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Sample records for osu nathan casebeer

  1. BOOSTING LY α   AND He ii λ 1640 LINE FLUXES FROM POPULATION III GALAXIES: STOCHASTIC IMF SAMPLING AND DEPARTURES FROM CASE-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mas-Ribas, Lluís; Dijkstra, Mark; Forero-Romero, Jaime E.

    2016-01-01

    We revisit calculations of nebular hydrogen Ly α and He ii λ 1640 line strengths for Population III (Pop III) galaxies, undergoing continuous, and bursts of, star formation. We focus on initial mass functions (IMFs) motivated by recent theoretical studies, which generally span a lower range of stellar masses than earlier works. We also account for case-B departures and the stochastic sampling of the IMF. In agreement with previous work, we find that departures from case-B can enhance the Ly α flux by a factor of a few, but we argue that this enhancement is driven mainly by collisional excitation and ionization, and not due to photoionization from the n  = 2 state of atomic hydrogen. The increased sensitivity of the Ly α flux to the high-energy end of the galaxy spectrum makes it more subject to stochastic sampling of the IMF. The latter introduces a dispersion in the predicted nebular line fluxes around the deterministic value by as much as a factor of ∼4. In contrast, the stochastic sampling of the IMF has less impact on the emerging Lyman Werner photon flux. When case-B departures and stochasticity effects are combined, nebular line emission from Pop III galaxies can be up to one order of magnitude brighter than predicted by “standard” calculations that do not include these effects. This enhances the prospects for detection with future facilities such as the James Webb Space Telescope and large, ground-based telescopes.

  2. Boosting Lyα and He II λ1640 Line Fluxes from Population III Galaxies: Stochastic IMF Sampling and Departures from Case-B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas-Ribas, Lluís; Dijkstra, Mark; Forero-Romero, Jaime E.

    2016-12-01

    We revisit calculations of nebular hydrogen Lyα and He II λ1640 line strengths for Population III (Pop III) galaxies, undergoing continuous, and bursts of, star formation. We focus on initial mass functions (IMFs) motivated by recent theoretical studies, which generally span a lower range of stellar masses than earlier works. We also account for case-B departures and the stochastic sampling of the IMF. In agreement with previous work, we find that departures from case-B can enhance the Lyα flux by a factor of a few, but we argue that this enhancement is driven mainly by collisional excitation and ionization, and not due to photoionization from the n = 2 state of atomic hydrogen. The increased sensitivity of the Lyα flux to the high-energy end of the galaxy spectrum makes it more subject to stochastic sampling of the IMF. The latter introduces a dispersion in the predicted nebular line fluxes around the deterministic value by as much as a factor of ˜4. In contrast, the stochastic sampling of the IMF has less impact on the emerging Lyman Werner photon flux. When case-B departures and stochasticity effects are combined, nebular line emission from Pop III galaxies can be up to one order of magnitude brighter than predicted by “standard” calculations that do not include these effects. This enhances the prospects for detection with future facilities such as the James Webb Space Telescope and large, ground-based telescopes.

  3. Nuclear chemistry, the MET Lab, and Nathan Sugarman - A retrospective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinberg, E.P.

    1991-01-01

    The evolution of nuclear chemistry will be traced briefly, with special emphasis on the exciting and highly productive period of the war-time Metallurgical Laboratory from 1942 to 1946. In particular, the Fission Product Radiochemistry section at The University of Chicago, which underwent sequential fissions of its own to Oak Ridge and Los Alamos, will provide a major focus. The post-war spread of nuclear chemistry throughout the country and the establishment of the National Laboratories provided the setting for the Golden Age of the field. Throughout this period, the personality and character of Nathan Sugarman was clearly evident. Whether as teacher, researcher, colleague, critic, counselor, friend, or acquaintance, Sug's intelligence, warmth, humor, high standards, and quiet leadership make a lasting impression on a generation of nuclear chemists

  4. Scaling analysis for the OSU AP600 test facility (APEX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes, J.N.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, the authors summarize the key aspects of a state-of-the-art scaling analysis (Reyes et al. (1995)) performed to establish the facility design and test conditions for the advanced plant experiment (APEX) at Oregon State University (OSU). This scaling analysis represents the first, and most comprehensive, application of the hierarchical two-tiered scaling (H2TS) methodology (Zuber (1991)) in the design of an integral system test facility. The APEX test facility, designed and constructed on the basis of this scaling analysis, is the most accurate geometric representation of a Westinghouse AP600 nuclear steam supply system. The OSU APEX test facility has served to develop an essential component of the integral system database used to assess the AP600 thermal hydraulic safety analysis computer codes. (orig.)

  5. The story of the man who bore my name / Nathan Kukk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kukk, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Peapiiskop Jakob Kuke poja Nathan Kuke kirjutatud põnev lugu sellest, kuidas tal peaaegu oli võimalik kohtuda Juhan Kuke poja Nthan Kukega, kudi iga kord oli nimekaim kuidagi mingi l põhjusel kas puhkusel või veidi varem samas paigas viibinud, kuid juba sealt lahkunud

  6. Activation of AMPK by OSU53 protects spinal cord neurons from oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Wu, Liang; Zhang, Yiming; Gu, Huijie; Huang, Zhongyue; Zhou, Kaifeng; Yin, Xiaofan

    2017-12-22

    The present study tested the potential effect of OSU53, a novel AMPK activator, against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced spinal cord neuron damages. Treatment with OSU53 attenuated H2O2-induced death and apoptosis of primary murine spinal cord neurons. OSU53 activated AMPK signaling, which is required for its actions in spinal cord neurons. The AMPK inhibitor Compound C or AMPKα1 siRNA almost abolished OSU53-mediated neuroprotection against H2O2. On the other hand, sustained-activation of AMPK by introducing the constitutive-active AMPKα1 mimicked OSU53's actions, and protected spinal cord neurons from oxidative stress. OSU53 significantly attenuated H2O2-induced reactive oxygen species production, lipid peroxidation and DNA damages in spinal cord neurons. Additionally, OSU53 increased NADPH content and heme oxygenase-1 mRNA expression in H2O2-treated spinal cord neurons. Together, we indicate that targeted-activation of AMPK by OSU53 protects spinal cord neurons from oxidative stress.

  7. The effects of the dopamine stabilizer (-)-OSU6162 on aggressive and sexual behavior in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, E; Näslund, J; Westman, A; Carlsson, A; Eriksson, E

    2016-03-22

    The dopamine stabilizer (-)-OSU61612 dampens locomotion in rodents rendered hyperactive by exposure to a novel environment or treatment with amphetamine, but stimulates locomotion in habituated animals displaying low motor activity, tentatively exerting this profile by selectively blocking extrasynaptic D2 receptors. The major aim of the present study was to explore the possible usefulness of (-)-OSU61612 as an anti-aggressive drug. To this end, the effect of (-)-OSU61612 on isolation-induced aggression in male mice and estrous cycle-dependent aggression in female rats were studied using the resident intruder test; in addition, the possible influence of (-)-OSU61612 on sexual behavior in male mice and on elevated plus maze (EPM) performance in male rats were assessed. (-)-OSU61612 at doses influencing neither locomotion nor sexual activity reduced aggression in male mice. The effect was observed also in serotonin-depleted animals and is hence probably not caused by the antagonism of serotonin receptors displayed by the drug; refuting the possibility that it is due to 5-HT1B activation, it was also not counteracted by isamoltane. (-)-OSU61612 did not display the profile of an anxiogenic or anxiolytic drug in the EPM but caused a general reduction in activity that is well in line with the previous finding that it reduces exploratory behavior of non-habituated animals. In line with the observations in males, (-)-OSU61612 reduced estrus cycle-related aggression in female Wistar rats, a tentative animal model of premenstrual dysphoria. By stabilizing dopaminergic transmission, (-)-OSU61612 may prove useful as a well-tolerated treatment of various forms of aggression and irritability.

  8. Model development for the dynamic analysis of the OSU inherently safe reactor. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aybar, H.S.

    1992-01-01

    Faculty and students in the Nuclear Engineering Program at the Ohio State University (OSU) have proposed a conceptual design for an inherently safe 340 MWe power reactor. The design is based on the state-of-the-art technology of LWRs and the High Temperature Gas- cooled Reactors (HTGRs). The OSU Inherently Safe Reactor (OSU-ISR) concept uses shorter than standard BWR fuel elements in the reactor core. All the fluid on the primary side is contained within a Prestressed Concrete Reactor Vessel (PCRV). This important feature significantly reduces the probability of a LOCA. A new feature of the OSU-ISR is an operator independent steam driven Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) housed within the PCRV. In accident conditions where the steam generators are incapacitated, steam from the core drives a jet injector, which takes water from the suppression pool and pumps it into the core cavity to maintain core coverability. The preliminary analysis of the concept was performed as a design project in the Nuclear Engineering Program at the OSU during the Spring of 1985, and published in ''Nuclear Technology.'' The use of a PCRV for ducting and containment and the replacement of forced recirculation with natural circulation on the primary side significantly improve the inherent safety of the plant. Currently, work is in progress for the refinement of the OSU-ISR concept, partially supported by a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy

  9. Interactional and Categorial Practices in the Strange Case of the United Nathans Weapons Inspections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIlvenny, Paul

    -conducts’. In this paper, the interactional practices of a prefigurative protest demonstration are examined. Video recordings were made of a creative, peaceful event called “United Nathans Weapons Inspections” in February 2003. The paper draws upon Mitchell Dean’s analytics of government in order to undertake an analytics...... of protest by uncovering how fields of visibility, forms of knowledge, technologies and apparatuses, and subjectivities and identities are negotiated and accomplished collaboratively in social interaction. The paper explores some of the tools and methods that are well suited to investigating the situated...... work by which subjectivation is morally accomplished in social interaction. The paper shows how CA and MCA can help trace the interactional, embodied and categorial practices that are endogenous to conducting the conduct of others and the self, and thus which constitute or contest the rationalities...

  10. The substituted (S)-3-phenylpiperidine (-)-OSU6162 reduces apomorphine- and amphetamine-induced behaviour in Cebus apella monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt-Christensen, Anne Mette; Andersen, M B; Fink-Jensen, A

    2006-01-01

    Low affinity dopamine (DA) D2 antagonists such as the substituted (S)-3-phenylpiperidine (-)-OSU6162 have been proposed to be putative antipsychotic agents not endowed with extrapyramidal side effects (EPS). In the present study we investigated the effects of (-)-OSU6162 on (-)-apomorphine and d-...

  11. Decomposing change in life expectancy : A bouquet of formulas in honor of Nathan Keyfitz's 90th birthday

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaupel, JW; Romo, VC

    We extend Nathan Keyfitz research on continuous change in life expectancy over time by presenting and proving a new formula for decomposing such change. The formula separates change in life expectancy over time into two terms. The first term captures the general effect of reduction in death rates at

  12. The substituted (S)-3-phenylpiperidine (-)-OSU6162 reduces apomorphine- and amphetamine-induced behaviour in Cebus apella monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt-Christensen, M; Andersen, M B; Fink-Jensen, A

    2006-01-01

    -amphetamine-induced behaviours in EPS sensitised Cebus apella monkeys. (-)-OSU6162 was administered subcutaneously in doses of 1, 3, 6 and 9 mg/kg alone and in combination with (-)-apomorphine (0.25 mg/kg) or d-amphetamine (0.5 mg/kg). (-)-OSU6162 inhibited (-)-apomorphine-(1-9 mg/kg) as well as d-amphetamine (3-9 mg....../kg)-induced arousal and stereotypy. EPS did not occur when (-)-OSU6162 was administered in combination with (-)-apomorphine or d-amphetamine. However, when (-)-OSU6162 was administered alone, dystonia was observed at high doses (6 and 9 mg/kg) in two out of six monkeys. The present study shows that (-)-OSU6162 can...

  13. Simulating wall and corner fire tests on wood products with the OSU room fire model

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. C. Tran

    1994-01-01

    This work demonstrates the complexity of modeling wall and corner fires in a compartment. The model chosen for this purpose is the Ohio State University (OSU) room fire model. This model was designed to simulate fire growth on walls in a compartment and therefore lends itself to direct comparison with standard room test results. The model input were bench-scale data...

  14. The effect of Bacillus sp. OSU-142 inoculation at various levels of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-15

    Sep 15, 2009 ... The effect of Bacillus sp. OSU-142 inoculation at various levels of nitrogen fertilization on growth, tuber distribution and yield of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) Zehra Ekin1*, Faruk Oğuz1, Murat Erman1 and Erdal Öğün2. 1Yüzüncü Yıl University, Faculty of Agriculture, Department of Field Crops, Van, ...

  15. OSU-2S/sorafenib synergistic antitumor combination against hepatocellular carcinoma: The role of PKCδ/p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hany A Omar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sorafenib (Nexavar® is an FDA-approved systemic therapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. However, the low efficacy and adverse effects at high doses limit the clinical application of sorafenib and strongly recommend its combination with other agents aiming at ameliorating its drawbacks. OSU-2S, a PKCδ activator, was selected as a potential candidate anticancer agent to be combined with sorafenib to promote the anti-cancer activity through synergistic interaction. Methods: The antitumor effects of sorafenib, OSU-2S and their combination were assessed by MTT assay, caspase activation, Western blotting, migration/invasion assays in four different HCC cell lines. The synergistic interactions were determined by Calcusyn analysis. PKCδ knockdown was used to elucidate the role of PKCδ activation as a mechanism for the synergy. The knockdown/over-expression of p53 was used to explain the differential sensitivity of HCC cell lines to sorafenib and/or OSU-2S. Results: OSU-2S synergistically enhanced the anti-proliferative effects of sorafenib in the four used HCC cell lines with combination indices < 1. This effect was accompanied by parallel increases in caspase 3/7 activity, PARP cleavage, PKCδ activation and HCC cell migration/invasion. In addition, PKCδ knockdown abolished the synergy between sorafenib and OSU-2S. Furthermore, p53 restoration in Hep3B cells through the over-expression rendered them more sensitive to both agents while p53 knockdown from HepG2 cells increased their resistance to both agents. Conclusions: OSU-2S augments the anti-proliferative effect of sorafenib in HCC cell lines, in part, through the activation of PKCδ. The p53 status in HCC cells predicts their sensitivity towards both sorafenib and OSU-2S. The proposed combination represents a therapeutically relevant approach that can lead to a new HCC therapeutic protocol.

  16. Albert Einstein, Boris Podolsky, Nathan Rosen. Can the quantum mechanical description of the physical reality be considered as complete?; Albert Einstein, Boris Podolsky, Nathan Rosen. Kann die quantenmechanische Beschreibung der physikalischen Realitaet als vollstaendig betrachtet werden?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiefer, Claus (ed.) [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2015-07-01

    The year 2015 marks not only the centenary anniversary around the general relativity theory, but also the octogenary anniversary around one of the most effective works of theoretical physics: The work of Albert Einstein, Boris Podolsky, and Nathan Rosen (EPR) from the year 1935 reprinted and commented here. In the commented edition present here not only the historical context and the effect history of this work are drawn after in detail but also the effects on modern research and the still discussed theoretical foundations of quantum theory. Reprinted are beyond the German translation of the EPR work also the translation of Bohr's subsequent work with the same title from the same year as well Einstein's article for the journal Dialectica written 1948 in German.

  17. Albert Einstein, Boris Podolsky, Nathan Rosen. Can the quantum mechanical description of the physical reality be considered as complete?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefer, Claus

    2015-01-01

    The year 2015 marks not only the centenary anniversary around the general relativity theory, but also the octogenary anniversary around one of the most effective works of theoretical physics: The work of Albert Einstein, Boris Podolsky, and Nathan Rosen (EPR) from the year 1935 reprinted and commented here. In the commented edition present here not only the historical context and the effect history of this work are drawn after in detail but also the effects on modern research and the still discussed theoretical foundations of quantum theory. Reprinted are beyond the German translation of the EPR work also the translation of Bohr's subsequent work with the same title from the same year as well Einstein's article for the journal Dialectica written 1948 in German.

  18. Methods of reducing liquid effluent from the OSU TRIGA MKII Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higginbotham, J.F.; Dodd, B.; Pratt, D.S.; Smith, S.; Anderson, T.V.

    1992-01-01

    In 1991, the OSU Radiation Center implemented a program to minimize the liquid effluent generated by the reactor facility. The goal of program is to become a 'zero' release facility with regards to routine liquid discharges. Only two liquid waste streams exist for the OSU reactor facility: discharges resulting from changing resin in the deminerializer and decontamination of equipment, primarily sample loading tubes. This paper describes a system which allows remote resin exchange to performed with the collection of all flush water. This water is then recycled for use as makeup for the primary water system. The service life of the resin is maximized by using a steam distillation unit as the source of makeup water to the deminerializer system instead of water coming directly from the City of Corvallis water supply. The second source of liquid waste water comes from the decontamination of the plastic loading tubes used to encapsulate samples. This process originally involved placing the tubes in a dishwasher and sending the discharge to a hold up tank. If the radionuclide concentrations in the tank were below the maximum permissible concentrations of 10CFR20 then it was released to the sanitary sewerage. This process was replaced in 1991 with a system which involved manual washing and rinsing of the tubes with the liquids being absorbed for disposal as solid waste. This paper will also describe the system which is being built to replace this process. It will use the dishwasher unit again but the liquid discharge will collected for absorption and disposal as solid waste. (author)

  19. GPA/GPSA/OSU-Okmulgee natural gas compression technician training program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doede, S.

    1999-07-01

    Approximately one year ago, OSU-Okmulgee and the Gas Processors Association began discussions about the possibility of developing a natural Gas Technician Training Program for GPA members. Following a presentation to the Membership and Services Committee, Chairman John Ehlers solicited and obtained the approval of the GPA Executive Committee to sponsor the program. Participation in the program was also made available to GPSA members. The purpose of the program is to upgrade the technical competency and professional level of incoming natural gas compression technicians. It educates students to analytically diagnose, service and maintain gas compression equipment and systems using industry recommended procedures, special tools and service information. It also provides course content, which will enable successful graduates to advance in position after additional experience, and to understand new systems, technologies and components as they are introduced. The two-year Associate-In-Applied Science Degree program includes six successive college semesters. Nearly one-half of the time is designated for technical/academic education at Oklahoma State University-Okmulgee with the balance of time allocated for on-the-job internship experiences at sponsoring GPA/GPSA members. Each block of technical education and general education course work is followed by an immediate work experience time period designated to reinforce the technical and general education. These time periods are approximately seven and one-half weeks in length each. It is essential for the success of the students and the program that the students' education at OSU-Okmulgee and work experiences at GPA/GPSA member facilities be closely aligned for maximum student learning and retention. In addition to technical classes on gas compression equipment and components, the courses offered in math, speech, technical writing, psychology and ethics for example, prepare students to be able to communicate well, get

  20. Archive of Geosample Data and Information from the Oregon State University (OSU) College of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences (CEOAS) Marine Geology Repository (MGR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Oregon State University Marine Geology Repository (OSU-MGR) is a partner in the Index to Marine and Lacustrine Geological Samples (IMLGS) database, contributing...

  1. The OSU1/QUA2/TSD2-encoded putative methyltransferase is a critical modulator of carbon and nitrogen nutrient balance response in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Gao

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The balance between carbon (C and nitrogen (N nutrients must be tightly coordinated so that cells can optimize their opportunity for metabolism, growth and development. However, the C and N nutrient balance perception and signaling mechanism remains poorly understood. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of two allelic oversensitive to sugar 1 mutants (osu1-1, osu1-2 in Arabidopsis thaliana. Using the cotyledon anthocyanin accumulation and root growth inhibition assays, we show that the osu1 mutants are more sensitive than wild-type to both of the imbalanced C/N conditions, high C/low N and low C/high N. However, under the balanced C/N conditions (low C/low N or high C/high N, the osu1 mutants have similar anthocyanin levels and root lengths as wild-type. Consistently, the genes encoding two MYB transcription factors (MYB75 and MYB90 and an Asn synthetase isoform (ASN1 are strongly up-regulated by the OSU1 mutation in response to high C/low N and low C/high N, respectively. Furthermore, the enhanced sensitivity of osu1-1 to high C/low N with respect to anthocyanin accumulation but not root growth inhibition can be suppressed by co-suppression of MYB75, indicating that MYB75 acts downstream of OSU1 in the high C/low N imbalance response. Map-based cloning reveals that OSU1 encodes a member of a large family of putative methyltransferases and is allelic to the recently reported QUA2/TSD2 locus identified in genetic screens for cell-adhesion-defective mutants. Accumulation of OSU1/QUA2/TSD2 transcript was not regulated by C and N balance, but the OSU1 promoter was slightly more active in the vascular system. Taken together, our results show that the OSU1/QUA2/TSD2-encoded putative methyltransferase is required for normal C/N nutrient balance response in plants.

  2. OSU-A9 inhibits angiogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells via disrupting Akt–NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omar, Hany A. [Division of Medicinal Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef 62514 (Egypt); Arafa, El-Shaimaa A. [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef 62514 (Egypt); Salama, Samir A. [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Al-Azhar University, Cairo 11511 (Egypt); Arab, Hany H. [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Cairo University, Cairo 11562 (Egypt); Wu, Chieh-Hsi, E-mail: chhswu@mail.cmu.edu.tw [School of Pharmacy, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Weng, Jing-Ru, E-mail: columnster@gmail.com [Department of Biological Science and Technology, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China)

    2013-11-01

    Since the introduction of angiogenesis as a useful target for cancer therapy, few agents have been approved for clinical use due to the rapid development of resistance. This problem can be minimized by simultaneous targeting of multiple angiogenesis signaling pathways, a potential strategy in cancer management known as polypharmacology. The current study aimed at exploring the anti-angiogenic activity of OSU-A9, an indole-3-carbinol-derived pleotropic agent that targets mainly Akt–nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling which regulates many key players of angiogenesis such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were used to study the in vitro anti-angiogenic effect of OSU-A9 on several key steps of angiogenesis. Results showed that OSU-A9 effectively inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in HUVECs. Besides, OSU-A9 inhibited angiogenesis as evidenced by abrogation of migration/invasion and Matrigel tube formation in HUVECs and attenuation of the in vivo neovascularization in the chicken chorioallantoic membrane assay. Mechanistically, Western blot, RT-PCR and ELISA analyses showed the ability of OSU-A9 to inhibit MMP-2 production and VEGF expression induced by hypoxia or phorbol-12-myristyl-13-acetate. Furthermore, dual inhibition of Akt–NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, the key regulators of angiogenesis, was observed. Together, the current study highlights evidences for the promising anti-angiogenic activity of OSU-A9, at least in part through the inhibition of Akt–NF-κB and MAPK signaling and their consequent inhibition of VEGF and MMP-2. These findings support OSU-A9's clinical promise as a component of anticancer therapy. - Highlights: • The antiangiogenic activity of OSU-A9 in HUVECs was explored. • OSU-A9 inhibited HUVECs proliferation, migration, invasion and tube formation. • OSU-A9

  3. Bringing a Global Issue Closer to Home: The OSU Climate Change Webinar Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jentes Banicki, J.; Dierkes, C.

    2012-12-01

    When people think about the effects of climate change, many will still picture that iconic lone polar bear clinging to a shrinking iceberg in Antarctica. But many don't realize that the impacts that we will face here at home could also be severe, directly affecting the food we eat, the health we have, and the natural environments we appreciate. To help better explain and ultimately localize those impacts for Great Lakes residents, 10 departments within Ohio State University partnered in 2009 to create the Global Change, Local Impact webinar series. The monthly series brings in experts from around the Great Lakes region to discuss issues and impacts we will encounter regionally as our climate changes. Originally designed as a small series for Ohioans, the series has broadened to focus on Great Lakes-related issues, with more than 4,500 attendees representing 500 organizations in governmental agencies, academia, non-profit groups, private industry, and the legislature from around the country. Over the past two years, the OSU Climate Team expanded its educational reach by partnering with external groups like the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Great Lakes Regional Water Program, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the Great Lakes Sea Grant Network to help deliver the most knowledgeable experts and resources for each Great Lake-focused climate topic and archive those resources on its www.changingclimate.osu.edu web site. As a result of these collaborative efforts, participants say the webinars are one of their primary resources for climate-related research information in the region, with 80-90% polled saying they use this information as an unbiased resource to help not only understand how climate change could affect local concerns like public health, agriculture, and infrastructure, but what they in their vocations and daily lives can do to prepare for it. For scientists and practitioners, this series serves as the perfect low carbon venue

  4. Evaluation of cholera surveillance system in Osu Klottey District, Accra, Ghana (2011-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjei, Eric Yirenkyi; Malm, Keziah Laurencia; Mensah, Kofi Nyarko; Sackey, Samuel Oko; Ameme, Donne; Kenu, Ernest; Abdulai, Marijanatu; Mills, Richael; Afari, Edwin

    2017-01-01

    Cholera is an acute illness characterized by profuse watery diarrhea. It is caused by vibrio cholera subgroup 01 and 0139. Rapid administration of fluid replacement therapy and supportive treatment can reduce mortality to around 1%. By the close of 2011, 10,628 cases and 100 deaths were reported in Ghana with a case fatality rate of 0.99. It is important to evaluate the cholera surveillance system in Ghana to determine if it is meeting its objective. The study was conducted in Osu Klottey district in the Accra Metropolitan area in January 2014. We assessed the operations (attributes and performance) of the surveillance system for cholera using CDC guidelines (2001). Surveillance data records at the district level from 2011-2013 were extracted and analyzed for frequency using Microsoft excel. Stakeholders and key informants were interviewed using structured questionnaire. Records were also reviewed at some health facilities and at district levels. In 2011 and 2012, case fatality rates (1.3% and 0.65%) respectively. Males were mostly affected. The most affected age group was 20-29. In 2011, Predictive value positive was 69.2% and 50% in 2012.Cholera peaked in March 2011 and April 2012. The Government of Ghana funded the system. The system is sensitive, simple, stable, flexible, acceptable and representative. It was also useful and data quality was relatively good. Predictive Value Positive was also good. The surveillance system is achieving its set out objectives. The system is sensitive, simple, stable, flexible, and acceptable. Predictive value positive was good.

  5. OSU-6: A Highly Efficient, Metal-Free, Heterogeneous Catalyst for the Click Synthesis of 5-Benzyl and 5-Aryl-1H-tetrazoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baskar Nammalwar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available OSU-6, an MCM-41 type hexagonal mesoporous silica with mild Brönsted acid properties, has been used as an efficient, metal-free, heterogeneous catalyst for the click synthesis of 5-benzyl and 5-aryl-1H-tetrazoles from nitriles in DMF at 90 °C. This catalyst offers advantages including ease of operation, milder conditions, high yields, and reusability. Studies are presented that demonstrate the robust nature of the catalyst under the optimized reaction conditions. OSU-6 promotes the 1,3-dipolar addition of azides to nitriles without significant degradation or clogging of the nanoporous structure. The catalyst can be reused up to five times without a significant reduction in yield, and it does not require treatment with acid between reactions.

  6. A study of thermal stratification in the cold legs during the subcooled blowdown phase of a loss of coolant accident in the OSU APEX thermal hydraulic testing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachs, D. M.

    1998-01-01

    Thermal stratification, which has been linked to the occurrence of pressurized thermal shock (PTS), is observed to occur during the early stages of simulated loss of coolant accidents (LOCAS) in the Oregon State University Advanced Plant Experiment (OSU APEX) Thermal Hydraulic Test Facility. The OSU APEX Test Facility is a scaled model of the Westinghouse AP600 nuclear power plant. Analysis of the OSU APEX facility data has allowed the determination of an onset criteria for thermal stratification and has provided support for the postulated mechanisms leading to thermal stratification. CFX 4.1, a computational fluid dynamics code, was used to generate a model of the cold legs and the downcomer that described the phenomena occurring within them. Some mixing phenomena were predicted that lead to non-uniformity between the two cold legs attached to the steam generator on the side of the facility containing the Passive Residual Heat Removal (PRHR) injection system. The stratification was found to be two phase and unlikely to be a factor in PTS

  7. Sunlight-induced inactivation of human Wa and porcine OSU rotaviruses in the presence of exogenous photosensitizers

    KAUST Repository

    Romero-Maraccini, Ofelia C.

    2013-10-01

    Human rotavirus Wa and porcine rotavirus OSU solutions were irradiated with simulated solar UV and visible light in the presence of different photosensitizers dissolved in buffered solutions. For human rotavirus, the exogenous effects were greater than the endogenous effects under irradiation with full spectrum and UVA and visible light at 25 C. For porcine rotavirus, the exogenous effects with UVA and visible light irradiation were only observed at high temperatures, >40 C. The results from dark experiments conducted at different temperatures suggest that porcine rotavirus has higher thermostability than human rotavirus. Concentrations of 3′-MAP excited triplet states of 1.8 fM and above resulted in significant human rotavirus inactivation. The measured excited triplet state concentrations of ≤0.45 fM produced by UVA and visible light irradiation of natural dissolved organic matter solutions were likely not directly responsible for rotavirus inactivation. Instead, the linear correlation for human rotavirus inactivation rate constant (kobs) with the phenol degradation rate constant (kexp) found in both 1 mM NaHCO3 and 1 mM phosphate-buffered solutions suggested that OH radical was a major reactive species for the exogenous inactivation of rotaviruses. Linear correlations between rotavirus kobs and specific UV254 nm absorbance of two river-dissolved organic matter and two effluent organic matter isolates indicated that organic matter aromaticity may help predict formation of radicals responsible for rotavirus inactivation. The results from this study also suggested that the differences in rotavirus strains should be considered when predicting solar inactivation of rotavirus in sunlit surface waters. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  8. Trading forest carbon - OSU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issues associate with trading carbon sequestered in forests are discussed. Scientific uncertainties associated with carbon measurement are discussed with respect to proposed accounting procedures. Major issues include: (1) Establishing baselines. (2) Determining additivity from f...

  9. OSU Chlorophyll Bloom Product

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This product was developed for the Oregon coast based on the observed change between running 8-day composite chlorophyll-a (CHL) data obtained by the MODerate...

  10. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the VP8* sialic acid-binding domain of porcine rotavirus strain OSU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yang-De; Li, Hao; Liu, Hui; Pan, Yi-Feng

    2007-01-01

    Porcine rotavirus strain OSU VP8* domain has been expressed, purified and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data from different crystal forms of the VP8* domain have been collected to 2.65 and 2.2 Å resolution, respectively. The rotavirus outer capsid spike protein VP4 is utilized in the process of rotavirus attachment to and membrane penetration of host cells. VP4 is cleaved by trypsin into two domains: VP8* and VP5*. The VP8* domain is implicated in initial interaction with sialic acid-containing cell-surface carbohydrates and triggers subsequent virus invasion. The VP8* domain from porcine OSU rotavirus was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Different crystal forms (orthorhombic P2 1 2 1 2 1 and tetragonal P4 1 2 1 2) were harvested from two distinct crystallization conditions. Diffraction data have been collected to 2.65 and 2.2 Å resolution and the VP8* 65–224 structure was determined by molecular replacement

  11. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the VP8* sialic acid-binding domain of porcine rotavirus strain OSU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yang-De, E-mail: zhangyd1960@yahoo.com.cn; Li, Hao [National Hepatobiliary and Enteric Surgery Research Center of The Ministry of Health, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Hunan Province (China); Liu, Hui; Pan, Yi-Feng [Biochemistry Laboratory, Institution of Biomedical Engineering, Central South University, Hunan Province (China); National Hepatobiliary and Enteric Surgery Research Center of The Ministry of Health, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Hunan Province (China)

    2007-02-01

    Porcine rotavirus strain OSU VP8* domain has been expressed, purified and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data from different crystal forms of the VP8* domain have been collected to 2.65 and 2.2 Å resolution, respectively. The rotavirus outer capsid spike protein VP4 is utilized in the process of rotavirus attachment to and membrane penetration of host cells. VP4 is cleaved by trypsin into two domains: VP8* and VP5*. The VP8* domain is implicated in initial interaction with sialic acid-containing cell-surface carbohydrates and triggers subsequent virus invasion. The VP8* domain from porcine OSU rotavirus was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Different crystal forms (orthorhombic P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and tetragonal P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2) were harvested from two distinct crystallization conditions. Diffraction data have been collected to 2.65 and 2.2 Å resolution and the VP8*{sub 65–224} structure was determined by molecular replacement.

  12. Hotel protests continue / Nathan Greenhalgh

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Greenhalgh, Nathan

    2009-01-01

    Leedu Hotellide ja Restoranide Liidu president ei ole rahul praeguse majandusolukorraga, kus tõstetakse käibemaksu, puuduvad otselennud suurematesse Euroopa pealinnadesse ja tahetakse kärpida Euroopa kultuuripealinn 2009 projekti eelarvet

  13. Mild Microcytic Anemia in an Infant with a Compound Heterozygosity for Hb C (HBB: c.19G > A) and Hb Osu Christiansborg (HBB: c.157G > A).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Maria O; Chui, David H K; Woda, Bruce A; Newburger, Peter E

    2016-06-01

    We report an infant with a compound heterozygosity for Hb C (HBB: c.19G > A) and Hb Osu Christiansborg (HBB: c.157G > A) and a phenotype of mild microcytic anemia with target cell morphology but without overt hemolysis.

  14. Génesis y estructura de los complejos fronterizos euro-indígenas: Repensando los márgenes americanos a partir (y más allá de la obra de Nathan Wachtel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Boccara

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available El presente ensayo tiene por objetivo dar cuenta de las principales transformaciones conocidas por las investigaciones en antropología histórica de las zonas fronterizas durante las últimas dos décadas. Partiremos de la presentación de la obra pionera del historiador y antropólogo francés Nathan Wachtel. Explicaremos en qué medida su libro, Los Vencidos, marca un hito en la literatura etnohistórica latinoamericanista. Luego veremos que el análisis en términos de resistencia/aculturación usado por Wachtel ha tendido a ser desplazado progresivamente por el estudio de los fenómenos de etnogénesis, etnificación y mestizaje. Mostraremos así en qué medida se puede afirmar que las investigaciones etnohistóricas relativas a las fronteras del Nuevo Mundo han experimentado un giro con respecto a la manera de abordar las dinámicas culturales y los procesos sociohistóricos que se desarrollaron desde la llegada de los europeos a América. Esto nos llevará a plantear una definición tentativa de la noción de complejo fronterizo.The current essay focuses in the main transformations known in historical anthropology research of frontier areas during the last decades. At the beginning we will present Los vencidos, the pioneer work of Nathan Wachtel, French Historian and Anthropologist, in order to explain how this book turned out to be a milestone in the ethnohistoric literature of Latin America. Then we will argue that the analysis proposed by the author, in terms of resistance/acculturation, tended to be progressively displaced by phenomena such as: ethnicity, mestizaje, ethnogenesis. We will show, thus how ethnohistorical research regarding the New World and its frontiers has change, above all in the ways to approach the cultural dynamic and the sociohistorical processes developed due to the arrival of European people to America. Finally this will lead us to pose a tentative definition of a notion called frontier complex.

  15. OSU VIIRS Chla Bloom Product

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This product was developed for the Oregon coast based on the observed change between running 8-day composite chlorophyll-a (CHL) data obtained by the VIIRS aboard...

  16. Mimic of OSU research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Hong; Miller, D.W.

    1991-01-01

    The Ohio State University research reactor (OSURR) is undergoing improvements in its research and educational capabilities. A computer-based digital data acquisition system, including a reactor system mimic, will be installed as part of these improvements. The system will monitor the reactor system parameters available to the reactor operator either in digital parameters available to the reactor operator either in digital or analog form. The system includes two computers. All the signals are sent to computer 1, which processes the data and sends the data through a serial port to computer 2 with a video graphics array VGA monitor, which is utilized to display the mimic system of the reactor

  17. OSU MODIS FLH Bloom Product

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Two bloom products were developed for the Oregon coast based on the observed change between running 8-day composite chlorophyll-a (CHL) and fluorescence line-height...

  18. Majandust stimuleerib stabiilne dollar / Nathan Lewis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lewis, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    Ligi kaks sajandit järgis USA stabiilse raha põhimõtet - kullastandardit, saavutades seeläbi maailmas liidripositsiooni. 1971. aastal sellest põhimõttest loobuti, peale mida on kullauntsides mõõdetud SKT langenud 78% ja riiki ähvardab liidrikohalt tõukamine

  19. Computational Process Modeling for Additive Manufacturing (OSU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagg, Stacey; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Powder-Bed Additive Manufacturing (AM) through Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) or Selective Laser Melting (SLM) is being used by NASA and the Aerospace industry to "print" parts that traditionally are very complex, high cost, or long schedule lead items. The process spreads a thin layer of metal powder over a build platform, then melts the powder in a series of welds in a desired shape. The next layer of powder is applied, and the process is repeated until layer-by-layer, a very complex part can be built. This reduces cost and schedule by eliminating very complex tooling and processes traditionally used in aerospace component manufacturing. To use the process to print end-use items, NASA seeks to understand SLM material well enough to develop a method of qualifying parts for space flight operation. Traditionally, a new material process takes many years and high investment to generate statistical databases and experiential knowledge, but computational modeling can truncate the schedule and cost -many experiments can be run quickly in a model, which would take years and a high material cost to run empirically. This project seeks to optimize material build parameters with reduced time and cost through modeling.

  20. World Economic Forum discusses Lithuanian prospects / Nathan Greenhalgh

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Greenhalgh, Nathan

    2009-01-01

    Maailma Majandusfoorumil pakuti välja lahendusi Leedu majandusliku olukorra parandamiseks. Üks meetod majanduskriisist väljumiseks oleks liti devalveerimine ning teine koos Läti ja Eestiga Baltimaade arengupanga loomine

  1. Dosimetry implications of BSH biodistribution study at OSU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, N.; Albertson, B.J.; Gahbauer, R.A.; Barth, R.F.; Goodman, J.H.

    2000-01-01

    A BSH biodistribution study was performed at Ohio State University, where tumor, normal brain, and blood boron concentrations of patients undergoing tumor debulking surgery were acquired. The results of this biodistribution study are subjects of other presentations in this meeting. In this paper, we present an overview of the dosimetry implications of this biodistribution data. The analysis for this paper assumed that the tumor boron RBE was factor of two higher than the normal brain boron RBE. Our conclusions from this analysis were that with the tumor/blood ratios observed in our patients for times of up to 14 hours post commencement of boron infusion, one could not successfully treat patients with BNCT using BSH. (author)

  2. OSU TOMF Program Site Selection and Preliminary Concept Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spadling, Steve [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States)

    2012-05-10

    The purpose of this report is to confirm the programmatic requirements for the new facilities, identify the most appropriate project site, and develop preliminary site and building concepts that successfully address the overall project goals and site issues. These new facilities will be designed to accommodate the staff, drivers and maintenance requirements for the future mixed fleet of passenger vehicles, Transit Style Buses and School Buses.

  3. OSU Reactor Sharing Program FY 1995 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higginbotham, J.F.

    1996-10-01

    This is the annual report of the activities supported under the Oregon State University Reactor Sharing Program, award number DE-FG06-NE38137. The beginning date for the award was September, 30, 1995 and the end date was September 29, 1996. Work conducted under this award is internally administered at the Radiation Center through a project tasking system. This allows for excellent quality control for the work which is performed from the point of initial contact, through the reactor application, project report generation and financial accounting. For the current fiscal year, FY95, the total cost of the reactor sharing program, including Radiation Center contributions, was $66,323.20 of which $40,000.00 was supplied by the DOE Reactor Sharing Program. The details of individual project costs is given in Table 1. The work performed for the individual projects are described in the brief work descriptions given in Table 2

  4. Chlorophyll-a, Aqua MODIS, OSU DB, 0.0125 degrees, West US

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA CoastWatch distributes chlorophyll-a concentration data from NASA's Aqua satellite. Measurements are gathered by the Moderate Resolution Imaging...

  5. A January angular momentum balance in the OSU two-level atmospheric general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.-W.; Grady, W.

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with an analysis of the atmospheric angular momentum balance, based on the simulation data of the Oregon State University two-level atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM). An attempt is also made to gain an understanding of the involved processes. Preliminary results on the angular momentum and mass balance in the AGCM are shown. The basic equations are examined, and questions of turbulent momentum transfer are investigated. The methods of analysis are discussed, taking into account time-averaged balance equations, time and longitude-averaged balance equations, mean meridional circulation, the mean meridional balance of relative angular momentum, and standing and transient components of motion.

  6. Refurbishment of the rotating rack of the OSU TRIGA MKII reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higginbotham, J.F.; Dodd, B.; Pratt, D.S.; Anderson, T.V.

    1992-01-01

    Many TRIGA reactors have experienced operational difficulties with the rotating racks used for sample irradiation. Generally the rack gradually becomes more difficult to rotate until it finally seizes. The recommended action at that point is replacement of the entire facility at a significant cost. The purpose of this paper is to describe the symptoms leading to rack failure and to present the results of a refurbishment procedure that does not involve the use of solvents which create mixed chemical and radioactive hazardous waste. The primary reason for rack failure is the buildup of sludge produced through irradiation of lubrication oil. The refurbishment procedure involves using a commercially available degreasing solution which can be pumped into and out of the rack with the objective of removing this sludge. The solution used is sold under the trade name 'Simple Green'. No radioactive material was detected on smear or air samples taken of the work area during the reifurbishment activities and the rack rotates freely in both direction even after eighteen months of operation. The only disadvantage to performing this procedure has been the need to maintain a very aggressive contamination control program when unloading samples from the rack. A very fine particulate material attaches to the outside of tubes used to encapsulate samples. This material can produce contamination levels of 10,000 dpm/100 cm 2 in the worst cases but will typically produce local hot spots on the order of 1000 dpm. (author)

  7. FULL LENGTH RESEARCH ARTICLE Osue et al. (2008) SWJ:1-4 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. Ahmed

    Current mass distribution of ivermectin to the ... antibodies, and the hazard of working with radioactive substances. .... using a modified protocol (Engelbrecht et al. .... in assumed endemic normal individuals show they have been exposed.

  8. A study of return to saturation oscillations in the OSU APEX thermal hydraulic testing facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Scott Cameron

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the flow oscillations which occur in the AP600 long term cooling test facility at Oregon State University. The AP600 system is an advanced pressurized water reactor design utilizing passive emergency cooling systems. A few hours after the initiation of a cold leg break, the passive cooling systems inject gravity fed cold water at a rate allowing steam production in the reactor vessel. Steam production in the core causes the pressure in the upper head to increase leading to flow oscillations in all the connecting reactor systems. This paper will show that the oscillations have a definite region of onset and termination for specific conditions in the APEX testing facility. Tests performed at high powers, high elevation breaks, and small break sizes do not exhibit oscillations. The APOS (Advanced Plant Oscillation Simulator) computer code has been developed using a quasi-steady state analysis for flows and a transient analysis for the core node energy balance. The pressure in the reactor head is calculated using a modified perfect gas analysis. For tank liquid inventories, a simple conservation of mass analysis is used to estimate the tank elevations. Simulation logic gleaned from APEX data and photographic evidence have been incorporated into the code to predict termination of the oscillations. Areas which would make the work more complete include a better understanding of two-phase fluid behavior for a top offtake on a pipe, more instrumentation in the core region of the APEX testing facility, and a clearer understanding of fluid conditions in the reactor barrel. Scaling of the oscillations onset and pressure amplitude are relatively straightforward, but termination and period are difficult to scale to the full AP600 plant. Differences in the core power profile and other geometrical differences between the testing facility and the actual plant make the scaling of this phenomenon to the actual plant conditions very difficult.

  9. Chlorophyll-a, Terra MODIS, OSU DB, 0.0125 degrees, West US, EXPERIMENTAL

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA CoastWatch distributes chlorophyll-a concentration data from NASA's Terra satellite. Measurements are gathered by the Moderate Resolution Imaging...

  10. Fukuyama : kõigepealt hea valitsus, siis demokraatia ja ajaloo lõpp / Francis Fukuyama ; interv. Nathan Gardels

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Fukuyama, Francis

    2005-01-01

    Francis Fukuyama sõnul vajab riik oma arenguks esmajoones head valitsemist. Kõige olulisem on, et oleks toimiv riik, mis suudab tagada julgeoleku ja majandusarengu elementaarsed tingimused. Iraagi praeguste probleemide põhjus on selles, et USA ei suutnud ette näha, kuidas riik Saddami kukkudes kokku variseb, kuid tuleb mõista, et aeg-ajalt on USA ja kogu maailma huvides kusagil maailma nurgas riigi ehitamine tõsiselt ette võtta, ütleb autor

  11. Continuity and Discontinuity in Casabella and Spazio. The 1950's architecture magazines directed by Luigi Moretti and Ernesto Nathan Rogers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orsina Simona Pierini

    2016-05-01

    However, the impact is quite different: with Luigi Moretti, his iconic  architecture, while rarely published in the journal, nonetheless remains in  the back of our minds. In contrast, Rogers, ever the educator, seems to  have entrusted the pencil to his young, up-and-coming contributors.

  12. Sunlight-induced inactivation of human Wa and porcine OSU rotaviruses in the presence of exogenous photosensitizers

    KAUST Repository

    Romero-Maraccini, Ofelia C.; Sadik, Nora J.; Rosado-Lausell, Sahid L.; Pugh, Charles R.; Niu, Xi-Zhi; Croue, Jean-Philippe; Nguyen, Thanh Ha

    2013-01-01

    dark experiments conducted at different temperatures suggest that porcine rotavirus has higher thermostability than human rotavirus. Concentrations of 3′-MAP excited triplet states of 1.8 fM and above resulted in significant human rotavirus inactivation

  13. Using semantic technologies and the OSU ontology for modelling context and activities in multi-sensory surveillance systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez A, Héctor F.; Martínez-Tomás, Rafael; Arias Tapia, Susana A.; Rincón Zamorano, Mariano

    2014-04-01

    Automatic systems that monitor human behaviour for detecting security problems are a challenge today. Previously, our group defined the Horus framework, which is a modular architecture for the integration of multi-sensor monitoring stages. In this work, structure and technologies required for high-level semantic stages of Horus are proposed, and the associated methodological principles established with the aim of recognising specific behaviours and situations. Our methodology distinguishes three semantic levels of events: low level (compromised with sensors), medium level (compromised with context), and high level (target behaviours). The ontology for surveillance and ubiquitous computing has been used to integrate ontologies from specific domains and together with semantic technologies have facilitated the modelling and implementation of scenes and situations by reusing components. A home context and a supermarket context were modelled following this approach, where three suspicious activities were monitored via different virtual sensors. The experiments demonstrate that our proposals facilitate the rapid prototyping of this kind of systems.

  14. Continuidad y discontinuidad : las revistas de arquitectura de Luigi Moretti y Ernesto Nathan Rogers en el Milán de la década de 1950

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orsina Simona Pierini

    2016-05-01

    Por tanto, sus éxitos son muy distintos: en el caso de Moretti la mente seguía la fascinación de sus arquitecturas, casi nunca publicadas en la revista, pero muy presentes por su fuerza icónica, mientras que en al caso del profesor Rogers, el legado parece confiarse a un lápiz, tan distinto del de sus amigos y alumnos.

  15. Endearing Leadership of Enduring Organizations: General Nathan F. Twining and the Dichotomous Air Wars of the Thirteenth and Fifteenth Air Forces During World War II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    American Airmen, but also fostered the cognitive dissonance played out in the divergent bombing strategies employed by the US and Great Britain...was very attuned to their force protection needs and made sure his forces supported the troops to their level of satisfaction —not to his level of... satisfaction based on arbitrary metrics. With the Thirteenth, Twining was perhaps more receptive to the feedback and cues he received from his joint

  16. Klein : üleilmastumiseks pole kütust / Naomi Klein ; interv. Nathan Gardels, tõlk. Külli-Riin Tigasson

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Klein, Naomi

    2008-01-01

    Energia kallinemise ja veokulude suurenemisega aeglustub globaliseerumine, Hiina muutub tarbimiskapitalismi omaksvõtuga sarnasemaks läänega ning lääs sarnaneb üha enam Hiinaga seoses kodanike vabaduse ohverdamisega jälgimistegevusele

  17. Zbigniew Brzezinski : Gruusia sõda meenutab Soome ründamist / Zbigniew Brzezinski ; interv. Nathan Gardels, tõlk. Külli-Riin Tigasson

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Brzezinski, Zbigniew

    2008-01-01

    USA poliitiku sõnul meenutab Putini juhitav Venemaa Hitleri ja Stalini oma, lääne tegevus Venemaa ohjeldamiseks peaks tema hinnangul sõltuma riikide pikaajalistest huvidest, kuid Venemaa tuleks peatada igal juhul. Lisa: Elulugu

  18. Smart campus transit laboratory for research and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-31

    A joint effort by the Ohio State University (OSU) Transportation and Parking Services, OSU College of Engineering, OSU Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Geodetic Science, and Clever Devices has recently succeeded in equipping the ...

  19. Ispitivanje nutritivne vrednosti osušenog jabučnog tropa i mogućnosti njegove upotrebe u industrijskoj proizvodnji hrane za životinje

    OpenAIRE

    Maslovarić, Marijana

    2017-01-01

    Apple pomace is a by-product of the industrial production of apple juice, amounting to approximately 20-30% of freshly processed apples. Several million tonnes of apple pomace is produced in the world annually. Fresh apple pomace is characterised by high sugar and moisture content, which makes it susceptible to microbial contamination, uncontrolled fermentation and spoiling. Despite increasingly stricter legal regulations in managing biodegradable waste, large quantities of apple pomace are s...

  20. The balance of kinetic and total energy simulated by the OSU two-level atmospheric general circulation model for January and July

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.-T.; Gates, W. L.; Kim, J.-W.

    1984-01-01

    A three-year simulation which prescribes seasonally varying solar radiation and sea surface temperature is the basis of the present study of the horizontal structure of the balances of kinetic and total energy simulated by Oregon State University's two-level atmospheric general circulation model. Mechanisms responsible for the local energy changes are identified, and the energy balance requirement's fulfilment is examined. In January, the vertical integral of the total energy shows large amounts of external heating over the North Pacific and Atlantic, together with cooling over most of the land area of the Northern Hemisphere. In July, an overall seasonal reversal is found. Both seasons are also characterized by strong energy flux divergence in the tropics, in association with the poleward transport of heat and momentum.

  1. High eIF4E Overexpression in Node Negative Breast Cancer as Predictor for Recurrence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Benjamin

    2002-01-01

    .... EIF4E overexpression has been found in human malignancies (Li, 1997; Nathan, 1997). Furthermore, there appears to be an association of eIF4E overexpression and clinical outcomes (Li, 1998; Nathan, 1997; Li, 2001...

  2. Strategic Communication Joint Integrating Concept. Version 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-07

    only by official government agencies acting deliberately, but also by other “representatives” such as businessmen, students, tourists, advertisers ...these activities can benefit from incorporating some of the advanced public relations, marketing, advertising and political campaigning techniques...1981. Casebeer, William B. & James D. Russell. “ Storytelling and Terrorism: Towards a Comprehensive ‘Counter-Narrative Strategy,’” Strategic

  3. Physical, chemical, and bio-optical data collected from Seaglider SG157 during IOOS OSU sampling on Trinidad Head Line in the North Pacific Ocean deployed from 2014-11-16 to 2015-03-09 (NODC Accession 0125046)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  4. Delegitimizing Al-Qaeda: A Jihad-Realist Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Suite 1204, Arlington VA 22202-4302. Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person shall be subject to a...unique “ brand ” of violent extremism: complex, simultaneous, multiple-target, mass casualty terrorist attacks directed at the U.S. 2 homeland.8 Short...Terror,” Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, Vol. 32, 2009, pp. 109-138; William D. Casebeer and James A Russell, “ Storytelling and Terrorism: Towards a

  5. The Actions of Teacher-Librarians Minimize or Reinforce Barriers to Adolescent Information Seeking. A Review of: Meyers, Eric M., Lisa P. Nathan, and Matthew L. Saxton. “Barriers to Information Seeking in School Libraries: Conflicts in Perceptions and Practice.” Information Research 12:2 (2007: paper 295.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie McKenna

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To study high school teacher-librarians and whether their actions and reactions are aligned with their perception of the role they play in creating an information seeking and learning environment.Design – Triangulation qualitative research undertaken over a 16 month period (Fall 2005 – 2007.Setting – Six high school libraries in the Puget Sound region of the state of Washington, United States.Subjects – Six teacher-librarians, each with a minimum of ten years experience and classroom teachers and students. This sample represented the range of school sizes, the rural, urban, and suburban mix, and the range of significant socioeconomic conditions (qualification for subsidized lunch and English as an additional language in the region.Methods – Four interviews of one to two hours were held with each teacher-librarian during school hours. Initial interviews were recorded by hand and a set question protocol was used (and included in the appendix. Questions were asked about their professional background and training; their job duties, day to day activities and priorities; their perceptions as to how others (e.g., peers and administrators support the library; the goals of their library’s services; how students use the library; and their critical assessment of their role. Subsequent interviews were undertaken within two days of a classroom visit to the library and also followed a set protocol of questions (Appendix D. The second set of interviews was audio recorded and transcribed. Two classroom teachers from each school were interviewed for 30 minutes and audio recorded using a set interview protocol (Appendix C within two days of class participation in library instruction. Library observations ranging from two to three hours each occurred during a minimum of seven randomized times at each library. These observation sessions typically included class instructional sessions of thirty to ninety minutes. The observation protocols are described in an appendix to the study. Consistent note-taking, varying of observation times and days of week, use of triangulated methods, comparison of emergent themes with other studies, audio-taping interviews, inter-coder checks, analyzing data for observer effect, and a number of other approaches ensured validity. Kuhlthau’s theory of intermediation and Zone of Intervention was used as a theoretical framework to categorize the teacher-librarians’ perceptions of their roles and their observed activities. Harris and Dewdney’s principles of information seeking behaviour were used as an analytic framework to study the difference between the teacher-librarians’ perceptions of their roles and their observed practices. These five roles are organizer of information; expert in locating material; identifier and instructor of general sources; advisor of search strategy; and mediator in the process of constructing meaning (Kuhlthau.Main Results – The findings were framed in the six principles of information seeking (Harris & Dewdney and were presented through use of narrative captured in both the observations and interviews.Principle 1: Information needs arise from the help-seeker’s situation.The high school students in the library to complete assignments about which the teacher-librarians were not apprised; therefore the teacher-librarians were unable to assist the students in meeting information needs.Principle 2: The decision to seek help or not seek help is affected by many factors.Principle 3: People tend to seek information that is most accessible.Issues of control were the greatest barrier to students’ successful information seeking behaviour. In the environments observed, the greatest balance of power was within the control of the teachers, including when and if the students would have access to the library, and whether the teacher-librarian would be informed of the assignment. Within the library facility, the teacher-librarians demonstrated a high need for control and power over the students’ activities and behaviour, and the students themselves had almost no power.Principle 4: People tend to first seek help or information from interpersonal sources, especially from people like themselves.Principle 5: Information seekers expect emotional support.The interpersonal style of each teacher-librarian had an affect on the nature of the students’ information seeking behaviour. The narratives demonstrated how the practices of staff, in particular, those actions that set expectations for student behaviour, had an affect on the actual information seeking activities undertaken by students. Principle 6: People follow habitual patterns in seeking information. The narrative used to recount the unsuccessful instruction and research session demonstrates that unless students are convinced of the reasons why they should change their approach, they will not change habitual patterns in seeking information. Students use familiar sources and their familiarity is with Google and Wikipedia. In order for them to understand why these sources alone are not adequate, the students would need to experience a situation that demonstrates this and would cause them to reconsider their habitual patterns. Conclusion – Students were not exposed to teacher-librarian behaviours and roles that would enable the development of information literacy skills. The absence of collaboration between teachers and teacher-librarians was detrimental to the support of students in their assigned tasks. Students were not able to carry out information seeking practices with any autonomy and were given no meaningful reason or evidence as to why they should consider different practices. The failure to recognize that students have information habits that must be validated in order to assist them in changing or establishing new information seeking behaviours was problematic. The adolescents’ need for affective support was negated and had consequences that affected their information seeking experience. These teacher-librarians perceive that they fulfill roles in support of information literacy learning, but their behaviours and actions contradict this perception. Teacher-librarians must be able to identify, analyze and change their behaviours and actions in order to better enable student achievement.

  6. Ballistic Phosphorene Transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-19

    IEEE Electron Devices Letters 35 (7): 795-797, 2014. 2. Yexin Deng, Zhe Luo, Nathan J. Conrad, Han Liu, Yongji Gong, Sina Najmaei, Pulickel M...IEEE Electron Devices Letters 35 (7): 795-797, 2014. 2. Yexin Deng, Zhe Luo, Nathan J. Conrad, Han Liu, Yongji Gong, Sina Najmaei, Pulickel M

  7. The History of Women in Botany and Science at the Herbarium Library: Evaluation for Historical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicker, Sandra J.

    Evaluating library collections by comparing them to bibliographies has a long history in research libraries. This evaluative study examined all 107 titles within the "Women in Botany" section of the Herbarium Library at The Ohio State University (OSU). The Herbarium is not part of the OSU Library system, but functions as a satellite to…

  8. The Hale Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Katti

    2012-01-01

    Ohio State University's (OSU) Frank W. Hale Jr. Black Cultural Center is a rarity in academia, as was its namesake. When OSU named its standout Black cultural center after the civil rights activist, professor and vice provost who championed such a place, it was commemorating what Dr. Frank W. Hale Jr. stood for. He promoted academic rigor, those…

  9. Analysis of photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) results at The Ohio State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Cynthia J.; Lembach, R. G.

    1993-06-01

    The Ohio State University (OSU) is one site of an FDA controlled investigational study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of excimer laser photorefractive keratectomy (PRK). This is a report of the current Phase III results at OSU for cases at 6 months post surgery as of 12/31/92.

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-0103 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TTRU-01-0103 ref|YP_763917.1| HAAAP family serine permease [Francisella tulare...nsis subsp. holarctica OSU18] gb|ABI83280.1| HAAAP family serine permease [Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica OSU18] YP_763917.1 0.077 25% ...

  11. A novel indole-3-carbinol derivative inhibits the growth of human oral squamous cell carcinoma in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Jing-Ru; Bai, Li-Yuan; Omar, Hany A; Sargeant, Aaron M; Yeh, Ching-Tung; Chen, Yuan-Yin; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Chiu, Chang-Fang

    2010-10-01

    Indole-3-carbinol (I3C), a naturally occurring phytochemical found in cruciferous vegetables, has received much attention due to its translational potential in cancer prevention and therapy. In this study, we investigated the antitumor effects of OSU-A9, a structurally optimized I3C derivative, in a panel of oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines, SCC4, SCC15, and SCC2095. The antiproliferative effect of OSU-A9 was approximately two-orders-of-magnitude higher than that of I3C. Importantly, normal human oral keratinocytes were less sensitive to OSU-A9 than oral cancer cells. This antiproliferative effect of OSU-A9 was attributable to the induction of mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis as evidenced by sub-G1 accumulation of cells, poly ADP-ribose polymerase cleavage, and cytochrome c release from the mitochondria. OSU-A9 down regulates Akt and NF-κB signaling pathways, leading to changes in many downstream effectors involved in regulating cell cycle and apoptosis. Moreover, the observed down regulation of IKKα and IKKβ expression by OSU-A9 is not reported for I3C. OSU-A9 also induces both the production of reactive oxygen species and the endoplasmic reticulum stress. Taken together, these results suggest the translational value of OSU-A9 in oral squamous cell cancer therapy in the future. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Geochemical characteristics of Proterozoic granite magmatism from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Yellappa

    MS received 20 November 2016; revised 12 July 2017; accepted 14 July 2017; published online 6 March 2018. Granitoid ...... India; Oxford University Press, New York, 223p. Nathan N P ..... Kwon, Chansoo Park, Nagesh P, Mohanty D P and.

  13. 78 FR 13756 - Technical Report: Effectiveness of LED Stop Lamps for Reducing Rear-End Crashes: Analyses of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-28

    ... provided. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Nathan K. Greenwell, Mathematical Statistician, Evaluation Division, NVS-431, National Center for Statistics and Analysis, National Highway Traffic Safety..., Mathematical Statistician, Evaluation Division, NVS-431, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Room...

  14. 75 FR 57329 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-20

    ..., Tommy S. Boden, Travis D. Bjerk, Scott L. Colson, Dustin G. Cook, Nathan J. Enloe, Stephen J. Faxon, Joseph B. Hall, Mark H. Horne, Michael J. Hurst, Chad W. Lawyer, John R. Little, Roy L. McKinney, Thomas...

  15. Kokakunsti täiustamine tehnoloogia abiga / Corby Kummer

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kummer, Corby

    2011-01-01

    Microsofti endise tehnoloogiajuhi Nathan Myhrvoldi eestvõttel töötati välja ja koostati viieköiteline uudseid mõtteid ja tehnoloogiaid sisaldav toitu ja toiduvalmistamist käsitlev teos : Modernist cuisine

  16. Muusika valib Tristan Priimägi / Tristan Priimägi

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Priimägi, Tristan, 1976-

    2003-01-01

    Heliplaatidest: Nathan Haines "Squire For Hire", Little Louie Vega "Soul Heaven - London Ibiza", Chalice "Ühendatud inimesed", DJ Spinna & Bobbito "The Wonder Of Stevie", Basement Jaxx "Kish Kash", Marcus Intalex "Soul:ution Volume 1"

  17. Cholesterol: the debate should be terminated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, David G

    2017-07-01

    Here, I offer personal perspectives on cholesterol homeostasis that reflect my belief that certain aspects of the debate have been overstated.-Nathan, D. G. Cholesterol: the debate should be terminated. © FASEB.

  18. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nutrition and Parkinson's Disease 2010 Expert Briefings: Legal Issues: Planning Ahead When You are Living with Parkinson's ... Day Interview with Nathan Slewett Expert Briefings: Cognitive Issues: Advice for Parkinson's Care Partners Who Is a ...

  19. Workshop for middle school and high school educators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    This paper summarizes the workshop entitled, 'Understanding and Teaching about Nuclear Technology and Its Place in Our Society' presented at Ohio State University (OSU) in August 1991. The workshop was a collaborative program with the American Nuclear Society (ANS) taking the lead and OSU taking a supportive and facilitator role. The paper addresses the issues of program management and development. Because the program elements provided by the ANS are generic to other workshops they have sponsored, only the unique contributions made by OSU are discussed

  20. A decision support system for transportation infrastructure and supply chain system planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    This project makes the results (models and methodology) of the research and development efforts on freight movement modeling (FMM) and supply chain design carried out by faculty at OSU and OU available to transportation and logistics professionals. A...

  1. Diffuse Attenuation Coef. K490, Aqua MODIS, 0.125 degrees, Indonesia

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — OSU distributes Diffuse Attenuation Coefficient at 490 nm Wavelength data from NASA's Aqua satellite. Measurements are gathered by the Moderate Resolution Imaging...

  2. Physical profile data from CTD casts in the coastal Western U.S. and NE Pacific (limit-180) from the R/V WECOMA in support of Global Ocean Ecosystem Dynamics (GLOBEC) from 2001-04-18 to 2001-12-11 (NODC Accession 0000747)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical profile data were collected from CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the R/V Wecoma. Data were collected by Oregon State University (OSU) in support of the...

  3. Compilation of ocean circulation and other data from ADCP current meters, CTD casts, tidal gauges, and other instruments from a World-Wide distribution by Oregon State University and other institutions as part of World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) and other projects from 24 November 1985 to 30 December 2000 (NODC Accession 0000649)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Compilation of ocean circulation and other data were collected from a World-Wide distribution by Oregon State University (OSU) and other institutions as part of...

  4. CURRENT DIRECTION, WIND GUST and other data from FIXED PLATFORM from 1974-02-23 to 1974-04-25 (NCEI Accession 7601418)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter and other data were collected from fixed platforms from 23 February 1974 to 25 April 1974. Data were collected by Oregon State University (OSU) as part...

  5. Oregon state university's advanced plant experiment (APEX) AP1000 integral facility test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes, J.N.; Groome, J.T.; Woods, B.G.; Young, E.; Abel, K.; Wu, Q.

    2005-01-01

    Oregon State University (OSU) has recently completed a three year study of the thermal hydraulic behavior of the Westinghouse AP1000 passive safety systems. Eleven Design Basis Accident (DBA) scenarios, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with technical support from Westinghouse Electric, were simulated in OSU's Advanced Plant Experiment (APEX)-1000. The OSU test program was conducted within the purview of the requirements of 10CFR50 Appendix B, NQA-1 and 10 CFR 21 and the test data was used to provide benchmarks for computer codes used in the final design approval of the AP1000. In addition to the DOE certification testing, OSU conducted eleven confirmatory tests for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This paper presents the test program objectives, a description of the APEX-1000 test facility and an overview of the test matrix that was conducted in support of plant certification. (authors)

  6. Current meter components and other data from FIXED PLATFORMS as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) from 1992-02-26 to 1993-04-14 (NODC Accession 9700264)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter components data were collected from FIXED PLATFORMS. Data were collected by Oregon State University (OSU) as part of the World Ocean Circulation...

  7. Current and other data from fixed platforms as part of the International Decade of Ocean Exploration / International Ocean Studies / First Dynamic Response and Kinematics Experiment in the Drake Passage (IDOE/ISOS/FDRAKE) from 1979-01-13 to 1980-02-01 (NODC Accession 8700085)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current and other data were collected from fixed platforms from 13 January 1979 to 01 February 1980. Data were collected by Oregon State University (OSU) as part of...

  8. Spin-Polarized Scanning Tunneling Microscope for Atomic-Scale Studies of Spin Transport, Spin Relaxation, and Magnetism in Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-09

    Polarized Scanning Tunneling Microscope for Atomic-Scale Studies of Spin Transport, Spin Relaxation, and Magnetism in Graphene Report Term: 0-Other Email ...Principal: Y Name: Jay A Gupta Email : gupta.208@osu.edu Name: Roland K Kawakami Email : kawakami.15@osu.edu RPPR Final Report as of 13-Nov-2017...studies on films and devices. Optimization of the Cr tip will be the next important step to establish this technique. We are writing up these early

  9. The Use of Substances Other Than Nicotine in Electronic Cigarettes Among College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenne, Deric R; Fischbein, Rebecca L; Tan, Andy Sl; Banks, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) have grown in popularity, especially among youth and young adults. Although e-cigarettes were originally intended to vaporize a liquid mixture containing nicotine, there appears to be an increasing trend in other substance use in e-cigarettes (OSUE). Cross-sectional data from 1542 undergraduate college student e-cigarette users from a large Midwestern university were collected via online survey to assess prevalence of e-cigarette use, reasons for use, perceived harm, and prevalence and predictors of OSUE. Nearly 7% (6.94%) reported using an e-cigarette to vaporize and inhale a substance other than nicotine. Current tobacco cigarette smokers were significantly more likely to report OSUE (51.0%) as compared with never (33.7%) and former (15.4%) smokers. Among respondents reporting OSUE, the primary reason for e-cigarette use was "safer than cigarettes" (21.7%), followed by "experimentation" (18.9%) and "friends use" (17.0%). Most (77.9%) reported using cannabis or some derivative of cannabis in an e-cigarette. Binomial logistic regression found that women were less likely to report OSUE by a factor of 0.60, former tobacco cigarette smokers as compared with never smokers were more likely to report OSUE by a factor of 1.87, and e-cigarette users who reported using e-cigarettes for "cool or trendy" reasons were more likely to report OSUE by a factor of 2.89. Little is known regarding the health effects of cannabis and cannabis derivatives delivered through e-cigarettes. Concern may also be warranted regarding the potential dangers of this young population using substances more dangerous than cannabis in e-cigarettes. Knowledge is limited regarding the public health impact of vaping cannabis or other illicit substances among college student populations. This study stresses the need for continued research regarding the vaping of cannabis and other illicit substances among college students.

  10. University Reactor Instrumentation grant program. Final report, September 7, 1990--August 31, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talnagi, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    The Ohio State University Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (OSU NRL) participated in the Department of Energy (DOE) grant program commonly denoted as the University Reactor Instrumentation (URI) program from the period September 1990 through August 1995, after which funding was terminated on a programmatic basis by DOE. This program provided funding support for acquisition of capital equipment targeted for facility upgrades and improvements, including modernizing reactor systems and instrumentation, improvements in research and instructional capabilities, and infrastructure enhancements. The staff of the OSU NRL submitted five grant applications during this period, all of which were funded either partially or in their entirety. This report will provide an overview of the activities carried out under these grants and assess their impact on the OSU NRL facilities

  11. Increased Expression of the Chemokines CXCL1 and MIP-1a by Resident Brain Cells Precedes Neutrophil Infiltration in the Brain Following Prolonged Soman-Induced Status Epilepticus in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    brain cytokine concentrations. J Neuroinflammation 2010, 7:40. 12. Manley NC, Bertrand AA, Kinney KS, Hing TC, Sapolsky RM: Characterization of monocyte...neurodegeneration. J Neurosci 2007, 27:9301-9309. 16. Wolpe SD, Davatelis G, Sherry B, Beutler B, Hesse DG, Nguyen HT, Moldawer LL , Nathan CF, Lowry SF

  12. Pramana – Journal of Physics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Measurement of product of solid state laser materials by an alternative method: Application to Nd doped YVO4 crystal for 4 F 3 / 2 → 4 I 11 / 2 transition · P K Mukhopadhyay Jogy George S K Sharma Rakesh Kapoor T P S Nathan · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. In this paper an alternative approach for measurement ...

  13. Worldwide Emerging Environmental Issues Affecting the U.S. Military. November 2008 Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    Anglia‘s Nathan Gillet. A report by the Dirección General de Aguas de Chile , the country‘s official water authority, warned that the Echaurren...population displacement in central Chile . Millennium Project, WFUNA International Environmental Security Issues––November 2008

  14. 75 FR 79427 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Amex LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-20

    ... end of December 2010, it will work with the Commission to set a new target date for implementation as... a Designated Market Maker (``DMM'') orally at or near the close. The provisions of NYSE Amex... Liu, Senior Special Counsel, Division of Trading and Markets, Commission, and Nathan Saunders, Special...

  15. 76 FR 24933 - Sunshine Federal Register Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-03

    ...: Commissioners' Conference Room, 11555 Rockville Pike, Rockville, Maryland. STATUS: Public and Closed. Week of...). (Contact: Robert Kahler, 301-415-7528.) This meeting will be webcast live at the Web address-- http://www...) (Contact: Nathan Sanfilippo, 301-415-3951.) [[Page 24934

  16. A Better Way to Budget: Building Support for Bold, Student-Centered Change in Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    "A Better Way to Budget" provides practical, innovative advice on how to overcome the political and social pushback that often prevents district and school leaders from shifting scarce resources to the most student-centered uses. Nathan Levenson shows how school leaders can uncover the sources of potential conflicts and create a…

  17. Vision-Based Autonomous Sensor-Tasking in Uncertain Adversarial Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-02

    structure. c) shows the AIS highlighted with different colours . d) shows the EP. While FTLE and AIS identify regions of different qualitative crowd motion...David M. Blei. A tutorial on bayesian nonparametric models. Journal of Mathematical Psychology , 56:1–12, 2012. [10] Nathan Halko, Per-Gunnar

  18. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Musica en vivo con Lobo! CareMAP: Managing Caregiver Stress CareMAP: End-of-Life Care What Is the ... Walk at Moving Day OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Interview with Nathan Slewett ...

  19. Effect of Nd 3+ concentration on CW and pulsed performance of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Q-switching was done with the help of an acousto-optic modulator and we have compared the pulses obtained from Nd : YVO4 laser with different doping concentration. It was found that the 1 at. ... S K Sharma1 T P S Nathan1. Diode Pumped Solid State Laser Group, Center for Advanced Technology, Indore 452 013, India ...

  20. Models, Analysis, and Recommendations Pertaining to the Retention of Naval Special Warfare s Mid-Level Officers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    The Analytic Hierarch/Network Process,” in Rev. R. Acad. Cien. Serie A. Mat (RACSAM), submitted by Francisco Javier Giron (Real Academia de Ciencias ...Academia de Ciencias : Spain. Scott, Nathan. Naval Special Warfare Officer Retention Survey. Monterey, CA: NPS Press, September 2013. Whittenberger

  1. Britain at CERN, from 12 to 14 November 2002: le stand de PPARC

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    Photo 01: Nathan Hill (from Qi3, the company appointed as UK Technology Transfer Co-ordinator for CERN), Basil Eastwood (UK Ambassador to Switzerland), Nigel Griffiths (UK Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Small Business) and Luciano Maiani (CERN Director-General) at the PPARC stand.

  2. Division of Forestry Directory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conservation Education Timber Management Wildland Fire & Aviation Burn Permits Firewise Alaska Brochure -8441 Safety Officer Tom Greiling thomas.greiling@alaska.gov (907) 761-6247 Fire Prevention Officer /SATS Radio Shop 5900 East Tudor Road Anchorage, AK 99507 nathan.skinner@alaska.gov (907) 451-2810 State

  3. Developing Conceptual Models for Assessing Climate Change Impacts to Contaminant Availability in Terrestrial Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Greenberg 2005), effects of dredged material (PIANC 2006), and ecosystem restoration (Fischenich 2008) among others. The process of developing a conceptual...Impacts to Contaminant Availability in Terrestrial Ecosystems by Burton C. Suedel, Nathan R. Beane, Eric R. Britzke, Cheryl R. Montgomery, and...are generally project or problem specific. Building a CM includes determining the components of the ecosystem , identifying relationships linking these

  4. M O Ikeke Appraisal of Thomas Berry's Idea of Technological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oduor

    understanding of the natural world to the solution of practical problems”. According to ... technology is not needed, but its ethical use is imperative. We set out ... named William Nathan after his father, became known as Thomas, the name he took for his ..... Nigeria, oil companies do not follow the best international standards.

  5. The physics of bread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2017-10-01

    Nathan Myhrvold - the polymath physicist whose passions range from cosmology to cooking - is this month publishing a massive, five-volume book about the science of bread and bread-making. Robert P Crease catches up with this intellectual livewire at his Cooking Lab headquarters in Seattle

  6. Plaadid / Mart Normet

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Normet, Mart, 1979-

    2006-01-01

    Uutest heliplaatidestMassive Attack "Collected", Nathan Fake "Drowning In A Sea Of Love", Layo & Bushwacka! "Feels Closer", Geminice "Progress", Slow "Pronto", Rihanna "A Girl Like Me", "Unexpected Dreams", "Santana III", Kubb "Mother", Morrissey "ringleader Of The Tormentors", Soda Effect "Goodbye Fantasy", "Heartworn", Lacuna Coil "Karrmacode", The Goo Goo Dolls "Let Love In"

  7. 76 FR 32248 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board; Notice of Filing of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-03

    ...\\ See letter from F. John White, Chief Executive Officer, Public Financial Management, Inc., dated... Financial Strategies, dated March 21, 2011 (``Nathan Howard Letter''); letter from Mike Nicholas, Chief... preserve the general confusion between the role of a financial advisor and the role of an underwriter and...

  8. Decomposing change in life expectancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaupel, James W.; Canudas Romo, Vladimir

    2003-01-01

    We extend Nathan Keyfitz's research on continuous change in life expectancy over time by presenting and proving a new formula for decomposing such change. The formula separates change in life expectancy over time into two terms. The first term captures the general effect of reduction in death rates...... in Sweden and Japan....

  9. Hitleri tapmiskatse ekraanil / Timo Diener

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Diener, Timo

    2009-01-01

    Kuidas sündis Bryan Singeri film "Operatsioon "Valküür"", peaosas Tom Cruise. Stsenaariumi autorid Christopher McQuarrie ja Nathan Alexander stsenaariumi sünnist, režissöör Bryan Singer filmivõtetest Saksamaal

  10. Exporting the Colombian Model Comparing Law Enfocement Stratregies Towards Security and Stability Operations in Colombia and Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Belen Boville provides a 7 Nathan Leites and Charles Wolf, Rebellion and Authority: An Analytic Essay ...Narcocorridos are so influential that the Mexican government has banned such music on public radio.189 Despite the government’s efforts, the lyrics ...and Wolf Jr., Charles. Rebellion and Authority: An Analytic Essay on Insurgent Conflicts. Chicago: Markham Publishing Company, 1970. Livingstone

  11. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Falls: Part 2 CareMAP: Changes Around the House: Part 2 Interview with Nathan Slewett Who Is ... for Problems with Urination? CareMAP: Changes Around the House: Part 1 Aware in Care: Real Stories Is ...

  12. 1492—The Medical Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Carlos A.

    1994-01-01

    This discussion was selected from the weekly staff conferences in the Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco. Taken from a transcription, it has been edited by Nathan M. Bass, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Medicine, under the direction of Lloyd H. Smith Jr, MD, Professor of Medicine and Associate Dean in the School of Medicine. Images PMID:7519808

  13. 1492--the medical consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, C A

    1994-06-01

    This discussion was selected from the weekly staff conferences in the Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco. Taken from a transcription, it has been edited by Nathan M. Bass, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Medicine, under the direction of Lloyd H. Smith Jr, MD, Professor of Medicine and Associate Dean in the School of Medicine.

  14. What's all this about entanglement?

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, FS

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available ? F. Stef Roux CSIR National Laser Centre February 2015 – p. 1/25 Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Albert Einstein Boris Podolsky Nathan Rosen Quantum mechanics: measurements on one particle dictate the state of the other particle. Spontaneous decay Unstable...

  15. Multilateral Cooperation on Nonproliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Nathan E . Busch and Daniel H. Joyner, eds., Combating Weapons of Mass Destruction: The Future of International Nonproliferation Policy (Athens, GA...or the World Bank . These organizations receive contributions from member states but have their own...Opening Reception Jack’s Lounge , Portola Hotel Friday, March 30, 2010 Timeline Content Delivery 7:30-8:30 Breakfast and Registration Cottonwood

  16. Gaming the System: A Game Theory Analysis of Theater Airborne ISR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-13

    Brown , Jason M., Col, USAF. "Strategy for Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance." AWC Research Report, Air University, 2013. Builder, Carl H...Nathan, MAJ, USA (division collection manager in Regional Command – South, 2012- 2013), Interview by Author. September 2013. Morgan, Gareth . Images of

  17. MPA Materials Matter July 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kippen, Karen Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-21

    This is the newsletter of the Materials Physics and Applications Division of Los Alamos National Laboratory for July 2016. Researcher Nathan Mara is highlighted, the MPA Deputy Division Leader gives a summary of progress within the division, and two different LANL-published studies are detailed.

  18. Brief Report: A Comparison of Symbol-Precedence View in Investigative and Conventional Textbooks Used in Algebra Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Milan F.; Walkington, Candace; Howell, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Recent reform movements have emphasized students making meaning of algebraic relationships; however, research on student thinking and learning often remains disconnected from the design of widely used curricular materials. Although a previous examination of algebra textbooks (Nathan, Long, & Alibali, 2002) demonstrated a preference for a…

  19. Baseball Physics: A New Mechanics Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagoner, Kasey; Flanagan, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    The game of baseball provides an interesting laboratory for experimenting with mechanical phenomena (there are many good examples in "The Physics Teacher," available on Professor Alan Nathan's website, and discussed in "Physics of Baseball & Softball"). We have developed a lab, for an introductory-level physics course, that…

  20. David Bowie's Hauntology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Steen Ledet

    David Bowie's now-defunct rock-opera trilogy's first installment 1. Outside is filled with uncanny mediations of rock music's chameleon. The inner sleeve booklet is titled The Diary of Nathan Adler, or the Ritual Art-Murder of Baby Grace Blue: A non-linear Gothic Drama Hyper-Cycle. Behind this long...

  1. Fair and effective?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasgaard, Maya; Nathan, Iben

    2014-01-01

    70) Pasgaard, M.a and Nathan, I. Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) is a proposed mechanism to mitigate global climate change without compromising biodiversity and local livelihoods. REDD+ initiatives are being introduced at a fast pace across the Global South. Many...

  2. Case of Master students at the university IbnZohr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pc

    2018-03-05

    Mar 5, 2018 ... by the social network of the individual (family, friends, employer, etc.) or the .... attractive and 30,8 % have a low degree of attractiveness. To seize better the .... marketing," 2eme edition, Nathan, Paris, 1997. [9] A. Fayolle, "L'art ...

  3. Bewildering Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letiche, Hugo

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the author offer a response to Nathan Snaza's (2013a, 2013b, 2014a; Sonu & Snaza, 2015) "bewildering" pedagogy as developed in the "Journal of Curriculum and Pedagogy". Pedagogy is about the role of being-with in human development; it does not primarily answer to cognitive or competency development or…

  4. Chakravarti, Prof. Aravinda

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2008 Honorary. Chakravarti, Prof. Aravinda. Date of birth: 6 February 1954. Address: Director - CCDG, McKusick-Nathans Inst. of Genetic, Medicine, Johns Hopkins Univ., School of Medicine, 733 N.Broadway, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA Contact: Office: (+1-410) 502 7525. Fax: (+1-410) 502 7544

  5. Comparison of Three Supply Distribution Systems for Medical and Surgical Supplies in the Veterans Administration Sierra Pacific Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    supplies are checked for expiration dates and inspected to ensure the packaging is not damaged, wet, or soiled . The type and quantity of items is...creating value in a global business enviroment . (9th ed.). New York, NY: McGraw-Hill/Irwin. Nathan, J., & Trinkaus, J. (1996). Improving health care

  6. Evidence-Based Psychosocial Treatments for Children and Adolescents Exposed to Traumatic Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Wendy K.; Ortiz, Claudio D.; Viswesvaran, Chockalingham; Burns, Barbara J.; Kolko, David J.; Putnam, Frank W.; Amaya-Jackson, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    The article reviews the current status (1993-2007) of psychosocial treatments for children and adolescents who have been exposed to traumatic events. Twenty-one treatment studies are evaluated using criteria from Nathan and Gorman (2002) along a continuum of methodological rigor ranging from Type 1 to Type 6. All studies were, at a minimum, robust…

  7. Return of the Lambkins: Practice Makes Perfect at Colorado Science Bowl |

    Science.gov (United States)

    of how we did here today," said Lambkins co-captain Nathan Sima. "We worked hard since last have to work hard at it to succeed." The team is looking forward to another opportunity to show to take what we're learning in the classroom and apply it in a competitive format," said Fort

  8. Organic thin film transistor integration: a hybrid approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, F. M

    2011-01-01

    .... Her research interests are in the field of nanoand thin-film technology for applications in large area and flexible electronics, including displays, sensors, photovoltaics, circuits and systems. Dr. Li has co-authored a book entitled CCD Image Sensors in Deep-Ultraviolet (2005), and has published articles in various scientific journals. Arokia Nathan holds the...

  9. Utilization of ICU Data to Improve 30 and 60 Day HENRE Mortality Models, Revision 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-12

    increased vascular per- meability, and increased blood flow (Serhan et al., 2010). These changes contribute to the recruitment of leukocytes (white blood...post-injury morbidity and mortality (Valparaiso et al., 2015). cell necrosis (Nathan and Ding, 2010). The host uses necrosis of its own cells as one of

  10. Planning a Family: Priorities and Concerns in Rural Tanzania ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Planning a Family: Priorities and Concerns in Rural Tanzania. T Marchant, AK Mushi, R Nathan, O Mukasa, S Abdulla, C Lengeler, JRM Armstrong Schellenberg. Abstract. A fertility survey using qualitative and quantitative techniques described a high fertility setting (TFR 5.8) in southern Tanzania where family planning use ...

  11. Rearing and Release of Megamelus scutellaris Berg (Hemiptera: Delphacidae) for Biological Control of Water hyacinth in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Hemiptera: Delphacidae) for Biological Control of Waterhyacinth in 2015 by Jan Freedman and Nathan Harms PURPOSE: Waterhyacinth biological control ... control agents. Three insects were released in the United States for biological control of waterhyacinth during the 1970s; two weevils, Neochetina...content) and competitive interactions with other biological control agents (e.g., Neochetina spp.), though their consideration in other biological

  12. The Importance of Systematics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1999-02-18

    Feb 18, 1999 ... Similarly, the work of Nathan Charles Rothschild, a taxonomic authority on flea species, was responsible for the discovery ... The use of genetic data for taxonomic purposes also brings systematics closer to realizing Darwin's desire that classification should reflect evolutionary relationships. Systematics is.

  13. New results for virial coefficients of hard spheres in D dimensions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nathan Clisby1 Barry M McCoy2. ARC Centre of Excellence for Mathematics and Statistics of Complex Systems, 139 Barry Street, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010, Australia; C.N. Yang Institute for Theoretical Physics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3840, USA ...

  14. Attenuated Neural Processing of Risk in Young Adults at Risk for Stimulant Dependence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Reske

    Full Text Available Approximately 10% of young adults report non-medical use of stimulants (cocaine, amphetamine, methylphenidate, which puts them at risk for the development of dependence. This fMRI study investigates whether subjects at early stages of stimulant use show altered decision making processing.158 occasional stimulants users (OSU and 50 comparison subjects (CS performed a "risky gains" decision making task during which they could select safe options (cash in 20 cents or gamble them for double or nothing in two consecutive gambles (win or lose 40 or 80 cents, "risky decisions". The primary analysis focused on risky versus safe decisions. Three secondary analyses were conducted: First, a robust regression examined the effect of lifetime exposure to stimulants and marijuana; second, subgroups of OSU with >1000 (n = 42, or <50 lifetime marijuana uses (n = 32, were compared to CS with <50 lifetime uses (n = 46 to examine potential marijuana effects; third, brain activation associated with behavioral adjustment following monetary losses was probed.There were no behavioral differences between groups. OSU showed attenuated activation across risky and safe decisions in prefrontal cortex, insula, and dorsal striatum, exhibited lower anterior cingulate cortex (ACC and dorsal striatum activation for risky decisions and greater inferior frontal gyrus activation for safe decisions. Those OSU with relatively more stimulant use showed greater dorsal ACC and posterior insula attenuation. In comparison, greater lifetime marijuana use was associated with less neural differentiation between risky and safe decisions. OSU who chose more safe responses after losses exhibited similarities with CS relative to those preferring risky options.Individuals at risk for the development of stimulant use disorders presented less differentiated neural processing of risky and safe options. Specifically, OSU show attenuated brain response in regions critical for performance monitoring

  15. Probe station for testing of ALICE silicon drift detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Humanic, T J; Piemonte, C; Rashevsky, A; Sugarbaker, E R; Vacchi, A

    2003-01-01

    Large area, 7.25 cm multiplied by 8.76 cm silicon drift detectors have been developed and are in production for the ALICE experiment at LHC. An active area of the detector of more than 50 cm**2 imposes high demands on the quality of processing and raw material. Automated testing procedures have been developed to test detectors before mounting them on the ladders. Probe stations for ALICE SDD testing were designed and built at INFN, Trieste and Ohio State University (OSU). Testing procedures, detector selection criteria and some details of the OSU probe station design are discussed.

  16. On the errors in measurements of Ohio 5 radio sources in the light of the GB survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machalski, J.

    1975-01-01

    Positions and flux densities of 405 OSU 5 radio sources surveyed at 1415 MHz down to 0.18 f.u. (Brundage et al. 1971) have been examined in the light of data from the GB survey made at 1400 MHz (Maslowski 1972). An identification analysis has shown that about 56% of OSU sources reveal themselves as single, 18% - as confused, 20% - as unresolved and 6% - having no counterparts in the GB survey down to 0.09 f.u. - seem to be spurious. The single OSU sources are strongly affected by the underestimation of their flux densities due to base-line procedure in their vicinity. The average value of about 0.03 f.u. has been found for the systematic underestimation. The second systematic error is due to the presence of a significant number of confused sources with strong overestimation of their flux densities. The confusion effect gives a characteristic non-Gaussian tail in the difference distribution between observed and real flux densities. The confusion effect has a strong influence on source counts from the OSU 5 survey. Differential number-counts relatively to that from the GB survey shows that the counts agree between themselves within the statistical uncertainty up to about 0.40 f.u., which is approximately 4 delta (delta - average rms flux density error in the OSU 5 survey). Below 0.40 f.u. the number of sources missing due to the confusion effect is significantly greater than the number-overestimation due to the noise error. Thus, this part of the OSU 5 source counts cannot be treated seriously, even in the statistical sense. An analysis of the approximate reliability and completeness of the OSU 5 survey shows that, although the total reliability estimated by the authors of the survey is good, the completeness is significantly lower due to the underestimation of the confusion effect magnitude. In fact, the OSU 5 completeness is 67% at 0.18 f.u. and 79% at 0.25 f.u. (author)

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CBRI-05-0288 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRI-05-0288 ref|YP_512974.1| Acyltransferase [Francisella tularensis subsp. h...olarctica] ref|YP_762841.1| acyltransferase [Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica OSU18] ref|YP_001427626.1| acyltransferase [Fra...ncisella tularensis subsp. holarctica FTA] emb|CAJ78620.1| Acyltransferase [Francis...ella tularensis subsp. holarctica LVS] gb|ABI82204.1| acyltransferase [Francisell...a tularensis subsp. holarctica OSU18] gb|EBA51928.1| acyltransferase [Francisella tularensis subsp. holarcti

  18. 76 FR 15952 - National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-22

    ... the data and discuss possible explanations; and (4) identify data gaps and future research.... or as necessary to complete business for the day. The Workshop will reconvene on Wednesday, April 6..., Newport Research Station--Bldg. 955, 2032 S.E. OSU Drive, Newport, OR 97365-5275; telephone: (541) 867...

  19. An Investigation of Collaborative Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    has made it difficult to focus on value added collaborative endeavors. Problem Statement Several articles and books have described the theory of...Model carmenwiki.osu.edu/display/libraries/Definition+of+Collaboration Dixon, P. (1999). Nietzsche and Jung: Sailing a deeper night. New York: P. Lang

  20. 77 FR 12313 - Food Labeling Workshop; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-N-0001] Food Labeling Workshop; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of... District Office (DALDO), in collaboration with Oklahoma State University (OSU), Robert M. Kerr Food...

  1. 77 FR 59404 - Food Defense; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-N-0001... Regional Office (SWRO), in co-sponsorship with Oklahoma State University (OSU), Robert M. Kerr Food... workshop will be held at the Robert M. Kerr Food & Agricultural Products Center, Oklahoma State University...

  2. The responses of net primary production (NPP) and total carbon storage for the continental United States to changes in atmospheric CO{sub 2}, climate, and vegetation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, D.A. [Marine Biological Lab., Woods Hole, MA (United States)

    1995-06-01

    We extrapolated 3 biogeochemistry models (BIOME-BGC, CENTURY, and TEM) across the continental US with the vegetation distributions of 3 biogeography models (BIOME2, DOLY, and MAPSS) for contemporary climate at 355 ppmv CO{sub 2} and each of 3 GCM climate scenarios at 710 ppmv. For contemporary conditions, continental NPP ranges from 3132 to 3854 TgC/yr and total carbon storage ranges from 109 to 125 PgC. The responses of NPP range from no response (BIOME-BGC with DOLY or MAPSS vegetations for UKMO climate) to increases of 53% and 56% (TEM with BIOME2 vegetations for GFDL and OSU climates). The responses of total carbon storage vary from a decrease of 39% (BIOME-BGC with MAPSS vegetation for UKMO climate) to increases of 52% and 56% (TEM with BIOME2 vegetations for OSU and GFDL climates). The UKMO responses of BIOME-BGC with MAPSS vegetation are caused by both decreased forest area (from 44% to 38%) and photosynthetic water stress. The OSU and GFDL responses of TEM with BIOME2 vegetations are caused by forest expansion (from 46% to 67% for OSU and to 75% for GFDL) and increased nitrogen cycling.

  3. Modification of an Existing In vitro Method to Predict Relative Bioavailable Arsenic in Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    The soil matrix can sequester arsenic (As) and reduces its exposure by soil ingestion. In vivo dosing studies and in vitro gastrointestinal (IVG) methods have been used to predict relative bioavailable (RBA) As. Originally, the Ohio State University (OSU-IVG) method predicted R...

  4. Partnership to Improve Nutrient Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    PINE began in 2013 by working with OSU Extension and producers to locate and test existing 1990s lysimeters in Benton, Linn and Lane counties. The team identified additional producers to install Prenart lysimeters at a total of 15 sites. Producers allow for soil and water samplin...

  5. Joseph V. Denney, the Land-Grant Mission, and Rhetorical Education at Ohio State: An Institutional History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendenhall, Annie S.

    2011-01-01

    This essay provides an account of The Ohio State University's (OSU) rhetoric department during the tenure of Joseph Villiers Denney, arguing that he appropriated and repurposed national trends in education and rhetoric in ways that complicate the narrative of rhetoric and composition's decline in the late nineteenth century. In this essay, the…

  6. The Use of Institutional Repositories: The Ohio State University Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Tschera Harkness

    2011-01-01

    In this paper the author compares the use of digital materials that have been deposited in The Ohio State University (OSU) Knowledge Bank (KB). Comparisons are made for content considered in scope of the university archives and those considered out of scope, for materials originating from different campus sources, and for different types of…

  7. Use of Maple Seeding Canopy Reflectance Dataset for Validation of SART/LEAFMOD Radiative Transfer Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Barbara J.; Peterson, David L.

    1999-01-01

    This project was a collaborative effort by researchers at ARC, OSU and the University of Arizona. The goal was to use a dataset obtained from a previous study to "empirically validate a new canopy radiative-transfer model (SART) which incorporates a recently-developed leaf-level model (LEAFMOD)". The document includes a short research summary.

  8. Individual differences in memory span: relationship between rate of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Individual differences in memory span: relationship between rate of item identification and rate of reading. AM Sunmola, CC Ukachi, JI Osu. Abstract. No Abstract Available African Journal for the Psychological Study of Social Issues Vol.4(1) 1999: 74-78. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL ...

  9. African Journal of Biomedical Research - Vol 21, No 1 (2018)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Onchocercal DNA amplification using beta actin gene primers compared with first internal transcribed spacer sequences for monitoring onchocerciasis eradication strategy · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. H.O. Osue, H.I. Inabo, S.E. Yakubu, P.A. Audu, ...

  10. National Pesticide Information Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How can I protect my pets when using pesticides around them? More FAQs FAQ Comics Video FAQs From NPIC: Fact Sheets Videos Web Apps Podcasts Outreach Materials NPIC Professional Resources Social Media: National Pesticide Information Center Tweets by NPICatOSU Please read our ...

  11. Microsatellite analysis of the correlation between molecular and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Co-ancestry distance showed six tied groups with the Kenya cluster showing some differentiation with Exact Tests for population differentiation with a p = 0.0513. The American inbred line (OSU 23i) segregated alone, while the Kenya lines (EM11-133 and. EM12-210) had close homology with the CIMMYT inbred lines ...

  12. Library Information Made to Order: An Open Source Project Built for and with Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Kim

    2009-01-01

    Oregon State University (OSU) libraries, where the author serves as lead programmer, have developed a tool to make it easier for librarians to build and maintain interactive course assignment pages (ICAPs) and subject research guides (SRGs). That tool, Library a la Carte, enables librarians with minimal technical expertise to create dynamic…

  13. Problems connected with the production of highly specific antisera against prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and prostaglandin A2 (PGA2) for radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopp, H.G.; Vetter, W.; Siegenthaler, W.

    1978-01-01

    To obtain sensitive and specific antisera against PGE 2 and PGA 2 these substances were coupled to thyroglobulin (Tg). Coupling reactions were performed by using either a hydroxy-succinimide-ester as intermediate step leading to a complex carrying 170mol PGE 2 per mol Tg (''PGE 2 -OSU-Tg'') and 240mol PGA 2 per mol Tg (''PGA 2 -OSU-Tg''), or N, N'-carbonyl-diimidazole resulting in ''PGE 2 -CDI-Tg'' (400mol PGE 2 per mol Tg) and ''PGA 2 -CDI-Tg'' (600mol PGA 2 per mol Tg). Two tracer systems ( 3 H-prostaglandin and 125 I-histamine-prostaglandin) were used for analysis of antibody activity. The PGE 2 -CDI-Tg and PGA 2 -CDI-Tg complexes were both poor immunogens in rabbits. The PGE 2 -OSU-Tg and PGA 2 -OSU-Tg conjugates were injected in rabbits and in guinea-pigs. These two compounds resulted in very high antibody titres in both animal species. However, in guinea-pigs a markedly higher antibody sensitivity and antibody specificity were observed than in rabbits. Our results indicate that the guinea-pig may be the animal of choice for immunization against prostaglandins. Antibody specificity of guinea-pig antisera may be high enough to measure the concentration of PGE 2 and PGA 2 in the presence of other prostaglandins or prostaglandin metabolites. (author)

  14. Education and research at the Ohio State University nuclear reactor laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.W.; Myser, R.D.; Talnagi, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    The educational and research activities at the Ohio State University Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (OSUNRL) are discussed in this paper. A brief description of an OSUNRL facility improvement program and its expected impact on research is presented. The overall long-term goal of the OSUNRL is to support the comprehensive education, research, and service mission of OSU

  15. Cyber Security--Are You Prepared?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Scott

    2007-01-01

    During the summer 2002 term, Oklahoma State University-Okmulgee's Information Technologies Division offered a one credit-hour network security course--which barely had adequate student interest to meet the institution's enrollment requirements. Today, OSU-Okmulgee boasts one of the nation's premier cyber security programs. Many prospective…

  16. Building a Champagne Network on a Beer Budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Jon; Pederson, Curt

    2004-01-01

    Oregon State University's demand for bandwidth to support scientific collaboration and research continues to grow exponentially, while state funding declines due to hard economic times. The challenge faced by these authors was to find creative yet fiscally responsible ways to meet OSU's bandwidth demands. Looking at their options for high-capacity…

  17. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... The content of mineral elements on whole blood and hair in Moschus sifanicus .... Vol 10, No 26 (2011), The effect of Aloe vera extract on humoral and cellular ... OSU-142 inoculation at various levels of nitrogen fertilization on growth, tuber ...

  18. Bureau of Land Management density management study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Cissel; Paul Anderson; Shanti Berryman; Sam Chan; Deanna Olson; Klaus. Puettman

    2004-01-01

    The Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Pacific Northwest Research Station (PNW), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and Oregon State University (OSU) established the Density Management Study (DMS) in 1994 to develop and test options for young stand management to meet Northwest Forest Plan objectives in western Oregon. The DMS demonstrates and evaluates alternative approaches...

  19. The Use of Substances Other Than Nicotine in Electronic Cigarettes Among College Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deric R Kenne

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes have grown in popularity, especially among youth and young adults. Although e-cigarettes were originally intended to vaporize a liquid mixture containing nicotine, there appears to be an increasing trend in other substance use in e-cigarettes (OSUE. Materials and methods: Cross-sectional data from 1542 undergraduate college student e-cigarette users from a large Midwestern university were collected via online survey to assess prevalence of e-cigarette use, reasons for use, perceived harm, and prevalence and predictors of OSUE. Results: Nearly 7% (6.94% reported using an e-cigarette to vaporize and inhale a substance other than nicotine. Current tobacco cigarette smokers were significantly more likely to report OSUE (51.0% as compared with never (33.7% and former (15.4% smokers. Among respondents reporting OSUE, the primary reason for e-cigarette use was “safer than cigarettes” (21.7%, followed by “experimentation” (18.9% and “friends use” (17.0%. Most (77.9% reported using cannabis or some derivative of cannabis in an e-cigarette. Binomial logistic regression found that women were less likely to report OSUE by a factor of 0.60, former tobacco cigarette smokers as compared with never smokers were more likely to report OSUE by a factor of 1.87, and e-cigarette users who reported using e-cigarettes for “cool or trendy” reasons were more likely to report OSUE by a factor of 2.89. Discussion: Little is known regarding the health effects of cannabis and cannabis derivatives delivered through e-cigarettes. Concern may also be warranted regarding the potential dangers of this young population using substances more dangerous than cannabis in e-cigarettes. Knowledge is limited regarding the public health impact of vaping cannabis or other illicit substances among college student populations. This study stresses the need for continued research regarding the vaping of cannabis and other

  20. Jet and electromagnetic tomography (JET) of extreme phases of matter in heavy-ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinz, Ulrich [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2015-08-31

    The Ohio State University (OSU) group contributed to the deliverables of the JET Collaboration three major products: 1. The code package iEBE-VISHNU for modeling the dynamical evolution of the soft medium created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, from its creation all the way to final freeze-out using a hybrid approach that interfaces a free-streaming partonic pre-equilbrium stage with a (2+1)-dimensional viscous relativistic fluid dynamical stage for the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) phase and the microscopic hadron cascade UrQMD for the hadronic rescattering and freeze-out stage. Except for UrQMD, all dynamical evolution components and interfaces were developed at OSU and tested and implemented in collaboration with the Duke University group. 2. An electromagnetic radiation module for the calculation of thermal photon emission from the QGP and hadron resonance gas stages of a heavy-ion collision, with emission rates that have been corrected for viscous effects in the expanding medium consistent with the bulk evolution. The electromagnetic radiation module was developed under OSU leadership in collaboration with the McGill group and has been integrated in the iEBE-VISHNU code package. 3. An interface between the Monte Carlo jet shower evolution and hadronization codes developed by the Wayne State University (WSU), McGill and Texas A&M groups and the iEBE-VISHNU bulk evolution code, for performing jet quenching and jet shape modification studies in a realistically modeled evolving medium that was tuned to measured soft hadron data. Building on work performed at OSU for the theoretical framework used to describe the interaction of jets with the medium, initial work on the jet shower Monte Carlo was started at OSU and moved to WSU when OSU Visiting Assistant Professor Abhijit Majumder accepted a tenure track faculty position at WSU in September 2011. The jet-hydro interface was developed at OSU and WSU and tested and implemented in collaboration with the McGill, Texas

  1. Visualize This The FlowingData Guide to Design, Visualization, and Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Yau, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    Practical data design tips from a data visualization expert of the modern age Data doesn?t decrease; it is ever-increasing and can be overwhelming to organize in a way that makes sense to its intended audience. Wouldn?t it be wonderful if we could actually visualize data in such a way that we could maximize its potential and tell a story in a clear, concise manner? Thanks to the creative genius of Nathan Yau, we can. With this full-color book, data visualization guru and author Nathan Yau uses step-by-step tutorials to show you how to visualize and tell stories with data. He explains how to ga

  2. Worldwide Emerging Environmental Issues Affecting the U.S. Military. Summarizing Environmental Security Monthly Scanning. July 2008 - June 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Anglia’s Nathan Gillet. A report by the Dirección General de Aguas de Chile , the country’s official water authority, warned that the Echaurren...Argentina (about 50% of current world production), Chile , China, and Australia. However, at the recent Lithium Market and Supply Emerging Environmental...held in Santiago, Chile , it was said that there is plenty of lithium supply to meet demand for the foreseeable future. Considering the potential

  3. Refusing What We Are

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mcilvenny, Paul Bruce

    2017-01-01

    -conducts’, practices in which alternative modes of being governed are performed. By questioning the conduct of their conduct, participants simultaneously question the relationship of the self to itself, playing with and risking identity in the process. The case study scrutinises video recordings of the “United Nathans...... the ways in which fields of visibility and modes of rationality are sequentially and categorially organised in the contingent accomplishment of counter-identities....

  4. A Theoretically Driven Investigation of the Efficacy of an Immersive Interactive Avatar Rich Virtual Environment in Pre-deployment Nursing Knowledge and Teamwork Skills Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    pedagogy , and instructional quality. Measures of effectiveness data is minimal and often has not been conducted in a rigorous manner. To be clear...instructional pedagogy and instructional quality between the programs offered. Efficacy studies beyond student satisfaction scores have not been done in a... video training materials on trauma care into our virtual Camp Resilience. Navy Lieutenant Commander Nathan Brezovic is our NMCP site Pl. As a Master’s

  5. Spring 2008 Industry Study. Privatized Military Operations Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Department of Defense Civilian Lt Col Nathan “ Chili ” Lindsay, United States Air Force COL Darius Lukowski, Polish Army Ms. Diane Meyer, Department...efforts of the USG. Recommendations This Liberia case study demonstrates the benefits and costs of using contractors for the execution of U.S...PMFs and the USG to explore innovative ways to partner such that both parties would benefit by identifying requirements and capabilities in a more

  6. Two-body problem in general relativity: A heuristic guide for the Einstein-Rosen bridge and EPR paradox

    OpenAIRE

    Weinstein, Galina

    2015-01-01

    Between 1935 and 1936, Einstein was occupied with the Schwarzschild solution and the singularity within it while working in Princeton on the unified field theory and with his assistant Nathan Rosen, on the theory of the Einstein-Rosen bridges. He was also occupied with quantum theory. He believed that quantum theory was an incomplete representation of real things. Together with Rosen and Boris Podolsky he invented the EPR paradox. I demonstrate that the two-body problem in general relativity ...

  7. Bell's theorem and quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Nathan

    1994-02-01

    Bell showed that assuming locality leads to a disagreement with quantum mechanics. Here the nature of the nonlocality that follows from quantum mechanics is investigated. Note by the Editor—Readers will recognize Professor Rosen, author of this paper, as one of the co-authors of the famous EPR paper, Albert Einstein, Boris Podolsky, and Nathan Rosen, ``Can Quantum-Mechanical Description of Physical Reality be considered Complete?'', Phys. Rev. 47, 770-780 (1935). Robert H. Romer, Editor

  8. design and testing of a cupola furnace for michael okpara university

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-01

    Mar 1, 2013 ... Carbon, C. %. 50.0. 57.5. 70.0. 86.0. 93.0 ... drical shape with a diameter of 380mm and a height of. 1480mm ... selection of charcoal as different from coke are as ex- amined and ..... Number of blades. 12. 2 .... cupola as modified during test running proved to be ... Ugonna Nathan Okorie, Fiepamo J. Adouyi ...

  9. Al-Shebab: An Al-Qaeda Affiliate Case Study (2Rev)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    deputies responsible for finance , administration, and security. Coordination among regional groups is common.10 The deputy leader of al-Shebab, Mukhtar...Maaliya (Ministry of Finance ) controlled taxation. A complex court system also emerged. Multiple training camps were built that focused on hand-to-hand...Nathan Chandler, Counterterrorism and Counterinsurgency in Somalia: Assessing the Campaign Against Al Shabaab, Rand Corporation , 2016, accessed 6/5

  10. Factors Impacting Intra-District Collaboration: A Field Study in a Midwest Police Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-01

    Delinquency 50, no. 4 (2004): 516–541; Neil Brewer, Patricia Mitchell, and Nathan Weber, “Gender Role, Organizational Status, and Conflict Management...attendance from both the patrol and detective divisions. During weekly COMPSTAT meetings, P6 explains, the staff goes over statistics and “the...and White Police Officers.” Crime & Delinquency 50, no. 4 (2004): 516–541 Thibault, Edward A., Lawrence M. Lynch, R. Bruce McBride, and Gregory Walsh

  11. Will PEDF Therapy Reverse Chronic Demyelination and Prevent Axon Loss in a Murine Model of Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Nathans J, Miller MI, Toga AW , Sidman RL, Zhang J (2011) An MRI-based atlas and database of the developing mouse brain. Neuroimage 54:80 – 89...including suggestions for reducing this burden to Department of Defense, Washington Headquarters Services , Directorate for Information Operations...suggesting the hypothesis that most of the regenerated oligodendroglia arose from OPCs that survived within the lesion, or migrated in to the lesion from

  12. Modular Research-Based Composably Trustworthy Mission-Oriented Resilient Clouds (MRC2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    supports a portable bytecode and several native code targets (x86, ARM, PPC) as well as more exotic runtime targets such as 8-bit PICs and JavaScript ...provision of application-level quality of service. The most specialized output of the Mirage compiler is a unikernel, a standalone kernel with a...Performance Computing, Networking, Storage and Analysis (SC), Seattle, WA, 2011, article 26. 23. Farrington, Nathan et al., “Helios: A hybrid electrical

  13. Landpower: A Selected Bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    3-0.pdf U.S. Department of the Army. Training and Doctrine Command. The United States Army Functional Concept for Mission Command, 2016-2028...Brassey’s, 1993. 205pp. (UA25 .B76 1993) Builder , Carl H. The Masks of War: American Military Styles in Strategy and Analysis. Baltimore: Johns...David T. "Landpower in History." Armed Forces Journal 140, no. 1 (August 2002): 40-42. Multimedia Freier, Nathan, moderator. "U.S. Grand Strategy

  14. Proceedings of Conference on Language Documentation and Linguistic Theory 3

    OpenAIRE

    Austin, PK

    2011-01-01

    A collection dealing with language documentation and linguistic theory from a conference held at SOAS on 19- 20 November 2011. Papers by Peter Austin, Oliver Bond, Lutz Marten & David Nathan, Balthasar Bickel, Anju Saxena, Anvita Abbi, Cathryn Bartram, Henrik Bergqvist, Martine Bruil, Eliane Camargo & Sabine Reiter, Kearsy Cormier, Jordan Fenlon, Ramas Rentelis, & Adam Schembri, Simeon Floyd & Martine Bruil, Diana Forker, Michael Franjieh & Kilu von Prince, Brent Henderson & Charl...

  15. Mapping Nuclear Fallout Using the Weather Research & Forecasting (WRF) Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Meterological Magazine, 47, pp. 295-308, 1998. [17] Air Resources Laboratory. (2012, April) Air Resources Laboratory. [Online]. http://www.arl.noaa.gov...Reanalysis Project," Bulletin of the American Meterological Society, pp. 437-471, 1996. [25] Steve Warner, Nathan Platt, and James F. Heagy, "User...Oriented Two-Dimensional Measure of Effectiveness for the Evaluation of Transport and Dispersion Models," Journal of Applied Meterology Vol. 43, pp. 58

  16. Science of Land Target Spectral Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-03

    more mines than people. In addition to fatal casualties and enormous financial losses, mines ruin large areas of fertile farmland and waterways. In...fields as climatology [100], detection theory [74], anomaly detection [89], and financial analysis [25]. It is in the last field where most of the theory...thankful for their ability to endure my shenanigans . I thank Alina Zare, Nathan VanderKraats, Nicholas Fisher, Xuping Zhang, Raazia Mazhar, Wen

  17. Joint Distraction Treatments of Intra-Articular Fracture-Induced Posttraumatic Osteoarthritis in a Large Animal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    amounts for those were based on a 60 kg animal. We have identified another approved vendor of Yucatan minipigs who offers animals at an intermediate ...Activity in Acute Cartilage Injury Sponsor Agency: Orthopaedic Trauma Association 9400 W. Higgins Road, Suite 305 Rosemont IL 60018-4226 01/01...Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society 9400 West Higgins Road, Suite 220 Rosemont IL 60018 05/12/2015 – 10/31/2016, $20,000 Total Costs Nathan A

  18. Avoiding a Pilot Retention Death Spiral: The Pilot Shortage and DOD’s Challenge to Maintain an Effective Fighting Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-09

    public oversight.”79 His comments apply equally well to the Air Force or the Navy. Anecdotal evidence provided by an anonymous survey on social media ...Master’s Thesis 31 July 2017- 09 APRIL 2018 Avoiding a Pilot Retention Death Spiral: The Pilot Shortage and DOD’s Challenge to Maintain an Effective ...DOD’S CHALLENGE TO MAINTAIN AN EFFECTIVE FIGHTING FORCE by Nathan Thompson Lieutenant Colonel, United States Air Force

  19. Learning from Our Military History: The United States Army, Operation Iraqi Freedom, and the Potential for Operational Art and Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    relationships, etc. 63For a philosophical and academic argument against EBO/EBAO, see Tim Challans, “Tipping Sacred Cows: Moral Potential Through...Springer, Fort Bliss , TX, 3 March 2011; BC020, Interview; BG060, Battalion Commander, Interview by Mark Battjes, Fort Stewart, GA, 15 March 2011. A...Interview; BE060, Interview; BC020, Interview; BB020, Battalion Commander, Interview by Mark Battjes and Nathan Springer, Fort Bliss , TX, 2 March

  20. Feasibility Study of a Novel Diet-Based Intervention for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Trial of Diet to Alter Disease Progression in Prostate Cancer Patients on Active Surveillance.” Peter Van Veldhuizen , Jr., MD will be joining the...Administrator Nathan Eriksen SWOG Prevention Committee Chairs Powel H. Brown, MD, PhD Gary E. Goodman, MD New SWOG Co-Chair Peter Van Veldhuizen , Jr...above. The Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) will be responsible for circulating all revisions of the protocol to Dr. Peter Van Veldhuizen , Jr

  1. An Assessment of the Available Evidence on the Returns to Military Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-07-01

    Hanushek Kassing McCall and Wallace Mason (1970) Nathan Associates Weinstein et al. Richardson (1967) Thorndike and Hagen (1957) u.s...Biderman Cutright Freeman Hanushek Kassing McCall and Wallace Mason (1970) Primary Purpose of the Study Analyze the vocational readjustment...that veterans do not receive a positive economic return from military voca- tional training. Mason (1970), Hanushek , Cutright, and Kassing reach

  2. Allocating Virtual and Physical Flows for Multiagent Teams in Mutable, Networked Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    work with while here at CMU, including Noam Hazon, Praveen Paruchuri, Roie Zivan, Nathan Brooks, Robin Glinton, Sean Owens, Nilanjan Chakraborty, and...Multiagent Systems. 5 [47] Steven Okamoto, Praveen Paruchuri, Yonghong Wang, Katia Sycara, Janusz Marecki, and Mudhakar Srivatsa. Multiagent communication...Christopher Portway, Milind Tambe, Craig Western, Praveen Paruchuri, and Sarit Kraus. Deployed AR- MOR protection: the application of a game theoretic model

  3. Analytical techniques for instrument design - Matrix methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    The authors take the traditional Cooper-Nathans approach, as has been applied for many years for steady-state triple-axis spectrometers, and consider its generalization to other inelastic scattering spectrometers. This involves a number of simple manipulations of exponentials of quadratic forms. In particular, they discuss a toolbox of matrix manipulations that can be performed on the 6-dimensional Cooper-Nathans matrix. They show how these tools can be combined to solve a number of important problems, within the narrow-band limit and the gaussian approximation. They will argue that a generalized program that can handle multiple different spectrometers could (and should) be written in parallel to the Monte-Carlo packages that are becoming available. They also discuss the complementarity between detailed Monte-Carlo calculations and the approach presented here. In particular, Monte-Carlo methods traditionally simulate the real experiment as performed in practice, given a model scattering law, while the Cooper-Nathans method asks the inverse question: given that a neutron turns up in a particular spectrometer configuration (e.g. angle and time of flight), what is the probability distribution of possible scattering events at the sample? The Monte-Carlo approach could be applied in the same spirit to this question

  4. Isotopic variants of light and heavy L-pyroglutamic acid succinimidyl esters as the derivatization reagents for DL-amino acid chiral metabolomics identification by liquid chromatography and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochizuki, Toshiki; Todoroki, Kenichiro; Inoue, Koichi; Min, Jun Zhe; Toyo’oka, Toshimasa, E-mail: toyooka@u-shizuoka-ken.ac.jp

    2014-02-06

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Isotopic variants of chiral labeling reagents were newly synthesized. •Analysis of DL-amino acids was performed by UPLC–ESI–MS/MS. •Highly efficient enantioseparation and detection of DL-amino acids were performed. •Differential analysis of DL-amino acid was successfully performed in real samples. -- Abstract: L-Pyroglutamic acid succinimidyl ester (L-PGA-OSu) and its isotopic variant (L-PGA[d{sub 5}]-OSu) were newly synthesized and evaluated as the chiral labeling reagents for the enantioseparation of amino acids, in terms of separation efficiency by reversed-phase chromatography and detection sensitivity by ESI-MS/MS. The enantiomers of amino acids were easily labeled with the reagents at 60 °C within 10 min in an alkaline medium containing triethylamine. Although all the diastereomers derived from 18 proteolytic amino acids could not be satisfactorily separated, the pairs of 9 amino acids were completely separated by reversed-phase chromatography using the small particle (1.7 μm) ODS column (Rs = 1.95–8.05). The characteristic daughter ions, i.e., m/z 84.04 and m/z 89.04, were detected from all the derivatives by the collision induced dissociation of the protonated molecular ions. A highly sensitive detection at a low-fmol level (0.5–3.2 fmol) was also obtained from the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) chromatograms. An isotope labeling strategy using light and heavy L-PGA-OSu for the differential analysis of the DL-amino acids in different sample groups is also presented in this paper. The differential analysis of biological sample (i.e., human serum) and food product (i.e., yogurt) were tried to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method. The ratios of the DL-amino acids in human serum samples, spiked with the different concentrations of D-amino acids, were determined by the procedures using L-PGA-OSu and L-PGA[d{sub 5}]-OSu. The D/L ratios in the two sample groups at different concentrations of

  5. Isotopic variants of light and heavy L-pyroglutamic acid succinimidyl esters as the derivatization reagents for DL-amino acid chiral metabolomics identification by liquid chromatography and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochizuki, Toshiki; Todoroki, Kenichiro; Inoue, Koichi; Min, Jun Zhe; Toyo’oka, Toshimasa

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Isotopic variants of chiral labeling reagents were newly synthesized. •Analysis of DL-amino acids was performed by UPLC–ESI–MS/MS. •Highly efficient enantioseparation and detection of DL-amino acids were performed. •Differential analysis of DL-amino acid was successfully performed in real samples. -- Abstract: L-Pyroglutamic acid succinimidyl ester (L-PGA-OSu) and its isotopic variant (L-PGA[d 5 ]-OSu) were newly synthesized and evaluated as the chiral labeling reagents for the enantioseparation of amino acids, in terms of separation efficiency by reversed-phase chromatography and detection sensitivity by ESI-MS/MS. The enantiomers of amino acids were easily labeled with the reagents at 60 °C within 10 min in an alkaline medium containing triethylamine. Although all the diastereomers derived from 18 proteolytic amino acids could not be satisfactorily separated, the pairs of 9 amino acids were completely separated by reversed-phase chromatography using the small particle (1.7 μm) ODS column (Rs = 1.95–8.05). The characteristic daughter ions, i.e., m/z 84.04 and m/z 89.04, were detected from all the derivatives by the collision induced dissociation of the protonated molecular ions. A highly sensitive detection at a low-fmol level (0.5–3.2 fmol) was also obtained from the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) chromatograms. An isotope labeling strategy using light and heavy L-PGA-OSu for the differential analysis of the DL-amino acids in different sample groups is also presented in this paper. The differential analysis of biological sample (i.e., human serum) and food product (i.e., yogurt) were tried to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method. The ratios of the DL-amino acids in human serum samples, spiked with the different concentrations of D-amino acids, were determined by the procedures using L-PGA-OSu and L-PGA[d 5 ]-OSu. The D/L ratios in the two sample groups at different concentrations of amino

  6. Using Open Source Tools to Create a Mobile Optimized, Crowdsourced Translation Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evviva Weinraub Lajoie

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In late 2012, OSU Libraries and Press partnered with Maria's Libraries, an NGO in Rural Kenya, to provide users the ability to crowdsource translations of folk tales and existing children's books into a variety of African languages, sub-languages, and dialects. Together, these two organizations have been creating a mobile optimized platform using open source libraries such as Wink Toolkit (a library which provides mobile-friendly interaction from a website and Globalize3 to allow for multiple translations of database entries in a Ruby on Rails application. Research regarding successes of similar tools has been utilized in providing a consistent user interface. The OSU Libraries & Press team delivered a proof-of-concept tool that has the opportunity to promote technology exploration, improve early childhood literacy, change the way we approach foreign language learning, and to provide opportunities for cost-effective, multi-language publishing.

  7. Learning From Where Students Look While Observing Simulated Physical Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaree, Dedra

    2005-04-01

    The Physics Education Research (PER) Group at the Ohio State University (OSU) has developed Virtual Reality (VR) programs for teaching introductory physics concepts. Winter 2005, the PER group worked with OSU's cognitive science eye-tracking lab to probe what features students look at while using our VR programs. We see distinct differences in the features students fixate on depending upon whether or not they have formally studied the related physics. Students who first make predictions seem to fixate more on the relevant features of the simulation than those who do not, regardless of their level of education. It is known that students sometimes perform an experiment and report results consistent with their misconceptions but inconsistent with the experimental outcome. We see direct evidence of one student holding onto misconceptions despite fixating frequently on the information needed to understand the correct answer. Future studies using these technologies may prove valuable for tackling difficult questions regarding student learning.

  8. Ten-year utilization of the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor (OSTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringle, John C.; Anderson, Terrance V.; Johnson, Arthur G.

    1978-01-01

    The Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor (OSTR) has been used heavily throughout the past ten years to accommodate exclusively university research, teaching, and training efforts. Averages for the past nine years show that the OSTR use time has been as follows: 14% for academic and special training courses; 44% for OSU research projects; 6% for non-OSU research projects; 2% for demonstrations for tours; and 34% for reactor maintenance, calibrations, inspections, etc. The OSTR has operated an average of 25.4 hours per week during this nine-year period. Each year, about 20 academic courses and 30 different research projects use the OSTR. Visitors to the facility average about 1,500 per year. No commercial radiations or services have been performed at the OSTR during this period. Special operator training courses are given at the OSTR at the rate of at least one per year. (author)

  9. Manipulating stand structure of Douglas-fir plantations for wildlife habitat and wood production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timothy B. Harrington

    2010-01-01

    In southwestern Oregon, a study was initiated by Oregon State University (OSU) in 1983 to determine effects of hardwood competition on Douglas-fir plantation development. The use of herbicides to uniformly suppress competing vegetation—especially fast-growing hardwoods—proved to be an effective approach to ensure dominance and a high level of productivity for planted...

  10. Anomalous Upwelling in Nan Wan: July 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Head Ruth H. Preller 7300 Security, Code 1226 Office of Couns sl.Code 1008.3 ADOR/Director NCST E. R. Franchi , 7000 Public Affairs (Unclassified...State University (OSU) tidal forcing drives the tidal currents. A global weather forecast model (Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction...system derives its open ocean boundary conditions from NRL global NCOM (Navy Co- astal Ocean Model) (Rhodes et al. 2002) that operates daily

  11. Chemical and Molecular Biological Aspects of Alkylhydrazine-Induced Carcinogenesis in Human Cells in Vitro. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-01

    DMH) and the metabolite methylazoxymethanol acetate ( MAMA ) have been shown to induce cancer in vivo in several species of rodents producing a variety of...The Pharmaceutical and Toxicological Research Institute (PTRI) I Co-Director, Developmental Chemotherapeutics, OSU Comprehensive Cancer Center...NNL[Methyl-l 4 C] I -dimethylhydrazine) of high specific activity Chapter III - Synthesis of (14 C] -labeled methylazoxymethanol 13 acetate ( MAMA ) of

  12. Microscale Enhancement of Heat and Mass Transfer for Hydrogen Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drost, Kevin [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Jovanovic, Goran [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Paul, Brian [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2015-09-30

    The document summarized the technical progress associated with OSU’s involvement in the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence. OSU focused on the development of microscale enhancement technologies for improving heat and mass transfer in automotive hydrogen storage systems. OSU’s key contributions included the development of an extremely compact microchannel combustion system for discharging hydrogen storage systems and a thermal management system for adsorption based hydrogen storage using microchannel cooling (the Modular Adsorption Tank Insert or MATI).

  13. Compliance with federal and state regulations regarding the emergency response plan and physical security plan at the Oregon State TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.G.; Ringle, J.C.; Anderson, T.V.

    1976-01-01

    Recent legislative actions within the State of Oregon have had a significant impact upon the OSU TRIGA Emergency Response Plan, and to a lesser extent upon the Physical Security Plan. These state imposed changes will be reviewed in light of existing federal requirements. With the upcoming acquisition of FLIP fuel in August 1976, NRC required several major changes to the existing Physical Security Plan. Within the limitations of public disclosure, these changes will be contrasted to the present plan. (author)

  14. Kinetics of the Electric Discharge Pumped Oxygen-Iodine Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    of the sustainer pulse is tailored to keep the discharge stable. In January 2007, OSU demonstrated a peak laser power of 0.28 W, using a pulser...controlled avalanche ionization, Applied Physics Letters, 22, p. 670, (1973). (57) Hill. A.E., The next generation of controlled avalanche discharge ...pressure oxygen pulsed discharge . Simple and quick method for temperature determination, J. Phys. D:Appl. Phys. 32, pp. 246-250, (1998). (71

  15. Using Open Source Tools to Create a Mobile Optimized, Crowdsourced Translation Tool

    OpenAIRE

    Evviva Weinraub Lajoie; Trey Terrell; Susan McEvoy; Eva Kaplan; Ariel Schwartz; Esther Ajambo

    2014-01-01

    In late 2012, OSU Libraries and Press partnered with Maria's Libraries, an NGO in Rural Kenya, to provide users the ability to crowdsource translations of folk tales and existing children's books into a variety of African languages, sub-languages, and dialects. Together, these two organizations have been creating a mobile optimized platform using open source libraries such as Wink Toolkit (a library which provides mobile-friendly interaction from a website) and Globalize3 to allow for multipl...

  16. The Use of Substances Other Than Nicotine in Electronic Cigarettes Among College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Deric R Kenne; Rebecca L Fischbein; Andy SL Tan; Mark Banks

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) have grown in popularity, especially among youth and young adults. Although e-cigarettes were originally intended to vaporize a liquid mixture containing nicotine, there appears to be an increasing trend in other substance use in e-cigarettes (OSUE). Materials and methods: Cross-sectional data from 1542 undergraduate college student e-cigarette users from a large Midwestern university were collected via online survey to assess prevalence of e...

  17. Fully Adaptive Radar Modeling and Simulation Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    using an object oriented programming (OOP) approach. It includes a FAR engine to control the operation of the perception-action (PA) cycle and...is unlimited 41 NATO North Atlantic Treaty Organization OOP object oriented programming OSU The Ohio State University PA perception-action PDF...development and testing on simulated, previously collected, and real-time streaming data. The architecture is coded in MATLAB using an object oriented

  18. N-hydroxysuccinimide-hippuran ester: application for radiolabeling of macromolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chervu, L.R.; Chun, S.B.; Bhargava, K.K.

    1987-01-01

    A method for synthesis of N-hydroxysuccinimide ester of radioactive orthoiodohippurric acid (OIH-OSU) is developed in order to label macromolecules including antibodies. The OIH-OSU is prepared in 87% yield by reacting molar equivalents of o-iodohippuric acid, N:N-di-succinimidyl carbonate and pyridine in DMF overnight. The active labeled ester is obtained using high specific activity OIH in a similar synthetic protocol. Conjugation of OIH-OSU to human serum albumin is effected by incubating the reactants for half an hour at room temperature followed by purification of the labeled protein on a Sephadex G-100 column with activity yield of 44.3%. Organ distribution for the labeled albumin preparation and the commercial iodinated human serum albumin (RISA) in mice and rats is similar. As expected urinary excretion of radioactivity for the labeled preparation is greater than that of RISA reflecting the rapid urinary clearance of the OIH moiety released into the bloodstream. Hippuran labeling method offers a mild and rapid protocol for radioiodine labeling of proteins and antibodies for application in diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures

  19. Building a platform for scientific-research cooperation under circumstances of realized asymmetry of potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiśniowski Witold

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Growing complexity of the environment arising both from the processes of globalization in world economy and from the development processes in Poland has become a strategic challenge for the Institute of Aviation. Significant disproportions of the potential of Poland, compared to Germany, United States, or China (especially in terms of the economic dimension and the adopted model for financing scientific research, as well as distant position of Polish universities on the scientific map of the world lead to the necessity to create a model for managing the Institute of Aviation based on internationalization of research and cooperation with leading scientific and (Ohio State University – OSU technological centres (General Electric – GE. The experiences of the Institute of Aviation show that what should be the basis of international competitiveness of research institutes is well educated scientific personnel, modern research infrastructure and competences of cooperation. A proof of this is 16-year-long strategic alliance (private-public partnership of the Institute and GE, cooperation with OSU and activities in European research consortia. The innovative dimension of scientific cooperation with OSU (2+2 formula, research internships, commission for predicting new directions of scientific research and other foreign partners allows the Institute of Aviation to achieve success in competition of international character.

  20. Problems connected with the production of highly specific antisera against prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and prostaglandin A2 (PGA2) for radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopp, H.G.; Vetter, W.; Siegenthaler, W.

    1977-01-01

    To obtain sensitive and specific antisera against PGE 2 and PGA 2 these substances were coupled to thyroglobulin (Tg). Coupling reactions were either performed by using a hydroxysuccinimideester as intermediate step leading to a complex carrying 170 mol PGE 2 per mol Tg ('PGE 2 -OSU-Tg') and 240 mol PGA 2 per mol Tg ('PGA 2 -OSU-Tg') or alternatively by using N,N'-carbonyl-diimidazole resulting in 'PGE 2 -CDI-Tg' (400 mol PGE 2 per mol Tg) and 'PGA 2 -CDI-Tg' (600 mol PGA 2 per mol Tg). Two tracer systems ( 3 H-prostaglandin, 125 I-histamine-prostaglandin) were used for analysis of antibody activity. Both PGE 2 - and PGA 2 -CDI-Tg complexes were poor immunogens in rabbits. The PGE 2 - and PGA 2 -OSU-Tg conjugates were injected both in rabbits and in guinea pigs. These two compounds resulted in very high antibody titers in both animal species. However, in guinea pigs markedly higher antibody sensitivity and antibody specificity were observed than in rabbits. Our results indicate that the guinea pig may be the animal of choice for immunization against prostaglandins. Antibody specificity of guinea pig antisera may be perhaps high enough to measure the concentration of PGE 2 and PGA 2 in the presence of other prostaglandins or prostaglandin metabolites. (orig.) [de

  1. Globally covering a-priori regional gravity covariance models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Arabelos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Gravity anomaly data generated using Wenzel’s GPM98A model complete to degree 1800, from which OSU91A has been subtracted, have been used to estimate covariance functions for a set of globally covering equal-area blocks of size 22.5° × 22.5° at Equator, having a 2.5° overlap. For each block an analytic covariance function model was determined. The models are based on 4 parameters: the depth to the Bjerhammar sphere (determines correlation, the free-air gravity anomaly variance, a scale factor of the OSU91A error degree-variances and a maximal summation index, N, of the error degree-variances. The depth of Bjerhammar-sphere varies from -134km to nearly zero, N varies from 360 to 40, the scale factor from 0.03 to 38.0 and the gravity variance from 1081 to 24(10µms-22. The parameters are interpreted in terms of the quality of the data used to construct OSU91A and GPM98A and general conditions such as the occurrence of mountain chains. The variation of the parameters show that it is necessary to use regional covariance models in order to obtain a realistic signal to noise ratio in global applications.Key words. GOCE mission, Covariance function, Spacewise approach`

  2. Hydrogeology and geochemistry of low-permeability oil-shales - Case study from HaShfela sub-basin, Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burg, Avihu; Gersman, Ronen

    2016-09-01

    Low permeability rocks are of great importance given their potential role in protecting underlying aquifers from surface and buried contaminants. Nevertheless, only limited data for these rocks is available. New appraisal wells drilled into the oil shale unit (OSU) of the Mt. Scopus Group in the HaShfela sub-basin, Central Israel, provided a one-time opportunity for detailed study of the hydrogeology and geochemistry of this very low permeability unit. Methods used include: slug tests, electrical logs, televiewer imaging, porosity and permeability measurements on core samples, chemical analyses of the rock column and groundwater analyses. Slug tests yielded primary indication to the low permeability of the OSU despite its high porosity (30-40%). Hydraulic conductivities as low as 10-10-10-12 m/s were calculated, using both the Hvorslev and Cooper-Bredehoeft-Papadopulos decoding methods. These low conductivities were confirmed by direct measurements of permeability in cores, and from calculations based on the Kozeny-Carman approach. Storativity was found to be 1 · 10-6 and specific storage - 3.8 · 10-9 m-1. Nevertheless, the very limited water flow in the OSU is argued to be driven gravitationally. The extremely slow recovery rates as well as the independent recovery of two adjacent wells, despite their initial large head difference of 214 m, indicate that the natural fractures are tight and are impermeable due to the confining stress at depth. Laboratory measured permeability is similar or even higher than the field-measured values, thereby confirming that fractures and bedding planes do not form continuous flow paths. The vertical permeability along the OSU is highly variable, implying hydraulic stratification and extremely low vertical hydraulic conductivity. The high salinity of the groundwater (6300-8000 mgCl/L) within the OSU and its chemical and isotopic compositions are explained by the limited water flow, suggesting long residence time of the water

  3. Complete genome sequence of Francisella tularensis subspecies holarctica FTNF002-00.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi D Barabote

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis subspecies holarctica FTNF002-00 strain was originally obtained from the first known clinical case of bacteremic F. tularensis pneumonia in Southern Europe isolated from an immunocompetent individual. The FTNF002-00 complete genome contains the RD(23 deletion and represents a type strain for a clonal population from the first epidemic tularemia outbreak in Spain between 1997-1998. Here, we present the complete sequence analysis of the FTNF002-00 genome. The complete genome sequence of FTNF002-00 revealed several large as well as small genomic differences with respect to two other published complete genome sequences of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica strains, LVS and OSU18. The FTNF002-00 genome shares >99.9% sequence similarity with LVS and OSU18, and is also approximately 5 MB smaller by comparison. The overall organization of the FTNF002-00 genome is remarkably identical to those of LVS and OSU18, except for a single 3.9 kb inversion in FTNF002-00. Twelve regions of difference ranging from 0.1-1.5 kb and forty-two small insertions and deletions were identified in a comparative analysis of FTNF002-00, LVS, and OSU18 genomes. Two small deletions appear to inactivate two genes in FTNF002-00 causing them to become pseudogenes; the intact genes encode a protein of unknown function and a drug:H(+ antiporter. In addition, we identified ninety-nine proteins in FTNF002-00 containing amino acid mutations compared to LVS and OSU18. Several non-conserved amino acid replacements were identified, one of which occurs in the virulence-associated intracellular growth locus subunit D protein. Many of these changes in FTNF002-00 are likely the consequence of direct selection that increases the fitness of this subsp. holarctica clone within its endemic population. Our complete genome sequence analyses lay the foundation for experimental testing of these possibilities.

  4. Creating and evaluating a new clicker methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengfei

    "Clickers", an in-class polling system, has been used by many instructors to add active learning and formative assessment to previously passive traditional lectures. While considerable research has been conducted on clicker increasing student interaction in class, less research has been reported on the effectiveness of using clicker to help students understand concepts. This thesis reported a systemic project by the OSU Physics Education group to develop and test a new clicker methodology. Clickers question sequences based on a constructivist model of learning were used to improve classroom dynamics and student learning. They also helped students and lecturers understand in real time whether a concept had been assimilated or more effort was required. Chapter 1 provided an introduction to the clicker project. Chapter 2 summarized widely-accepted teaching principles that have arisen from a long history of research and practice in psychology, cognitive science and physics education. The OSU clicker methodology described in this thesis originated partly from our years of teaching experience, but mostly was based on these teaching principles. Chapter 3 provided an overview of the history of clicker technology and different types of clickers. Also, OSU's use of clickers was summarized together with a list of common problems and corresponding solutions. These technical details may be useful for those who want to use clickers. Chapter 4 discussed examples of the type and use of question sequences based on the new clicker methodology. In several years of research, we developed a base of clicker materials for calculus-based introductory physics courses at OSU. As discussed in chapter 5, a year-long controlled quantitative study was conducted to determine whether using clickers helps students learn, how using clickers helps students learn and whether students perceive that clicker has a positive effect on their own learning process. The strategy for this test was based on

  5. A Rationally Designed Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor with Distinct Antitumor Activity against Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Ting Yang

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs are a class of antineoplastic agents previously demonstrating preclinical chemosensitizing activity against drug-resistant cancer cells and mouse xenografts. However, whereas clinical studies have shown efficacy against human hematologic malignancies, solid tumor trials have proved disappointing. We previously developed a novel HDACI, “OSU-HDAC42,” and herein examine its activity against ovarian cancer cell lines and xenografts. OSU-HDAC42, (i unlike most HDACIs, elicited a more than five-fold increase in G2-phase cells, at 2.5 µM, with G2 arrest followed by apoptosis; (ii at 1.0 µM, completely repressed messenger RNA expression of the cell cycle progression gene cdc2; (iii at low doses (0.25–1.0 µM for 24 hours, induced tumor cell epithelial differentiation, as evidenced by morphology changes and a more than five-fold up-regulation of epithelium-specific cytokeratins; (iv potently abrogated the growth of numerous ovarian cancer cells, with IC50 values of 0.5 to 1.0 µM, whereas also remaining eight-fold less toxic (IC50 of 8.6 µM to normal ovarian surface epithelial cells; and (v chemosensitizated platinum-resistant mouse xenografts to cisplatin. Compared with the clinically approved HDACI suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (vorinostat, 1.0 µM OSU-HDAC42 was more biochemically potent (i.e., enzyme-inhibitory, as suggested by greater gene up-regulation and acetylation of both histone and nonhistone proteins. In p53-dysfunctional cells, however, OSU-HDAC42 was two- to eight-fold less inductive of p53-regulated genes, whereas also having a two-fold higher IC50 than p53-functional cells, demonstrating some interaction with p53 tumor-suppressive cascades. These findings establish OSU-HDAC42 as a promising therapeutic agent for drug-resistant ovarian cancer and justify its further investigation.

  6. Insights from Severe Accident Analyses for Verification of VVER SAMG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaikwad, A. J.; Rao, R. S.; Gupta, A.; Obaidurrahaman, K., E-mail: avinashg@aerb.gov.in [Nuclear Safety Analysis Division, Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, Mumbai (India)

    2014-10-15

    The severe accident analyses of simultaneous rupture of all four steam lines (case-a), simultaneous occurrence of LOCA with SBO (case-b) and Station blackout (case-c) were performed with the computer code ASTEC V2r2 for a typical VVER-1000. The results obtained will be used for verification of sever accident provisions and Severe Accident Management Guidelines (SAMG). Auxiliary feed water and emergency core cooling systems are modelled as boundary conditions. The ICARE module is used to simulate the reactor core, which is divided into five radial regions by grouping similarly powered fuel assemblies together. Initially, CESAR module computes thermal hydraulics in primary and secondary circuits. As soon as core uncovery begins, the ICARE module is actuated based on certain parameters, and after this, ICARE module computes the thermal hydraulics in the core, bypass, downcomer and the lower plenum. CESAR handles the remaining components in the primary and secondary loops. CPA module is used to simulate the containment and to predict the thermal-hydraulic and hydrogen behaviour in the containment. The accident sequences were selected in such a way that they cover low/high pressure and slow/fast core damage progression events. Events simulated included slow progression events with high pressure and fast accident progression with low primary pressure. Analysis was also carried out for the case of SBO with the opening of the PORVs when core exit temperature exceeds certain value as part of SAMG. Time step sensitivity study was carried out for LOCA with SBO. In general the trends and magnitude of the parameters are as expected. The key results of the above analyses are presented in this paper. (author)

  7. Analytical techniques for instrument design - matrix methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    We take the traditional Cooper-Nathans approach, as has been applied for many years for steady-state triple-axis spectrometers, and consider its generalisation to other inelastic scattering spectrometers. This involves a number of simple manipulations of exponentials of quadratic forms. In particular, we discuss a toolbox of matrix manipulations that can be performed on the 6- dimensional Cooper-Nathans matrix: diagonalisation (Moller-Nielsen method), coordinate changes e.g. from (Δk I ,Δk F to ΔE, ΔQ ampersand 2 dummy variables), integration of one or more variables (e.g. over such dummy variables), integration subject to linear constraints (e.g. Bragg's Law for analysers), inversion to give the variance-covariance matrix, and so on. We show how these tools can be combined to solve a number of important problems, within the narrow-band limit and the gaussian approximation. We will argue that a generalised program that can handle multiple different spectrometers could (and should) be written in parallel to the Monte-Carlo packages that are becoming available. We will also discuss the complementarity between detailed Monte-Carlo calculations and the approach presented here. In particular, Monte-Carlo methods traditionally simulate the real experiment as performed in practice, given a model scattering law, while the Cooper-Nathans method asks the inverse question: given that a neutron turns up in a particular spectrometer configuration (e.g. angle and time of flight), what is the probability distribution of possible scattering events at the sample? The Monte-Carlo approach could be applied in the same spirit to this question

  8. Purchase of Journal Portfolios by Research Libraries is not Cost-Effective and May Lead to Normalization of Collections. A Review of: Murphy, Sarah Ann. “The Effects of Portfolio Purchasing on Scientific Subject Collections.” College & Research Libraries July 2008: 332-40.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Walker

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives – To determine whether the purchase of journal portfolios (i.e., packages of journals purchased as a group from publishers, such as Elsevier’s ScienceDirect from publishers is an effective means of meeting research needs for faculty in the life, medical, physical, and applied sciences, and to determine the effects of such purchases on research library collections.Design – Citation analysis.Setting – Ohio State University libraries in the life, medical, physical, and applied sciences.Subjects – A total of 253,604 citations from 6,815 articles published between the years 2003 and 2005 by Ohio State University faculty in the life, medical, physical, and applied sciences were analyzed using the Bradford distribution (an explanation of the Bradford Distribution is provided later in this review.Methods – Using ISI’s Science Citation Index,the author generated a list of articles published by Ohio State University (OSU faculty in the life, medical, physical, and applied sciences between the years 2003 and 2005. The author then assigned each article to a specific discipline, according to the OSU College of the first OSU author listed. For example, if an article was written by several co-authors, and the first OSU author listed was a faculty member in OSU’s College of Dentistry, the article would be designated a Dentistry article. Multi-disciplinary works were assigned to the college of the first OSU author listed. (The OSU Colleges considered to be part of the study were the College of Biological Sciences; the College of Dentistry; the College of Engineering; Food, Agriculture, and Environmental Sciences; the College of Mathematical and Physical Sciences; the College of Medicine; the College of Optometry; the College of Pharmacy; and the College of Veterinary Medicine. Books, conference proceedings, theses, and other non-journal materials were excluded from the set of citations considered. Next, the author pulled journal

  9. Less reality, more security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekert, Artur

    2009-09-01

    On 25 March 1935 John Tate, the then editor of Physical Review, received a paper that Einstein had co-authored with Boris Podolsky and Nathan Rosen, his younger colleagues at Princeton. The logbooks of Physical Review show that the EPR paper, as it has since become known, bypassed the refereeing process and went straight to press. Four printed pages of beautifully constructed argument appeared in the 15 May issue. They were heralded by a brief article in the New York Times titled "Einstein attacks quantum theory". And so he did.

  10. Wrox Cross Platform Android and iOS Mobile Development Three-Pack

    CERN Document Server

    McClure, Wallace B; Croft, John J; Dick, Jonathan; Hardy, Chris; Olson, Scott; Hunter, John; Horgen, Ben; Goers, Kenny; Blyth, Rory; Dunn, Craig; Bowling, Martin

    2012-01-01

    A bundle of 3 best-selling and respected mobile development e-books from Wrox form a complete library on the key tools and techniques for developing apps across the hottest platforms including Android and iOS.  This collection includes the full content of these three books, at a special price:Professional Android Programming with Mono for Android and .NET/C#, ISBN: 9781118026434, by Wallace B. McClure, Nathan Blevins, John J. Croft, IV, Jonathan Dick, and Chris HardyProfessional iPhone Programming with MonoTouch and .NET/C#, ISBN: 9780470637821, by Wallace B. McClure, Rory Blyth, Craig Dunn, C

  11. Project AIR FORCE Modeling Capabilities for Support of Combat Operations in Denied Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    within the Air Force and OSD.7 First, we thank Generals Herbert Carlisle, PACAF/CC, and Janet Wolfenbarger, AFMC/CC, for sponsoring this work. Gen...A5X, Brig Gen (s) John Cherrey, AF/A5XS, Col Jordan Thomas, AFA5XS, Lt Col Nathan Mead , AF/A5XS, Col Rich Gannon, AF/A9F, Ray Miller, AF/A9FC...linear programming (LP), which was developed in the 1940s by George Danzig to solve problems relevant to military logistics. Setting up MIP is

  12. Acute and Two-Week Inhalation Toxicity Studies in Rats for Polyalphaolefin (PAO) Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Institute for Science and Education (ORISE)); Antonio Brown (ORISE); Joseph B. Brune (Level One Personnel); Kathy A. Frondorf, Nathan M. Gargas... Nutrition , International, LLC, Brentwood MO) and reverse osmosis purified municipal tap water, ad libitum. Rats were randomly assigned to exposure...0.00 Red blood cells (# x 106/µL) 9.08 0.69 8.82 0.83 8.86 0.52 9.01 0.44 Hemoglobin (g/dL) 15.08 1.29 14.70 1.65 14.87 1.16 15.06 0.78 Hematocrit

  13. Data points visualization that means something

    CERN Document Server

    Yau, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    A fresh look at visualization from the author of Visualize This Whether it's statistical charts, geographic maps, or the snappy graphical statistics you see on your favorite news sites, the art of data graphics or visualization is fast becoming a movement of its own. In Data Points: Visualization That Means Something, author Nathan Yau presents an intriguing complement to his bestseller Visualize This, this time focusing on the graphics side of data analysis. Using examples from art, design, business, statistics, cartography, and online media, he explores both

  14. Back to basics audio

    CERN Document Server

    Nathan, Julian

    1998-01-01

    Back to Basics Audio is a thorough, yet approachable handbook on audio electronics theory and equipment. The first part of the book discusses electrical and audio principles. Those principles form a basis for understanding the operation of equipment and systems, covered in the second section. Finally, the author addresses planning and installation of a home audio system.Julian Nathan joined the audio service and manufacturing industry in 1954 and moved into motion picture engineering and production in 1960. He installed and operated recording theaters in Sydney, Austra

  15. iPad in the Enterprise Developing and Deploying Business Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Clevenger, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    Discover how to plan, design, develop, and deploy iPad apps for the enterprise Having taken the enterprise by storm, iPads are now in the hands of workers in virtually every level of companies in almost every industry. But using iPad apps in the enterprise is more complex than simply clicking an icon from the App Store. It presents unique challenges around software development, system integration, information security, application deployment, and device management. That's where this book comes in. iPhone Life Enterprise Editor and veteran mobile consultant Nathan Clevenger presents a guide for

  16. Quantum communication and other quantum information technologies

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, FS

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available -Podolsky-Rosen Albert Einstein Boris Podolsky Nathan Rosen Quantum mechanics: measurements on one particle dictate the state of the other particle. Spontaneous decay Unstable particle x p ∆x ∆p – p. 4/41 Parametric down conversion One incoming photon→ Two outgoing... ⊲ Decay of entanglement in turbulence — Theory — Numerical simulations — Experimental results – p. 2/41 Quantum mechanics Neils Bohr Paul Dirac Erwin Schroedinger Werner Heisenberg Lasers Computers Microelectronics Transistors – p. 3/41 Einstein...

  17. Special Forces Values: How The Regiment’s Ethical Framework Influences Its Organizational Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    revolutionary Nathan Hale professed, “Every kind of service necessary to the public good becomes honorable by being necessary.”129 This is clear and...v17i4a03p_0001.htm. 130 USASOC, “ARSOF Next,” 31. 39 graces of other customers who are watching, he has failed to do good , even though the end...mentoring programs, flexible work hours, and training ”—all of which the SF Regiment offers to one degree or another—”can create bonds, which may be

  18. Workshop on Laser Diagnostics in Fluid Mechanics and Combustion Held in Fishermens Bend, Victoria on 30 September-1 October 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-01

    one of the signals 90 degrees out of phase. The two cross correlator outputs are proportional to the sine and cosine of the original phase difference...normally used in coal fired furnaces. Velocity and concentration of particles will help in better understanding of the eiosion and heat transfer...Technologies for a Clean Environment, Vol I paper 20.1 ppl-8, Vilamoura, Portugal , 3-6 Sep (1991). 4.27 [561 Proctor, D.; Nathan, G.J.; Luxton, R.E.; Pearson

  19. Symptom Characteristics and Medical History of an Online Sample of Women Who Experience Symptoms of Persistent Genital Arousal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackowich, Robyn; Pink, Leah; Gordon, Allan; Poirier, Évéline; Pukall, Caroline F

    2018-02-17

    Persistent genital arousal disorder (PGAD; Leiblum & Nathan, 2001 ) is characterized by distressing symptoms suggestive of genital arousal in the absence of subjective feelings of arousal. Although awareness of PGAD is growing, there continues to be a lack of systematic research on it. This study characterized an online sample of women with symptoms of persistent genital arousal (PGA) in terms of their symptom characteristics, medical comorbidities, symptom triggers, management strategies, and predictors of distress. Women reported diverse PGA symptoms, with almost half reporting painful symptoms, and most reported very high distress and negative emotions. Further research and awareness of PGA are needed to provide effective care for this population.

  20. Aromaticine, a sesquiterpene lactone from Amblyopappus pusillus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matías López-Rodríguez

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Aromaticine (systematic name: 4a,8-dimethyl-3-methylene-3,3a,4,4a,7a,8,9,9a-octahydroazuleno[6,5-b]furan-2,5-dione, C15H18O3, is a natural lactone isolated from Amblyopappus pusillus. The molecular structure and conformation agree with the results of Romo, Joseph-Nathan & Díaz [(1964. Tetrahedron, 20, 79–85]. The fused-ring system contains a seven-membered ring in a twist-boat conformation and two five-membered rings trans fused in envelope conformations.

  1. Lie algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobson, Nathan

    1979-01-01

    Lie group theory, developed by M. Sophus Lie in the 19th century, ranks among the more important developments in modern mathematics. Lie algebras comprise a significant part of Lie group theory and are being actively studied today. This book, by Professor Nathan Jacobson of Yale, is the definitive treatment of the subject and can be used as a textbook for graduate courses.Chapter I introduces basic concepts that are necessary for an understanding of structure theory, while the following three chapters present the theory itself: solvable and nilpotent Lie algebras, Carlan's criterion and its

  2. Baseball Physics: A New Mechanics Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagoner, Kasey; Flanagan, Daniel

    2018-05-01

    The game of baseball provides an interesting laboratory for experimenting with mechanical phenomena (there are many good examples in The Physics Teacher, available on Professor Alan Nathan's website, and discussed in Physics of Baseball & Softball). We have developed a lab, for an introductory-level physics course, that investigates many of these phenomena. The lab uses inexpensive, readily available equipment such as wooden baseball bats, baseballs, and actual Major League Baseball data. By the end of the lab, students have revisited many concepts they learned earlier in the semester and come away with an understanding of how to put seemingly disparate ideas together to analyze a fun sport.

  3. From the Spoon to the Town

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Jacques Terrin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The famous expression of Ernesto Nathan Rogers well represents an approach that, according to the author, every architect should adopt. Unlike the majority of architects, designers love to build relationships of trust and creativity with the future users of their products and are prone to collaborative work, especially in the field of manual craft and industrial production. Architects should take inspiration from said modus operandi, by adopting cooperative and trans-disciplinary processes, developing participatory approaches and embracing new methods to better manage complexity. By paying more attention to human and anthropological factors and by learning to listen to others, it may be possible to radically revolutionize architectural practices.

  4. Sass and compass in action

    CERN Document Server

    Netherland, Wynn; Eppstein, Chris; Mathis, Brandon

    2013-01-01

    Wynn Netherland is a full stack web creative. When he's not shipping awesome at GitHub, he co-hosts The Changelog Podcast and speaks at industry conferences.Nathan Weizenbaum is the creator and the lead developer of Sass. He's currently a software engineer working on Gmail at Google.Chris Eppstein has more than ten years of experience building web sites. An active member of the Ruby community, he's the creator of Compass, a member of the Sass core team, and maintains or contributes to dozens of open source projects.

  5. Basic algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobson, Nathan

    2009-01-01

    A classic text and standard reference for a generation, this volume and its companion are the work of an expert algebraist who taught at Yale for two decades. Nathan Jacobson's books possess a conceptual and theoretical orientation, and in addition to their value as classroom texts, they serve as valuable references.Volume I explores all of the topics typically covered in undergraduate courses, including the rudiments of set theory, group theory, rings, modules, Galois theory, polynomials, linear algebra, and associative algebra. Its comprehensive treatment extends to such rigorous topics as L

  6. Wavevector and energy resolution of the polarized diffuse scattering spectrometer D7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fennell, T., E-mail: tom.fennell@psi.ch [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering and Imaging, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Mangin-Thro, L., E-mail: mangin-throl@ill.fr [Institut Laue-Langevin, 71 avenue des Martyrs, CS 20156 - 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Mutka, H., E-mail: mutka@ill.fr [Institut Laue-Langevin, 71 avenue des Martyrs, CS 20156 - 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Nilsen, G.J., E-mail: goran.nilsen@stfc.ac.uk [ISIS Neutron and Muon Source, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Wildes, A.R., E-mail: wildes@ill.fr [Institut Laue-Langevin, 71 avenue des Martyrs, CS 20156 - 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2017-06-11

    The instrumental divergence parameters and resolution for the D7 neutron diffuse scattering spectrometer at the Institut Laue-Langevin, France, are presented. The resolution parameters are calibrated against measurements of powders, single crystals, and the incoherent scattering from vanadium. We find that the powder diffraction resolution is well described by the Cagliotti function, the single crystal resolution function can be parameterized using the Cooper-Nathans formalism, and that in time-of-flight mode the energy resolution is consistent with monochromatic focussing.

  7. Young children's emergent science competencies in family and school contexts: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Kathryn Jean

    To address the lack of research in early science learning and on young children's informal science experiences, this 6-month long case study investigated an 8-year-old boy's emergent science competencies and his science experiences in family and school contexts. The four research questions used to guide this investigation were: (1) What are Nathan's emergent science competencies? (2) What are Nathan's science experiences in a family context? How does family learning contribute to his emergent science competencies? (3) What are Nathan's science experiences in school? How does school learning contribute to his emergent science competencies? (4) What is the role of parents and teachers in fostering emergent science competencies? My intensive 6-month fieldwork generated multiple data sources including field notes of 12 classroom observations, one parent interview, eight child interviews, one classroom teacher interview, and observation of eight family produced videos. In addition, I collected a parent journal including 38 entries of the child's how and why questions, a child digital photo journal including 15 entries of when Nathan saw or participated in science, and 25 various documents of work completed in the classroom. First, I analyzed data through an on-going and recursive process. Then, I applied several cycles of open coding to compare and contrast science learning between home and school, establish clear links between research questions and data, and form categories. Finally, I applied a cycle of holistic coding to categorized data that eventually culminated into themes. As a method of quality control, I shared my interpretations with the family and classroom teacher throughout the study. Findings revealed, Nathan's pre-scientific views of science were fluid and playful, he saw differences between the science he did at home and that he did in school, but he was able to articulate a relatively complex understanding of scientists' collaborative efforts. Nathan

  8. Calling all LEGO lovers! Add a mini control room to your collection

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2015-01-01

    The mini LHC Lego project launched in March (see here) now has almost 6,000 supporters - well on its way to the 10,000 votes needed for it to (hopefully!) hit store shelves. This week, the project added a new feature to its line: a mini control centre! The new LEGO Control centre, featuring operators "Kerstin" and "Marco".   The mini LHC project is the brainchild of ATLAS PhD student Nathan Readioff, who designed Lego replicas of the LHC and the ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb experiments on a micro scale. Each detector model is small enough to fit in the palm of your hand but crammed with detailed internal systems revealed by cutaway walls. Every major detector component is represented by a Lego piece. Now, Nathan has created a control centre to complement the mini LHC project. This would be an add-on feature for Lego’s consideration, should they decide to develop the accelerator into a box set. “The control centre is ...

  9. Developing and fostering a dynamic program for training in veterinary pathology and clinical pathology: veterinary students to post-graduate education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lairmore, Michael D; Oglesbee, Michael; Weisbrode, Steve E; Wellman, Maxey; Rosol, Thomas; Stromberg, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Recent reports project a deficiency of veterinary pathologists, indicating a need to train highly qualified veterinary pathologists, particularly in academic veterinary medicine. The need to provide high-quality research training for veterinary pathologists has been recognized by the veterinary pathology training program of the Ohio State University (OSU) since its inception. The OSU program incorporates elements of both residency training and graduate education into a unified program. This review illustrates the components and structure of the training program and reflects on future challenges in training veterinary pathologists. Key elements of the OSU program include an experienced faculty, dedicated staff, and high-quality students who have a sense of common mission. The program is supported through cultural and infrastructure support. Financial compensation, limited research funding, and attractive work environments, including work-life balance, will undoubtedly continue to be forces in the marketplace for veterinary pathologists. To remain competitive and to expand the ability to train veterinary pathologists with research skills, programs must support strong faculty members, provide appropriate infrastructure support, and seek active partnerships with private industry to expand program opportunities. Shortages of trained faculty may be partially resolved by regional cooperation to share faculty expertise or through the use of communications technology to bridge distances between programs. To foster continued interest in academic careers, training programs will need to continue to evolve and respond to trainees' needs while maintaining strong allegiances to high-quality pathology training. Work-life balance, collegial environments that foster a culture of respect for veterinary pathology, and continued efforts to reach out to veterinary students to provide opportunities to learn about the diverse careers offered in veterinary pathology will pay long

  10. Dietary supply of selenium for adolescents in three residential care orphanages in Southern Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adotey, Dennis K.; Stibilj, Vekoslava; Serfor-Armah, Yaw; Nyarko, Benjamin J.B.; Jaćimović, Radojko

    2011-01-01

    Adolescents require optimum dietary supply of the essential trace mineral selenium (Se); however the absence of reliable and accurate data on the dietary supply of selenium for the adolescent population in Ghanaian residential care orphanages have made it difficult for public health nutritionists to assess the adequacy of the dietary supply. The dietary supply of selenium for adolescents (12–15 years) in three residential care orphanages, (Osu, Tutu-Akwapim and Teshie), in Southern Ghana have been evaluated by sampling their 24-h duplicate diets (including water) for 7-consecutive days using the duplicate diet sampling technique. The mass fraction of selenium in the blended lyophilized homogenates of duplicate diets was determined by radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA). The validity of the RNAA method for selenium determination was checked by analyses of NIST SRM 1548a (Typical diet). The chemical yield of the radiochemical separation was determined by spectrophotometry. The average mass fractions of selenium in the blended lyophilized 24-hour duplicate diets for Osu, Tutu-Akwapim and Teshie were; 165 ± 61 [117.2–285.2], 203 ± 68 [110.5–304.9] and 250 ± 92 [128.8–408.0] ng Se g −1 lyophilized matter respectively. The average dietary supply of Se were, 57.6 ± 17.3 [42.2–88.4], 82.0 ± 30.7 [44.3–136.2] and 91.7 ± 44.2 [46.0–153.4] μg Se day −1 for Osu, Tutu-Akwapim and Teshie orphanages respectively. The data generated will help public health nutritionists in the provision of dietary advice and nutritional support for the studied orphanages, as well as other orphanages. The data will also help in the planning of institutional diets.

  11. Genome Enabled Discovery of Carbon Sequestration Genes in Poplar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filichkin, Sergei; Etherington, Elizabeth; Ma, Caiping; Strauss, Steve

    2007-02-22

    The goals of the S.H. Strauss laboratory portion of 'Genome-enabled discovery of carbon sequestration genes in poplar' are (1) to explore the functions of candidate genes using Populus transformation by inserting genes provided by Oakridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the University of Florida (UF) into poplar; (2) to expand the poplar transformation toolkit by developing transformation methods for important genotypes; and (3) to allow induced expression, and efficient gene suppression, in roots and other tissues. As part of the transformation improvement effort, OSU developed transformation protocols for Populus trichocarpa 'Nisqually-1' clone and an early flowering P. alba clone, 6K10. Complete descriptions of the transformation systems were published (Ma et. al. 2004, Meilan et. al 2004). Twenty-one 'Nisqually-1' and 622 6K10 transgenic plants were generated. To identify root predominant promoters, a set of three promoters were tested for their tissue-specific expression patterns in poplar and in Arabidopsis as a model system. A novel gene, ET304, was identified by analyzing a collection of poplar enhancer trap lines generated at OSU (Filichkin et. al 2006a, 2006b). Other promoters include the pGgMT1 root-predominant promoter from Casuarina glauca and the pAtPIN2 promoter from Arabidopsis root specific PIN2 gene. OSU tested two induction systems, alcohol- and estrogen-inducible, in multiple poplar transgenics. Ethanol proved to be the more efficient when tested in tissue culture and greenhouse conditions. Two estrogen-inducible systems were evaluated in transgenic Populus, neither of which functioned reliably in tissue culture conditions. GATEWAY-compatible plant binary vectors were designed to compare the silencing efficiency of homologous (direct) RNAi vs. heterologous (transitive) RNAi inverted repeats. A set of genes was targeted for post transcriptional silencing in the model Arabidopsis system; these include the floral

  12. Calibration of A Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) Facility: Experience at the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norlida Yussup

    2011-01-01

    A prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) facility at Oregon State University (OSU) TRIGA reactor has been built in year 2008 and been operated since then. PGNAA is a technique used to determine the presence and quantity of trace elements such as boron, hydrogen and carbon which are more difficult to detect with other neutron analysis method. A calibration is essential to ensure the system works as required and the output is valid and reliable. The calibration was carried out by using Standard Reference Material (SRM). Besides, background data was also acquired for comparisons and analysis. The results are analyzed and discussed in this paper. (author)

  13. Oklahoma State University proposed Advanced Technology Research Center. Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) evaluating the construction and equipping of the proposed Advanced Technology Research Center (ATRC) at Oklahoma State University (OSU) in Stillwater, Oklahoma. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required.

  14. Domain Specific Language Support for Exascale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadayappan, Ponnuswamy [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2017-02-24

    Domain-Specific Languages (DSLs) offer an attractive path to Exascale software since they provide expressive power through appropriate abstractions and enable domain-specific optimizations. But the advantages of a DSL compete with the difficulties of implementing a DSL, even for a narrowly defined domain. The DTEC project addresses how a variety of DSLs can be easily implemented to leverage existing compiler analysis and transformation capabilities within the ROSE open source compiler as part of a research program focusing on Exascale challenges. The OSU contributions to the DTEC project are in the area of code generation from high-level DSL descriptions, as well as verification of the automatically-generated code.

  15. Workshop on Topology and Geometric Group Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Fowler, James; Lafont, Jean-Francois; Leary, Ian

    2016-01-01

    This book presents articles at the interface of two active areas of research: classical topology and the relatively new field of geometric group theory. It includes two long survey articles, one on proofs of the Farrell–Jones conjectures, and the other on ends of spaces and groups. In 2010–2011, Ohio State University (OSU) hosted a special year in topology and geometric group theory. Over the course of the year, there were seminars, workshops, short weekend conferences, and a major conference out of which this book resulted. Four other research articles complement these surveys, making this book ideal for graduate students and established mathematicians interested in entering this area of research.

  16. Climate and transboundary water management issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjonback, D.

    1991-01-01

    The potential effects of climate change on transboundary river systems, major water uses, interjurisdictional arrangements, and water issues affecting water management in the Great Plains of Canada are discussed. Three atmospheric general circulation models (GCM) have been applied for a two times carbon dioxide concentration scenario for the Saskatchewan River system. The models were the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) model, the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) model, and the Oregon State University (OSU) model. For all models, soil moisture on the plains was reduced. The GISS model predicted slightly higher runoff for plains-originating streams, and a substantial increase in runoff (32%) in the Rockies. The GFDL model predicted lower runoffs in the plains and Rockies, with some locations near the Alberta-Saskatchewan border indicating zero runoff. The OSU model results generally bracketed the GISS and GFDL results, with total runoff approximating 1951-1980 mean. The GISS model indicated an increase in net basin supply of 28%, while the GFDL model, due to lower runoff and high soil moisture defecits, showed a decrease of 38%. For policy making, monitoring, and research, the GFDL model results can provide important guidelines. Greater attention to demand management and conservation will have short-term benefits in stretching the limited water resource base to support a larger economy, while providing flexibility to cope with future climate as it evolves. 1 ref

  17. Dietary intake of Arsenic, Iodine and Selenium by adolescents in three Orphanages in Southern Ghana using Radiochemical Neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adotey, K. D.

    2011-07-01

    Adolescents require optimum dietary supply of the essential trace minerals iodine (I) and selenium (Se). Their dietary exposure to arsenic (As), due to its natural presence in the diet, should be at levels that provides ample safety. Due to the late recognition of the critical nature of adolescent nutrition, there is scarce and almost non-existence of data on the adolescents dietary intake of As, I and Se; making it difficult for public health nutritionists to assess the adequacy of the dietary intake. The absence of data has also adversely affected the formulation of policies on adolescent nutrition and its integration into existing nutrition and health care programmes in Ghana. The dietary intake of As, I and Se for adolescents (12-15years) in three residential care orphanages, (Osu, Tutu- Akwapim, and Teshie), in Southern Ghana, have been evaluated by sampling their 24- hour total duplicate diets (including water) for 7-consecutive days using the duplicate diet sampling technique. The mass fraction of As, I and Se in the pooled blended lyophilized homogenates of duplicate diets was determined by radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA). The validity of the RNAA methods for As, I and Se determinations were respectively checked by analyses of NIST SRM 1548a (Typical Diet). The chemical yields (recovery of the respective radiochemical separation of As, I and Se were 90- 92%, 83-88%, and 78-85%. The mass fraction of arsenic in the lyophilized diets for Osu, Tutu-Akwapim and Teshie were 134 ± 104 [46-240], 146 ± 87 [39-355], and 189 ± 123 [69-348] ng As g -1 lyophilized matter. The dietary exposures to As were 47 ± 23 [17-84], 58 ± 44 [16-125] and 67 ± 28 [24-117] μg As day -1 for Osu, Tutu-Akwapim and Teshie orphanages respectively. The mass fraction of I in the lyophilized diets were 287 ± 95 [206-397], 286 ± 109 [201-386], and 961 ± 142 [588-1766] ng I g -1 lyophilized matter, for Osu, Tutu-Akwapim and Teshie respectively. The dietary intake of I

  18. Science-Based Simulation Model of Human Performance for Human Reliability Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, Dana L.; Boring, Ronald L.; Mosleh, Ali; Smidts, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Human reliability analysis (HRA), a component of an integrated probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), is the means by which the human contribution to risk is assessed, both qualitatively and quantitatively. However, among the literally dozens of HRA methods that have been developed, most cannot fully model and quantify the types of errors that occurred at Three Mile Island. Furthermore, all of the methods lack a solid empirical basis, relying heavily on expert judgment or empirical results derived in non-reactor domains. Finally, all of the methods are essentially static, and are thus unable to capture the dynamics of an accident in progress. The objective of this work is to begin exploring a dynamic simulation approach to HRA, one whose models have a basis in psychological theories of human performance, and whose quantitative estimates have an empirical basis. This paper highlights a plan to formalize collaboration among the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the University of Maryland, and The Ohio State University (OSU) to continue development of a simulation model initially formulated at the University of Maryland. Initial work will focus on enhancing the underlying human performance models with the most recent psychological research, and on planning follow-on studies to establish an empirical basis for the model, based on simulator experiments to be carried out at the INL and at the OSU.

  19. Theoretical studies in nuclear physics. Three year progress report and final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landau, R.H.; Madsen, V.A.

    1996-01-01

    In 1995 the DOE grant in Nuclear theory with Professors Rubin H. Landau and Victor A. Madsen as co-principal investigators ended. Their research was carried out in collaboration with graduate students in Corvallis, and with scientists at LLNL-Livermore, Los Alamos, TRIUMF, KFA-Julich, Hamburg University, Melbourne University, The Thinking Machine Corporation and IBM Research. Activities in nuclear and particle physics at Oregon State University (OSU) were diverse and active. Madsen's work concentrated on the relation of reactions to the nuclear structure, and Landau's work concentrated on intermediate energy physics, few-body problems, and computational physics. The Landau group had a weekly meeting of students and visitors. There was a weekly nuclear seminar with experimental and theoretical colleagues, and a weekly departmental colloquium. The DOE support had permitted the group to run Unix workstations networked to other computers in the Physics Department and the University. Since 1990 OSU has been using IBM RISC System 6000/model 530 with console and four X-stations. The equipment was purchased and is maintained with yearly DOE funding of the group

  20. Comparison of CRISPR/Cas9 expression constructs for efficient targeted mutagenesis in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Masafumi; Toki, Seiichi; Endo, Masaki

    2015-08-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system is an efficient tool used for genome editing in a variety of organisms. Despite several recent reports of successful targeted mutagenesis using the CRISPR/Cas9 system in plants, in each case the target gene of interest, the Cas9 expression system and guide-RNA (gRNA) used, and the tissues used for transformation and subsequent mutagenesis differed, hence the reported frequencies of targeted mutagenesis cannot be compared directly. Here, we evaluated mutation frequency in rice using different Cas9 and/or gRNA expression cassettes under standardized experimental conditions. We introduced Cas9 and gRNA expression cassettes separately or sequentially into rice calli, and assessed the frequency of mutagenesis at the same endogenous targeted sequences. Mutation frequencies differed significantly depending on the Cas9 expression cassette used. In addition, a gRNA driven by the OsU6 promoter was superior to one driven by the OsU3 promoter. Using an all-in-one expression vector harboring the best combined Cas9/gRNA expression cassette resulted in a much improved frequency of targeted mutagenesis in rice calli, and bi-allelic mutant plants were produced in the T0 generation. The approach presented here could be adapted to optimize the construction of Cas9/gRNA cassettes for genome editing in a variety of plants.

  1. Strong leadership and teamwork drive culture and performance change: Ohio State University Medical Center 2000-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, Fred; Bendapudi, Neeli; Rucci, Anthony; Schlesinger, Leonard

    2008-09-01

    Several characteristics of academic health centers have the potential to create high levels of internal conflict and misalignment that can pose significant leadership challenges. In September 2000, the positions of Ohio State University (OSU) senior vice president for health sciences, dean of the medical school, and the newly created position of chief executive officer of the OSU Medical Center (OSUMC) were combined under a single leader to oversee the OSUMC. This mandate from the president and trustees was modeled after top institutions with similar structures. The leader who assumed the role was tasked with improving OSUMC's academic, clinical, and financial performance. To achieve this goal, the senior vice president and his team employed the service value chain model of improving performance, based on the premise that leadership behavior/culture drives employee engagement/satisfaction, leading to customer satisfaction and improved organizational performance. Implementing this approach was a seven-step process: (1) selecting the right leadership team, (2) assessing the challenges and opportunities, (3) setting expectations for performance and leadership behavior, (4) aligning structures and functions, (5) engaging constituents, (6) developing leadership skills, and (7) defining strategies and tracking goals. The OSUMC setting during this period provides an observational case study to examine how these stepwise changes, instituted by strong leadership and teamwork, were able to make and implement sound decisions that drove substantial and measurable improvements in the engagement and satisfaction of faculty and staff; the satisfaction of students and patients; and academic, clinical, and financial performance.

  2. Testing of the multi-application small light water reactor (MASLWR) passive safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes, Jose N.; Groome, John; Woods, Brian G.; Young, Eric; Abel, Kent; Yao, You; Yoo, Yeon Jong

    2007-01-01

    Experimental thermal hydraulic research has been conducted at Oregon State University for the purpose of assessing the performance of a new reactor design concept, the multi-application small light water reactor (MASLWR). The MASLWR is a pressurized light water reactor design with a net output of 35 MWe that uses natural circulation in both normal and transient operation. Due to its small size, portability and modularity, the MASLWR design is well suited to help fill the potential need for grid appropriate reactor designs for smaller electricity grids as may be found in developing or remote regions. The purpose of the OSU MASLWR test facility is to assess the operation of the MASLWR under normal full operating pressure and full temperature conditions and to assess the passive safety systems under transient conditions. The data generated by the testing program will be used to assess computer code calculations and to provide a better understanding of the thermal-hydraulic phenomena in the design of the MASLWR NSSS. During this testing program, four tests were conducted at the OSU MASLWR test facility. These tests included one design basis accident and one beyond design basis accident. During the performance of these tests, plant operations to include start up, normal operation and shut down evolutions were demonstrated successfully

  3. Information on the Advanced Plant Experiment (APEX) Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Curtis Lee

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this report provides information related to the design of the Oregon State University Advanced Plant Experiment (APEX) test facility. Information provided in this report have been pulled from the following information sources: Reference 1: R. Nourgaliev and et.al, 'Summary Report on NGSAC (Next-Generation Safety Analysis Code) Development and Testing,' Idaho National Laboratory, 2011. Note that this is report has not been released as an external report. Reference 2: O. Stevens, Characterization of the Advanced Plant Experiment (APEX) Passive Residual Heat Removal System Heat Exchanger, Master Thesis, June 1996. Reference 3: J. Reyes, Jr., Q. Wu, and J. King, Jr., Scaling Assessment for the Design of the OSU APEX-1000 Test Facility, OSU-APEX-03001 (Rev. 0), May 2003. Reference 4: J. Reyes et al, Final Report of the NRC AP600 Research Conducted at Oregon State University, NUREG/CR-6641, July 1999. Reference 5: K. Welter et al, APEX-1000 Confirmatory Testing to Support AP1000 Design Certification (non-proprietary), NUREG-1826, August 2005.

  4. Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy – 33rd scale experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhinefrank, Kenneth E. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Lenee-Bluhm, Pukha [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Prudell, Joseph H. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Schacher, Alphonse A.; Hammagren, Erik J.; Zhang, Zhe [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.

    2013-07-29

    Columbia Power Technologies (ColPwr) and Oregon State University (OSU) jointly conducted a series of tests in the Tsunami Wave Basin (TWB) at the O.H. Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory (HWRL). These tests were run between November 2010 and February 2011. Models at 33rd scale representing Columbia Power’s Manta series Wave Energy Converter (WEC) were moored in configurations of one, three and five WEC arrays, with both regular waves and irregular seas generated. The primary research interest of ColPwr is the characterization of WEC response. The WEC response will be investigated with respect to power performance, range of motion and generator torque/speed statistics. The experimental results will be used to validate a numerical model. The primary research interests of OSU include an investigation into the effects of the WEC arrays on the near- and far-field wave propagation. This report focuses on the characterization of the response of a single WEC in isolation. To facilitate understanding of the commercial scale WEC, results will be presented as full scale equivalents.

  5. A NEW NETWORK FOR HIGHER-TEMPERATURE GAS-PHASE CHEMISTRY. I. A PRELIMINARY STUDY OF ACCRETION DISKS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Nanase; Herbst, Eric; Wakelam, Valentine

    2010-01-01

    We present a new interstellar chemical gas-phase reaction network for time-dependent kinetics that can be used for modeling high-temperature sources up to ∼800 K. This network contains an extended set of reactions based on the Ohio State University (OSU) gas-phase chemical network. The additional reactions include processes with significant activation energies, reverse reactions, proton exchange reactions, charge exchange reactions, and collisional dissociation. Rate coefficients already in the OSU network are modified for H 2 formation on grains, ion-neutral dipole reactions, and some radiative association reactions. The abundance of H 2 O is enhanced at high temperature by hydrogenation of atomic O. Much of the elemental oxygen is in the form of water at T ≥ 300 K, leading to effective carbon-rich conditions, which can efficiently produce carbon-chain species such as C 2 H 2 . At higher temperatures, HCN and NH 3 are also produced much more efficiently. We have applied the extended network to a simplified model of the accretion disk of an active galactic nucleus.

  6. The Boston Assessment of Traumatic Brain Injury-Lifetime (BAT-L) semistructured interview: evidence of research utility and validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortier, Catherine Brawn; Amick, Melissa M; Grande, Laura; McGlynn, Susan; Kenna, Alexandra; Morra, Lindsay; Clark, Alexandra; Milberg, William P; McGlinchey, Regina E

    2014-01-01

    Report the prevalence of lifetime and military-related traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) in Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) veterans and validate the Boston Assessment of TBI-Lifetime (BAT-L). The BAT-L is the first validated, postcombat, semistructured clinical interview to characterize head injuries and diagnose TBIs throughout the life span. Community-dwelling convenience sample of 131 OEF/OIF veterans. TBI criteria (alteration of mental status, posttraumatic amnesia, and loss of consciousness) were evaluated for all possible TBIs, including a novel evaluation of blast exposure. BAT-L, Ohio State University TBI Identification Method (OSU-TBI-ID). About 67% of veterans incurred a TBI in their lifetime. Almost 35% of veterans experienced at least 1 military-related TBI; all were mild in severity, 40% of them were due to blast, 50% were due to some other (ie, blunt) mechanism, and 10% were due to both types of injuries. Predeployment TBIs were frequent (45% of veterans). There was strong correspondence between the BAT-L and the OSU-TBI-ID (Cohen κ = 0.89; Kendall τ-b = 0.95). Interrater reliability of the BAT-L was strong (κs >0.80). The BAT-L is a valid instrument with which to assess TBI across a service member's lifetime and captures the varied and complex nature of brain injuries across OEF/OIF veterans' life span.

  7. Scaling Studies for High Temperature Test Facility and Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard R. Schult; Paul D. Bayless; Richard W. Johnson; James R. Wolf; Brian Woods

    2012-02-01

    The Oregon State University (OSU) High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) is an integral experimental facility that will be constructed on the OSU campus in Corvallis, Oregon. The HTTF project was initiated, by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), on September 5, 2008 as Task 4 of the 5-year High Temperature Gas Reactor Cooperative Agreement via NRC Contract 04-08-138. Until August, 2010, when a DOE contract was initiated to fund additional capabilities for the HTTF project, all of the funding support for the HTTF was provided by the NRC via their cooperative agreement. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began their involvement with the HTTF project in late 2009 via the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. Because the NRC's interests in HTTF experiments were only centered on the depressurized conduction cooldown (DCC) scenario, NGNP involvement focused on expanding the experimental envelope of the HTTF to include steady-state operations and also the pressurized conduction cooldown (PCC).

  8. TU-AB-202-02: Deformable Image Registration Accuracy Between External Beam Radiotherapy and HDR Brachytherapy CT Images for Cervical Cancer Using a 3D-Printed Deformable Pelvis Phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyasaka, Y; Kadoya, N; Ito, K; Chiba, M; Nakajima, Y; Dobashi, S; Takeda, K; Jingu, K; Kuroda, Y; Sato, K

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate deformable image registration (DIR) between external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and HDR brachytherapy (BT) CT images in cervical cancer is challenging. DSC has been evaluated only on the basis of the consistency of the structure, and its use does not guarantee an anatomically reasonable deformation. We evaluate the DIR accuracy for cervical cancer with DSC and anatomical landmarks using a 3D-printed pelvis phantom. Methods: A 3D-printed, deformable female pelvis phantom was created on the basis of the patient’s CT image. Urethane and silicon were used as materials for creating the uterus and bladder, respectively, in the phantom. We performed DIR in two cases: case-A with a full bladder (170 ml) in both the EBRT and BT images and case-B with a full bladder in the BT image and a half bladder (100 ml) in the EBRT image. DIR was evaluated using DSCs and 70 uterus and bladder landmarks. A Hybrid intensity and structure DIR algorithm with two settings (RayStation) was used. Results: In the case-A, DSCs of the intensity-based DIR were 0.93 and 0.85 for the bladder and uterus, respectively, whereas those of hybrid-DIR were 0.98 and 0.96, respectively. The mean landmark error values of intensity-based DIR were 0.73±0.29 and 1.70±0.19 cm for the bladder and uterus, respectively, whereas those of Hybrid-DIR were 0.43±0.33 and 1.23±0.25 cm, respectively. In both cases, the Hybrid-DIR accuracy was better than the intensity-based DIR accuracy for both evaluation methods. However, for several bladder landmarks, the Hybrid-DIR landmark errors were larger than the corresponding intensity-based DIR errors (e.g., 2.26 vs 1.25 cm). Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that Hybrid-DIR can perform with a better accuracy than the intensity-based DIR for both DSC and landmark errors; however, Hybrid-DIR shows a larger landmark error for some landmarks because the technique focuses on both the structure and intensity.

  9. TU-AB-202-02: Deformable Image Registration Accuracy Between External Beam Radiotherapy and HDR Brachytherapy CT Images for Cervical Cancer Using a 3D-Printed Deformable Pelvis Phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyasaka, Y; Kadoya, N; Ito, K; Chiba, M; Nakajima, Y; Dobashi, S; Takeda, K; Jingu, K [Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan); Kuroda, Y [Cybermedia Center, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka (Japan); Sato, K [Tohoku University Hospital, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Accurate deformable image registration (DIR) between external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and HDR brachytherapy (BT) CT images in cervical cancer is challenging. DSC has been evaluated only on the basis of the consistency of the structure, and its use does not guarantee an anatomically reasonable deformation. We evaluate the DIR accuracy for cervical cancer with DSC and anatomical landmarks using a 3D-printed pelvis phantom. Methods: A 3D-printed, deformable female pelvis phantom was created on the basis of the patient’s CT image. Urethane and silicon were used as materials for creating the uterus and bladder, respectively, in the phantom. We performed DIR in two cases: case-A with a full bladder (170 ml) in both the EBRT and BT images and case-B with a full bladder in the BT image and a half bladder (100 ml) in the EBRT image. DIR was evaluated using DSCs and 70 uterus and bladder landmarks. A Hybrid intensity and structure DIR algorithm with two settings (RayStation) was used. Results: In the case-A, DSCs of the intensity-based DIR were 0.93 and 0.85 for the bladder and uterus, respectively, whereas those of hybrid-DIR were 0.98 and 0.96, respectively. The mean landmark error values of intensity-based DIR were 0.73±0.29 and 1.70±0.19 cm for the bladder and uterus, respectively, whereas those of Hybrid-DIR were 0.43±0.33 and 1.23±0.25 cm, respectively. In both cases, the Hybrid-DIR accuracy was better than the intensity-based DIR accuracy for both evaluation methods. However, for several bladder landmarks, the Hybrid-DIR landmark errors were larger than the corresponding intensity-based DIR errors (e.g., 2.26 vs 1.25 cm). Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that Hybrid-DIR can perform with a better accuracy than the intensity-based DIR for both DSC and landmark errors; however, Hybrid-DIR shows a larger landmark error for some landmarks because the technique focuses on both the structure and intensity.

  10. Towards the chiral metabolomics: Liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry based DL-amino acid analysis after labeling with a new chiral reagent, (S)-2,5-dioxopyrrolidin-1-yl-1-(4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl) pyrrolidine-2-carboxylate, and the application to saliva of healthy volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochizuki, Toshiki; Takayama, Takahiro; Todoroki, Kenichiro; Inoue, Koichi; Min, Jun Zhe; Toyo’oka, Toshimasa, E-mail: toyooka@u-shizuoka-ken.ac.jp

    2015-05-22

    Highlights: • A novel chiral labeling reagent was synthesized. • Analysis of DL-amino acids was performed by UPLC–ESI-MS/MS. • Efficient enantioseparation and detection of DL-amino acids were performed. • DL-Amino acid in saliva was successfully determined under mild conditions. - Abstract: A novel triazine-type chiral derivatization reagent, i.e., (S)-2,5-dioxopyrrolidin-1-yl-1-(4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl) pyrrolidine-2-carboxylate (DMT-(S)-Pro-OSu), was developed for the highly sensitive and selective detection of chiral amines and amino acids by UPLC–MS/MS analysis. The enantiomers of amino acids were easily labeled with the reagents at room temperature within 40 min in an alkaline medium containing triethylamine. The diastereomers derived from proteolytic amino acids, except serine, were well separated under isocratic elution conditions by reversed-phase chromatography using an ODS column (R{sub s} = 1.2–9.0). DL-Serine was separated by use of an ADME column which has relatively higher polar surface than the conventional ODS column. The characteristic product ions, i.e., m/z 195.3 and m/z 209.3, were detected from all the diastereomers by the collision-induced dissociation of the protonated molecule. A highly sensitive detection on the amol–fmol level was obtained from the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) chromatogram. The chiral amines (e.g., adrenaline and noradrenaline) labeled with DMT-(S)-Pro-OSu were also well separated and sensitively detected by the present procedure. The method using DMT-(S)-Pro-OSu was used for the determination of DL-amino acids in the human saliva from healthy volunteers. Various L-amino acids were identified in the saliva. Furthermore, D-alanine (D-Ala) and D-proline (D-Pro) were also detected in relatively high concentrations (>5%). The ratio was higher in male saliva than in female saliva. However, the difference in the ratio of D-Ala for one day was not very high and the effect of foods and beverage

  11. Science Based Human Reliability Analysis: Using Digital Nuclear Power Plant Simulators for Human Reliability Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirley, Rachel Elizabeth

    Nuclear power plant (NPP) simulators are proliferating in academic research institutions and national laboratories in response to the availability of affordable, digital simulator platforms. Accompanying the new research facilities is a renewed interest in using data collected in NPP simulators for Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) research. An experiment conducted in The Ohio State University (OSU) NPP Simulator Facility develops data collection methods and analytical tools to improve use of simulator data in HRA. In the pilot experiment, student operators respond to design basis accidents in the OSU NPP Simulator Facility. Thirty-three undergraduate and graduate engineering students participated in the research. Following each accident scenario, student operators completed a survey about perceived simulator biases and watched a video of the scenario. During the video, they periodically recorded their perceived strength of significant Performance Shaping Factors (PSFs) such as Stress. This dissertation reviews three aspects of simulator-based research using the data collected in the OSU NPP Simulator Facility: First, a qualitative comparison of student operator performance to computer simulations of expected operator performance generated by the Information Decision Action Crew (IDAC) HRA method. Areas of comparison include procedure steps, timing of operator actions, and PSFs. Second, development of a quantitative model of the simulator bias introduced by the simulator environment. Two types of bias are defined: Environmental Bias and Motivational Bias. This research examines Motivational Bias--that is, the effect of the simulator environment on an operator's motivations, goals, and priorities. A bias causal map is introduced to model motivational bias interactions in the OSU experiment. Data collected in the OSU NPP Simulator Facility are analyzed using Structural Equation Modeling (SEM). Data include crew characteristics, operator surveys, and time to recognize

  12. Resolution function normalisation and secondary extinction in neutron triple-axis spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tindle, G.L.

    1987-01-01

    The theory of resolution correction in triple-axis spectrometry is developed from first principles. It is demonstrated that for ideally imperfect thin crystals the formulation coincides with that introduced initially by Cooper and Nathans and subsequently considered by Dorner. The predicted energy variation of peak Bragg reflectivities of monochromator and analyser crystals in Bragg case scattering is such as to confirm experimental data. In the Laue case to obtain results compatible with experiment one has to invoke theories of secondary extinction. In an attempt to accommodate these observations a new finite threshold model of secondary extinction is proposed which interpolates thin crystals formulas and conventional secondary extinction formulas obtained in the zero threshold limit. (orig.)

  13. Large-scale shell model calculations for the N=126 isotones Po-Pu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caurier, E.; Rejmund, M.; Grawe, H.

    2003-04-01

    Large-scale shell model calculations were performed in the full Z=82-126 proton model space π(Oh 9/2 , 1f 7/2 , Oi 13/2 , 2p 3/2 , 1f 5/2 , 2p 1/2 ) employing the code NATHAN. The modified Kuo-Herling interaction was used, no truncation was applied up to protactinium (Z=91) and seniority truncation beyond. The results are compared to experimental data including binding energies, level schemes and electromagnetic transition rates. An overall excellent agreement is obtained for states that can be described in this model space. Limitations of the approach with respect to excitations across the Z=82 and N=126 shells and deficiencies of the interaction are discussed. (orig.)

  14. Assembling the Past: Studies in the Professionalization of Archaeology, edited by Alice B Kehoe and Mary Beth Emmerichs, 1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Browman

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available The Assembling The Past volume, which focuses upon the issues of discrimination and marginalization in archaeology, is the delayed publication of two 1989 symposia dedicated to the history of archaeology - one in January of that year at the First Joint Archaeological Congress in Baltimore, chaired by Alice Kehoe and Jane Waldbaum, and the other in November at the 88th annual meetings of the American Anthropological Association, chaired by Nathan Reyman. Because of the time delay, in some cases the chapter authors have already published later papers, building on their presentations, so that the reader may already be familiar with part of the arguments presented. Nevertheless, I evaluate this work as a "must have" for any student of the history of Americanist archaeology.

  15. Further Evaluation of Androgen Therapy In Aplastic Anemia: With Special Reference to Correlation Between Response to Androgen and EEI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whang, Kee Suk [Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Deagu (Korea, Republic of)

    1967-03-15

    Patients with aplastic anemia were treated with a combination of depo-testosterone cyclopentylpropionate (Upjohn) and dexamethasone. In 7 of 15 patients treated, there was response in which either a significant increase in hemoglobin concentration, a prolonged interval or a cessation of blood transfusion requirement developed during androgen therapy. Younger patients with cellular marrow appeared to be better responding to androgen. EEI (Effective Erythropoietic Index) formulated by Gardner and Nathan (1966) which was a helpful measurement as to whether patients with myelofibrosis would response to androgen, was evaluated in patients with aplastic anemia. It was concluded that EEI as well as ferrokinetics indices (Plasma-{sup 59}Fe-disappearance rate, RBC {sup 59}Fe net incorporation) did not significantly correlate with the degree of response to androgen in aplastic anemia.

  16. Challenges for Democracies in Responding to Terrorism: A View from Canada and Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Sébastien Rioux

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The November 2015 terrorist attacks at the Bataclan concert hall and sidewalk cafés in Paris, the March 2016 bombing at the Brussels airport, and the mass shooting at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Fla. in June 2016 are just a few examples of the horror and loss of life inflicted on innocent civilians by individuals affiliated with, or supporting the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS. Canada is not immune: in October 2014 two ISIS-inspired attacks, one in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Que. and one in Ottawa, resulted in the deaths of Warrant Officer Patrice Vincent and Cpl. Nathan Cirillo. More recently, ISIS vowed to make the month of Ramadan a bloodbath in Europe and America.2 Heightened awareness, attention, and concern among western democracies surround the issue of terrorism on home soil. And there are serious challenges in addressing such threats.

  17. Culture at work: Family therapy and the culture concept in post-World War II America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Deborah F

    2004-01-01

    During the 1950s and 1960s, the concept of culture had currency beyond the disciplinary boundaries of anthropology and sociology. This article takes up a clinical example of the invocation of the culture concept by examining how early family therapists such as Nathan Ackerman, Murray Bowen, and Don Jackson used culture as a category of analysis during the formative years of their new field. The culture concept played an integral role in the processes by which family therapists simultaneously defined the object of their research and treatment, the family, and built their new field. Their varied uses of culture also contained tensions and contradictions, most notably between universal and relativist views of family and psychopathology and between views of family therapy as a conservative force for maintaining the nuclear family or a progressive force for overcoming social inequality. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The sustainable place: for an interrelation between architecture, the place and its environmental preexisting conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Vieira Dias

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This research will to draw up a hypothesis, based on the writings of the Italian architect Ernesto Nathan Rogers (1909-1969, of which, through the construction of architectures that qualify by concern about its correct insertion in place, seek in environmental preexistence its beginning, middle and end while buildings based on sustainable principles. To this end, it is necessary to expand the concept presented by Rogers, particularly dealing with the environment (or environmental as a result of cultural and historical accumulations, more that natural, bringing it to the contemporary discussions on the environment and place, that aggregates weather and natural values, with sustainable purpose for architecture and its urban environment.

  19. The computer boys take over computers, programmers, and the politics of technical expertise

    CERN Document Server

    Ensmenger, Nathan L

    2010-01-01

    This is a book about the computer revolution of the mid-twentieth century and the people who made it possible. Unlike most histories of computing, it is not a book about machines, inventors, or entrepreneurs. Instead, it tells the story of the vast but largely anonymous legions of computer specialists -- programmers, systems analysts, and other software developers -- who transformed the electronic computer from a scientific curiosity into the defining technology of the modern era. As the systems that they built became increasingly powerful and ubiquitous, these specialists became the focus of a series of critiques of the social and organizational impact of electronic computing. To many of their contemporaries, it seemed the "computer boys" were taking over, not just in the corporate setting, but also in government, politics, and society in general. In The Computer Boys Take Over, Nathan Ensmenger traces the rise to power of the computer expert in modern American society. His rich and nuanced portrayal of the ...

  20. MODERN PROCESSES AND EQUIPMENT FOR BEER PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. I. Sidorov

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Modern progress trends of processes of brewing and fermenters for their realization are considered. It is rotined that the today most widespread method of production are speed-up processes on the method of Nathan in one technological stage in one vehicle –cylinder-conical tank — CCT. The next stage of development must be passing to the continuous methods, however these, known enough methods, so far did not find realization. The second directions of development of brewing is distribution of minibrewerys, including restaurant complexes. The basic stimulus of development of this direction is possibility of receipt of the so-called «living» beer — the high-quality unfiltered product, however today large competition make mass productions which mastered the technique of production of «living» beer at industrial level.

  1. Alcoholism, politics, and bureaucracy: the consensus against controlled-drinking therapy in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peele, S

    1992-01-01

    Controlled drinking has long been rejected as a therapeutic goal in traditional American alcoholism treatment. More striking has been the adoption of this position by behaviorists who once fostered controlled-drinking (CD) therapy, such as Peter Nathan, former director of the Rutgers Center of Alcohol Studies. This shift has occurred even while the evidence for rejecting the value of moderation training is unclear. Rather than being justified empirically, this rejection must instead be understood as a strategy behaviorists have used to jettison a politically explosive element in the behavioral package in order to gain overall acceptance for the behavioral approach to treating alcoholism. However, this strategy entails significant scientific, clinical, social, and ethical costs.

  2. Adobe Illustrator CS2 crash course

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro Amado

    2007-01-01

    Introdução ao Adobe Illustrator.Compilação de informações, links e tutorial passo-a-passo para a iniciação a este softwarelt;p>FBAUP, Pedro Amado, 2007-01-22Versão 0.1 (alfa). Actualizada em 2007-01-22.Este trabalho está licenciado sob uma Licença Creative Commons Atribuição-Uso Não-Comercial-Partilha nos termos da mesma Licença 2.5 Portugal. Para ver uma cópia destalicença, visite http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/pt/ ou envie uma cartapara Creative Commons, 559 Nathan Abbott ...

  3. A journey in science: promise, purpose, privilege.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Carl

    2013-10-03

    Real innovations in medicine and science are historic and singular; the stories behind each occurrence are precious. At Molecular Medicine we have established the Anthony Cerami Award in Translational Medicine to document and preserve these histories. The monographs recount the seminal events as told in the voice of the original investigators who provided the crucial early insight. These essays capture the essence of discovery, chronicling the birth of ideas that created new fields of research; and launched trajectories that persisted and ultimately influenced how disease is prevented, diagnosed, and treated. In this volume, the first Cerami Award Monograph, by Carl Nathan, MD, chairman of the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at Weill Cornell Medical College, reflects towering genius and soaring inspiration.

  4. Cultural Protestantism and Nordic Religious Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchardt, Mette

    2015-01-01

    Is there a Nordic model for Religious Education? The article explores how Cultural Protestantism and Liberal Theology influenced the ways in which Religious Education developed in Sweden, Denmark and Norway from the late 19th century until the mid-20th century as part of the transformation...... of the relations between church and state. Situated between history of education and curriculum, church history and transnational welfare state history, the article focuses on three transnationally acting theologians, early historians and psychologists of religion and public debaters who involved themselves...... in the question of education, namely Nathan Söderblom (1866-1931), Edvard Lehmann (1862-1930) and Eivind Berggrav (1884-1959), who serve as prisms for the transnational historical analysis of what takes place between states and social fields. The article suggests that Nordic Cultural Protestantism contributed...

  5. Treatment of pulmonary hypertension in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: shortfall in efficacy or trial design?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan SD

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Steven D Nathan, Christopher S King Advanced Lung Disease Clinic, Inova Fairfax Hospital, Falls Church, VA, USA Abstract: Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF is a disease that carries a high mortality. Pulmonary hypertension (PH frequently complicates the course of patients with IPF and is associated with significantly worse outcomes. Whether PH is a surrogate or driver of these worse outcomes remains unanswered, but the presence of PH represents an attractive target for therapy. This review delves into the various pulmonary vasoactive agents that have been subjected to study in IPF, the pitfalls of some of these prior studies, and attempts to lay a foundation for future study designs targeting PH in IPF. Keywords: phenotype, interstitial lung disease

  6. Further Evaluation of Androgen Therapy In Aplastic Anemia: With Special Reference to Correlation Between Response to Androgen and EEI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whang, Kee Suk

    1967-01-01

    Patients with aplastic anemia were treated with a combination of depo-testosterone cyclopentylpropionate (Upjohn) and dexamethasone. In 7 of 15 patients treated, there was response in which either a significant increase in hemoglobin concentration, a prolonged interval or a cessation of blood transfusion requirement developed during androgen therapy. Younger patients with cellular marrow appeared to be better responding to androgen. EEI (Effective Erythropoietic Index) formulated by Gardner and Nathan (1966) which was a helpful measurement as to whether patients with myelofibrosis would response to androgen, was evaluated in patients with aplastic anemia. It was concluded that EEI as well as ferrokinetics indices (Plasma- 59 Fe-disappearance rate, RBC 59 Fe net incorporation) did not significantly correlate with the degree of response to androgen in aplastic anemia.

  7. Final report of “A Detailed Study of the Physical Mechanisms Controlling CO2-Brine Capillary Trapping in the Subsurface” (University of Arizona, DE-SC0006696)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaap, Marcel G. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2016-07-25

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) of carbon dioxide emissions generated by production or combustion of fossil fuels is a technologically viable means to reduce the build-up of CO2 in the atmosphere and oceans. Using advantages of scale and location, CCS is particularly suitable for large point sources near ubiquitous deep saline aquifers, depleted gas reservoirs, or at production reservoirs for enhanced oil recovery (EOR). In the BES-funded research project, Oregon State University (OSU) carried out capillary trapping experiments with proxy fluids that mimic the properties of the scCO2/brine system under ambient temperatures and pressures, and successfully developed a unique and novel x-ray compatible, high-pressure, elevated temperature setup to study the scCO2/brine system under challenging reservoir conditions. Both methodologies were applied to a variety of porous media, including synthetic (glass bead) and geologic (Bentheimer sandstone) materials. The University of Arizona (UA) developed pore-scale lattice Boltzmann (LB) models which are able to handle the experimental conditions for proxy fluids, as well as the scCO2/brine system, that are capable of simulating permeability in volumes of tens of millions of fluid elements. We reached the following summary findings (main institute indicated): 1. (OSU/UA) To understand capillary trapping in a multiphase fluid-porous medium system, the system must be analyzed from a pore-scale force balance perspective; trapping can be enhanced by manipulating wetting and nonwetting phase fluid properties. 2. (OSU) Pore-scale fluid connectivity and topology has a clear and direct effect on nonwetting phase capillary trapping efficiency. 3. (OSU) Rock type and flow regime also have a pronounced effects on capillary trapping. 4. (OSU/UA) There is a predictable relationship between NWP connectivity and NWP saturation, which allows for development of injection strategies that optimize trapping. The commonly used Land model (Land

  8. Final Report for Project ``Theory of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulrich W. Heinz

    2012-11-09

    In the course of this project the Ohio State University group led by the PI, Professor Ulrich Heinz, developed a comprehensive theoretical picture of the dynamical evolution of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions and of the numerous experimental observables that can be used to diagnose the evolving and short-lived hot and dense fireball created in such collisions. Starting from a qualitative understanding of the main features based on earlier research during the last decade of the twentieth century on collisions at lower energies, the group exploited newly developed theoretical tools and the stream of new high-quality data from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory (which started operations in the summer of the year 2000) to arrive at an increasingly quantitative description of the experimentally observed phenomena. Work done at Ohio State University (OSU) was instrumental in the discovery during the years 2001-2003 that quark-gluon plasma (QGP) created in nuclear collisions at RHIC behaves like an almost perfect liquid with minimal viscosity. The tool of relativistic fluid dynamics for viscous liquids developed at OSU in the years 2005-2007 opened the possibility to quantitatively determine the value of the QGP viscosity empirically from experimental measurements of the collective flow patterns established in the collisions. A first quantitative extraction of the QGP shear viscosity, with controlled theoretical uncertainty estimates, was achieved during the last year of this project in 2010. OSU has paved the way for a transition of the field of relativistic heavy-ion physics from a qualitative discovery stage to a new stage of quantitative precision in the description of quark-gluon plasma properties. To gain confidence in the precision of our theoretical understanding of quark-gluon plasma dynamics, one must test it on a large set of experimentally measured observables. This achievement report demonstrates that we have, at

  9. Teaching assistant-student interactions in a modified SCALE-UP classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBeck, George; Demaree, Dedra

    2012-02-01

    In the spring term of 2010, Oregon State University (OSU) began using a SCALE-UP style classroom in the instruction of the introductory calculus-based physics series. Instruction in this classroom was conducted in weekly two-hour sessions facilitated by the primary professor and either two graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) or a graduate teaching assistant and an undergraduate learning assistant (LA). During the course of instruction, two of the eight tables in the room were audio and video recorded. We examine the practices of the GTAs in interacting with the students through both qualitative and quantitative analyses of these recordings. Quantitatively, significant differences are seen between the most experienced GTA and the rest. A major difference in confidence is also observed in the qualitative analysis of this GTA compared to a less experienced GTA.

  10. Extended Opacity Tables with Higher Temperature-Density-Frequency Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillaci, Mark; Orban, Chris; Delahaye, Franck; Pinsonneault, Marc; Nahar, Sultana; Pradhan, Anil

    2015-05-01

    Theoretical models for plasma opacities underpin our understanding of radiation transport in many different astrophysical objects. These opacity models are also relevant to HEDP experiments such as ignition scale experiments on NIF. We present a significantly expanded set of opacity data from the widely utilized Opacity Project, and make these higher resolution data publicly available through OSU's portal with dropbox.com. This expanded data set is used to assess how accurate the interpolation of opacity data in temperature-density-frequency dimensions must be in order to adequately model the properties of most stellar types. These efforts are the beginning of a larger project to improve the theoretical opacity models in light of experimental results at the Sandia Z-pinch showing that the measured opacity of Iron disagrees strongly with all current models.

  11. The use of fault tree analysis to minimize research reactor downtime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, B.; Wang, C.H.; Anderson, T.V.

    1984-01-01

    For many reasons it is often highly desirable to maintain a research reactor in a continuously operable state and in the event of any failures to minimize the length of the reactor downtime. In order to keep the length of future downtimes to less than ten days for the sixteen year old OSU TRIGA reactor, a fault tree analysis was performed for all of the systems required to maintain the reactor operational. As a result of this analysis, it was possible to determine the critical parts and key components. By examining the availability and delivery times for each of these items, it was then possible to make reasoned decisions relating to the advance purchase of spare parts. This paper outlines the above process, along with examples of fault trees developed, and a recent history of the efficacy of this technique. (author)

  12. Simulation of natural circulation on an integral type experimental facility, MASLWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Youngjong; Lim, Sungwon; Ha, Jaejoo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The OSU MASLWR test facility was reconfigured to eliminate a recurring grounding problem and improve facility reliability in anticipation of conducting an IAEA International Collaborative Standard Problem (ICSP). The purpose of ICSP is to provide experimental data on flow instability phenomena under natural circulation conditions and coupled containment/reactor vessel behavior in integral-type reactors, and to evaluate system code capabilities to predict natural circulation phenomena for integral type PWR, by simulating an integrated experiment. A natural circulation in the primary side during various core powers is analyzed using TASS/SMR code for the integral type experimental facility. The calculation results show higher steady state primary flow than experiment. If it matches the initial flow with experiment, it shows lower primary flow than experiment according to the increase of power. The code predictions may be improved by applying a Reynolds number dependent form loss coefficient to accurately account for unrecoverable pressure losses.

  13. Plant Vascular Biology 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Biao

    2014-11-17

    This grant supported the Second International Conference on Plant Vascular Biology (PVB 2010) held July 24-28, 2010 on the campus of Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Biao Ding (Ohio State University; OSU) and David Hannapel (Iowa State University; ISU) served as co-chairs of this conference. Biao Ding served as the local organizer. PVB is defined broadly here to include studies on the biogenesis, structure and function of transport systems in plants, under conditions of normal plant growth and development as well as of plant interactions with pathogens. The transport systems cover broadly the xylem, phloem, plasmodesmata and vascular cell membranes. The PVB concept has emerged in recent years to emphasize the integrative nature of the transport systems and approaches to investigate them.

  14. Studies Related to the Oregon State University High Temperature Test Facility: Scaling, the Validation Matrix, and Similarities to the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard R. Schultz; Paul D. Bayless; Richard W. Johnson; William T. Taitano; James R. Wolf; Glenn E. McCreery

    2010-09-01

    The Oregon State University (OSU) High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) is an integral experimental facility that will be constructed on the OSU campus in Corvallis, Oregon. The HTTF project was initiated, by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), on September 5, 2008 as Task 4 of the 5 year High Temperature Gas Reactor Cooperative Agreement via NRC Contract 04-08-138. Until August, 2010, when a DOE contract was initiated to fund additional capabilities for the HTTF project, all of the funding support for the HTTF was provided by the NRC via their cooperative agreement. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began their involvement with the HTTF project in late 2009 via the Next Generation Nuclear Plant project. Because the NRC interests in HTTF experiments were only centered on the depressurized conduction cooldown (DCC) scenario, NGNP involvement focused on expanding the experimental envelope of the HTTF to include steady-state operations and also the pressurized conduction cooldown (PCC). Since DOE has incorporated the HTTF as an ingredient in the NGNP thermal-fluids validation program, several important outcomes should be noted: 1. The reference prismatic reactor design, that serves as the basis for scaling the HTTF, became the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR). The MHTGR has also been chosen as the reference design for all of the other NGNP thermal-fluid experiments. 2. The NGNP validation matrix is being planned using the same scaling strategy that has been implemented to design the HTTF, i.e., the hierarchical two-tiered scaling methodology developed by Zuber in 1991. Using this approach a preliminary validation matrix has been designed that integrates the HTTF experiments with the other experiments planned for the NGNP thermal-fluids verification and validation project. 3. Initial analyses showed that the inherent power capability of the OSU infrastructure, which only allowed a total operational facility power capability of 0.6 MW, is

  15. Energy Management of Hybrid Electric Vehicles: 15 years of development at the Ohio State University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizzoni Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to document 15 years of hybrid electric vehicle energy management research at The Ohio State University Center for Automotive Research (OSUCAR. Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV technology encompasses many diverse aspects. In this paper we focus exclusively on the evolution of supervisory control strategies for on-board energy management in HEV. We present a series of control algorithms that have been developed in simulation and implemented in prototype vehicles for charge-sustaining HEVs at OSU-CAR. These solutions span from fuzzy-logic control algorithms to more sophisticated model-based optimal control methods. Finally, methods developed for plug-in HEVs energy management are also discussed

  16. Micro and Nano-structure Development and Multiscale Physics at Sliding Metal Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigney; David; A.

    2006-06-01

    This final report describes research on the response of ductile materials to extreme loading conditions and high strain rates during impact combined with sliding friction. The work has involved a collaboration among two groups at Los Alamos National Laboratory and a tribology research grouup at The Ohio State University. The project involved experimental work and computer simulations at both laboratories and continuum mechanics analysis at OSU, supplemented by testing at AWE, Harwell, UK. Results demonstrated the importance of vorticity and mechanical mixing near the sliding interface in the development of nanocrystalline tribomaterial that is far from equilibrium. The work also revealed that strain rate sensitivity is an important materials property for determining the development of the velocity profile during sliding. As such, it is a property that is key to understanding the evolution of sliding behavior.

  17. Westinghouse AP 1000 program status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doehnert, B.

    2002-01-01

    The project 1000 is presented and features are discussed in the paper. Design maturity is characterized by 1300 man-year / $400 million design and testing effort, more than 12 000 design documents completed; 3D computer model developed. It includes structures, equipment, small / large pipe, cable trays, ducts etc. Licensing Maturity is determined by a very thorough and complete NRC review of AP600; 110 man-year effort (NRC) over 6 years, $30 million; independent, confirmatory plant analysis; independent, confirmatory plant testing (ROSA, OSU); over 7400 questions answered, no open items; over 380 meeting with NRC, 43 meetings with ACRS. NRC Design Certification is issued in December 1999. Reasons for developing AP 1000 and design changes are presented. Economic analysis shows an expectation for payback within 20 years. AP1000 provides 75% power uprate for 15% increment in capital cost. AP1000 meets new plant economic targets in the near term

  18. Scalable Data Management, Analysis, and Visualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Han-Wei [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2017-10-31

    This report is the entire final report for the SciDAC project authored by the whole team. OSU is part of the contributors to the report. This report is organized into sections and subsections, each covering an area of development and deployment of technologies applied to scientific applications of interest to the Department of Energy. Each sub-section includes: 1) a summary description of the research, development, and deployment carried out, the results and the extent to which the stated project objectives were met; 2) significant results, including major findings, developments, or conclusions; 3) products, such as publications and presentations, software developed, project website(s), technologies or techniques, inventions, awards, etc., and 4) conclusions of the projects and future directions for research, development, and deployment in this technology area.

  19. Başarılı ve Başarısız Dördüncü Sınıf Okuyucularının Okuduğunu Anlama ve Özetleme Becerileri.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Bahap Kudret

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Bu çalışmada okumada başarılı olan ve olmayan öğrencilerin okuduğunu anlama ve özetleme becerilerinin karşılaştırmalı olarak incelenmesi amaçlanmıştır. Çalışmada, öğrencilerin yazılı özetlerindeki biçimbirimbilgisi/sözdizimi [Ortalama Sözce Uzunlukları (OSU] ve sözcük dağarcıkları da [Farklı Sözcük Sayısı (FSÖZS] karşılaştırılmıştır. Ayrıca, okuduğunu anlama puanları, özetleme puanları, OSU ve FSÖZS arasındaki ilişkiler incelenmiştir. Bu amaçla, 122 başarılı ve 122 başarısız okuyucu olmak üzere, toplam 244 dördüncü sınıf öğrencisi araştırmaya katılmıştır. Bulgular, zayıf okuyucuların tüm soru türlerini yanıtlamada akranlarından daha başarısız olduklarını göstermiştir. Bununla birlikte, her iki gruptaki öğrencilerin de en çok ana düşünceyi bulma ile kişisel bilgi ve deneyimlerini kullanarak çıkarım yapma sorularında güçlük çektikleri belirlenmiştir. Zayıf okuyucuların özetlemenin tüm alt becerilerinde, ayrıca OSU ve FSÖZS ölçümlerinde akranlarından daha fazla güçlüğe sahip oldukları görülmüştür. Özetleme, biçimbirimbilgisi/sözdizimi (OSU ve sözcük dağarcığı (FSÖZS değişkenlerinin okuduğunu anlama üzerindeki etkisi incelendiğinde, biçimbirimbilgisi/sözdiziminin okuduğunu anlamayı en iyi yordayan değişken olduğu bulunmuştur. In this study, it was aimed to examine reading comprehension and summarizing skills of successful and unsuccessful students in reading comparatively. Their morphosyntax knowledge (Mean Length of UtteranceMLU and vocabulary knowledge (Different Words Used-DWU in their written summaries were also compared in the study. In addition, the relations between their reading comprehension scores, summarizing scores, MLU and DWU were examined. For this purpose, 122 successful and 122 unsuccessful readers, totally 244 fourth graders participated in the study. Findings showed that poor

  20. Effects of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR on rooting and root growth of kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa stem cuttings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YASAR ERTURK

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR on the rooting and root growth of semi-hardwood and hardwood kiwifruit stem cuttings were investigated. The PGPR used were Bacillus RC23, Paenibacillus polymyxa RC05, Bacillus subtilis OSU142, Bacillus RC03, Comamonas acidovorans RC41, Bacillus megaterium RC01 and Bacillus simplex RC19. All the bacteria showed indole-3-acetic acid (IAA producing capacity. Among the PGPR used, the highest rooting ratios were obtained at 47.50% for semi-hardwood stem cuttings from Bacillus RC03 and Bacillus simplex RC19 treatments and 42.50% for hardwood stem cuttings from Bacillus RC03. As well, Comamonas acidovorans RC41 inoculations indicated higher value than control treatments. The results suggest that these PGPR can be used in organic nursery material production and point to the feasibility of synthetic auxin (IBA replacement by organic management based on PGPR.

  1. Structurally Controlled Geothermal Systems in the Central Cascades Arc-Backarc Regime, Oregon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wannamaker, Philip E. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Energy and Geoscience Inst. (EGI)

    2016-07-31

    The goal of this project has been to analyze available magnetotelluric (MT) geophysical surveys, structural geology based on mapping and LiDAR, and fluid geochemical data, to identify high-temperature fluid upwellings, critically stressed rock volumes, and other evidence of structurally-controlled geothermal resources. Data were to be integrated to create conceptual models of volcanic-hosted geothermal resources along the Central Cascades arc segment, especially in the vicinity of Mt. Jefferson to Three Sisters. LiDAR data sets available at Oregon State University (OSU) allowed detailed structural geology modeling through forest canopy. Copious spring and well fluid chemistries, including isotopes, were modeled using Geo-T and TOUGHREACT software.

  2. Preparation and planning for the replacement of the Oregon State University TRIGA reactor rotary specimen rack assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, T.V.; Dodd, B.; Johnson, A.G.; Carpenter, W.T.

    1984-01-01

    Recently there have been a number of indications that the rotating rack may be approaching the end of its useful life. In order to benefit from the experience of other reactors who have removed and replaced their rotating racks, General Atomic (GA) was contacted and previous TRIGA Conference proceedings were scanned. It was determined that a number of facilities, had experienced difficulties with their lazy susans and eventually had to replace them. However, most of the written descriptions of this project were not sufficiently detailed to be of great use. The purpose of this paper is to identify some of the more important questions related to the replacement of our rotating rack assembly and OSU's currently proposed solutions, with a view towards soliciting ideas from other members of the TRIGA reactor community

  3. BOG: R-package for Bacterium and virus analysis of Orthologous Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jincheol Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BOG (Bacterium and virus analysis of Orthologous Groups is a package for identifying groups of differentially regulated genes in the light of gene functions for various virus and bacteria genomes. It is designed to identify Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COGs that are enriched among genes that have gone through significant changes under different conditions. This would contribute to the detection of pathogens, an important scientific research area of relevance in uncovering bioterrorism, among others. Particular statistical analyses include hypergeometric, Mann–Whitney rank sum, and gene set enrichment. Results from the analyses are organized and presented in tabular and graphical forms for ease of understanding and dissemination of results. BOG is implemented as an R-package, which is available from CRAN or can be downloaded from http://www.stat.osu.edu/~statgen/SOFTWARE/BOG/.

  4. Fireman Dither – Variate Ilona [Partitura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Eiji Simurra

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se do memorial descritivo dos procedimentos metodológicos e composicionais utilizados na elaboração da obra Fireman Dither – Variate Ilona (2011 – 2013, para orquestra sinfônica. A estreia da obra foi realizada pela Orquestra Sinfônica da UNICAMP (OSU, sob a regência de Cinthia Alireti, em 2013. Apresenta-se uma metodologia de planejamento orquestral, na qual utilizou-se o ambiente virtual de assistência à orquestração Orchidée. Tal ferramenta forneceu importantes subsídios técnicos e conceituais tanto para a estrutura formal da obra quanto para a geração de material composicional, implementadas em Fireman Dither – Variate Ilona.

  5. Using Photo-Elicitation with Native American Students to Explore Perceptions of the Physical Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Neurohr

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective – This research project explored Native American students’ perceptions of the Edmon Low Library at Oklahoma State University (OSU. The study sought to understand how Native American students perceived the role of the academic library in their lives, and which elements of the library students depicted and described as holding meaning for them. Methods – Photo-elicitation, a form of visual research and a participatory research method, was the primary method chosen to explore students’ perceptions of the library. To qualify for this study, students self-identified as Native American and as frequent library users. They also had completed three or more semesters of study at OSU. Five students followed a photo prompt for taking at least fifteen pictures of the library, then participated in two separate interviews with the primary researcher. Participants also completed a demographic/questionnaire form, answered semi-structured questions, and ranked the photos they took. Results – This study produced several emergent findings. First, students expressed uncertainty about the library’s books. Second, functional library tools such as express printers and library signage played a valuable role for facilitating student work. Third, the method of photo-elicitation was enjoyable for students and served as library discovery. Fourth, Native American resources and exhibits in the library had varied salience for students. Conclusion – Limited research focuses on Native American students in academic libraries, particularly on how students use and experience the library. Exploring how individual students who identify as Native American perceive the university library enhanced our understanding of how libraries in Predominantly White Institutions (PWIs can best serve and support students. This study provided insight into the method of photo-elicitation interviews. This research also provided practical benefits for student

  6. Development and characterization of genomic SSR markers in Cynodon transvaalensis Burtt-Davy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chengcheng; Wu, Yanqi; Taliaferro, Charles M; Bell, Greg E; Martin, Dennis L; Smith, Mike W

    2014-08-01

    Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers are a major molecular tool for genetic and genomic research that have been extensively developed and used in major crops. However, few are available in African bermudagrass (Cynodon transvaalensis Burtt-Davy), an economically important warm-season turfgrass species. African bermudagrass is mainly used for hybridizations with common bermudagrass [C. dactylon var. dactylon (L.) Pers.] in the development of superior interspecific hybrid turfgrass cultivars. Accordingly, the major objective of this study was to develop and characterize a large set of SSR markers. Genomic DNA of C. transvaalensis '4200TN 24-2' from an Oklahoma State University (OSU) turf nursery was extracted for construction of four SSR genomic libraries enriched with [CA](n), [GA](n), [AAG](n), and [AAT](n) as core repeat motifs. A total of 3,064 clones were sequenced at the OSU core facility. The sequences were categorized into singletons and contiguous sequences to exclude redundancy. From the two sequence categories, 1,795 SSR loci were identified. After excluding duplicate SSRs by comparison with previously developed SSR markers using a nucleotide basic local alignment tool, 1,426 unique primer pairs (PPs) were designed. Out of the 1,426 designed PPs, 981 (68.8 %) amplified alleles of the expected size in the donor DNA. Polymorphisms of the SSR PPs tested in eight C. transvaalensis plants were 93 % polymorphic with 544 markers effective in all genotypes. Inheritance of the SSRs was examined in six F(1) progeny of African parents 'T577' × 'Uganda', indicating 917 markers amplified heritable alleles. The SSR markers developed in the study are the first large set of co-dominant markers in African bermudagrass and should be highly valuable for molecular and traditional breeding research.

  7. The BaBar LST Detector High Voltage System: Design And Implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benelli, G.; Honscheid, K.; Lewis, E.A.; Regensburger, J.J.; Smith, D.S.; Ohio State U.

    2006-01-01

    In 2004, the first two sextants of the new Limited Streamer Tube (LST) detector were installed in the BABAR experiment to replace the ageing Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) as active detectors for the BABAR Instrumented Flux Return (IFR) muon system. Each streamer tube of the new detector consists of 8 cells. The cell walls are coated with graphite paint and a 100 (micro)m wire forms the anode. These wires are coupled in pairs inside the tubes resulting in 4 independent two-cell segments per LST. High voltage (HV) is applied to the 4 segments through a custom connector that also provides the decoupling capacitor to pick up the detector signals from the anode wires. The BABAR LST detector is operated at 5.5 kV. The high voltage system for the LST detector was designed and built at The Ohio State University (OSU HVPS). Each of the 25 supplies built for BaBar provides 80 output channels with individual current monitoring and overcurrent protection. For each group of 20 channels the HV can be adjusted between 0 and 6 kV. A 4-fold fan-out is integrated in the power supplies to provide a total of 320 outputs. The power supplies are controlled through built-in CANbus and Ethernet (TCP/IP) interfaces. In this presentation we will discuss the design and novel features of the OSU HVPS system and its integration into the BABAR EPICS detector control framework. Experience with the supplies operation during the LST extensive quality control program and their performance during the initial data taking period will be discussed

  8. Evaluation of an interactive, case-based review session in teaching medical microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blewett, Earl L; Kisamore, Jennifer L

    2009-01-01

    Background Oklahoma State University-Center for Health Sciences (OSU-CHS) has replaced its microbiology wet laboratory with a variety of tutorials including a case-based interactive session called Microbial Jeopardy!. The question remains whether the time spent by students and faculty in the interactive case-based tutorial is worthwhile? This study was designed to address this question by analyzing both student performance data and assessing students' perceptions regarding the tutorial. Methods Both quantitative and qualitative data were used in the current study. Part One of the study involved assessing student performance using archival records of seven case-based exam questions used in the 2004, 2005, 2006, and 2007 OSU-CHS Medical Microbiology course. Two sample t-tests for proportions were used to test for significant differences related to tutorial usage. Part Two used both quantitative and qualitative means to assess student's perceptions of the Microbial Jeopardy! session. First, a retrospective survey was administered to students who were enrolled in Medical Microbiology in 2006 or 2007. Second, responses to open-ended items from the 2008 course evaluations were reviewed for comments regarding the Microbial Jeopardy! session. Results Both student performance and student perception data support continued use of the tutorials. Quantitative and qualitative data converge to suggest that students like and learn from the interactive, case-based session. Conclusion The case-based tutorial appears to improve student performance on case-based exam questions. Additionally, students perceived the tutorial as helpful in preparing for exam questions and reviewing the course material. The time commitment for use of the case-based tutorial appears to be justified. PMID:19712473

  9. Evaluation of an interactive, case-based review session in teaching medical microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blewett, Earl L; Kisamore, Jennifer L

    2009-08-27

    Oklahoma State University-Center for Health Sciences (OSU-CHS) has replaced its microbiology wet laboratory with a variety of tutorials including a case-based interactive session called Microbial Jeopardy!. The question remains whether the time spent by students and faculty in the interactive case-based tutorial is worthwhile? This study was designed to address this question by analyzing both student performance data and assessing students' perceptions regarding the tutorial. Both quantitative and qualitative data were used in the current study. Part One of the study involved assessing student performance using archival records of seven case-based exam questions used in the 2004, 2005, 2006, and 2007 OSU-CHS Medical Microbiology course. Two sample t-tests for proportions were used to test for significant differences related to tutorial usage. Part Two used both quantitative and qualitative means to assess student's perceptions of the Microbial Jeopardy! session. First, a retrospective survey was administered to students who were enrolled in Medical Microbiology in 2006 or 2007. Second, responses to open-ended items from the 2008 course evaluations were reviewed for comments regarding the Microbial Jeopardy! session. Both student performance and student perception data support continued use of the tutorials. Quantitative and qualitative data converge to suggest that students like and learn from the interactive, case-based session. The case-based tutorial appears to improve student performance on case-based exam questions. Additionally, students perceived the tutorial as helpful in preparing for exam questions and reviewing the course material. The time commitment for use of the case-based tutorial appears to be justified.

  10. Evaluation of an interactive, case-based review session in teaching medical microbiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kisamore Jennifer L

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oklahoma State University-Center for Health Sciences (OSU-CHS has replaced its microbiology wet laboratory with a variety of tutorials including a case-based interactive session called Microbial Jeopardy!. The question remains whether the time spent by students and faculty in the interactive case-based tutorial is worthwhile? This study was designed to address this question by analyzing both student performance data and assessing students' perceptions regarding the tutorial. Methods Both quantitative and qualitative data were used in the current study. Part One of the study involved assessing student performance using archival records of seven case-based exam questions used in the 2004, 2005, 2006, and 2007 OSU-CHS Medical Microbiology course. Two sample t-tests for proportions were used to test for significant differences related to tutorial usage. Part Two used both quantitative and qualitative means to assess student's perceptions of the Microbial Jeopardy! session. First, a retrospective survey was administered to students who were enrolled in Medical Microbiology in 2006 or 2007. Second, responses to open-ended items from the 2008 course evaluations were reviewed for comments regarding the Microbial Jeopardy! session. Results Both student performance and student perception data support continued use of the tutorials. Quantitative and qualitative data converge to suggest that students like and learn from the interactive, case-based session. Conclusion The case-based tutorial appears to improve student performance on case-based exam questions. Additionally, students perceived the tutorial as helpful in preparing for exam questions and reviewing the course material. The time commitment for use of the case-based tutorial appears to be justified.

  11. Adopting an Advanced Community Pharmacy Practice Experiential Educational Model Across Colleges of Pharmacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Rodis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To discuss the experience of sharing an experiential model of education and practice development between two colleges of pharmacy and to provide a framework to guide faculty in this type of collaboration. Case Study: The Ohio State University College of Pharmacy (OSU COP Partner for Promotion (PFP program was developed in response to the need for advancing practice in the community pharmacy setting. After successful implementation of this program, the PFP program design and materials were shared, adapted, and implemented at the University of Utah College of Pharmacy (Utah COP. Collaborating faculty developed a framework based on lessons learned through this experience which proposes key guiding strategies as considerations to address prior to embarking on sharing any aspect of an educational program or model between institutions. Each step of the framework is described and applied to the process followed by The OSU COP and Utah COP in sharing the PFP program. Additional considerations related to transfer of educational models are discussed. Results/Conclusion: Sharing the education model and materials associated with the PFP program between institutions has enhanced experiential opportunities for students and helped develop residency training sites in the community setting. In addition, the relationship between the two colleges has contributed to faculty development, as well as an increase in community pharmacy service development with community pharmacy partners at each institution. It is hoped this experience will help guide collaborations between other colleges of pharmacy to enhance education of future pharmacists while positively impacting pharmacy practice, teaching, and research by faculty.   Type: Case Study

  12. Bioaccessibility tests accurately estimate bioavailability of lead to quail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, W. Nelson; Basta, Nicholas T; Chaney, Rufus L.; Henry, Paula F.; Mosby, David; Rattner, Barnett A.; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Sprague, Dan; Weber, John

    2016-01-01

    Hazards of soil-borne Pb to wild birds may be more accurately quantified if the bioavailability of that Pb is known. To better understand the bioavailability of Pb to birds, we measured blood Pb concentrations in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) fed diets containing Pb-contaminated soils. Relative bioavailabilities were expressed by comparison with blood Pb concentrations in quail fed a Pb acetate reference diet. Diets containing soil from five Pb-contaminated Superfund sites had relative bioavailabilities from 33%-63%, with a mean of about 50%. Treatment of two of the soils with phosphorus significantly reduced the bioavailability of Pb. Bioaccessibility of Pb in the test soils was then measured in six in vitro tests and regressed on bioavailability. They were: the “Relative Bioavailability Leaching Procedure” (RBALP) at pH 1.5, the same test conducted at pH 2.5, the “Ohio State University In vitro Gastrointestinal” method (OSU IVG), the “Urban Soil Bioaccessible Lead Test”, the modified “Physiologically Based Extraction Test” and the “Waterfowl Physiologically Based Extraction Test.” All regressions had positive slopes. Based on criteria of slope and coefficient of determination, the RBALP pH 2.5 and OSU IVG tests performed very well. Speciation by X-ray absorption spectroscopy demonstrated that, on average, most of the Pb in the sampled soils was sorbed to minerals (30%), bound to organic matter (24%), or present as Pb sulfate (18%). Additional Pb was associated with P (chloropyromorphite, hydroxypyromorphite and tertiary Pb phosphate), and with Pb carbonates, leadhillite (a lead sulfate carbonate hydroxide), and Pb sulfide. The formation of chloropyromorphite reduced the bioavailability of Pb and the amendment of Pb-contaminated soils with P may be a thermodynamically favored means to sequester Pb.

  13. Adopting an Advanced Community Pharmacy Practice Experiential Educational Model Across Colleges of Pharmacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Rodis, Pharm.D., BCPS

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To discuss the experience of sharing an experiential model of education and practice development between two colleges of pharmacy and to provide a framework to guide faculty in this type of collaboration.Case Study: The Ohio State University College of Pharmacy (OSU COP Partner for Promotion (PFP program was developed in response to the need for advancing practice in the community pharmacy setting. After successful implementation of this program, the PFP program design and materials were shared, adapted, and implemented at the University of Utah College of Pharmacy (Utah COP. Collaborating faculty developed a framework based on lessons learned through this experience which proposes key guiding strategies as considerations to address prior to embarking on sharing any aspect of an educational program or model between institutions. Each step of the framework is described and applied to the process followed by The OSU COP and Utah COP in sharing the PFP program. Additional considerations related to transfer of educational models are discussed.Results/Conclusion: Sharing the education model and materials associated with the PFP program between institutions has enhanced experiential opportunities for students and helped develop residency training sites in the community setting. In addition, the relationship between the two colleges has contributed to faculty development, as well as an increase in community pharmacy service development with community pharmacy partners at each institution. It is hoped this experience will help guide collaborations between other colleges of pharmacy to enhance education of future pharmacists while positively impacting pharmacy practice, teaching, and research by faculty.

  14. Stochastic simulation of climate change impacts on ice road operations, MacKenzie River, Northwest Territories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Mingko; Lonergan, S.

    1990-01-01

    Winter roads constitute an important part of the transportation network in the MacKenzie Delta, the Yellowknife area, and between the MacKenzie Highway and the Canol Road. Climatic changes in the MacKenzie Valley will alter the probabilities of ice cover thickness and duration, impacting on the periods when ice road river crossings are viable. Stochastic models were developed to generate air temperature and precipitation data to analyze climate impacts on when ice road crossing of the MacKenzie River at Norman Wells is feasible. The data were employed to simulate river ice growth and decay. Several general circulation models were employed to determine the impacts of climatic change on the ice regime. For precipitation simulation, the occurrence of wet or dry days was determined from Markov chain transition probabilities. In general, the Goddard Institute of Space Studies (GISS) model predicted the largest increase in monthly precipitation and the Oregon State University (OSU) model predicted the least changes. The various scenarios indicated that the duration for vehicular traffic over ice will be significantly reduced, compared to present day Norman Wells ice crossing operation. For 20 tonne vehicles, the current duration for safe crossing averages 169±14.6 days per year, while for the OSU scenario it will be reduced to 148±14.7 days, is further reduced to 127±24.9 days for the GISS scenario, and drops to 122±21.7 days for the GFDL (General Fluid Dynamics Laboratory) scenario. 5 refs., 1 fig

  15. Empowering the crowd: faculty discourse strategies for facilitating student reasoning in large lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaree, Dedra

    2012-02-01

    Oregon State University (OSU) has restructured its introductory calculus-based sequence including reformed curriculum modeled after the Interactive Science Learning Environment (ISLE). ISLE is driven by an experimental cycle roughly summarized as: observe phenomena, find patterns and devise explanations, test explanations, develop a model, apply the model to new observations. In implementing ISLE at OSU we have chosen to focus on student scientific reasoning, specifically student ability to develop and test models, make explicit judgments on how to approach open-ended tasks, and take an authoritative role in knowledge development. In order to achieve these goals, the lecture course heavily utilizes social engagement. During large-lecture group work, emphasis is placed on facilitating student discourse about issues such as what systems to choose or how to define an open-ended problem. Instructional strategies are aimed at building off the group discourse to create a full-class community where knowledge is developed through collaboration with peers. We are achieving these goals along with an increase in measured student conceptual knowledge and traditional problem solving abilities, and no loss of content coverage. It is an ongoing effort to understand ``best'' instructional strategies and to facilitate new faculty when they teach the curriculum. Our research has focused on understanding how to facilitate activities that promote this form of discourse. We have quantitative analysis of engagement based on video data, qualitative analysis of dialogue from audio data, classroom observations by an external researcher, and survey data. In this session we share a subset of what we have learned about how to engage students in scientific reasoning discourse during large lecture, both at the group-work and full-class level.

  16. Pollen, wind and fire: how to investigate genetic effects of disturbance-induced change in forest trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacles, Cecile F E

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the consequences of habitat disturbance on mating patterns although pollen and seed dispersal in forest trees has been a long-standing theme of forest and conservation genetics. Forest ecosystems face global environmental pressures from timber exploitation to genetic pollution and climate change, and it is therefore essential to comprehend how disturbances may alter the dispersal of genes and their establishment in tree populations in order to formulate relevant recommendations for sustainable resource management practices and realistic predictions of potential adaptation to climate change by means of range shift or expansion (Kremer et al. 2012). However, obtaining reliable evidence of disturbance-induced effects on gene dispersal processes from empirical evaluation of forest tree populations is difficult. Indeed, tree species share characteristics such as high longevity, long generation time and large reproductive population size, which may impede the experimenter's ability to assess parameters at the spatial and time scales at which any change may occur (Petit and Hampe 2006). It has been suggested that appropriate study designs should encompass comparison of populations before and after disturbance as well as account for demonstrated variation in conspecific density, that is, the spatial distribution of mates, and forest density, including all species and relating to alteration in landscape openness (Bacles & Jump 2011). However, more often than not, empirical studies aiming to assess the consequences of habitat disturbance on genetic processes in tree populations assume rather than quantify a change in tree densities in forests under disturbance and generally fail to account for population history, which may lead to inappropriate interpretation of a causal relationship between population genetic structure and habitat disturbance due to effects of unmonitored confounding variables (Gauzere et al. 2013). In this issue, Shohami and Nathan (2014

  17. Discovering governing equations from data by sparse identification of nonlinear dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunton, Steven

    The ability to discover physical laws and governing equations from data is one of humankind's greatest intellectual achievements. A quantitative understanding of dynamic constraints and balances in nature has facilitated rapid development of knowledge and enabled advanced technology, including aircraft, combustion engines, satellites, and electrical power. There are many more critical data-driven problems, such as understanding cognition from neural recordings, inferring patterns in climate, determining stability of financial markets, predicting and suppressing the spread of disease, and controlling turbulence for greener transportation and energy. With abundant data and elusive laws, data-driven discovery of dynamics will continue to play an increasingly important role in these efforts. This work develops a general framework to discover the governing equations underlying a dynamical system simply from data measurements, leveraging advances in sparsity-promoting techniques and machine learning. The resulting models are parsimonious, balancing model complexity with descriptive ability while avoiding overfitting. The only assumption about the structure of the model is that there are only a few important terms that govern the dynamics, so that the equations are sparse in the space of possible functions. This perspective, combining dynamical systems with machine learning and sparse sensing, is explored with the overarching goal of real-time closed-loop feedback control of complex systems. This is joint work with Joshua L. Proctor and J. Nathan Kutz. Video Abstract: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gSCa78TIldg

  18. Governmentality, Counter-conduct and Prefigurative Demonstrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIlvenny, Paul

    2016-01-01

    This chapter attends to the micro-ethnographic detail of actual practices, procedures and technologies – the techne – of governance, especially those practices that manifest as what Foucault called ‘counter-conducts’. The interactional and categorial practices of a prefigurative protest demonstra......This chapter attends to the micro-ethnographic detail of actual practices, procedures and technologies – the techne – of governance, especially those practices that manifest as what Foucault called ‘counter-conducts’. The interactional and categorial practices of a prefigurative protest...... demonstration are examined using video recordings that were made of a theatrical protest event called “United Nathans weapons inspections” in February 2003. The chapter draws upon Mitchell Dean’s analytics of government and Carl Death’s analytics of protest. A first step in an analytics of protest is to uncover...... how fields of visibility, forms of knowledge, technologies and apparatuses, and subjectivities and identities are negotiated and accomplished collaboratively. Specific tools and methods that are well suited to investigating the situated practices, procedures and technologies of governmentality...

  19. Forms of Affect, Relationality, and Periodical Encounters, or ‘Pine-Apple for the Million’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fionnuala Dillane

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The social, economic, intellectual, cultural, and material relations that comprise periodical encounters have been attended to in analyses that invoke the concept of the network, what Nathan Hensley has described as a ‘chain of visible or material interactions among human and nonhuman entities’. The affective dimensions of these relations, however, are neither material nor always visible, yet they are fundamental to all such interactions. This article argues that the periodical’s capacity to communicate, the contours, scope, and effects of that capacity, and in particular its genre traction, are everywhere underscored by a relationality that is charged with affect and emotions, shaped by what Raymond Williams famously described as ‘structures of feeling’. My focus on the haptic currents that drive periodical exchanges (taking examples from George Eliot at the Cornhill Magazine, Joseph Conrad in Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine, and James Joyce in the Irish Homestead follows from important theorizations of the unique affordances of this ‘most time-oriented of print forms’ (Beetham. Affect, feelings, and emotive responses are messy and cannot be pressed into a discrete methodology, but when considering the open-ended, multi-textured, serial form that is the periodical, there is something to be gained, I suggest, from trying to understand the operations of affect, its openness, its aleatoric potential, and its emotion-based effects.

  20. PREFACE: Soil Change Matters 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The opinions expressed and arguments employed in this publication are the sole responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the OECD or of the governments of its Member countries. The Workshop was sponsored by the OECD Co-operative Research Programme on Biological Resource Management for Sustainable Agricultural Systems, whose financial support made it possible for eight of the invited speakers to participate in the Workshop. We would like to thank the Organising Committee, the Scientific Committee and the financial support from the conference sponsors and funding from the Government of Victoria that allowed the success of the Soil Change Matters Workshop. Organising Committee (Department of Economic Development, Jobs, Transport and Resources unless otherwise noted): • Richard MacEwan (Convenor) • Jennifer Alexander • Helaina Black (James Hutton Institute, UK) • Doug Crawford • Phil Dyson (North Central CMA) • Jane Fisher • Gemma Heemskerk • Jonathan Hopley • Pauline Mele • Rebecca Mitchell • David Rees • Dugal Wallace • Dale Webster Scientific Committee (Department of Economic Development, Jobs, Transport and Resources unless otherwise noted): • Mr Richard MacEwan • Dr Dominique Arrouays (National Institute of Agronomic Research, France) • Helaina Black (James Hutton Institute, UK) • Mr Doug Crawford • Dr Ben Marchant (Geoscience, UK) • Dr Pauline Mele • Dr Budiman Minasny (University of Sydney, NSW) • Professor Dan Richter (Duke University, USA) • Mr Nathan Robinson Thanks are given to the authors and to the anonymous referees for the papers included here.

  1. Transdermal hormone therapy in postmenopausal women: A review of metabolic effects and drug delivery technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan W Kopper

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Nathan W Kopper, Jennifer Gudeman, Daniel J ThompsonKV Pharmaceutical, St. Louis, MO, USAAbstract: Vasomotor symptoms (VMS associated with menopause can cause significant discomfort and decrease the quality of life for women in the peri-menopausal and post-menopausal stages of life. Hormone therapy (HT is the mainstay of treatment for menopausal symptoms and is currently the only therapy proven effective for VMS. Numerous HT options are available to treat VMS, including estrogen-only and estrogen-progestogen combination products to meet the needs of both hysterectomized and nonhysterectomized women. In addition to selecting an appropriate estrogen or estrogen-progestogen combination, consideration should be given to the route of administration to best suit the needs of the patient. Delivery systems for hormone therapy include oral tablets, transdermal patches, transdermal topical (nonpatch products, and intravaginal preparations. Oral is currently the most commonly utilized route of administration in the United States. However, evidence suggests that oral delivery may lead to some undesirable physiologic effects caused by significant gut and hepatic metabolism. Transdermal drug delivery may mitigate some of these effects by avoiding gut and hepatic first-pass metabolism. Advantages of transdermal delivery include the ability to administer unmetabolized estradiol directly to the blood stream, administration of lower doses compared to oral products, and minimal stimulation of hepatic protein production. Several estradiol transdermal delivery technologies are available, including various types of patches, topical gels, and a transdermal spray.Keywords: estradiol, hormone therapy, menopause, transdermal drug delivery, vasomotor symptoms

  2. Direct Numerical Simulations of Particle-Laden Turbulent Channel Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jebakumar, Anand Samuel; Premnath, Kannan; Abraham, John

    2017-11-01

    In a recent experimental study, Lau and Nathan (2014) reported that the distribution of particles in a turbulent pipe flow is strongly influenced by the Stokes number (St). At St lower than 1, particles migrate toward the wall and at St greater than 10 they tend to migrate toward the axis. It was suggested that this preferential migration of particles is due to two forces, the Saffman lift force and the turbophoretic force. Saffman lift force represents a force acting on the particle as a result of a velocity gradient across the particle when it leads or lags the fluid flow. Turbophoretic force is induced by turbulence which tends to move the particle in the direction of decreasing turbulent kinetic energy. In this study, the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) is employed to simulate a particle-laden turbulent channel flow through Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS). We find that the preferential migration is a function of particle size in addition to the St. We explain the effect of the particle size and St on the Saffman lift force and turbophoresis and present how this affects particle concentration at different conditions.

  3. A Radiographic Study on the Associations of Age and Prevalence of Vertebral Fractures with Abdominal Aortic Calcification in Japanese Postmenopausal Women and Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Iwamoto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to determine the associations of age and history of non- and low-traumatic fractures with the severity of abdominal aortic calcification in Japanese postmenopausal women and men. Four hundred and one Japanese persons (24 men and 377 postmenopausal women, mean age: 73.8 years for whom thoracic and lumbar spine radiographs had been obtained to evaluate their posture prior to patient participation in a fall-prevention exercise program were enrolled. The associations of sex, age, history of hip fracture, prevalence of vertebral fracture, and spondylosis grade (the Nathan degree with the severity of abdominal aortic calcification (length of calcification, as evaluated according to the number of vertebral bodies were analyzed. Nine subjects (2.2% had a history of hip fracture, and 221 (55.1% had at least one prevalent vertebral fracture. Two hundred and sixty-seven subjects (66.6% had first-degree spondylosis. Age and the number of prevalent vertebral fractures, but not sex, history of hip fracture, or spondylosis grade, were significantly associated with the severity of abdominal aortic calcification. The present study confirmed that age and the number of vertebral fractures were associated with the severity of abdominal aortic calcification in Japanese postmenopausal women and men.

  4. Single photon emission computed tomography in lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, S.; Muro, T.; Eisenstein, S.

    1998-01-01

    Analysis of single photon emission computed tomographic images and plain X-ray films of the lumbar vertebrae was performed in 15 patients with lumbar spondylosis and 15 patients with lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis. The facet joint and osteophyte images were observed in particular, and the slipping ratio of spondylolisthetic vertebrae was determined. The slipping ratio of degenerative spondylolisthesis ranged from 11.8 % to 22.3 %. Hot uptake of 99mTc-HMDP by both L4-5 facet joints was significantly greater in the patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis than in those with lumbar spondylosis. The hot uptake by the osteophytes in lumbar spondylosis was nearly uniform among the three inferior segments, L3-4, L4-5 and L5-S, but was localized to the spondylolisthetic vertebrae, L4-5, or L5-S, in the patients with spondylolisthesis. Half of the osteophytes with hot uptake were assigned to the 3rd degree of Nathan's grading. It was suggested that stress was localized to the slipping vertebrae and their facet joints in patients with lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis. (author)

  5. Management of relapsed/refractory marginal zone lymphoma: focus on ibrutinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denlinger NM

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Nathan M Denlinger, Narendranath Epperla, Basem M William Department of Internal Medicine, The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center (OSUCCC-James, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA Abstract: Marginal zone lymphomas (MZLs consist of a diverse family of malignancies, which are derived from B-cells. The disease subtypes are recognized extranodal, nodal, and splenic MZLs. The disease characteristics, clinical course, and treatment vary considerably based on the site of involvement. In 2017, the US Food and Drug Administration approved ibrutinib, a first in class Bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibitor that revolutionized the care of chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients; for, the treatment of relapsed/refractory MZL based on pivotal open-label Phase II trial demonstrated an overall response rate of 48%, with a complete response rate of 3%, median progression-free survival of 14.2 months, and median overall survival not yet reached at a median follow-up of 19.4 months. In this review, we aim to summarize the current conundrums in the management of MZL and the evolving role of ibrutinib in the treatment of MZL. Keywords: non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, marginal zone, ibrutinib

  6. Several foundational and information theoretic implications of Bell’s theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Guruprasad; Banik, Manik

    2016-08-01

    In 1935, Albert Einstein and two colleagues, Boris Podolsky and Nathan Rosen (EPR) developed a thought experiment to demonstrate what they felt was a lack of completeness in quantum mechanics (QM). EPR also postulated the existence of more fundamental theory where physical reality of any system would be completely described by the variables/states of that fundamental theory. This variable is commonly called hidden variable and the theory is called hidden variable theory (HVT). In 1964, John Bell proposed an empirically verifiable criterion to test for the existence of these HVTs. He derived an inequality, which must be satisfied by any theory that fulfill the conditions of locality and reality. He also showed that QM, as it violates this inequality, is incompatible with any local-realistic theory. Later it has been shown that Bell’s inequality (BI) can be derived from different set of assumptions and it also find applications in useful information theoretic protocols. In this review, we will discuss various foundational as well as information theoretic implications of BI. We will also discuss about some restricted nonlocal feature of quantum nonlocality and elaborate the role of Uncertainty principle and Complementarity principle in explaining this feature.

  7. Localization and upregulation of survivin in cancer health disparities: a clinical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan S

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Salma Khan,1,2 Heather Ferguson Bennit,1,2 Malyn May Asuncion Valenzuela,1,2 David Turay,1,3 Carlos J Diaz Osterman,1,2 Ron B Moyron,1,2 Grace E Esebanmen,1,2 Arjun Ashok,1,2 Nathan R Wall1,2 1Department of Biochemistry, 2Center for Health Disparities and Molecular Medicine, 3Department of Anatomy, Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Loma Linda, CA, USA Abstract: Survivin is one of the most important members of the inhibitors of apoptosis protein family, as it is expressed in most human cancers but is absent in normal, differentiated tissues. Lending to its importance, survivin has proven associations with apoptosis and cell cycle control, and has more recently been shown to modulate the tumor microenvironment and immune evasion as a result of its extracellular localization. Upregulation of survivin has been found in many cancers including breast, prostate, pancreatic, and hematological malignancies, and it may prove to be associated with the advanced presentation, poorer prognosis, and lower survival rates observed in ethnically diverse populations. Keywords: survivin, cancer, exosomes, health disparity

  8. Entry layout in the history of English lexicography: Bailey 1736, Martin 1749 and Johnson 1755

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruxandra Vişan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper focuses on the history of lexicography and proposes a comparative analysis of three significant English dictionaries of the 18th century: Nathan Bailey’s Dictionarium Britannicum (second edition, 1736, Benjamin Martin’s Lingua Britannica Reformata (first edition, 1749, Samuel Johnson’s Dictionary of the English Language (first edition, 1755. The paper discusses the structure of the entries in these texts, concentrating on the changes undergone from Bailey to Johnson, and attempts to show that the increased complexity of Martin’s and Johnson’s lexicographic entries marks a departure from the model of the “universal” dictionary. While the structure of universal dictionaries such as Bailey’s retains important similarities with that of the encyclopaedias of the time, later 18th century dictionaries, such as those of Johnson, are closer in structure to contemporary dictionaries of the English language, indicating a more complete separation of what starts to count as “linguistic” from what starts to count as “encyclopaedic”.

  9. Transnational Militancy in the 21st Century (roundtable discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal Devji

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The following roundtable discussion took place via email between September 2009 and January 2010. The participants were invited on the basis of each having a unique disciplinary background – history, sociology and political theory – but at the same time enough in common to debate both the analytic and normative dimensions of transnational militancy. Faisal Devji is currently Reader in Modern South Asian History at St. Antony’s College, University of Oxford. His most recent book is The Terrorist in Search of Humanity: Militant Islam and GlobalPolitics. Prof. Kevin McDonald is Marie Curie International Fellow in the Department of Sociology at Goldsmiths College, University of London. His most recent book, Our Violent World: Terrorism in Society, is being published April, 2010. Saul Newman is Reader in Political Theory, also at Goldsmiths College. Saul is known for his work on ‘postanarchist’ theory, but also recently co-authored a book with the title Politics Most Unusual: Violence, Sovereignty and Democracy in the War on Terror. The roundtable was initiated and chaired by Journal of Critical Globalisation Studies co-editor Nathan Coombs.

  10. Normalised flood losses in Europe: 1970-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barredo, J. I.

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents an assessment of normalised flood losses in Europe for the period 1970-2006. Normalisation provides an estimate of the losses that would occur if the floods from the past take place under current societal conditions. Economic losses from floods are the result of both societal and climatological factors. Failing to adjust for time-variant socio-economic factors produces loss amounts that are not directly comparable over time, but rather show an ever-growing trend for purely socio-economic reasons. This study has used available information on flood losses from the Emergency Events Database (EM-DAT) and the Natural Hazards Assessment Network (NATHAN). Following the conceptual approach of previous studies, we normalised flood losses by considering the effects of changes in population, wealth, and inflation at the country level. Furthermore, we removed inter-country price differences by adjusting the losses for purchasing power parities (PPP). We assessed normalised flood losses in 31 European countries. These include the member states of the European Union, Norway, Switzerland, Croatia, and the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. Results show no detectable sign of human-induced climate change in normalised flood losses in Europe. The observed increase in the original flood losses is mostly driven by societal factors.

  11. CULTURA Y “YO”. REFLEXIONES SOBRE LA IDENTIDAD MODERNA - CULTURE AND “SELF”. REFLECTIONS ON MODERN IDENTITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARMEN ELISA ESCOBAR MARÍA

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper approaches one of the issues that Charles Taylor proposes as he describes and figures out the genesis of modern identity; the one that explores the relationship between collective and individual identities. The modern idea of being or having a self leads to the notion of inner nature. However, it comes to a self that cannot be fully articulated and that only from a web of interlocution with others can be defined. Thus Taylor examines omnipresent ideals of which we are not aware about right and freedom; this search leads him to the issue of background languages. Without refusing the idea of individuality, he looks for which remains as a fundamental value for the human condition, which ultimately makes our perspective one among other perspectives. Finally, combining Taylor, the Freudian concept of culture, and the thin line between individual and collective psychology, the paper analyzes the concepts of perplexity, horror, and break-in, invoking authors like the ethno-psychoanalyst T. Nathan and A. Sampson

  12. The NKI-Rockland Sample: A Model for Accelerating the Pace of Discovery Science in Psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Brody Nooner

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The National Institute of Mental Health strategic plan for advancing psychiatric neuroscience calls for an acceleration of discovery and the delineation of developmental trajectories for risk and resilience across the lifespan. To attain these objectives, sufficiently powered datasets with broad and deep phenotypic characterization, state-of-the-art neuroimaging, and genetic samples must be generated and made openly available to the scientific community. The enhanced Nathan Kline Institute Rockland Sample (NKI-RS is a response to this need. NKI-RS is an ongoing, institutionally-centered endeavor aimed at creating a large-scale (N>1000, deeply phenotyped, community-ascertained, lifespan sample (ages 6-85 years old with advanced neuroimaging and genetics. These data will be publically shared, openly and prospectively (i.e., on a weekly basis. Herein, we describe the conceptual basis of the NKI-RS, including study design, sampling considerations, and steps to synchronize phenotypic and neuroimaging assessment. Additionally, we describe our process for sharing the data with the scientific community while protecting participant confidentiality, maintaining an adequate database, and certifying data integrity. The pilot phase of the NKI-RS, including challenges in recruiting, characterizing, imaging, and sharing data, is discussed while also explaining how this experience informed the final design of the enhanced NKI-RS. It is our hope that familiarity with the conceptual underpinnings of the enhanced NKI-RS will facilitate harmonization with future data collection efforts aimed at advancing psychiatric neuroscience and nosology.

  13. Alpha particles from the photodisintegration of 9Be in the photon energy region 18 to 26 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchnea, A.; Johnson, R.G.; McNeill, K.G.

    1978-01-01

    Alpha particles from the 9 Be(γ,n) 8 Be(16.6) and 9 Be(γ,α 0 ) 5 He reactions were studied in the photon energy region 18 to 26 MeV; the results yielded a combined integrated cross section of 13.1 +- 2 MeV mb and an upper limit on the integrated (γ,α 0 ) cross section of 4.0 MeV mb. This agrees within error with the integrated cross section of Becchi, Meneghetti, Sanzone, and Vitale, 10 +- 2 MeV mb, which would contain about 50% of any contribution from the (γ,α 0 ) reaction. These reactions together with the 9 Be(γ,n 1 ) 8 Be reaction (which has an integrated cross section of 2.4 +- 0.4 MeV mb) are the major reaction channels contributing to the total photoneutron cross section in this energy region. Their sum, 15.5 MeV mb, agrees well with the results of Nathans and Halpern and Hughes, Sambell, Muirhead, and Spicer but disagrees with that of Costa, Pasqualini, Piragino, and Roasio. (author)

  14. Micafungin in the treatment of invasive candidiasis and invasive aspergillosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan P Wiederhold

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nathan P Wiederhold1, Jason M Cota2, Christopher R Frei11University of Texas at Austin College of Pharmacy, Austin, Texas, USA; 2University of the Incarnate Word Feik School of Pharmacy, San Antonio, Texas, USAAbstract: Micafungin is an echinocandin antifungal agent available for clinical use in Japan, Europe, and the United States. Through inhibition of β-1,3-glucan production, an essential component of the fungal cell wall, micafungin exhibits potent antifungal activity against key pathogenic fungi, including Candida and Aspergillus species, while contributing minimal toxicity to mammalian cells. This activity is maintained against polyene and azole-resistant isolates. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies have demonstrated linear kinetics both in adults and children with concentration-dependent activity observed both in vitro and in vivo. Dosage escalation studies have also demonstrated that doses much higher than those currently recommended may be administered without serious adverse effects. Clinically, micafungin has been shown to be efficacious for the treatment of invasive candidiasis and invasive aspergillosis. Furthermore, the clinical effectiveness of micafungin against these infections occurs without the drug interactions that occur with the azoles and the nephrotoxicity observed with amphotericin B formulations. This review will focus on the pharmacology, clinical microbiology, mechanisms of resistance, safety, and clinical efficacy of micafungin in the treatment of invasive candidiasis and invasive aspergillosis.Keywords: micafungin, echinocandin, Candida, Aspergillus, invasive candidiasis, invasive aspergillosis

  15. Automated Liquibase Generator And ValidatorALGV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manik Jain

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper presents an automation tool namely ALGV Automated Liquibase Generator and Validator for the automated generation and verification of liquibase scripts. Liquibase is one of the most efficient ways of applying and persisting changes to a database schema. Since its invention by Nathan Voxland 1 it has become de facto standard for database change management. The advantages of using liquibase scripts over traditional sql queries ranges from version control to reusing the same scripts over multiple database platforms. Irrespective of its advantages manual creation of liquibase scripts takes a lot of effort and sometimes is error-prone. ALGV helps to reduce the time consuming liquibase script generation manual typing efforts possible error occurrence and manual verification process and time by 75. Automating the liquibase generation process also helps to remove the burden of recollecting specific tags to be used for a particular change. Moreover developers can concentrate on the business logic and business data rather than wasting their precious efforts in writing files.

  16. Are diagrams always helpful tools? developmental and individual differences in the effect of presentation format on student problem solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Julie L; Koedinger, Kenneth R

    2012-09-01

    High school and college students demonstrate a verbal, or textual, advantage whereby beginning algebra problems in story format are easier to solve than matched equations (Koedinger & Nathan, 2004). Adding diagrams to the stories may further facilitate solution (Hembree, 1992; Koedinger & Terao, 2002). However, diagrams may not be universally beneficial (Ainsworth, 2006; Larkin & Simon, 1987). To identify developmental and individual differences in the use of diagrams, story, and equation representations in problem solving. When do diagrams begin to aid problem-solving performance? Does the verbal advantage replicate for younger students? Three hundred and seventy-three students (121 sixth, 117 seventh, 135 eighth grade) from an ethnically diverse middle school in the American Midwest participated in Experiment 1. In Experiment 2, 84 sixth graders who had participated in Experiment 1 were followed up in seventh and eighth grades. In both experiments, students solved algebra problems in three matched presentation formats (equation, story, story + diagram). The textual advantage was replicated for all groups. While diagrams enhance performance of older and higher ability students, younger and lower-ability students do not benefit, and may even be hindered by a diagram's presence. The textual advantage is in place by sixth grade. Diagrams are not inherently helpful aids to student understanding and should be used cautiously in the middle school years, as students are developing competency for diagram comprehension during this time. ©2011 The British Psychological Society.

  17. Si Wire-Array Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettcher, Shannon

    2010-03-01

    Micron-scale Si wire arrays are three-dimensional photovoltaic absorbers that enable orthogonalization of light absorption and carrier collection and hence allow for the utilization of relatively impure Si in efficient solar cell designs. The wire arrays are grown by a vapor-liquid-solid-catalyzed process on a crystalline (111) Si wafer lithographically patterned with an array of metal catalyst particles. Following growth, such arrays can be embedded in polymethyldisiloxane (PDMS) and then peeled from the template growth substrate. The result is an unusual photovoltaic material: a flexible, bendable, wafer-thickness crystalline Si absorber. In this paper I will describe: 1. the growth of high-quality Si wires with controllable doping and the evaluation of their photovoltaic energy-conversion performance using a test electrolyte that forms a rectifying conformal semiconductor-liquid contact 2. the observation of enhanced absorption in wire arrays exceeding the conventional light trapping limits for planar Si cells of equivalent material thickness and 3. single-wire and large-area solid-state Si wire-array solar cell results obtained to date with directions for future cell designs based on optical and device physics. In collaboration with Michael Kelzenberg, Morgan Putnam, Joshua Spurgeon, Daniel Turner-Evans, Emily Warren, Nathan Lewis, and Harry Atwater, California Institute of Technology.

  18. Diversity, expansion, and evolutionary novelty of plant DNA-binding transcription factor families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehti-Shiu, Melissa D; Panchy, Nicholas; Wang, Peipei; Uygun, Sahra; Shiu, Shin-Han

    2017-01-01

    Plant transcription factors (TFs) that interact with specific sequences via DNA-binding domains are crucial for regulating transcriptional initiation and are fundamental to plant development and environmental response. In addition, expansion of TF families has allowed functional divergence of duplicate copies, which has contributed to novel, and in some cases adaptive, traits in plants. Thus, TFs are central to the generation of the diverse plant species that we see today. Major plant agronomic traits, including those relevant to domestication, have also frequently arisen through changes in TF coding sequence or expression patterns. Here our goal is to provide an overview of plant TF evolution by first comparing the diversity of DNA-binding domains and the sizes of these domain families in plants and other eukaryotes. Because TFs are among the most highly expanded gene families in plants, the birth and death process of TFs as well as the mechanisms contributing to their retention are discussed. We also provide recent examples of how TFs have contributed to novel traits that are important in plant evolution and in agriculture.This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Gene Regulatory Mechanisms and Networks, edited by Dr. Erich Grotewold and Dr. Nathan Springer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Predicting individual brain maturity using dynamic functional connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian eQin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging-based functional connectivity (FC analyses have revealed significant developmental trends in specific intrinsic connectivity networks linked to cognitive and behavioral maturation. However, knowledge of how brain functional maturation is associated with FC dynamics at rest is limited. Here, we examined age-related differences in the temporal variability of FC dynamics with data publicly released by the Nathan Kline Institute (NKI (n=183, ages 7-30 and showed that dynamic inter-region interactions can be used to accurately predict individual brain maturity across development. Furthermore, we identified a significant age-dependent trend underlying dynamic inter-network FC, including increasing variability of the connections between the visual network, default mode network (DMN and cerebellum as well as within the cerebellum and DMN and decreasing variability within the cerebellum and between the cerebellum and DMN as well as the cingulo-opercular network. Overall, the results suggested significant developmental changes in dynamic inter-network interaction, which may shed new light on the functional organization of typical developmental brains.

  20. Conventional and novel stem cell based therapies for androgenic alopecia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talavera-Adame D

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Dodanim Talavera-Adame,1 Daniella Newman,2 Nathan Newman1 1American Advanced Medical Corp. (Private Practice, Beverly Hills, CA, 2Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA, USA Abstract: The prevalence of androgenic alopecia (AGA increases with age and it affects both men and women. Patients diagnosed with AGA may experience decreased quality of life, depression, and feel self-conscious. There are a variety of therapeutic options ranging from prescription drugs to non-prescription medications. Currently, AGA involves an annual global market revenue of US$4 billion and a growth rate of 1.8%, indicating a growing consumer market. Although natural and synthetic ingredients can promote hair growth and, therefore, be useful to treat AGA, some of them have important adverse effects and unknown mechanisms of action that limit their use and benefits. Biologic factors that include signaling from stem cells, dermal papilla cells, and platelet-rich plasma are some of the current therapeutic agents being studied for hair restoration with milder side effects. However, most of the mechanisms exerted by these factors in hair restoration are still being researched. In this review, we analyze the therapeutic agents that have been used for AGA and emphasize the potential of new therapies based on advances in stem cell technologies and regenerative medicine. Keywords: stem cells, stem cell therapies, hair follicle, dermal papilla, androgenic alopecia, laser, hair regeneration

  1. Some little-known facts and events from the history of gravitational wave research in Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatskiv, Ya. S.,; Vavilova, I. B.; Romanets, O. A.; Savchuk, V. S.

    2017-10-01

    The paper deals with the history of gravitational wave research in Ukraine and describes two little-known facts and events. The first one is concerning with a short period of Dr. Nathan Rosen's life in Kyiv and his scientific activity at the Institute of Physics of the Academy of Sciences of the UkrSSR in 1936-1938 years. At that time, he has published several papers, which promoted the first steps in the creation of modern theories in the fields of gravity and quantum physics. These papers, including "Plane-polarized waves in the General Theory of Relativity", have been issued in the "Ukrainian Physical Notes" ("Ukrainski Fizychni Zapysky"), which was not widely accessed. We quote also some parts from correspondence of N. Rosen and A. Einstein in this period. The second comment is related to the history of gravitational wave experimental research in Kyiv, which were initiated in 1970s by Prof. Aleksey Z. Petrov at the Institute of Theoretical Physics of the Academy of Sciences of the UkrSSR. We describe briefly the development of the detector of high-frequency gravitational waves (the Weber type antenna) as well as results obtained by K.A. Piragas's group.

  2. Huge supply/demand increases seen in oxygenate forecasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhoades, A.K.

    1992-01-01

    Industry originally projected that oxygenate supply would not be able to meet the demand created by U.S. oxygenated and reformulated gasoline mandates. This paper reports that those projections have been reserved in two recent industry reports - one from Chemical Market Associates Inc. (CMAI) and one from Pace Consultants Inc. Pace's report, by Paulo Nery and Nathan Sims, predicts gasoline and oxygenates demand, and examines the role ethanol may play in changing those values. CMAI's report estimates captive supply and demand of butylenes and oxygenates. Oxygenates are entering the domestic gasoline market this winter as a result of the 1990 U.S. Clean Air Act Amendments. Methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) is the most important oxygenate, although ethanol, ethyl tertiary butyl ether (ETBE), and tertiary amyl methyl ether (TAME) are gathering market strength. Ethanol's strength is derived from President Bush's ruling granting a waiver to reformulated gasoline containing ethanol. This waiver allows ethanol blends to have a vapor pressure 1 psi higher than other types of gasoline

  3. Improving medical students’ participation in research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menon R

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Rahul Menon, Vishnou Mourougavelou, Arjun MenonFaculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UKWe read with great interest the review by Siddaiah-Subramanya et al1 regarding the difficulty for medical students to participate in research, in developing countries. From our own experience as medical students, we agree that organizational factors, adequacy of knowledge, and variability in “attitudes” may all contribute to difficulty in participating in research. Nevertheless, we propose that the introduction of research projects, which may be part of an intercalated degree, could help improve medical students’ involvement in research.Author's replyManjunath Siddaiah-Subramanya,1,2 Harveen Singh,3 Kor Woi Tiang1,21Department of Surgery, Logan Hospital, Meadowbrook, 2Department of Medicine, Griffith University, Nathan, 3Department of Gastroenterology, Lady Cilento Children’s Hospital, Brisbane, QLD, Australia We would like to thank Menon et al for the letter in response to our article.1 We note that an overarching theme in the letter is the situation in countries where research at medical school could be improved. In the letter, Menon et al have brought out a couple of important issues: one is that the problem is multifactorial, and the other is the fact that opportunities and encouragement need to be provided to the students so that they could get more involved in research.View the original paper by Siddaiah-Subramanya and colleagues.

  4. Geochronological constraints on Cretaceous-Paleocene volcanism in South Westland, New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, C.J.; Cooper, A.F.; Palin, J.M.; Nathan, S.

    2005-01-01

    Cretaceous and Paleocene sedimentation in South Westland, New Zealand, is recorded in the Otumotu Formation, Tauperikaka Coal Measures, Whakapohai Sandstone, Arnott Basalt, Buttress Conglomerate, and Tokakoriri Formation, originally named and mapped by Nathan in 1977. Within this stratigraphic sequence, the name Buttress Conglomerate was used to describe volcanic conglomerates at Porphyry and Buttress Points that contained rounded clasts of plagioclasephyric intermediate volcanic rocks. Stratigraphically, the volcanic conglomerate at Porphyry Point forms sharp contacts with the underlying Arnott Basalt (Haumurian) and overlying Tokakoriri Formation (Teurian). The volcanic conglomerate at Buttress Point, however, is entirely fault-bounded. Clasts from each unit were collected and U-Pb zircon dated using the TIMS and ELA-ICP-MS methods. A trachyandesite clast collected at Buttress Point gives an age of 96.9 ± 1.6 Ma, whereas a rhyolite clast collected at Porphyry Point gives an age of 61.4 ± 0.8 Ma. Petrological, geochemical, and stratigraphic data suggest that erosion of the clasts closely followed volcanism, and that these ages accurately reflect the depositional ages of the conglomerates. Conglomerates at Porphyry and Buttress Points have been formally renamed the Porphyry Point Member of the Tokakoriri Formation and the Buttress Point Conglomerate, respectively. (author). 49 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs

  5. Biology of the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Nathan R

    2006-01-01

    In recognition of Dr. Nathan Brewer's many years of dedicated service to AALAS and the community of research animal care specialists, the premier issue of JAALAS includes the following compilation of Dr. Brewer's essays on rabbit anatomy and physiology. These essays were originally published in the ASLAP newsletter (formerly called Synapse), and are reprinted here with the permission and endorsement of that organization. I would like to thank Nina Hahn, Jane Lacher, and Nancy Austin for assistance in compiling these essays. Publishing this information in JAALAS allows Dr. Brewer's work to become part of the searchable literature for laboratory animal science and medicine and also assures that the literature references and information he compiled will not be lost to posterity. However, readers should note that this material has undergone only minor editing for style, has not been edited for content, and, most importantly, has not undergone peer review. With the agreement of the associate editors and the AALAS leadership, I elected to forego peer review of this work, in contradiction to standard JAALAS policy, based on the status of this material as pre-published information from an affiliate organization that holds the copyright and on the esteem in which we hold for Dr. Brewer as a founding father of our organization.

  6. Build your own tiny Lego LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Abha Eli Phoboo

    2015-01-01

    A PhD student working on the ATLAS experiment has created a replica of the Large Hadron Collider using Lego building blocks. Nathan Readioff, from the University of Liverpool (see here), submitted his design to Lego Ideas (see here) this week and is now awaiting the 10,000 votes needed for it to qualify for the Lego Review, which decides if projects become new Lego products. You can help this project, vote online now!   A computer simulation of the miniature Lego LHC, complete with four detectors connected with blue dipole magnets. His Lego design is a stylised model of the LHC, showcasing the four main detectors ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb at the micro scale. Each detector is small enough to fit in the palm of your hand, yet the details of the internal systems are intricate, revealed by cutaway walls. Every major detector component is represented by a Lego piece. The models are not strictly to scale with one another, but the same size base is used for each one to maximise the detail that can...

  7. Effect of Leaf Surface Chemical Properties on Efficacy of Sanitizer for Rotavirus Inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuzawa, Miyu; Ku, Kang-Mo; Palma-Salgado, Sindy Paola; Nagasaka, Kenya; Feng, Hao; Juvik, John A.; Sano, Daisuke; Shisler, Joanna L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The use of sanitizers is essential for produce safety. However, little is known about how sanitizer efficacy varies with respect to the chemical surface properties of produce. To answer this question, the disinfection efficacies of an oxidant-based sanitizer and a new surfactant-based sanitizer for porcine rotavirus (PRV) strain OSU were examined. PRV was attached to the leaf surfaces of two kale cultivars with high epicuticular wax contents and one cultivar of endive with a low epicuticular wax content and then treated with each sanitizer. The efficacy of the oxidant-based sanitizer correlated with leaf wax content as evidenced by the 1-log10 PRV disinfection on endive surfaces (low wax content) and 3-log10 disinfection of the cultivars with higher wax contents. In contrast, the surfactant-based sanitizer showed similar PRV disinfection efficacies (up to 3 log10) that were independent of leaf wax content. A statistical difference was observed with the disinfection efficacies of the oxidant-based sanitizer for suspended and attached PRV, while the surfactant-based sanitizer showed similar PRV disinfection efficacies. Significant reductions in the entry and replication of PRV were observed after treatment with either disinfectant. Moreover, the oxidant-based-sanitizer-treated PRV showed sialic acid-specific binding to the host cells, whereas the surfactant-based sanitizer increased the nonspecific binding of PRV to the host cells. These findings suggest that the surface properties of fresh produce may affect the efficacy of virus disinfection, implying that food sanitizers should be carefully selected for the different surface characteristics of fresh produce. IMPORTANCE Food sanitizer efficacies are affected by the surface properties of vegetables. This study evaluated the disinfection efficacies of two food sanitizers, an oxidant-based sanitizer and a surfactant-based sanitizer, on porcine rotavirus strain OSU adhering to the leaf epicuticular surfaces of

  8. Incorporating the International Polar Year Into Introductory Geology Laboratories at Ohio State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, S. A.; Wilson, T. J.

    2005-12-01

    The International Polar Year (IPY) provides an excellent opportunity for highlighting polar research in education. The ultimate goal of our outreach and education program is to develop a series of modules that are focused on societally-relevant topics being investigated in Antarctic earth science, while teaching basic geologic concepts that are standard elements of school curricula. For example, we envision a university-level, undergraduate, introductory earth science class with the entire semester/quarter laboratory program focused on polar earth science research during the period of the International Polar Year. To attain this goal, a series of modules will be developed, including inquiry-based exercises founded on imagery (video, digital photos, digital core scans), GIS data layers, maps, and data sets available from OSU research groups. Modules that highlight polar research are also suitable for the K-12 audience. Scaleable/grade appropriate modules that use some of the same data sets as the undergraduate modules can be outlined for elementary through high school earth science classes. An initial module is being developed that focuses on paleoclimate data. The module provides a hands-on investigation of the climate history archived in both ice cores and sedimentary rock cores in order to understand time scales, drivers, and processes of global climate change. The paleoclimate module also demonstrates the types of polar research that are ongoing at OSU, allowing students to observe what research the faculty are undertaking in their respective fields. This will link faculty research with student education in the classroom, enhancing learning outcomes. Finally, this module will provide a direct link to U.S. Antarctic Program research related to the International Polar Year, when new ice and sedimentary rock cores will be obtained and analyzed. As a result of this laboratory exercise, the students will be able to: (1) Define an ice core and a sedimentary rock core

  9. Final Report for Project DE-FC02-06ER25755 [Pmodels2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panda, Dhabaleswar [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Sadayappan, P. [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2014-03-12

    In this report, we describe the research accomplished by the OSU team under the Pmodels2 project. The team has worked on various angles: designing high performance MPI implementations on modern networking technologies (Mellanox InfiniBand (including the new ConnectX2 architecture and Quad Data Rate), QLogic InfiniPath, the emerging 10GigE/iWARP and RDMA over Converged Enhanced Ethernet (RoCE) and Obsidian IB-WAN), studying MPI scalability issues for multi-thousand node clusters using XRC transport, scalable job start-up, dynamic process management support, efficient one-sided communication, protocol offloading and designing scalable collective communication libraries for emerging multi-core architectures. New designs conforming to the Argonne’s Nemesis interface have also been carried out. All of these above solutions have been integrated into the open-source MVAPICH/MVAPICH2 software. This software is currently being used by more than 2,100 organizations worldwide (in 71 countries). As of January ’14, more than 200,000 downloads have taken place from the OSU Web site. In addition, many InfiniBand vendors, server vendors, system integrators and Linux distributors have been incorporating MVAPICH/MVAPICH2 into their software stacks and distributing it. Several InfiniBand systems using MVAPICH/MVAPICH2 have obtained positions in the TOP500 ranking of supercomputers in the world. The latest November ’13 ranking include the following systems: 7th ranked Stampede system at TACC with 462,462 cores; 11th ranked Tsubame 2.5 system at Tokyo Institute of Technology with 74,358 cores; 16th ranked Pleiades system at NASA with 81,920 cores; Work on PGAS models has proceeded on multiple directions. The Scioto framework, which supports task-parallelism in one-sided and global-view parallel programming, has been extended to allow multi-processor tasks that are executed by processor groups. A quantum Monte Carlo application is being ported onto the extended Scioto framework. A

  10. Learning to teach effectively: Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics graduate teaching assistants' teaching self-efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dechenne, Sue Ellen

    Graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) from science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) are important in the teaching of undergraduate students (Golde & Dore, 2001). However, they are often poorly prepared for teaching (Luft, Kurdziel, Roehrig, & Turner, 2004). This dissertation addresses teaching effectiveness in three related manuscripts: (1) A position paper that summarizes the current research on and develops a model of GTA teaching effectiveness. (2) An adaptation and validation of two instruments; GTA perception of teaching training and STEM GTA teaching self-efficacy. (3) A model test of factors that predict STEM GTA teaching self-efficacy. Together these three papers address key questions in the understanding of teaching effectiveness in STEM GTAs including: (a) What is our current knowledge of factors that affect the teaching effectiveness of GTAs? (b) Given that teaching self-efficacy is strongly linked to teaching performance, how can we measure STEM GTAs teaching self-efficacy? (c) Is there a better way to measure GTA teaching training than currently exists? (d) What factors predict STEM GTA teaching self-efficacy? An original model for GTA teaching effectiveness was developed from a thorough search of the GTA teaching literature. The two instruments---perception of training and teaching self-efficacy---were tested through self-report surveys using STEM GTAs from six different universities including Oregon State University (OSU). The data was analyzed using exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. Using GTAs from the OSU colleges of science and engineering, the model of sources of STEM GTA teaching self-efficacy was tested by administering self-report surveys and analyzed by using OLS regression analysis. Language and cultural proficiency, departmental teaching climate, teaching self-efficacy, GTA training, and teaching experience affect GTA teaching effectiveness. GTA teaching self-efficacy is a second-order factor combined from self

  11. 3. Workshop for IAEA ICSP on Integral PWR Design Natural Circulation Flow Stability and Thermo-hydraulic Coupling of Containment and Primary System during Accidents. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-04-01

    Most advanced nuclear power plant designs adopted several kinds of passive systems. Natural circulation is used as a key driving force for many passive systems and even for core heat removal during normal operation such as NuScale, CAREM, ESBWR and Indian AHWR designs. Simulation of natural circulation phenomena is very challenging since the driving force of it is weak compared to forced circulation and involves a coupling between primary system and containment for integral type reactor. The IAEA ICSP (International Collaborative Standard Problem) on 'Integral PWR Design Natural Circulation Flow Stability and Thermo-hydraulic Coupling of Containment and Primary System during Accidents' was proposed within the CRP on 'Natural Circulation Phenomena, Modelling, and Reliability of Passive Systems that utilize Natural Circulation'. Oregon State University (OSU) of USA offered to host this ICSP. This ICSP plans to conduct the following experiments and blind/open simulations with system codes: 1. Quasi-steady state operation with different core power levels: Conduct quasi-steady state operation with step-wise increase of core power level in order to observe single phase natural circulation flow according to power level. The experimental facility and operating conditions for an integral PWR will be used. 2. Thermo-hydraulic Coupling between Primary system and Containment: Conduct a loss of feedwater transient with subsequent ADS blowdown and long term cooling to determine the progression of a loss of feedwater transient by natural circulation through primary and containment systems. These tests would examine the blowdown phase as well as the long term cooling using sump natural circulation by coupling the primary to containment systems. This data could be used for the evaluation of system codes to determine if they model specific phenomena in an accurate manner. OSU completed planned two ICSP tests in July 2011 and real initial and boundary conditions measured from the

  12. EXPERIENCES WITH ACQUIRING HIGHLY REDUNDANT SPATIAL DATA TO SUPPORT DRIVERLESS VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Koppanyi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available As vehicle technology is moving towards higher autonomy, the demand for highly accurate geospatial data is rapidly increasing, as accurate maps have a huge potential of increasing safety. In particular, high definition 3D maps, including road topography and infrastructure, as well as city models along the transportation corridors represent the necessary support for driverless vehicles. In this effort, a vehicle equipped with high-, medium- and low-resolution active and passive cameras acquired data in a typical traffic environment, represented here by the OSU campus, where GPS/GNSS data are available along with other navigation sensor data streams. The data streams can be used for two purposes. First, high-definition 3D maps can be created by integrating all the sensory data, and Data Analytics/Big Data methods can be tested for automatic object space reconstruction. Second, the data streams can support algorithmic research for driverless vehicle technologies, including object avoidance, navigation/positioning, detecting pedestrians and bicyclists, etc. Crucial cross-performance analyses on map database resolution and accuracy with respect to sensor performance metrics to achieve economic solution for accurate driverless vehicle positioning can be derived. These, in turn, could provide essential information on optimizing the choice of geospatial map databases and sensors’ quality to support driverless vehicle technologies. The paper reviews the data acquisition and primary data processing challenges and performance results.

  13. A Multi-Layer Phoswich Radioxenon Detection System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David M. Hamby

    2007-01-01

    Further work was performed in optical modeling of the modified (dual planar) XEPHWICH design. Modeling capabilities and understanding were expanded through the performance of three additional simulations. The efficiency of the entire optical modeling process was increased by developing custom software to interface with both the input and output of the simulation program. Work continues on the design and implementation of the analog portion of the read-out system. This component is being prototyped and is nearing completion. The PCB (printed circuit board) is in its design phase for the two-channel digital pulse processor, necessary for the dual planar XEPHWICH. System components are being selected for the signal processor based on a balance of cost and our expectations of quality. Outside the scope of the grant, but entirely related, we continue to work on developing a source of fission-product xenon gases that will be produced in the OSU TRIGA reactor. The amount of HEU necessary to provide the needed activities of xenon fission products, as well as build-in times for each isotope of importance following irradiation, have been calculated. Irradiation times in the TRIGA have been determined. We've finalized our design of the xenon-fission-product collection chamber and initiated in-house fabrication. PNNL will be supplying the thin foils of enriched uranium necessary for xenon production

  14. Experimental and theoretical comparison of fuel temperature and bulk coolant characteristics in the Oregon State TRIGA reactor during steady state operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcum, W.R., E-mail: marcumw@engr.orst.ed [Oregon State University, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics, 116 Radiation Center, Corvallis, OR 97330 (United States); Woods, B.G.; Reese, S.R. [Oregon State University, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics, 116 Radiation Center, Corvallis, OR 97330 (United States)

    2010-01-15

    In September of 2008 Oregon State University (OSU) completed its core conversion analysis as part of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program. Experimental bulk coolant temperatures were collected in various locations throughout the Oregon State TRIGA Reactor (OSTR) core in order to supplement the validity of the numerical thermal hydraulic results produced in RELAP5-3D Version 2.4.2. Axial bulk coolant temperature distributions were collected by acquiring discrete thermocouple measurements in individual subchannel locations during steady state operation at 1.0 MW{sub th}. The experimental axial temperature distribution collected was compared to one-channel, two-channel, and eight-channel RELAP5-3D models and found to match within 11.94%, 11.69%, and 8.78%, respectively, on average. Comparisons to similar studies were made based on a dimensional analysis of fluid body forces in the discrete core locations, indicating that the chosen approach produces conservative results for use in the OSTR safety analysis.

  15. Surface currents in the Bohai Sea derived from the Korean Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, L.; Wang, M.

    2016-02-01

    The first geostationary ocean color satellite sensor, the Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) onboard the Korean Communication, Ocean, and Meteorological Satellite can monitor and measure ocean phenomena over an area of 2500 × 2500 km2 around the western Pacific region centered at 36°N and 130°E. Hourly measurements during the day around 9:00 to 16:00 local time are a unique capability of GOCI to monitor ocean features of higher temporal variability. In this presentation, we show some recent results of GOCI-derived ocean surface currents in the Bohai Sea using the Maximum Cross-Correlation (MCC) feature tracking method and compare the results with altimetry-inversed tidal current observations produced from Oregon State University (OSU) Tidal Inversion Software (OTIS). The performance of the GOCI-based MCC method is assessed and the discrepancies between the GOCI- and OTIS-derived currents are evaluated. A series of sensitivity studies are conducted with images from various satellite products and of various time differences, MCC adjustable parameters, and influence from other forcings such as wind, to find the best setups for optimal MCC performance. Our results demonstrate that GOCI can effectively provide real-time monitoring of not only water optical, biological, and biogeochemical variability, but also the physical dynamics in the region.

  16. Model of vortex dynamics in superconducting films in two-coil measurements of the coherence length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemberger, Thomas; Loh, Yen Lee

    In two-coil measurements on superconducting films, a magnetic field from a small coil is applied to the center of the film. When the amplitude of the ac field is increased, the film undergoes a transition from the ``Meissner'' state to a state with vortices and antivortices. Ultimately, the vortex density matches the applied magnetic field and field screening is negligible. Experimentally, the field at the transition is related to the superconducting coherence length, although a full theory of the relationship is lacking. We show that the mutual inductance between drive and pickup coils, on opposite sides of the film, as a function of ac field amplitude is well-described by a phenomenological model in which vortices and antivortices appear together in the film at the radius where the induced supercurrent is strongest, and then they move through a landscape of moderately strong vortex pinning sites. Work at OSU supported by DOE-Basic Energy Sciences through Grant No. FG02-08ER46533.

  17. Enhanced Hydrogen Production Integrated with CO2 Separation in a Single-Stage Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahesh Iyer; Himanshu Gupta; Danny Wong; Liang-Shih Fan

    2005-09-30

    Hydrogen production from coal gasification can be enhanced by driving the equilibrium limited Water Gas Shift reaction forward by incessantly removing the CO{sub 2} by-product via the carbonation of calcium oxide. This project aims at using the OSU patented high-reactivity mesoporous precipitated calcium carbonate sorbent for removing the CO{sub 2} product. Preliminary experiments demonstrate the show the superior performance of the PCC sorbent over other naturally occurring calcium sorbents. Gas composition analyses show the formation of 100% pure hydrogen. Novel calcination techniques could lead to smaller reactor footprint and single-stage reactors that can achieve maximum theoretical H{sub 2} production for multicyclic applications. Sub-atmospheric calcination studies reveal the effect of vacuum level, diluent gas flow rate, thermal properties of the diluent gas and the sorbent loading on the calcination kinetics which play an important role on the sorbent morphology. Steam, which can be easily separated from CO{sub 2}, is envisioned to be a potential diluent gas due to its enhanced thermal properties. Steam calcination studies at 700-850 C reveal improved sorbent morphology over regular nitrogen calcination. A mixture of 80% steam and 20% CO{sub 2} at ambient pressure was used to calcine the spent sorbent at 820 C thus lowering the calcination temperature. Regeneration of calcium sulfide to calcium carbonate was achieved by carbonating the calcium sulfide slurry by bubbling CO{sub 2} gas at room temperature.

  18. The ASAS-SN Catalog of Variable Stars I: The Serendipitous Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, T.; Kochanek, C. S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Shappee, B. J.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Thompson, Todd A.; Prieto, J. L.; Dong, Subo; Pawlak, M.; Shields, J. V.; Pojmanski, G.; Otero, S.; Britt, C. A.; Will, D.

    2018-04-01

    The All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae (ASAS-SN) is the first optical survey to routinely monitor the whole sky with a cadence of ˜2 - 3 days down to V≲ 17 mag. ASAS-SN has monitored the whole sky since 2014, collecting ˜100 - 500 epochs of observations per field. The V-band light curves for candidate variables identified during the search for supernovae are classified using a random forest classifier and visually verified. We present a catalog of 66,533 bright, new variable stars discovered during our search for supernovae, including 27,753 periodic variables and 38,780 irregular variables. V-band light curves for the ASAS-SN variables are available through the ASAS-SN variable stars database (https://asas-sn.osu.edu/variables). The database will begin to include the light curves of known variable stars in the near future along with the results for a systematic, all-sky variability survey.

  19. Science-based HRA: experimental comparison of operator performance to IDAC (Information-Decision-Action Crew) simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirley, Rachel [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Smidts, Carol [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Boring, Ronald [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Li, Yuandan [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Mosleh, Ali [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Information-Decision-Action Crew (IDAC) operator model simulations of a Steam Generator Tube Rupture are compared to student operator performance in studies conducted in the Ohio State University’s Nuclear Power Plant Simulator Facility. This study is presented as a prototype for conducting simulator studies to validate key aspects of Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) methods. Seven student operator crews are compared to simulation results for crews designed to demonstrate three different decision-making strategies. The IDAC model used in the simulations is modified slightly to capture novice behavior rather that expert operators. Operator actions and scenario pacing are compared. A preliminary review of available performance shaping factors (PSFs) is presented. After the scenario in the NPP Simulator Facility, student operators review a video of the scenario and evaluate six PSFs at pre-determined points in the scenario. This provides a dynamic record of the PSFs experienced by the OSU student operators. In this preliminary analysis, Time Constraint Load (TCL) calculated in the IDAC simulations is compared to TCL reported by student operators. We identify potential modifications to the IDAC model to develop an “IDAC Student Operator Model.” This analysis provides insights into how similar experiments could be conducted using expert operators to improve the fidelity of IDAC simulations.

  20. REACTIONS FORMING Cn=2,10(0,+), Cn=2,4H(0,+), AND C3H2(0,+) IN THE GAS PHASE: SEMIEMPIRICAL BRANCHING RATIOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabot, M.; Jallat, A.; Béroff, K.; Gratier, P.; Wakelam, V.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide a new set of branching ratios (BRs) for interstellar and planetary chemical networks based on a semiempirical model. We applied, instead of zero-order theory (i.e., only the most exoergic decaying channel is considered), a statistical microcanonical model based on the construction of breakdown curves and using experimental high velocity collision BRs for their parameterization. We applied the model to ion-molecule, neutral-neutral, and ion-pair reactions implemented in the few popular databases for astrochemistry, such as KIDA, OSU, and UMIST. We studied the reactions of carbon and hydrocarbon species with electrons, He + , H + , CH + , CH, C, and C + leading to intermediate complexes of the type C n=2,10 , C n=2,4 H, C 3 H 2 , C n=2,10 + , C n=2,4 H + , or C 3 H 2 + . Comparison of predictions with measurements supports the validity of the model. Huge deviations with respect to database values are often obtained. Effects of the new BRs in time-dependent chemistry for dark clouds and for photodissociation region chemistry with conditions similar to those found in the Horsehead Nebula are discussed.

  1. Association Mapping of Malting Quality Quantitative Trait Loci in Winter Barley: Positive Signals from Small Germplasm Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Gutiérrez

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Malting quality comprises one of the most economically relevant set of traits in barley ( L.. It is a complex phenotype, expensive and difficult to measure, that would benefit from a marker-assisted selection strategy. Malting quality is a target of the U.S. Barley Coordinated Agricultural Project (CAP and development of winter habit malting barley varieties is a key objective of the U.S. barley research community. The objective of this work was to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL for malting quality traits in a winter breeding program that is a component of the U.S. Barley CAP. We studied the association between five malting quality traits and 3072 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs from the barley oligonucleotide pool assay (BOPA 1 and 2, assayed in advanced inbred lines from the Oregon State University (OSU breeding program from three germplasm arrays (CAP I, CAP II, and CAP III. After comparing 16 models we selected a structured association model with posterior probabilities inferred from software STRUCTURE (QK approach to use on all germplasm arrays. Most of the marker-trait associations are germplasm- and environment-specific and close to previously mapped genes and QTL relevant for malt and beer quality. We found alleles fixed by random genetic drift, novel unmasked alleles, and genetic-background interaction. In a relatively small population size study we provide strong evidence for detecting true QTL.

  2. TRIGA reactor health physics considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.G.

    1970-01-01

    The factors influencing the complexity of a TRIGA health physics program are discussed in details in order to serve as a basis for later consideration of various specific aspects of a typical TRIGA health physics program. The health physics program must be able to provide adequate assistance, control, and safety for individuals ranging from the inexperienced student to the experienced postgraduate researcher. Some of the major aspects discussed are: effluent release and control; reactor area air monitoring; area monitoring; adjacent facilities monitoring; portable instrumentation, personnel monitoring. TRIGA reactors have not been associated with many significant occurrences in the area of health physics, although some operational occurrences have had health physics implications. One specific occurrence at OSU is described involving the detection of non-fission-product radioactive particulates by the continuous air monitor on the reactor top. The studies of this particular situation indicate that most of the particulate activity is coming from the rotating rack and exhausting to the reactor top through the rotating rack loading tube

  3. The Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO): Four Years Operating on the International Space Station (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, C. O.; Nahorniak, J.; Tufillaro, N.; Kappus, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO) is the first spaceborne imaging spectrometer designed to sample the coastal ocean. HICO images selected coastal regions at 92 m spatial resolution with full spectral coverage (88 channels covering 400 to 900 nm) and a high signal-to-noise ratio to resolve the complexity of the coastal ocean. Under sponsorship of the Office of Naval Research, HICO was built by the Naval Research Laboratory, which continues to operate the sensor. HICO has been operating on the International Space Station since October 2009 and has collected over 8000 scenes for more than 50 users. As Project Scientist I have been the link to the international ocean optics community primarily through our OSU HICO website (http://hico.oregonstate.edu). HICO operations are now under NASA support and HICO data is now also be available through the NASA Ocean Color Website (http://oceancolor.gsfc.nasa.gov ). Here we give a brief overview of HICO data and operations and discuss the unique challenges and opportunities that come from operating on the International Space Station.

  4. Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhinefrank, Kenneth [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc., Charlottesville, VA (United States); Lamb, Bradford [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc., Charlottesville, VA (United States); Prudell, Joseph [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc., Charlottesville, VA (United States); Hammagren, Erik [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc., Charlottesville, VA (United States); Lenee-Bluhm, Pukha [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc., Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2016-08-22

    This Project aims to satisfy objectives of the DOE’s Water Power Program by completing a system detailed design (SDD) and other important activities in the first phase of a utility-scale grid-connected ocean wave energy demonstration. In early 2012, Columbia Power (CPwr) had determined that further cost and performance optimization was necessary in order to commercialize its StingRAY wave energy converter (WEC). CPwr’s progress toward commercialization, and the requisite technology development path, were focused on transitioning toward a commercial-scale demonstration. This path required significant investment to be successful, and the justification for this investment required improved annual energy production (AEP) and lower capital costs. Engineering solutions were developed to address these technical and cost challenges, incorporated into a proposal to the US Department of Energy (DOE), and then adapted to form the technical content and statement of project objectives of the resulting Project (DE-EE0005930). Through Project cost-sharing and technical collaboration between DOE and CPwr, and technical collaboration with Oregon State University (OSU), National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL) and other Project partners, we have demonstrated experimentally that these conceptual improvements have merit and made significant progress towards a certified WEC system design at a selected and contracted deployment site at the Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) at the Marine Corps Base in Oahu, HI (MCBH).

  5. White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kern, J. Chris; Ward, David L.; Farr, Ruth A. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife)

    2002-02-01

    We report on our progress from April 2000 through March 2001 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW; Report A), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW; Report B), U.S. Geological Survey Biological Resources Division (USGS; Report C), Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC; Report D), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS; Report E), and Oregon State University (OSU; Report F). This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete; therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported. Highlights of results of our work from April 2000 through March 2001 are listed.

  6. A novel procedure for the assessment of the antioxidant capacity of food components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Toshihiro; Harashima, Mai; Kurogi, Katsuhisa; Suiko, Masahito; Liu, Ming-Cheh; Sakakibara, Yoichi

    2016-08-15

    Carbonylation, an oxidative modification of the amino group of arginine and lysine residues caused by reactive oxygen species, has emerged as a new type of oxidative damage. Protein carbonylation has been shown to exert adverse effects on various protein functions. Recently, the role of food components in the attenuation of oxidative stress has been the focus of many studies. Most of these studies focused on the chemical properties of food components. However, it is also important to determine their effects on protein functions via post-translational modifications. In this study, we developed a novel procedure for evaluating the antioxidant capacity of food components. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced protein carbonylation in HL-60 cells was quantitatively analyzed by using fluorescent dyes (Cy5-hydrazide dye and IC3-OSu dye), followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and fluorescence determination. Among a panel of food components tested, quinic acid, kaempferol, saponin, squalene, trigonelline, and mangiferin were shown to be capable of suppressing protein carbonylation in HL-60 cells. Our results demonstrated that this fluorescence labeling/SDS-PAGE procedure allows for the detection of oxidative stress-induced protein carbonylation with high sensitivity and quantitative accuracy. This method should be useful for the screening of new antioxidant food components as well as the analysis of their suppression mechanism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae (ASAS-SN) Light Curve Server v1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochanek, C. S.; Shappee, B. J.; Stanek, K. Z.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Thompson, Todd A.; Prieto, J. L.; Dong, Subo; Shields, J. V.; Will, D.; Britt, C.; Perzanowski, D.; Pojmański, G.

    2017-10-01

    The All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae (ASAS-SN) is working toward imaging the entire visible sky every night to a depth of V˜ 17 mag. The present data covers the sky and spans ˜2-5 years with ˜100-400 epochs of observation. The data should contain some ˜1 million variable sources, and the ultimate goal is to have a database of these observations publicly accessible. We describe here a first step, a simple but unprecedented web interface https://asas-sn.osu.edu/ that provides an up to date aperture photometry light curve for any user-selected sky coordinate. The V band photometry is obtained using a two-pixel (16.″0) radius aperture and is calibrated against the APASS catalog. Because the light curves are produced in real time, this web tool is relatively slow and can only be used for small samples of objects. However, it also imposes no selection bias on the part of the ASAS-SN team, allowing the user to obtain a light curve for any point on the celestial sphere. We present the tool, describe its capabilities, limitations, and known issues, and provide a few illustrative examples.

  8. CSRL application to nuclear power plant diagnosis and sensor data validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemi, S.; Punch, W.F. III; Hajek, B.K.

    1988-01-01

    During operational abnormalities, plant operators rely on the information provided by the plant sensors and associated alarms. The sensors' usefulness however, is quickly diminished by their large number and the extremely difficult task of interpreting and comprehending the provided information. Malfunction diagnosis can be further complicated by the existence of conflicting data which can lead to an incorrect diagnostic conclusion. Thus, the value of an operator aid to assist plant personnel in interpreting the available data and diagnosing the plant malfunctions is obvious. Recent work at the Ohio State University Laboratory for Artificial Intelligence Research (OSU-LAIR) and the Nuclear Engineering department has concentrated on the problem of performing expert system diagnosis using potentially invalid sensor data. That is, the authors have been developing expert systems that can perform diagnostic problem solving despite the existence of some conflicting data in the domain. This work has resulted in enhancement of a programming tool, CSRL, that allows domain experts to create a diagnostic system that will be, to some degree, tolerant of bad data. The domain of Boiling Water Nuclear Power Plants was chosen as a test domain to show usefulness of the ideas under real world conditions

  9. CSRL application to nuclear power plant diagnosis and sensor data validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemi, S.; Punch, W.F. III; Hajek, B.K.

    1987-01-01

    During operational abnormalities, plant operators rely on the information provided by the plant sensors and associated alarms. The sensors' usefulness however, is quickly diminished by their large number and the extremely difficult task of interpreting and comprehending the provided information. Malfunction diagnosis can be further complicated by the existence of conflicting data which can lead to an incorrect diagnostic conclusion. Thus, the value of an operator aid to assist plant personnel in interpreting the available data and diagnosing the plant malfunctions is obvious. Recent work at the Ohio State University Laboratory for Artificial Intelligence Research (OSU-LAIR) and the Nuclear Engineering Department has concentrated on the problem of performing expert system diagnosis using potentially invalid sensor data. Expert systems have been developed that can perform diagnostic problem solving despite the existence of some conflicting data in the domain. This work has resulted in enhancement of a programming tool, CSRL, that allows domain experts to create a diagnostic system that will be, to some degree, tolerant of bad data. The domain of Boiling Water Nuclear Power Plants was chosen as a test domain to show usefulness of the ideas under real world conditions

  10. Western Nuclear Science Alliance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reese, Steve; Miller, George; Frantz, Stephen; Beller, Denis; Morse, Ed; Krahenbuhl, Melinda; Flocchini, Bob; Elliston, Jim

    2010-01-01

    The Western Nuclear Science Alliance (WNSA) was formed at Oregon State University (OSU) under the DOE Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) program in 2002. The primary objective of the INIE program is to strengthen nuclear science and engineering programs at the member institutions and to address the long term goal of the University Reactor Infrastructure and Education Assistance Program. WNSA has been very effective in meeting these goals. The infrastructure at several of the WNSA university nuclear reactors has been upgraded significantly, as have classroom and laboratory facilities for Nuclear Engineering, Health Physics, and Radiochemistry students and faculty. Major nuclear-related education programs have been inaugurated, including considerable assistance by WNSA universities to other university nuclear programs. Research has also been enhanced under WNSA, as has outreach to pre-college and college students and faculty. The INIE program under WNSA has been an exceptional boost to the nuclear programs at the eight funded WNSA universities. In subsequent years under INIE these programs have expanded even further in terms of new research facilities, research reactor renovations, expanded educational opportunities, and extended cooperation and collaboration between universities, national laboratories, and nuclear utilities.

  11. The use of magnetic resonance imaging to quantify multi-phase flow patterns and transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes, J.N. Jr.; Lafi, A.Y.; Saloner, D.

    1998-01-01

    Conventional measurement techniques have given limited insights into the complex structure of multi-phase flows. This has led to highly subjective flow pattern classifications which have been cast in terms of flow regime maps. Rather than using static flow regime maps, some of the next generation of multi-phase flow analysis codes will implement interfacial area transport equations that would calculate the flow patterns that evolve spatially and temporally. To assess these new codes, a large data base needs to be established to quantify the essential characteristics of multi-phase flow structure. One such characteristic is the interfacial area concentration. In this paper, we discuss the current benefits and limitations of using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to examine multi- phase flow patterns and transitions. Of particular interest, are the MRI measurements of interfacial area concentration for slug flow in an air-water system. These tests were performed at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) School of Medicine MRI Center as a collaborative research effort with Oregon State University (OSU). The special scanning sequences designed by UCSF were capable of imaging at repetition intervals as fast as 7 milliseconds. (author)

  12. The use of magnetic resonance imaging to quantify multi-phase flow patterns and transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes, Jr, J N; Lafi, A Y [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States); Saloner, D [University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, Veterans Administration Medical Center, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1998-09-01

    Conventional measurement techniques have given limited insights into the complex structure of multi-phase flows. This has led to highly subjective flow pattern classifications which have been cast in terms of flow regime maps. Rather than using static flow regime maps, some of the next generation of multi-phase flow analysis codes will implement interfacial area transport equations that would calculate the flow patterns that evolve spatially and temporally. To assess these new codes, a large data base needs to be established to quantify the essential characteristics of multi-phase flow structure. One such characteristic is the interfacial area concentration. In this paper, we discuss the current benefits and limitations of using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to examine multi- phase flow patterns and transitions. Of particular interest, are the MRI measurements of interfacial area concentration for slug flow in an air-water system. These tests were performed at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) School of Medicine MRI Center as a collaborative research effort with Oregon State University (OSU). The special scanning sequences designed by UCSF were capable of imaging at repetition intervals as fast as 7 milliseconds. (author)

  13. Parasitemia due to Sarcocystis neurona-like infection in a clinically ill domestic cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitzer, Nina C; Marsh, Antoinette E; Burkhard, Mary Jo; Radin, M Judith; Wellman, Maxey L; Jugan, Maria; Parker, Valerie

    2017-09-01

    An 8-year-old, 6-kg, male neutered Domestic Shorthair cat was presented to The Ohio State University Veterinary Medical Center (OSU-VMC) for difficulty breathing. Physical examination and thoracic radiographs indicated pneumonia, a soft-tissue mass in the left caudal lung lobe, and diffuse pleural effusion. The effusion was classified as modified transudate. Rare extracellular elongated (~5-7 μm × 1-2 μm) zoites with a central round to oval-shaped purple to deep purple vesicular nucleus with coarsely stippled chromatin and light blue cytoplasm were seen on a peripheral blood smear. Serum IgG and IgM were positive for Sarcocystis sp. antibodies and negative for Toxoplasma gondii antibodies, suggesting that the infection was acute rather than a recrudescence of prior infection. This organism was most consistent with either Sarcocystis neurona or Sarcocystis dasypi based on DNA sequence analysis of PCR products using COC ssRNA, ITS-1, snSAG2, and JNB25/JD396 primer sets. This is the first report to visualize by light microscopy circulating Sarcocystis sp. merozoites in the peripheral blood of a domestic cat. Therefore, Sarcocystis should be considered as a differential diagnosis in cats with suspected systemic protozoal infection. © 2017 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  14. Qualitative assessment of the value of the Ohio State University TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binney, S.E.; Johnson, A.G.

    1989-01-01

    The Oregon State University (OSU) TRIGA Reactor (OSTR) is a major regional research, training, and service facility. The OSTR supports a wide variety of organizations at the local, state, regional, national, and international levels. Examples of usage of the OSTR are given in this paper to serve as a basis for assessing the value of the OSTR to its user organizations. It is difficult to assess the value of a facility such as the OSTR quantitatively, primarily because a dollar value cannot be assigned to many of the services that the OSTR performs, e.g., forensic analysis to assist police agencies in criminal cases. Significant qualitative statements can be made, however, to demonstrate the fact that the value of a research reactor facility such as the OSTR substantially outweighs the capital and operating costs of such a facility. Analysis of the data presented above clearly indicates that the value of the OSTR facility is overwhelmingly positive, i.e., the benefits associated with the services provided by the OSTR facility outweigh the cost of providing such services by perhaps as much as an order of magnitude

  15. Effects of surface roughness and vortex generators on the NACA 4415 airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reuss, R.L.; Hoffman, M.J.; Gregorek, G.M. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Wind turbines in the field can be subjected to many and varying wind conditions, including high winds with rotor locked or with yaw excursions. In some cases the rotor blades may be subjected to unusually large angles of attack that possibly result in unexpected loads and deflections. To better understand loadings at unusual angles of attack, a wind tunnel test was performed. An 18-inch constant chord model of the NACA 4415 airfoil section was tested under two dimensional steady state conditions in the Ohio State University Aeronautical and Astronautical Research Laboratory (OSU/AARL) 7 x 10 Subsonic Wind Tunnel (7 x 10). The objective of these tests was to document section lift and moment characteristics under various model and air flow conditions. These included a normal angle of attack range of {minus}20{degree} to +40{degree}, an extended angle of attack range of {minus}60{degree} to +230{degree}, applications of leading edge grit roughness (LEGR), and use of vortex generators (VGs), all at chord Reynolds numbers as high as possible for the particular model configuration. To realistically satisfy these conditions the 7 x 10 offered a tunnel-height-to-model-chord ratio of 6.7, suggesting low interference effects even at the relatively high lift and drag conditions expected during the test. Significantly, it also provided chord Reynolds numbers up to 2.0 million. 167 figs., 13 tabs.

  16. Delayed Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy for Non-Destructive Assay of Nuclear Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludewigt, Bernhard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mozin, Vladimir [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Campbell, Luke [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Favalli, Andrea [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hunt, Alan W. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Reedy, Edward T.E. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Seipel, Heather A. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2015-09-28

    This project has been a collaborative effort of researchers from four National Laboratories, Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory (LBNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and Idaho State University’s (ISU) Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC). Experimental measurements at the Oregon State University (OSU) were also supported. The research included two key components, a strong experimental campaign to characterize the delayed gamma-ray signatures of the isotopes of interests and of combined targets, and a closely linked modeling effort to assess system designs and applications. Experimental measurements were performed to evaluate fission fragment yields, to test methods for determining isotopic fractions, and to benchmark the modeling code package. Detailed signature knowledge is essential for analyzing the capabilities of the delayed gamma technique, optimizing measurement parameters, and specifying neutron source and gamma-ray detection system requirements. The research was divided into three tasks: experimental measurements, characterization of fission yields, and development of analysis methods (task 1), modeling in support of experiment design and analysis and for the assessment of applications (task 2), and high-rate gamma-ray detector studies (task 3).

  17. Immunobiotic Bifidobacteria Strains Modulate Rotavirus Immune Response in Porcine Intestinal Epitheliocytes via Pattern Recognition Receptor Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takamasa Ishizuka

    Full Text Available In this work, we aimed to characterize the antiviral response of an originally established porcine intestinal epithelial cell line (PIE cells by evaluating the molecular innate immune response to rotavirus (RVs. In addition, we aimed to select immunomodulatory bacteria with antiviral capabilities. PIE cells were inoculated with RVs isolated from different host species and the infective titers and the molecular innate immune response were evaluated. In addition, the protection against RVs infection and the modulation of immune response by different lactic acid bacteria (LAB strains was studied. The RVs strains OSU (porcine and UK (bovine effectively infected PIE cells. Our results also showed that RVs infection in PIE cells triggered TLR3-, RIG-I- and MDA-5-mediated immune responses with activation of IRF3 and NF-κB, induction of IFN-β and up-regulation of the interferon stimulated genes MxA and RNase L. Among the LAB strains tested, Bifidobacterium infantis MCC12 and B. breve MCC1274 significantly reduced RVs titers in infected PIE cells. The beneficial effects of both bifidobacteria were associated with reduction of A20 expression, and improvements of IRF-3 activation, IFN-β production, and MxA and RNase L expressions. These results indicate the value of PIE cells for studying RVs molecular innate immune response in pigs and for the selection of beneficial bacteria with antiviral capabilities.

  18. Experience with radioactivity releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, T.V.; Johnson, A.G.; Ringle, J.C.

    1972-01-01

    On December 11, 1970, the reactor top continuous air monitor (CAM) showed an increase in particulate air activity of an unusual nature. A check of the CAM filter with a multi-channel analyzer indicated that the majority of the activity was due to Cs-138 , Cs-139 , Rb-89 , and Rb-90 , which indicated a probable fuel element leak. The CAM filter was changed and rechecked several times, but the rubidium and cesium radionuclides were consistently identified. The procedure was followed by removing three fuel elements at a time. Since the CAM was the only instrument picking up radioactivity, it was used as the primary radiation monitor. During the search for the leaky fuel element, it was found that the element in position E-18 (triangle cut-out) was leaning against the top of the element in E-17. Particulate air activity originating from the rotating rack loading port on the reactor top was reported by OSU during the previous TRIGA Owner's Seminar. Short term relief can be obtained by inserting a standard CAM filter paper over the rotating rack loading tube opening, but this has not proved satisfactory for runs of one hour or longer. A simple filter system for the rotating rack was built, and is operated as part of the argon ventilation system. This appears to have solved the problem

  19. CFD Analyses of Air-Ingress Accident for VHTRs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Tae Kyu

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is one of six proposed Generation-IV concepts for the next generation of nuclear powered plants. The VHTR is advantageous because it is able to operate at very high temperatures, thus producing highly efficient electrical generation and hydrogen production. A critical safety event of the VHTR is a loss-of-coolant accident. This accident is initiated, in its worst-case scenario, by a double-ended guillotine break of the cross vessel that connects the reactor vessel and the power conversion unit. Following the depressurization process, the air (i.e., the air and helium mixture) in the reactor cavity could enter the reactor core causing an air-ingress event. In the event of air-ingress into the reactor core, the high-temperature in-core graphite structures will chemically react with the air and could lose their structural integrity. We designed a 1/8th scaled-down test facility to develop an experimental database for studying the mechanisms involved in the air-ingress phenomenon. The current research focuses on the analysis of the air-ingress phenomenon using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tool ANSYS FLUENT for better understanding of the air-ingress phenomenon. The anticipated key steps in the air-ingress scenario for guillotine break of VHTR cross vessel are: 1) depressurization; 2) density-driven stratified flow; 3) local hot plenum natural circulation; 4) diffusion into the reactor core; and 5) global natural circulation. However, the OSU air-ingress test facility covers the time from depressurization to local hot plenum natural circulation. Prior to beginning the CFD simulations for the OSU air-ingress test facility, benchmark studies for the mechanisms which are related to the air-ingress accident, were performed to decide the appropriate physical models for the accident analysis. In addition, preliminary experiments were performed with a simplified 1/30th scaled down acrylic set-up to understand the air

  20. Global vegetation change predicted by the modified Budyko model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monserud, R.A.; Tchebakova, N.M.; Leemans, R. (US Department of Agriculture, Moscow, ID (United States). Intermountain Research Station, Forest Service)

    1993-09-01

    A modified Budyko global vegetation model is used to predict changes in global vegetation patterns resulting from climate change (CO[sub 2] doubling). Vegetation patterns are predicted using a model based on a dryness index and potential evaporation determined by solving radiation balance equations. Climate change scenarios are derived from predictions from four General Circulation Models (GCM's) of the atmosphere (GFDL, GISS, OSU, and UKMO). All four GCM scenarios show similar trends in vegetation shifts and in areas that remain stable, although the UKMO scenario predicts greater warming than the others. Climate change maps produced by all four GCM scenarios show good agreement with the current climate vegetation map for the globe as a whole, although over half of the vegetation classes show only poor to fair agreement. The most stable areas are Desert and Ice/Polar Desert. Because most of the predicted warming is concentrated in the Boreal and Temperate zones, vegetation there is predicted to undergo the greatest change. Most vegetation classes in the Subtropics and Tropics are predicted to expand. Any shift in the Tropics favouring either Forest over Savanna, or vice versa, will be determined by the magnitude of the increased precipitation accompanying global warming. Although the model predicts equilibrium conditions to which many plant species cannot adjust (through migration or microevolution) in the 50-100 y needed for CO[sub 2] doubling, it is not clear if projected global warming will result in drastic or benign vegetation change. 72 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Experiences with Acquiring Highly Redundant Spatial Data to Support Driverless Vehicle Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppanyi, Z.; Toth, C. K.

    2018-05-01

    As vehicle technology is moving towards higher autonomy, the demand for highly accurate geospatial data is rapidly increasing, as accurate maps have a huge potential of increasing safety. In particular, high definition 3D maps, including road topography and infrastructure, as well as city models along the transportation corridors represent the necessary support for driverless vehicles. In this effort, a vehicle equipped with high-, medium- and low-resolution active and passive cameras acquired data in a typical traffic environment, represented here by the OSU campus, where GPS/GNSS data are available along with other navigation sensor data streams. The data streams can be used for two purposes. First, high-definition 3D maps can be created by integrating all the sensory data, and Data Analytics/Big Data methods can be tested for automatic object space reconstruction. Second, the data streams can support algorithmic research for driverless vehicle technologies, including object avoidance, navigation/positioning, detecting pedestrians and bicyclists, etc. Crucial cross-performance analyses on map database resolution and accuracy with respect to sensor performance metrics to achieve economic solution for accurate driverless vehicle positioning can be derived. These, in turn, could provide essential information on optimizing the choice of geospatial map databases and sensors' quality to support driverless vehicle technologies. The paper reviews the data acquisition and primary data processing challenges and performance results.

  2. Development of Switchable Polarity Solvent Draw Solutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Aaron D.

    2016-11-01

    Results of a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) study of flow and heat transfer in a printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) geometry are presented. CFD results obtained from a two-plate model are compared to corresponding experimental results for the validation. This process provides the basis for further application of the CFD code to PCHE design and performance analysis in a variety of internal flow geometries. As a part of the code verification and validation (V&V) process, CFD simulation of a single semicircular straight channel under laminar isothermal conditions was also performed and compared to theoretical results. This comparison yielded excellent agreement with the theoretical values. The two-plate CFD model based on the experimental PCHE design overestimated the effectiveness and underestimated the pressure drop. However, it is found that the discrepancy between the CFD result and experimental data was mainly caused by the uncertainty in the geometry of heat exchanger during the fabrication. The CFD results obtained using a slightly smaller channel diameter yielded good agreement with the experimental data. A separate investigation revealed that the average channel diameter of the OSU PCHE after the diffusion-bonding was 1.93 mm on the cold fluid side and 1.90 mm on the hot fluid side which are both smaller than the nominal design value. Consequently, the CFD code was shown to have sufficient capability to evaluate the heat exchanger thermal-hydraulic performance.

  3. Influence of transition on steady and unsteady wind-turbine airfoil aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Eric; Lavely, Adam; Vijayakumar, Ganesh; Brasseur, James

    2011-11-01

    Laminar-flow airfoils for large stall-regulated horizontal-axis wind turbines are designed to achieve a restrained maximum lift coefficient and a broad laminar low- drag bucket under steady flow conditions and at specific Reynolds numbers. Blind- comparisons of the 2000 NREL Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment showed large discrepancies and illustrated the need for improved physics modeling. We have studied the S809 airfoil under static and dynamic (ramp-up, ramp-down, and oscillatory) conditions, using the four-equation transition model of Langtry and Menter (2009), which has been implemented as a library accessible by an OpenFOAM RANS solver. Model validation is performed using surface-pressure and lift/drag data from U. Glasgow (2009) and OSU (1995) wind tunnel experiments. Performance of the transition model is assessed by analyzing integrated performance metrics, as well as detailed surface pressure and pressure gradient, wall-shear stress, and boundary-layer profiles and separation points. Demonstration of model performance in the light- and deep-stall regimes of dynamic stall is an important step in reducing uncertainties in full 3D simulations of turbines operating in the atmospheric boundary layer. Supported by NSF Grant 0933647.

  4. Studying Acute Coronary Syndrome Through the World Wide Web: Experiences and Lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Angelo A

    2017-10-13

    This study details my viewpoint on the experiences, lessons, and assessments of conducting a national study on care-seeking behavior for heart attack in the United States utilizing the World Wide Web. The Yale Heart Study (YHS) was funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Grounded on two prior studies, the YHS combined a Web-based interview survey instrument; ads placed on the Internet; flyers and posters in public libraries, senior centers, and rehabilitation centers; information on chat rooms; a viral marketing strategy; and print ads to attract potential participants to share their heart attack experiences. Along the way, the grant was transferred from Ohio State University (OSU) to Yale University, and significant administrative, information technology, and personnel challenges ensued that materially delayed the study's execution. Overall, the use of the Internet to collect data on care-seeking behavior is very time consuming and emergent. The cost of using the Web was approximately 31% less expensive than that of face-to-face interviews. However, the quality of the data may have suffered because of the absence of some data compared with interviewing participants. Yet the representativeness of the 1154 usable surveys appears good, with the exception of a dearth of African American participants. ©Angelo A Alonzo. Originally published in JMIR Research Protocols (http://www.researchprotocols.org), 13.10.2017.

  5. Calibration of Discrete Random Walk (DRW) Model via G.I Taylor's Dispersion Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaherchi, Teymour; Aliseda, Alberto

    2012-11-01

    Prediction of particle dispersion in turbulent flows is still an important challenge with many applications to environmental, as well as industrial, fluid mechanics. Several models of dispersion have been developed to predict particle trajectories and their relative velocities, in combination with a RANS-based simulation of the background flow. The interaction of the particles with the velocity fluctuations at different turbulent scales represents a significant difficulty in generalizing the models to the wide range of flows where they are used. We focus our attention on the Discrete Random Walk (DRW) model applied to flow in a channel, particularly to the selection of eddies lifetimes as realizations of a Poisson distribution with a mean value proportional to κ / ɛ . We present a general method to determine the constant of this proportionality by matching the DRW model dispersion predictions for fluid element and particle dispersion to G.I Taylor's classical dispersion theory. This model parameter is critical to the magnitude of predicted dispersion. A case study of its influence on sedimentation of suspended particles in a tidal channel with an array of Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines highlights the dependency of results on this time scale parameter. Support from US DOE through the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center, a UW-OSU partnership.

  6. Mapping of five candidate sex-determining loci in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew Robert E

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rainbow trout have an XX/XY genetic mechanism of sex determination where males are the heterogametic sex. The homology of the sex-determining gene (SDG in medaka to Dmrt1 suggested that SDGs evolve from downstream genes by gene duplication. Orthologous sequences of the major genes of the mammalian sex determination pathway have been reported in the rainbow trout but the map position for the majority of these genes has not been assigned. Results Five loci of four candidate genes (Amh, Dax1, Dmrt1 and Sox6 were tested for linkage to the Y chromosome of rainbow trout. We exclude the role of all these loci as candidates for the primary SDG in this species. Sox6i and Sox6ii, duplicated copies of Sox6, mapped to homeologous linkage groups 10 and 18 respectively. Genotyping fishes of the OSU × Arlee mapping family for Sox6i and Sox6ii alleles indicated that Sox6i locus might be deleted in the Arlee lineage. Conclusion Additional candidate genes should be tested for their linkage to the Y chromosome. Mapping data of duplicated Sox6 loci supports previously suggested homeology between linkage groups 10 and 18. Enrichment of the rainbow trout genomic map with known gene markers allows map comparisons with other salmonids. Mapping of candidate sex-determining loci is important for analyses of potential autosomal modifiers of sex-determination in rainbow trout.

  7. Relationship between age, sex and body mass index with fundamental motor skills among 3 to 6 years-old children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vameghi Roshanak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of childhood obesity is a serious public health problem. This problem is a multi-component disease and several factors are involved in its development. The childhood obesity led to poor mastery of fundamental motor skills (FMS and failure to develop in specialized skills that required in organized sports and activities. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between age, sex and body mass index (BMI with FMS in 3 to 6 years-old children. A total of 600 preschool children (300 boys and 300 girls between the ages of 3 to 6 years old participated in this research. Subjects were selected through multi-stage cluster random sampling in five regions in Tehran. Using the Ohio State University Scale of Intra Gross Motor Assessment (OSU-SIGMA FMS were assess. Body mass index (BMI was directly measured from height (m2/weight (kg for each child. The results showed that the negative correlations between jumping, skipping, hopping and throwing skills and BMI in any 3 groups children were significant (P0.05. The boys were performed better than girls in all FMS except hopping and skipping skills. In these skills the girls were better performed in all ages. These results highlight the need to provide organized opportunities which facilitate FMS and decreased high BMI levels in preschool children.

  8. Data collection and preparation of authoritative reviews on space food and nutrition research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    The collection and classification of information for a manually operated information retrieval system on the subject of space food and nutrition research are described. The system as it currently exists is designed for retrieval of documents, either in hard copy or on microfiche, from the technical files of the MSC Food and Nutrition Section by accession number, author, and/or subject. The system could readily be extended to include retrieval by affiliation, report and contract number, and sponsoring agency should the need arise. It can also be easily converted to computerized retrieval. At present the information retrieval system contains nearly 3000 documents which consist of technical papers, contractors' reports, and reprints obtained from the food and nutrition files at MSC, Technical Library, the library at the Texas Medical Center in Houston, the BMI Technical Libraries, Dr. E. B. Truitt at MBI, and the OSU Medical Libraries. Additional work was done to compile 18 selected bibliographies on subjects of immediate interest on the MSC Food and Nutrition Section.

  9. Geoid undulation accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Richard H.

    1993-01-01

    The determination of the geoid and equipotential surface of the Earth's gravity field, has long been of interest to geodesists and oceanographers. The geoid provides a surface to which the actual ocean surface can be compared with the differences implying information on the circulation patterns of the oceans. For use in oceanographic applications the geoid is ideally needed to a high accuracy and to a high resolution. There are applications that require geoid undulation information to an accuracy of +/- 10 cm with a resolution of 50 km. We are far from this goal today but substantial improvement in geoid determination has been made. In 1979 the cumulative geoid undulation error to spherical harmonic degree 20 was +/- 1.4 m for the GEM10 potential coefficient model. Today the corresponding value has been reduced to +/- 25 cm for GEM-T3 or +/- 11 cm for the OSU91A model. Similar improvements are noted by harmonic degree (wave-length) and in resolution. Potential coefficient models now exist to degree 360 based on a combination of data types. This paper discusses the accuracy changes that have taken place in the past 12 years in the determination of geoid undulations.

  10. Final Project Report "Advanced Concept Exploration For Fast Ignition Science Program"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STEPHENS, Richard B.; McLEAN, Harry M.; THEOBALD, Wolfgang; AKLI, Kramer; BEG, Farhat N.; SENTOKU, Yasuiko; SCHUMACHER, Douglas; WEI, Mingsheng S.

    2014-01-31

    and x-ray line radiation from K-shell fluorescence. Integrated experiments, which combine target compression with short-pulse laser heating, yield additional information on target heating efficiency. This indirect way of studying the underlying behavior of the electrons must be validated with computational modeling to understand the physics and improve the design. This program execution required a large, well-organized team and it was managed by a joint Collaboration between General Atomics (GA), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). The Collaboration was formed 8 years ago to understand the physics issues of the Fast Ignition concept, building on the strengths of each partner. GA fulfills its responsibilities jointly with the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), The Ohio State University (OSU) and the University of Nevada at Reno (UNR). Since RHED physics is pursued vigorously in many countries, international researchers have been an important part of our efforts to make progress. The division of responsibility was as follows: (1) LLE had primary leadership for channeling studies and the integrated energy transfer, (2) LLNL led the development of measurement methods, analysis, and deployment of diagnostics, and (3) GA together with UCSD, OSU and UNR studied the detailed energy-transfer physics. The experimental program was carried out using the Titan laser at the Jupiter Laser Facility at LLNL, the OMEGA and OMEGA EP lasers at LLE and the Texas Petawatt laser (TPW) at UT Austin. Modeling has been pursued on large computing facilities at LLNL, OSU, and UCSD using codes developed (by us and others) within the HEDLP program, commercial codes, and by leveraging existing supercomputer codes developed by the NNSA ICF program. This Consortium brought together all the components—resources, facilities, and personnel—necessary to accomplish its aggressive goals. The ACE Program has been strongly collaborative

  11. Moving toward queue operations at the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Michelle L.; Summers, Doug; Astier, Joseph; Suarez Sola, Igor; Veillet, Christian; Power, Jennifer; Cardwell, Andrew; Walsh, Shane

    2016-07-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope Observatory (LBTO), a joint scientific venture between the Instituto Nazionale di Astrofisica (INAF), LBT Beteiligungsgesellschaft (LBTB), University of Arizona, Ohio State University (OSU), and the Research Corporation, is one of the newest additions to the world's collection of large optical/infrared ground-based telescopes. With its unique, twin 8.4m mirror design providing a 22.8 meter interferometric baseline and the collecting area of an 11.8m telescope, LBT has a window of opportunity to exploit its singular status as the "first" of the next generation of Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs). Prompted by urgency to maximize scientific output during this favorable interval, LBTO recently re-evaluated its operations model and developed a new strategy that augments classical observing with queue. Aided by trained observatory staff, queue mode will allow for flexible, multi-instrument observing responsive to site conditions. Our plan is to implement a staged rollout that will provide many of the benefits of queue observing sooner rather than later - with more bells and whistles coming in future stages. In this paper, we outline LBTO's new scientific model, focusing specifically on our "lean" resourcing and development, reuse and adaptation of existing software, challenges presented from our one-of-a-kind binocular operations, and lessons learned. We also outline further stages of development and our ultimate goals for queue.

  12. Online education about herbs and dietary supplements: margin or mission?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Kathi J; Patel, Sejal

    2015-01-01

    Online education is increasingly used to train health professionals, but little is known about how variations in cost affect use of elective training. We assessed whether offering registration for free increased the number of modules consumed in both absolute terms (# modules consumed per person, pp) and relative terms (# modules consumed per # modules registered). We analyzed results of the 'natural experiment' on learner's use of the OSU Center for Integrative Health and Wellness online elective curriculum, Introduction Herbs and Dietary Supplements Across the Lifespan, in which costs varied based on monthly discounts for students, faculty, staff, alumni, and members of selected professional associations. Over 7 months there were a total of 905 registrants for 8553 modules. Most (847/905, 94%) registered for free; they completed 1505 (18%) of 8344 modules for which they registered. Fewer (58/905, 6%) people paid for registration; they completed a significantly higher percentage 90/209 (43%, P online elective training addresses the institutional mission of increasing the number health professionals trained and the number of modules consumed compared with charging for training. Additional research is needed to determine the impact of pricing on educational outcomes and ultimately on patient care. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Multivariate methods for the detection of greenhouse-gas-induced climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santer, B.D.; Wigley, T.M.L.; Jones, P.D.; Schlesinger, M.E.

    1990-01-01

    This investigation considers whether observed changes in surface air temperature are consistent with GCM equilibrium response predictions for a doubling of atmospheric CO 2 . The model considered is a version of the Oregon State University (OSU) atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM). The study consists of three stages. In the first stage the authors examine the spatial structure of changes in the annual mean and annual cycle for surface air temperature, mean sea-level pressure (SLP) and precipitation rate. Signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios or equivalent test statistics are then computed (using the 1 x CO 2 and 2 x CO 2 data) in order to identify variables most useful for detection purposes. Changes in both means and variances are considered as possible detection parameters. The highest S/N ratios are obtained for annual-mean and winter surface air temperature, and the lowest S/N ratios are obtained for SLP. There are significant increases in the temporal and spatial variability of precipitation, and significant decreases in the temporal and spatial variability of surface air temperature

  14. Le patrimoine astronomique provençal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rous, M.; Figon, P.; Guyot, S.

    2012-12-01

    L'OSU OAMP/Institut Pythéas porte les missions de conservation, inventaire et valorisation du patrimoine. Suite à la fusion de l'Observatoire de Marseille et du Laboratoire d'Astronomie Spatiale en 2000 pour créer le Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, le déménagement des équipes sur le site de Château-Gombert en 2008 a soulevé le problème du devenir des collections des deux sites d'origine. Nous ferons le bilan des actions passées en matière de conservation et de valorisation de ce riche patrimoine : versement à l'inventaire général du Ministère de la Culture, classement de 22 instruments au titre des Monuments Historiques, inventaire et numérisation des archives anciennes, montage d'expositions et réalisation du catalogue Telescopium, 400 ans de lunettes et de télescopes. Nous présenterons les actions en cours: mesures de conservation préventive, inventaire des archives et des instruments. Nous parlerons enfin des projets: création d'un espace d'exposition permanente, participation à des expositions temporaires.

  15. Chemical Looping Gasification for Hydrogen Enhanced Syngas Production with In-Situ CO2 Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kathe, Mandar [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Xu, Dikai [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Hsieh, Tien-Lin [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Simpson, James [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Statnick, Robert [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Tong, Andrew [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Fan, Liang-Shih [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2014-12-31

    This document is the final report for the project titled “Chemical Looping Gasification for Hydrogen Enhanced Syngas Production with In-Situ CO2 Capture” under award number FE0012136 for the performance period 10/01/2013 to 12/31/2014.This project investigates the novel Ohio State chemical looping gasification technology for high efficiency, cost efficiency coal gasification for IGCC and methanol production application. The project developed an optimized oxygen carrier composition, demonstrated the feasibility of the concept and completed cold-flow model studies. WorleyParsons completed a techno-economic analysis which showed that for a coal only feed with carbon capture, the OSU CLG technology reduced the methanol required selling price by 21%, lowered the capital costs by 28%, increased coal consumption efficiency by 14%. Further, using the Ohio State Chemical Looping Gasification technology resulted in a methanol required selling price which was lower than the reference non-capture case.

  16. Advanced Reactors-Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) Coupling: Theoretical Modeling and Experimental Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utgikar, Vivek [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Sun, Xiaodong [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Christensen, Richard [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Sabharwall, Piyush [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-12-29

    The overall goal of the research project was to model the behavior of the advanced reactorintermediate heat exchange system and to develop advanced control techniques for off-normal conditions. The specific objectives defined for the project were: 1. To develop the steady-state thermal hydraulic design of the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX); 2. To develop mathematical models to describe the advanced nuclear reactor-IHX-chemical process/power generation coupling during normal and off-normal operations, and to simulate models using multiphysics software; 3. To develop control strategies using genetic algorithm or neural network techniques and couple these techniques with the multiphysics software; 4. To validate the models experimentally The project objectives were accomplished by defining and executing four different tasks corresponding to these specific objectives. The first task involved selection of IHX candidates and developing steady state designs for those. The second task involved modeling of the transient and offnormal operation of the reactor-IHX system. The subsequent task dealt with the development of control strategies and involved algorithm development and simulation. The last task involved experimental validation of the thermal hydraulic performances of the two prototype heat exchangers designed and fabricated for the project at steady state and transient conditions to simulate the coupling of the reactor- IHX-process plant system. The experimental work utilized the two test facilities at The Ohio State University (OSU) including one existing High-Temperature Helium Test Facility (HTHF) and the newly developed high-temperature molten salt facility.

  17. Molecular Tagging Velocimetry Development for In-situ Measurement in High-Temperature Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Matthieu A.; Bardet, Philippe M.; Burns, Ross A.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    The High Temperature Test Facility, HTTF, at Oregon State University (OSU) is an integral-effect test facility designed to model the behavior of a Very High Temperature Gas Reactor (VHTR) during a Depressurized Conduction Cooldown (DCC) event. It also has the ability to conduct limited investigations into the progression of a Pressurized Conduction Cooldown (PCC) event in addition to phenomena occurring during normal operations. Both of these phenomena will be studied with in-situ velocity field measurements. Experimental measurements of velocity are critical to provide proper boundary conditions to validate CFD codes, as well as developing correlations for system level codes, such as RELAP5 (http://www4vip.inl.gov/relap5/). Such data will be the first acquired in the HTTF and will introduce a diagnostic with numerous other applications to the field of nuclear thermal hydraulics. A laser-based optical diagnostic under development at The George Washington University (GWU) is presented; the technique is demonstrated with velocity data obtained in ambient temperature air, and adaptation to high-pressure, high-temperature flow is discussed.

  18. Cherry Irradiation Studies. 1984 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eakin, D.E.; Hungate, F.P.; Tingey, G.L.; Olsen, K.L.; Fountain, J.B.; Burditt, A.K. Jr.; Moffit, H.R.; Johnson, D.A.; Lunden, J.D.

    1985-04-01

    Fresh cherries, cherry fruit fly larvae, and codling moth larvae were irradiated using the PNL cobalt-60 facility to determine the efficacy of irradiation treatment for insect disinfestation and potential shelf life extension. Irradiation is an effective disinfestation treatment with no significant degradation of fruit at doses well above those required for quarantine treatment. Sufficient codling moth control was achieved at projected doses of less than 25 krad; cherry fruit fly control, at projected doses of less than 15 krad. Dose levels up to 60 krad did not adversely affect cherry quality factors tested. Irradiation above 60 krad reduced the firmness of cherries but had no significant impact on other quality factors tested. Irradiation of cherries below 80 krad did not result in any significant differences in sensory evaluations (appearance, flavor, and firmness) in tests conducted at OSU. Irradiation up to 200 krad at a temperature of about 25 0 C (77 0 F) did not measurably extend shelf life. Irradiation at 500 krad at 25 0 C (77 0 F) increased mold and rotting of cherries tested. There is no apparent advantage of irradiation over low-temperature fumigation

  19. Rotavirus nonstructural protein 1 antagonizes innate immune response by interacting with retinoic acid inducible gene I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Lan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nonstructural protein 1 (NSP1 of rotavirus has been reported to block interferon (IFN signaling by mediating proteasome-dependent degradation of IFN-regulatory factors (IRFs and (or the β-transducin repeat containing protein (β-TrCP. However, in addition to these targets, NSP1 may subvert innate immune responses via other mechanisms. Results The NSP1 of rotavirus OSU strain as well as the IRF3 binding domain truncated NSP1 of rotavirus SA11 strain are unable to degrade IRFs, but can still inhibit host IFN response, indicating that NSP1 may target alternative host factor(s other than IRFs. Overexpression of NSP1 can block IFN-β promoter activation induced by the retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I, but does not inhibit IFN-β activation induced by the mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS, indicating that NSP1 may target RIG-I. Immunoprecipitation experiments show that NSP1 interacts with RIG-I independent of IRF3 binding domain. In addition, NSP1 induces down-regulation of RIG-I in a proteasome-independent way. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that inhibition of RIG-I mediated type I IFN responses by NSP1 may contribute to the immune evasion of rotavirus.

  20. Book Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redactie KITLV

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Chris Ballard, Paula Brown, R. Michael Bourke, Tracy Harwood (eds; The sweet potato in Oceania; A reappraisal (Peter Boomgaard Caroline Hughes; The political economy of Cambodia’s transition, 1991-2001 (Han Ten Brummelhuis Richard Robison, Vedi Hadiz; Reorganising power in Indonesia; The politics of oligarchy in an age of markets (Marleen Dieleman Michael W. Charney; Southeast Asian warfare, 1300-1900 (Hans Hägerdal Daniel Perret, Amara Srisuchat, Sombun Thanasuk (eds; Études sur l´histoire du sultanat de Patani (Mary Somers Heidhues Joel Robbins; Becoming sinners; Christianity and moral torment in a Papua New Guinea society (Menno Hekker Mujiburrahman; Feeling threatened; Muslim-Christian relations in Indonesia’s New Order (Gerry van Klinken Marie-Odette Scalliet; De Collectie-Galestin in de Leidse Universiteitsbibliotheek (Dick van der Meij James Neil Sneddon; Colloquial Jakartan Indonesian (Don van Minde James Leach; Creative land; Place and procreation on the Rai coast of Papua New Guinea (Dianne van Oosterhout Stanley J. Ulijaszek (ed.; Population, reproduction and fertility in Melanesia (Dianne van Oosterhout Angela Hobart; Healing performances of Bali; Between darkness and light (Nathan Porath Leo Suryadinata (ed.; Admiral Zheng He and Southeast Asia (Roderich Ptak Ruth Barnes; Ostindonesien im 20. Jahrhundert; Auf den Spuren der Sammlung Ernst Vatter (Reimar Schefold Marie-Antoinette Willemsen; Een missionarisleven in brieven; Willem van Bekkum, Indië 1936-1998 (Karel Steenbrink Marie-Antoinette Willemsen; Een pionier op Flores; Jilis Verheijen (1908-1997, missionaris en onderzoeker (Karel Steenbrink Akitoshi Shimizu, Jan van Bremen (eds; Wartime Japanese anthropology in Asia and the Pacific (Fridus Steijlen Lilie Roosman; Phonetic experiments on the word and sentence prosody of Betawi Malay and Toba Batak (Uri Tadmor Jamie D. Saul; The Naga of Burma; Their festivals, customs

  1. Pharmacokinetics and safety of posaconazole delayed-release tablets for invasive fungal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiederhold NP

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nathan P Wiederhold Departments of Pathology and Medicine/Infectious Diseases, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, South Texas Reference Laboratories, San Antonio, TX, USA Abstract: Posaconazole is a broad-spectrum triazole antifungal agent with potent activity against various pathogenic fungi, including yeast and moulds. Clinical studies have demonstrated that this agent is efficacious as prophylaxis against invasive fungal infections in patients at high risk, and may also be useful as salvage therapy against invasive aspergillosis and mucormycosis. However, the bioavailability of posaconazole following administration by oral suspension, which was the only formulation clinically available for many years, is highly variable and negatively influenced by several factors. Because of this, many patients had subtherapeutic or undetectable posaconazole levels when the oral suspension was used. To overcome this limitation, a delayed-release tablet was developed and is now available for clinical use. Hot-melt extrusion technology is used to combine a pH-sensitive polymer with posaconazole to produce a formulation that releases the drug in the elevated pH of the intestine where absorption occurs rather than in the low-pH environment of the stomach. This results in enhanced bioavailability and increased posaconazole exposure. Studies in healthy volunteers have demonstrated significantly higher and more consistent exposures with the tablet formulation compared to the oral suspension. In addition, pharmacokinetic parameters following administration of the tablets were not significantly affected by medications that raise gastric pH or increase gastric motility, and the tablets could also be administered without regard to food. Similar results have also been found in patients at high risk for invasive fungal infections who have received posaconazole tablets. The tablet formulation also appears to be well tolerated to date, although data

  2. Promoting adherence to nebulized therapy in cystic fibrosis: poster development and a qualitative exploration of adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones S

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Stephen Jones,1 Nathan Babiker,2 Emma Gardner,2,3 Jane Royle,2 Rachael Curley,3,4 Zhe Hui Hoo,3,4 Martin J Wildman3,4 1Psychology Department, University of Sheffield, 2Psychological Services, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, 3Adult Cystic Fibrosis Unit, Northern General Hospital, 4School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK Background: Cystic fibrosis (CF health care professionals recognize the need to motivate people with CF to adhere to nebulizer treatments, yet little is known about how best to achieve this. We aimed to produce motivational posters to support nebulizer adherence by using social marketing involving people with CF in the development of those posters. Methods: The Sheffield CF multidisciplinary team produced preliminary ideas that were elaborated upon with semi-structured interviews among people with CF to explore barriers and facilitators to the use of nebulized therapy. Initial themes and poster designs were refined using an online focus group to finalize the poster designs. Results: People with CF preferred aspirational posters describing what could be achieved through adherence in contrast to posters that highlighted the adverse consequences of nonadherence. A total of 14 posters were produced through this process. Conclusion: People with CF can be engaged to develop promotional material to support adherence, providing a unique perspective differing from that of the CF multidisciplinary team. Further research is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of these posters to support nebulizer adherence. Keywords: behavior change, social marketing, patient participation, nebulizers, medication adherence

  3. The evolving role of hyaluronic acid fillers for facial volume restoration and contouring: a Canadian overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhn C

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Channy Muhn,1 Nathan Rosen,1 Nowell Solish,2 Vince Bertucci,2 Mark Lupin,3 Alain Dansereau,4 Fred Weksberg,5 B Kent Remington,6 Arthur Swift71Division of Dermatology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, 2Division of Dermatology, New Women's College Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, 3Department of Dermatology and Skin Science, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, 4Private Practice, Repentigny, Québec, 5Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, 6Private Practice, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; 7St Mary's Hospital, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, CanadaAbstract: Recent advancements, including more versatile facial fillers, refined injection techniques and the adoption of a global facial approach, have contributed to improved patient outcome and increased patient satisfaction. Nine Canadian specialists (eight dermatologists, one plastic surgeon collaborated to develop an overview on volume restoration and contouring based on published literature and their collective clinical experience. The specialists concurred that optimal results in volume restoration and contouring depend on correcting deficiencies at various layers of the facial envelope. This includes creating a foundation for deep structural support in the supraperiosteal or submuscular plane; volume repletion of subcutaneous fat compartments; and the reestablishment of dermal and subdermal support to minimize cutaneous rhytids, grooves and furrows. It was also agreed that volume restoration and contouring using a global facial approach is essential to create a natural, youthful appearance in facial aesthetics. A comprehensive non-surgical approach should therefore incorporate combining fillers such as high-viscosity, low-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid (LMWHA for structural support and hyaluronic acid (HA for lines, grooves and furrows with neuromodulators, lasers and energy devices.Keywords: hyaluronic acid filler, volumizing, facial

  4. Survivin-T34A: molecular mechanism and therapeutic potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan R Aspe

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Jonathan R Aspe, Nathan R WallCenter for Health Disparities Research and Molecular Medicine, Division of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Department of Basic Sciences, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA, USAAbstract: The inhibitor of apoptosis protein survivin's threonine 34 to alanine (T34A mutation abolishes a phosphorylation site for p34(cdc2–cyclin B1, resulting in initiation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in cancer cells; however, it has little known direct effects on normal cells. The possibility that targeting survivin in this way may provide a novel approach for selective cancer gene therapy has yet to be fully evaluated. Although a flurry of work was undertaken in the late 1990s and early 2000s, only minor advances on this mutant have recently taken place. We recently described that cells generated to express a stable form of the mutant protein released this survivin-T34A to the conditioned medium. When this conditioned medium was collected and deposited on naive tumor cells, conditioned medium T34A was as effective as some chemotherapeutics in the induction of tumor cell apoptosis, and when combined with other forms of genotoxic stressors potentiated their killing effects. We hope with this review to revitalize the T34A field, as there is still much that needs to be investigated. In addition to determining the therapeutic dose and the duration of drug therapy required at the disease site, a better understanding of other key factors is also important. These include knowledge of target cell populations, cell-surface receptors, changes that occur in the target tissue at the molecular and cellular level with progression of the disease, and the mechanism and site of therapeutic action.Keywords: survivin, T34A, apoptosis, proliferation, therapy

  5. Dynamic changes to survivin subcellular localization are initiated by DNA damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maritess Gay Asumen

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Maritess Gay Asumen1, Tochukwu V Ifeacho2, Luke Cockerham3, Christina Pfandl4, Nathan R Wall31Touro University’s College of Osteopathic Medicine, Vallejo, CA, USA; 2University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 3Center for Health Disparities Research and Molecular Medicine, Loma Linda University, CA, USA; 4Green Mountain Antibodies, Burlington, VT, USAAbstract: Subcellular distribution of the apoptosis inhibitor survivin and its ability to relocalize as a result of cell cycle phase or therapeutic insult has led to the hypothesis that these subcellular pools may coincide with different survivin functions. The PIK kinases (ATM, ATR and DNA-PK phosphorylate a variety of effector substrates that propagate DNA damage signals, resulting in various biological outputs. Here we demonstrate that subcellular repartitioning of survivin in MCF-7 cells as a result of UV light-mediated DNA damage is dependent upon DNA damage-sensing proteins as treatment with the pan PIK kinase inhibitor wortmannin repartitioned survivin in the mitochondria and diminished it from the cytosol and nucleus. Mitochondrial redistribution of survivin, such as was recorded after wortmannin treatment, occurred in cells lacking any one of the three DNA damage sensing protein kinases: DNA-PK, ATM or ATR. However, failed survivin redistribution from the mitochondria in response to low-dose UV occurred only in the cells lacking ATM, implying that ATM may be the primary kinase involved in this process. Taken together, this data implicates survivian’s subcellular distribution is a dynamic physiological process that appears responsive to UV light- initiated DNA damage and that its distribution may be responsible for its multifunctionality.Keywords: survivin, PIK kinases, ATM, ATR, DNA-PK

  6. Comparative studies of vertebrate endothelin-converting enzyme-like 1 genes and proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holmes RS

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Roger S Holmes,1,2 Laura A Cox11Department of Genetics and Southwest National Primate Research Center, Texas Biomedical Research Institute, San Antonio, TX, USA; 2Eskitis Institute for Cell and Molecular Therapies and School of Biomolecular and Physical Sciences, Griffith University, Nathan, Queensland, AustraliaAbstract: Endothelin-converting enzyme-like 1 (ECEL1 is a member of the M13 family of neutral endopeptidases which play an essential role in the neural regulation of vertebrate respiration. Genetic deficiency of this protein results in respiratory failure soon after birth. Comparative ECEL1 amino acid sequences and structures and ECEL1 gene locations were examined using data from several vertebrate genome projects. Vertebrate ECEL1 sequences shared 66%–99% identity as compared with 30%–63% sequence identities with other M13-like family members, ECE1, ECE2, and NEP (neprilysin or MME. Three N-glycosylation sites were conserved among most vertebrate ECEL1 proteins examined. Sequence alignments, conserved key amino acid residues, and predicted secondary and tertiary structures were also studied, including cytoplasmic, transmembrane, and luminal sequences and active site residues. Vertebrate ECEL1 genes usually contained 18 exons and 17 coding exons on the negative strand. Exons 1 and 2 of the human ECEL1 gene contained 5'-untranslated (5'-UTR regions, a large CpG island (CpG256, and several transcription factor binding sites which may contribute to the high levels of gene expression previously reported in neural tissues. Phylogenetic analyses examined the relationships and potential evolutionary origins of the vertebrate ECEL1 gene with six other vertebrate neutral endopeptidase M13 family genes. These suggested that ECEL1 originated in an ancestral vertebrate genome from a duplication event in an ancestral neutral endopeptidase M13-like gene.Keywords: vertebrates, amino acid sequence, ECEL1, ECE1, ECE2, KELL, NEP, NEPL1, PHEX

  7. PiHi Observations at the ATA, Conventional and Unconventional SETI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harp, Gerald; Wilcox, B.; Arbunich, J.; Blair, S.; Backus, P. R.; Tarter, J. C.; Shostak, S.; Jordan, J.; Kilsdonk, T.; Ackermann, R. F.; Ross, J.; ATA Team

    2010-01-01

    Many radio SETI searches focus on the frequency range where the HI (1.42 GHz) and OH lines (1.6-1.7 GHz) lines are landmarks delineating the water hole This is only a small fraction of the terrestrial microwave window (TMW) from 1-10 GHz. This survey occurs near the center of the TMW at 4.462336275 GHz or π times the HI frequency. We call this the PiHI ("pie high") survey. The inspiration for PiHI observations comes from Carl Sagan in his book, Contact. This survey builds upon and extends a previous survey at PiHI (Blair, D. G. et al. (1992), MNRAS, 257, 105) with greater sensitivity, resolution, and coverage. We survey the nearest 94 main sequence stars in the HabCat catalog (Turnbull, M. C. and Tarter, J. C. (2003), ApJS, 145, 181) with spectral classes between F9 and G7 (max. radius 62 pc). The ATA's flexibility allows simultaneous measurements of targeted observations on stars (with beamformers) and 1° FOV "blind” observations of the areas around target stars (with imaging correlator). The targeted observations are carried out with a high resolution (0.7 Hz) spectrometer and integration times on the order of 200 s. The spectral imaging correlator measures a 50 x 50 grid of points with 3 kHz spectral resolution. This survey shows several signals of minor interest were discovered, though none of the signals reported are continuously "on,” which is an important characteristic for the positive identification of an ETI signal. The ATA has been funded through generous grants from the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation, the SETI Institute, UC Berkeley, the National Science Foundation (Grant No. 0540599), Sun Microsystems, Xilinx, Nathan Myhrvold, Greg Papadopoulos, and other corporations and individual donors.

  8. Monitoring HIV-infected Patients with Diabetes: Hemoglobin A1c, Fructosamine, or Glucose?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So-Young Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Published studies report inappropriately low hemoglobin A1C (HbA1c values that underestimate glycemia in HIV patients. Methods We reviewed the charts of all HIV patients with diabetes mellitus (DM at our clinic. Fifty-nine patients had HbA1c data, of whom 26 patients also had fructosamine data. We compared the most recent HbA1c to finger-stick (FS glucose averaged over three months, and fructosamine to FS averaged over six weeks. Predicted average glucose (pAG was calculated as reported by Nathan et al: pAG (mg/dL = 28.7 × A1C% – 46.7. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Analysis System (SAS and Kruskal–Wallis test. Results HbA1c values underestimated (UE actual average glucose (aAG in 19% of these patients and overestimated (OE aAG in 27%. HbA1c estimated aAG within the established range in only 54% of the patients. There were no statistical differences in the types of HIV medication used in patients with UE, OE, or accurately estimated (AE glycemia. A Spearman correlation coefficient between HbA1c and aAG was r = 0.53 ( P < 0.0001. Correlation between fructosamine and aAG was r = 0.47 ( P = 0.016. Conclusions The correlations between HbA1c and aAG and between fructosamine and aAG were weaker than expected, and fructosamine was not more accurate than HbA1c.

  9. Age-Related Decline in the Variation of Dynamic Functional Connectivity: A Resting State Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Chen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Normal aging is typically characterized by abnormal resting-state functional connectivity (FC, including decreasing connectivity within networks and increasing connectivity between networks, under the assumption that the FC over the scan time was stationary. In fact, the resting-state FC has been shown in recent years to vary over time even within minutes, thus showing the great potential of intrinsic interactions and organization of the brain. In this article, we assumed that the dynamic FC consisted of an intrinsic dynamic balance in the resting brain and was altered with increasing age. Two groups of individuals (N = 36, ages 20–25 for the young group; N = 32, ages 60–85 for the senior group were recruited from the public data of the Nathan Kline Institute. Phase randomization was first used to examine the reliability of the dynamic FC. Next, the variation in the dynamic FC and the energy ratio of the dynamic FC fluctuations within a higher frequency band were calculated and further checked for differences between groups by non-parametric permutation tests. The results robustly showed modularization of the dynamic FC variation, which declined with aging; moreover, the FC variation of the inter-network connections, which mainly consisted of the frontal-parietal network-associated and occipital-associated connections, decreased. In addition, a higher energy ratio in the higher FC fluctuation frequency band was observed in the senior group, which indicated the frequency interactions in the FC fluctuations. These results highly supported the basis of abnormality and compensation in the aging brain and might provide new insights into both aging and relevant compensatory mechanisms.

  10. Utility of proteomics in obstetric disorders: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández-Núñez J

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Jónathan Hernández-Núñez,1 Magel Valdés-Yong21Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hospital Alberto Fernández-Valdés, Santa Cruz del Norte, Mayabeque, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hospital Luis Díaz Soto, Habana del Este, La Habana, CubaAbstract: The study of proteomics could explain many aspects of obstetric disorders. We undertook this review with the aim of assessing the utility of proteomics in the specialty of obstetrics. We searched the electronic databases of MEDLINE, EBSCOhost, BVS Bireme, and SciELO, using various search terms with the assistance of a librarian. We considered cohort studies, case-control studies, case series, and systematic review articles published until October 2014 in the English or Spanish language, and evaluated their quality and the internal validity of the evidence provided. Two reviewers extracted the data independently, then both researchers simultaneously revised the data later, to arrive at a consensus. The search retrieved 1,158 papers, of which 965 were excluded for being duplicates, not relevant, or unrelated studies. A further 86 papers were excluded for being guidelines, protocols, or case reports, along with another 64 that did not contain relevant information, leaving 43 studies for inclusion. Many of these studies showed the utility of proteomic techniques for prediction, pathophysiology, diagnosis, management, monitoring, and prognosis of pre-eclampsia, perinatal infection, premature rupture of membranes, preterm birth, intrauterine growth restriction, and ectopic pregnancy. Proteomic techniques have enormous clinical significance and constitute an invaluable weapon in the management of obstetric disorders that increase maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality.Keywords: proteomic techniques, obstetrics, diagnosis, prediction

  11. Factors Related to Marital Satisfaction in Primiparous Women during Postpartum Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Zare

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: Postpartum period is often associated with decreased marital satisfaction in couples. The present study aimed to investigate factors contributing to marital satisfaction in primiparous women during postpartum period. Methods: This correlational study was performed on 104 primiparous women who referred to health care centers, Mashhad, Iran in 2013, 8 weeks after delivery, to receive health care services. Convenient sampling was the method of choice, and data collection tools included Nathan H. Azarin marital satisfaction questionnaire, stress, anxiety and depression scales (DASS-21, and demographic and fertility-related questionnaire. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16, and statistical tests of Kruskal-Wallis and Pearson correlation coefficient. Results: The mean score of women’s marital satisfaction was 65.37±17.4. There was a significant inverse correlation between duration of marriage (r₌-0.246, P=0.01, women’s age (r₌-0.203, P=0.03 and husband’s age (r₌-0.219, P=0.02 with marital satisfaction. Also a significant relationship was seen between the onset of sexual intercourse after childbirth (r₌0.268, P=0.006 and frequency of intercourse per week (P=0.001 with marital satisfaction. Additionally, there was a significant inverse correlation between depression (r₌-0.414, P=0.001, anxiety (r₌-0.27, P=0.004, and stress (r₌-0.203, P=0.03 with marital satisfaction. Conclusion: The age of women and their spouses, the duration of marriage, the onset and frequency of sexual intercourse after delivery, stress, depression, and anxiety are factors contributing to females’ marital satisfaction in postpartum period. As marital satisfaction affects the health of couples and families, it is therefore recommended to increase females’ marital satisfaction during the postpartum period through recognizing the related factors and planning appropriate interventions.

  12. Prediction of insulin resistance with anthropometric measures: lessons from a large adolescent population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wedin WK

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available William K Wedin,1 Lizmer Diaz-Gimenez,1 Antonio J Convit1,21Department of Psychiatry, NYU School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA; 2Nathan Kline Institute, Orangeburg, NY, USAObjective: The aim of this study was to describe the minimum number of anthropometric measures that will optimally predict insulin resistance (IR and to characterize the utility of these measures among obese and nonobese adolescents.Research design and methods: Six anthropometric measures (selected from three categories: central adiposity, weight, and body composition were measured from 1298 adolescents attending two New York City public high schools. Body composition was determined by bioelectric impedance analysis (BIA. The homeostatic model assessment of IR (HOMA-IR, based on fasting glucose and insulin concentrations, was used to estimate IR. Stepwise linear regression analyses were performed to predict HOMA-IR based on the six selected measures, while controlling for age.Results: The stepwise regression retained both waist circumference (WC and percentage of body fat (BF%. Notably, BMI was not retained. WC was a stronger predictor of HOMA-IR than BMI was. A regression model using solely WC performed best among the obese II group, while a model using solely BF% performed best among the lean group. Receiver operator characteristic curves showed the WC and BF% model to be more sensitive in detecting IR than BMI, but with less specificity.Conclusion: WC combined with BF% was the best predictor of HOMA-IR. This finding can be attributed partly to the ability of BF% to model HOMA-IR among leaner participants and to the ability of WC to model HOMA-IR among participants who are more obese. BMI was comparatively weak in predicting IR, suggesting that assessments that are more comprehensive and include body composition analysis could increase detection of IR during adolescence, especially among those who are lean, yet insulin-resistant.Keywords: BMI, bioelectrical impedance

  13. A qualitative study examining methods of accessing and identifying research relevant to clinical practice among rehabilitation clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel D

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Drasti Patel,1 Christine Koehmstedt,1 Rebecca Jones,1 Nathan T Coffey,1 Xinsheng Cai,2 Steven Garfinkel,2 Dahlia M Shaewitz,2 Ali A Weinstein1 1Center for Study of Chronic Illness and Disability, College of Health and Human Services, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA, 2American Institutes for Research, Washington, DC, USA Purpose: Research examining the utilization of evidence-based practice (EBP specifically among rehabilitation clinicians is limited. The objective of this study was to examine how various rehabilitative clinicians including physical therapists, occupational therapists, rehabilitation counselors, and physiatrists are gaining access to literature and whether they are able to implement the available research into practice.Methods: A total of 21 total clinicians were interviewed via telephone. Using NVivo, a qualitative analysis of the responses was performed.Results: There were similarities found with respect to the information-seeking behaviors and translation of research across the different clinician types. Lack of time was reported to be a barrier for both access to literature and implementation of research across all clinician types. The majority of clinicians who reported having difficulty with utilizing the published literature indicated that the literature was not applicable to their practice, the research was not specific enough to be put into practice, or the research found was too outdated to be relevant. In addition, having a supportive work environment aided in the search and utilization of research through providing resources central to assisting clinicians in gaining access to health information.Conclusion: Our study identified several barriers that affect EBP for rehabilitation clinicians. The findings suggest the need for researchers to ensure that their work is applicable and specific to clinical practice for implementation to occur. Keywords: health information, information behavior, knowledge utilization

  14. Ebrei e “zona di residenza” durante il regno di Alessandro II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Cifariello

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Alessandro CifarielloJews and “living space” during the reign of Tsar Alexander IIThis is the first of a series of papers written in Italian, English, and Russian, devoted to the publication of material not included in the Author’s 2009 dissertation entitled Judeophobia and the Anti-Nihilistic Novel in Russia at the End of the 19th Century. Taking as a point of departure works by leading scholars, such as Israel Bartal, Cesare G. De Michelis, Jonathan Frankel, John D. Klier, Dan Miron, Benjamin Nathans, Laura Salmon, Yohanan Petrovsky-Shtern, and Yuri Slezkine, this article aims at offering some new perspectives on the Pale of Settlement and on the history and culture of Russian Jewry during the reign of Alexander II. It highlights the laws and reforms concerning Russian Jews implemented by the Tsar’s government, and their fallout on Russian culture. The Author analyzes Jewish geography, urban space, history, legislation, reforms, society, cultural convergences and differences in the Pale of Settlement. The paper concludes with information about the 1881-1882 Russian pogroms and about how certain Jewish inhabitants of the Pale of Settlement then emigrated towards Central and Western Europe, the Middle East and the Americas. The paper discusses the commonplace of a separate Jewish space in the Pale envisaged in some late 19th and early 20th Century Yiddish literature, and describes the multicultural universe made up of several nationalities, one of which was in fact Russian Jewry, struggling for its rights and for full emancipation.

  15. ''Glassy'' low temperature thermal properties in crystalline solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nathan, B.D.

    1976-05-01

    Amorphous dielectrics are known to exhibit anomalous low temperature properties. An extensive review of these properties is presented with an eye toward an understanding of low-lying excitation modes thought to exist in glasses. Work on these systems is described in which a Zr-20 percent Nb samplewhich would be expected to reduce and redistribute the proposed tunneling states. Indeed, the thermal conductivity becomes similar to that of a quenched Zr-8 percent Nb sample and the ''excess'' specific heat linear in temperature dependence is reduced to half the value found in quenched Zr-20 percent Nb. The coefficient of the T 3 term in the specific heat unexpectedly increased from 23.3 to 56.9 erg/gm K 4 and this is attributed to a softening of the lattice due to annealing. The specific heat of this sample was remeasured after it had been dunked in liquid nitrogen. The cubic term was then found to be 19.5 erg/g K 4 , smaller than that in quenched Zr-20 percent Nb, an effect which had been expected due to the chemical diffusion during annealing. Further study of this phenomenon is suggested. Among other relevant measurements performed were the specific heat of a sample of amorphous B 2 O 3 (presented by Stephens (1976)); thermal conductivities of phase-separated unleached Vycor glass and Pyrex; thermal conductivities above 1.2 0 K of polycrystalline MgO, heat-treated Pyroceram and porous Vycor (presented by Tait (1975)) and of mixed crystal KBr-KI (presented by Nathan, Lou and Tait (1976)). The last sample exhibited density fluctuations on a scale of 1000 A but exhibited thermal properties typical of dielectric crystal. Speed of sound measurements were made on both unleached and porous Vycor

  16. Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockris, John O'M

    2011-11-30

    The idea of a "Hydrogen Economy" is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO₂ in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H₂ from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO₂ from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  17. Population pharmacokinetics of methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release multiple-layer beads in pediatric subjects with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teuscher NS

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Nathan S Teuscher,1 Akwete Adjei,2 Robert L Findling,3,4 Laurence L Greenhill,5 Robert J Kupper,2 Sharon Wigal6 1PK/PD Associates, Trophy Club, TX, 2Rhodes Pharmaceuticals L.P., Coventry, RI, 3Department of Psychiatric Services and Research, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD, 4Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, 5Department of Psychiatry, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University, New York, NY, 6AVIDA Inc., Newport Beach, CA, USA Abstract: A new multilayer-bead formulation of extended-release methylphenidate hydrochloride (MPH-MLR has been evaluated in pharmacokinetic studies in healthy adults and in Phase III efficacy/safety studies in children and adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. Using available data in healthy adults, a two-input, one-compartment, first-order elimination population pharmacokinetic model was developed using nonlinear mixed-effect modeling. The model was then extended to pediatric subjects, and was found to adequately describe plasma concentration–time data for this population. A pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model was also developed using change from baseline in the ADHD Rating Scale (ADHD-RS-IV total scores from a pediatric Phase III trial and simulated plasma concentration–time data. During simulations for each MPH-MLR dose level (10–80 mg, increased body weight resulted in decreased maximum concentration. Additionally, as maximum concentration increased, ADHD-RS-IV total score improved (decreased. Knowledge of the relationship between dose, body weight, and clinical response following the administration of MPH-MLR in children and adolescents may be useful for clinicians selecting initial dosing of MPH-MLR. Additional study is needed to confirm these results. Keywords: population pharmacokinetics, Aptensio XR™, MPH-MLR, methylphenidate

  18. Predictors of Facebook User Engagement With Health-Related Content for Gay, Bisexual, and Other Men Who Have Sex With Men: Content Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Card, Kiffer George; Lachowsky, Nathan; Hawkins, Blake W; Jollimore, Jody; Baharuddin, Fahmy; Hogg, Robert S

    2018-04-06

    Social media is used by community-based organizations (CBOs) to promote the well-being of gay and bisexual men (GBM). However, few studies have quantified which factors facilitate the diffusion of health content tailored for sexual minorities. The aim of this study was to identify post characteristics that can be leveraged to optimize the health promotion efforts of CBOs on Facebook. The Facebook application programming interface was used to collect 5 years' of posts shared across 10 Facebook pages administered by Vancouver-based CBOs promoting GBM health. Network analysis assessed basic indicators of network structure. Content analyses were conducted using informatics-based approaches. Hierarchical negative binomial regression of post engagement data was used to identify meaningful covariates of engagement. In total, 14,071 posts were shared and 21,537 users engaged with these posts. Most users (n=13,315) engaged only once. There was moderate correlation between the number of posts and the number of CBOs users engaged with (r=.53, Puser engagement was positively associated with positive sentiment, sharing multimedia, and posting about pre-exposure prophylaxis, stigma, and mental health. Engagement was negatively associated with asking questions, posting about dating, and sharing posts during or after work (versus before). Results highlight the existence of a core group of Facebook users who facilitate diffusion. Factors associated with greater user engagement present CBOs with a number of strategies for improving the diffusion of health content. ©Kiffer George Card, Nathan Lachowsky, Blake W Hawkins, Jody Jollimore, Fahmy Baharuddin, Robert S Hogg. Originally published in JMIR Public Health and Surveillance (http://publichealth.jmir.org), 06.04.2018.

  19. Chandra Catches "Piranha" Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Supermassive black holes have been discovered to grow more rapidly in young galaxy clusters, according to new results from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. These "fast-track" supermassive black holes can have a big influence on the galaxies and clusters that they live in. Using Chandra, scientists surveyed a sample of clusters and counted the fraction of galaxies with rapidly growing supermassive black holes, known as active galactic nuclei (or AGN). The data show, for the first time, that younger, more distant galaxy clusters contained far more AGN than older, nearby ones. Galaxy clusters are some of the largest structures in the Universe, consisting of many individual galaxies, a few of which contain AGN. Earlier in the history of the universe, these galaxies contained a lot more gas for star formation and black hole growth than galaxies in clusters do today. This fuel allows the young cluster black holes to grow much more rapidly than their counterparts in nearby clusters. Illustration of Active Galactic Nucleus Illustration of Active Galactic Nucleus "The black holes in these early clusters are like piranha in a very well-fed aquarium," said Jason Eastman of Ohio State University (OSU) and first author of this study. "It's not that they beat out each other for food, rather there was so much that all of the piranha were able to really thrive and grow quickly." The team used Chandra to determine the fraction of AGN in four different galaxy clusters at large distances, when the Universe was about 58% of its current age. Then they compared this value to the fraction found in more nearby clusters, those about 82% of the Universe's current age. The result was the more distant clusters contained about 20 times more AGN than the less distant sample. AGN outside clusters are also more common when the Universe is younger, but only by factors of two or three over the same age span. "It's been predicted that there would be fast-track black holes in clusters, but we never

  20. Scaling Studies for Advanced High Temperature Reactor Concepts, Final Technical Report: October 2014—December 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, Brian; Gutowska, Izabela; Chiger, Howard

    2018-03-26

    Computer simulations of nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulic phenomena are often used in the design and licensing of nuclear reactor systems. In order to assess the accuracy of these computer simulations, computer codes and methods are often validated against experimental data. This experimental data must be of sufficiently high quality in order to conduct a robust validation exercise. In addition, this experimental data is generally collected at experimental facilities that are of a smaller scale than the reactor systems that are being simulated due to cost considerations. Therefore, smaller scale test facilities must be designed and constructed in such a fashion to ensure that the prototypical behavior of a particular nuclear reactor system is preserved. The work completed through this project has resulted in scaling analyses and conceptual design development for a test facility capable of collecting code validation data for the following high temperature gas reactor systems and events— 1. Passive natural circulation core cooling system, 2. pebble bed gas reactor concept, 3. General Atomics Energy Multiplier Module reactor, and 4. prismatic block design steam-water ingress event. In the event that code validation data for these systems or events is needed in the future, significant progress in the design of an appropriate integral-type test facility has already been completed as a result of this project. Where applicable, the next step would be to begin the detailed design development and material procurement. As part of this project applicable scaling analyses were completed and test facility design requirements developed. Conceptual designs were developed for the implementation of these design requirements at the Oregon State University (OSU) High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF). The original HTTF is based on a ¼-scale model of a high temperature gas reactor concept with the capability for both forced and natural circulation flow through a prismatic core with

  1. Enhancement of Heat and Mass Transfer in Mechanically Contstrained Ultra Thin Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Drost; Jim Liburdy; Brian Paul; Richard Peterson

    2005-01-01

    Oregon State University (OSU) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) were funded by the U.S. Department of Energy to conduct research focused on resolving the key technical issues that limited the deployment of efficient and extremely compact microtechnology based heat actuated absorption heat pumps and gas absorbers. Success in demonstrating these technologies will reduce the main barriers to the deployment of a technology that can significantly reduce energy consumption in the building, automotive and industrial sectors while providing a technology that can improve our ability to sequester CO{sub 2}. The proposed research cost $939,477. $539,477 of the proposed amount funded research conducted at OSU while the balance ($400,000) was used at PNNL. The project lasted 42 months and started in April 2001. Recent developments at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Oregon State University suggest that the performance of absorption and desorption systems can be significantly enhanced by the use of an ultra-thin film gas/liquid contactor. This device employs microtechnology-based structures to mechanically constrain the gas/liquid interface. This technology can be used to form very thin liquid films with a film thickness less then 100 microns while still allowing gas/liquid contact. When the resistance to mass transfer in gas desorption and absorption is dominated by diffusion in the liquid phase the use of extremely thin films (<100 microns) for desorption and absorption can radically reduce the size of a gas desorber or absorber. The development of compact absorbers and desorbers enables the deployment of small heat-actuated absorption heat pumps for distributed space heating and cooling applications, heat-actuated automotive air conditioning, manportable cooling, gas absorption units for the chemical process industry and the development of high capacity CO{sub 2} absorption devices for CO{sub 2} collection and sequestration. The energy

  2. Novel Inorganic/Polymer Composite Membranes for CO2 Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, W.S. Winston [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Depts. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Chemistry, and Materials Science and Engineering; Dutta, Prabir K. [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Depts. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Chemistry, and Materials Science and Engineering; Schmit, Steve J. [Gradient Technology, Elk River, MN (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a cost-effective design and manufacturing process for new membrane modules that capture CO2 from flue gas in coal-fired power plants. The membrane consisted of a thin selective layer including inorganic (zeolite) embedded in a polymer structure so that it can be made in a continuous manufacturing process. The membrane was incorporated in spiral-wound modules for the field test with actual flue gas at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) in Wilsonville, AL and bench scale tests with simulated flue gas at the Ohio State University (OSU). Using the modules for post-combustion CO2 capture is expected to achieve the DOE target of $40/tonne CO2 captured (in 2007 dollar) for 2025. Membranes with the amine-containing polymer cover layer on zeolite-Y (ZY) nanoparticles deposited on the polyethersulfone (PES) substrate were successfully synthesized. The membranes showed a high CO2 permeance of about 1100 GPU (gas permeation unit, 1 GPU = 10-6 cm3 (STP)/(cm2 • s • cm Hg), 3000 GPU = 10-6 mol/(m2 • s • Pa)) with a high CO2/N2 selectivity of > 200 at the typical flue gas conditions at 57°C (about 17% water vapor in feed gas) and > 1400 GPU CO2 permeance with > 500 CO2/N2 selectivity at 102°C (~ 80% water vapor). The synthesis of ZY nanoparticles was successfully scaled up, and the pilot-scale membranes were also successfully fabricated using the continuous membrane machine at OSU. The transport performance of the pilot-scale membranes agreed reasonably well with the lab-scale membranes. The results from both the lab-scale and scale-up membranes were used for the techno-economic analysis. The scale-up membranes were fabricated into prototype spiral-wound membrane modules for continuous testing with simulated or real flue gas. For real flue gas testing, we worked with NCCC, in

  3. Accounting for ecosystem services in Life Cycle Assessment, Part II: toward an ecologically based LCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Baral, Anil; Bakshi, Bhavik R

    2010-04-01

    Despite the essential role of ecosystem goods and services in sustaining all human activities, they are often ignored in engineering decision making, even in methods that are meant to encourage sustainability. For example, conventional Life Cycle Assessment focuses on the impact of emissions and consumption of some resources. While aggregation and interpretation methods are quite advanced for emissions, similar methods for resources have been lagging, and most ignore the role of nature. Such oversight may even result in perverse decisions that encourage reliance on deteriorating ecosystem services. This article presents a step toward including the direct and indirect role of ecosystems in LCA, and a hierarchical scheme to interpret their contribution. The resulting Ecologically Based LCA (Eco-LCA) includes a large number of provisioning, regulating, and supporting ecosystem services as inputs to a life cycle model at the process or economy scale. These resources are represented in diverse physical units and may be compared via their mass, fuel value, industrial cumulative exergy consumption, or ecological cumulative exergy consumption or by normalization with total consumption of each resource or their availability. Such results at a fine scale provide insight about relative resource use and the risk and vulnerability to the loss of specific resources. Aggregate indicators are also defined to obtain indices such as renewability, efficiency, and return on investment. An Eco-LCA model of the 1997 economy is developed and made available via the web (www.resilience.osu.edu/ecolca). An illustrative example comparing paper and plastic cups provides insight into the features of the proposed approach. The need for further work in bridging the gap between knowledge about ecosystem services and their direct and indirect role in supporting human activities is discussed as an important area for future work.

  4. Adult-Rated Oceanography Part 1: A Project Integrating Ocean Sciences into Adult Basic Education Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowles, S.; Collier, R.; Torres, M. K.

    2004-12-01

    Busy scientists seek opportunities to implement education and outreach efforts, but often don't know where to start. One easy and tested method is to form collaborations with federally-funded adult education and adult literacy programs. These programs exist in every U.S. state and territory and serve underrepresented populations through such major initiatives as adult basic education, adult secondary education (and GED preparation), and English language acquisition. These students are workers, consumers, voters, parents, grandparents, and members of every community. They have specific needs that are often overlooked in outreach activities. This presentation will describe the steps by which the Oregon Ocean Science and Math Collaborative program was developed. It is based on a partnership between the Oregon Department of Community Colleges and Workforce Development, Oregon State University College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon Sea Grant, and the OSU Hatfield Marine Science Center. It includes professional development through instructor institutes; teachers at sea and informal education opportunities; curriculum and web site development. Through the partnership described here, instructors in adult basic education programs participate in a yearlong experience in which they develop, test, and adapt innovative instructional strategies to meet the specific needs of adult learners. This, in turn, leads to new prospects for study in the areas of ocean science and math and introduces non-academic careers in marine science to a new community. Working directly with instructors, we have identified expertise level, instructional environment, instructor background and current teaching strategies used to address science literacy and numeracy goals of the adult learners in the State of Oregon. Preliminary evaluation of our ongoing project in meeting these goals will be discussed. These efforts contribute to national goals of science literacy for all, by providing

  5. Analysis of essential Arabidopsis nuclear genes encoding plastid-targeted proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Linda J; Imre, Kathleen M; Hall, David A; Last, Robert L

    2013-01-01

    The Chloroplast 2010 Project (http://www.plastid.msu.edu/) identified and phenotypically characterized homozygous mutants in over three thousand genes, the majority of which encode plastid-targeted proteins. Despite extensive screening by the community, no homozygous mutant alleles were available for several hundred genes, suggesting that these might be enriched for genes of essential function. Attempts were made to generate homozygotes in ~1200 of these lines and 521 of the homozygous viable lines obtained were deposited in the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center (http://abrc.osu.edu/). Lines that did not yield a homozygote in soil were tested as potentially homozygous lethal due to defects either in seed or seedling development. Mutants were characterized at four stages of development: developing seed, mature seed, at germination, and developing seedlings. To distinguish seed development or seed pigment-defective mutants from seedling development mutants, development of seeds was assayed in siliques from heterozygous plants. Segregating seeds from heterozygous parents were sown on supplemented media in an attempt to rescue homozygous seedlings that could not germinate or survive in soil. Growth of segregating seeds in air and air enriched to 0.3% carbon dioxide was compared to discover mutants potentially impaired in photorespiration or otherwise responsive to CO2 supplementation. Chlorophyll fluorescence measurements identified CO2-responsive mutants with altered photosynthetic parameters. Examples of genes with a viable mutant allele and one or more putative homozygous-lethal alleles were documented. RT-PCR of homozygotes for potentially weak alleles revealed that essential genes may remain undiscovered because of the lack of a true null mutant allele. This work revealed 33 genes with two or more lethal alleles and 73 genes whose essentiality was not confirmed with an independent lethal mutation, although in some cases second leaky alleles were identified.

  6. Ibrutinib treatment improves T cell number and function in CLL patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Meixiao; Beckwith, Kyle; Do, Priscilla; Mundy, Bethany L; Gordon, Amber; Lehman, Amy M; Maddocks, Kami J; Cheney, Carolyn; Jones, Jeffrey A; Flynn, Joseph M; Andritsos, Leslie A; Awan, Farrukh; Fraietta, Joseph A; June, Carl H; Maus, Marcela V; Woyach, Jennifer A; Caligiuri, Michael A; Johnson, Amy J; Muthusamy, Natarajan; Byrd, John C

    2017-08-01

    Ibrutinib has been shown to have immunomodulatory effects by inhibiting Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) and IL-2-inducible T cell kinase (ITK). The relative importance of inhibiting these 2 kinases has not been examined despite its relevance to immune-based therapies. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients on clinical trials of ibrutinib (BTK/ITK inhibitor; n = 19) or acalabrutinib (selective BTK inhibitor; n = 13) were collected serially. T cell phenotype, immune function, and CLL cell immunosuppressive capacity were evaluated. Ibrutinib markedly increased CD4+ and CD8+ T cell numbers in CLL patients. This effect was more prominent in effector/effector memory subsets and was not observed with acalabrutinib. Ex vivo studies demonstrated that this may be due to diminished activation-induced cell death through ITK inhibition. PD-1 and CTLA-4 expression was significantly markedly reduced in T cells by both agents. While the number of Treg cells remained unchanged, the ratio of these to conventional CD4+ T cells was reduced with ibrutinib, but not acalabrutinib. Both agents reduced expression of the immunosuppressive molecules CD200 and BTLA as well as IL-10 production by CLL cells. Ibrutinib treatment increased the in vivo persistence of activated T cells, decreased the Treg/CD4+ T cell ratio, and diminished the immune-suppressive properties of CLL cells through BTK-dependent and -independent mechanisms. These features provide a strong rationale for combination immunotherapy approaches with ibrutinib in CLL and other cancers. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01589302 and NCT02029443. Samples described here were collected per OSU-0025. The National Cancer Institute.

  7. Characterization of coal-derived liquids and other fossil-fuel-related materials employing mass spectrometry. Final report, September 30, 1976-September 29, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheppele, S E

    1982-05-01

    A document was prepared which assessed the state-of-the art in the mass spectrometric characterization of fossil fuel materials and the relevance of these data to the fossil fuel industry. A Kratos DS50 SM data system was successfully interfaced to a CEC 21-110B mass spectrometer. Communications between the NOVA 3/12 computer in the data system and the OSU central computer were established. A Grant Comparator/Microdensitometer was acquired and made operational. Plans were developed and hardware acquired for interfacing the densitometer to the NOVA 3/12 computer. A quartz direct introduction probe was acquired for the CEC 21-110B. A temperature controller for the probe was acquired and interfaced to the slow speed ADC on the auxillary board in the data system/mass spectrometer interface. The combined FI/EI source was modified to operate in the FD mode and an apparatus was fabricated for conditioning FD emitters. A CSI supergrater 3 was interfaced to the PE 3920 gas chromatograph. The upgraded facility was used to develop mass spectrometric methods for the characterization of fossil fuel materials and to apply methods to the characterization of these materials. Activities included: (1) initial development of field-ionization mass spectrometry for the characterization of saturated hydrocarbons, (2) computerization of the technique of probe microdistillation/mass spectrometry, (3) initation of the development of a new method for the computer assisted assignment of formulas to ion masses, (4) characterization of neutral fractions from a hydrotreated tar-sands oil, and (5) characterization of coal-derived oils and asphaltenes.

  8. Regional Approaches to Climate Change for Inland Pacific Northwest Cereal Production Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigenbrode, S. D.; Abatzoglou, J. T.; Burke, I. C.; Capalbo, S.; Gessler, P.; Huggins, D. R.; Johnson-Maynard, J.; Kruger, C.; Lamb, B. K.; Machado, S.; Mote, P.; Painter, K.; Pan, W.; Petrie, S.; Paulitz, T. C.; Stockle, C.; Walden, V. P.; Wulfhorst, J. D.; Wolf, K. J.

    2011-12-01

    The long-term environmental and economic sustainability of agriculture in the Inland Pacific Northwest (northern Idaho, north central Oregon, and eastern Washington) depends upon improving agricultural management, technology, and policy to enable adaptation to climate change and to help realize agriculture's potential to contribute to climate change mitigation. To address this challenge, three land-grant institutions (Oregon State University, the University of Idaho and Washington State University) (OSU, UI, WSU) and USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) units are partners in a collaborative project - Regional Approaches to Climate Change for Pacific Northwest Agriculture (REACCH-PNA). The overarching goal of REACCH is to enhance the sustainability of Inland Pacific Northwest (IPNW) cereal production systems under ongoing and projected climate change while contributing to climate change mitigation. Supporting goals include: - Develop and implement sustainable agricultural practices for cereal production within existing and projected agroecological zones throughout the region as climate changes, - Contribute to climate change mitigation through improved fertilizer, fuel, and pesticide use efficiency, increased sequestration of soil carbon, and reduced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions consistent with the 2030 targets set by the USDA National Institute for Food and Agriculture (NIFA), - Work closely with stakeholders and policymakers to promote science-based agricultural approaches to climate change adaptation and mitigation, - Increase the number of scientists, educators, and extension professionals with the skills and knowledge to address climate change and its interactions with agriculture. In this poster, we provide an overview of the specific goals of this project and activities that are underway since its inception in spring of 2011.

  9. Near-Inertial Surface Currents and their influence on Surface Dispersion in the Northeastern Gulf of Mexico near the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, M.; Reniers, A.; MacMahan, J. H.; Howden, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    The continental shelf along the northeastern Gulf of Mexico is transected by the critical latitude (30°N) for inertial motions. At this latitude the inertial period is 24 hours and diurnal surface current oscillations can amplify due to resonance with diurnal wind and tidal forcing. Tidal amplitudes are relatively small in this region although K1 tidal currents can be strong over the shelf west of the DeSoto Canyon where the K1 tide propagates onshore as a Sverdrup wave. Other sources of diurnal motions include internal tidal currents, Poincaré waves, and basin resonance. It is therefore very difficult to separate inertial wind-driven motions from other diurnal motions. Spatiotemporal surface currents were measured using hourly 6 km resolution HF radar data collected in June 2010 during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill and July 2012 during the Grand Lagrangian Deployment (GLAD). Surface currents were also measured using GLAD GPS-tracked drifters. NDBC buoy wind data were used to determine wind-forcing, and OSU Tidal Inversion Software (OTIS) were used to predict tidal currents. The relative spatiotemporal influence of diurnal wind and tidal forcing on diurnal surface current oscillations is determined through a series of comparative analyses: phase and amplitude of bandpassed timeseries, wavelet analyses, wind-driven inertial oscillation calculations, and tidal current predictions. The wind-driven inertial ocean response is calculated by applying a simple "slab" model where wind-forcing is allowed to excite a layer of low-density water riding over high density water. The spatial variance of diurnal motions are found to be correlated with satellite turbidity imagery indicating that stratification influences the sea surface inertial response to wind-forcing. Surface dispersion is found to be minimized in regions of high diurnal variance suggesting that mean surface transport is restricted in regions of inertial motions associated with stratification.

  10. Adult-Rated Oceanography Part 2: Examples from the Trenches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, M. E.; Collier, R.; Cowles, S.

    2004-12-01

    We will share experiences and specific examples from an ongoing Ocean Science and Math Collaborative Project between OSU faculty and Community College instructors from the Oregon system of adult education and workforce development. The participants represent such diverse instructional programs as workforce training, workplace education (cannery workers), adult basic education, adult secondary education (GED preparation), English to Speakers of Other Languages, Family Literacy, and Tribal Education (Confederated Tribes of the Siletz Indians). This collaborative project is designed to integrate ocean sciences into the science, math, and critical thinking curriculum through the professional development activities of adult educators. Our strategy is to tailor new and existing ocean science resources to the needs of adult education instructors. This project provides a wide range of opportunities in time and effort for scientist involvement. Some scientists have chosen to participate in short interviews or conversations with adult educators, which give added value through real-world connections in the context of the larger project. Other participating scientists have made larger time investments, which include presentations at workshops, hosting teacher-at-sea opportunities and leading project planning and implementation efforts. This project serves as an efficient model for scientists to address the broader impact goals of their research. It takes advantage of a variety of established educational outreach resources funded through NSF (e.g. the national COSEE network and GeoEducation grants), NOAA (e.g. SeaGrant education and Ocean Explorer) as well as State and Federal adult education programs (e.g. The National Institute for Literacy Science and Numeracy Special Collection). We recognize the value and creativity inherent in these resources, and we are developing a model to "tune" their presentation, as well as their connection to new oceanographic research, in a manner

  11. A spare-parts inventory program for TRIGA reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, T V; Ringle, J C; Johnson, A G [Oregon State University (United States)

    1974-07-01

    As is fairly common with new reactor facilities, we had a few spare parts on hand as part of our original purchase when the OSU TRIGA first went critical in March of 1967. Within a year or so, however, it became apparent that we should critically examine our spare parts inventory in order to avoid unnecessary or prolonged outages due to lack of a crucial piece of equipment. Many critical components (those which must be present and operable according to our license or technical specifications) were considered, and a priority list of acquiring these was established. This first list was drawn up in March, 1969, two years after initial criticality, and some key components were ordered. The availability of funds was the overriding restriction then and now. This spare-parts list is reviewed and new components purchased annually; the average amount spent has been about $2,000 per year. This inventory has proved invaluable more than once; without it, we would have had lengthy shutdowns awaiting the arrival of the needed component. The sobering thought, however, is that our spare-parts inventory is still not complete-far from it, in fact, because this would be prohibitively expensive. It is very difficult to guess with 100% accuracy just which component might need replacing, and your $10,000 inventory of spare parts is useless in that instance if it doesn't include the needed part. An idea worth considering is to either (a) encourage General Atomic, through the collective voice of all TRIGA owners, to maintain a rather complete inventory of replacement parts, or (b) maintain an owner's spare-parts pool, financed by contributions from all the facilities. If either of these pools was established, the needed part could reach any facility within the U.S. within a few days, minimizing reactor outage time. (author)

  12. Gravity model improvement using the DORIS tracking system on the SPOT 2 satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerem, R. S.; Lerch, F. J.; Williamson, R. G.; Klosko, S. M.; Robbins, J. W.; Patel, G. B.

    1994-01-01

    A high-precision radiometric satellite tracking system, Doppler Orbitography and Radio-positioning Integrated by Satellite system (DORIS), has recently been developed by the French space agency, Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). DORIS was designed to provide tracking support for missions such as the joint United States/French TOPEX/Poseidon. As part of the flight testing process, a DORIS package was flown on the French SPOT 2 satellite. A substantial quantity of geodetic quality tracking data was obtained on SPOT 2 from an extensive international DORIS tracking network. These data were analyzed to assess their accuracy and to evaluate the gravitational modeling enhancements provided by these data in combination with the Goddard Earth Model-T3 (GEM-T3) gravitational model. These observations have noise levels of 0.4 to 0.5 mm/s, with few residual systematic effects. Although the SPOT 2 satellite experiences high atmospheric drag forces, the precision and global coverage of the DORIS tracking data have enabled more extensive orbit parameterization to mitigate these effects. As a result, the SPOT 2 orbital errors have been reduced to an estimated radial accuracy in the 10-20 cm RMS range. The addition of these data, which encompass many regions heretofore lacking in precision satellite tracking, has significantly improved GEM-T3 and allowed greatly improved orbit accuracies for Sun-synchronous satellites like SPOT 2 (such as ERS 1 and EOS). Comparison of the ensuing gravity model with other contemporary fields (GRIM-4C2, TEG2B, and OSU91A) provides a means to assess the current state of knowledge of the Earth's gravity field. Thus, the DORIS experiment on SPOT 2 has provided a strong basis for evaluating this new orbit tracking technology and has demonstrated the important contribution of the DORIS network to the success of the TOPEX/Poseidon mission.

  13. TU-C-9A-01: IROC Organization and Clinical Trial Credentialing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Followill, D; Molineu, A; Xiao, Y

    2014-01-01

    As a response to recommendations from a report from the Institute of Medicine, NCI is reorganizing it clinical trial groups into a National Clinical Trial Network (NCTN) that consists of four adult groups (Alliance, ECOGACRIN, NRG, and SWOG) and one children’s group (COG). NRG will house CIRO, a center to promote innovative radiation therapy research and intergroup collaboration in radiation. The quality assurance groups that support clinical trials have also been restructured. ITC, OSU Imaging corelab, Philadelphia Imaging core-lab, QARC, RPC, and RTOGQA have joined together to create the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core (IROC) Group. IROC’s mission is to provide integrated radiation oncology and diagnostic imaging quality control programs in support of the NCI’s NCTN thereby assuring high quality data for clinical trials designed to improve the clinical outcomes for cancer patients worldwide. This will be accomplished through five core services: site qualification, trial design support, credentialing, data management, case review.These changes are important for physicist participating in NCI clinical trials to understand. We will describe in detail the IROC’s activities and five core services so that as a user, the medical physicist can learn how to efficiently utilize this group. We will describe common pitfalls encountered in credentialing for current protocols and present methods to avoid them. These may include the which benchmarks are required for NSABP B-51/RTOG 1304 and how to plan them as well as tips for phantom planning. We will explain how to submit patient and phantom cases in the TRIAD system used by IROC. Learning Objectives: To understand the basic organization of IROC, its mission and five core services To learn how to use TRIAD for patient and phantom data submission To learn how to avoid common pitfalls in credentialing for current trials

  14. Flexible patient information search and retrieval framework: pilot implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdal, Selnur; Catalyurek, Umit V.; Saltz, Joel; Kamal, Jyoti; Gurcan, Metin N.

    2007-03-01

    Medical centers collect and store significant amount of valuable data pertaining to patients' visit in the form of medical free-text. In addition, standardized diagnosis codes (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification: ICD9-CM) related to those dictated reports are usually available. In this work, we have created a framework where image searches could be initiated through a combination of free-text reports as well as ICD9 codes. This framework enables more comprehensive search on existing large sets of patient data in a systematic way. The free text search is enriched by computer-aided inclusion of additional search terms enhanced by a thesaurus. This combination of enriched search allows users to access to a larger set of relevant results from a patient-centric PACS in a simpler way. Therefore, such framework is of particular use in tasks such as gathering images for desired patient populations, building disease models, and so on. As the motivating application of our framework, we implemented a search engine. This search engine processed two years of patient data from the OSU Medical Center's Information Warehouse and identified lung nodule location information using a combination of UMLS Meta-Thesaurus enhanced text report searches along with ICD9 code searches on patients that have been discharged. Five different queries with various ICD9 codes involving lung cancer were carried out on 172552 cases. Each search was completed under a minute on average per ICD9 code and the inclusion of UMLS thesaurus increased the number of relevant cases by 45% on average.

  15. Tsunamis generated by unconfined deformable granular landslides in various topographic configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFall, B. C.; Mohammed, F.; Fritz, H. M.

    2012-04-01

    Tsunamis generated by landslides and volcanic island collapses account for some of the most catastrophic events. Major tsunamis caused by landslides or volcanic island collapse were recorded at Krakatoa in 1883, Grand Banks, Newfoundland in 1929, Lituya Bay, Alaska in 1958, Papua New Guinea in 1998, and Java in 2006. Source and runup scenarios based on real world events are physically modeled in the three dimensional NEES tsunami wave basin (TWB) at Oregon State University (OSU). A novel pneumatic landslide tsunami generator (LTG) was deployed to simulate landslides with varying geometry and kinematics. The LTG consists of a sliding box filled with up to 1,350 kg of naturally rounded river gravel which is accelerated by means of four pneumatic pistons down the 2H: 1V slope, launching the granular landslide towards the water at velocities of up to 5 m/s. Topographical and bathymetric features can greatly affect wave characteristics and runup heights. Landslide tsunamis are studied in different topographic and bathymetric configurations: far field propagation and runup, a narrow fjord and curved headland configurations, and a conical island setting representing landslides off an island or a volcanic flank collapse. Water surface elevations were measured using an array of resistance wave gauges. The granulate landslide width, thickness and front velocity were measured using above and underwater cameras. Landslide 3-dimensional surface reconstruction and surface velocity properties were measured using a stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV) setup. The speckled pattern on the surface of the granular landslide allows for cross-correlation based PIV analysis. Wave runup was measured with resistance wave gauges along the slope and verified with video image processing. The measured landslide and tsunami data serve to validate and advance 3-dimensional numerical landslide tsunami and prediction models.

  16. Argon-41 production and evolution at the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor (OSTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anellis, L.G.; Johnson, A.G.; Higginbotham, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    , it may be safely concluded that argon-41 produced in the OSU TRIGA research reactor tank poses no significant health hazard to workers or to the public

  17. Presence, distribution, and molecular epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a small animal teaching hospital: a year-long active surveillance targeting dogs and their environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Balen, Joany; Kelley, Christina; Nava-Hoet, Rocio C; Bateman, Shane; Hillier, Andrew; Dyce, Jonathan; Wittum, Thomas E; Hoet, Armando E

    2013-05-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is known to be present in small animal veterinary clinical environments. However, a better understanding of the ecology and dynamics of MRSA in these environments is necessary for the development of effective infectious disease prevention and control programs. To achieve this goal, a yearlong active MRSA surveillance program was established at The Ohio State University (OSU) Veterinary Medical Center to describe the spatial and molecular epidemiology of this bacterium in the small animal hospital. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing, staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec (SCCmec) typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing, and dendrogram analysis were used to characterize and analyze the 81 environmental and 37 canine-origin MRSA isolates obtained during monthly sampling events. Overall, 13.5% of surfaces were contaminated with MRSA at 1 or more sampling times throughout the year. The majority of the environmental and canine isolates were SCCmec type II (93.8% and 86.5%, respectively) and USA100 (90.1% and 86.5%, respectively). By PFGE analysis, these isolates were found to be closely related, which reflects a low diversity of MRSA strains circulating in the hospital. For 5 consecutive months, 1 unique pulsotype was the most prevalent across the medical services and was recovered from a variety of surfaces and hospital locations. Carts/gurneys, doors, and examination tables/floors were the most frequently contaminated surfaces. Some surfaces maintained the same pulsotypes for 3 consecutive months. Molecular analysis found that incoming MRSA-positive dogs were capable of introducing a new pulsotype into the hospital environment during the surveillance period. Our results suggest that once a MRSA strain is introduced into the hospital environment, it can be maintained and spread for extended periods of time. These findings can aid in the development of biosecurity and biocontainment protocols aimed at

  18. Final Report of DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-04ER41306

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandi, Satyanarayan [Oklahoma State University; Babu, Kaladi S [Oklahoma State University; Rizatdinova, Flera [Okllahoma State University

    2013-12-10

    Project: Theoretical and Experimental Research in Weak, Electromagnetic and Strong Interactions: Investigators: S. Nandi, K.S. Babu, F. Rizatdinova Institution: Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 This completed project focused on the cutting edge research in theoretical and experimental high energy physics. In theoretical high energy physics, the two investigators (Nandi and Babu) worked on a variety of topics in model-building and phenomenological aspects of elementary particle physics. This includes unification of particles and forces, neutrino physics, Higgs boson physics, proton decay, supersymmetry, and collider physics. Novel physics ideas beyond the Standard Model with testable consequences at the LHC have been proposed. These ideas have stimulated the experimental community to look for new signals. The contributions of the experimental high energy physics group has been at the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatraon and the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. At the D0 experiment, the main focus was search for the Higgs boson in the WH channel, where improved limits were obtained. At the LHC, the OSU group has made significant contributions to the top quark physics, and the calibration of the b-tagging algorithms. The group is also involved in the pixel detector upgrade. This DOE supported grant has resulted in 5 PhD degrees during the past three years. Three postdoctoral fellows were supported as well. In theoretical research over 40 refereed publications have resulted in the past three years, with several involving graduate students and postdoctoral fellows. It also resulted in over 30 conference presentations in the same time period. We are also involved in outreach activities through the Quarknet program, where we engage Oklahoma school teachers and students in our research.

  19. In-vivo fluorescence detection of breast cancer growth factor receptors by fiber-optic probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Gilbert; Wang, Bingzhi; DeLuna, Frank; Sun, LuZhe; Ye, Jing Yong

    2018-02-01

    Breast cancer treatment options often include medications that target the overexpression of growth factor receptors, such as the proto-oncogene human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/neu) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) to suppress the abnormal growth of cancerous cells and induce cancer regression. Although effective, certain treatments are toxic to vital organs, and demand assurance that the pursued receptor is present at the tumor before administration of the drug. This requires diagnostic tools to provide tumor molecular signatures, as well as locational information. In this study, we utilized a fiber-optic probe to characterize in vivo HER2 and EGFR overexpressed tumors through the fluorescence of targeted dyes. HER2 and EGFR antibodies were conjugated with ICG-Sulfo-OSu and Alexa Fluor 680, respectively, to tag BT474 (HER2+) and MDA-MB-468 (EGFR+) tumors. The fiber was inserted into the samples via a 30-gauge needle. Different wavelengths of a supercontinuum laser were selected to couple into the fiber and excite the corresponding fluorophores in the samples. The fluorescence from the dyes was collected through the same fiber and quantified by a time-correlated single photon counter. Fluorescence at different antibody-dye concentrations was measured for calibration. Mice with subcutaneous HER2+ and/or EGFR+ tumors received intravenous injections of the conjugates and were later probed at the tumor sites. The measured fluorescence was used to distinguish between tumor types and to calculate the concentration of the antibody-dye conjugates, which were detectable at levels as low as 40 nM. The fiber-optic probe presents a minimally invasive instrument to characterize the molecular signatures of breast cancer in vivo.

  20. NW CSC annual report fiscal year 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisbal, Gustavo A.

    2013-01-01

    The Northwest Climate Science Center (NW CSC) was established in 2010 as one of eight regional Climate Science Centers created by the Department of the Interior (DOI). The NW CSC encompasses Washing-ton, Oregon, Idaho, and western Montana and has overlapping boundaries with three Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs): the Great Northern, the Great Basin, and the North Pacific. With guidance from its Executive Stakeholder Advisory Committee (ESAC), the NW CSC and its partner LCCs are addressing the highest priority regional climate science needs of Northwest natural and cultural resource managers. Climate Science Centers tap into the scientific expertise of both the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and academic institutions. The NW CSC is supported by an academic consortium with the capacity to generate climate science and tools in a coordinated fashion, serving stakeholders across the Northwest region. This consortium is primarily represented by Oregon State University (OSU), the University of Id-ho (UI), and the University of Washington (UW). The academic consortium and USGS provide capabilities in climate science, ecology, impacts and vulnerability assessment, modeling, adaptation planning, and advanced information technology, all necessary to address and respond to climate change in the Northwest. University members also recruit and train graduate students and early-career scientists. This Annual Report summarizes progress for the goals set out in the NW CSC Strategic Plan for 2012-2015 (http://www.doi.gov/csc/northwest/upload/Northwest-CSC-Strategic-Plan.cfm) and the NW CSC Work-plan for Fiscal Year (FY) 2013 (October 1, 2012 through September 30, 2013). The report follows the structure of the Strategic Plan, which describes the five core services (Executive, Science, Data, Communications, and Education and Training) provided by the NW CSC in support of the stated vision: Our Vision: To become nationally recognized as a best-practice model for the provision

  1. Phenomena identification and ranking tables for Westinghouse AP600 small break loss-of-coolant accident, main steam line break, and steam generator tube rupture scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, G.E.; Fletcher, C.D.; Davis, C.B. [and others

    1997-06-01

    This report revision incorporates new experimental evidence regarding AP600 behavior during small break loss-of-coolant accidents. This report documents the results of Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) efforts for the Westinghouse AP600 reactor. The purpose of this PIRT is to identify important phenomena so that they may be addressed in both the experimental programs and the RELAP5/MOD3 systems analysis computer code. In Revision of this report, the responses of AP600 during small break loss-of-coolant accident, main steam line break, and steam generator tube rupture accident scenarios were evaluated by a committee of thermal-hydraulic experts. Committee membership included Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory staff and recognized thermal-hydraulic experts from outside of the laboratory. Each of the accident scenarios was subdivided into separate, sequential periods or phases. Within each phase, the plant behavior is controlled by, at most, a few thermal-hydraulic processes. The committee identified the phenomena influencing those processes, and ranked & influences as being of high, medium, low, or insignificant importance. The primary product of this effort is a series of tables, one for each phase of each accident scenario, describing the thermal-hydraulic phenomena judged by the committee to be important, and the relative ranking of that importance. The rationales for the phenomena selected and their rankings are provided. This document issue incorporates an update of the small break loss-of-coolant accident portion of the report. This revision is the result of the release of experimental evidence from AP600-related integral test facilities (ROSA/AP600, OSU, and SPES) and thermal-hydraulic expert review. The activities associated with this update were performed during the period from June 1995 through November 1996. 8 refs., 26 figs., 42 tabs.

  2. Effects of grit roughness and pitch oscillations on the S814 airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janiszewska, J.M.; Ramsay, R.R.; Hoffmann, M.J.; Gregorek, G.M. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Horizontal-axis wind turbine rotors experience unsteady aerodynamics when the rotor is yawed, when rotor blades pass through the support tower wake, and when the wind is gusting. An understanding of this unsteady behavior is necessary to assist in the design of new rotor airfoils. The rotors also experience performance degradation due to surface roughness. These surface irregularities are due to the accumulation of insect debris, ice, and/or the aging process. Wind tunnel studies that examine both the steady and unsteady behavior of airfoils can help define pertinent flow phenomena, and the resultant data can also be used to validate analytical computer codes. An S814 airfoil model was tested in The Ohio State University Aeronautical and Astronautical Research Laboratory (OSU/AARL) 3 X 5 subsonic wind tunnel (3 X 5) under steady flow with both stationary model conditions and pitch oscillations. To study the extent of performance loss due to surface roughness, a leading edge grit roughness pattern (LEGR) was used to simulate leading edge contamination. After baseline cases were completed, the LEGR was applied for both steady state and model pitch oscillation cases. The Reynolds numbers for steady state conditions were 0.75, 1, 1.25 and 1.5 million, while the angle of attack ranged from -20{degrees} to +40{degrees}. While the model underwent pitch oscillations, data were acquired at Reynolds numbers of 0.75, 1, 1.25, and 1.5 million, at frequencies of 0.6, 1.2, and 1.8 Hz. Two sine wave forcing functions {+-}5.5{degrees} and {+-}10{degrees}, were used; at mean angles of attack of 8{degrees}, 14{degrees}, and 20{degrees}. For purposes herein, any reference to unsteady conditions means the model was in pitch oscillation.

  3. Effects of grit roughness and pitch oscillations on the S809 airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsay, R.F.; Hoffman, M.J.; Gregorek, G.M. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1995-12-01

    An S809 airfoil model was tested in The Ohio State University Aeronautical and Astronautical Research Laboratory (OSU/AARL) 3{times}5 subsonic wind tunnel (3{times}5) under steady flow and stationary model conditions, and also with the model undergoing pitch oscillations. To study the possible extent of performance loss due to surface roughness, a standard grit pattern (LEGR) was developed to simulate leading edge contamination. After baseline cases were completed, the LEGR was applied for both steady state and model pitch oscillation cases. The Reynolds numbers for steady state conditions were 0.75, 1, 1.25, and 1.5 million, while the angle of attack ranged from {minus}20, to +40 {degrees}. With the model undergoing pitch oscillations, data were acquired at Reynolds numbers of 0.75, 1, 1.25, and 1.4 million, at frequencies of 0.6, 1.2, and 1.8 Hz. Two sine wave forcing functions were used; {plus_minus} 5.5{degrees} and {plus_minus} 10{degrees}, at mean angles of attack of 8{degrees}, 14{degrees}, and 20{degrees}. For purposes herein, any reference to unsteady conditions means the model was in pitch oscillation about the quarter chord. In general, the unsteady maximum lift coefficient was from 4% to 86% higher than the steady state maximum lift coefficient, and variation in the quarter chord pitching moment coefficient magnitude was from {minus}83% to 195% relative to steady state values at high angles of attack. These findings indicate the importance of considering the unsteady flow behavior occurring in wind turbine operation to obtain accurate load estimates.

  4. Effects of grit roughness and pitch oscillations on the LS(1)-0417MOD airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janiszewska, J.M.; Ramsay, R.R.; Hoffman, M.J.; Gregorek, G.M. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Horizontal axis wind turbine rotors experience unsteady aerodynamics due to wind shear when the rotor is yawed, when rotor blades pass through the support tower wake, and when the wind is gusting. An understanding of this unsteady behavior is necessary to assist in the calculations of rotor performance and loads. The rotors also experience performance degradation caused by surface roughness. These surface irregularities are due to the accumulation of insect debris, ice, and/or the aging process. Wind tunnel studies that examine both the steady and unsteady behavior of airfoils can help define pertinent flow phenomena, and the resultant data can be used to validate analytical computer codes. An LS(l)-0417MOD airfoil model was tested in The Ohio State University Aeronautical and Astronautical Research Laboratory (OSU/AARL) 3{times}5 subsonic wind tunnel (3{times}5) under steady flow and stationary model conditions, as well as with the model undergoing pitch oscillations. To study the possible extent of performance loss due to surface roughness, a standard grit pattern (LEGR) was used to simulate leading edge contamination. After baseline cases were completed, the LEGR was applied for both steady state and model pitch oscillation cases. The Reynolds numbers for steady state conditions were 0.75, 1, 1.25, and 1.5 million, while the angle of attack ranged from {minus}20{degrees} to +40{degrees}. With the model undergoing pitch oscillations, data were acquired at Reynolds numbers of 0.75, 1, 1.25, and 1.5 million, at frequencies of 0.6, 1.2, and 1.8 Hz. Two sine wave forcing functions were used, {plus_minus} 5.5%{degrees} and {plus_minus} 10{degrees}, at mean angles of attack of 8{degrees}, 14{degrees}, and 20{degrees}. For purposes herein, any reference to unsteady conditions foil model was in pitch oscillation about the quarter chord.

  5. Effects of grit roughness and pitch oscillations on the LS(1)-0421MOD airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reuss, R.L.; HOffman, M.J.; Gregorek, G.M. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1995-12-01

    An LS(1)-0421 MOD airfoil model was tested in The Ohio State University Aeronautical and Astronautical Research Laboratory (OSU/AARL) 3{times}5 subsonic wind tunnel (3{times}5) under steady flow and stationary model conditions, and also with the model undergoing pitch oscillations. In order to study the possible extent of performance loss due to surface roughness, a leading edge grit roughness (LEGR) pattern was developed to simulate leading edge contamination. After baseline cases were completed, the LEGR was applied for both steady state and model pitch oscillation cases. The Reynolds numbers for steady state conditions were 0.75, 1, and 1.25 million, while the angle of attack ranged from {minus}10{degrees} to +40{degrees}. With the model undergoing pitch oscillations, data was acquired at Reynolds numbers of 0.75, 1, 1.25, and 1.5 million, at frequencies of 0.6, 1.2, and 1.8 Hz. Two sine wave forcing functions were used; {plus_minus} 5.5{degrees} and {plus_minus} 10{degrees}, at mean angles of attack of 8{degrees}, 14{degrees}, and 20{degrees}. For this report, unsteady conditions refer to the model in pitch oscillation. In general, the maximum unsteady lift coefficient was from 10% to 50% higher than the steady state maximum lift coefficient. Variation in the quarter chord pitching moment coefficient was nearly two times greater than steady state values at high angles of attack. These findings indicate the importance of considering the unsteady flow behavior occurring in wind turbine operation for accurate load estimates.

  6. Effects of grit roughness and pitch oscillations on the S801 airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsay, R.R.; Hoffman, M.J.; Gregorek, G.M. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Horizontal axis wind turbine rotors experience unsteady aerodynamics due to wind shear when the rotor is yawed, when rotor blades pass through the support tower wake, and when the wind is gusting. An understanding of this unsteady behavior is necessary to assist in the calculation of rotor performance and loads. The rotors also experience performance degradation due to surface roughness. These surface irregularities are due to the accumulation of insect debris, ice, and the aging process. Wind tunnel studies that examine both the steady and unsteady behavior of airfoils can help define pertinent flow phenomena, and the resultant data can be used to validate analytical computer codes. A S801 airfoil model was tested in The Ohio State University Aeronautical and Astronautical Research Laboratory (OSU/AARL) 3x5 subsonic wind tunnel (3x5) under steady flow and stationary model conditions, as well as with the model undergoing pitch oscillations. To study the possible extent of performance loss due to surface roughness, a standard grit pattern (LEGR) was used to simulate leading edge contamination. After baseline cases were completed, the LEGR was applied for both steady state and model pitch oscillation cases. The Reynolds numbers used for steady state conditions were 0.75, 1, 1.25, and 1.5 million, while the angle of attack ranged from -20{degrees} to +40{degrees}. With the model undergoing pitch oscillations, data were acquired at Reynolds numbers of 0.75, 1, 1.25, and 1.4 million, at frequencies of 0.6, 1.2, and 1.8 Hz. Two sine wave forcing functions were used, {plus_minus} 5.5 {degrees}and {plus_minus} 10{degrees}, at mean angles of attack of 8{degrees} 14{degrees} and 20{degrees} For purposes herein, any reference to unsteady conditions means that the airfoil model was in pitch oscillation about the quarter chord.

  7. Effects of grit roughness and pitch oscillations on the S815 airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reuss Ramsay, R.; Hoffman, M.J.; Gregorek, G.M. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Horizontal axis wind turbine rotors experience unsteady aerodynamics due to wind shear when the rotor is yawed, when rotor blades pass through the support tower wake, and when the wind is gusting. An understanding of this unsteady behavior is necessary to assist in the calculation of rotor performance and loads. The rotors also experience performance degradation due to surface roughness. These surface irregularities are cause by the accumulation of insect debris, ice, and the aging process. Wind tunnel studies that examine both the steady and unsteady behavior of airfoils can help define pertinent flow phenomena, and the resultant data can be used to validate analytical computer codes. A S815 airfoil model was tested in The Ohio State University Aeronautical and Astronautical Research Laboratory (OSU/AARL) 3 x 5 subsonic wind tunnel (3 x 5) under steady flow and stationary model conditions, as well as with the model undergoing pitch oscillations. To study the possible extent of performance loss due to surface roughness, a standard grit pattern (LEGR) was used to simulate leading edge contamination. After baseline cases were completed, the LEGR was applied for both steady state and model pitch oscillation cases. The Reynolds numbers used for steady state conditions were 0.75, 1, 1.25, and 1.4 million, while the angle of attack ranged from {minus}20{degree} to +40{degree}. With the model undergoing pitch oscillations, data were acquired at Reynolds numbers of 0.75, 1, 1.25, and 1.4 million, at frequencies of 0.6, 1.2, and 1.8 Hz. Two sine wave forcing functions were used; {+-}5.5{degree} and {+-}10{degree}, at mean angles of attack of 8{degree}, 14{degree}, and 20{degree}. For purposes herein, any reference to unsteady conditions means that the model was in pitch oscillation about the quarter chord.

  8. Valuing Professional Development Components for Emerging Undergraduate Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, I.

    2015-12-01

    In 2004 the Hatfield Marine Science Center (HMSC) at Oregon State University (OSU) established a Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program to engage undergraduate students in hands-on research training in the marine sciences. The program offers students the opportunity to conduct research focused on biological and ecological topics, chemical and physical oceanography, marine geology, and atmospheric science. In partnership with state and federal government agencies, this ten-week summer program has grown to include 20+ students annually. Participants obtain a background in the academic discipline, professional development training, and research experience to make informed decisions about careers and advanced degrees in marine and earth system sciences. Professional development components of the program are designed to support students in their research experience, explore career goals and develop skills necessary to becoming a successful young marine scientist. These components generally include seminars, discussions, workshops, lab tours, and standards of conduct. These componentscontribute to achieving the following professional development objectives for the overall success of new emerging undergraduate researchers: Forming a fellowship of undergraduate students pursuing marine research Stimulating student interest and understanding of marine research science Learning about research opportunities at Oregon State University "Cross-Training" - broadening the hands-on research experience Exploring and learning about marine science careers and pathways Developing science communication and presentation skills Cultivating a sense of belonging in the sciences Exposure to federal and state agencies in marine and estuarine science Academic and career planning Retention of talented students in the marine science Standards of conduct in science Details of this program's components, objectives and best practices will be discussed.

  9. Phenomena identification and ranking tables for Westinghouse AP600 small break loss-of-coolant accident, main steam line break, and steam generator tube rupture scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, G.E.; Fletcher, C.D.; Davis, C.B.

    1997-06-01

    This report revision incorporates new experimental evidence regarding AP600 behavior during small break loss-of-coolant accidents. This report documents the results of Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) efforts for the Westinghouse AP600 reactor. The purpose of this PIRT is to identify important phenomena so that they may be addressed in both the experimental programs and the RELAP5/MOD3 systems analysis computer code. In Revision of this report, the responses of AP600 during small break loss-of-coolant accident, main steam line break, and steam generator tube rupture accident scenarios were evaluated by a committee of thermal-hydraulic experts. Committee membership included Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory staff and recognized thermal-hydraulic experts from outside of the laboratory. Each of the accident scenarios was subdivided into separate, sequential periods or phases. Within each phase, the plant behavior is controlled by, at most, a few thermal-hydraulic processes. The committee identified the phenomena influencing those processes, and ranked ampersand influences as being of high, medium, low, or insignificant importance. The primary product of this effort is a series of tables, one for each phase of each accident scenario, describing the thermal-hydraulic phenomena judged by the committee to be important, and the relative ranking of that importance. The rationales for the phenomena selected and their rankings are provided. This document issue incorporates an update of the small break loss-of-coolant accident portion of the report. This revision is the result of the release of experimental evidence from AP600-related integral test facilities (ROSA/AP600, OSU, and SPES) and thermal-hydraulic expert review. The activities associated with this update were performed during the period from June 1995 through November 1996. 8 refs., 26 figs., 42 tabs

  10. Advances in Disaster Modeling, Simulation and Visualization for Sandstorm Risk Management in North China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang Lei

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Dust storms in North China result in high concentrations of airborne dust particles, which cause detrimental effects on human health as well as social and economic losses and environmental degradation. To investigate the impact of land surface processes on dust storms, we simulate two dust storm events in North China during spring 2002 using two versions of a dust storm prediction system developed by the Institute for Atmospheric Physics (IAP in Beijing, China. The primary difference between the IAP Sandstorm Prediction System (IAPS 1.0 and more recent version (IAPS 2.0 is the land surface modeling. IAPS 1.0 is based on the Oregon State University (OSU land surface model, whereas the latest version of the dust storm prediction (IAPS 2.0 uses NOAH land surface schemes for land surface modeling within a meteorological model, MM5. This work investigates whether the improved land surface modeling affects modeling of sandstorms. It is shown that an integrated sandstorm management system can be used to aid the following tasks: ensure sandstorm monitoring and warning; incorporate weather forecasts; ascertain the risk of a sandstorm disaster; integrate multiple technologies (for example, GIS, remote sensing, and information processing technology; track the progress of the storm in real-time; exhibit flexibility, accuracy and reliability (by using multiple sources of data, including in-situ meteorological observations; and monitor PM10 and PM2.5 dust concentrations in airborne dustfalls. The results indicate that with the new land surface scheme, the simulation of soil moisture is greatly improved, leading to a better estimate of the threshold frictional velocity, a key parameter for the estimating surface dust emissions. In this study, we also discuss specific mechanisms by which land surface processes affect dust storm modeling and make recommendations for further improvements to numerical dust storm simulations.

  11. High speed motion neutron radiography of two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, A.H.; Wang, S.L.

    1983-01-01

    Current research in the area of two-phase flow utilizes a wide variety of sensing devices, but some limitations exist on the information which can be obtained. Neutron radiography is a feasible alternative to ''see'' the two-phase flow. A system to perform neutron radiographic analysis of dynamic events which occur on the order of several milliseconds has been developed at Oregon State University. Two different methods have been used to radiograph the simulated two-phase flow. These are pulsed, or ''flash'' radiography, and high speed movie neutron radiography. The pulsed method serves as a ''snap-shot'' with an exposure time ranging from 10 to 20 milliseconds. In high speed movie radiography, a scintillator is used to convert neutrons into light which is enhanced by an optical intensifier and then photographed by a high speed camera. Both types of radiography utilize the pulsing capability of the OSU TRIGA reactor. The principle difficulty with this type of neutron radiography is the fogging of the image due to the large amount of scattering in the water. This difficulty can be overcome by using thin regions for the two-phase flow or using heavy water instead of light water. The results obtained in this paper demonstrate the feasibility of using neutron radiography to obtain data in two-phase flow situations. Both movies and flash radiographs have been obtained of air bubbles in water and boiling from a heater element. The neutron radiographs of the boiling element show both nucleate boiling and film boiling. (Auth.)

  12. The Rickettsia Endosymbiont of Ixodes pacificus Contains All the Genes of De Novo Folate Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnar, James; Mortazavi, Bobak; Laurent, Timothy; Deason, Jeff; Thephavongsa, Khanhkeo; Zhong, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Ticks and other arthropods often are hosts to nutrient providing bacterial endosymbionts, which contribute to their host’s fitness by supplying nutrients such as vitamins and amino acids. It has been detected, in our lab, that Ixodes pacificus is host to Rickettsia species phylotype G021. This endosymbiont is predominantly present, and 100% maternally transmitted in I. pacificus. To study roles of phylotype G021 in I. pacificus, bioinformatic and molecular approaches were carried out. MUMmer genome alignments of whole genome sequence of I. scapularis, a close relative to I. pacificus, against completely sequenced genomes of R. bellii OSU85-389, R. conorii, and R. felis, identified 8,190 unique sequences that are homologous to Rickettsia sequences in the NCBI Trace Archive. MetaCyc metabolic reconstructions revealed that all folate gene orthologues (folA, folC, folE, folKP, ptpS) required for de novo folate biosynthesis are present in the genome of Rickettsia buchneri in I. scapularis. To examine the metabolic capability of phylotype G021 in I. pacificus, genes of the folate biosynthesis pathway of the bacterium were PCR amplified using degenerate primers. BLAST searches identified that nucleotide sequences of the folA, folC, folE, folKP, and ptpS genes possess 98.6%, 98.8%, 98.9%, 98.5% and 99.0% identity respectively to the corresponding genes of Rickettsia buchneri. Phylogenetic tree constructions show that the folate genes of phylotype G021 and homologous genes from various Rickettsia species are monophyletic. This study has shown that all folate genes exist in the genome of Rickettsia species phylotype G021 and that this bacterium has the genetic capability for de novo folate synthesis. PMID:26650541

  13. An online photographic catalog of primary types of Platygastroidea (Hymenoptera in the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elijah J. Talamas

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A photographic catalog of primary types of Platygastroidea housed in the National Insect Collection, National Museum of Natural History, is here made available online at the image database at The Ohio State University (specimage.osu.edu. Following examination of this collection we enact the following taxonomic changes: Leptacis piniella MacGown syn. n. is treated as a junior synonym of Leptacis pinicola MacGown; Sacespalus indicus Mani is transferred to Platygaster Latreille; Platygaster indica Mukerjee is given the replacement name Platygaster chaos Talamas, n. n.; Synopeas rugiceps (Ashmead, comb. n. is transferred from Leptacis Förster; Axea atriclava (Kieffer, comb. n. is transferred from Psilanteris Kieffer; Chakra pachmarhica (Sharma, comb. n. is transferred from Paridris Kieffer; Paridris dubeyi Sharma, syn. n. is treated as a junior synonym of Chakra pachmarhica; Holoteleia indica (Mani is transferred to Opisthacantha Ashmead and given a replacement name, Opisthacantha nomados Talamas, n. n.; Psilanteris nigriclavata (Ashmead, comb. n. is transferred from Anteris Förster; Probaryconus grenadensis (Ashmead, comb. n. is transferred from Monoteleia Kieffer; Monoteleia syn.n. is treated as a junior synonym of Probaryconus Kieffer; Paridris karnatakensis Sharma, syn. n is treated as a junior synonym of Probaryconus cauverycus Saraswat; Probaryconus punctatus (Ashmead, comb. n. is transferred from Oxyteleia Kieffer; Triteleia bengalensis (Saraswat, comb. n. is transferred from Alloteleia Kieffer; Trimorus varius Fouts, syn. n. and Trimorus pulchricornis Fouts, syn. n. are treated as junior synonyms of Trimorus annulicornis (Ashmead; Neotypes are designated for Gryon leptocorisae (Howard, Idris seminiger (Ashmead, Telenomus graptae Howard, Telenomus persimilis Ashmead, and Telenomus rileyi Howard; lectotypes are designated for Cremastobaeus bicolor Ashmead, Oethecoctonus insularis (Ashmead, Oethecoctonus laticinctus (Ashmead and Probaryconus

  14. CORE: a phylogenetically-curated 16S rDNA database of the core oral microbiome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann L Griffen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Comparing bacterial 16S rDNA sequences to GenBank and other large public databases via BLAST often provides results of little use for identification and taxonomic assignment of the organisms of interest. The human microbiome, and in particular the oral microbiome, includes many taxa, and accurate identification of sequence data is essential for studies of these communities. For this purpose, a phylogenetically curated 16S rDNA database of the core oral microbiome, CORE, was developed. The goal was to include a comprehensive and minimally redundant representation of the bacteria that regularly reside in the human oral cavity with computationally robust classification at the level of species and genus. Clades of cultivated and uncultivated taxa were formed based on sequence analyses using multiple criteria, including maximum-likelihood-based topology and bootstrap support, genetic distance, and previous naming. A number of classification inconsistencies for previously named species, especially at the level of genus, were resolved. The performance of the CORE database for identifying clinical sequences was compared to that of three publicly available databases, GenBank nr/nt, RDP and HOMD, using a set of sequencing reads that had not been used in creation of the database. CORE offered improved performance compared to other public databases for identification of human oral bacterial 16S sequences by a number of criteria. In addition, the CORE database and phylogenetic tree provide a framework for measures of community divergence, and the focused size of the database offers advantages of efficiency for BLAST searching of large datasets. The CORE database is available as a searchable interface and for download at http://microbiome.osu.edu.

  15. Is it working? A look at the changing nutrient practices in Oregon's Southern Willamette Valley Groundwater Management Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlstein, S.; Compton, J.; Eldridge, A.; Henning, A.; Selker, J. S.; Brooks, J. R.; Schmitz, D.

    2016-12-01

    Groundwater nitrate contamination affects thousands of households in the southern Willamette Valley and many more across the Pacific Northwest. The southern Willamette Valley Groundwater Management Area (SWV GWMA) was established in 2004 due to nitrate levels in the groundwater exceeding the human health standard of 10 mg nitrate-N L-1. Much of the nitrogen inputs to the GWMA comes from agricultural nitrogen use, and thus efforts to reduce N inputs to groundwater are focused upon improving N management. Previous work in the 1990s in the Willamette Valley by researchers at Oregon State University determined the importance of cover crops and irrigation practices and made recommendations to the local farm community for reducing nitrogen (N) leaching. We are currently re-sampling many of the same fields studied by OSU to examine the influence of current crops and nutrient management practices on nitrate leaching below the rooting zone. This study represents important crops currently grown in the GWMA and includes four grass fields, three vegetable row-crop fields, two peppermint and wheat fields, and one each of hazelnuts and blueberries. New nutrient management practices include slow release fertilizers and precision agriculture approaches in some of the fields. Results from the first two years of sampling show nitrate leaching is lower in some crops like row crops grown for seed and higher in others like perennial rye grass seed when compared to the 1990s data. We will use field-level N input-output balances in order to determine the N use efficiency and compare this across crops and over time. The goal of this project is to provide information and tools that will help farmers, managers and conservation groups quantify the water quality benefits of management practices they are conducting or funding.

  16. Tematy, których nie da się uśpić. Z Jerzym Jedlickim rozmawia Anna Zawadzka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Zawadzka

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available On subjects that cannot be put to sleep. Anna Zawadzka in an interview with Jerzy Jedlicki The conversation with Jerzy Jedlicki is a part of series of interviews starting with the question about the subjects, that the interlocutors during his or her academical career were advised (by different persons and for different reasons not to pursue. Jedlicki mentions about three such issues: Poles and Jews during II World War period, Israel and Palestine, atheism and faith. He points out that nobody discouraged him from pursuing these subjects – it was himself, who refrained from being vocal on these matters. He clarifies why he used to censor himself, analyses how all the subjects work today in Polish public sphere and explains why he broke the silence several times.   Tematy, których nie da się uśpić. Z Jerzym Jedlickim rozmawia Anna Zawadzka Rozmowa z Jerzym Jedlickim przynależy do cyklu wywiadów, które rozpoczynają się pytaniem o tematy, które w toku kariery naukowej były rozmówcy z różnych przyczyn i przez różne osoby odradzane. Jedlicki wymienia trzy takie kwestie: Polacy i Żydzi w okresie okupacji, Izrael i Palestyna oraz ateizm i wiara. Zaznacza, że nikt mu nie odradzał ich podejmowania, a jedynie on sam powstrzymywał się przed zabieraniem publicznie głosu w tych sprawach. Wyjaśnia dlaczego się autocenzurował, analizuje, w jaki sposób wszystkie te trzy tematy funkcjonują dziś w polskiej sferze publicznej oraz tłumaczy, dlaczego kilkakrotnie przerwał jednak milczenie.

  17. Compact Heat Exchanger Design and Testing for Advanced Reactors and Advanced Power Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xiaodong; Zhang, Xiaoqin; Christensen, Richard; Anderson, Mark

    2018-03-31

    The goal of the proposed research is to demonstrate the thermal hydraulic performance of innovative surface geometries in compact heat exchangers used as intermediate heat exchangers (IHXs) and recuperators for the supercritical carbon dioxide (s-CO2) Brayton cycle. Printed-circuit heat exchangers (PCHEs) are the primary compact heat exchangers of interest. The overall objectives are: 1. To develop optimized PCHE designs for different working fluid combinations including helium to s-CO2, liquid salt to s-CO2, sodium to s-CO2, and liquid salt to helium; 2. To experimentally and numerically investigate thermal performance, thermal stress and failure mechanism of PCHEs under various transients; and 3. To study diffusion bonding techniques for elevated-temperature alloys and examine post-test material integrity of the PCHEs. The project objectives were accomplished by defining and executing five different tasks corresponding to these specific objectives. The first task involved a thorough literature review and a selection of IHX candidates with different surface geometries as well as a summary of prototypic operational conditions. The second task involved optimization of PCHE design with numerical analyses of thermal-hydraulic performances and mechanical integrity. The subsequent task dealt with the development of testing facilities and engineering design of PCHE to be tested in s-CO2 fluid conditions. The next task involved experimental investigation and validation of the thermal-hydraulic performances and thermal stress distribution of prototype PCHEs manufactured with particular surface geometries. The last task involved an investigation of diffusion bonding process and posttest destructive testing to validate mechanical design methods adopted in the design process. The experimental work utilized the two test facilities at The Ohio State University (OSU) including one existing High-Temperature Helium Test Facility (HTHF) and the newly developed s-CO2 test loop (STL

  18. A mild pulsed electric field condition that improves acid tolerance, growth, and protease activity of Lactobacillus acidophilus LA-K and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subspecies bulgaricus LB-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najim, N; Aryana, Kayanush J

    2013-06-01

    Pulsed electric field (PEF) processing involves the application of pulses of voltage for less than 1 s to fluid products placed between 2 electrodes. The effect of mild PEF on beneficial characteristics of probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus is not clearly understood. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of mild PEF conditions on acid tolerance, growth, and protease activity of Lb. acidophilus LA-K and Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus LB-12. A pilot plant PEF system (OSU-4M; The Ohio State University, Columbus) was used. The PEF treatments were positive square unipolar pulse width of 3 µs, pulse period of 0.5s, electric field strength of 1 kV/cm, delay time of 20 µs, flow rate of 60 mL/min, and 40.5°C PEF treatment temperature. Both Lb. acidophilus LA-K and Lb. bulgaricus LB-12 subjected to mild PEF conditions were acid tolerant until the end of the 120 min of incubation, unlike the Lb. bulgaricus control, which was not acid tolerant after 30 min. The mild PEF-treated Lb. acidophilus LA-K and Lb. bulgaricus LB-12 reached the logarithmic phase of growth an hour earlier than the control. Mild PEF conditions studied significantly improved acid tolerance, exponential growth, and protease activity of both Lb. acidophilus LA-K and Lb. bulgaricus LB-12 compared with the control. The mild PEF conditions studied can be recommended for pretreating cultures to enhance these desirable attributes. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's) present in sampled cooked food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palm Naa-Dedei, L.M.

    2010-07-01

    The study was conducted to determine the levels of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in the following traditionally prepared food: smoked and grilled Scomba japonicus, grilled meat (khebab) and bread sampled from some Ghanaian markets. By way of preparation of traditional food, some food comes into direct contact with smoke or extremely high temperature which are potential sources of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon generation. Levels of 20 individual Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons including acenaphthene, acenaphtyelene, anthanthrene, anthracene, benz(a)anthracene, benzo(a)pyrene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, benzo(e)pyrene, benzo(ghi)perylene, benzo(j)fluoranthene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, chrysene, cyclopenta(cd)pyrene, dibenzo(ah)anthracene, fluoranthene, fluorene, indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene, naphthalene, phenanthrene and pyrene were determined in 11 smoked and 5 grilled fish, 4 grilled pieces of meat and 3 loaves of baked bread using gas chromatographic techniques with flame ionization detector. Benzo(a)pyrene, which is one of the few PAH for which a legal limit exists in different types of food matrices and other high molecular weight PAHs suspected to be carcinogenic have been detected in high concentrations in most samples. Bread samples gave mean polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations of up to 20.39 μg/kg while khebab samples gave mean polycyclicaromatic hydrocarbon concentrations of up to 67.61 μg/kg. There was positive correlation of 0.987 between levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in khebab samples from locations Osu and Atomic down. There was a positive correlation in the concentrations of the high molecular weight PAHs in all smoked fishes from four locations with values between 0.954 and 0.999 for the correlation between any two groups. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentration determined in smoked fish samples deceased in terms of location according to the order Winneba > Madina > Chorkor > Ada.

  20. A spare-parts inventory program for TRIGA reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, T.V.; Ringle, J.C.; Johnson, A.G.

    1974-01-01

    As is fairly common with new reactor facilities, we had a few spare parts on hand as part of our original purchase when the OSU TRIGA first went critical in March of 1967. Within a year or so, however, it became apparent that we should critically examine our spare parts inventory in order to avoid unnecessary or prolonged outages due to lack of a crucial piece of equipment. Many critical components (those which must be present and operable according to our license or technical specifications) were considered, and a priority list of acquiring these was established. This first list was drawn up in March, 1969, two years after initial criticality, and some key components were ordered. The availability of funds was the overriding restriction then and now. This spare-parts list is reviewed and new components purchased annually; the average amount spent has been about $2,000 per year. This inventory has proved invaluable more than once; without it, we would have had lengthy shutdowns awaiting the arrival of the needed component. The sobering thought, however, is that our spare-parts inventory is still not complete-far from it, in fact, because this would be prohibitively expensive. It is very difficult to guess with 100% accuracy just which component might need replacing, and your $10,000 inventory of spare parts is useless in that instance if it doesn't include the needed part. An idea worth considering is to either (a) encourage General Atomic, through the collective voice of all TRIGA owners, to maintain a rather complete inventory of replacement parts, or (b) maintain an owner's spare-parts pool, financed by contributions from all the facilities. If either of these pools was established, the needed part could reach any facility within the U.S. within a few days, minimizing reactor outage time. (author)

  1. High Purity Hydrogen Production with In-Situ Carbon Dioxide and Sulfur Capture in a Single Stage Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nihar Phalak; Shwetha Ramkumar; Daniel Connell; Zhenchao Sun; Fu-Chen Yu; Niranjani Deshpande; Robert Statnick; Liang-Shih Fan

    2011-07-31

    Enhancement in the production of high purity hydrogen (H{sub 2}) from fuel gas, obtained from coal gasification, is limited by thermodynamics of the water gas shift (WGS) reaction. However, this constraint can be overcome by conducting the WGS in the presence of a CO{sub 2}-acceptor. The continuous removal of CO{sub 2} from the reaction mixture helps to drive the equilibrium-limited WGS reaction forward. Since calcium oxide (CaO) exhibits high CO{sub 2} capture capacity as compared to other sorbents, it is an ideal candidate for such a technique. The Calcium Looping Process (CLP) developed at The Ohio State University (OSU) utilizes the above concept to enable high purity H{sub 2} production from synthesis gas (syngas) derived from coal gasification. The CLP integrates the WGS reaction with insitu CO{sub 2}, sulfur and halide removal at high temperatures while eliminating the need for a WGS catalyst, thus reducing the overall footprint of the hydrogen production process. The CLP comprises three reactors - the carbonator, where the thermodynamic constraint of the WGS reaction is overcome by the constant removal of CO{sub 2} product and high purity H{sub 2} is produced with contaminant removal; the calciner, where the calcium sorbent is regenerated and a sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} stream is produced; and the hydrator, where the calcined sorbent is reactivated to improve its recyclability. As a part of this project, the CLP was extensively investigated by performing experiments at lab-, bench- and subpilot-scale setups. A comprehensive techno-economic analysis was also conducted to determine the feasibility of the CLP at commercial scale. This report provides a detailed account of all the results obtained during the project period.

  2. Coal and Open-pit surface mining impacts on American Lands (COAL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, T. A.; McGibbney, L. J.

    2017-12-01

    Mining is known to cause environmental degradation, but software tools to identify its impacts are lacking. However, remote sensing, spectral reflectance, and geographic data are readily available, and high-performance cloud computing resources exist for scientific research. Coal and Open-pit surface mining impacts on American Lands (COAL) provides a suite of algorithms and documentation to leverage these data and resources to identify evidence of mining and correlate it with environmental impacts over time.COAL was originally developed as a 2016 - 2017 senior capstone collaboration between scientists at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and computer science students at Oregon State University (OSU). The COAL team implemented a free and open-source software library called "pycoal" in the Python programming language which facilitated a case study of the effects of coal mining on water resources. Evidence of acid mine drainage associated with an open-pit coal mine in New Mexico was derived by correlating imaging spectrometer data from the JPL Airborne Visible/InfraRed Imaging Spectrometer - Next Generation (AVIRIS-NG), spectral reflectance data published by the USGS Spectroscopy Laboratory in the USGS Digital Spectral Library 06, and GIS hydrography data published by the USGS National Geospatial Program in The National Map. This case study indicated that the spectral and geospatial algorithms developed by COAL can be used successfully to analyze the environmental impacts of mining activities.Continued development of COAL has been promoted by a Startup allocation award of high-performance computing resources from the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE). These resources allow the team to undertake further benchmarking, evaluation, and experimentation using multiple XSEDE resources. The opportunity to use computational infrastructure of this caliber will further enable the development of a science gateway to continue foundational COAL

  3. Analysis of essential Arabidopsis nuclear genes encoding plastid-targeted proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda J Savage

    Full Text Available The Chloroplast 2010 Project (http://www.plastid.msu.edu/ identified and phenotypically characterized homozygous mutants in over three thousand genes, the majority of which encode plastid-targeted proteins. Despite extensive screening by the community, no homozygous mutant alleles were available for several hundred genes, suggesting that these might be enriched for genes of essential function. Attempts were made to generate homozygotes in ~1200 of these lines and 521 of the homozygous viable lines obtained were deposited in the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center (http://abrc.osu.edu/. Lines that did not yield a homozygote in soil were tested as potentially homozygous lethal due to defects either in seed or seedling development. Mutants were characterized at four stages of development: developing seed, mature seed, at germination, and developing seedlings. To distinguish seed development or seed pigment-defective mutants from seedling development mutants, development of seeds was assayed in siliques from heterozygous plants. Segregating seeds from heterozygous parents were sown on supplemented media in an attempt to rescue homozygous seedlings that could not germinate or survive in soil. Growth of segregating seeds in air and air enriched to 0.3% carbon dioxide was compared to discover mutants potentially impaired in photorespiration or otherwise responsive to CO2 supplementation. Chlorophyll fluorescence measurements identified CO2-responsive mutants with altered photosynthetic parameters. Examples of genes with a viable mutant allele and one or more putative homozygous-lethal alleles were documented. RT-PCR of homozygotes for potentially weak alleles revealed that essential genes may remain undiscovered because of the lack of a true null mutant allele. This work revealed 33 genes with two or more lethal alleles and 73 genes whose essentiality was not confirmed with an independent lethal mutation, although in some cases second leaky alleles

  4. Advanced Concept Exploration for Fast Ignition Science Program, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, Richard Burnite [General Atomics; McLean, Harry M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Theobald, Wolfgang [Laboratory for Laser Energetics; Akli, Kramer U. [The Ohio State University; Beg, Farhat N. [University of California, San Diego; Sentoku, Yasuhiko [University of Nevada, Reno; Schumacher, Douglass W. [The Ohio State University; Wei, Mingsheng [General Atomics

    2013-09-04

    target as well as large and erratic spread of the electron beam with increasing short pulse duration. We have demonstrated, using newly available higher contrast lasers, an improved energy coupling, painting a promising picture for FI feasibility. • Our detailed experiments and analyses of fast electron transport dependence on target material have shown that it is feasible to collimate fast electron beam by self-generated resistive magnetic fields in engineered targets with a rather simple geometry. Stable and collimated electron beam with spot size as small as 50-μm after >100-μm propagation distance (an angular divergence angle of 20°!) in solid density plasma targets has been demonstrated with FI-relevant (10-ps, >1-kJ) laser pulses Such collimated beam would meet the required heating beam size for FI. • Our new experimental platforms developed for the OMEGA laser (i.e., i) high resolution 8 keV backlighter platform for cone-in-shell implosion and ii) the 8 keV imaging with Cu-doped shell targets for detailed transport characterization) have enabled us to experimentally confirm fuel assembly from cone-in-shell implosion with record-high areal density. We have also made the first direct measurement of fast electron transport and spatial energy deposition in integrated FI experiments enabling the first experiment-based benchmarking of integrated simulation codes. Executing this program required a large team. It was managed as a collaboration between General Atomics (GA), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). GA fulfills its responsibilities jointly with the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), The Ohio State University (OSU) and the University of Nevada at Reno (UNR). The division of responsibility was as follows: (1) LLE had primary leadership for channeling studies and the integrated energy transfer, (2) LLNL led the development of measurement methods, analysis, and deployment of diagnostics, and (3

  5. Book reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redactie KITLV

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Peter Borschberg (ed., Iberians in the Singapore-Melaka area and adjacent regions (16th to 18th century (Syed Muhd Khairudin Aljunied Katharine L. Wiegele, Investing in miracles; El Shaddai and the transformation of popular Catholicism in the Philippines (Greg Bankoff Jean Gelman Taylor, Indonesia; Peoples and histories (Peter Boomgaard Clive Moore, New Guinea; Crossing boundaries and history (Harold Brookfield Nathan Porath, When the bird flies; Shamanic therapy and the maintenance of worldly boundaries among an indigenous people of Riau (Sumatra (Cynthia Chou and Martin Platt Paul van der Grijp, Identity and development; Tongan culture, agriculture, and the perenniality of the gift (H.J.M. Claessen Tim Bunnell, Malaysia, modernity and the multimedia super corridor; A critical geography of intelligent landscapes (Ben Derudder L. Fontijne, Guardians of the land in Kelimado; Louis Fontijne’s study of a colonial district in eastern Indonesia (Maribeth Erb Karl-Heinz Golzio, Geschichte Kambodschas; Das Land der Khmer von Angkor bis zur Gegenwart (Volker Grabowsky Emmanuel Poisson, Mandarins et subalternes au nord du Viêt Nam; Une bureaucracie à l’épreuve (1820-1918 (Martin Grossheim Generale Missiven van Gouverneurs-Generaal en Raden aan Heren XVII der Verenigde Oostindische Compagnie, Volume 10, 1737-1743 (Gerrit Knaap Aris Ananta and Evi Nurvidya Arifin (eds, International migration in Southeast Asia (Santo Koesoebjono Vladimir Braginsky, The comparative study of traditional Asian literatures; From reflective traditionalism to neo-traditionalism (G.L. Koster Fiona Kerlogue (ed., Performing objects; Museums, material culture and performance in Southeast Asia (Jennifer Lindsay Th.C. van der Meij, Puspakrema; A Javanese romance from Lombok (Julian Millie Robyn Maxwell, Sari to sarong; Five hundred years of Indian and Indonesian textile exchange -- Jasleen Dhamija, Woven magic; The affinity between

  6. Einstein's idealism and a new kind of space research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, M. A.

    In 1935, Albert Einstein, Boris Podolsky and Nathan Rosen made an attempt to imagine quantum experimental nonsense or some impossible experiment (EPR-experiment) in order to justify their local realism in physics. However, in the mid-1960s, John Bell showed that it is possible to realize this kind of nonsense in laboratory. Today, when EPR-refutation of local realism is routine in modern experimental physics (Clauser and Freedman [1972]; Aspect, Dalibard and Roger [1982]; Zeilinger et al. [1998]), we must; nevertheless, remark that Albert Einstein was not always a realist. As is known, in his Special Relativitz A. Einstein introduced some pure idealistic principle which K. Godel developed in famous "Remark about the relationship between Relativity theorz and Idealistic Philosophy" (1949). Kurt Godel for the first time showed an existence of special-relativistic solipsism, assuming that objective simultaneity in experimental science "loses its objective meaning". Correspondingly, there is only subjective simultaneity, that is provable by calculations with the finite velocity of light and astronomical observations. In particular, this space solipsism means that when we observe the sun, we can see only what happend on Sun 8.33 minutes ago; in other words, we percieve only certain sensations or a certain collections of ideas of the past, but not the present. Similarly, when astronomers observe galaxies estimated to be two billion light years from the Earth, they see these galaxies as they were two billion light years ago not as they are Now. Thus, in accordance with this, we may await that in this context for some pairs of astronomical objects we cannot prove they exist NOW. Moreover, this new kind of space research could be connected with introduction of the Cognitive Dark Matter, or, what is associated with manifold of the large-scale events of the Universe as a whole which are realizing Now, beyond consciousness of the observers-humans. Because we cannot know

  7. Family cohesion, acculturation, maternal cortisol, and preterm birth in Mexican-American women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiz RJ

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available R Jeanne Ruiz,1 Rita H Pickler,2 C Nathan Marti,3 Nancy Jallo41College of Nursing, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA; 2Department of Patient Services, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA; 3Abacist Analytics, Austin, TX, USA; 4School of Nursing, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USAObjective: To examine the potential moderating effects of family cohesion and acculturation on the physiological stress response (cortisol as a predictor of preterm birth (PTB in pregnant Mexican-American women.Methods: The sample included 470 participants; 33 had preterm births. All participants were self-identified as Mexican-American. In this cross-sectional study, family cohesion was measured by a self-report questionnaire. Acculturation was measured by self-report questionnaire as well as by years in the United States and country of birth. Stress was measured by serum cortisol. All measures were obtained at 22—24 weeks gestation. Additional data including history of PTB were obtained from the health record. Data analysis was primarily conducted using logistic regression.Results: The relationship between stress and PTB was predicted by family cohesion (estimate/standard error [E/SE] = —2.46, P = 0.014 and acculturation (E/SE = 2.56, P = 0.011. In addition, there was an interaction between family cohesion and history of previous PTB (E/SE = —2.12, P = 0.035.Conclusion: Results indicate that the impact of cortisol on PTB is predicted by acculturation and family cohesion such that higher levels of cortisol in conjunction with higher levels of acculturation and lower levels of family cohesion are associated with increased risk of PTB. In addition, low family cohesion in combination with a history of PTB was associated with higher levels of PTB. Assessment of family cohesion, including problem solving, adherence to family decisions, family shared space, and activity, should be included as part of prenatal

  8. Entropy, pricing and productivity of pumped-storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakatsanis, Georgios; Tyralis, Hristos; Tzouka, Katerina

    2016-04-01

    , Vienna, Austria, April 27 - May 2 2014, "The Face of the Earth - Process and Form", European Geophysical Union General Assembly 2. Paine, Nathan et al. (2014), Why market rules matter: Optimizing pumped hydroelectric storage when compensation rules differ, Energy Economics 46, 10-19

  9. Comparative studies of vertebrate scavenger receptor class B type 1: a high-density lipoprotein binding protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holmes RS

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Roger S Holmes,1,2 Laura A Cox11Department of Genetics and Southwest National Primate Research Center, Texas Biomedical Research Institute, San Antonio, TX, USA; 2School of Biomolecular and Physical Sciences, Griffith University, Nathan, Queensland, AustraliaAbstract: Scavenger receptor class B type 1 protein (SCARB1 plays an essential role in cholesterol homeostasis and functions in binding high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL in liver and other tissues of the body. SCARB1 also functions in lymphocyte homeostasis and in the uptake of hepatitis C virus (HCV by the liver. A genetic deficiency of this protein results in autoimmune disorders and significant changes in blood cholesterol phenotype. Comparative SCARB1 amino acid sequences and structures and SCARB1 gene locations were examined using data from several vertebrate genome projects. Vertebrate SCARB1 sequences shared 50%–99% identity as compared with 28%–31% sequence identities with other CD36-like superfamily members, ie, SCARB2 and SCARB3 (also called CD36. At least eight N-glycosylation sites were conserved among most of the vertebrate SCARB1 proteins examined. Sequence alignments, key amino acid residues, and conserved predicted secondary structures were also studied, including: cytoplasmic, transmembrane, and exoplasmic sequences; conserved N-terminal and C-terminal transmembrane glycines which participate in oligomer formation; conserved cystine disulfides and a free SH residue which participates in lipid transport; carboxyl terminal PDZ-binding domain sequences (Ala507-Arg/Lys508-Leu509; and 30 conserved proline and 18 conserved glycine residues, which may contribute to short loop formation within the exoplasmic HDL-binding sequence. Vertebrate SCARB1 genes usually contained 12 coding exons. The human SCARB1 gene contained CpG islands, micro RNA binding sites, and several transcription factor binding sites (including PPARG which may contribute to the high level (13.7 times

  10. Book Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redactie KITLV

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Christoph Antons (ed.; Law and development in East and South-East Asia (Adriaan Bedner David B. Dewitt, Carolina G. Hernandez (eds; Development and security in Southeast Asia (vol. 1 & 2 (Freek Colombijn Lily Kong, Brenda S.A. Yeoh; The politics of landscape in Singapore; Constructions of ‘nation’ (Ben Derudder Andrew Hardy; Red hills; Migrants and the state in the highlands of Vietnam (Hans Hägerdal Hanneman Samuel, Henk Schulte Nordholt (eds; Indonesia in transition; Rethinking ‘civil society’, ‘region’, and ‘crisis’ (david Henley S. Margana; Pujangga Jawa dan bayang-bayang kolonial (Mason Hoadley Karel E.M. Bongenaar; De ontwikkeling van het zelfbesturend landschap in Nederlandsch-Indie: 1855-1942 (Gerry van Klinken Pamela J. Stewart, Andrew Strathern; Humors and substances; Ideas of the body in New Guinea (Michael Lieber Wu Xiao An; Chinese business in the making of a Malay state, 1882-1941 (Loh Wei Leng Mikihiro Moriyama; Sundanese print culture and modernity in 19th-century West Java (Julian Millie Yunita T. Winarto; Seeds of knowledge; The beginning of integrated pest management in Java (Simon Platten Jelle Miedema, Ger Reesink; One head, many faces; New perspectives on the Bird’s Head Peninsula of New Guinea (Anton Ploeg Christopher R. Duncan (ed.; Civilizing the margins; Southeast Asian government policies for the development of minorities (Nathan Porath Rosario Mendoza Cortes, Celestina Puyal Boncan, Ricardo Trota Jose; The Filipino saga; History as social change (Portia L. Reyes Stephen Dobbs; The Singapore River; A social history, 1819-2002 (Victor R. Savage Michael Wood; Official history in modern Indonesia; New Order perceptions and counterviews (Henk Schulte Nordholt Claudio O. Delang (ed.; Living at the edge of Thai society; The Karen in the highlands of northern Thailand (Nicholas Tapp Andrew C. Willford, Kenneth M. George (eds; Spirited politics: Religion

  11. Optimal energy for cell radiosensitivity enhancement by gold nanoparticles using synchrotron-based monoenergetic photon beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman WN

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Wan Nordiana Rahman,1,2 Stéphanie Corde,3,4 Naoto Yagi,5 Siti Aishah Abdul Aziz,1 Nathan Annabell,2 Moshi Geso21School of Health Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kelantan, Malaysia; 2Division of Medical Radiation, School of Medical Sciences, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Bundoora, VIC, 3Radiation Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, High Street, Randwick, 4Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, Australia; 5Japanese Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Sayo-gun, Hyogo, JapanAbstract: Gold nanoparticles have been shown to enhance radiation doses delivered to biological targets due to the high absorption coefficient of gold atoms, stemming from their high atomic number (Z and physical density. These properties significantly increase the likelihood of photoelectric effects and Compton scattering interactions. Gold nanoparticles are a novel radiosensitizing agent that can potentially be used to increase the effectiveness of current radiation therapy techniques and improve the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. However, the optimum radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles is strongly dependent on photon energy, which theoretically is predicted to occur in the kilovoltage range of energy. In this research, synchrotron-generated monoenergetic X-rays in the 30–100 keV range were used to investigate the energy dependence of radiosensitization by gold nanoparticles and also to determine the photon energy that produces optimum effects. This investigation was conducted using cells in culture to measure dose enhancement. Bovine aortic endothelial cells with and without gold nanoparticles were irradiated with X-rays at energies of 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 81, and 100 keV. Trypan blue exclusion assays were performed after irradiation to determine cell viability. Cell radiosensitivity enhancement was indicated by the dose enhancement factor which was found to be maximum at 40 keV with a value of 3

  12. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  13. Comparisons of Unconsolidated Sediments Analyzed by APXS (MSL-Curiosity) within Gale Crater, Mars: Soils, Sands of the Barchan and Linear Dunes of the Active Bagnold Dune Field, and Ripple-field Sands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, L. M.; O'Connell-Cooper, C.; Spray, J. G.; Gellert, R.; Boyd, N. I.; Desouza, E.

    2017-12-01

    The MSL-APXS has analyzed a variety of unconsolidated sediments within the Gale impact crater, including soils, sands from barchan [High, Namib dunes], and linear dunes [Nathan Bridges, Mount Desert dunes], within the active Bagnold dune field, and sands from two smaller ripple fields ("mega-ripples"). The Gale "soils" (unsorted, unconsolidated sediments, ranging from fine-grained particles (including dust) to coarser "pebbly" material [>2 mm]), are, to a large degree, similar to Martian basaltic soils quantified by APXS, at Gusev crater (MER-A_Spirit) and Meridiani Planum (MER-B_Opportunity). Some local contributions are indicated by, for example, the enriched K levels (relative to a martian average basaltic soil [ABS]) within coarser Gale soil samples, and a Cr, Mn, Fe enrichment within finer-grained samples. Sands (grain size 62 µm to 2 mm) of the Bagnold dunes, generally, exhibit elevated Mg and Ni, indicating enrichment from olivine and pyroxene, but depleted S, Cl and Zn, indicating high activity levels and low dust. Compositional differences, related both to position within a dune (i.e., crest versus off-crest sand), and type of dune (linear versus barchan), are identified. Off-crest sands have Na, Al, Si, K, P contents similar to (or slightly depleted, relative to) the ABS, enrichment in Mg, and low dust content, whilst crest sands contain very high Mg and Ni (relative to the ABS), low felsic elemental concentrations and very low dust content. Cr is significantly enriched (and, to a lesser degree, Mn, Fe, Ti) in the off-crest sands of the linear dunes. In contrast, barchan dunes off-crest sands have Cr, Mn, Fe, and Ti abundances similar to those in the Gale soils. Additionally, Ni concentrations in barchan dunes off-crest sands are enriched relative to the linear dunes. Analyses from a small, isolated "mega-ripple" reveal a composition similar to that of the Gale soils, including a high dust content. The second mega-ripple, within a larger ripple field, is

  14. V2R mutations and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichet, Daniel G

    2009-01-01

    222300)(1), an autosomal recessive disorder. Other inherited disorders with complex polyuro-polydipsic syndrome with loss of water, sodium, chloride, calcium, magnesium, and potassium include Bartter syndrome (OMIM 601678)(1) and cystinosis (OMIM 219800)(1), while long-term lithium administration is the main cause of acquired NDI. Here, we use the gene symbols approved by the HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee (http://www.gene.ucl.ac.uk/nomenclature) and provide OMIM entry numbers [OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man)(1); McKusick-Nathans Institute for Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore, MD) and National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Library of Medicine (Bethesda, MD), 2000; World Wide Web URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/omim/]. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Does multicomponent physical exercise with simultaneous cognitive training boost cognitive performance in older adults? A 6-month rando­mized controlled trial with a 1-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eggenberger P

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Patrick Eggenberger,1 Vera Schumacher,2,3 Marius Angst,1 Nathan Theill,4,5 Eling D de Bruin1,6,7 1Institute of Human Movement Sciences and Sport, Department of Health Sciences and Technology, ETH Zurich, 2Department of Gerontopsychology and Gerontology, 3University Research Priority Program “Dynamics of Healthy Aging”, University of Zurich, Zurich, 4Division of Psychiatry Research, University of Zurich, Schlieren, 5Center for Gerontology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; 6CAPHRI School for Public Health and Primary Care, Department of Epidemiology, 7Centre for Evidence Based Physiotherapy, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands Background: Cognitive impairment is a health problem that concerns almost every second elderly person. Physical and cognitive training have differential positive effects on cognition, but have been rarely applied in combination. This study evaluates synergistic effects of multicomponent physical exercise complemented with novel simultaneous cognitive training on cognition in older adults. We hypothesized that simultaneous cognitive–physical components would add training specific cognitive benefits compared to exclusively physical training.Methods: Seniors, older than 70 years, without cognitive impairment, were randomly assigned to either: 1 virtual reality video game dancing (DANCE, 2 treadmill walking with simultaneous verbal memory training (MEMORY, or 3 treadmill walking (PHYS. Each program was complemented with strength and balance exercises. Two 1-hour training sessions per week over 6 months were applied. Cognitive performance was assessed at baseline, after 3 and 6 months, and at 1-year follow-up. Multiple regression analyses with planned comparisons were calculated.Results: Eighty-nine participants were randomized to the three groups initially, 71 completed the training, while 47 were available at 1-year follow-up. Advantages of the simultaneous cognitive–physical programs were

  16. Capturing Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure and Physical Activity: Feasibility Study and Comparison Between Self-Reports, Mobile Apps, Dosimeters, and Accelerometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Elke; Horsham, Caitlin; Allen, Martin; Nathan, Andrea; Lowe, John; Janda, Monika

    2018-04-17

    Nathan, John Lowe, Monika Janda. Originally published in JMIR Research Protocols (http://www.researchprotocols.org), 17.04.2018.

  17. Reply to Isgur's comments on valence QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, K.F.

    2000-01-01

    With the goal of understanding the complexity of QCD and the role of symmetry in dynamics, the authors studied a field theory called Valence QCD (VQCD) in which the Z graphs are forbidden so that the Fock space is limited to the valence quarks. The authors calculated nucleon form factors, matrix elements, and hadron masses both with this theory and with quenched QCD on a set of lattices with the same gauge background. Comparing the results of the lattice calculations in these two theories, the authors drew conclusions regarding the SU(6) valence quark model and chiral symmetry. While recognizing the goal of VQCD, Nathan Isgur disagrees on some of the conclusions the authors have drawn. The foremost objection raised in section 2 is to their suggestion that the major part of the hyperfine splittings in baryons is due to Goldstone boson exchange and not one-gluon-exchange (OGE) interactions. The logic of Isgur's objection is that VQCD yields a spectroscopy vastly different from quenched QCD and therefore the structure of the hadrons (to which hyperfine splittings in a quark model are intimately tied) is also suspect so no definite conclusions are possible. To put this into perspective it should be emphasized at the outset that spectroscopy is only one aspect of hadron physics examined in section 1. The authors have studied the axial and scalar couplings of nucleon in terms of F A /D A and F S /D S , the neutron to proton magnetic moment ratio μn/μp, and various form factors. None of these results reveal any pathologies of hadron structure and turn out to be close to the SU(6) relations, as expected. In fact this is what motivated the study of valence degrees of freedom via VQCD. In section 2 the authors address specific issues related to spectroscopy in VQCD. Isgur also presented more general arguments against the idea of boson exchange as a contributor to hyperfine effects. A cornerstone of his discussion is the unifying aspect of OGE in a quark model picture. The

  18. Platelet activating factors are associated with depressive symptoms in coronary artery disease patients: a hypothesis-generating study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazereeuw G

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Graham Mazereeuw,1,2,4 Nathan Herrmann,1,5 Hongbin Xu,3,4 Alexandre P Blanchard,3,4 Daniel Figeys,3,4 Paul I Oh,6 Steffany AL Bennett,3,4 Krista L Lanctôt1,2,4–61Hurvitz Brain Sciences Program, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON, 2Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 3Ottawa Institute of Systems Biology and Neural Regeneration Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology, and Immunology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, 4CIHR  Training Program in Neurodegenerative Lipidomics, Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology, and Immunology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, 5Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 6UHN Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, Toronto, ON, CanadaIntroduction: Depression is a frequent complication of coronary artery disease (CAD with an unknown etiology. Platelet activating factor (PAF lipids, which are associated with CAD, have recently been linked with novel proposed etiopathological mechanisms for depression such as inflammation, oxidative/nitrosative stress, and vascular endothelial dysfunction.Methods and results: This hypothesis-generating study investigated the relationships between various PAF species and depressive symptoms in 26 CAD patients (age: 60.6±9.2 years, 69% male, mean Hamilton Depression Rating Scale [HAM-D] score: 11.8±5.2, HAM-D range: 3–20. Plasma PAF analyses were performed using high performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in precursor ion scan. Significant associations between depressive symptom severity (HAM-D score and a greater plasma abundance of the PAFs phosphocholine (PC PC(O-12:0/2:0 (r=0.49, P=0.01, PC(O-14:1/2:0 (r=0.43, P=0.03, PC(O-17:3/2:0 (r=0.44, P=0.04, and PC(O-18:3/2:0 (r=0.50, P=0.01 were observed. Associations between those PAFs and HAM-D score persisted after adjusting for age and sex.Conclusion: These

  19. Toward a standardized structural-functional group connectome in MNI space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Andreas; Blankenburg, Felix

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of the structural architecture of the human brain in terms of connectivity between its subregions has provided profound insights into its underlying functional organization and has coined the concept of the "connectome", a structural description of the elements forming the human brain and the connections among them. Here, as a proof of concept, we introduce a novel group connectome in standard space based on a large sample of 169 subjects from the Enhanced Nathan Kline Institute-Rockland Sample (eNKI-RS). Whole brain structural connectomes of each subject were estimated with a global tracking approach, and the resulting fiber tracts were warped into standard stereotactic (MNI) space using DARTEL. Employing this group connectome, the results of published tracking studies (i.e., the JHU white matter and Oxford thalamic connectivity atlas) could be largely reproduced directly within MNI space. In a second analysis, a study that examined structural connectivity between regions of a functional network, namely the default mode network, was reproduced. Voxel-wise structural centrality was then calculated and compared to others' findings. Furthermore, including additional resting-state fMRI data from the same subjects, structural and functional connectivity matrices between approximately forty thousand nodes of the brain were calculated. This was done to estimate structure-function agreement indices of voxel-wise whole brain connectivity. Taken together, the combination of a novel whole brain fiber tracking approach and an advanced normalization method led to a group connectome that allowed (at least heuristically) performing fiber tracking directly within MNI space. Such an approach may be used for various purposes like the analysis of structural connectivity and modeling experiments that aim at studying the structure-function relationship of the human connectome. Moreover, it may even represent a first step toward a standard DTI template of the human brain

  20. Maintaining persistence and adherence with subcutaneous growth-hormone therapy in children: comparing jet-delivery and needle-based devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spoudeas HA

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Helen A Spoudeas,1 Priti Bajaj,2 Nathan Sommerford3 1London Centre for Paediatric Endocrinology, University College London, London, 2Ferring Pharmaceuticals, London, 3Health Informatics Research, Sciensus Ltd, Brighton, UK Purpose: Persistence and adherence with subcutaneous growth hormone (GH; somatropin therapy in children is widely acknowledged to be suboptimal. This study aimed to investigate how the use of a jet-delivery device, ZomaJet®, impacts on medication-taking behaviors compared to needle-based devices.Materials and methods: A retrospective cohort study of children aged ≤18 years was conducted using a UK-based, nationwide database of GH home-delivery schedules. Data were evaluated for the period between January 2010 and December 2012 for 6,061 children receiving either Zomacton® (somatropin via the ZomaJet jet-delivery device or one of six brands of GH all administered via needle-based devices. Persistence was analyzed for patients with appropriate data, measured as the time interval between first and last home deliveries. An analysis of adherence was conducted only for patients using ZomaJet who had appropriate data, measured by proportion of days covered. Brand switches were identified for all patients.Results: Persistence with GH therapy was significantly longer in patients using ZomaJet compared to needle-based devices (599 days versus 535 days, respectively, n=4,093; P<0.001; this association was observed in both sexes and across age subgroups (≤10 and 11–16 years. The majority (58% of patients using ZomaJet were classed as adherent (n=728. Only 297 patients (5% switched GH brand (n=6,061, and patients tended to use ZomaJet for longer than other devices before switching.Conclusion: It appears important that the choice of a jet-delivery device is offered to children prescribed daily GH therapy. These devices may represent a much-needed effective strategy for maintaining persistence with subcutaneous GH administration in

  1. Potential role of enzastaurin in the treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory advanced cutaneous T-cell lymphomas: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katz DA

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Deborah A Katz, Janet MD Plate, Sunita Nathan, Lydia UshaDivision of Hematology and Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs are rare extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas characterized by neoplastic T-lymphocyte accumulation in the skin. The two most common types of CTCLs are mycosis fungoides and the leukemic variant, Sézary syndrome. Prognosis of CTCLs depends on the stage, with a poor prognosis in advanced-stage disease. A number of agents have recently been developed for the treatment of CTCLs: chemotherapeutic agents such as pralatrexate, interferon-alpha, retinoids such as bexarotene, monoclonal antibodies such as alemtuzumab, and histone deacetylase inhibitors such as vorinostat and romidepsin. Nevertheless, there is no cure for CTCLs except for allogeneic stem cell transplant. A promising new drug is enzastaurin. Enzastaurin is a novel serine/threonine kinase inhibitor that binds to protein kinase C-β (PKC-β and inhibits the phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K/AKT/phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN signaling pathway. Enzastaurin induces apoptosis and inhibits angiogenesis; it was also shown to suppress growth of CTCL cell lines in vitro. Given its low toxicity, enzastaurin has been tested against both solid tumors and hematologic malignancies. This article is focused on the potential role of enzastaurin in the treatment of CTCLs. A phase II multicenter trial evaluated enzastaurin monotherapy in patients with CTCLs. However, the results from this study were disappointing, demonstrating that enzastaurin had only modest clinical activity. Hence, enzastaurin is not currently developed for treating CTCLs. Potential strategies to improve enzastaurin efficacy against CTCLs are discussed: validation of enzastaurin targets such as PKC-β expression in CTCL lesions and or/blood; measurement of serum vascular endothelial growth factor levels; dose optimization; combining enzastaurin with

  2. Book Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redactie KITLV

    2003-01-01

    + 241 pp. [BRC Occasional paper 1.] -Gerrit Knaap, Frédéric Mantienne, Les relations politiques et commerciales entre la France et la péninsule Indochinoise (XVIIe siècle. Paris: Les Indes Savantes, 2001, 395 pp. -Uli Kozok, James T. Collins, Malay, world language; A short history. Second edition. Kuala Lumpur: Dewan bahasa dan pustaka, 2000, xii + 101 pp. -Nathan Porath, Hoe Ban Seng, Semalai communities at Tasek Bera; A study of the structure of an Orang Asli society. [A.S. Baer and R. Gianno, eds.] Subang Jaya, Malaysia: Centre for Orang Asli concerns, 2001, xii + 191 pp. -Nathan Porath, Narifumi Maeda Tachimoto, The Orang Hulu; A report on Malaysian orang asli in the 1960's. [A.S. Baer, ed.] Subang Jaya, Malaysia: Centre for Orang Asli concerns, 2001, xiv + 104 pp. -Martin Ramstedt, Raechelle Rubinstein ,Staying local in the global village; Bali in the twentieth century. Honolulu: University of Hawai'i Press, 1999, xiii + 353 pp., Linda H. Connor (eds -Albert M. Salamanca, Thomas R. Leinbach ,Southeast Asia: diversity and development. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2000, xiii + 594 pp., Richard Ulack (eds -Heather Sutherland, Muhamad Hisyam, Caught between three fires; The Javanese pangulu under the Dutch colonial administration, 1882-1942. Jakarta: Indonesian-Netherlands cooperation in Islamic studies (INIS, 2001, 331 pp. [Seri INIS 37.] -Heather Sutherland, Roderich Ptak, China's seaborne trade with South and Southeast Asia (1200-1750. Aldershot: Ashgate, 1999, xii + 366 pp. [Variorum collected studies series CS638.] -Sikko Visscher, M. Jocelyn Armstrong ,Chinese populations in contemporary Southeast Asian societies. Richmond, Surrey: Curzon, 2001, xiv + 268 pp., R. Warwick Armstrong, Kent Mulliner (eds -Reed Wadley, Clifford Sather, Seeds of play, words of power; An ethnographic study of Iban shamanic chants. Kuching: Tun Jugah foundation, 2001, xvii + 753 pp. [Borneo classic series 5.] -Boris Wastiau, Raymond Corbey, Tribal art traffic; A chronicle

  3. Particle-tracking investigation of the retention of sucker larvae emerging from spawning grounds in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Tamara M.; Wherry, Susan A.; Simon, David C.; Markle, Douglas F.

    2014-01-01

    This study had two objectives: (1) to use the results of an individual-based particle-tracking model of larval sucker dispersal through the Williamson River delta and Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon, to interpret field data collected throughout Upper Klamath and Agency Lakes, and (2) to use the model to investigate the retention of sucker larvae in the system as a function of Williamson River flow, wind, and lake elevation. This is a follow-up study to work reported in Wood and others (2014) in which the hydrodynamic model of Upper Klamath Lake was combined with an individual-based, particle-tracking model of larval fish entering the lake from spawning areas in the Williamson River. In the previous study, the performance of the model was evaluated through comparison with field data comprising larval sucker distribution collected in 2009 by The Nature Conservancy, Oregon State University (OSU), and the U.S. Geological Survey, primarily from the (at that time) recently reconnected Williamson River Delta and along the eastern shoreline of Upper Klamath Lake, surrounding the old river mouth. The previous study demonstrated that the validation of the model with field data was moderately successful and that the model was useful for describing the broad patterns of larval dispersal from the river, at least in the areas surrounding the river channel immediately downstream of the spawning areas and along the shoreline where larvae enter the lake. In this study, field data collected by OSU throughout the main body of Upper Klamath Lake, and not just around the Williamson River Delta, were compared to model simulation results. Because the field data were collected throughout the lake, it was necessary to include in the simulations larvae spawned at eastern shoreline springs that were not included in the earlier studies. A complicating factor was that the OSU collected data throughout the main body of the lake in 2011 and 2012, after the end of several years of larval drift

  4. Delayed Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy for Non-Destructive Assay of Nuclear Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludewigt, Bernhard; Mozin, Vladimir; Campbell, Luke; Favalli, Andrea; Hunt, Alan W.; Reedy, Edward T.E.; Seipel, Heather

    2015-01-01

    High-energy, beta-delayed gamma-ray spectroscopy is a potential, non-destructive assay techniques for the independent verification of declared quantities of special nuclear materials at key stages of the fuel cycle and for directly assaying nuclear material inventories for spent fuel handling, interim storage, reprocessing facilities, repository sites, and final disposal. Other potential applications include determination of MOX fuel composition, characterization of nuclear waste packages, and challenges in homeland security and arms control verification. Experimental measurements were performed to evaluate fission fragment yields, to test methods for determining isotopic fractions, and to benchmark the modeling code package. Experimental measurement campaigns were carried out at the IAC using a photo-neutron source and at OSU using a thermal neutron beam from the TRIGA reactor to characterize the emission of high-energy delayed gamma rays from 235 U, 239 Pu, and 241 Pu targets following neutron induced fission. Data were collected for pure and combined targets for several irradiation/spectroscopy cycle times ranging from 10/10 seconds to 15/30 minutes.The delayed gamma-ray signature of 241 Pu, a significant fissile constituent in spent fuel, was measured and compared to 239 Pu. The 241 Pu/ 239 Pu ratios varied between 0.5 and 1.2 for ten prominent lines in the 2700-3600 keV energy range. Such significant differences in relative peak intensities make it possible to determine relative fractions of these isotopes in a mixed sample. A method for determining fission product yields by fitting the energy and time dependence of the delayed gamma-ray emission was developed and demonstrated on a limited 235 U data set. De-convolution methods for determining fissile fractions were developed and tested on the experimental data. The use of high count-rate LaBr 3 detectors was investigated as a potential alternative to HPGe detectors. Modeling capabilities were added to an

  5. Creating a FIESTA (Framework for Integrated Earth Science and Technology Applications) with MagIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnett, R.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Jarboe, N.; Tauxe, L.; Constable, C.

    2017-12-01

    galleries, full text searches and detailed filters. EarthRef's Seamount Catalog of bathymetry and morphology data, EarthRef's Geochemical Earth Reference Model (GERM) databases, and Oregon State University's Marine and Geology Repository (http://osu-mgr.org) will benefit from custom adaptations of FIESTA.

  6. Comparison of biological properties of 99mTc-labeled cyclic RGD Peptide trimer and dimer useful as SPECT radiotracers for tumor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Zuo-Quan; Yang, Yong; Fang, Wei; Liu, Shuang

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This study sought to evaluate a 99m Tc-labeled trimeric cyclic RGD peptide ( 99m Tc-4P-RGD 3 ) as the new radiotracer for tumor imaging. The objective was to compare its biological properties with those of 99m Tc-3P-RGD 2 in the same animal model. Methods: HYNIC-4P-RGD 3 was prepared by reacting 4P-RGD 3 with excess HYNIC-OSu in the presence of diisopropylethylamine. 99m Tc-4P-RGD 3 was prepared using a kit formulation, and evaluated for its tumor-targeting capability and biodistribution properties in the BALB/c nude mice with U87MG human glioma xenografts. Planar and SPECT imaging studies were performed in athymic nude mice with U87MG glioma xenografts. For comparison purpose, 99m Tc-3P-RGD 2 (a α v β 3 -targeted radiotracer currently under clinical evaluation for tumor imaging in cancer patients) was also evaluated in the same animal models. Blocking experiments were used to demonstrate the α v β 3 specificity of 99m Tc-4P-RGD 3 . Results: 99m Tc-4P-RGD 3 was prepared with > 95% RCP and high specific activity (~ 200 GBq/μmol). 99m Tc-4P-RGD 3 and 99m Tc-3P-RGD 2 shared almost identical tumor uptake and similar biodistribution properties. 99m Tc-4P-RGD 3 had higher uptake than 99m Tc-3P-RGD 2 in the intestines and kidneys; but it showed better metabolic stability. The U87MG tumors were clearly visualized by SPECT with excellent contrast with 99m Tc-4P-RGD 3 and 99m Tc-3P-RGD 2 . Conclusion: Increasing peptide multiplicity from 3P-RGD 2 to 4P-RGD 3 offers no advantages with respect to the tumor-targeting capability. 99m Tc-4P-RGD 3 is as good a SPECT radiotracer as 99m Tc-3P-RGD 2 for imaging α v β 3 -positive tumors. -- Graphical abstract: This report presents evaluations of a 99m Tc-labeled cyclic RGD peptide trimer ( 99m Tc-4P-RGD 3 ) as the new SPECT radiotracer for tumor imaging. It was found that 99m Tc-4P-RGD 3 was able to accumulate in the xenografted U87MG tumors with high specificity. Display Omitted

  7. SU-F-I-55: Performance Evaluation of Digital PET/CT: Medical Physics Basis for the Clinical Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J; Knopp, MV; Miller, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Replacement of conventional PMT-based detector with next generation digital photon counting (DPC) detector is a technology leap for PET imaging. This study evaluated the performance and characteristics of the DPC system and its stability within a 1 year time window following its installation focusing on the medical physics basis for clinical applications. Methods: A digital PET/CT scanner using 1:1 coupling of 23,040 crystal: detector elements was introduced and became operational at OSU. We tested and evaluated system performance and characteristics using NEMA NU2-2012. System stabilities in timing resolution, energy resolution, detector temperature and humidity (T&H) were monitored over 1-yr. Timing, energy and spatial resolution were characterized across clinically relevant count rate range. CQIE uniformity PET and NEMA IEC-Body PET with hot spheres varying with sizes and contrasts were performed. PET reconstructed in standard(4mm), High(2mm) and Ultra-High(1mm) definitions were evaluated. Results: NEMA results showed PET spatial resolution (mm-FWHM) from 4.01&4.14 at 1cm to 5.82&6.17 at 20cm in transverse & axial. 322±3ps timing and 11.0% energy resolution were measured. 5.7kcps/MBq system sensitivity with 24kcps/MBq effective sensitivity was obtained. The peak-NECR was ∼171kcps with the effective peak-NECR >650kcps@50kBq/mL. Scatter fraction was ∼30%, and the maximum trues was >900kcps. NEMA IQ demonstrated hot sphere contrast ranging from ∼62%±2%(10mm) to ∼88%±2%(22mm), cold sphere contrast of ∼86%±2%(28mm) and ∼89%±3%(37mm) and excellent uniformity. Monitoring 1-yr stability, it revealed ∼1% change in timing, ±0.4% change in energy resolution, and <10% variations in T&H. CQIE PET gave <3% SUV variances in axial. 60%–100% recovery coefficients across sphere sizes and contrast levels were achieved. Conclusion: Characteristics and stability of the next generation DPC PET detector system over an 1-yr time window was excellent and

  8. Preliminary Study of Single-Phase Natural Circulation for Lab-scaled Molten Salt Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Yukyung; Kang, Sarah; Kim, In Guk; Seo, Seok Bin; Bang, In Cheol [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seong Dae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Advanced reactors such as MSR (FHR), VHTR and AHTR utilized molten salt as a coolant for efficiency and safety which has advantages in higher heat capacity, lower pumping power and scale compared to liquid metal. It becomes more necessary to study on the characteristics of molten salt. However, due to several characteristics such as high operating temperature, large-scale facility and preventing solidification, satisfying that condition for study has difficulties. Thus simulant fluid was used with scaling method for lab-scale experiment. Scaled experiment enables simulant fluid to simulate fluid mechanics and heat transfer behavior of molten salt on lower operating temperature and reduced scale. In this paper, as a proof test of the scaled experiment, simplified single-phase natural circulation loop was designed in a lab-scale and applied to the passive safety system in advanced reactor in which molten salt is considered as a major coolant of the system. For the application of the improved safety system, prototype was based on the primary loop of the test-scale DRACS, the main passive safety system in FHR, developed at the OSU. For preliminary experiment, single-phase natural circulation under low power was performed. DOWTHERM A and DOWTHERM RP were selected as simulant candidates. Then, study of feasibility with simulant was conducted based on the scaling law for heat transfer characteristics and geometric parameters. Additionally, simulation with MARS code and ANSYS-CFX with the same condition of natural circulation was carried out as verification. For the accurate code simulation, thermo-physical properties of DOWTHERM A and RP were developed and implemented into MARS code. In this study, single-phase natural circulation experiment was performed with simulant oil, DOWTHERM RP, based on the passive safety system of FHR. Feasibility of similarity experiment for molten salt with oil simulant was confirmed by scaling method. In addition, simulation with two

  9. SU-F-I-55: Performance Evaluation of Digital PET/CT: Medical Physics Basis for the Clinical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J; Knopp, MV [The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Miller, M [Philips Healthcare, Highland Heights, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Replacement of conventional PMT-based detector with next generation digital photon counting (DPC) detector is a technology leap for PET imaging. This study evaluated the performance and characteristics of the DPC system and its stability within a 1 year time window following its installation focusing on the medical physics basis for clinical applications. Methods: A digital PET/CT scanner using 1:1 coupling of 23,040 crystal: detector elements was introduced and became operational at OSU. We tested and evaluated system performance and characteristics using NEMA NU2-2012. System stabilities in timing resolution, energy resolution, detector temperature and humidity (T&H) were monitored over 1-yr. Timing, energy and spatial resolution were characterized across clinically relevant count rate range. CQIE uniformity PET and NEMA IEC-Body PET with hot spheres varying with sizes and contrasts were performed. PET reconstructed in standard(4mm), High(2mm) and Ultra-High(1mm) definitions were evaluated. Results: NEMA results showed PET spatial resolution (mm-FWHM) from 4.01&4.14 at 1cm to 5.82&6.17 at 20cm in transverse & axial. 322±3ps timing and 11.0% energy resolution were measured. 5.7kcps/MBq system sensitivity with 24kcps/MBq effective sensitivity was obtained. The peak-NECR was ∼171kcps with the effective peak-NECR >650kcps@50kBq/mL. Scatter fraction was ∼30%, and the maximum trues was >900kcps. NEMA IQ demonstrated hot sphere contrast ranging from ∼62%±2%(10mm) to ∼88%±2%(22mm), cold sphere contrast of ∼86%±2%(28mm) and ∼89%±3%(37mm) and excellent uniformity. Monitoring 1-yr stability, it revealed ∼1% change in timing, ±0.4% change in energy resolution, and <10% variations in T&H. CQIE PET gave <3% SUV variances in axial. 60%–100% recovery coefficients across sphere sizes and contrast levels were achieved. Conclusion: Characteristics and stability of the next generation DPC PET detector system over an 1-yr time window was excellent and

  10. Coal Combustion Products Extension Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarunjit S. Butalia; William E. Wolfe

    2006-01-11

    40% by 2010, the CCP Extension Program be expanded at OSU, with support from state and federal agencies, utilities, trade groups, and the university, to focus on the following four specific areas of promise: (a) Expanding use in proven areas (such as use of fly ash in concrete); (b) Removing or reducing regulatory and perceptual barriers to use (by working in collaboration with regulatory agencies); (c) Developing new or under-used large-volume market applications (such as structural fills); and (d) Placing greater emphasis on FGD byproducts utilization.

  11. Development of a flight data acquisition system for small unmanned aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Scott

    Current developments surrounding the use of unmanned aerial vehicles have produced a need for a high quality data acquisition platform developed specifically a research environment. This work was undertaken to produce such a system that is low cost, extensible, and better supports fixed wing research through the inclusion of a custom vane based air data probe capable of measuring airspeed, angle of attack, and angle of sideslip. This was accomplished by starting with the open source Pixhawk system as the core and then modifying the device firmware and adding sensors to suit the needs of current aerospace research at OSU. An overview of each component of the system is presented, as well as a description of various firmware modifications to the stock Pixhawk system. Tests were then performed on all of the major sensors using bench testing, wind tunnel analysis, and flight maneuvers to determine the final performance of each part of the system. This research shows that all of the critical sensors on the data acquisition platform produce data acceptable for flight research. The accelerometer has been shown to have an overall tolerance of +/-0.0545 m/s², with +/-0.223 deg/s for the gyroscopic sensor, +/-1.32 hPa for the barometric sensor, +/-0.318 m/s for the airspeed sensor, +/-1.65 °C for the outside air temperature sensor, and +/-0.00115 V for the analog to digital converter. The stock calibration curve for the airspeed sensor was determined to be correct to within +/-0.5 in H2O through wind tunnel testing, and an experimental step input analysis on the flow direction vanes showed that worst case steady state error and time to damp are acceptable for the system. Power spectral density and spectral coherence analysis of flight data was used to show that the custom air data probe is capable of following the flight dynamics of a given aircraft to within a 10 percent tolerance across a range of frequencies. Finally, general performance of the system was proven using

  12. SECARB Commercial Scale CO2 Injection and Optimization of Storage Capacity in the Southeastern United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koperna, George J. [Advanced Resources International, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Pashin, Jack [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Walsh, Peter [Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2017-10-30

    The Commercial Scale Project is a US DOE/NETL funded initiative aimed at enhancing the knowledge-base and industry’s ability to geologically store vast quantities of anthropogenic carbon. In support of this goal, a large-scale, stacked reservoir geologic model was developed for Gulf Coast sediments centered on the Citronelle Dome in southwest Alabama, the site of the SECARB Phase III Anthropogenic Test. Characterization of regional geology to construct the model consists of an assessment of the entire stratigraphic continuum at Citronelle Dome, from surface to the depth of the Donovan oil-bearing formation. This project utilizes all available geologic data available, which includes: modern geophysical well logs from three new wells drilled for SECARB’s Anthropogenic Test; vintage logs from the Citronelle oilfield wells; porosity and permeability data from whole core and sidewall cores obtained from the injection and observation wells drilled for the Anthropogenic Test; core data obtained from the SECARB Phase II saline aquifer injection test; regional core data for relevant formations from the Geological Survey of Alabama archives. Cross sections, isopach maps, and structure maps were developed to validate the geometry and architecture of the Citronelle Dome for building the model, and assuring that no major structural defects exist in the area. A synthetic neural network approach was used to predict porosity using the available SP and resistivity log data for the storage reservoir formations. These data are validated and applied to extrapolate porosity data over the study area wells, and to interpolate permeability amongst these data points. Geostatistical assessments were conducted over the study area. In addition to geologic characterization of the region, a suite of core analyses was conducted to construct a depositional model and constrain caprock integrity. Petrographic assessment of core was conducted by OSU and analyzed to build a depositional framework

  13. Application of Crunch-Flow Routines to Constrain Present and Past Carbon Fluxes at Gas-Hydrate Bearing Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Marta [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences

    2014-01-31

    graduate students (OSU and UW) as well as DOE staff from the NETL lab in Albany on the use of Crunch Flow for geochemical applications.

  14. Hydrogen production from natural gas using an iron-based chemical looping technology: Thermodynamic simulations and process system analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kathe, Mandar V.; Empfield, Abbey; Na, Jing; Blair, Elena; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Design of iron-based chemical looping process using moving bed for H_2 from CH_4. • Auto-thermal operation design using thermodynamic rationale for 90% carbon capture. • Cold gas efficiency: 5% points higher than Steam Methane Reforming baseline case. • Net thermal efficiency: 6% points higher than Steam Methane Reforming baseline case. • Sensitivity analysis: Energy recovery scheme, operating pressure, no carbon capture. - Abstract: Hydrogen (H_2) is a secondary fuel derived from natural gas. Currently, H_2 serves as an important component in refining operations, fertilizer production, and is experiencing increased utilization in the transportation industry as a clean combustion fuel. In recent years, industry and academia have focused on developing technology that reduces carbon emissions. As a result, there has been an increase in the technological developments for producing H_2 from natural gas. These technologies aim to minimize the cost increment associated with clean energy production. The natural gas processing chemical looping technology, developed at The Ohio State University (OSU), employs an iron-based oxygen carrier and a novel gas–solid counter-current moving bed reactor for H_2 production. Specifically, this study examines the theoretical thermodynamic limits for full conversion of natural gas through iron-based oxygen carrier reactions with methane (CH_4), by utilizing simulations generated with ASPEN modeling software. This study initially investigates the reducer and the oxidizer thermodynamic phase diagrams then derives an optimal auto-thermal operating condition for the complete loop simulation. This complete loop simulation is initially normalized for analysis on the basis of one mole of carbon input from natural gas. The H_2 production rate is then scaled to match that of the baseline study, using a full-scale ASPEN simulation for computing cooling loads, water requirements and net parasitic energy consumption. The

  15. Theoretical & Experimental Research in Weak, Electromagnetic & Strong Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandi, Satyanarayan [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Babu, Kaladi [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Rizatdinova, Flera [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Khanov, Alexander [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Haley, Joseph [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States)

    2015-09-17

    produced in pairs and decaying to light quarks. Members of the OSU group played a leading role in the detailed optimization studies for the future ATLAS Inner Tracker (ITk), which will be installed during the Phase-II upgrade, replacing the current tracking system. The proposed studies aim to enhance the ATLAS discovery potential in the high-luminosity LHC era. The group members have contributed to the calibration of algorithms for identifying boosted vector bosons and b-jets, which will help expand the ATLAS reach in many searches for new physics.

  16. Delayed Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy for Non-Destructive Assay of Nuclear Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludewigt, Bernhard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mozin, Vladimir [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Campbell, Luke [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Favalli, Andrea [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hunt, Alan W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Reedy, Edward T.E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Seipel, Heather [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-06-01

    High-­energy, beta-delayed gamma-­ray spectroscopy is a potential, non-­destructive assay techniques for the independent verification of declared quantities of special nuclear materials at key stages of the fuel cycle and for directly assaying nuclear material inventories for spent fuel handling, interim storage, reprocessing facilities, repository sites, and final disposal. Other potential applications include determination of MOX fuel composition, characterization of nuclear waste packages, and challenges in homeland security and arms control verification. Experimental measurements were performed to evaluate fission fragment yields, to test methods for determining isotopic fractions, and to benchmark the modeling code package. Experimental measurement campaigns were carried out at the IAC using a photo-­neutron source and at OSU using a thermal neutron beam from the TRIGA reactor to characterize the emission of high-­energy delayed gamma rays from 235U, 239Pu, and 241Pu targets following neutron induced fission. Data were collected for pure and combined targets for several irradiation/spectroscopy cycle times ranging from 10/10 seconds to 15/30 minutes.The delayed gamma-ray signature of 241Pu, a significant fissile constituent in spent fuel, was measured and compared to 239Pu. The 241Pu/239Pu ratios varied between 0.5 and 1.2 for ten prominent lines in the 2700-­3600 keV energy range. Such significant differences in relative peak intensities make it possible to determine relative fractions of these isotopes in a mixed sample. A method for determining fission product yields by fitting the energy and time dependence of the delayed gamma-­ray emission was developed and demonstrated on a limited 235U data set. De-­convolution methods for determining fissile fractions were developed and tested on the experimental data. The use of high count-­rate LaBr3 detectors

  17. Galerkin CFD solvers for use in a multi-disciplinary suite for modeling advanced flight vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffitt, Nicholas J.

    This work extends existing Galerkin CFD solvers for use in a multi-disciplinary suite. The suite is proposed as a means of modeling advanced flight vehicles, which exhibit strong coupling between aerodynamics, structural dynamics, controls, rigid body motion, propulsion, and heat transfer. Such applications include aeroelastics, aeroacoustics, stability and control, and other highly coupled applications. The suite uses NASA STARS for modeling structural dynamics and heat transfer. Aerodynamics, propulsion, and rigid body dynamics are modeled in one of the five CFD solvers below. Euler2D and Euler3D are Galerkin CFD solvers created at OSU by Cowan (2003). These solvers are capable of modeling compressible inviscid aerodynamics with modal elastics and rigid body motion. This work reorganized these solvers to improve efficiency during editing and at run time. Simple and efficient propulsion models were added, including rocket, turbojet, and scramjet engines. Viscous terms were added to the previous solvers to create NS2D and NS3D. The viscous contributions were demonstrated in the inertial and non-inertial frames. Variable viscosity (Sutherland's equation) and heat transfer boundary conditions were added to both solvers but not verified in this work. Two turbulence models were implemented in NS2D and NS3D: Spalart-Allmarus (SA) model of Deck, et al. (2002) and Menter's SST model (1994). A rotation correction term (Shur, et al., 2000) was added to the production of turbulence. Local time stepping and artificial dissipation were adapted to each model. CFDsol is a Taylor-Galerkin solver with an SA turbulence model. This work improved the time accuracy, far field stability, viscous terms, Sutherland?s equation, and SA model with NS3D as a guideline and added the propulsion models from Euler3D to CFDsol. Simple geometries were demonstrated to utilize current meshing and processing capabilities. Air-breathing hypersonic flight vehicles (AHFVs) represent the ultimate

  18. Zihin Kuramı: Otizm Spektrum Bozukluğu Olan ve Normal Gelişen Çocukların Performanslarının Karşılaştırılması

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahar KEÇELİ KAYSILI

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nedensel karşılaştırma deseni kullanılarak planlanan bu araştırmada, otizm spektrum bozukluğu (OSB olan ve normal gelişen (NG çocukların, zihin kuramı performansları ve bu alandaki performansların genel dil ve kronolojik yaşla ilişkisi incelenmiştir. Araştırma grubunu, Türkçe Erken Dil Gelişimi Testi (TEDİL ifade edici dil eşdeğer yaşları en az 4 olan 30 OSB olan ve 30 NG çocuk oluşturmuştur. OSB olan ve NG çocuklar ortalama sözce uzunluğuna (OSU göre eşleştirilmişlerdir. Zihin kuramı becerileri bir grup işlemle değerlendirilmiştir. Araştırma sonuçları, dilde OSU’ ya göre eşleştirilen OSB olan çocuklarla NG çocukların zihin kuramı performanslarının benzer olduğunu, her iki grupta da dilin, zihin kuramı ile ilişkili olduğunu ancak NG çocuklarda dile ek olarak kronolojik yaşın da zihin kuramı ile ilişkili olduğunu göstermiştir. This study examined the theory of mind (ToM performance and the relationship between language, chronological age and theory of mind in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD and in typically developing (TD children by utilizing the ex-post-facto design. The participants were 30 children with ASD and 30 TD children whose Test of Early Language Development (TELD - Turkish Version expressive language age scores were at least 4 years old. Children with ASD and TD children were matched on mean length of utterance (MLU. ToM ability was assessed on a battery of tasks that have developmental sequence. The findings revealed that the children with ASD and TD children who were matched according to MLU, performed similarly on ToM tasks. Besides language was related to the performance on ToM tasks in children with ASD and in TD children whereas also chronological age is related to the performance on ToM tasks in TD children.

  19. Linking benthic hydrodynamics and cold-water coral occurrences: A high-resolution model study at three cold-water coral provinces in the NE Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohn, Christian; Rengstorf, Anna; White, Martin; Duineveld, Gerard; Mienis, Furu; Soetaert, Karline; Grehan, Anthony

    2014-03-01

    Observations from numerous cold-water coral locations in the NE Atlantic show energetic near-bottom flow dynamics along the European continental margin at individual coral mounds and mound clusters. Dynamics are largely controlled by tide-topography interaction generating and enhancing periodic motions such as trapped waves, freely propagating internal tides and internal hydraulic jumps. In this study, linkages between key abiotic parameters and cold water coral occurrences are explored across entire cold-water coral mound provinces using an integrated modelling and observational approach. The 3-D ocean circulation model ROMS-AGRIF was applied to simulate near-bottom hydrodynamic conditions at three provinces in the NE Atlantic (Logachev mounds, Arc mounds and Belgica mounds) adopting a nested model setup with a central grid resolution of 250 m. Simulations were carried out with a focus on accurate high-resolution topography and tidal forcing. The central model bathymetry was taken from high-resolution INSS (Irish National Seabed Survey) seafloor mapping data. The model was integrated over a full one-year reference period starting from the 1st January 2010. Interannual variability was not considered. Tidal forcing was obtained from a global solution of the Oregon State University (OSU) inverse tidal model. Modelled fields of benthic currents were validated against available independent in situ observations. Coral assemblage patterns (presence and absence locations) were obtained from benthic surveys of the EU FP7 CoralFISH programme and supplemented by data from additional field surveys. Modelled near-bottom currents, temperature and salinity were analysed for a 1-month subset (15th April to 15th May 2010) corresponding to the main CoralFISH survey period. The model results show intensified near-bottom currents in areas where living corals are observed by contrast with coral absence and random background locations. Instantaneous and time-mean current speeds at

  20. Development of a Remote External Repair Tool for Damaged or Defective Polyethylene Pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenneth H. Green; Willie E. Rochefort; Nick Wannenmacher; John A. Clark; Kevin Harris

    2006-06-30

    Current procedures for repairing polyethylene (PE) gas pipe require excavation, isolation, and removal of the damaged section of pipe followed by fusing a new section of pipe into place. These techniques are costly and very disruptive. An alternative repair method was developed at Timberline Tool with support from Oregon State University (OSU) and funding by the U. S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL). This project was undertaken to design, develop and test a tool and method for repairing damaged PE pipe remotely and externally in situ without squeezing off the flow of gas, eliminating the need for large-scale excavations. Through an iterative design and development approach, a final engineered prototype was developed that utilizes a unique thermo-chemical and mechanical process to apply a permanent external patch to repair small nicks, gouges and punctures under line pressure. The project identified several technical challenges during the design and development process. The repair tool must be capable of being installed under live conditions and operate in an 18-inch keyhole. This would eliminate the need for extensive excavations thus reducing the cost of the repair. Initially, the tool must be able to control the leak by encapsulating the pipe and apply slight pressure at the site of damage. Finally, the repair method must be permanent at typical operating pressures. The overall results of the project have established a permanent external repair method for use on damaged PE gas pipe in a safe and cost-effective manner. The engineered prototype was subjected to comprehensive testing and evaluation to validate the performance. Using the new repair tool, samples of 4-inch PE pipe with simulated damage were successfully repaired under line pressure to the satisfaction of DOE/NETL and the following natural gas companies: Northwest Natural; Sempra Energy, Southwest Gas Corporation, Questar, and Nicor. However, initial results of

  1. Determination of levels of organochlorine pesticides in plastic resin pellets on selected beaches in the Greater Accra region of Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amoatey, A. E.

    2012-07-01

    The levels of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in beached plastic resin pellets were determined with the objective of assessing the status of OCP pollution in the marine ecosystem in selected beaches in Ghana. Samples of plastic resin pellets were collected at seven beaches in Accra (namely Art centre, Sakumono, Osu castle, Labadi, Korle-Gonno, Independence Square and Tema Mighty beaches) and analyzed for organochlorine pesticides, total chlorine and extractable chlorine. The plastic pellets were subjected to Soxhlet extraction and the extracts analyzed using Gas chromatograph coupled with electron capture detector. The detected compounds were alpha-HCH, beta-HCH, gamma-HCH, delta-HCH, hexachlorobenzene, o, p' -DDE, p, p'-DDE, o,p'-DDD, o, p'-DDT, heptachlor, trans-heptachlor epoxy, trans-chlordane, trans-nanochlor, aldrin, dieldrin, endrin, alpha-endosulphan, beta-endosulphan, endosulphan sulphate and methoxychlor. Analysis of the virgin pellets recorded no organochlorine pesticides present. However, plastics pellets collected from all seven beaches were found to contain OCPs with the highest recorded on the Art Centre beach with a total concentration of 106.26 ng/g. Plastic pellets collected on the Labadi beach recorded the lowest OCPs with a concentration of 20.2 ng/g. Total chlorine and extractable organochlorine (EOCI) were also determined in the plastic resin pellets by using the Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA). The concentrations of total chlorine analyzed by INAA were between 2.82 and 50.25 mg/kg whereas the EOCR concentrations ranged from 1.67 to 30.90 mg/kg. EOCR accounted for 48.05% of the total chlorine in plastic pellets, suggesting that chlorine in the beached pellet relatively existed as organic and are extractable. The relative proportion of known or identified organochlorines (such as HCHs, DDT s, chlordane compounds, endosulphans, HCB and methoxychlor) to the total extractable organochlorine(EOCI) was averagely 7.4% which suggested

  2. Providing Hands on Experiences to Museum Visitors to Explore and Learn about Earthquakes and their Impacts in the Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olds, S. E.; Schiffman, C. R.; Butler, R. F.; Farley, M.; Frankel, S.; Hunter, N.; Lillie, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    Over the past ten years, UNAVCO has developed a suite of learning materials for formal undergraduate and grades 6-12 classroom environments, integrating GPS data from the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) to explore Earth science processes. To make complex Earth processes accessible to general audiences, UNAVCO has designed a multi-component visiting museum exhibit that explores the tectonic setting of the United States Pacific Northwest, hazards of living on a plate boundary, and the technologies being used to study the plate motion and in the future, help communities become more resilient to the impacts of earthquakes. This exhibit was installed in Fall 2013 at the Oregon State University (OSU) Hatfield Marine Science Center (HMSC) in Newport, Oregon. Through multiple hands-on elements, visitors to the HMSC exhibit explore and experience the build up and release of strain in the region, along with some of the technologies used to measure these changes. In one component, visitors compress a model of the Pacific Northwest to feel the build up of strain in the landscape and observe the movement of land over time. Supporting panels connect this movement to the measurements currently being observed by the network of PBO and other GPS stations in the Pacific Northwest. In another component, visitors learn about the recurrence interval for earthquakes at the Juan De Fuca - North America plate boundary by turning a handle to slowly move and compress plates until a simulated earthquake occurs. A related component explores how an earthquake early warning system (EEWS) of the future might combine seismic data collected by both seismometers and real time GPS to allow people and communities time to prepare for oncoming ground shaking and tsunami after an earthquake. Several technologies are also highlighted throughout the exhibit, including information panels that compare the accuracy of high precision GPS with smartphone technologies. Additionally, models of a full

  3. Coal Direct Chemical Looping Retrofit to Pulverized Coal Power Plants for In-Situ CO2 Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Liang; Li, Fanxing; Kim, Ray; Bayham, Samuel; McGiveron, Omar; Tong, Andrew; Connell, Daniel; Luo, Siwei; Sridhar, Deepak; Wang, Fei; Sun, Zhenchao; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2013-09-30

    A novel Coal Direct Chemical Looping (CDCL) system is proposed to effectively capture CO2 from existing PC power plants. The work during the past three years has led to an oxygen carrier particle with satisfactory performance. Moreover, successful laboratory, bench scale, and integrated demonstrations have been performed. The proposed project further advanced the novel CDCL technology to sub-pilot scale (25 kWth). To be more specific, the following objectives attained in the proposed project are: 1. to further improve the oxygen carrying capacity as well as the sulfur/ash tolerance of the current (working) particle; 2. to demonstrate continuous CDCL operations in an integrated mode with > 99% coal (bituminous, subbituminous, and lignite) conversion as well as the production of high temperature exhaust gas stream that is suitable for steam generation in existing PC boilers; 3. to identify, via demonstrations, the fate of sulfur and NOx; 4. to conduct thorough techno-economic analysis that validates the technical and economical attractiveness of the CDCL system. The objectives outlined above were achieved through collaborative efforts among all the participants. CONSOL Energy Inc. performed the techno-economic analysis of the CDCL process. Shell/CRI was able to perform feasibility and economic studies on the large scale particle synthesis and provide composite particles for the sub-pilot scale testing. The experience of B&W (with boilers) and Air Products (with handling gases) assisted the retrofit system design as well as the demonstration unit operations. The experience gained from the sub-pilot scale demonstration of the Syngas Chemical Looping (SCL) process at OSU was able to ensure the successful handling of the solids. Phase 1 focused on studies to improve the current particle to better suit the CDCL operations. The optimum operating conditions for the reducer reactor such as the temperature, char gasification enhancer type, and flow rate were identified. The

  4. IAEA/NDS requirements related to database software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronyaev, V.; Zerkin, V.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The Nuclear Data Section of the IAEA disseminates data to the NDS users through Internet or on CD-ROMs and diskettes. OSU Web-server on DEC Alpha with Open VMS and Oracle/DEC DBMS provides via CGI scripts and FORTRAN retrieval programs access to the main nuclear databases supported by the networks of Nuclear Reactions Data Centres and Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Centres (CINDA, EXFOR, ENDF, NSR, ENSDF). For Web-access to data from other libraries and files, hyper-links to the files stored in ASCII text or other formats are used. Databases on CD-ROM are usually provided with some retrieval system. They are distributed in the run-time mode and comply with all license requirements for software used in their development. Although major development work is done now at the PC with MS-Windows and Linux, NDS may not at present, due to some institutional conditions, use these platforms for organization of the Web access to the data. Starting the end of 1999, the NDS, in co-operation with other data centers, began to work out the strategy of migration of main network nuclear data bases onto platforms other than DEC Alpha/Open VMS/DBMS. Because the different co-operating centers have their own preferences for hardware and software, the requirement to provide maximum platform independence for nuclear databases is the most important and desirable feature. This requirement determined some standards for the nuclear database software development. Taking into account the present state and future development, these standards can be formulated as follows: 1. All numerical data (experimental, evaluated, recommended values and their uncertainties) prepared for inclusion in the IAEA/NDS nuclear database should be submitted in the form of the ASCII text files and will be kept at NDS as a master file. 2. Databases with complex structure should be submitted in the form of the files with standard SQL statements describing all its components. All extensions of standard SQL

  5. AFIP-7 Tomography – 2013 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craft, A. E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Williams, W. J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Abir, M. I.K. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wachs, D. M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2013-10-01

    This project seeks to assess the geometric stability of the U-Mo monolithic fuel system by evaluating the radiation-induced changes in the AFIP-7 experiment device. Neutron radiography and computed tomography (CT) provide valuable information about the post-irradiation condition of the fuel specimen. Tomographic reconstructions of the AFIP-7 fuel element will be analyzed to assess the geometric condition of the element after irradiation and provide information regarding the condition of the fuel, including gross geometric defects, bowing, twist, plate buckling, cracks, and other defects. The INL, in collaboration with Oregon State University (OSU), Missouri University of Science and Technology (Missouri S&T), and Real Time Tomography, is developing advanced neutron detector systems and tomographic reconstruction techniques to evaluate the AFIP-7 fuel element. Neutron computed tomography using the current neutron radiography technique available at the Neutron Radiography reactor (NRAD) is impractical due to the long time and high cost to produce a set of images for tomographic reconstruction. Advanced neutron radiography systems such as the micro-channel plate (MCP) detector and neutron computed radiography (CR) may reduce the time and cost of acquiring images for neutron CT. The MCP detector system tested at OSU and Missouri S&T provides neutron radiographs and has lower gamma sensitivity compared to other digital acquisition image systems. However, some significant, but not prohibitive, challenges must be overcome to make its use for imaging nuclear fuel more practical. Images taken with the MCP require significant image processing to reduce distortions and correct for the dynamic detector response. Also, the small active area of the detector (~30 mm diameter) requires the collection and combination of several images of a specimen, which may become time-consuming. The MCP is tested in low gamma dose environments, but should also be tested in the gamma field at the

  6. Obituary: Ronald Eugene Pitts, 1949-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacConnell, D. Jack

    2009-01-01

    Ronald Pitts, systems engineer in the Commanding Branch of the Space Telescope Science Institute and long-time Computer Sciences Corporation employee, died suddenly of a stroke on 4 May 2008 at his home in Laurel, Maryland. He was a dedicated scientist-engineer, husband, father, volunteer, and cherished friend to many. Ron was born on 19 January 1949 in Tucson, Arizona, and was raised, along with his sister Suzanne, on his parents' turkey farm outside Tucson. He picked up practical knowledge from his father, Vernon, and became a competent amateur electrician and plumber, skills he kept honed and used throughout his life. His mother, Ruth (Stephens), was a nurse and taught him compassion and patience and encouraged his inquisitive mind. Ron attended public schools and enrolled at the University of Arizona, graduating with a B. S. in Astronomy in 1971. Being from a family of modest means, he put himself through school working summers and part-time at a large copper mine south of town. Ron enrolled in the graduate astronomy program at the Ohio State University [OSU] in the fall of 1971 where he was a first-year fellowship student. During his second and third years, he was the Perkins Assistant, taking spectra for the very exacting but appreciative Philip Keenan who once remarked to another faculty member that Ron was the best observer he ever had. Later, in 1980, Ron was co-author with Keenan on "Revised MK Spectral Types for G, K, and M stars" and again in 1985 in a study of supergiants in open clusters. He met his future wife, Patricia Moore, also a graduate student in the department, and they were wed in 1973. Ron was also partially supported during his early OSU years by an NSF grant to Robert Wing, writing parts of Wing's photometric reduction code and observing on the program at Kitt Peak and Flagstaff in the summer of 1974. Wing remembers him as being very competent and pleasant to work with. Ron's thesis topic was "Oscillator Strengths for Neutral Iron and

  7. Predikce poruch učení pomocí testu komplexní imitace pohybu Prediction of learning difficulties with the test of complex imitation of movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Ozbič

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Vývojová porucha motorické koordinace (DCD je součástí heterogenní skupiny vývojových poruch a postihuje iniciaci, organizaci a provádění činností. Ve školské praxi i v každodenním životě s dětmi je často přehlížena. Proto si tento článek klade za cíl upozornit na tento problém a ukázat, jak mohou vyučující v různých předmětech děti s DCD snadno rozpoznat. Žáky s poruchami učení mohou rozpoznat zejména vyučující tělesné výchovy při neformálních úkolech a tito mohou později iniciovat příslušnou intervenci. Rychlá prognóza může vést k rychlejší intervenci, což vede ke zlepšení pohybových dovedností u dětí s DCD. Tento výzkum prokázal, že na základě dvaceti úkolů testu Bergès-Lézine pro komplexní imitaci pohybu/gest můžeme určit, které z dětí mají určité poruchy učení a které ne. Chceme zejména vyzdvihnout tři úkoly (12, 17 a 20, při kterých děti musejí protnout vertikální osu svých těl. Tyto tři úkoly zahrnují oboustrannou koordinaci. Děti s příznaky DCD mají problémy s prostorovou orientací a komplexní imitací pohybu/gest. Na základě velkých rozdílů, nalezených při úkolech, kdy žáci musí protnout vertikální osu svých těl a otáčet dlaně, lze děti rozdělit do dvou skupin (s motorickými poruchami a poruchami učení a bez nich. Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD is one of all of the heterogeneous range of developmental disorders affecting the initiation, organization and performance of actions. It is often being overlooked in school practice and in everyday work with children. Therefore, the aim of this article is to draw attention to this problem and prove how children with DCD can be easily recognized by teachers of different subjects. Especially PE teachers are those who can recognize pupils with learning difficulties, in informal tasks, and later on organize appropriate intervention. A quicker prognosis

  8. Book Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redactie KITLV

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available I Wayan Arka, Malcolm Ross (eds; The many faces of Austronesian voice systems; Some new empirical studies (René van den Berg H.W. Dick; Surabaya, city of work; A socioeconomic history, 1900-2000 (Peter Boomgaard Josiane Cauquelin; The aborigines of Taiwan: the Puyuma; From headhunting to the modern world. (Wen-Teh Chen Mark Turner, Owen Podger (with Maria Sumardjono and Wayan K. Tirthayasa; Decentralisation in Indonesia; Redesigning the state (Dorian Fougères Jérôme Samuel; Modernisation lexicale et politique terminologique; Le cas de l’Indonésien (Arndt Graf Nicholas J. White; British business in post-colonial Malaysia, 1957-70: neo-colonialism or disengagement? (Karl Hack Chin Peng; Alias Chin Peng; My side of history; As told to Ian Ward and Norma Miraflor (Russell Jones C.C. Chin, Karl Hack (eds; Dialogues with Chin Peng; New light on the Malayan Emergency (Russell Jones Saw Swee-Hock; Population policies and programmes in Singapore (Santo Koesoebjono Domenyk Eades; A grammar of Gayo; A language of Aceh, Sumatra (Yuri A. Lander Derek Johnson, Mark Valencia (eds; Piracy in Southeast Asia; Status, issues, and responses (Carolyn Liss Niclas Burenhult; A grammar of Jahai (James A. Matisoff Ann R. Kinney, Marijke J. Klokke, Lydia Kieven (photographs by Rio Helmi; Worshiping Siva and Buddha; The temple art of East Java (Dick van der Meij Ruben Stoel; Focus in Manado Malay; Grammar, particles, and intonation (Don van Minde Pamela J. Stewart, Andrew Strathern (eds; Expressive genres and historical change; Indonesia, Papua New Guinea and Taiwan. (Dianne van Oosterhout Johszua Robert Mansoben; Sistem politik tradisional di Irian Jaya, Indonesia; Studi perbandingan (Anton Ploeg Timothy B. Barnard (ed.; Contesting Malayness; Malay identities across boundaries (Nathan Porath Joel Bradshaw, Francisc Czobor (eds; Otto Dempwolff’s grammar of the Jabêm language in New Guinea (Ger Reesink

  9. Natural terrestrial radiation exposure in Hong Kong. A survey on environmental gamma absorbed dose rate in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, M.C.; Poon, H.T.; Chan, Y.K.; So, C.K.

    2000-01-01

    Hong Kong is a metropolitan city located on the southern coast of China with a population of some six million. About 90% of the population is concentrated in heavily built-up residential and commercial areas, which accounts for less than 50% of the total area in the territory. Hong Kong Observatory, 134A Nathan Road, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China. In order to understand the spatial variations in the environmental radiation levels in Hong Kong, the Hong Kong Observatory (HKO) in early 1999 conducted a study of the environmental gamma absorbed dose rate in air. The study combined data collected by the HKO radiation monitoring network (RMN) and data from a comprehensive territory-wide radiological survey conducted in January and February 1999. The RMN of ten stations each equipped with a Reuter-Stokes Model RSS-1013 HPIC has been in operation since 1987 to continuously monitor the environmental radiation levels over the territory as part of the emergency monitoring programme for response to nuclear accidents at a nearby nuclear power station. The terrestrial component of the environmental radiation field was estimated by subtracting from the measurements the cosmic contribution, which is determined to be about 39 nGy/h from measurements conducted over two large fresh water reservoirs. The RMN data with the long history was analysed to derive the seasonal variations in the environmental radiation levels. On average the environmental gamma absorbed dose rate in air in January and February is 1.03 times of the annual figure. This seasonal correction was applied to the results of the year 1999 survey. As the radiation field in the heavily built-up areas is enhanced by contribution from buildings, in the territory-wide survey measurements were made both in the open field and built-up areas. The territory of Hong Kong was divided into 42 grid boxes of 5 km x 5 km for open field and 61 grid boxes of 2.5 km x 2.5 km for built-up areas according to the population and land use. A

  10. SB6.0: The 6th International meeting on Synthetic Biology, July 9-11, 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahl, Linda J. [BioBricks Foundation

    2015-04-23

    direct administrative costs associated with selecting speakers (preparing announcements, evaluating abstract submissions) and handling travel arrangements. Leading U.S. researchers selected to speak at the SB6.0 conference included: Adam Arkin, Ph.D. Division Director of the Physical Biosciences Division at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Professor in the Department of Bioengineering at UC Berkeley Jay Keasling, Ph.D. Professor in the Department of Bioengineering at Berkeley, Senior Faculty Scientist and Associate Laboratory Director of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and Chief Executive Officer of the Joint BioEnergy Institute. Debra Mathews, Ph.D. Assistant Director for Science Programs for the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics, Assistant Professor in the Department of Pediatrics, and Affiliate Faculty in the McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Richard Murray, Ph.D. Thomas E. and Doris Everhart Professor of Control & Dynamical Systems and Bioengineering at Caltech. Sarah Richardson, Ph.D. Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellow in Genomics at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute. and others (for a complete listing of speakers presenting at the SB6.0 conference see http://sb6.biobricks.org/speakers/) The SB6.0 conference was the largest synthetic biology conference to date, and highlights of the SB6.0 conference have been published in a special issue of ACS Synthetic Biology (http://pubs.acs.org/toc/asbcd6/3/3). The BioBricks Foundation appreciates the support of the U.S. Department of Energy in helping to make this most influential and important conference in the field of synthetic biology a success.

  11. Gifts reserved for age: a Lacanian study of comedy in Philip Roth’s Exit Ghost = Dons reservados para a idade madura: um estudo lacaniano sobre a comédia em O fantasma sai de cena (2007, de Philip Roth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Milton Mellard

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The critical problem surrounding Philip Roth’s recent Exit Ghost (2007, the ninth and projected by the author as the final Zuckerman novel, is how it can function as comedy when one major character is dying of brain cancer and its protagonist is seventy-one years old, beginning to receive an elderly male’s gifts reserved for age –prostate cancer, prostate surgery, impotence, and incontinence – and, despite all, falls in love with a thirty-year-old married woman. A sequel to The Ghost Writer (1979, the first Zuckerman novel, whose character relations it repeats, Exit Ghost has comparatively less humor than its predecessor but there is humor enough. Moreover, and more important, it fits the genre of comedy because of the functions it gives to the classically traditional motifs of the phallus, castration, age versus youth, Eros and Thanatos, and the like. It is from a Lacanian critical perspective that it can be shown how the novel moves toward comedy’s conventional happy ending because of the duality of meanings attached to the matter of castration, the way in which Roth/Zuckerman displaces the object of desire from the young woman and finds it – enjoyment, jouissance – in the very process of writing itself.O grande problema para a crítica de O fantasma sai de cena, até agora o penúltimo romance de Philip Roth, concebido como o último envolvendo Nathan Zuckerman, é classificá-lo como comédia, e um de seus mais importantes personagens está morrendo de câncer no cérebro e o protagonista tem 71 anos e já está recebendo os dons reservados para a idade madura masculina, ou seja, câncer de próstata, cirurgia prostática, impotência, incontinência urinária e, apesar de tudo, apaixona-se por uma mulher casada, de 30 anos. Sendo uma continuação da série iniciada por The Ghost Writer (1979, o primeiro romance em que aparece o personagem Zuckerman, cujas relações com os demaispersonagens se repetem, O fantasma sai de cena

  12. Archbishop Danilo I: The donor of the frescoes in the prothesis of the Church of the Holy Apostles in Peć

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petković Sreten

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The frescoes in the prothesis of the Church of the Holy Apostles in the Patriarchate of Peć in Kosovo, date from around 1260. They are in poor condition and little has been written about them. Only the portraits of the Serbian hierarchs and saints in the apsis, Sava and Arsenije, have drawn attention, chiefly because the image of the second Serbian archbishop Arsenije - is believed to have been painted during his lifetime. The scenes of the prophet Daniel and the composition The Penitence of King David, are considered to have been painted for their symbolic meaning, primarily regarding to the Holy Communion. Among the compositions, one can see that besides The David rebuked by Nathan, all of them are linked with the life and visions of the prophet Daniel [Daniel in the Lions' Den, The Prophet's Vision of the Kingdom of Heaven (Daniel 7, 1-28. The Archangel Gabriel Foretells Future Events to the Prophet Daniel (Daniel 8, 3; 8, 16-27 and perhaps, The Three Youths in the Fiery Furnace. The small, painted area in the interior (2 *3.70 meters, mostly with scenes devoted to the prophet Daniel, clearly indicates that the prothesis was dedicated to this Old Testament character. In Byzantine churches, the lateral sections of the altar area, the prothesis and the diakonikon - like the parecclesion - were dedicated to the Mother of God and the saints, in most cases, St. Nikolas and St. John the Forerunner. The choice of the prophet Daniel, as the patron of the Peć prothesis was quite unusual. This was obviously done according to the wishes of the Serbian archbishop, Danilo, who thereby wished to pay tribute to his Old Testament namesake. There are several instances in medieval times when Serbian donors dedicated churches to the saints, who were their namesakes. The donor ship of archbishop Danilo 1 also determines mi-date when the frescoes in the prothesis came into being. As he administered the Serbian church for a brief period of less than two years

  13. Physical Activity, Sedentary Behavior, and Diet-Related eHealth and mHealth Research: Bibliometric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Andre Matthias; Maher, Carol A; Vandelanotte, Corneel; Hingle, Melanie; Middelweerd, Anouk; Lopez, Michael L; DeSmet, Ann; Short, Camille E; Nathan, Nicole; Hutchesson, Melinda J; Poppe, Louise; Woods, Catherine B; Williams, Susan L; Wark, Petra A

    2018-04-18

    papers originated from high-income countries (96.90%, 1659/1717), in particular the United States (48.83%, 836/1712). Most papers were trials and studied physical activity. Beginning in 2013, research on Generation 2 technologies (eg, smartphones, wearables) sharply increased, while research on Generation 1 (eg, text messages) technologies increased at a reduced pace. Reviews accounted for 20 of the 42 highly-cited papers (n=19 systematic reviews). Social media, smartphone apps, and wearable activity trackers used to encourage physical activity, less sedentary behavior, and/or healthy eating were the focus of 14 highly-cited papers. This study highlighted the rapid growth of the eHealth and mHealth physical activity, sedentary behavior, and diet research field, emphasized the sizeable contribution of research from high-income countries, and pointed to the increased research interest in Generation 2 technologies. It is expected that the field will grow and diversify further and that reviews and research on most recent technologies will continue to strongly impact the field. ©Andre Matthias Müller, Carol A Maher, Corneel Vandelanotte, Melanie Hingle, Anouk Middelweerd, Michael L Lopez, Ann DeSmet, Camille E Short, Nicole Nathan, Melinda J Hutchesson, Louise Poppe, Catherine B Woods, Susan L Williams, Petra A Wark. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 18.04.2018.

  14. THERMODYNAMICS OF ELECTROLYTES. XI. PROPERTIES OF 3-2, 4-2, AND OTHER HIGH-VALENCE TYPES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitzer, Kenneth S.; Silvester, Leonard F.

    1977-12-01

    , that show clearly these effects for the 3-2 and 4-2 electrolytes in water. Thus it was not possible to give an adequate treatment of osmotic and activity coefficients for such solutes without considering these other properties which can be measured at lower concentrations. While conductance data have been reasonably interpreted following Davies and others, the reports of enthalpy data for very high valence electrolytes left the behavior as apparently anomalous. Thus Nathan, Wallace, and Robinson stated that the heat of dilution of La{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} solutions fails to approach the Debye-Hueckel limiting law even at 2 x 10{sup -5} M and Lange and Miederer reported similar conclusions for several 3-2 and 4-2 solutes. We shall show that these data may be given a reasonable interpretation consistent with the limiting law and that these results assist in estimating activity coefficients for high-valence electrolytes.

  15. An exploration of fluoroscopically guided spinal steroid injections in patients with non-specific exercise-related lower-limb pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Neve

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Leon Neve1, John Orchard2, Nathan Gibbs3, Willem van Mechelen4, Evert Verhagen4, Ken Sesel5, Ian Burgess6, Brett Hines61VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; 2School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3South Sydney Sports Medicine, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 4EMGO, VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; 5Sydney X-ray Centre, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 6Mater Imaging, Sydney, NSW, AustraliaBackground: Fluoroscopically guided lumbar cortisone injections have been proven useful in cases of lower-limb pain caused by lumbar disc prolapse (with evidence levels ll-1/ll-2. These injections are also sometimes used clinically in sports medicine for patients with non-specific exercise-related lower-limb pain, where no prolapse or other obvious cause of nerve-impingement is diagnosed via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI or computed tomography (CT, even though this treatment scenario has not been adequately studied for this last diagnosis.Objectives: To explore whether fluoroscopically guided transforaminal lumbar cortisone injections may be a valid treatment method for non-specific exercise-related lower-limb pain.Study design: Retrospective case series.Methods: Patients were selected from databases at two sports clinics and divided into two groups: Group D, with back-related lower-limb pain and disc prolapse proven on CT or MR; and Group N, with non-specific exercise-related lower-limb pain. Patients were sent a questionnaire regarding: symptoms, improvement, effect of injections, satisfaction, side effects and other used treatments. Outcomes were compared between Group D and N.Results: 153 patients were eligible for the study (Group D: 93/Group N: 60. Eventually 110 patients responded (Group D: 67/Group N: 43. Twelve percent of Group D and 14% of Group N indicated that the injections had fully cured their symptoms. Altogether, 27% of Group D and 24% of Group N were certain the injections had improved their symptoms in the

  16. The Situation Model and Problem Model in Arithmetic Problem Solving%论数学问题解决中情境模型与问题模型的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    和美君; 刘儒德

    2012-01-01

    情境模型与问题模型是数学问题解决研究中的两个重要概念,前者是对问题所述情境的日常化的定性表征,后者是基于图式知识对问题关键变量的数量关系表征。本文介绍了两种模型的发展历史以及目前存在的争议,并提出未来研究需要解决的问题。%Situation model and problem model are two important concepts in arithmetic problem solving and representation. However, researchers have different opinions about their definitions, roles and relationships in the process of problem solving. Therefore, our aim is to talk about their development history, discriminate the concepts, and reveal the controversies and future study direction. On the basis of general text comprehension theory (Van Dijk & Kintsch, 1983), Kintsch and Greeno (1985)first proposed the construction of problem models in arithmetic problem solving research field. They argued that problem solvers would construct textbase and problem model, and the latter one was the only high-level representation problem solvers constructed. This left other researchers unsatisfied, and many began to express their own opinions and propose the concept of the situation model. Nathan, Kintsch, and Young (1992) argued that while Kintsch and Greeno(1985) placed too much emphasis on schemata and problem models, the situation model was very important for it could make explicit the implicit conditions in the problem, and could also monitor and even correct possible mistakes in problem models. Then, Moreau and Coquin-Viennot(2003)studied the nature of representation problem solvers constructed through the information types they chose when doing different tasks, and proved that when solving problems, students would construct different representations according to different task requirements, and meanwhile, the mathematical ability of students had a great impact on the their capability of choosing relevant information to construct

  17. Mobile Application to Promote Adherence to Oral Chemotherapy and Symptom Management: A Protocol for Design and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishbein, Joel Nathan; Nisotel, Lauren Ellen; MacDonald, James John; Amoyal Pensak, Nicole; Jacobs, Jamie Michele; Flanagan, Clare; Jethwani, Kamal; Greer, Joseph Andrew

    2017-04-20

    symptoms and side effects. At every stage in this trial, we are engaging stakeholders to solicit feedback on our progress and next steps. To our knowledge, we are the first to describe the development of an app designed for people taking oral chemotherapy. The app addresses many concerns with oral chemotherapy, such as medication adherence and symptom management. Soliciting feedback from stakeholders with broad perspectives and expertise ensured that the app was acceptable and potentially beneficial for patients, caregivers, and clinicians. In our development process, we instantiated 7 of the 8 best practices proposed in a recent review of mobile health app development. Our process demonstrated the importance of effective communication between research groups and technical teams, as well as meticulous planning of technical specifications before development begins. Future efforts should consider incorporating other proven strategies in software, such as gamification, to bolster the impact of mobile health apps. Forthcoming results from our randomized controlled trial will provide key data on the effectiveness of this app in improving medication adherence and symptom management. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02157519; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02157519 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6prj3xfKA). ©Joel Nathan Fishbein, Lauren Ellen Nisotel, James John MacDonald, Nicole Amoyal Pensak, Jamie Michele Jacobs, Clare Flanagan, Kamal Jethwani, Joseph Andrew Greer. Originally published in JMIR Research Protocols (http://www.researchprotocols.org), 20.04.2017.

  18. Entrevista com Pierre-Marc De Biasi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Romanelli

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7968.2012v1n29p223   Formado no ENS de Saint-Cloud e no ENSBA de Paris, doutor e pesquisador, Pierre-Marc de Biasi é coordenador de pesquisa no CNRS (ITEM: Institut des Textes et Manuscrits modernes. É membro do Doutorado da Université Paris 7, encarregado de um seminário de pesquisa na Université Paris 4 Sorbonne, membro da comissão editorial de várias revistas (Magazine littéraire, Genesis, Cahiers de médiologie, etc., diretor de inúmeras coleções literárias ou críticas (Hachette Supérieur, Seuil, CNRS éditions. Especialista em genética literária, é autor de vários artigos teóricos sobre a análise de manuscritos modernos e sobre a gênese da obra (especialmente na Encyclopædia Universalis, La génétique des textes, Nathan 2000, etc., sobre a história da escritura e as novas tecnologias, além de muitos ensaios, edições ou estudos das obras editadas e dos manuscritos de Flaubert: Carnets de travail Balland, 1988- prêmio da crítica da Académie française; Voyage en Égypte Grasset, 1991; L'Éducation sentimentale (Seuil, 1993; Madame Bovary (Imprimerie Nationale, 1994, Trois Contes (Bouvard et Pécuchet; 'Éducation sentimentale (Classiques de poche, 1999-2002; laubert, l'homme-plume (Gallimard "Découvertes", 2002, etc. P.- . de Biasi é também especialista em história do papel (Pouvoirs du papier, Cahiers de médiologie n°4, Gallimard, 1997 ; Le Devenir des papiers modernes, BNF 1997 ; La Saga du papier, un film Théma Arte 1999 ; Un livre d'art, Adam Biro-Arte édition, 1999 ; Une synthèse illustrée, Le papier, une aventure au quotidien, Gallimard "Découvertes", 1999. Paralelamente ao seu trabalho literário, P.-M. de Biasi tem publicado sobre a história da arte (pintura, arquitetura,  Genesis 14, junho 2000 e desenvolve uma pesquisa criativa nas artes plásticas (pintura, escultura, instalações. Com cerca de quarenta exposições em museus e em galerias após 1977

  19. Multicomponent physical exercise with simultaneous cognitive training to enhance dual-task walking of older adults: a secondary analysis of a 6-month randomized controlled trial with 1-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eggenberger P

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Patrick Eggenberger,1 Nathan Theill,2,3 Stefan Holenstein,1 Vera Schumacher,4,5 Eling D de Bruin1,6,7 1Department of Health Sciences and Technology, Institute of Human Movement Sciences and Sport, ETH Zurich, 2Division of Psychiatry Research, 3Center for Gerontology, 4Department of Gerontopsychology and Gerontology, 5University Research Priority Program “Dynamics of Healthy Aging”, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; 6Department of Epidemiology, CAPHRI School for Public Health and Primary Care, 7Centre for Evidence Based Physiotherapy, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands Background: About one-third of people older than 65 years fall at least once a year. Physical exercise has been previously demonstrated to improve gait, enhance physical fitness, and prevent falls. Nonetheless, the addition of cognitive training components may potentially increase these effects, since cognitive impairment is related to gait irregularities and fall risk. We hypothesized that simultaneous cognitive–physical training would lead to greater improvements in dual-task (DT gait compared to exclusive physical training.Methods: Elderly persons older than 70 years and without cognitive impairment were randomly assigned to the following groups: 1 virtual reality video game dancing (DANCE, 2 treadmill walking with simultaneous verbal memory training (MEMORY, or 3 treadmill walking (PHYS. Each program was complemented with strength and balance exercises. Two 1-hour training sessions per week over 6 months were applied. Gait variables, functional fitness (Short Physical Performance Battery, 6-minute walk, and fall frequencies were assessed at baseline, after 3 months and 6 months, and at 1-year follow-up. Multiple regression analyses with planned comparisons were carried out.Results: Eighty-nine participants were randomized to three groups initially; 71 completed the training and 47 were available at 1-year follow-up. DANCE/MEMORY showed a

  20. Computer-Based Driving in Dementia Decision Tool With Mail Support: Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapoport, Mark J; Zucchero Sarracini, Carla; Kiss, Alex; Lee, Linda; Byszewski, Anna; Seitz, Dallas P; Vrkljan, Brenda; Molnar, Frank; Herrmann, Nathan; Tang-Wai, David F; Frank, Christopher; Henry, Blair; Pimlott, Nicholas; Masellis, Mario; Naglie, Gary

    2018-05-25

    between the intervention and the control groups (50% vs 49%; Z=-0.19, P=.85). Two variables predicted algorithm-based reporting-caregiver concern (odds ratio [OR]=5.8, 95% CI 2.5-13.6, P<.001) and abnormal clock drawing (OR 6.1, 95% CI 3.1-11.8, P<.001). On the basis of this quantitative analysis, in-office abnormal clock drawing and expressions of concern about driving from caregivers substantially influenced physicians to report patients with mild dementia or mild cognitive impairment to transportation administrators, but the DD-DT tool itself did not increase such reports among these expert physicians. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02036099; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02036099 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6zGMF1ky8). ©Mark J Rapoport, Carla Zucchero Sarracini, Alex Kiss, Linda Lee, Anna Byszewski, Dallas P Seitz, Brenda Vrkljan, Frank Molnar, Nathan Herrmann, David F Tang-Wai, Christopher Frank, Blair Henry, Nicholas Pimlott, Mario Masellis, Gary Naglie. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 25.05.2018.