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Sample records for orthodontic brackets cured

  1. Influence of adhesion promoters and curing-light sources on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets

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    Claudia Tavares Machado

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: The conventional orthodontic adhesive presented higher bond strength than the nanofilled composite, although both materials interacted similarly to the teeth. The curing-light devices tested did not influence on bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

  2. The effect of pre-cure bracket movement on shear bond strength during placement of orthodontic brackets, an in vitro study.

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    Tam, Byron; Bollu, Prashanti; Chaudhry, Kishore; Subramani, Karthikeyan

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of linear and rotational pre-cure bracket displacement during the bonding procedure on shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets. Stainless steel orthodontic premolar brackets were bonded to the buccal surfaces of 50 human pre-molars with a conventional two-step bonding protocol. Extracted human pre-molars were divided into 5 groups (n=10/group). In the Control Group, the brackets were bonded with no pre-cure bracket displacement or rotation. The Rotation Group was bonded with 45 degrees of pre-cure rotation. The Displacement Group was bonded with 2mm pre-cure linear displacement. The Rotation-Displacement Group was bonded with pre-cure movements of 45º counter-clockwise rotation and 2mm displacement. The Slippage Group was bonded with 2mm each of mesial and distal pre-cure linear displacement. Photo-activation was carried out on the lateral sides of the bracket. Shear debonding force was measured, 24 hours after initial bonding, with an Instron universal testing machine using a knife-edged chisel. Data was analyzed using one-way ANOVA test. Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) was scored under 15x magnification. The ARI data was analyzed using the Chi-square test ( p -value bracket displacements do not appear to effect the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets. Key words: Shear bond strength, orthodontic bracket, displacement, rotation, adhesive remnant index, pre-cure movement.

  3. CARIOSTATIC EFFECT AND FLUORIDE RELEASE FROM A VISIBLE LIGHT-CURING ADHESIVE FOR BONDING OF ORTHODONTIC BRACKETS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    OGAARD, B; REZKLEGA, F; RUBEN, J; ARENDS, J

    This study was designed to investigate the cariostatic potential in vivo of a visible light-curing adhesive for the bonding of orthodontic brackets. The fluoride release of the adhesive in water and saliva was also measured. Ten orthodontic patients with premolars to be extracted participated. One

  4. Easy Debonding of Ceramic Brackets Bonded with a Light-Cured Orthodontic Adhesive Containing Microcapsules with a CO2 Laser.

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    Arima, Shiori; Namura, Yasuhiro; Tamura, Takahiko; Shimizu, Noriyoshi

    2018-03-01

    An easy debonding method for ceramic brackets using a light-cured Bis-GMA resin containing heat-expandable microcapsules and CO 2 laser was investigated. Ceramic brackets are used frequently in orthodontic treatment because of their desirable esthetic properties. However, the application of heavy force to ceramic brackets in debonding can fracture the tooth enamel and ceramic brackets, causing tooth pain. In total, 60 freshly extracted bovine permanent mandibular incisors were divided randomly into 10 groups of 6 specimens each, corresponding to the number of variables tested. Ceramic brackets were bonded to bovine permanent mandibular incisors using an orthodontic bonding agent containing heat-expandable microcapsules at different levels (0-30 wt%) and resin composite paste, and cured by a curing device. The bond strengths were measured before and after CO 2 laser irradiation, and the temperature increase in the pulp chamber in fresh human first premolars was also evaluated. With CO 2 laser irradiation for 5 sec to the bracket, the bond strength in the 25% microcapsule group decreased significantly, to ∼0.17-fold, compared with that of the no-laser group (p brackets, with less debonding time and enamel damage.

  5. Evaluation of shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets using trans-illumination technique with different curing profiles of LED light-curing unit in posterior teeth.

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    Heravi, Farzin; Moazzami, Saied Mostafa; Ghaffari, Negin; Jalayer, Javad; Bozorgnia, Yasaman

    2013-11-21

    Although using light-cured composites for bonding orthodontic brackets has become increasingly popular, curing light cannot penetrate the metallic bulk of brackets and polymerization of composites is limited to the edges. Limited access and poor direct sight may be a problem in the posterior teeth. Meanwhile, effectiveness of the trans-illumination technique is questionable due to increased bucco-lingual thickness of the posterior teeth. Light-emitting diode (LED) light-curing units cause less temperature rise and lower risk to the pulpal tissue. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of trans-illumination technique in bonding metallic brackets to premolars, using different light intensities and curing times of an LED light-curing unit. Sixty premolars were randomly divided into six groups. Bonding of brackets was done with 40- and 80-s light curing from the buccal or lingual aspect with different intensities. Shear bond strengths of brackets were measured using a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance test and Duncan's post hoc test. The highest shear bond belonged to group 2 (high intensity, 40 s, buccal) and the lowest belonged to group 3 (low intensity, 40 s, lingual). Bond strength means in control groups were significantly higher than those in experimental groups. In all experimental groups except group 6 (80 s, high intensity, lingual), shear bond strength was below the clinically accepted values. In clinical limitations where light curing from the same side of the bracket is not possible, doubling the curing time and increasing the light intensity during trans-illumination are recommended for achieving acceptable bond strengths.

  6. Adhesives for fixed orthodontic brackets.

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    Mandall, N A; Millett, D T; Mattick, C R; Hickman, J; Macfarlane, T V; Worthington, H V

    2003-01-01

    Bonding of orthodontic brackets to teeth is important to enable effective and efficient treatment with fixed appliances. The problem is bracket failure during treatment which increases operator chairside time and lengthens treatment time. A prolonged treatment is likely to increase the oral health risks of orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances one of which is irreversible enamel decalcification. To evaluate the effectiveness of different orthodontic adhesives for bonding. Electronic databases: the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE and EMBASE. Date of most recent searches: August 2002 (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 2, 2002). Trials were selected if they met the following criteria: randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) comparing two different adhesive groups. Participants were patients with fixed orthodontic appliances. The interventions were adhesives that bonded stainless steel brackets to all teeth except the molars. The primary outcome was debond or bracket failure. Data were recorded on decalcification as a secondary outcome, if present. Information regarding methods, participants, interventions, outcome measures and results were extracted in duplicate by pairs of reviewers (Nicky Mandall (NM) and Rye Mattick (CRM); Declan Millett (DTM) and Joy Hickman (JH2)). Since the data were not presented in a form that was amenable to meta-analysis, the results of the review are presented in narrative form only. Three trials satisfied the inclusion criteria. A chemical cured composite was compared with a light cure composite (one trial), a conventional glass ionomer cement (one trial) and a polyacid-modified resin composite (compomer) (one trial). The quality of the trial reports was generally poor. It is difficult to draw any conclusions from this review, however, suggestions are made for methods of improving future research involving

  7. Adhesives for fixed orthodontic brackets.

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    Mandall, Nicky A; Hickman, Joy; Macfarlane, Tatiana V; Mattick, Rye Cr; Millett, Declan T; Worthington, Helen V

    2018-04-09

    Bonding of orthodontic brackets to teeth is important to enable effective and efficient treatment with fixed appliances. The problem is bracket failure during treatment which increases operator chairside time and lengthens treatment time. A prolonged treatment is likely to increase the oral health risks of orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances one of which is irreversible enamel decalcification. This is an update of the Cochrane Review first published in 2003. A new full search was conducted on 26 September 2017 but no new studies were identified. We have only updated the search methods section in this new version. The conclusions of this Cochrane Review remain the same. To evaluate the effects of different orthodontic adhesives for bonding. Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 26 September 2017), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2017, Issue 8) in the Cochrane Library (searched 26 September 2017), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 26 September 2017), and Embase Ovid (1980 to 26 September 2017). The US National Institutes of Health Ongoing Trials Register (ClinicalTrials.gov) and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform were searched for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. Trials were selected if they met the following criteria: randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) comparing two different adhesive groups. Participants were patients with fixed orthodontic appliances. The interventions were adhesives that bonded stainless steel brackets to all teeth except the molars. The primary outcome was debond or bracket failure. Data were recorded on decalcification as a secondary outcome, if present. Information regarding methods, participants, interventions, outcome measures and results were extracted in

  8. A Comparison of the Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded With Light-Emitting Diode and Halogen Light-Curing Units

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    SM. Abtahi

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the problem: Various methods such as light emitting diode (LED have been used to enhance the polymerization of resin-based orthodontic adhesives. There is a lack of information on the advantages and disadvantages of different light curing systems.Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the effect of LED and halogen light curing systems on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.Materials and Methods: Forty extracted human premolars were etched with 37% phosphoric acid and cleansed with water spray and air dried. The sealant was applied on the tooth surface and the brackets were bonded using Transbond adhesive (3M Unitek,Monrovia, Calif. Adhesives were cured for 40 and 20 seconds with halogen (Blue Light, APOZA, Taiwan and LED (Blue dent, Smart, Yugoslavia light-curing systems,respectively. Specimens were thermocycled 2500 times (from 5 to 55 °C and the shear bond strength of the adhesive system was evaluated with an Universal testing machine (Zwick GmbH, Ulm, Germany at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min until the bracketswere detached from the tooth. Adhesive remnant index (ARI scores were determined after bracket failure. The data were submitted to statistical analysis, using Mann-Whitney analysis and t-test.Results: No significant difference was found in bond strength between the LED and halogen groups (P=0.12. A significant difference was not observed in the adhesive remnant index scores between the two groups (P=0.97.Conclusion: Within the limitations of this in vitro study, the shear bond strength of resin-based orthodontic adhesives cured with a LED was statistically equivalent to those cured with a conventional halogen-based unit. LED light-curing units can be suggested for the polymerization of orthodontic bonding adhesives.

  9. Three-dimensional deformation of orthodontic brackets

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    Melenka, Garrett W; Nobes, David S; Major, Paul W; Carey, Jason P

    2013-01-01

    Braces are used by orthodontists to correct the misalignment of teeth in the mouth. Archwire rotation is a particular procedure used to correct tooth inclination. Wire rotation can result in deformation to the orthodontic brackets, and an orthodontic torque simulator has been designed to examine this wire?bracket interaction. An optical technique has been employed to measure the deformation due to size and geometric constraints of the orthodontic brackets. Images of orthodontic brackets are c...

  10. Adhesives for orthodontic bracket bonding

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    Déborah Daniella Diniz Fonseca

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The advent of acid etching, introduced by Buonocore in 1955, brought the possibility of bonding between the bracket base and enamel, contributing to more esthetic and conservative orthodontics. This direct bracket bonding technique has brought benefits such as reduced cost and time in performing the treatment, as well as making it easier to perform oral hygiene. The aim of this study was to conduct a survey of published studies on orthodontic bracket bonding to dental enamel. It was verified that resin composites and glass ionomer are the most studied and researched materials for this purpose. Resin-modified glass ionomer, with its biocompatibility, capacity of releasing fluoride and no need for acid etching on the tooth structure, has become increasingly popular among dentists. However, due to the esthetic and mechanical properties of light polymerizable resin composite, it continues to be one of the adhesives of choice in the bracket bonding technique and its use is widely disseminated.

  11. Effect of delayed polymerization time and bracket manipulation on orthodontic bracket bonding

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    Ponikvar, Michael J.

    This study examined the effect of bracket manipulation in combination with delayed polymerization times on orthodontic bracket shear bond strength and degree of resin composite conversion. Orthodontics brackets were bonded to extracted third molars in a simulated oral environment after a set period of delayed polymerization time and bracket manipulation. After curing the bracket adhesive, each bracket underwent shear bond strength testing followed by micro-Raman spectroscopy analysis to measure the degree of conversion of the resin composite. Results demonstrated the shear bond strength and the degree of conversion of ceramic brackets did not vary over time. However, with stainless steel brackets there was a significant effect (p ≤ 0.05) of delay time on shear bond strength between the 0.5 min and 10 min bracket groups. In addition, stainless steel brackets showed significant differences related to degree of conversion over time between the 0.5 min and 5 min groups, in addition to the 0.5 min and 10 min groups. This investigation suggests that delaying bracket adhesive polymerization up to a period of 10 min then adjusting the orthodontic bracket may increase both shear bond strength and degree of conversion of stainless steel brackets while having no effect on ceramic brackets.

  12. Prototype of a new tip developed to be coupled to dental light-curing units for optimizing bonding of orthodontic brackets and accessories

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    Sergio Luiz Mota Júnior

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: development of a new device to be coupled to light-curing units for bonding orthodontic brackets and accessories, and test its efficacy in an in vitro mechanical trial. The inner surface of the device is mirrored and is based on physical concepts of light refraction and reflection. The main advantage of such device is the reduced clinical time needed for bonding and the low possibility of contamination during the process. METHODS: One hundred and twenty specimens were used for testing the shear bond strength of brackets bonded with the device. The Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI was also determined. The sample was divided into 2 groups. In group 1 a halogen light-curing unit was used while in group 2 a led light-curing unit was used. Each group was then subdivided. In subgroups H1 and L1, a conventional light guide rod was used while in subgroups H2 and L2 bonding was performed with the mirrored device coupled to the tip of the guide light rod. RESULTS: The values obtained for the shear bond strength and the ARI in the subgroups were compared. Results showed that there was no statistically significant difference for the shear strength (p > 0.05 and the ARI (p > 0.05 between the subgroups. CONCLUSION: The tests of mechanical trials and the ARI analysis showed that the new device fulfilled the requirements for bonding orthodontic accessories, and that the time for bonding was reduced to half, being necessary only one light exposure.

  13. Three-dimensional deformation of orthodontic brackets

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    Melenka, Garrett W; Nobes, David S; Major, Paul W

    2013-01-01

    Braces are used by orthodontists to correct the misalignment of teeth in the mouth. Archwire rotation is a particular procedure used to correct tooth inclination. Wire rotation can result in deformation to the orthodontic brackets, and an orthodontic torque simulator has been designed to examine this wire–bracket interaction. An optical technique has been employed to measure the deformation due to size and geometric constraints of the orthodontic brackets. Images of orthodontic brackets are collected using a stereo microscope and two charge-coupled device cameras, and deformation of orthodontic brackets is measured using a three-dimensional digital image correlation technique. The three-dimensional deformation of orthodontic brackets will be evaluated. The repeatability of the three-dimensional digital image correlation measurement method was evaluated by performing 30 archwire rotation tests using the same bracket and archwire. Finally, five Damon 3MX and five In-Ovation R self-ligating brackets will be compared using this technique to demonstrate the effect of archwire rotation on bracket design. PMID:23762201

  14. Three-dimensional deformation of orthodontic brackets.

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    Melenka, Garrett W; Nobes, David S; Major, Paul W; Carey, Jason P

    2013-01-01

    Braces are used by orthodontists to correct the misalignment of teeth in the mouth. Archwire rotation is a particular procedure used to correct tooth inclination. Wire rotation can result in deformation to the orthodontic brackets, and an orthodontic torque simulator has been designed to examine this wire-bracket interaction. An optical technique has been employed to measure the deformation due to size and geometric constraints of the orthodontic brackets. Images of orthodontic brackets are collected using a stereo microscope and two charge-coupled device cameras, and deformation of orthodontic brackets is measured using a three-dimensional digital image correlation technique. The three-dimensional deformation of orthodontic brackets will be evaluated. The repeatability of the three-dimensional digital image correlation measurement method was evaluated by performing 30 archwire rotation tests using the same bracket and archwire. Finally, five Damon 3MX and five In-Ovation R self-ligating brackets will be compared using this technique to demonstrate the effect of archwire rotation on bracket design.

  15. Delayed bracket placement in orthodontic treatment

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    Chandra Wigati

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Beside bracket position, the timing of bracket placement is one of the most essential in orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances. Even it seems simple the timing of bracket placement can be crucial and significantly influence the result of orthodontic treatment. However it is often found brackets are placed without complete understanding of its purpose and effects, which could be useless and even detrimental for the case. Purpose: The aim of this case report is to show that the timing of bracket placement could be different depending on the cases. Case: Five different cases are presented here with different timing of bracket placement. Case management: On these cases, brackets were placed on the upper arch first, on the lower arch first, or even only on some teeth first. Good and efficient orthodontic treatment results were achieved. Conclusion: For every orthodontic case, from the very beginning of treatment, bracket should be placed with the end result in mind. If brackets are correctly placed at a correct time, better treatment result could be achieved without unnecessary round tripping tooth movement.

  16. Material testing of reconditioned orthodontic brackets.

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    Reimann, S; Rewari, A; Keilig, L; Widu, F; Jäger, A; Bourauel, C

    2012-12-01

    While all manufacturers of orthodontic brackets label these products for single use, there are commercial providers offering bracket reconditioning (or "recycling"). We conducted this study to investigate the effects of different recycling techniques on material-related parameters in orthodontic brackets, aiming to derive indications for clinical use and conclusions about the biocompatibility, longevity, and application of recycled brackets. New metal brackets (equilibrium(®); Dentaurum, Ispringen, Germany) were compared to brackets recycled by different techniques, including direct flaming with a Bunsen burner, chemical reconditioning in an acid bath, a commercial unit (Big Jane; Esmadent, IL, USA), and outsourcing to a company (Ortho Clean, Dellstedt, Germany). Material-related examinations included the following: (1) corrosion behavior by static immersion testing and use of a mass spectrometer to determine nickel-ion concentrations in the corrosive medium, (2) surface features in scanning electron micrographs before and after corrosion testing, (3) Vickers hardness using a hardness testing machine, (4) shear bond strength as defined in DIN 13990-1, (5) dimensional stability of the bracket slots by light microscopy, and (6) frictional loss as assessed by an orthodontic measurement and simulation system (OMSS). Each examination was performed on ten brackets. Student's t-test was used for statistical analysis. Compared to the new brackets, those recycled in an acid bath or by a commercial provider revealed significant dimensional changes (pbrackets varied according to the recycling techniques employed. The group of brackets recycled by one company revealed hardness values that differed from those of all the other groups. No significant differences were observed in nickel-ion release, frictional loss, and shear bond strength. Recycling was found to significantly reduce the corrosion resistance and dimensional stability of orthodontic brackets. As the savings

  17. 21 CFR 872.5470 - Orthodontic plastic bracket.

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    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Orthodontic plastic bracket. 872.5470 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 872.5470 Orthodontic plastic bracket. (a) Identification. An orthodontic plastic bracket is a plastic device intended to be bonded to a tooth to apply...

  18. Light energy attenuation through orthodontic ceramic brackets at different irradiation times.

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    Santini, Ario; Tiu, Szu Hui; McGuinness, Niall J P; Aldossary, Mohammed Saeed

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the total light energy (TLE) transmission through three types of ceramic brackets with, bracket alone and with the addition of orthodontic adhesive, at different exposure durations, and to compare the microhardness of the cured adhesive. Three different makes of ceramic brackets, Pure Sapphire(M), Clarity™ ADVANCED(P) and Dual Ceramic(P) were used. Eighteen specimens of each make were prepared and allocated to three groups (n = 6). MARC(®)-resin calibrator was used to determine the light curing unit (LCU) tip irradiance (mW/cm(2)) and TLE (J/cm(2)) transmitted through the ceramic brackets, and through ceramic bracket plus Transbond™ XT Light Cure Adhesive, for 5, 10 and 20 s. Vickers-hardness values at the bottom of the cured adhesive were determined. Statistical analysis used one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA); P = 0.05. TLE transmission rose significantly among all samples with increasing exposure durations. TLE reaching the adhesive- enamel interface was less than 10 J/cm(2), and through monocrystalline and polycrystalline ceramic brackets was significantly different (P brackets. Clinicians are advised to measure the tip irradiance of their LCUs and increase curing time beyond 5 s. Orthodontic clinicians should understand the type of light curing device and the orthodontic adhesive used in their practice.

  19. Surface modification for bonding between amalgam and orthodontic brackets.

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    Wongsamut, Wittawat; Satrawaha, Sirichom; Wayakanon, Kornchanok

    2017-01-01

    Testing of methods to enhance the shear bond strength (SBS) between orthodontic metal brackets and amalgam by sandblasting and different primers. Three hundred samples of amalgam restorations (KerrAlloy ® ) were prepared in self-cured acrylic blocks, polished, and divided into two groups: nonsandblasted and sandblasted. Each group was divided into five subgroups with different primers used in surface treatment methods, with a control group of bonded brackets on human mandibular incisors. Following the surface treatments, mandibular incisor brackets (Unitek ® ) were bonded on the amalgam with adhesive resin (Transbond XT ® ). The SBS of the samples was tested. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) and failure modes were then determined under a stereo-microscope. Two-way analysis of variance, Chi-square, and Kruskal-Wallis tests were performed to calculate the correlations between and among the SBS and ARI values, the failure modes, and surface roughness results. There were statistically significant differences of SBS among the different adhesive primers and sandblasting methods ( P 0.05). Using adhesive primers with sandblasting together effectively enhances the SBS between orthodontic metal brackets and amalgam. The two primers with the ingredient methacryloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP) monomer, Alloy Primer ® and Assure Plus ® , were the most effective. Including sandblasting in the treatment is essential to achieve the bonding strength required.

  20. In vitro evaluation of microleakage under orthodontic brackets bonded with different adhesive systems.

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    Atash, Ramin; Fneiche, Ali; Cetik, Sibel; Bahrami, Babak; Balon-Perin, Alain; Orellana, Maria; Glineur, Régine

    2017-01-01

    Adhesives systems have a drawback when utilized for bonding orthodontic brackets: they shrink during photopolymerization creating microleakage. The aim of this study was to assess the stability of different orthodontic adhesives around brackets and enamel. Sixty noncarious mandibular premolars extracted for orthodontic reasons were randomly divided into six groups of adhesives used for bonding brackets to dental enamel: NeoBond ® Light Cure Adhesive Kit, Transbond™ Plus Self-Etching, Victory V-Slot APC PLUS ® + Transbond™ MIP, Rely-A-Bond ® Kit, Light Cure Orthodontic Adhesive Kit (OptiBond ® ), and Transbond™ MIP. Following bonding, all teeth underwent 2500 cycles of thermal cycling in baths ranging from 5°C to 55°C before being immersed in 2% methylene blue for 24 h. All samples were examined under a binocular microscope to assess the degree of microleakage at the "bracket-adhesive" and "adhesive-enamel" interfaces in the gingival and occlusal regions of the bracket. A significant difference was found at the "occlusal bracket-adhesive" interface. The highest microleakage values were found in the occlusal region, although no significant. Microleakage was observed in all groups. Group 2 had the highest microleakage values whereas Group 6 had the lowest values.

  1. Biodegradation of orthodontic metallic brackets and associated implications for friction.

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    Regis, Saulo; Soares, Paulo; Camargo, Elisa S; Guariza Filho, Odilon; Tanaka, Orlando; Maruo, Hiroshi

    2011-10-01

    This study aimed to assess the effect of clinical exposure on the surface morphology, dimensions, and frictional behavior of metallic orthodontic brackets. Ninety-five brackets, of 3 commercial brands, were retrieved from patients who had finished orthodontic treatment. As-received brackets, matched by type and brand, were used for comparisons. Surface morphology and precipitated material were analyzed by optical and scanning electron microscopy and x-ray microanalysis. Bracket dimensions were measured with a measuring microscope. Resistance to sliding on a stainless steel wire was assessed. Retrieved brackets showed surface alterations from corrosion, wear, and plastic deformation, especially in the external slot edges. Film deposition over the alloy surface was observed to a variable extent. The main elements in the film were carbon, oxygen, calcium, and phosphorus. The as-received brackets showed differences (P brackets' slots. The frictional behavior differed among brands. Retrieved brackets of 2 brands showed 10% to 20% increases in resistance to sliding. Metallic brackets undergo significant degradation during orthodontic treatment, possibly with increased friction. At present, it is difficult to predict the impact of these changes on the clinical performance of orthodontic components. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Laser debonding of ceramic orthodontic brackets: a theoretical approach

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    Kearney, Kristine L.; Marangoni, Roy D.; Rickabaugh, Jeff L.

    1992-06-01

    Ceramic brackets are an esthetic substitute for conventional stainless steel brackets in orthodontic patients. However, ceramic brackets are more brittle and have higher bond strengths which can lead to bracket breakage and enamel damage during debonding. It has been demonstrated that various lasers can facilitate ceramic bracket removal. One mechanism with the laser is through the softening of the bracket adhesive. The high energy density from the laser on the bracket and adhesive can have a resultant deleterious thermal effect on the pulp of the tooth which may lead to pulpal death. A theoretical computer model of bracket, adhesive, enamel and dentin has been generated for predicting heat flow through this system. Heat fluxes at varying intensities and modes have been input into the program and the resultant temperatures at various points or nodes were determined. Further pursuit should lead to optimum parameters for laser debonding which would have minimal effects on the pulp.

  3. A comparison of shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with four different orthodontic adhesives

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    Sharma, Sudhir; Tandon, Pradeep; Nagar, Amit; Singh, Gyan P; Singh, Alka; Chugh, Vinay K

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study is to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of stainless steel (SS) orthodontic brackets bonded with four different orthodontic adhesives. Materials and Methods: Eighty newly extracted premolars were bonded to 0.022 SS brackets (Ormco, Scafati, Italy) and equally divided into four groups based on adhesive used: (1) Rely-a-Bond (self-cure adhesive, Reliance Orthodontic Product, Inc., Illinois, USA), (2) Transbond XT (light-cure adhesive, 3M Unitek, CA, USA), (3) Transbond Plus (sixth generation self-etch primer, 3M Unitek, CA, USA) with Transbond XT (4) Xeno V (seventh generation self-etch primer, Dentsply, Konstanz, Germany) with Xeno Ortho (light-cure adhesive, Dentsply, Konstanz, Germany) adhesive. Brackets were debonded with a universal testing machine (Model No. 3382 Instron Corp., Canton, Mass, USA). The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was recordedIn addition, the conditioned enamel surfaces were observed under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results: Transbond XT (15.49 MPa) attained the highest bond strength. Self-etching adhesives (Xeno V, 13.51 MPa; Transbond Plus, 11.57 MPa) showed clinically acceptable SBS values and almost clean enamel surface after debonding. The analysis of variance (F = 11.85, P adhesives left on the tooth) to be the most prevalent in Transbond XT (40%), followed by Rely-a-Bond (30%), Transbond Plus with Transbond XT (15%), and Xeno V with Xeno Ortho (10%). Under SEM, enamel surfaces after debonding of the brackets appeared porous when an acid-etching process was performed on the surfaces of Rely-a-Bond and Transbond XT, whereas with self-etching primers enamel presented smooth and almost clean surfaces (Transbond Plus and Xeno V group). Conclusion: All adhesives yielded SBS values higher than the recommended bond strength (5.9-7–8 MPa), Seventh generation self-etching primer Xeno V with Xeno Ortho showed clinically acceptable SBS and the least amount of residual adhesive left on the

  4. Torque expression in self-ligating orthodontic brackets and conventionally ligated brackets: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Thomali, Yousef; Mohamed, Roshan-Noor; Basha, Sakeenabi

    2017-01-01

    Background To evaluate the torque expression of self ligating (SL) orthodontic brackets and conventionally ligated brackets and the torque expression in active and passive SL brackets. Material and Methods Our systematic search included MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsychINFO, Scopus, and key journals and review articles; the date of the last search was April 4th 2016. We graded the methodological quality of the studies by means of the Quality Assessment Tool for Quantitative Studies, developed fo...

  5. Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded to Zirconium Crowns.

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    Mehmeti, Blerim; Azizi, Bleron; Kelmendi, Jeta; Iljazi-Shahiqi, Donika; Alar, Željko; Anić-Milošević, Sandra

    2017-06-01

    An increasing demand for esthetic restorations has resulted in an increased use of all-ceramic restorations, such as zirconium. However, one of the challenges the orthodontist must be willing to face is how to increase bond strength between the brackets and various ceramic restorations.Bond strength can beaffected bybracket type, by the material that bracketsaremade of, and their base surface design or retention mode. ​: A im: of this study was to perform a comparative analysis of the shear bond strength (SBS) of metallic and ceramic orthodontic brackets bonded to all-zirconium ceramic surfaces used for prosthetic restorations, and also to evaluate the fracture mode of these two types of orthodontic brackets. Twenty samples/semi-crowns of all-zirconium ceramic, on which orthodontic brackets were bonded, 10 metallic and 10 ceramic polycrystalline brackets, were prepared for this research. SBS has been testedby Universal Testing Machine, with a load applied using a knife edged rod moving at a fixed rate of 1 mm/min, until failure occurred. The force required to debond the brackets was recorded in Newton, then SBS was calculated to MPa. In addition, the samples were analyzed using a digital camera magnifier to determine Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI). Statistical data were processed using t-test, and the level of significance was set at α = 0.05. Higher shear bond strength values were observed in metallic brackets bonded to zirconium crowns compared tothoseof ceramic brackets, with a significant difference. During the test, two of the ceramic brackets were partially or totally damaged. Metallic brackets, compared to ceramic polycrystalline brackets, seemed tocreate stronger adhesion with all-zirconium surfaces due to their better retention mode. Also, ceramic brackets showed higher fragility during debonding.

  6. Antibacterial Activity of Orthodontic Cement Containing Quaternary Ammonium Polyethylenimine Nanoparticles Adjacent to Orthodontic Brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Eldad; Sharabi, Revital; Eden, Adi; Zabrovsky, Asher; Ben-Gal, Gilad; Sharon, Esi; Pietrokovski, Yoav; Houri-Haddad, Yael; Beyth, Nurit

    2018-03-27

    Enamel demineralization is a common problem found in patients using orthodontic devices, such as orthodontic braces. It was found that Streptoccocus mutans growth increases adjacent to orthodontic devices, which may result in caries development. Incorporated antibacterial quaternary ammonium polyethylenimine (QPEI) nanoparticles were previously shown to be highly efficacious against various bacteria. Combining antibacterial materials in orthodontic cement may be advantageous to prevent bacterial outgrowth adjacent to orthodontic brackets. The aim was to evaluate the efficiency of orthodontic cement containing QPEI nanoparticles in reducing S. mutans and Lactobacillus casei outgrowth adjacent to orthodontic brackets. Orthodontic brackets were bonded to the buccal surfaces of extracted lower incisors. The antibacterial effect on S. mutans and L. casei outgrowth of Neobond bracket adhesive orthodontic cement with and without QPEI nanoparticles was compared. The antibacterial effect was evaluated using crystal violet staining and bacterial count (CFU/mL). The teeth in the experimental group, with the QPEI nanoparticles cement, showed significantly lower optical density (OD) values and CFU counts of S. mutans and L. casei than the teeth in the control group ( p brackets.

  7. Orthodontic bracket bonding without previous adhesive priming: A meta-regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Aline Segatto Pires; Degrazia, Felipe Weidenbach; Celeste, Roger Keller; Leitune, Vicente Castelo Branco; Samuel, Susana Maria Werner; Collares, Fabrício Mezzomo

    2016-05-01

    To determine the consensus among studies that adhesive resin application improves the bond strength of orthodontic brackets and the association of methodological variables on the influence of bond strength outcome. In vitro studies were selected to answer whether adhesive resin application increases the immediate shear bond strength of metal orthodontic brackets bonded with a photo-cured orthodontic adhesive. Studies included were those comparing a group having adhesive resin to a group without adhesive resin with the primary outcome measurement shear bond strength in MPa. A systematic electronic search was performed in PubMed and Scopus databases. Nine studies were included in the analysis. Based on the pooled data and due to a high heterogeneity among studies (I(2)  =  93.3), a meta-regression analysis was conducted. The analysis demonstrated that five experimental conditions explained 86.1% of heterogeneity and four of them had significantly affected in vitro shear bond testing. The shear bond strength of metal brackets was not significantly affected when bonded with adhesive resin, when compared to those without adhesive resin. The adhesive resin application can be set aside during metal bracket bonding to enamel regardless of the type of orthodontic adhesive used.

  8. Influence of surface treatments on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets to porcelain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cong; Zeng, Jishan; Wang, Shaoan; Yang, Zheng; Huang, Qian; Chen, Pixiu; Zhou, Shujuan; Liu, Xiaoqing

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of various surface treatments after different storage time and thermocycling on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets to the feldspathic porcelain surfaces. 128 disc-shaped porcelain specimens were randomly assigned to the following surface treatments: 9.6% HFA, 9.6% HFA combined with silane, 50 μ aluminum trioxide sandblasting followed by silane and application of silane after 37% phosphoric acid. Metal or ceramic brackets were bonded onto each treated porcelain facet with light cured resin. The samples were stored in 37 °C water 1 day or 7 days, thermocycled 500 times from 5 to 55 °C. The shear bond strengths were measured (1 mm/min), and statistically analyzed. The bond failure sites were classified according to ARI system. The surface of the glazed, sandblasted, hydrofluoric and phosphoric acid etched porcelain were examined with SEM. All groups achieved reasonable bond strengths to withstand the application of orthodontic forces. Water storage for 7 days caused lower shear bond strength than that of 1 day. But there is no statistically significant difference between the two groups. The mean shear bond strength provided by ceramic bracket with mechanical retention had no statistical difference with that of metal bracket. Therefore, the optimal treatment for orthodontic brackets bonding to feldspathic porcelain was to apply phosphoric acid combined with silane.

  9. Torque expression in self-ligating orthodontic brackets and conventionally ligated brackets: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Thomali, Yousef; Mohamed, Roshan-Noor; Basha, Sakeenabi

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the torque expression of self ligating (SL) orthodontic brackets and conventionally ligated brackets and the torque expression in active and passive SL brackets. Our systematic search included MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsychINFO, Scopus, and key journals and review articles; the date of the last search was April 4th 2016. We graded the methodological quality of the studies by means of the Quality Assessment Tool for Quantitative Studies, developed for the Effective Public Health Practice Project (EPHPP). In total, 87 studies were identified for screening, and 9 studies were eligible. The quality assessment rated one of the study as being of strong quality, 7 (77.78%) of these studies as being of moderate quality. Three out of 7 studies which compared SL and conventionally ligated brackets showed, conventionally ligated brackets with highest torque expression compared to SL brackets. Badawi showed active SL brackets with highest torque expression compared to passive SL brackets. Major and Brauchli showed no significant differences in torque expression of active and passive SL brackets. Conventionally ligated brackets presented with highest torque expression compared to SL brackets. Minor difference was recorded in a torque expression of active and passive SL brackets. Key words: Systematic review, self ligation, torque expression, conventional ligation.

  10. Quantitative analysis of enamel on debonded orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Nathan J; Lo, Thomas W G; Adams, Geoffrey G; Schneider, Paul M

    2017-09-01

    Iatrogenic damage to the tooth surface in the form of enamel tearouts can occur during removal of fixed orthodontic appliances. The aim of this study was to assess debonded metal and ceramic brackets attached with a variety of bonding materials to determine how frequently this type of damage occurs. Eighty-one patients close to finishing fixed orthodontic treatment were recruited. They had metal brackets bonded with composite resin and a 2-step etch-and-bond technique or ceramic brackets bonded with composite resin and a 2-step etch-and- bond technique, and composite resin with a self-etching primer or resin-modified glass ionomer cement. Debonded brackets were examined by backscattered scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy to determine the presence and area of enamel on the base pad. Of the 486 brackets collected, 26.1% exhibited enamel on the bonding material on the bracket base pad. The incidences of enamel tearouts for each group were metal brackets, 13.3%; ceramic brackets, 30.2%; composite resin with self-etching primer, 38.2%; and resin-modified glass ionomer cement, 21.2%. The percentage of the bracket base pad covered in enamel was highly variable, ranging from 0% to 46.1%. Enamel damage regularly occurred during the debonding process with the degree of damage being highly variable. Damage occurred more frequently when ceramic brackets were used (31.9%) compared with metal brackets (13.3%). Removal of ceramic brackets bonded with resin-modified glass ionomer cement resulted in less damage compared with the resin bonding systems. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of recycling and bonding agent application on bond strength of stainless steel orthodontic brackets

    OpenAIRE

    Bahnasi, Faisal I.; Abd-Rahman, Aida NA.; Abu-Hassan, Mohame I.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: 1) to assess different methods of recycling orthodontic brackets, 2) to evaluate Shear Bond Strength (SBS) of (a) new, (b) recycled and (c) repeated recycled stainless steel brackets (i) with and (ii) without bracket base primer. Study Design: A total of 180 extracted human premolar teeth and 180 premolar stainless steel brackets were used. One hundred teeth and 100 brackets were divided into five groups of 20-teeth each. Four methods of recycling orthodontic brackets were used in...

  12. Design of an Orthodontic Torque Simulator for Measurement of Bracket Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melenka, G. W.; Nobes, D. S.; Major, P. W.; Carey, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    The design and testing of an orthodontic torque simulator that reproduces the effect of archwire rotation on orthodontic brackets is described. This unique device is capable of simultaneously measuring the deformation and loads applied to an orthodontic bracket due to archwire rotation. Archwire rotation is used by orthodontists to correct the inclination of teeth within the mouth. This orthodontic torque simulator will provide knowledge of the deformation and loads applied to orthodontic bracket that will aide clinicians by describing the effect of archwire rotation on brackets. This will also impact that design on new archwirebracket systems by providing an assessment of performance. Deformation of the orthodontic bracket tie wings is measured using a digital image correlation process to measure elastic and plastic deformation. The magnitude of force and moments applied to the bracket though the archwire is also measured using a six-axis load cell. Initial tests have been performed on two orthodontic brackets of varying geometry to demonstrate the measurement capability of the orthodontic torque simulator. The demonstration experiment shows that a Damon Q bracket had a final plastic deformation after a single loading of 0.022 mm while the Speed bracket deformed 0.071 mm. This indicates that the Speed bracket plastically deforms 3.2 times more than the Damon Q bracket for similar magnitude of applied moment. The demonstration experiment demonstrates that bracket geometry affect the deformation of orthodontic brackets and this difference can be detected using the orthodontic torque simulator.

  13. Genotoxicity of corrosion eluates obtained from orthodontic brackets in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelieri, Fernanda; Marcondes, Joao Paulo C; de Almeida, Danielle Cristina; Salvadori, Daisy M F; Ribeiro, Daniel A

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether corrosion eluates obtained from commercially available orthodontic brackets are able to induce genetic damage in vitro. Genotoxicity was assessed by the single cell gel (comet) assay using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The following orthodontic metallic brackets were used: Morelli (Sorocaba, Brazil); Abzil (São José do Rio Preto, Brazil); Dentaurum (Pforzheim, Germany); and 3M Unitek (Puchheim, Germany). Each dental bracket was submitted to a corrosion process in a solution containing equal amounts of acetic acid and sodium chloride at 0.1 M concentration for 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, 35, and 70 days. CHO cells were exposed to eluates for 30 minutes at 37°C. The negative control was treated with the same solution used for corrosion process for 30 minutes at 37°C. Independent positive control was performed with methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) (Sigma Aldrich, St. Louis, Mo) at 1 ug/mL for 1 hour. None of the eluates was found to exhibit genotoxicity, regardless of the different commercial brands of orthodontic appliance used. In summary, our results indicate corrosion eluates obtained from orthodontic brackets do not induce genetic damage as assessed by single cell gel (comet) assay. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. 3D-printed orthodontic brackets - proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krey, Karl-Friedrich; Darkazanly, Nawras; Kühnert, Rolf; Ruge, Sebastian

    Today, orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances is usually carried out using preprogrammed straight-wire brackets made of metal or ceramics. The goal of this study was to determine the possibility of clinically implementing a fully digital workflow with individually designed and three-dimensionally printed (3D-printed) brackets. Edgewise brackets were designed using computer-aided design (CAD) software for demonstration purposes. After segmentation of the malocclusion model generated based on intraoral scan data, the brackets were digitally positioned on the teeth and a target occlusion model created. The thus-defined tooth position was used to generate a template for an individualized arch form in the horizontal plane. The base contours of the brackets were modified to match the shape of the tooth surfaces, and a positioning guide (fabricated beforehand) was used to ensure that the brackets were bonded at the correct angle and position. The brackets, positioning guide, and retainer splint, digitally designed on the target occlusion model, were 3D printed using a Digital Light Processing (DLP) 3D printer. The archwires were individually pre-bent using the template. In the treatment sequence, it was shown for the first time that, in principle, it is possible to perform treatment with an individualized 3D-printed brackets system by using the proposed fully digital workflow. Technical aspects of the system, problems encountered in treatment, and possible future developments are discussed in this article.

  15. Comparison of shear bond strength of stainless steel brackets bonded with three light- cured adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Minaei Basharik

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The bonding process of the brackets to enamel has been a critical issue in orthodontic research. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of 3 light-cured adhesives (transbond XT, Z250, light bond. Materials &Methods: In this study sixty extracted human premolars were collected and randomly divided into 3 test groups. All teeth were etched by 37% phosphoric acid. In first group brackets were bonded by Transbond XT adhesive, in group two brackets were bonded by Light bond adhesive and in third group were bonded by filtek Z250 composite. All of them were cured with Ortholux xt for 40 seconds.24 hours after thermocycling, Shear Bond Strength (SBS values of these brackets were recorded using a Universal Testing Machine. Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI scores were determined after the failure of the brackets, using Stereo Microscope the data were analyzed using ANOVA and Chi-square tests. Results: Mean shear bond strength of Transbond XT, light bond and Z250 were 28.9±2.25 MPa, 25.06±1.98 MPa and 26.8±2.57 MPa, respectively. No significant difference was observed in the SBS among the groups and a clinically acceptable SBS was found for the three adhesives. ARI scores were not significantly different between the various groups (P>0.05. Conclusion: This study showed that the Z250 can be used as light bond and transbond xt to bond orthodontic brackets and ARI and SBS scores were not significantly different.

  16. Are nano-composites and nano-ionomers suitable for orthodontic bracket bonding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Tancan; Yagci, Ahmet; Uysal, Banu; Akdogan, Gülsen

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to test nano-composite (Filtek Supreme Plus Universal) and a newly introduced nano-ionomer (Ketac N100 Light Curing Nano-Ionomer) restorative to determine their shear bond strength (SBS) and failure site locations in comparison with a conventional light-cure orthodontic bonding adhesive (Transbond XT). Sixty freshly extracted human maxillary premolar teeth were arbitrarily divided into three equal groups. The brackets were bonded to the teeth in each group with different composites, according to the manufacturers' instructions. The SBS values of the brackets were recorded in Megapascals (MPa) using a universal testing machine. Adhesive remnant index scores were determined after failure of the brackets. The data were analysed using analysis of variance, Tukey honestly significant difference, and chi-square tests. The results demonstrated that group 1 (Transbond XT, mean: 12.60 +/- 4.48 MPa) had a higher SBS than that of group 2 (nano-composite, mean: 8.33 +/- 5.16 MPa; P nano-ionomer, mean: 6.14 +/- 2.12 MPa; P Nano-composites and nano-ionomers may be suitable for bonding since they fulfil the previously suggested SBS ranges for clinical acceptability, but they are inferior to a conventional orthodontic composite.

  17. Corrosion of orthodontic brackets in different spices: in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, T P

    2014-01-01

    Moist environment in the mouth varies and causes variable amounts of corrosion of dental materials. This is of concern particularly when metallic implants, metallic fillings, orthodontic appliances are placed in the hostile electrolytic environment in the human mouth. Components of diet rich in salt and spices are important factors influencing the corrosion of metallic appliances placed in the oral cavity. To study in vitro corrosion of orthodontic metallic brackets immersed in solutions of salt and spices in artificial saliva. Orthodontic brackets were used for corrosion studies in artificial saliva, salt, and spices using electrochemical technique and surface analysis. Electrochemical studies using different parameters were done in solutions of artificial saliva containing salt and spices. Photomicrographs from the optical microscope were also obtained. RESULTS of corrosion studies have clearly demonstrated that certain spices such as turmeric and coriander are effective in reducing corrosion, whereas salt and red chili have been found to enhance it. Surface analysis of small pits present on the surface of the as-received bracket will initiate corrosion which leads to more pitting.

  18. The use of easily debondable orthodontic adhesives with ceramic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Chiyako; Namura, Yasuhiro; Tsuruoka, Takashi; Hama, Tomohiko; Kaji, Kaori; Shimizu, Noriyoshi

    2011-01-01

    We experimentally produced an easily debondable orthodontic adhesive (EDA) containing heat-expandable microcapsules. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the best debondable condition when EDA was used for ceramic brackets. Shear bond strengths were measured before and after heating and were compared statistically. Temperatures of the bracket base and pulp wall were also examined during heating. Bond strengths of EDA containing 30 wt% and 40 wt% heat-expandable microcapsules were 13.4 and 12.9 MPa, respectively and decreased significantly to 3.8 and 3.7 MPa, respectively, after heating. The temperature of the pulp wall increased 1.8-3.6°C after heating, less than that required to induce pulp damage. Based on the results, we conclude that heating for 8 s during debonding of ceramic brackets bonded using EDA containing 40 wt% heat-expandable microcapsules is the most effective and safest method for the enamel and pulp.

  19. Effects of delayed polymerization time and bracket manipulation on orthodontic resin modified glass ionomer adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Danielle Wiggins

    This study examined the effect of varying delayed polymerization times in combination with bracket manipulation on shear bond strength (SBS), degree of conversion (DC), and adhesive remnant index (ARI) score when using a resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI) adhesive. Specimens were divided into three groups of clinically relevant delay times (0.5, 2, and 4-min) to simulate the delay that frequently occurs between bracket placement and manipulation and subsequent light curing. Based on an analysis of variance (alpha=.05), the SBS was not significantly different between the three groups. While one of the goals of this study was to be the first study to quantify DC of RMGI using Raman microspectroscopy, several challenges, including weak peak signal with and without fluorescence, were encountered and as a result, DC could not be determined. A significant difference (pbracket with increasing delay time. A Spearman correlation between SBS and ARI indicated no positive association between SBS and ARI measures across delay times. The results of this study suggest that clinically relevant delay times of 0.5, 2, and 4-min do not negatively impact the SBS of a RMGI adhesive. However, with increasing delay time, the results suggest that more adhesive might remain on the bracket during debonding. With more adhesive remaining on the bracket, this could be beneficial in that less adhesive needs to be removed from enamel by grinding at the time of bracket removal when orthodontic treatment is completed.

  20. Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Fixed with Remineralizing Adhesive Systems after Simulating One Year of Orthodontic Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Lima Bezerra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to assess, in vitro, the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets fixed with remineralizing adhesive systems submitted to thermomechanical cycling, simulating one year of orthodontic treatment. Sixty-four bovine incisor teeth were randomly divided into 4 experimental groups (n=16: XT: Transbond XT, QC: Quick Cure, OL: Ortholite Color, and SEP: Transbond Plus Self-Etching Primer. The samples were submitted to thermomechanical cycling simulating one year of orthodontic treatment. Shear bond strength tests were carried out using a universal testing machine with a load cell of 50 KgF at 0.5 mm/minute. The samples were examined with a stereomicroscope and a scanning electron microscope (SEM in order to analyze enamel surface and Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney (with Bonferroni correction tests showed a significant difference between the studied groups (p<0.05. Groups XT, QC, and SEP presented the highest values of adhesive resistance and no statistical differences were found between them. The highest frequency of failures between enamel and adhesive was observed in groups XT, QC, and OL. Quick Cure (QC remineralizing adhesive system presented average adhesive resistance values similar to conventional (XT and self-etching (SEP adhesives, while remineralizing system (OL provided the lowest values of adhesive resistance.

  1. Effects of chlorhexidine (gel) application on bacterial levels and orthodontic brackets during orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bazi, Samar M; Abbassy, Mona A; Bakry, Ahmed S; Merdad, Leena A; Hassan, Ali H

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of applying 0.50% chlorhexidine (CHX) gel using the dental drug delivery system (3DS) on salivary Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) and on the surface topography of metal and ceramic orthodontic brackets. The study involved 20 orthodontic patients with high levels of salivary S. mutans. The patients were treated with professional mechanical tooth cleaning followed by application of 0.50% CHX using individual trays (3DS). Salivary S. mutans levels were repeatedly measured 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks post-treatment. In vitro study utilized forty ceramic and metallic brackets that were immersed in 0.50% CHX gel for 10 min, whereas another untreated forty brackets served as controls. The frictional resistances of stainless steel wires to the brackets before and after CHX treatment were recorded using a universal testing machine. Scanning electron microscopy was used to compare changes in the surface topography of brackets. Statistical analyses were used to determine the effect of CHX on bacterial count and to evaluate the effect of CHX on frictional resistance. According to the results of this study, S. mutans levels were reduced significantly (P brackets before or after application of CHX. (J Oral Sci 58, 35-42, 2016).

  2. Orthodontic Bracket Manufacturing Tolerances and Dimensional Differences between Select Self-Ligating Brackets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Thomas W.; Carey, Jason P.; Nobes, David S.; Major, Paul W.

    2010-01-01

    In all manufacturing processes there are tolerances; however, orthodontic bracket manufacturers seldom state the slot dimensional tolerances. This experiment develops a novel method of analyzing slot profile dimensions using photographs of the slot. Five points are selected along each wall, and lines are fitted to define a trapezoidal slot shape. This investigation measures slot height at the slot's top and bottom, angles between walls, slot taper, and the linearity of each wall. Slot dimensions for 30 upper right central incisor self-ligating stainless steel brackets from three manufacturers were evaluated. Speed brackets have a slot height 2% smaller than the nominal 0.559 mm size and have a slightly convergent taper. In-Ovation brackets have a divergent taper at an average angle of 1.47 degrees. In-Ovation is closest to the nominal value of slot height at the slot base and has the smallest manufacturing tolerances. Damon Q brackets are the most rectangular in shape, with nearly 90-degree corners between the slot bottom and walls. Damon slot height is on average 3% oversized. PMID:20981299

  3. Dental Hygiene and Orthodontics: Effect of Ultrasonic Instrumentation on Bonding Efficacy of Different Lingual Orthodontic Brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribante, Andrea; Sfondrini, Maria Francesca; Collesano, Vittorio; Tovt, Gaia; Bernardinelli, Luisa; Gandini, Paola

    2017-01-01

    Dental hygienists are often faced with patients wearing lingual orthodontic therapy, as ultrasonic instrumentation (UI) is crucial for oral health. As the application of external forces can lead to premature bonding failure, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of UI on shear bond strength (SBS) and on adhesive remnant index (ARI) of different lingual orthodontic brackets. 200 bovine incisors were divided into 10 groups. Four different lingual (STB, Ormco; TTR, Rocky Mountain Orthodontics; Idea, Leone; 2D, Forestadent) and vestibular control (Victory, 3M) brackets were bonded. UI was performed in half of specimens, whereas the other half did not receive any treatment. All groups were tested with a universal testing machine. SBS and ARI values were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed (significance: P = 0.05). TTR, Idea, and 2D lingual brackets significantly lowered SBS after UI, whereas for other braces no effect was recorded. Appliances with lower mesh area significantly reduced their adhesion capacity after UI. Moreover groups subjected to UI showed higher ARI scores than controls. UI lowered SBS of lingual appliances of small dimensions so particular care should be posed avoiding prolonged instrumentation around bracket base during plaque removal. Moreover, UI influenced also ARI scores.

  4. Effects of recycling and bonding agent application on bond strength of stainless steel orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahnasi, Faisal I; Abd-Rahman, Aida Na; Abu-Hassan, Mohame I

    2013-10-01

    1) to assess different methods of recycling orthodontic brackets, 2) to evaluate Shear Bond Strength (SBS) of (a) new, (b) recycled and (c) repeated recycled stainless steel brackets (i) with and (ii) without bracket base primer. A total of 180 extracted human premolar teeth and 180 premolar stainless steel brackets were used. One hundred teeth and 100 brackets were divided into five groups of 20-teeth each. Four methods of recycling orthodontic brackets were used in each of the first four groups while the last one (group V) was used as the control. Groups (I-V) were subjected to shear force within half an hour until the brackets debond. SBS was measured and the method showing the highest SBS was selected. A New group (VI) was recycled twice with the selected method. Six subgroups (1-6) were established; the primer was applied for three sub-groups, and the composite was applied for all brackets. Brackets were subjected to the same shear force, and SBS was measured for all sub-groups. There was a significant difference between the mean SBS of the sandblasting method and the means of SBS of each of the other three methods. There was however, no significant difference between the mean SBS of the new bracket and the mean SBS of recycled bracket using sandblasting. The mean SBS of all sub-groups were more than that recommended by Reynolds (17) in 1975. Brackets with primer showed slightly higher SBS compared to those of brackets without bonding agent. To decrease cost, sandblasted recycled orthodontic brackets can be used as an alternative to new brackets. It is recommended to apply a bonding agent on the bracket base to provide greater bond strength. Key words:Recycled bracket, shear bond strength, sandblasting, stainless steel orthodontic bracket.

  5. Effects of recycling and bonding agent application on bond strength of stainless steel orthodontic brackets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahnasi, Faisal I.; Abu-Hassan, Mohame I.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: 1) to assess different methods of recycling orthodontic brackets, 2) to evaluate Shear Bond Strength (SBS) of (a) new, (b) recycled and (c) repeated recycled stainless steel brackets (i) with and (ii) without bracket base primer. Study Design: A total of 180 extracted human premolar teeth and 180 premolar stainless steel brackets were used. One hundred teeth and 100 brackets were divided into five groups of 20-teeth each. Four methods of recycling orthodontic brackets were used in each of the first four groups while the last one (group V) was used as the control. Groups (I-V) were subjected to shear force within half an hour until the brackets debond. SBS was measured and the method showing the highest SBS was selected. A New group (VI) was recycled twice with the selected method. Six subgroups (1-6) were established; the primer was applied for three sub-groups, and the composite was applied for all brackets. Brackets were subjected to the same shear force, and SBS was measured for all sub-groups. Results: There was a significant difference between the mean SBS of the sandblasting method and the means of SBS of each of the other three methods. There was however, no significant difference between the mean SBS of the new bracket and the mean SBS of recycled bracket using sandblasting. The mean SBS of all sub-groups were more than that recommended by Reynolds (17) in 1975. Brackets with primer showed slightly higher SBS compared to those of brackets without bonding agent. Conclusion: To decrease cost, sandblasted recycled orthodontic brackets can be used as an alternative to new brackets. It is recommended to apply a bonding agent on the bracket base to provide greater bond strength. Key words:Recycled bracket, shear bond strength, sandblasting, stainless steel orthodontic bracket. PMID:24455081

  6. Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets and Disinclusion Buttons: Effect of Water and Saliva Contamination

    OpenAIRE

    Sfondrini, Maria Francesca; Fraticelli, Danilo; Gandini, Paola; Scribante, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of water and saliva contamination on the shear bond strength and failure site of orthodontic brackets and lingual buttons. Materials and Methods. 120 bovine permanent mandibular incisors were randomly divided into 6 groups of 20 specimens each. Both orthodontic brackets and disinclusion buttons were tested under three different enamel surface conditions: (a) dry, (b) water contamination, and (c) saliva contamination. Brackets and buttons...

  7. Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded with Nano-Filled Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Chalipa, Javad; Akhondi, Mohammad Sadegh Ahmad; Arab, Sepideh; Kharrazifard, Mohammad Javad; Ahmadyar, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets bonded with two types of nano-composites in comparison to a conventional orthodontic composite. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted human first premolars were randomly divided into 3 groups each containing 20 teeth. In group I, a conventional orthodontic composite (Transbond XT) was used to bond the brackets, while two nano-composites (Filtek TM Supreme XT and AELITE Aesthetic Enamel...

  8. Comparison of shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets using various zirconia primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Jin-Seok; Hwang, Chung-Ju

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets bonded to zirconia surfaces using three different zirconia primers and one silane primer, and subjected to thermocycling. We designed 10 experimental groups following the surface treatment and thermocycling. The surface was treated with one of the following method: no-primer (NP), Porcelain Conditioner (PC), Z-PRIME Plus (ZP), Monobond Plus (MP) and Zirconia Liner Premium (ZL) (n=20). Then each group was subdivided to non-thermocycled and thermocycled groups (NPT, PC, ZPT, MPT, ZLT) (n=10). Orthodontic brackets were bonded to the specimens using Transbond™ XT Paste and light cured for 15 s at 1,100 mW/cm(2). The SBS was measured at a 1 mm/min crosshead speed. The failure mode was assessed by examination with a stereomicroscope and the amount of bonding resin remaining on the zirconia surface was scored using the modified adhesive remnant index (ARI). The SBS of all experimental groups decreased after thermocycling. Before thermocycling, the SBS was ZL, ZP ≥ MP ≥ PC > NP but after thermocycling, the SBS was ZLT ≥ MPT ≥ ZPT > PCT = NPT (p > 0.05). For the ARI score, both of the groups lacking primer (NP and NPT) displayed adhesive failure modes, but the groups with zirconia primers (ZP, ZPT, MP, MPT, ZL, and ZLT) were associated with mixed failure modes. Surface treatment with a zirconia primer increases the SBS relative to no-primer or silane primer application between orthodontic brackets and zirconia prostheses.

  9. Nuclear techniques to identify allergenic metals in orthodontic brackets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenobio, E.G.; Zenobio, M.A.F.; Menezes, M.A.B.C.

    2009-01-01

    The present study determines the elementary alloy composition of ten commercial brands of brackets, especially related to Ni, Cr, and Co metals, confirmed allergenic elements. The nuclear techniques applied in the analyses were X-ray fluorescence (XRF) - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, France (National Center of Scientific Research), and X-ray energy spectrometry (XRES), and Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) - CDTN/CNEN, Brazil. The XRES and XRF techniques identified Cr in the 10 samples analyzed and Ni in eight samples. The INAA technique identified the presence of Cr (14% to 19%) and Co (42% to 2400 ppm) in all samples. The semi-quantitative analysis performed by XRF also identified Co in two samples. The techniques were effective in the identification of metals in orthodontic brackets. The elements identified in this study can be considered one of the main reason for the allergic processes among the patients studied. This finding suggests that the patients should be tested for allergy and allergenic sensibility to metals prior to the prescription of orthodontic device. (author)

  10. A quantitative AFM analysis of nano-scale surface roughness in various orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gi-Ja; Park, Ki-Ho; Park, Young-Guk; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2010-10-01

    In orthodontics, the surface roughnesses of orthodontic archwire and brackets affect the effectiveness of arch-guided tooth movement, corrosion behavior, and the aesthetics of orthodontic components. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements were used to provide quantitative information on the surface roughness of the orthodontic material. In this study, the changes in surface roughness of various orthodontic bracket slots before and after sliding movement of archwire in vitro and in vivo were observed through the utilization of AFM. Firstly, we characterized the surface of four types of brackets slots as follows: conventional stainless steel (Succes), conventional ceramic (Perfect), self-ligating stainless steel (Damon) and self-ligating ceramic (Clippy-C) brackets. Succes) and Damon brackets showed relatively smooth surfaces, while Perfect had the roughest surface among the four types of brackets used. Secondly, after in vitro sliding test with beta titanium wire in two conventional brackets (Succes and Perfect), there were significant increases in only stainless steel bracket, Succes. Thirdly, after clinical orthodontic treatment for a maximum of 2 years, the self-ligating stainless steel bracket, Damon, showed a significant increase in surface roughness. But self-ligating ceramic brackets, Clippy-C, represented less significant changes in roughness parameters than self-ligating stainless steel ones. Based on the results of the AFM measurements, it is suggested that the self-ligating ceramic bracket has great possibility to exhibit less friction and better biocompatibility than the other tested brackets. This implies that these bracket slots will aid in the effectiveness of arch-guided tooth movement.

  11. Shear bond strength of precoated orthodontic brackets: an in vivo study

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan, Ali H

    2010-01-01

    Ali H HassanDepartment of Preventive Dental Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi ArabiaObjective: To evaluate the shear bond strength of precoated orthodontic brackets bonded with self-etching primer relative to that of noncoated conventionally-bonded brackets at two different time intervals.Methods: Twenty-one subjects were selected for randomized split-mouth bonding of two types of brackets to the maxillary arch. Half of the teeth had precoated brackets b...

  12. Assessment of the hardness of different orthodontic wires and brackets produced by metal injection molding and conventional methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Alavi

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: MIM orthodontic brackets exhibited hardness values much lower than those of SS orthodontic archwires and were more compatible with NiTi and beta-titanium archwires. A wide range of microhardness values has been reported for conventional orthodontic brackets and it should be considered that the manufacturing method might be only one of the factors affecting the mechanical properties of orthodontic brackets including hardness.

  13. Orthodontic bracket bonding to glazed full-contour zirconia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Young Kwak

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This study evaluated the effects of different surface conditioning methods on the bond strength of orthodontic brackets to glazed full-zirconia surfaces. Materials and Methods Glazed zirconia (except for the control, Zirkonzahn Prettau disc surfaces were pre-treated: PO (control, polishing; BR, bur roughening; PP, cleaning with a prophy cup and pumice; HF, hydrofluoric acid etching; AA, air abrasion with aluminum oxide; CJ, CoJet-Sand. The surfaces were examined using profilometry, scanning electron microscopy, and electron dispersive spectroscopy. A zirconia primer (Z-Prime Plus, Z or a silane primer (Monobond-S, S was then applied to the surfaces, yielding 7 groups (PO-Z, BR-Z, PP-S, HF-S, AA-S, AA-Z, and CJ-S. Metal bracket-bonded specimens were stored in water for 24 hr at 37℃, and thermocycled for 1,000 cycles. Their bond strengths were measured using the wire loop method (n = 10. Results Except for BR, the surface pre-treatments failed to expose the zirconia substructure. A significant difference in bond strengths was found between AA-Z (4.60 ± 1.08 MPa and all other groups (13.38 ± 2.57 - 15.78 ± 2.39 MPa, p < 0.05. For AA-Z, most of the adhesive remained on the bracket. Conclusions For bracket bonding to glazed zirconia, a simple application of silane to the cleaned surface is recommended. A zirconia primer should be used only when the zirconia substructure is definitely exposed.

  14. Decalcification prevention around orthodontic brackets bonded to bleached enamel using different topical agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Msallam, Ferial Ahmed; Grawish, Mohammed El-Awady; Hafez, Ahmad Mohammed; Abdelnaby, Yasser Lotfy

    2017-12-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of different topical agents utilized for prevention of enamel decalcification around orthodontic brackets bonded to bleached and non-bleached enamel. Human maxillary premolars (n = 120) were divided into two equal groups. Teeth in group I were left without bleaching while those in group II were bleached with Vivastyle gel. Metal brackets were bonded to all the teeth using light-cured adhesive. Each group was divided into six equal subgroups (A, B, C, D, E, and F). In subgroup A, no material was applied (control). In subgroups B, C, D, E, and F, the following materials were applied respectively: Profluorid varnish, Enamel Pro Varnish, Ortho-Choice Ortho-Coat, GC Tooth Mousse, and GC MI Paste Plus. All teeth were cycled in a demineralization solution/artificial saliva for 15 days. Laser fluorescence was used to measure the level of enamel mineralization. The data were statistically analyzed. Regarding the non-bleaching subgroups, all studied material revealed significant demineralization reduction in comparison to the control subgroup (P  0.05). Ortho-Choice Ortho-Coat, and Profluorid and Enamel Pro varnishes could be utilized successfully to reduce enamel demineralization around brackets bonded to either bleached or non-bleached enamel. GC MI Paste Plus and GC Tooth Mousse were effective only in non-bleached enamel.

  15. Ion release from orthodontic brackets in 3 mouthwashes: an in-vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danaei, Shahla Momeni; Safavi, Afsaneh; Roeinpeikar, S M Mehdi; Oshagh, Morteza; Iranpour, Shiva; Omidkhoda, Maryam; Omidekhoda, Maryam

    2011-06-01

    Stainless steel orthodontic brackets can release metal ions into the saliva. Fluoridated mouthwashes are often recommended to orthodontic patients to reduce the risk of white-spot lesions around their brackets. However, little information is available regarding the effect of different mouthwashes in ion release of orthodontic brackets. The purpose of this study was to measure the amount of metal ion release from orthodontic brackets when kept in different mouthwashes. One hundred sixty stainless steel brackets (0.022-in, 3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif) were divided randomly into 4 equal groups and immersed in Oral B (Procter & Gamble, Weybridge, United Kingdom), chlorhexidine (Shahdaru Labratories, Tehran, Iran), and Persica (Poursina Pharmaceutical Laboratories, Tehran, Iran) mouthwashes and distilled deionized water and incubated at 37°C for 45 days. Nickel, chromium, iron, copper, and manganese released from the orthodontic brackets were measured with an inductively coupled plasma spectrometer. For statistical analysis, 1-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Duncan multiple-range tests were used. The results showed that ion release in deionized water was significantly (P 0.05) in nickel, chromium, iron, and copper ion release in the Oral B and Persica mouthwashes. The level of manganese release was significantly different in all 4 groups. If ion release is a concern, Oral B and Persica mouthwashes might be better options than chlorhexidine for orthodontic patients with stainless steel brackets. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Accuracy of four different digital intraoral scanners: effects of the presence of orthodontic brackets and wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yoo-Ran; Park, Ji-Man; Chun, Youn-Sic; Lee, Kkot-Nim; Kim, Minji

    The objective of this study was to compare the accuracy of four different digital intraoral scanners and the effects of buccal brackets and orthodontic wire. For this study, three sets of models (Control model, BKT model with buccal bracket, and WBKT model with buccal bracket and orthodontic wire) were scanned using four different types of intraoral scanners: E4D dentist, iTero, Trios, and Zfx IntraScan. The mesiodistal width of the teeth, intercanine width, and intermolar width measured by four scanners were compared. Three-dimensional (3D) images of the brackets were taken using the four scanners. Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA, independent t test, and post-hoc Tukey test at a significance level of P brackets and orthodontic wire. Comparison of 3D bracket images scanned by the four scanners showed differences in image distortion among the scanners. Bracket characteristics did not affect the 3D bracket images. The four intraoral scanners used in this study differed in accuracy. However, the results acquired by iTero and Trios were more reliable. Effects of buccal brackets and orthodontic wire on the 3D images taken by intraoral scanners were not clinically significant.

  17. Can 10% hydrofluoric acid be used for reconditioning of orthodontic brackets?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela D Pompeo

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: The aluminum oxide blasting technique was effective for the reconditioning of orthodontic brackets. Nevertheless, the reconditioning technique using 10% fluoridric acid for 60 s was not efficient for clinical use.

  18. Clinical assessment of demineralization and remineralization surrounding orthodontic brackets with FluoreCam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bora Korkut

    2017-04-01

    Conclusions: This study demonstrated that demineralization is measurable around orthodontic brackets and the demineralization can be completely inhibited and/or reversed by the use of commercially available remineralization products.

  19. Effect of saliva contamination on cementation of orthodontic brackets using different adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robaski, Aliden-Willian; Pamato, Saulo; Tomás-de Oliveira, Marcelo; Pereira, Jefferson-Ricardo

    2017-07-01

    The enamel condition and the quality of surface are points that need to be considered for achieving optimal efficiency in the treatment with orthodontic brackets. The aim of this study was to assess the immediate bond strength of metallic brackets cemented to dental. Forty human premolars were double-sectioned, placed in PVC matrices and randomly divided into 10 groups (n=8). They received artificial saliva contamination before or after the application of adhesive systems, except for the control groups. The metallic brackets were cemented using two orthodontic cements (Transbond™ Plus Color Change, 3M Unitek e Transbond™ XT Light, 3M Unitek). The specimens were subjected to mechanical shear bond strength testing and classified according to the fracture pattern. The results were analyzed using a two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test for multiple comparisons ( p brackets cemented on the dental enamel. Key words: Bonding, orthodontic brackets, shear bond strength, saliva, adhesive systems.

  20. An orthodontic bracket embedded in the medial pterygoid surface: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmott, Sheryl E; Ikeagwuani, Okechukwu; McLeod, Niall M H

    2016-03-01

    There is a potential risk that orthodontic brackets can become dislodged into the aerodigestive tract. This case illustrates the management of an orthodontic bracket, which became embedded in the deep tissues of the oropharynx. We aim to highlight the potential risk misplaced dental instruments and materials pose, including that they may become embedded in the soft tissues of the throat and suggest that that this possibility should be considered when they cannot be localized.

  1. Nanosilver coated orthodontic brackets: in vivo antibacterial properties and ion release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metin-Gürsoy, Gamze; Taner, Lale; Akca, Gülçin

    2017-02-01

    Silver nanoparticles are currently utilized in the fields of dentistry. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial properties and ion release of nanosilver coated orthodontic brackets compared to conventional brackets. Nanosilver coating process was applied to standard orthodontic brackets placed on the mandibular incisors of Wistar Albino rats in the study group and conventional brackets in the control group. Dental plaque, mucosal vestibular smears, saliva, and blood samples were collected from rats at various days. The amounts of nanosilver ions in blood and saliva were measured and microbiological evaluation was made for Streptococcus mutans. For testing cariogenicity, all rats were sacrificed at the end of 75 days under anaesthesia. Teeth were stained using a caries indicator, then the caries ratio was assessed. Nanosilver coated orthodontic bracket favoured the inhibition of S.mutans on Day 30 and reduction of caries on the smooth surfaces. The nanosilver amounts in the saliva and serum samples were significantly higher in the study group on Day 7. It is suggested that nanosilver coated orthodontic brackets, as an antibacterial agent without patient compliance, could be helpful for the prevention of white spot lesions during fixed orthodontic treatment. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Effect of blood contamination on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets and disinclusion buttons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfondrini, Maria Francesca; Gatti, Sara; Scribante, Andrea

    2011-07-01

    Our aim was to assess the effect of blood contamination on the shear bonding strength and sites of failure of orthodontic brackets and bondable buttons. We randomly divided 160 bovine permanent mandibular incisors into 8 groups of 20 specimens each. Both orthodontic brackets (Step brackets, Leone, Sesto Fiorentino, Italy) and bondable buttons (Flat orthodontic buttons, Leone, Sesto Fiorentino, Italy) were tested on four different enamel surfaces: dry; contamination with blood before priming; after priming; and before and after priming. Brackets and buttons were bonded to the teeth and subsequently tested using a Instron universal testing machine. Shear bonding strength and the rate of adhesive failures were recorded. Data were analysed using the analysis of variance (ANOVA), Scheffè tests, and the chi-square test. Uncontaminated enamel surfaces showed the highest bonding strengths for both brackets and buttons. When they were contaminated with blood, orthodontic brackets had significantly lower shear strengths than bondable buttons (P=0.0001). There were significant differences in sites of failure among the groups for the various enamel surfaces (P=0.001). Contamination of enamel by blood during bonding lowers the strength of the bond, more so with orthodontic brackets than with bondable buttons. Copyright © 2010 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Caries outcomes after orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances: do lingual brackets make a difference?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, M.H.; Attin, R.; Schwestka-Polly, R.; Wiechmann, D.

    2010-01-01

    Orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances is considered a risk factor for the development of white spot caries lesions (WSL). Traditionally, brackets are bonded to the buccal surfaces. Lingual brackets are developing rapidly and have become more readily available. Buccal surfaces are considered to

  4. Cytotoxic effects of polycarbonate-based orthodontic brackets by activation of mitochondrial apoptotic mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloukos, D.; Taoufik, E.; Eliades, T.; Katsaros, C.; Eliades, G.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to evaluate the biological effects of water eluents from polycarbonate based esthetic orthodontic brackets. METHODS: The composite polycarbonate brackets tested were Silkon Plus (SL, fiber-glass-reinforced), Elan ME (EL, ceramic particle-reinforced) and Elegance

  5. A scanning electron microscopic investigation of ceramic orthodontic brackets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, F.; Toms, A.P.

    1990-01-01

    Ceramic brackets were introduced to overcome the esthetic disadvantages of stainless steel brackets. The clinical impression of these brackets is very favorable. However, the sliding mechanics used in the Straightwire (A Company, San Diego, CA, USA) system appear to produce slower tooth movements with ceramic compared to stainless steel brackets. To determine whether this was due to any obvious mechanical problem in the bracket slot, Transcend (Unitek Corporation/3M, Monrovia, CA, USA) ceramic brackets were examined by a scanning electron microscope and compared to stainless steel brackets.Consistently, large surface defects were found in the ceramic bracket slots that were not present in the metal bracket slots. These irregularities could obviously hinder the sliding mechanics of the bracket slot-archwire system and create a greater demand on anchorage. Conversely, the fitting surface of the Transcend ceramic bracket showed extremely smooth surface characteristics, and it would seem advisable for the manufacturers to incorporate this surface within the bracket slot. (author)

  6. Can 10% hydrofluoric acid be used for reconditioning of orthodontic brackets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompeo, Daniela D; Rosário, Henrique D; Lopes, Beatriz Mv; Cesar, Paulo F; Paranhos, Luiz Renato

    2016-01-01

    Bracket debonding is a common problem during orthodontic treatment. This type of failure is associated to masticatory forces, poor adhesion, and the need for repositioning the piece. The objective of this work was to compare the shear bond strength of debonded brackets that were reconditioned using different protocols (alumina blasting versus hydrofluoric etching). This was an in vitro experimental study with 45 stainless steel orthodontic brackets. They were randomly divided into three groups: (1) New brackets (n = 15), (2) brackets reconditioned using 10% hydrofluoric acid for 60 s (n = 15), and (3) brackets reconditioned by aluminum oxide blasting until complete removal of the remaining resin (n = 15). In Groups 2 and 3, the insertion of composite resin proceeded in two stages to simulate a type of bracket failure in which the bonding resin was left at the bracket base. For the shear test, the assembly composed by the metallic support, and specimen was taken to the Instron universal testing machine in which the specimens were loaded using a semicircle-shaped active tip in the region of the bonding interface parallel to the surface of the bracket at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. The data were subjected to D'Agostino's normality test to have their distribution checked. Analysis of variance and Tukey's test (P brackets) showed higher bond strength than that obtained for the group treated with hydrofluoric acid (Group 2, P brackets. Nevertheless, the reconditioning technique using 10% fluoridric acid for 60 s was not efficient for clinical use.

  7. Cleansing orthodontic brackets with air-powder polishing: effects on frictional force and degree of debris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Brisa Dos Santos; Fagundes, Nathalia Carolina Fernandes; Aragón, Mônica Lídia Castro; Dias, Carmen Gilda Barroso Tavares; Normando, David

    2016-01-01

    Debris buildup on the bracket-wire interface can influence friction. Cleansing brackets with air-powder polishing can affect this process. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frictional force and amount of debris remaining on orthodontic brackets subjected to prophylaxis with air-powder polishing. Frictional force and debris buildup on the surface of 28 premolar brackets were evaluated after orthodontic treatment. In one hemiarch, each bracket was subjected to air-powder polishing (n = 14) for five seconds, while the contralateral hemiarch (n = 14) served as control. Mechanical friction tests were performed and images of the polished bracket surfaces and control surfaces were examined. Wilcoxon test was applied for comparative analysis between hemiarches at p Brackets that had been cleaned with air-powder polishing showed lower friction (median = 1.27 N) when compared to the control surfaces (median = 4.52 N) (p orthodontic brackets with air-powder polishing significantly reduces debris buildup on the bracket surface while decreasing friction levels observed during sliding mechanics.

  8. Spectrophotometric evaluation of dental bleaching under orthodontic bracket in enamel and dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correr, Americo-Bortolazzo; Rastelli, Alessandra-Nara-Souza; Lima, Débora-Alves-Nunes-Leite; Consani, Rafael-Leonardo-Xediek

    2014-01-01

    Aware of the diffusion capacity of bleaching in the dental tissues, many orthodontists are subjecting their patients to dental bleaching during orthodontic treatment for esthetic purposes or to anticipate the exchange of esthetic restorations after the orthodontic treatment. For this purpose specific products have been developed in pre-loaded whitening trays designed to fit over and around brackets and wires, with clinical efficacy proven. Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate, through spectrophotometric reflectance, the effectiveness of dental bleaching under orthodontic bracket. Material and Methods: Thirty-two bovine incisors crown blocks of 8 mm x 8 mm height lengths were used. Staining of tooth blocks with black tea was performed for six days. They were distributed randomly into 4 groups (1-home bleaching with bracket, 2- home bleaching without bracket, 3- office bleaching with bracket, 4 office bleaching without bracket). The color evaluation was performed (CIE L * a * b *) using color reflectance spectrophotometer. Metal brackets were bonded in groups 1 and 3. The groups 1 and 2 samples were subjected to the carbamide peroxide at 15%, 4 hours daily for 21 days. Groups 3 and 4 were subjected to 3 in-office bleaching treatment sessions, hydrogen peroxide 38%. After removal of the brackets, the second color evaluation was performed in tooth block, difference between the area under the bracket and around it, and after 7 days to verified color stability. Data analysis was performed using the paired t-test and two-way variance analysis and Tukey’s. Results: The home bleaching technique proved to be more effective compared to the office bleaching. There was a significant difference between the margin and center color values of the specimens that were subjected to bracket bonding. Conclusions: The bracket bond presence affected the effectiveness of both the home and office bleaching treatments. Key words:Tooth bleaching, spectrophotometry

  9. Rebonding of unused brackets with different orthodontic adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emigdio Enrique Orellana Jimenez

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare in vitro shear bond strength (SBS of different orthodontic adhesives in bonding and repeatedly rebonding metal brackets, and to evaluate the bond failure site with the adhesive remnant index (ARI. METHODS: Specimens consisted of 90 extracted human first premolars, randomly divided into three groups (n=30. The adhesives Alpha Plast (AP, ConciseTM (CO and TransbondTM XT (TB were used in each group. Three SBS tests were performed, i.e., one at T0 (initial and the other two at T1 and T2 (first and second rebondings, respectively, observing a 24-hour interval. The tests were performed in a Shimadzu AG-I (10kN SBS testing machine, at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. RESULTS: SBS data were subjected to ANOVA, Tukey's test and Bonferroni test (p<0.05. For the ARI, the Kruskal Wallis test was performed, followed by the Dunn test. The results revealed that at T0 groups AP and CO showed SBS values that were near, but above TB values; and at T1 and T2, the highest SBS values were observed for the AP group, followed by the CO and TB groups. CONCLUSION: Statistically significant differences were found in SBS between groups AP, CO and TB during bonding and repeated rebondings of unused metal brackets, with group AP achieving the highest SBS value. Regarding ARI, adhesive AP exhibited bond failure at the enamel-adhesive interface, with a higher enamel fracture frequency.

  10. [Effects of different resin removal methods on shear bond strength of rebonded orthodontic brackets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hai-miao; Zhao, Bin-jiao; Chen, Dong

    2015-06-01

    To compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of rebonded orthodontic metal brackets with different resin removal methods. Forty extracted premolars were chosen as samples and divided into 4 experimental groups. The teeth were bonded with brackets. The brackets from 3 groups were debonded while adhesive remnants were removed from bracket bases by methods of grinding, sandblasting, and direct flaming, respectively and then rebonded. The SBS values of all rebonded brackets were determined after pH cycling experiment for 30 days. Some rebonded bracket bases were selected and observed under scanning electron microscope (SEM). The data was analyzed by one-way ANOVA test using SPSS 13.0 software package. Statistical analysis revealed a significant difference of SBS values among the 4 experimental groups (Pbrackets after resin removal by grinding and sandblasting have a similar SBS compared to the initial brackets adhesive.

  11. Investigation of bracket bonding for orthodontic treatments using en-face optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda L.; Hughes, Michael; Bradu, Adrian; Todea, Carmen; Rominu, Roxana; Dodenciu, Dorin; Laissue, Philippe L.; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2008-04-01

    Despite good diagnosis and treatment planning, orthodontic treatment can fail if bonding fails. It is now common practice to address the aesthetic appearance of patients using aesthetic brackets instead of metal ones. Therefore, bonding aesthetic brackets has become an issue for orthodontists today. Orthodontic bonding is mainly achieved using composite resin but can also be performed with glass ionomer or resin cements. For improving the quality of bonding, the enamel is acid etched for 30 seconds with 38% phosphoric acid and then a bonding agent is applied. In our study we investigated and compared the quality of bonding between ceramic brackets, polymeric brackets and enamel, respectively using a new investigation method-OCT. The aim of our study was to evaluate the resin layer at the bracket base-tooth interface.

  12. Gingival response in orthodontic patients: Comparative study between self-ligating and conventional brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folco, Alejandra A; Benítez-Rogé, Sandra C; Iglesias, Marina; Calabrese, Diana; Pelizardi, Cristina; Rosa, Alcira; Brusca, Marisa I; Hecht, Pedro; Mateu, María E

    2014-01-01

    Orthodontic brackets contribute to the accumulation of bacterial plaque on tooth surfaces because they hinder oral hygiene. In contrast to conventional brackets, self-ligating brackets do not require additional parts to support the arches, thus improving dental hygiene. The aim of this study was to compare the gingival response in orthodontic patients wearing self-ligating or conventional brackets. A sample of 22 patients aged 16 to 30 years was divided into two groups: Group A, treated with selfligating brackets (Damon system) and Group B, treated with conventional brackets (Roth technique). The following were assessed during the treatment: Plaque Index (PI), Gingival Index (GI) and Probing Depth (PD), and sub-gingival samples were taken from teeth 14/24 for microbiological observation. No statistically significant difference was found between Groups A and B; p>0.05 (sign-ranked) or between PI, GI and PD at the different times (Friedman's Analysis of Variance), even though the indices were found to increase at 14 days, particularly for self-ligating brackets. The quantity and quality of microorganisms present were compatible with health on days 0, 28 and 56. As from day 14 there is a predominance of microbiota compatible with gingivitis in both groups. In the samples studied, orthodontic treatment increases bacterial plaque and inflammatory gingival response, but gingival-periodontal health can be maintained with adequate basic therapy. Self-ligating and conventional brackets produced similar gingival response.

  13. Physical and chemical properties of orthodontic brackets after 12 and 24 months: in situ study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo de Azevedo Bahia MENDES

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this article was to assess how intraoral biodegradation influenced the surface characteristics and friction levels of metallic brackets used during 12 and 24 months of orthodontic treatment and also to compare the static friction generated in these brackets with four different methods of the ligation of orthodontic wires. Material and Methods: Seventy premolar brackets as received from the manufacturer and 224 brackets that were used in previous orthodontic treatments were evaluated in this experiment. The surface morphology and the composition of the deposits found in the brackets were evaluated with rugosimetry, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Friction was analyzed by applying tensile tests simulating sliding mechanics with a 0.019x0.025" steel wire. The static friction levels produced by the following ligation methods were evaluated: loosely attached steel ligature around all four bracket wings, steel ligature attached to only two wings, conventional elastomeric ligation around all 4 bracket wings, and non-conventional Slide® elastomeric ligature. Results: The results demonstrated the presence of biodegradation effects such as corrosion pits, plastic deformation, cracks, and material deposits. The main chemical elements found on these deposits were Carbon and Oxygen. The maximum friction produced by each ligation method changed according to the time of intraoral use. The steel ligature loosely attached to all four bracket wings produced the lowest friction levels in the new brackets. The conventional elastic ligatures generated the highest friction levels. The metallic brackets underwent significant degradation during orthodontic treatment, showing an increase in surface roughness and the deposit of chemical elements on the surface. Conclusion: The levels of static friction decreased with use. The non-conventional elastic ligatures were the best alternative to reduce friction.

  14. Physical and chemical properties of orthodontic brackets after 12 and 24 months: in situ study

    Science.gov (United States)

    MENDES, Bernardo de Azevedo Bahia; FERREIRA, Ricardo Alberto Neto; PITHON, Matheus Melo; HORTA, Martinho Campolina Rebello; OLIVEIRA, Dauro Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this article was to assess how intraoral biodegradation influenced the surface characteristics and friction levels of metallic brackets used during 12 and 24 months of orthodontic treatment and also to compare the static friction generated in these brackets with four different methods of the ligation of orthodontic wires. Material and Methods Seventy premolar brackets as received from the manufacturer and 224 brackets that were used in previous orthodontic treatments were evaluated in this experiment. The surface morphology and the composition of the deposits found in the brackets were evaluated with rugosimetry, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Friction was analyzed by applying tensile tests simulating sliding mechanics with a 0.019x0.025" steel wire. The static friction levels produced by the following ligation methods were evaluated: loosely attached steel ligature around all four bracket wings, steel ligature attached to only two wings, conventional elastomeric ligation around all 4 bracket wings, and non-conventional Slide® elastomeric ligature. Results The results demonstrated the presence of biodegradation effects such as corrosion pits, plastic deformation, cracks, and material deposits. The main chemical elements found on these deposits were Carbon and Oxygen. The maximum friction produced by each ligation method changed according to the time of intraoral use. The steel ligature loosely attached to all four bracket wings produced the lowest friction levels in the new brackets. The conventional elastic ligatures generated the highest friction levels. The metallic brackets underwent significant degradation during orthodontic treatment, showing an increase in surface roughness and the deposit of chemical elements on the surface. Conclusion The levels of static friction decreased with use. The non-conventional elastic ligatures were the best alternative to reduce friction. PMID:25025560

  15. Physical and chemical properties of orthodontic brackets after 12 and 24 months: in situ study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Bernardo de Azevedo Bahia; Neto Ferreira, Ricardo Alberto; Pithon, Matheus Melo; Horta, Martinho Campolina Rebello; Oliveira, Dauro Douglas

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this article was to assess how intraoral biodegradation influenced the surface characteristics and friction levels of metallic brackets used during 12 and 24 months of orthodontic treatment and also to compare the static friction generated in these brackets with four different methods of the ligation of orthodontic wires. Seventy premolar brackets as received from the manufacturer and 224 brackets that were used in previous orthodontic treatments were evaluated in this experiment. The surface morphology and the composition of the deposits found in the brackets were evaluated with rugosimetry, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Friction was analyzed by applying tensile tests simulating sliding mechanics with a 0.019x0.025" steel wire. The static friction levels produced by the following ligation methods were evaluated: loosely attached steel ligature around all four bracket wings, steel ligature attached to only two wings, conventional elastomeric ligation around all 4 bracket wings, and non-conventional Slide® elastomeric ligature. The results demonstrated the presence of biodegradation effects such as corrosion pits, plastic deformation, cracks, and material deposits. The main chemical elements found on these deposits were Carbon and Oxygen. The maximum friction produced by each ligation method changed according to the time of intraoral use. The steel ligature loosely attached to all four bracket wings produced the lowest friction levels in the new brackets. The conventional elastic ligatures generated the highest friction levels. The metallic brackets underwent significant degradation during orthodontic treatment, showing an increase in surface roughness and the deposit of chemical elements on the surface. The levels of static friction decreased with use. The non-conventional elastic ligatures were the best alternative to reduce friction.

  16. Altered Passive Eruption Complicating Optimal Orthodontic Bracket Placement: A Case Report and Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulgaonkar, Rohan; Chitra, Prasad

    2015-11-01

    An unusual case of altered passive eruption with gingival hyperpigmentation and a Class I malocclusion in a 12-year-old girl having no previous history of medication is presented. The patient reported with spacing in the upper arch, moderate crowding in the lower arch, anterior crossbite and excessive gingival tissue on the labial surfaces of teeth in both the arches. The inadequate crown lengths made placement of the orthodontic brackets difficult. Preadjusted orthodontic brackets have a very precise placement protocol which can affect tooth movement in all 3 planes of space if violated. The periodontal condition was diagnosed as altered passive eruption Type IA. Interdisciplinary treatment protocols including periodontal surgical and orthodontic procedures were used. The periodontal surgical procedures were carried out prior to orthodontic therapy and the results obtained were satisfactory. It is suggested that orthodontists should be aware of conditions like altered passive eruption and modalities of management. In most instances, orthodontic therapy is not hindered.

  17. Shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets and disinclusion buttons: effect of water and saliva contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfondrini, Maria Francesca; Fraticelli, Danilo; Gandini, Paola; Scribante, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of water and saliva contamination on the shear bond strength and failure site of orthodontic brackets and lingual buttons. 120 bovine permanent mandibular incisors were randomly divided into 6 groups of 20 specimens each. Both orthodontic brackets and disinclusion buttons were tested under three different enamel surface conditions: (a) dry, (b) water contamination, and (c) saliva contamination. Brackets and buttons were bonded to the teeth and subsequently tested using a Instron universal testing machine. Shear bond strength values and adhesive failure rate were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA and Tukey tests (strength values) and Chi squared test (ARI Scores). Noncontaminated enamel surfaces showed the highest bond strengths for both brackets and buttons. Under water and saliva contamination orthodontic brackets groups showed significantly lower shear strengths than disinclusion buttons groups. Significant differences in debond locations were found among the groups under the various enamel surface conditions. Water and saliva contamination of enamel during the bonding procedure lowers bond strength values, more with orthodontic brackets than with disinclusion buttons.

  18. Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets and Disinclusion Buttons: Effect of Water and Saliva Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfondrini, Maria Francesca; Fraticelli, Danilo; Gandini, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of water and saliva contamination on the shear bond strength and failure site of orthodontic brackets and lingual buttons. Materials and Methods. 120 bovine permanent mandibular incisors were randomly divided into 6 groups of 20 specimens each. Both orthodontic brackets and disinclusion buttons were tested under three different enamel surface conditions: (a) dry, (b) water contamination, and (c) saliva contamination. Brackets and buttons were bonded to the teeth and subsequently tested using a Instron universal testing machine. Shear bond strength values and adhesive failure rate were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA and Tukey tests (strength values) and Chi squared test (ARI Scores). Results. Noncontaminated enamel surfaces showed the highest bond strengths for both brackets and buttons. Under water and saliva contamination orthodontic brackets groups showed significantly lower shear strengths than disinclusion buttons groups. Significant differences in debond locations were found among the groups under the various enamel surface conditions. Conclusions. Water and saliva contamination of enamel during the bonding procedure lowers bond strength values, more with orthodontic brackets than with disinclusion buttons. PMID:23762825

  19. Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets and Disinclusion Buttons: Effect of Water and Saliva Contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Francesca Sfondrini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of water and saliva contamination on the shear bond strength and failure site of orthodontic brackets and lingual buttons. Materials and Methods. 120 bovine permanent mandibular incisors were randomly divided into 6 groups of 20 specimens each. Both orthodontic brackets and disinclusion buttons were tested under three different enamel surface conditions: (a dry, (b water contamination, and (c saliva contamination. Brackets and buttons were bonded to the teeth and subsequently tested using a Instron universal testing machine. Shear bond strength values and adhesive failure rate were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA and Tukey tests (strength values and Chi squared test (ARI Scores. Results. Noncontaminated enamel surfaces showed the highest bond strengths for both brackets and buttons. Under water and saliva contamination orthodontic brackets groups showed significantly lower shear strengths than disinclusion buttons groups. Significant differences in debond locations were found among the groups under the various enamel surface conditions. Conclusions. Water and saliva contamination of enamel during the bonding procedure lowers bond strength values, more with orthodontic brackets than with disinclusion buttons.

  20. Ion Release and Galvanic Corrosion of Different Orthodontic Brackets and Wires in Artificial Saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahmasbi, Soodeh; Sheikh, Tahereh; Hemmati, Yasamin B

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the galvanic corrosion of brackets manufactured by four different companies coupled with stainless steel (SS) or nickel-titanium (NiTi) wires in an artificial saliva solution. A total of 24 mandibular central incisor Roth brackets of four different manufacturers (American Orthodontics, Dentaurum, Shinye, ORJ) were used in this experimental study. These brackets were immersed in artificial saliva along with SS or NiTi orthodontic wires (0.016'', round) for 28 days. The electric potential difference of each bracket/ wire coupled with a saturated calomel reference electrode was measured via a voltmeter and recorded constantly. Corrosion rate (CR) was calculated, and release of ions was measured with an atomic absorption spectrometer. Stereomicroscope was used to evaluate all samples. Then, samples with corrosion were further assessed by scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Two-way analysis of variance was used to analyze data. Among ions evaluated, release of nickel ions from Shinye brackets was significantly higher than that of other brackets. The mean potential difference was significantly lower in specimens containing a couple of Shinye brackets and SS wire compared with other specimens. No significant difference was observed in the mean CR of various groups (p > 0.05). Microscopic evaluation showed corrosion in two samples only: Shinye bracket coupled with SS wire and American Orthodontics bracket coupled with NiTi wire. Shinye brackets coupled with SS wire showed more susceptibility to galvanic corrosion. There were no significant differences among specimens in terms of the CR or released ions except the release of Ni ions, which was higher in Shinye brackets.

  1. Glass transition and degree of conversion of a light-cured orthodontic composite

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    Michela M. D. S. Sostena

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the glass transition temperature (Tg and degree of conversion (DC of a light-cured (Fill Magic versus a chemically cured (Concise orthodontic composite. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Anelastic relaxation spectroscopy was used for the first time to determine the Tg of a dental composite, while the DC was evaluated by infrared spectroscopy. The light-cured composite specimens were irradiated with a commercial LED light-curing unit using different exposure times (40, 90 and 120 s. RESULTS: Fill Magic presented lower Tg than Concise (35-84ºC versus 135ºC, but reached a higher DC. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study suggest that Fill Magic has lower Tg than Concise due to its higher organic phase content, and that when this light-cured composite is used to bond orthodontic brackets, a minimum energy density of 7.8 J/cm² is necessary to reach adequate conversion level and obtain satisfactory adhesion.

  2. Galvanic Corrosion among Different Combination of Orthodontic Archwires and Stainless Steel Brackets

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    Farzin Heravi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to assess the galvanic behavior of different bracket and archwire combinations that are commonly used in orthodontic treatments. Methods: Three types of orthodontic archwires with a diameter of 0.016×0.022 inch and 80 standard edgewise maxillary central incisor brackets were selected. Three groups consisted of different wire-bracket couples and one group was just brackets as a control group. Each group had five samples. Four brackets were then connected to each wire by elastic bands made from electrochemically neutral material. The samples were immersed into capped containers of Fusayama-Meyer artificial saliva. After six weeks, the released nickel ions were quantified via ion absorption technique. The mean and the standard deviation of all four groups were calculated and the data were compared together with Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric statistical test. Results: The highest concentration of released nickel ions was for bracket+ steel archwire and the least for the bracket without archwire. Conclusion: There were not significant differences among experimental groups, so it could be concluded that galvanic corrosion would not be a serious consideration through orthodontic treatment.  

  3. Bond efficacy of recycled orthodontic brackets: A comparative in vitro evaluation of two methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Vikram; Shekatkar, Yash; Kumbhat, Neesu; Gautam, G; Karbelkar, Shalan; Vandekar, Meghna

    2015-01-01

    Recycling of orthodontic brackets in developing orthodontic economies is an extremely common procedure. Bonding protocols and reliability of these brackets is, however, questionable, and still the subject of research. The aim was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of brackets recycled with sandblasting and silicoating. Ninety extracted human premolars were bonded with 0.022" SS brackets (American Orthodontics, Sheboygan USA) and then debonded. The debonded brackets were divided into three groups of 30 each. Group I: Sandblasting with 50-μm aluminum oxide (control group) Group II: Sandblasting with 50-μm aluminum oxide followed by metal primer application Group III: Silicoating with 30-μm Cojet sand followed by silane application and rebonded with Transbond XT. The sandblasted brackets and silicoated brackets were viewed under the scanning electron microscope, immediately after surface conditioning before rebonding. The shear bond strength with each group was tested. One-way analysis of variance, post-hoc Scheffe multiple comparison tests. The results showed that sandblasting created more irregularities and deeper erosions while silica coating created superficial irregularities and shallow erosions.

  4. Galvanic coupling of steel and gold alloy lingual brackets with orthodontic wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polychronis, Georgios; Al Jabbari, Youssef S; Eliades, Theodore; Zinelis, Spiros

    2018-03-06

    The aim of this research was to assess galvanic behavior of lingual orthodontic brackets coupled with representative types of orthodontic wires. Three types of lingual brackets: Incognito (INC), In-Ovation L (IOV), and STb (STB) were combined with a stainless steel (SS) and a nickel-titanium (NiTi) orthodontic archwire. All materials were initially investigated by scanning electron microscopy / x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDX) while wires were also tested by x-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD). All bracket-wire combinations were immersed in acidic 0.1M NaCl 0.1M lactic acid and neutral NaF 0.3% (wt) electrolyte, and the potential differences were continuously recorded for 48 hours. The SEM/EDX analysis revealed that INC is a single-unit bracket made of a high gold (Au) alloy while IOV and STB are two-piece appliances in which the base and wing are made of SS alloys. The SS wire demonstrated austenite and martensite iron phase, while NiTi wire illustrated an intense austenite crystallographic structure with limited martensite. All bracket wire combinations showed potential differences below the threshold of galvanic corrosion (200 mV) except for INC and STB coupled with NiTi wire in NaF media. The electrochemical results indicate that all brackets tested demonstrated galvanic compatibility with SS wire, but fluoride treatment should be used cautiously with NiTi wires coupled with Au and SS brackets.

  5. A comparative study of metal artifacts from common metal orthodontic brackets in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajan, Zahra Dalili; Alizadeh, Ahmad; Hemmaty, Yasmin Babael; Roushan, Zahra Atrkar; Khademi, Jalil

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to compare the metal artifacts from common metal orthodontic brackets in magnetic resonance imaging. A dry mandible with 12 intact premolars was prepared, and was scanned ten times with various types of brackets: American, 3M, Dentaurum, and Masel orthodontic brackets were used, together with either stainless steel (SS) or nickel titanium (NiTi) wires. Subsequently, three different sequences of coronal and axial images were obtained: spin-echo T1-weighted images, fast spin-echo T2-weighted images, and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images. In each sequence, the two sequential axial and coronal images with the largest signal-void area were selected. The largest diameters of the signal voids in the direction of the X-, Y-, and Z-axes were then measured twice. Finally, the mean linear values associated with different orthodontic brackets were analyzed using one-way analysis of variation, and the results were compared using the independent t-test to assess whether the use of SS or NiTi wires had a significant effect on the images. Statistically significant differences were only observed along the Z-axis among the four different brands of orthodontic brackets with SS wires. A statistically significant difference was observed along all axes among the brackets with NiTi wires. A statistically significant difference was found only along the Z-axis between nickel-free and nickel-containing brackets. With respect to all axes, the 3M bracket was associated with smaller signal-void areas. Overall, the 3M and Dentaurum brackets with NiTi wires induced smaller artifacts along all axes than those with SS wires

  6. A comparative study of metal artifacts from common metal orthodontic brackets in magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajan, Zahra Dalili; Alizadeh, Ahmad; Hemmaty, Yasmin Babael; Roushan, Zahra Atrkar; Khademi, Jalil [Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Rasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    This study was performed to compare the metal artifacts from common metal orthodontic brackets in magnetic resonance imaging. A dry mandible with 12 intact premolars was prepared, and was scanned ten times with various types of brackets: American, 3M, Dentaurum, and Masel orthodontic brackets were used, together with either stainless steel (SS) or nickel titanium (NiTi) wires. Subsequently, three different sequences of coronal and axial images were obtained: spin-echo T1-weighted images, fast spin-echo T2-weighted images, and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images. In each sequence, the two sequential axial and coronal images with the largest signal-void area were selected. The largest diameters of the signal voids in the direction of the X-, Y-, and Z-axes were then measured twice. Finally, the mean linear values associated with different orthodontic brackets were analyzed using one-way analysis of variation, and the results were compared using the independent t-test to assess whether the use of SS or NiTi wires had a significant effect on the images. Statistically significant differences were only observed along the Z-axis among the four different brands of orthodontic brackets with SS wires. A statistically significant difference was observed along all axes among the brackets with NiTi wires. A statistically significant difference was found only along the Z-axis between nickel-free and nickel-containing brackets. With respect to all axes, the 3M bracket was associated with smaller signal-void areas. Overall, the 3M and Dentaurum brackets with NiTi wires induced smaller artifacts along all axes than those with SS wires.

  7. A comparative study of metal artifacts from common metal orthodontic brackets in magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalili Kajan, Zahra; Khademi, Jalil; Alizadeh, Ahmad; Babaei Hemmaty, Yasamin; Atrkar Roushan, Zahra

    2015-09-01

    This study was performed to compare the metal artifacts from common metal orthodontic brackets in magnetic resonance imaging. A dry mandible with 12 intact premolars was prepared, and was scanned ten times with various types of brackets: American, 3M, Dentaurum, and Masel orthodontic brackets were used, together with either stainless steel (SS) or nickel titanium (NiTi) wires. Subsequently, three different sequences of coronal and axial images were obtained: spin-echo T1 -weighted images, fast spin-echo T2 -weighted images, and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images. In each sequence, the two sequential axial and coronal images with the largest signal-void area were selected. The largest diameters of the signal voids in the direction of the X-, Y-, and Z-axes were then measured twice. Finally, the mean linear values associated with different orthodontic brackets were analyzed using one-way analysis of variation, and the results were compared using the independent t-test to assess whether the use of SS or NiTi wires had a significant effect on the images. Statistically significant differences were only observed along the Z-axis among the four different brands of orthodontic brackets with SS wires. A statistically significant difference was observed along all axes among the brackets with NiTi wires. A statistically significant difference was found only along the Z-axis between nickel-free and nickel-containing brackets. With respect to all axes, the 3M bracket was associated with smaller signal-void areas. Overall, the 3M and Dentaurum brackets with NiTi wires induced smaller artifacts along all axes than those with SS wires.

  8. Changes in the surface roughness and friction coefficient of orthodontic bracket slots before and after treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaomo; Lin, Jiuxiang; Ding, Peng

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we tested the surface roughness of bracket slots and the friction coefficient between the bracket and the stainless steel archwire before and after orthodontic treatment. There were four experimental groups: groups 1 and 2 were 3M new and retrieved brackets, respectively, and groups 3 and 4 were BioQuick new and retrieved brackets, respectively. All retrieved brackets were taken from patients with the first premolar extraction and using sliding mechanics to close the extraction space. The surface roughness of specimens was evaluated using an optical interferometry profilometer, which is faster and nondestructive compared with a stylus profilometer, and provided a larger field, needing no sample preparation, compared with atomic force microscopy. Orthodontic treatment resulted in significant increases in surface roughness and coefficient of friction for both brands of brackets. However, there was no significant difference by brand for new or retrieved brackets. These retrieval analysis results highlight the necessity of reevaluating the properties and clinical behavior of brackets during treatment to make appropriate treatment decisions. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Adhesion of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Biofilm Formation on Different Types of Orthodontic Brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Papaioannou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To examine the interaction between Porphyromonas gingivalis and 3 different orthodontic brackets in vitro, focusing on the effect of an early salivary pellicle and other bacteria on the formation of biofilms. Material and Methods. Mono- and multi-species P. gingivalis biofilms were allowed to form in vitro, on 3 different bracket types (stainless steel, ceramic and plastic with and without an early salivary pellicle. The brackets were anaerobically incubated for 3 days in Brain Heart Infusion Broth to form biofilms. Bacteria were quantified by trypsin treatment and enumeration of the total viable counts of bacteria recovered. Results. Saliva was found to significantly affect (<0.001 adhesion and biofilm formation of P. gingivalis, with higher numbers for the coated brackets. No significant effect was detected for the impact of the type of biofilm, although on stainless steel and plastic brackets there was a tendency for higher numbers of the pathogen in multi-species biofilms. Bracket material alone was not found to affect the number of bacteria. Conclusions. The salivary pellicle seems to facilitate the adhesion of P. gingivalis and biofilm formation on orthodontic brackets, while the material comprising the brackets does not significantly impact on the number of bacteria.

  10. In vitro physical, chemical, and biological evaluation of commercially available metal orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joo Hyoung; Cha, Jung Yul; Hwang, Chung Ju

    2012-12-01

    This in vitro study was undertaken to evaluate the physical, chemical, and biological properties of commercially available metal orthodontic brackets in South Korea, because national standards for these products are lacking. FOUR BRACKET BRANDS WERE TESTED FOR DIMENSIONAL ACCURACY, (MANUFACTURING ERRORS IN ANGULATION AND TORQUE), CYTOTOXICITY, COMPOSITION, ELUTION, AND CORROSION: Archist (Daeseung Medical), Victory (3M Unitek), Kosaka (Tomy), and Confidence (Shinye Odontology Materials). The tested rackets showed no significant differences in manufacturing errors in angulation, but Confidence brackets showed a significant difference in manufacturing errors in torque. None of the brackets were cytotoxic to mouse fibroblasts. The metal ion components did not show a regular increasing or decreasing trend of elution over time, but the volume of the total eluted metal ions increased: Archist brackets had the maximal Cr elution and Confidence brackets appeared to have the largest volume of total eluted metal ions because of excessive Ni elution. Confidence brackets showed the lowest corrosion resistance during potentiodynamic polarization. The results of this study could potentially be applied in establishing national standards for metal orthodontic brackets and in evaluating commercially available products.

  11. A novel biomimetic orthodontic bonding agent helps prevent white spot lesions adjacent to brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfred, Lauren; Covell, David A; Crowe, Jennifer J; Tufekci, Eser; Mitchell, John C

    2013-01-01

    To compare changes in enamel microhardness adjacent to orthodontic brackets after using bonding agents containing various compositions of bioactive glass compared to a traditional resin adhesive following a simulated caries challenge. Extracted human third molars (n  =  10 per group) had orthodontic brackets bonded using one of four novel bioactive glass (BAG)-containing orthodontic bonding agents (BAG-Bonds) or commercially available Transbond-XT. The four new adhesives contained BAG in varying percentages incorporated into a traditional resin monomer mixture. Teeth were cycled through low-pH demineralizing and physiologic-pH remineralizing solutions once each day over 14 days. Microhardness was measured on longitudinal sections of the teeth 100, 200, and 300 µm from the bracket edge and beneath the brackets, at depths of 25 to 200 µm from the enamel surface. Normalized hardness values were compared using three-way analysis of variance. Significantly less reduction in enamel microhardness was found with the experimental adhesives at depths of 25 and 50 µm at all distances from the bracket edge. In all groups, there were no significant changes in enamel microhardness past 125-µm depth. Results varied with the different BAG-Bonds, with 81BAG-Bond showing the smallest decrease in enamel microhardness. The BAG-Bonds tested in this study showed a reduction in the amount of superficial enamel softening surrounding orthodontic brackets compared to a traditional bonding agent. The results indicate that clinically, BAG-Bonds may aid in maintaining enamel surface hardness, therefore helping prevent white spot lesions adjacent to orthodontic brackets.

  12. Debris and friction of self-ligating and conventional orthodontic brackets after clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Raíssa Costa; Bichara, Lívia Monteiro; Araujo, Adriana Monteiro de; Normando, David

    2015-07-01

    To compare the degree of debris and friction of conventional and self-ligating orthodontic brackets before and after clinical use. Two sets of three conventional and self-ligating brackets were bonded from the first molar to the first premolar in eight individuals, for a total of 16 sets per type of brackets. A passive segment of 0.019 × 0.025-inch stainless steel archwire was inserted into each group of brackets. Frictional force and debris level were evaluated as received and after 8 weeks of intraoral exposure. Two-way analysis of variance and Wilcoxon signed-rank test were applied at P brackets (P brackets showed a higher amount of debris compared with the conventional brackets. The frictional force in conventional brackets was significantly higher when compared with self-ligating brackets before clinical use (P brackets, when exposed to the intraoral environment, showed a significant increase in frictional force during the sliding mechanics. Debris accumulation was higher for the self-ligating system.

  13. Adhesion of periodontal pathogens to self-ligating orthodontic brackets: An in-vivo prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Woo-Sun; Kim, Kyungsun; Cho, Soha; Ahn, Sug-Joon

    2016-09-01

    Our aims were to analyze adhesion of periodontopathogens to self-ligating brackets (Clarity-SL [CSL], Clippy-C [CC] and Damon Q [DQ]) and to identify the relationships between bacterial adhesion and oral hygiene indexes. Central incisor brackets from the maxilla and mandible were collected from 60 patients at debonding after the plaque and gingival indexes were measured. Adhesions of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Prevotella intermedia (Pi), Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn), and Tannerella forsythia (Tf) were quantitatively determined using real-time polymerase chain reactions. Factorial analysis of variance was used to analyze bacterial adhesion in relation to bracket type and jaw position. Correlation coefficients were calculated to determine the relationships between bacterial adhesion and the oral hygiene indexes. Total bacteria showed greater adhesion to CSL than to DQ brackets, whereas Aa, Pg, and Pi adhered more to DQ than to CSL brackets. CC brackets showed an intermediate adhesion pattern between CSL and DQ brackets, but it did not differ significantly from either bracket type. Adhesion of Fn and Tf did not differ significantly among the 3 brackets. Most bacteria were detected in greater quantities in the mandibular than in the maxillary brackets. The plaque and gingival indexes were not strongly correlated with bacterial adhesion to the brackets. Because Aa, Pg, and Pi adhered more to the DQ brackets in the mandibular area, orthodontic patients with periodontal problems should be carefully monitored in the mandibular incisors where the distance between the bracket and the gingiva is small, especially when DQ brackets are used. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Frictional and mechanical properties of diamond-like carbon-coated orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muguruma, Takeshi; Iijima, Masahiro; Brantley, William A; Nakagaki, Susumu; Endo, Kazuhiko; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2013-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of a diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating on frictional and mechanical properties of orthodontic brackets. DLC films were deposited on stainless steel brackets using the plasma-based ion implantation/deposition (PBIID) method under two different atmospheric conditions. As-received metal brackets served as the control. Two sizes of stainless steel archwires, 0.018 inch diameter and 0.017 × 0.025 inch cross-section dimensions, were used for measuring static and kinetic friction by drawing the archwires through the bracket slots, using a mechanical testing machine (n = 10). The DLC-coated brackets were observed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Values of hardness and elastic modulus were obtained by nanoindentation testing (n = 10). Friction forces were compared by one-way analysis of variance and the Scheffé test. The hardness and elastic modulus of the brackets were compared using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests. SEM photomicrographs showed DLC layers on the bracket surfaces with thickness of approximately 5-7 μm. DLC-coated brackets deposited under condition 2 showed significantly less static frictional force for the stainless steel wire with 0.017 × 0.025 inch cross-section dimensions than as-received brackets and DLC-coated brackets deposited under condition 1, although both DLC-coated brackets showed significantly less kinetic frictional force than as-received brackets. The hardness of the DLC layers was much higher than that of the as-received bracket surfaces. In conclusion, the surfaces of metal brackets can be successfully modified by the PBIID method to create a DLC layer, and the DLC-coating process significantly reduces frictional forces.

  15. Antimicrobial Efficacy of Salvadora persica Extracts on a Monospecies Biofilm on Orthodontic Brackets In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halawany, Hassan S; Abraham, Nimmi B; Siddiqui, Yunus M; Balto, Hanan A; Jacob, Vimal

    2016-01-01

    The oral cavity is a rich ecosystem with a plethora of microorganisms, and different components of fixed orthodontic appliances may contribute to a shift in the balance of oral ecology. The purpose of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial potential of hexane and ethanol extracts of Salvadora persica on a monospecies biofilm model established on orthodontic brackets in vitro. Streptococcus mutans biofilm was formed on mini diamond orthodontic brackets following three days of anaerobic incubation at 37˚C. The bacterial cell viability of this biofilm was measured after their exposure to saline, hexane extract of S. persica, ethanol extract of S. persica and 0.2% chlorhexidine using 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol- 2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulphophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS) assay. On half of the brackets, the colony forming units (CFU) were counted. Both experiments were performed in triplicate. The absorbance values obtained from the MTS reduction assay after exposure to the different test agents showed a decline in the bacterial cell viability of the S. mutans biofilm as follows: chlorhexidine (+)0.05). The CFU counts of S. mutans obtained from chlorhexidine exposure were lower than from hexane and ethanol extracts. S. persica extracts were found to have antimicrobial effects on S. mutans biofilm established in vitro on orthodontic brackets suggestive of its potential use as an oral antimicrobial agent for orthodontic patients.

  16. Transparent magnesium aluminate spinel: a prospective biomaterial for esthetic orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Manu; Tiwari, Brijesh; Seema, Saraswathy; Kalra, Namitha; Biswas, Papiya; Rajeswari, Kotikalapudi; Suresh, Madireddy Buchi; Johnson, Roy; Gokhale, Nitin M; Iyer, Satish R; Londhe, Sanjay; Arora, Vimal; Tripathi, Rajendra P

    2014-11-01

    Adult orthodontics is recently gaining popularity due to its importance in esthetics, oral and general health. However, none of the currently available alumina or zirconia based ceramic orthodontic brackets meet the esthetic demands of adult patients. Inherent hexagonal lattice structure and associated birefringence limits the visible light transmission in polycrystalline alumina and make them appear white and non transparent. Hence focus of the present study was to assess the feasibility of using magnesium aluminate (MgAl2O4) spinel; a member of the transparent ceramic family for esthetic orthodontic brackets. Transparent spinel specimens were developed from commercially available white spinel powder through colloidal shaping followed by pressureless sintering and hot isostatic pressing at optimum conditions of temperature and pressure. Samples were characterized for chemical composition, phases, density, hardness, flexural strength, fracture toughness and optical transmission. Biocompatibility was evaluated with in-vitro cell line experiments for cytotoxicity, apoptosis and genotoxicity. Results showed that transparent spinel samples had requisite physico-chemical, mechanical, optical and excellent biocompatibility for fabricating orthodontic brackets. Transparent spinel developed through this method demonstrated its possibility as a prospective biomaterial for developing esthetic orthodontic brackets.

  17. Assessing the effects of hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrighetto, Augusto Ricardo; de Leão Withers, Eduardo Henrique; Grando, Karlos Giovani; Ambrosio, Aldrieli Regina; Shimizu, Roberto Hideo; Melo, Ana Cláudia

    2016-01-01

    Tooth bleaching is, today, one of the most widespread cosmetic treatments in dental practice,  so it is important to determine whether it can interfere with orthodontic bonding or not. The aim of this study was to assess the in vitro effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets. Forty-five upper bicuspids were divided into three groups (n = 15). In the control Group (C), the brackets were bonded without previous bleaching treatment. Group 1 (G1) was treated with 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent 24 h before bracket bonding. Group 2 was also bleached, and the brackets were bonded after 30 days. The shear bond strength of the brackets was measured using an EMIC machine, and the results were analyzed by ANOVA. There were no statistically significant differences between the three groups (P > 0.05), with Group C showing a mean bond strength of 9.72 ± 2.63 MPa, G1 of 8.09 ± 2.63 MPa, and G2 of 11.15 ± 4.42 MPa. It was possible to conclude that 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent does not affect the shear strength of orthodontic brackets bonded 24 h and 30 days after bleaching.

  18. Influence of the bracket on bonding and physical behavior of orthodontic resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolaños-Carmona, Victoria; Zein, Bilal; Menéndez-Núñez, Mario; Sánchez-Sánchez, Purificación; Ceballos-García, Laura; González-López, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study is to determine the influence of the type of bracket, on bond strength, microhardness and conversion degree (CD) of four resin orthodontic cements. Micro-tensile bond strength (µTBS) test between the bracket base and the cement was carried out on glass-hour-shaped specimens (n=20). Vickers Hardness Number (VHN) and micro-Raman spectra were recorded in situ under the bracket base. Weibull distribution, ANOVA and non-parametric test were applied for data analysis (pcement showing the worst performance. The CD was from 80% to 62.5%.

  19. Assessment of Ions released from Three Types of Orthodontic Brackets immersed in Different Mouthwashes: An in vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahidh, Mohammed; Garma, Noor Mh; Jasim, Esraa S

    2018-01-01

    Herbs are used widely in medicine. The purpose of the present study was to assess the ion release from gold-plated orthodontic bracket compared with other stainless steel brackets, and based on the findings of the study, the orthodontists can choose the most biocompatible brackets and mouthwashes useful in the clinical practice. A total of 150 orthodontic brackets from Orthotechnology™ Company, USA (50 stainless steel one-piece brackets, 50 stainless steel two-piece brackets, and 50 gold brackets) were immersed in four mouthwashes in addition to distilled water. Ten of each type of brackets in every media were immersed under 37°C for 45 days. Ions released in these mouthwashes were measured, and comparisons among different bracket types and among various mouthwashes were done by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and then with Games-Howell tests. Increased amounts of ions released in herbal mouth-washes were recorded in gold and two-piece brackets in comparison with one-piece stainless steel brackets. Herbal mouthwashes must be used with caution as they showed an increased amount of ions released in comparison with chlorhexidine. One-piece stainless steel bracket system is the most compatible bracket type, as they released the least amount of ions. One-piece stainless steel brackets are better than two-piece brackets in terms of ions released.

  20. Torsional strength of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing-fabricated esthetic orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrejaye, Najla; Pober, Richard; Giordano Ii, Russell

    2017-01-01

    To fabricate orthodontic brackets from esthetic materials and determine their fracture resistance during archwire torsion. Computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing technology (Cerec inLab, Sirona) was used to mill brackets with a 0.018 × 0.025-inch slot. Materials used were Paradigm MZ100 and Lava Ultimate resin composite (3M ESPE), Mark II feldspathic porcelain (Vita Zahnfabrik), and In-Ceram YZ zirconia (Vita Zahnfabrik). Ten brackets of each material were subjected to torque by a 0.018 × 0.025-inch stainless steel archwire (G&H) using a specially designed apparatus. The average moments and degrees of torsion necessary to fracture the brackets were determined and compared with those of commercially available alumina brackets, Mystique MB (Dentsply GAC). The YZ brackets were statistically significantly stronger than any other tested material in their resistance to torsion (P brackets. Resistance of MZ100 and Lava Ultimate composite resin brackets to archwire torsion was comparable to commercially available alumina ceramic brackets.

  1. Effects of silane application on the shear bond strength of ceramic orthodontic brackets to enamel surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinandi Sri Pudyani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fixed orthodontic appliances with ceramic brackets are used frequently to fulfill the aesthetic demand of patient through orthodontic treatment. Ceramic brackets have some weaknesses such as bond strength and enamel surface damage. In high bond strength the risk of damage in enamel surfaces increases after debonding. Purpose: This study aimed to determine the effect of silane on base of bracket and adhesive to shear bond strength and enamel structure of ceramic bracket. Method: Sixteen extracted upper premolars were randomly divided into four groups based on silane or no silane on the bracket base and on the adhesive surface. Design of the base on ceramic bracket in this research was microcrystalline to manage the influence of mechanical interlocking. Samples were tested in shear mode on a universal testing machine after attachment. Following it, adhesive remnant index (ARI scores were used to assess bond failure site. Statistical analysis was performed using a two-way Anova and the Mann-Whitney test. A scanning electron microscope (SEM with a magnification of 2000x was used to observe enamel structure after debonding. Result: Shear bond strength was increased between group without silane and group with silane on the base of bracket (p<0,05. There was no significance different between group without silane and group with silane on adhesive (p<0,05. Conclusion: Application of silane on base of bracket increases shear bond strength, however, application of silane on adhesive site does not increase shear bond strength of ceramic bracket. Most bonding failure occurred at the enamel adhesive interface and damage occurred on enamel structure in group contains silane of ceramic bracket.

  2. Clinical effects of pre-adjusted edgewise orthodontic brackets: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgiou, Spyridon N; Konstantinidis, Ioannis; Papadopoulou, Konstantina; Jäger, Andreas; Bourauel, Christoph

    2014-06-01

    Fixed-appliance treatment is a major part of orthodontic treatment, but clinical evidence remains scarce. Objective of this systematic review was to investigate how the therapeutic effects and side-effects of brackets used during the fixed-appliance orthodontic treatment are affected by their characteristics. SEARCH METHODS AND SELECTION CRITERIA: We searched MEDLINE and 18 other databases through April 2012 without restrictions for randomized controlled trials and quasi-randomized controlled trials investigating any bracket characteristic. After duplicate selection and extraction procedures, risk of bias was assessed also in duplicate according to Cochrane guidelines and quality of evidence according to the Grades of Recommendation. Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach. Random-effects meta-analyses, subgroup analyses, and sensitivity analyses were performed with the corresponding 95 per cent confidence intervals (CI) and 95 per cent prediction intervals (PI). We included 25 trials on 1321 patients, with most comparing self-ligated (SL) and conventional brackets. Based on the meta-analyses, the duration of orthodontic treatment was on average 2.01 months longer among patients with SL brackets (95 per cent CI: 0.45 to 3.57). The 95 per cent PIs for a future trial indicated that the difference could be considerable (-1.46 to 5.47 months). Treatment characteristics, outcomes, and side-effects were clinically similar between SL and conventional brackets. For most bracket characteristics, evidence is insufficient. Some meta-analyses included trials with high risk of bias, but sensitivity analyses indicated robustness. Based on existing evidence, no clinical recommendation can be made regarding the bracket material or different ligation modules. For SL brackets, no conclusive benefits could be proven, while their use was associated with longer treatment durations.

  3. Quantification of white spot lesions around orthodontic brackets with image analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Livas, C.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Derks, A.; Katsaros, C.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the use of image analysis for diagnosis and quantification of artificial white spot lesions on digital photographs before and after removal of orthodontic brackets. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Enamel demineralization was artificially induced on the labial surface of 20 teeth

  4. Evaluation of Antibacterial Effects of Silver-Coated Stainless Steel Orthodontic Brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arash, Valiollah; Keikhaee, Fatemeh; Rabiee, Sayed Mahmood; Rajabnia, Ramazan; Khafri, Soraya; Tavanafar, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    White spots and enamel demineralization around orthodontic brackets are among the most important complications resulting from orthodontic treatments. Since the antibacterial properties of metals and metallic particles have been well documented, the aim of this study was to assess the antibacterial effect of stainless steel orthodontic brackets coated with silver (Ag) particles. In this study, 40 standard metal brackets were divided into two groups of 20 cases and 20 controls. The brackets in the case group were coated with Ag particles using an electroplating method. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to assess the adequacy of the coating process. In addition, antibacterial tests, i.e., disk diffusion and direct contact tests were performed at three, six, 24, and 48 hours, and 15 and 30 days using a Streptococcus mutans strain. The results were analyzed using Student's t-test and repeated measures ANOVA. Analyses via SEM and AFM confirmed that excellent coatings were obtained by using an electroplating method. The groups exhibited similar behavior when subjected to the disk diffusion test in the agar medium. However, the bacterial counts of the Ag-coated brackets were, in general, significantly lower (PBrackets coated with Ag, via an electroplating method, exhibited antibacterial properties when placed in direct contact with Streptococcus mutans. This antibacterial effect persisted for 30 days after contact with the bacteria.

  5. Factors Affecting the Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets - a Review of In Vitro Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhadher, Waleed; Halawany, Hassan; Talic, Nabeel; Abraham, Nimmi; Jacob, Vimal

    2015-01-01

    The adhesive material used to bond orthodontic brackets to teeth should neither fail during the treatment period, resulting in treatment delays, untoward expenses or patient inconvenience nor should it damage the enamel on debonding at the end of the treatment. Although the effectiveness of a bonding system and any unfavorable effects on the enamel may be studied by conducting in-vivo studies, it is nearly impossible to independently analyze different variables that influence a specific bonding system in the oral environment. In-vitro studies, on the other hand, may utilize more standardized protocols for testing different bonding systems and materials available. Thus, the present review focused attention on in-vitro studies and made an attempt to discuss material-related, teeth-related (fluorotic vs non-fluorotic teeth) and other miscellaneous factors that influences the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets. Within the limitations of this review, using conventional acid-etch technique, ceramic brackets and bonding to non-fluorotic teeth was reported to have a positive influence on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets, but higher shear bond strength found on using ceramic brackets can be dangerous for the enamel.

  6. Methods for removal of resin remaining after debonding of orthodontic brackets: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateus Rodrigues Tonetto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The removal of resin debris and/or resin cement from the enamel surface without causing iatrogenic is the main objective when removing the orthodontic brackets. Some factors such as the time required for removal, damage to the tooth structure, are essential factors for the clinician at the time of removal. Various techniques are used for the removal of orthodontic brackets after the treatment; it is known that the use of clinical procedures such as the use of diamond burs and some pliers removers can damage the structure of the enamel, often depending on the bond strength that should be taken into consideration at the time of removal. This literature review aims to gather the most relevant studies that can clarify the clinical technique, which may be more suitable for removal of the brackets.

  7. Effect of Ti:sapphire laser on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets to ceramic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdur, Emire Aybuke; Basciftci, Faruk Ayhan

    2015-08-01

    With increasing demand for orthodontic treatments in adults, orthodontists continue to debate the optimal way to prepare ceramic surfaces for bonding. This study evaluated the effects of a Ti:sapphire laser on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets bonded to two ceramic surfaces (feldspathic and IPS Empress e-Max) and the results were compared with those using two other lasers (Er:YAG and Nd:YAG) and 'conventional' techniques, i.e., sandblasting (50 µm) and hydrofluoric (HF) acid. In total, 150 ceramic discs were prepared and divided into two groups. In each group, the following five subgroups were prepared: Ti:sapphire laser, Nd:YAG laser, Er:YAG laser, sandblasting, and HF acid. Mandibular incisor brackets were bonded using a light-cured adhesive. The samples were stored in distilled water for 24 hours at 37°C and then thermocycled. Extra samples were prepared and examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SBS testing was performed and failure modes were classified. ANOVA and Tukey's HSD tests were used to compare SBS among the five subgroups (P < 0.05). Feldspathic and IPS Empress e-Max ceramics had similar SBS values. The Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser (16.76 ± 1.37 MPa) produced the highest mean bond strength, followed by sandblasting (12.79 ± 1.42 MPa) and HF acid (11.28 ± 1.26 MPa). The Er:YAG (5.43 ± 1.21 MPa) and Nd:YAG laser (5.36 ± 1.04 MPa) groups were similar and had the lowest SBS values. More homogeneous and regular surfaces were observed in the ablation pattern with the Ti:sapphire laser than with the other treatments by SEM analysis. Within the limitations of this in vitro study, Ti:sapphire laser- treated surfaces had the highest SBS values. Therefore, this technique may be useful for the pretreatment of ceramic surfaces as an alternative to 'conventional' techniques. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Elemental, microstructural, and mechanical characterization of high gold orthodontic brackets after intraoral aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersche, Sepp; Sifakakis, Iosif; Zinelis, Spiros; Eliades, Theodore

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the elemental composition, the microstructure, and the selected mechanical properties of high gold orthodontic brackets after intraoral aging. Thirty Incognito™ (3M Unitek, Bad Essen, Germany) lingual brackets were studied, 15 brackets as received (control group) and 15 brackets retrieved from different patients after orthodontic treatment. The surface of the wing area was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Backscattered electron imaging (BEI) was performed, and the elemental composition was determined by X-ray EDS analysis (EDX). After appropriate metallographic preparation, the mechanical properties tested were Martens hardness (HM), indentation modulus (EIT), elastic index (ηIT), and Vickers hardness (HV). These properties were determined employing instrumented indentation testing (IIT) with a Vickers indenter. The results were statistically analyzed by unpaired t-test (α=0.05). There were no statistically significant differences evidenced in surface morphology and elemental content between the control and the experimental group. These two groups of brackets showed no statistically significant difference in surface morphology. Moreover, the mean values of HM, EIT, ηIT, and HV did not reach statistical significance between the groups (p>0.05). Under the limitations of this study, it may be concluded that the surface elemental content and microstructure as well as the evaluated mechanical properties of the Incognito™ lingual brackets remain unaffected by intraoral aging.

  9. Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets to Tooth Enamel After Treatment With Different Tooth Bleaching Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahid Dastjerdi, Elahe; Khaloo, Negar; Mojahedi, Seyed Masoud; Azarsina, Mohadese

    2015-11-01

    Bleaching treatments decrease shear bond strength between orthodontic brackets and teeth; although definite results have not been reported in this regard. This study determined the effects of different bleaching protocols on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets to teeth. This experimental study was performed in Iran. Forty-eight extracted human premolars were randomly assigned into four groups. In the control group, no bleaching treatment was performed. In groups 2 - 4, the bleaching procedures were performed using carbamide peroxide 45%, carbamide peroxide 20% and diode laser, respectively. Two weeks later, brackets were bonded to teeth and thermocycled. The shear bond strengths of the brackets to the teeth were measured. Data was analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Dunnett post-hoc test. Shear bond strength of the brackets to the teeth were 10.54 ± 1.51, 6.37 ± 0.92, 7.67 ± 1.01 and 7.49 ± 1.19 MPa, in groups 1 - 4, respectively. Significant differences were found between control group and all other groups (P brackets to the teeth. 45% carbamide peroxide had a more significant effect on bond strength compared to 20% carbamide peroxide. The difference in bond strength was not significant between laser group and either carbamide peroxide groups.

  10. The effects of silver coating on friction coefficient and shear bond strength of steel orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arash, Valiollah; Anoush, Keivan; Rabiee, Sayed Mahmood; Rahmatei, Manuchehr; Tavanafar, Saeid

    2015-01-01

    Aims of the present study was to measure frictional resistance between silver coated brackets and different types of arch wires, and shear bond strength of these brackets to the tooth. In an experimental clinical research 28 orthodontic brackets (standard, 22 slots) were coated with silver ions using electroplate method. Six brackets (coated: 3, uncoated: 3) were evaluated with Scanning Electron Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy. The amount of friction in 15 coated brackets was measured with three different kinds of arch wires (0.019 × 0.025-in stainless steel [SS], 0.018-in stainless steel [SS], 0.018-in Nickel-Titanium [Ni-Ti]) and compared with 15 uncoated steel brackets. In addition, shear bond strength values were compared between 10 brackets with silver coating and 10 regular brackets. Universal testing machine was used to measure shear bond strength and the amount of friction between the wires and brackets. SPSS 18 was used for data analysis with t-test. SEM and AFM results showed deposition of a uniform layer of silver, measuring 8-10 μm in thickness on bracket surfaces. Silver coating led to higher frictional forces in all the three types of arch wires, which was statistically significant in 0.019 × 0.025-in SS and 0.018-in Ni-Ti, but it did not change the shear bond strength significantly. Silver coating with electroplating method did not affect the bond strength of the bracket to enamel; in addition, it was not an effective method for decreasing friction in sliding mechanics. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Antibacterial Activity of Orthodontic Cement Containing Quaternary Ammonium Polyethylenimine Nanoparticles Adjacent to Orthodontic Brackets

    OpenAIRE

    Eldad Sharon; Revital Sharabi; Adi Eden; Asher Zabrovsky; Gilad Ben-Gal; Esi Sharon; Yoav Pietrokovski; Yael Houri-Haddad; Nurit Beyth

    2018-01-01

    Enamel demineralization is a common problem found in patients using orthodontic devices, such as orthodontic braces. It was found that Streptoccocus mutans growth increases adjacent to orthodontic devices, which may result in caries development. Incorporated antibacterial quaternary ammonium polyethylenimine (QPEI) nanoparticles were previously shown to be highly efficacious against various bacteria. Combining antibacterial materials in orthodontic cement may be advantageous to prevent bacter...

  12. Effect of Different Bleaching Techniques on Microleakage under orthodontic Brackets: In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salehi P

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of problem: Numerous studies report significant changes in tooth color that occur during orthodontic treatment. The adverse effects of bleaching procedures during orthodontic treatments have not been studied comprehensively. Objectives: This study investigated the effects of two methods of dental bleaching on the degree of microleakage beneath orthodontic brackets. Materials and Methods: We selected 45 extracted premolar teeth and bonded them to orthodontic brackets. These teeth were stored in normal saline for 24 hours and thermocycled. We randomly divided the samples into 3 groups of 15 teeth per group. The first group (control received no bleach treatment; the second group (office bleaching was treated with 35% hydrogen peroxide (Whiteness HP Maxx; and the third group (home bleaching was treated with 22% carbamide peroxide (Whiteness Perfect. The apices were sealed with sticky wax, rinsed in tap water, and air-dried. We applied nail varnish to the entire surface of each tooth, except for an area approximately 1 mm away from the brackets. The samples were immersed in basic fuchsine and cleaned after 24 hours. Microleakage was determined by direct measurement using a stereomicroscope. Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn post-hoc statistical tests, and SPSS software were used for statistical analysis. The significance level was set at P≤0.05. Results: The office bleaching group had significantly more microleakage scores under the brackets at both the occlusal (P=0.04 and gingival (P =0.040 margins of the brackets compared to the home bleaching group. The home bleaching group showed statistically more significant microleakage scores than the control group in both the gingival (P=0.006 and occlusal (P=0.014 margins of the brackets. All three groups had statistically more significant microleakage at the gingival margins of the brackets than the occlusal margins. Conclusions: Office bleaching caused the most microleakage under the brackets and home

  13. Biocompatibility of nanosilver-coated orthodontic brackets: an in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metin-Gürsoy, Gamze; Taner, Lale; Barış, Emre

    2016-12-01

    Nanosilver particles of which antibacterial and antifungal properties have been shown in various in vitro and in vivo studies are used in many medical and dental fields for the prevention of infection. In this study, it is intended to evaluate the biocompatibility of nanosilver-coated brackets. Nanosilver coating process was applied to the standard orthodontic brackets by a physical vapor deposition system. Brackets were coated with nanosilver particles of 1 μ thickness. A total of 12 Wistar Albino rats were included in the study (six) and control (six) groups. For the study and control groups, four nanosilver-coated and four standard brackets were aseptically implanted subcutaneously in the dorsal region of each rat. The brackets were removed with the surrounding tissues on days 7, 14, 30, and 60. The specimens were evaluated for inflammatory response. No significant difference was found in terms of tissue reaction between the study and control groups. On day 7, randomly distributed brown-black granules were seen in the granulation tissue adjacent to the bracket in the study group. These foreign particles continued along the bracket cavity in a few samples, but the inflammatory response was insignificant between the groups. Mast cell count was found to be significantly smaller only on day 7 in the study group than in the control group. Nanosilver-coated orthodontic brackets were found to be similar with the standard type concerning inflammation. Further researches are needed with regard to the assessment of the brown-black granules, especially on the deposition of the vessel walls.

  14. Fluoride releasing and enamel demineralization around orthodontic brackets by fluoride-releasing composite containing nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Mary A S; Morais, Weslanny A; Passos, Vanara F; Lima, Juliana P M; Rodrigues, Lidiany K A

    2014-05-01

    Fluoride-containing materials have been suggested to control enamel demineralization around orthodontic brackets during the treatment with fixed appliances. The improvement of their properties has been made through innovations, such as the application of nanotechnology by incorporation of nanofillers. This in vitro study evaluated the capacity of fluoride releasing and enamel demineralization inhibition of fluoride-releasing nanofilled cement around orthodontic brackets using an artificial caries biofilm model. Forty bovine enamel discs were selected by evaluating surface microhardness and randomized into four groups (n = 10): non-fluoride-releasing microfilled composite, fluoride-releasing microfilled composite, resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGI), and fluoride-releasing nanofilled composite (FN). After brackets bonding in each disc, the specimens were subjected to a cariogenic challenge through a Streptococcus mutans biofilm model. After the experimental period, the biofilm formed around the brackets was collected for fluoride analysis and the mineral loss around the brackets was determined by integrated demineralization via cross-sectional microhardness measurement at 20 and 70 μm from the bracket margin. Additionally, samples of each group were subjected to energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis examined under a scanning electron microscopy (SEM). ANOVA followed by Tukey test were applied for fluoride concentration and mineral loss data, respectively. At both distances, only RMGI statistically differed from the other groups presenting the lowest demineralization, although there was a trend to a lower demineralization of enamel around brackets in FN group. Similar condition was found to fluoride concentration and EDX/SEM analysis. Under the cariogenic exposure condition of this study, the fluoride-releasing nanofilled material had similar performance to fluoride-releasing microfilled materials. The presence of nanofillers in the fluoride

  15. Biocompatibility of nanosilver-coated orthodontic brackets: an in vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamze Metin-Gürsoy

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nanosilver particles of which antibacterial and antifungal properties have been shown in various in vitro and in vivo studies are used in many medical and dental fields for the prevention of infection. In this study, it is intended to evaluate the biocompatibility of nanosilver-coated brackets. Methods Nanosilver coating process was applied to the standard orthodontic brackets by a physical vapor deposition system. Brackets were coated with nanosilver particles of 1 μ thickness. A total of 12 Wistar Albino rats were included in the study (six and control (six groups. For the study and control groups, four nanosilver-coated and four standard brackets were aseptically implanted subcutaneously in the dorsal region of each rat. The brackets were removed with the surrounding tissues on days 7, 14, 30, and 60. The specimens were evaluated for inflammatory response. Results No significant difference was found in terms of tissue reaction between the study and control groups. On day 7, randomly distributed brown-black granules were seen in the granulation tissue adjacent to the bracket in the study group. These foreign particles continued along the bracket cavity in a few samples, but the inflammatory response was insignificant between the groups. Mast cell count was found to be significantly smaller only on day 7 in the study group than in the control group. Conclusions Nanosilver-coated orthodontic brackets were found to be similar with the standard type concerning inflammation. Further researches are needed with regard to the assessment of the brown-black granules, especially on the deposition of the vessel walls.

  16. Analysis and simulation of heat transfer in human tooth during the curing of orthodontic appliance and food ingestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Velazquez-Lopez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze and simulate the heat transfer in the human tooth undergoing fixed orthodontic appliances and food intake. An in vivo representative mathematic model of a layered thermographic profile was developed during the LED curing of Gemini bracket 0.022 in slot (conventional ligating system and Transbond XT adhesive. The characterization of the layered thermic response allowed to identify if during the LED curing process, according to manufacturer's specification (light curing unit, adhesive can induce pulpar necrosis. The profile's thermographic model was the simulation basis of many conditions such as food intake, due to in vivo metrology is affected by the impossibility of a correct apparatus position and the physiologic function of the oral cavity which is exposed to uncontrollable temperature changes. The metrology was carried out with a T-440 thermographic camera during LED curing bracket, using a LED curing light (Elipar S10 placed at 3 ± 1 mm for 5 s at each mesial and distal surface. The thermography outcomes were analyzed in the FLIR Tools Software, Microsoft Excel 2013 and SPSS 22. To adjust the mathematic model error, in vitro studies were performed on third molars for the purpose of realizing extreme exposition temperature condition tests caused by the LED curing unit without jeopardizing the human tooth vitality as would it be on in vivo experimentation. The bracket curing results according to manufacturer's conditions reached 39°C in vivo temperatures and 47°C on in vitro tests, which does not jeopardize human tooth vitality as said by previous researches, although, an LED curing precise protocol established by the manufacturer's LED curing light is sustained.

  17. Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded with Nano-filled Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sadegh Ahmad Akhoundi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS of orthodontic brackets bonded with two types of nano-composites in comparison to a conventional orthodontic composite. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted human first premolars were randomly divided into 3 groups each containing 20 teeth. In group I, a conventional orthodontic composite (Transbond XT was used to bond the brackets, while two nano-composites (Filtek TM Supreme XT and AELITE Aesthetic Enamel were used in groups II and III respectively. The teeth were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours, thermocycled in distilled water and debonded with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The adhesive remnant index (ARI was also evaluated using a stereomicroscope. Results: AELITE Aesthetic Enamel nano-composite revealed a SBS value of 8.44±2.09 MPa, which was higher than Transbond XT (6.91± 2.13 and Filtek TM Supreme XT (6.04± 2.01. Statistical analysis revealed a significant difference between groups II and III (P 0.05. Evaluation of ARI showed that Transbond XT left fewer adhesive remains on teeth after debonding. Conclusion: Results of this study indicate that the aforementioned nano-composites can be successfully used for bonding orthodontic brackets.

  18. Evaluation of shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with nano-filled composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalipa, Javad; Akhondi, Mohammad Sadegh Ahmad; Arab, Sepideh; Kharrazifard, Mohammad Javad; Ahmadyar, Maryam

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets bonded with two types of nano-composites in comparison to a conventional orthodontic composite. Sixty extracted human first premolars were randomly divided into 3 groups each containing 20 teeth. In group I, a conventional orthodontic composite (Transbond XT) was used to bond the brackets, while two nano-composites (Filtek TM Supreme XT and AELITE Aesthetic Enamel) were used in groups II and III respectively. The teeth were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours, thermocycled in distilled water and debonded with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was also evaluated using a stereomicroscope. AELITE Aesthetic Enamel nano-composite revealed a SBS value of 8.44±2.09 MPa, which was higher than Transbond XT (6.91±2.13) and Filtek TM Supreme XT (6.04±2.01). Statistical analysis revealed a significant difference between groups II and III (P 0.05). Evaluation of ARI showed that Transbond XT left fewer adhesive remains on teeth after debonding. Results of this study indicate that the aforementioned nano-composites can be successfully used for bonding orthodontic brackets.

  19. Evaluation of enamel damages following orthodontic bracket debonding in fluorosed teeth bonded with adhesion promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baherimoghadam, Tahreh; Akbarian, Sahar; Rasouli, Reza; Naseri, Navid

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate shear bond strength (SBS) of the orthodontic brackets bonded to fluorosed and nonfluorosed teeth using Light Bond with and without adhesion promoters and compare their enamel damages following debonding. In this study, 30 fluorosed (Thylstrup and Fejerskov Index = 4-5) and 30 nonfluorosed teeth were randomly distributed between two subgroups according to the bonding materials: Group 1, fluorosed teeth bonded with Light Bond; Group 2, fluorosed teeth bonded with adhesion promoters and Light Bond; Group 3, nonfluorosed teeth bonded with Light Bond; Group 4, nonfluorosed bonded with adhesion promoters and Light Bond. After bonding, the SBS of the brackets was tested with a universal testing machine. Stereomicroscopic evaluation was performed by unbiased stereology in all teeth to determine the amount of adhesive remnants and the number and length of enamel cracks before bonding and after debonding. The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance, Kruskal-Wallis, Wilcoxon Signed Rank, and Mann-Whitney test. While fluorosis reduced the SBS of orthodontic bracket (P = 0.017), Enhance Locus Ceruleus LC significantly increased the SBS of the orthodontic bracket in fluorosed and nonfluorosed teeth (P = 0.039). Significant increasing in the number and length of enamel crack after debonding was found in all four groups. There were no significant differences in the length of enamel crack increased after debonding among four groups (P = 0.768) while increasing in the number of enamel cracks after debonding was significantly different among the four groups (P = 0.023). Teeth in Group 2 showed the highest enamel damages among four groups following debonding. Adhesion promoters could improve the bond strength of orthodontic brackets, but conservative debonding methods for decreasing enamel damages would be necessary.

  20. Assessment of dimensional accuracy of preadjusted metal injection molding orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Shiva; Tajmirriahi, Farnaz

    2016-09-01

    the aim of this study is to evaluate the dimensional accuracy of McLaughlin, Bennett, and Trevisi (MBT) brackets manufactured by two different companies (American Orthodontics and Ortho Organizers) and determine variations in incorporation of values in relation to tip and torque in these products. In the present analytical/descriptive study, 64 maxillary right central brackets manufactured by two companies (American Orthodontics and Ortho Organizers) were selected randomly and evaluated for the accuracy of the values in relation to torque and angulation presented by the manufacturers. They were placed in a video measuring machine using special revolvers under them and were positioned in a manner so that the light beams would be directed on the floor of the slot without the slot walls being seen. Then, the software program of the same machine was used to determine the values of each bracket type. The means of measurements were determined for each sample and were analyzed with independent t -test and one-sample t -test. Based on the confidence interval, it can be concluded that at 95% probability, the means of tip angles of maxillary right central brackets of these two brands were 4.1-4.3° and the torque angles were 16.39-16.72°. The tips in these samples were at a range of 3.33-4.98°, and the torque was at a range of 15.22-18.48°. In the present study, there were no significant differences in the angulation incorporated into the brackets from the two companies; however, they were significantly different from the tiP values for the MBT prescription. In relation to torque, there was a significant difference between the American Orthodontic brackets exhibited significant differences with the reported 17°, too.

  1. Assessment of dimensional accuracy of preadjusted metal injection molding orthodontic brackets

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    Shiva Alavi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: the aim of this study is to evaluate the dimensional accuracy of McLaughlin, Bennett, and Trevisi (MBT brackets manufactured by two different companies (American Orthodontics and Ortho Organizers and determine variations in incorporation of values in relation to tip and torque in these products. Materials and Methods: In the present analytical/descriptive study, 64 maxillary right central brackets manufactured by two companies (American Orthodontics and Ortho Organizers were selected randomly and evaluated for the accuracy of the values in relation to torque and angulation presented by the manufacturers. They were placed in a video measuring machine using special revolvers under them and were positioned in a manner so that the light beams would be directed on the floor of the slot without the slot walls being seen. Then, the software program of the same machine was used to determine the values of each bracket type. The means of measurements were determined for each sample and were analyzed with independent t-test and one-sample t-test. Results: Based on the confidence interval, it can be concluded that at 95% probability, the means of tip angles of maxillary right central brackets of these two brands were 4.1-4.3° and the torque angles were 16.39-16.72°. The tips in these samples were at a range of 3.33-4.98°, and the torque was at a range of 15.22-18.48°. Conclusion: In the present study, there were no significant differences in the angulation incorporated into the brackets from the two companies; however, they were significantly different from the tiP values for the MBT prescription. In relation to torque, there was a significant difference between the American Orthodontic brackets exhibited significant differences with the reported 17°, too.

  2. Influence of Adhesives and Methods of Enamel Pretreatment on the Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets.

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    Jurišić, Sanja; Jurišić, Gordan; Jurić, Hrvoje

    2015-12-01

    The objective of present study was to examine influence of adhesives and methods of enamel pretreatment on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets. The adhesives used were resin-reinforced glass ionomer cements-GIC (Fuji Ortho LC) and composite resin (Transbond XT). The experimental sample consisted of 80 extracted human first premolars. The sample was divided into four equal groups, and the metal brackets were bonded with different enamel pretreatments by using two adhesives: group A-10% polyacrylic acid; Fuji Ortho LC, group B-37% phosphoric acid; Fuji Ortho LC, group C-self etching primer; Transbond XT, group D-37% phosphoric acid, primer; Transbond XT. SBS of brackets was measured. After debonding of brackets, the adhesive remnant index (ARI) was evaluated. After the statistical analysis of the collected data was performed (ANOVA; Sheffe post-hoc test), the results showed that significantly lower SBS of the group B was found in relation to the groups C (p=0.031) and D (p=0.026). The results of ARI were similar in all testing groups and it was not possible to determine any statistically significant difference of the ARI (Chi- square test) between all four experimental groups. The conclusion is that the use of composite resins material with appropriate enamel pretreatment according to manufacturer's recommendation is the "gold standard" for brackets bonding for fixed orthodontic appliances.

  3. Evaluation of a new nano-filled restorative material for bonding orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishara, Samir E; Ajlouni, Raed; Soliman, Manal M; Oonsombat, Charuphan; Laffoon, John F; Warren, John

    2007-01-01

    To compare the shear bond strength of a nano-hybrid restorative material, Grandio (Voco, Cuxhaven, Germany), to that of a traditional adhesive material (Transbond XT; 3M Unitek, Monrovia, CA, USA) when bonding orthodontic brackets. Forty teeth were randomly divided into 2 groups: 20 teeth were bonded with the Transbond adhesive system and the other 20 teeth with the Grandio restorative system, following manufacturer's instructions. Student t test was used to compare the shear bond strength of the 2 systems. Significance was predetermined at P 5 .05. The t test comparisons (t = 0.55) of the shear bond strength between the 2 adhesives indicated the absence of a significant (P = .585) difference. The mean shear bond strength for Grandio was 4.1 +/- 2.6 MPa and that for Transbond XT was 4.6 +/- 3.2 MPa. During debonding, 3 of 20 brackets (15%) bonded with Grandio failed without registering any force on the Zwick recording. None of the brackets bonded with Transbond XT had a similar failure mode. The newly introduced nano-filled composite materials can potentially be used to bond orthodontic brackets to teeth if its consistency can be more flowable to readily adhere to the bracket base.

  4. Assessment of the hardness of different orthodontic wires and brackets produced by metal injection molding and conventional methods.

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    Alavi, Shiva; Kachuie, Marzie

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess the hardness of orthodontic brackets produced by metal injection molding (MIM) and conventional methods and different orthodontic wires (stainless steel, nickel-titanium [Ni-Ti], and beta-titanium alloys) for better clinical results. A total of 15 specimens from each brand of orthodontic brackets and wires were examined. The brackets (Elite Opti-Mim which is produced by MIM process and Ultratrimm which is produced by conventional brazing method) and the wires (stainless steel, Ni-Ti, and beta-titanium) were embedded in epoxy resin, followed by grinding, polishing, and coating. Then, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) microanalysis was applied to assess their elemental composition. The same specimen surfaces were repolished and used for Vickers microhardness assessment. Hardness was statistically analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis test, followed by Mann-Whitney test at the 0.05 level of significance. The X-ray EDS analysis revealed different ferrous or co-based alloys in each bracket. The maximum mean hardness values of the wires were achieved for stainless steel (SS) (529.85 Vickers hardness [VHN]) versus the minimum values for beta-titanium (334.65 VHN). Among the brackets, Elite Opti-Mim exhibited significantly higher VHN values (262.66 VHN) compared to Ultratrimm (206.59 VHN). VHN values of wire alloys were significantly higher than those of the brackets. MIM orthodontic brackets exhibited hardness values much lower than those of SS orthodontic archwires and were more compatible with NiTi and beta-titanium archwires. A wide range of microhardness values has been reported for conventional orthodontic brackets and it should be considered that the manufacturing method might be only one of the factors affecting the mechanical properties of orthodontic brackets including hardness.

  5. Effect of various commercially available mouthrinses on shear bond strength of orthodontic metal brackets: An in vitro study

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    Nazeer Ahmed Meeran

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Alcohol containing mouthrinses affect the shear bond strength of the metal orthodontic brackets bonded with composite resin (Transbond XT in the present study, more when compared with alcohol-free mouthrinses. It is, therefore, highly advisable to avoid alcohol containing mouthrinses in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment and use alcohol-free mouthrinses as adjuncts to regular oral hygiene procedures for maintaining good enamel integrity and periodontal health, without compromising the shear bond strength of the bonded metal brackets.

  6. The influence of size and structure of metal orthodontic bracket base on bond strength on tooth enamel

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    Mitić Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The factors which may influence the bond strength of the applied orthodontic brackets on the tooth surface are the size and structure of the bracket base. Objective. The aim of the paper was to investigate the influence of size and shape of different types of brackets on bond strength on the enamel and analyze the remaining quality of adhesive material on the tooth surface after debonding of orthodontic brackets (adhesive remnant index - ARI. Methods. In this study, three types of metal brackets of different sizes and shapes of Dentaurum manufacturer were used (Utratrimm, Equilibrium 2, Discovery, Dentaurum, Inspringen, Germany. The brackets were applied onto the middle part of the anatomic crowns of buccal surfaces of 30 premolars extracted for orthodontic reasons. In addition, the pre-treatment of teeth by 37% orthophosphoric acid and adhesive material System1+ (Dentaurum, Germany were used. Results. The mean value of the bonded brackets bond strength of Discovery type after debonding was 8.67±0.32 MPa, while the value of the bonded brackets bond strength of Equilibrium 2 type amounted to 8.62±0.22 MPa. The value of the bonded brackets bond strength of Ultratrimm type after debonding was 8.22±0.49 MPa. There were no statistical differences in the values of bond strength regarding all three groups of the investigated orthodontic brackets (F=4.56; p<0.05. Conclusion. The base size and design of metal orthodontic brackets did not play a significant role in bond strength, while the values of ARI index were identical in all three investigated groups.

  7. Effects of green tea on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets after in-office vital bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Lopes, Murilo Baena; Oltramari-Navarro, Paula Vanessa; Fernandes, Thais Maria; Schwertner, Renata de Castro Alves; Ursi, Wagner José Silva

    2016-01-01

    The application of bleaching agents before placement of resin-bonded fixed appliances significantly, but temporarily, reduces bond strength to tooth structure. Antioxidants have been studied as a means to remove residual oxygen that compromises bonding to bleached enamel. This in vitro study evaluated whether green tea (GT) could restore the shear bond strength between bonded orthodontic brackets and bleached enamel. Six experimental groups were compared: group 1, no bleaching plus bracket bonding (positive control); group 2, bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) plus bracket bonding (negative control); group 3, 35% HP plus 10% sodium ascorbate (SA) plus bracket bonding; group 4, 35% HP plus 10% GT plus bracket bonding; group 5, no bleaching plus 10% SA plus bracket bonding; group 6, no bleaching plus 10% GT plus bracket bonding. Results suggested that GT, like SA, may be beneficial for bracket bonding immediately after bleaching.

  8. Effect of clearfil protect bond and transbond plus self-etch primer on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets

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    S Hamid Raji

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: The shear bond strength of clearfil protect bond and transbond plus self-etch primer was enough for bonding the orthodontic brackets. The mode of failure of bonded brackets with these two self-etch primers is safe for enamel.

  9. Galvanic Corrosion of and Ion Release from Various Orthodontic Brackets and Wires in a Fluoride-containing Mouthwash

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    Soodeh Tahmasbi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. This study compared the galvanic corrosion of orthodontic wires and brackets from various man-ufacturers following exposure to a fluoride mouthwash. Materials and methods. This study was conducted on 24 lower central incisor 0.022” Roth brackets of four different commercially available brands (Dentaurum, American Orthodontics, ORJ, Shinye. These brackets along with stainless steel (SS or nickel-titanium (NiTi orthodontic wires (0.016", round were immersed in Oral-B mouthwash containing 0.05% sodium fluoride for 28 days. The electric potential (EP difference of each bracket-wire couple was measured with a Satu-rated Calomel Reference Electrode (Ag/AgCl saturated with KCl via a voltmeter. The ions released in the electrolyte weremeasured with an atomic absorption spectrometer. All the specimens were assessed under a stereomicroscope and speci-mens with corrosion were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Data were analyzed using ANOVA. Results. The copper ions released from specimens with NiTi wire were greater than those of samples containing SS wire. ORJ brackets released more Cu ions than other samples. The Ni ions released from Shinye brackets were significantly more than those of other specimens (P < 0.05. Corrosion rate of brackets coupled with NiTi wires was higher than that of brack-ets coupled with SS wires. Light and electron microscopic observations showed greater corrosion of ORJ brackets. Conclusion. In fluoride mouthwash, Shinye and ORJ brackets exhibited greater corrosion than Dentaurum and American Orthodontics brackets. Stainless steel brackets used with NiTi wires showed greater corrosion and thus caution is recom-mended when using them.

  10. Galvanic Corrosion of and Ion Release from Various Orthodontic Brackets and Wires in a Fluoride-containing Mouthwash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahmasbi, Soodeh; Ghorbani, Mohammad; Masudrad, Mahdis

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. This study compared the galvanic corrosion of orthodontic wires and brackets from various manufacturers following exposure to a fluoride mouthwash. Materials and methods. This study was conducted on 24 lower central incisor 0.022" Roth brackets of four different commercially available brands (Dentaurum, American Orthodontics, ORJ, Shinye). These brackets along with stainless steel (SS) or nickel-titanium (NiTi) orthodontic wires (0.016", round) were immersed in Oral-B mouthwash containing 0.05% sodium fluoride for 28 days. The electric potential (EP) difference of each bracket-wire couple was measured with a Saturated Calomel Reference Electrode (Ag/AgCl saturated with KCl) via a voltmeter. The ions released in the electrolyte weremeasured with an atomic absorption spectrometer. All the specimens were assessed under a stereomicroscope and specimens with corrosion were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Data were analyzed using ANOVA. Results. The copper ions released from specimens with NiTi wire were greater than those of samples containing SS wire. ORJ brackets released more Cu ions than other samples. The Ni ions released from Shinye brackets were significantly more than those of other specimens (P brackets coupled with NiTi wires was higher than that of brackets coupled with SS wires. Light and electron microscopic observations showed greater corrosion of ORJ brackets. Conclusion. In fluoride mouthwash, Shinye and ORJ brackets exhibited greater corrosion than Dentaurum and American Orthodontics brackets. Stainless steel brackets used with NiTi wires showed greater corrosion and thus caution is recommended when using them.

  11. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength of RMGI and Composite Resin for Orthodontic Bracket Bonding

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    Yassaei, Soghra; Davari, Abdolrahim; Goldani Moghadam, Mahjobeh; Kamaei, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI) and composite resin for bonding metal and ceramic brackets. Materials and Methods: Eighty-eight human premolars extracted for orthodontic purposes were divided into 4 groups (n=22). In groups 1 and 2, 22 metal and ceramic brackets were bonded using composite resin (Transbond XT), respectively. Twenty-two metal and ceramic brackets in groups 3 and 4, respectively were bonded using RMGI (Fuji Ortho LC, Japan). After photo polymerization, the teeth were stored in water and thermocycled (500 cycles between 5° and 55°). The SBS value of each sample was determined using a Universal Testing Machine. The amount of residual adhesive remaining on each tooth was evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Statistical analyses were done using two-way ANOVA. Results: RMGI bonded brackets had significantly lower SBS value compared to composite resin bonded groups. No statistically significant difference was observed between metal and ceramic brackets bonded with either the RMGI or composite resin. The comparison of the adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores between the groups indicated that the bracket failure mode was significantly different among groups (Porthodontic bonding purposes; however the provided SBS is still within the clinically acceptable range. PMID:25628663

  12. Evaluation of force released by deflection of orthodontic wires in conventional and self-ligating brackets.

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    Higa, Rodrigo Hitoshi; Semenara, Nayara Thiago; Henriques, José Fernando Castanha; Janson, Guilherme; Sathler, Renata; Fernandes, Thais Maria Freire

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate deflection forces of rectangular orthodontic wires in conventional (MorelliTM), active (In-Ovation RTM) and passive (Damon 3MXTM) self-ligating brackets. Two brands of stainless steel and nickel-titanium (NiTi) wires (MorelliTM and GACTM), in addition to OrmcoTM copper-nickel-titanium wires were used. Specimens were assembled in a clinical simulation device especially designed for this study and tested in an Instron universal testing machine. For the testing procedures, an acrylic structure representative of the maxillary right central incisor was lingually moved in activations of 0 to 1 mm, with readings of the force released by deflection in unloading of 0.5, 0.8 and 1 mm at a constant speed of 2 mm/min. Inter-bracket forces with stainless steel, NiTi and CuNiTi were individually compared by two-way ANOVA, followed by Tukey's tests. Results showed that there were lower forces in conventional brackets, followed by active and passive self-ligating brackets. Within the brands, only for NiTi wires, the MorelliTM brand presented higher forces than GACTM wires. Bracket systems provide different degrees of deflection force, with self-ligating brackets showing the highest forces.

  13. Comparative assessment of different recycling methods of orthodontic brackets for clinical use.

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    de Oliveira Correia, Ayla M; de Souza Matos, Felipe; Pilli Jóias, Renata; de Mello Rode, Sigmar; Cesar, Paulo F; Paranhos, Luiz R

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to assess bond strength of the resin/bracket interface, under in-vitro shear stress, of metal brackets recycled by different clinical protocols. Sixty stainless steel orthodontic brackets were bonded on acrylic resin. The Transbond XT™ resin was applied at the base of the bracket aided by a matrix, obtaining 1 mm of thickness, and photoactivated with a LED device (40 s; 500 mW/cm2). Samples were randomly divided into four groups (N.=15) according to the reconditioning/recycling protocol: aluminum oxide (AO) 90 µm; hydrofluoric acid 60 s (HA60); hydrofluoric acid 120 s (HA120); hydrofluoric acid 60 s + silane (HA60S). After recycling, the resin was applied at the base of the bracket for shear testing in a universal testing machine (0.5 mm/min). After reconditioning/recycling, the surfaces were analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy. Data obtained after the shear test were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey's test (Porthodontic brackets when compared to the other protocols. The reconditioning technique with 10% hydrofluoric acid followed by the application of silane bonding agent may be used as an alternative protocol.

  14. Comparison of friction produced by two types of orthodontic bracket protectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima Mendonça, Steyner; Praxedes Neto, Otávio José; de Oliveira, Patricia Teixeira; dos Santos, Patricia Bittencourt Dutra; de Sá Leitão Pinheiro, Fábio Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Fixed orthodontic appliances have been regarded as a common causative factor of oral lesions. To manage soft tissue discomfort, most orthodontists recommend using a small amount of utility wax over the brackets in order to alleviate trauma. This in vitro study aimed at evaluating friction generated by two types of bracket protectors (customized acetate protector [CAP] and temporary resin protector [TRP]) during the initial stages of orthodontic treatment. An experimental model (test unit) was used to assess friction. In order to measure the friction produced in each test, the model was attached to a mechanical testing machine which simulated maxillary canines alignment. Intergroup comparison was carried out by one-way ANOVA with level of significance set at 5%. The friction presented by the TRP group was statistically higher than that of the control group at 6 mm. It was also higher than in the control and CAP groups in terms of maximum friction. The customized acetate protector (CAP) demonstrated not to interfere in friction between the wire and the orthodontic bracket slot.

  15. Enamel resistance to demineralization following Er:YAG laser etching for bonding orthodontic brackets

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    Ahrari, Farzaneh; Poosti, Maryam; Motahari, Pourya

    2012-01-01

    Background: Several studies have shown that laser-etching of enamel for bonding orthodontic brackets could be an appropriate alternative for acid conditioning, since a potential advantage of laser could or might be caries prevention. This study compared enamel resistance to demineralization following etching with acid phosphoric or Er:YAG laser for bonding orthodontic brackets. Materials and Methods: Fifty sound human premolars were divided into two equal groups. In the first group, enamel was etched with 37% phosphoric acid for 15 seconds. In the second group, Er:YAG laser (wavelength, 2 940 nm; 300 mJ/pulse, 10 pulses per second, 10 seconds) was used for tooth conditioning. The teeth were subjected to 4-day PH-cycling process to induce caries-like lesions. The teeth were then sectioned and the surface area of the lesion was calculated in each microphotographs and expressed in pixel. The total surface of each specimen was 196 608 pixels. Results: Mean lesion areas were 7 171 and 7532 pixels for Laser-etched and Acid-etched groups, respectively. The two sample t-test showed that there was no significant difference in lesion area between the two groups (P = 0.914). Conclusion: Although Er:YAG laser seems promising for etching enamel before bonding orthodontic brackets, it does not reduce enamel demineralization when exposed to acid challenge. PMID:23162591

  16. Should the orthodontic brackets always be removed prior to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)?

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    Poorsattar-Bejeh Mir, Arash; Rahmati-Kamel, Manouchehr

    2015-01-01

    Request for temporary removal of orthodontic appliances due to medical conditions that require magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is not uncommon in daily practice in the field of orthodontics. This may be at the expense of time and cost. Metal Orthodontic appliances cause more signal loss and image distortion as compared to ceramic and titanium ones. Stainless steel and large brackets in addition to the oriented miniscrews in relation to the axis of magnetic field may cause severe signal loss and image distortion. Moreover, gradient echo and frequency-selective fat saturation MR protocols are more susceptible to metal artifacts. The spin echo and fat-suppression protocols, low magnetic field strength (e.g., 1.5 Tesla vs. 3 Tesla), small field of view, high-resolution matrix, thin slice, increased echo train length and increased receiver band width could be applied to lessen the metal artifacts in MR images. The larger the distance between an appliance and desired location to be imaged, the lower the distortion and signal loss. Decision to remove brackets should be made based on its composition and desired anatomic location. In this review, first the principles of MR imaging are introduced (Part-I) and then the interactions of orthodontic appliances and magnetic field are farther discussed (Part-II). PMID:27195213

  17. Clinical and microbiological parameters in patients with self-ligating and conventional brackets during early phase of orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejda, Slavica; Varga, Marina Lapter; Milosevic, Sandra Anic; Mestrovic, Senka; Slaj, Martina; Repic, Dario; Bosnjak, Andrija

    2013-01-01

    To determine the effect of different bracket designs (conventional brackets and self-ligating brackets) on periodontal clinical parameters and periodontal pathogens in subgingival plaque. The following inclusion criteria were used: requirement of orthodontic treatment plan starting with alignment and leveling, good general health, healthy periodontium, no antibiotic therapy in the previous 6 months before the beginning of the study, and no smoking. The study sample totaled 38 patients (13 male, 25 female; mean age, 14.6 ± 2.0 years). Patients were divided into two groups with random distribution of brackets. Recording of clinical parameters was done before the placement of the orthodontic appliance (T0) and at 6 weeks (T1), 12 weeks (T2), and 18 weeks (T3) after full bonding of orthodontic appliances. Periodontal pathogens of subgingival microflora were detected at T3 using a commercially available polymerase chain reaction test (micro-Dent test) that contains probes for Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola. There was a statistically significant higher prevalence of A actinomycetemcomitans in patients with conventional brackets than in patients with self-ligating brackets, but there was no statistically significant difference for other putative periodontal pathogens. The two different types of brackets did not show statistically significant differences in periodontal clinical parameters. Bracket design does not seem to have a strong influence on periodontal clinical parameters and periodontal pathogens in subgingival plaque. The correlation between some periodontal pathogens and clinical periodontal parameters was weak.

  18. Effect of Argon Laser on Enamel Demineralization around Orthodontic Brackets: An In Vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miresmaeili, Amirfarhang; Etrati Khosroshahi, Mohammad; Motahary, Pouya; Rezaei-Soufi, Loghman; Mahjub, Hossein; Dadashi, Maryam; Farhadian, Nasrin

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study was designed to evaluate the effect of argon laser irradiation on development and progress of enamel demineralization around orthodontic brackets. Materials and Methods: Fifty caries-free, intact human premolars were randomly assigned to one of the following five equal groups: Groups 1 (control) and 2: The brackets were bonded using conventional halogen light for 40s and argon laser for 10s, respectively. Teeth in group 3 were lased with argon laser for 10s before bracket bonding with halogen light. Group 4 was the same as group 3 except that brackets were also bonded with argon laser. In group 5 samples were bonded conventionally, immersed in an artificial caries solution for two days and then irradiated for 10s with argon laser. All samples were subjected to demineralization by artificial caries solution for 10 days. After bracket removal, samples were buccolingually sectioned and evaluated by polarized light microscopy. Decalcified lesion depth in each section was measured by a trained examiner in a blind fashion. Data were analyzed in SPSS 14 using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD post hoc test. Results: The control group showed the greatest mean lesion depth while group 5 revealed the lowest. The laser-treated groups had significantly lower mean lesion depth compared with the control group (Pbracket bonding can increase caries resistance of intact and demineralized enamel. PMID:25584052

  19. Efficacy of quercetin flavonoid in recovering the postbleaching bond strength of orthodontic brackets: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsedin, Mana; Arash, Valiollah; Jahromi, Masoud Babaei; Moghadamnia, Ali Akbar; Kamel, Manouchehr Rahmati; Ezoji, Fariba; Bijani, Ali; Kavoli, Samira; Ghasemi, Tania; Ramezani, Gholamhossein

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate comparatively the effect of quercetin on postbleaching shear bond strength (SBS) and adhesive remnant index (ARI). Intact maxillary premolars were divided randomly into 12 groups of 10 each: (1) bonding the bracket immediately after bleaching, (2) bonding 1 week after bleaching, (3-8) application of three experimental concentrations of quercetin (0.1%, 0.5%, and 1%) at two time durations (5 and 10 min), (9-10) application of the solvent of quercetin at two time periods (5 and 10 min), (11) application of 10% sodium ascorbate for 10 min, and (12) bonding the brackets on nonbleached teeth. Bleaching was performed using 15% carbamide peroxide gel for 5 days (6 h daily). After incubation and thermocycling, the SBS of brackets was measured. The ARI too was recorded at ×20. The data were analyzed statistically (α =0.05). Bleaching reduced the SBS below 10 Megapascal (MPa) level ( P 0.01). All eight postbleaching treatments had rather similar efficacies ( P = 0.1396). The concentration of quercetin (beta = 0.259, P = 0.042) but not its duration (beta = 0.213, P = 0.093) significantly improved its efficacy. Bleaching can weaken the bond strength of orthodontic brackets below acceptable levels. The application of quercetin or Vitamin C or delaying the bracket bonding improved the postbleaching SBS.

  20. Orthodontic Metallic Lingual Brackets: The Dark Side of the Moon of Bond Failures?

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    Maria Francesca Sfondrini

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Lingual orthodontics, among both young and adult patients, increased in popularity during last years. The purposes of the present investigation were to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS values and Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI scores of different lingual brackets compared with a vestibular control bracket. One hundred bovine teeth were extracted and embedded in resin blocks. Four different lingual brackets (Idea, Leone; STB, Ormco; TTR, RMO; 2D, Forestadent and a vestibular control bracket (Victory, 3M were bonded to the bovine enamel surfaces and subsequently shear tested to failure utilizing a Universal Testing Machine. SBS values were measured. A microscopic evaluation was performed to obtain ARI scores. Statistical analysis was performed at a statistically significant level of p < 0.05 to determine significant differences in SBS values and ARI Scores. No statistically significant variations in SBS were reported among the different groups. Conversely, significant differences were shown in ARI scores among the various groups. Clinical relevance of the present study is that orthodontists can expect similar resistance to debonding forces from lingual appliances as with vestibular brackets.

  1. Effectiveness and efficiency of a CAD/CAM orthodontic bracket system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Matthew W; Koroluk, Lorne; Ko, Ching-Chang; Zhang, Kai; Chen, Mengqi; Nguyen, Tung

    2015-12-01

    The first straight-wire appliance was introduced over 40 years ago to increase the consistency and efficiency of orthodontic treatment. More recently, computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology has been used to create individualized orthodontic appliances. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical effectiveness and efficiency of CAD/CAM customized orthodontic appliances compared with direct and indirect bonded stock orthodontic brackets. This retrospective study included 3 treatment groups: group 1 patients were direct bonded with self-ligating appliances, group 2 patients were indirect bonded with self-ligating appliances, and group 3 patients were indirect bonded with CAD/CAM self-ligating appliances. Complete pretreatment and posttreatment records were obtained for all patients. The American Board of Orthodontics (ABO) Discrepancy Index was used to evaluate the pretreatment records, and the posttreatment outcomes were analyzed using the ABO Cast-Radiograph Evaluation. All data collection and analysis were completed by 1 evaluator. There were no statistically significant differences in the ABO Discrepancy Index or the ABO Cast-Radiograph Evaluation among the groups. Treatment times for the 3 groups were significantly different; the CAD/CAM group was the shortest at 13.8 ± 3.4 months, compared with 21.9 ± 5.0 and 16.9 ± 4.1 months for the direct bonded and indirect bonded groups, respectively. The number of treatment appointments for the CAD/CAM group was significantly fewer than for the direct bonded group. The CAD/CAM orthodontic bracket system evaluated in this study was as effective in treatment outcome measures as were standard brackets bonded both directly and indirectly. The CAD/CAM appliance was more efficient in regard to treatment duration, although the decrease in total archwire appointments was minimal. Further investigation is needed to better quantify the clinical benefits of CAD/CAM orthodontic

  2. Effect of Four Methods of Surface Treatment on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets to Zirconium

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    Soghra Yassaei

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Providing reliable attachment between bracket base and zirconia surface is a prerequisite for exertion of orthodontic force. The purpose of the present study was to eval- uate the effect of four zirconium surface treatment methods on shear bond strength (SBS of orthodontic brackets.Materials and Methods: One block of zirconium was trimmed into four zirconium sur- faces, which served as our four study groups and each had 18 metal brackets bonded to them. Once the glazed layer was removed, the first group was etched with 9.6% hydrofluoric acid (HF, and the other three groups were prepared by means of sandblasting and 1 W, and 2 W Er: YAG laser, respectively. After application of silane, central incisor brackets were bonded to the zirconium surfaces. The SBS values were measured by a Dartec testing ma- chine with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min.Results: The highest SBS was achieved in the sandblasted group (7.81±1.02 MPa followed in a descending order by 2 W laser group (6.95±0.87 MPa, 1 W laser group (6.87±0.92MPa and HF acid etched group (5.84±0.78 MPa. The differences between the study groups, were statistically significant except between the laser groups (P < 0.05. Conclusion: In terms of higher bond strength and safety, sandblasting and Er: YAG laser irradiation with power output of 1 W and 2 W can be considered more appropriate alterna- tives to HF acid etching for zirconium surface treatment prior to bracket bonding.

  3. The effect of ZnO nanoparticle coating on the frictional resistance between orthodontic wires and ceramic brackets

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    Ahmad

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Any decrease in friction between orthodontic wire and bracket can accelerate tooth movement in the sliding technique and result in better control of anchorage. This study was carried out to evaluate frictional forces by coating orthodontic wires and porcelain brackets with zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO. Methods. In this in vitro study, we evaluated a combination of 120 samples of 0.019×0.025 stainless steel (SS orthodontic wires and 22 mil system edgewise porcelain brackets with and without spherical zinc oxide nanoparticles. Spherical ZnO nanoparticles were deposited on wires and brackets by immersing them in ethanol solution and SEM (scanning electron microscope evaluation confirmed the presence of the ZnO coating. The frictional forces were calculated between the wires and brackets in four groups: group ZZ (coated wire and bracket, group OO (uncoated wire and bracket, group ZO (coated wire and uncoated bracket and group OZ (uncoated wire and coated bracket. Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used for data analysis. Results. The frictional force in ZZ (3.07±0.4 N was the highest (P <0.05, and OZ (2.18±0.5 N had the lowest amount of friction (P <0.05 among the groups. There was no significant difference in frictional forces between the ZO and OO groups (2.65±0.2 and 2.70±0.2 N, respectively. Conclusion. Coating of porcelain bracket surfaces with ZnO nanoparticles can decrease friction in the sliding technique, and wire coating combined with bracket coating is not recommended due to its effect on friction.

  4. In vitro assessment of photocatalytic titanium oxide surface modified stainless steel orthodontic brackets for antiadherent and antibacterial properties against Lactobacillus acidophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Alok Girish; Shetty, Pradeep Chandra; Ramachandra, C S; Bhat, N Sham; Laxmikanth, S M

    2011-11-01

    To assess the antiadherent and antibacterial properties of surface modified stainless steel orthodontic brackets with photocatalytic titanium oxide (TiO(2)) against Lactobacillus acidophilus. This study was done on 120 specimens of stainless steel preadjusted edgewise appliance (PEA) orthodontic brackets. The specimens were divided into four test groups. Each group consisted of 30 specimens. Groups containing uncoated brackets acted as a control group for their respective experimental group containing coated brackets. Surface modification of brackets was carried out by the radiofrequency (RF) magnetron sputtering method with photocatalytic TiO(2). Brackets then were subjected to microbiological tests for assessment of the antiadherent and antibacterial properties of photocatalytic TiO(2) coating against L acidophilus. Orthodontic brackets coated with photocatalytic TiO(2) showed an antiadherent effect against L acidophilus compared with uncoated brackets. The bacterial mass that was bound to the TiO(2)-coated brackets was less when compared with the uncoated brackets. Furthermore, TiO(2)-coated brackets had a bactericidal effect on L acidophilus, which causes dental caries. Surface modification of orthodontic brackets with photocatalytic TiO(2) can be used to prevent the accumulation of dental plaque and the development of dental caries during orthodontic treatment.

  5. Evaluation of a novel approach in the prevention of white spot lesions around orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, J; Walsh, L J; Naser-Ud Din, S; Ngo, H; Manton, D J

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the relative efficacy of a resin fissure sealant, nano-filled self-adhesive protective coating, resin infiltrant, glass ionomer cement (GIC), and GIC containing casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) in preventing the formation of subsurface lesions of enamel (SLE) adjacent to orthodontic brackets by acting as an enamel surface sealant (ESS). Eighty-five enamel specimens with molar tubes bonded at their centre were randomly divided into five groups, each treated with a different material at the bracket's periphery. Specimens were stored in an acetate demineralization solution at pH 4.5 for 7 days at 37 °C then imaged using quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) to determine the difference in fluorescence (∆F) between sound- and acid-exposed enamel. Lesion cross-sections were then examined using backscattered scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to measure lesion depth. The use of GIC alone or incorporating CPP-ACP significantly reduced ∆F compared with other materials. Backscattered SEM images showed no measurable demineralization for enamel treated with either GIC material in contrast with other groups, which showed statistically significant demineralization levels. The fluoride-releasing effects and CPP-ACP benefits of the GIC materials show promise as an effective ESS in inhibiting enamel demineralization adjacent to orthodontic brackets. © 2014 Australian Dental Association.

  6. Bond strength of stainless steel orthodontic brackets bonded to prefabricated acrylic teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan Abdul Razak, Wan Salbiah; Sherriff, Martyn; Bister, Dirk; Seehra, Jadbinder

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this in-vitro study was to evaluate the force to debond stainless steel orthodontic brackets bonded to acrylic teeth using different combinations of adhesive and surface treatments. One hundred prefabricated upper lateral incisor acrylic teeth were divided into 4 equal groups: Transbond XT® adhesive only (Group 1, control), Transbond XT® adhesive with sandblasting (Group 2), Transbond XT® adhesive with abrasion / + methyl methacrylate (MMA) (Group 3) and Triad® Gel only (Group 4). The force in Newtons (N) to debond the brackets was measured. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and pairwise multi-comparison of means (Šidak's adjustment) were undertaken. The highest force to debond was recorded for Group 2 (275.7 N; SD 89.0) followed by Group 3 (241.9 N; SD 76.0), Group 1 (142.7 N; SD 36.7) and Group 4 (67.9 N; SD 21.1). Significant differences in bond strength measurements between the experimental groups were detected. Mean force values for the groups revealed no significant differences between Group 2 and Group 3 (p>0.05). Both sandblasting and surface abrasion/+ application of methyl methacrylate (MMA) in combination with Transbond XT® adhesive are recommended for bonding stainless orthodontic brackets to acrylic teeth.

  7. Improving Tensile Bond Strength of Orthodontic Bracket by Applying Papain Gel as an Email Deproteinization Agent

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    Niswati Fathmah Rosyida

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An effort to improve the bonding between bracket and tooth surface is required. Objective: The aim of this studywas to evaluate the effect of papain gel on tensile bond strength (TBS and adhesive remnant index (ARI of the orthodontic brackets. Methods: A total of 42 healthy human premolars were randomly divided into six groups. 1 Resin-modifed glass ionomer cement (RMGIC without papain, 2 RMGIC with papain 8%, 3 RMGIC with papain 10%, 4 Composite resin (CR without papain, 5 CR with papain 8%, 6 CR with papain 10%. The TBS was determined using a universal testing machine. Bond failure was classifed according to the ARI. The TBS data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Mean Whitney tests with 5% of signifcance level. Results: The mean of TBS(MPa values of RMGIC groups are without papain (5.03 ± 1.52, papain 8% (4.79 ± 2.61, papain 10 (7.75 ± 1, 48. CR groups without papain (5.45 ± 1.23, papain 8% (2.30 ± 0.73, and papain 10% (4.84 ± 1.72 Bond failure was mainly classifed as score 1. The TBS values were statistically influenced by the application of papain and adhesive. Conclusion: The application of papain 10% before RMGIC cementation improves the tensile bond strength and could decrease the bond failure of the orthodontic bracket.

  8. Effect of Quaternary Ammonium Salt on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets to Enamel

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    Hannaneh Ghadirian

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study sought to assess the effect of quaternary ammonium salt (QAS on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets to enamel.Materials and Methods: In this in vitro experimental study, 0, 10, 20 and 30% concentrations of QAS were added to Transbond XT primer. Brackets were bonded to 60 premolar teeth using the afore-mentioned adhesive mixtures, and the shear bond strength of the four groups (n=15 was measured using a universal testing machine. After debonding, the adhesive remnant index (ARI score was determined under a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA.Results: The mean and standard deviation of shear bond strength of the control and 10%, 20% and 30% groups were 23.54±6.31, 21.81±2.82, 20.83±8.35 and 22.91±5.66 MPa, respectively. No significant difference was noted in shear bond strength of the groups (P=0.83. Study groups were not different in terms of ARI scores (P=0.80.Conclusions: The results showed that addition of QAS to Transbond XT primer had no adverse effect on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

  9. Evaluation of the force generated by gradual deflection of orthodontic wires in conventional metallic, esthetic, and self-ligating brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisconi, Manoela Fávaro; Janson, Guilherme; Henriques, José Fernando Castanha; Freitas, Karina Maria Salvatore de

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the deflection forces of Nitinol orthodontic wires placed in different types of brackets: metallic, reinforced polycarbonate with metallic slots, sapphire, passive and active self-ligating, by assessing strength values variation according to gradual increase in wire diameter and deflection and comparing different combinations in the different deflections. Specimens were set in a clinical simulation model and evaluated in a Universal Testing Machine (INSTRON 3342), using the ISO 15841 protocol. Data were subjected to One-way ANOVA, followed by Tukey tests (pbrackets presented the most similar behavior to each other. For conventional brackets there was no consistent behavior for any of the deflections studied. Self-ligating brackets presented the most consistent and predictable results while conventional brackets, as esthetic brackets, showed very different patterns of forces. Self-ligating brackets showed higher strength in all deflections when compared with the others, in 0.020-inch wires.

  10. Clinical acceptability of two self-etch adhesive resins for the bonding of orthodontic brackets to enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnebel, Bradley; Mateer, Scott; Maganzini, Anthony Louis; Freeman, Katherine

    2012-12-01

    To determine whether two self-adhesive resin cements, Clearfil SA and RelyX, can be used to successfully bond orthodontic brackets to enamel. Seventy extracted premolars were custom mounted, cleaned and randomly divided into three groups. In group 1 (control), orthodontic brackets were bonded to 25 premolars using the Transbond Plus and Transbond XT two step adhesive systerm adhesive. In group 2, brackets were bonded to 25 premolars using Clearfil SA. In group 3, brackets were bonded to 20 premolars using RelyX. The brackets were debonded using a universal testing machine and shear bond strengths recorded. After debonding, each tooth was examined under 20× magnification to evaluate the residual adhesive remaining. An ANOVA with Duncan's Multiple Range Test was used to determine whether there were significant differences in shear bond strength between the groups. A Kruskal-Wallis Test and a Bonferroni multiple comparison procedure were used to compare the bond failure modes (adhesive remnant index scores) between the groups. The mean shear bond strengths for the brackets bonded using Clearfil SA and RelyX were 5·930±1·840 and 3·334±1·953 MPa, respectively. Both were significantly lower than that for the brackets bonded using Transbond (7·875±3·611 MPa). Both self-etch adhesive resin cement groups showed a greater incidence of bracket failure at the enamel/adhesive interface while the Transbond group showed a higher incidence at the bracket/adhesive interface. The shear bond strengths of the self-etch adhesive resin cements may be inadequate to successfully bond orthodontic brackets to enamel.

  11. In vitro evaluation of microleakage around orthodontic brackets using laser etching and Acid etching methods.

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    Mohammad Hossein Toodehzaeim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available path of microleakage between the enamel and adhesive potentially allows microbial ingress that may consequently cause enamel decalcification. The aim of this study was to compare microleakage of brackets bonded either by laser or acid etching techniques.The specimens were 33 extracted premolars that were divided into three groups as the acid etching group (group 1, laser etching with Er:YAG at 100 mJ and 15 Hz for 15s (group 2, and laser etching with Er:YAG at 140 mJ and 15 Hz for 15s (group 3. After photo polymerization, the teeth were subjected to 500 thermal cycles. Then the specimens were sealed with nail varnish, stained with 2% methylen blue for 24hs, sectioned, and examined under a stereomicroscope. They were scored for marginal microleakage that occurred between the adhesive-enamel and bracket-adhesive interfaces from the occlusal and gingival margins. Data were analyzed with the Kruskal- Wallis test.For the adhesive-enamel and bracket-adhesive surfaces, significant differences were not observed between the three groups.According to this study, the Er:YAG laser with 1.5 and 2.1 watt settings may be used as an adjunctive for preparing the surface for orthodontic bracket bonding.

  12. The Effect of Different Soft Drinks on the Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets

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    M Omid Khoda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: It is proved that acidic soft drinks that are commonly used, have an adverse effect on dental structures, and may deteriorate oral heath of our patients and orthodontic appliances. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of yoghurt drink with other soft drinks on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.Materials and Methods: Seventy-five first premolar teeth extracted for orthodontic purposes were selected and standard twin metal brackets were bonded on the center of buccal surface with No-Mix composite. The teeth were thermocycled for 625 cycles and randomly divided into five groups of artificial saliva, carbonated yoghurt drink with lactic acid base, non-carbonated yoghurt drink with lactic acid base, 7 up with citric acid base and Pepsi with phosphoric acid base. In all groups, the teeth were immersed in liquid for five-minute sessions three times with equal intervening intervals for 3 months. SBS was measured by a universal testing machine with a speed of 0.5mm/min. Data was analyzed statistically by one-way ANOVA.Results: The results showed that mean values for the shear bond strength of carbonated yoghurt drinks, non-carbonated yoghurt drinks, 7up and Pepsi groups were 12.98(+_2.95, 13.26(+_4.00, 16.11(+_4.89, 14.73(+_5.10, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference among the groups (P-value= 0.238Conclusion: Soft drinks used in this study did not decrease the bond strength of the brackets bonded with this specific type of composite.

  13. The effect of different soft drinks on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omid Khoda, M; Heravi, F; Shafaee, H; Mollahassani, H

    2012-01-01

    It is proved that acidic soft drinks that are commonly used, have an adverse effect on dental structures, and may deteriorate oral heath of our patients and orthodontic appliances. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of yoghurt drink with other soft drinks on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets. Seventy-five first premolar teeth extracted for orthodontic purposes were selected and standard twin metal brackets were bonded on the center of buccal surface with No-Mix composite. The teeth were thermocycled for 625 cycles and randomly divided into five groups of artificial saliva, carbonated yoghurt drink with lactic acid base, non-carbonated yoghurt drink with lactic acid base, 7 up with citric acid base and Pepsi with phosphoric acid base. In all groups, the teeth were immersed in liquid for five-minute sessions three times with equal intervening intervals for 3 months. SBS was measured by a universal testing machine with a speed of 0.5mm/min. Data was analyzed statistically by one-way ANOVA. The results showed that mean values for the shear bond strength of carbonated yoghurt drinks, non-carbonated yoghurt drinks, 7up and Pepsi groups were 12.98(±2.95), 13.26(±4.00), 16.11(±4.89), 14.73(±5.10), respectively. There was no statistically significant difference among the groups (P-value= 0.238) Soft drinks used in this study did not decrease the bond strength of the brackets bonded with this specific type of composite.

  14. The Effect of Different Soft Drinks on the Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omid Khoda, M.; Heravi, F.; Shafaee, H.; Mollahassani, H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: It is proved that acidic soft drinks that are commonly used, have an adverse effect on dental structures, and may deteriorate oral heath of our patients and orthodontic appliances. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of yoghurt drink with other soft drinks on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five first premolar teeth extracted for orthodontic purposes were selected and standard twin metal brackets were bonded on the center of buccal surface with No-Mix composite. The teeth were thermocycled for 625 cycles and randomly divided into five groups of artificial saliva, carbonated yoghurt drink with lactic acid base, non-carbonated yoghurt drink with lactic acid base, 7 up with citric acid base and Pepsi with phosphoric acid base. In all groups, the teeth were immersed in liquid for five-minute sessions three times with equal intervening intervals for 3 months. SBS was measured by a universal testing machine with a speed of 0.5mm/min. Data was analyzed statistically by one-way ANOVA. Results: The results showed that mean values for the shear bond strength of carbonated yoghurt drinks, non-carbonated yoghurt drinks, 7up and Pepsi groups were 12.98(±2.95), 13.26(±4.00), 16.11(±4.89), 14.73(±5.10), respectively. There was no statistically significant difference among the groups (P-value= 0.238) Conclusion: Soft drinks used in this study did not decrease the bond strength of the brackets bonded with this specific type of composite. PMID:23066479

  15. Metal release profiles of orthodontic bands, brackets, and wires: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendl, B; Wiltsche, H; Lankmayr, E; Winsauer, H; Walter, A; Muchitsch, A; Jakse, N; Wendl, M; Wendl, T

    2017-11-01

    The present study evaluated the temporal release of Co Cr, Mn, and Ni from the components of a typical orthodontic appliance during simulated orthodontic treatment. Several commercially available types of bands, brackets, and wires were exposed to an artificial saliva solution for at least 44 days and the metals released were quantified in regular intervals using inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-MS, Elan DRC+, Perkin Elmer, USA). Corrosion products encountered on some products were investigated by a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray microanalyzer (EDX). Bands released the largest quantities of Co, Cr, Mn, and Ni, followed by brackets and wires. Three different temporal metal release profiles were observed: (1) constant, though not necessarily linear release, (2) saturation (metal release stopped after a certain time), and (3) an intermediate release profile that showed signs of saturation without reaching saturation. These temporal metal liberation profiles were found to be strongly dependent on the individual test pieces. The corrosion products which developed on some of the bands after a 6-month immersion in artificial saliva and the different metal release profiles of the investigated bands were traced back to different attachments welded onto the bands. The use of constant release rates will clearly underestimate metal intake by the patient during the first couple of days and overestimate exposure during the remainder of the treatment which is usually several months long. While our data are consistent with heavy metal release by orthodontic materials at levels well below typical dietary intake, we nevertheless recommend the use of titanium brackets and replacement of the band with a tube in cases of severe Ni or Cr allergy.

  16. Shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with different self-etching adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scougall Vilchis, Rogelio José; Yamamoto, Seigo; Kitai, Noriyuki; Yamamoto, Kohji

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets bonded with 4 self-etching adhesives. A total of 175 extracted premolars were randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 35). Group I was the control, in which the enamel was etched with 37% phosphoric acid, and stainless steel brackets were bonded with Transbond XT (3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif). In the remaining 4 groups, the enamel was conditioned with the following self-etching primers and adhesives: group II, Transbond Plus and Transbond XT (3M Unitek); group III, Clearfil Mega Bond FA and Kurasper F (Kuraray Medical, Tokyo, Japan); group IV, Primers A and B, and BeautyOrtho Bond (Shofu, Kyoto, Japan); and group V, AdheSE and Heliosit Orthodontic (Ivoclar Vivadent AG, Liechtenstein). The teeth were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours and debonded with a universal testing machine. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) including enamel fracture score was also evaluated. Additionally, the conditioned enamel surfaces were observed under a scanning electron microscope. The SBS values of groups I (19.0 +/- 6.7 MPa) and II (16.6 +/- 7.3 MPa) were significantly higher than those of groups III (11.0 +/- 3.9 MPa), IV (10.1 +/- 3.7 MPa), and V (11.8 +/- 3.5 MPa). Fluoride-releasing adhesives (Kurasper F and BeautyOrtho Bond) showed clinically acceptable SBS values. Significant differences were found in the ARI and enamel fracture scores between groups I and II. The 4 self-etching adhesives yielded SBS values higher than the bond strength (5.9 to 7.8 MPa) suggested for routine clinical treatment, indicating that orthodontic brackets can be successfully bonded with any of these self-etching adhesives.

  17. Reduction in static friction by deposition of a homogeneous diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating on orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaike, Shun; Hayakawa, Tohru; Kobayashi, Daishiro; Aono, Yuko; Hirata, Atsushi; Hiratsuka, Masanori; Nakamura, Yoshiki

    2015-01-01

    In orthodontics, a reduction in static friction between the brackets and wire is important to enable easy tooth movement. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a homogeneous diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating on the whole surfaces of slots in stainless steel orthodontic brackets on reducing the static friction between the brackets and the wire. The DLC coating was characterized using Raman spectroscopy, surface roughness and contact angle measurements, and SEM observations. Rectangular stainless steel and titanium-molybdenum alloy wires with two different sizes were employed, and the static friction between the brackets and wire was measured under dry and wet conditions. The DLC coating had a thickness of approximately 1.0 μm and an amorphous structure was identified. The results indicated that the DLC coating always led to a reduction in static friction.

  18. Root resorption during orthodontic treatment with self-ligating or conventional brackets: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jianru; Li, Meile; Li, Yu; Li, Xiaobing; Zhao, Zhihe

    2016-11-21

    The aim of this study was to compare the external apical root resorption (EARR) in patients receiving fixed orthodontic treatment with self-ligating or conventional brackets. Studies comparing the EARR between orthodontic patients using self-ligating or conventional brackets were identified through electronic search in databases including CENTRAL, PubMed, EMBASE, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) and SIGLE, and manual search in relevant journals and reference lists of the included studies until Apr 2016. The extraction of data and risk of bias evaluation were conducted by two investigators independently. The original outcome underwent statistical pooling by using Review Manager 5. Seven studies were included in the systematic review, out of which, five studies were statistically pooled in meta-analysis. The value of EARR of maxillary central incisors in the self-ligating bracket group was significantly lower than that in the conventional bracket group (SMD -0.31; 95% CI: -0.60--0.01). No significant differences in other incisors were observed between self-ligating and conventional brackets. Current evidences suggest self-ligating brackets do not outperform conventional brackets in reducing the EARR in maxillary lateral incisors, mandible central incisors and mandible lateral incisors. However, self-ligating brackets appear to have an advantage in protecting maxillary central incisor from EARR, which still needs to be confirmed by more high-quality studies.

  19. Evaluation of Scotchbond Multipurpose and maleic acid as alternative methods of bonding orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, M E; Bishara, S E; Damon, P; Jakobsen, J R

    1997-05-01

    Damage to the enamel surface during bonding and debonding of orthodontic brackets is a clinical concern. Alternative bonding methods that minimize enamel surface damage while maintaining a clinically useful bond strength is an aim of current research. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects on bond strength and bracket failure location of two adhesives (System 1+ and Scotchbond Multipurpose, 3M Dental Products Division) and two enamel conditioners (37% phosphoric acid and 10% maleic acid). Forty-eight freshly extracted human premolars were pumiced and divided into four groups of 12 teeth, and metal orthodontic brackets were attached to the enamel surface by one of four protocols: (1) System 1+ and phosphoric acid, (2) Scotchbond and phosphoric acid, (3) System 1+ and maleic acid, and (4) Scotchbond and maleic acid. After bracket attachment, the teeth were mounted in phenolic rings and stored in deionized water at 37 degrees C for 72 hours. A Zwick universal testing machine (Zwick GmbH & Co.) was used to determine shear bond strengths. The residual adhesive on the enamel surface was evaluated with the Adhesive Remnant Index. The analysis of variance was used to compare the four groups. Significance was predetermined at p adhesives on the enamel surfaces, revealed significant differences among the four groups (mean 2 = 0.005). A Duncan multiple range test revealed the difference occurred between the phosphoric acid and maleic acid groups, with maleic acid having bond failures at the enamel-adhesive interface. In conclusion, the use of Scotchbond Multipurpose and/or maleic acid does not significantly effect bond strength, however, the use of maleic acid resulted in an unfavorable bond failure location.

  20. Effect of surface treatment of prefabricated teeth on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets

    OpenAIRE

    Cumerlato, Marina; Lima, Eduardo Martinelli de; Osorio, Leandro Berni; Mota, Eduardo Gonçalves; Menezes, Luciane Macedo de; Rizzatto, Susana Maria Deon

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the effects of grinding, drilling, sandblasting, and ageing prefabricated teeth (PfT) on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets, as well as the effects of surface treatments on the adhesive remnant index (ARI). Methods: One-hundred-ninety-two PfT were divided into four groups (n = 48): Group 1, no surface treatment was done; Group 2, grinding was performed with a cylindrical diamond bur; Group 3,...

  1. Mechanical properties of orthodontic wires on ceramic brackets associated with low friction ligatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando KOIKE

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Few studies investigated the mechanical properties of orthodontic wires on ceramic brackets associated the ligatures. Objective This study aimed to compare the load-deflection of orthodontic wires with round section of 0.016” made of stainless steel (SS, nickel-titanium (NiTi and glass fiber-reinforced polymer composite (GFRPC. Material and method Sixty specimens obtained from 10 sectioned pre-contoured arches (TP Orthodontics, were divided into 3 groups of 20 according to each type of material (1 esthetic-type wire and 2 not esthetic and length of 50 mm. The methodology consisted of a 3-point bending test using esthetic ceramic brackets (INVU, TP Orthodontics, Edgewise, 0.022”x 0.025” as points of support. The tensile tests were performed on a mechanical test machine, at a speed of 10 mm/min, deflection of 1 mm, 2 mm and 3 mm. Friedman’s Non Parametric Multiple comparisons test was used (P<0.05. Result The nickel-titanium wire presented smaller load/ deflection compared with stainless steel. GFRPC wires had lower strength values among all groups evaluated (P<.05. The steel wire showed permanent deformation after 3 mm deflection, NiTi wire demonstrated memory effect and the esthetic type had fractures with loss of strength. Conclusion It can be concluded that steel wires have high strength values, requiring the incorporation of loops and folds to reduce the load / deflection. NiTi and GFRPC wires produced low levels of force, however the esthetic wire was shown to fracture and break.

  2. Comparison of Galvanic Currents Generated Between Different Combinations of Orthodontic Brackets and Archwires Using Potentiostat: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Rabindra S; Shafiuddin, Bareera; Pasha, Azam; Vinay, K; Narayan, Anjali; Shetty, Smitha V

    2015-07-01

    Technological advances in wire selection and bracket design have led to improved treatment efficiency and allowed longer time intervals between appliance adjustments. The wires remain in the mouth for a longer duration and are subjected to electrochemical reactions, mechanical forces of mastication and generalized wear. These cause different types of corrosion. This study was done to compare the galvanic currents generated between different combinations of brackets and archwires commonly used in orthodontic practices. The materials used for the study included different commercially available orthodontic archwires and brackets. The galvanic current generated by individual materials and different combinations of these materials was tested and compared. The orthodontic archwires used were 0.019″ × 0.025″ heat-activated nickel-titanium (3M Unitek), 0.019″ × 0.025″ beta-titanium (3M Unitek) and 0.019″ × 0.025″ stainless steel (3M Unitek). The orthodontic brackets used were 0.022″ MBT laser-cut (Victory Series, 3M Unitek) and metal-injection molded (Leone Company) maxillary central incisor brackets respectively. The ligature wire used for ligation was 0.009″ stainless steel ligature (HP Company). The galvanic current for individual archwires, brackets, and the different bracket-archwire-ligature combinations was measured by using a Potentiostat machine. The data were generated using the Linear Sweep Voltammetry and OriginPro 8.5 Graphing and Data Analysis Softwares. The study was conducted in two phases. Phase I comprised of five groups for open circuit potential (OCP) and galvanic current (I), whereas Phase II comprised of six groups for galvanic current alone. Mean, standard deviation and range were computed for the OCP and galvanic current (I) values obtained. Results were subjected to statistical analysis through ANOVA. In Phase I, higher mean OCP was recorded in stainless steel archwire, followed by beta-titanium archwire, heat-activated nickel

  3. Alterations in plaque accumulation and gingival inflammation promoted by treatment with self-ligating and conventional orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Mauricio de Almeida; Saraiva, Patrícia Pinto; Maltagliati, Liliana Ávila; Rhoden, Fernando Kleinübing; Costa, Carla Cristina Alvarenga; Normando, David; Capelozza Filho, Leopoldino

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate, comparatively, the periodontal response during orthodontic treatment performed with self-ligating and conventional brackets. Sixteen Caucasian individuals of both sexes, aged between 12 and 16 years old and in permanent dentition were selected. Eight individuals were treated with conventional brackets installed on the lower dental arch and self-ligating brackets on the upper arch. Another eight individuals received self-ligating brackets in the lower arch and conventional brackets in the upper arch. The subjects received material and instructions for oral hygiene. Visible plaque index (VPI), gingival bleeding index (GBI) and clinical attachment level (CAL) were evaluated just after installation of orthodontic appliances, and 30, 60 and 180 days later. Mann-Whitney test was used to compare differences between groups (self-ligating and conventional), two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's test was used to assess CAL at each site of each tooth. Significance level was set at 5%. No significant changes were found with regard to the assessed parameters (VPI, GBI and CAL) in either one of the systems. No significant changes were found with regard to the periodontal response to orthodontic treatment for the variables assessed and between subjects receiving passive self-ligating and conventional brackets. All individuals had received oral hygiene instructions and had their periodontal conditions monitored.

  4. Alterations in plaque accumulation and gingival inflammation promoted by treatment with self-ligating and conventional orthodontic brackets

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    Mauricio de Almeida Cardoso

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to evaluate, comparatively, the periodontal response during orthodontic treatment performed with self-ligating and conventional brackets. METHODS: Sixteen Caucasian individuals of both sexes, aged between 12 and 16 years old and in permanent dentition were selected. Eight individuals were treated with conventional brackets installed on the lower dental arch and self-ligating brackets on the upper arch. Another eight individuals received self-ligating brackets in the lower arch and conventional brackets in the upper arch. The subjects received material and instructions for oral hygiene. Visible plaque index (VPI, gingival bleeding index (GBI and clinical attachment level (CAL were evaluated just after installation of orthodontic appliances, and 30, 60 and 180 days later. Mann-Whitney test was used to compare differences between groups (self-ligating and conventional, two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's test was used to assess CAL at each site of each tooth. Significance level was set at 5%. RESULTS: No significant changes were found with regard to the assessed parameters (VPI, GBI and CAL in either one of the systems. CONCLUSION: No significant changes were found with regard to the periodontal response to orthodontic treatment for the variables assessed and between subjects receiving passive self-ligating and conventional brackets. All individuals had received oral hygiene instructions and had their periodontal conditions monitored.

  5. The effect of ZnO nanoparticle coating on the frictional resistance between orthodontic wires and ceramic brackets

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    Behroozian, Ahmad; Kachoei, Mojgan; Khatamian, Masumeh; Divband, Baharak

    2016-01-01

    Background. Any decrease in friction between orthodontic wire and bracket can accelerate tooth movement in the sliding technique and result in better control of anchorage. This study was carried out to evaluate frictional forces by coating orthodontic wires and porcelain brackets with zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO). Methods. In this in vitro study, we evaluated a combination of 120 samples of 0.019×0.025 stainless steel (SS) orthodonticwires and 22 mil system edgewise porcelain brackets with and without spherical zinc oxide nanoparticles. Spherical ZnOnanoparticles were deposited on wires and brackets by immersing them in ethanol solution and SEM (scanning electronmicroscope) evaluation confirmed the presence of the ZnO coating. The frictional forces were calculated between the wiresand brackets in four groups: group ZZ (coated wire and bracket), group OO (uncoated wire and bracket), group ZO (coatedwire and uncoated bracket) and group OZ (uncoated wire and coated bracket). Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Mann-Whitney andKruskal-Wallis tests were used for data analysis. Results. The frictional force in ZZ (3.07±0.4 N) was the highest (P <0.05), and OZ (2.18±0.5 N) had the lowest amount of friction (P <0.05) among the groups. There was no significant difference in frictional forces between the ZO and OO groups (2.65±0.2 and 2.70±0.2 N, respectively). Conclusion. Coating of porcelain bracket surfaces with ZnO nanoparticles can decrease friction in the sliding technique,and wire coating combined with bracket coating is not recommended due to its effect on friction. PMID:27429727

  6. Tooth angulation and dental arch perimeter-the effect of orthodontic bracket prescription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Luana F; Cecim, Rodolpho L; Machado, Sissy M; Normando, David

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of upper incisors and canine angulations introduced by different bracket prescriptions on dental arch perimeter. Cone beam computerized tomography scans collected using I-Cat (Imaging Sciences International, Hatfield, PA, USA) were selected conveniently from a database of routine exams of a clinical radiology center. Crown and radicular measurements of upper incisors and canines were made and exported to the Autocad 2011 software to create a virtual dental model. The virtual teeth were positioned with an angulation of zero; thereafter, a reference value for the perimeter of the arch was measured. Furthermore, teeth angulations were applied according to the standards of the Edgewise bracket system and the Straight-wire systems: MBT, Capelozza, Andrews, and Roth. The largest linear distances for tooth crown (anterior arch perimeter) and root (radicular distance) were obtained for each bracket prescription. The anterior perimeter for well-aligned incisors and canines without angulation was used as reference (crown: 47.34mm; root: 39.13mm). An increase in the arch perimeter was obtained for all bracket prescriptions evaluated, which ranged from 0.28 and 3.19mm in the Edgewise technique, for the crown and root measurements, respectively, to 1.09 and 11.28mm for the Roth prescription. Bracket prescriptions with greater angulation led to an increased use of space within the dental arch, mainly in the radicular region. The consequence of this radicular angular displacement will need to be further investigated. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Effects of surface treatment and artificial aging on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded to four different provisional restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Jabbari, Youssef S; Al Taweel, Sara M; Al Rifaiy, Mohammed; Alqahtani, Mohammed Q; Koutsoukis, Theodoros; Zinelis, Spiros

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the combined effects of material type, surface treatment, and thermocycling on the bond strength of orthodontic brackets to materials used for the fabrication of provisional crowns. Four materials were included in this study (ProTemp, Trim Plus, Trim II, and Superpont C+B). Sixty cylindrical specimens (1 × 3 cm) were prepared from each material and equally divided into three groups. The first group was ground with silica carbide paper, the second was polished with pumice, and the last group was sandblasted with 50-µm aluminum oxide particles. Stainless-steel maxillary central incisor brackets (Victory Series, 3M) were bonded to the provisional material specimens with Transbond XT light-cured composite resin, and half of the specimens from each group were thermocycled 500 times in 5°C and 55°C water baths. Then the brackets were debonded with shear testing, and the results were statistically analyzed by three-way analysis of variance and Tukey's multiple-comparison tests at α  =  0.05. Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) was also identified. Before and after thermocycling, ProTemp materials showed the highest shear bond strength with orthodontic brackets (10.3 and 13.1 MPa, respectively). The statistical analysis indicated an interaction among the three independent variables (P < .05) and statistically significant differences in bond strength among provisional materials (P < .001), surface treatments (P < .001), and thermocycling (P < .05). According to the ARI, most groups demonstrated adhesive failure. The provisional material type, surface treatment, and artificial aging have a significant effect on bond strength. Sandblasting treatment exerts a beneficial effect on shear bond strength.

  8. Effect of bromelain and papain gel on enamel deproteinisation before orthodontic bracket bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pithon, Matheus Melo; Campos, Matheus Souza; Coqueiro, Raildo da Silva

    2016-05-01

    To test the hypothesis that enamel surface deproteinisation with different concentrations of bromelain in association with 10% papain increases the shear bond strength (SBS) of brackets bonded with orthodontic composite and resin modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC). Orthodontic brackets were attached according to the following protocols to 195 bovine incisors, which were acquired and divided into 13 groups: 1) Transbond XT (TXT) according to the manufacturer's recommendations; 2) Deproteinisation with 3% bromelain (BD) plus 10% papain and TXT; 3) 6% BD plus 10% Papain and TXT; 4) RMGIC, without enamel deproteinisation and without acid etching; 5) RMGIC, with 3% BD plus 10% papain and without acid etching; 6) RMGIC, with 6% BD plus 10% papain and without acid etching; 7) attachment using RMGIC following etching with polyacrylic acid; 8) 3% BD plus 10% papain, attachment using RMGIC and etching with polyacrylic acid; 9) 6% BD plus 10% papain, and attachment using RMGIC following etching with polyacrylic acid; 10) etching with 37% phosphoric acid and attachment using RMGIC; 11) 3% BD plus 10% papain, etching with 37% phosphoric acid and attachment using RMGIC; 12) 6% BD plus 10% papain, etching with 37% phosphoric acid and attachment using RMGIC; 13) deproteinisation with 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), etching with polyacrylic acid and RMGIC. After bonding, the brackets were removed by a universal mechanical testing machine, which recorded shear bond strength at failure. The material remaining on the tooth was assessed using the adhesive remnant index (ARI). Deproteinisation with 3% and 6% bromelain gel plus papain significantly increased the shear bond strength (p < 0.05), when acid etching was performed with phosphoric acid, followed by primer application and attachment using Transbond XT (Group 3) and when attached with RMGIC without etching. Deproteinisation with 6% bromelain gel plus papain significantly increased (p < 0.05) the ARI score only when

  9. Effect of different methods of enamel conditioning on bond strength of orthodontic brackets

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    Davari AR

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: With the introduction of different bondable restorative materials in dentistry, various methods have been suggested to enhance the polymerization and shear bond strength of these materials. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of different methods of enamel conditioning on bond strength of orthodontic brackets and on the bracket/ adhesive failure mode. Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, brackets were bonded to thirty-six bovine incisor teeth with different protocols according to the manufacturer's instructions as follows: Group 1: conventional multistep adhesive (n=12; Group 2: self-etching primer system (n=12; Group 3: acid+self-etching primer system (n=12. Specimens were loaded in a universal testing machine (Instron, Canton and Mass and the mode of failure was recorded. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Kruskall-Wallis tests with p<0.05 as the limit of significance. Results: The mean shear bond strength was 11.7 ± 4.2, 10.5 ± 4.4, and 10.9 ± 4.8 MPa for group 1, 2, and 3 respectively. There was no significant difference in bond strength among the three groups (P=0.800. No significant difference was observed among the three groups with respect to residual adhesive on the enamel surfaces (P=0.554. Conclusion: Based on the results of the present study, the use of self-etching primers may be an alternative to conventional phosphoric acid pre-treatment in orthodontic bonding.

  10. Effect of surface treatment of prefabricated teeth on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumerlato, Marina; Lima, Eduardo Martinelli de; Osorio, Leandro Berni; Mota, Eduardo Gonçalves; Menezes, Luciane Macedo de; Rizzatto, Susana Maria Deon

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the effects of grinding, drilling, sandblasting, and ageing prefabricated teeth (PfT) on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets, as well as the effects of surface treatments on the adhesive remnant index (ARI). One-hundred-ninety-two PfT were divided into four groups (n = 48): Group 1, no surface treatment was done; Group 2, grinding was performed with a cylindrical diamond bur; Group 3, two drillings were done with a spherical diamond bur; Group 4, sandblasting was performed with 50-µm aluminum oxide. Before the experiment, half of the samples stayed immersed in distilled water at 37oC for 90 days. Brackets were bonded with Transbond XT and shear strength tests were carried out using a universal testing machine. SBS were compared by surface treatment and by ageing with two-way ANOVA, followed by Tukey's test. ARI scores were compared between surface treatments with Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Dunn's test. Surface treatments on PfT enhanced SBS of brackets (pgrinding) (pgrinding. There was a positive correlation between SBS and ARI.

  11. Microleakage under Orthodontic Metal Brackets Bonded with Three Different Bonding Techniques with/without Thermocycling

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    Berahman Sabzevari

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to compare the microleakage of beneath the orthodontic brackets bonded with 3 different bonding techniques and evaluate the effect of thermocycling. Methods: One hundred and twenty premolars were randomly divided into 6 groups, received the following treatment: group 1: 37% phosphoric acid gel+Unite primer+Unite adhesive, group 2: 37% phosphoric acid gel+ Transbond XT primer+Transbond XT adhesive, group 3: Transbond plus Self Etching Primer (TSEP+Transbond XT adhesive. Groups 4, 5, and 6 were similar to groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Evaluation of microleakage was done following to thermocycling test. After bonding, the specimens were sealed with nail varnish except for 1 mm around the brackets and then stained with 0.5% basic fuchsine. The specimens were sectioned at buccolingual direction in 2 parallel planes and evaluated under a stereomicroscope to determine the amount of microleakage at bracket-adhesive and adhesive-enamel interfaces from gingival and occlusal margins. Results: Microleakage was observed in all groups, and increased significantly after thermocycling at some interfaces of Unite adhesive group and conventional etching+Transbond XT adhesive group, but the increase was not significant in any interface of TSEP group. With or without thermocycling, TSEP displayed more microleakage than other groups. In most groups, microleakage at gingival margin was significantly higher than occlusal margin. Conclusion: Thermocycling and type of bonding technique significantly affect the amount of microleakage.

  12. In vitro Effects of a Neutral Fluoride Agent on Shear Bond Strength and Microleakage of Orthodontic Brackets

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    Farzaneh Ahrari

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of pretreatment with a neutral fluoride agent on shear bond strength (SBS and microleakage of orthodontic brackets, and to investigate any significant relationship between SBS and microleakage. Methods: Forty intact premolars were selected and randomly divided into 2 groups. Group 1 served as the control, while group 2 underwent treatment with a 2% sodium fluoride (NaF gel, which was applied on the enamel surface for 4 minutes before etching. After bonding orthodontic brackets, the teeth were immersed for 12 hours in methylen blue dye, followed by mounting in acrylic resin. Shear bond strength was determined using an Instron Universal Testing Machine and the amount of microleakage and the adhesive remnant index (ARI were assessed under a stereomicroscope. Results: The mean SBS and microleakage beneath metal brackets were not significantly different among the control and NaF-treated groups (P>0.05. Furthermore, no significant correlation was found between SBS and microleakage (r=-0.04, P=0.796. The ARI scores revealed that in both groups, most of the adhesive remained on the enamel surface after debonding. Conclusions: It may be concluded that pretreatment of enamel with 2% NaF prior to the bonding procedure does not significantly affect microleakage and SBS of orthodontic brackets and thus, it can be recommended as a suitable approach to reduce the incidence of white spot lesions in orthodontically treated patients, especially those at high risk of caries formation.  

  13. Effect of surface treatment of prefabricated teeth on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets

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    Marina Cumerlato

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the effects of grinding, drilling, sandblasting, and ageing prefabricated teeth (PfT on the shear bond strength (SBS of orthodontic brackets, as well as the effects of surface treatments on the adhesive remnant index (ARI. Methods: One-hundred-ninety-two PfT were divided into four groups (n = 48: Group 1, no surface treatment was done; Group 2, grinding was performed with a cylindrical diamond bur; Group 3, two drillings were done with a spherical diamond bur; Group 4, sandblasting was performed with 50-µm aluminum oxide. Before the experiment, half of the samples stayed immersed in distilled water at 37oC for 90 days. Brackets were bonded with Transbond XT and shear strength tests were carried out using a universal testing machine. SBS were compared by surface treatment and by ageing with two-way ANOVA, followed by Tukey’s test. ARI scores were compared between surface treatments with Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Dunn’s test. Results: Surface treatments on PfT enhanced SBS of brackets (p< 0.01, result not observed with ageing (p= 0.45. Groups II, III, and IV showed higher SBS and greater ARI than the Group 1 (p< 0.05. SBS was greater in the groups 3 and 4 (drilling, sandblasting than in the Group 2 (grinding (p< 0.05. SBS and ARI showed a positive correlation (Spearman’s R2= 0.57; p< 0.05. Conclusion: Surface treatment on PfT enhanced SBS of brackets, however ageing did not show any relevance. Sandblasting and drilling showed greater SBS than grinding. There was a positive correlation between SBS and ARI.

  14. Effect of surface treatment of prefabricated teeth on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumerlato, Marina; de Lima, Eduardo Martinelli; Osorio, Leandro Berni; Mota, Eduardo Gonçalves; de Menezes, Luciane Macedo; Rizzatto, Susana Maria Deon

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the effects of grinding, drilling, sandblasting, and ageing prefabricated teeth (PfT) on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets, as well as the effects of surface treatments on the adhesive remnant index (ARI). Methods: One-hundred-ninety-two PfT were divided into four groups (n = 48): Group 1, no surface treatment was done; Group 2, grinding was performed with a cylindrical diamond bur; Group 3, two drillings were done with a spherical diamond bur; Group 4, sandblasting was performed with 50-µm aluminum oxide. Before the experiment, half of the samples stayed immersed in distilled water at 37oC for 90 days. Brackets were bonded with Transbond XT and shear strength tests were carried out using a universal testing machine. SBS were compared by surface treatment and by ageing with two-way ANOVA, followed by Tukey’s test. ARI scores were compared between surface treatments with Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Dunn’s test. Results: Surface treatments on PfT enhanced SBS of brackets (p< 0.01), result not observed with ageing (p= 0.45). Groups II, III, and IV showed higher SBS and greater ARI than the Group 1 (p< 0.05). SBS was greater in the groups 3 and 4 (drilling, sandblasting) than in the Group 2 (grinding) (p< 0.05). SBS and ARI showed a positive correlation (Spearman’s R2= 0.57; p< 0.05). Conclusion: Surface treatment on PfT enhanced SBS of brackets, however ageing did not show any relevance. Sandblasting and drilling showed greater SBS than grinding. There was a positive correlation between SBS and ARI. PMID:28902249

  15. The impact of chlorhexidine mouth rinse on the bond strength of polycarbonate orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Farouk Ahmed; Hashem, Mohammed Ibrahim; Chalisserry, Elna P; Anil, Sukumaran

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of the current in-vivo study was to assess the effect of using 0.12% chlorhexidine (CHX) mouth rinse, before bonding, on shear bond strength of polycarbonate brackets bonded with composite adhesive. Eighteen orthodontic patients with a mean age 21.41 ± 1.2 years, who were scheduled to have 2 or more first premolars extracted, were included in this study. Patients were referred for an oral prophylaxis program which included, in part, the use of a mouth rinse. Patients were divided into 2 groups, a test group of 9 patients who used 0.12% CHX gluconate mouth rinse twice daily and a control group of 9 patients who used a mouth rinse without CHX, but with same color. After 1 week, polycarbonate brackets were bonded to first premolars with Transbond XT composite adhesive. Premolars were extracted after 28 days and tested for shear bond strength on a universal testing machine. Student's t-test was used to compare shear bond strengths of both groups. No statistically significant difference was found in bond strengths' values between both groups. The test group (with CHX) has mean shear bond strength of 14.21 ± 2.42 MPa whereas the control group (without CHX) revealed a mean strength of 14.52 ± 2.31 MPa. The use of 0.12% CHX mouth rinse, for one week before bonding, did not affect the shear bond strength of polycarbonate brackets bonded with Transbond composite. Furthermore, these brackets showed clinically acceptable bond strength.

  16. Damage of the Interface Between an Orthodontic Bracket and Enamel - the Effect of Some Elastic Properties of the Adhesive Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durgesh, B. H.; Alkheraif, A. A.; Al Sharawy, M.; Varrela, J.; Vallittu, P. K.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the magnitude of debonding stress of an orthodontic bracket bonded to the enamel with resin systems having different elastic properties. For the same purpose, sixty human premolars were randomly divided into four groups according to the adhesive system used for bonding brackets: G Fix flowable resin (GFI) with Everstick NET (ESN), GFI, G Aenial Universal Flow (GAU) with ESN, and GAU. The brackets were stressed in the occlusogingival direction on a universal testing machine. The values of debonding load and displacement were determined at the point of debonding. The elastic modulus of the tested materials was determined using nanoindentation. An analysis of variance showed a significant difference in the loads required to debond the bracket among the groups tested. The GAU group had the highest elastic modulus, followed by the GFI and ESN groups. ARI (Adhesive Remnant Index) scores demonstrated more remnants of the adhesive material on the bracket surface with adhesives having a higher elastic modulus. Taking into consideration results of the present in-vitro study, it can be concluded that the incorporation of a glass-fiber-reinforced composite resin (FRC) with a low elastic modulus between the orthodontic bracket and enamel increases the debonding force and strain more than with adhesive systems having a higher elastic modulus.

  17. In vitro evaluation of microbial contamination of orthodontic brackets as received from the manufacturer using microbiological and molecular tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos Gerzson, Darlene R; Simon, Daniel; Dos Anjos, Aline Lima; Freitas, Maria Perpétua Mota

    2015-11-01

    To test the null hypothesis that orthodontic brackets as supplied by manufacturers do not have microbial contamination. The sample comprised 140 brackets of four different commercially available brands, used directly from the manufacturer's packaging, divided into 14 groups (n  =  10 brackets each). Of the 140 pieces, 60 were full cases and 80 were replacement brackets. Materials were tested to detect bacterial growth, analyze types of bacteria present (biochemical test), and identify bacteria (molecular test with polymerase chain reaction [PCR]). In two of 12 groups the brackets showed microbial contamination: group 1, Morelli full case brackets, and group 12, Abzil-3M Unitek replacement brackets. Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis were the bacteria identified in groups 1 and 12, respectively (suggested by the biochemical test and confirmed by PCR). Brackets of two brands (Morelli and Abzil-3M Unitek) were found to be contaminated by bacteria in the original packages supplied by the manufacturers, which suggests a risk for patient contamination. These data suggest that the manufacturers of these materials should improve the quality control of the packaging used, including sterilization, for the security of patient health.

  18. Comparison of Microleakage under Rebonded Stainless Steel Orthodontic Brackets Using Two Methods of Adhesive Removal: Sandblast and Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudehzaeim, Mohamad Hossein; Yassaei, Soghra; Taherimoghadam, Shohreh

    2015-02-01

    Debonding is a common occurrence in orthodontic treatment and a considerable number of orthodontists prefer to rebond the detached brackets because of economic issues. The aim of this study was to compare the microleakage beneath rebonded stainless steel brackets using two methods of adhesive removal namely sandblast and laser. Sixty human premolar teeth were randomly divided into three groups. Following bonding the brackets, group 1 served as the control group. Brackets in groups 2 and 3 were debonded, and adhesive removal from the bracket bases was done by means of sandblasting and Er-YAG laser, respectively. After rebonding, teeth in each group were stained with 2% methylene blue for 24 hours, sectioned and examined under a stereomicroscope. Marginal microleakage at the adhesive-enamel and bracket-adhesive interfaces in the occlusal and gingival margins was determined. Statistical analysis was done using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Comparison of the microleakage scores among the three groups revealed no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05). At the enamel-adhesive interface, the gingival margins in all groups showed higher microleakage while in the adhesive-bracket interface, the occlusal margin exhibited greater microleakage. Er-YAG laser irradiation and sandblasting for adhesive removal from the debonded brackets yielded clinically acceptable microleakage scores.

  19. Comparison of frictional resistance between self-ligating and conventional brackets tied with elastomeric and metal ligature in orthodontic archwires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Vanessa Vieira; Lopes, Murilo Baena; Gonini Júnior, Alcides; Almeida, Marcio Rodrigues de; Moura, Sandra Kiss; Almeida, Renato Rodrigues de

    2014-01-01

    To compare the frictional resistance between self-ligating and conventional brackets tied to different types of wire. Abzil Kirium Capelozza (Pattern I) and Easy Clip (Roth prescription) incisor brackets were used. An elastomeric ligature or a 0.10-in ligating wire was used to ligate the wire to the Abzil bracket. Three types of orthodontic archwire alloys were assessed: 0.016-in NiTi wire, 0.016 x 0.021-in NiTi wire and 0.019 x 0.025-in steel wire. Ten observations were carried out for each bracket-archwire angulation combination. Brackets were mounted in a special appliance, positioned at 90 degrees in relation to the wire and tested in two angulations. Frictional test was performed in a Universal Testing Machine at 5 mm/min and 10 mm of displacement. The means (MPa) were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey's test set at 5% of significance. The surfaces of wires and brackets were observed at SEM. Steel-tied brackets (16.48 ± 8.31) showed higher means of frictional resistance than elastomeric-tied brackets (4.29 ± 2.16 ) and self-ligating brackets (1.66 ± 1.57) (P 0.05). No statistical differences (P > 0.05) were found between zero (7.76 ± 8.46) and five-degree (7.19 ± 7.93) angulations. Friction was influenced not only by the type of bracket, but also by the ligating systems. Different morphological aspects were observed for the brackets and wires studied.

  20. Surface quality and microstructure of low-vacuum sintered orthodontic bracket 17-4 PH stainless steel fabricated by MIM process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suharno, Bambang; Suharno, Lingga Pradinda; Saputro, Hantoro Restucondro; Irawan, Bambang; Prasetyadi, Tjokro; Ferdian, Deni; Supriyadi, Sugeng

    2018-02-01

    Surface roughness and microstructure play important role on orthodontic bracket quality. Therefore, orthodontic brackets need to have smooth surface roughness to reduce the friction and bacterial adhesion. Microstructure of orthodontic brackets also determine the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. There are two methods to produce orthodontic bracket, investment casting and metal injection molding. The purpose of this study is to observe the surface roughness and microstructure of orthodontic bracket which were made from two different fabrication methods. To produce orthodontic bracket with metal injection molding method, 17-4 PH stainless steel feedstock was injected to the orthodontic bracket mold using injection molding machine. After injection, the binder was eliminated with solvent and thermal debinding. Solvent debinding process was conducted with hexane at 50 °C on magnetic stirrer for 1.5 hours. Thermal debinding process was conducted at 510 °C with 0.5 °C/min heat rate and 120 min holding time. Hereafter, sintering process were performed with vacuum tube furnace at 1360 °C with heat rate 5 °C/min and 90 min holding time in low vacuum atmosphere. To produce orthodontic bracket with investment casting method, the wax was injected into the mold then the wax pattern was arranged into the tree form. The tree form was then dipped into ceramic slurry and allowed to harden, the ceramic slurry has a thickness in the region of 10 mm. The ceramic mold was then heated at a temperature of over than 1100°C to strengthen the ceramic mold and to remove the remaining wax. After that, the molten 17-4 PH stainless steel was poured into the ceramic mold at a temperature of over 1600°C. The natural cooling process was carried out at temperature of 25°C, after which the ceramic mold was broken away. Then, the orthodontic bracket was cut from the tree form. The results show that the orthodontic bracket which were made with investment casting fabrication

  1. Are Bonding Agents being Effective on the Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded to the Composite?

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    Fahimeh Farzanegan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the clinical problems in orthodontics is the bonding of brackets tocomposite restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bondstrength of brackets bonded to composite restorations using Excite. Methods:Forty brackets were bonded to composite surfaces, which were embedded inacrylic resin. One of the following four protocols was employed for surfacepreparation of the composite: group 1 37% phosphoric acid for 60 seconds, group2 roughening with a diamond bur plus 37% phosphoric acid for 60 seconds, group3 37% phosphoric acid for 60 seconds and the applying Excite®, group4 roughening with diamond bur plus 37% phosphoric acid for 60 seconds andapplying Excite®. Maxillary central brackets were bonded onto thecomposite prepared samples with Transbond XT. Shear Bond Strength (SBS wasmeasured by a universal testing machine. The ANOVA and Tukey test was utilizedfor data analysis. Results: There was a significant difference betweenthe four groups (P

  2. Use of orthodontic brackets for intermaxillary fixation for management of mandibular fracture in a pediatric patient

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    Rajeev Pandey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fracture of mandible is relatively less common in pediatric population when compared to adults. Management of pediatric mandibular fracture is a very complex issue and requires accurate and early treatment. Although the general principles of treatment remain the same as adult but various factors which influence the choice of management: age, dentition status, site involved, amount of displacement, number of fractures, and socioeconomic status. This case report describes a conservative way of management of moderately displaced mandibular fracture with the help of closed reduction achieved using intermaxillary fixation (IMF with help of elastics using orthodontic brackets. A 9-year-old male child was treated for body of mandible fracture using this technique. The IMF was removed after 3 weeks and adequate bone union was demonstrated clinically and radiographically.

  3. A comparative evaluation of the shear bond strength of five different orthodontic bonding agents polymerized using halogen and light-emitting diode curing lights: An in vitro investigation

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    Sujoy Banerjee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: With the introduction of photosensitive (light-activated restorative materials in orthodontics, various methods have been suggested to enhance the polymerization of the materials used, including use of more powerful light curing devices. Bond strength is an important property and determines the amount of force delivered and the treatment duration. Many light-cured bonding materials have become popular but it is the need of the hour to determine the bonding agent that is the most efficient and has the desired bond strength. Aim: To evaluate and compare the shear bond strengths of five different orthodontic light cure bonding materials cured with traditional halogen light and low-intensity light-emitting diode (LED light curing unit. Materials and Methods: 100 human maxillary premolar teeth, extracted for orthodontic purpose, were used to prepare the samples. 100 maxillary stainless steel bicuspid brackets of 0.018 slot of Roth prescription, manufactured by D-tech Company, were bonded to the prepared tooth surfaces of the mounted samples using five different orthodontic bracket bonding light-cured materials, namely, Enlight, Fuji Ortho LC (resin-modified glass ionomer cement, Orthobond LC, Relybond, and Transbond XT. The bond strength was tested on an Instron Universal testing machine (model no. 5582. Results: In Group 1 (halogen group, Enlight showed the highest shear bond strength (16.4 MPa and Fuji Ortho LC showed the least bond strength (6.59 MPa (P value 0.000. In Group 2 (LED group, Transbond showed the highest mean shear bond strength (14.6 MPa and Orthobond LC showed the least mean shear bond strength (6.27 MPa (P value 0.000. There was no statistically significant difference in the shear bond strength values of all samples cured using either halogen (mean 11.49 MPa or LED (mean 11.20 MPa, as the P value was 0.713. Conclusion: Polymerization with both halogen and LED resulted in shear bond strength values which were above the

  4. Streptococcus mutans forms xylitol-resistant biofilm on excess adhesive flash in novel ex-vivo orthodontic bracket model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Cindy S F; Ming, Yue; Foong, Kelvin W C; Rosa, Vinicius; Thuyen, Truong; Seneviratne, Chaminda J

    2017-04-01

    During orthodontic bonding procedures, excess adhesive is invariably left on the tooth surface at the interface between the bracket and the enamel junction; it is called excess adhesive flash (EAF). We comparatively evaluated the biofilm formation of Streptococcus mutans on EAF produced by 2 adhesives and examined the therapeutic efficacy of xylitol on S mutans formed on EAF. First, we investigated the biofilm formation of S mutans on 3 orthodontic bracket types: stainless steel preadjusted edgewise, ceramic preadjusted edgewise, and stainless steel self-ligating. Subsequently, tooth-colored Transbond XT (3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif) and green Grengloo (Ormco, Glendora, Calif) adhesives were used for bonding ceramic brackets to extracted teeth. S mutans biofilms on EAF produced by the adhesives were studied using the crystal violet assay and scanning electron microscopy. Surface roughness and surface energy of the EAF were examined. The therapeutic efficacies of different concentrations of xylitol were tested on S mutans biofilms. Significantly higher biofilms were formed on the ceramic preadjusted edgewise brackets (P = 0.003). Transbond XT had significantly higher S mutans biofilms compared with Grengloo surfaces (P = 0.007). There was no significant difference in surface roughness between Transbond XT and Grengloo surfaces (P >0.05). Surface energy of Transbond XT had a considerably smaller contact angle than did Grengloo, suggesting that Transbond XT is a more hydrophilic material. Xylitol at low concentrations had no significant effect on the reduction of S mutans biofilms on orthodontic adhesives (P = 0.016). Transbond XT orthodontic adhesive resulted in more S mutans biofilm compared with Grengloo adhesive on ceramic brackets. Surface energy seemed to play a more important role than surface roughness for the formation of S mutans biofilm on EAF. Xylitol does not appear to have a therapeutic effect on mature S mutans biofilm. Copyright © 2017 American

  5. [Orthodontic treatment of malocclusion Class III in patients aged 6-12 by Postnikov appliance, face mask and bracket system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postnikov, M A; Trunin, D A; Pankratova, N V; Nesterov, A M; Sadykov, M I; Ostankov, S A

    2018-01-01

    The diagnostics and treatment of malocclusion Class III in patients aged 6-12 is an vital problem in orthodontics. Method of orthodontic treatment of malocclusion Class III in patients with the help of improved and patented orthodontic construction - 'Postnikov appliance' - and face mask and bracket system is analysed in the article. Orthodontic treatment of malocclusion Class III was examined in 24 patients aged 6-12 by the suggested method. All patients were examined clinically and with the help af additional diagnostic methods: head cephalometry in lateral position with further data analysis in Dolphin Imaging (USA). The use of computer technologies in Dolphin Imaging helps to controll the process of correction of dentition correlation in different stages of treatment, to reduce the period of treatment of malocclusion Class III in patients aged 6-12 and to improve face esthetics and life quality ratio.

  6. Evaluation of the force generated by gradual deflection of orthodontic wires in conventional metallic, esthetic, and self-ligating brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoela Fávaro Francisconi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the deflection forces of Nitinol orthodontic wires placed in different types of brackets: metallic, reinforced polycarbonate with metallic slots, sapphire, passive and active self-ligating, by assessing strength values variation according to gradual increase in wire diameter and deflection and comparing different combinations in the different deflections. Material and Methods: Specimens were set in a clinical simulation model and evaluated in a Universal Testing Machine (INSTRON 3342, using the ISO 15841 protocol. Data were subjected to One-way ANOVA, followed by Tukey tests (p<0.05. Results: Self-ligating brackets presented the most similar behavior to each other. For conventional brackets there was no consistent behavior for any of the deflections studied. Conclusions: Self-ligating brackets presented the most consistent and predictable results while conventional brackets, as esthetic brackets, showed very different patterns of forces. Self-ligating brackets showed higher strength in all deflections when compared with the others, in 0.020-inch wires.

  7. Effect of various commercially available mouthrinses on shear bond strength of orthodontic metal brackets: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeran, Nazeer Ahmed; George, Ashwin Mathew

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol is known to degrade and dissolve the bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate present in the composite resin. The effect of alcohol containing mouthrinses on the shear bond strength of orthodontic metal brackets bonded with composite resin has not been verified until date and is the purpose of this study. The aims and objectives of the present study were to evaluate (1) Whether there is a significant difference in the shear bond strength of metal orthodontic brackets after the 1 year (12 h) and 2 years simulation (24 h) of mouth rinsing with 4 different commercially available mouthrinses (2 alcoholic and 2 alcohol-free mouthrinses) when compared to the control. (2) Whether alcohol containing mouthrinses have more adverse effect on the shear bond strength when compared with alcohol-free mouthrinses. (3) To assess the site of bond failure using adhesive remnant index. Experimental - laboratory based. A total of 100 upper premolars extracted for orthodontic purpose were collected immediately after extraction, cleared soft-tissue debris and blood and immediately stored in distilled water with 0.1% thymol crystals added to inhibit bacterial growth. Two alcohol containing mouthrinses and two alcohol-free mouthrinses were used and the bonded teeth were placed in the mouthrinses for a stipulated period of time (1 year simulation and 2 years simulation) and shear bond strength were tested using Lloyd Universal Testing Machine. The data were analyzed using analysis of variance and paired samples t-test. After the 1 year and 2 years simulation time, samples stored in alcohol containing mouthrinses showed lower bond strength (P orthodontic brackets bonded with composite resin (Transbond XT in the present study), more when compared with alcohol-free mouthrinses. It is, therefore, highly advisable to avoid alcohol containing mouthrinses in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment and use alcohol-free mouthrinses as adjuncts to regular oral hygiene procedures for maintaining

  8. Effectiveness of fluoride sealant in the prevention of carious lesions around orthodontic brackets: an OCT evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pithon, Matheus Melo; Santos, Mariana de Jesus; de Souza, Camilla Andrade; Leão, Jorge César Borges; Braz, Ana Karla Souza; de Araujo, Renato Evangelista; Tanaka, Orlando Motohiro; Oliveira, Dauro Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This article aimed to evaluate in vitro the efficiency of Pro Seal fluoride sealant application in the prevention of white spot lesions around orthodontic brackets. Material and Methods: Brackets were bonded to the buccal surface of bovine incisors, and five groups were formed (n = 15) according to the exposure of teeth to oral hygiene substances and the application of enamel sealant: G1 (control), only brushing was performed with 1.450 ppm fluoride; G2 (control) brushing associated with the use of mouthwash with 225 ppm fluoride; G3, only Pro Seal sealant application was performed with 1.000 ppm fluoride; G4 Pro Seal associated with brushing; G5 Pro Seal associated with brushing and mouthwash. Experimental groups alternated between pH cycling and the procedures described. All specimens were kept at a temperature of 37 °C throughout the entire experiment. Both brushing and immersion in solutions were performed within a time interval of one minute, followed by washing in deionized water three times a day for 28 days. Afterwards, an evaluation by Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) of the spectral type was performed. In each group, a scanning exam of the white spot lesion area (around the sites where brackets were bonded) and depth measurement of carious lesions were performed. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to determine whether there were significant differences among groups. For post hoc analysis, Tukey test was used. Results: There was statistically significant difference between groups 1 and 2 (p = 0.003), 1 and 3 (p = 0.008), 1 and 4 (p = 0.000) and 1 and 5 (p = 0.000). The group in which only brushing was performed (Group 1) showed deeper enamel lesion. Conclusion: Pro Seal sealant alone or combined with brushing and/or brushing and the use of a mouthwash with fluoride was more effective in protecting enamel, in comparison to brushing alone. PMID:26691968

  9. Effect of bioglass on artificially induced enamel lesion around orthodontic brackets: OCT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhsh, Turki; Al-batati, Mohammed; Mukhtar, Mona; Al-Najjar, Mohammed; Bakhsh, Saud; Bakhsh, Abdulsalam; Bakry, Ahmad; Mandurah, Mona; Abbassy, Mona

    2018-02-01

    Background and Objective: White spot lesions (WSLs) are commonly seen after completing orthodontic treatment. Different approaches have been suggested to avoid such a complication. Recently, 45S5 bioglass (BG) was introduced as remineralizing agent. Therefore, the objective of this in-vitro study was to assess the effect of BG in remineralizing WSLs using Optical coherence tomography (OCT). Methods: Fifteen human premolar teeth were sectioned and bonded to orthodontic brackets with Transbond XT primer followed by Transbond PLUS color change adhesive (3M Unitek, USA) on their smooth surfaces according to the manufacturer's instructions. Then, all specimens were varnished excluding the area of interest (AOI) around the bonded restoration, immersed in demineralizing solution and imaged by cross-polarization OCT (CONT group), and the maximum pixel value (MPV) of the AOI were calculated. Then, they were subjected to remineralizing solutions and BG application followed by OCT imaging (REM group). Results: Mann-Whitney test showed the MPV of the AOI in REM was greatly increased and was significantly different from CONT (penamel by MPV technique. The BG has a great potential to remineralize enamel defects, however further investigation is required.

  10. Development of Superhydrophobic Material SS 17-4 PH for Bracket Orthodontic Application by Metal Injection Molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supriadi, S.; Suharno, B.; Widjaya, T.; Ayuningtyas, S. T.; Baek, E. R.

    2018-01-01

    Dental’s plaque is a common problem that encountered during orthodontic treatment using bracket. It is caused by demineralization of enamel due to the activity of bacteria. The bacteria increase with remaining excess food which trapped in teeth and bracket. A hydrophobic surface could reduce food attachment on the bracket because of extremely low wettability properties that make it easy to clean with water. There are several methods to obtain hydrophobic surfaces, which are sol-gel, template replica and also etching. The propose of this work is to compare etching treatment and surface modification on sintered SS 17-4 PH as bracket material using CuCl2 and HCl as an etchant while stearic acid was used for surface modification. Hydrophobic surfaces were produced under various etching time i.e 15, 30, 45 and 60 seconds for CuCl2 and 40, 50, 60 and 70 minutes for HCl and also HCl concentration i.e 1,2 and 3 mol/L at room temperature. The hydrophobicity is observed using contact angle measurement while the microstructures observed by Scanning Electron Microscope. The result shows the contact angle could be achieved up to 60% higher than the as-sintered material. Hydrophobic structure has successfully fabricated using etching technique that might be applied to the orthodontic bracket.

  11. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded to Enamel Prepared By Er:YAG Laser and Conventional Acid-Etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, M.H.; Namvar, F.; Chalipa, J.; Saber, K.; Chiniforush, N.; Sarmadi, S.; Mirhashemi, A.H.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to compare shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets bonded to enamel prepared by Er:YAG laser with two different powers and conventional acid-etching. Materials and Methods: Forty-five human premolars extracted for orthodontic purposes were randomly assigned to three groups based on conditioning method: Group 1- conventional etching with 37% phosphoric acid; Group 2- irradiation with Er:YAG laser at 1 W; and Group 3- irradiation with Er:YAG laser at 1.5 W. Metal brackets were bonded on prepared enamel using a light-cured composite. All groups were subjected to thermocycling process. Then, the specimens mounted in auto-cure acryle and shear bond strength were measured using a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm per second. After debonding, the amount of resin remaining on the teeth was determined using the adhesive remnant index (ARI) scored 1 to 5. One-way analysis of variance was used to compare shear bond strengths and the Kruskal-Wallis test was performed to evaluate differences in the ARI for different etching types. Results: The mean and standard deviation of conventional acid-etch group, 1W laser group and 1.5W laser group was 3.82 ± 1.16, 6.97 ± 3.64 and 6.93 ± 4.87, respectively. Conclusion: The mean SBS obtained with an Er:YAG laser operated at 1W or 1.5W is approximately similar to that of conventional etching. However, the high variability of values in bond strength of irradiated enamel should be considered to find the appropriate parameters for applying Er:YAG laser as a favorable alternative for surface conditioning. PMID:22924098

  12. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded to Enamel Prepared By Er:YAG Laser and Conven-tional Acid-Etching

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    M.H. Hosseini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study was to compare shear bond strength (SBS of orthodontic brackets bonded to enamel prepared by Er:YAG laser with two different powers and conventional acid-etching.Materials and Methods: Forty-five human premolars extracted for orthodontic purposes were randomly assigned to three groups based on conditioning method: Group 1- conventional etching with 37% phosphoric acid; Group 2- irradiation with Er:YAG laser at 1 W; and Group 3- irradiation with Er:YAG laser at 1.5 W. Metal brackets were bonded on prepared enamel using a light-cured composite. All groups were subjected to thermocycling process. Then, the specimens mounted in auto-cure acryle and shear bond strength were measured using a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm per second. After debonding, the amount of resin remaining on the teeth was determined using the adhesive remnant index (ARI scored 1 to 5. One-way analysis of variance was used to compare shear bond strengths and the Kruskal-Wallis test was performed to evaluate differences in the ARI for different etching types.Results: The mean and standard deviation of conventional acid-etch group, 1W laser group and 1.5W laser group was 3.82 ± 1.16, 6.97 ± 3.64 and 6.93 ± 4.87, respectively.Conclusion: The mean SBS obtained with an Er:YAG laser operated at 1W or 1.5W is approximately similar to that of conventional etching. However, the high variability of values in bond strength of irradiated enamel should be considered to find the appropriate parameters for applying Er:YAG laser as a favorable alternative for surface conditioning.

  13. Orthodontic brackets in high field MR imaging: experimental evaluation of magnetic field interactions at 3.0 tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemper, J.; Adam, G.; Klocke, A.; Kahl-Nieke, B.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate static magnetic field interactions for 32 commonly used orthodontic brackets in a 3.0 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. Materials and methods: 32 orthodontic brackets consisting of a steel alloy (n=27), a cobalt-chromium alloy (n=2), ceramic (n=1), ceramic with a steel slot (n=1), and titanium (n=1) from 13 different manufacturers were tested for magnetic field interactions in a static magnetic field at 3.0 T (Gyroscan Intera 3.0 T, Philips Medical Systems, Best, Netherlands). The magnetic deflection force F Z [mN] was evaluated by determining the deflection angle β[ ] using the established deflection angle test according to the ASTM guidelines. The magnetic-field-induced rotational force F rot or torque was qualitatively determined using a 5-point grading scale (0: no torque; +4: very strong torque). Results: In 18 of the 32 brackets, the deflection angle β was found to be > 45 and the translational force exceeded the gravitational force F G on the particular bracket (F Z : 1.2-45.7 mN). The translational force F Z was found to be up to 68.5 times greater than the gravitational force F G (F Z /F G : 1.4-68.5). The rotational force F rot was correspondingly high (+3/+4) for those brackets. For the remaining 14 objects, the deflection angles were < 45 and the torque measurements ranged from 0 to +2. The static magnetic field did not affect the titanium bracket and the ceramic bracket. No measurable translational and rotational forces were found. (orig.)

  14. Comparison of the initial orthodontic force systems produced by a new lingual bracket system and a straight-wire appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuck, Lars-Michael; Wiechmann, Dirk; Drescher, Dieter

    2005-09-01

    Over the last few years, lingual appliances have become an established orthodontic treatment technique. Many studies have concentrated on various esthetic aspects, on laboratory and clinical procedures, and on patient comfort and compliance. The orthodontic force systems of these appliances, however, have not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was thus to determine the forces and moments produced by a new lingual bracket system during the leveling phase of orthodontic treatment and to compare those with the corresponding force system of a labial straight-wire appliance. The intra-oral situation of ten patients undergoing orthodontic treatment was replicated in measurement casts fitted with lingual and labial brackets. Special care was taken to precisely reproduce each patient's interbracket geometry. We measured each tooth's force systems as generated by a leveling arch inserted into the lingual and labial brackets. The resulting force systems of both appliances were found to be quite similar with regard to the magnitude of most force and moment components. Only the first molars were subjected to considerably greater single forces with the lingual appliance. Tipping moments were found to be significantly smaller with the lingual technique, whereas the rotational moments were significantly smaller with the labial appliance. All in all we noted significant differences between the two techniques only in certain areas which upon closer examination were distributed over only a few tooth types. The initial force systems produced by the new lingual bracket system proved to be comparable with those delivered by a conventional straight-wire appliance. The actual levels of forces and moments, however, were found in certain cases to be too heavy with both techniques. We therefore recommend the development of leveling wires producing considerably lighter forces and moments.

  15. Effect of nanotechnology in self-etch bonding systems on the shear bond strength of stainless steel orthodontic brackets

    OpenAIRE

    Hammad, Shaza M.; El-Wassefy, Noha; Maher, Ahmed; Fawakerji, Shafik M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the effect of silica dioxide (SiO2) nanofillers in different bonding systems on shear bond strength (SBS) and mode of failure of orthodontic brackets at two experimental times. Methods: Ninety-six intact premolars were divided into four groups: A) Conventional acid-etch and primer Transbond XT; B) Transbond Plus self-etch primer; and two self-etch bonding systems reinforced with silica dioxide nanofiller at different concentrations: C) Futurabond DC at 1%; D...

  16. Effect of time and pH on physical-chemical properties of orthodontic brackets and wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Aretha Aliny Ramos; Pithon, Matheus Melo; Carlo, Fabíola Galbiatti Carvalho; Carlo, Hugo Lemes; de Lima, Bruno Alessandro Silva Guedes; Dos Passos, Tibério Andrade; Lacerda-Santos, Rogério

    2015-03-01

    To test the hypothesis that treatment time, debris/biofilm, and oral pH have an influence on the physical-chemical properties of orthodontic brackets and arch wires. One hundred twenty metal brackets were evaluated. They were divided into four groups (n  =  30) according to treatment time: group C (control) and groups T12, T24, and T36 (brackets recovered after 12, 24, and 36 months of treatment, respectively). Rectangular stainless-steel arch wires that remained in the oral cavity for 12 to 24 months were also analyzed. Dimensional stability, surface morphology, composition of brackets, resistance to sliding of the bracket-wire set, surface roughness of wires, and oral pH were analyzed. One-way analysis of variance, followed by a Tukey multiple comparisons test, was used for statistical analysis (P bracket slots were shown to have more influence on the degradation process and frictional force of these devices than did oral pH.

  17. Does the bracket-ligature combination affect the amount of orthodontic space closure over three months? A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Henry; Collins, Jill; Tinsley, David; Sandler, Jonathan; Benson, Philip

    2013-06-01

    To investigate the effect of bracket-ligature combination on the amount of orthodontic space closure over three months. Randomized clinical trial with three parallel groups. A hospital orthodontic department (Chesterfield Royal Hospital, UK). Forty-five patients requiring upper first premolar extractions. Informed consent was obtained and participants were randomly allocated into one of three groups: (1) conventional pre-adjusted edgewise brackets and elastomeric ligatures; (2) conventional pre-adjusted edgewise brackets and Super Slick(®) low friction elastomeric ligatures; (3) Damon 3MX(®) passive self-ligating brackets. Space closure was undertaken on 0·019×0·025-inch stainless steel archwires with nickel-titanium coil springs. Participants were recalled at four weekly intervals. Upper alginate impressions were taken at each visit (maximum three). The primary outcome measure was the mean amount of space closure in a 3-month period. A one-way ANOVA was undertaken [dependent variable: mean space closure (mm); independent variable: group allocation]. The amount of space closure was very similar between the three groups (1 mm per 28 days); however, there was a wide variation in the rate of space closure between individuals. The differences in the amount of space closure over three months between the three groups was very small and non-significant (P = 0·718). The hypothesis that reducing friction by modifying the bracket/ligature interface increases the rate of space closure was not supported. The major determinant of orthodontic tooth movement is probably the individual patient response.

  18. Comparative in vitro study of the shear bond strength of brackets bonded with restorative and orthodontic resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Isber

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of brackets bonded with different restorative systems and compare it with that afforded by an established orthodontic bonding system. Seventy human bicuspids were used, divided into five different groups with 14 teeth each. Whereas a specific orthodontic bonding resin (TransbondTM XT was used in the control group, the restorative systems Charisma, Tetric Ceram, TPH Spectrum and Z100 were used in the other four groups. Seven days after bonding the brackets to the samples, shear forces were applied under pressure in a universal testing machine. The data collected was evaluated using the ANOVA test and, when a difference was identified, the Tukey test was applied. A 5% level of significance was adopted. The mean results of the shear bond strength tests were as follows: Group 1 (Charisma, 14.98 MPa; Group 2 (Tetric Ceram, 15.16 MPa; Group 3 (TPH, 17.70 MPa; Group 4 (Z100, 13.91 MPa; and Group 5 or control group (TransbondTM XT, 17.15 MPa. No statistically significant difference was found among the groups. It was concluded that all tested resins have sufficient bond strength to be recommended for bonding orthodontic brackets.

  19. Shear-bond-strength of orthodontic brackets to aged nano-hybrid composite-resin surfaces using different surface preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirtas, Hatice Kubra; Akin, Mehmet; Ileri, Zehra; Basciftci, Faruk Ayhan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different surface preparation methods on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic metal brackets to aged nano-hybrid resin composite surfaces in vitro. A total of 100 restorative composite resin discs, 6 mm in diameter and 3 mm thick, were obtained and treated with an ageing procedure. After ageing, the samples were randomly divided as follows according to surface preparation methods: (1)Control, (2)37% phosphoric acid gel, (3)Sandblasting, (4)Diamond bur, (5)Air-flow and 20 central incisor teeth were used for the control etched group. SBS test were applied on bonded metal brackets to all samples. SBS values and residual adhesives were evaluated. Analysis of variance showed a significant difference (porthodontic metal brackets to nano-hybrid composite resin surfaces.

  20. Occurrence and severity of enamel decalcification adjacent to bracket bases and sub-bracket lesions during orthodontic treatment with two different lingual appliances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klang, Elisabeth; Helms, Hans-Joachim; Wiechmann, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background: Using lingual enamel surfaces for bracket placement not only has esthetic advantages, but may also be suitable in terms of reducing frequencies of enamel decalcifications. Objective: To test the null-hypothesis that there is no significant difference in enamel decalcification or cavitation incidence adjacent to and beneath bracket bases between two lingual multi-bracket (MB) appliances that are different in terms of design, material composition, and manufacturing technology (group A: WIN, DW-LingualSystems; group B: Incognito, 3M-Unitek), taking into account patient- and treatment-related variables on white spot lesion (WSL) formation. Methods: Standardized, digital, top-view photographs of 630 consecutive subjects (16214 teeth; n Incognito = 237/6076 teeth; n WIN = 393/10138 teeth; mean age: 17.47±7.8; m/f 43.2/56.8%) with completed lingual MB treatment of the upper and lower permanent teeth 1–7 were screened for decalcification or cavitation adjacent to and beneath the bracket bases before and after treatment, scored from 0 to 7. Non-parametric ANOVA was used for main effects ‘appliance type’, ‘gender’, ‘treatment complexity’, ‘grouped age’ (≤16/>16 years), and ‘treatment duration’ as covariable, at an α-level of 5%. Results: About 2.57% [5.94%] of all teeth in group A [B] developed decalcifications. Subject-related incidence was 9.59% [16.17%] for upper incisors in group A [B], and 12.98% [25.74%] for all teeth 16–46. There were significant effects by gender, age, and treatment duration. Conclusion: The null-hypothesis was rejected: sub-bracket lesions were significantly less frequent in group A, while frequencies of WSL adjacent to brackets were not significantly affected by appliance type. In view of the overall low incidences of lingual post-orthodontic white-spot lesions, the use of lingual appliances is advocated as a valid strategy for a reduction of enamel decalcifications during orthodontic treatment. PMID

  1. Mechanical equilibrium of forces and moments applied on orthodontic brackets of a dental arch: Correlation with literature data on two and three adjacent teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Delphine; Bolender, Yves; Rémond, Yves; George, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Although orthodontics have greatly improved over the years, understanding of its associated biomechanics remains incomplete and is mainly based on two dimensional (2D) mechanical equilibrium and long-time clinical experience. Little experimental information exists in three dimensions (3D) about the forces and moments developed on orthodontic brackets over more than two or three adjacent teeth. We define here a simplified methodology to quantify 3D forces and moments applied on orthodontic brackets fixed on a dental arch and validate our methodology using existing results from the literature by means of simplified hypotheses.

  2. Influence of surface treatment on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets

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    Ione Helena Vieira Portella Brunharo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded to micro-hybrid and micro-particulate resins under different surface treatment methods was assessed. METHODS: Two hundred and eighty test samples were divided into 28 groups (n = 10, where 140 specimens were filled with Durafill micro-particulate resin and 140 with Charisma composite. In 140 samples, a coupling agent (silane was applied. The surface treatment methods were: Phosphoric and hydrofluoric acid etching, sodium bicarbonate and aluminum oxide blasting, stone and burs. A Universal Instron Machine was used to apply an occlusal shear force directly to the resin composite bracket surface at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. The means were compared using analysis of variance and multivariate regression to assess the interaction between composites and surface treatment methods. RESULTS: Means and standard deviations for the groups were: Sodium bicarbonate jet 11.27±2.78; burs 9.26±3.01; stone 7.95±3.67; aluminum oxide blasting 7.04±3.21; phosphoric acid 5.82±1.90; hydrofluoric acid 4.54±2.87, and without treatment 2.75±1.49. An increase of 1.94 MPa in shear bond strength was seen in Charisma groups. Silane agent application reduced the Charisma shear bond strength by 0.68 Mpa, but increased Durafill means for bicarbonate blasting (0.83, burs (0.98 and stone drilling (0.46. CONCLUSION: The sodium bicarbonate blasting, burs and stone drilling methods produced adequate shear bond strength and may be suitable for clinical use. The Charisma micro hybrid resin composite showed higher shear bond means than Durafill micro particle composite.

  3. Influence of surface treatment on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunharo, Ione Helena Vieira Portella; Fernandes, Daniel Jogaib; de Miranda, Mauro Sayão; Artese, Flavia

    2013-01-01

    The shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded to micro-hybrid and micro-particulate resins under different surface treatment methods was assessed. Two hundred and eighty test samples were divided into 28 groups (n = 10), where 140 specimens were filled with Durafill micro-particulate resin and 140 with Charisma composite. In 140 samples, a coupling agent (silane) was applied. The surface treatment methods were: Phosphoric and hydrofluoric acid etching, sodium bicarbonate and aluminum oxide blasting, stone and burs. A Universal Instron Machine was used to apply an occlusal shear force directly to the resin composite bracket surface at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. The means were compared using analysis of variance and multivariate regression to assess the interaction between composites and surface treatment methods. Means and standard deviations for the groups were: Sodium bicarbonate jet 11.27 ± 2.78; burs 9.26 ± 3.01; stone 7.95 ± 3.67; aluminum oxide blasting 7.04 ± 3.21; phosphoric acid 5.82 ± 1.90; hydrofluoric acid 4.54 ± 2.87, and without treatment 2.75 ± 1.49. An increase of 1.94 MPa in shear bond strength was seen in Charisma groups. Silane agent application reduced the Charisma shear bond strength by 0.68 Mpa, but increased Durafill means for bicarbonate blasting (0.83), burs (0.98) and stone drilling (0.46). The sodium bicarbonate blasting, burs and stone drilling methods produced adequate shear bond strength and may be suitable for clinical use. The Charisma micro hybrid resin composite showed higher shear bond means than Durafill micro particle composite.

  4. Enamel Surface Roughness after Debonding of Orthodontic Brackets and Various Clean-Up Techniques

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    Farzaneh Ahrari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to evaluate enamel roughness after adhesive removal using different burs and an Er:YAG laser.Materials and Methods: The buccal surfaces of forty human premolars were sealed by two layers of nail varnish, except for a circular area of 3 mm in diameter on the middle third. The enamel surfaces were initially subjected to profilometry analysis and four parameters of surface irregularity (Ra, Rq, Rt and Rz were recorded. Following bracket bonding and debonding, adhesive remnants were removed by tungsten carbide burs in low- or high- speed handpieces (group 1 and 2, respectively, an ultrafine diamond bur (group 3 or an Er:YAG laser (250 mJ, long pulse, 4 Hz (group 4, and surface roughness parameters were measured again. Then, the buccal surfaces were polished and the third profilometry measurements were performed.Results: The specimens that were cleaned with a low speed tungsten carbide bur showed no significant difference in surface irregularity between the different treatment stages (p>0.05. Surface roughness increased significantly after clean-up with the diamond bur and the Er:YAG laser (p<0.01. In comparison between groups, adhesive removal with tungsten carbide burs at slow- or high-speed handpieces produced the lowest, while enamel clean-up with the Er:YAG laser caused the highest values of roughness measurements (P<0.05.Conclusion: Under the study conditions, application of the ultrafine diamond bur or the Er:YAG laser caused irreversible enamel damage on tooth surface, and thus these methods could not be recommended for removing adhesive remnants after debonding of orthodontic brackets.

  5. Effects of different etching methods and bonding procedures on shear bond strength of orthodontic metal brackets applied to different CAD/CAM ceramic materials.

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    Buyuk, S Kutalmış; Kucukekenci, Ahmet Serkan

    2018-03-01

    To investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic metal brackets applied to different types of ceramic surfaces treated with different etching procedures and bonding agents. Monolithic CAD/CAM ceramic specimens (N = 120; n = 40 each group) of feldspathic ceramic Vita Mark II, resin nanoceramic Lava Ultimate, and hybrid ceramic Vita Enamic were fabricated (14 × 12 × 3 mm). Ceramic specimens were separated into four subgroups (n = 10) according to type of surface treatment and bonding onto the ceramic surface. Within each group, four subgroups were prepared by phosphoric acid, hydrofluoric acid, Transbond XT primer, and Clearfill Ceramic primer. Mandibular central incisor metal brackets were bonded with light-cure composite. The SBS data were analyzed using three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD tests. The highest SBS was found in the Vita Enamic group, which is a hybrid ceramic, etched with hydrofluoric acid and applied Transbond XT Adhesive primer (7.28 ± 2.49 MPa). The lowest SBS was found in the Lava Ultimate group, which is a resin nano-ceramic etched with hydrofluoric acid and applied Clearfill ceramic primer (2.20 ± 1.21 MPa). CAD/CAM material types and bonding procedures affected bond strength ( P .05). The use of Transbond XT as a primer bonding agent resulted in higher SBS.

  6. Assessment of clinical outcomes of Roth and MBT bracket prescription using the American Board of Orthodontics Objective Grading System

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    Mahesh Jain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is always a need to assess whether small changes in bracket prescription can lead to visually detectable differences in tooth positions. However, with little clinical evidence to show advantages of any of the popularly used bracket systems, orthodontists are forced to make clinical decisions with little scientific guidance. Aim: To compare the orthodontic cases finished with Roth and MBT prescription using American Board of Orthodontics-Objective Grading System (ABO-OGS. Settings and Design: Department of Orthodontics, Post-graduate dental college, retrospective cross-sectional study. Materials and Methods: Forty patients selected were divided into two groups of 20 patients each finished with straight wire appliance using Roth and MBT prescription, respectively. The examiner ability was assessed and calibrated by one of the ABO certified clinician to grade cases using the OGS. Statistical Analysis: Unpaired student t-test was used and P < 0.05 was accepted as significant. Results and Conclusions: MBT bracket group had a lower score of 2.60 points in buccolingual inclination and lower score of 1.10 points in occlusal contact category that was statistically significant when compared with Roth group. The difference in total ABO-OGS score was 2.65 points showing that the outcome for the MBT prescription was better than that of the Roth prescription, which is statistically significant, but with little or no clinical significance. It can be concluded that use of either one of the Roth and MBT bracket prescriptions have no impact to the overall clinical outcome and quality of treatment entirely depends on clinician judgment and experience.

  7. Effect of CO2 Laser and Fluoride Varnish Application on Microhardness of Enamel Surface Around Orthodontic Brackets.

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    Mahmoudzadeh, Majid; Rezaei-Soufi, Loghman; Farhadian, Nasrin; Jamalian, Seyed Farzad; Akbarzadeh, Mahdi; Momeni, Mohammadali; Basamtabar, Masome

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Orthodontic treatment has many advantages such as esthetic improvement and self-esteem enhancement; yet it has some disadvantages such as increasing the risk of formation of white spot lesions, because it makes oral hygiene more difficult. It is rational to implement procedures to prevent these lesions. The present study was aimed to assess the effect of CO 2 laser and fluoride varnish on the surface of the enamel surface microhardness around the orthodontic braces. Methods: Eighty extracted premolar teeth were selected, scaled, polished with nonfluoridated pumic and metal brackets were bonded to them. Then, they were randomly allocated to 5 groups: control (neither fluoride nor laser is used on enamel surfaces), fluoride (4 minutes fluoride varnish treatment of the enamel surfaces), CO 2 laser (10.6 µm CO 2 laser irradiation of the teeth), laserfluoride (fluoride application after laser irradiation) and fluoride-laser (fluoride was applied and then teeth were irradiated with laser). After surface treatment around brackets on enamel, the samples were stored in 0.1% thymol for less than 5 days and then they were exposed to a 10-day microbiological caries model. Microhardness values of enamel were evaluated with Vickers test. One sample of each group (5 teeth from 80 samples) was prepared for SEM (scanning electron microscopy) and the data from 75 remaining teeth were analyzed with analysis of variance (ANOVA) and chi-square tests (α =0.05). Results: Microhardness mean values from high to low were as follow: fluoride-laser, laser-fluoride, laser, fluoride and control. Microhardness in fluoride-laser group was significantly higher compared with that of the control group. Distribution adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were significantly different between groups and most of bond failures occurred at the enamel-adhesive interface in groups 2 to 5 and at the adhesive-bracket interface in the control group. Conclusion: Combination of fluoride varnish and

  8. Effect of light-curable fluoride varnish on enamel demineralization adjacent to orthodontic brackets: an in-vivo study.

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    Mehta, Anurag; Paramshivam, Ganesh; Chugh, Vinay Kumar; Singh, Surjit; Halkai, Sudha; Kumar, Santosh

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this in-vivo study was to evaluate the effect of a single application of Clinpro XT (3M ESPE, Pymble, New South Wales, Australia), a light-curable fluoride varnish, on enamel demineralization adjacent to orthodontic brackets. Thirty-eight patients (152 teeth) whose orthodontic treatment involved extraction of 4 first premolars were recruited. Two premolars each were assigned to the control group (no treatment) and the experimental group (received fluoride varnish application). The study was designed as a nonrandomized split-mouth study in which diagonally opposite quadrants received the same treatment. After the bonding procedures, a sectional T-loop was ligated into each bracket to serve as a site for plaque retention for enhanced demineralization. Clinpro XT was applied on the buccal surfaces adjacent to the brackets on all teeth in the experimental group only. Teeth in both groups were extracted after 15 days (n = 30), 30 days (n = 30), 45 days (n = 30), 90 days (n = 18), and 120 days (n = 18). Buccolingual sections were then evaluated under polarized light microscopy. After we excluded the dropouts, the mean depth of the demineralized enamel lesions was measured in final sample of 126 teeth. The Mann-Whitney test was used for comparison of the groups. In the control group, the depths of the demineralized enamel lesions increased from 30 to 120 days, whereas in the experimental group no sign of demineralization was noted throughout the observation period except for 3 teeth. Significant differences in the depths of demineralized lesions were found between the study groups. Clinpro XT light-curable fluoride varnish may be a reasonable alternative in the reduction of enamel demineralization around orthodontic brackets, especially in noncompliant and high-risk patients. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of two soft drinks on shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index of orthodontic metal brackets.

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    Sajadi, Soodabeh Sadat; Eslami Amirabadi, Gholamreza; Sajadi, Sepideh

    2014-07-01

    Bond failure of brackets during orthodontic treatment is a common problem; which results in treatment interference, increased treatment time and prolonged clinical time for rebonding of failed brackets. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of Coca-Cola and a non-alcoholic beer on the shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index (ARI) of orthodontic metal brackets in vitro. Eighty intact human premolars were divided into two experimental groups of Coca-Cola and non-alcoholic beer (Istak), and a control group of artificial saliva. Over a period of thirty days, the test groups were immersed in the respective soft drinks for 5 minutes, twice a day. For the remainder of the time, they were kept in artificial saliva at 37°C. The control group was stored in artificial saliva during the experiment. All samples were subjected to shearing forces using Universal Testing Machine. ARI was determined with a stereomicroscope at ×12 magnification. The data of shear bond strength were statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's Post-Hoc test and the data of ARI scores were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis test. No significant difference was observed in ARIs of the three groups (P≤ 0.552). The shear bond strength of Coke group was significantly lower than that of the two other groups (P≤ 0.035); but there was no significant difference between the shear bond strength of Istak and the control group (P≤ 0.999). Coca-Cola decreased the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

  10. Root resorption due to orthodontic treatment using self-ligating and conventional brackets : A cone-beam computed tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aras, Isil; Unal, Idil; Huniler, Gencer; Aras, Aynur

    2018-05-01

    Purpose of the present study was to compare external root resorption (ERR) volumetrically in maxillary incisors induced by orthodontic treatment using self-ligating brackets (Damon Q, DQ) or conventional brackets (Titanium Orthos, TO) with the help of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). A sample of 32 subjects, with Angle Class I malocclusion and anterior crowding of 4-10 mm, was divided randomly into two groups: a DQ group, in which self-ligating DQ brackets with Damon archwires were used; and a TO group, in which conventional TO brackets with large Orthos archwires were applied. The study was conducted using CBCT scans taken before (T1), and near the end (9 months after the initiation of treatment; T2) of the orthodontic treatment. The extent of ERR was determined volumetrically using Mimics software. Changes in root volume were evaluated by repeated-measures analysis of variance as well as by paired and independent t-tests. While significant differences were found between T1 and T2 for root volume in both groups (p  0.05). Maxillary central and lateral incisors showed similar volume loss (p > 0.05). Furthermore, the TO group showed a higher prevalence of palatinal and proximal slanted RR compared with the DQ group (p bracket system over the other only considering root resorption pattern or amount. Higher incidence of slanted RR found in patients treated with the TO system warrants further research to identify possible specific causes.

  11. Effect of Different Types of Toothpaste on the Frictional Resistance Between Orthodontic Stainless Steel Brackets and Wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinzadeh Nik, Tahereh; Hooshmand, Tabassom; Farhadifard, Homa

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different types of toothpaste on the frictional resistance between stainless steel brackets and archwires. Ninety stainless steel orthodontic brackets with stainless steel wires were bonded to bovine teeth and were divided into 6 groups for application of the following toothpastes: Colgate® Total® Advanced Whitening, Colgate® Total® Pro Gum Health, Colgate® Anticavity, Ortho.Kin®, and Sunstar GUM® Ortho toothpastes. No toothpaste was applied in the control group. Each group was brushed by a brushing machine with the use of the designated solution for 4.5 minutes. The frictional force was measured in a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 10 mm/minute over a 5-mm archwire. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) at the 0.05 significance level. The frictional resistance values of Ortho.Kin® and GUM® Ortho toothpastes and the control group were not significantly different (P>0.05). However, there were significant differences between the frictional resistance values of Colgate® Total® Pro Gum Health and Colgate® Anticavity toothpastes with that of the control group (Porthodontic toothpastes did not increase the frictional resistance between the orthodontic stainless steel brackets and wires.

  12. Assessment of antibacterial and cytotoxic effects of orthodontic stainless steel brackets coated with different phases of titanium oxide: An in-vitro study.

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    Baby, Roshen Daniel; Subramaniam, Siva; Arumugam, Ilakkiya; Padmanabhan, Sridevi

    2017-04-01

    Our objective was to assess the antibacterial and cytotoxic effects of orthodontic stainless steel brackets coated with different phases of photocatalytic titanium oxide. From a total sample of 115 brackets, 68 orthodontic stainless steel brackets were coated with titanium oxide using a radiofrequency magnetron sputtering machine. The coated brackets were then converted into 34 each of the anatase and rutile phases of titanium oxide. These brackets were subdivided into 4 groups for antibacterial study and 3 groups for cytotoxicity study. Brackets for the antibacterial study were assessed against the Streptococcus mutans species using microbiologic tests. Three groups for the cytotoxicity study were assessed using the thiazolyl tetrazolium bromide assay. The antibacterial study showed that both phases were effective, but the rutile phase of photocatalytic titanium oxide had a greater bactericidal effect than did the anatase phase. The cytotoxicity study showed that the rutile phase had a greater decrease in viability of cells compared with the anatase phase. It is recommended that orthodontic brackets be coated with the anatase phase of titanium oxide since they exhibited a significant antibacterial property and were only slightly cytotoxic. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Influence of No-Primer Adhesives and Anchor Pylons Bracket Bases on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets

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    Andrea Scribante

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS and adhesive remnant index (ARI scores of no-primer adhesives tested with two different bracket bases. Materials and Methods. 120 bovine permanent mandibular incisors were divided into 6 groups of 20 specimens. Two brackets (ODP with different bracket bases (anchor pylons and 80-gauge mesh were bonded to the teeth using a conventional adhesive (Transbond XT and two different no-primer adhesive (Ortho Cem; Heliosit systems. Groups were tested using an instron universal testing machine. SBS values were recorded. ARI scores were measured. SEM microphotographs were taken to evaluate the pattern of bracket bases. Statistical analysis was performed. ANOVA and Tukey tests were carried out for SBS values, whereas a chi-squared test was applied for ARI scores. Results. Highest bond strength values were reported with Transbond XT (with both pad designs, Ortho Cem bonded on anchor pylons and Heliosit on 80-gauge mesh. A higher frequency of ARI score of “3” was reported for Transbond XT groups. Other groups showed a higher frequency of ARI score “2” and “1.” Conclusion. Transbond XT showed the highest shear bond strength values with both pad designs.

  14. Comparison of Self-Etch Primers with Conventional Acid Etching System on Orthodontic Brackets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zope, Amit; Zope-Khalekar, Yogita; Chitko, Shrikant S.; Kerudi, Veerendra V.; Patil, Harshal Ashok; Jaltare, Pratik; Dolas, Siddhesh G

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The self-etching primer system consists of etchant and primer dispersed in a single unit. The etching and priming are merged as a single step leading to fewer stages in bonding procedure and reduction in the number of steps that also reduces the chance of introduction of error, resulting in saving time for the clinician. It also results in smaller extent of enamel decalcification. Aim To compare the Shear Bond Strength (SBS) of orthodontic bracket bonded with Self-Etch Primers (SEP) and conventional acid etching system and to study the surface appearance of teeth after debonding; etching with conventional acid etch and self-etch priming, using stereomicroscope. Materials and Methods Five Groups (n=20) were created randomly from a total of 100 extracted premolars. In a control Group A, etching of enamel was done with 37% phosphoric acid and bonding of stainless steel brackets with Transbond XT (3M Unitek, Monrovia, California). Enamel conditioning in left over four Groups was done with self-etching primers and adhesives as follows: Group B-Transbond Plus (3M Unitek), Group C Xeno V+ (Dentsply), Group D-G-Bond (GC), Group E-One-Coat (Coltene). The Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) score was also evaluated. Additionally, the surface roughness using profilometer were observed. Results Mean SBS of Group A was 18.26±7.5MPa, Group B was 10.93±4.02MPa, Group C was 6.88±2.91MPa while of Group D was 7.78±4.13MPa and Group E was 10.39±5.22MPa respectively. In conventional group ARI scores shows that over half of the adhesive was remaining on the surface of tooth (score 1 to 3). In self-etching primer groups ARI scores show that there was no or minor amount of adhesive remaining on the surface of tooth (score 4 and 5). SEP produces a lesser surface roughness on the enamel than conventional etching. However, statistical analysis shows significant correlation (pbracket bonding after enamel conditioning with any of the SEPs tested. The SEPs used in Groups C (Xeno V

  15. Comparative three-dimensional analysis of initial biofilm formation on three orthodontic bracket materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmer, Marc Philipp; Hellemann, Carolina Fuchslocher; Grade, Sebastian; Heuer, Wieland; Stiesch, Meike; Schwestka-Polly, Rainer; Demling, Anton Phillip

    2015-04-10

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate and compare early biofilm formation on biomaterials, which are being used in contemporary fixed orthodontic treatment. This study comprised 10 healthy volunteers (5 females and 5 males) with a mean age of 27.3 +-3.7 years. Three slabs of different orthodontic materials (stainless steel, gold and ceramic) were placed in randomized order on a splint in the mandibular molar region. Splints were inserted intraorally for 48 h. Then the slabs were removed from the splints and the biofilms were stained with a two color fluorescence assay for bacterial viability (LIVE/DEAD BacLight-Bacterial Viability Kit 7012, Invitrogen, Mount Waverley, Australia). The quantitative biofilm formation was analyzed by using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The biofilm coverage was 32.7 ± 37.7% on stainless steel surfaces, 59.5 ± 40.0% on gold surfaces and 56.8 ± 43.6% on ceramic surfaces. Statistical analysis showed significant differences in biofilm coverage between the tested materials (p=0.033). The Wilcoxon test demonstrated significantly lower biofilm coverage on steel compared to gold (p=0.011). Biofilm height on stainless steel surfaces was 4.0 ± 7.3 μm, on gold surfaces 6.0 ± 6.6 μm and on ceramic 6.5 ± 6.0 μm. The Friedman test revealed no significant differences between the tested materials (p=0.150). Pairwise comparison demonstrated significant differences between stainless steel and gold (p=0.047). Our results indicate that initial biofilm formation seemed to be less on stainless steel surfaces compared with other traditional materials in a short-term observation. Future studies should examine whether there is a difference in long-term biofilm accumulation between stainless steel, gold and ceramic brackets.

  16. Effect of fluoridated casein phospopeptide-amorphous-calcium phosphate complex, chlorhexidine fluoride mouthwash on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets: A comparative in vitro study

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    C A Abdul Shahariyar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the current study was to determine the effects of casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium-phosphate (CPP-ACP complex, chlorhexidine fluoride mouthwash on shear bond strengths (SBSs of orthodontic brackets. Materials and Methods: About sixty extracted healthy human premolar teeth with intact buccal enamel were divided into two equal groups to which brackets were bonded using self-etching primers (SEPs and conventional means respectively. These were further equally divided into three subgroups - (1 control (2 CPP-ACP (3 chlorhexidine fluoride mouthwash. The SBSs were then measured using a universal testing machine. Results: SBS of the conventional group was significantly higher than the self-etching group. The intragroup differences were statistically insignificant. Conclusion: CPP-ACP, chlorhexidine fluoride mouthwash did not adversely affect SBS of orthodontic brackets irrespective of the method of conditioning. Brackets bonded with conventional technique showed greater bond strengths as compared to those bonded with SEP.

  17. Bond strength of orthodontic light-cured resin-modified glass ionomer cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hsiang Yu; Chen, Chien Hsiu; Li, Chuan Li; Tsai, Hung Huey; Chou, Ta Hsiung; Wang, Wei Nan

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the bond strengths and debonded interfaces achieved with light-cured resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) and conventional light-cured composite resin. In addition, the effects of acid etching and water contamination were examined. One hundred human premolars were randomly divided into five equal groups. The mini Dyna-lock upper premolar bracket was selected for testing. The first four groups were treated with light-cured RMGIC with or without 15 per cent phosphoric acid-etching treatment and with or without water contamination preceding bracket bonding. The control samples were treated with the conventional light-cured Transbond composite resin under acid etching and without water contamination. Subsequently, the brackets were debonded by tensile force using an Instron machine. The modified adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were assigned to the bracket base of the debonded interfaces using a scanning electron microscope. The bond strength and modified ARI scores were determined and analysed statistically by one-way analysis of variance and chi-square test. Under all four conditions, the bond strength of the light-cure RMGIC was equal to or higher than that of the conventional composite resin. The highest bond strength was achieved when using RMGIC with acid etching but without water contamination. The modified ARI scores were 2 for Fuji Ortho LC and 3 for Transbond. No enamel detachment was found in any group. Fifteen per cent phosphoric acid etching without moistening the enamel of Fuji Ortho LC provided the more favourable bond strength. Enamel surfaces, with or without water contamination and with or without acid etching, had the same or a greater bond strength than Transbond.

  18. Occurrence of cervical invasive root resorption in first and second molar teeth of orthodontic patients eight years after bracket removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thönen, Andrea; Peltomäki, Timo; Patcas, Raphael; Zehnder, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence and potential orthodontic causes of cervical invasive root resorption (CIRR) are unknown. We aimed to identify the occurrence of CIRR in molar teeth of orthodontic patients treated with fixed appliances. All patients invited for final orthodontic recall between November 2009 and March 2011 were included. From 175 patients, 108 (46 men/62 women; mean age, 25 ± 5 years; mean time after bracket removal, 8 ± 2 years) were available. The first and second molar teeth (N = 858) of these patients were investigated for clinical and radiographic signs of CIRR. Patients identified with such signs were asked to have limited-volume cone-beam computed tomography scans performed. No clinical signs of CIRR were detected. CIRR could not be ruled out on bite-wing radiographs in 18 patients. CIRR was thus identified in 1 patient in whom a second maxillary molar was affected. All first molars had been extracted in this patient, and the second molars had been moved mesially over a long distance. The 3 other second molars showed surface resorption. CIRR in molar teeth of orthodontic patients have a low mid-term occurrence (0.9%; 95% confidence interval, 0.2%-5.2%). Long movement distances and/or long treatment duration may be related to the development of these lesions. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparison of the frictional characteristics of aesthetic orthodontic brackets measured using a modified in vitro technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arici, Nursel

    2015-01-01

    Objective The coefficients of friction (COFs) of aesthetic ceramic and stainless steel brackets used in conjunction with stainless steel archwires were investigated using a modified linear tribometer and special computer software, and the effects of the bracket slot size (0.018 inches [in] or 0.022 in) and materials (ceramic or metal) on the COF were determined. Methods Four types of ceramic (one with a stainless steel slot) and one conventional stainless steel bracket were tested with two types of archwire sizes: a 0.017 × 0.025-in wire in the 0.018-in slots and a 0.019 × 0.025-in wire in the 0.022-in slot brackets. For pairwise comparisons between the 0.018-in and 0.022-in slot sizes in the same bracket, an independent sample t-test was used. One-way and two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's post-hoc test at the 95% confidence level (α = 0.05) were also used for statistical analyses. Results There were significant differences between the 0.022-in and 0.018-in slot sizes for the same brand of bracket. ANOVA also showed that both slot size and bracket slot material had significant effects on COF values (p bracket with a 0.022-in stainless steel slot showed the lowest mean COF (µ = 0.18), followed by the conventional stainless steel bracket with a 0.022-in slot (µ = 0.21). The monocrystalline alumina ceramic bracket with a 0.018-in slot had the highest COF (µ = 0.85). Conclusions Brackets with stainless steel slots exhibit lower COFs than ceramic slot brackets. All brackets show lower COFs as the slot size increases. PMID:25667915

  20. Effects of long-term repeated topical fluoride applications and adhesion promoter on shear bond strengths of orthodontic brackets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Toshiya; Ishida, Rieko; Komatsuzaki, Akira; Sanpei, Shinya; Tanaka, Satoshi; Sekimoto, Tsuneo

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of long-term repeated topical application of fluoride before bonding and an adhesion promoter on the bond strength of orthodontic brackets. Materials and Methods: A total of 76 bovine incisors were collected and divided equally into four groups. In group 1, the brackets were bonded without topical fluoride application or adhesion promoter. In group 2, before bonding, the adhesion promoter was applied to nonfluoridated enamel. In group 3, the brackets were bonded without the application of the adhesion promoter to enamel, which had undergone long-term repeated topical fluoride treatments. Teeth in group 4 received the long-term repeated topical applications of fluoride, and the brackets were bonded using the adhesion promoter. All the brackets were bonded using BeautyOrtho Bond self-etching adhesive. The shear bond strength was measured and the bond failure modes were evaluated with the use of the adhesive remnant index (ARI) after debonding. Results: The mean shear bond strength was significantly lower in group 3 than in groups 1, 2, and 4, and there were no significant differences between the groups except for group 3. There were significant differences in the distribution of ARI scores between groups 2 and 3, and between groups 3 and 4. Conclusions: The adhesion promoter can recover the bond strength reduced by the long-term repeated topical applications of fluoride to the prefluoridation level and had a significantly great amount of adhesives left on either fluoridated or nonfluoridated enamel. PMID:25512720

  1. Evaluation of friction in orthodontics using various brackets and archwire combinations-an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sujeet; Singh, Shamsher; Hamsa P R, Rani; Ahmed, Sameer; Prasanthma; Bhatnagar, Apoorva; Sidhu, Manreet; Shetty, Pramod

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare frictional resistance which was produced between conventional brackets (0.022 slot Otho-Organiser) and self ligating brackets (active Forestadent and passive Damon III) by using various arch wire combinations (0.016 Niti, 0.018 Niti, 0.017 x 0.025 SS and 0.019 x 0.025 SS). An experimental model which consisted of 5 aligned stainless steel 0.022-in brackets was used to assess frictional forces which were produced by SLBs (self ligating brackets) and CELs (conventional elastomeric ligatures) with use of 0.016 nickel titanium, 0.018 nickel titanium, 0.017 X 0.025"stainless steel and 0.019 X 0.025"stainless steel wires. One way ANOVA test was used to study the effect of the bracket type, wire alloy and section on frictional resistance test . Conventional brackets produced highest levels of friction for all bracket/archwire combinations. Both Damon III and Forestadent brackets were found to produce significantly lower levels of friction when they were compared with elastomerically tied conventional brackets. SLBs are valid alternatives for low friction during sliding mechanics.

  2. Root resorption, treatment time and extraction rate during orthodontic treatment with self-ligating and conventional brackets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Introduction This study determined the amount and severity of EARR (external apical root resorption) after orthodontic treatment with self-ligating (SL) and conventional (Non-SL) brackets. Differences regarding rate of extraction cases, appointments and treatment time were evaluated. Material and methods 213 patients with a mean age of 12.4 ± 2.2 years were evaluated retrospectively. The treatments were performed with SL brackets (n = 139, Smartclip, 3 M Unitek, USA) or Non-SL brackets (n = 74, Victory Series, 3 M Unitek, USA). Measurements of the crown and root length of the incisors were taken using panoramic radiographs. Three-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed for an appliance effect. Results There was no difference between patients treated with Non-SL or SL brackets regarding the amount (in percentage) of EARR (Non-SL: 4.5 ± 6.6 vs. SL: 3.0 ± 5.6). Occurrence of severe EARR (sEARR) did also not differ between the two groups (Non-SL 0.5 vs. SL: 0.3). The percentage of patients with need of tooth extraction for treatment (Non SL: 8.1 vs. SL: 6.9) and the number of appointments (Non-SL: 12.4 ± 3.4 vs. SL: 13.9 ± 3.3) did not show any differences. The treatment time was shorter with Non-SL brackets (Non-SL: 18.1 ± 5.3 vs. SL: 20.7 ± 4.9 months). Conclusions This is the largest study showing that there is no difference in the amount of EARR, number of appointments and extraction rate between conventional and self-ligating brackets. For the first time we could demonstrate that occurrence of sEARR does not differ between the two types of brackets. PMID:24456620

  3. Shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets after acid-etched and erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser-etched

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    Shiva Alavi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Laser ablation has been suggested as an alternative method to acid etching; however, previous studies have obtained contrasting results. The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS and fracture mode of orthodontic brackets that are bonded to enamel etched with acid and erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG laser. Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, buccal surfaces of 15 non-carious human premolars were divided into mesial and distal regions. Randomly, one of the regions was etched with 37% phosphoric acid for 15 s and another region irradiated with Er:YAG laser at 100 mJ energy and 20 Hz frequency for 20 s. Stainless steel brackets were then bonded using Transbond XT, following which all the samples were stored in distilled water for 24 h and then subjected to 500 thermal cycles. SBS was tested by a chisel edge, mounted on the crosshead of universal testing machine. After debonding, the teeth were examined under Χ10 magnification and adhesive remnant index (ARI score determined. SBS and ARI scores of the two groups were then compared using t-test and Mann-Whitney U test. Significant level was set at P < 0.05. Results: The mean SBS of the laser group (16.61 ± 7.7 MPa was not significantly different from that of the acid-etched group (18.86 ± 6.09 MPa (P = 0.41. There was no significant difference in the ARI scores between two groups (P = 0.08. However, in the laser group, more adhesive remained on the brackets, which is not suitable for orthodontic purposes. Conclusion: Laser etching at 100 mJ energy produced bond strength similar to acid etching. Therefore, Er:YAG laser may be an alternative method for conventional acid-etching.

  4. Enhancing the Hardness of Sintered SS 17-4PH Using Nitriding Process for Bracket Orthodontic Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suharno, B.; Supriadi, S.; Ayuningtyas, S. T.; Widjaya, T.; Baek, E. R.

    2018-01-01

    Brackets orthodontic create teeth movement by applying force from wire to bracket then transferred to teeth. However, emergence of friction between brackets and wires reduces load for teeth movement towards desired area. In order to overcome these problem, surface treatment like nitriding chosen as a process which could escalate efficiency of transferred force by improving material hardness since hard materials have low friction levels. This work investigated nitriding treatment to form nitride layer which affecting hardness of sintered SS 17-4PH. The nitride layers produced after nitriding process at various temperature i.e. 470°C, 500°C, 530°C with 8hr holding time under 50% NH3 atmosphere. Optical metallography was conducted to compare microstructure of base and surface metal while the increasing of surface hardness then observed using vickers microhardness tester. Hardened surface layer was obtained after gaseous nitriding process because of nitride layer that contains Fe4N, CrN and Fe-αN formed. Hardness layers can achieved value 1051 HV associated with varies thickness from 53 to 119 μm. The presence of a precipitation process occurring in conjunction with nitriding process can lead to a decrease in hardness due to nitrogen content diminishing in solid solution phase. This problem causes weakening of nitrogen expansion in martensite lattice.

  5. Micro-CT evaluation of microleakage under orthodontic ceramic brackets bonded with different bonding techniques and adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Fırat; Ersöz, Mustafa; Öztürk, Seyit Ahmet; Hatunoğlu, Erdem; Malkoç, Sıddık

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate microleakage under orthodontic ceramic brackets bonded with direct and different indirect bonding techniques and adhesives using micro-computed tomography. A total of 30 human maxillary premolars were randomly separated into five groups with six teeth in each group. In group I, teeth were bonded directly with Transbond XT (3M Unitek). In group II, group III, group IV, and group V, teeth were bonded through an indirect technique with Custom I.Q. (Reliance Orthodontic Products), Sondhi Rapid-Set (3M Unitek), RMbond (RMO), and Transbond IDB (3M Unitek), respectively, following the manufacturer's instructions. Micro-CT system model 1172 of Skyscan (Kontich, Belgium) was used to scan all samples. NRecon (Skyscan) version 1.6, CT-Analyser V.1.11 (Skyscan), and TView (SkyScan, Bvba) software programs were used for microleakage evaluation. Microleakage values between the test groups were assessed using the Kruskal-Wallis test, while the Wilcoxon signed rank test was used for within-group comparisons. The level of significance was set at P Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance test, there were no significant differences among the tested groups, with regard to volume and percentage (microleakage/region of interest × 100) of microleakage values (P test showed that coronal microleakage volume and percentage values significantly differed for RMbond and Transbond IDB groups. In the study, only ceramic brackets were used and microleakage into mini gaps did not show up on the micro-CT image because 50% silver nitrate solution could not penetrate into mini gaps which are smaller than silver nitrate particles. Use of direct and indirect bonding techniques with different adhesives did not significantly affect the amount of microleakage. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Effects of fixed orthodontic treatment using conventional versus metal-injection molding brackets on salivary nickel and chromium levels: a double-blind randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Fariborz; Harandi, Saghar; Mollaei, Mobina; Rakhshan, Vahid

    2015-10-01

    Despite the importance of nickel and chromium release from orthodontic brackets, there are no in vivo or in vitro studies on this issue in the case of metal-injection molding (MIM) brackets. Saliva samples were collected from 30 orthodontic patients divided randomly into two groups of conventional and MIM brackets, before treatment and 2 months later. Approved attendees with odd and even numbers were, respectively, assigned to the control and treatment groups. For blinding, the patients were not informed of their bracket types, and the saliva samples were coded. Nickel and chromium levels were determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Data were analysed using repeated-measures two-way analysis of covariance, independent-samples t-test, chi-squared, Spearman and point-biserial correlation coefficients, Mann-Whitney, and Wilcoxon tests (α = 0.05). Mean nickel level increased from 7.87±8.14 (pre-treatment) to 12.57±9.96 (2nd month) in the control group, and from 8.62±9.85 (pre-treatment) to 8.86±6.42 µg/l in the MIM group. Both of these increases were significant (Wilcoxon P 0.1). The differences between both ions' levels measured in the 60th day in both bracket groups were not significant (Mann-Whitney P > 0.05). The extents of changes over time were not significantly different between the bracket types (Mann-Whitney P > 0.05). The sample size was not predetermined based on power calculations. The spectrophotometer was limited to detecting chromium concentrations above 0.25 µg/l. Ion discharge from brackets might continuously change. The current in vivo methods are unable to take such fluctuations into account. Nickel might increase in patients undergoing treatment with both bracket types, although the rate of increase might be greater in patients under treatment with conventional brackets. Using MIM brackets might reduce salivary chromium for a trivial but generalizable amount. Still, ion levels leached from conventional versus MIM brackets might

  7. Plaque retention by self-ligating vs elastomeric orthodontic brackets: quantitative comparison of oral bacteria and detection with adenosine triphosphate-driven bioluminescence.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pellegrini, P.; Sauerwein, R.W.; Finlayson, T.; McLeod, J.; Covell, D.A.; Maier, T.; Machida, C.A.

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Enamel decalcification is a common problem in orthodontics. The objectives of this randomized clinical study were to enumerate and compare plaque bacteria surrounding 2 bracket types, self-ligating (SL) vs elastomeric ligating (E), and to determine whether adenosine triphosphate

  8. Three-dimensional finite element analysis on canine teeth distalization by different accessories of bracket-free invisible orthodontics technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Nuo; Lei, Xue; Yang, Xiaoli; Li, Xinhui; Ge, Zhenlin

    2018-04-01

    Objective: to compare canine tooth stress distribution condition during maxillary canine tooth distalization by different accessories of bracket-free invisible orthodontics technology after removal of maxillary first premolar, and provide basis for clinical design of invisible orthodontics technology. Method: CBCT scanning image of a patient with individual normal occlusion was adopted, Mimics, Geomagic and ProlE software were used for establishing three-dimensional models of maxilla, maxillary dentition, parodontium, invisible orthodontics appliance and accessories, ANSYS WORKBENCH was utilized as finite element analysis tools for analyzing stress distribution and movement pattern of canine tooth and parodontium when canine tooth was equipped with power arm and vertical rectangle accessory. Meanwhile, canine tooth none-accessory design group was regarded as a control. Result: teeth had even bistal surface stress distribution in the power arm group; stress was concentrated on distal tooth neck, and the stress was gradually deviated to mesial-labial side and distal lingual side in vertical rectangle group and none-accessory group. Conclusion: teeth tend to move as a whole in the Power arm group, vertical rectangle group has lower tooth gradient compared with the none-accessory group, teeth are inclined for movement in the none-accessory group, and canine teeth tend to rotate to the distal lingual side.

  9. A comparative evaluation of accuracy of Mclaughlin Bennet Trevisi prescription of six commercially available orthodontic metal brackets: An in vitro study

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    Prateek Navratan Daga

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: While using preadjusted edgewise mechanics, tooth positioning relies on the accuracy of bracket prescription for correct expression of tip and torque when using full-size archwire, thus making accuracy of bracket prescription vital in its overall performance. This study aimed to investigate the precision offered in bracket prescription: slot dimensions, tip, and torque values. Materials and Methods: MBT prescriptions of upper left central incisor brackets manufactured by six different commercial houses were evaluated to assess the aforementioned accuracy of bracket slot dimensions as well as tip and torque values. Rapid-I Precision Measuring System was used to accurately determine slot dimensions as well as tip and torque values. Results: Results obtained in a descending order of accuracy were as follows: American Orthodontics, Ortho Organizers, 3M Unitek, Forestadent, Modern Orthodontics and JJ Orthodontics. The obtained results were evaluated statistically using one-way ANOVA test. P< 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Conclusion: This study helps us to note the accuracy level of the inherent prescription values offered in various commercial houses and the likely effect the same may have on our expectation of a prescription finish while using attachments from any of them.

  10. [Effect of casein phosphopeptide-amorphouscalcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) treatment on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets after tooth bleaching].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jing; Ding, Xiao-jun; Yu, Xiao-ping; Gong, Yi-ming

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of casein phosphopeptide-amorphouscalcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) treatment on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets after tooth bleaching. One hundred extracted human premolars were randomly divided and treated according to 5 groups (n=20) : (1) no treatment; (2) 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching; (3) 38% hydrogen peroxide bleaching; (4)10% carbamide peroxide bleaching and CPP-ACP paste; (5)38% hydrogen peroxide bleaching and CPP-ACP paste. In all groups, the brackets were bonded using a conventional acid-etch and bond system (Transbond XT, 3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif). The shear bond strength adhesive remnant index (ARI) of the brackets were determined and the data was analyzed by ANOVA and Bonferroni test using SPSS13.0 software package. The use of 10% carbamide peroxide and 38% hydrogen peroxide bleaching significantly decreased the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets when compared with untreated group (P0.05). The ARI did not show any significant difference before and after CPP-ACP treatment. After tooth bleaching, CPP-ACP treatment have little influence on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

  11. Bond strength and interfacial morphology of orthodontic brackets bonded to eroded enamel treated with calcium silicate-sodium phosphate salts or resin infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costenoble, Aline; Vennat, Elsa; Attal, Jean-Pierre; Dursun, Elisabeth

    2016-11-01

     To investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets bonded to eroded enamel treated with preventive approaches and to examine the enamel/bracket interfaces.  Ninety-one brackets were bonded to seven groups of enamel samples: sound; eroded; eroded+treated with calcium silicate-sodium phosphate salts (CSP); eroded+infiltrated by ICON ® ; eroded+infiltrated by ICON ® and brackets bonded with 1-month delay; eroded+infiltrated by an experimental resin; and eroded+infiltrated by an experimental resin and brackets bonded with 1-month delay. For each group, 12 samples were tested in SBS and bond failure was assessed with the adhesive remnant index (ARI); one sample was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM).  Samples treated with CSP or infiltration showed no significant differences in SBS values with sound samples. Infiltrated samples followed by a delayed bonding showed lower SBS values. All of the values remained acceptable. The ARI scores were significantly higher for sound enamel, eroded, and treated with CSP groups than for all infiltrated samples. SEM examinations corroborated the findings.  Using CSP or resin infiltration before orthodontic bonding does not jeopardize the bonding quality. The orthodontic bonding should be performed shortly after the resin infiltration.

  12. The Effect on Final Bond Strength of Bracket Manipulation Subsequent To Initial Positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, David A.

    The shear bond strength of light activated orthodontic adhesives varies according to the composition of the material, placement protocol, and time prior to light curing. Manipulating brackets after their initial placement on a tooth can disrupt the adhesive's polymerization and compromise final bond strength. No previous research has investigated how a specific degree of manipulation, and the amount of time elapsed prior to curing, under specific lighting conditions, affects the orthodontic adhesives shear bond strength. Victory SeriesRTM, MBT prescription, premolar (3M Unitek, Monrovia, CA) orthodontic brackets were bonded using three different adhesives to sixty (60) bicuspids and varying the time after bracket manipulation before curing. The shear bond strength was calculated for each specimen. The brackets were debonded and the same teeth were rebonded with new, identical brackets, using the same protocol and under the same conditions. The results showed a statistically significant difference between the shear bond strength of Transbond XT and Grengloo, with Transbond XT having the highest strength. There was also a statistically significance difference in bond strength between the group cured 30 seconds after manipulation and the groups manipulated at different intervals prior to curing, with the 30 second group having the highest bond strength. This study confirms that various orthodontic adhesives have different bond strengths depending on manipulation and varying times prior to curing each adhesive.

  13. Effect of laser-assisted bleaching with Nd:YAG and diode lasers on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirhashemi, Amirhossein; Emadian Razavi, Elham Sadat; Behboodi, Sara; Chiniforush, Nasim

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of laser-assisted bleaching with neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) and diode lasers on shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets. One hundred and four extracted human premolars were randomly divided into four groups: group 1: No bleaching applied (control group); group 2: Teeth bleached with 40 % hydrogen peroxide; group 3: Teeth treated with 30 % hydrogen peroxide activated with Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm, 2.5 W, 25 Hz, pulse duration of 100 μs, 6 mm distance); and group 4: Teeth treated with 30 % hydrogen peroxide activated with diode laser (810 nm, 1 W, CW, 6 mm distance). Equal numbers of teeth in groups 2, 3, and 4 were bonded at start, 1 h, 24 h, and 1 week after bleaching. A universal testing machine measured the SBS of the samples 24 h after bonding. After bracket debonding, the amount of residual adhesive on the enamel surface was observed under a stereomicroscope to determine the adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores. The SBS in the unbleached group was significantly higher than that in the bleached groups bonded immediately and 1 h after laser-assisted bleaching (P laser-assisted bleaching, the SBS was found to be significantly lower than that in the control group. Significant differences in the ARI scores existed among groups as well. The SBS of brackets seems to increase quickly within an hour after laser-assisted bleaching and 24 h after conventional bleaching. Thus, this protocol can be recommended if it is necessary to bond the brackets on the same day of bleaching.

  14. Effect of self-ligating bracket appliance on the periodontal tissues in patients with chronic periodontitis after orthodontic treatment

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    Liu-Qing Yang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the effect of self-ligating bracket appliance on the periodontal tissues in patients with chronic periodontitis after orthodontic treatment. Methods: A total of 56 patients with chronic periodontitis who were admitted in our hospital were included in the study and divided into the observation group and the control group according to different treatment protocols. The patients in the observation group were given self-ligating brackets, while the patients in the control group were given traditional brackets. The periodontal tissues and tooth motility (TM before and after treatment in the two groups were observed and recorded. IL-1 毬 and TNF-毩 levels in the gingival crervicular fluid (GCF before and after treatment in the two groups were detected. Results: PD, CAL, SBI, and PLI after treatment in the two groups were significantly reduced, while GR was significantly elevated when compared with the control group. PD, CAL, SBI, and PLI after treatment in the observation group were significantly lower than those in the control group, while GR was significantly higher than that in the control group. TM after treatment in the two groups was significantly improved, among which the number of 0° TM was significantly increased, while the number of Ⅰ°-Ⅲ°TM was significantly reduced. IL-1β and TNF-α levels in GCF after treatment in the two groups were significantly reduced when compared with before treatment. IL-1β and TNF-α levels in GCF after treatment in the observation group were significantly lower than those in the control group. Conclusions: The self-ligating brackets can effectively improve the periodontal tissues and TM in patients with chronic periodontitis, and reduce the levels of inflammatory cytokines in periodontal tissues, with an accurate efficacy.

  15. Report: Discussion on the development of nano Ag/TiO2 coating bracket and its antibacterial property and biocompatibility in orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ronghe; Zhang, Weiwei; Bai, Xueyan; Song, Xiaotong; Wang, Chunyan; Gao, Xinxin; Tian, Xubiao; Liu, Fengzhen

    2015-03-01

    This paper aims to explore the antibacterial property of nano Ag/TiO2 coating bracket for the common bacteria in oral cavity, and discuss its biocompatibility. Micro morphology in the surface of nano Ag/TiO2 coating bracket was detected by scanning electron microscope (SEM), and surface roughness of ordinary mental bracket, nano TiO2 coating bracket and nano Ag/TiO2 coating bracket were measured. First, antibacterial property of nano Ag/TiO2 coating bracket on the common bacteria in oral cavity was studied by sticking membrane method. Secondly, bonding strength of nano TiO2 coating and nano Ag/TiO2 coating bracket in groups were detected by scratching test. The result showed that, the synthetic nano Ag/TiO2 coating was nanogranular films with rigorous organizational structure, presenting as smooth and clean surface, and antibacterial rate of nano Ag/TiO2 coating for the common bacteria in oral cavity for 20 min was more than 79% in the dark. All the findings suggested that, nano Ag/TiO2 coating bracket not only has antibacterial effect but also has good biocompatibility, therefore, it can satisfy the clinical request of orthodontic treatment.

  16. Er:YAG pre-treatment for bonding of orthodontic bracket: 1 year of in vitro treatment

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    de Jesus Tavarez RR

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Rudys Rodolfo de Jesus Tavarez,1 Gisele Lima Bezerra,2 Karla Janilee de Souza Penha,3 Carlos Rocha Gomes Torres,4 Leily Macedo Firoozmand5 1Department of Dentistry, Ceuma University (UNICEUMA, 2Dentistry Program, Ceuma University (UNICEUMA, 3Dentistry Program, Federal University of Maranhão, UFMA, São Luís, MA, 4Restorative Dentistry Department, ICT UNESP University, São Paulo, 5Dentistry Department I, Federal University of Maranhão,UFMA, São Luís, MA, Brazil Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro bond strength of metal brackets bonded with: total etch, total etch with erbium: yttrium aluminum garnet laser (Er:YAG and self-etching adhesive systems, submitted to thermal-mechanical cycling, simulating 1 year of orthodontic treatment.Materials and methods: For the study, 80 bovine incisors were randomly divided into 3 experimental groups (n=16 each: XT- acid etching + Transbond XT, XT/Er:YAG- Transbond XT associated with Er:YAG laser irradiation (λ=2.94 μm, 60 mJ, 10 Hz and SEP- Transbond Plus Self Etching Primer. Samples were submitted to thermal-mechanical cycling, simulating 1 year of orthodontic treatment. Afterward, the shear bond strength test was performed in a universal test machine at a speed of 0.5mm/min. Samples were evaluated under a stereomicroscope and by scanning electron microscopy for analysis of enamel surface and adhesive remnant index. Data were analyzed using Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney (with Bonferroni correction statistical tests.Results: Statistically significant difference was observed between the groups studied (p<0.05. Groups XT and SEP showed the highest bond strength values, without statistical difference between them, while group XT/Er:YAG showed reduction in bond strength values. Higher frequency of adhesive failures between enamel and adhesive system was verified for groups XT and XT/Er:YAG.Conclusion: The conventional (XT and self-etching (SEP adhesive systems showed mean bond

  17. Orthodontic brackets in high field MR imaging: experimental evaluation of magnetic field interactions at 3.0 tesla; Kieferorthopaedische Brackets in der Hochfeld-Magnetresonanz-Tomographie: Experimentelle Beurteilung magnetischer Anziehungs- und Rotationskraefte bei 3 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemper, J.; Adam, G. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Klocke, A.; Kahl-Nieke, B. [Poliklinik fuer Kieferorthopaedie, Universitaetsklinikum Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany)

    2005-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate static magnetic field interactions for 32 commonly used orthodontic brackets in a 3.0 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. Materials and methods: 32 orthodontic brackets consisting of a steel alloy (n=27), a cobalt-chromium alloy (n=2), ceramic (n=1), ceramic with a steel slot (n=1), and titanium (n=1) from 13 different manufacturers were tested for magnetic field interactions in a static magnetic field at 3.0 T (Gyroscan Intera 3.0 T, Philips Medical Systems, Best, Netherlands). The magnetic deflection force F{sub Z} [mN] was evaluated by determining the deflection angle {beta}[ ] using the established deflection angle test according to the ASTM guidelines. The magnetic-field-induced rotational force F{sub rot} or torque was qualitatively determined using a 5-point grading scale (0: no torque; +4: very strong torque). Results: In 18 of the 32 brackets, the deflection angle {beta} was found to be > 45 and the translational force exceeded the gravitational force F{sub G} on the particular bracket (F{sub Z}: 1.2-45.7 mN). The translational force F{sub Z} was found to be up to 68.5 times greater than the gravitational force F{sub G} (F{sub Z}/F{sub G}: 1.4-68.5). The rotational force F{sub rot} was correspondingly high (+3/+4) for those brackets. For the remaining 14 objects, the deflection angles were < 45 and the torque measurements ranged from 0 to +2. The static magnetic field did not affect the titanium bracket and the ceramic bracket. No measurable translational and rotational forces were found. (orig.)

  18. Adhesion of Candida albicans to Vanillin Incorporated Self-Curing Orthodontic PMMA Resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zam, K.; Sawaengkit, P.; Thaweboon, S.; Thaweboon, B.

    2018-02-01

    It has been observed that there is an increase in Candida carriers during the treatment with orthodontic removable appliance. Vanillin is flavouring agent, which is known to have antioxidant and antimicrobial properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of vanillin incorporated PMMA on adhesion of Candida albicans. A total of 36 orthodontic self-curing PMMA resin samples were fabricated. The samples were divided into 3 groups depending on percentage of vanillin incorporated (0.1%, 0.5% and PMMA without vanillin as control). PMMA samples were coated with saliva. The adhesion assay was performed with C. albicans (ATCC 10231). The adherent yeast cells were stained with crystal violet and counted under microscope by random selection of 3 fields at 10X magnification. The statistical analyses performed by Kruskal Wallis and Mann Whitney non-parametric test. It was found that the PMMA resin samples with vanillin incorporation significantly reduced the adhesion of C. albicans as compared to the control group. This study indicates that vanillin incorporated resin can impede the adhesion of C. albicans to about 45 - 56 %. With further testing and development, vanillin can be employed as an antifungal agent to prevent adhesion of C. albicans to orthodontic self-curing PMMA resin.

  19. The Effect of Enamel Sandblasting on Enhancing Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumgartner, Stefan; Koletsi, Despina; Verna, Carlalberta

    2017-01-01

    terms included sandblasting, enamel abrasion, tooth surface, bond strength, bond failure, and adhesive remnant; data were extracted in standardized piloted forms. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool, adapted for in vitro studies where necessary. RESULTS: Of the 81 articles......PURPOSE: To critically appraise the evidence regarding the effect of enamel sandblasting on the bond strength of orthodontic brackets on either the labial or lingual tooth surface. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An electronic database search of published and unpublished literature was performed. Search...... initially retrieved, 13 were eligible for inclusion in the systematic review. All of the latter were in vitro studies with unclear risk of bias primarily due to unclear reporting of blinding of outcome assessors. Eight studies assessed the combined effect of enamel sandblasting and etching, while only five...

  20. Deproteinization of fluorosed enamel with sodium hypochlorite enhances the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets: An In vitro study

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    Rekha Sharma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Improving bonding strength to fluorosed teeh. Aims: To determine the effect of deproteinization using 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl prior to acid etching on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded to fluorosed teeth. Settings and Design: In vitro experimental study. Methods and Material: Forty freshly extracted human mandibular first premolars with TFI 4 were selected and divided into two groups of 20 each. In Group I the teeth were acid etched with 37% phosphoric acid and bonded with composite. In Group II the teeth were deproteinized with 5.25% NaOCl prior to acid etching with 37% phosphoric acid and were bonded with composite. Samples were then subjected to shear bond test by Instron Universal Testing machine. The sample from each group were selected for the SEM study (prior to bonding to analyze the etching patterns achieved. Statistical Analysis Used: Data was checked for normality by Shapiro Wilk Test, to compare the two groups unpaired t test was used. P value was predetermined at ≤ 0.05. Results: The S BS of Group II (11.75 ± 2.83 MPa was higher than Group I (7.44 ± 2.43 MPa and the difference was statistically significant (P = 0.000. On SEM the etching pattern was more of type 1 and 2 in Group II. Conclusions: Deproteinization using 5.25% NaOCl prior to acid etching significantly increases the shear bond strength of brackets bonded to fluorosed teeth and can be used as a convenient and effective option in orthodontic bonding to fluorosed teeth.

  1. Comparative three-dimensional analysis of initial biofilm formation on three orthodontic bracket materials

    OpenAIRE

    Dittmer, Marc Philipp; Hellemann, Carolina Fuchslocher; Grade, Sebastian; Heuer, Wieland; Stiesch, Meike; Schwestka-Polly, Rainer; Demling, Anton Phillip

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of the present study was to investigate and compare early biofilm formation on biomaterials, which are being used in contemporary fixed orthodontic treatment. Methods This study comprised 10 healthy volunteers (5 females and 5 males) with a mean age of 27.3?+?3.7?years. Three slabs of different orthodontic materials (stainless steel, gold and ceramic) were placed in randomized order on a splint in the mandibular molar region. Splints were inserted intraorally for 48?h...

  2. Comparison of shear bond strength of four types of orthodontic brackets with different base technologies

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    Gaurang H Chaudhary

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS of brackets systems with four different base technologies. Materials and Methods: Maxillary first premolars were randomly divided into four groups of thirty specimens each: (1 Master Series™ conventional twin, (2 T3™ self-ligating, (3 Victory series™ conventional twin, and (4 H4™ self-ligating brackets. Maxillary first premolars were bracketed using an acid-etch composite system, and the SBS measured using an Instron Universal Testing Machine at a crosshead speed of 2 mm/min. The ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparison tests were performed with significance predetermined at P ≤ 0.05. Results: The overall mean bond strengths were 8.49 ± 2.93, 10.85 ± 3.34, 9.42 ± 2.97, and 9.73 ± 2.62 for the Groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 brackets, respectively. One-way ANOVA test gave an F = 3.182 with a P = 0.026. The Group 1 and Group 2 were observed to have statistically significant difference with a P = 0.014. Conclusions: The T3 self-ligating one-piece design with microetched Quadra Grip™ base brackets had the highest bond strength. The SBS difference between Group 2, Group 3, and Group 4 was not significant, but the difference between Group 2 and Group 1 was statistically significant.

  3. Enamel Deproteinization using Papacarie and 10% Papain Gel on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Before and After Acid Etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, R M; Yeluri, R; Singh, C; Munshi, A K

    2015-01-01

    To suggest Papacarie(®) as a new deproteinizing agent in comparison with indigenously prepared 10% papain gel before and after acid etching that may enhance the quality of the bond between enamel surface and composite resin complex. One hundred and twenty five extracted human premolars were utilized and divided into five groups: In the group 1, enamel surface was etched and primer was applied. In group 2, treatment with papacarie(®) for 60 seconds followed by etching and primer application. In group 3, etching followed by treatment with papacarie(®) for 60 seconds and primer application. In group 4, treatment with 10% papain gel for 60 seconds followed by etching and primer application. In group 5, etching followed by treatment with 10% papain gel for 60 seconds and primer application . After bonding the brackets, the mechanical testing was performed using a Universal testing machine. The failure mode was analyzed using an adhesive remnant index. The etching patterns before and after application of papacarie(®) and 10% papain gel was also evaluated using SEM. The values obtained for shear bond strength were submitted to analysis of variance and Tukey test (p Adhesive remnant index no statistical difference was seen between the groups (p=0.538). Papacarie(®) or 10% papain gel can be used to deproteinize the enamel surface before acid etching to enhance the bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

  4. Effects of six different preventive treatments on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets: in vitro study

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    Gianguido Cossellu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of six different prophylactic agents on shear bond strength (SBS of orthodontic brackets. Materials and methods: One hundred twenty-six freshly extracted mandibular bovine incisors were used. Teeth were randomly divided into 7 equal groups (18 per group as follows: group-1 served as control with no pre-treatment; group-2 enamel treated with fluoride varnish (Fluor Protector, Ivoclar Vivadent; group-3 containing casein-phosphopeptide–amorphous calcium-phosphate (CPP–ACP paste (GC Tooth Mousse, RECALDENT™; group-4 with ozone (HealOzone, Kavo; group-5 with glycine powder (Perio Flow, EMS; group-6 with hydroxyapatite powder 99.5% (Coswell S.p.A.; group-7 with a toothpaste made of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals (BioRepair® Plus, Coswell S.p.A. Brackets were all bonded using the same technique with transbond XT (3 M Unitek, Monrovia, CA. All the bonded specimens were stored for 24 h in deionized water (37 °C and subjected to thermal cycling for 1000 cycles. The SBS was measured with an Instron Universal Testing machine and the adhesive remnant was assessed with the adhesive remnant index (ARI using a stereomicroscope at 10× magnification. Results: Statistical differences (ANOVA were found among the seven investigated groups (F = 12.226, p < 0.001. SBS of groups 2, 5 and 6 were significantly lower than the control group (p < 0.05. ARI scores (chi-square test were correlated with the differences of SBS values. Conclusion: CPP–ACP paste, ozone or BioRepair® did not compromise on bracket bond strength. Fluoride, glycine or hydroxyapatite significantly decreased the SBS; only the fluoride group showed significant clinically low (<6 MPa SBS values.

  5. A comparative study of shear bond strength of orthodontic bracket after acid-etched and Er:YAG treatment on enamel surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leão, Juliana C.; Mota, Cláudia C. B. O.; Cassimiro-silva, Patricia F.; Gomes, Anderson S. L.

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of teeth prepared for orthodontic bracket bonding with 37% phosphoric acid and Er:YAG laser. Forty bovine incisors were divided into two groups. In Group I, the teeth were conditioned with 37% phosphoric acid and brackets were bonded with Transbond XT; in Group II, the teeth were irradiated with Er:YAG and bonding with Transbond XT. After SBS test, the adhesive remnant index was determined. Adhesion to dental hard tissues after Er:YAG laser etching was inferior to that obtained after acid etching but exceeded what is believed to be clinically sufficient strength, and therefore can be used in patients.

  6. Fluoride level in saliva after bonding orthodontic brackets with a fluoride containing adhesive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogaard, B; Arends, J; Helseth, H; Dijkman, G; vanderKuijl, M

    The fluoride level in saliva is considered an important parameter in caries prevention. Elevation of the salivary fluoride level by a fluoride-releasing orthodontic bonding adhesive would most likely be beneficial in the prevention of enamel caries. In this study, the fluoride level in saliva was

  7. Effects of fixed orthodontic treatment using conventional (two-piece) versus metal injection moulding brackets on hair nickel and chromium levels: a double-blind randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaneh Masjedi, Mashallah; Haghighat Jahromi, Nima; Niknam, Ozra; Hormozi, Elham; Rakhshan, Vahid

    2017-02-01

    Although nickel and chromium are known as allergen and cytotoxic orthodontic metals, very few and controversial studies have assessed the effect of orthodontic treatment on their systemic levels especially those reflected by their best biomarker of exposure, hair. Additionally, metal injection moulding (MIM) brackets are not studied, and there is no study on systemic ion changes following their usage. In this double-blind randomized clinical trial, scalp hair samples of 24 female and 22 male fixed orthodontic patients [as two groups of conventional (two-piece) versus MIM brackets, n = 23×2] were collected before treatment and 6 months later. Randomization was carried out using a computer-generated random number table. The patients, laboratory expert, and author responsible for analyses were blinded of the bracket allocations. Hair nickel and chromium levels were measured using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The effects of treatment, bracket types, gender, and age on hair ions were analysed statistically (α = 0.05, β ≤ 0.02). In both groups combined (n = 46), nickel increased from 0.1600±0.0890 µg/g dry hair mass (pre-treatment) to 0.3199±0.1706 (6th month). Chromium increased from 0.1657±0.0884 to 0.3066±0.1362 µg/g. Both of these increases were significant (paired t-test, P = 0.0000). Bracket types, age, and gender had no significant influence on ion levels (P > 0.05). ANCOVA indicated different patterns of chromium increases in different genders (P = 0.033) and ages (P = 0.056). Sample size determination should have accounted for the grouping as well. Hair nickel and chromium levels might increase about 185-200% after 6 months. They might not be affected by bracket types. Gender and age might not influence the baseline or 6th-month levels of both metals. Gender might however interact with orthodontic treatment, only in the case of chromium. The research is registered offline (thesis) and online (IR.AJUMS.REC.1394.516). The protocol was pre

  8. Preparation of an orthodontic bracket coated with an nitrogen-doped TiO(2-x)N(y) thin film and examination of its antimicrobial performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Baocheng; Wang, Yuhua; Li, Na; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Yingjie

    2013-01-01

    A bracket coated with a nitrogen-doped (N-doped) TiO(2-x)N(y) thin film was prepared using the RF magnetron sputtering method. The physicochemical properties of the thin film were measured using X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry, while the antimicrobial activity of the bracket against common oral pathogenic microbes was assessed on the basis of colony counts. The rate of antimicrobial activity of the bracket coated with nano-TiO(2-x)N(y) thin film against Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Actinomyces viscous, and Candida albicans was 95.19%, 91.00%, 69.44%, and 98.86%, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy showed that fewer microbes adhered to the surface of this newly designed bracket than to the surface of the normal edgewise bracket. The brackets coated with the N-doped TiO(2-x)N(y) thin film showed high antimicrobial and bacterial adhesive properties against normal oral pathogenic bacterial through visible light, which is effective in prevention of enamel demineralization and gingivitis in orthodontic patients.

  9. The effects of a common stainless steel orthodontic bracket on the diagnostic quality of cranial and cervical 3T- MR images: a prospective, case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassetta, Michele; Pranno, Nicola; Stasolla, Alessandro; Orsogna, Nicola; Fierro, Davide; Cavallini, Costanza; Cantisani, Vito

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of orthodontic stainless steel brackets and two different types of archwires on the diagnostic quality of 3-T MR images. This prospective, case-control study was conducted following Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology guidelines. The recruitment was conducted among orthodontic patients. 80 subjects, requiring MRI for the presence of temporomandibular disorders, were enrolled and divided into four groups: 20 patients using aligners (control group); 20 patients with stainless steel brackets without archwires; 20 patients with stainless steel brackets and nickel-titanium archwires; and 20 patients with stainless steel brackets and stainless steel archwires. Two experts in neuroradiology evaluated the images to determine the amount of distortion in 6 regions and 48 districts. A score was subjectively assigned according to a modified receiver operating characteristic method of distortion classification. Any disagreement was resolved through consensus seeking; when this was not possible, a third neuroradiologist was consulted. The following statistical methods were used: descriptive statistics, Cohen's kappa coefficient (k), Kruskal-Wallis test, pairwise comparisons using the Dunn-Bonferroni approach. The significance was set at p ≤ 0.05. The presence of stainless steel brackets with or without archwires negatively influenced MRI of the cervical region, paranasal sinuses, head and neck region, and cervical vertebrae but did not influence MRI of brain and temporomandibular joint regions. Patients with a stainless steel multibracket orthodontic appliance should remove it before cervical vertebrae, cervical region, paranasal sinuses, and head and neck MRI scans. The brain and temporomandibular joint region MRI should not require the removal of such appliances.

  10. IN VITRO Cr(VI SPECIATION IN SYNTHETIC SALIVA AFTER RELEASING FROM ORTHODONTIC BRACKETS USING SILICA-APTES SEPARATION AND GF AAS DETERMINATION

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    Maciel S. Luz

    Full Text Available A method for Cr(VI speciation in synthetic saliva after releasing from orthodontic brackets, using silica nanoparticles organofunctionalized with (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES for Cr(III/Cr(VI separation and GF AAS determination is proposed. Under the optimized conditions, Cr(VI speciation was performed using 150 mg of silica organofunctionalized with 2.0% (v v-1 of APTES at pH 8. It was observed different sensitivity when calibrations of GF AAS were performed using Cr(III or Cr(VI as standard solutions. Consequently, calibrations using stoichiometric mixtures (Cr(III + Cr(VI were used for total Cr determination and calibration using Cr(VI was used only for the determination of this specie. The reliability of the proposed silica-APTES separation procedure and GF AAS determination was checked by addition of both species in synthetic saliva. Recoveries ranging from 97 to 110% were obtained. The repeatability, based on the relative standard deviation (RSD inter days was less than 6%. A corrosion test was carried out on 20 orthodontic brackets from two different models, after immersion in synthetic saliva (pH=6.0 at 37 °C with agitation (125 rpm for 24 h. It was observed that about 40% of the total chromium released from the analyzed orthodontic brackets was Cr(VI.

  11. Changes in biochemical parameters of oral fluid in patients during the orthodontic treatment with a bracket system under the action of a developed mucosal gel with probiotic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronkova, Anna V; Smaglyuk, Lyubov V

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Many research studies involving orthodontic patients focus on changes in levels of oral microbiocenosis after bracket placement. Based upon this the objective of the current study was to determine the effect of the developed mucosal gel with probiotics on the biochemical parameters of the oral fluid of patients during the orthodontic treatment with a bracket system. The aim: Aim of our study is to determine the effect of the developed mucosal gel with probiotics on the biochemical parameters of the oral fluid of patients during the orthodontic treatment with a bracket system. Materials and methods: 45 patients at the age of 18-24, with 15 people in each group (control, main and comparison group) were examined. The main group was presented by patients who, in order to prevent dysbiosis of the oral cavity during orthodontic treatment, were prescribed local use of the developed mucosal gel with probiotic. The statistical processing of the results of the study was carried out using methods of variation statistics using the EXCEL program (the standard package of Microsoft Office). Results: According to the results of biochemical studies, it was found that the use of orthodontic treatment of mucosal gel with probiotic in patients with crowded teeth contributes to the strengthening of antioxidant protection, an increase in nonspecific resistance, decrease in inflammation and normalization of microbiocenosis of the oral cavity. Conclusion: These studies indicated that the use of the developed mucosal gel with probiotic in patients with maxillofacial anomalies from the first day after fixation, as indicated by the level of biochemical markers of inflammation.

  12. Streptococcus mutans counts in plaque adjacent to orthodontic brackets bonded with resin-modified glass ionomer cement or resin-based composite

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    Solange Machado Mota

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the number of Streptococcus mutans CFU (colony forming units in the saliva and plaque adjacent to orthodontic brackets bonded with a glass ionomer cement - GIC (Fuji Ortho or a resin-based composite - RC (Concise. Twenty male and female patients, aged 12 to 20 years, participated in the study. Saliva was collected before and after placement of appliances. Plaque was collected from areas adjacent to brackets and saliva was again collected on the 15th, 30th, and 45th day after placement. On the 30th day, 0.4% stannous fluoride gel was applied for 4 minutes. No significant modification in the number of Streptococcus mutans CFU in saliva was observed after placement of the fixed orthodontic appliances. On the 15th day, the percentage of Streptococcus mutans CFU in plaque was statistically lower in sites adjacent to GIC-bonded brackets (mean = 0.365 than in those adjacent to RC-bonded brackets (mean = 0.935. No evidence was found of a contribution of GIC to the reduction of CFU in plaque after the 15th day. Topical application of stannous fluoride gel on the 30th day reduced the number of CFU in saliva, but not in plaque. This study suggests that the antimicrobial activity of GIC occurs only in the initial phase and is not responsible for a long-term anticariogenic property.

  13. Effect of nanotechnology in self-etch bonding systems on the shear bond strength of stainless steel orthodontic brackets

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    Shaza M. Hammad

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the effect of silica dioxide (SiO2 nanofillers in different bonding systems on shear bond strength (SBS and mode of failure of orthodontic brackets at two experimental times. Methods: Ninety-six intact premolars were divided into four groups: A Conventional acid-etch and primer Transbond XT; B Transbond Plus self-etch primer; and two self-etch bonding systems reinforced with silica dioxide nanofiller at different concentrations: C Futurabond DC at 1%; D Optibond All-in-One at 7%. Each group was allocated into two subgroups (n = 12 according to experimental time (12 and 24 hours. SBS test was performed using a universal testing machine. ARI scores were determined under a stereomicroscope. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM were used to determine the size and distribution of nanofillers. One-way ANOVA was used to compare SBS followed by the post-hoc Tukey test. The chi-square test was used to evaluate ARI scores. Results: Mean SBS of Futurabond DC and Optibond All-in-One were significantly lower than conventional system, and there were no significant differences between means SBS obtained with all self-etch bonding systems used in the study. Lower ARI scores were found for Futurabond DC and Optibond All-in-One. There was no significant difference of SBS and ARI obtained at either time points for all bonding systems. Relative homogeneous distribution of the fillers was observed with the bonding systems. Conclusion: Two nanofilled systems revealed the lowest bond strengths, but still clinically acceptable and less adhesive was left on enamel. It is advisable not to load the brackets immediately to the maximum.

  14. Effect of nanotechnology in self-etch bonding systems on the shear bond strength of stainless steel orthodontic brackets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, Shaza M.; El-Wassefy, Noha; Maher, Ahmed; Fawakerji, Shafik M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the effect of silica dioxide (SiO2) nanofillers in different bonding systems on shear bond strength (SBS) and mode of failure of orthodontic brackets at two experimental times. Methods: Ninety-six intact premolars were divided into four groups: A) Conventional acid-etch and primer Transbond XT; B) Transbond Plus self-etch primer; and two self-etch bonding systems reinforced with silica dioxide nanofiller at different concentrations: C) Futurabond DC at 1%; D) Optibond All-in-One at 7%. Each group was allocated into two subgroups (n = 12) according to experimental time (12 and 24 hours). SBS test was performed using a universal testing machine. ARI scores were determined under a stereomicroscope. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to determine the size and distribution of nanofillers. One-way ANOVA was used to compare SBS followed by the post-hoc Tukey test. The chi-square test was used to evaluate ARI scores. Results: Mean SBS of Futurabond DC and Optibond All-in-One were significantly lower than conventional system, and there were no significant differences between means SBS obtained with all self-etch bonding systems used in the study. Lower ARI scores were found for Futurabond DC and Optibond All-in-One. There was no significant difference of SBS and ARI obtained at either time points for all bonding systems. Relative homogeneous distribution of the fillers was observed with the bonding systems. Conclusion: Two nanofilled systems revealed the lowest bond strengths, but still clinically acceptable and less adhesive was left on enamel. It is advisable not to load the brackets immediately to the maximum. PMID:28444018

  15. In vitro evaluation of frictional forces of two ceramic orthodontic brackets versus a stainless steel bracket in combination with two types of archwires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arash, Valiollah; Rabiee, Mahmoud; Rakhshan, Vahid; Khorasani, Sara; Sobouti, Farhad

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare frictional forces between monocrystalline alumina (MA), polycrystalline alumina (PA), and stainless steel (SS) brackets with two SS wires: Rectangular and round. In this in vitro study, 60 0.022 brackets [20 PA (0° torque, Forestadent, Germany) and 20 MA (0° torque, Ormco, California, USA)] brackets plus 20 SS brackets (0° torque, Foretadent, Germany) and 60 SS archwires (30 rectangular 0.019 ×0.025 archwires and 30 round 0.018 archwires, Ortho Technology, USA) were used in subgroups of 10 from the combination of all brackets and all archwires. A universal testing machine (Instron, Model STM 250, Germany) was used to investigate the static frictional resistance. The angulation between the bracket and wire was 0°, and the wires were pulled through the slots at a crosshead speed of 10 mm/min. Two-way and one-way analyses of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey tests were used to analyze the data. Mean (SD) static frictional force for each group was as follows: MA + round: 3.47 (0.38); MA + rectangular: 4.05 (0.47); PA + round: 4.14 (0.37); PA + rectangular: 4.45 (0.65); SS + round: 3.28 (0.22); and SS + rectangular: 4.22 (0.61). Significant effects of bracket types (P = 0.001) and archwire types (P = 0.000) on the friction force were detected using ANOVA. Tukey test indicated significant differences between PA brackets with both SS and MA brackets (P brackets. The two archwires as well had significantly different effects (Tukey P = 0.000). Based on the present in-vitro study, the PA brackets might create higher frictional forces compared to both SS and MA brackets. The rectangular 0.019 ×0.025 archwire might create greater forces than round 0.018 archwire.

  16. In vitro evaluation of frictional forces of two ceramic orthodontic brackets versus a stainless steel bracket in combination with two types of archwires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arash, Valiollah; Rabiee, Mahmoud; Rakhshan, Vahid; Khorasani, Sara; Sobouti, Farhad

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare frictional forces between monocrystalline alumina (MA), polycrystalline alumina (PA), and stainless steel (SS) brackets with two SS wires: Rectangular and round. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, 60 0.022 brackets [20 PA (0° torque, Forestadent, Germany) and 20 MA (0° torque, Ormco, California, USA)] brackets plus 20 SS brackets (0° torque, Foretadent, Germany) and 60 SS archwires (30 rectangular 0.019 ×0.025 archwires and 30 round 0.018 archwires, Ortho Technology, USA) were used in subgroups of 10 from the combination of all brackets and all archwires. A universal testing machine (Instron, Model STM 250, Germany) was used to investigate the static frictional resistance. The angulation between the bracket and wire was 0°, and the wires were pulled through the slots at a crosshead speed of 10 mm/min. Two-way and one-way analyses of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey tests were used to analyze the data. Results: Mean (SD) static frictional force for each group was as follows: MA + round: 3.47 (0.38); MA + rectangular: 4.05 (0.47); PA + round: 4.14 (0.37); PA + rectangular: 4.45 (0.65); SS + round: 3.28 (0.22); and SS + rectangular: 4.22 (0.61). Significant effects of bracket types (P = 0.001) and archwire types (P = 0.000) on the friction force were detected using ANOVA. Tukey test indicated significant differences between PA brackets with both SS and MA brackets (P brackets. The two archwires as well had significantly different effects (Tukey P = 0.000). Conclusions: Based on the present in-vitro study, the PA brackets might create higher frictional forces compared to both SS and MA brackets. The rectangular 0.019 ×0.025 archwire might create greater forces than round 0.018 archwire. PMID:26020037

  17. Evaluation of frictional resistance and surface characteristics after immersion of orthodontic brackets and wire in different chemical solutions: A comparative in vitrostudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanjundan, Kavitha; Vimala, G

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the changes of static and kinetic frictional forces between the brackets and wires following exposure to a soft drink, acidic food ingredient, and acidulated fluoride prophylactic agents. Two types of Roth prescription mandibular incisor brackets were used: 3M Unitek Victory stainless steel (SS) brackets (n = 40) and Transcend 6000 polycrystalline alumina (PCA) brackets (n = 40) as well as eighty 0.019 × 0.025" dimension ortho technology SS wires of 50 mm length each. Subsequently, brackets tied with SS wires divided into eight subgroups (n = 10) and were immersed in vinegar (pH = 3.5 ± 0.5), Pepsi ® (pH = 2.46), Colgate Phos-Flur mouth rinse (pH = 5.1), and artificial saliva (control group pH = 7) for 24 h. Changes in surface morphology under scanning electron microscope ×1000, surface roughness (Ra) with surface profilometer (single bracket and single wire from each subgroup), and frictional resistance using universal testing machine were evaluated. Highest mean (standard deviation) static frictional force of 2.65 (0.25) N was recorded in Pepsi ® followed by 2.57 (0.25) N, 2.40 (0.22) N, and 2.36 (0.17) N for Vinegar, Colgate Phos-Flur mouth rinse, and artificial saliva groups, respectively. In a similar order, lesser mean kinetic frictional forces obtained. PCA brackets revealed more surface deterioration and higher frictional force values than SS brackets. A significant positive correlation was observed between frictional forces and bracket slot roughness (r = 0.861 and 0.802, respectively, for static and kinetic frictional forces, p < 0.001 for both) and wire roughness (r = 0.243 and 0.242, respectively, for static and kinetic frictional forces, p < 0.05 for both). Findings may have long-term implications when acidic food substances are used during fixed orthodontic treatment. Further, in vivo studies are required to analyze the clinical effect of acidic mediums in the oral environment during orthodontic treatment.

  18. Evaluation of frictional resistance and surface characteristics after immersion of orthodontic brackets and wire in different chemical solutions: A comparative in vitrostudy

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    Kavitha Nanjundan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the changes of static and kinetic frictional forces between the brackets and wires following exposure to a soft drink, acidic food ingredient, and acidulated fluoride prophylactic agents. Materials and Methods: Two types of Roth prescription mandibular incisor brackets were used: 3M Unitek Victory stainless steel (SS brackets (n = 40 and Transcend 6000 polycrystalline alumina (PCA brackets (n = 40 as well as eighty 0.019 × 0.025" dimension ortho technology SS wires of 50 mm length each. Subsequently, brackets tied with SS wires divided into eight subgroups (n = 10 and were immersed in vinegar (pH = 3.5 ± 0.5, Pepsi ® (pH = 2.46, Colgate Phos-Flur mouth rinse (pH = 5.1, and artificial saliva (control group pH = 7 for 24 h. Changes in surface morphology under scanning electron microscope ×1000, surface roughness (Ra with surface profilometer (single bracket and single wire from each subgroup, and frictional resistance using universal testing machine were evaluated. Results: Highest mean (standard deviation static frictional force of 2.65 (0.25 N was recorded in Pepsi ® followed by 2.57 (0.25 N, 2.40 (0.22 N, and 2.36 (0.17 N for Vinegar, Colgate Phos-Flur mouth rinse, and artificial saliva groups, respectively. In a similar order, lesser mean kinetic frictional forces obtained. PCA brackets revealed more surface deterioration and higher frictional force values than SS brackets. A significant positive correlation was observed between frictional forces and bracket slot roughness (r = 0.861 and 0.802, respectively, for static and kinetic frictional forces, p < 0.001 for both and wire roughness (r = 0.243 and 0.242, respectively, for static and kinetic frictional forces, p < 0.05 for both. Conclusions: Findings may have long-term implications when acidic food substances are used during fixed orthodontic treatment. Further, in vivo studies are required to analyze the clinical effect of acidic mediums in the oral environment during

  19. Influence of bleaching and desensitizing gel on bond strength of orthodontic brackets

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    Fernanda Alves Rodrigues Britto

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess, in vitro, the influence of bleaching gel and the use of desensitizing agent over bond strength of ceramic brackets bonded to bovine enamel. METHODS: One hundred bovine incisors were selected and randomly divided into five groups (n = 20: Group 1, control group (without bleaching; Group 2, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide; Group 3, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide (three applications, 15 minutes each and desensitizing agent applied for 10 minutes; Group 4, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide for 40 minutes; Group 5, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide for 40 minutes with desensitizing agent applied for 10 minutes. Brackets were bonded 7 days after bleaching and submitted to shear bond strength test after 24 hours at a compression rate of 1 mm/minute. After fracture, the adhesive remnant index (ARI was assessed under stereoscopic at 40 x magnification. Shear strength data (MPa were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test with significance level set at 5%. RESULTS: Group 5 (29.33 MPa showed significantly higher bond strength than Group 1 (19.19 MPa, Group 2 (20.59 MPa and Group 4 (23.25 MPa, but with no difference in comparison to Group 3. There was no significant difference among the other groups. The adhesive remnant index showed predominance of score 3, that is, all resin remained adhered to enamel for all groups. CONCLUSION: Bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide with calcium associated with desensitizing agent application produced higher bond strength values of brackets bonded to bovine enamel.

  20. Water and saliva contamination effect on shear bond strength of brackets bonded with a moisture-tolerant light cure system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Ascensión; Mena, Ana; Ortiz, Antonio José; Bravo, Luis Alberto

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of water and saliva contamination on shear bond strength of brackets bonded with a moisture-tolerant light cure system. Brackets were bonded to 240 bovine lower incisors divided into 12 groups. Four bonding procedures were evaluated, including (1) TSEP/Transbond XT, (2) TMIP/ Transbond XT, (3) TSEP/Transbond PLUS, and (4) TMIP/Transbond PLUS, each under three different bonding conditions: without contamination, with water contamination, and with saliva contamination. Shear bond strength was measured with a universal testing machine. The adhesive remnant on the teeth was quantified with the use of image analyzing equipment. Without contamination, bond strengths for the four procedures were similar (P > .05). TSEP/Tranbond PLUS and TMIP/Transbond PLUS left significantly less adhesive on the teeth after debonding than TSEP/Transbond XT and TMIP/Transbond XT (P .017), although for TMIP/ Transbond XT, both variables showed significant reductions after contamination (P < .017). TSEP/Transbond PLUS, TMIP/Transbond PLUS, and TSEP/Transbond XT showed greater tolerance to wet conditions than was shown by TMIP/Transbond XT.

  1. Shear strength of orthodontic bracket bonding with GIC bonding agent after the application of CPP-ACPF paste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melisa Budipramana

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: White spot lesion is a major problem during fixed orthodontic treatment. This problem can be solved by minimizing white spot lesion before the treatment and using a fluoride-releasing bonding agent. The application of casein phosphopeptidesamorphous calcium phospate fluoride (CPP-ACPF paste as remineralization agent before treatment and GIC as orthodontic bonding agent is expected to overcome this problem as well as to strengthen GIC bonding. Purpose: To measure the shear strength of fix orthodontic appliance using GIC bonding with CPP-ACPF application prior treatment. Methods: In this study, 50 extracted premolars were randomly divided into 2 groups: group 1 as treatment group and group II as control group that was not given CPPACPF pretreatment. After having been cut and put into acrylic device, the samples in group I were given pretreatment with CPP-ACPF paste on enamel surface for 2 minutes twice a day as instructed in product label for 14 days. Orthodontic brackets were bonded with GIC bonding agent on all samples in both groups as instructed in product label. Then, the shear strength was measured by Autograph Shimatzu with crosshead speed 0.5 mm/minute. The data was analyzed with Independent t-test. Results: The mean shear bond strength in treatment group was 19.22 ± 4.04 MPa and in control group was 12.97 ± 3.97 MPa. Independent t-test analysis showed that there was a significant difference between treatment and control group (p<0.05. Conclusion: CPP-ACPF pretreatment could increase GIC orthodontic bonding shear strength.Latar belakang: Lesi putih karies merupakan masalah utama selama perawatan dengan peranti cekat ortodonti. Hal ini dapat diatasi dengan cara mengurangi lesi putih sebelum perawatan dengan menggunakan bahan bonding yang mengandung fluorida. Aplikasi pasta casein phosphopeptides-amorphous calcium phospate fluoride (CPP-ACPF sebagai bahan remineralisasi sebelum perawatan dan bahan bonding GIC diharapkan dapat

  2. A comparative clinical study of the failure rate of orthodontic brackets bonded with two adhesive systems: conventional and self-etching primer (SEP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Gladys Cristina; Tortamano, André; Lopes, Luiz Vicente de Moura; Catharino, Priscilla Campanatti Chibebe; Morea, Camillo

    2013-01-01

    This study compared the clinical performance of orthodontic brackets bonded with Transbond adhesive paste after two primer systems: a two-stage conventional system (acid etching + Transbond XT adhesive primer) and a single-stage self-etching primer (SEP) (Transbond Plus). The sample comprised 480 metal brackets bonded to the teeth of 24 consecutive patients treated for 36 to 48 months. A split-mouth design was used for bonding, and both systems were used in each patient. Bracket failure rates for each system were analyzed; and failure causes as reported by the patients and the quadrant of teeth for which brackets failed were recorded. The conventional system group had a failure rate of 5.41%, whereas the rate for SEP was 4.58%. In this group, there were 5 failures (38.4%) in the right maxillary quadrant, 2 (15.4%) in the left maxillary quadrant, 4 (30.8%) in the right mandibular quadrant, and 2 (15.4%) in the left mandibular quadrant. In the SEP group, there were 4 (36.4%) failures in the right maxillary quadrant, 1 (9%) in the left maxillary quadrant, 3 (27.3%) in the right mandibular quadrant, and 3 (27.3%) in the left mandibular quadrant. Results of descriptive statistical analysis and odds ratio did not show any significant differences between rates (p = 0.67). The clinical efficiency of SEP was similar to that of the conventional system.

  3. A comparative clinical study of the failure rate of orthodontic brackets bonded with two adhesive systems: conventional and self-etching primer (SEP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladys Cristina Dominguez

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study compared the clinical performance of orthodontic brackets bonded with Transbond adhesive paste after two priming systems: a two-stage conventional system (acid etching + Transbond XT adhesive primer and a singlestage self-etching primer (SEP (Transbond Plus. METHODS: The sample comprised 480 metal brackets bonded to the teeth of 24 consecutive patients treated for 36 to 48 months. A split-mouth design was used for bonding, and both systems were used in each patient. Bracket failure rates for each system were analyzed; and failure causes as reported by the patients and the quadrant of teeth for which brackets failed were recorded. RESULTS: The conventional system group had a failure rate of 5.41%, whereas the rate for SEP was 4.58%. In this group, there were 5 failures (38.4% in the right maxillary quadrant, 2 (15.4% in the left maxillary quadrant, 4 (30.8% in the right mandibular quadrant, and 2 (15.4% in the left mandibular quadrant. In the SEP group, there were 4 (36.4% failures in the right maxillary quadrant, 1 (9% in the left maxillary quadrant, 3 (27.3% in the right mandibular quadrant, and 3 (27.3% in the left mandibular quadrant. Results of descriptive statistical analysis and odds ratio did not show any significant differences between rates (p = 0.67. CONCLUSION: The clinical efficiency of SEP was similar to that of the conventional system.

  4. In vitro Assessment of Influence of Various Bleaching Protocols on the Strength of Ceramic Orthodontic Brackets bonded to Bleached Tooth Surface: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iska, Divya; Devanna, Raghu; Singh, Madhvi; Chitumalla, Rajkiran; Balasubramanian, Sai C Bala; Goutam, Manish

    2017-12-01

    Esthetics is one of the common issues because of which patients consult dental orthodontic treatment. Two ways of tooth bleaching are available these days, which includes in-office bleach and home bleach. Various bleaching protocols are available these days for treating the tooth surfaces. Hence, we planned the present study for investigating the impact of various intracoronal bleaching protocols on shear bond strength of ceramic brackets bonded to tooth surface after bleaching. The present study included assessment of 100 extracted maxillary central incisors with the integrated buccal surface. A resin block was made and individual teeth were embedded in each block. Root canal therapy procedure was performed in all the teeth, after which 2 mm short of tooth apex up to the level of cementoenamel junction, removal of the root canal filling was done. All the samples were broadly divided into four study groups with 25 samples in each group. Bleaching procedure was carried in all the samples intracoronally followed by testing of shear bond strength using universal force testing machine. Following the modified adhesive remnant index (AI), assessment of remaining adhesive on the brackets was done. All the results were compiled and analyzed by Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software version 17.0. In the control group, mean shear bond strength was found to be 17.9 MPa. While comparing the carbamide peroxide (CP) group with sodium perborate study group, we observed a statistically significant difference. Nonsignificant results were obtained while comparing the shear bond strength in between sodium perborate group and hydrogen peroxide (HP) group. Intracoronal bleaching does affect the shear bond strength of ceramic brackets. Sodium perborate bleaching influences shear bond strength more strongly than other bleaching agents such as CP and HP. In patients undergoing orthodontic treatment, HP is a preferred agent where bleaching has to be followed by

  5. Effect of Surface Treatment on Enamel Cracks After Orthodontic Bracket Debonding: Er,Cr:YSGG Laser-Etching Versus Acid-Etching

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    Ghaffari, Hassanali; Mirhashemi, Amirhossein; Baherimoghadam, Tahereh; Azmi, Amir

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: This study sought to compare enamel cracks after orthodontic bracket debonding in the surfaces prepared with erbium, chromium: yttrium-scandium-galliumgarnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser and the conventional acid-etching technique. Materials and Methods: This in-vitro experimental study was conducted on 60 sound human premolars extracted for orthodontic purposes. The teeth were randomly divided into two groups (n=30). The teeth in group A were etched with 37% phosphoric acid gel, while the teeth in group B were subjected to Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation (gold handpiece, MZ8 tip, 50Hz, 4.5W, 60μs, 80% water and 60% air). Orthodontic brackets were bonded to the enamel surfaces and were then debonded in both groups. The samples were inspected under a stereomicroscope at ×38 magnification to assess the number and length of enamel cracks before bonding and after debonding. Independent-samples t-test was used to compare the frequency of enamel cracks in the two groups. Levene’s test was applied to assess the equality of variances. Results: No significant difference was noted in the frequency or length of enamel cracks between the two groups after debonding (P>0.05). Conclusions: Despite the same results of the frequency and length of enamel cracks in the two groups and by considering the side effects of acid-etching (demineralization and formation of white spot lesions), Er,Cr:YSGG laser may be used as an alternative to acid-etching for enamel surface preparation prior to bracket bonding. PMID:29296111

  6. Comparison of shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded using two different hydrophilic primers: An in vitro study

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    M Kumaraswamy Anand

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Salivary control and maintenance of a dry operating field is a prime requisite of orthodontic bonding. Moisture insensitive primer (MIP with a clinical significant bond strength values have a better edge over the conventional hydrophobic bonding systems. Aim: The aim of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of two hydrophilic primers with respect to conventional hydrophobic primer by comparing their shear bond strength (SBS and adhesive-failure locations after contamination with saliva and saliva substitute. Materials and Methods: A total of 150 extracted human premolars were randomly divided into five group s ; Group A (Transbond MIP/saliva substitute, Group B (Opal Primo/saliva substitute, Group C (Transbond MIP/natural saliva, Group D (Opal Primo/natural saliva, control group - Group E (Transbond XT/dry, adhesive-Transbond XT used for all five groups and bonded using stainless steel brackets. Shear forces were applied to the samples with a universal testing machine. SBSs was measured in megapascals. The mode of bond failure was determined using the adhesive remnant index (ARI. Results: The mean SBS produced by Transbond MIP was higher than Opal Primo, which was statistically significant according to one-way analysis of variance. Both the tested groups showed lesser bond strength values than Transbond XT (the control. ARI scores revealed that there was no statistically significant difference in the site of bond failure between study groups. ARI scores were found to be lower for study groups suggesting adhesive failure, compared to higher ARI scores for the control group suggesting cohesive failure. Conclusion: Transbond XT adhesive with Transbond MIP or Opal Primo have clinically acceptable bond strength in wet fields. Opal Primo is a viable option to use as a hydrophilic primer clinically.

  7. The influence of different types of brackets and efficacy of two chlorhexidine mouthwashes on oral hygiene and the incidence of white spot lesions in adolescents during the orthodontic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurišić, Sanja; Kozomara, Davorin; Jurić, Hrvoje; Verzak, Željko; Jurišić, Gordan

    2016-12-01

    To detect the effect of two different types of brackets (ceramic and stainless steel) and investigate the effectiveness of two chlorhexidine mouthwashes 0.2% (CHX) on oral hygiene status and incidence of white spot lesions (WSLs) in adolescents wearing fixed orthodontic appliance. One hundred and twenty subjects (aged 11 to 18 years, mean age 14.5 years) were divided into six equal groups according to brackets type and to different mouthwashes: Group 1: metal brackets and conventional CHX, Group 2: metal brackets and CHX with anti-discoloration system (CHX-ADS), Group 3: ceramic brackets and conventional CHX, Group 4: ceramic brackets and CHX-ADS, Group 5: metal brackets and water correction flavors mouthwash (placebo), Group 6: ceramic brackets and placebo. Four weeks after the placement of fixed orthodontic appliance the subjects were provided with three different mouthwashes for use during the next two weeks. Assessment was carried out according to oral hygiene index-simplified (OHI-S) and WSL index performed: prior to placement of the appliance (baseline), four weeks, six weeks, eighteen weeks, and thirty weeks after the placement. The data were then subjected to statistical analysis. Group 4 showed reduction in the OHI-S scores when compared to the Group 5 (in the 6 th week), and Group 6 (in the 6 th and 18 th week), which was statistically significant, Pbrackets and the usage of CHX-ADS resulted in better oral hygiene status and lower incidence of WSLs.

  8. Effects of near infrared laser radiation associated with photoabsorbing cream in preventing white spot lesions around orthodontic brackets: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacerda, Ângela Sueli Soares Braga; Hanashiro, Fernando Seishim; de Sant'Anna, Giselle Rodrigues; Steagall Júnior, Washington; Barbosa, Patrícia Silva; de Souza-Zaroni, Wanessa Christine

    2014-12-01

    The present study aims to investigate the effect of a low-power infrared laser on the inhibition of bovine enamel demineralization around orthodontic brackets. Near infrared lasers have been suggested as alternative approaches because they may produce an increase in resistance to dental caries. Forty-eight blocks of enamel obtained from bovine incisor teeth were divided into six groups: Group 1 (control), without treatment; Group 2 (C), photoabsorbing cream; Group 3 (CF), photoabsorbing cream with fluoride; Group 4 (L), irradiation with low-level infrared laser (λ=830 nm) at an energy density of 4.47 J/cm2; Group 5 (L+C), photoabsorbing cream followed by low-level infrared laser irradiation; and Group 6 (L+CF), photoabsorbing cream with fluoride followed by low-level infrared laser irradiation. After these procedures, the enamel blocks received an assortment of orthodontic brackets and were then submitted to pH cycling to simulate a highly cariogenic challenge. The enamel surface demineralization around the orthodontic brackets, according to the different treatments, was quantified by fluorescence loss analysis by quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF). The fluorescence loss, expressed as ΔF (percentage of loss fluorescence), was statistically examined by analysis of variance and the Tukey test. The control group (-10.48±2.85) was statistically similar to Group C (-14.52±7.80), which presented the lowest values of ΔF when compared with Groups FC (-3.67±3.21), L (-2.79±1.68), CL (-1.05±0:50), and CFL (-0.60±0:43). However, Groups FC, L, CL, and CFL showed no statistically significant differences among them. It can be concluded that both the low-level infrared laser and photoabsorbing cream with fluoride were effective in inhibiting the development of caries in enamel around orthodontic brackets, even in situations of high cariogenic challenge.

  9. Analysis of Shear Bond Strength and Morphology of Er:YAG Laser-Recycled Ceramic Orthodontic Brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ruo-qiao; Yang, Kai; Ji, Ling-fei; Ling, Chen

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the recycling of deboned ceramic brackets via an Er:YAG laser or via the traditional chairside processing methods of flaming and sandblasting; shear bond strength and morphological changes were evaluated in recycled brackets versus new brackets. 3M Clarity Self-Ligating Ceramic Brackets with a microcrystalline base were divided into groups subjected to flaming, sandblasting, or exposure to an Er:YAG laser. New ceramic brackets served as a control group. Shear bond strengths were determined with an Electroforce test machine and tested for statistical significance through analysis of variance. Morphological examinations of the recycled ceramic bracket bases were conducted with scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Residue on the bracket base was analyzed with Raman spectroscopy. Faded, dark adhesive was left on recycled bracket bases processed via flaming. Adhesive was thoroughly removed by both sandblasting and exposure to an Er:YAG laser. Compared with new brackets, shear bond strength was lower after sandblasting (p bracket. Er:YAG lasers effectively remove adhesive from the bases of ceramic brackets without damaging them; thus, this method may be preferred over other recycling methods.

  10. Degree of conversion of resin-based orthodontic bonding materials cured with single-wave or dual-wave LED light-curing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, Ario; McGuinness, Niall; Nor, Noor Azreen Md

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the degree of conversion (DC) of orthodontic adhesives (RBOAs) cured with dual peak or single peak light-emitting diode (LED) light-curing units (LCUs). Standardized samples of RBOAs, APCPlus, Opal® Bond® and LightBond(TM) were prepared (n = 3) and cured with one of two dual peak LCUs (bluephase® G2-Ivoclar-Vivadent or Valo-Ultradent) or a single peak control (bluephase® Ivoclar-Vivadent). The DC was determined using micro-Raman spectroscopy. The presence or absence of initiators other than camphorquinone was confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Data were analysed using general linear model in Minitab 15 (Minitab Inc., State College, PA, USA). There was no significant difference in DC between APCPlus, and Opal® Bond (confidence interval: -3.89- to 2.48); significant difference between APCPlus and LightBond(TM) (-18.55 to -12.18) and Opal® Bond and Lightbond(TM) (-17.85 to -11.48); no significant difference between bluephase (single peak) and dual peak LCUs, bluephase G2 (-4.896 to 1.476) and Valo (-3.935 to 2.437) and between bluephase G2 and Valo (-2.225 to 4.147). APCPlus and Opal® Bond showed higher DC values than LightBond(TM) (P<0.05). Lucirin® TPO was found only in Vit-l-escence. Lucirin® TPO was not identified in the three orthodontic adhesives. All three LCUs performed similarly with the orthodontic adhesives: orthodontic adhesive make had a greater effect on DC than the LCUs. It is strongly suggested that manufacturers of resin-based orthodontic materials test report whether or not dual peak LCUs should be used with their materials. Dual peak LED LCUs, though suitable in the majority of cases, may not be recommended for certain non Lucirin® TPO-containing materials. © 2014 British Orthodontic Society.

  11. Effect of Rebonding on the Bond Strength of Orthodontic Tubes: A Comparison of Light Cure Adhesive and Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cement In Vitro

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    Monika Aleksiejunaite

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of different enamel preparation procedures and compare light cure composite (LCC and resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI on the bond strength of orthodontic metal tubes rebonded to the enamel. Twenty human molars were divided into two groups (n=10. Tubes were bonded using LCC (Transbond XT in group 1 and RMGI (Fuji Ortho LC in group 2. The tubes in each group were bonded following manufacturers’ instructions (experiment I and then debonded using testing machine. Then, the same brackets were sandblasted and rebonded twice. Before the first rebonding, the enamel was cleaned using carbide bur (experiment II and before second rebonding, it was cleaned using carbide bur and soda blasted (experiment III. Mann–Whitney and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests showed no significant difference between RMGI and LCC bond strengths in case of normal bonding and rebonding, when enamel was cleaned using carbide bur before rebonding. Enamel soda blasting before rebonding significantly increased RMGI tensile bond strength value compared to LLC (p<0.05. LCC and RMGI (especially RMGI provide sufficient bond strengths for rebonding of molar tubes, when residual adhesive from previous bonding is removed and enamel soda blasted.

  12. In vivo effects of two acidic soft drinks on shear bond strength of metal orthodontic brackets with and without resin infiltration treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, Shaza M; Enan, Enas T

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the in vivo effects of two acidic soft drinks (Coca-Cola and Sprite) on the shear bond strength of metal orthodontic brackets with and without resin infiltration treatment. In addition, the enamel surface was evaluated, after debonding, using a scanning electron microscope. Sixty noncarious maxillary premolars, scheduled for extraction in 30 orthodontic patients, were used. Patients were randomly divided into two groups according to the soft drink tested (Coca-Cola or Sprite). In each group, application of resin infiltration (Icon. DMG, Hamburg, Germany) was done on one side only before bonding of brackets. Patients were told to rinse their mouth with their respective soft drink at room temperature for 5 minutes, three times a day for 3 months. Shear bond strength was tested with a universal testing machine. After shearing test, a scanning electron microscope was used to evaluate enamel erosion. Statistical analysis was performed by twoway analysis of variance followed by the least significant difference test. The Coca-Cola group without resin infiltration showed the lowest resistance to shearing forces. Scanning electron micrographs of both groups after resin application showed a significant improvement compared with results without resin use, as the enamel appeared smoother and less erosive. Pretreatment with the infiltrating resin has proved to result in a significant improvement in shear bond strength, regardless of the type of soft drink consumed.

  13. In vitro assessment of stainless steel orthodontic brackets coated with titanium oxide mixed Ag for anti-adherent and antibacterial properties against Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatani, Eman Jameel; Almutairi, Hamed H; Alharbi, Ali O; Alnakhli, Yasser Obaidallah; Divakar, Darshan Devang; Muzaheed; Alkheraif, Abdulaziz Abdullah; Khan, Aftab Ahmed

    2017-11-01

    Orthodontic brackets made from stainless steel were introduced in dentistry, though they have less ability in reducing enamel demineralization and are not successful in preventing microbial as well as biofilm growth. In this study, we evaluated the significant role of different brackets in reducing enamel demineralization indirectly. Results from different tests indicate the significant reduction in adhesion, biofilm formation and slow growth of tested bacterial species on brackets coated with Ag + TiO2 and found to be statistically significant lower than control. There was no loss in cell viability in all brackets indicating that the cells are biocompatible with different bracket materials. Scanning electron microscopy showed less bacteria attached with the surface coated with Ag + TiO2 indicated that bacteria were losing adherent nature on coated surface. In conclusion, TiO2+Ag coating on stainless steel brackets possessed anti-adherent properties and also have demonstrable antibacterial properties therefore helps in preventing dental caries and plaque accumulation indirectly. The cell compatibility of TiO2+Ag coated brackets is superior to the uncoated samples therefore can be used in orthodontics as it not only provide suitable antimicrobial activity and resistance to biofilm formation but also sustained the cell viability of human gingival fibroblast (HGF) cell lines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Can shielded brackets reduce mucosa alteration and increase comfort perception in orthodontic patients in the first 3 days of treatment? A single-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Lívia Pereira Brocos; de Oliveira, Augusto Henrique Alves; da Silva, Hillionne Ferreira; de Oliveira, Patrícia Teixeira; dos Santos, Patrícia Bittencourt Dutra; Pinheiro, Fabio Henrique de Sá Leitão

    2015-12-01

    Orthodontic patients can experience pain and discomfort on the oral mucosa from trauma caused by friction with the brackets and the wires. In this split-mouth design, single-blind randomized controlled trial, we aimed to investigate whether brackets with a self-snapping customized plastic shield would induce less mucosa alteration and discomfort than those without the shield. The overall sample comprised 42 patients (22 female, 20 male) from a government-funded orthodontic practice, with a mean age of 16.7 years. Eligibility criteria included, among others, no history of mouth ulcers or systemic diseases. Customized shields for the maxillary and mandibular brackets were fabricated and inserted on one side of the mouth. The null hypothesis was that bracket shielding would have no advantage. The primary outcomes were mucosal and discomfort assessments. As the secondary outcome, the numbers of spontaneous detachments of the shields were reported. Treatment allocation was mainly implemented using a random number table for selection of the intervention side. Only the raters in charge of assessing the oral mucosa were blinded to the side of the mouth where the shields had been placed. The mucosa was assessed by 3 calibrated raters at the following time points: immediately before bracket placement (baseline assessment, T0), 3 days after delivering the shields (direct assessment of intervention, T1), and 4 days after removal of the shields (indirect assessment of intervention, T2). The raters used a newly devised yardstick in which the higher the score, the more severe the alteration. Discomfort was assessed at T1 and T2 using a visual analog scale. The Mann-Whitney U test was performed at the 5% level of significance. Of 60 patients, 42 were eligible, and 35 were randomly selected to have one side of the mouth receive the intervention. Two patients discontinued the intervention at T1, and 5 stopped at T2. Seven additional patients were recruited and completed all time

  15. Suitability of orthodontic brackets for rebonding and reworking following removal by air pressure pulses and conventional debracketing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knösel, Michael; Mattysek, Simone; Jung, Klaus; Kubein-Meesenburg, Dietmar; Sadat-Khonsari, Reza; Ziebolz, Dirk

    2010-07-01

    To test the null hypothesis that there are no significant differences in the reusability of debonded brackets with regard to debonding technique and adhesive used. Ninety-six osteotomed third molars were randomly assigned to two study groups (n = 48) for bonding of a 0.018-inch bracket (Ormesh, Ormco) with either a composite adhesive (Mono-Lok2; RMO) or a glass ionomer cement (GIC; Fuji Ortho LC;GC). Each of these two groups were then randomly divided into four subgroups (n = 12) according to the method of debonding using (1) bracket removal pliers (BRP; Dentaurum), (2) a side cutter (SC; Dentaurum), (3) a lift-off debracketing instrument (LODI; 3M-Unitek), or (4) an air pressure pulse device (CoronaFlex; KaVo). The brackets were subsequently assessed visually for reusability and reworkability with 2x magnification and by pull testing with a 0.017- x 0.025-inch steel archwire. The proportions of reusable brackets were individually compared in terms of mode of removal and with regard to adhesives using the Fisher exact test (alpha = 5%). The null hypothesis was rejected. Not taking into account the debonding method, brackets bonded with GIC were judged to a significant extent (81%; n = 39; P < .01) to be reworkable compared with those bonded with composite (56%; n = 27). All brackets in both adhesive groups removed with either the LODI or the CoronaFlex were found to be reusable, whereas 79% (46%) of the brackets removed with the BRP (SC) were not. The proportion of reusable brackets differed significantly between modes of removal (P < .01). With regard to bracket reusability, the SC and the BRP cannot be recommended for debonding brackets, especially in combination with a composite adhesive.

  16. Effects of femtosecond laser and other surface treatments on the bond strength of metallic and ceramic orthodontic brackets to zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sanz, Verónica; Paredes-Gallardo, Vanessa; Bellot-Arcís, Carlos; Mendoza-Yero, Omel; Doñate-Buendía, Carlos; Montero, Javier; Albaladejo, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Femtosecond laser has been proposed as a method for conditioning zirconia surfaces to boost bond strength. However, metallic or ceramic bracket bonding to femtosecond laser-treated zirconia surfaces has not been tested. This study compared the effects of four conditioning techniques, including femtosecond laser irradiation, on shear bond strength (SBS) of metallic and ceramic brackets to zirconia.Three hundred zirconia plates were divided into five groups: 1) control (C); 2) sandblasting (APA); 3) silica coating and silane (SC); 4) femtosecond laser (FS); 5) sandblasting followed by femtosecond laser (APA+SC). A thermal imaging camera measured temperature changes in the zirconia during irradiation. Each group was divided into 2 subgroups (metallic vs ceramic brackets). SBS was evaluated using a universal testing machine. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was registered and surfaces were observed under SEM. Surface treatment and bracket type significantly affected the bracket-zirconia bond strength. SBS was significantly higher (pbrackets in all groups (APA+FS > APA > FS > SC > control) than metallic brackets (APA+FS > FS > SC > APA > control). For metallic brackets, groups SC (5.99 ± 1.86 MPa), FS (6.72 ± 2.30 MPa) and APA+FS (7.22 ± 2.73 MPa) reported significantly higher bond strengths than other groups (p brackets, the highest bond strength values were obtained in groups APA (25.01 ± 4.45 MPa), FS (23.18 ± 6.51 MPa) and APA+FS (29.22 ± 8.20 MPa).Femtosecond laser enhances bond strength of ceramic and metallic brackets to zirconia. Ceramic brackets provide significantly stronger adhesion than metallic brackets regardless of the surface treatment method.

  17. Assessment of efficacy of two chlorhexidine mouthrinses on oral hygiene and gingival health in adolescents wearing two types of orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurišić, S; Verzak, Ž; Jurišić, G; Jurić, H

    2018-05-01

    To investigate the efficacy of two formulations of chlorhexidine 0.2% (CHX) mouthrinses in terms of oral hygiene and gingival health status in adolescents with fixed orthodontic appliances wearing two different types of brackets during 18 weeks. Eighty subjects were randomly divided into two equal groups according to brackets type: (i) metal-stainless steel, (ii) ceramic. Four weeks after the placement of the fixed orthodontic appliances the subjects from each group were randomly allocated into two equal subgroups and were provided with two different mouthrinses for 14 days: (i) alcohol-free CHX, (ii) CHX with antidiscoloration system (CHX-ADS). Assessment was carried out according to gingival index (GI) and oral hygiene index-simplified (OHI-S) performed prior to the placement of the appliance (t 1 ), 6 weeks (t 2 ), and 18 weeks (t 3 ) after the placement. To analyse the data, two-way mixed model MANOVA. Pearson correlations, one-way ANOVA and Independent Samples t test were conducted. Statistically significant decrease in GI and OHI-S indices after 6 weeks and then increase after 18 weeks for all groups was found. Both GI and OHI-S values were lower in subjects wearing ceramic brackets, with statistically significant difference for GI after the usage of the mouthrinse for 14 days, at t 2 (Pbrackets as well as usage of CHX-ADS resulted in improved gingival status. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Effects of different black mediators on the shear strength of orthodontic bracket to the enamel treated with Nd-Yag laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shun-Te; Lin, I.-Shueng; Tsai, Chi-Cheng

    1995-04-01

    The Nd:YAG laser has ablation, crack, and crater effects on the dental enamel through black mediators which are very similar to the acid etching effects of phosphoric acid. This study was designed for searching how the different black mediators influence the shear strengths of the brackets bound to the enamel surfaces which were treated with the Nd:YAG laser. 90 bovine enamels divided into 5 groups were painted with 5 kinds of black mediators including Chinese ink, oil ink, black ball pen, water ink and black transfer paper. The enamel surfaces painted with black mediators were then radiated by Nd:YAG laser (ADL; American Dental Laser 300dl, power: 20 pps, 87.5 mj). Orthodontic brackets were bonded to the radiated surfaces. Then the shear strengths of the brackets to the enamels were measured by Instron. The results showed that the Chinese ink group and oil ink group has the strongest shear strength, ball pen group and water ink group showed the second strength, and the transfer paper group has the lowest shear strength. In addition, scanning electronic microscope also was used to observe the topographic changes of the enamel surfaces induced by the laser ablation.

  19. Evaluating the Type of Light Transmittance in Mono Crystalline, Poly Crystalline and Sapphire Brackets- An Invitro Spectrofluorometer Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Jauhar P; Kommi, Pradeep Babu; Kumar, M Senthil; Hanumanth; Venkatesan; Aniruddh; Arvinth; Kumar, Arani Nanda

    2016-08-01

    Most of the patients seek orthodontic treatment to improve the smile, which improves the facial profile by means of fixed appliances i.e., brackets and wires. The brackets are of different types like stainless steel and ceramic. Ceramic brackets were considered as aesthetic appliance which was divided into mono-crystalline, polycrystalline and sapphire brackets. The light transmittance might influence the degree of curing adhesive material in mono crystalline, polycrystalline and sapphire brackets. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the translucency and intensity of three different aesthetic brackets (mono crystalline, poly crystalline and sapphire ceramic brackets) and to determine their influence on shear bond strength of the brackets. The adhesive remnant index was also measured after debonding of the brackets from the tooth surface. Twenty six samples each of monocrystalline, polycrystalline and sapphire brackets (total 78 ceramic brackets) were used for the study. The bracket samples were subjected to optical fluorescence test using spectrofluorometer to measure the intensity of the brackets. Seventy eight extracted premolar teeth were procured and divided into 3 groups. The brackets were then bonded to the tooth using Transbond XT (3M Unitek) light cure composite material and cured with new light cure unit (Light Emitting Diode) of wood pecker company (400-450nm) for 30 seconds, and these samples were subjected to shear bond strength test with Instron Universal Testing Machine (UNITEK-94100) with a load range between 0 to 100 KN with a maximum cross head speed of 0.5mm/min. ARI (Adhesive Remnant Index) scores were evaluated according to Artun and Bergland scoring system using stereomicroscope at 20x magnification. The light absorption values obtained from spectrofluorometeric study were 3300000-3500000 cps for group 1 (monocrystalline ceramic brackets), 6000000-6500000 cps for Group 2 (polycrystalline ceramic brackets) and 2700000 -3000000 cps for

  20. Effects of fixed orthodontic brackets on oral malodor: A systematic review and meta-analysis according to the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing; Li, Cui-Ying; Jiang, Jiu-Hui

    2018-04-01

    This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to identify whether there is any relationship between fixed orthodontic appliances and malodor, and if self-ligating brackets (SLBs) prevent malodor better than conventional brackets (CBs). The electronic databases PubMed, Ovid, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library were searched from inception to September 2016; a manual search was also performed. Randomized controlled and clinical controlled trials, in which experimental groups received fixed orthodontic therapy and malodor was measured, were included. Patients treated with fixed orthodontic brackets were compared with those without any treatment, and SLB systems were compared with CB systems. Two reviewers independently selected potentially relevant studies, evaluated the risk for bias, extracted essential data, and synthesized findings using Review Manager version 5.3 (Copenhagen: The. Nordic Cochrane Centre, The Cochrane Collaboration, 2014). Four studies, involving a total of 152 participants, met the inclusion criteria. Fixed orthodontic appliances caused malodor from the initial visit to 2 to 3 months, but was only significant after the first week (mean difference 20.24 [95% confidence interval [CI]11.75-28.74]; P orthodontic treatment appeared to be a risk factor for malodor, independent of periodontal changes, and SLB systems controlled malodor better than CB systems.

  1. Finite element analysis of slot wall deformation in stainless steel and titanium orthodontic brackets during simulated palatal root torque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magesh, Varadaraju; Harikrishnan, Pandurangan; Kingsly Jeba Singh, Devadhas

    2018-04-01

    Torque applied on anterior teeth is vital for root positioning and stability. The aim of this study was to evaluate the detailed slot wall deformation in stainless steel (SS) and titanium (Ti) edgewise brackets during palatal root torque using finite element analysis. A finite element model was developed from a maxillary central incisor SS bracket (0.022 in). The generated torque values from an SS rectangular archwire (0.019 × 0.025 in) while twisting from 5° to 40° were obtained experimentally by a spine tester, and the calculated torque force was applied in the bracket slot. The deformations of the slot walls in both SS and Ti brackets were measured at various locations. There were gradual increases in the deformations of both bracket slot walls from the bottom to top locations. In the SS bracket slot for the 40° twist, the deformations were 9.28, 36.8, and 44.8 μm in the bottom, middle, and top slot wall locations, respectively. Similarly, in the Ti bracket slot for the 40° twist, the deformations were 39.2, 62.4, and 76.2 μm in the bottom, middle, and top slot wall locations, respectively. The elastic limits were reached at 28° for SS and at 37° for Ti. Both SS and Ti bracket slots underwent deformation during torque application. There are variations in the deformations at different locations in the slot walls and between the materials. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Resistência à remoção de braquetes ortodônticos sob ação de diferentes cargas contínuas Shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets using different static loading application

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    Carla Giannini

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: testar se existe alteração na resistência adesiva de dois cimentos utilizados na colagem de acessórios ortodônticos ao esmalte dentário bovino, sendo um de polimerização química (Concise ortodôntico e outro fotopolimerizável (Transbond XT, após a aplicação de cargas contínuas. METODOLOGIA: foram utilizados para este estudo 80 dentes bovinos e 80 braquetes metálicos. O esmalte bovino foi condicionado com ácido fosfórico a 37% por 1 minuto e depois lavado e seco. A aplicação dos adesivos, manipulação e aplicação dos dois cimentos foram feitas de acordo com as instruções dos fabricantes. Após 24 horas, todos os braquetes foram submetidos a cargas contínuas de 30g, 70g e 120g, menos o grupo controle, que não recebeu carga alguma. Os espécimes ficaram imersos em água filtrada por 28 dias dentro de uma estufa a 37°C. Depois deste período, as amostras foram submetidas a testes de cisalhamento em uma Máquina de Ensaios Universal Kratos. Os resultados foram registrados e enviados para análise estatística. CONCLUSÕES: (1 o cimento Concise apresentou maior resistência à remoção que o cimento Transbond XT para todas as cargas utilizadas, (2 não houve diferença estatisticamente significante na resistência adesiva frente às três cargas utilizadas para os dois cimentos testados; (3 no momento da fratura, conforme ocorreu o aumento da carga, a porcentagem de fratura do esmalte diminuiu para o Concise, ao contrário do cimento Transbond XT, onde a porcentagem de fratura de esmalte se manteve constante com o aumento das cargas.AIM: The purpose of this study was to test differences on bond strength between auto-cured (Concise and light-cured (Transbond XT cements after static loading and shear test. METHODS: Eighty bovine teeth and metallic orthodontic brackets (Morelli Ortodontia Braquete Edgewise/Rickets were tested after static loads of 30, 70 and 120grs. Bovine enamel was conditioned with 37% phosphoric

  3. In vitro comparative study of share bond of light cured composite resins with halogen light and argon laser, using stainless steel brackets on human premolars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carillo, Vitoria Eugenia Bismarck

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study in vitro was to compare the share bond strength of the light-cured composite resins Transbond XT (Unitek), with halogen light and argon laser. The Adhesive Remmant Index (ARI) was also investigated. The brackets Dyna lock (3M-UNITEK) were bonded to 75 human premolars, divided into 5 groups (15 each) according to time and the polymerization: Group H20, 15 brackets bonded with halogen light for 20s (10s both sides); Group H40, 15 brackets bonded with halogen light for 40s (20s both sides); Group A40, 15 brackets bonded with argon laser for 40s (20s both sides); Group A20, 15 brackets bonded with argon laser for 20s (10s both sides); Group A10, 15 brackets bonded with argon laser for 10s (5s both sides). The pulpal temperature changes were determined during a polymerization, not exceeding 3,5 deg C. After bonding, the teeth were submitted to a thermo cycled of 700 cycles between 5 deg C and 55 deg C, to simulate the consuming that the light cured composite resin would have in a short space of time. The specimens were then placed in PVC ring and embedded in acrylic resin (Aero-Jet). The tensile bond strength test was performed on an Universal Machine set at a crosshead speed of 1,5 mm/min, and for each rupture we registered a graphic and the best load required in Newtons, was converted to MPa and kgf. The share bond strength showed bigger values for the exposure time of 20 seconds, for the Group bonded for halogen light (H20), 7,45 kgf (7,64 MPa) and for argon laser 7,50 kgf (7,69 MPa); lesser values for the exposure time of 40s for the Group with halogen light (H40), 6,15 kgf (6,30 MPa) and argon laser Group (A40), 6,20 kgf (6,35 MPa) 0; and A10, 4,85 kgf (4,97 MPa). In the ARI Index, only A40 Group showed the 1 Index, with statistical results. In this Group, less than half of the remainder adhesive stayed on the surface of the enamel, conferring specimens failed at the enamel-adhesive interface. The results of the in vitro study demonstrate that

  4. A Twofold Comparison between Dual Cure Resin Modified Cement and Glass Ionomer Cement for Orthodontic Band Cementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attar, Hanaa El; Elhiny, Omnia; Salem, Ghada; Abdelrahman, Ahmed; Attia, Mazen

    2016-12-15

    To test the solubility of dual cure resin modified resin cement in a food simulating solution and the shear bond strength compared to conventional Glass ionomer cement. The materials tested were self-adhesive dual cure resin modified cement and Glass Ionomer (GIC). Twenty Teflon moulds were divided into two groups of tens. The first group was injected and packed with the modified resin cement, the second group was packed with GIC. To test the solubility, each mould was weighed before and after being placed in an analytical reagent for 30 days. The solubility was measured as the difference between the initial and final drying mass. To measure the Shear bond strength, 20 freshly extracted wisdom teeth were equally divided into two groups and embedded in self-cure acrylic resin. Four mm sections of stainless steel bands were cemented to the exposed buccal surfaces of teeth under a constant load of 500 g. Shear bond strength was measured using a computer controlled materials testing machine and the load required to deband the samples was recorded in Newtons. GIC showed significantly higher mean weight loss and an insignificant lower Shear bond strength, compared to dual cure resin Cement. It was found that dual cure resin modified cement was less soluble than glass ionomer cement and of comparable bond strength rendering it more useful clinically for orthodontic band cementation.

  5. The Effect of Various Types of Mechanical and Chemical Preconditioning on the Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets on Zirconia Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihun Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the combined effect of mechanical and chemical treatments on the shear bond strength (SBS of metal orthodontic brackets on zirconia restoration. The zirconia specimens were randomly divided into 12 groups (n=10 according to three factors: AL (Al2O3 and CO (CoJet™ by sandblasting material; SIL (silane, ZPP (Zirconia Prime Plus, and SBU (Single Bond Universal by primer; and N (not thermocycled and T (thermocycled. The specimens were evaluated for shear bond strength, and the fractured surfaces were observed using a stereomicroscope. Scanning electron microscopy images were also obtained. CO-SBU combination had the highest bond strength after thermocycling (26.2 MPa. CO-SIL showed significantly higher SBS than AL-SIL (p0.05. Modified Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI scoring and SEM figures were consistent with the results of the surface treatments. In conclusion, CO-SBU, which combines the effect of increased surface area and chemical bonding with both 10-MDP and silane, showed the highest SBS. Sandblasting with either material improved the mechanical bonding by increasing the surface area, and all primers showed clinically acceptable increase of shear bond strength for orthodontic treatment.

  6. Effects of low-level laser irradiation on the rate of orthodontic tooth movement and associated pain with self-ligating brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamruddin, Irfan; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed; Mahroof, Verda; Fida, Mubassar; Khamis, Mohd Fadhli; Husein, Adam

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of low-level laser irradiation applied at 3-week intervals on orthodontic tooth movement and pain associated with orthodontic tooth movement using self-ligating brackets. Twenty-two patients (11 male, 11 female; mean age, 19.8 ± 3.1 years) with Angle Class II Division 1 malocclusion were recruited for this split-mouth clinical trial; they required extraction of maxillary first premolars bilaterally. After leveling and alignment with self-ligating brackets (SmartClip SL3; 3M Unitek, St Paul, Minn), a 150-g force was applied to retract the canines bilaterally using 6-mm nickel-titanium closed-coil springs on 0.019 x 0.025-in stainless steel archwires. A gallium-aluminum-arsenic diode laser (iLas; Biolase, Irvine, Calif) with a wavelength of 940 nm in a continuous mode (energy density, 7.5 J/cm 2 /point; diameter of optical fiber tip, 0.04 cm 2 ) was applied at 5 points buccally and palatally around the canine roots on the experimental side; the other side was designated as the placebo. Laser irradiation was applied at baseline and then repeated after 3 weeks for 2 more consecutive follow-up visits. Questionnaires based on the numeric rating scale were given to the patients to record their pain intensity for 1 week. Impressions were made at each visit before the application of irradiation at baseline and the 3 visits. Models were scanned with a CAD/CAM scanner (Planmeca, Helsinki, Finland). Canine retraction was significantly greater (1.60 ± 0.38 mm) on the experimental side compared with the placebo side (0.79 ± 0.35 mm) (P orthodontic tooth movement and reduce the pain associated with it. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of shear bond strength of the stainless steel metallic brackets bonded by three bonding systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Ravadgar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In orthodontic treatment, it is essential to establish a satisfactory bond between enamel and bracket. After the self-etch primers (SEPs were introduced for the facilitation of bracket bonding in comparison to the conventional etch-and-bond system, multiple studies have been carried out on their shear bond strengths which have yielded different results. This study was aimed at comparing shear bond strengths of the stainless steel metallic brackets bonded by three bonding systems. Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, 60 extracted human maxillary premolar teeth were randomly divided into three equal groups: in the first group, Transbond XT (TBXT light cured composite was bonded with Transbond plus self-etching primer (TPSEP in the second group, TBXT composite was bonded with the conventional method of acid etching and in the third group, the self cured composite Unite TM bonding adhesive was bonded with the conventional method of acid etching. In all the groups, Standard edgewise-022 metallic brackets (American Orthodontics, Sheboygan, USA were used. Twenty-four hours after the completion of thermocycling, shear bond strength of brackets was measured by Universal Testing Machine (Zwick. In order to compare the shear bond strengths of the groups, the variance analysis test (ANOVA was adopted and p≤0.05 was considered as a significant level. Results: Based on megapascal, the average shear bond strength for the first, second, and third groups was 8.27±1.9, 9.78±2, and 8.92±2.5, respectively. There was no significant difference in the shear bond strength of the groups. Conclusions: Since TPSEP shear bond strength is approximately at the level of the conventional method of acid etching and within the desirable range for orthodontic brackets shear bond strength, applying TPSEP can serve as a substitute for the conventional method of etch and bond, particularly in orthodontic operations.

  8. Comparison of shear bond strength of the stainless steel metallic brackets bonded by three bonding systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Ravadgar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In orthodontic treatment, it is essential to establish a satisfactory bond between enamel and bracket. After the self-etch primers (SEPs were introduced for the facilitation of bracket bonding in comparison to the conventional etch-and-bond system, multiple studies have been carried out on their shear bond strengths which have yielded different results. This study was aimed at comparing shear bond strengths of the stainless steel metallic brackets bonded by three bonding systems. Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, 60 extracted human maxillary premolar teeth were randomly divided into three equal groups: in the first group, Transbond XT (TBXT light cured composite was bonded with Transbond plus self-etching primer (TPSEP; in the second group, TBXT composite was bonded with the conventional method of acid etching; and in the third group, the self cured composite Unite TM bonding adhesive was bonded with the conventional method of acid etching. In all the groups, Standard edgewise-022 metallic brackets (American Orthodontics, Sheboygan, USA were used. Twenty-four hours after the completion of thermocycling, shear bond strength of brackets was measured by Universal Testing Machine (Zwick. In order to compare the shear bond strengths of the groups, the variance analysis test (ANOVA was adopted and p≤0.05 was considered as a significant level. Results: Based on megapascal, the average shear bond strength for the first, second, and third groups was 8.27±1.9, 9.78±2, and 8.92±2.5, respectively. There was no significant difference in the shear bond strength of the groups. Conclusions: Since TPSEP shear bond strength is approximately at the level of the conventional method of acid etching and within the desirable range for orthodontic brackets shear bond strength, applying TPSEP can serve as a substitute for the conventional method of etch and bond, particularly in orthodontic operations.

  9. Comparison of multiple rebond shear strengths of debonded brackets after preparation with sandblasting and CO2 laser

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    Mojgan Kachoei

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Failure of orthodontic bracket bonds is a common occurrence during orthodontic treatment. Different techniques have been suggested in the literature to remove resin residues from the bracket bases and enamel surfaces to prepare the surfaces again after debonding. This study attempted to compare multiple rebond shear strengths (SBS of debonded brackets following preparation with sandblasting and CO2 laser. Methods. The brackets were bonded on 30 human and bovine maxillary central incisors using self-curing composite resin. SBS was measured using Hounsfield testing machine. The brackets were rebonded for two other times after composite resin residues on their surfaces were removed, either with air abrasion or CO2 laser. The debonded brackets and enamel surfaces were also evaluated after each debonding procedure under a stereomicroscope in order to determine adhesive remnant index (ARI. SBS of debonded brackets after each step were compared between sandblast and CO2 laser groups. Results. We observed significant differences in SBS values between pre-recycling and first (P = 0.04, second (P = 0.007 and third recycling (P = 0.007 with laser. Recycling with sandblasting resulted in a decrease in SBS after the first and second recycling procedure; however, the SBS increased after the third recycling procedure, with no significant differences. Conclusion. SBS of brackets after recycling with sandblasting and laser beams was not significantly different, and both were at a favorable level. However, repeating the recycling procedure with sandblasting resulted in more favorable SBS compared to laser.

  10. Comparison of two different debonding techniques in orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoli, Luca; Migliau, Guido; Besharat, Laith Konstantinos; Di Carlo, Stefano; Pompa, Giorgio; Di Giorgio, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate whether and how the adhesive bond failure site varied in relation to the material used for the orthodontic bonding and debonding technique applied. Two different methods of orthodontic debonding were included in our survey; cutters for orthodontics and debonding plier. Three different materials for the adhesion of the bracket: composite light curing, self-curing composite and glass ionomer cement. The remaining amount of adhesive on the tooth surface is an important parameter that gives information on how the location of the posting site varied during the debonding. 60 dental elements, maxillary and mandibular, previously extracted for orthodontic reasons, as well as periodontal, were included in our research. We investigated a possible significant correlation between different variables (debonding technique and materials for membership) and the ARI index. The use of orthodontic cutters or debonding pliers does not affect the adhesive bond failure site and both techniques have a tendency to leave a significant amount of adhesive on the surface enamel. In the resin-reinforced glass ionomer cements, detachment occurs at the interface enamel-adhesive and this pattern of detachment increases the risk of the enamel damage during debonding. In both types of composite resins (photopolymerizable or self-curing), the detachment occurs at the interface bracketing adhesive. In this case the amount of remaining adhesive material on the tooth must be removed with further methods, which in addition, increase the risk of iatrogenic injury as well as the working hours.

  11. Orthodontic brackets removal under shear and tensile bond strength resistance tests - a comparative test between light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, P. C. G.; Porto-Neto, S. T.; Lizarelli, R. F. Z.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2008-03-01

    We have investigated if a new LEDs system has enough efficient energy to promote efficient shear and tensile bonding strength resistance under standardized tests. LEDs 470 ± 10 nm can be used to photocure composite during bracket fixation. Advantages considering resistance to tensile and shear bonding strength when these systems were used are necessary to justify their clinical use. Forty eight human extracted premolars teeth and two light sources were selected, one halogen lamp and a LEDs system. Brackets for premolar were bonded through composite resin. Samples were submitted to standardized tests. A comparison between used sources under shear bonding strength test, obtained similar results; however, tensile bonding test showed distinct results: a statistical difference at a level of 1% between exposure times (40 and 60 seconds) and even to an interaction between light source and exposure time. The best result was obtained with halogen lamp use by 60 seconds, even during re-bonding; however LEDs system can be used for bonding and re-bonding brackets if power density could be increased.

  12. Orthodontic brackets removal under shear and tensile bond strength resistance tests – a comparative test between light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, P C G; Porto-Neto, S T; Lizarelli, R F Z; Bagnato, V S

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated if a new LEDs system has enough efficient energy to promote efficient shear and tensile bonding strength resistance under standardized tests. LEDs 470 ± 10 nm can be used to photocure composite during bracket fixation. Advantages considering resistance to tensile and shear bonding strength when these systems were used are necessary to justify their clinical use. Forty eight human extracted premolars teeth and two light sources were selected, one halogen lamp and a LEDs system. Brackets for premolar were bonded through composite resin. Samples were submitted to standardized tests. A comparison between used sources under shear bonding strength test, obtained similar results; however, tensile bonding test showed distinct results: a statistical difference at a level of 1% between exposure times (40 and 60 seconds) and even to an interaction between light source and exposure time. The best result was obtained with halogen lamp use by 60 seconds, even during re-bonding; however LEDs system can be used for bonding and re-bonding brackets if power density could be increased

  13. Effect of Ascorbic Acid on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded with Resin-modified Glass-ionomer Cement to Bleached Teeth

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    Behnam Khosravanifard

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Bleaching can considerably reduce shear bond strength (SBS of orthodontic brackets bonded with composite adhesives. Application of antioxidants is a method to reverse the negative effect of bleaching on compositeto-enamel bond. However, the efficacy of antioxidants in increasing the SBS of brackets bonded using resin-modified glassionomer cement (RMGIC has not been studied, which was the aim of this study. Materials and methods. Fifty freshly extracted human maxillary first premolars were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide (Pola Office Bleaching, SDI. Sodium ascorbate 10% was applied to the experimental specimens (n=25. All the specimens were etched with 37% phosphoric acid (Ivoclar/Vivadent and bonded using RMGIC (Fuji Ortho LC, GC. The specimens were subjected to incubation (37°C, 24h and thermocycling (1000 cycles, 5-55°C, dwell time = 1 min. The SBS was measured at 0.5 mm/min debonding crosshead speed. The adhesive remnant index (ARI was scored under ×10 magnification. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test, one- and independent-samples t-test, and Fisher’s exact test (α=0.05. Results. The mean SBS of experimental and control groups were 11.97 ± 4.49 and 7.7 ± 3.19 MPa, respectively. The difference was statistically significant (P=0.000 by t-test. SBS of both control (P=0.014 and experimental (P=0.000 groups were significantly higher than the minimum acceptable SBS of 6 MPa, according to one-sample t-test. Conclusion. Application of ascorbic acid can guarantee a strong bond when RMGIC is to be used. However, RMGIC might tolerate the negative effect of bleaching with minimum SA treatments (or perhaps without treatments, which deserves further studies.

  14. Adhesives for fixed orthodontic bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millett, Declan T; Glenny, Anne-Marie; Mattick, Rye Cr; Hickman, Joy; Mandall, Nicky A

    2016-10-25

    Orthodontic treatment involves using fixed or removable appliances (dental braces) to correct the positions of teeth. It has been shown that the quality of treatment result obtained with fixed appliances is much better than with removable appliances. Fixed appliances are, therefore, favoured by most orthodontists for treatment. The success of a fixed orthodontic appliance depends on the metal attachments (brackets and bands) being attached securely to the teeth so that they do not become loose during treatment. Brackets are usually attached to the front and side teeth, whereas bands (metal rings that go round the teeth) are more commonly used on the back teeth (molars). A number of adhesives are available to attach bands to teeth and it is important to understand which group of adhesives bond most reliably, as well as reducing or preventing dental decay during the treatment period. To evaluate the effectiveness of the adhesives used to attach bands to teeth during fixed appliance treatment, in terms of:(1) how often the bands come off during treatment; and(2) whether they protect the banded teeth against decay during fixed appliance treatment. The following electronic databases were searched: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (searched 2 June 2016), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 5) in the Cochrane Library (searched 2 June 2016), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 2 June 2016) and EMBASE Ovid (1980 to 2 June 2016). We searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. Randomised and controlled clinical trials (RCTs and CCTs) (including split-mouth studies) of adhesives used to attach orthodontic bands to molar teeth were selected. Patients with full arch fixed orthodontic appliance(s) who had bands attached to molars were included. All review authors

  15. Shear bond strength evaluation of chemically-cured and light-cured orthodontic adhesives after enamel deproteinization with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, J. C.; Krisnawati; Purbiati, M.

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to assess the effect of enamel deproteinization with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) before etching on the shear bond strength (SBS) of Unite (UN; 3M Unitek) and Xihu-BIOM adhesive (XB). Fifty-two maxillary first premolars were divided into four groups: (1) UN and (2) XB according to manufacturer’s recommendation and (3) UN and (4) XB deproteinized with 5.25% NaOCl. Brackets were bonded, and a mechanical test was performed using a universal testing machine. The mean SBS value for groups A1, A2, B1, and B2 was 13.51 ± 2.552, 14.36 ± 2.902, 16.43 ± 2.615, and 13.05 ± 2.348 MPa, respectively. A statistically significant difference in SBSs was observed between chemically cured groups and between group B (p 0.05). NaOCl enamel deproteinization before acid etching has a significant effect on the SBS of Unite adhesive, but not on that of the Xihu-BIOM adhesive. Furthermore, a significant difference in the SBS of Unite and Xihu-BIOM adhesives within the enamel deproteinization group was observed in this study.

  16. The Effects of Orthodontic Forces during Canine Retraction Using Self-ligating Brackets on Gingival Crevicular Fluid Enzyme Activity, Canine Movement and Root Resorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohaya Megat Abdul Wahab; Albira Sintian; Zaidah Zainal Arifin; Zaidah Zainal Ariffin; Shahrul Hisham Zainal Ariffin

    2015-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities were studied as bio markers of canine movement. Root resorption was also evaluated in canines subjected to the orthodontic forces. Nineteen subjects randomly received 100 and 150 g force using self-ligating brackets (SLB) either on the right or left site of maxillary arch. Gingival crevicular fluid samples were collected at distal sites of canines for five consecutive weeks. The activities of ALP, TRAP and AST were assayed and measured spectrophotometrically. Canine movement was measured for five consecutive weeks while root resorption was monitored at baseline, week 0 and week 5 using periapical radiographs. In 100 g group, TRAP activity significantly increased in week 3-5 when compared to TRAP baseline activity. However, ALP and AST activities slightly increased. In 150 g group, ALP and TRAP activities slightly increased when compared with their baseline activities. However, AST significantly increased in week 5. Canine movement and root resorption were not significantly different (p<0.05) in both groups. A force of 100 and 150 g slightly increased the bone modeling process and resulted in similar canine movement and root resorption. Therefore, 100 g force could be an optimum force for canine retraction and is preferable (compared with 150 g force) in canine retraction using SLB. (author)

  17. SEM Evaluation of Enamel Surface Changes and Enamel Microhardness around Orthodontic Brackets after Application of CO2 Laser, Er,Cr:YSGG Laser and Fluoride Varnish: An In vivo Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Tarundeep; Tripathi, Tulika; Rai, Priyank; Kanase, Anup

    2017-09-01

    One of the most undesirable consequences of orthodontic treatment is occurrence of enamel demineralization around orthodontic brackets. Numerous in vitro studies have reported the prevention of enamel demineralization by surface treatment with lasers and fluoride varnish. To evaluate the changes on the enamel surface and microhardness around orthodontic brackets after surface treatment by CO 2 laser, Er, Cr:YSGG laser and fluoride varnish in vivo. A double blind interventional study was carried out on 100 premolars which were equally divided into five groups, out of which one was the control group (Group 0). The intervention groups (Group I to IV) comprised of patients requiring fixed orthodontic treatment with all 4 first premolars extraction. Brackets were bonded on all 80 premolars which were to be extracted. Enamel surface treatment of Groups I, II and III was done by CO 2 laser, Er, Cr:YSGG laser and 5% sodium fluoride varnish respectively and Group IV did not receive any surface treatment. A modified T-loop was ligated to the bracket and after two months, the premolars were extracted. Surface changes were evaluated by Scanning Electron Microscopic (SEM) and microhardness testing. Comparison of mean microhardness between all the groups was assessed using post-hoc test with Bonferroni correction. Group I showed a melted enamel appearance with fine cracks and fissures while Group II showed a glossy, homogenous enamel surface with well coalesced enamel rods. Group III showed slight areas of erosions and Group IV presented areas of stripped enamel. Significant difference was observed between the mean microhardness (VHN) of Group I, Group II, Group III, Group IV and Group 0 with p<0.001. A significant difference of p<0.001 was observed while comparing Group I vs II,III,IV,0 and Group II vs III,IV,0. However, difference while comparing Group III vs IV was p=0.005 and difference between the mean microhardness of Group 0 vs Group III was non significant. Surface

  18. Shear Bond Strength of DentStat(trademark) for Bracket Bonding to Gold, Ceramic, and Enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-21

    they make a good choice for orthodontic bracket retention. According to a Cochrane review by Mandall (Mandall et al, 2002) all of their review...was developed as a temporary material for use in military field environments, can be used to effectively bond orthodontic brackets to type III gold... orthodontic composite resin adhesive, Transbond XTTM (3M Unitek Monrovia, California), as they are used to bond orthodontic brackets to gold

  19. Shear bond strength of metallic and ceramic brackets using color change adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisha de Souza Gomes Stumpf

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets using color change adhesives that are supposed to aid in removing excess of bonding material and compare them to a traditional adhesive. METHODS: Ninety metallic and ninety ceramic brackets were bonded to bovine incisors using two color change adhesives and a regular one. A tensile stress was applied by a universal testing machine. The teeth were observed in a microscope after debonding in order to determine the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI. RESULTS: The statistical analysis (ANOVA, Tukey, and Kruskall-Wallis tests demonstrated that the mean bond strength presented no difference when metallic and ceramic brackets were compared but the bond resistance values were significantly different for the three adhesives used. The most common ARI outcome was the entire adhesive remaining on the enamel. CONCLUSIONS: The bond strength was similar for metallic and ceramic brackets when the same adhesive system was used. ARI scores demonstrated that bonding with these adhesives is safe even when ceramic brackets were used. On the other hand, bond strength was too low for orthodontic purposes when Ortho Lite Cure was used.

  20. Shear bond strength of metallic and ceramic brackets using color change adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, Aisha de Souza Gomes; Bergmann, Carlos; Prietsch, José Renato; Vicenzi, Juliane

    2013-01-01

    To determine the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets using color change adhesives that are supposed to aid in removing excess of bonding material and compare them to a traditional adhesive. Ninety metallic and ninety ceramic brackets were bonded to bovine incisors using two color change adhesives and a regular one. A tensile stress was applied by a universal testing machine. The teeth were observed in a microscope after debonding in order to determine the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI). The statistical analysis (ANOVA, Tukey, and Kruskall-Wallis tests) demonstrated that the mean bond strength presented no difference when metallic and ceramic brackets were compared, but the bond resistance values were significantly different for the three adhesives used. The most common ARI outcome was the entire adhesive remaining on the enamel. The bond strength was similar for metallic and ceramic brackets when the same adhesive system was used. ARI scores demonstrated that bonding with these adhesives is safe even when ceramic brackets were used. On the other hand, bond strength was too low for orthodontic purposes when Ortho Lite Cure was used.

  1. Clinical Survival of Rebonded Brackets with Different ARI Scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Ahangar Atashi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bracket debonding is one of the most common events in orthodontics. The aim of the present study was to quantitatively compare clinical survival of rebonded brackets with different ARI scores with new brackets rebonding. Materials and Methods: The subjects in the present study consisted of 74 patients with 76 debonded brackets on maxillary first and second premolars. After refreshing the bracket base of the debonded brackets, they were assigned in two groups: group A with 27 brackets of ARI≥4 and group B with 28 brackets of ARI≤2. In 21 cases, new brackets were used (group C. The frequency of the debonding in each rebonded group during treatment was calculated in intervals of 6,12,18 mounths after onset of bracket rebonding . Chi-squared test was used to compare the frequency of debonded brackets. Results: The frequency of debonded brackets was significantly higher in group B (ARI≤2 than those of groups A (ARI≥4 and C (new brackets. The number of debonded brackets were not significantly different between groups A (ARI≥4 and C (new brackets. Conclusion: Rebonding strength of debonded brackets in those that the failure is presented between adhesive and enamel (ARI≥4 could be clinically acceptable with no need to use new brackets.    Key words: dental bonding; orthodontic brackets; prevalence

  2. Biodegradação de braquetes ortodônticos: avaliação da liberação iônica in vitro Biodegradation of orthodontic brackets: in vitro ion release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Schmidt Dolci

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar, in vitro, a biodegradação de aparelhos ortodônticos simulados constituídos de braquetes e fios de aço inoxidável. METODOLOGIA: a amostra foi dividida em 2 grupos, de acordo com a marca dos braquetes usados: grupo A - Dyna-Lock, 3M/Unitek (AISI 303; e grupo B - LG Edgewise Standard, American Orthodontics (AISI 316L. Os corpos-de-prova permaneceram incubados em solução salina (0,05% a 36ºC, sob agitação por um período de até 60 dias. A análise da liberação iônica foi realizada por meio de espectrofotometria de absorção atômica. O peso em massa dos braquetes também foi medido antes e após o experimento. RESULTADOS: os resultados indicaram que o grupo A apresentou maior liberação de íons ferro, níquel e cromo do que o grupo B. Além disso, os braquetes do grupo A também mostraram perda de massa, considerada outro indicativo de corrosão. CONCLUSÃO: concluiu-se que, nas condições deste experimento, os braquetes do grupo A apresentaram maior biodegradação que os acessórios do grupo B, o que pode estar associado à liga metálica e/ou ao processo de fabricação dos mesmos.OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate, in vitro, the biodegradation of simulated orthodontic appliances consisting of stainless steel brackets and wires. MATERIALS AND METHODOS: The sample was divided in 2 groups, according to brackets brand: group A - Dyna-Lock, 3M/ Unitek (AISI 303; and group B - LG Edgewise Standard, American Orthodontics (AISI 316L. The specimens (simulated orthodontic appliances were incubated in saline solution (0.05%, in shake, at 36ºC, for 60 days. The ion release was detected by atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The weight of brackets was also measured before and after the test. RESULTS: The results indicated that group A released more ions iron, nickel and chromium than group B. Moreover, the brackets in group A also presented weight loss, which is considered an indicator of corrosion

  3. The effect of enamel bleaching on the shear bond strengths of metal and ceramic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztaş, E; Bağdelen, G; Kiliçoğlu, H; Ulukapi, H; Aydin, I

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of bleaching and delayed bonding on the shear bond strengths of metal and ceramic brackets bonded with light and chemically cure composite resin to human enamel. One hundred and twenty extracted human premolar teeth were randomly divided into three groups of 40 each. The first two groups were bleached with 20 per cent carbamide peroxide (CP) at-home bleaching agent. No bleaching procedures were applied to the third group and served as control. The first two and control groups were divided into equal subgroups according to different adhesive-bracket combinations. Specimens in group 1 (n = 40) were bonded 24 hours after bleaching process was completed while the specimens in group 2 (n = 40) were bonded 14 days after. The specimens in all groups were debonded with a Universal testing machine while the modified adhesive remnant index was used to evaluate fracture properties. No statistically significant differences were found between the shear bond strengths of metal and ceramic brackets bonded to bleached enamel after 24 hours, 14 days, and unbleached enamel with light or chemical cure adhesives (P > 0.05). The mode of failure was mostly at the bracket/adhesive interface and cohesive failures within the resin were also observed. Our findings indicated that at-home bleaching agents that contain 20 per cent CP did not significantly affect the shear bond strength of metal and ceramic orthodontic brackets to enamel when bonding is performed 24 hours or 14 days after bleaching.

  4. Antibacterial and antiadherent properties of silver dioxide-coated brackets

    OpenAIRE

    Rizwan A Gilani; S M Laxmikanth; C S Ramachandra; Sangeeta L Prasad; Sushruth Shetty; S D Vasudevan

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Enamel demineralization after fixed orthodontic treatment can occur in 50% of patients. Brackets play a significant role in enamel demineralization. Silver has already been prooved to have antibacterial properties. Hence the present study is conducted to assess the antiadherent and antibacterial properties of photocatalytic silver dioxide (AgO2) surface modified stainless steel orthodontic brackets against S. mutans. Materials and Methods: 80 stainless steel brackets of maxillar...

  5. Comparison between two methods for resin removing after bracket debonding

    OpenAIRE

    Marchi, Rodrigo De; Marchi, Luciana Manzotti De; Terada, Raquel Sano Suga; Terada, Hélio Hissashi

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess - using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) - the effectiveness of two abrasive discs, one made from silicon and one from aluminum oxide, in removing adhesive remnants (AR) after debonding orthodontic brackets. METHODS: Ten randomly selected bovine teeth were used, i.e., 2 in the control group, and the other 8 divided into two groups, which had orthodontic brackets bonded to their surface with Concise Orthodontic Adhesive (3M). The following metho...

  6. Are torque values of preadjusted brackets precise?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Motta Streva

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to verify the torque precision of metallic brackets with MBT prescription using the canine brackets as the representative sample of six commercial brands. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty maxillary and 20 mandibular canine brackets of one of the following commercial brands were selected: 3M Unitek, Abzil, American Orthodontics, TP Orthodontics, Morelli and Ortho Organizers. The torque angle, established by reference points and lines, was measured by an operator using an optical microscope coupled to a computer. The values were compared to those established by the MBT prescription. RESULTS: The results showed that for the maxillary canine brackets, only the Morelli torque (-3.33º presented statistically significant difference from the proposed values (-7º. For the mandibular canines, American Orthodontics (-6.34º and Ortho Organizers (-6.25º presented statistically significant differences from the standards (-6º. Comparing the brands, Morelli presented statistically significant differences in comparison with all the other brands for maxillary canine brackets. For the mandibular canine brackets, there was no statistically significant difference between the brands. CONCLUSIONS: There are significant variations in torque values of some of the brackets assessed, which would clinically compromise the buccolingual positioning of the tooth at the end of orthodontic treatment.

  7. A comparison between two lingual orthodontic brackets in terms of speech performance and patients' acceptance in correcting Class II, Division 1 malocclusion: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samiha Haj-Younis

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To compare speech performance and levels of oral impairment between two types of lingual brackets. Methods: A parallel-group randomized controlled trial was carried out on patients with Class II, Division 1 malocclusion treated at the University of Hama School of Dentistry in Hama, Syria. A total of 46 participants (mean age: 22.3 ± 2.3 years with maxillary dentoalveolar protrusion were randomly distributed into two groups with 23 patients each (1:1 allocation ratio. Either STb (Ormco or 7th Generation (Ormco lingual brackets were applied. Fricative sound/s/ spectrograms were analyzed directly before intervention (T0, one week following premolar extraction prior to bracket placement (T1, within 24 hours of bracket bonding (T2, one month after (T3, and three months after (T4 bracket placement. Patients′ acceptance was assessed by means of standardized questionnaires. Results: After bracket placement, significant deterioration in articulation was recorded at all assessment times in the 7th Generation group, and up to T3 in the STb group. Significant intergroup differences were detected at T2 and T3. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups in reported tongue irritation levels, whereas chewing difficulty was significantly higher in the 7th Generation group one month after bracket placement. Conclusions: 7th Generation brackets have more interaction with sound production than STb ones. Although patients in both groups complained of some degree of oral impairment, STb appliances appeared to be more comfortable than the 7th Generation ones, particularly within the first month of treatment.

  8. A comparison between two lingual orthodontic brackets in terms of speech performance and patients' acceptance in correcting Class II, Division 1 malocclusion: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Younis, Samiha; Khattab, Tarek Z.; Hajeer, Mohammad Y.; Farah, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To compare speech performance and levels of oral impairment between two types of lingual brackets. Methods: A parallel-group randomized controlled trial was carried out on patients with Class II, Division 1 malocclusion treated at the University of Hama School of Dentistry in Hama, Syria. A total of 46 participants (mean age: 22.3 ± 2.3 years) with maxillary dentoalveolar protrusion were randomly distributed into two groups with 23 patients each (1:1 allocation ratio). Either STb (Ormco) or 7th Generation (Ormco) lingual brackets were applied. Fricative sound/s/ spectrograms were analyzed directly before intervention (T0), one week following premolar extraction prior to bracket placement (T1), within 24 hours of bracket bonding (T2), one month after (T3), and three months after (T4) bracket placement. Patients′ acceptance was assessed by means of standardized questionnaires. Results: After bracket placement, significant deterioration in articulation was recorded at all assessment times in the 7th Generation group, and up to T3 in the STb group. Significant intergroup differences were detected at T2 and T3. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups in reported tongue irritation levels, whereas chewing difficulty was significantly higher in the 7th Generation group one month after bracket placement. Conclusions: 7th Generation brackets have more interaction with sound production than STb ones. Although patients in both groups complained of some degree of oral impairment, STb appliances appeared to be more comfortable than the 7th Generation ones, particularly within the first month of treatment. PMID:27653268

  9. A comparison between two lingual orthodontic brackets in terms of speech performance and patients' acceptance in correcting Class II, Division 1 malocclusion: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Younis, Samiha; Khattab, Tarek Z; Hajeer, Mohammad Y; Farah, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    To compare speech performance and levels of oral impairment between two types of lingual brackets. A parallel-group randomized controlled trial was carried out on patients with Class II, Division 1 malocclusion treated at the University of Hama School of Dentistry in Hama, Syria. A total of 46 participants (mean age: 22.3 ± 2.3 years) with maxillary dentoalveolar protrusion were randomly distributed into two groups with 23 patients each (1:1 allocation ratio). Either STb (Ormco) or 7th Generation (Ormco) lingual brackets were applied. Fricative sound/s/ spectrograms were analyzed directly before intervention (T0), one week following premolar extraction prior to bracket placement (T1), within 24 hours of bracket bonding (T2), one month after (T3), and three months after (T4) bracket placement. Patients' acceptance was assessed by means of standardized questionnaires. After bracket placement, significant deterioration in articulation was recorded at all assessment times in the 7th Generation group, and up to T3 in the STb group. Significant intergroup differences were detected at T2 and T3. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups in reported tongue irritation levels, whereas chewing difficulty was significantly higher in the 7th Generation group one month after bracket placement. 7th Generation brackets have more interaction with sound production than STb ones. Although patients in both groups complained of some degree of oral impairment, STb appliances appeared to be more comfortable than the 7th Generation ones, particularly within the first month of treatment.

  10. In vitro comparative study of share bond of light cured composite resins with halogen light and argon laser, using stainless steel brackets on human premolars; Estudo comparativo in vitro da capacidade adesiva da resina fotoativada pela luz halogena e por laser de argonio, utilizando-se brackets metalicos em pre-molares humanos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carillo, Vitoria Eugenia Bismarck

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this study in vitro was to compare the share bond strength of the light-cured composite resins Transbond XT (Unitek), with halogen light and argon laser. The Adhesive Remmant Index (ARI) was also investigated. The brackets Dyna lock (3M-UNITEK) were bonded to 75 human premolars, divided into 5 groups (15 each) according to time and the polymerization: Group H20, 15 brackets bonded with halogen light for 20s (10s both sides); Group H40, 15 brackets bonded with halogen light for 40s (20s both sides); Group A40, 15 brackets bonded with argon laser for 40s (20s both sides); Group A20, 15 brackets bonded with argon laser for 20s (10s both sides); Group A10, 15 brackets bonded with argon laser for 10s (5s both sides). The pulpal temperature changes were determined during a polymerization, not exceeding 3,5 deg C. After bonding, the teeth were submitted to a thermo cycled of 700 cycles between 5 deg C and 55 deg C, to simulate the consuming that the light cured composite resin would have in a short space of time. The specimens were then placed in PVC ring and embedded in acrylic resin (Aero-Jet). The tensile bond strength test was performed on an Universal Machine set at a crosshead speed of 1,5 mm/min, and for each rupture we registered a graphic and the best load required in Newtons, was converted to MPa and kgf. The share bond strength showed bigger values for the exposure time of 20 seconds, for the Group bonded for halogen light (H20), 7,45 kgf (7,64 MPa) and for argon laser 7,50 kgf (7,69 MPa); lesser values for the exposure time of 40s for the Group with halogen light (H40), 6,15 kgf (6,30 MPa) and argon laser Group (A40), 6,20 kgf (6,35 MPa) 0; and A10, 4,85 kgf (4,97 MPa). In the ARI Index, only A40 Group showed the 1 Index, with statistical results. In this Group, less than half of the remainder adhesive stayed on the surface of the enamel, conferring specimens failed at the enamel-adhesive interface. The results of the in vitro study demonstrate that

  11. Antimicrobial effect, frictional resistance, and surface roughness of stainless steel orthodontic brackets coated with nanofilms of silver and titanium oxide: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Tania; Arash, Valiollah; Rabiee, Sayed Mahmood; Rajabnia, Ramazan; Pourzare, Amirhosein; Rakhshan, Vahid

    2017-06-01

    Nano-silver and nano-titanium oxide films can be coated over brackets in order to reduce bacterial aggregation and friction. However, their antimicrobial efficacy, surface roughness, and frictional resistance are not assessed before. Fifty-five stainless-steel brackets were divided into 5 groups of 11 brackets each: uncoated brackets, brackets coated with 60 µm silver, 100 µm silver, 60 µm titanium, and 100 µm titanium. Coating was performed using physical vapor deposition method. For friction test, three brackets from each group were randomly selected and tested. For scanning electron microscopy and atomic-force microscopy assessments, one and one brackets were selected from each group. For antibacterial assessment, six brackets were selected from each group. Of them, three were immediately subjected to direct contact with S. mutans. Colonies were counted 3, 6, 24, and 48 h of contact. The other three were stored in water for 3 months. Then were subjected to a similar direct contact test. Results pertaining to both subgroups were combined. Groups were compared statistically. Mean (SD) friction values of the groups 'control, silver-60, silver-100, titanium-60, and titanium-100' were 0.55 ± 0.14, 0.77 ± 0.08, 0.82 ± 0.11, 1.52 ± 0.24, and 1.57 ± 0.41 N, respectively (p = .0004, Kruskal-Wallis). Titanium frictions were significantly greater than control (p  .05, Dunn). In the uncoated group, colony count increased exponentially within 48 h. The coated groups showed significant reductions in colony count (p < .05, two-way-repeated-measures ANOVA). In conclusions, all four explained coatings reduce surface roughness and bacterial growth. Nano-titanium films are not suitable for friction reduction. Nano-silver results were not conclusive and need future larger studies. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The effect of pretreatment with fluoride on the tensile strength of orthodontic bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, W.N.; Sheen, D.H.

    1991-01-01

    White spot decalcifications and caries occurring adjacent to bonded orthodontic brackets have long been a concern to orthodontists. One procedure suggested to overcome this problem is fluoride treatment prior to bonding. The purpose of this study was to compare the tensile bond strength of orthodontic self-cured resin from Concise on teeth rinsed 4 minutes in 1.23% APF with untreated controls. Measurements were made on an Instron machine. Debonding interfaces were observed with a scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry. Distributions were calculated. The tensile bond strengths of the fluoride-treated teeth and the untreated teeth were not significantly different. The debonding interfaces between resin and bracket base, within the resin itself, and between enamel and resin were similar in the two experimental groups. However, greater enamel detachment was seen within the fluoride pretreatment group. So while fluoride pretreatment does not significantly affect tensile bond strength, it may cause enamel detachment after debonding

  13. A comparative study of frictional force in self-ligating brackets according to the bracket-archwire angulation, bracket material, and wire type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Souk Min

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to compare the frictional force (FR) in self-ligating brackets among different bracket-archwire angles, bracket materials, and archwire types. Methods Passive and active metal self-ligating brackets and active ceramic self-ligating brackets were included as experimental groups, while conventional twin metal brackets served as a control group. All brackets were maxillary premolar brackets with 0.022 inch [in] slots and a -7° torque. The orthodontic wires used included 0.018 round and 0.019 × 0.025 in rectangular stainless steel wires. The FR was measured at 0°, 5°, and 10° angulations as the wire was drawn through the bracket slots after attaching brackets from each group to the universal testing machine. Static and kinetic FRs were also measured. Results The passive self-ligating brackets generated a lower FR than all the other brackets. Static and kinetic FRs generally increased with an increase in the bracket-archwire angulation, and the rectangular wire caused significantly higher static and kinetic FRs than the round wire (p brackets exhibited the lowest static FR at the 0° angulation and a lower increase in static and kinetic FRs with an increase in bracket-archwire angulation than the other brackets, while the conventional twin brackets showed a greater increase than all three experimental brackets. Conclusions The passive self-ligating brackets showed the lowest FR in this study. Self-ligating brackets can generate varying FRs in vitro according to the wire size, surface characteristics, and bracket-archwire angulation. PMID:25667913

  14. ′An avant-garde indirect bonding technique for lingual orthodontics using the first complete digital "tad" (torque angulation device, & "BPD" (bracket positioning device′

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushar Hegde

    2010-01-01

    This article covers an Indirect Bonding Technique using the Torque Angulation Device (TAD and the Bracket Positioning Device (BPD which ensure great accuracy while minimizing the poten- tial for error as compared to most methods available to the orthodontist today. This technique has been developed by taking into account the advantages and pitfalls of indirect bonding.

  15. In vitro Evaluation of Effect of Dental Bleaching on the Shear Bond Strength of Sapphire Orthodontics Brackets Bonded with Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainab M Kadhom

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aimed to assess the effect of various types of bleaching agents on the shear bond strength of sapphire brackets bonded to human maxillary premolar teeth using resin modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC and to determine the site of bond failure. Materials and Methods: Thirty freshly extracted maxillary human premolars were selected and assigned into three equal groups, ten teeth in each. The first group was the control (unbleached group; the second group comprised teeth bleached with hydrogen peroxide group (HP 37.5% (in-office bleaching while the third group included teeth bleached with carbamide peroxide group (CP 16% (at-home bleaching. The teeth in the experimental groups were bleached and stored in water one day then bonded with sapphire brackets using RMGIC with the control group and left another day. De-bonding was performed using Instron universal testing machine. To determine the site of bond failure, both the enamel surface and bracket base of each tooth were examined under magnifying lens (20X of a stereomicroscope. Results: Results showed statistically highly significant difference in the shear bond strengths between control group and both of bleaching groups being low in the control group. Score III was the predominant site of bond failure in all groups. Conclusions: RMGIC provides adequate bond strength when bonding the sapphire brackets to bleached enamel; this bonding was strong enough to resist both the mechanical and masticatory forces. Most of the adhesive remained on the brackets, so it reduced the time required for removal of the bonding material’s remnants during enamel finishing and polishing.

  16. The assessment of orthodontic bonding defects: optical coherence tomography followed by three-dimensional reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rominu, R.; Sinescu, C.; Rominu, M.; Negrutiu, M.; Petrescu, E.; Pop, D.; Podoleanu, A. Gh.

    2011-10-01

    Orthodontic bonding is a simple yet important procedure that can influence the outcome of treatment in case it is performed incorrectly. An orthodontic treatment shadowed by repeated bonding failures can become unduly long and will decrease patient trust and compliance. Optical coherence tomography has been widely used in ophtalmology but is relatively new to dentistry. Using OCT one can detect aerial inclusions within the orthodontic adhesive or even identify incongruence between the bracket base and the tooth surface. The aim of our study was to identify bonding defects and reconstruct them three-dimensionally in order to be able to characterize them more accurately. We bonded 30 sound human permanent teeth with ceramic orthodontic brackets using a no-mix self-curing orthodontic adhesive. Prior to bonding all teeth were stored in tap water at 4°C and then professionally cleaned with rotary brushes and pumice. The samples were processed by the same person and the rotary brushes were changed after every fifth tooth. All interfaces were investigated by means of OCT and 4 defects were found. Subsequently, the defects were reconstructed threedimensionally using an open-source program. By identifying and reconstructing bonding defects we could assess the quality of the bonding procedure. Since bonding tends to be more accurate in vitro where the environmental conditions are close to ideal, it is probable that defects found in vivo be even greater in number, which leads to the conclusion that this type of investigation is potentially valuable.

  17. Vitalidade pulpar em dentes portadores de brackets ortodônticos: apresentação de uma técnica = Pulp vitality test on teeth having orthodontics brackets: technique presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barletta, Fernando Branco

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar a confiabilidade do teste de vitalidade pulpar com o gás refrigerante tetrafluoretano (CS 68 em dentes portadores de brackets ortodônticos. Foram selecionados 37 pacientes de clínica privada, com faixa etária entre 12 e 60 anos de idade. O teste de vitalidade pulpar foi realizado na face palatina ou lingual, na região de terço médio dos dentes, abaixo do cíngulo, nos grupos dentários dos incisivos, caninos e pré-molares superiores e inferiores, totalizando 402 dentes. Quando a resposta de sensibilidade pulpar era negativa ao teste, o mesmo era repetido; confirmando-se o resultado como negativo, realizavase uma tomada radiográfica pela técnica periapical do dente em questão. Os resultados evidenciaram 4 elementos dentários com resposta negativa ao teste de vitalidade pulpar, sendo 3 pré-molares e um incisivo central. A resposta dos demais foi positiva ao teste. Diante dos resultados, verificou-se que a aplicação do teste de vitalidade pulpar pela face palatina em pacientes portadores de brackets ortodônticos constitui-se em uma alternativa segura e confiável

  18. Air-powder polishing on self-ligating brackets after clinical use: effects on debris levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragón, Mônica L S Castro; Lima, Leandro Santiago; Normando, David

    2016-01-01

    Debris buildup on brackets and arch surfaces is one of the main factors that can influence the intensity of friction between bracket and orthodontic wire. This study sought to evaluate the effect of air-powder polishing cleaning on debris levels of self-ligating ceramic brackets at the end of orthodontic treatment, compared to the behavior of conventional brackets. Debris levels were evaluated in metal conventional orthodontic brackets (n = 42) and ceramic self-ligating brackets (n = 42) on canines and premolars, arranged in pairs. There were brackets with and without air-powder polishing. At the end of orthodontic treatment, a hemiarch served as control and the contralateral hemiarch underwent prophylaxis with air-powder polishing. Debris buildup in bracket slots was assessed through images, and Wilcoxon test was used to analyze the results. The median debris levels were statistically lower in the conventional metal brackets compared to self-ligating ones (p = 0.02), regarding brackets not submitted to air-powder polishing. Polishing significantly reduced debris buildup to zero in both systems, without differences between groups. Ceramic self-ligating brackets have a higher debris buildup in comparison to conventional metal brackets in vivo, but prophylaxis with sodium bicarbonate jet was effective in reducing debris levels in self-ligating and also in conventional brackets.

  19. Evaluation of a New Nano-filled Bonding Agent for Bonding Orthodontic Brackets as Compared to a Conventional Bonding Agent: An in vitro Study

    OpenAIRE

    Sandesh S Pai; Amrita Nagendra; Vinaya S Pai; K Neelima; A E Vishwanath; P Vinod; Sharanya Ajit Kumar; Roopa R Tubaki

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Recent advances in the field of material sciences have opened up a new horizon of options for bonding agents that can be used efficiently in orthodontics. The purpose of this study was evaluate and compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of the traditionally used Transbond XT and a newer nano-filled material Prime and Bond NT. Materials and methods: Sixty freshly extracted maxillary first premolars were stored in 0.1% (weight/volume) thymol. These were divided into two Groups. ...

  20. Evaluation of a New Nano-filled Bonding Agent for Bonding Orthodontic Brackets as Compared to a Conventional Bonding Agent: An in vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandesh S Pai

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Although both bonding agents provide clinically acceptable levels of bond strength, the technique to bond the nano-filled Prime and Bond NT is more cumbersome as compared to the Transbond XT material, which makes the latter a more popular choice in the clinical set up. If the application procedures for the Prime and Bond NT can be simplified then it could be a convenient option in the orthodontic practice.

  1. A Comparison of the Accuracy of 0.022 Slots at Face, Base and Mesial and Distal Surface of Brackets marketed by Different Manufacturers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karan Tangri

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that orthodontic bracket slots were different than stated by the manufacturers. All the brackets were larger at the face than at the base. Clinicians should be aware that there may be a three-dimensional loss of tooth positioning as a result of the inadvertent use of orthodontic brackets with inaccurate slots.

  2. A comparison of orthodontic bracket shear bond strength on enamel deproteinized by 5.25% sodium hypochlorite using total etch and self-etch primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongkowidjaja, F.; Soegiharto, B. M.; Purbiati, M.

    2017-08-01

    The shear bond strength (SBS) can be increased by removing protein pellicles from the enamel surface by deproteinization using 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). The SBS of a self-etch primer is lower than that of a total etch primer; nonetheless, it prevents white spot lesions. This study aimed to assess the SBS of the Anyetch (AE) total etch primer and FL-Bond II Shofu (FL) self-etch primer after enamel deproteinization using 5.25% NaOCl. Forty eight human maxillary first premolars were extracted, cleaned, and divided into four groups. In group A, brackets were bonded to the enamel without deproteinization before etching (A1: 10 teeth using total etch primer (AE); A2: 10 teeth using self-etch primer (FL)). In group B, brackets were bonded to the enamel after deproteinization with 5.25% NaOCl before etching (B1: 10 teeth using total etch primer (AE); B2: 10 teeth using self-etch primer (FL)). Brackets were bonded using Transbond XT, stored in artificial saliva for 24 h at 37°C, mounted on acrylic cylinders, and debonded using a Shimadzu AG-5000 universal testing machine. There were no significant differences in SBS between the total etch (AE) groups (p > 0.05) and between the self-etch (FL) groups (p > 0.05). There were significant differences in SBS between groups A and B. The mean SBS for groups A1, A2, B1, and B2 was 12.91±3.99, 4.46±2.47, 13.06±3.66, and 3.62±2.36 MPa, respectively. Deproteinization using NaOCl did not affect the SBS of the total etch primer (AE) group; it reduced the SBS of the self-etch primer (FL) group, but not with a statistically significant difference.

  3. Laser guided automated calibrating system for accurate bracket ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is widely recognized that accurate bracket placement is of critical importance in the efficient application of biomechanics and in realizing the full potential of a preadjusted edgewise appliance. Aim: The purpose of ... placement. Keywords: Hough transforms, Indirect bonding technique, Laser, Orthodontic bracket placement ...

  4. A study in vitro on radiation effects by Er:YAG laser combined with the fluorine therapy in the acid resistance of the dental enamel submitted to orthodontical brackets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshiyasu, Roseli Y.A.

    2001-01-01

    Several researches have been demonstrating an increase in the resistance acid of the enamel surface when irradiated by some lasers types as Nd:YAG, C0 2 , Er:YAG, and others, mainly when combined with the fluoride therapy after the irradiation of the laser. This study in vitro used the laser of Er:YAG which density of energy of 8.1 J/cm 2 on the enamel about of orthodontical brackets of teeth extracted pre-molars. These teeth were then submitted to a rich way in S. mutans for twenty one days. The cases were analyzed: (1) enamel surface without any treatment, (2) enamel surface without any irradiation laser, but with therapy with acidulated phosphate fluoride, (3) enamel surface irradiated with laser of Er:YAG and (4) enamel surface irradiated by laser of Er:YAG and with application of acidulated phosphate fluoride. The results were analyzed through optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The morphologic changes observed to the scanning electron microscopy suggest increase in the acid resistance of the enamel surface. However, to the optical microscopy, it was still possible to visualize undesirable white stains in the surface of the enamel. (author)

  5. Clinical evaluation of the failure rates of metallic brackets

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    Fábio Lourenço Romano

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate in vivo the bonding of metallic orthodontic brackets with different adhesive systems. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty patients (10.5-15.1 years old who had sought corrective orthodontic treatment at a University Orthodontic Clinic were evaluated. Brackets were bonded from the right second premolar to the left second premolar in the upper and lower arches using: Orthodontic Concise, conventional Transbond XT, Transbond XT without primer, and Transbond XT associated with Transbond Plus Self-etching Primer (TPSEP. The 4 adhesive systems were used in all patients using a split-mouth design; each adhesive system was used in one quadrant of each dental arch, so that each group of 5 patients received the same bonding sequence. Initial archwires were inserted 1 week after bracket bonding. The number of bracket failures for each adhesive system was quantified over a 6-month period. RESULTS: The number of debonded brackets was: 8- Orthodontic Concise, 2- conventional Transbond XT, 9- Transbond XT without primer, and 1- Transbond XT + TPSEP. By using the Kaplan-Meier methods, statistically significant differences were found between the materials (p=0.0198, and the Logrank test identified these differences. Conventional Transbond XT and Transbond XT + TPSEP adhesive systems were statistically superior to Orthodontic Concise and Transbond XT without primer (p<0.05. There was no statistically significant difference between the dental arches (upper and lower, between the dental arch sides (right and left, and among the quadrants. CONCLUSIONS: The largest number of bracket failures occurred with Orthodontic Concise and Transbond XT without primer systems and few bracket failures occurred with conventional Transbond XT and Transbond XT+TPSEP. More bracket failures were observed in the posterior region compared with the anterior region.

  6. Avaliação da superfície da porcelana após a descolagem de braquetes ortodônticos Porcelain surface evaluation after debonding of orthodontic brackets

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    André Moreira Mattos

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: o objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a influência do tempo de condicionamento ácido em superfície de porcelana e o estado desta após a descolagem de braquetes ortodônticos. METODOLOGIA: foram utilizadas 20 amostras de porcelana feldspática para esmalte (Duceram-LFC divididas em 2 grupos de acordo com o tempo de condicionamento com ácido fluorídico 10% (15 segundos e 1 minuto. Após o ataque ácido, foi aplicado silano (3M Scotchbond, adesivo resinoso (Optibond Solo Plus e resina (Fill Magic nestas superfícies. A descolagem foi realizada através de força de cisalhamento numa máquina universal de ensaios (DL 500 - EMIC calibrada com velocidade fixa de 0,5mm/minuto. O índice do adesivo remanescente (ARI nas superfícies cerâmicas e o estado destas após a remoção dos braquetes foram avaliados através de fotos digitais. RESULTADOS: no grupo 15 segundos, a força de adesão média foi de 3,63MPa, significantemente inferior à do grupo 1 minuto, que foi de 7,18MPa (pAIM: the aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of acid conditioning time in porcelain surface and its characteristics after debonding of orthodontic brackets. METHODS: twenty samples of feldspathic porcelain for enamel (Duceram-LFC were divided in 2 groups according with the amount of time of acid conditioning with hydrofluoric acid 10% (15 seconds and 1 minute. After acid etching, it was applied silane (3M Scotchbond, adhesive (Optibond Solo Plus and resin (Fill Magic in these surfaces. The debonding was done with shear strength through a universal testing machine (DL 500 - EMIC calibrated with a fixed speed of 0.5mm/minute. The adhesive remnant index (ARI in the porcelain surfaces and their characteristics after removal of the brackets were evaluated through digital pictures. RESULTS: in the 15 seconds group, the mean bond strength was 3.63Mpa, significantly lower than the 1 minute group, that was 7.18Mpa (p<0.0001. All fractures during debonding

  7. Effect of Adhesive Type on the Shear Bond Strength of Metal Brackets to Two Ceramic Substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Sadegh Ahmad Akhoundi; Farzaneh Aghajani; Javad Chalipa; Amir Hooman Sadrhaghighi

    2014-01-01

    Increased number of adult patients requesting orthodontic treatment result in bonding bracket to ceramic restorations more than before. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded to two types of ceramic bases with conventional orthodontic bonding resin and a new nano-filled composite resin.Twenty four feldespathic porcelain and 24 lithium disilicate ceramic disks were fabricated. All of the samples were conditioned by sandblasting,...

  8. Hypersensitivity to conventional and to nickel-free orthodontic brackets Hipersensibilidade a bráquetes ortodônticos convencionais e a bráquetes "nickel-free"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariele Cristina Garcia Pantuzo

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the allergenic potential of orthodontic brackets, comparing the cutaneous sensitivity provoked by metals present in conventional metallic brackets to that provoked by brackets with a low concentration of nickel, known as "nickel-free". A sample was selected from 400 patients undergoing treatment in the orthodontic clinic of the Pontifical Catholic University of Minas Gerais (Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil, in the period from the beginning of 2002 to the end of 2003. A cutaneous sensitivity patch test containing 5% nickel sulphate was used in 58 patients (30 males and 28 females, aged between 11 and 30, which were using fixed appliances with Morelli® brackets in both arches. In a second phase, 30 days later, a comparative test of cutaneous sensitivity was applied to the whole sample with two types of test specimens, in the form of a disc. Two alloys were tested: discs composed of the alloy used in the construction of conventional brackets and discs composed of a nickel-free alloy. The internal part of the forearm was chosen for testing, and 20 test specimens of each experiment (corresponding to the twenty brackets of a complete fixed appliance were applied. Of the 58 patients evaluated, 16 patients were sensitive to the patch test with 5% nickel sulphate. Out of these 16 patients, 12 developed an allergic reaction to experiment 1 (test specimen with nickel, while in experiment 2, only 5 patients showed sensitivity to that sample. The McNemar test revealed that the nickel-free test specimens provoked less allergic reaction when compared with the conventional alloy (p = 0.016.Este trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar a capacidade alergênica provocada pelos bráquetes ortodônticos, comparando a sensibilidade cutânea provocada pelos metais presentes nos bráquetes metálicos convencionais com a provocada por bráquetes com baixa concentração de níquel ("nickel-free". A amostra foi selecionada dos 400 pacientes

  9. Microbial profile on metallic and ceramic bracket materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anhoury, Patrick; Nathanson, Dan; Hughes, Christopher V; Socransky, Sigmund; Feres, Magda; Chou, Laisheng Lee

    2002-08-01

    The placement of orthodontic appliances creates a favorable environment for the accumulation of a microbiota and food residues, which, in time, may cause caries or exacerbate any pre-existing periodontal disease. The purpose of the present study was to compare the total bacterial counts present on metallic and ceramic orthodontic brackets in order to clarify which bracket type has a higher plaque retaining capacity and to determine the levels of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus spp on both types of brackets. Thirty-two metallic brackets and 24 ceramic brackets were collected from orthodontic patients at the day of debonding. Two brackets were collected from each patient; one from a maxillary central incisor and another from a maxillary second premolar. Sixteen patients who used metallic brackets and 12 patients who used ceramic brackets were sampled. Bacterial populations were studied using "checkerboard" DNA-DNA hybridization, which uses DNA probes to identify species in complex microbial samples. The significance of differences between groups was determined using the Mann-Whitney U-test. Results showed no significant differences between metallic and ceramic brackets with respect to the caries-inducing S mutans and L acidophilus spp counts. Mean counts of 8 of 35 additional species differed significantly between metallic and ceramic brackets with no obvious pattern favoring one bracket type over the other. This study showed higher mean counts of Treponema denticola, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum ss vincentii, Streptococcus anginosus, and Eubacterium nodatum on metallic brackets while higher counts of Eikenella corrodens, Campylobacter showae, and Selenomonas noxia were found on ceramic brackets.

  10. Class III malocclusion with complex problems of lateral open bite and severe crowding successfully treated with miniscrew anchorage and lingual orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagita, Takeshi; Kuroda, Shingo; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Yamashiro, Takashi

    2011-05-01

    In this article, we report the successful use of miniscrews in a patient with an Angle Class III malocclusion, lateral open bite, midline deviation, and severe crowding. Simultaneously resolving such problems with conventional Class III treatment is difficult. In this case, the treatment procedure was even more challenging because the patient preferred to have lingual brackets on the maxillary teeth. As a result, miniscrews were used to facilitate significant asymmetric tooth movement in the posterior and downward directions; this contributed to the camouflage of the skeletal mandibular protrusion together with complete resolution of the severe crowding and lateral open bite. Analysis of the jaw motion showed that irregularities in chewing movement were also resolved, and a stable occlusion was achieved. Improvements in the facial profile and dental arches remained stable at the 18-month follow-up. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparison of the effect of hydrogel and solution forms of sodium ascorbate on orthodontic bracket-enamel shear bond strength immediately after bleaching: An in vitro study

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    Kimyai Soodabeh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study compared the effects of hydrogel and solution forms of sodium ascorbate (SA with two different application times on bracket bond strength subsequent to bleaching. Materials and Methods: A total of 72 sound premolars were randomly divided into six groups (n = 12: An unbleached control group (group one and five experimental groups of carbamide peroxide. Specimens in group two were bonded immediately after bleaching; specimens in groups three and four were bleached, then treated with SA solution for ten minutes and three hours, respectively, and then bonded. In groups five and six, SA hydrogel was used and the specimens were prepared similar to groups three and four, respectively. Following debonding, bond strengths were recorded in MPa. To evaluate the amount of resin left on the enamel surfaces, adhesive remnant index (ARI scores were used. Statistical Analysis: The bond strength data were analyzed with ANOVA and pairwise comparisons were made by Tukey test. The ARI data were subjected to Kruskal-Wallis test and two-by-two comparisons were made by the Mann-Whitney U test. Results: There were significant differences in bond strengths between the groups ( P < 0.0005. However, the differences between groups three, four, five and six were not significant. Furthermore, there were no significant differences between group one and groups four and six, whereas the differences between the other groups were significant ( P < 0.05. Regarding ARI, there were significant differences among the groups ( P = 0.004. Conclusion: Bleaching significantly decreased the bracket bond strength. Compromised bonding was reversed with a three-hour application of both forms of SA.

  12. Frictional resistance of self-ligating versus conventional brackets in different bracket-archwire-angle combinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    MONTEIRO, Maria Regina Guerra; da SILVA, Licinio Esmeraldo; ELIAS, Carlos Nelson; VILELLA, Oswaldo de Vasconcellos

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the influence of archwire material (NiTi, beta-Ti and stainless steel) and brackets design (self-ligating and conventional) on the frictional force resistance. Material and Methods Two types of brackets (self-ligating brackets - Smartclip, 3M/Unitek - and conventional brackets - Gemini, 3M/Unitek) with three (0, 5, and 10 degrees) slot angulation attached with elastomeric ligatures (TP Orthodontics) were tested. All brackets were tested with archwire 0.019"x0.025" nickel-titanium, beta-titanium, and stainless steel (Unitek/3M). The mechanical testing was performed with a universal testing machine eMIC DL 10000 (eMIC Co, Brazil). The wires were pulled from the bracket slots at a cross-head speed of 3 mm/min until 2 mm displacement. Results Self-ligating brackets produced significantly lower friction values compared with those of conventional brackets. Frictional force resistance values were directly proportional to the increase in the bracket/ wire angulation. With regard to conventional brackets, stainless steel wires had the lowest friction force values, followed by nickel-titanium and beta-titanium ones. With regard to self-ligating brackets, the nickel-titanium wires had the lowest friction values, significantly lower than those of other materials. Conclusion even at different angulations, the self-ligating brackets showed significantly lower friction force values than the conventional brackets. Combined with nickel-titanium wires, the self-ligating brackets exhibit much lower friction, possibly due to the contact between nickel-titanium clips and wires of the same material. PMID:25025564

  13. Frictional resistance of self-ligating versus conventional brackets in different bracket-archwire-angle combinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Regina Guerra MONTEIRO

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the influence of archwire material (NiTi, beta-Ti and stainless steel and brackets design (self-ligating and conventional on the frictional force resistance. Material and Methods: Two types of brackets (self-ligating brackets - Smartclip, 3M/Unitek - and conventional brackets - Gemini, 3M/Unitek with three (0, 5, and 10 degrees slot angulation attached with elastomeric ligatures (TP Orthodontics were tested. All brackets were tested with archwire 0.019"x0.025" nickel-titanium, beta-titanium, and stainless steel (Unitek/3M. The mechanical testing was performed with a universal testing machine eMIC DL 10000 (eMIC Co, Brazil. The wires were pulled from the bracket slots at a cross-head speed of 3 mm/min until 2 mm displacement. Results: Self-ligating brackets produced significantly lower friction values compared with those of conventional brackets. Frictional force resistance values were directly proportional to the increase in the bracket/ wire angulation. With regard to conventional brackets, stainless steel wires had the lowest friction force values, followed by nickel-titanium and beta-titanium ones. With regard to self-ligating brackets, the nickel-titanium wires had the lowest friction values, significantly lower than those of other materials. Conclusion: even at different angulations, the self-ligating brackets showed significantly lower friction force values than the conventional brackets. Combined with nickel-titanium wires, the self-ligating brackets exhibit much lower friction, possibly due to the contact between nickel-titanium clips and wires of the same material.

  14. Estudo comparativo de seis tipos de braquetes ortodônticos quanto à força de adesão A comparative study of six types of orthodontic brackets with regard to bond strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo de Aquino Fleischmann

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: a realização de um diagnóstico acurado, assim como a correta seleção de materiais, especificamente dos braquetes, são requisitos importantes para o êxito da terapia ortodôntica. OBJETIVOS: investigar a influência de variados tipos de desenho da base de braquetes na força de adesão. METODOLOGIA: seis modelos foram avaliados mediante ensaio de cisalhamento - Discovery (Dentaurum - metálico com retenções por laser e 13,12mm² de área da base; Monobloc (Morelli - metálico em corpo único com protuberâncias e 10,22mm² de área; Edgewise Standard (Ortho Organizers - metálico com base MIM (Metal Injection Molding e 12,02mm² de área; Illusion Plus (Ortho Organizers - porcelana com sulcos de retenção e 13,49mm² de área; Composite (Morelli - policarbonato com protuberâncias para retenção mecânica e 14,68mm² de área; e Edgewise Standard (Morelli - metálico com tela de retenção e 14,31mm² de área. Os braquetes foram colados em dentes bovinos (incisivos com o sistema adesivo Fill Magic Ortodôntico (Vigodent, para a realização do teste. O ensaio foi executado em uma máquina de ensaios universal (EMIC, e a força de adesão foi computada, no momento da cisão, pelo software TESC, versão 3.01, medida em Newtons (N e em Megapascal (Mpa. RESULTADOS E CONCLUSÕES: não houve diferença estatística entre os braquetes testados, sendo que o grupo que apresentou a maior média de força de adesão foi o Discovery com 10,12Mpa.INTRODUCTION: An accurate diagnosis as well as the correct selection of materials, brackets in particular, are important pre-requisites for success in orthodontic therapy. AIM: The aim of this study was to examine the influence of various brackets-base designs on bond strength. METHODS: Six models were evaluated by a test of sheer bond strength: Discovery (Dentaurum - metallic with laser grooves and 13.12mm² of base area; Monobloc (Morelli - metallic one-piece with raised bumps and 10.22mm

  15. Influence of resin-modified glass ionomer and topical fluoride on levels of Streptococcus mutans in saliva and biofilm adjacent to metallic brackets

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    Marcela Cristina Damião ANDRUCIOLI

    Full Text Available Abstract Decalcification of enamel during fixed orthodontic appliance treatment remains a problem. White spot lesions are observed in nearly 50% of patients undergoing orthodontic treatment. The use of fluoride-containing orthodontic materials has shown inconclusive results on their ability to reduce decalcification. The aims of this investigation were to compare the levels of Streptococcus mutans (SM in saliva and biofilm adjacent to orthodontic brackets retained with a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC (Fuji ORTHO LC and a light cured composite resin (Transbond XT, and to analyze the influence of topical application of the 1.23% acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF on SM counts. In a parallel study design, two groups (n=14/15 were used with random allocation and high salivary SM counts before treatment. Biofilm was collected from areas adjacent to the brackets on teeth 13, 22, 33, and 41. Both saliva and biofilm were collected on the 7th, 21st, 35th, and 49th days after appliance placement. Topical fluoride application was carried out on the 35th day. Bonding with RMGIC did not alter SM counts in saliva or biofilm adjacent to the brackets. On the other hand, the biofilm adjacent to brackets retained with composite resin showed a significant increase in SM counts along the trial period. Topical application of 1.23% APF did not reduce salivary or biofilm SM counts regardless of the bonding material. In conclusion, fluoride topical application did not show efficacy in reducing SM. The use of RMGIC as bonding materials allowed a better control of SM cfu counts in dental biofilm hindering the significant increase of these microorganisms along the trial period, which was observed in the biofilm adjacent to the composite material.

  16. Analysis of mesiodistal angulations of preadjusted brackets

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    Marcos Rogério de MENDONÇA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Manufacturers offer various prescriptions of preadjusted brackets for use in the “straight-wire” orthodontic technique. However, the need to incorporate bends in the rectangular wires during orthodontic finishing has led to concerns regarding the type of prescription chosen and the credibility of information provided by the manufacturer. The aim of this study was to compare the slot angulations of Roth prescription preadjusted metallic brackets for the maxillary left central incisor and maxillary left canine. For each tooth type, 10 brackets of three commercial brands (GAC, Forestadent and Morelli were selected. Two individual metal matrices for brackets and tooth positioning were made for each group of teeth. Captured images were obtained by standardized ortho-radial photography with a digital camera. Images were exported and analyzed with the Image J software package. One-way ANOVA and Tukey statistical analyses were performed at the 5% significance level. For brackets of the maxillary left central incisor, differences in mean angulation were observed between the Morelli and GAC groups (p < 0.01 and between the Forestadent and GAC groups (p < 0.01. For brackets of the maxillary left canine, differences in mean angulation were found between the Morelli and GAC groups (p < 0.01 and between the Morelli and Forestadent groups (p < 0.05. In conclusion, despite their same prescription name, the different brands exhibited significantly different angulation measurements.

  17. Effect of two-step and one-step surface conditioning of glass ceramic on adhesion strength of orthodontic bracket and effect of thermo-cycling on adhesion strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asiry, Moshabab A; AlShahrani, Ibrahim; Alaqeel, Samer M; Durgesh, Bangalore H; Ramakrishnaiah, Ravikumar

    2018-08-01

    The adhesion strength of orthodontic brackets bonded to dental glass ceramics was evaluated after ceramic surface was treated with two-step and one-step surface conditioning systems, and subjecting to thermo-cycling. A total of forty specimens were fabricated from silica based glass ceramic (lithium disilicate) by duplicating the buccal surface of maxillary first premolar. The specimens were randomly assigned to two experimental groups (n = 20), group one specimens were treated with two-step surface conditioning system (IPS ceramic etching gel™ and Monobond plus™) and group two specimens were treated with one-step surface conditioning system (Monobond etch and prime™). The surface roughness of the specimens after treatment with two-step and one-step surface conditioning system was measured using non-contact surface profilometer. Ten randomly selected specimens from each group were subjected to thermo-cycling and the remaining ten served as baseline. The shear bond strength of the specimens was measured using universal material testing machine. The adhesive remnant index score was calculated, and the results of surface roughness and bond strength were tabulated and subjected to analysis of variance and post hoc tukey's test at a significance level of p step conditioning system had higher surface roughness and bond strength than one-step conditioning system. The majority of the specimens treated with both two-step and one-step conditioned specimens showed adhesive failure after subjecting thermo-cycling. Traditional two-step conditioning provides better bond strength. The clinical importance of the study is that, the silane promoted adhesion significantly reduces on exposure to thermo-cycling. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. O efeito do jateamento do esmalte na força de adesão na colagem de braquetes The effect of air abrasion in enamel adhesion of orthodontic bracket

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    Carla D'Agostini Derech

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: o propósito deste estudo in vitro foi avaliar o efeito do jateamento com óxido de alumínio na adesão de braquetes ortodônticos e compará-lo à tradicional técnica de condicionamento ácido do esmalte. METODOLOGIA: foram utilizados 80 dentes bovinos distribuídos aleatoriamente entre quatro grupos, sendo que a superfície do esmalte foi tratada da seguinte maneira: grupo 1 (somente jateamento com óxido de alumínio, grupo 2 (profilaxia com pedra-pomes e condicionamento com ácido, grupo 3 (jateamento com óxido de alumínio e condicionamento ácido e grupo 4 (somente condicionamento ácido. Após, foi aplicado sistema adesivo e o braquete colado com resina. Os corpos-de-prova foram submetidos ao teste de cisalhamento e análise do IAR. Aos resultados foram aplicados o teste de variância múltipla (ANOVA e a comparação entre pares (Tukey. Para a análise do IAR foi aplicado o teste Qui-quadrado. RESULTADOS: o grupo 1 apresentou a menor resistência ao cisalhamento (3,6MPa e o 3 a maior (13,27MPa. A análise Qui-quadrado do IAR demonstrou que o tratamento da superfície do esmalte tem influência sobre a quantidade de remanescente de resina sobre o esmalte e os grupos 3 e 4 apresentaram a maior quantidade de resina aderida. CONCLUSÕES: o jateamento de óxido de alumínio não deve ser o único procedimento utilizado no preparo da superfície do esmalte na colagem de braquetes, porém, quando associado ao condicionamento ácido, mostrou-se eficaz no aumento da retenção entre esmalte e resina. Novos estudos são necessários visando menor dano do esmalte e adesão satisfatória.AIM: The purpose of this study in vitro was to evaluate the effect of the air abrasion with Al-oxide in the adhesion of orthodontic brackets and compare with traditional technique of acid conditioning of the enamel. METHODS: Eighty bovine teeth distributed randomly between four groups had been used and the surface of the enamel was prepared in the

  19. Failure Rates of Orthodontic Fixed Lingual Retainers bonded with Two Flowable Light-cured Adhesives: A Comparative Prospective Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talic, Nabeel F

    2016-08-01

    This comparative prospective randomized clinical trial examined the in vivo failure rates of fixed mandibular and maxillary lingual retainers bonded with two light-cured flowable composites over 6 months. Consecutive patients were divided into two groups on a 1:1 basis. Two hundred fixed lingual retainers were included, and their failures were followed for 6 months. One group (n = 50) received retainers bonded with a nano-hybrid composite based on nano-optimized technology (Tetric-N-Flow, Ivoclar Vivadent). Another group (n = 50) received retainers bonded with a low viscosity (LV) composite (Transbond Supreme LV, 3M Unitek). There was no significant difference between the overall failure rates of mandibular retainers bonded with Transbond (8%) and those bonded with Tetric-N-Flow (18%). However, the odds ratio for failure using Tetric-N-flow was 2.52-fold greater than that of Transbond. The failure rate of maxillary retainers bonded with Transbond was higher (14%), but not significantly different, than that of maxillary retainers bonded with Tetric-N-flow (10%). There was no significant difference in the estimated mean survival times of the maxillary and mandibular retainers bonded with the two composites. Both types of composites tested in the current study can be used to bond fixed maxillary and mandibular lingual retainers, with low failure rates.

  20. Lazy & quarrelsome brackets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, A.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper we study two (kinds of) systems of brackets in an algebraic way. Lazy brackets have the same effect as introducing or eliminating 'a sufficient amount' of ordinary brackets at the same time. Quarrelsome brackets are brackets corresponding to different types of 'levels': think

  1. Curing efficiency of three light emitting diode units at different curing profiles

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    Priyanka Verma

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Reduction of exposure time to 6 s with high-intensity curing light seemed to be clinically acceptable and should be recommended. Curing of metal brackets with single exposure from buccal side showed lower shear bond strength values.

  2. Orthodontic appliance preferences of children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Daniel K; Fields, Henry W; Johnston, William M; Rosenstiel, Stephen F; Firestone, Allen R; Christensen, James C

    2010-12-01

    Although attractiveness and acceptability of orthodontic appliances have been rated by adults for themselves and for adolescents, children and adolescents have not provided any substantial data. The objective of this study was to evaluate preferences and acceptability of orthodontic appliances in children and adolescents. Images of orthodontic appliances previously captured and standardized were selected and incorporated into a computer-based survey. Additional images of shaped brackets and colored elastomeric ties, as well as discolored clear elastomeric ties, were captured and incorporated onto existing survey images with Photoshop (Adobe, San Jose, Calif). The survey displayed 12 orthodontic appliance variations to 139 children in 3 age groups: 9 to 11 years (n = 45), 12 to 14 years (n = 49), and 15 to 17 years (n = 45). The subjects rated each image for attractiveness and acceptability. All images were displayed and rated twice to assess rater reliability. Overall reliability ratings were r = 0.74 for attractiveness and k = 0.66 for acceptability. There were significant differences in bracket attractiveness and acceptability in each age group. The highest-rated appliances were clear aligners, twin brackets with colored ties, and shaped brackets with and without colored ties. Colored elastomeric ties improved attractiveness significantly over brackets without colored ties for children in the 12-to-14 year group. There was a tendency for older subjects to rate clear orthodontic appliances higher than did younger subjects. Ceramic brackets with discolored ties tended to be rated lower than ceramic brackets with new ties and scored lowest in acceptability and attractiveness in all age groups. Girls rated shaped brackets significantly higher than did boys. Children's preferences for orthodontic appliances differ by age and sex. Child and adolescent preferences differ from adult preferences. Copyright © 2010 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby

  3. Lazy & quarrelsome brackets

    OpenAIRE

    Visser, A.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper we study two (kinds of) systems of brackets in an algebraic way. Lazy brackets have the same effect as introducing or eliminating 'a sufficient amount' of ordinary brackets at the same time. Quarrelsome brackets are brackets corresponding to different types of 'levels': think e.g. of term levels versus sentence levels. A modest framework is proposed to study these kinds of brackets simultaneously.

  4. Influência da secção transversa de fios ortodônticos na fricção superficial de braquetes autoligados Influence of the cross-section of orthodontic wires on the surface friction of self-ligating brackets

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    Roberta Buzzoni

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: o objetivo do presente trabalho foi determinar a força de atrito estático entre braquetes de aço inoxidável autoligados com sistema de fechamento resiliente e fios ortodônticos redondos e retangulares do mesmo material. MÉTODOS: empregaram-se 30 braquetes referentes aos caninos superiores divididos em 6 grupos formados por braquetes autoligados Smartclip, In-Ovation R e convencionais Gemini amarrados com ligaduras elásticas. A hipótese testada neste trabalho foi quanto à possibilidade dos braquetes autoligados ativos serem suscetíveis à elevação da força de atrito com o aumento e alteração da secção transversal dos fios ortodônticos. Os ensaios foram realizados com tração de 30s em fios de aço inoxidável 0,020" e 0,019"X0,025" na máquina de ensaios Emic DL 10000, com uma célula de carga de 20 newtons. Cada conjunto braquete/fio foi responsável pela geração de quatro corpos de prova, totalizando 120 leituras. As comparações entre as médias foram realizadas através da Análise de Variância (one way ANOVA com correções pelo coeficiente de Bonferroni. RESULTADOS E CONCLUSÃO: os braquetes autoligados apresentaram maior força de atrito do que os braquetes convencionais amarrados com ligaduras elásticas. O grupo Smartclip foi o mais efetivo no controle do atrito (pOBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to assess the surface friction produced by self-ligating stainless steel brackets equipped with a resilient closure system and compare the friction generated during traction of round and rectangular orthodontic wires made from the same material. METHODS: Thirty maxillary canine brackets were divided into six groups comprising SmartClip and In-Ovation R self-ligating brackets, and conventional Gemini brackets tied with elastomeric ligatures. This investigation tested the hypothesis that self-ligating brackets are susceptible to increases in friction that are commensurate with increases and changes in the

  5. A comparative evaluation of the retention of metallic brackets bonded with resin-modified glass ionomer cement under different enamel preparations: A pilot study

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    Padmaja Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: For orthodontists, the ideal bonding material should be less moisture-sensitive and should release fluoride, thereby reducing unfavorable iatrogenic decalcification. Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cements (RMGICs, due to their ability to bond in the presence of saliva and blood can be a very good bonding agent for orthodontic attachments especially in the areas of mouth, which are difficult to access. Moreover, their fluoride releasing property makes them an ideal bonding agent for patients with poor oral hygiene. However, their immediate bond strength is said to be too low to immediately ligate the initial wire, which could increase the total number of appointments. The effect of sandblasting and the use of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCL on the immediate bond failure of RMGIC clinically have not been reported in the literature until the date. This investigation intended to assess the effect of sandblasting (of the bracket base and enamel and NaOCL on the rate of bond failure (with immediate ligation at 30 min of Fuji Ortho LC and its comparison with that of conventional light cured composite resin over a period of 1 year. Materials and Methods: 400 sample teeth were further divided into 4 groups of 100 each and bonded as follows: (1 Group 1: Normal metallic brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (2 Group 2: Sandblasted bracket base and enamel surface, brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (3 Group 3: Deproteinized enamel surface using sodium hypochlorite and brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (4 Group 4: Normal metallic bracket bonded with Transbond XT after etching enamel with 37% phosphoric acid. This group served as control group. Results and Conclusion: Results showed that sandblasting the bracket base and enamel, can significantly reduce the bond failure rate of RMGIC.

  6. Avaliação do Índice de Remanescente Adesivo utilizando braquetes com e sem tratamento na base e a interação com três sistemas de colagem Evaluation of Adhesive Remnant Index using conventional mesh bases and sandblasted orthodontic bracket bases and three bonding systems

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    Lilian Maria Brisque Pignatta

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar o Índice de Remanescente Adesivo (IRA em dentes bovinos após a descolagem de braquetes com e sem tratamento na base. METODOLOGIA: foram utilizados três sistemas de colagem ortodôntica para os dois padrões de base. Os dentes bovinos foram divididos em seis grupos de 40, de acordo com a base do braquete e o sistema de colagem. Vinte e quatro horas após a colagem foram realizados os testes de compressão em uma máquina de ensaios. A avaliação do IRA foi realizada em um estereomicroscópio por três examinadores calibrados. Foi utilizado o teste não paramétrico de Kruskal-Wallis, seguido do método de Dunn, para fazer as comparações múltiplas entre todos os grupos. RESULTADOS E CONCLUSÕES: observou-se que o tratamento das bases dos braquetes com óxido de alumínio não foi determinante para o aumento da adesividade entre o braquete e o adesivo. O grupo em que se utilizou braquetes com tratamento na base e adesivo TXT (3M-Unitek + Transbond Plus SEP (3M-Unitek apresentou a maior parte das fraturas na interface dente-adesivo (escore 4.AIM: To assess the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI in bovine teeth after debonding mesh bases and sandblasted orthodontic bracket bases. METHODS: Were used three bonding systems for the two standards of base. The bovine teeth were divided into 6 groups of 40, according to the bracket base and to the bonding system. Twenty four hours after bonding they had been carried through shear bond strength tests in a universal testing machine. The assessment of ARI was performed in a stereomicroscopy by three calibrated examiners. It was used the non-parametric Kruskall-Wallis test, followed by Dunn's method, to do the multiple comparisons among all groups. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: It was observed that the aluminum oxide sandblasting bracket bases was not determinative to the increase of the adhesiveness between bracket and adhesive. The group where it was used sandblasted orthodontic bracket bases and

  7. Investigation into the effects of stainless steel ligature ties on the mechanical characteristics of conventional and self-ligated brackets subjected to torque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Fakir, Hussam; Carey, Jason P; Melenka, Garrett W; Nobes, David S; Heo, Giseon; Major, Paul W

    2014-09-01

    Torque is applied to orthodontic brackets in order to alter the buccal-lingual angulation of a tooth. One factor that can affect torque is the ligation mode used to retain the archwire in the bracket slot. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of stainless steel ligation on torque expression and bracket deformation. This study utilized 60 upper right central incisor Damon Q brackets and 60 Ormco Orthos Twin brackets. The brackets used in this study were subdivided into four groups: (1) Damon Q ligated with SS ligature; (2) Damon Q with the sliding bracket door; (3) Orthos Twin bracket ligated with SS wire; and (4) Orthos Twin ligated with elastic ties. All brackets were tested using an orthodontic torque simulating device that applied archwire rotation from 0° to 45°. All brackets ligated with stainless steel ties exhibited greater torque expression and less deformation than brackets without stainless steel ties. As well, Damon Q brackets exhibit less bracket deformation than Orthos Twin brackets. Stainless steel ties can reduce the amount of plastic deformation for both types of brackets used in this study. © 2014 British Orthodontic Society.

  8. [Precision of three-dimensional printed brackets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, D; Wang, L C; Zhou, Y H; Liu, X M; Li, J

    2017-08-18

    This study was based on digital orthodontic diagnosis work flow for indirect bonding transfer tray model design and three-dimensional (3D) printing, and the aim of this paper was to inspect the dimensional accuracyof 3D printed brackets, which is the foundation of the follow up work and hoped that will illuminate the clinical application of the digital orthodontics work flow. The samples which consisted of 14 cases of patients with malocclusion from Department of Orthodontics Peking University were selected, including 8 cases with tooth extraction and 6 cases without tooth extraction. All the 14 patients were taken intra-oral scan (Trios 3Shape, Denmark) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT, NewTom 3G volumetric scanner, Aperio Service,Italy)shooting after periodontal treatment. STL data and DICOM data were obtained from intraoral scans and CBCT images.Data segmentation, registration, fusion, automatic tooth arrangement, virtual positioning of orthodontic appliance and conversion the coordinates of malocclusion model were all done with self-programming software. The data of 3D printing model with brackets on it were output finally and printed out with EDEN260V (Objet Geometries, Israel) to make indirect bonding transfer tray. Digital vernier caliper was used to measure the length and width of upper and lower left brackets and buccal tubes on those 3D models after removal of surrounding supporting material by ultrasonic vibration and water-spray. Intra-examiner reliability was assessed by using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC), and one-sample T test was used to compare the measurements with the standard dimensional data of the brackets. There were significant differences which range in 0.04-0.17 mm between the 13 items out of the 19 measurement items. Except for the length of the lower left premolars'brackets, mean values of the other items were greater than the test value. Although the measurement results in the width of brackets and the width and

  9. Experiense with remineraling means in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepanova Ye.A.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In patients undergoing orthodontic treatment using bracket-technology a high risk of caries development. The algorithm of preventive interventions for the prevention of hair demineralization of enamel of the teeth

  10. Microbial complexes levels in conventional and self-ligating brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamo, Ana Zilda Nazar; Nelson-Filho, Paulo; Andrucioli, Marcela Cristina Damião; do Nascimento, Cássio; Pedrazzi, Vinícius; Matsumoto, Mírian Aiko Nakane

    2017-05-01

    The aims were to evaluate the levels of bacterial species in saliva and in situ and to assess whether the design of brackets influences the risk of developing periodontal disease. Twenty patients (13.3 mean age) were bonded with self-ligating brackets and a conventional bracket. Saliva was collected before bonding and 30 and 60 days after bonding. One sample of each bracket was removed 30 and 60 days after bonding. The analysis was determined by checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization. The data was evaluated by the non-parametric test. A significant increase in the levels of bacterial species in the saliva occurred in 15 of the 22 analyzed species. The self-ligating brackets presented the highest incidence percentages for the orange and red complexes 60 days after bonding. In situ analyses showed different patterns according to the bracket design. The levels of Campylobacter rectus showed significant differences (p = 0.011) 60 days after bonding among the three brackets; the highest values were observed in the In-Ovation®R bracket. The bracket design seems to influence the levels of bacterial species involved in periodontal disease. Considering the wide variety of bacterial species, additional studies are needed to aid in the establishment of effective protocols to prevent the development of periodontal disease during orthodontic treatment. A dynamic alteration in the oral microbiota may lead to inflammatory reactions in the supporting soft and hard tissues. The different types of brackets interfere with bacterial adherence. Bracket design should be considered in orthodontic treatment.

  11. Comparative study on direct and indirect bracket bonding techniques regarding time length and bracket detachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Vinicius Bozelli

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the time spent for direct (DBB - direct bracket bonding and indirect (IBB - indirect bracket bonding bracket bonding techniques. The time length of laboratorial (IBB and clinical steps (DBB and IBB as well as the prevalence of loose bracket after a 24-week follow-up were evaluated. METHODS: Seventeen patients (7 men and 10 women with a mean age of 21 years, requiring orthodontic treatment were selected for this study. A total of 304 brackets were used (151 DBB and 153 IBB. The same bracket type and bonding material were used in both groups. Data were submitted to statistical analysis by Wilcoxon non-parametric test at 5% level of significance. RESULTS: Considering the total time length, the IBB technique was more time-consuming than the DBB (p < 0.001. However, considering only the clinical phase, the IBB took less time than the DBB (p < 0.001. There was no significant difference (p = 0.910 for the time spent during laboratorial positioning of the brackets and clinical session for IBB in comparison to the clinical procedure for DBB. Additionally, no difference was found as for the prevalence of loose bracket between both groups. CONCLUSION: the IBB can be suggested as a valid clinical procedure since the clinical session was faster and the total time spent for laboratorial positioning of the brackets and clinical procedure was similar to that of DBB. In addition, both approaches resulted in similar frequency of loose bracket.

  12. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation of human dental enamel after bracket debonding: a noncontact three-dimensional optical profilometry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Fabiano G; Nouer, Darcy F; Silva, Nelson P; Garbui, Ivana U; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Nouer, Paulo R A

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to undertake a qualitative and quantitative evaluation of changes on enamel surfaces after debonding of brackets followed by finishing procedures, using a high-resolution three-dimensional optical profiler and to investigate the accuracy of the technique. The labial surfaces of 36 extracted upper central incisors were examined. Before bonding, the enamel surfaces were subjected to profilometry, recording four amplitude parameters. Brackets were then bonded using two types of light-cured orthodontic adhesive: composite resin and resin-modified glass ionomer cement. Finishing was performed by three different methods: pumice on a rubber cup, fine and ultrafine aluminum oxide discs, and microfine diamond cups followed by silicon carbide brushes. The samples were subsequently re-analyzed by profilometry. Wilcoxon signed-rank test, Kruskal-Wallis test (p enamel roughness when diamond cups followed by silicon carbide brushes were used to finish surfaces that had remnants of resin-modified glass ionomer adhesive and when pumice was used to finish surfaces that had traces of composite resin. Enamel loss was minimal. The 3D optical profilometry technique was able to provide accurate qualitative and quantitative assessment of changes on the enamel surface after debonding. Morphological changes in the topography of dental surfaces, especially if related to enamel loss and roughness, are of considerable clinical importance. The quantitative evaluation method used herein enables a more comprehensive understanding of the effects of orthodontic bonding on teeth.

  13. Loss of surface enamel after bracket debonding : An in-vivo and ex-vivo evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pont, Huib Berghauser; Özcan, Mutlu; Bagis, Bora; Ren, Yijin

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to evaluate the surface enamel after bracket debonding and residual resin removal. METHODS: Thirty patients (female, 20; male, 10; mean age, 18.4 years) who completed orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances (Twin Brackets, 3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif)

  14. Color stability of ceramic brackets immersed in potentially staining solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guignone, Bruna Coser; Silva, Ludimila Karsbergen; Soares, Rodrigo Villamarim; Akaki, Emilio; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Pithon, Matheus Melo; Oliveira, Dauro Douglas

    2015-01-01

    To assess the color stability of five types of ceramic brackets after immersion in potentially staining solutions. Ninety brackets were divided into 5 groups (n = 18) according to brackets commercial brands and the solutions in which they were immersed (coffee, red wine, coke and artificial saliva). The brackets assessed were Transcend (3M/Unitek, Monrovia, CA, USA), Radiance (American Orthodontics, Sheboygan, WI, USA), Mystique (GAC International Inc., Bohemia, NY, USA) and Luxi II (Rocky Mountain Orthodontics, Denver, CO, USA). Chromatic changes were analyzed with the aid of a reflectance spectrophotometer and by visual inspection at five specific time intervals. Assessment periods were as received from the manufacturer (T0), 24 hours (T1), 72 hours (T2), as well as 7 days (T3) and 14 days (T4) of immersion in the aforementioned solutions. Results were submitted to statistical analysis with ANOVA and Bonferroni correction, as well as to a multivariate profile analysis for independent and paired samples with significance level set at 5%. The duration of the immersion period influenced color alteration of all tested brackets, even though these changes could not always be visually observed. Different behaviors were observed for each immersion solution; however, brackets immersed in one solution progressed similarly despite minor variations. Staining became more intense over time and all brackets underwent color alterations when immersed in the aforementioned solutions.

  15. Color stability of ceramic brackets immersed in potentially staining solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Coser Guignone

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the color stability of five types of ceramic brackets after immersion in potentially staining solutions.METHODS: Ninety brackets were divided into 5 groups (n = 18 according to brackets commercial brands and the solutions in which they were immersed (coffee, red wine, coke and artificial saliva. The brackets assessed were Transcend (3M/Unitek, Monrovia, CA, USA, Radiance (American Orthodontics, Sheboygan, WI, USA, Mystique (GAC International Inc., Bohemia, NY, USA and Luxi II (Rocky Mountain Orthodontics, Denver, CO, USA. Chromatic changes were analyzed with the aid of a reflectance spectrophotometer and by visual inspection at five specific time intervals. Assessment periods were as received from the manufacturer (T0, 24 hours (T1, 72 hours (T2, as well as 7 days (T3 and 14 days (T4 of immersion in the aforementioned solutions. Results were submitted to statistical analysis with ANOVA and Bonferroni correction, as well as to a multivariate profile analysis for independent and paired samples with significance level set at 5%.RESULTS: The duration of the immersion period influenced color alteration of all tested brackets, even though these changes could not always be visually observed. Different behaviors were observed for each immersion solution; however, brackets immersed in one solution progressed similarly despite minor variations.CONCLUSIONS: Staining became more intense over time and all brackets underwent color alterations when immersed in the aforementioned solutions.

  16. Comparison of Frictional Forces Generated by a New Ceramic Bracket with the Conventional Brackets using Unconventional and Conventional Ligation System and the Self-ligating Brackets: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasha, Azam; Vishwakarma, Swati; Narayan, Anjali; Vinay, K; Shetty, Smitha V; Roy, Partha Pratim

    2015-09-01

    Fixed orthodontic mechanotherapy is associated with friction between the bracket - wire - ligature interfaces during the sliding mechanics. A sound knowledge of the various factors affecting the magnitude of friction is of paramount importance. The present study was done to analyze and compare the frictional forces generated by a new ceramic (Clarity Advanced) bracket with the conventional, (metal and ceramic) brackets using unconventional and conventional ligation system, and the self-ligating (metal and ceramic) brackets in the dry condition. The various bracket wire ligation combinations were tested in dry condition. The brackets used were of 0.022″ × 0.028″ nominal slot dimension of MBT prescription: Stainless steel (SS) self-ligating bracket (SLB) of (SmartClip), SS Conventional bracket (CB) (Victory series), Ceramic SLB (Clarity SL), Conventional Ceramic bracket with metal slot (Clarity Bracket), Clarity Advanced Ceramic Brackets (Clarity(™) ADVANCED, 3M Unitek). These brackets were used with two types of elastomeric ligatures: Conventional Elastomeric Ligatures (CEL) (Clear medium mini modules) and Unconventional Elastomeric Ligatures (UEL) (Clear medium slide ligatures, Leone orthodontic products). The aligning and the retraction wires were used, i.e., 0.014″ nickel titanium (NiTi) wires and 0.019″ × 0.025″ SS wires, respectively. A universal strength testing machine was used to measure the friction produced between the different bracket, archwires, and ligation combination. This was done with the use of a custom-made jig being in position. Mean, standard deviation, and range were computed for the frictional values obtained. Results were subjected to statistical analysis through ANOVA. The frictional resistance observed in the new Clarity Advanced bracket with a conventional elastomeric ligature was almost similar with the Clarity metal slot bracket with a conventional elastomeric ligature. When using the UEL, the Clarity Advanced bracket

  17. Comparison of the efficacy of tooth alignment among lingual and labial brackets: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alobeid, Ahmad; El-Bialy, Tarek; Reimann, Susanne; Keilig, Ludger; Cornelius, Dirk; Jäger, Andreas; Bourauel, Christoph

    2018-03-13

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of tooth alignment with conventional and self-ligating labial and lingual orthodontic bracket systems. We tested labial brackets (0.022″ slot size) and lingual brackets (0.018″ slot size). The labial brackets were: (i) regular twin brackets (GAC-Twin [Dentsply]), (ii) passive self-ligating brackets including (Damon-Q® [ORMCO]; Ortho classic H4™ [Orthoclassic]; FLI®SL [RMO]), and (iii) active self-ligating brackets (GAC In-Ovation®C [DENTSPLY] and SPEED™[Strite]). The lingual brackets included (i) twin bracket systems (Incognito [3M] and Joy™ [Adenta]), (ii) passive self-ligating bracket system (GAC In-Ovation®LM™ [Dentsply]), and (iii) active self-ligating bracket system (Evolution SLT [Adenta]). The tested wires were Thermalloy-NiTi 0.013″ and 0.014″ (RMO). The archwires were tied to the regular twin brackets with stainless steel ligatures 0.010″ (RMO). The malocclusion simulated a displaced maxillary central incisor in the x-axis (2 mm gingivally) and in the z-axis (2 mm labially). The results showed that lingual brackets are less efficient in aligning teeth when compared with labial brackets in general. The vertical correction achieved by labial bracket systems ranged from 72 to 95 per cent with 13″ Thermalloy wires and from 70 to 87 per cent with 14″ Thermalloy wires. In contrast, the achieved corrections by lingual brackets with 13″ Thermalloy wires ranged between 25-44 per cent and 29-52 per cent for the 14" Thermalloy wires. The anteroposterior correction achieved by labial brackets ranged between 83 and 138 per cent for the 13″ Thermalloy and between 82 and 129 per cent for the 14″ Thermalloy wires. On the other hand, lingual brackets corrections ranged between 12 and 40 per cent for the 13″ Thermalloy wires and between 30 and 45 per cent for the 14″ Thermalloy wires. This is a lab-based study with different labial and lingual bracket slot sizes (however they are the

  18. Intraoral corrosion of self-ligating metallic brackets and archwires and the effect on friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tima, Lori Lynn

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how the frictional coefficient was affected due to intraoral use. A secondary aim of this study was to determine whether or not there was a relationship between corrosion of orthodontic alloys and friction via scanning electron microscopic qualitative analysis. Orthodontic brackets and 0.019 x 0.025 inch stainless steel archwires were collected and divided into three groups of n=10: used bracket and used wires (UBUW), used brackets and new wires (UBNW), and new brackets and new wires (NBNW). New materials were as-received from the manufacturer, and used materials were clinically used bracket and wires collected from patients following orthodontic treatment. Archwires were pulled through bracket slots at a rate of 0.5mm/min while friction forces were measured. Following a cleaning process, the surface topography of the bracket slots was examined under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Based on a 1-factor MANOVA, there was no significant group effect (all p>0.05) on frictional forces. Partial eta squared values indicated that intraoral exposure had only a small effect on frictional forces (≤ 3%). Qualitative analysis of SEM images did not show an association between surface characteristics of the bracket slots and magnitude of frictional force. Results suggest that surface corrosion from intraoral use does not significantly affect friction at the bracket wire interface.

  19. Bond strengths of different orthodontic adhesives after enamel conditioning with the same self-etching primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scougall-Vilchis, Rogelio J; Zárate-Díaz, Chrisel; Kusakabe, Shusuke; Yamamoto, Kohji

    2010-05-01

    To determine the shear bond strengths (SBS) of stainless steel brackets bonded with seven light-cured orthodontic adhesives after the enamel was conditioned with the same self-etching primer. A total of 140 extracted human molars were randomly divided into seven groups (N = 20). In all the groups, the enamel was conditioned with Transbond Plus SEP (TPSEP). Stainless steel brackets were bonded with the following orthodontic adhesives: Group I, Transbond XT; Group II, Blūgloo; Group III, BeautyOrtho Bond; Group IV, Enlight; Group V, Light Bond; Group VI, Transbond CC; Group VII, Xeno Ortho. The teeth were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours and debonded with a universal testing machine. The modified adhesive remnant index (ARI) was also recorded. There were no significant differences in the SBS values among the groups: I (18.0 +/- 7.4 MPa); II (18.3 +/- 5.1 MPa); III (14.8 +/- 4.3 MPa); IV (18.3 +/- 7.0 MPa); V (16.4 +/- 4.3 MPa); VI (20.3 +/- 5.3 MPa); VII (15.9 +/- 6.4 MPa), but significant differences in ARI were found. The seven orthodontic adhesives evaluated in this study can be successfully used for bonding stainless steel brackets when the enamel is conditioned with TPSEP, however, the differences among some groups might influence the clinical bond strengths. In addition, the amount of residual adhesive remaining on the teeth after debonding differed among the adhesives. Further studies are required to better understand the differences in SBS and ARI.

  20. In-Office Bleaching During Orthodontic Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Mauricio Neves; Dutra, Hélio; Morais, Alexandre; Sgura, Ricardo; Devito-Moraes, André Guaraci

    2017-04-01

    To demonstrate that it is possible to pursue teeth whitening treatment protocols during orthodontic treatment with no esthetic loss. Many patients undergoing orthodontic treatment desire to have a straight and well aligned dentition, but also whiter teeth. For many years, it was believed that carrying out a whitening treatment with positioned orthodontic brackets in place would result in localized spots on the enamel labial surfaces of teeth. However, a deeper understanding of the bleaching process suggests that the oxidation caused by products, which results from hydrogen peroxide decomposition, are able to diffuse peripherally into the tooth structure and reach even that under the cemented brackets. Two in-office-bleaching treatments were performed in patients using orthodontic fixed braces in two or three 40-minute sessions using a 35% hydrogen peroxide. In-office bleaching is possible and effective, even with orthodontic brackets in position. The teeth were successfully bleached despite the presence of brackets. All biological criteria have been fulfilled satisfying patients' expectations of aligned and whitened teeth in less time than if treatments had been performed separately, with satisfactory results and no esthetic loss. The whitening of teeth is possible during orthodontic treatment with fixed braces without any esthetic loss. The in-office bleaching treatment with brackets in position also may act as a motivation factor, preventing patient withdrawal or treatment interruption. Therefore, at the end of the orthodontic treatment, the patient is able to display an aligned, functional and whitened smile. (J Esthet Restor Dent 29:83-92, 2017). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. How and why of orthodontic bond failures: An in vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R K Vijayakumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The bonding of orthodontic brackets and their failure rates by both direct and in-direct procedures are well-documented in orthodontic literature. Over the years different adhesive materials and various indirect bonding transfer procedures have been compared and evaluated for bond failure rates. The aim of our study is to highlight the use of a simple, inexpensive and ease of manipulation of a single thermo-plastic transfer tray and the use the of a single light cure adhesive to evaluate the bond failure rates in clinical situations. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 patients were randomly divided into two groups (Group A and Group B. A split-mouth study design was used, for, both the groups so that they were distributed equally with-out bias. After initial prophylaxis, both the procedures were done as per manufactures instructions. All patients were initially motivated and reviewed for bond failures rates for 6 months. Results: Bond failure rates were assessed for over-all direct and indirect procedures, anterior and posterior arches, and for individual tooth. Z-test was used for statistically analyzing, the normal distribution of the sample in a spilt mouth study. The results of the two groups were compared and P value was calculated using Z-proportion test to assess the significance of the bond failure. Conclusion: Over-all bond failure was more for direct bonding. Anterior bracket failure was more in-direct bonding than indirect procedure, which showed more posterior bracket failures. In individual tooth bond failure, mandibular incisor, and premolar brackets showed more failure, followed by maxillary premolars and canines.

  2. Comparison of the force levels among labial and lingual self-ligating and conventional brackets in simulated misaligned teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alobeid, Ahmad; El-Bialy, Tarek; Khawatmi, Said; Dirk, Cornelius; Jäger, Andreas; Bourauel, Christoph

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate force levels exerted by levelling arch wires with labial and lingual conventional and self-ligating brackets. The tested orthodontic brackets were of the 0.022-in slot size for labial and 0.018-in for lingual brackets and were as follows: 1. Labial brackets: (i) conventional bracket (GAC-Twin, Dentsply), (ii) passive self-ligating (SL) brackets (Damon-Q®, ORMCO; Ortho classic H4™, Orthoclassic; FLI®SL, Rocky Mountain Orthodontics) and (iii) active SL brackets (GAC In-Ovation®C, DENTSPLY and SPEED™, Strite). 2. Lingual brackets: (i) conventional brackets (Incognito, 3M and Joy™, Adenta); (ii) passive SL bracket (GAC In-Ovation®LM™, Dentsply and (iii) active SL bracket (Evolution SLT, Adenta). Thermalloy-NiTi 0.013-in and 0.014-in arch wires (Rocky Mountain Orthodontics) were used with all brackets. The simulated malocclusion represented a maxillary central incisor displaced 2 mm gingivally (x-axis) and 2 mm labially (z-axis). Lingual bracket systems showed higher force levels (2.4 ± 0.2 to 3.8 ± 0.2 N) compared to labial bracket systems (from 1.1 ± 0.1 to 2.2 ± 0.4 N). However, the differences between SL and conventional bracket systems were minor and not consistent (labial brackets: 1.2 ± 0.1 N for the GAC Twin and 1.1 ± 0.1 to 1.6 ± 0.1 N for the SL brackets with 0.013-in thermalloy; lingual brackets: 2.5 ± 0.2 to 3.5 ± 0.1 N for the conventional and 2.7 ± 0.3 to 3.4 ± 0.1 N for the SL brackets with 0.013-in Thermalloy). This is an in vitro study with different slot sizes in the labial and lingual bracket systems, results should be interpreted with caution. Lingual bracket systems showed higher forces compared to labial bracket systems that might be of clinical concern. We recommend highly flexible nickel titanium arch wires lower than 0.013-in for the initial levelling and alignment especially with lingual appliances. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European

  3. Evaluation of failure characteristics and bond strength after ceramic and polycarbonate bracket debonding : effect of bracket base silanization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M.; Finnema, K.; Ybema, A.

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of silanization on the failure type and shear-peel bond strength (SBS) of ceramic and polycarbonate brackets, and to determine the type of failure when debonded with either a universal testing machine or orthodontic pliers. Silanized and

  4. The Effect of Bracket Base Pylon Orientation on the Shear Bond Strength of the ODP ANCHOR-LOCK Bracket Pad

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    in the dark) ( Bourke et al., 1992; McClean et al., 1994). Resin-modified glass ionomer cements that possess photochemical settling reactions also...primer/adhesive on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets. Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop 2001; 119(6):621-624. 61 Bourke AM, Walls AW

  5. Universal Cable Brackets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanvalkenburgh, C.

    1985-01-01

    Concept allows routing easily changed. No custom hardware required in concept. Instead, standard brackets cut to length and installed at selected locations along cable route. If cable route is changed, brackets simply moved to new locations. Concept for "universal" cable brackets make it easy to route electrical cable around and through virtually any structure.

  6. Assessment of bracket surface morphology and dimensional change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pillai Devu Radhakrishnan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to compare the surface morphology and dimensional stability of the bracket slot at the onset of treatment and after 12 months of intraoral exposure. The study also compared the amount of calcium at the bracket base which indicates enamel loss among the three orthodontic brackets following debonding after 12 months of intraoral exposure. Materials and Methods: The sample consisted of 60 (0.022” MBT canine brackets. They were divided into three groups: self-ligating, ceramic bracket with metal slot, and stainless steel (SS brackets. The slot dimensions, micromorphologic characteristics of as-received and retrieved brackets were measured with a stereomicroscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM, respectively. The amount of calcium at the bracket base which indicates enamel damage was quantified using energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX. Results: The results showed statistically significant alterations (P < 0.05 in the right vertical dimension, internal tie wing width (cervical, right and left depth of the slot (Kruskal–Wallis test. Multiple comparison using Mann–Whitney test showed that ceramic brackets underwent (P < 0.05 minimal alterations in the right vertical dimension, internal tie wing width (cervical, right and left depth of the slot (0.01 mm, −0.003 mm, 0.006 mm, −0.002 mm, respectively when compared with the changes seen in SS and self-ligating brackets. SEM analysis revealed an increase in the surface roughness of ceramic with metal slot brackets and self-ligating bracket showed the least irregularity. The presence of calcium was noted on all evaluated brackets under EDX, but ceramic with metal slot brackets showed a significantly greater amount of enamel loss (P = 0.001. Conclusion: Ceramic brackets were found to be dimensionally stable when compared to SS and self-ligating. Self-ligating bracket showed minimal surface irregularity. Ceramic with metal slot brackets showed a

  7. Topographic and chemical surface modifications to metal brackets after a period in the mouth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houb-Dine, Afaf; Bahije, Loubna; Oualalou, Youssef; Benyahia, Hicham; Zaoui, Fatima

    2017-09-01

    In the current state of our knowledge, the effects of corrosion on the performance of orthodontic appliances and on patient health are far from clear. Awareness of these problems has led to a growing demand for nickel-free products. Titanium brackets were recently launched on the market as an alternative to stainless-steel brackets. However, the use of fluorides for caries prevention creates a risk of corrosion of these titanium appliances. The aim of this study is to examine the corrosion of stainless-steel and titanium brackets in clinical orthodontic use, focusing on the impact of fluorine. After approval by the ethics committee and the informed consent of the patients, 30 candidates for multi-bracket treatment were selected on the basis of certain exclusion criteria. The patients were divided into 4 groups: group 1: titanium brackets and fluorine protection; group 2: titanium brackets without fluorine protection; group 3: stainless-steel brackets and fluorine protection; group 4: stainless-steel brackets without fluorine protection. Analysis of the brackets removed after 4months in the mouth, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with phase contrast, revealed a difference in the surface topography of the metal brackets and the presence of chromium coating on the surface of the titanium appliances. Copyright © 2017 CEO. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. A novel biomechanical model assessing continuous orthodontic archwire activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales, Christopher; Larson, Matthew; Grauer, Dan; Sheats, Rose; Stevens, Clarke; Ko, Ching-Chang

    2013-01-01

    Objective The biomechanics of a continuous archwire inserted into multiple orthodontic brackets is poorly understood. The purpose of this research was to apply the birth-death technique to simulate insertion of an orthodontic wire and consequent transfer of forces to the dentition in an anatomically accurate model. Methods A digital model containing the maxillary dentition, periodontal ligament (PDL), and surrounding bone was constructed from human computerized tomography data. Virtual brackets were placed on four teeth (central and lateral incisors, canine and first premolar), and a steel archwire (0.019″ × 0.025″) with a 0.5 mm step bend to intrude the lateral incisor was virtually inserted into the bracket slots. Forces applied to the dentition and surrounding structures were simulated utilizing the birth-death technique. Results The goal of simulating a complete bracket-wire system on accurate anatomy including multiple teeth was achieved. Orthodontic force delivered by the wire-bracket interaction was: central incisor 19.1 N, lateral incisor 21.9 N, and canine 19.9 N. Loading the model with equivalent point forces showed a different stress distribution in the PDL. Conclusions The birth-death technique proved to be a useful biomechanical simulation method for placement of a continuous archwire in orthodontic brackets. The ability to view the stress distribution throughout proper anatomy and appliances advances understanding of orthodontic biomechanics. PMID:23374936

  9. Comparative evaluation of nickel discharge from brackets in artificial saliva at different time intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jithesh, C; Venkataramana, V; Penumatsa, Narendravarma; Reddy, S N; Poornima, K Y; Rajasigamani, K

    2015-08-01

    To determine and compare the potential difference of nickel release from three different orthodontic brackets, in different artificial pH, in different time intervals. Twenty-seven samples of three different orthodontic brackets were selected and grouped as 1, 2, and 3. Each group was divided into three subgroups depending on the type of orthodontic brackets, salivary pH and the time interval. The Nickel release from each subgroup were analyzed by using inductively coupled plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrophotometer (Perkin Elmer, Optima 2100 DV, USA) model. Quantitative analysis of nickel was performed three times, and the mean value was used as result. ANOVA (F-test) was used to test the significant difference among the groups at 0.05 level of significance (P brackets have the highest at all 4.2 pH except in 120 h. The study result shows that the nickel release from the recycled stainless steel brackets is highest. Metal slot ceramic bracket release significantly less nickel. So, recycled stainless steel brackets should not be used for nickel allergic patients. Metal slot ceramic brackets are advisable.

  10. Motivational Goal Bracketing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nafziger, Julia; Koch, Alexander

    It is a puzzle why people often evaluate consequences of choices separately (narrow bracketing) rather than jointly (broad bracketing). We study the hypothesis that a present-biased individual, who faces two tasks, may bracket his goals narrowly for motivational reasons. Goals motivate because th...... of the tasks. Narrow goals have a stronger motivational force and thus can be optimal. In particular, if one task outcome becomes known before working on the second task, narrow bracketing is always optimal.......It is a puzzle why people often evaluate consequences of choices separately (narrow bracketing) rather than jointly (broad bracketing). We study the hypothesis that a present-biased individual, who faces two tasks, may bracket his goals narrowly for motivational reasons. Goals motivate because...

  11. Friction behavior of ceramic injection-molded (CIM) brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann, Susanne; Bourauel, Christoph; Weber, Anna; Dirk, Cornelius; Lietz, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Bracket material, bracket design, archwire material, and ligature type are critical modifiers of friction behavior during archwire-guided movement of teeth. We designed this in vitro study to compare the friction losses of ceramic injection-molded (CIM) versus pressed-ceramic (PC) and metal injection-molded (MIM) brackets-used with different ligatures and archwires-during archwire-guided retraction of a canine. Nine bracket systems were compared, including five CIM (Clarity™ and Clarity™ ADVANCED, both by 3M Unitek; discovery(®) pearl by Dentaurum; Glam by Forestadent; InVu by TP Orthodontics), two PC (Inspire Ice by Ormco; Mystique by DENTSPLY GAC), and two MIM (discovery(®) and discovery(®) smart, both by Dentaurum) systems. All of these were combined with archwires made of either stainless steel or fiberglass-reinforced resin (remanium(®) ideal arch or Translucent pearl ideal arch, both by Dentaurum) and with elastic ligatures or uncoated or coated stainless steel (all by Dentaurum). Archwire-guided retraction of a canine was simulated with a force of 0.5 N in the orthodontic measurement and simulation system (OMSS). Friction loss was determined by subtracting the effective orthodontic forces from the applied forces. Based on five repeated measurements performed on five brackets each, weighted means were calculated and evaluated by analysis of variance and a Bonferroni post hoc test with a significance level of 0.05. Friction losses were significantly (p brackets used with a stainless-steel ligature and the resin archwire. No critical difference to friction behavior was apparent between the various manufacturing technologies behind the bracket systems.

  12. Study of force loss due to friction comparing two ceramic brackets during sliding tooth movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSubaie, Mai; Talic, Nabeel; Khawatmi, Said; Alobeid, Ahmad; Bourauel, Christoph; El-Bialy, Tarek

    2016-09-01

    To compare the percentage of force loss generated during canine sliding movements in newly introduced ceramic brackets with metal brackets. Two types of ceramic brackets, namely polycrystalline alumina (PCA) ceramic brackets (Clarity Advanced) and monocrystalline alumina (MCA) ceramic brackets (Inspire Ice) were compared with stainless steel (SS) brackets (Victory Series). All bracket groups (n = 5 each) were for the maxillary canines and had a 0.018-inch slot size. The brackets were mounted on an Orthodontic Measurement and Simulation System (OMSS) to simulate the canine retraction movement into the first premolar extraction space. Using elastic ligatures, 0.016 × 0.022″ (0.40 × 0.56 mm) stainless steel archwires were ligated onto the brackets. Retraction force was applied via a nickel-titanium coil spring with a nearly constant force of approximately 1 N. The OMSS measured the percentage of force loss over the retraction path by referring to the difference between the applied retraction force and actual force acting on each bracket. Between group comparisons were done with one-way analysis of variance. The metal brackets revealed the lowest percentage of force loss due to friction, followed by the PCA and MCA ceramic bracket groups (67 ± 4, 68 ± 7, and 76 ± 3 %, respectively). There was no significant difference between SS and PCA brackets (p = 0.97), but we did observe significant differences between metal and MCA brackets (p = 0.03) and between PCA and MCA ceramic brackets (p = 0.04). PCA ceramic brackets, whose slot surface is covered with an yttria-stabilized zirconia-based coating exhibited frictional properties similar to those of metal brackets. Frictional resistance resulted in an over 60 % loss of the applied force due to the use of elastic ligatures.

  13. Orthodontics at a Pivotal Point of Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jeremy J.

    2014-01-01

    The profession of orthodontics is projected to face a multitude of challenges. Do cyclic forces accelerate the rate of tooth movement and hence the speed of orthodontic treatment? Would bioengineered cementum and dentine be a solution to root resorption? What would orthodontics be like when bioengineered periodontal ligament and alveolar bone become clinical practice, or one day, entire teeth are bioengineered? Would it be possible to selectively differentiate stem cells into osteoblasts or osteoclasts by either static or cyclic forces? What is the new demand on orthodontic expertise with increasingly automated appliances? What will be the impact of the next generation of dental implants or rapid prototyped crowns on orthodontics? A century ago, Edward Angle’s practice of fixed appliances, along with other seminal contributions, such as functional appliances, established the profession of orthodontics. Today, the biophysical principles of orthodontics remain largely unchanged from Angle’s era, despite incremental refinements of brackets and wires. The paucity of fundamental innovations in orthodontics for decades presents intrinsic risks for the profession. This review will identify challenges for contemporary orthodontics and delineate strategies for the profession to evolve in an era of unprecedented scientific and technological advances, and serve as a call to action for the orthodontic profession. PMID:25018618

  14. Periodontally accelerated osteogenic orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh Mohanlal Bhandari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report demonstrates an orthodontic method that offers short treatment time and the ability to simultaneously reshape and increase the buccolingual thickness of the supporting alveolar bone. A 23-year-old female with Angle′s Class I moderately to severely crowded malocclusion with periodontal pocket with 31 and reduced thickness of the buccal cortical plate of lower anteriors, requested shortened orthodontic treatment time. This surgery technique included buccal full-thickness flaps, selective partial decortication of the cortical plates, concomitant bone grafting/augmentation, and primary flap closure. Following the surgery, orthodontic adjustments were made approximately every 2 weeks. From bracketing to debracketing, the case was completed in approximately 7 months and 3 weeks. Posttreatment evaluation of patient revealed good results. Preexisting thin labial bony cortical plate with lower anteriors was covered. This finding suggests credence to the incorporation of the bone augmentation procedure into the corticotomy surgery because this made it possible to complete the orthodontic treatment with a more intact periodontium. The rapid expansive tooth movements with no significant apical root resorption may be attributed to the osteoclastic or catabolic phase of the regional acceleratory phenomenon.

  15. Esthetic perception of orthodontic appliances by Brazilian children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, Deise Caldas; Lima, Tatiana Araújo de; Duplat, Candice Belchior; Capelli, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this present study was to understand how children and adolescents perceive esthetic attractiveness of a variety of orthodontic appliances. It also analyzed preferences according to patients' age, sex and socioeconomic status. A photograph album consisting of eight photographs of different orthodontic appliances and clear tray aligners placed in a consenting adult with pleasing smile was used. A sample of children or adolescents aged between 8 and 17 years old (n = 276) was asked to rate each image for its attractiveness on a visual analog scale. Comparisons between the appliances attractiveness were performed by means of nonparametric statistics with Friedman's test followed by Dunn's multiple comparison post-hoc test. Correlation between appliances and individuals' socioeconomic status, age, sex, and esthetic perception was assessed by means of Spearman's correlation analysis. Attractiveness ratings of orthodontic appliances varied nonsignificantly for children in the following hierarchy: traditional metallic brackets with green elastomeric ligatures > traditional metallic brackets with gray elastomeric ligatures > sapphire esthetic brackets; and for adolescents, as follows: sapphire esthetic brackets > clear aligner without attachments > traditional metallic brackets with green elastomeric ligatures. The correlation between individuals' socioeconomic status and esthetic perception of a given appliance was negative and statistically significant for appliances such as the golden orthodontic brackets and traditional metallic brackets with green elastomeric ligatures. Metal appliances were considered very attractive, whereas aligners were classified as less attractive by children and adolescents. The correlation between esthetic perception and socioeconomic status revealed that individuals with a higher socioeconomic level judged esthetics as the most attractive attribute. For those with higher economic status, golden orthodontic brackets and

  16. Esthetic perception of orthodontic appliances by Brazilian children and adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, Deise Caldas; de Lima, Tatiana Araújo; Duplat, Candice Belchior; Capelli, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The objective of this present study was to understand how children and adolescents perceive esthetic attractiveness of a variety of orthodontic appliances. It also analyzed preferences according to patients' age, sex and socioeconomic status. Methods: A photograph album consisting of eight photographs of different orthodontic appliances and clear tray aligners placed in a consenting adult with pleasing smile was used. A sample of children or adolescents aged between 8 and 17 years old (n = 276) was asked to rate each image for its attractiveness on a visual analog scale. Comparisons between the appliances attractiveness were performed by means of nonparametric statistics with Friedman's test followed by Dunn's multiple comparison post-hoc test. Correlation between appliances and individuals' socioeconomic status, age, sex, and esthetic perception was assessed by means of Spearman's correlation analysis. Results: Attractiveness ratings of orthodontic appliances varied nonsignificantly for children in the following hierarchy: traditional metallic brackets with green elastomeric ligatures > traditional metallic brackets with gray elastomeric ligatures > sapphire esthetic brackets; and for adolescents, as follows: sapphire esthetic brackets > clear aligner without attachments > traditional metallic brackets with green elastomeric ligatures. The correlation between individuals' socioeconomic status and esthetic perception of a given appliance was negative and statistically significant for appliances such as the golden orthodontic brackets and traditional metallic brackets with green elastomeric ligatures. Conclusion: Metal appliances were considered very attractive, whereas aligners were classified as less attractive by children and adolescents. The correlation between esthetic perception and socioeconomic status revealed that individuals with a higher socioeconomic level judged esthetics as the most attractive attribute. For those with higher

  17. Esthetic perception of orthodontic appliances by Brazilian children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deise Caldas Kuhlman

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: The objective of this present study was to understand how children and adolescents perceive esthetic attractiveness of a variety of orthodontic appliances. It also analyzed preferences according to patients' age, sex and socioeconomic status. Methods: A photograph album consisting of eight photographs of different orthodontic appliances and clear tray aligners placed in a consenting adult with pleasing smile was used. A sample of children or adolescents aged between 8 and 17 years old (n = 276 was asked to rate each image for its attractiveness on a visual analog scale. Comparisons between the appliances attractiveness were performed by means of nonparametric statistics with Friedman's test followed by Dunn's multiple comparison post-hoc test. Correlation between appliances and individuals' socioeconomic status, age, sex, and esthetic perception was assessed by means of Spearman's correlation analysis. Results: Attractiveness ratings of orthodontic appliances varied nonsignificantly for children in the following hierarchy: traditional metallic brackets with green elastomeric ligatures > traditional metallic brackets with gray elastomeric ligatures > sapphire esthetic brackets; and for adolescents, as follows: sapphire esthetic brackets > clear aligner without attachments > traditional metallic brackets with green elastomeric ligatures. The correlation between individuals' socioeconomic status and esthetic perception of a given appliance was negative and statistically significant for appliances such as the golden orthodontic brackets and traditional metallic brackets with green elastomeric ligatures. Conclusion: Metal appliances were considered very attractive, whereas aligners were classified as less attractive by children and adolescents. The correlation between esthetic perception and socioeconomic status revealed that individuals with a higher socioeconomic level judged esthetics as the most attractive attribute. For those

  18. Nd:YAG Laser-aided ceramic brackets debonding: Effects on shear bond strength and enamel surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xianglong; Liu, Xiaolin; Bai, Ding; Meng, Yao; Huang, Lan

    2008-11-01

    In order to evaluate the efficiency of Nd:YAG laser-aided ceramic brackets debonding technique, both ceramic brackets and metallic brackets were bonded with orthodontic adhesive to 30 freshly extracted premolars. The specimens were divided into three groups, 10 in each, according to the brackets employed and the debonding techniques used: (1) metallic brackets with shear debonding force, (2) ceramic brackets with shear debonding force, and (3) ceramic brackets with Nd:YAG laser irradiation. The result showed that laser irradiation could diminish shear bond strength (SBS) significantly and produce the most desired ARI scores. Moreover, scanning electron microscopy investigation displayed that laser-aided technique induced little enamel scratch or loss. It was concluded that Nd:YAG laser could facilitate the debonding of ceramic brackets and diminish the amount of remnant adhesive without damaging enamel structure.

  19. Nd:YAG Laser-aided ceramic brackets debonding: Effects on shear bond strength and enamel surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Xianglong; Liu Xiaolin; Bai Ding; Meng Yao; Huang Lan

    2008-01-01

    In order to evaluate the efficiency of Nd:YAG laser-aided ceramic brackets debonding technique, both ceramic brackets and metallic brackets were bonded with orthodontic adhesive to 30 freshly extracted premolars. The specimens were divided into three groups, 10 in each, according to the brackets employed and the debonding techniques used: (1) metallic brackets with shear debonding force, (2) ceramic brackets with shear debonding force, and (3) ceramic brackets with Nd:YAG laser irradiation. The result showed that laser irradiation could diminish shear bond strength (SBS) significantly and produce the most desired ARI scores. Moreover, scanning electron microscopy investigation displayed that laser-aided technique induced little enamel scratch or loss. It was concluded that Nd:YAG laser could facilitate the debonding of ceramic brackets and diminish the amount of remnant adhesive without damaging enamel structure

  20. Nd:YAG Laser-aided ceramic brackets debonding: Effects on shear bond strength and enamel surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han Xianglong [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Department of Orthodontics, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Liu Xiaolin [Department of Orthodontics, Stomatology Hospital, Dalian University, Dalian 116021 (China); Bai Ding [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Department of Orthodontics, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)], E-mail: baiding88@hotmail.com; Meng Yao; Huang Lan [Department of Orthodontics, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2008-11-15

    In order to evaluate the efficiency of Nd:YAG laser-aided ceramic brackets debonding technique, both ceramic brackets and metallic brackets were bonded with orthodontic adhesive to 30 freshly extracted premolars. The specimens were divided into three groups, 10 in each, according to the brackets employed and the debonding techniques used: (1) metallic brackets with shear debonding force, (2) ceramic brackets with shear debonding force, and (3) ceramic brackets with Nd:YAG laser irradiation. The result showed that laser irradiation could diminish shear bond strength (SBS) significantly and produce the most desired ARI scores. Moreover, scanning electron microscopy investigation displayed that laser-aided technique induced little enamel scratch or loss. It was concluded that Nd:YAG laser could facilitate the debonding of ceramic brackets and diminish the amount of remnant adhesive without damaging enamel structure.

  1. Electropolishing-Orthodontic Office: A Simplified Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir Munjal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Electropolishing plays an important role in dentistry by providing enhanced mechanical properties, better corrosion protection, physical appearance and ease of cleaning various metallic attachments. To achieve all these objectives, we present here a simple and economical way to fabricate a electropolisher which has wide applications in orthodontic office (recycle brackets, anneal retention wires, etc..

  2. Orthodontic treatment: Introducing finite element analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driel, W.D. van; Leeuwen, E.J. van

    1998-01-01

    The aim of orthodontic treatment is the displacement of teeth by means ofspecial appliances, like braces and brackets. Through these appliances the orthodontist can apply a set of forces to the teeth which wilt result in its displacement through the jawbone. Finite Element analysis of this process

  3. Generalized Moshinsky bracket recurrence relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevelacqua, J.J.

    1979-01-01

    Recurrence relations for generalized Talmi-Moshinsky brackets are derived. These relations permit the generation of transformation brackets once appropriate starting brackets are determined. The savings in computer time, when compared with generating brackets individually, is at least a factor of 10 for brackets with radial quantum numbers as large as 9 and angular quantum numbers as large as 2. (author)

  4. Forces in the presence of ceramic versus stainless steel brackets with unconventional vs conventional ligatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccetti, Tiziano; Franchi, Lorenzo; Camporesi, Matteo

    2008-01-01

    To compare the forces resulting from four types of bracket/ligature combinations: ceramic brackets and stainless steel brackets combined with unconventional elastomeric ligatures (UEL) and conventional elastomeric ligatures (CEL) during the leveling and aligning phases of orthodontic therapy. The testing model consisted of five 0.022-inch preadjusted brackets (second premolar, first premolar, canine, lateral incisor, and central incisor) for each of the two bracket types. The canine bracket was welded to a sliding bar that allowed for different amounts of offset in the gingival direction. The forces generated by a 0.014-inch superelastic nickel titanium wire in the presence of either the UEL or CEL bracket/ligature systems at different amounts of upward canine misalignment (1.5 mm, 3 mm, 4.5 mm, and 6 mm) were recorded. Significant differences were found between UEL and CEL systems for all tested variables (P < .01) with the exception of the canine misalignment of 1.5 mm. The average amount of recorded force in the presence of CEL was negligible with 3.0 mm or greater of canine misalignment. On the contrary, during alignment, a force available for tooth movement was recorded in the presence of both ceramic and stainless steel brackets when associated with UEL. The type of ligature used influenced the actual amount of force released by the orthodontic system significantly more than the type of bracket used (stainless steel vs ceramic).

  5. Friction between various self-ligating brackets and archwire couples during sliding mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanos, Sennay; Secchi, Antonino G; Coby, Guy; Tanna, Nipul; Mante, Francis K

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the frictional resistance between active and passive self-ligating brackets and 0.019 × 0.025-in stainless steel archwire during sliding mechanics by using an orthodontic sliding simulation device. Maxillary right first premolar active self-ligating brackets In-Ovation R, In-Ovation C (both, GAC International, Bohemia, NY), and SPEED (Strite Industries, Cambridge, Ontario, Canada), and passive self-ligating brackets SmartClip (3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif), Synergy R (Rocky Mountain Orthodontics, Denver, Colo), and Damon 3mx (Ormco, Orange, Calif) with 0.022-in slots were used. Frictional force was measured by using an orthodontic sliding simulation device attached to a universal testing machine. Each bracket-archwire combination was tested 30 times at 0° angulation relative to the sliding direction. Statistical comparisons were performed with 1-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Dunn multiple comparisons. The level of statistical significance was set at P <0.05. The Damon 3mx brackets had significantly the lowest mean static frictional force (8.6 g). The highest mean static frictional force was shown by the SPEED brackets (83.1 g). The other brackets were ranked as follows, from highest to lowest, In-Ovation R, In-Ovation C, SmartClip, and Synergy R. The mean static frictional forces were all statistically different. The ranking of the kinetic frictional forces of bracket-archwire combinations was the same as that for static frictional forces. All bracket-archwire combinations showed significantly different kinetic frictional forces except SmartClip and In-Ovation C, which were not significantly different from each other. Passive self-ligating brackets have lower static and kinetic frictional resistance than do active self-ligating brackets with 0.019 × 0.025-in stainless steel wire. Copyright © 2010 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Influence of various surface-conditioning methods on the bond strength of metal brackets to ceramic surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmage, P; Nergiz, [No Value; Herrmann, W; Ozcan, M; Nergiz, Ibrahim; �zcan, Mutlu

    With the increase in adult orthodontic treatment comes the need to find a reliable method for bonding orthodontic brackets onto metal or ceramic crowns and fixed partial dentures. In this study, shear bond strength and surface roughness tests were used to examine the effect of 4 different surface

  7. Shear bond strength and debonding characteristics of metal and ceramic brackets bonded with conventional acid-etch and self-etch primer systems: An in-vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzakouchaki, Behnam; Shirazi, Sajjad; Sharghi, Reza; Shirazi, Samaneh; Moghimi, Mahsan; Shahrbaf, Shirin

    2016-02-01

    Different in-vitro studies have reported various results regarding shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets when SEP technique is compared to conventional system. This in-vivo study was designed to compare the effect of conventional acid-etching and self-etching primer adhesive (SEP) systems on SBS and debonding characteristics of metal and ceramic orthodontic brackets. 120 intact first maxillary and mandibular premolars of 30 orthodontic patients were selected and bonded with metal and ceramic brackets using conventional acid-etch or self-etch primer system. The bonded brackets were incorporated into the wire during the study period to simulate the real orthodontic treatment condition. The teeth were extracted and debonded after 30 days. The SBS, debonding characteristics and adhesive remnant indices (ARI) were determined in all groups. The mean SBS of metal brackets was 10.63±1.42 MPa in conventional and 9.38±1.53 MPa in SEP system, (P=0.004). No statistically significant difference was noted between conventional and SEP systems in ceramic brackets. The frequency of 1, 2 and 3 ARI scores and debonding within the adhesive were the most common among all groups. No statistically significant difference was observed regarding ARI or failure mode of debonded specimens in different brackets or bonding systems. The SBS of metal brackets bonded using conventional system was significantly higher than SEP system, although the SBS of SEP system was clinically acceptable. No significant difference was found between conventional and SEP systems used with ceramic brackets. Total SBS of metal brackets was significantly higher than ceramic brackets. Due to adequate SBS of SEP system in bonding the metal brackets, it can be used as an alternative for conventional system. Shear bond strength, Orthodontic brackets, Adhesive remnant index, self-etch.

  8. Bracket for photovoltaic modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciasulli, John; Jones, Jason

    2014-06-24

    Brackets for photovoltaic ("PV") modules are described. In one embodiment, a saddle bracket has a mounting surface to support one or more PV modules over a tube, a gusset coupled to the mounting surface, and a mounting feature coupled to the gusset to couple to the tube. The gusset can have a first leg and a second leg extending at an angle relative to the mounting surface. Saddle brackets can be coupled to a torque tube at predetermined locations. PV modules can be coupled to the saddle brackets. The mounting feature can be coupled to the first gusset and configured to stand the one or more PV modules off the tube.

  9. Prototype to measure bracket debonding force in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jéssika Lagni Tonus

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Material biodegradation that occurs in the mouth may interfere in the bonding strength between the bracket and the enamel, causing lower bond strength values in vivo, in comparison with in vitro studies. Objective: To develop a prototype to measure bracket debonding force in vivo and to evaluate, in vitro, the bond strength obtained with the prototype. Methods: A original plier (3M Unitek was modified by adding one strain gauge directly connected to its claw. An electronic circuit performed the reading of the strain gauge, and the software installed in a computer recorded the values of the bracket debonding force, in kgf. Orthodontic brackets were bonded to the facial surface of 30 bovine incisors with adhesive materials. In Group 1 (n = 15, debonding was carried out with the prototype, while tensile bond strength testing was performed in Group 2 (n = 15. A universal testing machine was used for the second group. The adhesive remnant index (ARI was recorded. Results: According to Student’s t test (α = 0.05, Group 1 (2.96 MPa and Group 2 (3.08 MPa were not significantly different. ARI score of 3 was predominant in the two groups. Conclusion: The prototype proved to be reliable for obtaining in vivo bond strength values for orthodontic brackets.

  10. Prototype to measure bracket debonding force in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonus, Jéssika Lagni; Manfroi, Fernanda Borguetti; Borges, Gilberto Antonio; Grigolo, Eduardo Correa; Helegda, Sérgio; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Material biodegradation that occurs in the mouth may interfere in the bonding strength between the bracket and the enamel, causing lower bond strength values in vivo, in comparison with in vitro studies. Objective: To develop a prototype to measure bracket debonding force in vivo and to evaluate, in vitro, the bond strength obtained with the prototype. Methods: A original plier (3M Unitek) was modified by adding one strain gauge directly connected to its claw. An electronic circuit performed the reading of the strain gauge, and the software installed in a computer recorded the values of the bracket debonding force, in kgf. Orthodontic brackets were bonded to the facial surface of 30 bovine incisors with adhesive materials. In Group 1 (n = 15), debonding was carried out with the prototype, while tensile bond strength testing was performed in Group 2 (n = 15). A universal testing machine was used for the second group. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was recorded. Results: According to Student’s t test (α = 0.05), Group 1 (2.96 MPa) and Group 2 (3.08 MPa) were not significantly different. ARI score of 3 was predominant in the two groups. Conclusion: The prototype proved to be reliable for obtaining in vivo bond strength values for orthodontic brackets. PMID:28444011

  11. Influence of optical properties of esthetic brackets (color, translucence, and fluorescence) on visual perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes Filho, Hibernon; Maia, Lúcio E G; Araújo, Marcus Vinicius A; Ruellas, Antônio Carlos O

    2012-04-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the optical properties of esthetic brackets and determine their influence on visual perception. Eighty esthetic brackets of 16 commercial brands were tested. The color and translucency of the brackets, as well as the color of the maxillary central incisors of 40 subjects, were measured with a spectrophotometer. The fluorescence of the brackets was determined by duly calibrated appraisers. The color differences between the brands of brackets and the teeth were calculated. Data were analyzed by using 1-way analysis of variance; the Scheffé multiple comparison test was used to establish the difference between brands of brackets, (α = 0.05). The color parameters L ∗ a ∗ b ∗ of nontranslucent brackets ranged from 49.4 to 86.0, -1.6 to 3.0, and 1.9 to 14.6, respectively. The direct transmission of light ranged from 0.0% to 38.8% transmittance. No bracket showed fluorescence. The color and translucency, as well as the color difference, of the brackets were influenced by brand (P perception; translucent brackets and the nontranslucent InVu (TP Orthodontics, LaPorte, Ind) brackets were less visually perceptible. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of Micro-organism in Ligated Metal and Self-ligating Brackets using Scanning Electron Microscopy: An In Vivo Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunil, P C; Michael, Tony; Raju, Aravind S; Paul, Renji K; Mamatha, J; Ebin, T M

    2015-07-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the sites of plaque accumulation and to compare the plaque accumulated with metal and self-ligating orthodontic brackets in order to know which bracket type had a higher plaque retaining capacity. The study was done on 20 subjects who were scheduled for orthodontic treatment including extraction of four premolars and fixed orthodontic appliances. Mesh-backed edgewise metal brackets ligated with steel ligatures and self-ligating brackets were bonded to the premolars to be extracted using composite (Transbond XT, 3M). The subjects were told to continue their normal oral hygiene regimen. Teeth were extracted at 1, 2, and 3 weeks after bracket bonding. Plaque attached to the buccal surfaces was stained using plaque disclosing agent. The teeth were then immersed in fixative containing 4% formaldehyde and 1% glutaraldehyde in phosphate buffer for 24 h, followed by 0.1 M phosphate buffer for 12 h. The specimens were then mounted on aluminum stubs, and sputter coated with gold prior to Scanning electron microscopy examination. The results showed that increased retention of plaque in metal brackets ligated with steel ligatures and comparatively less in self-ligating brackets at the base of the brackets. This study highlights that higher retention of plaque in metal brackets ligated with steel ligatures and comparatively less plaque retention in self-ligating brackets. Excess composite around the bracket base is the critical site of plaque accumulation associated with fixed appliances due to its rough surface texture.

  13. Enamel shear bond strength of two orthodontic self-etching bonding systems compared to Transbond™ XT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellak, Andreas; Rusdea, Patrick; Schauseil, Michael; Stein, Steffen; Korbmacher-Steiner, Heike Maria

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) and Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) scores of two self-etching no-mix adhesives (Prompt L-Pop™ and Scotchbond™) for orthodontic appliances to the commonly used total etch system Transbond XT™ (in combination with phosphoric acid). In all, 60 human premolars were randomly divided into three groups of 20 specimens each. In group 1 (control), brackets were bonded with Transbond™ XT primer. Prompt L-Pop™ (group 2) and Scotchbond™ Universal (group 3) were used in the experimental groups. Lower premolar brackets were bonded by light curing the adhesive. After 24 h of storage, the shear bond strength (SBS) was measured using a Zwicki 1120 testing machine. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was determined under 10× magnification. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to statistically compare the SBS and the ARI scores. No significant differences in the SBS between any of the experimental groups were detected (group 1: 15.49 ± 3.28 MPa; group 2: 13.89 ± 4.95 MPa; group 3: 14.35 ± 3.56 MPa; p = 0.489), nor were there any significant differences in the ARI scores (p = 0.368). Using the two self-etching no-mix adhesives (Prompt L-Pop™ and Scotchbond™) for orthodontic appliances does not affect either the SBS or ARI scores in comparison with the commonly used total-etch system Transbond™ XT. In addition, Scotchbond™ Universal supports bonding on all types of surfaces (enamel, metal, composite, and porcelain) with no need for additional primers. It might therefore be helpful for simplifying bonding in orthodontic procedures.

  14. Six-month bracket failure rate with a flowable composite: A split-mouth randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sindhuja Krishnan

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: The use of flowable composites as an orthodontic bonding adhesive merits great attention because of their adequate bond strength, ease of clinical handling and reduced number of steps in bonding. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this Randomized Controlled Trial was to comparatively evaluate over a 6-month period the bond failure rate of a flowable composite (Heliosit Orthodontic, Ivoclar Vivadent AG, Schaan and a conventional orthodontic bonding adhesive (Transbond XT, 3M Unitek. METHODS: 53 consecutive patients (23 males and 30 females who fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria were included in the study. A total of 891 brackets were analyzed, where 444 brackets were bonded using Heliosit Orthodontic and 447 brackets were bonded using Transbond XT. The survival rates of brackets were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier analysis. Bracket survival distributions for bonding adhesives, tooth location and dental arch were compared with the log-rank test. RESULTS: The failure rates of the Transbond XT and the Heliosit Orthodontic groups were 8.1% and 6% respectively. No significant differences in the survival rates were observed between them (p= 0.242. There was no statistically significant difference in the bond failure rates when the clinical performance of the maxillary versus the mandibular arches and the anterior versus the posterior segments were compared. CONCLUSIONS: Both systems had clinically acceptable bond failure rates and are adequate for orthodontic bonding needs.

  15. Comparison of static friction with self-ligating, modified slot design and conventional brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Morais Castro

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare the static frictional forces generated at the bracket/wire interface of stainless steel brackets with different geometries and angulations, combined with orthodontic wires of different diameters. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The frictional forces were evaluated with three different types of metal brackets: a passive self-ligating (SmartClipTM, 3M/Unitek, Monrovia, USA, with a modified slot design (Mini Uni TwinTM, 3M/Unitek, Monrovia, USA and conventional (Kirium, Abzil, São José do Rio Preto, Brazil. The samples were mounted in a testing device with three different angulations and tested with 0.014" and 0.018" stainless steel wires (American Orthodontics, Sheboygan, USA. The static frictional force was measured using a universal testing machine (DL 500, EMIC®, São José dos Pinhais, Brazil with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Statistical analysis was performed by two-way ANOVA followed by Bonferroni's post hoc test. RESULTS: There was a significant difference (p<0.05 in static friction when the three types of brackets were tested with the same wire size. The wire diameter influenced friction only when the brackets had a 10º angulation (p<0.05. The angulation influenced friction (p<0.05 when the brackets were associated with a 0.018" wire. CONCLUSION: Brackets with a modified slot design showed intermediate static frictional force values between the conventional and self-ligating brackets tested.

  16. Bonding brackets to porcelain: in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sant'Anna Eduardo Franzotti

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to verify, in vitro, the effect of various porcelain surface treatments on the shear strength of orthodontic brackets bonded to porcelain and the mode of fracture after debonding. Eighty-eight samples of metallic supported feldspathic porcelain were randomly divided into four groups according to their surface preparation as follows: the porcelain was maintained intact (GI, roughened with a diamond bur (GII, etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid (GIII, or sandblasted with aluminum oxide (GIV. The specimens were treated with silane (Scothprime and brackets were bonded with Concise. Each sample was subjected to a shear load at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min and a recording was made at the point of failure. Bond strengths, adequate to withstand the application of orthodontic forces, were achieved in all groups. The Kruskal-Wallis statistical test showed no significant differences in bond strength between the groups (p>0.05. However, many more porcelain fractures occurred on deglazed porcelain. This study indicates that with the appropriate material selection, the silane/composite procedure alone may be adequate for bonding.

  17. Evaluation of the Friction of Self-Ligating and Conventional Bracket Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecco, Simona; Di Iorio, Donato; Nucera, Riccardo; Di Bisceglie, Beatrice; Cordasco, Giancarlo; Festa, Felice

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This in vitro study evaluated the friction (F) generated by aligned stainless steel (SS) conventional brackets, self-ligating Damon MX© brackets (SDS Ormco, Glendora, California, USA), Time3© brackets (American Orthodontics, Sheboygan, Wisconsin, USA), Vision LP© brackets (American Orthodontics), and low-friction Slide© ligatures (Leone, Firenze, Italy) coupled with various SS, nickel-titanium (NiTi), and beta-titanium (TMA) archwires. Methods: All brackets had a 0.022-inch slot, and the orthodontic archwires were 0.014-inch, 0.016-inch, 0.014×0.025-inch, 0.018×0.025-inch, and 0.019×0.025-inch NiTi; 0.017×0.025-inch TMA; and 0.019×0.025-inch SS. Each bracket-archwire combination was tested 10 times. In the test, 10 brackets of the same group were mounted in alignment on a metal bar. The archwires moved through all the 10 brackets at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min (each run lasted approximately 5 min). The differences among 5 groups of brackets were analyzed through the Kruskal-Wallis test, and a Mann-Whitney test was calculated as post hoc analysis. The P value was set at 0.05. Results: Coupled with 0.014-inch NiTi and 0.016-inch NiTi, Victory Series© brackets generated the greatest F, while Damon MX© and Vision LP© brackets generated the lowest (Pbrackets and Slide© ligatures. Coupled with all the rectangular archwires, Victory Series© brackets, Slide© ligatures, and Vision LP© self-ligating brackets generated significantly lower F than did Time3© and Damon MX© self-ligating brackets (Pbrackets are a family of brackets that, in vitro, can generate different levels of F when coupled with thin or thick, rectangular, or round archwires. Clinical conclusions based on our results are not possible due to the limitations of the experimental conditions. PMID:21769273

  18. In vitro analysis of shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index comparing light curing and self-curing composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murilo Gaby Neves

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate, in vitro, the shear bond strength of self-curing (ConciseTM - 3M and Alpha Plast - DFL and light-curing composites (TransbondTM XT - 3M and Natural Ortho - DFL used in orthodontics bonding, associated to Morelli metal brackets, with further analysis of adhesive remnant index (ARI and enamel condition in scanning electron microscopy (SEM. METHODS: Forty human premolars, just extracted and stored in physiologic solution 0.9 % were used. Randomly, these samples were divided in four groups: G1 group, the brackets were bonded with ConciseTM - 3M composite; in G2 group, Alpha Plast - DFL composite was used; in G3 group, TransbondTM XT - 3M was used; in G4 group, Natural Ortho - DFL composite was used. These groups were submitted to shear strength tests in universal testing machine, at 0.5 mm per minute speed. RESULTS: Statistical difference between G3 and G4 groups was recorded, as G4 showing higher strength resistance than G3. In the other hand, there were no statistical differences between G1, G2 and G3 and G1, G2 and G4 groups. ARI analysis showed that there was no statistical difference between the groups, and low scores were recorded among then. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM analysis revealed the debonding spots and the enamel surface integrity. CONCLUSIONS: Shear bond strength was satisfactory and similar between the composites, however Natural Ortho - DFL revealed best comparing to TransbondTM XT - 3M.

  19. Effect of Adhesive Type on the Shear Bond Strength of Metal Brackets to Two Ceramic Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sadegh Ahmad Akhoundi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Increased number of adult patients requesting orthodontic treatment result in bonding bracket to ceramic restorations more than before. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded to two types of ceramic bases with conventional orthodontic bonding resin and a new nano-filled composite resin.Twenty four feldespathic porcelain and 24 lithium disilicate ceramic disks were fabricated. All of the samples were conditioned by sandblasting, hydrofluoric acid and silane. Maxillary incisor metal brackets were bonded to half of the disks in each group by conventional orthodontic bonding resin and the other half bonded with a nano-filled composite. The samples then were thermocycled for 2000 cycle between 5-55° C. Shear bond strength was measured and the mode of failure was examined. Randomly selected samples were also evaluated by SEM.The lowest bond strength value was found infeldespathic ceramic bonded by nano-filled composite (p<0.05. There was not any statistically significant difference between other groups regarding bond strength. The mode of failure in the all groups except group 1 was cohesive and porcelain damages were detected.Since less damages to feldspathic porcelain was observed when the nano-filled composite was used to bond brackets, the use of nano-filled composite resins can be suggested for bonding brackets to feldspathic porcelain restorations.

  20. A study in vitro on radiation effects by Er:YAG laser combined with the fluorine therapy in the acid resistance of the dental enamel submitted to orthodontical brackets; Um estudo in vitro sobre os efeitos da irradiacao pelo laser de Er:YAG combinado com a terapia com fluor na resistencia acida do esmalte de dentes submetidos a aparelho ortodontico fixo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshiyasu, Roseli Y A

    2001-07-01

    Several researches have been demonstrating an increase in the resistance acid of the enamel surface when irradiated by some lasers types as Nd:YAG, C0{sub 2}, Er:YAG, and others, mainly when combined with the fluoride therapy after the irradiation of the laser. This study in vitro used the laser of Er:YAG which density of energy of 8.1 J/cm{sup 2} on the enamel about of orthodontical brackets of teeth extracted pre-molars. These teeth were then submitted to a rich way in S. mutans for twenty one days. The cases were analyzed: (1) enamel surface without any treatment, (2) enamel surface without any irradiation laser, but with therapy with acidulated phosphate fluoride, (3) enamel surface irradiated with laser of Er:YAG and (4) enamel surface irradiated by laser of Er:YAG and with application of acidulated phosphate fluoride. The results were analyzed through optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The morphologic changes observed to the scanning electron microscopy suggest increase in the acid resistance of the enamel surface. However, to the optical microscopy, it was still possible to visualize undesirable white stains in the surface of the enamel. (author)

  1. [Bond strengths of customized titanium brackets manufactured by selective laser melting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Dao-xing; Wang, Ze-min; Guo, Hong-ming; Li, Song; Bai, Yu-xing

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the bond strengths of customized titanium bracket manufactured by selective laser melting. Eighty human premolars which had been extracted for orthodontic purpose were collected and divided randomly (by random table) into two groups (customized bracket group and 3M bracket group, 40 molars in each group). The 35% phosphoric acid was used for etching and the brackets were bonded with 3M Unitek bonding adhesive. All bonded specimens were placed in saline for 24 hours at room temperature and were tested on DWD3050 electronic testing machine to determine the shear bond strength and tensile bond strength. After debonding, the adhesive remnant indexes (ARI) were recorded. The shear bond strengths of customized brackets was 6.80 (6.20, 8.32) MPa, which was significantly lower than that of the 3M brackets [10.46 (9.72, 11.48) MPa] (Z = -3.463, P < 0.05). And the tensile bond strengths of customized brackets was (6.93 ± 1.21) MPa, which was significantly higher than that of the 3M brackets [(5.88 ± 1.23) MPa] (t = 2.81, P < 0.05). No significant difference was found in the ARI between two different kinds of the brackets. The shear bond strength and tensile bond strength of both kinds of brackets were enough for clinic application.

  2. An in vitro study into the efficacy of complex tooth alignment with conventional and self-ligating brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montasser, M A; Keilig, L; Bourauel, C

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of tooth alignment achieved by various small cross-section archwire/bracket combinations using the orthodontic measurement and simulation system. The study comprised three types of orthodontic brackets 1) conventional ligating (Victory Series and Mini-Taurus), 2) self-ligating (SmartClip a passive self-ligating bracket and Time3 an active self-ligating bracket), and 3) a conventional low-friction bracket (Synergy). All brackets had a nominal 0.022″ slot size. Brackets were combined with 1) 0.012″ stainless steel, 2) 0.012″ Orthonol, 3) 0.012″ Thermalloy, and 4) 0.0155″ coaxial archwires. Archwires were tied to the conventional brackets with stainless steel ligatures and elastomeric rings. The malocclusion simulated represented a central upper incisor displaced 2 mm gingivally (x-axis) and 2 mm labially (z-axis). The inciso-gingival correction achieved by the different archwire/bracket combinations ranged from 15 to 95%, while the labio-lingual correction ranged from 10 to 95%. The smallest correction was achieved by coaxial, Orthonol, and thermally archwires when ligated with the elastomeric rings to conventional brackets. Stainless steel archwires achieved from 65 to 90% of inciso-gingival correction and from 60 to 90% of labio-lingual correction. The resultant tooth alignment was the product of interaction between the archwire type, bracket type, and bracket design including ligature type. Small cross-sectional archwires might produce up to 95% correction if combined properly with the bracket system. Elastomeric rings when used with conventional brackets limit the efficacy of malalignment correction. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. A Comparative Evaluation of Adherence of Microorganism to Different Types of Brackets: A Scanning Electron Microscopic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashidhar, E P; Sahitya, M; Sunil, T; Murthy, Anup R; Rani, M S

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the adherence of microorganism to different types of brackets using the scanning electron microscope (SEM). A double-blinded study was undertaken to evaluate and adherence of microorganisms to different types of brackets using SEM. At random, 12 patients reporting for treatment to the department of Orthodontics VS Dental College and Hospital were selected. Four types of brackets were included in the present study stainless steel, titanium, composite, and ceramic. Brackets were bonded to teeth of the patient on all the four quadrants. The teeth included for bonding were lateral incisor, canine, first premolar, and second premolar. The brackets were left for 72 h. After 72 h brackets were debonded, and they were evaluated by SEM for adherence of microorganism in the slot and tie wings surface. The SEM images were graded, and the adherence of microorganism to the brackets in the surfaces and the four different quadrants were recorded. There is a significant difference in adherence of microorganisms to the various types of brackets (P 0.05) included in the study. The interaction of bracket/surface, bracket/quadrant, surface/quadrants was analyzed, there was no significance of comparison of bracket/surfaces/quadrant but the interaction of bracket/quadrant was found to be significant (bracket/surfaces/quadrant was also found to be significant (bracket material and the least adherence of microorganisms was observed with the titanium bracket material. The adherence of microorganisms is relatively more in the slot area, when compare to the tie wings surface maximum adherence of microorganism is observed in the upper left quadrant and least adherence of microorganism is observed in the lower right quadrant. There is a significant difference in adherence of microorganisms to various types of brackets and the surfaces included in the study. There is no significant difference in the adherence of microorganism to the bracket

  4. Dimensional accuracy of ceramic self-ligating brackets and estimates of theoretical torsional play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngran; Lee, Dong-Yul; Kim, Yoon-Ji R

    2016-09-01

    To ascertain the dimensional accuracies of some commonly used ceramic self-ligation brackets and the amount of torsional play in various bracket-archwire combinations. Four types of 0.022-inch slot ceramic self-ligating brackets (upper right central incisor), three types of 0.018-inch ceramic self-ligating brackets (upper right central incisor), and three types of rectangular archwires (0.016 × 0.022-inch beta-titanium [TMA] (Ormco, Orange, Calif), 0.016 × 0.022-inch stainless steel [SS] (Ortho Technology, Tampa, Fla), and 0.019 × 0.025-inch SS (Ortho Technology)) were measured using a stereomicroscope to determine slot widths and wire cross-sectional dimensions. The mean acquired dimensions of the brackets and wires were applied to an equation devised by Meling to estimate torsional play angle (γ). In all bracket systems, the slot tops were significantly wider than the slot bases (P brackets, and Clippy-Cs (Tomy, Futaba, Fukushima, Japan) among the 0.018-inch brackets. The Damon Clear (Ormco) bracket had the smallest dimensional error (0.542%), whereas the 0.022-inch Empower Clear (American Orthodontics, Sheboygan, Wis) bracket had the largest (3.585%). The largest amount of theoretical play is observed using the Empower Clear (American Orthodontics) 0.022-inch bracket combined with the 0.016 × 0.022-inch TMA wire (Ormco), whereas the least amount occurs using the 0.018 Clippy-C (Tomy) combined with 0.016 × 0.022-inch SS wire (Ortho Technology).

  5. Fluoride release and cariostatic potential of orthodontic adhesives with and without daily fluoride rinsing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chin, M.Y.; Sandham, A.; Rumachik, E.N.; Ruben, J.L.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In this study, we aimed to evaluate the fluoride-release profiles and caries lesion development in an enamel model with brackets cemented with 4 orthodontic adhesives with and without daily fluoride exposure. METHODS: Four orthodontic adhesives (Ketac Cem mu, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany;

  6. Fluoride release and cariostatic potential of orthodontic adhesives with and without daily fluoride rinsing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chin, Yeen; Sandham, John; Rumachik, Elena N.; Ruben, Jan L.; Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte D. N. J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: In this study, we aimed to evaluate the fluoride-release profiles and caries lesion development in an enamel model with brackets cemented with 4 orthodontic adhesives with and without daily fluoride exposure. Methods: Four orthodontic adhesives (Ketac Cem mu, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany;

  7. Spectrophotometric assessment of tooth bleaching under orthodontic braquets bonded with different materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Maria Lima de CASTRO

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction patients have been submitted to tooth bleaching during orthodontic treatment for aesthetic purposes or to anticipate the replacement of restorations after completion of the treatment. Objective to evaluate the effectiveness of tooth bleaching under orthodontic brackets bonded with different materials. Material and method a hundred bovine enamel blocks were divided into two groups, at-home and in-office tooth bleaching. In-office bleaching was subdivided into five groups (n = 10: HP (control - without brackets; SA(t - brackets bonded with Transbond XT, without bleaching; SA(fm - brackets bonded with Orthodontic Fill Magic, without bleaching; HP(t - brackets bonded with Transbond XT subjected to bleaching; and HP(fm - brackets bonded with Orthodontic Fill Magic subjected to bleaching. At-home bleaching followed the same treatments, only replacing the bleaching agent. Spectrophotometric assessment was used for tooth color determination at three moments: 1 before staining (baseline; 2 after staining; 3 after bonding the brackets and bleaching procedures. Data were submitted to ANOVA and analyzed by Tukey's test (p < 0.05. Result For both types of bleaching, the control group had an effective bleaching action. Groups using Transbond XT presented greater bleaching potential among the groups with orthodontic accessory, but the bleaching action differed from the positive control. Groups using Orthodontic Fill Magic presented no bleaching action, resembling the negative control groups (artificial saliva. Conclusion the orthodontic bracket impaired the effectiveness of the at-home and in-office bleaching treatment, regardless of the resin used for bonding.

  8. Using Little's Irregularity Index in orthodontics: outdated and inaccurate?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Macauley, Donal

    2012-12-01

    Little\\'s Irregularity Index (LII) was devised to objectively score mandibular incisor alignment for epidemiological studies but has been extended to assess the relative performance of orthodontic brackets, retainer or treatment modalities. Our aim was to examine the repeatability and precision of LII measurements of four independent examiners on the maxillary arch of orthodontic patients. The hypothesis was that the reproducibility of individual contact point displacement measurements, used to calculate the LII score, are inappropriate.

  9. Dental Extrusion with Orthodontic Miniscrew Anchorage: A Case Report Describing a Modified Method

    OpenAIRE

    Horliana, Ricardo Fidos; Horliana, Anna Carolina Ratto Tempestini; Wuo, Alexandre do Vale; Perez, Fl?vio Eduardo Guillin; Abr?o, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the skeletal anchorage through miniscrews has expanded the treatment options in orthodontics (Yamaguchi et al., 2012). We hereby present a modified method for tooth extrusion for cases where crown-lengthening surgery is contraindicated for aesthetic reasons. This modified method uses three orthodontic appliances: a mini-implant, an orthodontic wire, and a bracket. The aim of this case report was to increase the length of the clinical crown of a fractured tooth (tooth 23) by m...

  10. Fibrotic encapsulation of orthodontic appliance in palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthu, Jananni; Muthanandam, Sivaramakrishnan; Umapathy, Gubernath; Kannan, Anitha Logaranjani

    2017-01-01

    Iatrogenic trauma though not serious is very common in dental practice. Orthodontic treatment can inflict such injuries as they are prolonged over a long period of time. Ill-fabricated orthodontic appliances, such as wires and brackets, or the patients' habits such as application of constant pressure over the appliance can traumatize the adjacent oral soft tissues. In rare cases, these appliances can get embedded into the mucosa and gingival tissues. This case report describes one such case of iatrogenic trauma to the palatal mucosa due to entrapment of a tongue spike appliance and its surgical management.

  11. Orthodontic scars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Reddy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic therapy apart from its benefits also has potential risks and limitations in terms of tissue damage. Fortunately, in orthodontics, risks are minimal and infrequent However, all potential risks and limitations should be considered and addressed when making the decision to undergo orthodontic treatment. Orthodontic treatment carries with it the risk of various types of soft and hard tissue damages (e.g. decalcification of enamel, lacerations, ulcerations, temporomandibular joint disorders, etc-, apart from treatment failure in itself. If correcting a malocclusion is to be of benefit, the advantages offered should outweigh any possible damage- All preventive procedures should be considered during and after orthodontic treatment to restore the normal health of soft and hard tissues. Hence, the orthodontist should be vigilant and prudent enough in assessing and monitoring every aspect of these tissues at any given stage and time in order to achieve a healthy and successful final result.

  12. A novel antibacterial orthodontic cement containing a quaternary ammonium monomer dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Mary A.S.; Wu, Junling; Weir, Michael D.; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Demineralized lesions in tooth enamel around orthodontic brackets are caused by acids from cariogenic biofilm. This study aimed to develop a novel antibacterial orthodontic cement by incorporating a quaternary ammonium monomer dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMADDM) into a commercial orthodontic cement, and to investigate the effects on microcosm biofilm response and enamel bond strength. DMADDM, a recently-synthetized antibacterial monomer, was incorporated into orthodontic cement at 0%, 1.5%, 3% and 5% mass fractions. Bond strength of brackets to enamel was measured. A microcosm biofilm model was used to measure metabolic activity, lactic acid production, and colony-forming units (CFU) on orthodontic cements. Shear bond strength was not reduced at 3% DAMDDM (p > 0.1), but was slightly reduced at 5% DMADDM, compared to 0% DMADDM. Biofilm viability was substantially inhibited when in contact with orthodontic cement containing 3% DMADDM. Biofilm metabolic activity, lactic acid production, and CFU were much lower on orthodontic cement containing DMADDM than control cement (p orthodontic cement containing 3% DMADDM inhibited oral biofilms without compromising the enamel bond strength, and is promising to reduce or eliminate demineralization in enamel around orthodontic brackets. PMID:25035230

  13. Avaliação da atividade antimicrobiana de adesivo ortodôntico associado a verniz de clorexidina e timol na colagem de braquetes Evaluation of antimicrobial activity of orthodontic adhesive associated with chlorhexidine-thymol varnish in bracket bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Freire de Carvalho Calabrich

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar a atividade antimicrobiana da associação de um adesivo ortodôntico com um verniz de clorexidina e timol. MÉTODOS: foram utilizados 32 pré-molares humanos divididos em 4 grupos. O grupo 1 consistiu do grupo controle, no qual o adesivo utilizado para a colagem do braquete não estava associado a nenhum agente antimicrobiano. Os grupos 2, 3 e 4 foram colados com um sistema adesivo associado a um verniz de clorexidina e timol. Os grupos 3 e 4 foram armazenados em água por 7 dias e 30 dias, respectivamente, enquanto os corpos de prova do grupo 2 foram, logo depois da colagem, colocados em ágar semeado com Streptococcus mutans por 48h a 37ºC. RESULTADOS: os grupos experimentais, com exceção do grupo controle, apresentaram atividade antimicrobiana com tendência de redução do seu potencial de ação com maior tempo de imersão em água. CONCLUSÃO: a associação do verniz de clorexidina a um sistema adesivo utilizado em Ortodontia apresenta-se vantajosa pela sua atividade antimicrobiana.OBJECTIVE: To assess the antimicrobial activity resulting from the association of an orthodontic adhesive with chlorhexidine-thymol varnish. METHODS: Thirty-two extracted human premolars were used, divided into four groups. In Group 1, the control group, the adhesive used to bond the bracket was not associated with any antimicrobial agent. Groups 2, 3 and 4 were bonded with an adhesive system associated with chlorhexidine-thymol varnish. Groups 3 and 4 were stored in water for 7 days and 30 days, respectively, while the specimens from group 2 were, soon after bonding, placed on agar seeded with Streptococcus mutans for 48 hours, at 37º C. RESULTS: The experimental groups, with the exception of the control group, showed antimicrobial activity whose action tended to decline commensurately with the amount of time that they remained immersed in water. CONCLUSIONS: The association of chlorhexidine-thymol varnish with an adhesive system used in

  14. Modified precision lingual bonding technique: A step-wise approach with torque angulation device-bracket positioning device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosaline Tina Paul

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Contemporary preadjusted edgewise appliance is all about the precision in bracket design, prescription and positioning in addition to the orthodontist's skill and training. However, achieving it is a bigger challenge as the anatomy of the lingual surface of a tooth is uneven, dissimilar, and moreover the tooth alignment on the lingual surface is variant. Thus, the need for an accurate method of bracket positioning with predetermined torque and angulation incorporated in the brackets according to the patients' need is of key importance. Materials and Methods: A TAD-BPD machine used to enhance the accuracy of bracket positioning and bioplast accurate tray transfer technique was used. Results: A step-wise procedures in bracket positioning and fabricating an indirect bonding tray for lingual orthodontics using the torque angulation device-bracket positioning device. Conclusions: This technique facilitated unhindered bonding even in severely crowded cases and easy rebonding during mid-treatment stages.

  15. Therapeutic efficacy of self-ligating brackets: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehbi, Hasnaa; Azaroual, Mohamed Faouzi; Zaoui, Fatima; Halimi, Abdelali; Benyahia, Hicham

    2017-09-01

    Over the last few years, the use of self-ligating brackets in orthodontics has progressed considerably. These systems have been the subject of numerous studies with good levels of evidence making it possible to evaluate their efficacy and efficiency compared to conventional brackets. The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of self-ligating brackets by means of a systematic review of the scientific literature. A systematic study was undertaken in the form of a recent search of the electronic Pubmed database, oriented by the use of several keywords combined by Boolean operators relating to the therapeutic efficacy of self-ligating brackets through the study of tooth alignment, space closure, expansion, treatment duration and degree of discomfort. The search was limited to randomized controlled studies, and two independent readers identified studies corresponding to the selection criteria. The chosen articles comprised 20 randomized controlled trials. The studies analyzed revealed the absence of significant differences between the two types of system on the basis of the clinical criteria adopted, thereby refuting the hypothesis of the superiority of self-ligating brackets over conventional systems. Copyright © 2017 CEO. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Influência do agente clareador peróxido de carbamida a 10% na resistência mecânica da colagem de braquetes ortodônticos Influence of 10% carbamide peroxide gel on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgard Norões R. da Matta

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available O propósito deste estudo in vitro foi determinar a influência do agente clareador peróxido de carbamida a 10% na resistência mecânica da colagem de braquetes ortodônticos. Foram estudados três grupos denominados G1 (não submetido ao clareamento, G2 (com clareamento e colagem realizada 1 semana após e G3 (com clareamento e colagem realizada 24h após. O teste de cisalhamento foi conduzido na máquina de ensaios mecânicos Emic, com a velocidade de deformação de 0,5 mm/min.A resitência ao cisalhamento em relação à área de colagem foi calculada para cada dente e expressa em MPa. Os resultados mostraram aumento estatisticamente significante (pThe purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the influence of 10% carbamide peroxide gel on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets. Three group were studied: G1 (without bleaching, G2 (bleaching and bonding after 1 week and G3 (bleaching and bonding after 24h. The shear test was conduced in a Emic testing machine with a crosshead speed of 0,5 mm/min. The shear bond strength was calculated for each tooth and expressed in MPa. The results show enhance statistical significant (p<0,001 on the shear bond strength after bleaching and encreased with the time interval between bleaching and bonding, significantily.

  17. Poisson brackets of orthogonal polynomials

    OpenAIRE

    Cantero, María José; Simon, Barry

    2009-01-01

    For the standard symplectic forms on Jacobi and CMV matrices, we compute Poisson brackets of OPRL and OPUC, and relate these to other basic Poisson brackets and to Jacobians of basic changes of variable.

  18. Shear Bond Strength of Three Orthodontic Bonding Systems on Enamel and Restorative Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Hellak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this in vitro study was to determine the shear bond strength (SBS and adhesive remnant index (ARI score of two self-etching no-mix adhesives (iBond™ and Scotchbond™ on different prosthetic surfaces and enamel, in comparison with the commonly used total etch system Transbond XT™. Materials and Methods. A total of 270 surfaces (1 enamel and 8 restorative surfaces, n=30 were randomly divided into three adhesive groups. In group 1 (control brackets were bonded with Transbond XT primer. In the experimental groups iBond adhesive (group 2 and Scotchbond Universal adhesive (group 3 were used. The SBS was measured using a Zwicki 1120™ testing machine. The ARI and SBS were compared statistically using the Kruskal–Wallis test (P≤0.05. Results. Significant differences in SBS and ARI were found between the control group and experimental groups. Conclusions. Transbond XT showed the highest SBS on human enamel. Scotchbond Universal on average provides the best bonding on all other types of surface (metal, composite, and porcelain, with no need for additional primers. It might therefore be helpful for simplifying bonding in orthodontic procedures on restorative materials in patients. If metal brackets have to be bonded to a metal surface, the use of a dual-curing resin is recommended.

  19. Shear Bond Strength of Three Orthodontic Bonding Systems on Enamel and Restorative Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellak, Andreas; Ebeling, Jennifer; Schauseil, Michael; Stein, Steffen; Roggendorf, Matthias; Korbmacher-Steiner, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this in vitro study was to determine the shear bond strength (SBS) and adhesive remnant index (ARI) score of two self-etching no-mix adhesives (iBond ™ and Scotchbond ™ ) on different prosthetic surfaces and enamel, in comparison with the commonly used total etch system Transbond XT ™ . Materials and Methods . A total of 270 surfaces (1 enamel and 8 restorative surfaces, n = 30) were randomly divided into three adhesive groups. In group 1 (control) brackets were bonded with Transbond XT primer. In the experimental groups iBond adhesive (group 2) and Scotchbond Universal adhesive (group 3) were used. The SBS was measured using a Zwicki 1120 ™ testing machine. The ARI and SBS were compared statistically using the Kruskal-Wallis test ( P ≤ 0.05). Results . Significant differences in SBS and ARI were found between the control group and experimental groups. Conclusions . Transbond XT showed the highest SBS on human enamel. Scotchbond Universal on average provides the best bonding on all other types of surface (metal, composite, and porcelain), with no need for additional primers. It might therefore be helpful for simplifying bonding in orthodontic procedures on restorative materials in patients. If metal brackets have to be bonded to a metal surface, the use of a dual-curing resin is recommended.

  20. In vitro analysis of shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index of different metal brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda de Souza Henkin

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: There is a great variety of orthodontic brackets in the Brazilian market, and constantly evaluating them is critical for professionals to know their properties, so as to be able to choose which product best suits their clinical practice. Objectives: To evaluate the bond strength and the adhesive remnant index (ARI of different brands of metal brackets. Material and Methods: A total of 105 bovine incisors were used, and brackets of different brands were bonded to teeth. Seven different bracket brands were tested (MorelliTM, American OrthodonticsTM, TP OrthodonticsTM, Abzil-3MTM, OrthometricTM, TecnidentTM and UNIDENTM. Twenty-four hours after bonding, shear bond strength test was performed; and after debonding, the ARI was determined by using an optical microscope at a 10-fold increase. Results: Mean shear bond strength values ranged from 3.845 ± 3.997 (MorelliTM to 9.871 ± 5.106 MPa (TecnidentTM. The majority of the ARI index scores was 0 and 1. Conclusion: Among the evaluated brackets, the one with the lowest mean shear bond strength values was MorelliTM. General evaluation of groups indicated that a greater number of bond failure occurred at the enamel/adhesive interface.

  1. In vitro analysis of shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index of different metal brackets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkin, Fernanda de Souza; de Macêdo, Érika de Oliveira Dias; Santos, Karoline da Silva; Schwarzbach, Marília; Samuel, Susana Maria Werner; Mundstock, Karina Santos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: There is a great variety of orthodontic brackets in the Brazilian market, and constantly evaluating them is critical for professionals to know their properties, so as to be able to choose which product best suits their clinical practice. Objectives: To evaluate the bond strength and the adhesive remnant index (ARI) of different brands of metal brackets. Material and Methods: A total of 105 bovine incisors were used, and brackets of different brands were bonded to teeth. Seven different bracket brands were tested (MorelliTM, American OrthodonticsTM, TP OrthodonticsTM, Abzil-3MTM, OrthometricTM, TecnidentTM and UNIDENTM). Twenty-four hours after bonding, shear bond strength test was performed; and after debonding, the ARI was determined by using an optical microscope at a 10-fold increase. Results: Mean shear bond strength values ranged from 3.845 ± 3.997 (MorelliTM) to 9.871 ± 5.106 MPa (TecnidentTM). The majority of the ARI index scores was 0 and 1. Conclusion: Among the evaluated brackets, the one with the lowest mean shear bond strength values was MorelliTM. General evaluation of groups indicated that a greater number of bond failure occurred at the enamel/adhesive interface. PMID:28125142

  2. Comparison of Antibacterial Effects of ZnO and CuO Nanoparticles Coated Brackets against Streptococcus Mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramazanzadeh, Baratali; Jahanbin, Arezoo; Yaghoubi, Masoud; Shahtahmassbi, Nasser; Ghazvini, Kiarash; Shakeri, Mohammadtaghi; Shafaee, Hooman

    2015-09-01

    During the orthodontic treatment, microbial plaques may accumulate around the brackets and cause caries, especially in high-risk patients. Finding ways to eliminate this microbial plaque seems to be essential. The aim of this study was to compare the antibacterial effects of nano copper oxide (CuO) and nano zinc oxide (ZnO) coated brackets against Streptococcus mutans (S.mutans) in order to decrease the risk of caries around the orthodontic brackets during the treatment. Sixty brackets were coated with nanoparticles of ZnO (n=20), CuO (n=20) and CuO-ZnO (n=20). Twelve uncoated brackets constituted the control group. The brackets were bonded to the crowns of extracted premolars, sterilized and prepared for antimicrobial tests (S.mutans ATCC35668). The samples taken after 0, 2, 4, 6 and 24 hours were cultured on agar plates. Colonies were counted 24 hours after incubation. One-way ANOVA and Tukey tests were used for statistical analysis. In CuO and CuO-ZnO coated brackets, no colony growth was seen after two hours. Between 0-6 hours, the mean colony counts were not significantly different between the ZnO and the control group (p>0.05). During 6-24 hours, the growth of S.mutans was significantly reduced by ZnO nanoparticles in comparison with the control group (pbrackets have better antimicrobial effect on S.mutans than ZnO coated brackets.

  3. Correlates of Narrow Bracketing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Alexander; Nafziger, Julia

    We examine whether different phenomena of narrow bracketing can be traced back to some common characteristic and whether and how different phenomena are related. We find that making dominated lottery choices or ignoring the endowment when making risky choices are related phenomena and are both as...

  4. Is laser conditioning a valid alternative to conventional etching for aesthetic brackets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfondrini, M F; Calderoni, G; Vitale, M C; Gandini, P; Scribante, A

    2018-03-01

    ER:Yag lasers have been described as a more conservative alternative to conventional acid-etching enamel conditioning technique, when bonding conventional metallic orthodontic brackets. Since the use of aesthetic orthodontic brackets is constantly increasing, the purpose of the present report has been to test laser conditioning with different aesthetic brackets. Study Design: Five different aesthetic brackets (microfilled copolymer, glass fiber, sapphire, polyoxymethylene and sintered ceramic) were tested for shear bond strength and Adhesive Remnant Index scores using two different enamel conditioning techniques (acid etching and ER:Yag laser application). Two hundred bovine incisors were extracted, cleaned and embedded in resin. Specimens were then divided into 10 groups with random tables. Half of the specimens were conditioned with conventional orthophosphoric acid gel, the other half with ER:Yag laser. Different aesthetic brackets (microfilled copolymer, glass fiber, sapphire, polyoxymethylene and sintered ceramic) were then bonded to the teeth. Subsequently all groups were tested in shear mode with a Universal Testing Machine. Shear bond strength values and adhesive remnant index scores were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed. When considering conventional acid etching technique, sapphire, polyoxymethylene and sintered ceramic brackets exhibited the highest SBS values. Lowest values were reported for microfilled copolymer and glass fiber appliances. A significant decrease in SBS values after laser conditioning was reported for sapphire, polyoxymethylene and sintered ceramic brackets, whereas no significant difference was reported for microfilled copolymer and glass fiber brackets. Significant differences in ARI scores were also reported. Laser etching can significantly reduce bonding efficacy of sapphire, polyoxymethylene and sintered ceramic brackets.

  5. Comparison of static friction with self-ligating, modified slot design and conventional brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Raquel Morais; Neto, Perrin Smith; Horta, Martinho Campolina Rebello; Pithon, Matheus Melo; Oliveira, Dauro Douglas

    2013-01-01

    To compare the static frictional forces generated at the bracket/wire interface of stainless steel brackets with different geometries and angulations, combined with orthodontic wires of different diameters. The frictional forces were evaluated with three different types of metal brackets: a passive self-ligating (SmartClipTM, 3M/Unitek, Monrovia, USA), with a modified slot design (Mini Uni TwinTM, 3M/Unitek, Monrovia, USA) and conventional (Kirium, Abzil, São José do Rio Preto, Brazil). The samples were mounted in a testing device with three different angulations and tested with 0.014" and 0.018" stainless steel wires (American Orthodontics, Sheboygan, USA). The static frictional force was measured using a universal testing machine (DL 500, EMIC®, São José dos Pinhais, Brazil) with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Statistical analysis was performed by two-way ANOVA followed by Bonferroni's post hoc test. There was a significant difference (pstatic friction when the three types of brackets were tested with the same wire size. The wire diameter influenced friction only when the brackets had a 10º angulation (pfriction (pstatic frictional force values between the conventional and self-ligating brackets tested.

  6. A Simplified Lingual Bracket Positioner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharath Kumar Shetty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The indirect bonding system for lingual brackets may be broadly classified as; techniques using setup models and those using diagnostic models. The techniques using setup models are more accurate and many of them require the use of lingual bracket positioners for determining the correct position of brackets. We have devised a simpler yet reliable and effective bracket positioner ′Lingual Bracket Positioner′ in our department. Although many variants are available commercially, this design is easy to fabricate, cheap and ready to use.

  7. [Friction: self-ligating brackets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thermac, Guilhem; Morgon, Laurent; Godeneche, Julien

    2008-12-01

    The manufacturers of self-ligating brackets advertise a reduction of the friction engendered between the wire and the bracket, which is an essential parameter for treatment's speed and comfort. We have compared the friction obtained with four types of self-ligating brackets - In-Ovation R, Damon 3, Smart Clip and Quick - with that of a standard bracket Omniarch associated with an elastomeric ligature. All bracket were tested on a bench of traction with three types of wires: steel .019"x.025", TMA .019"x.025" and NEO sentalloy F300 .020"x.020". The results confirm a clear friction reduction for all tested wire.

  8. Friction Forces during Sliding of Various Brackets for Malaligned Teeth: An In Vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crincoli, Vito; Di Bisceglie, Maria Beatrice; Balsamo, Antonio; Serpico, Vitaliano; Chiatante, Francesco; Pappalettere, Carmine; Boccaccio, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Aims. To measure the friction force generated during sliding mechanics with conventional, self-ligating (Damon 3 mx, Smart Clip, and Time 3) and low-friction (Synergy) brackets using different archwire diameters and ligating systems in the presence of apical and buccal malalignments of the canine. Methods. An experimental setup reproducing the right buccal segment of the maxillary arch was designed to measure the friction force generated at the bracket/wire and wire/ligature interfaces of different brackets. A complete factorial plan was drawn up and a three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was carried out to investigate whether the following factors affect the values of friction force: (i) degree of malalignment, (ii) diameter of the orthodontic wire, and (iii) bracket/ligature combination. Tukey post hoc test was also conducted to evaluate any statistically significant differences between the bracket/ligature combinations analyzed. Results. ANOVA showed that all the above factors affect the friction force values. The friction force released during sliding mechanics with conventional brackets is about 5-6times higher than that released with the other investigated brackets. A quasilinear increase of the frictional forces was observed for increasing amounts of apical and buccal malalignments. Conclusion. The Synergy bracket with silicone ligature placed around the inner tie-wings appears to yield the best performance. PMID:23533364

  9. The Effect of Two Soft Drinks on Bracket Bond Strength and on Intact and Sealed Enamel: An In Vitro Study

    OpenAIRE

    Pasha, Azam; Sindhu, D; Nayak, Rabindra S; Mamatha, J; Chaitra, K R; Vishwakarma, Swati

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of two soft drinks, Coca-Cola and Mirinda orange on bracket bond strength, on adhesive remnant on teeth after debonding the bracket, and to observe by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM) the effect of these drinks on intact and sealed enamel. Methods: 120 non-carious maxillary premolar teeth already extracted for Orthodontic purposes were taken and divided into three groups, i.e., Coca-Cola drink, Mirinda orang...

  10. Trends in contemporary orthodontic research publications: Evaluation of three major orthodontic journals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M P Kumar Prasanna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In this study, we aimed to evaluate the inclination of orthodontic research published in original articles in three of the most popular and recognized orthodontic journals with high impact factor; American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (AJODO, the Angle Orthodontist (AO, and European Journal of Orthodontics (EJO published in a 5-year duration time frame (2010–2014. Materials and Methods: Online search with supplementary hand searching was undertaken for original research articles in these three orthodontic journals from 2010 to 2014. Classification of data was completed autonomously by manual and direct appraisal of the manuscript of each journal. Results and Conclusion: Three thousand one hundred and forty articles published in AJODO, AO, and EJO in the particular time period were selected, out of which 1783 original research study articles (56.78% were appraised for classification in their various respective knowledge domains. AO (82.73% and EJO (76.99% were relatively more committed toward publication of research work in comparison to AJODO (34.55%. Research articles based on perception and questionnaires (12%, temporary anchorage devices (11%, cone-beam computed tomography (8%, invisible orthodontics (lingual orthodontics, clear aligners, esthetic brackets, and wires (5%, and airway examination (5% were the five most recurrently selected subjects of interest (41% in these three journals during the observation period. The total number of research articles published in the three journals reduced statistically significantly in 2014 when compared to 2010.

  11. Resistance to Sliding in Clear and Metallic Damon 3 and Conventional Edgewise Brackets: an In vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim Soltani, Mohammad; Golfeshan, Farzaneh; Alizadeh, Yoones; Mehrzad, Jabraiel

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Frictional forces are considered as important counterforce to orthodontic tooth movement. It is claimed that self-ligating brackets reduce the frictional forces. Purpose The aim of this study was to compare the resistance to sliding in metallic and clear Damon brackets with the conventional brackets in a wet condition. Materials and Method The samples included 4 types of brackets; metallic and clear Damon brackets and metallic and clear conventional brackets (10 brackets in each group). In this study, stainless steel wires sized 0.019×0.025 were employed and the operator’s saliva was used to simulate the conditions of oral cavity. The tidy-modified design was used for simulation of sliding movement. The resistance to sliding and static frictional forces was measured by employing Testometric machine and load cell. Results The mean (±SD) of resistance to sliding was 194.88 (±26.65) and 226.62 (±39.9) g in the esthetic and metallic Damon brackets, while these values were 187.81(±27.84) and 191.17(±66.68) g for the clear and metallic conventional brackets, respectively. Static frictional forces were 206.4(±42.45) and 210.38(±15.89) g in the esthetic and metallic Damon brackets and 220.63(±49.29) and 215.13(±62.38) g in the clear and metallic conventional brackets. According to two-way ANOVA, no significant difference was observed between the two bracket materials (clear and metal) and the two types of bracket (self-ligating versus conventional) regarding resistance to sliding (p= 0.17 and p= 0.23, respectively) and static frictional forces (p= 0.55 and p= 0.96, respectively). Conclusion Neither the type of bracket materials nor their type of ligation made difference in resistance to sliding and static friction. PMID:26106630

  12. Resistance to Sliding in Clear and Metallic Damon 3 and Conventional Edgewise Brackets: an In vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim Soltani, Mohammad; Golfeshan, Farzaneh; Alizadeh, Yoones; Mehrzad, Jabraiel

    2015-03-01

    Frictional forces are considered as important counterforce to orthodontic tooth movement. It is claimed that self-ligating brackets reduce the frictional forces. The aim of this study was to compare the resistance to sliding in metallic and clear Damon brackets with the conventional brackets in a wet condition. The samples included 4 types of brackets; metallic and clear Damon brackets and metallic and clear conventional brackets (10 brackets in each group). In this study, stainless steel wires sized 0.019×0.025 were employed and the operator's saliva was used to simulate the conditions of oral cavity. The tidy-modified design was used for simulation of sliding movement. The resistance to sliding and static frictional forces was measured by employing Testometric machine and load cell. The mean (±SD) of resistance to sliding was 194.88 (±26.65) and 226.62 (±39.9) g in the esthetic and metallic Damon brackets, while these values were 187.81(±27.84) and 191.17(±66.68) g for the clear and metallic conventional brackets, respectively. Static frictional forces were 206.4(±42.45) and 210.38(±15.89) g in the esthetic and metallic Damon brackets and 220.63(±49.29) and 215.13(±62.38) g in the clear and metallic conventional brackets. According to two-way ANOVA, no significant difference was observed between the two bracket materials (clear and metal) and the two types of bracket (self-ligating versus conventional) regarding resistance to sliding (p= 0.17 and p= 0.23, respectively) and static frictional forces (p= 0.55 and p= 0.96, respectively). Neither the type of bracket materials nor their type of ligation made difference in resistance to sliding and static friction.

  13. Bracketing effects on risk tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester Moher

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Research has shown that risk tolerance increases when multiple decisions and associated outcomes are presented together in a broader ``bracket'' rather than one at a time. The present studies disentangle the influence of problem bracketing (presenting multiple investment options together from that of outcome bracketing (presenting the aggregated outcomes of multiple decisions, factors which have been deliberately confounded in previous research. In the standard version of the bracketing task, in which participants decide how much of an initial endowment to invest into each in a series of repeated, identical gambles, we find a problem bracketing effect but not an outcome bracketing effect. However, this pattern of results does not generalize to the cases of non-identical gambles nor discrete choice, where we fail to find the standard bracketing effect.

  14. Avaliação da resistência ao cisalhamento de braquetes colados com resinas ortodônticas fluoretadas Evaluation of shear bond strength of brackets bonded with orthodontic