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Sample records for osha limit levels

  1. Academic Experiences with OSHA

    Schmidt, Raymond L.

    1977-01-01

    Reports the results of a survey of college and university chemistry departments that identifies the level of inspections that have occurred due to new standards set by the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA). (MLH)

  2. OSHA [Three Booklets.

    Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Washington, DC.

    This document consists of three separate booklets designed to educate the public and users about the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). The 54-page "All about OSHA" is intended to provide a nonexhaustive overview of OSHA services. The following topics are discussed: the need for occupational safety and health…

  3. The effect of the OSHA lead exposure in construction standard on blood lead levels among iron workers employed in bridge rehabilitation.

    Levin, S M; Goldberg, M; Doucette, J T

    1997-03-01

    Over 50,000 workers are at risk of occupational exposure to lead in the course of renovating the nation's deteriorating infrastructure. In mid-1993, to control exposure to lead in the construction setting OSHA promulgated a Lead in Construction Standard. In this study, we assessed the effect of the mandated changes in exposure conditions which followed the introduction of this new standard. We analyzed changes in baseline and maximum blood lead concentrations and in maximum increments in blood lead levels before and after introduction of the standard among iron workers employed in the renovation of a large, lead-painted, steel bridge in New York City. Results indicated that baseline and maximum blood lead levels fell significantly after the implementation of the provisions of the standard, as did maximum increments in blood lead concentrations. Seventy-six percent of the workers maintained blood lead concentrations below 20 micrograms/dl after the OSHA standard, as compared with 66% prior to its implementation. Increments of 20 micrograms/dl or more occurred considerably more frequently before introduction of the standard (13% before vs. 4% after; p = 0.01). Evidence of decreased exposure to lead was observed among iron workers who were present both before and after the introduction of the OSHA standard, as well as among iron workers newly hired after the OSHA provisions were put in place. These findings document the effectiveness of the OSHA construction lead standard in controlling exposure to lead in this complex and variable environment. The data indicate the utility of blood lead determinations in assessing the outcome of industrial hygiene interventions to reduce exposures to lead in the construction setting.

  4. OSHA Confronts Carcinogens in the Workplace as Inflation Fighters Confront OSHA.

    Heller, Ilene

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the apparently opposing forces of worker safety, as represented by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and economic inflation spawned by expensive industrial processes needed to limit the emission of carcinogens. (CP)

  5. OSHA, A Moral Responsibility

    McPherson, William H.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the goal of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the role of industrial arts teachers in helping students understand the importance of safety in industry. Four instructional approaches which industrial arts teachers may use to develop positive student attitudes toward safety are also described. (SH)

  6. OSHA: Five Years Later

    Training, 1975

    1975-01-01

    An interview with Earl D. Heath, Director of the Office of Training and Education, Occupational Safety, and Health Division, U. S. Department of Labor, provides a discussion of the status of OSHA legislation in its training programs, in-house courses, and current course-development projects. (BP)

  7. Evaluating OSHA's ethylene oxide standard: exposure determinants in Massachusetts hospitals.

    LaMontagne, A D; Kelsey, K T

    2001-03-01

    This study sought to identify determinants of workplace exposures to ethylene oxide to assess the effect of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA's) 1984 ethylene oxide standard. An in-depth survey of all hospitals in Massachusetts that used ethylene oxide from 1990 through 1992 (96% participation, N = 90) was conducted. Three types of exposure events were modeled with logistic regression: exceeding the 8-hour action level, exceeding the 15-minute excursion limit, and worker exposures during unmeasured accidental releases. Covariates were drawn from data representing an ecologic framework including direct and indirect potential exposure determinants. After adjustment for frequencies of ethylene oxide use and exposure monitoring, a significant inverse relation was observed between exceeding the action level and the use of combined sterilizer-aerators, an engineering control technology developed after the passage of the OSHA standard. Conversely, the use of positive-pressure sterilizers that employ ethylene oxide gas mixtures was strongly related to both exceeding the excursion limit and the occurrence of accidental releases. These findings provide evidence of a positive effect of OSHA's ethylene oxide standard and specific targets for future prevention and control efforts.

  8. OSHA and Experimental Safety Design.

    Sichak, Stephen, Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Suggests that a governmental agency, most likely Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) be considered in the safety design stage of any experiment. Focusing on OSHA's role, discusses such topics as occupational health hazards of toxic chemicals in laboratories, occupational exposure to benzene, and role/regulations of other agencies.…

  9. Increased sensitivity of OSHA method analysis of diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione in air.

    LeBouf, Ryan; Simmons, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) operated in selected ion monitoring mode was used to enhance the sensitivity of OSHA Methods 1013/1016 for measuring diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione in air samples. The original methods use flame ionization detection which cannot achieve the required sensitivity to quantify samples at or below the NIOSH recommended exposure limits (REL: 5 ppb for diacetyl and 9.3 ppb for 2,3-pentanedione) when sampling for both diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione. OSHA Method 1012 was developed to measure diacetyl at lower levels but requires an electron capture detector, and a sample preparation time of 36 hours. Using GC/MS allows detection of these two alpha-diketones at lower levels than OSHA Method 1012 for diacetyl and OSHA Method 1016 for 2,3-pentanedione. Acetoin and 2,3-hexanedione may also be measured using this technique. Method quantification limits were 1.1 ppb for diacetyl (22% of the REL), 1.1 ppb for 2,3-pentanedione (12% of the REL), 1.1 ppb for 2,3-hexanedione, and 2.1 ppb for acetoin. Average extraction efficiencies above the limit of quantitation were 100% for diacetyl, 92% for 2,3-pentanedione, 89% for 2,3-hexanedione, and 87% for acetoin. Mass spectrometry with OSHA Methods 1013/1016 could be used by analytical laboratories to provide more sensitive and accurate measures of exposure to diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione.

  10. Comparing Online and In-Person Delivery Formats of the OSHA 10-Hour General Industry Health and Safety Training for Young Workers.

    Shendell, Derek G; Milich, Lindsey J; Apostolico, Alexsandra A; Patti, Alexa A; Kelly, Siobhan

    2017-05-01

    Seven school districts or comprehensive high schools were enrolled in online OSHA 10-hour General Industry or Construction health and safety training via CareerSafe to determine the feasibility of online training for students, given limited resources for in-person trainings. A two-campus school district was analyzed comparing OSHA 10 for General Industry across in-person, supervisor-level teachers as authorized trainers, and online course formats. The online training courses were completed by 86 of 91 students, while another 53 of 57 students completed in-person training. Both groups completed identical OSHA-approved quizzes for "Introduction to OSHA," the initial 2-h module consistently provided in OSHA 10 courses across topics and formats. Results indicated teacher supervision was critical, and girls had higher online course completion rates, overall quiz scores, and never failed. Though both cohorts passed, in-person had significantly higher scores than online; both struggled with two questions. Online OSHA 10 for General Industry can be an efficient learning tool for students when limited resources prevent widespread availability of in-person courses.

  11. 78 FR 47419 - Requirements for the OSHA Training Institute Education Centers Program and the OSHA Outreach...

    2013-08-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Occupational Safety and Health Administration [Docket No. OSHA-2009-0022] Requirements for the OSHA Training Institute Education Centers Program and the OSHA Outreach Training Program...) Requirements AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), U.S. Department of Labor. ACTION...

  12. OSHA: Implications for Higher Education.

    National Association of College and University Business Officers, Washington, DC.

    Presented in this document are several articles concerning recommendations about the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (OSHA) and its implications for higher education. It is time for an educated look at facilities and programs and the beginning of plans which, in the long run, will bring colleges and universities into compliance with…

  13. Real-time monitoring of airborne beryllium, at OSHA limit levels, by time-resolved laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Radziemski, L.J.; Loree, T.R.; Cremers, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    Real-time detection of beryllium particulate is being investigated by the new technique of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. For beryllium detection we monitor the 313.1-nm feature of once ionized beryllium (Be II). Numerous publications describe the technique, our beryllium results, and other applications. Here we summarize the important points and describe our experiments with beryllium

  14. Achieving OSHA VPP ``STAR'' status and its benefits

    Lehr, J; Sammons, J; Bayer, R

    1998-07-01

    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) created the Voluntary Protection Program (hereafter referred to as VPP) to recognize industrial institutions that demonstrate exemplary safety and health programs, which exceed the minimum requirements, set forth by the Code of Federal Regulations. The Montenay International Corporation, parent company of Montenay Energy Resources of Montgomery County, Inc. (hereafter referred to as MERMCI) committed resources, manpower and funding to prepare the site for OSHA VPP acceptance. MERMCI first scrutinized all aspects of their safety and health program; comparing existing practices to OSHA guidelines for total safety compliance. Having met preliminary guidelines, dedicated personnel prepared the application, which took about one (1) year. The application was submitted to OSHA in Washington, D.C. and Philadelphia region III office for preliminary approval. The regional VPP administrator visited the site to verify qualifications governing the basis for program admittance. Injury and illness rates, industry average comparisons and initial record keeping practices were examined. A tentative date was set to perform an in-depth inspection of the facility, interview the majority of the employees and make a determination for program approval. The OSHA inspectors thoroughly inspected the facility and made a recommendation for MERMCI to participate in the Voluntary Protection Program at the STAR level.

  15. OSHA Enforcement, Industrial Compliance and Workplace Injuries

    Ann P. Bartel; Lacy Glenn Thomas

    1982-01-01

    This paper develops and tests a three-equation simultaneous model of OSHA enforcement behavior, industrial compliance and workplace injuries. The enforcement equation is based on the assumption that OSHA acts as a political institution that gains support through the transfer of wealth from firms to employees; the empirical results are largely consistent with this notion. Contrary to previous work, we find that OSHA enforcement efforts have, indeed, had a statistically significant impact on in...

  16. Industry Raps OSHA's Proposed Cancer Policy

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Presents the response of the American Industrial Health Council (AIHC) to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA's) genetic proposal for regulating chemical carcinogens in industry. (HM)

  17. Trends in OSHA Compliance Monitoring Data 1979-2011: Statistical Modeling of Ancillary Information across 77 Chemicals.

    Sarazin, Philippe; Burstyn, Igor; Kincl, Laurel; Lavoué, Jérôme

    2016-05-01

    The Integrated Management Information System (IMIS) is the largest multi-industry source of exposure measurements available in North America. However, many have suspected that the criteria through which worksites are selected for inspection are related to exposure levels. We investigated associations between exposure levels and ancillary variables in IMIS in order to understand the predictors of high exposure within an enforcement context. We analyzed the association between nine variables (reason for inspection, establishment size, total amount of penalty, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) plan, OSHA region, union status, inspection scope, year, and industry) and exposure levels in IMIS using multimodel inference for 77 agents. For each agent, we used two different types of models: (i) logistic models were used for the odds ratio (OR) of exposure being above the threshold limit value (TLV) and (ii) linear models were used for exposure concentrations restricted to detected results to estimate percent increase in exposure level, i.e. relative index of exposure (RIE). Meta-analytic methods were used to combine results for each variable across agents. A total of 511,047 exposure measurements were modeled for logistic models and 299,791 for linear models. Higher exposures were measured during follow-up inspections than planned inspections [meta-OR = 1.61, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.44-1.81; meta-RIE = 1.06, 95% CI: 1.03-1.09]. Lower exposures were observed for measurements collected under state OSHA plans compared to measurements collected under federal OSHA (meta-OR = 0.82, 95% CI: 0.73-0.92; meta-RIE = 0.86, 95% CI: 0.81-0.91). A 'high' total historical amount of penalty relative to none was associated with higher exposures (meta-OR = 1.54, 95% CI: 1.40-1.71; meta-RIE = 1.18, 95% CI: 1.13-1.23). The relationships observed between exposure levels and ancillary variables across a vast majority of agents suggest that certain elements of OSHA

  18. What To Do When OSHA Comes Calling.

    Barber, Charles K.

    This booklet explains the actions that college or university administrators should take if their institution is subject to an inspection by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) for possible health or safety violations. After providing a fictional case study and an explanation of the OSHA inspection process, the booklet reviews…

  19. The future of the OSHA PSM standard.

    Kaelin, David E

    2014-07-01

    The significance of the proposed PSM changes could be to greatly expand coverage of processes in order to include many not currently covered by the PSM regulation. New chemicals will likely be added to Appendix A, and reactive chemicals (a definition will be needed) also may be covered. What exactly will be the definition of a reactive chemical is unclear at this time, although definitions used in New Jersey in the TCPA Act may guide OSHA. It is likely that atmospheric storage of flammable liquids will be included more specifically and the exemption of these tanks eliminated. In applying RAGAGEP, sites may be required to apply the most recent codes and standards to covered processes, perhaps at the time of PHA auditing: A narrowing of the PSM exemption for retail facilities could bring many of them under the PSM regulation at some level. Process safety management practices should be applied to all facilities that store and process hazardous materials that have fire, explosion, reactivity, and toxic properties. If changes are made to the PSM regulation, many new sites will be covered and will need to formally adopt PSM as defined in the OSHA regulation. The addition of reactive chemicals to the PSM regulation will greatly expand the number of processes covered by the regulation. Keeping up with the most current codes, standards, and legislative changes is a daunting task that may require the support of specialists. The results of the proposed legislation will be an increase in the level of process safety excellence throughout the chemical industries.

  20. The Declining Effects of OSHA Inspections on Manufacturing Injuries: 1979 to 1998

    Wayne B. Gray; John Mendeloff

    2002-01-01

    This study examines the impact of OSHA inspections on injuries in manufacturing plants. The authors use the same model and some of the same plant-level data employed by several earlier studies that found large effects of OSHA inspections on injuries for 1979-85. These new estimates indicate that an OSHA inspection imposing a penalty reduced lost-workday injuries by about 19% in 1979-85, but that this effect fell to 11% in 1987-91, and to a statistically insignificant 1% in 1992-98. The author...

  1. Mapping sound intensities by seating position in a university concert band: A risk of hearing loss, temporary threshold shifts, and comparisons with standards of OSHA and NIOSH

    Holland, Nicholas Vedder, III

    Exposure to loud sounds is one of the leading causes of hearing loss in the United States. The purpose of the current research was to measure the sound pressure levels generated within a university concert band and determine if those levels exceeded permissible sound limits for exposure according to criteria set by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Time-weighted averages (TWA) were obtained via a dosimeter during six rehearsals for nine members of the ensemble (plus the conductor), who were seated in frontal proximity to "instruments of power" (trumpets, trombones, and percussion; (Backus, 1977). Subjects received audiometer tests prior to and after each rehearsal to determine any temporary threshold shifts (TTS). Single sample t tests were calculated to compare TWA means and the maximum sound intensity exposures set by OSHA and NIOSH. Correlations were calculated between TWAs and TTSs, as well as TTSs and the number of semesters subjects reported being seated in proximity to instruments of power. The TWA-OSHA mean of 90.2 dBA was not significantly greater than the specified OSHA maximum standard of 90.0 dBA (p > .05). The TWA-NIOSH mean of 93.1 dBA was, however, significantly greater than the NIOSH specified maximum standard of 85.0 dBA (p OSHA, r = .20 for NIOSH); the correlation between TTSs and semesters of proximity to instruments of power was also considered weak (r = .13). TWAs cumulatively exceeded both association's sound exposure limits at 11 specified locations (nine subjects and both ears of the conductor) throughout the concert band's rehearsals. In addition, hearing acuity, as determined by TTSs, was substantially affected negatively by the intensities produced in the concert band. The researcher concluded that conductors, as well as their performers, must be aware of possible damaging sound intensities in rehearsals or performances.

  2. Views of a Cal/OSHA Inspector.

    Oudiz, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Retiring CAL/OSHA Industrial Hygienist and Senior Safety Engineer Jack Oudiz offers his thoughts in the nature of a voluntary "exit interview" on his years working for the agency and its performance in its mission.

  3. Exposure Control--OSHA's Bloodborne Pathogens Standard.

    Granville, Mark F.

    1993-01-01

    Explains schools' responsibilities in complying with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Bloodborne Pathogens Standard. Describes exposure determination plan, protective equipment, housekeeping practices, labeling of waste, training employees, hepatitis B vaccinations, postexposure evaluation and medical follow-up, and…

  4. OSHA at 40: Looking Back, Looking Ahead

    Riley, Kevin; Appelbaum, Lauren D.

    2011-01-01

    On April 28, 1971, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) came into being. While some states had laws and agencies in place to regulate certain workplace health and safety hazards, the establishment of OSHA following passage of the Occupational Safety and Health Act meant the federal government was able to intervene for the first time to regulate workplace health and safety conditions and protect workers. From its inception, the agency has been the focus of considerable poli...

  5. New evidence on the health hazards and control of metalworking fluids since completion of the OSHA advisory committee report.

    Mirer, Franklin E

    2010-08-01

    Metalworking fluids (MWF) are used in the manufacture of engines, transmissions, chassis parts and other products. In 2003, OSHA denied a union petition to promulgate a standard for MWF. The 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals rejected a union lawsuit to compel OSHA to regulate MWF. OSHA relied exclusively on the 1999 Metal Working Fluids Standards Advisory Committee report, therefore, only evidence available before 1999 was quoted supporting the denial. This review was conducted to identify studies published since 1998. Electronic reference sources were queried for the terms for metalworking fluids, machining fluids, cutting fluids, cutting oils, coolants, machining, and machinist. All items returned were reviewed for relevance to MWF regulation. The review noted 227 reports in the peer reviewed literature directly relevant to regulation of MWF exposures. Of these, 26 addressed cancer; 58 respiratory effects; 32 skin effects or absorption; 45 microbial contaminants; and 76 exposure measurements and controls. Three major studies identified excess cancer including lung, liver, pancreatic, laryngeal, and leukemia associated with MWF exposures. Reports strengthened associations of asthma and hypersensitivity pneumonitis with recent exposure to MWF. Material new evidence demonstrates significant risks to material impairment of health at prevailing exposure levels and feasibility of lower exposure limits. Copyright 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. OSHA's approach to risk assessment for setting a revised occupational exposure standard for 1,3-butadiene.

    Grossman, E A; Martonik, J

    1990-01-01

    In its 1980 benzene decision [Industrial Union Department, ALF-CIO v. American Petroleum Institute, 448 U.S. 607 (1980)], the Supreme Court ruled that "before he can promulgate any permanent health or safety standard, the Secretary [of Labor] is required to make a threshold finding that a place of employment is unsafe--in the sense that significant risks are present and can be lessened by a change in practices" (448 U.S. at 642). The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has interpreted this to mean that whenever possible, it must quantify the risk associated with occupational exposure to a toxic substance at the current permissible exposure limit (PEL). If OSHA determines that there is significant risk to workers' health at its current standard, then it must quantify the risk associated with a variety of alternative standards to determine at what level, if any, occupational exposure to a substance no longer poses a significant risk. For rulemaking on occupational exposure to 1,3-butadiene, there are two studies that are suitable for quantitative risk assessment. One is a mouse inhalation bioassay conducted by the National Toxicology Program (NTP), and the other is a rat inhalation bioassay conducted by Hazelton Laboratories Europe. Of the four risk assessments that have been submitted to OSHA, all four have used the mouse and/or rat data with a variety of models to quantify the risk associated with occupational exposure to 1,3-butadiene. In addition, OSHA has performed its own risk assessment using the female mouse and female rat data and the one-hit and multistage models.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2401254

  7. Upper Limit for Regional Sea Level Projections

    Jevrejeva, Svetlana; Jackson, Luke; Riva, Riccardo; Grinsted, Aslak; Moore, John

    2016-04-01

    With more than 150 million people living within 1 m of high tide future sea level rise is one of the most damaging aspects of warming climate. The latest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report (AR5 IPCC) noted that a 0.5 m rise in mean sea level will result in a dramatic increase the frequency of high water extremes - by an order of magnitude, or more in some regions. Thus the flood threat to the rapidly growing urban populations and associated infrastructure in coastal areas are major concerns for society. Hence, impact assessment, risk management, adaptation strategy and long-term decision making in coastal areas depend on projections of mean sea level and crucially its low probability, high impact, upper range. With probabilistic approach we produce regional sea level projections taking into account large uncertainties associated with Greenland and Antarctica ice sheets contribution. We calculate the upper limit (as 95%) for regional sea level projections by 2100 with RCP8.5 scenario, suggesting that for the most coastlines upper limit will exceed the global upper limit of 1.8 m.

  8. Impact of preparing for OSHA local emphasis program inspections of New York dairy farms: Case studies and financial cost analysis.

    Gadomski, Anne M; Vargha, Marybeth; Tallman, Nancy; Scribani, Melissa B; Kelsey, Timothy W

    2016-03-01

    OSHA inspection of dairy farms began in July 1, 2014 in New York State. As of September 2014, a total of eight farms were randomly selected for inspection. This case study addresses how dairy farm managers prepared for these inspections, and identifies farm level costs preparing for inspection and/or being inspected. Four farms that were OSHA inspected and 12 farms that were not inspected were included in this mixed method evaluation using a multimodal (telephone, email, or mail) survey. Descriptive analysis was carried out using frequencies, proportions, means, and medians. Overall, the impact of OSHA inspections was positive, leading to improved safety management and physical changes on the farm and worker trainings, although the farmers' perspectives about OSHA inspection were mixed. The cost of compliance was low relative to estimated overall production costs. Clarifications and engineering solutions for specific dairy farm hazard exposures are needed to facilitate compliance with OSHA regulations. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Selected science: an industry campaign to undermine an OSHA hexavalent chromium standard

    Lurie Peter

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract While exposure to hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI has been associated with increased lung cancer risk for more than 50 years, the chemical is not currently regulated by the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA on the basis of its carcinogenicity. The agency was petitioned in 1993 and sued in 1997 and 2002 to lower the workplace Cr(VI exposure limit, resulting in a court order to issue a final standard by February 2006. Faced with the threat of stronger regulation, the chromium industry initiated an effort to challenge the scientific evidence supporting a more protective standard. This effort included the use of "product defense" consultants to conduct post hoc analyses of a publicly-funded study to challenge results viewed unfavorably by the industry. The industry also commissioned a study of the mortality experience of workers at four low-exposure chromium plants, but did not make the results available to OSHA in a timely manner, despite multiple agency requests for precisely these sorts of data. The commissioned study found a statistically significant elevation in lung cancer risk among Cr(VI-exposed workers at levels far below the current standard. This finding changed when the multi-plant cohort was divided into two statistically underpowered components and then published separately. The findings of the first paper published have been used by the chromium industry to attempt to slow OSHA's standard setting process. The second paper was withheld from OSHA until it was accepted for publication in a scientific journal, after the rulemaking record had closed. Studies funded by private sponsors that seek to influence public regulatory proceedings should be subject to the same access and reporting provisions as those applied to publicly funded science. Parties in regulatory proceedings should be required to disclose whether the studies were performed by researchers who had the right to present their findings without the

  10. 77 FR 42988 - Updating OSHA Construction Standards Based on National Consensus Standards; Head Protection...

    2012-07-23

    .... OSHA-2011-0184] RIN 1218-AC65 Updating OSHA Construction Standards Based on National Consensus... Administration (OSHA), Department of Labor. ACTION: Direct final rule; correction. SUMMARY: OSHA is correcting a... confusion resulting from a drafting error. OSHA published the DFR on June 22, 2012 (77 FR 37587). OSHA also...

  11. OSHA. Training Module 4.330.3.77.

    Fillenwarth, Lynn; Bonnstetter, Ron

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with the Federal and Iowa Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA). Included are objectives, instructor guides, and student handouts. This module includes an overview of OSHA administration, analysis of OSHA standards including…

  12. OSHA Training Programs. Module SH-48. Safety and Health.

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This student module on OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Act) training programs is one of 50 modules concerned with job safety and health. This module provides a list of OSHA training requirements and describes OSHA training programs and other safety organizations' programs. Following the introduction, 11 objectives (each keyed to a page in the…

  13. 29 CFR 1960.31 - Inspections by OSHA.

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inspections by OSHA. 1960.31 Section 1960.31 Labor... MATTERS Inspection and Abatement § 1960.31 Inspections by OSHA. (a) The Secretary or the Secretary's... scheduled inspections as an integral part of OSHA's evaluation of an agency's safety and health program in...

  14. OSHA 101: an introduction to OSHA for the occupational health nurse.

    Fell-Carlson, Deborah

    2004-10-01

    The OSHA standards become easy to use with experience. Occupational health nurses who are unfamiliar with the standards are better served to use them as a reference, rather than attempting to read the entire document. Many of the standards have booklets published to assist users in understanding the information. These booklets are available within the publications link of the OSHA website. Occupational health nurses who have taken the initiative to gain knowledge about OSHA and to become fluent in navigating the OSHA standards soon discover that the ability to access the information contained in the standards quickly is a marketable skill. Employers depend on occupational health nurses to develop comprehensive programs that achieve the goal of injury prevention and also meet compliance requirements. The standards contain a wealth of information to do just that.

  15. Training Requirements in OSHA Standards. Revised.

    Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Washington, DC.

    This booklet contains excerpts of the training-related requirements of the standards promulgated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). It is designed as an aid for employers, safety and health professionals, and others who need to know training requirements. (References to training may be difficult to locate in the long and…

  16. Age correction in monitoring audiometry: method to update OSHA age-correction tables to include older workers

    Dobie, Robert A; Wojcik, Nancy C

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The US Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Noise Standard provides the option for employers to apply age corrections to employee audiograms to consider the contribution of ageing when determining whether a standard threshold shift has occurred. Current OSHA age-correction tables are based on 40-year-old data, with small samples and an upper age limit of 60?years. By comparison, recent data (1999?2006) show that hearing thresholds in the US population have improved....

  17. The Impact of Different Permissible Exposure Limits on Hearing Threshold Levels Beyond 25 dBA.

    Sayapathi, Balachandar S; Su, Anselm Ting; Koh, David

    2014-10-01

    Development of noise-induced hearing loss is reliant on a few factors such as frequency, intensity, and duration of noise exposure. The occurrence of this occupational malady has doubled from 120 million to 250 million in a decade. Countries such as Malaysia, India, and the US have adopted 90 dBA as the permissible exposure limit. According to the US Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the exposure limit for noise is 90 dBA, while that of the US National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) is 85 dBA for 8 hours of noise exposure. This study aimed to assess the development of hearing threshold levels beyond 25 dBA on adoption of 85 dBA as the permissible exposure limit compared to 90 dBA. This is an intervention study done on two automobile factories. There were 203 employees exposed to noise levels beyond the action level. Hearing protection devices were distributed to reduce noise levels to a level between the permissible exposure limit and action level. The permissible exposure limits were 90 and 85 dBA in factories 1 and 2, respectively, while the action levels were 85 and 80 dBA, respectively. The hearing threshold levels of participants were measured at baseline and at first month of postshift exposure of noise. The outcome was measured by a manual audiometer. McNemar and chi-square tests were used in the statistical analysis. We found that hearing threshold levels of more than 25 dBA has changed significantly from pre-intervention to post-intervention among participants from both factories (3000 Hz for the right ear and 2000 Hz for the left ear). There was a statistically significant association between participants at 3000 Hz on the right ear at 'deteriorated' level ( χ² (1) = 4.08, φ = - 0.142, P = 0.043), whereas there was worsening of hearing threshold beyond 25 dBA among those embraced 90 dBA. The adoption of 85 dBA as the permissible exposure limit has preserved hearing threshold level among participants at 3000 Hz

  18. A legacy of struggle: the OSHA ergonomics standard and beyond, Part II.

    Delp, Linda; Mojtahedi, Zahra; Sheikh, Hina; Lemus, Jackie

    2014-11-01

    The OSHA ergonomics standard issued in 2000 was repealed within four months through a Congressional resolution that limits future ergonomics rulemaking. This section continues the conversation initiated in Part I, documenting a legacy of struggle for an ergonomics standard through the voices of eight labor, academic, and government key informants. Part I summarized important components of the standard; described the convergence of labor activism, research, and government action that laid the foundation for a standard; and highlighted the debates that characterized the rulemaking process. Part II explores the anti-regulatory political landscape of the 1990s, as well as the key opponents, power dynamics, and legal maneuvers that led to repeal of the standard. This section also describes the impact of the ergonomics struggle beyond the standard itself and ends with a discussion of creative state-level policy initiatives and coalition approaches to prevent work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) in today's sociopolitical context.

  19. Occupational exposure to ethylene oxide--OSHA. Final rule: supplemental statement of reasons.

    1985-01-02

    On June 22, 1984, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) published a final standard for ethylene oxide (EtO) that established a permissible exposure limit of 1 part EtO per million parts of air determined as an 8-hour time--weighted average (TWA) concentration (29 CFR 1910.1047, 49 FR 25734). The standard also includes provisions for methods of exposure control, personal protective equipment, measurement of employee exposure, training, signs, and labels, medical surveillance, regulated areas, emergencies and recordkeeping. The basis for this action was a determination by OSHA, based on human and animal data, that exposure to EtO presents a carcinogenic, mutagenic, genotoxic, reproductive, neurologic, and sensitization hazard to workers. During the rulemaking proceedings that led to the establishment of the 1 ppm TWA, the issue of whether there was a need for a short-term exposure limit (STEL) for workers protection from EtO was raised. OSHA reserved decision on the adoption of a STEL at the conclusion of the rulemaking in order to permit peer review of the available evidence and to review more fully the arguments and pertinent data regarding the STEL issue. Upon receipt of the analyses from most of the peer reviewers, OSHA published a notice to that effect on September 19, 1984 (49 FR 36659) and invited public comment on the pertinent issues addressed in the peer reviews. Based on the entire rulemaking record, including the peer reviews and public comments received since June 22, the Assistant Secretary has determined that adoption of a STEL for EtO is not warranted by the available health evidence, and that a STEL is not reasonably necessary or appropriate for inclusion in the final EtO standard. OSHA has also asked that NIOSH fund certain additional studies related to whether a dose-rate relationship can be established for EtO, and OSHA will review the results of those studies when they become available.

  20. Design Compliance Matrices to ANSI and OSHA

    BENDIXSEN, R.B.

    2000-01-01

    U.S. Department of Energy Letter 98-SFD-028 requested Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. to provide clarifications as to compliance with ANSI 57.1, 57.2, 57.9, and 29 CFR 1910.179 (OSHA), in the form of an item-by-item compliance matrix, for the CSB. This Supporting Document contains Fluor Daniel, Inc.'s response for use by Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. regarding the clarifications requested by the U.S. Department of Energy

  1. Longitudinal Patterns of Compliance with OSHA Health and Safety Regulations in the Manufacturing Sector

    Wayne B. Gray; Carol Adaire Jones

    1989-01-01

    We examine the impact of OSHA enforcement on company compliance with agency regulations in the manufacturing sector, with a unique plant-level data set of inspection and compliance behavior during 1972-1983, the first twelve years of the agency operation. The analysis suggests that, for an individual inspected plant, the average effect of OSHA inspections during this period was to reduce expected citations by 3.0 or by .36 s.d. The total effect on expected citations of additional inspections ...

  2. The Impact of Different Permissible Exposure Limits on Hearing Threshold Levels Beyond 25 dBA

    Sayapathi, Balachandar S; Su, Anselm Ting; Koh, David

    2014-01-01

    Background: Development of noise-induced hearing loss is reliant on a few factors such as frequency, intensity, and duration of noise exposure. The occurrence of this occupational malady has doubled from 120 million to 250 million in a decade. Countries such as Malaysia, India, and the US have adopted 90 dBA as the permissible exposure limit. According to the US Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the exposure limit for noise is 90 dBA, while that of the US National Institut...

  3. Statistical Modeling of Occupational Exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Using OSHA Data.

    Lee, Derrick G; Lavoué, Jérôme; Spinelli, John J; Burstyn, Igor

    2015-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a group of pollutants with multiple variants classified as carcinogenic. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) provided access to two PAH exposure databanks of United States workplace compliance testing data collected between 1979 and 2010. Mixed-effects logistic models were used to predict the exceedance fraction (EF), i.e., the probability of exceeding OSHA's Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL = 0.2 mg/m3) for PAHs based on industry and occupation. Measurements of coal tar pitch volatiles were used as a surrogate for PAHs. Time, databank, occupation, and industry were included as fixed-effects while an identifier for the compliance inspection number was included as a random effect. Analyses involved 2,509 full-shift personal measurements. Results showed that the majority of industries had an estimated EF < 0.5, although several industries, including Standardized Industry Classification codes 1623 (Water, Sewer, Pipeline, and Communication and Powerline Construction), 1711 (Plumbing, Heating, and Air-Conditioning), 2824 (Manmade Organic Fibres), 3496 (Misc. Fabricated Wire products), and 5812 (Eating Places), and Major group's 13 (Oil and Gas Extraction) and 30 (Rubber and Miscellaneous Plastic Products), were estimated to have more than an 80% likelihood of exceeding the PEL. There was an inverse temporal trend of exceeding the PEL, with lower risk in most recent years, albeit not statistically significant. Similar results were shown when incorporating occupation, but varied depending on the occupation as the majority of industries predicted at the administrative level, e.g., managers, had an estimated EF < 0.5 while at the minimally skilled/laborer level there was a substantial increase in the estimated EF. These statistical models allow the prediction of PAH exposure risk through individual occupational histories and will be used to create a job-exposure matrix for use in a population-based case

  4. Do OSHA Inspections Reduce Injuries? A Panel Analysis

    Wayne B. Gray; John T. Scholz

    1991-01-01

    Using data on injuries and OSHA inspections for 6,842 large manufacturing plants between 1979 and 1985, we find evidence that OSHA inspections significantly reduce injuries. This effect comes exclusively from inspections that impose penalties, inspections which do not impose penalties appear to have no effect on injuries. Plants which are inspected (and penalized) in a given year experience a 22 percent decline in their injuries during the following few years. In our sample, total OSHA enforc...

  5. OSHA regulations: how they relate to ophthalmic practice.

    Garber, N

    1992-01-01

    The OSHA regulations, which took effect March 6, 1992, require that all employees be trained in infection control practices when they are hired, their job description changes, or the standards for universal precautions are revised. An explanation, provided to inform employees where a copy of the OSHA standard can be reviewed should be available at each clinical and surgical site, and OSHA regulation definitions must also be posted. The OSHA regulation applies to any clinical, housekeeping, or administrative staff that has any potential risk of exposure to blood or other potentially infectious substances.

  6. Compliance with OSHA record-keeping requirements.

    Seligman, P J; Sieber, W K; Pedersen, D H; Sundin, D S; Frazier, T M

    1988-01-01

    The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 requires employers to maintain records of workplace injuries and illnesses. To assess compliance with the law, data from the National Occupational Exposure Survey (NOES) were examined. Of the 4,185 companies with 11 or more employees, 75 per cent maintained OSHA Form 200 designed for recording illnesses and injuries. The number of employees and the presence of a union were positive determinants in the record maintenance. Of companies with 500 or more employees, 95 per cent kept records compared with 60 per cent of companies with between 11 and 99 employees. PMID:3407825

  7. 75 FR 2890 - OSHA Listens: Occupational Safety and Health Administration Stakeholder Meeting

    2010-01-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Occupational Safety and Health Administration [Docket No. OSHA-2010-0004] OSHA Listens: Occupational Safety and Health Administration Stakeholder Meeting AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Occupational Safety...

  8. The role of OSHA violations in serious workplace accidents.

    Mendeloff, J

    1984-05-01

    California accident investigations for 1976 show that violations of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's safety standards were a contributing factor in 13% to 19% of the 645 deaths reported to the workers' compensation program during that year. However, a panel of safety engineers judged that only about 50% of these violations could have been detected if an inspector had visited the day before the accident. These findings indicate that the potential gains from stronger enforcement of current standards are limited but not insignificant. The likelihood that a violation contributed to a serious accident varied considerably among accident types, industries, and size classes of plants. These findings can be used to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of the OSHA program by means of better targeting of inspections and accident investigations, more intelligent assessment of which violations should be penalized most heavily, and the provision of information to employers and workers about which violations are most consequential.

  9. Review: Sanya Osha (ed.), The Social Contract in Africa (2014)

    Damian Chukwudi Ukwandu

    2014-01-01

    Review of the edited volume:Sanya Osha (ed.), The Social Contract in Africa, Pretoria: Africa Institute for South Africa, 2014, ISBN 978-0-7983-0444-3, 200 pages Besprechung des Sammelbandes:Sanya Osha (Hrsg.), The Social Contract in Africa, Pretoria: Africa Institute for South Africa, 2014, ISBN 978-0-7983-0444-3, 200 Seiten

  10. OSHA Standard Time: Worker Safety Rules for Schools.

    Smith, Sharon E.; Roy, Kenneth R.

    1994-01-01

    Briefly describes six of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards applicable to school districts. Provides a suggested approach for compliance and discusses how one district has begun to meet the challenge. The mandated OSHA programs concern the following: (1) hazard communication; (2) chemical hygiene; (3) bloodborne…

  11. 29 CFR 1960.16 - Compliance with OSHA standards.

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance with OSHA standards. 1960.16 Section 1960.16 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Standards § 1960.16 Compliance with OSHA standards. Each agency head shall...

  12. Training Requirements in OSHA Standards and Training Guidelines.

    Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Washington, DC.

    This booklet contains Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) training requirements, excerpted from OSHA standards. The booklet is designed to help employers, safety and health professionals, training directors, and others who need to know training requirements. (Requirements for posting information, warning signs, labels, and the…

  13. 76 FR 17451 - Online OSHA Outreach Training Programs

    2011-03-29

    ... online providers must attend a mandatory orientation meeting at the OSHA Directorate of Training and... training their workers on specific hazards of their job, as noted in many OSHA standards. A list of... personnel, roofers, residential construction workers, etc. (i) Course Orientation. Explain the course...

  14. Respiratory protection standard: comments on OSHA's proposed revision.

    Decker, M D

    1995-06-01

    On November 15, 1994, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) published in the Federal Register (59:58884-58956) the draft of a proposed revision of the Respiratory Protection Standard. One of OSHA's oldest standards, the Respiratory Protection Standard defines the conduct of the employer (eg, hospital) with respect to respirator training, fit testing, medical examinations, use, storage, and so on. The proposed revision appears to have been drafted with no consideration for its effect on healthcare workers or the healthcare industry. SHEA has prepared the following comments to OSHA, which have been submitted to the docket and will be presented at public hearings later this month.

  15. 76 FR 80735 - Corrections and Technical Amendments to 16 OSHA Standards

    2011-12-27

    ... 1926 Corrections and Technical Amendments to 16 OSHA Standards AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Notice of corrections and technical amendments to standards. SUMMARY: OSHA is correcting typographical errors in, and making non- substantive technical amendments to, 16 OSHA...

  16. 29 CFR 42.10 - Farm labor contact persons and regional coordinators (OSHA).

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Farm labor contact persons and regional coordinators (OSHA... contact persons and regional coordinators (OSHA). (a) OSHA Area Directors shall be responsible for... taken; and (2) migrant farmworker camp inspections are scheduled promptly. (b) OSHA Area Directors shall...

  17. 77 FR 43018 - Updating OSHA Construction Standards Based on National Consensus Standards; Head Protection...

    2012-07-23

    .... OSHA-2011-0184] RIN 1218-AC65 Updating OSHA Construction Standards Based on National Consensus... Health Administration (OSHA), Department of Labor. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking; correction. SUMMARY: OSHA is correcting a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) with regard to the construction...

  18. 77 FR 68684 - Updating OSHA Standards Based on National Consensus Standards; Head Protection

    2012-11-16

    ..., 1918, and 1926 [Docket No. OSHA-2011-0184] RIN 1218-AC65 Updating OSHA Standards Based on National Consensus Standards; Head Protection AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Final rule; confirmation of effective date. SUMMARY: OSHA is confirming the effective date of its...

  19. 29 CFR 1904.9 - Recording criteria for cases involving medical removal under OSHA standards.

    2010-07-01

    ... surveillance requirements of an OSHA standard, you must record the case on the OSHA 300 Log. (b) Implementation—(1) How do I classify medical removal cases on the OSHA 300 Log? You must enter each medical removal case on the OSHA 300 Log as either a case involving days away from work or a case involving restricted...

  20. An analysis of violations of Osha's (1987) occupational exposure to benzene standard.

    Williams, Pamela R D

    2014-01-01

    -containing products may be used or produced during production processes, such as petroleum refineries, metal industries, and chemical companies. Not surprisingly, the greatest number of benzene standard violations have been issued to private facility owners (rather than government entities), given that the OSH Act primarily covers private sector employers. More violations have also been issued during inspections where union representation was present and from complaint-driven (vs. planned or other) inspections, which is consistent with OSHA inspection priorities. Violations of the benzene standard have typically involved a single instance per facility and 10 or fewer exposed employees. Because the OSH Act prescribes penalty caps for citations, initial penalties issued for noncompliance with the benzene standard have generally been less than $5,000 per violation. Despite some potential limitations, the OSHA inspection database contains the best available data for assessing historical and current violations of the benzene standard. These data, which have not been previously analyzed or published for benzene, may be of interest to professionals and practitioners involved in benzene risk assessment, risk management, and/or public policy issues.

  1. OSHA Laboratory Standard: Driving Force for Laboratory Safety!

    Roy, Kenneth R.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA's) Laboratory Safety Standards as the major driving force in establishing and maintaining a safe working environment for teachers and students. (Author)

  2. General RMP Guidance - Appendix D: OSHA Guidance on PSM

    OSHA's Process Safety Management (PSM) Guidance on providing complete and accurate written information concerning process chemicals, process technology, and process equipment; including process hazard analysis and material safety data sheets.

  3. RMP Guidance for Warehouses - Appendix D: OSHA Guidance on PSM

    This text is taken directly from OSHA's appendix C to the Process Safety Management standard (29 CFR 1910.119). Compiled information required by this standard, including material safety data sheets (MSDS), is essential to process hazards analysis (PHA).

  4. Significant Revisions to OSHA 29 CFR 1910.269.

    Neitzel, Dennis K

    2015-06-01

    The updated OSHA 29 CFR 1910.269 requirements are significant for assisting employers in their efforts to protect their employees from electrical hazards. In addition, OSHA based these revisions on the latest consensus standards and improvements in electrical safety technology. Together, the updated regulation creates a unified and up-to-date set of requirements to help employers more effectively establish safe work practices to protect their workers.

  5. A Recipe for Success OSHA VPP and Wellness

    Keprta, Sean

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) which is a program to promote effective worksite-based safety and health. In the VPP, management, labor, and OSHA establish cooperative relationships at workplaces that have implemented a comprehensive safety and health management system. The history of JSC's Total Health program and the movement from the Safety and Total Health program and the efforts to become certified by OSHA is reviewed.

  6. Age correction in monitoring audiometry: method to update OSHA age-correction tables to include older workers.

    Dobie, Robert A; Wojcik, Nancy C

    2015-07-13

    The US Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Noise Standard provides the option for employers to apply age corrections to employee audiograms to consider the contribution of ageing when determining whether a standard threshold shift has occurred. Current OSHA age-correction tables are based on 40-year-old data, with small samples and an upper age limit of 60 years. By comparison, recent data (1999-2006) show that hearing thresholds in the US population have improved. Because hearing thresholds have improved, and because older people are increasingly represented in noisy occupations, the OSHA tables no longer represent the current US workforce. This paper presents 2 options for updating the age-correction tables and extending values to age 75 years using recent population-based hearing survey data from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Both options provide scientifically derived age-correction values that can be easily adopted by OSHA to expand their regulatory guidance to include older workers. Regression analysis was used to derive new age-correction values using audiometric data from the 1999-2006 US NHANES. Using the NHANES median, better-ear thresholds fit to simple polynomial equations, new age-correction values were generated for both men and women for ages 20-75 years. The new age-correction values are presented as 2 options. The preferred option is to replace the current OSHA tables with the values derived from the NHANES median better-ear thresholds for ages 20-75 years. The alternative option is to retain the current OSHA age-correction values up to age 60 years and use the NHANES-based values for ages 61-75 years. Recent NHANES data offer a simple solution to the need for updated, population-based, age-correction tables for OSHA. The options presented here provide scientifically valid and relevant age-correction values which can be easily adopted by OSHA to expand their regulatory guidance to

  7. Surveillance of Washington OSHA exposure data to identify uncharacterized or emerging occupational health hazards.

    Lofgren, Don J; Reeb-Whitaker, Carolyn K; Adams, Darrin

    2010-07-01

    Chemical substance exposure data from the Washington State Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) program were reviewed to determine if inspections conducted as a result of a report of a hazard from a complainant or referent may alert the agency to uncharacterized or emerging health hazards. Exposure and other electronically stored data from 6890 health inspection reports conducted between April 2003 and August 2008 were extracted from agency records. A total of 515 (7%) inspections with one or more personal airborne chemical substance samples were identified for further study. Inspections by report of a hazard and by targeting were compared for the following: number of inspections, number and percentage of inspections with workers exposed to substances above an agency's permissible exposure limit, types of industries inspected, and number and type of chemical substances assessed. Report of a hazard inspections documented work sites with worker overexposure at the same rate as agency targeted inspections (approximately 35% of the time), suggesting that complainants and referents are a credible pool of observers capable of directing the agency to airborne chemical substance hazards. Report of a hazard inspections were associated with significantly broader distribution of industries as well as a greater variety of chemical substance exposures than were targeted inspections. Narrative text that described business type and processes inspected was more useful than NAICS codes alone and critical in identifying processes and industries that may be associated with new hazards. Finally, previously identified emerging hazards were found among the report of a hazard data. These findings indicate that surveillance of OSHA inspection data can be a valid tool to identify uncharacterized and emerging health hazards. Additional research is needed to develop criteria for objective review and prioritization of the data for intervention. Federal OSHA and other state

  8. 76 FR 2417 - OSHA-7 Form (“Notice of Alleged Safety and Health Hazards”); Extension of the Office of...

    2011-01-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Occupational Safety and Health Administration [Docket No. OSHA-2010-0056] OSHA... and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Request for public comments. SUMMARY: OSHA solicits... specified in the OSHA-7 Form. DATES: Comments must be submitted (postmarked, sent, or received) by March 14...

  9. 77 FR 24992 - OSHA Strategic Partnership Program for Worker Safety and Health (OSPP); Extension of the Office...

    2012-04-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Occupational Safety and Health Administration [Docket No. OSHA-2011-0861] OSHA... and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Request for public comments. SUMMARY: OSHA solicits... specified in the OSHAs Strategic Partnership Program for Worker Safety and Health (OSPP). DATES: Comments...

  10. Use of OSHA inspections data for fatal occupational injury surveillance in New Jersey.

    Stanbury, M; Goldoft, M

    1990-01-01

    Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) computerized inspections data, death certificates, and medical examiner records identified 204 fatal occupational injuries in New Jersey, 1984-85. OSHA computerized data uniquely identified seven cases. They did not identify 35 fatalities under OSHA's jurisdiction, of which 24 were investigated by OSHA but not recorded, four were not considered work-related, and seven were not known to OSHA. Eighty-seven were outside OSHA's jurisdiction; 28 were among the self-employed who are not under the health and safety protection of any governmental agency. PMID:2297066

  11. A Critical Review of OSHA Heat Enforcement Cases: Lessons Learned.

    Arbury, Sheila; Lindsley, Matthew; Hodgson, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to review the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) 2012 to 2013 heat enforcement cases, using identified essential elements of heat illness prevention to evaluate employers' programs and make recommendations to better protect workers from heat illness. (1) Identify essential elements of heat illness prevention; (2) develop data collection tool; and (3) analyze OSHA 2012 to 2013 heat enforcement cases. OSHA's database contains 84 heat enforcement cases in 2012 to 2013. Employer heat illness prevention programs were lacking in essential elements such as providing water and shade; adjusting the work/rest proportion to allow for workload and effective temperature; and acclimatizing and training workers. In this set of investigations, most employers failed to implement common elements of illness prevention programs. Over 80% clearly did not rely on national standard approaches to heat illness prevention.

  12. Effectiveness of OSHA Outreach Training on carpenters' work-related injury rates, Washington State 2000-2008.

    Schoenfisch, Ashley L; Lipscomb, Hester; Sinyai, Clayton; Adams, Darrin

    2017-01-01

    Despite the size and breadth of OSHA's Outreach Training program for construction, information on its impact on work-related injury rates is limited. In a 9-year dynamic cohort of 17,106 union carpenters in Washington State, the effectiveness of OSHA Outreach Training on workers' compensation claims rate was explored. Injury rates were calculated by training status overall and by carpenters' demographic and work characteristics using Poisson regression. OSHA Outreach Training resulted in a 13% non-significant reduction in injury claims rates overall. The protective effect was more pronounced for carpenters in their apprenticeship years, drywall installers, and with increasing time since training. In line with these observed effects and prior research, it is unrealistic to expect OSHA Outreach Training alone to have large effects on union construction workers' injury rates. Standard construction industry practice should include hazard awareness and protection training, coupled with more efficient approaches to injury control. Am. J. Ind. Med. 60:45-57, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Maximum penetration level of distributed generation without violating voltage limits

    Morren, J.; Haan, de S.W.H.

    2009-01-01

    Connection of Distributed Generation (DG) units to a distribution network will result in a local voltage increase. As there will be a maximum on the allowable voltage increase, this will limit the maximum allowable penetration level of DG. By reactive power compensation (by the DG unit itself) a

  14. Adolescent occupational fatalities in North Carolina (1990-2008): an investigation of child labor and OSHA violations and enforcement.

    Rauscher, Kimberly; Runyan, Carol

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated adolescent worker fatalities involving violations of the child labor laws and/or Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards, as well as the enforcement activity involved in each case. Medical examiner records were used to identify work-related deaths among adolescents ages 11-17 between 1990 and 2008 and child labor violations. Investigations from state and federal Departments of Labor (DOL) were used to determine inspection activity, identify OSHA violations, and confirm child labor violations. Fifty-two percent of cases involved one or more child labor violations. Nine cases were investigated by either the U.S. or North Carolina DOL; among them, four had child labor violations. Eleven cases were investigated by the North Carolina DOL and all involved OSHA violations. Significant child labor and OSHA violations exist in adolescent worker fatalities in North Carolina, and gaps exist in enforcement at both the federal and state level, signaling needed improvements in the protection of adolescent workers.

  15. 77 FR 68717 - Updating OSHA Standards Based on National Consensus Standards; Head Protection

    2012-11-16

    ..., 1918, and 1926 [Docket No. OSH-2011-0184] RIN 1218-AC65 Updating OSHA Standards Based on National Consensus Standards; Head Protection AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Proposed rule; withdrawal. SUMMARY: With this notice, OSHA is withdrawing the proposed rule that...

  16. 29 CFR 500.132 - Applicable Federal standards: ETA and OSHA housing standards.

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applicable Federal standards: ETA and OSHA housing... Migrant Workers Housing Safety and Health § 500.132 Applicable Federal standards: ETA and OSHA housing... § 500.131, all migrant housing is subject to either the ETA standards or the OSHA standards, as follows...

  17. 29 CFR 1904.39 - Reporting fatalities and multiple hospitalization incidents to OSHA.

    2010-07-01

    ... to OSHA. 1904.39 Section 1904.39 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY... fatalities and multiple hospitalization incidents to OSHA. (a) Basic requirement. Within eight (8) hours... Administration (OSHA), U.S. Department of Labor, that is nearest to the site of the incident. You may also use...

  18. 29 CFR 1904.41 - Annual OSHA injury and illness survey of ten or more employers.

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Annual OSHA injury and illness survey of ten or more... Reporting Fatality, Injury and Illness Information to the Government § 1904.41 Annual OSHA injury and illness survey of ten or more employers. (a) Basic requirement. If you receive OSHA's annual survey form...

  19. 75 FR 77798 - Interpretation of OSHA's Provisions for Feasible Administrative or Engineering Controls of...

    2010-12-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Occupational Safety and Health Administration [Docket No. OSHA-2010-0032] 29 CFR Parts 1910 and 1926 Interpretation of OSHA's Provisions for Feasible Administrative or Engineering Controls of Occupational Noise AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION...

  20. 29 CFR 1912.32 - Presence of OSHA officer or employee.

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Presence of OSHA officer or employee. 1912.32 Section 1912... Presence of OSHA officer or employee. The meetings of all advisory committees shall be in the presence of an OSHA officer or employee designated for this purpose. Such officer or employee shall be empowered...

  1. Training Requirements in OSHA Standards and Training Guidelines. Revised.

    Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Washington, DC.

    This guide provides an overview of Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) standards and training guidelines for various industries. The first section introduces the concept of voluntary training guidelines, explaining that the guidelines are designed to help employers determine whether a worksite problem can be solved by training, what training…

  2. Informing Workers of Chemical Hazards: The OSHA Hazard Communication Standard.

    American Chemical Society, Washington, DC.

    Practical information on how to implement a chemical-related safety program is outlined in this publication. Highlights of the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administrations (OSHA) Hazard Communication Standard are presented and explained. These include: (1) hazard communication requirements (consisting of warning labels, material safety…

  3. OSHA in healthcare--out of sight, out of mind?

    Harris, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Millions of employees across thousands of sites. The highest illness and injury rates in the nation. Millions of nosocomial infections and fatalities each year. Few OSHA inspections. Healthcare might feel exempt, but, according to the author, "it looks like we finally got their attention".

  4. Transmission Level High Temperature Superconducting Fault Current Limiter

    Stewart, Gary [SuperPower, Inc., Schenectady, NY (United States)

    2016-10-05

    The primary objective of this project was to demonstrate the feasibility and reliability of utilizing high-temperature superconducting (HTS) materials in a Transmission Level Superconducting Fault Current Limiter (SFCL) application. During the project, the type of high-temperature superconducting material used evolved from 1st generation (1G) BSCCO-2212 melt cast bulk high-temperature superconductors to 2nd generation (2G) YBCO-based high-temperature superconducting tape. The SFCL employed SuperPower's “Matrix” technology, that offers modular features to enable scale up to transmission voltage levels. The SFCL consists of individual modules that contain elements and parallel inductors that assist in carrying the current during the fault. A number of these modules are arranged in an m x n array to form the current-limiting matrix.

  5. Threshold limit values, permissible exposure limits, and feasibility: The bases for exposure limits in the United States

    Rappaport, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    The development of exposure limits in the United States has always relied heavily upon the threshold limit values (TLVs) developed by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). In fact, the TLVs were adopted as official exposure limits by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) in 1972 and 1989. Given the continuing importance of the ACGIH limits, this paper compares the basis of the TLVs with that employed by OSHA de novo in its 12 new permissible exposure limits (PELs). Using benzene as an example, it is shown that OSHA's new PELs have been established following a rigorous assessment of the inherent risks and the feasibility of instituting the limit. The TLVs, on the other hand, have been developed by ad hoc procedures and appear to have traditionally reflected levels thought to be achievable at the time. However, this might be changing. Analysis of the historical reductions of TLVs, for 27 substances on the 1991-1992 list of intended changes, indicates smaller reductions in the past (median reduction of 2.0-2.5-fold between 1946 and 1988) compared to those currently being observed (median reduction of 7.5-fold between 1989 and 1991). Further analysis suggests a more aggressive policy of the ACGIH regarding TLVs for carcinogens but not for substances that produce effects other than cancer. Regardless of whether the basis of the TLVs has changed recently, it would take a relatively long time for the impact of any change to be felt, since the median age of the 1991-1992 TLVs is 16.5 years, and 75% of these limits are more than 10 years old. The implications of OSHA's continued reliance on the TLVs as a means of updating its PELs are discussed, and four alternatives are presented to the ACGIH regarding the future of its activities related to exposure limits. It is concluded that new mechanisms are needed for OSHA to update its PELs in a timely fashion so that the TLVs will not be adopted by default in the future

  6. Limited oxygen index levels of impregnated Scots pine wood

    Tomak, Eylem Dizman; Cavdar, Ayfer Donmez

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Scots pine samples were treated with 4 wood preservatives with various concentrations. • Limited oxygen index level was evaluated both for leached and un-leached samples. • All treatments improved fire retardance of samples despite some chemicals leached out. • Samples treated with fireproof agent showed the best results. • LOI of samples treated with boron powder and silicon oil was not changed by leaching. - Abstract: In this study, effect of various concentrations of boron powder, mixture of boric acid and borax, fireproof agent based on liquid blend of limestone, and silicon oil on limited oxygen index levels (LOI) of S. pine wood was investigated. Wood samples were first vacuum treated with the preservatives, and then were subjected to leaching procedure. Samples treated with fireproof agent showed the best results for improving the fire retardancy of wood, furthermore, samples treated with 25%, 50% and 100% of the solution did not burn. Leaching did not considerably change the LOI of wood samples treated with boron powder and silicon oil; however, LOI levels of samples treated with the mixture of boric acid and borax and fireproof agent were affected by leaching procedure probably arising those preservatives did not chemically bond to main wood components. All treatments improved fire retardancy of samples despite some amount of preservatives leached out from wood

  7. Limited oxygen index levels of impregnated Scots pine wood

    Tomak, Eylem Dizman, E-mail: eylemdizman@yahoo.com [Forest Industry Engineering Department, Faculty of Forestry, Bursa Technical University, 16200 Bursa (Turkey); Cavdar, Ayfer Donmez [Interior Architecture Department, Faculty of Architecture, Karadeniz Technical University, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey)

    2013-12-10

    Highlights: • Scots pine samples were treated with 4 wood preservatives with various concentrations. • Limited oxygen index level was evaluated both for leached and un-leached samples. • All treatments improved fire retardance of samples despite some chemicals leached out. • Samples treated with fireproof agent showed the best results. • LOI of samples treated with boron powder and silicon oil was not changed by leaching. - Abstract: In this study, effect of various concentrations of boron powder, mixture of boric acid and borax, fireproof agent based on liquid blend of limestone, and silicon oil on limited oxygen index levels (LOI) of S. pine wood was investigated. Wood samples were first vacuum treated with the preservatives, and then were subjected to leaching procedure. Samples treated with fireproof agent showed the best results for improving the fire retardancy of wood, furthermore, samples treated with 25%, 50% and 100% of the solution did not burn. Leaching did not considerably change the LOI of wood samples treated with boron powder and silicon oil; however, LOI levels of samples treated with the mixture of boric acid and borax and fireproof agent were affected by leaching procedure probably arising those preservatives did not chemically bond to main wood components. All treatments improved fire retardancy of samples despite some amount of preservatives leached out from wood.

  8. OSHA--what is its role in dentistry and how do we provide training?

    Basquill, Linda C; Govoni, Mary; Bednarsh, Helene

    2005-03-01

    The mission of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is to ensure the safety and health of America's workers. Although OSHA's focus is on safety, there is a natural overlap into the infection control arena. The work practice control, engineering control, and personal protective equipment regulations are examples of OSHA safety topics that have a direct impact on dental infection control. In a similar fashion, the regulations designed to protect the dental health care worker often translate into increased safety for the dental patient. To ensure their safety, OSHA requires workers to be appropriately trained. This article reviews the regulatory significance of OSHA, compares OSHA with other regulatory and advisory agencies, and discusses OSHA's training requirements. Principles for conducting training in the dental health care setting along with suggestions for assessing training also are presented.

  9. 29 CFR 1913.10 - Rules of agency practice and procedure concerning OSHA access to employee medical records.

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rules of agency practice and procedure concerning OSHA... PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE CONCERNING OSHA ACCESS TO EMPLOYEE MEDICAL RECORDS § 1913.10 Rules of agency practice and procedure concerning OSHA access to employee medical records. (a) General policy. OSHA access...

  10. What kinds of injuries do OSHA inspections prevent?

    Haviland, Amelia; Burns, Rachel; Gray, Wayne; Ruder, Teague; Mendeloff, John

    2010-08-01

    OSHA's enforcement program is one of the major public efforts to protect American workers. We examine both the scope of injury prevention that inspections can contribute and the types of standards that contribute the most. We linked Pennsylvania Department of Labor and Industry files for lost-time injuries and employment to calculate injury rates for 1998-2005 for all single-establishment manufacturing firms. We linked these to OSHA inspection records. Inspections with penalties did affect injury types unrelated to standards as well as those related. We also found again that citations for violations of the standard requiring personal protective equipment had the largest impact on preventing injuries. Programs requiring protective equipment use deserve added attention from consultants and inspectors. In addition, some inspections spur managers to undertake safety measures that go beyond compliance with standards. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Updating OSHA standards based on national consensus standards. final rule; confirmation of effective date.

    2008-03-14

    OSHA is confirming the effective date of its direct final rule that revises a number of standards for general industry that refer to national consensus standards. The direct final rule states that it would become effective on March 13, 2008 unless OSHA receives significant adverse comment on these revisions by January 14, 2008. OSHA received no adverse comments by that date and, therefore, is confirming that the rule will become effective on March 13, 2008.

  12. The OSHA hazardous chemical occupational exposure standard for laboratories.

    Armbruster, D A

    1991-01-01

    OSHA's chemical occupational exposure standard for laboratories is an outgrowth of the previously issued Hazard Communication Standard. The standard relieves laboratories from complying with general industry standards but does require compliance with specific laboratory guidelines. The heart of the standard is the creation of a Chemical Hygiene Plan (CHP). The CHP addresses major issues such as safety equipment and procedures, work practices, training, the designation of a chemical hygiene officer, and the provision of medical consultation and examination for affected employees. This new standard, in full effect as of January 31, 1991, presents yet another regulatory challenge to laboratory managers but also ensures a safer environment for laboratory workers.

  13. OSHA safety requirements for hazardous chemicals in the workplace.

    Dohms, J

    1992-01-01

    This article outlines the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requirements set forth by the Hazard Communication Standard, which has been in effect for the healthcare industry since 1987. Administrators who have not taken concrete steps to address employee health and safety issues relating to hazardous chemicals are encouraged to do so to avoid the potential of large fines for cited violations. While some states administer their own occupational safety and health programs, they must adopt standards and enforce requirements that are at least as effective as federal requirements.

  14. OSHA's bloodborne pathogens rule an opportunity/threat.

    Weller, S C

    1992-02-01

    If you supply healthcare linen, OSHA's new ruling comes with a price tag, but it may be a marketing boon as well. The costs of compliance are high--about $1.19 million annually. One of the most costly and important parts of the ruling is the required employer-paid hepatitis B vaccination of employees. But behind the costs, there's good news for the textile rental industry. The opportunity to serve small medical facilities and nursing homes as well as hospitals with reusable healthcare garments could create a revenue source estimated to be at least $177 million a year.

  15. Location of the H[+/-] level: Experimental limits for muonium

    Lichti, R.L.; Chow, K.H.; Gil, J.M.; Stripe, D.L.; Vilao, R.C.; Cox, S.F.J.

    2006-01-01

    The defect energy levels for muonium, a light pseudo-isotope of hydrogen, are investigated to define the equivalent of the H[+/-] level which is predicted to be fixed at a universal energy. Existing results for Mu at donor and acceptor sites in silicon tentatively place Mu[+/-] approximately 0.5eV above the predicted hydrogen level. Measured donor ionization energies in other materials in which two neutral Mu centers are observed define a range for the Mu acceptor energies. We discuss possible reinterpretation of known energies and the current state of investigations to obtain these muonium acceptor levels in order to further refine a determination of the Mu[+/-] energy

  16. Review of the OSHA framework for oversight of occupational environments.

    Choi, Jae-Young; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy

    2009-01-01

    The OSHA system for oversight of chemicals in the workplace was evaluated to derive lessons for oversight of nanotechnology. Criteria relating to the development, attributes, evolution, and outcomes of the system were used for evaluation that was based upon quantitative expert elicitation and historical literature analysis. The oversight system had inadequate resources in terms of finances, expertise, and personnel, and insufficient incentive for compliance. The system showed a lack of flexibility in novel situations. There were minimal requirements on companies for data on health and safety of their products. These factors have a strong influence on public confidence and health and safety. The oversight system also scored low on attributes such as public input, transparency, empirical basis, conflict of interest, and informed consent. The experts in our sample tend to believe that the current oversight system for chemicals in the workplace is neither adequate nor effective. It is very likely that the performance of the OSHA oversight system for nanomaterials will be equally inadequate.

  17. 78 FR 35585 - Updating OSHA Standards Based on National Consensus Standards; Signage

    2013-06-13

    ...; Signage AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Department of Labor. ACTION: Notice... Administration (``OSHA'' or ``the Agency'') proposes to update its general industry and construction signage... standards, ANSI Z53.1-1967, Z35.1-1968, and Z35.2-1968, in its signage standards, thereby providing...

  18. The Role of OSHA in Safety and Health. Module SH-02. Safety and Health.

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This student module on the role of OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Act) in Safety and Health is one of 50 modules concerned with job safety and health. This module looks at the OSHA Act, its aims, and the rights and responsibilities of employers and workers under the Act. Following the introduction, 16 objectives (each keyed to a page in the…

  19. OSHA Final Rule Gives Employees the Right to See Their Exposure and Medical Records.

    Hayes, Mary

    1982-01-01

    Provides details pertaining to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) ruling that gives employees, their designated representatives, and OSHA the right to examine their on-the-job medical records. Discusses the effects the ruling may have on organizations. (Author/MLF)

  20. All About OSHA and How It Will Help -- and Unnerve -- Your District

    American School Board Journal, 1973

    1973-01-01

    In response to OSHA, school board members and administrators should initiate a comprehensive, districtwide safety education and accident prevention program. OSHA will affect schools by requiring injury and illness records and onsite inspections. It will affect the operation of the physical plant and effect the provision of a comprehensive,…

  1. 29 CFR 1912a.10 - Presence of OSHA officer or employee.

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Presence of OSHA officer or employee. 1912a.10 Section 1912a.10 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Presence of OSHA officer or employee. The meetings of all advisory committees shall be in the presence of...

  2. Upper limit set for level of lightning activity on Titan

    Desch, M. D.; Kaiser, M. L.

    1990-01-01

    Because optically thick cloud and haze layers prevent lightning detection at optical wavelength on Titan, a search was conducted for lightning-radiated signals (spherics) at radio wavelengths using the planetary radioastronomy instrument aboard Voyager 1. Given the maximum ionosphere density of about 3000/cu cm, lightning spherics should be detectable above an observing frequency of 500 kHz. Since no evidence for spherics is found, an upper limit to the total energy per flash in Titan lightning of about 10 to the 6th J, or about 1000 times weaker than that of typical terrestrial lightning, is inferred.

  3. Ask Dr. Sue--OSHA Requires Employers to Give Hepatitis B Immunization and Protection to First Aiders.

    Aronson, Susan S.

    1992-01-01

    Explains rules of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) that require employers to protect employees whose jobs may result in worker contact with potentially infectious materials. Describes conditions that apply to violations of OSHA rules. Urges child care programs to formulate plans for compliance with OSHA requirements. (SM)

  4. 29 CFR 1960.67 - Federal agency certification of the injury and illness annual summary (OSHA 300-A or equivalent).

    2010-07-01

    ... annual summary (OSHA 300-A or equivalent). 1960.67 Section 1960.67 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor... Reporting Requirements § 1960.67 Federal agency certification of the injury and illness annual summary (OSHA... has examined the OSHA 300 Log and that he or she believes, based on his or her knowledge of the...

  5. [Limits of cardiac functional adaptation in "top level" resistance athletes].

    Carù, B; Righetti, G; Bossi, M; Gerosa, C; Gazzotti, G; Maranetto, D

    2001-02-01

    Sports activity, particularly when performed at high level, provokes cardiovascular adjustments depending on the type of sport and on the level of the load. We evaluated 15 athletes from the Italian national team during a non-agonistic period of cross country skiing, with non-invasive tests including exercise test, color Doppler echocardiography, Holter monitoring, physical examination and standard rest electrocardiogram. Physical examination, rest electrocardiogram, exercise testing and echocardiography were all within the range of the expected values for this type of subjects. Holter monitoring recorded during the periods of agonistic activity revealed significant hypokinetic arrhythmias such as severe bradycardia, pauses, I and II degree atrioventricular blocks, and complete atrioventricular block in 2 cases; these features were not observed on Holter monitoring recorded during the non-agonistic period. The perfect health status of subjects and their racing results may bring about physiological functional adjustments, but these observations suggest the need for a follow-up to evaluate possible pathologic outcomes.

  6. Is the Levels of Processing effect language-limited?

    Baddeley, Alan David; Hitch, Graham James

    2017-01-01

    The concept of Levels of Processing (LOP), proposing that deep coding enhances retention,has played a central role in the study of episodic memory. Evidence has however been based almost entirely on retention of individual words. Across five experiments, we compare LOP effects between visual and verbal stimuli, using judgments of pleasantness as a method of inducing deep encoding and a range of shallow encoding judgments selected so as to be applicable to both verbal and visual stimuli. LOP e...

  7. Taking Open Innovation to the Molecular Level - Strengths and Limitations.

    Zdrazil, Barbara; Blomberg, Niklas; Ecker, Gerhard F

    2012-08-01

    The ever-growing availability of large-scale open data and its maturation is having a significant impact on industrial drug-discovery, as well as on academic and non-profit research. As industry is changing to an 'open innovation' business concept, precompetitive initiatives and strong public-private partnerships including academic research cooperation partners are gaining more and more importance. Now, the bioinformatics and cheminformatics communities are seeking for web tools which allow the integration of this large volume of life science datasets available in the public domain. Such a data exploitation tool would ideally be able to answer complex biological questions by formulating only one search query. In this short review/perspective, we outline the use of semantic web approaches for data and knowledge integration. Further, we discuss strengths and current limitations of public available data retrieval tools and integrated platforms.

  8. Limitations of potentiometric oxygen sensors operating at low oxygen levels

    Lund, Anders; Jacobsen, Torben; Hansen, Karin Vels

    2011-01-01

    The electrochemical processes that limit the range of oxygen partial pressures in which potentiometric oxygen sensors can be used, were analysed using a theoretical and an experimental approach. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was performed on porous Pt/yttria stabilised zirconia (YSZ......) electrodes between 10−6 and 0.2 bar and at temperatures between 500 and 950 °C. The flow of oxide ions and electron holes through a sensor cell, with a YSZ electrolyte, were calculated under similar conditions. The oxygen permeation of the sensor cell was insignificant at an oxygen partial pressure of 10......−6 bar for an inlet flow rate higher than 2 L h−1 between 600 and 800 °C. The polarisation resistance measured between 10−6 and 10−4 bar was found to be inversely proportional to the oxygen partial pressure, nearly temperature independent and inversely proportional to the inlet gas flow rate, which shows...

  9. Discussion on the methods for calculation release limits for low-level radioactive waste

    Cao Fengbo; Liu Xiaochao

    2012-01-01

    The release request for low-level radioactive waste are briefly described in this paper. Associating with the conditions of low-level radioactive waste of some radioactive waste processing station, the methods and gist for calculating release limits for low-level radioactive waste with national release limits and annual effective dose limit for the public or the occupation are discussed. Then release limits for the low-level radioactive waste are also proposed. (authors)

  10. Updating OSHA standards based on national consensus standards. Direct final rule.

    2007-12-14

    In this direct final rule, the Agency is removing several references to consensus standards that have requirements that duplicate, or are comparable to, other OSHA rules; this action includes correcting a paragraph citation in one of these OSHA rules. The Agency also is removing a reference to American Welding Society standard A3.0-1969 ("Terms and Definitions") in its general-industry welding standards. This rulemaking is a continuation of OSHA's ongoing effort to update references to consensus and industry standards used throughout its rules.

  11. Updating OSHA Standards Based on National Consensus Standards; Eye and Face Protection. Final rule.

    2016-03-25

    On March 13, 2015, OSHA published in the Federal Register a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to revise its eye and face protection standards for general industry, shipyard employment, marine terminals, longshoring, and construction by updating the references to national consensus standards approved by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). OSHA received no significant objections from commenters and therefore is adopting the amendments as proposed. This final rule updates the references in OSHA's eye and face standards to reflect the most recent edition of the ANSI/International Safety Equipment Association (ISEA) eye and face protection standard. It removes the oldest-referenced edition of the same ANSI standard. It also amends other provisions of the construction eye and face protection standard to bring them into alignment with OSHA's general industry and maritime standards.

  12. Plant Operations. OSHA on Campus: Campus Safety Officers Discuss Problems and Potentials

    Kuchta, Joseph F.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    The Occupation Safety and Health Act (OSHA) has presented campus safety officers with new problems, but it is also offering them new potentials, which were explored at the recent national conference on Campus Security. (Editor)

  13. Analysis of Construction Fatalities - The OSHA Data Base 1985-1989

    1990-01-01

    .... Statistics from the OSHA data base are compared with construction fatality data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and the National Safety Council.

  14. 75 FR 64216 - Interpretation of OSHA's Provisions for Feasible Administrative or Engineering Controls of...

    2010-10-19

    ... submitting personal information such as social security numbers and birth dates. Docket: To read or download... of reducing noise exposures is consistent with OSHA's traditional adherence to a hierarchy of...

  15. Physical Exposures, Work Tasks, and OSHA-10 Training Among Temporary and Payroll Construction Workers.

    Caban-Martinez, Alberto J; Santiago, Katerina M; Stillman, Jordan; Moore, Kevin J; Sierra, Danielle A; Chalmers, Juanita; Baniak, Melissa; Jordan, Melissa M

    2018-04-01

    We characterize and compare the self-reported physical exposures, work tasks, and OSHA-10 training in a non-probabilistic sample of temporary and payroll construction workers. In June 2016, a total of 250 payroll and temporary general laborers employed at Florida construction sites completed a survey at the job site as part of the falls reported among minority employees (FRAME) study. Workers employed through temp agencies (57.1%) were significantly more likely to report moving or lifting materials more than 100 pounds than payroll workers (38.5%; P < 0.01). Temporary construction workers with 10-hour OSHA training (22.2%) spent significantly less time with intense hand use/awkward hand posture than temporary workers without 10-hour OSHA training (46.9%; P = 0.048). Temp construction workers with OSHA 10-hour training reported less hazardous physical postures than workers without the same training.

  16. Operating room sound level hazards for patients and physicians.

    Fritsch, Michael H; Chacko, Chris E; Patterson, Emily B

    2010-07-01

    Exposure to certain new surgical instruments and operating room devices during procedures could cause hearing damage to patients and personnel. Surgical instruments and related equipment generate significant sound levels during routine usage. Both patients and physicians are exposed to these levels during the operative cases, many of which can last for hours. The noise loads during cases are cumulative. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) standards are inconsistent in their appraisals of potential damage. Implications of the newer power instruments are not widely recognized. Bruel and Kjaer sound meter spectral recordings for 20 major instruments from 5 surgical specialties were obtained at the ear levels for the patient and the surgeon between 32 and 20 kHz. Routinely used instruments generated sound levels as high as 131 dB. Patient and operator exposures differed. There were unilateral dominant exposures. Many instruments had levels that became hazardous well within the length of an average surgical procedure. The OSHA and NIOSH systems gave contradicting results when applied to individual instruments and types of cases. Background noise, especially in its intermittent form, was also of significant nature. Some patients and personnel have additional predisposing physiologic factors. Instrument noise levels for average length surgical cases may exceed OSHA and NIOSH recommendations for hearing safety. Specialties such as Otolaryngology, Orthopedics, and Neurosurgery use instruments that regularly exceed limits. General operating room noise also contributes to overall personnel exposures. Innovative countermeasures are suggested.

  17. Instructional materials for SARA/OSHA training. Volume 1, General site working training

    Copenhaver, E.D.; White, D.A.; Wells, S.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1988-04-01

    This proposed 24 hour ORNL SARA/OSHA training curriculum emphasizes health and safety concerns in hazardous waste operations as well as methods of worker protection. Consistent with guidelines for hazardous waste site activities developed jointly by National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Occupational Safety and Health Administration, US Coast Guard, and the Envirorunental Protection Agency, the program material will address Basic Training for General Site Workers to include: ORNL Site Safety Documentation, Safe Work Practices, Nature of Anticipated Hazards, Handling Emergencies and Self-Rescue, Employee Rights and Responsibilities, Demonstration of Use, Care, and Limitations of Personal Protective, Clothing and Equipment, and Demonstration of Monitoring Equipment and Sampling Techniques. The basic training courses includes major fundamentals of industrial hygiene presented to the workers in a format that encourages them to assume responsibility for their own safety and health protection. Basic course development has focused on the special needs of ORNL facilities. Because ORNL generates chemical wastes, radioactive wastes, and mixed wastes, we have added significant modules on radiation protection in general, as well as modules on radiation toxicology and on radiation protective clothing and equipment.

  18. A new estimate of the impact of OSHA inspections on manufacturing injury rates, 1998-2005.

    Haviland, Amelia M; Burns, Rachel M; Gray, Wayne B; Ruder, Teague; Mendeloff, John

    2012-11-01

    A prior study indicated that the effect of OSHA inspections on lost workday injuries had declined from 1979 through 1998. This study provides an updated estimate for 1998-2005. Injury data from the Pennsylvania workers' compensation program were linked with employment data from unemployment compensation records to calculate lost-time rates for single-establishment manufacturing firms with more than 10 employees. These rates were linked to OSHA inspection findings. The RAND Human Subjects Protection Committee determined that this study was exempt from review. Inspections with penalties reduced injuries by an average of 19-24% annually in the 2 years following the inspection. These effects were not found for workplaces with fewer than 20 or more than 250 employees or for inspections without penalties. These findings should be generalizable to the 29 states where federal OSHA directly enforces standards. They suggest that the impact of inspections has increased from the 1990s. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. All About OSHA: The Who, What, Where, When, Why and How of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970.

    Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Washington, DC.

    The pamphlet summarizes the operations of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the provisions of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA's mission is to assure safe and healthful working conditions and to preserve human resources. Employers and employees who are covered by the act and employer and employee…

  20. Strategy for Coordinated EPA/Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Implementation of the Chemical Accident Prevention Requirements of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990

    EPA and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) share responsibility for prevention: OSHA has the Process Safety Management Standard to protect workers, and EPA the Risk Management Program to protect the general public and environment.

  1. On the VPP and current administrative strategies of US OSHA; Beikoku OSHA ni okeru jishuteki anzen eisei kanri program (VPP) oyobi saikin no seisaku doko ni tsuite

    Hanayasu, S [Research Inst. of Industrial Safety, Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-02-15

    This paper describes VPP (Voluntary Protection Programs) and current administrative strategies of US Department of Labor, OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration). Although VPP is conducted by the Federal Government or the state governments with original VPP, it is properly a voluntary program in which entrepreneurs independently participate. OSHA inspects the content and execution condition of every program based on a VPP standard, and after certifying a business establishment satisfying the standard as excellent one, OSHA excludes it from inspection objects for a certain period. After such a period, reinspection and renewal are repeated. This system is derived from that a voluntary program proposed by constructor of Calif. in 1978 was markedly effective to protect workers from damages. Safety and health problem includes various keywords such as internationalization, new technology, risk assessment, process control, self responsibility, information opening, and diverse policies. Although uniform regal safety and health measures are important, promotion and establishment of activities by workers and entrepreneurs themselves in a field are also important. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  2. The beryllium quandary: will the lower exposure limits spur new developments in sampling and analysis?

    Brisson, Michael

    2013-06-03

    At the time this article was written, new rulemakings were under consideration at OSHA and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) that would propose changes to occupational exposure limits for beryllium. Given these developments, it’s a good time to review the tools and methods available to IHs for assessing beryllium air and surface contamination in the workplace—what’s new and different, and what’s tried and true. The article discusses limit values and action levels for beryllium, problematic aspects of beryllium air sampling, sample preparation, sample analysis, and data evaluation.

  3. 21 CFR 109.4 - Establishment of tolerances, regulatory limits, and action levels.

    2010-04-01

    ... a food additive, may be established to define a level of contamination at which a food may be... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Establishment of tolerances, regulatory limits, and action levels. 109.4 Section 109.4 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  4. 21 CFR 509.4 - Establishment of tolerances, regulatory limits, and action levels.

    2010-04-01

    ... a food additive, may be established to define a level of contamination at which a food may be... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Establishment of tolerances, regulatory limits, and action levels. 509.4 Section 509.4 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  5. Adopted levels and derived limits for Ra-226 and the decision making processes concerning TENORM releases

    Paschoa, A.S.

    2002-01-01

    A fraction of a primary dose limit can be, in general, agreed upon as a dose related level to be adopted in decision-making processes. In the case of TENORM releases, fractions of primary dose levels for 226 Ra, 228 Ra, and 210 Po may be of particular importance to establish adopted levels for 226 Ra could be adopted at the highest portion of the natural background variation. Above such level, intervention and remedial action levels could also be adopted. All those levels would be fractions of the primary level, but translated in terms of derived limits expressed in practical units. Derived limits would then be calculated by using environmental models. In such approach 'critical groups' would have to be carefully defined and identified. In addition, the size of a critical group would be chosen to be used in environmental modeling. Site specific environmental models and parameters are desirable, though unavailable, or very difficult to obtain, in most cases. Thus, mathematical models and parameters of more generic nature are often used. A sensitive parametric analysis can make a ranking of the parameters used in a model, allowing one to choose how important each parameter will be for the model output. The paper will point out that when using the adopted levels and derived limits, as suggested above, the uncertainties and importance of the parameters entering an environmental model can make the difference for decision makers to take the right or wrong decision, as far as radiological protection is concerned. (author)

  6. Adopted levels and derived limits for Ra-226 and the decision making processes concerning TENORM releases

    Paschoa, A.S.

    2002-01-01

    A fraction of a primary dose limit can be, in general, agreed upon as a dose related level to be adopted in decision-making processes. In the case of TENORM releases, fractions of primary dose levels for 226 Ra, 228 Ra, and 210 Po may be of particular importance to establish adopted levels and derived limits to guide decision making processes. Thus, for example, a registration level for 226 Ra could be adopted at the highest portion of the natural background variation. Above such level, intervention and remedial action levels could also be adopted. All those levels would be fractions of the primary level, but translated in terms of derived limits expressed in practical units. Derived limits would then be calculated by using environmental models. In such approach 'critical groups' would have to be carefully defined and identified. In addition, the size of a critical group would be chosen to be used in environmental modeling. Site specific environmental models and parameters are desirable, though unavailable, or very difficult to obtain, in most cases. Thus, mathematical models and parameters of more generic nature are often used. A sensitive parametric analysis can make a ranking of the parameters used in a model, allowing one to choose how important each parameter will be for the model output. The paper will point out that when using the adopted levels and derived limits, as suggested above, the uncertainties and importance of the parameters entering an environmental model can make the difference for decision makers to take the right or wrong decision, as far as radiological protection is concerned. (author)

  7. 77 FR 22349 - OSHA Training Institute Education Center; Notice of Competition and Request for Applications

    2012-04-13

    ... Selection Freedom of Information Act Transparency Notification of Non-Selection Non-Selection Appeal... students are selected without regard to race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age, or disability... cooperative agreement with OSHA, and the organization has participated in the Orientation meeting. Freedom of...

  8. 78 FR 35559 - Updating OSHA Standards Based on National Consensus Standards; Signage

    2013-06-13

    ...; Signage AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Department of Labor. ACTION: Direct... signage standards by adding references to the latest versions of the American National Standards Institute... earlier ANSI standards, ANSI Z53.1-1967, Z35.1-1968 and Z35.2-1968, in its signage standards, thereby...

  9. 78 FR 65932 - Updating OSHA Standards Based on National Consensus Standards; Signage

    2013-11-04

    ...; Signage AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Department of Labor. ACTION... accompanied its direct final rule revising its signage standards for general industry and construction. DATES... proposed rule (NPRM) along with the direct final rule (DFR) (see 78 FR 35585) updating its signage...

  10. 78 FR 66642 - Updating OSHA Standards Based on National Consensus Standards; Signage

    2013-11-06

    ...; Signage AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Department of Labor. ACTION: Final... (78 FR 35559) a direct final rule that revised its signage standards for general industry and... revised its signage standards for general industry at 29 CFR 1910.97, 1910.145, and 1910.261, and...

  11. The OSHA Communication Standard and State Right-to-Know Laws.

    Roll, Michalene H.

    1990-01-01

    As a result of a 1988 federal appellate court mandate, schools and colleges in 24 states and 2 territories with OSHA-approved state plans must inform their employees about hazardous chemicals to which they may be exposed. School administrators should implement a responsible program meeting regulatory compliance, tort liability, and public…

  12. On wiping the interior walls of 37-mm closed-face cassettes: an OSHA perspective.

    Hendricks, Warren; Stones, Fern; Lillquist, Dean

    2009-12-01

    As early as 1976, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) methods for analyzing metal samples collected using 37-mm polystyrene closed-face cassettes specified that any loose dust be transferred from the cassette to the digestion vessel, that the cassette be rinsed, and that, if necessary, the cassette be wiped out to help ensure that all particles that enter the cassette are included along with the filter as part of the sample for analysis. OSHA analytical methods for metal analysis were recently revised to explicitly require cassette wiping for all metal samples. This change was based on policy that any material entering the collection device constitutes part of the sample and on OSHA Salt Lake Technical Center research showing that invisible residue on the cassette walls can significantly contribute to the total sample results reported. OSHA procedures are consistent with guidance given in the NIOSH Manual of Analytical Methods. This guidance concludes that internal deposits in sampling cassettes should be included in the analysis and that one way to accomplish this would be to wipe or wash the internal surfaces of the cassette and include the material along with the filter for analysis.

  13. OSHA and ADA: "Reasonable Accommodation" in Training Persons with Developmental Disabilities.

    Sandoz, Charles J.

    This paper documents an approach to meeting the training requirements of the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) and the "reasonable accommodation" requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) for individuals with developmental disabilities. It describes a training program used with three adult workers with mild mental…

  14. Under-recording of work-related injuries and illnesses: An OSHA priority.

    Fagan, Kathleen M; Hodgson, Michael J

    2017-02-01

    A 2009 Government Accounting Office (GAO) report, along with numerous published studies, documented that many workplace injuries are not recorded on employers' recordkeeping logs required by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and consequently are under-reported to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), resulting in a substantial undercount of occupational injuries in the United States. OSHA conducted a Recordkeeping National Emphasis Program (NEP) from 2009 to 2012 to identify the extent and causes of unrecorded and incorrectly recorded occupational injuries and illnesses. OSHA found recordkeeping violations in close to half of all facilities inspected. Employee interviews identified workers' fear of reprisal and employer disciplinary programs as the most important causes of under-reporting. Subsequent inspections in the poultry industry identified employer medical management policies that fostered both under-reporting and under-recording of workplace injuries and illnesses. OSHA corroborated previous research findings and identified onsite medical units as a potential new cause of both under-reporting and under-recording. Research is needed to better characterize and eliminate obstacles to the compilation of accurate occupational injury and illness data. Occupational health professionals who work with high hazard industries where low injury rates are being recorded may wish to scrutinize recordkeeping practices carefully. This work suggests that, although many high-risk establishments manage recordkeeping with integrity, the lower the reported injury rate, the greater the likelihood of under-recording and under-reporting of work-related injuries and illnesses. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Occupational safety and health in the Universities: fulfilling the fundamental requirement of OSHA and AELA

    Ismail Bahari

    2000-01-01

    This paper discusses the result of a survey among the universities to looks at whether such basic similarities in requirements by both Acts actually help in fulfilling and integrating the fundamental requirement of OSHA, Malaysian Occupational Safety and Health Act and AELA, Malaysian Atomic Energy Licensing Act especially through self-regulation

  16. 75 FR 24505 - Modernization of OSHA's Injury and Illness Data Collection Process

    2010-05-05

    ... workplace injuries and illnesses as well as, supporting President Obama's Open Government Initiative..., Director, OSHA Office of Communications, Room N-3647, U.S. Department of Labor, 200 Constitution Avenue, NW... workplaces. The employer is obligated to record work-related injuries and illnesses that meet one or more of...

  17. Study on current limiting characteristics of SFCL with two trigger current levels

    Lim, S.H.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) with two trigger current levels was suggested and its effectiveness through the analysis on the current limiting characteristics was described. The proposed SFCL, which consists of the triggering and the limiting components, can limit the fault current by generating the limiting impedance through two steps according to the amplitude of the initial fault current. In case that the fault happens, the lower initial fault current causes the only superconducting element of the triggering component to be quenched. On the other hand, the higher initial fault current makes both the superconducting elements comprising the triggering and the limiting components of the SFCL to be quenched, which contributes to the higher impedance of the SFCL. Therefore, the effective fault current limiting operation of the SFCL can be performed by generating the SFCL's impedance in proportion to the amplitude of the initial fault current. To confirm the current limiting operation of the proposed SFCL, the short-circuit tests of the SFCL according to the fault angle were carried out and its effective fault current limiting operations could be discussed.

  18. Modernized level limiters for petroleum products during pouring into railway cars

    Batrakov, B.P.; Bakshi, A.S.; Efremov, V.A.

    1983-01-01

    The drawbacks of the POUN-1 and POUN-2 pouring limiters are examined and a brief description of the POUN-1M level limiter is given. The device is modernized and is designed for operation with pressure differentials up to 5 kilograms per square centimeter is approved for the premium quality level and is series manufactured by the ''Starorusspribor'' factory. It is noted that at the Neftekhimavtomatika Scientific and Industrial Association factory is planning to manufacture the first industrial series of the POUN-2M level limiters which are designed for pressure differentials up to seven kilograms per square centimeter. Unlike the basic design, the POUN-2M device is equipped with a hydraulic shock and a flow generator which controls the fluid flow rate during the time the sealing valve is closed.

  19. Analysis on current limiting characteristics of a transformer type SFCL with two triggering current levels

    Lim, Sung-Hun; Ko, Seckcheol; Han, Tae-Hee

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We suggested the transformer type SFCL with two triggering current levels. ► The short-circuit tests for the suggested SFCL was executed. ► The fault angle as the fault conditions to verify its operation was selected. ► The usefulness of the suggested SFCL was confirmed through the short-circuit test. -- Abstract: In this paper, the transformer type superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) with two triggering current levels was suggested and its current limiting characteristics were analyzed. The structure of the suggested transformer type SFCL with two triggering current levels largely consists of two parts. One is the transformer with two magnetically coupled coils, which correspond to the primary winding and the secondary one connected with one high-T C superconducting (HTSC) element. The other is third coil, or, another secondary winding with one HTSC element, which is wound on the same iron core together with two coils. This suggested transformer type SFCL can limit the fault current by generating its limiting impedance with two different amplitudes, which are dependent on the initial amplitude of the fault current in case of the fault occurrence. To confirm the usefulness of the proposed SFCL, the current limiting tests of the SFCL according to the fault angle, one of the effective fault conditions to affect the amplitude of the initial fault current, were carried out and its effective limiting operations were discussed

  20. Potential low-level waste disposal limits for activation products from fusion

    Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Peloquin, R.A.

    1983-09-01

    Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) scientists are involved in studies considering alternative construction materials for the first wall of commercial fusion reactors. To permit a comparison of radioactivity levels, both the level of activation and an acceptable limit for the radionuclides present must be known. Generic material composition guidelines can be developed using the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations governing the near-surface disposal of low-level radioactive wastes. These regulations consider wastes defined as containing source, special nuclear, or by-product materials arising from research, industrial, medical, and nuclear fuel-cycle activities. However, not all of the activation products produced in low-level wastes from fusion reactors are considered by the NRC in their regulations. The purpose of this report is to present potential low-level waste-disposal limits for ten radionuclides resulting from fusion reactor operations that are not considered in the NRC low-level waste regulations. These potential limits will be used by HEDL scientists to complete their generic material composition guidelines for the first wall of commercial fusion reactors

  1. Matching of singly- and doubly-unresolved limits of tree-level QCD squared matrix elements

    Somogyi, Gabor [University of Debrecen and Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-4001 Debrecen, PO Box 51 (Hungary); Trocsanyi, Zoltan [University of Debrecen and Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-4001 Debrecen, PO Box 51 (Hungary); Duca, Vittorio Del [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. di Torino, via P. Giuria, 1 - 10125 Torino (Italy)

    2005-06-01

    We describe how to disentangle the singly- and doubly-unresolved (soft and/or collinear) limits of tree-level QCD squared matrix elements. Using the factorization formulae presented in this paper, we outline a viable general subtraction scheme for computing next-to-next-to-leading order corrections for electron-positron annihilation into jets.

  2. The effects of temperature and pressure on airborne exposure concentrations when performing compliance evaluations using ACGIH TLVs and OSHA PELs.

    Stephenson, D J; Lillquist, D R

    2001-04-01

    Occupational hygienists perform air sampling to characterize airborne contaminant emissions, assess occupational exposures, and establish allowable workplace airborne exposure concentrations. To perform these air sampling applications, occupational hygienists often compare an airborne exposure concentration to a corresponding American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) threshold limit value (TLV) or an Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) permissible exposure limit (PEL). To perform such comparisons, one must understand the physiological assumptions used to establish these occupational exposure limits, the relationship between a workplace airborne exposure concentration and its associated TLV or PEL, and the effect of temperature and pressure on the performance of an accurate compliance evaluation. This article illustrates the correct procedure for performing compliance evaluations using airborne exposure concentrations expressed in both parts per million and milligrams per cubic meter. In so doing, a brief discussion is given on the physiological assumptions used to establish TLVs and PELs. It is further shown how an accurate compliance evaluation is fundamentally based on comparison of a measured work site exposure dose (derived from the sampling site exposure concentration estimate) to an estimated acceptable exposure dose (derived from the occupational exposure limit concentration). In addition, this article correctly illustrates the effect that atmospheric temperature and pressure have on airborne exposure concentrations and the eventual performance of a compliance evaluation. This article also reveals that under fairly moderate conditions of temperature and pressure, 30 degrees C and 670 torr, a misunderstanding of how varying atmospheric conditions affect concentration values can lead to a 15 percent error in assessing compliance.

  3. Amino acid limitation induces down-regulation of WNT5a at transcriptional level

    Wang Zuguang; Chen Hong

    2009-01-01

    An aberrant WNT signaling contributes to the development and progression of multiple cancers. WNT5a is one of the WNT signaling molecules. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that amino acid deprivation induces changes in the WNT signaling pathway in colon cancer cells. Results showed that targets of the amino acid response pathway, ATF3 and p21, were induced in the human colon cancer cell line SW480 during amino acid limitation. There was a significant decrease in the WNT5a mRNA level following amino acid deprivation. The down-regulation of WNT5a mRNA by amino acid deprivation is not due to mRNA destabilization. There is a reduction of nuclear β-catenin protein level by amino acid limitation. Under amino acid limitation, phosphorylation of ERK1/2 was increased and the blockage of ERK1/2 by the inhibitor U0126 partially restored WNT5a mRNA level. In conclusion, amino acid limitation in colon cancer cells induces phosphorylation of ERK1/2, which then down-regulates WNT5a expression.

  4. Levels of cyclic-2,3-diphosphoglycerate in Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum during phosphate limitation.

    Seely, R J; Fahrney, D E

    1984-01-01

    Batch-grown Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum cells grew nonexponentially in the absence of exogenous Pi until intracellular cyclic-2,3-diphosphoglycerate (cyclic DPG) had fallen below 2 mumol/g (dry weight), the limit of detection. Growth resumed immediately upon transfer to medium containing Pi Cyclic DPG levels were also below detection in Pi-limited chemostat cultures operating at a dilution rate of 0.173 h-1 (4-h doubling time), with reservoir Pi concentrations below 200 microM. At th...

  5. Dose limits, constraints, reference levels. What does it mean for radiation protection?

    Breckow, J.

    2016-01-01

    The established concept of radiation protection with its basic principles justification, optimization, and limitation has proved its value and is going to be continued. In its deeper meaning, however, the concept is rather subtle and complex. Furthermore, in some aspects there remain some breaches or inconsistencies. This is just true for the terms dose limit, reference lever, and constraint that are tightly associated with the radiation protection principles. In order to guarantee the ability of radiation protection in whole extent, the subtle differences of meaning have to be communicated. There is a permanent need to defend the conceptual function of these terms against deliberate or undeliberate misinterpretations. Reference levels are definitely not the same as dose limits and they may not be misused as such. Any attempt to misinterpret fundamental radiation protection principles for selfish purposes should discouraged vigorously.

  6. Transferring generic SARA/OSHA training to US Department of Energy facilities

    White, A.; McKinley, T.

    1989-01-01

    The Technical Resources and Training Section staff at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have developed three extensive training programs for hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal facility workers a required by SARA/OSHA, 29 CFR 1910.120. The ORNL program is widely recognized as one of the best in the DOE system. ORNL and ORAU, who manages the Training Resources and Data Exchange (TRADE) network for DOE, entered into as cooperative relationship to respond to the many requests from DOE contractors for copies of the ORNL training materials. This discussion will describe the ORNL program and the process of turning it into a series of generic tools which can be used by additional DOE facilities to meet the training requirements established by SARA/OSHA, 20 CFR 1910.120. The speakers will describe how the materials are being used by DOE facilities as well as plans for additional resources to be developed through TRADE. 5 refs

  7. A legacy of struggle: the OSHA ergonomics standard and beyond, Part I.

    Delp, Linda; Mojtahedi, Zahra; Sheikh, Hina; Lemus, Jackie

    2014-11-01

    In November 2000, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued an ergonomics standard to prevent debilitating work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs). It was rescinded by Congress within four months. We explore how this story unfolded over two decades of collaboration and conflict. Part I provides an overview of the historical context of the struggle for a standard, followed by interviews with key players from labor, academia and government. They provide a snapshot of the standard; discuss the prevalence of WMSDs in the context of changing work organization; give insight into the role of unions and of scientific debate within the context of rulemaking; and uncover the basis for the groundbreaking OSHA citations that laid the foundation for a standard. Part II interviews further explore the anti-regulatory political landscape of the 1990s that led to repeal of the standard, discuss the impact of the struggle beyond the standard, and describe creative approaches for the future.

  8. Patterns and trends in injuries due to chemicals based on OSHA occupational injury and illness statistics

    Mannan, M. Sam [Mary Kay O' Connor Process Safety Center, Chemical Engineering Department, Texas A and M University System, College Station, TX 77843-3122 (United States)], E-mail: mannan@tamu.edu; O' Connor, T. Michael [Mary Kay O' Connor Process Safety Center, Chemical Engineering Department, Texas A and M University System, College Station, TX 77843-3122 (United States); Keren, Nir [Department of Agriculture and Biosystems Engineering, 102 Industrial Education Building II, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-3130 (United States)

    2009-04-15

    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) provide the Survey of Occupational Illness and Injury (SOII) statistics from 1992 to 2006, which is often used to measure the rate of injuries and illness in industry. The present system of gathering and classifying this data was implemented in 1992 with minor changes in 2002. It is hoped that using these statistics to measure safety progress and determine patterns of injury will guide further improvements in chemical safety. Recognizing such factors as what chemicals most frequently cause injury can help to focus safety efforts regarding that chemical. Factors such as what part of the body is most commonly affected by particular chemicals can lead to improved personnel protection practices. This paper provides a detailed analysis of injuries due to chemicals using OSHA's SOII data, which offers valuable insight into measures that should be taken to reduce injuries due to chemicals.

  9. Radon in the Workplace: the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Ionizing Radiation Standard.

    Lewis, Robert K

    2016-10-01

    On 29 December 1970, the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 established the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). This article on OSHA, Title 29, Part 1910.1096 Ionizing Radiation standard was written to increase awareness of the employer, the workforce, state and federal governments, and those in the radon industry who perform radon testing and radon mitigation of the existence of these regulations, particularly the radon relevant aspect of the regulations. This review paper was also written to try to explain what can sometimes be complicated regulations. As the author works within the Radon Division of the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Radiation Protection, the exclusive focus of the article is on radon. The 1910.1096 standard obviously covers many other aspects of radiation and radiation safety in the work place.

  10. An analysis of OSHA inspections assessing contaminant exposures in general medical and surgical hospitals.

    Knight, Jordan L; Sleeth, Darrah K; Larson, Rodney R; Pahler, Leon F

    2013-04-01

    This study analyzed data from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Chemical Exposure Health Database to assess contaminant exposures in general medical and surgical hospitals. Seventy-five inspections conducted in these hospitals from 2005 through 2009 were identified. Five categories of inspections were conducted, the three most common being complaint-based, planned, and referral-based inspections. Complaint-based inspections comprised the majority of inspections-55 (73%) of the 75 conducted. The overall violation rate for all inspection types was 68%. This finding was compared to the violation rates of planned inspections (100%), referral-based inspections (83%), and complaint-based inspections (62%). Asbestos was the hazardous substance most commonly sampled and cited by OSHA in hospitals, with 127 samples collected during 24 inspections; 31% of the total 75 inspections resulting in one or more violations were due to asbestos. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Patterns and trends in injuries due to chemicals based on OSHA occupational injury and illness statistics

    Mannan, M. Sam; O'Connor, T. Michael; Keren, Nir

    2009-01-01

    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) provide the Survey of Occupational Illness and Injury (SOII) statistics from 1992 to 2006, which is often used to measure the rate of injuries and illness in industry. The present system of gathering and classifying this data was implemented in 1992 with minor changes in 2002. It is hoped that using these statistics to measure safety progress and determine patterns of injury will guide further improvements in chemical safety. Recognizing such factors as what chemicals most frequently cause injury can help to focus safety efforts regarding that chemical. Factors such as what part of the body is most commonly affected by particular chemicals can lead to improved personnel protection practices. This paper provides a detailed analysis of injuries due to chemicals using OSHA's SOII data, which offers valuable insight into measures that should be taken to reduce injuries due to chemicals

  12. The final word. OSHA's final ruling offers firm deadlines for infection control.

    West, K

    1992-03-01

    Departments that have put off program development while waiting for the final ruling to be published have a lot of work to do. Many departments have been cited and fined by OSHA in the past year for failure to begin infection-control programs or provide hepatitis-B vaccines to personnel. Under the new budget, OSHA was granted permission to up its fine structure sevenfold--thus, a small fine is $7,000, and the highest fine for a single violation is $70,000. Fines can have a greater impact on a department's budget than implementation of the program over time. A key point to remember is that a strong infection-control program will reduce exposure follow-up costs and worker-compensation claims. Infection control is a win-win situation.

  13. Risk newsboy: approach for addressing uncertainty in developing action levels and cleanup limits

    Cooke, Roger; MacDonell, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    Site cleanup decisions involve developing action levels and residual limits for key contaminants, to assure health protection during the cleanup period and into the long term. Uncertainty is inherent in the toxicity information used to define these levels, based on incomplete scientific knowledge regarding dose-response relationships across various hazards and exposures at environmentally relevant levels. This problem can be addressed by applying principles used to manage uncertainty in operations research, as illustrated by the newsboy dilemma. Each day a newsboy must balance the risk of buying more papers than he can sell against the risk of not buying enough. Setting action levels and cleanup limits involves a similar concept of balancing and distributing risks and benefits in the face of uncertainty. The newsboy approach can be applied to develop health-based target concentrations for both radiological and chemical contaminants, with stakeholder input being crucial to assessing 'regret' levels. Associated tools include structured expert judgment elicitation to quantify uncertainty in the dose-response relationship, and mathematical techniques such as probabilistic inversion and iterative proportional fitting. (authors)

  14. 76 FR 63190 - Michigan State Plan; Change in Level of Federal Enforcement: Indian Tribes

    2011-10-12

    ... issues covered by the state's OSHA-approved occupational safety and health plan. Federal OSHA retained... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Occupational Safety and Health Administration 29 CFR Part 1952 Michigan State Plan; Change in Level of Federal Enforcement: Indian Tribes AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health...

  15. Are your employees protected from blood-borne pathogens? OSHA standards charge textile rental companies with responsibility for worker safety.

    Weller, S C

    1991-11-01

    Congress is putting pressure on OSHA to finalize its Universal Precaution standards by December. When the standards go into effect, textile rental companies that serve medical, dental, and outpatient care facilities--including private physician and dentist offices--must take steps to protect employees from blood-borne pathogens. Soiled linens, towels, gowns, and other items from any customer in risk categories link a textile rental facility and/or commercial laundry with the OSHA regulations. Read and heed this information.

  16. TRADE instructional materials for SARA/OSHA training. Volume 2, Managers and supervisors training

    1989-03-01

    This document provides instructional materials for an eight-hour training course for managers and supervisors of hazardous waste sites. It is one of three volumes of course materials TRADE is preparing to help DOE contractor training staff comply with 29 CFR 1910.120, the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) rule that implements Title I of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. OSHA`s final rule for hazardous waste operators was published in the Federal Register of March 6, 1989 (54 FR 9294). Combined with the materials in Volumes I and III and with appropriate site-specific information, these materials will help DOE contractors to meet the requirements of 1910.120 (e) that ``on-site management and supervisors directly responsible for, or who supervise employees engaged in, hazardous waste operations`` receive the same initial training as that of the employees they supervise and at least eight additional hours of specialized training in managing hazardous waste operations.

  17. Limited prognostic value of tissue protein expression levels of cyclin E in Danish ovarian cancer patients

    Heeran, Mel C; Høgdall, Claus K; Kjaer, Susanne K

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the expression of cyclin E in tumour tissues from 661 patients with epithelial ovarian tumours. The second was to evaluate whether cyclin E tissue expression levels correlate with clinico-pathological parameters and prognosis of the disease. Using...... tissue arrays (TA), we analysed the cyclin E expression levels in tissues from 168 women with borderline ovarian tumours (BOT) (147 stage I, 4 stage II, 17 stage III) and 493 Ovarian cancer (OC) patients (127 stage I, 45 stage II, 276 stage III, 45 stage IV). Using a 10% cut-off level for cyclin E......-off value showed that cyclin E had no independent prognostic value. In conclusion, we found cyclin E expression in tumour tissue to be of limited prognostic value to Danish OC patients....

  18. Levels of cyclic-2,3-diphosphoglycerate in Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum during phosphate limitation.

    Seely, R J; Fahrney, D E

    1984-10-01

    Batch-grown Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum cells grew nonexponentially in the absence of exogenous Pi until intracellular cyclic-2,3-diphosphoglycerate (cyclic DPG) had fallen below 2 mumol/g (dry weight), the limit of detection. Growth resumed immediately upon transfer to medium containing Pi Cyclic DPG levels were also below detection in Pi-limited chemostat cultures operating at a dilution rate of 0.173 h-1 (4-h doubling time), with reservoir Pi concentrations below 200 microM. At this dilution rate, the Pi concentration in the culture was 4 microM. An H2-limited steady state was achieved with 400 microM Pi in the inflowing medium (67 microM in the culture). The cyclic DPG content of these cells was 72 to 74 mumol/g, about one-third the amount in batch-grown cells. The specific growth rate accelerated immediately to 0.36 h-1 (1.9-h doubling time) under washout conditions at high dilution rate. The cellular content of cyclic DPG declined over a 2-h period, and then increased rapidly as the Pi level in the medium approached 200 microM. Expansion of the cyclic DPG pool coincided with a marked increase in Pi assimilation. These results indicated that M. thermoautotrophicum accumulated cyclic DPG only when Pi and H2 were readily available.

  19. Levels of cyclic-2,3-diphosphoglycerate in Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum during phosphate limitation.

    Seely, R J; Fahrney, D E

    1984-01-01

    Batch-grown Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum cells grew nonexponentially in the absence of exogenous Pi until intracellular cyclic-2,3-diphosphoglycerate (cyclic DPG) had fallen below 2 mumol/g (dry weight), the limit of detection. Growth resumed immediately upon transfer to medium containing Pi Cyclic DPG levels were also below detection in Pi-limited chemostat cultures operating at a dilution rate of 0.173 h-1 (4-h doubling time), with reservoir Pi concentrations below 200 microM. At this dilution rate, the Pi concentration in the culture was 4 microM. An H2-limited steady state was achieved with 400 microM Pi in the inflowing medium (67 microM in the culture). The cyclic DPG content of these cells was 72 to 74 mumol/g, about one-third the amount in batch-grown cells. The specific growth rate accelerated immediately to 0.36 h-1 (1.9-h doubling time) under washout conditions at high dilution rate. The cellular content of cyclic DPG declined over a 2-h period, and then increased rapidly as the Pi level in the medium approached 200 microM. Expansion of the cyclic DPG pool coincided with a marked increase in Pi assimilation. These results indicated that M. thermoautotrophicum accumulated cyclic DPG only when Pi and H2 were readily available. PMID:6480564

  20. A dulal-functional medium voltage level DVR to limit downstream fault currents

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Li, Yun Wei; Vilathgamuwa, D. Mahinda

    2007-01-01

    on the other parallel feeders connected to PCC. Furthermore, if not controlled properly, the DVR might also contribute to this PCC voltage sag in the process of compensating the missing voltage, thus further worsening the fault situation. To limit the flow of large line currents, and therefore restore the PCC...... situations. Controlling the DVR as a virtual inductor would also ensure zero real power absorption during the DVR compensation and thus minimize the stress in the dc link. Finally, the proposed fault current limiting algorithm has been tested in Matlab/Simulink simulation and experimentally on a medium......The dynamic voltage restorer (DVR) is a modern custom power device used in power distribution networks to protect consumers from sudden sags (and swells) in grid voltage. Implemented at medium voltage level, the DVR can be used to protect a group of medium voltage or low voltage consumers. However...

  1. Assessment of concentration limit for the safe disposal of very low level wastes

    Nam, Yun Seog

    2008-02-01

    The large amounts of radionuclides are generated from the decommissioning of nuclear facilities (included the nuclear power plant). Because of this, countries or agencies using the nuclear power are one of considering issues for the effective disposal. Among decommissioning wastes, wastes have no or very limited radioactivity are disposed of in conventional landfill or recycled thought approval from regulatory control. And wastes like LILW (Low and Intermediate Level Wastes) or HLW (High Level Wastes) are sent the repository or the interim storage facilities. In order to solve the space problem of the LILW repository and reduce disposal costs, some LLW which are relatively lower than other LLW are classified as VLLW (Very Low Level Wastes). IAEA is added to the VLLW category of the radioactive waste classification and some countries are operating a VLLW disposal facility or will be operating. In this study, the VLLW acceptance criteria of each radionuclide are derived by considering the inadvertent human intrusion scenario applying to a study on the near-surface disposal (LILW). The effect of important parameter, especially, waste isolation period, dilution factor and food consumption rate, is considered. It is concluded that the concentration limits of radionuclides considering in this study are evaluated approximately between 1 and 100 Bq/g. These values are similar to the case of France and Spain and the IAEA's predicted values. Based on this study, acceptance criteria of VLLW disposal facilities are suggested. And this study is contributed to the public relations for the safety of the VLLW disposal facility

  2. Limitations of two-level emitters as nonlinearities in two-photon controlled-PHASE gates

    Nysteen, Anders; McCutcheon, Dara P. S.; Heuck, Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the origin of imperfections in the fidelity of a two-photon controlled-PHASE gate based on two-level-emitter nonlinearities. We focus on a passive system that operates without external modulations to enhance its performance. We demonstrate that the fidelity of the gate is limited...... by opposing requirements on the input pulse width for one-and two-photon-scattering events. For one-photon scattering, the spectral pulse width must be narrow compared with the emitter linewidth, while two-photon-scattering processes require the pulse width and emitter linewidth to be comparable. We find...

  3. Limitations and problems in deriving risk estimates for low-level radiation exposure

    Cohen, B.L.

    1981-01-01

    Some of the problems in determining the cancer risk of low-level radiation from studies of exposed groups are reviewed and applied to the study of Hanford workers by Mancuso, Stewart, and Kneale. Problems considered are statistical limitations, variation of cancer rates with geography and race, the ''healthy worker effect,'' calendar year and age variation of cancer mortality, choosing from long lists, use of proportional mortality rates, cigarette smoking-cancer correlations, use of averages to represent data distributions, ignoring other data, and correlations between radiation exposure and other factors that may cause cancer. The current status of studies of the Hanford workers is reviewed

  4. Assessing the Levels and Health Risk of Atmospheric Formaldehyde in Makkah, Saudi Arabia

    Atef M.F. Mohammed; Essam A. Morsy; Turki M. Habeebullah; Said Munir

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric Formaldehyde (HCHO) was monitored in four sites on the Holy Mosque of Makkah, Saudi Arabia during August, 2013. The daily mean concentrations of HCHO were ranged from 1.09-18.92 g/m3. The levels of HCHO were significantly higher than the permissible exposure limit (0.042 μg/m3) of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). However, it were not exceeded the recommended exposure limit of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (20 μg/m3) and Egyptian...

  5. Reliability analysis of component-level redundant topologies for solid-state fault current limiter

    Farhadi, Masoud; Abapour, Mehdi; Mohammadi-Ivatloo, Behnam

    2018-04-01

    Experience shows that semiconductor switches in power electronics systems are the most vulnerable components. One of the most common ways to solve this reliability challenge is component-level redundant design. There are four possible configurations for the redundant design in component level. This article presents a comparative reliability analysis between different component-level redundant designs for solid-state fault current limiter. The aim of the proposed analysis is to determine the more reliable component-level redundant configuration. The mean time to failure (MTTF) is used as the reliability parameter. Considering both fault types (open circuit and short circuit), the MTTFs of different configurations are calculated. It is demonstrated that more reliable configuration depends on the junction temperature of the semiconductor switches in the steady state. That junction temperature is a function of (i) ambient temperature, (ii) power loss of the semiconductor switch and (iii) thermal resistance of heat sink. Also, results' sensitivity to each parameter is investigated. The results show that in different conditions, various configurations have higher reliability. The experimental results are presented to clarify the theory and feasibility of the proposed approaches. At last, levelised costs of different configurations are analysed for a fair comparison.

  6. Balancing public health and resource limitations: A role for ethical low-level risk communication

    McGinn, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    Recognition of the pervasiveness of risk in everyday life in modern industrial society has elicited calls for greater efforts to protect individual and public health. Yet, it is increasingly clear that decisions to do so must often be made in the context of significant limits in the amounts of financial resources available for achieving that protection. Achieving risk-free work, residential, and community environments may be so expensive as to render a private business unit uncompetitive or as to divert resources from or prelude commencing with other governmental projects with equal or greater health benefit potential. Ethical low-level risk communication (LLRC) is something risk-generating entities are morally obligated to do. However, such communication also offers important opportunities for such entities to move toward achieving better balances between health and the costs of protecting it. In this paper, the authors elaborate on several features of an ethically ideal LLRC process, focusing on those with aspects they hope are not obvious or common knowledge. In discussing these features, they provide examples of conflicts between health risks and resource limits at the level of the individual private firm, the local community, or the national government, such that LLRC with the feature in question provides an opportunity for mitigating or at least clarifying the conflict in question

  7. Evaluation of the association of acute overshift change in pulmonary function and atopy using OSHA cotton dust surveillance data.

    Jennison, E; Jacobs, R R

    1994-05-01

    OSHA surveillance data were collected for 769 individuals employed in four different cotton textile mills. Current workers were asked to complete a questionnaire about personal and family history of atopy or asthma. Both surveillance and survey data were available for 502 individuals. The prevalence of atopy in the population as reported by questionnaire was 18%, while asthma was reported by 4%. Dust levels at the four mills were in compliance with the cotton dust standard during the period of surveillance. No relationship was found between a self-reported history of atopy or asthma and the magnitude or frequency of acute overshift declines in forced expiratory volume during 1 second (FEV1). Nonsmokers had annual changes in FEV1 and forced vital capacity (FVC) comparable to nonexposed populations. In one of the four mills surveyed, annual declines in FEV1 and FVC for current smokers were significantly greater than declines for smokers in the other mills or the general smoking population (p effect was also observed for subjects who were categorized as atopic (p effect from exposure to the levels of cotton dust observed in these mills.

  8. Client Perceptions of Occupational Health and Safety Management System Assistance Provided by OSHA On-Site Consultation: Results of a Survey of Colorado Small Business Consultation Clients.

    Autenrieth, Daniel A; Brazile, William J; Gilkey, David P; Reynolds, Stephen J; June, Cathy; Sandfort, Del

    2015-01-01

    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) On-Site Consultation Service provides assistance establishing occupational health and safety management systems (OHSMS) to small businesses. The Safety and Health Program Assessment Worksheet (Revised OSHA Form 33) is the instrument used by consultants to assess an organization's OHSMS and provide feedback on how to improve a system. A survey was developed to determine the usefulness of the Revised OSHA Form 33 from the perspective of Colorado OSHA consultation clients. One hundred and seven clients who had received consultation services within a six-year period responded to the survey. The vast majority of respondents indicated that the Revised OSHA Form 33 accurately reflected their OHSMS and that information provided on the Revised OSHA Form 33 was helpful for improving their systems. Specific outcomes reported by the respondents included increased safety awareness, reduced injuries, and improved morale. The results indicate that the OHSMS assistance provided by OSHA consultation is beneficial for clients and that the Revised OSHA Form 33 can be an effective tool for assessing and communicating OHSMS results to business management. Detailed comments and suggestions provided on the Revised OSHA Form 33 are helpful for clients to improve their OHSMS.

  9. Improving Limit Surface Search Algorithms in RAVEN Using Acceleration Schemes: Level II Milestone

    Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mandelli, Diego [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cogliati, Joshua Joseph [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sen, Ramazan Sonat [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Curtis Lee [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The RAVEN code is becoming a comprehensive tool to perform Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA); Uncertainty Quantification (UQ) and Propagation; and Verification and Validation (V&V). The RAVEN code is being developed to support the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) pathway by developing an advanced set of methodologies and algorithms for use in advanced risk analysis. The RISMC approach uses system simulator codes applied to stochastic analysis tools. The fundamental idea behind this coupling approach to perturb (by employing sampling strategies) timing and sequencing of events, internal parameters of the system codes (i.e., uncertain parameters of the physics model) and initial conditions to estimate values ranges and associated probabilities of figures of merit of interest for engineering and safety (e.g. core damage probability, etc.). This approach applied to complex systems such as nuclear power plants requires performing a series of computationally expensive simulation runs. The large computational burden is caused by the large set of (uncertain) parameters characterizing those systems. Consequently, exploring the uncertain/parametric domain, with a good level of confidence, is generally not affordable, considering the limited computational resources that are currently available. In addition, the recent tendency to develop newer tools, characterized by higher accuracy and larger computational resources (if compared with the presently used legacy codes, that have been developed decades ago), has made this issue even more compelling. In order to overcome to these limitations, the strategy for the exploration of the uncertain/parametric space needs to use at best the computational resources focusing the computational effort in those regions of the uncertain/parametric space that are “interesting” (e.g., risk-significant regions of the input space) with respect the targeted Figures Of Merit (FOM): for example, the failure of the system

  10. Protein Phosphatase 1 Down Regulates ZYG-1 Levels to Limit Centriole Duplication.

    Nina Peel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In humans perturbations of centriole number are associated with tumorigenesis and microcephaly, therefore appropriate regulation of centriole duplication is critical. The C. elegans homolog of Plk4, ZYG-1, is required for centriole duplication, but our understanding of how ZYG-1 levels are regulated remains incomplete. We have identified the two PP1 orthologs, GSP-1 and GSP-2, and their regulators I-2SZY-2 and SDS-22 as key regulators of ZYG-1 protein levels. We find that down-regulation of PP1 activity either directly, or by mutation of szy-2 or sds-22 can rescue the loss of centriole duplication associated with a zyg-1 hypomorphic allele. Suppression is achieved through an increase in ZYG-1 levels, and our data indicate that PP1 normally regulates ZYG-1 through a post-translational mechanism. While moderate inhibition of PP1 activity can restore centriole duplication to a zyg-1 mutant, strong inhibition of PP1 in a wild-type background leads to centriole amplification via the production of more than one daughter centriole. Our results thus define a new pathway that limits the number of daughter centrioles produced each cycle.

  11. Protecting workers from pathogens. Employers must act now to comply with OSHA's new standard on bloodborne pathogens.

    White, C L

    1992-04-01

    A new standard set forth by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires healthcare employers to implement sweeping new controls in areas such as record keeping, engineering, hazard prevention, and work practice. Through the bloodborne pathogen standard, which went into effect on March 6, OSHA acknowledges that healthcare workers face significant health risks as a result of occupational exposure to blood and other infectious materials. Although most prudent healthcare providers already adhere to the Centers for Disease Control's universal precautions, the OSHA regulations include several additional mandatory measures that are more specific and stringent. The additional measures include the development of an exposure control plan, procedures for responding to an employee's exposure to bloodborne pathogens, the implementation of certain engineering and work practice controls to eliminate or minimize on-the-job exposure risks, and the provision of personal protective equipment and information and training programs. OSHA estimates that the greatest cost component of implementing procedures to bring a facility into compliance is attributable to the purchase of personal protective equipment. Although the costs of compliance are substantial, OSHA has estimated that these costs represent less than 1 percent of the healthcare industry's annual revenues. Violation of the bloodborne pathogen standard may result in penalties of up to $70,000, depending on the severity of the infraction. Criminal penalties are also possible for willful violations that result in worker death.

  12. The Determinants of Federal and State Enforcement of Workplace Safety Regulations: OSHA Inspections 1990-2010*

    Jung, Juergen

    2013-01-01

    We explore the determinants of inspection outcomes across 1.6 million Occupational Safety and Health Agency (OSHA) audits from 1990 through 2010. We find that discretion in enforcement differs in state and federally conducted inspections. State agencies are more sensitive to local economic conditions, finding fewer standard violations and fewer serious violations as unemployment increases. Larger companies receive greater lenience in multiple dimensions. Inspector issued fines and final fines, after negotiated reductions, are both smaller during Republican presidencies. Quantile regression analysis reveals that Presidential and Congressional party affiliations have their greatest impact on the largest negotiated reductions in fines. PMID:24659856

  13. Impact of OSHA Final Rule—Recording Hearing Loss: An Analysis of an Industrial Audiometric Dataset

    Rabinowitz, Peter M.; Slade, Martin; Dixon-Ernst, Christine; Sircar, Kanta; Cullen, Mark

    2003-01-01

    The 2003 Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Occupational Injury and Illness Recording and Reporting Final Rule changed the definition of recordable work-related hearing loss. We performed a study of the Alcoa Inc. audiometric database to evaluate the impact of this new rule. The 2003 rule increased the rate of potentially recordable hearing loss events from 0.2% to 1.6% per year. A total of 68.6% of potentially recordable cases had American Academy of Audiology/American Medi...

  14. Teacher Professionalism--An Innovative Programme for Teaching Mathematics to Foundation Level Learners with Limited Language Proficiency.

    Naude, H.; Pretorius, E.; Vandeyar, S.

    2003-01-01

    Details a study of the ways that limited language proficiency affected learners' readiness for mathematics instruction among disadvantaged preschoolers within a Griqua community in South Africa. Notes a link between limited language proficiency and nonreadiness for foundation level mathematics due to limited thinking skills, which constitute…

  15. Pineal melatonin level disruption in humans due to electromagnetic fields and ICNIRP limits

    Halgamuge, Malka N.

    2013-01-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classifies electromagnetic fields (EMFs) as 'possibly carcinogenic' to humans that might transform normal cells into cancer cells. Owing to high utilisation of electricity in day-to-day life, exposure to power-frequency (50 or 60 Hz) EMFs is unavoidable. Melatonin is a natural hormone produced by pineal gland activity in the brain that regulates the body's sleep-wake cycle. How man-made EMFs may influence the pineal gland is still unsolved. The pineal gland is likely to sense EMFs as light but, as a consequence, may decrease the melatonin production. In this study, more than one hundred experimental data of human and animal studies of changes in melatonin levels due to power-frequency electric and magnetic fields exposure were analysed. Then, the results of this study were compared with the International Committee of Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) limit and also with the existing experimental results in the literature for the biological effect of magnetic fields, in order to quantify the effects. The results show that this comparison does not seem to be consistent despite the fact that it offers an advantage of drawing attention to the importance of the exposure limits to weak EMFs. In addition to those inconsistent results, the following were also observed from this work: (i) the ICNIRP recommendations are meant for the well-known acute effects, because effects of the exposure duration cannot be considered and (ii) the significance of not replicating the existing experimental studies is another limitation in the power-frequency EMFs. Regardless of these issues, the above observation agrees with our earlier study in which it was confirmed that it is not a reliable method to characterise biological effects by observing only the ratio of AC magnetic field strength to frequency. This is because exposure duration does not include the ICNIRP limit. Furthermore, the results show the significance of

  16. Evaluation of geologic materials to limit biological intrusion of low-level waste site covers

    Hakonson, T.E.; White, G.C.; Karlen, E.M.

    1982-01-01

    The long-term integrity of low-level waste shallow land burial sites is dependent on the interaction of physical, chemical, and biological factors that modify the waste containment system. This paper reports the preliminary results of a screening study to-determine the effectiveness of four biobarrier materials to stop plant root and animal penetration into simulated low-level wastes. Experiments employed 288 lysimeters consisting of 25-cm-diam PVC pipe, with four factors tested: plant species (alfalfa, barley, and sweet clover); top soil thickness (30 and 60 cm); biobarrier material (crushed tuff, bentonite clay, cobble, and cobble-gravel); and biobarrier thickness (clay-15, 30, and 45 cm, others 30, 60, and 90 cm). The crushed tuff, a sandy backfill material, offers little resistance to root and animal intrusion through the cover profile, while bentonite clay, cobble, and cobble-gravel combinations do reduce plant root and animal intrusion thorugh cover profiles. However, dessication of the clay barrier by invading plant roots may limit the usefulness of this material as a moisture and/or biological barrier. The cobble-gravel combination appears to be the best candidate for further testing on a larger scale because the gravel helps impede the imgration of soil into the cobble layer - the probable cause of failure of cobble-only biobarriers

  17. Ten years after: is it time to revisit the 1994 OSHA indoor air quality rule?

    Ahrens, David

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 20 million nonsmoking workers are employed in workplaces without restrictions on smoking and are potentially exposed to secondhand smoke--a Class A carcinogen. These workers are largely in the service industry, in southern and western states and in non-urban areas. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA's) 1994 proposal for smoke-free workplaces (withdrawn in 2001) was attacked by many interest groups that may no longer oppose this protection. Federal regulation for smoke-free workplaces is needed for workers, who are not protected by state and local smoke-free laws. This policy could save thousands of lives each year, and prevent significant illness. Twenty-one states have "state plans" that would allow more protective laws. Of the 29 states under OSHA, 11 have comprehensive smoke-free statutes. Changes in the policy environment and in institutions such as unions, restaurant associations, and the tobacco industry since 2001 may improve the prospects for federal action and reduce disparities that currently characterize exposure to secondhand smoke.

  18. Impact of OSHA Final Rule—Recording Hearing Loss: An Analysis of an Industrial Audiometric Dataset

    Rabinowitz, Peter M.; Slade, Martin; Dixon-Ernst, Christine; Sircar, Kanta; Cullen, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The 2003 Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Occupational Injury and Illness Recording and Reporting Final Rule changed the definition of recordable work-related hearing loss. We performed a study of the Alcoa Inc. audiometric database to evaluate the impact of this new rule. The 2003 rule increased the rate of potentially recordable hearing loss events from 0.2% to 1.6% per year. A total of 68.6% of potentially recordable cases had American Academy of Audiology/American Medical Association (AAO/AMA) hearing impairment at the time of recordability. On average, recordable loss occurred after onset of impairment, whereas the non-age-corrected 10-dB standard threshold shift (STS) usually preceded impairment. The OSHA Final Rule will significantly increase recordable cases of occupational hearing loss. The new case definition is usually accompanied by AAO/AMA hearing impairment. Other, more sensitive metrics should therefore be used for early detection and prevention of hearing loss. PMID:14665813

  19. Occupational Safety & Health. Inspectors' Opinions on Improving OSHA Effectiveness. Fact Sheet for Subcommittee on Health and Safety, Committee on Education and Labor, House of Representatives.

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    Questionnaires gathered opinions of all Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) field supervisors and a randomly selected sample of one-third of the compliance officers about OSHA's approach to improving workplace safety and health. Major topics addressed were enforcement, safety and health standards, education and training, employer…

  20. Stand-level variation in evapotranspiration in non-water-limited eucalypt forests

    Benyon, Richard G.; Nolan, Rachael H.; Hawthorn, Sandra N. D.; Lane, Patrick N. J.

    2017-08-01

    To better understand water and energy cycles in forests over years to decades, measurements of spatial and long-term temporal variability in evapotranspiration (Ea) are needed. In mountainous terrain, plot-level measurements are important to achieving this. Forest inventory data including tree density and size measurements, often collected repeatedly over decades, sample the variability occurring within the geographic and topographic range of specific forest types. Using simple allometric relationships, tree stocking and size data can be used to estimate variables including sapwood area index (SAI), which may be strongly correlated with annual Ea. This study analysed plot-level variability in SAI and its relationship with overstorey and understorey transpiration, interception and evaporation over a 670 m elevation gradient, in non-water-limited, even-aged stands of Eucalyptus regnans F. Muell. to determine how well spatial variation in annual Ea from forests can be mapped using SAI. Over the 3 year study, mean sap velocity in five E. regnans stands was uncorrelated with overstorey sapwood area index (SAI) or elevation: annual transpiration was predicted well by SAI (R2 0.98). Overstorey and total annual interception were positively correlated with SAI (R2 0.90 and 0.75). Ea from the understorey was strongly correlated with vapour pressure deficit (VPD) and net radiation (Rn) measured just above the understorey, but relationships between understorey Ea and VPD and Rn differed between understorey types and understorey annual Ea was not correlated with SAI. Annual total Ea was also strongly correlated with SAI: the relationship being similar to two previous studies in the same region, despite differences in stand age and species. Thus, spatial variation in annual Ea can be reliably mapped using measurements of SAI.

  1. Low-level radiation: a high-level concern

    Holden, C.

    1979-01-01

    The role of DOE in radiation health effects research is discussed. The possibility of conflict of interest is presented. The Mancuso episode is cited as evidence. The roles of several agencies (EPA, NRC, and OSHA) in establishing safe limits of radiation exposure are discussed

  2. Present limits to heat-adaptability in corals and population-level responses to climate extremes.

    Bernhard M Riegl

    Full Text Available Climate change scenarios suggest an increase in tropical ocean temperature by 1-3°C by 2099, potentially killing many coral reefs. But Arabian/Persian Gulf corals already exist in this future thermal environment predicted for most tropical reefs and survived severe bleaching in 2010, one of the hottest years on record. Exposure to 33-35°C was on average twice as long as in non-bleaching years. Gulf corals bleached after exposure to temperatures above 34°C for a total of 8 weeks of which 3 weeks were above 35°C. This is more heat than any other corals can survive, providing an insight into the present limits of holobiont adaptation. We show that average temperatures as well as heat-waves in the Gulf have been increasing, that coral population levels will fluctuate strongly, and reef-building capability will be compromised. This, in combination with ocean acidification and significant local threats posed by rampant coastal development puts even these most heat-adapted corals at risk. WWF considers the Gulf ecoregion as "critically endangered". We argue here that Gulf corals should be considered for assisted migration to the tropical Indo-Pacific. This would have the double benefit of avoiding local extinction of the world's most heat-adapted holobionts while at the same time introducing their genetic information to populations naïve to such extremes, potentially assisting their survival. Thus, the heat-adaptation acquired by Gulf corals over 6 k, could benefit tropical Indo-Pacific corals who have <100 y until they will experience a similarly harsh climate. Population models suggest that the heat-adapted corals could become dominant on tropical reefs within ∼20 years.

  3. Drought limitations to leaf-level gas exchange: results from a model linking stomatal optimization and cohesion-tension theory

    Kimberly A. Novick; Chelcy F. Miniat; James M. Vose

    2016-01-01

    We merge concepts from stomatal optimization theory and cohesion–tension theory to examine the dynamics of three mechanisms that are potentially limiting to leaf-level gas exchange in trees during drought: (1) a ‘demand limitation’ driven by an assumption of optimal stomatal functioning; (2) ‘hydraulic limitation’ of water movement from the roots to the leaves...

  4. 42 CFR 433.67 - Limitations on level of FFP for permissible provider-related donations.

    2010-10-01

    ... provider-related donations. 433.67 Section 433.67 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... permissible provider-related donations. (a)(1) Limitations on bona fide donations. There are no limitations on the amount of bona fide provider-related donations that a State may receive without a reduction in FFP...

  5. 77 FR 74224 - OSHA Data Initiative (ODI); Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) Approval of...

    2012-12-13

    ... Schmidt, Office of Statistical Analysis, Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of... 1904. These data will allow OSHA to calculate occupational injury and illness rates and to focus its... and dates of birth. Although all submissions are listed in the http://www.regulations.gov index, some...

  6. Compliance of SLAC's Laser Safety Program with OSHA Requirements for the Control of Hazardous Energy

    Woods, M.

    2009-01-01

    SLAC's COHE program requires compliance with OSHA Regulation 29CFR1910.147, 'The control of hazardous energy (lockout/tagout)'. This regulation specifies lockout/tagout requirements during service and maintenance of equipment in which the unexpected energization or start up of the equipment, or release of stored energy, could cause injury to workers. Class 3B and Class 4 laser radiation must be considered as hazardous energy (as well as electrical energy in associated equipment, and other non-beam energy hazards) in laser facilities, and therefore requires careful COHE consideration. This paper describes how COHE is achieved at SLAC to protect workers against unexpected Class 3B or Class 4 laser radiation, independent of whether the mode of operation is normal, service, or maintenance

  7. Risk Factors for Heat-related Illness in U.S. Workers: An OSHA Case Series.

    Tustin, Aaron W; Cannon, Dawn L; Arbury, Sheila B; Thomas, Richard J; Hodgson, Michael J

    2018-05-30

    The aim of this study was to describe risk factors for heat-related illness (HRI) in U.S. workers. We reviewed a subset of HRI enforcement investigations conducted by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) from 2011 through 2016. We assessed characteristics of the workers, employers, and events. We stratified cases by severity to assess whether risk factors were more prevalent in fatal HRIs. We analyzed 38 investigations involving 66 HRIs. Many workers had predisposing medical conditions or used predisposing medications. Comorbidities were more prevalent in workers who died. Most (73%) fatal HRIs occurred during the first week on the job. Common clinical findings in heat stroke cases included multiorgan failure, muscle breakdown, and systemic inflammation. Severe HRI is more likely when personal susceptibilities coexist with work-related and environmental risk factors. Almost all HRIs occur when employers do not adhere to preventive guidelines.

  8. Evaluation of geologic materials to limit biological intrusion into low-level radioactive waste disposal sites

    Hakonson, T.E.

    1986-02-01

    This report describes the results of a three-year research program to evaluate the performance of selected soil and rock trench cap designs in limiting biological intrusion into simulated waste. The report is divided into three sections including a discussion of background material on biological interactions with waste site trench caps, a presentation of experimental data from field studies conducted at several scales, and a final section on the interpretation and limitations of the data including implications for the user

  9. Critical evaluation of the limit of transuranic contamination of low level waste

    Rodger, W.A.

    1976-01-01

    The suggested limit for transuranics of 10 nanocuries/gram as a break point at which wastes should go to a national repository is seriously questioned. It is shown that insofar as protection of water supplies is concerned, the key to the problem is $sup 90$Sr, not transuranics, and in any case, the limit should be based on a site-determined inventory, not on concentration. Concentration is only important as a protection for future stumblers who might dig into the waste. Calculations are presented to show that for this purpose the limit should be higher by several orders of magnitude. The 10 nanocurie/gram should be used as a definition of complete innocuousness. 4 refs

  10. Prioritising Progression over Proficiency: Limitations of Teacher-Based Assessment within Technician-Level Vocational Education

    Carter, Alan; Bathmaker, Ann-Marie

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the evolution of assessment policy and practice in technician-level vocational education. Using the example of an advanced-level BTEC National programme in Engineering in one college in the UK, the article highlights how the origins of current assessment practice lie in genuine concerns since the late 1950s about the…

  11. Constructing Hotelling's T 2 control limits for different α levels of ...

    When the quality of a product is controlled by combinations of two or more variables, a high level decision qui-ckly determines the out of control signals, while simultaneously, evaluating the variable(s) responsible for the false alarm rate (α) levels of significance. In this connection, bootstrap algorithm for constructing ...

  12. Limits on the adaptability of coastal marshes to rising sea level

    Kirwan, Matthew L.; Guntenspergen, Glenn R.; D'Alpaos, Andrea; Morris, James T.; Mudd, Simon M.; Temmerman, Stijn

    2010-01-01

    Assumptions of a static landscape inspire predictions that about half of the world's coastal wetlands will submerge during this century in response to sea-level acceleration. In contrast, we use simulations from five numerical models to quantify the conditions under which ecogeomorphic feedbacks allow coastal wetlands to adapt to projected changes in sea level. In contrast to previous sea-level assessments, we find that non-linear feedbacks among inundation, plant growth, organic matter accretion, and sediment deposition, allow marshes to survive conservative projections of sea-level rise where suspended sediment concentrations are greater than ~20 mg/L. Under scenarios of more rapid sea-level rise (e.g., those that include ice sheet melting), marshes will likely submerge near the end of the 21st century. Our results emphasize that in areas of rapid geomorphic change, predicting the response of ecosystems to climate change requires consideration of the ability of biological processes to modify their physical environment.

  13. LOW-NOISE PAVEMENT AS A WAY OF LIMITATION OF TRAFFIC NOISE LEVEL

    Władysław Gardziejczyk

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Road surface can significantlyreduce the trafficnoise level. Depending on the characteristic of the upper surface layers the differences between the maximum rolling noise levels from passing vehicles to reach values about 10 dB (A. A special group is low-noise pavements characterized by the presence of voids above 15%. Application the porous asphalt layers or asphalt mixture type BBTM affects a significantreduction the width of land surrounded the roads where permissible equivalent sound level is exceeded. Such solutions in some cases can replace acoustic barriers. Road pavements with a higher content of voids require proper maintenance because their acoustic performances are reduced during operation.

  14. Detection and quantification limits: basic concepts, international harmonization, and outstanding ('low-level') issues

    Currie, L.A.

    2004-01-01

    A brief review is given of concepts, basic definitions, and terminology for metrological detection and quantification capabilities, representing harmonized recommendations and norms of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), respectively. Treatment of the (low-level) blank and variance function are discussed in some detail, together with special problems arising with detection decisions and the reporting of low-level data. Key references to the international documents follow, as well as specialized references addressing very low-level counting data, skewed environmental blank distributions, and multiple and multivariate detection decisions

  15. Competing Quantum Hall Phases in the Second Landau Level in Low Density Limit

    Pan, Wei [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Serafin, A. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). National High Magnetic Field Lab. (MagLab); Xia, J. S. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). National High Magnetic Field Lab. (MagLab); Liang, Y. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). National High Magnetic Field Lab. (MagLab); Sullivan, N. S. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). National High Magnetic Field Lab. (MagLab); Baldwin, K. W. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); West, K. W. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Pfeiffer, L. N. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Tsui, D. C. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Up to date, studies of the fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) states in the second Landau level have mainly been carried out in the high electron density regime, where the electron mobility is the highest. Only recently, with the advance of high quality low density MBE growth, experiments have been pushed to the low density regime [1], where the electron-electron interactions are strong and the Landau level mixing parameter, defined by κ = e2/εIB/ℏωe, is large. Here, lB = (ℏe/B)1/2 is the magnetic length and ωc = eB/m the cyclotron frequency. All other parameters have their normal meanings. It has been shown that a large Landau level mixing effect strongly affects the electron physics in the second Landau level [2].

  16. Attempting to be active: Self-efficacy and barrier limitation differentiate activity levels of working mothers.

    Gierc, Madelaine; Locke, Sean; Jung, Mary; Brawley, Lawrence

    2016-07-01

    Working mothers are less physically active than working women without children and mothers who do not work. The purpose of this study was to examine concurrent self-regulatory efficacy and barriers to physical activity in a sample of working mothers. Women completed a mixed-methods survey which included measures of physical activity, concurrent self-regulatory efficacy, and barriers. Sufficiently active women experienced significantly greater concurrent self-regulatory efficacy and significantly less barrier limitation and frequency. No significant group differences were found for age, domestic duties performed, and children's extracurricular activities. Thematic analysis of barriers revealed six themes of common and unique factors, including limited time and family activities. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Education level and physical functional limitations among Japanese community residents-gender difference in prognosis from stroke

    Inoue Manami

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little research has been conducted to examine the relationship between education level and functional limitations among Japanese community residents. We sought to examine the association between education level and physical functional limitations among Japanese men and women, and whether that association was modified by gender and history of stroke. Methods We examined prevalence of physical functional limitation by educational level using the data from a total of 29,134 Japanese men and women aged 50–69 years living in communities in 2000. The information of educational level (junior high school graduates, senior high school graduates, college and/or higher education and physical functional limitations (no need for assistance, need for assistance when going outdoors, and need for assistance to carry out indoor activities were obtained by self-administrated questionnaire. Results The proportions of the subjects reported their highest level of schooling were 48% for junior high school, 39% for high school, and 13% for college. Three hundred and twenty eight subjects (1% of total subjects reported having some physical functional limitations. Multinomial logistic regression analyses showed that the odds ratio of needing assistance to carry out indoor activities were 4.84(95%CI:3.61,6.50 for lowest education level group and 2.21(95%CI:1.00,4.86 for middle education level group compared to highest education level group. The corresponding odds ratios of needing assistance when going outdoors were 2.36(95%CI: 2.03,2.72 and 1.08(95%CI:0.73,1.60, respectively. Further, the significant excess prevalence of having functional limitations associated with the low education level was identified for men regardless of history of stroke and for women without history of stroke. Conclusion Low education level was associated with the higher prevalence of physical functional limitations for both genders. That association among persons with

  18. Drought limitations to leaf-level gas exchange: results from a model linking stomatal optimization and cohesion-tension theory.

    Novick, Kimberly A; Miniat, Chelcy F; Vose, James M

    2016-03-01

    We merge concepts from stomatal optimization theory and cohesion-tension theory to examine the dynamics of three mechanisms that are potentially limiting to leaf-level gas exchange in trees during drought: (1) a 'demand limitation' driven by an assumption of optimal stomatal functioning; (2) 'hydraulic limitation' of water movement from the roots to the leaves; and (3) 'non-stomatal' limitations imposed by declining leaf water status within the leaf. Model results suggest that species-specific 'economics' of stomatal behaviour may play an important role in differentiating species along the continuum of isohydric to anisohydric behaviour; specifically, we show that non-stomatal and demand limitations may reduce stomatal conductance and increase leaf water potential, promoting wide safety margins characteristic of isohydric species. We used model results to develop a diagnostic framework to identify the most likely limiting mechanism to stomatal functioning during drought and showed that many of those features were commonly observed in field observations of tree water use dynamics. Direct comparisons of modelled and measured stomatal conductance further indicated that non-stomatal and demand limitations reproduced observed patterns of tree water use well for an isohydric species but that a hydraulic limitation likely applies in the case of an anisohydric species. Published 2015. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  19. A sound level distribution model for symphony orchestras: possibilities and limitations

    Wenmaekers, R.H.C.; Hak, C.C.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Musicians in a symphony orchestra rely on the direct and reflected sound on a concert hall stage to be able to hear each other. Besides ensemble conditions, members and directors of symphony orchestras are concerned about the noise levels musicians are exposed to. However, the actual contribution of

  20. Limits to prediction of energy balance from milk composition measures at individual cow level

    Løvendahl, P; Ridder, C; Friggens, N C

    2010-01-01

    at each milking. Three breeds (Danish Red, Holstein-Friesian, and Jersey) of cows (299 cows, 623 lactations) in parities 1 to 4 were used. Milk data were smoothed using a rolling local regression. Energy balance based on milk composition was calculated using a partial least squares (PLS) model based......Frequently updated energy balance (EB) estimates for individual cows are especially useful for dairy herd management, and individual-level estimates form the basis for group-level EB estimates. The accuracy of EB estimates determines the value of this information for management decision support....... This study aimed to assess EB accuracy through ANOVA components and by comparing EB estimates based either on milk composition (EBalMilk) or on body condition score (BCS) and body weight (BW) (EBalBody). Energy balance based on milk composition was evaluated using data in which milk composition was measured...

  1. Annual limits on intake for members of the public and derived reference levels of radionuclide concentrations in the environment

    Mason, G.C.

    1983-01-01

    A proposal is presented recommending the introduction in Australia of Annual Limits on Intake of radionuclides for members of the public and of corresponding reference levels of radionuclide concentrations in the environment. The proposal is related to recent recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection and draft recommendations under consideration by the International Atomic Energy Agency

  2. Advantages and Limitations of E-Learning in Master’s Level Healthcare Education : A Reflective Discussion Paper

    Hanna Hopia; Mariël Kanne

    2017-01-01

    The current paper is a reflective discussion report that describes the advantages and limitations of online teaching and learning at master’s level healthcare education from the teachers’ point of view. The aim is to open dialogue between nursing educators and healthcare providers on how

  3. Mast cells limit extracellular levels of IL-13 via a serglycin proteoglycan-serine protease axis.

    Waern, Ida; Karlsson, Iulia; Thorpe, Michael; Schlenner, Susan M; Feyerabend, Thorsten B; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Åbrink, Magnus; Hellman, Lars; Pejler, Gunnar; Wernersson, Sara

    2012-12-01

    Mast cell (MC) granules contain large amounts of proteases of the chymase, tryptase and carboxypeptidase A (MC-CPA) type that are stored in complex with serglycin,a proteoglycan with heparin side chains. Hence, serglycinprotease complexes are released upon MC degranulation and may influence local inflammation. Here we explored the possibility that a serglycin-protease axis may regulate levels of IL-13, a cytokine involved in allergic asthma. Indeed, we found that wild-type MCs efficiently degraded exogenous or endogenously produced IL-13 upon degranulation,whereas serglycin −/− MCs completely lacked this ability.Moreover, MC-mediated IL-13 degradation was blocked both by a serine protease inhibitor and by a heparin antagonist,which suggests that IL-13 degradation is catalyzed by serglycin-dependent serine proteases and that optimal IL-13 degradation is dependent on both the serglycin and the protease component of the serglycin-protease complex.Moreover, IL-13 degradation was abrogated in MC-CPA −/−MC cultures, but was normal in cultures of MCs with an inactivating mutation of MC-CPA, which suggests that the IL-13-degrading serine proteases rely on MC-CPA protein.Together, our data implicate a serglycin-serine protease axis in the regulation of extracellular levels of IL-13. Reduction of IL-13 levels through this mechanism possibly can provide a protective function in the context of allergic inflammation.

  4. Limitations of ADAMTS-13 activity level in diagnosing thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura in pregnancy.

    Ehsanipoor, Robert M; Rajan, Priya; Holcombe, Randall F; Wing, Deborah A

    2009-10-01

    In pregnancy, it may be difficult to differentiate the syndrome of hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets from thrombotic thrombocytopenia purpura. Severely depressed (present a case of a patient that presented at 20 weeks gestation with elevated liver enzymes and thrombocytopenia. The diagnosis was unclear at the time of presentation. She underwent induction of labor, and during the postpartum course, she was eventually diagnosed with thrombotic thrombocytopenia purpura; however, her activity level of a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs-13 was only moderately depressed at 15% (normal pregnancy value 41%-105%).

  5. Growth Performance and Carcass Characteristics of Korean Native Ducks Fed Diets with Varying Levels of Limiting Amino Acids

    Y. K. Choo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available There are multiple experiments conducted with male Korean native ducks (KND to evaluate the optimal levels of limiting amino acids (AA. In Exp. 1, a total of 450 one-d-old male KNDs were divided into five groups with six replicates and fed experimental diets with varying levels of lysine, total sulfur amino acids (TSAA and threonine (T1, 0.90/0.74/0.70%; T2, 1.00/0.82/0.77%; T3, 1.10/0.90/0.85%; T4, 1.20/0.98/0.93%; T5, 1.30/1.07/1.01% to 21 d of age. In Exp. 2, one-d-old male KND were received and fed commercial starter diet from hatching to 21 d of age, and then divided into five groups with six replicates and fed one of five diets varying levels of lysine, TSAA, and threonine (T1, 0.73/0.62/0.54%; T2, 0.80/0.68/0.60%; T3, 0.87/0.74/0.65%; T4, 0.94/0.80/0.70%; T5, 1.01/0.86/0.75% during 22 to 56 d of age, respectively. The BW gain was linearly increased as dietary limiting AA levels increased to 1.20% lysine, 0.98% TSAA and 0.93% threonine. There were no significant differences in feed intake, gain:feed and uniformity among groups. In Exp. 2, the BW gain and gain:feed were not affected by dietary limiting AA levels. There were no significant differences in carcass characteristics and meat quality among groups. The growth performance and carcass characteristics did not show the significant response to increasing dietary limiting AA levels in KND during 22 to 56 d of age. In conclusion, the levels of lysine, TSAA and threonine necessary to maximize growth for starter phase were at least 1.20%, 0.98%, and 0.93%, respectively. On the other hands, KND require relatively low levels of limiting AA for late growth and carcass yield. The dietary levels of 0.73% lysine, 0.62% TSAA and 0.54% threonine appear to be adequate during growing phase.

  6. An OSHA based approach to safety analysis for nonradiological hazardous materials

    Yurconic, M.

    1992-08-01

    The PNL method for chemical hazard classification defines major hazards by means of a list of hazardous substances (or chemical groups) with associated trigger quantities. In addition, the functional characteristics of the facility being classified is also be factored into the classification. In this way, installations defined as major hazard will only be those which have the potential for causing very serious incidents both on and off site. Because of the diversity of operations involving chemicals, it may not be possible to restrict major hazard facilities to certain types of operations. However, this hazard classification method recognizes that in the industrial sector major hazards are most commonly associated with activities involving very large quantities of chemicals and inherently energetic processes. These include operations like petrochemical plants, chemical production, LPG storage, explosives manufacturing, and facilities which use chlorine, ammonia, or other highly toxic gases in bulk quantities. The basis for this methodology is derived from concepts used by OSHA in its proposed chemical process safety standard, the Dow Fire and Explosion Index Hazard Classification Guide, and the International Labor Office's program on chemical safety. For the purpose of identifying major hazard facilities, this method uses two sorting criteria, (1) facility function and processes and (2) quantity of substances to identify facilities requiringclassification. Then, a measure of chemical energy potential (material factor) is used to identify high hazard class facilities

  7. Screen-level non-GTS data assimilation in a limited-area mesoscale model

    M. Milelli

    2010-06-01

    . It has to be pointed out that a correct description of the planetary boundary layer, even only the lowest part of it, could be helpful to the forecasters and, in general, to the users, in order to deal with meteorological hazards such as snow (in particular snow/rain limit definition, or fog (description of temperature inversions.

  8. Comparison of approximate formulas for decision levels and detection limits for paired counting with the exact results

    Potter, W.E.

    2005-01-01

    The exact probability density function for paired counting can be expressed in terms of modified Bessel functions of integral order when the expected blank count is known. Exact decision levels and detection limits can be computed in a straightforward manner. For many applications perturbing half-integer corrections to Gaussian distributions yields satisfactory results for decision levels. When there is concern about the uncertainty for the expected value of the blank count, a way to bound the errors of both types using confidence intervals for the expected blank count is discussed. (author)

  9. Existence of limit cycles in a three level trophic chain with Lotka–Volterra and Holling type II functional responses

    Castellanos, Víctor; Chan-López, Ramón E.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we analyze a three level trophic chain model, considering a logistic growth for the lowest trophic level, a Lotka–Volterra and Holling type II functional responses for predators in the middle and in the cusp in the chain, respectively. The differential system is based on the Leslie–Gower scheme. We establish conditions on the parameters that guarantee the coexistence of populations in the habitat. We find that an Andronov–Hopf bifurcation takes place. The first Lyapunov coefficient is computed explicitly and we show the existence of a stable limit cycle. Numerically, we observe a strange attractor and there exist evidence of the model to exhibit chaotic dynamics.

  10. Effects of blood lead levels on airflow limitations in Korean adults: Findings from the 5th KNHNES 2011

    Chung, Hye Kyung; Chang, Yoon Soo; Ahn, Chul Woo

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to examine whether blood levels of heavy metals, such as lead, mercury and cadmium, are related with pulmonary function in Korean adults. This investigation included 870 Korean adults (≥40 years) who received pulmonary function testing in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) V-2, 2011. Data of blood levels of heavy metals, pulmonary function tests and anthropometric measurements were acquired. Blood lead levels showed inverse correlations with the FEV 1 /FVC ratio before (r=−0.276, p<0.001) and after adjustment of multiple compounding factors (r=−0.115, p=0.001). A logistic multiple regression analysis revealed that blood lead levels were a significant influencing factor for the FEV 1 /FVC ratio (β=−0.017, p=0.001, adjusted R 2 =0.267). The odds ratios (ORs) for the FEV 1 /FVC ratio were significantly lower in the highest tertile group of the blood lead levels than in the lowest tertile group in Model 1 (OR=0.007, 95% CI=0.000−0.329) and Model 2 (OR=0.006, 95% CI=0.000−0.286). These findings imply that environmental exposure to lead might be an important factor that may cause airflow limitations in Korean adults. - Highlights: • Blood lead levels showed inverse correlations with the FEV 1 /FVC ratio. • Blood lead level was a significant influencing factor for the FEV 1 /FVC ratio. • ORs for FEV 1 /FVC were lower in the highest blood lead group than in the lowest group. • Environmental exposure to lead might be an important factor for airflow limitations

  11. Benzene metabolite levels in blood and bone marrow of B6C3F{sub 1} mice after low-level exposure

    Bechtold, W.E.; Strunk, M.R.; Thornton-Manning, J.R. [and others

    1995-12-01

    Studies at the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI) have explored the species-specific uptake and metabolism of benzene. Results have shown that metabolism is dependent on both dose and route of administration. Of particular interest were shifts in the major metabolic pathways as a function of exposure concentration. In these studies, B6C3F{sub 1} mice were exposed to increasing levels of benzene by either gavage or inhalation. As benzene internal dose increased, the relative amounts of muconic acid and hydroquinone decreased. In contrast, the relative amount of catechol increased with increasing exposure. These results show that the relative levels of toxic metabolites are a function of exposure level. Based on these results and assuming a linear relationship between exposure concentration and levels of bone marrow metabolites, it would be difficult to detect an elevation of any phenolic metabolites above background after occupational exposures to the OSHA Permissible Exposure Limit of 1 ppm benzene.

  12. Noise exposure levels for musicians during rehearsal and performance times.

    McIlvaine, Devon; Stewart, Michael; Anderson, Robert

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine daily noise doses and 8-hour time weighted averages for rock band musicians, crew members, and spectators during a typical rehearsal and performance using both Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) measurement criteria. Personal noise dosimetry was completed on five members of a rock band during one 2-hr rehearsal and one 4-hr performance. Time-weighted averages (TWA) and daily dose values were calculated using both OSHA and NIOSH criteria and compared to industry guidelines for enrollment in hearing conservation programs and the use of hearing protection devices. TWA values ranged from 84.3 to 90.4 dBA (OSHA) and from 90.0 to 96.4 dBA (NIOSH) during the rehearsal. The same values ranged from 91.0 to 99.7 dBA (OSHA) and 94.0 to 102.8 dBA (NIOSH) for the performance. During the rehearsal, daily noise doses ranged from 45.54% to 106.7% (OSHA) and from 317.74% to 1396.07% (NIOSH). During the performance, doses ranged from 114.66% to 382.49% (OSHA) and from 793.31% to 5970.15% (NIOSH). The musicians in this study were exposed to dangerously high levels of noise and should be enrolled in a hearing conservation programs. Hearing protection devices should be worn, especially during performances. The OSHA measurement criteria yielded values significantly more conservative than those produced by NIOSH criteria. Audiologists should counsel musician-patients about the hazards of excessive noise (music) exposure and how to protect their hearing.

  13. Operational limits of a three level neutral point clamped converter used for controlling a hybrid energy storage system

    Etxeberria, A.; Vechiu, I.; Camblong, H.; Kreckelbergh, S.; Bacha, S.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The control of a hybrid storage system using a Three Level NPC converter is analysed. • A sinusoidal PWM with an offset injection is used to control the storage system. • The operation of the selected converter is analysed in its entire operation range. • The operational limits of the Three Level NPC converter are defined. - Abstract: This work analyses the use of a Three-Level Neutral Point Clamped (3LNPC) converter to control the power flow of a Hybrid Energy Storage System (HESS) and at the same time interconnect it with the common AC bus of a microgrid. Nowadays there is not any storage technology capable of offering a high energy storage capacity, a high power capacity and a fast response at the same time. Therefore, the necessity of hybridising more than one storage technology is a widely accepted idea in order to satisfy the mentioned requirements. This work shows how the operational limits of the 3LNPC converter can be calculated and integrated in a control structure to facilitate an optimal use of the HESS according to the rules fixed by the user

  14. Pretransplant soluble CD30 level has limited effect on acute rejection, but affects graft function in living donor kidney transplantation.

    Kim, Myoung Soo; Kim, Hae Jin; Kim, Soon Il; Ahn, Hyung Joon; Ju, Man Ki; Kim, Hyun Jung; Jeon, Kyung Ock; Kim, Yu Seun

    2006-12-27

    Serum soluble CD30 (sCD30) levels might be a useful marker of immunologic status in pre transplant (Tx) recipients. We retrospectively correlated preTx sCD30 levels (high versus low) on postTx graft survival, incidence of acute rejection, and graft function using stored preTx serum. Of 254 recipients who underwent kidney Tx, 120 recipients were enrolled under the uniform criteria (living donor, age >25 years, viral hepatitis free, diabetes free). The preTx sCD30 was not significantly associated with differences in graft survival rate during 47.5+/-11.4 months of follow-up (P = 0.5901). High sCD30 (> or =115 U/ml) was associated with a higher incidence of clinically or pathologically defined acute rejection than low sCD30, but the difference was not statistically significant (33.9% vs. 22.4%, P = 0.164). The response rate to antirejection therapy in patients with high sCD30 was inferior to those with low sCD30, but also was not statistically significant (33.3% vs. 7.7%, P = 0.087). However, mean serum creatinine levels in high sCD30 patients at one month, one year, and three years postTx were significantly different from those with low sCD30 (P acute rejection episodes, donor age, kidney weight/recipient body weight ratio, and preTx sCD30 levels were independent variables affecting the serum creatinine level three years postTx. PreTx sCD30 level has a limited effect on the incidence of acute rejection and response to antirejection treatment, but inversely and independently affects serum creatinine level after living donor kidney transplantation.

  15. Turbulent piloted partially-premixed flames with varying levels of O2/N2: stability limits and PDF calculations

    Juddoo, Mrinal; Masri, Assaad R.; Pope, Stephen B.

    2011-12-01

    This paper reports measured stability limits and PDF calculations of piloted, turbulent flames of compressed natural gas (CNG) partially-premixed with either pure oxygen, or with varying levels of O2/N2. Stability limits are presented for flames of CNG fuel premixed with up to 20% oxygen as well as CNG-O2-N2 fuel where the O2 content is varied from 8 to 22% by volume. Calculations are presented for (i) Sydney flame B [Masri et al. 1988] which uses pure CNG as well as flames B15 to B25 where the CNG is partially-premixed with 15-25% oxygen by volume, respectively and (ii) Sandia methane-air (1:3 by volume) flame E [Barlow et al. 2005] as well as new flames E15 and E25 that are partially-premixed with 'reconstituted air' where the O2 content in nitrogen is 15 and 25% by volume, respectively. The calculations solve a transported PDF of composition using a particle-based Monte Carlo method and employ the EMST mixing model as well as detailed chemical kinetics. The addition of oxygen to the fuel increases stability, shortens the flames, broadens the reaction zone, and shifts the stoichiometric mixture fraction towards the inner side of the jet. It is found that for pure CNG flames where the reaction zone is narrow (∼0.1 in mixture fraction space), the PDF calculations fail to reproduce the correct level of local extinction on approach to blow-off. A broadening in the reaction zone up to about 0.25 in mixture fraction space is needed for the PDF/EMST approach to be able to capture these finite-rate chemistry effects. It is also found that for the same level of partial premixing, increasing the O2/N2 ratio increases the maximum levels of CO and NO but shifts the peak to richer mixture fractions. Over the range of oxygenation investigated here, stability limits have shown to improve almost linearly with increasing oxygen levels in the fuel and with increasing the contribution of release rate from the pilot.

  16. Electrical safety code manual a plan language guide to national electrical code, OSHA and NFPA 70E

    Keller, Kimberley

    2010-01-01

    Safety in any workplace is extremely important. In the case of the electrical industry, safety is critical and the codes and regulations which determine safe practices are both diverse and complicated. Employers, electricians, electrical system designers, inspectors, engineers and architects must comply with safety standards listed in the National Electrical Code, OSHA and NFPA 70E. Unfortunately, the publications which list these safety requirements are written in very technically advanced terms and the average person has an extremely difficult time understanding exactly what they need to

  17. Safety limit warning levels for the avoidance of excessive sound amplification to protect against further hearing loss.

    Johnson, Earl E

    2017-11-01

    To determine safe output sound pressure levels (SPL) for sound amplification devices to preserve hearing sensitivity after usage. A mathematical model consisting of the Modified Power Law (MPL) (Humes & Jesteadt, 1991 ) combined with equations for predicting temporary threshold shift (TTS) and subsequent permanent threshold shift (PTS) (Macrae, 1994b ) was used to determine safe output SPL. The study involves no new human subject measurements of loudness tolerance or threshold shifts. PTS was determined by the MPL model for 234 audiograms and the SPL output recommended by four different validated prescription recommendations for hearing aids. PTS can, on rare occasion, occur as a result of SPL delivered by hearing aids at modern day prescription recommendations. The trading relationship of safe output SPL, decibel hearing level (dB HL) threshold, and PTS was captured with algebraic expressions. Better hearing thresholds lowered the safe output SPL and higher thresholds raised the safe output SPL. Safe output SPL can consider the magnitude of unaided hearing loss. For devices not set to prescriptive levels, limiting the output SPL below the safe levels identified should protect against threshold worsening as a result of long-term usage.

  18. A solubility-limited-source-term model for the geological disposal of cemented intermediate-level waste

    Robinson, P.C.; Hodgkinson, D.P.; Tasker, P.W.; Lever, D.A.; Windsor, M.E.; Grime, P.W.; Herbert, A.W.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents and illustrates the use of a source-team model for an intermediate-level radioactive-waste repository. The model deals with the behaviour of long-lived nuclides after the initial containment period. The major processes occurring in the near-field are included, namely sorption, elemental solubility limits, chain decay and transport due to groundwater flow. The model is applied to a realistic example of ILW disposal. From this it is clear that some nuclides are present in sufficient quantities to reach their solubility limit even when the assumed sorption coefficients are large. For these nuclides the precise sorption coefficient is unimportant. It is also clear that some daughter products, in particular Pb-210, become significant. The toxicity of the repository porewater is calculated and it is shown that, although this toxicity is high compared to levels acceptable in drinking water, it is much lower than the toxicity of the waste itself. However, the near-field chemical environment is only one of a number of containment barriers. In addition, it has been shown that the rate at which radionuclides enter the rock surrounding the repository is very low. (author)

  19. Level-set reconstruction algorithm for ultrafast limited-angle X-ray computed tomography of two-phase flows.

    Bieberle, M; Hampel, U

    2015-06-13

    Tomographic image reconstruction is based on recovering an object distribution from its projections, which have been acquired from all angular views around the object. If the angular range is limited to less than 180° of parallel projections, typical reconstruction artefacts arise when using standard algorithms. To compensate for this, specialized algorithms using a priori information about the object need to be applied. The application behind this work is ultrafast limited-angle X-ray computed tomography of two-phase flows. Here, only a binary distribution of the two phases needs to be reconstructed, which reduces the complexity of the inverse problem. To solve it, a new reconstruction algorithm (LSR) based on the level-set method is proposed. It includes one force function term accounting for matching the projection data and one incorporating a curvature-dependent smoothing of the phase boundary. The algorithm has been validated using simulated as well as measured projections of known structures, and its performance has been compared to the algebraic reconstruction technique and a binary derivative of it. The validation as well as the application of the level-set reconstruction on a dynamic two-phase flow demonstrated its applicability and its advantages over other reconstruction algorithms. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  20. Factors limiting microbial growth and activity at a proposed high-level nuclear repository, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Kieft, T.L.; Kovacik, W.P. Jr.; Ringelberg, D.B.; White, D.C.; Haldeman, D.L.; Amy, P.S.; Hersman, L.E.

    1997-01-01

    As part of the characterization of Yucca Mountain, Nev., as a potential repository for high-level nuclear waste, volcanic tuff was analyzed for microbial abundance and activity. Tuff was collected aseptically from nine sites along a tunnel in Yucca Mountain. Microbial abundance was generally low: direct microscopic cell counts were near detection limits at all sites (3.2 X 10(1) to 2.0 X 10(5) cells g-1 [dry weight]); plate counts of aerobic heterotrophs ranged from 1.0 X 10(1) to 3.2 X 10(3) CFU g-1 (dry weight). Phospholipid fatty acid concentrations (0.1 to 3.7 pmol g-1) also indicated low microbial biomasses: diglyceride fatty acid concentrations, indicative of dead cells, were in a similar range (0.2 to 2.3 pmol g-1). Potential microbial activity was quantified as 14CO2 production in microcosms containing radiolabeled substrates (glucose, acetate, and glutamic acid); amendments with water and nutrient solutions (N and P) were used to test factors potentially limiting this activity. Similarly, the potential for microbial growth and the factors limiting growth were determined by performing plate counts before and after incubating volcanic tuff samples for 24 h under various conditions: ambient moisture, water-amended, and amended with various nutrient solutions (N, P, and organic C). A high potential for microbial activity was demonstrated by high rates of substrate mineralization (as much as 70% of added organic C in 3 weeks). Water was the major limiting factor to growth and microbial activity, while amendments with N and P resulted in little further stimulation. Organic C amendments stimulated growth more than water alone

  1. Nevada State plan; final approval determination. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), U.S. Department of Labor. Final State plan approval--Nevada.

    2000-04-18

    This document amends OSHA's regulations to reflect the Assistant Secretary's decision granting final approval to the Nevada State plan. As a result of this affirmative determination under section 18(e) of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, Federal OSHA's standards and enforcement authority no longer apply to occupational safety and health issues covered by the Nevada plan, and authority for Federal concurrent jurisdiction is relinquished. Federal enforcement jurisdiction is retained over any private sector maritime employment, private sector employers on Indian land, and any contractors or subcontractors on any Federal establishment where the land is exclusive Federal jurisdiction. Federal jurisdiction remains in effect with respect to Federal government employers and employees. Federal OSHA will also retain authority for coverage of the United States Postal Service (USPS), including USPS employees, contract employees, and contractor-operated facilities engaged in USPS mail operations.

  2. Variation of Enzyme Activities and Metabolite Levels in 24 Arabidopsis Accessions Growing in Carbon-Limited Conditions1[W

    Cross, Joanna M.; von Korff, Maria; Altmann, Thomas; Bartzetko, Linda; Sulpice, Ronan; Gibon, Yves; Palacios, Natalia; Stitt, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Our understanding of the interaction of carbon (C) metabolism with nitrogen (N) metabolism and growth is based mainly on studies of responses to environmental treatments, and studies of mutants and transformants. Here, we investigate which metabolic parameters vary and which parameters change in a coordinated manner in 24 genetically diverse Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) accessions, grown in C-limited conditions. The accessions were grown in short days, moderate light, and high nitrate, and analyzed for rosette biomass, levels of structural components (protein, chlorophyll), total phenols and major metabolic intermediates (sugars, starch, nitrate, amino acids), and the activities of seven representative enzymes from central C and N metabolism. The largest variation was found for plant weight, reducing sugars, starch at the end of the night, and several enzyme activities. High levels of one sugar correlated with high levels of other sugars and starch, and a trend to increased amino acids, slightly lower nitrate, and higher protein. The activities of enzymes at the interface of C and N metabolism correlated with each other, but were unrelated to carbohydrates, amino acid levels, and total protein. Rosette weight was unrelated or showed a weak negative trend to sugar and amino acid contents at the end of the day in most of the accessions, and was negatively correlated with starch at the end of the night. Rosette weight was positively correlated with several enzyme activities. We propose that growth is not related to the absolute levels of starch, sugars, and amino acids; instead, it is related to flux, which is indicated by the enzymatic capacity to use these central resources. PMID:17085515

  3. Feedback damping of a microcantilever at room temperature to the minimum vibration amplitude limited by the noise level.

    Kawamura, Y; Kanegae, R

    2016-06-17

    Cooling the vibration amplitude of a microcantilever as low as possible is important to improve the sensitivity and resolutions of various types of scanning type microscopes and sensors making use of it. When the vibration amplitude is controlled to be smaller using a feed back control system, it is known that the obtainable minimum amplitude of the vibration is limited by the floor noise level of the detection system. In this study, we demonstrated that the amplitude of the thermal vibration of a microcantilever was suppressed to be about 0.15 pmHz(-1/2), which is the same value with the floor noise level, without the assistance of external cryogenic cooling. We think that one of the reason why we could reach the smaller amplitude at room temperature is due to stiffer spring constant of the lever, which leads to higher natural frequency and consequently lower floor noise level. The other reason is considered to be due to the increase in the laser power for the diagnostics, which lead to the decrease in the signal to noise ratio determined by the optical shot noise.

  4. The impact of OSHA recordkeeping regulation changes on occupational injury and illness trends in the US: a time-series analysis.

    Friedman, Lee S; Forst, Linda

    2007-07-01

    The Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses (SOII), based on Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) logs, indicates that the number of occupational injuries and illnesses in the US has steadily declined by 35.8% between 1992-2003. However, major changes to the OSHA recordkeeping standard occurred in 1995 and 2001. The authors assessed the relation between changes in OSHA recordkeeping regulations and the trend in occupational injuries and illnesses. SOII data available from the Bureau of Labor Statistics for years 1992-2003 were collected. The authors assessed time series data using join-point regression models. Before the first major recordkeeping change in 1995, injuries and illnesses declined annually by 0.5%. In the period 1995-2000 the slope declined by 3.1% annually (95% CI -3.7% to -2.5%), followed by another more precipitous decline occurring in 2001-2003 (-8.3%; 95% CI -10.0% to -6.6%). When stratifying the data, the authors continued to observe significant changes occurring in 1995 and 2001. The substantial declines in the number of injuries and illnesses correspond directly with changes in OSHA recordkeeping rules. Changes in employment, productivity, OSHA enforcement activity and sampling error do not explain the large decline. Based on the baseline slope (join-point regression analysis, 1992-4), the authors expected a decline of 407 964 injuries and illnesses during the period of follow-up if no intervention occurred; they actually observed a decline of 2.4 million injuries and illnesses of which 2 million or 83% of the decline can be attributed to the change in the OSHA recordkeeping rules.

  5. The impact of OSHA recordkeeping regulation changes on occupational injury and illness trends in the US: a time‐series analysis

    Friedman, Lee S; Forst, Linda

    2007-01-01

    Objectives The Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses (SOII), based on Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) logs, indicates that the number of occupational injuries and illnesses in the US has steadily declined by 35.8% between 1992–2003. However, major changes to the OSHA recordkeeping standard occurred in 1995 and 2001. The authors assessed the relation between changes in OSHA recordkeeping regulations and the trend in occupational injuries and illnesses. Methods SOII data available from the Bureau of Labor Statistics for years 1992–2003 were collected. The authors assessed time series data using join‐point regression models. Results Before the first major recordkeeping change in 1995, injuries and illnesses declined annually by 0.5%. In the period 1995–2000 the slope declined by 3.1% annually (95% CI −3.7% to −2.5%), followed by another more precipitous decline occurring in 2001–2003 (−8.3%; 95% CI −10.0% to −6.6%). When stratifying the data, the authors continued to observe significant changes occurring in 1995 and 2001. Conclusions The substantial declines in the number of injuries and illnesses correspond directly with changes in OSHA recordkeeping rules. Changes in employment, productivity, OSHA enforcement activity and sampling error do not explain the large decline. Based on the baseline slope (join‐point regression analysis, 1992–4), the authors expected a decline of 407 964 injuries and illnesses during the period of follow‐up if no intervention occurred; they actually observed a decline of 2.4 million injuries and illnesses of which 2 million or 83% of the decline can be attributed to the change in the OSHA recordkeeping rules. PMID:17303676

  6. The EPQ model under conditions of two levels of trade credit and limited storage capacity in supply chain management

    Chung, Kun-Jen

    2013-09-01

    An inventory problem involves a lot of factors influencing inventory decisions. To understand it, the traditional economic production quantity (EPQ) model plays rather important role for inventory analysis. Although the traditional EPQ models are still widely used in industry, practitioners frequently question validities of assumptions of these models such that their use encounters challenges and difficulties. So, this article tries to present a new inventory model by considering two levels of trade credit, finite replenishment rate and limited storage capacity together to relax the basic assumptions of the traditional EPQ model to improve the environment of the use of it. Keeping in mind cost-minimisation strategy, four easy-to-use theorems are developed to characterise the optimal solution. Finally, the sensitivity analyses are executed to investigate the effects of the various parameters on ordering policies and the annual total relevant costs of the inventory system.

  7. Energy levels of a scalar particle in a static gravitational field close to the black hole limit

    Gossel, G. H.; Berengut, J. C.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2011-10-01

    The bound-state energy levels of a scalar particle in the gravitational field of finite-sized objects with interiors described by the Florides and Schwarzschild metrics are found. For these metrics, bound states with zero energy (where the binding energy is equal to the rest mass of the scalar particle) only exist when a singularity occurs in the metric. Therefore, in contrast to the Coulomb case, no pairs are produced in the non-singular static metric. For the Florides metric the singularity occurs in the black hole limit, while for the Schwarzschild interior metric it corresponds to infinite pressure at the center. Moreover, the energy spectrum is shown to become quasi-continuous as the metric becomes singular.

  8. Seated limits-of-stability of athletes with disabilities with regard to competitive levels and sport classification.

    Santos, P B R; Vigário, P S; Mainenti, M R M; Ferreira, A S; Lemos, T

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we asked whether wheelchair rugby (WR) classification and competitive level influence trunk function of athletes with disabilities, in terms of seated limits-of-stability (LoS). Twenty-eight athletes were recruited from international- and national-level WR teams, with each group exhibiting marked differences in years of sports practice and training volume. Athletes were also distributed into three groups according their classification: low-point (0.5-1.5-point); mid-point (2.0-2.5-point); and high-point (3.0-3.5-point). Athletes were asked to sit on a force platform and to lean the body as far as possible in eight predefined directions. Center of pressure (COP) coordinates were calculated from the ground reaction forces acquired with the force platform. LoS were computed as the area of ellipse adjusted to maximal COP excursion achieved for the eight directions. ANOVAs reveal that LoS were not different when international- and national-level players were compared (P=.744). Nevertheless, LoS were larger in players from the high-point group than from the low-point group (P=.028), with the mid-point group being not different from both (P>.194). In summary, (i) competitive level does not impact LoS measures and (ii) LoS are remarkably distinct when comparing both extremes of the WR classification range. Our results suggest that, as a training-resistant measure, LoS could be a valid assessment of trunk impairment, potentially contributing to the development of an evidence-based WR classification. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Rates and limits of climatic change: Discussion of possible targets; Rates and limits of temperature, precipitation, and sea-level changes

    Gleick, P H [Pacific Inst. for SiDES, Berkeley, CA (US); Sassin, W [Landl (AT)

    1990-10-01

    The rate of sea-level rise over the next century is likely to accelerate rapidly and exceed rates of rise experienced over the last several thousand years. Under these conditions, adverse effects on natural ecosystems such as coastal marshes and coral reef islands would be widely observable by 2050, and would be noticeable in vulnerable ecosystems by the year 2000, even under low sea-level rise scenario. Non-linearities and sudden events such as storm surges and a change in storm frequency and intensity could lead to damages even earlier. Similarly, change in temperature and precipitation patterns far greater than those experienced in the last 10000to 100000 years seem likely unless strong actions are taken soon. Rates of change in temperature, precipitation, and sea level over geologic time have often exceeded the rates expected over the next century from global warming. These large excursions, however, were often accompanied by dramatic changes in ecosystems and by large species extinctions, and they occurred when no human infrastructure existed. The adaptive abilities of natural ecosystems can be used to define targets of maximum rates of rise. For coral reef islands and coastal marshes, the maximum rate of accretion of materials is 10 to 15 mm/yr. At this rate, however, many reefs and marshes that accrete materials at slower rates will be inundated and destroyed. Average rates of accretion for marshes are lower - between 2 and 5 mm/yr, and between 5 and 10 mm/yr for coral reefs. Even at these lower rates, some ecosystem losses are to be expected. This information leads to a recommended target for the rate of sea-level rise of between 20 and 50 mm per decade, and a target for absolute sea-level rise of between 0.2 and 0.5 above the 1990 global mean sea level. (authors).

  10. Relation of N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide levels after symptom-limited exercise to baseline and ischemia levels.

    van der Zee, P Marc; Verberne, Hein J; van Spijker, Rianne C; van Straalen, Jan P; Fischer, Johan C; Sturk, Augueste; van Eck-Smit, Berthe L F; de Winter, Robbert J

    2009-03-01

    Circulating levels of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and the amino-terminal portion of the prohormone (NT-proBNP) have been reported to increase immediately after myocardial ischemia. The association between extent of exercise-induced myocardial ischemia measured using myocardial perfusion scintigraphy and the magnitude and time course of changes in NT-proBNP was studied. One hundred one patients underwent symptom-limited exercise myocardial perfusion scintigraphy. Myocardial ischemia was assessed semiquantitatively. Serum samples were obtained before the start of exercise (baseline), at maximal exercise, and every hour up to 6 hours after maximal exercise. Myocardial ischemia was present in 37 patients (37%). NT-proBNP rapidly increased during exercise (to 113%, interquartile range 104 to 144, and 118%, interquartile range 106 to 142, of baseline, respectively), with a second peak at 4 (141%, interquartile range 119 to 169) and 5 hours (136%, interquartile range 93 to 188), respectively. Absolute changes between NT-proBNP at baseline and at maximum exercise in patients with versus without ischemia were similar (median, 30 pg/ml, interquartile range 7 to 45 vs 15, interquartile range 4 to 46, respectively, p = 0.230), but absolute change between baseline and the secondary peak was higher in patients with ischemia than in patients without ischemia (median 64 pg/ml, interquartile range 32 to 172 vs 34, interquartile range 19 to 85, respectively, p = 0.024). In multivariate linear stepwise regression analysis of determinants of changes in NT-proBNP after exercise, baseline NT-proBNP was the only independent determinant of absolute changes at maximum exercise, whereas the presence of ischemia was not predictive. Baseline NT-proBNP, cystatin C, and end-systolic volume were independent determinants of the absolute increase to secondary peak levels. In conclusion, myocardial ischemia per se did not lead to additional increases in NT-proBNP within 6 hours after exercise.

  11. Evaluation of functional limitations in female soccer players and their relationship with sports level--a cross sectional study.

    Monika Grygorowicz

    Full Text Available THE MAIN OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY: the aim of this study was to analyze: a abnormalities in the length of lower limb muscles, b the correctness of movement patterns, and c the impact of functional limitations of muscles on the correctness of fundamental movement patterns in a group of female soccer players, in relation to their skill level. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 21 female soccer players from Polish Ekstraklasa and 22 players from the 1(st Division were tested for lower limb muscle length restrictions and level of fundamental movement skills (with the Fundamental Movement Screen™ test concept by Gray Cook. Chi-square test was used for categorical unrelated variables. Differences between groups in absolute point values were analyzed using the non-parametric Mann-Whitney U test. Statistical significance was set at p<0.05. RESULTS: Statistically significant higher number of measurements indicating an abnormal length of rectus femoris was observed in the 1st Division group (p = 0.0433. In the group of Ekstraklasa the authors obtained a significantly higher number of abnormal hamstring test results (p = 0.0006. Ekstraklasa players scored higher in the rotational stability test of the trunk (p = 0.0008, whereas the 1st Division players scored higher in the following tests: deep squat (p = 0.0220, in-line lunge (p = 0.0042 and active straight leg raise (p = 0.0125. The results suggest that there are different functional reasons affecting point values obtained in the FMS™ tests in both analyzed groups. CONCLUSIONS: The differences in the flexibility of rectus femoris and hamstring muscle observed between female soccer players with different levels of training, may result from a long-term impact of soccer training on the muscle-tendon system and articular structures. Different causes of abnormalities in fundamental movement patterns in both analyzed groups suggest the need for tailoring prevention programs to the level of sport

  12. Concentration Limits in the Cement Based Swiss Repository for Long-lived, Intermediate-level Radioactive Wastes (LMA)

    Berner, Urs

    1999-12-01

    The Swiss repository concept for long-lived, intermediate-level radioactive wastes (LMA), in Swiss terminology) foresees cylindrical concrete silos surrounded by a ring of granulated bentonite to deposit the waste. As one of the possible options and similar to the repository for high level wastes, the silos will be located in a deep crystalline host rock. Solidified with concrete in steel drums, the waste is stacked into a silo and the silo is then backfilled with a porous mortar. To characterize the release of radionuclides from the repository, the safety assessment considers first the dissolution into the pore water of the concrete, and then diffusion through the outer bentonite ring into the deep crystalline groundwater. For 19 safety relevant radionuclides (isotopes of U, Th, Pa, Np, Pu, Am, Ni, Zr, Mo, Nb, Se, Sr, Ra, Tc, Sn, I, C, Cs, Cl) the report recommends maximum elemental concentrations to be expected in the cement pore water of the particularly considered repository. These limits will form the parameter base for subsequent release model chains. Concentration limits in a geochemical environment are usually obtained from thermodynamic equilibrium calculations performed with geochemical speciation codes. However, earlier studies revealed that this procedure does not always lead to reliable results. Main reasons for this are the complexity of the systems considered, as well as the lacking completeness of, and the uncertainty associated with the thermodynamic data. To improve the recommended maximum concentrations for a distinct repository design, this work includes additional design- and system-dependent criteria. The following processes, inventories and properties are considered in particular: a) recent experimental investigations, particularly from cement systems, b) thermodynamic model calculations when reliable data are available, c) total inventories of radionuclides, d) sorption- and co-precipitation processes, e) dilution with stable isotopes, f

  13. Derivation of an occupational exposure limit (OEL) for methylene chloride based on acute CNS effects and relative potency analysis.

    Storm, J E; Rozman, K K

    1998-06-01

    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) methylene chloride Permissible Exposure Level (PEL) or 25 ppm is quantitatively derived from mouse tumor results observed in a high-exposure National Toxicology Program bioassay. Because this approach depends on controversial interspecies and low-dose extrapolations, the PEL itself has stimulated heated debate. Here, an alternative safety assessment for methylene chloride is presented. It is based on an acute human lowest-observed-adverse-effect level (LOAEL) of 200 ppm for subtle central nervous system (CNS) depression. Steep, parallel exposure-response curves for anesthetic and subanesthetic CNS effects associated with compounds mechanistically and structurally related to methylene chloride are shown to support a safety factor of two to account for inter-individual variability in response. LOAEL/no-observed-adverse-effect ratios for subtle CNS effects associated with structurally related solvents are shown to support a safety factor range of two to four to account for uncertainty in identifying a subthreshold exposure level. Anesthetic relative potencies and anesthetic/subanesthetic effect level ratios are shown to be constant for the compounds evaluated, demonstrating that subanesthetic relative potencies are also constant. Relative potencies among similarly derived occupational exposure limits (OELs) for solvents structurally related to methylene chloride are therefore used to validate the derived methylene chloride OEL range of 25-50 ppm. Because this safety assessment is based on human (rather than rodent) data and empirical (rather than theoretical) exposure-response relationships and is supported by relative potency analysis, it is a defensible alternative to to the OSHA risk assessment and should positively contribute to the debate regarding the appropriate basis and value for a methylene chloride PEL.

  14. Prediction of radionuclide invention for low-and intermediate-level radioactive waste by considering concentration limit of waste package

    Jung, Kang Il; Kim, Min Seong; Jeong, Noh Gyeon; Park, Jin Beak [Korea Radioactive Waste Agency(KORAD), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The result of a preliminary safety assessment that was completed by applying the radionuclide inventory calculated on the basis of available data from radioactive waste generation agencies suggested that many difficulties are to be expected with regard to disposal safety and operation. Based on the results of the preliminary safety assessment of the entire disposal system, in this paper, a unit package exceeding the safety goal is selected that occupies a large proportion of radionuclides in intermediate-level radioactive waste. We introduce restrictions on the amount of radioactivity in a way that excludes the high surface dose rate of the package. The radioactivity limit for disposal will be used as the baseline data for establishing the acceptance criteria and the disposal criteria for each disposal facility to meet the safety standards. It is necessary to draw up a comprehensive safety development plan for the Gyeongju waste disposal facility that will contribute to the construction of a Safety Case for the safety optimization of radioactive waste disposal facilities.

  15. Quantum driving of a two level system: quantum speed limit and superadiabatic protocols – an experimental investigation

    Malossi, N; Arimondo, E; Ciampini, D; Mannella, R; Bason, M G; Viteau, M; Morsch, O

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental requirement in quantum information processing and in many other areas of science is the capability of precisely controlling a quantum system by preparing a quantum state with the highest fidelity and/or in the fastest possible way. Here we present an experimental investigation of a two level system, characterized by a time-dependent Landau-Zener Hamiltonian, aiming to test general and optimal high-fidelity control protocols. The experiment is based on a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) loaded into an optical lattice, then accelerated, which provides a high degree of control over the experimental parameters. We implement generalized Landau-Zener sweeps, comparing them with the well-known linear Landau-Zener sweep. We drive the system from an initial state to a final state with fidelity close to unity in the shortest possible time (quantum brachistochrone), thus reaching the ultimate speed limit imposed by quantum mechanics. On the opposite extreme of the quantum control spectrum, the aim is not to minimize the total transition time but to maximize the adiabaticity during the time-evolution, the system being constrained to the adiabatic ground state at any time. We implement such transitionless superadiabatic protocols by an appropriate transformation of the Hamiltonian parameters. This transformation is general and independent of the physical system.

  16. Pulsed vs. CW low level light therapy on osteoarticular signs and symptoms in limited scleroderma (CREST syndrome)

    Barolet, Daniel

    2012-03-01

    Limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis (lcSSc) was formerly known as CREST syndrome in reference to the associated clinical features: Calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, Esophageal dysfunction, Sclerodactyly, and Telangiectasias. The transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) has been identified has a major player in the pathogenic process, while low level light therapy (LLLT) has been shown to modulate this cytokine superfamily. This case study was conducted to assess the efficacy of 940nm using microsecond domain pulsing and continuous wave mode (CW) on osteoarticular signs and symptoms associated with lcSSc. The patient was treated two to three times a week for 13 weeks, using a sequential pulsing mode on one elbow, and a CW mode on the other. Efficacy assessments included inflammation, symptoms, pain, and health scales, patient satisfaction, clinical global impression, and adverse effects monitoring. Significant functional and morphologic improvements were observed after LLLT, with best results seen with the pulsing mode. No significant adverse effects were noted. Two mechanisms of action may be at play. The 940nm wavelength provides inside-out heating possibly vasodilating capillaries which in turn increases catabolic processes leading to a reduction of in situ calcinosis. LLLT may also improve symptoms by triggering a cascade of cellular reactions, including the modulation of inflammatory mediators.

  17. Formaldehyde exposure in U.S. industries from OSHA air sampling data.

    Lavoue, Jerome; Vincent, Raymond; Gerin, Michel

    2008-09-01

    National occupational exposure databanks have been cited as sources of exposure data for exposure surveillance and exposure assessment for occupational epidemiology. Formaldehyde exposure data recorded in the U.S Integrated Management Information System (IMIS) between 1979 and 2001 were collected to elaborate a multi-industry retrospective picture of formaldehyde exposures and to identify exposure determinants. Due to the database design, only detected personal measurement results (n = 5228) were analyzed with linear mixed-effect models, which explained 29% of the total variance. Short-term measurement results were higher than time-weighted average (TWA) data and decreased 18% per year until 1987 (TWA data 5% per year) and 5% per year (TWA data 4% per year) after that. Exposure varied across industries with maximal estimated TWA geometric means (GM) for 2001 in the reconstituted wood products, structural wood members, and wood dimension and flooring industries (GM = 0.20 mg/m(3). Highest short-term GMs estimated for 2001 were in the funeral service and crematory and reconstituted wood products industries (GM = 0.35 mg/m(3). Exposure levels in IMIS were marginally higher during nonprogrammed inspections compared with programmed inspections. An increasing exterior temperature tended to cause a decrease in exposure levels for cold temperatures (-5% per 5 degrees C for T 15 degrees C). Concentrations measured during the same inspection were correlated and varied differently across industries and sample type (TWA, short term). Sensitivity analyses using TOBIT regression suggested that the average bias caused by excluding non-detects is approximately 30%, being potentially higher for short-term data if many non-detects were actually short-term measurements. Although limited by availability of relevant exposure determinants and potential selection biases in IMIS, these results provide useful insight on formaldehyde occupational exposure in the United States in the last

  18. Airborne exposure and soil levels associated with lead abatement of a steel tank.

    Lange, John H

    2002-02-01

    This study reports on airborne exposure levels and soil concentrations of lead in regard to abatement of a steel structure (water tank). The tank was de-leaded by abrasive sand blasting. The ball of the tank had a lead surface level that exceeded the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) definition of lead-based paint (LBP) (0.5% lead), but paint on stem and base was below this criterion. Personal and area airborne samples were collected during different activities of lead abatement of the tank. Summary results suggest during abrasive blasting of ball and stem/base personal exposure levels, as reported with arithmetic and geometric means, exceed the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) permissible exposure limit (50 microg/m3). Highest personal exposure (occupational exposure) was associated with blasting of ball. Distribution of airborne and soil samples suggest non-normality and is best represented by a logarithmic form. Geometric standard deviations for air and soil lead support a non-normal distribution. Outlying values were found for personal and area air samples. Exposure levels associated with blasting stem/base section of tank support OSHA's policy requiring air monitoring of work at levels below the criterion established by EPA in identifying LBP. Area samples were statistically lower than personal samples associated with blasting ball and stem/base of tank. Exposure data suggest that workers performing abatement on steel structures have elevated lead exposure from surface lead. Respirator protection requirements are discussed. Soil lead concentration was suggested to decrease as distance increased from tank. Soil lead is suggested to be a result of deposition from LBP on tank surface. Minimal efforts were required to reduce average lead soil levels below EPA's upper acceptable criterion (1200 ppm Pb).

  19. Special Analysis: Updated Analysis of the Effect of Wood Products on Trench Disposal Limits at the E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility

    Cook, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    This Special Analysis (SA) develops revised radionuclide inventory limits for trench disposal of low-level radioactive waste in the presence of wood products in the E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility. These limits should be used to modify the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) for trench disposal. Because the work on which this SA is based employed data from tests using 100 percent wood products, the 40 percent limitation on wood products for trench (i.e., slit or engineered trench) disposal is not needed in the modified WAC

  20. Exercise and limitations in physical activity levels among new dialysis patients in the United States: an epidemiologic study.

    Stack, Austin G; Murthy, Bhamidipati

    2008-12-01

    Epidemiologic studies of physical activity among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are lacking. The aim of this study was to describe the patterns of physical activity among new dialysis patients in the United States. Multivariate logistic regression analyses examined associations of self-reported limitations in physical activity and exercise frequency with sociodemographic and clinical variables in 2,264 patients from Wave 2 of the Dialysis Morbidity and Mortality Study. Overall, 56% of patients exercised less than once a week, 75% reported severe limitations in vigorous activities, whereas 42% had severe limitations in moderate physical activities. Fewer limitations in moderate or vigorous activities correlated positively with male gender (odds-ratio [OR] = 1.61), black race OR =1.49), Hispanic ethnicity (OR = 2.39), serum albumin (OR = 1.69 per 1 g/L higher), positive affect (OR = 2.33), peritoneal dialysis (OR = 1.90), and negatively with age (OR = 0.67), heart failure (OR = 0.75), peripheral vascular disease (OR = 0.69), malnutrition (OR = 0.67), and depression (OR = 0.39). Patients reporting fewer limitations in moderate or vigorous activities (OR = 1.35 and 1.28, respectively), or frequent visits with a dietitian (2 to 3 times per week vs. less) (OR = 1.21) in the pre-ESRD period exercised more frequently. Limitations in physical activity are common among new ESRD patients and these, in part, are related to pre-existing cardiovascular disease, malnutrition, and mental health.

  1. H.R. 3173: A Bill to apply the provisions of OSHA to certain Department of Energy nuclear facilities. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundredth First Congress, First Session, August 4, 1989

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    H.R. 3173: A Bill to apply the provisions of OSHA to certain Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities. The purpose is to improve and enforce standards for employee health and safety at DOE nuclear facilities

  2. Occupational amputations in Illinois 2000-2007: BLS vs. data linkage of trauma registry, hospital discharge, workers compensation databases and OSHA citations.

    Friedman, Lee; Krupczak, Colin; Brandt-Rauf, Sherry; Forst, Linda

    2013-05-01

    Workplace amputation is a widespread, disabling, costly, and preventable public health problem. Thousands of occupational amputations occur each year, clustering in particular economic sectors, workplaces, and demographic groups such as young workers, Hispanics, and immigrants. To identify and describe work related amputations amongst Illinois residents that occur within Illinois as reported in three legally mandated State databases; to compare these cases with those identified through the BLS-Survey of Occupational Illnesses and Injuries (SOII); and to determine the extent of direct intervention by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) for these injuries in the State. We linked cases across three databases in Illinois - trauma registry, hospital discharge, and workers compensation claims. We describe amputation injuries in Illinois between 2000 and 2007, compare them to the BLS-SOII, and determine OSHA investigations of the companies where amputations occurred. There were 3984 amputations identified, 80% fingertips, in the Illinois databases compared to an estimated 3637, 94% fingertips, from BLS-SOII. Though the overall agreement is close, there were wide fluctuations (over- and under-estimations) in individual years between counts in the linked dataset and federal survey estimates. No OSHA inspections occurred for these injuries. Increased detection of workplace amputations is essential to targeting interventions and to evaluating program effectiveness. There should be mandatory reporting of all amputation injuries by employers and insurance companies within 24h of the event, and every injury should be investigated by OSHA. Health care providers should recognise amputation as a public health emergency and should be compelled to report. There should be a more comprehensive occupational injury surveillance system in the US that enhances the BLS-SOII through linkage with state databases. Addition of industry, occupation, and work

  3. Relation of N-Terminal Pro B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Levels After Symptom-Limited Exercise to Baseline and Ischemia Levels

    van der Zee, P. Marc; Verberne, Hein J.; van Spijker, Rianne C.; van Straalen, Jan P.; Fischer, Johan C.; Sturk, Augueste; van Eck-Smit, Berthe L. F.; de Winter, Robbert J.

    2009-01-01

    Circulating levels of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and the amino-terminal portion of the prohormone (NT-proBNP) have been reported to increase immediately after myocardial ischemia. The association between extent of exercise-induced myocardial ischemia measured using myocardial perfusion

  4. High levels of time contraction in young children in dual tasks are related to their limited attention capacities.

    Hallez, Quentin; Droit-Volet, Sylvie

    2017-09-01

    Numerous studies have shown that durations are judged shorter in a dual-task condition than in a simple-task condition. The resource-based theory of time perception suggests that this is due to the processing of temporal information, which is a demanding cognitive task that consumes limited attention resources. Our study investigated whether this time contraction in a dual-task condition is greater in younger children and, if so, whether this is specifically related to their limited attention capacities. Children aged 5-7years were given a temporal reproduction task in a simple-task condition and a dual-task condition. In addition, different neuropsychological tests were used to assess not only their attention capacities but also their capacities in terms of working memory and information processing speed. The results showed a shortening of perceived time in the dual task compared with the simple task, and this increased as age decreased. The extent of this shortening effect was directly linked to younger children's limited attentional capacities; the lower their attentional capacities, the greater the time contraction. This study demonstrated that children's errors in time judgments are linked to their cognitive capacities rather than to capacities that are specific to time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Transuranium element toxicity: dose-response relationships at low exposure levels. Summary and speculative interpretation relative to exposure limits

    Thompson, R.C.

    1975-01-01

    A summary is given of information on transuranium element toxicity and the correlation of this information with current established exposure limits. It is difficult to calculate a biologically relevant radiation dose from deposited plutonium; it is exposure that must be controlled in order to prevent biological effect, and if the relationship between exposure and effect is known, then radiation dose is of no concern. There are extensive data on the effects of plutonium in bone. Results of studies at the University of Utah indicate that plutonium in beagles may be as much as ten times more toxic than radium. It has been suggested that this toxicity ratio may be even higher in man than in the beagle dog because of differences in surface-to-volume ratios and differences in the rate of burial of surface-deposited plutonium. The present capabilities for extrapolating dose-effect relationships seem to be limited to the setting of upper limits, based on assumptions of linearity and considerations related to natural background

  6. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 has a limited role in cell cycle regulation of cyclin D1 levels.

    Yang, Ke; Guo, Yang; Stacey, William C; Harwalkar, Jyoti; Fretthold, Jonathan; Hitomi, Masahiro; Stacey, Dennis W

    2006-08-30

    The expression level of cyclin D1 plays a vital role in the control of proliferation. This protein is reported to be degraded following phosphorylation by glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) on Thr-286. We recently showed that phosphorylation of Thr-286 is responsible for a decline in cyclin D1 levels during S phase, an event required for efficient DNA synthesis. These studies were undertaken to test the possibility that phosphorylation by GSK3 is responsible for the S phase specific decline in cyclin D1 levels, and that this event is regulated by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT signaling pathway which controls GSK3. We found, however, that neither PI3K, AKT, GSK3, nor proliferative signaling activity in general is responsible for the S phase decline in cyclin D1 levels. In fact, the activity of these signaling kinases does not vary through the cell cycle of proliferating cells. Moreover, we found that GSK3 activity has little influence over cyclin D1 expression levels during any cell cycle phase. Inhibition of GSK3 activity by siRNA, LiCl, or other chemical inhibitors failed to influence cyclin D1 phosphorylation on Thr-286, even though LiCl efficiently blocked phosphorylation of beta-catenin, a known substrate of GSK3. Likewise, the expression of a constitutively active GSK3 mutant protein failed to influence cyclin D1 phosphorylation or total protein expression level. Because we were unable to identify any proliferative signaling molecule or pathway which is regulated through the cell cycle, or which is able to influence cyclin D1 levels, we conclude that the suppression of cyclin D1 levels during S phase is regulated by cell cycle position rather than signaling activity. We propose that this mechanism guarantees the decline in cyclin D1 levels during each S phase; and that in so doing it reduces the likelihood that simple over expression of cyclin D1 can lead to uncontrolled cell growth.

  7. OSHA medical and workplace surveillance requirements and NIOSH recommendations (for employees exposed to toxic substances and other work hazards)

    Cooper, L. P.

    1983-01-01

    Both OSHA medical and work place surveillance requirements and NIOSH recommendations were prepared as a desk reference to help occupational health professionals to perform their duties. The medical surveillance information focuses on frequency of physical examinations, specific problems that may arise as a result of exposure (e.g., decreased immunocompetence, weight loss, ets.), conditions that intensify the harmful effects of exposure (e.g., medication an exposed employee may be taking, cigarette smoking, etc.), the areas that should be scrutinized in medical and work histories and during the physical exam, and specific clinical tests that should be conducted. Recordkeeping requirements are also specified. The workplace surveillance information consists of monitoring requirements, personal protective equipment requirements, and recordkeeping requirements. Such details as the sampling devices that should be used, the type of respirators that should be worn, and the frequency of inspections are included. This document does not specify the training, labeling and posting, and safe work practice requirements and recommendations due to space considerations.

  8. Why Organization May Be the Primary Limitation to Implementing Sustainability at the Local Level: Examples from Swedish Case Studies

    E. Carina H. Keskitalo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Much of the effort to address environmental issues at the local level has focused on defining principles and aims rather than addressing the operational difficulties of implementation. Drawing upon insights from sustainability scholarship, this study reviews two cases: the development of a Swedish standard for implementing sustainable development at municipality, county council, and regional levels, and attempts by a small rural municipality to establish a process towards implementing the Aalborg Commitments. The research illustrates the specific organizational and managerial complexity of these case study experiences. It concludes that an organizational focus on integration and mainstreaming deserves particular attention to achieve broader sustainability, or related environmental or adaptation goals. The results, in particular, highlight the role that integrated management systems can play for sustainability work at the local level.

  9. Caveats and limitations of plate reader-based high-throughput kinetic measurements of intracellular calcium levels

    Heusinkveld, Harm J.; Westerink, Remco H.S.

    2011-01-01

    Calcium plays a crucial role in virtually all cellular processes, including neurotransmission. The intracellular Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+ ] i ) is therefore an important readout in neurotoxicological and neuropharmacological studies. Consequently, there is an increasing demand for high-throughput measurements of [Ca 2+ ] i , e.g. using multi-well microplate readers, in hazard characterization, human risk assessment and drug development. However, changes in [Ca 2+ ] i are highly dynamic, thereby creating challenges for high-throughput measurements. Nonetheless, several protocols are now available for real-time kinetic measurement of [Ca 2+ ] i in plate reader systems, though the results of such plate reader-based measurements have been questioned. In view of the increasing use of plate reader systems for measurements of [Ca 2+ ] i a careful evaluation of current technologies is warranted. We therefore performed an extensive set of experiments, using two cell lines (PC12 and B35) and two fluorescent calcium-sensitive dyes (Fluo-4 and Fura-2), for comparison of a linear plate reader system with single cell fluorescence microscopy. Our data demonstrate that the use of plate reader systems for high-throughput real-time kinetic measurements of [Ca 2+ ] i is associated with many pitfalls and limitations, including erroneous sustained increases in fluorescence, limited sensitivity and lack of single cell resolution. Additionally, our data demonstrate that probenecid, which is often used to prevent dye leakage, effectively inhibits the depolarization-evoked increase in [Ca 2+ ] i . Overall, the data indicate that the use of current plate reader-based strategies for high-throughput real-time kinetic measurements of [Ca 2+ ] i is associated with caveats and limitations that require further investigation. - Research highlights: → The use of plate readers for high-throughput screening of intracellular Ca 2+ is associated with many pitfalls and limitations. → Single cell

  10. The Prediction of Reading Levels between Second and Third Grade Limited English Proficient Students in a Bilingual Program

    Moses, Britani Creel

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to predict the third grade English reading TAKS scores while considering the same students' native language, Spanish, reading level as assessed by a state-approved reading assessment, the Evaluacion del desarrollo de la lectura (EDL), from the end of the second grade year. In addition, this study was been designed to…

  11. Dose limits

    Fitoussi, L.

    1987-12-01

    The dose limit is defined to be the level of harmfulness which must not be exceeded, so that an activity can be exercised in a regular manner without running a risk unacceptable to man and the society. The paper examines the effects of radiation categorised into stochastic and non-stochastic. Dose limits for workers and the public are discussed

  12. FEDERAL RULEMAKING: Procedural and Analytical Requirements at OSHA and Other Agencies

    2001-06-14

    informal rulemaking. Formal rulemaking is used in ratemaking proceedings and in certain other cases when rules are required by statute to be made “on...substantial flexibility regarding how the analyses should be prepared, but also indicates that the analyses should contain certain basic elements and...calendar days, so our review is limited to a description of the issuing agency’s rulemaking actions.25 We also collect basic information about the nonmajor

  13. Sink limitation induces the expression of multiple soybean vegetative lipoxygenase mRNAs while the endogenous jasmonic acid level remains low.

    Bunker, T W; Koetje, D S; Stephenson, L C; Creelman, R A; Mullet, J E; Grimes, H D

    1995-08-01

    The response of individual members of the lipoxygenase multigene family in soybeans to sink deprivation was analyzed. RNase protection assays indicated that a novel vegetative lipoxygenase gene, vlxC, and three other vegetative lipoxygenase mRNAs accumulated in mature leaves in response to a variety of sink limitations. These data suggest that several members of the lipoxygenase multigene family are involved in assimilate partitioning. The possible involvement of jasmonic acid as a signaling molecule regulating assimilate partitioning into the vegetative storage proteins and lipoxygenases was directly assessed by determining the endogenous level of jasmonic acid in leaves from plants with their pods removed. There was no rise in the level of endogenous jasmonic acid coincident with the strong increase in both vlxC and vegetative storage protein VspB transcripts in response to sink limitation. Thus, expression of the vegetative lipoxygenases and vegetative storage proteins is not regulated by jasmonic acid in sink-limited leaves.

  14. Management of endocrine disease: value and limitations of assessing vitamin D nutritional status and advised levels of vitamin D supplementation.

    Romagnoli, Elisabetta; Pepe, Jessica; Piemonte, Sara; Cipriani, Cristiana; Minisola, Salvatore

    2013-10-01

    The growing attention to the role of vitamin D in skeletal and extra-skeletal diseases over the last decade induced an increased demand for vitamin D determination as well as a dramatic rise of sales of vitamin D supplement. However, several critical points in this field remain to be clarified. We lack a clear consensus about the definition of vitamin D deficiency, insufficiency, and sufficiency. The identification of different thresholds defining vitamin D status has relevant implications in clinical practice. In fact, the worldwide prevalence of low vitamin D status is highly varying according to the level of 25(OH)D utilized to define sufficiency. Therefore, the assessment of 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels may have a critical role, but a number of different technical problems associated with its determination may interfere in interpreting the results. The hydrophobic nature of vitamin D and the tight binding to its carrier (vitamin D binding protein), the different forms circulating in blood, and the issue of standardization are among the most important factors influencing the measurement of this metabolite. Another controversial point relies on the conflicting guidance on prevention and treatment of vitamin D deficiency endorsed by different medical and scientific communities. In particular, uncertainty exists about how to replete vitamin D stores, how to maintain normal 25(OH)D levels after repletion, which form of vitamin D is preferable for supplementation, and which route of administration and dosing regimens are advisable. Finally, concerns have been raised regarding vitamin D toxicity and its adverse effects.

  15. Proposed Occupational Exposure Limits for Non-Carcinogenic Hanford Waste Tank Vapor Chemicals

    Poet, Torka S.; Timchalk, Chuck

    2006-01-01

    A large number of volatile chemicals have been identified in the headspaces of tanks used to store mixed chemical and radioactive waste at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, and there is concern that vapor releases from the tanks may be hazardous to workers. Contractually established occupational exposure limits (OELs) established by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) do not exist for all chemicals of interest. To address the need for worker exposure guidelines for those chemicals that lack OSHA or ACGIH OELs, a procedure for assigning Acceptable Occupational Exposure Limits (AOELs) for Hanford Site tank farm workers has been developed and applied to a selected group of 57 headspace chemicals

  16. Proposed Occupational Exposure Limits for Non-Carcinogenic Hanford Waste Tank Vapor Chemicals

    Poet, Torka S.; Timchalk, Chuck

    2006-03-24

    A large number of volatile chemicals have been identified in the headspaces of tanks used to store mixed chemical and radioactive waste at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, and there is concern that vapor releases from the tanks may be hazardous to workers. Contractually established occupational exposure limits (OELs) established by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) do not exist for all chemicals of interest. To address the need for worker exposure guidelines for those chemicals that lack OSHA or ACGIH OELs, a procedure for assigning Acceptable Occupational Exposure Limits (AOELs) for Hanford Site tank farm workers has been developed and applied to a selected group of 57 headspace chemicals.

  17. Quench limits

    Sapinski, M.

    2012-01-01

    With thirteen beam induced quenches and numerous Machine Development tests, the current knowledge of LHC magnets quench limits still contains a lot of unknowns. Various approaches to determine the quench limits are reviewed and results of the tests are presented. Attempt to reconstruct a coherent picture emerging from these results is taken. The available methods of computation of the quench levels are presented together with dedicated particle shower simulations which are necessary to understand the tests. The future experiments, needed to reach better understanding of quench limits as well as limits for the machine operation are investigated. The possible strategies to set BLM (Beam Loss Monitor) thresholds are discussed. (author)

  18. Convergent Evolution of Hemoglobin Function in High-Altitude Andean Waterfowl Involves Limited Parallelism at the Molecular Sequence Level.

    Chandrasekhar Natarajan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental question in evolutionary genetics concerns the extent to which adaptive phenotypic convergence is attributable to convergent or parallel changes at the molecular sequence level. Here we report a comparative analysis of hemoglobin (Hb function in eight phylogenetically replicated pairs of high- and low-altitude waterfowl taxa to test for convergence in the oxygenation properties of Hb, and to assess the extent to which convergence in biochemical phenotype is attributable to repeated amino acid replacements. Functional experiments on native Hb variants and protein engineering experiments based on site-directed mutagenesis revealed the phenotypic effects of specific amino acid replacements that were responsible for convergent increases in Hb-O2 affinity in multiple high-altitude taxa. In six of the eight taxon pairs, high-altitude taxa evolved derived increases in Hb-O2 affinity that were caused by a combination of unique replacements, parallel replacements (involving identical-by-state variants with independent mutational origins in different lineages, and collateral replacements (involving shared, identical-by-descent variants derived via introgressive hybridization. In genome scans of nucleotide differentiation involving high- and low-altitude populations of three separate species, function-altering amino acid polymorphisms in the globin genes emerged as highly significant outliers, providing independent evidence for adaptive divergence in Hb function. The experimental results demonstrate that convergent changes in protein function can occur through multiple historical paths, and can involve multiple possible mutations. Most cases of convergence in Hb function did not involve parallel substitutions and most parallel substitutions did not affect Hb-O2 affinity, indicating that the repeatability of phenotypic evolution does not require parallelism at the molecular level.

  19. Investigation levels of radioisotopes in the body and in urine consequences of the recent recommendations on the annual limits of intake

    Shamai, Y.; Tirkel, M.; Schlesinger, T.

    1980-01-01

    The recently presented recommendations of Committee 2 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) concerning annual limits of intake (ALI) for workers differ in many cases from the maximum permissible annual intake (MPAI) previously recommended. The new recommendations directly influence the derived health physics parameters, such as the acceptable body burden and concentration of radioisotopes in the urine. The investigation level at any time after intake was defined as the concentration of activity in the urine arising from an intake of 1/20 of an ALI. An analogous definition is used for the total body investigation level. A computer code was written which calculates the investigation levels in the body and urine. Results are given for some commonly used radioisotopes, as a function of time after ingestion. From these investigation levels it is possible to calculate the levels in urine and the body arising from an intake that corresponds to a particular committed dose. (H.K.)

  20. Is beryllium-induced lung cancer caused only by soluble forms and high exposure levels?

    Schubauer-Berigan, Mary K; Couch, James R; Deddens, James A

    2017-08-01

    The US Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recently proposed a permissible exposure limit of 0.2 µg/m 3 for beryllium, based partly on extrapolated estimates of lung cancer risk from a pooled occupational cohort. The purpose of the present analysis was to evaluate whether cohort members exposed at lower levels to mainly insoluble forms of beryllium exhibit increased risk of lung cancer. We conducted Cox proportional hazards regression analyses among 75 lung cancer cases in age-based risk sets within two lower exposure plants in the pooled cohort followed from 1940 to 2005. We used categorical and power models to evaluate exposure-response patterns for mean and cumulative beryllium exposures in the two-plant cohort, comparing findings with the full pooled cohort. We also evaluated the distribution of exposure-years in each cohort by solubility class (soluble, insoluble and mixed). 98% of workers in the two-plant cohort were hired between 1955 and 1969. The mean beryllium exposure averaged 1.3 µg/m 3 and the predominant form was insoluble. Adjusting for confounders, we observed a monotonic increase in lung cancer mortality across exposure categories in the two-plant cohort. The exposure-response coefficients (per unit ln exposure) were 0.270 (p=0.061) for mean exposure and 0.170 (p=0.033) for cumulative exposure, compared with 0.155 and 0.094 (respectively) in the full cohort. The low-exposure levels at these two plants and the predominance of insoluble beryllium suggest that the overall pooled cohort findings on which OSHA's lung cancer risk assessment is based are relevant for current workers exposed to any form of beryllium. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. 25-hydroxy-Vitamin D status: limitations in comparison and clinical interpretation of serum-levels across different assay methods.

    Enko, Dietmar; Fridrich, Leo; Rezanka, Erwin; Stolba, Robert; Ernst, Juliane; Wendler, Iris; Fabian, Daniel; Hauptlorenz, Susanne; Halwachs-Baumann, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Background: Over the last decade, clinical interest to evaluate human 25-hydroxy-vitamin D (25[OH]D) serum levels has increased exponentially. In the present study, four chemiluminescence immunoassays (CLIA), one radioimmunoassy (RIA), and one high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method were compared and also with the liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method in view of 25(OH)D serum level determination. Methods: For the method comparison, blood samples from 133 consecutive patients were prospectively collected. All participants gave written informed consent for their blood samples to be used in this study. They came to the Department of Nuclear Medicine of the Central Hospital Steyr (Austria) for osteodensidometric measurement as part of their preventive medical check-up. Pearson's correlation coefficients, Bland-Altman plots, and paired t-tests were calculated. Assay-specific reference ranges were considered using blood samples from persons with normal parathormone, calcium, and total-protein values (n = 97). Results: The highest correlation was between the HPLC and the LC-MS/MS method (r = 0.96). The lowest correlation was between the cobas Vitamin D3 assay (Roche) and any of the evaluated assays (r = 0.46 - 0.63). Bland-Altman plots revealed a big negative mean bias in three assays (cobas Vitamin D3 assay [Roche]: -22.8; DiaSorin LIAISON [25[OH]D total CLIA [Diasorin]: -18.4; Diasorin 25[OH]D125 I RIA [Diasorin]: -23.8 [nmol/L]) and a much smaller positive mean bias in the other assays (ClinRep complete 25[OH]D2/D3 HPLC kit [Recipe]: 2.7; ADVIA Centaur Vitamin D total assay [Siemens]: 8.2; IDS total vitamin D assay [Immunodiagnostic Systems]: 12.1 [nmol/L]) compared to the LC-MS/MS method. Meanwhile, the manufacturer has withdrawn the cobas Vitamin D3 assay from the market. Conclusions: Poor antibody specificity with cross-reactivity to other vitamin D metabolites, incomplete extraction of the 25(OH)D analyte from the vitamin D

  2. Level of data quality from Health Management Information Systems in a resources limited setting and its associated factors, eastern Ethiopia

    Kidist Teklegiorgis

    2016-08-01

    Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted by using structured questionnaires in Dire Dawa Administration health facilities. All unit and/or department heads from all government health facilities were selected. The data was analysed using STATA version 11. Frequency and percentages were computed to present the descriptive findings. Association between variables was computed using binary logistic regression. Results: Over all data quality was found to be 75.3% in unit and/or departments. Trained staff to fill format, decision based on supervisor directives and department heads seek feedback were significantly associated with data quality and their magnitudes were (AOR = 2.253, 95% CI [1.082, 4.692], (AOR = 2.131, 95% CI [1.073, 4.233] and (AOR = 2.481, 95% CI [1.262, 4.876], respectively. Conclusion: Overall data quality was found to be below the national expectation level. Low data quality was found at health posts compared to health centres and hospitals. There was also a shortage of assigned HIS personnel, separate HIS offices, and assigned budgets for HIS across all units and/or departments.

  3. Radio-frequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) exposure levels in different European outdoor urban environments in comparison with regulatory limits.

    Urbinello, Damiano; Joseph, Wout; Huss, Anke; Verloock, Leen; Beekhuizen, Johan; Vermeulen, Roel; Martens, Luc; Röösli, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Concerns of the general public about potential adverse health effects caused by radio-frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs) led authorities to introduce precautionary exposure limits, which vary considerably between regions. It may be speculated that precautionary limits affect the base station network in a manner that mean population exposure unintentionally increases. The objectives of this multicentre study were to compare mean exposure levels in outdoor areas across four different European cities and to compare with regulatory RF-EMF exposure levels in the corresponding areas. We performed measurements in the cities of Amsterdam (the Netherlands, regulatory limits for mobile phone base station frequency bands: 41-61 V/m), Basel (Switzerland, 4-6 V/m), Ghent (Belgium, 3-4.5 V/m) and Brussels (Belgium, 2.9-4.3 V/m) using a portable measurement device. Measurements were conducted in three different types of outdoor areas (central and non-central residential areas and downtown), between 2011 and 2012 at 12 different days. On each day, measurements were taken every 4s for approximately 15 to 30 min per area. Measurements per urban environment were repeated 12 times during 1 year. Arithmetic mean values for mobile phone base station exposure ranged between 0.22 V/m (Basel) and 0.41 V/m (Amsterdam) in all outdoor areas combined. The 95th percentile for total RF-EMF exposure varied between 0.46 V/m (Basel) and 0.82 V/m (Amsterdam) and the 99th percentile between 0.81 V/m (Basel) and 1.20 V/m (Brussels). All exposure levels were far below international reference levels proposed by ICNIRP (International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection). Our study did not find indications that lowering the regulatory limit results in higher mobile phone base station exposure levels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Current limiters

    Loescher, D.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Systems Surety Assessment Dept.; Noren, K. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    1996-09-01

    The current that flows between the electrical test equipment and the nuclear explosive must be limited to safe levels during electrical tests conducted on nuclear explosives at the DOE Pantex facility. The safest way to limit the current is to use batteries that can provide only acceptably low current into a short circuit; unfortunately this is not always possible. When it is not possible, current limiters, along with other design features, are used to limit the current. Three types of current limiters, the fuse blower, the resistor limiter, and the MOSFET-pass-transistor limiters, are used extensively in Pantex test equipment. Detailed failure mode and effects analyses were conducted on these limiters. Two other types of limiters were also analyzed. It was found that there is no best type of limiter that should be used in all applications. The fuse blower has advantages when many circuits must be monitored, a low insertion voltage drop is important, and size and weight must be kept low. However, this limiter has many failure modes that can lead to the loss of over current protection. The resistor limiter is simple and inexpensive, but is normally usable only on circuits for which the nominal current is less than a few tens of milliamperes. The MOSFET limiter can be used on high current circuits, but it has a number of single point failure modes that can lead to a loss of protective action. Because bad component placement or poor wire routing can defeat any limiter, placement and routing must be designed carefully and documented thoroughly.

  5. Effects of Ligusticum porteri (Osha) Root Extract on Human Promyelocytic Leukemia Cells.

    Nguyen, Khanh; Sparks, Jean; Omoruyi, Felix

    2017-01-01

    Ligusticum porteri roots have been traditionally used in folk medicine, but the scientific basis is unclear. To investigate the cytotoxicity, antioxidant, and immunomodulatory effects of L. porteri root extract on human promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cells and H 2 O 2 -induced oxidative damaged HL-60 cells. HL-60 cells were incubated with different concentrations of root extract, and cells were harvested for viability assays on day 3 and 7. Cytokine levels (interferon-gamma [IFN-γ], interleukin-2 [IL-2], and interleukin-10 [IL-10]) and antioxidant indexes (malondialdehyde [MDA], reduced glutathione [GSH], superoxide dismutase [SOD], and catalase [CAT]) in H 2 O 2 -induced-stressed HL-60 were measured after 2 days. The viability of HL-60 challenged with H 2 O 2 declined by 42% compared to unstressed cells. After 7 days of incubation with 200 or 400 μg/mL L. porteri , the viability of HL-60 cells was two-fold higher than the control. Stressed HL-60 cells treated with 100, 200, and 400 μg/mL L. porteri reduced the lipid peroxidation by 12%-13%. We noted an increase in GSH levels, SOD and CAT activities in stressed HL-60 supplemented with 400 μg/mL root extract. Treatment with 400 μg/mL L. porteri significantly ( P effect against the oxidation of reduced glutathione (GSH)Treatment with L. porteri root extract may be effective in preventing oxidative damage through increasing the activities of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase [SOD] and catalase [CAT]) in acute promyelocytic leukemia cells.

  6. Dose limits, constraints, reference levels. What does it mean for radiation protection?; Grenzwerte, Richtwerte, Referenzwerte. Was bedeutet das fuer den Strahlenschutz

    Breckow, J. [Technische Hochschule Mittelhessen (THM), Giessen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz (IMPS)

    2016-07-01

    The established concept of radiation protection with its basic principles justification, optimization, and limitation has proved its value and is going to be continued. In its deeper meaning, however, the concept is rather subtle and complex. Furthermore, in some aspects there remain some breaches or inconsistencies. This is just true for the terms dose limit, reference lever, and constraint that are tightly associated with the radiation protection principles. In order to guarantee the ability of radiation protection in whole extent, the subtle differences of meaning have to be communicated. There is a permanent need to defend the conceptual function of these terms against deliberate or undeliberate misinterpretations. Reference levels are definitely not the same as dose limits and they may not be misused as such. Any attempt to misinterpret fundamental radiation protection principles for selfish purposes should discouraged vigorously.

  7. The metabolic response of P. putida KT2442 producing high levels of polyhydroxyalkanoate under single- and multiple-nutrient-limited growth: Highlights from a multi-level omics approach

    Poblete-Castro Ignacio

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas putida KT2442 is a natural producer of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs, which can substitute petroleum-based non-renewable plastics and form the basis for the production of tailor-made biopolymers. However, despite the substantial body of work on PHA production by P. putida strains, it is not yet clear how the bacterium re-arranges its whole metabolism when it senses the limitation of nitrogen and the excess of fatty acids as carbon source, to result in a large accumulation of PHAs within the cell. In the present study we investigated the metabolic response of KT2442 using a systems biology approach to highlight the differences between single- and multiple-nutrient-limited growth in chemostat cultures. Results We found that 26, 62, and 81% of the cell dry weight consist of PHA under conditions of carbon, dual, and nitrogen limitation, respectively. Under nitrogen limitation a specific PHA production rate of 0.43 (g·(g·h-1 was obtained. The residual biomass was not constant for dual- and strict nitrogen-limiting growth, showing a different feature in comparison to other P. putida strains. Dual limitation resulted in patterns of gene expression, protein level, and metabolite concentrations that substantially differ from those observed under exclusive carbon or nitrogen limitation. The most pronounced differences were found in the energy metabolism, fatty acid metabolism, as well as stress proteins and enzymes belonging to the transport system. Conclusion This is the first study where the interrelationship between nutrient limitations and PHA synthesis has been investigated under well-controlled conditions using a system level approach. The knowledge generated will be of great assistance for the development of bioprocesses and further metabolic engineering work in this versatile organism to both enhance and diversify the industrial production of PHAs.

  8. RMP Guidance for Chemical Distributors - Chapter 2: Applicability of Program Levels

    Identify the necessary actions for compliance once it is decided that one or more processes are subject to OSHA PSM or prevention regulation. Requirements differ based on the potential for public impacts and the level of effort needed to prevent accidents.

  9. 78 FR 52116 - Request for Public Comment on a Review Level Alternative Dispute Resolution Program

    2013-08-22

    .... Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (``OSHA'') at the trial level before an... and voluntary procedures to promote case settlement. Under the program, an administrative law judge acts as a settlement judge and oversees the ADR process. If a case does not settle, an administrative...

  10. Effectiveness of enforcement levels of speed limit and drink driving laws and associated factors – Exploratory empirical analysis using a bivariate ordered probit model

    Behram Wali

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The contemporary traffic safety research comprises little information on quantifying the simultaneous association between drink driving and speeding among fatally injured drivers. Potential correlation between driver's drink driving and speeding behavior poses a substantial methodological concern which needs investigation. This study therefore focused on investigating the simultaneous impact of socioeconomic factors, fatalities, vehicle ownership, health services and highway agency road safety policies on enforcement levels of speed limit and drink driving laws. The effectiveness of enforcement levels of speed limit and drink driving laws has been investigated through development of bivariate ordered probit model using data extricated from WHO's global status report on road safety in 2013. The consistent and intuitive parameter estimates along with statistically significant correlation between response outcomes validates the statistical supremacy of bivariate ordered probit model. The results revealed that fatalities per thousand registered vehicles, hospital beds per hundred thousand population and road safety policies are associated with a likely medium or high effectiveness of enforcement levels of speed limit and drink driving laws, respectively. Also, the model encapsulates the effect of several other agency related variables and socio-economic status on the response outcomes. Marginal effects are reported for analyzing the impact of such factors on intermediate categories of response outcomes. The results of this study are expected to provide necessary insights to elemental enforcement programs. Also, marginal effects of explanatory variables may provide useful directions for formulating effective policy countermeasures for overcoming driver's speeding and drink driving behavior.

  11. An assessment of racial differences in the upper limits of normal ALT levels in children and the effect of obesity on elevated values.

    Kliethermes, S; Ma, M; Purtell, C; Balasubramanian, N; Gonzalez, B; Layden, T J; Cotler, S J

    2017-10-01

    Childhood obesity is a risk factor for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and poses important public health issues for children. Racial differences in alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels among children have not been described. This study aimed to identify racial differences in upper limit normal (ULN) ALT levels and evaluate the effect of obesity on elevated levels in children without other metabolic risk factors. National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys and clinical data from the Loyola University Health System were used to determine ULN ALT by race and gender. Quantile regression was used to evaluate the impact of obesity on elevated ALT and to identify potential risk factors for ALT above the ULN. Upper limit normal (ULN) ALT was approximately 28.0 and 21.0-24.0 U/L for boys and girls, respectively. No significant difference in ULN ALT across race was observed. Obesity was significantly associated with elevated ALT; obese children with elevated ALT had values 10 U/L higher than normal-weight children. Racial differences in ALT levels among adults are not evident in children. Obesity, in the absence of metabolic risk factors and other causes of liver disease, is associated with elevated ALT, providing evidence against the concept of healthy obesity in children. © 2016 World Obesity Federation.

  12. Energy Level Statistics of SO(5) Limit of Super-symmetry U(6/4) in Interacting Boson-Fermion Model

    Bai Hongbo; Zhang Jinfu; Zhou Xianrong

    2005-01-01

    We study the energy level statistics of the SO(5) limit of super-symmetry U(6/4) in odd-A nucleus using the interacting boson-fermion model. The nearest neighbor spacing distribution (NSD) and the spectral rigidity (Δ 3 ) are investigated, and the factors that affect the properties of level statistics are also discussed. The results show that the boson number N is a dominant factor. If N is small, both the interaction strengths of subgroups SO B (5) and SO BF (5) and the spin play important roles in the energy level statistics, however, along with the increase of N, the statistics distribution would tend to be in Poisson form.

  13. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) serum basal levels is not affected by power training in mobility-limited older adults - A randomized controlled trial.

    Hvid, L G; Nielsen, M K F; Simonsen, C; Andersen, M; Caserotti, P

    2017-07-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a potential important factor involved in neuroplasticity, and may be a mediator for eliciting adaptations in neuromuscular function and physical function in older individuals following physical training. As power training taxes the neural system to a very high extent, it may be particularly effective in terms of eliciting increases in systemic BDNF levels. We examined the effects of 12weeks of power training on mature BDNF (mBDNF) and total BDNF (tBDNF) in mobility-limited older adults from the Healthy Ageing Network of Competence (HANC) study. We included 47 older men and women: n=22 in the training group (TG: progressive high intensity power training, 2 sessions per week; age 82.7±5.4years, 55% women) and n=25 in the control group (CG: no interventions; age 82.2±4.5years, 76% women). Following overnight fasting, basal serum levels of mBDNF and tBDNF were assessed (human ELISA kits) at baseline and post-intervention. At baseline, mBDNF and tBDNF levels were comparable in the two groups, TG and CG. Post-intervention, no significant within-group or between-group changes were observed in mBDNF or tBDNF. Moreover, when divided into responder tertiles based upon changes in mBDNF and tBDNF (i.e. decliners, maintainers, improvers), respectively, comparable findings were observed for TG and CG. Altogether, basal systemic levels of serum mBDNF and tBDNF are not affected in mobility-limited older adults following 12-weeks of power training, and do not appear to be a major mechanistic factor mediating neuroplasticity in mobility-limited older adults. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Paleoclimatological context and reference level of the 2°C and 1.5°C Paris Agreement long-term temperature limits

    Lüning, Sebastian; Vahrenholt, Fritz

    2017-12-01

    The Paris Agreement adopted in December 2015 during the COP21 conference stipulates that the increase in the global average temperature is to be kept well below 2°C above “pre-industrial levels” and that efforts are pursued to limit the temperature increase to 1.5°C above “pre-industrial levels”. In order to further increase public acceptance of these limits it is important to transparently place the target levels and their baselines in a paleoclimatic context of the past 150,000 years (Last Interglacial, LIG) and in particular of the last 10,000 years (Holocene; Present Interglacial, PIG). Intense paleoclimatological research of the past decade has firmed up that pre-industrial temperatures have been highly variable which needs to be reflected in the pre-industrial climate baseline definitions. The currently used reference level 1850-1900 represents the end of the Little Ice Age (LIA).The LIA represents the coldest phase of the last 10,000 years when mean temperatures deviated strongly negatively from the Holocene average and which therefore are hard to justify as a representative pre-industrial baseline. The temperature level reached during the interval 1940-1970 may serve as a better reference level as it appears to roughly correspond to the average pre-industrial temperature of the past two millennia. Placing the climate limits in an enlarged paleoclimatic context will help to demonstrate that the chosen climate targets are valid and represent dangerous extremes of the known natural range of Holocene temperature variability.

  15. Change in Vitamin D Levels Occurs Early after Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation and Depends on Treatment Regimen in Resource-Limited Settings

    Havers, Fiona P.; Detrick, Barbara; Cardoso, Sandra W.; Berendes, Sima; Lama, Javier R.; Sugandhavesa, Patcharaphan; Mwelase, Noluthando H.; Campbell, Thomas B.; Gupta, Amita

    2014-01-01

    Study Background Vitamin D has wide-ranging effects on the immune system, and studies suggest that low serum vitamin D levels are associated with worse clinical outcomes in HIV. Recent studies have identified an interaction between antiretrovirals used to treat HIV and reduced serum vitamin D levels, but these studies have been done in North American and European populations. Methods Using a prospective cohort study design nested in a multinational clinical trial, we examined the effect of three combination antiretroviral (cART) regimens on serum vitamin D levels in 270 cART-naïve, HIV-infected adults in nine diverse countries, (Brazil, Haiti, Peru, Thailand, India, Malawi, South Africa, Zimbabwe and the United States). We evaluated the change between baseline serum vitamin D levels and vitamin D levels 24 and 48 weeks after cART initiation. Results Serum vitamin D levels decreased significantly from baseline to 24 weeks among those randomized to efavirenz/lamivudine/zidovudine (mean change: −7.94 [95% Confidence Interval (CI) −10.42, −5.54] ng/ml) and efavirenz/emtricitabine/tenofovir-DF (mean change: −6.66 [95% CI −9.40, −3.92] ng/ml) when compared to those randomized to atazanavir/emtricitabine/didanosine-EC (mean change: −2.29 [95% CI –4.83, 0.25] ng/ml). Vitamin D levels did not change significantly between week 24 and 48. Other factors that significantly affected serum vitamin D change included country (p<0.001), season (p<0.001) and baseline vitamin D level (p<0.001). Conclusion Efavirenz-containing cART regimens adversely affected vitamin D levels in patients from economically, geographically and racially diverse resource-limited settings. This effect was most pronounced early after cART initiation. Research is needed to define the role of Vitamin D supplementation in HIV care. PMID:24752177

  16. Limited copy number-high resolution melting (LCN-HRM) enables the detection and identification by sequencing of low level mutations in cancer biopsies.

    Do, Hongdo; Dobrovic, Alexander

    2009-10-08

    Mutation detection in clinical tumour samples is challenging when the proportion of tumour cells, and thus mutant alleles, is low. The limited sensitivity of conventional sequencing necessitates the adoption of more sensitive approaches. High resolution melting (HRM) is more sensitive than sequencing but identification of the mutation is desirable, particularly when it is important to discriminate false positives due to PCR errors or template degradation from true mutations.We thus developed limited copy number - high resolution melting (LCN-HRM) which applies limiting dilution to HRM. Multiple replicate reactions with a limited number of target sequences per reaction allow low level mutations to be detected. The dilutions used (based on Ct values) are chosen such that mutations, if present, can be detected by the direct sequencing of amplicons with aberrant melting patterns. Using cell lines heterozygous for mutations, we found that the mutations were not readily detected when they comprised 10% of total alleles (20% tumour cells) by sequencing, whereas they were readily detectable at 5% total alleles by standard HRM. LCN-HRM allowed these mutations to be identified by direct sequencing of those positive reactions.LCN-HRM was then used to review formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) clinical samples showing discordant findings between sequencing and HRM for KRAS exon 2 and EGFR exons 19 and 21. Both true mutations present at low levels and sequence changes due to artefacts were detected by LCN-HRM. The use of high fidelity polymerases showed that the majority of the artefacts were derived from the damaged template rather than replication errors during amplification. LCN-HRM bridges the sensitivity gap between HRM and sequencing and is effective in distinguishing between artefacts and true mutations.

  17. Agricultural Education and OSHA

    Brown, Ronald A.

    1974-01-01

    Agriculture teachers should be interested in and become familiar with the implications of the Williams-Steiger Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 for their own benefit, for their students, and for their students' future employers. (AG)

  18. Airborne isocyanate exposures in the collision repair industry and a comparison to occupational exposure limits.

    Reeb-Whitaker, Carolyn; Whittaker, Stephen G; Ceballos, Diana M; Weiland, Elisa C; Flack, Sheila L; Fent, Kenneth W; Thomasen, Jennifer M; Trelles Gaines, Linda G; Nylander-French, Leena A

    2012-01-01

    Isocyanate exposure was evaluated in 33 spray painters from 25 Washington State autobody shops. Personal breathing zone samples (n = 228) were analyzed for isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) monomer, 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) monomer, IPDI polyisocyanate, and three polyisocyanate forms of HDI. The objective was to describe exposures to isocyanates while spray painting, compare them with short-term exposure limits (STELs), and describe the isocyanate composition in the samples. The composition of polyisocyanates (IPDI and HDI) in the samples varied greatly, with maximum amounts ranging from up to 58% for HDI biuret to 96% for HDI isocyanurate. There was a significant inverse relationship between the percentage composition of HDI isocyanurate to IPDI and to HDI uretdione. Two 15-min STELs were compared: (1) Oregon's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OR-OSHA) STEL of 1000 μg/m(3) for HDI polyisocyanate, and (2) the United Kingdom's Health and Safety Executive (UK-HSE) STEL of 70 μg NCO/m(3) for all isocyanates. Eighty percent of samples containing HDI polyisocyanate exceeded the OR-OSHA STEL while 98% of samples exceeded the UK-HSE STEL. The majority of painters (67%) wore half-face air-purifying respirators while spray painting. Using the OR-OSHA and the UK-HSE STELs as benchmarks, 21% and 67% of painters, respectively, had at least one exposure that exceeded the respirator's OSHA-assigned protection factor. A critical review of the STELs revealed the following limitations: (1) the OR-OSHA STEL does not include all polyisocyanates, and (2) the UK-HSE STEL is derived from monomeric isocyanates, whereas the species present in typical spray coatings are polyisocyanates. In conclusion, the variable mixtures of isocyanates used by autobody painters suggest that an occupational exposure limit is required that includes all polyisocyanates. Despite the limitations of the STELs, we determined that a respirator with an assigned protection factor of 25 or

  19. Critical levels and loads of atmospheric pollutants for terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The emergence of a scientific concept. Application potentials and their limits

    Landmann, G.

    1993-01-01

    The 'critical loads and levels' are defined as the highest atmospheric deposition rate or concentration of a gaseous pollutant, respectively, that will not cause harmful effects on sensitive elements of an ecosystem. The recent emergence of the concept of critical loads and levels is described, from the first explicit mention in 1986 to the production of the first European maps in 1991. The difficulties linked to the definition of the concept and to its english-derived terminology are discussed. The main approaches used for assessing critical loads and levels are briefly described. Important research is developed under the auspices of the Convention of Geneva (Long Range Transboundary Air Pollution Transport, UN-ECE), arising from intensive studies which have been carried out on the effects of air pollution on terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems for the past ten or fifteen years. Current knowledge is summarized, as well as the remaining gaps (and questions) which hinder the calculation of the critical thresholds. Finally, beyond the fundamental relevance of this scientifically sound and easily understood concept, its limits are pointed out. In brief, the 'critical loads and levels' concept is attractive and motivating to many scientists: it implies to apply an integrated and finalized approach, favors the prospecting of poorly known ecosystems and regions, and represents an interesting interface with decision makers

  20. Correlation of cardiac Troponin I levels (10 folds upper limit of normal) and extent of coronary artery disease in Non-ST elevation myocardial infarction

    Qadir, F.; Khan, M.; Hanif, B.; Lakhani, S.L.; Farooq, S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To determine the correlation of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) 10 folds upper limit of normal (ULN) and extent of coronary artery disease (CAD) in Non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 230 consecutive NSTEMI patients admitted in Tabba Heart Institute, Karachi between April to December 2008. cTnI was measured using MEIA method. All patients underwent coronary angiography in the index hospitalization. Stenosis > 70% in any of the three major epicardial vessels was considered significant CAD. Extent of CAD was defined as significant single, two or three vessel CAD. Chi-square test was applied to test the association between cTnI levels and CAD extent. Results: Out of 230 patients, in 111 patients with cTnI levels 10 folds ULN, 23(19.3%) had single vessel, 37(31.1 %) had two vessel and 55(46.2%) had three vessel significant CAD. The results suggest that there was an insignificant association between the cTnI levels and single vessel, two vessel and the overall CAD extent (p= 0.35, p= 0.21 and p= 0.13 respectively), however there was a statistically significant association between the cTnI levels and three vessel CAD (p < 0.04). Conclusion: Higher cTnI levels are associated with an increased proportion of severe three vessel CAD involvement. Prompt identification and referral of this patient subset to early revascularization strategies would improve clinical outcomes. (author)

  1. Higher Levels of Caregiver Strain Perceived by Indian Mothers of Children and Young Adults with Cerebral Palsy Who have Limited Self-Mobility.

    Prakash, V; Patel, Anjali M; Hariohm, K; Palisano, Robert J

    2017-02-01

    Describe and compare the caregiver strain experienced among Indian mothers of children and young adults with cerebral palsy (CP) living in low resource settings. 62 consecutive children and young adults with spastic CP (mean age 6.0 ± 4.5, range 2-21) and their parents were recruited from an outpatient physiotherapy department for this cross-sectional study. Ability to walk was classified using the Gross Motor Function Classification System and mother's caregiver strain was measured using caregiver strain index (CSI). Mothers of children and young adults who have limited self-mobility perceived higher caregiver strain (mean CSI score 12.0 ± 1.3, p < 0.05) than mothers of children who can walk (mean CSI score 4.5 ± 3.0, p < 0.05). All 46 mothers of children and youth in GMFCS levels IV and V reported high levels of caregiver stress compared with only three of 16 mothers of children and youth who walk (levels I and II). Physiotherapists and occupational therapists serving children and youth with CP are encouraged to partner with families to identify goals for ease of caregiving, activity, and participation at home and in the community.

  2. Using a Bayesian Probabilistic Forecasting Model to Analyze the Uncertainty in Real-Time Dynamic Control of the Flood Limiting Water Level for Reservoir Operation

    Liu, Dedi; Li, Xiang; Guo, Shenglian

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic control of the flood limiting water level (FLWL) is a valuable and effective way to maximize the benefits from reservoir operation without exceeding the design risk. In order to analyze the impacts of input uncertainty, a Bayesian forecasting system (BFS) is adopted. Applying quantile water...... inflow values and their uncertainties obtained from the BFS, the reservoir operation results from different schemes can be analyzed in terms of benefits, dam safety, and downstream impacts during the flood season. When the reservoir FLWL dynamic control operation is implemented, there are two fundamental......, also deterministic water inflow was tested. The proposed model in the paper emphasizes the importance of analyzing the uncertainties of the water inflow forecasting system for real-time dynamic control of the FLWL for reservoir operation. For the case study, the selected quantile inflow from...

  3. Contrasting levels of heavy metals in the feathers of urban pigeons from close habitats suggest limited movements at a restricted scale

    Frantz, Adrien; Pottier, Marie-Anne; Karimi, Battle; Corbel, Hélène; Aubry, Emmanuel; Haussy, Claudy; Gasparini, Julien; Castrec-Rouelle, Maryse

    2012-01-01

    Despite restrictions in emissions, heavy metals may remain a major environmental issue due to their numerous sources and their persistence. Here, we assessed current levels of 4 metals (Copper, Cadmium, Lead, Zinc) in the feathers of 91 feral pigeons (Columba livia) from 7 sites in the urbanized region of Paris. Elements were detected in all pigeons, indicating that metals persist in urbanized areas. The ratio between metal concentrations in the feathers vs. in the environment calculated using data from other studies was 2–90 times higher for cadmium than for other metals, underlying its ecological importance. Concentrations in the feathers depended on locality, suggesting that pigeons remain in local habitats at this restricted scale, as expected from previous observations. Overall, our study suggests that urban feral pigeons may represent a good model system for metal biomonitoring. Highlights: ► We measured the concentrations of 4 heavy metals in pigeon feathers through Paris. ► Cadmium, Copper, Lead and Zinc were present in pigeons from all 7 sites. ► Metals thus still persist in the city though their emissions have been reduced. ► Metal concentrations in the feathers depended on the local origin of the pigeons. ► These differences suggest limited pigeon movements at a very restricted scale. - Concentrations of metals in the feathers of Parisian feral pigeons (Columba livia) strongly differ at a restricted spatial scale, suggesting limited movements in urban areas.

  4. Pulsed versus continuous wave low-level light therapy on osteoarticular signs and symptoms in limited scleroderma (CREST syndrome): a case report

    Barolet, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    Limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis (lcSSc) was formerly known as CREST syndrome in reference to the associated clinical features: calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dysfunction, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasias. The transforming growth factor beta has been identified as a major player in the pathogenic process, where low-level light therapy (LLLT) has been shown to modulate this cytokine superfamily. This case study was conducted to assess the efficacy of 940 nm using millisecond pulsing and continuous wave (CW) modes on osteoarticular signs and symptoms associated with lcSSc. The patient was treated two to three times a week for 13 weeks using a sequential pulsing mode on one elbow and a CW mode on the other. Efficacy assessments included inflammation, symptoms, pain, health scales, patient satisfaction, clinical global impression, and adverse effects monitoring. Considerable functional and morphologic improvements were observed after LLLT, with the best results seen with the pulsing mode. No adverse effects were noted. Pulsed LLLT represents a treatment alternative for osteoarticular signs and symptoms in limited scleroderma (CREST syndrome).

  5. Low reproductive isolation and highly variable levels of gene flow reveal limited progress towards speciation between European river and brook lampreys.

    Rougemont, Q; Gaigher, A; Lasne, E; Côte, J; Coke, M; Besnard, A-L; Launey, S; Evanno, G

    2015-12-01

    Ecologically based divergent selection is a factor that could drive reproductive isolation even in the presence of gene flow. Population pairs arrayed along a continuum of divergence provide a good opportunity to address this issue. Here, we used a combination of mating trials, experimental crosses and population genetic analyses to investigate the evolution of reproductive isolation between two closely related species of lampreys with distinct life histories. We used microsatellite markers to genotype over 1000 individuals of the migratory parasitic river lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) and freshwater-resident nonparasitic brook lamprey (Lampetra planeri) distributed in 10 sympatric and parapatric population pairs in France. Mating trials, parentage analyses and artificial fertilizations demonstrated a low level of reproductive isolation between species even though size-assortative mating may contribute to isolation. Most parapatric population pairs were strongly differentiated due to the joint effects of geographic distance and barriers to migration. In contrast, we found variable levels of gene flow between sympatric populations ranging from panmixia to moderate differentiation, which indicates a gradient of divergence with some population pairs that may correspond to alternative morphs or ecotypes of a single species and others that remain partially isolated. Ecologically based divergent selection may explain these variable levels of divergence among sympatric population pairs, but incomplete genome swamping following secondary contact could have also played a role. Overall, this study illustrates how highly differentiated phenotypes can be maintained despite high levels of gene flow that limit the progress towards speciation. © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  6. Quantification of 226Ra at environmental relevant levels in natural waters by ICP-MS: Optimization, validation and limitations of an extraction and preconcentration approach.

    Lagacé, François; Foucher, Delphine; Surette, Céline; Clarisse, Olivier

    2017-05-15

    Radium (Ra) at environmental relevant levels in natural waters was determined by ICP-MS after an off-line pre-concentration procedure. The latter consisted of Ra selective elution from potential interfering elements (i.e. other alkaline earth cations: Ba 2+ , Sr 2+ , Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ ) on a series of two different ion exchange resins (AG50W-X8 and Sr-resin). The overall analytical method was optimized according to the instrumental performance, the volume of water sample loaded on resins, and the sample salinity. Longer acquisition time (up to 150 s) was required to ensure stable measurement of Ra by ICP-MS at ultra trace level (1.0pgL -1 ). For a synthetic groundwater spiked with Ra at 10.0pgL -1 , the analytical procedure demonstrated efficient separation of the analyte from its potential interfering elements and a complete recovery, independent of the sample volume tested from 10 up to 100mL. For synthetic seawater spiked at a level of 10.0pgL -1 of Ra, the total load of salts on the two resins should not exceed 0.35g in order to ensure a complete separation and recovery of Ra. The method was validated on natural waters (i.e. groundwater, freshwater and seawater samples) spiked with Ra at different levels (0.0, 0.5, 1.0 and 5.0pgL -1 ). Absolute Ra detection limits were determined at 0.020pgL -1 (0.73mBqL -1 ) and 0.12pgL -1 (4.4mBqL -1 ) respectively for 60.0mL of freshwater sample and for 10.0mL of seawater. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of limit feeding varying levels of distillers dried grains with solubles in non-feed-withdrawal molt programs for laying hens.

    Mejia, L; Meyer, E T; Studer, D L; Utterback, P L; Utterback, C W; Parsons, C M; Koelkebeck, K W

    2011-02-01

    An experiment was conducted with 672 Hy-Line W-36 Single Comb White Leghorn hens (69 wk of age) to evaluate the effects of feeding varying levels of corn distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) with corn, wheat middlings, and soybean hulls on long-term laying hen postmolt performance. The control molt treatment consisted of a 47% corn:47% soybean hulls (C:SH) diet fed ad libitum for 28 d. Hens fed the other 7 treatments were limit fed 65 g/hen per day for 16 d, and then fed 55 g/hen per day for 12 d. Hens on treatments 2 and 3 were fed 49% C:35% wheat middlings (WM) or SH:10% DDGS diets (C:WM:10DDGS, C:SH:10DDGS). Hens on treatments 4 and 5 were fed 49% C:25% WM or SH:20% DDGS diets (C:WM:20DDGS, C:SH:20DDGS). Those on treatments 6 and 7 were fed 47% C:47% DDGS (C:DDGS) or 47% WM:47% DDGS (WM:DDGS) diets. Those on treatment 8 were fed a 94% DDGS diet. At 28 d, all hens were fed a corn-soybean meal layer diet (16% CP) and production performance was measured for 36 wk. None of the hens fed the molt diets went completely out of production, and only the C:SH and C:SH:10DDGS molt diets decreased hen-day egg production to below 5% by wk 4 of the molt period. Postmolt egg production was lowest (P 0.05) in egg weights were detected among treatments throughout the postmolt period. In addition, no consistent differences were observed among treatments for egg mass throughout the postmolt period. Overall results of this study indicated that limit feeding diets containing DDGS at levels of 65 or 55 g/hen per day during the molt period did not cause hens to totally cease egg production.

  8. The levels of heavy metals in water and all aquatic in Ismailia canal, (Egypt) compared with the international permissible limits and accumulative studies for these metals in biota

    Saleh, H.M.; Moloukhia, H.; Belacy, N.; Abd El-Rahman, G.A.

    2011-01-01

    The concentration of Pb, Cd, Cu, Zu, Ni, Fe and Mn were determined in water, and in different organs of fishes, bivalves, snails and plants in Ismailia canal, Egypt. Moreover, accumulation of the investigated heavy metals by aquatic biota in Ismailia canal and the concentration factor values for this accumulation were calculated to qualify the degree of pollution and compare these levels with the international permissible limits. Results showed that Pb, Cd, Cu and Zn were exceeded the permissible limits especially in the industrial area of Abu- Zaabal, Kalubia governorate. The relative order of heavy metal levels in the canal water was: Fe>Mn>Pb>Zn>Ni>Cd>Cu.Accumulation of heavy metals by the aquatic biota was determined. The accumulation of heavy metals by common snails, namely physa acuta and biomphalaria alexandrina and the bivalve oyster Caelatura (caelatura) companyoi was found mainly in the edible parts (soft parts), whereas, the accumulation by their shells, which are mainly formed of calcium carbonate was via adsorption and surface complexation, since all the accumulated heavy metals were released by adding 0.1 M HCl for few minutes . Moreover, accumulation of heavy metals by common plants namely water hyacinth plant (Eichhornia crassipes) and freshwater weeds were determined. It was found that the accumulation of heavy metals was higher in roots than in leaves. On the other hand, the accumulation of heavy metals by common fish namely, Oreochromis niloticus (Nile Tilapia) was measured in its organs : muscles, liver, gills and gonads. It was found that there is variation of distribution of heavy metals among fish organs. Since the high accumulation of heavy metals among the investigated biota, they can be used as biological indicator for pollution of heavy metals in aquatic ecosystem . The average values and standard deviation for all measurements were determined. Data obtained were compared with the permissible concentrations of the environmental protection

  9. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) serum basal levels is not affected by power training in mobility-limited older adults - A randomized controlled trial

    Hvid, Lars G; Nielsen, Martin KF; Simonsen, Casper

    2017-01-01

    high extent, it may be particularly effective in terms of eliciting increases in systemic BDNF levels. We examined the effects of 12 weeks of power training on mature BDNF (mBDNF) and total BDNF (tBDNF) in mobility-limited older adults from the Healthy Ageing Network of Competence (HANC) study. We......Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a potential important factor involved in neuroplasticity, and may be a mediator for eliciting adaptations in neuromuscular function and physical function in older individuals following physical training. As power training taxes the neural system to a very...... included 47 older men and women: n = 22 in the training group (TG: progressive high intensity power training, 2 sessions per week; age 82.7 ± 5.4 years, 55% women) and n = 25 in the control group (CG: no interventions; age 82.2 ± 4.5 years, 76% women). Following overnight fasting, basal serum levels of m...

  10. Multiple-level stakeholder engagement in malaria clinical trials: addressing the challenges of conducting clinical research in resource-limited settings.

    Mtove, George; Kimani, Joshua; Kisinza, William; Makenga, Geofrey; Mangesho, Peter; Duparc, Stephan; Nakalembe, Miriam; Phiri, Kamija S; Orrico, Russell; Rojo, Ricardo; Vandenbroucke, Pol

    2018-03-22

    Multinational clinical trials are logistically complex and require close coordination between various stakeholders. They must comply with global clinical standards and are accountable to multiple regulatory and ethical bodies. In resource-limited settings, it is challenging to understand how to apply global clinical standards to international, national, and local factors in clinical trials, making multiple-level stakeholder engagement an important element in the successful conduct of these clinical trials. During the planning and implementation of a large multinational clinical trial for intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy in resource-limited areas of sub-Saharan Africa, we encountered numerous challenges, which required implementation of a range of engagement measures to ensure compliance with global clinical and regulatory standards. These challenges included coordination with ongoing global malaria efforts, heterogeneity in national regulatory structures, sub-optimal healthcare infrastructure, local practices and beliefs, and perspectives that view healthcare providers with undue trust or suspicion. In addition to engagement with international bodies, such as the World Health Organization, the Malaria in Pregnancy Consortium, the Steve Biko Centre for Bioethics, and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, in order to address the challenges just described, Pfizer Inc. and Medicines for Malaria Venture (the "Sponsoring Entities" for these studies) and investigators liaised with national- and district-level stakeholders such as health ministers and regional/local community health workers. Community engagement measures undertaken by investigators included local meetings with community leaders to explain the research aims and answer questions and concerns voiced by the community. The investigators also engaged with family members of prospective trial participants in order to be sensitive to local practices and beliefs. Engagement

  11. Centrobin-mediated Regulation of the Centrosomal Protein 4.1-associated Protein (CPAP) Level Limits Centriole Length during Elongation Stage*

    Gudi, Radhika; Haycraft, Courtney J.; Bell, P. Darwin; Li, Zihai; Vasu, Chenthamarakshan

    2015-01-01

    Microtubule-based centrioles in the centrosome mediate accurate bipolar cell division, spindle orientation, and primary cilia formation. Cellular checkpoints ensure that the centrioles duplicate only once in every cell cycle and achieve precise dimensions, dysregulation of which results in genetic instability and neuro- and ciliopathies. The normal cellular level of centrosomal protein 4.1-associated protein (CPAP), achieved by its degradation at mitosis, is considered as one of the major mechanisms that limits centriole growth at a predetermined length. Here we show that CPAP levels and centriole elongation are regulated by centrobin. Exogenous expression of centrobin causes abnormal elongation of centrioles due to massive accumulation of CPAP in the cell. Conversely, CPAP was undetectable in centrobin-depleted cells, suggesting that it undergoes degradation in the absence of centrobin. Only the reintroduction of full-length centrobin, but not its mutant form that lacks the CPAP binding site, could restore cellular CPAP levels in centrobin-depleted cells, indicating that persistence of CPAP requires its interaction with centrobin. Interestingly, inhibition of the proteasome in centrobin-depleted cells restored the cellular and centriolar CPAP expression, suggesting its ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation when centrobin is absent. Intriguingly, however, centrobin-overexpressing cells also showed proteasome-independent accumulation of ubiquitinated CPAP and abnormal, ubiquitin-positive, elongated centrioles. Overall, our results show that centrobin interacts with ubiquitinated CPAP and prevents its degradation for normal centriole elongation function. Therefore, it appears that loss of centrobin expression destabilizes CPAP and triggers its degradation to restrict the centriole length during biogenesis. PMID:25616662

  12. Phenylalanine and tyrosine levels are rate-limiting factors in production of health promoting metabolites in Vitis vinifera cv. Gamay Red cell suspension.

    Manela, Neta; Oliva, Moran; Ovadia, Rinat; Sikron-Persi, Noga; Ayenew, Biruk; Fait, Aaron; Galili, Gad; Perl, Avichai; Weiss, David; Oren-Shamir, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Environmental stresses such as high light intensity and temperature cause induction of the shikimate pathway, aromatic amino acids (AAA) pathways, and of pathways downstream from AAAs. The induction leads to production of specialized metabolites that protect the cells from oxidative damage. The regulation of the diverse AAA derived pathways is still not well understood. To gain insight on that regulation, we increased AAA production in red grape Vitis vinifera cv. Gamay Red cell suspension, without inducing external stress on the cells, and characterized the metabolic effect of this induction. Increased AAA production was achieved by expressing a feedback-insensitive bacterial form of 3-deoxy- D-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase enzyme (AroG (*)) of the shikimate pathway under a constitutive promoter. The presence of AroG(*) protein led to elevated levels of primary metabolites in the shikimate and AAA pathways including phenylalanine and tyrosine, and to a dramatic increase in phenylpropanoids. The AroG (*) transformed lines accumulated up to 20 and 150 fold higher levels of resveratrol and dihydroquercetin, respectively. Quercetin, formed from dihydroquercetin, and resveratrol, are health promoting metabolites that are induced due to environmental stresses. Testing the expression level of key genes along the stilbenoids, benzenoids, and phenylpropanoid pathways showed that transcription was not affected by AroG (*). This suggests that concentrations of AAAs, and of phenylalanine in particular, are rate-limiting in production of these metabolites. In contrast, increased phenylalanine production did not lead to elevated concentrations of anthocyanins, even though they are also phenylpropanoid metabolites. This suggests a control mechanism of this pathway that is independent of AAA concentration. Interestingly, total anthocyanin concentrations were slightly lower in AroG(*) cells, and the relative frequencies of the different anthocyanins changed as well.

  13. Phenylalanine and tyrosine levels are rate-limiting factors in production of health promoting metabolites in Vitis vinifera cv. Gamay Red cell suspension

    Neta eManela

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Environmental stresses such as high light intensity and temperature cause induction of the shikimate pathway, aromatic amino acids (AAA pathways, and of pathways downstream from AAAs. The induction leads to production of specialized metabolites that protect the cells from oxidative damage. The regulation of the diverse AAA derived pathways is still not well understood. To gain insight on that regulation, we increased AAA production in red grape Vitis vinifera cv. Gamay Red cell suspension, without inducing external stress on the cells, and characterized the metabolic effect of this induction. Increased AAA production was achieved by expressing a feedback-insensitive bacterial form of 3-deoxy- D-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase enzyme (AroG* of the shikimate pathway under a constitutive promoter. The presence of AroG* protein led to elevated levels of primary metabolites in the shikimate and AAA pathways including phenylalanine and tyrosine, and to a dramatic increase in phenylpropanoids. The AroG* transformed lines accumulated up to 20 and 150 fold higher levels of resveratrol and dihydroquercetin, respectively. Quercetin, formed from dihydroquercetin, and resveratrol, are health promoting metabolites that are induced due to environmental stresses. Testing the expression level of key genes along the stilbenoids, benzenoids and phenylpropanoid pathways showed that transcription was not affected by AroG*. This suggests that concentrations of AAAs, and of phenylalanine in particular, are rate-limiting in production of these metabolites. In contrast, increased phenylalanine production did not lead to elevated concentrations of anthocyanins, even though they are also phenylpropanoid metabolites. This suggests a control mechanism of this pathway that is independent of AAA concentration. Interestingly, total anthocyanin concentrations were slightly lower in AroG* cells, and the relative frequencies of the different anthocyanins changed as

  14. Glyphosate has limited short-term effects on commensal bacterial community composition in the gut environment due to sufficient aromatic amino acid levels.

    Nielsen, Lene Nørby; Roager, Henrik M; Casas, Mònica Escolà; Frandsen, Henrik L; Gosewinkel, Ulrich; Bester, Kai; Licht, Tine Rask; Hendriksen, Niels Bohse; Bahl, Martin Iain

    2018-02-01

    Recently, concerns have been raised that residues of glyphosate-based herbicides may interfere with the homeostasis of the intestinal bacterial community and thereby affect the health of humans or animals. The biochemical pathway for aromatic amino acid synthesis (Shikimate pathway), which is specifically inhibited by glyphosate, is shared by plants and numerous bacterial species. Several in vitro studies have shown that various groups of intestinal bacteria may be differently affected by glyphosate. Here, we present results from an animal exposure trial combining deep 16S rRNA gene sequencing of the bacterial community with liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) based metabolic profiling of aromatic amino acids and their downstream metabolites. We found that glyphosate as well as the commercial formulation Glyfonova ® 450 PLUS administered at up to fifty times the established European Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI = 0.5 mg/kg body weight) had very limited effects on bacterial community composition in Sprague Dawley rats during a two-week exposure trial. The effect of glyphosate on prototrophic bacterial growth was highly dependent on the availability of aromatic amino acids, suggesting that the observed limited effect on bacterial composition was due to the presence of sufficient amounts of aromatic amino acids in the intestinal environment. A strong correlation was observed between intestinal concentrations of glyphosate and intestinal pH, which may partly be explained by an observed reduction in acetic acid produced by the gut bacteria. We conclude that sufficient intestinal levels of aromatic amino acids provided by the diet alleviates the need for bacterial synthesis of aromatic amino acids and thus prevents an antimicrobial effect of glyphosate in vivo. It is however possible that the situation is different in cases of human malnutrition or in production animals. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Limitations of variable number of tandem repeat typing identified through whole genome sequencing of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis on a national and herd level.

    Ahlstrom, Christina; Barkema, Herman W; Stevenson, Karen; Zadoks, Ruth N; Biek, Roman; Kao, Rowland; Trewby, Hannah; Haupstein, Deb; Kelton, David F; Fecteau, Gilles; Labrecque, Olivia; Keefe, Greg P; McKenna, Shawn L B; De Buck, Jeroen

    2015-03-08

    identify closely and distantly related isolates, limiting the applicability of using this typing scheme to study the molecular epidemiology of MAP at a national and herd-level.

  16. Limited predictive value of achieving beneficial plasma (Z)-endoxifen threshold level by CYP2D6 genotyping in tamoxifen-treated Polish women with breast cancer

    Hennig, Ewa E.; Piatkowska, Magdalena; Karczmarski, Jakub; Goryca, Krzysztof; Brewczynska, Elzbieta; Jazwiec, Radoslaw; Kluska, Anna; Omiotek, Robert; Paziewska, Agnieszka; Dadlez, Michal; Ostrowski, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    Tamoxifen, the most frequently used drug for treating estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, must be converted into active metabolites to exert its therapeutic efficacy, mainly through CYP2D6 enzymes. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of CYP2D6 polymorphisms on (Z)-endoxifen-directed tamoxifen metabolism and to assess the usefulness of CYP2D6 genotyping for identifying patients who are likely to have insufficient (Z)-endoxifen concentrations to benefit from standard therapy. Blood samples from 279 Polish women with breast cancer receiving tamoxifen 20 mg daily were analyzed for CYP2D6 genotype and drug metabolite concentration. Steady-state plasma levels of tamoxifen and its 14 metabolites were measured by using the ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method. In nearly 60 % of patients, including over 30 % of patients with fully functional CYP2D6, (Z)-endoxifen concentration was below the predefined threshold of therapeutic efficacy. The most frequently observed CYP2D6 genotype was EM/PM (34.8 %), among which 83.5 % of patients had a combination of wild-type and *4 alleles. Plasma concentration of five metabolites was significantly correlated with CYP2D6 genotype. For the first time, we identified an association between decreased (E/Z)-4-OH-N-desmethyl-tamoxifen-β-D-glucuronide levels (r 2 = 0.23; p < 10 −16 ) and increased CYP2D6 functional impairment. The strongest correlation was observed for (Z)-endoxifen, whose concentration was significantly lower in groups of patients carrying at least one CYP2D6 null allele, compared with EM/EM patients. The CYP2D6 genotype accounted for plasma level variability of (Z)-endoxifen by 27 % (p < 10 −16 ) and for the variability of metabolic ratio indicating (Z)-endoxifen-directed metabolism of tamoxifen by 51 % (p < 10 −43 ). The majority of breast cancer patients in Poland may not achieve a therapeutic level of (Z)-endoxifen upon receiving a standard

  17. The Strain Index (SI) and Threshold Limit Value (TLV) for Hand Activity Level (HAL): risk of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in a prospective cohort.

    Garg, A; Kapellusch, J; Hegmann, K; Wertsch, J; Merryweather, A; Deckow-Schaefer, G; Malloy, E J

    2012-01-01

    A cohort of 536 workers was enrolled from 10 diverse manufacturing facilities and was followed monthly for six years. Job physical exposures were individually measured. Worker demographics, medical history, psychosocial factors, current musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) and nerve conduction studies (NCS) were obtained. Point and lifetime prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) at baseline (symptoms + abnormal NCS) were 10.3% and 19.8%. During follow-up, there were 35 new CTS cases (left, right or both hands). Factors predicting development of CTS included: job physical exposure (American conference of governmental industrial hygienists Threshold Limit Value (ACGIH TLV) for Hand Activity Level (HAL) and the Strain Index (SI)), age, BMI, other MSDs, inflammatory arthritis, gardening outside of work and feelings of depression. In the adjusted models, the TLV for HAL and the SI were both significant per unit increase in exposure with hazard ratios (HR) increasing up to a maximum of 5.4 (p = 0.05) and 5.3 (p = 0.03), respectively; however, similar to other reports, both suggested lower risk at higher exposures. Data suggest that the TLV for HAL and the SI are useful metrics for estimating exposure to biomechanical stressors. This study was conducted to determine how well the TLV for HAL and the SI predict risk of CTS using a prospective cohort design with survival analysis. Both the TLV for HAL and the SI were found to predict risk of CTS when adjusted for relevant covariates.

  18. An analysis of collegiate band directors' exposure to sound pressure levels

    Roebuck, Nikole Moore

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a significant but unfortunate common occupational hazard. The purpose of the current study was to measure the magnitude of sound pressure levels generated within a collegiate band room and determine if those sound pressure levels are of a magnitude that exceeds the policy standards and recommendations of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). In addition, reverberation times were measured and analyzed in order to determine the appropriateness of acoustical conditions for the band rehearsal environment. Sound pressure measurements were taken from the rehearsal of seven collegiate marching bands. Single sample t test were conducted to compare the sound pressure levels of all bands to the noise exposure standards of OSHA and NIOSH. Multiple regression analysis were conducted and analyzed in order to determine the effect of the band room's conditions on the sound pressure levels and reverberation times. Time weighted averages (TWA), noise percentage doses, and peak levels were also collected. The mean Leq for all band directors was 90.5 dBA. The total accumulated noise percentage dose for all band directors was 77.6% of the maximum allowable daily noise dose under the OSHA standard. The total calculated TWA for all band directors was 88.2% of the maximum allowable daily noise dose under the OSHA standard. The total accumulated noise percentage dose for all band directors was 152.1% of the maximum allowable daily noise dose under the NIOSH standards, and the total calculated TWA for all band directors was 93dBA of the maximum allowable daily noise dose under the NIOSH standard. Multiple regression analysis revealed that the room volume, the level of acoustical treatment and the mean room reverberation time predicted 80% of the variance in sound pressure levels in this study.

  19. A model for mild traumatic brain injury that induces limited transient memory impairment and increased levels of axon related serum biomarkers

    Elham eRostami

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI is one of the most common neuronal insults and can lead to long-term disabilities. mTBI occurs when the head is exposed to a rapid acceleration-deceleration movement triggering axonal injuries. Our limited understanding of the underlying pathological changes makes it difficult to predict the outcome of mTBI. In this study we used a scalable rat model for rotational acceleration TBI, previously characterized for the threshold of axonal pathology. We have analyzed whether a TBI just above the defined threshold would induce any detectable behavioral changes and/or changes in serum biomarkers. The effect of injury on sensory motor functions, memory and anxiety were assessed by beam walking, radial arms maze and elevated plus maze at 3 to 7 days following TBI. The only behavioral deficits found were transient impairments in working and reference memory. Blood serum was analyzed at 1, 3 and 14 days after injury for changes in selected protein biomarkers. Serum levels of neurofilament heavy chain (NF-H and Tau, as well as S100B and myelin basic protein (MBP showed significant increases in the injured animals at all time points. No signs of macroscopic injuries such as intracerebral hematomas or contusions were found. Amyloid precursor protein (APP immunostaining indicated axonal injuries at all time points analyzed. In summary, this model mimics some of the key symptoms of mTBI, such as transient memory impairment, which is paralleled by an increase in serum biomarkers. Our findings suggest that serum biomarkers may be used to detect mTBI. The model provides a suitable foundation for further investigation of the underlying pathology of mTBI.

  20. Radio-frequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) exposure levels in different European outdoor urban environments in comparison with regulatory limits

    Urbinello, Damiano; Joseph, Wout; Huss, Anke|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/331385880; Verloock, Leen; Beekhuizen, Johan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/34472641X; Vermeulen, Roel|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/216532620; Martens, Luc; Röösli, Martin

    Background: Concerns of the general public about potential adverse health effects caused by radio-frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs) led authorities to introduce precautionary exposure limits, which vary considerably between regions. It may be speculated that precautionary limits affect the

  1. Assessing the Levels and Health Risk of Atmospheric Formaldehyde in Makkah, Saudi Arabia

    Atef M.F. Mohammed

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric Formaldehyde (HCHO was monitored in four sites on the Holy Mosque of Makkah, Saudi Arabia during August, 2013. The daily mean concentrations of HCHO were ranged from 1.09-18.92 g/m3. The levels of HCHO were significantly higher than the permissible exposure limit (0.042 μg/m3 of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA. However, it were not exceeded the recommended exposure limit of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (20 μg/m3 and Egyptian law 4/1994 (0.37 mg/m3. Spatial variations of HCHO concentrations most probably due to variations in local meteorology and traffic flow, which was considered the main source of emissions. Exposure doses for various age groups were estimated, which ranged from 0.000004 to 0.000259 mg/kg/day. Maximum exposure dose was recorded for boys (age 12-14 years and children (6-8 years and minimum for females (19-65 years.

  2. Airborne Isocyanate Exposures in the Collision Repair Industry and a Comparison to Occupational Exposure Limits

    Reeb-Whitaker, Carolyn; Whittaker, Stephen G.; Ceballos, Diana M.; Weiland, Elisa C.; Flack, Sheila L.; Fent, Kenneth W.; Thomasen, Jennifer M.; Gaines, Linda G. Trelles; Nylander-French, Leena A.

    2014-01-01

    Isocyanate exposure was evaluated in 33 spray painters from 25 Washington State autobody shops. Personal breathing zone samples (n = 228) were analyzed for isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) monomer, 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) monomer, IPDI polyisocyanate, and three polyisocyanate forms of HDI. The objective was to describe exposures to isocyanates while spray painting, compare them with short-term exposure limits (STELs), and describe the isocyanate composition in the samples. The composition of polyisocyanates (IPDI and HDI) in the samples varied greatly, with maximum amounts ranging from up to 58% for HDI biuret to 96% for HDI isocyanurate. There was a significant inverse relationship between the percentage composition of HDI isocyanurate to IPDI and to HDI uretdione. Two 15-min STELs were compared: (1) Oregon's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OR-OSHA) STEL of 1000 μg/m3 for HDI polyisocyanate, and (2) the United Kingdom's Health and Safety Executive (UK-HSE) STEL of 70 μg NCO/m3 for all isocyanates. Eighty percent of samples containing HDI polyisocyanate exceeded the OR-OSHA STEL while 98% of samples exceeded the UKHSE STEL. The majority of painters (67%) wore half-face air-purifying respirators while spray painting. Using the OROSHA and the UK-HSE STELs as benchmarks, 21% and 67% of painters, respectively, had at least one exposure that exceeded the respirator's OSHA-assigned protection factor. A critical review of the STELs revealed the following limitations: (1) the OR-OSHA STEL does not include all polyisocyanates, and (2) the UK-HSE STEL is derived from monomeric isocyanates, whereas the species present in typical spray coatings are polyisocyanates. In conclusion, the variable mixtures of isocyanates used by autobody painters suggest that an occupational exposure limit is required that includes all polyisocyanates. Despite the limitations of the STELs, we determined that a respirator with an assigned protection factor of 25 or

  3. Simple serum markers for significant liver inflammation in chronic hepatitis B patients with an alanine aminotransferase level lower than 2 times upper limit of normal

    LI Qiang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the simple serum markers for significant liver inflammation in chronic hepatitis B (CHB patients with an alanine aminotransferase (ALT level of <2 times upper limit of normal (ULN. MethodsThe clinical data of 278 CHB patients with ALT <2×ULN (ULN=40 U/L were analyzed retrospectively. Significant liver inflammation was defined as a liver inflammatory activity grade (G ≥2. The t-test was used for comparison of normally distributed continuous data between groups, and the Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test was used for non-normally distributed continuous data; the chi-square test was used for comparison of categorical data between groups. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent predictors for significant liver inflammation in CHB patients with ALT <2×ULN. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve was used to evaluate the diagnostic value of serum markers in significant liver inflammation. ResultsOf the 278 CHB patients enrolled, 175 (62.9% had no significant liver inflammation (G0-1 group and 103 (37.1% had significant liver inflammation (G2-4 group. There were significant differences in ALT, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT, albumin, globulin, prothrombin time (PT, platelet, absolute neutrophil count, hyaluronic acid (HA, glycocholic acid, precollagen Ⅲ, and collagen type Ⅳ(ⅣC between the two groups (all P<0.05. The multivariate regression analysis showed that GGT, PT, ⅣC, and HA were independent predictors for significant liver inflammation in CHB patients with ALT<2×ULN (OR=1.015, 1.600, 1.151, and 1.014, P=0.008, 0.021, 0.003, and 0.018. The areas under the ROC curve for GGT, PT, IVC, and HA to diagnose significant liver inflammation were 0.804, 0.722, 0.707, and 0.632, respectively. The cut-off value of 48.5 U/L for GGT to predict significant liver inflammation had a specificity of 90.3% and a negative

  4. Early Liver and Kidney Dysfunction Associated with Occupational Exposure to Sub-Threshold Limit Value Levels of Benzene, Toluene, and Xylenes in Unleaded Petrol

    Masoud Neghab

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: The average exposure of petrol station workers to BTX did not exceed the current threshold limit values (TLVs for these chemicals. However, evidence of subtle, subclinical and prepathologic early liver and kidney dysfunction was evident in exposed individuals.

  5. Health and safety training for hazardous waste site activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory: Implementation of OSHA 29 CFR 1910.120(e)

    White, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Among the requirements set forth by the interim final rule, 29 CFR Part 1910.120, promulgated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) in response to the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA), are specific provisions for health and safety training of employees involved in hazardous waste operations. These training provisions require a minimum of 40 hours of initial instruction off the site for employees involved in corrective operations and cleanup activities at hazardous waste sites. A less detailed training requirement of 24 hours is specified for employees working in more routine treatment, storage, and disposal activities. Managers and supervisors who are directly responsible for or who supervise employees engaged in hazardous waste operations must complete 8 additional hours of training related to management of hazardous waste site activities. Consistent with the intent of 29 CFR 1910.120, a training program has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to comply with the need to protect the safety and health of hazardous waste workers. All hourly requirements specified in the interim final rule are met by a comprehensive program structure involving three stages of training. This paper will outline and discuss the content of each of these stages of the program. The involvement of various ORNL organizations in facilitating the training will be highlighted. Implementation strategies will be discussed as well as progress made to date

  6. The association of the original OSHA chemical hazard communication standard with reductions in acute work injuries/illnesses in private industry and the industrial releases of chemical carcinogens.

    Oleinick, Arthur

    2014-02-01

    OSHA predicted the original chemical Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) would cumulatively reduce the lost workday acute injury/illness rate for exposure events by 20% over 20 years and reduce exposure to chemical carcinogens. JoinPoint trend software identified changes in the rate of change of BLS rates for days away from work for acute injuries/illnesses during 1992-2009 for manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries for both chemical, noxious or allergenic injury exposure events and All other exposure events. The annual percent change in the rates was used to adjust observed numbers of cases to estimate their association with the standard. A case-control study of EPA's Toxic Release Inventory 1988-2009 data compared carcinogen and non-carcinogens' releases. The study estimates that the HCS was associated with a reduction in the number of acute injuries/illnesses due to chemical injury exposure events over the background rate in the range 107,569-459,395 (Hudson method/modified BIC model) depending on whether the HCS is treated as a marginal or sole factor in the decrease. Carcinogen releases have declined at a substantially faster rate than control non-carcinogens. The previous HCS standard was associated with significant reductions in chemical event acute injuries/illnesses and chemical carcinogen exposures. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Review of the OSHA-NIOSH Response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill: Protecting the Health and Safety of Cleanup Workers.

    Michaels, David; Howard, John

    2012-07-18

    The fire and explosion of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig resulted in an enormous oil spill that threatened large distances of coastline. The overall response was led by the United States Coast Guard and involved the oil company BP, federal agencies, and state and local governments of five states. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health focused extensive resources on ensuring that BP and its contractors provided safe working conditions for thousands of workers involved in the response. Federal personnel visited worksites daily, identifying hazards and means of abatement; assessed training programs to ensure that workers were adequately trained in languages they could understand; monitored chemical exposures and determined that the proper personal protective equipment was deployed; insisted on implementation of a heat mitigation program; rostered thousands of workers; and conducted extensive outreach in communities impacted by the spill. Advance planning, immediate deployment, and collaboration across agencies helped ensure that the response operations resulted in no worker fatalities, and relatively few injuries and illnesses. For future responses, improvements should be made in how safety and health information, as well as the process behind safety and health decisions, are communicated to the public. Michaels D, Howard J. Review of the OSHA-NIOSH Response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill: Protecting the Health and Safety of Cleanup Workers. PLoS Currents Disasters. 2012 Jul 18.

  8. Building arrangement and site layout design guides for on site low level radioactive waste storage facilities

    McMullen, J.W.; Feehan, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    Many papers have been written by AE's and utilities describing their onsite storage facilities, why they are needed, NRC regulations, and disposal site requirements. This paper discusses a typical storage facility and address the design considerations and operational aspects that are generally overlooked when designing and siting a low level radioactive waste storage facility. Some topics to be addressed are: 1. Container flexibility; 2. Modular expansion capabilities; 3. DOT regulations; 4. Meterological requirements; 5. OSHA; 6. Fire protection; 7. Floods; 8. ALARA

  9. Insecticide-treated bed nets reduce plasma antibody levels and limit the repertoire of antibodies to Plasmodium falciparum variant surface antigens

    Askjaer, N; Maxwell, C; Chambo, W

    2001-01-01

    The use of insecticide-treated bed nets (ITN) has been documented to reduce malaria morbidity and mortality in areas with endemic malaria, but concerns have been raised that ITN usage could affect the acquisition of malaria immunity. Several lines of evidence have indicated that antibodies against...... variant surface antigens (VSA) are important in the development of naturally acquired immunity to Plasmodium falciparum malaria and may thus be good indicators of immune status. We have compared the levels of VSA antibodies in plasma from children who have used ITN for 4 years to levels in plasma from...

  10. Short communication: Glucose kinetics in dairy heifers limit-fed a low- or high-forage ration at four levels of nitrogen intake

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of level of forage and nitrogen (N) intake on glucose kinetics in growing dairy heifers. Eight Holstein heifers (beginning at 362 ± 7 kg body weight (BW) and 12.3 ± 0.4 months of age) were fed eight rations according to a split-plot, 4 x 4 La...

  11. Glyphosate has limited short-term effects on commensal bacterial community composition in the gut environment due to sufficient aromatic amino acid levels

    Nielsen, Lene Nørby; Roager, Henrik Munch; Casas, Mònica Escolà

    2017-01-01

    in acetic acid produced by the gut bacteria. We conclude that sufficient intestinal levels of aromatic amino acids provided by the diet alleviates the need for bacterial synthesis of aromatic amino acids and thus prevents an antimicrobial effect of glyphosate in vivo. It is however possible...

  12. Early Liver and Kidney Dysfunction Associated with Occupational Exposure to Sub-Threshold Limit Value Levels of Benzene, Toluene, and Xylenes in Unleaded Petrol.

    Neghab, Masoud; Hosseinzadeh, Kiamars; Hassanzadeh, Jafar

    2015-12-01

    Unleaded petrol contains significant amounts of monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons such as benzene, toluene, and xylenes (BTX). Toxic responses following occupational exposure to unleaded petrol have been evaluated only in limited studies. The main purpose of this study was to ascertain whether (or not) exposure to unleaded petrol, under normal working conditions, is associated with any hepatotoxic or nephrotoxic response. This was a cross-sectional study in which 200 employees of Shiraz petrol stations with current exposure to unleaded petrol, as well as 200 unexposed employees, were investigated. Atmospheric concentrations of BTX were measured using standard methods. Additionally, urine and fasting blood samples were taken from individuals for urinalysis and routine biochemical tests of kidney and liver function. The geometric means of airborne concentrations of BTX were found to be 0.8 mg m(-3), 1.4 mg m(-3), and 2.8 mg m(-3), respectively. Additionally, means of direct bilirubin, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, blood urea and plasma creatinine were significantly higher in exposed individuals than in unexposed employees. Conversely, serum albumin, total protein, and serum concentrations of calcium and sodium were significantly lower in petrol station workers than in their unexposed counterparts. The average exposure of petrol station workers to BTX did not exceed the current threshold limit values (TLVs) for these chemicals. However, evidence of subtle, subclinical and prepathologic early liver and kidney dysfunction was evident in exposed individuals.

  13. Project Opalinus Clay: Radionuclide Concentration Limits in the Near-Field of a Repository for Spent Fuel and Vitrified High-Level Waste

    Berner, U

    2002-10-01

    The disposal feasibility study currently performed by Nagra includes a succession of quantitative models, aiming at describing the fate of radionuclides potentially escaping from the repository system. In this chain of models the present report provides the so called 'solubility limits' (maximum expected concentrations) for safety relevant radionuclides from SF/HLW wastes, disposed of in a reducing clay (Opalinus Clay, bentonite) environment. Solubility and speciation calculations in bentonite pore waters were performed using the very recently updated Nagra/PSI Chemical Thermodynamic Data Base (TDB) for the majority of the 37 elements addressed as potentially relevant. Particularly for the most relevant actinides, the straightforward applications with this updated TDB yielded results in contradiction to chemical analogy considerations. This was a consequence of incomplete data and called for problem specific TDB extensions, which were evaluated in a separate study. However, a summary of these problem specific extensions is provided in section 4.1. The results presented in this report solely depend on geochemical model calculations. Thus, it is of utmost importance that the underlying data and assumptions are made clear to the reader. In order to ensure traceability, all thermodynamic data not included in the Nagra/PSI TDB are explicitly specified in the report, in order to provide complete documentation for quality assurance and for comprehensibility. In order to clearly distinguish between results derived from data carefully reviewed in the Nagra/PSI TDB and those calculated from 'other' data, the summary of expected maximum concentrations provided in Table 1 includes two columns. The heading CALCULATED provides maximum concentrations based on data fully documented in the updated TDB, whereas maximum concentrations, which include additional problem specific data and/or data from other sources, are given under the heading RECOMMENDED. The

  14. Project Opalinus Clay: Radionuclide Concentration Limits in the Near-Field of a Repository for Spent Fuel and Vitrified High-Level Waste

    Berner, U.

    2002-10-01

    The disposal feasibility study currently performed by Nagra includes a succession of quantitative models, aiming at describing the fate of radionuclides potentially escaping from the repository system. In this chain of models the present report provides the so called 'solubility limits' (maximum expected concentrations) for safety relevant radionuclides from SF/HLW wastes, disposed of in a reducing clay (Opalinus Clay, bentonite) environment. Solubility and speciation calculations in bentonite pore waters were performed using the very recently updated Nagra/PSI Chemical Thermodynamic Data Base (TDB) for the majority of the 37 elements addressed as potentially relevant. Particularly for the most relevant actinides, the straightforward applications with this updated TDB yielded results in contradiction to chemical analogy considerations. This was a consequence of incomplete data and called for problem specific TDB extensions, which were evaluated in a separate study. However, a summary of these problem specific extensions is provided in section 4.1. The results presented in this report solely depend on geochemical model calculations. Thus, it is of utmost importance that the underlying data and assumptions are made clear to the reader. In order to ensure traceability, all thermodynamic data not included in the Nagra/PSI TDB are explicitly specified in the report, in order to provide complete documentation for quality assurance and for comprehensibility. In order to clearly distinguish between results derived from data carefully reviewed in the Nagra/PSI TDB and those calculated from 'other' data, the summary of expected maximum concentrations provided in Table 1 includes two columns. The heading CALCULATED provides maximum concentrations based on data fully documented in the updated TDB, whereas maximum concentrations, which include additional problem specific data and/or data from other sources, are given under the heading RECOMMENDED. The present study also pays

  15. Organizing by covenant : the organization of transitional labor markets : paper IREC Conference 2004 'Governance issues in shifting industrial and employment relations' Utrecht, The Netherlands, August 26-28, 2004 : session potential and limits of national level socio-economic governance

    Korver, T.; Oeij, P.R.A.

    2004-01-01

    From 26-28 August 2004 in Utrecht the Industrial Relations in Europe Conference (IREC) was held on governance issues in shifting industrial and employment relations. As part of the session 'potential and limits of national level socio-economic governance' this paper about the organization of

  16. Limit of detection in the presence of instrumental and non-instrumental errors: study of the possible sources of error and application to the analysis of 41 elements at trace levels by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry technique

    Badocco, Denis; Lavagnini, Irma; Mondin, Andrea; Tapparo, Andrea; Pastore, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the detection limit was estimated when signals were affected by two error contributions, namely instrumental errors and operational-non-instrumental errors. The detection limit was theoretically obtained following the hypothesis testing schema implemented with the calibration curve methodology. The experimental calibration design was based on J standards measured I times with non-instrumental errors affecting each standard systematically but randomly among the J levels. A two-component variance regression was performed to determine the calibration curve and to define the detection limit in these conditions. The detection limit values obtained from the calibration at trace levels of 41 elements by ICP-MS resulted larger than those obtainable from a one component variance regression. The role of the reagent impurities on the instrumental errors was ascertained and taken into account. Environmental pollution was studied as source of non-instrumental errors. The environmental pollution role was evaluated by Principal Component Analysis technique (PCA) applied to a series of nine calibrations performed in fourteen months. The influence of the seasonality of the environmental pollution on the detection limit was evidenced for many elements usually present in the urban air particulate. The obtained results clearly indicated the need of using the two-component variance regression approach for the calibration of all the elements usually present in the environment at significant concentration levels. - Highlights: • Limit of detection was obtained considering a two variance component regression. • Calibration data may be affected by instrumental and operational conditions errors. • Calibration model was applied to determine 41 elements at trace level by ICP-MS. • Non instrumental errors were evidenced by PCA analysis

  17. Inverse Limits

    Ingram, WT

    2012-01-01

    Inverse limits provide a powerful tool for constructing complicated spaces from simple ones. They also turn the study of a dynamical system consisting of a space and a self-map into a study of a (likely more complicated) space and a self-homeomorphism. In four chapters along with an appendix containing background material the authors develop the theory of inverse limits. The book begins with an introduction through inverse limits on [0,1] before moving to a general treatment of the subject. Special topics in continuum theory complete the book. Although it is not a book on dynamics, the influen

  18. Zebra mussel filter feeding and food-limited production of Daphnia: Recent changes in lower trophic level dynamics of Oneida Lake, New York, U.S.A.

    Horgan, M.J.; Mills, E.L.

    1999-01-01

    Exotic zebra mussels can alter lower trophic level dynamics in lakes that they colonize by consuming large quantities of phytoplankton. We simulated the indirect effects of zebra mussel grazing on Daphnia by artificially reducing phytoplankton concentration for in situ Daphnia reproduction experiments. The response of Daphnia reproduction to reduced phytoplankton was evaluated for both the in situ experiments and field observations in Oneida Lake, New York, U.S.A. Oneida Lake has had an abundant population of zebra mussels since 1992. Our experiments revealed that fecundity of individuals from two species of Daphnia was positively related to phytoplankton concentration during the spring clearwater phase, although there was no discernible effect of food concentration on fecundity in summer cyanobacteria-dominated assemblages. The experimental results suggest that Daphnia fecundity responds to chlorophyll a concentrations zebra mussels became abundant in Oneida Lake have been characterized by high water clarity, low chlorophyll concentrations, long clearwater phases, and low Daphnia biomass compared with the previous 17 years. The food web effects of zebra mussel grazing are complex and it will take more years for impacts at higher trophic levels to develop and be identified.

  19. LANSCE beam current limiter

    Gallegos, F.R.

    1996-01-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated beam. Active instrumentation, such as the Beam Current Limiter, is a component of the RSS. The current limiter is designed to limit the average current in a beam line below a specific level, thus minimizing the maximum current available for a beam spill accident. The beam current limiter is a self-contained, electrically isolated toroidal beam transformer which continuously monitors beam current. It is designed as fail-safe instrumentation. The design philosophy, hardware design, operation, and limitations of the device are described

  20. Limitations of quantitative bone-mass measurements using assessments of first-order statistics of grey-level histograms in plain radiographs

    Kouloulias, V.E.; Matsopoulos, G.; Kouvaris, J.R.; Antypas, C.; Uzunoglu, N.C.; Varela, M.N.; Metafa, A.; Sandilos, P.; Vlahos, L.J. [Areteion Univ. Hospital, Athens (Greece). Radiology Dept.

    2004-04-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the quality assurance of image-processing techniques in plain radiographs of skeletal structures. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty-two patients were studied, each with one osteolytic metastasis. Accuracy and precision of tube voltage and timer were confirmed. The mean value of grey-level histograms in plain radiographs (MVGLHs) was assessed. The deviation was monitored after five sets of sequential X-rays retaining the same settings for each radiograph. RESULTS: Deviation was significantly higher in anatomical areas of thorax (21.2%) and abdomen (42.4%), while the consistency of MVGLH for weight-bearing bones was satisfactory with a maximum deviation of 2.9% (P<0.001, Kruskal-Wallis test). CONCLUSION: Assessment of MVGLH in plain radiographs is a reliable method for the extremities and generally for regions without superimposed movable tissues.

  1. Limitations of quantitative bone-mass measurements using assessments of first-order statistics of grey-level histograms in plain radiographs

    Kouloulias, V.E.; Matsopoulos, G.; Kouvaris, J.R.; Antypas, C.; Uzunoglu, N.C.; Varela, M.N.; Metafa, A.; Sandilos, P.; Vlahos, L.J.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the quality assurance of image-processing techniques in plain radiographs of skeletal structures. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty-two patients were studied, each with one osteolytic metastasis. Accuracy and precision of tube voltage and timer were confirmed. The mean value of grey-level histograms in plain radiographs (MVGLHs) was assessed. The deviation was monitored after five sets of sequential X-rays retaining the same settings for each radiograph. RESULTS: Deviation was significantly higher in anatomical areas of thorax (21.2%) and abdomen (42.4%), while the consistency of MVGLH for weight-bearing bones was satisfactory with a maximum deviation of 2.9% (P<0.001, Kruskal-Wallis test). CONCLUSION: Assessment of MVGLH in plain radiographs is a reliable method for the extremities and generally for regions without superimposed movable tissues

  2. Efficiency of Iron-Based Oxy-Hydroxides in Removing Antimony from Groundwater to Levels below the Drinking Water Regulation Limits

    Konstantinos Simeonidis

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the efficiency of iron-based oxy-hydroxides to remove antimony from groundwater to meet the requirements of drinking water regulations. Results obtained by batch adsorption experiments indicated that the qualified iron oxy-hydroxide (FeOOH, synthesized at pH 4 for maintaining a high positive charge density (2.5 mmol OH−/g achieved a residual concentration of Sb(III below the EU drinking water regulation limit of 5 μg/L by providing an adsorption capacity of 3.1 mg/g. This is more than twice greater compared either to similar commercial FeOOHs (GFH, Bayoxide or to tetravalent manganese feroxyhyte (Fe-MnOOH adsorbents. In contrast, all tested adsorbents failed to achieve a residual concentration below 5 μg/L for Sb(V. The higher efficiency of the qualified FeOOH was confirmed by rapid small-scale column tests, since an adsorption capacity of 3 mg Sb(III/g was determined at a breakthrough concentration of 5 μg/L. However, it completely failed to achieve Sb(V concentrations below 5 μg/L even at the beginning of the column experiments. The results of leaching tests classified the spent qualified FeOOH to inert wastes. Considering the rapid kinetics of this process (i.e., 85% of total removal was performed within 10 min, the developed qualified adsorbent may be promoted as a prospective material for point-of-use Sb(III removal from water in vulnerable communities, since the adsorbent’s cost was estimated to be close to 30 ± 3.4 €/103 m3 for every 10 μg Sb(III/L removed.

  3. Feasibility of establishing a biosafety level 3 tuberculosis culture laboratory of acceptable quality standards in a resource-limited setting: an experience from Uganda.

    Ssengooba, Willy; Gelderbloem, Sebastian J; Mboowa, Gerald; Wajja, Anne; Namaganda, Carolyn; Musoke, Philippa; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Joloba, Moses Lutaakome

    2015-01-15

    Despite the recent innovations in tuberculosis (TB) and multi-drug resistant TB (MDR-TB) diagnosis, culture remains vital for difficult-to-diagnose patients, baseline and end-point determination for novel vaccines and drug trials. Herein, we share our experience of establishing a BSL-3 culture facility in Uganda as well as 3-years performance indicators and post-TB vaccine trials (pioneer) and funding experience of sustaining such a facility. Between September 2008 and April 2009, the laboratory was set-up with financial support from external partners. After an initial procedure validation phase in parallel with the National TB Reference Laboratory (NTRL) and legal approvals, the laboratory registered for external quality assessment (EQA) from the NTRL, WHO, National Health Laboratories Services (NHLS), and the College of American Pathologists (CAP). The laboratory also instituted a functional quality management system (QMS). Pioneer funding ended in 2012 and the laboratory remained in self-sustainability mode. The laboratory achieved internationally acceptable standards in both structural and biosafety requirements. Of the 14 patient samples analyzed in the procedural validation phase, agreement for all tests with NTRL was 90% (P 80% in all years from NTRL, CAP, and NHLS, and culture was 100% for CAP panels and above regional average scores for all years with NHLS. Quarterly DST scores from WHO-EQA ranged from 78% to 100% in 2010, 80% to 100% in 2011, and 90 to 100% in 2012. From our experience, it is feasible to set-up a BSL-3 TB culture laboratory with acceptable quality performance standards in resource-limited countries. With the demonstrated quality of work, the laboratory attracted more research groups and post-pioneer funding, which helped to ensure sustainability. The high skilled experts in this research laboratory also continue to provide an excellent resource for the needed national discussion of the laboratory and quality management systems.

  4. Analysis of a Farquhar-von Caemmerer-Berry leaf-level photosynthetic rate model for Populus tremuloides in the context of modeling and measurement limitations

    Lenz, Kathryn E.; Host, George E.; Roskoski, Kyle; Noormets, Asko; Sober, Anu; Karnosky, David F.

    2010-01-01

    The balance of mechanistic detail with mathematical simplicity contributes to the broad use of the Farquhar, von Caemmerer and Berry (FvCB) photosynthetic rate model. Here the FvCB model was coupled with a stomatal conductance model to form an [A,g s ] model, and parameterized for mature Populus tremuloides leaves under varying CO 2 and temperature levels. Data were selected to be within typical forest light, CO 2 and temperature ranges, reducing artifacts associated with data collected at extreme values. The error between model-predicted photosynthetic rate (A) and A data was measured in three ways and found to be up to three times greater for each of two independent data sets than for a base-line evaluation using parameterization data. The evaluation methods used here apply to comparisons of model validation results among data sets varying in number and distribution of data, as well as to performance comparisons of [A,g s ] models differing in internal-process components. - A photosynthetic rate model is parameterized for Populus tremuloides and evaluated based on its ability to predict dependent as well as independent data.

  5. Level of community mental health literacy in sub-Saharan Africa: current studies are limited in number, scope, spread, and cognizance of cultural nuances.

    Atilola, Olayinka

    2015-02-01

    The combination of high prevalence of mental disorders and the scarcity of resources to care for them in sub-Saharan Africa underscores the need for good mental health literacy as a potential mental health resource. To conduct a systematic review of the findings of studies that have examined aspects of mental health literacy among community dwellers in sub-Saharan Africa. A search was conducted using local and international indexes like MEDLINE, EMBASE and PsychInfo. Only 19 studies from eight different countries met inclusion criteria. Key aspects of the functional mental health literacy that has been examined include recognition of mental disorders, knowledge about causation, and treatment preferences. The modes of seeking mental health information are yet to be examined. Some studies utilized a methodology that allowed for respondents to use local labels to describe their understanding of various mental disorders. Otherwise, respondents were largely unable to label orthodox psychiatry syndromes correctly. Supernatural and ultra-human views were rampant, and alternative mental health services were mostly preferred. Quantitative modes of assessment were the most common, and authors-especially those that adopted this mode of assessment-did not take full cognizance of socio-cultural underpinnings of the concept of mental health literacy in their conclusion and recommendations. There is need for more studies to adopt more comprehensive approaches to the assessment of mental health literacy. The outcomes of such studies will provide the right context for making profound statements on the level of knowledge and skills for mental health promotion in sub-Saharan Africa.

  6. Reactor limit control system

    Rubbel, F.E.

    1982-01-01

    The very extensive use of limitations in the operational field between protection system and closed-loop controls is an important feature of German understanding of operational safety. The design of limitations is based on very large activities in the computational field but mostly on the high level of the plant-wide own commissioning experience of a turnkey contractor. Limitations combine intelligence features of closed-loop controls with the high availability of protection systems. (orig.)

  7. Detector limitations, STAR

    Underwood, D. G.

    1998-07-13

    Every detector has limitations in terms of solid angle, particular technologies chosen, cracks due to mechanical structure, etc. If all of the presently planned parts of STAR [Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC] were in place, these factors would not seriously limit our ability to exploit the spin physics possible in RHIC. What is of greater concern at the moment is the construction schedule for components such as the Electromagnetic Calorimeters, and the limited funding for various levels of triggers.

  8. The phantom menace. Determination of the true Method Detection Limit (MDL) for background levels of PCDDs, PCDFs, and cPCBs in human serum by high-resolution mass spectrometry

    Turner, W.; Welch, S.; DiPietro, E.; Cash, T.; McClure, C.; Needham, L.; Patterson, D. [CDC/ATSDR, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2004-09-15

    The recent worldwide decline in background serum levels of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, furans, and coplanar biphenyls (PCDDs/PCDFs/cPCBs) is unquestionably an important finding. However, as serum levels continue to diminish, our analytical methods for measuring these toxicants will continue to be ''pushed to their limit''. In a previous article, we investigated some of the variables that influence the quantification of ''ultra-trace'' (fg/g) concentrations of PCDDs/PCDFs and cPCBs in human serum. In this report, we continue to explore parameters that can affect the determination of the ''true'' detection limit of our method (MDL), using both analytical standards and matrix-based samples.

  9. Ready for OSHA and MOSHA

    Smith, Nelson T.

    1976-01-01

    At north Arundel Vo-Tech in Maryland a well-organized safety program involves the entire school staff--plus Maryland Occupational Health and Safety Act. Strict enforcement of safety violations keeps everyone safety conscious--including the administration and custodial staff. (Editor/HD)

  10. Limitations of MIRD at the cellular level

    Makrigiorgos, M.G.; Aldestein, S.J.; Kassis, A.I.

    1989-01-01

    The MIRD formulation assumes a homogeneous distribution of radionuclides over the human organ of interest. The dosimetric impact of making this assumption when calculating the dose to individual cells in an organ is examined in the present work. For this purpose, a computer program has been written to calculate radiation dose to individual cells of a human organ for various three-dimensional distributions of radiopharmaceutical in this organ. The effects of two variables have been considered in the calculations: (a) the intracellular -to-extracellular radionuclide concentration [k], and (b) the fraction of the organ volume occupied by the radiolabeled cells [f]. Both photons and electrons emitted by the radionuclide have been accounted for in these dose estimations. For small f and large k values, the MIRD formulation is shown to underestimate severely the dose to individual labeled cells. To demonstrate the relevance of such considerations to current clinical practice, an example is presented from diagnostic nuclear medicine: technetium-99m labeled Microlite, a commonly used agent for spleen, liver and lung imaging that concentrates exclusively and highly in macrophages. Based on the dosimetric model developed, it is shown that the actual dose to labeled cells is 10 to 60 times higher than that predicted by the conventional MIRD formulation

  11. Exposure to non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation and public health : review of safety levels; Exposicion a radiaciones no ionizantes ambientales y salud publica: Una revision de las bases biomedicas de los limites de seguridad

    Ubeda, A.; Trillo, M. A.

    2005-07-01

    The potential health effects of the exposure to non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation are a source of increasing interest on the part of the public and the authorities. This article summarizes the theoretical-experimental basis supporting the safety levels proposed by international committees, and reviews the recent scientific literature on non-ionizing radiation's bioeffects that are relevant to the validation or modification of the present exposure limits. Because of its social interest, special consideration is given to power frequency fields (50-60Hz) and to the radio communication signals of mobile telephony. The paper also describes how interpretations of the scientific evidence, other than those of the international committees, have generated some controversy and have provided a basis for more restrictive limits, like those adopted in Europe by Switzerland and Italy. The article also identifies some gaps in the present scientific knowledge on the bioelectromagnetics discipline and proposes that additional research is needed to complete our present knowledge on the biological responses to non-ionizing radiation. (Author) 80 refs.

  12. Distinct Patterns of Cognitive Aging Modified by Education Level and Gender among Adults with Limited or No Formal Education: A Normative Study of the Mini-Mental State Examination.

    Xie, Haiqun; Zhang, Chengguo; Wang, Yukai; Huang, Shuyun; Cui, Wei; Yang, Wenbin; Koski, Lisa; Xu, Xiping; Li, Youbao; Zheng, Meili; He, Mingli; Fu, Jia; Shi, Xiuli; Wang, Kai; Tang, Genfu; Wang, Binyan; Huo, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Dementia is increasingly prevalent due to rapid aging of the population, but under-recognized among people with low education levels. This is partly due to a lack of appropriate and precise normative data, which underestimates cognitive aging in the use of screening tools for dementia. We aimed to improve the precision of screening for cognitive impairment, by characterizing the patterns of cognitive aging and derived normative data of the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) for illiterate and low-educated populations. This community-based study included data from 2,280 individuals aged 40 years or older from two rural areas. Multiple linear modeling examined the effect of aging on cognition reflected by the MMSE, stratified by education level and gender. Threshold effect of age on cognition was performed using a smoothing function. The majority of participants (60.4%) were illiterate or had attended only primary school (24.6%). The effect of aging on cognition varied by gender and education. Primary-school educated females and males remained cognitively stable up to 62 and 71 years of age, respectively, with MMSE score declining 0.4 and 0.8 points/year in females and males thereafter. Illiterates females scored 2.3 points lower than illiterate males, and scores for both declined 0.2 points/year. According to these results, normative data stratified by age, education and gender was generated. This study suggests gender and educational differences exist in cognitive aging among adults with limited or no formal education. To improve screening precision for cognitive impairment with the use of MMSE in low-educated population, age, gender, and education level should be considered.

  13. In-situ bioremediation at the French Limited Site

    Woodward, R.; Ramsden, D.

    1990-01-01

    In situ biodegradation of petrochemical wastes at the French Limited Superfund Site was stimulated by providing the appropriate pH, essential nutrients, oxygen, and substrate availability. Fourteen wastewater treatment parameters, plus toxicity, were monitored to document the program of bioremediation. Periodic, organic priority pollutant analysis of mixed liquor, settled sludges and subsoils provided data for kinetics interpretation and half life calculation. The half lives of thirteen PAH compounds ranged from 27 to 46 days, in contrast to the degradation rate, in months, reported for these compounds in LTUs. An ambitious air monitoring program measured fugitive emissions at lagoon side, fenceline, and from the lagoon surface by floating flux chamber. The amount of volatiles lost never exceeded 1/2 of the OSHA 8 hr TLV and it could be readily managed by adjusting the intensity and frequency of mixing and aeration. The demonstration confirmed the feasibility of in situ bioremediation and led to one of the first US EPA Record of Decisions to use bioremediation for cleanup of a large Superfund site. A consent Decree outlining the site remedial action program was signed by the PRP task group and published in the Federal Register. This represents a landmark project for in situ bioremediation and has established precedence for use of this technology at CERCLA and RCRA sites nationwide

  14. 29 CFR 1952.165 - Level of Federal enforcement.

    2010-07-01

    ... issues covered under the Iowa plan. This determination also relinquishes concurrent Federal OSHA... proceedings in contested cases under section 10; to institute proceedings to correct imminent dangers under... accordance with section 18(e), final approval relinquishes Federal OSHA authority only with regard to...

  15. 29 CFR 1952.215 - Level of Federal enforcement.

    2010-07-01

    ... OSHA authority to issue citations for violations of such standards under sections 5(a)(2) and 9 of the... proceedings in contested cases under section 10; to institute proceedings to correct imminent dangers under... accordance with section 18(e), final approval relinquishes Federal OSHA authority only with regard to...

  16. 29 CFR 1952.244 - Level of Federal enforcement.

    2010-07-01

    ... OSHA authority to issue citations for violation of such standards under sections 5(a)(2) and 9 of the... proceedings in contested cases under section 10; to institute proceedings to correct imminent dangers under.... (b) In accordance with section 18(e), final approval relinquishes Federal OSHA authority only with...

  17. 29 CFR 1952.225 - Level of Federal enforcement.

    2010-07-01

    ... OSHA authority to issue citations for violations of such standards under sections 5(a)(2) and 9 of the... proceedings in contested cases under section 10; to institute proceedings to correct imminent dangers under... accordance with section 18(e), final approval relinquishes Federal OSHA authority only with regard to...

  18. 29 CFR 1952.265 - Level of Federal enforcement.

    2010-07-01

    ... employees, as in the case of temporary emergency standards promulgated under section 6(c) of the Act (29 U.S... Michigan plan under sections 18(e) and (f) of the Act (29 U.S.C. 667(e) and (f)). Federal OSHA will also... engaged in USPS mail operations. The OSHA Regional Administrator will make a prompt recommendation for the...

  19. 29 CFR 1952.314 - Level of Federal enforcement.

    2010-07-01

    ... to issues covered under the Hawaii plan. This determination also relinquishes concurrent Federal OSHA... proceedings in contested cases under section 10; to institute proceedings to correct imminent dangers under.... (b) In accordance with section 18(e), final approval relinquishes Federal OSHA authority only with...

  20. 29 CFR 1952.355 - Level of Federal enforcement.

    2010-07-01

    ... OSHA authority to issue citations for violation of such standards under sections 5(a)(2) and 9 of the... proceedings in contested cases under section 10; to institute proceedings to correct imminent dangers under... accordance with section 18(e), final approval relinquishes Federal OSHA authority only with regard to...

  1. 29 CFR 1952.235 - Level of Federal enforcement.

    2010-07-01

    ... OSHA authority to issue citations for violations of such standards under sections 5(a)(2) and 9 of the... proceedings in contested cases under section 10; to institute proceedings to correct imminent dangers under... accordance with section 18(e), final approval relinquishes Federal OSHA authority only with regard to...

  2. 29 CFR 1952.95 - Level of Federal enforcement.

    2010-07-01

    ... under the South Carolina plan. This determination also relinquishes concurrent Federal OSHA authority to... cases under section 10; to institute proceedings to correct imminent dangers under section 13; and to... with section 18(e), final approval relinquishes Federal OSHA authority only with regard to occupational...

  3. 29 CFR 1952.155 - Level of Federal enforcement.

    2010-07-01

    ... relinquishes concurrent Federal OSHA authority to issue citations for violations of such standards under... conduct enforcement proceedings in contested cases under section 10; to institute proceedings to correct...) determination. (b)(1) In accordance with section 18(e), final approval relinquishes Federal OSHA authority only...

  4. 29 CFR 1952.205 - Level of Federal enforcement.

    2010-07-01

    ... OSHA authority to issue citations for violations of such standards under sections 5(a)(2) and 9 of the... proceedings in contested cases under section 10; to institute proceedings to correct imminent dangers under... accordance with section 18(e), final approval relinquishes Federal OSHA authority only with regard to...

  5. 29 CFR 1952.345 - Level of Federal enforcement.

    2010-07-01

    ... OSHA authority to issue citations for violations of such standards under sections 5(a)(2) and 9 of the... proceedings in contested cases under section 10; to institute proceedings to correct imminent dangers under... accordance with section 18(e), final approval relinquishes Federal OSHA authority only with regard to...

  6. 29 CFR 1952.375 - Level of Federal Enforcement.

    2010-07-01

    ... OSHA authority to issue citations for violations of such standards under section 5(a)(2) and 9 of the... proceedings in contested cases under section 10; to institute proceedings to correct imminent dangers under... accordance with section 18(e), final approval relinquishes Federal OSHA authority only with regard to...

  7. 29 CFR 1952.325 - Level of Federal enforcement.

    2010-07-01

    ... OSHA authority to issue citations for violations of such standards under sections 5 (a)(2) and 9 of the... proceedings in contested cases under section 10; to institute proceedings to correct imminent dangers under... accordance with section 18(e), final approval relinquishes Federal OSHA authority only with regard to...

  8. 29 CFR 1952.105 - Level of Federal enforcement.

    2010-07-01

    ... concurrent Federal OSHA authority to issue citations for violations of such standards under Sections 5(a)(2... proceedings in contested cases under Section 10; to institute proceedings to correct imminent dangers under...), final approval relinquishes Federal OSHA authority with regard to occupational safety and health issues...

  9. 29 CFR 1952.115 - Level of Federal enforcement.

    2010-07-01

    ... issues covered under the Utah plan. This determination also relinquishes concurrent Federal OSHA... proceedings in contested cases under section 10; to institute proceedings to correct imminent dangers under... accordance with section 18(e), final approval relinquishes Federal OSHA authority only with regard to...

  10. 29 CFR 1952.295 - Level of Federal enforcement.

    2010-07-01

    ... OSHA authority to issue citations for violations of such standards under section 5(a)(2) and 9 of the... proceedings in contested cases under section 10; to institute proceedings to correct imminent dangers under.... (b)(1) In accordance with section 18(e), final approval relinquishes Federal OSHA authority only with...

  11. 29 CFR 1952.272 - Level of Federal enforcement.

    2010-07-01

    ... case of temporary emergency standards promulgated under section 6(c) of the Act (29 U.S.C. 665(c)), in... sections 18(e) and (f) of the Act (29 U.S.C. 667(e) and (f)). Federal OSHA will also retain authority for... operations. The OSHA Regional Administrator will make a prompt recommendation for the resumption of the...

  12. Current limiter circuit system

    Witcher, Joseph Brandon; Bredemann, Michael V.

    2017-09-05

    An apparatus comprising a steady state sensing circuit, a switching circuit, and a detection circuit. The steady state sensing circuit is connected to a first, a second and a third node. The first node is connected to a first device, the second node is connected to a second device, and the steady state sensing circuit causes a scaled current to flow at the third node. The scaled current is proportional to a voltage difference between the first and second node. The switching circuit limits an amount of current that flows between the first and second device. The detection circuit is connected to the third node and the switching circuit. The detection circuit monitors the scaled current at the third node and controls the switching circuit to limit the amount of the current that flows between the first and second device when the scaled current is greater than a desired level.

  13. Dose limits for ionising radiation

    Gifford, D.

    1989-01-01

    Dose limits for exposure to ionising radiation are assessed to see if they give sufficient protection both for the occupationally exposed and for the general public. It is concluded that current limits give a level of safety that satisfies the necessary criteria in the light of present knowledge and further reductions would be unlikely to improve standards of safety. (author)

  14. Time Limits : Effects on Recall

    Hirano, Kinue

    2000-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of differing time limits and the level of language proficiency on the written recalls of 66 Japanese EFL undergraduates. Results showed that different time limits affected total recall, but not main ideas recalled. Regardless of proficiency level, the 20-minute group (Group 2) recalled a greater number of idea units than the 8-minute group (Group 1). However, no significant difference was found between Groups 1 and 2 regarding the recall of main ideas, alth...

  15. Interference and memory capacity limitations.

    Endress, Ansgar D; Szabó, Szilárd

    2017-10-01

    Working memory (WM) is thought to have a fixed and limited capacity. However, the origins of these capacity limitations are debated, and generally attributed to active, attentional processes. Here, we show that the existence of interference among items in memory mathematically guarantees fixed and limited capacity limits under very general conditions, irrespective of any processing assumptions. Assuming that interference (a) increases with the number of interfering items and (b) brings memory performance to chance levels for large numbers of interfering items, capacity limits are a simple function of the relative influence of memorization and interference. In contrast, we show that time-based memory limitations do not lead to fixed memory capacity limitations that are independent of the timing properties of an experiment. We show that interference can mimic both slot-like and continuous resource-like memory limitations, suggesting that these types of memory performance might not be as different as commonly believed. We speculate that slot-like WM limitations might arise from crowding-like phenomena in memory when participants have to retrieve items. Further, based on earlier research on parallel attention and enumeration, we suggest that crowding-like phenomena might be a common reason for the 3 major cognitive capacity limitations. As suggested by Miller (1956) and Cowan (2001), these capacity limitations might arise because of a common reason, even though they likely rely on distinct processes. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Partnerships – Limited partnerships and limited liability limited partnerships

    Henning, Johan J.

    2000-01-01

    Consideration of the Limited Liability Partnership Act 2000 which introduced a new corporate entity, carrying the designations “partnership” and “limited” which allow members to limit their liability whilst organising themselves internally as a partnership. Article by Professor Johan Henning (Director of the Centre for Corporate Law and Practice, IALS and Dean of the Faculty of Law, University of the Free State, South Africa). Published in Amicus Curiae - Journal of the Institute of Advanced ...

  17. HOME Income Limits

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — HOME Income Limits are calculated using the same methodology that HUD uses for calculating the income limits for the Section 8 program. These limits are based on HUD...

  18. Toward Modeling Limited Plasticity in Ceramic Materials

    Grinfeld, Michael; Schoenfeld, Scott E; Wright, Tim W

    2008-01-01

    The characteristic features of many armor-related ceramic materials are the anisotropy on the micro-scale level and the very limited, though non-vanishing, plasticity due to limited number of the planes for plastic slip...

  19. Limits on fundamental limits to computation.

    Markov, Igor L

    2014-08-14

    An indispensable part of our personal and working lives, computing has also become essential to industries and governments. Steady improvements in computer hardware have been supported by periodic doubling of transistor densities in integrated circuits over the past fifty years. Such Moore scaling now requires ever-increasing efforts, stimulating research in alternative hardware and stirring controversy. To help evaluate emerging technologies and increase our understanding of integrated-circuit scaling, here I review fundamental limits to computation in the areas of manufacturing, energy, physical space, design and verification effort, and algorithms. To outline what is achievable in principle and in practice, I recapitulate how some limits were circumvented, and compare loose and tight limits. Engineering difficulties encountered by emerging technologies may indicate yet unknown limits.

  20. Solubility limits on radionuclide dissolution

    Kerrisk, J.F.

    1984-12-31

    This paper examines the effects of solubility in limiting dissolution rates of a number of important radionuclides from spent fuel and high-level waste. Two simple dissolution models were used for calculations that would be characteristics of a Yucca Mountain repository. A saturation-limited dissolution model, in which the water flowing through the repository is assumed to be saturated with each waste element, is very conservative in that it overestimates dissolution rates. A diffusion-limited dissolution model, in which element-dissolution rates are limited by diffusion of waste elements into water flowing past the waste, is more realistic, but it is subject to some uncertainty at this time. Dissolution rates of some elements (Pu, Am, Sn, Th, Zr, Sm) are always limited by solubility. Dissolution rates of other elements (Cs, Tc, Np, Sr, C, I) are never solubility limited; their release would be limited by dissolution of the bulk waste form. Still other elements (U, Cm, Ni, Ra) show solubility-limited dissolution under some conditions. 9 references, 3 tables.

  1. Variance in total levels of phospholipase C zeta (PLC-ζ) in human sperm may limit the applicability of quantitative immunofluorescent analysis as a diagnostic indicator of oocyte activation capability.

    Kashir, Junaid; Jones, Celine; Mounce, Ginny; Ramadan, Walaa M; Lemmon, Bernadette; Heindryckx, Bjorn; de Sutter, Petra; Parrington, John; Turner, Karen; Child, Tim; McVeigh, Enda; Coward, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    To examine whether similar levels of phospholipase C zeta (PLC-ζ) protein are present in sperm from men whose ejaculates resulted in normal oocyte activation, and to examine whether a predominant pattern of PLC-ζ localization is linked to normal oocyte activation ability. Laboratory study. University laboratory. Control subjects (men with proven oocyte activation capacity; n = 16) and men whose sperm resulted in recurrent intracytoplasmic sperm injection failure (oocyte activation deficient [OAD]; n = 5). Quantitative immunofluorescent analysis of PLC-ζ protein in human sperm. Total levels of PLC-ζ fluorescence, proportions of sperm exhibiting PLC-ζ immunoreactivity, and proportions of PLC-ζ localization patterns in sperm from control and OAD men. Sperm from control subjects presented a significantly higher proportion of sperm exhibiting PLC-ζ immunofluorescence compared with infertile men diagnosed with OAD (82.6% and 27.4%, respectively). Total levels of PLC-ζ in sperm from individual control and OAD patients exhibited significant variance, with sperm from 10 out of 16 (62.5%) exhibiting levels similar to OAD samples. Predominant PLC-ζ localization patterns varied between control and OAD samples with no predictable or consistent pattern. The results indicate that sperm from control men exhibited significant variance in total levels of PLC-ζ protein, as well as significant variance in the predominant localization pattern. Such variance may hinder the diagnostic application of quantitative PLC-ζ immunofluorescent analysis. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Study on the effect of stressful surrounding on the immuno-function and sex-hormones levels in mouse models of stress (limited space of activity surtounded by water)

    Ye Huolin; Yang Junping; Qiu Liying

    2008-01-01

    Objective: to study the animal behavior and immuno-function changes under psychostressful conditions through investigating those reactions in mouse models of stress. Methods: Mouse models of stress (n=60) were prepared with the animals isolated and confined to a 4 cm 2 wooden platfrom 20 cm above water surface for 12h (n=20), 24h (n=20) or 48h (n=20). The animals were sacrificed after the experiment: thymas and spleen weight were measured in half of the animals and serum cortisol, aldoste- tone, E 2 , T levels were measured with RIA in the other half. Twenty animals were kept under hormal enviromenat and served as controls. Results: The genelal behavior in the stressful models changes markedly with evidence in favor of anxiety resulting in decreased stamina. The thymas weight and thymic index (at 24h, 48h) as well as splenic weight and splenic index (at 12, 24 and 48h) in the models were significantly lower than those in the controls (P 2 , T, levels were significantly lower (P also <0.01). Conclusion: Psychostress could induce behavior changes with alteration of immuno-function and hormone levels in the experimental animals (mouse models of stress), resulting in deterioration of general health condition. (authors)

  3. The need to promote behaviour change at the cultural level: one factor explaining the limited impact of the MEMA kwa Vijana adolescent sexual health intervention in rural Tanzania. A process evaluation

    Wight Daniel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few of the many behavioral sexual health interventions in Africa have been rigorously evaluated. Where biological outcomes have been measured, improvements have rarely been found. One of the most rigorous trials was of the multi-component MEMA kwa Vijana adolescent sexual health programme, which showed improvements in knowledge and reported attitudes and behaviour, but none in biological outcomes. This paper attempts to explain these outcomes by reviewing the process evaluation findings, particularly in terms of contextual factors. Methods A large-scale, primarily qualitative process evaluation based mainly on participant observation identified the principal contextual barriers and facilitators of behavioural change. Results The contextual barriers involved four interrelated socio-structural factors: culture (i.e. shared practices and systems of belief, economic circumstances, social status, and gender. At an individual level they appeared to operate through the constructs of the theories underlying MEMA kwa Vijana - Social Cognitive Theory and the Theory of Reasoned Action – but the intervention was unable to substantially modify these individual-level constructs, apart from knowledge. Conclusion The process evaluation suggests that one important reason for this failure is that the intervention did not operate sufficiently at a structural level, particularly in regard to culture. Recently most structural interventions have focused on gender or/and economics. Complementing these with a cultural approach could address the belief systems that justify and perpetuate gender and economic inequalities, as well as other barriers to behaviour change.

  4. MAESPA: a model to study interactions between water limitation, environmental drivers and vegetation function at tree and stand levels, with an example application to [CO2] × drought interactions

    B. E. Medlyn

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Process-based models (PBMs of vegetation function can be used to interpret and integrate experimental results. Water limitation to plant carbon uptake is a highly uncertain process in the context of environmental change, and many experiments have been carried out that study drought limitations to vegetation function at spatial scales from seedlings to entire canopies. What is lacking in the synthesis of these experiments is a quantitative tool incorporating a detailed mechanistic representation of the water balance that can be used to integrate and analyse experimental results at scales of both the whole-plant and the forest canopy. To fill this gap, we developed an individual tree-based model (MAESPA, largely based on combining the well-known MAESTRA and SPA ecosystem models. The model includes a hydraulically-based model of stomatal conductance, root water uptake routines, drainage, infiltration, runoff and canopy interception, as well as detailed radiation interception and leaf physiology routines from the MAESTRA model. The model can be applied both to single plants of arbitrary size and shape, as well as stands of trees. The utility of this model is demonstrated by studying the interaction between elevated [CO2] (eCa and drought. Based on theory, this interaction is generally expected to be positive, so that plants growing in eCa should be less susceptible to drought. Experimental results, however, are varied. We apply the model to a previously published experiment on droughted cherry, and show that changes in plant parameters due to long-term growth at eCa (acclimation may strongly affect the outcome of Ca × drought experiments. We discuss potential applications of MAESPA and some of the key uncertainties in process representation.

  5. Limited economic evaluation to assess the effectiveness of a university-wide office ergonomics program.

    Bidassie, Balmatee; McGlothlin, James D; Goh, Alina; Feyen, Robert G; Barany, James W

    2010-05-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the effectiveness and provide a limited economic evaluation of an office ergonomics program at a major university from 1995 to 2007. The relationship between office-related recordable injuries, reported lost time, severity of these injuries, and the Workers' Compensation (WC) paid was analyzed and the corresponding incident cost was calculated. Two major datasets analyzed were OSHA 200/300 logs (1991-2007) and WC claims paid (1999-2007). Since the beginning of the office ergonomics program in 1995 and through 2007 (13-year period), the number of office cumulative trauma disorder (CTD) cases decreased by 53%. Since the official start (in 1999) of a 50-50 cost share agreement for office equipment purchases between the university's Safety and Health Department (SHD) and the university departments evaluated, it was observed that the incident rate decreased by 63%, Total Days Away/restrict or Transfer (DART) rate decreased by 41%, Lost Time Case (LTC) rate decreased by 71% and office-related carpal tunnel syndrome decreased by almost 50%. The long-term goal of this research is to demonstrate the self-sustainability of an office ergonomics program by showing that equipment costs are eventually offset by a decrease in WC claims paid and lost time from office-related injuries and illnesses. While limited, this research helps in cost-justifying the implementation of future office ergonomics programs for large organizations. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Robust test limits

    Albers, Willem/Wim; Kallenberg, W.C.M.; Otten, G.D.

    1997-01-01

    Because of inaccuracies of the measurement process inspection of manufactured parts requires test limits which are more strict than the given specification limits. Test limits derived under the assumption of normality for product characteristics turn out to violate the prescribed bound on the

  7. OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens Standards Exposure Control Plan

    Luhrs, Caro Elise; Teitelbaum, Rita

    1993-01-01

    The Hummer Associates Exposure Control Plan is designed to reduce significant occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens and infectious materials for Hummer Associates health care personnel. Under universal precautions, all patients and all body fluids are considered potentially infectious for bloodborne pathogens. Medical personnel need not be at increased risk if universal precautions are correctly understood and followed. This program covers all employees who could reasonably anticipate contact with blood or other potentially infectious materials during the performance of their job responsibilities. Although HIV and hepatitis B are mentioned most often, this program applies to all bloodborne diseases. The two main components needed to implement this program are universal precautions and engineering/work practice controls. This program covers all employees who may have occupational exposure to blood or other potentially infectious materials. Other aspects of this program are discussed.

  8. Planning for compliance: OSHA's bloodborne pathogen rule.

    Bednar, B; Duke, M C

    1990-11-01

    Overall, the bloodborne pathogen rule constitutes a reasonable response to a significant threat to workplace safety. The risks to dialysis workers from HBV and HIV must be minimized or eliminated and the rule is generally consistent with the consensus approach. Unfortunately for dialysis providers, the rule is not exempt from the law of unintended consequences: government regulation will always have impact beyond its object. Promulgation of the final rule will immediately increase the expenses of dialysis providers. Additionally, the enormity of the HBV and HIV problem coupled with the open-ended nature of the rule's key provisions will almost certainly bring additional costs. So long as dialysis reimbursement remains flat, the unintended consequence of the bloodborne pathogen rule may be to quicken the pace of consolidation in the dialysis service market. The added burden of compliance may be too much for small independent facilities. Only large chains may have the resources to comply and survive. To forestall this effect and to provide employees with maximum protection, all dialysis providers should plan now for compliance.

  9. KADIKÖY İLÇESİNDEKİ İLK, ORTA VE YÜKSEK ÖĞRETİM KURUMLARINDAKİ BİLGİSAYAR LABORATUARLARININ OSHA ERGONOMİK KRİTERLERİNE GÖRE İNCELENMESİ

    ŞAKAR, Yavuz ERDOĞAN/ Mehmet Fatih ERKOÇ/ Çiğde

    2014-01-01

    Bu araştırmanın amacı, öğretim kurumlarındaki bilgisayar laboratuarlarının ergonomik kriterlere uygunluğunu incelemektir. Bu amacı gerçekleştirmek üzere US-OSHA tarafından geliştirilen “Bilgisayarlı Çalışma Ortamlarında Ergonomi Uyum Ölçeği” araştırmacılar tarafından Türkçeye çevrilmiştir. Geçerlilik ve güvenirlik çalışması tamamlanarak, bazı maddeler çıkarılmıştır. Ölçeğin, cronbach alfa iç tutarlılık katsayısı 0,81 olarak hesaplanmıştır. Elde edilen sonuçlar OSHA Ergonomik Kriterler ölçeğin...

  10. 7 CFR 1400.204 - Limited partnerships, limited liability partnerships, limited liability companies, corporations...

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limited partnerships, limited liability partnerships..., limited liability partnerships, limited liability companies, corporations, and other similar legal entities. (a) A limited partnership, limited liability partnership, limited liability company, corporation...

  11. Passive fault current limiting device

    Evans, Daniel J.; Cha, Yung S.

    1999-01-01

    A passive current limiting device and isolator is particularly adapted for use at high power levels for limiting excessive currents in a circuit in a fault condition such as an electrical short. The current limiting device comprises a magnetic core wound with two magnetically opposed, parallel connected coils of copper, a high temperature superconductor or other electrically conducting material, and a fault element connected in series with one of the coils. Under normal operating conditions, the magnetic flux density produced by the two coils cancel each other. Under a fault condition, the fault element is triggered to cause an imbalance in the magnetic flux density between the two coils which results in an increase in the impedance in the coils. While the fault element may be a separate current limiter, switch, fuse, bimetal strip or the like, it preferably is a superconductor current limiter conducting one-half of the current load compared to the same limiter wired to carry the total current of the circuit. The major voltage during a fault condition is in the coils wound on the common core in a preferred embodiment.

  12. JET pump limiter

    Sonnenberg, K.; Deksnis, E.; Shaw, R.; Reiter, D.

    1988-01-01

    JET plans to install two pump limiter modules which can be used for belt-limiter, inner-wall and X-point discharges and, also, for 1-2s as the main limiter. A design is presented which is compatible with two diagnostic systems, and which allows partial removal of the pump limiter to provide access for remote-handling operations. The high heat-flux components are initially cooled during a pulse. Heat is removed between discharges by radiation and pressure contacts to a water-cooled support structure. The pumping edge will be made of annealed pyrolytic graphite. Exhaust efficiency has been estimated, for a 1-d edge model, using a Monte-Carlo calculation of neutral gas transport. When the pump limiter is operated together with other wall components we expect an efficiency of ≅ 5% (2.5 x 10 21 part/s). As a main limiter the efficiency increases to about 10%. (author)

  13. Performance limitations at ISABELLE

    Keil, E.

    1975-01-01

    The transverse stability of coasting beams in the planned ISABELLE storage rings was studied. The beam--beam tune shift limitation at 0.005 can be avoided, and a computer simulation seems to show 0.005 is a pessimistic limit. For beams of reasonable smoothness on the edge, the actual limit should be somewhat higher. Some coupling effects due to the beam--beam interaction are also examined

  14. Limit loads in nozzles

    Zouain, N.

    1983-01-01

    The static method for the evaluation of the limit loads of a perfectly elasto-plastic structure is presented. Using the static theorem of Limit Analysis and the Finite Element Method, a lower bound for the colapso load can be obtained through a linear programming problem. This formulation if then applied to symmetrically loaded shells of revolution and some numerical results of limit loads in nozzles are also presented. (Author) [pt

  15. Limit analysis via creep

    Taroco, E.; Feijoo, R.A.

    1981-07-01

    In this paper it is presented a variational method for the limit analysis of an ideal plastic solid. This method has been denominated as Modified Secundary Creep and enables to find the collapse loads through a minimization of a functional and a limit process. Given an ideal plastic material it is shown how to determinate the associated secundary creep constitutive equation. Finally, as an application, it is found the limit load in an pressurized von Mises rigid plastic sphere. (Author) [pt

  16. Over the limit.

    Qu, G

    1989-01-01

    With over 1 billion population, China is adding some 15 million to that total each year. And in the 18 years from 1982 to 2000, the net increase of Chinese population is expected to exceed 200 million. Because of the gigantic pressure from population and some mistakes in policies, the levels of ecological destruction and environment pollution are both serious. This includes deforestation, grassland degradation, desert encroachment, water resources shortage, and waste of mineral resources. Natural disasters including floods and droughts caused by those problems happen more and more frequently. If development damages the resource base, it can only result in a false prosperity, the so-called hollow economy. A large number of environmental problems result directly or indirectly from the pressure of population growth. Studies show that the appropriate number of people that can be supported by China's 9.6 million sq. km is about 700 million. However, this limit is now exceeded by over 300 million people, and will be exceeded by 500 million by the end of this century. Therefore, the task is to implement a birth control policy. At present, in urban areas, the goal of family planning has been reached, but in rural areas hard work is needed. Population control in urban areas, especially in big and medium-sized cities, includes dealing with the inflow of migrants from the countryside. There are 13 cities with a population above 2 million, 37 cities above 1-2 million, and 75 cities above 0.5-1 million. A lot of cities are very crowded, exerting great pressure on the environment. The booming of rural enterprises could provide a good solution to control the flow of rural people into big and medium-sized cities. The relationship between population, resources, environment, and development should be managed properly.

  17. Numerical Limit Analysis:

    Damkilde, Lars

    2007-01-01

    Limit State analysis has a long history and many prominent researchers have contributed. The theoretical foundation is based on the upper- and lower-bound theorems which give a very comprehensive and elegant formulation on complicated physical problems. In the pre-computer age Limit State analysis...... also enabled engineers to solve practical problems within reinforced concrete, steel structures and geotechnics....

  18. Advanced limiters for ISX

    Mioduszewski, P.K.; Edmonds, P.H.; Sheffield, J.

    1982-01-01

    Continuous removal of heat and particles becomes a vital necessity in future steady-state fusion devices. The pump limiter seems to be an attractive concept to combine these two tasks. On ISX, various schemes of pump limiters are being explored with the final goal to furnish the ISX--C device with a pump limiter to handle heat removal and particle control in steady state. The emphasis of the present paper is on pump limiters based on ballistic particle collection. If this concept turns out to be successful in supplying sufficient pumping efficiency, it may be possible to design pump limiters without a leading edge. Analytical calculations of the particle collection efficiency are given for various limiter configurations. Pumping efficiencies of approximately 4--10%, depending on the specific configuration, seem to be feasible and should be sufficient for steady-state operation. Initial experimental results on pump limiter studies in ISX--B confirm the calculated collection efficiencies. By measuring the ion saturation current to the limiter blade and the pressure buildup simultaneously, we found a correlation between the incident particle flux and the pressure rise that agrees well with a simple model

  19. Limits to Inclusion

    Hansen, Janne Hedegaard

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I will argue that a theoretical identification of the limit to inclusion is needed in the conceptual identification of inclusion. On the one hand, inclusion is formulated as a vision that is, in principle, limitless. On the other hand, there seems to be an agreement that inclusion has a limit in the pedagogical practice. However,…

  20. Mitigating greenhouse: Limited time, limited options

    Moriarty, Patrick; Honnery, Damon

    2008-01-01

    Most human-caused climate change comes from fossil fuel combustion emissions. To avoid the risk of serious climate change, very recent research suggests that emission reductions will need to be both large and rapidly implemented. We argue that technical solutions-improving energy efficiency, use of renewable and nuclear energy, and carbon capture and sequestration-can only be of minor importance, mainly given the limited time available to take effective climate action. Only curbing energy use, perhaps through 'social efficiency' gains, particularly in the high-energy consumption countries, can provide the rapid emissions reductions needed. The social efficiency approach requires a basic rethinking in how we can satisfy our human needs with low environmental impacts. Large cuts in emissions could then occur rapidly, but only if resistance to such changes can be overcome. Particularly in transport, there are also serious potential conflicts between the technical and the social efficiency approaches, requiring a choice to be made

  1. Modeling Complex Time Limits

    Oleg Svatos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyze complexity of time limits we can find especially in regulated processes of public administration. First we review the most popular process modeling languages. There is defined an example scenario based on the current Czech legislature which is then captured in discussed process modeling languages. Analysis shows that the contemporary process modeling languages support capturing of the time limit only partially. This causes troubles to analysts and unnecessary complexity of the models. Upon unsatisfying results of the contemporary process modeling languages we analyze the complexity of the time limits in greater detail and outline lifecycles of a time limit using the multiple dynamic generalizations pattern. As an alternative to the popular process modeling languages there is presented PSD process modeling language, which supports the defined lifecycles of a time limit natively and therefore allows keeping the models simple and easy to understand.

  2. Moving toroidal limiter

    Ikuta, Kazunari; Miyahara, Akira.

    1983-06-01

    The concept of the limiter-divertor proposed by Mirnov is extended to a toroidal limiter-divertor (which we call moving toroidal limiter) using the stream of ferromagnetic balls coated with a low Z materials such as plastics, graphite and ceramics. An important advantage of the use of the ferromagnetic materials would be possible soft landing of the balls on a catcher, provided that the temperature of the balls is below Curie point. Moreover, moving toroidal limiter would work as a protector of the first wall not only against the vertical movement of plasma ring but also against the violent inward motion driven by major disruption because the orbit of the ball in the case of moving toroidal limiter distributes over the small major radius side of the toroidal plasma. (author)

  3. Approach to DOE threshold guidance limits

    Shuman, R.D.; Wickham, L.E.

    1984-01-01

    The need for less restrictive criteria governing disposal of extremely low-level radioactive waste has long been recognized. The Low-Level Waste Management Program has been directed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to aid in the development of a threshold guidance limit for DOE low-level waste facilities. Project objectives are concernd with the definition of a threshold limit dose and pathway analysis of radionuclide transport within selected exposure scenarios at DOE sites. Results of the pathway analysis will be used to determine waste radionuclide concentration guidelines that meet the defined threshold limit dose. Methods of measurement and verification of concentration limits round out the project's goals. Work on defining a threshold limit dose is nearing completion. Pathway analysis of sanitary landfill operations at the Savannah River Plant and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is in progress using the DOSTOMAN computer code. Concentration limit calculations and determination of implementation procedures shall follow completion of the pathways work. 4 references

  4. Upper limit of peak area

    Helene, O.A.M.

    1982-08-01

    The determination of the upper limit of peak area in a multi-channel spectra, with a known significance level is discussed. This problem is specially important when the peak area is masked by the background statistical fluctuations. The problem is exactly solved and, thus, the results are valid in experiments with small number of events. The results are submitted to a Monte Carlo test and applied to the 92 Nb beta decay. (Author) [pt

  5. Application of fault current limiters

    Neumann, A.

    2007-11-30

    This report presents the results of a study commissioned by the Department for Business, Enterprise and Industry (BERR; formerly the Department of Trade and Industry) into the application of fault current limiters in the UK. The study reviewed the current state of fault current limiter (FCL) technology and regulatory position in relation to all types of current limiters. It identified significant research and development work with respect to medium voltage FCLs and a move to high voltage. Appropriate FCL technologies being developed include: solid state breakers; superconducting FCLs (including superconducting transformers); magnetic FCLs; and active network controllers. Commercialisation of these products depends on successful field tests and experience, plus material development in the case of high temperature superconducting FCL technologies. The report describes FCL techniques, the current state of FCL technologies, practical applications and future outlook for FCL technologies, distribution fault level analysis and an outline methodology for assessing the materiality of the fault level problem. A roadmap is presented that provides an 'action agenda' to advance the fault level issues associated with low carbon networks.

  6. Tokamak pump limiters

    Conn, R.W.

    1984-05-01

    Recent experiments with a scoop limiter without active internal pumping have been carried out in the PDX tokamak with up to 6MW of auxiliary neutral beam heating. Experiments have also been done with a rotating head pump limiter in the PLT tokamak in conjunction with RF plasma heating. Extensive experiments have been done in the ISX-B tokamak and first experiments have been completed with the ALT-I limiter in TEXTOR. The pump limiter modules in these latter two machines have internal getter pumping. Experiments in ISX-B are with ohmic and auxiliary neutral beam heating. The results in ISX-B and TEXTOR show that active density control and particle removal is achieved with pump limiters. In ISX-B, the boundary layer (or scape-off layer) plasma partially screens the core plasma from gas injection. In both ISX-B and TEXTOR, the pressure internal to the module scales linearly with plasma density but in ISX-B, with neutral beam injection, a nonlinear increase is observed at the highest densities studied. Plasma plugging is the suspected cause. Results from PDX suggest that a region may exist in which core plasma energy confinement improves using a pump limiter during neutral beam injection. Asymmetric radial profiles and an increased edge electron temperature are observed in discharges with improved confinement. The injection of small amounts of neon into ISX-B has more clearly shown an improved electron core energy confinement during neutral beam injection. While carried out with a regular limiter, this Z-mode of operation is ideal for use with pump limiters and should be a way to achieve energy confinement times similar to values for H-mode tokamak plasmas. The implication of all these results for the design of a reactor pump limiter is described

  7. Tokamak pump limiters

    Conn, R.W.; California Univ., Los Angeles

    1984-01-01

    Recent experiments with a scoop limiter without active internal pumping have been carried out in the PDX tokamak with up to 6 MW of auxiliary neutral beam heating. Experiments have also been performed with a rotating head pump limiter in the PLT tokamak in conjunction with RF plasma heating. Extensive experiments have been done in the ISX-B tokamak and first experiments have been completed with the ALT-I limiter in TEXTOR. The pump limiter modules in these latter two machines have internal getter pumping. Experiments in ISX-B are with ohmic and auxiliary neutral beam heating. The results in ISX-B and TEXTOR show that active density control and particle removal is achieved with pump limiters. In ISX-B, the boundary layer (or scrape-off layer) plasma partially screens the core plasma from gas injection. In both ISX-B and TEXTOR, the pressure internal to the module scales linearly with plasma density but in ISX-B, with neutral beam injection, a nonlinear increase is observed at the highest densities studied. Plasma plugging is the suspected cause. Results from PDX suggest that a regime may exist in which core plasma energy confinement improves using a pump limiter during neutral beam injection. Asymmetric radial profiles and an increased edge electron temperature are observed in discharges with improved confinement. The injection of small amounts of neon into ISX-B has more clearly shown an improved electron core energy confinement during neutral beam injection. While carried out with a regular limiter, this 'Z-mode' of operation is ideal for use with pump limiters and should be a way to achieve energy confinement times similar to values for H-mode tokamak plasmas. The implication of all these results for the design of a reactor pump limiter is described. (orig.)

  8. Novel limiter pump topologies

    Schultz, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The use of limiter pumps as the principle plasma exhaust system of a magnetic confinement fusion device promises significant simplification, when compared to previously investigating divertor based systems. Further simplifications, such as the integration of the exhaust system with a radio frequency heating system and with the main reactor shield and structure are investigated below. The integrity of limiters in a reactor environment is threatened by many mechanisms, the most severe of which may be erosion by sputtering. Two novel topolgies are suggested which allow high erosion without limiter failure

  9. Novel limiter pump topologies

    Schultz, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The use of limiter pumps as the principle plasma exhaust system of a magnetic confinement fusion device promises significant simplification, when compared to previously investigating divertor based systems. Further simplifications, such as the integration of the exhaust system with a radio frequency heating system and with the main reactor shield and structure are investigated below. The integrity of limiters in a reactor environment is threatened by many mechanisms, the most severe of which may be erosion by sputtering. Two novel topologies are suggested which allow high erosion without limiter failure

  10. HUD Program Income Limits

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — Income limits used to determine the income eligibility of applicants for assistance under three programs authorized by the National Housing Act. These programs are...

  11. Limited Income and Resources

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Information for those with limited income and resources (those who may qualify for or already have the Low Income Subsidy to lower their prescription drug coverage...

  12. SIS - Annual Catch Limit

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Annual Catch Limit (ACL) dataset within the Species Information System (SIS) contains information and data related to management reference points and catch data.

  13. Limited Denial of Participation

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — A Limited Denial of Participation (LDP) is an action taken by a HUD Field Office or the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Single Family (DASSF) or Multifamily (DASMF)...

  14. Towards Improved Optical Limiters

    Huffman, Peter

    2002-01-01

    .... The first approach was to synthesize and study soluble thallium phthalocyanines. Thallium, due to its proximity to lead and indium on the periodic table, should exhibit favorable optical limiting properties...

  15. ACA Federal Upper Limits

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Affordable Care Act Federal Upper Limits (FUL) based on the weighted average of the most recently reported monthly average manufacturer price (AMP) for...

  16. HOME Rent Limits

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — In accordance with 24 CFR Part 92.252, HUD provides maximum HOME rent limits. The maximum HOME rents are the lesser of: The fair market rent for existing housing for...

  17. Limit lines for risk

    Cox, D.C.; Baybutt, P.

    1982-01-01

    Approaches to the regulation of risk from technological systems, such as nuclear power plants or chemical process plants, in which potential accidents may result in a broad range of adverse consequences must take into account several different aspects of risk. These include overall or average risk, accidents posing high relative risks, the rate at which accident probability decreases with increasing accident consequences, and the impact of high frequency, low consequence accidents. A hypothetical complementary cumulative distribution function (CCDF), with appropriately chosen parametric form, meets all these requirements. The Farmer limit line, by contrast, places limits on the risks due to individual accident sequences, and cannot adequately account for overall risk. This reduces its usefulness as a regulatory tool. In practice, the CCDF is used in the Canadian nuclear licensing process, while the Farmer limit line approach, supplemented by separate qualitative limits on overall risk, is employed in the United Kingdom

  18. Adjusting estimative prediction limits

    Masao Ueki; Kaoru Fueda

    2007-01-01

    This note presents a direct adjustment of the estimative prediction limit to reduce the coverage error from a target value to third-order accuracy. The adjustment is asymptotically equivalent to those of Barndorff-Nielsen & Cox (1994, 1996) and Vidoni (1998). It has a simpler form with a plug-in estimator of the coverage probability of the estimative limit at the target value. Copyright 2007, Oxford University Press.

  19. Smoothness of limit functors

    Abstract. Let S be a scheme. Assume that we are given an action of the one dimen- sional split torus Gm,S on a smooth affine S-scheme X. We consider the limit (also called attractor) subfunctor Xλ consisting of points whose orbit under the given action. 'admits a limit at 0'. We show that Xλ is representable by a smooth ...

  20. Safety and design limits

    Shishkov, L. K.; Gorbaev, V. A.; Tsyganov, S. V.

    2007-01-01

    The paper touches upon the issues of NPP safety ensuring at the stage of fuel load design and operation by applying special limitations for a series of parameters, that is, design limits. Two following approaches are compared: the one used by west specialists for the PWR reactor and the Russian approach employed for the WWER reactor. The closeness of approaches is established, differences that are mainly peculiarities of terms are noted (Authors)

  1. Altruism and Reproductive Limitations

    Carey J. Fitzgerald

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We examined how different types of reproductive limitations — functional (schizoid personality disorder and schizophrenia, physical (malnutrition, and sexual (bisexuality and homosexuality — influenced altruistic intentions toward hypothetical target individuals of differing degrees of relatedness (r = 0, .25, and .50. Participants were 312 undergraduate students who completed a questionnaire on altruism toward hypothetical friends, half-siblings, and siblings with these different types of reproductive limitations. Genetic relatedness and reproductive limitations did not influence altruistic decision-making when the cost of altruism was low but did as the cost of altruism increased, with participants being more likely to help a sibling over a half-sibling and a half-sibling over a friend. Participants also indicated they were more likely to help a healthy (control person over people with a reproductive limitation. Of the three types of reproductive limitations, functional limitations had the strongest effect on altruistic decision-making, indicating that people were less likely to help those who exhibit abnormal social behavior.

  2. Effluent release limits, sources and control

    Swindell, G.E.

    1977-01-01

    Objectives of radiation protection in relation to releases. Environmental transfer models for radionuclides. Relationship between releases, environmental levels and doses to persons. Establishment of release limits: Limits based on critical population group concept critical pathway analysis and identification of critical group. Limits based on optimization of radiation protection individual dose limits, collective doses and dose commitments 1) differential cost benefit analysis 2) authorized and operational limits taking account of future exposures. Monitoring of releases to the environment: Objectives of effluent monitoring. Typical sources and composition of effluents; design and operation of monitoring programmes; recording and reporting of monitoring results; complementary environmental monitoring. (orig.) [de

  3. Waste tank characterization sampling limits

    Tusler, L.A.

    1994-01-01

    This document is a result of the Plant Implementation Team Investigation into delayed reporting of the exotherm in Tank 241-T-111 waste samples. The corrective actions identified are to have immediate notification of appropriate Tank Farm Operations Shift Management if analyses with potential safety impact exceed established levels. A procedure, WHC-IP-0842 Section 12.18, ''TWRS Approved Sampling and Data Analysis by Designated Laboratories'' (WHC 1994), has been established to require all tank waste sampling (including core, auger and supernate) and tank vapor samples be performed using this document. This document establishes levels for specified analysis that require notification of the appropriate shift manager. The following categories provide numerical values for analysis that may indicate that a tank is either outside the operating specification or should be evaluated for inclusion on a Watch List. The information given is intended to translate an operating limit such as heat load, expressed in Btu/hour, to an analysis related limit, in this case cesium-137 and strontium-90 concentrations. By using the values provided as safety flags, the analytical laboratory personnel can notify a shift manager that a tank is in potential violation of an operating limit or that a tank should be considered for inclusion on a Watch List. The shift manager can then take appropriate interim measures until a final determination is made by engineering personnel

  4. Force Limit System

    Pawlik, Ralph; Krause, David; Bremenour, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The Force Limit System (FLS) was developed to protect test specimens from inadvertent overload. The load limit value is fully adjustable by the operator and works independently of the test system control as a mechanical (non-electrical) device. When a test specimen is loaded via an electromechanical or hydraulic test system, a chance of an overload condition exists. An overload applied to a specimen could result in irreparable damage to the specimen and/or fixturing. The FLS restricts the maximum load that an actuator can apply to a test specimen. When testing limited-run test articles or using very expensive fixtures, the use of such a device is highly recommended. Test setups typically use electronic peak protection, which can be the source of overload due to malfunctioning components or the inability to react quickly enough to load spikes. The FLS works independently of the electronic overload protection.

  5. Theory of limit cycles

    Ye, Yan-Qian; Lo, Chi Y

    1986-01-01

    Over the past two decades the theory of limit cycles, especially for quadratic differential systems, has progressed dramatically in China as well as in other countries. This monograph, updating the 1964 first edition, includes these recent developments, as revised by eight of the author's colleagues in their own areas of expertise. The first part of the book deals with limit cycles of general plane stationary systems, including their existence, nonexistence, stability, and uniqueness. The second section discusses the global topological structure of limit cycles and phase-portraits of quadratic systems. Finally, the last section collects important results that could not be included under the subject matter of the previous two sections or that have appeared in the literature very recently. The book as a whole serves as a reference for college seniors, graduate students, and researchers in mathematics and physics.

  6. 41 CFR 109-50.204 - Limitations.

    2010-07-01

    ... DISPOSAL AUTHORITIES 50.2-Math and Science Equipment Gift Program § 109-50.204 Limitations. (a) Excess and... (or unlimited) level of authority. (d) Gifts shall be serviceable and in working order. Disposal...

  7. Hadron collider luminosity limitations

    Evans, Lyndon R

    1992-01-01

    The three colliders operated to date have taught us a great deal about the behaviour of both bunched and debunched beams in storage rings. The main luminosity limitations are now well enough understood that most of them can be stronglu attenuated or eliminated by approriate design precautions. Experience with the beam-beam interaction in both the SPS and the Tevatron allow us to predict the performance of the new generation of colliders with some degree of confidence. One of the main challenges that the accelerator physicist faces is the problem of the dynamic aperture limitations due to the lower field quality expected, imposed by economic and other constraints.

  8. SLC kicker magnet limitations

    Cassel, R.; Donaldson, A.; Mattison, T.; Bowden, G.; Weaver, J.; Bulos, F.; Fiander, D.

    1991-01-01

    The SLC Damping Ring kicker magnets requires a fast magnetic field rise time of 58 nsec, a peak field of 800 gauss, a pulse amplitude stability of 0.01%, and a reasonable operational lifetime. The original kicker magnets designed by SLAC and at Fermi were not able to fulfill the SLC kicker requirements. Extensive studies were conducted to determine the limitation in the magnets, response of the ferrite in kicker magnet, and the modifications needed to improve the kicker magnet performance. The paper details the SLAC and Fermi kicker magnets limitation of performance

  9. Summary of Dissolved Concentration Limits

    Yueting Chen

    2001-01-01

    According to the Technical Work Plan titled Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report for SR (CRWMS M and O 2000a), the purpose of this study is to perform abstractions on solubility limits of radioactive elements based on the process-level information and thermodynamic databases provided by Natural Environment Program Operations (NEPO) and Waste Package Operations (WPO). The scope of this analysis is to produce solubility limits as functions, distributions, or constants for all transported radioactive elements identified by the Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) radioisotope screening. Results from an expert elicitation for solubility limits of most radioactive elements were used in the previous Total System Performance Assessments (TSPAs). However, the elicitation conducted in 1993 does not meet the criteria set forth by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) due to lack of documentation and traceability (Kotra et al. 1996, Section 3). Therefore, at the Waste Form Abstraction Workshop held on February 2-4, 1999, at Albuquerque, New Mexico, the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) decided to develop geochemical models to study solubility for the proposed Monitored Geologic Repository. WPO/NEPO is to develop process-level solubility models, including review and compilation of relevant thermodynamic data. PAO's responsibility is to perform abstractions based on the process models and chemical conditions and to produce solubility distributions or response surfaces applicable to the proposed repository. The results of this analysis and conceptual model will feed the performance assessment for Total System Performance Assessment--Site Recommendation (TSPA-SR) and Total System Performance Assessment--License Application (TSPA-LA), and to the Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report section on concentration limits

  10. Summary of Dissolved Concentration Limits

    Yueting Chen

    2001-06-11

    According to the Technical Work Plan titled Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report for SR (CRWMS M&O 2000a), the purpose of this study is to perform abstractions on solubility limits of radioactive elements based on the process-level information and thermodynamic databases provided by Natural Environment Program Operations (NEPO) and Waste Package Operations (WPO). The scope of this analysis is to produce solubility limits as functions, distributions, or constants for all transported radioactive elements identified by the Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) radioisotope screening. Results from an expert elicitation for solubility limits of most radioactive elements were used in the previous Total System Performance Assessments (TSPAs). However, the elicitation conducted in 1993 does not meet the criteria set forth by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) due to lack of documentation and traceability (Kotra et al. 1996, Section 3). Therefore, at the Waste Form Abstraction Workshop held on February 2-4, 1999, at Albuquerque, New Mexico, the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) decided to develop geochemical models to study solubility for the proposed Monitored Geologic Repository. WPO/NEPO is to develop process-level solubility models, including review and compilation of relevant thermodynamic data. PAO's responsibility is to perform abstractions based on the process models and chemical conditions and to produce solubility distributions or response surfaces applicable to the proposed repository. The results of this analysis and conceptual model will feed the performance assessment for Total System Performance Assessment--Site Recommendation (TSPA-SR) and Total System Performance Assessment--License Application (TSPA-LA), and to the Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report section on concentration limits.

  11. Working within limits

    Gerda Jehoel-Gijsbers

    2010-01-01

    Original title: Beperkt aan het werk. For many years, the Netherlands was known as a country with high levels of sickness absenteeism and a large number of incapacity benefit claimants. At European level, this was sometimes referred to as 'the Dutch disease'. Many policy measures later,

  12. Activation analysis. Detection limits

    Revel, G.

    1999-01-01

    Numerical data and limits of detection related to the four irradiation modes, often used in activation analysis (reactor neutrons, 14 MeV neutrons, photon gamma and charged particles) are presented here. The technical presentation of the activation analysis is detailed in the paper P 2565 of Techniques de l'Ingenieur. (A.L.B.)

  13. Thermal background noise limitations

    Gulkis, S.

    1982-01-01

    Modern detection systems are increasingly limited in sensitivity by the background thermal photons which enter the receiving system. Expressions for the fluctuations of detected thermal radiation are derived. Incoherent and heterodyne detection processes are considered. References to the subject of photon detection statistics are given.

  14. The Copyright Agency Limited.

    Morgan, Caroline

    1993-01-01

    The evolution and functions of Australia's Copyright Agency Limited are described. The agency is a copyright collecting organization which collectively administers the rights of authors and publishers whose works are copied in education, and enters into blanket agreements with educational authorities outside the existing statutory license. Some…

  15. Occupational dose equivalent limits

    Goldfinch, E.P.

    1980-01-01

    This paper considers methods of limiting individual radiation risks by recognizing the variation of risk with age at exposure, taking into account both somatic and genetic risks and proposes a simple formula for controlling individual cumulative exposure and hence risk. (Author)

  16. The Limits of Accountability.

    Bailey, Stephen K.

    This discussion, presented at the Regent's Trustees' Conference, February 1973, reviews the limits of accountability in higher education. Managerial efficiency is suggested to assist in eliminating educational and financial waste. This, however, is the secondary concept emphasized. The primary emphasis indicates the legitimacy of the claims that a…

  17. Limitations on blanket performance

    Malang, S.

    1999-01-01

    The limitations on the performance of breeding blankets in a fusion power plant are evaluated. The breeding blankets will be key components of a plant and their limitations with regard to power density, thermal efficiency and lifetime could determine to a large degree the attractiveness of a power plant. The performance of two rather well known blanket concepts under development in the frame of the European Blanket Programme is assessed and their limitations are compared with more advanced (and more speculative) concepts. An important issue is the question of which material (structure, breeder, multiplier, coatings) will limit the performance and what improvement would be possible with a 'better' structural material. This evaluation is based on the premise that the performance of the power plant will be limited by the blankets (including first wall) and not by other components, e.g. divertors, or the plasma itself. However, the justness of this premise remains to be seen. It is shown that the different blanket concepts cover a large range of allowable power densities and achievable thermal efficiencies, and it is concluded that there is a high incentive to go for better performance in spite of possibly higher blanket cost. However, such high performance blankets are usually based on materials and technologies not yet developed and there is a rather high risk that the development could fail. Therefore, it is explained that a part of the development effort should be devoted to concepts where the materials and technologies are more or less in hand in order to ensure that blankets for a DEMO reactor can be developed and tested in a given time frame. (orig.)

  18. The philosophy of dose limitation

    Recht, P.

    1981-01-01

    The evolution of concepts and terms appearing in the European Rules of 15 July 1980 is briefly described. After a period where ''tolerance doses'' represent definite limits which should be respected, appears the concept of a ''as low as possible'' and ''as low as practicable'' level. The hypothesis that any exposure represents a risk which should be avoided is taken into account in the later evolution. As a consequence one has to examine the advantages and disadvantages in other words to make a cost-benefit analysis. This evolution leads to the concepts of justification and optimization used at the present time. (author)

  19. Dose limits cause unacceptable risk

    Collier, Sylvia.

    1985-01-01

    This paper on radiation dose limits for workers and the public discusses the following: Medical Research Council report; safety standards; risk assessment; deaths from cancers; biological radiation effects; UK legislation; low-level radiation; public concern; UKAEA staff survey; Ionising Radiations Regulations; United Nations Scientific Committee on Effects of Atomic Radiation; US studies on work force in nuclear establishments; problems of extrapolation; Japanese data from Hiroshima and Nagasaki; International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations; studies on uranium miners; UK Health and Safety Executive; UK National Radiological Protection Board. (U.K.)

  20. Limits to power system growth

    Slater, S.M.; Klein, A.C.; Webb, B.J.; Pauley, K.A.

    1993-01-01

    In the design of space nuclear power systems a variety of conversion techniques may be used, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. A study was performed which analyzed over 120 proposed system designs. The designs were compared to identify the optimum conversion system as a function of power level and find limits to specific mass (kg/kWe) for each power cycle. Furthermore, the component masses were studied to determine which component of the overall design contributes the most to total system mass over a variety of power levels. The results can provide a focus for future research efforts by selecting the best conversion technology for the desired power range, and optimizing the system component which contributes most to the total mass

  1. Age Limit of Pediatrics.

    Hardin, Amy Peykoff; Hackell, Jesse M

    2017-09-01

    Pediatrics is a multifaceted specialty that encompasses children's physical, psychosocial, developmental, and mental health. Pediatric care may begin periconceptionally and continues through gestation, infancy, childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood. Although adolescence and young adulthood are recognizable phases of life, an upper age limit is not easily demarcated and varies depending on the individual patient. The establishment of arbitrary age limits on pediatric care by health care providers should be discouraged. The decision to continue care with a pediatrician or pediatric medical or surgical subspecialist should be made solely by the patient (and family, when appropriate) and the physician and must take into account the physical and psychosocial needs of the patient and the abilities of the pediatric provider to meet these needs. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  2. FTU pump limiter

    Alessandrini, C.; Ciotti, M.; Mattei, A. De; Maddaluno, G.; Mazzitelli, G.

    1989-01-01

    The control of the refuelling and recycling of the plasma is crucial in providing enhanced performances in tokamaks and steady-state operation in future reactors. In this paper, we report details of the design and analysis for the pump limiter to be incorporated into the FTU tokamak. The FTU, presently under commissioning, is a compact high field (B=8T), medium high density, circular cross section machine with small accesses. The dimensions of the equatorial port (width 8 cm) would reduce the length of the entrance throat to a few centimeters, which is unacceptable for efficient particle trapping. We have, therefore, designed a rotating blade of the pump limiter head that, in the working position, extends in the toroidal direction inside the vacuum chamber. (author) 8 refs., 4 figs

  3. Limits of Nuclear Stability

    Nerlo-Pomorska, B; Kleban, M

    2003-01-01

    The modern version of the liquid-drop model (LSD) is compared with the macroscopic part of the binding energy evaluated within the Hartree-Fock- Bogoliubov procedure with the Gogny force and the relativistic mean field theory. The parameters of a liquid-drop like mass formula which approximate on the average the self-consistent results are compared with other models. The limits of nuclear stability predicted by these models are discussed.

  4. Are Limit Orders Rational?

    Šmíd, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 4 (2007), s. 32-38 ISSN 0572-3043 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA402/06/1417; GA ČR GA402/04/1294; GA ČR GD402/03/H057 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : market microstructure * limit order market * portfolio selection Subject RIV: AH - Economics

  5. INAA - application and limitation

    Heydorn, K.

    1990-01-01

    The uncertainties associated with performing Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) are discussed in relation to their category. The Comite International de Poids et Mesure (CIPM) distinguishes between uncertainties according to how their contribution to the overall uncertainty is evaluated. INAA is a potentially definitive method, if all sources of uncertainty can be accounted for. The limitation of the method is reached when uncertainties, which cannot be accounted for, assume significance, and the method cannot be brought in statistical control. (orig.)

  6. Density limits in Tokamaks

    Tendler, M.

    1984-06-01

    The energy loss from a tokamak plasma due to neutral hydrogen radiation and recycling is of great importance for the energy balance at the periphery. It is shown that the requirement for thermal equilibrium implies a constraint on the maximum attainable edge density. The relation to other density limits is discussed. The average plasma density is shown to be a strong function of the refuelling deposition profile. (author)

  7. Photovoltaic energy cost limit

    Coiante, D.

    1992-01-01

    Referring to a photovoltaic system for grid connected applications, a parametric expression of kWh cost is derived. The limit of kWh cost is carried out extrapolating the values of cost components to their lowest figure. The reliability of the forecast is checked by disaggregating kWh cost in direct and indirect costs and by discussing the possible cost reduction of each component

  8. Heat flux limiting sleeves

    Harris, William G.

    1985-01-01

    A heat limiting tubular sleeve extending over only a portion of a tube having a generally uniform outside diameter, the sleeve being open on both ends, having one end thereof larger in diameter than the other end thereof and having a wall thickness which decreases in the same direction as the diameter of the sleeve decreases so that the heat transfer through the sleeve and tube is less adjacent the large diameter end of the sleeve than adjacent the other end thereof.

  9. Superconductive AC current limiter

    Bekhaled, M.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes an AC current limiter for a power transport line including a power supply circuit and feeding a load circuit via an overload circuit-breaker member. The limiter comprises a transformer having a primary winding connected in series between the power supply circuit and the load circuit and at least one secondary winding of superconductor material contained in a cryogenic enclosure and short-circuited on itself. The leakage reactance of the transformer as seen from the primary winding is low, and the resistance of the at least one secondary winding when in the non-superconducting state and as seen from the primary is much greater than the nominal impedance of the transformer. The improvement whereby the at least one secondary winding of the transformer comprises an active winding in association with a set of auxiliary windings. The set of auxiliary windings is constituted by an even number of series-connected auxiliary windings wound in opposite directions, with the total number of turns in one direction being equal to the total number of turns in the opposite direction, and with the thermal capacity of the secondary winding as a whole being sufficiently high to limit the expansion thereof to a value which remains small during the time it takes the circuit-breaking member to operate

  10. Strategic arms limitation

    Allen Greb, G.; Johnson, Gerald W.

    1983-10-01

    Following World War II, American scientists and politicians proposed in the Baruch plan a radical solution to the problem of nuclear weapons: to eliminate them forever under the auspices of an international nuclear development authority. The Soviets, who as yet did not possess the bomb, rejected this plan. Another approach suggested by Secretary of War Henry Stimson to negotiate directly with the Soviet Union was not accepted by the American leadership. These initial arms limitation failures both reflected and exacerbated the hostile political relationship of the superpowers in the 1950s and 1960s. Since 1969, the more modest focus of the Soviet-American arms control process has been on limiting the numbers and sizes of both defensive and offensive strategic systems. The format for this effort has been the Strategic Arms Limitatins Talks (Salt) and more recently the Strategic Arms Reduction Talks (START). Both sides came to these negotiations convinced that nuclear arsenals had grown so large that some for of mutual restraint was needed. Although the SALT/START process has been slow and ponderous, it has produced several concrete the agreements and collateral benefits. The 1972 ABM Treaty restricts the deployment of ballistic missile defense systems, the 1972 Interim Agreement places a quantitative freeze on each side's land based and sea based strategic launchers, and the as yet unratified 1979 SALT II Treaty sets numerical limits on all offensive strategic systems and sublimits on MIRVed systems. Collateral benefits include improved verification procedures, working definitions and counting rules, and permanent bureaucratic apparatus which enhance stability and increase the chances for achieving additional agreements.

  11. Beta limits for ETF

    Helton, F.J.; Miller, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    ETF (Engineering Test Facility) one-dimensional transport simulations indicate that a volume-average beta of 4% is required for ignition. It is therefore important that theoretical beta limits, determined by requiring equilibria to be stable to all ideal modes, exceed 4%. This paper documents an ideal MHD analysis wherein it is shown that, with appropriate plasma cross-sectional shape and current profile optimization, operation near 5% is possible. The critical beta value, however, depends on the functional form used for ff', which suggests that higher critical betas could be achieved by directly optimizing the safety factor profile. (author)

  12. Limitations of Boltzmann's principle

    Lavenda, B.H.

    1995-01-01

    The usual form of Boltzmann's principle assures that maximum entropy, or entropy reduction, occurs with maximum probability, implying a unimodal distribution. Boltzmann's principle cannot be applied to nonunimodal distributions, like the arcsine law, because the entropy may be concave only over a limited portion of the interval. The method of subordination shows that the arcsine distribution corresponds to a process with a single degree of freedom, thereby confirming the invalidation of Boltzmann's principle. The fractalization of time leads to a new distribution in which arcsine and Cauchy distributions can coexist simultaneously for nonintegral degrees of freedom between √2 and 2

  13. Fault current limiter

    Darmann, Francis Anthony

    2013-10-08

    A fault current limiter (FCL) includes a series of high permeability posts for collectively define a core for the FCL. A DC coil, for the purposes of saturating a portion of the high permeability posts, surrounds the complete structure outside of an enclosure in the form of a vessel. The vessel contains a dielectric insulation medium. AC coils, for transporting AC current, are wound on insulating formers and electrically interconnected to each other in a manner such that the senses of the magnetic field produced by each AC coil in the corresponding high permeability core are opposing. There are insulation barriers between phases to improve dielectric withstand properties of the dielectric medium.

  14. Dose. Detriment. Limit assessment

    Breckow, J.

    2015-01-01

    One goal of radiation protection is the limitation of stochastic effects due to radiation exposure. The probability of occurrence of a radiation induced stochastic effect, however, is only one of several other parameters which determine the radiation detriment. Though the ICRP-concept of detriment is a quantitative definition, the kind of detriment weighting includes somewhat subjective elements. In this sense, the detriment-concept of ICRP represents already at the stage of effective dose a kind of assessment. Thus, by comparing radiation protection standards and concepts interconvertible or with those of environment or occupational protection one should be aware of the possibly different principles of detriment assessment.

  15. Marketing with limited budget

    Smirnova, Daria

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research-based thesis was to get an idea how managers of two small resembling hotels of a specific region deal with marketing process with a limited budget. In addition, the aim of the thesis was to examine if hotel managers who were interviewed perceive marketing only in the way of ‘promotion’ rather than marketing research, marketing mix and marketing environment theories. It was also found out if hotel managers of those hotels consider marketing as a key to successful h...

  16. Limitation of Auditors' Liability

    Werlauff, Erik; Foged-Ladefoged, Lise Kolding

    2014-01-01

    The article examines the question of whether rules on the limitation of auditors’ liability within the perspective of EU law are needed, and if so, which rules can provide an appropriate balance between the potential injured party’s interests and those of the auditing sector, including with respect...... to the fact that the insurance premiums associated with an unlimited liability must of course make the auditor’s tasks more expensive. Relevant EU recommendations and a comparative glance at other EU countries’ proposed solutions to the problem are included....

  17. Expansive or Limitative Strategy?

    Knudsen, Morten; Juul Nielsen, Annegrete; Finke, Katrine

    2008-01-01

    Since the emergence of new public health in the 1970s, health has not merely been considered the absence of disease, but physical, mental and social wellbeing. This article seeks to analyzes the implications of this broad concept of health at an organizational level.The broad concept of health...

  18. Limits to biofuels

    Johansson S.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Biofuel production is dependent upon agriculture and forestry systems, and the expectations of future biofuel potential are high. A study of the global food production and biofuel production from edible crops implies that biofuel produced from edible parts of crops lead to a global deficit of food. This is rather well known, which is why there is a strong urge to develop biofuel systems that make use of residues or products from forest to eliminate competition with food production. However, biofuel from agro-residues still depend upon the crop production system, and there are many parameters to deal with in order to investigate the sustainability of biofuel production. There is a theoretical limit to how much biofuel can be achieved globally from agro-residues and this amounts to approximately one third of todays’ use of fossil fuels in the transport sector. In reality this theoretical potential may be eliminated by the energy use in the biomass-conversion technologies and production systems, depending on what type of assessment method is used. By surveying existing studies on biofuel conversion the theoretical limit of biofuels from 2010 years’ agricultural production was found to be either non-existent due to energy consumption in the conversion process, or up to 2–6000TWh (biogas from residues and waste and ethanol from woody biomass in the more optimistic cases.

  19. Limits to biofuels

    Johansson, S.

    2013-06-01

    Biofuel production is dependent upon agriculture and forestry systems, and the expectations of future biofuel potential are high. A study of the global food production and biofuel production from edible crops implies that biofuel produced from edible parts of crops lead to a global deficit of food. This is rather well known, which is why there is a strong urge to develop biofuel systems that make use of residues or products from forest to eliminate competition with food production. However, biofuel from agro-residues still depend upon the crop production system, and there are many parameters to deal with in order to investigate the sustainability of biofuel production. There is a theoretical limit to how much biofuel can be achieved globally from agro-residues and this amounts to approximately one third of todays' use of fossil fuels in the transport sector. In reality this theoretical potential may be eliminated by the energy use in the biomass-conversion technologies and production systems, depending on what type of assessment method is used. By surveying existing studies on biofuel conversion the theoretical limit of biofuels from 2010 years' agricultural production was found to be either non-existent due to energy consumption in the conversion process, or up to 2-6000TWh (biogas from residues and waste and ethanol from woody biomass) in the more optimistic cases.

  20. (Limiting the greenhouse effect)

    Rayner, S.

    1991-01-07

    Traveler attended the Dahlem Research Conference organized by the Freien Universitat, Berlin. The subject of the conference was Limiting the Greenhouse Effect: Options for Controlling Atmospheric CO{sub 2} Accumulation. Like all Dahlem workshops, this was a meeting of scientific experts, although the disciplines represented were broader than usual, ranging across anthropology, economics, international relations, forestry, engineering, and atmospheric chemistry. Participation by scientists from developing countries was limited. The conference was divided into four multidisciplinary working groups. Traveler acted as moderator for Group 3 which examined the question What knowledge is required to tackle the principal social and institutional barriers to reducing CO{sub 2} emissions'' The working rapporteur was Jesse Ausubel of Rockefeller University. Other working groups examined the economic costs, benefits, and technical feasibility of options to reduce emissions per unit of energy service; the options for reducing energy use per unit of GNP; and the significant of linkage between strategies to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions and other goals. Draft reports of the working groups are appended. Overall, the conference identified a number of important research needs in all four areas. It may prove particularly important in bringing the social and institutional research needs relevant to climate change closer to the forefront of the scientific and policy communities than hitherto.

  1. Limitations of inclusive fitness.

    Allen, Benjamin; Nowak, Martin A; Wilson, Edward O

    2013-12-10

    Until recently, inclusive fitness has been widely accepted as a general method to explain the evolution of social behavior. Affirming and expanding earlier criticism, we demonstrate that inclusive fitness is instead a limited concept, which exists only for a small subset of evolutionary processes. Inclusive fitness assumes that personal fitness is the sum of additive components caused by individual actions. This assumption does not hold for the majority of evolutionary processes or scenarios. To sidestep this limitation, inclusive fitness theorists have proposed a method using linear regression. On the basis of this method, it is claimed that inclusive fitness theory (i) predicts the direction of allele frequency changes, (ii) reveals the reasons for these changes, (iii) is as general as natural selection, and (iv) provides a universal design principle for evolution. In this paper we evaluate these claims, and show that all of them are unfounded. If the objective is to analyze whether mutations that modify social behavior are favored or opposed by natural selection, then no aspect of inclusive fitness theory is needed.

  2. Contribution to the study of maximum levels for liquid radioactive waste disposal into continental and sea water. Treatment of some typical samples; Contribution a l'etude des niveaux limites relatifs a des rejets d'effluents radioactifs liquides dans les eaux continentales et oceaniques. Traitement de quelques exemples types

    Bittel, R; Mancel, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires, departement de la protection sanitaire

    1968-10-01

    The most important carriers of radioactive contamination of man are the whole of foodstuffs and not only ingested water or inhaled air. That is the reason why, in accordance with the spirit of the recent recommendations of the ICRP, it is proposed to substitute the idea of maximum levels of contamination of water to the MPC. In the case of aquatic food chains (aquatic organisms and irrigated foodstuffs), the knowledge of the ingested quantities and of the concentration factors food/water permit to determinate these maximum levels, or to find out a linear relation between the maximum levels in the case of two primary carriers of contamination (continental and sea waters). The notion of critical food-consumption, critical radioelements and formula of waste disposal are considered in the same way, taking care to attach the greatest possible importance to local situations. (authors) [French] Les vecteurs essentiels de la contamination radioactive de l'homme sont les aliments dans leur ensemble, et non seulement l'eau ingeree ou l'air inhale. C'est pourquoi, en accord avec l'esprit des recentes recommandations de la C.I.P.R., il est propose de substituer aux CMA la notion de niveaux limites de contamination des eaux. Dans le cas des chaines alimentaires aquatiques (organismes aquatiques et aliments irrigues), la connaissance des quantites ingerees et celle des facteurs de concentration aliments/eau permettent de determiner ces niveaux limites dans le cas de deux vecteurs primaires de contamination (eaux continentales et eaux oceaniques). Les notions de regime alimentaire critique, de radioelement critique et de formule de rejets sont envisagees, dans le meme esprit, avec le souci de tenir compte le plus possible des situations locales. (auteurs)

  3. The limitation and modification of flux-limited diffusion theory

    Liu Chengan; Huang Wenkai

    1986-01-01

    The limitation of various typical flux-limited diffusion theory and advantages of asymptotic diffusion theory with time absorption constant are analyzed and compared. The conclusions are as following: Though the flux-limited problem in neutron diffusion theory are theoretically solved by derived flux-limited diffusion equation, it's going too far to limit flux due to the inappropriate assumption in deriving flux-limited diffusion equation. The asymptotic diffusion theory with time absorption constant has eliminated the above-mentioned limitation, and it is more accurate than flux-limited diffusion theory in describing neutron transport problem

  4. Limits of Lubrication in

    Olsson, David Dam

    as delivered stainless steel surfaces implying microstructure changes in terms of larger ratio of closed lubricant pockets due to selective grain boundary etching. Strategic surfaces have also been created by macroscopic texturing using spherical indentations having a very small edge slope in order to promote...... by strategic surfaces in comparison to normal stainless steel surfaces implying a larger extent of bi-axial stretching. Numerical simulations have been applied in order to evaluate limits of lubrication in the simulative strip reduction based on predictions of critical parameters appearing in terms......-models corresponds well to experimental results in terms of lubricant film breakdown and subsequently pick-up development. Punching and blanking have been investigated regarding tribological conditions in case of using stainless steel workpiece materials. However, this has called for development of a new test method...

  5. Personal Freedom beyond Limits

    Juan Fernando Sellés

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work we distinguish between freedom in the human manifestations (intelligence, will,actions and personal freedom in the personal intimacy. This second is beyond the freedom reached bythe classic and modern thought, since it takes root in the personnel act of being. Because of it, it is not possible to characterize this freedom like the classic description as ‘domain over the own acts’, becauseit is a description of ‘categorial’ order; neither like present day ‘autonomy’ or ‘independence’, becausethe existence of one person alone is impossible, since ‘person’ means relation, personal free openingto other persons, description of the ‘transcendental’ order and, therefore, to the margin of limits.

  6. [Does medicine limit enlightenment?].

    Schipperges, H

    1977-01-01

    In the first, historical part the most important programs of "Medical Enlightenment", are pointed out, beginning with Leibniz, followed by the public health movement of the 18th century, up to the time of Immanuel Kant. Based on this historical background several concepts of a "Medical Culture" are analysed in detail, for instance the "Theorie einer Medizinal-Ordnung" by Johann Benjamin Ehrhard (1800), the "Medicinische Reform" by Rudolf Virchow (1848) and the programs of the "Gesellschaft Deutscher Naturforscher und Arzte" (about 1850-1890), the latter bearing both scientific and political character. Following the historical part, the question is raised whether "Enlightenment" is limited by medicine and whether medicine is able to provide a program for individual health education resulting in a more cultivated style of private life, and lastly how this might be realized.

  7. The limits of subfunctionalization

    Bergman Aviv

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The duplication-degeneration-complementation (DDC model has been proposed as an explanation for the unexpectedly high retention of duplicate genes. The hypothesis proposes that, following gene duplication, the two gene copies degenerate to perform complementary functions that jointly match that of the single ancestral gene, a process also known as subfunctionalization. We distinguish between subfunctionalization at the regulatory level and at the product level (e.g within temporal or spatial expression domains. Results In contrast to what is expected under the DDC model, we use in silico modeling to show that regulatory subfunctionalization is expected to peak and then decrease significantly. At the same time, neofunctionalization (recruitment of novel interactions increases monotonically, eventually affecting the regulatory elements of the majority of genes. Furthermore, since this process occurs under conditions of stabilizing selection, there is no need to invoke positive selection. At the product level, the frequency of subfunctionalization is no higher than would be expected by chance, a finding that was corroborated using yeast microarray time-course data. We also find that product subfunctionalization is not necessarily caused by regulatory subfunctionalization. Conclusion Our results suggest a more complex picture of post-duplication evolution in which subfunctionalization plays only a partial role in conjunction with redundancy and neofunctionalization. We argue that this behavior is a consequence of the high evolutionary plasticity in gene networks.

  8. The Limits to Relevance

    Averill, M.; Briggle, A.

    2006-12-01

    Science policy and knowledge production lately have taken a pragmatic turn. Funding agencies increasingly are requiring scientists to explain the relevance of their work to society. This stems in part from mounting critiques of the "linear model" of knowledge production in which scientists operating according to their own interests or disciplinary standards are presumed to automatically produce knowledge that is of relevance outside of their narrow communities. Many contend that funded scientific research should be linked more directly to societal goals, which implies a shift in the kind of research that will be funded. While both authors support the concept of useful science, we question the exact meaning of "relevance" and the wisdom of allowing it to control research agendas. We hope to contribute to the conversation by thinking more critically about the meaning and limits of the term "relevance" and the trade-offs implicit in a narrow utilitarian approach. The paper will consider which interests tend to be privileged by an emphasis on relevance and address issues such as whose goals ought to be pursued and why, and who gets to decide. We will consider how relevance, narrowly construed, may actually limit the ultimate utility of scientific research. The paper also will reflect on the worthiness of research goals themselves and their relationship to a broader view of what it means to be human and to live in society. Just as there is more to being human than the pragmatic demands of daily life, there is more at issue with knowledge production than finding the most efficient ways to satisfy consumer preferences or fix near-term policy problems. We will conclude by calling for a balanced approach to funding research that addresses society's most pressing needs but also supports innovative research with less immediately apparent application.

  9. Lathe leveler

    Lovelady, III, Michael W.J.

    2018-03-06

    A lathe leveler for centering a cutting tool in relation to a cylindrical work piece includes a first leveling arm having a first contact point disposed adjacent a distal end of the first leveling arm, a second leveling arm having a second contact point disposed adjacent a distal end of the second leveling arm, a leveling gage, and a leveling plate having a cutting tool receiving surface positioned parallel to a horizontal axis of the leveling gage and on a same plane as a midpoint of the first contact point and the second contact point. The leveling arms and leveling plate are dimensioned and configured such that the cutting tool receiving surface is centered in relation to the work piece when the first and second contact points are in contact with one of the inner surface and outer surface of the cylindrical work piece and the leveling gage is centered.

  10. Limit, breakthrough and prosperity

    Takahashi, Minoru

    1973-01-01

    It is pointed out that the flow toward serious crises is in progress with regard to energy and industrial problems. Technical and industrial preparation and countermeasure to the flow are proposed, and the existence of a certain new world attainable on the assumption that the countermeasure is successful is described. The relation between oil output and the increasing demand for energy is pointed out as a subject matter of the crisis. The contribution of oil energy to total energy, after the output turns to decreasing process, decreases by 177.87x10 6 tons (converted to coal at the rate 6848 kcal/kg) per year at maximum. Converted to the GNP of the world, this becomes (425 dollar/ton x 177.87 x 10 6 ton=75.6 x 10 9 dollar). This fluctuation width in a year must be compensated by the change of industrial structure and energy supplying means. The countermeasure and preparation are proposed from the viewpoints of the energy and the industrial structure in which nuclear power generation plays important role. The largest production on the earth limited by energy consumption and the temperature balance on the earth is investigated, and the perspective in the future is given. (Yamamoto, Y.)

  11. What value, detection limits

    Currie, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    Specific approaches and applications of LLD's to nuclear and ''nuclear-related'' measurements are presented in connection with work undertaken for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the International Atomic Energy Agency. In this work, special attention was given to assumptions and potential error sources, as well as to different types of analysis. For the former, the authors considered random and systematic error associated with the blank and the calibration and sample preparation processes, as well as issues relating to the nature of the random error distributions. Analysis types considered included continuous monitoring, ''simple counting'' involving scalar quantities, and spectrum fitting involving data vectors. The investigation of data matrices and multivariate analysis is also described. The most important conclusions derived from this study are: that there is a significant lack of communication and compatibility resulting from diverse terminology and conceptual bases - including no-basis ''ad hoc'' definitions; that the distinction between detection decisions and detection limits is frequently lost sight of; and that quite erroneous LOD estimates follow from inadequate consideration of the actual variability of the blank, and systematic error associated with the blank, the calibration-recovery factor, matrix effects, and ''black box'' data reduction models

  12. The limits of deterrence

    Tertrais, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this contribution is to propose a better insight of the validity of the theory of deterrence, and of related doctrines in more complex and more various situations than in the past: emergence of powers like China and India, of new nuclear States like North Korea and Pakistan, of countries planning to acquire nuclear weapons like Iran, and possibility of a new wave of nuclear proliferation in Middle-East and north-eastern Asia. It also aims at providing arguments in the debates on the struggle against nuclear proliferation and on the future of deterrence. The author first presents and comments the principles of deterrence, and illustrates them by more or less recent historical situations (Iran during the war with Iraq, USA after Pearl Harbour, Arab-Israeli wars, Iraq, and so on). He notably outlines that the notion of deterrence is present in Islamic culture, and that Iran has well integrated it in its defence strategy. Examples of statements and behaviours of other Arab leaders are discussed. The author also briefly indicates how the deterrence strategy is present in the official doctrines of Russia, India, Pakistan, and North Korea. In a second part, based on various examples, the author analyses the practical limitations of deterrence by distinguishing the psychological dimension (bounded rationality, political leaders suffering from various psychological problems, importance of the ideological and spiritual dimension, values prevailing on interests, the case of Iran), and the strategic dimension (good understanding of the enemy, sensitivity of the threat of massive damages, existence of a single decision centre and of an efficient communication). The author finally proposes seven recommendations for better deterrence efficiency

  13. Science Curriculum Guide, Level 4.

    Newark School District, DE.

    The fourth of four levels in a K-12 science curriculum is outlined. In Level 4 (grades 9-12), science areas include earth science, biology, chemistry, and physics. Six major themes provide the basis for study in all levels (K-12). These are: Change, Continuity, Diversity, Interaction, Limitation, and Organization. In Level 4, all six themes are…

  14. Cortisol level

    ... enable JavaScript. The cortisol blood test measures the level of cortisol in the blood. Cortisol is a ... in the morning. This is important, because cortisol level varies throughout the day. You may be asked ...

  15. Triglyceride level

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003493.htm Triglyceride level To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The triglyceride level is a blood test to measure the amount ...

  16. Os limites da competitividade

    Henrique Rattner

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available

    Costuma-se destacar os aspectos aparentemente positivos e as vantagens hipotéticas da concorrência e da competitividade entre empresas e também entre nações. Não se pode negar que a concorrência nos mercados tenha exercido uma função central e fundamental na gênese e na expansão do sistema de produção capitalista. Ela contribuiu para a geração e acumulação de riquezas materiais. Também estimulou e fortaleceu as aspirações de seus principais atores sociais, os empreendedores, de exigir uma organização política mais democrática em oposição ao regime feudal ou absolutista, em determinado período da história do mundo ocidental.

  17. Development of an extended shift exposure limit adjustment factor for coal mine dusts

    Tiernan, G; Van Zanten, D [SIMTARS (Australia)

    1999-12-31

    Four models for adjusting exposure standards for use during altered work shifts are reviewed. These are the absorbed dose adjustment model; the Brief and Scala model; the US Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) model; and the pharmacokinetic models of Hockey and Reist and of Stan Roach. The most appropriate model is selected for control of coal mine dusts exposure. 14 refs., 3 tabs.

  18. Modeling & Verifying Aircraft Paint Hangar Airflow to Reduce Green House Gas and Energy Usage while Protecting Occupational Health Energy

    2015-05-30

    violations have the potential for significant fines and costs associated with remediation. 2.2.5 Social Acceptance OSHA managers and industrial...Exposure Limit OSHA Occupational Safety and Health Administration PEL Permissible Exposure Limit PETTT Productivity Enhancement, Technology Transfer and...and Health Administration ( OSHA ) non-compliance concerns that could surface, though unrelated to this project. Because the project team could not

  19. Level 1 - level 2 interface

    Boneham, P.

    2003-01-01

    The Plant Damage States (PDS) are the starting point for the level 2 analysis. A PDS is group of core damage sequences that are expected to have similar severe accident progressions. In this paper an overview of Level 1/Level 2 interface, example PDS parameters, example PDS definitions using codes and example Bridge Tree are presented. PDS frequency calculation (identification of sequences for each PDS in level 1,split some CD sequences which have different level 2 progressions), code calculations providing support for grouping decisions and timings as well as PDS frequencies and definitions input to level 2 are also discussed

  20. Do professional boundaries limit trust?

    Smythe, Elizabeth; Hennessy, Julia; Abbott, Max; Hughes, Frances

    2018-02-01

    The present study uses stories of mental health support workers talking about their relationship with clients to wonder about how trust might be limited by the professional boundaries of nursing. The writing arose out of an appreciative inquiry study looking at the role of mental health support workers. Participants talked about how they worked with their clients. As researchers, we were struck by the depth of trust that was built between worker and client. We have brought a phenomenological lens to wonder about the nature of trust, as shown in the data. The original research sought to identify what was working well for mental health support workers. The present study brings a phenomenological interpretive approach to four stories from the discovery phase of the study, with our thinking informed by Heidegger and van Manen. Interviews were conducted with 26 mental health support workers and six stakeholders in 2012-2103. For this paper, we drew from those transcripts stories of three mental health support workers and one stakeholder. Through a process of talking together, writing, and rewriting, we wondered about the meaning within these stories, with a strong focus on how trust was enacted. We saw that mental health support workers in this study, by not carrying the boundaries of being 'professional', seemed free to grow a stronger relationship of trust which was therapeutic. We ask: Is it time to rethink how professional boundaries limit the level of trust achieved with clients to the detriment of impactful care? © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  1. FED pumped limiter configuration issues

    Haines, J.R.; Fuller, G.M.

    1983-01-01

    Impurity control in the Fusion Engineering Device (FED) is provided by a toroidal belt pumped limiter. Limiter design issues addressed in this paper are (1) poloidal location of the limiter belt, (2) shape of the limiter surface facing the plasma, and (3) whether the belt is pumped from one or both sides. The criteria used for evaluation of limiter configuration features were sensitivity to plasma-edge conditions and ease of maintenance and fabrication. The evaluation resulted in the selection of a baseline FED limiter that is located at the bottom of the device and has a flat surface with a single leading edge

  2. FED pumped limiter configuration issues

    Haines, J.R.; Fuller, G.M.

    1983-01-01

    Impurity control in the Fusion Engineering Device (FED) is provided by a toroidal belt pumped limiter. Limiter design issues addressed in this paper are (1) poloidal location of the limiter belt, (2) shape of the limiter surface facing the plasma, and (3) whether the belt is pumped from one or both sides. The criteria used for evaluation of limiter configuration features were sensitivity to plasma edge conditions and ease of maintenance and fabrication. The evaluation resulted in the selection of a baseline FED limiter that is located at the bottom of the device and has a flat surface with a single leading edge

  3. HELIOS: Application for criticality limits assessment

    Simeonov, T.

    2011-01-01

    In the early years, after the discovery of fission, the criticality safety assessment and the established safety limits, have been mainly based on direct experiments. Later, following the advances in the theory, computational methods and computer hardware, theoretical methods have been elaborated to the level to become reliable assessment tools. The computer codes started replacing the experiments, while the experimental data became a valuable validation source for their models. An application of the two-dimensional transport theory code HELIOS for assessment of criticality limits is presented in this paper. The effect of the enrichment, the system dimensions, H/U5 ration and different reflectors were studied in heterogeneous and homogenized systems. Comparisons with published experimental data and evaluated safety limits are made here to demonstrate the range of HELIOS applicability and limitations. (Author)

  4. Stable convergence and stable limit theorems

    Häusler, Erich

    2015-01-01

    The authors present a concise but complete exposition of the mathematical theory of stable convergence and give various applications in different areas of probability theory and mathematical statistics to illustrate the usefulness of this concept. Stable convergence holds in many limit theorems of probability theory and statistics – such as the classical central limit theorem – which are usually formulated in terms of convergence in distribution. Originated by Alfred Rényi, the notion of stable convergence is stronger than the classical weak convergence of probability measures. A variety of methods is described which can be used to establish this stronger stable convergence in many limit theorems which were originally formulated only in terms of weak convergence. Naturally, these stronger limit theorems have new and stronger consequences which should not be missed by neglecting the notion of stable convergence. The presentation will be accessible to researchers and advanced students at the master's level...

  5. Charter Halibut Limited Access Program

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This limited access system limits the number of charter vessels that may participate in the guided sport fishery for halibut in area 2C and 3A. NMFS issues a charter...

  6. Level densities

    Ignatyuk, A.V.

    1998-01-01

    For any applications of the statistical theory of nuclear reactions it is very important to obtain the parameters of the level density description from the reliable experimental data. The cumulative numbers of low-lying levels and the average spacings between neutron resonances are usually used as such data. The level density parameters fitted to such data are compiled in the RIPL Starter File for the tree models most frequently used in practical calculations: i) For the Gilber-Cameron model the parameters of the Beijing group, based on a rather recent compilations of the neutron resonance and low-lying level densities and included into the beijing-gc.dat file, are chosen as recommended. As alternative versions the parameters provided by other groups are given into the files: jaeri-gc.dat, bombay-gc.dat, obninsk-gc.dat. Additionally the iljinov-gc.dat, and mengoni-gc.dat files include sets of the level density parameters that take into account the damping of shell effects at high energies. ii) For the backed-shifted Fermi gas model the beijing-bs.dat file is selected as the recommended one. Alternative parameters of the Obninsk group are given in the obninsk-bs.dat file and those of Bombay in bombay-bs.dat. iii) For the generalized superfluid model the Obninsk group parameters included into the obninsk-bcs.dat file are chosen as recommended ones and the beijing-bcs.dat file is included as an alternative set of parameters. iv) For the microscopic approach to the level densities the files are: obninsk-micro.for -FORTRAN 77 source for the microscopical statistical level density code developed in Obninsk by Ignatyuk and coworkers, moller-levels.gz - Moeller single-particle level and ground state deformation data base, moller-levels.for -retrieval code for Moeller single-particle level scheme. (author)

  7. On the Sen limit squared

    Fullwood, James; Wang, Dongxu

    2018-01-01

    We introduce a class of F-theory vacua whose smooth elliptic fibers admit a vanishing $j$-invariant, and construct a weak coupling limit associated with such vacua which we view as the `square' of the Sen limit. We find that while Sen's limit is naturally viewed as an orientifold theory, the universal tadpole relation which equates the D3 charge between the associated F-theory compactification and the limit we construct suggests that perhaps the limiting theory is in fact an oriented theory c...

  8. Material limitations on the detection limit in refractometry.

    Skafte-Pedersen, Peder; Nunes, Pedro S; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, Niels Asger

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the detection limit for refractometric sensors relying on high-Q optical cavities and show that the ultimate classical detection limit is given by min {Δn} ≳ η, with n + iη being the complex refractive index of the material under refractometric investigation. Taking finite Q factors and filling fractions into account, the detection limit declines. As an example we discuss the fundamental limits of silicon-based high-Q resonators, such as photonic crystal resonators, for sensing in a bio-liquid environment, such as a water buffer. In the transparency window (λ ≳ 1100 nm) of silicon the detection limit becomes almost independent on the filling fraction, while in the visible, the detection limit depends strongly on the filling fraction because the silicon absorbs strongly.

  9. Material Limitations on the Detection Limit in Refractometry

    Niels Asger Mortensen

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the detection limit for refractometric sensors relying on high-Q optical cavities and show that the ultimate classical detection limit is given by min {Δn} ≳ η with n + iη being the complex refractive index of the material under refractometric investigation. Taking finite Q factors and filling fractions into account, the detection limit declines. As an example we discuss the fundamental limits of silicon-based high-Q resonators, such as photonic crystal resonators, for sensing in a bio-liquid environment, such as a water buffer. In the transparency window (λ ≳ 1100 nm of silicon the detection limit becomes almost independent on the filling fraction, while in the visible, the detection limit depends strongly on the filling fraction because the silicon absorbs strongly.

  10. Material Limitations on the Detection Limit in Refractometry

    Skafte-Pedersen, Peder; Nunes, Pedro S.; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, Niels Asger

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the detection limit for refractometric sensors relying on high-Q optical cavities and show that the ultimate classical detection limit is given by min {Δn} ≳ η with n + iη being the complex refractive index of the material under refractometric investigation. Taking finite Q factors and filling fractions into account, the detection limit declines. As an example we discuss the fundamental limits of silicon-based high-Q resonators, such as photonic crystal resonators, for sensing in a...

  11. Thermodynamic limit for coherence-limited solar power conversion

    Mashaal, Heylal; Gordon, Jeffrey M.

    2014-09-01

    The spatial coherence of solar beam radiation is a key constraint in solar rectenna conversion. Here, we present a derivation of the thermodynamic limit for coherence-limited solar power conversion - an expansion of Landsberg's elegant basic bound, originally limited to incoherent converters at maximum flux concentration. First, we generalize Landsberg's work to arbitrary concentration and angular confinement. Then we derive how the values are further lowered for coherence-limited converters. The results do not depend on a particular conversion strategy. As such, they pertain to systems that span geometric to physical optics, as well as classical to quantum physics. Our findings indicate promising potential for solar rectenna conversion.

  12. BCS gap equations in the quantum limit

    Norman, M.R.

    1991-01-01

    It was shown that in the quantum limit where only one Landau level is occupied,Tc diverges with increasing H.It was also indcated that Tc is unaffected impurities or by a nonzero g factor, in contrast to what was indicated in Ref. 2.The authors result is due to an assumption that the DOS about a Debye width of the chemical potential is constant. This approximation is questionable sice chemical potential decrease rapidly as H increases.Here Tc is calculated as a function of H in the quantum limit for an appropriate set of parameters to understand how impurities and nonzero g factor affect the result

  13. Arctic Sea Level Reconstruction

    Svendsen, Peter Limkilde

    Reconstruction of historical Arctic sea level is very difficult due to the limited coverage and quality of tide gauge and altimetry data in the area. This thesis addresses many of these issues, and discusses strategies to help achieve a stable and plausible reconstruction of Arctic sea level from...... 1950 to today.The primary record of historical sea level, on the order of several decades to a few centuries, is tide gauges. Tide gauge records from around the world are collected in the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL) database, and includes data along the Arctic coasts. A reasonable...... amount of data is available along the Norwegian and Russian coasts since 1950, and most published research on Arctic sea level extends cautiously from these areas. Very little tide gauge data is available elsewhere in the Arctic, and records of a length of several decades,as generally recommended for sea...

  14. Risk based limits for Operational Safety Requirements

    Cappucci, A.J. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    OSR limits are designed to protect the assumptions made in the facility safety analysis in order to preserve the safety envelope during facility operation. Normally, limits are set based on ''worst case conditions'' without regard to the likelihood (frequency) of a credible event occurring. In special cases where the accident analyses are based on ''time at risk'' arguments, it may be desirable to control the time at which the facility is at risk. A methodology has been developed to use OSR limits to control the source terms and the times these source terms would be available, thus controlling the acceptable risk to a nuclear process facility. The methodology defines a new term ''gram-days''. This term represents the area under a source term (inventory) vs time curve which represents the risk to the facility. Using the concept of gram-days (normalized to one year) allows the use of an accounting scheme to control the risk under the inventory vs time curve. The methodology results in at least three OSR limits: (1) control of the maximum inventory or source term, (2) control of the maximum gram-days for the period based on a source term weighted average, and (3) control of the maximum gram-days at the individual source term levels. Basing OSR limits on risk based safety analysis is feasible, and a basis for development of risk based limits is defensible. However, monitoring inventories and the frequencies required to maintain facility operation within the safety envelope may be complex and time consuming

  15. Limits of qualitative detection and quantitative determination

    Curie, L.A.

    1976-01-01

    The fact that one can find a series of disagreeing and limiting definitions of the detection limit leads to the reinvestigation of the problems of signal detection and signal processing in analytical and nuclear chemistry. Three cut-off levels were fixed: Lsub(C) - the net signal level (sensitivity of the equipment), above which an observed signal can be reliably recognized as 'detected'; Lsub(D) - the 'true' net signal level, from which one can a priori expect a detection; Lsub(Q) - the level at which the measuring accuracy is sufficient for quantitative determination. Exact definition equations as well as a series of working formulae are given for the general analytical case and for the investigation of radioactivity. As it is assumed that the radioactivity of the Poisson distribution is determined, it is dealt with in such a manner that precise limits can be derived for short-lived and long-lived radionuclides with or without disturbance. The fundamentals are made clear by simple examples for spectrophotometry and radioactivity and by a complicated example for activation analysis in which one must choose between alternative nuclear reactions. (orig./LH) [de

  16. Are Your Custodians Exposed to Excessive Lead Levels?

    School Business Affairs, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Data from a 1994 University of Maryland study suggest that typical janitorial tasks (sweeping, vacuuming, emptying trash receptacles, cleaning fixtures, and other related housekeeping activities) would not result in an airborne lead exposure that exceeded Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards. Lead abatement work should…

  17. Design and analysis of the TFTR fixed limiters - 1

    Winkler, P.; Fixler, S.; Timlen, W.V.

    1981-01-01

    The operation of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) consists of two phases. In the first phase, the Tokamak systems will be tested and an ohmic heated plasma of 4 MW produced. The plasma limiter system for this phase consists of a set of movable and a set of fixed limiters. Because of the low power level during this phase, a design of passively cooled fixed limiters without tiles will satisfy the requirements. This limiter will be replaced by an actively cooled tile-covered axisymmetric limiter in the second phase. This paper discusses the design of the first phase fixed limiters only

  18. Approaching the Shockley-Queisser limit: General assessment of the main limiting mechanisms in photovoltaic cells

    Vossier, Alexis; Gualdi, Federico; Dollet, Alain; Ares, Richard; Aimez, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    In principle, the upper efficiency limit of any solar cell technology can be determined using the detailed-balance limit formalism. However, “real” solar cells show efficiencies which are always below this theoretical value due to several limiting mechanisms. We study the ability of a solar cell architecture to approach its own theoretical limit, using a novel index introduced in this work, and the amplitude with which the different limiting mechanisms affect the cell efficiency is scrutinized as a function of the electronic gap and the illumination level to which the cell is submitted. The implications for future generations of solar cells aiming at an improved conversion of the solar spectrum are also addressed

  19. Material limitations on the detection limit in refractometry

    Skafte-Pedersen, Peder; Nunes, Pedro; Xiao, Sanshui

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the detection limit for refractometric sensors relying on high-Q optical cavities and show that the ultimate classical detection limit is given by min {Δn} ≳ η with n + iη being the complex refractive index of the material under refractometric investigation. Taking finite Q factors and...

  20. Further limitations on nuclear testing

    Brown, P.S.

    1991-11-01

    This document addresses a number of subjects related to further constraints on nuclear testing, briefly discussing each of the following topics: the current political situation, the kinds of steps that might next be taken in test limitations and the impacts of further testing limits, the need for a test ban readiness program, some issues related to verification, and the possibility of confidence building measures as alternative, or near-term, steps to further test limitations

  1. ICRF power limitation relation to density limit in ASDEX

    Ryter, F.

    1992-01-01

    Launching high ICRF power into ASDEX plasmas required good antenna-plasma coupling. This could be achieved by sufficient electron density in front of the antennas i.e. small antenna-plasma distance (1-2 cm) and moderate to high line-averaged electron density compared to the density window in ASDEX. These are conditions eventually close to the density limit. ICRF heated discharges terminated by plasma disruptions caused by the RF pulse limited the maximum RF power which can be injected into the plasma. The disruptions occurring in these cases have clear phenomenological similarities with those observed in density limit discharges. We show in this paper that the ICRF-power limitation by plasma disruptions in ASDEX was due to reaching the density limit. (orig.)

  2. ICRF power limitation relation to density limit in ASDEX

    Ryter, F.

    1992-01-01

    Launching high ICRF power into ASDEX plasmas required good antenna-plasma coupling. This could be achieved by sufficient electron density in front of the antennas i.e. small antenna-plasma distance (1-2 cm) and moderate to high line-averaged electron density compared to the density window in ASDEX. These are conditions eventually close to the density limit. ICRF heated discharges terminated by plasma disruptions caused by the RF pulse limited the maximum RF power which can be injected into the plasma. The disruptions occurring in these cases have clear phenomenological similarities with those observed in density limit discharges. We show in this paper that the ICRF-power limitation by plasma disruptions in ASDEX was due to reaching the density limit. (author) 3 refs., 3 figs

  3. Limit cycles in quantum systems

    Niemann, Patrick

    2015-04-27

    In this thesis we investigate Limit Cycles in Quantum Systems. Limit cycles are a renormalization group (RG) topology. When degrees of freedom are integrated out, the coupling constants flow periodically in a closed curve. The presence of limit cycles is restricted by the necessary condition of discrete scale invariance. A signature of discrete scale invariance and limit cycles is log-periodic behavior. The first part of this thesis is concerned with the study of limit cycles with the similarity renormalization group (SRG). Limit cycles are mainly investigated within conventional renormalization group frameworks, where degrees of freedom, which are larger than a given cutoff, are integrated out. In contrast, in the SRG potentials are unitarily transformed and thereby obtain a band-diagonal structure. The width of the band structure can be regarded as an effective cutoff. We investigate the appearance of limit cycles in the SRG evolution. Our aim is to extract signatures as well as the scaling factor of the limit cycle. We consider the 1/R{sup 2}-potential in a two-body system and a three-body system with large scattering lengths. Both systems display a limit cycle. Besides the frequently used kinetic energy generator we apply the exponential and the inverse generator. In the second part of this thesis, Limit Cycles at Finite Density, we examine the pole structure of the scattering amplitude for distinguishable fermions at zero temperature in the medium. Unequal masses and a filled Fermi sphere for each fermion species are considered. We focus on negative scattering lengths and the unitary limit. The properties of the three-body spectrum in the medium and implications for the phase structure of ultracold Fermi gases are discussed.

  4. Magnetic shielding of a limiter

    Brevnov, N.N.; Stepanov, S.B.; Khimchenko, L.N.; Matthews, G.F.; Goodal, D.H.J.

    1991-01-01

    Localization of plasma interaction with material surfaces in a separate chamber, from where the escape of impurities is hardly realized, i.e. application of magnetic divertors or pump limiters, is the main technique for reduction of the impurity content in a plasma. In this case, the production of a divertor configuration requires a considerable power consumption and results in a less effective utilization of the magnetic field volume. Utilization of a pump limiter, for example the ICL-type, under tokamak-reactor conditions would result in the extremely high and forbidden local heat loadings onto the limiter surface. Moreover, the magnetically-shielded pump limiter (MSL) was proposed to combine positive properties of the divertor and the pump limiter. The idea of magnetic shielding is to locate the winding with current inside the limiter head so that the field lines of the resultant magnetic field do not intercept the limiter surface. In this case the plasma flows around the limiter leading edges and penetrates into the space under the limiter. The shielding magnetic field can be directed either counter the toroidal field or counter the poloidal one of a tokamak, dependent on the concrete diagram of the device. Such a limiter has a number of advantages: -opportunity to control over the particle and impurity recycling without practical influence upon the plasma column geometry, - perturbation of a plasma column magnetic configuration from the side of such a limiter is less than that from the side of the divertor coils. The main deficiency is the necessity to locate active windings inside the discharge chamber. (author) 5 refs., 3 figs

  5. Force Limited Vibration Test of HESSI Imager

    Amato, Deborah; Pankow, David; Thomsen, Knud

    2000-01-01

    The High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI) is a solar x-ray and gamma-ray observatory scheduled for launch in November 2000. Vibration testing of the HESSI imager flight unit was performed in August 1999. The HESSI imager consists of a composite metering tube, two aluminum trays mounted to the tube on titanium flexure mounts, and nine modulation grids mounted on each tray. The vibration tests were acceleration controlled and force limited, in order to prevent overtesting. The force limited strategy reduced the shaker force and notched the acceleration at resonances. The test set-up, test levels, and results are presented. The development of the force limits is also discussed. The imager successfully survived the vibration testing.

  6. Dose limits to the eye lens

    Sion, N.

    2016-01-01

    Protecting the human body from the effects of ionizing radiation is essential to forestall stochastic effects and require placing limits on the effective dose. Dose limits on specific organs are also necessary to reduce the deterministic effects and tissue reactions. The standard for radiation protection was ISO 15382 (2002) which mainly dealt with beta radiation for nuclear power plant workers. Clearly an update is required to allow for new technology and the proliferative use of radiation in medical practices. There is a need for more explicit radiation monitoring to operators and staff. ICRP118 (International Commission on Radiological Protection), Ref. 1, evolved their recommendations to include eye lens doses as a follow on to their publication 103 and to focus on radiation exposures. It provides updated estimates of 'practical' threshold doses for tissue injury at the level of 1% incidence. This paper discusses the current status and the recommendation for a drastic reduction of the dose limit to the eye lens. (author)

  7. Determination and Interpretation of Characteristic Limits for Radioactivity Measurements: Decision Threshhold, Detection Limit and Limits of the Confidence Interval

    2017-01-01

    Since 2004, the environment programme of the IAEA has included activities aimed at developing a set of procedures for analytical measurements of radionuclides in food and the environment. Reliable, comparable and fit for purpose results are essential for any analytical measurement. Guidelines and national and international standards for laboratory practices to fulfil quality assurance requirements are extremely important when performing such measurements. The guidelines and standards should be comprehensive, clearly formulated and readily available to both the analyst and the customer. ISO 11929:2010 is the international standard on the determination of the characteristic limits (decision threshold, detection limit and limits of the confidence interval) for measuring ionizing radiation. For nuclear analytical laboratories involved in the measurement of radioactivity in food and the environment, robust determination of the characteristic limits of radioanalytical techniques is essential with regard to national and international regulations on permitted levels of radioactivity. However, characteristic limits defined in ISO 11929:2010 are complex, and the correct application of the standard in laboratories requires a full understanding of various concepts. This publication provides additional information to Member States in the understanding of the terminology, definitions and concepts in ISO 11929:2010, thus facilitating its implementation in Member State laboratories.

  8. Tachyons in the Galilean limit

    Batlle, Carles [Departament de Matemàtiques and IOC, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, EPSEVG,Av. V. Balaguer 1, Vilanova i la Geltrú, E-08808 (Spain); Gomis, Joaquim [Departament de Física Quàntica i Astrofísica and Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (ICCUB),Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, Barcelona, E-08028 (Spain); Mezincescu, Luca [Department of Physics, University of Miami,P.O. Box 248046, Coral Gables, FL, 33124 (United States); Townsend, Paul K. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Centre for Mathematical Sciences,University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-20

    The Souriau massless Galilean particle of “colour” k and spin s is shown to be the Galilean limit of the Souriau tachyon of mass m=ik and spin s. We compare and contrast this result with the Galilean limit of the Nambu-Goto string and Green-Schwarz superstring.

  9. FUEL CASK IMPACT LIMITER VULNERABILITIES

    Leduc, D.; England, J.; Rothermel, R.

    2009-01-01

    Cylindrical fuel casks often have impact limiters surrounding just the ends of the cask shaft in a typical 'dumbbell' arrangement. The primary purpose of these impact limiters is to absorb energy to reduce loads on the cask structure during impacts associated with a severe accident. Impact limiters are also credited in many packages with protecting closure seals and maintaining lower peak temperatures during fire events. For this credit to be taken in safety analyses, the impact limiter attachment system must be shown to retain the impact limiter following Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT) and Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) impacts. Large casks are often certified by analysis only because of the costs associated with testing. Therefore, some cask impact limiter attachment systems have not been tested in real impacts. A recent structural analysis of the T-3 Spent Fuel Containment Cask found problems with the design of the impact limiter attachment system. Assumptions in the original Safety Analysis for Packaging (SARP) concerning the loading in the attachment bolts were found to be inaccurate in certain drop orientations. This paper documents the lessons learned and their applicability to impact limiter attachment system designs

  10. Beam-limiting and radiation-limiting interlocks

    Macek, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reviews several aspects of beam-limiting and radiation- limiting interlocks used for personnel protection at high-intensity accelerators. It is based heavily on the experience at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) where instrumentation-based protection is used extensively. Topics include the need for ''active'' protection systems, system requirements, design criteria, and means of achieving and assessing acceptable reliability. The experience with several specific devices (ion chamber-based beam loss interlock, beam current limiter interlock, and neutron radiation interlock) designed and/or deployed to these requirements and criteria is evaluated

  11. Limits to magnetic resonance microscopy

    Glover, Paul; Mansfield, Peter

    2002-01-01

    The last quarter of the twentieth century saw the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) grow from a laboratory demonstration to a multi-billion dollar worldwide industry. There is a clinical body scanner in almost every hospital of the developed nations. The field of magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM), after mostly being abandoned by researchers in the first decade of MRI, has become an established branch of the science. This paper reviews the development of MRM over the last decade with an emphasis on the current state of the art. The fundamental principles of imaging and signal detection are examined to determine the physical principles which limit the available resolution. The limits are discussed with reference to liquid, solid and gas phase microscopy. In each area, the novel approaches employed by researchers to push back the limits of resolution are discussed. Although the limits to resolution are well known, the developments and applications of MRM have not reached their limit. (author)

  12. LANSCE Beam Current Limiter (XL)

    Gallegos, F.R.; Hall, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is an engineered safety system that provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated proton beams. The Beam Current Limiter (XL), as an active component of the RSS, limits the maximum average current in a beamline, thus the current available for a beam spill accident. Exceeding the pre-set limit initiates action by the RSS to mitigate the hazard (insertion of beam stoppers in the low energy beam transport). The beam limiter is an electrically isolated, toroidal transformer and associated electronics. The device was designed to continuously monitor beamline currents independent of any external timing. Fail-safe operation was a prime consideration in its development. Fail-safe operation is defined as functioning as intended (due to redundant circuitry), functioning with a more sensitive fault threshold, or generating a fault condition. This report describes the design philosophy, hardware, implementation, operation, and limitations of the device

  13. The historical development of radiation protection limits

    Schuettmann, W.

    1976-01-01

    The present internationally largely corresponding radiation protection limits are based on recommendations given by the ICRP in 1965. In order to better understand the underlying concepts, a historical sketch of the development is presented including actual discussions of trends to be excepted. Although exposure of healthy individuals by man-made sources up to these maximum levels is legally permissible, it should be emphasized again and again that any unavoidable exposure must be justified by the need for its associated cause. (author)

  14. Tokamak plasma interaction with limiters

    Pitcher, C.S.

    1987-11-01

    The importance of plasma purity is first discussed in terms of the general requirements of controlled thermonuclear fusion. The tokamak approach to fusion and its inherent problem of plasma contamination are introduced. A main source of impurities is due to the bombardment of the limiter by energetic particles and thus the three main aspects of the plasma-limiter interaction are reviewed, boundary plasma conditions, fuelling/recycling and impurity production. The experiments, carried out on the DITE tokamak at Culham Laboratory, UK, investigated these three topics and the results are compared with predicted behaviour; new physical phenomena are presented in all three areas. Simple one-dimensional fluid equations are found to adequately describe the SOL plasma, except in regard to the pre-sheath electric field and ambipolarity; that is, the electric field adjacent to the limiter surface appears to be weak and the associated plasma flow can be non-ambipolar. Recycling of fuel particles from the limiter is observed to be near unity at all times. The break-up behaviour of recycled and gas puffed D 2 molecules is dependent on the electron temperature, as expected. Impurity production at the limiter is chemical erosion of graphite being negligible. Deposition of limiter and wall-produced impurities is found on the limiter. The spatial distributions of impurities released from the limiter are observed and are in good agreement with a sputtered atom transport code. Finally, preliminary experiments on the transport of impurity ions along field lines away from the limiter have been performed and compared with simple analytic theory. The results suggest that the pre-sheath electric field in the SOL is much weaker than the simple fluid model would predict

  15. Bases for establishing radiation exposure limits

    Pochin, E.E.

    1977-01-01

    It is an essential requirement of good radiation protection that all unnecessary exposure of people should be avoided and that any necessary exposure, whether of workers or of members of the general public, should be minimised. It is, however, an additional requirement that such necessary exposures should not exceed certain stated limits. These principles are based on the possibility that even the smallest exposures may involve some risk of harm, that any risk of harm should be justifiable by the circumstances necessitating it, and that risk should always be limited to an appropriately low level. The bases for establishing exposure limits must therefore involve an assessment of the risk involved in any form of radiation exposure, and an opinion as to the degree of safety that should be ensured in circumstances which necessitate any occupational or public exposure to radiation. There is increasing quantitative evidence on the frequency on which harm, and particularly the induction of malignancies, may be caused in people exposed to radiation at high doses; and somewhat clearer bases than previously for inferring the possible frequencies at low doses. It is therefore easier to assess the degree of safety ensured by restricting radiation exposure to particular levels. The degree of safety which should be regarded as appropriate in different circumstances remains a matter for review, but suggestions are made as to levels which would be advocated by informed opinion, and the exposure limits which would correspond to these. It is clear also that a comparable degree of safety should be ensured whether the radiation exposure involves the whole body more of less uniformly, or individual tissues or organs selectively. Increasing epidemiological evidence is available on the relative sensitivity to radiation induction of malignancies in a number of organs, and to the apparently much lower sensitivity of other organs; and experimental evidence in animals allows a comparable

  16. Sea-land limits: a case study

    Afranio R. de Mesquita

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The limits between sea and land were estimated at "Pulso" beach located in the Southeastern Brazilian shelf (φ = 23°33/17.4886"S; Λ = 045° 13'13.0504"W - WGS84, between the island of São Sebastião and the city of Ubatuba, SP, Brazil. The relative sea level of the year 1831 at "Pulso" beach, as per Brazilian law Number 9760 dated from 1946, was estimated and materialized. The retro-estimation allowed the demarcation of the Legal Sea-Land Limits at "Pulso" beach as per the terms of the law. The accuracy of the procedure for the transference of the long-term sea level from the research station of Ubatuba to "Pulso" beach was assessed by parallel work of geometrical leveling referred to the IBGE (Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics geodetic network. The motivation, the hypotheses (Brest, Cananeia and IPCC and the methods here used are described, together with a short history of the Legal Sea-Land Limits. The results indicated that the legal Sea-Land Limits at "Pulso" beach are well within the beach area. They were determined as per law 9760, and there is the need to reactivate the national network of sea level gauge.Os limites entre mar e terra foram estimados na praia chamada Pulso, localizada na costa sudeste do Brasil (φ = 23°33'17, 4886"S; Λ = 045°13'13, 0504"W entre a Ilha de São Sebastião e a cidade de Ubatuba, no Estado de São Paulo, SP, Brasil. O nível relativo do mar do ano de 1831 na praia do Pulso, ou "Praia do Pulso" (PP, foi estimado e materializado, de acordo com a Lei brasileira Número 9760 de 1946. A acurácia do procedimento foi acompanhada por trabalho paralelo de nivelamento geométrico referido ao sistema nacional de geodésia do IBGE (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística. A motivação, as hipóteses (Brest, Cananeia e IPCC e os métodos utilizados são descritos, acompanhados por um breve histórico dos "Terrenos de Marinha". Os resultados indicaram que os limites em (PP estão bem dentro

  17. The Limits of Exercise Physiology

    Gabriel, Brendan M; Zierath, Juleen R

    2017-01-01

    Many of the established positive health benefits of exercise have been documented by historical discoveries in the field of exercise physiology. These investigations often assess limits: the limits of performance, or the limits of exercise-induced health benefits. Indeed, several key findings have...... been informed by studying highly trained athletes, in addition to healthy or unhealthy people. Recent progress has been made in regard to skeletal muscle metabolism and personalized exercise regimes. In this perspective, we review some of the historical milestones of exercise physiology, discuss how...

  18. Information Processing and Limited Liability

    Bartosz Mackowiak; Mirko Wiederholt

    2012-01-01

    Decision-makers often face limited liability and thus know that their loss will be bounded. We study how limited liability affects the behavior of an agent who chooses how much information to acquire and process in order to take a good decision. We find that an agent facing limited liability processes less information than an agent with unlimited liability. The informational gap between the two agents is larger in bad times than in good times and when information is more costly to process.

  19. Limited Releases of Krsko NPP

    Breznik, B.; Kovac, A.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Krsko Nuclear Power Plant is about 700 MW Pressurised Water Reactor plant located in Slovenia close to the border with Croatia. The authorised limit for the radioactive releases is basically set to 50 μSv effective dose per year to the members of the public. There is also additional limitation of total activities released in a year and concentration. The poster presents the effluents of the year 2000 and evaluated dose referring to the limits and to the natural and other sources of radiation around the plant. (author)

  20. Nuclear Structure at the Limits

    Nazarewicz, W.

    1998-01-01

    One of the frontiers of todays nuclear science is the journey to the limits of atomic charge and nuclear mass, of neutron-to-proton ratio, and of angular momentum. The tour to the limits is not only a quest for new, exciting phenomena, but the new data are expected, as well, to bring qualitatively new information about the fundamental properties of the nucleonic many-body system, the nature of the nuclear interaction, and nucleonic correlations at various energy-distance scales. In this series of lectures, current developments in nuclear structure at the limits are discussed from a theoretical perspective, mainly concentrating on medium-mass and heavy nuclei