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Sample records for oscillations crucial roles

  1. Epoxy adhesive plays crucial role at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Epoxy adhesives are set to play a vital role in Europe's biggest-ever scientific experiment at the European Centrefor Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, thereby helping scientists gain a better understanding of the origins of the universe." (1/2 page)

  2. Epoxy adhesive plays crucial role at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "Epoxy adhesives are set to play a vital role in Europe's biggest-ever scientific experiment at the European Centre for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, thereby helping scientists gain a better understanding of the origins of the universe." (1 page)

  3. Crucial Role of Vitamin D in the Musculoskeletal System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke Wintermeyer

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D is well known to exert multiple functions in bone biology, autoimmune diseases, cell growth, inflammation or neuromuscular and other immune functions. It is a fat-soluble vitamin present in many foods. It can be endogenously produced by ultraviolet rays from sunlight when the skin is exposed to initiate vitamin D synthesis. However, since vitamin D is biologically inert when obtained from sun exposure or diet, it must first be activated in human beings before functioning. The kidney and the liver play here a crucial role by hydroxylation of vitamin D to 25-hydroxyvitamin D in the liver and to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D in the kidney. In the past decades, it has been proven that vitamin D deficiency is involved in many diseases. Due to vitamin D’s central role in the musculoskeletal system and consequently the strong negative impact on bone health in cases of vitamin D deficiency, our aim was to underline its importance in bone physiology by summarizing recent findings on the correlation of vitamin D status and rickets, osteomalacia, osteopenia, primary and secondary osteoporosis as well as sarcopenia and musculoskeletal pain. While these diseases all positively correlate with a vitamin D deficiency, there is a great controversy regarding the appropriate vitamin D supplementation as both positive and negative effects on bone mineral density, musculoskeletal pain and incidence of falls are reported.

  4. PDGFRα plays a crucial role in connective tissue remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikawa, Shinjiro; Ishii, Yoko; Hamashima, Takeru; Yamamoto, Seiji; Mori, Hisashi; Fujimori, Toshihiko; Shen, Jie; Inoue, Ran; Nishizono, Hirofumi; Itoh, Hiroshi; Majima, Masataka; Abraham, David; Miyawaki, Toshio; Sasahara, Masakiyo

    2015-12-07

    Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) plays a pivotal role in the remodeling of connective tissues. Emerging data indicate the distinctive role of PDGF receptor-α (PDGFRα) in this process. In the present study, the Pdgfra gene was systemically inactivated in adult mouse (α-KO mouse), and the role of PDGFRα was examined in the subcutaneously implanted sponge matrices. PDGFRα expressed in the fibroblasts of Pdgfra-preserving control mice (Flox mice), was significantly reduced in the sponges in α-KO mice. Neovascularized areas were largely suppressed in the α-KO mice than in the Flox mice, whereas the other parameters related to the blood vessels and endothelial cells were similar. The deposition of collagen and fibronectin and the expression of collagen 1a1 and 3a1 genes were significantly reduced in α-KO mice. There was a significantly decrease in the number and dividing fibroblasts in the α-KO mice, and those of macrophages were similar between the two genotypes. Hepatocyte growth factor (Hgf) gene expression was suppressed in Pdgfra-inactivated fibroblasts and connective tissue. The findings implicate the role of PDGFRα-dependent ECM and HGF production in fibroblasts that promotes the remodeling of connective tissue and suggest that PDGFRα may be a relevant target to regulate connective tissue remodeling.

  5. Crucial roles of NGF in dorsal horn plasticity in partially deafferentated cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Chen, Shan-Shan; Dan, Qi-Qin; Rong, Rong; Zhou, Xue; Zhang, Lian-Feng; Wang, Ting-Hua

    2011-04-01

    Though exogenous nerve growth factor (NGF) has been implicated in spinal cord plasticity, whether endogenous NGF plays a crucial role has not been established in vivo. This study investigated first the role of endogenous NGF in spinal dorsal horn (DH) plasticity following removal of L1-L5 and L7-S2 dorsal root ganglions (DRGs) in cats. Co-culture of chick embryo DRG with DH condition media, protein band fishing by cells as well as western blot showed that NGF could promote neurite growth in vitro. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization technique revealed an increase in the NGF and NGF mRNA immunoreactive cells in the DH after partial deafferentation. Lastly, after blocking with NGF antibody, choleragen subunit B horseradish peroxidase (CB-HRP) tracing showed a reduction in the neuronal sprouting observed in the DH. Our results demonstrated that in the cat, endogenous NGF plays a crucial role in DH plasticity after partial deafferentation.

  6. The role of stochasticity in sawtooth oscillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichtenberg, A.J.; Itoh, Kimitaka; Itoh, Sanae; Fukuyama, Atsushi.

    1991-08-01

    In this paper we have demonstrated that stochastization of field lines, resulting from the interaction of the fundamental m/n=1/1 helical mode with other periodicities, plays an important role in sawtooth oscillations. The time scale for the stochastic temperature diffusion has been determined. It was shown to be sufficiently fast to account for the fast sawtooth crash, and is generally shorter than the time scales for the redistribution of current. The enhancement of the electron and ion viscosity, arising from the stochastic field lines, has been calculated. The enhanced electron viscosity always leads to an initial increase in the growth rate of the mode; the enhanced ion viscosity can ultimately lead to mode stabilization before a complete temperature redistribution or flux reconnection has occurred. A dynamical model has been introduced to calculate the path of the sawtooth oscillation through a parameter space of shear and amplitude of the helical perturbation. The stochastic trigger to the enhanced growth rate and the stabilization by the ion viscosity are also included in the mode. A reasonable prescription for the flux reconnection at the end of the growth phase allows us to determine the initial q-value for the successive sawtooth ramps. (J.P.N.)

  7. Role of Frontal Alpha Oscillations in Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustenberger, Caroline; Boyle, Michael R.; Foulser, A. Alban; Mellin, Juliann M.; Fröhlich, Flavio

    2015-01-01

    Creativity, the ability to produce innovative ideas, is a key higher-order cognitive function that is poorly understood. At the level of macroscopic cortical network dynamics, recent EEG data suggests that cortical oscillations in the alpha frequency band (8 – 12 Hz) are correlated with creative thinking. However, whether alpha oscillations play a fundamental role in creativity has remained unknown. Here we show that creativity is increased by enhancing alpha power using 10 Hz transcranial alternating current stimulation (10Hz-tACS) of the frontal cortex. In a study of 20 healthy participants with a randomized, balanced cross-over design, we found a significant improvement of 7.4% in the Creativity Index measured by the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking, a comprehensive and most frequently used assay of creative potential and strengths. In a second similar study with 20 subjects, 40Hz-tACS was used in instead of 10Hz-tACS to rule out a general “electrical stimulation” effect. No significant change in the Creativity Index was found for such frontal gamma stimulation. Our results suggest that alpha activity in frontal brain areas is selectively involved in creativity; this enhancement represents the first demonstration of specific neuronal dynamics that drive creativity and can be modulated by non-invasive brain stimulation. Our findings agree with the model that alpha recruitment increases with internal processing demands and is involved in inhibitory top-down control, which is an important requirement for creative ideation. PMID:25913062

  8. Crucial role of alkaline sphingomyelinase in sphingomyelin digestion: a study on enzyme knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yao; Cheng, Yajun; Hansen, Gert H

    2011-01-01

    ) and KO mice were fed ³H-palmitic acid labeled SM together with milk SM by gavage. The lipids in intestinal content, intestinal tissues, serum, and liver were analyzed by TLC. In KO mice, nondigested ³H-SM in the intestinal content increased by 6-fold and the formation of ³H-ceramide decreased markedly....... The KO mice also showed significantly decreased radioactivity in liver and serum. Furthermore, alkaline phosphatase activity in the mucosa was reduced by 50% and histological comparison of two female littermates preliminarily suggested mucosal hypertrophy in KO mice. This study provides definite proof...... for crucial roles of alk-SMase in SM digestion and points to possible roles in regulating mucosal growth and alkaline phosphatase function....

  9. The crucial role of the proto-oncogene c-mos in regulation of oocyte maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Jałocha

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Meiosis arrest before fertilization is a common and unique feature of oogenesis in many animal species. On account of the unclear biological significance of meiosis arrest at various stages and for different durations in different animal species, this process and its regulation are the subject of many scientific studies. Studies on the development of ovarian teratomas proved to be helpful in defining the role of particular genes and biochemical cycles in control of the cell cycle in animals. These benign tumors are a valuable source of information on oocyte maturation. The [i]c-mos[/i] proto-oncogene, which is specifically expressed in female and male germ cells, plays a crucial role in control of meiotic cell division in mammals. Its product – Mos protein kinase – acting through mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs regulates critical cellular functions required for homeostasis and decides about cell survival or apoptosis. The MAPK kinase kinase – MAPK kinase – MAPK (MKKK-MKK-MAPK phosphorelay system, in view of its role in cells, seems to be the ideal target for therapeutic intervention in cancer and other diseases. The recent research on human oocytes suggests that the basic mechanisms regulating various stages of oocyte maturation are similar to those described in animals.

  10. Crucial role of vinexin for keratinocyte migration in vitro and epidermal wound healing in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kioka, Noriyuki; Ito, Takuya; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Uekawa, Natsuko; Umemoto, Tsutomu; Motoyoshi, Soh; Imai, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Kenzo; Watanabe, Hideto; Yamada, Masayasu; Ueda, Kazumitsu

    2010-01-01

    In the process of tissue injury and repair, epithelial cells rapidly migrate and form epithelial sheets. Vinexin is a cytoplasmic molecule of the integrin-containing cell adhesion complex localized at focal contacts in vitro. Here, we investigated the roles of vinexin in keratinocyte migration in vitro and wound healing in vivo. Vinexin knockdown using siRNA delayed migration of both HaCaT human keratinocytes and A431 epidermoid carcinoma cells in scratch assay but did not affect cell proliferation. Induction of cell migration by scratching the confluent monolayer culture of these cells activated both EGFR and ERK, and their inhibitors AG1478 and U0126 substantially suppressed scratch-induced keratinocyte migration. Vinexin knockdown in these cells inhibited the scratch-induced activation of EGFR, but not that of ERK, suggesting that vinexin promotes cell migration via activation of EGFR. We further generated vinexin (-/-) mice and isolated their keratinocytes. They similarly showed slow migration in scratch assay. Furthermore, vinexin (-/-) mice exhibited a delay in cutaneous wound healing in both the back skin and tail without affecting the proliferation of keratinocytes. Together, these results strongly suggest a crucial role of vinexin in keratinocyte migration in vitro and cutaneous wound healing in vivo.

  11. SIRT1 may play a crucial role in overload-induced hypertrophy of skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koltai, Erika; Bori, Zoltán; Chabert, Clovis; Dubouchaud, Hervé; Naito, Hisashi; Machida, Shuichi; Davies, Kelvin Ja; Murlasits, Zsolt; Fry, Andrew C; Boldogh, Istvan; Radak, Zsolt

    2017-06-01

    Silent mating type information regulation 2 homologue 1 (SIRT1) activity and content increased significantly in overload-induced hypertrophy. SIRT1-mediated signalling through Akt, the endothelial nitric oxide synthase mediated pathway, regulates anabolic process in the hypertrophy of skeletal muscle. The regulation of catabolic signalling via forkhead box O 1 and protein ubiquitination is SIRT1 dependent. Overload-induced changes in microRNA levels regulate SIRT1 and insulin-like growth factor 1 signalling. Significant skeletal muscle mass guarantees functional wellbeing and is important for high level performance in many sports. Although the molecular mechanism for skeletal muscle hypertrophy has been well studied, it still is not completely understood. In the present study, we used a functional overload model to induce plantaris muscle hypertrophy by surgically removing the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles in rats. Two weeks of muscle ablation resulted in a 40% increase in muscle mass, which was associated with a significant increase in silent mating type information regulation 2 homologue 1 (SIRT1) content and activity (P overload-induced hypertrophy. These findings, along with the well-known regulatory roles that SIRT1 plays in modulating both anabolic and catabolic pathways, allow us to propose the hypothesis that SIRT1 may actually play a crucial causal role in overload-induced hypertrophy of skeletal muscle. This hypothesis will now require rigorous direct and functional testing. © 2017 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2017 The Physiological Society.

  12. The First Call Note Plays a Crucial Role in Frog Vocal Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xizi; Fan, Yanzhu; Xue, Fei; Brauth, Steven E; Tang, Yezhong; Fang, Guangzhan

    2017-08-31

    Vocal Communication plays a crucial role in survival and reproductive success in most amphibian species. Although amphibian communication sounds are often complex consisting of many temporal features, we know little about the biological significance of each temporal component. The present study examined the biological significance of notes of the male advertisement calls of the Emei music frog (Babina daunchina) using the optimized electroencephalogram (EEG) paradigm of mismatch negativity (MMN). Music frog calls generally contain four to six notes separated approximately by 150 millisecond intervals. A standard stimulus (white noise) and five deviant stimuli (five notes from one advertisement call) were played back to each subject while simultaneously recording multi-channel EEG signals. The results showed that the MMN amplitude for the first call note was significantly larger than for that of the others. Moreover, the MMN amplitudes evoked from the left forebrain and midbrain were typically larger than those from the right counterpart. These results are consistent with the ideas that the first call note conveys more information than the others for auditory recognition and that there is left-hemisphere dominance for processing information derived from conspecific calls in frogs.

  13. Generalized theory of spin fluctuations in itinerant electron magnets: Crucial role of spin anharmonicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solontsov, A.

    2015-01-01

    The paper critically overviews the recent developments of the theory of spatially dispersive spin fluctuations (SF) in itinerant electron magnetism with particular emphasis on spin-fluctuation coupling or spin anharmonicity. It is argued that the conventional self-consistent renormalized (SCR) theory of spin fluctuations is usually used aside of the range of its applicability actually defined by the constraint of weak spin anharmonicity based on the random phase approximation (RPA) arguments. An essential step in understanding SF in itinerant magnets beyond RPA-like arguments was made recently within the soft-mode theory of SF accounting for strong spin anharmonicity caused by zero-point SF. In the present paper we generalize it to apply for a wider range of temperatures and regimes of SF and show it to lead to qualitatively new results caused by zero-point effects. - Highlights: • We review the spin-fluctuation theory of itinerant electron magnets with account of zero-point effects. • We generalize the existing theory to account for different regimes of spin fluctuations. • We show that zero-point spin fluctuations play a crucial role in both low- and high-temperature properties of metallic magnets. • We argue that a new scheme of calculation of ground state properties of magnets is needed including zero-point effects

  14. The cell membrane plays a crucial role in survival of bacteria and archaea in extreme environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konings, Wil N.; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Koning, Sonja; Driessen, Arnold J.M.

    2002-01-01

    The cytoplasmic membrane of bacteria and archaea determine to a large extent the composition of the cytoplasm. Since the ion and in particular the proton and/or the sodium ion electrochemical gradients across the membranes are crucial for the bioenergetic conditions of these microorganisms,

  15. Crucial role of strategy updating for coexistence of strategies in interaction networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianlei; Zhang, Chunyan; Cao, Ming; Weissing, Franz J.

    2015-04-01

    Network models are useful tools for studying the dynamics of social interactions in a structured population. After a round of interactions with the players in their local neighborhood, players update their strategy based on the comparison of their own payoff with the payoff of one of their neighbors. Here we show that the assumptions made on strategy updating are of crucial importance for the strategy dynamics. In the first step, we demonstrate that seemingly small deviations from the standard assumptions on updating have major implications for the evolutionary outcome of two cooperation games: cooperation can more easily persist in a Prisoner's Dilemma game, while it can go more easily extinct in a Snowdrift game. To explain these outcomes, we develop a general model for the updating of states in a network that allows us to derive conditions for the steady-state coexistence of states (or strategies). The analysis reveals that coexistence crucially depends on the number of agents consulted for updating. We conclude that updating rules are as important for evolution on a network as network structure and the nature of the interaction.

  16. Beyond war and PTSD: The crucial role of transition stress in the lives of military veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobbs, Meaghan C; Bonanno, George A

    2018-02-01

    Although only a relatively small minority of military veterans develop Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), mental health theory and research with military veterans has focused primarily on PTSD and its treatment. By contrast, many and by some accounts most veterans experience high levels of stress during the transition to civilian life, however transition stress has received scant attention. In this paper we attempt to address this deficit by reviewing the wider range of challenges, rewards, successes, and failures that transitioning veterans might experience, as well as the factors that might moderate these experiences. To illuminate this argument, we briefly consider what it means to become a soldier (i.e., what is required to transition into military service) and more crucially what kind of stressors veterans might experience when they attempt to shed that identity (i.e., what is required to transition out of military service). We end by suggesting how an expanded research program on veteran transition stress might move forward. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The Crucial Role of the Operational Artist: A Case Study of Operation Barbarossa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-25

    In some cases, German generals used the opportunity after the war to report their personal views and experiences to a very receptive US audience ...change the attitude and expectations concerning the role of the operational artist from a receptive to a pro-active one. 136 This understanding of

  18. Empowered to cook: The crucial role of 'food agency' in making meals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubek, Amy B; Carabello, Maria; Morgan, Caitlin; Lahne, Jacob

    2017-09-01

    What makes an individual, on any given occasion, able and willing to prepare a meal for themselves: that is, to cook? As home cooking has increasingly become the focus of public-health, nutrition, and policy interventions and campaigns, the need for a better understanding has become apparent. It is clear that cooking is not merely a matter of mechanical skill or rote training; beyond this, it is difficult to explain why similar individuals have such different capacities for setting and achieving food-related goals. This paper proposes a new paradigm for cooking and food provisioning - termed "food agency" - that attempts to describe how an individual's desires form and are enacted in correspondence with social environments: broadly, agency emerges from the complex interplay of individual technical skills and cognitive capacities with social and cultural supports and barriers. Drawing on a close reading of anthropological and sociological research into cooking, the authors propose that an individual's ability to integrate such complexity in regard to provisioning - to possess 'food agency' - is crucial. This argument is supplemented by empirical case studies from a large body of ethnographic observations and interviews with home cooks from the United States, conducted over the last decade. Overall, more food agency means the cook is more empowered to act. Adopting the paradigm of food agency into the consideration of everyday cooking practices has the potential to support transdisciplinary food scholarship integrating individual actions within a food system and thus inform nutrition and public health interventions related to meal preparation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Environmental consequences of shale gas exploitation and the crucial role of rock microfracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Francois

    2015-04-01

    The growing exploitation of unconventional gas and oil resources has dramatically changed the international market of hydrocarbons in the past ten years. However, several environmental concerns have also been identified such as the increased microseismicity, the leakage of gas into freshwater aquifers, and the enhanced water-rock interactions inducing the release of heavy metals and other toxic elements in the produced water. In all these processes, fluids are transported into a network of fracture, ranging from nanoscale microcracks at the interface between minerals and the kerogen of the source rock, to well-developed fractures at the meter scale. Characterizing the fracture network and the mechanisms of its formation remains a crucial goal. A major difficulty when analyzing fractures from core samples drilled at depth is that some of them are produced by the coring process, while some other are produced naturally at depth by the coupling between geochemical and mechanical forces. Here, I present new results of high resolution synchrotron 3D X-ray microtomography imaging of shale samples, at different resolutions, to characterize their microfractures and their mechanisms of formation. The heterogeneities of rock microstructure are also imaged, as they create local stress concentrations where cracks may nucleate or along which they propagate. The main results are that microcracks form preferentially along kerogen-mineral interfaces and propagate along initial heterogeneities according to the local stress direction, connecting to increase the total volume of fractured rock. Their lifetime is also an important parameter because they may seal by fluid circulation, fluid-rock interactions, and precipitation of a cement. Understanding the multi-scale processes of fracture network development in shales and the coupling with fluid circulation represents a key challenge for future research directions.

  20. The Crucial Role of C18-Cer in Fat-Induced Skeletal Muscle Insulin Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blachnio-Zabielska, Agnieszka U; Chacinska, Marta; Vendelbo, Mikkel H; Zabielski, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Muscle bioactive lipids accumulation leads to several disorder states. The most common are insulin resistance (IR) and type 2 diabetes. There is an ongoing debate which of the lipid species plays the major role in induction of muscle IR. Our aim was to elucidate the role of particular lipid group in induction of muscle IR. The analyses were performed on muscle from the following groups of rats: 1. Control, fed standard diet, 2 HFD, fed high fat diet, 3. HFD/Myr, fed HFD and treated with myriocin (Myr), an inhibitor of ceramide de novo synthesis. We utilized [U13C] palmitate isotope tracer infusion and mass spectrometry to measure content and synthesis rate of muscle long-chain acyl-CoA (LCACoA), diacylglycerols (DAG) and ceramide (Cer). HFD led to intramuscular accumulation of LCACoA, DAG and Cer and skeletal muscle IR. Myr-treatment caused decrease in Cer (most noticeable for stearoyl-Cer and oleoyl-Cer) and accumulation of DAG, possibly due to re-channeling of excess of intramuscular LCACoA towards DAG synthesis. An improvement in insulin sensitivity at both systemic and muscular level coincided with decrease in ceramide, despite elevated intramuscular DAG. The improved insulin sensitivity was associated with decreased muscle stearoyl- and oleoyl-ceramide content. The results indicate that accumulation of those ceramide species has the greatest impact on skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity in rats. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. A crucial role of ROCK for alleviation of senescence-associated phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joon Tae; Kang, Hyun Tae; Park, Chi Hyun; Lee, Young-Sam; Cho, Kyung A; Park, Sang Chul

    2018-06-01

    In our previous study, we uncovered a novel mechanism in which amelioration of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) phenotype is mediated by mitochondrial functional recovery upon rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibition. However, it remains elusive whether this mechanism is also applied to the amelioration of normal aging cells. In this study, we used Y-27632 and fasudil as effective ROCK inhibitors, and examined their role in senescence. We found that ROCK inhibition induced the functional recovery of the mitochondria as well as the metabolic reprogramming, which are two salient features that are altered in normal aging cells. Moreover, microarray analysis revealed that the up-regulated pathway upon ROCK inhibition is enriched for chromatin remodeling genes, which may play an important role in the alleviation of senescence-associated cell cycle arrest. Indeed, ROCK inhibition induced cellular proliferation, concomitant with the amelioration of senescent phenotype. Furthermore, the restorative effect by ROCK inhibition was observed in vivo as evidenced by the facilitated cutaneous wound healing. Taken together, our data indicate that ROCK inhibition might be utilized to ameliorate normal aging process and to treat age-related disease. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A crucial role for maternal dietary methyl donor intake in epigenetic programming and fetal growth outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Meghan; Bainbridge, Shannon; Fontaine-Bisson, Bénédicte

    2018-06-01

    The fetal origins of health and disease framework has identified extremes in fetal growth and birth weight as factors associated with the lifelong generation of chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and hypertension. Maternal nutrition plays a critical role in fetal and placental development, in part by providing the methyl groups required to establish the fetus's genome structure and function, notably through DNA methylation. The goal of this narrative review is to describe the role of maternal dietary methyl donor (methionine, folate, and choline) and cofactor (zinc and vitamins B2, B6, and B12) intake in one-carbon metabolism and DNA methylation in the fetus and placenta, as well as their impacts on fetal growth and lifelong health outcomes, with specific examples in animals and humans. Based on the available evidence, it is concluded that intake of different amounts of dietary methyl donors and cofactors during pregnancy may alter fetal growth and development, thus establishing a major link between early environmental exposure and disease development in the offspring later in life.

  3. Calcium ion in skeletal muscle: its crucial role for muscle function, plasticity, and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berchtold, M W; Brinkmeier, H; Müntener, M

    2000-01-01

    in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. In addition, a multitude of Ca(2+)-binding proteins is present in muscle tissue including parvalbumin, calmodulin, S100 proteins, annexins, sorcin, myosin light chains, beta-actinin, calcineurin, and calpain. These Ca(2+)-binding proteins may either exert an important role in Ca(2......Mammalian skeletal muscle shows an enormous variability in its functional features such as rate of force production, resistance to fatigue, and energy metabolism, with a wide spectrum from slow aerobic to fast anaerobic physiology. In addition, skeletal muscle exhibits high plasticity that is based...... on the potential of the muscle fibers to undergo changes of their cytoarchitecture and composition of specific muscle protein isoforms. Adaptive changes of the muscle fibers occur in response to a variety of stimuli such as, e.g., growth and differentition factors, hormones, nerve signals, or exercise...

  4. Podoplanin-expressing Cells Derived from Bone Marrow Play a Crucial Role in Postnatal Lymphatic Neovascularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Yoon; Park, Changwon; Cho, Yong Pil; Lee, Eugine; Kim, Hyongbum; Kim, Pilhan; Yun, Seok H.; Yoon, Young-sup

    2010-01-01

    Background Emerging evidence has suggested a contribution of bone marrow (BM) cells to lymphatic vessel formation; however, the exact phenotype of the cells with lymphatic endothelial progenitor cell (LEPC) function has yet to be identified. Here we investigate the identity of BM-derived LEPCs and their role in lymphatic neovascularization. Methods and Results Culture of BM-mononuclear cells (MNCs) in the presence of VEGFA, VEGFC and EGF resulted in expression of lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) markers. Among these cells, podoplanin+ cells were isolated by magnetic-labeled cell separation system (MACS) and characterized by FACS and immunocytochemistry. These podoplanin+ cells highly express markers for LECs, hematopoietic lineages, and stem/progenitor cells, and upon further cultivation, generate LECs. We further confirmed that podoplanin+ cells exist in small numbers in BM and peripheral blood (PB) of normal mice, but are significantly (15 fold) augmented upon lymphangiogenic stimuli such as tumor implantation. Next, to evaluate the potential of podoplanin+ cells for the formation of new lymphatic vessels in vivo, we injected culture-isolated or freshly isolated BM-derived podoplanin+ cells into wound and tumor models. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the injected cells were incorporated into the lymphatic vasculature, displayed LEC phenotypes, and increased lymphatic vascular density in tissues, suggesting lymphvasculogenesis. Podoplanin+ cells also expressed high levels of lymphangiogenic cytokines and increased proliferation of LECs during co-culture, suggesting a lymphangiogenic or paracrine role. Conclusions Our results provide compelling evidence that BM-derived podoplanin+ cells, a previously unrecognized cell type, function as LEPCs and participate in postnatal lymphatic neovascularization through both lymphvasculogenesis and lymphangiogenesis. PMID:20855662

  5. Correlations Between Personality and Brain Structure: A Crucial Role of Gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nostro, Alessandra D; Müller, Veronika I; Reid, Andrew T; Eickhoff, Simon B

    2017-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that males and females differ in personality and gender differences have also been reported in brain structure. However, effects of gender on this "personality-brain" relationship are yet unknown. We therefore investigated if the neural correlates of personality differ between males and females. Whole brain voxel-based morphometry was used to investigate the influence of gender on associations between NEO FFI personality traits and gray matter volume (GMV) in a matched sample of 182 males and 182 females. In order to assess associations independent of and dependent on gender, personality-GMV relationships were tested across the entire sample and separately for males and females. There were no significant correlations between any personality scale and GMV in the analyses across the entire sample. In contrast, significant associations with GMV were detected for neuroticism, extraversion, and conscientiousness only in males. Interestingly, GMV in left precuneus/parieto-occipital sulcus correlated with all 3 traits. Thus, our results indicate that brain structure-personality relationships are highly dependent on gender, which might be attributable to hormonal interplays or differences in brain organization between males and females. Our results thus provide possible neural substrates of personality-behavior relationships and underline the important role of gender in these associations. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Quantitative proteomic profiling for clarification of the crucial roles of lysosomes in microbial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Benhong; Gao, Yanpan; Zhan, Shaohua; Ge, Wei

    2017-07-01

    Lysosomes play vital roles in both innate and adaptive immunity. It is widely accepted that lysosomes do not function exclusively as a digestive organelle. It is also involved in the process of immune cells against pathogens. However, the changes in the lysosomal proteome caused by infection with various microbes are still largely unknown, and our understanding of the proteome of the purified lysosome is another obstacle that needs to be resolved. Here, we performed a proteomic study on lysosomes enriched from THP1 cells after infection with Listeria monocytogenes (L.m), Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) and Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV). In combination with the gene ontology (GO) analysis, we identified 284 lysosomal-related proteins from a total of 4560 proteins. We also constructed the protein-protein interaction networks for the differentially expressed proteins and revealed the core lysosomal proteins, including SRC in the L. m treated group, SRC, GLB1, HEXA and HEXB in the HSV-1 treated group and GLB1, CTSA, CTSB, HEXA and HEXB in the VSV treated group, which are involved in responding to diverse microbial infections. This study not only reveals variable lysosome responses depending on the bacterial or virus infection, but also provides the evidence based on which we propose a novel approach to proteome research for investigation of the function of the enriched organelles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. TRBP and eIF6 homologue in Marsupenaeus japonicus play crucial roles in antiviral response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Wang

    Full Text Available Plants and invertebrates can suppress viral infection through RNA silencing, mediated by RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC. Trans-activation response RNA-binding protein (TRBP, consisting of three double-stranded RNA-binding domains, is a component of the RISC. In our previous paper, a TRBP homologue in Fenneropenaeus chinensis (Fc-TRBP was reported to directly bind to eukaryotic initiation factor 6 (Fc-eIF6. In this study, we further characterized the function of TRBP and the involvement of TRBP and eIF6 in antiviral RNA interference (RNAi pathway of shrimp. The double-stranded RNA binding domains (dsRBDs B and C of the TRBP from Marsupenaeus japonicus (Mj-TRBP were found to mediate the interaction of TRBP and eIF6. Gel-shift assays revealed that the N-terminal of Mj-TRBP dsRBD strongly binds to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA and that the homodimer of the TRBP mediated by the C-terminal dsRBD increases the affinity to dsRNA. RNAi against either Mj-TRBP or Mj-eIF6 impairs the dsRNA-induced sequence-specific RNAi pathway and facilitates the proliferation of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV. These results further proved the important roles of TRBP and eIF6 in the antiviral response of shrimp.

  8. The crucial role of habits in energy consumption: an evolutionary approach on changing current patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marechal, Kevin (Centre for Economic and Social Studies on the Environment (CESSE), Univ. Libre de Bruxelles, Univ. d' Europe (Belgium)). e-mail: kevin.marechal@ulb.ac.be

    2009-07-01

    A substantial body of literature has shown that our behaviour is often guided by habits. The existence of habits - not fully conscious forms of behaviour - is important as it contradicts rational choice theory. Their presence thus calls for the setting of new instruments as they make it unlikely that consumers be capable of exercising control over their energy consumption in reaction to given incentives. This is further increased in the evolutionary perspective where the current carbon-based Socio-Technical System constraints and shapes consumers' choices through structural forces. Habits being potentially 'counterintentional', they may explain the 'efficiency paradox' in energy as well as the continued increase of energy consumption despite the rising environmental awareness among the population. Policies aiming at reducing energy consumption should thus specifically address the performance context of habits. For instance, targeting new residents has proven to be more effective given that their preceding habits have been disturbed. The results of our empirical analysis confirm this idea by showing how a change of context makes people more receptive to a proposed measure. Our analysis of the role played by habits also suggests that individuals do not consider the need to change existing habits as an obstacle even though this is contradicted implicitly in the answers they provided to open questions. This 'unconsciousness' is one of the most delicate features of habits and it should thus be accounted for when designing measures. Given the other characteristics of habits, the joint use of feedbacks and commitment strategies appears promising.

  9. The crucial role of nomothetic and idiographic conceptions of time: interdisciplinary collaboration in nuclear waste management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Corinne; Stauffacher, Michael; Krütli, Pius; Scholz, Roland W

    2012-01-01

    The disposal of nuclear waste involves extensive time scales. Technical experts consider up to 1 million years for the disposal of spent fuel and high-level waste in their safety assessment. Yet nuclear waste is not only a technical but also a so-called sociotechnical problem and, therefore, requires interdisciplinary collaboration between technical, natural, social sciences, and the humanities in its management. Given that these disciplines differ in their language, epistemics, and interests, such collaboration might be problematic. Based on evidence from cognitive psychology, we suggest that, in particular, a concept like time is presumably critical and can be understood differently. This study explores how different scientific disciplines understand extensive time scales in general and then focuses on nuclear waste. Eighteen qualitative exploratory interviews were conducted with experts for time-related phenomena of different disciplines, among them experts working in nuclear waste management. Analyses revealed two distinct conceptions of time corresponding to idiographic and nomothetic research approaches: scientists from the humanities and social sciences tend to have a more open, undetermined conception of time, whereas natural scientists tend to focus on a more determined conception that includes some undetermined aspects. Our analyses lead to reflections on potential difficulties for interdisciplinary teams in nuclear waste management. We focus on the understanding of the safety assessment, on potential implications for communication between experts from different disciplines (e.g., between experts from the humanities and engineering for risk assessment and risk communication), and we reflect on the roles of different disciplines in nuclear waste management. © 2011 Society for Risk Analysis.

  10. The thin brown line: The crucial role of peat in protecting permafrost in Arctic Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaglioti, B.; Mann, D. H.; Farquharson, L. M.; Baughman, C. A.; Jones, B. M.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Williams, A. P.; Andreu-Hayles, L.

    2017-12-01

    Ongoing warming threatens to thaw Arctic permafrost and release its stored carbon, which could trigger a permafrost-carbon feedback capable of augmenting global warming. The effects of warming air temperatures on permafrost are complicated by the fact that across much of the Arctic and Subarctic a mat of living plants and decaying litter cover the ground and buffer underlying permafrost from air temperatures. For simplicity here, we refer to this organic mat as "peat". Because this peat modifies heat flow between ground and air, the rate and magnitude of permafrost responses to changing climate - and hence the permafrost-carbon feedback - are partly slaved to the peat layer's slower dynamics. To explore this relationship, we used 14C-age offsets within lake sediments in Alaskan watersheds underlain by yedoma deposits to track the changing responses of permafrost thaw to fluctuating climate as peat accumulated over the last 14,000 years. As the peat layer built up, warming events became less effective at thawing permafrost and releasing ancient carbon. Consistent with this age-offset record, the geological record shows that early in post-glacial times when the peat cover was still thin and limited in extent, warm intervals triggered extensive thermokarst that resulted in rapid aggradation of floodplains. Today in contrast, hillslopes and floodplains remain stable despite rapid warming, probably because of the buffering effects of the extensive peat cover. Another natural experiment is provided by tundra fires like the 2007 Anaktuvuk River fire that removed the peat cover from tundra underlain by continuous permafrost and resulted in widespread thermkarsting. Further support for peat's critical role in protecting permafrost comes from the results of modeling how permafrost temperatures under different peat thicknesses respond to warming air temperature. Although post-industrial warming has not yet surpassed the buffering capacity of 14,000 years of peat buildup in

  11. The crucial protective role of glutathione against tienilic acid hepatotoxicity in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiya, Takayoshi; Mori, Kazuhiko; Hattori, Chiharu; Kai, Kiyonori; Kataoka, Hiroko; Masubuchi, Noriko; Jindo, Toshimasa; Manabe, Sunao

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the hepatotoxic potential of tienilic acid in vivo, we administered a single oral dose of tienilic acid to Sprague-Dawley rats and performed general clinicopathological examinations and hepatic gene expression analysis using Affymetrix microarrays. No change in the serum transaminases was noted at up to 1000 mg/kg, although slight elevation of the serum bile acid and bilirubin, and very mild hepatotoxic changes in morphology were observed. In contrast to the marginal clinicopathological changes, marked upregulation of the genes involved in glutathione biosynthesis [glutathione synthetase and glutamate-cysteine ligase (Gcl)], oxidative stress response [heme oxygenase-1 and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase quinone 1] and phase II drug metabolism (glutathione S-transferase and UDP glycosyltransferase 1A6) were noted after 3 or 6 h post-dosing. The hepatic reduced glutathione level decreased at 3-6 h, and then increased at 24 or 48 h, indicating that the upregulation of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-regulated gene and the late increase in hepatic glutathione are protective responses against the oxidative and/or electrophilic stresses caused by tienilic acid. In a subsequent experiment, tienilic acid in combination with L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of Gcl caused marked elevation of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) with extensive centrilobular hepatocyte necrosis, whereas BSO alone showed no hepatotoxicity. The elevation of ALT by this combination was observed at the same dose levels of tienilic acid as the upregulation of the Nrf2-regulated genes by tienilic acid alone. In conclusion, these results suggest that the impairment of glutathione biosynthesis may play a critical role in the development of tienilic acid hepatotoxicity through extensive oxidative and/or electrophilic stresses

  12. Galactose metabolism plays a crucial role in biofilm formation by Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Yunrong; Beauregard, Pascale B; Vlamakis, Hera; Losick, Richard; Kolter, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Galactose is a common monosaccharide that can be utilized by all living organisms via the activities of three main enzymes that make up the Leloir pathway: GalK, GalT, and GalE. In Bacillus subtilis, the absence of GalE causes sensitivity to exogenous galactose, leading to rapid cell lysis. This effect can be attributed to the accumulation of toxic galactose metabolites, since the galE mutant is blocked in the final step of galactose catabolism. In a screen for suppressor mutants restoring viability to a galE null mutant in the presence of galactose, we identified mutations in sinR, which is the major biofilm repressor gene. These mutations caused an increase in the production of the exopolysaccharide (EPS) component of the biofilm matrix. We propose that UDP-galactose is the toxic galactose metabolite and that it is used in the synthesis of EPS. Thus, EPS production can function as a shunt mechanism for this toxic molecule. Additionally, we demonstrated that galactose metabolism genes play an essential role in B. subtilis biofilm formation and that the expressions of both the gal and eps genes are interrelated. Finally, we propose that B. subtilis and other members of the Bacillus genus may have evolved to utilize naturally occurring polymers of galactose, such as galactan, as carbon sources. Bacteria switch from unicellular to multicellular states by producing extracellular matrices that contain exopolysaccharides. In such aggregates, known as biofilms, bacteria are more resistant to antibiotics. This makes biofilms a serious problem in clinical settings. The resilience of biofilms makes them very useful in industrial settings. Thus, understanding the production of biofilm matrices is an important problem in microbiology. In studying the synthesis of the biofilm matrix of Bacillus subtilis, we provide further understanding of a long-standing microbiological observation that certain mutants defective in the utilization of galactose became sensitive to it. In this

  13. Crucial roles of the protein kinases MK2 and MK3 in a mouse model of glomerulonephritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam J Guess

    Full Text Available Elevated mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 (p38 MAPK signaling has been implicated in various experimental and human glomerulopathies, and its inhibition has proven beneficial in animal models of these diseases. p38 MAPK signaling is partially mediated through MK2 and MK3, two phylogenetically related protein kinases that are its direct substrates. The current study was designed to determine the specific roles of MK2 and MK3 in a mouse model of acute proliferative glomerulonephritis, using mice with disrupted MK2 and/or MK3 genes. We found that the absence of MK3 alone worsened the disease course and increased mortality slightly compared to wild-type mice, whereas the absence of MK2 alone exhibited no significant effect. However, in an MK3-free background, the disease course depended on the presence of MK2 in a gene dosage-dependent manner, with double knock-out mice being most susceptible to disease induction. Histological and renal functional analyses confirmed kidney damage following disease induction. Because the renal stress response plays a crucial role in kidney physiology and disease, we analyzed the stress response pattern in this disease model. We found that renal cortices of diseased mice exhibited a pronounced and specific pattern of expression and/or phosphorylation of stress proteins and other indicators of the stress response (HSPB1, HSPB6, HSPB8, CHOP, eIF2α, partially in a MK2/MK3 genotype-specific manner, and without induction of a general stress response. Similarly, the expression and activation patterns of other protein kinases downstream of p38 MAPK (MNK1, MSK1 depended partially on the MK2/MK3 genotype in this disease model. In conclusion, MK2 and MK3 together play crucial roles in the regulation of the renal stress response and in the development of glomerulonephritis, which can potentially be exploited to develop novel therapeutic approaches to treat glomerular disease.

  14. [The supervisor has a crucial role in the medical student's degree projects. Experiences from seven semesters at Karolinska Institutet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Riitta; Shoshan, Maria; Ponzer, Sari

    2015-01-13

    In Sweden degree projects have a central role in evaluation of higher education, wherefore significant resources are spent on developing students' research competence. The undergraduate medical program at Karolinska Institutet introduced its degree project course in 2010. This paper gives an overview of the course and summarizes experiences from the first seven terms. In order to finalize their projects within one term, most students need substantial support. A highly structured course and frequent progress monitoring are advantageous. Other crucial factors are the quality of the supervision and students' verbal skills as well as support in scientific writing. In addition, increased awareness of the learning outcomes already at the beginning of the course may help students to achieve the expected results. Finally, students need to recognize their own responsibility for learning. 

  15. Crucial Role of Selenium in the Virucidal Activity of Benzisoselenazol-3(2H-ones and Related Diselenides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Mlochowski

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Various N-substituted benzisoselenazol-3(2H-ones and their non-selenium-containing analogues have been synthesized and tested against selected viruses (HHV-1, EMCV and VSV to determine the extent to which selenium plays a role in antiviral activity. The data presented here show that the presence of selenium is crucial for the antiviral properties of benzisoselenazol-3(2H-ones since their isostructural analogues having different groups but lacking selenium either did not show any antiviral activity or their activity was substantially lower. The open-chain analogues of benzisoselenazol-3(2H-ones—diselenides also exhibited high antiviral activity while selenides and disulfides were completely inactive towards model viruses.

  16. Functional role of frontal alpha oscillations in creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustenberger, Caroline; Boyle, Michael R; Foulser, A Alban; Mellin, Juliann M; Fröhlich, Flavio

    2015-06-01

    Creativity, the ability to produce innovative ideas, is a key higher-order cognitive function that is poorly understood. At the level of macroscopic cortical network dynamics, recent electroencephalography (EEG) data suggests that cortical oscillations in the alpha frequency band (8-12 Hz) are correlated with creative thinking. However, whether alpha oscillations play a functional role in creativity has remained unknown. Here we show that creativity is increased by enhancing alpha power using 10 Hz transcranial alternating current stimulation (10 Hz-tACS) of the frontal cortex. In a study of 20 healthy participants with a randomized, balanced cross-over design, we found a significant improvement of 7.4% in the Creativity Index measured by the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking (TTCT), a comprehensive and most frequently used assay of creative potential and strengths. In a second similar study with 20 subjects, 40 Hz-tACS was used instead of 10 Hz-tACS to rule out a general "electrical stimulation" effect. No significant change in the Creativity Index was found for such frontal 40 Hz stimulation. Our results suggest that alpha activity in frontal brain areas is selectively involved in creativity; this enhancement represents the first demonstration of specific neuronal dynamics that drive creativity and can be modulated by non-invasive brain stimulation. Our findings agree with the model that alpha recruitment increases with internal processing demands and is involved in inhibitory top-down control, which is an important requirement for creative ideation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. C-X-C Chemokine Receptor Type 4 Plays a Crucial Role in Mediating Oxidative Stress-Induced Podocyte Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Hongyan; Wu, Qinyu; Miao, Jinhua; Luo, Congwei; Hong, Xue; Wang, Yongping; Tang, Lan; Hou, Fan Fan; Liu, Youhua; Zhou, Lili

    2017-08-20

    Oxidative stress plays a role in mediating podocyte injury and proteinuria. However, the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the potential role of C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4), the receptor for stromal cell-derived factor 1α (SDF-1α), in mediating oxidative stress-induced podocyte injury. In mouse model of adriamycin nephropathy (ADR), CXCR4 expression was significantly induced in podocytes as early as 3 days. This was accompanied by an increased upregulation of oxidative stress in podocyte, as demonstrated by malondialdehyde assay, nitrotyrosine staining and secretion of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine in urine, and induction of NOX2 and NOX4, major subunits of NADPH oxidase. CXCR4 was also induced in human kidney biopsies with proteinuric kidney diseases and colocalized with advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs), an established oxidative stress trigger. Using cultured podocytes and mouse model, we found that AOPPs induced significant loss of podocyte marker Wilms tumor 1 (WT1), nephrin, and podocalyxin, accompanied by upregulation of desmin both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, AOPPs worsened proteinuria and aggravated glomerulosclerosis in ADR. These effects were associated with marked activation of SDF-1α/CXCR4 axis in podocytes. Administration of AMD3100, a specific inhibitor of CXCR4, reduced proteinuria and ameliorated podocyte dysfunction and renal fibrosis triggered by AOPPs in mice. In glomerular miniorgan culture, AOPPs also induced CXCR4 expression and downregulated nephrin and WT1. Innovation and Conclusion: These results suggest that chemokine receptor CXCR4 plays a crucial role in mediating oxidative stress-induced podocyte injury, proteinuria, and renal fibrosis. CXCR4 could be a new target for mitigating podocyte injury, proteinuria, and glomerular sclerosis in proteinuric chronic kidney disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 345-362.

  18. Genome-wide siRNA Screening at Biosafety Level 4 Reveals a Crucial Role for Fibrillarin in Henipavirus Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celine Deffrasnes

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hendra and Nipah viruses (genus Henipavirus, family Paramyxoviridae are highly pathogenic bat-borne viruses. The need for high biocontainment when studying henipaviruses has hindered the development of therapeutics and knowledge of the viral infection cycle. We have performed a genome-wide siRNA screen at biosafety level 4 that identified 585 human proteins required for henipavirus infection. The host protein with the largest impact was fibrillarin, a nucleolar methyltransferase that was also required by measles, mumps and respiratory syncytial viruses for infection. While not required for cell entry, henipavirus RNA and protein syntheses were greatly impaired in cells lacking fibrillarin, indicating a crucial role in the RNA replication phase of infection. During infection, the Hendra virus matrix protein co-localized with fibrillarin in cell nucleoli, and co-associated as a complex in pulldown studies, while its nuclear import was unaffected in fibrillarin-depleted cells. Mutagenesis studies showed that the methyltransferase activity of fibrillarin was required for henipavirus infection, suggesting that this enzyme could be targeted therapeutically to combat henipavirus infections.

  19. The crucial role of cyclic GMP in the eclosion hormone mediated signal transduction in the silkworm metamorphoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibanaka, Y; Hayashi, H; Okada, N; Fujita, N

    1991-10-31

    The signal transduction of the peptide, eclosion hormone, in the silkworm Bombyx mori appears to be mediated via the second messenger cyclic GMP throughout their life cycle. Injection of 8-bromo-cGMP induced the ecdysis behavior in pharate adults with similar latency to eclosion hormone-induced ecdysis; the moulting occurred 50-70 min after the injection. The potency of 8Br-cGMP was 10(2) fold higher than that of cGMP and the efficacy was increased by the co-injection of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor IBMX. On the other hand, in the silkworm pupal ecdysis the eclosion hormone and also 8Br-cGMP induced the moulting behavior in a dose-dependent manner. The adult development of the ability to respond to 8Br-cGMP took place concomitantly with the response to the eclosion hormone. Both the developmental time courses were shifted by a shift of light and dark cycles. Accordingly, the sensitivities to the peptide and cyclic nucleotide developed correspondently under the light and dark circadian rhythm. Thus throughout the silkworm life cycle, eclosion hormone is effective to trigger the ecdysis behavior and cGMP plays a crucial role as the second messenger in the eclosion hormone-mediated signal transduction.

  20. HCV subtype characterization among injection drug users: implication for a crucial role of Zhenjiang in HCV transmission in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiyu Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HCV transmission is closely associated with drug-trafficking routes in China. However, the transmission route of HCV in Eastern China remains unclear. Here, we investigate the role of Zhenjiang city of Jiangsu province, an important transportation hub linking Shanghai with other regions of China, in HCV transmission. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 141 whole blood samples were collected from injection drug users (IDUs in Zhenjiang and then tested for HCV infection. Of them, 115 HCV positive plasmas were subjected to RNA extraction, RT-PCR amplification, and sequencing. The subtype characterization and the evolutionary origin of HCV strains circulating in Zhenjiang were determined using polygenetic or phylogeographic analyses. Seven HCV subtypes 1b, 2a, 3a, 3b, 6a, 6e and 6n were detected among Zhenjiang IDUs, showing a complex HCV epidemic. The most predominant subtypes were 3a (38% and 1b (26.8%. Among these subtypes, subtypes 3b, 6n and 6e originated from Southwestern China (i.e., Yunnan and/or Guangxi, subtypes 2a and 6a from Southern China (i.e., Guangdong, subtype 1b from Central (i.e., Henan and Northwestern (i.e., Xinjiang China, and subtype 3a from Southwestern (i.e., Yunnan and Northwestern (i.e., Xinjiang China. From Zhenjiang, subtypes 1b and 2a were further spread to Eastern (i.e., Shanghai and Northern (i.e., Beijing China, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The mixing of seven HCV subtypes in Zhenjiang from all quarters of China indicates that as an important middle station, Zhenjiang plays a crucial role in HCV transmission, just as it is important in population migration between other regions of China and Eastern China.

  1. The role of Ce(III) in BZ oscillating reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Paulo A.; Varela, Hamilton; Faria, Roberto B.

    2012-03-01

    Herein we present results on the oscillatory dynamics in the bromate-oxalic acid-acetone-Ce(III)/Ce(IV) system in batch and also in a CSTR. We show that Ce(III) is the necessary reactant to allow the emergence of oscillations. In batch, oscillations occur with Ce(III) and also with Ce(IV), but no induction period is observed with Ce(III). In a CSTR, no oscillations were found using a freshly prepared Ce(IV), but only when the cerium-containing solution was aged, allowing partial conversion of Ce(IV) to Ce(III) by reaction with acetone.

  2. Crucial role of rho-kinase in pressure overload-induced right ventricular hypertrophy and dysfunction in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Shohei; Satoh, Kimio; Kikuchi, Nobuhiro; Miyata, Satoshi; Suzuki, Kota; Omura, Junichi; Shimizu, Toru; Kobayashi, Kenta; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Fukumoto, Yoshihiro; Sakata, Yasuhiko; Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    2014-06-01

    Right ventricular (RV) failure is the leading cause of death in various cardiopulmonary diseases, including pulmonary hypertension. It is generally considered that the RV is vulnerable to pressure overload as compared with the left ventricle (LV). However, as compared with LV failure, the molecular mechanisms of RV failure are poorly understood, and hence therapeutic targets of the disorder remain to be elucidated. Thus, we aimed to identify molecular therapeutic targets for RV failure in a mouse model of pressure overload. To induce pressure overload to respective ventricles, we performed pulmonary artery constriction or transverse aortic constriction in mice. We first performed microarray analysis and found that the molecules related to RhoA/Rho-kinase and integrin pathways were significantly upregulated in the RV with pulmonary artery constriction compared with the LV with transverse aortic constriction. Then, we examined the responses of both ventricles to chronic pressure overload in vivo. We demonstrated that compared with transverse aortic constriction, pulmonary artery constriction caused greater extents of mortality, Rho-kinase expression (especially ROCK2 isoform), and oxidative stress in pressure-overloaded RV, reflecting the weakness of the RV in response to pressure overload. Furthermore, mice with myocardial-specific overexpression of dominant-negative Rho-kinase showed resistance to pressure overload-induced hypertrophy and dysfunction associated with reduced oxidative stress. Finally, dominant-negative Rho-kinase mice showed a significantly improved long-term survival in both pulmonary artery constriction and transverse aortic constriction as compared with littermate controls. These results indicate that the Rho-kinase pathway plays a crucial role in RV hypertrophy and dysfunction, suggesting that the pathway is a novel therapeutic target of RV failure in humans. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. An efficient approach to suppress the negative role of contrarian oscillators in synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiyun; Ruan, Zhongyuan; Liu, Zonghua

    2013-09-01

    It has been found that contrarian oscillators usually take a negative role in the collective behaviors formed by conformist oscillators. However, experiments revealed that it is also possible to achieve a strong coherence even when there are contrarians in the system such as neuron networks with both excitable and inhibitory neurons. To understand the underlying mechanism of this abnormal phenomenon, we here consider a complex network of coupled Kuramoto oscillators with mixed positive and negative couplings and present an efficient approach, i.e., tit-for-tat strategy, to suppress the negative role of contrarian oscillators in synchronization and thus increase the order parameter of synchronization. Two classes of contrarian oscillators are numerically studied and a brief theoretical analysis is provided to explain the numerical results.

  4. Role of Longwave Cloud-Radiation Feedback in the Simulation of the Madden-Julian Oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daehyun; Ahn, Min-Seop; Kang, In-Sik; Del Genio, Anthony D.

    2015-01-01

    The role of the cloud-radiation interaction in the simulation of the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) is investigated. A special focus is on the enhancement of column-integrated diabatic heating due to the greenhouse effects of clouds and moisture in the region of anomalous convection. The degree of this enhancement, the greenhouse enhancement factor (GEF), is measured at different precipitation anomaly regimes as the negative ratio of anomalous outgoing longwave radiation to anomalous precipitation. Observations show that the GEF varies significantly with precipitation anomaly and with the MJO cycle. The greenhouse enhancement is greater in weak precipitation anomaly regimes and its effectiveness decreases monotonically with increasing precipitation anomaly. The GEF also amplifies locally when convection is strengthened in association with the MJO, especially in the weak precipitation anomaly regime (less than 5 mm day(exp -1)). A robust statistical relationship is found among CMIP5 climate model simulations between the GEF and the MJO simulation fidelity. Models that simulate a stronger MJO also simulate a greater GEF, especially in the weak precipitation anomaly regime (less than 5 mm day(exp -1)). Models with a greater GEF in the strong precipitation anomaly regime (greater than 30 mm day(-1)) represent a slightly slower MJO propagation speed. Many models that lack the MJO underestimate the GEF in general and in particular in the weak precipitation anomaly regime. The results herein highlight that the cloud-radiation interaction is a crucial process for climate models to correctly represent the MJO.

  5. Selective population rate coding: a possible computational role of gamma oscillations in selective attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Naoki

    2009-12-01

    Selective attention is often accompanied by gamma oscillations in local field potentials and spike field coherence in brain areas related to visual, motor, and cognitive information processing. Gamma oscillations are implicated to play an important role in, for example, visual tasks including object search, shape perception, and speed detection. However, the mechanism by which gamma oscillations enhance cognitive and behavioral performance of attentive subjects is still elusive. Using feedforward fan-in networks composed of spiking neurons, we examine a possible role for gamma oscillations in selective attention and population rate coding of external stimuli. We implement the concept proposed by Fries ( 2005 ) that under dynamic stimuli, neural populations effectively communicate with each other only when there is a good phase relationship among associated gamma oscillations. We show that the downstream neural population selects a specific dynamic stimulus received by an upstream population and represents it by population rate coding. The encoded stimulus is the one for which gamma rhythm in the corresponding upstream population is resonant with the downstream gamma rhythm. The proposed role for gamma oscillations in stimulus selection is to enable top-down control, a neural version of time division multiple access used in communication engineering.

  6. Gβ-like CpcB plays a crucial role for growth and development of Aspergillus nidulans and Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Kong

    Full Text Available Growth, development, virulence and secondary metabolism in fungi are governed by heterotrimeric G proteins (G proteins. A Gβ-like protein called Gib2 has been shown to function as an atypical Gβ in Gpa1-cAMP signaling in Cryptococcus neoformans. We found that the previously reported CpcB (cross pathway control B protein is the ortholog of Gib2 in Aspergillus nidulans and Aspergillus fumigatus. In this report, we further characterize the roles of CpcB in governing growth, development and toxigenesis in the two aspergilli. The deletion of cpcB results in severely impaired cellular growth, delayed spore germination, and defective asexual sporulation (conidiation in both aspergilli. Moreover, CpcB is necessary for proper expression of the key developmental activator brlA during initiation and progression of conidiation in A. nidulans and A. fumigatus. Somewhat in accordance with the previous study, the absence of cpcB results in the formation of fewer, but not micro-, cleistothecia in A. nidulans in the presence of wild type veA, an essential activator of sexual development. However, the cpcB deletion mutant cleistothecia contain no ascospores, validating that CpcB is required for progression and completion of sexual fruiting including ascosporogenesis. Furthermore, unlike the canonical GβSfaD, CpcB is not needed for the biosynthesis of the mycotoxin sterigmatocystin (ST as the cpcB null mutant produced reduced amount of ST with unaltered STC gene expression. However, in A. fumigatus, the deletion of cpcB results in the blockage of gliotoxin (GT production. Further genetic analyses in A. nidulans indicate that CpcB may play a central role in vegetative growth, which might be independent of FadA- and GanB-mediated signaling. A speculative model summarizing the roles of CpcB in conjunction with SfaD in A. nidulans is presented.

  7. Memo has a novel role in S1P signaling and is [corrected] crucial for vascular development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Shunya; Bottos, Alessia; Allegood, Jeremy C; Masson, Regis; Maurer, Francisca G; Genoud, Christel; Kaeser, Patrick; Huwiler, Andrea; Murakami, Masato; Spiegel, Sarah; Hynes, Nancy E

    2014-01-01

    Memo is a conserved protein that was identified as an essential mediator of tumor cell motility induced by receptor tyrosine kinase activation. Here we show that Memo null mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) are impaired in PDGF-induced migration and this is due to a defect in sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling. S1P is a bioactive phospholipid produced in response to multiple stimuli, which regulates many cellular processes. S1P is secreted to the extracellular milieu where it exerts its function by binding a family of G-protein coupled receptors (S1PRs), causing their activation in an autocrine or paracrine manner. The process, termed cell-autonomous S1PR signaling, plays a role in survival and migration. Indeed, PDGF uses cell-autonomous S1PR signaling to promote cell migration; we show here that this S1P pathway requires Memo. Using vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) with Memo knock-down we show that their survival in conditions of serum-starvation is impaired. Furthermore, Memo loss in HUVECs causes a reduction of junctional VE-cadherin and an increase in sprout formation. Each of these phenotypes is rescued by S1P or S1P agonist addition, showing that Memo also plays an important role in cell-autonomous S1PR signaling in endothelial cells. We also produced conventional and endothelial cell-specific conditional Memo knock-out mouse strains and show that Memo is essential for embryonic development. Starting at E13.5 embryos of both strains display bleeding and other vascular problems, some of the phenotypes that have been described in mouse strains lacking S1PRs. The essential role of Memo in embryonic vascular development may be due in part to alterations in S1P signaling. Taken together our results show that Memo has a novel role in the S1P pathway and that Memo is needed to promote cell-autonomous S1PR activation.

  8. Semantic congruence enhances memory of episodic associations: role of theta oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atienza, Mercedes; Crespo-Garcia, Maite; Cantero, Jose L

    2011-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that theta oscillations play a crucial role in episodic encoding. The present study evaluates whether changes in electroencephalographic theta source dynamics mediate the positive influence of semantic congruence on incidental associative learning. Here we show that memory for episodic associations (face-location) is more accurate when studied under semantically congruent contexts. However, only participants showing RT priming effect in a conceptual priming test (priming group) also gave faster responses when recollecting source information of semantically congruent faces as compared with semantically incongruent faces. This improved episodic retrieval was positively correlated with increases in theta power during the study phase mainly in the bilateral parahippocampal gyrus, left superior temporal gyrus, and left lateral posterior parietal lobe. Reconstructed signals from the estimated sources showed higher theta power for congruent than incongruent faces and also for the priming than the nonpriming group. These results are in agreement with the attention to memory model. Besides directing top-down attention to goal-relevant semantic information during encoding, the dorsal parietal lobe may also be involved in redirecting attention to bottom-up-driven memories thanks to connections between the medial-temporal and the left ventral parietal lobe. The latter function can either facilitate or interfere with encoding of face-location associations depending on whether they are preceded by semantically congruent or incongruent contexts, respectively, because only in the former condition retrieved representations related to the cue and the face are both coherent with the person identity and are both associated with the same location.

  9. Serratia marcescens outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit: crucial role of implementing hand hygiene among external consultants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagnani, Carlotta; Cocchi, Priscilla; Lega, Laura; Campana, Silvia; Biermann, Klaus Peter; Braggion, Cesare; Pecile, Patrizia; Chiappini, Elena; de Martino, Maurizio; Galli, Luisa

    2015-01-13

    Serratia marcescens represents an important pathogen involved in hospital acquired infections. Outbreaks are frequently reported and are difficult to eradicate. The aim of this study is to describe an outbreak of Serratia marcescens occurred from May to November 2012 in a neonatal intensive care unit, to discuss the control measures adopted, addressing the role of molecular biology in routine investigations during the outbreak. After an outbreak of Serratia marcescens involving 14 neonates, all admitted patients were screened for rectal and ocular carriage every two weeks. Extensive environmental sampling procedure and hand sampling of the staff were performed. Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern and molecular analysis of isolates were carried out. Effective hand hygiene measures involving all the external consultants has been implemented. Colonized and infected babies were cohorted. Dedicated staff was established to care for the colonized or infected babies. During the surveillance, 65 newborns were sampled obtaining 297 ocular and rectal swabs in five times. Thirty-four Serratia marcescens isolates were collected: 11 out of 34 strains were isolated from eyes, being the remaining 23 isolated from rectal swabs. Two patients presented symptomatic conjunctivitis. Environmental and hand sampling resulted negative. During the fifth sampling procedure no colonized or infected patients have been identified. Two different clones have been identified. Ocular and rectal colonization played an important role in spread of infections. Implementation of infection control measures, involving also external specialists, allowed to control a serious Serratia marcescens outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit.

  10. Thiol/Disulfide system plays a crucial role in redox protection in the acidophilic iron-oxidizing bacterium Leptospirillum ferriphilum.

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    Javiera Norambuena

    Full Text Available Thiol/disulfide systems are involved in the maintenance of the redox status of proteins and other molecules that contain thiol/disulfide groups. Leptospirillum ferriphilum DSM14647, an acidophilic bacterium that uses Fe(2+ as electron donor, and withstands very high concentrations of iron and other redox active metals, is a good model to study how acidophiles preserve the thiol/disulfide balance. We studied the composition of thiol/disulfide systems and their role in the oxidative stress response in this extremophile bacterium. Bioinformatic analysis using genomic data and enzymatic assays using protein extracts from cells grown under oxidative stress revealed that the major thiol/disulfide system from L. ferriphilum are a cytoplasmic thioredoxin system (composed by thioredoxins Trx and thioredoxin reductase TR, periplasmic thiol oxidation system (DsbA/DsbB and a c-type cytochrome maturation system (DsbD/DsbE. Upon exposure of L. ferriphilum to reactive oxygen species (ROS-generating compounds, transcriptional activation of the genes encoding Trxs and the TR enzyme, which results in an increase of the corresponding activity, was observed. Altogether these data suggest that the thioredoxin-based thiol/disulfide system plays an important role in redox protection of L. ferriphilum favoring the survival of this microorganism under extreme environmental oxidative conditions.

  11. Controversies over the mechanisms underlying the crucial role of the left fronto-parietal areas in the representation of tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido eGainotti

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Anatomo-clinical and neuroimaging data show that the left fronto-parietal areas play an important role in representing tools. As manipulation is an important source of knowledge about tools, it has been assumed that motor activity explains the link between tool knowledge and the left fronto-parietal areas. However, controversies exist over the exact mechanisms underlying this relationship. According to a strong version of the ‘embodied cognition theory’, activation of a tool concept necessarily involves re-enactment of the corresponding kind of action. Impairment of the ability to use tools should, therefore, lead to impairment of tool knowledge. Both the ‘domains of knowledge hypothesis’ and the ‘sensory-motor model of conceptual knowledge’ refute the strong version of the ‘embodied cognition hypothesis’ but acknowledge that manipulation and other action schemata play an important role in our knowledge of tools. The basic difference between these two models is that the former is based on an innatist model and the latter holds that the brain’s organization of categories is experience dependent. Data supporting and arguing against each of these models are briefly reviewed. In particular, the following lines of research, which argue against the innate nature of the brain’s categorical organization, are discussed: (1 the observation that in patients with category-specific disorders the semantic impairment does not respect the boundaries between biological entities and artefact items; (2 data showing that experience-driven neuroplasticity in musicians is not confined to alterations of perceptual and motor maps but also leads to the establishment of higher-level semantic representations for musical instruments; (3 results of experiments using previously unfamiliar materials showing that the history of our sensory-motor experience with an object significantly affects its neural representation.

  12. Crucial role of molecular planarity on the second order nonlinear optical property of pyridine based chalcone single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Anthoni Praveen; Jayarama, A.; Ng, Seik Weng

    2015-05-01

    An efficient nonlinear optical material 2E-3-(4-bromophenyl)-1-(pyridin-3-yl) prop-2-en-1-one (BPP) was synthesized and single crystals were grown using slow evaporation solution growth technique at room temperature. Grown crystal had prismatic morphology and its structure was confirmed by various spectroscopic studies, elemental analysis, and single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. The single crystal XRD of the crystal showed that BPP crystallizes in monoclinic system with noncentrosymmetric space group P21 and the cell parameters are a = 5.6428(7) Å, b = 3.8637(6) Å, c = 26.411(2) Å, β = 97.568(11) deg and v = 575.82(12) Å3. The UV-Visible spectrum reveals that the crystal is optically transparent and has high optical energy band gap of 3.1 eV. The powder second harmonic generation efficiency (SHG) of BPP is 6.8 times that of KDP. From thermal analysis it is found that the crystal melts at 139 °C and decomposes at 264 °C. High optical transparency down to blue region, higher powder SHG efficiency and better thermal stability than that of urea makes this chalcone derivative a promising candidate for SHG applications. Furthermore, effect of molecular planarity on SHG efficiency and role of pyridine ring adjacent to carbonyl group in forming noncentrosymmetric crystal systems of chalcone family is also discussed.

  13. Importance of pH Homeostasis in Metabolic Health and Diseases: Crucial Role of Membrane Proton Transport

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    Wataru Aoi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Protons dissociated from organic acids in cells are partly buffered. If not, they are transported to the extracellular fluid through the plasma membrane and buffered in circulation or excreted in urine and expiration gas. Several transporters including monocarboxylate transporters and Na+/H+ exchanger play an important role in uptake and output of protons across plasma membranes in cells of metabolic tissues including skeletal muscle and the liver. They also contribute to maintenance of the physiological pH of body fluid. Therefore, impairment of these transporters causes dysfunction of cells, diseases, and a decrease in physical performance associated with abnormal pH. Additionally, it is known that fluid pH in the interstitial space of metabolic tissues is easily changed due to little pH buffering capacitance in interstitial fluids and a reduction in the interstitial fluid pH may mediate the onset of insulin resistance unlike blood containing pH buffers such as Hb (hemoglobin and albumin. In contrast, habitual exercise and dietary intervention regulate expression/activity of transporters and maintain body fluid pH, which could partly explain the positive effect of healthy lifestyle on disease prognosis.

  14. Skewed X-chromosome inactivation plays a crucial role in the onset of symptoms in carriers of Becker muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viggiano, Emanuela; Picillo, Esther; Ergoli, Manuela; Cirillo, Alessandra; Del Gaudio, Stefania; Politano, Luisa

    2017-04-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder affecting approximately 1: 18.000 male births. Female carriers are usually asymptomatic, although 2.5-18% may present muscle or heart symptoms. In the present study, the role of the X chromosome inactivation (XCI) on the onset of symptoms in BMD carriers was analysed and compared with the pattern observed in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) carriers. XCI was determined on the lymphocytes of 36 BMD carriers (both symptomatic and not symptomatic) from 11 families requiring genetic advice at the Cardiomyology and Medical Genetics of the Second University of Naples, using the AR methylation-based assay. Carriers were subdivided into two groups, according to age above or below 50 years. Seven females from the same families known as noncarriers were used as controls. A Student's t-test for nonpaired data was performed to evaluate the differences observed in the XCI values between asymptomatic and symptomatic carriers, and carriers aged above or below 50 years. A Pearson correlation test was used to evaluate the inheritance of the XCI pattern in 19 mother-daughter pairs. The results showed that symptomatic BMD carriers had a skewed XCI with a preferential inactivation of the X chromosome carrying the normal allele, whereas the asymptomatic carriers and controls showed a random XCI. No concordance concerning the XCI pattern was observed between mothers and related daughters. The data obtained in the present study suggest that the onset of symptoms in BMD carriers is related to a skewed XCI, as observed in DMD carriers. Furthermore, they showed no concordance in the XCI pattern inheritance. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Crucial role of carbonic anhydrase IX in tumorigenicity of xenotransplanted adult T-cell leukemia-derived cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasu, Kentaro; Yamaguchi, Kazunori; Takanashi, Tomoka; Tamai, Keiichi; Sato, Ikuro; Ine, Shoji; Sasaki, Osamu; Satoh, Kennichi; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Fukushima, Takuya; Harigae, Hideo; Sugamura, Kazuo

    2017-03-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA9) is a membrane-associated carbonic anhydrase that regulates cellular pH, is upregulated in various solid tumors, and is considered to be a therapeutic target. Here, we describe the essential role of CA9 in the tumorigenicity of cells derived from human adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL). We previously established the highly tumorigenic ST1-N6 subline from the ATL-derived ST1 cell line by serial xenotransplantation in NOG mice. In the present study, we first show that CA9 expression is strongly enhanced in ST1-N6 cells. We then sorted ST1 cells by high or low CA9 expression and established ST1-CA9 high and ST1-CA9 low sublines. ST1-CA9 high cells, like ST1-N6 cells, were more strongly tumorigenic than ST1-CA9 low or parental ST1 cells when injected into NOG mice. Knockdown of CA9 with shRNAs suppressed the ability of ST1-CA9 high cells to initiate tumors, and the tumorigenicity of ST1 cells was significantly enhanced by introducing wild-type CA9 or a CA9 mutant with deletion of an intracytoplasmic domain. However, a CA9 with point mutations in the catalytic site did not increase the tumorigenicity of ST1 cells. Furthermore, we detected a small population of CA9 + CD25 + cells in lymph nodes of ATL patients. These findings suggest that CA9, and particularly its carbonic anhydrase activity, promotes the tumorigenicity of ATL-derived cells and may be involved in malignant development of lymphoma-type ATL. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  16. Development of a highly metastatic model that reveals a crucial role of fibronectin in lung cancer cell migration and invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Xianghuo

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The formation of metastasis is the most common cause of death in patients with lung cancer. A major implement to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in lung cancer metastasis has been the lack of suitable models to address it. In this study, we aimed at establishing a highly metastatic model of human lung cancer and characterizing its metastatic properties and underlying mechanisms. Methods The human lung adeno-carcinoma SPC-A-1 cell line was used as parental cells for developing of highly metastatic cells by in vivo selection in NOD/SCID mice. After three rounds of selection, a new SPC-A-1sci cell line was established from pulmonary metastatic lesions. Subsequently, the metastatic properties of this cell line were analyzed, including optical imaging of in vivo metastasis, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical analysis of several epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT makers and trans-well migration and invasion assays. Finally, the functional roles of fibronectin in the invasive and metastatic potentials of SPC-A-1sci cells were determined by shRNA analysis. Results A spontaneously pulmonary metastatic model of human lung adeno-carcinoma was established in NOD/SCID mice, from which a new lung cancer cell line, designated SPC-A-1sci, was isolated. Initially, the highly metastatic behavior of this cell line was validated by optical imaging in mice models. Further analyses showed that this cell line exhibit phenotypic and molecular alterations consistent with EMT. Compared with its parent cell line SPC-A-1, SPC-A-1sci was more aggressive in vitro, including increased potentials for cell spreading, migration and invasion. Importantly, fibronectin, a mesenchymal maker of EMT, was found to be highly expressed in SPC-A-1sci cells and down-regulation of it can decrease the in vitro and in vivo metastatic abilities of this cell line. Conclusions We have successfully established a new human lung cancer cell line with

  17. Development of a highly metastatic model that reveals a crucial role of fibronectin in lung cancer cell migration and invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Deshui; Yao, Ming; Yan, Mingxia; Wang, Xiaomin; Hao, Xiangfang; Liang, Linhui; Liu, Lei; Kong, Hanwei; He, Xianghuo; Li, Jinjun

    2010-01-01

    The formation of metastasis is the most common cause of death in patients with lung cancer. A major implement to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in lung cancer metastasis has been the lack of suitable models to address it. In this study, we aimed at establishing a highly metastatic model of human lung cancer and characterizing its metastatic properties and underlying mechanisms. The human lung adeno-carcinoma SPC-A-1 cell line was used as parental cells for developing of highly metastatic cells by in vivo selection in NOD/SCID mice. After three rounds of selection, a new SPC-A-1sci cell line was established from pulmonary metastatic lesions. Subsequently, the metastatic properties of this cell line were analyzed, including optical imaging of in vivo metastasis, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical analysis of several epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) makers and trans-well migration and invasion assays. Finally, the functional roles of fibronectin in the invasive and metastatic potentials of SPC-A-1sci cells were determined by shRNA analysis. A spontaneously pulmonary metastatic model of human lung adeno-carcinoma was established in NOD/SCID mice, from which a new lung cancer cell line, designated SPC-A-1sci, was isolated. Initially, the highly metastatic behavior of this cell line was validated by optical imaging in mice models. Further analyses showed that this cell line exhibit phenotypic and molecular alterations consistent with EMT. Compared with its parent cell line SPC-A-1, SPC-A-1sci was more aggressive in vitro, including increased potentials for cell spreading, migration and invasion. Importantly, fibronectin, a mesenchymal maker of EMT, was found to be highly expressed in SPC-A-1sci cells and down-regulation of it can decrease the in vitro and in vivo metastatic abilities of this cell line. We have successfully established a new human lung cancer cell line with highly metastatic potentials, which is subject to EMT and possibly

  18. Analysis of delay-induced basal ganglia oscillations: the role of external excitatory nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidar, Ihab; Pasillas-Lépine, William; Panteley, Elena; Chaillet, Antoine; Palfi, Stéphane; Senova, Suhan

    2014-09-01

    Basal ganglia are interconnected deep brain structures involved in movement generation. Their persistent beta-band oscillations (13-30 Hz) are known to be linked to Parkinson's disease motor symptoms. In this paper, we provide conditions under which these oscillations may occur, by explicitly considering the role of the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN). We analyse the existence of equilibria in the associated firing-rate dynamics and study their stability by relying on a delayed multiple-input/multiple-output (MIMO) frequency analysis. Our analysis suggests that the PPN has an influence on the generation of pathological beta-band oscillations. These results are illustrated by simulations that confirm numerically the analytic predictions of our two main theorems.

  19. Crucial role for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dastidar, P.R.

    1980-01-01

    Generation of electricity by a nuclear reactor is explained. After taking a survey of the hydro-electric potential and coal deposits of India and considering their limitations, the need for nuclear power becomes evident. It is also economically competitive. The strategy for nuclear power development in India is to use natural uranium fuel based heavy water moderated thermal reactors to produce plutonium-239 and to use thorium based fast breeder reactors to breed plutonium-239 and uranium-233, and in turn these radioisotopes will be used to fuel FBR type reactors. This strategy maximises the energy obtainable from natural uranium by a factor of 400. The present state of nuclear power generation in India and the research programmes of the FBR type reactor are outlined. Other benefits from nuclear energy research are mentioned. Some of them are leak detection techniques, radiosterilisation and plant breeding by radiation mutation. The spin-off of the Indian atomic energy programme are : development of radiation detection instruments and other sophisticated electronic instruments, development of methods of preparation of ultra-pure materials, fabrication of components such as seamless tubes, non-destructive testing methods, and reliability evaluation techniques. Other applications of nuclear energy are mentioned. (M.G.B.)

  20. Crucial role for nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dastidar, P R

    1980-01-01

    Generation of electricity by a nuclear reactor is explained. After taking a survey of the hydro-electric potential and coal deposits of India and considering their limitations, the need for nuclear power becomes evident. It is also economically competitive. The strategy for nuclear power development in India is to use natural uranium fuel based heavy water moderated thermal reactors to produce plutonium-239 and to use thorium based fast breeder reactors to breed plutonium-239 and uranium-233, and in turn these radioisotopes will be used to fuel FBR type reactors. This strategy maximises the energy obtainable from natural uranium by a factor of 400. The present state of nuclear power generation in India and the research programmes of the FBR type reactor are outlined. Other benefits from nuclear energy research are mentioned. Some of them are leak detection techniques, radiosterilisation and plant breeding by radiation mutation. The spin-off of the Indian atomic energy programme are: development of radiation detection instruments and other sophisticated electronic instruments, development of methods of preparation of ultra-pure materials, fabrication of components such as seamless tubes, non-destructive testing methods, and reliability evaluation techniques. Other applications of nuclear energy are mentioned.

  1. The forgotten role of central volume in low frequency oscillations of heart rate variability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Ferrario

    Full Text Available The hypothesis that central volume plays a key role in the source of low frequency (LF oscillations of heart rate variability (HRV was tested in a population of end stage renal disease patients undergoing conventional hemodialysis (HD treatment, and thus subject to large fluid shifts and sympathetic activation. Fluid overload (FO in 58 chronic HD patients was assessed by whole body bioimpedance measurements before the midweek HD session. Heart Rate Variability (HRV was measured using 24-hour Holter electrocardiogram recordings starting before the same HD treatment. Time domain and frequency domain analyses were performed on HRV signals. Patients were retrospectively classified in three groups according to tertiles of FO normalized to the extracellular water (FO/ECW%. These groups were also compared after stratification by diabetes mellitus. Patients with the low to medium hydration status before the treatment (i.e. 1st and 2nd FO/ECW% tertiles showed a significant increase in LF power during last 30 min of HD compared to dialysis begin, while no significant change in LF power was seen in the third group (i.e. those with high pre-treatment hydration values. In conclusion, several mechanisms can generate LF oscillations in the cardiovascular system, including baroreflex feedback loops and central oscillators. However, the current results emphasize the role played by the central volume in determining the power of LF oscillations.

  2. The forgotten role of central volume in low frequency oscillations of heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrario, Manuela; Moissl, Ulrich; Garzotto, Francesco; Cruz, Dinna N; Tetta, Ciro; Signorini, Maria G; Ronco, Claudio; Grassmann, Aileen; Cerutti, Sergio; Guzzetti, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The hypothesis that central volume plays a key role in the source of low frequency (LF) oscillations of heart rate variability (HRV) was tested in a population of end stage renal disease patients undergoing conventional hemodialysis (HD) treatment, and thus subject to large fluid shifts and sympathetic activation. Fluid overload (FO) in 58 chronic HD patients was assessed by whole body bioimpedance measurements before the midweek HD session. Heart Rate Variability (HRV) was measured using 24-hour Holter electrocardiogram recordings starting before the same HD treatment. Time domain and frequency domain analyses were performed on HRV signals. Patients were retrospectively classified in three groups according to tertiles of FO normalized to the extracellular water (FO/ECW%). These groups were also compared after stratification by diabetes mellitus. Patients with the low to medium hydration status before the treatment (i.e. 1st and 2nd FO/ECW% tertiles) showed a significant increase in LF power during last 30 min of HD compared to dialysis begin, while no significant change in LF power was seen in the third group (i.e. those with high pre-treatment hydration values). In conclusion, several mechanisms can generate LF oscillations in the cardiovascular system, including baroreflex feedback loops and central oscillators. However, the current results emphasize the role played by the central volume in determining the power of LF oscillations.

  3. The Functional Role of Neural Oscillations in Non-Verbal Emotional Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symons, Ashley E; El-Deredy, Wael; Schwartze, Michael; Kotz, Sonja A

    2016-01-01

    Effective interpersonal communication depends on the ability to perceive and interpret nonverbal emotional expressions from multiple sensory modalities. Current theoretical models propose that visual and auditory emotion perception involves a network of brain regions including the primary sensory cortices, the superior temporal sulcus (STS), and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). However, relatively little is known about how the dynamic interplay between these regions gives rise to the perception of emotions. In recent years, there has been increasing recognition of the importance of neural oscillations in mediating neural communication within and between functional neural networks. Here we review studies investigating changes in oscillatory activity during the perception of visual, auditory, and audiovisual emotional expressions, and aim to characterize the functional role of neural oscillations in nonverbal emotion perception. Findings from the reviewed literature suggest that theta band oscillations most consistently differentiate between emotional and neutral expressions. While early theta synchronization appears to reflect the initial encoding of emotionally salient sensory information, later fronto-central theta synchronization may reflect the further integration of sensory information with internal representations. Additionally, gamma synchronization reflects facilitated sensory binding of emotional expressions within regions such as the OFC, STS, and, potentially, the amygdala. However, the evidence is more ambiguous when it comes to the role of oscillations within the alpha and beta frequencies, which vary as a function of modality (or modalities), presence or absence of predictive information, and attentional or task demands. Thus, the synchronization of neural oscillations within specific frequency bands mediates the rapid detection, integration, and evaluation of emotional expressions. Moreover, the functional coupling of oscillatory activity across multiples

  4. Distinct roles of theta and alpha oscillations in the involuntary capture of goal-directed attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Anthony M; Dux, Paul E; Jones, Caelyn N; Mattingley, Jason B

    2017-05-15

    Mechanisms of attention assign priority to sensory inputs on the basis of current task goals. Previous studies have shown that lateralized neural oscillations within the alpha (8-14Hz) range are associated with the voluntary allocation of attention to the contralateral visual field. It is currently unknown, however, whether similar oscillatory signatures instantiate the involuntary capture of spatial attention by goal-relevant stimulus properties. Here we investigated the roles of theta (4-8Hz), alpha, and beta (14-30Hz) oscillations in human goal-directed visual attention. Across two experiments, we had participants respond to a brief target of a particular color among heterogeneously colored distractors. Prior to target onset, we cued one location with a lateralized, non-predictive cue that was either target- or non-target-colored. During the behavioral task, we recorded brain activity using electroencephalography (EEG), with the aim of analyzing cue-elicited oscillatory activity. We found that theta oscillations lateralized in response to all cues, and this lateralization was stronger if the cue matched the target color. Alpha oscillations lateralized relatively later, and only in response to target-colored cues, consistent with the capture of spatial attention. Our findings suggest that stimulus induced changes in theta and alpha amplitude reflect task-based modulation of signals by feature-based and spatial attention, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The role of inelastic processes in the temperature dependence of hall induced resistance oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunold, Alejandro; Torres, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    We develop a model of magnetoresistance oscillations induced by the Hall field in order to study the temperature dependence observed in recent experiments in two dimensional electron systems. The model is based on the solution of the von Neumann equation incorporating the exact dynamics of two-dimensional damped electrons in the presence of arbitrarily strong magnetic and dc electric fields, while the effects of randomly distributed neutral and charged impurities are perturbatively added. Both the effects of elastic impurity scattering as well as those related to inelastic processes play an important role. The theoretical predictions correctly reproduce the experimentally observed oscillations amplitude, provided that the quantum inelastic scattering rate obeys a T 2 temperature dependence, consistent with electron–electron interaction effects

  6. Role of phase breaking processes on resonant spin transfer torque nano-oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Abhishek; Tulapurkar, Ashwin A.; Muralidharan, Bhaskaran

    2018-05-01

    Spin transfer torque nano-oscillators (STNOs) based on magnetoresistance and spin transfer torque effects find potential applications in miniaturized wireless communication devices. Using the non-coherent non-equilibrium Green's function spin transport formalism self-consistently coupled with the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert-Slonczewski's equation and the Poisson's equation, we elucidate the role of elastic phase breaking on the proposed STNO design featuring double barrier resonant tunneling. Demonstrating the immunity of our proposed design, we predict that despite the presence of elastic dephasing, the resonant tunneling magnetic tunnel junction structures facilitate oscillator designs featuring a large enhancement in microwave power up to 8μW delivered to a 50Ω load.

  7. Characterizing the roles of alpha and theta oscillations in multisensory attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Arielle S; Payne, Lisa; Sekuler, Robert

    2017-05-01

    Cortical alpha oscillations (8-13Hz) appear to play a role in suppressing distractions when just one sensory modality is being attended, but do they also contribute when attention is distributed over multiple sensory modalities? For an answer, we examined cortical oscillations in human subjects who were dividing attention between auditory and visual sequences. In Experiment 1, subjects performed an oddball task with auditory, visual, or simultaneous audiovisual sequences in separate blocks, while the electroencephalogram was recorded using high-density scalp electrodes. Alpha oscillations were present continuously over posterior regions while subjects were attending to auditory sequences. This supports the idea that the brain suppresses processing of visual input in order to advantage auditory processing. During a divided-attention audiovisual condition, an oddball (a rare, unusual stimulus) occurred in either the auditory or the visual domain, requiring that attention be divided between the two modalities. Fronto-central theta band (4-7Hz) activity was strongest in this audiovisual condition, when subjects monitored auditory and visual sequences simultaneously. Theta oscillations have been associated with both attention and with short-term memory. Experiment 2 sought to distinguish these possible roles of fronto-central theta activity during multisensory divided attention. Using a modified version of the oddball task from Experiment 1, Experiment 2 showed that differences in theta power among conditions were independent of short-term memory load. Ruling out theta's association with short-term memory, we conclude that fronto-central theta activity is likely a marker of multisensory divided attention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. LCM-seq reveals the crucial role of LsSOC1 in heat-promoted bolting of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zijing; Zhao, Wensheng; Ge, Danfeng; Han, Yingyan; Ning, Kang; Luo, Chen; Wang, Shenglin; Liu, Renyi; Zhang, Xiaolan; Wang, Qian

    2018-05-17

    Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) is one of the most economically important vegetables. The floral transition in lettuce is accelerated under high temperatures, which can significantly decrease yields. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the floral tranition in lettuce is poorly known. Using laser capture microdissection coupled with RNA sequencing, we isolated shoot apical meristem cells from the bolting-sensitive lettuce line S39 at four critical stages of development. Subsequently, we screened specifically for the flowering-related gene LsSOC1 during the floral transition through comparative transcriptomic analysis. Molecular biology, developmental biology, and biochemical tools were combined to investigate the biological function of LsSOC1 in lettuce. LsSOC1 knockdown by RNA interference resulted in a significant delay in the timing of bolting and insensitivity to high temperature, which indicated that LsSOC1 functions as an activator during heat-promoted bolting in lettuce. We determined that two heat-shock transcription factors, HsfA1e and HsfA4c, bound to the promoter of LsSOC1 to confirm that LsSOC1 played an important role in heat-promoted bolting. This study indicates that LsSOC1 plays a crucial role in the heat-promoted bolting process in lettuce. Further investigation of LsSOC1 may be useful for clarification of the bolting mechanism in lettuce. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. L-type calcium channels play a crucial role in the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Li [Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Wang, Yu [Department of Oncology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Wang, Huan [Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Kong, Lingmin [Department of Fundamental Medicine, Cell Engineering Research Centre, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Zhang, Liang [Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Chen, Xin [Department of General Dentistry, The 174th Hospital of Chinese PLA, Xiamen 361003 (China); Ding, Yin, E-mail: dingyin@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China)

    2012-08-03

    results suggest that VDCC{sub L} plays a crucial role in the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of rMSCs.

  10. quatre-quart1 is an indispensable U12 intron-containing gene that plays a crucial role in Arabidopsis development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Kyung Jin; Kim, Bo Mi; Lee, Kwanuk; Kang, Hunseung

    2017-05-17

    Despite increasing understanding of the importance of the splicing of U12-type introns in plant development, the key question of which U12 intron-containing genes are essential for plant development has not yet been explored. Here, we assessed the functional role of the quatre-quart1 (QQT1) gene, one of the ~230 U12 intron-containing genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. Expression of QQT1 in the U11/U12-31K small nuclear ribonucleoprotein mutant (31k) rescued the developmental-defect phenotypes of the 31k mutant, whereas the miRNA-mediated qqt1 knockdown mutants displayed severe defects in growth and development, including severely arrested stem growth, small size, and the formation of serrated leaves. The structures of the shoot apical meristems in the qqt1 mutants were abnormal and disordered. Identification of QQT1-interacting proteins via a yeast two-hybrid screening and a firefly luciferase complementation-imaging assay revealed that a variety of proteins, including many chloroplast-targeted proteins, interacted with QQT1. Importantly, the levels of chloroplast-targeted proteins in the chloroplast were reduced, and the chloroplast structure was abnormal in the qqt1 mutant. Collectively, these results provide clear evidence that QQT1 is an indispensable U12 intron-containing gene whose correct splicing is crucial for the normal development of Arabidopsis. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  11. The flexible loop L1 of the H3K4 demethylase JARID1B ARID domain has a crucial role in DNA-binding activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Wenming; Peng, Yu; Lin, Donghai

    2010-01-01

    JARID1B, a member of the JmjC demethylase family, has a crucial role in H3K4me3 demethylation. The ARID domain is a potential DNA-binding domain of JARID1B. Previous studies indicate that a GC-rich DNA motif is the specific target of the ARID domain. However, the details of the interaction between the ARID domain and duplex DNA require further study. Here, we utilized NMR spectroscopy to assign the backbone amino acids and mapped the DNA-binding sites of the human JARID1B ARID domain. Perturbations to 1 H- 15 N correlation spectra revealed that the flexible loop L1 of ARID was the main DNA-binding interface. EMSA and intrinsic fluorescence experiments demonstrated that mutations on loop L1 strongly reduced the DNA-binding activity of JARID1B ARID. Furthermore, transfection of mutant forms resulted in a distinct loss of intrinsic H3K4 demethylase activity, implying that the flexible loop L1 made a major contribution to sustaining the DNA-binding ability of JARID1B ARID domain.

  12. Cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases play crucial roles in controlling cold-induced sweetening and apical dominance of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tengfei; Fang, Hui; Liu, Jun; Reid, Stephen; Hou, Juan; Zhou, Tingting; Tian, Zhendong; Song, Botao; Xie, Conghua

    2017-12-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is an important enzyme that functions in producing energy and supplying intermediates for cellular metabolism. Recent researches indicate that GAPDHs have multiple functions beside glycolysis. However, little information is available for functions of GAPDHs in potato. Here, we identified 4 putative cytosolic GAPDH genes in potato genome and demonstrated that the StGAPC1, StGAPC2, and StGAPC3, which are constitutively expressed in potato tissues and cold inducible in tubers, encode active cytosolic GAPDHs. Cosuppression of these 3 GAPC genes resulted in low tuber GAPDH activity, consequently the accumulation of reducing sugars in cold stored tubers by altering the tuber metabolite pool sizes favoring the sucrose pathway. Furthermore, GAPCs-silenced tubers exhibited a loss of apical dominance dependent on cell death of tuber apical bud meristem (TAB-meristem). It was also confirmed that StGAPC1, StGAPC2, and StGAPC3 interacted with the autophagy-related protein 3 (ATG3), implying that the occurrence of cell death in TAB-meristem could be induced by ATG3 associated events. Collectively, the present research evidences first that the GAPC genes play crucial roles in diverse physiological and developmental processes in potato tubers. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Crucial role of IL1beta and C3a in the in vitro-response of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells to inflammatory mediators of polytrauma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina-Emily Hengartner

    Full Text Available Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC exert immune-modulatory effects and support tissue regeneration in various local trauma models. In case of a polytrauma, high amounts of danger-associated molecular patterns are released, leading to a systemic increase of inflammatory mediators. The influence of such a complex inflammatory microenvironment on human MSC is mainly unknown so far. Therefore, we investigated the effects of a defined serum-free polytrauma "cocktail" containing IL beta, IL6, IL8 and the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a, in concentrations corresponding to those measured in the blood of polytrauma patients, on human MSC in vitro. The polytrauma cocktail induced directed migration of MSC with C3a representing its major soluble chemoattractive agent. Furthermore, the polytrauma cocktail and IL1beta upregulated the expression of MMP1 indicating a potential role of IL1beta to enhance MSC migration in the tissue context. COX2, PTGES and TSG6 were also found to be upregulated upon stimulation with the polytrauma cocktail or IL1beta, but not through other single factors of the polytrauma cocktail in pathophysiologically relevant concentrations. An RNA expression array of 84 inflammation-related genes revealed that both the polytrauma cocktail and IL1beta induced C3, CSF1, TLR3 and various chemokines without major qualitative or quantitative differences. These results indicate that IL1beta is a crucial mediator of the polytrauma cocktail in terms of immune-modulation and MMP1 expression. Thus, upon encountering the primary sterile, inflammatory milieu of a polytrauma, endogenous or systemically transfused MSC might be able to migrate to sites of injury, secrete TSG6 and PGE2 and to influence macrophage biology as observed in local trauma models.

  14. GABAergic modulation of visual gamma and alpha oscillations and its consequences for working memory performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lozano Soldevilla, D.; Huurne, N.; Cools, R.; Jensen, O.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Impressive in vitro research in rodents and computational modeling has uncovered the core mechanisms responsible for generating neuronal oscillations. In particular, GABAergic interneurons play a crucial role for synchronizing neural populations. Do these mechanistic principles apply to

  15. Plexcitons: The Role of Oscillator Strengths and Spectral Widths in Determining Strong Coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Reshmi [School; Thomas, Anoop [School; Pullanchery, Saranya [School; Joseph, Linta [School; Somasundaran, Sanoop Mambully [School; Swathi, Rotti Srinivasamurthy [School; Gray, Stephen K. [Center; Thomas, K. George [School

    2018-01-05

    Strong coupling interactions between plasmon and exciton-based excitations have been proposed to be useful in the design of optoelectronic systems. However, the role of various optical parameters dictating the plasmon-exciton (plexciton) interactions is less understood. Herein, we propose an inequality for achieving strong coupling between plasmons and excitons through appropriate variation of their oscillator strengths and spectral widths. These aspects are found to be consistent with experiments on two sets of free-standing plexcitonic systems obtained by (i) linking fluorescein isothiocyanate on Ag nanoparticles of varying sizes through silane coupling and (ii) electrostatic binding of cyanine dyes on polystyrenesulfonate-coated Au nanorods of varying aspect ratios. Being covalently linked on Ag nanoparticles, fluorescein isothiocyanate remains in monomeric state, and its high oscillator strength and narrow spectral width enable us to approach the strong coupling limit. In contrast, in the presence of polystyrenesulfonate, monomeric forms of cyanine dyes exist in equilibrium with their aggregates: Coupling is not observed for monomers and H-aggregates whose optical parameters are unfavorable. The large aggregation number, narrow spectral width, and extremely high oscillator strength of J-aggregates of cyanines permit effective delocalization of excitons along the linear assembly of chromophores, which in turn leads to efficient coupling with the plasmons. Further, the results obtained from experiments and theoretical models are jointly employed to describe the plexcitonic states, estimate the coupling strengths, and rationalize the dispersion curves. The experimental results and the theoretical analysis presented here portray a way forward to the rational design of plexcitonic systems attaining the strong coupling limits.

  16. Controlling Working Memory Operations by Selective Gating: The Roles of Oscillations and Synchrony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipoppa, Mario; Szwed, Marcin; Gutkin, Boris S.

    2016-01-01

    Working memory (WM) is a primary cognitive function that corresponds to the ability to update, stably maintain, and manipulate short-term memory (ST M) rapidly to perform ongoing cognitive tasks. A prevalent neural substrate of WM coding is persistent neural activity, the property of neurons to remain active after having been activated by a transient sensory stimulus. This persistent activity allows for online maintenance of memory as well as its active manipulation necessary for task performance. WM is tightly capacity limited. Therefore, selective gating of sensory and internally generated information is crucial for WM function. While the exact neural substrate of selective gating remains unclear, increasing evidence suggests that it might be controlled by modulating ongoing oscillatory brain activity. Here, we review experiments and models that linked selective gating, persistent activity, and brain oscillations, putting them in the more general mechanistic context of WM. We do so by defining several operations necessary for successful WM function and then discussing how such operations may be carried out by mechanisms suggested by computational models. We specifically show how oscillatory mechanisms may provide a rapid and flexible active gating mechanism for WM operations. PMID:28154616

  17. Beneficial Effect of Fluoxetine and Sertraline on Chronic Stress-Induced Tumor Growth and Cell Dissemination in a Mouse Model of Lymphoma: Crucial Role of Antitumor Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Emilia Di Rosso

    2018-06-01

    progression. Our results emphasize the crucial role of the immune system in tumor progression under stress situations. Although a direct effect of stress and drug treatment on tumor biology could not be ruled out, the beneficial effect of fluoxetine and sertraline appears to be mainly due to a restoration of antitumor immune response.

  18. Long term changes in flooding and heavy rainfall associated with North Atlantic tropical cyclones: Roles of the North Atlantic Oscillation and El Niño-Southern Oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, Yog N.; Villarini, Gabriele; Zhang, Wei; Vecchi, Gabriel A.

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the contribution of North Atlantic tropical cyclones (TCs) to flooding and heavy rainfall across the continental United States. Analyses highlight the spatial variability in these hazards, their temporal changes in terms of frequency and magnitude, and their connection to large-scale climate, in particular to the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). We use long-term stream and rain gage measurements, and our analyses are based on annual maxima (AMs) and peaks-over-threshold (POTs). TCs contribute to ∼20-30% of AMs and POTs over Florida and coastal areas of the eastern United States, and the contribution decreases as we move inland. We do not detect statistically significant trends in the magnitude or frequency of TC floods. Regarding the role of climate, NAO and ENSO do not play a large role in controlling the frequency and magnitude of TC flooding. The connection between heavy rainfall and TCs is comparable to what observed in terms of flooding. Unlike flooding, NAO plays a significant role in TC-related extreme rainfall along the U.S. East Coast, while ENSO is most strongly linked to the TC precipitation in Texas.

  19. Role of vortex structures in excitation of self-oscillating combustion of condensed systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samsonov, V.P.; Murunov, E.Yu.; Alekseev, M.V.

    2008-01-01

    One studied experimentally the effect of the free convection and the eddy structures occurring near the gasoline burner singing flame on the excitation conditions of thermal self-oscillations in a tube-resonator. One introduces a procedure to measure the gas column oscillation amplitude. The singing flame height and the flame mass speed at the excitation of the acoustic oscillations are revealed to reduce, while the gasoline burning efficiency is found to increase. By means of the digital photometry one studied the mechanisms of the singing flame temperature field changes within one oscillation period. One derived the hysteresis dependences of the amplitude of the acoustic oscillations on the gasoline diffusion flame thermal power. One brings to the notice a mechanism of the effect of the eddy structures of the excitation of the burning self-oscillation mode of the condensed systems [ru

  20. Single-trial regression elucidates the role of prefrontal theta oscillations in response conflict

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael X Cohen

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In most cognitive neuroscience experiments there are many behavioral and experimental dynamics, and many indices of brain activity, that vary from trial to trial. For example, in studies of response conflict, conflict is usually treated as a binary variable (i.e., response conflict exists or does not in any given trial, whereas some evidence and intuition suggests that conflict may vary in intensity from trial to trial. Here we demonstrate that single-trial multiple regression of time-frequency electrophysiological activity reveals neural mechanisms of cognitive control that are not apparent in cross-trial averages. We also introduce a novel extension to oscillation phase coherence and synchronization analyses, based on weighted phase modulation, that has advantages over standard coherence measures in terms of linking electrophysiological dynamics to trial-varying behavior and experimental variables. After replicating previous response conflict findings using trial-averaged data, we extend these findings using single trial analytic methods to provide novel evidence for the role of medial frontal-lateral prefrontal theta-band synchronization in conflict-induced response time dynamics, including a role for lateral prefrontal theta-band activity in biasing response times according to perceptual conflict. Given that these methods shed new light on the prefrontal mechanisms of response conflict, they are also likely to be useful for investigating other neurocognitive processes.

  1. Understanding Social Dynamics and School Shootings Requires Larger Context. Commentary on: "Bullying, Romantic Rejection, and Conflicts with Teachers: The Crucial Role of Social Dynamics in the Development of School Shootings--A Systematic Review"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Jessie

    2014-01-01

    Jessie Klein begins her commentary on "Bullying, Romantic Rejection, and Conflicts with Teachers: The Crucial Role of Social Dynamics in the Development of School Shootings--A Systematic Review" (Sommer, Leuschner, and Scheithauer," International Journal of Developmental Science" v 8, n1-2, p3-24, 2014) by saying that to…

  2. Suppression and revival of oscillation in indirectly coupled limit cycle oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, P.R.; Kamal, N.K.; Verma, U.K.; Suresh, K.; Thamilmaran, K.; Shrimali, M.D.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The phenomena of suppression and revival of oscillations are studied in indirectly coupled nonlinear oscillators. • The decay parameter and a feedback factor play a crucial role in emergent dynamical behavior of oscillators. • The critical curves for different dynamical regions are obtained analytically using linear stability analysis. • Electronic circuit experiments demonstrate these emergent dynamical states. - Abstract: We study the phenomena of suppression and revival of oscillations in a system of limit cycle oscillators coupled indirectly via a dynamic local environment. The dynamics of the environment is assumed to decay exponentially with time. We show that for appropriate coupling strength, the decay parameter of the environment plays a crucial role in the emergent dynamics such as amplitude death (AD) and oscillation death (OD). We also show that introducing a feedback factor in the diffusion term revives the oscillations in this system. The critical curves for the regions of different emergent states as a function of coupling strength, decay parameter of the environment and feedback factor in the coupling are obtained analytically using linear stability analysis. These results are found to be consistent with the numerics and are also observed experimentally.

  3. Exploring the role of brain oscillations in speech perception in noise: Intelligibility of isochronously retimed speech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Aubanel

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of evidence shows that brain oscillations track speech. This mechanism is thought to maximise processing efficiency by allocating resources to important speech information, effectively parsing speech into units of appropriate granularity for further decoding. However, some aspects of this mechanism remain unclear. First, while periodicity is an intrinsic property of this physiological mechanism, speech is only quasi-periodic, so it is not clear whether periodicity would present an advantage in processing. Second, it is still a matter of debate which aspect of speech triggers or maintains cortical entrainment, from bottom-up cues such as fluctuations of the amplitude envelope of speech to higher level linguistic cues such as syntactic structure. We present data from a behavioural experiment assessing the effect of isochronous retiming of speech on speech perception in noise. Two types of anchor points were defined for retiming speech, namely syllable onsets and amplitude envelope peaks. For each anchor point type, retiming was implemented at two hierarchical levels, a slow time scale around 2.5 Hz and a fast time scale around 4 Hz. Results show that while any temporal distortion resulted in reduced speech intelligibility, isochronous speech anchored to P-centers (approximated by stressed syllable vowel onsets was significantly more intelligible than a matched anisochronous retiming, suggesting a facilitative role of periodicity defined on linguistically motivated units in processing speech in noise.

  4. Quantum Transport in Solids: Bloch Dynamics and Role of Oscillating Fields

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim, Ki

    1997-01-01

    .... The specific areas of research are those of Bloch electron dynamics, quantum transport in oscillating electric fields or in periodic potentials, and the capacitive nature of atomic size structures...

  5. Potential role of the glycolytic oscillator in acute hypoxia in tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fru, Leonard Che; Adamson, Erin B; Campos, David D; Fain, Sean B; Song, Chihwa; Kissick, Michael W; Jacques, Steven L; Van der Kogel, Albert J; Nickel, Kwang P; Kimple, Randall J

    2015-01-01

    Tumor acute hypoxia has a dynamic component that is also, at least partially, coherent. Using blood oxygen level dependent magnetic resonance imaging, we observed coherent oscillations in hemoglobin saturation dynamics in cell line xenograft models of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. We posit a well-established biochemical nonlinear oscillatory mechanism called the glycolytic oscillator as a potential cause of the coherent oscillations in tumors. These data suggest that metabolic changes within individual tumor cells may affect the local tumor microenvironment including oxygen availability and therefore radiosensitivity. These individual cells can synchronize the oscillations in patches of similar intermediate glucose levels. These alterations have potentially important implications for radiation therapy and are a potential target for optimizing the cancer response to radiation. (paper)

  6. The role of inhibition in generating and controlling Parkinson's disease oscillations in the basal ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind eKumar

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Movement disorders in Parkinson's disease (PD are commonly associated with slow oscillations and increased synchrony of neuronal activity in the basal ganglia. The neural mechanisms underlying this dynamic network dysfunction, however, are only poorly understood. Here, we show that the strength of inhibitory inputs from striatum to globus pallidus external (GPe is a key parameter controlling oscillations in the basal ganglia. Specifically, the increase in striatal activity observed in PD is sufficient to unleash the oscillations in the basal ganglia. This finding allows us to propose a unified explanation for different phenomena: absence of oscillation in the healthy state of the basal ganglia, oscillations in dopamine-depleted state and quenching of oscillations under deep brain stimulation (DBS. These novel insights help us to better understand and optimize the function of DBS protocols. Furthermore, studying the model behaviour under transient increase of activity of the striatal neurons projecting to the indirect pathway, we are able to account for both motor impairment in PD patients and for reduced response inhibition in DBS implanted patients.

  7. Distal C terminus of CaV1.2 channels plays a crucial role in the neural differentiation of dental pulp stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Ge

    Full Text Available L-type voltage-dependent CaV1.2 channels play an important role in the maintenance of intracellular calcium homeostasis, and influence multiple cellular processes. C-terminal cleavage of CaV1.2 channels was reported in several types of excitable cells, but its expression and possible roles in non-excitable cells is still not clear. The aim of this study was to determine whether distal C-terminal fragment of CaV1.2 channels is present in rat dental pulp stem cells and its possible role in the neural differentiation of rat dental pulp stem cells. We generated stable CaV1.2 knockdown cells via short hairpin RNA (shRNA. Rat dental pulp stem cells with deleted distal C-terminal of CaV1.2 channels lost the potential of differentiation to neural cells. Re-expression of distal C-terminal of CaV1.2 rescued the effect of knocking down the endogenous CaV1.2 on the neural differentiation of rat dental pulp stem cells, indicating that the distal C-terminal of CaV1.2 is required for neural differentiation of rat dental pulp stem cells. These results provide new insights into the role of voltage-gated Ca(2+ channels in stem cells during differentiation.

  8. Increasing Knowledge and Self-Efficacy through a Pre-Service Course on Promoting Positive School Climate: The Crucial Role of Reducing Moral Disengagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooks, Claire V.; Jaffe, Peter G.; Rodriguez, Arely

    2017-01-01

    Teachers play an important role in promoting a positive school climate, which in turns supports academic achievement and positive mental health among students. This study evaluated the impact of a pre-service teacher education course addressing a range of contributors to school climate. Participants included a cohort of 212 pre-service teachers…

  9. Common arterial trunk and ventricular non-compaction in Lrp2 knockout mice indicate a crucial role of LRP2 in cardiac development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Baardman (Taco); M.V. Zwier (Mathijs V.); L.J. Wisse (Lambertus); A.C. Gittenberger-De Groot (Adriana); W.S. Kerstjens-Frederikse (Wilhelmina); R.M.W. Hofstra (Robert); A. Jurdzinski (Angelika); B.P. Hierck (Beerend); M.R.M. Jongbloed (Monique); R.M.F. Berger (Rolf); T. Plösch (Torsten); M.C. DeRuiter (Marco)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractLipoprotein-related receptor protein 2 (LRP2) is important for development of the embryonic neural crest and brain in both mice and humans. Although a role in cardiovascular development can be expected, the hearts of Lrp2 knockout (KO) mice have not yet been investigated. We studied the

  10. Common arterial trunk and ventricular non-compaction in Lrp2 knockout mice indicate a crucial role of LRP2 in cardiac development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baardman, Maria E.; Zwier, Mathijs V.; Wisse, Lambertus J.; Gittenberger-de Groot, Adriana C.; Kerstjens-Frederikse, Wilhelmina S.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; Jurdzinski, Angelika; Hierck, Beerend P.; Jongbloed, Monique R. M.; Berger, Rolf M. F.; Plosch, Torsten; DeRuiter, Marco C.

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein-related receptor protein 2 (LRP2) is important for development of the embryonic neural crest and brain in both mice and humans. Although a role in cardiovascular development can be expected, the hearts of Lrp2 knockout (KO) mice have not yet been investigated. We studied the

  11. Poleward propagation of boreal summer intraseasonal oscillations in a coupled model: role of internal processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajayamohan, R.S. [University of Victoria, Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis, P.O. Box 3065, Victoria, BC (Canada); Annamalai, H.; Hafner, Jan [University of Hawaii, International Pacific Research Center, Honolulu (United States); Luo, Jing-Jia [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Frontier Research Centre for Global Change, Yokohama (Japan); Yamagata, Toshio [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Frontier Research Centre for Global Change, Yokohama (Japan); The University of Tokyo, Department of Earth and Planetary Science, Tokyo (Japan)

    2011-09-15

    The study compares the simulated poleward migration characteristics of boreal summer intraseasonal oscillations (BSISO) in a suite of coupled ocean-atmospheric model sensitivity integrations. The sensitivity experiments are designed in such a manner to allow full coupling in specific ocean basins but forced by temporally varying monthly climatological sea surface temperature (SST) adopted from the fully coupled model control runs (ES10). While the local air-sea interaction is suppressed in the tropical Indian Ocean and allowed in the other oceans in the ESdI run, it is suppressed in the tropical Pacific and allowed in the other oceans in the ESdP run. Our diagnostics show that the basic mean state in precipitation and easterly vertical shear as well as the BSISO properties remain unchanged due to either inclusion or exclusion of local air-sea interaction. In the presence of realistic easterly vertical shear, the continuous emanation of Rossby waves from the equatorial convection is trapped over the monsoon region that enables the poleward propagation of BSISO anomalies in all the model sensitivity experiments. To explore the internal processes that maintain the tropospheric moisture anomalies ahead of BSISO precipitation anomalies, moisture and moist static energy budgets are performed. In all model experiments, advection of anomalous moisture by climatological winds anchors the moisture anomalies that in turn promote the northward migration of BSISO precipitation. While the results indicate the need for realistic simulation of all aspects of the basic state, our model results need to be taken with caution because in the ECHAM family of coupled models the internal variance at intraseasonal timescales is indeed very high, and therefore local air-sea interactions may not play a pivotal role. (orig.)

  12. ECA3, a Golgi-localized P2A-type-ATPase, plays a crucial role in manganese nutrition in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mills, Rebecca F.; Doherty, Melissa Louise; Lopez Marques, Rosa Laura

    2008-01-01

    and development, and transport processes play a key role in regulating their cellular levels. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) contains four P(2A)-type ATPase genes, AtECA1 to AtECA4, which are expressed in all major organs of Arabidopsis. To elucidate the physiological role of AtECA2 and AtECA3 in Arabidopsis...... not so striking because in this case all plants were severely affected. ECA3 partially restored the growth defect on high Mn of the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) pmr1 mutant, which is defective in a Golgi Ca/Mn pump (PMR1), and the yeast K616 mutant (Deltapmc1 Deltapmr1 Deltacnb1), defective in Golgi...

  13. Analysis of the role of the low threshold currents IT and Ih in intrinsic delta oscillations of thalamocortical neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yimy eAmarillo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Thalamocortical neurons are involved in the generation and maintenance of brain rhythms associated with global functional states. The repetitive burst firing of TC neurons at delta frequencies (1-4 Hz has been linked to the oscillations recorded during deep sleep and during episodes of absence seizures. To get insight into the biophysical properties that are the basis for intrinsic delta oscillations in these neurons, we performed a bifurcation analysis of a minimal conductance-based thalamocortical neuron model including only the IT channel and the sodium and potassium leak channels. This analysis unveils the dynamics of repetitive burst firing of TC neurons, and describes how the interplay between the amplifying variable mT and the recovering variable hT of the calcium channel IT is sufficient to generate low threshold oscillations in the delta band. We also explored the role of the hyperpolarization activated cationic current Ih in this reduced model and determine that, albeit not required, Ih amplifies and stabilizes the oscillation.

  14. Evidence for emergency vaccination having played a crucial role to control the 1965/66 foot-and-mouth disease outbreak in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana eZingg

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD is a highly contagious disease which caused several large outbreaks in Europe in the last century. The last important outbreak in Switzerland took place in 1965/66 and affected more than 900 premises and more than 50,000 animals were slaughtered. Large scale emergency vaccination of the cattle and pig population has been applied to control the epidemic. In recent years, many studies have used infectious disease models to assess the impact of different disease control measures, including models developed for diseases exotic for the specific region of interest. Often, the absence of real outbreak data makes a validation of such models impossible. This study aimed to evaluate whether a spatial, stochastic simulation model (the Davis Animal Disease Simulation model can predict the course of a Swiss FMD epidemic based on the available historic input data on population structure, contact rates, epidemiology of the virus and quality of the vaccine. In addition, the potential outcome of the 1965/66 FMD epidemic without application of vaccination was investigated. Comparing the model outcomes to reality, only the largest 10% of the simulated outbreaks approximated the number of animals being culled. However, the simulation model highly overestimated the number of culled premises. While the outbreak duration could not be well reproduced by the model compared to the 1965/66 epidemic, it was able to accurately estimate the size of the area infected. Without application of vaccination the model predicted a much higher mean number of culled animals than with vaccination, demonstrating that vaccination was likely crucial in disease control for the Swiss FMD outbreak in 1965/66. The study demonstrated the feasibility to analyze historical outbreak data with modern analytical tools. However, it also confirmed that predicted epidemics from a most carefully parametrized model cannot integrate all eventualities of a real epidemic

  15. Dual stage synthesis and crucial role of cytoadherence-linked asexual gene 9 in the surface expression of malaria parasite var proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goel, Suchi; Valiyaveettil, Manojkumar; Achur, Rajeshwara N

    2010-01-01

    adherence. However, how CLAG9 influences this process remains unknown. In this study, we show that CLAG9 interacts with VAR2CSA, a PfEMP1 that mediates IRBC adherence to chondroitin 4-sulfate in the placenta. Importantly, our results show that the adherent parasites synthesize CLAG9 at two stages--the early......Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family members mediate the adherence of parasite-infected red blood cells (IRBCs) to various host receptors. A previous study has shown that the parasite protein, cytoadherence-linked asexual gene 9 (CLAG9), is also essential for IRBC...... within the parasite. Based on these findings, we propose that CLAG9 plays a critical role in the trafficking of PfEMP1s onto the IRBC surface. These results have important implications for the development of therapeutics for cerebral, placental, and other cytoadherence-associated malaria illnesses....

  16. Crucial roles of Nox2-derived oxidative stress in deteriorating the function of insulin receptors and endothelium in dietary obesity of middle-aged mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Junjie; Fan, Lampson M; Mai, Anna; Li, Jian-Mei

    2013-11-01

    Systemic oxidative stress associated with dietary calorie overload plays an important role in the deterioration of vascular function in middle-aged patients suffering from obesity and insulin resistance. However, effective therapy is still lacking. In this study, we used a mouse model of middle-aged obesity to investigate the therapeutic potential of pharmaceutical inhibition (apocynin, 5 mM supplied in the drinking water) or knockout of Nox2, an enzyme generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity, oxidative stress, insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction. Littermates of C57BL/6J wild-type (WT) and Nox2 knockout (KO) mice (7 months old) were fed with a HFD (45% kcal fat) or normal chow diet (NCD, 12% kcal fat) for 16 weeks and used at 11 months of age. Compared to NCD WT mice, HFD WT mice developed obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia and hypertension. Aortic vessels from these mice showed significantly increased Nox2 expression and ROS production, accompanied by significantly increased ERK1/2 activation, reduced insulin receptor expression, decreased Akt and eNOS phosphorylation and impaired endothelium-dependent vessel relaxation to acetylcholine. All these HFD-induced abnormalities (except the hyperinsulinaemia) were absent in apocynin-treated WT or Nox2 KO mice given the same HFD. In conclusion, Nox2-derived ROS played a key role in damaging insulin receptor and endothelial function in dietary obesity after middle-age. Targeting Nox2 could represent a valuable therapeutic strategy in the metabolic syndrome. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  17. Novel ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS-induced null alleles of the Drosophila homolog of LRRK2 reveal a crucial role in endolysosomal functions and autophagy in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark W. Dodson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in LRRK2 cause a dominantly inherited form of Parkinson’s disease (PD and are the most common known genetic determinant of PD. Inhibitor-based therapies targeting LRRK2 have emerged as a key therapeutic strategy in PD; thus, understanding the consequences of inhibiting the normal cellular functions of this protein is vital. Despite much interest, the physiological functions of LRRK2 remain unclear. Several recent studies have linked the toxicity caused by overexpression of pathogenic mutant forms of LRRK2 to defects in the endolysosomal and autophagy pathways, raising the question of whether endogenous LRRK2 might play a role in these processes. Here, we report the characterization of multiple novel ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS-induced nonsense alleles in the Drosophila LRRK2 homolog, lrrk. Using these alleles, we show that lrrk loss-of-function causes striking defects in the endolysosomal and autophagy pathways, including the accumulation of markedly enlarged lysosomes that are laden with undigested contents, consistent with a defect in lysosomal degradation. lrrk loss-of-function also results in the accumulation of autophagosomes, as well as the presence of enlarged early endosomes laden with mono-ubiquitylated cargo proteins, suggesting an additional defect in lysosomal substrate delivery. Interestingly, the lysosomal abnormalities in these lrrk mutants can be suppressed by a constitutively active form of the small GTPase rab9, which promotes retromer-dependent recycling from late endosomes to the Golgi. Collectively, our data provides compelling evidence of a vital role for lrrk in lysosomal function and endolysosomal membrane transport in vivo, and suggests a link between lrrk and retromer-mediated endosomal recycling.

  18. Novel ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS)-induced null alleles of the Drosophila homolog of LRRK2 reveal a crucial role in endolysosomal functions and autophagy in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, Mark W; Leung, Lok K; Lone, Mohiddin; Lizzio, Michael A; Guo, Ming

    2014-12-01

    Mutations in LRRK2 cause a dominantly inherited form of Parkinson's disease (PD) and are the most common known genetic determinant of PD. Inhibitor-based therapies targeting LRRK2 have emerged as a key therapeutic strategy in PD; thus, understanding the consequences of inhibiting the normal cellular functions of this protein is vital. Despite much interest, the physiological functions of LRRK2 remain unclear. Several recent studies have linked the toxicity caused by overexpression of pathogenic mutant forms of LRRK2 to defects in the endolysosomal and autophagy pathways, raising the question of whether endogenous LRRK2 might play a role in these processes. Here, we report the characterization of multiple novel ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS)-induced nonsense alleles in the Drosophila LRRK2 homolog, lrrk. Using these alleles, we show that lrrk loss-of-function causes striking defects in the endolysosomal and autophagy pathways, including the accumulation of markedly enlarged lysosomes that are laden with undigested contents, consistent with a defect in lysosomal degradation. lrrk loss-of-function also results in the accumulation of autophagosomes, as well as the presence of enlarged early endosomes laden with mono-ubiquitylated cargo proteins, suggesting an additional defect in lysosomal substrate delivery. Interestingly, the lysosomal abnormalities in these lrrk mutants can be suppressed by a constitutively active form of the small GTPase rab9, which promotes retromer-dependent recycling from late endosomes to the Golgi. Collectively, our data provides compelling evidence of a vital role for lrrk in lysosomal function and endolysosomal membrane transport in vivo, and suggests a link between lrrk and retromer-mediated endosomal recycling. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Crucial Role of Mesangial Cell-derived Connective Tissue Growth Factor in a Mouse Model of Anti-Glomerular Basement Membrane Glomerulonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, Naohiro; Mori, Kiyoshi; Kasahara, Masato; Ishii, Akira; Koga, Kenichi; Ohno, Shoko; Mori, Keita P; Kato, Yukiko; Osaki, Keisuke; Kuwabara, Takashige; Kojima, Katsutoshi; Taura, Daisuke; Sone, Masakatsu; Matsusaka, Taiji; Nakao, Kazuwa; Mukoyama, Masashi; Yanagita, Motoko; Yokoi, Hideki

    2017-02-13

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) coordinates the signaling of growth factors and promotes fibrosis. Neonatal death of systemic CTGF knockout (KO) mice has hampered analysis of CTGF in adult renal diseases. We established 3 types of CTGF conditional KO (cKO) mice to investigate a role and source of CTGF in anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) glomerulonephritis. Tamoxifen-inducible systemic CTGF (Rosa-CTGF) cKO mice exhibited reduced proteinuria with ameliorated crescent formation and mesangial expansion in anti-GBM nephritis after induction. Although CTGF is expressed by podocytes at basal levels, podocyte-specific CTGF (pod-CTGF) cKO mice showed no improvement in renal injury. In contrast, PDGFRα promoter-driven CTGF (Pdgfra-CTGF) cKO mice, which predominantly lack CTGF expression by mesangial cells, exhibited reduced proteinuria with ameliorated histological changes. Glomerular macrophage accumulation, expression of Adgre1 and Ccl2, and ratio of M1/M2 macrophages were all reduced both in Rosa-CTGF cKO and Pdgfra-CTGF cKO mice, but not in pod-CTGF cKO mice. TGF-β1-stimulated Ccl2 upregulation in mesangial cells and macrophage adhesion to activated mesangial cells were decreased by reduction of CTGF. These results reveal a novel mechanism of macrophage migration into glomeruli with nephritis mediated by CTGF derived from mesangial cells, implicating the therapeutic potential of CTGF inhibition in glomerulonephritis.

  20. A novel aldo-keto reductase from Jatropha curcas L. (JcAKR) plays a crucial role in the detoxification of methylglyoxal, a potent electrophile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudalkar, Shalini; Sreeharsha, Rachapudi Venkata; Reddy, Attipalli Ramachandra

    2016-05-20

    Abiotic stress leads to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which further results in the production of reactive carbonyls (RCs) including methylglyoxal (MG). MG, an α, β-dicarbonyl aldehyde, is highly toxic to plants and the mechanism behind its detoxification is not well understood. Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) play a role in detoxification of reactive aldehydes and ketones. In the present study, we cloned and characterised a putative AKR from Jatropha curcas (JcAKR). Phylogenetically, it forms a small clade with AKRs of Glycine max and Rauwolfia serpentina. JcAKR was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli BL-21(DE3) cells and the identity of the purified protein was confirmed through MALDI-TOF analysis. The recombinant protein had high enzyme activity and catalytic efficiency in assays containing MG as the substrate. Protein modelling and docking studies revealed MG was efficiently bound to JcAKR. Under progressive drought and salinity stress, the enzyme and transcript levels of JcAKR were higher in leaves compared to roots. Further, the bacterial and yeast cells expressing JcAKR showed more tolerance towards PEG (5%), NaCl (200mM) and MG (5mM) treatments compared to controls. In conclusion, our results project JcAKR as a possible and potential target in crop improvement for abiotic stress tolerance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Crucial role of dynamic linker histone binding and divalent ions for DNA accessibility and gene regulation revealed by mesoscale modeling of oligonucleosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collepardo-Guevara, Rosana; Schlick, Tamar

    2012-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of a mesoscale model of oligonucleosomes are analyzed to examine the role of dynamic-linker histone (LH) binding/unbinding in high monovalent salt with divalent ions, and to further interpret noted chromatin fiber softening by dynamic LH in monovalent salt conditions. We find that divalent ions produce a fiber stiffening effect that competes with, but does not overshadow, the dramatic softening triggered by dynamic-LH behavior. Indeed, we find that in typical in vivo conditions, dynamic-LH binding/unbinding reduces fiber stiffening dramatically (by a factor of almost 5, as measured by the elasticity modulus) compared with rigidly fixed LH, and also the force needed to initiate chromatin unfolding, making it consistent with those of molecular motors. Our data also show that, during unfolding, divalent ions together with LHs induce linker-DNA bending and DNA–DNA repulsion screening, which guarantee formation of heteromorphic superbeads-on-a-string structures that combine regions of loose and compact fiber independently of the characteristics of the LH–core bond. These structures might be important for gene regulation as they expose regions of the DNA selectively. Dynamic control of LH binding/unbinding, either globally or locally, in the presence of divalent ions, might constitute a mechanism for regulation of gene expression. PMID:22790986

  2. An in vivo genetic screen for genes involved in spliced leader trans-splicing indicates a crucial role for continuous de novo spliced leader RNP assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Lucas; Pandarakalam, George C; Fasimoye, Rotimi; Harrison, Neale; Connolly, Bernadette; Pettitt, Jonathan; Müller, Berndt

    2017-08-21

    Spliced leader (SL) trans-splicing is a critical element of gene expression in a number of eukaryotic groups. This process is arguably best understood in nematodes, where biochemical and molecular studies in Caenorhabditis elegans and Ascaris suum have identified key steps and factors involved. Despite this, the precise details of SL trans-splicing have yet to be elucidated. In part, this is because the systematic identification of the molecules involved has not previously been possible due to the lack of a specific phenotype associated with defects in this process. We present here a novel GFP-based reporter assay that can monitor SL1 trans-splicing in living C. elegans. Using this assay, we have identified mutants in sna-1 that are defective in SL trans-splicing, and demonstrate that reducing function of SNA-1, SNA-2 and SUT-1, proteins that associate with SL1 RNA and related SmY RNAs, impairs SL trans-splicing. We further demonstrate that the Sm proteins and pICln, SMN and Gemin5, which are involved in small nuclear ribonucleoprotein assembly, have an important role in SL trans-splicing. Taken together these results provide the first in vivo evidence for proteins involved in SL trans-splicing, and indicate that continuous replacement of SL ribonucleoproteins consumed during trans-splicing reactions is essential for effective trans-splicing. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Crucial role of Asp408 in the proton translocation pathway of multidrug transporter AcrB: evidence from site-directed mutagenesis and carbodiimide labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, Markus A; von Ballmoos, Christoph; Verrey, François; Pos, Klaas M

    2009-06-30

    The three-component AcrA/AcrB/TolC efflux system of Escherichia coli catalyzes the proton motive force-driven extrusion of a variety of cytotoxic compounds. The inner membrane pump component AcrB belongs to the resistance nodulation and cell division (RND) superfamily and is responsible for drug specificity and energy transduction of the entire tripartite efflux system. Systematic mutational analysis of titratable and polar membrane-located amino acids revealed four residues, D407, D408, K940, and, R971, to be of prime importance for AcrB function. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry, D408 was shown to specifically react with dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) in a pH-dependent manner. The apparent pK(a) of D408 of 7.4 would enable binding and release of protons under physiological conditions. In contrast to other secondary transporters, D408 was not protected from carbodiimide modification in the presence of drugs, which supports the notion of spatially separated transport pathways for drugs and protons. This study provides evidence for a substantial role of membrane-located carboxylates as a central element of the proton translocation pathway in AcrB and other members of the RND superfamily.

  4. A crucial role of paralogous β-defensin genes in the Chinese alligator innate immune system revealed by the first determination of a Crocodilia defensin cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ke-Yi; Wang, Xin; Wan, Qiu-Hong; Fang, Sheng-Guo

    2018-04-01

    The β-defensin, one of the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), is a significant component of the innate immune with a broad range of antimicrobial activities. Differing from the widely-studied mammals and birds, limited information about β-defensins has been reported in reptiles, especially in crocodilians. As a same ancient species as dinosaurs and the most endangered species of 23 crocodilians, the survival of Chinese alligator (Alligator sinensis) means a powerful immune system and possible involvement of AMPs in its immune resistance. In this study, we identified 20 novel Alligator sinensisβ-defensin genes (AsBDs) from a 390 kb region using bioinformatic and experimental approaches, and successfully distinguished six orthologous AsBDs to birds and nine paralogous AsBDs undergoing gene duplication events. The amino acid alignment shows that the AsBD paralogs, like α-defensins, encode a significantly longer pro-piece comparing with the orthologs. The calculation of non-synonymous (d N ) and synonymous (d S ) substitutions in the mature peptide reveals that the AsBD paralogs experience a significantly higher selective pressure (d N /d S ) than the orthologs, but a similar evolutionary force to α-defensins. The gene expression result indicates that the AsBD paralogs have a significantly higher expression level than the orthologos in gastrointestinal tract where the host is vulnerable to enteric pathogenic bacteria, as observed in α-defensins. These three pieces of evidence demonstrate that the AsBD paralogs do play an important role in maintaining long-term survival of this endangered reptile. Thus, this survey of AsBDs on the genomic structure, evolutionary characteristics, and expression pattern provides a genetic and immunological foundation for further investigating their antimicrobial function and alternative antibiotics potentiality. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Structural Analysis of β-Fructofuranosidase from Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous Reveals Unique Features and the Crucial Role of N-Glycosylation in Oligomerization and Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Escudero, Mercedes; Gimeno-Pérez, María; González, Beatriz; Linde, Dolores; Merdzo, Zoran; Fernández-Lobato, María; Sanz-Aparicio, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous β-fructofuranosidase (XdINV)is a highly glycosylated dimeric enzyme that hydrolyzes sucrose and releases fructose from various fructooligosaccharides (FOS) and fructans. It also catalyzes the synthesis of FOS, prebiotics that stimulate the growth of beneficial bacteria in human gut. In contrast to most fructosylating enzymes, XdINV produces neo-FOS, which makes it an interesting biotechnology target. We present here its three-dimensional structure, which shows the expected bimodular arrangement and also a long extension of its C terminus that together with an N-linked glycan mediate the formation of an unusual dimer. The two active sites of the dimer are connected by a long crevice, which might indicate its potential ability to accommodate branched fructans. This arrangement could be representative of a group of GH32 yeast enzymes having the traits observed in XdINV. The inactive D80A mutant was used to obtain complexes with relevant substrates and products, with their crystals structures showing at least four binding subsites at each active site. Moreover, two different positions are observed from subsite +2 depending on the substrate, and thus, a flexible loop (Glu-334–His-343) is essential in binding sucrose and β(2–1)-linked oligosaccharides. Conversely, β(2–6) and neo-type substrates are accommodated mainly by stacking to Trp-105, explaining the production of neokestose and the efficient fructosylating activity of XdINV on α-glucosides. The role of relevant residues has been investigated by mutagenesis and kinetics measurements, and a model for the transfructosylating reaction has been proposed. The plasticity of its active site makes XdINV a valuable and flexible biocatalyst to produce novel bioconjugates. PMID:26823463

  6. Reduced Gamma Oscillations in a Mouse Model of Intellectual Disability: A Role for Impaired Repetitive Neurotransmission?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Powell, A. D.; Saintot, P.P.; Gill, K. K.; Bharathan, A.; Buck, S.C.; Morris, G.; Jiruška, Přemysl; Jefferys, J. G. R.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 5 (2014), e95871 E-ISSN 1932-6203 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : intellectual disability * gamma oscillations * synaptopathy * X-linked mental retardation Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.234, year: 2014

  7. Restoring Lost Anti-HER-2 Th1 Immunity in Breast Cancer: A Crucial Role for Th1 Cytokines in Therapy and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocera, Nadia F; Lee, M Catherine; De La Cruz, Lucy M; Rosemblit, Cinthia; Czerniecki, Brian J

    2016-01-01

    The ErbB/B2 (HER-2/neu) oncogene family plays a critical role in the development and metastatic spread of several tumor types including breast, ovarian and gastric cancer. In breast cancer, HER-2/neu is expressed in early disease development in a large percentage of DCIS lesions and its expression is associated with an increased risk of invasion and recurrence. Targeting HER-2 with antibodies such as trastuzumab or pertuzumab has improved survival, but patients with more extensive disease may develop resistance to therapy. Interestingly, response to HER-2 targeted therapies correlates with presence of immune response genes in the breast. Th1 cell production of the cytokines interferon gamma (IFNγ) and TNFα can enhance MHC class I expression, PD-L1 expression, augment apoptosis and tumor senescence, and enhances growth inhibition of many anti-breast cancer agents, including anti-estrogens and HER-2 targeted therapies. Recently, we have identified that a loss of anti-HER-2 CD4 Th1 in peripheral blood occurs during breast tumorigenesis and is dramatically diminished, even in Stage I breast cancers. The loss of anti-HER-2 Th1 response is specific and not readily reversed by standard therapies. In fact, this loss of anti-HER-2 Th1 response in peripheral blood correlates with lack of complete response to neoadjuvant therapy and diminished disease-free survival. This defect can be restored with HER-2 vaccinations in both DCIS and IBC. Correcting the anti-HER-2 Th1 response may have significant impact in improving response to HER-2 targeted therapies. Development of immune monitoring systems for anti-HER-2 Th1 to identify patients at risk for recurrence could be critical to improving outcomes, since the anti-HER-2 Th1 response can be restored by vaccination. Correction of the cellular immune response against HER-2 may prevent recurrence in high-risk patients with DCIS and IBC at risk of developing new or recurrent breast cancer.

  8. Linking micro- and macroevolutionary perspectives to evaluate the role of Quaternary sea-level oscillations in island diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulou, Anna; Knowles, L Lacey

    2017-12-01

    With shifts in island area, isolation, and cycles of island fusion-fission, the role of Quaternary sea-level oscillations as drivers of diversification is complex and not well understood. Here, we conduct parallel comparisons of population and species divergence between two island areas of equivalent size that have been affected differently by sea-level oscillations, with the aim to understand the micro- and macroevolutionary dynamics associated with sea-level change. Using genome-wide datasets for a clade of seven Amphiacusta ground cricket species endemic to the Puerto Rico Bank (PRB), we found consistently deeper interspecific divergences and higher population differentiation across the unfragmented Western PRB, in comparison to the currently fragmented Eastern PRB that has experienced extreme changes in island area and connectivity during the Quaternary. We evaluate alternative hypotheses related to the microevolutionary processes (population splitting, extinction, and merging) that regulate the frequency of completed speciation across the PRB. Our results suggest that under certain combinations of archipelago characteristics and taxon traits, the repeated changes in island area and connectivity may create an opposite effect to the hypothesized "species pump" action of oscillating sea levels. Our study highlights how a microevolutionary perspective can complement current macroecological work on the Quaternary dynamics of island biodiversity. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution © 2017 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  9. Consciousness in waking and dreaming: the roles of neuronal oscillation and neuromodulation in determining similarities and differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, D; Pace-Schott, E F; Hobson, J A

    1997-05-01

    State-dependent aspects of consciousness are explored with particular attention to waking and dreaming. First, those phenomenological differences between waking and dreaming that have been established through subjective reports are reviewed. These differences are robustly expressed in most aspects of consciousness including perception, attention, memory, emotion, orientation, and thought. Next, the roles of high frequency neuronal oscillation and neuromodulation are explored in waking and rapid eye movement sleep, the stage of sleep with which the most intense dreaming is associated. The high frequency neuronal oscillations serve similar functions in the wake and rapid eye movement states sleep but neuromodulation is very different in the two states. The collective high frequency oscillatory activity gives coherence to spatially separate neurons but, because of the different neuromodulation, the binding of sensory input in the wake state is very different from the binding of internally perceived input during rapid eye movement sleep. An explanatory model is presented which states that neuromodulation, as well as input source and brain activation level differentiate states of the brain, while the self-organized collective neuronal oscillations unify consciousness via long range correlations.

  10. NREM sleep oscillations and brain plasticity in aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart eFogel

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The human electroencephalogram (EEG during non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREM is characterized mainly by high-amplitude (> 75 µV, slow-frequency (< 4 Hz waves (slow waves; SW and sleep spindles (~11-15 Hz; > 0.25 s. These NREM oscillations play a crucial role in brain plasticity, and importantly, NREM sleep oscillations change considerably with aging. This review discusses the association between NREM sleep oscillations and cerebral plasticity as well as the functional impact of age-related changes on NREM sleep oscillations. We propose that age-related reduction in sleep-dependent memory consolidation may be due in part to changes in NREM sleep oscillations.

  11. Update on the mechanisms and roles of high-frequency oscillations in seizures and epileptic disorders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jiruška, Přemysl; Alvarado-Rojas, C.; Schevon, C.A.; Staba, R.; Stacey, W.; Wendling, F.; Avoli, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 8 (2017), s. 1330-1339 ISSN 0013-9580 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV15-29835A; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-02634S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : high-frequency oscillations * epilepsy * ripples * fast ripples * ictogenesis * epileptogenesis * seizures * interneurons * computer models Subject RIV: FH - Neurology OBOR OECD: Neurosciences (including psychophysiology Impact factor: 5.295, year: 2016

  12. Topography's crucial role in Heinrich Events

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, William H. G.; Valdes, Paul J.; Payne, Antony J.

    2014-01-01

    Heinrich Events are frequently promoted as examples of an abruptly forced climate change. Although the evidence for changes in the ice sheets, which cause these events, is clear, the pathway by which these changes can affect the climate is not. The most common explanation is that the melting icebergs released by the ice sheet cause a change in the ocean’s circulation. Here we propose that the change in the height of the ice sheet, which changes the atmospheric circulation, is just as importan...

  13. The crucial role of the private sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberis, M; Paxman, J M

    1986-12-01

    Private support for the development of family planning programs continues to grow and now includes industries that provide family planning services, commercial outlets that distribute contraceptives, community groups that help to build demand, private medical practitioners who include contraception as a part of health care, organizations that provide technical and financial assistance to developing country programs, pharmaceutical firms, and foundations that underwrite contraceptive research. Although the mix of private and public programs differs from country to country, these 2 family planning programs complement each other and often work in close partnership. The private sector has the advantages of being able to pioneer innovative programs the public sector is unwilling or unable to pursue, to bring foreign financial and technical assistance to developing countries without political implications, and to achieve financially self-sustaining family planning efforts that are linked to other development efforts. In many countries, the private sector has been instrumental in developing a national family planning program and in eliminating barriers to family planning in countries with restrictive laws and policies. The private sector has been especially important in pioneering grassroots programs that improve the status of women through education, health care, training, and economic opportunity.

  14. Role of zonal flow predator-prey oscillations in triggering the transition to H-mode confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, L; Zeng, L; Rhodes, T L; Hillesheim, J C; Doyle, E J; Groebner, R J; Peebles, W A; Burrell, K H; Wang, G

    2012-04-13

    Direct evidence of zonal flow (ZF) predator-prey oscillations and the synergistic roles of ZF- and equilibrium E×B flow shear in triggering the low- to high-confinement (L- to H-mode) transition in the DIII-D tokamak is presented. Periodic turbulence suppression is first observed in a narrow layer at and just inside the separatrix when the shearing rate transiently exceeds the turbulence decorrelation rate. The final transition to H mode with sustained turbulence and transport reduction is controlled by equilibrium E×B shear due to the increasing ion pressure gradient.

  15. Neutrino Scattering Uncertainties and their Role in Long Baseline Oscillation Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D.A. Harris; G. Blazey; Arie Bodek; D. Boehnlein; S. Boyd; William Brooks; Antje Bruell; Howard S. Budd; R. Burnstein; D. Casper; A. Chakravorty; Michael Christy; Jesse Chvojka; M.A.C. Cummings; P. deBarbaro; D. Drakoulakos; J. Dunmore; Rolf Ent; Hugh Gallagher; David Gaskell; Ronald Gilman; Charles Glashausser; Wendy Hinton; Xiaodong Jiang; T. Kafka; O. Kamaev; Cynthia Keppel; M. Kostin; Sergey Kulagin; Gerfried Kumbartzki; Steven Manly; W.A. Mann; Kevin Mcfarland-porter; Wolodymyr Melnitchouk; Jorge Morfin; D. Naples; John Nelson; Gabriel Niculescu; Maria-ioana Niculescu; W. Oliver; Michael Paolone; Emmanuel Paschos; A. Pla-Dalmau; Ronald Ransome; C. Regis; P. Rubinov; V. Rykalin; Willis Sakumoto; P. Shanahan; N. Solomey; P. Spentzouris; P. Stamoulis; G. Tzanakos; Stephen Wood; F.X. Yumiceva; B. Ziemer; M. Zois

    2004-01-01

    The field of oscillation physics is about to make an enormous leap forward in statistical precision: first through the MINOS experiment in the coming year, and later through the NOvA and T2K experiments. Because of the relatively poor understanding of neutrino interactions in the energy ranges of these experiments, there are systematics that can arise in interpreting far detector data that can be as large as or even larger than the expected statistical uncertainties. We describe how these systematic errors arise, and how specific measurements in a dedicated neutrino scattering experiment like MINERvA can reduce the cross section systematic errors to well below the statistical errors

  16. Einstein and the "Crucial" Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holton, Gerald

    1969-01-01

    Examines the widespread view that it was the crucial Michelson-Morley experiment that led Einstein to formulate the special relativity theory. From Einstein's writings, evidence is presented that no such direct genetic connection exists. The author suggests that the historian of science must resist the experimenticist's fallacy of imposing a…

  17. WE-FG-BRA-08: Potential Role of the Glycolytic Oscillator in Acute Hypoxia in Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Che Fru, L; Adamson, E; Campos, D; Song, C; Kimple, R; Fain, S; Kissick, M; Jacques, S; Kogel, A van der; Nickel, K

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Oscillatory dynamics in acute hypoxia have been observed, but poorly understood. They have mostly been attributed to vascular perturbations, but no link has yet been made to metabolic causes. We set out to determine the fundamental frequencies and test for coherence in tumor oxygen dynamics and spatial properties. Methods: Severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice were inoculated onto bilateral flanks with human derived head and neck carcinoma (UW-SCC22) cell line xenografts. Oxygen dynamics were monitored in the tumor every minute for an hour using three modalities: blood oxygen level dependent - magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-MRI), hemoglobin oxygen saturation photoacoustic, and locally manufactured optical probes for spectral fitting. A statistical test was used to separate fluctuating from non-fluctuating voxels and pixels in BOLD-MRI and photoacoustic data respectively. The power spectrum density (PSD) and the autocorrelation functions were calculated for the time series of each voxel, pixel and region, of the BOLD-MRI, photoacoustic or fiber optic data respectively. Results: Using all three techniques, intermittent oxygen dynamics with both coherent and incoherent signatures was observed in the tumors. Upon averaging the PSDs of fluctuating voxels and pixels, it was found that these oscillations occurred with periods of minutes to tens of minutes from all three approaches. Observations from the BOLD-MRI and photoacoustic data showed that clusters of voxels oscillated in a synchronized manner. Conclusion: We were able to use three different modalities to show that fluctuation in tumor oxygen is both coherent and incoherent, with periods of minutes to tens of minutes. These periods are very similar to those from the well-established metabolic, non-linear biomechanical phenomenon called the glycolytic oscillator. This may provide an additional explanation to the cause of cyclic hypoxia. Such dynamics could have profound implications in

  18. WE-FG-BRA-08: Potential Role of the Glycolytic Oscillator in Acute Hypoxia in Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Che Fru, L [University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Adamson, E; Campos, D; Song, C; Kimple, R [University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Fain, S; Kissick, M [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Jacques, S [Oregon Health and Science University, Portland OR USA, Portland, OR (United States); Kogel, A van der [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Nickel, K [University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Oscillatory dynamics in acute hypoxia have been observed, but poorly understood. They have mostly been attributed to vascular perturbations, but no link has yet been made to metabolic causes. We set out to determine the fundamental frequencies and test for coherence in tumor oxygen dynamics and spatial properties. Methods: Severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice were inoculated onto bilateral flanks with human derived head and neck carcinoma (UW-SCC22) cell line xenografts. Oxygen dynamics were monitored in the tumor every minute for an hour using three modalities: blood oxygen level dependent - magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-MRI), hemoglobin oxygen saturation photoacoustic, and locally manufactured optical probes for spectral fitting. A statistical test was used to separate fluctuating from non-fluctuating voxels and pixels in BOLD-MRI and photoacoustic data respectively. The power spectrum density (PSD) and the autocorrelation functions were calculated for the time series of each voxel, pixel and region, of the BOLD-MRI, photoacoustic or fiber optic data respectively. Results: Using all three techniques, intermittent oxygen dynamics with both coherent and incoherent signatures was observed in the tumors. Upon averaging the PSDs of fluctuating voxels and pixels, it was found that these oscillations occurred with periods of minutes to tens of minutes from all three approaches. Observations from the BOLD-MRI and photoacoustic data showed that clusters of voxels oscillated in a synchronized manner. Conclusion: We were able to use three different modalities to show that fluctuation in tumor oxygen is both coherent and incoherent, with periods of minutes to tens of minutes. These periods are very similar to those from the well-established metabolic, non-linear biomechanical phenomenon called the glycolytic oscillator. This may provide an additional explanation to the cause of cyclic hypoxia. Such dynamics could have profound implications in

  19. Role of North Indian Ocean Air-Sea Interaction in Summer Monsoon Intraseasonal Oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L.; Han, W.; Li, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Air-sea coupling processes over the North Indian Ocean associated with Indian summer monsoon intraseasonal oscillation (MISO) are analyzed. Observations show that MISO convection anomalies affect underlying sea surface temperature (SST) through changes in surface shortwave radiation (via cloud cover change) and surface latent heat flux (associated with surface wind speed change). In turn, SST anomalies determine the changing rate of MISO precipitation (dP/dt): warm (cold) SST anomalies cause increasing (decreasing) precipitation rate through increasing (decreasing) surface convergence. Air-sea interaction gives rise to a quadrature relationship between MISO precipitation and SST anomalies. A local air-sea coupling model (LACM) is established based on these observed physical processes, which is a damped oscillatory system with no external forcing. The period of LACM is proportional to the square root of mean state mixed layer depth , assuming other physical parameters remain unchanged. Hence, LACM predicts a relatively short (long) MISO period over the North Indian Ocean during the May-June monsoon developing (July-August mature) phase when is shallow (deep). This result is consistent with observed MISO statistics. An oscillatory external forcing of a typical 30-day period is added to LACM, representing intraseasonal oscillations originated from the equatorial Indian Ocean and propagate into the North Indian Ocean. The period of LACM is then determined by both the inherent period associated with local air-sea coupling and the period of external forcing. It is found that resonance occurs when , amplifying the MISO in situ. This result explains the larger MISO amplitude during the monsoon developing phase compared to the mature phase, which is associated with seasonal cycle of . LACM, however, fails to predict the observed small MISO amplitude during the September-October monsoon decaying phase, when is also shallow. This deficiency might be associated with the

  20. The role of nonlinear torsional contributions on the stability of flexural-torsional oscillations of open-cross section beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Egidio, Angelo; Contento, Alessandro; Vestroni, Fabrizio

    2015-12-01

    An open-cross section thin-walled beam model, already developed by the authors, has been conveniently simplified while maintaining the capacity of accounting for the significant nonlinear warping effects. For a technical range of geometrical and mechanical characteristics of the beam, the response is characterized by the torsional curvature prevailing over the flexural ones. A Galerkin discretization is performed by using a suitable expansion of displacements based on shape functions. The attention is focused on the dynamic response of the beam to a harmonic force, applied at the free end of the cantilever beam. The excitation is directed along the symmetry axis of the beam section. The stability of the one-component oscillations has been investigated using the analytical model, showing the importance of the internal resonances due to the nonlinear warping coupling terms. Comparison with the results provided by a computational finite element model has been performed. The good agreement among the results of the analytical and the computational models confirms the effectiveness of the simplified model of a nonlinear open-cross section thin-walled beam and overall the important role of the warping and of the torsional elongation in the study of the one-component dynamic oscillations and their stability.

  1. Past and future ice age initiation: the role of an intrinsic deep-ocean millennial oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. G.

    2014-05-01

    This paper offers three interdependent contributions to studies of climate variation: (1) the recognition and analysis of an intrinsic millennial oceanic oscillation that affects both Northern and Southern high latitude climates, (2) The recognition of an oceanographic switch to ice-free seas west of Greenland that explains the initiation of the Last Ice Age, and (3) an analysis of the effect of increasing salinity in the seas east of Greenland that suggests the possibility of the initiation of an ice age threshold climate in the near future. In the first contribution the millennial oscillation in the flow of the North Atlantic Drift reported by Bond et al. (1997) is proposed to be part of a 1500 yr intrinsic deep ocean oscillation. This oscillation involves the exchange of North Atlantic intermediate-level deep water (NADW) formed in the seas east of Greenland with Antarctic Bottom Water formed in a shallow-water zone at the edge of the Antarctic continent. The concept of NADW formation is already well known, with details of the sinking water flowing out of the Greenland Sea observed by Smethie et al. (2000) using chlorofluorocarbon tracers. The concept of Antarctic Bottom Water formation is also already well established. However, its modulation by the changing fraction of NADW in the Southern Ocean, which I infer from the analysis of Weyl (1968), has not been previously discussed. The modulated lower-salinity Antarctic Bottom Water that reaches the northern North Atlantic then provides negative feedback for the cyclic variation of NADW formation as proposed here. This causes the 1500 yr bipolar oscillation. The feedback suggests the possible sinusoidal character of the proposed oscillation model. The model is consistent with the cooling of the Little Ice Age (Lamb, 1972, 1995), and it also correctly predicts NASA's observation of today's record maximum area of winter sea ice on the Southern Ocean and the present observed record low rate of Antarctic Bottom Water

  2. Cell cycle stage-specific differential expression of topoisomerase I in tobacco BY-2 cells and its ectopic overexpression and knockdown unravels its crucial role in plant morphogenesis and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Badri Nath; Mudgil, Yashwanti; John, Riffat; Achary, V Mohan Murali; Tripathy, Manas Kumar; Sopory, Sudhir K; Reddy, Malireddy K; Kaul, Tanushri

    2015-11-01

    DNA topoisomerases catalyze the inter-conversion of different topological forms of DNA. Cell cycle coupled differential accumulation of topoisomerase I (Topo I) revealed biphasic expression maximum at S-phase and M/G1-phase of cultured synchronized tobacco BY-2 cells. This suggested its active role in resolving topological constrains during DNA replication (S-phase) and chromosome decondensation (M/G1 phase). Immuno-localization revealed high concentrations of Topo I in nucleolus. Propidium iodide staining and Br-UTP incorporation patterns revealed direct correlation between immunofluorescence intensity and rRNA transcription activity within nucleolus. Immuno-stained chromosomes during metaphase and anaphase suggested possible role of Topo I in resolving topological constrains during mitotic chromosome condensation. Inhibitor studies showed that in comparison to Topo I, Topo II was essential in resolving topological constrains during chromosome condensation. Probably, Topo II substituted Topo I functioning to certain extent during chromosome condensation, but not vice-versa. Transgenic Topo I tobacco lines revealed morphological abnormalities and highlighted its crucial role in plant morphogenesis and development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Oscillations in stellar atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, A.; Ringuelet, A.E.; Fontenla, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Atmospheric excitation and propagation of oscillations are analyzed for typical pulsating stars. The linear, plane-parallel approach for the pulsating atmosphere gives a local description of the phenomenon. From the local analysis of oscillations, the minimum frequencies are obtained for radially propagating waves. The comparison of the minimum frequencies obtained for a variety of stellar types is in good agreement with the observed periods of the oscillations. The role of the atmosphere in the globar stellar pulsations is thus emphasized. 7 refs

  4. The role of high-frequency oscillations in epilepsy surgery planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloss, David; Nevitt, Sarah J; Staba, Richard

    2017-10-05

    Epilepsy is a serious brain disorder characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures. Approximately two-thirds of seizures can be controlled with antiepileptic medications (Kwan 2000). For some of the others, surgery can completely eliminate or significantly reduce the occurrence of disabling seizures. Localization of epileptogenic areas for resective surgery is far from perfect, and new tools are being investigated to more accurately localize the epileptogenic zone (the zone of the brain where the seizures begin) and improve the likelihood of freedom from postsurgical seizures. Recordings of pathological high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) may be one such tool. To assess the ability of HFOs to improve the outcomes of epilepsy surgery by helping to identify more accurately the epileptogenic areas of the brain. For the latest update, we searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialized Register (25 July 2016), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) via the Cochrane Register of Studies Online (CRSO, 25 July 2016), MEDLINE (Ovid, 1946 to 25 July 2016), CINAHL Plus (EBSCOhost, 25 July 2016), Web of Science (Thomson Reuters, 25 July 2016), ClinicalTrials.gov (25 July 2016), and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform ICTRP (25 July 2016). We included studies that provided information on the outcomes of epilepsy surgery for at least six months and which used high-frequency oscillations in making decisions about epilepsy surgery. The primary outcome of the review was the Engel Class Outcome System (class I = no disabling seizures, II = rare disabling seizures, III = worthwhile improvement, IV = no worthwhile improvement). Secondary outcomes were responder rate, International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) epilepsy surgery outcome, frequency of adverse events from any source and quality of life outcomes. We intended to analyse outcomes via an aggregated data fixed-effect model meta-analysis. Two studies representing

  5. The role of shallow convection in promoting the northward propagation of boreal summer intraseasonal oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Zhao, Jiuwei; Fu, Xiouhua; Huang, Gang

    2018-02-01

    By conducting idealized experiments in a general circulation model (GCM) and in a toy theoretical model, we test the hypothesis that shallow convection (SC) is responsible for explaining why the boreal summer intraseasonal oscillation (BSISO) prefers propagating northward. Two simulations are performed using ECHAM4, with the control run using a standard detrainment rate of SC and the sensitivity run turning off the detrainment rate of SC. These two simulations display dramatically different BSISO characteristics. The control run simulates the realistic northward propagation (NP) of the BSISO, while the sensitivity run with little SC only simulates stationary signals. In the sensitivity run, the meridional asymmetries of vorticity and humidity fields are simulated under the monsoon vertical wind shear (VWS); thus, the frictional convergence can be excited to the north of the BSISO. However, the lack of SC makes the lower and middle troposphere very dry, which prohibits further development of deeper convection. A theoretical BSISO model is also constructed, and the result shows that SC is a key to convey the asymmetric vorticity effect to induce the BSISO to move northward. Thus, both the GCM and theoretical model results demonstrate the importance of SC in promoting the NP of the BSISO.

  6. Prediction equations of forced oscillation technique: the insidious role of collinearity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narchi, Hassib; AlBlooshi, Afaf

    2018-03-27

    Many studies have reported reference data for forced oscillation technique (FOT) in healthy children. The prediction equation of FOT parameters were derived from a multivariable regression model examining the effect of age, gender, weight and height on each parameter. As many of these variables are likely to be correlated, collinearity might have affected the accuracy of the model, potentially resulting in misleading, erroneous or difficult to interpret conclusions.The aim of this work was: To review all FOT publications in children since 2005 to analyze whether collinearity was considered in the construction of the published prediction equations. Then to compare these prediction equations with our own study. And to analyse, in our study, how collinearity between the explanatory variables might affect the predicted equations if it was not considered in the model. The results showed that none of the ten reviewed studies had stated whether collinearity was checked for. Half of the reports had also included in their equations variables which are physiologically correlated, such as age, weight and height. The predicted resistance varied by up to 28% amongst these studies. And in our study, multicollinearity was identified between the explanatory variables initially considered for the regression model (age, weight and height). Ignoring it would have resulted in inaccuracies in the coefficients of the equation, their signs (positive or negative), their 95% confidence intervals, their significance level and the model goodness of fit. In Conclusion with inaccurately constructed and improperly reported models, understanding the results and reproducing the models for future research might be compromised.

  7. Quenching oscillating behaviors in fractional coupled Stuart-Landau oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhongkui; Xiao, Rui; Yang, Xiaoli; Xu, Wei

    2018-03-01

    Oscillation quenching has been widely studied during the past several decades in fields ranging from natural sciences to engineering, but investigations have so far been restricted to oscillators with an integer-order derivative. Here, we report the first study of amplitude death (AD) in fractional coupled Stuart-Landau oscillators with partial and/or complete conjugate couplings to explore oscillation quenching patterns and dynamics. It has been found that the fractional-order derivative impacts the AD state crucially. The area of the AD state increases along with the decrease of the fractional-order derivative. Furthermore, by introducing and adjusting a limiting feedback factor in coupling links, the AD state can be well tamed in fractional coupled oscillators. Hence, it provides one an effective approach to analyze and control the oscillating behaviors in fractional coupled oscillators.

  8. Effects of semantic relatedness on age-related associative memory deficits: the role of theta oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo-Garcia, Maite; Cantero, Jose L; Atienza, Mercedes

    2012-07-16

    Growing evidence suggests that age-related deficits in associative memory are alleviated when the to-be-associated items are semantically related. Here we investigate whether this beneficial effect of semantic relatedness is paralleled by spatio-temporal changes in cortical EEG dynamics during incidental encoding. Young and older adults were presented with faces at a particular spatial location preceded by a biographical cue that was either semantically related or unrelated. As expected, automatic encoding of face-location associations benefited from semantic relatedness in the two groups of age. This effect correlated with increased power of theta oscillations over medial and anterior lateral regions of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and lateral regions of the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) in both groups. But better-performing elders also showed increased brain-behavior correlation in the theta band over the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) as compared to young adults. Semantic relatedness was, however, insufficient to fully eliminate age-related differences in associative memory. In line with this finding, poorer-performing elders relative to young adults showed significant reductions of theta power in the left IFG that were further predictive of behavioral impairment in the recognition task. All together, these results suggest that older adults benefit less than young adults from executive processes during encoding mainly due to neural inefficiency over regions of the left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC). But this associative deficit may be partially compensated for by engaging preexistent semantic knowledge, which likely leads to an efficient recruitment of attentional and integration processes supported by the left PPC and left anterior PFC respectively, together with neural compensatory mechanisms governed by the right VLPFC. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Arabidopsis GLUTATHIONE REDUCTASE1 plays a crucial role in leaf responses to intracellular hydrogen peroxide and in ensuring appropriate gene expression through both salicylic acid and jasmonic acid signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhamdi, Amna; Hager, Jutta; Chaouch, Sejir; Queval, Guillaume; Han, Yi; Taconnat, Ludivine; Saindrenan, Patrick; Gouia, Houda; Issakidis-Bourguet, Emmanuelle; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Noctor, Graham

    2010-07-01

    Glutathione is a major cellular thiol that is maintained in the reduced state by glutathione reductase (GR), which is encoded by two genes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana; GR1 and GR2). This study addressed the role of GR1 in hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) responses through a combined genetic, transcriptomic, and redox profiling approach. To identify the potential role of changes in glutathione status in H(2)O(2) signaling, gr1 mutants, which show a constitutive increase in oxidized glutathione (GSSG), were compared with a catalase-deficient background (cat2), in which GSSG accumulation is conditionally driven by H(2)O(2). Parallel transcriptomics analysis of gr1 and cat2 identified overlapping gene expression profiles that in both lines were dependent on growth daylength. Overlapping genes included phytohormone-associated genes, in particular implicating glutathione oxidation state in the regulation of jasmonic acid signaling. Direct analysis of H(2)O(2)-glutathione interactions in cat2 gr1 double mutants established that GR1-dependent glutathione status is required for multiple responses to increased H(2)O(2) availability, including limitation of lesion formation, accumulation of salicylic acid, induction of pathogenesis-related genes, and signaling through jasmonic acid pathways. Modulation of these responses in cat2 gr1 was linked to dramatic GSSG accumulation and modified expression of specific glutaredoxins and glutathione S-transferases, but there is little or no evidence of generalized oxidative stress or changes in thioredoxin-associated gene expression. We conclude that GR1 plays a crucial role in daylength-dependent redox signaling and that this function cannot be replaced by the second Arabidopsis GR gene or by thiol systems such as the thioredoxin system.

  10. Structural and pharmacological characteristics of chimeric peptides derived from peptide E and beta-endorphin reveal the crucial role of the C-terminal YGGFL and YKKGE motifs in their analgesic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condamine, Eric; Courchay, Karine; Rego, Jean-Claude Do; Leprince, Jérôme; Mayer, Catherine; Davoust, Daniel; Costentin, Jean; Vaudry, Hubert

    2010-05-01

    Peptide E (a 25-amino acid peptide derived from proenkephalin A) and beta-endorphin (a 31-amino acid peptide derived from proopiomelanocortin) bind with high affinity to opioid receptors and share structural similarities but induce analgesic effects of very different intensity. Indeed, whereas they possess the same N-terminus Met-enkephalin message sequence linked to a helix by a flexible spacer and a C-terminal part in random coil conformation, in contrast with peptide E, beta-endorphin produces a profound analgesia. To determine the key structural elements explaining this very divergent opioid activity, we have compared the structural and pharmacological characteristics of several chimeric peptides derived from peptide E and beta-endorphin. Structures were obtained under the same experimental conditions using circular dichroism, computational estimation of helical content and/or nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and NMR-restrained molecular modeling. The hot-plate and writhing tests were used in mice to evaluate the antinociceptive effects of the peptides. Our results indicate that neither the length nor the physicochemical profile of the spacer plays a fundamental role in analgesia. On the other hand, while the functional importance of the helix cannot be excluded, the last 5 residues in the C-terminal part seem to be crucial for the expression or absence of the analgesic activity of these peptides. These data raise the question of the true function of peptides E in opioidergic systems. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Ultra-structural time-course study in the C. elegans model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy highlights a crucial role for sarcomere-anchoring structures and sarcolemma integrity in the earliest steps of the muscle degeneration process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouilly, Nicolas; Lecroisey, Claire; Martin, Edwige; Pierson, Laura; Mariol, Marie-Christine; Qadota, Hiroshi; Labouesse, Michel; Streichenberger, Nathalie; Mounier, Nicole; Gieseler, Kathrin

    2015-11-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disease characterized by progressive muscle degeneration due to mutations in the dystrophin gene. In spite of great advances in the design of curative treatments, most patients currently receive palliative therapies with steroid molecules such as prednisone or deflazacort thought to act through their immunosuppressive properties. These molecules only slightly slow down the progression of the disease and lead to severe side effects. Fundamental research is still needed to reveal the mechanisms involved in the disease that could be exploited as therapeutic targets. By studying a Caenorhabditis elegans model for DMD, we show here that dystrophin-dependent muscle degeneration is likely to be cell autonomous and affects the muscle cells the most involved in locomotion. We demonstrate that muscle degeneration is dependent on exercise and force production. Exhaustive studies by electron microscopy allowed establishing for the first time the chronology of subcellular events occurring during the entire process of muscle degeneration. This chronology highlighted the crucial role for dystrophin in stabilizing sarcomeric anchoring structures and the sarcolemma. Our results suggest that the disruption of sarcomeric anchoring structures and sarcolemma integrity, observed at the onset of the muscle degeneration process, triggers subcellular consequences that lead to muscle cell death. An ultra-structural analysis of muscle biopsies from DMD patients suggested that the chronology of subcellular events established in C. elegans models the pathogenesis in human. Finally, we found that the loss of sarcolemma integrity was greatly reduced after prednisone treatment suggesting a role for this molecule in plasma membrane stabilization. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. In-Depth Temporal Transcriptome Profiling Reveals a Crucial Developmental Switch with Roles for RNA Processing and Organelle Metabolism That Are Essential for Germination in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narsai, Reena; Law, Simon R.; Carrie, Chris; Xu, Lin; Whelan, James

    2011-01-01

    Germination represents a rapid transition from dormancy to a high level of metabolic activity. In-depth transcriptomic profiling at 10 time points in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), including fresh seed, ripened seed, during stratification, germination, and postgermination per se, revealed specific temporal expression patterns that to our knowledge have not previously been identified. Over 10,000 transcripts were differentially expressed during cold stratification, with subequal numbers up-regulated as down-regulated, revealing an active period in preparing seeds for germination, where transcription and RNA degradation both play important roles in regulating the molecular sequence of events. A previously unidentified transient expression pattern was observed for a group of genes, whereby a significant rise in expression was observed at the end of stratification and significantly lower expression was observed 6 h later. These genes were further defined as germination specific, as they were most highly expressed at this time in germination, in comparison with all developmental tissues in the AtGenExpress data set. Functional analysis of these genes using genetic inactivation revealed that they displayed a significant enrichment for embryo-defective or -arrested phenotype. This group was enriched in genes encoding mitochondrial and nuclear RNA-processing proteins, including more than 45% of all pentatricopeptide domain-containing proteins expressed during germination. The presence of mitochondrial DNA replication factors and RNA-processing functions in this germination-specific subset represents the earliest events in organelle biogenesis, preceding any changes associated with energy metabolism. Green fluorescent protein analysis also confirmed organellar localization for 65 proteins, largely showing germination-specific expression. These results suggest that mitochondrial biogenesis involves a two-step process to produce energetically active organelles: an

  13. Catalytic mechanisms of direct pyrrole synthesis via dehydrogenative coupling mediated by PNP-Ir or PNN-Ru pincer complexes: Crucial role of proton-transfer shuttles in the PNP-Ir system

    KAUST Repository

    Qu, Shuanglin

    2014-04-02

    Kempe et al. and Milstein et al. have recently advanced the dehydrogenative coupling methodology to synthesize pyrroles from secondary alcohols (e.g., 3) and β-amino alcohols (e.g., 4), using PNP-Ir (1) and PNN-Ru (2) pincer complexes, respectively. We herein present a DFT study to characterize the catalytic mechanism of these reactions. After precatalyst activation to give active 1A/2A, the transformation proceeds via four stages: 1A/2A-catalyzed alcohol (3) dehydrogenation to give ketone (11), base-facilitated C-N coupling of 11 and 4 to form an imine-alcohol intermediate (18), base-promoted cyclization of 18, and catalyst regeneration via H2 release from 1R/2R. For alcohol dehydrogenations, the bifunctional double hydrogen-transfer pathway is more favorable than that via β-hydride elimination. Generally, proton-transfer (H-transfer) shuttles facilitate various H-transfer processes in both systems. Notwithstanding, H-transfer shuttles play a much more crucial role in the PNP-Ir system than in the PNN-Ru system. Without H-transfer shuttles, the key barriers up to 45.9 kcal/mol in PNP-Ir system are too high to be accessible, while the corresponding barriers (<32.0 kcal/mol) in PNN-Ru system are not unreachable. Another significant difference between the two systems is that the addition of alcohol to 1A giving an alkoxo complex is endergonic by 8.1 kcal/mol, whereas the addition to 2A is exergonic by 8.9 kcal/mol. The thermodynamic difference could be the main reason for PNP-Ir system requiring lower catalyst loading than the PNN-Ru system. We discuss how the differences are resulted in terms of electronic and geometric structures of the catalysts and how to use the features in catalyst development. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  14. Identifying crucial parameter correlations maintaining bursting activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Doloc-Mihu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent experimental and computational studies suggest that linearly correlated sets of parameters (intrinsic and synaptic properties of neurons allow central pattern-generating networks to produce and maintain their rhythmic activity regardless of changing internal and external conditions. To determine the role of correlated conductances in the robust maintenance of functional bursting activity, we used our existing database of half-center oscillator (HCO model instances of the leech heartbeat CPG. From the database, we identified functional activity groups of burster (isolated neuron and half-center oscillator model instances and realistic subgroups of each that showed burst characteristics (principally period and spike frequency similar to the animal. To find linear correlations among the conductance parameters maintaining functional leech bursting activity, we applied Principal Component Analysis (PCA to each of these four groups. PCA identified a set of three maximal conductances (leak current, [Formula: see text]Leak; a persistent K current, [Formula: see text]K2; and of a persistent Na+ current, [Formula: see text]P that correlate linearly for the two groups of burster instances but not for the HCO groups. Visualizations of HCO instances in a reduced space suggested that there might be non-linear relationships between these parameters for these instances. Experimental studies have shown that period is a key attribute influenced by modulatory inputs and temperature variations in heart interneurons. Thus, we explored the sensitivity of period to changes in maximal conductances of [Formula: see text]Leak, [Formula: see text]K2, and [Formula: see text]P, and we found that for our realistic bursters the effect of these parameters on period could not be assessed because when varied individually bursting activity was not maintained.

  15. No evidence for role of extracellular choline-acetyltransferase in generation of gamma oscillations in rat hippocampal slices in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollnagel, J O; ul Haq, R; Behrens, C J; Maslarova, A; Mody, I; Heinemann, U

    2015-01-22

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is well known to induce persistent γ-oscillations in the hippocampus when applied together with physostigmine, an inhibitor of the ACh degrading enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Here we report that physostigmine alone can also dose-dependently induce γ-oscillations in rat hippocampal slices. We hypothesized that this effect was due to the presence of choline in the extracellular space and that this choline is taken up into cholinergic fibers where it is converted to ACh by the enzyme choline-acetyltransferase (ChAT). Release of ACh from cholinergic fibers in turn may then induce γ-oscillations. We therefore tested the effects of the choline uptake inhibitor hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) on persistent γ-oscillations either induced by physostigmine alone or by co-application of ACh and physostigmine. We found that HC-3 itself did not induce γ-oscillations and also did not prevent physostigmine-induced γ-oscillation while washout of physostigmine and ACh-induced γ-oscillations was accelerated. It was recently reported that ChAT might also be present in the extracellular space (Vijayaraghavan et al., 2013). Here we show that the effect of physostigmine was prevented by the ChAT inhibitor (2-benzoylethyl)-trimethylammonium iodide (BETA) which could indicate extracellular synthesis of ACh. However, when we tested for effects of extracellularly applied acetyl-CoA, a substrate of ChAT for synthesis of ACh, physostigmine-induced γ-oscillations were attenuated. Together, these findings do not support the idea that ACh can be synthesized by an extracellularly located ChAT. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Short period sound speed oscillation measured by intensive XBT survey and its role on GNSS/acoustic positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, M.; Matsui, R.; Imano, M.; Honsho, C.

    2017-12-01

    In the GNSS/acoustic measurement, sound speed in ocean plays a key role of accuracy of final positioning. We have shown than longer period sound speed undulation can be properly estimated from GNSS-A analysis itself in our previous work. In this work, we have carried out intensive XBT measurement to get temporal variation of sound speed in short period to be compared with GNSS-A derived one. In the individual temperature profile obtained by intensive XBT measurements (10 minutes interval up to 12 times of cast), clear vertical oscillation up to 20 m of amplitude in the shallow part were observed. These can be interpreted as gravitational internal wave with short-period and hence short wavelength anomaly. Kido et al. (2007) proposed that horizontal variation of the ocean structure can be considered employing five or more transponders at once if the structure is expressed by two quantities, i.e., horizontal gradient in x/y directions. However, this hypothesis requires that the variation must has a large spatial scale (> 2-5km) so that the horizontal variation can be regarded as linear within the extent of acoustic path to seafloor transponders. Therefore the wavelength of the above observed internal wave is getting important. The observed period of internal wave was 30-60 minute. However its wavelength cannot be directly measured. It must be estimate based on density profile of water column. In the comparison between sound speed change and positioning, the delay of their phases were 90 degree, which indicates that most steep horizontal slope of internal wave correspond to largest apparent positioning shift.

  17. Role of Gts1p in regulation of energy-metabolism oscillation in continuous cultures of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhaojun; Tsurugi, Kunio

    2007-03-01

    Energy-metabolism oscillation (EMO) in an aerobic chemostat culture of yeast is basically regulated by a feedback loop of redox reactions in energy metabolism and modulated by metabolism of storage carbohydrates. In this study, we investigated the role of Gts1p in the stabilization of EMO, using the GTS1-deleted transformant gts1Delta. We found that fluctuations in the redox state of the NAD co-factor and levels of redox-regulated metabolites in glycolysis, especially of ethanol, are markedly reduced in amplitude during EMO of gts1Delta, while respiration indicated by the oxygen uptake rate (OUR) and energy charge is not so affected throughout EMO in gts1Delta. Further, the transitions of the levels of OUR, NAD(+) : NADH ratio and intracellular pH between the two phases were apparently retarded compared with those in the wild-type, suggesting attenuation of EMO in gts1Delta. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of genes encoding enzymes for the synthesis of trehalose and glycogen are fairly reduced in gts1Delta, consistent with the decreased synthesis of storage carbohydrates. In addition, the level of inorganic phosphate, which is required for the reduction of NAD(+) and mainly supplied from trehalose synthesis, was decreased in the early respiro-fermentative phase in gts1Delta. Thus, we suggested that the deletion of GTS1 as a transcriptional co-activator for these genes inhibited the metabolism of storage carbohydrates, which causes attenuation of the feedback loop of dehydrogenase reactions in glycolysis with the restricted fluctuation of ethanol as a main synchronizing agent for EMO in a cell population.

  18. Multifaceted roles for low-frequency oscillations in bottom-up and top-down processing during navigation and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekstrom, Arne D; Watrous, Andrew J

    2014-01-15

    A prominent and replicated finding is the correlation between running speed and increases in low-frequency oscillatory activity in the hippocampal local field potential. A more recent finding concerns low-frequency oscillations that increase in coherence between the hippocampus and neocortical brain areas such as prefrontal cortex during memory-related behaviors (i.e., remembering the correct location to visit). In this review, we tie together movement-related and memory-related low-frequency oscillations in the rodent with similar findings in humans. We argue that although movement-related low-frequency oscillations, in particular, may have slightly different characteristics in humans than rodents, placing important constraints on our thinking about this issue, both phenomena have similar functional foundations. We review four prominent theoretical models that provide partially conflicting accounts of movement-related low-frequency oscillations. We attempt to tie together these theoretical proposals, and existing data in rodents and humans, with memory-related low-frequency oscillations. We propose that movement-related low-frequency oscillations and memory-related low-frequency oscillatory activity, both of which show significant coherence with oscillations in other brain regions, represent different facets of "spectral fingerprints," or different resonant frequencies within the same brain networks underlying different cognitive processes. Together, movement-related and memory-related low-frequency oscillatory coupling may be linked by their distinct contributions to bottom-up, sensorimotor driven processing and top-down, controlled processing characterizing aspects of memory encoding and retrieval. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Oscillator monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeill, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    Present high-speed data acquisition systems in nuclear diagnostics use high-frequency oscillators to provide timing references for signals recorded on fast, traveling-wave oscilloscopes. An oscillator's sinusoidal wave shape is superimposed on the recorded signal with each cycle representing a fixed time increment. During data analysis the sinusoid is stripped from the signal, leaving a clean signal shape with known timing. Since all signal/time relationships are totally dependant upon working oscillators, these critical devices must have remote verification of proper operation. This manual presents the newly-developed oscillator monitor which will provide the required verification

  20. Neural computational modeling reveals a major role of corticospinal gating of central oscillations in the generation of essential tremor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-en Qu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential tremor, also referred to as familial tremor, is an autosomal dominant genetic disease and the most common movement disorder. It typically involves a postural and motor tremor of the hands, head or other part of the body. Essential tremor is driven by a central oscillation signal in the brain. However, the corticospinal mechanisms involved in the generation of essential tremor are unclear. Therefore, in this study, we used a neural computational model that includes both monosynaptic and multisynaptic corticospinal pathways interacting with a propriospinal neuronal network. A virtual arm model is driven by the central oscillation signal to simulate tremor activity behavior. Cortical descending commands are classified as alpha or gamma through monosynaptic or multisynaptic corticospinal pathways, which converge respectively on alpha or gamma motoneurons in the spinal cord. Several scenarios are evaluated based on the central oscillation signal passing down to the spinal motoneurons via each descending pathway. The simulated behaviors are compared with clinical essential tremor characteristics to identify the corticospinal pathways responsible for transmitting the central oscillation signal. A propriospinal neuron with strong cortical inhibition performs a gating function in the generation of essential tremor. Our results indicate that the propriospinal neuronal network is essential for relaying the central oscillation signal and the production of essential tremor.

  1. Neural computational modeling reveals a major role of corticospinal gating of central oscillations in the generation of essential tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Hong-En; Niu, Chuanxin M; Li, Si; Hao, Man-Zhao; Hu, Zi-Xiang; Xie, Qing; Lan, Ning

    2017-12-01

    Essential tremor, also referred to as familial tremor, is an autosomal dominant genetic disease and the most common movement disorder. It typically involves a postural and motor tremor of the hands, head or other part of the body. Essential tremor is driven by a central oscillation signal in the brain. However, the corticospinal mechanisms involved in the generation of essential tremor are unclear. Therefore, in this study, we used a neural computational model that includes both monosynaptic and multisynaptic corticospinal pathways interacting with a propriospinal neuronal network. A virtual arm model is driven by the central oscillation signal to simulate tremor activity behavior. Cortical descending commands are classified as alpha or gamma through monosynaptic or multisynaptic corticospinal pathways, which converge respectively on alpha or gamma motoneurons in the spinal cord. Several scenarios are evaluated based on the central oscillation signal passing down to the spinal motoneurons via each descending pathway. The simulated behaviors are compared with clinical essential tremor characteristics to identify the corticospinal pathways responsible for transmitting the central oscillation signal. A propriospinal neuron with strong cortical inhibition performs a gating function in the generation of essential tremor. Our results indicate that the propriospinal neuronal network is essential for relaying the central oscillation signal and the production of essential tremor.

  2. Role of polarizer-tilting-angle in zero-field spin-transfer nano-oscillators with perpendicular anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Fuentes, C.; Gallardo, R. A., E-mail: rodolfo.gallardo@usm.cl; Landeros, P. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Avenida España 1680, 2390123 Valparaíso (Chile)

    2015-10-05

    An analytical model for studying the stability of a single domain ferromagnetic layer under the influence of a spin-polarized current is presented. The theory is applied to bias-field-free nano-oscillators with perpendicular anisotropy, which allows to obtain a polarizer-angle vs. current phase diagram that describes the stability of magnetic states. Explicit formulae for the critical current densities unveil the influence of the relative orientation between free and polarizer layers, allowing the emergence of precessional steady-states, and also the possibility to reduce the magnitude of the threshold current density to produce microwave oscillations. It is shown that oscillating steady-states arise in a broad angular region, and the dependence of their boundaries is fully specified by the model. The reliability of the analytical results has been corroborated by comparison to numerical calculations. Such structures are currently under intense research because of remarkable properties offering new prospects for microwave applications in communication technologies.

  3. Chromospheric oscillations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lites, B.W.; Rutten, R.J.; Thomas, J.H.

    1995-01-01

    We show results from SO/Sacramento Peak data to discuss three issues: (i)--the spatial occurrence of chromospheric 3--min oscillations; (ii)--the validity of Ca II H&K line-center Doppler Shift measurements; (iii)--the signi ?cance of oscillation power and phase at frequencies above 10 mHz.

  4. Inverted oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuce, C [Physics Department, Anadolu University, Eskisehir (Turkey); Kilic, A [Physics Department, Anadolu University, Eskisehir (Turkey); Coruh, A [Physics Department, Sakarya University, Sakarya (Turkey)

    2006-07-15

    The inverted harmonic oscillator problem is investigated quantum mechanically. The exact wavefunction for the confined inverted oscillator is obtained and it is shown that the associated energy eigenvalues are discrete, and the energy is given as a linear function of the quantum number n.

  5. Role of the atmospheric mean state on the initiation of the Madden-Julian oscillation in a tropical channel model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, Pallav; Zhang, Chidong [University of Miami, RSMAS/MPO, Miami, FL (United States); Moncrieff, Mitchell W.; Dudhia, Jim; Caron, Julie M.; Bruyere, Cindy [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Ruby Leung, L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Tropical channel models, defined as models that are global in the zonal direction but bounded in the meridional direction, are particularly useful for simulating the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) and understanding its physical and dynamical basis. Influences from the extratropics through the lateral boundaries have been found to be essential to the reproduction of the initiation of certain MJO events. This led to a hypothesis that multi-year simulations using a tropical channel model would reproduce reasonable MJO statistics under the influence of prescribed lateral boundary conditions derived from global reanalyses. Interestingly, the MJO statistics in such a multi-year simulation by a high-resolution tropical channel model are not better than those from global climate models. The error in the atmospheric mean state is found to be a possible reason for the poor MJO statistics in the simulation. Nevertheless, even with a large error in the mean state, the multi-year simulation captures two MJO events previously found to be initiated by extratropical influences. However, the model does not reproduce a third event, whose initiation is not directly influenced by the extratropics. This implies that in the absence of dynamical interactions between the MJO and the lateral boundary conditions, the error in the mean state could be sufficient to prevent the MJO initiation. To explore this third MJO event further, a series of sensitivity tests are conducted. These tests show that the simulation of this event is neither critically influenced by the cumulus parameterization employed, nor the initial conditions when the model is integrated 2 weeks prior to the MJO initiation. The model captures this event when the MJO signal is already present in the initial conditions. The use of high-resolution sea surface temperature does not improve the simulation of the third MJO event. A higher-resolution nested domain covering the Indo-Pacific warm pool region and including a cloud

  6. Role of the Indian Ocean on the southern oscillation, atmospheric circulation indices and monsoon rainfall over India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sadhuram, Y.; Wells, N.C.

    Oscillation and ENSO is also examined. Indian monsoon rainfall is strongly and positively correlated with the SST of November month (0.77; statistically significant at 99% level) of the preceding calendar year. Monsoon indices (M1, U200) are strongly...

  7. Brain Oscillations, Hypnosis, and Hypnotizability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mark P; Adachi, Tomonori; Hakimian, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes the state-of-science knowledge regarding the associations between hypnosis and brain oscillations. Brain oscillations represent the combined electrical activity of neuronal assemblies, usually measured as specific frequencies representing slower (delta, theta, alpha) and faster (beta, gamma) oscillations. Hypnosis has been most closely linked to power in the theta band and changes in gamma activity. These oscillations are thought to play a critical role in both the recording and recall of declarative memory and emotional limbic circuits. The authors propose that this role may be the mechanistic link between theta (and perhaps gamma) oscillations and hypnosis, specifically, that the increases in theta oscillations and changes in gamma activity observed with hypnosis may underlie some hypnotic responses. If these hypotheses are supported, they have important implications for both understanding the effects of hypnosis and for enhancing response to hypnotic treatments.

  8. Accelerator-based neutrino oscillation searches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitehouse, D.A.; Rameika, R.; Stanton, N.

    1993-01-01

    This paper attempts to summarize the neutrino oscillation section of the Workshop on Future Directions in Particle and Nuclear Physics at Multi-GeV Hadron Beam Facilities. There were very lively discussions about the merits of the different oscillation channels, experiments, and facilities, but we believe a substantial consensus emerged. First, the next decade is one of great potential for discovery in neutrino physics, but it is also one of great peril. The possibility that neutrino oscillations explain the solar neutrino and atmospheric neutrino experiments, and the indirect evidence that Hot Dark Matter (HDM) in the form of light neutrinos might make up 30% of the mass of the universe, point to areas where accelerator-based experiments could play a crucial role in piecing together the puzzle. At the same time, the field faces a very uncertain future. The LSND experiment at LAMPF is the only funded neutrino oscillation experiment in the United States and it is threatened by the abrupt shutdown of LAMPF proposed for fiscal 1994. The future of neutrino physics at the Brookhaven National Laboratory AGS depends the continuation of High Energy Physics (HEP) funding after the RHIC startup. Most proposed neutrino oscillation searches at Fermilab depend on the completion of the Main Injector project and on the construction of a new neutrino beamline, which is uncertain at this point. The proposed KAON facility at TRIUMF would provide a neutrino beam similar to that at the AGS but with a much increase intensity. The future of KAON is also uncertain. Despite the difficult obstacles present, there is a real possibility that we are on the verge of understanding the masses and mixings of the neutrinos. The physics importance of such a discovery can not be overstated. The current experimental status and future possibilities are discussed below

  9. Low frequency modulation of transionospheric radio wave amplitude at low-latitudes: possible role of field line oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Sinha

    Full Text Available Ionospheric scintillations of radio waves at low-latitudes are associated with electron density irregularities. These irregularities are field-aligned and can provide excitation energy all along the field line to non-local field-aligned oscillations, such as the local field line oscillations. Eigen-periods of toroidal field line oscillations at low-latitudes, computed by using the dipole magnetic field and ion distributions obtained from the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI for typical nighttime conditions, fall in the range of 20–25 s. When subjected to spectral analysis, signal strength of the radio waves recorded on the 250 MHz beacon at Pondicherry (4.5° N dip, Mumbai (13.4° N dip and Ujjain (18.6° N dip exhibit periodicities in the same range. For the single event for which simultaneous ground magnetic data were available, the geomagnetic field also oscillated at the same periodicity. The systematic presence of a significant peak in the 20–25 s range during periods of strong radio wave scintillations, and its absence otherwise suggests the possibility that field line oscillations are endogenously excited by the irregularities, and the oscillations associated with the excited field line generate the modulation characteristics of the radio waves received on the ground. The frequency of modulation is found to be much lower than the characteristic frequencies that define the main body of scintillations, and they probably correspond to scales that are much larger than the typical Fresnel scale. It is possible that the refractive mechanism associated with larger scale long-lived irregularities could be responsible for the observed phenomenon. Results of a preliminary numerical experiment that uses a sinusoidal phase irregularity in the ionosphere as a refracting media are presented. The results show that phase variations which are large enough to produce a focal plane close to the ground can reproduce features that are not

  10. Low frequency modulation of transionospheric radio wave amplitude at low-latitudes: possible role of field line oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Sinha

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Ionospheric scintillations of radio waves at low-latitudes are associated with electron density irregularities. These irregularities are field-aligned and can provide excitation energy all along the field line to non-local field-aligned oscillations, such as the local field line oscillations. Eigen-periods of toroidal field line oscillations at low-latitudes, computed by using the dipole magnetic field and ion distributions obtained from the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI for typical nighttime conditions, fall in the range of 20–25 s. When subjected to spectral analysis, signal strength of the radio waves recorded on the 250 MHz beacon at Pondicherry (4.5° N dip, Mumbai (13.4° N dip and Ujjain (18.6° N dip exhibit periodicities in the same range. For the single event for which simultaneous ground magnetic data were available, the geomagnetic field also oscillated at the same periodicity. The systematic presence of a significant peak in the 20–25 s range during periods of strong radio wave scintillations, and its absence otherwise suggests the possibility that field line oscillations are endogenously excited by the irregularities, and the oscillations associated with the excited field line generate the modulation characteristics of the radio waves received on the ground. The frequency of modulation is found to be much lower than the characteristic frequencies that define the main body of scintillations, and they probably correspond to scales that are much larger than the typical Fresnel scale. It is possible that the refractive mechanism associated with larger scale long-lived irregularities could be responsible for the observed phenomenon. Results of a preliminary numerical experiment that uses a sinusoidal phase irregularity in the ionosphere as a refracting media are presented. The results show that phase variations which are large enough to produce a focal plane close to the ground can reproduce features that are not

  11. Characterizing brain oscillations in cognition and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, H.

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that neuronal oscillations play a fundamental role for shaping the functional architecture of the working brain. This thesis investigates brain oscillations in rat, human healthy population and major depressive disorder (MDD) patients. A novel measurement termed

  12. Chemical Oscillations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IMTECH),. Chandigarh. Praveen Kumar is pursuing his PhD in chemical dynamics at. Panjab University,. Chandigarh. Keywords. Chemical oscillations, autoca-. talYSis, Lotka-Volterra model, bistability, hysteresis, Briggs-. Rauscher reaction.

  13. Chemical Oscillations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the law of mass-action that every simple reaction approaches ... from thermodynamic equilibrium. Such oscillating systems cor- respond to thermodynamically open systems. .... experimentally observable, and the third is always unstable.

  14. Evidence for the role of the Atlantic multidecadal oscillation and the ocean heat uptake in hiatus prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasini, Antonello; Triacca, Umberto; Attanasio, Alessandro

    2017-08-01

    The recent hiatus in global temperature at the surface has been analysed by several studies, mainly using global climate models. The common accepted picture is that since the late 1990s, the increase in anthropogenic radiative forcings has been counterbalanced by other factors, e.g., a decrease in natural forcings, augmented ocean heat storage and negative phases of ocean-atmosphere-coupled oscillation patterns. Here, simple vector autoregressive models are used for forecasting the temperature hiatus in the period 2001-2014. This gives new insight into the problem of understanding the ocean contribution (in terms of heat uptake and atmosphere-ocean-coupled oscillations) to the appearance of this recent hiatus. In particular, considering data about the ocean heat content until a depth of 700 m and the Atlantic multidecadal oscillation is necessary for correctly forecasting the hiatus, so catching both trend and interannual variability. Our models also show that the ocean heat uptake is substantially driven by the natural component of the total radiative forcing at a decadal time scale, confining the importance of the anthropogenic influences to a longer range warming of the ocean.

  15. Nonlinear oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Nayfeh, Ali Hasan

    1995-01-01

    Nonlinear Oscillations is a self-contained and thorough treatment of the vigorous research that has occurred in nonlinear mechanics since 1970. The book begins with fundamental concepts and techniques of analysis and progresses through recent developments and provides an overview that abstracts and introduces main nonlinear phenomena. It treats systems having a single degree of freedom, introducing basic concepts and analytical methods, and extends concepts and methods to systems having degrees of freedom. Most of this material cannot be found in any other text. Nonlinear Oscillations uses sim

  16. Bullying, Romantic Rejection, and Conflicts with Teachers: A Finnish Perspective. Commentary on: "Bullying, Romantic Rejection, and Conflicts with Teachers: The Crucial Role of Social Dynamics in the Development of School Shootings--A Systematic Review"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksanen, Atte; Kaltiala-Heino, Riittakerttu; Kiilakoski, Tomi; Lindberg, Nina

    2014-01-01

    The systematic review by Sommer, Leuschner, and Scheithauer ("International Journal of Developmental Science" v8, n1-2, p3-24, 2014) includes 126 school shooting cases from 13 countries. This comprehensive review provides a valuable synthesis of a topic largely discussed in school shooting research: The role of bullying and peer…

  17. Relative role of pre-monsoon conditions and intraseasonal oscillations in determining early-vs-late indian monsoon intensity in a GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Rohit; Chakraborty, Arindam; Nanjundiah, Ravi S.

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to identify relative roles of different land-atmospheric conditions, apart from sea surface temperature (SST), in determining early vs. late summer monsoon intensity over India in a high resolution general circulation model (GCM). We find that in its early phase (June-July; JJ), pre-monsoon land-atmospheric processes play major role to modulate the precipitation over Indian region. These effects of pre-monsoon conditions decrease substantially during its later phase (August-September; AS) for which the interannual variation is mainly governed by the low frequency northward propagating intraseasonal oscillations. This intraseasonal variability which is related to mean vertical wind shear has a significant role during the early phase of monsoon as well. Further, using multiple linear regression, we show that interannual variation of early and late monsoon rainfall over India is best explained when all these land-atmospheric parameters are taken together. Our study delineates the relative role of different processes affecting early versus later summer monsoon rainfall over India that can be used for determining its subseasonal predictability.

  18. Justification of a "Crucial" Experiment: Parity Nonconservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Allan; Smokler, Howard

    1981-01-01

    Presents history, nature of evidence evaluated, and philosophical questions to justify the view that experiments on parity nonconservation were "crucial" experiments in the sense that they decided unambiguously and within a short period of time for the appropriate scientific community, between two or more competing theories or classes of theories.…

  19. Between giant oscillations and uniform distribution of droplets: The role of varying lumen of channels in microfluidic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulski, Olgierd; Jakiela, Slawomir; Garstecki, Piotr

    2015-12-01

    The simplest microfluidic network (a loop) comprises two parallel channels with a common inlet and a common outlet. Recent studies that assumed a constant cross section of the channels along their length have shown that the sequence of droplets entering the left (L) or right (R) arm of the loop can present either a uniform distribution of choices (e.g., RLRLRL...) or long sequences of repeated choices (RRR...LLL), with all the intermediate permutations being dynamically equivalent and virtually equally probable to be observed. We use experiments and computer simulations to show that even small variation of the cross section along channels completely shifts the dynamics either into the strong preference for highly grouped patterns (RRR...LLL) that generate system-size oscillations in flow or just the opposite-to patterns that distribute the droplets homogeneously between the arms of the loop. We also show the importance of noise in the process of self-organization of the spatiotemporal patterns of droplets. Our results provide guidelines for rational design of systems that reproducibly produce either grouped or homogeneous sequences of droplets flowing in microfluidic networks.

  20. The Crucial Role of the Pls1 Tetraspanin during Ascospore Germination in Podospora anserina Provides an Example of the Convergent Evolution of Morphogenetic Processes in Fungal Plant Pathogens and Saprobes▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambou, Karine; Malagnac, Fabienne; Barbisan, Crystel; Tharreau, Didier; Lebrun, Marc-Henri; Silar, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Pls1 tetraspanins were shown for some pathogenic fungi to be essential for appressorium-mediated penetration into their host plants. We show here that Podospora anserina, a saprobic fungus lacking appressorium, contains PaPls1, a gene orthologous to known PLS1 genes. Inactivation of PaPls1 demonstrates that this gene is specifically required for the germination of ascospores in P. anserina. These ascospores are heavily melanized cells that germinate under inducing conditions through a specific pore. On the contrary, MgPLS1, which fully complements a ΔPaPls1 ascospore germination defect, has no role in the germination of Magnaporthe grisea nonmelanized ascospores but is required for the formation of the penetration peg at the pore of its melanized appressorium. P. anserina mutants with mutation of PaNox2, which encodes the NADPH oxidase of the NOX2 family, display the same ascospore-specific germination defect as the ΔPaPls1 mutant. Both mutant phenotypes are suppressed by the inhibition of melanin biosynthesis, suggesting that they are involved in the same cellular process required for the germination of P. anserina melanized ascospores. The analysis of the distribution of PLS1 and NOX2 genes in fungal genomes shows that they are either both present or both absent. These results indicate that the germination of P. anserina ascospores and the formation of the M. grisea appressorium penetration peg use the same molecular machinery that includes Pls1 and Nox2. This machinery is specifically required for the emergence of polarized hyphae from reinforced structures such as appressoria and ascospores. Its recurrent recruitment during fungal evolution may account for some of the morphogenetic convergence observed in fungi. PMID:18757568

  1. The crucial role of the Pls1 tetraspanin during ascospore germination in Podospora anserina provides an example of the convergent evolution of morphogenetic processes in fungal plant pathogens and saprobes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambou, Karine; Malagnac, Fabienne; Barbisan, Crystel; Tharreau, Didier; Lebrun, Marc-Henri; Silar, Philippe

    2008-10-01

    Pls1 tetraspanins were shown for some pathogenic fungi to be essential for appressorium-mediated penetration into their host plants. We show here that Podospora anserina, a saprobic fungus lacking appressorium, contains PaPls1, a gene orthologous to known PLS1 genes. Inactivation of PaPls1 demonstrates that this gene is specifically required for the germination of ascospores in P. anserina. These ascospores are heavily melanized cells that germinate under inducing conditions through a specific pore. On the contrary, MgPLS1, which fully complements a DeltaPaPls1 ascospore germination defect, has no role in the germination of Magnaporthe grisea nonmelanized ascospores but is required for the formation of the penetration peg at the pore of its melanized appressorium. P. anserina mutants with mutation of PaNox2, which encodes the NADPH oxidase of the NOX2 family, display the same ascospore-specific germination defect as the DeltaPaPls1 mutant. Both mutant phenotypes are suppressed by the inhibition of melanin biosynthesis, suggesting that they are involved in the same cellular process required for the germination of P. anserina melanized ascospores. The analysis of the distribution of PLS1 and NOX2 genes in fungal genomes shows that they are either both present or both absent. These results indicate that the germination of P. anserina ascospores and the formation of the M. grisea appressorium penetration peg use the same molecular machinery that includes Pls1 and Nox2. This machinery is specifically required for the emergence of polarized hyphae from reinforced structures such as appressoria and ascospores. Its recurrent recruitment during fungal evolution may account for some of the morphogenetic convergence observed in fungi.

  2. Comparative analysis of seven viral nuclear export signals (NESs reveals the crucial role of nuclear export mediated by the third NES consensus sequence of nucleoprotein (NP in influenza A virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nopporn Chutiwitoonchai

    Full Text Available The assembly of influenza virus progeny virions requires machinery that exports viral genomic ribonucleoproteins from the cell nucleus. Currently, seven nuclear export signal (NES consensus sequences have been identified in different viral proteins, including NS1, NS2, M1, and NP. The present study examined the roles of viral NES consensus sequences and their significance in terms of viral replication and nuclear export. Mutation of the NP-NES3 consensus sequence resulted in a failure to rescue viruses using a reverse genetics approach, whereas mutation of the NS2-NES1 and NS2-NES2 sequences led to a strong reduction in viral replication kinetics compared with the wild-type sequence. While the viral replication kinetics for other NES mutant viruses were also lower than those of the wild-type, the difference was not so marked. Immunofluorescence analysis after transient expression of NP-NES3, NS2-NES1, or NS2-NES2 proteins in host cells showed that they accumulated in the cell nucleus. These results suggest that the NP-NES3 consensus sequence is mostly required for viral replication. Therefore, each of the hydrophobic (Φ residues within this NES consensus sequence (Φ1, Φ2, Φ3, or Φ4 was mutated, and its viral replication and nuclear export function were analyzed. No viruses harboring NP-NES3 Φ2 or Φ3 mutants could be rescued. Consistent with this, the NP-NES3 Φ2 and Φ3 mutants showed reduced binding affinity with CRM1 in a pull-down assay, and both accumulated in the cell nucleus. Indeed, a nuclear export assay revealed that these mutant proteins showed lower nuclear export activity than the wild-type protein. Moreover, the Φ2 and Φ3 residues (along with other Φ residues within the NP-NES3 consensus were highly conserved among different influenza A viruses, including human, avian, and swine. Taken together, these results suggest that the Φ2 and Φ3 residues within the NP-NES3 protein are important for its nuclear export function

  3. The role of zonal flows and predator-prey oscillations in triggering the formation of edge and core transport barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, L.; Zeng, L.; Rhodes, T. L.; Hillesheim, J. C.; Peebles, W. A.; Groebner, R. J.; Burrell, K. H.; McKee, G. R.; Yan, Z.; Tynan, G. R.; Diamond, P. H.; Boedo, J. A.; Doyle, E. J.; Grierson, B. A.; Chrystal, C.; Austin, M. E.; Solomon, W. M.; Wang, G.

    2014-07-01

    We present direct evidence of low frequency, radially sheared, turbulence-driven flows (zonal flows (ZFs)) triggering edge transport barrier formation preceding the L- to H-mode transition via periodic turbulence suppression in limit-cycle oscillations (LCOs), consistent with predator-prey dynamics. The final transition to edge-localized mode-free H-mode occurs after the equilibrium E × B flow shear increases due to ion pressure profile evolution. ZFs are also observed to initiate formation of an electron internal transport barrier (ITB) at the q = 2 rational surface via local suppression of electron-scale turbulence. Multi-channel Doppler backscattering (DBS) has revealed the radial structure of the ZF-induced shear layer and the E × B shearing rate, ωE×B, in both barrier types. During edge barrier formation, the shearing rate lags the turbulence envelope during the LCO by 90°, transitioning to anti-correlation (180°) when the equilibrium shear dominates the turbulence-driven flow shear due to the increasing edge pressure gradient. The time-dependent flow shear and the turbulence envelope are anti-correlated (180° out of phase) in the electron ITB. LCOs with time-reversed evolution dynamics (transitioning from an equilibrium-flow dominated to a ZF-dominated state) have also been observed during the H-L back-transition and are potentially of interest for controlled ramp-down of the plasma stored energy and pressure (normalized to the poloidal magnetic field) \\beta_{\\theta} =2\\mu_{0} n{( {T_{e} +T_{i}})}/{B_{\\theta}^{2}} in ITER.

  4. Crucial test of the Dirac cosmologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steigman, G.

    1978-01-01

    In a cosmology consistent with the Cosmological Principle (large scale, statistical isotropy and homogeneity of the universe), a Planck spectrum is not preserved as the universe evolves unless the number of photons in a comoving volume is conserved. It is shown that a large class of cosmological models based on Dirac's Large Numbers Hypothesis (LNH) violate this constraint. The observed isotropy and spectral distribution of the microwave background radiation thus provide a crucial test of such cosmologies. After reviewing the LNH, the general evolution of radiation spectra in cosmologies consistent with the cosmological principle is outlined. It is shown that the predicted deviations from a Planck spectrum for Dirac cosmologies (as well as for ''tired-light'' cosmologies) are enormous. The Planckian (or near-Planckian) spectral form for the microwave radiation provides a crucial test, failed by such cosmologies

  5. Oscillator circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Graf, Rudolf F

    1996-01-01

    This series of circuits provides designers with a quick source for oscillator circuits. Why waste time paging through huge encyclopedias when you can choose the topic you need and select any of the specialized circuits sorted by application?This book in the series has 250-300 practical, ready-to-use circuit designs, with schematics and brief explanations of circuit operation. The original source for each circuit is listed in an appendix, making it easy to obtain additional information.Ready-to-use circuits.Grouped by application for easy look-up.Circuit source listing

  6. Low-frequency oscillations in Hall thrusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Li-Qiu; Han Liang; Yu Da-Ren; Guo Ning

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we summarize the research development of low-frequency oscillations in the last few decades. The findings of physical mechanism, characteristics and stabilizing methods of low-frequency oscillations are discussed. It shows that it is unreasonable and incomplete to model an ionization region separately to analyze the physical mechanism of low-frequency oscillations. Electro-dynamics as well as the formation conditions of ionization distribution play an important role in characteristics and stabilizing of low-frequency oscillations. Understanding the physical mechanism and characteristics of low- frequency oscillations thoroughly and developing a feasible method stabilizing this instability are still important research subjects. (review)

  7. Titanium nitride coatings synthesized by IPD method with eliminated current oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chodun Rafał

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the effects of elimination of current oscillations within the coaxial plasma accelerator during IPD deposition process on the morphology, phase structure and properties of synthesized TiN coatings. Current observations of waveforms have been made by use of an oscilloscope. As a test material for experiments, titanium nitride TiN coatings synthesized on silicon and high-speed steel substrates were used. The coatings morphology, phase composition and wear resistance properties were determined. The character of current waveforms in the plasma accelerator electric circuit plays a crucial role during the coatings synthesis process. Elimination of the current oscillations leads to obtaining an ultrafine grained structure of titanium nitride coatings and to disappearance of the tendency to structure columnarization. The coatings obtained during processes of a non-oscillating character are distinguished by better wear-resistance properties.

  8. Loneliness over time: The crucial role of social anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Michelle H; Rodebaugh, Thomas L; Zyphur, Michael J; Gleeson, John F M

    2016-07-01

    Loneliness is known to be associated with multiple adverse physical outcomes, including higher mortality and morbidity risk. However, the impact of loneliness on mental health is less well researched, with most studies assessing how loneliness relates to depressive symptoms alone. We hypothesized that 2 mental health symptoms that relate to the fear of others-social anxiety and paranoia-would contribute to loneliness. We examined how loneliness relates to social anxiety, paranoia, and depression symptoms in a general community sample aged 18-87 years old (N = 1,010). We administered online measures over 3 time points across a 6-month period. In a cross-lagged structural equation model controlling for trait levels and prior states, our results indicated that earlier loneliness positively predicted future states of social anxiety, paranoia, and depression. However, in the same model, earlier social anxiety was the only predictor of future loneliness. These results suggest that loneliness may be a potential antecedent to emerging mental health symptoms and that identifying and treating co-occurring social anxiety symptoms may reduce the severity of loneliness. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. The Crucial Role of Additive Manufacturing at NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, John

    2016-01-01

    At NASA, the first steps of the Journey to Mars are well underway with the development of NASA's next generation launch system and investments in research and technologies that should increase the affordability, capability, and safety of exploration activities. Additive Manufacturing presents a disruptive opportunity for NASA to design and manufacture hardware with new materials at dramatically reduced cost and schedule. Opportunities to incorporate additive manufacturing align very well with NASA missions and with most NASA programs related to space, science, and aeronautics. The Agency also relies on many partnerships with other government agencies, industry and academia.

  10. Crucial role of antibodies to pertactin in Bordetella pertussis immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellwig, SMM; Rodriguez, ME; Berbers, GAM; de Winkel, JGJV; Mooi, FR

    2003-01-01

    Pertussis, a serious infectious disease of the respiratory tract caused by Bordetella pertussis, is reemerging in vaccinated populations. Efforts to curtail this disease are hampered by limited insight into the basis of protective immunity. Opsonophagocytosis was recently found to play a central

  11. One dimension harmonic oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen-Tannoudji, Claude; Diu, Bernard; Laloe, Franck.

    1977-01-01

    The importance of harmonic oscillator in classical and quantum physics, eigenvalues and eigenstates of hamiltonian operator are discussed. In complement are presented: study of some physical examples of harmonic oscillators; study of stationnary states in the /x> representation; Hermite polynomials; resolution of eigenvalue equation of harmonic oscillator by polynomial method; isotope harmonic oscillator with three dimensions; charged harmonic oscillator in uniform electric field; quasi classical coherent states of harmonic oscillator; eigenmodes of vibration of two coupled harmonic oscillators; vibration modus of a continuous physical system (application to radiation: photons); vibration modus of indefinite linear chain of coupled harmonic oscillators (phonons); one-dimensional harmonic oscillator in thermodynamic equilibrium at temperature T [fr

  12. Power oscillation damping controller

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    A power oscillation damping controller is provided for a power generation device such as a wind turbine device. The power oscillation damping controller receives an oscillation indicating signal indicative of a power oscillation in an electricity network and provides an oscillation damping control...

  13. Oscillations of void lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhiezer, A.I.; Davydov, L.N.; Spol'nik, Z.A.

    1976-01-01

    Oscillations of a nonideal crystal are studied, in which macroscopic defects (pores) form a hyperlattice. It is shown that alongside with acoustic and optical phonons (relative to the hyperlattice), in such a crystal oscillations of the third type are possible which are a hydridization of sound oscillations of atoms and surface oscillations of a pore. Oscillation spectra of all three types were obtained

  14. Oscillators - a simple introduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Oscillators are kernel components of electrical and electronic circuits. Discussion of history, mechanisms and design based on Barkhausens observation. Discussion of a Wien Bridge oscillator based on the question: Why does this circuit oscillate ?......Oscillators are kernel components of electrical and electronic circuits. Discussion of history, mechanisms and design based on Barkhausens observation. Discussion of a Wien Bridge oscillator based on the question: Why does this circuit oscillate ?...

  15. Oscillators and Eigenvalues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Erik

    1997-01-01

    In order to obtain insight in the nature of nonlinear oscillators the eigenvalues of the linearized Jacobian of the differential equations describing the oscillator are found and displayed as functions of time. A number of oscillators are studied including Dewey's oscillator (piecewise linear wit...... with negative resistance), Kennedy's Colpitts-oscillator (with and without chaos) and a new 4'th order oscillator with hyper-chaos....

  16. The Role of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) on Recent Greenland Surface Mass Loss and Mass Partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedesco, M.; Alexander, P.; Porter, D. F.; Fettweis, X.; Luthcke, S. B.; Mote, T. L.; Rennermalm, A.; Hanna, E.

    2017-12-01

    Despite recent changes in Greenland surface mass losses and atmospheric circulation over the Arctic, little attention has been given to the potential role of large-scale atmospheric processes on the spatial and temporal variability of mass loss and partitioning of the GrIS mass loss. Using a combination of satellite gravimetry measurements, outputs of the MAR regional climate model and reanalysis data, we show that changes in atmospheric patterns since 2013 over the North Atlantic region of the Arctic (NAA) modulate total mass loss trends over Greenland together with the spatial and temporal distribution of mass loss partitioning. For example, during the 2002 - 2012 period, melting persistently increased, especially along the west coast, as a consequence of increased insulation and negative NAO conditions characterizing that period. Starting in 2013, runoff along the west coast decreased while snowfall increased substantially, when NAO turned to a more neutral/positive state. Modeled surface mass balance terms since 1950 indicate that part of the GRACE-period, specifically the period between 2002 and 2012, was exceptional in terms of snowfall over the east and northeast regions. During that period snowfall trend decreased to almost 0 Gt/yr from a long-term increasing trend, which presumed again in 2013. To identify the potential impact of atmospheric patterns on mass balance and its partitioning, we studied the spatial and temporal correlations between NAO and snowfall/runoff. Our results indicate that the correlation between summer snowfall and NAO is not stable during the 1950 - 2015 period. We further looked at changes in patterns of circulation using self organizing maps (SOMs) to identify the atmospheric patterns characterizing snowfall during different periods. We discuss potential implications for past changes and future GCM and RCM simulations.

  17. Crucial contextual attributes of nursing leadership towards a care ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Lena-Karin; Stenberg, Maja

    2017-06-01

    It is of importance to understand and communicate caring ethics as a ground for qualitative caring environments. Research is needed on nursing attributes that are visible in nursing leadership since it may give bases for reflections related to the patterns of specific contexts. The aim of this study was to illuminate the meaning of crucial attributes in nursing leadership toward an ethical care of patients in psychiatric in-patient settings. The design of the study was descriptive and qualitative with a phenomenological hermeneutical approach. Participants and research context: The study comprised focus group interviews with nurses working in indoor psychiatric care who participated after giving informed consent. Ethical considerations: Since the topic and informants are not labeled as sensitive and subject to ethical approval, it is not covered by the ethics committee's aim and purpose according to Swedish law. However, careful procedures have been followed according to ethics expressed in the Declaration of Helsinki. When identifying the thematic structures, analysis resulted in three major themes: To supply, including the following aspects: to supply evidence, to supply common space, and to supply good structures; To support, including the following aspects: to be a role model, to show appreciation and care, and to harbor; To shield, including the following aspects: to advocate, to emit non-tolerance of unethical behavior, and to reprove. Leadership is challenging for nurses and plays an important role in ethical qualitative care. These findings should not be understood as a description about nurse manager's role, which probably has different attributes and more focus on an organizational level. Making the understanding about crucial attributes explicit, the nurse may receive confirmation and recognition of crucial attributes for ethical care in order to move toward an ethical care.

  18. Identifying Crucial Issues in Climate Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Motoyoshi; Greve, Ralf; Hara, Toshika; Watanabe, Yutaka W.; Ohmura, Atsumu; Ito, Akihiko; Kawamiya, Michio

    2009-01-01

    Drastic Change in the Earth System During Global Warming; Sapporo, Japan, 24 June 2008; The Nobel Peace Prize awarded to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and former U.S. vice president Al Gore indicates that global warming is recognized as a real phenomenon critical to human beings. However, humanity's knowledge concerning global warming is based on an uncertainty larger than 50% in the warming rate during the past century. Therefore, scientific clarification is needed to understand important mechanisms that potentially produce positive feedbacks in the Earth system-such mechanisms must be better understood before scientists can develop more reliable predictions. To plan for the future, a symposium was organized at Japan's Hokkaido University in association with the G8 Summit, where the most recent updates on the five urgent issues in climate science were discussed. These issues, considered to be crucial as severe impacts on human society continue to rise, included (1) causes and magnitude of sea level rise; (2) decay of glaciers and the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets; (3) disappearance of the summer Arctic sea ice; (4) carbon uptake or emission by the terrestrial ecosystem; and (5) marine ecosystem change resulting in carbon emissions.

  19. Modeling microtubule oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jobs, E.; Wolf, D.E.; Flyvbjerg, H.

    1997-01-01

    Synchronization of molecular reactions in a macroscopic volume may cause the volume's physical properties to change dynamically and thus reveal much about the reactions. As an example, experimental time series for so-called microtubule oscillations are analyzed in terms of a minimal model...... for this complex polymerization-depolymerization cycle. The model reproduces well the qualitatively different time series that result from different experimental conditions, and illuminates the role and importance of individual processes in the cycle. Simple experiments are suggested that can further test...... and define the model and the polymer's reaction cycle....

  20. Dipolar oscillations in a quantum degenerate Fermi-Bose atomic mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferlaino, F; Brecha, R J; Hannaford, P; Riboli, F; Roati, G; Modugno, G; Inguscio, M

    2003-01-01

    We study the dynamics of coupled dipolar oscillations in a Fermi-Bose mixture of 40 K and 87 Rb atoms. This low-energy collective mode is strongly affected by the interspecies interactions. Measurements are performed in the classical and quantum degenerate regimes and reveal the crucial role of the statistical properties of the mixture. At the onset of quantum degeneracy, we investigate the role of Pauli blocking and superfluidity for K and Rb atoms, respectively, resulting in a change in the collisional interactions

  1. Integrated Modelling in CRUCIAL Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahura, Alexander; Nuterman, Roman; Mukhamedzhanova, Elena; Nerobelov, Georgiy; Sedeeva, Margarita; Suhodskiy, Alexander; Mostamandy, Suleiman; Smyshlyaev, Sergey

    2017-04-01

    The NordForsk CRUCIAL project (2016-2017) "Critical steps in understanding land surface - atmosphere interactions: from improved knowledge to socioeconomic solutions" as a part of the Pan-Eurasian EXperiment (PEEX; https://www.atm.helsinki.fi/peex) programme activities, is looking for a deeper collaboration between Nordic-Russian science communities. In particular, following collaboration between Danish and Russian partners, several topics were selected for joint research and are focused on evaluation of: (1) urbanization processes impact on changes in urban weather and climate on urban-subregional-regional scales and at contribution to assessment studies for population and environment; (2) effects of various feedback mechanisms on aerosol and cloud formation and radiative forcing on urban-regional scales for better predicting extreme weather events and at contribution to early warning systems, (3) environmental contamination from continues emissions and industrial accidents for better assessment and decision making for sustainable social and economic development, and (4) climatology of atmospheric boundary layer in northern latitudes to improve understanding of processes, revising parameterizations, and better weather forecasting. These research topics are realized employing the online integrated Enviro-HIRLAM (Environment - High Resolution Limited Area Model) model within students' research projects: (1) "Online integrated high-resolution modelling of Saint-Petersburg metropolitan area influence on weather and air pollution forecasting"; (2) "Modeling of aerosol impact on regional-urban scales: case study of Saint-Petersburg metropolitan area"; (3) "Regional modeling and GIS evaluation of environmental pollution from Kola Peninsula sources"; and (4) "Climatology of the High-Latitude Planetary Boundary Layer". The students' projects achieved results and planned young scientists research training on online integrated modelling (Jun 2017) will be presented and

  2. Role of light and the circadian clock in the rhythmic oscillation of intraocular pressure: Studies in VPAC2 receptor and PACAP deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrenkrug, Jan; Georg, Birgitte; Hannibal, Jens; Jørgensen, Henrik Løvendahl

    2018-04-01

    The intraocular pressure of mice displays a daily rhythmicity being highest during the dark period. The present study was performed to elucidate the role of the circadian clock and light in the diurnal and the circadian variations in intraocular pressure in mice, by using animals with disrupted clock function (VPAC2 receptor knockout mice) or impaired light information to the clock (PACAP knockout mice). In wildtype mice, intraocular pressure measured under light/dark conditions showed a statistically significant 24 h sinusoidal rhythm with nadir during the light phase and peak during the dark phase. After transfer of the wildtype mice into constant darkness, the intraocular pressure increased, but the rhythmic changes in intraocular pressure continued with a pattern identical to that obtained during the light/dark cycle. The intraocular pressure in VPAC2 receptor deficient mice during light/dark conditions also showed a sinusoidal pattern with significant changes as a function of a 24 h cycle. However, transfer of the VPAC2 receptor knockout mice into constant darkness completely abolished the rhythmic changes in intraocular pressure. The intraocular pressure in PACAP deficient mice oscillated significantly during both 24 h light and darkness and during constant darkness. During LD conditions, the amplitude of PACAP deficient was significantly lower compared to wildtype mice, resulting in higher daytime and lower nighttime values. In conclusion, by studying the VPAC2 receptor knockout mouse which lacks circadian control and the PACAP knockout mouse which displays impaired light signaling, we provided evidence that the daily intraocular pressure rhythms are primarily generated by the circadian master clock and to a lesser extent by environmental light and darkness. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Lepton asymmetry and neutrino oscillations interplay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirilova, Daniela, E-mail: dani@astro.bas.bg [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Astronomy and NAO (Bulgaria)

    2013-03-15

    We discuss the interplay between lepton asymmetry L and {nu} oscillations in the early Universe. Neutrino oscillations may suppress or enhance previously existing L. On the other hand L is capable to suppress or enhance neutrino oscillations. The mechanism of L enhancement in MSW resonant {nu} oscillations in the early Universe is numerically analyzed. L cosmological effects through {nu} oscillations are discussed. We discuss how L may change the cosmological BBN constraints on neutrino and show that BBN model with {nu}{sub e}{r_reversible}{nu}{sub s} oscillations is extremely sensitive to L - it allows to obtain the most stringent constraints on L value. We discuss also the cosmological role of active-sterile {nu} mixing and L in connection with the indications about additional relativistic density in the early Universe, pointed out by BBN, CMB and LSS data and the analysis of global {nu} data.

  4. Chemotaxis and Actin Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Hsu, Hsin-Fang; Negrete, Jose; Beta, Carsten; Pumir, Alain; Gholami, Azam; Tarantola, Marco; Westendorf, Christian; Zykov, Vladimir

    Recently, self-oscillations of the cytoskeletal actin have been observed in Dictyostelium, a model system for studying chemotaxis. Here we report experimental results on the self-oscillation mechanism and the role of regulatory proteins and myosin II. We stimulate cells rapidly and periodically by using photo un-caging of the chemoattractant in a micro-fluidic device and measured the cellular responses. We found that the response amplitude grows with stimulation strength only in a very narrow region of stimulation, after which the response amplitude reaches a plateau. Moreover, the frequency-response is not constant but rather varies with the strength of external stimuli. To understand the underlying mechanism, we analyzed the polymerization and de-polymerization time in the single cell level. Despite of the large cell-to-cell variability, we found that the polymerization time is independent of external stimuli and the de-polymerization time is prolonged as the stimulation strength increases. Our conclusions will be summarized and the role of noise in the signaling network will be discussed. German Science Foundation CRC 937.

  5. Talking about domestic abuse: Crucial conversations for health visitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury-Jones, Caroline

    2015-12-01

    Domestic abuse is a serious problem across the world and it is considered a public health issue. Nurses play a crucial role in recognising and responding to domestic abuse but they sometimes lack confidence in dealing with the issue. In this article, two recently completed studies are used to extract lessons for health visiting practice. The first study investigated primary healthcare professionals' beliefs about domestic abuse. Many healthcare professionals were confident in dealing with domestic abuse. However, there was disinclination among some to discuss the issue. People who experience abuse rarely discuss it unless asked. So the study highlighted a potential dynamic of silence between health professionals and abused people in their care. The second study investigated student nurses and student midwives experiences of learning about domestic abuse. The student nurses had learned less than the student midwives. They had not been taught about domestic abuse in university and many had not had the opportunity to learn about it in clinical placement. They reported reluctance among some mentors to discuss the issue with them, with a resulting silencing of the issue. Both of these studies have important lessons for health visiting practice regarding opening up crucial conversations about domestic abuse.

  6. Oscillations in glycolysis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kloster, Antonina; Olsen, Lars Folke

    2012-01-01

    also decreases by stimulating the ATPase activity, e.g. by FCCP or Amphotericin B. Thus, ATPase activity strongly affects the glycolytic oscillations. We discuss these data in relation to a simple autocatalytic model of glycolysis which can reproduce the experimental data and explain the role...... of membrane-bound ATPases . In addition we also studied a recent detailed model of glycolysis and found that, although thismodel faithfully reproduces the oscillations of glycolytic intermediates observed experimentally, it is not able to explain the role of ATPase activity on the oscillations....

  7. Oscillating heat pipes

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Hongbin

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the fundamental fluid flow and heat transfer principles occurring in oscillating heat pipes and also provides updated developments and recent innovations in research and applications of heat pipes. Starting with fundamental presentation of heat pipes, the focus is on oscillating motions and its heat transfer enhancement in a two-phase heat transfer system. The book covers thermodynamic analysis, interfacial phenomenon, thin film evaporation,  theoretical models of oscillating motion and heat transfer of single phase and two-phase flows, primary  factors affecting oscillating motions and heat transfer,  neutron imaging study of oscillating motions in an oscillating heat pipes, and nanofluid’s effect on the heat transfer performance in oscillating heat pipes.  The importance of thermally-excited oscillating motion combined with phase change heat transfer to a wide variety of applications is emphasized. This book is an essential resource and learning tool for senior undergraduate, gradua...

  8. Circuit oscillations in odor perception and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Leslie M

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory system neural oscillations as seen in the local field potential have been studied for many decades. Recent research has shown that there is a functional role for the most studied gamma oscillations (40-100Hz in rats and mice, and 20Hz in insects), without which fine odor discrimination is poor. When these oscillations are increased artificially, fine discrimination is increased, and when rats learn difficult and highly overlapping odor discriminations, gamma is increased in power. Because of the depth of study on this oscillation, it is possible to point to specific changes in neural firing patterns as represented by the increase in gamma oscillation amplitude. However, we know far less about the mechanisms governing beta oscillations (15-30Hz in rats and mice), which are best associated with associative learning of responses to odor stimuli. These oscillations engage every part of the olfactory system that has so far been tested, plus the hippocampus, and the beta oscillation frequency band is the one that is most reliably coherent with other regions during odor processing. Respiratory oscillations overlapping with the theta frequency band (2-12Hz) are associated with odor sniffing and normal breathing in rats. They also show coupling in some circumstances between olfactory areas and rare coupling between the hippocampus and olfactory bulb. The latter occur in specific learning conditions in which coherence strength is negatively or positively correlated with performance, depending on the task. There is still much to learn about the role of neural oscillations in learning and memory, but techniques that have been brought to bear on gamma oscillations (current source density, computational modeling, slice physiology, behavioral studies) should deliver much needed knowledge of these events. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Automatic Oscillating Turret.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-01

    Final Report: February 1978 ZAUTOMATIC OSCILLATING TURRET SYSTEM September 1980 * 6. PERFORMING 01G. REPORT NUMBER .J7. AUTHOR(S) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT...o....e.... *24 APPENDIX P-4 OSCILLATING BUMPER TURRET ...................... 25 A. DESCRIPTION 1. Turret Controls ...Other criteria requirements were: 1. Turret controls inside cab. 2. Automatic oscillation with fixed elevation to range from 20* below the horizontal to

  10. Neutrino oscillations in matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikheyev, S.P.; Smirnov, A.Yu.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper we describe united formalism of ν-oscillations for different regimes, which is immediate generalization of vacuum oscillations theory. Adequate graphical representation of this formalism is given. We summarize main properties of ν-oscillations for different density distributions. (orig./BBOE)

  11. The colpitts oscillator family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Erik; Murali, K.; Tamasevicius, A.

    A tutorial study of the Colpitts oscillator family defined as all oscillators based on a nonlinear amplifier and a three- terminal linear resonance circuit with one coil and two capacitors. The original patents are investigated. The eigenvalues of the linearized Jacobian for oscillators based...

  12. Damping of Coherent oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Vos, L

    1996-01-01

    Damping of coherent oscillations by feedback is straightforward in principle. It has been a vital ingredient for the safe operation of accelerators since a long time. The increasing dimensions and beam intensities of the new generation of hadron colliders impose unprecedented demands on the performance of future systems. The arguments leading to the specification of a transverse feedback system for the CERN SPS in its role as LHC injector and the LHC collider itself are developped to illustrate this. The preservation of the transverse emittance is the guiding principle during this exercise keeping in mind the hostile environment which comprises: transverse impedance bent on developping coupled bunch instabilities, injection errors, unwanted transverse excitation, unavoidable tune spreads and noise in the damping loop.

  13. Study on the Neutrino Oscillation with a Next Generation Medium-Baseline Reactor Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Kyung Kwang; Shin, Chang Dong

    2014-01-01

    For over fifty years, reactor experiments have played an important role in neutrino physics, in both discoveries and precision measurements. One of the methods to verify the existence of neutrino is the observation of neutrino oscillation phenomena. Electron antineutrinos emitted from a reactor provide the measurement of the small mixing angle θ 13 , providing rich programs of neutrino properties, detector development, nuclear monitoring, and application. Using reactor neutrinos, future reactor neutrino experiments, more precise measurements of θ 12 ,Δm 12 2 , and mass hierarchy will be explored. The precise measurement of θ 13 would be crucial for measuring the CP violation parameters at accelerators. Therefore, reactor neutrino physics will assist in the complete understanding of the fundamental nature and implications of neutrino masses and mixing. In this paper, we investigated several characteristics of RENO-50, which is a future medium-baseline reactor neutrino oscillation experiment, by using the GloBES simulation package

  14. Explosive death of conjugate coupled Van der Pol oscillators on networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Nannan; Sun, Zhongkui; Yang, Xiaoli; Xu, Wei

    2018-06-01

    Explosive death phenomenon has been gradually gaining attention of researchers due to the research boom of explosive synchronization, and it has been observed recently for the identical or nonidentical coupled systems in all-to-all network. In this work, we investigate the emergence of explosive death in networked Van der Pol (VdP) oscillators with conjugate variables coupling. It is demonstrated that the network structures play a crucial role in identifying the types of explosive death behaviors. We also observe that the damping coefficient of the VdP system not only can determine whether the explosive death state is generated but also can adjust the forward transition point. We further show that the backward transition point is independent of the network topologies and the damping coefficient, which is well confirmed by theoretical analysis. Our results reveal the generality of explosive death phenomenon in different network topologies and are propitious to promote a better comprehension for the oscillation quenching behaviors.

  15. Time delay induced different synchronization patterns in repulsively coupled chaotic oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Chenggui; Yi, Ming; Shuai, Jianwei

    2013-09-01

    Time delayed coupling plays a crucial role in determining the system's dynamics. We here report that the time delay induces transition from the asynchronous state to the complete synchronization (CS) state in the repulsively coupled chaotic oscillators. In particular, by changing the coupling strength or time delay, various types of synchronous patterns, including CS, antiphase CS, antiphase synchronization (ANS), and phase synchronization, can be generated. In the transition regions between different synchronous patterns, bistable synchronous oscillators can be observed. Furthermore, we show that the time-delay-induced phase flip bifurcation is of key importance for the emergence of CS. All these findings may light on our understanding of neuronal synchronization and information processing in the brain.

  16. Nature's Autonomous Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, H. G.; Yee, J.-H.; Mayr, M.; Schnetzler, R.

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinearity is required to produce autonomous oscillations without external time dependent source, and an example is the pendulum clock. The escapement mechanism of the clock imparts an impulse for each swing direction, which keeps the pendulum oscillating at the resonance frequency. Among nature's observed autonomous oscillators, examples are the quasi-biennial oscillation and bimonthly oscillation of the Earth atmosphere, and the 22-year solar oscillation. The oscillations have been simulated in numerical models without external time dependent source, and in Section 2 we summarize the results. Specifically, we shall discuss the nonlinearities that are involved in generating the oscillations, and the processes that produce the periodicities. In biology, insects have flight muscles, which function autonomously with wing frequencies that far exceed the animals' neural capacity; Stretch-activation of muscle contraction is the mechanism that produces the high frequency oscillation of insect flight, discussed in Section 3. The same mechanism is also invoked to explain the functioning of the cardiac muscle. In Section 4, we present a tutorial review of the cardio-vascular system, heart anatomy, and muscle cell physiology, leading up to Starling's Law of the Heart, which supports our notion that the human heart is also a nonlinear oscillator. In Section 5, we offer a broad perspective of the tenuous links between the fluid dynamical oscillators and the human heart physiology.

  17. Evidence supporting a role for astrocytes in the regulation of cognitive flexibility and neuronal oscillations through the Ca2+ binding protein S100β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockett, Adam T; Kane, Gary A; Monari, Patrick K; Briones, Brandy A; Vigneron, Pierre-Antoine; Barber, Gabriela A; Bermudez, Andres; Dieffenbach, Uma; Kloth, Alexander D; Buschman, Timothy J; Gould, Elizabeth

    2018-01-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is important for cognitive flexibility, the ability to switch between two task-relevant dimensions. Changes in neuronal oscillations and alterations in the coupling across frequency ranges have been correlated with attention and cognitive flexibility. Here we show that astrocytes in the mPFC of adult male Sprague Dawley rats, participate in cognitive flexibility through the astrocyte-specific Ca2+ binding protein S100β, which improves cognitive flexibility and increases phase amplitude coupling between theta and gamma oscillations. We further show that reduction of astrocyte number in the mPFC impairs cognitive flexibility and diminishes delta, alpha and gamma power. Conversely, chemogenetic activation of astrocytic intracellular Ca2+ signaling in the mPFC enhances cognitive flexibility, while inactivation of endogenous S100β among chemogenetically activated astrocytes in the mPFC prevents this improvement. Collectively, our work suggests that astrocytes make important contributions to cognitive flexibility and that they do so by releasing a Ca2+ binding protein which in turn enhances coordinated neuronal oscillations.

  18. A memristor-based third-order oscillator: beyond oscillation

    KAUST Repository

    Talukdar, Abdul Hafiz Ibne

    2012-10-06

    This paper demonstrates the first third-order autonomous linear time variant circuit realization that enhances parametric oscillation through the usage of memristor in conventional oscillators. Although the output has sustained oscillation, the linear features of the conventional oscillators become time dependent. The poles oscillate in nonlinear behavior due to the oscillation of memristor resistance. The mathematical formulas as well as SPICE simulations are introduced for the memristor-based phase shift oscillator showing a great matching.

  19. A memristor-based third-order oscillator: beyond oscillation

    KAUST Repository

    Talukdar, Abdul Hafiz Ibne; Radwan, Ahmed G.; Salama, Khaled N.

    2012-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the first third-order autonomous linear time variant circuit realization that enhances parametric oscillation through the usage of memristor in conventional oscillators. Although the output has sustained oscillation, the linear features of the conventional oscillators become time dependent. The poles oscillate in nonlinear behavior due to the oscillation of memristor resistance. The mathematical formulas as well as SPICE simulations are introduced for the memristor-based phase shift oscillator showing a great matching.

  20. Oscillations of disks

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, Shoji

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the current state of research on disk oscillation theory, focusing on relativistic disks and tidally deformed disks. Since the launch of the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in 1996, many high-frequency quasiperiodic oscillations (HFQPOs) have been observed in X-ray binaries. Subsequently, similar quasi-periodic oscillations have been found in such relativistic objects as microquasars, ultra-luminous X-ray sources, and galactic nuclei. One of the most promising explanations of their origin is based on oscillations in relativistic disks, and a new field called discoseismology is currently developing. After reviewing observational aspects, the book presents the basic characteristics of disk oscillations, especially focusing on those in relativistic disks. Relativistic disks are essentially different from Newtonian disks in terms of several basic characteristics of their disk oscillations, including the radial distributions of epicyclic frequencies. In order to understand the basic processes...

  1. Oscillating thermionic conversion for high-density space power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, D.L.; Morris, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    The compactness, maneuverability, and productive weight utilization of space nuclear reactors benefit from the use of thermionic converters at high temperature. Nuclear-thermionic-conversion power requirements are discussed, and the role of oscillations in thermionic energy conversion (TEC) history is examined. Proposed TEC oscillations are addressed, and the results of recent studies of TEC oscillations are reviewed. The possible use of high-frequency TEC oscillations to amplify low-frequency ones is considered. The accomplishments of various programs studying the use of high-temperature thermionic oscillators are examined. 16 references

  2. Quantum-classical correspondence for the inverted oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maamache, Mustapha; Ryeol Choi, Jeong

    2017-11-01

    While quantum-classical correspondence for a system is a very fundamental problem in modern physics, the understanding of its mechanism is often elusive, so the methods used and the results of detailed theoretical analysis have been accompanied by active debate. In this study, the differences and similarities between quantum and classical behavior for an inverted oscillator have been analyzed based on the description of a complete generalized Airy function-type quantum wave solution. The inverted oscillator model plays an important role in several branches of cosmology and particle physics. The quantum wave packet of the system is composed of many sub-packets that are localized at different positions with regular intervals between them. It is shown from illustrations of the probability density that, although the quantum trajectory of the wave propagation is somewhat different from the corresponding classical one, the difference becomes relatively small when the classical excitation is sufficiently high. We have confirmed that a quantum wave packet moving along a positive or negative direction accelerates over time like a classical wave. From these main interpretations and others in the text, we conclude that our theory exquisitely illustrates quantum and classical correspondence for the system, which is a crucial concept in quantum mechanics. Supported by the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (NRF-2016R1D1A1A09919503)

  3. Pipeline network expansion crucial to economic development in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jha, Kiran Kumar; Tandon, Anil; Sati, Vipin Chandra [Indian Oil Corporation Ltd., Sadiq Nagar, New Delhi (India)

    2008-07-01

    Oil Sector plays a crucial role in the development of a country and provides the required balance and stability to the economy. Though traditionally coal has had the largest share in the energy basket in India, oil and gas as a source of energy have gradually gained importance and it is expected that oil and gas will continue to command a significant share in the years to come. Transportation of oil and gas by pipelines, which are recognized worldwide as the most reliable and cost effective mode for transportation is a developing business in India. With the increasing demand for oil and gas, a necessity has arisen for according priority attention to develop a well-spread out pipeline network throughout the country so as to facilitate efficient transportation to various consumption centres. The country has already opened its doors to private sector within the country as well as to multinationals. Thus, considerable scope exists not only for making investments but also for consultants, equipment and material manufacturers/suppliers and contractors for providing their services to the Indian pipeline industry. With growth of the economy, the opportunities for investment in the Indian pipeline industry are likely to improve further. (author)

  4. Environmental assessments in the built environment: crucial yet underdeveloped

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinonen, Jukka; Horvath, Arpad; Junnila, Seppo

    2015-03-01

    Environmental assessments have been developed with increasing emphasis since the wide-scale emergence of environmental concerns in the 1970s. However, after decades there is still plenty of room left for development. These assessments are also rapidly becoming more and more crucial as we seem to be reaching the boundaries of the carrying capacity of our planet. Assessments of the emissions from the built environment and especially of the interactions between human communities and emissions are in a very central role in the quest to solve the great problem of sustainable living. Policy- makers and professionals in various fields urgently need reliable data on the current conditions and realistic future projections, as well as robust and scientifically defensible models for decision making. This recognition was the main motivation to call for this Focus Issue, and the published contributions truly highlight the same point. This editorial provides brief summaries and discussions on the 16 articles of the Focus Issue, depicting the several interesting perspectives they offer to advance the state of the art. Now we encourage academics, practitioners, government, industry, individual consumers, and other decision makers to utilize the available findings and develop the domain of environmental assessment of the built environment further. Indeed, we hope that this Focus Issue is merely a kernel of a significantly large future body of literature.

  5. The Oscillator Principle of Nature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Oscillators are found on all levels in Nature. The general oscillator concept is defined and investigated. Oscillators may synchronize into fractal patterns. Apparently oscillators are the basic principle in Nature. The concepts of zero and infinite are discussed. Electronic manmade oscillators...

  6. Accelerator studies of neutrino oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Ereditato, A

    2000-01-01

    The question of whether the neutrino has a non-vanishing mass plays acrucial role in particle physics. A massive neutrino would unambiguously reveal the existence of new physics beyond the Standard Model. In addition, it could have profound implications on astrophysics and cosmology, with effects on the evolution of the Universe. Experiments aiming at direct neutrino-mass measurements based on kinematics have not been able, so far, to measure the very small neutrino mass. Indirect measurements can be performed by exploiting reactions which may only occur for massive neutrinos. Neutrino oscillation is one of those processes. The mass difference between neutrino mass-eigenstates can be inferred from a phase measurement. This feature allows for high sensitivity experiments. Neutrinos from different sources can be used to search for oscillations: solar neutrinos, neutrinos produced in the interaction of cosmic rays with the atmosphere and artificially produced neutrinos from nuclear reactors and particle accelera...

  7. Experimental studies of neutrino oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Kajita, Takaaki

    2016-01-01

    The 2015 Nobel Prize in physics has been awarded to Takaaki Kajita and Arthur McDonald "for the discovery of neutrino oscillations, which shows that neutrinos have mass". Takaaki Kajita of Tokyo University is a Japanese physicist, known for neutrino experiments at the Kamiokande and its successor, Super-Kamiokande. This volume of collected works of Kajita on neutrino oscillations provides a good glimpse into as well as a record of the rise and the role of Asian research in the frontiers of neutrino physics. Japan is now a major force in the study of the 3 families of neutrinos. Much remains to be done to clarify the Dirac vs. Majorana nature of the neutrino, and the cosmological implications of the neutrino. The collected works of Kajita and his Super-Kamiokande group will leave an indelible foot-print in the history of big and better science.

  8. On the Dirac oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, R. de Lima

    2007-01-01

    In the present work we obtain a new representation for the Dirac oscillator based on the Clifford algebra C 7. The symmetry breaking and the energy eigenvalues for our model of the Dirac oscillator are studied in the non-relativistic limit. (author)

  9. A Conspiracy of Oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.

    2008-01-01

    We discuss nonlinear mechanical systems containing several oscillators whose frequecies are all much higher than frequencies associated with the remaining degrees of freedom. In this situation a near constant of the motion, an adiabatic invariant, exists which is the sum of all the oscillator...... actions. The phenomenon is illustrated, and calculations of the small change of the adiabatic invariant is outlined....

  10. Synchronization of hyperchaotic oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamasevicius, A.; Cenys, A.; Mykolaitis, G.

    1997-01-01

    Synchronization of chaotic oscillators is believed to have promising applications in secure communications. Hyperchaotic systems with multiple positive Lyapunov exponents (LEs) have an advantage over common chaotic systems with only one positive LE. Three different types of hyperchaotic electronic...... oscillators are investigated demonstrating synchronization by means of only one properly selected variable....

  11. The role of fluctuations in bistability and oscillations during the H{sub 2} + O{sub 2} reaction on nanosized rhodium crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosfils, P.; Gaspard, P. [Center for Nonlinear Phenomena and Complex Systems (CENOLI), Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Campus Plaine Code Postal 231, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Visart de Bocarmé, T. [Center for Nonlinear Phenomena and Complex Systems (CENOLI) and Chemical Physics of Materials—Catalysis and Tribology, Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Campus Plaine Code Postal 243, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-08-14

    A combined experimental and theoretical study is presented of fluctuations observed by field ion microscopy in the catalytic reaction of water production on a rhodium tip. A stochastic approach is developed to provide a comprehensive understanding of the different phenomena observed in the experiment, including burst noise manifesting itself in a bistability regime, noisy oscillations, and nanopatterns with a cross-like oxidized zone separating the surface into four quadrants centered on the (111) facets. The study is based on a stochastic model numerically simulating the processes of adsorption, desorption, reaction, and transport. The surface diffusion of hydrogen is described as a percolation process dominated by large clusters corresponding to the four quadrants. The model reproduces the observed phenomena in the ranges of temperature, pressures, and electric field of the experiment.

  12. Gravity waves observed from the Equatorial Wave Studies (EWS campaign during 1999 and 2000 and their role in the generation of stratospheric semiannual oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Deepa

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The altitude profiles of temperature fluctuations in the stratosphere and mesosphere observed with the Rayleigh Lidar at Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E on 30 nights during January to March 1999 and 21 nights during February to April 2000 were analysed to bring out the temporal and vertical propagation characteristics of gravity wave perturbations. The gravity wave perturbations showed periodicities in the 0.5–3-h range and attained large amplitudes (4–5 K in the mesosphere. The phase propagation characteristics of gravity waves with different periods showed upward wave propagation with a vertical wavelength of 5–7 km. The mean flow acceleration computed from the divergence of momentum flux of gravity waves is compared with that calculated from monthly values of zonal wind obtained from RH-200 rockets flights. Thus, the contribution of gravity waves towards the generation of Stratospheric Semi Annual Oscillation (SSAO is estimated.

  13. Anomalous normal mode oscillations in semiconductor microcavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H. [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States). Dept. of Physics; Hou, H.Q.; Hammons, B.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Semiconductor microcavities as a composite exciton-cavity system can be characterized by two normal modes. Under an impulsive excitation by a short laser pulse, optical polarizations associated with the two normal modes have a {pi} phase difference. The total induced optical polarization is then expected to exhibit a sin{sup 2}({Omega}t)-like oscillation where 2{Omega} is the normal mode splitting, reflecting a coherent energy exchange between the exciton and cavity. In this paper the authors present experimental studies of normal mode oscillations using three-pulse transient four wave mixing (FWM). The result reveals surprisingly that when the cavity is tuned far below the exciton resonance, normal mode oscillation in the polarization is cos{sup 2}({Omega}t)-like, in contrast to what is expected form the simple normal mode model. This anomalous normal mode oscillation reflects the important role of virtual excitation of electronic states in semiconductor microcavities.

  14. Do the Uncertainty Relations Really have Crucial Significances for Physics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumitru S.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available It is proved the falsity of idea that the Uncertainty Relations (UR have crucial significances for physics. Additionally one argues for the necesity of an UR-disconnected quantum philosophy.

  15. Clinical Trials: A Crucial Key to Human Health Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Past Issues Clinical Trials: A Crucial Key to Human Health Research Past Issues / Summer 2006 Table of Contents ... Javascript on. Photo: PhotoDisc At the forefront of human health research today are clinical trials—studies that use ...

  16. Adaptation dans les zones cruciales au regard des changements ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ) vise à accroître la résilience des populations pauvres dans trois « zones cruciales » au regard des changements climatiques : les bassins hydrographiques, les deltas et les régions semi-arides.

  17. A proactive and holistic information management approach is crucial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ESARBICA Journal: Journal of the Eastern and Southern Africa Regional Branch of ... holistic information management approach is crucial to e-government development ... and to develop new electronic services hence boosting innovation.

  18. A Design Principle for a Posttranslational Biochemical Oscillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig C. Jolley

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Multisite phosphorylation plays an important role in biological oscillators such as the circadian clock. Its general role, however, has been elusive. In this theoretical study, we show that a simple substrate with two modification sites acted upon by two opposing enzymes (e.g., a kinase and a phosphatase can show oscillations in its modification state. An unbiased computational analysis of this oscillator reveals two common characteristics: a unidirectional modification cycle and sequestering of an enzyme by a specific modification state. These two motifs cause a substrate to act as a coupled system in which a unidirectional cycle generates single-molecule oscillators, whereas sequestration synchronizes the population by limiting the available enzyme under conditions in which substrate is in excess. We also demonstrate the conditions under which the oscillation period is temperature compensated, an important feature of the circadian clock. This theoretical model will provide a framework for analyzing and synthesizing posttranslational oscillators.

  19. Multidrug resistance-associated proteins are crucial for the viability of activated rat hepatic stellate cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hannivoort, Rebekka A.; Dunning, Sandra; Borght, Sara Vander; Schroyen, Ben; Woudenberg, Jannes; Oakley, Fiona; Buist-Homan, Manon; van den Heuvel, Fiona A. J.; Geuken, Mariska; Geerts, Albert; Roskams, Tania; Faber, Klaas Nico; Moshage, Han

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) survive and proliferate in the chronically injured liver. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters play a crucial role in cell viability by transporting toxic metabolites or xenobiotics out of the cell. ABC transporter expression in HSCs and its relevance to cell

  20. Observation of Quasichanneling Oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wistisen, T. N.; Mikkelsen, R. E.; Uggerhoj, University I.; Wienands, University; Markiewicz, T. W.

    2017-01-01

    Here, we report on the first experimental observations of quasichanneling oscillations, recently seen in simulations and described theoretically. Although above-barrier particles penetrating a single crystal are generally seen as behaving almost as in an amorphous substance, distinct oscillation peaks nevertheless appear for particles in that category. The quasichanneling oscillations were observed at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory by aiming 20.35 GeV positrons and electrons at a thin silicon crystal bent to a radius of R = 0.15 m, exploiting the quasimosaic effect. For electrons, two relatively faint quasichanneling peaks were observed, while for positrons, seven quasichanneling peaks were clearly identified.

  1. LSND neutrino oscillation results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louis, W.C.

    1996-01-01

    In the past several years, a number of experiments have searched for neutrino oscillations, where a neutrino of one type (say bar ν μ ) spontaneously transforms into a neutrino of another type (say bar ν e ). For this phenomenon to occur, neutrinos must be massive and the apparent conservation law of lepton families must be violated. In 1995 the LSND experiment published data showing candidate events that are consistent with bar ν μ oscillations. Additional data are reported here which provide stronger evidence for neutrino oscillations

  2. Neutrino Oscillation Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayser, Boris

    2014-01-01

    To complement the neutrino-physics lectures given at the 2011 International School on Astro Particle Physics devoted to Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics (ISAPP 2011; Varenna, Italy), at the 2011 European School of High Energy Physics (ESHEP 2011; Cheila Gradistei, Romania), and, in modified form, at other summer schools, we present here a written description of the physics of neutrino oscillation. This description is centered on a new way of deriving the oscillation probability. We also provide a brief guide to references relevant to topics other than neutrino oscillation that were covered in the lectures

  3. Neutrino Oscillation Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayser, Boris [Fermilab (United States)

    2014-07-01

    To complement the neutrino-physics lectures given at the 2011 International School on Astro Particle Physics devoted to Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics (ISAPP 2011; Varenna, Italy), at the 2011 European School of High Energy Physics (ESHEP 2011; Cheila Gradistei, Romania), and, in modified form, at other summer schools, we present here a written description of the physics of neutrino oscillation. This description is centered on a new way of deriving the oscillation probability. We also provide a brief guide to references relevant to topics other than neutrino oscillation that were covered in the lectures.

  4. Oscillator, neutron modulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agaisse, R.; Leguen, R.; Ombredane, D.

    1960-01-01

    The authors present a mechanical device and an electronic control circuit which have been designed to sinusoidally modulate the reactivity of the Proserpine atomic pile. The mechanical device comprises an oscillator and a mechanism assembly. The oscillator is made of cadmium blades which generate the reactivity oscillation. The mechanism assembly comprises a pulse generator for cycle splitting, a gearbox and an engine. The electronic device comprises or performs pulse detection, an on-off device, cycle pulse shaping, phase separation, a dephasing amplifier, electronic switches, counting scales, and control devices. All these elements are briefly presented

  5. Automated Detection of Oscillating Regions in the Solar Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, J.; Marsh, M. S.; Kucera, T. A.; Young, C. A.

    2010-01-01

    Recently observed oscillations in the solar atmosphere have been interpreted and modeled as magnetohydrodynamic wave modes. This has allowed for the estimation of parameters that are otherwise hard to derive, such as the coronal magnetic-field strength. This work crucially relies on the initial detection of the oscillations, which is commonly done manually. The volume of Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) data will make manual detection inefficient for detecting all of the oscillating regions. An algorithm is presented that automates the detection of areas of the solar atmosphere that support spatially extended oscillations. The algorithm identifies areas in the solar atmosphere whose oscillation content is described by a single, dominant oscillation within a user-defined frequency range. The method is based on Bayesian spectral analysis of time series and image filtering. A Bayesian approach sidesteps the need for an a-priori noise estimate to calculate rejection criteria for the observed signal, and it also provides estimates of oscillation frequency, amplitude, and noise, and the error in all of these quantities, in a self-consistent way. The algorithm also introduces the notion of quality measures to those regions for which a positive detection is claimed, allowing for simple post-detection discrimination by the user. The algorithm is demonstrated on two Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) datasets, and comments regarding its suitability for oscillation detection in SDO are made.

  6. OSCILLATING FILAMENTS. I. OSCILLATION AND GEOMETRICAL FRAGMENTATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gritschneder, Matthias; Heigl, Stefan; Burkert, Andreas, E-mail: gritschm@usm.uni-muenchen.de [University Observatory Munich, LMU Munich, Scheinerstrasse 1, D-81679 Munich (Germany)

    2017-01-10

    We study the stability of filaments in equilibrium between gravity and internal as well as external pressure using the grid-based AMR code RAMSES. A homogeneous, straight cylinder below a critical line mass is marginally stable. However, if the cylinder is bent, such as with a slight sinusoidal perturbation, an otherwise stable configuration starts to oscillate, is triggered into fragmentation, and collapses. This previously unstudied behavior allows a filament to fragment at any given scale, as long as it has slight bends. We call this process “geometrical fragmentation.” In our realization, the spacing between the cores matches the wavelength of the sinusoidal perturbation, whereas up to now, filaments were thought to be only fragmenting on the characteristic scale set by the mass-to-line ratio. Using first principles, we derive the oscillation period as well as the collapse timescale analytically. To enable a direct comparison with observations, we study the line-of-sight velocity for different inclinations. We show that the overall oscillation pattern can hide the infall signature of cores.

  7. Again on neutrino oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilenky, S.M.; Pontecorvo, B.

    1976-01-01

    The general case is treated of a weak interaction theory in which a term violating lepton charges is present. In such a scheme the particles with definite masses are Majorana neutrinos (2N if in the weak interaction participate N four-component neutrinos). Neutrino oscillations are discussed and it is shown that the minimum average intensity at the earth of solar neutrinos is 1/2N of the intensity expected when oscillations are absent

  8. Density-wave oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belblidia, L.A.; Bratianu, C.

    1979-01-01

    Boiling flow in a steam generator, a water-cooled reactor, and other multiphase processes can be subject to instabilities. It appears that the most predominant instabilities are the so-called density-wave oscillations. They can cause difficulties for three main reasons; they may induce burnout; they may cause mechanical vibrations of components; and they create system control problems. A comprehensive review is presented of experimental and theoretical studies concerning density-wave oscillations. (author)

  9. Oscillators and operational amplifiers

    OpenAIRE

    Lindberg, Erik

    2005-01-01

    A generalized approach to the design of oscillators using operational amplifiers as active elements is presented. A piecewise-linear model of the amplifier is used so that it make sense to investigate the eigenvalues of the Jacobian of the differential equations. The characteristic equation of the general circuit is derived. The dynamic nonlinear transfer characteristic of the amplifier is investigated. Examples of negative resistance oscillators are discussed.

  10. Chaotic solar oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blacher, S; Perdang, J [Institut d' Astrophysique, B-4200 Cointe-Ougree (Belgium)

    1981-09-01

    A numerical experiment on Hamiltonian oscillations demonstrates the existence of chaotic motions which satisfy the property of phase coherence. It is observed that the low-frequency end of the power spectrum of such motions is remarkably similar in structure to the low-frequency SCLERA spectra. Since the smallness of the observed solar amplitudes is not a sufficient mathematical ground for inefficiency of non-linear effects the possibility of chaos among solar oscillations cannot be discarded a priori.

  11. Case for neutrino oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramond, P.

    1982-01-01

    The building of a machine capable of producing an intense, well-calibrated beam of muon neutrinos is regarded by particle physicists with keen interest because of its ability of studying neutrino oscillations. The possibility of neutrino oscillations has long been recognized, but it was not made necessary on theoretical or experimental grounds; one knew that oscillations could be avoided if neutrinos were massless, and this was easily done by the conservation of lepton number. The idea of grand unification has led physicists to question the existence (at higher energies) of global conservation laws. The prime examples are baryon-number conservation, which prevents proton decay, and lepton-number conservation, which keeps neutrinos massless, and therefore free of oscillations. The detection of proton decay and neutrino oscillations would therefore be an indirect indication of the idea of Grand Unification, and therefore of paramount importance. Neutrino oscillations occur when neutrinos acquire mass in such a way that the neutrino mass eigenstates do not match the (neutrino) eigenstates produced by the weak interactions. We shall study the ways in which neutrinos can get mass, first at the level of the standard SU 2 x U 1 model, then at the level of its Grand Unification Generalizations

  12. pH-regulated chemical oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbán, Miklós; Kurin-Csörgei, Krisztina; Epstein, Irving R

    2015-03-17

    The hydrogen ion is arguably the most ubiquitous and important species in chemistry. It also plays a key role in nearly every biological process. In this Account, we discuss systems whose behavior is governed by oscillations in the concentration of hydrogen ion. The first chemical oscillators driven by changes in pH were developed a quarter century ago. Since then, about two dozen new pH oscillators, systems in which the periodic variation in pH is not just an indicator but an essential prerequisite of the oscillatory behavior, have been discovered. Mechanistic understanding of their behavior has grown, and new ideas for their practical application have been proposed and, in some cases, tested. Here we present a catalog of the known pH oscillators, divide them into mechanistically based categories based on whether they involve a single oxidant and reductant or an oxidant and a pair of reductants, and describe general mechanisms for these two major classes of systems. We also describe in detail the chemistry of one example from each class, hydrogen peroxide-sulfide and ferricyanide-iodate-sulfite. Finally, we consider actual and potential applications. These include using pH oscillators to induce oscillation in species that would otherwise be nonoscillatory, creating novel spatial patterns, generating periodic transitions between vesicle and micelle states, stimulating switching between folded and random coil states of DNA, building molecular motors, and designing pulsating drug delivery systems. We point out the importance for future applications of finding a batch pH oscillator, one that oscillates in a closed system for an extended period of time, and comment on the progress that has been made toward that goal.

  13. Moisture dynamics of the northward and eastward propagating boreal summer intraseasonal oscillations: possible role of tropical Indo-west Pacific SST and circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Prasanth A.; Sahai, A. K.

    2016-08-01

    Boreal summer intraseasonal oscillation (BSISO) has complex spatial structure due to the co-existence of equatorial eastward and off-equatorial northward propagation in the equatorial Indian Ocean. As a result, equatorial Indian Ocean convection has simultaneous northward and eastward (NE), northward only (N-only) and eastward only (E-only) propagations. It is well established that the convection propagates in the direction of increasing moist static energy (MSE). The moisture and MSE budget analysis reveals that the horizontal advection of anomalous MSE contributes to positive MSE tendency, which is in agreement with the horizontal advection of column integrated moisture anomaly. Northward movement of warm SST and the anomalous moisture advected by zonal wind are the major initiative for the northward propagation of convection from the equatorial Indian Ocean in both NE and N-only category. At the same time warm SST anomaly in the equatorial west Pacific along with moisture advection caused by anomalous meridional wind is important for the equatorial eastward branch of NE propagation. As these anomalies in the west Pacific moves northward, equatorial Indian Ocean convection establishes over the equatorial west Pacific. The absence of these processes confines the BSISO in northward direction for N-only category. In the case of E-only movement, warm SST anomaly and moisture advection by zonal component of wind causes the eastward propagation of convection. Boundary layer moisture convergence always remains east of convection center in E-only propagation, while it coincides with convection centre in other two categories. Thus the present study concludes that the difference in underlying SST and atmospheric circulation in tropical Indo-west Pacific oceanic regions encourage the differential propagation of BSISO convection through moisture dynamics.

  14. Sectorial oscillation of acoustically levitated nanoparticle-coated droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Duyang; Chen, Zhen; Geng, Xingguo

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the dynamics of a third mode sectorial oscillation of nanoparticle-coated droplets using acoustic levitation in combination with active modulation. The presence of nanoparticles at the droplet surface changes its oscillation amplitude and frequency. A model linking the interfacial rheology and oscillation dynamics has been proposed in which the compression modulus ɛ of the particle layer is introduced into the analysis. The ɛ obtained with the model is in good agreement with that obtained by the Wilhelmy plate approach, highlighting the important role of interfacial rheological properties in the sectorial oscillation of droplets.

  15. Neuronal oscillations enhance stimulus discrimination by ensuring action potential precision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaefer, Andreas T; Angelo, Kamilla; Spors, Hartwig

    2006-01-01

    generated membrane potential oscillations dramatically improve action potential (AP) precision by removing the membrane potential variance associated with jitter-accumulating trains of APs. This increased AP precision occurred irrespective of cell type and--at oscillation frequencies ranging from 3 to 65 Hz......Although oscillations in membrane potential are a prominent feature of sensory, motor, and cognitive function, their precise role in signal processing remains elusive. Here we show, using a combination of in vivo, in vitro, and theoretical approaches, that both synaptically and intrinsically......, membrane potential oscillations dramatically enhance the discriminatory capabilities of individual neurons and networks of cells and provide one attractive explanation for their abundance in neurophysiological systems....

  16. Time Series Decomposition into Oscillation Components and Phase Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Takeru; Komaki, Fumiyasu

    2017-02-01

    Many time series are naturally considered as a superposition of several oscillation components. For example, electroencephalogram (EEG) time series include oscillation components such as alpha, beta, and gamma. We propose a method for decomposing time series into such oscillation components using state-space models. Based on the concept of random frequency modulation, gaussian linear state-space models for oscillation components are developed. In this model, the frequency of an oscillator fluctuates by noise. Time series decomposition is accomplished by this model like the Bayesian seasonal adjustment method. Since the model parameters are estimated from data by the empirical Bayes' method, the amplitudes and the frequencies of oscillation components are determined in a data-driven manner. Also, the appropriate number of oscillation components is determined with the Akaike information criterion (AIC). In this way, the proposed method provides a natural decomposition of the given time series into oscillation components. In neuroscience, the phase of neural time series plays an important role in neural information processing. The proposed method can be used to estimate the phase of each oscillation component and has several advantages over a conventional method based on the Hilbert transform. Thus, the proposed method enables an investigation of the phase dynamics of time series. Numerical results show that the proposed method succeeds in extracting intermittent oscillations like ripples and detecting the phase reset phenomena. We apply the proposed method to real data from various fields such as astronomy, ecology, tidology, and neuroscience.

  17. Analysis of a proposed crucial test of quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collett, M.J.; Loudon, R.

    1987-01-01

    An experiment based on an extension of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen argument has been proposed by Popper as a crucial test of the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics. Here the authors show, by a slightly more complete version of Popper's analysis, although still at a relatively primitive level of sophistication, that the proposed experiment does not in fact provide such a test. (author)

  18. Fanatically Formative: Successful Learning during the Crucial K-3 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sornson, Bob

    2012-01-01

    Helping children experience early learning success and acquire essential skills by third grade is a crucial part of any school reform effort. Yet, many teachers and children are overwhelmed by the ineffective curriculum-driven education system and the "rush to cover" climate in schools. "Fanatically Formative" shows how you can rediscover the joy…

  19. Hypothalamic expression and moonlight-independent changes of Cry3 and Per4 implicate their roles in lunar clock oscillators of the lunar-responsive Goldlined spinefoot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, Riko; Okano, Keiko; Takeuchi, Yuki; Yamauchi, Chihiro; Fukushiro, Masato; Takemura, Akihiro; Okano, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Lunar cycle-associated physiology has been found in a wide variety of organisms. Studies suggest the presence of a circalunar clock in some animals, but the location of the lunar clock is unclear. We previously found lunar-associated expression of transcripts for Cryptochrome3 gene (SgCry3) in the brain of a lunar phase-responsive fish, the Goldlined spinefoot (Siganus guttatus). Then we proposed a photoperiodic model for the lunar phase response, in which SgCry3 might function as a phase-specific light response gene and/or an oscillatory factor in unidentified circalunar clock. In this study, we have developed an anti-SgCRY3 antibody to identify SgCRY3-immunoreactive cells in the brain. We found immunoreactions in the subependymal cells located in the mediobasal region of the diencephalon, a crucial site for photoperiodic seasonal responses in birds. For further assessment of the lunar-responding mechanism and the circalunar clock, we investigated mRNA levels of Cry3 as well as those of the other clock(-related) genes, Period (Per2 and Per4), in S. guttatus reared under nocturnal moonlight interruption or natural conditions. Not only SgCry3 but SgPer4 mRNA levels showed lunar phase-dependent variations in the diencephalon without depending on light condition during the night. These results suggest that the expressions of SgCry3 and SgPer4 are not directly regulated by moonlight stimulation but endogenously mediated in the brain, and implicate that circadian clock(-related) genes may be involved in the circalunar clock locating within the mediobasal region of the diencephalon.

  20. Hypothalamic expression and moonlight-independent changes of Cry3 and Per4 implicate their roles in lunar clock oscillators of the lunar-responsive Goldlined spinefoot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riko Toda

    Full Text Available Lunar cycle-associated physiology has been found in a wide variety of organisms. Studies suggest the presence of a circalunar clock in some animals, but the location of the lunar clock is unclear. We previously found lunar-associated expression of transcripts for Cryptochrome3 gene (SgCry3 in the brain of a lunar phase-responsive fish, the Goldlined spinefoot (Siganus guttatus. Then we proposed a photoperiodic model for the lunar phase response, in which SgCry3 might function as a phase-specific light response gene and/or an oscillatory factor in unidentified circalunar clock. In this study, we have developed an anti-SgCRY3 antibody to identify SgCRY3-immunoreactive cells in the brain. We found immunoreactions in the subependymal cells located in the mediobasal region of the diencephalon, a crucial site for photoperiodic seasonal responses in birds. For further assessment of the lunar-responding mechanism and the circalunar clock, we investigated mRNA levels of Cry3 as well as those of the other clock(-related genes, Period (Per2 and Per4, in S. guttatus reared under nocturnal moonlight interruption or natural conditions. Not only SgCry3 but SgPer4 mRNA levels showed lunar phase-dependent variations in the diencephalon without depending on light condition during the night. These results suggest that the expressions of SgCry3 and SgPer4 are not directly regulated by moonlight stimulation but endogenously mediated in the brain, and implicate that circadian clock(-related genes may be involved in the circalunar clock locating within the mediobasal region of the diencephalon.

  1. Do muons oscillate?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolgov, A.D.; Morozov, A.Yu.; Okun, L.B.; Schepkin, M.G.

    1997-01-01

    We develop a theory of the EPR-like effects due to neutrino oscillations in the π→μν decays. Its experimental implications are space-time correlations of the neutrino and muon when they are both detected, while the pion decay point is not fixed. However, the more radical possibility of μ-oscillations in experiments where only muons are detected (as suggested in hep-ph/9509261), is ruled out. We start by discussing decays of monochromatic pions, and point out a few ''paradoxes''. Then we consider pion wave packets, solve the ''paradoxes'', and show that the formulas for μν correlations can be transformed into the usual expressions, describing neutrino oscillations, as soon as the pion decay point is fixed. (orig.)

  2. Neutrino Oscillations Present Status and Future Plans

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    This book reviews the status of a very exciting field - neutrino oscillations - at a very important time. The fact that neutrinos have mass has only been proved in the last few years and the acceptance of that fact has opened up a whole new area of study to understand the fundamental parameters of the mixing matrix. The book summarizes the results from all the experiments which have played a role in the measurement of neutrino oscillations and briefly describes the scope of some new planned experiments. Contributions include a theoretical introduction by Stephen Parke from FNAL, as well as art

  3. Oscillations in neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeye, Gudrun Kristine

    1999-01-01

    We have studied radial and nonradial oscillations in neutron stars, both in a general relativistic and non-relativistic frame, for several different equilibrium models. Different equations of state were combined, and our results show that it is possible to distinguish between the models based on their oscillation periods. We have particularly focused on the p-, f-, and g-modes. We find oscillation periods of II approx. 0.1 ms for the p-modes, II approx. 0.1 - 0.8 ms for the f-modes and II approx. 10 - 400 ms for the g-modes. For high-order (l → 4) f-modes we were also able to derive a formula that determines II l+1 from II l and II l-1 to an accuracy of 0.1%. Further, for the radial f-mode we find that the oscillation period goes to infinity as the maximum mass of the star is approached. Both p-, f-, and g-modes are sensitive to changes in the central baryon number density n c , while the g-modes are also sensitive to variations in the surface temperature. The g-modes are concentrated in the surface layer, while p- and f-modes can be found in all parts of the star. The effects of general relativity were studied, and we find that these are important at high central baryon number densities, especially for the p- and f-modes. General relativistic effects can therefore not be neglected when studying oscillations in neutron stars. We have further developed an improved Cowling approximation in the non-relativistic frame, which eliminates about half of the gap in the oscillation periods that results from use of the ordinary Cowling approximation. We suggest to develop an improved Cowling approximation also in the general relativistic frame. (Author)

  4. Oscillations in neutron stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeye, Gudrun Kristine

    1999-07-01

    We have studied radial and nonradial oscillations in neutron stars, both in a general relativistic and non-relativistic frame, for several different equilibrium models. Different equations of state were combined, and our results show that it is possible to distinguish between the models based on their oscillation periods. We have particularly focused on the p-, f-, and g-modes. We find oscillation periods of II approx. 0.1 ms for the p-modes, II approx. 0.1 - 0.8 ms for the f-modes and II approx. 10 - 400 ms for the g-modes. For high-order (l (>{sub )} 4) f-modes we were also able to derive a formula that determines II{sub l+1} from II{sub l} and II{sub l-1} to an accuracy of 0.1%. Further, for the radial f-mode we find that the oscillation period goes to infinity as the maximum mass of the star is approached. Both p-, f-, and g-modes are sensitive to changes in the central baryon number density n{sub c}, while the g-modes are also sensitive to variations in the surface temperature. The g-modes are concentrated in the surface layer, while p- and f-modes can be found in all parts of the star. The effects of general relativity were studied, and we find that these are important at high central baryon number densities, especially for the p- and f-modes. General relativistic effects can therefore not be neglected when studying oscillations in neutron stars. We have further developed an improved Cowling approximation in the non-relativistic frame, which eliminates about half of the gap in the oscillation periods that results from use of the ordinary Cowling approximation. We suggest to develop an improved Cowling approximation also in the general relativistic frame. (Author)

  5. Regulating Cortical Oscillations in an Inhibition-Stabilized Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadi, Monika P; Sejnowski, Terrence J

    2014-04-21

    Understanding the anatomical and functional architecture of the brain is essential for designing neurally inspired intelligent systems. Theoretical and empirical studies suggest a role for narrowband oscillations in shaping the functional architecture of the brain through their role in coding and communication of information. Such oscillations are ubiquitous signals in the electrical activity recorded from the brain. In the cortex, oscillations detected in the gamma range (30-80 Hz) are modulated by behavioral states and sensory features in complex ways. How is this regulation achieved? Although several underlying principles for the genesis of these oscillations have been proposed, a unifying account for their regulation has remained elusive. In a network of excitatory and inhibitory neurons operating in an inhibition-stabilized regime, we show that strongly superlinear responses of inhibitory neurons facilitate bidirectional regulation of oscillation frequency and power. In such a network, the balance of drives to the excitatory and inhibitory populations determines how the power and frequency of oscillations are modulated. The model accounts for the puzzling increase in their frequency with the salience of visual stimuli, and a decrease with their size. Oscillations in our model grow stronger as the mean firing level is reduced, accounting for the size dependence of visually evoked gamma rhythms, and suggesting a role for oscillations in improving the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of signals in the brain. Empirically testing such predictions is still challenging, and implementing the proposed coding and communication strategies in neuromorphic systems could assist in our understanding of the biological system.

  6. 神经振荡在人类视觉工作记忆表征维持中的作用%Role of neural oscillations in maintenance of human visual working memory representations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘亚丽; 王亮

    2016-01-01

    Human visual system receives many cluttered stimuli simultaneously,but only a few of visual representations can be held in the mind to guide subsequent goal-oriented behaviors,which indicates the limited capacity of visual working memory.Meanwhile,the neural representations of visual stimuli can be noisy and hence the memory precision is varying.This review systematically illustrates the roles of neural oscillations in maintaining visual working memory and neural mechanisms underlying the capacity and precision.In the end,several potential directions of this field for future studies are discussed.A large amount of researches demonstrates that during the maintenance of visual working memory representations,the theta band oscillations can facilitate the neural information communications between brain regions throughout a relative long distance,in order to achieve the top-down cognitive control;the alpha band oscillations,which was initially considered as an electrophysiological correlate of cortical idling,are now generally treated to reflect functional inhibition or non-engagement of a given brain regions,in order to gate neural information to the task-relevant regions;as for gamma band,the high frequency oscillation property make it suitable for the integration of multiple object features in the local neural network and hold the relevant representations.Therefore,theta and gamma band engage in the maintenance of working memory representations directly,while alpha oscillations serve in an indirect way of functional inhibition.In addition,the cross frequency coupling and neural synchronization enable the collaboration of different brain regions in the working memory network.The contralateral delay activity (CDA) is widely acknowledged to be an online electrophysiological marker of working memory capacity.In addition,the alpha oscillations in irrelevant regions also have a strong correlation with individual capacity.Early studies that aimed to explore memory capacity

  7. The Roles of Fission Yeast Ase1 in Mitotic Cell Division, Meiotic Nuclear Oscillation, and Cytokinesis Checkpoint SignalingD⃞V⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Yamashita, Akira; Sato, Masamitsu; Fujita, Akiko; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Toda, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    The Ase1/Prc1 proteins constitute a conserved microtubule-associated protein family that is implicated in central spindle formation and cytokinesis. Here we characterize a role for fission yeast Ase1. Ase1 localizes to microtubule overlapping zones and displays dynamic alterations of localization during the cell cycle. In particular, its spindle localization during metaphase is reduced substantially, followed by robust appearance at the spindle midzone in anaphase. ase1 deletions are viable b...

  8. Oscillating acoustic streaming jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moudjed, Brahim; Botton, Valery; Henry, Daniel; Millet, Severine; Ben Hadid, Hamda; Garandet, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    The present paper provides the first experimental investigation of an oscillating acoustic streaming jet. The observations are performed in the far field of a 2 MHz circular plane ultrasound transducer introduced in a rectangular cavity filled with water. Measurements are made by Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in horizontal and vertical planes near the end of the cavity. Oscillations of the jet appear in this zone, for a sufficiently high Reynolds number, as an intermittent phenomenon on an otherwise straight jet fluctuating in intensity. The observed perturbation pattern is similar to that of former theoretical studies. This intermittently oscillatory behavior is the first step to the transition to turbulence. (authors)

  9. Oscillating Finite Sums

    KAUST Repository

    Alabdulmohsin, Ibrahim M.

    2018-03-07

    In this chapter, we use the theory of summability of divergent series, presented earlier in Chap. 4, to derive the analogs of the Euler-Maclaurin summation formula for oscillating sums. These formulas will, in turn, be used to perform many remarkable deeds with ease. For instance, they can be used to derive analytic expressions for summable divergent series, obtain asymptotic expressions of oscillating series, and even accelerate the convergence of series by several orders of magnitude. Moreover, we will prove the notable fact that, as far as the foundational rules of summability calculus are concerned, summable divergent series behave exactly as if they were convergent.

  10. Brownian parametric oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbe, Christine; Jung, Peter; Hänggi, Peter

    1994-05-01

    We discuss the stochastic dynamics of dissipative, white-noise-driven Floquet oscillators, characterized by a time-periodic stiffness. Thus far, little attention has been paid to these exactly solvable nonstationary systems, although they carry a rich potential for several experimental applications. Here, we calculate and discuss the mean values and variances, as well as the correlation functions and the Floquet spectrum. As one main result, we find for certain parameter values that the fluctuations of the position coordinate are suppressed as compared to the equilibrium value of a harmonic oscillator (parametric squeezing).

  11. Friedel oscillations in graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawlor, J. A.; Power, S. R.; Ferreira, M.S.

    2013-01-01

    Symmetry breaking perturbations in an electronically conducting medium are known to produce Friedel oscillations in various physical quantities of an otherwise pristine material. Here we show in a mathematically transparent fashion that Friedel oscillations in graphene have a strong sublattice...... asymmetry. As a result, the presence of impurities and/or defects may impact the distinct graphene sublattices very differently. Furthermore, such an asymmetry can be used to explain the recent observations that nitrogen atoms and dimers are not randomly distributed in graphene but prefer to occupy one...

  12. Proprioceptive evoked gamma oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnfred, S.M.; Hansen, Lars Kai; Parnas, J.

    2007-01-01

    A proprioceptive stimulus consisting of a weight change of a handheld load has recently been shown to elicit an evoked potential. Previously, somatosensory gamma oscillations have only been evoked by electrical stimuli. We conjectured that a natural proprioceptive stimulus also would be able...... to evoke gamma oscillations. EEG was recorded using 64 channels in 14 healthy subjects. In each of three runs a stimulus of 100 g load increment in each hand was presented in 120 trials. Data were wavelet transformed and runs collapsed. Inter-trial phase coherence (ITPC) was computed as the best measure...

  13. Oscillating Finite Sums

    KAUST Repository

    Alabdulmohsin, Ibrahim M.

    2018-01-01

    In this chapter, we use the theory of summability of divergent series, presented earlier in Chap. 4, to derive the analogs of the Euler-Maclaurin summation formula for oscillating sums. These formulas will, in turn, be used to perform many remarkable deeds with ease. For instance, they can be used to derive analytic expressions for summable divergent series, obtain asymptotic expressions of oscillating series, and even accelerate the convergence of series by several orders of magnitude. Moreover, we will prove the notable fact that, as far as the foundational rules of summability calculus are concerned, summable divergent series behave exactly as if they were convergent.

  14. Oscillators from nonlinear realizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyrev, N.; Krivonos, S.

    2018-02-01

    We construct the systems of the harmonic and Pais-Uhlenbeck oscillators, which are invariant with respect to arbitrary noncompact Lie algebras. The equations of motion of these systems can be obtained with the help of the formalism of nonlinear realizations. We prove that it is always possible to choose time and the fields within this formalism in such a way that the equations of motion become linear and, therefore, reduce to ones of ordinary harmonic and Pais-Uhlenbeck oscillators. The first-order actions, that produce these equations, can also be provided. As particular examples of this construction, we discuss the so(2, 3) and G 2(2) algebras.

  15. Oscillation Baselining and Analysis Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-03-27

    PNNL developed a new tool for oscillation analysis and baselining. This tool has been developed under a new DOE Grid Modernization Laboratory Consortium (GMLC) Project (GM0072 - “Suite of open-source applications and models for advanced synchrophasor analysis”) and it is based on the open platform for PMU analysis. The Oscillation Baselining and Analysis Tool (OBAT) performs the oscillation analysis and identifies modes of oscillations (frequency, damping, energy, and shape). The tool also does oscillation event baselining (fining correlation between oscillations characteristics and system operating conditions).

  16. Hippocampal gamma oscillations increase with memory load

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Vugt, Marieke K.; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Litt, Brian; Brandt, Armin; Kahana, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Although the hippocampus plays a crucial role in encoding and retrieval of contextually mediated episodic memories, considerable controversy surrounds the role of the hippocampus in short-term or working memory. To examine both hippocampal and neocortical contributions to working memory function, we

  17. Trust building electronic services as a crucial self-regulation feature of Digital Business Ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radoslav Delina

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In the field of digital business ecosystem, the self-regulation feature plays crucial role. ICT supports biological and sociological phenomena through efficient electronic services. One of the main roles is building and enhancing efficient relationships between actors within the ecosystem. Problem of interaction between commercial subjects depends on expected benefits. These expectations are predictors of successful result from realized transaction with potential partner. And this predictor is based on trust and trustworthiness. The paper presents trust as crucial factor for cooperation and discusses specifics of several trust building mechanisms to increase the level of trust in e-cooperation within digital business ecosystems. Based on results provided by questionnaire survey in Slovak business environment, the paper discusses the relationship between the level of respondents´ electronic business experience and their preferences for the portfolio of trust building mechanisms.

  18. Metabolomic Analysis of Differential Changes in Metabolites during ATP Oscillations in Chondrogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyuck Joon Kwon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Prechondrogenic condensation is a critical step for skeletal pattern formation. Recent studies reported that ATP oscillations play an essential role in prechondrogenic condensation. However, the molecular mechanism to underlie ATP oscillations remains poorly understood. In the present study, it was investigated how changes in metabolites are implicated in ATP oscillations during chondrogenesis by using capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry (CE-TOF-MS. CE-TOF-MS detected 93 cationic and 109 anionic compounds derived from known metabolic pathways. 15 cationic and 18 anionic compounds revealed significant change between peak and trough of ATP oscillations. These results implicate that glycolysis, mitochondrial respiration and uronic acid pathway oscillate in phase with ATP oscillations, while PPRP and nucleotides synthesis pathways oscillate in antiphase with ATP oscillations. This suggests that the ATP-producing glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration oscillate in antiphase with the ATP-consuming PPRP/nucleotide synthesis pathway during chondrogenesis.

  19. Building better oscillators using nonlinear dynamics and pattern ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Frequency and time references play an essential role in modern technology and in liv- ... of noise and improve the frequency precision of oscillators, with particular ..... signal is cyclostationary (the statistics is periodic rather than stationary) the ...

  20. The crucial dialogue between energy economists and oil geologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrodon, A.

    2005-01-01

    The world oil production trend in the coming years and decades is indisputably important. There are many scenarios, but their differences affect their reliability. Economists and geologists preparing such scenarios rely on data and reasoning that are often more complementary than contradictory to one another as they emphasize different points. Thus it is increasingly crucial and necessary to compare these various approaches in an honest and efficient dialogue. (author)

  1. Human gamma oscillations during slow wave sleep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Valderrama

    Full Text Available Neocortical local field potentials have shown that gamma oscillations occur spontaneously during slow-wave sleep (SWS. At the macroscopic EEG level in the human brain, no evidences were reported so far. In this study, by using simultaneous scalp and intracranial EEG recordings in 20 epileptic subjects, we examined gamma oscillations in cerebral cortex during SWS. We report that gamma oscillations in low (30-50 Hz and high (60-120 Hz frequency bands recurrently emerged in all investigated regions and their amplitudes coincided with specific phases of the cortical slow wave. In most of the cases, multiple oscillatory bursts in different frequency bands from 30 to 120 Hz were correlated with positive peaks of scalp slow waves ("IN-phase" pattern, confirming previous animal findings. In addition, we report another gamma pattern that appears preferentially during the negative phase of the slow wave ("ANTI-phase" pattern. This new pattern presented dominant peaks in the high gamma range and was preferentially expressed in the temporal cortex. Finally, we found that the spatial coherence between cortical sites exhibiting gamma activities was local and fell off quickly when computed between distant sites. Overall, these results provide the first human evidences that gamma oscillations can be observed in macroscopic EEG recordings during sleep. They support the concept that these high-frequency activities might be associated with phasic increases of neural activity during slow oscillations. Such patterned activity in the sleeping brain could play a role in off-line processing of cortical networks.

  2. From excitability to oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postnov, D. E.; Neganova, A. Y.; Jacobsen, J. C. B.

    2013-01-01

    One consequence of cell-to-cell communication is the appearance of synchronized behavior, where many cells cooperate to generate new dynamical patterns. We present a simple functional model of vasomotion based on the concept of a two-mode oscillator with dual interactions: via relatively slow dif...

  3. Neutrino oscillation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camilleri, L.

    1996-01-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments (ν μ →ν e and ν μ →ν τ ) currently being performed at accelerators are reviewed. Future plans for short and long base-line experiments are summarized. (author) 10 figs., 2 tabs., 29 refs

  4. A simple violin oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    For acoustic tests the violin is driven laterally at the bridge by a small speaker of the type commonly found in pocket transistor radios. An audio oscillator excites the tone which is picked up by a sound level meter. Gross patterns of vibration modes are obtained by the Chladni method.

  5. Nonlinearity in oscillating bridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Gazzola

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We first recall several historical oscillating bridges that, in some cases, led to collapses. Some of them are quite recent and show that, nowadays, oscillations in suspension bridges are not yet well understood. Next, we survey some attempts to model bridges with differential equations. Although these equations arise from quite different scientific communities, they display some common features. One of them, which we believe to be incorrect, is the acceptance of the linear Hooke law in elasticity. This law should be used only in presence of small deviations from equilibrium, a situation which does not occur in widely oscillating bridges. Then we discuss a couple of recent models whose solutions exhibit self-excited oscillations, the phenomenon visible in real bridges. This suggests a different point of view in modeling equations and gives a strong hint how to modify the existing models in order to obtain a reliable theory. The purpose of this paper is precisely to highlight the necessity of revisiting the classical models, to introduce reliable models, and to indicate the steps we believe necessary to reach this target.

  6. Integrated optoelectronic oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jian; Hao, Tengfei; Li, Wei; Domenech, David; Baños, Rocio; Muñoz, Pascual; Zhu, Ninghua; Capmany, José; Li, Ming

    2018-04-30

    With the rapid development of the modern communication systems, radar and wireless services, microwave signal with high-frequency, high-spectral-purity and frequency tunability as well as microwave generator with light weight, compact size, power-efficient and low cost are increasingly demanded. Integrated microwave photonics (IMWP) is regarded as a prospective way to meet these demands by hybridizing the microwave circuits and the photonics circuits on chip. In this article, we propose and experimentally demonstrate an integrated optoelectronic oscillator (IOEO). All of the devices needed in the optoelectronic oscillation loop circuit are monolithically integrated on chip within size of 5×6cm 2 . By tuning the injection current to 44 mA, the output frequency of the proposed IOEO is located at 7.30 GHz with phase noise value of -91 dBc/Hz@1MHz. When the injection current is increased to 65 mA, the output frequency can be changed to 8.87 GHz with phase noise value of -92 dBc/Hz@1MHz. Both of the oscillation frequency can be slightly tuned within 20 MHz around the center oscillation frequency by tuning the injection current. The method about improving the performance of IOEO is carefully discussed at the end of in this article.

  7. The variational spiked oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilera-Navarro, V.C.; Ullah, N.

    1992-08-01

    A variational analysis of the spiked harmonic oscillator Hamiltonian -d 2 / d x 2 + x 2 + δ/ x 5/2 , δ > 0, is reported in this work. A trial function satisfying Dirichlet boundary conditions is suggested. The results are excellent for a large range of values of the coupling parameter. (author)

  8. Neutrino oscillation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camilleri, L [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)

    1996-11-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments ({nu}{sub {mu}}{yields}{nu}{sub e} and {nu}{sub {mu}}{yields}{nu}{sub {tau}}) currently being performed at accelerators are reviewed. Future plans for short and long base-line experiments are summarized. (author) 10 figs., 2 tabs., 29 refs.

  9. Pacemaker neuron and network oscillations depend on a neuromodulator-regulated linear current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunbing Zhao

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Linear leak currents have been implicated in the regulation of neuronal excitability, generation of neuronal and network oscillations, and network state transitions. Yet, few studies have directly tested the dependence of network oscillations on leak currents or explored the role of leak currents on network activity. In the oscillatory pyloric network of decapod crustaceans neuromodulatory inputs are necessary for pacemaker activity. A large subset of neuromodulators is known to activate a single voltage-gated inward current IMI, which has been shown to regulate the rhythmic activity of the network and its pacemaker neurons. Using the dynamic clamp technique, we show that the crucial component of IMI for the generation of oscillatory activity is only a close-to-linear portion of the current-voltage relationship. The nature of this conductance is such that the presence or the absence of neuromodulators effectively regulates the amount of leak current and the input resistance in the pacemaker neurons. When deprived of neuromodulatory inputs, pyloric oscillations are disrupted; yet, a linear reduction of the total conductance in a single neuron within the pacemaker group recovers not only the pacemaker activity in that neuron, but also leads to a recovery of oscillations in the entire pyloric network. The recovered activity produces proper frequency and phasing that is similar to that induced by neuromodulators. These results show that the passive properties of pacemaker neurons can significantly affect their capacity to generate and regulate the oscillatory activity of an entire network, and that this feature is exploited by neuromodulatory inputs.

  10. GABAergic modulation of visual gamma and alpha oscillations and its consequences for working memory performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Soldevilla, Diego; ter Huurne, Niels; Cools, Roshan; Jensen, Ole

    2014-12-15

    Impressive in vitro research in rodents and computational modeling has uncovered the core mechanisms responsible for generating neuronal oscillations. In particular, GABAergic interneurons play a crucial role for synchronizing neural populations. Do these mechanistic principles apply to human oscillations associated with function? To address this, we recorded ongoing brain activity using magnetoencephalography (MEG) in healthy human subjects participating in a double-blind pharmacological study receiving placebo, 0.5 mg and 1.5 mg of lorazepam (LZP; a benzodiazepine upregulating GABAergic conductance). Participants performed a demanding visuospatial working memory (WM) task. We found that occipital gamma power associated with WM recognition increased with LZP dosage. Importantly, the frequency of the gamma activity decreased with dosage, as predicted by models derived from the rat hippocampus. A regionally specific gamma increase correlated with the drug-related performance decrease. Despite the system-wide pharmacological intervention, gamma power drug modulations were specific to visual cortex: sensorimotor gamma power and frequency during button presses remained unaffected. In contrast, occipital alpha power modulations during the delay interval decreased parametrically with drug dosage, predicting performance impairment. Consistent with alpha oscillations reflecting functional inhibition, LZP affected alpha power strongly in early visual regions not required for the task demonstrating a regional specific occipital impairment. GABAergic interneurons are strongly implicated in the generation of gamma and alpha oscillations in human occipital cortex where drug-induced power modulations predicted WM performance. Our findings bring us an important step closer to linking neuronal dynamics to behavior by embracing established animal models. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A test device for premixed gas turbine combustion oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, G.A.; Gemmen, R.S.; Yip, M.J.

    1996-03-01

    This report discusses design and operation of a single-nozzle test combustor for studying lean, premixed combustion oscillations from gas turbine fuel nozzles. It was used to study oscillations from a prototype fuel nozzle that produced oscillations during testing in a commercial engine. Similar, but not identical, oscillations were recorded in the test device. Basic requirements of the device design were that the flame geometry be maintained and acoustic losses be minimized; this was achieved by using a Helmholtz resonator as the combustor geometry. Surprisingly, the combustor oscillated strongly at several frequencies, without modification of the resonator. Brief survey of operating conditions suggests that it may be helpful to characterize oscillating behavior in terms of reference velocity and inlet air temperature with the rig backpressure playing a smaller role. The preliminary results do not guarantee that the single-nozzle test device will reproduce arbitrary oscillations that occur on a complete engine test. Nozzle/nozzle interactions may complicate the response, and oscillations controlled by acoustic velocities transverse to the nozzle axis may not be reproduced in a test device that relies on a bulk Helmholtz mode. Nevertheless, some oscillations can be reproduced, and the single-nozzle test device allows both active and passive control strategies to be tested relatively inexpensively.

  12. Anharmonic oscillator and Bogoliubov transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pattnayak, G.C.; Torasia, S.; Rath, B.

    1990-01-01

    The anharmonic oscillator occupies a cornerstone in many problems in physics. It was observed that none of the authors have tested Bogoliubov transformation to study anharmonic oscillator. The groundstate energy of the anharmonic oscillator is studied using Bogoliubov transformation and the results presented. (author)

  13. Bimodal oscillations in nephron autoregulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sosnovtseva, Olga; Pavlov, A.N.; Mosekilde, Erik

    2002-01-01

    The individual functional unit of the kidney (the nephron) displays oscillations in its pressure and flow regulation at two different time scales: fast oscillations associated with a myogenic dynamics of the afferent arteriole, and slower oscillations arising from a delay in the tubuloglomerular ...

  14. Observation and analysis of oscillations in linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeman, J.T.

    1991-11-01

    This report discusses the following on oscillation in linear accelerators: Betatron Oscillations; Betatron Oscillations at High Currents; Transverse Profile Oscillations; Transverse Profile Oscillations at High Currents.; Oscillation and Profile Transient Jitter; and Feedback on Transverse Oscillations

  15. Reactor oscillator - Proposal of the organisation for oscillator operation; Reaktorski oscilator - Predlog organizacije rada na oscilatoru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lolic, B; Loloc, B [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Laboratorija za fiziku reaktora, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1961-12-15

    The organizational structure for operating the reactor with the reactor oscillator describes the duties of the reactor operators; staff responsible for operating the oscillator who are responsible for measurements, preparation of the samples and further treatment of the obtained results.

  16. Public information - the crucial element in nuclear power acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, R.; Middlemiss, N.

    1996-01-01

    The British nuclear industry approach to the public information is described as the crucial element in nuclear power acceptance. The industry need to be a reliable, trustworthy source of information. There is evidence that when issues are examined in court or in quasi-judicial contexts, the public gains a better appreciation of the issues. The media report both sides of debate more evenly. Therefore the best way to deal with the most hostile opposition may be to take into a legal framework, rather than engage in hand-to-hand battle

  17. Public information - the crucial element in nuclear power acceptance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, R; Middlemiss, N [British Nuclear Industry Forum, London (United Kingdom)

    1996-07-01

    The British nuclear industry approach to the public information is described as the crucial element in nuclear power acceptance. The industry need to be a reliable, trustworthy source of information. There is evidence that when issues are examined in court or in quasi-judicial contexts, the public gains a better appreciation of the issues. The media report both sides of debate more evenly. Therefore the best way to deal with the most hostile opposition may be to take into a legal framework, rather than engage in hand-to-hand battle.

  18. Pattern formation in arrays of chemical oscillators

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chemical oscillators; phase flip; oscillation death. PACS No. 05.45 .... array oscillate (with varying amplitudes and frequencies), while the others experience oscillation death .... Barring the boundary cells, one observes near phase flip and near ...

  19. Entanglement in neutrino oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasone, M.; Dell' Anno, F.; De Siena, S.; Illuminati, F. [Universita degli Studi di Salerno Via Ponte don Melillon, Dipt. di Matematica e Informatica, Fisciano SA (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Gruppo collegato di Salerno - Baronissi SA (Italy); Dell' Anno, F.; De Siena, S.; Illuminati, F. [CNR-INFM Coherentia - Napoli (Italy); Blasone, M. [ISI Foundation for Scientific Interchange, Torino (Italy)

    2009-03-15

    Flavor oscillations in elementary particle physics are related to multimode entanglement of single-particle states. We show that mode entanglement can be expressed in terms of flavor transition probabilities, and therefore that single-particle entangled states acquire a precise operational characterization in the context of particle mixing. We treat in detail the physically relevant cases of two- and three-flavor neutrino oscillations, including the effective measure of CP violation. We discuss experimental schemes for the transfer of the quantum information encoded in single-neutrino states to spatially delocalized two-flavor charged-lepton states, thus showing, at least in principle, that single-particle entangled states of neutrino mixing are legitimate physical resources for quantum information tasks. (authors)

  20. Nonlinear (Anharmonic Casimir Oscillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habibollah Razmi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We want to study the dynamics of a simple linear harmonic micro spring which is under the influence of the quantum Casimir force/pressure and thus behaves as a (an nonlinear (anharmonic Casimir oscillator. Generally, the equation of motion of this nonlinear micromechanical Casimir oscillator has no exact solvable (analytical solution and the turning point(s of the system has (have no fixed position(s; however, for particular values of the stiffness of the micro spring and at appropriately well-chosen distance scales and conditions, there is (are approximately sinusoidal solution(s for the problem (the variable turning points are collected in a very small interval of positions. This, as a simple and elementary plan, may be useful in controlling the Casimir stiction problem in micromechanical devices.

  1. Entanglement in neutrino oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasone, M.; Dell'Anno, F.; De Siena, S.; Illuminati, F.; Dell'Anno, F.; De Siena, S.; Illuminati, F.; Blasone, M.

    2009-01-01

    Flavor oscillations in elementary particle physics are related to multimode entanglement of single-particle states. We show that mode entanglement can be expressed in terms of flavor transition probabilities, and therefore that single-particle entangled states acquire a precise operational characterization in the context of particle mixing. We treat in detail the physically relevant cases of two- and three-flavor neutrino oscillations, including the effective measure of CP violation. We discuss experimental schemes for the transfer of the quantum information encoded in single-neutrino states to spatially delocalized two-flavor charged-lepton states, thus showing, at least in principle, that single-particle entangled states of neutrino mixing are legitimate physical resources for quantum information tasks. (authors)

  2. Acoustics waves and oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Sen, S.N.

    2013-01-01

    Parameters of acoustics presented in a logical and lucid style Physical principles discussed with mathematical formulations Importance of ultrasonic waves highlighted Dispersion of ultrasonic waves in viscous liquids explained This book presents the theory of waves and oscillations and various applications of acoustics in a logical and simple form. The physical principles have been explained with necessary mathematical formulation and supported by experimental layout wherever possible. Incorporating the classical view point all aspects of acoustic waves and oscillations have been discussed together with detailed elaboration of modern technological applications of sound. A separate chapter on ultrasonics emphasizes the importance of this branch of science in fundamental and applied research. In this edition a new chapter ''Hypersonic Velocity in Viscous Liquids as revealed from Brillouin Spectra'' has been added. The book is expected to present to its readers a comprehensive presentation of the subject matter...

  3. Discrete repulsive oscillator wavefunctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, Carlos A; Rueda-Paz, Juvenal; Wolf, Kurt Bernardo

    2009-01-01

    For the study of infinite discrete systems on phase space, the three-dimensional Lorentz algebra and group, so(2,1) and SO(2,1), provide a discrete model of the repulsive oscillator. Its eigenfunctions are found in the principal irreducible representation series, where the compact generator-that we identify with the position operator-has the infinite discrete spectrum of the integers Z, while the spectrum of energies is a double continuum. The right- and left-moving wavefunctions are given by hypergeometric functions that form a Dirac basis for l 2 (Z). Under contraction, the discrete system limits to the well-known quantum repulsive oscillator. Numerical computations of finite approximations raise further questions on the use of Dirac bases for infinite discrete systems.

  4. Nonlinear dynamics in micromechanical and nanomechanical resonators and oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Tyler

    dynamics in passive resonators, self-sustained MEMS are becoming increasingly prevalent in both research and technology for crucial objectives, such as measurement of time. Despite some effort, much work remains in order to understand phase noise and stability for an oscillator based upon a nonlinear resonator. With the eventual goal of making comprehensive measurements of such a nonlinear oscillator with controlled amplitude and phase, this work describes the realization of a micromechanical phase feedback oscillator.

  5. Neutrino Masses and Oscillations

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva. Audiovisual Unit; Treille, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    This course will not cover its subject in the customary way. The emphasis will be on the simple theoretical concepts (helicity, handedness, chirality, Majorana masses) which are obscure in most of the literature, and on the quantum mechanics of oscillations, that ALL books get wrong. Which, hopefully, will not deter me from discussing some of the most interesting results from the labs and from the cosmos.

  6. Oscillations in quasineutral plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenier, E.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the limit, as the vacuum electric permittivity goes to zero, of a plasma physics system, deduced from the Vlasov-Poisson system for special initial data (distribution functions which are analytic in the space variable, with compact support in velocity), a limit also called open-quotes quasineutral regimeclose quotes of the plasma, and the related oscillations of the electric field, with high frequency in time. 20 refs

  7. Density oscillations within hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, R.; Barshay, S.

    1976-01-01

    In models of extended hadrons, in which small bits of matter carrying charge and effective mass exist confined within a medium, oscillations in the matter density may occur. A way of investigating this possibility experimentally in high-energy hadron-hadron elastic diffraction scattering is suggested, and the effect is illustrated by examining some existing data which might be relevant to the question [fr

  8. Neutrino Oscillations Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogli, Gianluigi

    2005-06-01

    We review the status of the neutrino oscillations physics, with a particular emphasis on the present knowledge of the neutrino mass-mixing parameters. We consider first the νμ → ντ flavor transitions of atmospheric neutrinos. It is found that standard oscillations provide the best description of the SK+K2K data, and that the associated mass-mixing parameters are determined at ±1σ (and NDF = 1) as: Δm2 = (2.6 ± 0.4) × 10-3 eV2 and sin 2 2θ = 1.00{ - 0.05}{ + 0.00} . Such indications, presently dominated by SK, could be strengthened by further K2K data. Then we point out that the recent data from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, together with other relevant measurements from solar and reactor neutrino experiments, in particular the KamLAND data, convincingly show that the flavor transitions of solar neutrinos are affected by Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effects. Finally, we perform an updated analysis of two-family active oscillations of solar and reactor neutrinos in the standard MSW case.

  9. Primate beta oscillations and rhythmic behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Hugo; Bartolo, Ramón

    2018-03-01

    The study of non-human primates in complex behaviors such as rhythm perception and entrainment is critical to understand the neurophysiological basis of human cognition. Next to reviewing the role of beta oscillations in human beat perception, here we discuss the role of primate putaminal oscillatory activity in the control of rhythmic movements that are guided by a sensory metronome or internally gated. The analysis of the local field potentials of the behaving macaques showed that gamma-oscillations reflect local computations associated with stimulus processing of the metronome, whereas beta-activity involves the entrainment of large putaminal circuits, probably in conjunction with other elements of cortico-basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical circuit, during internally driven rhythmic tapping. Thus, this review emphasizes the need of parametric neurophysiological observations in non-human primates that display a well-controlled behavior during high-level cognitive processes.

  10. CRUCIAL: Cryosat-2 Success over Inland Water and Land

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Philip; Berry, Philippa; Balmbra, Robert

    2014-01-01

    CRUCIAL is an ESA/STSE funded project investigating innovative land and inland water applications from Cryosat-2 with a forward-look component to the future Sentinel-3 mission. The fact that the Earth’s land surface is, in general, a relatively poor reflector of Ku band energy, with the exceptions...... of inland water, salar and ice surfaces has enabled Earth-orbiting satellite radar altimeters to be used for land surface applications including mapping and measurement of river and lake systems. Research with EnviSat Burst Echoes has shown that substantial high frequency information content is present...... of Cryosat-2 altimeter in SAR mode (I8 KHz) offers the opportunity to recover high frequency signals over much of the Earth’s land surface, enhancing the inland water height retrieval capability. Constraining this application is the limited availability of SAR Full Bit Rate (FBR) data from Cryosat-2 over...

  11. Parameters of oscillation generation regions in open star cluster models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilov, V. M.; Putkov, S. I.

    2017-07-01

    We determine the masses and radii of central regions of open star cluster (OCL) models with small or zero entropy production and estimate the masses of oscillation generation regions in clustermodels based on the data of the phase-space coordinates of stars. The radii of such regions are close to the core radii of the OCL models. We develop a new method for estimating the total OCL masses based on the cluster core mass, the cluster and cluster core radii, and radial distribution of stars. This method yields estimates of dynamical masses of Pleiades, Praesepe, and M67, which agree well with the estimates of the total masses of the corresponding clusters based on proper motions and spectroscopic data for cluster stars.We construct the spectra and dispersion curves of the oscillations of the field of azimuthal velocities v φ in OCL models. Weak, low-amplitude unstable oscillations of v φ develop in cluster models near the cluster core boundary, and weak damped oscillations of v φ often develop at frequencies close to the frequencies of more powerful oscillations, which may reduce the non-stationarity degree in OCL models. We determine the number and parameters of such oscillations near the cores boundaries of cluster models. Such oscillations points to the possible role that gradient instability near the core of cluster models plays in the decrease of the mass of the oscillation generation regions and production of entropy in the cores of OCL models with massive extended cores.

  12. Neuronal ensemble for visual working memory via interplay of slow and fast oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuhara, Hiroaki; Yamaguchi, Yoko

    2011-05-01

    The current focus of studies on neural entities for memory maintenance is on the interplay between fast neuronal oscillations in the gamma band and slow oscillations in the theta or delta band. The hierarchical coupling of slow and fast oscillations is crucial for the rehearsal of sensory inputs for short-term storage, as well as for binding sensory inputs that are represented in spatially segregated cortical areas. However, no experimental evidence for the binding of spatially segregated information has yet been presented for memory maintenance in humans. In the present study, we actively manipulated memory maintenance performance with an attentional blink procedure during human scalp electroencephalography (EEG) recordings and identified that slow oscillations are enhanced when memory maintenance is successful. These slow oscillations accompanied fast oscillations in the gamma frequency range that appeared at spatially segregated scalp sites. The amplitude of the gamma oscillation at these scalp sites was simultaneously enhanced at an EEG phase of the slow oscillation. Successful memory maintenance appears to be achieved by a rehearsal of sensory inputs together with a coordination of distributed fast oscillations at a preferred timing of the slow oscillations. © 2011 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2011 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Improved Ultraviolet and Infrared Oscillator Strengths for OH+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, James N.; Bittner, Dror M.; Bernath, Peter F.

    2018-03-01

    Molecular ions are key reaction intermediates in the interstellar medium. OH+ plays a central role in the formation of more complex chemical species and for estimating the cosmic ray ionization rate in astrophysical environments. Here, we use a recent analysis of a laboratory spectrum in conjunction with ab initio methods to calculate infrared and ultraviolet oscillator strengths. These new oscillator strengths include branch dependent intensity corrections, arising from the Herman–Wallis effect, that have not been included before. We estimate 10% total uncertainty in the UV and 6% total uncertainty in the IR for the oscillator strengths.

  14. Quasioptical Josephson oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wengler, M.J.; Pance, A.; Liu, B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the authors' work with large 2-dimensional arrays of Josephson junctions for submillimeter power generation. The basic design of the Quasioptical Josephson Oscillator (QJO) is presented. The reasons for each design decision are discussed. Superconducting devices have not yet been fabricated, but scale models and computer simulations have been done. A method for characterizing array rf coupling structures is described, and initial results with this method are presented. Microwave scale models of the radiation structure are built and a series of measurements are made with a network analyzer

  15. Oscillations in nonlinear systems

    CERN Document Server

    Hale, Jack K

    2015-01-01

    By focusing on ordinary differential equations that contain a small parameter, this concise graduate-level introduction to the theory of nonlinear oscillations provides a unified approach to obtaining periodic solutions to nonautonomous and autonomous differential equations. It also indicates key relationships with other related procedures and probes the consequences of the methods of averaging and integral manifolds.Part I of the text features introductory material, including discussions of matrices, linear systems of differential equations, and stability of solutions of nonlinear systems. Pa

  16. Neutrino oscillations at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlini, R.; Choi, C.; Donohue, J.

    1985-01-01

    Work at Argonne continues on the construction of the neutrino oscillation experiment (E645). Construction of detector supports and active shield components were completed at the Provo plant of the principal contractor for the project (the Pittsburgh-Des Moines Corporation). Erection of the major experimental components was completed at the LAMPF experimental site in mid-March 1985. Work continues on the tunnel which will house the detector. Construction of detector components (scintillators and proportional drift tubes) is proceeding at Ohio State University and Louisiana State University. Consolidation of these components into the 20-ton neutrino detector is beginning at LAMPF

  17. Theory of oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Andronov, Aleksandr Aleksandrovich; Vitt, Aleksandr Adolfovich

    1966-01-01

    Theory of Oscillators presents the applications and exposition of the qualitative theory of differential equations. This book discusses the idea of a discontinuous transition in a dynamic process. Organized into 11 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the simplest type of oscillatory system in which the motion is described by a linear differential equation. This text then examines the character of the motion of the representative point along the hyperbola. Other chapters consider examples of two basic types of non-linear non-conservative systems, namely, dissipative systems and self-

  18. Solar and stellar oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fossat, E.

    1981-01-01

    We try to explain in simple words what a stellar oscillation is, what kind of restoring forces and excitation mechanisms can be responsible for its occurence, what kind of questions the theoretician asks to the observer and what kind of tools the latter is using to look for the answers. A selected review of the most striking results obtained in the last few years in solar seismology and the present status of their consequences on solar models is presented. A brief discussion on the expected extension towards stellar seismology will end the paper. A selected bibliography on theory as well as observations and recent papers is also included. (orig.)

  19. Coupled nonlinear oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, J; Scott, A C

    1983-01-01

    Topics discussed include transitions in weakly coupled nonlinear oscillators, singularly perturbed delay-differential equations, and chaos in simple laser systems. Papers are presented on truncated Navier-Stokes equations in a two-dimensional torus, on frequency locking in Josephson point contacts, and on soliton excitations in Josephson tunnel junctions. Attention is also given to the nonlinear coupling of radiation pulses to absorbing anharmonic molecular media, to aspects of interrupted coarse-graining in stimulated excitation, and to a statistical analysis of long-term dynamic irregularity in an exactly soluble quantum mechanical model.

  20. Impacto psicosocial del síndrome demencial en cuidadores cruciales Psychosocial impact of demential syndrome in crucial care givers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos LLibre Guerra

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Las demencias, entidades de elevada frecuencia en el adulto mayor, constituyen un creciente problema de salud en países con una alta expectativa de vida como el nuestro, no solo por su magnitud, sino por su repercusión a nivel individual, familiar y social. Se presenta un estudio descriptivo de corte transversal, realizado en el período comprendido entre enero de 2003 y enero de 2005, en las áreas de salud del municipio Marianao, con el objetivo de determinar el impacto psicosocial del síndrome demencial en cuidadores cruciales. Se visitaron 110 cuidadores de pacientes con demencia y enfermedad de Alzheimer diagnosticados de acuerdo con los criterios del DSM-IV. Los cuidadores cruciales de los pacientes con demencia correspondieron en su mayoría a mujeres casadas, esposa o hijas del paciente, en la quinta década de la vida, amas de casa, y con un nivel medio de escolaridad. El cuidador dedica alrededor de 12 h diarias al cuidado del paciente, la mayor parte en la supervisión. Se evidenció afectación psicológica en el 89 % de los cuidadores. El nivel de sobrecarga o estrés en la muestra es significativamente elevado. Los cuidadores consideran como primera prioridad información acerca de la enfermedad y atención al paciente. Se recomienda realizar un plan de intervención educativa dirigido a los cuidadores, que permita reducir la sobrecarga física, psicológica y económica del cuidado y mejorar su calidad de vida.The dementias, entities of an elevated frequency in the older adult, are an increasing health problem in countries with a high life expectancy at birth as ours, not only because of their magnitude, but also because of their repercussion at the individual, familiar and social levels. A descriptive cross-sectional study was undertaken from January 2003 to January 2005 in the health areas of Marianao municipality with the objective of determining the psychosocial impact of the demential syndrome in crucial care givers. 110

  1. Bounded-oscillation Pushdown Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Ganty

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We present an underapproximation for context-free languages by filtering out runs of the underlying pushdown automaton depending on how the stack height evolves over time. In particular, we assign to each run a number quantifying the oscillating behavior of the stack along the run. We study languages accepted by pushdown automata restricted to k-oscillating runs. We relate oscillation on pushdown automata with a counterpart restriction on context-free grammars. We also provide a way to filter all but the k-oscillating runs from a given PDA by annotating stack symbols with information about the oscillation. Finally, we study closure properties of the defined class of languages and the complexity of the k-emptiness problem asking, given a pushdown automaton P and k >= 0, whether P has a k-oscillating run. We show that, when k is not part of the input, the k-emptiness problem is NLOGSPACE-complete.

  2. Single ICCII Sinusoidal Oscillators Employing Grounded Capacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. Horng

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Two inverting second-generation current conveyors (ICCII based sinusoidal oscillators are presented. The first sinusoidal oscillator is composed of one ICCII, two grounded capacitors and two resistors. The oscillation condition and oscillation frequency can be orthogonally controllable. The second sinusoidal oscillator is composed of one ICCII, two grounded capacitors and three resistors. The oscillation condition and oscillation frequency can be independently controllable through different resistors.

  3. A computational model clarifies the roles of positive and negative feedback loops in the Drosophila circadian clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Junwei; Zhou Tianshou

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies showed that a single negative feedback structure should be sufficient for robust circadian oscillations. It is thus pertinent to ask why current cellular clock models almost universally have interlocked negative feedback loop (NFL) and positive feedback loop (PFL). Here, we propose a molecular model that reflects the essential features of the Drosophila circadian clock to clarify the different roles of negative and positive feedback loops. In agreement with experimental observations, the model can simulate circadian oscillations in constant darkness, entrainment by light-dark cycles, as well as phenotypes of per 01 and clk Jrk mutants. Moreover, sustained oscillations persist when the PFL is removed, implying the crucial role of NFL for rhythm generation. Through parameter sensitivity analysis, it is revealed that incorporation of PFL increases the robustness of the system to regulatory processes in PFL itself. Such reduced models can aid understanding of the design principles of circadian clocks in Drosophila and other organisms with complex transcriptional feedback structures.

  4. Stable And Oscillating Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, Martin B.; Garrett, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    Sample stability or instability determined by levitating frequency. Degree of oscillation of acoustically levitated object along axis of levitation chamber controlled by varying frequency of acoustic driver for axis above or below frequency of corresponding chamber resonance. Stabilization/oscillation technique applied in normal Earth gravity, or in absence of gravity to bring object quickly to rest at nominal levitation position or make object oscillate in desired range about that position.

  5. Isotropic oscillator: spheroidal wave functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mardoyan, L.G.; Pogosyan, G.S.; Ter-Antonyan, V.M.; Sisakyan, A.N.

    1985-01-01

    Solutions of the Schroedinger equation are found for an isotropic oscillator (10) in prolate and oblate spheroidal coordinates. It is shown that the obtained solutions turn into spherical and cylindrical bases of the isotropic oscillator at R→0 and R→ infinity (R is the dimensional parameter entering into the definition of prolate and oblate spheroidal coordinates). The explicit form is given for both prolate and oblate basis of the isotropic oscillator for the lowest quantum states

  6. Neutrino oscillations. Theory and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beshtoev, Kh.M.

    2001-01-01

    Theoretical schemes on neutrino oscillations are considered. The experimental data on neutrino oscillations obtained in the Super-Kamiokande (Japan) and SNO (Canada) experiments are given. Comparison of these data with the predictions obtained in the theoretical schemes is done. Conclusion is made that the experimental data confirm only the scheme with transitions (oscillations) between aromatic ν e -, ν μ -, ν τ - neutrinos with maximal angle mixings. (author)

  7. Crucial problems in the design of a terahertz tripler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Jin; Zhang Dehai; Jiang Changhong; Zhao Xin; Yan Dashuai; Huang Jian

    2015-01-01

    A frequency-multiplied source at the terahertz band using discrete planar Schottky diodes, which is a critical element in heterodyne instruments, has been studied by some domestic research institutions in recent years. Besides the design method, there are still many crucial problems that must be taken into consideration in the design. This article mainly discuss three aspects based on the measured data of a 225 GHz tripler that we designed. Firstly, the accuracy of the diode model concerns the reliability of the simulation results. According to the Spice parameters and the measured results, the physical size and the DC parameter of the Schottky diode can be corrected until there is a good consistency between the simulated and measured results. Secondly, the heat accumulation happens to the Schottky junction when the high input power is added. A steady-state thermal simulation is done and the results show that the hottest temperature is about 140 °C with 250 mW input power, which is safe to the diode. Lastly, some non-ideal factors are brought during the assembly process such as the uncertainty in the conductive adhesive shape and location deviation of the circuit. Furthermore, the effect on the performance of the frequency multiplier is calculated in this work. (paper)

  8. Crucial problems in the design of a terahertz tripler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Meng; Dehai, Zhang; Changhong, Jiang; Xin, Zhao; Jian, Huang; Dashuai, Yan

    2015-08-01

    A frequency-multiplied source at the terahertz band using discrete planar Schottky diodes, which is a critical element in heterodyne instruments, has been studied by some domestic research institutions in recent years. Besides the design method, there are still many crucial problems that must be taken into consideration in the design. This article mainly discuss three aspects based on the measured data of a 225 GHz tripler that we designed. Firstly, the accuracy of the diode model concerns the reliability of the simulation results. According to the Spice parameters and the measured results, the physical size and the DC parameter of the Schottky diode can be corrected until there is a good consistency between the simulated and measured results. Secondly, the heat accumulation happens to the Schottky junction when the high input power is added. A steady-state thermal simulation is done and the results show that the hottest temperature is about 140 °C with 250 mW input power, which is safe to the diode. Lastly, some non-ideal factors are brought during the assembly process such as the uncertainty in the conductive adhesive shape and location deviation of the circuit. Furthermore, the effect on the performance of the frequency multiplier is calculated in this work.

  9. The Wien Bridge Oscillator Family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Erik

    2006-01-01

    A tutorial in which the Wien bridge family of oscillators is defined and investigated. Oscillators which do not fit into the Barkhausen criterion topology may be designed. A design procedure based on initial complex pole quality factor is reported. The dynamic transfer characteristic of the ampli......A tutorial in which the Wien bridge family of oscillators is defined and investigated. Oscillators which do not fit into the Barkhausen criterion topology may be designed. A design procedure based on initial complex pole quality factor is reported. The dynamic transfer characteristic...

  10. Unstable oscillators based hyperchaotic circuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murali, K.; Tamasevicius, A.; G. Mykolaitis, A.

    1999-01-01

    A simple 4th order hyperchaotic circuit with unstable oscillators is described. The circuit contains two negative impedance converters, two inductors, two capacitors, a linear resistor and a diode. The Lyapunov exponents are presented to confirm hyperchaotic nature of the oscillations in the circ...... in the circuit. The performance of the circuit is investigated by means of numerical integration of appropriate differential equations, PSPICE simulations, and hardware experiment.......A simple 4th order hyperchaotic circuit with unstable oscillators is described. The circuit contains two negative impedance converters, two inductors, two capacitors, a linear resistor and a diode. The Lyapunov exponents are presented to confirm hyperchaotic nature of the oscillations...

  11. Heat exchanger with oscillating flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, Stephen J. (Inventor); Blosser, Max L. (Inventor); Camarda, Charles J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Various heat exchange apparatuses are described in which an oscillating flow of primary coolant is used to dissipate an incident heat flux. The oscillating flow may be imparted by a reciprocating piston, a double action twin reciprocating piston, fluidic oscillators or electromagnetic pumps. The oscillating fluid flows through at least one conduit in either an open loop or a closed loop. A secondary flow of coolant may be used to flow over the outer walls of at least one conduit to remove heat transferred from the primary coolant to the walls of the conduit.

  12. Magma chamber interaction giving rise to asymmetric oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walwer, D.; Ghil, M.; Calais, E.

    2017-12-01

    Geodetic time series at four volcanoes (Okmok, Akutan, Shishaldin, and Réunion) are processed using Multi-channel Singular Spectrum Analysis (M-SSA) and reveal sawtooth-shaped oscillations ; the latter are characterized by short intervals of fast inflations followed by longer intervals of slower deflations. At Okmok and Akutan, the oscillations are first damped and then accentuated. At Okmok, the increase in amplitude of the oscillations is followed by an eruption. We first show that the dynamics of these four volcanoes bears similarities with that of a simple nonlinear, dissipative oscillator, indicating that the inflation-deflation episodes are relaxation oscillations. These observations imply that ab initio dynamical models of magma chambers should possess an asymmetric oscillatory regime. Next, based on the work of Whitehead and Helfrich [1991], we show that a model of two magma chambers — connected by a cylindrical conduit in which the magma viscosity depends on temperature — gives rise to asymmetric overpressure oscillations in the magma reservoirs. These oscillations lead to surface deformations that are consistent with those observed at the four volcanoes in this study. This relaxation oscillation regime occurs only when the vertical temperature gradient in the host rock between the two magma chambers is large enough and when the magma flux entering the volcanic system is sufficiently high. The magma being supplied by a deeper source region, the input flux depends on the pressure difference between the source and the deepest reservoir. When this difference is not sufficiently high, the magma flux exponentially decreases, leading to damped oscillations as observed at Akutan and Okmok. The combination of observational and modeling results clearly supports the role of relaxation oscillations in the dynamics of volcanic systems.

  13. Modeling of termokinetic oscillations at partial oxidation of methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutyunov, A. V.; Belyaev, A. A.; Inovenkov, I. N.; Nefedov, V. V.

    2017-12-01

    Partial oxidation of natural gas at moderate temperatures below 1500 K has significant interest for a number of industrial applications. But such processes can proceed at different unstable regimes including oscillating modes. Nonlinear phenomena at partial oxidation of methane were observed at different conditions. The investigation of the complex nonlinear system of equations that describes this process is a real method to insure its stability at industrial conditions and, at the same time, is an effective tool for its further enhancement. Numerical analysis of methane oxidation kinetics in the continuous stirred-tank reactor, with the use of detailed kinetic model has shown the possibility of the appearance of oscillating modes in the appropriate range of reaction parameters that characterize the composition, pressure, reagents flow, thermophysical features of the system, and geometry of the reactor. The appearance of oscillating modes is connected both with the reaction kinetics, heat release and sink and reagents introduction and removing. At that, oscillations appear only at a limited range of parameters, but can be accompanied by significant change in the yield of products. We have determined the range of initial temperature and pressure at which oscillations can be observed, if all other parameters remained fixed. The boundaries of existence of oscillations on the phase plane were calculated. It was shown that depending on the position inside the oscillation region the oscillations have different frequency and amplitude. It was reviled the role of heat exchange with the environment: at the absence of heat exchange the oscillating modes are impossible. In the vicinity of the boundary of phase range, where oscillations exist, significant change of concentration of some products were observed, for example, that of CO2, which in this case one of the principal products is. At that, insignificant increase in pressure not only change the character of CO2 behaving

  14. Input-dependent frequency modulation of cortical gamma oscillations shapes spatial synchronization and enables phase coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowet, Eric; Roberts, Mark; Hadjipapas, Avgis; Peter, Alina; van der Eerden, Jan; De Weerd, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Fine-scale temporal organization of cortical activity in the gamma range (∼25-80Hz) may play a significant role in information processing, for example by neural grouping ('binding') and phase coding. Recent experimental studies have shown that the precise frequency of gamma oscillations varies with input drive (e.g. visual contrast) and that it can differ among nearby cortical locations. This has challenged theories assuming widespread gamma synchronization at a fixed common frequency. In the present study, we investigated which principles govern gamma synchronization in the presence of input-dependent frequency modulations and whether they are detrimental for meaningful input-dependent gamma-mediated temporal organization. To this aim, we constructed a biophysically realistic excitatory-inhibitory network able to express different oscillation frequencies at nearby spatial locations. Similarly to cortical networks, the model was topographically organized with spatially local connectivity and spatially-varying input drive. We analyzed gamma synchronization with respect to phase-locking, phase-relations and frequency differences, and quantified the stimulus-related information represented by gamma phase and frequency. By stepwise simplification of our models, we found that the gamma-mediated temporal organization could be reduced to basic synchronization principles of weakly coupled oscillators, where input drive determines the intrinsic (natural) frequency of oscillators. The gamma phase-locking, the precise phase relation and the emergent (measurable) frequencies were determined by two principal factors: the detuning (intrinsic frequency difference, i.e. local input difference) and the coupling strength. In addition to frequency coding, gamma phase contained complementary stimulus information. Crucially, the phase code reflected input differences, but not the absolute input level. This property of relative input-to-phase conversion, contrasting with latency codes

  15. Reactor oscillator - I - III, Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lolic, B.

    1961-12-01

    Project 'Reactor oscillator' covers the following activities: designing reactor oscillators for reactors RA and RB with detailed engineering drawings; constructing and mounting of the oscillator; designing and constructing the appropriate electronic equipment for the oscillator; measurements at the RA and RB reactors needed for completing the oscillator construction

  16. Time domain oscillating poles: Stability redefined in Memristor based Wien-oscillators

    KAUST Repository

    Talukdar, Abdul Hafiz Ibne; Radwan, Ahmed G.; Salama, Khaled N.

    2012-01-01

    poles. The idea is verified using a Memristor based Wien oscillator. Sustained oscillations are observed without having the poles of the system fixed on the imaginary axis and the oscillating behavior of the system poles is reported. The oscillating

  17. Morning and Evening Oscillators Cooperate to Reset Circadian Behavior in Response to Light Input

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi Lamba

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Light is a crucial input for circadian clocks. In Drosophila, short light exposure can robustly shift the phase of circadian behavior. The model for this resetting posits that circadian photoreception is cell autonomous: CRYPTOCHROME senses light, binds to TIMELESS (TIM, and promotes its degradation, which is mediated by JETLAG (JET. However, it was recently proposed that interactions between circadian neurons are also required for phase resetting. We identify two groups of neurons critical for circadian photoreception: the morning (M and the evening (E oscillators. These neurons work synergistically to reset rhythmic behavior. JET promotes acute TIM degradation cell autonomously in M and E oscillators but also nonautonomously in E oscillators when expressed in M oscillators. Thus, upon light exposure, the M oscillators communicate with the E oscillators. Because the M oscillators drive circadian behavior, they must also receive inputs from the E oscillators. Hence, although photic TIM degradation is largely cell autonomous, neural cooperation between M and E oscillators is critical for circadian behavioral photoresponses.

  18. Adaptor protein complex 2-mediated endocytosis is crucial for male reproductive organ development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Youn; Xu, Zheng-Yi; Song, Kyungyoung; Kim, Dae Heon; Kang, Hyangju; Reichardt, Ilka; Sohn, Eun Ju; Friml, Jirí; Juergens, Gerd; Hwang, Inhwan

    2013-08-01

    Fertilization in flowering plants requires the temporal and spatial coordination of many developmental processes, including pollen production, anther dehiscence, ovule production, and pollen tube elongation. However, it remains elusive as to how this coordination occurs during reproduction. Here, we present evidence that endocytosis, involving heterotetrameric adaptor protein complex 2 (AP-2), plays a crucial role in fertilization. An Arabidopsis thaliana mutant ap2m displays multiple defects in pollen production and viability, as well as elongation of staminal filaments and pollen tubes, all of which are pivotal processes needed for fertilization. Of these abnormalities, the defects in elongation of staminal filaments and pollen tubes were partially rescued by exogenous auxin. Moreover, DR5rev:GFP (for green fluorescent protein) expression was greatly reduced in filaments and anthers in ap2m mutant plants. At the cellular level, ap2m mutants displayed defects in both endocytosis of N-(3-triethylammonium-propyl)-4-(4-diethylaminophenylhexatrienyl) pyridinium dibromide, a lypophilic dye used as an endocytosis marker, and polar localization of auxin-efflux carrier PIN FORMED2 (PIN2) in the stamen filaments. Moreover, these defects were phenocopied by treatment with Tyrphostin A23, an inhibitor of endocytosis. Based on these results, we propose that AP-2-dependent endocytosis plays a crucial role in coordinating the multiple developmental aspects of male reproductive organs by modulating cellular auxin level through the regulation of the amount and polarity of PINs.

  19. Convection and stellar oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarslev, Magnus Johan

    2017-01-01

    for asteroseismology, because of the challenges inherent in modelling turbulent convection in 1D stellar models. As a result of oversimplifying the physics near the surface, theoretical calculations systematically overestimate the oscillation frequencies. This has become known as the asteroseismic surface effect. Due...... to lacking better options, this frequency difference is typically corrected for with ad-hoc formulae. The topic of this thesis is the improvement of 1D stellar convection models and the effects this has on asteroseismic properties. The source of improvements is 3D simulations of radiation...... atmospheres to replace the outer layers of stellar models. The additional turbulent pressure and asymmetrical opacity effects in the atmosphere model, compared to convection in stellar evolution models, serve to expand the atmosphere. The enlarged acoustic cavity lowers the pulsation frequencies bringing them...

  20. Photospheric oscillations. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fossat, E.; Ricort, G.

    1975-01-01

    Intensity fluctuations in the wings of the Fraunhofer line Na D 1 5896 have been recorded for about two hundred hours at the focus of the Nice coude refractor, using a sodium optical resonance device. Because of the large beam aperture available, records have been made on circular apertures from 22'' up to 32' diameter (the whole sun). The principal results from the analysis of these date are: As shown by White and Cha, the five-minute oscillation has a gaussian random character with a mean lifetime of about 20 min. Its two-dimensional spatial power spectrum is roughly gaussian for every temporal frequency between 2 and 6 MHz. The width of this gaussian spectrum is near 5 x 10 -5 km -1 (i.e. π = 20,000 km). (orig./BJ) [de

  1. Coronal Waves and Oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakariakov Valery M.

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Wave and oscillatory activity of the solar corona is confidently observed with modern imaging and spectral instruments in the visible light, EUV, X-ray and radio bands, and interpreted in terms of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD wave theory. The review reflects the current trends in the observational study of coronal waves and oscillations (standing kink, sausage and longitudinal modes, propagating slow waves and fast wave trains, the search for torsional waves, theoretical modelling of interaction of MHD waves with plasma structures, and implementation of the theoretical results for the mode identification. Also the use of MHD waves for remote diagnostics of coronal plasma - MHD coronal seismology - is discussed and the applicability of this method for the estimation of coronal magnetic field, transport coefficients, fine structuring and heating function is demonstrated.

  2. Optogenetically evoked gamma oscillations are disturbed by cocaine administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan E Dilgen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Drugs of abuse have enormous societal impact by degrading the cognitive abilities, emotional state and social behavior of addicted individuals. Among other events involved in the addiction cycle, the study of a single exposure to cocaine, and the contribution of the effects of that event to the continuous and further use of drugs of abuse are fundamental. Gamma oscillations are thought to be important neural correlates of cognitive processing in the prefrontal cortex (PFC which include decision making, set shifting and working memory. It follows that cocaine exposure might modulate gamma oscillations, which could result in reduced cognitive ability. Parvalbumin-positive fast-spiking interneurons play an orchestrating role in gamma oscillation induction and it has been shown recently that gamma oscillations can be induced in an anesthetized animal using optogenetic techniques. We use a knock-in mouse model together with optogenetics and in vivo electrophysiology to study the effects of acute cocaine on PFC gamma oscillation as a step toward understanding the cortical changes that may underlie continuous use of stimulants. Our results show that acute cocaine administration increases entrainment of the gamma oscillation to the optogentically induced driving frequency. Our results also suggest that this modulation of gamma oscillations is driven trough activation of DAD1 receptors. The acute cocaine-mediated changes in mPFC may underlie the enhancement of attention and awareness commonly reported by cocaine users and may contribute to the further use and abuse of psychostimulants.

  3. Rac1 Dosage Is Crucial for Normal Endochondral Bone Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Dai; Bush, Jason R; Bryce, Dawn-Marie; Kamijo, Ryutaro; Beier, Frank

    2017-10-01

    Rac1, a member of the small Rho GTPase family, plays multiple cellular roles. Studies of mice conditionally lacking Rac1 have revealed essential roles for Rac1 in various tissues, including cartilage and limb mesenchyme, where Rac1 loss produces dwarfism and long bone shortening. To gain further insight into the role of Rac1 in skeletal development, we have used transgenic mouse lines to express a constitutively active (ca) Rac1 mutant protein in a Cre recombinase-dependent manner. Overexpression of caRac1 in limb bud mesenchyme or chondrocytes leads to reduced body weight and shorter bones compared with control mice. Histological analysis of growth plates showed that caRac1;Col2-Cre mice displayed ectopic hypertrophic chondrocytes in the proliferative zone and enlarged hypertrophic zones. These mice also displayed a reduced proportion of proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive cells in the proliferative zone and nuclear β-catenin localization in the ectopic hypertrophic chondrocytes. Importantly, overexpression of caRac1 partially rescued the phenotypes of Rac1fl/fl;Col2-Cre and Rac1fl/fl;Prx1-Cre conditional knockout mice, including body weight, bone length, and growth plate disorganization. These results suggest that tight regulation of Rac1 activity is necessary for normal cartilage development. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  4. The crucial impact of lysosomes in aging and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Hughes, Adam L; Madeo, Frank; Ruckenstuhl, Christoph

    2016-12-01

    Lysosomes are the main catabolic organelles of a cell and play a pivotal role in a plethora of cellular processes, including responses to nutrient availability and composition, stress resistance, programmed cell death, plasma membrane repair, development, and cell differentiation. In line with this pleiotropic importance for cellular and organismal life and death, lysosomal dysfunction is associated with many age-related pathologies like Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease, as well as with a decline in lifespan. Conversely, targeting lysosomal functional capacity is emerging as a means to promote longevity. Here, we analyze the current knowledge on the prominent influence of lysosomes on aging-related processes, such as their executory and regulatory roles during general and selective macroautophagy, or their storage capacity for amino acids and ions. In addition, we review and discuss the roles of lysosomes as active players in the mechanisms underlying known lifespan-extending interventions like, for example, spermidine or rapamycin administration. In conclusion, this review aims at critically examining the nature and pliability of the different layers, in which lysosomes are involved as a control hub for aging and longevity. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The Differentiation Balance of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Is Crucial to Hematopoiesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Wu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs, the important component and regulator of bone marrow microenvironment, give rise to hematopoietic-supporting stromal cells and form hematopoietic niches for hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs. However, how BMSC differentiation affects hematopoiesis is poorly understood. In this review, we focus on the role of BMSC differentiation in hematopoiesis. We discussed the role of BMSCs and their progeny in hematopoiesis. We also examine the mechanisms that cause differentiation bias of BMSCs in stress conditions including aging, irradiation, and chemotherapy. Moreover, the differentiation balance of BMSCs is crucial to hematopoiesis. We highlight the negative effects of differentiation bias of BMSCs on hematopoietic recovery after bone marrow transplantation. Keeping the differentiation balance of BMSCs is critical for hematopoietic recovery. This review summarises current understanding about how BMSC differentiation affects hematopoiesis and its potential application in improving hematopoietic recovery after bone marrow transplantation.

  6. Oscillator strengths for neutral technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garstang, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Oscillator strengths have been calculated for most of the spectral lines of TcI which are of interest in the study of stars of spectral type S. Oscillator strengths have been computed for the corresponding transitions in MnI as a partial check of the technetium calculations

  7. Hyperchaos in coupled Colpitts oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cenys, Antanas; Tamasevicius, Arunas; Baziliauskas, Antanas

    2003-01-01

    The paper suggests a simple solution of building a hyperchaotic oscillator. Two chaotic Colpitts oscillators, either identical or non-identical ones are coupled by means of two linear resistors R-k. The hyperchaotic output signal v(t) is a linear combination, specifically the mean of the individual...

  8. Stochastic and Chaotic Relaxation Oscillations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grasman, J.; Roerdink, J.B.T.M.

    1988-01-01

    For relaxation oscillators stochastic and chaotic dynamics are investigated. The effect of random perturbations upon the period is computed. For an extended system with additional state variables chaotic behavior can be expected. As an example, the Van der Pol oscillator is changed into a

  9. Oscillating solitons in nonlinear optics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... are derived, and the relevant properties and features of oscillating solitons are illustrated. Oscillating solitons are controlled by the reciprocal of the group velocity and Kerr nonlinearity. Results of this paper will be valuable to the study of dispersion-managed optical communication system and mode-locked fibre lasers.

  10. Augmenting cognition by neuronal oscillations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horschig, J.M.; Zumer, J.; Bahramisharif, A.

    2014-01-01

    Cortical oscillations have been shown to represent fundamental functions of a working brain, e.g., communication, stimulus binding, error monitoring, and inhibition, and are directly linked to behavior. Recent studies intervening with these oscillations have demonstrated effective modulation of both

  11. Oscillating universe with quintom matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Huahui; Cai Yifu; Qiu Taotao; Piao Yunsong; Zhang Xinmin

    2008-01-01

    In this Letter, we study the possibility of building a model of the oscillating universe with quintom matter in the framework of 4-dimensional Friedmann-Robertson-Walker background. Taking the two-scalar-field quintom model as an example, we find in the model parameter space there are five different types of solutions which correspond to: (I) a cyclic universe with the minimal and maximal values of the scale factor remaining the same in every cycle, (II) an oscillating universe with its minimal and maximal values of the scale factor increasing cycle by cycle, (III) an oscillating universe with its scale factor always increasing, (IV) an oscillating universe with its minimal and maximal values of the scale factor decreasing cycle by cycle, and (V) an oscillating universe with its scale factor always decreasing

  12. Precision of Classification of Odorant Value by the Power of Olfactory Bulb Oscillations Is Altered by Optogenetic Silencing of Local Adrenergic Innervation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ramirez-Gordillo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuromodulators such as noradrenaline appear to play a crucial role in learning and memory. The goal of this study was to determine the role of norepinephrine in representation of odorant identity and value by olfactory bulb oscillations in an olfactory learning task. We wanted to determine whether the different bandwidths of olfactory bulb oscillations encode information involved in associating the odor with the value, and whether norepinephrine is involved in modulating this association. To this end mice expressing halorhodopsin under the dopamine-beta-hydrolase (DBH promoter received an optetrode implant targeted to the olfactory bulb. Mice learned to differentiate odorants in a go-no-go task. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis showed that there was development of a broadband differential rewarded vs. unrewarded odorant-induced change in the power of local field potential oscillations as the mice became proficient in discriminating between two odorants. In addition, the change in power reflected the value of the odorant rather than the identity. Furthermore, optogenetic silencing of local noradrenergic axons in the olfactory bulb altered the differential oscillatory power response to the odorants for the theta, beta, and gamma bandwidths.

  13. Precision of Classification of Odorant Value by the Power of Olfactory Bulb Oscillations Is Altered by Optogenetic Silencing of Local Adrenergic Innervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Gordillo, Daniel; Ma, Ming; Restrepo, Diego

    2018-01-01

    Neuromodulators such as noradrenaline appear to play a crucial role in learning and memory. The goal of this study was to determine the role of norepinephrine in representation of odorant identity and value by olfactory bulb oscillations in an olfactory learning task. We wanted to determine whether the different bandwidths of olfactory bulb oscillations encode information involved in associating the odor with the value, and whether norepinephrine is involved in modulating this association. To this end mice expressing halorhodopsin under the dopamine-beta-hydrolase (DBH) promoter received an optetrode implant targeted to the olfactory bulb. Mice learned to differentiate odorants in a go-no-go task. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis showed that there was development of a broadband differential rewarded vs. unrewarded odorant-induced change in the power of local field potential oscillations as the mice became proficient in discriminating between two odorants. In addition, the change in power reflected the value of the odorant rather than the identity. Furthermore, optogenetic silencing of local noradrenergic axons in the olfactory bulb altered the differential oscillatory power response to the odorants for the theta, beta, and gamma bandwidths.

  14. Free oscillation of the Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Abedini

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available   This work is a study of the Earths free oscillations considering a merge of solid and liquid model. At the turn of 19th century Geophysicists presented the theory of the free oscillations for a self-gravitating, isotropic and compressible sphere. Assuming a steel structure for an Earth size sphere, they predicted a period of oscillation of about 1 hour. About 50 years later, the free oscillations of stars was studied by Cowling and others. They classified the oscillation modes of the stars into acoustic and gravity modes on the basis of their driving forces. These are pressure and buoyancy forces respectively. The earliest measurements for the period of the free oscillations of the Earth was made by Benyove from a study of Kamchathca earthquake. Since then, the Geophysicists have been trying to provide a theoretical basis for these measurements. Recently, the theory concerning oscillations of celestial fluids is extended by Sobouti to include the possible oscillations of the Earthlike bodies. Using the same technique, we study the free oscillations of a spherically symmetric, non-rotating and elastic model for the Earth.   We used the actual data of the Earths interior structure in our numerical calculations. Numerical results show that there exist three distinct oscillation modes namely acoustic, gravity and toroidal modes. These modes are driven by pressure, buoyancy and shear forces respectively. The shear force is due to the elastic properties of the solid part of the Earth. Our numerical results are consistent with the seismic data recorded from earthquake measurements.

  15. Collagen V expression is crucial in regional development of the supraspinatus tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connizzo, Brianne K; Adams, Sheila M; Adams, Thomas H; Birk, David E; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2016-12-01

    Manipulations in cell culture and mouse models have demonstrated that reduction of collagen V results in altered fibril structure and matrix assembly. A tissue-dependent role for collagen V in determining mechanical function was recently established, but its role in determining regional properties has not been addressed. The objective of this study was to define the role(s) of collagen V expression in establishing the site-specific properties of the supraspinatus tendon. The insertion and midsubstance of tendons from wild type, heterozygous and tendon/ligament-specific null mice were assessed for crimp morphology, fibril morphology, cell morphology, as well as total collagen and pyridinoline cross-link (PYD) content. Fibril morphology was altered at the midsubstance of both groups with larger, but fewer, fibrils and no change in cell morphology or collagen compared to the wild type controls. In contrast, a significant disruption of fibril assembly was observed at the insertion site of the null group with the presence of structurally aberrant fibrils. Alterations were also present in cell density and PYD content. Altogether, these results demonstrate that collagen V plays a crucial role in determining region-specific differences in mouse supraspinatus tendon structure. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:2154-2161, 2016. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Amplitude mediated chimera states with active and inactive oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Rupak; Sen, Abhijit

    2018-05-01

    The emergence and nature of amplitude mediated chimera states, spatio-temporal patterns of co-existing coherent and incoherent regions, are investigated for a globally coupled system of active and inactive Ginzburg-Landau oscillators. The existence domain of such states is found to shrink and shift in parametric space with the increase in the fraction of inactive oscillators. The role of inactive oscillators is found to be twofold—they get activated to form a separate region of coherent oscillations and, in addition, decrease the common collective frequency of the coherent regions by their presence. The dynamical origin of these effects is delineated through a bifurcation analysis of a reduced model system that is based on a mean field approximation. Our results may have practical implications for the robustness of such states in biological or physical systems where age related deterioration in the functionality of components can occur.

  17. From intrusive to oscillating thoughts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peirce, Anne Griswold

    2007-10-01

    This paper focused on the possibility that intrusive thoughts (ITs) are a form of an evolutionary, adaptive, and complex strategy to prepare for and resolve stressful life events through schema formation. Intrusive thoughts have been studied in relation to individual conditions, such as traumatic stress disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder. They have also been documented in the average person experiencing everyday stress. In many descriptions of thought intrusion, it is accompanied by thought suppression. Several theories have been put forth to describe ITs, although none provides a satisfactory explanation as to whether ITs are a normal process, a normal process gone astray, or a sign of pathology. There is also no consistent view of the role that thought suppression plays in the process. I propose that thought intrusion and thought suppression may be better understood by examining them together as a complex and adaptive mechanism capable of escalating in times of need. The ability of a biological mechanism to scale up in times of need is one hallmark of a complex and adaptive system. Other hallmarks of complexity, including self-similarity across scales, sensitivity to initial conditions, presence of feedback loops, and system oscillation, are also discussed in this article. Finally, I propose that thought intrusion and thought suppression are better described together as an oscillatory cycle.

  18. Transitioning to a New Facility: The Crucial Role of Employee Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slosberg, Meredith; Nejati, Adeleh; Evans, Jennie; Nanda, Upali

    Transitioning to a new facility can be challenging for employees and detrimental to operations. A key aspect of the transition is employee understanding of, and involvement in, the design of the new facility. The literature lacks a comprehensive study of the impact of change engagement throughout the design, construction, and activation of a project as well as how that can affect perceptions, expectations, and, eventually, satisfaction of employees. The purpose of this research was to examine employee perceptions and satisfaction throughout a hospital design, construction, and activation process. Three pulse-point surveys were administered throughout the transition of a children's hospital emergency department and neonatal intensive care unit to a new facility. We also administered a postoccupancy survey 3 months after the move into the new facility. We received 544 responses and analyzed them to assess the relationship between involvement in design or change engagement initiatives and overall perceptions. The results revealed a strong relationship between employee engagement and their level of preparedness to move, readiness to adapt, and satisfaction. Early involvement in the design of a facility or new processes can significantly affect staff preparedness and readiness to adapt as well as employees' overall satisfaction with the building after occupancy. In addition, our findings suggest that keeping a finger on the pulse of employee perceptions and expectations throughout the design, construction, and activation phase is critical to employee preparedness and satisfaction in transitioning to a new facility.

  19. A crucial role for CDC42 in senescence-associated inflammation and atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi K Ito

    Full Text Available Risk factors for atherosclerosis accelerate the senescence of vascular endothelial cells and promote atherogenesis by inducing vascular inflammation. A hallmark of endothelial senescence is the persistent up-regulation of pro-inflammatory genes. We identified CDC42 signaling as a mediator of chronic inflammation associated with endothelial senescence. Inhibition of CDC42 or NF-κB signaling attenuated the sustained up-regulation of pro-inflammatory genes in senescent human endothelial cells. Endothelium-specific activation of the p53/p21 pathway, a key mediator of senescence, also resulted in up-regulation of pro-inflammatory molecules in mice, which was reversed by Cdc42 deletion in endothelial cells. Likewise, endothelial-specific deletion of Cdc42 significantly attenuated chronic inflammation and plaque formation in atherosclerotic mice. While inhibition of NF-κB suppressed the pro-inflammatory responses in acute inflammation, the influence of Cdc42 deletion was less marked. Knockdown of cdc-42 significantly down-regulated pro-inflammatory gene expression and restored the shortened lifespan to normal in mutant worms with enhanced inflammation. These findings indicate that the CDC42 pathway is critically involved in senescence-associated inflammation and could be a therapeutic target for chronic inflammation in patients with age-related diseases without compromising host defenses.

  20. Crucial role of interleukin-4 in the survival of colon cancer stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Francipane, Maria Giovanna; Alea, Mileidys Perez; Lombardo, Ylenia; Todaro, Matilde; Medema, J. P.; Stassi, Giorgio

    2008-01-01

    Colon tumors may be maintained by a rare fraction of cancer stem-like cells (CSC) that express the cell surface marker CD133. Self-renewing CSCs exhibit relatively greater resistance to clinical cytotoxic therapies and recent work suggests that this resistance may be mediated in part by an autocrine

  1. Crucial role of interleukin-4 in the survival of colon cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francipane, Maria Giovanna; Alea, Mileidys Perez; Lombardo, Ylenia; Todaro, Matilde; Medema, J P; Stassi, Giorgio

    2008-06-01

    Colon tumors may be maintained by a rare fraction of cancer stem-like cells (CSC) that express the cell surface marker CD133. Self-renewing CSCs exhibit relatively greater resistance to clinical cytotoxic therapies and recent work suggests that this resistance may be mediated in part by an autocrine response to the immune cytokine interleukin 4 (IL-4). Blocking IL-4 signaling can sensitize CSCs to apoptotic stimuli and increase the in vivo efficacy of cytotoxic therapy. These findings suggest that inhibitors of IL-4 signaling may offer a new therapeutic tool in colon carcinoma.

  2. A new vesicle trafficking regulator CTL1 plays a crucial role in ion homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yi-Qun; Chen, Jiu-Geng; Chen, Zi-Ru; An, Dong; Lv, Qiao-Yan; Han, Mei-Ling; Wang, Ya-Ling; Salt, David E; Chao, Dai-Yin

    2017-12-01

    Ion homeostasis is essential for plant growth and environmental adaptation, and maintaining ion homeostasis requires the precise regulation of various ion transporters, as well as correct root patterning. However, the mechanisms underlying these processes remain largely elusive. Here, we reported that a choline transporter gene, CTL1, controls ionome homeostasis by regulating the secretory trafficking of proteins required for plasmodesmata (PD) development, as well as the transport of some ion transporters. Map-based cloning studies revealed that CTL1 mutations alter the ion profile of Arabidopsis thaliana. We found that the phenotypes associated with these mutations are caused by a combination of PD defects and ion transporter misregulation. We also established that CTL1 is involved in regulating vesicle trafficking and is thus required for the trafficking of proteins essential for ion transport and PD development. Characterizing choline transporter-like 1 (CTL1) as a new regulator of protein sorting may enable researchers to understand not only ion homeostasis in plants but also vesicle trafficking in general.

  3. WW II "guinea pigs" played crucial role in refining plastic surgery in Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Wilton, P

    1998-01-01

    When WW II started, Canada had only 4 plastic surgeons. One of them, Dr. Ross Tilley, would treat hundreds of Allied airmen whose bodies needed massive reconstruction because of war injuries. These men became known as the guinea pigs, and Tilley would bring the lessons he learned on them back to Canada.

  4. Claudin-1 is a p63 target gene with a crucial role in epithelial development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Lopardo

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The epidermis of the skin is a self-renewing, stratified epithelium that functions as the interface between the human body and the outer environment, and acts as a barrier to water loss. Components of intercellular junctions, such as Claudins, are critical to maintain tissue integrity and water retention. p63 is a transcription factor essential for proliferation of stem cells and for stratification in epithelia, mutated in human hereditary syndromes characterized by ectodermal dysplasia. Both p63 and Claudin-1 null mice die within few hours from birth due to dehydration from severe skin abnormalities. These observations suggested the possibility that these two genes might be linked in one regulatory pathway with p63 possibly regulating Claudin-1 expression. Here we show that silencing of DeltaNp63 in primary mouse keratinocytes results in a marked down-regulation of Claudin-1 expression (-80%. DeltaNp63alpha binds in vivo to the Claudin-1 promoter and activates both the endogenous Claudin-1 gene and a reporter vector containing a -1.4 Kb promoter fragment of the Claudin-1 gene. Accordingly, Claudin-1 expression was absent in the skin of E15.5 p63 null mice and natural p63 mutant proteins, specifically those found in Ankyloblepharon-Ectodermal dysplasia-Clefting (AEC patients, were indeed altered in their capacity to regulate Claudin-1 transcription. This correlates with deficient Claudin-1 expression in the epidermis of an AEC patient carrying the I537T p63 mutation. Notably, AEC patients display skin fragility similar to what observed in the epidermis of Claudin-1 and p63 null mice. These findings reinforce the hypothesis that these two genes might be linked in a common regulatory pathway and that Claudin-1 may is an important p63 target gene involved in the pathogenesis of ectodermal dysplasias.

  5. The Crucial Role of Postcue Encoding in Directed Forgetting and Context-Dependent Forgetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastotter, Bernhard; Bauml, Karl-Heinz

    2007-01-01

    People can intentionally forget previously studied material if, after study, a forget cue is provided and new material is learned. It has recently been suggested that such list-method directed forgetting arises because the forget cue induces a change in internal context and causes context-dependent forgetting of the studied material (L. Sahakyan &…

  6. Leveraging age diversity in times of demographic change: the crucial role of leadership

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janz, K.; Buengeler, C.; Eckhoff, R.A.; Homan, A.C.; Voelpel, S.C.; Scott, C.L.; Byrd, M.Y.

    2012-01-01

    With demographic change, organizations today are seeing changes in societal make-up translated to the composition of their workforce. In the future, younger and older employees will have to work together synergistically to achieve good performance. The authors argue that it will be largely up to

  7. The auditory dorsal stream plays a crucial role in projecting hallucinated voices into external space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looijestijn, Jasper; Diederen, Kelly M. J.; Goekoop, Rutger; Sommer, Iris E. C.; Daalman, Kirstin; Kahn, Rene S.; Hoek, Hans W.; Blom, Jan Dirk

    Introduction: Verbal auditory hallucinations (VAHs) are experienced as spoken voices which seem to originate in the extracorporeal environment or inside the head. Animal and human research has identified a 'where' pathway for sound processing comprising the planum temporale, the middle frontal gyrus

  8. Eye tracking reveals a crucial role for facial motion in recognition of faces by infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Naiqi G; Quinn, Paul C; Liu, Shaoying; Ge, Liezhong; Pascalis, Olivier; Lee, Kang

    2015-06-01

    Current knowledge about face processing in infancy comes largely from studies using static face stimuli, but faces that infants see in the real world are mostly moving ones. To bridge this gap, 3-, 6-, and 9-month-old Asian infants (N = 118) were familiarized with either moving or static Asian female faces, and then their face recognition was tested with static face images. Eye-tracking methodology was used to record eye movements during the familiarization and test phases. The results showed a developmental change in eye movement patterns, but only for the moving faces. In addition, the more infants shifted their fixations across facial regions, the better their face recognition was, but only for the moving faces. The results suggest that facial movement influences the way faces are encoded from early in development. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Intercentrosomal angular separation during mitosis plays a crucial role for maintaining spindle stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutradhar, S.; Basu, S.; Paul, R.

    2015-10-01

    Cell division through proper spindle formation is one of the key puzzles in cell biology. In most mammalian cells, chromosomes spontaneously arrange to achieve a stable bipolar spindle during metaphase which eventually ensures proper segregation of the DNA into the daughter cells. In this paper, we present a robust three-dimensional mechanistic model to investigate the formation and maintenance of a bipolar mitotic spindle in mammalian cells under different physiological constraints. Using realistic parameters, we test spindle viability by measuring the spindle length and studying the chromosomal configuration. The model strikingly predicts a feature of the spindle instability arising from the insufficient intercentrosomal angular separation and impaired sliding of the interpolar microtubules. In addition, our model successfully reproduces chromosomal patterns observed in mammalian cells, when activity of different motor proteins is perturbed.

  10. Crucial role of sidewalls in velocity distributions in quasi-two-dimensional granular gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zon, J.S.; Kreft, J.; Goldman, D.L.; Miracle, D.; Swift, J. B.; Swinney, H. L.

    2004-01-01

    The significance of sidewalls which yield velocity distributions with non-Gaussian tails and a peak near zero velocity in quasi-two-dimensional granular gases, was investigated. It was observed that the particles gained energy only through collisions with the bottom of the container, which was not

  11. Identifying and training adaptive cross-cultural management skills: The crucial role of cultural metacognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Mor (Shira); M.W. Morris (Michael); J. Joh (Johann)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractFor managers, intercultural effectiveness requires forging close working relationships with people from different cultural backgrounds (Black, Mendenhall, and Oddou, 1991). Recent research with executives has found that higher cultural metacognition is associated with affective closeness

  12. Community health workers: A crucial role in newborn health care and survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Aboubaker

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available There is ample evidence from research and implementation to show that community health workers, when appropriately trained, supplied, supported and supervised, can identify and correctly treat most children for pneumonia, diarrhoea and malaria. Community management of childhood illness is an important contribution to the remarkable progress in reducing child mortality. Globally, the rate of under–five mortality has decreased by nearly half, from 90 deaths per 1000 live births in 1990 to 46 in 2013.

  13. Duty and role of Nuclear Regulation Authority facing a crucial moment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asaoka, Mie

    2013-01-01

    Duty of Nuclear Regulation Authority (NRA) was to restore public trust on nuclear regulation spoiled by the Fukushima nuclear accident. How applied such regulation as mandatory back-fitting based on latest knowledge and 40 year operational limit in principle became of great concern. Active faults issue on existing nuclear power station could be a touchstone. Safety side judgment and electric utilities side's proof responsibilities were required as more stringent criteria for active faults. The expert group had been working on assessment of fracture zones under the field survey. Reform of safety regulations should be done based on three important standpoints: (1) not business easiness but public safety was first (2) NRA keeping stance to judge its own safety standard and how NRA ought to be and (3) importance of public disclosure of information and participation in decision-making judging from greatness of public effects caused by nuclear disaster. (T. Tanaka)

  14. THE CRUCIAL ROLE OF CENTRAL BANK TRANSPARENCY IN ASSESSING THE MONETARY POLICY COMMITTEE MECHANISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumiter Florin Cornel

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the past, central banks used to be very reserved regarding their activities, strategies and monetary policy decisions and actions. As central banks become more and more independent, transparency gained importance based upon accountability arguments. An important fact for adopting an increasing central bank transparency lies in its importance of influencing the development of expectations. The concept of central bank transparency has emerged in the economic literature relatively later than some other key concepts. The widespread agreement of an inflation targeting regime and a more transparent central bank is desired by the most central banks around the world in the context of the need of the public disclosure of macroeconomic models, the quarterly time series for indicators like: inflation, output, budgetary deficit, public debt, interest rate, inflation expectations, the public announcement of the monetary policy decisions, objectives and targets, the publication of some key monetary tools like: inflation report, financial stability report, monetary policy committee report, annual report. These are all key issues in the construction of a more transparent and independent central bank in the context of a good global governance. Moreover, for the fruitful success of the central bank, latum sensu, and monetary policy, stricto sensu, it must be encompassed a complex monetary policy committee mechanism. This complex mechanism must by edowed with the collegial approach of the monetary policy committee, structure of the voting mechanism within the committee, the importance of the person which announces the changes within the interest rates and the public disclosure of these information’s enriched in a communication strategy. This communication strategy is very important for assessing and public understanding of the central bank’s actions but also for communicating the objectives, targets and forward looking approaches of the monetary policy in the global context of the transmission mechanism.

  15. Ductal carcinoma in situ within fibroadenoma: Microcalcifications identified on mammography play a crucial role in diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Jai Kyung; Kim, Yee Jeong; Kim, Bo Mi; Kim, Eun Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Fibroadenoma is a common, benign tumor of the breast, which is rarely associated with an increased risk of carcinoma. We report a case of ductal carcinoma in situ within a fibroadenoma in a 38-year-old woman. The lesion was a 1 cm, circumscribed, ovoid mass with internal calcifications evident on mammography and ultrasound, which is commonly found in fibroadenoma, but the calcifications were fine and linear, which is uncommon. This type of calcification is classified as suspicious by the American College of Radiology Breast Imaging-Reporting And Data System, and it is often correlated with comedo necrosis of ductal carcinoma, and, so, requires immediate pathologic confirmation. In our case, careful analysis of the unusual calcifications led to appropriate intervention and diagnosis. Radiologists should be aware that fibroadenomas can be malignant, and they should look for suspicious microcalcifications within a fibroadenoma

  16. Kcne2 deletion uncovers its crucial role in thyroid hormone biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roepke, Torsten K.; King, Elizabeth C.; Reyna-Neyra, Andrea; Paroder, Monika; Purtell, Kerry; Koba, Wade; Fine, Eugene; Lerner, Daniel J.; Carrasco, Nancy; Abbott, Geoffrey W.

    2009-01-01

    Thyroid dysfunction affects 1–4% of the population worldwide, causing defects including neurodevelopmental disorders, dwarfism and cardiac arrhythmia. Here, we show that KCNQ1 and KCNE2 form a TSH-stimulated, constitutively-active, thyrocyte K+ channel required for normal thyroid hormone biosynthesis. Targeted disruption of Kcne2 impaired thyroid iodide accumulation up to 8-fold, impaired maternal milk ejection and halved milk T4 content, causing hypothyroidism, 50% reduced litter size, dwarfism, alopecia, goiter, and cardiac abnormalities including hypertrophy, fibrosis, and reduced fractional shortening. The alopecia, dwarfism and cardiac abnormalities were alleviated by T3/T4 administration to pups, by supplementing dams with T4 pre- and postpartum, or by pre-weaning surrogacy with Kcne2+/+ dams; conversely these symptoms were elicited in Kcne2+/+ pups by surrogacy with Kcne2−/− dams. The data identify a critical thyrocyte K+ channel, provide a possible novel therapeutic avenue for thyroid disorders, and predict an endocrine component to some previously-identified KCNE2- and KCNQ1-linked human cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:19767733

  17. Task-shifting: The crucial role of medical doctors in reducing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Task-shifting in surgery raises important ethical issues, as patient risk ... oppressive political climate, including insecurity and threat of ... of job description, unsatisfactory organization and ... provincial level with commitment to return after having.

  18. The impact of parental deployment to war on children: the crucial role of parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gewirtz, Abigail H; Zamirt, Osnat

    2014-01-01

    It is estimated that approximately 2 million children have been affected by military deployment, yet much of what is known about the adjustment of children experiencing a parent's combat deployment has emerged only within the past 5-10 years. The extant literature on associations of parental deployment and children's adjustment is briefly reviewed by child's developmental stage. Applying a family stress model to the literature, we propose that the impact of parental deployment and reintegration on children's adjustment is largely mediated by parenting practices. Extensive developmental literature has demonstrated the importance of parenting for children's resilience in adverse contexts more generally, but not specifically in deployment contexts. We review the sparse literature on parenting in deployed families as well as emerging data on empirically supported parenting interventions for military families. An agenda for future research in this area is proffered.

  19. Low-temperature magnetism of alabandite: Crucial role of surface oxidation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čuda, J.; Kohout, Tomáš; Filip, J.; Tuček, J.; Kosterov, A.; Haloda, J.; Skála, Roman; Santala, E.; Medřík, I.; Zbořil, R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 98, 8/9 (2013), s. 1550-1556 ISSN 0003-004X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB300130903 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : alabandite (MnS) * hausmannite (Mn3O4) * magnetism * troilite (FeS) * crystallization * experimental mineralogy * ferromanganese deposit * hysteresis * low temperature * magnetic anomaly * magnetic field * manganese deposit * oxidation * remanent magnetization * stoichiometry * sulfide Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 2.059, year: 2013

  20. Ductal carcinoma in situ within fibroadenoma: Microcalcifications identified on mammography play a crucial role in diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Jai Kyung; Kim, Yee Jeong; Kim, Bo Mi [NHIS Ilsan Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun Kyung [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Fibroadenoma is a common, benign tumor of the breast, which is rarely associated with an increased risk of carcinoma. We report a case of ductal carcinoma in situ within a fibroadenoma in a 38-year-old woman. The lesion was a 1 cm, circumscribed, ovoid mass with internal calcifications evident on mammography and ultrasound, which is commonly found in fibroadenoma, but the calcifications were fine and linear, which is uncommon. This type of calcification is classified as suspicious by the American College of Radiology Breast Imaging-Reporting And Data System, and it is often correlated with comedo necrosis of ductal carcinoma, and, so, requires immediate pathologic confirmation. In our case, careful analysis of the unusual calcifications led to appropriate intervention and diagnosis. Radiologists should be aware that fibroadenomas can be malignant, and they should look for suspicious microcalcifications within a fibroadenoma.

  1. Kcne2 deletion uncovers its crucial role in thyroid hormone biosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Roepke, Torsten K.; King, Elizabeth C.; Reyna-Neyra, Andrea; Paroder, Monika; Purtell, Kerry; Koba, Wade; Fine, Eugene; Lerner, Daniel J.; Carrasco, Nancy; Abbott, Geoffrey W.

    2009-01-01

    Thyroid dysfunction affects 1?4% of the population worldwide, causing defects including neurodevelopmental disorders, dwarfism and cardiac arrhythmia. Here, we show that KCNQ1 and KCNE2 form a TSH-stimulated, constitutively-active, thyrocyte K+ channel required for normal thyroid hormone biosynthesis. Targeted disruption of Kcne2 impaired thyroid iodide accumulation up to 8-fold, impaired maternal milk ejection and halved milk T4 content, causing hypothyroidism, 50% reduced litter size, dwarf...

  2. Choosing the Right Solution Approach: The Crucial Role of Situational Knowledge in Electricity and Magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelsbergh, Elwin R.; de Jong, Ton; Ferguson-Hessler, Monica G. M.

    2011-01-01

    Novice problem solvers are rather sensitive to surface problem features, and they often resort to trial and error formula matching rather than identifying an appropriate solution approach. These observations have been interpreted to imply that novices structure their knowledge according to surface features rather than according to problem type…

  3. Eye Tracking Reveals a Crucial Role for Facial Motion in Recognition of Faces by Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Naiqi G.; Quinn, Paul C.; Liu, Shaoying; Ge, Liezhong; Pascalis, Olivier; Lee, Kang

    2015-01-01

    Current knowledge about face processing in infancy comes largely from studies using static face stimuli, but faces that infants see in the real world are mostly moving ones. To bridge this gap, 3-, 6-, and 9-month-old Asian infants (N = 118) were familiarized with either moving or static Asian female faces, and then their face recognition was…

  4. Crucial role of strategy updating for coexistence of strategies in interaction networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Jianlei; Zhang, Chunyan; Cao, Ming; Weissing, Franz J.

    2015-01-01

    Network models are useful tools for studying the dynamics of social interactions in a structured population. After a round of interactions with the players in their local neighborhood, players update their strategy based on the comparison of their own payoff with the payoff of one of their

  5. Religious Identity, Difference and Human Rights: the Crucial Role of Hermeneutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bas de Gaay Fortman؛ M.A. Mohamed Salih

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available غالباً دو پرسش اساسی درباره روایات تفسیرپذیر دینی و تفاسیر آنها مطرح است: نخست، خداوند چه تکالیفی را تعیین و چه حقوقی را اعطاء کرده است که در مورد همه انسان‌ها کاربرد دارند؟ و پرسش دوم اینکه آیا انسان‌ها صلاحیت کافی دارند که در کلام غیر واضح خدا، به خاطر منافع سیاسی، اجتماعی یا اقتصادینقص بر رحمت خداوند را ممکن بدانند؟ این مقاله با بررسی پاسخ‌های مطرح برای پرسش‌های پیش‌گفته به بحث پیرامون فرصت‌های بهره برداری نشده از تنوع باورهای انسانی و منافع بالقوه آن به منظور تضمین احترام به حقوق بشر، تقدس روح انسان و تنوع ابزارهایی می‌پردازد که فضای لازم را برای تصمیم‌گیری از منظر تفاوت انسان‌ها فراهم می‌سازند. �رفت که جز تبعیض ثمری نخواهد داشت؟ در این نوشتار پاسخ به این پرسش‌ها و نظایر آنها در پرتو مفهوم «شهروندی جهانی» هدفی است که پی گرفته می‌شود. کلیدواژه‌ها

  6. TLR4 plays a crucial role in MSC-induced inhibition of NK cell function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Ying [No. 307 Hospital of the Chinese People' s Liberation Army, Beijing (China); Liu, Jin; Liu, Yang; Qin, Yaru [Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing (China); Luo, Qun [No. 307 Hospital of the Chinese People' s Liberation Army, Beijing (China); Wang, Quanli, E-mail: 13691110351@163.com [No. 307 Hospital of the Chinese People' s Liberation Army, Beijing (China); Duan, Haifeng, E-mail: duanhf0720@163.com [Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing (China)

    2015-08-21

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a kind of stromal cell within the tumor microenvironment. In our research, MSC derived from acute myeloid leukemia patients' bone marrow (AML-MSC) and lung cancer tissues (LC-MSC) as well as normal bone marrow-derived MSC (BM-MSC) cultured in conditioned medium of HeLa cells were found to have higher expressions of Toll-like receptor (TLR4) mRNA compared with BM-MSC. The sorted TLR4-positive MSC (TLR4+ MSC) differed in cytokine (interleukin-6, interleukin-8, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) secretion from those of unsorted MSC. MSC was reported to inhibit natural killer (NK) cell proliferation and function. In this research, we confirmed that TLR4+ MSC aggravate this suppression. Furthermore, when TLR4 in the sorted cells were stimulated by LPS or following blocked by antibody, the suppression on NK cell proliferation and cytotoxicity were more intensive or recovered respectively. Compared to unsorted MSC, NKG2D receptor expression on NK cells were also inhibited by TLR4+ MSC. These findings suggest that activation of TLR4 pathway is important for TLR4+ MSC and MSC to obstruct anti-tumor immunity by inhibiting NK cell function, which may provide a potential stroma-targeted tumor therapy. - Highlights: • TLR4+ MSC inhibit NK cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro. • TLR4+ MSC inhibit NKG2D expression on NK cells and NK cell cytotoxicity. • The distinguished cytokine expression of TLR4+ MSC may contribute to the inhibition on NK cell function.

  7. A theory of generalized Bloch oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duggen, Lars; Lassen, Benny; Lew Yan Voon, L C; Willatzen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Bloch oscillations of electrons are shown to occur for cases when the energy spectrum does not consist of the traditional evenly-spaced ladders and the potential gradient does not result from an external electric field. A theory of such generalized Bloch oscillations is presented and an exact calculation is given to confirm this phenomenon. Our results allow for a greater freedom of design for experimentally observing Bloch oscillations. For strongly coupled oscillator systems displaying Bloch oscillations, it is further demonstrated that reordering of oscillators leads to destruction of Bloch oscillations. We stipulate that the presented theory of generalized Bloch oscillations can be extended to other systems such as acoustics and photonics. (paper)

  8. NDH-Mediated Cyclic Electron Flow Around Photosystem I is Crucial for C4 Photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Noriko; Takabayashi, Atsushi; Noguchi, Ko; Tazoe, Youshi; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; von Caemmerer, Susanne; Sato, Fumihiko; Endo, Tsuyoshi

    2016-10-01

    C 4 photosynthesis exhibits efficient CO 2 assimilation in ambient air by concentrating CO 2 around ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) through a metabolic pathway called the C 4 cycle. It has been suggested that cyclic electron flow (CEF) around PSI mediated by chloroplast NADH dehydrogenase-like complex (NDH), an alternative pathway of photosynthetic electron transport (PET), plays a crucial role in C 4 photosynthesis, although the contribution of NDH-mediated CEF is small in C 3 photosynthesis. Here, we generated NDH-suppressed transformants of a C 4 plant, Flaveria bidentis, and showed that the NDH-suppressed plants grow poorly, especially under low-light conditions. CO 2 assimilation rates were consistently decreased in the NDH-suppressed plants under low and medium light intensities. Measurements of non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of Chl fluorescence, the oxidation state of the reaction center of PSI (P700) and the electrochromic shift (ECS) of pigment absorbance indicated that proton translocation across the thylakoid membrane is impaired in the NDH-suppressed plants. Since proton translocation across the thylakoid membrane induces ATP production, these results suggest that NDH-mediated CEF plays a role in the supply of ATP which is required for C 4 photosynthesis. Such a role is more crucial when the light that is available for photosynthesis is limited and the energy production by PET becomes rate-determining for C 4 photosynthesis. Our results demonstrate that the physiological contribution of NDH-mediated CEF is greater in C 4 photosynthesis than in C 3 photosynthesis, suggesting that the mechanism of PET in C 4 photosynthesis has changed from that in C 3 photosynthesis accompanying the changes in the mechanism of CO 2 assimilation. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Neutrino oscillation: status and outlooks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedelec, P.

    1994-01-01

    Whether the neutrinos are massive or not is one of the most puzzling question of physics today. If they are massive, they can contribute significantly to the Dark Matter of the Universe. An other consequence of a non-zero mass of neutrinos is that they might oscillate from one flavor to another. This oscillation process is by now the only way to detect a neutrino with a mass in the few eV range. Several neutrino experiments are currently looking for such an oscillation, in different modes, using different techniques. An overview of the experimental situation for neutrino experiments at accelerators is given. (author). 9 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs

  10. Synchronous Oscillations in Microtubule Polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlier, M. F.; Melki, R.; Pantaloni, D.; Hill, T. L.; Chen, Y.

    1987-08-01

    Under conditions where microtubule nucleation and growth are fast (i.e., high magnesium ion and tubulin concentrations and absence of glycerol), microtubule assembly in vitro exhibits an oscillatory regime preceding the establishment of steady state. The amplitude of the oscillations can represent >50% of the maximum turbidity change and oscillations persist for up to 20 periods of 80 s each. Oscillations are accompanied by extensive length redistribution of microtubules. Preliminary work suggests that the oscillatory kinetics can be simulated using a model in which many microtubules undergo synchronous transitions between growing and rapidly depolymerizing phases, complicated by the kinetically limiting rate of nucleotide exchange on free tubulin.

  11. Oscillation results for certain fractional difference equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyun WANG

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Fractional calculus is a theory that studies the properties and application of arbitrary order differentiation and integration. It can describe the physical properties of some systems more accurately, and better adapt to changes in the system, playing an important role in many fields. For example, it can describe the process of tumor growth (growth stimulation and growth inhibition in biomedical science. The oscillation of solutions of two kinds of fractional difference equations is studied, mainly using the proof by contradiction, that is, assuming the equation has a nonstationary solution. For the first kind of equation, the function symbol is firstly determined, and by constructing the Riccati function, the difference is calculated. Then the condition of the function is used to satisfy the contradiction, that is, the assumption is false, which verifies the oscillation of the solution. For the second kind of equation with initial condition, the equivalent fractional sum form of the fractional difference equation are firstly proved. With considering 0<α≤1 and α>1, respectively, by using the properties of Stirling formula and factorial function, the contradictory is got through enhanced processing, namely the assuming is not established, and the sufficient condition for the bounded solutions of the fractional difference equation is obtained. The above results will optimize the relevant conclusions and enrich the relevant results. The results are applied to the specific equations, and the oscillation of the solutions of equations is proved.

  12. CRPS: A contingent hypothesis with prostaglandins as crucial conversion factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veen, Phe

    2015-11-01

    CRPS is an acute pain disease expressed as chronic pain with a severe loss of tissue and function. CRPS usually occurs after minor injuries and then progresses in a way that is scarcely controllable, or completely uncontrollable. This article addresses the functional control mechanism of a biological organism, a comparison of techniques, and the way the negative feedback mechanisms fail in regulated feedback systems. The measurement and regulation system is controlled at the local, regional, and central levels in a biological system. Locally generated substances such as prostaglandins and hormones, as well as the central nervous system, play important roles in this process. Prostaglandins fulfil many conversion functions and are involved in vasoactive processes, pain, and inflammation. They play an intermediating role between the activity of the autonomic nervous system and local occurrences. The insufficiently explored conversion function of prostaglandins as a ubiquitously present cofactor may be related to the development of CRPS at sites which have had minor injuries in the past. Chronic Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is a moderately prevalent disease, which occurs more frequently with age. Even though there are diseases known to have a precipitating effect on the aetiology of CRPS, for example Carpal tunnel syndrome, the mechanism of onset is unknown. The disease falls under the category of chronic pain, and seldom has an effective treatment based on scientific research. The economic and psychosocial aspects of the disease are substantial. CRPS is the final position of a positive feedback measurement and control system. Homoeostasis is directed by measurement and control processes. In electronics, a rapid conversion system, which quickly adapts to changing circumstances, superimposed with a delayed conversion system, which ensures a stable basis of homoeostasis. Measured changes are compensatorily controlled. An analogy is expected for a Complex Adaptive System

  13. Rabi oscillation between states of a coupled harmonic oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Tae Jun

    2003-01-01

    Rabi oscillation between bound states of a single potential is well known. However the corresponding formula between the states of two different potentials has not been obtained yet. In this work, we derive Rabi formula between the states of a coupled harmonic oscillator which may be used as a simple model for the electron transfer. The expression is similar to typical Rabi formula for a single potential. This result may be used to describe transitions between coupled diabatic potential curves

  14. Oscillations in Mathematical Biology

    CERN Document Server

    1983-01-01

    The papers in this volume are based on talks given at a one day conference held on the campus of Adelphi University in April 1982. The conference was organized with the title "Oscillations in Mathematical Biology;" however the speakers were allowed considerable latitutde in their choice of topics. In the event, the talks all concerned the dynamics of non-linear systems arising in biology so that the conference achieved a good measure of cohesion. Some of the speakers cho~e not to submit a manuscript for these proceedings, feeling that their material was too conjectural to be committed to print. Also the paper of Rinzel and Troy is a distillation of the two separate talks that the authors gave. Otherwise the material reproduces the conference proceedings. The conference was made possible by the generous support of the Office of the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Adelphi. The bulk of the organization of the conference was carried out by Dr. Ronald Grisell whose energy was in large measure responsib...

  15. Principal oscillation patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storch, H. von; Buerger, G.; Storch, J.S. von

    1993-01-01

    The Principal Oscillation Pattern (POP) analysis is a technique which is used to simultaneously infer the characteristic patterns and time scales of a vector time series. The POPs may be seen as the normal modes of a linearized system whose system matrix is estimated from data. The concept of POP analysis is reviewed. Examples are used to illustrate the potential of the POP technique. The best defined POPs of tropospheric day-to-day variability coincide with the most unstable modes derived from linearized theory. POPs can be derived even from a space-time subset of data. POPs are successful in identifying two independent modes with similar time scales in the same data set. The POP method can also produce forecasts which may potentially be used as a reference for other forecast models. The conventional POP analysis technique has been generalized in various ways. In the cyclostationary POP analysis, the estimated system matrix is allowed to vary deterministically with an externally forced cycle. In the complex POP analysis not only the state of the system but also its ''momentum'' is modeled. Associated correlation patterns are a useful tool to describe the appearance of a signal previously identified by a POP analysis in other parameters. (orig.)

  16. Emotional intelligence as a crucial component to medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Debbi R

    2015-12-06

    The primary focus of this review was to discover what is already known about Emotional Intelligence (EI) and the role it plays within social relationships, as well as its importance in the fields of health care and health care education. This article analyzes the importance of EI in the field of health care and recommends various ways that this important skill can be built into medical programs. Information was gathered using various database searches including EBSCOHOST, Academic Search Premier and ERIC. The search was conducted in English language journals from the last ten years. Descriptors include: Emotional Intelligence, medical students and communication skills, graduate medical education, Emotional Intelligence and graduate medical education, Emotional Intelligence training programs, program evaluation and development. Results of the study show a direct correlation between medical education and emotional intelligence competencies, which makes the field of medical education an ideal one in which to integrate further EI training. The definition of EI as an ability-based skill allows for training in specific competencies that can be directly applied to a specialized field. When EI is conceptualized as an ability that can be taught, learned, and changed, it may be used to address the specific aspects of the clinician-patient relationship that are not working well. For this reason, teaching EI should be a priority in the field of medical education in order to better facilitate this relationship in the future.

  17. The Singularity: A Crucial Phase in Divine Self-Actualization?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Zimmerman

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Ray Kurzweil and others have posited that the confluence of nanotechnology, artificial intelligence, robotics, and genetic engineering will soon produce posthuman beings that will far surpass us in power and intelligence. Just as black holes constitute a ldquo;singularityrdquo; from which no information can escape, posthumans will constitute a ldquo;singularity:rdquo; whose aims and capacities lie beyond our ken. I argue that technological posthumanists, whether wittingly or unwittingly, draw upon the long-standing Christian discourse of ldquo;theosis,rdquo; according to which humans are capable of being God or god-like. From St. Paul and Luther to Hegel and Kurzweil, the idea of human self-deification plays a prominent role. Hegel in particular emphasizes that God becomes wholly actualized only in the process by which humanity achieves absolute consciousness. Kurzweil agrees that God becomes fully actual only through historical processes that illuminate and thus transform the entire universe. The difference is that for Kurzweil and many other posthumanists, our offspringmdash;the posthumansmdash;will carry out this extraordinary process. What will happen to Home sapiens in the meantime is a daunting question.br /br /

  18. Crucial Physical Dependencies of the Core-Collapse Supernova Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, A.; Vartanyan, D.; Dolence, J. C.; Skinner, M. A.; Radice, D.

    2018-02-01

    We explore with self-consistent 2D F ornax simulations the dependence of the outcome of collapse on many-body corrections to neutrino-nucleon cross sections, the nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung rate, electron capture on heavy nuclei, pre-collapse seed perturbations, and inelastic neutrino-electron and neutrino-nucleon scattering. Importantly, proximity to criticality amplifies the role of even small changes in the neutrino-matter couplings, and such changes can together add to produce outsized effects. When close to the critical condition the cumulative result of a few small effects (including seeds) that individually have only modest consequence can convert an anemic into a robust explosion, or even a dud into a blast. Such sensitivity is not seen in one dimension and may explain the apparent heterogeneity in the outcomes of detailed simulations performed internationally. A natural conclusion is that the different groups collectively are closer to a realistic understanding of the mechanism of core-collapse supernovae than might have seemed apparent.

  19. The Duffing oscillator with damping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Kim

    2015-01-01

    An analytical solution to the differential equation describing the Duffing oscillator with damping is presented. The damping term of the differential equation and the initial conditions satisfy an algebraic equation, and thus the solution is specific for this type of damping. The nonlinear term...... of the differential equation is allowed to be considerable compared to the linear term. The solution is expressed in terms of the Jacobi elliptic functions by including a parameter-dependent elliptic modulus. The analytical solution is compared to the numerical solution, and the agreement is found to be very good....... It is established that the period of oscillation is shorter compared to that of a linearized model but increasing with time and asymptotically approaching the period of oscillation of the linear damped model. An explicit expression for the period of oscillation has been derived, and it is found to be very accurate....

  20. Electronically tunable RC sinusoidal oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florescu, Valeriu

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents two types of active configurations for realizing electronically tunable RC sinusoidal oscillators. The type-1 network employs two grounded scaled resistances KR 1 and KR 2 , where K is scaling factor. The frequency of oscillation W 0 is controlled conveniently by adjusting K, since W 0 appears in the form W 0 =1/K √ R 1 C 1 R 2 C 2 . For realizing the scaled resistances, an active configuration is proposed, which realizes KR 1 =R 1 /(1+f(V B )), where f(V B ) denotes a function of a controlling voltage V B . Thus the frequency tuning can be effected by controlling a voltage V B . The type-2 oscillator uses two periodically switched conductances. It is shown that the tuning of oscillation frequency can be done by varying the pulse width-to-period ratio (t/T) of the periodically switched conductances. (author)

  1. Thermoelastic Loss in Microscale Oscillators

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Houston, B. H; Photiadis, D. M; Marcus, M. H; Bucaro, J. A; Liu, Xiao; Vignola, J. F

    2001-01-01

    ...) and nanoelectromechanical (NEMS) oscillators. The theory defines a flexural modal participation factor, the fraction of potential energy stored in flexure, and approximates the internal friction by assuming the energy loss to occur solely via...

  2. Oscillating nonlinear acoustic shock waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaididei, Yuri; Rasmussen, Anders Rønne; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2016-01-01

    We investigate oscillating shock waves in a tube using a higher order weakly nonlinear acoustic model. The model includes thermoviscous effects and is non isentropic. The oscillating shock waves are generated at one end of the tube by a sinusoidal driver. Numerical simulations show that at resona......We investigate oscillating shock waves in a tube using a higher order weakly nonlinear acoustic model. The model includes thermoviscous effects and is non isentropic. The oscillating shock waves are generated at one end of the tube by a sinusoidal driver. Numerical simulations show...... polynomial in the space and time variables, we find analytical approximations to the observed single shock waves in an infinitely long tube. Using perturbation theory for the driven acoustic system approximative analytical solutions for the off resonant case are determined....

  3. Transient voltage oscillations in coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhuri, P.

    1985-01-01

    Magnet coils may be excited into internal voltage oscillations by transient voltages. Such oscillations may electrically stress the magnet's dielectric components to many times its normal stress. This may precipitate a dielectric failure, and the attendant prolonged loss of service and costly repair work. Therefore, it is important to know the natural frequencies of oscillations of a magnet during the design stage, and to determine whether the expected switching transient voltages can excite the magnet into high-voltage internal oscillations. The series capacitance of a winding significantly affects its natural frequencies. However, the series capacitance is difficult to calculate, because it may comprise complex capacitance network, consisting of intra- and inter-coil turn-to-turn capacitances of the coil sections. A method of calculating the series capacitance of a winding is proposed. This method is rigorous but simple to execute. The time-varying transient voltages along the winding are also calculated

  4. Biological oscillations: Fluorescence monitoring by confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattoraj, Shyamtanu; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2016-09-01

    Fluctuations play a vital role in biological systems. Single molecule spectroscopy has recently revealed many new kinds of fluctuations in biological molecules. In this account, we focus on structural fluctuations of an antigen-antibody complex, conformational dynamics of a DNA quadruplex, effects of taxol on dynamics of microtubules, intermittent red-ox oscillations at different organelles in a live cell (mitochondria, lipid droplets, endoplasmic reticulum and cell membrane) and stochastic resonance in gene silencing. We show that there are major differences in these dynamics between a cancer cell and the corresponding non-cancer cell.

  5. Studying aeroelastic oscillations with tensoresistor and Arduino

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demenkov, Maxim

    2018-05-01

    We describe a modification of the Flexy device, originally developed at the Slovak University of Technology. With our version of it, constructed at the Institute of Control Sciences, one can study aeroelastic oscillations (flutter) using cheap and freely available components. Flex sensor (tensoresistor) changes its electrical resistance proportionally to its bending. The lightweight plastic plate (attached to the resistor) plays the role of a wing in the flow generated by a small fan. Both fan and tensoresistor are connected to an Arduino microcontroller and it is possible to obtain and analyze experimental data from the device on a personal computer.

  6. Modelling solar-like oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggenberger, P; Miglio, A [Institut d' Astrophysique et de Geophysique de l' Universite de Liege, 17 Allee du 6 Aout, B-4000 Liege (Belgium); Carrier, F [Institute of Astronomy, University of Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200 D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Mathis, S [CEA/DSM/DAPNIA/Service d' Astrophysique, CEA/Saclay, AIM-Unite Mixte de Recherche CEA-CNRS-Universite Paris VII, UMR 7158, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)], E-mail: eggenberger@Qastro.ulg.ac.be

    2008-10-15

    The computation of models of stars for which solar-like oscillations have been observed is discussed. After a brief intoduction on the observations of solar-like oscillations, the modelling of isolated stars and of stars belonging to a binary system is presented with specific examples of recent theoretical calibrations. Finally the input physics introduced in stellar evolution codes for the computation of solar-type stars is discussed with a peculiar emphasis on the modelling of rotation for these stars.

  7. Modeling nonlinearities in MEMS oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Deepak K; Woodhouse, Jim; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2013-08-01

    We present a mathematical model of a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) oscillator that integrates the nonlinearities of the MEMS resonator and the oscillator circuitry in a single numerical modeling environment. This is achieved by transforming the conventional nonlinear mechanical model into the electrical domain while simultaneously considering the prominent nonlinearities of the resonator. The proposed nonlinear electrical model is validated by comparing the simulated amplitude-frequency response with measurements on an open-loop electrically addressed flexural silicon MEMS resonator driven to large motional amplitudes. Next, the essential nonlinearities in the oscillator circuit are investigated and a mathematical model of a MEMS oscillator is proposed that integrates the nonlinearities of the resonator. The concept is illustrated for MEMS transimpedance-amplifier- based square-wave and sine-wave oscillators. Closed-form expressions of steady-state output power and output frequency are derived for both oscillator models and compared with experimental and simulation results, with a good match in the predicted trends in all three cases.

  8. How adaptation shapes spike rate oscillations in recurrent neuronal networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz eAugustin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Neural mass signals from in-vivo recordings often show oscillations with frequencies ranging from <1 Hz to 100 Hz. Fast rhythmic activity in the beta and gamma range can be generated by network based mechanisms such as recurrent synaptic excitation-inhibition loops. Slower oscillations might instead depend on neuronal adaptation currents whose timescales range from tens of milliseconds to seconds. Here we investigate how the dynamics of such adaptation currents contribute to spike rate oscillations and resonance properties in recurrent networks of excitatory and inhibitory neurons. Based on a network of sparsely coupled spiking model neurons with two types of adaptation current and conductance based synapses with heterogeneous strengths and delays we use a mean-field approach to analyze oscillatory network activity. For constant external input, we find that spike-triggered adaptation currents provide a mechanism to generate slow oscillations over a wide range of adaptation timescales as long as recurrent synaptic excitation is sufficiently strong. Faster rhythms occur when recurrent inhibition is slower than excitation and oscillation frequency increases with the strength of inhibition. Adaptation facilitates such network based oscillations for fast synaptic inhibition and leads to decreased frequencies. For oscillatory external input, adaptation currents amplify a narrow band of frequencies and cause phase advances for low frequencies in addition to phase delays at higher frequencies. Our results therefore identify the different key roles of neuronal adaptation dynamics for rhythmogenesis and selective signal propagation in recurrent networks.

  9. Stellar oscillations in planet-hosting giant stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatzes, Artie P; Zechmeister, Mathias [Thueringer Landessternwarte, Sternwarte 5, D-07778 (Germany)], E-mail: artie@tls-tautenburg.de

    2008-10-15

    Recently a number of giant extrasolar planets have been discovered around giant stars. These discoveries are important because many of these giant stars have intermediate masses in the range 1.2-3 Msun. Early-type main sequence stars of this mass range have been avoided by radial velocity planet search surveys due the difficulty of getting the requisite radial velocity precision needed for planet discoveries. Thus, giant stars can tell us about planet formation for stars more massive than the sun. However, the determination of stellar masses for giant stars is difficult due to the fact that evolutionary tracks for stars covering a wide range of masses converge to the same region of the H-R diagram. We report here on stellar oscillations in three planet-hosting giant stars: HD 13189, {beta} Gem, and {iota} Dra. Precise stellar radial velocity measurements for these stars show variations whose periods and amplitudes are consistent with solar-like p-mode oscillations. The implied stellar masses for these objects based on the characteristics of the stellar oscillations are consistent with the predictions of stellar isochrones. An investigation of stellar oscillations in planet hosting giant stars offers us the possibility of getting an independent determination of the stellar mass for these objects which is of crucial importance for extrasolar planet studies.

  10. On the nonlinear modeling of ring oscillators

    KAUST Repository

    Elwakil, Ahmed S.

    2009-06-01

    We develop higher-order nonlinear models of three-stage and five-stage ring oscillators based on a novel inverter model. The oscillation condition and oscillation frequency are derived and compared to classical linear model analysis. Two important special cases for five-stage ring oscillators are also studied. Numerical simulations are shown. © 2009 World Scientific Publishing Company.

  11. Some comparison of two fractional oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang Yonggang; Zhang Xiu'e

    2010-01-01

    The other form of fractional oscillator equation comparing to the widely discussed one is ushered in. The properties of vibration of two fractional oscillators are discussed under the influence of different initial conditions. The interpretation of the characteristics of the fractional oscillators using different method is illustrated. Based on two fractional oscillator equations, two linked bodies and the continuous system are studied.

  12. Magnetically Coupled Magnet-Spring Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoso, G.; Ladera, C. L.; Martin, P.

    2010-01-01

    A system of two magnets hung from two vertical springs and oscillating in the hollows of a pair of coils connected in series is a new, interesting and useful example of coupled oscillators. The electromagnetically coupled oscillations of these oscillators are experimentally and theoretically studied. Its coupling is electromagnetic instead of…

  13. On the nonlinear modeling of ring oscillators

    KAUST Repository

    Elwakil, Ahmed S.; Salama, Khaled N.

    2009-01-01

    We develop higher-order nonlinear models of three-stage and five-stage ring oscillators based on a novel inverter model. The oscillation condition and oscillation frequency are derived and compared to classical linear model analysis. Two important special cases for five-stage ring oscillators are also studied. Numerical simulations are shown. © 2009 World Scientific Publishing Company.

  14. On the mechanism of oscillations in neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasen, Jens Christian; Barington, Torben; Olsen, Lars Folke

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated the regulation of the oscillatory generation of H(2)O(2) and oscillations in shape and size in neutrophils in suspension. The oscillations are independent of cell density and hence do not represent a collective phenomena. Furthermore, the oscillations are independent...... of the external glucose concentration and the oscillations in H(2)O(2) production are 180 degrees out of phase with the oscillations in NAD(P)H. Cytochalasin B blocked the oscillations in shape and size whereas it increased the period of the oscillations in H(2)O(2) production. 1- and 2-butanol also blocked...... the oscillations in shape and size, but only 1-butanol inhibited the oscillations in H(2)O(2) production. We conjecture that the oscillations are likely to be due to feedback regulations in the signal transduction cascade involving phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3K). We have tested this using a simple mathematical...

  15. Reactor oscillator - I - III, Part I; Reaktorski oscilator - I-III, I Deo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lolic, B [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Laboratorija za fiziku reaktora, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1961-12-15

    Project 'Reactor oscillator' covers the following activities: designing reactor oscillators for reactors RA and RB with detailed engineering drawings; constructing and mounting of the oscillator; designing and constructing the appropriate electronic equipment for the oscillator; measurements at the RA and RB reactors needed for completing the oscillator construction.

  16. Oscillations in the prefrontal cortex: a gateway to memory and attention.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benchenane, K.; Tiesinga, P.H.; Battaglia, F.P.

    2011-01-01

    We consider the potential role of oscillations in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in mediating attention, working memory and memory consolidation. Activity in the theta, beta, and gamma bands is related to communication between PFC and different brain areas. While gamma/beta oscillations mediate

  17. Synchronisation Induced by Repulsive Interactions in a System of van der Pol Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, T. V.; Toral, R.

    2011-09-01

    We consider a system of identical van der Pol oscillators, globally coupled through their velocities, and study how the presence of competitive interactions affects its synchronisation properties. We will address the question from two points of view. Firstly, we will investigate the role of competitive interactions on the synchronisation among identical oscillators. Then, we will show that the presence of a fraction of repulsive links results in the appearance of macroscopic oscillations at that signal's rhythm, in regions where the individual oscillator is unable to synchronise with a weak external signal.

  18. The Oscillation of a Class of the Fractional-Order Delay Differential Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianli Lu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several oscillation results are proposed including necessary and sufficient conditions for the oscillation of fractional-order delay differential equations with constant coefficients, the sufficient or necessary and sufficient conditions for the oscillation of fractional-order delay differential equations by analysis method, and the sufficient or necessary and sufficient conditions for the oscillation of delay partial differential equation with three different boundary conditions. For this, α-exponential function which is a kind of functions that play the same role of the classical exponential functions of fractional-order derivatives is used.

  19. Higher-order chaotic oscillator using active bessel filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Erik; Mykolaitis, Gytis; Bumelien, Skaidra

    2010-01-01

    A higher-order oscillator, including a nonlinear unit and an 8th-order low-pass active Bessel filter is described. The Bessel unit plays the role of "three-in-one": a delay line, an amplifier and a filter. Results of hardware experiments and numerical simulation are presented. Depending...

  20. Flashing oscillation in pool water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamasa, Tomoji; Kondo, Koichi; Hazuku, Tatsuya

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of high-pressure saturated water discharging into the pool water. The purpose of the experiment is to clarify the phenomena that occur in blow-down of high-pressure saturated water from the pressure vessel into the water-filled containment in the case of a wall-crack accident or a LOCA in an advanced reactor. The results revealed that a flashing oscillation (FO) occurs when high-pressure saturated water discharges into the pool water, under specified experimental settings. The range of the flashing oscillates between a point very close to and some distance from the vent hole. The pressures in the vent tube and pool water vary according to the flashing oscillation. The pressure oscillation and frequency of flashing position might be caused by the balancing action between the supply of saturated water, flashing at the control volume and its condensation on the steam-water interface. A linear analysis was conducted using a spherical flashing bubble model. The period of the flashing oscillation in the experiments can be explained by theoretical analysis

  1. Neutrino oscillations at proton accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael, Douglas

    2002-01-01

    Data from many different experiments have started to build a first glimpse of the phenomenology associated with neutrino oscillations. Results on atmospheric and solar neutrinos are particularly clear while a third result from LSND suggests a possibly very complex oscillation phenomenology. As impressive as the results from current experiments are, it is clear that we are just getting started on a long-term experimental program to understand neutrino masses, mixings and the physics which produce them. A number of exciting fundamental physics possibilities exist, including that neutrino oscillations could demonstrate CP or CPT violation and could be tied to exotic high-energy phenomena including strings and extra dimensions. A complete exploration of oscillation phenomena demands many experiments, including those possible using neutrino beams produced at high energy proton accelerators. Most existing neutrino experiments are statistics limited even though they use gigantic detectors. High intensity proton beams are essential for producing the intense neutrino beams which we need for next generation neutrino oscillation experiments

  2. Neutrino Oscillations at Proton Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Douglas

    2002-12-01

    Data from many different experiments have started to build a first glimpse of the phenomenology associated with neutrino oscillations. Results on atmospheric and solar neutrinos are particularly clear while a third result from LSND suggests a possibly very complex oscillation phenomenology. As impressive as the results from current experiments are, it is clear that we are just getting started on a long-term experimental program to understand neutrino masses, mixings and the physics which produce them. A number of exciting fundamental physics possibilities exist, including that neutrino oscillations could demonstrate CP or CPT violation and could be tied to exotic high-energy phenomena including strings and extra dimensions. A complete exploration of oscillation phenomena demands many experiments, including those possible using neutrino beams produced at high energy proton accelerators. Most existing neutrino experiments are statistics limited even though they use gigantic detectors. High intensity proton beams are essential for producing the intense neutrino beams which we need for next generation neutrino oscillation experiments.

  3. Momento crucial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustí Boixeda de Miquel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Apunts. Educación Física y Deportes es uno de los proyectos estratégicos del INEFC (Institut Nacional d’Educació Física de Catalunya. La dirección del INEFC promueve intensamente la transformación e internacionalización de nuestra revista para convertirla en una publicación científica de alto impacto.

  4. Restoration of oscillation in network of oscillators in presence of direct and indirect interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majhi, Soumen; Bera, Bidesh K. [Physics and Applied Mathematics Unit, Indian Statistical Institute, Kolkata-700108 (India); Bhowmick, Sourav K. [Department of Electronics, Asutosh College, Kolkata-700026 (India); Ghosh, Dibakar, E-mail: diba.ghosh@gmail.com [Physics and Applied Mathematics Unit, Indian Statistical Institute, Kolkata-700108 (India)

    2016-10-23

    The suppression of oscillations in coupled systems may lead to several unwanted situations, which requires a suitable treatment to overcome the suppression. In this paper, we show that the environmental coupling in the presence of direct interaction, which can suppress oscillation even in a network of identical oscillators, can be modified by introducing a feedback factor in the coupling scheme in order to restore the oscillation. We inspect how the introduction of the feedback factor helps to resurrect oscillation from various kinds of death states. We numerically verify the resurrection of oscillations for two paradigmatic limit cycle systems, namely Landau–Stuart and Van der Pol oscillators and also in generic chaotic Lorenz oscillator. We also study the effect of parameter mismatch in the process of restoring oscillation for coupled oscillators. - Highlights: • Amplitude death is observed using direct and indirect coupling. • Revival of oscillation using feedback parameter is discussed. • Restoration of oscillation is observed in limit cycle and chaotic systems.

  5. Decrease in early right alpha band phase synchronization and late gamma band oscillations in processing syntax in music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, María Herrojo; Koelsch, Stefan; Bhattacharya, Joydeep

    2009-04-01

    The present study investigated the neural correlates associated with the processing of music-syntactical irregularities as compared with regular syntactic structures in music. Previous studies reported an early ( approximately 200 ms) right anterior negative component (ERAN) by traditional event-related-potential analysis during music-syntactical irregularities, yet little is known about the underlying oscillatory and synchronization properties of brain responses which are supposed to play a crucial role in general cognition including music perception. First we showed that the ERAN was primarily represented by low frequency (music-syntactical irregularities as compared with music-syntactical regularities, were associated with (i) an early decrease in the alpha band (9-10 Hz) phase synchronization between right fronto-central and left temporal brain regions, and (ii) a late ( approximately 500 ms) decrease in gamma band (38-50 Hz) oscillations over fronto-central brain regions. These results indicate a weaker degree of long-range integration when the musical expectancy is violated. In summary, our results reveal neural mechanisms of music-syntactic processing that operate at different levels of cortical integration, ranging from early decrease in long-range alpha phase synchronization to late local gamma oscillations. 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Effect of Mefloquine, a Gap Junction Blocker, on Circadian Period2 Gene Oscillation in the Mouse Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinmi Koo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundIn mammals, the master circadian pacemaker is localized in an area of the ventral hypothalamus known as the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN. Previous studies have shown that pacemaker neurons in the SCN are highly coupled to one another, and this coupling is crucial for intrinsic self-sustainability of the SCN central clock, which is distinguished from peripheral oscillators. One plausible mechanism underlying the intercellular communication may involve direct electrical connections mediated by gap junctions.MethodsWe examined the effect of mefloquine, a neuronal gap junction blocker, on circadian Period 2 (Per2 gene oscillation in SCN slice cultures prepared from Per2::luciferase (PER2::LUC knock-in mice using a real-time bioluminescence measurement system.ResultsAdministration of mefloquine causes instability in the pulse period and a slight reduction of amplitude in cyclic PER2::LUC expression. Blockade of gap junctions uncouples PER2::LUC-expressing cells, in terms of phase transition, which weakens synchrony among individual cellular rhythms.ConclusionThese findings suggest that neuronal gap junctions play an important role in synchronizing the central pacemaker neurons and contribute to the distinct self-sustainability of the SCN master clock.

  7. Gamma band oscillations: a key to understanding schizophrenia symptoms and neural circuit abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, James M; McCarley, Robert W

    2016-05-01

    We review our current understanding of abnormal γ band oscillations in schizophrenia, their association with symptoms and the underlying cortical circuit abnormality, with a particular focus on the role of fast-spiking parvalbumin gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurons in the disease state. Clinical electrophysiological studies of schizophrenia patients and pharmacological models of the disorder show an increase in spontaneous γ band activity (not stimulus-evoked) measures. These findings provide a crucial link between preclinical and clinical work examining the role of γ band activity in schizophrenia. MRI-based experiments measuring cortical GABA provides evidence supporting impaired GABAergic neurotransmission in schizophrenia patients, which is correlated with γ band activity level. Several studies suggest that stimulation of the cortical circuitry, directly or via subcortical structures, has the potential to modulate cortical γ activity, and improve cognitive function. Abnormal γ band activity is observed in patients with schizophrenia and disease models in animals, and is suggested to underlie the psychosis and cognitive/perceptual deficits. Convergent evidence from both clinical and preclinical studies suggest the central factor in γ band abnormalities is impaired GABAergic neurotransmission, particularly in a subclass of neurons which express parvalbumin. Rescue of γ band abnormalities presents an intriguing option for therapeutic intervention.

  8. Vasovagal oscillations and vasovagal responses produced by the Vestibulo-Sympathetic Reflex in the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei B. Yakushin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation (sGVS induces oscillations in blood pressure (BP and heart rate (HR i.e., vasovagal oscillations, and decreases in BP and HR i.e., vasovagal responses, in isoflurane-anesthetized rats. We determined the characteristics of the vasovagal oscillations, assessed their role in the generation of vasovagal responses and determined whether they could be induced by monaural as well as by binaural sGVS and by oscillation in pitch. Wavelet analyses were used to determine the power distributions of the waveforms. Monaural and binaural sGVS and pitch generated vasovagal oscillations at the frequency and at twice the frequency of stimulation. Vasovagal oscillations and vasovagal responses were maximally induced at low stimulus frequencies (0.025-0.05 Hz. The oscillations were attenuated and the responses were rarely induced at higher stimulus frequencies. Vasovagal oscillations could occur without induction of vasovagal responses, but vasovagal responses were always associated with a vasovagal oscillation. We posit that the vasovagal oscillations originate in a low frequency band that, when appropriately activated by strong sympathetic stimulation, can generate vasovagal oscillations as a precursor for vasovagal responses and syncope. We further suggest that the activity responsible for the vasovagal oscillations arises in low frequency, otolith neurons with orientation vectors close to the vertical axis of the head. These neurons are likely to provide critical input to the Vestibulo-Sympathetic Reflex to increase BP and HR upon changes in head position relative to gravity, and to contribute to the production of vasovagal oscillations and vasovagal responses and syncope when the baroreflex is inactivated.

  9. The parietal epithelial cell is crucially involved in human idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkman, Henry; Smeets, Bart; van der Laak, Jeroen; Steenbergen, Eric; Wetzels, Jack

    2005-10-01

    Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is one of the most common patterns of glomerular injury encountered in human renal biopsies. Epithelial hyperplasia, which can be prominent in FSGS, has been attributed to dedifferentiation and proliferation of podocytes. Based on observations in a mouse model of FSGS, we pointed to the role of parietal epithelial cells (PECs). In the present study we investigated the relative role of PECs and podocytes in human idiopathic FSGS. We performed a detailed study of lesions from a patient with recurrent idiopathic FSGS by serial sectioning, marker analysis and three-dimensional reconstruction of glomeruli. We have studied the expression of markers for podocytes, PECs, mesangial cells, endothelium, and myofibroblasts. We also looked at proliferation and composition of the deposited extracellular matrix (ECM). We found that proliferating epithelial cells in FSGS lesions are negative for podocyte and macrophage markers, but stain for PEC markers. The composition of the matrix deposited by these cells is identical to Bowman's capsule. Our study demonstrates that PECs are crucially involved in the pathogenesis of FSGS lesions.

  10. Sigma Factor SigB Is Crucial to Mediate Staphylococcus aureus Adaptation during Chronic Infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Tuchscherr

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen that causes a range of infections from acute invasive to chronic and difficult-to-treat. Infection strategies associated with persisting S. aureus infections are bacterial host cell invasion and the bacterial ability to dynamically change phenotypes from the aggressive wild-type to small colony variants (SCVs, which are adapted for intracellular long-term persistence. The underlying mechanisms of the bacterial switching and adaptation mechanisms appear to be very dynamic, but are largely unknown. Here, we analyzed the role and the crosstalk of the global S. aureus regulators agr, sarA and SigB by generating single, double and triple mutants, and testing them with proteome analysis and in different in vitro and in vivo infection models. We were able to demonstrate that SigB is the crucial factor for adaptation in chronic infections. During acute infection, the bacteria require the simultaneous action of the agr and sarA loci to defend against invading immune cells by causing inflammation and cytotoxicity and to escape from phagosomes in their host cells that enable them to settle an infection at high bacterial density. To persist intracellularly the bacteria subsequently need to silence agr and sarA. Indeed agr and sarA deletion mutants expressed a much lower number of virulence factors and could persist at high numbers intracellularly. SigB plays a crucial function to promote bacterial intracellular persistence. In fact, ΔsigB-mutants did not generate SCVs and were completely cleared by the host cells within a few days. In this study we identified SigB as an essential factor that enables the bacteria to switch from the highly aggressive phenotype that settles an acute infection to a silent SCV-phenotype that allows for long-term intracellular persistence. Consequently, the SigB-operon represents a possible target to develop preventive and therapeutic strategies against chronic and therapy

  11. Sigma Factor SigB Is Crucial to Mediate Staphylococcus aureus Adaptation during Chronic Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuchscherr, Lorena; Bischoff, Markus; Lattar, Santiago M; Noto Llana, Mariangeles; Pförtner, Henrike; Niemann, Silke; Geraci, Jennifer; Van de Vyver, Hélène; Fraunholz, Martin J; Cheung, Ambrose L; Herrmann, Mathias; Völker, Uwe; Sordelli, Daniel O; Peters, Georg; Löffler, Bettina

    2015-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen that causes a range of infections from acute invasive to chronic and difficult-to-treat. Infection strategies associated with persisting S. aureus infections are bacterial host cell invasion and the bacterial ability to dynamically change phenotypes from the aggressive wild-type to small colony variants (SCVs), which are adapted for intracellular long-term persistence. The underlying mechanisms of the bacterial switching and adaptation mechanisms appear to be very dynamic, but are largely unknown. Here, we analyzed the role and the crosstalk of the global S. aureus regulators agr, sarA and SigB by generating single, double and triple mutants, and testing them with proteome analysis and in different in vitro and in vivo infection models. We were able to demonstrate that SigB is the crucial factor for adaptation in chronic infections. During acute infection, the bacteria require the simultaneous action of the agr and sarA loci to defend against invading immune cells by causing inflammation and cytotoxicity and to escape from phagosomes in their host cells that enable them to settle an infection at high bacterial density. To persist intracellularly the bacteria subsequently need to silence agr and sarA. Indeed agr and sarA deletion mutants expressed a much lower number of virulence factors and could persist at high numbers intracellularly. SigB plays a crucial function to promote bacterial intracellular persistence. In fact, ΔsigB-mutants did not generate SCVs and were completely cleared by the host cells within a few days. In this study we identified SigB as an essential factor that enables the bacteria to switch from the highly aggressive phenotype that settles an acute infection to a silent SCV-phenotype that allows for long-term intracellular persistence. Consequently, the SigB-operon represents a possible target to develop preventive and therapeutic strategies against chronic and therapy-refractory infections.

  12. Nonstationary oscillations in gyrotrons revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumbrajs, O.; Kalis, H.

    2015-01-01

    Development of gyrotrons requires careful understanding of different regimes of gyrotron oscillations. It is known that in the planes of the generalized gyrotron variables: cyclotron resonance mismatch and dimensionless current or cyclotron resonance mismatch and dimensionless interaction length complicated alternating sequences of regions of stationary, periodic, automodulation, and chaotic oscillations exist. In the past, these regions were investigated on the supposition that the transit time of electrons through the interaction space is much shorter than the cavity decay time. This assumption is valid for short and/or high diffraction quality resonators. However, in the case of long and/or low diffraction quality resonators, which are often utilized, this assumption is no longer valid. In such a case, a different mathematical formalism has to be used for studying nonstationary oscillations. One example of such a formalism is described in the present paper

  13. Prediction of pilot induced oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin PANĂ

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available An important problem in the design of flight-control systems for aircraft under pilotedcontrol is the determination of handling qualities and pilot-induced oscillations (PIO tendencieswhen significant nonlinearities exist in the vehicle description. The paper presents a method to detectpossible pilot-induced oscillations of Category II (with rate and position limiting, a phenomenonusually due to a misadaptation between the pilot and the aircraft response during some tasks in whichtight closed loop control of the aircraft is required from the pilot. For the analysis of Pilot in the LoopOscillations an approach, based on robust stability analysis of a system subject to uncertainparameters, is proposed. In this analysis the nonlinear elements are substituted by linear uncertainparameters. This approach assumes that PIO are characterized by a limit cycle behavior.

  14. Magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, L.D.; Ballard, W.P.; Clark, M.C.; Marder, B.M.

    1987-05-19

    A magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator employs self-generated magnetic fields to generate microwave energy. An anode of the oscillator includes slow-wave structures which are formed of a plurality of thin conductive vanes defining cavities therebetween, and a gap is formed between the anode and a cathode of the oscillator. In response to a pulsed voltage applied to the anode and cathode, self-generated magnetic fields are produced in a cross-field orientation with respect to the orientation of the electric field between the anode and the cathode. The cross-field magnetic fields insulate the flow of electrons in the gap and confine the flow of electrons within the gap. 11 figs.

  15. Solar opacities constrained by solar neutrinos and solar oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, A.N.

    1989-01-01

    This review discusses the current situation for opacities at the solar center, the solar surface, and for the few million kelvin temperatures that occur below the convection zone. The solar center conditions are important because they are crucial for the neutrino production, which continues to be predicted about 4 times that observed. The main extinction effects there are free-free photon absorption in the electric fields of the hydrogen, helium and the CNO atoms, free electron scattering of photons, and the bound-free and bound-bound absorption of photons by iron atoms with two electrons in the 1s bound level. An assumption that the iron is condensed-out below the convection zone, and the opacity in the central regions is thereby reduced, results in about a 25 percent reduction in the central opacity but only a 5 percent reduction at the base of the convection zone. Furthermore, the p-mode solar oscillations are changed with this assumption, and do not fit the observed ones as well as for standard models. A discussion of the large effective opacity reduction by weakly interacting massive particles also results in poor agreement with observed p-mode oscillation frequencies. The much larger opacities for the solar surface layers from the Los Alamos Astrophysical Opacity Library instead of the widely used Cox and Tabor values show small improvements in oscillation frequency predictions, but the largest effect is in the discussion of p-mode stability. Solar oscillation frequencies can serve as an opacity experiment for the temperatures and densities, respectively, of a few million kelvin and between 0.1 and 10 g/cm 3 . Current oscillation frequency calculations indicate that possibly the Opacity Library values need an increase of typically 15 percent just at the bottom of the convection zone at 3 x 10 6 K. 41 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab

  16. Wigner oscillators, twisted Hopf algebras and second quantization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, P.G.; Toppan, F. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mails: pgcastro@cbpf.br; toppan@cbpf.br; Chakraborty, B. [S. N. Bose National Center for Basic Sciences, Kolkata (India)]. E-mail: biswajit@bose.res.in

    2008-07-01

    By correctly identifying the role of central extension in the centrally extended Heisenberg algebra h, we show that it is indeed possible to construct a Hopf algebraic structure on the corresponding enveloping algebra U(h) and eventually deform it through Drinfeld twist. This Hopf algebraic structure and its deformed version U{sup F}(h) is shown to be induced from a more 'fundamental' Hopf algebra obtained from the Schroedinger field/oscillator algebra and its deformed version, provided that the fields/oscillators are regarded as odd-elements of a given superalgebra. We also discuss the possible implications in the context of quantum statistics. (author)

  17. Spontaneous oscillations in microfluidic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Daniel; Angilella, Jean-Regis; Motter, Adilson

    2017-11-01

    Precisely controlling flows within microfluidic systems is often difficult which typically results in systems being heavily reliant on numerous external pumps and computers. Here, I present a simple microfluidic network that exhibits flow rate switching, bistablity, and spontaneous oscillations controlled by a single pressure. That is, by solely changing the driving pressure, it is possible to switch between an oscillating and steady flow state. Such functionality does not rely on external hardware and may even serve as an on-chip memory or timing mechanism. I use an analytic model and rigorous fluid dynamics simulations to show these results.

  18. Oscillating liquid flow ICF Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petzoldt, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    Oscillating liquid flow in a falling molten salt inertial confinement fusion reactor is predicted to rapidly clear driver beam paths of residual liquid droplets. Oscillating flow will also provide adequate neutron and x-ray protection for the reactor structure with a short (2-m) fall distance permitting an 8 Hz repetition rate. A reactor chamber configuration is presented with specific features to clear the entire heavy-ion beam path of splashed molten salt. The structural components, including the structure between beam ports, are shielded. 3 refs., 12 figs

  19. Neutrino oscillation measurements with reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKeown, R.D. [W. K. Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2010-11-01

    Since the first direct observations of antineutrino events by Reines and Cowan in the 1950's, nuclear reactors have been an important tool in the study of neutrino properties. More recently, the study of neutrino oscillations has been a very active area of research. The pioneering observation of oscillations by the KamLAND experiment has provided important information on the neutrino masses and the neutrino mixing matrix. New experiments to study the remaining unknown mixing angle are currently under development. These recent studies and potential future developments will be discussed.

  20. ALG-2 oscillates in subcellular localization, unitemporally with calcium oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Jonas Marstrand; Mollerup, Jens; Berchtold, Martin Werner

    2007-01-01

    discovered that the subcellular distribution of a tagged version of ALG-2 could be directed by physiological external stimuli (including ATP, EGF, prostaglandin, histamine), which provoke intracellular Ca2+ oscillations. Cellular stimulation led to a redistribution of ALG-2 from the cytosol to a punctate...

  1. TOWARDS THRESHOLD FREQUENCY IN CHAOTIC COLPITTS OSCILLATOR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Erik; Tamasevicius, Arunas; Mykolaitis, Gytis

    2007-01-01

    A novel version of chaotic Colpitts oscillator is described. Instead of a linear loss resistor, it includes an extra inductor and diode in the collector circuit of the transistor. The modified circuit in comparison with the common Colpitts oscillator may generate chaotic oscillations at the funda......A novel version of chaotic Colpitts oscillator is described. Instead of a linear loss resistor, it includes an extra inductor and diode in the collector circuit of the transistor. The modified circuit in comparison with the common Colpitts oscillator may generate chaotic oscillations...

  2. Endogenous Cortical Oscillations Constrain Neuromodulation by Weak Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Stephen L.; Iyengar, Apoorva K.; Foulser, A. Alban; Boyle, Michael R.; Fröhlich, Flavio

    2014-01-01

    Background Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation modality that may modulate cognition by enhancing endogenous neocortical oscillations with the application of sine-wave electric fields. Yet, the role of endogenous network activity in enabling and shaping the effects of tACS has remained unclear. Objective We combined optogenetic stimulation and multichannel slice electrophysiology to elucidate how the effect of weak sine-wave electric field depends on the ongoing cortical oscillatory activity. We hypothesized that the structure of the response to stimulation depended on matching the stimulation frequency to the endogenous cortical oscillation. Methods We studied the effect of weak sine-wave electric fields on oscillatory activity in mouse neocortical slices. Optogenetic control of the network activity enabled the generation of in vivo like cortical oscillations for studying the temporal relationship between network activity and sine-wave electric field stimulation. Results Weak electric fields enhanced endogenous oscillations but failed to induce a frequency shift of the ongoing oscillation for stimulation frequencies that were not matched to the endogenous oscillation. This constraint on the effect of electric field stimulation imposed by endogenous network dynamics was limited to the case of weak electric fields targeting in vivo-like network dynamics. Together, these results suggest that the key mechanism of tACS may be enhancing but not overriding of intrinsic network dynamics. Conclusion Our results contribute to understanding the inconsistent tACS results from human studies and propose that stimulation precisely adjusted in frequency to the endogenous oscillations is key to rational design of non-invasive brain stimulation paradigms. PMID:25129402

  3. GABA level, gamma oscillation, and working memory performance in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Ming A. Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A relationship between working memory impairment, disordered neuronal oscillations, and abnormal prefrontal GABA function has been hypothesized in schizophrenia; however, in vivo GABA measurements and gamma band neural synchrony have not yet been compared in schizophrenia. This case–control pilot study (N = 24 compared baseline and working memory task-induced neuronal oscillations acquired with high-density electroencephalograms (EEGs to GABA levels measured in vivo with magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Working memory performance, baseline GABA level in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC, and measures of gamma oscillations from EEGs at baseline and during a working memory task were obtained. A major limitation of this study is a relatively small sample size for several analyses due to the integration of diverse methodologies and participant compliance. Working memory performance was significantly lower for patients than for controls. During the working memory task, patients (n = 7 had significantly lower amplitudes in gamma oscillations than controls (n = 9. However, both at rest and across working memory stages, there were significant correlations between gamma oscillation amplitude and left DLPFC GABA level. Peak gamma frequency during the encoding stage of the working memory task (n = 16 significantly correlated with GABA level and working memory performance. Despite gamma band amplitude deficits in patients across working memory stages, both baseline and working memory-induced gamma oscillations showed strong dependence on baseline GABA levels in patients and controls. These findings suggest a critical role for GABA function in gamma band oscillations, even under conditions of system and cognitive impairments as seen in schizophrenia.

  4. GABA level, gamma oscillation, and working memory performance in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi-Ming A; Stanford, Arielle D; Mao, Xiangling; Abi-Dargham, Anissa; Shungu, Dikoma C; Lisanby, Sarah H; Schroeder, Charles E; Kegeles, Lawrence S

    2014-01-01

    A relationship between working memory impairment, disordered neuronal oscillations, and abnormal prefrontal GABA function has been hypothesized in schizophrenia; however, in vivo GABA measurements and gamma band neural synchrony have not yet been compared in schizophrenia. This case-control pilot study (N = 24) compared baseline and working memory task-induced neuronal oscillations acquired with high-density electroencephalograms (EEGs) to GABA levels measured in vivo with magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Working memory performance, baseline GABA level in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), and measures of gamma oscillations from EEGs at baseline and during a working memory task were obtained. A major limitation of this study is a relatively small sample size for several analyses due to the integration of diverse methodologies and participant compliance. Working memory performance was significantly lower for patients than for controls. During the working memory task, patients (n = 7) had significantly lower amplitudes in gamma oscillations than controls (n = 9). However, both at rest and across working memory stages, there were significant correlations between gamma oscillation amplitude and left DLPFC GABA level. Peak gamma frequency during the encoding stage of the working memory task (n = 16) significantly correlated with GABA level and working memory performance. Despite gamma band amplitude deficits in patients across working memory stages, both baseline and working memory-induced gamma oscillations showed strong dependence on baseline GABA levels in patients and controls. These findings suggest a critical role for GABA function in gamma band oscillations, even under conditions of system and cognitive impairments as seen in schizophrenia.

  5. Neutrino oscillations in a predictive SUSY GUT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blazek, T.; Raby, S.; Tobe, K.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we present a predictive SO(10) supersymmetric grand unified theory with the family symmetry U(2)xU(1) which has several nice features. We are able to fit fermion masses and mixing angles, including recent neutrino data, with nine parameters in the charged fermion sector and four in the neutrino sector. The family symmetry plays a preeminent role. (i) The model is ''natural''--we include all terms allowed by the symmetry. It restricts the number of arbitrary parameters and enforces many zeros in the effective mass matrices. (ii) Family symmetry breaking from U(2)xU(1)→U(1)→ nothing generates the family hierarchy. It also constrains squark and slepton mass matrices, thus ameliorating flavor violation resulting from squark and slepton loop contributions. (iii) It naturally gives large angle ν μ -ν τ mixing describing atmospheric neutrino oscillation data and small angle ν e -ν s mixing, consistent with the small mixing angle Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) solution to solar neutrino data. (iv) Finally, in this paper we assume minimal family symmetry-breaking vacuum expectation values (VEV's). As a result we cannot obtain a three neutrino solution to both atmospheric and solar neutrino oscillations. In addition, the solution discussed here cannot fit liquid scintillation neutrino detector (LSND) data even though this solution requires a sterile neutrino ν s . It is important to note, however, that with nonminimal family symmetry-breaking VEV's, a three neutrino solution is possible with the small mixing angle MSW solution to solar neutrino data and large angle ν μ -ν τ mixing describing atmospheric neutrino oscillation data. In the four neutrino case, nonminimal family VEV's may also permit a solution for LSND. The results with nonminimal family breaking are still under investigation and will be reported in a future paper. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society

  6. Prevention of Pressure Oscillations in Modeling a Cavitating Acoustic Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Klenow

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cavitation effects play an important role in the UNDEX loading of a structure. For far-field UNDEX, the structural loading is affected by the formation of local and bulk cavitation regions, and the pressure pulses resulting from the closure of the cavitation regions. A common approach to numerically modeling cavitation in far-field underwater explosions is Cavitating Acoustic Finite Elements (CAFE and more recently Cavitating Acoustic Spectral Elements (CASE. Treatment of cavitation in this manner causes spurious pressure oscillations which must be treated by a numerical damping scheme. The focus of this paper is to investigate the severity of these oscillations on the structural response and a possible improvement to CAFE, based on the original Boris and Book Flux-Corrected Transport algorithm on structured meshes [6], to limit oscillations without the energy loss associated with the current damping schemes.

  7. Charge Analyzer Responsive Local Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Linda Habash; Thornton, Gary

    2015-01-01

    The first transatlantic radio transmission, demonstrated by Marconi in December of 1901, revealed the essential role of the ionosphere for radio communications. This ionized layer of the upper atmosphere controls the amount of radio power transmitted through, reflected off of, and absorbed by the atmospheric medium. Low-frequency radio signals can propagate long distances around the globe via repeated reflections off of the ionosphere and the Earth's surface. Higher frequency radio signals can punch through the ionosphere to be received at orbiting satellites. However, any turbulence in the ionosphere can distort these signals, compromising the performance or even availability of space-based communication and navigations systems. The physics associated with this distortion effect is analogous to the situation when underwater images are distorted by convecting air bubbles. In fact, these ionospheric features are often called 'plasma bubbles' since they exhibit some of the similar behavior as underwater air bubbles. These events, instigated by solar and geomagnetic storms, can cause communication and navigation outages that last for hours. To help understand and predict these outages, a world-wide community of space scientists and technologists are devoted to researching this topic. One aspect of this research is to develop instruments capable of measuring the ionospheric plasma bubbles. Figure 1 shows a photo of the Charge Analyzer Responsive to Local Oscillations (CARLO), a new instrument under development at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). It is a frequency-domain ion spectrum analyzer designed to measure the distributions of ionospheric turbulence from 1 Hz to 10 kHz (i.e., spatial scales from a few kilometers down to a few centimeters). This frequency range is important since it focuses on turbulence scales that affect VHF/UHF satellite communications, GPS systems, and over-the-horizon radar systems. CARLO is based on the flight-proven Plasma Local

  8. Remote quantum entanglement between two micromechanical oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedinger, Ralf; Wallucks, Andreas; Marinković, Igor; Löschnauer, Clemens; Aspelmeyer, Markus; Hong, Sungkun; Gröblacher, Simon

    2018-04-01

    Entanglement, an essential feature of quantum theory that allows for inseparable quantum correlations to be shared between distant parties, is a crucial resource for quantum networks 1 . Of particular importance is the ability to distribute entanglement between remote objects that can also serve as quantum memories. This has been previously realized using systems such as warm 2,3 and cold atomic vapours 4,5 , individual atoms 6 and ions 7,8 , and defects in solid-state systems 9-11 . Practical communication applications require a combination of several advantageous features, such as a particular operating wavelength, high bandwidth and long memory lifetimes. Here we introduce a purely micromachined solid-state platform in the form of chip-based optomechanical resonators made of nanostructured silicon beams. We create and demonstrate entanglement between two micromechanical oscillators across two chips that are separated by 20 centimetres . The entangled quantum state is distributed by an optical field at a designed wavelength near 1,550 nanometres. Therefore, our system can be directly incorporated in a realistic fibre-optic quantum network operating in the conventional optical telecommunication band. Our results are an important step towards the development of large-area quantum networks based on silicon photonics.

  9. Solar filament material oscillations and drainage before eruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi, Yi; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Hong, Junchao; Li, Haidong; Yang, Dan; Yang, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Both large-amplitude longitudinal (LAL) oscillations and material drainage in a solar filament are associated with the flow of material along the filament axis, often followed by an eruption. However, the relationship between these two motions and a subsequent eruption event is poorly understood. We analyze a filament eruption using EUV imaging data captured by the Atmospheric Imaging Array on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the Hα images from the Global Oscillation Network Group. Hours before the eruption, the filament was activated, with one of its legs undergoing a slow rising motion. The asymmetric activation inclined the filament relative to the solar surface. After the active phase, LAL oscillations were observed in the inclined filament. The oscillation period increased slightly over time, which may suggest that the magnetic fields supporting the filament evolve to be flatter during the slow rising phase. After the oscillations, a significant amount of filament material was drained toward one filament endpoint, followed immediately by the violent eruption of the filament. The material drainage may further support the change in magnetic topology prior to the eruption. Moreover, we suggest that the filament material drainage could play a role in the transition from a slow to a fast rise of the erupting filament.

  10. Growth-rate-dependent dynamics of a bacterial genetic oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osella, Matteo; Lagomarsino, Marco Cosentino

    2013-01-01

    Gene networks exhibiting oscillatory dynamics are widespread in biology. The minimal regulatory designs giving rise to oscillations have been implemented synthetically and studied by mathematical modeling. However, most of the available analyses generally neglect the coupling of regulatory circuits with the cellular “chassis” in which the circuits are embedded. For example, the intracellular macromolecular composition of fast-growing bacteria changes with growth rate. As a consequence, important parameters of gene expression, such as ribosome concentration or cell volume, are growth-rate dependent, ultimately coupling the dynamics of genetic circuits with cell physiology. This work addresses the effects of growth rate on the dynamics of a paradigmatic example of genetic oscillator, the repressilator. Making use of empirical growth-rate dependencies of parameters in bacteria, we show that the repressilator dynamics can switch between oscillations and convergence to a fixed point depending on the cellular state of growth, and thus on the nutrients it is fed. The physical support of the circuit (type of plasmid or gene positions on the chromosome) also plays an important role in determining the oscillation stability and the growth-rate dependence of period and amplitude. This analysis has potential application in the field of synthetic biology, and suggests that the coupling between endogenous genetic oscillators and cell physiology can have substantial consequences for their functionality.

  11. Queueing-Based Synchronization and Entrainment for Synthetic Gene Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, William; Butzin, Nicholas; Hochendoner, Philip; Ogle, Curtis

    Synthetic gene oscillators have been a major focus of synthetic biology research since the beginning of the field 15 years ago. They have proven to be useful both for biotechnological applications as well as a testing ground to significantly develop our understanding of the design principles behind synthetic and native gene oscillators. In particular, the principles governing synchronization and entrainment of biological oscillators have been explored using a synthetic biology approach. Our work combines experimental and theoretical approaches to specifically investigate how a bottleneck for protein degradation, which is present in most if not all existing synthetic oscillators, can be leveraged to robustly synchronize and entrain biological oscillators. We use both the terminology and mathematical tools of queueing theory to intuitively explain the role of this bottleneck in both synchronization and entrainment, which extends prior work demonstrating the usefulness of queueing theory in synthetic and native gene circuits. We conclude with an investigation of how synchronization and entrainment may be sensitive to the presence of multiple proteolytic pathways in a cell that couple weakly through crosstalk. This work was supported by NSF Grant #1330180.

  12. Neutrino masses and neutrino oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Di Lella, L

    2000-01-01

    These lectures review direct measurements of neutrino masses and the status of neutrino oscillation searches using both natural neutrino sources (the Sun and cosmic rays interacting in the Earth atmosphere) and artificial neutrinos (produced by nuclear reactors and accelerators). Finally, future experiments and plans are presented. (68 refs).

  13. Harmonic oscillator in Snyder space

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The harmonic oscillator in Snyder space is investigated in its classical and quantum versions. The classical trajectory is obtained and the semiclassical quantization from the phase space trajectories is discussed. An effective cut-off to high frequencies is found. The quantum version is developed and an equivalent usual ...

  14. Compressible flow in fluidic oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Emilio; Hirsch, Damian; Gharib, Mory

    2013-11-01

    We present qualitative observations on the internal flow characteristics of fluidic oscillator geometries commonly referred to as sweeping jets in active flow control applications. We also discuss the effect of the geometry on the output jet in conditions from startup to supersonic exit velocity. Supported by the Boeing Company.

  15. Ellipsoidal basis for isotropic oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallies, W.; Lukac, I.; Pogosyan, G.S.; Sisakyan, A.N.

    1994-01-01

    The solutions of the Schroedinger equation are derived for the isotropic oscillator potential in the ellipsoidal coordinate system. The explicit expression is obtained for the ellipsoidal integrals of motion through the components of the orbital moment and Demkov's tensor. The explicit form of the ellipsoidal basis is given for the lowest quantum numbers. 10 refs.; 1 tab. (author)

  16. The relativistic harmonic oscillator reconsidered

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofsaess, T.

    1978-01-01

    The bound states of scalar quarks interacting through a scalar harmonic oscillator are investigated. In the presence of this interaction the dressed quark propagator differs substantially from the free one. This leads to a Bethe Salpeter equation which does not allow for any stable bound states of positive mass. (orig.) [de

  17. Inverse problem of solar oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekii, T.; Shibahashi, H.

    1987-01-01

    The authors present some preliminary results of numerical simulation to infer the sound velocity distribution in the solar interior from the oscillation data of the Sun as the inverse problem. They analyze the acoustic potential itself by taking account of some factors other than the sound velocity, and infer the sound velocity distribution in the deep interior of the Sun

  18. Sum rules for neutrino oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobzarev, I.Yu.; Martemyanov, B.V.; Okun, L.B.; Schepkin, M.G.

    1981-01-01

    Sum rules for neutrino oscillations are obtained. The derivation of the general form of the s matrix for two stage process lsub(i)sup(-)→ν→lsub(k)sup(+-) (where lsub(i)sup(-)e, μ, tau, ... are initial leptons with flavor i and lsub(k)sup(+-) is final lepton) is presented. The consideration of two stage process lsub(i)sup(-)→ν→lsub(k)sup(+-) gives the possibility to take into account neutrino masses and to obtain the expressions for the oscillating cross sections. In the case of Dirac and left-handed Majorana neutrino is obtained the sum rule for the quantities 1/Vsub(K)σ(lsub(i)sup(-)→lsub(K)sup(+-)), (where Vsub(K) is a velocity of lsub(K)). In the left-handed Majorana neutrino case there is an additional antineutrino admixture leading to lsub(i)sup(-)→lsub(K)sup(+) process. Both components (neutrino and antineutrino) oscillate independently. The sums Σsub(K)1/Vsub(k)σ(lsub(i)sup(-) - lsub(K)sup(+-) then oscillate due to the presence of left-handed antineutrinos and right-handed neutrinos which do not take part in weak interactions. If right-handed currents are added sum rules analogous to considered above may be obtained. All conclusions are valid in the general case when CP is not conserved [ru

  19. Oscillating solitons in nonlinear optics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The study of solitons in those physical systems reveals some exciting .... With the following power series expansions for g(z,t) and f(z,t): g(z,t) = εg1(z,t) + ... If nonlinearity γ (z) is also taken as a function in figure 1b, the periodic and oscillation.

  20. Low-Vibration Oscillating Compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, P. A.

    1984-01-01

    Oscillating compressor momentum compensated: produces little vibration in its supporting structure. Compressure requires no lubrication and virtually free of wear. Compresses working fluids such as helium, nitrogen or chlorfluorocarbons for Stirling-cycle refrigeration or other purposes. Compressor includes two mutually opposed ferromagnetic pistons of same shape and mass. Electromagnetic flux links both pistons, causing magnetic attraction between them.

  1. Matter effects in neutrino oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dass, G.V.

    1989-01-01

    After a review of the relevant aspects of neutrino oscillations for propagation in vacuum and in material media, this paper discuss the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein mechanism and its application to a solution of the solar neutrino puzzle. The elementary level of the talk is suitable to people not working in neutrino physics

  2. Mesino oscillation in MFV SUSY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Joshua [Cornell University, Department of Physics, LEPP, Ithaca, NY (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Csaki, Csaba; Grossman, Yuval; Heidenreich, Ben [Cornell University, Department of Physics, LEPP, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2013-04-15

    R-parity violating supersymmetry in a Minimal Flavor Violation paradigm can produce same-sign dilepton signals via direct sbottom-LSP pair production. Such signals arise when the sbottom hadronizes and the resulting mesino oscillates into an antimesino. The first bounds on the sbottom mass are placed in this scenario using current LHC results. (orig.)

  3. Chimera States in Neural Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahar, Sonya; Glaze, Tera

    2014-03-01

    Chimera states have recently been explored both theoretically and experimentally, in various coupled nonlinear oscillators, ranging from phase-oscillator models to coupled chemical reactions. In a chimera state, both coherent and incoherent (or synchronized and desynchronized) states occur simultaneously in populations of identical oscillators. We investigate chimera behavior in a population of neural oscillators using the Huber-Braun model, a Hodgkin-Huxley-like model originally developed to characterize the temperature-dependent bursting behavior of mammalian cold receptors. One population of neurons is allowed to synchronize, with each neuron receiving input from all the others in its group (global within-group coupling). Subsequently, a second population of identical neurons is placed under an identical global within-group coupling, and the two populations are also coupled to each other (between-group coupling). For certain values of the coupling constants, the neurons in the two populations exhibit radically different synchronization behavior. We will discuss the range of chimera activity in the model, and discuss its implications for actual neural activity, such as unihemispheric sleep.

  4. Cdc42 is crucial for the maturation of primordial cell junctions in keratinocytes independent of Rac1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Dan; Pedersen, Esben; Wang, Zhipeng

    2008-01-01

    Cell-cell contacts are crucial for the integrity of all tissues. Contrasting reports have been published about the role of Cdc42 in epithelial cell-cell contacts in vitro. In keratinocytes, it was suggested that Rac1 and not Cdc42 is crucial for the formation of mature epithelial junctions, based...... on dominant negative inhibition experiments. Deletion of the Cdc42 gene in keratinocytes in vivo slowly impaired the maintenance of cell-cell contacts by an increased degradation of beta-catenin. Whether Cdc42 is required for the formation of mature junctions was not tested. We show now that Cdc42-deficient...... immortalized and primary keratinocytes form only punctate primordial cell contacts in vitro, which cannot mature into belt-like junctions. This defect was independent of enhanced degradation of beta-catenin, but correlated to an impaired activation and localization of aPKCzeta in the Cdc42-null keratinocytes...

  5. Gamma oscillation maintains stimulus structure-dependent synchronization in cat visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samonds, Jason M; Bonds, A B

    2005-01-01

    Visual cortical cells demonstrate both oscillation and synchronization, although the underlying causes and functional significance of these behaviors remain uncertain. We simultaneously recorded single-unit activity with microelectrode arrays in supragranular layers of area 17 of cats paralyzed and anesthetized with propofol and N(2)O. Rate-normalized autocorrelograms of 24 cells reveal bursting (100%) and gamma oscillation (63%). Renewal density analysis, used to explore the source of oscillation, suggests a contribution from extrinsic influences such as feedback. However, a bursting refractory period, presumably membrane-based, could also encourage oscillatory firing. When we investigated the source of synchronization for 60 cell pairs we found only moderate correlation of synchrony with bursts and oscillation. We did, nonetheless, discover a possible functional role for oscillation. In all cases of cross-correlograms that exhibited oscillation, the strength of the synchrony was maintained throughout the stimulation period. When no oscillation was apparent, 75% of the cell pairs showed decay in their synchronization. The synchrony between cells is strongly dependent on similar response onset latencies. We therefore propose that structured input, which yields tight organization of latency, is a more likely candidate for the source of synchronization than oscillation. The reliable synchrony at response onset could be driven by spatial and temporal correlation of the stimulus that is preserved through the earlier stages of the visual system. Oscillation then contributes to maintenance of the synchrony to enhance reliable transmission of the information for higher cognitive processing.

  6. Generalized oscillator systems and their parabosonic interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macfarlane, A J [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics

    1994-12-31

    The Fock space description of various bosonic oscillator systems are carried out. All descriptions are based on a single creation - annihilation pair. Special attention is paid to the q-deformed Calogero-Vasiliev oscillator. 23 refs.

  7. Analytic Neutrino Oscillation Probabilities in Matter: Revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parke, Stephen J. [Fermilab; Denton, Peter B. [Copenhagen U.; Minakata, Hisakazu [Madrid, IFT

    2018-01-02

    We summarize our recent paper on neutrino oscillation probabilities in matter, explaining the importance, relevance and need for simple, highly accurate approximations to the neutrino oscillation probabilities in matter.

  8. Bursting oscillations, bifurcation and synchronization in neuronal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Haixia [School of Science, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Wang Qingyun, E-mail: drwangqy@gmail.com [Department of Dynamics and Control, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Lu Qishao [Department of Dynamics and Control, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > We investigate bursting oscillations and related bifurcation in the modified Morris-Lecar neuron. > Two types of fast-slow bursters are analyzed in detail. > We show the properties of some crucial bifurcation points. > Synchronization transition and the neural excitability are explored in the coupled bursters. - Abstract: This paper investigates bursting oscillations and related bifurcation in the modified Morris-Lecar neuron. It is shown that for some appropriate parameters, the modified Morris-Lecar neuron can exhibit two types of fast-slow bursters, that is 'circle/fold cycle' bursting and 'subHopf/homoclinic' bursting with class 1 and class 2 neural excitability, which have different neuro-computational properties. By means of the analysis of fast-slow dynamics and phase plane, we explore bifurcation mechanisms associated with the two types of bursters. Furthermore, the properties of some crucial bifurcation points, which can determine the type of the burster, are studied by the stability and bifurcation theory. In addition, we investigate the influence of the coupling strength on synchronization transition and the neural excitability in two electrically coupled bursters with the same bursting type. More interestingly, the multi-time-scale synchronization transition phenomenon is found as the coupling strength varies.

  9. Two particle states, lepton mixing and oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Kachelriess, M; Schönert, S

    2000-01-01

    Discussions of lepton mixing and oscillations consider generally only flavor oscillations of neutrinos and neglect the accompanying charged leptons. In cases of experimental interest like pion or nuclear beta decay an oscillation pattern is expected indeed only for neutrinos if only one of the two produced particles is observed. We argue that flavor oscillations of neutrinos without detecting the accompanying lepton is a peculiarity of the two-particle states $|l\

  10. A theory of generalized Bloch oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duggen, Lars; Lew Yan Voon, L. C.; Lassen, Benny

    2016-01-01

    Bloch oscillations of electrons are shown to occur for cases when the energy spectrum does not consist of the traditional evenly-spaced ladders and the potential gradient does not result from an external electric field. A theory of such generalized Bloch oscillations is presented and an exact...... oscillations. We stipulate that the presented theory of generalized Bloch oscillations can be extended to other systems such as acoustics and photonics....

  11. Pile oscillator ROB-1, cooperation NPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, M; Markovic, V; Obradovic, D; Kocic, A; Velickovic, LJ; Jovanovic, S [Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1965-11-15

    The present paper explains the purpose of the work on reactor kinetics and separately deals with the region for which the ROB-1 reactor oscillator is constructed. The theoretical part concerns the basic principles on which the oscillator operates. the paper also discusses the details of the oscillator, the procedure for preparation and measurement, and analyzes the source of errors. In addition several examples of the use of oscillator are given. (author)

  12. Nonlinear analysis of ring oscillator circuits

    KAUST Repository

    Ge, Xiaoqing

    2010-06-01

    Using nonlinear systems techniques, we analyze the stability properties and synchronization conditions for ring oscillator circuits, which are essential building blocks in digital systems. By making use of its cyclic structure, we investigate local and global stability properties of an n-stage ring oscillator. We present a sufficient condition for global asymptotic stability of the origin and obtain necessity if the ring oscillator consists of identical inverter elements. We then give a synchronization condition for identical interconnected ring oscillators.

  13. Comparison of Methods for Oscillation Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Trangbæk, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    This paper compares a selection of methods for detecting oscillations in control loops. The methods are tested on measurement data from a coal-fired power plant, where some oscillations are occurring. Emphasis is put on being able to detect oscillations without having a system model and without...... using process knowledge. The tested methods show potential for detecting the oscillations, however, transient components in the signals cause false detections as well, motivating usage of models in order to remove the expected signals behavior....

  14. Pile oscillator ROB-1, cooperation NPY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, M.; Markovic, V.; Obradovic, D.; Kocic, A.; Velickovic, LJ.; Jovanovic, S.

    1965-11-01

    The present paper explains the purpose of the work on reactor kinetics and separately deals with the region for which the ROB-1 reactor oscillator is constructed. The theoretical part concerns the basic principles on which the oscillator operates. the paper also discusses the details of the oscillator, the procedure for preparation and measurement, and analyzes the source of errors. In addition several examples of the use of oscillator are given. (author)

  15. Nonlinear analysis of ring oscillator circuits

    KAUST Repository

    Ge, Xiaoqing; Arcak, Murat; Salama, Khaled N.

    2010-01-01

    Using nonlinear systems techniques, we analyze the stability properties and synchronization conditions for ring oscillator circuits, which are essential building blocks in digital systems. By making use of its cyclic structure, we investigate local and global stability properties of an n-stage ring oscillator. We present a sufficient condition for global asymptotic stability of the origin and obtain necessity if the ring oscillator consists of identical inverter elements. We then give a synchronization condition for identical interconnected ring oscillators.

  16. The MSW Effect and Matter Effects in Neutrino Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, A. Yu.

    2006-03-01

    The MSW (Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein) effect is the adiabatic or partially adiabatic neutrino flavor conversion in media with varying density. The main notions related to the effect, its dynamics and physical picture are reviewed. The large mixing MSW effect is realized inside the Sun providing a solution of the solar neutrino problem. The small mixing MSW effect driven by the 1-3 mixing can be realized for the supernova (SN) neutrinos. Inside collapsing stars new elements of the MSW dynamics may show up: non-oscillatory transition, non-adiabatic conversion, time dependent adiabaticity violation induced by shock waves. Effects of the resonance enhancement and the parametric enhancement of oscillations can be realized for atmospheric and accelerator neutrinos in the Earth. Precise results for neutrino oscillations in low density media with arbitrary density profile are presented and the attenuation effect is described. The area of applications is the solar and SN neutrinos inside the Earth, and the results are crucial for the neutrino oscillation tomography.

  17. NOx Emission Reduction by Oscillating Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2005-09-01

    This project focuses on a new technology that reduces NOx emissions while increasing furnace efficiency for both air- and oxygen-fired furnaces. Oscillating combustion is a retrofit technology that involves the forced oscillation of the fuel flow rate to a furnace. These oscillations create successive, fuel-rich and fuel-lean zones within the furnace.

  18. Neutrino oscillations: present status and outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwetz, T.

    2005-01-01

    In this talk the present status of neutrino oscillations is reviewed, based on a global analysis of world neutrino oscillation data from solar, atmospheric, reactor, and accelerator neutrino experiments. Furthermore, I discuss the expected improvements in the determination of neutrino parameters by future oscillation experiments within a timescale of 10 years. (author)

  19. Neutrino oscillations in the early universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enqvist, K.

    1990-01-01

    The oscillations of electron neutrinos into inert neutrinos may have resonant behaviour in the heat bath of the early Universe. It is shown that any initial neutrino asymmetry will be washed away by the oscillations. Neutrino oscillations would affect also primordial helium production, which implies stringent limits on the neutrino mixing parameters. (orig.)

  20. The supersymmetric Pegg-Barnett oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2005-01-01

    The su(n) Lie algebraic structure of the Pegg-Barnett oscillator that possesses a finite-dimensional number-state space is demonstrated. The supersymmetric generalization of the Pegg-Barnett oscillator is suggested. it is shown that such a supersymmetric Pegg-Barnett oscillator may have some potential applications, e.g., the mass spectrum of the charged leptons

  1. Three flavour oscillation interpretation of neutrino data

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    To explain the atmospheric neutrino problem in terms of neutrino oscillations, ЖС¾ of about 10-¿. eV. ¾. [8] is needed whereas the neutrino oscil- lation solution to the solar neutrino problem requires ЖС¾ ~10- eV. ¾ . Hence both solar and atmospheric neutrino problems cannot be explained in terms of e ° μ oscillations.

  2. Quantitative proteomics identify molecular targets that are crucial in larval settlement and metamorphosis of bugula neritina

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Huoming

    2011-01-07

    The marine invertebrate Bugula neritina has a biphasic life cycle that consists of a swimming larval stage and a sessile juvenile and adult stage. The attachment of larvae to the substratum and their subsequent metamorphosis have crucial ecological consequences. Despite many studies on this species, little is known about the molecular mechanism of these processes. Here, we report a comparative study of swimming larvae and metamorphosing individuals at 4 and 24 h postattachment using label-free quantitative proteomics. We identified more than 1100 proteins at each stage, 61 of which were differentially expressed. Specifically, proteins involved in energy metabolism and structural molecules were generally down-regulated, whereas proteins involved in transcription and translation, the extracellular matrix, and calcification were strongly up-regulated during metamorphosis. Many tightly regulated novel proteins were also identified. Subsequent analysis of the temporal and spatial expressions of some of the proteins and an assay of their functions indicated that they may have key roles in metamorphosis of B. neritina. These findings not only provide molecular evidence with which to elucidate the substantial changes in morphology and physiology that occur during larval attachment and metamorphosis but also identify potential targets for antifouling treatment. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  3. Interplay between Solo and keratin filaments is crucial for mechanical force–induced stress fiber reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Sachiko; Ohashi, Kazumasa; Mashiko, Toshiya; Kondo, Hiroshi; Mizuno, Kensaku

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical force–induced cytoskeletal reorganization is essential for cell and tissue remodeling and homeostasis; however, the underlying cellular mechanisms remain elusive. Solo (ARHGEF40) is a RhoA-targeting guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) involved in cyclical stretch–induced human endothelial cell reorientation and convergent extension cell movement in zebrafish gastrula. In this study, we show that Solo binds to keratin-8/keratin-18 (K8/K18) intermediate filaments through multiple sites. Solo overexpression promotes the formation of thick actin stress fibers and keratin bundles, whereas knockdown of Solo, expression of a GEF-inactive mutant of Solo, or inhibition of ROCK suppresses stress fiber formation and leads to disorganized keratin networks, indicating that the Solo-RhoA-ROCK pathway serves to precisely organize keratin networks, as well as to promote stress fibers. Of importance, knockdown of Solo or K18 or overexpression of GEF-inactive or deletion mutants of Solo suppresses tensile force–induced stress fiber reinforcement. Furthermore, knockdown of Solo or K18 suppresses tensile force-induced RhoA activation. These results strongly suggest that the interplay between Solo and K8/K18 filaments plays a crucial role in tensile force–induced RhoA activation and consequent actin cytoskeletal reinforcement. PMID:26823019

  4. SWIM: a computational tool to unveiling crucial nodes in complex biological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paci, Paola; Colombo, Teresa; Fiscon, Giulia; Gurtner, Aymone; Pavesi, Giulio; Farina, Lorenzo

    2017-03-20

    SWItchMiner (SWIM) is a wizard-like software implementation of a procedure, previously described, able to extract information contained in complex networks. Specifically, SWIM allows unearthing the existence of a new class of hubs, called "fight-club hubs", characterized by a marked negative correlation with their first nearest neighbors. Among them, a special subset of genes, called "switch genes", appears to be characterized by an unusual pattern of intra- and inter-module connections that confers them a crucial topological role, interestingly mirrored by the evidence of their clinic-biological relevance. Here, we applied SWIM to a large panel of cancer datasets from The Cancer Genome Atlas, in order to highlight switch genes that could be critically associated with the drastic changes in the physiological state of cells or tissues induced by the cancer development. We discovered that switch genes are found in all cancers we studied and they encompass protein coding genes and non-coding RNAs, recovering many known key cancer players but also many new potential biomarkers not yet characterized in cancer context. Furthermore, SWIM is amenable to detect switch genes in different organisms and cell conditions, with the potential to uncover important players in biologically relevant scenarios, including but not limited to human cancer.

  5. Corporate Governance as a Crucial Factor in Achieving Sustainable Corporate Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julija Bistrova

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the developed stock markets the corporate governance aspect is crucial in the stock portfolio selection process for investor seeking to achieve shareholder value sustainability. In the emerging markets the importance of the corporate governance role just starts to be realized by the investors and by the corporate managers. The present research, looking at the stock performance leaders and laggards, analyzes whether the corporate governance system matters to achieve long-term shareholder value within the Central and Eastern European stock markets universe. Corporate governance quality was assessed and compared among the out- and underperformers. The financial results plausibility and the ownership structure were considered as well. Additionally, the authors analyzed whether the quality of corporate governance influences the economic performance of the company. The obtained results provide the proof that the corporate governance does matter as the market outperformers have above average corporate governance quality and provide trustworthy financial results more often than the underperforming companies. Besides, well-governed companies are also able to deliver more attractive financial results.

  6. Quality of governance and effectiveness of protected areas: crucial concepts for conservation planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Johanna; Cabeza, Mar

    2017-07-01

    Protected areas (PAs) are a key tool for biodiversity conservation and play a central role in the Convention on Biological Diversity. Recently, the effectiveness of PAs has been questioned, and assessing how effective they are in enabling the future persistence of biodiversity is not trivial. Here, we focus on terrestrial PAs and clarify the terminology related to PA effectiveness, distinguishing between management and ecological aspects. We suggest that the quality of governance affects both aspects of effectiveness but recognize a lack of synthetic understanding of the topic. We present a conceptual framework linking the underlying mechanisms by which the quality of governance affects conservation outcomes in PAs and how this relates to conservation planning. We show that it is crucial to separate pressure and response and how these together will lead to the observed conservation outcomes. We urge for more focused attention on governance factors and in particular more empirical research on how to address causality and how to account for the quality of governance when prioritizing actions. Our framework is linked to the classic concepts of systematic conservation planning and clarifies the strategies available to achieve a comprehensive and effective network of PAs. © 2016 The Authors. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of New York Academy of Sciences.

  7. Disruption of Circadian Rhythms: A Crucial Factor in the Etiology of Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Salgado-Delgado

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Circadian factors might play a crucial role in the etiology of depression. It has been demonstrated that the disruption of circadian rhythms by lighting conditions and lifestyle predisposes individuals to a wide range of mood disorders, including impulsivity, mania and depression. Also, associated with depression, there is the impairment of circadian rhythmicity of behavioral, endocrine, and metabolic functions. Inspite of this close relationship between both processes, the complex relationship between the biological clock and the incidence of depressive symptoms is far from being understood. The efficiency and the timing of treatments based on chronotherapy (e.g., light treatment, sleep deprivation, and scheduled medication indicate that the circadian system is an essential target in the therapy of depression. The aim of the present review is to analyze the biological and clinical data that link depression with the disruption of circadian rhythms, emphasizing the contribution of circadian desynchrony. Therefore, we examine the conditions that may lead to circadian disruption of physiology and behavior as described in depressive states, and, according to this approach, we discuss therapeutic strategies aimed at treating the circadian system and depression.

  8. VP3 is crucial for the stability of Nora virus virions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadanandan, Sajna Anand; Ekström, Jens-Ola; Jonna, Venkateswara Rao; Hofer, Anders; Hultmark, Dan

    2016-09-02

    Nora virus is an enteric virus that causes persistent, non-pathological infection in Drosophila melanogaster. It replicates in the fly gut and is transmitted via the fecal-oral route. Nora virus has a single-stranded positive-sense RNA genome, which is translated in four open reading frames. Reading frame three encodes the VP3 protein, the structure and function of which we have investigated in this work. We have shown that VP3 is a trimer that has an α-helical secondary structure, with a functionally important coiled-coil domain. In order to identify the role of VP3 in the Nora virus life cycle, we constructed VP3-mutants using the cDNA clone of the virus. Our results show that VP3 does not have a role in the actual assembly of the virus particles, but virions that lack VP3 or harbor VP3 with a disrupted coiled coil domain are incapable of transmission via the fecal-oral route. Removing the region downstream of the putative coiled coil appears to have an effect on the fitness of the virus but does not hamper its replication or transmission. We also found that the VP3 protein and particularly the coiled coil domain are crucial for the stability of Nora virus virions when exposed to heat or proteases. Hence, we propose that VP3 is imperative to Nora virus virions as it confers stability to the viral capsid. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Slow oscillations orchestrating fast oscillations and memory consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölle, Matthias; Born, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Slow-wave sleep (SWS) facilitates the consolidation of hippocampus-dependent declarative memory. Based on the standard two-stage memory model, we propose that memory consolidation during SWS represents a process of system consolidation which is orchestrated by the neocortical memory. The slow oscillations temporally group neuronal activity into up-states of strongly enhanced neuronal activity and down-states of neuronal silence. In a feed-forward efferent action, this grouping is induced not only in the neocortex but also in other structures relevant to consolidation, namely the thalamus generating 10-15Hz spindles, and the hippocampus generating sharp wave-ripples, with the latter well known to accompany a replay of newly encoded memories taking place in hippocampal circuitries. The feed-forward synchronizing effect of the slow oscillation enables the formation of spindle-ripple events where ripples and accompanying reactivated hippocampal memory information become nested into the single troughs of spindles. Spindle-ripple events thus enable reactivated memory-related hippocampal information to be fed back to neocortical networks in the excitable slow oscillation up-state where they can induce enduring plastic synaptic changes underlying the effective formation of long-term memories. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Measuring neutrino oscillation parameters using $\

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backhouse, Christopher James [Oriel College, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-01

    MINOS is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. It consists of two large steel-scintillator tracking calorimeters. The near detector is situated at Fermilab, close to the production point of the NuMI muon-neutrino beam. The far detector is 735 km away, 716m underground in the Soudan mine, Northern Minnesota. The primary purpose of the MINOS experiment is to make precise measurements of the 'atmospheric' neutrino oscillation parameters (Δmatm2 and sin2atm). The oscillation signal consists of an energy-dependent deficit of vμ interactions in the far detector. The near detector is used to characterize the properties of the beam before oscillations develop. The two-detector design allows many potential sources of systematic error in the far detector to be mitigated by the near detector observations. This thesis describes the details of the vμ-disappearance analysis, and presents a new technique to estimate the hadronic energy of neutrino interactions. This estimator achieves a significant improvement in the energy resolution of the neutrino spectrum, and in the sensitivity of the neutrino oscillation fit. The systematic uncertainty on the hadronic energy scale was re-evaluated and found to be comparable to that of the energy estimator previously in use. The best-fit oscillation parameters of the vμ-disappearance analysis, incorporating this new estimator were: Δm2 = 2.32-0.08+0.12 x 10-3 eV2, sin 2 2θ > 0.90 (90% C.L.). A similar analysis, using data from a period of running where the NuMI beam was operated in a configuration producing a predominantly $\\bar{v}$μ beam, yielded somewhat different best-fit parameters Δ$\\bar{m}${sup 2} = (3.36-0.40+0.46(stat.) ± 0.06(syst.)) x 10-3eV2, sin2 2$\\bar{θ}$ = 0.86-0.12_0

  11. Time domain oscillating poles: Stability redefined in Memristor based Wien-oscillators

    KAUST Repository

    Talukdar, Abdul Hafiz Ibne

    2012-07-28

    Traditionally, the necessary and sufficient condition for any system to be oscillating is that its poles are located on the imaginary (jω) axis. In this paper, for the first time, we have shown that systems can oscillate with time-domain oscillating poles. The idea is verified using a Memristor based Wien oscillator. Sustained oscillations are observed without having the poles of the system fixed on the imaginary axis and the oscillating behavior of the system poles is reported. The oscillating resistance and triangular shape of FFT are also demonstrated with mathematical reasoning and simulation results to support the unusual and surprising characteristics. © 2009 IEEE.

  12. Oscillators that sync and swarm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keeffe, Kevin P; Hong, Hyunsuk; Strogatz, Steven H

    2017-11-15

    Synchronization occurs in many natural and technological systems, from cardiac pacemaker cells to coupled lasers. In the synchronized state, the individual cells or lasers coordinate the timing of their oscillations, but they do not move through space. A complementary form of self-organization occurs among swarming insects, flocking birds, or schooling fish; now the individuals move through space, but without conspicuously altering their internal states. Here we explore systems in which both synchronization and swarming occur together. Specifically, we consider oscillators whose phase dynamics and spatial dynamics are coupled. We call them swarmalators, to highlight their dual character. A case study of a generalized Kuramoto model predicts five collective states as possible long-term modes of organization. These states may be observable in groups of sperm, Japanese tree frogs, colloidal suspensions of magnetic particles, and other biological and physical systems in which self-assembly and synchronization interact.

  13. Torsional oscillations of the sun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snodgrass, H.B.; Howard, R.; National Solar Observatory, Tucson, AZ)

    1985-01-01

    The sun's differential rotation has a cyclic pattern of change that is tightly correlated with the sunspot, or magnetic activity, cycle. This pattern can be described as a torsional oscillation, in which the solar rotation is periodically sped up or slowed down in certain zones of latitude while elsewhere the rotation remains essentially steady. The zones of anomalous rotation move on the sun in wavelike fashion, keeping pace with and flanking the zones of magnetic activity. It is uncertain whether this torsional oscillation is a globally coherent ringing of the sun or whether it is a local pattern caused by and causing local changes in the magnetic fields. In either case, it may be an important link in the connection between the rotation and the cycle that is widely believed to exist but is not yet understood. 46 references

  14. Cubication of conservative nonlinear oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belendez, Augusto; Alvarez, Mariela L; Fernandez, Elena; Pascual, Inmaculada

    2009-01-01

    A cubication procedure of the nonlinear differential equation for conservative nonlinear oscillators is analysed and discussed. This scheme is based on the Chebyshev series expansion of the restoring force, and this allows us to approximate the original nonlinear differential equation by a Duffing equation in which the coefficients for the linear and cubic terms depend on the initial amplitude, A, while in a Taylor expansion of the restoring force these coefficients are independent of A. The replacement of the original nonlinear equation by an approximate Duffing equation allows us to obtain an approximate frequency-amplitude relation as a function of the complete elliptic integral of the first kind. Some conservative nonlinear oscillators are analysed to illustrate the usefulness and effectiveness of this scheme.

  15. Coding of Information in Limit Cycle Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleimer, Jan-Hendrik; Stemmler, Martin

    2009-12-01

    Starting from a general description of noisy limit cycle oscillators, we derive from the Fokker-Planck equations the linear response of the instantaneous oscillator frequency to a time-varying external force. We consider the time series of zero crossings of the oscillator’s phase and compute the mutual information between it and the driving force. A direct link is established between the phase response curve summarizing the oscillator dynamics and the ability of a limit cycle oscillator, such as a heart cell or neuron, to encode information in the timing of peaks in the oscillation.

  16. Quantum oscillations of conductivity in bismuth wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condrea, Elena

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of the resistance of bismuth nanowires with several diameters and different quality reveal oscillations on the dependence of resistance under uniaxial strain at T = 4.2 K. Amplitude of oscillations is significant (38 %) at helium temperature and becomes smearing at T = 77 K. Observed oscillations originate from quantum size effect. A simple evaluation of period of oscillations allows us to identify the groups of carriers involved in transport. Calculated periods of 42.2 and 25.9 nm satisfy approximately the ratio 2:1 for two experimentally observed sets of oscillations from light and heavy electrons.

  17. Memristor-based reactance-less oscillator

    KAUST Repository

    Zidan, Mohammed A.

    2012-10-02

    The first reactance-less oscillator is introduced. By using a memristor, the oscillator can be fully implemented on-chip without the need for any capacitors or inductors, which results in an area-efficient fully integrated solution. The concept of operation of the proposed oscillator is explained and detailed mathematical analysis is introduced. Closed-form expressions for the oscillation frequency and oscillation conditions are derived. Finally, the derived equations are verified with circuit simulations showing excellent agreement. © 2011 The Institution of Engineering and Technology.

  18. Memristor-based reactance-less oscillator

    KAUST Repository

    Zidan, Mohammed A.; Omran, Hesham; Radwan, Ahmed G.; Salama, Khaled N.

    2012-01-01

    The first reactance-less oscillator is introduced. By using a memristor, the oscillator can be fully implemented on-chip without the need for any capacitors or inductors, which results in an area-efficient fully integrated solution. The concept of operation of the proposed oscillator is explained and detailed mathematical analysis is introduced. Closed-form expressions for the oscillation frequency and oscillation conditions are derived. Finally, the derived equations are verified with circuit simulations showing excellent agreement. © 2011 The Institution of Engineering and Technology.

  19. Overshoot mechanism in transient excitation of THz and Gunn oscillations in wide-bandgap semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momox, Ernesto; Zakhleniuk, Nick; Balkan, Naci

    2012-11-01

    A detailed study of high-field transient and direct-current (DC) transport in GaN-based Gunn diode oscillators is carried out using the commercial simulator Sentaurus Device. Applicability of drift-diffusion (DD) and hydrodynamic (HD) models to high-speed, high-frequency devices is discussed in depth, and the results of the simulations from these models are compared. It is shown, for a highly homogeneous device based on a short (2 μm) supercritically doped (1017 cm-3) GaN specimen, that the DD model is unable to correctly take into account some essential physical effects which determine the operation mode of the device. At the same time, the HD model is ideally suited to solve such problems due to its ability to incorporate non-local effects. We show that the velocity overshoot near the device contacts and space charge injection and extraction play a crucial role in defining the operation mode of highly homogeneous short diodes in both the transient regime and the voltage-controlled oscillation regime. The transient conduction current responses are fundamentally different in the DD and HD models. The DD current simply repeats the velocity-field (v-F) characteristics, and the sample remains in a completely homogeneous state. In the HD model, the transient current pulse with a full width at half maximum of approximately 0.2 ps is increased about twofold due to the carrier injection (extraction) into (from) the active region and the velocity overshoot. The electron gas is characterized by highly inhomogeneous distributions of the carrier density, the electric field and the electron temperature. The simulation of the DC steady states of the diodes also shows very different results for the two models. The HD model shows the trapped stable anodic domain in the device, while the DD model completely retains all features of the v-F characteristics in a homogeneous gas. Simulation of the voltage-controlled oscillator shows that it operates in the accumulation layer mode

  20. Harmonic oscillator on a lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ader, J.P.; Bonnier, B.; Hontebeyrie, M.; Meyers, C.

    1983-01-01

    The continuum limit of the ground state energy for the harmonic oscillator with discrete time is derived for all possible choices of the lattice derivative. The occurrence of unphysical values is shown to arise whenever the lattice laplacian is not strictly positive on its Brillouin zone. These undesirable limits can either be finite and arbitrary (multiple spectrum) or infinite (overlapping sublattices with multiple spectrum). (orig.)

  1. Multipartite entanglement in neutrino oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasone, Massimo; Dell'Anno, Fabio; De Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2009-01-01

    Particle mixing is related to multi-mode entanglement of single-particle states The occupation number of both flavor eigenstates and mass eigenstates can be used to define a multiqubit space. In such a framework, flavor neutrino states can be interpreted as multipartite mode-entangled states. By using two different entanglement measures, we analyze the behavior of multipartite entanglement in the phenomenon of neutrino oscillations.

  2. Multipartite entanglement in neutrino oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasone, Massimo; Dell' Anno, Fabio; De Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio, E-mail: blasone@sa.infn.i [Dipartimento di Matematica e Informatica, Universita degli Studi di Salerno, Via Ponte don Melillo, I-84084 Fisciano (Italy)

    2009-06-01

    Particle mixing is related to multi-mode entanglement of single-particle states The occupation number of both flavor eigenstates and mass eigenstates can be used to define a multiqubit space. In such a framework, flavor neutrino states can be interpreted as multipartite mode-entangled states. By using two different entanglement measures, we analyze the behavior of multipartite entanglement in the phenomenon of neutrino oscillations.

  3. Invariants of collective neutrino oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pehlivan, Y.; Balantekin, A. B.; Kajino, Toshitaka; Yoshida, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    We consider the flavor evolution of a dense neutrino gas by taking into account both vacuum oscillations and self-interactions of neutrinos. We examine the system from a many-body perspective as well as from the point of view of an effective one-body description formulated in terms of the neutrino polarization vectors. We show that, in the single angle approximation, both the many-body picture and the effective one-particle picture possess several constants of motion. We write down these constants of motion explicitly in terms of the neutrino isospin operators for the many-body case and in terms of the polarization vectors for the effective one-body case. The existence of these constants of motion is a direct consequence of the fact that the collective neutrino oscillation Hamiltonian belongs to the class of Gaudin Hamiltonians. This class of Hamiltonians also includes the (reduced) BCS pairing Hamiltonian describing superconductivity. We point out the similarity between the collective neutrino oscillation Hamiltonian and the BCS pairing Hamiltonian. The constants of motion manifest the exact solvability of the system. Borrowing the well established techniques of calculating the exact BCS spectrum, we present exact eigenstates and eigenvalues of both the many-body and the effective one-particle Hamiltonians describing the collective neutrino oscillations. For the effective one-body case, we show that spectral splits of neutrinos can be understood in terms of the adiabatic evolution of some quasiparticle degrees of freedom from a high-density region where they coincide with flavor eigenstates to the vacuum where they coincide with mass eigenstates. We write down the most general consistency equations which should be satisfied by the effective one-body eigenstates and show that they reduce to the spectral split consistency equations for the appropriate initial conditions.

  4. Oscillations and Waves in Sunspots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Khomenko

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A magnetic field modifies the properties of waves in a complex way. Significant advances have been made recently in our understanding of the physics of sunspot waves with the help of high-resolution observations, analytical theories, as well as numerical simulations. We review the current ideas in the field, providing the most coherent picture of sunspot oscillations as by present understanding.

  5. [Role of the family in the development of borderline personality disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, P

    1993-11-01

    The role of family in the development of borderline personality disorder is examined with an emphasis on dimensions of family functioning. A synthesis of theoretical concepts implicating such factors, derived mostly from psychoanalysis, is proposed with an emphasis on separation-individuation, early frustrations, regression to recognition memory, oscillations in attachment and social influences. Empirical studies are reviewed. Affective neglect and parental overprotection are often cited, although dysfunctional behaviour control may have a regulatory effect on these factors and a crucial impact on psychic reality of the patient recalling his childhood.

  6. 3-D numerical simulations of coronal loops oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Selwa

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We present numerical results of 3-D MHD model of a dipole active region field containing a loop with a higher density than its surroundings. We study different ways of excitation of vertical kink oscillations by velocity perturbation: as an initial condition, and as an impulsive excitation with a pulse of a given position, duration, and amplitude. These properties are varied in the parametric studies. We find that the amplitude of vertical kink oscillations is significantly amplified in comparison to horizontal kink oscillations for exciters located centrally (symmetrically below the loop, but not if the exciter is located a significant distance to the side of the loop. This explains why the pure vertical kink mode is so rarely observed in comparison to the horizontally polarized one. We discuss the role of curved magnetic field lines and the pulse overlapping at one of the loop's footpoints in 3-D active regions (AR's on the excitation and the damping of slow standing waves. We find that footpoint excitation becomes more efficient in 3-D curved loops than in 2-D curved arcades and that slow waves can be excited within an interval of time that is comparable to the observed one wave-period due to the combined effect of the pulse inside and outside the loop. Additionally, we study the effect of AR topology on the excitation and trapping of loop oscillations. We find that a perturbation acting directly on a single loop excites oscillations, but results in an increased leakage compared to excitation of oscillations in an AR field by an external source.

  7. 3-D numerical simulations of coronal loops oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Selwa

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We present numerical results of 3-D MHD model of a dipole active region field containing a loop with a higher density than its surroundings. We study different ways of excitation of vertical kink oscillations by velocity perturbation: as an initial condition, and as an impulsive excitation with a pulse of a given position, duration, and amplitude. These properties are varied in the parametric studies. We find that the amplitude of vertical kink oscillations is significantly amplified in comparison to horizontal kink oscillations for exciters located centrally (symmetrically below the loop, but not if the exciter is located a significant distance to the side of the loop. This explains why the pure vertical kink mode is so rarely observed in comparison to the horizontally polarized one. We discuss the role of curved magnetic field lines and the pulse overlapping at one of the loop's footpoints in 3-D active regions (AR's on the excitation and the damping of slow standing waves. We find that footpoint excitation becomes more efficient in 3-D curved loops than in 2-D curved arcades and that slow waves can be excited within an interval of time that is comparable to the observed one wave-period due to the combined effect of the pulse inside and outside the loop. Additionally, we study the effect of AR topology on the excitation and trapping of loop oscillations. We find that a perturbation acting directly on a single loop excites oscillations, but results in an increased leakage compared to excitation of oscillations in an AR field by an external source.

  8. Subpanel on accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    Neutrinos are among nature's fundamental constituents, and they are also the ones about which we know least. Their role in the universe is widespread, ranging from the radioactive decay of a single atom to the explosions of supernovae and the formation of ordinary matter. Neutrinos might exhibit a striking property that has not yet been observed. Like the back-and-forth swing of a pendulum, neutrinos can oscillate to-and-from among their three types (or flavors) if nature provides certain conditions. These conditions include neutrinos having mass and a property called open-quotes mixing.close quotes The phenomenon is referred to as neutrino oscillations. The questions of the origin of neutrino mass and mixing among the neutrino flavors are unsolved problems for which the Standard Model of particle physics holds few clues. It is likely that the next critical step in answering these questions will result from the experimental observation of neutrino oscillations. The High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) Subpanel on Accelerator-Based Neutrino Oscillation Experiments was charged to review the status and discovery potential of ongoing and proposed accelerator experiments on neutrino oscillations, to evaluate the opportunities for the U.S. in this area of physics, and to recommend a cost-effective plan for pursuing this physics, as appropriate. The complete charge is provided in Appendix A. The Subpanel studied these issues over several months and reviewed all the relevant and available information on the subject. In particular, the Subpanel reviewed the two proposed neutrino oscillation programs at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The conclusions of this review are enumerated in detail in Chapter 7 of this report. The recommendations given in Chapter 7 are also reproduced in this summary

  9. Synaptic Remodeling Generates Synchronous Oscillations in the Degenerated Outer Mouse Retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wadood eHaq

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available During neuronal degenerative diseases, neuronal microcircuits undergo severe structural alterations, leading to remodeling of synaptic connectivity. The functional consequences of such remodeling are mostly unknown. For instance, in mutant rd1 mouse retina, a common model for Retinitis Pigmentosa, rod bipolar cells (RBCs establish contacts with remnant cone photoreceptors (cones as a consequence of rod photoreceptor cell death and the resulting lack of presynaptic input. To assess the functional connectivity in the remodeled, light-insensitive outer rd1 retina, we recorded spontaneous population activity in retinal wholemounts using Ca2+ imaging and identified the participating cell types. Focusing on cones, RBCs and horizontal cells (HCs, we found that these cell types display spontaneous oscillatory activity and form synchronously active clusters. Overall activity was modulated by GABAergic inhibition from HCs. Many of the activity clusters comprised both cones and RBCs. Opposite to what is expected from the intact (wild-type cone-ON bipolar cell pathway, cone and RBC activity was positively correlated and, at least partially, mediated by glutamate transporters expressed on RBCs. Deletion of gap junctional coupling between cones reduced the number of clusters, indicating that electrical cone coupling plays a crucial role for generating the observed synchronized oscillations. In conclusion, degeneration-induced synaptic remodeling of the rd1 retina results in a complex self-sustained outer retinal oscillatory network, that complements (and potentially modulates the recently described inner retinal oscillatory network consisting of amacrine, bipolar and ganglion cells.

  10. Automatic oscillator frequency control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. F. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A frequency control system makes an initial correction of the frequency of its own timing circuit after comparison against a frequency of known accuracy and then sequentially checks and corrects the frequencies of several voltage controlled local oscillator circuits. The timing circuit initiates the machine cycles of a central processing unit which applies a frequency index to an input register in a modulo-sum frequency divider stage and enables a multiplexer to clock an accumulator register in the divider stage with a cyclical signal derived from the oscillator circuit being checked. Upon expiration of the interval, the processing unit compares the remainder held as the contents of the accumulator against a stored zero error constant and applies an appropriate correction word to a correction stage to shift the frequency of the oscillator being checked. A signal from the accumulator register may be used to drive a phase plane ROM and, with periodic shifts in the applied frequency index, to provide frequency shift keying of the resultant output signal. Interposition of a phase adder between the accumulator register and phase plane ROM permits phase shift keying of the output signal by periodic variation in the value of a phase index applied to one input of the phase adder.

  11. Micro-machined resonator oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Dale R.; Sniegowski, Jeffry J.; Bivens, Hugh M.; Wessendorf, Kurt O.

    1994-01-01

    A micro-miniature resonator-oscillator is disclosed. Due to the miniaturization of the resonator-oscillator, oscillation frequencies of one MHz and higher are utilized. A thickness-mode quartz resonator housed in a micro-machined silicon package and operated as a "telemetered sensor beacon" that is, a digital, self-powered, remote, parameter measuring-transmitter in the FM-band. The resonator design uses trapped energy principles and temperature dependence methodology through crystal orientation control, with operation in the 20-100 MHz range. High volume batch-processing manufacturing is utilized, with package and resonator assembly at the wafer level. Unique design features include squeeze-film damping for robust vibration and shock performance, capacitive coupling through micro-machined diaphragms allowing resonator excitation at the package exterior, circuit integration and extremely small (0.1 in. square) dimensioning. A family of micro-miniature sensor beacons is also disclosed with widespread applications as bio-medical sensors, vehicle status monitors and high-volume animal identification and health sensors. The sensor family allows measurement of temperatures, chemicals, acceleration and pressure. A microphone and clock realization is also available.

  12. Drifting oscillations in axion monodromy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flauger, Raphael [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); McAllister, Liam [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Silverstein, Eva [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Westphal, Alexander, E-mail: flauger@physics.ucsd.edu, E-mail: mcallister@cornell.edu, E-mail: evas@stanford.edu, E-mail: alexander.westphal@desy.de [Theory Group, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany)

    2017-10-01

    We study the pattern of oscillations in the primordial power spectrum in axion monodromy inflation, accounting for drifts in the oscillation period that can be important for comparing to cosmological data. In these models the potential energy has a monomial form over a super-Planckian field range, with superimposed modulations whose size is model-dependent. The amplitude and frequency of the modulations are set by the expectation values of moduli fields. We show that during the course of inflation, the diminishing energy density can induce slow adjustments of the moduli, changing the modulations. We provide templates capturing the effects of drifting moduli, as well as drifts arising in effective field theory models based on softly broken discrete shift symmetries, and we estimate the precision required to detect a drifting period. A non-drifting template suffices over a wide range of parameters, but for the highest frequencies of interest, or for sufficiently strong drift, it is necessary to include parameters characterizing the change in frequency over the e-folds visible in the CMB. We use these templates to perform a preliminary search for drifting oscillations in a part of the parameter space in the Planck nominal mission data.

  13. Neutrino Oscillation Experiment at JHF

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    T2K is a long baseline neutrino experiment designed to investigate how neutrinos change from one flavor to another as they travel (neutrino oscillations). An intense beam of muon neutrinos is generated at the J-PARC nuclear physics site on the East coast of Japan and directed across the country to the Super-Kamiokande neutrino detector in the mountains of western Japan. The beam is measured once before it leaves the J-PARC site, using the near detector ND280, and again at Super-K, 295 km away: the change in the measured intensity and composition of the beam is used to provide information on the properties of neutrinos. The high intensity neutrino beam is produced in an off-axis configuration. The peak neutrino energy is tuned to the oscillation maximum of ∼ 0.6 GeV to maximize the sensitivity to neutrino oscillations. The science goals of T2K can be summarized as follows: •\tsearch for CP violation in the neutrino sector •\tdiscovery of νμ → νe ( i.e. the confirmation that θ13 > 0 ) •\tprecision ...

  14. Superconducting low-noise oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riebman, L.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a cryogenic oscillator having low phase noise and low noise. It comprises resonant circuit means formed of superconducting material for generating a signal at a desired frequency; linear amplifier means electrically connected to the resonant circuit means at first and second locations thereon; limiter means electrically connected to the resonant circuit means at a third location thereon; and buffer amplifier means for applying the signal generated by the resonant circuit means to a load and electrically connected to the resonant circuit means at a fourth location thereon. This patent also describes a method of minimizing phase noise and 1/f noise in an oscillator circuit of the type having a resonant circuit driving a load and at least a linear amplifier connected to the resonant circuit defining a closed loop having a loop gain greater than unity, and having a limiter for stabilizing the oscillator. It comprises connecting between the resonant circuit and the load a buffer amplifier and connecting the linear amplifier and the buffer amplifier to the resonant circuit

  15. Boltzmann map for quantum oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streater, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    The authors define a map tau on the space of quasifree states of the CCR or CAR of more than one harmonic oscillator which increases entropy except at fixed points of tau. The map tau is the composition of a double stochastic map T*, and the quasifree reduction Q. Under mixing conditions on T, iterates of tau take any initial state to the Gibbs states, provided that the oscillator frequencies are mutually rational. They give an example of a system with three degrees of freedom with energies omega 1 , omega 2 , and omega 3 mutually irrational, but obeying a relation n 1 omega 1 + n 2 omega 2 = n 3 omega 3 , n/sub i/epsilon Z. The iterated Boltzmann map converges from an initial state rho to independent Gibbs states of the three oscillators at betas (inverse temperatures) β 1 , β 2 , β 3 obeying the equation n 1 omega 1 β 1 + n 2 omega 3 β 1 number. The equilibrium state can be rewritten as a grand canonical state. They show that for two, three, or four fermions we can get the usual rate equations as a special case

  16. Neutrino Oscillations:. a Phenomenological Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogli, G. L.; Lisi, E.; Marrone, A.; Palazzo, A.; Rotunno, A. M.; Montanino, D.

    We review the status of the neutrino oscillations physics, with a particular emphasis on the present knowledge of the neutrino mass-mixing parameters. We consider first the νμ → ντ flavor transitions of atmospheric neutrinos. It is found that standard oscillations provide the best description of the SK+K2K data, and that the associated mass-mixing parameters are determined at ±1σ (and NDF = 1) as: Δm2 = (2.6 ± 0.4) × 10-3 eV2 and sin 2 2θ = 1.00{ - 0.05}{ + 0.00} . Such indications, presently dominated by SK, could be strengthened by further K2K data. Then we point out that the recent data from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, together with other relevant measurements from solar and reactor neutrino experiments, in particular the KamLAND data, convincingly show that the flavor transitions of solar neutrinos are affected by Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effects. Finally, we perform an updated analysis of two-family active oscillations of solar and reactor neutrinos in the standard MSW case.

  17. Drifting oscillations in axion monodromy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flauger, Raphael; Westphal, Alexander

    2014-12-01

    We study the pattern of oscillations in the primordial power spectrum in axion monodromy inflation, accounting for drifts in the oscillation period that can be important for comparing to cosmological data. In these models the potential energy has a monomial form over a super-Planckian field range, with superimposed modulations whose size is model-dependent. The amplitude and frequency of the modulations are set by the expectation values of moduli fields. We show that during the course of inflation, the diminishing energy density can induce slow adjustments of the moduli, changing the modulations. We provide templates capturing the effects of drifting moduli, as well as drifts arising in effective field theory models based on softly broken discrete shift symmetries, and we estimate the precision required to detect a drifting period. A non-drifting template suffices over a wide range of parameters, but for the highest frequencies of interest, or for sufficiently strong drift, it is necessary to include parameters characterizing the change in frequency over the e-folds visible in the CMB. We use these templates to perform a preliminary search for drifting oscillations in a part of the parameter space in the Planck nominal mission data.

  18. Nonlinearity induced synchronization enhancement in mechanical oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaplewski, David A.; Lopez, Omar; Guest, Jeffrey R.; Antonio, Dario; Arroyo, Sebastian I.; Zanette, Damian H.

    2018-05-08

    An autonomous oscillator synchronizes to an external harmonic force only when the forcing frequency lies within a certain interval, known as the synchronization range, around the oscillator's natural frequency. Under ordinary conditions, the width of the synchronization range decreases when the oscillation amplitude grows, which constrains synchronized motion of micro- and nano-mechanical resonators to narrow frequency and amplitude bounds. The present invention shows that nonlinearity in the oscillator can be exploited to manifest a regime where the synchronization range increases with an increasing oscillation amplitude. The present invention shows that nonlinearities in specific configurations of oscillator systems, as described herein, are the key determinants of the effect. The present invention presents a new configuration and operation regime that enhances the synchronization of micro- and nano-mechanical oscillators by capitalizing on their intrinsic nonlinear dynamics.

  19. Nonlocal synchronization in nearest neighbour coupled oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Nashar, H.F.; Elgazzar, A.S.; Cerdeira, H.A.

    2002-02-01

    We investigate a system of nearest neighbour coupled oscillators. We show that the nonlocal frequency synchronization, that might appear in such a system, occurs as a consequence of the nearest neighbour coupling. The power spectra of nonadjacent oscillators shows that there is no complete coincidence between all frequency peaks of the oscillators in the nonlocal cluster, while the peaks for neighbouring oscillators approximately coincide even if they are not yet in a cluster. It is shown that nonadjacent oscillators closer in frequencies, share slow modes with their adjacent oscillators which are neighbours in space. It is also shown that when a direct coupling between non-neighbours oscillators is introduced explicitly, the peaks of the spectra of the frequencies of those non-neighbours coincide. (author)

  20. Cortical networks dynamically emerge with the interplay of slow and fast oscillations for memory of a natural scene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuhara, Hiroaki; Sato, Naoyuki; Yamaguchi, Yoko

    2015-05-01

    Neural oscillations are crucial for revealing dynamic cortical networks and for serving as a possible mechanism of inter-cortical communication, especially in association with mnemonic function. The interplay of the slow and fast oscillations might dynamically coordinate the mnemonic cortical circuits to rehearse stored items during working memory retention. We recorded simultaneous EEG-fMRI during a working memory task involving a natural scene to verify whether the cortical networks emerge with the neural oscillations for memory of the natural scene. The slow EEG power was enhanced in association with the better accuracy of working memory retention, and accompanied cortical activities in the mnemonic circuits for the natural scene. Fast oscillation showed a phase-amplitude coupling to the slow oscillation, and its power was tightly coupled with the cortical activities for representing the visual images of natural scenes. The mnemonic cortical circuit with the slow neural oscillations would rehearse the distributed natural scene representations with the fast oscillation for working memory retention. The coincidence of the natural scene representations could be obtained by the slow oscillation phase to create a coherent whole of the natural scene in the working memory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.