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  1. Test-retest reliability of maximal leg muscle power and functional performance measures in patients with severe osteoarthritis (OA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Allan; Roos, Ewa M.; Overgaard, Søren

    Abstract : Purpose To evaluate the reliability of single-joint and multi-joint maximal leg muscle power and functional performance measures in patients with severe OA. Background Muscle power, taking both strength and velocity into account, is a more functional measure of lower extremity muscle...... and scheduled for unilateral total hip (n=9) or knee (n=11) replacement. Patients underwent a test battery on two occasions separated by approximately one week (range 7 to 11 days). Muscle power was measured using: 1. A linear encoder, unilateral lower limb isolated single-joint dynamic movement, e.g. knee...... flexion 2. A leg extension press, unilateral multi-joint knee and hip extension Functional performance was measured using: 1. 20 m walk usual pace 2. 20 m walk maximal pace 3. 5 times chair stands 4. Maximal number of knee bends/30sec Pain was measured on a VAS prior to and after conducting the entire...

  2. Patellar Skin Surface Temperature by Thermography Reflects Knee Osteoarthritis Severity

    OpenAIRE

    Anna E. Denoble; Norine Hall; Carl F. Pieper; Virginia B. Kraus

    2010-01-01

    Background: Digital infrared thermal imaging is a means of measuring the heat radiated from the skin surface. Our goal was to develop and assess the reproducibility of serial infrared measurements of the knee and to assess the association of knee temperature by region of interest with radiographic severity of knee Osteoarthritis (rOA). Methods: A total of 30 women (15 Cases with symptomatic knee OA and 15 age-matched Controls without knee pain or knee OA) participated in this study. Infrared ...

  3. Osteoarthritis and a high-fat diet: the full 'OA syndrome' in a small animal model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraan, P.M. van der

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is one of the main risk factors for osteoarthritis (OA) and due to the global rise in obesity this will increasingly contribute to OA development. The article of Griffin and co-workers in this issue of Arthritis Research and Therapy shows that a high-fat diet leads to obesity and OA in the

  4. Development and Evaluation of the Boston University Osteoarthritis Functional Pain Short Form (BU-OA-FPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, Adam P; Ni, Pengshend; Jette, Alan; Fitzgerald, G Kelley

    2018-04-19

    Pragmatic studies have gained popularity, thus emphasizing the need for patient-reported outcomes (PRO) to be integrated into electronic health records. This study describes the development of a customized short form from the Boston University Osteoarthritis Functional Assessment PRO (BU-OA-PRO) for a specific pragmatic clinical trial. A Functional Pain Short Form was created from an existing item bank of deidentified data in the BU-OA-PRO. Item response theory (IRT) methods were used to select items. Reliability was measured with the Cronbach alpha, then with IRT simulation methods. To examine validity, ceiling and floor effects, correlations between the short-form scores and scores from the BU-OA-PRO and the Western Ontario McMasters University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) Pain and Difficulty subscales, and the area under the curve (AUC) were calculated. A minimum detectable change at 90% confidence (MDC90) was calculated based on a calibration sample. The BU-OA PRO was reduced from 126 items to 10 items to create the BU-OA Functional Pain Short Form (BU-OA-FPS). The Cronbach alpha indicated high internal consistency (0.91), and reliability distribution estimates were 0.96 (uniform) and 0.92 (normal). Low ceiling effects (4.57%), and floor effects (0%) were found. Moderate-to-high correlations between the BU-OA PRO and BU-OA-FPS were found with WOMAC Pain (BU-OA-FPS = 0.67; BU-OA-PRO = 0.64) and Difficulty (BU-OA-FPS = 0.73; BU-OA-PRO = 0.69) subscales. The correlation between the BU-OA-PRO and BU-OA-FPS was 0.94. The AUC ranged from 0.80 to 0.88. The MDC90 was approximately 6 standardized points. The BU-OA-FPS provides reliable and valid measurement of functional pain. Pragmatic studies may consider the BU-OA-FPS for use in electronic health records to capture outcomes.

  5. Osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allen, Kelli D.; Choong, Peter F.; Davis, Aileen M.

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of pain and disability worldwide. Despite the existence of evidence-based treatments and guidelines, substantial gaps remain in the quality of OA management. There is underutilization of behavioral and rehabilitative strategies to prevent and treat OA as well...

  6. Patellar Skin Surface Temperature by Thermography Reflects Knee Osteoarthritis Severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna E. Denoble

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Digital infrared thermal imaging is a means of measuring the heat radiated from the skin surface. Our goal was to develop and assess the reproducibility of serial infrared measurements of the knee and to assess the association of knee temperature by region of interest with radiographic severity of knee Osteoarthritis (rOA. Methods A total of 30 women (15 Cases with symptomatic knee OA and 15 age-matched Controls without knee pain or knee OA participated in this study. Infrared imaging was performed with a Meditherm Med2000™ Pro infrared camera. The reproducibility of infrared imaging of the knee was evaluated through determination of intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs for temperature measurements from two images performed 6 months apart in Controls whose knee status was not expected to change. The average cutaneous temperature for each of five knee regions of interest was extracted using WinTes software. Knee x-rays were scored for severity of rOA based on the global Kellgren-Lawrence grading scale. Results The knee infrared thermal imaging procedure used here demonstrated long-term reproducibility with high ICCs (0.50–0.72 for the various regions of interest in Controls. Cutaneous temperature of the patella (knee cap yielded a significant correlation with severity of knee rOA (R = 0.594, P = 0.02. Conclusion The skin temperature of the patellar region correlated with x-ray severity of knee OA. This method of infrared knee imaging is reliable and as an objective measure of a sign of inflammation, temperature, indicates an interrelationship of inflammation and structural knee rOA damage.

  7. Patellar skin surface temperature by thermography reflects knee osteoarthritis severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denoble, Anna E; Hall, Norine; Pieper, Carl F; Kraus, Virginia B

    2010-10-15

    Digital infrared thermal imaging is a means of measuring the heat radiated from the skin surface. Our goal was to develop and assess the reproducibility of serial infrared measurements of the knee and to assess the association of knee temperature by region of interest with radiographic severity of knee Osteoarthritis (rOA). A total of 30 women (15 Cases with symptomatic knee OA and 15 age-matched Controls without knee pain or knee OA) participated in this study. Infrared imaging was performed with a Meditherm Med2000™ Pro infrared camera. The reproducibility of infrared imaging of the knee was evaluated through determination of intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for temperature measurements from two images performed 6 months apart in Controls whose knee status was not expected to change. The average cutaneous temperature for each of five knee regions of interest was extracted using WinTes software. Knee x-rays were scored for severity of rOA based on the global Kellgren-Lawrence grading scale. The knee infrared thermal imaging procedure used here demonstrated long-term reproducibility with high ICCs (0.50-0.72 for the various regions of interest) in Controls. Cutaneous temperature of the patella (knee cap) yielded a significant correlation with severity of knee rOA (R = 0.594, P = 0.02). The skin temperature of the patellar region correlated with x-ray severity of knee OA. This method of infrared knee imaging is reliable and as an objective measure of a sign of inflammation, temperature, indicates an interrelationship of inflammation and structural knee rOA damage.

  8. "Let's talk about OA pain": a qualitative analysis of the perceptions of people suffering from OA. Towards the development of a specific pain OA-Related questionnaire, the Osteoarthritis Symptom Inventory Scale (OASIS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Cedraschi

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Pain is the primary outcome measurement in osteoarthritis, and its assessment is mostly based on its intensity. The management of this difficult chronic condition could be improved by using pain descriptors to improve analyses of painful sensations. This should help to define subgroups of patients based on pain phenotype, for more adapted treatment. This study draws upon patients' descriptions of their pain, to identify and understand their perception of osteoarthritis pain and to categorize pain dimensions. METHODS: This qualitative study was conducted with representative types of patients suffering from osteoarthritis. Two focus groups were conducted with a sample of 14 participants, with either recent or chronic OA, at one or multiple sites. Focus groups were semi-structured and used open-ended questions addressing personal experiences to explore the experiences of patients with OA pain and the meanings they attributed to these pains. RESULTS: TWO MAIN POINTS EMERGED FROM CONTENT ANALYSES: -A major difficulty in getting patients to describe their osteoarthritis pain: perception that nobody wants to hear about it; necessity to preserve one's self and social image; notion of self-imposed stoicism; and perception of osteoarthritis as a complex, changing, illogical disease associated with aging. -Osteoarthritis pains were numerous and differed in intensity, duration, depth, type of occurrence, impact and rhythm, but also in painful sensations and associated symptoms. Based on analyses of the verbatim interviews, seven dimensions of OA pain emerged: pain sensory description, OA-related symptoms, pain variability profile, pain-triggering factors, pain and physical activity, mood and image, general physical symptoms. SUMMARY: In osteoarthritis, pain analysis should not be restricted to intensity. Our qualitative study identified pain descriptors and defined seven dimensions of osteoarthritis pain. Based on these dimensions, we aim to

  9. Effect of joint traction on functional improvement and quality of life in patients with severe knee osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Sedigheh Sadat Naeimee; Abbas Rahimi; Mehdi Rezaee; Alireza Akbarzadeh Baghban; Khosro Khademi Kalantari; ُSomayeh Mahmoudi Aghdam

    2012-01-01

    Background and aim: Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most prevalent joint disease in adults around the world and its incidence rises with age. Patients with severe knee osteoarthritis often complain of pain and severe functional disability. Most of conservative treatments used in this group of patients induce poor improvements. This study evaluated the effect of joint traction on quality of life of patients with severe knee osteoarthritis.Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial study, forty f...

  10. Myostatin serum concentrations are correlated with the severity of knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chang; Shao, Yan; Lin, Chuangxin; Zeng, Chun; Fang, Hang; Pan, Jianying; Cai, Daozhang

    2017-09-01

    Myostatin, a member of the transforming growth factor-β family, contributes to joint deterioration in mice. Thus, we aimed to assess the correlation of myostatin concentrations with the presence and severity of knee osteoarthritis (OA). We determined serum and synovial fluid (SF) myostatin concentrations in a population of 184 patients with knee OA and 109 healthy controls. The knee OA group presented with higher serum myostatin concentrations than the controls. Knee OA patients with KL grade 4 showed higher serum and SF myostatin concentrations compared with those with KL grade 2 and 3. Knee OA patients with KL grade 3 had higher serum and SF myostatin concentrations compared with those with KL grade 2. Serum and SF myostatin concentrations were significantly correlated with KL grading. Serum and SF myostatin concentrations were correlated with the presence and severity of knee OA. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Does Loading Influence the Severity of Cartilage Degeneration in the Canine Groove-Model of OA?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Petra; Intema, Femke; van El, Benno; DeGroot, Jeroen; Bijlsma, J. W. J.; Lafeber, Floris; Mastbergen, Simon

    2009-01-01

    Many animal models are used to study osteoarthritis (OA). In these models the role of joint loading in the development of CA is not fully understood. We studied the effect of loading on the development of CIA in the canine Groove-model. In ten female beagle dogs OA was induced in one knee according

  12. Mental Health-Ill Health Differences in Disease Severity and Its Sociodemographic Biobehavioral Predictors Among Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezakhani Moghaddam, Hamed; Nadrian, Haidar; Abbagolizadeh, Nategh; Babazadeh, Towhid; Aghemiri, Mehran; Fathipour, Asaad

    2018-01-01

    Our aim in this cross-sectional study was to investigate mental health-ill health differences in disease severity and its sociodemographic biobehavioral predictors among patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Applying convenient sampling, 180 patients with knee OA in Tabriz, Iran, were recruited to participate in completing a three-section questionnaire (SF-12, Lequesne Algofunctional Index and Self-Management Behaviors Scale). Separate hierarchical multiple linear regressions were performed with OA severity as dependent variable: one for OA patients with positive mental health and other for OA patients with mental disorders symptoms. Among the patients with positive mental health, but not those with symptoms of mental disorder, pain management, duration of OA, physical activity management, living alone, and level of education were significant predictors of disease severity. Health care providers with a better understanding on the determinants of disease severity by mental health status may identify vulnerable patients and develop targeted interventions to foster disease management behaviors among OA patients.

  13. Positive association between increased popliteal artery vessel wall thickness and generalized osteoarthritis: is OA also part of the metabolic syndrome?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornaat, Peter R.; Sharma, Ruby; Geest, Rob J. van der; Lamb, Hildo J.; Bloem, Johan L.; Watt, Iain; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Hellio le Graverand, Marie-Pierre

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine if a positive association exists between arterial vessel wall thickness and generalized osteoarthritis (OA). Our hypothesis is that generalized OA is another facet of the metabolic syndrome. The medical ethical review board of our institution approved the study. Written informed consent was obtained from each patient prior to the study. Magnetic resonance (MR) images of the knee were obtained in 42 patients who had been diagnosed with generalized OA at multiple joint sites. Another 27 MR images of the knee were obtained from a matched normal (non-OA) reference population. Vessel wall thickness of the popliteal artery was quantitatively measured by dedicated software. Linear regression models were used to investigate the association between vessel wall thickness and generalized OA. Adjustments were made for age, sex, and body mass index (BMI). Confidence intervals (CI) were computed at the 95% level and a significance level of α = 0.05 was used. Patients in the generalized OA population had a significant higher average vessel wall thickness than persons from the normal reference population (p ≤ α), even when correction was made for sex, age, and BMI. The average vessel wall thickness of the popliteal artery was 1.09 mm in patients with generalized OA, and 0.96 mm in the matched normal reference population. The association found between increased popliteal artery vessel wall thickness and generalized osteoarthritis suggests that generalized OA might be another facet of the metabolic syndrome. (orig.)

  14. Positive association between increased popliteal artery vessel wall thickness and generalized osteoarthritis: is OA also part of the metabolic syndrome?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornaat, Peter R.; Sharma, Ruby; Geest, Rob J. van der; Lamb, Hildo J.; Bloem, Johan L.; Watt, Iain [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Kloppenburg, Margreet [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Rheumatology, Leiden (Netherlands); Hellio le Graverand, Marie-Pierre [Pfizer Global Research and Development, New London, CT (United States)

    2009-12-15

    The purpose of the study was to determine if a positive association exists between arterial vessel wall thickness and generalized osteoarthritis (OA). Our hypothesis is that generalized OA is another facet of the metabolic syndrome. The medical ethical review board of our institution approved the study. Written informed consent was obtained from each patient prior to the study. Magnetic resonance (MR) images of the knee were obtained in 42 patients who had been diagnosed with generalized OA at multiple joint sites. Another 27 MR images of the knee were obtained from a matched normal (non-OA) reference population. Vessel wall thickness of the popliteal artery was quantitatively measured by dedicated software. Linear regression models were used to investigate the association between vessel wall thickness and generalized OA. Adjustments were made for age, sex, and body mass index (BMI). Confidence intervals (CI) were computed at the 95% level and a significance level of {alpha} = 0.05 was used. Patients in the generalized OA population had a significant higher average vessel wall thickness than persons from the normal reference population (p {<=} {alpha}), even when correction was made for sex, age, and BMI. The average vessel wall thickness of the popliteal artery was 1.09 mm in patients with generalized OA, and 0.96 mm in the matched normal reference population. The association found between increased popliteal artery vessel wall thickness and generalized osteoarthritis suggests that generalized OA might be another facet of the metabolic syndrome. (orig.)

  15. Effect of antiresorptive and anabolic bone therapy on development of osteoarthritis in a posttraumatic rat model of OA

    OpenAIRE

    Bagi, Cedo M.; Berryman, Edwin; Zakur, David E.; Wilkie, Dean; Andresen, Catharine J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of disability, but despite the high unmet clinical need and extensive research seeking dependable therapeutic interventions, no proven disease-modifying treatment for OA is currently available. Due to the close interaction and interplay between the articular cartilage and the subchondral bone plate, it has been hypothesized that antiresorptive drugs can also reduce cartilage degradation, inhibit excessive turnover of the subchondral bone pla...

  16. Effects of neuromuscular training (NEMEX-TJR) on patient-reported outcomes and physical function in severe primary hip or knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ageberg, Eva; Nilsdotter, Anna; Kosek, Eva

    2013-01-01

    The benefits of exercise in mild and moderate knee or hip osteoarthritis (OA) are apparent, but the evidence in severe OA is less clear. We recently reported that neuromuscular training was well tolerated and feasible in patients with severe primary hip or knee OA. The aims of this controlled bef...... before-and-after study were to compare baseline status to an age-matched population-based reference group and to examine the effects of neuromuscular training on patient-reported outcomes and physical function in patients with severe primary OA of the hip or knee.......The benefits of exercise in mild and moderate knee or hip osteoarthritis (OA) are apparent, but the evidence in severe OA is less clear. We recently reported that neuromuscular training was well tolerated and feasible in patients with severe primary hip or knee OA. The aims of this controlled...

  17. Focal knee lesions in knee pairs of asymptomatic and symptomatic subjects with OA risk factors—Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chundru, Renu, E-mail: renu.chundru@ucsf.edu [Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Research Group, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, 185 Berry Street, Suite 350, San Francisco, CA 94107 (United States); Baum, Thomas, E-mail: thbaum@gmx.de [Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Research Group, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, 185 Berry Street, Suite 350, San Francisco, CA 94107 (United States); Nardo, Lorenzo, E-mail: lorenzo.nardo@ucsf.edu [Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Research Group, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, 185 Berry Street, Suite 350, San Francisco, CA 94107 (United States); Nevitt, Michael C., E-mail: MNevitt@psg.ucsf.edu [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, 185 Berry Street, Suite 5700, San Francisco, CA 94107 (United States); Lynch, John, E-mail: JLynch@psg.ucsf.edu [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, 185 Berry Street, Suite 5700, San Francisco, CA 94107 (United States); McCulloch, Charles E., E-mail: CMcCulloch@epi.ucsf.edu [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, 185 Berry Street, Suite 5700, San Francisco, CA 94107 (United States); Link, Thomas M., E-mail: tmlink@radiology.ucsf.edu [Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Research Group, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, 185 Berry Street, Suite 350, San Francisco, CA 94107 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Objective: To better understand the relationship between knee pain and bilateral knee lesions, we compared focal knee lesions in knee pairs of subjects with no, unilateral, and bilateral knee pain, and risk factors for knee osteoarthritis (OA), but no radiographic knee OA. Materials and methods: We examined both knees of 120 subjects from the Osteoarthritis Initiative database. We randomly selected 60 subjects aged 45–55 years with OA risk factors, no knee pain (WOMAC pain score = 0) and no radiographic OA (KL-score ≤1) in both knees. We also selected two comparison groups with OA risk factors and no radiographic OA in both knees, but with knee pain (WOMAC pain score ≥5): 30 subjects with right only knee pain and 30 subjects with bilateral knee pain. All subjects underwent 3T MRI of both knees and focal knee lesions were assessed. Results: Statistically significant associations between prevalence of focal lesions in the right and left knee with odds ratios up to 13.5 were found in all three subject groups. Focal knee lesions were generally not associated with pain in analyses comparing knee pairs of subjects with unilateral knee pain (p > 0.05). The prevalence and severity of focal knee lesions were not significantly different in knee pairs of subjects with no knee pain and those with bilateral knee pain (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Focal knee lesions in the right and left knee of subjects with OA risk factors were positively associated with each other independent of knee pain status, and were not statistically significant different between knees in subjects with unilateral knee pain.

  18. Focal knee lesions in knee pairs of asymptomatic and symptomatic subjects with OA risk factors—Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chundru, Renu; Baum, Thomas; Nardo, Lorenzo; Nevitt, Michael C.; Lynch, John; McCulloch, Charles E.; Link, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To better understand the relationship between knee pain and bilateral knee lesions, we compared focal knee lesions in knee pairs of subjects with no, unilateral, and bilateral knee pain, and risk factors for knee osteoarthritis (OA), but no radiographic knee OA. Materials and methods: We examined both knees of 120 subjects from the Osteoarthritis Initiative database. We randomly selected 60 subjects aged 45–55 years with OA risk factors, no knee pain (WOMAC pain score = 0) and no radiographic OA (KL-score ≤1) in both knees. We also selected two comparison groups with OA risk factors and no radiographic OA in both knees, but with knee pain (WOMAC pain score ≥5): 30 subjects with right only knee pain and 30 subjects with bilateral knee pain. All subjects underwent 3T MRI of both knees and focal knee lesions were assessed. Results: Statistically significant associations between prevalence of focal lesions in the right and left knee with odds ratios up to 13.5 were found in all three subject groups. Focal knee lesions were generally not associated with pain in analyses comparing knee pairs of subjects with unilateral knee pain (p > 0.05). The prevalence and severity of focal knee lesions were not significantly different in knee pairs of subjects with no knee pain and those with bilateral knee pain (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Focal knee lesions in the right and left knee of subjects with OA risk factors were positively associated with each other independent of knee pain status, and were not statistically significant different between knees in subjects with unilateral knee pain

  19. OARSI/OMERACT initiative to define states of severity and indication for joint replacement in hip and knee osteoarthritis. An OMERACT 10 Special Interest Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gossec, Laure; Paternotte, Simon; Bingham, Clifton O

    2011-01-01

    To define pain and physical function cutpoints that would, coupled with structural severity, define a surrogate measure of "need for joint replacement surgery," for use as an outcome measure for potential structure-modifying interventions for osteoarthritis (OA)....

  20. Adipokine hormones and hand osteoarthritis: radiographic severity and pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Massengale

    Full Text Available Obesity's association with hand osteoarthritis cannot be fully explained by mechanical loading. We examined the relationship between adipokines and radiographic hand osteoarthritis severity and pain.In a pilot study of 44 hand osteoarthritis patients (39 women and 5 men, serum adipokine concentrations and hand x-ray Kallman-scores were analyzed using linear regression models. Secondary analyses examined correlates of hand pain.The cohort had a mean age of 63.5 years for women and 72.6 for men; mean (standard deviation Kallman-scores were 43.3(17.4 for women and 46.2(10.8 for men. Mean body-mass-index was 30 kg/m(2 for women and men. Mean leptin concentration was 32.2 ng/ml (women and 18.5 ng/ml (men; mean adiponectin-total was 7.9 ng/ml (women and 5.3 ng/ml (men; mean resistin was 7.3 ng/ml (women and 9.4 ng/ml (men. No association was found between Kallman-scores and adipokine concentrations (R(2 = 0.00-0.04 unadjusted analysis, all p-values>0.22. Secondary analyses showed mean visual-analog-scale pain of 4.8(2.4 for women and 6.6(0.9 for men. Leptin, BMI, and history of coronary artery disease were found to be associated with visual-analog-scale scores for chronic hand pain (R(2 = 0.36 unadjusted analysis, p-values≤0.04.In this pilot study, we found that adipokine serum concentrations were not associated with hand osteoarthritis radiographic severity; the most important correlates of joint damage were age and disease duration. Leptin serum concentration, BMI, and coronary artery disease were associated with the intensity of chronic hand OA pain.

  1. Subgroup analyses of the effectiveness of oral glucosamine for knee and hip osteoarthritis: a systematic review and individual patient data meta-analysis from the OA trial bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runhaar, Jos; Rozendaal, Rianne M; van Middelkoop, Marienke; Bijlsma, Hans J W; Doherty, Michael; Dziedzic, Krysia S; Lohmander, L Stefan; McAlindon, Timothy; Zhang, Weiya; Bierma Zeinstra, Sita

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of oral glucosamine in subgroups of people with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA) based on baseline pain severity, body mass index (BMI), sex, structural abnormalities and presence of inflammation using individual patient data. After a systematic search of the literature and clinical trial registries, all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effect of any oral glucosamine substance in patients with clinically or radiographically defined hip or knee OA were contacted. As a minimum, pain, age, sex and BMI at baseline and pain as an outcome measure needed to be assessed. Of 21 eligible studies, six (n=1663) shared their trial data with the OA Trial Bank. Five trials (all independent of industry, n=1625) compared glucosamine with placebo, representing 55% of the total number of participants in all published placebo-controlled RCTs. Glucosamine was no better than placebo for pain or function at short (3 months) and long-term (24 months) follow-up. Glucosamine was also no better than placebo among the predefined subgroups. Stratification for knee OA and type of glucosamine did not alter these results. Although proposed and debated for several years, open trial data are not widely made available for studies of glucosamine for OA, especially those sponsored by industry. Currently, there is no good evidence to support the use of glucosamine for hip or knee OA and an absence of evidence to support specific consideration of glucosamine for any clinically relevant OA subgroup according to baseline pain severity, BMI, sex, structural abnormalities or presence of inflammation. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. Association of Irisin and CRP Levels with the Radiographic Severity of Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yongtao; Xu, Wei; Xie, Zonggang; Dong, Qirong

    2016-02-01

    Irisin, a recently identified myokine, is implicated in protecting mice from obesity. This study was designed to examine the relation of irisin levels in serum and synovial fluid (SF) with the radiographic severity of osteoarthritis (OA). Our study included 215 patients with knee OA. Irisin levels in serum and SF were evaluated using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The progression of OA was assessed using Kellgren-Lawrence grading system. Knee OA patients had lower serum irisin concentrations and increased serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels compared with healthy controls. There were markedly decreased irisin levels in both the serum and the SF, as well as increased serum CRP levels of knee OA patients with Kellgren and Lawrence (KL) grade 4 compared with patients classified as KL grade 2 and 3. Furthermore, patients with KL grade 3 showed markedly reduced serum and SF levels of irisin, as well as increased serum CRP levels compared with patients classified as KL grade 2. Irisin levels in serum and SF of knee OA patients were negatively correlated with disease severity evaluated by KL grading criteria. Irisin levels in the serum and SF of knee OA patients were negatively correlated with disease severity evaluated by the radiographic KL grading criteria.

  3. Effect of antiresorptive and anabolic bone therapy on development of osteoarthritis in a posttraumatic rat model of OA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagi, Cedo M; Berryman, Edwin; Zakur, David E; Wilkie, Dean; Andresen, Catharine J

    2015-11-06

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of disability, but despite the high unmet clinical need and extensive research seeking dependable therapeutic interventions, no proven disease-modifying treatment for OA is currently available. Due to the close interaction and interplay between the articular cartilage and the subchondral bone plate, it has been hypothesized that antiresorptive drugs can also reduce cartilage degradation, inhibit excessive turnover of the subchondral bone plate, prevent osteophyte formation, and/or that bone anabolic drugs might also stimulate cartilage synthesis by chondrocytes and preserve cartilage integrity. The benefit of intensive zoledronate (Zol) and parathyroid hormone (PTH) therapy for bone and cartilage metabolism was evaluated in a rat model of OA. Medial meniscectomy (MM) was used to induce OA in male Lewis rats. Therapy with Zol and human PTH was initiated immediately after surgery. A dynamic weight-bearing (DWB) system was deployed to evaluate the weight-bearing capacity of the front and hind legs. At the end of the 10-week study, the rats were euthanized and the cartilage pathology was evaluated by contrast (Hexabrix)-enhanced μCT imaging and traditional histology. Bone tissue was evaluated at the tibial metaphysis and epiphysis, including the subchondral bone. Histological techniques and dynamic histomorphometry were used to evaluate cartilage morphology and bone mineralization. The results of this study highlight the complex changes in bone metabolism in different bone compartments influenced by local factors, including inflammation, pain and mechanical loads. Surgery caused severe and extensive deterioration of the articular cartilage at the medial tibial plateau, as evidenced by contrast-enhanced μCT and histology. The study results showed the negative impact of MM surgery on the weight-bearing capacity of the operated limb, which was not corrected by treatment. Although both Zol and PTH improved subchondral bone mass and

  4. Subgrouping and TargetEd Exercise pRogrammes for knee and hip OsteoArthritis (STEER OA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holden, Melanie A; Burke, Danielle L; Runhaar, Jos

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Knee and hip osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of disability worldwide. Therapeutic exercise is a recommended core treatment for people with knee and hip OA, however, the observed effect sizes for reducing pain and improving physical function are small to moderate. This may...... and (2) mediators of the effect of therapeutic exercise for reducing pain and improving physical function. This will enable optimal targeting and refining the content of future exercise interventions. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Systematic review and individual participant data meta-analyses. A previous...... comprehensive systematic review will be updated to identify randomised controlled trials that compare the effects of therapeutic exercise for people with knee and hip OA on pain and physical function to a non-exercise control. Lead authors of eligible trials will be invited to share individual participant data...

  5. Presence of Gout is Associated With Increased Prevalence and Severity of Knee Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Rennie G.; Samuels, Jonathan; Gyftopoulos, Soterios; Krasnokutsky, Svetlana; Leung, Joseph; Swearingen, Christopher J.; Pillinger, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Gout and osteoarthritis (OA) are the most prevalent arthritides, but their relationship is neither well established nor well understood. Objectives We assessed whether a diagnosis of gout or asymptomatic hyperuricemia (AH) is associated with increased prevalence/severity of knee OA. Methods 119 male patients ages 55–85 were sequentially enrolled from the primary care clinics of an urban VA hospital, assessed and categorized into 3 groups: gout (ACR Classification Criteria), AH ([serum urate] ≥ 6.8 mg/dL, no gout), and control ([serum urate] gout). 25 patients from each group subsequently underwent formal assessment of knee OA presence and severity (ACR Clinical/Radiographic Criteria, Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grade). Musculoskeletal ultrasound was used to detect monosodium urate (MSU) deposition at the knees and 1st metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joints. Results 68.0% of gout, 52.0% of AH, and 28.0% of age-matched control subjects had knee OA (gout vs. control, P=0.017). Odds ratio for knee OA in gout vs. controls was 5.46 prior to, and 3.80 after adjusting for BMI. Gout subjects also had higher KL grades than controls (P=0.001). Subjects with sonographically-detected MSU crystal deposition on cartilage were more likely to have OA than those without (60.0 vs 27.5%, P=0.037), with crystal deposition at the 1st MTP joints correlating most closely with OA knee involvement. Conclusion Knee OA was more prevalent in gout patients vs. controls, and intermediate in AH. Knee OA was more severe in gout patients vs. controls. PMID:25710856

  6. The association between knee joint biomechanics and neuromuscular control and moderate knee osteoarthritis radiographic and pain severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astephen Wilson, J L; Deluzio, K J; Dunbar, M J; Caldwell, G E; Hubley-Kozey, C L

    2011-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the association between biomechanical and neuromuscular factors of clinically diagnosed mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis (OA) with radiographic severity and pain severity separately. Three-dimensional gait analysis and electromyography were performed on a group of 40 participants with clinically diagnosed mild to moderate medial knee OA. Associations between radiographic severity, defined using a visual analog radiographic score, and pain severity, defined with the pain subscale of the WOMAC osteoarthritis index, with knee joint kinematics and kinetics, electromyography patterns of periarticular knee muscles, BMI and gait speed were determined with correlation analyses. Multiple linear regression analyses of radiographic and pain severity were also explored. Statistically significant correlations between radiographic severity and the overall magnitude of the knee adduction moment during stance (r²=21.4%, P=0.003) and the magnitude of the knee flexion angle during the gait cycle (r²=11.4%, P=0.03) were found. Significant correlations between pain and gait speed (r²=28.2%, Pjoint biomechanical variables are associated with structural knee OA severity measured from radiographs in clinically diagnosed mild to moderate levels of disease, but that pain severity is only reflected in gait speed and neuromuscular activation patterns. A combination of the knee adduction moment and BMI better explained structural knee OA severity than any individual factor alone. Copyright © 2010 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Baseline Vitamin D Status is Predictive of Longitudinal Change in Tibial BMD in Knee Osteoarthritis (OA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    With its lack of effective treatment and high prevalence, the public health impact of OA is substantial. Peri-articular bone in OA can be evaluated with the medial:lateral tibial BMD ratio (M:L BMD) obtained from dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Higher M:L BMD is associated with medial OA features...

  8. Grading and quantification of hip osteoarthritis severity by analyzing the spectral energy distribution of radiographic hip joint space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boniatis, I; Costaridou, L; Panayiotakis, G; Panagiotopoulos, E

    2009-01-01

    An image analysis system is proposed for the assessment of hip osteoarthritis (OA) severity. Sixty four hips (18 normal, 46 osteoarthritic), corresponding to 32 patients of unilateral or bilateral hip OA were studied. Employing custom developed software, 64 Region Of Interest (ROI) images of Hip Joint Spaces (HJSs) were delineated on patients' digitized radiographs. The Fourier spectrum of each HJS-ROI was computed and expressed in polar coordinates. Spectral signatures, quantifying the radial and angular distribution of HJS spectral energy were formed. Signature descriptors were generated and utilized in the design of a two-level hierarchical decision tree, used for the grading of the severity of the disease. Accordingly, at Level 1, implemented by a multiple classifier system, the discrimination between normal and osteoarthritic hips was performed. At Level 2, the hips that had been successfully characterized as osteoarthritic at Level 1, were further characterized as of 'Mild / Moderate' or 'Severe' OA, by the Bayes classifier. A signature descriptors based regression model was designed, so as to quantify OA-severity. The system graded OA reliably, given that the accomplished classification accuracies for Level 1 and Level 2 were 98.4% and 100%, respectively. OA-severity values, expressed by HJS-narrowing, correlated highly (r = 0.9, p < 0.001) with values predicted by the model. The system may contribute to OA-patient management.

  9. Effect of joint traction on functional improvement and quality of life in patients with severe knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Sadat Naeimee

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: Osteoarthritis (OA is the most prevalent joint disease in adults around the world and its incidence rises with age. Patients with severe knee osteoarthritis often complain of pain and severe functional disability. Most of conservative treatments used in this group of patients induce poor improvements. This study evaluated the effect of joint traction on quality of life of patients with severe knee osteoarthritis.Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial study, forty female patients with severe knee OA were randomly assigned to two following groups; common physiotherapy treatment and common physiotherapy treatment accompanied by knee distraction. Quality of life was evaluated pre- and post-treatment and also one month follow-up using the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS questionnaire.Results: Common physiotherapy treatment accompanied by knee distraction resulted in significantly better quality of life post-treatment and at 1month follow-up, compared to common physiotherapy treatment alone (P<0.01.Conclusion: Common physiotherapy treatment accompanied by knee distraction induces significant improvement in quality of life in patients with severe knee osteoarthritis compared to common physiotherapy treatment alone.

  10. Erosive osteoarthritis: a more severe form of radiographic hand osteoarthritis rather than a distinct entity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Michelle; Nicholls, Elaine; Kwok, Wing-Yee; Peat, George; Kloppenburg, Margreet; van der Windt, Danielle; Myers, Helen; Dziedzic, Krysia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether erosive osteoarthritis shares the same pattern of joint involvement and risk profile as increasing grades of non-erosive hand osteoarthritis. Methods Participants were from two population-based cohorts, aged ≥50 years, reporting hand symptoms in the previous month. Interphalangeal joints were assessed for erosive osteoarthritis (Verbruggen–Veys erosive or remodelled phase) and radiographic osteoarthritis (sliding cut-offs of K&L≥2, K&L≥3 and K&L=4). At the joint level, similarities in the frequency and pattern of erosive and non-erosive osteoarthritis were assessed by Spearman's rank correlation coefficients and generalised estimating equations. At the person level, individuals with erosive osteoarthritis were compared to those with non-erosive osteoarthritis using logistic regression, adjusted for age and gender (aOR), for the following exposures: family history, previous injury, overuse and metabolic factors (BMI, dyslipidaemia, hypertension, diabetes). Results In 1076 symptomatic participants the ranked frequency of involvement for erosive joints was comparable to joints with K&L≥3 and K&L=4 (r>0.95). Patterns of joint involvement in erosive osteoarthritis were strongest for symmetry (aOR=6.5; 95% CI 3.0 to 14.1), followed by row (2.0; 0.8 to 5.0) and ray (0.3; 0.0 to 2.5), which was similar to joints with K&L≥3 and K&L=4. Individuals with erosive osteoarthritis (n=80) had an increased risk of metabolic syndrome (2.7; 1.0 to 7.1), notably dyslipidaemia (4.7; 2.1 to 10.6) compared with non-erosive osteoarthritis classed K&L≥3 (n=193). Conclusions The similar frequency of radiographic joint involvement and patterning in erosive osteoarthritis and more severe non-erosive osteoarthritis is consistent with prevalent erosive osteoarthritis being a severe form of hand osteoarthritis rather than a distinct entity. Metabolic exposures, dyslipidaemia in particular, may be implicated in erosive osteoarthritis. PMID:24095935

  11. Intra-articular hip injection: does pain relief correlate with radiographic severity of osteoarthritis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshmukh, Ajit J.; Rodriguez, Jose A.; Panagopoulos, Georgia; Alizadeh, Ahmadreza; Klein, Devon A.

    2011-01-01

    Intra-articular injection is being used widely for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes in the hip. However, its efficacy is not always predictable in patients with hip osteoarthritis (OA). The purpose of this study was to determine whether the degree of radiographic severity of OA was predictive of the response to intra-articular injection of local anesthetic with corticosteroid and to determine the relationship between immediate pain relief resulting from the anesthetic and delayed pain relief resulting from corticosteroid administration. This retrospective study included 217 patients (220 injections) with diagnosis of hip OA who underwent a fluoroscopically guided therapeutic hip injection of local anesthetic and corticosteroid. Hip radiographs were scored using the Kellgren-Lawrence scale. Immediate and delayed pain relief was documented using a visual analog scale. Logistic regression analysis was performed to investigate whether age, gender or radiographic severity of OA were independent predictors of pain relief. Degree of agreement between immediate and delayed response was assessed with the kappa coefficient. Immediate pain relief was reported in 68.2% of hips and delayed relief in 71.4% of hips. A high level of agreement was observed between immediate and delayed pain relief (kappa = 0.80, p < 0.001). 94% of patients reporting immediate relief also reported relief 2 weeks later. Univariate and multivariate analysis revealed that neither gender nor age was related to immediate or delayed pain relief. Only severity of OA (based on radiographic analysis) was observed to be predictive of pain relief. Pain relief following intra-articular hip injection correlated with radiographic severity of OA. This intervention may be of therapeutic and prognostic value in patients awaiting hip arthroplasty. (orig.)

  12. Adiponectin and Leptin Synovial Fluid Concentration as a Marker for the Severity of Knee Osteoarthritis in Obese Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddy Mart Salim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Osteoarthritis (OA is a chronic degenerative joint disorder of the synovial joint characterized by loss of articular cartilage, osteophyte formation, and alterations of subchondral bone. An increase of weight bearing affect on knee joint biomechanically and alter concentration of adipokines, such as adiponectin and leptin. Herein we reported a correlation between adiponectin and leptin synovial fluid concentration with the severity of knee OA in obese patients. Material and Methods: Totally 45 patients were included in this research. ELISA was used to determine adiponectin and leptin concentrations of synovial fluid. The severity of knee OA was classified by Kellgren-Lawrence grading scale. Data analysis was conducted using SPSS for windows. Results: Based on the leptin measurement, it was shown that leptin concentrations were correlated positively with the severity of knee OA. Vice versa, adiponectin concentrations were correlated negative. Conclusion: Our study was support the biomarker function of adiponectin and leptin concentration on synovial fluids, in which those concentrations were related with the severity of OA. Those results also suggested the function of leptin and adiponectin on OA. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(4.000: 746-756

  13. ASSESSMENT OF IN VIVO MECHANICAL MUSCLE FUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH OSTEOARTHRITIS (OA) OF THE HIP; RELIABILITY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Carsten; Overgaard, Søren; Aagaard, Per

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Muscle function in patients with hip OA is not well-studied. We established a new setup of tests in order to monitor patients before and after surgery with total hip arthroplasty (THA). A test-retest protocol was designed to evaluate the reproducibility of single- and multi-joint str...

  14. The possible role of the tibial plateau angle for the severity of osteoarthritis in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Y.; Hara, Y.; Ochi, H.; Nezu, Y.; Harada, Y.; Yogo, T.; Orima, H.; Tagawa, M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine factors correlated with the severity of radiographic osteoarthritis (OA) scoring in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CrCLR). Three radiographs of stifle joints (craniocaudal, mediolateral, and mediolateral radiograph with 90 degree flexion of the stifle and tarsal joints) were obtained from 36 dogs with CrCLR (Clinical group) and from 22 dogs without stifle joint disease (Control group). Information about these dogs was collected from the owners and from medical records. Radiographic OA scores in each dog in the clinical group were determined from radiographs using a numeric grading system previously reported. The tibial plateau angle (TPA) in each dog in both groups was measured on mediolateral radiographs with 90 degree flexion of the stifle and tarsal joints. The Mann-Whitney's U test was used for comparing variables between the clinical group and the control group, and Spearman's rank correlation test was used for evaluating correlations between radiographic OA scores and variables in the clinical group. No significant differences were detected between the clinical group and the control group for any of the variables. There were two positive correlations; one between the radiographic OA score and TPA (r=0.395, p=0.014); and the other between body weight and OA score (r=0.399, p=0.013) in the clinical group. Our results indicate that body weight and TPA could affect the severity of the radiographic OA score in dogs with CrCLR

  15. New Strategies in Targeted Interventions for Posttraumatic Osteoarthritis (PT-OA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Collagen Type II promoter, which is expressed exclusively in cartilage. To generate EGFR-conditional knock out (EGFR-cko) mice, EGFR-flox mice were...cartilage and only induced after surgery whereas our model selectively knocked out EGFR in cartilage throughout the entire development of the mouse. We...can stem from traumatic events  Car accidents  Sporting injuries  Extreme Weight gain (Obesity) Osteoarthritis  Cartilage does not have

  16. Large-scale meta-analysis of interleukin-1 beta and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist polymorphisms on risk of radiographic hip and knee osteoarthritis and severity of knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkhof, H J M; Doherty, M; Arden, N K; Abramson, S B; Attur, M; Bos, S D; Cooper, C; Dennison, E M; Doherty, S A; Evangelou, E; Hart, D J; Hofman, A; Javaid, K; Kerna, I; Kisand, K; Kloppenburg, M; Krasnokutsky, S; Maciewicz, R A; Meulenbelt, I; Muir, K R; Rivadeneira, F; Samuels, J; Sezgin, M; Slagboom, E; Smith, A J P; Spector, T D; Tamm, A; Tamm, A; Uitterlinden, A G; Wheeler, M; Zhai, G; Zhang, W; van Meurs, J B J; Valdes, A M

    2011-03-01

    To clarify the role of common genetic variation in the Interleukin-1β (IL1B) and Interleukin-1R antagonist (IL1RN) genes on risk of knee and hip osteoarthritis (OA) and severity of knee OA by means of large-scale meta-analyses. We searched PubMed for articles assessing the role of IL1B and IL1RN polymorphisms/haplotypes on the risk of hip and/or knee OA. Novel data were included from eight unpublished studies. Meta-analyses were performed using fixed- and random-effects models with a total of 3595 hip OA and 5013 knee OA cases, and 6559 and 9132 controls respectively. The role of ILRN haplotypes on radiographic severity of knee OA was tested in 1918 cases with Kellgren-Lawrence (K/L) 1 or 2 compared to 199 cases with K/L 3 or 4. The meta-analysis of six published studies retrieved from the literature search and eight unpublished studies showed no evidence of association between common genetic variation in the IL1B or IL1RN genes and risk of hip OA or knee OA (P>0.05 for rs16944, rs1143634, rs419598 and haplotype C-G-C (rs1143634, rs16944 and rs419598) previously implicated in risk of hip OA). The C-T-A haplotype formed by rs419598, rs315952 and rs9005, previously implicated in radiographic severity of knee OA, was associated with reduced severity of knee OA (odds ratio (OR)=0.71 95%CI 0.56-0.91; P=0.006, I(2)=74%), and achieved borderline statistical significance in a random-effects model (OR=0.61 95%CI 0.35-1.06 P=0.08). Common genetic variation in the Interleukin-1 region is not associated with prevalence of hip or knee OA but our data suggest that IL1RN might have a role in severity of knee OA. Copyright © 2010 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Can multivariate models based on MOAKS predict OA knee pain? Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Gómez, Carlos D.; Zanella-Calzada, Laura A.; Galván-Tejada, Jorge I.; Galván-Tejada, Carlos E.; Celaya-Padilla, José M.

    2017-03-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common rheumatic disease in the world. Knee pain is the most disabling symptom in the disease, the prediction of pain is one of the targets in preventive medicine, this can be applied to new therapies or treatments. Using the magnetic resonance imaging and the grading scales, a multivariate model based on genetic algorithms is presented. Using a predictive model can be useful to associate minor structure changes in the joint with the future knee pain. Results suggest that multivariate models can be predictive with future knee chronic pain. All models; T0, T1 and T2, were statistically significant, all p values were 0.60.

  18. Inhibited osteoclastic bone resorption through alendronate treatment in rats reduces severe osteoarthritis progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebelt, M; Waarsing, J H; Groen, H C; Müller, C; Koelewijn, S J; de Blois, E; Verhaar, J A N; de Jong, M; Weinans, H

    2014-09-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a non-rheumatoid joint disease characterized by progressive degeneration of extra-cellular cartilage matrix (ECM), enhanced subchondral bone remodeling, osteophyte formation and synovial thickening. Alendronate (ALN) is a potent inhibitor of osteoclastic bone resorption and results in reduced bone remodeling. This study investigated the effects of pre-emptive use of ALN on OA related osteoclastic subchondral bone resorption in an in vivo rat model for severe OA. Using multi-modality imaging we measured effects of ALN treatment within cartilage and synovium. Severe osteoarthritis was induced in left rat knees using papain injections in combination with a moderate running protocol. Twenty rats were treated with subcutaneous ALN injections and compared to twenty untreated controls. Animals were longitudinally monitored for 12weeks with in vivo μCT to measure subchondral bone changes and SPECT/CT to determine synovial macrophage activation using a folate-based radiotracer. Articular cartilage was analyzed at 6 and 12weeks with ex vivo contrast enhanced μCT and histology to measure sulfated-glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content and cartilage thickness. ALN treatment successfully inhibited subchondral bone remodeling. As a result we found less subchondral plate porosity and reduced osteophytosis. ALN treatment did not reduce subchondral sclerosis. However, after the OA induction phase, ALN treatment protected cartilage ECM from degradation and reduced synovial macrophage activation. Surprisingly, ALN treatment also improved sGAG content of tibia cartilage in healthy joints. Our data was consistent with the hypothesis that osteoclastic bone resorption might play an important role in OA and may be a driving force for progression of the disease. However, our study suggest that this effect might not solely be effects on osteoclastic activity, since ALN treatment also influenced macrophage functioning. Additionally, ALN treatment and physical activity

  19. Association of Cross Linked C-Telopeptide II Collagen and Hyaluronic Acid with Knee Osteoarthritis Severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Butar Butar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study was carried out to investigate the association of Cross Linked C-Telopeptide Type I & II Collagen (CTX-I and II and hyaluronic acid (HA with knee osteoarthritis (OA severity. METHODS: Sixty menopause women with primary knee OA were enrolled in this study during their visits to the Outpatient Department. Patients with knee pain during weight bearing, active or passive range of motion, or tenderness with Kellgren-Lawrence (KL grade of more than I were included. Patients with injury, inflammatory and metabolic diseases were excluded. Patients were put in a 10-hour fasting prior to withdrawal of morning blood samples for examinations of HA, CTX-I, interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β, and high sensitivity C reactive protein (hs-CRP level. Second void morning urine specimens were taken for CTXII assessment. HA, CTX-I and II levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: Sixty menopausal female patients were included in this study, 35 with KL grade II, 17 grade III, and 8 grade IV. Means of CTX-II were significantly different between subjects KL grade IV and III (p=0.021. Correlation of KL grade was significant with CTX-II (p=0.001, r=0.412 and HA (p=0.0411, r=0.269. KL grades were not significantly associated with CTX-I (p=0.8364, r=-0.0272; IL-1β (p=0.5773, r=0.0853 and hs-CRP (p=0.2625, r=0.1470. CONCLUSIONS: CTX-II and HA were associated with severity of knee OA, suggesting that CTX-II and HA can be used as marker for knee OA severity. KEYWORDS: CTX-II, hyaluronic acid, otestoarthritis, knee.

  20. Differences in characteristics and patient-reported questionnaire responses in patients who choose non-surgical versus surgical treatment for severe hip osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Have, Mads; Overgaard, Søren; Jensen, Carsten

    Background: Preoperative patient characteristics may influence patient choice for participating in RCT’s. Purpose / Aim of Study: This study aimed to compare patient characteristics, level of pain, physical function and joint space width in patients with severe hip osteoarthritis (OA) who accepted...... or refused to participate in a RCT. Materials and Methods: In this prospective cohort study a total of 137 patients with primary hip OA were asked to choose between surgical or non- surgical treatment. We then compared the characteristics of each patient cohort (demographics, pain level and duration......, analgesic use, exercise habits), the radiographic hip OA state and their responses to Hip dysfunction and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS, 0-100) and European Quality of Life Scale (EQ-5D-5L) questionnaires. Findings / Results: The between-group HOOS scores were significantly different in three out...

  1. Cartilage Degeneration and Alignment in Severe Varus Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Yasuaki; Mukai, Shogo; Yabumoto, Hiromitsu; Tarumi, Eri; Nakamura, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between cartilage, ligament, and meniscus degeneration and radiographic alignment in severe varus knee osteoarthritis in order to understand the development of varus knee osteoarthritis. Fifty-three patients (71 knees) with primary varus knee osteoarthritis and who underwent total knee arthroplasty were selected for this study. There were 6 men and 47 women, with 40 right knees and 31 left knees studied; their mean age at operation was 73.5 years. The ligament, meniscus, degeneration of joint cartilage, and radiographic alignments were examined visually. The tibial plateau-tibial shaft angle was larger if the condition of the cartilage in the lateral femoral condyle was worse. The femorotibial angle and tibial plateau-tibial shaft angle were larger if the conditions of the lateral meniscus or the cartilage in the lateral tibial plateau were worse. Based on the results of this study, progression of varus knee osteoarthritis may occur in the following manner: medial knee osteoarthritis starts in the central portion of the medial tibial plateau, and accompanied by medial meniscal extrusion and anterior cruciate ligament rupture, cartilage degeneration expands from the anterior to the posterior in the medial tibial plateau. Bone attrition occurs in the medial tibial plateau, and the femoro-tibial angle and tibial plateau-tibial shaft angle increase. Therefore, the lateral intercondylar eminence injures the cartilage of the lateral femoral condyle in the longitudinal fissure type. Thereafter, the cartilage degeneration expands in the whole of the knee joints.

  2. Subgrouping and TargetEd Exercise pRogrammes for knee and hip OsteoArthritis (STEER OA): a systematic review update and individual participant data meta-analysis protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holden, M.A.; Burke, D.L.; Runhaar, J.; Windt, D. van der; Riley, R.D.; Dziedzic, K.; Legha, A.; Evans, A.L.; Abbott, J.H.; Baker, K.; Brown, J.; Bennell, K.L.; Bossen, D.; Brosseau, L.; Chaipinyo, K.; Christensen, R.; Cochrane, T; Rooij, M. de; Doherty, M.; French, H.P.; Hickson, S.; Hinman, R.S.; Hopman-Rock, M.; Hurley, M.V.; Ingram, C.; Knoop, J.; Krauss, I.; McCarthy, C.; Messier, S.P.; Patrick, D.L.; Sahin, N.; Talbot, L.A.; Taylor, R.; Teirlinck, C.H.; Middelkoop, M. van; Walker, C.; Foster, N.E.

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Knee and hip osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of disability worldwide. Therapeutic exercise is a recommended core treatment for people with knee and hip OA, however, the observed effect sizes for reducing pain and improving physical function are small to moderate. This may be due

  3. Subgrouping and TargetEd Exercise pRogrammes for knee and hip OsteoArthritis (STEER OA): a systematic review update and individual participant data meta-analysis protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holden, Melanie A.; Burke, Danielle L.; Runhaar, Jos; van der Windt, Danielle; Riley, Richard D.; Dziedzic, Krysia; Legha, Amardeep; Evans, Amy L.; Abbott, J. Haxby; Baker, Kristin; Brown, Jenny; Bennell, Kim L.; Bossen, Daniel; Brosseau, Lucie; Chaipinyo, Kanda; Christensen, Robin; Cochrane, Tom; de Rooij, Mariette; Doherty, Michael; French, Helen P.; Hickson, Sheila; Hinman, Rana S.; Hopman-Rock, Marijke; Hurley, Michael V.; Ingram, Carol; Knoop, Jesper; Krauss, Inga; McCarthy, Chris; Messier, Stephen P.; Patrick, Donald L.; Sahin, Nilay; Talbot, Laura A.; Taylor, Robert; Teirlinck, Carolien H.; van Middelkoop, Marienke; Walker, Christine; Foster, Nadine E.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Knee and hip osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of disability worldwide. Therapeutic exercise is a recommended core treatment for people with knee and hip OA, however, the observed effect sizes for reducing pain and improving physical function are small to moderate. This may be due

  4. OAS1: a multiple sclerosis susceptibility gene that influences disease severity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, M

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Type 1 interferons upregulate oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1). A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in exon 7 of OAS1 results in differential RNAseL enzyme activity, the A allele coding for a truncated form with low activity and the G conferring high activity. We hypothesized that OAS1 genotypes would influence both susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS) and disease activity with the AA genotype being overrepresented and the GG genotype underrepresented in relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) with increased disease activity. METHODS: We examined OAS1 genotype distribution in 401 patients with MS, 394 healthy controls, and 178 patients with RRMS receiving interferon-beta (IFNbeta) assessed as 1) having no or minimal disease activity on IFNbeta, 2) having disease activity despite IFNbeta, and 3) 65 patients with RRMS with highly active disease. RESULTS: The OAS1 genotype distribution differed between patients with MS and controls (p = 0.000003), with lower frequency of GG homozygotes in patients with MS (6%) compared with controls (17%). In relation to disease severity, 34 (32%) patients with no or minimal disease activity on IFNbeta had the AA and 8 (8%) the GG genotype; of patients with disease activity despite IFNbeta, 27 (51%) were AA, while only 1 (2%) was GG (p = 0.03). Median time to first relapse on IFNbeta was 24 months in patients with RRMS with AA genotype and 33 months with AG or GG genotype (p = 0.04). The GG genotype was absent in 65 patients with highly active RRMS (p = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: A functional OAS1 SNP, AA genotype, confers susceptibility to MS and the GG genotype may protect against increased disease activity.

  5. Obesity and disability in the symptomatic Irish knee osteoarthritis population.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ambrose, N L

    2010-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is a common disorder with significant social and financial implications. Obesity is the strongest modifiable risk factor of knee OA. There is little data on obesity in Irish knee OA populations and its relationship to other measures of disease severity.

  6. Management of osteoarthritis (OA) with the pharma-standard supplement FlexiQule (Boswellia): a 12-week registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcaro, G; Dugall, M; Luzzi, R; Ledda, A; Pellegrini, L; Hu, S; Ippolito, E

    2015-10-22

    This registry study assessed the pharma-standard supplement FlexiQule (Boswellia extract in capsules) in the management of symptoms associated to osteoarthritis (OA) also managed with the 'standard management' (SM) in comparison with a group of patients managed only with SM. The 12- week registry included patients with symptomatic knee arthrosis. They were able to walk on a treadmill for a walking test and to complete the WOMAC questionnaire. 32 patients used the supplement and 34 acted as controls (SM). No safety problems were observed. At 12 weeks, the Karnofsky scale was significantly improved in both groups: the variation was higher (p<0.05) in the supplement group. The WOMAC score was decreased significantly more in the supplement+SM group in comparison with controls considering pain, stiffness and physical functions (p<0.05). For social and emotional functions the decrease in score was also more evident in the supplement group (p<0.05). Both groups improved in pain-free and total walking distance at 12 weeks. Pain-free walking distance (treadmill) was higher (p<0.05) with the supplement (from 93.4;11.6 m to 271.3;19.3 m) than in controls (from 90.5;13.5 m to 158.3;22.3)(p<0.05). The improvement in total walking distance was also higher in the supplement group (p<0.05) (from 164.3;23.2 to 322.3;22.3 m) in comparison with the SM- only group ( from 158.3;18,4 to 240.2;19.3 m). The need for concomitant drugs and medical attention during the registry was reduced more in the supplement group (p<0.05). In conclusion the difference between SM and the Flexiqule+SM was in favor of the management with the supplement for all target measurements. The product is safe and well tolerated.

  7. Clinical benefit of joint distraction in the treatment of severe osteoarthritis of the ankle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marijnissen, ACA; van Roermund, PM; van Melkebeek, J; Schenk, W; Verbout, AJ; Bijlsma, JWJ; Lafeber, FPJG

    Objective. Osteoarthritis, (OA) is a degenerative, disabling joint disease that affects >10% of the adult population. No effective disease-modifying treatment is available. In the present study, we used joint distraction, a relatively new treatment in Which mechanical contact between the articular

  8. The OA Trial Bank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Middelkoop, Marienke; Arden, N K; Atchia, I.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of intra-articular (IA) glucocorticoids for knee or hip osteoarthritis (OA) in specific subgroups of patients with severe pain and inflammatory signs using individual patient data (IPD) from existing trials. Design: Randomized trials evaluating one or more IA...... glucocorticoid preparation in patients with knee or hip OA, published from 1995 up to June 2012 were selected from the literature. IPD obtained from original trials included patient and disease characteristics and outcomes measured. The primary outcome was pain severity at short-term follow-up (up to 4 weeks...... Interval 1.50-26.31) when receiving IA glucocorticoid injection compared to placebo. No statistical significant interaction effects were found between inflammatory signs and IA glucocorticoid injections compared to placebo and to tidal irrigation at all follow-up points. Conclusions: This IPD meta...

  9. Osteoarthritis Severity Determination using Self Organizing Map Based Gabor Kernel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anifah, L.; Purnomo, M. H.; Mengko, T. L. R.; Purnama, I. K. E.

    2018-02-01

    The number of osteoarthritis patients in Indonesia is enormous, so early action is needed in order for this disease to be handled. The aim of this paper to determine osteoarthritis severity based on x-ray image template based on gabor kernel. This research is divided into 3 stages, the first step is image processing that is using gabor kernel. The second stage is the learning stage, and the third stage is the testing phase. The image processing stage is by normalizing the image dimension to be template to 50 □ 200 image. Learning stage is done with parameters initial learning rate of 0.5 and the total number of iterations of 1000. The testing stage is performed using the weights generated at the learning stage. The testing phase has been done and the results were obtained. The result shows KL-Grade 0 has an accuracy of 36.21%, accuracy for KL-Grade 2 is 40,52%, while accuracy for KL-Grade 2 and KL-Grade 3 are 15,52%, and 25,86%. The implication of this research is expected that this research as decision support system for medical practitioners in determining KL-Grade on X-ray images of knee osteoarthritis.

  10. Oral administration of undenatured native chicken type II collagen (UC-II) diminished deterioration of articular cartilage in a rat model of osteoarthritis (OA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagi, C M; Berryman, E R; Teo, S; Lane, N E

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the ability of undenatured native chicken type II collagen (UC-II) to prevent excessive articular cartilage deterioration in a rat model of osteoarthritis (OA). Twenty male rats were subjected to partial medial meniscectomy tear (PMMT) surgery to induce OA. Immediately after the surgery 10 rats received vehicle and another 10 rats oral daily dose of UC-II at 0.66 mg/kg for a period of 8 weeks. In addition 10 naïve rats were used as an intact control and another 10 rats received sham surgery. Study endpoints included a weight-bearing capacity of front and hind legs, serum biomarkers of bone and cartilage metabolism, analyses of subchondral and cancellous bone at the tibial epiphysis and metaphysis, and cartilage pathology at the medial tibial plateau using histological methods. PMMT surgery produced moderate OA at the medial tibial plateau. Specifically, the deterioration of articular cartilage negatively impacted the weight bearing capacity of the operated limb. Immediate treatment with the UC-II preserved the weight-bearing capacity of the injured leg, preserved integrity of the cancellous bone at tibial metaphysis and limited the excessive osteophyte formation and deterioration of articular cartilage. Study results demonstrate that a clinically relevant daily dose of UC-II when applied immediately after injury can improve the mechanical function of the injured knee and prevent excessive deterioration of articular cartilage. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Obesity increases the prevalence and severity of focal knee abnormalities diagnosed using 3T MRI in middle-aged subjects - data from the osteoarthritis initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laberge, Marc A.; Baum, Thomas; Virayavanich, Warapat; Nardo, Lorenzo; Link, Thomas M.; Nevitt, M.C.; Lynch, J.; McCulloch, C.E.

    2012-01-01

    To study the effect of BMI on the prevalence, severity, and 36-month progression of early degenerative changes in the knee by using 3T MRI in middle-aged subjects without radiographic osteoarthritis (OA). We examined baseline and 36-month follow-up MR studies from 137 middle-aged individuals (45-55 years old) with risk factors for knee OA but no radiographic OA from the Osteoarthritis Initiative. Subjects were grouped into three categories: normal BMI (BMI 2 , n = 38), overweight (BMI 25-29.9 kg/m 2 , n = 37), and obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m 2 , n = 62). Using 3T MRI, cartilage, meniscus, and bone marrow abnormalities were graded using the OA Whole-organ MR Imaging Score (WORMS). The statistical analysis was corrected as necessary for differences in age, sex, and OA risk factors other than BMI. The overall prevalence of lesions was 64% for meniscus and 79% for cartilage (including low grade lesions). At baseline, the prevalence and severity of knee lesions was positively associated with BMI, with a nearly fourfold increase in meniscal tears and more than twofold increase in high-grade cartilage defects in obese individuals relative to normal-weight subjects. Over the 36-month follow-up period, the number of new or worsening cartilage lesions of any grade was significantly higher in obese subjects (p = 0.039), while there was no significant difference in meniscal lesion progression. Obesity was associated with both higher prevalence and severity of early degenerative changes in the knee in middle-aged individuals without radiographic OA and with significantly increased cartilage lesion progression (of any grade) over 36 months. (orig.)

  12. Obesity increases the prevalence and severity of focal knee abnormalities diagnosed using 3T MRI in middle-aged subjects - data from the osteoarthritis initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laberge, Marc A.; Baum, Thomas; Virayavanich, Warapat; Nardo, Lorenzo; Link, Thomas M. [University of California San Francisco, Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Research, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Nevitt, M.C.; Lynch, J.; McCulloch, C.E. [University of California San Francisco, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2012-06-15

    To study the effect of BMI on the prevalence, severity, and 36-month progression of early degenerative changes in the knee by using 3T MRI in middle-aged subjects without radiographic osteoarthritis (OA). We examined baseline and 36-month follow-up MR studies from 137 middle-aged individuals (45-55 years old) with risk factors for knee OA but no radiographic OA from the Osteoarthritis Initiative. Subjects were grouped into three categories: normal BMI (BMI < 25 kg/m{sup 2}, n = 38), overweight (BMI 25-29.9 kg/m{sup 2}, n = 37), and obese (BMI {>=} 30 kg/m{sup 2}, n = 62). Using 3T MRI, cartilage, meniscus, and bone marrow abnormalities were graded using the OA Whole-organ MR Imaging Score (WORMS). The statistical analysis was corrected as necessary for differences in age, sex, and OA risk factors other than BMI. The overall prevalence of lesions was 64% for meniscus and 79% for cartilage (including low grade lesions). At baseline, the prevalence and severity of knee lesions was positively associated with BMI, with a nearly fourfold increase in meniscal tears and more than twofold increase in high-grade cartilage defects in obese individuals relative to normal-weight subjects. Over the 36-month follow-up period, the number of new or worsening cartilage lesions of any grade was significantly higher in obese subjects (p = 0.039), while there was no significant difference in meniscal lesion progression. Obesity was associated with both higher prevalence and severity of early degenerative changes in the knee in middle-aged individuals without radiographic OA and with significantly increased cartilage lesion progression (of any grade) over 36 months. (orig.)

  13. Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis. It causes pain, swelling, and reduced motion in your ... it affects your hands, knees, hips or spine. Osteoarthritis breaks down the cartilage in your joints. Cartilage ...

  14. Feasibility of neuromuscular training in patients with severe hip or knee OA: The individualized goal-based NEMEX-TJR training program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Link Anne

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although improvements are achieved by general exercise, training to improve sensorimotor control may be needed for people with osteoarthritis (OA. The aim was to apply the principles of neuromuscular training, which have been successfully used in younger and middle-aged patients with knee injuries, to older patients with severe hip or knee OA. We hypothesized that the training program was feasible, determined as: 1 at most acceptable self-reported pain following training; 2 decreased or unchanged pain during the training period; 3 few joint specific adverse events related to training, and 4 achieved progression of training level during the training period. Methods Seventy-six patients, between 60 and 77 years, with severe hip (n = 38, 55% women or knee OA (n = 38, 61% women underwent an individualized, goal-based neuromuscular training program (NEMEX-TJR in groups for a median of 11 weeks (quartiles 7 to 15 prior to total joint replacement (TJR. Pain was self-reported immediately after each training session on a 0 to 10 cm, no pain to pain as bad as it could be, scale, where 0-2 indicates safe, > 2 to 5 acceptable and > 5 high risk pain. Joint specific adverse events were: not attending or ceasing training because of increased pain/problems in the index joint related to training, and self-reported pain > 5 after training. The level of difficulty of training was registered. Results Patients with severe OA of the hip or knee reported safe pain (median 2 cm after training. Self-reported pain was lower at training sessions 10 and 20 (p = 0.04 and unchanged at training sessions 5 and 15 (p = 0.170, p = 0.161 compared with training session 1. There were no joint specific adverse events in terms of not attending or ceasing training. Few patients (n = 17, 22% reported adverse events in terms of self-reported pain > 5 after one or more training sessions. Progression of training level was achieved over time (p Conclusions The NEMEX

  15. A cost-effectiveness analysis of celecoxib compared with diclofenac in the treatment of pain in osteoarthritis (OA) within the Swedish health system using an adaptation of the NICE OA model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brereton, Nicholas; Pennington, Becky; Ekelund, Mats; Akehurst, Ronald

    2014-09-01

    Celecoxib for the treatment of pain resulting from osteoarthritis (OA) was reviewed by the Tandvårds- och läkemedelsförmånsverket-Dental and Pharmaceutical Benefits Board (TLV) in Sweden in late 2010. This study aimed to evaluate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of celecoxib plus a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) compared to diclofenac plus a PPI in a Swedish setting. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) in the UK developed a health economic model as part of their 2008 assessment of treatments for OA. In this analysis, the model was reconstructed and adapted to a Swedish perspective. Drug costs were updated using the TLV database. Adverse event costs were calculated using the regional price list of Southern Sweden and the standard treatment guidelines from the county council of Stockholm. Costs for treating cardiovascular (CV) events were taken from the Swedish DRG codes and the literature. Over a patient's lifetime treatment with celecoxib plus a PPI was associated with a quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gain of 0.006 per patient when compared to diclofenac plus a PPI. There was an increase in discounted costs of 529 kr per patient, which resulted in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of 82,313 kr ($12,141). Sensitivity analysis showed that treatment was more cost effective in patients with an increased risk of bleeding or gastrointestinal (GI) complications. The results suggest that celecoxib plus a PPI is a cost effective treatment for OA when compared to diclofenac plus a PPI. Treatment is shown to be more cost effective in Sweden for patients with a high risk of bleeding or GI complications. It was in this population that the TLV gave a positive recommendation. There are known limitations on efficacy in the original NICE model.

  16. Immediate Efficacy of Neuromuscular Exercise in Patients with Severe Osteoarthritis of the Hip or Knee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Allan; Overgaard, Søren; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS) and the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) questionnaire. The secondary outcomes were the HOOS/KOOS subscales Pain, Symptoms, Sport and Recreation, and Joint-related Quality of Life. Exploratory outcomes were functional performance measures and lower limb...... muscle power. RESULTS: Included were 165 patients, 56% female, average age 67 years (SD ± 8), and a body mass index of 30 (SD ± 5), who were scheduled for primary hip or knee replacement. The postintervention difference between mean changes in ADL was 7.2 points (95% CI 3.5 to 10.9, p = 0.0002) in favor...... and objective performance were improved and pain reduced immediately following 8 weeks of neuromuscular exercise. While the effects were moderate in hip OA, they were only small in knee OA. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01003756....

  17. Treatment choice for osteoarthritis of the knee joint according to semi-automatic MRI based assessment of disease severity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasho, Takahisa; Suzuki, Masahiko; Nakagawa, Koichi; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Matsuki, Megumi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Moriya, Hideshige

    2008-01-01

    Objective assessment of disease severity of osteoarthritis of the knee joint (OA knee) is fundamental to establish adequate treatment system. Regrettably, there is no such a reliable system. Grading system based upon X-ray findings or measurement of joint space narrowing is widely used method for this purpose but they are still far from satisfaction. Our previous study elucidated that measuring irregularity of the contour of the femoral condyle on MRI (irregularity index) using newly developed software enabled us to assess disease severity of OA objectively. Advantages of this system are expressing severity by metric variable and semi-automatic character. In the present study, we examined relationship between treatment selection and irregularity index. Sixty-one medial type OA knees that received total knee arthroplasty (TKA), arthroscopic surgery (AS), and conservative treatment (CT) were involved. Their x-ray grading, irregularity index were recorded at the time of corresponding treatment. Irregularity index of each group were compared. As for AS group, pre- and post-operative knee score employing JOA score were also examined to study relationship between irregularity index and improvement of knee score. All the four parameters that represent irregularity of femoral condyle were significantly higher in TKA group than in AS group, whereas no significant difference was observed between AS group and CT group. Negative correlation was observed between irregularity index and improvement of knee score after arthroscopic surgery. Although treatment selection was determined by skillful knee surgeon in this series, irregularity index could indicate adequate timing of TKA. It also served as an indicator to predict outcome of arthroscopic surgery, and could be used as to show limitation of arthroscopic surgery. Our new system to assess disease severity of OA knee can serve as an index to determine treatment options. (author)

  18. [Hand osteoarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šenolt, Ladislav

    Hand osteoarthritis (OA) is a common chronic disorder causing pain and limitation of mobility of affected joints. The prevalence of hand OA increases with age and more often affects females. Clinical signs obviously do not correlate with radiographic findings - symptomatic hand OA affects approximately 26 % of adult subjects, but radiographic changes can be found in up to two thirds of females and half of males older than 55 years.Disease course differ among individual patients. Hand OA is a heterogeneous disease. Nodal hand OA is the most common subtype affecting interphalangeal joints, thumb base OA affects first carpometacarpal joint. Erosive OA represents a specific subtype of hand OA, which is associated with joint inflammation, more pain, functional limitation and erosive findings on radiographs.Treatment of OA is limited. Analgesics and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are the only agents reducing symptoms. New insights into the pathogenesis of disease should contribute to the development of novel effective treatment of hand OA.

  19. Reliability and Accuracy of Cross-sectional Radiographic Assessment of Severe Knee Osteoarthritis: Role of Training and Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klara, Kristina; Collins, Jamie E; Gurary, Ellen; Elman, Scott A; Stenquist, Derek S; Losina, Elena; Katz, Jeffrey N

    2016-07-01

    To dêtermine the reliability of radiographic assessment of knee osteoarthritis (OA) by nonclinician readers compared to an experienced radiologist. The radiologist trained 3 nonclinicians to evaluate radiographic characteristics of knee OA. The radiologist and nonclinicians read preoperative films of 36 patients prior to total knee replacement. Intrareader and interreader reliability were measured using the weighted κ statistic and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Scores κ reliability among nonclinicians (κ) ranged from 0.40 to 1.0 for individual radiographic features and 0.72 to 1.0 for Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grade. ICC ranged from 0.89 to 0.98 for the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) summary score. Interreader agreement among nonclinicians ranged from κ of 0.45 to 0.94 for individual features, and 0.66 to 0.97 for KL grade. ICC ranged from 0.87 to 0.96 for the OARSI Summary Score. Interreader reliability between nonclinicians and the radiologist ranged from κ of 0.56 to 0.85 for KL grade. ICC ranged from 0.79 to 0.88 for the OARSI Summary Score. Intrareader and interreader agreement was variable for individual radiograph features but substantial for summary KL grade and OARSI Summary Score. Investigators face tradeoffs between cost and reader experience. These data suggest that in settings where costs are constrained, trained nonclinicians may be suitable readers of radiographic knee OA, particularly if a summary score (KL grade or OARSI Score) is used to determine radiographic severity.

  20. Epidemiological characteristics of patellofemoral osteoarthritis in elderly Koreans and its symptomatic contribution in knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyung Joon; Gn, Kiran Kumar; Kang, Jong Yeal; Suh, Kuen Tak; Kim, Tae Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have reported the prevalence of knee osteoarthritis (OA) but have invariably focused on the tibiofemoral (TF) joint and overlooked the patellofemoral (PF) joint. Accordingly, little epidemiological information is available regarding the PF OA. The purpose of the current study was to document the epidemiological characteristics of PF OA in elderly Koreans. Radiographic assessment was performed for 681 elderly (≥65 years old) Koreans recruited from a community, and symptom severity was evaluated using Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Index (WOMAC) and Short Form-36 (SF-36) scales. Prevalence of different categories of knee OA (isolated PF OA, isolated TF OA and combined PF and TF OA) was calculated. The symptoms of isolated PF OA group and non-OA group were compared. The overall prevalence of OA was 22.0% in the PF compartment and 34.1% in the TF compartment. The prevalence of isolated PF OA, isolated TF OA, and combined PF and TF OA was 3.8%, 17.8%, and 19.2%, respectively. Female sex, aging, and obesity were not associated with isolated PF OA. No significant differences were found in any clinical outcome scales between the isolated PF and non-OA groups. This study documents that OA in the PF joint is common in elderly Koreans, but isolated PF OA is rare. Demographic risk factors are not associated with isolated PF OA, suggesting that isolated PF OA may have a different pathophysiology from other types of knee OA. Our study also indicates that the presence of isolated PF OA should not be construed to be responsible for clinical symptoms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. How well do radiographic, clinical and self-reported diagnoses of knee osteoarthritis agree? Findings from the Hertfordshire cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parsons, C.; Clynes, M.; Syddall, H.; Jagannath, D.; Litwic, A.; van der Pas, S.; Cooper, C.; Dennison, E.M.; Edwards, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Epidemiological studies of knee osteoarthritis (OA) have often used a radiographic definition. However, the clinical syndrome of OA is influenced by a broad range of factors in addition to the structural changes required for radiographic OA. Hence more recently several studies have

  2. Development of an Autologous Macrophage-based Adoptive Gene Transfer Strategy to Treat Posttraumatic Osteoarthritis (PTOA) and Osteoarithritis (OA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    damaged articular cartilage showed evidence of an increase in cell proliferation of chondrocytes, consistent with the literature showing that anabolic ...2. Stiebel M, Miller LE, Block JE (2014) Post-traumatic knee osteoarthritis in the young patient: therapeutic dilemmas and emerging technologies. Open...delivery of an anti-catabolic agent, i.e., IL-1ra, in addition to a pro- anabolic growth factor, i.e., TGF-β3, with the M2-macrophage approach would

  3. Histopathological subgroups in knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, L A; Moreton, B J; Mapp, P I; Wilson, D; Hill, R; Ferguson, E; Scammell, B E; Walsh, D A

    2017-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a heterogeneous, multi-tissue disease. We hypothesised that different histopathological features characterise different stages during knee OA progression, and that discrete subgroups can be defined based on validated measures of OA histopathological features. Medial tibial plateaux and synovium were from 343 post-mortem (PM) and 143 OA arthroplasty donations. A 'chondropathy/osteophyte' group (n = 217) was classified as PM cases with osteophytes or macroscopic medial tibiofemoral chondropathy lesions ≥grade 3 to represent pre-surgical (early) OA. 'Non-arthritic' controls (n = 48) were identified from the remaining PM cases. Mankin histopathological scores were subjected to Rasch analysis and supplemented with histopathological scores for subchondral bone marrow replacement and synovitis. Item weightings were derived by principle components analysis (PCA). Histopathological subgroups were sought using latent class analysis (LCA). Chondropathy, synovitis and osteochondral pathology were each associated with OA at arthroplasty, but each was also identified in some 'non-arthritic' controls. Tidemark breaching in the chondropathy/osteophyte group was greater than in non-arthritic controls. Three histopathological subgroups were identified, characterised as 'mild OA', or 'severe OA' with mild or moderate/severe synovitis. Presence and severity of synovitis helps define distinct histopathological OA subgroups. The absence of a discrete 'normal' subgroup indicates a pathological continuum between normality and OA status. Identifying specific pathological processes and their clinical correlates in OA subgroups has potential to accelerate the development of more effective therapies. Copyright © 2016 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Development and prevention of knee osteoarthritis: The load of obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Runhaar (Jos)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractAccording to the World Health Organization, more than 150 million (± 2.5%) people suffer from osteoarthritis (OA ) worldwide. Above the age of 60 years, these figures even rise to 10% 2. In almost 30% of these cases, OA leads to moderate to severe disability. Thereby, it is the most

  5. Choice of treatment modalities was not influenced by pain, severity or co-morbidity in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamtvedt, Gro; Dahm, Kristin Thuve; Holm, Inger; Odegaard-Jensen, Jan; Flottorp, Signe

    2010-03-01

    Patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) are commonly treated by physiotherapists in primary care. The physiotherapists use different treatment modalities. In a previous study, we identified variation in the use of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), low level laser or acupuncture, massage and weight reduction advice for patients with knee OA. The purpose of this study was to examine factors that might explain variation in treatment modalities for patients with knee OA. Practising physiotherapists prospectively collected data for one patient with knee osteoarthritis each through 12 treatment sessions.We chose to examine factors that might explain variation in the choice of treatment modalities supported by high or moderate quality evidence, and modalities which were frequently used but which were not supported by evidence from systematic reviews. Experienced clinicians proposed factors that they thought might explain the variation in the choice of these specific treatments. We used these factors in explanatory analyses. Using TENS, low level laser or acupuncture was significantly associated with having searched databases to help answer clinical questions in the last six months (odds ratio [OR] = 1.93, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.08-3.42). Not having Internet access at work and using more than four treatment modalities were significant determinants for giving massage (OR = 0.36, 95% CI = 0.19-0.68 and OR = 8.92, 95% CI = 4.37-18.21, respectively). Being a female therapist significantly increased the odds for providing weight reduction advice (OR = 3.60, 95% CI = 1.12-11.57). No patient characteristics, such as age, pain or co-morbidity, were significantly associated with variation in practice. Factors related to patient characteristics, such as pain severity and co-morbidity, did not seem to explain variation in treatment modalities for patients with knee OA. Variation was associated with the following factors: physiotherapists having Internet

  6. Feasibility of neuromuscular training in patients with severe hip or knee OA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ageberg, Eva; Link, Anne; Roos, Ewa M

    2010-01-01

    for a median of 11 weeks (quartiles 7 to 15) prior to total joint replacement (TJR). Pain was self-reported immediately after each training session on a 0 to 10 cm, no pain to pain as bad as it could be, scale, where 0-2 indicates safe, > 2 to 5 acceptable and > 5 high risk pain. Joint specific adverse events...... training. Self-reported pain was lower at training sessions 10 and 20 (p = 0.04) and unchanged at training sessions 5 and 15 (p = 0.170, p = 0.161) compared with training session 1. There were no joint specific adverse events in terms of not attending or ceasing training. Few patients (n = 17, 22......%) reported adverse events in terms of self-reported pain > 5 after one or more training sessions. Progression of training level was achieved over time (p training program is feasible in patients with severe hip or knee OA, in terms of safe self-reported pain following...

  7. Decreased synovial fluid ghrelin levels are linked with disease severity in primary knee osteoarthritis patients and are increased following laser therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yu-Cong; Deng, Hong-Yu; Mao, Zheng; Zhao, Chang; Huang, Ju; Liu, Gang

    2017-07-01

    Ghrelin has been proved to inhibit inflammation and promote cartilage growth. So far, its role in patients with primary knee osteoarthritis has not been investigated. The current study was performed to explore the serum and synovial ghrelin levels as well as the relationship between ghrelin levels and disease severity in primary knee OA patients. 52 primary knee OA patients were recruited in the study. 52 sex and age-matched patients visiting our hospital for regular body check were selected as controls. The serum and synovial fluid ghrelin levels were examined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) before treatment, one week and four weeks after laser therapy, respectively. The inflammation markers IL-6 and TNF-α were also investigated. The radiographic progression was assessed by Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L) grade scale and the symptomatic severity was evaluated by visual analog scale (VAS), Lequesne index and Lysholm scores. The Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis curve was conducted to test the diagnostic value of ghrelin, IL-6 and TNF-α for radiographic progression. No significant difference of serum ghrelin levels was found between knee OA patients and healthy controls. Synovial fluid ghrelin concentrations were significantly negatively correlated with K-L grading (r=-0.591, Pghrelin levels were also related to clinical severity determined by Lequesne index (r=-0.308, P=0.025),VAS scores (r=-0.591, Pghrelin levels were also negatively associated with TNF-α (r=-0.424, P=0.002) and IL-6 concentrations (r=-0.428, P=0.002). ROC curve analysis demonstrated that ghrelin exhibited more diagnostic value than IL-6 and TNF-α for assessing radiographic progression in medium-late stage. Decreased synovial fluid ghrelin levels are related to disease severity in patients with primary osteoarthritis and are increased following laser therapy. Local application of ghrelin may serve as an adjunctive therapy for knee OA. Copyright © 2017. Published by

  8. OMERACT/OARSI initiative to define states of severity and indication for joint replacement in hip and knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gossec, Laure; Hawker, Gillian; Davis, Aileen M

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Time to theoretical indication of joint replacement surgery has been proposed as a primary outcome for potential structure-modifying interventions for osteoarthritis (OA). The objectives of this OMERACT/OARSI Working Group were to identify pain, physical function, and structure states ...

  9. The influence of sex and obesity on gait biomechanics in people with severe knee osteoarthritis scheduled for arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, K L; Sosdian, L; Hinman, R S; Wrigley, T V; Kasza, J; Dowsey, M; Choong, P; Bennell, K L

    2017-11-01

    Sex and body mass may influence knee biomechanics associated with poor total knee arthroplasty (TKA) outcomes for knee osteoarthritis (OA). This study aimed to determine if gait differed between men and women, and overweight and class I obese patients with severe knee OA awaiting TKA. 34 patients with severe knee OA (average age 70.0 (SD 7.2) years, body mass index 30.3 (4.1kg/m 2 )) were recruited from a TKA waiting list. Three-dimensional gait analysis was performed at self-selected walking speed. Comparisons were made between men and women, and overweight (body mass index (BMI) 25.0-29.9kg/m 2 ) and class I obese (BMI 30.0-34.9kg/m 2 ) participants. Biomechanical outcomes included absolute and body size-adjusted peak knee adduction moment (KAM), KAM impulse, peak knee flexion moment, as well as peak knee flexion and varus-valgus angles, peak varus-valgus thrust, and peak vertical ground reaction force (GRF). Men had a higher absolute peak KAM, KAM impulse and peak GRF compared to women, and this sex-difference in frontal plane moments remained after adjusting for body size. However, when additionally adjusting for static knee alignment, differences disappeared. Knee biomechanics were similar between obesity groups after adjusting for the greater body weight of those with class I obesity. Men had greater KAM and KAM impulse even after adjustment for body size; however adjustment for their more varus knees removed this difference. Obesity group did not influence knee joint kinematics or moments. This suggests sex- and obesity-differences in these variables may not be associated with TKA outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Pain sensitisation and the risk of poor outcome following physiotherapy for patients with moderate to severe knee osteoarthritis: protocol for a prospective cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Helen; Smart, Keith M; Moloney, Niamh A; Blake, Catherine; Doody, Catherine M

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pain is the dominant symptom of knee osteoarthritis (OA), and recent evidence suggests factors outside of local joint pathology, such as pain sensitisation, can contribute significantly to the pain experience. It is unknown how pain sensitisation influences outcomes from commonly employed interventions such as physiotherapy. The aims of this study are, first, to provide a comprehensive description of the somatosensory characteristics of people with pain associated with knee OA. Second, we will investigate if indicators of pain sensitisation in patients with knee osteoarthritis are predictive of non-response to physiotherapy. Methods and analysis This is a multicentre prospective cohort study with 140 participants. Eligible patients with moderate to severe symptomatic knee osteoarthritis will be identified at outpatient orthopaedic and rheumatology clinics. A baseline assessment will provide a comprehensive description of the somatosensory characteristics of each participant by means of clinical examination, quantitative sensory testing, and validated questionnaires measuring pain and functional capacity. Participants will then undergo physiotherapy treatment. The primary outcome will be non-response to physiotherapy on completion of the physiotherapy treatment programme as defined by the Osteoarthritis Research Society International treatment responder criteria. A principal component analysis will identify measures related to pain sensitisation to include in the predictive model. Regression analyses will explore the relationship between responder status and pain sensitisation while accounting for confounders. Ethics and dissemination This study has been approved by St James’ Hospital/AMNCH Research Ethics Committee and by the St Vincent's Healthcare Group Ethics and Medical Research Committee. The results will be presented at international conferences and published in a peer review journal. Trial registration number NCT02310945. PMID:26059523

  11. Pain sensitisation and the risk of poor outcome following physiotherapy for patients with moderate to severe knee osteoarthritis: protocol for a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Helen; Smart, Keith M; Moloney, Niamh A; Blake, Catherine; Doody, Catherine M

    2015-06-09

    Pain is the dominant symptom of knee osteoarthritis (OA), and recent evidence suggests factors outside of local joint pathology, such as pain sensitisation, can contribute significantly to the pain experience. It is unknown how pain sensitisation influences outcomes from commonly employed interventions such as physiotherapy. The aims of this study are, first, to provide a comprehensive description of the somatosensory characteristics of people with pain associated with knee OA. Second, we will investigate if indicators of pain sensitisation in patients with knee osteoarthritis are predictive of non-response to physiotherapy. This is a multicentre prospective cohort study with 140 participants. Eligible patients with moderate to severe symptomatic knee osteoarthritis will be identified at outpatient orthopaedic and rheumatology clinics. A baseline assessment will provide a comprehensive description of the somatosensory characteristics of each participant by means of clinical examination, quantitative sensory testing, and validated questionnaires measuring pain and functional capacity. Participants will then undergo physiotherapy treatment. The primary outcome will be non-response to physiotherapy on completion of the physiotherapy treatment programme as defined by the Osteoarthritis Research Society International treatment responder criteria. A principal component analysis will identify measures related to pain sensitisation to include in the predictive model. Regression analyses will explore the relationship between responder status and pain sensitisation while accounting for confounders. This study has been approved by St James' Hospital/AMNCH Research Ethics Committee and by the St Vincent's Healthcare Group Ethics and Medical Research Committee. The results will be presented at international conferences and published in a peer review journal. NCT02310945. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a

  12. Radiography in osteoarthritis of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boegaard, T.; Jonsson, K.

    1999-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a multifactorial process affecting cartilage and subchondral bone. Conventional radiographs are inexpensive and readily available. The increased knowledge with regard to interpreting weightbearing radiographs of the tibiofemoral joint and axial radiographs of the patellofemoral joint will enable these examinations to remain competitive techniques compared with more expensive and sophisticated methods, such as MR imaging, when investigating knee pain to establish the diagnosis and the severity of OA. (orig.)

  13. Radiography in osteoarthritis of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boegaard, T. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, County Hospital, Helsingborg (Sweden); Jonsson, K. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital, Lund (Sweden)

    1999-11-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a multifactorial process affecting cartilage and subchondral bone. Conventional radiographs are inexpensive and readily available. The increased knowledge with regard to interpreting weightbearing radiographs of the tibiofemoral joint and axial radiographs of the patellofemoral joint will enable these examinations to remain competitive techniques compared with more expensive and sophisticated methods, such as MR imaging, when investigating knee pain to establish the diagnosis and the severity of OA. (orig.)

  14. Temporal summation of pain as a prospective predictor of clinical pain severity in adults aged 45 years and above with knee osteoarthritis: ethnic differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodin, Burel R.; Bulls, Hailey W.; Herbert, Matthew S.; Schmidt, Jessica; King, Christopher D.; Glover, Toni L.; Sotolongo, Adriana; Sibille, Kimberly T.; Cruz-Almeida, Yenisel; Staud, Roland; Fessler, Barri J.; Redden, David T.; Bradley, Laurence A.; Fillingim, Roger B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Enhanced pain facilitation is reportedly an important contributor to the clinical pain experiences of individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Ethnic differences in the prevalence and severity of knee OA in addition to associated pain are also well documented. Temporal summation (TS) of pain is a widely applicable quantitative sensory testing method that invokes neural mechanisms related to pain facilitatory processes. This study tested whether TS of pain, an index of pain facilitation, differentially predicts the clinical pain experiences of African Americans and non-Hispanic Whites with symptomatic knee OA. Methods A total of 225 study participants underwent assessment of TS of mechanical and heat pain stimuli applied to their most symptomatic knee and their ipsilateral hand (mechanical) or forearm (heat). Using telephone-based surveys, participants subsequently reported their average and worst clinical pain severity across four consecutive weeks following assessment of TS. Results In predicting future clinical pain, ethnicity interacted with TS of mechanical pain (but not heat pain), such that TS of mechanical pain at the knee significantly predicted greater clinical ratings of average (b = .02, p = .016) and worst (b = .02, p = .044) clinical pain for non-Hispanic Whites but not African Americans (p’s > .30). Conclusions These results reveal the importance of considering ethnicity when examining pain facilitation and the clinical pain of individuals with symptomatic knee OA. The results of this study are discussed in terms of ethnic differences in the predictors of clinical pain experiences among African Americans and non-Hispanic Whites with knee OA. PMID:24804882

  15. Correlation between Gene Expression and Osteoarthritis Progression in Human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Leilei; Huang, Xiaobin; Karperien, Marcel; Post, Janine N

    2016-07-14

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a multifactorial disease characterized by gradual degradation of joint cartilage. This study aimed to quantify major pathogenetic factors during OA progression in human cartilage. Cartilage specimens were isolated from OA patients and scored 0-5 according to the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) guidelines. Protein and gene expressions were measured by immunohistochemistry and qPCR, respectively. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays were used to detect apoptotic cells. Cartilage degeneration in OA is a gradual progress accompanied with gradual loss of collagen type II and a gradual decrease in mRNA expression of SOX9, ACAN and COL2A1. Expression of WNT antagonists DKK1 and FRZB was lost, while hypertrophic markers (RUNX2, COL10A1 and IHH) increased during OA progression. Moreover, DKK1 and FRZB negatively correlated with OA grading, while RUNX2 and IHH showed a significantly positive correlation with OA grading. The number of apoptotic cells was increased with the severity of OA. Taken together, our results suggested that genetic profiling of the gene expression could be used as markers for staging OA at the molecular level. This helps to understand the molecular pathology of OA and may lead to the development of therapies based on OA stage.

  16. Correlation between Gene Expression and Osteoarthritis Progression in Human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leilei Zhong

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a multifactorial disease characterized by gradual degradation of joint cartilage. This study aimed to quantify major pathogenetic factors during OA progression in human cartilage. Cartilage specimens were isolated from OA patients and scored 0–5 according to the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI guidelines. Protein and gene expressions were measured by immunohistochemistry and qPCR, respectively. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL assays were used to detect apoptotic cells. Cartilage degeneration in OA is a gradual progress accompanied with gradual loss of collagen type II and a gradual decrease in mRNA expression of SOX9, ACAN and COL2A1. Expression of WNT antagonists DKK1 and FRZB was lost, while hypertrophic markers (RUNX2, COL10A1 and IHH increased during OA progression. Moreover, DKK1 and FRZB negatively correlated with OA grading, while RUNX2 and IHH showed a significantly positive correlation with OA grading. The number of apoptotic cells was increased with the severity of OA. Taken together, our results suggested that genetic profiling of the gene expression could be used as markers for staging OA at the molecular level. This helps to understand the molecular pathology of OA and may lead to the development of therapies based on OA stage.

  17. A walking program for people with severe knee osteoarthritis did not reduce pain but may have benefits for cardiovascular health: a phase II randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, J A; Webster, K E; Levinger, P; Singh, P J; Fong, C; Taylor, N F

    2017-12-01

    The primary aim was to evaluate the effect of a dosed walking program on knee pain for patients with severe knee osteoarthritis (OA). Secondary aims evaluated the effects on cardiovascular health, function and quality of life. Participants with severe knee OA and increased cardiovascular risk were randomly assigned to a 12-week walking program of 70 min/week of at least moderate intensity, or to usual care. The primary outcome was knee pain (0-10). Secondary outcomes were of cardiovascular risk including physical activity, blood pressure, blood lipid and glucose levels, body mass index and waist circumference; WOMAC Index scores; physical function; and quality of life. Forty-six participants (23 each group) were recruited. Sixteen participants (70%) adhered to the walking program. Intention to treat analysis showed no between-group difference in knee pain. The walking group had increased odds of achieving a healthy systolic blood pressure (OR = 5.7, 95% CI 1.2-26.9), and a faster walking speed (Mean Difference (MD) = 0.12 m/s, 95% CI 0.02-0.23). Per protocol analysis based on participant adherence showed the walking group had more daily steps (MD = 1345 steps, 95% CI 365-2325); more time walking (MD = 18 min/day, 95% CI 5-31); reduced waist circumference (MD = -5.3 cm, 95% CI -10.5 to -0.03); and increased knee stiffness (MD = 0.9 units, 95% CI 0.07-1.8). Patients with severe knee OA prescribed a 12-week walking program of 70 min/week may have had cardiovascular benefits without decreasing knee pain. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12615000015549. Copyright © 2016 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Immediate efficacy of neuromuscular exercise in patients with severe osteoarthritis of the hip or knee: a secondary analysis from a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villadsen, Allan; Overgaard, Søren; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders; Christensen, Robin; Roos, Ewa M

    2014-07-01

    Knowledge about the effects of exercise in severe and endstage osteoarthritis (OA) is limited. The aim was to evaluate the efficacy of a neuromuscular exercise program in patients with clinically severe hip or knee OA. This was a randomized controlled assessor-blinded trial. Patients received an educational package (care-as-usual) only, or care-as-usual plus an 8-week neuromuscular exercise intervention (NEMEX-TJR). NEMEX-TJR was supervised by a physiotherapist, twice weekly for 1 h. The primary outcome was Activities of Daily Living (ADL) subscale from the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS) and the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) questionnaire. The secondary outcomes were the HOOS/KOOS subscales Pain, Symptoms, Sport and Recreation, and Joint-related Quality of Life. Exploratory outcomes were functional performance measures and lower limb muscle power. Included were 165 patients, 56% female, average age 67 years (SD ± 8), and a body mass index of 30 (SD ± 5), who were scheduled for primary hip or knee replacement. The postintervention difference between mean changes in ADL was 7.2 points (95% CI 3.5 to 10.9, p = 0.0002) in favor of NEMEX-TJR compared with control. Second, there were statistically significant differences between groups in favor of NEMEX-TJR on all self-reported outcomes and most functional performance tests (walk, chair stands, and 1-leg knee bends). Stratified analyses according to joint revealed moderate effect size for ADL for hip patients (0.63, 95% CI 0.26 to 1.00). Corresponding effect size for knee patients was small (0.23 95% CI -0.14 to 0.60). Feasibility of neuromuscular exercise was confirmed in patients about to have total joint replacement. Self-reported activities of daily living and objective performance were improved and pain reduced immediately following 8 weeks of neuromuscular exercise. While the effects were moderate in hip OA, they were only small in knee OA. Clinical

  19. Joint distraction in treatment of osteoarthritis (II): effects on cartilage in a canine model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Valburg, A. A.; van Roermund, P. M.; Marijnissen, A. C.; Wenting, M. J.; Verbout, A. J.; Lafeber, F. P.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    2000-01-01

    From a clinical point of view, joint distraction as a treatment for osteoarthritis (OA) of hip and ankle has been demonstrated to be very promising. Pain, joint mobility and functional ability, the most important factors for a patient with severe OA, all improved. Although radiographic joint space

  20. Treatment of patients with hand osteoarthritis : outcome measures, patient satisfaction, and economic evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marks, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to investigate the limitations in daily life, outcome measures, clinical outcomes with the emphasis on patient satisfaction, and economic aspects of the treatment of hand osteoarthritis (OA). Patients with hand OA report severe restrictions in daily life, in particular in

  1. Muscle power is an independent determinant of pain and quality of life in knee osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    OBJECTIVE: This study examined the relationships between leg muscle strength, power, and perceived disease severity in subjects with knee osteoarthritis (OA) in order to determine whether dynamic leg extensor muscle power would be associated with pain and quality of life in knee OA. METHODS: Baseli...

  2. OA Go Away: Development and Preliminary Validation of a Self-Management Tool to Promote Adherence to Exercise and Physical Activity for People with Osteoarthritis of the Hip or Knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toupin April, Karine; Backman, Catherine; Tugwell, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the face and content validity, construct validity, and test–retest reliability of the OA Go Away (OGA), a personalized self-management tool to promote adherence to exercise and physical activity for people with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip or knee. Methods: The face and content validity of OGA version 1.0 were determined via interviews with 10 people with OA of the hip or knee and 10 clinicians. A revised OGA version 2.0 was then tested for construct validity and test–retest reliability with a new sample of 50 people with OA of the hip or knee by comparing key items in the OGA journal with validated outcome measures assessing similar health outcomes and comparing scores on key items of the journal 4–7 days apart. Face and content validity were then confirmed with a new sample of 5 people with OA of the hip or knee and 5 clinicians. Results: Eighteen of 30 items from the OGA version 1.0 and 41 of 43 items from the OGA version 2.0 journal, goals and action plan, and exercise log had adequate content validity. Construct validity and test–retest reliability were acceptable for the main items of the OGA version 2.0 journal. The OGA underwent modifications based on results and participant feedback. Conclusion: The OGA is a novel self-management intervention and assessment tool for people with OA of the hip or knee that shows adequate preliminary measurement properties. PMID:27909359

  3. Severity mapping of the proximal femur: a new method for assessing hip osteoarthritis with computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turmezei, T D; Lomas, D J; Hopper, M A; Poole, K E S

    2014-10-01

    Plain radiography has been the mainstay of imaging assessment in osteoarthritis for over 50 years, but it does have limitations. Here we present the methodology and results of a new technique for identifying, grading, and mapping the severity and spatial distribution of osteoarthritic disease features at the hip in 3D with clinical computed tomography (CT). CT imaging of 456 hips from 230 adult female volunteers (mean age 66 ± 17 years) was reviewed using 3D multiplanar reformatting to identify bone-related radiological features of osteoarthritis, namely osteophytes, subchondral cysts and joint space narrowing. Scoresheets dividing up the femoral head, head-neck region and the joint space were used to register the location and severity of each feature (scored from 0 to 3). Novel 3D cumulative feature severity maps were then created to display where the most severe disease features from each individual were anatomically located across the cohort. Feature severity maps showed a propensity for osteophytes at the inferoposterior and superolateral femoral head-neck junction. Subchondral cysts were a less common and less localised phenomenon. Joint space narrowing osteophytes and joint space narrowing for the first time. We believe this technique can perform several important roles in future osteoarthritis research, including phenotyping and sensitive disease assessment in 3D. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Altered Visual and Feet Proprioceptive Feedbacks during Quiet Standing Increase Postural Sway in Patients with Severe Knee Osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirata, Rogerio Pessoto; Jørgensen, Tanja Schjødt; Rosager, Sara

    2013-01-01

    The objective was to investigate how postural control in knee osteoarthritis (KOA) patients, with different structural severities and pain levels, is reorganized under different sensory conditions.......The objective was to investigate how postural control in knee osteoarthritis (KOA) patients, with different structural severities and pain levels, is reorganized under different sensory conditions....

  5. Osteoarthritis year in review 2016: imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesen, M; Ellegaard, K; Henriksen, M; Gudbergsen, H; Hansen, P; Bliddal, H; Bartels, E M; Riis, R G

    2017-02-01

    The current narrative review covers original research related to imaging in osteoarthritis (OA) in humans published in English between April 1st 2015 and March 31st 2016, in peer reviewed journals available in Medline via PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/). Relevant studies in humans, subjectively decided by the authors, contributing significantly to the OA imaging field, were selected from an extensive Medline search using the terms "Osteoarthritis" in combination with "MRI", "Imaging", "Radiography", "X-rays", "Ultrasound", "Computed tomography", "Nuclear medicine", "PET-CT", "PET-MRI", "Scintigraphy", "SPECT". Publications were sorted according to relevance for the OA imaging research community with an emphasis on high impact special interest journals using the software for systematic reviews www.covidence.org. An overview of newly published studies compared to studies reported previous years is presented, followed by a review of selected imaging studies of primarily knee, hip and hand OA focussing on (1) results for detection of OA and OA-related pathology (2) studies dealing with treatments and (3) studies focussing on prognosis of disease progression or joint replacement. A record high number of 1420 articles were published, among others, of new technologies and tools for improved morphological and pathophysiological understanding of OA-related changes in joints. Also, imaging data were presented of monitoring treatment effect and prognosis of OA progression, primarily using established radiographic, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasound (US) methods. Imaging continues to play an important role in OA research, where several exciting new technologies and computer aided analysis methods are emerging to complement the conventional imaging approaches. Copyright © 2016 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Osteoarthritis and osteoporosis: what is the overlap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bultink, Irene E M; Lems, Willem F

    2013-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) and osteoporosis (OP) are highly prevalent health problems, associated with considerable morbidity. In the past, attention was focused on a supposed inverse relationship between OA and OP, since both disorders usually affect the elderly, but were regarded to rarely coexist in a single person. However, recent studies have revealed several factors which contribute to the pathogenesis of both disorders. These insights might contribute to the development of shared new treatment options in the near future. Increased subchondral bone loss is a characteristic feature of OP and the early stage of OA, and this finding is the rationale for studies on the effect of anti-osteoporotic drugs in OA. In addition, inflammation and unfavourable body composition have been recognized as contributing factors for both disorders. Underweight is a risk factor for OP, while obesity stimulates the development of OA, by mechanical overloading of weight-bearing joints but also by supposed unfavourable effects of adipokines.

  7. The Age-Related Changes in Cartilage and Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YongPing Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is closely associated with aging, but its underlying mechanism is unclear. Recent publications were reviewed to elucidate the connection between aging and OA. With increasing OA incidence, more senior people are facing heavy financial and social burdens. Age-related OA pathogenesis is not well understood. Recently, it has been realized that age-related changes in other tissues besides articular cartilage may also contribute to OA development. Many factors including senescence-related secretory phenotypes, chondrocytes’ low reactivity to growth factors, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress, and abnormal accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs may all play key roles in the pathogenesis of age-related OA. Lately, epigenetic regulation of gene expression was recognized for its impact on age-related OA pathogenesis. Up to now, few studies have been reported about the role of miRNA and long-noncoding RNA (lncRNA in age-related OA. Research focusing on this area may provide valuable insights into OA pathogenesis. OA-induced financial and social burdens have become an increasingly severe threat to older population. Age-related changes in noncartilage tissue should be incorporated in the understanding of OA development. Growing attention on oxidative stress and epigenetics will provide more important clues for the better understanding of the age-related OA.

  8. What is the evidence for viscosupplementation in the treatment of patients with hip osteoarthritis? Systematic review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.; Lamme, Bas; Sermon, An; Mulier, Michiel

    2008-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a disease of the synovial joints and is the most common cause of chronic pain in the elderly. One of the treatment modalities for OA of the hip is viscosupplementation (VS). Today there are several different formulations of viscosupplements produced by different manufactures

  9. Analyzing the History of Falls in Patients with Severe Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsonga, Theano; Michalopoulou, Maria; Malliou, Paraskevi; Godolias, George; Kapetanakis, Stylianos; Gkasdaris, Grigorios; Soucacos, Panagiotis

    2015-12-01

    One out of three adults over the age of 65 years and one out of two over the age of 80 falls annually. Fall risk increases for older adults with severe knee osteoarthritis, a matter that should be further researched. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the history of falls including frequency, mechanism and location of falls, activity during falling and injuries sustained from falls examining at the same time their physical status. The secondary purpose was to determine the effect of age, gender, chronic diseases, social environment, pain elsewhere in the body and components of health related quality of life such as pain, stiffness, physical function, and dynamic stability on falls frequency in older adults aged 65 years and older with severe knee osteoarthritis. An observational longitudinal study was conducted on 68 patients (11 males and 57 females) scheduled for total knee replacement due to severe knee osteoarthritis (grade 3 or 4) and knee pain lasting at least one year or more. Patients were personally interviewed for fall history and asked to complete self-administered questionnaires, such as the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC), and physical performance test was performed. The frequency of falls was 63.2% for the past year. The majority of falls took place during walking (89.23%). The main cause of falling was stumbling (41.54%). There was a high rate of injurious falling (29.3%). The time patients needed to complete the physical performance test implied the presence of disability and frailty. The high rates of fall risk, the high disability levels, and the low quality of life were confirmed by questionnaires and the mobility test. Patients with severe knee osteoarthritis were at greater risk of falling, as compared to healthy older adults. Pain, stiffness, limited physical ability, reduced muscle strength, all consequences of severe knee osteoarthritis

  10. CHECKing radiographic joint damage in early osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kinds, M.B.

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease, characterized by pain and functional disability. OA commonly involves the larger joints, with symptomatic knee and hip OA affecting 6% and 3% of the adult population (age 30 years and over), respectively. The prevalence and disease

  11. Biomarkers of Chondrocyte Apoptosis and Autophagy in Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Castrogiovanni, Paola; Trovato, Francesca Maria; Weinberg, Annelie Martina; Al-Wasiyah, Mohammad K.; Alqahtani, Mohammed H.; Mobasheri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Cell death with morphological and molecular features of apoptosis has been detected in osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage, which suggests a key role for chondrocyte death/survival in the pathogenesis of OA. Identification of biomarkers of chondrocyte apoptosis may facilitate the development of novel therapies that may eliminate the cause or, at least, slow down the degenerative processes in OA. The aim of this review was to explore the molecular markers and signals that induce chondrocyte apoptosis in OA. A literature search was conducted in PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Google Scholar using the keywords chondrocyte death, apoptosis, osteoarthritis, autophagy and biomarker. Several molecules considered to be markers of chondrocyte apoptosis will be discussed in this brief review. Molecular markers and signalling pathways associated with chondroycte apoptosis may turn out to be therapeutic targets in OA and approaches aimed at neutralizing apoptosis-inducing molecules may at least delay the progression of cartilage degeneration in OA. PMID:26334269

  12. Expedited CT-Based Methods for Evaluating Fracture Severity to Assess Risk of Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis After Articular Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Donald D; Kilburg, Anthony T; Thomas, Thaddeus P; Marsh, J Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) is common after intra-articular fractures of the tibial plafond. An objective CT-based measure of fracture severity was previously found to reliably predict whether PTOA developed following surgical treatment of such fractures. However, the extended time required obtaining the fracture energy metric and its reliance upon an intact contralateral limb CT limited its clinical applicability. The objective of this study was to establish an expedited fracture severity metric that provided comparable PTOA predictive ability without the prior limitations. An expedited fracture severity metric was computed from the CT scans of 30 tibial plafond fractures using textural analysis to quantify disorder in CT images. The expedited method utilized an intact surrogate model to enable severity assessment without requiring a contralateral limb CT. Agreement between the expedited fracture severity metric and the Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) radiographic OA score at two-year follow-up was assessed using concordance. The ability of the metric to differentiate between patients that did or did not develop PTOA was assessed using the Wilcoxon Ranked Sum test. The expedited severity metric agreed well (75.2% concordance) with the KL scores. The initial fracture severity of cases that developed PTOA differed significantly (p = 0.004) from those that did not. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed that the expedited severity metric could accurately predict PTOA outcome in 80% of the cases. The time required to obtain the expedited severity metric averaged 14.9 minutes/ case, and the metric was obtained without using an intact contralateral CT. The expedited CT-based methods for fracture severity assessment present a solution to issues limiting the utility of prior methods. In a relatively short amount of time, the expedited methodology provided a severity score capable of predicting PTOA risk, without needing to have the intact contralateral limb

  13. Kinematic alterations of the lower limbs and pelvis during an ascending stairs task are associated with the degree of knee osteoarthritis severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Glaucia Helena; Selistre, Luiz Fernando Approbato; Petrella, Marina; Mattiello, Stela Márcia

    2017-03-01

    Individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA) generally demonstrate great difficulty in ascending stairs. The strategies and compensations used by these individuals in stair activities have not been fully established. The purpose of this study was to investigate the joint kinematics of the pelvis, hip, knee and ankle throughout the gait cycle, in the sagittal and frontal planes, in individuals with mild and moderate knee OA, during an ascending stairs task. Thirty-one individuals with knee OA and 19 controls were subjected to clinical and radiographic analysis, divided into three groups: control, mild knee OA, and moderate knee OA. Participants answered a self-reported questionnaire, carried out performance-based tests, and their kinematic data were recorded during an ascending stairs task using an eight-camera Qualisys 3D-Motion analysis system. The individuals with moderate degrees of knee OA demonstrated kinematic alterations in the pelvis, hip, knee, and ankle in the sagittal plane. The individuals with mild degrees of knee OA demonstrated kinematic alterations of the hip in the frontal plane, and kinematic alterations of the ankle in the sagittal plane. The ascending stairs task allowed verification of meaningful information regarding gait strategies used by individuals with mild and moderate knee OA. The strategies of these two groups of individuals are different for this task, although more pronounced in individuals with moderate knee OA. The findings should be taken into account in the development of rehabilitation programs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Cold Pain Threshold Identifies a Subgroup of Individuals With Knee Osteoarthritis That Present With Multimodality Hyperalgesia and Elevated Pain Levels

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Anthony; Benson, Heather A.E.; Will, Rob; Moss, Penny

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Cold hyperalgesia has been established as an important marker of pain severity in a number of conditions. This study aimed to establish the extent to which patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) demonstrate widespread cold, heat, and pressure hyperalgesia. OA participants with widespread cold hyperalgesia were compared with the remaining OA cohort to determine whether they could be distinguished in terms of hyperalgesia, pain report, pain quality, and physical function. Methods: A...

  15. Effects of non-surgical joint distraction in the treatment of severe knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademi-Kalantari, Khosro; Mahmoodi Aghdam, Somayeh; Akbarzadeh Baghban, Alireza; Rezayi, Mehdi; Rahimi, Abbas; Naimee, Sedighesadat

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical results of non surgical knee distraction in patients with severe knee osteoarthritis. forty female patients with severe knee osteoarthritis were randomly divided in two groups. A standard physiotherapy treatment was applied to both groups and in one group it was accompanied with 20 min knee joint distraction. The patients were treated for 10 sessions. Clinical examination consisted of functional examination, completion of a quality of life questionnaire, pain scale, and assessment of joint mobility and joint edema. The standard physiotherapy treatment accompanied by knee distraction resulted in significantly higher improvement in pain (P = 0.004), functional ability (P = 0.02), quality of life (P = 0.002) and knee flexion range of motion (p = 0.02) compared to the standard physiotherapy treatment alone post treatment and after 1 month follow up. Adding knee distraction to standard physiotherapy treatment can result in further improvement in pain relief, increased functional ability and better quality of life in patients with severe knee osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Age, bodyweight, smoking habits and the risk of severe osteoarthritis in the hip and knee in men

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaervholm, Bengt; Lewold, Stefan; Malchau, Henrik; Vingard, Eva

    2005-01-01

    Background:The objective of this study was to estimate the risk of severe osteoarthritis, with the need for arthroplasty, in the knee and/or hip according to body mass index (BMI) both within a normal range and in persons with high BMI. Furthermore, we wanted to study the significance of smoking. Methods: This study identifies male construction workers participating in a national health control program (n = 320,192). The incidence rate for joint replacement was found by matching with the Swedish hospital discharge register between 1987 and 1998. BMI and smoking habit was registered at the time of the health examination. Results: In total 1495 cases of osteoarthritis of the hip and 502 cases of osteoarthritis of the knee were identified and included in this analysis. The incidence rate was found to increase linearly to the BMI even within low and normal BMI. The relative risk for osteoarthritis of the hip was more than two times higher in persons with a BMI of 20-24 than in men with a BMI 17-19. There was almost a doubling of the risk of severe knee osteoarthritis with an increase in BMI of 5 kg/m 2 . Smoker had a lower risk of osteoarthritis than non-smokers and ex-smokers. Conclusions: BMI is an important predictor of osteoarthritis even within normal BMI. A decreased risk of osteoarthritis of the hip was found in smokers, but the effect was weak compared to that of BMI or age. Contrary to studies of radiographic osteoarthritis our study indicates higher risk of hip than of knee osteoarthritis

  17. How well do radiographic, clinical and self-reported diagnoses of knee osteoarthritis agree? Findings from the Hertfordshire cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Camille; Clynes, Michael; Syddall, Holly; Jagannath, Darshan; Litwic, Anna; van der Pas, Suzan; Cooper, Cyrus; Dennison, Elaine M; Edwards, Mark H

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies of knee osteoarthritis (OA) have often used a radiographic definition. However, the clinical syndrome of OA is influenced by a broad range of factors in addition to the structural changes required for radiographic OA. Hence more recently several studies have adopted a clinical or self-reported approach to OA diagnosis rather than a radiographic approach. The aim of this study was to investigate agreement between radiographic OA and the clinical and self-reported diagnoses of OA. Data were available for 199 men and 196 women in the Hertfordshire Cohort Study (HCS), UK. Participants completed a questionnaire detailing self-reported OA. Clinical OA was defined based on American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria. Knee radiographs were taken and graded for overall Kellgren and Lawrence (K&L) score. The mean (standard deviation (SD)) age of study participants was 75.2 (2.6) years and almost identical proportions of men and women. The prevalence of knee OA differed depending on the method employed for diagnosis; 21% of the study participants self-reported knee OA, 18% of the participants had clinical knee OA and 42% of the participants had radiographic OA. Of those 72 study participants with a self-reported diagnosis of knee OA 52 (72%) had a radiographic diagnosis of knee OA, while 66% (39 out of 59) of study participants with clinical knee OA had a diagnosis of radiographic knee OA. However 58% of those participants diagnosed with radiographic OA did not have either self-reported knee OA or a diagnosis of clinical OA. Therefore in comparison with the radiographic definition of OA, both the clinical and self-report definitions had high specificity (91.5% & 91.5% respectively) and low sensitivity (24.5% and 32.7% respectively). There is modest agreement between the radiographic, clinical and self-report methods of diagnosis of knee OA.

  18. Correlation between varus knee malalignment and patellofemoral osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, Shuhei; Nakajima, Mikio; Okamoto, Yoshinori; Oda, Shuhei; Hoshiyama, Yoshiaki; Iida, Go; Neo, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between patellofemoral osteoarthritis (OA) and varus OA of the knee with a focus on the location of joint space narrowing. Eighty-five patients scheduled to undergo total knee arthroplasty caused by varus OA were enrolled in this study. The relationship between patellofemoral OA and varus knee malalignment was elucidated. To determine the alignment of the patellofemoral joint in varus knees, patellar tilt, and the tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove (TT-TG) distance were measured, and patellofemoral OA was classified using computed tomography. The femorotibial angles in patients with stage II-IV patellofemoral OA were significantly larger than those in patients with stage I patellofemoral OA, and the patellar tilt in patients with stage II-IV patellofemoral OA and the TT-TG distance in patients with stage IV patellofemoral OA were significantly larger than those in patients with stage I patellofemoral OA. The TT-TG distance was strongly correlated with patellar tilt (R(2) = 0.41, P Patellofemoral joint space narrowing was mainly noted at the lateral facet, and it was found on both sides as patellofemoral OA worsened. Varus knee malalignment was induced by patellofemoral OA, especially at the lateral facet. Patellar tilt and the TT-TG distance are considered critical factors for the severity of patellofemoral OA. Understanding the critical factors for patellofemoral OA in varus knees such as the TT-TG distance and patellar will facilitate the prevention of patellofemoral OA using procedures such as high tibial osteotomy and total knee arthroplasty to correct knee malalignment. Retrospective cohort study, Level III.

  19. Severe osteoarthritis of the hand associates with common variants within the ALDH1A2 gene and with rare variants at 1p31

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Helgadottir, Hafdis T

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis and is a major cause of pain and disability in the elderly. To search for sequence variants that confer risk of osteoarthritis of the hand, we carried out a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in subjects with severe hand osteoarthritis, using...

  20. Weight-bearing computed tomography findings in varus ankle osteoarthritis: abnormal internal rotation of the talus in the axial plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Beom; Yi, Young; Kim, Jae-Young; Cho, Jae-Ho; Kwon, Min-Soo; Choi, Seung-Hyuk; Lee, Woo-Chun

    2017-08-01

    To assess the incidence of abnormal internal rotation of the talus in the axial plane in patients with varus ankle osteoarthritis, and to determine whether this incidence differs from the severity of varus ankle osteoarthritis (moderate versus severe). We retrospectively evaluated weight-bearing computed tomography (CT) and plain radiographs of 52 ankles with no abnormalities (control group) and 96 ankles with varus osteoarthritis (varus-OA group), which were further stratified into a moderate-OA subgroup (50 ankles) and a severe-OA subgroup (46 ankles). A new radiographic parameter on weight-bearing CT, the talus rotation ratio, was used to assess the rotation of the talus in the axial plane. The normal range of the talus rotation ratio was defined as the 95% prediction interval for talus rotation ratio values in the control group. Abnormal internal rotation of the talus was defined for talus rotation ratio values above the normal range. We determined the incidence of abnormal internal rotation of the talus in the varus-OA group, moderate-OA subgroup, and severe-OA subgroup. In the varus-OA group, the incidence of abnormal internal rotation of the talus was 45% (43 ankles), which corresponded to an incidence of 32% (16 ankles) in the moderate-OA subgroup and 59% (27 ankles) in the severe-OA subgroup (p = 0.013). Our study demonstrates that abnormal internal rotation of the talus occurs in patients with varus ankle osteoarthritis, and is more frequently noted in severe than in moderate varus ankle osteoarthritis.

  1. Weight-bearing computed tomography findings in varus ankle osteoarthritis: abnormal internal rotation of the talus in the axial plane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji-Beom; Yi, Young; Lee, Woo-Chun [Seoul Foot and Ankle Center, Dubalo Orthopaedic Clinic, Seochogu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae-Young; Kwon, Min-Soo; Choi, Seung-Hyuk [Inje University Seoul Paik Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Jung-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jae-Ho [Hallym University, ChunCheon Sacred Heart Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Chuncheon, GangWon-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    To assess the incidence of abnormal internal rotation of the talus in the axial plane in patients with varus ankle osteoarthritis, and to determine whether this incidence differs from the severity of varus ankle osteoarthritis (moderate versus severe). We retrospectively evaluated weight-bearing computed tomography (CT) and plain radiographs of 52 ankles with no abnormalities (control group) and 96 ankles with varus osteoarthritis (varus-OA group), which were further stratified into a moderate-OA subgroup (50 ankles) and a severe-OA subgroup (46 ankles). A new radiographic parameter on weight-bearing CT, the talus rotation ratio, was used to assess the rotation of the talus in the axial plane. The normal range of the talus rotation ratio was defined as the 95% prediction interval for talus rotation ratio values in the control group. Abnormal internal rotation of the talus was defined for talus rotation ratio values above the normal range. We determined the incidence of abnormal internal rotation of the talus in the varus-OA group, moderate-OA subgroup, and severe-OA subgroup. In the varus-OA group, the incidence of abnormal internal rotation of the talus was 45% (43 ankles), which corresponded to an incidence of 32% (16 ankles) in the moderate-OA subgroup and 59% (27 ankles) in the severe-OA subgroup (p = 0.013). Our study demonstrates that abnormal internal rotation of the talus occurs in patients with varus ankle osteoarthritis, and is more frequently noted in severe than in moderate varus ankle osteoarthritis. (orig.)

  2. Weight-bearing computed tomography findings in varus ankle osteoarthritis: abnormal internal rotation of the talus in the axial plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji-Beom; Yi, Young; Lee, Woo-Chun; Kim, Jae-Young; Kwon, Min-Soo; Choi, Seung-Hyuk; Cho, Jae-Ho

    2017-01-01

    To assess the incidence of abnormal internal rotation of the talus in the axial plane in patients with varus ankle osteoarthritis, and to determine whether this incidence differs from the severity of varus ankle osteoarthritis (moderate versus severe). We retrospectively evaluated weight-bearing computed tomography (CT) and plain radiographs of 52 ankles with no abnormalities (control group) and 96 ankles with varus osteoarthritis (varus-OA group), which were further stratified into a moderate-OA subgroup (50 ankles) and a severe-OA subgroup (46 ankles). A new radiographic parameter on weight-bearing CT, the talus rotation ratio, was used to assess the rotation of the talus in the axial plane. The normal range of the talus rotation ratio was defined as the 95% prediction interval for talus rotation ratio values in the control group. Abnormal internal rotation of the talus was defined for talus rotation ratio values above the normal range. We determined the incidence of abnormal internal rotation of the talus in the varus-OA group, moderate-OA subgroup, and severe-OA subgroup. In the varus-OA group, the incidence of abnormal internal rotation of the talus was 45% (43 ankles), which corresponded to an incidence of 32% (16 ankles) in the moderate-OA subgroup and 59% (27 ankles) in the severe-OA subgroup (p = 0.013). Our study demonstrates that abnormal internal rotation of the talus occurs in patients with varus ankle osteoarthritis, and is more frequently noted in severe than in moderate varus ankle osteoarthritis. (orig.)

  3. OAS :: Photos

    Science.gov (United States)

    subscriptions Videos Photos Live Webcast Social Media Facebook @oasofficial Facebook Twitter @oas_official Photos and Symbols Authorities Social Media Facebook Twitter Newsletters Press and Communications Rights Actions against Corruption C Children Civil Registry Civil Society Contact Us Culture Cyber

  4. Urinary C-terminal telopeptide of type II collagen, radiological severity, and functional assessment in knee osteoarthritis: are these related?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayam M Abdel Ghany

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion This study further confirms that urinary CTX-II is an index of early cartilage degradation in knee OA even before radiological changes occurs. The functional assessment using the WOMAC is an easy inexpensive method in reflecting cartilage degradation. Moreover, this work supports the lack of association between the functional status of knee OA patients assessed using the WOMAC and their radiological severity measured using the Kellgren-Lawrence grading scale.

  5. New guidelines for topical NSAIDs in the osteoarthritis treatment paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Roy D

    2010-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common form of arthritis, often affects hands, hips, and knees and involves an estimated 26.9 million US adults. Women have a higher prevalence of OA, and the risk of developing OA increases with age, obesity, and joint malalignment. OA typically presents with pain and reduced function. Therapeutic programs are often multimodal and must take into account pharmaceutical toxicities and patient comorbidities. For example, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are associated with cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and renal adverse events. Topical NSAIDs offer efficacy with reduced systemic drug exposure. This is a review of current guideline recommendations regarding the use of topical NSAIDs in OA of the hand and knee. Articles were identified by PubMed search (January 1, 2000 to May 21, 2010). Several current guidelines for management of OA recommend topical NSAIDs, indicating them as a safe and effective treatment. One guideline recommends that topical NSAIDs be considered as first-line pharmacologic therapy. A US guideline for knee OA recommends topical NSAIDs in older patients and in patients with increased gastrointestinal risk. The consensus across US and European OA guidelines is that topical NSAIDs are a safe and effective treatment for OA. Because the research base on topical NSAIDs for OA is small, guidelines will continue to evolve.

  6. Case definitions of knee osteoarthritis in 4,151 unselected subjects: relevance for epidemiological studies. The Copenhagen osteoarthritis study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laxafoss, Erling; Jacobsen, Steffen; Gosvig, Kasper K.; Sonne-Holm, Stig

    2010-01-01

    The aims of the present study were threefold: to examine the distribution of knee joint osteoarthritis in a large, standardized radiological study; to examine the relationships between self reported knee pain and radiological OA; and to examine the natural history of radio-morphological change over age in individuals without radiological features of OA. The Copenhagen Osteoarthritis Study - COS is a substudy of the Copenhagen City Heart Study, a longitudinal regional health survey. From the third inclusion of the CCHS (1992-1994) 4,151 subjects were selected for subsequent standardized radiography of the pelvis, the knees, the hands, the wrists, and the lumbar spine. Images were analyzed and knee joint osteoarthritis (OA) was classified according to the radiographic atlas of Kellgren and Lawrence. Joint space width (JSW) was measured at three sites within both the medial and the lateral compartment. For the entire cohort the prevalence of radiological knee joint OA of all grades was 38.7% for men and 44.2% for women. Age stratification documented increasing knee joint OA both in regard to prevalence and morphological severity. Knee pain was universally correlated to the Kellgren and Lawrence severity of OA. In a subgroup with no features of radiological OA, a significant and linear decline in JSW with increasing age was found. We found a clear relationship between self-reported knee pain and radiological osteoarthritis. Pain was proportionally related to the severity of change. We also demonstrated a significant diminishing of joint space width with increasing age in individuals without apparent radiological degeneration. (orig.)

  7. Case definitions of knee osteoarthritis in 4,151 unselected subjects: relevance for epidemiological studies. The Copenhagen osteoarthritis study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laxafoss, Erling; Jacobsen, Steffen; Gosvig, Kasper K.; Sonne-Holm, Stig [Copenhagen University Hospital of Hvidovre (Denmark). Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

    2010-09-15

    The aims of the present study were threefold: to examine the distribution of knee joint osteoarthritis in a large, standardized radiological study; to examine the relationships between self reported knee pain and radiological OA; and to examine the natural history of radio-morphological change over age in individuals without radiological features of OA. The Copenhagen Osteoarthritis Study - COS is a substudy of the Copenhagen City Heart Study, a longitudinal regional health survey. From the third inclusion of the CCHS (1992-1994) 4,151 subjects were selected for subsequent standardized radiography of the pelvis, the knees, the hands, the wrists, and the lumbar spine. Images were analyzed and knee joint osteoarthritis (OA) was classified according to the radiographic atlas of Kellgren and Lawrence. Joint space width (JSW) was measured at three sites within both the medial and the lateral compartment. For the entire cohort the prevalence of radiological knee joint OA of all grades was 38.7% for men and 44.2% for women. Age stratification documented increasing knee joint OA both in regard to prevalence and morphological severity. Knee pain was universally correlated to the Kellgren and Lawrence severity of OA. In a subgroup with no features of radiological OA, a significant and linear decline in JSW with increasing age was found. We found a clear relationship between self-reported knee pain and radiological osteoarthritis. Pain was proportionally related to the severity of change. We also demonstrated a significant diminishing of joint space width with increasing age in individuals without apparent radiological degeneration. (orig.)

  8. Nutritional Factors and Osteoarthritis: A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prof. R N Srivastava

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is the most common disease according to TNS Arogya survey 2007. Although OA was previously thought to be a progressive degenerative disorder, it is now known that spontaneous arrest or reversal of disease can occur. Conventional medications are often effective for symptomatic relief but they can also cause significant side effects and do not slow the progression of disease. Though the role of nutritional factors in OA has been suggested as early as 700 BC, it was first established in the 1960s. Several nutritional factors are helpful in relieving the symptoms of OA and they might positively affect the progression of the disease without any side effects. Preliminary evidences suggest several of these may have a role in influencing the course of OA. Studies have proven the role of these factors and experiment based results have established their therapeutic role. Research is ongoing on the beneficial properties of plant derived extracts for OA and nutraceuticals industries are accordingly making firm contribution to this sector. This article focuses the role of nutrients to slow down the progression of OA and their future aspects.

  9. Subgrouping and TargetEd Exercise pRogrammes for knee and hip OsteoArthritis (STEER OA): a systematic review update and individual participant data meta-analysis protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Melanie A; Burke, Danielle L; Runhaar, Jos; van Der Windt, Danielle; Riley, Richard D; Dziedzic, Krysia; Legha, Amardeep; Evans, Amy L; Abbott, J Haxby; Baker, Kristin; Brown, Jenny; Bennell, Kim L; Bossen, Daniël; Brosseau, Lucie; Chaipinyo, Kanda; Christensen, Robin; Cochrane, Tom; de Rooij, Mariette; Doherty, Michael; French, Helen P; Hickson, Sheila; Hinman, Rana S; Hopman-Rock, Marijke; Hurley, Michael V; Ingram, Carol; Knoop, Jesper; Krauss, Inga; McCarthy, Chris; Messier, Stephen P; Patrick, Donald L; Sahin, Nilay; Talbot, Laura A; Taylor, Robert; Teirlinck, Carolien H; van Middelkoop, Marienke; Walker, Christine; Foster, Nadine E

    2017-12-22

    Knee and hip osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of disability worldwide. Therapeutic exercise is a recommended core treatment for people with knee and hip OA, however, the observed effect sizes for reducing pain and improving physical function are small to moderate. This may be due to insufficient targeting of exercise to subgroups of people who are most likely to respond and/or suboptimal content of exercise programmes. This study aims to identify: (1) subgroups of people with knee and hip OA that do/do not respond to therapeutic exercise and to different types of exercise and (2) mediators of the effect of therapeutic exercise for reducing pain and improving physical function. This will enable optimal targeting and refining the content of future exercise interventions. Systematic review and individual participant data meta-analyses. A previous comprehensive systematic review will be updated to identify randomised controlled trials that compare the effects of therapeutic exercise for people with knee and hip OA on pain and physical function to a non-exercise control. Lead authors of eligible trials will be invited to share individual participant data. Trial-level and participant-level characteristics (for baseline variables and outcomes) of included studies will be summarised. Meta-analyses will use a two-stage approach, where effect estimates are obtained for each trial and then synthesised using a random effects model (to account for heterogeneity). All analyses will be on an intention-to-treat principle and all summary meta-analysis estimates will be reported as standardised mean differences with 95% CI. Research ethical or governance approval is exempt as no new data are being collected and no identifiable participant information will be shared. Findings will be disseminated via national and international conferences, publication in peer-reviewed journals and summaries posted on websites accessed by the public and clinicians. CRD42017054049. © Article

  10. Prevalence of hand osteoarthritis and knee osteoarthritis in Kashin-Beck disease endemic areas and non Kashin-Beck disease endemic areas: A status survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, QuanQuan; Liu, Yun Qi; Sun, Li Yan; Deng, Qing; Wang, Shao Ping; Cao, Yan Hong; Zhang, Xue Ying; Jiang, Yuan Yuan; Lv, Hong Yan; Duan, Li Bin; Yu, Jun

    2018-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a considerable health problem worldwide, and the prevalence of OA varies in different regions. In this study, the prevalence of OA in Kashin-Beck disease (KBD) and non-KBD endemic areas was examined, respectively. According to monitoring data, 4 types of regions (including none, mild, moderate and high KBD endemic areas) in Heilongjiang and Jilin provinces were selected. All local residents were eligible for inclusion criteria have undergone X-ray images of hands and anteroposterior image of knees. A total of 1673 cases were collected, 1446 cases were analyzed after removing the KBD patients (227). The overall hand OA and knee OA detection rates were 33.3% (481/1446) and 56.6% (818/1446), respectively. After being standardized by age, the detection rate of hand OA in the KBD endemic areas was significantly higher than that in the non-endemic endemic areas. Differently, there was no significant difference in the detection rates of knee OA between the KBD endemic areas and the non-endemic area. The correlation coefficient between the severity of OA and the severity of knee OA was 0.358 and 0.197 in the KBD and non-KBD endemic areas, respectively. Where the KBD historical prevalence level was higher, the severity of the residents’ hand OA was more serious. The detection rates of hand OA and knee OA increased with age. The detection rate of knee OA increased with the increase in body mass index. The prevalence of hand OA was closely related to the pathogenic factors of Kashin-Beck disease, and the prevalence of knee OA had no significant correlation with KBD pathogenic factors. PMID:29320581

  11. Severe Osteoarthritis of the Knee as an Early Symptom of Alkaptonuria: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alois Franz

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Alkaptonuria (AKU is a very rare disease and occurs due to the deficiency of the enzyme homogentisate1, 2-dioxygenase (HGD which results in ochronosis, a term used to describe the dark pigmentation of the tissues. Alkaptonuria affects mostly the knee joint followed by the hip as major weight bearing joints, where the life quality of such patients is severely affected. Case Presentation: We present a case of Caucasian male who was suffering from severe osteoarthritis of the knee. Initially he underwent an arthroscopic partial meniscectomy in a nearby hospital. Fourteen months later we performed a total knee replacement using the Journey II CR prosthesis. We found a dark pigmentation of the inside of the knee (synovial tissue and cartilage. A positive urine test and a pathological specimen examination revealed the diagnosis of AKU. The patient had no complications after the surgery and underwent a standard rehabilitation program. Conclusions: Osteoarthritis could be the first manifestation of patients with AKU and the onset of the joint disease could be late and rapid.

  12. The development of a short measure of physical function for knee OA KOOS-Physical Function Shortform (KOOS-PS) - an OARSI/OMERACT initiative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perruccio, A V; Stefan Lohmander, L; Canizares, M

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a short measure of physical function for knee osteoarthritis (OA) using multi-national data from individuals with varying degrees of severity of knee OA. METHODS: Rasch analysis, based on the partial credit model, was conducted on Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score...... and Western Ontario McMaster Universities' Osteoarthritis Index data from individuals with knee OA, ranging from community to pre-total knee replacement samples from five countries. Fit of the data to the Rasch model was evaluated by overall model fit and item-level fit statistics (chi(2), size of residual, F....... RESULTS: Thirteen data sets were included (n=2145), with an age range of 26-95 years, and a male/female ratio of 1:1.4. The final model included seven of the original 22 items. From easiest to most difficult, the items (logit) were as follows: rising from bed (1.366), putting on socks/stockings (1...

  13. Adherence to a Mediterranean diet is associated with lower prevalence of osteoarthritis: Data from the osteoarthritis initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronese, Nicola; Stubbs, Brendon; Noale, Marianna; Solmi, Marco; Luchini, Claudio; Smith, Toby O; Cooper, Cyrus; Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Reginster, Jean-Yves; Rizzoli, Renè; Maggi, Stefania

    2017-12-01

    The Mediterranean diet appears to be beneficial for several medical conditions, but data regarding osteoarthritis (OA) are not available. The aim of this study was to investigate if adherence to the Mediterranean diet is associated with a lower prevalence of OA of the knee in a large cohort from North America. 4358 community-dwelling participants (2527 females; mean age: 61.2 years) from the Osteoarthritis Initiative were included. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet was evaluated through a validated Mediterranean diet score (aMED) categorized into quartiles (Q). Knee OA was diagnosed both clinically and radiologically. The strength of the association between aMED (divided in quartiles) and knee OA was investigated through a logistic regression analysis and reported as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusted for potential confounders. Participants with a higher adherence to Mediterranean diet had a significantly lower prevalence of knee OA compared to those with lower adherence (Q4: 25.2% vs. Q1: 33.8%; p Mediterranean diet, only higher use of cereals was associated with lower odds of having knee OA (OR: 0.76; 95%CI: 0.60-0.98; p = 0.03). Higher adherence to a Mediterranean diet is associated with lower prevalence of knee OA. This remained when adjusting for potential confounders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  14. OAS :: Speeches

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    the Human Resources of the OAS, including its organizational structure, each organizational unit's contract and travel control measure reports, the applicable procurement rules and regulations, and the Strategy and Organizational Development Luis Alberto Porto Rizzo » Luis Alberto Porto Rizzo Senior Advisor

  15. OAS :: SEDI

    Science.gov (United States)

    subscriptions Videos Photos Live Webcast Social Media Facebook @oasofficial Facebook Twitter @oas_official Scholarships School of Governance Science and Technology Social Development Summits of the Americas Sustainable Development T Telecommunications Terrorism Tourism Trade Treaties and Agreements W Women Y Youth Strategic

  16. OAS :: Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    subscriptions Videos Photos Live Webcast Social Media Facebook @oasofficial Facebook Twitter @oas_official Audios Photos Social Media Facebook Twitter Newsletters Press and Communications Department Contact us at Rights Actions against Corruption C Children Civil Registry Civil Society Contact Us Culture Cyber

  17. OAS :: Newsletters

    Science.gov (United States)

    subscriptions Videos Photos Live Webcast Social Media Facebook @oasofficial Facebook Twitter @oas_official Audios Photos Social Media Facebook Twitter Newsletters Press and Communications Department Contact us at Rights Actions against Corruption C Children Civil Registry Civil Society Contact Us Culture Cyber

  18. Adegbesan, Oa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adegbesan, Oa. Vol 32, No 1 (2010) - Articles Botswana team sport players' perception of cohesion and imagery use in sport. Abstract. ISSN: 0379-9069. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of ...

  19. Nutraceuticals: potential for chondroprotection and molecular targeting of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Daniel J; Choudhury, Marwa; Hirsh, David M; Hardin, John A; Cobelli, Neil J; Sun, Hui B

    2013-11-21

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease and a leading cause of adult disability. There is no cure for OA, and no effective treatments which arrest or slow its progression. Current pharmacologic treatments such as analgesics may improve pain relief but do not alter OA disease progression. Prolonged consumption of these drugs can result in severe adverse effects. Given the nature of OA, life-long treatment will likely be required to arrest or slow its progression. Consequently, there is an urgent need for OA disease-modifying therapies which also improve symptoms and are safe for clinical use over long periods of time. Nutraceuticals-food or food products that provide medical or health benefits, including the prevention and/or treatment of a disease-offer not only favorable safety profiles, but may exert disease- and symptom-modification effects in OA. Forty-seven percent of OA patients use alternative medications, including nutraceuticals. This review will overview the efficacy and mechanism of action of commonly used nutraceuticals, discuss recent experimental and clinical data on the effects of select nutraceuticals, such as phytoflavonoids, polyphenols, and bioflavonoids on OA, and highlight their known molecular actions and limitations of their current use. We will conclude with a proposed novel nutraceutical-based molecular targeting strategy for chondroprotection and OA treatment.

  20. Nutraceuticals: Potential for Chondroprotection and Molecular Targeting of Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Leong

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a degenerative joint disease and a leading cause of adult disability. There is no cure for OA, and no effective treatments which arrest or slow its progression. Current pharmacologic treatments such as analgesics may improve pain relief but do not alter OA disease progression. Prolonged consumption of these drugs can result in severe adverse effects. Given the nature of OA, life-long treatment will likely be required to arrest or slow its progression. Consequently, there is an urgent need for OA disease-modifying therapies which also improve symptoms and are safe for clinical use over long periods of time. Nutraceuticals—food or food products that provide medical or health benefits, including the prevention and/or treatment of a disease—offer not only favorable safety profiles, but may exert disease- and symptom-modification effects in OA. Forty-seven percent of OA patients use alternative medications, including nutraceuticals. This review will overview the efficacy and mechanism of action of commonly used nutraceuticals, discuss recent experimental and clinical data on the effects of select nutraceuticals, such as phytoflavonoids, polyphenols, and bioflavonoids on OA, and highlight their known molecular actions and limitations of their current use. We will conclude with a proposed novel nutraceutical-based molecular targeting strategy for chondroprotection and OA treatment.

  1. Correlation between Gene Expression and Osteoarthritis Progression in Human

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhong, Leilei; Huang, Xiaobin; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes; Post, Janine Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a multifactorial disease characterized by gradual degradation of joint cartilage. This study aimed to quantify major pathogenetic factors during OA progression in human cartilage. Cartilage specimens were isolated from OA patients and scored 0–5 according to the Osteoarthritis

  2. Synovial and systemic pharmacokinetics (PK) of triamcinolone acetonide (TA) following intra-articular (IA) injection of an extended-release microsphere-based formulation (FX006) or standard crystalline suspension in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, V B; Conaghan, P G; Aazami, H A; Mehra, P; Kivitz, A J; Lufkin, J; Hauben, J; Johnson, J R; Bodick, N

    2018-01-01

    Intra-articular (IA) corticosteroids relieve osteoarthritis (OA) pain, but rapid absorption into systemic circulation may limit efficacy and produce untoward effects. We compared the pharmacokinetics (PK) of IA triamcinolone acetonide (TA) delivered as an extended-release, microsphere-based formulation (FX006) vs a crystalline suspension (TAcs) in knee OA patients. This Phase 2 open-label study sequentially enrolled 81 patients who received a single IA injection of FX006 (5 mL, 32 mg delivered dose, N = 63) or TAcs (1 mL, 40 mg, N = 18). Synovial fluid (SF) aspiration was attempted in each patient at baseline and one post-IA-injection visit (FX006: Week 1, Week 6, Week 12, Week 16 or Week 20; TAcs: Week 6). Blood was collected at baseline and multiple post-injection times. TA concentrations (validated LC-MS/MS, geometric means (GMs)), PK (non-compartmental analysis models), and adverse events (AEs) were assessed. SF TA concentrations following FX006 were quantifiable through Week 12 (pg/mL: 231,328.9 at Week 1; 3590.0 at Week 6; 290.6 at Week 12); post-TAcs, only two of eight patients had quantifiable SF TA at Week 6 (7.7 pg/mL). Following FX006, plasma TA gradually increased to peak (836.4 pg/mL) over 24 h and slowly declined to IA injection prolonged SF joint residency, diminished peak plasma levels, and thus reduced systemic TA exposure relative to TAcs. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Relationships between the center of pressure and the movements of the ankle and knee joints during the stance phase in patients with severe medial knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukaya, Takashi; Mutsuzaki, Hirotaka; Okubo, Tomoyuki; Mori, Koichi; Wadano, Yasuyoshi

    2016-08-01

    The knee joint movement during the stance phase is affected by altered ankle movement and the center of pressure (COP). However the relationships between changes in the center of pressure (COP) and the altered kinematics and kinetics of the ankle and knee joints in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationships between changes in the COP and the altered kinematic and kinetic variables in ankle and knee joints during the stance phase in patients with medial knee OA. Fourteen patients with knee OA (21 knees) and healthy subjects were assessed by gait analysis using an eight-camera motion analysis system to record forward and lateral shifts in the COP and the angle and net internal moments of the knee and ankle joint. Spearman rank-correlation coefficients were used to determine the relationship between these results. In knees with medial OA, lateral shifts in the COP were correlated with knee flexion angle. Lateral shifts in the COP were correlated with the second peak of the knee extensor moment and correlated with the knee abductor moment. In patients with medial knee OA, lateral shifts in the COP were negatively correlated with the kinematic and kinetic variables in the sagittal plane of the knee joints. Controlling such lateral shifts in the COP may thus be an effective intervention for mechanical loads on the knee during the stance phase in patients with knee OA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Physical therapy as an adjunctive treatment for severe osteoarthritis in a Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Tammy Culpepper; Stringer, Elizabeth; Krauss, Sue; Trout, Tim

    2015-03-01

    This case report describes a new physical therapy technique, specifically the Wolfe Kinetic Technique, as adjunctive therapy in the treatment of severe osteoarthritis in a 20-yr-old Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis). This animal was managed with oral analgesics for 3 yr with fair to minimal response over time. Due to worsening of lameness and mobility, physical therapy was initiated. Ten treatment sessions were administered at 1-wk intervals. Within 1 mo the Komodo dragon exhibited marked improvement in gait and function, increased responsiveness to his environment, and increased mobility which continued to improve over the subsequent sessions. Although outcomes could not be measured by standardized objective measures, this study provides a reference for treatment of future cases and a foundation for future research substantiating treatment practices in animal physical therapy.

  5. Vitamin C Intakeand Risk Factors for Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Ayu Destiani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Knee osteoarthritis (OA is a degenerative disease of the knee joints characterized by progressive softening and disintegration of articular cartilage. In OA, which is influenced by several risk factors, free radicals are increased by local ischemia in the cartilage. As an exogenous antioxidant, vitamin C also plays an important role in collagen and glycosaminoglycan synthesis. This study was carried out to identify vitamin C intake as well as risk factors in knee OA. Methods: The study population was determined by non-probability sampling with convenient approach to knee OA patients at the Rheumatology Outpatient Clinic of Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital in October–November 2013. Data were obtained through questionnaire interview about risk factors, severity index of OA and vitamin C intake profile. Data presentation was conducted by descriptive method. Results: There were 47 patients diagnosed with knee OA in the Rheumatology Outpatient Clinic. The result showed that 7 patients (14.9% had low vitamin C intake for the last 3 months. There were 30 patients with family history of OA (63.8%. Thirty two patients (68.1% were passive smokers, 44 patients (93.6% had history of repeated use of knee joints and majority of respondents had obesity.  Conclusions: Most of the subjects have sufficient vitamin C intake and more than half have risk factors that may contribute to the incidence of knee OA.   DOI: 10.15850/amj.v4n2.1067

  6. Viscosupplementation for Osteoarthritis: a Primer for Primary Care Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Osteoarthritis (OA) constitutes a growing public health burden and the most common cause of disability in the United States. Non-pharmacologic modalities and conservative pharmacologic therapies are recommended for the initial treatment of OA, including acetaminophen, and topical and oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. However, safety concerns continue to mount regarding the use of these treatments and none have been shown to impact disease progression. Viscosupplementation with injections of hyaluronans (HAs) are indicated when non-pharmacologic and simple analgesics have failed to relieve symptoms (e.g., pain, stiffness) associated with knee OA. This review evaluates literature focusing on the efficacy and/or safety of HA injections in treating OA of the knee and in other joints, including the hip, shoulder, and ankle. Methods Relevant literature on intra-articular (IA) HA injections as a treatment for OA pain in the knee and other joints was identified through PubMed database searches from inception until January 2013. Search terms included “hyaluronic acid” or “hylan”, and “osteoarthritis”. Discussion Current evidence indicates that HA injections are beneficial and safe for patients with OA of the knee. IA injections of HAs treat the symptoms of knee OA and may also have disease-modifying properties, potentially delaying progression of OA. Although traditionally reserved for second-line treatment, evidence suggests that HAs may have value as a first-line therapy in the treatment of knee OA as they have been shown to be more effective in earlier stages and grades of disease, more recently diagnosed OA, and in less severe radiographic OA. Conclusion For primary care physicians who treat and care for patients with OA of the knee, IA injection with HAs constitutes a safe and effective treatment that can be routinely administered in the office setting. PMID:24203348

  7. Clinical features of symptomatic patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis (OA) is common and leads to pain and disability. However, current classification criteria do not distinguish between patellofemoral and tibiofemoral joint OA. The objective of this study was to provide empirical evidence of the clinical features of patellofemoral joint OA (PFJOA) and to explore the potential for making a confident clinical diagnosis in the community setting. Methods This was a population-based cross-sectional study of 745 adults aged ≥50 years with knee pain. Information on risk factors and clinical signs and symptoms was gathered by a self-complete questionnaire, and standardised clinical interview and examination. Three radiographic views of the knee were obtained (weight-bearing semi-flexed posteroanterior, supine skyline and lateral) and individuals were classified into four subsets (no radiographic OA, isolated PFJOA, isolated tibiofemoral joint OA, combined patellofemoral/tibiofemoral joint OA) according to two different cut-offs: 'any OA' and 'moderate to severe OA'. A series of binary logistic and multinomial regression functions were performed to compare the clinical features of each subset and their ability in combination to discriminate PFJOA from other subsets. Results Distinctive clinical features of moderate to severe isolated PFJOA included a history of dramatic swelling, valgus deformity, markedly reduced quadriceps strength, and pain on patellofemoral joint compression. Mild isolated PFJOA was barely distinguished from no radiographic OA (AUC 0.71, 95% CI 0.66, 0.76) with only difficulty descending stairs and coarse crepitus marginally informative over age, sex and body mass index. Other cardinal signs of knee OA - the presence of effusion, bony enlargement, reduced flexion range of movement, mediolateral instability and varus deformity - were indicators of tibiofemoral joint OA. Conclusions Early isolated PFJOA is clinically manifest in symptoms and self-reported functional

  8. Osteoarthritis year in review 2015: rehabilitation and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennell, K L; Hall, M; Hinman, R S

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this narrative review was to highlight recent research in the rehabilitation of people with osteoarthritis (OA) by summarizing findings from selected key systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials (RCTs). A systematic search was conducted using the PubMed, Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) and Cochrane databases from April 1st 2014 to March 31st 2015. A selection of these is discussed based on study quality, relevance, contribution to new knowledge or controversial findings. Methodological quality of RCTs was assessed using guidelines from PEDro. From 274 articles, 74 were deemed to meet the eligibility criteria including 24 systematic reviews and 50 studies reporting on findings from RCTs. Overall the methodological quality of the RCTs was moderate. The studies were grouped into several themes covering; evidence of rehabilitation outcomes in less studied joints including the hand and hip; new insights into exercise in knee OA; effects of biomechanical treatments on symptoms and structure in knee OA; and effects of acupuncture. Exercise was the most common treatment evaluated. Although little evidence supported benefit of exercise for hand OA, exercise has positive effects for hip and knee OA symptoms and these benefits may depend upon patient phenotypes. The first evidence that a brace can influence knee joint structure emerged. The latest evidence suggests that acupuncture has, at best, small treatment effects on knee OA pain of unlikely clinical relevance. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterization of the cartilage DNA methylome in knee and hip osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Michael D; Reynard, Louise N; Barter, Matt J; Refaie, Ramsay; Rankin, Kenneth S; Young, David A; Loughlin, John

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the genome-wide DNA methylation profile of chondrocytes from knee and hip cartilage obtained from patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and hip cartilage obtained from patients with femoral neck fracture, providing the first comparison of DNA methylation between OA and non-OA hip cartilage, and between OA hip and OA knee cartilage. The study was performed using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array, which allows the annotation of ∼480,000 CpG sites. Genome-wide methylation was assessed in chondrocyte DNA extracted from 23 hip OA patients, 73 knee OA patients, and 21 healthy hip control patients with femoral neck fracture. Analysis revealed that chondrocytes from the hip cartilage of OA patients and healthy controls have unique methylation profiles, with 5,322 differentially methylated loci (DMLs) identified between the 2 groups. In addition, a comparison between hip and knee OA chondrocytes revealed 5,547 DMLs between the 2 groups, including DMLs in several genes known to be involved in the pathogenesis of OA. Hip OA samples were found to cluster into 2 groups. A total of 15,239 DMLs were identified between the 2 clusters, with an enrichment of genes involved in inflammation and immunity. Similarly, we confirmed a previous report of knee OA samples that also clustered into 2 groups. We demonstrated that global DNA methylation using a high-density array can be a powerful tool in the characterization of OA at the molecular level. Identification of pathways enriched in DMLs between OA and OA-free cartilage highlight potential etiologic mechanisms that are involved in the initiation and/or progression of the disease and that could be therapeutically targeted. © 2014 The Authors. Arthritis & Rheumatology is published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Rheumatology.

  10. Our Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis Risk Factors and Relationship with Osteoarhritis-Osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadide Torlak Koca

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Osteoarthritis (OA is a degenerative disease, that developes as a result of the impairment of formation and destruction processes in cartilage and sinovial tissues, with the effect of various traumatic, biomechanic, inflammatory and genetic factors. Material and Methods: In this study, risk factors and relation between OA and OP (osteoporosis is evaluated in 127 patients with knee OA. Age, gender, obesity, menopause, ligamentous laxity, DM, injury of joint, genetic predisposition and proprioceptive defects are the risk factors in knee OA. Results: No relation was observed between radiographic knee OA and scores of tests which evaluate pain and disability such as WOMAC and Lequesne; but there was a significant relation between obesity and WOMAC and Lequesne scores. Thus, obesity is a disability determinant in knee OA. We think that smoking has protective effects on OA, but this claim has to be proven with studies containing large control groups. In accordance with literature, we determined a significant concurrence between hand and knee OA. This relation gets stronger as severity of radiographic disease increases. In our patients with knee OA depriving clinical inflammation signs, CRP values were higher than control group and this was statistically significant. Therefore, we may not deny a chronic inflammatory response in OA. No significant relation observed between serum cholesterol values, lipid values, blood pressure and OA. However, presence of DM accelerates the radiographic progression of OA. Serum uric acid levels were significantly higher in our OA patients than in controls. The literature data, that high serum uric acid levels play role especially in generalised OA’s multifactorial etiology, is also supported by our results. Conclusion: Age, gender, menopause and genetic predisposition seemed to have more effects on the incidence of knee OA; while obesity, period of menopause, ligamantous laxity and DM seemed to have more effects

  11. patterns of knee, hip and hand osteoarthritis in kenyatta national

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    studied to determine the prevalence of obesity in this cohort of patients. Results: A total of 201 patients with knee, hip or hand osteoarthritis were studied. Of these participants,. 77% had knee OA, 15% hip OA, 3% hand OA and 5% had combined knee and hip OA. Obese participants were 41% and 32% were overweight.

  12. MR Imaging-based Semi-quantitative Methods for Knee Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    JARRAYA, Mohamed; HAYASHI, Daichi; ROEMER, Frank Wolfgang; GUERMAZI, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based semi-quantitative (SQ) methods applied to knee osteoarthritis (OA) have been introduced during the last decade and have fundamentally changed our understanding of knee OA pathology since then. Several epidemiological studies and clinical trials have used MRI-based SQ methods to evaluate different outcome measures. Interest in MRI-based SQ scoring system has led to continuous update and refinement. This article reviews the different SQ approaches for MRI-based whole organ assessment of knee OA and also discuss practical aspects of whole joint assessment. PMID:26632537

  13. Relationship between the functional exon 3 deleted growth hormone receptor polymorphism and symptomatic osteoarthritis in women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claessen, K. M. J. A.; Kloppenburg, M.; Kroon, H. M.; Bijsterbosch, J.; Pereira, A. M.; Romijn, J. A.; van der Straaten, T.; Nelissen, R. G. H. H.; Hofman, A.; Uitterlinden, A. G.; Duijnisveld, B. J.; Lakenberg, N.; Beekman, M.; van Meurs, J. B.; Slagboom, P. E.; Biermasz, N. R.; Meulenbelt, I.

    2014-01-01

    Background Several studies suggest a role of the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) axis in the pathophysiology of primary osteoarthritis (OA). A common polymorphism of the GH receptor (exon 3 deletion, d3-GHR) is associated with increased GH/IGF-1 activity. Objective To study

  14. Hyaluronic acid and other conservative treatment options for osteoarthritis of the ankle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteveen, Angelique G. H.; Hofstad, Cheriel J.; Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The cause of ankle osteoarthritis (OA) is usually trauma. Patients are relatively young, since ankle trauma occurs at a relatively young age. Several conservative treatment options are available, evidence of the benefits and harms of these options are lacking. Objectives To assess the

  15. Methodologies for semiquantitative evaluation of hip osteoarthritis by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaremko, Jacob L; Lambert, Robert G W; Zubler, Veronika

    2014-01-01

    As a wider variety of therapeutic options for osteoarthritis (OA) becomes available, there is an increasing need to objectively evaluate disease severity on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This is more technically challenging at the hip than at the knee, and as a result, few systematic scoring...

  16. A pre-operative group rehabilitation programme provided limited benefit for people with severe hip and knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, Jason A; Webster, Kate E; Levinger, Pazit; Fong, Cynthia; Taylor, Nicholas F

    2014-01-01

    To determine if a pre-operative group rehabilitation programme can improve arthritis self-efficacy for people with severe hip and knee osteoarthritis. Single group, repeated measures design: 4-week baseline phase followed by a 6-week intervention phase of water exercise, and education with self-management strategies. The primary outcome was arthritis self-efficacy. The secondary outcomes were measures of pain (WOMAC), activity limitation (WOMAC), activity performance (30 s chair stand test, 10 m walk test) and health-related quality of life (EuroQol). Twenty participants (10 knee osteoarthritis and 10 hip osteoarthritis) with a mean age of 71 years (SD 7) attended 92% (SD 10%) of the scheduled sessions. All measures demonstrated baseline stability between two time points for measurements at week 1 and measurements at week 4. After the 6-week intervention programme there were no significant improvements for arthritis self-efficacy. There was a 12% increase for fast walking speed (mean increase of 0.14 m/s, 95% CI 0.07, 0.22). There were no significant improvements for other secondary outcomes. A pre-operative water-based exercise and educational programme did not improve arthritis self-efficacy, self-reported pain and activity limitation, and health-related quality of life for people with hip and knee osteoarthritis who were candidates for joint replacement. While there was a significant increase in one measure of activity performance (walking speed), these findings suggest the current programme may be of little value. Implications for Rehabilitation This pre-operative group rehabilitation programme for people with severe hip and knee osteoarthritis did not change arthritis self-efficacy, pain, activity limitation and health-related quality of life. This programme may have little value in preparing people for joint replacement surgery. The optimal pre-operative programme requires further design and investigation.

  17. The type 2 cannabinoid receptor regulates susceptibility to osteoarthritis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sophocleous, A; Börjesson, A E; Salter, D M; Ralston, S H

    2015-09-01

    Cannabinoid receptors and their ligands have been implicated in the regulation of various physiological processes but their role in osteoarthritis has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of the type 2 cannabinoid receptor (Cnr2) in regulating susceptibility to osteoarthritis in mice. We analysed the severity of knee osteoarthritis as assessed by the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) scoring system in mice with targeted deletion of Cnr2 (Cnr2(-/-)) and wild type (WT) littermates. Studies were conducted in mice subjected to surgical destabilisation of the medial meniscus (DMM) and in those with spontaneous age-related osteoarthritis (OA). Osteoarthritis was more severe following DMM in the medial compartment of the knee in Cnr2(-/-) compared with WT mice (mean ± sem score = 4.9 ± 0.5 vs 3.6 ± 0.3; P = 0.017). Treatment of WT mice with the CB2-selective agonist HU308 following DMM reduced the severity of OA in the whole joint (HU308 = 8.4 ± 0.2 vs vehicle = 10.4 ± 0.6; P = 0.007). Spontaneous age related osteoarthritis was also more severe in the medial compartment of the knee in 12-month old Cnr2(-/-) mice compared with WT (5.6 ± 0.5 vs 3.5 ± 0.3, P = 0.008). Cultured articular chondrocytes from Cnr2(-/-) mice produced less proteoglycans in vitro than wild type chondrocytes. These studies demonstrate that the Cnr2 pathway plays a role in the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis in mice and shows that pharmacological activation of CB2 has a protective effect. Further studies of the role of cannabinoid receptors in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis in man are warranted. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Multi-joint postural behavior in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcot, Katia; Sagawa, Yoshimasa; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Suvà, Domizio; Armand, Stéphane

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated balance impairment in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Although it is currently accepted that postural control depends on multi-joint coordination, no study has previously considered this postural strategy in patients suffering from knee OA. The objectives of this study were to investigate the multi-joint postural behavior in patients with knee OA and to evaluate the association with clinical outcomes. Eighty-seven patients with knee OA and twenty-five healthy elderly were recruited to the study. A motion analysis system and two force plates were used to investigate the joint kinematics (trunk and lower body segments), the lower body joint moments, the vertical ground reaction force ratio and the center of pressure (COP) during a quiet standing task. Pain, functional capacity and quality of life status were also recorded. Patients with symptomatic and severe knee OA adopt a more flexed posture at all joint levels in comparison with the control group. A significant difference in the mean ratio was found between groups, showing an asymmetric weight distribution in patients with knee OA. A significant decrease in the COP range in the anterior-posterior direction was also observed in the group of patients. Only small associations were observed between postural impairments and clinical outcomes. This study brings new insights regarding the postural behavior of patients with severe knee OA during a quiet standing task. The results confirm the multi-joint asymmetric posture adopted by this population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Osteoarthritis: new insights in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Loppini, Mattia; Fumo, Caterina; Rizzello, Giacomo; Khan, Wasim Sardar; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most frequent and symptomatic health problem in the middle-aged and elderly population, with over one-half of all people over the age of 65 showing radiographic changes in painful knees. The aim of the present study was to perform an overview on the available animal models used in the research field on the OA. Discrepancies between the animal models and the human disease are present. As regards human 'idiopathic' OA, with late onset and slow progression, it is perhaps wise not to be overly enthusiastic about animal models that show severe chondrodysplasia and very early OA. Advantage by using genetically engineered mouse models, in comparison with other surgically induced models, is that molecular etiology is known. Find potential molecular markers for the onset of the disease and pay attention to the role of gender and environmental factors should be very helpful in the study of mice that acquire premature OA. Surgically induced destabilization of joint is the most widely used induction method. These models allow the temporal control of disease induction and follow predictable progression of the disease. In animals, ACL transection and meniscectomy show a speed of onset and severity of disease higher than in humans after same injury.

  20. Increased friction coefficient and superficial zone protein expression in patients with advanced osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neu, C P; Reddi, A H; Komvopoulos, K; Schmid, T M; Di Cesare, P E

    2010-09-01

    To quantify the concentration of superficial zone protein (SZP) in the articular cartilage and synovial fluid of patients with advanced osteoarthritis (OA) and to further correlate the SZP content with the friction coefficient, OA severity, and levels of proinflammatory cytokines. Samples of articular cartilage and synovial fluid were obtained from patients undergoing elective total knee replacement surgery. Additional normal samples were obtained from donated body program and tissue bank sources. Regional SZP expression in cartilage obtained from the femoral condyles was quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and visualized by immunohistochemistry. Friction coefficient measurements of cartilage plugs slid in the boundary lubrication system were obtained. OA severity was graded using histochemical analyses. The concentrations of SZP and proinflammatory cytokines in synovial fluid were determined by ELISA. A pattern of SZP localization in knee cartilage was identified, with load-bearing regions exhibiting high SZP expression. SZP expression patterns were correlated with friction coefficient and OA severity; however, SZP expression was observed in all samples at the articular surface, regardless of OA severity. SZP expression and aspirate volume of synovial fluid were higher in OA patients than in normal controls. Expression of cytokines was elevated in the synovial fluid of some patients. Our findings indicate a mechanochemical coupling in which physical forces regulate OA severity and joint lubrication. The findings of this study also suggest that SZP may be ineffective in reducing joint friction in the boundary lubrication mode at an advanced stage of OA, where other mechanisms may dominate the observed tribological behavior.

  1. The relationship between pain and dynamic knee joint loading in knee osteoarthritis varies with radiographic disease severity. A cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Marius; Aaboe, Jens; Bliddal, Henning

    2012-08-01

    In a cross sectional study, we investigated the relationships between knee pain and mechanical loading across the knee, as indicated by the external knee adduction moment (KAM) during walking in patients with symptomatic knee OA who were distinguished by different radiographic disease severities. Data from 137 symptomatic medial knee OA patients were used. Based on Kellgren/Lawrence (K/L) grading, the patients were divided into radiographically less severe (K/L ≤ 2, n=68) or severe (K/L>2, n=69) medial knee OA. Overall knee pain was rated on a 10 cm visual analog scale, and peak KAM and KAM impulses were obtained from gait analyses. Mixed linear regression analyses were performed with KAM variables as the outcome, and pain and disease severity as independent variables, adjusting for age, gender, and walking speed. In adjusted analyses, less severe patients demonstrated negative relationships between pain intensities and dynamic loading. The severe patient group showed no relationship between pain intensity and peak KAM, and a positive relationship between pain intensity and KAM impulse. In radiographically less severe knee OA, the negative relationships between pain intensity and dynamic knee joint loading indicate a natural reaction to pain, which will limit the stress on the joint. In contrast, either absent or positive relationships between pain and dynamic loading in severe OA may lead to overuse and accelerated disease progression. These findings may have a large potential interest for strategies of treatment in knee OA. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Tibiofemoral subchondral surface ratio (SSR) is a predictor of osteoarthritis symptoms and radiographic progression: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everhart, J S; Siston, R A; Flanigan, D C

    2014-06-01

    Symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) is poorly correlated with radiographic severity, but subchondral bone measures may be useful for risk assessment as bone shape is grossly unaffected at early radiographic stages. We sought to determine whether compartment-specific size mismatch in the naturally asymmetric tibiofemoral joint, measured as tibiofemoral subchondral surface ratio (SSR): (1) predicts incident symptoms, (2) predicts incident or progressive OA, (3) is reproducible and time invariant. OA Initiative participants with baseline MRIs and up to 48-month follow-up (n = 1,338) were analyzed. Logistic regression was used to determine the association between SSR and incident symptoms, incident OA, and progression of OA after adjusting for demographic, radiologic, injury-related, and lifestyle-related factors. Reproducibility was assessed as % coefficient of variation (CV) on repeat MRI studies at baseline and 24 months. Increased medial SSR is protective against incident symptoms at 48 months (per 0.1 increase: OR 0.48 CI 0.30, 0.75; P = 0.001). Increased lateral SSR values are protective against lateral OA incidence (OR 0.23 CI 0.06, 0.77; P = 0.016) or progression (OR 0.66 CI 0.43, 0.99; P = 0.049) at 24 months. Both medial and lateral SSR are stable over time (medial: mean change 0.001 SD 0.016; lateral: mean change 0.000 SD 0.017) and are highly reproducible (3.0% CV medial SSR; 2.7% CV lateral SSR). A larger medial SSR is protective against developing OA-related symptoms. A larger lateral SSR is protective against lateral OA incidence or progression. Finally, lateral and medial SSR are stable over time and are highly reproducible across MRI studies. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Nutraceuticals and osteoarthritis pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Angela; Leong, Daniel J; Cardoso, Luis; Sun, Hui B

    2018-02-24

    Arthritis is a chronic disease of joints. It is highly prevalent, particularly in the elderly, and is commonly associated with pain that interferes with quality of life. Because of its chronic nature, pharmacological approaches to pain relief and joint repair must be safe for long term use, a quality many current therapies lack. Nutraceuticals refer to compounds or materials that can function as nutrition and exert a potential therapeutic effect, including the relief of pain, such as pain related to arthritis, of which osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form. Of interest, nutraceuticals have recently been shown to have potential in relieving OA pain in human clinical trials. Emerging evidence indicates nutraceuticals may represent promising alternatives for the relief of OA pain. In this paper, we will overview OA pain and the use of nutraceuticals in OA pain management, focusing on those that have been evaluated by clinical trials. Furthermore, we discuss the biologic and pharmacologic actions underlying the nutraceutical effects on pain relief based on the potential active ingredients identified from traditional nutraceuticals in OA pain management and their potential for drug development. The review concludes by sharing our viewpoints that future studies should prioritize elucidating the mechanisms of action of nutraceuticals in OA and developing nutraceuticals that not only relieve OA pain, but also mitigate OA pathology. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. DIABETES-ASSOCIATED OSTEOARTHRITIS: A SYNTROPY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Kazygasheva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This review presents our own and literature data dedicated to predisposing and pathogenetic factors involved in development of a common comorbidity, diabetes-associated osteoarthritis (DAOA. So far, there is no wide-accepted clinical or scientific viewing of DAOA as a distinct clinical phenotype of osteoarthritis (OA. To our knowledge, the role of genetic factors in DAOA development was not discussed in details. Therefore, we have drawn attention to the cross-acting genes involved in both OA and diabetes, i.e., PPARγ, FTO, ADIPOQ, and AGE. These genes encode proteins which can contribute to the pathogenesis of both OA and diabetes. However, some controversies exist about genetic predisposal for OA and diabetes. We review the studies which concern various clinical characteristics of DAOA. We describe a role of chronic hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, advanced glycation end-products (AGE in development of OA and micro- and macrovascular complications of diabetes. The mechanisms of low-grade inflammation, humoral and cellular immune responses to cartilage antigens, and their role in OA progression are discussed. We underline a similarity of low-grade inflammation in OA and microvascular complications in diabetes. In conclusion, OA and diabetes comorbidity is not a mere coincidence of these diseases. They share some common genetic and pathogenetic factors, a distinct phenotype, and may change thinking of physicians and scientists towards a holistic (personalized approach to prevention, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of this comorbidity. We discuss opportunities of DAOA pharmacotherapy based on the key comorbidity feature, i.e., emergence of a new disease property by coexistence of several diseases. One may hypothesize that studying genetic, molecular, and cellular networks in comorbidities may lead to new treatment strategies (‘network pharmacology” based on targeting the network hubs. We provide examples of such approach in some

  5. New developments in osteoarthritis and cartilage biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulet, Blandine; Staines, Katherine A

    2016-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease and the most common form of arthritis. Characterised by articular cartilage loss, subchondral bone thickening and osteophyte formation, the OA joint afflicts much pain and disability. Whilst OA has been associated with many contributing factors, its underpinning molecular mechanisms are, nevertheless, not fully understood. Clinical management of OA is largely palliative and there is an ever growing need for an effective disease modifying treatment. This review discusses some of the recent progress in OA therapies in the different joint tissues affected by OA pathology. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Existence of a neuropathic pain component in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtori, Seiji; Orita, Sumihisa; Yamashita, Masaomi; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Ito, Toshinori; Shigemura, Tomonori; Nishiyama, Hideki; Konno, Shin; Ohta, Hideyuki; Takaso, Masashi; Inoue, Gen; Eguchi, Yawara; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Kishida, Shunji; Kuniyoshi, Kazuki; Aoki, Yasuchika; Arai, Gen; Miyagi, Masayuki; Kamoda, Hiroto; Suzkuki, Miyako; Nakamura, Junichi; Furuya, Takeo; Kubota, Gou; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Masahiko; Sasho, Takahisa; Nakagawa, Koichi; Toyone, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2012-07-01

    Pain from osteoarthritis (OA) is generally classified as nociceptive (inflammatory). Animal models of knee OA have shown that sensory nerve fibers innervating the knee are significantly damaged with destruction of subchondral bone junction, and induce neuropathic pain (NP). Our objective was to examine NP in the knees of OA patients using painDETECT (an NP questionnaire) and to evaluate the relationship between NP, pain intensity, and stage of OA. Ninety-two knee OA patients were evaluated in this study. Pain scores using Visual Analogue Scales (VAS), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), painDETECT, duration of symptoms, severity of OA using the Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) system, and amount of joint fluid were evaluated and compared using a Spearman's correlation coefficient by rank test. Our study identified at least 5.4% of our knee OA patients as likely to have NP and 15.2% as possibly having NP. The painDETECT score was significantly correlated with the VAS and WOMAC pain severity. Compared with the painDETECT score, there was a tendency for positive correlation with the KL grade, and tendency for negative correlation with the existence and amount of joint fluid, but these correlations were not significant. PainDETECT scores classified 5.4% of pain from knee OA as NP. NP tended to be seen in patients with less joint fluid and increased KL grade, both of which corresponded to late stages of OA. It is important to consider the existence of NP in the treatment of knee OA pain.

  7. Cold Pain Threshold Identifies a Subgroup of Individuals With Knee Osteoarthritis That Present With Multimodality Hyperalgesia and Elevated Pain Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Anthony; Benson, Heather A E; Will, Rob; Moss, Penny

    2017-09-01

    Cold hyperalgesia has been established as an important marker of pain severity in a number of conditions. This study aimed to establish the extent to which patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) demonstrate widespread cold, heat, and pressure hyperalgesia. OA participants with widespread cold hyperalgesia were compared with the remaining OA cohort to determine whether they could be distinguished in terms of hyperalgesia, pain report, pain quality, and physical function. A total of 80 participants with knee OA and 40 matched healthy, pain-free controls participated. OA participants completed a washout of their usual medication. Quantitative sensory testing was completed at 3 sites using standard methods. Cold pain threshold (CPT) and heat pain thresholds (HPT) were tested using a Peltier thermode and pressure pain thresholds (PPT) using a digital algometer. All participants completed the short-form health survey questionnaire and OA participants completed the PainDETECT, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index of the Knee (WOMAC), and pain quality assessment scale questionnaires. OA participants demonstrated widespread cold hyperalgesia (Ppain, decreased function, and more features of neuropathic pain. This study identified a specific subgroup of patients with knee OA who exhibited widespread, multimodality hyperalgesia, more pain, more features of neuropathic pain, and greater functional impairment. Identification of patients with this pain phenotype may permit more targeted and effective pain management.

  8. Articular chondrocyte alignment in the rat after surgically induced osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hideaki; Tamaki, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Noriaki; Onishi, Hideaki

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] Chondrocytes in articular cartilage are aligned as columns from the joint surface. Notably, loss of chondrocyte and abnormalities of differentiation factors give rise to osteoarthritis (OA). However, the relationship between chondrocyte alignment and OA progression remains unclear. This study was performed to investigate temporal alterations in surgically-induced OA rats. [Subjects and Methods] Thirteen-week-old Wistar rats (n=30) underwent destabilized medial meniscus surgery in their right knee and sham surgery in their left knee. Specimens (n=5) were collected at 0, 1, 2, 4 and 8 weeks after surgery. Histological analysis with Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) scores, cell density ratios, cell alignments and correlation between OARSI scores and cell density/alignment was performed. [Results] OARSI scores were significantly higher at 1, 2, 4 and 8 weeks in the DMM group than in the control. Cell density ratios were decreased significantly in the DMM group at 2, 4 and 8 weeks compared with the control. Chondrocyte alignment was decreased significantly in the DMM group at 4 and 8 weeks. There were negative correlations between OA severity and cell density / cell alignment. [Conclusion] The results suggest a relationship between chondrocyte alignment and cartilage homeostasis, which plays an important role in OA progression. PMID:28533592

  9. Osteoarthritis year in review 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, M; Ellegaard, K; Henriksen, M

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The current narrative review covers original research related to imaging in osteoarthritis (OA) in humans published in English between April 1st 2015 and March 31st 2016, in peer reviewed journals available in Medline via PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/). METHODS: Relevant...... compared to studies reported previous years is presented, followed by a review of selected imaging studies of primarily knee, hip and hand OA focussing on (1) results for detection of OA and OA-related pathology (2) studies dealing with treatments and (3) studies focussing on prognosis of disease...

  10. Self-perceived weather sensitivity and joint pain in older people with osteoarthritis in six European countries: results from the European Project on OSteoArthritis (EPOSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Erik J; van der Pas, Suzan; Schaap, Laura A; Sánchez-Martínez, Mercedes; Zambon, Sabina; Peter, Richard; Pedersen, Nancy L; Dennison, Elaine M; Denkinger, Michael; Castell, Maria Victoria; Siviero, Paola; Herbolsheimer, Florian; Edwards, Mark H; Otero, Angel; Deeg, Dorly J H

    2014-03-05

    People with osteoarthritis (OA) frequently report that their joint pain is influenced by weather conditions. This study aimed to examine whether there are differences in perceived joint pain between older people with OA who reported to be weather-sensitive versus those who did not in six European countries with different climates and to identify characteristics of older persons with OA that are most predictive of perceived weather sensitivity. Baseline data from the European Project on OSteoArthritis (EPOSA) were used. ACR classification criteria were used to determine OA. Participants with OA were asked about their perception of weather as influencing their pain. Using a two-week follow-up pain calendar, average self-reported joint pain was assessed (range: 0 (no pain)-10 (greatest pain intensity)). Linear regression analyses, logistic regression analyses and an independent t-test were used. Analyses were adjusted for several confounders. The majority of participants with OA (67.2%) perceived the weather as affecting their pain. Weather-sensitive participants reported more pain than non-weather-sensitive participants (M = 4.1, SD = 2.4 versus M = 3.1, SD = 2.4; p weather sensitivity and joint pain remained present (B = 0.37, p = 0.03). Logistic regression analyses revealed that women and more anxious people were more likely to report weather sensitivity. Older people with OA from Southern Europe were more likely to indicate themselves as weather-sensitive persons than those from Northern Europe. Weather (in)stability may have a greater impact on joint structures and pain perception in people from Southern Europe. The results emphasize the importance of considering weather sensitivity in daily life of older people with OA and may help to identify weather-sensitive older people with OA.

  11. The development of a short measure of physical function for hip OA HOOS-Physical Function Shortform (HOOS-PS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, A M; Perruccio, A V; Canizares, M

    2008-01-01

    : The daily activity and sports and recreational items of the HOOS were reduced to five items achieving a feasible, short measure of physical function with interval level properties. This tool has potential for use as the function component of an OA severity scoring system. Further testing of this measure......OBJECTIVE: To derive a cross-culturally valid, short measure of physical function using function subscales (daily living and sports and recreation) of the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS). METHODS: Rasch analysis was conducted on data from individuals from multiple countries...... who had hip osteoarthritis (OA). Fit of the data to the Rasch model was evaluated by model chi(2) and item fit statistics (chi(2), size of residual, and F-test). Differential item functioning was evaluated by gender, age and country. Unidimensionality was evaluated by factor analysis of residuals...

  12. The Influence of Radiographic Severity on the Relationship between Muscle Strength and Joint Loading in Obese Knee Osteoarthritis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Aaboe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the relationship between knee muscle strength and the external knee adduction moment during walking in obese knee osteoarthritis patients and whether disease severity influences this relationship. Methods. This cross-sectional study included 136 elderly obese (BMI>30 adults with predominant medial knee osteoarthritis. Muscle strength, standing radiographic severity as measured by the Kellgren and Lawrence scale, and the peak external knee adduction moment were measured at self-selected walking speed. Results. According to radiographic severity, patients were classified as “less severe” (KL 1-2, N=73 or “severe” (KL 3-4, N=63. A significant positive association was demonstrated between the peak knee adduction moment and hamstring muscle strength in the whole cohort (P=.047. However, disease severity did not influence the relationship between muscle strength and dynamic medial knee joint loading. Severe patients had higher peak knee adduction moment and more varus malalignment (P<.001. Conclusion. Higher hamstring muscle strength relates to higher estimates of dynamic knee joint loading in the medial compartment. No such relationship existed for quadriceps muscle strength. Although cross sectional, the results suggest that hamstrings function should receive increased attention in future studies and treatments that aim at halting disease progression.

  13. Tibiofemoral osteoarthritis affects quality of life and function in elderly Koreans, with women more adversely affected than men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Inje; Kim, Hyun Ah; Seo, Young-Il; Song, Yeong Wook; Hunter, David J; Jeong, Jin Young; Kim, Dong Hyun

    2010-06-22

    The prevalence of knee osteoarthritis(OA) in East Asia is as common for men and even higher for women than that reported in the Caucasian population. Since both population aging and economic growth have taken place at a much faster pace in Asian countries, such as South Korea, one would expect knee OA to become a major public health problem. However, few studies have examined the influence of knee OA on the quality of life (QoL) and physical function in Asia. The aim of this cross-sectional study is to investigate the influence of knee osteoarthritis (OA) on the quality of life (QoL), function and lower extremity physical performance and the gender difference in its influence in elderly community residents in Korea. Participants were from the population-based Hallym Aging Study (HAS). The mean age of the 504 study subjects was 70.2 years and 274 (54%) were women. Demographic information was obtained by questionnaire, and radiographic evaluations consisted of weight-bearing semi-flexed knee radiographs. Self-reported QoL and function were assessed using Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) Index and Short Form 12-item (SF-12). Performance-based lower extremity function was assessed using the tests consisting of standing balance, usual walk and chair stands. The odds ratios(ORs) for belonging to the worst quartile of WOMAC and physical performance test were calculated by logistic regression analysis in radiographic knee OA compared to non-OA after adjustment of confounders. Scores for SF-12 items were analyzed using general linear models and means adjusted for age, BMI and OA severity were compared. Subjects with radiographic knee OA had significantly increased OR for belonging to the worst WOMAC quartile(for pain, 2.13,95% confidence interval[CI], 1.33-3.40, for stiffness, 2.94,95% CI,1.78-4.86, and for function, 2.97, 95% CI,1.83-4.81) and significantly worse SF-12 scores compared to non-OA after adjustment of age, BMI and sex. Women had

  14. Tibiofemoral osteoarthritis affects quality of life and function in elderly Koreans, with women more adversely affected than men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunter David J

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of knee osteoarthritis(OA in East Asia is as common for men and even higher for women than that reported in the Caucasian population. Since both population aging and economic growth have taken place at a much faster pace in Asian countries, such as South Korea, one would expect knee OA to become a major public health problem. However, few studies have examined the influence of knee OA on the quality of life (QoL and physical function in Asia. The aim of this cross-sectional study is to investigate the influence of knee osteoarthritis (OA on the quality of life (QoL, function and lower extremity physical performance and the gender difference in its influence in elderly community residents in Korea. Methods Participants were from the population-based Hallym Aging Study (HAS. The mean age of the 504 study subjects was 70.2 years and 274 (54% were women. Demographic information was obtained by questionnaire, and radiographic evaluations consisted of weight-bearing semi-flexed knee radiographs. Self-reported QoL and function were assessed using Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis (WOMAC Index and Short Form 12-item (SF-12. Performance-based lower extremity function was assessed using the tests consisting of standing balance, usual walk and chair stands. The odds ratios(ORs for belonging to the worst quartile of WOMAC and physical performance test were calculated by logistic regression analysis in radiographic knee OA compared to non-OA after adjustment of confounders. Scores for SF-12 items were analyzed using general linear models and means adjusted for age, BMI and OA severity were compared. Results Subjects with radiographic knee OA had significantly increased OR for belonging to the worst WOMAC quartile(for pain, 2.13,95% confidence interval[CI], 1.33-3.40, for stiffness, 2.94,95% CI,1.78-4.86, and for function, 2.97, 95% CI,1.83-4.81 and significantly worse SF-12 scores compared to non-OA

  15. The role of imaging in early hip OA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebelt, M; Agricola, R; Weinans, H; Kim, Y J

    2014-10-01

    Hip osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by cartilage degradation, subchondral bone sclerosis and osteophyte formation. Nowadays, OA is thought to develop via different etiologies that all lead to a similar form of end stage joint degradation. One of these subtypes is related to an abnormal shaped hip joint, like acetabular dysplasia and a cam deformity. These bony abnormalities are highly predictive for development of hip OA, but they are likely to already be present from childhood. This suggests that these deformations induce OA changes in the hip, well before extensive hip degradation becomes present three to four decades later. Accurate detection and successful characterization of these early OA events might lead to better treatment options for hip OA besides nowadays available invasive joint replacement surgery. However, current diagnostic imaging techniques like radiographs or plain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), are not sensitive enough to detect these subtle early OA changes. Nor are they able to disentangle intertwined and overlapping cascades from different OA subtypes, and neither can they predict OA progression. New and more sensitive imaging techniques might enable us to detect first OA changes on a cellular level, providing us with new opportunities for early intervention. In this respect, shape analysis using radiography, MRI, computed tomography (CT), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT, and positron emission tomography (PET) might prove promising techniques and be more suited to detect early pathological changes in the hip joint. A broad application of these techniques might give us more understanding what can be considered physiological adaptation of the hip, or when early OA really starts. With a more clear definition of early OA, more homogenous patient populations can be selected and help with the development of new disease modifying OA interventions. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International

  16. BIOCHEMICAL AND HISTOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF TETRACYCLINES ON SPONTANEOUS OSTEOARTHRITIS IN GUINEA PIGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edin De Bri

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are mediators in connective tissue destruction in a variety of pathologic processes. Recently discovered chemically modified tetracyclines have been found to be effective inhibitors of MMP mediated connective tissue degradation in both rheumatoid arthritis (RA and osteoarthritis (OA. The Hartley guinea pig model has been described with a high incidence of spontaneous OA-like changes in the knee joint. Therefore we have studied the effect of two tetracyclines, doxycycline (Dox and chemically modified tetracycline-7 (CMT-7 which have both previously been shown as potent MMP inhibitors. We found that prophylactic orally given CMT-7 decreases OA changes in the knee joints both in vitro and in vivo in the guinea pig OA model. OA changes were most severe in the central compartment of the medial condyle in the control group. Cartilage fibrillation and destruction, in addition to subchondral bone sclerosis and cyst formation were all less in the CMT-7 treated group compared with controls. Collagen, hyaluronan and proteoglycan content in cartilage was higher in the CMT-7 treated group compared with controls. In contrast, OA changes were not decreased in the Dox group. These results show that tetracyclines, but not all tetracyclines, can reduce the severity of OA in the guinea pig model of spontaneous OA.

  17. Research progress on osteoarthritis treatment mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yun-Tao; Chen, Jian; Meng, Zhu-Long; Ge, Wan-Yu; Bian, Yang-Yang; Cheng, Shao-Wen; Xing, Chen-Kun; Yao, Jiang-Ling; Fu, Jian; Peng, Lei

    2017-09-01

    Osteoarthritis is a common disease and is frequently encountered in the older population; the incidence rises sharply with age. It is estimated that more than 360 million people suffer from OA. However, the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis remains unclear, and we cannot effectively prevent the progression of OA. The aim of this review was to explore the molecular markers and signaling pathways that induce chondrocyte apoptosis in OA. We searched, using the key words osteoarthritis, chondrocyte apoptosis, autophagy, endoplasmic reticulum stress, molecular targets, and biomarkers, in PubMed, Web of Science, and Google Scholar from 1994 to 2017. We also reviewed the signaling pathways and molecular markers associated with chondrocyte apoptosis and approaches aimed at inhibiting the apoptosis-inducing mechanism to at least delay the progression of cartilage degeneration in OA. This article provides an overview of targeted therapies and the related signaling pathways in OA. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  18. Combination of Intra-Articular and Intraosseous Injections of Platelet Rich Plasma for Severe Knee Osteoarthritis: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikel Sánchez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess a novel approach to treating severe knee osteoarthritis by targeting synovial membrane, superficial articular cartilage, synovial fluid, and subchondral bone by combining intra-articular injections and intraosseous infiltrations of platelet rich plasma. We explored a new strategy consisting of intraosseous infiltrations of platelet rich plasma into the subchondral bone in combination with the conventional intra-articular injection in order to tackle several knee joint tissues simultaneously. We assessed the clinical outcomes through osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS and the inflammatory response by quantifying mesenchymal stem cells in synovial fluid. There was a significant pain reduction in the KOOS from baseline (61.55±14.11 to week 24 (74.60±19.19, after treatment (p=0.008, in the secondary outcomes (symptoms, p=0.004; ADL, p=0.022; sport/rec., p=0.017; QOL, p=0.012, as well as VAS score (p<0.001 and Lequesne Index (p=0.008. The presence of mesenchymal stem cells in synovial fluid and colony-forming cells one week after treatment decreased substantially from 7.98±8.21 MSC/μL to 4.04±5.36 MSC/μL (p=0.019 and from 601.75±312.30 to 139.19±123.61  (p=0.012, respectively. Intra-articular injections combined with intraosseous infiltrations of platelet rich plasma reduce pain and mesenchymal stem cells in synovial fluid, besides significantly improving knee joint function in patients with severe knee osteoarthritis. This trial is registered on EudraCT with the number 2013-003982-32.

  19. Joint Instability and Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darryl Blalock

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Joint instability creates a clinical and economic burden in the health care system. Injuries and disorders that directly damage the joint structure or lead to joint instability are highly associated with osteoarthritis (OA. Thus, understanding the physiology of joint stability and the mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA is of clinical significance. The first section of this review discusses the structure and function of major joint tissues, including periarticular muscles, which play a significant role in joint stability. Because the knee, ankle, and shoulder joints demonstrate a high incidence of ligament injury and joint instability, the second section summarizes the mechanisms of ligament injury-associated joint instability of these joints. The final section highlights the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanical and biological mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA. These advances may lead to new opportunities for clinical intervention in the prevention and early treatment of OA.

  20. Genetics of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Fontenla, Cristina; Gonzalez, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a complex disease caused by the interaction of multiple genetic and environmental factors. This review focuses on the studies that have contributed to the discovery of genetic susceptibility factors in OA. The most relevant associations discovered until now are discussed in detail: GDF-5, 7q22 locus, MCF2L, DOT1L, NCOA3 and also some important findings from the arcOGEN study. Moreover, the different approaches that can be used to minimize the specific problems of the study of OA genetics are discussed. These include the study of microsatellites, phenotype standardization and other methods such as meta-analysis of GWAS and gene-based analysis. It is expected that these new approaches contribute to finding new susceptibility genetic factors for OA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Joint instability and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blalock, Darryl; Miller, Andrew; Tilley, Michael; Wang, Jinxi

    2015-01-01

    Joint instability creates a clinical and economic burden in the health care system. Injuries and disorders that directly damage the joint structure or lead to joint instability are highly associated with osteoarthritis (OA). Thus, understanding the physiology of joint stability and the mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA is of clinical significance. The first section of this review discusses the structure and function of major joint tissues, including periarticular muscles, which play a significant role in joint stability. Because the knee, ankle, and shoulder joints demonstrate a high incidence of ligament injury and joint instability, the second section summarizes the mechanisms of ligament injury-associated joint instability of these joints. The final section highlights the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanical and biological mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA. These advances may lead to new opportunities for clinical intervention in the prevention and early treatment of OA.

  2. Interleukin-6 from subchondral bone mesenchymal stem cells contributes to the pathological phenotypes of experimental osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaofeng; Cao, Lei; Li, Fan; Ma, Chao; Liu, Guangwang; Wang, Qiugen

    2018-01-01

    As a main cause of morbidity in the aged population, osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by cartilage destruction, synovium inflammation, osteophytes, and subchondral bone sclerosis. To date its etiology remains elusive. Recent data highlight an important role of subchondral bone in the onset and progression of OA. Therefore, elucidating the mechanisms underlying abnormal subchondral bone could be of importance in the treatment of OA. Interleukin-6 is a proinflammatory cytokine involved in many physiological and pathological processes. Although in vitro and in vivo studies have indicated that IL-6 is an important cytokine in the physiopathogenesis of OA, its effects on subchondral bone have not been studied in OA animal models. In this study, we aimed to i) investigate the role of IL-6 in the pathological phenotypes of OA subchondral bone MSCs including increase in cell numbers, mineralization disorder and abnormal type I collagen production; ii) explore whether the systemic blockade of IL-6 signaling could alleviate the pathological phenotypes of experimental OA. We found that IL-6 was over-secreted by OA subchondral bone MSCs compared with normal MSCs and IL-6/STAT3 signaling was over-activated in subchondral bone MSCs, which contributed to the pathological phenotypes of OA subchondral bone MSCs. More importantly, systemic inhibition of IL-6/STAT3 signaling with IL-6 antibody or STAT3 inhibitor AG490 decreased the severity of pathological phenotypes of OA subchondral bone MSCs and cartilage lesions in OA. Our findings provide strong evidence for a pivotal role for IL-6 signaling in OA and open up new therapeutic perspectives. PMID:29736207

  3. The Gait Deviation Index Is Associated with Hip Muscle Strength and Patient-Reported Outcome in Patients with Severe Hip Osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenlund, Signe; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders; Overgaard, Søren

    2016-01-01

    ) and with severe primary hip osteoarthritis underwent 3-dimensional gait analysis. Mean Gait Deviation Index, pain after walking and maximal isometric hip muscle strength (flexor, extensor, and abductor) were recorded. All patients completed the 'Physical Function Short-form of the Hip disability...... was to investigate associations between Gait Deviation Index as a measure of gait 'quality' and hip muscle strength and between Gait Deviation Index and patient-reported outcomes in patients with primary hip osteoarthritis. METHOD: Forty-seven patients (34 males), aged 61.1 ± 6.7 years, with BMI 27.3 ± 3.4 (kg/m2...... and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS-Physical Function) and the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score subscales for pain (HOOS-Pain) and quality-of-life (HOOS-QOL). RESULTS: Mean Gait Deviation Index was positively associated with hip abduction strength (pstrength (p = 0...

  4. A radiographic analysis of alignment of the lower extremities--initiation and progression of varus-type knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, T; Hashimura, M; Takayama, K; Ishida, K; Kawakami, Y; Matsuzaki, T; Nakano, N; Matsushita, T; Kuroda, R; Kurosaka, M

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate alignment based on age in normal knees and alignment based on deformity in osteoarthritis (OA) knees using detailed radiographic parameters. Various parameters were measured from weight-bearing long leg radiographs of 1251 legs (797 normal and 454 OA knees) as a cross-sectional study. Normal knees were classified by age (young, middle aged, aged, and elderly) and symptomatic OA knees on the basis of the alignment (femorotibial angle (FTA): mild, moderate, severe and profound). The mean measurements in each group were calculated and compared within each group. The femoral shaft showed medially bowed curvature (femoral bowing) of approximately 2° in the young normal group, which shifted to lateral bowing with age. However, OA knees showed larger lateral bowing with OA grade, which might reduce the condylar-shaft angle and subsequently shifted the mechanical axis medially. Progression of mild to moderate OA might be associated with a decreasing condylar-shaft angle (femoral condylar orientation) and widening condylar-plateau angle (joint space narrowing) rather than decreasing tibial plateau flattering. Steeping of the tibial plateau inclination due to increasing tibial plateau shift (tibial plateau compression) rather than medial tibial bowing might be the main contributor to worsening of varus deformity in knees with severe and profound OA. This cross-sectional study might provide the possibility of OA initiation and progression. The lateral curvature of the femoral shaft associated with aging may contribute to the initiation of varus-type OA of the knee. These changes in the femur may be followed by secondary signs of OA progression including varus femoral condylar orientation, medial joint space narrowing, and tibial plateau compression. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Osteoarthritis - a role for weight management in rheumatology practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bliddal, H; Christensen, Pia; Riecke, B.F.

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) and obesity are related diseases, which occur in a large proportion of the population. Epidemiological evidence show that weight is of great importance for the development of OA in the knee, and to some extent also in hip and finger joints. Once acquired, the OA contributes to...

  6. Treatment modalities for patients with varus medial knee osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Duivenvoorden (Tijs)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common joint disorders in the Western population, which causes pain, stiffness, loss of function and disability. In patients with OA the cartilage, located at the ends of long bones, is damaged. OA is most prevalent in the knee

  7. OAS :: Our Structure

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    the Human Resources of the OAS, including its organizational structure, each organizational unit's contract and travel control measure reports, the applicable procurement rules and regulations, and the Related Links OAS Charter Organizational Charts Organizational List Authorities Our Locations Contact Us

  8. OAS :: Office of Protocol

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    Social Media Facebook @oasofficial Facebook Twitter @oas_official Twitter Newsletters Documents OAS Technology Social Development Summits of the Americas Sustainable Development T Telecommunications Terrorism Tourism Trade Treaties and Agreements W Women Y Youth Strategic Partners Permanent Observers Civil Society

  9. OAS :: Upcoming Live Webcasts

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    Social Media Facebook @oasofficial Facebook Twitter @oas_official Twitter Newsletters Documents OAS Videos Audios Photos Social Media Facebook Twitter Newsletters Press and Communications Department C Children Civil Registry Civil Society Contact Us Culture Cyber Security D Demining Democracy

  10. Hip Osteoarthritis: Genetics, epidemiological risk factors and burden of the disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Castaño Betancourt (Martha)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common degenerative joint disease, characterized by progressive damage of the articular cartilage, osteophyte formation and alterations in the subchondral bone. OA is associated with an extremely high burden in terms of health

  11. Are physiotherapists adhering to quality indicators for the management of knee osteoarthritis? An observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spitaels, D.; Hermens, R.P.; Assche, D. Van; Verschueren, S.; Luyten, F.; Vankrunkelsven, P.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common musculoskeletal condition that often leads to pain, stiffness and disability. Physiotherapy plays an important role in the management of knee OA, however we hypothesize discordance between physiotherapists' practice and existing guideline recommendations.

  12. Barriers for guideline adherence in knee osteoarthritis care: A qualitative study from the patients' perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spitaels, D.; Vankrunkelsven, P.; Desfosses, J.; Luyten, F.; Verschueren, S.; Assche, D. Van; Aertgeerts, B.; Hermens, R.P.

    2017-01-01

    RATIONALE, AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: Guidelines for patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) are suboptimally implemented in clinical care. To improve guideline adherence, patients' perceived barriers and facilitators in current care were investigated. METHODS: Eleven patients with knee OA were extensively

  13. The alignment of the knee joint in relationship to age and osteoarthritis: the Copenhagen Osteoarthritis Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laxafoss, Erling; Jacobsen, Steffen; Gosvig, Kasper K; Sonne-Holm, Stig

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the changes in the axis of the knee joint in both radiologically osteoarthritic and non-osteoarthritic knees, on the basis of angles measurable in standardized clinical short knee radiographs, in a cross sectional study of an epidemiological cohort. From the third inclusion of the Copenhagen City Heart Study, 4,151 subjects were selected for standardized radiography of the knees. After censuring the inclusion, the resulting cohort was comprised of 3,488 individuals. Images were analyzed for radiological knee joint osteoarthritis (OA) and the anatomical femorotibial axis of the knee joint was measured. The prevalence of knee joint OA in males was 27.9% and 27.5%, for the left and right knees respectively. In females this was 32.8% and 36.4%. The mean knee joint angles were 4.11° in males; and 5.45° in females. A difference of 1.3° was found between the genders. In non-osteoarthritic knees the increase in valgus orientation in relationship to increasing age was found to be 0.03° and 0.04° per year, respectively, for males and females. Likewise, Kellgren and Lawrence found that OA was seen to influence a shift towards varus of 0.55°-0.76° per level of OA. Stratification in accordance with morphological severity of OA documented a clear tendency for the axis of the diseased knees to depart from the mean, primarily in the direction of varus. In knees exhibiting no signs of radiographic osteoarthritis we found a significant relationship between increasing age and a shift in the anatomical axis in the direction of valgus.

  14. Adding a Vitamin D Supplement Likely Does Not Improve Knee Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Vitamin D Supplement Likely Does Not Improve Knee Osteoarthritis By Colleen Labbe, M.S. | June 1, 2013 Vitamin D supplements likely do not improve symptoms of knee osteoarthritis (OA), according to results from a clinical trial ...

  15. The conservative treatment of ankle osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteveen, A.G.H.

    2015-01-01

    In 70% to 78% of patients with ankle osteoarthritis (OA), they present themselves with the sequelae of a traumatic event in the past. Ankle trauma occurs in many patients at a relatively young age. Consequently, the expected life span of many patients with ankle OA is relatively long. Many treatment

  16. The canine bilateral groove model of osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Intema, F.; Groot, J. de; Elshof, B.; Vianen, M.E.; Yocum, S.; Zuurmond, A.; Mastbergen, S.C.; Lafeber, F.P.

    2008-01-01

    In studies aimed at local treatment of experimental osteoarthritis (OA) it is optimal to have an internal (untreated) OA control. Such an approach excludes interanimal variation, and allows paired statistical evaluation of treatment efficacy. For this purpose, we developed and characterized a

  17. Osteoarthritis and Osteoporosis: What Is the Overlap?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bultink, I.E.M.; Lems, W.F.

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) and osteoporosis (OP) are highly prevalent health problems, associated with considerable morbidity. In the past, attention was focused on a supposed inverse relationship between OA and OP, since both disorders usually affect the elderly, but were regarded to rarely coexist in a

  18. A new classification for 'Pistol Grip Deformity'. Correlation between the severity of the deformity and the grade of osteoarthritis of the hip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ipach, Ingmar; Mittag, F.; Sachsenmaier, S.; Kluba, T.; Heinrich, P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Two types of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) are described as reasons for the early development of osteoarthritis of the hip. Cam impingement develops from contact between an abnormal head-neck junction and the acetabular rim. Pincer impingement is characterized by local or general overcoverage of the femoral head by the acetabular rim. Both forms might cause early osteoarthritis of the hip. A decreased head/neck offset has been recognized on AP pelvic views and labeled as 'pistol grip deformity'. The aim of the study was to develop a classification for this deformity with regard to the stage of osteoarthritis of the hip. Materials and Methods: 76 pelvic and axial views were analyzed for alpha angle and head ratio. 22 of them had a normal shape in the head-neck region and no osteoarthritis signs, 27 had a 'pistol grip deformity' and osteoarthritis I and 27 had a 'pistol grip deformity' and osteoarthritis II -IV . The CART method was used to develop a classification. Results: There was a statistically significant correlation between alpha angle and head ratio. A statistically significant difference in alpha angle and head ratio was seen between the three groups. Using the CART method, we developed a three-step classification system for the 'pistol grip deformity' with very high accuracy. This deformity was aggravated by increasing age. Conclusion: Using this model it is possible to differentiate between normal shapes of the head-neck junction and different severities of the pistol grip deformity. (orig.)

  19. Harmonising measures of knee and hip osteoarthritis in population-based cohort studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leyland, K M; Gates, L S; Nevitt, M

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Population-based osteoarthritis (OA) cohorts provide vital data on risk factors and outcomes of OA, however the methods to define OA vary between cohorts. We aimed to provide recommendations for combining knee and hip OA data in extant and future population cohort studies, in order to ...

  20. Call for standardized definitions of osteoarthritis and risk stratification for clinical trials and clinical use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraus, V B; Blanco, F J; Englund, M

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a heterogeneous disorder. The goals of this review are (1) To stimulate use of standardized nomenclature for OA that could serve as building blocks for describing OA and defining OA phenotypes, in short to provide unifying disease concepts for a heterogeneous disorder; and ...... sophisticated definitions, terminology and tools....

  1. Hidden osteophyte formation on plain X-ray is the predictive factor for development of knee osteoarthritis after 48 months--data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuragi, J; Sasho, T; Yamaguchi, S; Sato, Y; Watanabe, A; Akagi, R; Muramatsu, Y; Mukoyama, S; Akatsu, Y; Fukawa, T; Endo, J; Hoshi, H; Yamamoto, Y; Sasaki, T; Takahashi, K

    2015-03-01

    To examine whether the detection of osteophytes anywhere in the knee could serve as a pre-radiographic biomarker for osteoarthritis (OA) development. Baseline magnetic resonance imaging (MRIs) of 132 participants in the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) were studied. Based on radiographs, 66 knees were assessed as osteoarthritis-free (no-osteoarthritis [NOA], or Kellgren/Lawrence [K/L] severity grade 0/1 both at baseline and 48 months), and another 66 knees were assessed as having radiographic OA changes (pre-radiographic osteoarthritis [PROA], or with K/L grade 0/1 at baseline and grade ≥ 2 at 48 months). Using baseline MRI data, we examined eight sites of osteophyte formation: the medial and lateral femoral condyle (MFC and LFC, respectively); medial and lateral tibial plateau (MTP and LTP, respectively); medial and lateral facets of the patellofemoral joint (PM and PL, respectively); tibial spine (TS); and femoral intercondylar notch (IC). Knee joint osteophyte size was assessed via the 8-point marginal osteophytes item of the whole-organ magnetic resonance imaging score (WORMS). The frequencies and distributions of osteophytes were compared between groups. Mild-size osteophytes (defined as score ≥ 2) were observed more frequently at the MFC (P = 0.00278), MTP (P = 0.0046), TS (P = 0.0146), PM (P formation at the IC, even those of K/L severity grade 0/1, are at risk for the development of radiographic OA by 48 months. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Age related prevalence of hand osteoarthritis diagnosed by photography (HOASCORE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Helgi

    2017-12-02

    Hand photography has been used in a number of studies to determine the presence and severity of hand osteoarthritis (HOA). The aim of this study was to present age and gender specific prevalences of HOA diagnosed by this method. Six thousand three hundred forty three photographs (from 3676 females and 2667 males aged 40-96) were scored for hand osteoarthritis by a 0-3 grade (0 = no evidence of OA, 1 = possible OA, 2 = definite OA and 3 = severe OA) for each of the three main sites, distal interphalangeal joints (DIP), proximal interphalangeal joints (PIP) and thumb base (CMC1). An aggregate score of 0-9 was thus obtained (HOASCORE) to reflect the severity of HOA in each case. DIP joints were most commonly affected, followed by the thumb base and the PIP joints. Having definite DIP joint OA starts at a younger age compared with the other two sites, and there is a marked female preponderance in the age groups from 55 to 69, but after 70 the gender differences are less marked and the prevalence is fairly stable. PIP joint prevalence also indicates a female preponderance from 60 to 79. Thumb base OA has a more marked female preponderance and a rising prevalence thoughout life. The prevalence of individuals with no evidence of photographic OA (HOASCORE = 0) drops from 88% to 57% between the age categories 40-49 and 50-54 and decreased to 33% in the 70-74 age group with a slower decline after that age. DIP and PIP prevalence were strongly associated with each other with an OR of 16.6(12.8-21.5),p < 0.001 of having definite OA at the other site. This was less marked for the thumb base with an OR of 2.2(1.8-2.7, p < 0.001), and 2.7(2.0-3.5, p < 0.001) of having definite DIP or PIP HOA respectively. The prevalence of hand OA in DIP, PIP and thumb base joints obtained by the photographic HOASCORE method is higher in women and increases after the age of fifty. These results are in line with those obtained by clinical examination and radiography

  3. The Influence of Weather Conditions on Joint Pain in Older People with Osteoarthritis: Results from the European Project on OSteoArthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Erik J; Schaap, Laura A; Herbolsheimer, Florian; Dennison, Elaine M; Maggi, Stefania; Pedersen, Nancy L; Castell, Maria Victoria; Denkinger, Michael D; Edwards, Mark H; Limongi, Federica; Sánchez-Martínez, Mercedes; Siviero, Paola; Queipo, Rocio; Peter, Richard; van der Pas, Suzan; Deeg, Dorly J H

    2015-10-01

    This study examined whether daily weather conditions, 3-day average weather conditions, and changes in weather conditions influence joint pain in older people with osteoarthritis (OA) in 6 European countries. Data from the population-based European Project on OSteoArthritis were used. The American College of Rheumatology classification criteria were used to diagnose OA in older people (65-85 yrs). After the baseline interview, at 6 months, and after the 12-18 months followup interview, joint pain was assessed using 2-week pain calendars. Daily values for temperature, precipitation, atmospheric pressure, relative humidity, and wind speed were obtained from local weather stations. Multilevel regression modelling was used to examine the pain-weather associations, adjusted for several confounders. The study included 810 participants with OA in the knee, hand, and/or hip. After adjustment, there were significant associations of joint pain with daily average humidity (B = 0.004, p weather conditions. Changes in weather variables between 2 consecutive days were not significantly associated with reported joint pain. The associations between pain and daily average weather conditions suggest that a causal relationship exist between joint pain and weather variables, but the associations between day-to-day weather changes and pain do not confirm causation. Knowledge about the relationship between joint pain in OA and weather may help individuals with OA, physicians, and therapists to better understand and manage fluctuations in pain.

  4. Blood Transcriptional Signatures for Disease Progression in a Rat Model of Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Korostyński

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomarkers of osteoarthritis (OA that can accurately diagnose the disease at the earliest stage would significantly support efforts to develop treatments for prevention and early intervention. We have sought to determine the time course of alterations in peripheral blood gene expression profile associated with the development of OA. Blood samples were collected from a tail vein of individual rats with monosodium iodoacetate- (MIA- induced OA (2, 14, 21, and 28 days after the treatment. We used whole-genome microarrays to reveal OA-related transcriptional alterations of 72 transcripts. Three main groups of coexpressed genes revealed diverse time-dependent profiles of up- and downregulation. Functional links that connect expression of the gradually downregulated genes to the G13 signaling pathway were indicated. The mRNA abundance levels of the identified transcripts were further analyzed in publicly available gene expression dataset obtained from a GARP study cohort of OA patients. We revealed three-gene signature differentially expressed in both rat and human blood (TNK2, KCTD2, and WDR37. The alterations in expression of the selected transcripts in peripheral blood samples of the patients indicate heterogeneity of the OA profiles potentially related to disease progress and severity of clinical symptoms. Our study identifies several potential stage-specific biomarkers of OA progression.

  5. Systematic review of guidelines for the physical management of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larmer, Peter J; Reay, Nicholas D; Aubert, Elizabeth R; Kersten, Paula

    2014-02-01

    To undertake a systematic critical appraisal of guidelines to provide a summary of recommendations for the physical management of osteoarthritis (OA). The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus with Full Text, Scopus, ScienceDirect, PEDro, and Google Scholar databases were searched (2000-2013) to identify all guidelines, protocols, and recommendations for the management or treatment of OA. In addition, Internet searches of all relevant arthritis organizations were undertaken. All searches were performed between July 2012 and end of April 2013. Guidelines that included only pharmacological, injection therapy, or surgical interventions were excluded. Guidelines published only in English were retrieved. OA guidelines developed from evidence-based research, consensus, and/or expert opinion were retrieved. There were no restrictions on severity or site of OA, sex, or age. Nineteen guidelines were identified for evaluation. The quality of all guidelines was critically appraised using the Appraisal of Guidelines for REsearch and Evaluation II instrument. Each guideline was independently reviewed. All relevant recommendations for the physical management of OA were synthesized, graded, and ranked according to available evidence. Seventeen guidelines with recommendations on the physical management of OA met the inclusion criteria and underwent a full critical appraisal. There were variations in the interventions, levels of evidence, and strength of recommendations across the guidelines. Forty different interventions were identified. Recommendations were graded from "strongly recommended" to "unsupported." Exercise and education were found to be strongly recommended by most guidelines. Exercise and education were key recommendations supporting the importance of rehabilitation in the physical management of OA. This critical appraisal can assist health care providers who are involved in the management of people with OA. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of

  6. Contact sport and osteoarthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Molloy, Michael G

    2011-04-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease in the world and the single largest cause of disability for those over 18 years. It affects more than twice as many people as does cardiac disease, and increases in incidence and prevalence with age. Animal and human studies have shown no evidence of increased risk of hip or knee OA with moderate exercise and in the absence of traumatic injury, sporting activity has a protective effect. One age-matched case control study found recreational runners who ran 12-14 miles per week for up to 40 years had no increase in radiological or symptomatic hip or knee OA. However, higher rates of hip OA occur in contact sports than in age-matched controls, with the highest rate in professional players. Soccer players with torn anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL) are more likely to develop knee OA than those with intact ACL. Early ACL repair reduces the risk of knee OA, but does not prevent it. Established injury prevention programmes have been refined to prevent injuries such as ACL rupture.

  7. Chondrogenic Effect of Intra-articular Hypertonic-Dextrose (Prolotherapy) in Severe Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topol, Gastón Andrés; Podesta, Leandro Ariel; Reeves, Kenneth Dean; Giraldo, Marcia Mallma; Johnson, Lanny L; Grasso, Raul; Jamín, Alexis; Clark, Tom; Rabago, David

    2016-11-01

    Dextrose injection is reported to improve knee osteoarthritis (KOA)-related clinical outcomes, but its effect on articular cartilage is unknown. A chondrogenic effect of dextrose injection has been proposed. To assess biological and clinical effects of intra-articular hypertonic dextrose injections (prolotherapy) in painful KOA. Case series with blinded arthroscopic evaluation before and after treatment. Physical medicine and day surgery practice. Symptomatic KOA for at least 6 months, arthroscopy-confirmed medial compartment exposed subchondral bone, and temporary pain relief with intra-articular lidocaine injection. Four to 6 monthly 10-mL intra-articular injections with 12.5% dextrose. Visual cartilage growth assessment of 9 standardized medial condyle zones in each of 6 participants by 3 arthroscopy readers masked to pre-/postinjection status (total 54 zones evaluated per reader); biopsy of a cartilage growth area posttreatment, evaluated using hematoxylin and eosin and Safranin-O stains, quantitative polarized light microscopy, and immunohistologic cartilage typing; self-reported knee specific quality of life using the Western Ontario McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC, 0-100 points). Six participants (1 female and 5 male) with median age of 71 years, WOMAC composite score of 57.5 points, and a 9-year pain duration received a median of 6 dextrose injections and follow-up arthroscopy at 7.75 months (range 4.5-9.5 months). In 19 of 54 zone comparisons, all 3 readers agreed that the posttreatment zone showed cartilage growth compared with the pretreatment zone. Biopsy specimens showed metabolically active cartilage with variable cellular organization, fiber parallelism, and cartilage typing patterns consistent with fibro- and hyaline-like cartilage. Compared with baseline status, the median WOMAC score improved 13 points (P = .013). Self-limited soreness after methylene blue instillation was noted. Positive clinical and chondrogenic effects were seen

  8. The mediating role of psychological symptoms on falls risk among older adults with osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mat S

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Sumaiyah Mat,1 Chin Teck Ng,1–3 Farhana Fadzil,4 Faizatul Izza Rozalli,4 Maw Pin Tan1,5 1Ageing and Age-Associated Disorders Research Group, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 2Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Singapore General Hospital, 3Duke-NUS Medical School, National University Singapore, Singapore; 4Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 5Geriatric Division, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of fear of falling (FoF and psychological symptoms in explaining the relationship between osteoarthritis (OA symptom severity and falls. Individuals aged ≥65 years with ≥2 falls or ≥1 injurious fall over the past 12 months were included in the falls group, while volunteers aged ≥65 years with no history of falls over 12 months were recruited as controls. The presence of lower extremity OA was determined radiologically and clinically. Severity of symptoms was assessed using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC questionnaire. FoF and psychological status were measured with the shortened version of the Falls Efficacy Scale-International and the 21-item Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21, respectively. Of 389 (229 fallers, 160 non-fallers potential participants, mean (SD age: 73.74 (6.60 years, 141 had clinical OA and 171 had radiological OA. Fallers with both radiological OA and clinical OA had significantly higher FoF and DASS-21 scores than non-fallers. FoF was significantly positively correlated with symptom severity in fallers and non-fallers with radiological and clinical OA. Depression, anxiety, and stress scores were only significantly correlated with symptom severity among fallers but not non-fallers in both clinical and radiological OA. The relationship between mild symptoms and reduced risk of falls

  9. Physical activity and osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gates, L S; Leyland, K M; Sheard, S

    2017-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) is increasingly recognised as an important factor within studies of osteoarthritis (OA). However, subjective methods used to assess PA are highly variable and have not been developed for use within studies of OA, which creates difficulties when comparing and interpreting PA...... established via an international expert consensus meeting and modified Delphi exercise using a geographically diverse committee selected on the basis of individual expertise in physical activity, exercise medicine, and OA. Agreement was met for all aims of study: (1) The use of Metabolic Equivalent of Task...... (MET) minutes per week (MET-min/week) as a method for harmonising PA variables among cohorts; (2) The determination of methods for treating missing components of MET-min/week calculation; a value will be produced from comparable activities within a representative cohort; (3) Exclusion of the domain...

  10. Cross-cultural validation of the educational needs assessment tool into Chinese for use in severe knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao H

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Huiwen Zhao,1,* Zhe Dong,2,* Fei Xie,3,4 Guanxin Wang,2 Zhihua Wen,5 Lixia Zhang,5 Mwidimi Ndosi,6,7 Wen Luo1 1Joint Department, The 2nd Ward of Joint Surgery, Tianjin Hospital, Tianjin, China; 2Medical Examination Center, No 6 Hospital, Beijing, China; 3Nursing Experimental Teaching Center, Tianjin Hospital, Tianjin, China; 4College of Nursing, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, China; 5Joint Department, The 1st Ward of Joint Surgery, Tianjin Hospital, Tianjin, China; 6Department of Nursing, University of the West of England, Bristol, UK; 7Academic Rheumatology Unit, Bristol Teaching Hospitals, Bristol, UK *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Patient education is an integral part of the management of osteoarthritis. The educational needs assessment tool (ENAT was developed in the UK to help direct needs-based patient education in rheumatic diseases. Aim: The aim of the study was to adapt and validate the ENAT into Chinese, for use in severe knee osteoarthritis (KOA. Methods: This cross-cultural validation study took two phases: 1 adaptation of the ENAT into Chinese (CENAT and 2 validation of the CENAT. The Construct validity was determined using factor analysis and criterion-related validity by comparing data from CENAT with data from different self-efficacy scales: patient–physician interactions scale (PEPPI-10, self-efficacy for rehabilitation outcome scale (SER, and the self-efficacy for exercise scale (SEE. Results: The sample comprised 196 patients, with mean age 63.6±8.7 years, disease duration was 11.5 years, and 57.1% were female. The CENAT was found to have high internal consistency. The CENAT had weak correlations with the Chinese versions of PEPPI r=0.40, SER r=0.40, and SEE r=0.39. There were no correlations with age r=-0.03 or disease duration r=-0.11. Conclusion: The ENAT translated well into Chinese and has evidence of validity in KOA. Future studies will further inform its

  11. OAS :: Member States

    Science.gov (United States)

    the Human Resources of the OAS, including its organizational structure, each organizational unit's contract and travel control measure reports, the applicable procurement rules and regulations, and the

  12. Real-Time Tracking of Knee Adduction Moment in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sang Hoon; Lee, Song Joo; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2014-01-01

    Background The external knee adduction moment (EKAM) is closely associated with the presence, progression, and severity of knee osteoarthritis (OA). However, there is a lack of convenient and practical method to estimate and track in real-time the EKAM of patients with knee OA for clinical evaluation and gait training, especially outside of gait laboratories. New Method A real-time EKAM estimation method was developed and applied to track and investigate the EKAM and other knee moments during stepping on an elliptical trainer in both healthy subjects and a patient with knee OA. Results Substantial changes were observed in the EKAM and other knee moments during stepping in the patient with knee OA. Comparison with Existing Method(s) This is the first study to develop and test feasibility of real-time tracking method of the EKAM on patients with knee OA using 3-D inverse dynamics. Conclusions The study provides us an accurate and practical method to evaluate in real-time the critical EKAM associated with knee OA, which is expected to help us to diagnose and evaluate patients with knee OA and provide the patients with real-time EKAM feedback rehabilitation training. PMID:24361759

  13. Use of hyaluronic acid preparations in the combination therapy of osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Olyunin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The current recommendations for the pharmacotherapy of osteoarthritis (OA primarily focus on analgesics and main concern is with the use of paracetamol and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs. Intraarticular injections of first of all hyaluronic acid (HA preparations that have proven to be effective in clinical practice are a promising treatment for OA. By taking into account the favorable safety profile of HA preparations, it may be suggested that these injections may be an acceptable alternative to NSAIDs or successfully used in combination with the latter. There have been recently the recommendations for the administration of HA preparations in OA treatment, which characterize the current practice of HA use for OA and had been prepared by a group of experts from 5 European countries. The experts consider that there is today rather solid evidence to demonstrate the efficacy of HA in mild and moderately severe knee OA; moreover, its effect is clinically significant in such patients. In the authors’ view, topical HA therapy should be a compulsory component of treatment for knee OA, since the alternative possibilities of therapy for this disease are limited. Although the optimal effect of HA is observed when it is applied in the early stage of OA, this treatment may be also useful in its late stage. HA should be regarded as an adjunct method that must be applied if surgery cannot be performed in these patients.

  14. Sex-Specific Protection of Osteoarthritis by Deleting Cartilage Acid Protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xianpeng; Ritter, Susan Y; Tsang, Kelly; Shi, Ruirui; Takei, Kohtaro; Aliprantis, Antonios O

    2016-01-01

    Cartilage acidic protein 1 (CRTAC1) was recently identified as an elevated protein in the synovial fluid of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) by a proteomic analysis. This gene is also upregulated in both human and mouse OA by transcriptomic analysis. The objective of this study was to characterize the expression and function of CRTAC1 in OA. Here, we first confirm the increase of CRTAC1 in cartilage biopsies from OA patients undergoing joint replacement by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, we report that proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor alpha upregulate CRTAC1 expression in primary human articular chondrocytes and synovial fibroblasts. Genetic deletion of Crtac1 in mice significantly inhibited cartilage degradation, osteophyte formation and gait abnormalities of post-traumatic OA in female, but not male, animals undergoing the destabilization of medial meniscus (DMM) surgery. Taken together, CRTAC1 is upregulated in the osteoarthritic joint and directly induced in chondrocytes and synovial fibroblasts by pro-inflammatory cytokines. This molecule is necessary for the progression of OA in female mice after DMM surgery and thus represents a potential therapy for this prevalent disease, especially for women who demonstrate higher rates and more severe OA.

  15. Sex-Specific Protection of Osteoarthritis by Deleting Cartilage Acid Protein 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianpeng Ge

    Full Text Available Cartilage acidic protein 1 (CRTAC1 was recently identified as an elevated protein in the synovial fluid of patients with osteoarthritis (OA by a proteomic analysis. This gene is also upregulated in both human and mouse OA by transcriptomic analysis. The objective of this study was to characterize the expression and function of CRTAC1 in OA. Here, we first confirm the increase of CRTAC1 in cartilage biopsies from OA patients undergoing joint replacement by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, we report that proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor alpha upregulate CRTAC1 expression in primary human articular chondrocytes and synovial fibroblasts. Genetic deletion of Crtac1 in mice significantly inhibited cartilage degradation, osteophyte formation and gait abnormalities of post-traumatic OA in female, but not male, animals undergoing the destabilization of medial meniscus (DMM surgery. Taken together, CRTAC1 is upregulated in the osteoarthritic joint and directly induced in chondrocytes and synovial fibroblasts by pro-inflammatory cytokines. This molecule is necessary for the progression of OA in female mice after DMM surgery and thus represents a potential therapy for this prevalent disease, especially for women who demonstrate higher rates and more severe OA.

  16. Changes of rabbit meniscus influenced by hyaline cartilage injury of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiajun; Huang, Suizhu; Zheng, Jia; Zhong, Chunan; Tang, Chao; Zheng, Lei; Zhang, Zhen; Xu, Jianzhong

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common disease in the elderly population. Most of the previous OA-related researches focused on articular cartilage degeneration, osteophyte formation and synovitis etc. However, the role of the meniscus in these pathological changes has not been given enough attention. The goal of our study was to find the pathological changes of the meniscus in OA knee and determine their relationship. 20 months old female Chinese rabbits received either knee damaging operations with articular cartilage scratch method or sham operation randomly on one of their knees. They were sacrificed after 1-6 weeks post-operation. Medial Displacement Index (MDI) for meniscus dislocation, hematoxylin and eosin (HE) for routine histological evaluation, Toluidine blue (TB) stains for evaluating proteoglycans were carried out. Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining was performed with a two-step detection kit. Histological analysis showed chondrocyte clusters around cartilage lesions and moderate loss of proteoglycans in the operation model, as well as MDI increase and all characteristics of OA. High expression of MMP-3 and TIMP-1 also were found in both hyaline cartilage and meniscus. Biomechanical and biochemistry environment around the meniscus is altered when OA occur. If meniscus showed degeneration, subluxation and dysfunction, OA would be more severe. Prompt repair or reconstruction of hyaline cartilage in weight bearing area when it injured could prevent meniscus degeneration and subluxation, then prevent the development of OA.

  17. [Subchondral bone in osteoarthritis: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Jian; Cao, Yue-long; Shi, Yin-yu

    2011-08-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most prevalent of joint diseases,and its pathology is characterized by the degeneration of cartilage, sclerosis of subchondral bone, and osteophyte formation. Localization of the early lesions of OA has not been clarified, but many researchers have focused on cartilage and have considered that changes in subchondral bone occur subsequently to the degeneration of cartilage. However, a low bone mineral density, particularly in the knee joint with OA, high bone turnover, and efficacy of bone resorption inhibitors for OA have recently been reported, suggesting that subchondral bone plays an important role in the pathogenesis of OA. This review aims to make a conclusion about advancement in research of subchondral bone in osteoarthritis.

  18. An ultrasound score for knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riecke, B F; Christensen, R.; Torp-Pedersen, S

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop standardized musculoskeletal ultrasound (MUS) procedures and scoring for detecting knee osteoarthritis (OA) and test the MUS score's ability to discern various degrees of knee OA, in comparison with plain radiography and the 'Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score' (KOOS......) domains as comparators. METHOD: A cross-sectional study of MUS examinations in 45 patients with knee OA. Validity, reliability, and reproducibility were evaluated. RESULTS: MUS examination for knee OA consists of five separate domains assessing (1) predominantly morphological changes in the medial...... coefficients ranging from 0.75 to 0.97 for the five domains. Construct validity was confirmed with statistically significant correlation coefficients (0.47-0.81, P knee OA. In comparison with standing radiographs...

  19. Serum and urinary biochemical markers for knee and hip-osteoarthritis: a systematic review applying the consensus BIPED criteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spil, W.E. van; Groot, J. de; Lems, W.F.; Oostveen, J.C.M.; Lafeber, F.P.J.G.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Molecules that are released into biological fluids during matrix metabolism of articular cartilage, subchondral bone, and synovial tissue could serve as biochemical markers of the process of osteoarthritis (OA). Unfortunately, actual breakthroughs in the biochemical OA marker field are

  20. MR findings in knee osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guermazi, Ali; Taouli, Bachir; Genant, Harry K.; Zaim, Souhil; Miaux, Yves; Peterfy, Charles G.

    2003-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of disability. Recent advances in drug discovery techniques and improvements in understanding the pathophysiology of osteoarthritic disorders have resulted in an unprecedented number of new therapeutic agents. Of all imaging modalities, radiography has been the most widely used for the diagnosis and management of the progression of knee OA. Magnetic resonance imaging is a relatively recent technique and its applications to osteoarthritis have been limited. Compared with conventional radiography, MR imaging offers unparalleled discrimination among articular soft tissues by directly visualizing all components of the knee joint simultaneously and therefore allowing the knee joint to be evaluated as a whole organ. In this article we present the MR findings in knee OA including cartilage abnormalities, osteophytes, bone edema, subarticular cysts, bone attrition, meniscal tears, ligament abnormalities, synovial thickening, joint effusion, intra-articular loose bodies, and periarticular cysts. (orig.)

  1. Altered Expression of Wnt Signaling Pathway Components in Osteogenesis of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Osteoarthritis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornero-Esteban, Pilar; Peralta-Sastre, Ascensión; Herranz, Eva; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Luis; Mucientes, Arkaitz; Abásolo, Lydia; Marco, Fernando; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Lamas, José Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by altered homeostasis of joint cartilage and bone, whose functional properties rely on chondrocytes and osteoblasts, belonging to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). WNT signaling acts as a hub integrating and crosstalking with other signaling pathways leading to the regulation of MSC functions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the existence of a differential signaling between Healthy and OA-MSCs during osteogenesis. MSCs of seven OA patients and six healthy controls were isolated, characterised and expanded. During in vitro osteogenesis, cells were recovered at days 1, 10 and 21. RNA and protein content was obtained. Expression of WNT pathway genes was evaluated using RT-qPCR. Functional studies were also performed to study the MSC osteogenic commitment and functional and post-traslational status of β-catenin and several receptor tyrosine kinases. Several genes were downregulated in OA-MSCs during osteogenesis in vitro. These included soluble Wnts, inhibitors, receptors, co-receptors, several kinases and transcription factors. Basal levels of β-catenin were higher in OA-MSCs, but calcium deposition and expression of osteogenic genes was similar between Healthy and OA-MSCs. Interestingly an increased phosphorylation of p44/42 MAPK (ERK1/2) signaling node was present in OA-MSCs. Our results point to the existence in OA-MSCs of alterations in expression of Wnt pathway components during in vitro osteogenesis that are partially compensated by post-translational mechanisms modulating the function of other pathways. We also point the relevance of other signaling pathways in OA pathophysiology suggesting their role in the maintenance of joint homeostasis through modulation of MSC osteogenic potential.

  2. Evolving guidelines in the use of topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the treatment of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmaceda, Casilda M

    2014-01-21

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a standard treatment for osteoarthritis (OA), but the use of oral NSAIDs has been linked to an elevated risk for cardiovascular and gastrointestinal adverse events and renal toxicity. Topical NSAIDs are thought to afford efficacy that is comparable to oral formulations while reducing widespread systemic drug exposure, which may provide a benefit in terms of safety and tolerability. As a result, European treatment guidelines have, for many years, recommended the use of topical NSAIDs as a safe and effective treatment option for OA. Following the recent approval of several topical NSAID formulations by the US Food and Drug Administration, US treatment guidelines are increasingly recommending the use of topical NSAIDs as an alternative therapy and, in some cases, as a first-line option for OA. This commentary summarizes OA treatment guidelines that are currently available and discusses their potential evolution with regard to the increased inclusion of topical NSAIDs.

  3. The relationship of antiresorptive drug use to structural findings and symptoms of knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Laura D; Nevitt, Michael C; Wildy, Kathryn; Barrow, Karen D; Harris, Fran; Felson, David; Peterfy, Charles; Visser, Marjolein; Harris, Tamara B; Wang, Benjamin W E; Kritchevsky, Stephen B

    2004-11-01

    To examine the cross-sectional association between use of medications that have a bone antiresorptive effect (estrogen, raloxifene, and alendronate) and both the structural features of knee osteoarthritis (OA), assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and radiography, and the symptoms of knee OA in elderly women. Women in the Health, Aging and Body Composition Study underwent MRI and radiography of the knee if they reported symptoms of knee OA, and women without significant knee symptoms were selected as controls. MR images of the knee were assessed for multiple features of OA using the Whole-Organ MRI scoring method, and radiographs were read for Kellgren and Lawrence grade and individual features of OA. Concurrent medication use and knee symptoms were assessed by interview, and knee pain severity was evaluated using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC). There were 818 postmenopausal women from whom we obtained MR images of the knee and data on medication use. Among these women, 214 (26.2%) were receiving antiresorptive drugs. We found no significant association between overall use of antiresorptive drugs and the presence of knee pain and radiographic changes of OA of the knee. Use of alendronate, but not estrogen, was associated with less severity of knee pain as assessed by WOMAC scores. Both alendronate use and estrogen use were associated with significantly less subchondral bone attrition and bone marrow edema-like abnormalities in the knee as assessed by MRI, as compared with women who had not received these medications. Elderly women being treated with alendronate and estrogen had a significantly decreased prevalence of knee OA-related subchondral bone lesions compared with those reporting no use of these medications. Alendronate use was also associated with a reduction in knee pain according to the WOMAC scores.

  4. OAS :: What We Do

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    the Human Resources of the OAS, including its organizational structure, each organizational unit's contract and travel control measure reports, the applicable procurement rules and regulations, and the Member States Our History Logo Authorities What We Do Related Links OAS Charter Organizational Charts

  5. OAS :: Page Not Found

    Science.gov (United States)

    here. Here you will find data on the Human Resources of the OAS, including its organizational structure , each organizational unit's staffing, vacant posts, and performance contracts. The OAS executes a to the performance contract and travel control measure reports, the applicable procurement rules and

  6. Psychosocial and demographic factors influencing pain scores of patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberly, Lauren; Richter, Dustin; Comerci, George; Ocksrider, Justin; Mercer, Deana; Mlady, Gary; Wascher, Daniel; Schenck, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Pain levels in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee are commonly assessed by using a numeric scoring system, but results may be influenced by factors other than the patient's actual physical discomfort or disease severity, including psychosocial and demographic variables. We examined the possible relation between knee-pain scores and several psychosocial, sociodemographic, disease, and treatment variables in 355 patients with knee OA. The pain-evaluation instrument was a 0- to 10-point rating scale. Data obtained retrospectively from the patients' medical records were demographic characteristics, body mass index (BMI), concomitant disorders, illicit and prescription drug use, alcohol use, smoking, knee OA treatment, and severity of knee OA indicated by Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) radiographic grade. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine whether these variables correlated with reported pain scores. On univariate analysis, higher pain scores were significantly associated with Native American or Hispanic ethnicity; a higher BMI; current prescription for an opioid, antidepressant, or gabapentinoid medication; depression; diabetes mellitus; fibromyalgia; illicit drug use; lack of health insurance; smoking; previous knee injection; and recommendation by the clinician that the patient undergo knee surgery. Neither the patient's sex nor the KL grade showed a correlation. On multivariate analysis, depression, current opioid prescription, and Native American or Hispanic ethnicity retained a significant association with higher pain scores. Our results in a large, ethnically diverse group of patients with knee OA suggest that psychosocial and sociodemographic factors may be important determinants of pain levels reported by patients with knee OA.

  7. A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies novel variants associated with osteoarthritis of the hip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evangelou, Evangelos; Kerkhof, Hanneke J; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis with a clear genetic component. To identify novel loci associated with hip OA we performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on European subjects.......Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis with a clear genetic component. To identify novel loci associated with hip OA we performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on European subjects....

  8. Pastoral care and religious support as a part of treatment of religious patient with the severe form of osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurović Aleksandar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Religious needs of patients are consistently being neglected in the clinical medicine. Pastoral care is a religious support which a religious patient receives from priests, chaplains, imams, rabbis or other religious authorities. Religious support, in terms of clinical medicine, is a spiritual support which religious patients obtain from religious and trained medical workers. The aim of this report was to present the effects of pastoral care and religious support in hospital treatment of a 73-year-old patient with the severe form of osteoarthritis. Case report. The 73- year-old, highly religious patient with severe form of osteoarthritis was admitted at the Clinic for Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Military Medical Academy in Belgrade, due to heterogeneous problems in the activities of daily living. The patient walked with difficulty using a stick, suffered pain, and was anxious and depressive. In order to objectively demonstrate effects of both pastoral care and religious support in this patient we performed multiple treatment with reversal design, in which the basic treatment consisting of hospital care, pharmacotherapy and physical therapy (the treatment A was alternatively changed with the treatment that included combination of the basic treatment and religious support provided by religious physiatrist and physiotherapist (the treatment B or combination of the basic treatment and pastoral care provided by military priest (the treatment C. The treatment A was applied three times and lasted two weeks, every time. Treatments B and C were applied once and lasted three weeks, each. The order of the treatments was: A→B→A→C→A. During the whole treatment period the patient’s condition was assessed by several measuring scale: the level of depression by The Hamilton Rang Scale for Depression and The Zung Self Rating Depression Scale; the level of anxiety by The Zung Self Rating Anxiety Scale; the functional capability of

  9. Exercise therapy may postpone total hip replacement surgery in patients with hip osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svege, Ida; Nordsletten, Lars; Fernandes, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Exercise treatment is recommended for all patients with hip osteoarthritis (OA), but its effect on the long-term need for total hip replacement (THR) is unknown.......Exercise treatment is recommended for all patients with hip osteoarthritis (OA), but its effect on the long-term need for total hip replacement (THR) is unknown....

  10. Dietary intake of fiber and risk of knee osteoarthritis in two U.S. prospective cohorts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objectives: Dietary fiber reduces body weight and inflammation both of which are linked with knee osteoarthritis (OA). We examined the association between fiber intake and risk of knee OA. Methods: We used data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) of 4796 participants and Framingham Offspring Os...

  11. Comparative digital cartilage histology for human and common osteoarthritis models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedersen DR

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Douglas R Pedersen, Jessica E Goetz, Gail L Kurriger, James A MartinDepartment of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USAPurpose: This study addresses the species-specific and site-specific details of weight-bearing articular cartilage zone depths and chondrocyte distributions among humans and common osteoarthritis (OA animal models using contemporary digital imaging tools. Histological analysis is the gold-standard research tool for evaluating cartilage health, OA severity, and treatment efficacy. Historically, evaluations were made by expert analysts. However, state-of-the-art tools have been developed that allow for digitization of entire histological sections for computer-aided analysis. Large volumes of common digital cartilage metrics directly complement elucidation of trends in OA inducement and concomitant potential treatments.Materials and methods: Sixteen fresh human knees, 26 adult New Zealand rabbit stifles, and 104 bovine lateral plateaus were measured for four cartilage zones and the cell densities within each zone. Each knee was divided into four weight-bearing sites: the medial and lateral plateaus and femoral condyles.Results: One-way analysis of variance followed by pairwise multiple comparisons (Holm–Sidak method at a significance of 0.05 clearly confirmed the variability between cartilage depths at each site, between sites in the same species, and between weight-bearing articular cartilage definitions in different species.Conclusion: The present study clearly demonstrates multisite, multispecies differences in normal weight-bearing articular cartilage, which can be objectively quantified by a common digital histology imaging technique. The clear site-specific differences in normal cartilage must be taken into consideration when characterizing the pathoetiology of OA models. Together, these provide a path to consistently analyze the volume and variety of histologic slides necessarily generated

  12. Serum adipokines, adipose tissue measurements and metabolic parameters in patients with advanced radiographic knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussirot, Eric; Michel, Fabrice; Béreau, Matthieu; Dehecq, Barbara; Gaugler, Béatrice; Wendling, Daniel; Grandclément, Emilie; Saas, Philippe; Dumoulin, Gilles

    2017-11-01

    We conducted the present study to evaluate the serum levels of adipokines (leptin, total and high molecular adiponectin, resistin), a marker of cartilage breakdown (C2C), and ghrelin together with body composition in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Fifty patients and 50 sex-matched healthy subjects (HS) were evaluated. Knee OA was scored according to the Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grade. Body composition parameters including lean mass and measurements of fat mass (total fat, adiposity, fat in the android and gynoid regions, visceral fat and trunk/legs fat ratio) were obtained using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Most of the recruited patients (88%) had advanced knee OA with KL grade 3 or 4. The patients had higher body mass index than HS (p < 0.0001). Serum leptin, high molecular adiponectin, resistin and ghrelin levels did not differ between patients and HS. Total adiponectin was higher in women with OA compared to women from the HS group (p = 0.004). Total fat mass, adiposity and measurements of central adiposity (fat in the android region, trunk/lower limbs fat ratio and visceral fat) were increased in patients with knee OA (all p < 0.05). Total adiponectin was borderline associated with the severity of OA. Our results show that total adiponectin is significantly increased in women with advanced knee OA. Independently of gender, patients with severe knee OA were characterized by a significant excess of fat with a distribution toward the visceral region. This abnormal body composition may contribute to the cardiometabolic profile that is described in patients with knee OA.

  13. Intra-articular Hyaluronic Acid (HA) and Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) injection versus Hyaluronic acid (HA) injection alone in Patients with Grade III and IV Knee Osteoarthritis (OA): A Retrospective Study on Functional Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saturveithan, C; Premganesh, G; Fakhrizzaki, S; Mahathir, M; Karuna, K; Rauf, K; William, H; Akmal, H; Sivapathasundaram, N; Jaspreet, K

    2016-07-01

    Introduction: Intra-articular hyaluronic acid (HA) is widely utilized in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis whereas platelet rich plasma (PRP) enhances the regeneration of articular cartilage. This study analyses the efficacy of HA and PRP in grade III and IV knee osteoarthritis. Methodology: This is a cross sectional study with retrospective review of 64 patients (101 knees) which includes 56 knees injected with HA+ PRP, and 45 knees with HA only. Results: During the post six months International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) evaluation, HA+PRP group showed marked improvement of 24.33 compared to 12.15 in HA group. Decrement in visual analogue score (VAS) in HA+PRP was 1.9 compared to 0.8 in HA group. Conclusion: We propose intra-articular HA and PRP injections as an optional treatment modality in Grade III and IV knee osteoarthritis in terms of functional outcome and pain control for up to six months when arthroplasty is not an option.

  14. Intra-articular Hyaluronic Acid (HA and Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP injection versus Hyaluronic acid (HA injection alone in Patients with Grade III and IV Knee Osteoarthritis (OA: A Retrospective Study on Functional Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saturveithan C

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intra-articular hyaluronic acid (HA is widely utilized in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis whereas platelet rich plasma (PRP enhances the regeneration of articular cartilage. This study analyses the efficacy of HA and PRP in grade III and IV knee osteoarthritis. Methodology: This is a cross sectional study with retrospective review of 64 patients (101 knees which includes 56 knees injected with HA+ PRP, and 45 knees with HA only. Results: During the post six months International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC evaluation, HA+PRP group showed marked improvement of 24.33 compared to 12.15 in HA group. Decrement in visual analogue score (VAS in HA+PRP was 1.9 compared to 0.8 in HA group. Conclusion: We propose intra-articular HA and PRP injections as an optional treatment modality in Grade III and IV knee osteoarthritis in terms of functional outcome and pain control for up to six months when arthroplasty is not an option.

  15. Muscle weakness, afferent sensory dysfunction and exercise in knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, Ewa M.; Herzog, Walter; Block, Joel A

    2011-01-01

    Lower-extremity muscle strength and afferent sensory dysfunction, such as reduced proprioceptive acuity, are potentially modifiable putative risk factors for knee osteoarthritis (OA). Findings from current studies suggest that muscle weakness is a predictor of knee OA onset, while there is confli...... with previous knee injuries) are easily identified, and may benefit from exercise interventions to prevent or delay OA onset....... there is conflicting evidence regarding the role of muscle weakness in OA progression. In contrast, the literature suggests a role for afferent sensory dysfunction in OA progression but not necessarily in OA onset. The few pilot exercise studies performed in patients who are at risk of incident OA indicate...... a possibility for achieving preventive structure or load modifications. In contrast, large randomized controlled trials of patients with established OA have failed to demonstrate beneficial effects of strengthening exercises. Subgroups of individuals who are at increased risk of knee OA (such as those...

  16. Association Between Plasma Beta-endorphin and WOMAC Score in Female Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hori Hariyanto

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: β-endorphin plays a role in the descending pain control in the central nervous system. Central sensitization may be involved in the generating and maintenance of osteoarthritis (OA pain. However, the correlation between β-endorphin and pain severity in OA has shown conflicting results. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between plasma β-endorphin and the severity of the disease. METHODS: This study was an observational cross-sectional study carried out on 60 female subjects with knee OA who fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Plasma β-endorphin was measured by a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA kit. Osteoarthritis knees were classified by the Kellegren-Lawrence (KL grading (1-4 criteria. The Western Ontario McMaster University Osteoarthritis (WOMAC scoring method was used to assess self-reported physical function, pain and stiffness. RESULTS: The mean of the participants' ages was 58 years old, ranging from 42 to 83 years. Overall, more than 70% of the participants were overweight with a mean of body mass index (BMI of 27.59. More than 54% of the participants were diagnosed of having KL grading 3 or 4. Plasma β-endorphin was correlated inversely with the WOMAC subscale of stiffness (r=-0.286, p=0.0311, but no correlation was noted with the WOMAC subscale of pain and physical activity. There was no significant difference of the mean of plasma β-endorphin among the KL gradings. CONCLUSIONS: Plasma β-endorphin is associated with better WOMAC total score and stiffness subscale, but not associated with KL grading of OA. KEYWORDS: knee osteoarthritis, female, β-endorphin, WOMAC, Kellgren-Lawrence.

  17. Occupational kneeling and radiographic tibiofemoral and patellofemoral osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rytter, Søren; Egund, Niels; Jensen, Lilli Kirkeskov

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The objective of our study was to evaluate the association between occupational kneeling and compartment specific radiographic tibiofemoral (TF) and patellofemoral (PF) osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: Questionnaire data and bilateral knee radiographs were obtained in 134 male...

  18. Early detection of osteoarthritis in rabbits using MRI with a double-contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Okihiro; Ikoma, Kazuya; Kido, Masamitsu; Kabuto, Yukichi; Ueshima, Keiichiro; Matsuda, Ken-Ichi; Tanaka, Masaki; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2018-03-13

    Articular cartilage degeneration has been evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, this method has several problems, including its time-consuming nature and the requirement of a high magnetic field or specialized hardware. The purpose of this study was to sequentially assess early degenerative changes in rabbit knee articular cartilage using MRI with a new double-contrast agent. We induced osteoarthritis (OA) in the right knee of rabbits by anterior cruciate ligament transection and partial medial meniscectomy. Proton density-weighted images and T 2 -calculated images were obtained before and after contrast agent injection into the knee. The signal intensity ratio (SIR) values on the proton density-weighted images were calculated by dividing the signal intensity of the articular cartilage by that of joint fluid. Six rabbits were examined using MRI at 2 (designated 2-w OA) and 4 weeks (4-w OA) after the operation. Histological examination was performed 4 weeks after the operation. One rabbit was histologically examined 2 weeks after the operation. The control consisted of six rabbits that were not subjected to the operation. The SIR values, T 2 values and the thicknesses of the cartilage of the 2-w OA, 4-w OA and the control before and after contrast agent injection were analyzed. The Mankin score and OARSI (Osteoarthritis Research Society International) score were used for the histological evaluation. Significant differences in the SIR and T 2 values of the medial and lateral condyles of the femur were found between the control and the 4-w OA only after contrast agent injection. No significant differences were found in the SIR and T 2 values before contrast agent injection between the control, the 2-w OA and 4-w OA. The thickness of the articular cartilage revealed no significant differences. In the histological assessment, the Mankin score and OARSI score sequentially increased from the control to the 4-w OA. We evaluated the SIR and T 2 values

  19. The Association Between Body Mass Index and the Prevalence, Severity, and Frequency of Low Back Pain: Data From the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Charles A; Kusin, David J; Li, Samuel Q; Ahn, Uri M; Ahn, Nicholas U

    2018-02-16

    Cross-sectional study. To determine whether there is an association between body mass index (BMI) and the prevalence, severity, and frequency of low back pain and identify other potential patient risk factors for the development of low back pain. Many studies have implicated that a high BMI is a risk factor for low back pain. However, few studies have examined the association between increased BMI and the prevalence, severity, and frequency of low back pain. Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative, a multicenter, prospective study of knee osteoarthritis, were used to conduct this study, which included 4796 patients. BMI was categorized according to the World Health Organization classification and the prevalence, severity, and frequency of low back pain were assessed. Logistic regression was performed to identify additional patient risk factors associated with low back pain. The prevalence of low back pain was found to be significantly higher in patients with an elevated BMI compared to those with normal or underweight BMI and demonstrated a stepwise increase with each BMI category. Approximately 47.4% of patients with normal or underweight BMI complained of low back pain compared with 72.8% of morbidly obese patients (P frequency or severity of low back pain episodes. Osteoarthritis of the back and depression were patient variables found to be associated with all three measures (prevalence, severity, and frequency) of low back pain. Elevated BMI is strongly associated with an increased prevalence of low back pain. Depression and osteoarthritis of the back are associated with the prevalence, severity, and frequency of low back pain. 3.

  20. The addition of tramadol as a second opioid may improve pain relief in severe osteoarthritis: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lorenzo, Luigi; Foti, Calogero; Forte, Alfonso Maria; Palmieri, Enzo; Formisano, Rita; Vatakencherry, Abraham; Pappagallo, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Opioid combination has been shown to reduce the need for escalating doses for the treatment of cancer pain. A prospective study was planned to evaluate the addition of tramadol to a stronger opioid for the treatment of severe pain as a result of osteoarthritis, previously uncontrolled by non-opioid analgesics or weak opioids. All subjects received tramadol 200 mg and tizanidine 2 mg. At 2 weeks, tramadol was discontinued for patients still reporting poor pain relief (effectiveness ≤50%), and a stronger opioid was titrated to a morphine equivalent amount (MEA) of 40-60 mg orally. After two additional weeks, patients were then divided into two groups: the Strong Opioid Group (SO) and the Tramadol plus the Strong Opioid Group (TSO). The SO group was allowed to escalate opioid dose for lack of effectiveness; the TSO group received tramadol 150 mg daily, thereafter additional strong opioid titration was allowed. A total of 74 patients were studied: SO (n = 40) and TSOG (n = 34). All patients eventually achieved pain relief quality, with both groups reporting similar Karnofsky Performance Scale effectiveness. The SO group achieved satisfactory pain relief (>50%) at an average daily oral MEA of 120 mg. TSO subjects achieved satisfactory pain relief (>50%) at an average daily oral MEA of 95 mg. The addition of tramadol provided a synergistic effect resulting in a 30-mg decrease in necessary morphine equivalents with fewer opioid-related adverse effects. © 2010 The Authors. Pain Practice © 2010 World Institute of Pain.

  1. OAS :: Accountability :: Human Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    OAS, including its organizational structure, each organizational unit's staffing, vacant posts, and a list of procurement notices for formal bids, links to the performance contract and travel control Plan Human Resources Organizational Structure Functions of each organizational unit Vacant Posts

  2. OAS :: Our Locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    the Human Resources of the OAS, including its organizational structure, each organizational unit's contract and travel control measure reports, the applicable procurement rules and regulations, and the Charter Organizational Charts Organizational List Authorities Our Locations Contact Us Telephone: +1 (202

  3. A critical appraisal of clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of lower-limb osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pencharz, James N; Grigoriadis, Elizabeth; Jansz, Gwenderlyn F; Bombardier, Claire

    2002-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines are important tools to assist clinical decision-making. Recently, several guidelines addressing the management of osteoarthritis (OA) have been published. Clinicians treating patients with OA must ensure that these guidelines are developed with consistency and methodological rigour. We undertook a qualitative summary and critical appraisal of six medical treatment guidelines for the management of lower-limb OA published in the medical literature within the past 5 years. A review of these six guidelines revealed that each possesses strengths and weakness. While most described the scope and intended patient populations, the guidelines varied considerably in the rigour of their development, coverage of implementation issues, and disclosure of conflicts of interest. PMID:11879536

  4. COMBINATION THERAPY IN THE TREATMENT OF OSTEOARTHRITIS. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF THERAFLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L I Alekseeva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is the most common form of joint damage and a major cause of morbidity and disability. The significant increase in the incidence is due to the rapid aging of the population and the pandemic of obesity. The main clinical symptoms of OA are pain and deformation of joints, leading to functional impairment. OA treatment requires not only accurate diagnosis, but also estimation of the prevalence and severity of articular damage, the general health status of the patient and the presence of comorbid conditions for the correct choice of treatment, and possibly a combination thereof. Proven effectiveness of chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine hydrochloride alone, created the preconditions for the development of complex products. The effectiveness of this combination is supported by experimental and clinical data.

  5. Chondroprotective Effects and Mechanisms of Dextromethorphan: Repurposing Antitussive Medication for Osteoarthritis Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liv Weichien Chen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is the most common joint disorder and primarily affects older people. The ideal anti-OA drug should have a modest anti-inflammatory effect and only limited or no toxicity for long-term use. Because the antitussive medication dextromethorphan (DXM is protective in atherosclerosis and neurological diseases, two common disorders in aged people, we examined whether DXM can be protective in pro-inflammatory cytokine-stimulated chondrocytes and in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA animal model in this study. Chondrocytes were prepared from cartilage specimens taken from pigs or OA patients. Western blotting, quantitative PCR, and immunohistochemistry were adopted to measure the expression of collagen II (Col II and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP. DXM significantly restored tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α-mediated reduction of collagen II and decreased TNF-α-induced MMP-13 production. To inhibit the synthesis of MMP-13, DXM blocked TNF-α downstream signaling, including I kappa B kinase (IKKα/β-IκBα-nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK-activator protein-1 (AP-1 activation. Besides this, DXM protected the CIA mice from severe inflammation and cartilage destruction. DXM seemed to protect cartilage from inflammation-mediated matrix degradation, which is an irreversible status in the disease progression of osteoarthritis. The results suggested that testing DXM as an osteoarthritis therapeutic should be a focus in further research.

  6. Commentary on recent therapeutic guidelines for osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Berenbaum, Francis; Hochberg, Marc; Punzi, Leonardo; Reginster, Jean-Yves

    2015-06-01

    Despite availability of international evidence-based guidelines for osteoarthritis (OA) management, agreement on the different treatment modalities is lacking. A symposium of European and US OA experts was held within the framework of the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology to discuss and compare guidelines and recommendations for the treatment of knee OA and to reach a consensus for management, particularly for areas in which there is no clear consensus: non-pharmacological therapy; efficacy and safety of analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs); intra-articular (i.a.) hyaluronates (HA); and the role of chondroitin sulfate (CS) and/or glucosamine sulfate (GS). All guidelines reviewed agree that knee OA is a progressive disease of the joint whose management requires non-pharmacological and pharmacological approaches. Discrepancies between guidelines are few and mostly reflect heterogeneity of expert panels involved, geographical differences in the availability of pharmacotherapies, and heterogeneity of the studies included. Panels chosen for guideline development should include experts with real clinical experience in drug use and patient management. Implementation of agreed guidelines can be thwarted by drug availability and reimbursement plans, resulting in optimal OA treatment being jeopardized, HA and symptomatic slow-acting drugs for osteoarthritis (SySADOAs) being clear examples of drugs whose availability and prescription can greatly vary geographically. In addition, primary care providers, often responsible for OA management (at least in early disease), may not adhere to clinical care guidelines, particularly for non-pharmacological OA treatment. Harmonization of the recommendations for knee OA treatment is challenging but feasible, as shown by the step-by-step therapeutic algorithm developed by the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO). More easily disseminated and

  7. A Posteriori Comparison of Natural and Surgical Destabilization Models of Canine Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Moreau

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For many years Canis familiaris, the domestic dog, has drawn particular interest as a model of osteoarthritis (OA. Here, we optimized the dog model of experimental OA induced by cranial cruciate ligament sectioning. The usefulness of noninvasive complementary outcome measures, such as gait analysis for the limb function and magnetic resonance imaging for structural changes, was demonstrated in this model. Relationships were established between the functional impairment and the severity of structural changes including the measurement of cartilage thinning. In the dog model of naturally occurring OA, excellent test-retest reliability was denoted for the measurement of the limb function. A criterion to identify clinically meaningful responders to therapy was determined for privately owned dogs undergoing clinical trials. In addition, the recording of accelerometer-based duration of locomotor activity showed strong and complementary agreement with the biomechanical limb function. The translation potential of these models to the human OA condition is underlined. A preclinical testing protocol which combines the dog model of experimental OA induced by cranial cruciate ligament transection and the Dog model of naturally occurring OA offers the opportunity to further investigate the structural and functional benefits of disease-modifying strategies. Ultimately, a better prediction of outcomes for human clinical trials would be brought.

  8. A Posteriori Comparison of Natural and Surgical Destabilization Models of Canine Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; d'Anjou, Marc-André; Blond, Laurent; Pelletier, Johanne-Martel; del Castillo, Jérôme R. E.

    2013-01-01

    For many years Canis familiaris, the domestic dog, has drawn particular interest as a model of osteoarthritis (OA). Here, we optimized the dog model of experimental OA induced by cranial cruciate ligament sectioning. The usefulness of noninvasive complementary outcome measures, such as gait analysis for the limb function and magnetic resonance imaging for structural changes, was demonstrated in this model. Relationships were established between the functional impairment and the severity of structural changes including the measurement of cartilage thinning. In the dog model of naturally occurring OA, excellent test-retest reliability was denoted for the measurement of the limb function. A criterion to identify clinically meaningful responders to therapy was determined for privately owned dogs undergoing clinical trials. In addition, the recording of accelerometer-based duration of locomotor activity showed strong and complementary agreement with the biomechanical limb function. The translation potential of these models to the human OA condition is underlined. A preclinical testing protocol which combines the dog model of experimental OA induced by cranial cruciate ligament transection and the Dog model of naturally occurring OA offers the opportunity to further investigate the structural and functional benefits of disease-modifying strategies. Ultimately, a better prediction of outcomes for human clinical trials would be brought. PMID:24288664

  9. Effect of Full-Length Carbon Fiber Insoles on Lower Limb Kinetics in Patients With Midfoot Osteoarthritis: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Taeim; Kim, Jung Hyun; Oh-Park, Mooyeon; Hwang, Ji Hye

    2018-03-01

    We investigated the effects of full-length carbon fiber (FCF) insoles on gait, muscle activity, kinetics, and pain in patients with midfoot osteoarthritis (OA). We enrolled 13 patients with unilateral midfoot OA (mild: Visual Analog Scale [VAS] range, 1-3; moderate, VAS range, 4-7) and healthy controls. All participants were asked to walk under two conditions: with and without FCF insole. The outcome measures were ground reaction force, quantitative gait parameters, electromyography activities and pain severity (VAS). In the patients with moderate midfoot OA, significantly longer gait cycle and higher muscle activity of lower limb during loading-response phase were observed while walking without FCF insoles. In the mild midfoot OA group, there was no significant difference in VAS score (without, 2.0 ± 1.0 vs. with, 2.0 ± 0.5) with FCF insole use. However, significantly reduced VAS score (without, 5.5 ± 1.4 vs. with, 2.0 ± 0.5) and muscle activity of the tibialis anterior and increased muscle activity of gastrocnemius were observed in the moderate midfoot OA group by using an FCF insole (P < 0.05). Full-length carbon fiber insoles can improve pain in individuals with moderate midfoot OA, which might be associated with changes in the kinetics and muscle activities of the lower limb. Taken together, the results of the present study suggest that FCF insoles may be used as a helpful option for midfoot OA.

  10. Strength and voluntary activation in relation to functioning in patients with osteoarthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. D.M. van Leeuwen

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by pain, and problems with activities of daily life, especially if the hip or knee joint is affected. The aim of this project was to study associations between strength, voluntary activation and physical functioning in elderly patients with OA. People with OA of

  11. OCCUPATIONAL RISK FACTORS IN KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muralidhara

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Osteoarthritis (OA, also often called “osteoarthrosis” or “degenerative joint disease” is the most common form of arthritis. MATERIALS AND METHODS Present retrospective statistical study was conducted at the Department of orthopaedics in a tertiary care hospital (Catering to a largely agricultural population over a period of 2 years from January 2012 to December 2014. RESULTS Prevalence of osteoarthritis common in farmers accounting to 70%. Other occupations at risk of OA of knee were, Teachers 12%, Housewives 08%, Athletes 04%, Policemen 04% and Drivers 02%. It is in conformity with most previous studies reviewed. CONCLUSION Osteoarthritis of Knee is a major health issue and important cause of disability in elderly population. Occupational risk factors are important in development of osteoarthritis.

  12. Comparison of the WOMAC (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities) osteoarthritis index and a self-report format of the self-administered Lequesne-Algofunctional index in patients with knee and hip osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucki, G; Sangha, O; Stucki, S; Michel, B A; Tyndall, A; Dick, W; Theiler, R

    1998-03-01

    To compare the metric properties and validity of German versions of the WOMAC (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities) and a self-administered questionnaire-format of the Lequesne-Algofunctional-Index in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the lower extremities. Cross-sectional analysis of the instruments' internal consistency (Cronbach's coefficient alpha) and construct validity (correlation with radiological OA-severity and limitation in range-of-motion) in ambulatory patients and patients before hip arthroplasty. Test-retest reliability was assessed on a subsample after 10 days. Data from 51 patients out of 91 contacted could be analyzed. Twenty-nine patients had knee and 22 patients had hip OA. Both the WOMAC and Lequesne OA-indices and their scales or sections had a satisfactory test-retest reliability (Intraclass correlation coefficient 0.43-0.96). All scales of the WOMAC were internally consistent (Cronbach's coefficient alpha 0.81-0.96) and associated with radiological OA-severity and joint range of motion. However, only the function but not the symptom sections (Cronbach's coefficient alpha knee: 0.55; hip: 0.63) of the self-administered Lequesne OA index were internally consistent for both, patients with knee and hip OA. Also, the symptom components were not or only weakly associated with radiological OA-severity and joint range of motion. Although our results are based on a German version using a self-report format we may caution using the self-administered Lequesne OA index without prior testing of its metric properties and validity.

  13. Vascular Pathology And Osteoarthritis Population-based studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Hoeven (Theun)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most frequent joint disorder worldwide and causes a considerable burden of pain, disability, and ever increasing costs to society. Due to rapid ageing and the epidemic of obesity in western populations, prevalence of OA is expected

  14. Osteoarthritis and metabolic dysregulation: insights from a preclinical model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, H.M. de

    2018-01-01

    This thesis aims to identify the effect of metabolic factors, inflammatory processes and obesity in the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis (OA), using a high-fat diet and/or traumatic injury in a small animal model. The first part of this thesis describes, the rat Groove model of OA, using a one-time

  15. Nutritional Factors and Osteoarthritis: A review article | Sanghi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research is ongoing on the beneficial properties of plant derived extracts for OA and nutraceuticals industries are accordingly making firm contribution to this sector. This article focuses the role of nutrients to slow down the progression of OA and their future aspects. Keywords: Osteoarthritis; Dietary factors; Nutrition; Review

  16. Pain distribution in primary care patients with hip osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Erik; Overgaard, Søren; Vestergaard, Jacob T

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hip osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common diagnosis in primary care adult patients presenting with hip pain but pain location and pain distribution in primary care patients with hip OA have been reported inadequately. OBJECTIVE: To describe pain location and pain distribution...

  17. Prevalence of hip osteoarthritis in chiropractic practice in denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Erik; Christensen, Henrik W; Overgaard, Søren

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to measure the prevalence of clinical and radiographic hip osteoarthritis (OA) and first-time diagnosis of hip OA in consecutive patients presenting to chiropractic practices in Denmark and to report the components of the initial treatment rendered...

  18. Symptom and structure modification in osteoarthritis with pharmaceutical-grade chondroitin sulfate: what's the evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, M; Chevalier, X; Henrotin, Y; Hunter, D J; Uebelhart, D

    2013-03-01

    been found to be poor, it is recommended that pharmaceutical-grade chondroitin sulfate is used rather than food supplements in the treatment of OA. Chondroitin sulfate is recommended by several guidelines from international societies in the management of knee and hip OA. Furthermore, its safety profile is favorable when compared with many other therapies used in OA. Chondroitin sulfate is an effective and safe treatment option for patients with osteoarthritis.

  19. Traumatic osteoarthritis-induced persistent mechanical hyperalgesia in a rat model of anterior cruciate ligament transection plus a medial meniscectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai HC

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Hsiao-Chien Tsai,1–3 Ta-Liang Chen,2–4 Yu-Pin Chen,5 Ruei-Ming Chen1,3,6 1Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Department of Anesthesiology, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Department of Anesthesiology, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Anesthesiology and Health Policy Research Center, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan; 5Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Wan Fang Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan; 6Comprehensive Cancer Center, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan Background: Osteoarthritis (OA is a degenerative joint disease characterized by progressive cartilage degeneration, subchondral bone changes, osteophyte formation, and synovitis. A major symptom is pain that is triggered by peripheral and central changes within the pain pathways. Some surgery-induced joint instability rat models of OA were described to mimic traumatic OA. Several behavioral tests were developed to access OA-induced pain. However, follow-up in most studies usually only occurred for about 4 weeks. Since traumatic OA is a chronic disease which gradually develops after trauma, the pattern of pain might differ between early and late stages after the trauma. Purpose: To observe the time-dependent development of hypersensitivity after traumatic OA and to determine the best timing and methods to investigate traumatic OA-induced pain.Methods: Anterior cruciate ligament transection plus medial meniscectomy was used to induce traumatic OA in Sprague-Dawley rats. Traumatic OA-induced pain was evaluated using four different behavioral tests for 15 weeks.Results: A significant difference in mechanical hypersensitivity developed throughout the observational period. It was worst in the first 3 weeks after the operation, then became less significant

  20. Biomechanical and neuromuscular adaptations during the landing phase of a stepping-down task in patients with early or established knee osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez-Ramirez, Diana C.; Malfait, Bart; Baert, Isabel; van der Leeden, Marike; van Dieën, Jaap; Lems, Willem F.; Dekker, Joost; Luyten, Frank P.; Verschueren, Sabine

    Background: To compare the knee joint kinematics, kinetics and EMG activity patterns during a stepping-down task in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) with control subjects. Methods: 33 women with knee OA (early OA, n = 14; established OA n = 19) and 14 female control subjects performed a

  1. Limited use of surgeon's advice on exercise for knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryaa, Sofie; Ingelsrud, Lina H; Skou, Søren T

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The Good Life with osteoArthritis in Denmark (GLA:D) programme consists of patient education and supervised exercise therapy and adheres to clinical guidelines for knee osteoarthritis (OA). The purpose of this study was to present the treatment choice and clinical results of patients...

  2. Relationship of bone mineral density to progression of knee osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective. To evaluate the longitudinal relationship between bone mineral density (BMD) and BMD changes and the progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA), as measured by cartilage outcomes. Methods. We used observational cohort data from the Vitamin D for Knee Osteoarthritis trial. Bilateral femoral ...

  3. T2 map signal variation predicts symptomatic osteoarthritis progression: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Haoti; Miller, David J. [The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Electrical Engineering, University Park, PA (United States); Urish, Kenneth L. [Magee Womens Hospital of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, The Bone and Joint Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-07-15

    The aim of this work is to use quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to identify patients at risk for symptomatic osteoarthritis (OA) progression. We hypothesized that classification of signal variation on T2 maps might predict symptomatic OA progression. Patients were selected from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI), a prospective cohort. Two groups were identified: a symptomatic OA progression group and a control group. At baseline, both groups were asymptomatic (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis [WOMAC] pain score total <10) with no radiographic evidence of OA (Kellgren-Lawrence [KL] score ≤ 1). The OA progression group (n = 103) had a change in total WOMAC score greater than 10 by the 3-year follow-up. The control group (n = 79) remained asymptomatic, with a change in total WOMAC score less than 10 at the 3-year follow-up. A classifier was designed to predict OA progression in an independent population based on T2 map cartilage signal variation. The classifier was designed using a nearest neighbor classification based on a Gaussian Mixture Model log-likelihood fit of T2 map cartilage voxel intensities. The use of T2 map signal variation to predict symptomatic OA progression in asymptomatic individuals achieved a specificity of 89.3 %, a sensitivity of 77.2 %, and an overall accuracy rate of 84.2 %. T2 map signal variation can predict symptomatic knee OA progression in asymptomatic individuals, serving as a possible early OA imaging biomarker. (orig.)

  4. Relationships between physical performance and knee and hip osteoarthritis: findings from the European Project on Osteoarthritis (EPOSA).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edwards, M.H.; van der Pas, S.; Denkinger, M.D.; Parsons, C.; Jameson, K.A.; Schaap, L.A.; Zambon, S.; Castell, M.V; Herbolsheimer, F.; Nasell, H.; Sanchez-Martinez, M.; Otero, A.; Nikolaus, T.; van Schoor, N.M.; Pedersen, N.L.; Maggi, S.; Deeg, D.J.H.; Cooper, C.; Dennison, E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: poor physical performance (PP) is known to be associated with disability, lower quality of life and higher mortality rates. Knee and hip osteoarthritis (OA) might be expected to contribute to poor PP, through joint pain and restricted range of movement. Both clinical and self-reported OA

  5. Genetic Determinism of Primary Early-Onset Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aury-Landas, Juliette; Marcelli, Christian; Leclercq, Sylvain; Boumédiene, Karim; Baugé, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease worldwide. A minority of cases correspond to familial presentation characterized by early-onset forms which are genetically heterogeneous. This review brings a new point of view on the molecular basis of OA by focusing on gene mutations causing early-onset OA (EO-OA). Recently, thanks to whole-exome sequencing, a gain-of-function mutation in the TNFRSF11B gene was identified in two distant family members with EO-OA, opening new therapeutic perspectives for OA. Indeed, unraveling the molecular basis of rare Mendelian OA forms will improve our understanding of molecular processes involved in OA pathogenesis and will contribute to better patient diagnosis, management, and therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Asporin and transforming growth factor-beta gene expression in osteoblasts from subchondral bone and osteophytes in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakao, Kei; Takahashi, Kenji A; Arai, Yuji; Saito, Masazumi; Honjyo, Kuniaki; Hiraoka, Nobuyuki; Kishida, Tsunao; Mazda, Osam; Imanishi, Jiro; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2009-11-01

    To clarify the significance of subchondral bone and osteophytes in the pathology of osteoarthritis (OA), we investigated the expression of asporin (ASPN), transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), TGF-beta2, TGF-beta3, and runt-related transcription factor-2 (Runx2) genes involved in bone metabolism. Osteoblasts were isolated from 19 patients diagnosed with knee OA and from 4 patients diagnosed with femoral neck fracture. Osteoblast expression of mRNA encoding ASPN, TGF-beta1, TGF-beta2, TGF-beta3, and Runx2 was analyzed using real-time RT-PCR. Expression of ASPN, TGF-beta1, and TGF-beta3 mRNA in the subchondral bone and osteophytes of OA patients increased compared with that of non-OA patients. The ratio of ASPN to TGF-beta1 mRNA in patients with severe cartilage damage was higher than that in patients with mild cartilage damage. The increased ratio of ASPN mRNA to TGF-beta1 mRNA in patients with severe relative to mild cartilage damage indicates that increased ASPN mRNA expression was significantly associated with the severity of cartilage degeneration. This finding suggests that ASPN may regulate TGF-beta1-mediated factors in the development of OA, which may provide clues as to the underlying pathology of OA.

  7. Comparison between rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis on knee joint MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhi; Meng Xianghong, Suo Yongmei; Wan Yeda

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the MRI characteristics between the late stage rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA) in the knee joints. Materials and Methods: We collected knee joints MR data using 0.35 T MR from 40 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and 60 cases with osteoarthritis between July, 2010 and August, 2012. We compared the differences in the menisci, the articular cartilage, the subchondral bone, and synovial lesions between the two groups. We calculated the morbidity and analyzed the severity in each part in both groups, and compared the differences between the two groups. If P<0.05, the results had statistical significance. Results: The injury of all parts in the medial and lateral menisci in the RA group was more severe than in the OA group (P<0.05). The articular cartilage of lateral tibiofemoral joints in the RA group was more severe than in the OA group (Z values of the lateral femoral condyle and the lateral tibial plateau were 5.702 vs. 7.534, P<0.05). However, the injury did not significantly differ at the articular cartilage in the patellofemoral joints and in the medial tibiofemoral joints (P>0.05). The subchondral bone marrow lesions of both medial and lateral tibiofemoral joints in the RA group were more severe than in the OA group (the χ 2 values of the medial and lateral femoral condyle were 6.730 and 23.938, respectively; the χ 2 values of the medial and lateral tibial plateau were 12.033 and 41.017, respectively; P<0.05). However, there was no statistical significance in the subchondral bone marrow lesions in the patellofemoral joints (P>0.05). In the RA group, there were 97.5% (39/40) cases having diffuse synovial thickening, including 20 cases with bone destruction in the bare area. In the OA group, there were 21.7% (13/60) cases having synovial thickening with less extend compared to RA group, none of them had bone destruction in the bare area. Conclusions: There are diffuse synovial thickening, bare area destruction, diffuse

  8. A Phase IIIb, Multicentre, Randomised, Parallel-Group, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind Study to Investigate the Efficacy and Safety of OROS Hydromorphone in Subjects with Moderate-to-Severe Chronic Pain Induced by Osteoarthritis of the Hip or the Knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Vojtaššák

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Opioid analgesics are included in treatment guidelines for the symptomatic management of osteoarthritis (OA. Starting with a low dose of opioid and slowly titrating to a higher dose may help avoid intolerable side effects. Methods. Subjects aged ≥40 years, with moderate to severe pain induced by OA of the hip or knee not adequately controlled by previous non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs or paracetamol treatment, were enrolled. Subjects received OROS hydromorphone 4 mg or placebo once-daily. The dose was titrated every 3-4 days in case of unsatisfactory pain control during the 4-week titration phase. A 12 week maintenance phase followed. The primary efficacy endpoint was the change in “pain on average” measured on the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI scale from baseline to the end of the maintenance phase. Results. 139 subjects received OROS hydromorphone and 149 subjects received placebo. All efficacy endpoints showed similar improvements from baseline to end of study in the 2 groups. The safety results were consistent with the safety profile of OROS hydromorphone. Conclusion.The study did not meet the primary endpoint; although many subjects' pain was not adequately controlled at inclusion, their pain may have improved with continued paracetamol or NSAID treatment.

  9. Factor structure of the arthritis body experience scale (ABES) in a U.S. population of people with osteoarthritis (OA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), fibromyalgia (FM) and other rheumatic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyington, J E A; Devellis, R; Shreffler, J; Schoster, B; Callahan, L F

    2008-01-01

    To examine the psychometric properties of the Arthritis Body Experience Scale (ABES) in a US sample of people with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia and other rheumatic conditions. The ABES, with the scoring direction modified, was phone-administered to 937 individuals who self-identified as having one or more arthritis conditions based on a validated, US, national survey assessment tool. Descriptive statistics of demographic variables and factor analysis of scale items were conducted. Scale dimensionality was assessed using principal component analysis (PCA) with oblique rotation. Criteria for assessing factors were eigenvalues > 1, visual assessment of scree plot, and structure and pattern matrices. The predominantly female (74.2%) and Caucasian (79.9%) sample had a mean age of 61.0 ± 13.1 years, and a mean BMI of 30.2 ± 7.1. Major arthritis conditions reported were rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis and fibromyalgia. A three-factor structure with cronbach alpha values of .84, .85 and .53 was elicited, and accounted for 72% of the variance. Compared to the two-factor structure evidenced by the original ABES scale in a sample of UK adults, the data from this sample evidenced a three-factor structure with higher variance. The third factor's cronbach alpha of .53 was low and could be improved by the addition of salient questions derived from further qualitative interviews with patients with arthritis and other rheumatic conditions and from current literature findings. The observed psychometrics indicate the scale usefully assesses body image in populations with arthritis and related conditions. However, further testing and refinement is needed to determine its utility in clinical and other settings.

  10. An 8-Week Knee Osteoarthritis Treatment Program of Hyaluronic Acid Injection, Deliberate Physical Rehabilitation, and Patient Education is Cost Effective at 2 Years Follow-up: The OsteoArthritis Centers of America Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry E. Miller

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous nonsurgical interventions have been reported to improve symptoms of knee osteoarthritis (OA over the short term. However, longer follow-up is required to accurately characterize outcomes such as cost effectiveness and delayed arthroplasty. A total of 553 patients with symptomatic knee OA who previously underwent a single 8-week multimodal treatment program were contacted at 1 year ( n = 336 or 2 years ( n = 217 follow-up. The percentage of patients who underwent knee arthroplasty was 10% at 1 year and 18% at 2 years following program completion. The treatment program was highly cost effective at $12,800 per quality-adjusted life year at 2 years. Cost effectiveness was maintained under a variety of plausible assumptions and regardless of gender, age, body mass index, disease severity, or knee pain severity. In summary, a single 8-week multimodal knee OA treatment program is cost effective and may lower knee arthroplasty utilization through 2 years follow-up.

  11. Effects of an intensive weight loss program on knee joint loading in obese adults with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaboe, J; Bliddal, H; Messier, S P

    2011-01-01

    To determine the effect of an intensive weight loss program on knee joint loads during walking in obese patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA).......To determine the effect of an intensive weight loss program on knee joint loads during walking in obese patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA)....

  12. OARSI recommended performance-based tests to assess physical function in people diagnosed with hip or knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobson, F; Hinman, R S; Roos, Ewa M.

    2013-01-01

    To recommend a consensus-derived set of performance-based tests of physical function for use in people diagnosed with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA) or following joint replacement.......To recommend a consensus-derived set of performance-based tests of physical function for use in people diagnosed with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA) or following joint replacement....

  13. Osteoarthritis: New Insights in Animal Models

    OpenAIRE

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Loppini, Mattia; Fumo, Caterina; Rizzello, Giacomo; Khan, Wasim Sardar; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most frequent and symptomatic health problem in the middle-aged and elderly population, with over one-half of all people over the age of 65 showing radiographic changes in painful knees. The aim of the present study was to perform an overview on the available animal models used in the research field on the OA. Discrepancies between the animal models and the human disease are present. As regards human ‘idiopathic’ OA, with late onset and slow progression, it is perha...

  14. The effect of education and supervised exercise vs. education alone on the time to total hip replacement in patients with severe hip osteoarthritis. A randomized clinical trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Carsten; Roos, Ewa M; Kjærsgaard-Andersen, Per; Overgaard, Søren

    2013-01-14

    The age- and gender-specific incidence of total hip replacement surgery has increased over the last two decades in all age groups. Recent studies indicate that non-surgical interventions are effective in reducing pain and disability, even at later stages of the disease when joint replacement is considered. We hypothesize that the time to hip replacement can be postponed in patients with severe hip osteoarthritis following participation in a patient education and supervised exercise program when compared to patients receiving patient education alone. A prospective, blinded, parallel-group multi-center trial (2 sites), with balanced randomization [1:1]. Patients with hip osteoarthritis and an indication for hip replacement surgery, aged 40 years and above, will be consecutively recruited and randomized into two treatment groups. The active treatment group will receive 3 months of supervised exercise consisting of 12 sessions of individualized, goal-based neuromuscular training, and 12 sessions of intensive resistance training plus patient education (3 sessions). The control group will receive only patient education (3 sessions). The primary end-point for assessing the effectiveness of the intervention is 12 months after baseline. However, follow-ups will also be performed once a year for at least 5 years. The primary outcome measure is the time to hip replacement surgery measured on a Kaplain-Meier survival curve from time of inclusion. Secondary outcome measures are the five subscales of the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, physical activity level (UCLA activity score), and patient's global perceived effect. Other measures include pain after exercise, joint-specific adverse events, exercise adherence, general health status (EQ-5D-5L), mechanical muscle strength and performance in physical tests. A cost-effectiveness analysis will also be performed. To our knowledge, this is the first randomized clinical trial comparing a patient education plus

  15. Intraarticular injections (corticosteroid, hyaluronic acid, platelet rich plasma) for the knee osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayhan, Egemen; Kesmezacar, Hayrettin; Akgun, Isik

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a complex “whole joint” disease pursued by inflammatory mediators, rather than purely a process of “wear and tear”. Besides cartilage degradation, synovitis, subchondral bone remodeling, degeneration of ligaments and menisci, and hypertrophy of the joint capsule take parts in the pathogenesis. Pain is the hallmark symptom of OA, but the extent to which structural pathology in OA contributes to the pain experience is still not well known. For the knee OA, intraarticular (IA) injection (corticosteroids, viscosupplements, blood-derived products) is preferred as the last nonoperative modality, if the other conservative treatment modalities are ineffective. IA corticosteroid injections provide short term reduction in OA pain and can be considered as an adjunct to core treatment for the relief of moderate to severe pain in people with OA. IA hyaluronic acid (HA) injections might have efficacy and might provide pain reduction in mild OA of knee up to 24 wk. But for HA injections, the cost-effectiveness is an important concern that patients must be informed about the efficacy of these preparations. Although more high-quality evidence is needed, recent studies indicate that IA platelet rich plasma injections are promising for relieving pain, improving knee function and quality of life, especially in younger patients, and in mild OA cases. The current literature and our experience indicate that IA injections are safe and have positive effects for patient satisfaction. But, there is no data that any of the IA injections will cause osteophytes to regress or cartilage and meniscus to regenerate in patients with substantial and irreversible bone and cartilage damage. PMID:25035839

  16. Measuring physiotherapy performance in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamtvedt, Gro; Dahm, Kristin Thuve; Holm, Inger; Flottorp, Signe

    2008-07-08

    Patients with knee osteoarthritis [OA] are commonly treated by physiotherapists in primary care. Measuring physiotherapy performance is important before developing strategies to improve quality. The purpose of this study was to measure physiotherapy performance in patients with knee OA by comparing clinical practice to evidence from systematic reviews. We developed a data-collection form and invited all private practitioners in Norway [n = 2798] to prospectively collect data on the management of one patient with knee OA through 12 treatment session. Actual practice was compared to findings from an overview of systematic reviews summarising the effect of physiotherapy interventions for knee OA. A total of 297 physiotherapists reported their management for patients with knee OA. Exercise was the most common treatment used, provided by 98% of the physiotherapists. There is evidence of high quality that exercise reduces pain and improves function in patients with knee OA. Thirty-five percent of physiotherapists used acupuncture, low-level laser therapy or transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. There is evidence of moderate quality that these treatments reduce pain in knee OA. Patient education, supported by moderate quality evidence for improving psychological outcomes, was provided by 68%. Physiotherapists used a median of four different treatment modalities for each patient. They offered many treatment modalities based on evidence of low quality or without evidence from systematic reviews, e.g. traction and mobilisation, massage and stretching. Exercise was used in almost all treatment sessions in the management of knee OA. This practice is desirable since it is supported by high quality evidence. Physiotherapists also provide several other treatment modalities based on evidence of moderate or low quality, or no evidence from systematic reviews. Ways to promote high quality evidence into physiotherapy practice should be identified and evaluated.

  17. Measuring physiotherapy performance in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holm Inger

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with knee osteoarthritis [OA] are commonly treated by physiotherapists in primary care. Measuring physiotherapy performance is important before developing strategies to improve quality. The purpose of this study was to measure physiotherapy performance in patients with knee OA by comparing clinical practice to evidence from systematic reviews. Methods We developed a data-collection form and invited all private practitioners in Norway [n = 2798] to prospectively collect data on the management of one patient with knee OA through 12 treatment session. Actual practice was compared to findings from an overview of systematic reviews summarising the effect of physiotherapy interventions for knee OA. Results A total of 297 physiotherapists reported their management for patients with knee OA. Exercise was the most common treatment used, provided by 98% of the physiotherapists. There is evidence of high quality that exercise reduces pain and improves function in patients with knee OA. Thirty-five percent of physiotherapists used acupuncture, low-level laser therapy or transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. There is evidence of moderate quality that these treatments reduce pain in knee OA. Patient education, supported by moderate quality evidence for improving psychological outcomes, was provided by 68%. Physiotherapists used a median of four different treatment modalities for each patient. They offered many treatment modalities based on evidence of low quality or without evidence from systematic reviews, e.g. traction and mobilisation, massage and stretching. Conclusion Exercise was used in almost all treatment sessions in the management of knee OA. This practice is desirable since it is supported by high quality evidence. Physiotherapists also provide several other treatment modalities based on evidence of moderate or low quality, or no evidence from systematic reviews. Ways to promote high quality evidence into

  18. Nutraceuticals in the management of osteoarthritis : a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragle, Ryan L; Sawitzke, Allen D

    2012-09-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic, highly prevalent and disabling disease that is expected to increase in prevalence secondary to longer life expectancy and a disproportionately aging population. Treatment of OA is only marginally effective and has been focused primarily on symptom control using weight loss, physical therapy, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), acetaminophen, intra-articular steroids or viscosupplementation, topical NSAIDs and analgesics, diacerein (an oral interleukin-1β inhibitor) and finally joint replacement surgery. The use of nutraceuticals in the treatment of OA is common, and scientific studies examining the effects of nutraceuticals on the pathogenesis and treatment of OA are increasing. This review examines the efficacy and safety of select nutraceuticals for the treatment of OA. The reviewed nutraceuticals include glucosamine, chondroitin, collagen hydrolysates (CHs) and avocado-soybean unsaponifiables (ASUs). There have been several clinical trials examining the efficacy of these products and the results demonstrate significant heterogeneity. Significant improvements in pain, function and structural outcomes have been shown for some of the treatment arms or subgroups of patients, but the effects are not consistent across the studies. Glucosamine, chondroitin and the two in combination have been the most extensively studied. Significant improvement in pain and functional indices and a decrease in the loss of joint space width were demonstrated in some but not all studies. CHs showed significant improvement in pain and functional indices for several subgroups of patients, but these findings were not pervasive amongst the treatment arms. ASU has demonstrated positive results with respect to decreased NSAID use in several studies and functional and pain end points in most of the reviewed studies; however, in the two studies examining structural end points, the results were mixed. The safety of these nutraceuticals has been

  19. OAS :: Accountability :: Procurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    OAS, including its organizational structure, each organizational unit's staffing, vacant posts, and a list of procurement notices for formal bids, links to the performance contract and travel control Performance Contract reports from January 2013 to June 2017 may be found.) Travel Information and Control

  20. OAS :: Our History

    Science.gov (United States)

    the Human Resources of the OAS, including its organizational structure, each organizational unit's contract and travel control measure reports, the applicable procurement rules and regulations, and the Organizational Charts Organizational List Authorities Our Locations Contact Us Although some scholars trace the

  1. OAS :: General Assembly

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    subscriptions Videos Photos Live Webcast Social Media Facebook @oasofficial Facebook Twitter @oas_official Scholarships School of Governance Science and Technology Social Development Summits of the Americas Sustainable Development T Telecommunications Terrorism Tourism Trade Treaties and Agreements W Women Y Youth Strategic

  2. OAS :: Contact Us

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    subscriptions Videos Photos Live Webcast Social Media Facebook @oasofficial Facebook Twitter @oas_official Scholarships School of Governance Science and Technology Social Development Summits of the Americas Sustainable Development T Telecommunications Terrorism Tourism Trade Treaties and Agreements W Women Y Youth Strategic

  3. OAS :: Who We Are

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    subscriptions Videos Photos Live Webcast Social Media Facebook @oasofficial Facebook Twitter @oas_official Scholarships School of Governance Science and Technology Social Development Summits of the Americas Sustainable Development T Telecommunications Terrorism Tourism Trade Treaties and Agreements W Women Y Youth Strategic

  4. OAS :: Press Releases

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    subscriptions Videos Photos Live Webcast Social Media Facebook @oasofficial Facebook Twitter @oas_official Social Media Facebook Twitter Newsletters Press and Communications Department Contact us at: +1 (202) 370 Rights Actions against Corruption C Children Civil Registry Civil Society Contact Us Culture Cyber

  5. OAS :: Email subscriptions

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  6. Strontium ranelate causes osteophytes overgrowth in a model of early phase osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Jian-Guo; Dai, Mu-Wei; Wang, Yu; Tian, Fa-Ming; Song, Hui-Ping; Xiao, Ya-Ping; Shao, Li-Tao; Zhang, Ying-Ze; Zhang, Liu

    2017-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA) involves cartilage changes as well as modifications of subchondral bone and synovial tissues. Strontium ranelate (SR), an anti-osteoporosis compound, which is currently in phase III clinical trial for treatment of OA. Evidences suggest that SR preferably deposited in osteophyte, other than in subchondral bone in early phase of OA. This phenomenon raises concern about its utility for OA treatment as a disease-modifying drug. To evaluate the effect of SR on cartil...

  7. Subchondral bone in osteoarthritis: insight into risk factors and microstructural changes

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Guangyi; Yin, Jimin; Gao, Junjie; Cheng, Tak S; Pavlos, Nathan J; Zhang, Changqing; Zheng, Ming H

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a major cause of disability in the adult population. As a progressive degenerative joint disorder, OA is characterized by cartilage damage, changes in the subchondral bone, osteophyte formation, muscle weakness, and inflammation of the synovium tissue and tendon. Although OA has long been viewed as a primary disorder of articular cartilage, subchondral bone is attracting increasing attention. It is commonly reported to play a vital role in the pathogenesis of OA. Subcho...

  8. Sex-Specific Protection of Osteoarthritis by Deleting Cartilage Acid Protein 1

    OpenAIRE

    Ge, Xianpeng; Ritter, Susan Y.; Tsang, Kelly; Shi, Ruirui; Takei, Kohtaro; Aliprantis, Antonios O.

    2016-01-01

    Cartilage acidic protein 1 (CRTAC1) was recently identified as an elevated protein in the synovial fluid of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) by a proteomic analysis. This gene is also upregulated in both human and mouse OA by transcriptomic analysis. The objective of this study was to characterize the expression and function of CRTAC1 in OA. Here, we first confirm the increase of CRTAC1 in cartilage biopsies from OA patients undergoing joint replacement by real-time PCR and immunohistochemis...

  9. Osteoarthritis of the knee after meniscal resection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paradowski, P T; Lohmander, L S; Englund, M

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine prevalence, incidence and progression of radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA) in a cohort of subjects with previous meniscectomy. METHODS: We assessed 221 subjects (177 men and 44 women) with weight bearing knee radiography twice (assessment A and B) with a follow-up time...... Kellgren and Lawrence grade 2 or worse. RESULTS: At assessment A, we found tibiofemoral radiographic OA in 107 subjects' index knee (48%) of which 41 subjects (38%) had bilateral tibiofemoral OA. At assessment B, the corresponding figures were 151 (68%) and 71 (32%). At assessment A, we found...... patellofemoral OA in 32 subjects' index knee (14%) of which 11 (34%) had bilateral patellofemoral OA. At assessment B, the corresponding figures were 51 (23%) and 19 (37%). There was an increase of the sum of joint space narrowing (JSN) and osteophyte grades in the tibiofemoral joint of 144 subjects' index knee...

  10. The application of T1 and T2 relaxation time and magnetization transfer ratios to the early diagnosis of patellar cartilage osteoarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Weiwu; Qu, Nan; Lu, Zhihua; Yang, Shixun [Shanghai Jiaotong University, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China)

    2009-11-15

    We compare the T1 and T2 relaxation times and magnetization transfer ratios (MTRs) of normal subjects and patients with osteoarthritis (OA) to evaluate the ability of these techniques to aid in the early diagnosis and treatment of OA. The knee joints in 11 normal volunteers and 40 patients with OA were prospectively evaluated using T1 relaxation times as measured using delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC), T2 relaxation times (multiple spin-echo sequence, T2 mapping), and MTRs. The OA patients were further categorized into mild, moderate, and severe OA. The mean T1 relaxation times of the four groups (normal, mild OA, moderate OA, and severe OA) were: 487.3{+-}27.7, 458.0{+-}55.9, 405.9{+-}57.3, and 357.9{+-}36.7 respectively (p<0.001). The mean T2 relaxation times of the four groups were: 37.8{+-}3.3, 44.0{+-}8.5, 50.9{+-}9.5, and 57.4{+-}4.8 respectively (p<0.001). T1 relaxation time decreased and T2 relaxation time increased with worsening degeneration of patellar cartilage. The result of the covariance analysis showed that the covariate age had a significant influence on T2 relaxation time (p<0.001). No significant differences between the normal and OA groups using MTR were noted. T1 and T2 relaxation times are relatively sensitive to early degenerative changes in the patellar cartilage, whereas the MTR may have some limitations with regard to early detection of OA. In addition, The T1 and T2 relaxation times negatively correlate with each other, which is a novel finding. (orig.)

  11. The NAD-Dependent Deacetylase Sirtuin-1 Regulates the Expression of Osteogenic Transcriptional Activator Runt-Related Transcription Factor 2 (Runx2 and Production of Matrix Metalloproteinase (MMP-13 in Chondrocytes in Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koh Terauchi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aging is one of the major pathologic factors associated with osteoarthritis (OA. Recently, numerous reports have demonstrated the impact of sirtuin-1 (Sirt1, which is the NAD-dependent deacetylase, on human aging. It has been demonstrated that Sirt1 induces osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. However, the role of Sirt1 in the OA chondrocytes still remains unknown. We postulated that Sirt1 regulates a hypertrophic chondrocyte lineage and degeneration of articular cartilage through the activation of osteogenic transcriptional activator Runx2 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-13 in OA chondrocytes. To verify whether sirtuin-1 (Sirt1 regulates chondrocyte activity in OA, we studied expressions of Sirt1, Runx2 and production of MMP-13, and their associations in human OA chondrocytes. The expression of Sirt1 was ubiquitously observed in osteoarthritic chondrocytes; in contrast, Runx2 expressed in the osteophyte region in patients with OA and OA model mice. OA relating catabolic factor IL-1βincreased the expression of Runx2 in OA chondrocytes. OA chondrocytes, which were pretreated with Sirt1 inhibitor, inhibited the IL-1β-induced expression of Runx2 compared to the control. Since the Runx2 is a promotor of MMP-13 expression, Sirt1 inactivation may inhibit the Runx2 expression and the resultant down-regulation of MMP-13 production in chondrocytes. Our findings suggest thatSirt1 may regulate the expression of Runx2, which is the osteogenic transcription factor, and the production of MMP-13 from chondrocytes in OA. Since Sirt1 activity is known to be affected by several stresses, including inflammation and oxidative stress, as well as aging, SIRT may be involved in the development of OA.

  12. Spontaneous osteoarthritis in Dunkin Hartley guinea pigs: histologic, radiologic, and biochemical changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez, P.A.; Glasson, S.S.; Trubetskoy, O.V.; Haimes, H.B.

    1997-01-01

    Dunkin Hartley guinea pigs develop spontaneous, age-related osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee and other joints. Histologic changes are observed beginning at 3 months of age. Disease severity increases with age, and at 18 months moderate to severe OA is observed. A study was undertaken to assess the morphologic and biochemical changes of 22-month-old animals, and to compare them with values in 2-month-old guinea pigs. Biochemical indices characteristic of OA, from tibial cartilage, indicated an increase in proteoglycan content from 283 +/- 2 micrograms/mg (mean +/- SEM) at 2 months of age to 365 +/- 6 micrograms/mg at 22 months. Collagen concentration in cartilage decreased from 364 +/- 2 micrograms/ at 2 months to 223 +/- 3 micrograms/mg at 22 months. Proteoglycan fragments found in synovial fluid measured 4.6 +/- 1 micrograms/ml at 2 months and increased to 37 +/- 2 micrograms/ml at 22 months. Radiographic changes observed at 22 months included marginal osteophytes of the tibia and femur, sclerosis of the subchondral bone of the tibial plateau, femoral condyle cysts, and calcification of the collateral ligaments. Histologic evaluation revealed severe OA, with a Mankin score of 10.7 +/- 0.5 in 22-month-old animals. In contrast, 2-month-old animals had no histologic or radiographically detectable lesions. The results of the study reported here indicate that the lesions observed in this model are similar to those of human OA. Spontaneous development of OA in guinea pig is amenable to the study of the pathogenesis of OA and to the evaluation of potential disease-modifying agents

  13. Bone marrow edema-like lesions change in volume in the majority of patients with osteoarthritis; associations with clinical features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornaat, Peter R.; Sharma, Ruby; Bloem, Johan L.; Watt, Iain [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Kloppenburg, Margreet; Botha-Scheepers, Stella A. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Rheumatology, Leiden (Netherlands); Hellio le Graverand, Marie-Pierre [Pfizer Groton, Groton, CT (United States); Coene, L.N.J.E.M. [Haga Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, The Hague (Netherlands)

    2007-12-15

    It has been suggested that bone marrow edema-like (BME) lesions in the knee are associated with progression of osteoarthritis (OA). The purpose of our study in patients with OA was to evaluate prospectively changes of BME lesions over 2 years and their relationship with clinical features. Magnetic resonance (MR) images of the knee were obtained from 182 patients (20% male; aged 43-76 years; mean age 59 years) who had been diagnosed with familial symptomatic OA at multiple joint sites. MR images were made at baseline and at 2 years follow-up. BME lesions in 2 years were associated with clinical features assessed by Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) scores. A total of 327 BME lesions were recorded. Total size of BME lesions changed in 90 patients (66%). Size of individual lesions changed in 147 foci (45%): new lesions appeared in 69 (21%), existing lesions disappeared in 32 (10%), increased in size in 26 (8%) and decreased in size in 20 (6%) lesions. Increase or decrease of BME lesions, over a 2-year time period, was not associated with severity of WOMAC scores. BME lesions fluctuated in the majority of patients with OA over a 2-year time period. These changes were not associated with severity of WOMAC scores at the study end point. (orig.)

  14. Bone marrow edema-like lesions change in volume in the majority of patients with osteoarthritis; associations with clinical features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornaat, Peter R.; Sharma, Ruby; Bloem, Johan L.; Watt, Iain; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Botha-Scheepers, Stella A.; Hellio le Graverand, Marie-Pierre; Coene, L.N.J.E.M.

    2007-01-01

    It has been suggested that bone marrow edema-like (BME) lesions in the knee are associated with progression of osteoarthritis (OA). The purpose of our study in patients with OA was to evaluate prospectively changes of BME lesions over 2 years and their relationship with clinical features. Magnetic resonance (MR) images of the knee were obtained from 182 patients (20% male; aged 43-76 years; mean age 59 years) who had been diagnosed with familial symptomatic OA at multiple joint sites. MR images were made at baseline and at 2 years follow-up. BME lesions in 2 years were associated with clinical features assessed by Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) scores. A total of 327 BME lesions were recorded. Total size of BME lesions changed in 90 patients (66%). Size of individual lesions changed in 147 foci (45%): new lesions appeared in 69 (21%), existing lesions disappeared in 32 (10%), increased in size in 26 (8%) and decreased in size in 20 (6%) lesions. Increase or decrease of BME lesions, over a 2-year time period, was not associated with severity of WOMAC scores. BME lesions fluctuated in the majority of patients with OA over a 2-year time period. These changes were not associated with severity of WOMAC scores at the study end point. (orig.)

  15. Clinical and ultrasonographic features associated to response to intraarticular corticosteroid injection. A one year follow up prospective cohort study in knee osteoarthritis patient with joint effusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galisteo, Carlos; García-Manrique, María; Navarro, Noemí; Caixàs, Assumpta; Larrosa, Marta; Gratacós, Jordi

    2018-01-01

    Objectives Intraarticular injection is used for pain relief in knee osteoarthritis (OA), but there is not a well defined profile of patient who could get more benefit from it. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the frequency of pain relief at one year after corticosteroids intraarticular injection and to identify clinical factors associated to response in patients with knee osteoarthritis with joint effusion. Methods One-year prospective cohort study of patients with knee OA with joint effusion confirmed by ultrasound. An intraarticular injection was performed following a clinical protocol. Anthropometric measurements, laboratory parameters, clinical severity, ultrasound parameters and radiological severity were collected. Response regarding pain and presence of synovial fluid on ultrasound at one month and at one year were evaluated. Clinical responder were consider in subjects with enough improvement to carry out normal daily activities with pain VASeffusion. PMID:29351562

  16. Proprioception in knee osteoarthritis: a narrative review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoop, J.; Steultjens, M.P.M.; van der Leeden, M.; van der Esch, M.; Thorstensson, C.A.; Roorda, L.D.; Lems, W.F.; Dekker, J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To give an overview of the literature on knee proprioception in knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients. Method: A literature search was performed and reviewed using the narrative approach. Results: (1) Three presumed functions of knee proprioception have been described in the literature:

  17. Association of knee pain and different definitions of knee osteoarthritis with health-related quality of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiadaliri, A. A.; Lamm, C.J.; Gerhardsson de Verdier, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background: While the impact of knee pain and knee osteoarthritis (OA) on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) has been investigated in the literature, there is a lack of knowledge on the impact of different definitions of OA on HRQoL. The main aim of this study was to measure and compare...... among references (neither knee pain nor OA) was 42 %. The participants with knee pain and OA had all HRQoL measures lower compared to those with knee pain but no OA. The ACR clinical definition of knee OA was associated with lower HRQoL than the definition based on radiographic knee OA (adjusted...

  18. Role of intra-articular corticosteroid injections in pain management during physical rehabilitation of moderate to severe cases of knee osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasaduq, N.; Saleem, M.; Rehman, S.S.U.; Saleem, M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the role of intra-articular corticosteroid injections in pain management during physical rehabilitation of moderate to severe cases of knee osteoarthritis. Study Design: Randomized control trial (RCT). Place and Duration of Study: Department of Rheumatology and Rehabilitation, Fauji Foundation Hospital Rawalpindi during June 2011 to February 2012. Patients and Methods: Sixty patients with moderate to severe knee osteoarthritis were randomly selected by using probability simple random sampling technique, and randomly placed into two groups A and B through flip a coin method. The intra-articular corticosteroid injections were administered into 30 patients, including 22 female and 08 male, followed by a 2 weeks physical rehabilitation program. In group B all 30 patients, 19 female and 11 male, underwent through a 2 weeks physical rehabilitation program. The visual analog scale (VAS) was used to assess the intensity of pain and was measured at the start and at completion of the 2 week treatment program. Results: There were 60 cases in the study; 30 in each treatment groups A and B, and no drop outs. Mean age of the patients in group A was 56.25 and group B it was 58.75 years. Majority of patients in both the groups were between 44 - 77 years of age. The pain intensity was calculated in group A (p-value=0.007) and group B (p-value=0.009) at baseline. The patients in group A was treated by intra-articular corticosteroid injections followed by physical rehabilitation and group B was treated only with physical rehabilitation for two months. The pain intensity was measured at the completion of treatment for group A (p - value = 0.006) and B (p - value 0.271). Conclusion: The study concluded that intra-articular corticosteroid injections combined with physical therapy management are more effective in pain management during physical rehabilitation of moderate to severe cases of knee osteoarthritis as compare with physical therapy alone. (author)

  19. Association of metabolic syndrome in patients with osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, S.; Salim, B.; Khalil, Z.; Nasim, A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine association of osteoarthritis (OA) with metabolic syndrome in a tertiary care hospital of Pakistan. Methodology: A cross-sectional study was conducted at Fauji Foundation Hospital, Rawalpindi, Pakistan. Patients were randomly interviewed in the Female Rheumatology department and a total of 240 patients with single rheumatologic disease and age >35 years were selected. Informed consent was taken and patients were interviewed using a self-made questionnaire to evaluate their medical history, physical and laboratory examination. SPSS version 17 was used to analyze the data. Results: Out of 240 subjects, 81 patients had OA and another 81 patients were randomly selected from the age and gender matched control (non-OA) group. The mean age of patients in OA and non-OA group was 56.68 ± 09.76 and 53.57 ± 11.01 years, respectively. In OA group, 48.1% and in non-OA group 22.2% of patients were falling in category of being obese/morbidly obese. According to AHA criteria for Metabolic Syndrome, percentage of OA patients labeled to have metabolic syndrome was 58.8% as compared to 19.5% in non-OA group. Conclusion: There was a strong association of metabolic syndrome with OA and would surely make a foreground for future studies to be conducted on developing preventive strategies and ultimately reducing the morbidities and mortalities associated with Metabolic Osteoarthritis. (author)

  20. Association between grip strength and hand and knee radiographic osteoarthritis in Korean adults: Data from the Dong-gu study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihui Wen

    Full Text Available We assessed whether grip strength was related to various types of radiographic damage in Korean adults with osteoarthritis (OA.Data from 2,251 subjects enrolled in the Dong-gu study, who had no hand joint pain, were analyzed to investigate the relationship between grip strength and OA. Hand grip strength was measured using a hand-held dynamometer, and radiographs of the hand and knee were scored according to a semi-quantitative grading system. Multiple linear regressions were used to explore associations between grip strength and radiographic features of OA.Grip strength in men and women was negatively related to hand (both p < 0.001 and knee (men, p < 0.001; women, p = 0.010 OA after adjusting for confounders. Hand (men, p < 0.001; women, p = 0.001 and knee (both p < 0.001 joint space narrowing (JSN showed the strongest associations with low grip strength, regardless of gender. Moreover, the severity of hand osteophytes in women (p = 0.001, and subchondral cysts (men, p < 0.001 was correlated with low grip strength in both genders.Among subjects without hand joint pain, low grip strength was associated significantly with hand and knee radiographic OA, regardless of gender. Among all types of OA radiographic damage, low grip strength showed the strongest association with JSN.

  1. Vibratory perception threshold in young and middle-aged patients at high risk of knee osteoarthritis compared to controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Shakoor, Najia; Ageberg, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Vibratory perception threshold (VPT) is impaired in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). It is, however, not known if sensory deficits precede or follow as a consequence of OA. The aim of this study was to investigate VPT in 2 independent groups of patients with high risk of future OA (young a...

  2. Responsiveness of observational and self-report methods for assessing disability in mobility in patients with osteoarthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steultjens, M.P.M.; Roorda, L.D.; Dekker, J.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To establish the responsiveness of observational and self-report methods for the assessment of disability in mobility in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Methods: Data from 186 patients with hip OA of knee OA were used. Data from 1 observational method and 4 self-report methods for the

  3. Responsiveness of observational and self-report methods for assessing disability in mobility in patients with osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steultjens, M. P.; Roorda, L. D.; Dekker, J.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    2001-01-01

    To establish the responsiveness of observational and self-report methods for the assessment of disability in mobility in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Data from 186 patients with hip OA or knee OA were used. Data from 1 observational method and 4 self-report methods for the assessment of

  4. The effects of exercise and weight loss in overweight patients with hip osteoarthritis : design of a prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paans, Nienke; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; van der Meer, Klaas; Bulstra, Sjoerd K.; Stevens, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Background: Hip osteoarthritis (OA) is recognised as a substantial source of disability, with pain and loss of function as principal symptoms. An aging society and a growing number of overweight people, which is considered a risk factor for OA, contribute to the growing number of cases of hip OA. In

  5. Muscle Power Is an Independent Determinant of Pain and Quality of Life in Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Kieran F; Price, Lori Lyn; Harvey, William F; Driban, Jeffrey B; Hau, Cynthia; Fielding, Roger A; Wang, Chenchen

    2015-12-01

    This study examined the relationships between leg muscle strength, power, and perceived disease severity in subjects with knee osteoarthritis (OA) in order to determine whether dynamic leg extensor muscle power would be associated with pain and quality of life in knee OA. Baseline data on 190 subjects with knee OA (mean ± SD age 60.2 ± 10.4 years, body mass index 32.7 ± 7.2 kg/m(2) ) were obtained from a randomized controlled trial. Knee pain was measured using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, and health-related quality of life was assessed using the Short Form 36 (SF-36). One-repetition maximum (1RM) strength was assessed using the bilateral leg press, and peak muscle power was measured during 5 maximum voluntary velocity repetitions at 40% and 70% of 1RM. In univariate analysis, greater muscle power was significantly associated with pain (r = -0.17, P power was a significant independent predictor of pain (P ≤ 0.05) and PCS scores (P ≤ 0.04). However, muscle strength was not an independent determinant of pain or quality of life (P ≥ 0.06). Muscle power is an independent determinant of pain and quality of life in knee OA. Compared to strength, muscle power may be a more clinically important measure of muscle function within this population. New trials to systematically examine the impact of muscle power training interventions on disease severity in knee OA are particularly warranted. © 2015, American College of Rheumatology.

  6. Tissue Engineering in Osteoarthritis: Current Status and Prospect of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Gun-Il

    2018-04-27

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis. Over the last 20 years, attempts have been made to regenerate articular cartilage to overcome the limitations of conventional treatments. As OA is generally associated with larger and diffuse involvement of articular surfaces and alteration of joint homeostasis, a tissue engineering approach for cartilage regeneration is more difficult than in simple chondral defects. Autologous and allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have rapidly emerged as investigational products for cartilage regeneration. This review outlines points to consider in MSC-based approaches for OA treatment, including allogeneic MSCs, sources of MSCs, dosages, feasibility of multiple injections, indication according to severity of OA lesion and patient age, and issues regarding implantation versus injection. We introduce possible mechanisms of action of implanted or injected MSCs as well as the immunological aspects of MSC therapy and provide a summary of clinical trials of MSCs in the treatment of OA. Given current knowledge, it is too early to draw conclusions on the ultimate effectiveness of intra-articular application of MSCs in terms of regenerative effects. Further radiological and histological data will be needed, with a larger pool of patients, before this question can be answered.

  7. Constructing osteoarthritis through discourse – a qualitative analysis of six patient information leaflets on osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ong Bie

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health service policy in the United Kingdom emphasises the importance of self-care by patients with chronic conditions. Written information for patients about their condition is seen as an important aid to help patients look after themselves. From a discourse analysis perspective written texts such as patient information leaflets do not simply describe the reality of a medical condition and its management but by drawing on some sorts of knowledge and evidence rather than others help construct the reality of that condition. This study explored patient information leaflets on osteoarthritis (OA to see how OA was constructed and to consider the implications for self-care. Methods Systematic and repeated readings of six patient information leaflets on osteoarthritis to look for similarities and differences across leaflets, contradictions within leaflets and the resources called on to make claims about the nature of OA and its management. Results Biomedical discourse of OA as a joint disease dominated. Only one leaflet included an illness discourse albeit limited, and was also the only one to feature patient experiences of living with OA. The leaflets had different views on the causes of OA including the role of lifestyle and ageing. Most emphasised patient responsibility for preventing the progression of OA. Advice about changing behaviour such as diet and exercise was not grounded in lived experience. There were inconsistent messages about using painkillers, exercise and the need to involve professionals when making changes to lifestyle. Conclusion The nature of the discourse impacted on how OA and the respective roles of patients and professionals were depicted. Limited discourse on illness meant that the complexity of living with OA and its consequences was underestimated. Written information needs to shift from joint biology to helping patients live with osteoarthritis. Written information should incorporate patient

  8. Analgesic use in patients with knee and/or hip osteoarthritis referred to an outpatient center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knoop, Jesper; van Tunen, Joyce; van der Esch, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Although analgesics are widely recommended in current guidelines, underuse and inadequate prescription of analgesics seem to result in suboptimal treatment effects in patients with knee and/or hip osteoarthritis (OA). This study aimed (i) to describe the use of analgesics; and (ii) to determine...... factors that are related to analgesic use in patients with knee and/or hip OA referred to an outpatient center. A cross-sectional study with data from 656 patients with knee and/or hip OA referred to an outpatient center (Amsterdam Osteoarthritis (AMS-OA) cohort) was conducted. Self-reported use...

  9. Kinesiotape and quadriceps strengthening with elastic band in women with knee osteoarthritis and overweight or obesity. A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Ballesteros, Saúl; Espinosa-Morales, Rolando; Clark-Peralta, Patricia; Gómez-Pineda, Ascención Guadalupe; Guadarrama-Becerril, Jaime Horacio

    2018-04-07

    The beneficial effects of exercise in the treatment of Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee have been verified in several studies. Kinesiotaping (KT) has been popularized due to its reducing local pressure and increasing circulation, resulting in decreased pain. Determine the clinical effectiveness of strengthening therapy with KT in women with knee OA for pain reduction. Thirty two women with knee OA, aged 50-70 years, with overweight or obesity grade I, who were randomized into two groups: one with exercise and KT, and the other, with exercise and placebo technique. Both groups performed stretching and quadriceps strengthening exercise with the elastic band 3 days weekly for 6 weeks. Measurement of the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain subscale was taken as primary outcome. Stiffness and functionality of the same index and the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for pain intensity were measured. At the end of the study, there were no significant differences between the groups. Both groups had a difference of 2.7 points with respect to the baseline measurement, change percentage of 32.2% and 31.1% for placebo and experimental respectively (p=0.2). KT plus quadriceps strengthening exercise does not offer advantages for improvement of pain compared with quadriceps strengthening exercise alone in knee OA. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Espaola de Reumatologa y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatologa. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Prevalence of knee abnormalities in patients with osteoarthritis and anterior cruciate ligament injury identified with peripheral magnetic resonance imaging: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, H. [McMaster Univ., Dept. of Medical Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: wuh5@mcmaster.ca; Webber, C. [Hamilton Health Sciences, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); McMaster Univ., Dept. of Radiology, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Fuentes, C.O. [Hamilton Health Sciences, Dept. of Radiology, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Benson, R.; Beattie, K. [McMaster Univ., Dept. of Medical Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Adachi, J.D.; Xie, X. [McMaster Univ., Dept. of Medical Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Jabbari, F. [Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Levy, D.R. [McMaster Univ., Sports Medicine, Dept. of Family Medicine and Dept. of Medicine, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2007-06-15

    To assess, with a peripheral magnetic resonance imaging system (pMRI), the prevalence of bony and soft tissue abnormalities in the knee joints of normal subjects, osteoarthritis (OA) patients, and individuals who have suffered an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture; and 2) to compare the prevalence among groups. Magnetic resonance (MR) images of 28 healthy, 32 OA, and 26 ACL damaged knees were acquired with a 1.0-T pMRI system. Two radiologists grade the presence and severity of 9 MR image features: cartilage degeneration, osteophytes, subchondral cyst, bone marrow edema, meniscal abnormality, ligament integrity, loose bodies, popliteal cysts, and joint effusion. Ten of 28 healthy (35.7%), 24 of 26 ACL (92.3%), and all OA knees (100%) showed prevalent cartilage defects; 5 healthy (17.9%), 20 ACL (76.9%), and all OA knees (100%) had osteophytes; and 9 normal (32.1%), 21 ACL (80.8%), and 29 OA knees (90.6%) had meniscal abnormalities. One-half of the knees in the OA group (16 of 32, 50%) had subchondral cysts, and almost one-half had bone marrow edema (15 of 32, 46.9%). These features were not common in the ACL group (7.7%, and 11.5%, respectively) and were not observed in healthy knees. The OA group had the most severe cartilage defects, osteophytes, bone marrow edema, subchondral cysts, and meniscal abnormalities; the ACL group showed more severe cartilage defects, osteophytes, and meniscal abnormalities than did normal subjects. The results suggest that knees that have sustained ACL damage have OA-like features, most subjects (19 of 26, 73.1%) could be identified as in the early stage of OA. The prominent abnormalities present in ACL-damaged knees are cartilage defects, osteophytes, and meniscal abnormalities. (author)

  11. Prevalence of knee abnormalities in patients with osteoarthritis and anterior cruciate ligament injury identified with peripheral magnetic resonance imaging: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, H.; Webber, C.; Fuentes, C.O.; Benson, R.; Beattie, K.; Adachi, J.D.; Xie, X.; Jabbari, F.; Levy, D.R.

    2007-01-01

    To assess, with a peripheral magnetic resonance imaging system (pMRI), the prevalence of bony and soft tissue abnormalities in the knee joints of normal subjects, osteoarthritis (OA) patients, and individuals who have suffered an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture; and 2) to compare the prevalence among groups. Magnetic resonance (MR) images of 28 healthy, 32 OA, and 26 ACL damaged knees were acquired with a 1.0-T pMRI system. Two radiologists grade the presence and severity of 9 MR image features: cartilage degeneration, osteophytes, subchondral cyst, bone marrow edema, meniscal abnormality, ligament integrity, loose bodies, popliteal cysts, and joint effusion. Ten of 28 healthy (35.7%), 24 of 26 ACL (92.3%), and all OA knees (100%) showed prevalent cartilage defects; 5 healthy (17.9%), 20 ACL (76.9%), and all OA knees (100%) had osteophytes; and 9 normal (32.1%), 21 ACL (80.8%), and 29 OA knees (90.6%) had meniscal abnormalities. One-half of the knees in the OA group (16 of 32, 50%) had subchondral cysts, and almost one-half had bone marrow edema (15 of 32, 46.9%). These features were not common in the ACL group (7.7%, and 11.5%, respectively) and were not observed in healthy knees. The OA group had the most severe cartilage defects, osteophytes, bone marrow edema, subchondral cysts, and meniscal abnormalities; the ACL group showed more severe cartilage defects, osteophytes, and meniscal abnormalities than did normal subjects. The results suggest that knees that have sustained ACL damage have OA-like features, most subjects (19 of 26, 73.1%) could be identified as in the early stage of OA. The prominent abnormalities present in ACL-damaged knees are cartilage defects, osteophytes, and meniscal abnormalities. (author)

  12. Presence, location, type and size of denuded areas of subchondral bone in the knee as a function of radiographic stage of OA - data from the OA initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frobell, R B; Wirth, W; Nevitt, M; Wyman, B T; Benichou, O; Dreher, D; Davies, R Y; Lee, J H; Baribaud, F; Gimona, A; Hudelmaier, M; Cotofana, S; Eckstein, F

    2010-05-01

    To assess the presence, location, type and size of denuded areas of subchondral bone (dAB) in the femorotibial joint, measured quantitatively with 3T MRI, in a large subset of OAI participants. One knee of 633 subjects (250 men, 383 women, aged 61.7+/-9.6 y) were studied, spanning all radiographic osteoarthritis (OA) stages. dABs were determined quantitatively using segmentations of coronal FLASHwe images, representing areas where the subchondral bone was not covered by cartilage. Post hoc visual examination of segmented images determined whether dABs represented full thickness cartilage loss or internal osteophyte. 7% Of the knees were Kellgren & Lawrence (KL) grade 0, 6% grade 1, 41% grade 2, 41% grade 3, and 5% grade 4. 39% Of the participants (48% of the men and 33% of the women) displayed dABs; 61% of the dABs represented internal osteophytes. 1/47 Participants with KL grade 0 displayed 'any' dAB whereas 29/32 of the KL grade 4 knees were affected. Even as early as KL grade 1, 29% of the participants showed dABs. There were significant relationships of dAB with increasing KL grades (Posteophytes were more frequent laterally (mainly posterior tibia and internal femur) whereas full thickness cartilage loss was more frequent medially (mainly external tibia and femur). dABs occur already at earliest stages of radiographic OA (KL grades 1 and 2) and become more common (and larger) with increasing disease severity. Almost all KL grade 4 knees exhibited dABs, with cartilage loss being more frequent than internal osteophytes. Copyright 2010 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Do radiographic disease and pain account for why people with or at high risk of knee osteoarthritis do not meet physical activity guidelines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Daniel K; Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Felson, David T; Gross, K Douglas; Niu, Jingbo; Nevitt, Michael; Lewis, Cora E; Torner, James; Neogi, Tuhina

    2013-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) and pain are assumed to be barriers to meeting physical activity guidelines, but this has not been formally evaluated. The purpose of this study was to determine the proportions of people with and those without knee OA and knee pain who meet recommended physical activity levels through walking. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of community-dwelling adults from the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study who had or who were at high risk of knee OA. Participants wore a StepWatch activity monitor to record steps per day for 7 days. The proportion of participants who met the recommended physical activity levels was defined as those accumulating≥150 minutes per week at ≥100 steps per minute in bouts lasting ≥10 minutes. These proportions were also determined for those with and those without knee OA, as classified by radiography and by severity of knee pain. Of the 1,788 study participants (mean±SD age 67.2±7.7 years, mean±SD body mass index 30.7±6.0 kg/m2, 60% women), lower overall percentages of participants with radiographic knee OA and knee pain met recommended physical activity levels. However, these differences were not statistically significant between those with and those without knee OA; 7.3% and 10.1% of men (P=0.34) and 6.3% and 7.8% of women (P=0.51), respectively, met recommended physical activity levels. Similarly, for those with moderate/severe knee pain and those with no knee pain, 12.9% and 10.9% of men (P=0.74) and 6.7% and 11.0% of women (P=0.40), respectively, met recommended physical activity levels. Disease and pain have little impact on achieving recommended physical activity levels among people with or at high risk of knee OA. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  14. New application of 18F-fluoride PET for the detection of bone remodeling in early-stage osteoarthritis of the hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Naomi; Inaba, Yutaka; Tateishi, Ukihide; Yukizawa, Yohei; Ike, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Tomio; Saito, Tomoyuki

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies have reported the acceleration of subchondral bone remodeling during the development of osteoarthritis (OA). However, it is not possible to evaluate such molecular abnormalities using conventional radiographic techniques. We have applied 18F-fluoride PET to the analysis of painful or dysplastic hips at various stages of OA and then compared this with radiographic findings and clinical findings. A consecutive series of 65 joints from 48 patients (average age, 40 years; range, 19-72 years) with a hip joint complaint or radiographic dysplastic hip were enrolled in this study. Twenty-five contralateral joints without any evidence of OA or clinical symptoms were assigned as a normal control group. Radiographic evaluations were performed on the basis of Kellgren and Lawrence grade and the minimum joint space. Clinical evaluations were performed using the grading scale for pain severity and the SUVmax was measured for each joint. The association between SUVmax and the radiographic or clinical findings was evaluated. 18F-fluoride PET shows a significantly higher uptake value for progressive-stage OA cases than for early-stage cases and also shows a significantly higher uptake value in cases with severe pain. Even in early-OA-stage patients who do not show joint space narrowing on a plain x-ray, cases with severe pain show a significantly higher uptake value. 18F-fluoride PET has great potential as an imaging method for diagnosing early-stage OA without any marked radiographic changes.

  15. The relationship between clinical characteristics, radiographic osteoarthritis and 3D bone area: data from the osteoarthritis initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, A J; Dube, B; Hensor, E M A; Kingsbury, S R; Peat, G; Bowes, M A; Conaghan, P G

    2014-10-01

    Radiographic measures of osteoarthritis (OA) are based upon two dimensional projection images. Active appearance modelling (AAM) of knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables accurate, 3D quantification of joint structures in large cohorts. This cross-sectional study explored the relationship between clinical characteristics, radiographic measures of OA and 3D bone area (tAB). Clinical data and baseline paired radiographic and MRI data, from the medial compartment of one knee of 2588 participants were obtained from the NIH Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI). The medial femur (MF) and tibia (MT) tAB were calculated using AAM. 'OA-attributable' tAB (OA-tAB) was calculated using data from regression models of tAB of knees without OA. Associations between OA-tAB and radiographic measures of OA were investigated using linear regression. In univariable analyses, height, weight, and age in female knees without OA explained 43.1%, 32.1% and 0.1% of the MF tAB variance individually and 54.4% when included simultaneously in a multivariable model. Joint space width (JSW), osteophytes and sclerosis explained just 5.3%, 14.9% and 10.1% of the variance of MF OA-tAB individually and 17.4% when combined. Kellgren Lawrence (KL) grade explained approximately 20% of MF OA-tAB individually. Similar results were seen for MT OA-tAB. Height explained the majority of variance in tAB, confirming an allometric relationship between body and joint size. Radiographic measures of OA, derived from a single radiographic projection, accounted for only a small amount of variation in 3D knee OA-tAB. The additional structural information provided by 3D bone area may explain the lack of a substantive relationship with these radiographic OA measures. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Increased pain sensitivity but normal function of exercise induced analgesia in hip and knee osteoarthritis - treatment effects of neuromuscular exercise and total joint replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosek, E; Roos, Ewa M.; Ageberg, E

    2013-01-01

    To assess exercise induced analgesia (EIA) and pain sensitivity in hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) and to study the effects of neuromuscular exercise and surgery on these parameters.......To assess exercise induced analgesia (EIA) and pain sensitivity in hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) and to study the effects of neuromuscular exercise and surgery on these parameters....

  17. The Role of Neuromuscular Changes in Aging and Knee Osteoarthritis on Dynamic Postural Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takacs, Judit; Carpenter, Mark G.; Garland, S. Jayne; Hunt, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic joint condition, with 30% of those over the age of 75 exhibiting severe radiographic disease. Nearly 50% of those with knee OA have experienced a fall in the past year. Falls are a considerable public health concern, with a high risk of serious injury and a significant socioeconomic impact. The ability to defend against a fall relies on adequate dynamic postural control, and alterations in dynamic postural control are seen with normal aging. Neuromuscular changes associated with aging may be responsible for some of these alterations in dynamic postural control. Even greater neuromuscular deficits, which may impact dynamic postural control and the ability to defend against a fall, are seen in people with knee OA. There is little evidence to date on how knee OA affects the ability to respond to and defend against falls and the neuromuscular changes that contribute to balance deficits. As a result, this review will: summarize the key characteristics of postural responses to an external perturbation, highlight the changes in dynamic postural control seen with normal aging, review the neuromuscular changes associated with aging that have known and possible effects on dynamic postural control, and summarize the neuromuscular changes and balance problems in knee OA. Future research to better understand the role of neuromuscular changes in knee OA and their effect on dynamic postural control will be suggested. Such an understanding is critical to the successful creation and implementation of fall prevention and treatment programs, in order to reduce the excessive risk of falling in knee OA. PMID:23696951

  18. Osteoarthritis in the cat: 1. how common is it and how easy to recognise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, David; Zainal Ariffin, Siti Mariam bt; Johnston, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is very common, particularly in older cats, but its clinical significance has largely gone unrecognised until recently. As in other species, OA is often painful and appropriate treatment is required to improve the animal's quality of life. Most cases appear to be primary or idiopathic. It is important for the clinician to actively seek these cases in the practice population. The recognition of chronic arthritic pain is a major challenge since most cats will not exhibit lameness. The main features of feline OA are changes in behaviour and lifestyle, which develop gradually and which owners tend to interpret as simply being the effects of old age. A meaningful physical orthopaedic examination can be difficult to achieve. A lack of familiarity with feline joint radiographs, and the fact that major cartilage pathology can be present in the absence of any bony change, mean that radiographic identification of OA in the cat can also be problematic. CLIENT QUESTIONNAIRE: The recognition of chronic arthritic pain in the cat is based on owner questionnaires designed to elicit information about changes in mobility, activity levels, grooming habits and general demeanour. Several publications now report on the significance of behavioural and lifestyle changes as indicators of chronic arthritic pain in the cat. However, there is not as yet a fully validated owner-based questionnaire for recognising chronic pain in the cat. Furthermore, the aetiopathogenesis of feline OA still requires detailed investigation. Such studies are likely to make a major contribution to comparative rheumatology, since feline OA, more so than the canine disease, shows many similarities with human OA.

  19. Criteria for selection and application of molecular markers for clinical studies of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otterness, I G; Swindell, A C

    2003-03-01

    To develop criteria for the selection and application of molecular markers for the study of osteoarthritis (OA). Statistical criteria for marker selection for OA are developed. After studying more than 20 different molecular markers for monitoring OA, procedures for choosing markers for clinical studies have been developed. For a particular study, the process starts with the markers showing 'face-validity' for monitoring OA. They are next required to successfully distinguish OA patients from controls. This necessitates definition of the distribution of marker values in OA patients and controls. So far, they have been consistently log-normal. The difference (Delta) in marker values between OA and controls defines the opportunity for marker improvement. The between-visit standard deviation (S) in patients puts limits on the detection of marker changes. The two variables can be combined to estimate the practicality of a marker using a modified power analysis. The number of patients (N*) required to observe a 50% improvement with an alpha level of P=0.05 and with 80% certainty is estimated as 50(S/Delta)(2). N*, S and Delta should be used to characterize and compare markers. Marker efficiency can be refined by regressing on secondary variables, such as age, sex, BMI, severity, etc. Finally, the use of two or more markers may be required to improve marker prediction of clinical outcome. Correlated markers can be used to reinforce conclusions by essentially adding replicative data. Independent, complementary markers can be used to develop associations with clinical parameters, and perhaps diagnose and monitor disease status, activities that so far have not been possible with single markers.

  20. A measure of treatment response: patient and physician satisfaction with traditional NSAIDs for osteoarthritis control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Stephanie D; Everett, Sharlette V; Taylor, Thomas N; Watson, Douglas J; Taylor-Stokes, Gavin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The clinical response to traditional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (tNSAIDs) varies substantially. The objective of this study was to describe physicians’ and patients’ perceptions of response to tNSAIDs as measured by satisfaction with control of patients’ osteoarthritis (OA). Patients and methods A cross-sectional survey was undertaken in 2009 in Germany, Spain, and the UK. Linked physician and patient questionnaires collected data on OA management, degree of pain and disability, and satisfaction with OA control. Results The study included 363 treating physicians and 713 patients receiving tNSAIDs. Patient mean (standard deviation) age was 65.5 (11.0) years (range 36–94 years); 60% were women; 86% were white; and one-quarter were obese. Dissatisfaction with control of patients’ OA was expressed by physicians or their patients, or both, for 51% of patients, including 208 patients (31%) with mild OA and 478 patients (60%) with moderate or severe OA. Overall, 37% of patients reported dissatisfaction and 34% had a physician who reported dissatisfaction. Patient and physician assessments were the same in 70% of cases; Cohen’s κ coefficient was 0.34 (95% confidence interval 0.26–0.41), indicating fair agreement. Of those reporting dissatisfaction, most physicians (79%) and patients (64%) believed that the current control was the best that could be achieved. The most common reasons for which physicians reported dissatisfaction were inadequate response (56%), side effects (11.1%), and poor tolerance (7.8%). Conclusion One-half of patients or their treating physicians were dissatisfied with the control of OA provided by tNSAID therapy; moreover, most believed it was the best control that could be achieved. PMID:27790025

  1. Role of subchondral bone properties and changes in development of load-induced osteoarthritis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebayo, O O; Ko, F C; Wan, P T; Goldring, S R; Goldring, M B; Wright, T M; van der Meulen, M C H

    2017-12-01

    Animal models recapitulating post-traumatic osteoarthritis (OA) suggest that subchondral bone (SCB) properties and remodeling may play major roles in disease initiation and progression. Thus, we investigated the role of SCB properties and its effects on load-induced OA progression by applying a tibial loading model on two distinct mouse strains treated with alendronate (ALN). Cyclic compression was applied to the left tibia of 26-week-old male C57Bl/6 (B6, low bone mass) and FVB (high bone mass) mice. Mice were treated with ALN (26 μg/kg/day) or vehicle (VEH) for loading durations of 1, 2, or 6 weeks. Changes in articular cartilage and subchondral and epiphyseal cancellous bone were analyzed using histology and microcomputed tomography. FVB mice exhibited thicker cartilage, a thicker SCB plate, and higher epiphyseal cancellous bone mass and tissue mineral density than B6 mice. Loading induced cartilage pathology, osteophyte formation, and SCB changes; however, lower initial SCB mass and stiffness in B6 mice did not attenuate load-induced OA severity compared to FVB mice. By contrast, FVB mice exhibited less cartilage damage, and slower-growing and less mature osteophytes. In B6 mice, inhibiting bone remodeling via ALN treatment exacerbated cartilage pathology after 6 weeks of loading, while in FVB mice, inhibiting bone remodeling protected limbs from load-induced cartilage loss. Intrinsically lower SCB properties were not associated with attenuated load-induced cartilage loss. However, inhibiting bone remodeling produced differential patterns of OA pathology in animals with low compared to high SCB properties, indicating that these factors do influence load-induced OA progression. Copyright © 2017 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Adaptation and validation of the Osteoarthritis Knee and Hip Quality of Life (OAKHQOL) questionnaire for use in patients with osteoarthritis in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez Sáenz de Tejada, Marta; Escobar, Antonio; Herdman, Michael; Herrera, Carmen; García, Lidia; Sarasqueta, Cristina

    2011-12-01

    This study aims to adapt and validate the Spanish version of the Osteoarthritis Knee and Hip Quality of Life (OAKHQOL) questionnaire. The OAKHQOL was adapted into Spanish using a forward-backward translation methodology. The Spanish version was then validated in a prospective, mixed-design study of 759 patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA). Patients completed the OAKHQOL, Short Form 36 (SF-36), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, and the EQ-5D. The internal consistency was evaluated using Cronbach's alpha. Convergent validity was assessed by examining correlations between the OAKHQOL and other patient-reported instruments; known groups' validity was assessed by determining the capacity of the OAKHQOL to discriminate between patients with different levels of disease severity measured using the Lequesne Index. Test-retest reliability was evaluated by calculating the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for all OAKHQOL domains in 409 stable patients with OA. Responsiveness was evaluated by calculating effect sizes among 129 patients undergoing hip or knee replacement. Cronbach's alpha for the five domains of the OAKHQOL ranged from 0.60 to 0.93 while ICCs ranged from 0.75 to 0.81 for all domains except the two social domains. Statistically significant differences (p < 0.001) were observed between patients with different degrees of disease severity on all domains except "social support". The instrument showed convergent validity among hypothesized domains (p < 0.001). Results of the study supported that the Spanish version OAKHQOL questionnaire was a valid instrument to measure health-related quality of life in patients with OA of the lower limb.

  3. Randomized, controlled clinical trial evaluating the efficacy of pulsed signal therapy in dogs with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Meghan O; Gordon-Evans, Wanda J; Knap, Kim E; Evans, Richard B

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of pulsed signal therapy (PST) in reducing pain and increasing function in dogs with osteoarthritis (OA) using a randomized, blinded, controlled clinical trial. Randomized, controlled, blinded clinical trial. Adult dogs (n = 60) with moderate-to-severe clinical signs of OA. Dogs were randomized by age into 2 groups: dogs ≥ 9 years and dogs Goniometry and gait analysis were performed, and the Canine Brief Pain Inventory (CBPI) questionnaire was given to the owners to fill out without supervision. Outcome measures were repeated at the end of treatment (Day 11) and 6 weeks after beginning treatment (Day 42). The PST group performed significantly better than the control group as measured by the CBPI Severity and Interference scores (P Veterinary Surgeons.

  4. T1rho MRI of menisci and cartilage in patients with osteoarthritis at 3T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ligong, E-mail: ligong.wang@nyumc.org [Quantitative Multinuclear Musculoskeletal Imaging Group (QMMIG), Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Chang, Gregory, E-mail: gregory.chang@nyumc.org [Quantitative Multinuclear Musculoskeletal Imaging Group (QMMIG), Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Xu, Jian, E-mail: jian.xu.sz@siemens.com [Siemens HealthCare, New York, NY (United States); Vieira, Renata L.R., E-mail: Renata.Vieira@nyumc.org [Quantitative Multinuclear Musculoskeletal Imaging Group (QMMIG), Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Krasnokutsky, Svetlana, E-mail: Svetlana.Krasnokutsky@nyumc.org [Division of Rheumatology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Abramson, Steven, E-mail: StevenB.Abramson@nyumc.org [Division of Rheumatology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Regatte, Ravinder R., E-mail: Ravinder.Regatte@nyumc.org [Quantitative Multinuclear Musculoskeletal Imaging Group (QMMIG), Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Objective: To assess and compare subregional and whole T1rho values (median ± interquartile range) of femorotibial cartilage and menisci in patients with doubtful (Kellgren–Lawrence (KL) grade 1) to severe (KL4) osteoarthritis (OA) at 3T. Materials and methods: 30 subjects with varying degrees of OA (KL1–4, 13 females, 17 males, mean age ± SD = 63.9 ± 13.1 years) were evaluated on a 3T MR scanner using a spin-lock-based 3D GRE sequence for T1rho mapping. Clinical proton density (PD)-weighted fast spin echo (FSE) images in sagittal (without fat saturation), axial, and coronal (fat-saturated) planes were acquired for cartilage and meniscus Whole-organ MR imaging score (WORMS) grading. Wilcoxon rank sum test was performed to determine whether there were any statistically significant differences between subregional and whole T1rho values of femorotibial cartilage and menisci in subjects with doubtful to severe OA. Results: Lateral (72 ± 10 ms, median ± interquartile range) and medial (65 ± 10 ms) femoral anterior cartilage subregions in moderate–severe OA subjects had significantly higher T1rho values (P < 0.05) than cartilage subregions and whole femorotibial cartilage in doubtful–minimal OA subjects. There were statistically significant differences in meniscus T1rho values of the medial posterior subregion of subjects with moderate–severe OA and T1rho values of all subregions and the whole meniscus in subjects with doubtful–minimal OA. When evaluated based on WORMS, statistically significant differences were identified in T1rho values between the lateral femoral anterior cartilage subregion in patients with WORMS5–6 (advanced degeneration) and whole femorotibial cartilage and all cartilage subregions in patients with WORMS0–1 (normal). Conclusion: T1rho values are higher in specific meniscus and femorotibial cartilage subregions. These findings suggest that regional damage of both femorotibial hyaline cartilage and menisci may be associated with

  5. T1rho MRI of menisci and cartilage in patients with osteoarthritis at 3T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ligong; Chang, Gregory; Xu, Jian; Vieira, Renata L.R.; Krasnokutsky, Svetlana; Abramson, Steven; Regatte, Ravinder R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess and compare subregional and whole T1rho values (median ± interquartile range) of femorotibial cartilage and menisci in patients with doubtful (Kellgren–Lawrence (KL) grade 1) to severe (KL4) osteoarthritis (OA) at 3T. Materials and methods: 30 subjects with varying degrees of OA (KL1–4, 13 females, 17 males, mean age ± SD = 63.9 ± 13.1 years) were evaluated on a 3T MR scanner using a spin-lock-based 3D GRE sequence for T1rho mapping. Clinical proton density (PD)-weighted fast spin echo (FSE) images in sagittal (without fat saturation), axial, and coronal (fat-saturated) planes were acquired for cartilage and meniscus Whole-organ MR imaging score (WORMS) grading. Wilcoxon rank sum test was performed to determine whether there were any statistically significant differences between subregional and whole T1rho values of femorotibial cartilage and menisci in subjects with doubtful to severe OA. Results: Lateral (72 ± 10 ms, median ± interquartile range) and medial (65 ± 10 ms) femoral anterior cartilage subregions in moderate–severe OA subjects had significantly higher T1rho values (P < 0.05) than cartilage subregions and whole femorotibial cartilage in doubtful–minimal OA subjects. There were statistically significant differences in meniscus T1rho values of the medial posterior subregion of subjects with moderate–severe OA and T1rho values of all subregions and the whole meniscus in subjects with doubtful–minimal OA. When evaluated based on WORMS, statistically significant differences were identified in T1rho values between the lateral femoral anterior cartilage subregion in patients with WORMS5–6 (advanced degeneration) and whole femorotibial cartilage and all cartilage subregions in patients with WORMS0–1 (normal). Conclusion: T1rho values are higher in specific meniscus and femorotibial cartilage subregions. These findings suggest that regional damage of both femorotibial hyaline cartilage and menisci may be associated with

  6. EULAR recommendations for the health professional's approach to pain management in inflammatory arthritis and osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geenen, Rinie; Overman, Cécile L; Christensen, Robin; Åsenlöf, Pernilla; Capela, Susana; Huisinga, Karen L; Husebø, Mai Elin P; Köke, Albère J A; Paskins, Zoe; Pitsillidou, Irene A; Savel, Carine; Austin, Judith; Hassett, Afton L; Severijns, Guy; Stoffer-Marx, Michaela; Vlaeyen, Johan W S; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Ryan, Sarah J; Bergman, Stefan

    2018-01-01

    Pain is the predominant symptom for people with inflammatory arthritis (IA) and osteoarthritis (OA) mandating the development of evidence-based recommendations for the health professional's approach to pain management. A multidisciplinary task force including professionals and patient

  7. Matrix Gla Protein polymorphism, but not concentrations, is associated with radiographic hand osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective. Factors associated with mineralization and osteophyte formation in osteoarthritis (OA) are incompletely understood. Genetic polymorphisms of matrix Gla protein (MGP), a mineralization inhibitor, have been associated clinically with conditions of abnormal calcification. We therefore evalua...

  8. Alterations to the subchondral bone architecture during osteoarthritis : bone adaptation versus endochondral bone formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, L.G.E.; Donkelaar, van C.C.; Rietbergen, van B.; Emans, P.J.; Ito, K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by loss of cartilage and alterations in subchondral bone architecture. Changes in cartilage and bone tissue occur simultaneously and are spatially correlated, indicating that they are probably related. We investigated two hypotheses regarding this

  9. Modifiable lifestyle factors are associated with lower pain levels in adults with knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Erin Connelly

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With no cure or effective treatments for osteoarthritis (OA, the need to identify modifiable factors to decrease pain and increase physical function is well recognized.

  10. EULAR recommendations for the non-pharmacological core management of hip and knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Linda; Hagen, Kåre B; Bijlsma, Johannes W J

    2013-01-01

    The objective was to develop evidence -based recommendations and a research and educational agenda for the non-pharmacological management of hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA). The multidisciplinary task force comprised 21 experts: nurses, occupational therapists, physiotherapists, rheumatologists...

  11. Validity and reliability of three definitions of hip osteoarthritis: cross sectional and longitudinal approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Reijman (Max); J.M.W. Hazes (Mieke); H.A.P. Pols (Huib); R.M.D. Bernsen (Roos); B.W. Koes (Bart); S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES: To compare the reliability and validity in a large open population of three frequently used radiological definitions of hip osteoarthritis (OA): Kellgren and Lawrence grade, minimal joint space (MJS), and Croft grade; and to investigate whether the

  12. Functional annotation of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis associated genes by integrative genome-wide gene expression profiling analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan-Chun Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA and osteoarthritis (OA are two major types of joint diseases that share multiple common symptoms. However, their pathological mechanism remains largely unknown. The aim of our study is to identify RA and OA related-genes and gain an insight into the underlying genetic basis of these diseases. METHODS: We collected 11 whole genome-wide expression profiling datasets from RA and OA cohorts and performed a meta-analysis to comprehensively investigate their expression signatures. This method can avoid some pitfalls of single dataset analyses. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: We found that several biological pathways (i.e., the immunity, inflammation and apoptosis related pathways are commonly involved in the development of both RA and OA. Whereas several other pathways (i.e., vasopressin-related pathway, regulation of autophagy, endocytosis, calcium transport and endoplasmic reticulum stress related pathways present significant difference between RA and OA. This study provides novel insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying this disease, thereby aiding the diagnosis and treatment of the disease.

  13. Impact of clinical osteoarthritis of the hip, knee and hand on self-rated health in six European countries : the European Project on OSteoArthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schoor, Natasja M; Zambon, S.; Castell, M.V; Cooper, C.; Denkinger, M.; Dennison, Elaine M; Edwards, Mark H; Herbolsheimer, F.; Maggi, S.; Sánchez-Martinez, M; Pedersen, Nancy L; Peter, R.; Schaap, L A; Rijnhart, J J M; van der Pas, S; Deeg, D J H

    PURPOSE: Osteoarthritis (OA) has been shown to be associated with decreased physical function, which may impact upon a person's self-rated health (SRH). Only a few studies have examined the association between OA and SRH in the general population, but to date none have used a clinical definition of

  14. Self-perceived weather sensitivity and joint pain in older people with osteoarthritis in six European countries: results from the European Project on OSteoArthritis (EPOSA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, E.J.; van der Pas, S.; Schaap, L.A.; Sanchez-Martinez, M.; Zambon, S.; Peter, R.; Pedersen, N.L.; Dennison, E.M.; Denkinger, M.; Castell, M.V; Siviero, P.; Herbolsheimer, F.; Edwards, M.H.; Otero, A.; Deeg, D.J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: People with osteoarthritis (OA) frequently report that their joint pain is influenced by weather conditions. This study aimed to examine whether there are differences in perceived joint pain between older people with OA who reported to be weather-sensitive versus those who did not in six

  15. The Influence of Weather Conditions on Joint Pain in Older People with Osteoarthritis: Results from the European Project on OSteoArthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, E.J.; Schaap, L.A.; Herbolsheimer, F.; Dennison, E.M.; Maggi, S.; Pedersen, N.L.; Castell, M.V; Denkinger, M.D.; Edwards, M.H.; Limongi, F.; Sanchez-Martinez, M.; Siviero, P.; Queipo, R.; Peter, R.; van der Pas, S.; Deeg, D.J.H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This study examined whether daily weather conditions, 3-day average weather conditions, and changes in weather conditions influence joint pain in older people with osteoarthritis (OA) in 6 European countries. Methods. Data from the population-based European Project on OSteoArthritis were

  16. Work Participation and Health Status in Early Osteoarthritis of the Hip and/or Knee : A Comparison Between the Cohort Hip and Cohort Knee and the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bieleman, H. J.; Oosterveld, F. G. J.; Oostveen, J. C. M.; Reneman, M. F.; Groothoff, J. W.

    Objective. To examine the work participation of Dutch people with early osteoarthritis (OA) in hips or knees and compare this with data from the American Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) cohort. The influence of health status and personal factors on work participation was analyzed. Methods. In the

  17. Effects of Vitamin D Supplementation during the Induction and Progression of Osteoarthritis in a Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. Castillo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies correlate low levels of vitamin D with the osteoarthritis (OA progression. Cytokines and metalloproteases play a major role in OA promoting the inflammation and degradation of the cartilage and can be induced through the Toll-like receptor (TLR pathway. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effect of vitamin D supplementation on the development of osteoarthritis (OA through examining the genetic regulation of TLRs, cytokines, and metalloproteases in chondrocytes as well as the wideness of cartilage in rats with OA. Our results demonstrate that the signaling through TLR-4 is a proinflammatory mechanism in osteoarthritis that drives the upregulation of MMP-3, IL-1β, and TNF-α gene expression, leading to cartilage degradation and inflammation. Vitamin D supplementation had a protective effect during the onset but not during the chronic stage of OA in the rat model.

  18. Melanocortin 1 receptor-signaling deficiency results in an articular cartilage phenotype and accelerates pathogenesis of surgically induced murine osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Julia; Seebach, Elisabeth; Hackmayer, Gerit; Greth, Carina; Bauer, Richard J; Kleinschmidt, Kerstin; Bettenworth, Dominik; Böhm, Markus; Grifka, Joachim; Grässel, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Proopiomelanocortin-derived peptides exert pleiotropic effects via binding to melanocortin receptors (MCR). MCR-subtypes have been detected in cartilage and bone and mediate an increasing number of effects in diathrodial joints. This study aims to determine the role of MC1-receptors (MC1) in joint physiology and pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA) using MC1-signaling deficient mice (Mc1re/e). OA was surgically induced in Mc1re/e and wild-type (WT) mice by transection of the medial meniscotibial ligament. Histomorphometry of Safranin O stained articular cartilage was performed with non-operated controls (11 weeks and 6 months) and 4/8 weeks past surgery. µCT-analysis for assessing epiphyseal bone architecture was performed as a longitudinal study at 4/8 weeks after OA-induction. Collagen II, ICAM-1 and MC1 expression was analysed by immunohistochemistry. Mc1re/e mice display less Safranin O and collagen II stained articular cartilage area compared to WT prior to OA-induction without signs of spontaneous cartilage surface erosion. This MC1-signaling deficiency related cartilage phenotype persisted in 6 month animals. At 4/8 weeks after OA-induction cartilage erosions were increased in Mc1re/e knees paralleled by weaker collagen II staining. Prior to OA-induction, Mc1re/e mice do not differ from WT with respect to bone parameters. During OA, Mc1re/e mice developed more osteophytes and had higher epiphyseal bone density and mass. Trabecular thickness was increased while concomitantly trabecular separation was decreased in Mc1re/e mice. Numbers of ICAM-positive chondrocytes were equal in non-operated 11 weeks Mc1re/e and WT whereas number of positive chondrocytes decreased during OA-progression. Unchallenged Mc1re/e mice display smaller articular cartilage covered area without OA-related surface erosions indicating that MC1-signaling is critical for proper cartilage matrix integrity and formation. When challenged with OA, Mc1re/e mice develop a more severe OA

  19. Osteoarthritis guidelines: Barriers to implementation and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira de Meneses, Sarah; Rannou, Francois; Hunter, David J

    2016-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of disability worldwide. Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) have been developed to facilitate improved OA management. Scientific communities worldwide have proposed CPGs for OA treatment. Despite the number of highly prominent guidelines available and their remarkable consistency, their uptake has been suboptimal. Possibly because of the multitude of barriers related to the implementation of CPGs. For example, different guidelines show contradictions, some lack evidence, and they lack a hierarchy or tools to facilitate their translation and application. Also, the guidelines do not acknowledge the effect of comorbidities on choosing the treatments. Finally, poor integration of multidisciplinary services within and across healthcare settings is a major barrier to the effective implementation of management guidelines. Here we describe the main problems related to the OA guidelines and some solutions so as to offer some guidance on the elaboration of future CPGs and their implementation in primary care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Symptomatic efficacy and safety of diacerein in the treatment of osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, E. M.; Bliddal, Henning; Schøndorff, P. K.

    2010-01-01

    To estimate the efficacy and safety of diacerein as a pain-reducing agent in the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA), using meta-analysis of published randomized placebo-controlled trials (RCTs).......To estimate the efficacy and safety of diacerein as a pain-reducing agent in the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA), using meta-analysis of published randomized placebo-controlled trials (RCTs)....

  1. Exercise increases interleukin-10 levels both intraarticularly and peri-synovially in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helmark, Ida C; Mikkelsen, Ulla R; Børglum, Jens

    2010-01-01

    The microdialysis method was applied to the human knee joint with osteoarthritis (OA) in order to reveal changes in biochemical markers of cartilage and inflammation, intraarticularly and in the synovium, in response to a single bout of mechanical joint loading.......The microdialysis method was applied to the human knee joint with osteoarthritis (OA) in order to reveal changes in biochemical markers of cartilage and inflammation, intraarticularly and in the synovium, in response to a single bout of mechanical joint loading....

  2. Translation and validation of Moroccan Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) osteoarthritis index in knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faik, A; Benbouazza, K; Amine, B; Maaroufi, H; Bahiri, R; Lazrak, N; Aboukal, R; Hajjaj-Hassouni, N

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the reliability and validity of the Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) in Moroccan patients with knee osteoarthritis. The WOMAC was translated and back translated to and from dialectal Arabic, pre-tested and reviewed by a committee following the Guillemin criteria. The Moroccan version of the WOMAC was administered twice during a 24-48 h interval to 71 Moroccan patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis, fulfilling the revised criteria of the American College of Rheumatology. The test-retest reliability was assessed using intra-class correlation coefficient, and the Bland and Altman method. Internal consistency was assessed by Cronbach's alpha coefficient. Construct validity was tested by correlating the WOMAC subscales with visual analogic scale (VAS) of pain, VAS of handicap, maximum distance walked and clinical characteristics. The Moroccan version of the WOMAC showed good reliability, with ICC values of the three dimensions: pain, stiffness and physical function being 0.80, 0.77 and 0.89, respectively. Bland and Altman analysis showed that means of differences did not differ significantly from 0 and that no systematic trend was observed. Internal consistency with Cronbach's alpha for pain was found to be 0.76, and its equivalents for stiffness and physical function subscales were evaluated at 0.76, 0.90, respectively. Construct validity showed statistically significant correlation with all WOMAC subscales and VAS of pain (rho=0.38, 0.42, 0.63 respectively, P<0.01). Correlation between VAS handicap (rho=0.38 P<0.001) and maximum distance walked (rho=-0.40, P<0.01) was observed with physical function subscale. There was no correlation between age, duration of disease, BMI and severity of pain and physical function in knee OA. The Moroccan version of the WOMAC is a comprehensible, reliable, and valid instrument to measure outcome in patients with knee OA.

  3. Osteoarthritis, Application of Physical Therapy Proceduers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dijana Avdić

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a group of overlapping disorders, which may have different aetiology but similar biological, morphologic and clinical outcome. In osteoarthritis, process will not encompass the joint cartilage only, but the entire joint, including sub-hondral bone, ligaments, capsule, and sinovial membrane and surrounding muscles. Osteoarthritis is a multi-factor disorder of sinovial joints, which occurs as result of mechanical and biological factors, which destabilise normal hondrocyte function, partitioning of cartilage, extra-cellular matrix and sub-hondral bone. The earliest changes, which are restricted to the joint cartilage surface only, do not cause any subjective feeling. The pain in arthrosis occurs (or re-occurs a bit later, Diagnosis will be determined based on clinical exam as well as signs and symptoms present. Symptomatic and functional treatment of osteoarthritis as one of rheumatic disorders must be taken throughout years, sometimes throughout a lifetime. It encompasses application of many medications and physical therapy procedures.

  4. Osteoarthritis Year in Review 2015: Clinical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Leena

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight clinical research in osteoarthritis. A literature search was conducted using PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/) with the search terms “osteoarthritis [All Fields] AND treatment [All Fields]” and the following limits activated: humans, English language, all adult 19+ years, published between April 1, 2014 and April 1, 2015. A second literature search was then conducted with the search terms “osteoarthritis [All Fields] AND epidemiology [All Fields]”, with the same limits. Reports of surgical outcome, case series, surgical technique, tissue sample or culture studies, trial protocols, and pilot studies were excluded. Of 1523, 148 were considered relevant. Among epidemiologic and observational clinical studies, themes included physical activity, early knee OA, and confidence/instability/falls. Symptom outcomes of pharmacologic treatments were reported for methotrexate, adalimumab, anti-nerve growth factor monoclonal antibodies, strontium ranelate, bisphosphonates, glucosamine, and chondroitin sulfate, and structural outcomes of pharmacologic treatments for strontium ranelate, recombinant human fibroblast growth factor 18, and glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate. Symptom outcomes of non-pharmacologic interventions were reported for: neuromuscular exercise, quadriceps strengthening, weight reduction and maintenance, TENS, therapeutic ultrasound, stepped care strategies, cognitive behavior therapy for sleep disturbance, acupuncture, gait modification, booster physical therapy, a web-based therapeutic exercise resource center for knee OA; hip physical therapy for hip OA; and joint protection and hand exercises for hand OA. Structure outcomes of non-pharmacologic interventions were reported for patellofemoral bracing. PMID:26707991

  5. Complementary and Alternative Exercises for Management of Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Chien Chyu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a chronic condition characterized by degeneration of cartilage and its underlying bone within a joint. With no cure currently available, the goals of treating OA are to alleviate pain, maintain, or improve joint mobility, increase the muscle strength of the joints, and minimize the disabling effects of the disease. Recent research has suggested that complementary and alternative medicine (CAM exercises may improve OA symptoms. This paper covers CAM mind-body exercises—Tai Chi, qigong, and yoga—for OA management and evaluates their benefits in pain reduction, muscle strength, physical function, stiffness, balance, fear of falling, self-efficacy, quality of life, and psychological outcomes in patients with OA, based on randomized controlled trials published. Findings from the literature suggest that CAM exercises demonstrate considerable promise in the management of OA. Future studies require rigorous randomized controlled trials with larger sample sizes.

  6. Osteoarthritis of the thumb carpometacarpal joint: Correlation of ultrasound appearances to disability and treatment response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallinson, P.I.; Tun, J.K.; Farnell, R.D.; Campbell, D.A.; Robinson, P.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate grading of thumb carpometacarpal joint (CMCJ) osteoarthritis (OA) using ultrasound, correlating findings with disability and treatment response. Materials and methods: Patients with symptomatic thumb OA attending for ultrasound-guided CMCJ steroid injection and a group of asymptomatic controls were recruited prospectively. Thumb CMCJ ultrasound was graded (osteophytes, joint-space narrowing, capsule size, and measured capsule size), and a Disabilities of the Arm Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire was completed for each patient. Symptomatic patients then underwent injection with DASH repeated 6 weeks post-treatment. Ultrasound features were correlated with the initial DASH disability score and response as defined by change in DASH 6 weeks after treatment. Results: Thirty-one patients with symptomatic OA and 37 asymptomatic controls were recruited. With the exception of osteophytes (p = 0.017), no statistically significant correlation was demonstrated between severity of ultrasound features and patient disability. However, all features demonstrated statistically significant higher grades in the symptomatic group compared to controls. Ultrasound grading did not have statistical correlation with treatment response. Conclusion: No correlation was found between the majority of ultrasound features and the clinical severity of OA or likely response to treatment. However, these features are significantly more common in the symptomatic population

  7. Characteristics and clinical implications of the pharmacokinetic profile of ibuprofen in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallelli, L; Galasso, O; Urzino, A; Saccà, S; Falcone, D; Palleria, C; Longo, P; Corigliano, A; Terracciano, R; Savino, R; Gasparini, G; De Sarro, G; Southworth, S R

    2012-12-01

    Ibuprofen is a non-selective cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-1/COX-2 inhibitor used to treat pain conditions and inflammation. Limited data have been published concerning the pharmacokinetic profile and clinical effects of ibuprofen in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). In this paper we compared the pharmacokinetic and clinical profile of ibuprofen (at a dosage of from 800 mg/day to 1800 mg/day) administered in patients affected by severe knee OA. Ibuprofen was administered for 7 days to patients who were scheduled to undergo knee arthroplasty due to OA. After 7 days, the ibuprofen concentration in plasma and synovial fluid was measured through both high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-UV and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC/MS), while clinical effects were evaluated through both visual analogue scale (VAS) and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) scores. The Naranjo scale and the WHO causality assessment scale were used for estimating the probability of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The severity of ADRs was assessed by the modified Hartwig and Siegel scale. Ibuprofen showed a dose-dependent diffusion in both plasma and synovial fluid, which was related to the reduction of pain intensity and improvement of health status, without the development of ADRs. Ibuprofen at higher dosages can be expected to provide better control of OA symptoms as a result of higher tissue distribution.

  8. Economic and Humanistic Burden of Osteoarthritis: A Systematic Review of Large Sample Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Feng; Kovic, Bruno; Jin, Xuejing; He, Xiaoning; Wang, Mengxiao; Silvestre, Camila

    2016-11-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) consumes a significant amount of healthcare resources, and impairs the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of patients. Previous reviews have consistently found substantial variations in the costs of OA across studies and countries. The comparability between studies was poor and limited the detection of the true differences between these studies. To review large sample studies on measuring the economic and/or humanistic burden of OA published since May 2006. We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE databases using comprehensive search strategies to identify studies reporting economic burden and HRQoL of OA. We included large sample studies if they had a sample size ≥1000 and measured the cost and/or HRQoL of OA. Reviewers worked independently and in duplicate, performing a cross-check between groups to verify agreement. Within- and between-group consolidation was performed to resolve discrepancies, with outstanding discrepancies being resolved by an arbitrator. The Kappa statistic was reported to assess the agreement between the reviewers. All costs were adjusted in their original currency to year 2015 using published inflation rates for the country where the study was conducted, and then converted to 2015 US dollars. A total of 651 articles were screened by title and abstract, 94 were reviewed in full text, and 28 were included in the final review. The Kappa value was 0.794. Twenty studies reported direct costs and nine reported indirect costs. The total annual average direct costs varied from US$1442 to US$21,335, both in USA. The annual average indirect costs ranged from US$238 to US$29,935. Twelve studies measured HRQoL using various instruments. The Short Form 12 version 2 scores ranged from 35.0 to 51.3 for the physical component, and from 43.5 to 55.0 for the mental component. Health utilities varied from 0.30 for severe OA to 0.77 for mild OA. Per-patient OA costs are considerable and a patient's quality of life remains poor. Variations in

  9. OAS1 polymorphisms are associated with susceptibility to West Nile encephalitis in horses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan J Rios

    Full Text Available West Nile virus, first identified within the United States in 1999, has since spread across the continental states and infected birds, humans and domestic animals, resulting in numerous deaths. Previous studies in mice identified the Oas1b gene, a member of the OAS/RNASEL innate immune system, as a determining factor for resistance to West Nile virus (WNV infection. A recent case-control association study described mutations of human OAS1 associated with clinical susceptibility to WNV infection. Similar studies in horses, a particularly susceptible species, have been lacking, in part, because of the difficulty in collecting populations sufficiently homogenous in their infection and disease states. The equine OAS gene cluster most closely resembles the human cluster, with single copies of OAS1, OAS3 and OAS2 in the same orientation. With naturally occurring susceptible and resistant sub-populations to lethal West Nile encephalitis, we undertook a case-control association study to investigate whether, similar to humans (OAS1 and mice (Oas1b, equine OAS1 plays a role in resistance to severe WNV infection. We identified naturally occurring single nucleotide mutations in equine (Equus caballus OAS1 and RNASEL genes and, using Fisher's Exact test, we provide evidence that mutations in equine OAS1 contribute to host susceptibility. Virtually all of the associated OAS1 polymorphisms were located within the interferon-inducible promoter, suggesting that differences in OAS1 gene expression may determine the host's ability to resist clinical manifestations associated with WNV infection.

  10. Compliance With the AAOS Guidelines for Treatment of Osteoarthritis of the Knee: A Survey of the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Victor Rex; Ong, Alvin Chua; Orozco, Fabio Ramiro; Hernandez, Victor Hugo; Lutz, Rex William; Post, Zachary Douglas

    2018-02-01

    The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) published a series of evidence-based guidelines for treatment of knee osteoarthritis (OA). We studied compliance with these guidelines among orthopaedic surgeons. We sent a survey to members of the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons. It included five clinical vignettes based on the Kellgren-Lawrence radiographic system for classification of knee OA. Respondents selected treatment currently supported or not supported by the AAOS guidelines. Of 345 responses, the frequency of use of recommended interventions was 80%, 82%, 21%, 50%, and 98% for OA at stages 0 through 4, respectively. For stage 2 and stage 3 OA, intra-articular hyaluronic acid was the most commonly selected intervention not recommended by the AAOS. Apparently, AAOS guidelines on the treatment of OA have not reached the orthopaedic community, resulting in lack of treatment consensus and continued use of modalities with no proven patient benefits. Management of moderate to severe knee OA does not align with AAOS guidelines. We encourage researchers to conduct clinical trials to identify the role of intra-articular corticosteroids in treating this condition.

  11. Evaluation of the novel avocado/soybean unsaponifiable Arthrocen to alter joint pain and inflammation in a rat model of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudarzi, Ramin; Reid, Allison; McDougall, Jason J

    2018-01-01

    Avocado/soybean unsaponifiables such as Arthrocen have been reported to reduce cartilage catabolism and chondrocytic synthesis of inflammatory mediators associated with osteoarthritis (OA). While there is some clinical evidence that avocado/soybean unsaponifiables can reduce OA pain, no preclinical studies have corroborated this observation. The present study determined whether addition of an avocado/soybean unsaponifiable (Arthrocen) to the drinking water of OA rats reduced direct and referred joint pain. OA was induced in male Wistar rats by intra-articular injection of sodium monoiodoacetate (MIA: 0.3mg) and animals were allowed to recover for 14 days. Arthrocen was added to the drinking water which was available to animals ad libitum. On day 30, joint pain was assessed by dynamic incapacitance while referred pain was determined by von Frey hair algesiometry. The joint damage induced by MIA injection was severe and was consistent with end-stage OA. Arthrocen consumption (approximately 35 mg/day) attenuated the joint oedema associated with MIA injection. Hindlimb weight bearing also significantly improved in Arthrocen-treated rats (P<0.05); however, von Frey hair mechanosensitivity was unaffected by this treatment. These data indicate that Arthrocen has the potential to reduce joint inflammation and pain associated with end-stage OA.

  12. Total knee replacement and non-surgical treatment of knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Søren T; Roos, Ewa M; Laursen, Mogens B

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare 2-year outcomes of total knee replacement (TKR) followed by non-surgical treatment to that of non-surgical treatment alone and outcomes of the same non-surgical treatment to that of written advice. DESIGN: In two randomized trials, 200 (mean age 66) adults with moderate...... to severe knee osteoarthritis (OA), 100 eligible for TKR and 100 not eligible for TKR, were randomized to TKR followed by non-surgical treatment, non-surgical treatment alone, or written advice. Non-surgical treatment consisted of 12 weeks of supervised exercise, education, dietary advice, use of insoles......, and pain medication. The primary outcome was the mean score of the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) subscales, covering pain, symptoms, activities of daily living (ADL), and quality of life (QOL). RESULTS: Patients randomized to TKR had greater improvements than patients randomized...

  13. Individual patient data meta-analysis of trials investigating the effectiveness of intra-articular glucocorticoid injections in patients with knee or hip osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Middelkoop, Marienke; Dziedzic, Krysia S; Doherty, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Based on small to moderate effect sizes for the wide range of symptomatic treatments in osteoarthritis (OA), and on the heterogeneity of OA patients, treatment guidelines for OA have stressed the need for research on clinical predictors of response to different treatments. A meta...

  14. Pain of osteoarthritis and bone uptake - is there a correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadhwa, S.S.; Carollan, M.; Abbati, D.; Chan, W.-L.; Bui, C.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: In patients with osteoarthritis bone scintigraphy is consistently reported as demonstrating mild, moderate or severe arthritis, particularly for the medial compartment of the knee, depending on the degree of uptake. Numerous studies however have not demonstrated a correlation between severity of bone scan findings and severity of osteoarthritis (OA) demonstrated at surgery or arthroscopy. In fact, most studies have not demonstrated any correlation between OA as assessed with imaging and subsequent surgical findings. The only positive correlation for outcome of OA of the knee appears to be the severity of pain. In this pilot study we investigate if there is correlation between pain and scintigraphic findings in medial compartment OA. 69 patients (18 - 87 years) without history of recent knee trauma or previous surgery for insertion of knee prosthesis who presented for a bone scan for any reasons were studied. All patients were asked to quantify any knee pain on a simple 4 point score i.e. no pain, non limiting pain, pain limiting daily activity and rest pain. Uptake in the medial compartment of the knee was quantified by measuring the count ratio between the medial compartment and the corresponding distal femur. 45 patients reported no pain, 20 reported non-limiting pain while 4 reported limiting pain. No patient reported pain at rest. In general pain was bilateral with no major differences. The mean knee/femur ratio for patients with no pain was 1.46 +/- 0.95 (N=90). Knee/femur ratio for patients with non-limiting pain was 1.77 +/- 0.57 (N=40) and for those with limiting pain it was 2.36 +/- 1.82 (N=8). Although the results were not statistically significant there was a clear trend towards a rising knee/femur ratio with increasing pain. The number of patients with knee pain was small and further study concentrating on this group would be required to assess the significance of the trend findings. Further study particularly in patients with significant

  15. Changes of articular cartilage and subchondral bone after extracorporeal shockwave therapy in osteoarthritis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ching-Jen; Cheng, Jai-Hong; Chou, Wen-Yi; Hsu, Shan-Ling; Chen, Jen-Hung; Huang, Chien-Yiu

    2017-01-01

    We assessed the pathological changes of articular cartilage and subchondral bone on different locations of the knee after extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) in early osteoarthritis (OA). Rat knees under OA model by anterior cruciate ligament transaction (ACLT) and medial meniscectomy (MM) to induce OA changes. Among ESWT groups, ESWT were applied to medial (M) femur (F) and tibia (T) condyles was better than medial tibia condyle, medial femur condyle as well as medial and lateral (L) tibia condyles in gross osteoarthritic areas (posteophyte formation and subchondral sclerotic bone (psubchondral bone repair in all ESWT groups compared to OA group (p T(M+L) > F(M) in OA rat knees.

  16. Direct and indirect economic costs among private-sector employees with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Ariel; Hartrick, Craig; Edelsberg, John; Sadosky, Alesia; Oster, Gerry

    2011-11-01

    To estimate direct and indirect economic costs among private-sector employees with osteoarthritis (OA). Using a large US employer benefits database, we identified all employees with evidence of OA during calendar year 2007, and compared their costs of health care and work loss to age-and-sex-matched employees without evidence of OA in that year. Private-sector employees with OA (n = 2399) averaged 62.9 days of absenteeism versus 36.7 days among matched comparators (n = 2399) (P Private-sector employees with OA have higher direct and indirect costs than those without this condition.

  17. Secondary Knee Osteoarthritis due to Neurofibromatosis Type 1 Treated with above the Knee Amputation: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Patel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF-1 has a variety of associated orthopaedic manifestations that have been previously reported. We report a case of severe, grade 4 knee osteoarthritis (OA with recurrent subluxation and joint laxity due to multiple extra-articular neurofibromas ultimately treated with Above the Knee Amputation (AKA. Case Description. A 39-year-old man presented with multiple neurofibromas and lymphedema leading to degenerative changes of the knee. Conservative treatment failed due to the severity of the knee degeneration and patient discomfort. Likewise, arthroplasty was not possible due to poor bone quality and joint instability. Therefore, AKA was selected to relieve symptoms and provide functional improvement. six months after the procedure the patient has increased functional capacity for ambulation and activities of daily living, as well as significant decrease in pain and discomfort. Clinical Relevance. Extra-articular neurofibromas causing severe secondary OA in relatively young patients can be functionally improved with AKA and prosthetic device use.

  18. Hyaline cartilage calcification of the first metatarsophalangeal joint is associated with osteoarthritis but independent of age and BMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, Jan; Hawellek, Thelonius; Hischke, Sandra; Bertrand, Jessica; Krause, Matthias; Püschel, Klaus; Rüther, Wolfgang; Niemeier, Andreas

    2016-11-15

    Hyaline cartilage calcification (CC) is associated with osteoarthritis (OA) in hip and knee joints. The first metatarsophalangeal joint (1 st MTPJ) is frequently affected by OA, but it is unclear if CC occurs in the 1 st MTPJ. The aim of the present study was to analyze the prevalence of CC of the 1 st MTPJ in the general population by high-resolution digital contact radiography (DCR) and to determine its association with histological OA severity, age and body mass index (BMI). 168 metatarsal heads of 84 donors (n = 47 male, n = 37 female; mean age 62.73 years, SD ±18.8, range 20-93) were analyzed by DCR for the presence of CC. Histological OA grade (hOA) by OARSI was analyzed in the central load-bearing zone of the first metatarsal head (1 st MH). Structural equation modeling (SEM) was performed to analyze the interrelationship between CC, hOA, age and BMI. The prevalence of CC of 1 st MH was 48.8 % (41/84) (95 %-CI [37.7 %, 60.0 %]), independent of the affected side (p = 0.42), gender (p = 0.41) and BMI (p = 0.51). The mean amount of CC of one MH correlated significantly with that of the contralateral side (r s  = 0.4, 95 %-CI [0.26, 0.52], p cartilage area) of the MH correlated significantly with the severity of hOA (r s  = 0.51, 95 %-CI [0.32, 0.65], p studies.

  19. Risk factors for fear of falling in elderly patients with severe knee osteoarthritis before and one year after total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsonga, Theano; Michalopoulou, Maria; Kapetanakis, Stylianos; Giovannopoulou, Eirini; Malliou, Paraskevi; Godolias, George; Soucacos, Panagiotis

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the regression of fear of falling (FOF) and identify its risk factors in patients with severe knee osteoarthritis before and one year after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). 11 men and 57 women with a mean age of 73 years and a mean body mass index of 30.36 kg/m2 who had severe (grade 3 or 4) knee osteoarthritis and knee pain of ≥1 year were included. Two weeks before and one year after TKA, patients were asked about their FOF status and falls history. Patients were asked to complete the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly, Short Form 36 (SF-36), and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) questionnaires. Clinical performance was assessed using the Berg Balance Scale and Timed Up and Go (TUG) test. Of the 68 patients, 56 (82.4%) had FOF preoperatively and 30 (44.1%) had FOF one year after TKA (p<0.001). The strongest predictors for FOF preoperatively were fallers (odds ratio [OR]=9.83, p=0.028), mental component summary (MCS) score of SF-36 (OR=0.88, p=0.024), and TUG (OR=3.4, p=0.013). The strongest predictors for FOF one year postoperatively were fallers (OR=16.51, p=0.041), patients with ≥2 chronic diseases (OR=17.33, p=0.011), physical function score of WOMAC (OR=1.015, p=0.005), and MCS score of SF-36 (OR=0.86, p=0.015). TKA positively affected FOF and gradually reduced the FOF rate over a year period after TKA in an elderly population.

  20. Community-Based Progressive Aquatic Exercise for the Management of Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayle Maryanna Masslon

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background We examined the feasibility and effectiveness of a community-based progressive aquatic exercise program for community dwelling older adults, with moderate to severe knee osteoarthritis (OA. Objectives The purposes of this study were to 1, assess the effects of a progressive aquatic exercise program on the walking ability, stair climbing ability, quadriceps muscle strength, as well as self-reported symptoms, function, and quality of life in community dwelling adults with moderate to severe knee OA and; 2, assess the feasibility of a community-based aquatic program for community dwelling adults with knee OA. Methods Seventeen volunteers (12 women (x = 61.1 years and 5 men (x = 69.0 years participated in a progressive 8 - 10 week aquatic exercise program, consisting of 20 - 24, 1-hour sessions. Outcome measures, acquired twice before beginning the exercise protocol as well as after 4 and 8 weeks of exercise, included the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS instrument, a 2 minute walk test (2MWT, a 10 step stair climb for time, and an isometric knee extension strength assessment. Results Significant improvements were detected in 2 MWT, 10 step stair climb, right quadriceps isometric force development, and the KOOS symptoms and stiffness subscale. Significant improvement was found on KOOS function subscales between baseline testing sessions and maintained at follow-up. Non-significant improvements were identified in left quadriceps isometric force development, KOOS pain, and KOOS quality of life. Conclusions These data suggest that a community-based, progressive aquatic exercise program is feasible and results in measurable improvements in function without worsening symptoms. Further study is warranted to investigate the impact of a longer program and the role of aquatic exercise in the long-term management of patients with knee OA.

  1. Dynamic weight-bearing assessment of pain in knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klokker, Louise; Christensen, Robin; Wæhrens, Eva Elisabet Ejlersen

    2016-01-01

    -minute-walk-test (6MWT), and 6-min-walk-test with subsequent pain rating (6MWTpain), and once with a transition questionnaire (TRANS-Q) for the patient-reported change in pain after 12 weeks of exercise. Construct validity (baseline-scores) and responsiveness (change-scores) were estimated by Spearman Correlation...... a standing position). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the construct validity, responsiveness, and interpretability of the DAP for knee osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: One-hundred participants with knee OA were tested twice each with the DAP, the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), six...

  2. Current and future impact of osteoarthritis on health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turkiewicz, A; Petersson, I F; Björk, J

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the current and future (to year 2032) impact of osteoarthritis (OA) health care seeking. METHOD: Population-based study with prospectively ascertained data from the Skåne Healthcare Register (SHR), Sweden, encompassing more than 15 million person-years of primary and specia......OBJECTIVE: To estimate the current and future (to year 2032) impact of osteoarthritis (OA) health care seeking. METHOD: Population-based study with prospectively ascertained data from the Skåne Healthcare Register (SHR), Sweden, encompassing more than 15 million person-years of primary...

  3. Gait changes in patients with knee osteoarthritis are replicated by experimental knee pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Aaboe, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by pain and associated with abnormal knee moments during walking. The relationship between knee OA pain and gait changes remains to be clarified, and a better understanding of this link could advance the treatment and prevention of disease...

  4. High plasma levels of vitamin C and E are associated with incident radiographic knee osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous studies suggest that the antioxidants vitamins C and E may protect against development of knee osteoarthritis (OA). We examined the association of circulating levels of vitamin C and E with incident whole knee radiographic OA (WKROA). We performed a nested case-control study of incident WKR...

  5. Which patients with osteoarthritis of hip and/or knee benefit most from behavorial graded activity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenhof, C.; Ende, C.H.M. van den; Dekker, J.; Köke, A.J.A.; Oostendorp, R.A.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.

    2007-01-01

    Our objective was to investigate whether behavioral graded activity (BGA) has particular benefit in specific subgroups of osteoarthritis (OA) patients. Two hundred participants with OA of hip or knee, or both (clinical American College of Rheumatology, ACR, criteria) participated in a randomized

  6. Prediction of progression of radiographic knee osteoarthritis using tibial trabecular bone texture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woloszynski, T; Podsiadlo, P; Stachowiak, G W

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE.: To develop a system for prediction of progression of radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA) using tibial trabecular bone (TB) texture. METHODS.: We studied 203 knees with (n=68) or without (n=135) radiographic tibiofemoral OA in 105 subjects (90 men, 15 women, mean age 54 years) who ha...

  7. Which patients with osteoarthritis of hip and/or knee benefit most from behavioral graded activity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenhof, C.; Ende, C.H.M. van den; Dekker, J.; Kiike, A.J.; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.

    2007-01-01

    Our objective was to investigate whether behavioral graded activity (BGA) has particular benefit in specific subgroups of osteoarthritis (OA) patients. Two hundred participants with OA of hip or knee, or both (clinical American College of Rheumatology, ACR, criteria) participated in a randomized

  8. T2* measurement of the knee articular cartilage in osteoarthritis at 3T

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Newbould, Rexford D.; Miller, Sam R.; Toms, Laurence D.; Swann, Peter; Tielbeek, Jeroen A. W.; Gold, Garry E.; Strachan, Robin K.; Taylor, Peter C.; Matthews, Paul M.; Brown, Andrew P.

    2012-01-01

    To measure reproducibility, longitudinal and cross-sectional differences in T2* maps at 3 Tesla (T) in the articular cartilage of the knee in subjects with osteoarthritis (OA) and healthy matched controls. MRI data and standing radiographs were acquired from 33 subjects with OA and 21 healthy

  9. Effectiveness of exercise therapy in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baar, M.E. van; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Dekker, J.; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.

    1999-01-01

    Objectives: To review the effectiveness of exercise therapy in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip of knee. Methods: A computerized literature search of Medline, Embase, and Cinahl was carried out. Randomized clinical trials on exercise therapy for OA of the hip of knee were selected if

  10. Comparative lipidomic analysis of synovial fluid in human and canine osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosinska, M. K.; Mastbergen, S. C.; Liebisch, G.; Wilhelm, J.; Dettmeyer, R. B.; Ishaque, B.; Rickert, M.; Schmitz, G.; Lafeber, F. P.; Steinmeyer, J.

    Objective: The lipid profile of synovial fluid (SF) is related to the health status of joints. The early stages of human osteoarthritis (OA) are poorly understood, which larger animals are expected to be able to model closely. This study examined whether the canine groove model of OA represents

  11. The critical shoulder angle is associated with osteoarthritis in the shoulder but not rotator cuff tears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnison, Arnar O; Sørensen, Thomas J; Kallemose, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2013 Moor et al introduced the concept of the critical shoulder angle (CSA) and suggested that an abnormal CSA was a leading factor in development of rotator cuff tear (RCT) and osteoarthritis (OA) of the shoulder. This study assessed whether the CSA was associated with RCT and OA...

  12. Differences in Osteoarthritis Self-Management Support Intervention Outcomes According to Race and Health Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperber, Nina R.; Bosworth, Hayden B.; Coffman, Cynthia J.; Lindquist, Jennifer H.; Oddone, Eugene Z.; Weinberger, Morris; Allen, Kelli D.

    2013-01-01

    We explored whether the effects of a telephone-based osteoarthritis (OA) self-management support intervention differed by race and health literacy. Participants included 515 veterans with hip and/or knee OA. Linear mixed models assessed differential effects of the intervention compared with health education (HE) and usual care (UC) on pain…

  13. Bone structural changes in osteoarthritis as a result of mechanoregulated bone adaptation: a modeling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, L.G.E.; Rietbergen, van B.; Donkelaar, van C.C.; Ito, K.

    2011-01-01

    Objective There are strong indications that subchondral bone may play an important role in osteoarthritis (OA), making it an interesting target for medical therapies. The subchondral bone structure changes markedly during OA, and it has long been assumed that this occurs secondary to cartilage

  14. Decreased bone tissue mineralization can partly explain subchondral sclerosis observed in osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, L.G.E.; Donkelaar, van C.C.; Rietbergen, van B.; Emans, P.J.; Ito, K.

    2012-01-01

    For many years, pharmaceutical therapies for osteoarthritis (OA) were focused on cartilage. However, it has been theorized that bone changes such as increased bone volume fraction and decreased bone matrix mineralization may play an important role in the initiation and pathogenesis of OA as well.

  15. Comparison of manual therapy and exercise therapy in osteoarthritis of the hip: a randomized clinical trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksma, H.L.; Dekker, J.; Ronday, H.K.; Heering, A.; Lubbe, N. van der; Vel, C.; Breedveld, F.C.; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of a manual therapy program compared with an exercise therapy program in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip. METHODS: A single-blind, randomized clinical trial of 109 hip OA patients was carried out in the outpatient clinic for physical therapy of

  16. Prevention of Incident Knee Osteoarthritis by Moderate Weight Loss in Overweight and Obese Females

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Runhaar (Jos); B.C. de Vos (Bastiaan); M. van Middelkoop (Marienke); D. Vroegindeweij (Dammis); E.H.G. Oei (Edwin); S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstract__Objective:__ This study evaluated the effect of moderate weight loss on the incidence of knee osteoarthritis (OA) in middle-aged overweight and obese women, without clinical and radiologic knee OA at baseline. __Methods:__ A total of 353 women (87%) with followup data available

  17. The longitudinal reliability and responsiveness of the OMERACT Hand Osteoarthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scoring System (HOAMRIS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugen, Ida K.; Eshed, Iris; Gandjbakhch, Frederique

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the interreader reliability of change scores and the responsiveness of the OMERACT Hand Osteoarthritis (OA) Magnetic Resonance Image (MRI) Scoring System (HOAMRIS). Methods. Paired MRI (baseline and 5-yr followup) from 20 patients with hand OA were scored with known time se...

  18. High LDL levels lead to increased synovial inflammation and accelerated ectopic bone formation during experimental osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munter, W. de; Bosch, M.H. van den; Sloetjes, A.W.; Croce, K.J.; Vogl, T.; Roth, J.; Koenders, M.I.; Loo, F.A.J. van de; Berg, W.B. van den; Kraan, P.M. van der; Lent, P.L.E.M. van

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A relation between osteoarthritis (OA) and increased cholesterol levels is apparent. In the present study we investigate OA pathology in apolipoprotein E (ApoE)(-)(/-) mice with and without a cholesterol-rich diet, a model for high systemic low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels

  19. Patient information and emotional needs across the hip osteoarthritis continuum: a qualitative study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brembo, E.A.; Kapstad, H.; Eide, T.; Mansson, L.; Dulmen, S. van; Eide, H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis worldwide, affecting a growing number of people in the ageing populations. Currently, it affects about 50 % of all people over 65 years of age. There are no disease-modifying treatments for OA; hence preference-sensitive treatment

  20. Patient information and emotional needs across the hip osteoarthritis continuum: a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brembo, E.A.; Kapstad, H.; Eide, T.; Mansson, L.; Dulmen, S. van; Eide, H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis worldwide, affecting a growing number of people in the ageing populations. Currently, it affects about 50 % of all people over 65 years of age. There are no disease-modifying treatments for OA; hence preference-sensitive treatment

  1. Cumulative years in occupation and the risk of hip or knee osteoarthritis in men and women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Susan; Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Davidsen, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Occupational workload has been associated with an increased risk of osteoarthritis (OA), but only little research has been conducted among female workers. The objective of this study was to analyse if men and women in farming, construction or healthcare work have increased risk of developing OA...... of the hip or knee....

  2. An OMERACT reliability exercise of inflammatory and structural abnormalities in patients with knee osteoarthritis using ultrasound assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruyn, George Aw; Naredo, Esperanza; Damjanov, Nemanja

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether ultrasonography (US) is reliable for the evaluation of inflammatory and structural abnormalities in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: Thirteen patients with early knee OA were examined by 11 experienced sonographers during 2 days. Dichotomous and semiqu......OBJECTIVE: To assess whether ultrasonography (US) is reliable for the evaluation of inflammatory and structural abnormalities in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: Thirteen patients with early knee OA were examined by 11 experienced sonographers during 2 days. Dichotomous...

  3. Group education and exercise is feasible in knee and hip osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Søren Thorgaard; Odgaard, Anders; Rasmussen, Jens Ole

    2012-01-01

    Clinical practice does not reflect current clinical guidelines recommending an early multimodal non-surgical treatment for knee and hip osteoarthritis (OA). The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility of such an initiative (Good Life with osteoArthritis in Denmark (GLA:D) in persons...

  4. Structural joint changes, malalignment, and laxity in osteoarthritis of the knee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Esch, M.; Steultjens, M.; Wieringa, H.; Dinant, H.; Dekker, J.

    2005-01-01

    To assess the relationship between (i) structural joint changes (i.e. joint space narrowing and osteophyte formation) and laxity and (ii) joint malalignment and laxity in osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. A cross-sectional study was carried out on 35 outpatients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

  5. Thermal and mechanical pain sensitization in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevilaqua-Grossi, Debora; Zanin, Marilia; Benedetti, Camila; Florencio, Lidiane; Oliveira, Anamaria

    2018-02-26

    The aim was to assess sensitization using quantitative sensory testing in mechanical and thermal modes in individuals with and without osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Pain thresholds were correlated with functionality, symptoms of depression and intensity of pain. Thirty control volunteers and 30 patients with OA of the knee were assessed. Punctate pain thresholds using Von Frey filaments and thermal pain thresholds using a Thermal Sensory Analyzer were evaluated in the periarticular region of the knee and forearm. Using a digital pressure algometer, pressure pain thresholds were assessed in the periarticular region of the knee and on the root exit zone on the lumbar and sacral spine. Punctate, pressure, and thermal pain thresholds differed significantly between participants with and without OA (p pain sensitization. Pressure pain thresholds also showed moderate and negative correlations with data on functionality, symptoms of depression and intensity of pain (-0.36  -0.56), contributing up to 30% of their variability. Allodynia and hyperalgesia were demonstrated in the OA group, suggesting central sensitization in patients with mild to moderate severity of joint damage. Correlation between mechanical hypersensitivity and psychosocial factors seems to be small, despite of its significance.

  6. Self-caring of women with osteoarthritis living at different levels of independence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Carol L; Schmeiser, Donna; Yehle, Karen T

    2003-08-01

    Successful management of chronic conditions such as osteoarthritis (OA) may improve health and quality of life and foster independence. Health professionals need to understand what women do to manage their OA by self-caring in order to support the improvement of health in older adults. A descriptive study of difficulties of living with and self-caring of OA was conducted. Sixty women over 65 years old who lived in homes in the community, in assisted living (AL) apartments, and in long-term care (LTC) facilities participated in interviews. Data were the reports of symptoms and self-caring behaviors. Descriptive, Kendall tau-b and tau-c, and chi-square analyses revealed that there were similarities and differences among the women. All of the women used a variety of self-caring techniques. Differences included that community-residing women reported more often that they had pain, moved too slowly, and had sleep disturbances. Community-residing women reported more negative emotions, while reporting significantly more often that they used a wide range of positive coping methods. By anticipating severe physical and functional problems of living with OA and difficulties in self-caring, health care providers may help women maintain an independent lifestyle.

  7. Physiotherapy management of knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Carolyn J; Hinman, Rana S; Bennell, Kim L

    2011-05-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent chronic joint disease causing pain and disability. Physiotherapy, which encompasses a number of modalities, is a non-invasive treatment option in the management of OA. This review summarizes the evidence for commonly used physiotherapy interventions. There is strong evidence to show short-term beneficial effects of exercise on pain and function, although the type of exercise does not seem to influence treatment outcome. Delivery modes, including individual, group or home exercise are all effective, although therapist contact may improve benefits. Attention to improving adherence to exercise is needed to maximize outcomes in the longer-term. Knee taping applied with the aim of realigning the patella and unloading soft tissues can reduce pain. There is also evidence to support the use of knee braces in people with knee OA. Biomechanical studies show that lateral wedge shoe insoles reduce knee load but clinical trials do not support symptomatic benefits. Recent studies suggest individual shoe characteristics also affect knee load and there is current interest in the effect of modified shoe designs. Manual therapy, while not to be used as a stand-alone treatment, may be beneficial. In summary, although the research is not equivocal, there is sufficient evidence to indicate that physiotherapy interventions can reduce pain and improve function in those with knee OA. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases © 2011 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. An inflammation-responsive transcription factor in the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Alpana; Ray, Bimal K

    2008-01-01

    A number of risk factors including biomechanical stress on the articular cartilage imposed by joint overloading due to obesity, repetitive damage of the joint tissues by injury of the menisci and ligaments, and abnormal joint alignment play a significant role in the onset of osteoarthritis (OA). Genetic predisposition can also lead to the formation of defective cartilage matrix because of abnormal gene expression in the cartilage-specific cells. Another important biochemical event in OA is the consequence of inflammation. It has been shown that synovial inflammation triggers the synthesis of biological stimuli such as cytokines and growth factors which subsequently reach the chondrocyte cells of the articular cartilage activating inflammatory events in the chondrocytes leading to cartilage destruction. In addition to cartilage degradation, hypertrophy of the subchondral bone and osteophyte formation at the joint margins also takes place in OA. Both processes involve abnormal expression of a number of genes including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) for cartilage degradation and those associated with bone formation during osteophyte development. To address how diverse groups of genes are activated in OA chondrocyte, we have studied their induction mechanism. We present evidence for abundant expression of an inflammation-responsive transcription factor, SAF-1, in moderate to severely damaged OA cartilage tissues. In contrast, cells in normal cartilage matrix contain very low level of SAF-1 protein. SAF-1 is identified as a major regulator of increased synthesis of MMP-1 and -9 and pro-angiogenic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). While VEGF by stimulating angiogenesis plays a key role in new bone formation in osteophyte, increase of MMP-1 and -9 is instrumental for cartilage erosion in the pathogenesis of OA. Increased expression in degenerated cartilage matrix and in the osteophytes indicate for a key regulatory role of SAF-1 in directing catabolic

  9. Disease progression and phasic changes in gene expression in a mouse model of osteoarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard F Loeser

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is the most common form of arthritis and has multiple risk factors including joint injury. The purpose of this study was to characterize the histologic development of OA in a mouse model where OA is induced by destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM model and to identify genes regulated during different stages of the disease, using RNA isolated from the joint "organ" and analyzed using microarrays. Histologic changes seen in OA, including articular cartilage lesions and osteophytes, were present in the medial tibial plateaus of the DMM knees beginning at the earliest (2 week time point and became progressively more severe by 16 weeks. 427 probe sets (371 genes from the microarrays passed consistency and significance filters. There was an initial up-regulation at 2 and 4 weeks of genes involved in morphogenesis, differentiation, and development, including growth factor and matrix genes, as well as transcription factors including Atf2, Creb3l1, and Erg. Most genes were off or down-regulated at 8 weeks with the most highly down-regulated genes involved in cell division and the cytoskeleton. Gene expression increased at 16 weeks, in particular extracellular matrix genes including Prelp, Col3a1 and fibromodulin. Immunostaining revealed the presence of these three proteins in cartilage and soft tissues including ligaments as well as in the fibrocartilage covering osteophytes. The results support a phasic development of OA with early matrix remodeling and transcriptional activity followed by a more quiescent period that is not maintained. This implies that the response to an OA intervention will depend on the timing of the intervention. The quiescent period at 8 weeks may be due to the maturation of the osteophytes which are thought to temporarily stabilize the joint.

  10. A genetic association study between growth differentiation factor 5 (GDF 5 polymorphism and knee osteoarthritis in Thai population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sura Thanyachai

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Osteoarthritis (OA is a multi-factorial disease and genetic factor is one of the important etiologic risk factors. Various genetic polymorphisms have been elucidated that they might be associated with OA. Recently, several studies have shown an association between Growth Differentiation Factor 5(GDF5 polymorphism and knee OA. However, the role of genetic predisposing factor in each ethnic group cannot be replicated to all, with conflicting data in the literatures. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the association between GDF5 polymorphism and knee OA in Thai population. Materials and Methods One hundred and ninety three patients aged 54-88 years who attended Ramathibodi Hospital were enrolled. Ninety cases with knee OA according to American College of Rheumatology criteria and one hundred and three cases in control group gave informed consent. Blood sample (5 ml were collected for identification of GDF5 (rs143383 single nucleotide polymorphism by PCR/RFLP according to a standard protocol. This study protocol was approved by the Ethics Committee on human experimentation of Ramathibodi Hospital Faculty of Medicine, Mahidol University. Odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for the risk of knee OA by genotype (TT, TC and CC and allele (T/C analyses. Results The baseline characteristics between two groups including job, smoking and activity were not different, except age and BMI. The entire cases and controls were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (p > 0.05. The OA knee group (n = 90 had genotypic figure which has shown by TT 42.2% (n = 38, TC 45.6% (n = 41 and CC 12% (n = 11, whereas the control group (n = 103 revealed TT 32% (n = 33, TC 45.6% (n = 47, and CC 22.3% (n = 23, respectively. Genotypic TT increased risk of knee OA as compared to CC [OR = 2.41 (P = 0.04, 95%CI = 1.02-5.67]. In the allele analysis, the T allele was found to be significantly associated with knee OA [OR = 1.53 (P = 0

  11. Cartilage regeneration for treatment of osteoarthritis: a paradigm for nonsurgical intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Tiku, Moti L.; Sabaawy, Hatem E.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is associated with articular cartilage abnormalities and affects people of older age: preventative or therapeutic treatment measures for OA and related articular cartilage disorders remain challenging. In this perspective review, we have integrated multiple biological, morphological, developmental, stem cell and homeostasis concepts of articular cartilage to develop a paradigm for cartilage regeneration. OA is conceptually defined as an injury of cartilage that initiates c...

  12. Knee joint pain potentially due to bone alterations in a knee osteoarthritis patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Masatoshi; Nakamura, Yukio; Kamimura, Mikio; Uchiyama, Shigeharu; Mukaiyama, Keijiro; Ikegami, Shota; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2014-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the leading cause of musculoskeletal pain and functional disability worldwide. However, the etiology of this condition is still largely unknown. We report the clinical course of an elderly man with knee OA. Plain radiographs and MRI examinations performed during follow-up suggested that the pathophysiology of the patient's knee OA and joint pain may have been primarily due to bone alterations.

  13. Bevacizumab, an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibody, inhibits osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Nagai, Toshihiro; Sato, Masato; Kobayashi, Miyuki; Yokoyama, Munetaka; Tani, Yoshiki; Mochida, Joji

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Angiogenesis is an important factor in the development of osteoarthritis (OA). We investigated the efficacy of bevacizumab, an antibody against vascular endothelial growth factor and an inhibitor of angiogenesis, in the treatment of OA using a rabbit model of anterior cruciate ligament transection. Methods First, we evaluated the response of gene expression and histology of the normal joint to bevacizumab treatment. Next, in a rabbit model of OA induced by anterior cruciate ligam...

  14. Our Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis Risk Factors and Relationship with Osteoarhritis-Osteoporosis

    OpenAIRE

    Nadide Torlak Koca; Vesile Sepici; Aliye Kapukıran Tosun; Gökhan Koca

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative disease, that developes as a result of the impairment of formation and destruction processes in cartilage and sinovial tissues, with the effect of various traumatic, biomechanic, inflammatory and genetic factors. Material and Methods: In this study, risk factors and relation between OA and OP (osteoporosis) is evaluated in 127 patients with knee OA. Age, gender, obesity, menopause, ligamentous laxity, DM, injury of joint, genetic predisposition an...

  15. Lifetime risk of primary total hip replacement surgery for osteoarthritis from 2003-2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ackerman, Ilana N; Bohensky, Megan A; de Steiger, Richard

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the lifetime risk of total hip replacement surgery (THR) for osteoarthritis (OA) between countries, and over time. METHODS: Data on primary THR procedures performed for OA in 2003 and 2013 were extracted from national arthroplasty registries in Australia, Denmark, Finland, N....... These multi-national risk estimates can inform resource planning for OA service delivery. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  16. Gait changes in patients with knee osteoarthritis are replicated by experimental knee pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Nielsen, Thomas Graven; Aaboe, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by pain and associated with abnormal knee moments during walking. The relationship between knee OA pain and gait changes remains to be clarified, and a better understanding of this link could advance the treatment and prevention of disease...... progression. This study investigated changes in knee moments during walking following experimental knee pain in healthy volunteers, and whether these changes replicated the joint moments observed in medial knee OA patients....

  17. Body mass index and progressive hand osteoarthritis: data from the Oslo hand osteoarthritis cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, K; Slatkowsky-Christensen, B; van der Heijde, D; Kvien, T K; Hagen, K B; Haugen, I K

    2015-01-01

    Few longitudinal studies have studied the association between body mass index (BMI) and hand osteoarthritis (OA). We aimed to explore the association between BMI and progressive hand OA in a longitudinal study of the Oslo hand OA cohort. Participants with existing hand OA had hand radiographs and BMI data taken at baseline and 7-year follow-up (n = 103). The radiographs were read according to the Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) scale. First, we examined the association between baseline BMI and incident OA (KL grade ≥ 2) in joints without OA at baseline (adjusted for age and sex) using generalized estimating equation (GEE) analyses. Second, we examined whether changes in BMI from baseline to follow-up were associated with increasing KL sum score from baseline to follow-up using linear regression. We repeated the analyses using changes in number of joints with symptomatic OA and patient-reported pain and physical function as the outcome. The mean (SD) age at baseline was 61.6 (5.6) years and 91 (94%) of the cohort were women. The mean (SD) BMI was 25.7 (4.0) kg/m(2) at baseline and the mean (SD) BMI change was 1.1 (2.0) kg/m(2). There was no relationship between baseline BMI and development of more joints with OA during follow-up. Similarly, there was no association between change in BMI and hand OA progression, increasing hand pain or disability. In the Oslo hand OA cohort, higher BMI was not related to hand OA progression.

  18. Somatosensory abnormalities in knee OA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylde, Vikki; Palmer, Shea; Learmonth, Ian D; Dieppe, Paul

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to use quantitative sensory testing (QST) to explore the range and prevalence of somatosensory abnormalities demonstrated by patients with advanced knee OA. One hundred and seven knee OA patients and 50 age- and sex-matched healthy participants attended a 1-h QST session. Testing was performed on the medial side of the knee and the pain-free forearm. Light-touch thresholds were assessed using von Frey filaments, pressure pain thresholds using a digital pressure algometer, and thermal sensation and pain thresholds using a Thermotest MSA. Significant differences in median threshold values from knee OA patients and healthy participants were identified using Mann-Whitney U-tests. The z-score transformations were used to determine the prevalence of the different somatosensory abnormalities in knee OA patients. Testing identified 70% of knee OA patients as having at least one somatosensory abnormality. Comparison of median threshold values between knee OA patients and healthy participants revealed that patients had localized thermal and tactile hypoaesthesia and pressure hyperalgesia at the osteoarthritic knee. Tactile hypoaesthesia and pressure hyperalgesia were also present at the pain-free forearm. The most prevalent somatosensory abnormalities were tactile hypoaesthesia and pressure hyperalgesia, evident in between 20 and 34% of patients. This study found that OA patients demonstrate an array of somatosensory abnormalities, of which the most prevalent were tactile hypoaesthesia and pressure hyperalgesia. Further research is now needed to establish the clinical implications of these somatosensory abnormalities.

  19. Gait Changes Vary Among Horses with Naturally Occurring Osteoarthritis Following Intra-articular Administration of Autologous Platelet Rich Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustajab Hussain Mirza

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms to reduce lameness associated with osteoarthritis (OA are vital to equine health and performance. This study was designed to quantify response to autologous, intra-articular platelet-rich plasma (PRP in horses with OA. Kinetic gait analysis was performed on 12 horses with unilateral forelimb lameness and OA in the same limb before and after intra-articular anesthesia (IAA. Radiographs and kinetic data were obtained before, 6 and 16 weeks after PRP administration to same joint 4 weeks after IAA. Statistical evaluations included filtration effect on platelet concentration, relationship between kinetic variable changes after IAA versus PRP in the affected limb, and associations between response to PRP and response to IAA, platelet concentration and radiographic OA. A positive response to IAA or PRP was defined as ≥5% improvement in peak vertical force, vertical impulse or breaking impulse of the affected limb. Out of 10 horses that responded to IAA, 4 responded to PRP at both time points and 2 responded at one. Of 2 horses that did not respond to IAA, one responded to PRP at both time points. Filtration increased platelet concentration significantly. The relationship between kinetic variable alterations of the affected limb after IAA and PRP was not significant, and response to PRP was not associated with response to IAA, platelet concentration or radiographic OA. Changes in kinetic variables following IAA in joints with naturally occurring OA provide a custom standard to assess intra-articular therapy. Kinetic gait changes after intra-articular PRP are variable in horses with moderate to severe forelimb OA.

  20. Post-operative rehabilitation and nutrition in osteoarthritis [version 3; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Musumeci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a degenerative process involving the progressive loss of articular cartilage, synovial inflammation and structural changes in subchondral bone that lead to loss of synovial joint structural features and functionality of articular cartilage. OA represents one of the most common causes of physical disability in the world. Different OA treatments are usually considered in relation to the stage of the disease. In the early stages, it is possible to recommend physical activity programs that can maintain joint health and keep the patient mobile, as recommended by OA Research Society International (OARSI and European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR. In the most severe and advanced cases of OA, surgical intervention is necessary. After, in early postoperative stages, it is essential to include a rehabilitation exercise program in order to restore the full function of the involved joint. Physical therapy is crucial for the success of any surgical procedure and can promote recovery of muscle strength, range of motion, coordinated walking, proprioception and mitigate joint pain. Furthermore, after discharge from the hospital, patients should continue the rehabilitation exercise program at home associated to an appropriate diet. In this review, we analyze manuscripts from the most recent literature and provide a balanced and comprehensive overview of the latest developments on the effect of physical exercise on postoperative rehabilitation in OA. The literature search was conducted using PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Google Scholar, using the keywords ‘osteoarthritis’, ‘rehabilitation’, ‘exercise’ and ‘nutrition’. The available data suggest that physical exercise is an effective, economical and accessible to everyone practice, and it is one of the most important components of postoperative rehabilitation for OA.

  1. Decreased Knee Joint Loading Associated With Early Knee Osteoarthritis After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellsandt, Elizabeth; Gardinier, Emily S; Manal, Kurt; Axe, Michael J; Buchanan, Thomas S; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury predisposes individuals to early-onset knee joint osteoarthritis (OA). Abnormal joint loading is apparent after ACL injury and reconstruction. The relationship between altered joint biomechanics and the development of knee OA is unknown. Altered knee joint kinetics and medial compartment contact forces initially after injury and reconstruction are associated with radiographic knee OA 5 years after reconstruction. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Individuals with acute, unilateral ACL injury completed gait analysis before (baseline) and after (posttraining) preoperative rehabilitation and at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years after reconstruction. Surface electromyographic and knee biomechanical data served as inputs to an electromyographically driven musculoskeletal model to estimate knee joint contact forces. Patients completed radiographic testing 5 years after reconstruction. Differences in knee joint kinetics and contact forces were compared between patients with and those without radiographic knee OA. Patients with OA walked with greater frontal plane interlimb differences than those without OA (nonOA) at baseline (peak knee adduction moment difference: 0.00 ± 0.08 N·m/kg·m [nonOA] vs -0.15 ± 0.09 N·m/kg·m [OA], P = .014; peak knee adduction moment impulse difference: -0.001 ± 0.032 N·m·s/kg·m [nonOA] vs -0.048 ± 0.031 N·m·s/kg·m [OA], P = .042). The involved limb knee adduction moment impulse of the group with osteoarthritis was also lower than that of the group without osteoarthritis at baseline (0.087 ± 0.023 N·m·s/kg·m [nonOA] vs 0.049 ± 0.018 N·m·s/kg·m [OA], P = .023). Significant group differences were absent at posttraining but reemerged 6 months after reconstruction (peak knee adduction moment difference: 0.02 ± 0.04 N·m/kg·m [nonOA] vs -0.06 ± 0.11 N·m/kg·m [OA], P = .043). In addition, the OA group walked with lower peak medial compartment contact forces of the involved limb

  2. Outcome Expectations and Osteoarthritis: Association of Perceived Benefits of Exercise With Self-Efficacy and Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marszalek, Jolanta; Price, Lori Lyn; Harvey, William F; Driban, Jeffrey B; Wang, Chenchen

    2017-04-01

    Outcome expectancy is recognized as a determinant of exercise engagement and adherence. However, little is known about which factors influence outcome expectations for exercise among people with knee osteoarthritis (OA). This is the first study to examine the association of outcome expectations for exercise with demographic, physical, and psychosocial outcomes in individuals with knee OA. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of the baseline data from a randomized trial of tai chi versus physical therapy in participants with symptomatic knee OA. Knee pain was evaluated using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC). Outcome expectations for exercise, self-efficacy, depression, anxiety, stress, and social support were measured using standard instruments. Logistic regression models were utilized to determine associations with outcome expectations. There were 262 participants, with a mean age of 59.8 years and a mean body mass index of 32.1 kg/m 2 ; 69.1% of the participants were female, 51.5% were white, the mean disease duration was 8.6 years, and the mean WOMAC knee pain and function scores were 260.8 and 906.8, respectively. Higher outcome expectations for exercise were associated with greater self-efficacy (odds ratio [OR] 1.25 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.11-1.41]; P = 0.0004), as well as with fewer depressive symptoms (OR 0.84 for each 5-point increase [95% CI 0.73-0.97]; P = 0.01). Outcome expectancy was not significantly associated with sex, race, education, pain, function, radiographic severity, social support, anxiety, or stress. Our results suggest significant associations between outcome expectations for exercise and self-efficacy and depression. Future studies should examine how these relationships longitudinally affect long-term clinical outcomes of exercise-based treatment for knee OA. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  3. Addressing obesity in the management of knee and hip osteoarthritis - weighing in from an economic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flego, Anna; Dowsey, Michelle M; Choong, Peter F M; Moodie, Marj

    2016-05-26

    Obesity is one of the only modifiable risk factors for both incidence and progression of Osteoarthritis (OA). So there is increasing interest from a public health perspective in addressing obesity in the management of OA. While evidence of the efficacy of intereventions designed to address obesity in OA populations continues to grow, little is known about their economic credentials. The aim of this study is to conduct a scoping review of: (i) the published economic evidence assessing the economic impact of obesity in OA populations; (ii) economic evaluations of interventions designed to explicitly address obesity in the prevention and management of OA in order to determine which represent value for money. Besides describing the current state of the literature, the study highlights research gaps and identifies future research priorities. In July 2014, a search of the peer reviewed literature, published in English, was undertaken for the period January 1975 - July 2014 using Medline Complete (Ebscohost), Embase, Econlit, Global Health, Health Economics Evaluation Database (HEED), all Cochrane Library databases as well as the grey literature using Google and reference lists of relevant studies. A combination of key search terms was used to identify papers assessing the economic impact of obesity in OA or economic evaluations conducted to assess the efficiency of obesity interventions for the prevention or management of OA. 14 studes were identified; 13 were cost burden studies assessing the impact of obesity as a predictor for higher costs in Total Joint Arthroplasty (TJA) patients and one a cost-effectiveness study of an intervention designed to address obesity in the managment of mild to moderate OA patients. The majority of the economic studies conducted are cost burden studies. While there is some evidence of the association between severe obesity and excess hospital costs for TJA patients, heterogeneity in studies precludes definitive statements about the

  4. L-DOPA is an endogenous ligand for OA1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa M Lopez

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Albinism is a genetic defect characterized by a loss of pigmentation. The neurosensory retina, which is not pigmented, exhibits pathologic changes secondary to the loss of pigmentation in the retina pigment epithelium (RPE. How the loss of pigmentation in the RPE causes developmental defects in the adjacent neurosensory retina has not been determined, but offers a unique opportunity to investigate the interactions between these two important tissues. One of the genes that causes albinism encodes for an orphan GPCR (OA1 expressed only in pigmented cells, including the RPE. We investigated the function and signaling of OA1 in RPE and transfected cell lines. Our results indicate that OA1 is a selective L-DOPA receptor, with no measurable second messenger activity from two closely related compounds, tyrosine and dopamine. Radiolabeled ligand binding confirmed that OA1 exhibited a single, saturable binding site for L-DOPA. Dopamine competed with L-DOPA for the single OA1 binding site, suggesting it could function as an OA1 antagonist. OA1 response to L-DOPA was defined by several common measures of G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR activation, including influx of intracellular calcium and recruitment of beta-arrestin. Further, inhibition of tyrosinase, the enzyme that makes L-DOPA, resulted in decreased PEDF secretion by RPE. Further, stimulation of OA1 in RPE with L-DOPA resulted in increased PEDF secretion. Taken together, our results illustrate an autocrine loop between OA1 and tyrosinase linked through L-DOPA, and this loop includes the secretion of at least one very potent retinal neurotrophic factor. OA1 is a selective L-DOPA receptor whose downstream effects govern spatial patterning of the developing retina. Our results suggest that the retinal consequences of albinism caused by changes in melanin synthetic machinery may be treated by L-DOPA supplementation.

  5. EFFECTIVENESS OF MANUAL THERAPY VERSUS EXERCISE THERAPY FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS IN KARACHI PAKISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayesha Zakir

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Among musculoskeletal disorders knee Osteoarthritis (OA is exceedingly prevailing articular disorder affecting people and it is a major cause of disability and socioeconomic burden. It is more common in women than men. Entities with knee OA must often undergo a variety of problems, such as pain and tenderness in joints, movement limitation, crepitus on movement, swelling, recurrent effusion, and local inflammation which ultimately leads to limitation in physical function, like lack of ability to perform Activities of Daily Living (ADL or Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL. For reducing knee pain in osteoarthritis several conventional treatment methods are used world widely but most extensively used in our country are pharmacologic and physical therapy. The objective of the study is to find out the effectiveness of Manual therapy verses Exercise therapy for the management of knee osteoarthritis. Methods: Sixty patients including both male and female with mean age (51years and SD of (5.1 were enrolled in the study and divided randomly in to two groups. Those who were assigned as group A had received Manual therapy and those who were assigned as group B had received Exercise therapy. Participants had received three treatment sessions of 30 min per week for consecutive 4 weeks. OUTCOME MEASURE: WOMAC index score for pain, stiffness and physical function was used to evaluate the baseline score and treatment effects after 12 therapy sessions. Results: Study showed significant improvement in both groups before and after the treatment but in comparison manual therapy group showed significant results with respect to pain subscale (p=0.003 and physical function subscale (p=0.004. Conclusion: Significant difference found between manual therapy and exercise therapy treatment approaches in treating knee osteoarthritis. Findings of this study revealed the fact that short term treatment sessions of manual therapy were superior to

  6. Clinical algorithms to aid osteoarthritis guideline dissemination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meneses, S. R. F.; Goode, A. P.; Nelson, A. E

    2016-01-01

    Background: Numerous scientific organisations have developed evidence-based recommendations aiming to optimise the management of osteoarthritis (OA). Uptake, however, has been suboptimal. The purpose of this exercise was to harmonize the recent recommendations and develop a user-friendly treatment...... algorithm to facilitate translation of evidence into practice. Methods: We updated a previous systematic review on clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for OA management. The guidelines were assessed using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation for quality and the standards for developing...... to facilitate the implementation of guidelines in clinical practice are necessary. The algorithms proposed are examples of how to apply recommendations in the clinical context, helping the clinician to visualise the patient flow and timing of different treatment modalities. (C) 2016 Osteoarthritis Research...

  7. Estimation of Serum Matrix Metalloproteinases-1 Levels in Iraqi Female Patients with Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vean Sabah Ali

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This study was established to investigate the correlation between the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-1 and the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA. Blood samples were collected from 55 female patients with inflammatory OA and controls for estimation of serum (MMP-1 levels. In the current study, there is significant increase (p<0.001 in the mean of serum MMP-1 levels in osteoarthritis females (4027.73 ± 1345.28 pg/ml than that in control females (798.76 ± 136.79 pg/ml. It was concluded that MMP-1 may be associated with the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis.

  8. The influence of sport participation on physical function in patients with osteoarthritis during and after exercise therapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenhof, C.; Perry, S.; Lucas, C.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The objectives of this study were to investigate 1) in which sports activities patients with osteoarthritis (OA) participate, 2) the cross sectional differences in functional outcome between sports participants and nonsports participants and 3) the influence of regular sports

  9. Use and costs of prescription medications and alternative treatments in patients with osteoarthritis and chronic low back pain in community-based settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Mugdha; Tai, Kei-Sing; Sadosky, Alesia; Leslie, Douglas; Stacey, Brett R

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the use and direct medical costs of pharmacologic and alternative treatments for patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and chronic low back pain (CLBP). The LifeLink™ Health Plan Claims Database was used to identify patients ≥18 years old, diagnosed with OA (N = 112,951) or CLBP (N = 101,294). Of these patients, 64,085 with OA and 47,386 with CLBP received pain-related treatments during CY2008 and were selected for inclusion. For patients in both cohorts, pharmacologic and alternative treatments, and direct medical costs were examined during CY2008. Opioids were the most frequently prescribed medication (>70%) in both groups, followed by nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (>50%). Over 30% received antidepressants, >20% received benzodiazepines, and 15% in each group received sedative hypnotics. Use of alternative treatments was as follows: chiropractor, OA 11%, CLBP 34%; physical therapy, 20% in both groups; transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulations (TENS), OA 14%, CLBP 22%; acupuncture, hydrotherapy, massage therapy, and biofeedback, patients were, OA: $15,638 ($22,595); CLBP: $11,829 ($20,035). Pharmacologic therapies accounted for approximately 20% of these costs, whereas alternative treatments accounted for only 3% to 4% of the total costs. Patients with OA and CLBP used a variety of pain-related and adjunctive medications. Although, alternative treatments are widely recommended, we found limited use of several of these in clinical practice, potentially due to the source of our data (commercial claims). Further research is needed to ascertain the extent to which such therapies contribute to the total costs of OA and CLBP management. © 2012 The Authors. Pain Practice © 2012 World Institute of Pain.

  10. Vastus medialis motor unit properties in knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chess David G

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maximal isometric quadriceps strength deficits have been widely reported in studies of knee osteoarthritis (OA, however little is known about the effect of osteoarthritis knee pain on submaximal quadriceps neuromuscular function. The purpose of this study was to measure vastus medialis motor unit (MU properties in participants with knee OA, during submaximal isometric contractions. Methods Vastus medialis motor unit potential (MUP parameters were assessed in 8 patients with knee OA and 8 healthy, sex and age-matched controls during submaximal isometric contractions (20% of maximum isometric torque. Unpaired t-tests were used to compare groups for demographic and muscle parameters. Results Maximum knee extension torque was ~22% lower in the OA group, a difference that was not statistically significantly (p = 0.11. During submaximal contractions, size related parameters of the needle MUPs (e.g. negative peak duration and amplitude-to-area ratio were greater in the OA group (p Conclusions Changes in MU recruitment and rate coding strategies in OA may reflect a chronic reinnervation process or a compensatory strategy in the presence of chronic knee pain associated with OA.

  11. Topical diclofenac in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niklas Schuelert

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Niklas Schuelert, Fiona A Russell, Jason J McDougallDepartment of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, CanadaAbstract: Osteoarthritis (OA is a common disease that affects millions of people worldwide. As there is no cure for OA, drug treatment to relieve symptoms is the main form of management. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs such as diclofenac are the most commonly used drugs to treat knee OA pain. Unfortunately, these agents are associated with gastrointestinal and cardiovascular risks, which limit their chronic use. Topical NSAIDs are emerging as a viable alternative for managing OA pain. Because a pharmacologically effective dose can be restricted to the site of pain, there is superfluous systemic absorption, and the risk of related adverse effects is minimized. This article reviews the currently available preclinical and clinical information on topical diclofenac for the treatment of OA pain, including data from recently published randomized controlled trials regarding the efficacy and safety of topical diclofenac. Most studies confirm topical diclofenac to be as effective as oral diclofenac with significantly reduced side effects; however, the efficacy of NSAIDs is far from optimal, and more research needs to be done to investigate the underlying mechanisms of OA in order to improve treatment options, especially for patients with NSAID-resistant OA pain.Keywords: osteoarthritis, topical diclofenac, NSAID, joint pain 

  12. RNA Microarray Analysis of Macroscopically Normal Articular Cartilage from Knees Undergoing Partial Medial Meniscectomy: Potential Prediction of the Risk for Developing Osteoarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Farooq Rai

    Full Text Available (i To provide baseline knowledge of gene expression in macroscopically normal articular cartilage, (ii to test the hypothesis that age, body-mass-index (BMI, and sex are associated with cartilage RNA transcriptome, and (iii to predict individuals at potential risk for developing "pre-osteoarthritis" (OA based on screening of genetic risk-alleles associated with OA and gene transcripts differentially expressed between normal and OA cartilage.Healthy-appearing cartilage was obtained from the medial femoral notch of 12 knees with a meniscus tear undergoing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. Cartilage had no radiographic, magnetic-resonance-imaging or arthroscopic evidence for degeneration. RNA was subjected to Affymetrix microarrays followed by validation of selected transcripts by microfluidic digital polymerase-chain-reaction. The underlying biological processes were explored computationally. Transcriptome-wide gene expression was probed for association with known OA genetic risk-alleles assembled from published literature and for comparison with gene transcripts differentially expressed between healthy and OA cartilage from other studies.We generated a list of 27,641 gene transcripts in healthy cartilage. Several gene transcripts representing numerous biological processes were correlated with age and BMI and differentially expressed by sex. Based on disease-specific Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, gene transcripts associated with aging were enriched for bone/cartilage disease while the gene expression profile associated with BMI was enriched for growth-plate calcification and OA. When segregated by genetic risk-alleles, two clusters of study patients emerged, one cluster containing transcripts predicted by risk studies. When segregated by OA-associated gene transcripts, three clusters of study patients emerged, one of which is remarkably similar to gene expression pattern in OA.Our study provides a list of gene transcripts in healthy

  13. Impact of clinical osteoarthritis of the hip, knee and hand on self-rated health in six European countries: the European Project on OSteoArthritis

    OpenAIRE

    van Schoor, N. M.; Zambon, S.; Castell, M. V.; Cooper, C.; Denkinger, M.; Dennison, E. M.; Edwards, M. H.; Herbolsheimer, F.; Maggi, S.; S?nchez-Martinez, M.; Pedersen, N. L.; Peter, R.; Schaap, L. A.; Rijnhart, J. J. M.; van der Pas, S.

    2015-01-01

    PurposeOsteoarthritis (OA) has been shown to be associated with decreased physical function, which may impact upon a person’s self-rated health (SRH). Only a few studies have examined the association between OA and SRH in the general population, but to date none have used a clinical definition of OA. The objectives are: (1) To examine the cross-sectional association between clinical OA and fair-to-poor SRH in the general population; (2) To examine whether this association differs between coun...

  14. A qualitative study on patients with knee osteoarthritis to evaluate the influence of different pain patterns on patients’ quality of life and to find out patients’ interpretation and coping strategies for the disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith K.W. Chan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this qualitative study of patients with osteoarthritis (OA of the knee was to evaluate the influence of different pain patterns on their quality of life and to investigate their interpretation and coping strategies for the disease using patient interviews. Patients were recruited by convenience sampling in a private general practice clinic in Hong Kong. Those screened positive for OA of the knee were asked to self-evaluate their average pain score and classify the severity of their OA before attending a semi-structured interview by a research assistant. Twenty patients were interviewed and 98 codes were identified. The content was analyzed independently by two researchers who were not doing the interviews. Codes and themes generated were analyzed based on the grounded theory. A wide range of symptoms was described by patients with OA of the knee, in which pain was the most prominent symptom. Most patients (80% described two different types of pain, mechanical and inflammatory pain, each presenting with a different pain quality and onset pattern. Most patients self-graded their OA severity at a level higher than their corres­ponding pain score, indicating that there may be other variables that patients would consider during self-evaluation of severity. More than half of the participants seek medical assistance late because their health-seeking behavior was affected by their perception of the problem, concern, and expectation from treatment. The study findings can help healthcare providers to understand and be aware of the existence of two pain patterns, mechanical and inflammatory pain in knee OA, as well as to appreciate the great variations of symptoms, the different perspectives, and the different coping and health-seeking behaviors among knee OA patients during their management. Finally, this study also provides a useful basis for further research on topics like factors that affect patients’ self-evaluated disease severity

  15. The potential role of sclerostin in the development of osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Jianlin; Lin, S.; Dong, Q

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), a debilitating degenerative joint disease which is greatly influenced by alterations in the local mechanical loading environment in the joint. The exact aetiology of OA remains unknown, but loss of articular cartilage, subchondral sclerosis, and bone remodeling has been known...... and cartilage/subchondral in both physiological and pathological conditions may lead to development of more effective strategies for treating OA patients. © 2016, E-Century Publishing Corporation. All rights reserved....... of literatures have reported about the relation between Sclerostin and OA. In this review we have tried to summarize the current knowledge on the effect of Sclerostin and to explore the potential role of Sclerostin during the process of OA. A better understanding of the relationship between Sclerostin...

  16. Biochemical Markers for Osteoarthritis: Is There any Promising Candidate?

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    Elif Aydın

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is the most common degenerative joint disease. OA affects millions of individuals each year and becoming the most important cause of pain in geriatric population. Progressive destruction of articular cartilage is one of the prominent features of the disease. The diagnosis of OA is generally based on clinical and radiographical findings, which are insufficient to determine early-stage OA and predict disease course. There is a need for biomarkers that help clinicians early diagnose, assess disease activity, predict prognosis and monitor response to therapy. There are a growing number of publications regarding candidate markers in this field. The aim of this paper was to review recent studies on biochemical markers that reflect cartilage, synovial and bone turnover and their clinical use in patients with OA.

  17. Alflutop in osteoarthritis therapy

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    G. V. Lukina

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study efficacy and safety of different schemes of alflutop (AT administration in pts with osteoarthritis (OA. Material and methods 45 pts (40 womene and 5 men with knee or hip OA or nodular form of the disease were included. Mean age was 60,3± 10,0 years, mean disease duration - 8,0±6,0 years, mean duration of the last exacerbation - 5,6±5,4 months. Pts with 2 (27 pts and 3(15 pts X-ray OA stage and 2 functional class (30 pts prevailed. Pts were devided into 3 comparable groups, 15 pts in each. Pts of the group 1 received AT I ml/day intramuscularly (im during 3 weeks, group 2 pts received intra-articular (ia injections of AT 2 ml twice a week for 3 weeks and then im for 20 days. In group 3 ia (6 and im (20 injections were performed^simultaneously. During 12 months of follow up every pt received 2 appropriate courses. Results. 41 pts completed the study. AT significantly decreased joint pain at rest and at movement measured visual analog scale and WOMAC index in all groups. It also improved functional activity of pts (according to WOMAC index. Improvement according to doctor assessment was achieved after the second course in 78% of pts in group I, in 92% in group 2 and in 86% in group 3. Sonography of knee joints showed significant decrease of synovial membrane thickness (as a sign of synovitis as well as increase parts of intra-articular hyaline cartilage thickness in group 2 and 3 pts. There was no radiological progression year of follow up. Tolerability was good. The drug was stopped due to adverse events in only 3 pts (dermatitis at the site of injection-1, increase of joint pain after intra-articular injections- 2 . In 3 other pts side effects were mild, and treatmend was continued. Conclusion. Combined Im and AT administration provides anti-inflammatory, analgesic and possible chondroprotective effect in OA pts.

  18. What of guidelines for osteoarthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Anita Y N; Doherty, Michael

    2011-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is by far the most common joint disease and a major cause of pain and disability. The prevalence and impact of OA will increase in the next decades in the Asia-Pacific region due to increased longevity, increasing urbanization and a parallel increase in obesity. The three main types of evidence to inform evidence-based practice are research evidence, expert experience and patient opinion--all three of these are equally weighted. Guideline development groups vary in terms of process and structure of guideline production and in how much integration there is between research, expert and patient evidence. Nevertheless, guidelines on OA concur in recommending: holistic assessment of the patient and individualizing the management plan; patient information access; weight loss if overweight or obese, and prescription of exercise. Additional adjunctive non-pharmacological and pharmacological interventions, including surgery, may be added to this core set as required. However, when audited, it appears that management of OA is often suboptimal, with a major focus on oral analgesics, especially non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. A number of barriers to implementation are evident and appropriate audit of care is necessary to improve delivery of service and to plan healthcare resources. For OA, the effect size of placebo in clinical trials is usually far greater than the additional specific effect of individual treatments, emphasizing the importance of contextual ('meaning') response in this chronic painful condition. This has important implications for clinical care in that optimization of the contextual response can lead to improvements in patient outcomes even in the absence of very effective treatments. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases © 2011 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Pain Sensitization Associated with Non-Response Following Physiotherapy in People with Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Helen; Smart, Keith M; Moloney, Niamh A; Blake, Catherine; Doody, Catherine M

    2018-05-22

    In knee osteoarthritis (OA) pain sensitization has been linked to a more severe symptomatology, but the prognostic implications of pain sensitivity in people undergoing conservative treatment such as physiotherapy are not established. This study aimed to prospectively investigate the association between features of pain sensitization and clinical outcome (non-response) following guideline-based physiotherapy in people with knee OA. Participants (n=156) with moderate/severe knee OA were recruited from secondary care. All participants completed self-administered questionnaires and underwent quantitative sensory testing (QST) at baseline, thereby establishing subjective and objective measures of pain sensitization. Participants (n=134) were later classified following a physiotherapy intervention, using treatment responder criteria (responder/non-responder). QST data was reduced to a core set of latent variables using principal component analysis. A hierarchical logistic regression model was constructed to investigate if features related to pain sensitization predicted non-response after controlling for other known predictors of poor outcome in knee OA. Higher temporal summation (TS) (OR 2.00, 95% CI 1.23 to 3.27) and lower pressure pain thresholds (PPT) (OR 0.48, 95% CI 0.29 to 0.81) emerged as robust predictors of non-response following physiotherapy, along with a higher comorbidity score. The model demonstrated high sensitivity (87.8%) but modest specificity (52.3%). The independent relationship between pain sensitization and non-response may indicate an underlying explanatory association between neuroplastic changes in nociceptive processing and the maintenance of on-going pain and disability in knee OA pain. These preliminary results suggest interventions targeting pain sensitization may warrant future investigation in this population.

  20. Reliability testing of two classification systems for osteoarthritis and post-traumatic arthritis of the elbow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Michael H; Sykes, Joshua B; Olson, Stephen T; Smith, Richard A; Mauck, Benjamin M; Azar, Frederick M; Throckmorton, Thomas W

    2015-03-01

    The severity of elbow arthritis is one of many factors that surgeons must evaluate when considering treatment options for a given patient. Elbow surgeons have historically used the Broberg and Morrey (BM) and Hastings and Rettig (HR) classification systems to radiographically stage the severity of post-traumatic arthritis (PTA) and primary osteoarthritis (OA). We proposed to compare the intraobserver and interobserver reliability between systems for patients with either PTA or OA. The radiographs of 45 patients were evaluated at least 2 weeks apart by 6 evaluators of different levels of training. Intraobserver and interobserver reliability were calculated by Spearman correlation coefficients with 95% confidence intervals. Agreement was considered almost perfect for coefficients >0.80 and substantial for coefficients of 0.61 to 0.80. In patients with both PTA and OA, intraobserver reliability and interobserver reliability were substantial, with no difference between classification systems. There were no significant differences in intraobserver or interobserver reliability between attending physicians and trainees for either classification system (all P > .10). The presence of fracture implants did not affect reliability in the BM system but did substantially worsen reliability in the HR system (intraobserver P = .04 and interobserver P = .001). The BM and HR classifications both showed substantial intraobserver and interobserver reliability for PTA and OA. Training level differences did not affect reliability for either system. Both trainees and fellowship-trained surgeons may easily and reliably apply each classification system to the evaluation of primary elbow OA and PTA, although the HR system was less reliable in the presence of fracture implants. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Underlying molecular mechanisms of DIO2 susceptibility in symptomatic osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bomer, N.; Den Hollander, W.T.H.F.; Ramos, Y.F.M.; Bos, S.D.; Van der Breggen, R.; Lakenberg, N.; Pepers, B.A.; Van Eeden, A.E.; Darvishan, A.; Tobi, E.W.; Duijnisveld, B.J.; Van den Akker, E.B.; Heijmans, B.T.; Van Roon-Mom, W.M.C.; Verbeek, F.J.; Osch, G.J.V.M.; Nelissen, R.G.H.H.; Slagboom, P.E.; Meulenbelt, I.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate how the genetic susceptibility gene DIO2 confers risk to osteoarthritis (OA) onset in humans and to explore whether counteracting the deleterious effect could contribute to novel therapeutic approaches. Methods: Epigenetically regulated expression of DIO2 was explored by

  2. Underlying molecular mechanisms of DIO2 susceptibility in symptomatic osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Bomer (Nils); W. den Hollander (Wouter); Y.F.M. Ramos (Yolande); S.D. Bos (Steffan); R. van der Breggen (Ruud); N. Lakenberg (Nico); B.A. Pepers (Barry); A.E. van Eeden (Annelies); A. Darvishan (Arash); E.W. Tobi (Elmar); B.J. Duijnisveld (Bouke); E.B. van den Akker (Erik); B.T. Heijmans (Bastiaan); W.M.C. van Roon-Mom (Willeke); F.J. Verbeek (Fons); G.J.V.M. van Osch (Gerjo); R.G.H.H. Nelissen (Rob); P.E. Slagboom (Eline); I. Meulenbelt (Ingrid)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: To investigate how the genetic susceptibility gene DIO2 confers risk to osteoarthritis (OA) onset in humans and to explore whether counteracting the deleterious effect could contribute to novel therapeutic approaches. Methods: Epigenetically regulated expression of DIO2 was

  3. Efficacy and safety of ginger in osteoarthritis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, E M; Folmer, V N; Bliddal, Henning

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical efficacy and safety of oral ginger for symptomatic treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) by carrying out a systematic literature search followed by meta-analyses on selected studies. Inclusion criteria were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing ...

  4. Effects of strontium ranelate on spinal osteoarthritis progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruyere, O; Delferriere, D; Roux, C

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine whether a 3-year treatment with strontium ranelate could delay the progression of spinal osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: This study was a post-hoc analysis of pooled data from the Spinal Osteoporosis Therapeutic Intervention (SOTI) and TReatment...

  5. Observer Variability in Evaluating Pisotriquetral Osteoarthritis using Pisotriquetral View

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heeg, Erik; ten Berg, Paul W. L.; Maas, Mario; Strackee, Simon D.

    2017-01-01

    A pisotriquetral (semilateral) view of the wrist may improve the assessment of pisotriquetral osteoarthritis (OA), but its reliability and reproducibility are unclear. The purpose of this cross-sectional observer study was to investigate (1) the inter- and intraobserver agreement of evaluating

  6. Longitudinal use of complementary and alternative medicine among older adults with radiographic knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shibing; Dubé, Catherine E; Eaton, Charles B; McAlindon, Timothy E; Lapane, Kate L

    2013-11-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), a chronic and often painful disease for which there is no cure, accounts for more mobility issues in older adults than any other disease. Cross-sectional studies have found that arthritis is the most common reason for older adults to use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Although previous research has profiled the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of CAM users, few studies have provided information on variation in CAM use over time and most only considered use of any CAM, which was often a mixture of heterogeneous therapies. This study sought to describe the longitudinal patterns of CAM use among older adults with knee OA and to identify correlates and predictors of different commonly used CAM therapies. The Osteoarthritis Initiative included 1121 adults aged ≥65 years with radiographic tibiofemoral OA in one or both knees at baseline. Annual surveys captured current use of conventional therapies and 25 CAM modalities (grouped into 6 categories) for joint pain or arthritis at baseline and during the 4-year follow-up. We assessed longitudinal use of CAM modalities by summing the number of visits with participants reporting use of each modality. Correlates of CAM use under consideration included sociodemographic indicators, body mass index, overall measures of mental and physical well-being, and clinical indices of knee OA. Generalized estimation equations provided adjusted odds ratio estimates and 95% CIs. Nearly one-third of older adults reported using ≥1 CAM modality for treating OA at all assessments. With the exception of glucosamine and chondroitin (18%), few were persistent users of other CAM modalities. One in 5 of those using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or glucosamine and/or chondroitin were using them concurrently. Adjusted models revealed the following: (1) adults aged ≥75 years were less likely to use dietary supplements than those between ages 65 and 75 years; (2) persons with more severe knee

  7. Knee Confidence as it Relates to Self-Reported and Objective Correlates of Knee Osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Søren T; Rasmussen, Sten; Simonsen, Ole

    2015-01-01

    osteoarthritis (OA). Background Lack of knee confidence is a frequent symptom in patients with knee OA, but little is known of associations between knee confidence and other common correlates of knee OA. Methods Baseline data from 220 patients with knee OA were applied in ordinal regression analyses, with knee...... confidence, assessed using item Q3 of the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, as the dependent variable and self-reported (pain on walking, general health, fear of movement, self-efficacy, function, and previous serious injury) and objective measures (muscle strength, 20-m walk time.......21; 95% CI: 1.09, 1.34), and general health (OR = 0.024; 95% CI: 0.002, 0.259) explained 19% of the variance in knee confidence (Pcommon finding in individuals with knee OA. Pain on walking was confirmed as a correlate of knee confidence, whereas...

  8. Case definitions of knee osteoarthritis in 4,151 unselected subjects: relevance for epidemiological studies : The Copenhagen Osteoarthritis Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laxafoss, Erling; Jacobsen, Steffen; Gosvig, Kasper K

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aims of the present study were threefold: to examine the distribution of knee joint osteoarthritis in a large, standardized radiological study; to examine the relationships between self reported knee pain and radiological OA; and to examine the natural history of radio-morpholog...

  9. Role of Osteoarthritis, Comorbidity, and Pain in Determining Functional Limitations in Older Populations : European Project on Osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zambon, Sabina; Siviero, Paola; Denkinger, Michael D; Limongi, Federica; Victoria Castell, Maria; van der Pas, Suzan; Otero, Ángel; Edwards, Mark H; Peter, Richard; Pedersen, Nancy L; Sánchez-Martinez, Mercedes; Dennison, Elaine M; Gesmundo, Antonella; Schaap, Laura A; Deeg, Dorly J H; van Schoor, Natasja M; Maggi, Stefania

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the role of comorbidity and pain in the association between hip/knee osteoarthritis (OA) with self-reported as well as performance-based functional limitations in a general elderly population. METHODS: We analyzed the data of 2,942 individuals, ages between 65 and 85 years,

  10. Osteoarthritis in the neonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weigel, W.; Hayek, W.H.; Bens, G.

    1979-01-01

    A fatally ending index case of sepsis osteoarthritis that was diagnosed retrospectively initiated this report. This patient had severe, asymmetrically distributed metaphyseal growthdisturbances, many long bones. In order to determine the features of early radiologic diagnosis we report the findings of 7 further patients with neonatal septic osteoarthritis with clinical and radiological follow-up. The most important observation for early radiologic diagnosis of osteoarthritis is the displacement of fat layers along the metaphysis. Other findings of the soft tissues have the same diagnostic value as bone destruction and subperiosteal new bone formation found one to three weeks later on roentgenfilms. Detecting early signs of osteoarthritis helps in localizing the focus for bacteriologic diagnosis, which is to be more successful than blood cultures. Diagnosing a joint empyema initiates surgical intervention for pressure relief in order to avoid necrosis of the epiphysis as seen in the femoral bone in septic arthritis of the hip joint. Early diagnosis and treatment to destruction of growing cartilage is necessary to avoid gross disturbances and length discrepancies of long bones. In cases of sepsis called 'babygram' and a repeat examination 10 to 14 days later is mandatory. (orig.) [de

  11. β2‑adrenergic receptor functionality and genotype in two different models of chronic inflammatory disease: Liver cirrhosis and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Reyes; Esteban, Pablo; Zapater, Pedro; Inda, María-Del-Mar; Conte, Anna Lucia; Gómez-Escolar, Laura; Martínez, Helena; Horga, José F; Palazon, José M; Peiró, Ana M

    2018-06-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the functional status of β2 adrenoceptors (β2AR) in two models of chronic inflammatory disease: liver cirrhosis (LC) and osteoarthritis (OA). The β2AR gene contains three single nucleotide polymorphisms at amino acid positions 16, 27 and 164. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential influence of lymphocyte β2AR receptor functionality and genotype in LC and OA patients. Blood samples from cirrhotic patients (n=52, hepatic venous pressure gradient 13±4 mmHg, CHILD 7±2 and MELD 11±4 scores), OA patients (n=30, 84% Kellgren‑Lawrence severity 4 grade, 14% knee replacement joint) and healthy volunteers as control group (n=26) were analyzed. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from whole blood and basal and isoproterenol induced adenylate cyclase activity (isoproterenol stimulus from 10‑9 to 10‑4 mM), and β2AR allelic variants (rs1042713, rs1042714, rs1800888) were determined. β2AR functionality was decreased in the two different models of chronic inflammatory disease studied, OA (50% vs. control) and LC (85% vs. control). In these patients, the strength of the β2AR response to adrenergic stimulation was very limited. Adrenergic modulation of PBMC function through the β2AR stimulus is decreased in chronic inflammatory processes including LC and OA, suggesting that the adrenergic system may be important in the development of these processes.

  12. Curcumin slows osteoarthritis progression and relieves osteoarthritis-associated pain symptoms in a post-traumatic osteoarthritis mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhuo; Leong, Daniel J; Xu, Lin; He, Zhiyong; Wang, Angela; Navati, Mahantesh; Kim, Sun J; Hirsh, David M; Hardin, John A; Cobelli, Neil J; Friedman, Joel M; Sun, Hui B

    2016-06-03

    Curcumin has been shown to have chondroprotective potential in vitro. However, its effect on disease and symptom modification in osteoarthritis (OA) is largely unknown. This study aimed to determine whether curcumin could slow progression of OA and relieve OA-related pain in a mouse model of destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM). Expression of selected cartilage degradative-associated genes was evaluated in human primary chondrocytes treated with curcumin and curcumin nanoparticles and assayed by real-time PCR. The mice subjected to DMM surgery were orally administered curcumin or topically administered curcumin nanoparticles for 8 weeks. Cartilage integrity was evaluated by Safranin O staining and Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) score, and by immunohistochemical staining of cleaved aggrecan and type II collagen, and levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 and ADAMTS5. Synovitis and subchondral bone thickness were scored based on histologic images. OA-associated pain and symptoms were evaluated by von Frey assay, and locomotor behavior including distance traveled and rearing. Both curcumin and nanoparticles encapsulating curcumin suppressed mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory mediators IL-1β and TNF-α, MMPs 1, 3, and 13, and aggrecanase ADAMTS5, and upregulated the chondroprotective transcriptional regulator CITED2, in primary cultured chondrocytes in the absence or presence of IL-1β. Oral administration of curcumin significantly reduced OA disease progression, but showed no significant effect on OA pain relief. Curcumin was detected in the infrapatellar fat pad (IPFP) following topical administration of curcumin nanoparticles on the skin of the injured mouse knee. Compared to vehicle-treated controls, topical treatment led to: (1) reduced proteoglycan loss and cartilage erosion and lower OARSI scores, (2) reduced synovitis and subchondral plate thickness, (3) reduced immunochemical staining of type II collagen and aggrecan

  13. A natural seaweed derived mineral supplement (Aquamin F for knee osteoarthritis: A randomised, placebo controlled pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuskowski Michael A

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis (OA is a slowly destructive process that may be influenced by a nutritional mineral balance in the body. Methods This small, double blind, placebo controlled pilot study investigated the impact of treatment with a natural multi-mineral supplement from seaweed (Aquamin on 6 minute walking distance (6 MWD, range of motion (ROM, and pain and joint mobility measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index in subjects with moderate to severe OA of the knee during gradual withdrawal of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs that were being used daily for pain management. Subjects (n = 29 with moderate to severe OA of the knee were randomised to receive either Aquamin (2400 mg/d or Placebo for up to 12 weeks. Results Of the 29 subjects initially randomized, only 22 subjects proceeded to treatment due to 7 subjects not meeting study selection criteria at baseline. Fourteen subjects completed the study and an ITT analysis (n = 22 of the data showed no significant differences in WOMAC scores however, the data did reveal significant improvements in passive and active extension ROM (0.83° ± 1.54 vs. -1.54° ± 2.43; difference, 5.2° ± 2.2, p = 0.028 and 6 MWD (150 ± 48 ft vs. 12.5 ± 31.5 ft; difference, 136 ± 57 ft, p = 0.03 in the Aquamin group compared to the placebo group; respectively, following a 50% reduction in NSAID use. The treatments were well tolerated and the adverse event profiles were not significantly different between the groups. Conclusion This small preliminary study suggests Aquamin may increase range of motion and walking distances in subjects with OA of the knee and may allow partial withdrawal of NSAIDs over 12 weeks of treatment. Additional research is needed to confirm these preliminary observations. Trial registration NCT00755482

  14. Management of osteoarthritis in general practice in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Caroline A; Harrison, Christopher; Tropea, Joanne; Hinman, Rana S; Britt, Helena; Bennell, Kim

    2014-04-01

    To describe management of osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip (OA-hip) and knee (OA-knee) by Australian general practitioners (GPs). We analyzed data from the Bettering the Evaluation and Care of Health program, from April 1, 2005 to March 31, 2010. Patient and GP characteristics and encounter management data were extracted. Data were classified by the International Classification of Primary Care, version 2, and summarized using descriptive statistics and 95% confidence intervals around point estimates. There were 489,900 GP encounters at which OA was managed (rate of 26.4 per 1,000 encounters). OA-hip was managed at a rate of 2.3 per 1,000 encounters (n = 1,106, 8.6% OA) and OA-knee at a rate of 6.2 per 1,000 (n = 3,058, 23.7% OA). The encounter management rate per 1,000 for OA-hip was higher among non-metropolitan dwellers (2.85 per 1,000 versus 1.97 per 1,000) and lower for non-English-speaking people (1.53 per 1,000 encounters versus 2.39 per 1,000). The rate for OA-knee was higher for non-English-speaking background (8.50 per 1,000 encounters versus 6.24 per 1,000) and lower among indigenous people (3.16 per 1,000 encounters versus 6.46 per 1,000). Referral to an orthopedic surgeon was the most frequently used nonpharmacologic management (OA-knee 17.4 per 100 contacts and OA-hip 17.7 per 100), followed by advice, education, and counselling. As first-line treatment, medication prescription rates (OA-knee 78.7 per 100 contacts and OA-hip 73.2 per 100) were substantially higher than rates of lifestyle management (OA-knee 20.7 per 100 contacts and OA-hip 14.8 per 100). OA-hip and OA-knee encounters and management differ. Nonpharmacologic treatments as first-line management were low compared with pharmacologic management rates, and surgical referral rates were high. However, lack of longitudinal data limits definitive assessment of appropriateness of care. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  15. Risk and consequences of osteoarthritis after a professional football career: a systematic review of the recent literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gouttebarge, V.; Inklaar, H.; Frings-Dresen, M. H.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess whether previous injury is a risk determinant for knee and ankle osteoarthritis (OA) in former professional football players and to explore OA-related activity and work limitations. To retrieve the relevant recent literature, the Medline, Embase and

  16. Pain and disability in patients with osteoarthritis of hip or knee: the relationship with articular, kinesiological, and psychological characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Baar, M. E.; Dekker, J.; Lemmens, J. A.; Oostendorp, R. A.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1998-01-01

    To determine to what extent articular, kinesiological, and psychological factors each contribute to pain and disability in patients with osteoarthritis (OA), after controlling for other factors. Cross sectional study among 200 patients with OA of the hip or knee. Dependent variables include pain

  17. Internal consistency and validity of an observational method for assessing disability in mobility in patients with osteoarthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steultjens, M.P.M.; Dekker, J.; Baar, M.E. van; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To establish the internal consistency of validity of an observational method for assessing diasbility in mobility in patients with osteoarthritis (OA), Methods: Data were obtained from 198 patients with OA of the hip or knee. Results of the observational method were compared with results

  18. Internal consistency and validity of an observational method for assessing disability in mobility in patients with osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steultjens, M. P.; Dekker, J.; van Baar, M. E.; Oostendorp, R. A.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1999-01-01

    To establish the internal consistency and validity of an observational method for assessing disability in mobility in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Data were obtained from 198 patients with OA of the hip or knee. Results of the observational method were compared with results of self-report

  19. The effect of glucosamine sulphate on osteoarthritis: design of a long- term randomised clinical trial [ISRCTN54513166].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.M. Rozendaal (Rianne); B.W. Koes (Bart); H.H. Weinans (Harrie); E.J. Uitterlinden (Elian); G.J.V.M. van Osch (Gerjo); A.Z. Ginai (Abida); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan); S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Pharmacological treatment for osteoarthritis (OA) can be divided into two groups: symptom-modifying drugs and disease-modifying drugs. Symptom-modifying drugs are currently the prescription of choice for patients with OA, as disease-modifying drugs are not yet available in

  20. Within-Person Pain Variability and Mental Health in Older Adults With Osteoarthritis: An Analysis Across 6 European Cohorts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Koning, Elisa J.; Timmermans, E.J.; van Schoor, N.M.; Stubbs, Brendon; van den Kommer, Tessa N.; Dennison, E.M.; Limongi, Federica; Castell, Maria Victoria; Edwards, M.H.; Queipo, Rocio; Cooper, Cyrus; Siviero, Paola; van der Pas, Suzan; Pedersen, N.L.; Sánchez-Martínez, Mercedes; Deeg, D.J.H.; Denkinger, Michael D.; Nikolaus, T.; Denkinger, M.; Peter, R.; Herbolsheimer, F.; Maggi, S.; Zambon, S.; Limongi, F.; Noale, M.; Siviero, P.; Deeg, D.J.H.; van der Pas, S.; van Schoor, N.M.; Schaap, L.A.; Timmermans, E.J.; Lips, P.; Otero, Á.; Castell, M.V.; Sanchez-Martinez, M.; Pedersen, N.L.; Dennison, E.M.; Cooper, C.; Edwards, M.H.

    Pain is a key symptom of Osteoarthritis (OA) and has been linked to poor mental health. Pain fluctuates over time within individuals, but a paucity of studies have considered day-to-day fluctuations of joint pain in relation to affective symptoms in older persons with OA. This study investigated the

  1. Time spent in primary care for hip osteoarthritis patients once the diagnosis is set : a prospective observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paans, Nienke; van der Veen, Willem Jan; van der Meer, Klaas; Bulstra, Sjoerd K.; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Stevens, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Background: Previous research on time to referral to orthopaedic surgery has predominantly used hip complaints as starting point instead of the moment the diagnosis of osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip is established, therefore little is known about the length of time a patient diagnosed with hip OA

  2. Relationship between insulin-like growth factor-1 and radiographic disease in patients with primary osteoarthritis: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claessen, K.M.; Ramautar, S.R.; Pereira, A.M.; Smit, J.W.A.; Biermasz, N.R.; Kloppenburg, M.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between radiographic osteoarthritis (OA) and either serum insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) levels or IGF-1 gene polymorphisms in patients with primary OA. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review of reported associations between circulating IGF-1 and/or

  3. Evaluation of education for people with osteoarthritis of the knee: recruitment and retention issues in study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Fiona; Triggs, Eric; Cadbury, Heather; Axford, John; Victor, Christina

    1998-10-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common and often disabling condition affecting older adults. Treatment using anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) often contributes to morbidity ( 1 ). It is a common reason for people seeking help from primary care ( 2 ). However, unfortunately management approaches often reflect the ageist view that OA is an inevitable consequence of ageing.

  4. The effectiveness of exercise therapy in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee: a randomized clinical trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baar, M.E. van; Dekker, J.; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; Bijl, D.; Voorn, T.B.; Lemmens, J.A.M.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness of exercise therapy in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip or knee. Methods: A randomized single blind, clinical trial was conducted in a primary care setting. Patients with hip or knee OA by American College of Rheumatology criteria were

  5. The effectiveness of exercise therapy in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee: a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Baar, M. E.; Dekker, J.; Oostendorp, R. A.; Bijl, D.; Voorn, T. B.; Lemmens, J. A.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1998-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of exercise therapy in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip or knee. A randomized single blind, clinical trial was conducted in a primary care setting. Patients with hip or knee OA by American College of Rheumatology criteria were selected. Two intervention

  6. Thermotherapy for treatment of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, L; Yonge, K A; Robinson, V; Marchand, S; Judd, M; Wells, G; Tugwell, P

    2003-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a degenerative joint disease that affects mostly the weight-bearing joints in the knees and hips. As the affected joint degenerates pain and restriction of movement often occur. Inflammation can also occur sometimes resulting in edema of the joint with OA. Treatment focuses on decreasing pain and improving movement. To determine the effectiveness of thermotherapy in the treatment of OA of the knee. The outcomes of interest were relief of pain, reduction of edema, and improvement of flexion or range of motion (ROM) and function. Two independent reviewers selected randomized and controlled clinical trials with participants with clinical and/or radiological confirmation of OA of the knee; and interventions using heat or cold therapy compared with standard treatment and/or placebo. Trials comparing head to head therapies, such as two different types of diathermy, were excluded. Randomized and controlled clinical trials including participants with clinical or radiographical confirmation of OA of the knee; and interventions using heat or cold compared to standard treatment or placebo were considered for inclusion. Study results were extracted by two independent reviewers. Outcomes were continuous in nature (pain, strength, improvement) and were analyzed by weighted mean difference using a fixed effects model. Graphical data were used when table data were not available. Three randomized controlled trials, involving 179 patients, were included in this review. The included trials varied in terms of design, outcomes measured, cryotherapy or thermotherapy treatments and overall methodological quality. In one trial, administration of 20 minutes of ice massage, 5 days per week, for 3 weeks, compared to control demonstrated a clinically important benefit for knee OA on increasing quadriceps strength (29% relative difference). There was also a statistically significant improvement, but no clinical benefit in improving knee flexion ROM (8% relative difference

  7. Impact of Osteoarthritis on Household Catastrophic Health Expenditures in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoungyoung; Cho, Soo-Kyung; Kim, Daehyun; Kim, Dalho; Jung, Sun-Young; Jang, Eun Jin; Sung, Yoon-Kyoung

    2018-05-21

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a disease of old age whose prevalence is increasing. This study explored the impact of OA on household catastrophic health expenditure (CHE) in Korea. We used data on 5,200 households from the Korea Health Panel Survey in 2013 and estimated annual living expenses and out-of-pocket (OOP) payments. Household CHE was defined when a household's total OOP health payments exceeded 10%, 20%, 30%, or 40% of the household's capacity to pay. To compare the OOP payments of households with OA individuals and those without OA, OA households were matched 1:1 with households containing a member with other chronic disease such as neoplasm, hypertension, heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, diabetes, or osteoporosis. The impact of OA on CHE was determined by multivariable logistic analysis. A total of 1,289 households were included, and households with and without OA patients paid mean annual OOP payments of $2,789 and $2,607, respectively. The prevalence of household CHE at thresholds of 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40% were higher in households with OA patients than in those without OA patients ( P < 0.001). The presence of OA patients in each household contributed significantly to CHE at thresholds of 10% (odds ratio [OR], 1.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16-1.87), 20% (OR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.01-1.66), and 30% (OR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.05-1.78), but not of 40% (OR, 1.17; 95% CI, 0.87-1.57). The presence of OA patients in Korean households is significantly related to CHE. Policy makers should try to reduce OOP payments in households with OA patients.

  8. Use of dimensionality reduction for structural mapping of hip joint osteoarthritis data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoharatos, C; Fotopoulos, S; Boniatis, I; Panayiotakis, G; Panagiotopoulos, E

    2009-01-01

    A visualization-based, computer-oriented, classification scheme is proposed for assessing the severity of hip osteoarthritis (OA) using dimensionality reduction techniques. The introduced methodology tries to cope with the confined ability of physicians to structurally organize the entire available set of medical data into semantically similar categories and provide the capability to make visual observations among the ensemble of data using low-dimensional biplots. In this work, 18 pelvic radiographs of patients with verified unilateral hip OA are evaluated by experienced physicians and assessed into Normal, Mild and Severe following the Kellgren and Lawrence scale. Two regions of interest corresponding to radiographic hip joint spaces are determined and representative features are extracted using a typical texture analysis technique. The structural organization of all hip OA data is accomplished using distance and topology preservation-based dimensionality reduction techniques. The resulting map is a low-dimensional biplot that reflects the intrinsic organization of the ensemble of available data and which can be directly accessed by the physician. The conceivable visualization scheme can potentially reveal critical data similarities and help the operator to visually estimate their initial diagnosis. In addition, it can be used to detect putative clustering tendencies, examine the presence of data similarities and indicate the existence of possible false alarms in the initial perceptual evaluation

  9. PRP in OA knee - update, current confusions and future options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, Mandeep S; Patel, Sandeep; John, Rakesh

    2017-01-01

    Positive results have been uniformly observed by various researchers for platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in early osteoarthritis (OA) knee in the past few years. PRP has clearly demonstrated its supremacy in comparison to hyaluronic acid (HA) and placebo in various clinical trials and is undoubtedly the best option available for symptomatic treatment in early OA. The release of growth factors from PRP occurs immediately and lasts for around three weeks and the clinical effect tends to wane down by the end of the year. Prolonged and sustained release of growth factors from platelets could possibly help in much better biological healing and sustained clinical effects. PRP in combination with biocompatible carriers could be one way of achieving this. Gelatin hydrogel PRP and chitosan PRP seem to be promising based on early in vitro studies and animal studies. PRP in combination with hyaluronic acid also seems to be additive. This article intends to discuss the present status of the PRP, confusions surrounding its use, upcoming trends and ideas for improvising PRP for use early OA knees based on available evidence. © The Authors, published by EDP Sciences, 2017.

  10. Effect of walking versus resistance exercise on pain and function in older adults with knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srishti Sanat Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Knee osteoarthritis (OA is an important cause of pain and functional limitation in older people. Several short-term studies state that walking and resistance exercise reduce pain and disability and improve physical fitness in people with knee OA. Aims: To compare the effect of walking and resistance exercise on pain and function in older adults with knee OA. Materials and Methods: A quasi-experimental study was conducted at the physiotherapy department of General Hospital. Twenty one males and females in the age range of 60-75 years, diagnosed with knee OA by the orthopedic department according to the American College of Rheumatology criteria were randomly allocated into three groups. Conventional physiotherapy treatment remained common for all the groups. Group A subjects additionally walked at a self-paced speed. Group B subjects received resistance exercise for hip and knee muscles. Group C subjects received conventional physiotherapy treatment alone. Intervention was given 5 days/week for 2 weeks. Pain intensity at rest and during activity was assessed using visual analog scale (VAS and physical function was assessed by Western Ontario McMasters Arthritic Index (WOMAC. The level of significance was set at 5%. Results: There was a significant difference in VAS at rest within group A and group B. The difference in VAS during activity and WOMAC scores was significant within each group. Mean difference in VAS during activity revealed a significant difference between group B and group A and between group B and group C. The mean difference in WOMAC scores was significant between group A and group C. Mean difference in VAS at rest showed no difference between the groups. Conclusion: Resistance exercises are more effective in reducing pain during activity and walking is more effective in improving physical function in older adults with knee OA.

  11. The study of subchondral lesions in osteoarthritis of the knee using magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagishi, Hiroshi

    2001-01-01

    In order to examine the significance of the signal abnormalities of subchondral bone in osteoarthritic knee with 0.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), especially in T2-low signal lesions which show a low signal intensity on both the T1- and T2-weighted images and T2-high signal lesions which show a low signal intensity on the T1-weighted image and a high signal intensity on the T2-weighted image, we examined 54 patients (representing 58 knees) with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee on MRI as compared with the arthroscopic findings or operative findings and histologically evaluated them. In addition, in order to elucidate what becomes of those signal abnormalities in the subchondral bone after biomechanical treatment utilizing a high tibial osteotomy (HTO) which reduces the maldistributed load, we examined 30 patients (representing 34 knees) under HTO on MRI and compared these findings with the arthroscopic findings. The incidence of the presence of those signal abnormalities of subchondral bone on MRI tended to correlate with the severity of the articular cartilage damage, and also reflected the degree of damage to the articular cartilage well. In a histologically investigation, T2-high signal lesions showed granulation tissue with high vascularity, which seemed to be an active phase in OA. T2-low signal lesions of OA in a late stage showed subchondral sclerosis histologically. In addition, the signal changes of the subchondral bone on MRI seemed correlate with the changes in the load distribution in the knee joint because T2-high signal lesions before HTO were observed to either diminish or disappear after undergoing a successful osteotomy. The signal abnormalities of the subchondral bone on MRI on OA thus helped in determining the appropriate phase, therapeutic effects and prognosis of OA. (author)

  12. Effects of home-based resistance training and neuromuscular electrical stimulation in knee osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce-Brand Robert A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quadriceps femoris muscle (QFM weakness is a feature of knee osteoarthritis (OA and exercise programs that strengthen this muscle group can improve function, disability and pain. Traditional supervised resistance exercise is however resource intensive and dependent on good adherence which can be challenging to achieve in patients with significant knee OA. Because of the limitations of traditional exercise programs, interest has been shown in the use of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES to strengthen the QFM. We conducted a single-blind, prospective randomized controlled study to compare the effects of home-based resistance training (RT and NMES on patients with moderate to severe knee OA. Methods 41 patients aged 55 to 75 years were randomised to 6 week programs of RT, NMES or a control group receiving standard care. The primary outcome was functional capacity measured using a walk test, stair climb test and chair rise test. Additional outcomes were self-reported disability, quadriceps strength and cross-sectional area. Outcomes were assessed pre- and post-intervention and at 6 weeks post-intervention (weeks 1, 8 and 14 respectively. Results There were similar, significant improvements in functional capacity for the RT and NMES groups at week 8 compared to week 1 (p≤0.001 and compared to the control group (p  Conclusions Home-based NMES is an acceptable alternative to exercise therapy in the management of knee OA, producing similar improvements in functional capacity. Trial registration: Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN85231954

  13. Diet Quality and Nutrient Intake of Urban Overweight and Obese Primarily African American Older Adults with Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevasti Vergis

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Diet quality may be a unique target for preventing and managing obesity-related osteoarthritis (OA. Using the Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HEI-2010, this study examined the nutrient intake and diet quality of 400 urban overweight and obese primarily African American older adults with self-reported lower extremity OA. Associations between sociodemographic and health-related factors and diet quality were explored. Participants (mean age 67.8 years, SD 5.9 were included. Habitual dietary intake was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ. Nutrient intake and diet quality were calculated from the FFQ. Results indicated that diet quality needs improvement (HEI-2010: 66.3 (SD 10.5. Age, body mass index, employment (multivariable model only, and OA severity (bivariate model only were significant predictors of HEI-2010 total score in linear models. Mean intakes for fiber, calcium, and vitamin D were below recommendations, while percentage of calories as total fat exceeded recommendations. These findings can inform future dietary intervention trials and public health messaging for a sub-population at a high risk for obesity-related OA.

  14. Measuring patient satisfaction with exercise therapy for knee osteoarthritis: evaluating the utility of the physiotherapy outpatient survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, H P; Keogan, F; Gilsenan, C; Waldron, L; O'Connell, P

    2010-06-01

    To assess patient satisfaction with exercise for knee osteoarthritis (OA). A convenience sample of 27 patients recruited to a randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing open kinetic chain and closed kinetic chain exercises for knee OA were reassessed at nine months post-randomization. Clinical outcomes included self-report and physical performance measures of function and pain severity. Patients also completed the Physiotherapy Outpatient Survey (POPS), which is a multi-dimensional measure of patient satisfaction with physiotherapy. There was no significant difference in satisfaction between the two intervention groups. Overall mean satisfaction for the entire cohort was 4.07 of a maximum score of 5 (standard deviation (SD) = 0.52). Lower levels of satisfaction with outcome (mean = 3.56, SD = 0.8) were reported compared with other domains of expectations, communication, organization and the therapist (mean = 3.79-4.49; SDs = 0.42-0.92). Both intervention groups improved from baseline on clinical outcomes of pain, self-report function and walking distance, with no significant differences between the two groups. High levels of satisfaction were reported in this subsample of knee OA patients participating in an RCT evaluating the effects of different exercise approaches for knee OA. Satisfaction varied depending on the satisfaction domain, with lower satisfaction with outcome compared with other aspects of care. The POPS questionnaire can be used to measure the multi-dimensional aspects of satisfaction with physiotherapy.

  15. Treatment of pain associated to knee osteoarthritis in the elderly: a randomized double-blind clinical trial with lysine clonixinate

    OpenAIRE

    Santos,Fânia Cristina; Souza,Polianna Mara Rodrigues de; Toniolo Neto,João; Atallah,Álvaro Nagib

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common arthropathy and one of the major causes of chronic pain in the elderly population, which may lead to major functional incapacity of these individuals. Aiming at treating pain of elderly patients with knee OA, we have used lysine clonixinate (LC) and have evaluated its effectiveness METHOD: Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial with 109 elderly patients with knee OA-related pain. Participants were distribut...

  16. Predictors of response to prefabricated foot orthoses or rocker-sole footwear in individuals with first metatarsophalangeal joint osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Menz, HB; Auhl, M; Tan, JM; Levinger, P; Roddy, E; Munteanu, SE

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Osteoarthritis of the first metatarsophalangeal joint (1st MTPJ OA) is a common and disabling condition commonly managed with footwear and orthotic interventions. The objective of this study was to identify factors associated with a successful treatment response in people with 1st MTPJ OA provided with prefabricated orthoses or rocker-sole footwear as part of a randomised clinical trial. METHODS: People with 1st MTPJ OA (n = 88) who participated in a randomised trial were allocate...

  17. The Relationship Between Pain and Eating among Overweight and Obese Individuals with Osteoarthritis: An Ecological Momentary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karmel W Choi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Osteoarthritis (OA patients who are overweight or obese report higher levels of pain compared with their normal-weight OA counterparts. Evidence suggests that overweight or obese OA patients also experience pain relief from eating foods high in calories, fat or sugar. Eating to alleviate pain may be problematic because it can lead to additional weight gain, which may contribute to heightened pain.

  18. Uncovering transcription factor and microRNA risk regulatory pathways associated with osteoarthritis by network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhenhua; Zhang, Chi; He, Lingxiao; Sui, Yanfang; Lin, Xiafei; Pan, Jingjing

    2018-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of joint disease. The development of inflammation have been considered to play a key role during the progression of OA. Regulatory pathways are known to play crucial roles in many pathogenic processes. Thus, deciphering these risk regulatory pathways is critical for elucidating the mechanisms underlying OA. We constructed an OA-specific regulatory network by integrating comprehensive curated transcription and post-transcriptional resource involving transcription factor (TF) and microRNA (miRNA). To deepen our understanding of underlying molecular mechanisms of OA, we developed an integrated systems approach to identify OA-specific risk regulatory pathways. In this study, we identified 89 significantly differentially expressed genes between normal and inflamed areas of OA patients. We found the OA-specific regulatory network was a standard scale-free network with small-world properties. It significant enriched many immune response-related functions including leukocyte differentiation, myeloid differentiation and T cell activation. Finally, 141 risk regulatory pathways were identified based on OA-specific regulatory network, which contains some known regulator of OA. The risk regulatory pathways may provide clues for the etiology of OA and be a potential resource for the discovery of novel OA-associated disease genes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Variations in the pre-operative status of patients coming to primary hip replacement for osteoarthritis in European orthopaedic centres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puhl Wofhart

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Total hip joint replacement (THR is a high volume, effective intervention for hip osteoarthritis (OA. However, indications and determinants of outcome remain unclear. The 'EUROHIP consortium' has undertaken a cohort study to investigate these questions. This paper describes the variations in disease severity in this cohort and the relationships between clinical and radiographic severity, and explores some of the determinants of variation. Methods A minimum of 50 consecutive, consenting patients coming to primary THR for primary hip OA in each of the 20 participating orthopaedic centres entered the study. Pre-operative data included demographics, employment and educational attainment, drug utilisation, and involvement of other joints. Each subject completed the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC – Likert version 3.1. Other data collected at the time of surgery included the prosthesis used and American Society of Anaesthesiologists (ASA status. Pre-operative radiographs were read by the same three readers for Kellgren and Lawrence (K&L grading and Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI atlas features. Regression analyses were carried out. Results Data from 1327 subjects has been analysed. The mean age of the group was 65.7 years, and there were more women (53.4% than men. Most (79% were ASA status 1 or 2. Reported disease duration was 5 years or less in 69.2%. Disease in other joint sites was common. Radiographs were available in 1051 subjects and the K&L grade was 3 or 4 in 95.8%. There was much more variation in clinical severity (WOMAC score; the mean total WOMAC score was 59.2 (SD 16.1. The radiographic severity showed no correlation with WOMAC scores. Significantly higher WOMAC scores (worse disease were seen in older people, women, those with obesity, those with worse general health, and those with lower educational attainment. Conclusion 1. Clinical disease severity

  20. ALPHA-CTX is associated with subchondral bone turnover and predicts progression of joint space narrowing and osteophytes in osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, Janet L; Bay-Jensen, Anne C; Huffman, Kim M; He, Yi; Leeming, Diana J; McDaniel, Gary E; Karsdal, Morten A; Kraus, Virginia B

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate joint tissue remodeling, with urinary collagen biomarkers, uALPHA CTX and uCTXII, and their association with osteoarthritis (OA) severity, progression, and localized knee bone turnover. Methods Participants (N=149) with symptomatic and radiographic knee OA underwent fixed flexion knee radiography at baseline and 3 years, and late-phase bone scintigraphy of both knees at baseline, scored semi-quantitatively for osteophyte (OST) and joint space narrowing (JSN) severity and uptake intensity with scores summed across knees. Urinary concentrations of ALPHA CTX and CTXII were determined by ELISA. Immunohistochemistry of human OA knees was performed to localize the joint tissue origin of the biomarker epitopes. Results uALPHA CTX correlated strongly with intensity of bone scintigraphic uptake, and JSN and OST progression (risk ratio=13.2 and 3, respectively). uCTXII was strongly associated with intensity of bone scintigraphic uptake, with JSN and OST severity, and OA progression based on OST. uALPHA CTX localized primarily to high bone turnover areas in subchondral bone; CTXII localized to the bone-cartilage interface, the tidemark, and damaged articular cartilage. Conclusion Baseline uALPHA CTX, localized to high turnover areas of subchondral bone, was associated with dynamic bone turnover of knees signified by scintigraphy, and progression of both OST and JSN. uCTXII correlated with JSN and OST severity, and progression of OST. To our knowledge, this represents the first report of serological markers reflecting subchondral bone turnover. These collagen markers may be useful for non-invasive detection and quantification of active subchondral bone turnover and joint remodeling in knee OA. PMID:24909851

  1. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISAs) for metalloproteinase derived type II collagen neoepitope, CIIM--increased serum CIIM in subjects with severe radiographic osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay-Jensen, Anne-Christine; Liu, Qi; Byrjalsen, Inger

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In joint degenerative diseases, the collagens are degraded by matrix metalloproteinases and protein fragments are released to serum as potential biomarkers. METHODS: A collagen type II specific neoepitope, CIIM, was identified (…RDGAAG(1053)) by mass spectrometry. Two ELISAs against...... the neoepitope were developed. CIIM was measured in cartilage explants in the presence or absence of protease inhibitors. CIIM was measured in OA synovial fluid (n=51) and serum (n=156). Knee OA was graded by standard Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) score. RESULTS: The ELISAs showed good technical performance; CV%,

  2. Factors Associated with the Use of Hyaluronic Acid and Corticosteroid Injections among Patients with Radiographically Confirmed Knee Osteoarthritis: A Retrospective Data Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapane, Kate L; Liu, Shao-Hsien; Dubé, Catherine E; Driban, Jeffrey B; McAlindon, Timothy E; Eaton, Charles B

    2017-02-01

    Despite the rapid proliferation of hyaluronate (HA) and corticosteroid (CO) injections and clinical guidelines regarding their use in osteoarthritis (OA), information on the characteristics of people receiving these injections is scarce. We describe the use of injections among adults with radiographically confirmed knee OA and identify factors associated with injection use. We used publicly available data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI), an international collaboration sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, and included participants with ≥1 radiographically confirmed knee OA (Kellgren-Lawrence grade ≥2 [definite osteophytes and possible joint space narrowing (JSN) on anteroposterior weight-bearing radiograph]) at baseline. We matched 415 participants who received at least 1 HA and/or CO injection during the 6-month interval before 1 of the first 7 annual follow-up assessments to 1841 injection nonusers by randomly selecting a study visit to match the distribution observed in the injection users. Multinomial logistic regression models were used for identifying factors associated with injection use, including sociodemographic and clinical/functional factors. Eighteen percent of the 2256 patients identified as having knee OA had received at least 1 injection (years 1-7, 16.9%, 13.7%, 16.6%, 13.5%, 15.9%, 13.5%, and 9.9%, respectively), most commonly with CO (68.4%). HA and CO were more commonly injected in those with a higher annual household income (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] [95% CI] with HA, US ≥$50,000 vs injection may be associated with higher socioeconomic positioning and indicators of greater disease severity in patients with knee OA. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Is early osteoarthritis associated with differences in joint congruence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conconi, Michele; Halilaj, Eni; Parenti Castelli, Vincenzo; Crisco, Joseph J

    2014-12-18

    Previous studies suggest that osteoarthritis (OA) is related to abnormal or excessive articular contact stress. The peak pressure resulting from an applied load is determined by many factors, among which is shape and relative position and orientation of the articulating surfaces or, referring to a more common nomenclature, joint congruence. It has been hypothesized that anatomical differences may be among the causes of OA. Individuals with less congruent joints would likely develop higher peak pressure and thus would be more exposed to the risk of OA onset. The aim of this work was to determine if the congruence of the first carpometacarpal (CMC) joint differs with the early onset of OA or with sex, as the female population has a higher incidence of OA. 59 without and 38 with early OA were CT-scanned with their dominant or arthritic hand in a neutral configuration. The proposed measure of joint congruence is both shape and size dependent. The correlation of joint congruence with pathology and sex was analyzed both before and after normalization for joint size. We found a significant correlation between joint congruence and sex due to the sex-related differences in size. The observed correlation disappeared after normalization. Although joint congruence increased with size, it did not correlate significantly with the onset of early OA. Differences in joint congruence in this population may not be a primary cause of OA onset or predisposition, at least for the CMC joint. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Aging and Osteoarthritis: An Inevitable Encounter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Hügle

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a major health burden of our time. Age is the most prominent risk factor for the development and progression of OA. The mechanistic influence of aging on OA has different facets. On a molecular level, matrix proteins such as collagen or proteoglycans are modified, which alters cartilage function. Collagen cross-linking within the bone results in impaired plasticity and increased stiffness. Synovial or fat tissue, menisci but also ligaments and muscles play an important role in the pathogenesis of OA. In the elderly, sarcopenia or other causes of muscle atrophy are frequently encountered, leading to a decreased stability of the joint. Inflammation in form of cellular infiltration of synovial tissue or subchondral bone and expression of inflammatory cytokines is more and more recognized as trigger of OA. It has been demonstrated that joint movement can exhibit anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Therefore physical activity or physiotherapy in the elderly should be encouraged, also in order to increase the muscle mass. A reduced stem cell capacity in the elderly is likely associated with a decrease of repair mechanisms of the musculoskeletal system. New treatment strategies, for example with mesenchymal stem cells (MSC are investigated, despite clear evidence for their efficacy is lacking.

  5. Reflections about Osteoarthritis and Curcuma longa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akuri, Marina Cristina; Barbalho, Sandra Maria; Val, Raíssa Meira; Guiguer, Elen Landgraf

    2017-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic inflammatory degenerative process that affects joints such as the hands, hips, shoulders, feet, spine, and especially knees in millions of people worldwide. Some authors have shown that Curcuma longa components may exhibit benefic effects in the treatment of degenerative diseases as OA. This plant belongs to the family Zingiberaceae and it is popularly known as turmeric or saffron. This review intended to perform a retrospective search to identify studies involving humans and animal models. This review was based on articles linking OA and C. longa. Databases as Medline, Science Direct, and Lilacs were consulted and a retrospective search was carried out in order to identify studies involving humans and animal models. The curcuminoids from C. longa exhibit actions at different locations in the pathogenesis of OA once it may play an important role as anti-inflammatory, down-regulating enzymes as phospholipase A2, cyclooxygenase-2, and lipoxygenases, and reducing tumor necrosis factor-alpha-and interleukins such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and IL-8. They also act as inducer of apoptosis in synoviocytes, decreasing the inflammation process and may also reduce the synthesis of reactive oxygen species. For these reasons, new pharmaceutical technology and pharmacological studies should be proposed to determine the dose, the best delivery vehicle, pharmaceutical formulation and route of administration of this plant so its use as an adjunct in the treatment of OA may become a reality in clinical practice. PMID:28503046

  6. Does occupational therapy reduce the need for surgery in carpometacarpal osteoarthritis? Protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjeken, Ingvild; Eide, Ruth Else Mehl; Klokkeide, Åse; Matre, Karin Hoegh; Olsen, Monika; Mowinckel, Petter; Andreassen, Øyvor; Darre, Siri; Nossum, Randi

    2016-11-15

    In the absence of disease-modifying interventions for hand osteoarthritis (OA), occupational therapy (OT) comprising patient education, hand exercises, assistive devices and orthoses are considered as core treatments, whereas surgery are recommended for those with severe carpometacarpal (CMC1) OA. However, even though CMC1 surgery may reduce pain and improve function, the risk of adverse effects is high, and randomized controlled trials comparing surgery with non-surgical interventions are warranted. This multicentre randomized controlled trial aims to address the following questions: Does OT in the period before surgical consultation reduce the need for surgery in CMC1-OA? What are patients' motivation and reasons for wanting CMC1-surgery? Are there differences between departments of rheumatology concerning the degree of CMC1-OA, pain and functional limitations in patients who are referred for surgical consultation for CMC1 surgery? Is the Measure of Activity Performance of the Hand a reliable measure in patients with CMC1-OA? Do patients with CMC1-OA with and without affection of the distal and proximal interphalangeal finger joints differ with regard to symptoms and function? Do the degree of CMC1-OA, symptoms and functional limitations significantly predict improvement after 2 years following OT or CMC1-surgery? Is OT more cost-effective than surgery in the management of CMC1-OA? All persons referred for surgical consultation due to their CMC1-OA at one of three Norwegian departments of rheumatology are invited to participate. Those who agree attend a clinical assessment and report their symptoms, function and motivation for surgery in validated outcome measures, before they are randomly selected to receive OT in the period before surgical consultation (estimated n = 180). The primary outcome will be the number of participants in each group who have received surgical treatment after 2 years. Secondary and tertiary outcomes are pain, function and

  7. Impact of clinical osteoarthritis of the hip, knee and hand on self-rated health in six European countries: the European Project on OSteoArthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schoor, N M; Zambon, S; Castell, M V; Cooper, C; Denkinger, M; Dennison, E M; Edwards, M H; Herbolsheimer, F; Maggi, S; Sánchez-Martinez, M; Pedersen, N L; Peter, R; Schaap, L A; Rijnhart, J J M; van der Pas, S; Deeg, D J H

    2016-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) has been shown to be associated with decreased physical function, which may impact upon a person's self-rated health (SRH). Only a few studies have examined the association between OA and SRH in the general population, but to date none have used a clinical definition of OA. The objectives are: (1) To examine the cross-sectional association between clinical OA and fair-to-poor SRH in the general population; (2) To examine whether this association differs between countries; (3) To examine whether physical function is a mediator in the association between clinical OA and SRH. Baseline data of the European Project on OSteoArthritis (EPOSA) were used, which includes pre-harmonized data from six European cohort studies (n = 2709). Clinical OA was defined according to the American College of Rheumatology criteria. SRH was assessed using one question: How is your health in general? Physical function was assessed using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities OA Index and Australian/Canadian OA Hand Index. The prevalence of fair-to-poor SRH ranged from 19.8 % in the United Kingdom to 63.5 % in Italy. Although country differences in the strength of the associations were observed, clinical OA of the hip, knee and hand were significantly associated with fair-to-poor SRH in five out of six European countries. In most countries and at most sites, the association between clinical OA and fair-to-poor SRH was partly or fully mediated by physical function. Clinical OA at different sites was related to fair-to-poor SRH in the general population. Most associations were (partly) mediated by physical functioning, indicating that deteriorating physical function in patients with OA should be a point of attention in patient care.

  8. Leptin - a link between obesity and osteoarthritis. applications for prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuolteenaho, Katriina; Koskinen, Anna; Moilanen, Eeva

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common cause of musculoskeletal disability and pain in the world. The current drug treatment for OA is symptom relieving, and there is an urgent need for treatments that could retard, prevent or repair cartilage destruction in OA. Obesity is a major risk factor for OA. Traditionally, it has been thought to contribute to the development of OA by increasing the load on weight-bearing joints. However, this appears to be an over-simplification, because obesity is also linked to OA in the hand and finger joints. Recent studies have shown that adipocytokine leptin is a possible link between obesity and OA: Leptin levels in synovial fluid are increased in obese patients, leptin receptor (Ob-R) is expressed in cartilage, and leptin induces the production of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), pro-inflammatory mediators and nitric oxide (NO) in chondrocytes. Furthermore, according to the very recent findings, not only leptin levels in the joint but also leptin sensitivity in the cartilage are enhanced in obese OA patients. The findings supporting leptin as a causative link between obesity and OA offer leptin as a potential target to the development of disease-modifying drugs for osteoarthritis (DMOAD), especially for obese patients. © 2013 Nordic Pharmacological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Reliability and validity of the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) Osteoarthritis Index in Italian patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaffi, F; Leardini, G; Canesi, B; Mannoni, A; Fioravanti, A; Caporali, R; Lapadula, G; Punzi, L

    2003-08-01

    The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) Osteoarthritis (OA) Index is a tested questionnaire to assess symptoms and physical functional disability in patients with OA of the knee and the hip. We adapted the WOMAC for the Italian language and tested its metric properties in 304 patients with symptomatic OA of the knee. Three hundred and four consecutive patients, attending 29 rheumatologic outpatient clinic in northern, central, and southern Italy, were asked to answer two disease-specific questionnaires (WOMAC and Lequesne algofunctional index) and one generic instrument (Medical Outcomes Study SF-36 Health Survey-MOS SF-36). A sample of 258 patients was readministered the WOMAC 7-10 days after the first visit and the structured interview, which also assessed demographic and other characteristics. Internal consistency was assessed using Cronbach's alpha, reliability using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), and construct and discriminant validity using Spearman's correlations, Wilcoxon rank sum test, and Kruskal-Wallis test. All WOMAC subscales (pain, stiffness, and physical function) were internally consistent with Cronbach's coefficient alpha of 0.91, 0.81, and 0.84, respectively. Test-retest reliability was satisfactory with ICCs of 0.86, 0.68, and 0.89, respectively. In comparison with the SF-36, the expected correlations were found when comparing items measuring similar constructs, supporting the concepts of convergent construct validity. Very high correlations were also obtained between WOMAC scores and Lequesne OA algofunctional index. WOMAC physical function, but not WOMAC stiffness and pain subscales, was weakly associated with radiological OA severity (P=0.03). Also, WOMAC pain score was inversely correlated (P=0.01) with years of formal education. Examination of discriminant validity showed that the scores on the WOMAC and SF-36 followed hypothesized patterns: the WOMAC discriminated better among subjects with varying severity of

  10. Effects of intra-articular hyaluronic acid injection on immunohistochemical characterization of joint afferents in a rat model of knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeuchi, M; Izumi, M; Aso, K; Sugimura, N; Kato, T; Tani, T

    2015-03-01

    Intra-articular hyaluronic acid (HA) injection, known as viscosupplementation, is a widely used therapy for pain relief in knee osteoarthritis (OA). Long-term clinical efficacy of HA has been reported in spite of a relatively short residence time. Herein, we evaluated our hypothesis that intra-articular HA injection could reduce the OA-associated changes in joint afferents. OA was induced by intra-articular injection of mono-iodoacetate in rats. Animals in the OA + HA group were given three weekly intra-articular HA injections. Pain-related behaviours, including weight-bearing asymmetry and mechanical hyperalgesia of the paw, knee joint histology and immunohistochemistry of joint afferents identified by retrograde labelling, were compared between groups (naïve, OA and OA + HA). OA rats showed pain-related behaviours and up-regulation of pain-related neurochemical markers [calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), tyrosine receptor kinase A (TrkA) and acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3)] in joint afferents. HA injections reduced not only the severity of OA and pain behaviours but also OA-associated neurochemical changes in joint afferents. The differences between OA and OA + HA were statistically significant in CGRP (61 ± 10% vs. 51 ± 10%; p = 0.0406) but not significant in TrkA (62 ± 10% vs. 54 ± 9%; p = 0.0878) and ASIC3 (38 ± 9% vs. 32 ± 8%; p = 0.3681). Intra-articular HA injections reduced the severity of OA, decreased mechanical hyperalgesia of the paw, but not weight-bearing asymmetry, and attenuated OA-associated up-regulation of CGRP, but not TrkA and ASIC3, in joint afferents. The modulatory effects of HA on joint afferents is one of the underlying mechanisms of the gap between HA residence time and duration of clinical efficacy. © 2014 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  11. Osteoarthritis: Control of human cartilage hypertrophic differentiation. Research highlight van: Gremlin1, frizzled-related protein, and Dkk-1 are key regulators of human articular cartilage homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buckland, J.; Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Disruption of articular cartilage homeostasis is important in osteoarthritis (OA) pathogenesis, key to which is activation of articular chondrocyte hypertrophic differentiation. Healthy articular cartilage is resistant to hypertrophic differentiation, whereas growth-plate cartilage is destined to

  12. All-cause mortality and serious cardiovascular events in people with hip and knee osteoarthritis: a population based cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian A Hawker

    Full Text Available Because individuals with osteoarthritis (OA avoid physical activities that exacerbate symptoms, potentially increasing risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD and death, we assessed the relationship between OA disability and these outcomes.In a population cohort aged 55+ years with at least moderately severe symptomatic hip and/or knee OA, OA disability (Western Ontario McMaster Universities (WOMAC OA scores; Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ walking score; use of walking aids and other covariates were assessed by questionnaire. Survey data were linked to health administrative data to determine the relationship between baseline OA symptom severity to all-cause mortality and occurrence of a composite CVD outcome (acute myocardial infarction, coronary revascularization, heart failure, stroke or transient ischemic attack over a median follow-up of 13.2 and 9.2 years, respectively.Of 2156 participants, 1,236 (57.3% died and 822 (38.1% experienced a CVD outcome during follow-up. Higher (worse baseline WOMAC function scores and walking disability were independently associated with a higher all-cause mortality (adjusted hazard ratio, aHR, per 10-point increase in WOMAC function score 1.04, 95% confidence interval, CI 1.01-1.07, p = 0.004; aHR per unit increase in HAQ walking score 1.30, 95% CI 1.22-1.39, p<0.001; and aHR for those using versus not using a walking aid 1.51, 95% CI 1.34-1.70, p<0.001. In survival analysis, censoring on death, risk of our composite CVD outcome was also significantly and independently associated with greater baseline walking disability ((aHR for use of a walking aid = 1.27, 95% CI 1.10-1.47, p = 0.001; aHR per unit increase in HAQ walking score = 1.17, 95% CI 1.08-1.27, p<0.001.Among individuals with hip and/or knee OA, severity of OA disability was associated with a significant increase in all-cause mortality and serious CVD events after controlling for multiple confounders. Research is needed to elucidate modifiable

  13. Acetabular labrum of hip joint in osteoarthritis: A qualitative original study and short review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, S; Dermon, A; Gkantsinikoudis, N; Kommata, V; Soukakos, P; Dermon, C R

    2017-01-01

    Histological architecture of normal acetabular labrum regarding free nerve endings (FNEs) and mechanoreceptors (MRs) has been satisfactorily described in the literature. However, the presence of FNEs and MRs in acetabular labrum of hip joint has been analyzed only once in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Aim of this article is to report histological distribution pattern of FNEs and MRs in acetabular labrum of patients with severe OA, at the same time conducting a comparison with normal acetabular labrum described in the literature. Seven patients with severe hip OA were enrolled in this study. Patient selection was assisted by the utilization of specific clinical scales delineated by the American College of Rheumatology. After successful total hip arthroplasty, tissue samples of acetabular labra of seven patients were histologically processed and stained with the gold standard chloride method, which was subsequently examined under a compound microscope. FNEs and MRs constituted the major histological structures. Identified MRs included Pacini corpuscles, Ruffini corpuscles, and Golgi-Mazzoni corpuscles. The presence of FNEs was predominant in the middle part of the acetabular labrum, featuring a remarkable decrease in peripheral parts. In contrast, MRs were detected basically in peripheral parts and less in the middle part. Differentiation of the distribution pattern of MRs and FNEs in acetabular labrum of hip joint is remarkable between normal patients and patients with severe OA. The abundance of FNEs in the middle part of the pathologic labrum is mainly responsible for the observed discrimination. A "conversion" of MRs to FNEs may occur during OA progression, modulating therefore this pattern as well as the upcoming clinical manifestations.

  14. Validation of TMJ osteoarthritis synthetic defect database via non-rigid registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paniagua, Beatriz; Pera, Juliette; Budin, Francois; Gomes, Liliane; Styner, Martin; Lucia, Cevidanes; Nguyen, Tung

    2015-03-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders are a group of conditions that cause pain and dysfunction in the jaw joint and the muscles controlling jaw movement. However, diagnosis and treatment of these conditions remain controversial. To date, there is no single sign, symptom, or test that can clearly diagnose early stages of osteoarthritis (OA). Instead, the diagnosis is based on a consideration of several factors, including radiological evaluation. The current radiological diagnosis scores of TMJ pathology are subject to misdiagnosis. We believe these scores are limited by the acquisition procedures, such as oblique cuts of the CT and head positioning errors, and can lead to incorrect diagnoses of flattening of the head of the condyle, formation of osteophytes, or condylar pitting. This study consists of creating and validating a methodological framework to simulate defects in CBCT scans of known location and size, in order to create synthetic TMJ OA database. User-generated defects were created using a non-rigid deformation protocol in CBCT. All segmentation evaluation, surface distances and linear distances from the user-generated to the simulated defects showed our methodological framework to be very precise and within a voxel (0.5 mm) of magnitude. A TMJ OA synthetic database will be created next, and evaluated by expert radiologists, and this will serve to evaluate how sensitive the current radiological diagnosis tools are.

  15. Effectiveness of Foot Orthoses Versus Rocker-Sole Footwear for First Metatarsophalangeal Joint Osteoarthritis: Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menz, Hylton B; Auhl, Maria; Tan, Jade M; Levinger, Pazit; Roddy, Edward; Munteanu, Shannon E

    2016-05-01

    To compare the effectiveness of prefabricated foot orthoses to rocker-sole footwear in reducing foot pain in people with first metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint osteoarthritis (OA). Participants (n = 102) with first MTP joint OA were randomly allocated to receive individualized, prefabricated foot orthoses or rocker-sole footwear. The primary outcome measure was the pain subscale on the Foot Health Status Questionnaire (FHSQ) at 12 weeks. Secondary outcome measures included the function, footwear, and general foot health subscales of the FHSQ; the Foot Function Index; severity of pain and stiffness at the first MTP joint; perception of global improvement; general health status; use of rescue medication and co-interventions to relieve pain; physical activity; and the frequency of self-reported adverse events. The FHSQ pain subscale scores improved in both groups, but no statistically significant difference between the groups was observed (adjusted mean difference 2.05 points, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] -3.61, 7.71; P = 0.477). However, the footwear group exhibited lower adherence (mean ± SD total hours worn 287 ± 193 versus 448 ± 234; P footwear are similarly effective at reducing foot pain in people with first MTP joint OA. However, prefabricated foot orthoses may be the intervention of choice due to greater adherence and fewer associated adverse events. © 2016 The Authors. Arthritis Care & Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Rheumatology.

  16. Therapeutic modalities and postural balance of patients with knee osteoarthritis: systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andressa Silva

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective The objective of this review was to evaluate the evidence of the influence of therapeutic modalities on postural balance in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA.Methods A search for published papers on therapeutic modalities was conducted using the Pubmed, Medline, Lilacs and SciELO databases. The keywords “knee” and “balance” in combination with “osteoarthritis” were used as the search strategy. Randomized controlled clinical trials published in the last 10 years in either English or Portuguese were selected. The PEDro scale was applied to assess the quality of the selected clinical trials.Results A total of 46 studies of patients with knee OA were found, of which seven were analyzed in full and 39 were excluded because they did not meet the inclusion criteria. Of the seven studies reviewed, six were considered to have a high methodological quality on the PEDro scale. Several therapeutic modalities were found (physical exercise, hydrotherapy, electrotherapy and manual therapy, and postural balance improved in only three studies.Conclusion The studies included in this systematic review had a high methodological quality, so it can be concluded that the therapeutic modalities used in those studies improved postural balance in patients with knee OA.

  17. OAS :: Accountability :: Program and Project Evaluation Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Social Media Facebook @oasofficial Facebook Twitter @oas_official Twitter Newsletters Documents OAS Technology Social Development Summits of the Americas Sustainable Development T Telecommunications Terrorism Tourism Trade Treaties and Agreements W Women Y Youth Strategic Partners Permanent Observers Civil Society

  18. Knee osteoarthritis prevalence in hospitalized elderly patients: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ke Qiang; Li, Chuan Silvia; Lin, Zhong Qiu; Feng, Guo Fei; Wang, Xiao Hui; Fu, Wen Zhe; Xie, Zhi Quan

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the prevalence rate of knee osteoarthritis (OA) and the risk factors for OA in hospitalized elderly patients. We conducted this retrospective study in elderly patients (aged 65 years and older) who were hospitalized in the Geriatric Ward of General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command of the People's Liberation Army between January 2011 and June 2013, including general condition, present history, past history, physical examination, X-ray results, and disease diagnosis. The prevalence, awareness, and treatment rates of knee OA in hospitalized elderly patients were calculated. Risk factors were computed using multiple logistic regression analysis. Of a total of 267 (17.4%) hospitalized elderly patients diagnosed with knee OA, the prevalence rate of OA was 9.95% in males and 37.76% in females. The rate of awareness among those with OA was 51.68%; the rate of treatment was 83.33%; and the rate of control was 77.39%. The medical expenses for both females (1143±315 yuan month-1) and males (1192±357 yuan month-1) in knee OA patients are higher than that of the non-knee OA group (989±274 yuan month-1, 1038±295 yuan month-1). The risk factors for knee OA include gender (OR=2.448), age (OR=1.124), transportation mode (OR= 8.972), exercise (OR=7.374), bowel evacuation position (OR=5.767), family history of knee OA (OR=2.195), and body mass index (OR=2.469). The prevalence of knee OA is unexpectedly high in hospitalized elderly patients, and the rates of awareness and treatment are less than desirable. Prevention and control measures should be taken in patients with concomitant risk factors.

  19. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the French version of the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS) in hip osteoarthritis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ornetti, P; Parratte, S; Gossec, L

    2010-01-01

    osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: The French version of the HOOS was developed according to published international guidelines to ensure content validity. The new version was then evaluated in two symptomatic hip OA populations, one with no indication for joint replacement (medical group), and the other waiting......OBJECTIVE: To translate and adapt the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS) into French and to evaluate the psychometric properties of this new version, by testing feasibility, internal consistency, construct validity, reliability and responsiveness, in patients with hip...

  20. A COMPARATIVE STUDY BETWEEN JOINT MOBILIZATION AND CONVENTIONAL PHYSIOTHERAPY IN KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aftab Ahmad

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Osteoarthritis (O.A. is an active disease process involving articular cartilage destruction, subchondral bone thickening and new bone formation. Worldwide osteoarthritis is estimated to be the fourth leading cause of disability, in which 10% are males and 13% are females. Studies from china, Bangladesh and Pakistan have shown high prevalence of knee osteoarthritis. Pharmacological interventions, surgical procedures and Physiotherapy management play important role in knee Osteoarthritis. In Physiotherapy management of osteoarthritis, manual therapy along with thermotherapy and/or electrotherapy is used. Current study was to evaluate the effectiveness of joint mobilization in knee osteo-arthritis. Methods: Comparative study was undertaken on 50 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee who were randomly assigned to one of two groups that received Joint mobilization alone (n = 25; mean age, 53 years or Conventional Physiotherapy (n = 25; mean age, 50 years.Both groups were received their programs for 8 weeks; two sessions per week. Analysis of data within group and between groups of the pre and post treatment values of the function and pain was done using pair t test and independent t test. Results: Both groups showed significant improvement in ISOA score and VAS. There was statistical significant difference between the two groups (Group A and B i.e. p < 0.005. Conclusion: Manual joint mobilization improves the effectiveness of the treatment program in treating symptoms of knee OA and improves function in elderly people with knee OA.

  1. Transculturalization and validation of a Spanish translation of the specific lower limb osteoarthritis and quality of life questionnaire AMICAL: Arthrose des Membres Inférieurs et Qualité de vie AMIQUAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Cuervo, Gisela; Guillermin, Francis; Rat, Anne-Christine; Duarte-Salazar, Carolina; Alemán-Hernández, Sylvia-I; Vergara-Álvarez, Yuriria; Goycochea-Robles, María-Victoria

    2014-01-01

    Several generic questionnaires have been used to measure quality of life in patients with Osteoarthritis (OA) since few instruments have been developed specifically for OA and none was developed for Spanish speaking patients. The purpose of the study was to validate and adapt to Spanish the French questionnaire AMICAL to measure quality of life in patients with hip and knee OA. Transversal, analytical study. The validation process was performed in phases: translation from French to Spanish, translated version analysis by a multidisciplinary expert team, application of a pilot test to patients to evaluate grammatical and content equivalence, blind back translation, and analysis. The questionnaire was applied to hip and knee OA patients, together with the SF-36 questionnaire, as well as the WOMAC and the Lequesne indexes. The reproducibility was evaluated applying the questionnaire after 72hours. The clinimetric analysis was calculated with SPSS 16.0. One hundred patients with hip OA and 100 patients with knee OA, radiological stages ii-iii, were included to evaluate homogeneity. Sixty-five patients with hip OA and 65 patients with knee OA were included to evaluate consistency. The final sample included 100 hip and 100 patients knee OA patients to estimate homogeneities and 65 patients were evaluated to estimate consistency. Mean (SD) age of patients with hip and knee OA, was 56.34 ± 13 and 60.1 ± 9.2, respectively. Sixty seven percent and 79.8% were female, respectively. Cronbach' alpha for AMICAL was 0.946 and 0.999, for hip OA and knee OA, respectively; and test-retest reliability using the intraclass correlation coefficients was 0.979 and 0.998, respectively. There was also a significant correlation with all the instruments (P<.05), except with the Lequesne index (r-0.383). The Spanish version of AMICAL questionnaire keep the clinimetric properties, homogeneity, and consistency, and has a good correlation with other instruments. Consequently, it is reliable

  2. Epidemiology of osteoarthritis: state of the evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Kelli D.; Golightly, Yvonne M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review This review focuses on recent studies of osteoarthritis epidemiology, including research on prevalence, incidence, and a broad array of potential risk factors at the person level and joint level. Recent findings Studies continue to illustrate the high impact of osteoarthritis worldwide, with increasing incidence. Person-level risk factors with strong evidence regarding osteoarthritis incidence and/or progression include age, sex, socioeconomic status, family history, and obesity. Joint-level risk factors with strong evidence for incident osteoarthritis risk include injury and occupational joint loading; the associations of injury and joint alignment with osteoarthritis progression are compelling. Moderate levels of physical activity have not been linked to increased osteoarthritis risk. Some topics of high recent interest or emerging evidence for association with osteoarthritis include metabolic pathways, vitamins, joint shape, bone density, limb length inequality, muscle strength and mass, and early structural damage. Summary Osteoarthritis is a complex, multifactorial disease, and there is still much to learn regarding mechanisms underlying incidence and progression. However, there are several known modifiable and preventable risk factors, including obesity and joint injury; efforts to mitigate these risks can help to lessen the impact of osteoarthritis. PMID:25775186

  3. Hip osteoarthritis: What the radiologist wants to know

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karachalios, Theofilos; Karantanas, Apostolos H.; Malizos, Konstantinos

    2007-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common disease of the hip joint seen in adults. The diagnosis of OA is based on a combination of radiographic findings of joint degeneration and characteristic subjective symptoms. The lack of a radiographic consensus definition has resulted in a variation of the published incidences and prevalence of OA. The chronological sequence of degeneration includes the following plain radiographic findings: joint space narrowing, development of osteophytes, subchondral sclerosis, and cyst formation. There are cases though, that plain radiographs show minor changes and the clinical suspicion of early disease can be confirmed with more sophisticated imaging methods, such as multi-detector computed tomography and MR imaging. The present article will review all the clinical information on the hip OA together with an updated radiological approach, with emphasis on the early depiction and the differential diagnosis of the disease

  4. Diet-Intestinal Microbiota Axis in Osteoarthritis: A Possible Role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusheng Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal microbiota is highly involved in host physiology and pathology through activity of the microbiome and its metabolic products. Osteoarthritis (OA is a common form of arthritis characterized by articular cartilage destruction and osteophyte formation. Although various person-level risk factors, such as age, sex, and obesity, have been proposed for the pathogenesis of OA, the underlying links between these person-level factors and OA are still enigmatic. Based on the current understanding in the crosstalk between intestinal microbiota and these risk factors, intestinal microbiota could be considered as a major hidden risk factor that provides a unifying mechanism to explain the involvement of these person-level risk factors in OA.

  5. Perna canaliculus Lipid Complex PCSO-524™ Demonstrated Pain Relief for Osteoarthritis Patients Benchmarked against Fish Oil, a Randomized Trial, without Placebo Control

    OpenAIRE

    Zawadzki, Marek; Janosch, Claudia; Szechinski, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) typically generates pain, reduced mobility and reduced quality of life. Most conventional treatments for osteoarthritis, such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and simple analgesics, have side effects. PCSO-524?, a non polar lipid extract from the New Zealand Green Lipped Mussel, is rich in omega-3 fatty acids and has been shown to reduce inflammation in both animal studies and patient trials. This OA trial examined pain relief changes in relation to qualit...

  6. Topical Treatment of Degenerative Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zengdong; Huang, Rongzhong

    2018-01-01

    This article reviews topical management strategies for degenerative osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. A search of Pubmed, Embase and the Cochrane library using MeSH terms including "topical," "treatment," "knee" and "osteoarthritis" was carried out. Original research and review articles on the effectiveness and safety, recommendations from international published guidelines and acceptability studies of topical preparations were included. Current topical treatments included for the management of knee OA include topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, capsaicin, salicylates and physical treatments such as hot or cold therapy. Current treatment guidelines recommend topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs as an alternative and even first-line therapy for OA management, especially among elderly patients. Guidelines on other topical treatments vary, from recommendations against their use, to in favor as alternative or simultaneous therapy, especially for patients with contraindications to other analgesics. Although often well-tolerated and preferred by many patients, clinical care still lags in the adoption of topical treatments. Aspects of efficacy, safety and patient quality of life data require further research. Copyright © 2018 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collins, N J; Prinsen, C A C; Christensen, R

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to synthesize evidence regarding measurement properties of the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). DESIGN: A comprehensive literature search identified 37 eligible papers evaluating KOOS measurement properties in partici......OBJECTIVE: To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to synthesize evidence regarding measurement properties of the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). DESIGN: A comprehensive literature search identified 37 eligible papers evaluating KOOS measurement properties...... in participants with knee injuries and/or osteoarthritis (OA). Methodological quality was evaluated using the COSMIN checklist. Where possible, meta-analysis of extracted data was conducted for all studies and stratified by age and knee condition; otherwise narrative synthesis was performed. RESULTS: KOOS has...... adequate internal consistency, test-retest reliability and construct validity in young and old adults with knee injuries and/or OA. The ADL subscale has better content validity for older patients and Sport/Rec for younger patients with knee injuries, while the Pain subscale is more relevant for painful...

  8. The prevalence of radiological glenohumeral osteoarthritis in long-term type 1 diabetes: the Dialong shoulder study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juel, N G; Brox, J I; Hellund, J C; Holte, K B; Berg, T J

    2017-12-14

    This study compares the prevalence of radiological osteoarthritis (OA) in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1) for > 45 years and controls, and explores the association with shoulder pain and glycaemic burden in patients with DM1. The Dialong study is a cross-sectional, observational study with 30 years of historical data on long-term glycaemic control. We included 102 patients with DM1 and 73 diabetes-free controls. Demographic data, worst shoulder pain last week [numeric rating scale (NRS) 0-10], pain on abduction at examination (NRS 0-10), and current and historical glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA 1c ) levels were collected. Standardized shoulder X-rays were taken and interpreted for OA applying the Kellgren-Lawrence classification. In the diabetes group (49% women), the mean ± sd duration of DM1 was 50.6 ± 4.8 years, mean 30 year HbA 1c 7.4%, and age 61.9 ± 7.1 years. The mean age of controls (57% women) was 62.6 ± 7.0 years. Radiological glenohumeral OA was found in 36 diabetes patients (35%) and 10 controls (14%) [odds ratio (OR) 3.4, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6 to 7.5; p = 0.002]. Few persons had moderate and severe OA [6.9% vs 1.3%, OR 5.3 (95% Cl 0.6 to 44.1); p = 0.1]. Fifteen diabetes patients had painful OA versus two controls (adjusted OR 5.4, 95% CI 0.6 to 47.9; p = 0.13). There was no association between OA and long-term glycaemic burden (mean 30 year HbA 1c ) in the diabetes group (p > 0.2). Radiological glenohumeral OA was more common in patients with DM1 than in controls for mild, but not moderate and severe OA. The radiological findings were not associated with shoulder pain or long-term glycaemic burden.

  9. Mitochondrial Haplogroups Define Two Phenotypes of Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Moreno, Mercedes; Soto-Hermida, Angel; Oreiro, Natividad; Pértega, Sonia; Fenández-López, Carlos; Rego-Pérez, Ignacio; Blanco, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess a mitochondrion-related phenotype in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Methods: Serum levels of the following OA-related biomarkers: matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1); MMP-3; MMP-13; myeloperoxidase (MPO); a peptide of the alpha-helical region of type II collagen, Coll2-1, and its nitrated form Coll2-1NO2; a C-terminal neoepitope generated by the collagenase-mediated cleavage of collagen type II triple helix, C2C; the C-propeptide of collagen type II, CPII; hyaluronic acid (HA); human cartilage glycoprotein 39, YKL-40; cartilage oligomeric matrix protein; and cathepsin K were analyzed in 48 OA patients and 52 healthy controls carrying the haplogroups H and J. Logistic regression models and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were performed to predict the onset of OA. Results: MMP-13 was the only biomarker significantly increased in OA patients compared to healthy controls in both haplogroups H and J. The collagen type II biomarkers, Coll2-1, Coll2-1NO2, the Coll2-1NO2/Coll2-1 ratio, C2C, CPII, and the C2C:CPII ratio were significantly increased in OA patients carrying haplogroup H compared to OA carriers of the haplogroup J. Two logistic regression models for diagnosis were constructed and adjusted for age, gender, and body mass index. For haplogroup H, the biomarkers significantly associated with OA were MMP-13 and Coll2-1; the area under the curve (AUC) of the ROC curve for this model was 0.952 (95% CI = 0.892–1.012). For haplogroup J, the only biomarker significantly associated with OA was MMP-13; the AUC for this model was 0.895 (95% CI = 0.801–0.989). Conclusion: The mitochondrial DNA haplogroups are potential complementary candidates for biomarkers of OA; their genotyping in conjunction with the assessment of classical protein molecular markers is recommended. PMID:22593743

  10. Diagnosis of osteoarthritis by cartilage surface smoothness quantified automatically from knee MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tummala, Sudhakar; Bay-Jensen, Anne-Christine; Karsdal, Morten A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: We investigated whether surface smoothness of articular cartilage in the medial tibiofemoral compartment quantified from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be appropriate as a diagnostic marker of osteoarthritis (OA). Method: At baseline, 159 community-based subjects aged 21 to 81...... with normal or OA-affected knees were recruited to provide a broad range of OA states. Smoothness was quantified using an automatic framework from low-field MRI in the tibial, femoral, and femoral subcompartments. Diagnostic ability of smoothness was evaluated by comparison with conventional OA markers......, correlations between smoothness and pain values and smoothness loss and cartilage loss supported a link to progression of OA. Thereby, smoothness markers may allow detection and monitoring of OA-supplemented currently accepted markers....

  11. The Early Diagnosis of Hypothyroidism as a Factor in the Progression of Osteoarthritis and Comorbid Processes, the Features of Phytocorrection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.O. Voloshynа

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the prevalence and forms of hypothyroidism in patients with osteoarthritis (OA and to investigate the effect of phytomedication zobofit on the functional and morphological status of the thyroid gland, the manifestations of comorbid diseases, oxidative status, fibrinolytic and proteolytic activity of the blood. Materials and methods. In 312 patients with OA, we have studied the manifestations of comorbid processes, and among them — hypothyroidism phenomena. We have used clinical, biochemical, radioimmunological, ultrasound methods. Results. All patients with OA after 50 years had the increasing number and severity of comorbid processes. Among them, 4.48 % of patients has symptomatic and 13.78 % — subclinical hypothyroidism. Symptoms of hypothyroidism were marked in people over 55, especially — over 60 years. Subclinical hypothyroidism slightly worsened clinical symptoms of OA and comorbid processes, but enhanced the effects of oxidative stress, reduction of fibrinolytic and increase of proteolytic activity of the blood, impaired glomerular filtration rate of the kidneys. The above is considered as non-specific pathophysiological basis for the progression of identified ailments. Three-month application of the herbal medication zobofit in most patients has normalized thyroid homeostasis, improved overall outcomes of the treatment for underlying and comorbid illnesses, reduced the severity of metabolic disorders. Conclusions. In OA patients aged over 50 years with a high level of comorbidity, it is necessary to carry out screening for hypothyroidism. If you noticed the signs of subclinical hypothyroidism in this population of patients, it is appropriate to use multicomponental phytomedications with diverse thyroid-stimulating action.

  12. Synovial inflammation in patients with different stages of knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ene, Răzvan; Sinescu, Ruxandra Diana; Ene, Patricia; Cîrstoiu, Monica Mihaela; Cîrstoiu, Florin Cătălin

    2015-01-01

    The synovium is an intra-articular mesenchymal tissue and essential for the normal joint function. It is involved in many pathological characteristic processes and sometimes specific for this distinctive tissue. In this study, we refer to synovial proliferative disorders according to the stage of osteoarthritis (OA) disease. Forty-three patients with knee OA were treated in the Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Emergency University Hospital of Bucharest, Romania, in the last two years. In all cases, we used at least five criteria for the knee OA: knee pain, knee joint tenderness, no palpable warmth over the knee, stiffness, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein levels. In all the cases the synovial tissue was selected by the orthopedic surgeon. X-ray examination was taken in every case of the affected joint. Patients who were considered to have early OA underwent arthroscopic synovial biopsy of the symptomatic joint. Synovial tissue samples from patients with late OA were obtained at the time of knee joint arthroplasty. Microscopic examination in early osteoarthritis revealed for more than half of patients with synovial biopsy through arthroscopic technique having synovitis lesions with mononuclear infiltrates, diffuse fibrosis, thickening of the lining layer, macrophages appearance and neoformation vessels also. The synovitis seen in advanced OA knees tends to be diffuse and is not mandatory localized to areas of chondral defects, although an association has been reported between chondral defects and associated synovitis in the knee medial tibio-femoral compartment. The overexpression of mediators of inflammation and the increased mononuclear cell infiltration were seen in early OA, compared with late OA.

  13. Cost-effectiveness of total hip and knee replacements for the Australian population with osteoarthritis: discrete-event simulation model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Higashi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Osteoarthritis constitutes a major musculoskeletal burden for the aged Australians. Hip and knee replacement surgeries are effective interventions once all conservative therapies to manage the symptoms have been exhausted. This study aims to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of hip and knee replacements in Australia. To our best knowledge, the study is the first attempt to account for the dual nature of hip and knee osteoarthritis in modelling the severities of right and left joints separately. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a discrete-event simulation model that follows up the individuals with osteoarthritis over their lifetimes. The model defines separate attributes for right and left joints and accounts for several repeat replacements. The Australian population with osteoarthritis who were 40 years of age or older in 2003 were followed up until extinct. Intervention effects were modelled by means of disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs averted. Both hip and knee replacements are highly cost effective (AUD 5,000 per DALY and AUD 12,000 per DALY respectively under an AUD 50,000/DALY threshold level. The exclusion of cost offsets, and inclusion of future unrelated health care costs in extended years of life, did not change the findings that the interventions are cost-effective (AUD 17,000 per DALY and AUD 26,000 per DALY respectively. However, there was a substantial difference between hip and knee replacements where surgeries administered for hips were more cost-effective than for knees. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Both hip and knee replacements are cost-effective interventions to improve the quality of life of people with osteoarthritis. It was also shown that the dual nature of hip and knee OA should be taken into account to provide more accurate estimation on the cost-effectiveness of hip and knee replacements.

  14. Hand joint space narrowing and osteophytes are associated with magnetic resonance imaging-defined knee cartilage thickness and radiographic knee osteoarthritis: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugen, Ida K; Cotofana, Sebastian; Englund, Martin; Kvien, Tore K; Dreher, Donatus; Nevitt, Michael; Lane, Nancy E; Eckstein, Felix

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate whether features of radiographic hand osteoarthritis (OA) are associated with quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-defined knee cartilage thickness, radiographic knee OA, and 1-year structural progression. A total of 765 participants in Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI; 455 women, mean age 62.5 yrs, SD 9.4) obtained hand radiographs (at baseline), knee radiographs (baseline and Year 1), and knee MRI (baseline and Year 1). Hand radiographs were scored for presence of osteophytes and joint space narrowing (JSN). Knee radiographs were scored according to the Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) scale. Cartilage thickness in the medial and lateral femorotibial compartments was measured quantitatively from coronal FLASHwe images. We examined the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between features of hand OA (total osteophyte and JSN scores) and knee cartilage thickness, 1-year knee cartilage thinning (above smallest detectable change), presence of knee OA (KL grade ≥ 3), and progression of knee OA (KL change ≥ 1) by linear and logistic regression. Both hand OA features were included in a multivariate model (if p ≤ 0.25) adjusted for age, sex, and body mass index (BMI). Hand JSN was associated with reduced knee cartilage thickness (ß = -0.02, 95% CI -0.03, -0.01) in the medial femorotibial compartment, while hand osteophytes were associated with the presence of radiographic knee OA (OR 1.10, 95% CI 1.03-1.18; multivariate models) with both hand OA features as independent variables adjusted for age, sex, and BMI). Radiographic features of hand OA were not associated with 1-year cartilage thinning or radiographic knee OA progression. Our results support a systemic OA susceptibility and possibly different mechanisms for osteophyte formation and cartilage thinning.

  15. The association between reduced knee joint proprioception and medial meniscal abnormalities using MRI in knee osteoarthritis: results from the Amsterdam osteoarthritis cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Esch, M; Knoop, J; Hunter, D J; Klein, J-P; van der Leeden, M; Knol, D L; Reiding, D; Voorneman, R E; Gerritsen, M; Roorda, L D; Lems, W F; Dekker, J

    2013-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is characterized by pain and activity limitations. In knee OA, proprioceptive accuracy is reduced and might be associated with pain and activity limitations. Although causes of reduced proprioceptive accuracy are divergent, medial meniscal abnormalities, which are highly prevalent in knee OA, have been suggested to play an important role. No study has focussed on the association between proprioceptive accuracy and meniscal abnormalities in knee OA. To explore the association between reduced proprioceptive accuracy and medial meniscal abnormalities in a clinical sample of knee OA subjects. Cross-sectional study in 105 subjects with knee OA. Knee proprioceptive accuracy was assessed by determining the joint motion detection threshold in the knee extension direction. The knee was imaged with a 3.0 T magnetic resonance (MR) scanner. Number of regions with medial meniscal abnormalities and the extent of abnormality in the anterior and posterior horn and body were scored according to the Boston-Leeds Osteoarthritis Knee Score (BLOKS) method. Multiple regression analyzes were used to examine whether reduced proprioceptive accuracy was associated with medial meniscal abnormalities in knee OA subjects. Mean proprioceptive accuracy was 2.9° ± 1.9°. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-detected medial meniscal abnormalities were found in the anterior horn (78%), body (80%) and posterior horn (90%). Reduced proprioceptive accuracy was associated with both the number of regions with meniscal abnormalities (P knee complaints. This is the first study showing that reduced proprioceptive accuracy is associated with medial meniscal abnormalities in knee OA. The study highlights the importance of meniscal abnormalities in understanding reduced proprioceptive accuracy in persons with knee OA. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. All rights reserved.

  16. Good Life with osteoArthritis in Denmark (GLA:D™)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Søren Thorgaard; Roos, Ewa M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The uptake of evidence-based guidelines in clinical practice is suboptimal in osteoarthritis (OA) and other chronic diseases. Good Life with osteoArthritis in Denmark (GLA:D) was launched in 2013 with the aim of implementing guidelines for the treatment of knee and hip OA in clinical...... disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS) quality of life subscale, 0-100, worst to best), number of patients on painkillers and sick leave, and access to care according to guidelines. RESULTS: Data from 9,825 participants from the GLA:D registry were utilised in the analyses. It was demonstrated...... months are pain intensity (0 to 100, best to worst), objective physical function (30-s chair-stand test and 40-m fast-paced walk test), physical activity (number of days per week being physically active for at least 30 min), quality of life (Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and the Hip...

  17. Weight loss is effective for symptomatic relief in obese subjects with knee osteoarthritis independently of joint damage severity assessed by high-field MRI and radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudbergsen, H.; Boesen, M.; Lohmander, L. S.

    2012-01-01

    With an increasing prevalence of older and obese citizens, the problems of knee osteoarthritis (KOA) will escalate. Weight loss is recommended for obese KOA patients and in a majority of cases this leads to symptomatic relief. We hypothesized that pre-treatment structural status of the knee joint......, assessed by radiographs, 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and knee-joint alignment, may influence the symptomatic changes following a significant weight reduction....

  18. Osteoarthritis: detection, pathophysiology, and current/future treatment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sovani, Sujata; Grogan, Shawn P

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a disease of the joint, and age is the major risk factor for its development. Clinical manifestation of OA includes joint pain, stiffness, and loss of mobility. Currently, no pharmacological treatments are available to treat this specific joint disease; only symptom-modifying drugs are available. Improvement in imaging technology, identification of biomarkers, and increased understanding of the molecular basis of OA will aid in detecting the early stages of disease. Yet the development of interventional strategies remains elusive and will be critical for effective prevention of OA-associated joint destruction. The potential of cell-based therapies may be applicable in improving joint function in mild to more advanced cases of OA. Ongoing studies to understand the basis of this disease will eventually lead to prevention and treatment strategies and will also be a key in reducing the social and economic burden of this disease. Nurses are advised to provide an integrative approach of disease assessment and management in OA patients' care with a focus on education and implementation. Knowledge and understanding of OA and how this affects the individual patient form the basis for such an integrative approach to all-round patient care and disease management.

  19. Use of firocoxib for the treatment of equine osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donnell JR

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Josh R Donnell, David D Frisbie Department of Clinical Sciences, Orthopedic Research Center, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA Abstract: This review presents the pathogenesis and medical treatment of equine osteoarthritis (OA, focusing on firocoxib. Inhibition of prostaglandin E2 remains a fundamental treatment for decreasing clinical symptoms (ie, pain and lameness associated with OA in horses. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, which inhibit the production of prostaglandin E2 from the arachidonic acid pathway, continue to be a mainstay for the clinical treatment of OA. Firocoxib is a cyclooxygenase (COX-2-preferential NSAID that has been shown to be safe and to have a 70% oral bioavailability in the horse. Three clinical reports identified symptom-modifying effects (reduction in pain and/or lameness in horses with OA administered the once-daily recommended dose (0.1 mg/kg of oral firocoxib following 7 days of administration. Other reports have suggested that a one-time loading dose (0.3 mg/kg of firocoxib provides an earlier (1–3 days onset of action compared to the recommended dose. It is noteworthy that OA disease-modifying effects have been reported in horses for other COX-2-preferential NSAIDs (meloxicam and carprofen, but have not been attributed to firocoxib due to a lack of investigation to date. Keywords: horse, osteoarthritis, firocoxib, COX-2 inhibitor, NSAID

  20. Integrating lifestyle approaches into osteoarthritis care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garver MJ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Matthew J Garver,1 Brian C Focht,2 Sarah J Taylor3 1Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition, Abilene Christian University, Abilene, TX, 2Department of Human Sciences, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, 3School of Occupational Therapy, Texas Woman's University, Dallas, TX, USA Abstract: As the lifetime risk, societal cost, and overall functional impact of osteoarthritis (OA is imposing, it is imperative that clinicians provide an individualized care model for patients. Patients must be offered a multiplicity of care strategies and encouraged to embrace lifestyle approaches for self-managing the effects and symptoms of OA. Certainly, the attitude of the clinician and patient will directly influence receptivity and implementation of lifestyle approaches. This work proposes how the use of structured and routine assessments and cognitive therapy ideologies may complement a comprehensive treatment plan. Assessments described herein include objective and/or self-report measures of physical function, pain, attitude about social support, and sleep quality. Baseline assessments followed by systematic monitoring of the results may give patients and clinicians valuable insight into the effectiveness of the care plan. Empirical evidence from randomized trials with OA patients highlights the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral change strategies for addressing salient concerns for OA (pain control, mobility performance, and sleep quality. Cognitive restructuring can provide patients with renewed power in managing their disease. Cognitive therapy topics discussed presently include: 1 what is OA?, 2 effectiveness of exercise and FITT (frequency, intensity, time, and type principles for OA patients, 3 goal-setting and barriers, and 4 translating to independent care. Woven within the discussion about cognitive therapy are ideas about how the results from baseline assessments and group-mediated dynamics might assist more favorable outcomes. There are a plethora

  1. Association of Exercise Therapy and Reduction of Pain Sensitivity in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Klokker, Louise; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Exercise has beneficial effects on pain in knee osteoarthritis (OA), yet the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of exercise on pressure-pain sensitivity in patients with knee OA. METHODS: In a randomized controlled trial...... visual analog scale pain scores during constant pressure for 6 minutes at 125% of the PPT as a measure of temporal summation (TS) of pressure-pain. Secondary outcomes included self-reported pain using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) questionnaire. Analyses were based on the "per...

  2. Knee osteoarthritis image registration: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván-Tejada, Jorge I.; Celaya-Padilla, José M.; Treviño, Victor; Tamez-Peña, José G.

    2015-03-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is a very common disease, in early stages, changes in joint structures are shown, some of the most common symptoms are; formation of osteophytes, cartilage degradation and joint space reduction, among others. Based on a joint space reduction measurement, Kellgren-Lawrence grading scale, is a very extensive used tool to asses radiological OA knee x-ray images, based on information obtained from these assessments, the objective of this work is to correlate the Kellgren-Lawrence score to the bilateral asymmetry between knees. Using public data from the Osteoarthritis initiative (OAI), a set of images with different Kellgren-Lawrencescores were used to determine a relationship of Kellgren-Lawrence score and the bilateral asymmetry, in order to measure the asymmetry between the knees, the right knee was registered to match the left knee, then a series of similarity metrics, mutual information, correlation, and mean squared error where computed to correlate the deformation (mismatch) of the knees to the Kellgren-Lawrence score. Radiological information was evaluated and scored by OAI radiologist groups. The results of the study suggest an association between Radiological Kellgren-Lawrence score and image registration metrics, mutual information and correlation is higher in the early stages, and mean squared error is higher in advanced stages. This association can be helpful to develop a computer aided grading tool.

  3. Effect of Exercise and Weight Loss in People Who Have Hip Osteoarthritis and Are Overweight or Obese : A Prospective Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paans, Nienke; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Dilling, Roelien G.; Bos, Martine; van der Meer, Klaas; Bulstra, Sjoerd K.; Stevens, Martin

    Background. Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disorder in the world and is recognized as a substantial source of disability. For people with OA of the knee, exercise in combination with weight loss is a proven, effective, conservative treatment option, yet evidence is lacking for people

  4. Functional capacity of people with early osteoarthritis : a comparison between subjects from the cohort hip and cohort knee (CHECK) and healthy ageing workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bieleman, H. J.; van Ittersum, M. W.; Groothoff, J. W.; Oostveen, J. C. M.; Oosterveld, F. G. J.; van der Schans, C. P.; Soer, R.; Reneman, M. F.

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of osteoarthritis (OA) increases, but the impact of the disorder on peoples' functional capacity is not known. Therefore, the objective of this study was to compare self-reported health status and functional capacity of subjects with early OA of hip and/or knee to reference data of

  5. Similar group mean scores, but large individual variations, in patient-relevant outcomes over 2 years in meniscectomized subjects with and without radiographic knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paradowski, Przemyslaw T; Englund, Martin; Roos, Ewa M.

    2004-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have, so far, identified factors associated with increased risk for incident or progressive OA, such as age, sex, heredity, obesity, and joint injury. There is, however, a paucity of long-term data that provide information on the nature of disease progression on either gro...... knee osteoarthritis (OA)....

  6. Subchondral Bone Plate Thickening Precedes Chondrocyte Apoptosis and Cartilage Degradation in Spontaneous Animal Models of Osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Zamli, Zaitunnatakhin; Robson Brown, Kate; Tarlton, John F.; Adams, Mike A.; Torlot, Georgina E.; Cartwright, Charlie; Cook, William A.; Vassilevskaja, Kristiina; Sharif, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disorder characterised by bone remodelling and cartilage degradation and associated with chondrocyte apoptosis. These processes were investigated at 10, 16, 24, and 30 weeks in Dunkin Hartley (DH) and Bristol Strain 2 (BS2) guinea pigs that develop OA spontaneously. Both strains had a more pronounced chondrocyte apoptosis, cartilage degradation, and subchondral bone changes in the medial than the lateral side of the tibia, and between strains, the ...

  7. The development of a preliminary ultrasonographic scoring system for features of hand osteoarthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keen, H I

    2008-05-01

    Painful osteoarthritis (OA) of the hand is common and a validated ultrasound (US) scoring system would be valuable for epidemiological and therapeutic outcome studies. US is increasingly used to assess peripheral joints, though most of the US focus in rheumatic diseases has been on rheumatoid arthritis. We aimed to develop a preliminary US hand OA scoring system, initially focusing on relevant pathological features with potentially high reliability.

  8. Validity and reliability of three definitions of hip osteoarthritis: cross sectional and longitudinal approach

    OpenAIRE

    Reijman, Max; Hazes, Mieke; Pols, Huib; Bernsen, Roos; Koes, Bart; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita

    2004-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES: To compare the reliability and validity in a large open population of three frequently used radiological definitions of hip osteoarthritis (OA): Kellgren and Lawrence grade, minimal joint space (MJS), and Croft grade; and to investigate whether the validity of the three definitions of hip OA is sex dependent. METHODS: SUBJECTS: from the Rotterdam study (aged > or= 55 years, n = 3585) were evaluated. The inter-rater reliability was tested in a random set of 148 x rays. ...

  9. The Identity Crisis of Osteoarthritis in General Practice: A Qualitative Study Using Video-Stimulated Recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paskins, Zoe; Sanders, Tom; Croft, Peter R; Hassell, Andrew B

    2015-11-01

    Patients and doctors report marked disenchantment with primary care consultation experiences relating to osteoarthritis. This study aimed to observe and analyze interactions between general practitioners (GPs) and patients presenting with osteoarthritis (OA) to identify how to improve care for OA. We conducted an observational study in general practices in the United Kingdom using video-recorded real-life consultations of unselected patients and their GPs. Postconsultation interviews were conducted using video-stimulated recall. Both consultations and interviews were analyzed thematically. Three key themes were identified in an analysis of 19 OA consultations and the matched GP and patient interviews: complexity, dissonance, and prioritization. The topic of osteoarthritis arises in the consultation in complex contexts of multimorbidity and multiple, often not explicit, patient agendas. Dissonance between patient and doctor was frequently observed and reported; this occurred when GPs normalized symptoms of OA as part of life and reassured patients who were not seeking reassurance. GPs used wear and tear in preference to osteoarthritis or didn't name the condition at all. GPs subconsciously made assumptions that patients did not consider OA a priority and that symptoms raised late in the consultation were not troublesome. The lack of a clear illness profile results in confusion between patients and doctors about what OA is and its priority in the context of multimorbidity. This study highlights generic communication issues regarding the potential negative consequences of unsought reassurance and the importance of validation of symptoms and raises new arguments for tackling OA's identity crisis by developing a clearer medical language with which to explain OA. © 2015 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  10. Osteophyte detection for hand osteoarthritis identification in x-ray images using CNNs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Sreeparna; Bhunia, Satyajit; Schaefer, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we describe a class of analog algorithms based on the concept of cellular neural networks (CNNs) for detecting osteoarthritis (OA) from x-ray images. The indicator of OA that we examine is the presence of bony spurs or osteophytes in the vicinity of the weight bearing joints of the fingers. Results on a series of hand x-ray images are shown to be promising.

  11. The association between changes in synovial fluid levels of ARGS-aggrecan fragments, progression of radiographic osteoarthritis and self-reported outcomes: a cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, S; Englund, M; Struglics, A

    2012-01-01

    of tibiofemoral or patellofemoral OA according to the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) atlas, and scored patient-reported outcomes using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). Using logistic regression (adjusted for age, gender, body mass index, time between examinations...

  12. A Water Rehabilitation Program in Patients with Hip Osteoarthritis Before and After Total Hip Replacement

    OpenAIRE

    ?yp, Marek; Kaczor, Ryszard; Cabak, Anna; Tederko, Piotr; W?ostowska, Ewa; Stanis?awska, Iwona; Szypu?a, Jan; Tomaszewski, Wies?aw

    2016-01-01

    Background Pain associated with coxarthrosis, typically occurring in middle-aged and elderly patients, very commonly causes considerable limitation of motor fitness and dependence on pharmacotherapy. This article provides an assessment of a rehabilitation program with tailored water exercises in patients with osteoarthritis before and after total hip replacement. Material/Methods A total of 192 patients (the mean age 61.03?10.89) suffering from hip osteoarthritis (OA) were evaluated before an...

  13. Increased joint loads during walking--a consequence of pain relief in knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Simonsen, Erik B; Alkjaer, T

    2006-01-01

    Joint pain is a primary symptom in knee osteoarthritis (OA), but the effect of pain and pain relief on the knee joint mechanics of walking is not clear. In this study, the effects of local knee joint analgesia on knee joint loads during walking were studied in a group of knee osteoarthritis....... Although the patients walked with less compressive knee joint forces compared to the reference group, the effects of pain relief may accelerate the degenerative changes....

  14. High mid-term revision rate after treatment of large, full-thickness cartilage lesions and OA in the patellofemoral joint using a large inlay resurfacing prosthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Jens Ole

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The HemiCAP-Wave® implant for the patellofemoral resurfacing treatment of large cartilage lesions and osteoarthritis (OA) was introduced in 2009. The outcome of a prospective cohort study of 18 patients with large trochlea lesions or isolated OA treated with the HemiCAP-Wave® implant...... pain but high mid-term revision rate after patellofemoral inlay resurfacing using the HemiCAP-Wave® implant. Patellofemoral resurfacing implantation treatment with a large inlay prosthesis can offer temporary treatment for large isolated patellofemoral cartilage lesions or OA in younger patients...

  15. COMPARISONS AMONG RADIOGRAPHY, ULTRASONOGRAPHY AND COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY FOR EX VIVO CHARACTERIZATION OF STIFLE OSTEOARTHRITIS IN THE HORSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lasalle, Julie; Alexander, Kate; Olive, Julien; Laverty, Sheila

    2016-09-01

    A better understanding of imaging characteristics of equine stifle osteoarthritis (OA) may allow earlier detection and improve prognosis. Objectives of this ex vivo, prospective, methods comparison study were to (1) describe the location and severity of naturally acquired OA lesions in the equine stifle using ultrasound (US), radiography (XR), computed tomography (CT), and macroscopic evaluation (ME); (2) compare the diagnostic performance of each imaging modality with ME; and (3) describe subchondral bone mineral density (BMD) in equine stifle joints with OA using CT. Radiographic, CT, and US evaluations were performed on 23 equine cadaver stifles and compared with ME. Significant associations were found between osteophyte global scores for all imaging modalities (CT, P ˂ 0.0001; XR, P = 0.005; US, P = 0.04) vs. ME osteophyte global scores. Osteophytes were detected most frequently in the medial femorotibial (MFT) joint. A specific pattern of osteophytes was observed, with a long ridge of new bone at the insertion of the MFT joint capsule cranially on the medial femoral condyle. A novel caudo-10°proximo-5°lateral-cranio-disto-medial oblique radiographic projection was helpful for detection of intercondylar osteophytes. Multiplanar CT reformatted images were helpful for characterizing all osteophytes. Osteophyte grades at most sites did not differ among modalities. Low sensitivity/specificity for subchondral bone sclerosis and flattening of femoral condyles sugg