraline. © Copyright 2016 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  9. A model of survival following pre-hospital cardiac arrest based on the Victorian Ambulance Cardiac Arrest Register.

    Fridman, Masha; Barnes, Vanessa; Whyman, Andrew; Currell, Alex; Bernard, Stephen; Walker, Tony; Smith, Karen L

    2007-11-01

    This study describes the epidemiology of sudden cardiac arrest patients in Victoria, Australia, as captured via the Victorian Ambulance Cardiac Arrest Register (VACAR). We used the VACAR data to construct a new model of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), which was specified in accordance with observed trends. All cases of cardiac arrest in Victoria that were attended by Victorian ambulance services during the period of 2002-2005. Overall survival to hospital discharge was 3.8% among 18,827 cases of OHCA. Survival was 15.7% among 1726 bystander witnessed, adult cardiac arrests of presumed cardiac aetiology, presenting in ventricular fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia (VF/VT), where resuscitation was attempted. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, bystander CPR, cardiac arrest (CA) location, response time, age and sex were predictors of VF/VT, which, in turn, was a strong predictor of survival. The same factors that affected VF/VT made an additional contribution to survival. However, for bystander CPR, CA location and response time this additional contribution was limited to VF/VT patients only. There was no detectable association between survival and age younger than 60 years or response time over 15min. The new model accounts for relationships among predictors of survival. These relationships indicate that interventions such as reduced response times and bystander CPR act in multiple ways to improve survival.

  10. Distinguishing in-hospital and out-of-hospital status epilepticus: clinical implications from a 10-year cohort study.

    Sutter, R; Semmlack, S; Spiegel, R; Tisljar, K; Rüegg, S; Marsch, S

    2017-09-01

    The aim was to determine differences of clinical, treatment and outcome characteristics between patients with in-hospital and out-of-hospital status epilepticus (SE). From 2005 to 2014, clinical data were assessed in adults with SE treated in an academic medical care centre. Clinical characteristics, treatment and outcomes were compared between patients with in-hospital and out-of-hospital SE. Amongst 352 patients, 213 were admitted with SE and 139 developed in-hospital SE. Patients with in-hospital SE had more acute/fatal aetiologies (60% vs. 35%, P Status Epilepticus Severity Score (STESS) was an independent predictor for death in both groups, increased Charlson Comorbidity Index and treatment refractory SE were associated with death only in patients with in-hospital SE. Continuous anaesthesia for refractory SE was associated with increased mortality only in patients with out-of-hospital SE. The area under the receiver operating curve was 0.717 for prediction of death by STESS in patients with in-hospital SE and 0.811 in patients with out-of-hospital SE. Patients with in-hospital SE had more fatal aetiologies and comorbidities, refractory SE, less return to functional baseline, and increased mortality compared to patients with out-of-hospital SE. Whilst the STESS was a robust predictor for death in both groups, the association between continuous anaesthesia and death was limited to out-of-hospital SE. © 2017 EAN.

  11. Extreme temperatures and out-of-hospital coronary deaths in six large Chinese cities.

    Chen, Renjie; Li, Tiantian; Cai, Jing; Yan, Meilin; Zhao, Zhuohui; Kan, Haidong

    2014-12-01

    The seasonal trend of out-of-hospital coronary death (OHCD) and sudden cardiac death has been observed, but whether extreme temperature serves as a risk factor is rarely investigated. We therefore aimed to evaluate the impact of extreme temperatures on OHCDs in China. We obtained death records of 126,925 OHCDs from six large Chinese cities (Harbin, Beijing, Tianjin, Nanjing, Shanghai and Guangzhou) during the period 2009-2011. The short-term associations between extreme temperature and OHCDs were analysed with time-series methods in each city, using generalised additive Poisson regression models. We specified distributed lag non-linear models in studying the delayed effects of extreme temperature. We then applied Bayesian hierarchical models to combine the city-specific effect estimates. The associations between extreme temperature and OHCDs were almost U-shaped or J-shaped. The pooled relative risks (RRs) of extreme cold temperatures over the lags 0-14 days comparing the 1st and 25th centile temperatures were 1.49 (95% posterior interval (PI) 1.26-1.76); the pooled RRs of extreme hot temperatures comparing the 99th and 75th centile temperatures were 1.53 (95% PI 1.27-1.84) for OHCDs. The RRs of extreme temperature on OHCD were higher if the patients with coronary heart disease were old, male and less educated. This multicity epidemiological study suggested that both extreme cold and hot temperatures posed significant risks on OHCDs, and might have important public health implications for the prevention of OHCD or sudden cardiac death. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. Análisis de la inclusión de la policía en la respuesta de emergencias al paro cardiorrespiratorio extrahospitalario Analysis of the inclussion of police personnel on the out of hospital cardiac arrest emergency response

    Andrea Aguilera-Campos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: El presente estudio busca analizar una alternativa al pronóstico de paro cardiorrespiratorio extrahospitalario (PCE como problema de salud pública al involucrar a los cuerpos policiacos en la respuesta de emergencias. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se analizó retrospectivamente un registro de PCE iniciado en junio de 2009. Se contrastó un modelo basado en un número limitado de ambulancias con primera respuesta por la policía. RESULTADOS: La mortalidad fue de 100%, tiempos de respuesta elevados y 10.8% recibió reanimación cardiopulmonar (RCP por testigos presenciales. En 63.7% de los eventos la policía llegaba antes que la ambulancia y en 1.5% el policía dio RCP. El costo por vida salvada fue 5.8-60 millones de pesos en un modelo sólo con ambulancias vs. 0.5-5.5 millones de pesos en un modelo con primera respuesta policiaca. CONCLUSIONES: La intervención de la policía en la ciudad de Querétaro facilitaría la disminución de la mortalidad por PCE a un menor costo.OBJETIVE: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OCHA is a public health problem in which survival depends on community initial response among others. This study tries to analyze what's the proportional cost of enhancing such response by involving the police corps in it. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We analyzed retrospectively an OCHA registry started on June 2009. We contrasted a model with limited number of ambulances and police based first response. RESULTS: Mortality was 100%, response times high and 10.8% of the victims were receiving cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR by bystanders. In 63.7% of the events the police arrived before the ambulance, in 1.5% of these cases the police provided CPR. The cost for each saved life was of 5.8-60 million Mexican pesos per life with only ambulance model vs 0.5-5.5 million Mexican pesos on a police first response model with 12 ambulances. CONCLUSIONS: In Queretaro interventions can be performed taking advantage of the response capacity of the

  13. AFEM Consensus Conference, 2013. AFEM Out-of-Hospital Emergency Care Workgroup Consensus Paper: Advancing Out-of-Hospital Emergency Care in Africa-Advocacy and Development

    N.K. Mould-Millman

    2014-06-01

    Future directions of the AFEM Out-of-Hospital Emergency Care Workgroup include creating an online Toolkit. This will serve as a repository of template documents to guide implementation and development of clinical care, education, transportation, public access, policy and governance.

  14. Cardiac arrest during anesthesia at a University Hospital in Nigeria ...

    Background: We assessed the incidence and outcomes of cardiac arrest during anesthesia in the operating room at our university hospital. A previous study on intraoperative cardiac arrests covered a period from 1994-1998 and since then; anesthetic personnel, equipment, and workload have increased remarkably.

  15. Perinatal outcomes of unplanned out-of-hospital deliveries: a case-control study.

    Pasternak, Yael; Wintner, Eliana Muskin; Shechter-Maor, Gil; Pasternak, Yehonatan; Miller, Netanella; Biron-Shental, Tal

    2018-04-01

    To compare the pregnancy and perinatal outcomes of unplanned home or car births vs. in-hospital deliveries. A retrospective, case-control study of women who underwent unplanned out-of-hospital deliveries vs. in-hospital deliveries from 2004 through 2014. Matching was based on gestational age and parity in a ratio of 2:1. There were no significant differences between the groups regarding demographic criteria, prenatal care and delivery complications. Women who delivered out of hospital (n = 90) had significantly fewer cesarean deliveries (1.1 vs. 10.6%; p = 0.05) and operative deliveries (2.2 vs. 13.3%; p = 0.004) in their obstetrical history than did the control group (n = 180). Significantly more newborns delivered out of the hospital had polycythemia (25.6 vs. 1.7%; p unplanned out-of-hospital deliveries tend to have fewer complications in their previous deliveries. Higher rates of polycythemia and hypothermia require attention for neonates born out of the hospital.

  16. Managing out of hours clinical photography at the University Hospitals Bristol.

    Brinkworth, Simon; Kenny, Alice; Knights, Christina

    2018-04-01

    In recent years, Medical Illustration at University Hospitals Bristol (UHBristol) NHS Foundation Trust has seen a steady increase in photography requests, including the need for out of hours photography provision. This paper details how Medical Illustration at UHBristol decided to manage an out of hours clinical photography service.

  17. Assessment of anxiety and depression in hospitalized cardiac ...

    Results: The anxiety and depression level in hospitalized cardiac patient's was 79.5% ... Conclusion: Depression symptoms are more common among hospitalized patients than in those .... married (95.2 %), house wife (42.8 %), .... Number of reasons accounts the association of ... because Presence of mental stress among.

  18. Reduced Right Ventricular Function Predicts Long-Term Cardiac Re-Hospitalization after Cardiac Surgery.

    Leela K Lella

    Full Text Available The significance of right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF, independent of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF, following isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG and valve procedures remains unknown. The aim of this study is to examine the significance of abnormal RVEF by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR, independent of LVEF in predicting outcomes of patients undergoing isolated CABG and valve surgery.From 2007 to 2009, 109 consecutive patients (mean age, 66 years; 38% female were referred for pre-operative CMR. Abnormal RVEF and LVEF were considered 30 days outcomes included, cardiac re-hospitalization, worsening congestive heart failure and mortality. Mean clinical follow up was 14 months.Forty-eight patients had reduced RVEF (mean 25% and 61 patients had normal RVEF (mean 50% (p<0.001. Fifty-four patients had reduced LVEF (mean 30% and 55 patients had normal LVEF (mean 59% (p<0.001. Patients with reduced RVEF had a higher incidence of long-term cardiac re-hospitalization vs. patients with normal RVEF (31% vs.13%, p<0.05. Abnormal RVEF was a predictor for long-term cardiac re-hospitalization (HR 3.01 [CI 1.5-7.9], p<0.03. Reduced LVEF did not influence long-term cardiac re-hospitalization.Abnormal RVEF is a stronger predictor for long-term cardiac re-hospitalization than abnormal LVEF in patients undergoing isolated CABG and valve procedures.

  19. Recent Trends in Out-of-Hospital Births in the United States.

    MacDorman, Marian F; Declercq, Eugene; Mathews, T J

    2013-01-01

    Although out-of-hospital births are still relatively rare in the United States, it is important to monitor trends in these births, as they can affect patterns of facility usage, clinician training, and resource allocation, as well as health care costs. Trends and characteristics of home and birth center births are analyzed to more completely profile contemporary out-of-hospital births in the United States. National birth certificate data were used to examine a recent increase in out-of-hospital births. After a gradual decline from 1990 to 2004, the number of out-of-hospital births increased from 35,578 in 2004 to 47,028 in 2010. In 2010, 1 in 85 US infants (1.18%) was born outside a hospital; about two-thirds of these were born at home, and most of the rest were born in birth centers. The proportion of home births increased by 41%, from 0.56% in 2004 to 0.79% in 2010, with 10% of that increase occurring in the last year. The proportion of birth center births increased by 43%, from 0.23% in 2004 to 0.33% in 2010, with 14% of the increase in the last year. About 90% of the total increase in out-of hospital births from 2004 to 2010 was a result of increases among non-Hispanic white women, and 1 in 57 births to non-Hispanic white women (1.75%) in 2010 was an out-of-hospital birth. Most home and birth center births were attended by midwives. Home and birth center births in the United States are increasing, and the rate of out-of-hospital births is now at the highest level since 1978. There has been a decline in the risk profile of out-of-hospital births, with a smaller proportion of out-of-hospital births in 2010 than in 2004 occurring to adolescents and unmarried women and fewer preterm, low-birth-weight, and multiple births. © 2013 This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the United States.

  20. Cardiac Arrest and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Outcome Reports: Update of the Utstein Resuscitation Registry Templates for Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Statement for Healthcare Professionals From a Task Force of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (American Heart Association, European Resuscitation Council, Australian and New Zealand Council on Resuscitation, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, InterAmerican Heart Foundation, Resuscitation Council of Southern Africa, Resuscitation Council of Asia); and the American Heart Association Emergency Cardiovascular Care Committee and the Council on Cardiopulmonary, Critical Care, Perioperative and Resuscitation.

    Perkins, Gavin D; Jacobs, Ian G; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Berg, Robert A; Bhanji, Farhan; Biarent, Dominique; Bossaert, Leo L; Brett, Stephen J; Chamberlain, Douglas; de Caen, Allan R; Deakin, Charles D; Finn, Judith C; Gräsner, Jan-Thorsten; Hazinski, Mary Fran; Iwami, Taku; Koster, Rudolph W; Lim, Swee Han; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming; McNally, Bryan F; Morley, Peter T; Morrison, Laurie J; Monsieurs, Koenraad G; Montgomery, William; Nichol, Graham; Okada, Kazuo; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock; Travers, Andrew H; Nolan, Jerry P

    2015-11-01

    Utstein-style guidelines contribute to improved public health internationally by providing a structured framework with which to compare emergency medical services systems. Advances in resuscitation science, new insights into important predictors of outcome from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, and lessons learned from methodological research prompted this review and update of the 2004 Utstein guidelines. Representatives of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation developed an updated Utstein reporting framework iteratively by meeting face to face, by teleconference, and by Web survey during 2012 through 2014. Herein are recommendations for reporting out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Data elements were grouped by system factors, dispatch/recognition, patient variables, resuscitation/postresuscitation processes, and outcomes. Elements were classified as core or supplemental using a modified Delphi process primarily based on respondents' assessment of the evidence-based importance of capturing those elements, tempered by the challenges to collect them. New or modified elements reflected consensus on the need to account for emergency medical services system factors, increasing availability of automated external defibrillators, data collection processes, epidemiology trends, increasing use of dispatcher-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation, emerging field treatments, postresuscitation care, prognostication tools, and trends in organ recovery. A standard reporting template is recommended to promote standardized reporting. This template facilitates reporting of the bystander-witnessed, shockable rhythm as a measure of emergency medical services system efficacy and all emergency medical services system-treated arrests as a measure of system effectiveness. Several additional important subgroups are identified that enable an estimate of the specific contribution of rhythm and bystander actions that are key determinants of outcome. Copyright © 2014 European

  1. Methylphenidate poisoning: an evidence-based consensus guideline for out-of-hospital management.

    Scharman, Elizabeth J; Erdman, Andrew R; Cobaugh, Daniel J; Olson, Kent R; Woolf, Alan D; Caravati, E Martin; Chyka, Peter A; Booze, Lisa L; Manoguerra, Anthony S; Nelson, Lewis S; Christianson, Gwenn; Troutman, William G

    2007-01-01

    A review of US poison center data for 2004 showed over 8,000 ingestions of methylphenidate. A guideline that determines the conditions for emergency department referral and prehospital care could potentially optimize patient outcome, avoid unnecessary emergency department visits, reduce health care costs, and reduce life disruption for patients and caregivers. An evidence-based expert consensus process was used to create the guideline. Relevant articles were abstracted by a trained physician researcher. The first draft of the guideline was created by the lead author. The entire panel discussed and refined the guideline before distribution to secondary reviewers for comment. The panel then made changes based on the secondary review comments. The objective of this guideline is to assist poison center personnel in the appropriate out-of-hospital triage and initial out-of-hospital management of patients with suspected ingestions of methylphenidate by 1) describing the process by which a specialist in poison information should evaluate an exposure to methylphenidate, 2) identifying the key decision elements in managing cases of methylphenidate ingestion, 3) providing clear and practical recommendations that reflect the current state of knowledge, and 4) identifying needs for research. This review focuses on the ingestion of more than a single therapeutic dose of methylphenidate and the effects of an overdose and is based on an assessment of current scientific and clinical information. The expert consensus panel recognizes that specific patient care decisions may be at variance with this guideline and are the prerogative of the patient and the health professionals providing care, considering all of the circumstances involved. This guideline does not substitute for clinical judgment. Recommendations are in chronological order of likely clinical use. The grade of recommendation is in parentheses. 1) All patients with suicidal intent, intentional abuse, or in cases in which

  2. Implementation of a standardized out-of-hospital management method for Parkinson dysphagia.

    Wei, Hongying; Sun, Dongxiu; Liu, Meiping

    2017-12-01

    Our objective is to explore the effectiveness and feasibility of establishing a swallowing management clinic to implement out-of-hospital management for Parkinson disease (PD) patients with dysphagia. Two-hundred seventeen (217) voluntary PD patients with dysphagia in a PD outpatient clinic were divided into a control group with 100 people, and an experimental group with 117 people. The control group was given dysphagia rehabilitation guidance. The experimental group was presented with the standardized out-of-hospital management method as overall management and information and education materials. Rehabilitation efficiency and incidence rate of dysphagia, as well as relevant complications of both groups were compared after a 6-month intervention. Rehabilitation efficiency and the incidence rate of dysphagia including relevant complications of patients treated with the standardized out-of-hospital management were compared with those seen in the control group. The differences have distinct statistics meaning (pdysphagia complications and improve the quality of life in patients with PD.

  3. Cost-effectiveness of Out-of-Hospital Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for Acute Respiratory Failure.

    Thokala, Praveen; Goodacre, Steve; Ward, Matt; Penn-Ashman, Jerry; Perkins, Gavin D

    2015-05-01

    We determine the cost-effectiveness of out-of-hospital continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) compared with standard care for adults presenting to emergency medical services with acute respiratory failure. We developed an economic model using a United Kingdom health care system perspective to compare the costs and health outcomes of out-of-hospital CPAP to standard care (inhospital noninvasive ventilation) when applied to a hypothetical cohort of patients with acute respiratory failure. The model assigned each patient a probability of intubation or death, depending on the patient's characteristics and whether he or she had out-of-hospital CPAP or standard care. The patients who survived accrued lifetime quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and health care costs according to their age and sex. Costs were accrued through intervention and hospital treatment costs, which depended on patient outcomes. All results were converted into US dollars, using the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development purchasing power parities rates. Out-of-hospital CPAP was more effective than standard care but was also more expensive, with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of £20,514 per QALY ($29,720/QALY) and a 49.5% probability of being cost-effective at the £20,000 per QALY ($29,000/QALY) threshold. The probability of out-of-hospital CPAP's being cost-effective at the £20,000 per QALY ($29,000/QALY) threshold depended on the incidence of eligible patients and varied from 35.4% when a low estimate of incidence was used to 93.8% with a high estimate. Variation in the incidence of eligible patients also had a marked influence on the expected value of sample information for a future randomized trial. The cost-effectiveness of out-of-hospital CPAP is uncertain. The incidence of patients eligible for out-of-hospital CPAP appears to be the key determinant of cost-effectiveness. Copyright © 2015 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  4. Safety of Intranasal Fentanyl in the Out-of-Hospital Setting

    Karlsen, Anders P H; Pedersen, Danny M B; Trautner, Sven

    2014-01-01

    : In this prospective observational study, we administered intranasal fentanyl in the out-of-hospital setting to adults and children older than 8 years with severe pain resulting from orthopedic conditions, abdominal pain, or acute coronary syndrome refractory to nitroglycerin spray. Patients received 1 to 3 doses...

  5. People with Intellectual Disabilities in Out-of-Area Specialist Hospitals: What Do Families Think?

    Bonell, Simon; Ali, Afia; Hall, Ian; Chinn, Deborah; Patkas, Ioannis

    2011-01-01

    Background: Little has been published regarding the views of family members of people with intellectual disabilities who are being cared for in out-of-area psychiatric hospitals. This study explores this area with specific reference to whether culturally appropriate services were being provided. Materials and Methods: Sixteen family members were…

  6. Trends in Out-of-Hospital Births in the United States, 1990-2012

    ... to American Indian women, and 0.54% to Asian or Pacific Islander women. In 2012, out-of-hospital births comprised 3%– ... the United States choose home birth. J Midwifery Womens Health 54(2):119–26. 2009. Health Management Associates. Midwifery licensure and discipline program in Washington ...

  7. Transforming Identities through Transforming Care: How People with Learning Disabilities Experience Moving out of Hospital

    Head, Annabel; Ellis-Caird, Helen; Rhodes, Louisa; Parkinson, Kathie

    2018-01-01

    Background: People with learning disabilities are moving out of hospitals as part of the Transforming Care programme, although thus far their views on how they have experienced this have not been researched. Materials and Methods: A qualitative design was used to explore how people with learning disabilities experienced moving as part of…

  8. Payment Reform Pilot In Beijing Hospitals Reduced Expenditures And Out-Of-Pocket Payments Per Admission.

    Jian, Weiyan; Lu, Ming; Chan, Kit Yee; Poon, Adrienne N; Han, Wei; Hu, Mu; Yip, Winnie

    2015-10-01

    In 2009 China announced plans to reform provider payment methods at public hospitals by moving from fee-for-service (FFS) to prospective and aggregated payment methods that included the use of diagnosis-related groups (DRGs) to control health expenditures. In October 2011 health policy makers selected six Beijing hospitals to pioneer the first DRG payment system in China. We used hospital discharge data from the six pilot hospitals and eight other hospitals, which continued to use FFS and served as controls, from the period 2010-12 to evaluate the pilot's impact on cost containment through a difference-in-differences methods design. Our study found that DRG payment led to reductions of 6.2 percent and 10.5 percent, respectively, in health expenditures and out-of-pocket payments by patients per hospital admission. We did not find evidence of any increase in hospital readmission rates or cost shifting from cases eligible for DRG payment to ineligible cases. However, hospitals continued to use FFS payments for patients who were older and had more complications than other patients, which reduced the effectiveness of payment reform. Continuous evidence-based monitoring and evaluation linked with adequate management systems are necessary to enable China and other low- and middle-income countries to broadly implement DRGs and refine payment systems. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  9. Implementation of a standardized out-of-hospital management method for Parkinson dysphagia

    Wei, Hongying; Sun, Dongxiu; Liu, Meiping

    2017-01-01

    Summary Objective: Our objective is to explore the effectiveness and feasibility of establishing a swallowing management clinic to implement out-of-hospital management for Parkinson disease (PD) patients with dysphagia. Method: Two-hundred seventeen (217) voluntary PD patients with dysphagia in a PD outpatient clinic were divided into a control group with 100 people, and an experimental group with 117 people. The control group was given dysphagia rehabilitation guidance. The experimental gr...

  10. Time to standardise levels of care amongst Out-of-Hospital Emergency Care providers in Africa

    Mould-Millman, N.K.; Stein, C.; Wallis, L.A.

    2016-01-01

    The African Federation for Emergency Medicine’s Out-of-Hospital Emergency Care (OHEC) Committee convened 15 experts from various OHEC systems in Africa to participate in a consensus process to define levels of care within which providers in African OHEC systems should safely and effectively function. The expert panel concluded that four provider levels were relevant for African OHEC systems: (i) first aid, (ii) basic life support, (iii) intermediate life support, and (iv) advanced life suppor...

  11. QTc-prolonging drugs and hospitalizations for cardiac arrhythmias

    De Bruin, Marie L; Hoes, Arno W; Leufkens, Hubert G M

    2003-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmia as an adverse effect of noncardiac drugs has been an issue of growing importance during the past few years. In this population-based study, we evaluated the risk for serious cardiac arrhythmias during the use of several noncardiac QTc-prolonging drugs in day-to-day practice......, and subsequently focused on several specific groups of patients who could be extremely vulnerable for drug-induced arrhythmias. We performed a case-control study in which patients (cases), hospitalized for nonatrial cardiac arrhythmias from 1987 to 1998, were compared with their matched controls regarding current...... use of QTc-prolonging drugs. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using multivariate conditional logistic regression, adjusting for potential confounding factors. Data were obtained from the PHARMO record linkage system. We identified 501 cases, 39 of whom used QTc...

  12. Implementation of a standardized out-of-hospital management method for Parkinson dysphagia

    Hongying Wei

    Full Text Available Summary Objective: Our objective is to explore the effectiveness and feasibility of establishing a swallowing management clinic to implement out-of-hospital management for Parkinson disease (PD patients with dysphagia. Method: Two-hundred seventeen (217 voluntary PD patients with dysphagia in a PD outpatient clinic were divided into a control group with 100 people, and an experimental group with 117 people. The control group was given dysphagia rehabilitation guidance. The experimental group was presented with the standardized out-of-hospital management method as overall management and information and education materials. Rehabilitation efficiency and incidence rate of dysphagia, as well as relevant complications of both groups were compared after a 6-month intervention. Results: Rehabilitation efficiency and the incidence rate of dysphagia including relevant complications of patients treated with the standardized out-of-hospital management were compared with those seen in the control group. The differences have distinct statistics meaning (p<0.01. Conclusion: Establishing a swallowing management protocol for outpatient setting can effectively help the recovery of the function of swallowing, reduce the incidence rate of dysphagia complications and improve the quality of life in patients with PD.

  13. Patient satisfaction in out-of-hospital emergency care: a multicentre survey.

    Neumayr, Agnes; Gnirke, André; Schaeuble, Joerg C; Ganter, Michael T; Sparr, Harald; Zoll, Adolf; Schinnerl, Adolf; Nuebling, Matthias; Heidegger, Thomas; Baubin, Michael

    2016-10-01

    There is only limited information on patient satisfaction with emergency medical services (EMS). The aim of this multicentre survey was to evaluate patient satisfaction in five out-of-hospital physician-based EMS in Austria and Switzerland. The psychometrically tested and standardized questionnaire 'patient satisfaction in out-of-hospital emergency care' was used for this survey. The recruitment of the patients was carried out on the basis of inclusion and exclusion criteria. All questionnaires were sent together with an invitation letter and a prepaid return envelope, followed by a reminder 2 weeks later. The descriptive statistical analysis was carried out by an external organization to maintain anonymity. The response rate of all EMS was 46.7%. High satisfaction rates were achieved for the four quality scales 'emergency call, emergency treatment, transport and hospital admission'. A significant difference was found between the Swiss and the Austrian dispatch centres in the judgement of the call takers' social skills. Patient satisfaction with the emergency treatment, for example, reduction of pain, was high in all EMS, independent of whether the EMS is physician (Austria) or physician and emergency medical assistant based (Switzerland). Lowest satisfaction rates were found for items of social skills. Patient satisfaction in out-of-hospital physician-based EMS is generally high. There is room for improvement in areas such as the social skills of dispatchers and EMS-team members and the comfort of the patients during transport. A checklist should be developed for basic articles that patients should take along to hospital and for questions on responsibilities for children, dependent people or pets.

  14. Intrapartum and Postpartum Transfers to a Tertiary Care Hospital from Out-of-Hospital Birth Settings: A Retrospective Case Series.

    Lundeen, Tiffany

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the reasons for and outcomes of maternal transfers from private homes and freestanding birthing suites to a large academic hospital in order to better understand and meet the needs of transferring women and their families. The convenience sample included all adult women admitted to the labor and birth unit or emergency room within a 5-year period who: 1) had planned to give birth out-of-hospital but developed complications at term before the onset of labor and were admitted to the hospital for labor induction; 2) had planned to give birth at home or in a birthing suite but transferred to the hospital during labor; or 3) arrived at the hospital for care within 24 hours after a planned birth at home or in a birthing suite. Descriptive data for each transfer were obtained from the medical record. Fifty-one transfers were identified: 11 prior to labor, 38 during labor, and 2 postpartum. Only 4 transfers were considered urgent by the referring provider. The most common reasons for intrapartum transfer were prolonged labor (n = 19) and desire for epidural analgesia (n = 10). Only 25% of the medical records had documentation that the referring provider accompanied the woman to the hospital during the care transition or was involved in her hospital course; however, the prenatal and/or intrapartum records had been delivered by the referring provider, were referenced in the hospital admission note, and had become part of the permanent hospital medical record for 85% of the women. On average, one transfer per year was complicated by neonatal morbidity, and one transfer per year involved significant disagreement between hospital providers and the women presenting for care. Collecting and reviewing data about a facility's perinatal transfer events can help the local multi-stakeholder group appraise current practice and plan for quality improvement. © 2016 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  15. In-hospital pediatric cardiac arrest in Honduras.

    Matamoros, Martha; Rodriguez, Roger; Callejas, Allison; Carranza, Douglas; Zeron, Hilda; Sánchez, Carlos; Del Castillo, Jimena; López-Herce, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the characteristic and the prognostic factors of in-hospital pediatric cardiac arrest (CA) in a public hospital Honduras. A prospective observational study was performed on pediatric in-hospital CA as a part of a multicenter international study. One hundred forty-six children were studied. The primary end point was survival at hospital discharge. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the influence of each factor on mortality. Cardiac arrest occurred in the emergency department in 66.9%. Respiratory diseases and sepsis were predominant causes of CA. Return of spontaneous circulation was achieved in 60% of patients, and 22.6% survived to hospital discharge. The factors related with mortality were nonrespiratory cause of CA (odds ratio [OR], 2.55; P = 0.045), adrenaline administration (OR, 4.96; P = 0.008), and a duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation more than 10 minutes (OR, 3.40; P = 0.012). In-hospital CA in children in a developing country has low survival. Patients with nonrespiratory causes and those who need adrenaline administration and prolonged resuscitation had worse prognosis.

  16. Out-of-hospital emergency care providers' work and challenges in a changing care environment.

    Mikkola, Riitta; Paavilainen, Eija; Salminen-Tuomaala, Mari; Leikkola, Päivi

    2018-03-01

    Acutely ill patients are often treated on site instead of being transported to hospital, so wide-ranging professional competence is required from staff. The aim of this study was to describe and produce new information about out-of-hospital emergency care providers' competence, skills and willingness to engage in self-development activities, and to uncover challenges experienced by care providers in the midst of changing work practices. A quantitative questionnaire was sent to out-of-hospital emergency care providers (N = 142, response rate 53%) of one Finnish hospital district. Data were analysed using spss for Windows 22 software. Almost all respondents found their work interesting and their ability to work independently sufficient. The majority found the work meaningful. Almost 20% felt that work was dominated by constant rush, and 40%, more than half of 25-year-olds but <10% of over 45-years-olds, found the work physically straining. The majority indicated that they had a sufficient theoretical-practical basis to perform their regular duties, and more than one-third felt that they had sufficient skills to deal with multiple patient or disaster situations. Over 20% stated that they were unsure about performing new or infrequent procedures. A number of factors experienced as challenging were revealed. The results provide a basis for improving care providers' initial and further training. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  17. Out-of-hospital births in the United States 2009-2014.

    Grunebaum, Amos; Chervenak, Frank A

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate recent trends of out-of-hospital births in the US from 2009 to 2014. We accessed data for all live births occurring in the US from the National Vital Statistics System, Natality Data Files for 2009-2014 through the interactive data tool, VitalStats. Out-of-hospital (OOH) births in the US increased from 2009 to 2014 by 80.2% from 32,596 to 58,743 (0.79%-1.47% of all live births). Home births (HB) increased by 77.3% and births in freestanding birthing centers (FBC) increased by 79.6%. In 2014, 63.8% of OOH births were HB, 30.7% were in FBC, and 5.5% were in other places, physicians offices, or clinics. The majority of women who had an OOH birth in 2014 were non-Hispanic White (82.3%). About in one in 47 non-Hispanic White women had an OOH in 2014, up from 1 in 87 in 2009. Women with a HB were older compared to hospital births (age ≥35: 21.5% vs. 15.4%), had a higher live birth order(≥5: 18.9% vs. 4.9%), 3.48% had infants home and in freestanding birthing centers has significantly increased in the US making it the country with the most out of hospital births among all developed countries. The root cause of the increase in planned OOH births should be identified and addressed by the medical community.

  18. Ambient air pollution, temperature and out-of-hospital coronary deaths in Shanghai, China

    Dai, Jinping; Chen, Renjie; Meng, Xia; Yang, Changyuan; Zhao, Zhuohui; Kan, Haidong

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the effects of ambient air pollution and temperature in triggering out-of-hospital coronary deaths (OHCDs) in China. We evaluated the associations of air pollution and temperature with daily OHCDs in Shanghai, China from 2006 to 2011. We applied an over-dispersed generalized additive model and a distributed lag nonlinear model to analyze the effects of air pollution and temperature, respectively. A 10 μg/m 3 increase in the present-day PM 10 , PM 2.5 , SO 2 , NO 2 and CO were associated with increases in OHCD mortality of 0.49%, 0.68%, 0.88%, 1.60% and 0.08%, respectively. A 1 °C decrease below the minimum-mortality temperature corresponded to a 3.81% increase in OHCD mortality on lags days 0–21, and a 1 °C increase above minimum-mortality temperature corresponded to a 4.61% increase over lag days 0–3. No effects were found for in-hospital coronary deaths. This analysis suggests that air pollution, low temperature and high temperature may increase the risk of OHCDs. - Highlights: • Few studies have evaluated the effects of air pollution and temperature on OHCDs in China. • The present-day concentrations of air pollution were associated with OHCDs. • The effect of high temperatures on OHCDs was more immediate than low temperatures. • No significant effects were found for in-hospital coronary deaths. - Ambient air pollution and temperature may trigger out-of-hospital coronary deaths but not in-hospital coronary deaths

  19. Out-of-pocket expenditure on maternity care for hospital births in Uttar Pradesh, India.

    Goli, Srinivas; Rammohan, Anu; Moradhvaj

    2018-02-27

    The studies measured Out-of-Pocket Expenditure (OOPE) for hospital births previously suffer from serious data limitations. To overcome such limitations, we designed a hospital-based study for measuring the levels and factors of OOPE on maternity care for hospital births by its detailed components. Data were collected from women for non-complicated deliveries 24-h before the survey and complicated deliveries 48-h prior to the survey at the hospital settings in Uttar Pradesh, India during 2014. The simple random sampling design was used in the selection of respondents. Bivariate analyses were used to estimate mean expenditure on Antenatal care services (ANCs), Delivery care and Total Maternity Expenditure (TME). Multivariate linear regression was employed to examine the factor associated with the absolute and relative share of expenditure in couple's annual income on ANCs, delivery care, and TME. The findings show that average expenditure on maternal health care is high ($155) in the study population. Findings suggest that factors such as income, place, and number of ANCs, type, and place of institutional delivery are significantly associated with both absolute and relative expenditure on maternity care. The likelihood of incidence of catastrophic expenditure on maternity care is significantly higher for women delivered in private hospitals (β = 2.427, p maternity care for hospital births reported in this study is much higher as it was collected with a better methodology, although with smaller sample size. Therefore, ongoing maternity benefit scheme in India in general and Uttar Pradesh in particular need to consider the levels of OOPE on maternity care and demand-side and supply-side factors determining it for a more effective policy to reduce the catastrophic burden on households and help women to achieve better maternity health outcomes in poor regional settings like Uttar Pradesh in India.

  20. Withholding or termination of resuscitation in pediatric out-of-hospital traumatic cardiopulmonary arrest.

    Fallat, Mary E

    2014-04-01

    This multiorganizational literature review was undertaken to provide an evidence base for determining whether or not recommendations for out-of-hospital termination of resuscitation could be made for children who are victims of traumatic cardiopulmonary arrest. Although there is increasing acceptance of out-of-hospital termination of resuscitation for adult traumatic cardiopulmonary arrest when there is no expectation of a good outcome, children are routinely excluded from state termination-of-resuscitation protocols. The decision to withhold resuscitative efforts in a child under specific circumstances (decapitation or dependent lividity, rigor mortis, etc) is reasonable. If there is any doubt as to the circumstances or timing of the traumatic cardiopulmonary arrest, under the current status of limiting termination of resuscitation in the field to persons older than 18 years in most states, resuscitation should be initiated and continued until arrival to the appropriate facility. If the patient has arrested, resuscitation has already exceeded 30 minutes, and the nearest facility is more than 30 minutes away, involvement of parents and family of these children in the decision-making process with assistance and guidance from medical professionals should be considered as part of an emphasis on family-centered care, because the evidence suggests that either death or a poor outcome is inevitable.

  1. Increase in cerebral oxygenation during advanced life support in out-of-hospital patients is associated with return of spontaneous circulation.

    Genbrugge, Cornelia; Meex, Ingrid; Boer, Willem; Jans, Frank; Heylen, René; Ferdinande, Bert; Dens, Jo; De Deyne, Cathy

    2015-03-24

    By maintaining sufficient cerebral blood flow and oxygenation, the goal of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is to preserve the pre-arrest neurological state. To date, cerebral monitoring abilities during CPR have been limited. Therefore, we investigated the time-course of cerebral oxygen saturation values (rSO₂) during advanced life support in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Our primary aim was to compare rSO₂ values during advanced life support from patients with return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) to patients who did not achieve ROSC. We performed an observational study to measure rSO₂ using Equanox (Nonin, Plymouth, MI) from the start of advanced life support in the pre-hospital setting. rSO₂ of 49 consecutive out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients were analyzed. The total increase from initial rSO₂ value until two minutes before ROSC or end of advanced life support efforts was significantly larger in the group with ROSC 16% (9 to 36) compared to the patients without ROSC 10% (4 to 15) (P = 0.02). Mean rSO₂ from the start of measurement until two minutes before ROSC or until termination of advanced life support was higher in patients with ROSC than in those without, namely 39% ± 7 and 31% ± 4 (P = 0.05) respectively. During pre-hospital advanced life support, higher increases in rSO₂ are observed in patients attaining ROSC, even before ROSC was clinically determined. Our findings suggest that rSO₂ could be used in the future to guide patient tailored treatment during cardiac arrest and could therefore be a surrogate marker of the systemic oxygenation state of the patient.

  2. Influence of chest compression artefact on capnogram-based ventilation detection during out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Leturiondo, Mikel; Ruiz de Gauna, Sofía; Ruiz, Jesus M; Julio Gutiérrez, J; Leturiondo, Luis A; González-Otero, Digna M; Russell, James K; Zive, Dana; Daya, Mohamud

    2018-03-01

    Capnography has been proposed as a method for monitoring the ventilation rate during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). A high incidence (above 70%) of capnograms distorted by chest compression induced oscillations has been previously reported in out-of-hospital (OOH) CPR. The aim of the study was to better characterize the chest compression artefact and to evaluate its influence on the performance of a capnogram-based ventilation detector during OOH CPR. Data from the MRx monitor-defibrillator were extracted from OOH cardiac arrest episodes. For each episode, presence of chest compression artefact was annotated in the capnogram. Concurrent compression depth and transthoracic impedance signals were used to identify chest compressions and to annotate ventilations, respectively. We designed a capnogram-based ventilation detection algorithm and tested its performance with clean and distorted episodes. Data were collected from 232 episodes comprising 52 654 ventilations, with a mean (±SD) of 227 (±118) per episode. Overall, 42% of the capnograms were distorted. Presence of chest compression artefact degraded algorithm performance in terms of ventilation detection, estimation of ventilation rate, and the ability to detect hyperventilation. Capnogram-based ventilation detection during CPR using our algorithm was compromised by the presence of chest compression artefact. In particular, artefact spanning from the plateau to the baseline strongly degraded ventilation detection, and caused a high number of false hyperventilation alarms. Further research is needed to reduce the impact of chest compression artefact on capnographic ventilation monitoring. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Opt-out of voluntary HIV testing: a Singapore hospital's experience.

    Arlene C Chua

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Since 2008, the Singapore Ministry of Health (MOH has expanded HIV testing by increasing anonymous HIV test sites, as well as issuing a directive to hospitals to offer routine voluntary opt out inpatient HIV testing. We reviewed this program implemented at the end of 2008 at Tan Tock Seng Hospital (TTSH, the second largest acute care general hospital in Singapore. METHODS AND FINDINGS: From January 2009 to December 2010, all inpatients aged greater or equal than 21 years were screened for HIV unless they declined or were not eligible for screening. We reviewed the implementation of the Opt Out testing policy. There were a total of 93,211 admissions; 41,543 patients were included based on HIV screening program eligibility criteria. Among those included, 79% (n = 32,675 opted out of HIV screening. The overall acceptance rate was 21%. Majority of eligible patients who were tested (63% were men. The mean age of tested patients was 52 years. The opt out rate was significantly higher among females (OR: 1.5, 95%CI: 1.4-1.6, aged >60 years (OR: 2.3, 95%CI: 2.2-2.4 and Chinese ethnicity (OR: 1.7, 95%CI:1.6-1.8. The false positive rate of the HIV screening test is 0.56%. The proportion of patients with HIV infection among those who underwent HIV screening is 0.18%. All 16 confirmed HIV patients were linked to care. CONCLUSION: The default opt-in rate of inpatient HIV testing was low at Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore. Efforts to address individual HIV risk perception and campaigns against HIV stigma are needed to encourage more individuals to be tested for HIV.

  4. Opt-out of voluntary HIV testing: a Singapore hospital's experience.

    Chua, Arlene C; Leo, Yee Sin; Cavailler, Philippe; Chu, Christine; Ng, Aloysius; Ng, Oon Tek; Krishnan, Prabha

    2012-01-01

    Since 2008, the Singapore Ministry of Health (MOH) has expanded HIV testing by increasing anonymous HIV test sites, as well as issuing a directive to hospitals to offer routine voluntary opt out inpatient HIV testing. We reviewed this program implemented at the end of 2008 at Tan Tock Seng Hospital (TTSH), the second largest acute care general hospital in Singapore. From January 2009 to December 2010, all inpatients aged greater or equal than 21 years were screened for HIV unless they declined or were not eligible for screening. We reviewed the implementation of the Opt Out testing policy. There were a total of 93,211 admissions; 41,543 patients were included based on HIV screening program eligibility criteria. Among those included, 79% (n = 32,675) opted out of HIV screening. The overall acceptance rate was 21%. Majority of eligible patients who were tested (63%) were men. The mean age of tested patients was 52 years. The opt out rate was significantly higher among females (OR: 1.5, 95%CI: 1.4-1.6), aged >60 years (OR: 2.3, 95%CI: 2.2-2.4) and Chinese ethnicity (OR: 1.7, 95%CI:1.6-1.8). The false positive rate of the HIV screening test is 0.56%. The proportion of patients with HIV infection among those who underwent HIV screening is 0.18%. All 16 confirmed HIV patients were linked to care. The default opt-in rate of inpatient HIV testing was low at Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore. Efforts to address individual HIV risk perception and campaigns against HIV stigma are needed to encourage more individuals to be tested for HIV.

  5. Out-of-hospital mortality among patients receiving methadone for noncancer pain.

    Ray, Wayne A; Chung, Cecilia P; Murray, Katherine T; Cooper, William O; Hall, Kathi; Stein, C Michael

    2015-03-01

    Growing methadone use in pain management has raised concerns regarding its safety relative to other long-acting opioids. Methadone hydrochloride may increase the risk for lethal respiratory depression related to accidental overdose and life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. To compare the risk of out-of-hospital death in patients receiving methadone for noncancer pain with that in comparable patients receiving sustained-release (SR) morphine sulfate. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using Tennessee Medicaid records from 1997 through 2009. The cohort included patients receiving morphine SR or methadone who were aged 30 to 74 years, did not have cancer or another life-threatening illness, and were not in a hospital or nursing home. At cohort entry, 32 742 and 6014 patients had filled a prescription for morphine SR or methadone, respectively. The patients' median age was 48 years, 57.9% were female, and comparable proportions had received cardiovascular, psychotropic, and other musculoskeletal medications. Nearly 90% of the patients received the opioid for back pain or other musculoskeletal pain. The median doses prescribed for morphine SR and methadone were 90 mg/d and 40 mg/d, respectively. The primary study end point was out-of-hospital mortality, given that opioid-related deaths typically occur outside the hospital. There were 477 deaths during 28 699 person-years of follow-up (ie, 166 deaths per 10 000 person-years). After control for study covariates, patients receiving methadone had a 46% increased risk of death during the follow-up period, with an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 1.46 (95% CI, 1.17-1.83; P Methadone doses of 20 mg/d or less, the lowest dose quartile, were associated with an increased risk of death (HR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.01-2.51, P = .046) relative to a comparable dose of morphine SR (methadone in this retrospective cohort study, even for low doses, supports recommendations that it should not be a drug of first choice for

  6. Out of pocket payments and social health insurance for private hospital care: Evidence from Greece.

    Grigorakis, Nikolaos; Floros, Christos; Tsangari, Haritini; Tsoukatos, Evangelos

    2016-08-01

    The Greek state has reduced their funding on health as part of broader efforts to limit the large fiscal deficits and rising debt ratios to GDP. Benefits cuts and limitations of Social Health Insurance (SHI) reimbursements result in substantial Out of Pocket (OOP) payments in the Greek population. In this paper, we examine social health insurance's risk pooling mechanisms and the catastrophic impact that OOP payments may have on insured's income and well-being. Using data collected from a cross sectional survey in Greece, we find that the OOP payments for inpatient care in private hospitals have a positive relationship with SHI funding. Moreover, we show that the SHI funding is inadequate to total inpatient financing. We argue that the Greek health policy makers have to give serious consideration to the perspective of a SHI system which should be supplemented by the Private Health Insurance (PHI) sector. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Outcome among patients suffering from in-hospital cardiac arrest

    Trpković Sladjana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In relation to pre-hospital treatment of patients with cardiac arrest (CA in the field where resuscitation is often started by nonprofessionals, resuscitation in hospital is most commonly performed by well-trained personnel. Objective. The aim was to define the factors associated with an improved outcome among patients suffering from the inhospital CA (IHCA. Methods. The prospective study included a total of 100 patients in the Emergency Center over two-year period. The patterns by the Utstein-Style guidelines recorded the following: age, sex, reason for hospital admission, comorbidity, cause and origin of CA, continuous monitoring, time of arrival of the medical emergency team and time of delivery of the first defibrillation shock (DC. Results. Most patients (61% had cardiac etiology. Return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC was achieved in 58% of patients. ROSC was more frequently achieved in younger patients (57.69±11.37, (p<0.05, non-surgical patients (76.1%, (p<0.01 and in patients who were in continuous monitoring (66.7% (p<0.05. The outcome of CPR was significantly better in patients who received advanced life support (ALS (76.6% (p<0.01. Time until the delivery of the first DC shock was significantly shorter in patients who achieved ROSC (1.67±1.13 min, (p<0.01. A total of 5% of IHCA patients survived to hospital discharge. Conclusion. In our study, the outcome of CPR was better in patients who were younger and with non-surgical diseases, which are prognostic factors that we cannot control. Factors associated with better outcome of IHCA patients were: continuous monitoring, shorter time until the delivery of the first DC and ALS. This means that better education of medical staff, better organization and up-to-dated technical equipment are needed.

  8. Advanced vs. Basic Life Support in the Treatment of Out-of-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Arrest in the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium.

    Kurz, Michael Christopher; Schmicker, Robert H; Leroux, Brian; Nichol, Graham; Aufderheide, Tom P; Cheskes, Sheldon; Grunau, Brian; Jasti, Jamie; Kudenchuk, Peter; Vilke, Gary M; Buick, Jason; Wittwer, Lynn; Sahni, Ritu; Straight, Ronald; Wang, Henry E

    2018-04-30

    Prior observational studies suggest no additional benefit from advanced life support (ALS) when compared with providing basic life support (BLS) for patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We compared the association of ALS care with OHCA outcomes using prospective clinical data from the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium (ROC). Included were consecutive adults OHCA treated by participating emergency medical services (EMS) agencies between June 1, 2011, and June 30, 2015. We defined BLS as receipt of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and/or automated defibrillation and ALS as receipt of an advanced airway, manual defibrillation, or intravenous drug therapy. We compared outcomes among patients receiving: 1) BLS-only; 2) BLS + late ALS; 3) BLS + early ALS; and 4) ALS-first care. Using multivariable logistic regression, we evaluated the associations between level of care and return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), survival to hospital discharge, and survival with good functional status, adjusting for age, sex, witnessed arrest, bystander CPR, shockable initial rhythm, public location, EMS response time, CPR quality, and ROC site. Among 35,065 patients with OHCA, characteristics were median age 68 years (IQR 56-80), male 63.9%, witnessed arrest 43.8%, bystander CPR 50.6%, and shockable initial rhythm 24.2%. Care delivered was: 4.0% BLS-only, 31.5% BLS + late ALS, 17.2% BLS + early ALS, and 47.3% ALS-first. ALS care with or without initial BLS care was independently associated with increased adjusted ROSC and survival to hospital discharge unless delivered greater than 6 min after BLS arrival (BLS + late ALS). Regardless of when it was delivered, ALS care was not associated with significantly greater functional outcome. ALS care was associated with survival to hospital discharge when provided initially or within six minutes of BLS arrival. ALS care, with or without initial BLS care, was associated with increased ROSC, however it was

  9. [Out-of-hospital pediatric emergencies. Perception and assessment by emergency physicians].

    Eich, C; Roessler, M; Timmermann, A; Heuer, J F; Gentkow, U; Albrecht, B; Russo, S G

    2009-09-01

    Out-of-hospital (OOH) pediatric emergencies have a relatively low prevalence. In Germany the vast majority of cases are attended by non-specialized emergency physicians (EPs) for whom these are not routine procedures. This may lead to insecurity and fear. However, it is unknown how EPs perceive and assess pediatric emergencies and how they could be better prepared for them. All active EPs (n=50) of the Department of Anaesthesiology, Emergency and Intensive Care Medicine at the University Medical Centre of Göttingen were presented with a structured questionnaire in order to evaluate their perception and assessment of OOH pediatric emergencies. The 43 participating EPs made highly detailed statements on the expected characteristics of OOH pediatric emergencies. Their confidence level grew with the children's age (pemergencies. They felt the greatest deficits were in the care of infrequent but life-threatening emergencies. Three educational groups can be differentiated: knowledge and skills to be gained with children in hospital, clinical experience from adult care also applicable in children and rare diagnoses and interventions to be trained with manikins or simulators.

  10. Out-of-Hospital Hypertonic Resuscitation Following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Bulger, Eileen M.; May, Susanne; Brasel, Karen J.; Schreiber, Martin; Kerby, Jeffrey D.; Tisherman, Samuel A.; Newgard, Craig; Slutsky, Arthur; Coimbra, Raul; Emerson, Scott; Minei, Joseph P.; Bardarson, Berit; Kudenchuk, Peter; Baker, Andrew; Christenson, Jim; Idris, Ahamed; Davis, Daniel; Fabian, Timothy C.; Aufderheide, Tom P.; Callaway, Clifton; Williams, Carolyn; Banek, Jane; Vaillancourt, Christian; van Heest, Rardi; Sopko, George; Hata, J. Steven; Hoyt, David B.

    2010-01-01

    Context Hypertonic fluids restore cerebral perfusion with reduced cerebral edema and modulate inflammatory response to reduce subsequent neuronal injury and thus have potential benefit in resuscitation of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Objective To determine whether out-of-hospital administration of hypertonic fluids improves neurologic outcome following severe TBI. Design, Setting, and Participants Multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial involving 114 North American emergency medical services agencies within the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium, conducted between May 2006 and May 2009 among patients 15 years or older with blunt trauma and a prehospital Glasgow Coma Scale score of 8 or less who did not meet criteria for hypovolemic shock. Planned enrollment was 2122 patients. Intervention A single 250-mL bolus of 7.5% saline/6% dextran 70 (hypertonic saline/dextran), 7.5% saline (hypertonic saline), or 0.9% saline (normal saline) initiated in the out-of-hospital setting. Main Outcome Measure Six-month neurologic outcome based on the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE) (dichotomized as >4 or ≤4). Results The study was terminated by the data and safety monitoring board after randomization of 1331 patients, having met prespecified futility criteria. Among the 1282 patients enrolled, 6-month outcomes data were available for 1087 (85%). Baseline characteristics of the groups were equivalent. There was no difference in 6-month neurologic outcome among groups with regard to proportions of patients with severe TBI (GOSE ≤4) (hypertonic saline/dextran vs normal saline: 53.7% vs 51.5%; difference, 2.2% [95% CI, −4.5% to 9.0%]; hypertonic saline vs normal saline: 54.3% vs 51.5%; difference, 2.9% [95% CI, −4.0% to 9.7%]; P=.67). There were no statistically significant differences in distribution of GOSE category or Disability Rating Score by treatment group. Survival at 28 days was 74.3% with hypertonic saline

  11. Equity in out-of-pocket payments for hospital care: evidence from India.

    Roy, Kakoli; Howard, David Hill

    2007-02-01

    The lack of formal health insurance and inadequate social safety nets cause families in most low-income countries to finance health spending through out-of-pocket (OOP) payments, leaving poor families unable to insure their consumption during periods of major illnesses. To examine how well the Indian healthcare system protects households of differing living standards against the financial consequences of unanticipated health shocks. The data are drawn from the 52nd round of National Sample Survey, a nationally representative socioeconomic and health survey conducted in 1995-1996. The sample comprises 24,379 (3.84%) households where a member was hospitalized during the 1-year reference period. We estimate, using ordinary least squares, the relationship between household consumption (proxy for ability to pay) and OOP payments for hospitalization. We also estimate the relationship between consumption and OOP share in consumption. Our results indicate that both utilization (payments) and the consequent financial burden (payment share) increases with increasing ability to pay (ATP). While this relationship is retained across the different subgroups (e.g., gender, social code, region, etc.), comparisons across groups indicate horizontal inequities including differences in both degrees of progressivity and the redistributive effect. The finding that OOP payments do not decline with ATP could be an indication of: (1) the lack of insurance which implies that the better-off must pay from OOP to secure quality health care and (2) the absence of risk-pooling or prepayments mechanisms which poses financial impediments to the consumption of health care by the poor.

  12. Pulmonary complications in pediatric cardiac surgery at a university hospital.

    Borges, Daniel Lago; Sousa, Lícia Raquel Teles; Silva, Raquel Teixeira; Gomes, Holga Cristina da Rocha; Ferreira, Fernando Mauro Muniz; Lima, Willy Leite; Borges, Lívia Christina do Prado Lui

    2010-01-01

    To identify the prevalence of pulmonary complications in children undergone cardiac surgery, as well as demographic and clinical characteristics of this population. The sample comprised 37 children of both genders, underwent cardiac surgery at the Hospital Universitário Presidente Dutra, São Luis (MA) during the year of 2007. There were not included patients who had lung disease in pre-operative period, patients with neurological disorders, intra-operative death besides lack of data in medical records. The data were obtained from general medical and nursing staff of their medical records. The population of the study was predominantly composed by female children, from the countryside and at school age. Pathologies considered low risk were the majority, especially the patent ductus arteriosus, interventricular communication and interatrial communication. It was observed that the largest share of children made use of cardiopulmonary bypass for more than 30 minutes, with a median of 80 minutes, suffered a median sternotomy, using only the mediastinal drain and made use of mechanical ventilation after surgery, with the median about 6.6 hours. Only three (8.1%) patients developed pulmonary complications, and of these, two died. Most of the sample was female, school aged and from the countryside. The low time of cardiopulmonary bypass and mechanical ventilation, and congenital heart disease with low risk, may have been factors that contributed to the low rate of pulmonary complications postoperative.

  13. Out-of-hospital births, U.S., 1978: birth weight and Apgar scores as measures of outcome.

    Declercq, E R

    1984-01-01

    An examination of 1978 natality data for the United States disclosed that low birth weight was less common among 30,819 infants born out of hospital than among 3,294,101 infants born in hospital in that year. When controls were applied for birth attendant, infants' race, and mothers' education, age, nativity, and parity, the data revealed that white, well-educated women between 25 and 39 years of age, who were having their second babies and were attended by midwives out of hospital, were at l...

  14. [Supply prescription filling and out-of-pocket expenditures on medicines in public hospitals in Mexico in 2009].

    Sesma-Vázquez, Sergio; Gómez-Dantés, Octavio; Wirtz, Veronika J; Castro-Tinoco, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    To analyze the availability of drugs in public hospitals, the prescription-filling patterns for in-patients when they are discharged and their out-of-pocket expenditure during their hospitalization. Using the National Satisfaction and Responsiveness Survey (ENSATA) 2009, which includes a representative sample of public hospitals in Mexico in 2009, the availability of 83 essential medicines in the hospital pharmacies at the day of visit, the proportion of prescriptions completely filled for patients when they are discharged and their out-of-pocket expenditure during their hospitalization were analyzed. A total of 26 271 patients in 160 public hospitals were interviewed. The mean availability of drugs was 82% for all hospitals, with the lowest availability for the Ministry of Health (SESA) hospitals (77%, with a range of 30 to 96%). Patients discharged at social security hospitals received in 97% of cases a complete prescription filling, while in SESA hospitals the average was only 56.2%, with a large variance among states (13 to 94%). The median inpatient spending was 150 pesos in national currency (1% spent over 10 000 pesos). The lack of medicines in public hospitals may increase in-patient morbidity and mortality and has an economic impact on household spending, particularly in those with scarce resources.

  15. Imaging the heart: cardiac scintigraphy and echocardiography in US hospitals (1983)

    McPhee, S.J.; Garnick, D.W.

    1986-01-01

    The rapid growth of cardiac catheterization has raised questions about the availability of less costly, noninvasive tests such as cardiac scintigraphy and echocardiography. To assess their availability and rates of use, we surveyed 3778 non-federal short-term US hospitals in June, 1983. Overall, 2605 hospitals (69%) offered 201 Tl myocardial perfusion scans, 2580 (68%) 99mTc equilibrium gated blood pool scans, and 2483 (67%) cardiac shunt scans; 1679 hospitals (44%) offered M-mode and/or 2-dimensional echocardiography, and 768 (20%) pulsed Doppler echocardiography. Volumes of procedures varied enormously among hospitals capable of performing them. High volumes of both scintigraphy and echocardiography were performed in a small number of hospitals. Larger, voluntary, and teaching hospitals performed higher volumes of both procedures. Despite widespread availability of these noninvasive technologies, high volumes of both cardiac scintigraphy and echocardiography procedures are concentrated in a small number of US hospitals

  16. Pattern of perioperative cardiac arrests at University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital.

    Kwari, Y D; Bello, M R; Eni, U E

    2010-01-01

    Perioperative cardiac arrests and death on the table represent the most serious complications of surgery and anaesthesia. This paper was designed to study their pattern, causes and outcomes following cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and intensive care unit (ICU) management in our institution. Three year retrospective review of perioperative cardiac arrests and death on operating table following surgical procedure under anaesthesia. For each cardiac arrest or death on the table the sequence of events leading to the arrest was evaluated using case notes, anaesthetic chart and ICU records. Study variables which include demographic data, ASA score, anaesthetic technique, causes and outcome were analysed and discussed. Fourteen perioperative cardiac arrests were encountered following 4051 anaesthetics administered over the three year study period. Twelve out of the fourteen cardiac arrests occurred following general anaesthesia, while the remaining two occurred following spinal anaesthesia. There was no cardiac arrest following local anaesthesia. Children suffered more cardiac arrest than adults. ASA class III and IV risk status suffered more arrests than ASA I and II. Hypoxia from airway problems was the commonest cause of cardiac arrest followed by septic shock. Monitoring with pulse oximeter was done in only 4 out of the 14 cardiac arrests. Only 2 (14%) out of 14 cardiac arrests recovered to home discharge, one of them with significant neurological deficit. Majority of arrests were due to hypoxia from airway problems that were not detected early There is need to improve on patient monitoring, knowledge of CPR and intensive care so as to improve the outcome of perioperative cardiac arrest.

  17. Outcomes of Basic Versus Advanced Life Support for Out-of-Hospital Medical Emergencies.

    Sanghavi, Prachi; Jena, Anupam B; Newhouse, Joseph P; Zaslavsky, Alan M

    2015-11-03

    Most Medicare patients seeking emergency medical transport are treated by ambulance providers trained in advanced life support (ALS). Evidence supporting the superiority of ALS over basic life support (BLS) is limited, but some studies suggest ALS may harm patients. To compare outcomes after ALS and BLS in out-of-hospital medical emergencies. Observational study with adjustment for propensity score weights and instrumental variable analyses based on county-level variations in ALS use. Traditional Medicare. 20% random sample of Medicare beneficiaries from nonrural counties between 2006 and 2011 with major trauma, stroke, acute myocardial infarction (AMI), or respiratory failure. Neurologic functioning and survival to 30 days, 90 days, 1 year, and 2 years. Except in cases of AMI, patients showed superior unadjusted outcomes with BLS despite being older and having more comorbidities. In propensity score analyses, survival to 90 days among patients with trauma, stroke, and respiratory failure was higher with BLS than ALS (6.1 percentage points [95% CI, 5.4 to 6.8 percentage points] for trauma; 7.0 percentage points [CI, 6.2 to 7.7 percentage points] for stroke; and 3.7 percentage points [CI, 2.5 to 4.8 percentage points] for respiratory failure). Patients with AMI did not exhibit differences in survival at 30 days but had better survival at 90 days with ALS (1.0 percentage point [CI, 0.1 to 1.9 percentage points]). Neurologic functioning favored BLS for all diagnoses. Results from instrumental variable analyses were broadly consistent with propensity score analyses for trauma and stroke, showed no survival differences between BLS and ALS for respiratory failure, and showed better survival at all time points with BLS than ALS for patients with AMI. Only Medicare beneficiaries from nonrural counties were studied. Advanced life support is associated with substantially higher mortality for several acute medical emergencies than BLS. National Science Foundation, Agency for

  18. Significance of the carboxyhemoglobin level for out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest

    Youichi Yanagawa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: At low concentrations, carbon monoxide (CO can confer cyto and tissue-protective effects, such as endogenous Heme oxygenase 1 expression, which has antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative, and antiapoptotic effects. The level of carboxyhemoglobin in the blood is an indicator of the endogenous production of CO and inhaled CO. Aim of study: To investigate the significance of the value of carboxyhemoglobin for out-of-hospital (OH cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA. Materials and Methods: This study involved a medical chart review of cases treated from January to December 2005. The inclusion criteria included a patient who was transported to this department due to an OH CPA. The exclusion criteria included a patient who did not undergo blood gas analysis on arrival and who experienced CPA due to acute carbon monoxide intoxication. The subjects were divided into two groups based on their final outcome of either survival or non-survival. Results: There was no significant difference associated with the sex, age, frequency of witness collapse, bystander cardiopulmonary arrest, electrocardiogram at scene, cause of CPA, value of PCO 2 , HCO3 - , and methemoglobin. The frequency of OH return of spontaneous circulation and the value of pH, PO 2 , base excess, and carboxyhemoglobin in the survival group were greater than those values in the non-survival group. There were no subjects whose carboxyhemoglobin level was 0% on arrival in the survival groups. Conclusion: There appeared to be an association between higher carboxyhemoglobin levels and survival in comparison with non-survival patients.

  19. Debriefing bystanders of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is valuable

    Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Fjordholt, Martin

    2014-01-01

    , positively influencing the ability to cope with the emotional reactions and the cognitive perception of own performance and motivates improvement of CPR skills. Importantly, it increases confidence to provide CPR in the future. Implementation of telephone debriefing to bystanders at Emergency Medical...... the phenomenological approach. RESULTS: Six themes emerged from analysis of debriefing audio files: (1) identification of OHCA; (2) emotional and perceptual experience with OHCA; (3) collaboration with healthcare professionals; (4) patients outcome; (5) coping with the experience and (6) general reflections. When...

  20. Does macrolide use confer risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest compared with penicillin V?

    Hertz, Frederik Boetius; Jensen, Aksel; Knudsen, Jenny D

    2018-01-01

    were examined by conditional logistic regression analyses in case-crossover and case-time-control models, using penicillin-V treatment as the comparative reference. From nationwide registries, we identified all OHCAs in Denmark from 2001 to 2010 and use of antibiotics. ETHICS: The present study...... was approved by the Danish Data Protection Agency (Danish Data Protection Agency (ref.no. 2007-58-0015, local ref.no. GEH-2014-017, (I-Suite.nr. 02 735)). PARTICIPANTS: We identified 29 111 patients with an OHCA. Of these, 514 were in macrolide treatment ≤7 days before OHCA and 1237 in penicillin-V treatment....... RESULTS: In the case-crossover analyses, overall macrolide use was not associated with OHCA with penicillin V as negative comparative reference (OR=0.90; 95% CI 0.73 to 1.10). Compared with penicillin-V treatment, specific macrolides were not associated with increased risk of OHCA: roxithromycin (OR=0...

  1. Comorbidity burden is not associated with higher mortality after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    Winther-Jensen, Matilde; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Nielsen, Niklas

    2016-01-01

    at either 33 or 36 °C with no difference regarding mortality and neurological outcome. This post-hoc study of the TTM-trial formed a modified comorbidity index (mCI), based on available comorbidities from the Charlson comorbidity index (CCI). RESULTS: Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) decreased...... was associated with higher mortality following OHCA, but when adjusting for confounders, the influence was no longer significant. The association between mCI and mortality was not modified by TTM. Comorbidity burden is associated with lower rates of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation after OHCA....

  2. Antipsychotics and Associated Risk of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    Weeke, Peter; Jensen, Aksel; Folke, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    % confidence interval [CI]:1.23-1.89) as was use with typical antipsychotics (OR= 1.66, CI: 1.27-2.17). By contrast, overall atypical antipsychotics drug use was not (OR= 1.29, CI: 0.90-1.85). Two individual typical antipsychotic drugs were associated with OHCA, haloperidol (OR= 2.43, CI: 1...

  3. Long-term prognosis after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    Horsted, Tina I; Rasmussen, Lars S; Meyhoff, Christian S

    2007-01-01

    (SF-36) and the mini mental state examination (MMSE) were administered. RESULTS: We had data on 984 cases of OHCA. In 512 cases CPR was attempted and at 6 months, a total of 63 patients were alive corresponding to 12.3% [95% CI: 9.7-15.5%] of all who were treated. Of the 33 patients examined...

  4. Barriers to recognition of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest during emergency medical calls

    Alfsen, David; Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Egerod, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    the dispatchers' recognition of OHCA, focusing on the communication during the emergency call. The purpose of this study is to identify factors affecting medical dispatchers' recognition of OHCA during emergency calls in a qualitative analysis of calls. METHODS: An investigator triangulated inductive thematic...... to an automated external defibrillator should be initiated. Previous studies have investigated barriers to recognition of OHCA, and found the caller's description of sign of life, the type of caller, caller's emotional state, an inadequate dialogue during the emergency call, and patient's agonal breathing...... as influential factors. Though many of these factors are included in the algorithms used by medical dispatchers, many OHCA still remain not recognised. Qualitative studies investigating the communication between the caller and dispatcher are very scarce. There is a lack of knowledge about what influences...

  5. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and placement of automated external defibrillators in the community

    Folke, Fredrik

    2010-01-01

    forskelle i patientkarakteristika afhængigt af hvor hjertestoppet forekommer (boligområde versus offentligt rum); 4) at estimere omkostnings-effektiviteten for PAD programmer i boligområder og det offentligt rum afhængigt af valgte AED placeringsstrategi. METODE OG RESULTATER I perioden 1994-2005 blev alle...

  6. Dextrose 10% in the treatment of out-of-hospital hypoglycemia.

    Kiefer, Matthew V; Gene Hern, H; Alter, Harrison J; Barger, Joseph B

    2014-04-01

    Prehospital first responders historically have treated hypoglycemia in the field with an IV bolus of 50 mL of 50% dextrose solution (D50). The California Contra Costa County Emergency Medical Services (EMS) system recently adopted a protocol of IV 10% dextrose solution (D10), due to frequent shortages and relatively high cost of D50. The feasibility, safety, and efficacy of this approach are reported using the experience of this EMS system. Over the course of 18 weeks, paramedics treated 239 hypoglycemic patients with D10 and recorded patient demographics and clinical outcomes. Of these, 203 patients were treated with 100 mL of D10 initially upon EMS arrival, and full data on response to treatment was available on 164 of the 203 patients. The 164 patients' capillary glucose response to initial infusion of 100 mL of D10 was calculated and a linear regression line fit between elapsed time and difference between initial and repeat glucose values. Feasibility, safety, and the need for repeat glucose infusions were examined. The study cohort included 102 men and 62 women with a median age of 68 years. The median initial field blood glucose was 38 mg/dL, with a subsequent blood glucose median of 98 mg/dL. The median time to second glucose testing was eight minutes after beginning the 100 mL D10 infusion. Of 164 patients, 29 (18%) required an additional dose of IV D10 solution due to persistent or recurrent hypoglycemia, and one patient required a third dose. There were no reported adverse events or deaths related to D10 administration. Linear regression analysis of elapsed time and difference between initial and repeat glucose values showed near-zero correlation. In addition to practical reasons of cost and availability, theoretical risks of using 50 mL of D50 in the out-of-hospital setting include extravasation injury, direct toxic effects of hypertonic dextrose, and potential neurotoxic effects of hyperglycemia. The results of one local EMS system over an 18-week

  7. Opt-out of Voluntary HIV Testing: A Singapore Hospital's Experience

    Chua, Arlene C.; Leo, Yee Sin; Cavailler, Philippe; Chu, Christine; Ng, Aloysius; Ng, Oon Tek; Krishnan, Prabha

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Since 2008, the Singapore Ministry of Health (MOH) has expanded HIV testing by increasing anonymous HIV test sites, as well as issuing a directive to hospitals to offer routine voluntary opt out inpatient HIV testing. We reviewed this program implemented at the end of 2008 at Tan Tock Seng Hospital (TTSH), the second largest acute care general hospital in Singapore. METHODS AND FINDINGS: From January 2009 to December 2010, all inpatients aged greater or equal than 21 years were ...

  8. Revisiting the “Golden Hour”: An Evaluation of Out-of-Hospital Time in Shock and Traumatic Brain Injury

    Newgard, Craig D.; Meier, Eric N.; Bulger, Eileen M.; Buick, Jason; Sheehan, Kellie; Lin, Steve; Minei, Joseph P.; Barnes-Mackey, Roxy A.; Brasel, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective We evaluated shock and traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients previously enrolled in an out-of-hospital clinical trial to test the association between out-of-hospital time and outcome. Methods This was a secondary analysis of shock and TBI patients ≥ 15 years enrolled in a Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium out-of-hospital clinical trial by 81 EMS agencies transporting to 46 Level I and II trauma centers in 11 sites (May 2006 through May 2009). Inclusion criteria were: SBP ≤ 70 mmHg or SBP 71 - 90 mmHg with heart rate ≥ 108 beats per minute (shock cohort) and Glasgow Coma Scale score ≤ 8 (TBI cohort); patients meeting both criteria were placed in the shock cohort. Primary outcomes were 28-day mortality (shock cohort) and 6-month Glasgow Outcome Scale - Extended (GOSE) ≤ 4 (TBI cohort). Results There were 778 patients in the shock cohort (26% 28-day mortality) and 1,239 patients in the TBI cohort (53% 6-month GOSE ≤ 4). Out-of-hospital time > 60 minutes was not associated with worse outcomes after accounting for important confounders in the shock cohort (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.42, 95% CI 0.77-2.62) or TBI cohort (aOR 0.80, 95% CI 0.52-1.21). However, shock patients requiring early critical hospital resources and arriving > 60 minutes had higher 28-day mortality (aOR 2.37, 95% CI 1.05-5.37); this finding was not observed among a similar TBI subgroup. Conclusions Among out-of-hospital trauma patients meeting physiologic criteria for shock and TBI, there was no association between time and outcome. However, the subgroup of shock patients requiring early critical resources arriving after 60 minutes had higher mortality. PMID:25596960

  9. A case-crossover analyses of fine particulate matter and out-of-hospital sudden unexpected death

    Out-of-hospital sudden unexpected deaths (OHSUD) are natural deaths that occur without obvious underlying causes and account for nearly 1 in 6 deaths in the United States. Ambient air pollution is known to be causally related to overall mortality, therefore, we hypothesized that ...

  10. Characteristics of out-of-hospital paediatric emergencies attended by ambulance- and helicopter-based emergency physicians

    Eich, Christoph; Russo, Sebastian G.; Heuer, Jan F.; Timmermann, Arnd; Gentkow, Uta; Quintel, Michael; Roessler, Markus

    Background: In Germany, as in many other countries, for the vast majority of cases, critical out-of-hospital (OOH) paediatric emergencies are attended by non-specialised emergency physicians (EPs). As it is assumed that this may lead to deficient service we aimed to gather robust data on the

  11. Analysis of steps adapted protocol in cardiac rehabilitation in the hospital phase

    Winkelmann, Eliane Roseli; Dallazen, Fernanda; Bronzatti, Angela Beerbaum Steinke; Lorenzoni, Juliara Cristina Werner; Windmöller, Pollyana

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze a cardiac rehabilitation adapted protocol in physical therapy during the postoperative hospital phase of cardiac surgery in a service of high complexity, in aspects regarded to complications and mortality prevalence and hospitalization days. Methods This is an observational cross-sectional, retrospective and analytical study performed by investigating 99 patients who underwent cardiac surgery for coronary artery bypass graft, heart valve replacement or a combination of both. Step program adapted for rehabilitation after cardiac surgery was analyzed under the command of the physiotherapy professional team. Results In average, a patient stays for two days in the Intensive Care Unit and three to four days in the hospital room, totalizing six days of hospitalization. Fatalities occurred in a higher percentage during hospitalization (5.1%) and up to two years period (8.6%) when compared to 30 days after hospital discharge (1.1%). Among the postoperative complications, the hemodynamic (63.4%) and respiratory (42.6%) were the most prevalent. 36-42% of complications occurred between the immediate postoperative period and the second postoperative day. The hospital discharge started from the fifth postoperative day. We can observe that in each following day, the patients are evolving in achieving the Steps, where Step 3 was the most used during the rehabilitation phase I. Conclusion This evolution program by steps can to guide the physical rehabilitation at the hospital in patients after cardiac surgery. PMID:25859866

  12. QTc-prolonging drugs and hospitalizations for cardiac arrhythmias

    De Bruin, ML; Hoes, AW; Leufkens, HGM

    2003-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmia as an adverse effect of noncardiac drugs has been an issue of growing importance during the past few years. In this population-based study, we evaluated the risk for serious cardiac arrhythmias during the use of several noncardiac QTc-prolonging drugs in day-to-day practice, and

  13. Epidemiology and Outcomes After In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest After Pediatric Cardiac Surgery

    Gupta, Punkaj; Jacobs, Jeffrey P.; Pasquali, Sara K.; Hill, Kevin D.; Gaynor, J. William; O’Brien, Sean M.; He, Max; Sheng, Shubin; Schexnayder, Stephen M.; Berg, Robert A.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Imamura, Michiaki; Jacobs, Marshall L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Multicenter data regarding cardiac arrest in children undergoing heart operations are limited. We describe epidemiology and outcomes associated with postoperative cardiac arrest in a large multiinstitutional cohort. Methods Patients younger than 18 years in the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (2007 through 2012) were included. Patient factors, operative characteristics, and outcomes were described for patients with and without postoperative cardiac arrest. Multivariable models were used to evaluate the association of center volume with cardiac arrest rate and mortality after cardiac arrest, adjusting for patient and procedural factors. Results Of 70,270 patients (97 centers), 1,843 (2.6%) had postoperative cardiac arrest. Younger age, lower weight, and presence of preoperative morbidities (all p < 0.0001) were associated with cardiac arrest. Arrest rate increased with procedural complexity across common benchmark operations, ranging from 0.7% (ventricular septal defect repair) to 12.7% (Norwood operation). Cardiac arrest was associated with significant mortality risk across procedures, ranging from 15.4% to 62.3% (all p < 0.0001). In multivariable analysis, arrest rate was not associated with center volume (odds ratio, 1.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.71 to 1.57 in low- versus high-volume centers). However, mortality after cardiac arrest was higher in low-volume centers (odds ratio, 2.00; 95% confidence interval, 1.52 to 2.63). This association was present for both high- and low-complexity operations. Conclusions Cardiac arrest carries a significant mortality risk across the stratum of procedural complexity. Although arrest rates are not associated with center volume, lower-volume centers have increased mortality after cardiac arrest. Further study of mechanisms to prevent cardiac arrest and to reduce mortality in those with an arrest is warranted. PMID:25443018

  14. Moving out of the Laboratory: Deploying Pervasive Technologies in a Hospital

    Hansen, Thomas Riisgaard; Bardram, Jakob; Søgaard, Mads

    2006-01-01

    The authors deployed a distributed system containing a location-tracking system, a context-awareness system, wall-sized displays, and mobile phones in a Danish hospital's operating ward. This article presents the lessons they learned from deploying these pervasive computing technologies...

  15. Time Trends and Educational Inequalities in Out-of-Hospital Coronary Deaths in Norway 1995-2009

    Sulo, Enxhela; Nygård, Ottar; Vollset, Stein Emil

    2017-01-01

    using Poisson regression analysis with year as the independent, continuous variable. Information on the highest achieved education was obtained from The National Education Database and classified as primary (up to 10 years of compulsory education), secondary (high school or vocational school......BACKGROUND: Recent time trends and educational gradients characterizing out-of-hospital coronary deaths (OHCD) are poorly described. METHODS AND RESULTS: We identified all deaths from coronary heart disease occurring outside the hospital in Norway during 1995 to 2009. Time trends were explored......), or tertiary (college/university). Educational gradients in OHCD were explored using Poisson regression, stratified by sex and age (

  16. Rapid Rule-Out of Acute Myocardial Injury Using a Single High-Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin I Measurement.

    Sandoval, Yader; Smith, Stephen W; Shah, Anoop S V; Anand, Atul; Chapman, Andrew R; Love, Sara A; Schulz, Karen; Cao, Jing; Mills, Nicholas L; Apple, Fred S

    2017-01-01

    Rapid rule-out strategies using high-sensitivity cardiac troponin assays are largely supported by studies performed outside the US in selected cohorts of patients with chest pain that are atypical of US practice, and focused exclusively on ruling out acute myocardial infarction (AMI), rather than acute myocardial injury, which is more common and associated with a poor prognosis. Prospective, observational study of consecutive patients presenting to emergency departments [derivation (n = 1647) and validation (n = 2198) cohorts], where high-sensitivity cardiac troponin I (hs-cTnI) was measured on clinical indication. The negative predictive value (NPV) and diagnostic sensitivity of an hs-cTnI concentration rules out acute myocardial injury, regardless of etiology, with an excellent NPV and diagnostic sensitivity, and identifies patients at minimal risk of AMI or cardiac death at 30 days. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02060760. © 2016 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  17. Renal Insufficiency and Early Bystander CPR Predict In-Hospital Outcomes in Cardiac Arrest Patients Undergoing Mild Therapeutic Hypothermia and Cardiac Catheterization: Return of Spontaneous Circulation, Cooling, and Catheterization Registry (ROSCCC Registry

    Anjala Chelvanathan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA patients are a critically ill patient population with high mortality. Combining mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH with early coronary intervention may improve outcomes in this population. The aim of this study was to evaluate predictors of mortality in OHCA patients undergoing MTH with and without cardiac catheterization. Design. A retrospective cohort of OHCA patients who underwent MTH with catheterization (MTH + C and without catheterization (MTH + NC between 2006 and 2011 was analyzed at a single tertiary care centre. Predictors of in-hospital mortality and neurologic outcome were determined. Results. The study population included 176 patients who underwent MTH for OHCA. A total of 66 patients underwent cardiac catheterization (MTH + C and 110 patients did not undergo cardiac catheterization (MTH + NC. Immediate bystander CPR occurred in approximately half of the total population. In the MTH + C and MTH + NC groups, the in-hospital mortality was 48% and 78%, respectively. The only independent predictor of in-hospital mortality for patients with MTH + C, after multivariate analysis, was baseline renal insufficiency (OR = 8.2, 95% CI 1.8–47.1, and p = 0.009. Conclusion. Despite early cardiac catheterization, renal insufficiency and the absence of immediate CPR are potent predictors of death and poor neurologic outcome in patients with OHCA.

  18. Trends and Characteristics of United States Out-of-Hospital Births 2004-2014: New Information on Risk Status and Access to Care.

    MacDorman, Marian F; Declercq, Eugene

    2016-06-01

    Out-of-hospital births are increasing in the United States. Our purpose was to examine trends in out-of-hospital births from 2004 to 2014, and to analyze newly available data on risk status and access to care. Newly available data from the revised birth certificate for 47 states and Washington, DC, were used to examine out-of-hospital births by characteristics and to compare them with hospital births. Trends from 2004 to 2014 were also examined. Out-of-hospital births increased by 72 percent, from 0.87 percent of United States births in 2004 to 1.50 percent in 2014. Compared with mothers who had hospital births, those with out-of-hospital births had lower prepregnancy obesity (12.5% vs 25.0%) and smoking (2.8% vs 8.5%) rates, and higher college graduation (39.3% vs 30.0%) and breastfeeding initiation (94.3% vs 80.8%) rates. Among planned home births, 67.1 percent were self-paid, compared with 31.9 percent of birth center and 3.4 percent of hospital births. Vaginal births after cesarean (VBACs) comprised 4.6 percent of planned home births and 1.6 percent of hospital and birth center births. Sociodemographic and medical risk status of out-of-hospital births improved substantially from 2004 to 2014. Improvements in risk status of out-of-hospital births from 2004 to 2014 suggest that appropriate selection of low-risk women is improving. High rates of self-pay for the costs of out-of-hospital birth suggest serious gaps in insurance coverage, whereas higher-than-average rates of VBAC could reflect lack of access to hospital VBACs. Mandating private insurance and Medicaid coverage could substantially improve access to out-of-hospital births. Improving access to hospital VBACs might reduce the number of out-of-hospital VBACs. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Does Seeing the Doctor More Often Keep You Out of the Hospital?

    Robert Kaestner; Anthony T. Lo Sasso

    2012-01-01

    By exploiting a unique health insurance benefit design, we provide novel evidence on the causal association between outpatient and inpatient care. Our results indicate that greater outpatient spending was associated with more hospital admissions: a $100 increase in outpatient spending was associated with a 2.7% increase in the probability of having an inpatient event and a 4.6% increase in inpatient spending among enrollees in our sample. Moreover, we present evidence that the increase in hos...

  20. Order-specific fertility estimates based on perinatal statistics and statistics on out-of-hospital births

    Kreyenfeld, Michaela; Peters, Frederik; Scholz, Rembrandt; Wlosnewski, Ines

    2014-01-01

    Until 2008, German vital statistics has not provided information on biological birth order. We have tried to close part of this gap by providing order-specific fertility rates generated from Perinatal Statistics and statistics on out-of-hospital births for the period 2001-2008. This investigation has been published in Comparative Population Studies (CPoS) (see Kreyenfeld, Scholz, Peters and Wlosnewski 2010). The CPoS-paper describes how data from the Perinatal Statistics and statistics on out...

  1. Cardiac myxoma: A surgical experience of 38 patients over 9 years, at SSKM hospital Kolkata, India

    Mohammad Shahbaaz Khan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiac myxoma is the most common benign intracardiac tumor. We studied its clinical presentation, morbidity, mortality and recurrence following surgery over a period of 9 years. Materials and Methods: This study was performed at cardiothoracic and vascular surgery department of a tertiary level hospital of eastern India, Seth Sukhlal Karnani Memorial hospital, Institute of Post Graduate Medical Education and Research Kolkata. Near 6000 cardiac cases were operated at our center over this period. Preoperative diagnosis was made with clinical presentation and preoperative echocardiography. Complete tumor excision was done and all patients were followed up for recurrence and complications. Result: A total of 38 cases of cardiac myxoma were operated over a period from October 2002 to October 2011. Cardiac myxoma constituted about 0.6% of all cardiac cases operated at our institute. This most commonly presented at fifth decade of life. Of these, 35 cases were left atrial and 2 cases were right atrial, and 1 case was having both atrial involvements. The left atrial myxoma mostly presented as mitral stenosis and very few presented with embolic and constitutional symptoms. No death or recurrence was observed during the follow up period. Conclusion: Cardiac myxomas form a very small percentage of the cardiac cases. A high index of suspicion is essential for diagnosis. Echocardiography is the ideal diagnostic tool as also for follow-up. Immediate surgical treatment is indicated in all patients. Cardiac myxomas can be excised with a low rate of mortality and morbidity.

  2. Trends and characteristics of home and other out-of-hospital births in the United States, 1990-2006.

    MacDorman, Marian F; Menacker, Fay; Declercq, Eugene

    2010-03-03

    This report examines trends and characteristics of out-of-hospital and home births in the United States. Descriptive tabulations of data are presented and interpreted. In 2006, there were 38,568 out-of-hospital births in the United States, including 24,970 home births and 10,781 births occurring in a freestanding birthing center. After a gradual decline from 1990 to 2004, the percentage of out-of-hospital births increased by 3% from 0.87% in 2004 to 0.90% in 2005 and 2006. A similar pattern was found for home births. After a gradual decline from 1990 to 2004, the percentage of home births increased by 5% to 0.59% in 2005 and remained steady in 2006. Compared with the U.S. average, home birth rates were higher for non-Hispanic white women, married women, women aged 25 and over, and women with several previous children. Home births were less likely than hospital births to be preterm, low birthweight, or multiple deliveries. The percentage of home births was 74% higher in rural counties of less than 100,000 population than in counties with a population size of 100,000 or more. The percentage of home births also varied widely by state; in Vermont and Montana more than 2% of births in 2005-2006 were home births, compared with less than 0.2% in Louisiana and Nebraska. About 61% of home births were delivered by midwives. Among midwife-delivered home births, one-fourth (27%) were delivered by certified nurse midwives, and nearly three-fourths (73%) were delivered by other midwives. Women may choose home birth for a variety of reasons, including a desire for a low-intervention birth in a familiar environment surrounded by family and friends and cultural or religious concerns. Lack of transportation in rural areas and cost factors may also play a role.

  3. Electronic Versus Manual Data Processing: Evaluating the Use of Electronic Health Records in Out-of-Hospital Clinical Research

    Newgard, Craig D.; Zive, Dana; Jui, Jonathan; Weathers, Cody; Daya, Mohamud

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To compare case ascertainment, agreement, validity, and missing values for clinical research data obtained, processed, and linked electronically from electronic health records (EHR), compared to “manual” data processing and record abstraction in a cohort of out-ofhospital trauma patients. Methods This was a secondary analysis of two sets of data collected for a prospective, population-based, out-of-hospital trauma cohort evaluated by 10 emergency medical services (EMS) agencies transporting to 16 hospitals, from January 1, 2006 through October 2, 2007. Eighteen clinical, operational, procedural, and outcome variables were collected and processed separately and independently using two parallel data processing strategies, by personnel blinded to patients in the other group. The electronic approach included electronic health record data exports from EMS agencies, reformatting and probabilistic linkage to outcomes from local trauma registries and state discharge databases. The manual data processing approach included chart matching, data abstraction, and data entry by a trained abstractor. Descriptive statistics, measures of agreement, and validity were used to compare the two approaches to data processing. Results During the 21-month period, 418 patients underwent both data processing methods and formed the primary cohort. Agreement was good to excellent (kappa 0.76 to 0.97; intraclass correlation coefficient 0.49 to 0.97), with exact agreement in 67% to 99% of cases, and a median difference of zero for all continuous and ordinal variables. The proportions of missing out-of-hospital values were similar between the two approaches, although electronic processing generated more missing outcomes (87 out of 418, 21%, 95% CI = 17% to 25%) than the manual approach (11 out of 418, 3%, 95% CI = 1% to 5%). Case ascertainment of eligible injured patients was greater using electronic methods (n = 3,008) compared to manual methods (n = 629). Conclusions In this

  4. Diabetes education of patients and their entourage: out-of-hospital national study (EDUCATED 2).

    Lapostolle, Frédéric; Hamdi, Nadia; Barghout, Majed; Soulat, Louis; Faucher, Anna; Lambert, Yves; Peschanski, Nicolas; Ricard-Hibon, Agnès; Chassery, Carine; Roti, Maryline; Bounes, Vincent; Debaty, Guillaume; Mokni, Tarak; Egmann, Gérald; Fort, Pierre-Arnaud; Boudenia, Karim; Alayrac, Laurent; Safraou, Mohamed; Galinski, Michel; Adnet, Frédéric

    2017-04-01

    To determine the contributing factors in the successful diabetes education of patients and their entourage. Prospective observational study conducted in a pre-hospital setting by 17 emergency services across France (September 2009-January 2011) included all insulin-treated patients (≥18 years) provided that at least one family member was present on scene. Data were collected from patients and their entourage: (1) personal details including language proficiency and educational attainment, (2) treatments, (3) diabetes-related data (log sheets, glucose meter, glucagon, glycated hemoglobin, prior hypoglycemic episodes); (4) care by diabetologist, general practitioner and/or visiting nurse. The main end points were ability to measure capillary blood sugar (patient) and awareness of hypoglycemia symptoms and ability to administer glucagon (entourage). Overall, 561 patients and 736 family members were included; 343 patients (61%) were experiencing a hypoglycemic episode (patients and 343 (50%) family members could measure capillary blood sugar. They could name a median of 2 [0-3‰] hypoglycemia symptoms although 217 (39%) patients and 262 (39%) family members could name no symptom. Few patients (33%) had glucagon available. In multivariate analyses, the main factor associated with better patient education was care by a diabetologist. Lack of an educational qualification and visits by a nurse were associated with poor patient education, and French mother tongue and care by a diabetologist with better education of the entourage. In France, diabetic patients and their entourage are inadequately educated. Their education benefits most from care by a diabetologist.

  5. Out of hospital point of care ultrasound: current use models and future directions.

    Nelson, B P; Sanghvi, A

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound has evolved from a modality that was once exclusively reserved to certain specialities of its current state, in which its portability and durability lend to its broadly increasing applications. This review describes portable ultrasound in the hospital setting and its comparison to gold standard imaging modalities. Also, this review summarizes current literature describing portable ultrasound use in prehospital, austere and remote environments, highlighting successes and barriers to use in these environments. Prehospital ultrasound has the ability to increase diagnostic ability and allow for therapeutic intervention in the field. In austere environments, ultrasound may be the only available imaging modality and thus can guide diagnosis, therapeutics and determine which patients may need emergent transfer to a healthcare facility. The most cutting edge applications of portable ultrasound employ telemedicine to obtain and transmit ultrasound images. This technology and ability to transmit images via satellite and cellular transmission can allow for even novice users to obtain interpretable images in austere environments. Portable ultrasound uses have steadily grown and will continue to do so with the introduction of more portable and durable technologies. As applications continue to grow, certain technologic considerations and future directions are explored.

  6. [Factors related to lack of autonomous mobility during out-of-hospital emergency care].

    Montero García, Antonio; Morales Asencio, José Miguel; Trujillo Illescas, Juan Alfonso; Martí, Celia

    2016-10-01

    To explore the frequency of lack of autonomous mobility and factors related to it in patients requiring prehospital emergency services. Cross-sectional, observational, retrospective analysis. We identified a stratified random sample of patients attended by the public health emergency service of Andalusia in 2011. The sample included 280 patients with a mean age of 56 years; 63.9% were men. The majority were attended in homes and streets or other public spaces. Most were transported to a hospital in a mobile intensive care unit. The reasons for calling the service were most often related to chest pain or injuries. Loss of autonomous mobility was seen more often in men, when care was required in a public area, when there were injuries or altered vital signs, and when the patient required transport in a mobile intensive care unit. Dependence on others was significantly associated with the presence of a prior condition before the patient required transport (odds ratio [OR], 3.27; 95% CI, 1.60-6.33), the use of immobilization strategies (OR, 7.71; 95% CI, 1.7-34.96], and the use of ambulance transport (OR, 4.35; 95% CI, 1.63-11.60]. The following 2 variables were at the limit of significance: pain during the care process (OR, 1.13; 95% CI, 0.99-1.29) and age (OR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.97-1.01). The profile we identified for patients and situations in which patients cannot move autonomously during prehospital emergency care can be used to plan preventive strategies to ensure patient safety.

  7. Variability in case-mix adjusted in-hospital cardiac arrest rates.

    Merchant, Raina M; Yang, Lin; Becker, Lance B; Berg, Robert A; Nadkarni, Vinay; Nichol, Graham; Carr, Brendan G; Mitra, Nandita; Bradley, Steven M; Abella, Benjamin S; Groeneveld, Peter W

    2012-02-01

    It is unknown how in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) rates vary across hospitals and predictors of variability. Measure variability in IHCA across hospitals and determine if hospital-level factors predict differences in case-mix adjusted event rates. Get with the Guidelines Resuscitation (GWTG-R) (n=433 hospitals) was used to identify IHCA events between 2003 and 2007. The American Hospital Association survey, Medicare, and US Census were used to obtain detailed information about GWTG-R hospitals. Adult patients with IHCA. Case-mix-adjusted predicted IHCA rates were calculated for each hospital and variability across hospitals was compared. A regression model was used to predict case-mix adjusted event rates using hospital measures of volume, nurse-to-bed ratio, percent intensive care unit beds, palliative care services, urban designation, volume of black patients, income, trauma designation, academic designation, cardiac surgery capability, and a patient risk score. We evaluated 103,117 adult IHCAs at 433 US hospitals. The case-mix adjusted IHCA event rate was highly variable across hospitals, median 1/1000 bed days (interquartile range: 0.7 to 1.3 events/1000 bed days). In a multivariable regression model, case-mix adjusted IHCA event rates were highest in urban hospitals [rate ratio (RR), 1.1; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.0-1.3; P=0.03] and hospitals with higher proportions of black patients (RR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.0-1.3; P=0.01) and lower in larger hospitals (RR, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.45-0.66; PCase-mix adjusted IHCA event rates varied considerably across hospitals. Several hospital factors associated with higher IHCA event rates were consistent with factors often linked with lower hospital quality of care.

  8. Predicting in-hospital mortality after redo cardiac operations: development of a preoperative scorecard.

    Launcelott, Sebastian; Ouzounian, Maral; Buth, Karen J; Légaré, Jean-Francois

    2012-09-01

    The present study generated a risk model and an easy-to-use scorecard for the preoperative prediction of in-hospital mortality for patients undergoing redo cardiac operations. All patients who underwent redo cardiac operations in which the initial and subsequent procedures were performed through a median sternotomy were included. A logistic regression model was created to identify independent preoperative predictors of in-hospital mortality. The results were then used to create a scorecard predicting operative risk. A total of 1,521 patients underwent redo procedures between 1995 and 2010 at a single institution. Coronary bypass procedures were the most common previous (58%) or planned operations (54%). The unadjusted in-hospital mortality for all redo cases was higher than for first-time procedures (9.7% vs. 3.4%; pscorecard was generated using these independent predictors, stratifying patients undergoing redo cardiac operations into 6 risk categories of in-hospital mortality ranging from risk to >40%. Reoperation represents a significant proportion of modern cardiac surgical procedures and is often associated with significantly higher mortality than first-time operations. We created an easy-to-use scorecard to assist clinicians in estimating operative mortality to ensure optimal decision making in the care of patients facing redo cardiac operations. Copyright © 2012 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Pre-hospital Assessment of the Role of Adrenaline: Measuring the Effectiveness of Drug administration In Cardiac arrest (PARAMEDIC-2): Trial protocol.

    Perkins, Gavin D; Quinn, Tom; Deakin, Charles D; Nolan, Jerry P; Lall, Ranjit; Slowther, Anne-Marie; Cooke, Matthew; Lamb, Sarah E; Petrou, Stavros; Achana, Felix; Finn, Judith; Jacobs, Ian G; Carson, Andrew; Smyth, Mike; Han, Kyee; Byers, Sonia; Rees, Nigel; Whitfield, Richard; Moore, Fionna; Fothergill, Rachael; Stallard, Nigel; Long, John; Hennings, Susie; Horton, Jessica; Kaye, Charlotte; Gates, Simon

    2016-11-01

    Despite its use since the 1960s, the safety or effectiveness of adrenaline as a treatment for cardiac arrest has never been comprehensively evaluated in a clinical trial. Although most studies have found that adrenaline increases the chance of return of spontaneous circulation for short periods, many studies found harmful effects on the brain and raise concern that adrenaline may reduce overall survival and/or good neurological outcome. The PARAMEDIC-2 trial seeks to determine if adrenaline is safe and effective in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. This is a pragmatic, individually randomised, double blind, controlled trial with a parallel economic evaluation. Participants will be eligible if they are in cardiac arrest in the out-of-hospital environment and advanced life support is initiated. Exclusions are cardiac arrest as a result of anaphylaxis or life threatening asthma, and patient known or appearing to be under 16 or pregnant. 8000 participants treated by 5 UK ambulance services will be randomised between December 2014 and August 2017 to adrenaline (intervention) or placebo (control) through opening pre-randomised drug packs. Clinical outcomes are survival to 30 days (primary outcome), hospital discharge, 3, 6 and 12 months, health related quality of life, and neurological and cognitive outcomes (secondary outcomes). Trial registration (ISRCTN73485024). Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Implementing a working together model for Aboriginal patients with acute coronary syndrome: an Aboriginal Hospital Liaison Officer and a specialist cardiac nurse working together to improve hospital care.

    Daws, Karen; Punch, Amanda; Winters, Michelle; Posenelli, Sonia; Willis, John; MacIsaac, Andrew; Rahman, Muhammad Aziz; Worrall-Carter, Linda

    2014-11-01

    Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) contributes to the disparity in life expectancy between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians. Improving hospital care for Aboriginal patients has been identified as a means of addressing this disparity. This project developed and implemented a working together model of care, comprising an Aboriginal Hospital Liaison Officer and a specialist cardiac nurse, providing care coordination specifically directed at improving attendance at cardiac rehabilitation services for Aboriginal Australians in a large metropolitan hospital in Melbourne. A quality improvement framework using a retrospective case notes audit evaluated Aboriginal patients' admissions to hospital and identified low attendance rates at cardiac rehabilitation services. A working together model of care coordination by an Aboriginal Hospital Liaison Officer and a specialist cardiac nurse was implemented to improve cardiac rehabilitation attendance in Aboriginal patients admitted with ACS to the cardiac wards of the hospital. A retrospective medical records audit showed that there were 68 Aboriginal patients admitted to the cardiac wards with ACS from 1 July 2008 to 30 June 2011. A referral to cardiac rehabilitation was recorded for 42% of these. During the implementation of the model of care, 13 of 15 patients (86%) received a referral to cardiac rehabilitation and eight of the 13 (62%) attended. Implementation of the working together model demonstrated improved referral to and attendance at cardiac rehabilitation services, thereby, has potential to prevent complications and mortality. WHAT IS KNOWN ABOUT THE TOPIC?: Aboriginal Australians experience disparities in access to recommended care for acute coronary syndrome. This may contribute to the life expectancy gap between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD?: This paper describes a model of care involving an Aboriginal Hospital Liaisons Officer and a specialist cardiac nurse working

  11. [Relationship between previous severity of illness and outcome of in-hospital cardiac arrest].

    Serrano, M; Rodríguez, J; Espejo, A; del Olmo, R; Llanos, S; Del Castillo, J; López-Herce, J

    2014-07-01

    To analyze the relationship between previous severity of illness, lactic acid, creatinine and inotropic index with mortality of in-hospital cardiac arrest (CA) in children, and the value of a prognostic index designed for adults. The study included total of 44 children aged from 1 month to 18 years old who suffered a cardiac arrest while in hospital. The relationship between previous severity of illness scores (PRIMS and PELOD), lactic acid, creatinine, treatment with vasoactive drugs, inotropic index with return of spontaneous circulation and survival at hospital discharge was analyzed. The large majority (90.3%) of patients had a return of spontaneous circulation, and 59% survived at hospital discharge. More than two-thirds (68.2%) were treated with inotropic drugs at the time of the CA. The patients who died had a higher lactic acid before the CA (3.4 mmol/L) than survivors (1.4 mmol/L), P=.04. There were no significant differences in PRIMS, PELOD, creatinine, inotropic drugs, and inotropic index before CA between patients who died and survivors. A high lactic acid previous to cardiac arrest could be a prognostic factor of in-hospital cardiac arrest in children. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of Inpatient Dobutamine versus Milrinone on Out-of-Hospital Mortality in Patients with Acute Decompensated Heart Failure.

    King, Jordan B; Shah, Rashmee U; Sainski-Nguyen, Amy; Biskupiak, Joseph; Munger, Mark A; Bress, Adam P

    2017-06-01

    To determine the effect of dobutamine versus milrinone on out-of-hospital mortality in the treatment of patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). Propensity score weighted retrospective cohort study with mortality as the primary outcome. An academic health care system. Five hundred adult patients with a prior history of heart failure who survived a hospitalization for ADHF that included treatment with dobutamine or milrinone between January 1, 2006, and April 30, 2014. ADHF events were defined as a hospitalization with receipt of an intravenous loop diuretic or a brain-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) value greater than 400 pg/ml during the hospitalization. Patients were followed until death or 180 days from hospital discharge. Risk ratios (RRs) for mortality associated with dobutamine compared with milrinone were calculated at 15, 30, and 180 days postdischarge using Poisson regression with robust error variance. Mean age was 62.7 years, 65.4% were male, and 48.2% had a mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) of 40% or lower. Overall, 55 (18%) of dobutamine-treated versus 23 (12%) of milrinone-treated patients died during follow-up (RR 1.27, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.76-2.13, p=0.360). For death from cardiovascular causes, the RR for dobutamine was 1.49 (95% CI 0.79-2.82, p=0.214). For death from worsening heart failure, the RR for dobutamine was 2.55 (95% CI 1.07-6.10, p=0.035). A trend toward significance was observed at day 15 after discharge for all mortality analyses (all p values milrinone in patients with ADHF. These results replicate and extend prior associations with mortality and should be confirmed in a prospective study. © 2017 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  13. Out of Pocket Expenditure for Hospitalization among Below Poverty Line Households in District Solan, Himachal Pradesh, India, 2013.

    Gupt, Anadi; Kaur, Prabhdeep; Kamraj, P; Murthy, B N

    2016-01-01

    Health insurance schemes, like Rashtriya Swasthya Bima Yojana (RSBY), should provide financial protection against catastrophic health costs by reducing out of pocket expenditure (OOPE) for hospitalizations. We estimated and compared the proportion and extent of OOPE among below poverty line (BPL) families beneficiaries and not beneficiaries by RSBY during hospitalizations in district Solan, H.P., India, 2013. We conducted a cross sectional survey among hospitalized BPL families in the beneficiaries and non-beneficiaries groups. We compared proportion incurring OOPE and its extent during hospitalization, pre/post-hospitalization periods in different domains. Overall, proportion of non-beneficiaries who incurred OOPE was higher than the beneficiaries but it was not statistically significant (87.2% vs. 80.9%). The median overall OOPE was $39 (Rs 2567) in the non-beneficiaries group as compared to $11 (Rs 713) in the beneficiaries group (p<0.01). Median expenditure on in house and out house drugs and consumables was $23 (Rs 1500) in the non beneficiaries group as compared to nil in the beneficiaries group (p<0.01). Non-beneficiary status was significantly associated [OR: 2.4 (1.3-4.3)] with OOPE above median independently and also after adjusting for various covariates. RSBY has decreased the extent of OOPE among the beneficiaries; however OOPE was incurred mainly due to purchase of drugs from outside the health facility. The treatment seeking behaviour in beneficiaries group has improved among comparatively older group with chronic conditions. RSBY has enabled beneficiaries to get more facilities such as drugs, consumables and diagnostics from the health facility.

  14. Out of Pocket Expenditure for Hospitalization among Below Poverty Line Households in District Solan, Himachal Pradesh, India, 2013.

    Anadi Gupt

    Full Text Available Health insurance schemes, like Rashtriya Swasthya Bima Yojana (RSBY, should provide financial protection against catastrophic health costs by reducing out of pocket expenditure (OOPE for hospitalizations. We estimated and compared the proportion and extent of OOPE among below poverty line (BPL families beneficiaries and not beneficiaries by RSBY during hospitalizations in district Solan, H.P., India, 2013.We conducted a cross sectional survey among hospitalized BPL families in the beneficiaries and non-beneficiaries groups. We compared proportion incurring OOPE and its extent during hospitalization, pre/post-hospitalization periods in different domains.Overall, proportion of non-beneficiaries who incurred OOPE was higher than the beneficiaries but it was not statistically significant (87.2% vs. 80.9%. The median overall OOPE was $39 (Rs 2567 in the non-beneficiaries group as compared to $11 (Rs 713 in the beneficiaries group (p<0.01. Median expenditure on in house and out house drugs and consumables was $23 (Rs 1500 in the non beneficiaries group as compared to nil in the beneficiaries group (p<0.01. Non-beneficiary status was significantly associated [OR: 2.4 (1.3-4.3] with OOPE above median independently and also after adjusting for various covariates.RSBY has decreased the extent of OOPE among the beneficiaries; however OOPE was incurred mainly due to purchase of drugs from outside the health facility. The treatment seeking behaviour in beneficiaries group has improved among comparatively older group with chronic conditions. RSBY has enabled beneficiaries to get more facilities such as drugs, consumables and diagnostics from the health facility.

  15. Barriers to effective, safe communication and workflow between nurses and non-consultant hospital doctors during out-of-hours.

    Brady, Anne-Marie; Byrne, Gobnait; Quirke, Mary Brigid; Lynch, Aine; Ennis, Shauna; Bhangu, Jaspreet; Prendergast, Meabh

    2017-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the nature and type of communication and workflow arrangements between nurses and doctors out-of-hours (OOH). Effective communication and workflow arrangements between nurses and doctors are essential to minimize risk in hospital settings, particularly in the out-of-hour's period. Timely patient flow is a priority for all healthcare organizations and the quality of communication and workflow arrangements influences patient safety. Qualitative descriptive design and data collection methods included focus groups and individual interviews. A 500 bed tertiary referral acute hospital in Ireland. Junior and senior Non-Consultant Hospital Doctors, staff nurses and nurse managers. Both nurses and doctors acknowledged the importance of good interdisciplinary communication and collaborative working, in sustaining effective workflow and enabling a supportive working environment and patient safety. Indeed, issues of safety and missed care OOH were found to be primarily due to difficulties of communication and workflow. Medical workflow OOH is often dependent on cues and communication to/from nursing. However, communication systems and, in particular the bleep system, considered central to the process of communication between doctors and nurses OOH, can contribute to workflow challenges and increased staff stress. It was reported as commonplace for routine work, that should be completed during normal hours, to fall into OOH when resources were most limited, further compounding risk to patient safety. Enhancement of communication strategies between nurses and doctors has the potential to remove barriers to effective decision-making and patient flow. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  16. [Reminiscence on the municipal out-of-hospital maternity unit and the motherhood home in Novi Sad].

    Dobanovacki, Dusanka; Breberina, Milan; Vujosević, Bozica; Pećanac, Marija; Zakula, Nenad; Trajković, Velicko

    2013-01-01

    In the mid-twentieth century, the health care of women and children was inadequate in the post-war Yugoslavia, including the city of Novi Sad, due to the severe post-war reality: poverty in the devastated country, shortage of all commodities and services and especially of medical supplies, equipment and educated staff. OUT-OF-HOSPITAL MATERNITY UNIT: One of the serious problems was parturition at home and morbidity and mortality of the newborns and women. Soon after the World War II the action programme of improving the women's health was realized on the state level by establishing out-of-hospital maternity units but under the expert supervision. The Maternity unit at 30 Ljudevita Gaja Street in Novi Sad played a great role in providing skilled birth attendance at mainly normal deliveries. With a minimal number of medical staff and modest medical equipment, about 2000 healthy babies were born in this house. After 5 years of functioning in that way, this unit was transformed into the Motherhood Home and became a social and medical institution for pregnant women and new mothers. Regardless of the redefined organization concept the curative and preventive health care as well as women and children social protection programmes were provided successfully for the next 12 years. Although the Motherhood Home was moved into the Women Health Centre of Novi Sad and later into the former Maternity Hospital in Sremski Karlovci, its great importance for women and children's health care remained unchanged. In 1979 the overall social situation and mostly economic issues led to its closing. The house in Gajeva Street is now used as the municipality office. However, this house with its story recommends itself to become a house for a special social function, such as a museum of medical history of Novi Sad. A small investment could make it possible to collect, preserve and display the valuable records of our past, which is something we do owe to the generations to come.

  17. Frequency of rib and sternum fractures associated with out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation is underestimated by conventional chest X-ray.

    Lederer, Wolfgang; Mair, Dieter; Rabl, Walter; Baubin, Michael

    2004-02-01

    Fractured ribs and sternum are frequent complications of thoracic compression during CPR in adults. This study was conducted to determine whether findings of plain chest radiography (CXR) correlate with post-mortem findings in patients who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. CXR findings and autopsy results of CPR-related chest injuries comprising rib and sternum fractures were compared prospectively in 19 patients. Fractures were diagnosed in nine of 19 patients by means of radiology and in 18 of 19 patients by autopsy (rib fractures in 6/19 versus 17/19, P=0.002; sternum fractures in 5/19 versus in 9/19, P=0.227. The total number of isolated bone fractures detected by CXR was 18 (12 rib and six sternum fractures) and by autopsy 92 (83 rib and nine sternum fractures). The majority of rib fractures was located in the anterior part of the thoracic cage. Sternum fractures predominantly occurred in the lower third. Eight of 19 patients received either thrombolytic or antithrombotic treatment during CPR but no major bleeding complication associated with CPR was detected by autopsy. The findings of this study indicate that fractures associated with CPR are underreported in conventional radiographic investigations. No major bleeding complications related to CPR-associated fractures was detected.

  18. The Relationship Between Preoperative Hemoglobin Concentration, Use of Hospital Resources, and Outcomes in Cardiac Surgery.

    Hallward, George; Balani, Nikhail; McCorkell, Stuart; Roxburgh, James; Cornelius, Victoria

    2016-08-01

    Preoperative anemia is an established risk factor associated with adverse perioperative outcomes after cardiac surgery. However, limited information exists regarding the relationship between preoperative hemoglobin concentration and outcomes. The aim of this study was to investigate how outcomes are affected by preoperative hemoglobin concentration in a cohort of patients undergoing cardiac surgery. A retrospective, observational cohort study. A single-center tertiary referral hospital. The study comprised 1,972 adult patients undergoing elective and nonelective cardiac surgery. The independent relationship of preoperative hemoglobin concentration was explored on blood transfusion rates, return to the operating room for bleeding and/or cardiac tamponade, postoperative intensive care unit (ICU) and in-hospital length of stay, and mortality. The overall prevalence of anemia was 32% (629/1,972 patients). For every 1-unit increase in hemoglobin (g/dL), blood transfusion requirements were reduced by 11%, 8%, and 3% for red blood cell units, platelet pools, and fresh frozen plasma units, respectively (adjusted incident rate ratio 0.89 [95% CI 0.87-0.91], 0.92 [0.88-0.97], and 0.97 [0.96-0.99]). For each 1-unit increase in hemoglobin (g/dL), the probability (over time) of discharge from the ICU and hospital increased (adjusted hazard ratio estimates 1.04 [1.00-1.08] and 1.12 [1.12-1.16], respectively). A lower preoperative hemoglobin concentration resulted in increased use of hospital resources after cardiac surgery. Each g/dL unit fall in preoperative hemoglobin concentration resulted in increased blood transfusion requirements and increased postoperative ICU and hospital length of stay. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Combined social and private health insurance versus catastrophic out of pocket payments for private hospital care in Greece.

    Grigorakis, Nikolaos; Floros, Christos; Tsangari, Haritini; Tsoukatos, Evangelos

    2017-01-03

    The high level of out of pocket (OOP) payments constitutes a major concern for Greece and several other European and OECD countries as a result of the significant down turning of their public health finances due to the 2008 financial crisis. The basic objective of this study is to provide empirical evidence on the effect of combining social health insurance (SHI) and private health insurance (PHI) on OOP payments. Further, this study examines the catastrophic impact of OOP payments on insured's welfare using the incidence and intensity methodological approach of measuring catastrophic health care expenditures. Conducting a cross-sectional survey in Greece in 2013, we find that the combination of SHI-PHI has a strong negative influence on insured OOP payments for inpatient health care in private hospitals. Furthermore, our results indicate that SHI coverage is not sufficient by itself to manage with this issue. Moreover, we find that poor people present a greater tendency to incur catastrophic OOP expenditures for hospital health care in private providers. Drawing evidence from Greece, a country with huge fiscal problems that has suffered the consequences of the economic crisis more than any other, could be a starting point for policymakers to consider the perspective of SHI-PHI co-operation against OOP payments more seriously.

  20. Clinical experience and skills of physicians in hospital cardiac arrest teams in Denmark: a nationwide study

    Lauridsen KG

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Kasper G Lauridsen,1–3 Anders S Schmidt,1–3 Philip Caap,3,4 Rasmus Aagaard,2,3,5 Bo Løfgren1,3,4 1Department of Internal Medicine, 2Clinical Research Unit, Regional Hospital of Randers, Randers, 3Research Center for Emergency Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, 4Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus, 5Department of Anesthesiology, Randers Regional Hospital, Denmark Background: The quality of in-hospital resuscitation is poor and may be affected by the clinical experience and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR training. This study aimed to investigate the clinical experience, self-perceived skills, CPR training and knowledge of the guidelines on when to abandon resuscitation among physicians of cardiac arrest teams. Methods: We performed a nationwide cross-sectional study in Denmark. Telephone interviews were conducted with physicians in the cardiac arrest teams in public somatic hospitals using a structured questionnaire. Results: In total, 93 physicians (53% male from 45 hospitals participated in the study. Median age was 34 (interquartile range: 30–39 years. Respondents were medical students working as locum physicians (5%, physicians in training (79% and consultants (16%, and the median postgraduate clinical experience was 48 (19–87 months. Most respondents (92% felt confident in treating a cardiac arrest, while fewer respondents felt confident in performing intubation (41% and focused cardiac ultrasound (39% during cardiac arrest. Median time since last CPR training was 4 (2–10 months, and 48% had attended a European Resuscitation Council (ERC Advanced Life Support course. The majority (84% felt confident in terminating resuscitation; however, only 9% were able to state the ERC guidelines on when to abandon resuscitation. Conclusion: Physicians of Danish cardiac arrest teams are often inexperienced and do not feel competent performing important clinical skills during resuscitation. Less than half have

  1. Desmosomal Molecules In and Out of Adhering Junctions: Normal and Diseased States of Epidermal, Cardiac and Mesenchymally Derived Cells

    Sebastian Pieperhoff

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Current cell biology textbooks mention only two kinds of cell-to-cell adhering junctions coated with the cytoplasmic plaques: the desmosomes (maculae adhaerentes, anchoring intermediate-sized filaments (IFs, and the actin microfilament-anchoring adherens junctions (AJs, including both punctate (puncta adhaerentia and elongate (fasciae adhaerentes structures. In addition, however, a series of other junction types has been identified and characterized which contain desmosomal molecules but do not fit the definition of desmosomes. Of these special cell-cell junctions containing desmosomal glycoproteins or proteins we review the composite junctions (areae compositae connecting the cardiomyocytes of mature mammalian hearts and their importance in relation to human arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathies. We also emphasize the various plakophilin-2-positive plaques in AJs (coniunctiones adhaerentes connecting proliferatively active mesenchymally-derived cells, including interstitial cells of the heart and several soft tissue tumor cell types. Moreover, desmoplakin has also been recognized as a constituent of the plaques of the complexus adhaerentes connecting certain lymphatic endothelial cells. Finally, we emphasize the occurrence of the desmosomal transmembrane glycoprotein, desmoglein Dsg2, out of the context of any junction as dispersed cell surface molecules in certain types of melanoma cells and melanocytes. This broadening of our knowledge on the diversity of AJ structures indicates that it may still be too premature to close the textbook chapters on cell-cell junctions.

  2. Multilayer out-of-plane overlap electrostatic energy harvesting structure actuated by blood pressure for powering intra-cardiac implants

    Deterre, M.; Risquez, S.; Bouthaud, B.; Dal Molin, R.; Woytasik, M.; Lefeuvre, E.

    2013-12-01

    We present an innovative multilayer out-of-plane electrostatic energy harvesting device conceived in view of scavenging energy from regular blood pressure in the heart. This concept involves the use of a deformable packaging for the implant in order to transmit the blood pressure to the electrostatic transducer. As shown in previous work, this is possible by using thin metal micro-bellows structure, providing long term hermeticity and high flexibility. The design of the electrostatic device has overcome several challenges such as the very low frequency of the mechanical excitation (1 to 2 Hz) and the small available room in the medical implant. Analytical and numerical models have been used to maximize the capacitance variation, and hence to optimize the energy conversion. We have theoretically shown that a 25-layer transducer with 6-mm diameter and 1-mm thickness could harvest at least 20 mJ per heart beat in the left ventricle under a maximum voltage of 75 V. These results show that the proposed concept is promising and could power the next generation of leadless pacemakers.

  3. Effects of advanced life support on patients who suffered cardiac arrest outside of hospital and were defibrillated.

    Hagihara, Akihito; Onozuka, Daisuke; Nagata, Takashi; Hasegawa, Manabu

    2018-01-01

    The effects and relative benefits of advanced airway management and epinephrine on patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) who were defibrillated are not well understood. This was a prospective observational study. Using data of all out-of-hospital cardiac arrest cases occurring between 2005 and 2013 in Japan, hierarchical logistic regression and conditional logistic regression along with time-dependent propensity matching were performed. Outcome measures were survival and minimal neurological impairment [cerebral performance category (CPC) 1 or 2] at 1month after the event. We analyzed 37,873 cases that met the inclusion criteria. Among propensity-matched patients, advanced airway management and/or prehospital epinephrine use was related to decreased rates of 1-month survival (adjusted odds ratio 0.88, 95% confidence interval 0.80 to 0.97) and CPC (1, 2) (adjusted odds ratio 0.56, 95% confidence interval 0.48 to 0.66). Advanced airway management was related to decreased rates of 1-month survival (adjusted odds ratio 0.89, 95% confidence interval 0.81to 0.98) and CPC (1, 2) (adjusted odds ratio 0.54, 95% confidence interval 0.46 to 0.64) in patients who did not receive epinephrine, whereas epinephrine use was not related to the outcome measures. In defibrillated patients with OHCA, advanced airway management and/or epinephrine are related to reduced long-term survival, and advanced airway management is less beneficial than epinephrine. However, the proportion of patients with OHCA who responded to an initial shock was very low in the study subjects, and the external validity of our findings might be limited. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Frequency of cardiac defects among children at echocardiography centre in a teaching hospital

    Malik, A.S.; Majeed, R.; Channer, M.S.; Saleem, M.I.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess frequency of cardiac defects among children from birth to 12 years of age on each Methodology: A cross sectional study was conducted at echocardiography centre in coronary care unit at Bahawal Victoria Hby Paediatric Transthoracic echo probe; 2-D colour Doppler, Acuson CV-70 and Niemo-30 echocardiography machines. Mothers of children with cardiac defects were interviewed at the echocardiography centre. Variables included were A- Muscular plus Vascular defects; B- Valvular defects; C-Pericardial effusion; D- Dextrocardia and E- Congestive cardiac failure. History of children for sore throat followed by joint pains; history of mothers for drug intake (antihypertensive, antipyretic, anti-emetic, hypoglycaemic) as well as chronic diseases (diabetes mellitus, hypertension, anaemia) during pregnancy were surveyed. Parity of mothers, their cousin marriages, and family socio-economic status was also inquired. The results were tabulated, analyzed and finally subjected to suitable test of significant (SR of proportion) to find out statistical significant if any. Results: It was found that out of 150 patients, 76 (50.66%) were suffering from Cardiac muscular and Vascular defects, 61 (40.66%) Valvular defects, 7 (4.66%) Pericardial effusion, 2 (1.33%) Dextrocardia and 4 (2.66%) from Congestive Cardiac Failure. According to age, 54 (36%) were from birth to 3 years of age and 51 (34%) from 10 to 12 years. There was history of Rheumatic fever among 45 (30%) children. There were 106 (70.6%) children from lower socio-economic class and 79 (52.6%) parents had history of cousin marriages. Conclusion: Frequency of cardiac defects was more in children of male sex, lower socio-economic group, from birth to three years age and children from primipara mothers in our specified locality. Rheumatic fever, cousin's marriage, and prescribed drugs intake during pregnancy (for metabolic and hormonal disorders) were other contributors to cardiac defects. (author)

  5. Development and validation of risk models to predict outcomes following in-hospital cardiac arrest attended by a hospital-based resuscitation team.

    Harrison, David A; Patel, Krishna; Nixon, Edel; Soar, Jasmeet; Smith, Gary B; Gwinnutt, Carl; Nolan, Jerry P; Rowan, Kathryn M

    2014-08-01

    The National Cardiac Arrest Audit (NCAA) is the UK national clinical audit for in-hospital cardiac arrest. To make fair comparisons among health care providers, clinical indicators require case mix adjustment using a validated risk model. The aim of this study was to develop and validate risk models to predict outcomes following in-hospital cardiac arrest attended by a hospital-based resuscitation team in UK hospitals. Risk models for two outcomes-return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) for greater than 20min and survival to hospital discharge-were developed and validated using data for in-hospital cardiac arrests between April 2011 and March 2013. For each outcome, a full model was fitted and then simplified by testing for non-linearity, combining categories and stepwise reduction. Finally, interactions between predictors were considered. Models were assessed for discrimination, calibration and accuracy. 22,479 in-hospital cardiac arrests in 143 hospitals were included (14,688 development, 7791 validation). The final risk model for ROSC>20min included: age (non-linear), sex, prior length of stay in hospital, reason for attendance, location of arrest, presenting rhythm, and interactions between presenting rhythm and location of arrest. The model for hospital survival included the same predictors, excluding sex. Both models had acceptable performance across the range of measures, although discrimination for hospital mortality exceeded that for ROSC>20min (c index 0.81 versus 0.72). Validated risk models for ROSC>20min and hospital survival following in-hospital cardiac arrest have been developed. These models will strengthen comparative reporting in NCAA and support local quality improvement. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Development and validation of risk models to predict outcomes following in-hospital cardiac arrest attended by a hospital-based resuscitation team☆

    Harrison, David A.; Patel, Krishna; Nixon, Edel; Soar, Jasmeet; Smith, Gary B.; Gwinnutt, Carl; Nolan, Jerry P.; Rowan, Kathryn M.

    2014-01-01

    Aim The National Cardiac Arrest Audit (NCAA) is the UK national clinical audit for in-hospital cardiac arrest. To make fair comparisons among health care providers, clinical indicators require case mix adjustment using a validated risk model. The aim of this study was to develop and validate risk models to predict outcomes following in-hospital cardiac arrest attended by a hospital-based resuscitation team in UK hospitals. Methods Risk models for two outcomes—return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) for greater than 20 min and survival to hospital discharge—were developed and validated using data for in-hospital cardiac arrests between April 2011 and March 2013. For each outcome, a full model was fitted and then simplified by testing for non-linearity, combining categories and stepwise reduction. Finally, interactions between predictors were considered. Models were assessed for discrimination, calibration and accuracy. Results 22,479 in-hospital cardiac arrests in 143 hospitals were included (14,688 development, 7791 validation). The final risk model for ROSC > 20 min included: age (non-linear), sex, prior length of stay in hospital, reason for attendance, location of arrest, presenting rhythm, and interactions between presenting rhythm and location of arrest. The model for hospital survival included the same predictors, excluding sex. Both models had acceptable performance across the range of measures, although discrimination for hospital mortality exceeded that for ROSC > 20 min (c index 0.81 versus 0.72). Conclusions Validated risk models for ROSC > 20 min and hospital survival following in-hospital cardiac arrest have been developed. These models will strengthen comparative reporting in NCAA and support local quality improvement. PMID:24830872

  7. Performance of a remote interrogation system for the in-hospital evaluation of cardiac implantable electronic devices.

    Mittal, Suneet; Younge, Kevin; King-Ellison, Kelly; Hammill, Eric; Stein, Kenneth

    2016-08-01

    Patients with a cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) often need device interrogation in an in-hospital environment. A diagnosis-only, remote interrogation device and process for CIED interrogation was developed to address this situation. Here, we describe our initial clinical experience with this system. The LATITUDE Consult Communicator is a stand-alone interrogation-only device used to read the patient's implanted CIED. Once retrieved, the data are securely transmitted via an analog phone line to a central server. The clinician can request a review of the transmitted data at any time. Following FDA approval, we determined the usage and performance of the system. Communicators (n = 53) were installed in 42 hospital facilities. The most common location was in the emergency department (n = 32, 60 %). There were 509 discreet transmissions, which were categorized as follows: no arrhythmia episodes in the past 72 h and no out of range measurements (n = 174, 34 %); arrhythmia episodes in past 72 h but no out of range measurements (n = 170, 33 %); and further review recommended (n = 130, 26 %). (In 35 [7 %] instances, interrogation without analysis was requested.) The further review interrogations were then sub-divided into those of a non-urgent and urgent nature. Overall, only 53 (10 %) of the 509 transmissions were classified as urgent. Clinicians had access to full technical consultation in ≤15 min in 89 % of instances. Our data demonstrate the feasibility of a new diagnosis-only, remote interrogation device and remote evaluation process for the interrogation of CIEDs in an in-hospital environment.

  8. Association between Smokefree Legislation and Hospitalizations for Cardiac, Cerebrovascular and Respiratory Diseases: A Meta-Analysis

    Tan, Crystal E.; Glantz, Stanton A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Secondhand smoke causes cardiovascular and respiratory disease. Smokefree legislation is associated with a lower risk of hospitalization and death from these diseases. Methods and Results Random effects meta-analysis was conducted by law comprehensiveness to determine the relationship between smokefree legislation and hospital admission or death from cardiac, cerebrovascular, and respiratory diseases. Studies were identified using a systematic search for studies published before November 30, 2011 using Science Citation Index, Google Scholar, PubMed, and Embase and references in identified papers. Change in hospital admissions (or deaths) in the presence of a smokefree law, duration of follow-up, and law comprehensiveness (workplaces only; workplaces and restaurants; or workplaces, restaurants, and bars) were recorded. Forty-five studies of 33 smokefree laws with median follow-up of 24 months (range 2–57 months) were included. Comprehensive smokefree legislation was associated with significantly lower rates of hospital admissions (or deaths) for all 4 diagnostic groups: coronary events (RR .848, 95% CI .816–.881), other heart disease (RR .610, 95% CI .440–.847), cerebrovascular accidents (RR .840, 95% CI .753–.936), and respiratory disease (RR .760, 95% CI .682–.846). The difference in risk following comprehensive smokefree laws does not change with longer follow-up. More comprehensive laws were associated with larger changes in risk. Conclusions Smokefree legislation was associated with a lower risk of smoking-related cardiac, cerebrovascular, and respiratory diseases, with more comprehensive laws associated with greater changes in risk. PMID:23109514

  9. Hospital employees' theoretical knowledge on what to do in an in-hospital cardiac arrest

    Herlitz Johan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Guidelines recommend that all health care professionals should be able to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR, including the use of an automated external defibrillator. Theoretical knowledge of CPR is then necessary. The aim of this study was to investigate how much theoretical knowledge in CPR would increase among all categories of health care professionals lacking training in CPR, in an intervention hospital, after a systematic standardised training. Their results were compared with the staff at a control hospital with an ongoing annual CPR training programme. Methods Health care professionals at two hospitals, with a total of 3144 employees, answered a multiple-choice questionnaire before and after training in CPR. Bootstrapped chi-square tests and Fisher's exact test were used for the statistical analyses. Results In the intervention hospital, physicians had the highest knowledge pre-test, but other health care professionals including nurses and assistant nurses reached a relatively high level post-test. Improvement was inversely related to the level of previous knowledge and was thus most marked among other health care professionals and least marked among physicians. The staff at the control hospital had a significantly higher level of knowledge pre-test than the intervention hospital, whereas the opposite was found post-test. Conclusions Overall theoretical knowledge increased after systematic standardised training in CPR. The increase was more pronounced for those without previous training and for those staff categories with the least medical education.

  10. Implementing Sustainable Data Collection for a Cardiac Outcomes Registry in an Australian Public Hospital.

    Cox, Nicholas; Brennan, Angela; Dinh, Diem; Brien, Rita; Cowie, Kath; Stub, Dion; Reid, Christopher M; Lefkovits, Jeffrey

    2018-04-01

    Clinical outcome registries are an increasingly vital component of ensuring quality and safety of patient care. However, Australian hospitals rarely have additional resources or the capacity to fund the additional staff time to complete the task of data collection and entry. At the same time, registry funding models do not support staff for the collection of data at the site but are directed towards the central registry tasks of data reporting, managing and quality monitoring. The sustainability of a registry is contingent on building efficiencies into data management and collection. We describe the methods used in a large Victorian public hospital to develop a sustainable data collection system for the Victorian Cardiac Outcomes Registry (VCOR), using existing staff and resources common to many public hospitals. We describe the features of the registry and the hospital specific strategies that allowed us to do this as part of our routine business of providing good quality cardiac care. All clinical staff involved in patient care were given some data collection task with the entry of these data embedded into the staff's daily workflow. A senior cardiology registrar was empowered to allocate data entry tasks to colleagues when data were found to be incomplete. The task of 30-day follow-up proved the most onerous part of data collection. Cath-lab nursing staff were allocated this role. With hospital accreditation and funding models moving towards performance based quality indicators, collection of accurate and reliable information is crucial. Our experience demonstrates the successful implementation of clinical outcome registry data collection in a financially constrained public hospital environment utilising existing resources. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Racial disparities in the use of cardiac revascularization: does local hospital capacity matter?

    Suhui Li

    Full Text Available To assess the extent to which the observed racial disparities in cardiac revascularization use can be explained by the variation across counties where patients live, and how the within-county racial disparities is associated with the local hospital capacity.Administrative data from Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council (PHC4 between 1995 and 2006.The study sample included 207,570 Medicare patients admitted to hospital for acute myocardial infarction (AMI. We identified the use of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI procedures within three months after the patient's initial admission for AMI. Multi-level hierarchical models were used to determine the extent to which racial disparities in procedure use were attributable to the variation in local hospital capacity.Blacks were less likely than whites to receive CABG (9.1% vs. 5.8%; p<0.001 and PCI (15.7% vs. 14.2%; p<0.001. The state-level racial disparity in use rate decreases for CABG, and increases for PCI, with the county adjustment. Higher number of revascularization hospitals per 1,000 AMI patients was associated with smaller within-county racial differences in CABG and PCI rates. Meanwhile, very low capacity of catheterization suites and AMI hospitals contributed to significantly wider racial gap in PCI rate.County variation in cardiac revascularization use rates helps explain the observed racial disparities. While smaller hospital capacity is associated with lower procedure rates for both racial groups, the impact is found to be larger on blacks. Therefore, consequences of fewer medical resources may be particularly pronounced for blacks, compared with whites.

  12. Variations in survival after cardiac arrest among academic medical center-affiliated hospitals.

    Michael Christopher Kurz

    Full Text Available Variation exists in cardiac arrest (CA survival among institutions. We sought to determine institutional-level characteristics of academic medical centers (AMCs associated with CA survival.We examined discharge data from AMCs participating with Vizient clinical database-resource manager. We identified cases using ICD-9 diagnosis code 427.5 (CA or procedure code 99.60 (CPR. We estimated hospital-specific risk-standardized survival rates (RSSRs using mixed effects logistic regression, adjusting for individual mortality risk. Institutional and community characteristics of AMCs with higher than average survival were compared with those with lower survival.We analyzed data on 3,686,296 discharges in 2012, of which 33,700 (0.91% included a CA diagnosis. Overall survival was 42.3% (95% CI 41.8-42.9 with median institutional RSSR of 42.6% (IQR 35.7-51.0; Min-Max 19.4-101.6. We identified 28 AMCs with above average survival (median RSSR 61.8% and 20 AMCs with below average survival (median RSSR 26.8%. Compared to AMCs with below average survival, those with high CA survival had higher CA volume (median 262 vs.119 discharges, p = 0.002, total beds (722 vs. 452, p = 0.02, and annual surgical volume (24,939 vs. 13,109, p<0.001, more likely to offer cardiac catheterization (100% vs. 72%, p = 0.007 or cardiac surgery (93% vs. 61%, p = 0.02 and cared for catchment areas with higher household income ($61,922 vs. $49,104, p = 0.004 and lower poverty rates (14.6% vs. 17.3%, p = 0.03.Using discharge data from Vizient, we showed AMCs with higher CA and surgical case volume, cardiac catheterization and cardiac surgery facilities, and catchment areas with higher socioeconomic status had higher risk-standardized CA survival.

  13. Survival models for out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation from the perspectives of the bystander, the first responder, and the paramedic

    Waalewijn, R. A.; de Vos, R.; Tijssen, J. G.; Koster, R. W.

    2001-01-01

    Survival from out-of-hospital resuscitation depends on the strength of each component of the chain of survival. We studied, on the scene, witnessed, nontraumatic resuscitations of patients older than 17 years. The influence of the chain of survival and potential predictors on survival was analyzed

  14. Saving The Savable: Using Bystanders To Increase Survival From Out Of Hospital Cardiac Arrest (Ohca) In New York City

    2016-03-01

    failed to increase production , studies examined the organizational social system and the technical system combined with the social system, and the...distributed problem solving and production model that 36 Jeff Howe, “The Rise of Crowdsourcing,” Wired...civically engaged, the groups are named “Community Active,” “Neighborhood Advocates,” “Vocal Opinionators,” “Issues Aware,” “The Absentees ,” and

  15. Mortality and neurological outcome in the elderly after target temperature management for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    Winther-Jensen, Matilde; Pellis, Tommaso; Kuiper, Michael

    2015-01-01

    allocation was not statistically significant for either mortality or neurological outcome. CONCLUSION: Increasing age is associated with significantly increased mortality after OHCA, but mortality rate is not influenced by level of target temperature. Risk of poor neurological outcome also increases with age...

  16. Cost-effectiveness of Different Advanced Life Support Providers for Victims of Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrests

    Zui-Shen Yen

    2006-01-01

    Conclusion: The use of EMTs as ALS care providers for OHCA patients in the two-tiered EMS system resulted in a reasonable cost-effectiveness ratio. EMTs could be considered as the second tier of EMS systems in urban areas in Taiwan.

  17. Association of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and survival according to ambulance response-times after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    Rajan, Shahzleen; Wissenberg, Mads; Folke, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    30-day survival chances decreased for both patients with bystander CPR and those without. However, the contrast between the survival chances of patients with versus without bystander CPR increased over time: within 5 minutes, 30-day survival was 14.5% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 12.8-16.4) versus...... 6.3% (95% CI: 5.1-7.6), corresponding to 2.3 times higher chances of survival associated with bystander CPR; within 10 minutes, 30-day survival chances were 6.7% (95% CI: 5.4-8.1) versus 2.2% (95% CI: 1.5-3.1), corresponding to 3.0 times higher chances of 30-day survival associated with bystander...... CPR. The contrast in 30-day survival became statistically insignificant when response time was >13 minutes (bystander CPR vs no bystander CPR: 3.7% [95% CI: 2.2-5.4] vs 1.5% [95% CI: 0.6-2.7]), but 30-day survival was still 2.5 times higher associated with bystander CPR. Based on the model and Danish...

  18. Challenges in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest - A study combining closed-circuit television (CCTV) and medical emergency calls

    Linderoth, Gitte; Hallas, Peter; Lippert, Freddy

    2015-01-01

    to effective intervention were situation awareness, communication and attitude/approach. Potentially, some of these challenges could be minimized if the dispatcher was able to see the victim and the bystanders at the scene. A team approach, with the dispatcher responsible for the role as team leader...... of a remote resuscitation team of a caller and bystanders, may potentially improve treatment of OHCA....

  19. Ultrasonography for Proper Endotracheal Tube Placement Confirmation in Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest Patients: Two-center Experience

    Jen-Tang Sun

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: Real-time tracheal ultrasonography is an accurate method for identifying endotracheal tube position during cardiopulmonary resuscitation without the need for interruption of chest compression.

  20. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use is associated with increased risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    Sondergaard, Kathrine B; Weeke, Peter; Wissenberg, Mads

    2017-01-01

    Arrest Registry, all persons with OHCA during 2001-10 were identified. NSAID use 30 days before OHCA was categorized as follows: diclofenac, naproxen, ibuprofen, rofecoxib, celecoxib, and other. Risk of OHCA associated with use of NSAIDs was analysed by conditional logistic regression in case......-time-control models matching four controls on sex and age per case to account for variation in drug utilization over time. We identified 28 947 persons with OHCA of whom 3376 were treated with an NSAID up to 30 days before OHCA. Ibuprofen and diclofenac were the most commonly used NSAIDs and represented 51.0% and 21.......8% of total NSAID use, respectively. Use of diclofenac (odds ratio [OR], 1.50 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.23-1.82]) and ibuprofen [OR, 1.31 (95% CI 1.14-1.51)] was associated with a significantly increased risk of OHCA. Use of naproxen [OR, 1.29 (95% CI 0.77-2.16)], celecoxib [OR, 1.13 (95% CI 0...

  1. Prognostic implication of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in patients with cardiogenic shock and acute myocardial infarction

    Ostenfeld, Sarah; Lindholm, Matias Greve; Kjaergaard, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    -morbidities were more prevalent in the non-OHCA group. By univariate analysis age (Hazard ratio (HR)=1.02 [CI 1.00-1.03], p=0.01) and lactate at admission (HR=1.06 [CI 1.03-1.09], p4], p=NS) was associated with mortality. In multivariate analysis, only age (HR=1.02 [CI 1...... to a tertiary centre with the diagnosis of CS and acute MI were enrolled, 118 (48%) presented with OHCA and 130 (52%) without (non-OHCA patients). Mean lactate level at admission was significantly higher in OHCA patients compared with non-OCHA patients (9mmol/l (SD 6) vs. 6mmol/l (SD 4) p

  2. Neuroprotective Effects of the Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Analog Exenatide After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    Wiberg, Sebastian; Hassager, Christian; Schmidt, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    points were feasibility, defined as initiation of the study drug in >90% patients within 240 minutes of return of spontaneous circulation, and efficacy, defined as the geometric area under the neuron-specific enolase curve from 24 to 72 hours after admission. The main secondary end points included...... a composite end point of death and poor neurological function, defined as a Cerebral Performance Category score of 3 to 5 assessed at 30 and 180 days. RESULTS: The study drug was initiated within 240 minutes of return of spontaneous circulation in 96% patients. The median blood glucose 8 hours after admission...... in patients receiving exenatide was lower than that in patients receiving placebo (5.8 [5.2-6.7] mmol/L versus 7.3 [6.2-8.7] mmol/L, Pneuron-specific enolase curve, or a composite end point of death and poor neurological function...

  3. Impact of respiratory infection in the results of cardiac surgery in a tertiary hospital in Brazil

    Isaac Newton Guimarães Andrade

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective:To assess the impact of respiratory tract infection in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery in relation to mortality and to identify patients at higher risk of developing this complication.Methods:Cross-sectional observational study conducted at the Recovery of Cardiothoracic Surgery, using information from a database consisting of a total of 900 patients operated on in this hospital during the period from 01/07/2008 to 1/07/2009. We included patients whose medical records contained all the information required and undergoing elective surgery, totaling 109 patients with two excluded. Patients were divided into two groups, WITH and WITHOUT respiratory tract infection, as the development or respiratory tract infection in hospital, with patients in the group without respiratory tract infection, the result of randomization, using for the pairing of the groups the type of surgery performed. The outcome variables assessed were mortality, length of hospital stay and length of stay in intensive care unit. The means of quantitative variables were compared using the Wilcoxon and student t-test.Results:The groups were similar (average age P=0.17; sex P=0.94; surgery performed P=0.85-1.00 Mortality in the WITH respiratory tract infection group was significantly higher (P<0.0001. The times of hospitalization and intensive care unit were significantly higher in respiratory tract infection (P<0.0001. The presence of respiratory tract infection was associated with the development of other complications such as renal failure dialysis and stroke P<0.00001 and P=0.002 respectively.Conclusion:The development of respiratory tract infection postoperative cardiac surgery is related to higher mortality, longer periods of hospitalization and intensive care unit stay.

  4. Impact of respiratory infection in the results of cardiac surgery in a tertiary hospital in Brazil

    Andrade, Isaac Newton Guimarães; de Araújo, Diego Torres Aladin; de Moraes, Fernando Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the impact of respiratory tract infection in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery in relation to mortality and to identify patients at higher risk of developing this complication. Methods Cross-sectional observational study conducted at the Recovery of Cardiothoracic Surgery, using information from a database consisting of a total of 900 patients operated on in this hospital during the period from 01/07/2008 to 1/07/2009. We included patients whose medical records contained all the information required and undergoing elective surgery, totaling 109 patients with two excluded. Patients were divided into two groups, WITH and WITHOUT respiratory tract infection, as the development or respiratory tract infection in hospital, with patients in the group without respiratory tract infection, the result of randomization, using for the pairing of the groups the type of surgery performed. The outcome variables assessed were mortality, length of hospital stay and length of stay in intensive care unit. The means of quantitative variables were compared using the Wilcoxon and student t-test. Results The groups were similar (average age P=0.17; sex P=0.94; surgery performed P=0.85-1.00) Mortality in the WITH respiratory tract infection group was significantly higher (P<0.0001). The times of hospitalization and intensive care unit were significantly higher in respiratory tract infection (P<0.0001). The presence of respiratory tract infection was associated with the development of other complications such as renal failure dialysis and stroke P<0.00001 and P=0.002 respectively. Conclusion The development of respiratory tract infection postoperative cardiac surgery is related to higher mortality, longer periods of hospitalization and intensive care unit stay. PMID:26313727

  5. Is a sedentary lifestyle an independent predictor for hospital and early mortality after elective cardiac surgery?

    Noyez, L; Biemans, I; Verkroost, M; van Swieten, H

    2013-10-01

    This study evaluates whether a sedentary lifestyle is an independent predictor for increased mortality after elective cardiac surgery. Three thousand one hundred fifty patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery between January 2007 and June 2012 completed preoperatively the Corpus Christi Heart Project questionnaire concerning physical activity (PA). Based on this questionnaire, 1815 patients were classified as active and 1335 patients were classified as sedentary. The endpoints of the study were hospital mortality and early mortality. The study population had a mean age of 69.7 ± 10.1 (19-95) years and a mean logistic EuroSCORE risk of 5.1 ± 5.6 (0.88-73.8). Sedentary patients were significantly older (p = 0.001), obese (p = 0.001), had a higher EuroSCORE risk (p = 0.001), and a higher percentage of complications. Hospital mortality (1.1 % versus 0.4 % (p = 0.014)) and early mortality (1.5 % versus 0.6 % (p = 0.006)) were significantly higher in the sedentary group compared with the active group. However, a sedentary lifestyle was not identified as an independent predictor for hospital mortality (p = 0.61) or early mortality (p = 0.70). Sedentary patients were older, obese and had a higher EuroSCORE risk. They had significantly more postoperative complications, higher hospital mortality and early mortality. Despite these results, sedentary behaviour could not be identified as an independent predictor for hospital or early mortality.

  6. Dimensionality of the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) in cardiac patients

    Emons, Wilco H M; Sijtsma, Klaas; Pedersen, Susanne S.

    2012-01-01

    The hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) measures anxiety and depressive symptoms and is widely used in clinical and nonclinical populations. However, there is some debate about the number of dimensions represented by the HADS. In a sample of 534 Dutch cardiac patients, this study examined...... items each were found to be structurally sound and reliable. These scales covered the two key attributes of anxiety and (anhedonic) depression. The findings suggest that the HADS may be reduced to a 10-item questionnaire comprising two 5-item scales measuring anxiety and depressive symptoms....

  7. Hospital utilization and out of pocket expenditure in public and private sectors under the universal government health insurance scheme in Chhattisgarh State, India: Lessons for universal health coverage.

    Nandi, Sulakshana; Schneider, Helen; Dixit, Priyanka

    2017-01-01

    Research on impact of publicly financed health insurance has paid relatively little attention to the nature of healthcare provision the schemes engage. India's National Health Insurance Scheme or RSBY was made universal by Chhattisgarh State in 2012. In the State, public and private sectors provide hospital services in a context of extensive gender, social, economic and geographical inequities. This study examined enrolment, utilization (public and private) and out of pocket (OOP) expenditure for the insured and uninsured, in Chhattisgarh. The Chhattisgarh State Central sample (n = 6026 members) of the 2014 National Sample Survey (71st Round) on Health was extracted and analyzed. Variables of enrolment, hospitalization, out of pocket (OOP) expenditure and catastrophic expenditure were descriptively analyzed. Multivariate analyses of factors associated with enrolment, hospitalization (by sector) and OOP expenditure were conducted, taking into account gender, socio-economic status, residence, type of facility and ailment. Insurance coverage was 38.8%. Rates of hospitalization were 33/1000 population among the insured and 29/1000 among the uninsured. Of those insured and hospitalized, 67.2% utilized the public sector. Women, rural residents, Scheduled Tribes and poorer groups were more likely to utilize the public sector for hospitalizations. Although the insured were less likely to incur out of pocket (OOP) expenditure, 95.1% of insured private sector users and 66.0% of insured public sector users, still incurred costs. Median OOP payments in the private sector were eight times those in the public sector. Of households with at least one member hospitalized, 35.5% experienced catastrophic health expenditures (>10% monthly household consumption expenditure). The study finds that despite insurance coverage, the majority still incurred OOP expenditure. The public sector was nevertheless less expensive, and catered to the more vulnerable groups. It suggests the need to

  8. Hospital utilization and out of pocket expenditure in public and private sectors under the universal government health insurance scheme in Chhattisgarh State, India: Lessons for universal health coverage.

    Sulakshana Nandi

    Full Text Available Research on impact of publicly financed health insurance has paid relatively little attention to the nature of healthcare provision the schemes engage. India's National Health Insurance Scheme or RSBY was made universal by Chhattisgarh State in 2012. In the State, public and private sectors provide hospital services in a context of extensive gender, social, economic and geographical inequities. This study examined enrolment, utilization (public and private and out of pocket (OOP expenditure for the insured and uninsured, in Chhattisgarh. The Chhattisgarh State Central sample (n = 6026 members of the 2014 National Sample Survey (71st Round on Health was extracted and analyzed. Variables of enrolment, hospitalization, out of pocket (OOP expenditure and catastrophic expenditure were descriptively analyzed. Multivariate analyses of factors associated with enrolment, hospitalization (by sector and OOP expenditure were conducted, taking into account gender, socio-economic status, residence, type of facility and ailment. Insurance coverage was 38.8%. Rates of hospitalization were 33/1000 population among the insured and 29/1000 among the uninsured. Of those insured and hospitalized, 67.2% utilized the public sector. Women, rural residents, Scheduled Tribes and poorer groups were more likely to utilize the public sector for hospitalizations. Although the insured were less likely to incur out of pocket (OOP expenditure, 95.1% of insured private sector users and 66.0% of insured public sector users, still incurred costs. Median OOP payments in the private sector were eight times those in the public sector. Of households with at least one member hospitalized, 35.5% experienced catastrophic health expenditures (>10% monthly household consumption expenditure. The study finds that despite insurance coverage, the majority still incurred OOP expenditure. The public sector was nevertheless less expensive, and catered to the more vulnerable groups. It suggests

  9. Hjertestop uden for hospital

    Frandsen, F; Nielsen, J R; Gram, L

    1989-01-01

    During the period 1.10.1986-30.9.1987, all patients with cardiac arrest outside hospital brought to the casualty department in Odense Hospital were registered. Out of 160 patients, 133 (83%) could be primarily resuscitated, 19 (12%) were resuscitated but died later in hospital and eight patients (5......%) were resuscitated and could be discharged alive from hospital. Out of the eight patients who were discharged alive, only two (1%) had retained reasonable cerebral function as assessed by dementia testing. Treatment of the cardiac arrest prior to the arrival of the ambulance, duration of the cardiac...... arrest for less than six minutes and staffing of the ambulance with three first-aid men were factors of decisive importance for survival of the patients. The results of this investigation demonstrate that treatment of cardiac arrest outside hospital is unsatisfactory. Proposals for improvement...

  10. Challenges, needs, and experiences of recently hospitalized cardiac patients and their informal caregivers.

    Blair, Judith; Volpe, Marie; Aggarwal, Brooke

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States. Unpaid family caregivers of patients who experienced a cardiac event may occupy a key position in disseminating continuous health messages to these patients, yet more information is needed to guide the development of educational and behavioral interventions targeting caregivers. The purpose of this qualitative study was to assess the challenges, needs, and personal experiences of cardiac patients and their informal caregivers to explore the types of programs and services that would be most beneficial in promoting adherence to national CVD guidelines among cardiac patients and their caregivers. Patients who had been admitted to the cardiovascular service line of a large urban academic medical center and their informal caregivers (N = 38, 63% women, 74% white) participated in semistructured interviews and focus groups. Participants were asked to speak about 4 major categories of their personal experiences: support, challenges, coping, and program delivery, to determine their needs, the kind of educational interventions that would be most helpful to them, and how they would prefer this information/education to be delivered. Both patients and caregivers ranked diet as the most pressing challenge (91% and 78%, respectively). The Internet, television, and social media were the preferred methods of delivery of such programs. Challenges most commonly cited by caregivers and patients included issues related to taking/administering prescribed medications and medication side effects, and mental stress. Caregivers expressed that not knowing what to expect after the patient's discharge from the hospital was a major stressor. These findings may inform the development of educational interventions targeted to cardiac caregivers so that they may be more effective in assisting the patients in their care to adhere to national CVD prevention guidelines.

  11. Renal function in patients with hypertension associated congestive cardiac failure seen in a tertiary hospital.

    Osuji, C U; Nwaneli, C U; Onwubere, B J; Onwubuya, E I; Ahaneku, G I

    2012-01-01

    Background. Chronic kidney disease is frequently seen in patients with congestive cardiac failure and is an independent risk factor for morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of chronic kidney disease in patients with hypertension associated congestive cardiac failure. Method. One hundred and fifty patients with hypertension associated congestive cardiac failure were recruited consecutively from the medical outpatient department and the medical wards of the Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital Nnewi over a one year period, January to December 2010. Patients' biodata and medical history were obtained, detailed physical examination done and each patient had a chest X-ray, 12 lead ECG, urinalysis, serum urea and creatinine assay done. Ethical clearance was obtained from the Ethical Review Board of our institution and data analysed using SPSS-version 16. Results. There were 86 males and 64 females with mean age 62.7 ± 12.5 years. The mean blood pressures were systolic 152.8 ± 28.5 mmHg and diastolic 94.3 ± 18 mmHg. 84.7% had blood pressure ≥140/90 mmHg on presentation. The mean GFR was 70.1 ± 31.3 mls/min. 76% of subjects had GFR <90 mls/min and no statistical significant difference between males and females, P = 0.344. The mean serum urea was 7.2 ± 51 mmol/L while the mean serum creatinine was 194 ± 416.2 mmol/L. Conclusions. This study has demonstrated that majority of patients presenting with hypertension associated congestive cardiac failure have some degree of chronic kidney disease.

  12. The percentage of nosocomial-related out of total hospitalizations for rotavirus gastroenteritis and its association with hand hygiene compliance.

    Waisbourd-Zinman, Orith; Ben-Ziony, Shiri; Solter, Ester; Chodick, Gabriel; Ashkenazi, Shai; Livni, Gilat

    2011-03-01

    Because the absolute numbers of both community-acquired and nosocomial rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) vary, we studied the percentage of hospitalizations for RVGE that were transmitted nosocomially as an indicator of in-hospital acquisition of the infection. In a 4-year prospective study, the percentage of nosocomial RVGE declined steadily, from 20.3% in 2003 to 12.7% in 2006 (P = .001). Concomitantly, the rate of compliance with hand hygiene increased from 33.7% to 49% (P = .012), with a significant (P Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Out-of-pocket expenditure for hospitalization in Haryana State of India: Extent, determinants & financial risk protection

    Deepshikha Sharma

    2017-01-01

    >Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings showed that hospitalization resulted in significant OOP expenditure, leading to CHEs and impoverishment of households. Impact of OOP expenditures was inequitably more on the vulnerable groups. OOP expenditure may be curtailed through provision of free medicines and diagnostics and removal of any form of user charges.

  14. Automated cardiopulmonary resuscitation using a load-distributing band external cardiac support device for in-hospital cardiac arrest: a single centre experience of AutoPulse-CPR.

    Spiro, J R; White, S; Quinn, N; Gubran, C J; Ludman, P F; Townend, J N; Doshi, S N

    2015-02-01

    Poor quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) predicts adverse outcome. During invasive cardiac procedures automated-CPR (A-CPR) may help maintain effective resuscitation. The use of A-CPR following in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) remains poorly described. Firstly, we aimed to assess the efficiency of healthcare staff using A-CPR in a cardiac arrest scenario at baseline, following re-training and over time (Scenario-based training). Secondly, we studied our clinical experience of A-CPR at our institution over a 2-year period, with particular emphasis on the details of invasive cardiac procedures performed, problems encountered, resuscitation rates and in-hospital outcome (AutoPulse-CPR Registry). Scenario-based training: Forty healthcare professionals were assessed. At baseline, time-to-position device was slow (mean 59 (±24) s (range 15-96s)), with the majority (57%) unable to mode-switch. Following re-training time-to-position reduced (28 (±9) s, pCPR Registry: 285 patients suffered IHCA, 25 received A-CPR. Survival to hospital discharge following conventional CPR was 28/260 (11%) and 7/25 (28%) following A-CPR. A-CPR supported invasive procedures in 9 patients, 2 of whom had A-CPR dependant circulation during transfer to the catheter lab. A-CPR may provide excellent haemodynamic support and facilitate simultaneous invasive cardiac procedures. A significant learning curve exists when integrating A-CPR into clinical practice. Further studies are required to better define the role and effectiveness of A-CPR following IHCA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Coronary Artery-Bypass-Graft Surgery Increases the Plasma Concentration of Exosomes Carrying a Cargo of Cardiac MicroRNAs: An Example of Exosome Trafficking Out of the Human Heart with Potential for Cardiac Biomarker Discovery.

    Costanza Emanueli

    Full Text Available Exosome nanoparticles carry a composite cargo, including microRNAs (miRs. Cultured cardiovascular cells release miR-containing exosomes. The exosomal trafficking of miRNAs from the heart is largely unexplored. Working on clinical samples from coronary-artery by-pass graft (CABG surgery, we investigated if: 1 exosomes containing cardiac miRs and hence putatively released by cardiac cells increase in the circulation after surgery; 2 circulating exosomes and exosomal cardiac miRs correlate with cardiac troponin (cTn, the current "gold standard" surrogate biomarker of myocardial damage.The concentration of exosome-sized nanoparticles was determined in serial plasma samples. Cardiac-expressed (miR-1, miR-24, miR-133a/b, miR-208a/b, miR-210, non-cardiovascular (miR-122 and quality control miRs were measured in whole plasma and in plasma exosomes. Linear regression analyses were employed to establish the extent to which the circulating individual miRs, exosomes and exosomal cardiac miR correlated with cTn-I. Cardiac-expressed miRs and the nanoparticle number increased in the plasma on completion of surgery for up to 48 hours. The exosomal concentration of cardiac miRs also increased after CABG. Cardiac miRs in the whole plasma did not correlate significantly with cTn-I. By contrast cTn-I was positively correlated with the plasma exosome level and the exosomal cardiac miRs.The plasma concentrations of exosomes and their cargo of cardiac miRs increased in patients undergoing CABG and were positively correlated with hs-cTnI. These data provide evidence that CABG induces the trafficking of exosomes from the heart to the peripheral circulation. Future studies are necessary to investigate the potential of circulating exosomes as clinical biomarkers in cardiac patients.

  16. Relationship between quantitative cardiac neuronal imaging with {sup 123}I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine and hospitalization in patients with heart failure

    Parker, Matthew W.; Sood, Nitesh [University of Connecticut, School of Medicine Department of Medicine, Farmington, CT (United States); Hartford Hospital, Division of Cardiology, Hartford, CT (United States); Ahlberg, Alan W. [Hartford Hospital, Division of Cardiology, Hartford, CT (United States); Jacobson, Arnold F. [GE Healthcare, Princeton, NJ (United States); Heller, Gary V. [The Intersocietal Accreditation Commission, Ellicott City, MD (United States); Lundbye, Justin B. [University of Connecticut, School of Medicine Department of Medicine, Farmington, CT (United States); The Hospital of Central Connecticut, Division of Cardiology, New Britain, CT (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Hospitalization in patients with systolic heart failure is associated with morbidity, mortality, and cost. Myocardial sympathetic innervation, imaged by {sup 123}I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine ({sup 123}I-mIBG), has been associated with cardiac events in a recent multicenter study. The present analysis explored the relationship between {sup 123}I-mIBG imaging findings and hospitalization. Source documents from the ADMIRE-HF trial were reviewed to identify hospitalization events in patients with systolic heart failure following cardiac neuronal imaging using {sup 123}I-mIBG. Time to hospitalization was analyzed with the Kaplan-Meier method and compared to the mIBG heart-to-mediastinum (H/M) ratio using multiple-failure Cox regression. During 1.4 years of median follow-up, 362 end-point hospitalizations occurred in 207 of 961 subjects, 79 % of whom had H/M ratio <1.6. Among subjects hospitalized for any cause, 88 % had H/M ratio <1.6 and subjects with H/M ratio <1.6 experienced hospitalization earlier than subjects with higher H/M ratios (log-rank p = 0.003). After adjusting for elevated brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and time since heart failure diagnosis, a low mIBG H/M ratio was associated with cardiac-related hospitalization (HR 1.48, 95 % CI 1.05 - 2.0; p = 0.02). The mIBG H/M ratio may risk-stratify patients with heart failure for cardiac-related hospitalization, especially when used in conjunction with BNP. Further studies are warranted to examine these relationships. (orig.)

  17. Relationship between quantitative cardiac neuronal imaging with 123I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine and hospitalization in patients with heart failure

    Parker, Matthew W.; Sood, Nitesh; Ahlberg, Alan W.; Jacobson, Arnold F.; Heller, Gary V.; Lundbye, Justin B.

    2014-01-01

    Hospitalization in patients with systolic heart failure is associated with morbidity, mortality, and cost. Myocardial sympathetic innervation, imaged by 123 I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine ( 123 I-mIBG), has been associated with cardiac events in a recent multicenter study. The present analysis explored the relationship between 123 I-mIBG imaging findings and hospitalization. Source documents from the ADMIRE-HF trial were reviewed to identify hospitalization events in patients with systolic heart failure following cardiac neuronal imaging using 123 I-mIBG. Time to hospitalization was analyzed with the Kaplan-Meier method and compared to the mIBG heart-to-mediastinum (H/M) ratio using multiple-failure Cox regression. During 1.4 years of median follow-up, 362 end-point hospitalizations occurred in 207 of 961 subjects, 79 % of whom had H/M ratio <1.6. Among subjects hospitalized for any cause, 88 % had H/M ratio <1.6 and subjects with H/M ratio <1.6 experienced hospitalization earlier than subjects with higher H/M ratios (log-rank p = 0.003). After adjusting for elevated brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and time since heart failure diagnosis, a low mIBG H/M ratio was associated with cardiac-related hospitalization (HR 1.48, 95 % CI 1.05 - 2.0; p = 0.02). The mIBG H/M ratio may risk-stratify patients with heart failure for cardiac-related hospitalization, especially when used in conjunction with BNP. Further studies are warranted to examine these relationships. (orig.)

  18. [New medical approach to out-of-hospital treatment of psychomotor agitation in psychiatric patients: a report of 14 cases].

    Cester-Martínez, Armando; Cortés-Ramas, José Antonio; Borraz-Clares, Diego; Pellicer-Gayarre, Marta

    2017-06-01

    This case series explored the usefulness of an inhaled dose of 9.1 mg of loxapine administered outside the hospital to treat psychomotor agitation related to schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or schizoaffective disorder. The Clinical Global Impression Scale and the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (excitement component) were used to assess the effects of treatment in 14 patients. The treatment was useful in 12 patients, who showed significant improvement (Pagitation related to a psychiatric disorder. Mechanical restraint and parenteral medication can be avoided after use of this drug. Loxapine treatment shortens the agitation episode and attenuates the impact on the patient, facilitating ambulance transfer.

  19. Is there a difference in survival between men and women suffering in-hospital cardiac arrest?

    Israelsson, Johan; Persson, Carina; Strömberg, Anna; Arestedt, Kristofer

    2014-01-01

    To describe in-hospital cardiac arrest (CA) events with regard to sex and to investigate if sex is associated with survival. Previous studies exploring differences between sexes are incongruent with regard to clinical outcomes. In order to provide equality and improve care, further investigations into these aspects are warranted. This registry study included 286 CAs. To investigate if sex was associated with survival, logistic regression analyses were performed. The proportion of CA with a resuscitation attempt compared to CA without resuscitation was higher among men. There were no associations between sex and survival when controlling for previously known predictors and interaction effects. Sex does not appear to be a predictor for survival among patients suffering CA where resuscitation is attempted. The difference regarding proportion of resuscitation attempts requires more attention. It is important to consider possible interaction effects when studying the sex perspective. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Major depression and first-time hospitalization with ischemic heart disease, cardiac procedures and mortality in the general population

    Gasse, Christiane; Laursen, Thomas M; Baune, Bernhard T

    2014-01-01

    -59 years of age and during the first weeks following psychiatric admission. Our findings support recent cardiovascular disease prevention guidelines on assessing depression among other psychosocial factors in patients at increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk.......Objective: We investigated the association between unipolar depression and incident hospital admissions due to ischemic heart disease, invasive cardiac procedures and mortality independent of other medical illnesses.Methods: A population-based cohort of 4.6 million persons aged 15 years or older...... with depression (women: IRR: 1.38; MRR: 2.35; men: IRR: 1.42; MRR: 2.67). One-year mortality after new ischemic heart disease was elevated by 34% in women and men. By contrast, overall rates of invasive cardiac procedures following cardiac hospitalizations were significantly decreased by 34% in persons...

  1. Out of Hospital emergency pediatric assistance and resuscitation in a rural area in the interior of the country

    Ana Lopes Dias

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Aim: The rapid response vehicles (VMER are intended for emergency pre-hospital medical intervention, and 5-15% of their activations are for pediatric patients. The aim of the study was to characterize the assistance of the pediatric VMER-Vila Real services, to better identify gaps and develop strategies to correct them. Materials and Methods: Retrospective review of children reports’ less than 18 years of age assisted by VMER-Vila Real between January 2005 and December 2012 (eight years. Results: During the study period, VMER-Vila Real was activated 8131, of which 463 (5.7% were children less than 18 years with with a mean age of 8.2 years. The mean time of arrival at the site of assistance was 18 minutes. In 22.2% of situations, rendez-vous was made. The main reason for activation was acute disease (39.5%, of which 43.2% presented seizures. Trauma accounted for 36.5%. Acute disease was more prevalent in children under two years of age and trauma in adolescents (p <0.001. Advanced life support procedures were instituted in 5.2% of patients. Three hundred ninety-eight patients were transported to local hospitals (86%. There were 13 deaths (2.8% during this period. Discussion: The main reasons for the activation were acute illness in patients under two years of age and trauma in the adolescence. The average time of arrival at patients’ location, high percentage of rendez-vous and deliveries can be justified by the peculiar regional topography. The total number of activations within this age group, which presents itself with specific needs in terms of treatment, puts in evidence the need of additional investment in the training of human resources.

  2. Competing Risk of Cardiac Status and Renal Function During Hospitalization for Acute Decompensated Heart Failure.

    Salah, Khibar; Kok, Wouter E; Eurlings, Luc W; Bettencourt, Paulo; Pimenta, Joana M; Metra, Marco; Verdiani, Valerio; Tijssen, Jan G; Pinto, Yigal M

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the dynamic changes in renal function in combination with dynamic changes in N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) in patients hospitalized for acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). Treatment of ADHF improves cardiac parameters, as reflected by lower levels of NT-proBNP. However this often comes at the cost of worsening renal parameters (e.g., serum creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR], or serum urea). Both the cardiac and renal markers are validated indicators of prognosis, but it is not yet clear whether the benefits of lowering NT-proBNP are outweighed by the concomitant worsening of renal parameters. This study was an individual patient data analysis assembled from 6 prospective cohorts consisting of 1,232 patients hospitalized for ADHF. Endpoints were all-cause mortality and the composite of all-cause mortality and/or readmission for a cardiovascular reason within 180 days after discharge. A significant reduction in NT-proBNP was not associated with worsening of renal function (WRF) or severe WRF (sWRF). A reduction of NT-proBNP of more than 30% during hospitalization determined prognosis (all-cause mortality hazard ratio [HR]: 1.81; 95% confidence Interval [CI]: 1.32 to 2.50; composite endpoint: HR: 1.36, 95% CI: 1.13 to 1.64), regardless of changes in renal function and other clinical variables. When we defined prognosis, NT-proBNP changes during hospitalization for treatment of ADHF prevailed over parameters for worsening renal function. Severe WRF is a measure of prognosis, but is of lesser value than, and independent of the prognostic changes induced by adequate NT-proBNP reduction. This suggests that in ADHF patients it may be warranted to strive for an optimal decrease in NT-proBNP, even if this induces WRF. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Risk of cardiac pacemaker pocket infection in a tertiary care hospital

    Jaswinder Singh Gill

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The risk of pacemaker pocket infections (PPIs is rare with good antisepsis techniques and use of advanced antibiotics. However, injudicious antibiotic usage leads to the rise of multidrug-resistant bacteria, which may cause PPI. Few reports exist about the microbial spectrum of the PPI from our country, prompting us to study the same. Methods: We conducted this retrospective observational study for 3 years (January 2013–February 2016 from all the patients with PPI. We collected the relevant clinical samples (blood and pus for the microbial culture using a standard protocol. We included 100 samples collected from the medical staff and the hospital environment as a control sample. The data were analyzed using appropriate statistical methods and a P< 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Our data showed that 17 out of 160 (10.6% patients had PPI. Coagulase negative Staphylococcus sp. was isolated in 7 (41.2% patients, followed by Staphylococcus aureus in 4 patients (23.5%. Other isolated bacteria include multidrug-resistant Burkholderia cepacia (n = 3, Mycobacterium abscessus (n = 2 and polymicrobial infection in a single patient. One out of hundred surveillance samples grew B. cepacia. Conclusion: Our data revealed a high incidence of Gram-positive cocci causing PPI. Every hospital should formulate their antibiotic policy based on the pattern of the hospital flora and their drug sensitivity.

  4. The use of the laryngeal tube disposable (LT-D) by paramedics during out-of-hospital resuscitation-an observational study concerning ERC guidelines 2005.

    Wiese, C H R; Semmel, T; Müller, J U; Bahr, J; Ocker, H; Graf, B M

    2009-02-01

    In the current guidelines of the European Resuscitation Council (ERC), tracheal intubation, as an instrument for securing the airway during resuscitation, has become less important for persons not trained in this method. For those persons, different supraglottic airway devices are recommended by the ERC. The present investigation deals with the application of the laryngeal tube disposable (LT-D) during pre-hospital resuscitation by paramedics. During a period of 2 years (2006-2008), we registered all cardiac arrest situations in which the LT-D had been applied according to the ERC guidelines 2005. Therefore, we investigated one emergency medical system in Germany. During the defined period, 92 resuscitation attempts, recorded on standardised data sheets, were included. The LT-D was used in 46% of all cardiac arrest situations. Overall, the LT-D was successfully inserted in more than 90% of all cases on first attempt. In 95% of all cases, no problems concerning ventilation of the patient were described. As an alternative airway device recommended by the ERC in 2005, the LT-D may enable airway control rapidly and effectively. Additionally, by using the LT-D, a reduced "no-flow-time" and a better outcome may be possible.

  5. Intubation is not a marker for coma after in-hospital cardiac arrest: A retrospective study.

    Berg, Katherine M; Grossestreuer, Anne V; Uber, Amy; Patel, Parth V; Donnino, Michael W

    2017-10-01

    In-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) strikes over 200,000 people in the United States annually. Targeted temperature management (TTM) is considered beneficial in other settings, but there is no prospective data for IHCA. Recent work on TTM and IHCA found an association between TTM and worse outcome. However, the authors used intubation as a marker for coma to determine eligibility for TTM. The validity of this approach is unexplored. Retrospective, single center study of adult patients with IHCA occurring in an intensive care unit, intubated prior to or during the event, or immediately after ROSC. We evaluated the percentage of patients documented as comatose after arrest, defined as Glasgow Comas Score (GCS) <8 for the primary analysis. We also evaluated the difference in hospital survival in patients with GCS <8 versus ≥8. Two sensitivity analyses using different methods for defining coma using post-ROSC GCS were conducted. 29/102 (28%) intubated patients had a post-ROSC GCS≥8, and 22 (22%) were documented as following commands. Survival in patients with GCS≥8 vs.<8 was 62% (18/29) vs. 37% (27/73) in unadjusted analysis (p=0.02). The adjusted odds ratio for survival to hospital discharge was 3.81 (95%CI: 1.37-10.61, p=0.01). Results were similar in both sensitivity analyses. Intubation prior to or during IHCA was not a valid marker of coma after ROSC. Post-ROSC mental status was associated with hospital survival, and thus could be an important confounder when conducting observational studies on the association of TTM with outcomes in this patient population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Prognostic value of depression, anxiety, and anger in hospitalized cardiovascular disease patients for predicting adverse cardiac outcomes.

    Nakamura, Shunichi; Kato, Koji; Yoshida, Asuka; Fukuma, Nagaharu; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Ito, Hiroto; Mizuno, Kyoichi

    2013-05-15

    Although attention has recently been focused on the role of psychosocial factors in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD), the factors that have the greatest influence on prognosis have not yet been elucidated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of depression, anxiety, and anger on the prognosis of patients with CVD. Four hundred fourteen consecutive patients hospitalized with CVD were prospectively enrolled. Depression was evaluated using the Patient Health Questionnaire, anxiety using the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire, and anger using the Spielberger Trait Anger Scale. Cox proportional-hazards regression was used to examine the individual effects of depression, anxiety, and anger on a combined primary end point of cardiac death or cardiac hospitalization and on a combined secondary end point of all-cause death or hospitalization during follow-up (median 14.2 months). Multivariate analysis showed that depression was a significant risk factor for cardiovascular hospitalization or death after adjusting for cardiac risk factors and other psychosocial factors (hazard ratio 2.62, p = 0.02), whereas anxiety was not significantly associated with cardiovascular hospitalization or death after adjustment (hazard ratio 2.35, p = 0.10). Anger was associated with a low rate of cardiovascular hospitalization or death (hazard ratio 0.34, p depression in hospitalized patients with CVD is a stronger independent risk factor for adverse cardiac events than either anxiety or anger. Anger may help prevent adverse outcomes. Routine screening for depression should therefore be performed in patients with CVD, and the potential effects of anger in clinical practice should be reconsidered. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ambulatory care sensitive conditions at out-of-hospital emergence services in Croatia: a longitudinal study based on routinely collected data.

    Kostanjšek, Diana; Benčić, Miro; Keglević, Mladenka Vrcić

    2014-12-01

    Conditions for which a hospital and emergency utilization can be considered avoidable are often referred as ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSCs). Until now, there has been no published research related to ACSCs in Croatia. This study was undertaken with the aim of determining the trends relating to ACSCs in out-of-hospital ES from 1995-2012. The study is based on data from the Croatian Health Service Yearbooks. Five chronic and three acute conditions were chosen: diabetes, hypertension, congestive heart failure, angina pectoris, asthma and COPD, bacterial pneumonia, urinary tract infections and skin infections. The results indicate that the ES in Croatia is overused, and consequently ACSCs are over-represented; 23.3% Croatian citizens visited the ES and around 15% of all diagnoses belonged to the ACSCs, with decreased trend. The leading diagnosis is hypertension, followed by asthma and COPD. For a better understanding of the importance of ACSC within the Croatian context, further research is needed.

  8. Adrenaline (epinephrine) dosing period and survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest: a retrospective review of prospectively collected data.

    Warren, Sam A; Huszti, Ella; Bradley, Steven M; Chan, Paul S; Bryson, Chris L; Fitzpatrick, Annette L; Nichol, Graham

    2014-03-01

    Expert guidelines for treatment of cardiac arrest recommend administration of adrenaline (epinephrine) every three to five minutes. However, the effects of different dosing periods of epinephrine remain unclear. We sought to evaluate the association between epinephrine average dosing period and survival to hospital discharge in adults with an in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA). We performed a retrospective review of prospectively collected data on 20,909 IHCA events from 505 hospitals participating in the Get With The Guidelines-Resuscitation (GWTG-R) quality improvement registry. Epinephrine average dosing period was defined as the time between the first epinephrine dose and the resuscitation endpoint, divided by the total number of epinephrine doses received subsequent to the first epinephrine dose. Associations with survival to hospital discharge were assessed by using generalized estimating equations to construct multivariable logistic regression models. Compared to a referent epinephrine average dosing period of 4 to <5 min per dose, survival to hospital discharge was significantly higher in patients with the following epinephrine average dosing periods: for 6 to <7 min/dose, adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.41 (95%CI: 1.12, 1.78); for 7 to <8 min/dose, adjusted OR, 1.30 (95%CI: 1.02, 1.65); for 8 to <9 min/dose, adjusted OR, 1.79 (95%CI: 1.38, 2.32); for 9 to <10 min/dose, adjusted OR, 2.17 (95%CI: 1.62, 2.92). This pattern was consistent for both shockable and non-shockable cardiac arrest rhythms. Less frequent average epinephrine dosing than recommended by consensus guidelines was associated with improved survival of in-hospital cardiac arrest. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Home Discharge and Out-of-Hospital Follow-Up of Total Artificial Heart Patients Supported by a Portable Driver System

    2014-01-01

    To enhance ambulation and facilitate hospital discharge of total artificial heart (TAH)–supported patients, we adapted a mobile ventricular assistance device (VAD) driver (Excor) for TAH use and report on the performance of Excor-driven TAH patients discharged home. Ten patients stabilized on a TAH, driven by the CSS (“Circulatory Support System”), were progressively switched over to the Excor in hospital over 14 days as a pilot, with daily hemodynamics and laboratory parameters measured. Twenty-two stable TAH patients were subsequently placed on the Excor, trained, and discharged home. Clinical and hemodynamic parameters were followed. All pilot study patients were clinically stable on the Excor, with no decrease in TAH output noted (6.3 + 0.3 L/min [day 1] vs. 5.8 + 0.2 L/min [day 14], p = 0.174), with a trend suggesting improvement of both hepatic and renal function. Twenty-two TAH patients were subsequently successfully discharged home on the portable driver and were supported out of hospital for up to 598 days (range, 2–598; mean = 179 ± 140 days), remaining ambulatory, New York Heart Association (NYHA) class I or II, and free of readmission for 88.5% of the time of support. TAH patients may be effectively and safely supported by a mobile drive system. As such, the utility of the TAH may be extended to support patients beyond the hospital, at home, with overall ambulatory freedom. PMID:24577369

  10. Is a sedentary lifestyle an independent predictor for hospital and early mortality after elective cardiac surgery?

    Noyez, L.; Biemans, I.; Verkroost, M.W.; Swieten, H.A. van

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study evaluates whether a sedentary lifestyle is an independent predictor for increased mortality after elective cardiac surgery. METHODS: Three thousand one hundred fifty patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery between January 2007 and June 2012 completed preoperatively the

  11. High-velocity penetrating thoracic trauma with suspected cardiac involvement in a combat support hospital

    Dominguez, F.; Gentlesk, P.J.; Eckart, R.E.; Beekley, A.C.; Huffer, L.L.

    2011-01-01

    The most common cardiac injuries in the United States are blunt trauma from motor vehicle accidents or low-velocity trauma from stabbings. During military conflict, high-velocity injuries, including gunshot wounds (GSW) and fragment injury from improvised explosive devices (IED), are relatively more common. This is a retrospective review of cases with high-velocity penetrating injury and suspected myocardial involvement during a 6-month period in Baghdad, Iraq, at a United States Army hospital during Operation Iraqi Freedom. Eleven cases survived to admission (GSW in 5, IED in 6). The mean age of the all-male cohort was 27 years (range, 3-54 years). Eight of the 11 patients (73%) were victims of polytrauma. The entrance involved the right ventricle (n=3), right atrium (n=2), left ventricle (n=1), or mediastinum and pericardial reflections (n=5). Echocardiography was performed in all 11 patients. In 7 patients, no foreign body was identifiable, and in 2 patients the foreign body was identified within the pericardial fat pad. Three patients were identified as having a suspected ventricular septal defect, ranging in size from 2 to 8 mm. The most common electrocardiographic abnormality was atrioventricular block and right bundle branch block. In 4 patients, the management of the chest injury was nonsurgical, and in 1 patient the treatment was a chest tube only. Four of the patients underwent median sternotomy, 1 underwent emergent lateral thoracotomy, and 1 underwent an infradiaphragmatic approach. This case series is too small to draw definitive conclusions; however, a multidisciplinary approach to high-velocity injuries with potential for cardiac involvement augments preoperative assessment for myocardial injury and may allow selective nonoperative management. (author)

  12. Current and Future Status of Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation for In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Singal, Rohit K; Singal, Deepa; Bednarczyk, Joseph; Lamarche, Yoan; Singh, Gurmeet; Rao, Vivek; Kanji, Hussein D; Arora, Rakesh C; Manji, Rizwan A; Fan, Eddy; Nagpal, A Dave

    2017-01-01

    Numerous series, propensity-matched trials, and meta-analyses suggest that appropriate use of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (E-CPR) for in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) can be lifesaving. Even with an antecedent cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) duration in excess of 45 minutes, 30-day survival with favourable neurologic outcome using E-CPR is approximately 35%-45%. Survival may be related to age, duration of CPR, or etiology. Associated complications include sepsis, renal failure, limb and neurologic complications, hemorrhage, and thrombosis. However, methodological biases-including small sample size, selection bias, publication bias, and inability to control for confounders-in these series prevent definitive conclusions. As such, the 2015 American Heart Association Advanced Cardiac Life Support guidelines update recommended E-CPR as a Level of Evidence IIb recommendation in appropriate cases. The absence of high-quality evidence presents an opportunity for clinician/scientists to generate practice-defining data through collaborative investigation and prospective trials. A multidisciplinary dialogue is required to standardize the field and promote multicentre investigation of E-CPR with data sharing and the development of a foundation for high-quality trials. The objectives of this review are to (1) provide an overview of the strengths and limitations of currently available studies investigating the use of E-CPR in patients with IHCA and highlight knowledge gaps; (2) create a framework for the standardization of terminology, clinical practice, data collection, and investigation of E-CPR for patients with IHCA that will help ensure congruence in future work in this area; and (3) propose suggestions to guide future research by the cardiovascular community to advance this important field. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Adverse events in cardiac surgery, a mixed methods retrospective study in an Italian teaching hospital.

    Bellandi, Tommaso; Tartaglia, Riccardo; Forni, Silvia; D'Arienzo, Sara; Tulli, Giorgio

    2017-08-01

    Adverse events (AEs) are a major concern in surgery, but the evidence in cardiac surgery is limited, especially on the contributory factors. According to the data of the National Outcomes Program, a unit was selected to conduct a mixed methods investigation into the incidence, type, and cause of AE, given its mortality rate that was double the national average on coronary artery bypass grafting, valve reparation, and replacement. A retrospective investigation on the performance of a cardiac surgery, combining the routinely collected data on process and outcome measures with a 2-stage structured review of 280 medical records performed by 3 expert clinicians, with the support of a methodologist. At least one risk had been verified in 137 of 280 cases (48.9%, 95% CI, 43.1-54.8). The total number of AE was 42, with an incidence of 15% (95% CI, 10.8-20.2) and a preventability of 80.9% (95% CI, 69.1-92.8). In 11.9% of AE, the consequence is death, disability in 40.5%, and extended hospital stay in 69% of the cases. Adverse events are associated with problems in care management at the ward (89/137, 64.9%, 95% CI, 56.9-72.9), followed by surgical complications (46/137, 33.6%, 95% CI, 25.7-41.5) and infection/sepsis (32/137, 23.4%, 95% CI, 16.3-30.4). An active error was made by the health care workers in 31 of 42 cases with AE, either during the decision making or during the execution of an action. A total of 36 AEs were due to deficiencies attributed to organizational factors and 31 were linked to poor teamwork. The mixed methods approach demonstrated how a deep understanding of AE and poor performance may emerge thanks to the combination of routinely available data and experts' evaluations. The main limitation of this study is its focus on the cardiac surgery rather than on the entire process of care. The evaluation could have been integrated with on-site observations and the analysis of reported incidents. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Intraoperative cardiac arrest and mortality in trauma patients. A 14-yr survey from a Brazilian tertiary teaching hospital.

    Marcelo T O Carlucci

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Little information on the factors influencing intraoperative cardiac arrest and its outcomes in trauma patients is available. This survey evaluated the associated factors and outcomes of intraoperative cardiac arrest in trauma patients in a Brazilian teaching hospital between 1996 and 2009. METHODS: Cardiac arrest during anesthesia in trauma patients was identified from an anesthesia database. The data collected included patient demographics, ASA physical status classification, anesthesia provider information, type of surgery, surgical areas and outcome. All intraoperative cardiac arrests and deaths in trauma patients were reviewed and grouped by associated factors and also analyzed as totally anesthesia-related, partially anesthesia-related, totally surgery-related or totally trauma patient condition-related. FINDINGS: Fifty-one cardiac arrests and 42 deaths occurred during anesthesia in trauma patients. They were associated with male patients (P<0.001 and young adults (18-35 years (P=0.04 with ASA physical status IV or V (P<0.001 undergoing gastroenterological or multiclinical surgeries (P<0.001. Motor vehicle crashes and violence were the main causes of trauma (P<0.001. Uncontrolled hemorrhage or head injury were the most significant associated factors of intraoperative cardiac arrest and mortality (P<0.001. All cardiac arrests and deaths reported were totally related to trauma patient condition. CONCLUSIONS: Intraoperative cardiac arrest and mortality incidence was highest in male trauma patients at a younger age with poor clinical condition, mainly related to uncontrolled hemorrhage and head injury, resulted from motor vehicle accidents and violence.

  15. Risk factors for hospital-associated venous thromboembolism in critically ill children following cardiothoracic surgery or therapeutic cardiac catheterisation.

    Atchison, Christie M; Amankwah, Ernest; Wilhelm, Jean; Arlikar, Shilpa; Branchford, Brian R; Stock, Arabela; Streiff, Michael; Takemoto, Clifford; Ayala, Irmel; Everett, Allen; Stapleton, Gary; Jacobs, Marshall L; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Goldenberg, Neil A

    2018-02-01

    Paediatric hospital-associated venous thromboembolism is a leading quality and safety concern at children's hospitals. The aim of this study was to determine risk factors for hospital-associated venous thromboembolism in critically ill children following cardiothoracic surgery or therapeutic cardiac catheterisation. We conducted a retrospective, case-control study of children admitted to the cardiovascular intensive care unit at Johns Hopkins All Children's Hospital (St. Petersburg, Florida, United States of America) from 2006 to 2013. Hospital-associated venous thromboembolism cases were identified based on ICD-9 discharge codes and validated using radiological record review. We randomly selected two contemporaneous cardiovascular intensive care unit controls without hospital-associated venous thromboembolism for each hospital-associated venous thromboembolism case, and limited the study population to patients who had undergone cardiothoracic surgery or therapeutic cardiac catheterisation. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for associations between putative risk factors and hospital-associated venous thromboembolism were determined using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Among 2718 admissions to the cardiovascular intensive care unit during the study period, 65 met the criteria for hospital-associated venous thromboembolism (occurrence rate, 2%). Restriction to cases and controls having undergone the procedures of interest yielded a final study population of 57 hospital-associated venous thromboembolism cases and 76 controls. In a multiple logistic regression model, major infection (odds ratio=5.77, 95% confidence interval=1.06-31.4), age ⩽1 year (odds ratio=6.75, 95% confidence interval=1.13-160), and central venous catheterisation (odds ratio=7.36, 95% confidence interval=1.13-47.8) were found to be statistically significant independent risk factors for hospital-associated venous thromboembolism in these children. Patients with all three

  16. Etiology of Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Patients with Epilepsy: Experience of Tertiary Referral Hospital in Sapporo City, Japan.

    Miyata, Kei; Ochi, Satoko; Enatsu, Rei; Wanibuchi, Masahiko; Mikuni, Nobuhiro; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Uemura, Shuji; Tanno, Katsuhiko; Narimatsu, Eichi; Maekawa, Kunihiko; Usui, Keiko; Mizobuchi, Masahiro

    2016-05-15

    It has been reported that epilepsy patients had higher risk of sudden death than that of the general population. However, in Japan, there is very little literature on the observational research conducted on sudden fatal events in epilepsy. We performed a single-center, retrospective study on all the out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients treated in our emergency department between 2007 and 2013. Among the OHCA patients, we extracted those with a history of epilepsy and then analyzed the characteristics of the fatal events and the background of epilepsy. From 1,823 OHCA patients, a total of 10 cases were enrolled in our study. The median age was 34 years at the time of the incident [9-52 years; interquartile range (IQR), 24-45]. We determined that half of our cases resulted from external causes of death such as drowning and suffocation and the other half were classified as sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). In addition, asphyxia was implicated as the cause in eight cases. Only the two near-drowning patients were immediately resuscitated, but the remaining eight patients died. The median age of first onset of epilepsy was 12 years (0.5-30; IQR, 3-21), and the median disease duration was 25 years (4-38; IQR, 6-32). Patients with active epilepsy accounted for half of our series and they were undergoing poly anti-epileptic drug therapy. The fatal events related to epilepsy tended to occur in the younger adult by external causes. An appropriate therapeutic intervention and a thorough observation were needed for its prevention.

  17. [Effect of the availability of a medicalized mobile ICU (MMICU) on the hospital admissions after an out-of-hospital cardiorespiratory arrest (OH-CRA)].

    Alvarez González, M; Cambronero Galache, J A; Nevado Losada, E; Trascasa Muñoz de la Peña, M; de la Fuente O'Connor, M E; Sánchez García, M

    2003-11-01

    Patients admitted in an ICU after OH-CRA before and after the implementation of a MMICU were evaluated. During a period of 11 years, divided into a pre-MMICU period (1988-1993) and a post-MMICU period (1994-1998), 39 patients were admitted in the pre period and 64 patients in the post period. The basal characteristics, the etiologies of OH-CRA and of death in ICU they were similar. The incidence of severe anoxic encephalopathy (SAE) it doubled in the post period. There were not significant differences both to the discharge from ICU and to the hospital discharge. We conclude that after implementing a MMICU more patients are admitted in ICU resuscitated after OH-CRA. The survival does not vary, but the incidence of SAE increases.

  18. Prognostic Implications of Level-of-Care at Tertiary Heart Centers Compared With Other Hospitals After Resuscitation From Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    Søholm, Helle; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Bro-Jeppesen, John

    2015-01-01

    (OR, 10 [5.3-22] and 3.8 [2.5-5.7]), neurophysiological examination (OR, 1.8 [1.3-2.6]), and brain computed tomography (OR, 1.9 [1.4-2.6]), whereas no difference in therapeutic hypothermia was noted. Patients at tertiary centers were more often consulted by a cardiologist (OR, 8.6 [5.0-15]), had...

  19. Digitization of Electrocardiogram From Telemetry Prior to In-hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Pilot Study.

    Attin, Mina; Wang, Lu; Soroushmehr, S M Reza; Lin, Chii-Dean; Lemus, Hector; Spadafore, Maxwell; Najarian, Kayvan

    2016-03-01

    Analyzing telemetry electrocardiogram (ECG) data over an extended period is often time-consuming because digital records are not widely available at hospitals. Investigating trends and patterns in the ECG data could lead to establishing predictors that would shorten response time to in-hospital cardiac arrest (I-HCA). This study was conducted to validate a novel method of digitizing paper ECG tracings from telemetry systems in order to facilitate the use of heart rate as a diagnostic feature prior to I-HCA. This multicenter study used telemetry to investigate full-disclosure ECG papers of 44 cardiovascular patients obtained within 1 hr of I-HCA with initial rhythms of pulseless electrical activity and asystole. Digital ECGs were available for seven of these patients. An algorithm to digitize the full-disclosure ECG papers was developed using the shortest path method. The heart rate was measured manually (averaging R-R intervals) for ECG papers and automatically for digitized and digital ECGs. Significant correlations were found between manual and automated measurements of digitized ECGs (p < .001) and between digitized and digital ECGs (p < .001). Bland-Altman methods showed bias = .001 s, SD = .0276 s, lower and upper 95% limits of agreement for digitized and digital ECGs = .055 and -.053 s, and percentage error = 0.22%. Root mean square (rms), percentage rms difference, and signal to noise ratio values were in acceptable ranges. The digitization method was validated. Digitized ECG provides an efficient and accurate way of measuring heart rate over an extended period of time. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. The administration of dextrose during in-hospital cardiac arrest is associated with increased mortality and neurologic morbidity.

    Peng, Teng J; Andersen, Lars W; Saindon, Brian Z; Giberson, Tyler A; Kim, Won Young; Berg, Katherine; Novack, Victor; Donnino, Michael W

    2015-04-10

    Dextrose may be used during cardiac arrest resuscitation to prevent or reverse hypoglycemia. However, the incidence of dextrose administration during cardiac arrest and the association of dextrose administration with survival and other outcomes are unknown. We used the Get With The Guidelines®-Resuscitation national registry to identify adult patients with an in-hospital cardiac arrest between the years 2000 and 2010. To assess the adjusted effects of dextrose administration on survival, we used multivariable regression models with adjustment for multiple patient, event, and hospital characteristics. We performed additional analyses to examine the effects of dextrose on neurological outcome and return of spontaneous circulation. Among the 100,029 patients included in our study, 4,189 (4.2%) received dextrose during cardiac arrest resuscitation. The rate of dextrose administration increased during the study period (odds ratio 1.11, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.09-1.12 per year, P dextrose during resuscitation had lower rates of survival compared with patients who did not receive dextrose (relative risk 0.88, 95% CI 0.80-0.98, P = 0.02). Administration of dextrose was associated with worse neurological outcome (relative risk 0.88, 95% CI 0.79-0.99, P = 0.03) but an increased chance of return of spontaneous circulation (relative risk 1.07, 95% CI 1.04-1.10, P dextrose during resuscitation in patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest was found to be associated with a significantly decreased chance of survival and a decreased chance of good neurological outcome.

  1. Out-of-Pocket and Informal Payment Before and After the Health Transformation Plan in Iran: Evidence from Hospitals Located in Kurdistan, Iran

    Bakhtiar Piroozi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background One of the objectives of the health transformation plan (HTP in Iran is to reduce out-of-pocket (OOP payments for inpatient services and eradicate informal payments. The HTP has three phases: the first phase (launched in May 5, 2014 is focused on reducing OOP payments for inpatient services; the second phase (launched in May 22, 2014 is focused on primary healthcare (PHC and the third phase utilizes an updated relative value units for health services (launched in September 29, 2014 and is focused on the elimination of informal payments. This aim of this study was to determine the OOP payments and the frequency of informal cash payments to physicians for inpatient services before and after the HTP in Kurdistan province, Iran. Methods This quasi-experimental study used multistage sampling method to select and evaluate 265 patients discharged from hospitals in Kurdistan province. The study covered 3 phases (before the HTP, after the first, and third phases of the HTP. Part of the data was collected using a hospital information system form and the rest were collected using a questionnaire. Data were analyzed using Fisher exact test, logistic regression, and independent samples ttest. Results The mean OOP payments before the HTP and after the first and third phases, respectively, were US$59.4, US$17.6, and US$14.3 in hospital affiliated to the Ministry of Health and Medical Education (MoHME, US$39.6, US$33.7, and US$13.7 in hospitals affiliated to Social Security Organization (SSO, and US$153.3, US$188.7, and US$66.4 in private hospitals. In hospitals affiliated to SSO and MoHME there was a significant difference between the mean OOP payments before the HTP and after the third phase (P < .05. The percentage of informal payments to physicians in hospitals affiliated to MoHME, SSO, and private sector, respectively, were 4.5%, 8.1%, and 12.5% before the HTP, and 0.0%, 7.1%, and 10.0% after the first phase. Contrary to the time before the HTP

  2. Evaluation of secondary dose and cancer risk for out-of-field organ in esophageal cancer IMRT in a chinese hospital using atom phantom measurements

    Qi, Yaping; He, Lijuan; Liu, Yuanyuan; Liu, Hongdong; Huo, Wanli; Chen, Zhi; Wang, Zhi; Xu, X. George

    2017-01-01

    There have been few studies on the secondary cancer after radiation treatment in Chinese hospitals. This study has measured out-of-field absorbed organ doses from intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) radiotherapy for esophageal cancer in a Chinese hospital and evaluated the risks of secondary cancer. The dose measurements were based on the thermoluminescence dosemeter (TLD) and the ATOM phantom, which represents an adult male. Over 100 TLD chips were placed in 35 different organ sites and one group of the same TLDs was set as background contrast. All TLDs were calibrated against the same Linac accelerator performing an IMRT plan for esophageal cancer. The measured doses were used to calculate the secondary cancer risks according to biological effects of ionizing radiation (BEIR) VII methodology. The baseline risks and survival data were based on relevant statistics for the Chinese population. It is found that the out-of-field organ doses depended greatly on the distance between organ sites and the target isocenter. The organ doses decreased exponentially as the distance from the target isocenter increased, and, for distances <15 cm, the organ doses fell off more rapidly and almost decreased by 99.55%. When compared with the calculation results by the Pinnacle treatment planning system (TPS), most of the out-of-field organ doses were underestimated in the TPS and the percentage of underestimation reached 100% for distant organs such as the bladder, prostate and testis. These trends are due to a known fact that out-of-field organs received secondary radiation resulted from patients and collimator scattering as well as leakage in the gantry head. The higher lifetime attribute risks (LARs) per 100 000 population were in the lower esophagus (186) and lungs (93.2) near the target. But all LARs of considered organs were found to be less than the baseline cancer risks. Results in this article can help to provide a database about the effect of radiotherapy

  3. Out-of-Pocket and Informal Payment Before and After the Health Transformation Plan in Iran: Evidence from Hospitals Located in Kurdistan, Iran.

    Piroozi, Bakhtiar; Rashidian, Arash; Moradi, Ghobad; Takian, Amirhossein; Ghasri, Hooman; Ghadimi, Tayyeb

    2017-02-11

    One of the objectives of the health transformation plan (HTP) in Iran is to reduce out-of-pocket (OOP) payments for inpatient services and eradicate informal payments. The HTP has three phases: the first phase (launched in May 5, 2014) is focused on reducing OOP payments for inpatient services; the second phase (launched in May 22, 2014) is focused on primary healthcare (PHC) and the third phase utilizes an updated relative value units for health services (launched in September 29, 2014) and is focused on the elimination of informal payments. This aim of this study was to determine the OOP payments and the frequency of informal cash payments to physicians for inpatient services before and after the HTP in Kurdistan province, Iran. This quasi-experimental study used multistage sampling method to select and evaluate 265 patients discharged from hospitals in Kurdistan province. The study covered 3 phases (before the HTP, after the first, and third phases of the HTP). Part of the data was collected using a hospital information system form and the rest were collected using a questionnaire. Data were analyzed using Fisher exact test, logistic regression, and independent samples t test. The mean OOP payments before the HTP and after the first and third phases, respectively, were US$59.4, US$17.6, and US$14.3 in hospital affiliated to the Ministry of Health and Medical Education (MoHME), US$39.6, US$33.7, and US$13.7 in hospitals affiliated to Social Security Organization (SSO), and US$153.3, US$188.7, and US$66.4 in private hospitals. In hospitals affiliated to SSO and MoHME there was a significant difference between the mean OOP payments before the HTP and after the third phase (PKurdistan province. © 2017 The Author(s); Published by Kerman University of Medical Sciences. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and

  4. Positive predictive value and impact of misdiagnosis of a heart failure diagnosis in administrative registers among patients admitted to a University Hospital cardiac care unit

    Mard, Shan; Nielsen, Finn Erland

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the positive predictive value (PPV) of a diagnosis of heart failure (HF) in the Danish National Registry of Patients (NRP) among patients admitted to a University Hospital cardiac care unit, and to evaluate the impact of misdiagnosing HF.......To evaluate the positive predictive value (PPV) of a diagnosis of heart failure (HF) in the Danish National Registry of Patients (NRP) among patients admitted to a University Hospital cardiac care unit, and to evaluate the impact of misdiagnosing HF....

  5. The rationale for sitting elderly patients in hospital out of bed for long periods is medically unsubstantiated and detrimental to their recovery.

    Bliss, Mary Rose

    2004-01-01

    The notorious statement by Asher about the dangers of bed rest [Brit Med J 1947; ii: 967-8] which continues to be quoted out of context in leading medical journals today is inapplicable to modern short stay elderly hospital patients and has little medical foundation. 'Blood clotting in the veins' is more likely to result from venous stasis during sitting than from lying down. 'Lime draining from the bones' refers to subjects' spending weeks, not hours, in the horizontal position and similar losses have been shown to occur in healthy people immobilised in chairs for long periods during the day. Constipation is common in sick old people and there is no evidence that 'scybala stacking up the colon' is more likely to occur in bed than in a chair. The 'flesh rotting from the seat', or pressure sores, occur as frequently or more frequently, in sick patients nursed in chairs as in bed. 'Urine leaking from the distended bladder' may be reduced in very debilitated old people sitting in chairs, but at the expense of impaired renal function associated with reduced perfusion in the upright posture and exacerbated incontinence due to a compensatory diuresis at night. The 'spirit evaporating from the soul' today is more likely to afflict old patients who are exhausted by prolonged chair nursing and orthostatic hypotension due to age or illness. Recent studies in intensive care patients have highlighted the hypotension due to vasodilatation which can occur in infection and trauma. There is no evidence that nosocomial pneumonia is reduced by sitting patients out of bed, and lack of sleep is likely to exacerbate infection and delay recovery. Preventing patients from lying down when they feel the need is a violation of their rights and has been shown to be probably as injurious as the Victorian practice of preventing healthy patients from getting up. Physiotherapy is obviously important but patients should be allowed to decide for themselves how long they spend in or out of bed.

  6. 'Getting to Know Me': The second phase roll-out of a staff training programme for supporting people with dementia in general hospitals.

    Elvish, Ruth; Burrow, Simon; Cawley, Rosanne; Harney, Kathryn; Pilling, Mark; Gregory, Julie; Keady, John

    2018-01-01

    Objectives The aims were to evaluate a second phase roll-out of a dementia care training programme for general hospital staff and to further develop two outcome scales: the Confidence in Dementia scale for measuring confidence in working with people with dementia and the Knowledge in Dementia scale for measuring knowledge in dementia. Method Following a 'training the trainers' phase, the study involved the delivery of the 'Getting to Know Me' training programme to a large number of staff (n = 517) across three National Health Service (NHS) Trusts situated in North-West England. The impact of the programme was evaluated using a pre-post design which explored: (i) changes in confidence in dementia, (ii) changes in knowledge in dementia, and (iii) changes in beliefs about behaviours that challenge. Results Statistically significant change was identified between pre-post training on all outcome measures (Confidence in Dementia: eight point increase, p Staff knowledge in dementia and confidence in working with people with dementia significantly increased following attendance at the training sessions. The findings are consistent with preliminary findings and strengthen current knowledge about the impact of dementia care training in general hospitals. The Confidence in Dementia and Knowledge in Dementia scales continue to demonstrate psychometrically sound properties and demonstrate utility in the field of dementia research.

  7. Developing Indicators of Service Quality Provided for Cardiovascular Patients Hospitalized in Cardiac Care Unit

    Saber Azami-Aghdash

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cardiovascular diseases are among the most prevalent chronic diseases leading to high degrees of mortality and morbidity worldwide and in Iran. The aim of the current study was to determine and develop appropriate indicators for evaluating provided service quality for cardiovascular patients admitted to Cardiac Care Units (CCU in Iran. Methods: In order to determine the indicators for evaluating provided service quality, a four-stage process including reviewing systematic review articles in premier bibliographic databases, interview, performing two rounds of Delphi technique, and holding experts panel by attendance of experts in different fields was adopted. Finally, after recognizing relevant indicators in resources, these indicators were finalized during various stages using ideas of 27 experts in different fields. Results: Among 2800 found articles in the text reviewing phase, 21 articles, which had completely mentioned relevant indicators, were studied and 48 related indicators were extracted. After two interviews with a cardiologist and an epidemiologist, 32 items of the indicators were omitted and replaced by 27 indicators coping with the conditions of Iranian hospitals. Finally, 43 indicators were added into the Delphi phase and after 2 rounds of Delphi with 18 specialists, 7 cases were excluded due to their low scores of applicability. In the experts’ panel stage, 6 items were also omitted and 10 new indicators were developed to replace them. Eventually, 40 indicators were finalized. Conclusion: In this study, some proper indicators for evaluating provided service quality for CCU admissions in Iran were determined. Considering the informative richness of these indicators, they can be used by managers, policy makers, health service providers, and also insurance agencies in order to improve the quality of services, decisions, and policies.

  8. Improving Providers' Role Definitions to Decrease Overcrowding and Improve In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Response.

    Leary, Marion; Schweickert, William; Neefe, Stacie; Tsypenyuk, Boris; Falk, Scott Austin; Holena, Daniel N

    2016-07-01

    How nontechnical factors such as inadequate role definition and overcrowding affect outcomes of in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) is unknown. Using a bundled intervention, we sought to improve providers' role definitions and decrease overcrowding during IHCA events. To determine if a bundled intervention consisting of a nurse/physician leadership dyad, visual cues for provider roles, and a "role check" would lead to reductions in crowding and improve perceptions of communication and team leadership. Baseline data on the number and type of IHCA providers were collected. Providers were asked to complete a postevent survey rating communication and leadership. A bundled intervention was then introduced. Data were then obtained for the subsequent IHCA events. Twenty ICHA events were captured before and 34 after the intervention. The number of physicians present at pulse checks 2 (median [interquartile range]: 6 [5-8] before vs 5 [3-6] after, P = .02) and 3 (7 [5-9] vs 4 [4-5], P = .004) decreased significantly after the intervention. The overall number of providers at the third pulse check (18 [14-22] before vs 14 [12-16] after, P = .04) also decreased after the intervention. On a 10-point Likert scale, ratings of communication (8 [7-8]) and physician leadership (8 [7-9]) did not differ significantly from before to after the intervention. Both the physician leads (90%) and patients' primary nurses (97%) were able to identify clear nurse leaders. A bundled intervention targeted at improving IHCA response led to a decrease in overcrowding at ICHA events without substantial changes in the perceptions of communication or physician leadership. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  9. Disease-specific out-of-pocket and catastrophic health expenditure on hospitalization in India: Do Indian households face distress health financing?

    Kastor, Anshul; Mohanty, Sanjay K

    2018-01-01

    Rising non-communicable diseases (NCDs) coupled with increasing injuries have resulted in a significant increase in health spending in India. While out-of-pocket expenditure remains the major source of health care financing in India (two-thirds of the total health spending), the financial burden varies enormously across diseases and by the economic well-being of the households. Though prior studies have examined the variation in disease pattern, little is known about the financial risk to the families by type of diseases in India. In this context, the present study examines disease-specific out-of-pocket expenditure (OOPE), catastrophic health expenditure (CHE) and distress health financing. Unit data from the 71st round of the National Sample Survey Organization (2014) was used for this study. OOPE is defined as health spending on hospitalization net of reimbursement, and CHE is defined as household health spending exceeding 10% of household consumption expenditure. Distress health financing is defined as a situation when a household has to borrow money or sell their property/assets or when it gets contributions from friends/relatives to meet its health care expenses. OOPE was estimated for 16 selected diseases and across three broad categories- communicable diseases, NCDs and injuries. Multivariate logistic regression was used to understand the determinants of distress financing and CHE. Mean OOPE on hospitalization was INR 19,210 and was the highest for cancer (INR 57,232) followed by heart diseases (INR 40,947). About 28% of the households incurred CHE and faced distress financing. Among all the diseases, cancer caused the highest CHE (79%) and distress financing (43%). More than one-third of the inpatients reported distressed financing for heart diseases, neurological disorders, genito urinary problems, musculoskeletal diseases, gastro-intestinal problems and injuries. The likelihood of incurring distress financing was 3.2 times higher for those hospitalized

  10. Medication and Dietary Supplement Interactions among a Low-Income, Hospitalized Patient Population Who Take Cardiac Medications

    Paula Gardiner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To identify characteristics associated with the use of potentially harmful combinations of dietary supplements (DS and cardiac prescription medications in an urban, underserved, inpatient population. Methods. Cardiac prescription medication users were identified to assess the prevalence and risk factors of potentially harmful dietary supplement-prescription medication interactions (PHDS-PMI. We examined sociodemographic and clinical characteristics for crude (χ2 or t-tests and adjusted multivariable logistic regression associations with the outcome. Results. Among 558 patients, there were 121 who also used a DS. Of the 110 participants having a PHDS-PMI, 25% were asked about their DS use at admission, 75% had documentation of DS in their chart, and 21% reported the intention to continue DS use after discharge. A multivariable logistic regression model noted that for every additional medication or DS taken the odds of having a PHDS-PMI increase and that those with a high school education are significantly less likely to have a PHDS-PMI than those with a college education. Conclusion. Inpatients at an urban safety net hospital taking a combination of cardiac prescription medications and DS are at a high risk of harmful supplement-drug interactions. Providers must ask about DS use and should consider the potential for interactions when having patient discussions about cardiac medications and DS.

  11. Early administration of epinephrine (adrenaline) in patients with cardiac arrest with initial shockable rhythm in hospital: propensity score matched analysis.

    Andersen, Lars W; Kurth, Tobias; Chase, Maureen; Berg, Katherine M; Cocchi, Michael N; Callaway, Clifton; Donnino, Michael W

    2016-04-06

    To evaluate whether patients who experience cardiac arrest in hospital receive epinephrine (adrenaline) within the two minutes after the first defibrillation (contrary to American Heart Association guidelines) and to evaluate the association between early administration of epinephrine and outcomes in this population. Prospective observational cohort study. Analysis of data from the Get With The Guidelines-Resuscitation registry, which includes data from more than 300 hospitals in the United States. Adults in hospital who experienced cardiac arrest with an initial shockable rhythm, including patients who had a first defibrillation within two minutes of the cardiac arrest and who remained in a shockable rhythm after defibrillation. Epinephrine given within two minutes after the first defibrillation. Survival to hospital discharge. Secondary outcomes included return of spontaneous circulation and survival to hospital discharge with a good functional outcome. A propensity score was calculated for the receipt of epinephrine within two minutes after the first defibrillation, based on multiple characteristics of patients, events, and hospitals. Patients who received epinephrine at either zero, one, or two minutes after the first defibrillation were then matched on the propensity score with patients who were "at risk" of receiving epinephrine within the same minute but who did not receive it. 2978 patients were matched on the propensity score, and the groups were well balanced. 1510 (51%) patients received epinephrine within two minutes after the first defibrillation, which is contrary to current American Heart Association guidelines. Epinephrine given within the first two minutes after the first defibrillation was associated with decreased odds of survival in the propensity score matched analysis (odds ratio 0.70, 95% confidence interval 0.59 to 0.82; P<0.001). Early epinephrine administration was also associated with a decreased odds of return of spontaneous circulation

  12. Influence of mild therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest on hospital mortality

    van der Wal, Greetje; Brinkman, Sylvia; Bisschops, Laurens L. A.; Hoedemaekers, Cornelia W.; van der Hoeven, Johannes G.; de Lange, Dylan W.; de Keizer, Nicolette F.; Pickkers, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Following two randomized controlled trials that demonstrated reduced mortality and better neurological outcome in cardiac arrest patients, mild therapeutic hypothermia was implemented in many intensive care units. Up to now, no large observational studies have confirmed the beneficial

  13. Frequency and causes of discharges against medical advice from hospital cardiac care units of East Azerbaijan, Iran

    Saber Azami-Aghdash

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Discharges against medical advice (DAMA is a common problem of hospitals that could lead increasing the complications and readmission. For this, the aim of this study is to investigate the frequency and effective factors of DAMA in patients with cardiovascular disease in hospital cardiac care units (CCU of East Azerbaijan, Iran. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed, in 2013, in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. Required information was extracted using valid and reliable forms of medical records of 2000 patients admitted to 20 CCU in 17 hospitals of East Azerbaijan, by two trained interviewers. Data analysis was performed using descriptive statistics (frequency, mean, percentage, etc., chi-square test, and linear regression model using the SPSS software. The tests were considered a statistically significant level of 0.05%. Results: The results showed that 272 patients (13.6% were DAMA from the hospital. The frequency of DAMA was in men more than women. The most frequency of discharge has occurred in the range of 40-80 years old. Results of linear regression showed that there was a significant correlation between DAMA and type of insurance, history of myocardial infarction (MI, comorbid disease, cause of hospitalization, location of hospital, and staying < 48 hours (P < 0.050. Conclusion: In this study, the rate of DAMA was relatively high compared with similar studies and it is considered as a concern problem that should study the reasons and its effective factors and plan effective interventions to reduce them.

  14. A qualitative study about experiences and emotions of emergency medical technicians and out-of-hospital emergency nurses after performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation resulting in death.

    Fernández-Aedo, I; Pérez-Urdiales, I; Unanue-Arza, S; García-Azpiazu, Z; Ballesteros-Peña, S

    To explore the experiences, emotions and coping skills among emergency medical technicians and emergency nurses after performing out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation manoeuvres resulting in death. An exploratory qualitative research was performed. Seven emergency medical technicians and six emergency nurses were selected by non-probability sampling among emergency medical system workers. The meetings took place up to information saturation, achieved after six individual interviews and a focal group. The meetings were then transcribed and a manual and inductive analysis of the contents performed. After a failed resuscitation several short and long-term reactions appear. They can be negatives, such as sadness or uncertainty, or positives, such as the feeling of having done everything possible to save the patient's life. Emotional stress increases when ambulance staff have to talk with the deceased's family or when the patient is a child. The workers don't know of a coping strategy other than talking about their emotions with their colleagues. Death after a failed resuscitation can be viewed as a traumatic experience for rescuers. Being in contact with the suffering of others is an emotional, stress-generating factor with direct repercussions on the working and personal lives of emergency staff. Nevertheless, structured coping techniques are not common among those professionals. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Enfermería Intensiva y Unidades Coronarias (SEEIUC). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. [Survival of out-hospital cardiac arrests attended by a mobile intensive care unit in Asturias (Spain) in 2010].

    Iglesias-Llaca, F; Suárez-Gil, P; Viña-Soria, L; García-Castro, A; Castro-Delgado, R; Fente Álvarez, A I; Álvarez-Ramos, M B

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate attendance timings, out- and in-hospital characteristics, and survival of cardiac arrests attended by an advanced life support unit in Asturias (Spain) in 2010. Factors related to survival upon admission and at discharge were also analyzed. A retrospective, observational trial was carried out involving a cohort of out-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) occurring between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2010, with one year of follow-up from OHCA. Health Care Area IV of the Principality of Asturias, with a population of 342,020 in 2010. All patients with OHCA and attended by an advanced life support unit were considered. Demographic data, the etiology of cardiac arrest, bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), attendance timings and survival upon admission, at discharge and after one year. A total of 177 OHCA were included. Of these, 120 underwent CPR by the advanced life support team. Sixty-six of these cases (55%) were caused by presumed heart disease. A total of 63 patients (52.5%) recovered spontaneous circulation, and 51 (42.5%) maintained circulation upon admission to hospital. Thirteen patients (10.8%) were discharged alive. After one year, 11 patients were still alive (9.2%) - 9 of them (7.5%) with a Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) score of 1. Ventricular fibrillation and short attendance timings were related to increased survival. The survival rate upon admission was better than in other series and similar at discharge. Initial rhythm and attendance timings were related. Public automated external defibrillators (AED) were not used, and bystander CPR was infrequent. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  16. Relationship between quantitative cardiac neuronal imaging with ¹²³I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine and hospitalization in patients with heart failure.

    Parker, Matthew W; Sood, Nitesh; Ahlberg, Alan W; Jacobson, Arnold F; Heller, Gary V; Lundbye, Justin B

    2014-09-01

    Hospitalization in patients with systolic heart failure is associated with morbidity, mortality, and cost. Myocardial sympathetic innervation, imaged by (123)I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine ((123)I-mIBG), has been associated with cardiac events in a recent multicenter study. The present analysis explored the relationship between (123)I-mIBG imaging findings and hospitalization. Source documents from the ADMIRE-HF trial were reviewed to identify hospitalization events in patients with systolic heart failure following cardiac neuronal imaging using (123)I-mIBG. Time to hospitalization was analyzed with the Kaplan-Meier method and compared to the mIBG heart-to-mediastinum (H/M) ratio using multiple-failure Cox regression. During 1.4 years of median follow-up, 362 end-point hospitalizations occurred in 207 of 961 subjects, 79 % of whom had H/M ratio heart failure diagnosis, a low mIBG H/M ratio was associated with cardiac-related hospitalization (HR 1.48, 95 % CI 1.05 - 2.0; p = 0.02). The mIBG H/M ratio may risk-stratify patients with heart failure for cardiac-related hospitalization, especially when used in conjunction with BNP. Further studies are warranted to examine these relationships.

  17. Sudden Cardiac Death in Young Adults With Previous Hospital-Based Psychiatric Inpatient and Outpatient Treatment

    Risgaard, Bjarke; Waagstein, Kristine; Winkel, Bo Gregers

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Psychiatric patients have premature mortality compared to the general population. The incidence of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in psychiatric patients is unknown in a nationwide setting. The aim of this study was to compare nationwide SCD incidence rates in young individuals with and......Introduction: Psychiatric patients have premature mortality compared to the general population. The incidence of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in psychiatric patients is unknown in a nationwide setting. The aim of this study was to compare nationwide SCD incidence rates in young individuals...

  18. Association between smoke-free legislation and hospitalizations for cardiac, cerebrovascular, and respiratory diseases: a meta-analysis.

    Tan, Crystal E; Glantz, Stanton A

    2012-10-30

    Secondhand smoke causes cardiovascular and respiratory disease. Smoke-free legislation is associated with a lower risk of hospitalization and death from these diseases. Random-effects meta-analysis was conducted by law comprehensiveness to determine the relationship between smoke-free legislation and hospital admission or death from cardiac, cerebrovascular, and respiratory diseases. Studies were identified by using a systematic search for studies published before November 30, 2011 with the use of the Science Citation Index, Google Scholar, PubMed, and Embase and references in identified articles. Change in hospital admissions (or deaths) in the presence of a smoke-free law, duration of follow-up, and law comprehensiveness (workplaces only; workplaces and restaurants; or workplaces, restaurants, and bars) were recorded. Forty-five studies of 33 smoke-free laws with median follow-up of 24 months (range, 2-57 months) were included. Comprehensive smoke-free legislation was associated with significantly lower rates of hospital admissions (or deaths) for all 4 diagnostic groups: coronary events (relative risk, 0.848; 95% confidence interval 0.816-0.881), other heart disease (relative risk, 0.610; 95% confidence interval, 0.440-0.847), cerebrovascular accidents (relative risk, 0.840; 95% confidence interval, 0.753-0.936), and respiratory disease (relative risk, 0.760; 95% confidence interval, 0.682-0.846). The difference in risk following comprehensive smoke-free laws does not change with longer follow-up. More comprehensive laws were associated with larger changes in risk. Smoke-free legislation was associated with a lower risk of smoking-related cardiac, cerebrovascular, and respiratory diseases, with more comprehensive laws associated with greater changes in risk.

  19. Survival in patients without acute ST elevation after cardiac arrest and association with early coronary angiography

    Dankiewicz, J; Nielsen, N; Annborn, M

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate whether early coronary angiography (CAG) after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of a presumed cardiac cause is associated with improved outcomes in patients without acute ST elevation. METHODS: The target temperature management after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (TTM) trial...... showed no difference in all-cause mortality or neurological outcome between an intervention of 33 and 36 °C. In this post hoc analysis, 544 patients where the admission electrocardiogram did not show acute ST elevation were included. Early CAG was defined as being performed on admission or within...... early CAG was not significantly associated with survival. CONCLUSIONS: In this post hoc observational study of a large randomized trial, early coronary angiography for patients without acute ST elevation after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of a presumed cardiac cause was not associated with improved...

  20. Outcomes in a Community-Based Intensive Cardiac Rehabilitation Program: Comparison with Hospital-Based and Academic Programs.

    Katzenberg, Charles; Silva, Edna; Young, M Jean; Gilles, Greg

    2018-04-13

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a community-based intensive cardiac rehabilitation program could produce positive changes in risk factor profile and outcomes in an at-risk population. Participants seeking either primary or secondary coronary artery disease prevention voluntarily enrolled in the 12-week intensive cardiac rehabilitation program. Data were obtained at baseline and 6-12 months after completion of the program. A total of 142 individuals, mean age 69 years, completed the Heart Series between 2012 and 2016. Follow-up data were available in 105 participants (74%). Participants showed statistically significant improvements in mean weight (165 to 162 lbs, P = .0005), body mass index (26 to 25 kg/m 2 , P = .001), systolic blood pressure (126 to 122 mm Hg, P = .01), diastolic blood pressure (73 to 70 mm Hg, P = .0005), total cholesterol (175 to 168 mg/dL, P = .03), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) (100 to 93 mg/dL, P = .005), LDL-C/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) ratio (1.8 to 1.6, P = .005), and cholesterol/HDL-C ratio (3.2 to 3.0, P = .003). Changes in HDL-C, triglycerides, and fasting blood glucose did not reach statistical significance, but all trended in favorable directions. Adverse cardiovascular disease outcomes were rare (one stent placement, no deaths). A total of 105 participants completed our 12-week community-based intensive cardiac rehabilitation program and showed significant positive changes in several measures of cardiac risk, with only 1 adverse event. These results compare favorably with those of hospital-based and academic institutional programs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Vasopressin, steroids, and epinephrine and neurologically favorable survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest: a randomized clinical trial.

    Mentzelopoulos, Spyros D; Malachias, Sotirios; Chamos, Christos; Konstantopoulos, Demetrios; Ntaidou, Theodora; Papastylianou, Androula; Kolliantzaki, Iosifinia; Theodoridi, Maria; Ischaki, Helen; Makris, Dimosthemis; Zakynthinos, Epaminondas; Zintzaras, Elias; Sourlas, Sotirios; Aloizos, Stavros; Zakynthinos, Spyros G

    2013-07-17

    Among patients with cardiac arrest, preliminary data have shown improved return of spontaneous circulation and survival to hospital discharge with the vasopressin-steroids-epinephrine (VSE) combination. To determine whether combined vasopressin-epinephrine during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and corticosteroid supplementation during and after CPR improve survival to hospital discharge with a Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) score of 1 or 2 in vasopressor-requiring, in-hospital cardiac arrest. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial performed from September 1, 2008, to October 1, 2010, in 3 Greek tertiary care centers (2400 beds) with 268 consecutive patients with cardiac arrest requiring epinephrine according to resuscitation guidelines (from 364 patients assessed for eligibility). Patients received either vasopressin (20 IU/CPR cycle) plus epinephrine (1 mg/CPR cycle; cycle duration approximately 3 minutes) (VSE group, n = 130) or saline placebo plus epinephrine (1 mg/CPR cycle; cycle duration approximately 3 minutes) (control group, n = 138) for the first 5 CPR cycles after randomization, followed by additional epinephrine if needed. During the first CPR cycle after randomization, patients in the VSE group received methylprednisolone (40 mg) and patients in the control group received saline placebo. Shock after resuscitation was treated with stress-dose hydrocortisone (300 mg daily for 7 days maximum and gradual taper) (VSE group, n = 76) or saline placebo (control group, n = 73). Return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) for 20 minutes or longer and survival to hospital discharge with a CPC score of 1 or 2. Follow-up was completed in all resuscitated patients. Patients in the VSE group vs patients in the control group had higher probability for ROSC of 20 minutes or longer (109/130 [83.9%] vs 91/138 [65.9%]; odds ratio [OR], 2.98; 95% CI, 1.39-6.40; P = .005) and survival to hospital discharge with CPC

  2. Transfer of residents to hospital prior to cardiac death: the influence of nursing home quality and ownership type.

    Anic, Gabriella M; Pathak, Elizabeth Barnett; Tanner, Jean Paul; Casper, Michele L; Branch, Laurence G

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesised that among nursing home decedents, nursing home for-profit status and poor quality-of-care ratings, as well as patient characteristics, would lower the likelihood of transfer to hospital prior to heart disease death. Using death certificates from a large metropolitan area (Tampa Florida Metropolitan Statistical Area) for 1998-2002, we geocoded residential street addresses of heart disease decedents to identify 2172 persons who resided in nursing homes (n=131) at the time of death. We analysed decedent place of death as an indicator of transfer prior to death. Multilevel logistic regression modelling was used for analysis. Cause of death and decedent characteristics were obtained from death certificates. Nursing home characteristics, including state inspector ratings for multiple time points, were obtained from Florida's Agency for Healthcare Administration. Nursing home for-profit status, level of nursing care and quality-of-care ratings were not associated with the likelihood of transfer to hospital prior to heart disease death. Nursing homes >5 miles from a hospital were more likely to transfer decedents, compared with facilities located close to a hospital. Significant predictors of no transfer for nursing home residents were being white, female, older, less educated and widowed/unmarried. In this study population, contrary to our hypotheses, sociodemographic characteristics of nursing home decedents were more important predictors of no transfer prior to cardiac death than quality rankings or for-profit status of nursing homes.

  3. Elevated serum osteoprotegerin levels predict in-hospital major adverse cardiac events in patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction.

    Çanga, Aytun; Durakoğlugil, Murtaza Emre; Erdoğan, Turan; Kirbaş, Aynur; Yilmaz, Adnan; Çiçek, Yüksel; Ergül, Elif; Çetin, Mustafa; Kocaman, Sinan Altan

    2012-11-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate whether osteoprotegerin (OPG) is related to in-hospital major adverse cardiac events (MACE) and reperfusion parameters in patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). The OPG/receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK)/RANK ligand pathway has recently been associated with atherosclerosis. OPG is a predictor of cardiovascular events in patients with acute coronary syndrome. This study included 96 consecutive patients with STEMI undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Two groups with equal number of patients were formed according to median OPG level. The association of OPG levels on admission with post-procedural reperfusion parameters, and in-hospital MACE were investigated. Patients with higher OPG levels displayed higher neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio, admission troponin, admission glucose, and high-sensitive C-reactive protein. Higher OPG levels were associated with increased thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) risk score, TIMI risk index, pain to balloon time, need for inotropic support, shock, and MACE, mainly driven by death. Reperfusion parameters were not different between the two groups. TIMI risk score, TIMI risk index, myocardial blush grade, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), number of obstructed vessels, and OPG significantly predicted adverse cardiac events. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed OPG as an independent predictor of MACE as well as eGFR, number of obstructed vessels, and corrected TIMI frame count. OPG, a bidirectional molecule displaying both atheroprotective and pro-atherosclerotic properties, is currently known as a marker of inflammation and a predictor of cardiovascular mortality. The present study, for the first time, demonstrated that an increased OPG level is related to in-hospital adverse cardiovascular events after primary PCI in patients with STEMI. Copyright © 2012 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd

  4. Associations between blood glucose level and outcomes of adult in-hospital cardiac arrest: a retrospective cohort study.

    Wang, Chih-Hung; Huang, Chien-Hua; Chang, Wei-Tien; Tsai, Min-Shan; Yu, Ping-Hsun; Wu, Yen-Wen; Chen, Wen-Jone

    2016-08-24

    We intended to analyse the associations between blood glucose (BG) level and clinical outcomes of in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA). We conducted a retrospective observational study in a single medical centre and evaluated patients who experienced IHCA between 2006 and 2014. We used multivariable logistic regression analysis to study associations between independent variables and outcomes. We calculated the mean BG level for each patient by averaging the maximum and minimum BG levels in the first 24 h after arrest, and we used mean BG level for our final analysis. We included a total of 402 patients. Of these, 157 patients (39.1 %) had diabetes mellitus (DM). The average mean BG level was 209.9 mg/dL (11.7 mmol/L). For DM patients, a mean BG level between 183 and 307 mg/dL (10.2-17.1 mmol/L) was significantly associated with favourable neurological outcome (odds ratio [OR] 2.71, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.18-6.20; p value = 0.02); a mean BG level between 147 and 317 mg/dL (8.2-17.6 mmol/L) was significantly associated with survival to hospital discharge (OR 2.38, 95 % CI 1.26-4.53; p value = 0.008). For non-DM patients, a mean BG level between 143 and 268 mg/dL (7.9-14.9 mmol/L) was significantly associated with survival to hospital discharge (OR 2.93, 95 % CI 1.62-5.40; p value level in the first 24 h after cardiac arrest was associated with neurological outcome for IHCA patients with DM. For neurological and survival outcomes, the optimal BG range may be higher for patients with DM than for patients without DM.

  5. Adjuvant Hypofractionated Versus Conventional Whole Breast Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: Long-Term Hospital-Related Morbidity From Cardiac Causes

    Chan, Elisa K.; Woods, Ryan; McBride, Mary L.; Virani, Sean; Nichol, Alan; Speers, Caroline; Wai, Elaine S.; Tyldesley, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The risk of cardiac injury with hypofractionated whole-breast/chest wall radiation therapy (HF-WBI) compared with conventional whole-breast/chest wall radiation therapy (CF-WBI) in women with left-sided breast cancer remains a concern. The purpose of this study was to determine if there is an increase in hospital-related morbidity from cardiac causes with HF-WBI relative to CF-WBI. Methods and Materials: Between 1990 and 1998, 5334 women ≤80 years of age with early-stage breast cancer were treated with postoperative radiation therapy to the breast or chest wall alone. A population-based database recorded baseline patient, tumor, and treatment factors. Hospital administrative records identified baseline cardiac risk factors and other comorbidities. Factors between radiation therapy groups were balanced using a propensity-score model. The first event of a hospital admission for cardiac causes after radiation therapy was determined from hospitalization records. Ten- and 15-year cumulative hospital-related cardiac morbidity after radiation therapy was estimated for left- and right-sided cases using a competing risk approach. Results: The median follow-up was 13.2 years. For left-sided cases, 485 women were treated with CF-WBI, and 2221 women were treated with HF-WBI. Mastectomy was more common in the HF-WBI group, whereas boost was more common in the CF-WBI group. The CF-WBI group had a higher prevalence of diabetes. The 15-year cumulative hospital-related morbidity from cardiac causes (95% confidence interval) was not different between the 2 radiation therapy regimens after propensity-score adjustment: 21% (19-22) with HF-WBI and 21% (17-25) with CF-WBI (P=.93). For right-sided cases, the 15-year cumulative hospital-related morbidity from cardiac causes was also similar between the radiation therapy groups (P=.76). Conclusions: There is no difference in morbidity leading to hospitalization from cardiac causes among women with left-sided early-stage breast

  6. Adjuvant Hypofractionated Versus Conventional Whole Breast Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: Long-Term Hospital-Related Morbidity From Cardiac Causes

    Chan, Elisa K. [Department of Oncology, Saint John Regional Hospital, Saint John (Canada); Woods, Ryan; McBride, Mary L. [Cancer Control Research Department, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada); Virani, Sean [Division of Cardiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Nichol, Alan [Radiation Therapy Program, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada); Speers, Caroline [Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada); Wai, Elaine S. [Radiation Therapy Program, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada); Tyldesley, Scott, E-mail: styldesl@bccancer.bc.ca [Radiation Therapy Program, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The risk of cardiac injury with hypofractionated whole-breast/chest wall radiation therapy (HF-WBI) compared with conventional whole-breast/chest wall radiation therapy (CF-WBI) in women with left-sided breast cancer remains a concern. The purpose of this study was to determine if there is an increase in hospital-related morbidity from cardiac causes with HF-WBI relative to CF-WBI. Methods and Materials: Between 1990 and 1998, 5334 women ≤80 years of age with early-stage breast cancer were treated with postoperative radiation therapy to the breast or chest wall alone. A population-based database recorded baseline patient, tumor, and treatment factors. Hospital administrative records identified baseline cardiac risk factors and other comorbidities. Factors between radiation therapy groups were balanced using a propensity-score model. The first event of a hospital admission for cardiac causes after radiation therapy was determined from hospitalization records. Ten- and 15-year cumulative hospital-related cardiac morbidity after radiation therapy was estimated for left- and right-sided cases using a competing risk approach. Results: The median follow-up was 13.2 years. For left-sided cases, 485 women were treated with CF-WBI, and 2221 women were treated with HF-WBI. Mastectomy was more common in the HF-WBI group, whereas boost was more common in the CF-WBI group. The CF-WBI group had a higher prevalence of diabetes. The 15-year cumulative hospital-related morbidity from cardiac causes (95% confidence interval) was not different between the 2 radiation therapy regimens after propensity-score adjustment: 21% (19-22) with HF-WBI and 21% (17-25) with CF-WBI (P=.93). For right-sided cases, the 15-year cumulative hospital-related morbidity from cardiac causes was also similar between the radiation therapy groups (P=.76). Conclusions: There is no difference in morbidity leading to hospitalization from cardiac causes among women with left-sided early-stage breast

  7. Hemodynamic–directed cardiopulmonary resuscitation during in–hospital cardiac arrest*

    Sutton, Robert M.; Friess, Stuart H.; Maltese, Matthew R.; Naim, Maryam Y.; Bratinov, George; Weiland, Theodore R.; Garuccio, Mia; Bhalala, Utpal; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Becker, Lance B.; Berg, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) guidelines assume that cardiac arrest victims can be treated with a uniform chest compression (CC) depth and a standardized interval administration of vasopressor drugs. This non-personalized approach does not incorporate a patient’s individualized response into ongoing resuscitative efforts. In previously reported porcine models of hypoxic and normoxic ventricular fibrillation (VF), a hemodynamic-directed resuscitation improved short-term survival compared...

  8. Evaluation of the effect of music on anxiety level of patients hospitalized in cardiac wards before angiography

    Zahra Pourmovahed

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients experience high levels of anxiety before angiography, which is mostly associated with irreparable effects on health status of such individuals. Use of alternative medicine to reduce stress and anxiety is of paramount importance. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of music on anxiety level of patients hospitalized in cardiac wards before angiography. Methods: This clinical trial was conducted on 70 patients admitted to cardiac wards before angiography in three selected hospitals of Shiraz, Iran in 2015. Samples were selected through randomized and available sampling and divided into two groups of control (n=35 and intervention (n=35. In this study, the intervention group received one hour of music before angiography for 20 minutes, whereas the usual care of ward was provided for the control group. Data was collected using the state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI by Spielberger one hour before angiography (immediately before the intervention and 20 minutes after angiography (immediately after the intervention through interviews with all the participants. Data analysis was performed in SPSS version 22 using descriptive statistics, Chi-square, as well as paired and independent-tests. Results: In this study, mean anxiety scores of patients in the intervention and control groups before the intervention were 48.45±6.63 and 48.25±6.63, respectively. After the intervention, these scores were changed to 44.28±5.21 and 49.02±7.74 in the intervention (P=0.004 and control (P=0.90 groups, respectively. Therefore, a significant difference was observed between the groups after the intervention (P=0.008. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, music before angiography could lead to a significant decrease in anxiety level of patients. Therefore, this approach could be used as an effective method to alleviate anxiety in patients.

  9. Evaluation of the effect of music on anxiety level of patients hospitalized in cardiac wards before angiography

    Pourmovahed Zahra

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Patients experience high levels of anxiety before angiography, which is mostly associated with irreparable effects on health status of such individuals. Use of alternative medicine to reduce stress and anxiety is of paramount importance. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of music on anxiety level of patients hospitalized in cardiac wards before angiography. Materials and Method: This clinical trial was conducted on 70 patients admitted to cardiac wards before angiography in three selected hospitals of Shiraz, Iran in 2015. Samples were randomized convenience sampling and divided into two groups of control (n=35 and intervention (n=35. In this study, the intervention group received one hour of music before angiography for 20 minutes, whereas the usual care of ward was provided for the control group. Data was collected using the state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI by Spielberger one hour before angiography (immediately before the intervention and 20 minutes after angiography (immediately after the intervention through interviews with all the participants. Data analysis was performed in SPSS version 22 using descriptive statistics, Chi-square, as well as paired and independent-tests. Results: In this study, mean anxiety scores of patients in the intervention and control groups before the intervention were 48.45±6.63 and 48.25±6.63, respectively. After the intervention, these scores were changed to 44.28±5.21 and 49.02±7.74 in the intervention (P=0.004 and control (P=0.90 groups, respectively. Therefore, a significant difference was observed between the groups after the intervention (P=0.008. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, music before angiography could lead to a significant decrease in anxiety level of patients. Therefore, this approach could be used as an effective method to alleviate anxiety in patients.

  10. Does accelerometer feedback on high-quality chest compression improve survival rate? An in-hospital cardiac arrest simulation.

    Jung, Min Hee; Oh, Je Hyeok; Kim, Chan Woong; Kim, Sung Eun; Lee, Dong Hoon; Chang, Wen Joen

    2015-08-01

    We investigated whether visual feedback from an accelerometer device facilitated high-quality chest compressions during an in-hospital cardiac arrest simulation using a manikin. Thirty health care providers participated in an in-hospital cardiac arrest simulation with 1 minute of continuous chest compressions. Chest compressions were performed on a manikin lying on a bed according to visual feedback from an accelerometer feedback device. The manikin and accelerometer recorded chest compression data simultaneously. The simulated patient was deemed to have survived when the chest compression data satisfied all of the preset high-quality chest compression criteria (depth ≥51 mm, rate >100 per minute, and ≥95% full recoil). Survival rates were calculated from the feedback device and manikin data. The survival rate according to the feedback device data was 80%; however, the manikin data indicated a significantly lower survival rate (46.7%; P = .015). The difference between the accelerometer and manikin survival rates was not significant for participants with a body mass index greater than or equal to 20 kg/m(2) (93.3 vs 73.3%, respectively; P = .330); however, the difference in survival rate was significant in participants with body mass index less than 20 kg/m(2) (66.7 vs 20.0%, respectively; P = .025). The use of accelerometer feedback devices to facilitate high-quality chest compression may not be appropriate for lightweight rescuers because of the potential for compression depth overestimation. Clinical Research Information Service (KCT0001449). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Factoring socioeconomic status into cardiac performance profiling for hospitals: does it matter?

    Alter, David A; Austin, Peter C; Naylor, C David; Tu, Jack V

    2002-01-01

    Critics of "scorecard medicine" often highlight the incompleteness of risk-adjustment methods used when accounting for baseline patient differences. Although socioeconomic status is a highly important determinant of adverse outcome for patients admitted to the hospital with acute myocardial infarction, it has not been used in most risk-adjustment models for cardiovascular report cards. To determine the incremental impact of socioeconomic status adjustments on age, sex, and illness severity for hospital-specific 30-day mortality rates after acute myocardial infarction. The authors compared the absolute and relative hospital-specific 30-day acute myocardial infarction mortality rates in 169 hospitals throughout Ontario between April 1, 1994 and March 31, 1997. Patient socioeconomic status was characterized by median neighborhood income using postal codes and 1996 Canadian census data. They examined two risk-adjustment models: the first adjusted for age, sex, and illness severity (standard), whereas the second adjusted for age, sex, illness severity, and median neighborhood income level (socioeconomic status). There was an extremely strong correlation between 'standard' and 'socioeconomic status' risk-adjusted mortality rates (r = 0.99). Absolute differences in 30-day risk-adjusted mortality rates between the socioeconomic status and standard risk-adjustment models were small (median, 0.1%; 25th-75th percentile, 0.1-0.2). The agreement in the quintile rankings of hospitals between the socioeconomic status and standard risk-adjustment models was high (weighted kappa = 0.93). Despite its importance as a determinant of patient outcomes, the effect of socioeconomic status on hospital-specific mortality rates over and above standard risk-adjustment methods for acute myocardial infarction hospital profiling in Ontario was negligible.

  12. Implementation of a Computerized Order Entry Tool to Reduce the Inappropriate and Unnecessary Use of Cardiac Stress Tests With Imaging in Hospitalized Patients.

    Gertz, Zachary M; O'Donnell, William; Raina, Amresh; Balderston, Jessica R; Litwack, Andrew J; Goldberg, Lee R

    2016-10-15

    The rising use of imaging cardiac stress tests has led to potentially unnecessary testing. Interventions designed to reduce inappropriate stress testing have focused on the ambulatory setting. We developed a computerized order entry tool intended to reduce the use of imaging cardiac stress tests and improve appropriate use in hospitalized patients. The tool was evaluated using preimplementation and postimplementation cohorts at a single urban academic teaching hospital. All hospitalized patients referred for testing were included. The co-primary outcomes were the use of imaging stress tests as a percentage of all stress tests and the percentage of inappropriate tests, compared between the 2 cohorts. There were 478 patients in the precohort and 463 in the postcohort. The indication was chest pain in 66% and preoperative in 18% and was not significantly different between groups. The use of nonimaging stress tests increased from 4% in the pregroup to 15% in the postgroup (p nonimaging stress tests increased from 7% to 25% (p nonimaging cardiac stress tests and reduced the use of imaging tests yet was not able to reduce inappropriate use. Our study highlights the differences in cardiac stress testing between hospitalized and ambulatory patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Positive predictive value and impact of misdiagnosis of a heart failure diagnosis in administrative registers among patients admitted to a University Hospital cardiac care unit

    Mard, Shan; Nielsen, Finn Erland

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the positive predictive value (PPV) of a diagnosis of heart failure (HF) in the Danish National Registry of Patients (NRP) among patients admitted to a University Hospital cardiac care unit, and to evaluate the impact of misdiagnosing HF. DESIGN: The NRP was used to identify...

  14. Cardiac complications associated with short-term mortality in schizophrenia patients hospitalized for pneumonia: a nationwide case-control study.

    Ya-Tang Liao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pneumonia is one of most prevalent infectious diseases worldwide and is associated with considerable mortality. In comparison to general population, schizophrenia patients hospitalized for pneumonia have poorer outcomes. We explored the risk factors of short-term mortality in this population because the information is lacking in the literature. METHODS: In a nationwide schizophrenia cohort, derived from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan, that was hospitalized for pneumonia between 2000 and 2008 (n = 1,741, we identified 141 subjects who died during their hospitalizations or shortly after their discharges. Based on risk-set sampling in a 1∶4 ratio, 468 matched controls were selected from the study cohort (i.e., schizophrenia cohort with pneumonia. Physical illnesses were categorized as pre-existing and incident illnesses that developed after pneumonia respectively. Exposures to medications were categorized by type, duration, and defined daily dose. We used stepwise conditional logistic regression to explore the risk factors for short-term mortality. RESULTS: Pre-existing arrhythmia was associated with short-term mortality (adjusted risk ratio [RR] = 4.99, p<0.01. Several variables during hospitalization were associated with increased mortality risk, including incident arrhythmia (RR = 7.44, p<0.01, incident heart failure (RR = 5.49, p = 0.0183 and the use of hypoglycemic drugs (RR = 2.32, p<0.01. Furthermore, individual antipsychotic drugs (such as clozapine known to induce pneumonia were not significantly associated with the risk. CONCLUSIONS: Incident cardiac complications following pneumonia are associated with increased short-term mortality. These findings have broad implications for clinical intervention and future studies are needed to clarify the mechanisms of the risk factors.

  15. Hemodynamics and vasopressor support in therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest

    Bro-Jeppesen, John; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Søholm, Helle

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Inducing therapeutic hypothermia (TH) in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest (OHCA) can be challenging due to its impact on central hemodynamics and vasopressors are frequently used to maintain adequate organ perfusion. The aim of this study was to assess the association between level of vasopres......AIM: Inducing therapeutic hypothermia (TH) in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest (OHCA) can be challenging due to its impact on central hemodynamics and vasopressors are frequently used to maintain adequate organ perfusion. The aim of this study was to assess the association between level...

  16. Sympathoadrenal Activation and Endothelial Damage Are Inter Correlated and Predict Increased Mortality in Patients Resuscitated after Out-Of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    I. Johansson, Pär; Bro-Jeppesen, John; Kjaergaard, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    site ICU. Blood was sampled a median 135 min (Inter Quartile Range (IQR) 103-169) after OHCA. Plasma catecholamines (adrenaline, noradrenaline) and serum endothelial biomarkers (syndecan-1, thrombomodulin, sE-selectin, sVE-cadherin) were measured at admission (immediately after randomization). We had...

  17. Abstract 20854: A Tale of Self-Fulfilling Prophecies in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: Emergency Medical Technicians Deliberately Perform Substandard CPR When Anticipating Poor Prognosis

    Bødtker, Henrik; Klausen, Troels M; Lauridsen, Kasper G

    2017-01-01

    ) if they believe resuscitation to be futile. Furthermore, to investigate if different patient and resuscitation attempt characteristics result in EMTs deliberately performing substandard CPR.Methods: This was a cross-sectional questionnaire survey study conducted in 2016 through 2017 including EMTs from a Danish...... and compressions). Overall, 22% and 51% would perform substandard CPR if the patient were 80 or 90 years old respectively, 46% if the patient was living in a nursing home and up to 31% due to comorbidity such as cancer. EMTs (51%) would deliberately perform substandard CPR in case of on-going bystander CPR >20...... minutes. EMTs (72%) felt competent to terminate resuscitation, but only 9% knew international termination guidelines.Conclusion: EMTs delay start of resuscitation if they anticipate resuscitation to be futile. Furthermore, they deliberately perform substandard CPR based on controversial patient...

  18. Design of the Circulation Improving Resuscitation Care (CIRC) Trial: a new state of the art design for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest research

    Lerner, E.B.; Persse, D.; Souders, C.M.; Sterz, F.; Malzer, R.; Lozano, M., Jr.; Westfall, M.; Brouwer, M.A.; Grunsven, P.M. van; Whitehead, A.; Olsen, J.A.; Herken, U.R.; Wik, L.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: Mechanical chest compression devices, such as the AutoPulse((R)), have been developed to overcome problems associated with manual CPR (M-CPR). Animal and human studies have shown that AutoPulse CPR improves hemodynamic parameters over M-CPR. However, human studies conducted in the

  19. The inflammatory response after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is not modified by targeted temperature management at 33 °C or 36 °C

    Bro-Jeppesen, John; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Wanscher, Michael

    2014-01-01

    of the inflammatory response. METHODS: We studied 169 patients included at a single center in the TTM-trial, randomly assigned to TTM at 33 °C or 36 °C for 24 h. Plasma samples were analyzed for inflammatory markers including interleukin (IL) IL-1β,IL-4,IL-6,IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), C-reactive protein...... (CRP) and procalcitonin (PCT) at randomization and 24, 48 and 72 h after CA. Severity of PCAS was assessed by Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score. RESULTS: Plasma levels of both IL-6 and IL-10 determined at randomization correlated with severity of PCAS at day 2 (r=0.36 and r=0.27, p.... The systemic inflammatory response after CA was not modified by TTM at 33 °C or 36 °C....

  20. Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in relation to age and early identification of patients with minimal chance of long-term survival

    Wissenberg, Mads; Folke, Fredrik; Hansen, Carolina Malta

    2015-01-01

    .7%), early senior patients 66 to 80 years of age (41.5%), and late senior patients >80 years of age (24.8%). Characteristics in working-age patients, early senior patients, and late senior patients were as follows: witnessed arrest in 53.8%, 51.1%, and 52.1%; bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation in 44.......7%, 30.3%, and 23.4%; and prehospital shock from a defibrillator in 54.7%, 45.0%, and 33.8% (all Pworking-age patients, from 12.1% to 34.6%; early senior patients, from 6.4% to 21.5%; and late senior patients......, from 4.0% to 15.0% (all Pworking-age patients, 5.8% to 22.0% (Psenior patients, 2.7% to 8.4% (Psenior patients experienced only a minor increase (1.5% to 2.0%; P=0.01). Overall, 3 of 9499 patients achieved 30-day...

  1. High-sensitivity troponin-T as a prognostic marker after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest - A targeted temperature management (TTM) trial substudy

    Gilje, Patrik; Koul, Sasha; Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig

    2016-01-01

    -TnT) is a prognostic marker among survivors of OHCA with both ischemic and non-ischemic aetiologies remains to be determined. We sought to evaluate the ability of hs-TnT to prognosticate all-cause mortality, death due to cardiovascular causes or multi-organ failure and death due to cerebral causes after OHCA...... circulation (ROSC). The endpoints were 180 day all-cause mortality, death due to cardiovascular causes or multi-organ failure and death due to cerebral causes. Subgroups based on the initial ECG after ROSC (STEMI vs all other ECG presentations) were analyzed. RESULTS: Hs-TnT was independently associated.......05). In patients with STEMI, hs-TnT was independently associated with death due to cardiovascular causes or multi-organ failure (at 48h: OR 1.47, CI 1.10-1.95, pnon...

  2. African experiences of humanitarian cardiovascular medicine: the Cardiac Centre of St. Elizabeth Catholic General Hospital, Shisong.

    Budzee, Sr Appolonia; Tchoumi, Jc Tantchou; Giamberti, Alessandro; Ambassa, Jc; Cirri, Sylvia; Butera, Gianfranco

    2012-06-01

    The cardiac centre of Shisong inaugurated few years ago is a good example of the mobilization of humanitarian resources from the north and south for the improvement of cardiovascular diagnosis and treatment in Africa. From the inauguration of the Center to December 2011, 23 surgical missions have been organized, (5 peadiatric and 18 adults) and 204 patients have been operated with the help of the partners: Associazione Bambini Cardiopatici nel Mondo and Cuore Fratello. The Catheterisation Laboratory has performed a total of 117 diagnostic and interventional procedures while 22 pace makers were implanted (12 single-chambers and 10 dual-chambers). Many problems and challenges are faced everyday but with the enthusiasm, the dynamism and the professional skills of the personnel, the help of the partners we see a bright future.

  3. Pattern of cardiac diseases among children in a tertiary hospital in ...

    2018-03-07

    Mar 7, 2018 ... (71.4%) of ACHD followed by Patent ductus arteriosus. (PDA) which accounted for ... Ventricular septal defect(VSD). 15. 71.4. Patent ductus ... (one at Garki hospital, Abuja for VSD closure and the other in India). Majority of the ...

  4. Simulation exercise to improve retention of cardiopulmonary resuscitation priorities for in-hospital cardiac arrests: A randomized controlled trial.

    Sullivan, Nancy J; Duval-Arnould, Jordan; Twilley, Marida; Smith, Sarah P; Aksamit, Deborah; Boone-Guercio, Pam; Jeffries, Pamela R; Hunt, Elizabeth A

    2015-01-01

    Traditional American Heart Association (AHA) cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) curriculum focuses on teams of two performing quality chest compressions with rescuers on their knees but does not include training specific to In-Hospital Cardiac Arrests (IHCA), i.e. patient in hospital bed with large resuscitation teams and sophisticated technology available. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with the primary goal of evaluating the effectiveness and ideal frequency of in-situ training on time elapsed from call for help to; (1) initiation of chest compressions and (2) successful defibrillation in IHCA. Non-intensive care unit nurses were randomized into four groups: standard AHA training (C) and three groups that participated in 15 min in-situ IHCA training sessions every two (2M), three (3M) or six months (6M). Curriculum included specific choreography for teams to achieve immediate chest compressions, high chest compression fractions and rapid defibrillation while incorporating use of a backboard, stepstool. More frequent training was associated with decreased median (IQR) seconds to: starting compressions: [C: 33(25-40) vs. 6M: 21(15-26) vs. 3M: 14(10-20) vs. 2M: 13(9-20); p training sessions: [C:5%(1/18) vs. 6M: 23%(4/17) vs. 3M: 56%(9/16) vs. 2M: 73%(11/15); p training sessions conducted every 3 months are effective in improving timely initiation of chest compressions and defibrillation in IHCA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The assessment of neonates’ exposure to traumatic factors in the cardiac ward within the first 24 hours of hospitalization

    Grażyna Cepuch

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: During the first 24 hours of hospitalization, neonates with ductus-dependent CHD are exposed to a number of traumatic impulses arising from the need for necessary care and therapeutic procedures. Material and methods: The studied group consisted of neonates in a stable condition, suffering from ductusdependent CHD, monitored from the first to the fifth day of their life. The research involved the observation of 10 patients of the cardiac ward at the University Children’s Hospital. The research was carried out by means of the following methods: observation with available assessment tools, such as author’s questionnaire, CRIES scale, sound level meter and stopper. Results: The total number of all procedures performed on the group of 10 neonates amounted to 622 per day. The average number of invasive procedures per day performed on one patient was 6.6, while the procedures connected with touching averaged at 57.3. The average daily noise level amounted to 72.2 dB; the total daily time of exposure to artificial light averaged at 87 minutes, with the average duration of a single lighting episode lasting 14.6 minutes. The average pain level of a neonate connected with chosen invasive procedures fell between 5 and 7 points in the CRIES scale. Conclusions: The impact of traumatic factors disrupts the process of adaptation, may adversely influence further development of central nervous system, perception and sense organs and disturbs psychological development.

  6. Measurement of total hemoglobin reduces red cell transfusion in hospitalized patients undergoing cardiac surgery: a retrospective database analysis.

    Craver, Christopher; Belk, Kathy W; Myers, Gerard J

    2018-01-01

    Historically, perioperative hemoglobin monitoring has relied on calculated saturation, using blood gas devices that measure plasma hematocrit (Hct). Co-oximetry, which measures total hemoglobin (tHb), yields a more comprehensive assessment of hemodilution. The purpose of this study was to examine the association of tHb measurement by co-oximetry and Hct, using conductivity with red blood cell (RBC) transfusion, length of stay (LOS) and inpatient costs in patients having major cardiac surgery. A retrospective study was conducted on patients who underwent coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) and/or valve replacement (VR) procedures from January 2014 to June 2016, using MedAssets discharge data. The patient population was sub-divided by the measurement modality (tHb and Hct), using detailed billing records and Current Procedural Terminology coding. Cost was calculated using hospital-specific cost-to-charge ratios. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify significant drivers of RBC transfusion and resource utilization. The study population included 18,169 cardiovascular surgery patients. Hct-monitored patients accounted for 66% of the population and were more likely to have dual CABG and VR procedures (10.4% vs 8.9%, p=0.0069). After controlling for patient and hospital characteristics, as well as patient comorbidities, Hct-monitored patients had significantly higher RBC transfusion risk (OR=1.26, CI 1.15-1.38, pcosts (IRR=1.15, pcost (IRR=1.22, pcost compared to Hct monitoring.

  7. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for refractory cardiac arrest

    Steven A Conrad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR is the use of rapid deployment venoarterial (VA extracorporeal membrane oxygenation to support systemic circulation and vital organ perfusion in patients in refractory cardiac arrest not responding to conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. Although prospective controlled studies are lacking, observational studies suggest improved outcomes compared with conventional CPR when ECPR is instituted within 30-60 min following cardiac arrest. Adult and pediatric patients with witnessed in-hospital and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and good quality CPR, failure of at least 15 min of conventional resuscitation, and a potentially reversible cause for arrest are candidates. Percutaneous cannulation where feasible is rapid and can be performed by nonsurgeons (emergency physicians, intensivists, cardiologists, and interventional radiologists. Modern extracorporeal systems are easy to prime and manage and are technically easy to manage with proper training and experience. ECPR can be deployed in the emergency department for out-of-hospital arrest or in various inpatient units for in-hospital arrest. ECPR should be considered for patients with refractory cardiac arrest in hospitals with an existing extracorporeal life support program, able to provide rapid deployment of support, and with resources to provide postresuscitation evaluation and management.

  8. Survival and health care costs until hospital discharge of patients treated with onsite, dispatched or without automated external defibrillator

    Berdowski, Jocelyn; Kuiper, Mathijs J.; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; Koster, Rudolph W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to determine whether automated external defibrillator (AED) use during resuscitation is associated with lower in-hospital health care costs. Methods: For this observational prospective study, we included all treated out-of-hospital cardiac arrests of suspected cardiac

  9. Frequency and echocardiographic study of dilated cardiomyopathy in children presenting with cardiac failure

    Khan, M.A.; Mohammad, J.; Hussain, M.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the role of echocardiography in diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy as a cause of cardiac failure in children. Design: This was descriptive study. Children presenting with cardiac failure from indoor patients were selected and echocardiography along with chest X- ray, ECG, cardiac enzymes and ASO titre was performed in all patients. Subject: Fifty hospitalized patients with congestive heart failure were selected consecutively from hospitalized patients. Main Outcome: Role of echocardiography in the diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy in children presenting with cardiac failure. Results: Out of fifty patients admitted with cardiac failure 27 (54%) cases were found to be dilated cardiomyopathy while congenital heart disease, myocarditis and rheumatic heart disease were found in 12 (24%), 8 (16%) and 3 (6%) cases respectively. Conclusion: Dilated cardiomyopathy is an important cause of cardiac failure in children and echocardiography is an important tool to diagnose and differentiate dilated cardiomyopathy from other causes of cardiac failure. (author)

  10. The cardiac catheterization laboratory personnel TLD dosimetry in Dr. Faghihi Hospital in Shiraz

    Derakhshan, Sh.

    2004-01-01

    In this study all of the personnel of Angiography of Dr.Faghihi hospital used TLD service During 2002-2003. This service was given by center for Radiation Protection and Application of the Shiraz University. These staff were divided in two group, one groups was technicians and the other group was the nurses. The result of this research shows that the maximum dose received to Technicians and nurses were 0.4mSv and 0.55mSV respectively. The average annual dose to technicians and nurses were 0.02 mSv and 0.19 mSv. This result shows that the nurses of this hospital receive more dose than the techniques

  11. The German Birth Order Register - order-specific data generated from perinatal statistics and statistics on out-of-hospital births 2001-2008

    Michaela Kreyenfeld; Rembrandt D. Scholz; Frederik Peters; Ines Wlosnewski

    2010-01-01

    Until 2008, Germany’s vital statistics did not include information on the biological order of each birth. This resulted in a dearth of important demographic indicators, such as the mean age at first birth and the level of childlessness. Researchers have tried to fill this gap by generating order-specific birth rates from survey data, and by combining survey data with vital statistics. This paper takes a different approach by using hospital statistics on births to generate birth order-specific...

  12. Nourishing change. Partnership enlists dozens of hospitals to put healthier food on their menus and kick junk food out of the cafeteria.

    Lee, Jaimy

    2012-10-08

    More than 150 hospitals have signed on to the Partnership for a Healthier America's push to ditch the deep-fat fryer in their cafeterias and bulk up on fruit and veggies. "Our focus is to ensure that if people want to make a healthy choice, they can," says Larry Soler, left, president and CEO of the partnership, which is working to reduce childhood obesity.

  13. Effects of a mandatory basic life support training programme on the no-flow fraction during in-hospital cardiac resuscitation: an observational study.

    Müller, Michael P; Richter, Torsten; Papkalla, Norbert; Poenicke, Cynthia; Herkner, Carsten; Osmers, Anne; Brenner, Sigrid; Koch, Thea; Schwanebeck, Uta; Heller, Axel R

    2014-07-01

    Many hospitals have basic life support (BLS) training programmes, but the effects on the quality of chest compressions are unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the no-flow fraction (NFF) during BLS provided by standard care nursing teams over a five-year observation period during which annual participation in the BLS training was mandatory. All healthcare professionals working at Dresden University Hospital were instructed in BLS and automated external defibrillator (AED) use according to the current European Resuscitation Council guidelines on an annual basis. After each cardiac arrest occurring on a standard care ward, AED data were analyzed. The time without chest compressions during the period without spontaneous circulation (i.e., the no-flow fraction) was calculated using thoracic impedance data. For each year of the study period (2008-2012), a total of 1454, 1466, 1487, 1432, and 1388 health care professionals, respectively, participated in the training. The median no-flow fraction decreased significantly from 0.55 [0.42; 0.57] (median [25‰; 75‰]) in 2008 to 0.3 [0.28; 0.35] in 2012. Following revision of the BLS curriculum after publication of the 2010 guidelines, cardiac arrest was associated with a higher proportion of patients achieving ROSC (72% vs. 48%, P=0.025) but not a higher survival rate to hospital discharge (35% vs. 19%, P=0.073). The NFF during in-hospital cardiac resuscitation decreased after establishment of a mandatory annual BLS training for healthcare professionals. Following publication of the 2010 guidelines, more patients achieved ROSC after in-hospital cardiac arrest. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Utility of heart rate turbulence and T-Wave alternans to assess risk for Re-admission and cardiac death in hospitalized heart failure patients.

    Yamada, Shinya; Yoshihisa, Akiomi; Sato, Yu; Sato, Takamasa; Kamioka, Masashi; Kaneshiro, Takashi; Oikawa, Masayoshi; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Ishida, Takafumi; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2018-05-18

    Heart failure (HF) patients have a higher risk of recurrent HF and cardiac death, and electrical remodeling is considered to be an important factor for HF progression. The present study aimed to validate the utility of electrocardiogram and Holter monitoring for the risk stratification of HF patients. Our study comprised 215 patients (144 males, mean age 62 years) who had been hospitalized due to acute decompensated HF. Electrocardiogram (QRS duration and QTc interval) and 24-hour Holter monitoring (heart rate variability, heart rate turbulence and T-wave alternans [TWA]) were performed in stable condition before discharge. The clinical characteristics and outcomes were then investigated. During a median follow-up period of 2.7 years, there were 83 (38.6%) cardiac events (re-hospitalization due to worsening HF [n = 51] or cardiac death [n = 32]). The patients with cardiac events had a lower turbulence slope (TS) and higher TWA compared to those without cardiac events (TS, 3.0±5.5 ms/RR vs. 5.3±5.6 ms/RR, P = 0.001; TWA, 66.1±19.6 μV vs. 54.7±15.1 μV, P < 0.001). Univariable analysis showed that TS, TWA, QRS duration, and QTc interval were associated with cardiac events (P = 0.004, P < 0.001, P = 0.037 and P = 0.024, respectively), while the multivariable analysis after the adjustment of multiple confounders showed that TS and TWA were independent predictive factors of cardiac events with a hazard ratio of 0.936 and 1.015 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.860-0.974, P = 0.006; and 95% CI: 1.003-1.027, p = 0.016), respectively. The measurement of TS and TWA is useful for assessing risk for re-hospitalization and cardiac death in HF patients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Pre-resuscitation factors associated with mortality in 49,130 cases of in-hospital cardiac arrest: a report from the National Registry for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.

    Larkin, Gregory Luke; Copes, Wayne S; Nathanson, Brian H; Kaye, William

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate key pre-arrest factors and their collective ability to predict post-cardiopulmonary arrest mortality. CPR is often initiated indiscriminately after in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest. Improved understanding of pre-arrest factors associated with mortality may inform advance care planning. A cohort of 49,130 adults who experienced pulseless cardiopulmonary arrest from January 2000 to September 2004 was obtained from 366 US hospitals participating in the National Registry for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (NRCPR). Logistic regression with bootstrapping was used to model in-hospital mortality, which included those discharged in unfavorable and severely worsened neurologic state (Cerebral Performance Category >/=3). Overall in-hospital mortality was 84.1%. Advanced age, black race, non-cardiac, non-surgical illness category, pre-existing malignancy, acute stroke, trauma, septicemia, hepatic insufficiency, general floor or Emergency Department location, and pre-arrest use of vasopressors or assisted/mechanical ventilation were independently predictive of in-hospital mortality. Retained peri-arrest factors including cardiac monitoring, and shockable initial pulseless rhythms, were strongly associated with survival. The validation model's AUROC curve (0.77) revealed fair performance. Predictive pre-resuscitation factors may supplement patient-specific information available at bedside to assist in revising resuscitation plans during the patient's hospitalization. Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  16. Somatic hospital contacts, invasive cardiac procedures, and mortality from heart disease in patients with severe mental disorder.

    Laursen, Thomas Munk; Munk-Olsen, Trine; Agerbo, Esben; Gasse, Christiane; Mortensen, Preben Bo

    2009-07-01

    Excess mortality from heart disease is observed in patients with severe mental disorder. This excess mortality may be rooted in adverse effects of pharmacological or psychotropic treatment, lifestyle factors, or inadequate somatic care. To examine whether persons with severe mental disorder, defined as persons admitted to a psychiatric hospital with bipolar affective disorder, schizoaffective disorder, or schizophrenia, are in contact with hospitals and undergoing invasive procedures for heart disease to the same degree as the nonpsychiatric general population, and to determine whether they have higher mortality rates of heart disease. A population-based cohort of 4.6 million persons born in Denmark was followed up from 1994 to 2007. Rates of mortality, somatic contacts, and invasive procedures were estimated by survival analysis. Incidence rate ratios of heart disease admissions and heart disease mortality as well as probability of invasive cardiac procedures. The incidence rate ratio of heart disease contacts in persons with severe mental disorder compared with the rate for the nonpsychiatric general population was only slightly increased, at 1.11 (95% confidence interval, 1.08-1.14). In contrast, their excess mortality rate ratio from heart disease was 2.90 (95% confidence interval, 2.71-3.10). Five years after the first contact for somatic heart disease, the risk of dying of heart disease was 8.26% for persons with severe mental disorder (aged mental disorder as compared with the nonpsychiatric general population (7.04% vs 12.27%, respectively). Individuals with severe mental disorder had only negligible excess rates of contact for heart disease. Given their excess mortality from heart disease and lower rates of invasive procedures after first contact, it would seem that the treatment for heart disease offered to these individuals in Denmark is neither sufficiently efficient nor sufficiently intensive. This undertreatment may explain part of their excess

  17. Description of hot debriefings after in-hospital cardiac arrests in an international pediatric quality improvement collaborative.

    Sweberg, Todd; Sen, Anita I; Mullan, Paul C; Cheng, Adam; Knight, Lynda; Del Castillo, Jimena; Ikeyama, Takanari; Seshadri, Roopa; Hazinski, Mary Fran; Raymond, Tia; Niles, Dana E; Nadkarni, Vinay; Wolfe, Heather

    2018-05-22

    The American Heart Association recommends debriefing after attempted resuscitation from in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) to improve resuscitation quality and outcomes. This is the first published study detailing the utilization, process and content of hot debriefings after pediatric IHCA. Using prospective data from the Pediatric Resuscitation Quality Collaborative (pediRES-Q), we analyzed data from 227 arrests occurring between February 1, 2016, and August 31, 2017. Hot debriefings, defined as occurring within minutes to hours of IHCA, were evaluated using a modified Team Emergency Assessment Measure framework for qualitative content analysis of debriefing comments. Hot debriefings were performed following 108 of 227 IHCAs (47%). The median interval to debriefing was 130 min (Interquartile range [IQR] 45, 270). Median debriefing duration was 15 min (IQR 10, 20). Physicians facilitated 95% of debriefings, with a median of 9 participants (IQR 7, 11). After multivariate analysis, accounting for hospital site, debriefing frequency was not associated with patient age, gender, race, illness category or unit type. The most frequent positive (plus) comments involved cooperation/coordination (60%), communication (47%) and clinical standards (41%). The most frequent negative (delta) comments involved equipment (46%), cooperation/coordination (45%), and clinical standards (36%). Approximately half of pediatric IHCAs were followed by hot debriefings. Hot debriefings were multi-disciplinary, timely, and often addressed issues of team cooperation/coordination, communication, clinical standards, and equipment. Additional studies are warranted to identify barriers to hot debriefings and to evaluate the impact of these debriefings on patient outcomes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Assessment Of Nurses Performance During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation In Intensive Care Unit And Cardiac Care Unit At The Alexandria Main University Hospital.

    Dr. Nagla Hamdi Kamal Khalil El- Meanawi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiopulmonary resuscitation one of the most emergency management the nurse has a pivotal role and should be highly qualified in performing these procedures. The aim of the study is to assess performance of nurses during Cardio pulmonary resuscitation for patient with cardiac arrest In Intensive Care Unit and Cardiac Care Unit at the Alexandria main university hospital. To answer the question what are the most common area of satisfactory and area of neglection in nurses performance during Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation. The sample consists of 53 staff nurses working in Intensive care unit amp cardiac care unit at Alexandria main university hospital. The tools of data collection were structured of questionnaire sheet and observational cheek list. The results showed that unsatisfactory performance between nurses in both units. The study concluded that all nurses need to improve their performance during cardiopulmonary resuscitation for patient with cardiac arrest it is crucial for nursing staff to participate in CPR courses in order to refresh and update their theoretical knowledge and performance skills and consequently to improve the safety and effectiveness of care. The study recommended that continuous evaluation of nurses knowledge and performance is essential the optimal frequency with which CPR training should be implemented at least every 6 months in order to avoid deterioration in nurses CPR knowledge and skills.

  19. Effectiveness of the clinical pharmacist in reducing mortality in hospitalized cardiac patients: a propensity score-matched analysis

    Zhai XB

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Xiao-bo Zhai,1 Zhi-chun Gu,2 Xiao-yan Liu2 1Department of Pharmacy, Shanghai East Hospital, Affiliated to Tongji University School of Medicine, 2Department of Pharmacy, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Background: Pharmacist-led medication review services have been assessed in the meta-analyses in hospital. Of the 135 relevant articles located, 21 studies met the inclusion criteria; however, there was no statistically significant difference found between pharmacists’ interventions and usual care for mortality (odds ratio 1.50, 95% confidence interval 0.65, 3.46, P=0.34. These analyses may not have found a statistically significant effect because they did not adequately control the wide variation in the delivery of care and patient selection parameters. Additionally, the investigators did not conduct research on the cases of death specifically and did not identify all possible drug-related problems (DRPs that could cause or contribute to mortality and then convince physicians to correct. So there will be a condition to use a more precise approach to evaluate the effect of clinical pharmacist interventions on the mortality rates of hospitalized cardiac patients. Objective: To evaluate the impact of the clinical pharmacist as a direct patient-care team member on the mortality of all patients admitted to the cardiology unit. Methods: A comparative study was conducted in a cardiology unit of a university-affiliated hospital. The clinical pharmacists did not perform any intervention associated with improper use of medications during Phase I (preintervention and consulted with the physicians to address the DRPs during Phase II (postintervention. The two phases were compared to evaluate the outcome, and propensity score (PS matching was applied to enhance the comparability. The primary endpoint of the study was the composite of all-cause mortality during Phase I and Phase II

  20. Effects of a Structured Discharge Planning Program on Perceived Functional Status, Cardiac Self-efficacy, Patient Satisfaction, and Unexpected Hospital Revisits Among Filipino Cardiac Patients: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    Cajanding, Ruff Joseph

    Cardiovascular diseases remain the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among Filipinos and are responsible for a very large number of hospital readmissions. Comprehensive discharge planning programs have demonstrated positive benefits among various populations of patients with cardiovascular disease, but the clinical and psychosocial effects of such intervention among Filipino patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) have not been studied. In this study we aimed to determine the effectiveness of a nurse-led structured discharge planning program on perceived functional status, cardiac self-efficacy, patient satisfaction, and unexpected hospital revisits among Filipino patients with AMI. A true experimental (randomized control) 2-group design with repeated measures and data collected before and after intervention and at 1-month follow-up was used in this study. Participants were assigned to either the control (n = 68) or the intervention group (n = 75). Intervention participants underwent a 3-day structured discharge planning program implemented by a cardiovascular nurse practitioner, which is comprised of a series of individualized lecture-discussion, provision of feedback, integrative problem solving, goal setting, and action planning. Control participants received standard routine care. Measures of functional status, cardiac self-efficacy, and patient satisfaction were measured at baseline; cardiac self-efficacy and patient satisfaction scores were measured prior to discharge, and perceived functional status and number of revisits were measured 1 month after discharge. Participants in the intervention group had significant improvement in functional status, cardiac self-efficacy, and patient satisfaction scores at baseline and at follow-up compared with the control participants. Furthermore, participants in the intervention group had significantly fewer hospital revisits compared with those who received only standard care. The results demonstrate that a

  1. Factors affecting the development of adverse drug reactions to β-blockers in hospitalized cardiac patient population

    Mugoša S

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Snežana Mugoša,1,2 Nataša Djordjević,3 Nina Djukanović,4 Dragana Protić,5 Zoran Bukumirić,6 Ivan Radosavljević,7 Aneta Bošković,8 Zoran Todorović5,9 1Department of Pharmacotherapy, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Montenegro, 2Clinical Trial Department, Agency for Medicines and Medical Devices of Montenegro, Podgorica, Montenegro; 3Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Kragujevac, Kragujevac, 4High Medical School “Milutin Milanković”, Belgrade, 5Department of Pharmacology, Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, 6Institute for Medical Statistics and Informatics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, 7Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Kragujevac, Kragujevac, Serbia; 8Clinic for Heart Diseases, Clinical Centre of Montenegro, Podgorica, Montenegro; 9Department of Clinical Immunology and Allergy, Medical Center “Bežanijska kosa”, Belgrade, Serbia Abstract: The aim of the present study was to undertake a study on the prevalence of cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6 poor metabolizer alleles (*3, *4, *5, and *6 on a Montenegrin population and its impact on developing adverse drug reactions (ADRs of β-blockers in a hospitalized cardiac patient population. A prospective study was conducted in the Cardiology Center of the Clinical Center of Montenegro and included 138 patients who had received any β-blocker in their therapy. ADRs were collected using a specially designed questionnaire, based on the symptom list and any signs that could point to eventual ADRs. Data from patients’ medical charts, laboratory tests, and other available parameters were observed and combined with the data from the questionnaire. ADRs to β-blockers were observed in 15 (10.9% patients. There was a statistically significant difference in the frequency of ADRs in relation to genetically determined enzymatic activity (P<0.001, with ADRs’ occurrence significantly

  2. Hospital-based versus hybrid cardiac rehabilitation program in coronary bypass surgery patients in western Iran: effects on exercise capacity, risk factors, psychological factors, and quality of life.

    Najafi, Farid; Nalini, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of alternative delivery models for a cardiac rehabilitation program (CRP) in low- and middle-income countries is not well documented. This study compared the traditional hospital-based CRP with a hybrid CRP in western Iran. This observational study was conducted with postcoronary surgery patients in Imam-Ali Hospital in Kermanshah, Iran. Both program models included 2 phases: (1) a common preliminary phase (2-4 weeks) involving exercise training and a plan to control cardiac risk factors; and (2) a complementary phase (8 weeks) consisting of group educational classes and exercise training conducted 3 times a week in the hospital or once a week accompanied by phone calls in the hybrid program. Changes in exercise capacity, blood pressure, lipids, resting heart rate, body mass index, waist circumference, smoking, depression, anxiety, and quality of life as well as differences in attendance at hospital sessions were investigated. From a total of 887 patients, 780 (87.9%) completed the programs. There was no association between course completion and type of CRP. Mean age of patients completing the programs was 55.6 ± 8.7 years and 23.8% were female. The hospital-based (n = 585) and hybrid (n = 195) programs resulted in a significant increase in exercise capacity (P countries where there are no appropriate health facilities in remote areas.

  3. Role of cardiac biomarkers (troponin I and CK-MB as predictors of quality of life and long-term outcome after cardiac surgery

    Bignami Elena

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Perioperative and postoperative morbidity and mortality associated with cardiac surgery affect both the outcome and quality of life. Markers such as troponin effectively predict short-term outcome. In a prospective cohort study in a University Hospital we assessed the role of cardiac biomarkers, also as predictors of long-term outcome and life quality after cardiac surgery with a three-year follow-up after conventional heart surgery. Patients were interviewed via phone calls with a structured questionnaire examining general health, functional status, activities of daily living, perception of life quality and need for hospital readmission. Descriptive statistics and multivariate analysis were performed. Out of 252 consecutive patients, 8 (3.2% died at the three years follow up: 7 for cardiac complications and 1 for cancer. Thirty-six patients (13.5% had hospital readmission for cardiac causes (mostly for atrial fibrillation or other arrhythmias (9.3%, but none needed cardiac surgical reintervention; 21 patients (7.9% were hospitalised for non-cardiac causes. No limitation in function activities of daily living was reported by most patients (94%, 92% perceived their general health as excellent, very good or good and none considered it insufficient; 80% were NYHA I, 17% NYHA II, 3% NYHA III and none NYHA IV. Multivariate analysis indicated preoperative treatment with digitalis or nitrates, and postoperative cardiac biomarkers release was independently associated to death. Elevated cardiac biomarker release and length of hospital stay were the only postoperative independent predictors of death in this study.

  4. More care out of hospital? A qualitative exploration of the factors influencing the development of the district nursing workforce in England.

    Drennan, Vari M

    2018-01-01

    Objectives Many countries seek to improve care for people with chronic conditions and increase delivery of care outside of hospitals, including in the home. Despite these policy objectives in the United Kingdom, the home visiting nursing service workforce, known as district nursing, is declining. This study aimed to investigate the factors influencing the development of district nursing workforces in a metropolitan area of England. Methods A qualitative study in a metropolitan area of three million residents in diverse socio-economic communities using semi-structured interviews with a purposive sample of senior nurses in provider and commissioning organizations. Thematic analysis was framed by theories of workforce development. All participants reported that the context for the district nursing service was one of major reorganizations in the face of wider National Health Service changes and financial pressures. The analysis identified five themes that can be seen to impact the ways in which the district nursing workforce was developed. These were: the challenge of recruitment and retention, a changing case-mix of patients and the requirement for different clinical skills, the growth of specialist home visiting nursing services and its impact on generalist nursing, the capacity of the district nursing service to meet growing demand, and the influence of the short-term service commissioning process on the need for long-term workforce development. Conclusion There is an apparent paradox between health policies which promote more care within and closer to home and the reported decline in district nursing services. Using the lens of workforce development theory, an explanatory framework was offered with factors such as the nature of the nursing labour market, human resource practices, career advancement opportunities as well as the contractual context and the economic environment.

  5. Uso do desfibrilador automático externo no ambiente pré-hospitalar peruano: melhorando a resposta a emergências na América Latina Use of automated external defibrillator in Peruvian out-of-hospital environment: improving emergency response in Latin America

    Pablo Lister

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Este relato de caso reporta o atendimento pré-hospitalar de um paciente com fatores de risco atendido pelo serviço pré-hospitalar ao ser acometido por uma parada cardíaca e apresentar fibrilação ventricular. O paciente foi atendido seguindo os padrões de suporte básico de vida e suporte cardiovascular avançado. Um desfibrilador automático externo (DAE foi aplicado com resultados favoráveis e o paciente se recuperou do quadro de perigo de vida com sucesso. Este é o primeiro relato documentado com resultados favoráveis no Peru, na área de atendimento pré-hospitalar e enfatiza a necessidade de serem adotadas políticas de acesso público à desfibrilação precoce.El presente reporte de caso, relata la atencion prehospitalaria de un paciente con factores de riesgo atendido en el area prehospitalaria al sufrir arresto cardiaco y presentar fibrilacion ventricular. El paciente fue atendido bajo estandares de Soporte Basico Vital y Soporte Cardiovascular Avanzado Vital, se aplico un Desfibrilador Automatizado Externo (DEA con resultado favorable y exito al recuperar al paciente de su condicion de compromiso de vida. Este es el primer reporte documentado con resultado favorable en el pais, en el area prehospitalaria y refuerza la conveniencia de adoptar politicas de Acceso Publico a la Desfibrilacion Temprana.This case report relates out-of-hospital care to a patient with risk factors treated in the out-of-hospital services after cardiac arrest and ventricular fibrillation. The patient was treated according to the standards of basic life support and advanced cardiovascular life support; by applying an automated external defibrillator (AED with favorable outcome and successful recovery of the patient from his risk of life condition. This is the first documented report with a favorable outcome in Peru, in out-of-hospital services and stresses the desirability of adopting policies for public access to early defibrillation.

  6. Factors associated with prolonged length of stay following cardiac surgery in a major referral hospital in Oman: a retrospective observational study.

    Almashrafi, Ahmed; Alsabti, Hilal; Mukaddirov, Mirdavron; Balan, Baskaran; Aylin, Paul

    2016-06-08

    Two objectives were set for this study. The first was to identify factors influencing prolonged postoperative length of stay (LOS) following cardiac surgery. The second was to devise a predictive model for prolonged LOS in the cardiac intensive care unit (CICU) based on preoperative factors available at admission and to compare it against two existing cardiac stratification systems. Observational retrospective study. A tertiary hospital in Oman. All adult patients who underwent cardiac surgery at a major referral hospital in Oman between 2009 and 2013. 30.5% of the patients had prolonged LOS (≥11 days) after surgery, while 17% experienced prolonged ICU LOS (≥5 days). Factors that were identified to prolong CICU LOS were non-elective surgery, current congestive heart failure (CHF), renal failure, combined coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) and valve surgery, and other non-isolated valve or CABG surgery. Patients were divided into three groups based on their scores. The probabilities of prolonged CICU LOS were 11%, 26% and 28% for group 1, 2 and 3, respectively. The predictive model had an area under the curve of 0.75. Factors associated with prolonged overall postoperative LOS included the body mass index, the