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Sample records for ornl quasi-static mechanical

  1. Mechanics of quasi-static crack growth

    Rice, J R

    1978-10-01

    Results on the mechanics of quasi-static crack growth are reviewed. These include recent studies on the geometry and stability of crack paths in elastic-brittle solids, and on the thermodynamics of Griffith cracking, including environmental effects. The relation of crack growth criteria to non-elastic rheological models is considered and paradoxes with energy balance approaches, based on singular crack models, are discussed for visco-elastic, diffuso-elastic, and elastic-plastic materials. Also, recent approaches to prediction of stable crack growth in ductile, elastic-plastic solids are discussed.

  2. Mechanical performance of carbon-epoxy laminates. Part II: quasi-static and fatigue tensile properties

    José Ricardo Tarpani

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available In Part II of this work, quasi-static tensile properties of four aeronautical grade carbon-epoxy composite laminates, in both the as-received and pre-fatigued states, have been determined and compared. Quasi-static mechanical properties assessed were tensile strength and stiffness, tenacity (toughness at the maximum load and for a 50% load drop-off. In general, as-molded unidirectional cross-ply carbon fiber (tape reinforcements impregnated with either standard or rubber-toughened epoxy resin exhibited the maximum performance. The materials also displayed a significant tenacification (toughening after exposed to cyclic loading, resulting from the increased stress (the so-called wear-in phenomenon and/or strain at the maximum load capacity of the specimens. With no exceptions, two-dimensional woven textile (fabric pre-forms fractured catastrophically under identical cyclic loading conditions imposed to the fiber tape architecture, thus preventing their residual properties from being determined.

  3. Mechanical performance of carbon-epoxy laminates. Part I: quasi-static and impact bending properties

    José Ricardo Tarpani

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available In Part I of this study, quasi-static and impact bending properties of four aeronautical grade carbon-epoxy laminates have been determined and compared. Materials tested were unidirectional cross-ply (tape and bidirectional woven textile (fabric carbon fiber lay-up architectures, impregnated with standard and rubber-toughened resins, respectively, giving rise to 1.5 mm-thick laminates. Quasi-static mechanical properties assessed in transversal mode loading were modulus of elasticity, flexural strength and tenacity at the maximum load, whereas the net absorbed energy was determined under translaminar impact conditions. Two-dimensional woven carbon fiber reinforcements embedded in a rubber-toughened matrix presented the best mechanical performance under static loading. Under dynamic loading conditions, woven fiber fabric pre-forms were favorably sensitive to increasing impact energies regardless the nature of the employed epoxy resin. However, it was concluded that great care should be taken with this material within the low energy impact regimen.

  4. Mechanical response of common millet (Panicum miliaceum) seeds under quasi-static compression: Experiments and modeling.

    Hasseldine, Benjamin P J; Gao, Chao; Collins, Joseph M; Jung, Hyun-Do; Jang, Tae-Sik; Song, Juha; Li, Yaning

    2017-09-01

    The common millet (Panicum miliaceum) seedcoat has a fascinating complex microstructure, with jigsaw puzzle-like epidermis cells articulated via wavy intercellular sutures to form a compact layer to protect the kernel inside. However, little research has been conducted on linking the microstructure details with the overall mechanical response of this interesting biological composite. To this end, an integrated experimental-numerical-analytical investigation was conducted to both characterize the microstructure and ascertain the microscale mechanical properties and to test the overall response of kernels and full seeds under macroscale quasi-static compression. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was utilized to examine the microstructure of the outer seedcoat and nanoindentation was performed to obtain the material properties of the seedcoat hard phase material. A multiscale computational strategy was applied to link the microstructure to the macroscale response of the seed. First, the effective anisotropic mechanical properties of the seedcoat were obtained from finite element (FE) simulations of a microscale representative volume element (RVE), which were further verified from sophisticated analytical models. Then, macroscale FE models of the individual kernel and full seed were developed. Good agreement between the compression experiments and FE simulations were obtained for both the kernel and the full seed. The results revealed the anisotropic property and the protective function of the seedcoat, and showed that the sutures of the seedcoat play an important role in transmitting and distributing loads in responding to external compression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The dynamic and quasi-static mechanical response of three aluminum armor alloys: 5059, 5083 and 7039

    Perez-Bergquist, Sara J., E-mail: sara.perezbergquist@gmail.com [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM 87545 (United States); Gray, G.T.; Cerreta, Ellen K.; Trujillo, Carl P.; Perez-Bergquist, Alex [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM 87545 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} Aluminum alloys for use in armor applications. {yields} Mechanical response in dynamic and quasi-static regimes with temperature dependence. {yields} Shear localization with evidence of early stages of dynamic recrystallization. - Abstract: The mechanical response and microstructural evolution of aluminum alloys 5083, 5059 and 7039 was examined in compression and shear in both the quasi-static (0.001 s{sup -1}) and dynamic ({approx}2000 s{sup -1}) strain rate regimes. Electron Back Scattered Diffraction was utilized for detailed post-mortem analysis of the specimens following loading. The mechanical responses in shear were found to be strain-rate sensitive. At the slowest strain rates, all of the alloys had relatively large volumes of highly deformed material with 5083 and 5059 having the largest shear affected volumes. The dynamic strain rate test samples all formed highly compact shear localized volumes across the sheared zone with 7039 consistently displaying the narrowest shear regions. The morphology of these shear bands, along with the limited hardening during deformation, indicate a mechanism change at the higher strain rates. Higher resolution orientation image mapping has shown that between the three alloys there are varying degrees of crystallographic order within the shear bands. Transmission electron microscopy revealed various stages of dynamic recrystallization were present suggesting that while low strain rate deformation is controlled by dislocation multiplication and glide, high strain and strain-rate deformation is influenced in part due to mechanical recrystallization.

  6. Mechanical property evaluation of apricot fruits under quasi-static and dynamic loading

    E Ahmadi

    2016-04-01

    of fruit per level × 3 (impact energy level × 2 (both red and yellow × 2 (at 25oC and 3oC} was selected. In this study, using a factorial experiment in a completely randomized design, the effect of different factors (impact energy in 3 levels, temperature in 2 levels 3oC and 25°C and color in 2 levels red and yellow on acoustic stiffness, radius of curvature, color characteristic a* and b*, precent Brix, penetration force, penetration work and penetration deformation in apricot under the quasi-static forces were studied. In order to conduct this experiment, the universal testing machine of biological materials was used. After the determination of mechanical properties of the products, the SAS statistical program (1.9 was applied to analyze and normalize the resulted data. Factorial test also was used to determine the effects of independent variables on the dependent variables. Data analyses were performed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SAS version 19.0.The variance analysis of the data was conducted in the form of multivariate factorial (2×2×3 design. The data were collected by three controlling factors: two temperature levels (3 and 20°C, two types of colour (Yellow and Red fruits and three levels of impact energy. The Duncan’s multiple range tests was used to compare the means. The values of reducible sugars were measured by the fruit juice standard - test methods No. 2685 (Institute of Standards and Industrial Research of Iran. The apricots TSS (total soluble solids for each temperature level by Refractomete (Model: 3820 (PAL-2, Resolution: ± 0.1% Brix were obtained. Results and Discussion: Respectively, the main and interaction effects of these variables were examined. The results of analysis of variance showed that,, the radius of curvature, color characteristic, acoustics stiffness, elastic modulus, percent Brix, penetration force and penetration deformation on main and interaction effects were significant at 5% and 1% probability

  7. The Mechanical and Reaction Behavior of PTFE/Al/Fe2O3 under Impact and Quasi-Static Compression

    Jun-yi Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Quasi-static compression and drop-weight test were used to characterize the mechanical and reaction behavior of PTFE/Al/Fe2O3 composites. Two kinds of PTFE/Al/Fe2O3 composites were prepared with different mass of PTFE, and the reaction phenomenon and stress-strain curves were recorded; the residuals after reaction were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD. The results showed that, under quasi-static compression condition, the strength of the materials is increased (from 37.1 Mpa to 77.2 Mpa with the increase of PTFE, and the reaction phenomenon occurred only in materials with high PTFE content. XRD analysis showed that the reaction between Al and Fe2O3 was not triggered with identical experimental conditions. In drop-weight tests, PTFE/Al/Fe2O3 specimens with low PTFE content were found to be more insensitive by high-speed photography, and a High Temperature Metal Slag Spray (HTMSS phenomenon was observed in both kinds of PTFE/Al/Fe2O3 composites, indicating the existence of thermite reaction, which was confirmed by XRD. In PTFE/Al/Fe2O3 system, the reaction between PTFE and Al precedes the reaction between Al and Fe2O3.

  8. JAC, 2-D Finite Element Method Program for Quasi Static Mechanics Problems by Nonlinear Conjugate Gradient (CG) Method

    Biffle, J.H.

    1991-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: JAC is a two-dimensional finite element program for solving large deformation, temperature dependent, quasi-static mechanics problems with the nonlinear conjugate gradient (CG) technique. Either plane strain or axisymmetric geometry may be used with material descriptions which include temperature dependent elastic-plastic, temperature dependent secondary creep, and isothermal soil models. The nonlinear effects examined include material and geometric nonlinearities due to large rotations, large strains, and surface which slide relative to one another. JAC is vectorized to perform efficiently on the Cray1 computer. A restart capability is included. 2 - Method of solution: The nonlinear conjugate gradient method is employed in a two-dimensional plane strain or axisymmetric setting with various techniques for accelerating convergence. Sliding interface conditions are also implemented. A four-node Lagrangian uniform strain element is used with orthogonal hourglass viscosity to control the zero energy modes. Three sets of continuum equations are needed - kinematic statements, constitutive equations, and equations of equilibrium - to describe the deformed configuration of the body. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem - Maxima of: 10 load and solution control functions, 4 materials. The strain rate is assumed constant over a time interval. Current large rotation theory is applicable to a maximum shear strain of 1.0. JAC should be used with caution for large shear strains. Problem size is limited only by available memory

  9. The Effects of Triggering Mechanisms on the Energy Absorption Capability of Circular Jute/Epoxy Composite Tubes under Quasi-Static Axial Loading

    Sivagurunathan, Rubentheran; Lau Tze Way, Saijod; Sivagurunathan, Linkesvaran; Yaakob, Mohd. Yuhazri

    2018-01-01

    The usage of composite materials have been improving over the years due to its superior mechanical properties such as high tensile strength, high energy absorption capability, and corrosion resistance. In this present study, the energy absorption capability of circular jute/epoxy composite tubes were tested and evaluated. To induce the progressive crushing of the composite tubes, four different types of triggering mechanisms were used which were the non-trigger, single chamfered trigger, double chamfered trigger and tulip trigger. Quasi-static axial loading test was carried out to understand the deformation patterns and the load-displacement characteristics for each composite tube. Besides that, the influence of energy absorption, crush force efficiency, peak load, mean load and load-displacement history were examined and discussed. The primary results displayed a significant influence on the energy absorption capability provided that stable progressive crushing occurred mostly in the triggered tubes compared to the non-triggered tubes. Overall, the tulip trigger configuration attributed the highest energy absorption.

  10. Quasi-static and dynamic compressive deformation of a bulk nanolayered Ag–Cu eutectic alloy: Macroscopic response and dominant deformation mechanisms

    Kingstedt, O.T.; Eftink, B.; Lambros, J.; Robertson, I.M.

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructured multilayered material systems offer an attractive method of increasing material strength. This work examines the response of a bulk eutectic silver–copper material (Ag 60 Cu 40 , subscripts indicating atomic percent) which has a hierarchical structure of alternating Ag and Cu layers with thicknesses down to 50 nm. The hierarchical structure consists of two primary arrangements of layers, eutectic colonies of parallel layers, most commonly found at the material interior, and “grains” consisting of alternating Ag and Cu layers which emanate from a central region in a radial pattern, most commonly found at the material exterior surface. We show that the hierarchical structure causes a significant increase in the measured strength response when comparing the Ag 60 Cu 40 response to that of the constituent materials in their bulk nanograined or micrograined form. The deformation mechanisms of this material are studied under compressive loading over the quasi-static and dynamic regime (10 −3 –10 3 s −1 ) with strain between 5% and 50%

  11. Fatigue and quasi-static mechanical behavior of bio-degradable porous biomaterials based on magnesium alloys.

    Hedayati, R; Ahmadi, S M; Lietaert, K; Tümer, N; Li, Y; Amin Yavari, S; Zadpoor, A A

    2018-07-01

    Magnesium and its alloys have the intrinsic capability of degrading over time in vivo without leaving toxic degradation products. They are therefore suitable for use as biodegradable scaffolds that are replaced by the regenerated tissues. One of the main concerns for such applications, particularly in load-bearing areas, is the sufficient mechanical integrity of the scaffold before sufficient volumes of de novo tissue is generated. In the majority of the previous studies on the effects of biodegradation on the mechanical properties of porous biomaterials, the change in the elastic modulus has been studied. In this study, variations in the static and fatigue mechanical behavior of porous structures made of two different Mg alloys (AZ63 and M2) over different dissolution times ( 6, 12, and 24 h) have been investigated. The results showed an increase in the mechanical properties obtained from stress-strain curve (elastic modulus, yield stress, plateau stress, and energy absorption) after 6-12 h and a sharp decrease after 24 h. The initial increase in the mechanical properties may be attributed to the accumulation of corrosion products in the pores of the porous structure before degradation has considerably proceeded. The effects of mineral deposition was more pronounced for the elastic modulus as compared to other mechanical properties. That may be due to insufficient integration of the deposited particles in the structure of the magnesium alloys. While the bonding of the parts being combined in a composite-like material is of great importance in determining its yield stress, the effects of bonding strength of both parts is much lower in determining the elastic modulus. The results of the current study also showed that the dissolution rates of the studied Mg alloys were too high for direct use in human body. © 2018 Authors Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 106A: 1798-1811, 2018. © 2018

  12. Mechanical integrity of thin inorganic coatings on polymer substrates under quasi-static, thermal and fatigue loadings

    Leterrier, Y.; Mottet, A.; Bouquet, N.; Gillieron, D.; Dumont, P.; Pinyol, A.; Lalande, L.; Waller, J.H.; Manson, J.-A.E.

    2010-01-01

    The interplay between residual stress state, cohesive and adhesive properties of coatings on substrates is reviewed in this article. Attention is paid to thin inorganic coatings on polymers, characterized by a very high hygro-thermo-mechanical contrast between the brittle and stiff coating and the compliant and soft substrate. An approach to determine the intrinsic, thermal and hygroscopic contributions to the coating residual stress is detailed. The critical strain for coating failure, coating toughness and coating/substrate interface shear strength are derived from the analysis of progressive coating cracking under strain. Electro-fragmentation and electro-fatigue tests in situ in a microscope are described. These methods enable reproducing the thermo-mechanical loads present during processing and service life, hence identifying and modeling the critical conditions for failure. Several case studies relevant to food and pharmaceutical packaging, flexible electronics and thin film photovoltaic devices are discussed to illustrate the benefits and limits of the present methods and models.

  13. Load monitoring of aerospace structures utilizing micro-electro-mechanical systems for static and quasi-static loading conditions

    Martinez, M; Rocha, B; Li, M; Shi, G; Beltempo, A; Rutledge, R; Yanishevsky, M

    2012-01-01

    The National Research Council Canada (NRC) has worked on the development of structural health monitoring (SHM) test platforms for assessing the performance of sensor systems for load monitoring applications. The first SHM platform consists of a 5.5 m cantilever aluminum beam that provides an optimal scenario for evaluating the ability of a load monitoring system to measure bending, torsion and shear loads. The second SHM platform contains an added level of structural complexity, by consisting of aluminum skins with bonded/riveted stringers, typical of an aircraft lower wing structure. These two load monitoring platforms are well characterized and documented, providing loading conditions similar to those encountered during service. In this study, a micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) for acquiring data from triads of gyroscopes, accelerometers and magnetometers is described. The system was used to compute changes in angles at discrete stations along the platforms. The angles obtained from the MEMS were used to compute a second, third or fourth order degree polynomial surface from which displacements at every point could be computed. The use of a new Kalman filter was evaluated for angle estimation, from which displacements in the structure were computed. The outputs of the newly developed algorithms were then compared to the displacements obtained from the linear variable displacement transducers connected to the platforms. The displacement curves were subsequently post-processed either analytically, or with the help of a finite element model of the structure, to estimate strains and loads. The estimated strains were compared with baseline strain gauge instrumentation installed on the platforms. This new approach for load monitoring was able to provide accurate estimates of applied strains and shear loads. (paper)

  14. Effect of structural factors on mechanical properties of the magnesium alloy Ma2-1 under quasi-static and high strain rate deformation conditions

    Garkushin, G. V.; Razorenov, S. V.; Krasnoveikin, V. A.; Kozulin, A. A.; Skripnyak, V. A.

    2015-02-01

    The elastic limit and tensile strength of deformed magnesium alloys Ma2-1 with different structures and textures were measured with the aim of finding a correlation between the spectrum of defects in the material and the resistance to deformation and fracture under quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. The studies were performed using specimens in the as-received state after high-temperature annealing and specimens subjected to equal-channel angular pressing at a temperature of 250°C. The anisotropy of strength characteristics of the material after shock compression with respect to the direction of rolling of the original alloy was investigated. It was shown that, in contrast to the quasi-static loading conditions, under the shock wave loading conditions, the elastic limit and tensile strength of the magnesium alloy Ma2-1 after equal-channel angular pressing decrease as compared to the specimens in the as-received state.

  15. Quasi-Static Electric Field Generator

    Generazio, Edward R. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A generator for producing an electric field for with an inspection technology system is provided. The generator provides the required variable magnitude quasi-static electric fields for the "illumination" of objects, areas and volumes to be inspected by the system, and produces human-safe electric fields that are only visible to the system. The generator includes a casing, a driven, non-conducting and triboelectrically neutral rotation shaft mounted therein, an ungrounded electrostatic dipole element which works in the quasi-static range, and a non-conducting support for mounting the dipole element to the shaft. The dipole element has a wireless motor system and a charging system which are wholly contained within the dipole element and the support that uses an electrostatic approach to charge the dipole element.

  16. Modeling Quasi-Static and Fatigue-Driven Delamination Migration

    De Carvalho, N. V.; Ratcliffe, J. G.; Chen, B. Y.; Pinho, S. T.; Baiz, P. M.; Tay, T. E.

    2014-01-01

    An approach was proposed and assessed for the high-fidelity modeling of progressive damage and failure in composite materials. It combines the Floating Node Method (FNM) and the Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT) to represent multiple interacting failure mechanisms in a mesh-independent fashion. Delamination, matrix cracking, and migration were captured failure and migration criteria based on fracture mechanics. Quasi-static and fatigue loading were modeled within the same overall framework. The methodology proposed was illustrated by simulating the delamination migration test, showing good agreement with the available experimental data.

  17. Quasi-Static Indentation Analysis of Carbon-Fiber Laminates.

    Briggs, Timothy [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); English, Shawn Allen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Nelson, Stacy Michelle [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    A series of quasi - static indentation experiments are conducted on carbon fiber reinforced polymer laminates with a systematic variation of thicknesses and fixture boundary conditions. Different deformation mechanisms and their resulting damage mechanisms are activated b y changing the thickn ess and boundary conditions. The quasi - static indentation experiments have been shown to achieve damage mechanisms similar to impact and penetration, however without strain rate effects. The low rate allows for the detailed analysis on the load response. Moreover, interrupted tests allow for the incremental analysis of various damage mechanisms and pr ogressions. The experimentally tested specimens are non - destructively evaluated (NDE) with optical imaging, ultrasonics and computed tomography. The load displacement responses and the NDE are then utilized in numerical simulations for the purpose of model validation and vetting. The accompanying numerical simulation work serves two purposes. First, the results further reveal the time sequence of events and the meaning behind load dro ps not clear from NDE . Second, the simulations demonstrate insufficiencies in the code and can then direct future efforts for development.

  18. Quasi-static acoustic tweezing thromboelastometry.

    Holt, R G; Luo, D; Gruver, N; Khismatullin, D B

    2017-07-01

    Essentials Blood coagulation measurement during contact with an artificial surface leads to unreliable data. Acoustic tweezing thromboelastometry is a novel non-contact method for coagulation monitoring. This method detects differences in the blood coagulation state within 10 min. Coagulation data were obtained using a much smaller sample volume (4 μL) than currently used. Background Thromboelastography is widely used as a tool to assess the coagulation status of critical care patients. It allows observation of changes in material properties of whole blood, beginning with early stages of clot formation and ending with clot lysis. However, the contact activation of the coagulation cascade at surfaces of thromboelastographic systems leads to inherent variability and unreliability in predicting bleeding or thrombosis risks. Objectives To develop acoustic tweezing thromboelastometry as a non-contact method for perioperative assessment of blood coagulation. Methods Acoustic tweezing is used to levitate microliter drops of biopolymer and human blood samples. By quasi-statically changing the acoustic pressure we control the sample drop location and deformation. Sample size, deformation and location are determined by digital imaging at each pressure. Results Simple Newtonian liquid solutions maintain a constant, reversible location vs. deformation curve. In contrast, the location/deformation curves for gelatin, alginate, whole blood and blood plasma uniquely change as the samples solidify. Increasing elasticity causes the sample to deform less, leading to steeper stress/strain curves. By extracting a linear regime slope, we show that whole blood or blood plasma exhibits a unique slope profile as it begins to clot. By exposing blood samples to pro- or antithrombotic agents, the slope profile changes, allowing detection of hyper- or hypocoagulable states. Conclusions We demonstrate that quasi-static acoustic tweezing can yield information about clotting onset, maturation

  19. Quasi-static crack tip fields in rate-sensitive FCC single crystals

    In this work, the effects of loading rate, material rate sensitivity and constraint level on quasi-static crack tip fields in a FCC single crystal are studied. ... Global General Motors R&D, India Science Lab, GM Technical Centre (India), Bangalore 560 066, India; Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, ...

  20. Quasi-static elastography comparison of hyaline cartilage structures

    McCredie, A. J.; Stride, E.; Saffari, N.

    2009-11-01

    Joint cartilage, a load bearing structure in mammals, has only limited ability for regeneration after damage. For tissue engineers to design functional constructs, better understanding of the properties of healthy tissue is required. Joint cartilage is a specialised structure of hyaline cartilage; a poroviscoelastic solid containing fibril matrix reinforcements. Healthy joint cartilage is layered, which is thought to be important for correct tissue function. However, the behaviour of each layer during loading is poorly understood. Ultrasound elastography provides access to depth-dependent information in real-time for a sample during loading. A 15 MHz focussed transducer provided details from scatterers within a small fixed region in each sample. Quasi-static loading was applied to cartilage samples while ultrasonic signals before and during compressions were recorded. Ultrasonic signals were processed to provide time-shift profiles using a sum-squared difference method and cross-correlation. Two structures of hyaline cartilage have been tested ultrasonically and mechanically to determine method suitability for monitoring internal deformation differences under load and the effect of the layers on the global mechanical material behaviour. Results show differences in both the global mechanical properties and the ultrasonically tested strain distributions between the two structures tested. It was concluded that these differences are caused primarily by the fibril orientations.

  1. Quasi-static and dynamic forced shear deformation behaviors of Ti-5Mo-5V-8Cr-3Al alloy

    Wang, Zhiming; Chen, Zhiyong, E-mail: czysh@netease.com; Zhan, Congkun; Kuang, Lianjun; Shao, Jianbo; Wang, Renke; Liu, Chuming

    2017-04-13

    The mechanical behavior and microstructure characteristics of Ti-5Mo-5V-8Cr-3Al alloy were investigated with hat-shaped samples compressed under quasi-static and dynamic loading. Compared with the quasi-static loading, a higher shear stress peak and a shear instability stage were observed during the dynamic shear response. The results showed that an adiabatic shear band consisting of ultrafine equiaxed grains was only developed in the dynamic specimen, while a wider shear region was formed in the quasi-static specimen. The microhardness measurements revealed that shear region in the quasi-static specimen and adiabatic shear band in the dynamic specimen exhibited higher hardness than that of adjacent regions due to the strain hardening and grain refining, respectively. A stable orientation, in which the crystallographic {110} planes and <111> directions were respectively parallel to the shear plane and shear direction, developed in both specimens. And the microtexture of the adiabatic shear band was more well-defined than that of the shear region in the quasi-static specimen. Rotational dynamic recrystallization mechanism was suggested to explain the formation of ultrafine equiaxed grains within the adiabatic shear band by thermodynamic and kinetic calculations.

  2. Implementation of the quasi-static method for neutron transport

    Alcaro, Fabio; Dulla, Sandra; Ravetto, Piero; Le Tellier, Romain; Suteau, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    The study of the dynamic behavior of next generation nuclear reactors is a fundamental aspect for safety and reliability assessments. Despite the growing performances of modern computers, the full solution of the neutron Boltzmann equation in the time domain is still an impracticable task, thus several approximate dynamic models have been proposed for the simulation of nuclear reactor transients; the quasi-static method represents the standard tool currently adopted for the space-time solution of neutron transport problems. All the practical applications of this method that have been proposed contain a major limit, consisting in the use of isotropic quantities, such as scalar fluxes and isotropic external neutron sources, being the only data structures available in most deterministic transport codes. The loss of the angular information produces both inaccuracies in the solution of the kinetic model and the inconsistency of the quasi-static method itself. The present paper is devoted to the implementation of a consistent quasi-static method. The computational platform developed by CEA in Cadarache has been used for the creation of a kinetic package to be coupled with the existing SNATCH solver, a discrete-ordinate multi-dimensional neutron transport solver, employed for the solution of the steady-state Boltzmann equation. The work aims at highlighting the effects of the angular treatment of the neutron flux on the transient analysis, comparing the results with those produced by the previous implementations of the quasi-static method. (author)

  3. Improved quasi-static nodal green's function method

    Li Junli; Jing Xingqing; Hu Dapu

    1997-01-01

    Improved Quasi-Static Green's Function Method (IQS/NGFM) is presented, as an new kinetic method. To solve the three-dimensional transient problem, improved Quasi-Static Method is adopted to deal with the temporal problem, which will increase the time step as long as possible so as to decrease the number of times of space calculation. The time step of IQS/NGFM can be increased to 5∼10 times longer than that of Full Implicit Differential Method. In spatial calculation, the NGFM is used to get the distribution of shape function, and it's spatial mesh can be nearly 20 times larger than that of Definite Differential Method. So the IQS/NGFM is considered as an efficient kinetic method

  4. A Planar Quasi-Static Constraint Mode Tire Model

    2015-07-10

    strikes a balance between simple tire models that lack the fidelity to make accurate chassis load predictions and computationally intensive models that...strikes a balance between heuristic tire models (such as a linear point-follower) that lack the fidelity to make accurate chassis load predictions...UNCLASSIFIED: Distribution Statement A. Cleared for public release A PLANAR QUASI-STATIC CONSTRAINT MODE TIRE MODEL Rui Maa John B. Ferris

  5. Convergence of the Quasi-static Antenna Design Algorithm

    2013-04-01

    was the first antenna design with quasi-static methods. In electrostatics, a perfect conductor is the same as an equipotential surface . A line of...which can cause the equipotential surface to terminate on the disk or feed wire. This requires an additional step in the solution process; the... equipotential surface is sampled to verify that the charge is enclosed by the equipotential surface . The final solution must be verified with a detailed

  6. Generalization of the memory integer model for the analysis of the quasi-static behaviour of polyurethane foams

    Jmal, Hamdi; Ju, Ming Lei; Dupuis, Raphael; Aubry, Evelyne

    2014-01-01

    Polyurethane foam is a cellular material characterized by an interesting mechanical spectrum of properties: low density, capacity to absorb the deformation energy and low stiffness. This spectrum of properties makes polyurethane foam commonly used in many thermal, acoustic and comfort applications. Several models, such as memory, hyper-elastic and pseudo-elastic models have been developed in the literature to describe the mechanical response of polyurethane foam under quasi-static and dynamic test conditions. The main disadvantage of these models is the dependence of their parameters against the test conditions (strain rate, maximum compression level, etc). This affects the general character of their representativeness to the quasi-static and dynamic behaviours of polyurethane foam. The main goal of this article is to implement reliable mechanical model which is able to provide the quasi-static response of the polyurethane foam under different strain rates and large compressive deformation. The dimensional parameters of our model can be expressed by the product of two independent parts; the first contain only the test conditions and the second define the dimensionless and invariant parameters that characterize the foam material. The developed model has been proposed after several experimental studies allowing the apprehension of the quasi-static behaviour (through unidirectional compression tests). The polyurethane foam, under large deformations, exhibits a nonlinear elastic behaviour and viscoelastic behaviour. To assess the ability of our model to be a general representation, three industrial polyurethane foams have been considered.

  7. Stress induced conditioning and thermal relaxation in the simulation of quasi-static compression experiments

    Scalerandi, M; Delsanto, P P; Johnson, P A

    2003-01-01

    Local interaction simulation approach simulations of the ultrasonic wave propagation in multi-grained materials have succeeded in reproducing most of the recently observed nonclassical nonlinear effects, such as stress-strain hysteresis and discrete memory in quasi-static experiments and a downwards shift of the resonance frequency and the generation of odd harmonics at specific amplitude rates in dynamics experiments. By including a simple mechanism of thermally activated random transitions, we can predict the occurrence of experimentally observed effects, such as the conditioning and relaxation of the specimen. Experiments are also suggested for a quantitative assessment of the validity of the model

  8. Stress induced conditioning and thermal relaxation in the simulation of quasi-static compression experiments

    Scalerandi, M; Johnson, P A

    2003-01-01

    Local interaction simulation approach simulations of the ultrasonic wave propagation in multi-grained materials have succeeded in reproducing most of the recently observed nonclassical nonlinear effects, such as stress-strain hysteresis and discrete memory in quasi-static experiments and a downwards shift of the resonance frequency and the generation of odd harmonics at specific amplitude rates in dynamics experiments. By including a simple mechanism of thermally activated random transitions, we can predict the occurrence of experimentally observed effects, such as the conditioning and relaxation of the specimen. Experiments are also suggested for a quantitative assessment of the validity of the model.

  9. Hot accreting white dwarfs in the quasi-static approximation

    Iben, I. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Properties of white dwarfs which are accreting hydrogen-rich matter at rates in the range 1.5 x 10 -9 to 2.5 x 10 -7 M/sub sun/ yr -1 are investigated in several approximations. Steady-burning models, in which matter is processed through nuclear-burning shells as rapidly as it is accreted, provide a framework for understanding the properties of models in which thermal pulses induced by hydrogen burning and helium burning are allowed to occur. In these latter models, the underlying carbon-oxygen core is chosen to be in a cycle-averaged steady state with regard to compressional heating and neutrino losses. Several of these models are evolved in the quasi-static approximation. Combining results obtained in the steady-burning approximation with those obtained in the quasi-static approximation, expressions are obtained for estimating, as functions of accretion rate and white dwarf mass, the thermal pulse recurrence period and the duration of hydrogen-burning phases. The time spent by an accreting model burning hydrogen as a large star of giant dimensions versus time spent burning hydrogen as a hot dwarf is also estimated as a function of model mass and accretion rate. Finally, suggestions for detecting observational counterparts of the theoretical models and suggestions for further theoretical investigations are offered. Subject headings: stars: accretion: stars: interiors: stars: novae: stars: symbiotic: stars: white dwarfs

  10. Quasi-static responses and variational principles in gradient plasticity

    Nguyen, Quoc-Son

    2016-12-01

    Gradient models have been much discussed in the literature for the study of time-dependent or time-independent processes such as visco-plasticity, plasticity and damage. This paper is devoted to the theory of Standard Gradient Plasticity at small strain. A general and consistent mathematical description available for common time-independent behaviours is presented. Our attention is focussed on the derivation of general results such as the description of the governing equations for the global response and the derivation of related variational principles in terms of the energy and the dissipation potentials. It is shown that the quasi-static response under a loading path is a solution of an evolution variational inequality as in classical plasticity. The rate problem and the rate minimum principle are revisited. A time-discretization by the implicit scheme of the evolution equation leads to the increment problem. An increment of the response associated with a load increment is a solution of a variational inequality and satisfies also a minimum principle if the energy potential is convex. The increment minimum principle deals with stables solutions of the variational inequality. Some numerical methods are discussed in view of the numerical simulation of the quasi-static response.

  11. A Minimum Leakage Quasi-Static RAM Bitcell

    Adam Teman

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available As SRAMs continue to grow and comprise larger percentages of the area and power consumption in advanced systems, the need to minimize static currents becomes essential. This brief presents a novel 9T Quasi-Static RAM Bitcell that provides aggressive leakage reduction and high write margins. The quasi-static operation method of this cell, based on internal feedback and leakage ratios, minimizes static power while maintaining sufficient, albeit depleted, noise margins. This paper presents the concept of the novel cell, and discusses the stability of the cell under hold, read and write operations. The cell was implemented in a low-power 40 nm TSMC process, showing as much as a 12× reduction in leakage current at typical conditions, as compared to a standard 6T or 8T bitcell at the same supply voltage. The implemented cell showed full functionality under global and local process variations at nominal and low voltages, as low as 300 mV.

  12. A quasi-static treatment of multiple phase jumps

    Englman, R; Vertesi, T

    2005-01-01

    A quasi-static, WKB-type treatment accounts well for the surprising phase jumps that are odd multiples of π (1 + 2n)π, found as a molecular system journeys adiabatically in a configuration coordinate plane that contains several points of degeneracies. We show that the number n in the phase jump is an integer close to |n'| that appears in the expression for the complex wavefunction amplitude valid (approximately) for times close to when the phase jump occurs: -δT + 2πθ+πn'sinδT -i[1-πn'cosδT](δT is a shifted and rescaled trajectory-time parameter and θ is a numerical fraction (<1) which depends on the adiabaticity of the motion.) The central quantity n' is local, i.e., depends on the values of the parameters in the Hamiltonian only at the beginning of the trajectory and at the instant of the phase jump

  13. Quasi-Static Condensation of Aeroelastic Suspension Bridge Model

    Møller, Randi N.; Krenk, Steen; N. Svendsen, Martin

    2017-01-01

    For long span bridges the wind-induced dynamic response is a design driving factor and therefore continuously a subject for detailed analysis. Traditionally both buffeting and stability calculations have been considered in the frequency domain. However, this yields alimitation in accounting...... for turbulence when considering the stability limit and further it is not possible to account for non-linear effects. These limitations suggest to do simulations of the aeroelastic response of long span bridges in the time domain. For this it is of interest to have an efficient model while still maintaining...... sufficient accuracy. This contribution is on quasi-static reduction of an aeroelastic finite element model of a 3000m suspension bridge proposed for crossing Sulafjorden in Norway. The model is intended for stability limit calculation where the representation of higher modes is of less importance...

  14. The Quasi-Static Electromagnetic Approximation for Weakly Conducting Media

    Heubrandtner, T

    2002-01-01

    In a conducting dielectric charge and electric field decay with a time constant tau_R = \\varepsilon/\\sigma. In a weakly conducting medium, as e.g. glass or melamine-phenolic laminate in use in RPC's, this time is about 10^{-3} s; so it is long as compared to the time the charge cloud needs to move through the gap and to the time the signal needs to propagate through a dielectric to the electrode. A quasi-static theory to deal with transient phenomena in weakly conducting media has been developed in Haus and Melcher (1989), Fano, Chu and Adler (1963); it simplifies the analysis considerably since it requires only the solution of a scalar diffusion-type equations in place of the time-dependent Maxwell equations. This little known theory is applied to treat the generation of signals in simple models for chambers with such materials.

  15. Biomagnetic localization from transient quasi-static events

    Mosher, J.C.; Leahy, R.M.; Lewis, P.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)]|[University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Signal and Image Processing Inst.

    1993-02-01

    Sensory stimuli, such as auditory, visual, or somatosensory, evoke neural responses in very localized regions of the brain. A SQUID biomagnetometer can measure the very weak fields that are generated outside of the head by this response. A simple source and head model of current dipoles inside a conducting sphere is typically used to interpret these magnetic field measurements or magnetoencephalogram (MEG). Locating dipole sources using data recorded from an array of biomagnetic sensors is distinguished from conventional array source localization techniques by the quasi-static transient nature of the data. Here, the basic MEG model is reviewed, then a localization example is given to motivate the need for partitioning the data to improve estimator performance. Tune-eigenspectrum analysis is introduced as a means of partitioning and interpreting spatio-temporal biomagnetic data. Examples using both simulated and somatosensory data are presented.

  16. Biomagnetic localization from transient quasi-static events

    Mosher, J.C.; Leahy, R.M.; Lewis, P.S. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States) University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Signal and Image Processing Inst.)

    1993-01-01

    Sensory stimuli, such as auditory, visual, or somatosensory, evoke neural responses in very localized regions of the brain. A SQUID biomagnetometer can measure the very weak fields that are generated outside of the head by this response. A simple source and head model of current dipoles inside a conducting sphere is typically used to interpret these magnetic field measurements or magnetoencephalogram (MEG). Locating dipole sources using data recorded from an array of biomagnetic sensors is distinguished from conventional array source localization techniques by the quasi-static transient nature of the data. Here, the basic MEG model is reviewed, then a localization example is given to motivate the need for partitioning the data to improve estimator performance. Tune-eigenspectrum analysis is introduced as a means of partitioning and interpreting spatio-temporal biomagnetic data. Examples using both simulated and somatosensory data are presented.

  17. Localization from near-source quasi-static electromagnetic fields

    Mosher, John Compton [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1993-09-01

    A wide range of research has been published on the problem of estimating the parameters of electromagnetic and acoustical sources from measurements of signals measured at an array of sensors. In the quasi-static electromagnetic cases examined here, the signal variation from a point source is relatively slow with respect to the signal propagation and the spacing of the array of sensors. As such, the location of the point sources can only be determined from the spatial diversity of the received signal across the array. The inverse source localization problem is complicated by unknown model order and strong local minima. The nonlinear optimization problem is posed for solving for the parameters of the quasi-static source model. The transient nature of the sources can be exploited to allow subspace approaches to separate out the signal portion of the spatial correlation matrix. Decomposition techniques are examined for improved processing, and an adaptation of MUtiple SIgnal Characterization (MUSIC) is presented for solving the source localization problem. Recent results on calculating the Cramer-Rao error lower bounds are extended to the multidimensional problem here. This thesis focuses on the problem of source localization in magnetoencephalography (MEG), with a secondary application to thunderstorm source localization. Comparisons are also made between MEG and its electrical equivalent, electroencephalography (EEG). The error lower bounds are examined in detail for several MEG and EEG configurations, as well as localizing thunderstorm cells over Cape Canaveral and Kennedy Space Center. Time-eigenspectrum is introduced as a parsing technique for improving the performance of the optimization problem.

  18. Experimental analysis of quasi-static and dynamic fracture initiation toughness of gy4 armor steel material

    Ren, Peng; Guo, Zitao

    Quasi-static and dynamic fracture initiation toughness of gy4 armour steel material are investigated using three point bend specimen. The modified split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) apparatus with digital image correlation (DIC) system is applied to dynamic loading experiments. Full-field deformation measurements are obtained by using DIC to elucidate on the strain fields associated with the mechanical response. A series of experiments are conducted at different strain rate ranging from 10-3 s-1 to 103 s-1, and the loading rate on the fracture initiation toughness is investigated. Specially, the scanning electron microscope imaging technique is used to investigate the fracture failure micromechanism of fracture surfaces. The gy4 armour steel material fracture toughness is found to be sensitive to strain rate and higher for dynamic loading as compared to quasi-static loading. This work is supported by National Nature Science Foundation under Grant 51509115.

  19. Micromechanical definition of an entropy for quasi-static deformation of granular materials

    Rothenburg, L.; Kruyt, Nicolaas P.

    2009-01-01

    A micromechanical theory is formulated for quasi-static deformation of granular materials, which is based on information theory. A reasoning is presented that leads to the definition of an information entropy that is appropriate for quasi-static deformation of granular materials. This definition is

  20. Energy based study of quasi-static delamination as a low cycle fatigue process

    Amaral, L.; Yao, L.; Alderliesten, R.C.; Benedictus, R.

    2015-01-01

    This work proposes to treat quasi-static mode I delamination growth of CFRP as a low-cycle fatigue process. To this end, mode I quasi-static and fatigue delamination tests were performed. An average physical Strain Energy Release Rate (SERR), derived from an energy balance, is used to characterize

  1. ORNL probabilistic fracture-mechanics code OCA-P

    Cheverton, R.D.; Ball, D.G.

    1984-01-01

    The computer code OCA-P was developed at the request of the USNRC for the purpose of helping to evaluate the integrity of PWR pressure vessels during overcooling accidents (OCA's). The code can be used for both deterministic and probabilistic fracture-mechanics calculations, and consists essentially of OCA-II and a Monte Carlo routine similar to that developed by Strosnider et al. In the probabilistic mode OCA-P generates a large number of vessels (10 6 more or less), each with a different combination of the various values of the different parameters involved in the analysis of flaw behavior. For each of these vessels a deterministic fracture-mechanics analysis is performed (calculation of K/sub I/, K/sub Ic/, K/sub Ia/) to determine whether vessel failure takes place. The conditional probability of failure is simply the number of vessels that fail divided by the number of vessels generated. OCA-II is used for the deterministic analysis. Basic input to OCA-II includes, among other things, the primry-system pressure transient and the temperature transient for the coolant in the reactor-vessel downcomer. With this and additional information available OCA-II performs a one-dimensional thermal analysis to obtain the temperature distribution in the wall as a function of time and then a one-dimensional linear-elastic stress analysis. OCA-P has been checked against similar codes and is presently being used in the Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock Program for specific PWR plants

  2. Quasi-static structural optimization under the seismic loads

    Choi, W. S.; Lee, K. M.; Kim, T. W.

    2001-01-01

    For preliminaries to optimization of SMART under the seismic loads, a quasi-static structural optimization for elastic structures under dynamic loads is presented. An equivalent static load (ESL) set is defined as a static load set, which generates the same displacement field as that from a dynamic load at a certain time. Multiple ESL sets calculated at all the time intervals are employed to represent the various states of the structure under the dynamic load. They can cover all the critical states that might happen at arbitrary times. The continuous characteristics of a dynamic load are considered by multiple static load sets. The calculated sets of ESLs are utilized as a multiple loading condition in the optimization process. A design cycle is defined as a circulated process between an analysis domain and a design domain. The analysis domain gives the loading condition needed in the design domain. The design domain gives a new updated design to be verified by the analysis domain in the next design cycle. The design cycles are iterated until the design converges. Structural optimization with dynamic loads is tangible by the proposed method. Standard example problems are solved to verify the validity of the method

  3. Modeling of magnetorheological fluid in quasi-static squeeze flow mode

    Horak, Wojciech

    2018-06-01

    This work presents a new nonlinear model to describe MR fluid behavior in the squeeze flow mode. The basis for deriving the model were the principles of continuum mechanics and the theory of tensor transformation. The analyzed case concerned quasi-static squeeze with a constant area, between two parallel plates with non-slip boundary conditions. The developed model takes into account the rheological properties or MR fluids as a viscoplastic material for which yield stress increases due to compression. The model also takes into account the formation of normal force in the MR fluid as a result of the magnetic field impact. Moreover, a new parameter has been introduced which characterizes the behavior of MR fluid subjected to compression. The proposed model has been experimentally validated and the obtained results suggest that the assumptions made in the model development are reasonable, as good model compatibility with the experiments was obtained.

  4. Interpretation of quasi-static and dynamic tensile behavior by digital image correlation technique in TWinning Induced Plasticity (TWIP) and low-carbon steel sheets

    Kang, Minju; Park, Jaeyeong; Sohn, Seok Su; Kim, Hyoung Seop [Center for Advanced Aerospace Materials, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Nack J. [Graduate Institute of Ferrous Technology, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sunghak, E-mail: shlee@postech.ac.kr [Center for Advanced Aerospace Materials, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-02

    In this study, dynamic tensile tests were conducted on TWinning Induced Plasticity (TWIP) and low-carbon (LC) steel sheets at a strain rate of 1500–2000/s by using a split Hopkinson tensile bar, and deformation mechanisms related with improvement of dynamic tensile properties were investigated by a digital image correlation (DIC) technique. The dynamic tensile strength was higher than the quasi-static tensile strength in both TWIP and LC sheets, while the dynamic elongation was same to the quasi-static elongation in the TWIP sheet and was much lower than the quasi-static elongation in the LC sheet. According to the DIC results of the dynamically tensioned TWIP sheet, the homogeneous deformation occurred before the necking at the strain of 47.4%. This indicated that the dynamic deformation processes were almost similar to the quasi-static ones as the TWIP sheet was homogeneously deformed in the initial and intermediate deformation stages. This could be explained by deformation mechanisms including twinning, in consideration of favorable effect of increased twinning on tensile properties under the dynamic loading. On the other hand, the dynamically tensioned LC sheet was rapidly deformed and fractured as the necking was intensified in a narrow strain-concentrated region. The present DIC technique is an outstanding method for detailed dynamic deformation analyses, and provides an important idea for practical safety analyses of automotive steel sheets.

  5. Quasi-static Design of Electrically Small Ultra-Wideband Antennas

    2017-02-01

    Equations. The ACD uses a constant line charge distribution and image line charge distribution (both on the -axis) to generate equipotential surfaces ...Each equipotential surface represents an ACD antenna design with a different height. In the Quasi-static Antenna Design Algorithm [2, 3, 4, 5, 6...quasi- static approximation used in the algorithm. A static charge distribution is used to generate equipotential surfaces . The equipotential surfaces

  6. Seismic performance evaluation of an infilled rocking wall frame structure through quasi-static cyclic testing

    Pan, Peng; Wu, Shoujun; Wang, Haishen; Nie, Xin

    2018-04-01

    Earthquake investigations have illustrated that even code-compliant reinforced concrete frames may suffer from soft-story mechanism. This damage mode results in poor ductility and limited energy dissipation. Continuous components offer alternatives that may avoid such failures. A novel infilled rocking wall frame system is proposed that takes advantage of continuous component and rocking characteristics. Previous studies have investigated similar systems that combine a reinforced concrete frame and a wall with rocking behavior used. However, a large-scale experimental study of a reinforced concrete frame combined with a rocking wall has not been reported. In this study, a seismic performance evaluation of the newly proposed infilled rocking wall frame structure was conducted through quasi-static cyclic testing. Critical joints were designed and verified. Numerical models were established and calibrated to estimate frame shear forces. The results evaluation demonstrate that an infilled rocking wall frame can effectively avoid soft-story mechanisms. Capacity and initial stiffness are greatly improved and self-centering behavior is achieved with the help of the infilled rocking wall. Drift distribution becomes more uniform with height. Concrete cracks and damage occurs in desired areas. The infilled rocking wall frame offers a promising approach to achieving seismic resilience.

  7. Quasi-static puncture resistance behaviors of high-strength polyester fabric for soft body armor

    Qiu-Shi Wang

    Full Text Available A series of economical and flexible fabrics were prepared using high-strength polyester yarns with different fabric structures, weft density and number of layers. The effect of these factors on quasi-static puncture resistance was comparatively studied. The failure mode of the fabrics was analyzed with SEM photographs. Findings indicate that the structure and the weft density affected the quasi-static puncture resistance property of the fabrics, the plain fabrics had better puncture resistance property than twill and satin fabrics. The max puncture force and puncture energy of the plain fabrics with 160 yarn/10 cm reached the max values which were 107.43 N and 0.44 J, respectively. The number of layers had a linear relationship to quasi-static puncture resistance. The contact pressure and friction of the probe against the fibers were the main hindrance during the quasi-static puncture process and the breakage of the fibers during the penetration was caused by the bend and tensile deformation. Keywords: High-strength polyester fabrics, Fabric structure, Multiple-layer fabrics, Quasi-static puncture resistance

  8. Dynamical and quasi-static multi-physical models of a diesel internal combustion engine using Energetic Macroscopic Representation

    Horrein, L.; Bouscayrol, A.; Cheng, Y.; El Fassi, M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) dynamical and static models. • Organization of ICE model using Energetic Macroscopic Representation. • Description of the distribution of the chemical, thermal and mechanical power. • Implementation of the ICE model in a global vehicle model. - Abstract: In the simulation of new vehicles, the Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) is generally modeled by a static map. This model yields the mechanical power and the fuel consumption. But some studies require the heat energy from the ICE to be considered (i.e. waste heat recovery, thermal regulation of the cabin). A dynamical multi-physical model of a diesel engine is developed to consider its heat energy. This model is organized using Energetic Macroscopic Representation (EMR) in order to be interconnected to other various models of vehicle subsystems. An experimental validation is provided. Moreover a multi-physical quasi-static model is also derived. According to different modeling aims, a comparison of the dynamical and the quasi-static model is discussed in the case of the simulation of a thermal vehicle. These multi-physical models with different simulation time consumption provide good basis for studying the effects of the thermal energy on the vehicle behaviors, including the possibilities of waste heat recovery

  9. The Assessing of the Failure Behavior of Glass/Polyester Composites Subject to Quasi Static Stresses

    Stanciu, M. D.; Savin, A.; Teodorescu-Drăghicescu, H.

    2017-06-01

    Using glass fabric reinforced composites for structure of wind turbine blades requires high mechanical strengths especially to cyclic stresses. Studies have shown that approximately 50% of composite material failure occurs because of fatigue. Composites behavior to cyclic stresses involves three stages regarding to stiffness variation: the first stage is characterized by the accelerated decline of stiffness with micro-cracks, the second stage - a slight decrease of stiffness characterized by the occurrence of delamination and third stage characterized by higher decreases of resistance and occurrence of fracture thereof. The aim of the paper is to analyzed the behavior of composites reinforced with glass fibers fabric type RT500 and polyester resin subjected to tensile cyclic loading with pulsating quasi-static regime with asymmetry coefficient R = 0. The samples were tested with the universal tensile machine LS100 Lloyd Instruments Plus, with a load capacity of 100 kN. The load was applied with different speeds of 1 mm/min, 10 mm/min and 20 mm/min. After tests, it was observed that the greatest permanent strains were recorded in the first load cycles when the total energy storage by material was lost due to internal friction. With increasing number of cycles, the glass/polyester composites ability to store energy of deformation decreases, the flow phenomenon characterized by large displacements to smaller loading forces appearing.

  10. Tensile characterisation of the aorta across quasi-static to blast loading strain rates

    Magnus, Danyal; Proud, William; Haller, Antoine; Jouffroy, Apolline

    2017-06-01

    The dynamic tensile failure mechanisms of the aorta during Traumatic Aortic Injury (TAI) are poorly understood. In automotive incidents, where the aorta may be under strains of the order of 100/s, TAI is the second largest cause of mortality. In these studies, the proximal descending aorta is the most common site where rupture is observed. In particular, the transverse direction is most commonly affected due to the circumferential orientation of elastin, and hence the literature generally concentrates upon axial samples. This project extends these dynamic studies to the blast loading regime where strain-rates are of the order of 1000/s. A campaign of uniaxial tensile experiments are conducted at quasi-static, intermediate (drop-weight) and high (tensile Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar) strain rates. In each case, murine and porcine aorta models are considered and the extent of damage assessed post-loading using histology. Experimental data will be compared against current viscoelastic models of the aorta under axial stress. Their applicability across strain rates will be discussed. Using a multi-disciplinary approach, the conditions applied to the samples replicate in vivo conditions, employing a blood simulant-filled tubular specimen surrounded by a physiological solution.

  11. Quasi-static characterisation and impact testing of auxetic foam for sports safety applications

    Duncan, Olly; Alderson, Andrew; Foster, Leon; Senior, Terry; Allen, Tom

    2016-01-01

    This study compared low strain rate material properties and impact force attenuation of auxetic foam and the conventional open-cell polyurethane counterpart. This furthers our knowledge with regards to how best to apply these highly conformable and breathable auxetic foams to protective sports equipment. Cubes of auxetic foam measuring 150 × 150 × 150 mm were fabricated using a thermo–mechanical conversion process. Quasi-static compression confirmed the converted foam to be auxetic, prior to being sliced into 20 mm thick cuboid samples for further testing. Density, Poisson’s ratio and the stress–strain curve were all found to be dependent on the position of each cuboid from within the cube. Impact tests with a hemispherical drop hammer were performed for energies up to 6 J, on foams covered with a polypropylene sheet between 1 and 2 mm thick. Auxetic samples reduced peak force by ∼10 times in comparison to the conventional foam. This work has shown further potential for auxetic foam to be applied to protective equipment, while identifying that improved fabrication methods are required. (paper)

  12. Residual stresses under quasi-static and cyclic loading in shot peened Inconel 718

    Hoffmeister, Juergen; Schulze, Volker [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. for Applied Materials; Hessert, Roland; Koenig, Gerhard [MTU Aero Engines, Munich (Germany)

    2012-01-15

    The residual stress state induced by shot peening should be taken into account in the dimensioning of turbine components. Understanding the changes in the residual stress state caused by the application of quasi-static and cyclic loads is a prerequisite. In order to describe the residual stress state after quasi-static loading, several different shot peened Inconel 718 specimens were loaded isothermally up to specific tensile loadings. To analyze the residual stress state after cyclic loading, isothermal low cycle fatigue tests were performed. These tests were stopped after a defined number of cycles. Finally, after the specimens had been subjected to different loads, the surface residual stresses and - for special loadings - the residual stress depth distributions were determined experimentally by using X-ray diffraction. The surface - core model was adapted so that the complete residual stress depth distribution after quasi-static and cyclic loading can now be described. (orig.)

  13. A Monte Carlo implementation of the predictor-corrector Quasi-Static method

    Hackemack, M. W.; Ragusa, J. C.; Griesheimer, D. P.; Pounders, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    The Quasi-Static method (QS) is a useful tool for solving reactor transients since it allows for larger time steps when updating neutron distributions. Because of the beneficial attributes of Monte Carlo (MC) methods (exact geometries and continuous energy treatment), it is desirable to develop a MC implementation for the QS method. In this work, the latest version of the QS method known as the Predictor-Corrector Quasi-Static method is implemented. Experiments utilizing two energy-groups provide results that show good agreement with analytical and reference solutions. The method as presented can easily be implemented in any continuous energy, arbitrary geometry, MC code. (authors)

  14. Analysis of the elastic behaviour of nonclassical nonlinear mesoscopic materials in quasi-static experiments

    Ruffino, E.; Scalerandi, M.

    2000-01-01

    As discovered by recent quasi-static and dynamic resonance experiments, the classical nonlinear theory fails in describing the hysteretic behaviour of nonlinear mesoscopic materials like rocks, concrete, etc. The paper applies the local interaction simulation approach (LISA) for studying such kind of nonclassical nonlinearity. To this purpose, in the LISA treatment of ultrasonic wave propagation has been included a phenomenological model, based on the PM space approach, of the local mesoscopic features of rocks and other materials with localized damages. A quantitative comparison of simulation and experimental results in quasi-static experiments is also presented

  15. Quasi-static and dynamic experimental studies on the tensile strength and failure pattern of concrete and mortar discs.

    Jin, Xiaochao; Hou, Cheng; Fan, Xueling; Lu, Chunsheng; Yang, Huawei; Shu, Xuefeng; Wang, Zhihua

    2017-11-10

    As concrete and mortar materials widely used in structural engineering may suffer dynamic loadings, studies on their mechanical properties under different strain rates are of great importance. In this paper, based on splitting tests of Brazilian discs, the tensile strength and failure pattern of concrete and mortar were investigated under quasi-static and dynamic loadings with a strain rate of 1-200 s -1 . It is shown that the quasi-static tensile strength of mortar is higher than that of concrete since coarse aggregates weaken the interface bonding strength of the latter. Numerical results confirmed that the plane stress hypothesis lead to a lower value tensile strength for the cylindrical specimens. With the increase of strain rates, dynamic tensile strengths of concrete and mortar significantly increase, and their failure patterns change form a single crack to multiple cracks and even fragment. Furthermore, a relationship between the dynamic increase factor and strain rate was established by using a linear fitting algorithm, which can be conveniently used to calculate the dynamic increase factor of concrete-like materials in engineering applications.

  16. The breakage behaviour of Aspirin under quasi-static indentation and single particle impact loading: effect of crystallographic anisotropy.

    Olusanmi, D; Roberts, K J; Ghadiri, M; Ding, Y

    2011-06-15

    The influence of crystallographic structural anisotropy on the breakage behaviour of Aspirin under impact loading is highlighted. Under both quasi-static testing conditions, using nano-indentation, and dynamic impact tests, Aspirin demonstrates clear anisotropy in its slip and fracture behaviour. During nano-indentation on the (100) and (001) faces, cracks were propagated along the [010] direction. While the hardness was found to be comparatively similar for both these faces, it was observed that slip due to plastic deformation occurred more readily on the (100) than the (001) crystal planes suggesting the former as the preferred slip plane. Furthermore, the fracture toughness on the (001) planes was found to be distinctly lower than that of the (100) planes, indicating the former as the preferred cleavage plane. Observations of the crystal morphology of damaged particles after dynamic impact testing showed that both the chipping and fragmentation of Aspirin mostly occurred via cleavage in a manner consistent with the observed fracture behaviour following nano-indentation. This work highlights the importance of cleavage as a dominant factor underpinning the fracture mechanism of Aspirin under both quasi-static and impact loading conditions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Challenging the in-vivo assessment of biomechanical properties of the uterine cervix: A critical analysis of ultrasound based quasi-static procedures.

    Maurer, M M; Badir, S; Pensalfini, M; Bajka, M; Abitabile, P; Zimmermann, R; Mazza, E

    2015-06-25

    Measuring the stiffness of the uterine cervix might be useful in the prediction of preterm delivery, a still unsolved health issue of global dimensions. Recently, a number of clinical studies have addressed this topic, proposing quantitative methods for the assessment of the mechanical properties of the cervix. Quasi-static elastography, maximum compressibility using ultrasound and aspiration tests have been applied for this purpose. The results obtained with the different methods seem to provide contradictory information about the physiologic development of cervical stiffness during pregnancy. Simulations and experiments were performed in order to rationalize the findings obtained with ultrasound based, quasi-static procedures. The experimental and computational results clearly illustrate that standardization of quasi-static elastography leads to repeatable strain values, but for different loading forces. Since force cannot be controlled, this current approach does not allow the distinction between a globally soft and stiff cervix. It is further shown that introducing a reference elastomer into the elastography measurement might overcome the problem of force standardization, but a careful mechanical analysis is required to obtain reliable stiffness values for cervical tissue. In contrast, the maximum compressibility procedure leads to a repeatable, semi-quantitative assessment of cervical consistency, due to the nonlinear nature of the mechanical behavior of cervical tissue. The evolution of cervical stiffness in pregnancy obtained with this procedure is in line with data from aspiration tests. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Universal formula for quasi-static density perturbation by a magnetoplasma wave

    Kaufman, A.N.; Cary, J.R.; Pereira, N.R.

    1979-01-01

    The general expression for the ponderomotive Hamiltonian is used to obtain the quasi-static quasi-neutral density change caused by the ponderomotive force of a cold magnetoplasma wave of arbitrary frequency and polarization: deltan (x) =-[vertical-barE(x) vertical-bar 2 -vertical-barB(x) vertical-bar 2 ] /4π

  19. Development of temperature stable charge based piezoelectric composite quasi-static pressure sensors

    Ende, D.A. van den; Groen, W.A.; Zwaag, S. van der

    2010-01-01

    In this work piezoelectric composite charge based sensors are developed, aimed at quasi-static pressure sensor or switch type applications. The use of piezoelectric composite materials allows for manufacturing robust devices which can easily be integrated with conventional polymer processing.

  20. Confirmation of quasi-static approximation in SAR evaluation for a wireless power transfer system.

    Hirata, Akimasa; Ito, Fumihiro; Laakso, Ilkka

    2013-09-07

    The present study discusses the applicability of the magneto-quasi-static approximation to the calculation of the specific absorption rate (SAR) in a cylindrical model for a wireless power transfer system. Resonant coils with different parameters were considered in the 10 MHz band. A two-step quasi-static method that is comprised of the method of moments and the scalar-potential finite-difference methods is applied, which can consider the effects of electric and magnetic fields on the induced SAR separately. From our computational results, the SARs obtained from our quasi-static method are found to be in good agreement with full-wave analysis for different positions of the cylindrical model relative to the wireless power transfer system, confirming the applicability of the quasi-static approximation in the 10 MHz band. The SAR induced by the external electric field is found to be marginal as compared to that induced by the magnetic field. Thus, the dosimetry for the external magnetic field, which may be marginally perturbed by the presence of biological tissue, is confirmed to be essential for SAR compliance in the 10 MHz band or lower. This confirmation also suggests that the current in the coil rather than the transferred power is essential for SAR compliance.

  1. Confirmation of quasi-static approximation in SAR evaluation for a wireless power transfer system

    Hirata, Akimasa; Ito, Fumihiro; Laakso, Ilkka

    2013-01-01

    The present study discusses the applicability of the magneto-quasi-static approximation to the calculation of the specific absorption rate (SAR) in a cylindrical model for a wireless power transfer system. Resonant coils with different parameters were considered in the 10 MHz band. A two-step quasi-static method that is comprised of the method of moments and the scalar-potential finite-difference methods is applied, which can consider the effects of electric and magnetic fields on the induced SAR separately. From our computational results, the SARs obtained from our quasi-static method are found to be in good agreement with full-wave analysis for different positions of the cylindrical model relative to the wireless power transfer system, confirming the applicability of the quasi-static approximation in the 10 MHz band. The SAR induced by the external electric field is found to be marginal as compared to that induced by the magnetic field. Thus, the dosimetry for the external magnetic field, which may be marginally perturbed by the presence of biological tissue, is confirmed to be essential for SAR compliance in the 10 MHz band or lower. This confirmation also suggests that the current in the coil rather than the transferred power is essential for SAR compliance. (note)

  2. Experimental Strength of Single-Lap Hybrid Joints on Woven Fabric Kenaf Fiber Composites Under Quasi Static Condition

    Yee Lee Sim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For the past decades, usage of natural fiber reinforced composites in low bearing load applications are increasing tremendously due to drawbacks concerning the use of synthetic fibers. Kenaf fibers have a good potential to be used as composite reinforcements as they possesses excellent fiber strength compared to own self-weight. Current work concentrates on mechanical properties of woven fabric kenaf composites with single-lap hybrid joints configurations. Four width to diameter ratio, (W/d of cross-ply lay-up joints as designed in testing series were tested by using quasi static mechanical testing. Experimental results showed that the failure load increased with the increasing of W/d ratios. Thinner lay-up had better bearing strength compared to thicker lay-up as found in current study.

  3. Simulation of quasi-static hydraulic fracture propagation in porous media with XFEM

    Juan-Lien Ramirez, Alina; Neuweiler, Insa; Löhnert, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is the injection of a fracking fluid at high pressures into the underground. Its goal is to create and expand fracture networks to increase the rock permeability. It is a technique used, for example, for oil and gas recovery and for geothermal energy extraction, since higher rock permeability improves production. Many physical processes take place when it comes to fracking; rock deformation, fluid flow within the fractures, as well as into and through the porous rock. All these processes are strongly coupled, what makes its numerical simulation rather challenging. We present a 2D numerical model that simulates the hydraulic propagation of an embedded fracture quasi-statically in a poroelastic, fully saturated material. Fluid flow within the porous rock is described by Darcy's law and the flow within the fracture is approximated by a parallel plate model. Additionally, the effect of leak-off is taken into consideration. The solid component of the porous medium is assumed to be linear elastic and the propagation criteria are given by the energy release rate and the stress intensity factors [1]. The used numerical method for the spatial discretization is the eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM) [2]. It is based on the standard Finite Element Method, but introduces additional degrees of freedom and enrichment functions to describe discontinuities locally in a system. Through them the geometry of the discontinuity (e.g. a fracture) becomes independent of the mesh allowing it to move freely through the domain without a mesh-adapting step. With this numerical model we are able to simulate hydraulic fracture propagation with different initial fracture geometries and material parameters. Results from these simulations will also be presented. References [1] D. Gross and T. Seelig. Fracture Mechanics with an Introduction to Micromechanics. Springer, 2nd edition, (2011) [2] T. Belytschko and T. Black. Elastic crack growth in finite elements with minimal

  4. The quasi-equilibrium response of MOS structures: Quasi-static factor

    Okeke, M.; Balland, B.

    1984-07-01

    The dynamic response of a MOS structure driven into a non-equilibrium behaviour by a voltage ramp is presented. In contrast to Khun's quasi-static technique it is shown that any ramp-driven MOS structure has some degree of non-equilibrium. A quasi staticity factor μAK which serves as a measure of the degree of quasi-equilibrium, has been introduced for the first time. The mathematical model presented in the paper allows a better explanation of the experimental recordings. It is shown that this model could be used to analyse the various features of the response of the structure and that such physical parameters as the generation-rate, trap activation energy, and the effective capture constants could be obtained.

  5. An improved technique for quasi-static C-V measurements

    Turan, R.; Finstad, T.G.

    1990-10-01

    A new automated quasi-static C-V measurement technique for MOS capacitors has been developed. This techniques uses an integrating electrometer to measure the charge accumulated on a MOS capacitor in response of a small voltage step. Making use of the internal data storage system of a commercial electrometer and a personal computer, the charge Q on the MOS capacitor is measured as a function of time t and stored. The capacitance is then obtained by analyzing this Q-t data set. A Si MOS sample is measured and analyzed in terms of interface charges as an example. Advantages over a commercial quasi-static meter which uses similar measurement technique are presented. It is also shown that this technique is potentially capable of measuring both high and low frequency C-V curves simultaneously. 9 refs. 5 figs

  6. Triaxial quasi-static compression and creep behavior of bedded salt from southeastern New Mexico

    Hansen, F.D.

    1979-11-01

    This report summarizes the results obtained from a series of triaxial quasi-static compression and creep tests on specimens of bedded salt recovered at depth intervals of 1953 to 1954 and 2711 to 2722 feet in AEC Hole No. 7 in southeastern New Mexico. The primary objective was the determination of the deformational characteristics of the salt for prescribed stress and temperature states under quasi-static and time-dependent conditions. The test conditions encompassed confining pressures of 500 and 2000 psi, differential axial stresses of 1500, 3000 and 4500 psi, temperatures of 23 and 100 0 C, and time durations of several hours to ten days. The data analysis was confined primarily to power law fits to the creep strain-time measurements and to an evaluation of the principal strain ratio behavior for the various test conditions and axial strain magnitudes

  7. Application of genetic algorithm in quasi-static fiber grating wavelength demodulation technology

    2007-01-01

    A modified genetic algorithm (GA) has been proposed, which was used to wavelength demodulation in quasi-static fiber grating sensing system. The modification method of GA has been introduced and the relevant mathematical model has been established. The objective function and individual fitness evaluation strategy interrelated with GA are also established. The influence of population size, chromosome size, generations, crossover probability and mutation probability on the GA has been analyzed, and the optimal parameters of modified GA have been obtained. The simulations and experiments, show that the modified GA can be applied to quasi-static fiber grating sensing system, and the wavelength demodulation precision is equal to or less than 3 pm.

  8. Neutron kinetics of fluid-fuel systems by the quasi-static method

    Dulla, S.; Ravetto, P.; Rostagno, M.M.

    2004-01-01

    The quasi-static method for the neutron kinetics of nuclear reactors is generalized for application to neutron multiplying systems fueled by a fluid multiplying material, typically a mixture of fissile molten salts. The method is derived by the application of factorization formulae for both the neutron density and the delayed precursor concentrations and the projection of the balance equations upon a weighting function. A physically meaningful weight can be assumed as the solution of the adjoint model, which is constructed for the situation considered, including delayed neutrons. The quasi-static scheme is then applied to calculations of some transients for a typical configuration of a molten-salt reactor, in a multigroup diffusion model with a one-dimensional slug-flow velocity field. The physical features associated to the motion of the fissile material are highlighted

  9. Relationship between Alfvén Wave and Quasi-Static Acceleration in Earth's Auroral Zone

    Mottez, Fabrice

    2016-02-01

    There are two main categories of acceleration processes in the Earth's auroral zone: those based on quasi-static structures, and those based on Alfvén wave (AW). AWs play a nonnegligible role in the global energy budget of the plasma surrounding the Earth because they participate in auroral acceleration, and because auroral acceleration conveys a large portion of the energy flux across the magnetosphere. Acceleration events by double layers (DLs) and by AW have mostly been investigated separately, but many studies cited in this chapter show that they are not independent: these processes can occur simultaneously, and one process can be the cause of the other. The quasi-simultaneous occurrences of acceleration by AW and by quasi-static structures have been observed predominantly at the polar cap boundary of auroral arc systems, where often new bright arcs develop or intensify.

  10. Quasi-Static Evolution, Catastrophe, and Failed Eruption of Solar Flux Ropes

    2016-12-30

    Ropes James Chen Beam Physics Branch Plasma Physics Division December 30, 2016 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. i REPORT...pressure gradient force combine to balance the major radial hoop force. The macroscopic forces on the flux ropes and onset conditions are quantified...Solar physics theory 67-4989-07 Quasi-Static Evolution, Catastrophe, and “Failed” Eruption of Solar Flux Ropes James Chen1 Plasma Physics Division

  11. ENERGY DISSIPATION THROUGH QUASI-STATIC TIDES IN WHITE DWARF BINARIES

    Willems, B.; Deloye, C. J.; Kalogera, V.

    2010-01-01

    We present a formalism to study tidal interactions in white dwarf binaries in the limiting case of quasi-static tides, in which the tidal forcing frequencies are small, compared to the inverse of the white dwarf's dynamical timescale. The formalism is valid for arbitrary orbital eccentricities and therefore applicable to white dwarf binaries in the Galactic disk as well as globular clusters. In the quasi-static limit, the total perturbation of the gravitational potential shows a phase shift with respect to the position of the companion, the magnitude of which is determined primarily by the efficiency of energy dissipation through convective damping. We determine rates of secular evolution of the orbital elements and white dwarf rotational angular velocity for a 0.3 M sun helium white dwarf in binaries with orbital frequencies in the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) gravitational wave frequency band and companion masses ranging from 0.3 M sun to 10 5 M sun . The resulting tidal evolution timescales for the orbital semimajor axis are longer than a Hubble time, so that convective damping of quasi-static tides need not be considered in the construction of gravitational wave templates of white dwarf binaries in the LISA band. Spin-up of the white dwarf, on the other hand, can occur on timescales of less than 10 Myr, provided that the white dwarf is initially rotating with a frequency much smaller than the orbital frequency. For semi-detached white dwarf binaries spin-up can occur on timescales of less than 1 Myr. Nevertheless, the timescales remain longer than the orbital inspiral timescales due to gravitational radiation, so that the degree of asynchronism in these binaries increases. As a consequence, tidal forcing eventually occurs at forcing frequencies beyond the quasi-static tide approximation. For the shortest period binaries, energy dissipation is therefore expected to take place through dynamic tides and resonantly excited g-modes.

  12. Quasi-static Multilayer Electrical Modeling of Human Limb for IBC

    S. H. Pun

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Home health care system and long term physiologic parameters monitoring system are important for elevating the living quality of chronic disease patients and elderly. Elaborating towards a sophisticated and comprehensive home health care system, Intra-Body Communication (IBC is believed to have advantages in power consumption, electromagnetic radiation, interference from external electromagnetic noise, security, and restriction in spectrum resource. In this article, we start from quasi-static Maxwell

  13. Ionospheric quasi-static electric field anomalies during seismic activity in August–September 1981

    M. Gousheva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes new results, analyses and information for the plate tectonic situation in the processing of INTERCOSMOS-BULGARIA-1300 satellite data about anomalies of the quasi-static electric field in the upper ionosphere over activated earthquake source regions at different latitudes. The earthquake catalogue is made on the basis of information from the United State Geological Survey (USGS website. The disturbances in ionospheric quasi-static electric fields are recorded by IESP-1 instrument aboard the INTERCOSMOS-BULGARIA-1300 satellite and they are compared with significant seismic events from the period 14 August–20 September 1981 in magnetically very quiet, quiet and medium quiet days. The main tectonic characteristics of the seismically activated territories are also taken in account. The main goal of the above research work is to enlarge the research of possible connections between anomalous vertical electric field penetrations into the ionosphere and the earthquake manifestations, also to propose tectonic arguments for the observed phenomena. The studies are represented in four main blocks: (i previous studies of similar problems, (ii selection of satellite, seismic and plate tectonic data, (iii data processing with new specialized software and observations of the quasi-static electric field and (iiii summary, comparison of new with previous results in our studies and conclusion. We establish the high informativity of the vertical component Ez of the quasi-static electric field in the upper ionosphere according observations by INTERCOSMOS-BULGARIA-1300 that are placed above considerably activated earthquake sources. This component shows an increase of about 2–10 mV/m above sources, situated on mobile structures of the plates. The paper discusses the observed effects. It is represented also a statistical study of ionospheric effects 5–15 days before and 5–15 days after the earthquakes with magnitude M 4.8–7.9.

  14. A quasi-static polynomial nodal method for nuclear reactor analysis

    Gehin, J.C.

    1992-09-01

    Modern nodal methods are currently available which can accurately and efficiently solve the static and transient neutron diffusion equations. Most of the methods, however, are limited to two energy groups for practical application. The objective of this research is the development of a static and transient, multidimensional nodal method which allows more than two energy groups and uses a non-linear iterative method for efficient solution of the nodal equations. For both the static and transient methods, finite-difference equations which are corrected by the use of discontinuity factors are derived. The discontinuity factors are computed from a polynomial nodal method using a non-linear iteration technique. The polynomial nodal method is based upon a quartic approximation and utilizes a quadratic transverse-leakage approximation. The solution of the time-dependent equations is performed by the use of a quasi-static method in which the node-averaged fluxes are factored into shape and amplitude functions. The application of the quasi-static polynomial method to several benchmark problems demonstrates that the accuracy is consistent with that of other nodal methods. The use of the quasi-static method is shown to substantially reduce the computation time over the traditional fully-implicit time-integration method. Problems involving thermal-hydraulic feedback are accurately, and efficiently, solved by performing several reactivity/thermal-hydraulic updates per shape calculation

  15. A quasi-static polynomial nodal method for nuclear reactor analysis

    Gehin, Jess C. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1992-09-01

    Modern nodal methods are currently available which can accurately and efficiently solve the static and transient neutron diffusion equations. Most of the methods, however, are limited to two energy groups for practical application. The objective of this research is the development of a static and transient, multidimensional nodal method which allows more than two energy groups and uses a non-linear iterative method for efficient solution of the nodal equations. For both the static and transient methods, finite-difference equations which are corrected by the use of discontinuity factors are derived. The discontinuity factors are computed from a polynomial nodal method using a non-linear iteration technique. The polynomial nodal method is based upon a quartic approximation and utilizes a quadratic transverse-leakage approximation. The solution of the time-dependent equations is performed by the use of a quasi-static method in which the node-averaged fluxes are factored into shape and amplitude functions. The application of the quasi-static polynomial method to several benchmark problems demonstrates that the accuracy is consistent with that of other nodal methods. The use of the quasi-static method is shown to substantially reduce the computation time over the traditional fully-implicit time-integration method. Problems involving thermal-hydraulic feedback are accurately, and efficiently, solved by performing several reactivity/thermal-hydraulic updates per shape calculation.

  16. Quasi-static axial crushes on woven jute/polyester AA6063T52 composite tubes

    Othman, A.; Ismail, AE

    2018-04-01

    Quasi-static axial loading have been studied in this paper to determine the behaviour of jute/polyester wrapped on aluminium alloy 6063T52. The filler material also was include into crush box specimen, which is polyurethane (PU) and polystyrene (PE) rigid foam at ranging 40 and 45 kg/m3 densities. All specimen profile was fabricated using hand layup techniques and the length of each specimen were fixed at 100 mm as well as diameter and width of the tube at 50.8 mm. The two types of tubular cross-section were studied of round and square thin-walled profiles and the angle of fibre at 450 were analysed for four layers. Thin walled of aluminium was 1.9 mm and end frontal of each specimen of composite were chamfered at 450 to prevent catastrophic failure mode. The specific absorbed energy (SEA) and crush force efficiency (CFE) were analyses for each specimen to see the behaviour on jute/polyester wrapped on metallic structure can give influence the energy management for automotive application. Result show that the four layers’ jute/polyester with filler material show significant value in term of specific absorbed energy compared empty and polyurethane profiles higher 26.66% for empty and 15.19% compared to polyurethane profiles. It has been found that the thin walled square profile of the jute/polyester tubes with polystyrene foam-filled is found higher respectively 27.42% to 13.13% than empty and polyurethane (PU) foam tubes. An introduce filler material onto thin walled composite profiles gave major advantage increases the mean axial load of 31.87% from 32.94 kN to 48.35 kN from empty to polystyrene thin walled round jute/polyester profiles and 31.7% from 23.11 KN to 33.84 kN from empty to polystyrene thin walled square jute/polyester profiles. Failure mechanisms of the axially loaded composite tubes were also observed and discussed.

  17. A quasi-static algorithm that includes effects of characteristic time scales for simulating failures in brittle materials

    Liu, Jinxing; El Sayed, Tamer S.

    2013-01-01

    When the brittle heterogeneous material is simulated via lattice models, the quasi-static failure depends on the relative magnitudes of Telem, the characteristic releasing time of the internal forces of the broken elements and Tlattice

  18. On the relation between quasi-static and dynamic stress induced reversible structural relaxation of amorphous alloys

    Krueger, P.; Stucky, T.; Boewe, M.; Neuhaeuser, H.

    1993-01-01

    Quasi-static stress relaxation and dynamic internal friction measurements of stress induced reversible structural relaxation were performed on the amorphous alloy Fe 40 Ni 40 B 20 . The kinetics can be well described by a stretched exponential Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts quasi-static relaxation. The thermally activated part of the internal friction shows an Arrhenius temperature behaviour for a fixed vibration frequency and an inverse power frequency behaviour for a fixed temperature. The activation energies calculated from the Arrhenius equation and from the frequency shift method are significantly different. In order to explain this discrepancy the relation between the quasi-static and the dynamic descriptions of the reversible relaxation is reexamined. In particular it is shown that these two activation energies are connected by the Kohlrausch exponent of the quasi-static relaxation. (orig.)

  19. ORNL `90

    Anderson, T.; Barnes, D.; Jefferson, J. [eds.

    1990-12-31

    This overview of research conducted at ORNL in 1991 presents information on the subjects of biology, physics, and the environment. Specific topics include gene mutations in kidney disease, technology assessments in thermonuclear fusion, submarine hunting technology, ozone-safe refrigerants, optical data storage via surface enhanced raman spectroscopy, and waste mitigating microbes. (GHH)

  20. Dynamic and quasi-static simulation and analysis of the plutonium oxide/metal containers subject to 30-foot dropping

    Gong, C.; Miller, R.F.

    1995-01-01

    This analysis of the plutonium oxide/metal storage containers is in support of the design and testing project The results from the dynamic analysis show some important facts that have not been considered before. The internal bagless transfer can will have higher stress than the primary container. The quasi-static analysis provides a conservative solution. In both vertical upright drop (dynamic) and inclined upside down drop (quasi-static) the containers are structurally sound

  1. Research on Monte Carlo improved quasi-static method for reactor space-time dynamics

    Xu Qi; Wang Kan; Li Shirui; Yu Ganglin

    2013-01-01

    With large time steps, improved quasi-static (IQS) method can improve the calculation speed for reactor dynamic simulations. The Monte Carlo IQS method was proposed in this paper, combining the advantages of both the IQS method and MC method. Thus, the Monte Carlo IQS method is beneficial for solving space-time dynamics problems of new concept reactors. Based on the theory of IQS, Monte Carlo algorithms for calculating adjoint neutron flux, reactor kinetic parameters and shape function were designed and realized. A simple Monte Carlo IQS code and a corresponding diffusion IQS code were developed, which were used for verification of the Monte Carlo IQS method. (authors)

  2. Quasi-static electric field in a cylindrical volume conductor induced by external coils.

    Esselle, K P; Stuchly, M A

    1994-02-01

    An expansion technique based on modified Bessel functions is used to obtain an analytical solution for the electric field induced in a homogeneous cylindrical volume conductor by an external coil. The current in the coil is assumed to be changing slowly so that quasi-static conditions can be justified. Valid for any coil type, this solution is ideal for fast computation of the induced electric field at a large number of points. Efficient implementation of this method in a computer code is described and numerical results are presented for a perpendicular circular coil and a tangential double-square coil.

  3. Small-Scale Quasi-Static Tests on Non-Slender Piles Situated in Sand

    Sørensen, Søren Peder Hyldal; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    In the period from February 2009 till March 2011 a series of small-scale tests on pile foundations has been conducted at Aalborg University. In all the tests the piles have been exposed to quasi-static loading and all the tests have been conducted in a pressure tank. The objective of the tests has...... been to investigate the effect of pile diameter and length to diameter ratio on the soil response in sand for non-slender piles. Further, the tests have been conducted to calibrate a three-dimensional numerical model in the commercial program FLAC3D....

  4. A New Energy Efficiency Measure for Quasi-Static MIMO Channels

    Belmega , Elena Veronica; Lasaulce , Samson; Debbah , Merouane; Hjorungnes , Are

    2009-01-01

    International audience; In this paper, we consider the multiple input multiple out- put (MIMO) quasi static channel. Our objective is to study the power allocation (over the transmit antennas) problem where not only the performance with respect to (w.r.t.) the transmission reliability but also the cost in terms of the consumed power is accounted for. We first review the existing results w.r.t energy effciency functions (benefit per cost) which focus mainly on the single input single output (S...

  5. Investigation of Quasi-Static Indentation Response of Inkjet Printed Sandwich Structures under Various Indenter Geometries

    Dikshit, Vishwesh; Nagalingam, Arun Prasanth; Yap, Yee Ling; Sing, Swee Leong; Yeong, Wai Yee; Wei, Jun

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to determine the quasi-static indentation response and failure mode in three-dimensional (3D) printed trapezoidal core structures, and to characterize the energy absorbed by the structures. In this work, the trapezoidal sandwich structure was designed in the following two ways. Firstly, the trapezoidal core along with its facesheet was 3D printed as a single element comprising a single material for both core and facesheet (type A); Secondly, the trapezoidal core along with facesheet was 3D printed, but with variation in facesheet materials (type B). Quasi-static indentation was carried out using three different indenters, namely standard hemispherical, conical, and flat indenters. Acoustic emission (AE) technique was used to capture brittle cracking in the specimens during indentation. The major failure modes were found to be brittle failure and quasi-brittle fractures. The measured indentation energy was at a maximum when using a conical indenter at 9.40 J and 9.66 J and was at a minimum when using a hemispherical indenter at 6.87 J and 8.82 J for type A and type B series specimens respectively. The observed maximum indenter displacements at failure were the effect of material variations and composite configurations in the facesheet. PMID:28772649

  6. Quasi-static Cycle Performance Analysis of Micro Modular Reactor for Heat Sink Temperature Variation

    Cho, Seong Kuk; Lee, Jekyoung; Ahn, Yoonhan; Lee, Jeong Ik [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Jae Eun [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    A Supercritical CO{sub 2} (S-CO{sub 2}) cycle has potential for high thermal efficiency in the moderate turbine inlet temperature (450 - 750 .deg. C) and achieving compact system size because of small specific volume and simple cycle layouts. Owing to small specific volume of S-CO{sub 2} and the development of heat exchanger technology, it can accomplish complete modularization of the system. The previous works focused on the cycle performance analysis for the design point only. However, the heat sink temperature can be changed depending on the ambient atmosphere condition, i.e. weather, seasonal change. This can influence the compressor inlet temperature, which alters the cycle operating condition overall. To reflect the heat sink temperature variation, a quasi-static analysis code for a simple recuperated S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle has been developed by the KAIST research team. Thus, cycle performance analysis is carried out with a compressor inlet temperature variation in this research. In the case of dry air-cooling system, the ambient temperature of the local surrounding can affect the compressor inlet temperature. As the compressor inlet temperature increases, thermal efficiency and generated electricity decrease. As further works, the experiment of S-CO{sub 2} integral test loop will be performed to validate in-house codes, such as KAIST{sub T}MD and the quasi-static code.

  7. Enhancement of quasi-static strain energy harvesters using non-uniform cross-section post-buckled beams

    Jiao, Pengcheng; Borchani, Wassim; Hasni, Hassene; Lajnef, Nizar

    2017-08-01

    Thanks to their efficiency enhancement systems based on post-buckled structural elements have been extensively used in many applications such as actuation, remote sensing and energy harvesting. The post-buckling snap-through behavior of bilaterally constrained beams has been exploited to create sensing or energy harvesting mechanisms for quasi-static applications. The conversion mechanism has been used to transform low-rate and low-frequency excitations into high-rate motions. Electric energy has been generated from such high-rate motions using piezoelectric transducers. However, lack of control over the post-buckling behavior severely limits the mechanism’s efficiency. This study aims to maximize the levels of harvestable power by controlling the location of snap-throughs along the beam at different buckling transitions. Since the snap-through location cannot be controlled by tuning the geometric properties of a uniform beam, non-uniform cross-sections are examined. An energy-based theoretical model is herein developed to predict the post-buckling response of non-prismatic beams. The total potential energy is minimized under constraints that represent the physical confinement of the beam between the lateral boundaries. The experimentally validated results show that changing the shape and geometric dimensions of non-uniform beams allows for the accurate controlling of the snap-through location at different buckling transitions. A 78.59% improvement in harvested energy levels has been achieved by optimization of beam shape.

  8. Nonlinear quasi-static finite element simulations predict in vitro strength of human proximal femora assessed in a dynamic sideways fall setup.

    Varga, Peter; Schwiedrzik, Jakob; Zysset, Philippe K; Fliri-Hofmann, Ladina; Widmer, Daniel; Gueorguiev, Boyko; Blauth, Michael; Windolf, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Osteoporotic proximal femur fractures are caused by low energy trauma, typically when falling on the hip from standing height. Finite element simulations, widely used to predict the fracture load of femora in fall, usually include neither mass-related inertial effects, nor the viscous part of bone׳s material behavior. The aim of this study was to elucidate if quasi-static non-linear homogenized finite element analyses can predict in vitro mechanical properties of proximal femora assessed in dynamic drop tower experiments. The case-specific numerical models of 13 femora predicted the strength (R(2)=0.84, SEE=540N, 16.2%), stiffness (R(2)=0.82, SEE=233N/mm, 18.0%) and fracture energy (R(2)=0.72, SEE=3.85J, 39.6%); and provided fair qualitative matches with the fracture patterns. The influence of material anisotropy was negligible for all predictions. These results suggest that quasi-static homogenized finite element analysis may be used to predict mechanical properties of proximal femora in the dynamic sideways fall situation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Plastic collapse and energy absorption of circular filled tubes under quasi-static loads by computational analysis

    Beng, Yeo Kiam; Tzeng, Woo Wen [Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Sabah (Malaysia)

    2017-02-15

    This study presents the finite element analysis of plastic collapse and energy absorption of polyurethane-filled aluminium circular tubes under quasi-static transverse loading. Increasing focuses were given to impact damage of structures where energy absorbed during impact could be controlled to avoid total structure collapse of energy absorbers and devices designed to dissipate energy. ABAQUS finite element analysis application was utilized for modelling and simulating the polyurethane-filled aluminium tubes, different set of diameterto- thickness ratios and span lengths, subjected to transverse three-point-bending load. Different sets of polyurethane-filled aluminium tubes subjected to the transverse loading were modelled and simulated. The failure modes and mechanisms of filled tubes and its capabilities as energy absorbers to further improve and strengthening of empty tube were also identified. The results showed that plastic deformation response was affected by the geometric constraints and parameters of the specimens. The diameter-to-thickness ratio and span lengths had shown to play crucial role in optimizing the PU-filled tube as energy absorber.

  10. Aggregate Effect on the Concrete Cone Capacity of an Undercut Anchor under Quasi-Static Tensile Load.

    Marcon, Marco; Ninčević, Krešimir; Boumakis, Ioannis; Czernuschka, Lisa-Marie; Wan-Wendner, Roman

    2018-05-01

    In the last decades, fastening systems have become an essential part of the construction industry. Post-installed mechanical anchors are frequently used in concrete members to connect them with other load bearing structural members, or to attach appliances. Their performance is limited by the concrete related failure modes which are highly influenced by the concrete mix design. This paper aims at investigating the effect that different aggregates used in the concrete mix have on the capacity of an undercut anchor under tensile quasi-static loading. Three concrete batches were cast utilising three different aggregate types. For two concrete ages (28 and 70 days), anchor tensile capacity and concrete properties were obtained. Concrete compressive strength, fracture energy and elastic modulus are used to normalize and compare the undercut anchor concrete tensile capacity employing some of the most widely used prediction models. For a more insightful comparison, a statistical method that yields also scatter information is introduced. Finally, the height and shape of the concrete cones are compared by highly precise and objective photogrammetric means.

  11. Microstructure and Deformation Response of TRIP-Steel Syntactic Foams to Quasi-Static and Dynamic Compressive Loads

    Ehinger, David; Weise, Jörg; Baumeister, Joachim; Funk, Alexander; Krüger, Lutz; Martin, Ulrich

    2018-01-01

    The implementation of hollow S60HS glass microspheres and Fillite 106 cenospheres in a martensitically transformable AISI 304L stainless steel matrix was realized by means of metal injection molding of feedstock with varying fractions of the filler material. The so-called TRIP-steel syntactic foams were studied with respect to their behavior under quasi-static compression and dynamic impact loading. The interplay between matrix material behavior and foam structure was discussed in relation to the findings of micro-structural investigations, electron back scatter diffraction EBSD phase analyses and magnetic measurements. During processing, the cenospheres remained relatively stable retaining their shape while the glass microspheres underwent disintegration associated with the formation of pre-cracked irregular inclusions. Consequently, the AISI 304L/Fillite 106 syntactic foams exhibited a higher compression stress level and energy absorption capability as compared to the S60HS-containing variants. The α′ -martensite kinetic of the steel matrix was significantly influenced by material composition, strain rate and arising deformation temperature. The highest ferromagnetic α′-martensite phase fraction was detected for the AISI 304L/S60HS batches and the lowest for the TRIP-steel bulk material. Quasi-adiabatic sample heating, a gradual decrease in strain rate and an enhanced degree of damage controlled the mechanical deformation response of the studied syntactic foams under dynamic impact loading. PMID:29695107

  12. Meso-Scale Progressive Damage Behavior Characterization of Triaxial Braided Composites under Quasi-Static Tensile Load

    Ren, Yiru; Zhang, Songjun; Jiang, Hongyong; Xiang, Jinwu

    2018-04-01

    Based on continuum damage mechanics (CDM), a sophisticated 3D meso-scale finite element (FE) model is proposed to characterize the progressive damage behavior of 2D Triaxial Braided Composites (2DTBC) with 60° braiding angle under quasi-static tensile load. The modified Von Mises strength criterion and 3D Hashin failure criterion are used to predict the damage initiation of the pure matrix and fiber tows. A combining interface damage and friction constitutive model is applied to predict the interface damage behavior. Murakami-Ohno stiffness degradation scheme is employed to predict the damage evolution process of each constituent. Coupling with the ordinary and translational symmetry boundary conditions, the tensile elastic response including tensile strength and failure strain of 2DTBC are in good agreement with the available experiment data. The numerical results show that the main failure modes of the composites under axial tensile load are pure matrix cracking, fiber and matrix tension failure in bias fiber tows, matrix tension failure in axial fiber tows and interface debonding; the main failure modes of the composites subjected to transverse tensile load are free-edge effect, matrix tension failure in bias fiber tows and interface debonding.

  13. Comparison of the quasi-static method and the dynamic method for simulating fracture processes in concrete

    Liu, J. X.; Deng, S. C.; Liang, N. G.

    2008-02-01

    Concrete is heterogeneous and usually described as a three-phase material, where matrix, aggregate and interface are distinguished. To take this heterogeneity into consideration, the Generalized Beam (GB) lattice model is adopted. The GB lattice model is much more computationally efficient than the beam lattice model. Numerical procedures of both quasi-static method and dynamic method are developed to simulate fracture processes in uniaxial tensile tests conducted on a concrete panel. Cases of different loading rates are compared with the quasi-static case. It is found that the inertia effect due to load increasing becomes less important and can be ignored with the loading rate decreasing, but the inertia effect due to unstable crack propagation remains considerable no matter how low the loading rate is. Therefore, an unrealistic result will be obtained if a fracture process including unstable cracking is simulated by the quasi-static procedure.

  14. Four-level time decomposition quasi-static power flow and successive disturbances analysis. [Power system disturbances

    Jovanovic, S M [Nikola Tesla Inst., Belgrade (YU)

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a model and an appropriate numerical procedure for a four-level time decomposition quasi-static power flow and successive disturbances analysis of power systems. The analysis consists of the sequential computation of the zero, primary, secondary and tertiary quasi-static states and of the estimation of successive structural disturbances during the 1200 s dynamics after a structural disturbance. The model is developed by detailed inspection of the time decomposition characteristics of automatic protection and control devices. Adequate speed of the numerical procedure is attained by a specific application of the inversion matrix lemma and the decoupled model constant coefficient matrices. The four-level time decomposition quasi-static method is intended for security and emergency analysis. (author).

  15. Measurement of quasi-static and low frequency electric fields on the Viking satellite

    Block, L.P.; Faelthammar, C.G.; Lindqvist, P.A.; Marklund, G.T.; Mozer, F.S.; Pedersen, A.

    1987-03-01

    The instrument for measurement of quasi-static and low frequency (dc and slow varying) electric fields on the Viking satellite is described. The instrument uses three spherical probe pairs to measure the full three-dimensional electric field vector with 18.75 ms time resolution. The probes are kept near plasma potential by means of a controllable bias current. A guard covering part of the booms is biased to a negative voltage to prevent photoelectrons escaping from the probes from reaching the satellite body. Current-voltage sweeps are performed to determine the plasma density and temperature and to select the optimal bias current. The bias currents to the probes and the voltage offset on the guards as well as the current-voltage sweeps are controlled by an on-board microprocessor which can be programmed from the ground and allows great flexibility. (authors)

  16. Cooling and quasi-static contraction of the primitive solar nebula after gas accretion

    Watanabe, Seichiro; Nakagawa, Yoshitsugu; Nakazawa, Kiyoshi

    1990-01-01

    The evolution of the primitive solar nebula in the quasi-static contraction phase where the nebula cools down toward the thermal steady state is studied. The solar irradiation onto the nebula keeps the surface temperature constant, so that the convective ozone retreats from the surface as the nebula cools. Thus if thermal convection is the only source of turbulence, convection will quiet down in an early time of the cooling. Afterward, the nebula evolves toward an isothermal structure in a time scale of 1000 yr. The cooling rates in the vicinity of the midplate at 1 AU are 0.003 K/hr at T(c) = 1000 K and 3 x 10 to the -5th K/hr at T(c) = 300 K for the standard model. If some turbulence exists irrespective of convection, convection may continue for sufficiently strong turbulent heating. 39 refs

  17. Levitation force of melt-textured YBCO superconductors under non-quasi-static situation

    Zhao, Z. M.; Xu, J. M.; Yuan, X. Y.; Zhang, C. P.

    2018-06-01

    The superconducting levitation force of a simple superconductor-magnet system under non-quasi-static situation is investigated experimentally. Two yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) samples with different performances are chosen from two small batches of samples prepared by the top-seeded melt-textured growth process. The residual carbon content of the precursor powders of the two batches is different due to different heat treatment processes. During the experimental process for measuring the levitation force, the value of the relative speed between the YBCO sample and the permanent magnet is higher than that in conventional studies. The variation characteristics of the superconducting levitation force are analyzed and a crossing phenomenon in the force-displacement hysteresis curves is observed. The results indicate that the superconducting levitation force is different due to the different residual carbon contents. As residual carbon contents reduce, the crossing phenomenon is more obvious accordingly.

  18. Plasticity and damage in aluminum syntactic foams deformed under dynamic and quasi-static conditions

    Balch, Dorian K. [Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (United States); O' Dwyer, John G. [Waterford Institute of Technology (Ireland); Davis, Graham R. [Queen Mary, University of London (United Kingdom); Cady, Carl M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gray, George T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dunand, David C. [Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (United States)]. E-mail: dunand@northwestern.edu

    2005-01-25

    Syntactic foams were fabricated by liquid metal infiltration of commercially pure and 7075 aluminum into preforms of hollow ceramic microspheres. The foams exhibited peak strengths during quasi-static compression ranging from -100 to -230 MPa, while dynamic compression loading showed a 10-30% increase in peak strength magnitude, with strain rate sensitivities similar to those of aluminum-matrix composite materials. X-ray tomographic investigation of the post-compression loaded foam microstructures revealed sharp differences in deformation modes, with the unalloyed-Al foam failing initially by matrix deformation, while the alloy-matrix foams failed more abruptly through the formation of sharp crush bands oriented at about 45 deg. to the compression axis. These foams displayed pronounced energy-absorbing capabilities, suggesting their potential use in packaging applications or for impact protection; proper tailoring of matrix and microsphere strengths would result in optimized syntactic foam properties.

  19. Study of damage of graphite/epoxy composites submitted to repeated quasi-static shear loadings

    Khadhraoui-Lattreche, Malika

    1984-01-01

    Quasi static loading tests on composite materials with organic matrix allow the behaviour of the materials under repeated loadings to be studied while avoiding viscoelastic effects. In this research thesis, the author reports the study of one-directional composite samples submitted to static pure shear loadings which represent the most severe stress state for this type of material. The material behaviour has been determined by application of loads greater than the yield strength, and of zero torque unloads. This allowed cumulative residual deformations to be monitored, and the increasing evolution of this parameter to be studied with respect to the number of applied cycles. The author deduces from these results a characteristic law for the material which introduces a decoupling between the stress and the cumulative residual deformation. Thus, a method of prediction of cumulative residual deformations is developed. Besides, a brief application to another material seems to confirm this type of law, and suggests that its generalisation should be studied [fr

  20. Influence of Strain Rate on Heat Release under Quasi-Static Stretching of Metals. Experiment

    Zimin, B. A.; Sventitskaya, V. E.; Smirnov, I. V.; Sud'enkov, Yu. V.

    2018-04-01

    The paper presents the results of experimental studies of energy dissipation during a quasi-static stretching of metals and alloys at room temperature. The strain rates varied in the range of 10-3-10-2 s-1. Samples of M1 copper, AZ31B magnesium alloy, BT6 titanium, 12Cr18Ni10Ti steel, and D16AM aluminum alloy were analyzed. The experimental results demonstrated a significant dependence of the heat release on the strain rate in the absence of its influence on stress-strain diagrams for all the metals studied in this range of strain rates. The correlation of the changes in the character of heat release with the processes of structural transformations at various stages of plastic flow is shown on the qualitative level. A difference in the nature of the processes of heat release in materials with different ratios of the plasticity and strength is noted.

  1. Microstructural Changes of the Nanostructured Bainitic Steel Induced by Quasi-Static and Dynamic Deformation

    Marcisz J.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the microstructure of nanostructured bainitic steel induced by quasi-static and dynamic deformation have been shown in the article. The method of deformation and strain rate have important impact on the microstructure changes especially due to strain localization. Microstructure of nanostructured steel Fe-0.6%C-1.9Mn-1.8Si-1.3Cr-0.7Mo consists of nanometer size carbide-free bainite laths and 20-30% volume fraction of retained austenite. Quasi-static and dynamic (strain rate up to 2×102 s−1 compression tests were realized using Gleeble simulator. Dynamic deformation at the strain rate up to 9×103 s−1 was realized by the Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar method (SHPB. Moreover high energy firing tests of plates made of the nanostructured bainitic steel were carried out to produce dynamically deformed material for investigation. Adiabatic shear bands were found as a result of localization of deformation in dynamic compression tests and in firing tests. Microstructure of the bands was examined and hardness changes in the vicinity of the bands were determined. The TEM examination of the ASBs showed the change from the internal shear band structure to the matrix structure to be gradual. This study clearly resolved that the interior (core of the band has an extremely fine grained structure with grain diameter ranging from 100 nm to 200 nm. Martensitic twins were found within the grains. No austenite and carbide reflections were detected in the diffraction patterns taken from the core of the band. Hardness of the core of the ASBs for examined variants of isothermal heat treatment was higher about 300 HV referring to steel matrix hardness.

  2. Quasi-Static Behavior of Palm-Based Elastomeric Polyurethane: For Strengthening Application of Structures under Impulsive Loadings

    H. M. Chandima Chathuranga Somarathna

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, attention has been focused on elastomeric polymers as a potential retrofitting material considering their capability in contributing towards the impact resistance of various structural elements. A comprehensive understanding of the behavior and the morphology of this material are essential to propose an effective and feasible alternative to existing structural strengthening and retrofitting materials. This article presents the findings obtained from a series of experimental investigations to characterize the physical, mechanical, chemical and thermal behavior of eight types of palm-based polyurethane (PU elastomers, which were synthesized from the reaction between palm kernel oil-based monoester polyol (PKO-p and 4,4-diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI with polyethylene glycol (PEG as the plasticizer via pre-polymerization. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy analysis was conducted to examine the functional groups in PU systems. Mechanical and physical behavior was studied with focus on elongation, stresses, modulus, energy absorption and dissipation, and load dispersion capacities by conducting hardness, tensile, flexural, Izod impact, and differential scanning calorimetry tests. Experimental results suggest that the palm-based PU has positive effects as a strengthening and retrofitting material against dynamic impulsive loadings both in terms of energy absorption and dissipation, and load dispersion. In addition, among all PUs with different plasticizer contents, PU2 to PU8 (which contain 2% to 8% (w/w PEG with respect to PKO-p content show the best correlation with mechanical response under quasi-static conditions focusing on energy absorption and dissipation and load dispersion characteristics.

  3. A PSP-based small-signal MOSFET model for both quasi-static and nonquasi-static operations

    Aarts, A.C.T.; Smit, G.D.J.; Scholten, A.J.; Klaassen, D.B.M.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a small-signal MOSFET model is described, which takes the local effects of both velocity saturation and transverse mobility reduction into account. The model is based on the PSP model and is valid for both quasi-static and nonquasi-static (NQS) operations. Recently, it has been found

  4. Quasi-Static Single-Component Hybrid Simulation of a Composite Structure with Multi-Axis Control

    Høgh, J.; Waldbjørn, J.; Wittrup-Schmidt, J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a quasi-static hybrid simulation performed on a single component structure. Hybrid simulation is a substructural technique, where a structure is divided into two sections: a numerical section of the main structure and a physical experiment of the remainder. In previous cases...

  5. On the performance of diagonal lattice space-time codes for the quasi-static MIMO channel

    Abediseid, Walid; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2013-01-01

    There has been tremendous work done on designing space-time codes for the quasi-static multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) channel. All the coding design to date focuses on either high-performance, high rates, low complexity encoding and decoding

  6. JAC2D: A two-dimensional finite element computer program for the nonlinear quasi-static response of solids with the conjugate gradient method

    Biffle, J.H.; Blanford, M.L.

    1994-05-01

    JAC2D is a two-dimensional finite element program designed to solve quasi-static nonlinear mechanics problems. A set of continuum equations describes the nonlinear mechanics involving large rotation and strain. A nonlinear conjugate gradient method is used to solve the equations. The method is implemented in a two-dimensional setting with various methods for accelerating convergence. Sliding interface logic is also implemented. A four-node Lagrangian uniform strain element is used with hourglass stiffness to control the zero-energy modes. This report documents the elastic and isothermal elastic/plastic material model. Other material models, documented elsewhere, are also available. The program is vectorized for efficient performance on Cray computers. Sample problems described are the bending of a thin beam, the rotation of a unit cube, and the pressurization and thermal loading of a hollow sphere

  7. JAC3D -- A three-dimensional finite element computer program for the nonlinear quasi-static response of solids with the conjugate gradient method

    Biffle, J.H.

    1993-02-01

    JAC3D is a three-dimensional finite element program designed to solve quasi-static nonlinear mechanics problems. A set of continuum equations describes the nonlinear mechanics involving large rotation and strain. A nonlinear conjugate gradient method is used to solve the equation. The method is implemented in a three-dimensional setting with various methods for accelerating convergence. Sliding interface logic is also implemented. An eight-node Lagrangian uniform strain element is used with hourglass stiffness to control the zero-energy modes. This report documents the elastic and isothermal elastic-plastic material model. Other material models, documented elsewhere, are also available. The program is vectorized for efficient performance on Cray computers. Sample problems described are the bending of a thin beam, the rotation of a unit cube, and the pressurization and thermal loading of a hollow sphere

  8. Impact of Martensite Spatial Distribution on Quasi-Static and Dynamic Deformation Behavior of Dual-Phase Steel

    Singh, Manpreet; Das, Anindya; Venugopalan, T.; Mukherjee, Krishnendu; Walunj, Mahesh; Nanda, Tarun; Kumar, B. Ravi

    2018-02-01

    The effects of microstructure parameters of dual-phase steels on tensile high strain dynamic deformation characteristic were examined in this study. Cold-rolled steel sheets were annealed using three different annealing process parameters to obtain three different dual-phase microstructures of varied ferrite and martensite phase fraction. The volume fraction of martensite obtained in two of the steels was near identical ( 19 pct) with a subtle difference in its spatial distribution. In the first microstructure variant, martensite was mostly found to be situated at ferrite grain boundaries and in the second variant, in addition to at grain boundaries, in-grain martensite was also observed. The third microstructure was very different from the above two with respect to martensite volume fraction ( 67 pct) and its morphology. In this case, martensite packets were surrounded by a three-dimensional ferrite network giving an appearance of core and shell type microstructure. All the three steels were tensile deformed at strain rates ranging from 2.7 × 10-4 (quasi-static) to 650 s-1 (dynamic range). Field-emission scanning electron microscope was used to characterize the starting as well as post-tensile deformed microstructures. Dual-phase steel consisting of small martensite volume fraction ( 19 pct), irrespective of its spatial distribution, demonstrated high strain rate sensitivity and on the other hand, steel with large martensite volume fraction ( 67 pct) displayed a very little strain rate sensitivity. Interestingly, total elongation was found to increase with increasing strain rate in the dynamic regime for steel with core-shell type of microstructure containing large martensite volume fraction. The observed enhancement in plasticity in dynamic regime was attributed to adiabatic heating of specimen. To understand the evolving damage mechanism, the fracture surface and the vicinity of fracture ends were studied in all the three dual-phase steels.

  9. Controlled elastic postbuckling of bilaterally constrained non-prismatic columns: application to enhanced quasi-static energy harvesters

    Liu, Suihan; Burgueño, Rigoberto

    2016-12-01

    Axially compressed bilaterally constrained columns, which can attain multiple snap-through buckling events in their elastic postbuckling response, can be used as energy concentrators and mechanical triggers to transform external quasi-static displacement input to local high-rate motions and excite vibration-based piezoelectric transducers for energy harvesting devices. However, the buckling location with highest kinetic energy release along the element, and where piezoelectric oscillators should be optimally placed, cannot be controlled or isolated due to the changing buckling configurations. This paper proposes the concept of stiffness variations along the column to gain control of the buckling location for optimal placement of piezoelectric transducers. Prototyped non-prismatic columns with piece-wise varying thickness were fabricated through 3D printing for experimental characterization and numerical simulations were conducted using the finite element method. A simple theoretical model was also developed based on the stationary potential energy principle for predicting the critical line contact segment that triggers snap-through events and the buckling morphologies as compression proceeds. Results confirm that non-prismatic column designs allow control of the buckling location in the elastic postbuckling regime. Compared to prismatic columns, non-prismatic designs can attain a concentrated kinetic energy release spot and a higher number of snap-buckling mode transitions under the same global strain. The direct relation between the column’s dynamic response and the output voltage from piezoelectric oscillator transducers allows the tailorable postbuckling response of non-prismatic columns to be used as multi-stable energy concentrators with enhanced performance in micro-energy harvesters.

  10. Self-consistent quasi-static radial transport during the substorm growth phase

    Le Contel, O.; Pellat, R.; Roux, A.

    2000-06-01

    We develop a self-consistent description of the slowly changing magnetic configuration of the near-Earth plasma sheet (NEPS) during substorm growth phase. This new approach is valid for quasi-static fluctuations ωcurrent. The quasi-neutrality condition (QNC) is solved via an expansion in the small parameter Te/Ti (Te/Ti is the ratio between the electronic and ionic temperatures). To the lowest order in Te/Ti, we find that the enforcement of QNC implies the presence of a global electrostatic potential which is constant for a given magnetic field line but varies across the magnetic field. The corresponding electric field shields the effect of the inductive component of the electric field, thereby producing a partial reduction of the motion that would correspond to the inductive electric field. Furthermore, we show that enforcing the QNC implies a field-aligned potential drop which is computed to the next order in Te/Ti in a companion paper [Le Contel et al., this issue]. In the present paper, we show that the direction of the azimuthal electric field varies along the field line, thus the equatorial electric field cannot be mapped onto the ionosphere. Furthermore during the growth phase, the (total) azimuthal electric field is directed eastward, close to the equator, and westward, off-equator. Thus large equatorial pitch angle particles drift tailward, whereas small pitch angle particles drift earthward.

  11. Multi objective optimization of foam-filled circular tubes for quasi-static and dynamic responses

    Fauzan Djamaluddin

    Full Text Available AbstractFuel consumption and safety are currently key aspects in automobile design. The foam-filled thin-walled aluminium tube represents a potentially effective material for use in the automotive industry, due to its energy absorption capability and light weight. Multi-objective crashworthiness design optimization for foam-filled double cylindrical tubes is presented in this paper. The double structures are impacted by a rigid wall simulating quasi-static and dynamic loadings. The optimal parameters under consideration are the minimum peak crushing force and maximum specific energy absorption, using the non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm-II (NSGA-II technique. Radial basis functions (RBF and D-Optimal are adopted to determine the more complex crashworthiness functional objectives. The comparison is performed by finite element analysis of the impact crashworthiness characteristics in tubes under static and dynamic loads. Finally, the optimum crashworthiness performance of empty and foam-filled double tubes is investigated and compared to the traditional single foam-filled tube. The results indicate that the foam-filled double aluminium circular tube can be recommended for crashworthy structures.

  12. Effect of Elastin Digestion on the Quasi-static Tensile Response of Medial Collateral Ligament

    Henninger, Heath B.; Underwood, Clayton J.; Romney, Steven J.; Davis, Grant L.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Elastin is a structural protein that provides resilience to biological tissues. We examined the contributions of elastin to the quasi-static tensile response of porcine medial collateral ligament through targeted disruption of the elastin network with pancreatic elastase. Elastase concentration and treatment time were varied to determine a dose response. Whereas elastin content decreased with increasing elastase concentration and treatment time, the change in peak stress after cyclic loading reached a plateau above 1 U/ml elastase and 6 hr treatment. For specimens treated with 2 U/ml elastase for 6 hr, elastin content decreased approximately 35%. Mean peak tissue strain after cyclic loading (4.8%, p≥0.300), modulus (275 MPa, p≥0.114) and hysteresis (20%, p≥0.553) were unaffected by elastase digestion, but stress decreased significantly after treatment (up to 2 MPa, p≤0.049). Elastin degradation had no effect on failure properties, but tissue lengthened under the same pre-stress. Stiffness in the linear region was unaffected by elastase digestion, suggesting that enzyme treatment did not disrupt collagen. These results demonstrate that elastin primarily functions in the toe region of the stress-strain curve, yet contributes load support in the linear region. The increase in length after elastase digestion suggests that elastin may pre-stress and stabilize collagen crimp in ligaments. PMID:23553827

  13. Pore network modeling of drainage process in patterned porous media: a quasi-static study

    Zhang, Tao

    2015-04-17

    This work represents a preliminary investigation on the role of wettability conditions on the flow of a two-phase system in porous media. Since such effects have been lumped implicitly in relative permeability-saturation and capillary pressure-saturation relationships, it is quite challenging to isolate its effects explicitly in real porous media applications. However, within the framework of pore network models, it is easy to highlight the effects of wettability conditions on the transport of two-phase systems. We employ quasi-static investigation in which the system undergo slow movement based on slight increment of the imposed pressure. Several numerical experiments of the drainage process are conducted to displace a wetting fluid with a non-wetting one. In all these experiments the network is assigned different scenarios of various wettability patterns. The aim is to show that the drainage process is very much affected by the imposed pattern of wettability. The wettability conditions are imposed by assigning the value of contact angle to each pore throat according to predefined patterns.

  14. Quasi-Static Viscoelastic Finite Element Model of an Aircraft Tire

    Johnson, Arthur R.; Tanner, John A.; Mason, Angela J.

    1999-01-01

    An elastic large displacement thick-shell mixed finite element is modified to allow for the calculation of viscoelastic stresses. Internal strain variables are introduced at the element's stress nodes and are employed to construct a viscous material model. First order ordinary differential equations relate the internal strain variables to the corresponding elastic strains at the stress nodes. The viscous stresses are computed from the internal strain variables using viscous moduli which are a fraction of the elastic moduli. The energy dissipated by the action of the viscous stresses is included in the mixed variational functional. The nonlinear quasi-static viscous equilibrium equations are then obtained. Previously developed Taylor expansions of the nonlinear elastic equilibrium equations are modified to include the viscous terms. A predictor-corrector time marching solution algorithm is employed to solve the algebraic-differential equations. The viscous shell element is employed to computationally simulate a stair-step loading and unloading of an aircraft tire in contact with a frictionless surface.

  15. The Cross-Flow Mixing Analysis of Quasi-Static Pebble Flow in Pebble Bed Reactor

    Fang Xiang; Liu Zhiyong; Sun Yanfei; Yang Xingtuan; Jiang Shengyao

    2014-01-01

    In the pebble bed reactor, large number of fuel pebbles’ movement law and moving state can affect the reactor’s design, operation and safety directly. Therefore the pebble flow, which is based on the theory of particle streaming, is one of the most important research subjects of the pebble bed reactor engineering. The in-core pebble flow is a very slow particle flow (or called quasi-static particle flow), which is very different from the usual particle motion. How to accurately describe the characteristics of in-core pebble flow is a central issue for this subject. Due to the presence of random flow, the cross-mixing phenomenon will occur inevitably. In the present paper, the mixing phenomenon of pebble flow is generalized on the basis of experiment results. The pebble flow cross-mixing probability serves as the parameter which describes both the regularity and the randomness of pebble flow. The results are provided in the form of diagrammatic presentation. (author)

  16. Two Types of Long-duration Quasi-static Evolution of Solar Filaments

    Xing, C.; Li, H. C.; Jiang, B.; Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D.

    2018-04-01

    In this Letter, we investigate the long-duration quasi-static evolution of 12 pre-eruptive filaments (four active region (AR) and eight quiescent filaments), mainly focusing on the evolution of the filament height in 3D and the decay index of the background magnetic field. The filament height in 3D is derived through two-perspective observations of Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO). The coronal magnetic field is reconstructed using the potential field source surface model. A new finding is that the filaments we studied show two types of long-duration evolution: one type comprises a long-duration static phase and a short, slow rise phase with a duration of less than 12 hr and a speed of 0.1–0.7 km s‑1, while the other one only presents a slow rise phase but with an extremely long duration of more than 60 hr and a smaller speed of 0.01–0.2 km s‑1. At the moment approaching the eruption, the decay index of the background magnetic field at the filament height is similar for both AR and quiescent filaments. The average value and upper limit are ∼0.9 and ∼1.4, close to the critical index of torus instability. Moreover, the filament height and background magnetic field strength are also found to be linearly and exponentially related with the filament length, respectively.

  17. Quasi-static modeling of human limb for intra-body communications with experiments.

    Pun, Sio Hang; Gao, Yue Ming; Mak, PengUn; Vai, Mang I; Du, Min

    2011-11-01

    In recent years, the increasing number of wearable devices on human has been witnessed as a trend. These devices can serve for many purposes: personal entertainment, communication, emergency mission, health care supervision, delivery, etc. Sharing information among the devices scattered across the human body requires a body area network (BAN) and body sensor network (BSN). However, implementation of the BAN/BSN with the conventional wireless technologies cannot give optimal result. It is mainly because the high requirements of light weight, miniature, energy efficiency, security, and less electromagnetic interference greatly limit the resources available for the communication modules. The newly developed intra-body communication (IBC) can alleviate most of the mentioned problems. This technique, which employs the human body as a communication channel, could be an innovative networking method for sensors and devices on the human body. In order to encourage the research and development of the IBC, the authors are favorable to lay a better and more formal theoretical foundation on IBC. They propose a multilayer mathematical model using volume conductor theory for galvanic coupling IBC on a human limb with consideration on the inhomogeneous properties of human tissue. By introducing and checking with quasi-static approximation criteria, Maxwell's equations are decoupled and capacitance effect is included to the governing equation for further improvement. Finally, the accuracy and potential of the model are examined from both in vitro and in vivo experimental results.

  18. Quasi-static and ratcheting properties of trabecular bone under uniaxial and cyclic compression.

    Gao, Li-Lan; Wei, Chao-Lei; Zhang, Chun-Qiu; Gao, Hong; Yang, Nan; Dong, Li-Min

    2017-08-01

    The quasi-static and ratcheting properties of trabecular bone were investigated by experiments and theoretical predictions. The creep tests with different stress levels were completed and it is found that both the creep strain and creep compliance increase rapidly at first and then increase slowly as the creep time goes by. With increase of compressive stress the creep strain increases and the creep compliance decreases. The uniaxial compressive tests show that the applied stress rate makes remarkable influence on the compressive behaviors of trabecular bone. The Young's modulus of trabecular bone increases with increase of stress rate. The stress-strain hysteresis loops of trabecular bone under cyclic load change from sparse to dense with increase of number of cycles, which agrees with the change trend of ratcheting strain. The ratcheting strain rate rapidly decreases at first, and then exhibits a relatively stable and small value after 50cycles. Both the ratcheting strain and ratcheting strain rate increase with increase of stress amplitude or with decrease of stress rate. The creep model and the nonlinear viscoelastic constitutive model of trabecular bone were proposed and used to predict its creep property and rate-dependent compressive property. The results show that there are good agreements between the experimental data and predictions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Study of an athermal quasi static plastic deformation in a 2D granular material

    Zhang, Jie

    2017-11-01

    In crystalline materials, the plasticity has been well understood in terms of dynamics of dislocation, i.e. flow defects in the crystals where the flow defects can be directly visualized under a microscope. In a contrast, the plasticity in amorphous materials, i.e. glass, is still poorly understood due to the disordered nature of the materials. In this talk, I will discuss the recent results we have obtained in our ongoing research of the plasticity of a 2D glass in the athermal quasi static limit where the 2D glass is made of bi-disperse granular disks with very low friction. Starting from a densely packed homogeneous and isotropic initial state, we apply pure shear deformation to the system. For a sufficiently small strain, the response of the system is linear and elastic like; when the strain is large enough, the plasticity of the system gradually develops and eventually the shear bands are fully developed. In this study, we are particularly interested in how to relate the local plastic deformation to the macroscopic response of the system and also in the development of the shear bands.

  20. Viscoelastic modeling of apples under quasi-static loading using finite element method to investigate the causes of bruising

    B Ghasemi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Apple is one of the most important horticultural crops of Iran. Its production in the country stands in the second place after citrus. Iran holds the fourth place in the world production of apples and gains a major share in the export of this product. Therefore, it is necessary to enhance the quantity and quality of the fruit in order to maintain and promote its position among the countries importing this product from Iran. Most of the mechanical damages to fruits and vegetables occur due to contact stresses under static, quasi-static and impact loading. To obtain stress distribution inside the fruit we can use finite element analysis. The aim of this study was to simulate the behavior of the apple as a viscoelastic body subjected to quasi-static loading and also to determine the failure criteria (maximum normal stress or shear stress of apple flesh to estimate its susceptibility to mechanical bruising. Materials and methods: In this study, Golab kohanz apple was used. Two samples were removed from each apple using a core sampler, one was used for uniaxial compression and the other was used for confined compression test using Instron universal tension and compression machine. Spherical indenter and parallel plate tests were performed in order to study apple susceptibility to bruising at four deformation levels (1, 2, 3 and 4 mm and the bruise volume was then measured after 24 hours. Stress-strain curves were plotted and then, the elastic and viscoelastic properties were obtained. Then, by using the data obtained from apple properties, the apple was modeled in Abaqus software as spherical and cylindrical shapes with viscoelastic behavior subjected to quasi-static loadings. Results and Discussion: The normal stress distribution of the modeled apple in the shape of a cylindrical sample is shown in Fig. 4. The value of maximum normal stress was obtained (0.51 MPa at the contact point of the loading plate with the sample. Experimental

  1. Modeling of Hydraulic Fracture Propagation at the kISMET Site Using a Fully Coupled 3D Network-Flow and Quasi- Static Discrete Element Model

    Zhou, Jing [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Huang, Hai [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mattson, Earl [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wang, Herb F. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Haimson, Bezalel C. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Doe, Thomas W. [Golder Associates Inc., Redmond, VA (United States); Oldenburg, Curtis M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Dobson, Patrick F. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Aimed at supporting the design of hydraulic fracturing experiments at the kISMET site, ~1500 m below ground in a deep mine, we performed pre-experimental hydraulic fracturing simulations in order to estimate the breakdown pressure, propagation pressure, fracture geometry, and the magnitude of induced seismicity using a newly developed fully coupled three-dimensional (3D) network flow and quasi-static discrete element model (DEM). The quasi-static DEM model, which is constructed by Delaunay tessellation of the rock volume, considers rock fabric heterogeneities by using the “disordered” DEM mesh and adding random perturbations to the stiffness and tensile/shear strengths of individual DEM elements and the elastic beams between them. A conjugate 3D flow network based on the DEM lattice is constructed to calculate the fluid flow in both the fracture and porous matrix. One distinctive advantage of the model is that fracturing is naturally described by the breakage of elastic beams between DEM elements. It is also extremely convenient to introduce mechanical anisotropy into the model by simply assigning orientation-dependent tensile/shear strengths to the elastic beams. In this paper, the 3D hydraulic fracturing model was verified against the analytic solution for a penny-shaped crack model. We applied the model to simulate fracture propagation from a vertical open borehole based on initial estimates of rock mechanical properties and in-situ stress conditions. The breakdown pressure and propagation pressure are directly obtained from the simulation. In addition, the released elastic strain energies of individual fracturing events were calculated and used as a conservative estimate for the magnitudes of the potential induced seismic activities associated with fracturing. The comparisons between model predictions and experimental results are still ongoing.

  2. Faults self-organized by repeated earthquakes in a quasi-static antiplane crack model

    D. Sornette

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available We study a 2D quasi-static discrete crack anti-plane model of a tectonic plate with long range elastic forces and quenched disorder. The plate is driven at its border and the load is transferred to all elements through elastic forces. This model can be considered as belonging to the class of self-organized models which may exhibit spontaneous criticality, with four additional ingredients compared to sandpile models, namely quenched disorder, boundary driving, long range forces and fast time crack rules. In this 'crack' model, as in the 'dislocation' version previously studied, we find that the occurrence of repeated earthquakes organizes the activity on well-defined fault-like structures. In contrast with the 'dislocation' model, after a transient, the time evolution becomes periodic with run-aways ending each cycle. This stems from the 'crack' stress transfer rule preventing criticality to organize in favour of cyclic behaviour. For sufficiently large disorder and weak stress drop, these large events are preceded by a complex spacetime history of foreshock activity, characterized by a Gutenberg-Richter power law distribution with universal exponent B = 1±0.05. This is similar to a power law distribution of small nucleating droplets before the nucleation of the macroscopic phase in a first-order phase transition. For large disorder and large stress drop, and for certain specific initial disorder configurations, the stress field becomes frustrated in fast time: out-of-plane deformations (thrust and normal faulting and/or a genuine dynamics must be introduced to resolve this frustration.

  3. Static and quasi-static analysis of lobed-pumpkin balloon

    Nakashino, Kyoichi; Sasaki, Makoto; Hashimoto, Satoshi; Saito, Yoshitaka; Izutsu, Naoki

    The present study is motivated by the need to improve design methodology for super pressure balloon with 3D gore design concept, currently being developed at the Scientific Balloon Center of ISAS/JAXA. The distinctive feature of the 3-D gore design is that the balloon film has excess materials not only in the circumferential direction but also in the meridional direction; the meridional excess is gained by attaching the film boundaries to the corresponding tendons of a shorter length with a controlled shortening rate. The resulting balloon shape is a pumpkin-like shape with large bulges formed between adjacent tendons. The balloon film, when fully inflated, develops wrinkles in the circumferential direction over its entire region, so that the stresses in the film are limited to a small amount of uniaxial tension in the circumferential direction while the high meridional loads are carried by re-enforced tendons. Naturally, the amount of wrinkling in the film is dominated by the shortening rate between the film boundaries and the tendon curve. In the 3-D gore design, as a consequence, the shortening rate becomes a fundamental design parameter along with the geometric parameters of the gore. In view of this, we have carried out a series of numerical study of the lobed-pumpkin balloon with varying gore geometry as well as with varying shortening rate. The numerical simula-tions were carried out with a nonlinear finite element code incorporating the wrinkling effect. Numerical results show that there is a threshold value for the shortening rate beyond which the stresses in the balloon film increases disproportionately. We have also carried out quasi-static simulations of the inflation process of the lobed-pumpkin balloon, and have obtained asymmetric deformations when the balloon films are in uniaxial tension state.

  4. Prediction of plastic deformation under contact condition by quasi-static and dynamic simulations using explicit finite element analysis

    Siswanto, W. A.; Nagentrau, M.; Tobi, A. L. Mohd; Tamin, M. N.

    2016-01-01

    We compared the quasi-static and dynamic simulation responses on elastic-plastic deformation of advanced alloys using Finite element (FE) method with an explicit numerical algorithm. A geometrical model consisting of a cylinder-on-flat surface contact under a normal load and sliding motion was examined. Two aeroengine materials, Ti-6Al-4V and Super CMV (Cr-Mo-V) alloy, were employed in the FE analysis. The FE model was validated by comparative magnitudes of the FE-predicted maximum contact pressure variation along the contact half-width length with the theoretical Hertzian contact solution. Results show that the (compressive) displacement of the initial contact surface steadily increases for the quasi-static load case, but accumulates at an increasing rate to the maximum level for the dynamic loading. However, the relatively higher stiffness and yield strength of the Super CMV alloy resulted in limited deformation and low plastic strain when compared to the Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The accumulated equivalent plastic strain of the material point at the initial contact position was nearly a thousand times higher for the dynamic load case (for example, 6.592 for Ti-6Al-4V, 1.0 kN) when compared to the quasi-static loading (only 0.0072). During the loading step, the von Mises stress increased with a decreasing and increasing rate for the quasi-static and dynamic load case, respectively. A sudden increase in the stress magnitude to the respective peak value was registered due to the additional constraint to overcome the static friction of the mating surfaces during the sliding step

  5. EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES ON THE QUASI-STATIC AXIAL CRUSHING BEHAVIOR OF FOAM-FILLED STEEL EXTRUSION TUBES

    AL EMRAN ISMAIL

    2010-01-01

    The concerns of automotive safety have been given special attention in order to reduce human fatalities or injuries. One of the techniques to reduce collision impact or compression energy is by filling polymeric foam into metallic tubes. In this work, polyurethane foam was introduced into the steel extrusion tubes and quasi-statically compressed at constant cross-head displacement. Different tube thicknesses and foam densities were used and these parameters were related to the crashwor...

  6. Prediction of plastic deformation under contact condition by quasi-static and dynamic simulations using explicit finite element analysis

    Siswanto, W. A.; Nagentrau, M.; Tobi, A. L. Mohd [Faculty of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, Batu Pahat (Malaysia); Tamin, M. N. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Johor Bahru (Malaysia)

    2016-11-15

    We compared the quasi-static and dynamic simulation responses on elastic-plastic deformation of advanced alloys using Finite element (FE) method with an explicit numerical algorithm. A geometrical model consisting of a cylinder-on-flat surface contact under a normal load and sliding motion was examined. Two aeroengine materials, Ti-6Al-4V and Super CMV (Cr-Mo-V) alloy, were employed in the FE analysis. The FE model was validated by comparative magnitudes of the FE-predicted maximum contact pressure variation along the contact half-width length with the theoretical Hertzian contact solution. Results show that the (compressive) displacement of the initial contact surface steadily increases for the quasi-static load case, but accumulates at an increasing rate to the maximum level for the dynamic loading. However, the relatively higher stiffness and yield strength of the Super CMV alloy resulted in limited deformation and low plastic strain when compared to the Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The accumulated equivalent plastic strain of the material point at the initial contact position was nearly a thousand times higher for the dynamic load case (for example, 6.592 for Ti-6Al-4V, 1.0 kN) when compared to the quasi-static loading (only 0.0072). During the loading step, the von Mises stress increased with a decreasing and increasing rate for the quasi-static and dynamic load case, respectively. A sudden increase in the stress magnitude to the respective peak value was registered due to the additional constraint to overcome the static friction of the mating surfaces during the sliding step.

  7. Quasi-static analysis of flexible pavements based on predicted frequencies using Fast Fourier Transform and Artificial Neural Network

    Ali Reza Ghanizadeh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available New trend in design of flexible pavements is mechanistic-empirical approach. The first step for applying this method is analyzing the pavement structure for several times and computation of critical stresses and strains, which needs a fast analysis method with good accuracy. This paper aims to introduce a new rapid pavement analysis approach, which can consider the history of loading and rate effect. To this end, 1200 flexible pavement sections were analyzed, and equivalent frequencies (EF were calculated using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT method at various depths of asphalt layer. A nonlinear regression equation has been presented for determining EF at different depths of asphalt layer. For more accurate predicting of EF at low frequencies, a feed-forward Artificial Neural Network (ANN was employed, which allows accurate prediction of EF. The frequencies obtained by the proposed regression equation and ANN were compared with frequencies observed in Virginia Smart Road project, and it was found that there is a good agreement between observed and predicted frequencies. Comparison of quasi-static analysis of flexible pavements by frequencies obtained using FFT method and full dynamic analysis by 3D-Move program approves that the critical responses of pavement computed by proposed quasi-static analysis approach are comparable to critical responses computed using full dynamic analysis. Keywords: Equivalent frequency, Fast Fourier Transform (FFT, Pavement quasi-static analysis, Dynamic modulus, Artificial Neural Network (ANN

  8. A study of microstructure, quasi-static response, fatigue, deformation and fracture behavior of high strength alloy steels

    Kannan, Manigandan

    The history of steel dates back to the 17th century and has been instrumental in the betterment of every aspect of our lives ever since, from the pin that holds the paper together to the Automobile that takes us to our destination steel touches everyone every day. Path breaking improvements in manufacturing techniques, access to advanced machinery and understanding of factors like heat treatment, corrosion resistance have aided in the advancement in the properties of steel in the last few years. In this dissertation document, the results of a study aimed at the influence of alloy chemistry, processing and influence of the quasi static and fatigue behavior of seven alloy steels is discussed. The microstructure of the as-received steel was examined and characterized for the nature and morphology of the grains and the presence of other intrinsic features in the microstructure. The tensile, cyclic fatigue and bending fatigue tests were done on a fully automated closed-loop servo-hydraulic test machine at room temperature. The failed samples of high strength steels were examined in a scanning electron microscope for understanding the fracture behavior, especially the nature of loading be it quasi static, cyclic fatigue or bending fatigue . The quasi static and cyclic fatigue fracture behavior of the steels examined coupled with various factors contributing to failure are briefly discussed in light of the conjoint and mutually interactive influences of intrinsic microstructural effects, nature of loading, and stress (load)-deformation-microstructural interactions.

  9. FEM Modeling of the Relationship between the High-Temperature Hardness and High-Temperature, Quasi-Static Compression Experiment.

    Zhang, Tao; Jiang, Feng; Yan, Lan; Xu, Xipeng

    2017-12-26

    The high-temperature hardness test has a wide range of applications, but lacks test standards. The purpose of this study is to develop a finite element method (FEM) model of the relationship between the high-temperature hardness and high-temperature, quasi-static compression experiment, which is a mature test technology with test standards. A high-temperature, quasi-static compression test and a high-temperature hardness test were carried out. The relationship between the high-temperature, quasi-static compression test results and the high-temperature hardness test results was built by the development of a high-temperature indentation finite element (FE) simulation. The simulated and experimental results of high-temperature hardness have been compared, verifying the accuracy of the high-temperature indentation FE simulation.The simulated results show that the high temperature hardness basically does not change with the change of load when the pile-up of material during indentation is ignored. The simulated and experimental results show that the decrease in hardness and thermal softening are consistent. The strain and stress of indentation were analyzed from the simulated contour. It was found that the strain increases with the increase of the test temperature, and the stress decreases with the increase of the test temperature.

  10. The improved quasi-static method vs the direct method: a case study for CANDU reactor transients

    Kaveh, S.; Koclas, J.; Roy, R.

    1999-01-01

    Among the large number of methods for the transient analysis of nuclear reactors, the improved quasi-static procedure is one of the most widely used. In recent years, substantial increase in both computer speed and memory has motivated a rethinking of the limitations of this method. The overall goal of the present work is a systematic comparison between the improved quasi-static and the direct method (mesh-centered finite difference) for realistic CANDU transient simulations. The emphasis is on the accuracy of the solutions as opposed to the computational speed. Using the computer code NDF, a typical realistic transient of CANDU reactor has been analyzed. In this transient the response of the reactor regulating system to a substantial local perturbation (sudden extraction of the five adjuster rods) has been simulated. It is shown that when updating the detector responses is of major importance, it is better to use a well-optimized direct method rather than the improved quasi-static method. (author)

  11. FEM Modeling of the Relationship between the High-Temperature Hardness and High-Temperature, Quasi-Static Compression Experiment

    Tao Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The high-temperature hardness test has a wide range of applications, but lacks test standards. The purpose of this study is to develop a finite element method (FEM model of the relationship between the high-temperature hardness and high-temperature, quasi-static compression experiment, which is a mature test technology with test standards. A high-temperature, quasi-static compression test and a high-temperature hardness test were carried out. The relationship between the high-temperature, quasi-static compression test results and the high-temperature hardness test results was built by the development of a high-temperature indentation finite element (FE simulation. The simulated and experimental results of high-temperature hardness have been compared, verifying the accuracy of the high-temperature indentation FE simulation.The simulated results show that the high temperature hardness basically does not change with the change of load when the pile-up of material during indentation is ignored. The simulated and experimental results show that the decrease in hardness and thermal softening are consistent. The strain and stress of indentation were analyzed from the simulated contour. It was found that the strain increases with the increase of the test temperature, and the stress decreases with the increase of the test temperature.

  12. Quasi-static analysis of muscle forces in the shoulder mechanism during wheelchair propulsion

    van der Helm, Frans C T; Veeger, H. E J

    During wheelchair propulsion the largest net joint moments and net joint powers are generated around the shoulder. The analysis of the contribution of arm- and shoulder muscles to the joint moments could explain the low efficiency of wheelchair propulsion. Basically, it is assumed that a large

  13. Enhanced quasi-static particle-in-cell simulation of electron cloud instabilities in circular accelerators

    Feng, Bing

    Electron cloud instabilities have been observed in many circular accelerators around the world and raised concerns of future accelerators and possible upgrades. In this thesis, the electron cloud instabilities are studied with the quasi-static particle-in-cell (PIC) code QuickPIC. Modeling in three-dimensions the long timescale propagation of beam in electron clouds in circular accelerators requires faster and more efficient simulation codes. Thousands of processors are easily available for parallel computations. However, it is not straightforward to increase the effective speed of the simulation by running the same problem size on an increasingly number of processors because there is a limit to domain size in the decomposition of the two-dimensional part of the code. A pipelining algorithm applied on the fully parallelized particle-in-cell code QuickPIC is implemented to overcome this limit. The pipelining algorithm uses multiple groups of processors and optimizes the job allocation on the processors in parallel computing. With this novel algorithm, it is possible to use on the order of 102 processors, and to expand the scale and the speed of the simulation with QuickPIC by a similar factor. In addition to the efficiency improvement with the pipelining algorithm, the fidelity of QuickPIC is enhanced by adding two physics models, the beam space charge effect and the dispersion effect. Simulation of two specific circular machines is performed with the enhanced QuickPIC. First, the proposed upgrade to the Fermilab Main Injector is studied with an eye upon guiding the design of the upgrade and code validation. Moderate emittance growth is observed for the upgrade of increasing the bunch population by 5 times. But the simulation also shows that increasing the beam energy from 8GeV to 20GeV or above can effectively limit the emittance growth. Then the enhanced QuickPIC is used to simulate the electron cloud effect on electron beam in the Cornell Energy Recovery Linac

  14. Determination of temperature dependence of piezoelectric coefficients matrix of lead zirconate titanate ceramics by quasi-static and resonance method

    Li Fei; Xu Zhuo; Wei Xiaoyong; Yao Xi

    2009-01-01

    The piezoelectric coefficients (d 33 , -d 31 , d 15 , g 33 , -g 31 , g 15 ) of soft and hard lead zirconate titanate ceramics were measured by the quasi-static and resonance methods, at temperatures from 20 to 300 0 C. The results showed that the piezoelectric coefficients d 33 , -d 31 and d 15 obtained by these two methods increased with increasing temperature for both hard and soft PZT ceramics, while the piezoelectric coefficients g 33 , -g 31 and g 15 decreased with increasing temperature for both hard and soft PZT ceramics. In this paper, the observed results were also discussed in terms of intrinsic and extrinsic contributions to piezoelectric response.

  15. Criteria for initiation of delamination in quasi-static punch-shear tests of a carbon-fiber composite material.

    Chin, Eric Brian [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); English, Shawn Allen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Briggs, Timothy [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    V arious phenomenological delamination initiation criteria are analyzed in quasi - static punch - shear tests conducted on six different geometries. These six geometries are modeled and analyzed using elastic, large - deformation finite element analysis. Analysis output is post - processed to assess different delamination initiation criteria, and their applicability to each of the geometries. These criteria are compared to test results to assess whether or not they are appropriate based on what occurred in testing. Further, examinations of CT scans and ultrasonic images o f test specimens are conducted in the appendix to determine the sequence of failure in each test geometry.

  16. Effects of middle ear quasi-static stiffness on sound transmission quantified by a novel 3-axis optical force sensor.

    Dobrev, Ivo; Sim, Jae Hoon; Aqtashi, Baktash; Huber, Alexander M; Linder, Thomas; Röösli, Christof

    2018-01-01

    Intra-operative quantification of the ossicle mobility could provide valuable feedback for the current status of the patient's conductive hearing. However, current methods for evaluation of middle ear mobility are mostly limited to the surgeon's subjective impression through manual palpation of the ossicles. This study investigates how middle ear transfer function is affected by stapes quasi-static stiffness of the ossicular chain. The stiffness of the middle ear is induced by a) using a novel fiber-optic 3-axis force sensor to quantify the quasi-static stiffness of the middle ear, and b) by artificial reduction of stapes mobility due to drying of the middle ear. Middle ear transfer function, defined as the ratio of the stapes footplate velocity versus the ear canal sound pressure, was measured with a single point LDV in two conditions. First, a controlled palpation force was applied at the stapes head in two in-plane (superior-inferior or posterior-anterior) directions, and at the incus lenticular process near the incudostapedial joint in the piston (lateral-medial) direction with a novel 3-axis PalpEar force sensor (Sensoptic, Losone, Switzerland), while the corresponding quasi-static displacement of the contact point was measured via a 3-axis micrometer stage. The palpation force was applied sequentially, step-wise in the range of 0.1-20 gF (1-200 mN). Second, measurements were repeated with various stages of stapes fixation, simulated by pre-load on the stapes head or drying of the temporal bone, and with severe ossicle immobilization, simulated by gluing of the stapes footplate. Simulated stapes fixation (forced drying of 5-15 min) severely decreases (20-30 dB) the low frequency (4 kHz) response. Stapes immobilization (gluing of the footplate) severely reduces (20-40 dB) the low and mid frequency response (force (Force-displacement measurements around the incudostapedial joint showed quasi-static stiffness in the range of 200-500 N/m for normal middle

  17. ORNL calibrations facility

    Berger, C.D.; Gupton, E.D.; Lane, B.H.; Miller, J.H.; Nichols, S.W.

    1982-08-01

    The ORNL Calibrations Facility is operated by the Instrumentation Group of the Industrial Safety and Applied Health Physics Division. Its primary purpose is to maintain radiation calibration standards for calibration of ORNL health physics instruments and personnel dosimeters. This report includes a discussion of the radioactive sources and ancillary equipment in use and a step-by-step procedure for calibration of those survey instruments and personnel dosimeters in routine use at ORNL

  18. New aspects in the implementation of the quasi-static method for the solution of neutron diffusion problems in the framework of a nodal method

    Caron, D.; Dulla, S.; Ravetto, P.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The implementation of the quasi-static method in 3D nodal diffusion theory model in hexagonal-z geometry is described. • Different formulations of the quasi-static technique are discussed. • The results presented illustrate the features of the various formulations, highlighting advantages and drawbacks. • A novel adaptive procedure for the selection of the time interval between shape recalculations is presented. - Abstract: The ability to accurately model the dynamic behaviour of the neutron distribution in a nuclear system is a fundamental aspect of reactor design and safety assessment. Due to the heavy computational burden associated to the direct time inversion of the full model, the quasi-static method has become a standard approach to the numerical solution of the nuclear reactor dynamic equations on the full phase space. The present paper is opened by an introductory critical review of the basics of the quasi-static scheme for the general neutron kinetic problem. Afterwards, the implementation of the quasi-static method in the context of a three-dimensional nodal diffusion theory model in hexagonal-z geometry is described, including some peculiar aspects of the adjoint nodal equations and the explicit formulation of the quasi-static nodal equations. The presentation includes the discussion of different formulations of the quasi-static technique. The results presented illustrate the features of the various formulations, highlighting the corresponding advantages and drawbacks. An adaptive procedure for the selection of the time interval between shape recalculations is also presented, showing its usefulness in practical applications.

  19. Failure Behaviour of Aluminium/CFRP Laminates with Varying Fibre Orientation in Quasi-static Indentation Test

    Romli, N. K.; Rejab, M. R. M.; Bachtiar, D.; Siregar, J.; Rani, M. F.; Salleh, Salwani Mohd; Merzuki, M. N. M.

    2018-03-01

    The response of the aluminium/carbon laminate was examined by an experimental work. The investigation on fibre metal laminate behaviour was done through an indentation test in a quasi-static loading. The hybrid laminate was fabricated by a compression moulding technique and used two types of carbon fibre orientations; plain weave and unidirectional. The plain weave orientation is dry fibre, and unidirectional orientation is prepreg type fibre. The plain weave carbon fibre and aluminium alloy 2024-0 was laminated by using thermoset epoxy while the unidirectional carbon fibre was pressed by using a hot press machine and cured under a specific temperature and pressure. A compression moulding technique was used for the FML fabrication. The aluminium sheet metal has been roughening by a metal sanding method which to improve the bonding between the fibre and metal layer. The main objective of this paper is to determine the failure response of the laminate under five variation of the crosshead speeds in the quasi-static loading. Based on the experimental data of the test, the result of 1 mm/min in the plain weave CFRP has lower loading than unidirectional fibre which the value of both was 4.11 kN and 4.69 kN, respectively.

  20. Quasi-static strength and fractography analysis of two dental implants manufactured by direct metal laser sintering.

    Gehrke, Sergio Alexandre; Pérez-Díaz, Leticia; Dedavid, Berenice Anina

    2018-01-30

    New manufacturing methods was developed to improve the tissues integration with the titanium alloy pieces. The present in vitro study was to assess the resistance and fracture mode after applied a quasi-static compressive force on the two dental implants manufactured by direct metal laser sintering. Twenty dental implants manufactured by direct metal laser sintering, using titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) granules in two designs (n = 10 per group): Conventional dental implant (group Imp1) two-piece implant design, where the surgical implant and prosthetic abutment are two separate components and, the one-piece implant (group Imp2), where the surgical implant and prosthetic abutment are one integral piece. All samples were subjected to quasi-static loading at a 30° angle to the implant axis in a universal testing machine. The mean fracture strengths were 1269.2 ± 128.8 N for the group Imp1 and, 1259.5 ± 115.1 N for the group Imp2, without statistical differences (P = .8722). In both groups, the fracture surface does not present crack between the compact core and the superficial (less dense and porous) part of the implants. Based on the measured resistance data for the two implant models manufactured by direct metal laser sintering tested in the present study, we can suggest that they have adequate capacity to withstand the masticatory loads. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Quasi-static motion of microparticles at the depinning contact line of an evaporating droplet on PDMS surface

    Yu, Ying-Song; Xia, Xue-Lian; Zheng, Xu; Huang, Xianfu; Zhou, Jin-Zhi

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, evaporation of sessile water droplets containing fluorescent polystyrene (PS) microparticles on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces with different curing ratios was studied experimentally using laser confocal microscopy. At the beginning, there were some microparticles located at the contact line and some microparticles moved towards the line. Due to contact angle hysteresis, at first both the contact line and the microparticles were pinned. With the depinning contact line, the microparticles moved together spontaneously. Using the software ImageJ, the location of contact lines at different time were acquired and the circle centers and radii of the contact lines were obtained via the least square method. Then the average distance of two neighbor contact lines at a certain time interval was obtained to characterize the motion of the contact line. Fitting the distance-time curve at the depinning contact line stage with polynomials and differentiating the polynomials with time, we obtained the velocity and acceleration of both the contact line and the microparticles located at the line. The velocity and the maximum acceleration were, respectively, of the orders of 1 μm/s and 20-200 nm/s2, indicating that the motion of the microparticles located at the depinning contact line was quasi-static. Finally, we presented a theoretical model to describe the quasi-static process, which may help in understanding both self-pinning and depinning of microparticles.

  2. Experimental Investigation of InSight HP3 Mole Interaction with Martian Regolith Simulant. Quasi-Static and Dynamic Penetration Testing

    Marshall, Jason P.; Hudson, Troy L.; Andrade, José E.

    2017-10-01

    The InSight mission launches in 2018 to characterize several geophysical quantities on Mars, including the heat flow from the planetary interior. This quantity will be calculated by utilizing measurements of the thermal conductivity and the thermal gradient down to 5 meters below the Martian surface. One of the components of InSight is the Mole, which hammers into the Martian regolith to facilitate these thermal property measurements. In this paper, we experimentally investigated the effect of the Mole's penetrating action on regolith compaction and mechanical properties. Quasi-static and dynamic experiments were run with a 2D model of the 3D cylindrical mole. Force resistance data was captured with load cells. Deformation information was captured in images and analyzed using Digitial Image Correlation (DIC). Additionally, we used existing approximations of Martian regolith thermal conductivity to estimate the change in the surrounding granular material's thermal conductivity due to the Mole's penetration. We found that the Mole has the potential to cause a high degree of densification, especially if the initial granular material is relatively loose. The effect on the thermal conductivity from this densification was found to be relatively small in first-order calculations though more complete thermal models incorporating this densification should be a subject of further investigation. The results obtained provide an initial estimate of the Mole's impact on Martian regolith thermal properties.

  3. Characterizing the influence of matrix ductility on damage phenomenology in continuous fiber-reinforced thermoplastic laminates undergoing quasi-static indentation

    Yudhanto, Arief

    2017-12-12

    The use of thermoplastic matrix was known to improve the impact properties of laminated composites. However, different ductility levels can exist in a single family of thermoplastic matrix, and this may consequently modify the damage phenomenology of thermoplastic composites. This paper focuses on the effect of matrix ductility on the out-of-plane properties of thermoplastic composites, which was studied through quasi-static indentation (QSI) test that may represent impact problem albeit the speed difference. We evaluated continuous glass-fiber reinforced polypropylene thermoplastic composites (GFPP), and selected homopolymer PP and copolymer PP that represent ductile and less ductile matrices, respectively. Several cross-ply laminates were selected to study the influence of ply thicknesses and relative orientation of interfaces on QSI properties of GFPP. It is expected that GFPP with ductile matrix improves energy absorption of GFPP. However, the damage mechanism is completely different between GFPP with ductile and GFPP with less ductile matrices. GFPP with ductile matrix exhibits smaller damage zone in comparison to the one with less ductile matrix. Higher matrix ductility inhibits the growth of ply cracking along the fiber, and this causes the limited size of delamination. The stacking sequence poses more influence on less ductile composites rather than the ductile one.

  4. Pressure prediction model based on artificial neural network optimized by genetic algorithm and its application in quasi-static calibration of piezoelectric high-pressure sensor.

    Gu, Tingwei; Kong, Deren; Jiang, Jian; Shang, Fei; Chen, Jing

    2016-12-01

    This paper applies back propagation neural network (BPNN) optimized by genetic algorithm (GA) for the prediction of pressure generated by a drop-weight device and the quasi-static calibration of piezoelectric high-pressure sensors for the measurement of propellant powder gas pressure. The method can effectively overcome the slow convergence and local minimum problems of BPNN. Based on test data of quasi-static comparison calibration method, a mathematical model between each parameter of drop-weight device and peak pressure and pulse width was established, through which the practical quasi-static calibration without continuously using expensive reference sensors could be realized. Compared with multiple linear regression method, the GA-BPNN model has higher prediction accuracy and stability. The percentages of prediction error of peak pressure and pulse width are less than 0.7% and 0.3%, respectively.

  5. On the performance of diagonal lattice space-time codes for the quasi-static MIMO channel

    Abediseid, Walid

    2013-06-01

    There has been tremendous work done on designing space-time codes for the quasi-static multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) channel. All the coding design to date focuses on either high-performance, high rates, low complexity encoding and decoding, or targeting a combination of these criteria. In this paper, we analyze in detail the performance of diagonal lattice space-time codes under lattice decoding. We present both upper and lower bounds on the average error probability. We derive a new closed form expression of the lower bound using the so-called sphere-packing bound. This bound presents the ultimate performance limit a diagonal lattice space-time code can achieve at any signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The upper bound is simply derived using the union-bound and demonstrates how the average error probability can be minimized by maximizing the minimum product distance of the code. © 2013 IEEE.

  6. Contact forces between a particle and a wet wall at both quasi-static and dynamic state

    Zhang Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The contact regime of particle-wall is investigated by the atomic force microscope (AFM and theoretical models. First, AFM is used to measure the cohesive force between a micron-sized grain and a glass plate at quasi-static state under various humidity. It is found out that the cohesive force starts to grow slowly and suddenly increase rapidly beyond a critical Relative Humidity (RH. Second, mathematical models of contacting forces are presented to depict the dynamic process that a particle impacts on a wet wall. Then the energy loss of a falling grain is calculated in comparison with the models and the experimental data from the previous references. The simulation results show that the force models presented here are adaptive for both low and high viscosity fluid films with different thickness.

  7. Solving the quasi-static field model of the pulse-line accelerator; relationship to a circuit model

    Friedman, Alex

    2005-01-01

    The Pulse-Line Ion Accelerator (PLIA) is a promising approach to high-gradient acceleration of an ion beam at high line charge density. A recent note by R. J. Briggs suggests that a 'sheath helix' model of such a system can be solved numerically in the quasi-static limit. Such a model captures the correct macroscopic behavior from first principles without the need to time-advance the full Maxwell equations on a grid. This note describes numerical methods that may be used to effect such a solution, and their connection to the circuit model that was described in an earlier note by the author. Fine detail of the fields in the vicinity of the helix wires is not obtained by this approach, but for purposes of beam dynamics simulation such detail is not generally needed

  8. Precision structural engineering of self-rolled-up 3D nanomembranes guided by transient quasi-static FEM modeling.

    Huang, Wen; Koric, Seid; Yu, Xin; Hsia, K Jimmy; Li, Xiuling

    2014-11-12

    Micro- and nanoscale tubular structures can be formed by strain-induced self-rolled-up nanomembranes. Precision engineering of the shape and dimension determines the performance of devices based on this platform for electronic, optical, and biological applications. A transient quasi-static finite element method (FEM) with moving boundary conditions is proposed as a general approach to design diverse types of three-dimensional (3D) rolled-up geometries. This method captures the dynamic release process of membranes through etching driven by mismatch strain and accurately predicts the final dimensions of rolled-up structures. Guided by the FEM modeling, experimental demonstration using silicon nitride membranes was achieved with unprecedented precision including controlling fractional turns of a rolled-up membrane, anisotropic rolling to form helical structures, and local stress control for 3D hierarchical architectures.

  9. Determination of temperature dependence of piezoelectric coefficients matrix of lead zirconate titanate ceramics by quasi-static and resonance method

    Li Fei; Xu Zhuo; Wei Xiaoyong; Yao Xi, E-mail: lifei1216@gmail.co [Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2009-05-07

    The piezoelectric coefficients (d{sub 33}, -d{sub 31}, d{sub 15}, g{sub 33}, -g{sub 31}, g{sub 15}) of soft and hard lead zirconate titanate ceramics were measured by the quasi-static and resonance methods, at temperatures from 20 to 300 {sup 0}C. The results showed that the piezoelectric coefficients d{sub 33}, -d{sub 31} and d{sub 15} obtained by these two methods increased with increasing temperature for both hard and soft PZT ceramics, while the piezoelectric coefficients g{sub 33}, -g{sub 31} and g{sub 15} decreased with increasing temperature for both hard and soft PZT ceramics. In this paper, the observed results were also discussed in terms of intrinsic and extrinsic contributions to piezoelectric response.

  10. IMPLEMENTATION OF THE IMPROVED QUASI-STATIC METHOD IN RATTLESNAKE/MOOSE FOR TIME-DEPENDENT RADIATION TRANSPORT MODELLING

    Zachary M. Prince; Jean C. Ragusa; Yaqi Wang

    2016-02-01

    Because of the recent interest in reactor transient modeling and the restart of the Transient Reactor (TREAT) Facility, there has been a need for more efficient, robust methods in computation frameworks. This is the impetus of implementing the Improved Quasi-Static method (IQS) in the RATTLESNAKE/MOOSE framework. IQS has implemented with CFEM diffusion by factorizing flux into time-dependent amplitude and spacial- and weakly time-dependent shape. The shape evaluation is very similar to a flux diffusion solve and is computed at large (macro) time steps. While the amplitude evaluation is a PRKE solve where the parameters are dependent on the shape and is computed at small (micro) time steps. IQS has been tested with a custom one-dimensional example and the TWIGL ramp benchmark. These examples prove it to be a viable and effective method for highly transient cases. More complex cases are intended to be applied to further test the method and its implementation.

  11. High strain rate and quasi-static tensile behaviour of Ti-6Al-4V after cyclic damage

    Verleysen P.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available It is common that energy absorbing structural elements are subjected to a number of loading cycles before a crash event. Several studies have shown that previous fatigue can significantly influence the tensile properties of some materials, and hence the behaviour of structural elements made of them. However, when the capacity of absorbing energy of engineering materials is determined, fresh material without any fatigue damage is most often used. This study investigates the effect of fatigue damage on the dynamic tensile properties of Ti-6Al-4V in thin-sheet form. Results are completed with tests at quasi-static strain rates and observations of the fracture surfaces, and compared with results obtained from other alloys and steel grades. The experiments show that the dynamic properties of Ti-6Al-4V are not affected by a number of fatigue loading cycles high enough to significantly reduce the energy absorbing capabilities of EDM machined samples.

  12. Experimental study of strain prediction on wave induced structures using modal decomposition and quasi static Ritz vectors

    Skafte, Anders; Kristoffersen, Julie; Vestermark, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    into two parts using complementary filters: Low frequency response caused by the quasi-static effect of the waves acting on the structure, and the high frequency response given by the modal properties of the structure. The high frequency response is then decomposed into modal coordinates using...... the experimental mode shapes. Strain histories are predicted by multiplying the modal coordinates with the expanded strain mode shapes. The low frequency response is decomposed using Ritz-vectors corresponding to the shapes that the structure vibrates with due to the wave loading. Strain Ritz......-vectors are then extracted from the finite element model by applying a load corresponding to a representative wave and the strain history for the low frequency response is found by multiplying the decomposed signal with the strain Ritz-vectors. Finally the combined strain history is found by adding the strain histories from...

  13. Can Plant-Based Natural Flax Replace Basalt and E-Glass for Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Tubular Energy Absorbers? A Comparative Study on Quasi-Static Axial Crushing

    Libo Yan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Using plant-based natural fibers to substitute glass fibers as reinforcement of composite materials is of particular interest due to their economic, technical, and environmental significance. One potential application of plant-based natural fiber reinforced polymer (FRP composites is in automotive engineering as crushable energy absorbers. Current study experimentally investigated and compared the energy absorption efficiency of plant-based natural flax, mineral-based basalt, and glass FRP (GFRP composite tubular energy absorbers subjected to quasi-static axial crushing. The effects of number of flax fabric layer, the use of foam filler and the type of fiber materials on the crashworthiness characteristics, and energy absorption capacities were discussed. In addition, the failure mechanisms of the hollow and foam-filled flax, basalt, and GFRP tubes in quasi-static axial crushing were analyzed and compared. The test results showed that the energy absorption capabilities of both hollow and foam-filled energy absorbers made of flax were superior to the corresponding energy absorbers made of basalt and were close to energy absorbers made of glass. This study, therefore, indicated that flax fiber has the great potential to be suitable replacement of basalt and glass fibers for crushable energy absorber application.

  14. ORNL pellet acceleration program

    Foster, C.A.; Milora, S.L.

    1978-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) pellet fueling program is centered around developing equipment to accelerate large pellets of solidified hydrogen to high speeds. This equipment will be used to experimentally determine pellet-plasma interaction physics on contemporary tokamaks. The pellet experiments performed on the Oak Ridge Tokamak (ORMAK) indicated that much larger, faster pellets would be advantageous. In order to produce and accelerate pellets of the order of 1 to 6 mm in diameter, two apparatuses have been designed and are being constructed. The first will make H 2 pellets by extruding a filament of hydrogen and mechanically chopping it into pellets. The pellets formed will be mechanically accelerated with a high speed arbor to a speed of 950 m/sec. This technique may be extended to speeds up to 5000 m/sec, which makes it a prime candidate for a reactor fueling device. In the second technique, a hydrogen pellet will be formed, loaded into a miniature rifle, and accelerated by means of high pressure hydrogen gas. This technique should be capable of speeds of the order of 1000 m/sec. While this technique does not offer the high performance of the mechanical accelerator, its relative simplicity makes it attractive for near-term experiments

  15. Effect of wettability on two-phase quasi-static displacement: validation of two pore scale modeling approaches

    Verma, Rahul

    2018-01-06

    Understanding of pore-scale physics for multiphase flow in porous media is essential for accurate description of various flow phenomena. In particular, capillarity and wettability strongly influence capillary pressure-saturation and relative permeability relationships. Wettability is quantified by the contact angle of the fluid-fluid interface at the pore walls. In this work we focus on the non-trivial interface equilibria in presence of non-neutral wetting and complex geometries. We quantify the accuracy of a volume-of-fluid (VOF) formulation, implemented in a popular open-source computational fluid dynamics code, compared with a new formulation of a level set (LS) method, specifically developed for quasi-static capillarity-dominated displacement. The methods are tested in rhomboidal packings of spheres for a range of contact angles and for different rhomboidal configurations and the accuracy is evaluated against the semi-analytical solutions obtained by Mason and Morrow (1994). While the VOF method is implemented in a general purpose code that solves the full Navier-Stokes (NS) dynamics in a finite volume formulation, with additional terms to model surface tension, the LS method is optimised for the quasi-static case and, therefore, less computationally expensive. To overcome the shortcomings of the finite volume NS-VOF system for low capillary number flows, and its computational cost, we introduce an overdamped dynamics and a local time stepping to speed up the convergence to the steady state, for every given imposed pressure gradient (and therefore saturation condition). Despite these modifications, the methods fundamentally differ in the way they capture the interface, as well as in the number of equations solved and in the way the mean curvature (or equivalently capillary pressure) is computed. This study is intended to provide a rigorous validation study and gives important indications on the errors committed by these methods in solving more complex geometry

  16. Effect of wettability on two-phase quasi-static displacement: validation of two pore scale modeling approaches

    Verma, Rahul; Icardi, Matteo; Prodanović, Maša

    2018-01-01

    Understanding of pore-scale physics for multiphase flow in porous media is essential for accurate description of various flow phenomena. In particular, capillarity and wettability strongly influence capillary pressure-saturation and relative permeability relationships. Wettability is quantified by the contact angle of the fluid-fluid interface at the pore walls. In this work we focus on the non-trivial interface equilibria in presence of non-neutral wetting and complex geometries. We quantify the accuracy of a volume-of-fluid (VOF) formulation, implemented in a popular open-source computational fluid dynamics code, compared with a new formulation of a level set (LS) method, specifically developed for quasi-static capillarity-dominated displacement. The methods are tested in rhomboidal packings of spheres for a range of contact angles and for different rhomboidal configurations and the accuracy is evaluated against the semi-analytical solutions obtained by Mason and Morrow (1994). While the VOF method is implemented in a general purpose code that solves the full Navier-Stokes (NS) dynamics in a finite volume formulation, with additional terms to model surface tension, the LS method is optimised for the quasi-static case and, therefore, less computationally expensive. To overcome the shortcomings of the finite volume NS-VOF system for low capillary number flows, and its computational cost, we introduce an overdamped dynamics and a local time stepping to speed up the convergence to the steady state, for every given imposed pressure gradient (and therefore saturation condition). Despite these modifications, the methods fundamentally differ in the way they capture the interface, as well as in the number of equations solved and in the way the mean curvature (or equivalently capillary pressure) is computed. This study is intended to provide a rigorous validation study and gives important indications on the errors committed by these methods in solving more complex geometry

  17. The ORNL plasma fueling program

    Gouge, M.J.; Milora, S.L.; Foster, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing pellet injectors for over ten years. These devices produce frozen hydrogen isotope pellets and then accelerate the projectiles to speeds in the km/s range by either pneumatic or mechanical techniques. A variety of designs have been developed, including single-shot guns, multiple-shot guns, machine guns, and centrifugal accelerators. These injectors have been used to inject hydrogen and deuterium pellets into plasmas on numerous tokamak experiments resulting in improved plasma performance. ORNL has recently provided pellet fueling systems for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), the Joint European Torus (JET), and the Tore Supra tokamak. This paper discusses developments on these injector designs. 10 refs

  18. Poromechanical approach describing the moisture influence on the non-linear quasi-static and dynamic behaviour of porous building materials

    Carmeliet, J.; Abeele, van den K.E.A.

    2004-01-01

    The non-linear quasi-static and dynamic elastic behaviour of Berea sandstone has been experimentally analysed showing hysteresis and a strong influence of moisture especially in the lower saturation range. It is shown that non-linear hysteretic response originates within the "bond system" of the

  19. Comparison of quasi-static and dynamic squats: a three-dimensional kinematic, kinetic and electromyographic study of the lower limbs.

    Clément, Julien; Hagemeister, Nicola; Aissaoui, Rachid; de Guise, Jacques A

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have described 3D kinematics, 3D kinetics and electromyography (EMG) of the lower limbs during quasi-static or dynamic squatting activities. One study compared these two squatting conditions but only at low speed on healthy subjects, and provided no information on kinetics and EMG of the lower limbs. The purpose of the present study was to contrast simultaneous recordings of 3D kinematics, 3D kinetics and EMG of the lower limbs during quasi-stat ic and fast-dynamic squats in healthy and pathological subjects. Ten subjects were recruited: five healthy and five osteoarthritis subjects. A motion-capture system, force plate, and surface electrodes respectively recorded 3D kinematics, 3D kinetics and EMG of the lower limbs. Each subject performed a quasi-static squat and several fast-dynamic squats from 0° to 70° of knee flexion. The two squatting conditions were compared for positions where quasi-static and fast-dynamic knee flexion-extension angles were similar. Mean differences between quasi-static and fast-dynamic squats were 1.5° for rotations, 1.9 mm for translations, 2.1% of subjects' body weight for ground reaction forces, 6.6 Nm for torques, 11.2 mm for center of pressure, and 6.3% of maximum fast-dynamic electromyographic activities for EMG. Some significant differences (psquats were small. 69.5% of compared data were equivalent. In conclusion, this study showed that quasi-static and fast-dynamic squatting activities are comparable in terms of 3D kinematics, 3D kinetics and EMG, although some reservations still remain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Quasi-static and dynamic motions of the columellar footplate in ostrich (Struthio camelus) measured ex vivo.

    Muyshondt, Pieter G G; Claes, Raf; Aerts, Peter; Dirckx, Joris J J

    2018-01-01

    The nature of the movement of the columellar footplate (CFP) in birds is still a matter of ongoing debate. Some sources claim that rocking motion is dominant, while others propose a largely piston-like motion. In this study, motions of the CFP are experimentally investigated in the ostrich using a post-mortem approach. For quasi-static loads, micro-CT scans of ostrich heads were made under positive and negative middle-ear pressures of 1 kPa. For dynamic loads, laser Doppler vibrometry was used to measure the velocity on multiple locations of the CFP as a function of excitation frequency from 0.125 to 4 kHz, and digital stroboscopic holography was used to assess the 1D full-field out-of-plane displacement of the CFP at different excitation frequencies. To expose the CFP in the experiments, measurements were made from the medial side of the CFP after opening and draining the inner ear. To determine the influence of the inner-ear load on CFP motions, a finite element model was created of the intact ostrich middle ear with inner-ear load included. For quasi-static loads, the CFP performed largely piston-like motions under positive ME pressure, while under negative ME pressure the difference between piston and rocking motion was smaller. For dynamic loads, the CFP motion was almost completely piston-like for frequencies below 1 kHz. For higher frequencies, the motions became more complicated with an increase of the rocking components, although they never exceeded the piston component. When including the inner-ear load to the model, the rocking components started to increase relative to the piston component when compared to the result of the model with unloaded CFP, but only at high frequencies above 1 kHz. In this frequency range, the motion could no longer be identified as purely piston-like or rocking. As a conclusion, the current results suggest that CFP motion is predominantly piston-like below 1 kHz, while at higher frequencies the motion becomes too

  1. JAC3D -- A three-dimensional finite element computer program for the nonlinear quasi-static response of solids with the conjugate gradient method; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    Biffle, J.H.

    1993-02-01

    JAC3D is a three-dimensional finite element program designed to solve quasi-static nonlinear mechanics problems. A set of continuum equations describes the nonlinear mechanics involving large rotation and strain. A nonlinear conjugate gradient method is used to solve the equation. The method is implemented in a three-dimensional setting with various methods for accelerating convergence. Sliding interface logic is also implemented. An eight-node Lagrangian uniform strain element is used with hourglass stiffness to control the zero-energy modes. This report documents the elastic and isothermal elastic-plastic material model. Other material models, documented elsewhere, are also available. The program is vectorized for efficient performance on Cray computers. Sample problems described are the bending of a thin beam, the rotation of a unit cube, and the pressurization and thermal loading of a hollow sphere.

  2. JAC2D: A two-dimensional finite element computer program for the nonlinear quasi-static response of solids with the conjugate gradient method; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    Biffle, J.H.; Blanford, M.L.

    1994-05-01

    JAC2D is a two-dimensional finite element program designed to solve quasi-static nonlinear mechanics problems. A set of continuum equations describes the nonlinear mechanics involving large rotation and strain. A nonlinear conjugate gradient method is used to solve the equations. The method is implemented in a two-dimensional setting with various methods for accelerating convergence. Sliding interface logic is also implemented. A four-node Lagrangian uniform strain element is used with hourglass stiffness to control the zero-energy modes. This report documents the elastic and isothermal elastic/plastic material model. Other material models, documented elsewhere, are also available. The program is vectorized for efficient performance on Cray computers. Sample problems described are the bending of a thin beam, the rotation of a unit cube, and the pressurization and thermal loading of a hollow sphere.

  3. Effects of Thermally Induced Microcracking on the Quasi Static and Dynamic Response of Salem Limestone

    2017-06-30

    elastic material, e.g., a high strength steel. A third bar, the striker bar, is propelled (typically by a gas gun) into the end of the incident bar...Sciences 36:433-448. Ferrero, A. M., and P. Marini. 2001. Experimental studies on the mechanical behaviour of two thermal cracked marbles. Rock

  4. ORNL radioactive waste operations

    Sease, J.D.; King, E.M.; Coobs, J.H.; Row, T.H.

    1982-01-01

    Since its beginning in 1943, ORNL has generated large amounts of solid, liquid, and gaseous radioactive waste material as a by-product of the basic research and development work carried out at the laboratory. The waste system at ORNL has been continually modified and updated to keep pace with the changing release requirements for radioactive wastes. Major upgrading projects are currently in progress. The operating record of ORNL waste operation has been excellent over many years. Recent surveillance of radioactivity in the Oak Ridge environs indicates that atmospheric concentrations of radioactivity were not significantly different from other areas in East Tennesseee. Concentrations of radioactivity in the Clinch River and in fish collected from the river were less than 4% of the permissible concentration and intake guides for individuals in the offsite environment. While some radioactivity was released to the environment from plant operations, the concentrations in all of the media sampled were well below established standards

  5. Admissible Shape Parameters for a Planar Quasi-Static Constraint Mode Tire Model

    2014-01-21

    Journal of Vibration, 1988. 110(1): p. 70-75. 4. Zegelaar, P.W.A.P., H. B., The In-plane Dynamics of Tyres on Uneven Roads . Vehicle System Dynamics...ADDRESS(ES) Vehicle Terrain performance laboratory,Virginia Tech Mechanical Engineering Department,635 Prices Fork Road - MC 0238,Blacksburg,VA,24061...such that the upper portion is in direct contact with the lower portion and there is a discontinuous and dramatic increase in apparent stiffness). A

  6. Finite element analysis of plantar fascia during walking: a quasi-static simulation.

    Chen, Yen-Nien; Chang, Chih-Wei; Li, Chun-Ting; Chang, Chih-Han; Lin, Cheng-Feng

    2015-01-01

    The plantar fascia is a primary arch supporting structure of the foot and is often stressed with high tension during ambulation. When the loading on the plantar fascia exceeds its capacity, the inflammatory reaction known as plantar fasciitis may occur. Mechanical overload has been identified as the primary causative factor of plantar fasciitis. However, a knowledge gap exists between how the internal mechanical responses of the plantar fascia react to simple daily activities. Therefore, this study investigated the biomechanical responses of the plantar fascia during loaded stance phase by use of the finite element (FE) modeling. A 3-dimensional (3-D) FE foot model comprising bones, cartilage, ligaments, and a complex-shaped plantar fascia was constructed. During the stance phase, the kinematics of the foot movement was reproduced and Achilles tendon force was applied to the insertion site on the calcaneus. All the calculations were made on a single healthy subject. The results indicated that the plantar fascia underwent peak tension at preswing (83.3% of the stance phase) at approximately 493 N (0.7 body weight). Stress concentrated near the medial calcaneal tubercle. The peak von Mises stress of the fascia increased 2.3 times between the midstance and preswing. The fascia tension increased 66% because of the windlass mechanism. Because of the membrane element used in the ligament tissue, this FE model was able to simulate the mechanical structure of the foot. After prescribing kinematics of the distal tibia, the proposed model indicated the internal fascia was stressed in response to the loaded stance phase. Based on the findings of this study, adjustment of gait pattern to reduce heel rise and Achilles tendon force may lower the fascia loading and may further reduce pain in patients with plantar fasciitis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Quasi-static drift-tube accelerating structures for low-speed heavy ions

    Faltens, A.; Keefe, D.

    1977-01-01

    The major attractions of the pulsed drift-tubes are that they are non-resonant structures and that they appear suitable for accelerating a very high current bunch at low energies. The mechanical tolerances of the non-resonant structure are very loose and the cost per meter should be low; the cost of the transport system is expected to be the major cost. The pulse power modulators used to drive the drift-tubes are inexpensive compared to r.f. sources with equivalent peak-power. The longitudinal emittance of the beam emerging from the structure could be extremely low

  8. A quasi-static algorithm that includes effects of characteristic time scales for simulating failures in brittle materials

    Liu, Jinxing

    2013-04-24

    When the brittle heterogeneous material is simulated via lattice models, the quasi-static failure depends on the relative magnitudes of Telem, the characteristic releasing time of the internal forces of the broken elements and Tlattice, the characteristic relaxation time of the lattice, both of which are infinitesimal compared with Tload, the characteristic loading period. The load-unload (L-U) method is used for one extreme, Telem << Tlattice, whereas the force-release (F-R) method is used for the other, Telem T lattice. For cases between the above two extremes, we develop a new algorithm by combining the L-U and the F-R trial displacement fields to construct the new trial field. As a result, our algorithm includes both L-U and F-R failure characteristics, which allows us to observe the influence of the ratio of Telem to Tlattice by adjusting their contributions in the trial displacement field. Therefore, the material dependence of the snap-back instabilities is implemented by introducing one snap-back parameter γ. Although in principle catastrophic failures can hardly be predicted accurately without knowing all microstructural information, effects of γ can be captured by numerical simulations conducted on samples with exactly the same microstructure but different γs. Such a same-specimen-based study shows how the lattice behaves along with the changing ratio of the L-U and F-R components. © 2013 The Author(s).

  9. Quasi-static drift-tube accelerating structures for low-speed heavy ions

    Faltens, A.; Keefe, D.

    1978-01-01

    A pulsed drift-tube accelerating structure for use in Heavy Ion Fusion applications is described. Possible arrangements of components in such a structure, the injector design needs, and the influence of the existing state of component technology on drift-tube structure design are considered. It is concluded that the major attractions of the pulsed drift tubes are that they are nonresonant structures and that they appear suitable for accelerating a very high current bunch at low energies. The mechanical tolerances of the nonresonant structure are very loose and the cost per meter should be low; the cost of the transport system is expected to be the major cost. The pulse-power modulators used to drive the drift tubes are inexpensive compared with rf sources of equivalent peak power. The longitudinal emittance of the beam emerging from the structure could be extremely low. (U.K.)

  10. ORNL Annual Sustainability Report

    Lapsa, Melissa Voss [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nichols, Teresa A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-02-01

    As described in this report, we have made substantial progress across the 25 roadmaps of the Sustainable Campus Initiative. The report also outlines our plans to continue integrating sustainable practices into the planning, execution, and evaluation of all ORNL activities. We appreciate your interest in our journey to sustainability, and we welcome your comments, questions, and suggestions.

  11. ORNL '90

    Anderson, T.; Barnes, D.; Jefferson, J. (eds.)

    1990-01-01

    This overview of research conducted at ORNL in 1991 presents information on the subjects of biology, physics, and the environment. Specific topics include gene mutations in kidney disease, technology assessments in thermonuclear fusion, submarine hunting technology, ozone-safe refrigerants, optical data storage via surface enhanced raman spectroscopy, and waste mitigating microbes. (GHH)

  12. An Experimental Study of Circular Cutout Hole Effect of Kevlar/epoxy-Al2O3 Composite under Subjected to Quasi-Static Compressive and Tensile Loading

    Ayad Abed Ramadhan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper has presented an experimental study of quasi-static compressive and tensile loading of cutout hole specimens of Kevlar-29/epoxy-Al2O3 laminated composite. The experimental procedure hasbeen developed to study the performance of (50%, 55% and 60% volume fraction (vf and (0o/90o and +45o/-45o fiber orientation angle effects of these composites under quasi-static tensile and compressiveload using a servo-hydraulic testing machine. The study was concluded that the ultimate load capacity increases as volume fraction increases in tensile test. While, the maximum load bearing capacity increaseswith the decrease of volume fraction in compression test. Hence, from the results obtained it can have considered the 55% volume fraction of composite panels is a good value for tensile and compressionapplications.

  13. Quasi-static displacement calibration system for a "Violin-Mode" shadow-sensor intended for Gravitational Wave detector suspensions

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V.

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes the design of, and results from, a calibration system for optical linear displacement (shadow) sensors. The shadow sensors were designed to detect "Violin-Mode" (VM) resonances in the 0.4 mm diameter silica fibre suspensions of the test masses/mirrors of Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory gravitational wave interferometers. Each sensor illuminated the fibre under test, so as to cast its narrow shadow onto a "synthesized split photodiode" detector, the shadow falling over adjacent edges of the paired photodiodes. The apparatus described here translated a vertically orientated silica test fibre horizontally through a collimated Near InfraRed illuminating beam, whilst simultaneously capturing the separate DC "shadow notch" outputs from each of the paired split photodiode detectors. As the ratio of AC to DC photocurrent sensitivities to displacement was known, a calibration of the DC response to quasi-static shadow displacement allowed the required AC sensitivity to vibrational displacement to be found. Special techniques are described for generating the required constant scan rate for the test fibre using a DC motor-driven stage, for removing "jitter" at such low translation rates from a linear magnetic encoder, and so for capturing the two shadow-notch signals at each micrometre of the test fibre's travel. Calibration, across the four detectors of this work, gave a vibrational responsivity in voltage terms of (9.45 ± 1.20) MV (rms)/m, yielding a VM displacement sensitivity of (69 ± 13) pm (rms)/√Hz, at 500 Hz, over the required measuring span of ±0.1 mm.

  14. Numerical Modeling Describing the Effects of Heterogeneous Distributions of Asperities on the Quasi-static Evolution of Frictional Slip

    Selvadurai, P. A.; Parker, J. M.; Glaser, S. D.

    2017-12-01

    A better understanding of how slip accumulates along faults and its relation to the breakdown of shear stress is beneficial to many engineering disciplines, such as, hydraulic fracture and understanding induced seismicity (among others). Asperities forming along a preexisting fault resist the relative motion of the two sides of the interface and occur due to the interaction of the surface topographies. Here, we employ a finite element model to simulate circular partial slip asperities along a nominally flat frictional interface. Shear behavior of our partial slip asperity model closely matched the theory described by Cattaneo. The asperity model was employed to simulate a small section of an experimental fault formed between two bodies of polymethyl methacrylate, which consisted of multiple asperities whose location and sizes were directly measured using a pressure sensitive film. The quasi-static shear behavior of the interface was modeled for cyclical loading conditions, and the frictional dissipation (hysteresis) was normal stress dependent. We further our understanding by synthetically modeling lognormal size distributions of asperities that were randomly distributed in space. Synthetic distributions conserved the real contact area and aspects of the size distributions from the experimental case, allowing us to compare the constitutive behaviors based solely on spacing effects. Traction-slip behavior of the experimental interface appears to be considerably affected by spatial clustering of asperities that was not present in the randomly spaced, synthetic asperity distributions. Estimates of bulk interfacial shear stiffness were determined from the constitutive traction-slip behavior and were comparable to the theoretical estimates of multi-contact interfaces with non-interacting asperities.

  15. HyPEP FY-07 Report: Initial Calculations of Component Sizes, Quasi-Static, and Dynamics Analyses

    Chang Oh

    2007-01-01

    The Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR) coupled to the High Temperature Steam Electrolysis (HTSE) process is one of two reference integrated systems being investigated by the U.S. Department of Energy and Idaho National Laboratory for the production of hydrogen. In this concept a VHTR outlet temperature of 900 C provides thermal energy and high efficiency electricity for the electrolysis of steam in the HTSE process. In the second reference system the Sulfur Iodine (SI) process is coupled to the VHTR to produce hydrogen thermochemically. This report describes component sizing studies and control system strategies for achieving plant production and operability goals for these two reference systems. The optimal size and design condition for the intermediate heat exchanger, one of the most important components for integration of the VHTR and HTSE plants, was estimated using an analytic model. A partial load schedule and control system was designed for the integrated plant using a quasi-static simulation. Reactor stability for temperature perturbations in the hydrogen plant was investigated using both a simple analytic method and a dynamic simulation. Potential efficiency improvements over the VHTR/HTSE plant were investigated for an alternative design that directly couples a High Temperature Steam Rankin Cycle (HTRC) to the HTSE process. This work was done using the HYSYS code and results for the HTRC/HTSE system were compared to the VHTR/HTSE system. Integration of the VHTR with SI process plants was begun. Using the ASPEN plus code the efficiency was estimated. Finally, this report describes planning for the validation and verification of the HYPEP code

  16. Quasi-static ensemble variational data assimilation: a theoretical and numerical study with the iterative ensemble Kalman smoother

    Fillion, Anthony; Bocquet, Marc; Gratton, Serge

    2018-04-01

    The analysis in nonlinear variational data assimilation is the solution of a non-quadratic minimization. Thus, the analysis efficiency relies on its ability to locate a global minimum of the cost function. If this minimization uses a Gauss-Newton (GN) method, it is critical for the starting point to be in the attraction basin of a global minimum. Otherwise the method may converge to a local extremum, which degrades the analysis. With chaotic models, the number of local extrema often increases with the temporal extent of the data assimilation window, making the former condition harder to satisfy. This is unfortunate because the assimilation performance also increases with this temporal extent. However, a quasi-static (QS) minimization may overcome these local extrema. It accomplishes this by gradually injecting the observations in the cost function. This method was introduced by Pires et al. (1996) in a 4D-Var context. We generalize this approach to four-dimensional strong-constraint nonlinear ensemble variational (EnVar) methods, which are based on both a nonlinear variational analysis and the propagation of dynamical error statistics via an ensemble. This forces one to consider the cost function minimizations in the broader context of cycled data assimilation algorithms. We adapt this QS approach to the iterative ensemble Kalman smoother (IEnKS), an exemplar of nonlinear deterministic four-dimensional EnVar methods. Using low-order models, we quantify the positive impact of the QS approach on the IEnKS, especially for long data assimilation windows. We also examine the computational cost of QS implementations and suggest cheaper algorithms.

  17. A calculation and uncertainty evaluation method for the effective area of a piston rod used in quasi-static pressure calibration

    Gu, Tingwei; Kong, Deren; Shang, Fei; Chen, Jing

    2018-04-01

    This paper describes the merits and demerits of different sensors for measuring propellant gas pressure, the applicable range of the frequently used dynamic pressure calibration methods, and the working principle of absolute quasi-static pressure calibration based on the drop-weight device. The main factors affecting the accuracy of pressure calibration are analyzed from two aspects of the force sensor and the piston area. To calculate the effective area of the piston rod and evaluate the uncertainty between the force sensor and the corresponding peak pressure in the absolute quasi-static pressure calibration process, a method for solving these problems based on the least squares principle is proposed. According to the relevant quasi-static pressure calibration experimental data, the least squares fitting model between the peak force and the peak pressure, and the effective area of the piston rod and its measurement uncertainty, are obtained. The fitting model is tested by an additional group of experiments, and the peak pressure obtained by the existing high-precision comparison calibration method is taken as the reference value. The test results show that the peak pressure obtained by the least squares fitting model is closer to the reference value than the one directly calculated by the cross-sectional area of the piston rod. When the peak pressure is higher than 150 MPa, the percentage difference is less than 0.71%, which can meet the requirements of practical application.

  18. Fusion research at ORNL

    1982-03-01

    The ORNL Fusion Program includes the experimental and theoretical study of two different classes of magnetic confinement schemes - systems with helical magnetic fields, such as the tokamak and stellarator, and the ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) class of toroidally linked mirror systems; the development of technologies, including superconducting magnets, neutral atomic beam and radio frequency (rf) heating systems, fueling systems, materials, and diagnostics; the development of databases for atomic physics and radiation effects; the assessment of the environmental impact of magnetic fusion; and the design of advanced demonstration fusion devices. The program involves wide collaboration, both within ORNL and with other institutions. The elements of this program are shown. This document illustrates the program's scope; and aims by reviewing recent progress

  19. Pellet fueling development at ORNL

    Combs, S.K.; Milora, S.L.; Foster, C.A.; Schuresko, D.D.; Foust, C.R.; Simmons, D.W.; Beard, D.S.

    1986-09-01

    Advanced plasma fueling systems for magnetic confinement devices are being developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The general approach is that of producing and accelerating frozen hydrogenic pellets at speeds in the range of 1-2 km/s and higher. Two specific concepts are under development: (1) high-speed pneumatic acceleration; and (2) mechanical (centrifugal) acceleration. Both approaches are being pursued to meet the projected pellet size and delivery rates for major near-term plasma confinement devices, such as the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), Tore Supra, the Joint European Torus (JET), JT-60, and Doublet III-D (DIII-D), as well as future applications. In addition to these confinement physics related activities, ORNL is pursuing advanced technologies to achieve pellet velocities significantly in excess of the 2-km/s range already attained with pneumatic injectors and has embarked on a development program designed to explore the feasibility of fabricating and accelerating tritium pellets. This paper describes these ongoing activities

  20. Moment measurements in dynamic and quasi-static spine segment testing using eccentric compression are susceptible to artifacts based on loading configuration.

    Van Toen, Carolyn; Carter, Jarrod W; Oxland, Thomas R; Cripton, Peter A

    2014-12-01

    The tolerance of the spine to bending moments, used for evaluation of injury prevention devices, is often determined through eccentric axial compression experiments using segments of the cadaver spine. Preliminary experiments in our laboratory demonstrated that eccentric axial compression resulted in "unexpected" (artifact) moments. The aim of this study was to evaluate the static and dynamic effects of test configuration on bending moments during eccentric axial compression typical in cadaver spine segment testing. Specific objectives were to create dynamic equilibrium equations for the loads measured inferior to the specimen, experimentally verify these equations, and compare moment responses from various test configurations using synthetic (rubber) and human cadaver specimens. The equilibrium equations were verified by performing quasi-static (5 mm/s) and dynamic experiments (0.4 m/s) on a rubber specimen and comparing calculated shear forces and bending moments to those measured using a six-axis load cell. Moment responses were compared for hinge joint, linear slider and hinge joint, and roller joint configurations tested at quasi-static and dynamic rates. Calculated shear force and bending moment curves had similar shapes to those measured. Calculated values in the first local minima differed from those measured by 3% and 15%, respectively, in the dynamic test, and these occurred within 1.5 ms of those measured. In the rubber specimen experiments, for the hinge joint (translation constrained), quasi-static and dynamic posterior eccentric compression resulted in flexion (unexpected) moments. For the slider and hinge joints and the roller joints (translation unconstrained), extension ("expected") moments were measured quasi-statically and initial flexion (unexpected) moments were measured dynamically. In the cadaver experiments with roller joints, anterior and posterior eccentricities resulted in extension moments, which were unexpected and expected, for those

  1. Quasi-static method and finite element method for obtaining the modifications of the spontaneous emission rate and energy level shift near a plasmonic nanostructure.

    Zhao, Yun-Jin; Tian, Meng; Wang, Xiao-Yun; Yang, Hong; Zhao, Heping; Huang, Yong-Gang

    2018-01-22

    We provide numerical demonstrations of the applicability and accuracy of the quasi-static method and the finite-element method in the investigation of the modifications of the spontaneous emission rate and the energy level shift of an emitter placed near a silver-air interface or a silver nano-sphere. The analytical results are presented as a reference. Our calculations show that the finite element method is an accurate and general method. For frequency away from the radiative mode, the quasi-static method can be applied more effectively for calculating the energy level shift than the spontaneous emission rate. But for frequency around, there is a blue shift for both and this shift increases with the increasing of emitter-silver distance. Applying the theory to the nanosphere dimmer, we see similar phenomenon and find extremely large modifications of the spontaneous emission rate and energy level shift. These findings are instructive in the fields of quantum light-matter interactions.

  2. DPF Durability ORNL-04-0692

    Watkins, Thomas R [ORNL; Shyam, Amit [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL; Stafford, Randall [Cummins, Inc

    2016-11-01

    A substantial amount of testing and analysis was performed over the 13-year-duration of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Cummins Inc. and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ORNL's work focused on developing fundamental understanding of the mechanical and physical properties and their relationship to the microstructure of Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) materials (i.e., cordierite, aluminum titanate, Si-SiC). These materials exhibit significant strain tolerance owing to their highly porous and mircocracked microstructures. That is, while very weak, the porous and compliant microstructure could withstand large strains without failing catastrophically. Substantial knowledge was also gained with respect to preparation of test specimens for evaluation of mechanical properties and the care required. Once the role of the microstructure of the wall material on its mechanical response was understood, the DPF honeycombs themselves were re-examined, and the influence of the honeycomb structure was considered. Cummins s work focused mainly on the apparent strength of the DPF honeycomb structure and using the material properties generated at ORNL for input to their regeneration and performance-predictive models.

  3. Quasi-Static Transient Thermal Stresses in an Elliptical Plate due to Sectional Heat Supply on the Curved Surfaces over the Upper Face

    Lalsingh Khalsa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an attempt to determine quasi-static thermal stresses in a thin elliptical plate which is subjected to transient temperature on the top face with zero temperature on the lower face and the homogeneous boundary condition of the third kind on the fixed elliptical curved surface. The solution to conductivity equation is elucidated by employing a classical method. The solution of stress components is achieved by using Goodier’s and Airy’s potential function involving the Mathieu and modified functions and their derivatives. The obtained numerical results are accurate enough for practical purposes, better understanding of the underlying elliptic object, and better estimates of the thermal effect on the thermoelastic problem. The conclusions emphasize the importance of better understanding of the underlying elliptic structure, improved understanding of its relationship to circular object profile, and better estimates of the thermal effect on the thermoelastic problem.

  4. Temperature dependent quasi-static capacitance-voltage characterization of SiO2/β-Ga2O3 interface on different crystal orientations

    Zeng, Ke; Singisetti, Uttam

    2017-09-01

    The interface trap density (Dit) of the SiO2/β-Ga2O3 interface in ( 2 ¯ 01), (010), and (001) orientations is obtained by the Hi-Lo method with the low frequency capacitance measured using the Quasi-Static Capacitance-Voltage (QSCV) technique. QSCV measurements are carried out at higher temperatures to increase the measured energy range of Dit in the bandgap. At room temperature, higher Dit is observed near the band edge for all three orientations. The measurement at higher temperatures led to an annealing effect that reduced the Dit value for all samples. Comparison with the conductance method and frequency dispersion of the capacitance suggests that the traps at the band edge are slow traps which respond to low frequency signals.

  5. Surface asperity evolution and microstructure analysis of Al 6061T5 alloy in a quasi-static cold uniaxial planar compression (CUPC)

    Li, Hejie; Jiang, Zhengyi; Wei, Dongbin; Gao, Xingjian; Xu, Jianzhong; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We used AFM and EBSD to analyses the surface asperity flattening process. • Analysis of the influence of deformation rate on the surface asperity flattening. • Investigation of the effect of lubrication on microstructure development. • Deformation rate influence the generation of orientation components obviously. - Abstract: In a quasi-static cold uniaxial planar compression, surface asperity evolution and microstructure analysis of Al 6061T5 alloy are carried out by employing Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) and Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) methods. Strain rate affects the surface asperity evolution obviously. While lubrication can hinder the surface asperity flattening by constraining the surface localized deformation. Lubrication can accelerate the crystallization in CUPC process. It also impedes the activation of some orientation components by hindering the activation of related slip systems in light metal Al alloy

  6. Antihysteresis of perceived longitudinal body axis during continuous quasi-static whole-body rotation in the earth-vertical roll plane.

    Tatalias, M; Bockisch, C J; Bertolini, G; Straumann, D; Palla, A

    2011-03-01

    Estimation of subjective whole-body tilt in stationary roll positions after rapid rotations shows hysteresis. We asked whether this phenomenon is also present during continuous quasi-static whole-body rotation and whether gravitational cues are a major contributing factor. Using a motorized turntable, 8 healthy subjects were rotated continuously about the earth-horizontal naso-occipital axis (earth-vertical roll plane) and the earth-vertical naso-occipital axis (earth-horizontal roll plane). In both planes, three full constant velocity rotations (2°/s) were completed in clockwise and counterclockwise directions (acceleration = 0.05°/s(2), velocity plateau reached after 40 s). Subjects adjusted a visual line along the perceived longitudinal body axis (pLBA) every 2 s. pLBA deviation from the longitudinal body axis was plotted as a function of whole-body roll position, and a sine function was fitted. At identical whole-body earth-vertical roll plane positions, pLBA differed depending on whether the position was reached by a rotation from upright or by passing through upside down. After the first 360° rotation, pLBA at upright whole-body position deviated significantly in the direction of rotation relative to pLBA prior to rotation initiation. This deviation remained unchanged after subsequent full rotations. In contrast, earth-horizontal roll plane rotations resulted in similar pLBA before and after each rotation cycle. We conclude that the deviation of pLBA in the direction of rotation during quasi-static earth-vertical roll plane rotations reflects static antihysteresis and might be a consequence of the known static hysteresis of ocular counterroll: a visual line that is perceived that earth-vertical is expected to be antihysteretic, if ocular torsion is hysteretic.

  7. Nonlinear evolutions of an ultra-intense ultra-short laser pulse in a rarefied plasma through a new quasi-static theory

    Yazdanpanah, J.

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we present a new description of self-consistent wake excitation by an intense short laser pulse, based on applying the quasi-static approximation (slow variations of the pulse-envelope) in the instantaneous Lorentz-boosted pulse co-moving frame (PCMF), and best verify our results through comparison with particle-in-cell simulations. According to this theory, the plasma motion can be treated perturbatively in the PCMF due to its high initial-velocity and produces a quasi-static wakefield in this frame. The pulse envelope, on the other hand, is governed by a form of the Schrödinger equation in the PCMF, in which the wakefield acts as an effective potential. In this context, pulse evolutions are characterized by local conservation laws resulted from this equation and subjected to Lorentz transformation into the laboratory frame. Using these conservation laws, precise formulas are obtained for spatiotemporal pulse evolutions and related wakefield variations at initial stages, and new equations are derived for instantaneous group velocity and carrier frequency. In addition, based on properties of the Schrödinger equation, spectral-evolutions of the pulse are described and the emergence of an anomalous dispersion branch with linear relation ω ≈ ck (c is the light speed) is predicted. Our results are carefully discussed versus previous publications and the significance of our approach is described by showing almost all suggestive definitions of group-velocity based on energy arguments fail to reproduce our formula and correctly describe the instantaneous pulse-velocity.

  8. Hydraulic manipulator research at ORNL

    Kress, R.L.; Jansen, J.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Love, L.J. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)

    1997-03-01

    Recently, task requirements have dictated that manipulator payload capacity increase to accommodate greater payloads, greater manipulator length, and larger environmental interaction forces. General tasks such as waste storage tank cleanup and facility dismantlement and decommissioning require manipulator life capacities in the range of hundreds of pounds rather than tens of pounds. To meet the increased payload capacities demanded by present-day tasks, manipulator designers have turned once again to hydraulics as a means of actuation. In order to successfully design, build, and deploy a new hydraulic manipulator (or subsystem), sophisticated modeling, analysis, and control experiments are usually needed. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a history of projects that incorporate hydraulics technology, including mobile robots, teleoperated manipulators, and full-scale construction equipment. In addition, to support the development and deployment of new hydraulic manipulators, ORNL has outfitted a significant experimental laboratory and has developed the software capability for research into hydraulic manipulators, hydraulic actuators, hydraulic systems, modeling of hydraulic systems, and hydraulic controls. The purpose of this article is to describe the past hydraulic manipulator developments and current hydraulic manipulator research capabilities at ORNL. Included are example experimental results from ORNL`s flexible/prismatic test stand.

  9. Pellet injector research and development at ORNL

    Combs, S.K.; Argo, B.E.; Baylor, L.R.; Cole, M.J.; Dyer, G.R.; Fehling, D.T.; Fisher, P.W.; Foster, C.A.; Foust, C.R.; Gouge, M.J.; Jernigan, T.C.; Langley, R.A.; Milora, S.L.; Qualls, A.L.; Schechter, E.; Sparks, D.O.; Tsai, C.C.; Wilgen, J.B.; Whealton, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    A variety of pellet injector designs have been developed at ORNL including single-shot guns that inject one pellet, multiple-shot guns that inject four and eight pellets, machine gun-types (single- and multiple-barrel) that can inject up to >100 pellets, and centrifugal accelerators (mechanical devices that are inherently capable of high repetition rates and long-pulse operation). With these devices, macroscopic pellets (1--6 mm in diameter) composed of hydrogen isotopes are typically accelerated to speeds of ∼1.0 to 2.0 km/s for injection into plasmas of experimental fusion devices. In the past few years, steady progress has been made at ORNL in the development and application of pellet injectors for fueling present-day and future fusion devices. In this paper, we briefly describe some research and development activities at ORNL, including: (1) two recent applications and a new one on large experimental fusion devices, (2) high-velocity pellet injector development, and (3) tritium injector research

  10. Pellet injector research at ORNL

    Combs, S.K.; Foster, C.A.; Milora, S.L.

    1988-01-01

    Advanced plasma fueling systems for magnetic confinement devices are under development a the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The general approach is that of producing and accelerating frozen hydrogen isotope pellets at speeds in the range 1-2 km/s and higher. Recently, ORNL provided pneumataic-based pellet fueling systems for two of the world's largest tokamak experiments, the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and the Joint European Torus (JET). A new versatile centrifuge type injector is being readied at ORNL for use on the Tore Supra tokamak. Also, a new simplified eight-shot injector design has been developed for use on the Princeton Beta Experiment (PBX) and the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF). In addition to these confinement physics related activities, ORNL is pursuing advanced technologies to achieve pellet velocities significantly in excess of 2 km/s and is carrying out a Tritium Proof-of-Principle (TPOP) experiment in which the fabrication and acceleration of tritium pellets have already been demonstrated. This paper describes these ongoing activities. 25 refs., 9 figs

  11. ORNL decontamination and decommissioning program

    Bell, J.P.

    1980-01-01

    A program has been initiated at ORNL to decontaminate and decommission surplus or abandoned nuclear facilities. Program planning and technical studies have been performed by UCC-ND Engineering. A feasibility study for decommissioning the Metal Recovery Facility, a fuel reprocessing pilot plant, has been completed

  12. Hydraulic manipulator research at ORNL

    Kress, R.L.; Jansen, J.F.; Love, L.J.

    1997-01-01

    Recently, task requirements have dictated that manipulator payload capacity increase to accommodate greater payloads, greater manipulator length, and larger environmental interaction forces. General tasks such as waste storage tank cleanup and facility dismantlement and decommissioning require manipulator life capacities in the range of hundreds of pounds rather than tens of pounds. To meet the increased payload capacities demanded by present-day tasks, manipulator designers have turned once again to hydraulics as a means of actuation. In order to successfully design, build, and deploy a new hydraulic manipulator (or subsystem), sophisticated modeling, analysis, and control experiments are usually needed. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a history of projects that incorporate hydraulics technology, including mobile robots, teleoperated manipulators, and full-scale construction equipment. In addition, to support the development and deployment of new hydraulic manipulators, ORNL has outfitted a significant experimental laboratory and has developed the software capability for research into hydraulic manipulators, hydraulic actuators, hydraulic systems, modeling of hydraulic systems, and hydraulic controls. The purpose of this article is to describe the past hydraulic manipulator developments and current hydraulic manipulator research capabilities at ORNL. Included are example experimental results from ORNL's flexible/prismatic test stand

  13. Quasi-static time-series simulation using OpenDSS in IEEE distribution feeder model with high PV penetration and its impact on solar forecasting

    Mohammed, Touseef Ahmed Faisal

    Since 2000, renewable electricity installations in the United States (excluding hydropower) have more than tripled. Renewable electricity has grown at a compounded annual average of nearly 14% per year from 2000-2010. Wind, Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) and solar Photo Voltaic (PV) are the fastest growing renewable energy sectors. In 2010 in the U.S., solar PV grew over 71% and CSP grew by 18% from the previous year. Globally renewable electricity installations have more than quadrupled from 2000-2010. Solar PV generation grew by a factor of more than 28 between 2000 and 2010. The amount of CSP and solar PV installations are increasing on the distribution grid. These PV installations transmit electrical current from the load centers to the generating stations. But the transmission and distribution grid have been designed for uni-directional flow of electrical energy from generating stations to load centers. This causes imbalances in voltage and switchgear of the electrical circuitry. With the continuous rise in PV installations, analysis of voltage profile and penetration levels remain an active area of research. Standard distributed photovoltaic (PV) generators represented in simulation studies do not reflect the exact location and variability properties such as distance between interconnection points to substations, voltage regulators, solar irradiance and other environmental factors. Quasi-Static simulations assist in peak load planning hour and day ahead as it gives a time sequence analysis to help in generation allocation. Simulation models can be daily, hourly or yearly depending on duty cycle and dynamics of the system. High penetration of PV into the power grid changes the voltage profile and power flow dynamically in the distribution circuits due to the inherent variability of PV. There are a number of modeling and simulations tools available for the study of such high penetration PV scenarios. This thesis will specifically utilize OpenDSS, a open source

  14. Estimation of quasi-static J–R curves from Charpy energy and adaptation to ASTM E 1921 reference temperature estimation of ferritic steels

    Sreenivasan, P.R.

    2014-01-01

    Many researchers had suggested a sort of scaling procedure for predicting the quasi-static J–R curves from dynamic J–R curves obtained from instrumented Charpy V-notch (CVN) impact tests using key-curve, compliance or other procedures. Chaouadi, based on extensive tests and literature data, had quantitatively formalized the method and suggested general applicability of his method for a class of steels. In this paper, first, the Chauoadi-procedure is tried on some selected data from the literature (including the data used by Chaouadi and other workers) and an adaptation of the method is suggested using Wallin's as well as Landes's lower bound methods for upper-shelf J–R curve estimation from CVN energy. Using Chaouadi and other data as the benchmark, suitable scaling factors have been determined that enable estimation of quasi-static J–R curves from CVN energy alone, without the need for dynamic CVN J–R curves. The final formulae are given. This new method can be called modified Wallin–Landes procedure. Then this method is applied to fracture toughness and reference temperature (T 0 – ASTM E-1921) estimation from the full Charpy-transition data. The results are compared with those from the author's IGC-procedure, and modifications, if any, are suggested. Based on the new results, it is suggested that the IGC-procedure may be modified as: final T Q-est = T Q-IGC for T Q-Sch dy ≤ 20 °C (in the IGC-procedure the dividing temperature was 60 °C); and for T Q-Sch dy > 20 °C, T Q-IGC = T Q-WLm (different from the IGC-procedre and subscript WLm indicating modified Wallin–Landes procedure). For the 59 or more steels examined (including highly irradiated steels), the T Q-WL estimates at higher temperatures are consistent and conservative; a few non-conservative values are acceptably less than 20 °C, whereas other predictions show non-conservatism of up to 40–50 °C. At lower temperatures, T Q-IGC is consistently conservative and not over

  15. Fracture behaviour of mullite fibre reinforced-mullite matrix composites under quasi-static and ballistic impact loading

    Boccaccini, A. R.; Atiq, S.; Boccaccini, D. N.; Dlouhý, Ivo; Kaya, C.

    č. 65 (2005), s. 325-333 ISSN 0266-3538 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2041003 Keywords : ceramic matrix composites * mullite matrix * toughness Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 2.184, year: 2005

  16. Review of recent ORNL specific-plant analyses

    Cheverton, R.D.; Dickson, T.L.

    1991-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been helping the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) develop the pressurized thermal shock (PTS) evaluation methodology since the mid-1970s. During the early 1980s, ORNL developed the integrated PTS (IPTS) methodology, which is a probabilistic approach that includes postulation of PTS transients, estimation of their frequencies, thermal/hydraulic analyses to obtain the corresponding thermal and pressure loadings on the reactor pressure vessel, and probabilistic fracture mechanics analyses. The scope of the IPTS program included development of the probabilistic fracture mechanics code OCA-P and application of the IPTS methodology to three nuclear plants in the US (Oconee I, Calvert Cliffs I, and H. B. Robinson II). The results of this effort were used to help establish the PTS Rule (10CFR50.61) and Regulatory Guide 1.154, which pertains to the PTS issue. The IPTS Program was completed in 1985, and since that time the ORNL related effort has been associated with long-term programs aimed at improving/updating the probabilistic fracture mechanics methodology and input data. In 1990, the NRC requested that ORNL review a vessel-integrity evaluation report submitted to the NRC by the Yankee Atomic Electric Co. for the Yankee Rowe reactor and that ORNL also perform an independent probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis. Details of the methodology and preliminary results are the subject of this paper/presentation

  17. Resonant double loop antenna development at ORNL

    Taylor, D.J.; Baity, F.W.; Brown, R.A.; Bryan, W.E.; Fadnek, A.; Hoffman, D.J.; King, J.F.; Livesey, R.L.; McIlwain, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    As part of the development of ion cyclotron resonant heating (ICRH) systems for fusion research, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has built resonant double loop (RDL) antennas for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ, US) and Tore Supra (Centre d'Etudes Nucleaire, Cadarache, France). Each antenna has been designed to deliver 4 MW of power. The electrical circuit and the mechanical philosophy employed are the same for both antennas, but different operating environments lead to substantial differences in the designs of specific components. A description and a comparison of the technologies developed in the two designs are presented. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  18. Study of Channel Characteristics for Galvanic-Type Intra-Body Communication Based on a Transfer Function from a Quasi-Static Field Model

    Min Du

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Intra-Body Communication (IBC, which modulates ionic currents over the human body as the communication medium, offers a low power and reliable signal transmission method for information exchange across the body. This paper first briefly reviews the quasi-static electromagnetic (EM field modeling for a galvanic-type IBC human limb operating below 1 MHz and obtains the corresponding transfer function with correction factor using minimum mean square error (MMSE technique. Then, the IBC channel characteristics are studied through the comparison between theoretical calculations via this transfer function and experimental measurements in both frequency domain and time domain. High pass characteristics are obtained in the channel gain analysis versus different transmission distances. In addition, harmonic distortions are analyzed in both baseband and passband transmissions for square input waves. The experimental results are consistent with the calculation results from the transfer function with correction factor. Furthermore, we also explore both theoretical and simulation results for the bit-error-rate (BER performance of several common modulation schemes in the IBC system with a carrier frequency of 500 kHz. It is found that the theoretical results are in good agreement with the simulation results.

  19. A Low Cost C8051F006 SoC-Based Quasi-Static C-V Meter for Characterizing Semiconductor Devices

    Khairurrijal Khairurrijal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on a C8051F006 SoC (system on-a-chip, a simple and low cost quasi-static capacitance-voltage (C-V meter was designed and developed to obtain C-V characteristics of semiconductor devices. The developed C-V meter consists of a capacitance meter, a programmable voltage source, a C8051F006 SoC-based slave controller, and a personal computer (PC as a master controller. The communication between the master and slave controllers is facilitated by the RS 232 serial communication. The accuracy of the C-V meter was guaranteed by the calibration functions, which are employed by the program in the PC and obtained through the calibration processes of analog to digital converter (ADC, digital to analog converters (DACs of the C8051F006 SoC, and the programmable voltage source. Examining 33-pF and 1000-pF capacitors as well three different p-n junction diodes, it was found that the capacitances of common capacitors are in the range of specified values and typical C-V curves of p-n junction diodes are achieved.

  20. On the propagation of a quasi-static disturbance in a heterogeneous, deformable, and porous medium with pressure-dependent properties

    Vasco, D.W.

    2011-10-01

    Using an asymptotic technique, valid when the medium properties are smoothly-varying, I derive a semi-analytic expression for the propagation velocity of a quasi-static disturbance traveling within a nonlinear-elastic porous medium. The phase, a function related to the propagation time, depends upon the properties of the medium, including the pressure-sensitivities of the medium parameters, and on pressure and displacement amplitude changes. Thus, the propagation velocity of a disturbance depends upon its amplitude, as might be expected for a nonlinear process. As a check, the expression for the phase function is evaluated for a poroelastic medium, when the material properties do not depend upon the fluid pressure. In that case, the travel time estimates agree with conventional analytic estimates, and with values calculated using a numerical simulator. For a medium with pressure-dependent permeability I find general agreement between the semi-analytic estimates and estimates from a numerical simulation. In this case the pressure amplitude changes are obtained from the numerical simulator.

  1. Quantitative analysis and prediction of experimental observations on quasi-static hysteretic metal–ferroelectric–metal–insulator–semiconductor FET and its dynamic behaviour based on Landau theory

    Li, Yang; Lian, Yong; Samudra, Ganesh S

    2015-01-01

    Due to internal voltage amplification induced by the negative capacitance of ferroelectrics, the metal–ferroelectric–metal–insulator–semiconductor (MFMIS) FET has been widely investigated to explore its potential application in low power devices. Based on Landau theory and stability criterion, a simulation program is implemented and MFMIS structure is quantitatively analyzed. The results show that it can be appropriately designed for both integrated circuits and memory devices by tuning capacitances contributed by MOSFET dielectric stack and ferroelectrics. Our simulation results on electrical characteristics of ferroelectric devices agree well with both quasi-static and dynamic experimental observations. The influence of the ferroelectric/dielectric layer thickness and area as well as temperature on hysteretic polarization-electric field characteristic of a ferroelectric are successfully explained. For a C–V loop sweeping over the gate voltage in MFMIS, possible asymmetry in the accessible negative capacitance region is also interpreted. Moreover, experimentally observed reduction in the equivalent capacitance of the ferroelectric–dielectric bilayer at high frequency is confirmed by Landau–Khalatnikov theory based simulation. Our work provides a more complete and explicit analytical treatment to understand the effect of negative capacitance of a ferroelectric on device performance. (paper)

  2. Fast Determination of Distribution-Connected PV Impacts Using a Variable Time-Step Quasi-Static Time-Series Approach: Preprint

    Mather, Barry

    2017-08-24

    The increasing deployment of distribution-connected photovoltaic (DPV) systems requires utilities to complete complex interconnection studies. Relatively simple interconnection study methods worked well for low penetrations of photovoltaic systems, but more complicated quasi-static time-series (QSTS) analysis is required to make better interconnection decisions as DPV penetration levels increase. Tools and methods must be developed to support this. This paper presents a variable-time-step solver for QSTS analysis that significantly shortens the computational time and effort to complete a detailed analysis of the operation of a distribution circuit with many DPV systems. Specifically, it demonstrates that the proposed variable-time-step solver can reduce the required computational time by as much as 84% without introducing any important errors to metrics, such as the highest and lowest voltage occurring on the feeder, number of voltage regulator tap operations, and total amount of losses realized in the distribution circuit during a 1-yr period. Further improvement in computational speed is possible with the introduction of only modest errors in these metrics, such as a 91 percent reduction with less than 5 percent error when predicting voltage regulator operations.

  3. ORNL Pocket Meter Program: internal operating procedures

    Berger, C.D.; Miller, J.H.; Dunsmore, M.R.

    1984-12-01

    The ORNL Pocket Meter Program is designed for auditing the approximate photon radiation exposure of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) radiation workers. Although pocket meters are considered to be a secondary personnel dosimetry system at ORNL, they are valuable indicators of unplanned exposures if proper procedures are followed for testing, calibrating, deploying, wearing, processing, and recording data. 4 figures, 1 table

  4. Elastic-plastic deformation of anhydrite and polyhalite as determined from quasi-static triaxial compression tests

    Pfiefle, T.W.; Senseny, P.E.

    1981-05-01

    Constant stress-rate triaxial compression experiments were performed on specimens of anhydrite and polyhalite at low confining pressure and at two temperatures. The loading rate was 5.75 x 10 -2 MPa s -1 ; the confining pressures were 1, 5, 10, and 20 MPa and the two temperatures were 25 0 C and 100 0 C. The specimens were loaded to failure in a soft testing machine so that failure occurred at peak stress. Results from these experiments were used to construct yield envelopes, failure envelopes and stress-strain curves, and to determine mechanical properties. Yield, determined by the onset of dilatancy, occurs at about sixty percent of peak stress. The effect of temperature on both the yield and failure envelopes is negligible. The polyhalite specimens were found to be about twice as strong as the anhydrite specimens. The stress-strain data were fitted to a constitutive law

  5. Quasi-static characterisation of trained pseudoelastic shape memory alloy wire subjected to cyclic loading: transformation kinetics

    Enemark, Søren; Santos, Ilmar

    2016-01-01

    A kinetic law for constitutive modelling of shape memory alloys is proposed in order to increase model predictability in comparison with experimental data. The proposed law is based on cubic Bézier curves and contains curvature controlling parameters. The kinetic law and also the Duhem–Madelung sub......-loop model are implemented in a state-of-the-art constitutive model based on the framework by Lagoudas and coworkers. The original and modified models are fitted to consistent experimental results from mechanical cyclic loading under isothermal conditions (0–800 MPa, 30–70 °C) of a trained pseudoelastic...... shape memory alloy wire. Quantitative measures of goodness of fit show that both models perform well, but use of the modified model results in 31% reduction of the residual standard deviation compared with the original model (21.4 versus 14.8 MPa) in model calibration and 23% in model validation...

  6. Effects of matrix properties on microscale damage in thermoplastic laminates under quasi-static and impact loading

    Wafai, B. Husam

    2018-03-01

    Thermoplastics reinforced with continuous fibers are very promising building materials for the auto industry and consumer electronics to reduce the weight of vehicles and portable devices, and to deliver a high impact tolerance at the same time. Polypropylene is an abundant thermoplastic, and its glass fibers composites make a valuable solution that is suitable for mass production. But the adoption of such composites requires a deep understanding of their mechanical behavior under the relevant loading conditions. In this Ph.D. work, we aim to understand the damage process in continuous glass fiberreinforced polypropylene in detail. We will focus in particular on developing an approach for microscale observation of damage during the out-of-plane loading process and will use these observations for both qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the composite. We will apply our approach to two kinds of polypropylene composites, one of them is specially designed to withstand impact. The comparison between the two types of composites at slow and fast loading cases will shed some light on the effect of the polymer properties on the behavior of composites under out-of-plane loading.

  7. The effects of high temperature and fiber diameter on the quasi static compressive behavior of metal fiber sintered sheets

    Song, Weidong, E-mail: swdgh@bit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Liu, Ge [State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Wang, Jianzhong; Tang, Huiping [State Key Laboratory of Porous Metal Materials, Northwest Institute for Non-ferrous Metal Research, Xi’an 710016 (China)

    2017-04-06

    The compressive mechanical properties of the sintered sheets of continuous stainless steel fibers with different fiber diameters (8 µm, 12 µm, 28 µm) are investigated at temperatures from 298 K to 1073 K. The stress-strain curves of metal fiber sintered sheet (MFSS) are obtained by testing under uniaxial compression and 0.2% offset yield stress are determined. Inner micro-structures of the material are revealed by using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and microscopic computer tomography. The results indicates that fabrication technique and porosity are two principle factors affecting the yield strength of MFSS and the strength of MFSS is insensitive to the temperature below 873 K while softening occurs at temperature 1073 K. At relative high porosity (e.g. 77%), the material with small diameter fibers tends to have higher yield strength while at low porosity, MFSS's yield strength becomes high with the increase of the fiber diameter, which is probably attributed to the joint size, the surface appearance of fibers and prehardening generated during the manufacturing of MFSS. A simplified structure model taking joint size into consideration is established to explain the influence of the joint size on the yield strength of MFSS.

  8. Distinguishing Alfven waves from quasi-static field structures associated with the discrete aurora: Sounding rocket and HILAT satellite measurements

    Knudsen, D.J.; Kelley, M.C.; Earle, G.D.; Vickrey, J.F.; Boehm, M.

    1990-01-01

    The authors present and analyze sounding rocket and HILAT satellite measurements of the low frequency ( 0 in the auroral oval. By examining the time-domain field data it is often difficult to distinguish temporal fluctuations from static structures which are Doppler shifted to a non-zero frequency in the spacecraft frame. However, they show that such a distinction can be made by constructing the impedance function Z(f). Using Z(f) they find agreement with the static field interpretation below about 0.1 Hz in the spacecraft frame, i.e. Z(f) = Σ p -1 where Σ p is the height-integrated Pedersen conductivity of the ionosphere. About 0.1 Hz the authors find Z(f) > Σ p -1 , which they argue to be due to the presence of Alfven waves incident from the magnetosphere and reflecting from the lower ionosphere, forming a standing wave pattern. These waves may represent an electromagnetic coupling mechanism between the auroral acceleration region and the ionosphere

  9. Stability of machining induced residual stresses in Inconel 718 under quasi-static loading at room temperature

    Madariaga, A.; Esnaola, J.A.; Arrazola, P.J.; Ruiz-Hervias, J.; Muñoz, P.; Ostolaza, K.

    2015-01-01

    Tensile residual stresses are very often generated on the surface when machining nickel alloys. In order to determine their influence on the final mechanical behaviour of the component residual stress stability should be considered. In the present work the evolution of surface residual stresses induced by machining in Inconel 718 under static loading at room temperature was studied experimentally and numerically. An Inconel 718 disc was face turned employing industrial working conditions and specimens for tensile tests were extracted from the disc. Surface residual stresses were measured by X-ray diffraction for initial state and after applying different loads over the material's yield stress. Then, a finite element model based on the surface–core approach was fitted to experimental results and the study was extended to analyse the influence of load level, degree of work-hardening and initial surface conditions. For the studied case, initial tensile surface residual stress (776 MPa) became even more tensile when applying loads higher than the material yield stress, but a shift was observed at the highest applied load (1350 MPa) and initial residual stress was relaxed about 170 MPa. This particular behaviour is associated to the modified stress–strain properties of the machined affected surface layer which was strongly work-hardened. Moreover, if the work-hardened properties are not considered in the finite element model results differ substantially from experiments. Surface residual stress stability also depends on the initial surface residual stress, but the degree of work-hardening induced by the machining process must be considered as well. If the difference between the yield stress of the surface and the yield stress of the core is lower than the initial surface residual stress, the surface begins yielding first and consequently the surface residual stress is decreased. In contrast, if the difference between the yield stress of the surface and the

  10. Stability of machining induced residual stresses in Inconel 718 under quasi-static loading at room temperature

    Madariaga, A., E-mail: amadariaga@mondragon.edu [Mechanical and Industrial Production Department, Faculty of Engineering, Mondragon Unibertsitatea, Loramendi 4, Mondragon 20500 Gipuzkoa (Spain); Esnaola, J.A.; Arrazola, P.J. [Mechanical and Industrial Production Department, Faculty of Engineering, Mondragon Unibertsitatea, Loramendi 4, Mondragon 20500 Gipuzkoa (Spain); Ruiz-Hervias, J.; Muñoz, P. [Departamento Ciencia de Materiales, ETSI Caminos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, c/Profesor Aranguren s/n, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Ostolaza, K. [Materials and Processes Technology Department, ITP S.A., Parque Tecnológico, Edificio 300, 48170 Zamudio (Spain)

    2015-01-03

    Tensile residual stresses are very often generated on the surface when machining nickel alloys. In order to determine their influence on the final mechanical behaviour of the component residual stress stability should be considered. In the present work the evolution of surface residual stresses induced by machining in Inconel 718 under static loading at room temperature was studied experimentally and numerically. An Inconel 718 disc was face turned employing industrial working conditions and specimens for tensile tests were extracted from the disc. Surface residual stresses were measured by X-ray diffraction for initial state and after applying different loads over the material's yield stress. Then, a finite element model based on the surface–core approach was fitted to experimental results and the study was extended to analyse the influence of load level, degree of work-hardening and initial surface conditions. For the studied case, initial tensile surface residual stress (776 MPa) became even more tensile when applying loads higher than the material yield stress, but a shift was observed at the highest applied load (1350 MPa) and initial residual stress was relaxed about 170 MPa. This particular behaviour is associated to the modified stress–strain properties of the machined affected surface layer which was strongly work-hardened. Moreover, if the work-hardened properties are not considered in the finite element model results differ substantially from experiments. Surface residual stress stability also depends on the initial surface residual stress, but the degree of work-hardening induced by the machining process must be considered as well. If the difference between the yield stress of the surface and the yield stress of the core is lower than the initial surface residual stress, the surface begins yielding first and consequently the surface residual stress is decreased. In contrast, if the difference between the yield stress of the surface and the

  11. Estimation of quasi-static J–R curves from Charpy energy and adaptation to ASTM E 1921 reference temperature estimation of ferritic steels

    Sreenivasan, P.R., E-mail: sreeprs@yahoo.co.in

    2014-04-01

    Many researchers had suggested a sort of scaling procedure for predicting the quasi-static J–R curves from dynamic J–R curves obtained from instrumented Charpy V-notch (CVN) impact tests using key-curve, compliance or other procedures. Chaouadi, based on extensive tests and literature data, had quantitatively formalized the method and suggested general applicability of his method for a class of steels. In this paper, first, the Chauoadi-procedure is tried on some selected data from the literature (including the data used by Chaouadi and other workers) and an adaptation of the method is suggested using Wallin's as well as Landes's lower bound methods for upper-shelf J–R curve estimation from CVN energy. Using Chaouadi and other data as the benchmark, suitable scaling factors have been determined that enable estimation of quasi-static J–R curves from CVN energy alone, without the need for dynamic CVN J–R curves. The final formulae are given. This new method can be called modified Wallin–Landes procedure. Then this method is applied to fracture toughness and reference temperature (T{sub 0} – ASTM E-1921) estimation from the full Charpy-transition data. The results are compared with those from the author's IGC-procedure, and modifications, if any, are suggested. Based on the new results, it is suggested that the IGC-procedure may be modified as: final T{sub Q-est} = T{sub Q-IGC} for T{sub Q-Sch}{sup dy} ≤ 20 °C (in the IGC-procedure the dividing temperature was 60 °C); and for T{sub Q-Sch}{sup dy} > 20 °C, T{sub Q-IGC} = T{sub Q-WLm} (different from the IGC-procedre and subscript WLm indicating modified Wallin–Landes procedure). For the 59 or more steels examined (including highly irradiated steels), the T{sub Q-WL} estimates at higher temperatures are consistent and conservative; a few non-conservative values are acceptably less than 20 °C, whereas other predictions show non-conservatism of up to 40–50 °C. At lower temperatures

  12. Quasi-static three-dimensional magnetic field evolution in solar active region NOAA 11166 associated with an X1.5 flare

    Vemareddy, P.; Wiegelmann, T.

    2014-01-01

    We study the quasi-static evolution of coronal magnetic fields constructed from the non-linear force-free field (NLFFF) approximation aiming to understand the relation between the magnetic field topology and ribbon emission during an X1.5 flare in active region (AR) NOAA 11166. The flare with a quasi-elliptical and two remote ribbons occurred on 2011 March 9 at 23:13 UT over a positive flux region surrounded by negative flux at the center of the bipolar AR. Our analysis of the coronal magnetic structure with potential and NLFFF solutions unveiled the existence of a single magnetic null point associated with a fan-spine topology and is co-spatial with the hard X-ray source. The footpoints of the fan separatrix surface agree with the inner edge of the quasi-elliptical ribbon and the outer spine is linked to one of the remote ribbons. During the evolution, the slow footpoint motions stressed the field lines along the polarity inversion line and caused electric current layers in the corona around the fan separatrix surface. These current layers trigger magnetic reconnection as a consequence of dissipating currents, which are visible as cusp-shaped structures at lower heights. The reconnection process reorganized the magnetic field topology whose signatures are observed at the separatrices/quasi-separatrix layer structure in both the photosphere and the corona during the pre-to-post flare evolution. In agreement with previous numerical studies, our results suggest that the line-tied footpoint motions perturb the fan-spine system and cause null point reconnection, which eventually causes the flare emission at the footpoints of the field lines.

  13. Quasi-static displacement calibration system for a “Violin-Mode” shadow-sensor intended for Gravitational Wave detector suspensions

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design of, and results from, a calibration system for optical linear displacement (shadow) sensors. The shadow sensors were designed to detect “Violin-Mode” (VM) resonances in the 0.4 mm diameter silica fibre suspensions of the test masses/mirrors of Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory gravitational wave interferometers. Each sensor illuminated the fibre under test, so as to cast its narrow shadow onto a “synthesized split photodiode” detector, the shadow falling over adjacent edges of the paired photodiodes. The apparatus described here translated a vertically orientated silica test fibre horizontally through a collimated Near InfraRed illuminating beam, whilst simultaneously capturing the separate DC “shadow notch” outputs from each of the paired split photodiode detectors. As the ratio of AC to DC photocurrent sensitivities to displacement was known, a calibration of the DC response to quasi-static shadow displacement allowed the required AC sensitivity to vibrational displacement to be found. Special techniques are described for generating the required constant scan rate for the test fibre using a DC motor-driven stage, for removing “jitter” at such low translation rates from a linear magnetic encoder, and so for capturing the two shadow-notch signals at each micrometre of the test fibre's travel. Calibration, across the four detectors of this work, gave a vibrational responsivity in voltage terms of (9.45 ± 1.20) MV (rms)/m, yielding a VM displacement sensitivity of (69 ± 13) pm (rms)/√Hz, at 500 Hz, over the required measuring span of ±0.1 mm

  14. Quasi-static displacement calibration system for a “Violin-Mode” shadow-sensor intended for Gravitational Wave detector suspensions

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V. [SUPA (Scottish Universities Physics Alliance), Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, 107 Rottenrow, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-15

    This paper describes the design of, and results from, a calibration system for optical linear displacement (shadow) sensors. The shadow sensors were designed to detect “Violin-Mode” (VM) resonances in the 0.4 mm diameter silica fibre suspensions of the test masses/mirrors of Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory gravitational wave interferometers. Each sensor illuminated the fibre under test, so as to cast its narrow shadow onto a “synthesized split photodiode” detector, the shadow falling over adjacent edges of the paired photodiodes. The apparatus described here translated a vertically orientated silica test fibre horizontally through a collimated Near InfraRed illuminating beam, whilst simultaneously capturing the separate DC “shadow notch” outputs from each of the paired split photodiode detectors. As the ratio of AC to DC photocurrent sensitivities to displacement was known, a calibration of the DC response to quasi-static shadow displacement allowed the required AC sensitivity to vibrational displacement to be found. Special techniques are described for generating the required constant scan rate for the test fibre using a DC motor-driven stage, for removing “jitter” at such low translation rates from a linear magnetic encoder, and so for capturing the two shadow-notch signals at each micrometre of the test fibre's travel. Calibration, across the four detectors of this work, gave a vibrational responsivity in voltage terms of (9.45 ± 1.20) MV (rms)/m, yielding a VM displacement sensitivity of (69 ± 13) pm (rms)/√Hz, at 500 Hz, over the required measuring span of ±0.1 mm.

  15. Nuclear astrophysics data at ORNL

    Smith, M.S.; Blackmon, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    There is a new program of evaluation and dissemination of nuclear data of critical importance for nuclear astrophysics within the Physics Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Recent activities include determining the rates of the important 14 O(α,p) 17 F and 17 F(p,γ) 18 Ne reactions, disseminating the Caughlan and Fowler reaction rate compilation on the World Wide Web, and evaluating the 17 O(p,α) 14 N reaction rate. These projects, which are closely coupled to current ORNL nuclear astrophysics research, are briefly discussed along with future plans

  16. Pellet injector development at ORNL [Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Gouge, M.J.; Argo, B.E.; Baylor, L.R.; Combs, S.K.; Fehling, D.T.; Fisher, P.W.; Foster, C.A.; Foust, C.R.; Milora, S.L.; Qualls, A.L.; Schechter, D.E.; Simmons, D.W.; Sparks, D.O.; Tsai, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    Advanced plasma fueling systems for magnetic confinement experiments are under development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The general approach is that of producing and accelerating frozen hydrogenic pellets to speeds in the kilometer-per-second range by either pneumatic (light-gas gun) or mechanical (centrifugal force) techniques. ORNL has recently provided a centrifugal pellet injector for the Tore Supra tokamak and a new, simplified, eight-shot pneumatic injector for the Advanced Toroidal Facility stellarator at ORNL. Hundreds of tritium and DT pellets were accelerated at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly facility at Los Alamos in 1988--89. These experiments, done in a single-shot pipe-gun system, demonstrated the feasibility of forming and accelerating tritium pellets at low 3 He levels. A new, tritium-compatible extruder mechanism is being designed for longer-pulse DT applications. Two-stage light-gas guns and electron beam rocket accelerators for speeds of the order of 2--10 km/s are also under development. Recently, a repeating, two-stage light-gas gun accelerated 10 surrogate pellets at a 1-Hz repetition rate to speeds in the range of 2--3 km/s; and the electron beam rocket accelerator completed initial feasibility and scaling experiments. ORNL has also developed conceptual designs of advanced plasma fueling systems for the Compact Ignition Tokamak and the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

  17. Pellet injector development at ORNL

    Milora, S.L.; Argo, B.E.; Baylor, L.R.; Cole, M.J.; Combs, S.K.; Dyer, G.R.; Fehling, D.T.; Fisher, P.W.; Foster, C.A.; Foust, C.R.; Gouge, M.J.; Jernigan, T.C.; Langley, R.A.; Qualls, A.L.; Schechter, D.E.; Sparks, D.O.; Tsai, C.C.; Whealton, J.H.; Wilgen, J.B.; Schmidt, G.L.

    1992-01-01

    Plasma fueling systems for magnetic confinement experiments are under development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ORNL has recently provided a four-shot tritium pellet injector with up to 4-mm-diam capability for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). This injector, which is based on the in situ condensation technique for pellet formation, features three single-stage gas guns that have been qualified in deuterium at up to 1.7 km/s and a two-stage light gas gun driver that has been operated at 2.8-km/s pellet speeds for deep penetration in the high-temperature TFTR supershot regime. Performance improvements to the centrifugal pellet injector for the Tore Supra tokamak are being made by modifying the storage-type pellet feed system, which has been redesigned to improve the reliability of delivery of pellets and to extend operation to longer pulse durations (up to 400 pellets). Two-stage light gas guns and electron-beam (e-beam) rocket accelerators for speeds in the range from 2 to 10 km/s are also under development. A repeating, two-stage light gas gun that has been developed can accelerate low-density plastic pellets at a 1-Hz repetition rate to speeds of 3 km/s. In a collaboration with ENEA-Frascati, a test facility has been prepared to study repetitive operation of a two-stage gas gun driver equipped with an extrusion-type deuterium pellet source. Extensive testing of the e-beam accelerator has demonstrated a parametric dependence of propellant burn velocity and pellet speed, in accordance with a model derived from the neutral gas shielding theory for pellet ablation in a magnetized plasma

  18. Short guide to SDI profiling at ORNL

    Pomerance, H.S.

    1976-06-01

    ORNL has machine-searchable data bases that correspond to printed indexes and abstracts. This guide describes the peculiarities of those several data bases and the conventions of the ORNL search system so that users can write their own queries or search profiles and can interpret the part of the output that is encoded.

  19. Decommissioning of surplus facilities at ORNL

    Myrick, T.E.; Coobs, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) National SFMP, administered by the Richland Operations Office. This program was established to provide for the management of certain DOE surplus radioactively contaminated facilities from the end of their operating life until final facility disposition is completed. As part of this program, the ORNL SFMP oversees some 75 facilities, ranging in complexity from abandoned waste storage tanks to large experimental reactors. This paper describes the scope of the ORNL program and outlines the decommissioning activities currently underway, including a brief description of the decontamination techniques being utilized. 4 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  20. ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) 89

    Anderson, T.D.; Appleton, B.R.; Jefferson, J.W.; Merriman, J.R.; Mynatt, F.R.; Richmond, C.R.; Rosenthal, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    This is the inaugural issues of an annual publication about the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Here you will find a brief overview of ORNL, a sampling of our recent research achievements, and a glimpse of the directions we want to take over the next 15 years. A major purpose of ornl 89 is to provide the staff with a sketch of the character and dynamics of the Laboratory.

  1. ORNL [Oak Ridge National Laboratory] 89

    Anderson, T.D.; Appleton, B.R.; Jefferson, J.W.; Merriman, J.R.; Mynatt, F.R.; Richmond, C.R.; Rosenthal, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    This is the inaugural issues of an annual publication about the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Here you will find a brief overview of ORNL, a sampling of our recent research achievements, and a glimpse of the directions we want to take over the next 15 years. A major purpose of ornl 89 is to provide the staff with a sketch of the character and dynamics of the Laboratory

  2. ORNL compact loop antenna design for TFTR and Tore Supra

    Taylor, D.J.; Baity, F.W.; Bryan, W.E.; Hoffman, D.J.; McIlwain, R.L.; Ray, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    The goal supplemental ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) of fusion plasma is to deliver power at high efficiencies deep within the plasma. The technology for fast-wave ICRH has reached the point of requiring ''proof-of-performance'' demonstration of specific antenna configurations of specific antenna configurations and their mechanical adequacy for operating in a fusion environment. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed the compact loop antenna concept based on a resonant double loop (RDL) configuration for use in both Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and the Tore Supra ICRH programs. A description and a comparison of the technologies developed in the two designs are presented. The electrical circuit and the mechanical philosophy employed are the same for both antennas, but different operating environments result in substantial differences in the design of specific components. The ORNL TFTR antenna is designed to deliver 4 MW over a 2-s pulse, and the ORNL Tore Supra antenna is designed for 4 MW and essentially steady-state conditions. The TFTR design embodies the first operations compact RDL antenna, and the Tore Supra antenna extends the technology to an operational duty cycle consistent with reactor-relevant applications. 7 refs., 5 figs

  3. Predictor-Corrector Quasi-Static Method Applied to Nonoverlapping Local/Global Iterations with 2-D/1-D Fusion Transport Kernel and p-CMFD Wrapper for Transient Reactor Analysis

    Cho, Bumhee; Cho, Nam Zin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the steady-state p-CMFD adjoint flux is used as the weighting function to obtain PK parameters instead of the computationally expensive transport adjoint angular flux. Several numerical problems are investigated to see the capability of the PCQS method applied to the NLG iteration. CRX-2K adopts the nonoverlapping local/global (NLG) iterative method with the 2-D/1-D fusion transport kernel and the global p-CMFD wrapper. The parallelization of the NLG iteration has been recently implemented in CRX-2K and several numerical results are reported in a companion paper. However, the direct time discretization leads to a fine time step size to acquire an accurate transient solution, and the step size involved in the transport transient calculations is millisecond-order. Therefore, the transient calculations need much longer computing time than the steady-state calculation. To increase the time step size, Predictor-Corrector Quasi-Static (PCQS) method can be one option to apply to the NLG iteration. The PCQS method is a linear algorithm, so the shape function does not need to be updated more than once at a specific time step like a conventional quasi-static (QS) family such as Improved Quasi-Static (IQS) method. Moreover, the shape function in the PCQS method directly comes from the direct transport calculation (with a large time step), so one can easily implement the PCQS method in an existing transient transport code. Any QS method needs to solve the amplitude function in the form of the point kinetics (PK) equations, and accurate PK parameters can be obtained by the transport steady-state adjoint angular flux as a weighting function. The PCQS method is applied to the transient NLG iteration with the 2-D/1-D fusion transport kernel and the global p-CMFD wrapper, and has been implemented in CRX-2K. In the numerical problems, the PCQS method with the NLG iteration shows more accurate solutions compared to the direct transient calculations with large time step

  4. ORNL Isotopes Facilities Shutdown Program Plan

    Gibson, S.M.; Patton, B.D.; Sears, M.B.

    1990-10-01

    This plan presents the results of a technical and economic assessment for shutdown of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) isotopes production and distribution facilities. On December 11, 1989, the Department of Energy (DOE), Headquarters, in a memorandum addressed to DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO), gave instructions to prepare the ORNL isotopes production and distribution facilities, with the exception of immediate facility needs for krypton-85, tritium, and yttrium-90, for safe shutdown. In response to the memorandum, ORNL identified 17 facilities for shutdown. Each of these facilities is located within the ORNL complex with the exception of Building 9204-3, which is located at the Y-12 Weapons Production Plant. These facilities have been used extensively for the production of radioactive materials by the DOE Isotopes Program. They currently house a large inventory of radioactive materials. Over the years, these aging facilities have inherited the problems associated with storing and processing highly radioactive materials (i.e., facilities' materials degradation and contamination). During FY 1990, ORNL is addressing the requirements for placing these facilities into safe shutdown while maintaining the facilities under the existing maintenance and surveillance plan. The day-to-day operations associated with the surveillance and maintenance of a facility include building checks to ensure that building parameters are meeting the required operational safety requirements, performance of contamination control measures, and preventative maintenance on the facility and facility equipment. Shutdown implementation will begin in FY 1993, and shutdown completion will occur by the end of FY 1994

  5. penORNL: a parallel Monte Carlo photon and electron transport package using PENELOPE

    Bekar, Kursat B.; Miller, Thomas Martin; Patton, Bruce W.; Weber, Charles F.

    2015-01-01

    The parallel Monte Carlo photon and electron transport code package penORNL was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to enable advanced scanning electron microscope (SEM) simulations on high-performance computing systems. This paper discusses the implementations, capabilities and parallel performance of the new code package. penORNL uses PENELOPE for its physics calculations and provides all available PENELOPE features to the users, as well as some new features including source definitions specifically developed for SEM simulations, a pulse-height tally capability for detailed simulations of gamma and x-ray detectors, and a modified interaction forcing mechanism to enable accurate energy deposition calculations. The parallel performance of penORNL was extensively tested with several model problems, and very good linear parallel scaling was observed with up to 512 processors. penORNL, along with its new features, will be available for SEM simulations upon completion of the new pulse-height tally implementation.

  6. Documentation of programs that compute 1) static tilts for a spatially variable slip distribution, and 2) quasi-static tilts produced by an expanding dislocation loop with a spatially variable slip distribution

    McHugh, Stuart

    1976-01-01

    The material in this report is concerned with the effects of a vertically oriented rectangular dislocation loop on the tilts observed at the free surface of an elastic half-space. Part I examines the effect of a spatially variable static strike-slip distribution across the slip surface. The tilt components as a function of distance parallel, or perpendicular, to the strike of the slip surface are displayed for different slip-versus-distance profiles. Part II examines the effect of spatially and temporally variable slip distributions across the dislocation loop on the quasi-static tilts at the free surface of an elastic half space. The model discussed in part II may be used to generate theoretical tilt versus time curves produced by creep events.

  7. Pressure Safety Program Implementation at ORNL

    Lower, Mark [ORNL; Etheridge, Tom [ORNL; Oland, C. Barry [XCEL Engineering, Inc.

    2013-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility that is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC. In February 2006, DOE promulgated worker safety and health regulations to govern contractor activities at DOE sites. These regulations, which are provided in 10 CFR 851, Worker Safety and Health Program, establish requirements for worker safety and health program that reduce or prevent occupational injuries, illnesses, and accidental losses by providing DOE contractors and their workers with safe and healthful workplaces at DOE sites. The regulations state that contractors must achieve compliance no later than May 25, 2007. According to 10 CFR 851, Subpart C, Specific Program Requirements, contractors must have a structured approach to their worker safety and health programs that at a minimum includes provisions for pressure safety. In implementing the structured approach for pressure safety, contractors must establish safety policies and procedures to ensure that pressure systems are designed, fabricated, tested, inspected, maintained, repaired, and operated by trained, qualified personnel in accordance with applicable sound engineering principles. In addition, contractors must ensure that all pressure vessels, boilers, air receivers, and supporting piping systems conform to (1) applicable American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (2004) Sections I through XII, including applicable code cases; (2) applicable ASME B31 piping codes; and (3) the strictest applicable state and local codes. When national consensus codes are not applicable because of pressure range, vessel geometry, use of special materials, etc., contractors must implement measures to provide equivalent protection and ensure a level of safety greater than or equal to the level of protection afforded by the ASME or applicable state or local codes. This report documents the work performed to address legacy pressure vessel deficiencies and comply

  8. ORNL trends and balances, 1987-1992

    1987-01-01

    A brief overview is given that covers the roles, organization, R and D sponsors, and recent achievements of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Current R and D programs are described in the areas of nuclear and engineering technologies, advanced energy systems, biomedical and environmental sciences, and basic physical sciences. ORNL's future activities are discussed

  9. ORNL engineering design and construction reengineering report

    McNeese, L.E.

    1998-01-01

    A team composed of individuals representing research and development (R and D) divisions, infrastructure support organizations, and Department of Energy (DOE)-Oak Ridge Operations was chartered to reengineer the engineering, design, and construction (ED and C) process at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The team recognized that ED and C needs of both R and D customers and the ORNL infrastructure program have to be met to maintain a viable and competitive national laboratory. Their goal was to identify and recommend implementable best-in-class ED and C processes that will efficiently and cost-effectively support the ORNL R and D staff by being responsive to their programmatic and infrastructure needs. The team conducted process mapping of current and potential ED and C approaches, developed idealized versions of ED and C processes, and identified potential barriers to an efficient ED and C process. Eight subteams were assigned to gather information and to evaluate the significance of potential barriers through benchmarking, surveys, interviews, and reviews of key topical areas in order to determine whether the perceived barriers were real and important and whether they resulted from laws or regulations over which ORNL has no control.

  10. Pellet injector development and experiments at ORNL

    Baylor, L.R.; Argo, B.E.; Barber, G.C.; Combs, S.K.; Cole, M.J.; Dyer, G.R.; Fehling, D.T.; Fisher, P.W.; Foster, C.A.; Foust, C.R.; Gouge, M.J.; Jernigan, T.C.; Langley, R.A.; Milora, S.L.; Qualls, A.L.; Schechter, D.E.; Sparks, D.O.; Tsai, C.C.; Wilgen, J.B.; Whealton, J.H.

    1993-01-01

    The development of pellet injectors for plasma fueling of magnetic confinement fusion experiments has been under way at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the past 15 years. Recently, ORNL provided a tritium-compatible four-shot pneumatic injector for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) based on the in situ condensation technique that features three single-stage gas guns and an advanced two-stage light gas gun driver. In another application, ORNL supplied the Tore Supra tokamak with a centrifuge pellet injector in 1989 for pellet fueling experiments that has achieved record numbers of injected pellets into a discharge. Work is progressing on an upgrade to that injector to extend the number of pellets to 400 and improve pellet repeatability. In a new application, the ORNL three barrel repeating pneumatic injector has been returned from JET and is being readied for installation on the DIII-D device for fueling and enhanced plasma performance experiments. In addition to these experimental applications, ORNL is developing advanced injector technologies, including high-velocity pellet injectors, tritium pellet injectors, and long-pulse feed systems. The two-stage light gas gun and electron-beam-driven rocket are the acceleration techniques under investigation for achieving high velocity. A tritium proof-of-principle (TPOP) experiment has demonstrated the feasibility of tritium pellet production and acceleration. A new tritium-compatible, extruder-based, repeating pneumatic injector is being fabricated to replace the pipe gun in the TPOP experiment and will explore issues related to the extrudability of tritium and acceleration of large tritium pellets. The tritium pellet formation experiments and development of long-pulse pellet feed systems are especially relevant to the International Tokamak Engineering Reactor (ITER)

  11. RECOG-ORNL, Pattern Recognition Data Analysis

    Begovich, C.L.; Larson, N.M.

    2000-01-01

    Description of program or function: RECOG-ORNL, a general-purpose pattern recognition code, is a modification of the RECOG program, written at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. RECOG-ORNL contains techniques for preprocessing, analyzing, and displaying data, and for unsupervised and supervised learning. Data preprocessing routines transform the data into useful representations by auto-calling, selecting important variables, and/or adding products or transformations of the variables of the data set. Data analysis routines use correlations to evaluate the data and interrelationships among the data. Display routines plot the multidimensional patterns in two dimensions or plot histograms, patterns, or one variable versus another. Unsupervised learning techniques search for classes contained inherently in the data. Supervised learning techniques use known information about some of the data to generate predicted properties for an unknown set

  12. Theoretical and experimental investigations concerning the problem of quasi-static crack propagation in two-component materials subject to residual stresses

    Braun, H.P.

    1979-01-01

    With the aim of obtaining microstructural information of multi-component materials fracture-mechanical calculations on continuum-mechanical models of fiber composites were performed. There were ideal sections of material permitting the formulation of suitable mixed boundary value problems of static thermoelasticity whose solutions could be obtained by means of appropriate numerical methods from continuum mechanics. As model loads exclusively thermally induced residual stresses were assumed, being of special interest because of the thermomechanically inhomogeneous structure of composite materials on one hand and having got decisive significance for a number of important areas of application as e.g. aero-space industry, reactor technology and chemical apparatus engineering on the other. The results evaluated numerically are exemplarily examined by means of photoelasticity. (orig./IHOE) [de

  13. ORNL process waste treatment plant modifications

    Bell, J.P.

    1982-01-01

    The ORNL Process Waste Treatment Plant removes low levels of radionuclides (primarily Cs-137 and Sr-90) from process waste water prior to discharge. The previous plant operation used a scavenging precipitaton - ion exchange process which produced a radioactive sludge. In order to eliminate the environmental problems associated with sludge disposal, the plant is being converted to a new ion exchange process without the precipitation process

  14. Pellet injector research and development at ORNL

    Combs, S.K.; Barber, G.C.; Baylor, L.R.

    1994-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been developing pellet injectors for plasma fueling experiments on magnetic confinement devices for more than 15 years. Recent major applications of the ORNL development program include (1) a tritium-compatible four-shot pneumatic injector for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, (2) a centrifuge pellet injector for the Tore Supra tokamak, and most recently (3) a three-barrel repeating pneumatic injector for the DIII-D tokamak. In addition to applications, ORNL is developing advanced technologies, including high-speed pellet injectors, tritium injectors, and long-pulse pellet feed systems. The high-speed research involves a collaboration between ORNL and ENEA-Frascati in the development of a repeating two-stage light gas gun based on an extrusion-type pellet feed system. Construction of a new tritium-compatible, extruder-based repeating pneumatic injector (8-mm-diam) is complete and will replace the pipe gun in the original tritium proof-of-principle experiment. The development of a steady-state feed system in which three standard extruders operate in tandem is under way. These research and development activities are relevant to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and are briefly described in this paper

  15. A FAST study of quasi-static structure ("Inverted-V") potential drops and their latitudinal dependence in the premidnight sector and ramifications for the current-voltage relationship

    Dombeck, J.; Cattell, C.; McFadden, J.

    2013-09-01

    Utilizing FAST satellite electron measurements, we present the first reported investigation of the dependency on latitude of quasi-static structure ("inverted-V") potential drop magnitude (Φ). A trend of lower Φ at lower latitudes in the premidnight sector on field lines with dark foot points was observed. This trend is supported both statistically and in individual satellite crossings. The existence of two distinct peaks in occurrence probability for Φ was also observed: one between ~2 kV and 10 kV and the other at somewhat less than 1 kV. The relative occurrence of structures with Φ in the higher (>2 kV) peak is significantly reduced with decreasing latitude. This partially accounts for the statistical trend of lower potential drop magnitudes at lower latitudes. The two Φ occurrence frequency peaks correspond to two different regimes (one with eΦ/kTe ~ or > 1 and one with eΦ/kTe current-voltage relation where source electron density rather than Φ is most directly controlled by the field-aligned current density. These observations and their ramifications represent a significant step forward in the understanding of field-aligned currents, auroral acceleration, and magnetospheric-ionospheric coupling.

  16. Annual report of the Solids Mechanics Laboratory, 1985

    1986-01-01

    Research on the plasticity of metals and soils; fracture mechanics; shell stability and deformation; homogenization; rheology of rocks as a function of temperature; rheology of wood; similitude in dynamics and quasi-statics; anchoring; vibrothermography; calculation of the stability of underground structures; composite materials; soil reinforcement; and wave propagation is presented [fr

  17. The evolution of teleoperated manipulators at ORNL

    Kress, R.L.; Jansen, J.F.; Noakes, M.W.; Herndon, J.N.

    1996-01-01

    ORNL has made significant contributions to teleoperator and telerobotics technology for two decades and continues with an aggressive program today. Examples of past projects are: (1) the M2 servomanipulator, which was the first digitally controlled teleoperator; (2) the Advanced Servomanipulator (ASM), which was the first remotely maintainable teleoperator; (3) the CESARm/Kraft dissimilar teleoperated system; and (4) the Laboratory Telerobotic Manipulator (LTM), a 7-Degree-of-Freedom (7-DOF) telerobot built as a prototype for work in space. More recently, ORNL has become heavily involved with Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ERWM) robotics programs funded by the Department of Energy (DOE). The ERWM program requires high payloads and high dexterity. As a result, a hydraulically actuated, dual-arm system comprised of two 6-DOF arms mounted on a 5-DOF base has been constructed and is being used today for various research tasks and for decontamination and dismantlement activities. All of these teleoperated manipulator systems build upon the experiences gained throughout the almost two decades of development. Each system incorporates not only the latest technology in computers, sensors, and electronics, but each new . system also adds at least one new feature to the technologies already developed and demonstrated in the previous system(s). As a result of this process, a serious study of these manipulator systems is a study in the evolution of teleoperated manipulator the systems in general. This provides insight not only into the research and development paths chosen in the past, but also into the appropriate directions for future teleoperator and telerobotics research. This paper examines each of the teleoperated/telerobotic systems developed at ORNL, summarizes their features and capabilities, examines the state of the most current telerobotic system (the Dual Arm Work Module), PM provides direction for a Next Generation Telerobotic Manipulator system

  18. Quasi-static tensile properties of the Cranial Cruciate Ligament (CrCL) in adult cattle: towards the design of a prosthetic CrCL.

    Diotalevi, Lucien; Petit, Yvan; Brailovski, Vladimir; Nichols, Sylvain; Marchionatti, Emma; Wagnac, Éric

    2018-03-01

    Mechanical properties of the Cranial Cruciate Ligament (CrCL) in adult cattle are not well documented and protocols used in the literature focus on testing a full femur-CrCL-tibia complex rather than an isolated CrCL. The aim of this study was to assess a wider range of tensile properties of the CrCL along its anatomic axis with experimental measurements of the global elongation, displacement and strain fields, in order to provide guidelines for the design of CrCL prosthetic surrogates. Fourteen bovine CrCL were harvested from seven mature cows (5.1 ± 1.3 years) weighing 631 ± 90kg. The mean CrCL length was 41.4 ± 1.5mm and its mean cross-section was 103.9 ± 23.8mm 2 . Pre-conditioning was achieved with 30 cycles of loading from 30 to 200N at a strain rate of 0.02s -1 . Specimens were then loaded to failure at the same strain rate. The following results were obtained: the mean ultimate tensile load (UTL) 4372 ± 1485N and the median [quartiles] maximal global elongation 19.3 [17.8; 21.4] %. At first physical signs of tearing, the mean load was 3315 ± 1336N and mean elongation 13.5 ± 4.9%. The mean absorbed energy at failure was 5.23 ± 2.08 MJ.mm -3 and the mean stiffness at various levels of elongation was: 220 ± 195N.% -1 (5%), 285 ± 162N.% -1 (10%), 239 ± 200N.% -1 (15%), 146 ± 59N.% -1 (20%), 153 ± 136N.% -1 (25%). None of these properties were related to the bovine weight, age and side of the body (p > 0.05). An ideal prosthetic surrogate should then follow these sets of properties and the experimental data suggest that the in-vivo maximal elongation is below 13.5%. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Separation science and technology: an ORNL perspective

    Pruett, D.J.

    1986-05-01

    This report was prepared as a summary of a fourfold effort: (1) to examine schemes for defining and categorizing the field of separation science and technology; (2) to review several of the major categories of separation techniques in order to determine the most recent developments and future research needs; (3) to consider selected problems and programs that require advances in separation science and technology as a part of their solution; and (4) to propose suggestions for new directions in separation research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

  20. ORNL's Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center

    Barnett, C.F.; Gregory, D.C.

    1983-01-01

    The Data Center maintains a detailed bibliography of atomic data measurements and calculations for processes of interest to the fusion community. One hundred nineteen journals are regularly searched for papers of interest, including back issues to 1950. Entries are categorized by author, process, reactants, energy range, and theory/experiment. Complete bibliographies have been published since 1978 and a computerized data retrieval system is available. In addition, an updated and extended multi-volume critical compilation of cross sections (the ORNL Redbooks) is under way

  1. The ORNL Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center

    Schultz, D.R.; Krstic, P.S.; Ownby, F.M.; Meyer, F.W.; Havener, C.C.; Bannister, M.E.; Liu, W.; Jeffery, D.J.; Stancil, P.C.

    1997-01-01

    The principal mission of the Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center is the collection evaluation, and dissemination of atomic collision data relevant to fusion energy development. With the advent of the widespread use of the World Wide Web, the data center's resources are being placed on-line to facilitate their use by end-users (cf. http://www-cfadc.phy.ornl.gov/). As this development continues, initially disparate, individually compiled resources will be transformed into integrated tools for retrieving recommended data, or displaying and manipulating the information available. The data center's present capabilities, recent data production/evaluation efforts, and goals for future development are highlighted here

  2. ORNL 25 MV tandem accelerator control system

    Juras, R.C.; Biggerstaff, J.A.; Hoglund, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    The CAMAC-based control system for the 25 MV tandem electrostatic accelerator of the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was specified by ORNL and built by the National Electrostatics Corporation. Two Perkin-Elmer 32-bit minicomputers are used in the system, a message switching computer and a supervisory computer. The message switching computer transmits and receives control information on six serial highways. This computer shares memory with the supervisory computer. Operator consoles are located on a serial highway; control is by means of a console CRT, trackball, and assignable shaft encoders and meters. Two identical consoles operate simultaneously: one is located in the tandem control room; the other is located in the cyclotron control room to facilitate operation during injection of tandem beams into the cyclotron or when beam lines under control of the cyclotron control system are used. The supervisory computer is used for accelerator parameter setup calculations, actual accelerator setup for new beams based on scaled, recorded parameters from previously run beams, and various other functions. Nearly seven years of control system operation and improvements will be discussed

  3. ORNL grouting technologies for immobilizing hazardous wastes

    Dole, L.R.; Trauger, D.B.

    1983-01-01

    The Cement and Concrete Applications Group at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed versatile and inexpensive processes to solidify large quantities of hazardous liquids, sludges, and solids. By using standard off the shelf processing equipment, these batch or continuous processes are compatible with a wide range of disposal methods, such as above-ground storage, shallow-land burial, deep geological disposal, sea-bed dumping, and bulk in-situ solidification. Because of their economic advantages, these latter bulk in-situ disposal scenarios have received the most development. ORNL's experience has shown that tailored cement-based formulas can be developed which tolerate wide fluctuations in waste feed compositions and still maintain mixing properties that are compatible with standard equipment. In addition to cements, these grouts contain pozzolans, clays and other additives to control the flow properties, set-times, phase separations and impacts of waste stream fluctuation. The cements, fly ashes and other grout components are readily available in bulk quantities and the solids-blends typically cost less than $0.05 to 0.15 per waste gallon. Depending on the disposal scenario, total disposal costs (material, capital, and operating) can be as low as $0.10 to 0.50 per gallon

  4. The ORNL fusion power demonstration study

    Shannon, T.E.; Steiner, D.

    1978-01-01

    In this paper, we review the design approach developed in the ORNL Fusion Power Demonstration Study [1]. The major emphasis of this study is in the application of current and near-term technology as the most logical path to near-term demonstration of tokamak fusion power. In addition we are pursuing a number of concepts to simplify the tokamak reactor to be more acceptable to the utility industry as a future source of energy. The discussion will focus on the areas having the greatest overall impact on reactor feasibility: 1) overall size and power output, 2) remote maintenance considerations, 3) electrical power supplies, 4) blanket design; and 5) economics. The tokamak device, by nature of its configuration and pulsed operation, is an exceptionally complex engineering design problem. We have concluded that innovative design concepts are essential to cope with this basic complexity. We feel that the feasibility of tokamak fusion power has been significantly improved by these design approaches. (author)

  5. Methods for training radiochemical technicians at ORNL

    Parrott, J.R.; Nicol, R.G.

    1975-01-01

    The training of personnel to carry out radiochemical operations at ORNL is a formidable and recurrent task since repetitive, production-type operations are not involved, and programs are constantly shifting. It is essential that provisions be made for the routine retraining of personnel if they are to make effective contributions on a continuing basis. The present training methods have emerged as a result of thirty years experience in a variety of radiochemical pilot-plant programs. These programs have included operations performed in glove boxes, hot-cell manipulator work handling high-neutron-emitting isotopes, and the entire spectrum of remote solvent extraction operations. Present methods of training and the results obtained are summarized

  6. Experimental Report: ORNL Proposal ID IPTS 8937

    Mirmelstein, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-02-03

    Neutron scattering experiment was performed using fine-resolution Fermi chopper spectrometer “SEQUOIA” installed at the Spallation Neutron Source, ORNL. Although this spectrometer is designed to measure inelastic neutron scattering spectra, during experiments a signal of elastic scattering is also recorded. The coherent nuclear component of this elastic scattering provides Bragg diffraction pattern of a sample, i.e., CeNi single crystal in our case. Therefore, it is possible to follow the CeNi structural variations as a function of pressure and to register structural phase transition. Measurements were performed at the temperature of 15 K under pressure of zero (ambient pressure at 15 K), 400, 800, and 2200 bars.

  7. Methods for training radiochemical technicians at ORNL

    Parrott, J.R.; Nicol, R.G.

    The training of personnel to carry out radiochemical operations at ORNL is a formidable and recurrent task since programs are constantly shifting. It is essential that provisions be made for the routine retraining of these personnel if they are to make effective contributions on a continuing basis. Training methods are described that have emerged as a result of thirty years experience in a variety of radiochemical pilot-plant programs. Emphasis is placed on training programs for technicians for the 233 U Processing Facility since essentially all aspects of radiochemical operations are encountered in this facility. These programs have included operations performed in glove boxes, hot-cell manipulator work handling high-neutron-emitting isotopes, and the entire spectrum of remote solvent extraction operations. (U.S.)

  8. The new hydrofracture facility at ORNL

    Weeren, H.O.; Dunwoody, N.E.; Lasher, L.C.; Godsey, A.R.

    1982-01-01

    Methods currently proposed or in active use for the permanent disposal of radioactive wastes include isolation in deep geologic formations of salt, clay or rock, deep-sea burial, and deep-well disposal. Interment in deep formations is generally regarded as the most suitable process for wastes containing high concentrations of long-lived radionuclides; however, the costs involved are a major drawback. Both sea burial and deep-well disposal are environmentally suspect. An alternative process for permanent waste disposal has been in operational use for nearly 20 years at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This process - hydrofracture - immobilizes the waste in a shale formation that is well removed from the biosphere. It is an inexpensive approach that is particularly suited for the permanent disposal of large batches of waste

  9. Fission product releases at severe LWR accident conditions: ORNL/CEA measurements versus calculations

    Andre, B.; Ducros, G.; Leveque, J.P. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Grenoble, 38 (France). Dept. de Thermohydraulique et de Physique; Osborne, M.F.; Lorenz, R.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Maro, D. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Dept. de Protection de l`Environnement et des Installations

    1995-12-31

    Experimental programs in the United States and France have followed similar paths in supplying much of the data needed to analyze severe accidents. Both the HI/VI program, conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under the sponsorship of the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the HEVA/VERCORS program, supported by IPSN-Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique (CEA) and carried out at the Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, have studied fission product release from light water reactor (LWR) fuel samples during test sequences representative of severe accidents. Recognizing that more accurate data, i.e., a better defined source term, could reduce the safety margins included in the rather conservative source terms originating from WASH-1400, the primary objective of these programs has been to improve the data base concerning fission product release and behavior at high temperatures. To facilitate the comparison, a model based on fission product diffusion mechanisms that was developed at ORNL and adapted with CEA experimental data is proposed. This CEA model is compared with the ORNL experimental data in a blind test. The two experimental programs used similar techniques in out-of-pile studies. Highly irradiated fuel samples were heated in radiofrequency induction furnaces to very high temperatures (up to 2700 K at ORNL and 2750 K at CEA) in oxidizing (H{sub 2}O), reducing (H{sub 2}) or mixed (H{sub 2}O+H{sub 2}) environments. The experimental parameters, which were chosen from calculated accident scenarios, did not duplicate specific accidents, but rather emphasized careful control of test conditions to facilitate extrapolation of the results to a wide variety of accident situations. This paper presents a broad and consistent database from ORNL and CEA release results obtained independently since the early 1980`S. A comparison of CORSOR and CORSOR Booth calculations, currently used in safety analysis, and the experimental results is presented and

  10. ORNL-EPR study: results and implications

    McAlees, D.G.

    1976-01-01

    A two-year preliminary design study of a tokamak experimental power reactor has been completed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The major engineering features, plasma physics characteristics, and technological requirements of the device are discussed. Plasma confinement is provided in a toroidal chamber of major radius, R/sub o/ = 6.75 m and minor radius, a = 2.25 m. The toroidal magnetic field strength is 4.8 T. A unique poloidal magnetic field system creates the fields required for plasma equilibrium and stability. The power extraction system is centered around the blanket, which absorbs approximately 90 percent of the energy produced in the plasma. The operating characteristics and nuclear performance of the system are given. The results of the study indicate a low benefit-to-cost ratio for this design. Recent developments have suggested that some of the design constraints were too restrictive. The advisability of a large scale test of the ideas linked to these developments has become apparent. To this end, ORNL has started the design of a high-β tokamak. The basis for the high power density device is discussed

  11. Recent negative ion source developments at ORNL

    Alton, G.D.

    1979-01-01

    According to specifications written for the 25 MV ORNL tandem accelerator, the ion source used during acceptance testing must be capable of producing a negative ion beam of intensity greater than or equal to 7.5 μA within a phase space of less than or equal to 1 π cm-mrad (MeV)/sup 1/2/. The specifications were written prior to the development of an ion source with such capabilities but fortunately Andersen and Tykesson introduced a source in 1975 which could easily meet the specified requirements. The remarkable beam intensity and quality properties of this source has motivated the development of other sources which utilize sputtering in the presence of a diffuse cesium plasma - some of which will be described in these proceedings. This report describes results of studies associated with the development of a modified Aarhus geometry and an axial geometry source which utilize sputtering in the presence of a diffuse cesium plasma for the production of negative ion beams

  12. ORNL Evaluation of Electrabel Safety Cases for Doel 3 / Tihange 2: Final Report

    Bass, Bennett Richard [ORNL; Dickson, Terry L [ORNL; Gorti, Sarma B [ORNL; Klasky, Hilda B [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Sokolov, Mikhail A [ORNL; Williams, Paul T [ORNL; Server, W. L. [ATI Consulting, Pinehurst, NC

    2015-11-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) performed a detailed technical review of the 2015 Electrabel (EBL) Safety Cases prepared for the Belgium reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) at Doel 3 and Tihange 2 (D3/T2). The Federal Agency for Nuclear Control (FANC) in Belgium commissioned ORNL to provide a thorough assessment of the existing safety margins against cracking of the RPVs due to the presence of almost laminar flaws found in each RPV. Initial efforts focused on surveying relevant literature that provided necessary background knowledge on the issues related to the quasilaminar flaws observed in D3/T2 reactors. Next, ORNL proceeded to develop an independent quantitative assessment of the entire flaw population in the two Belgian reactors according to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI, Appendix G, Fracture Toughness Criteria for Protection Against Failure, New York (1992 and 2004). That screening assessment of all EBL-characterized flaws in D3/T2 used ORNL tools, methodologies, and the ASME Code Case N-848, Alternative Characterization Rules for QuasiLaminar Flaws . Results and conclusions from the ORNL flaw acceptance assessments of D3/T2 were compared with those from the 2015 EBL Safety Cases. Specific findings of the ORNL evaluation of that part of the EBL structural integrity assessment focusing on stability of the flaw population subjected to primary design transients include the following: ORNL s analysis results were similar to those of EBL in that very few characterized flaws were found not compliant with the ASME (1992) acceptance criterion. ORNL s application of the more recent ASME Section XI (2004) produced only four noncompliant flaws, all due to LOCAs. The finding of a greater number of non-compliant flaws in the EBL screening assessment is due principally to a significantly more restrictive (conservative) criterion for flaw size acceptance used by EBL. ORNL s screening assessment results

  13. A master equation for force distributions in soft particle packings - Irreversible mechanical responses to isotropic compression and decompression

    Saitoh, K.; Magnanimo, Vanessa; Luding, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical responses of soft particle packings to quasi-static deformations are determined by the microscopic restructuring of force-chain networks, where complex non-affine displacements of constituent particles cause the irreversible macroscopic behavior. Recently, we have proposed a master

  14. Calibration measurements using the ORNL fissile mass flow monitor

    March-Leuba, J.; Uckan, T.; Sumner, J.; Mattingly, J.; Mihalczo, J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a demonstration of fissile-mass-flow measurements using the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Fissile Mass Flow Monitor in the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). This Flow Monitor is part of a Blend Down Monitoring System (BDMS) that will be installed in at least two Russian Federation (R.F.) blending facilities. The key objectives of the demonstration of the ORNL Flow Monitor are two: (a) demonstrate that the ORNL Flow Monitor equipment is capable of reliably monitoring the mass flow rate of 235 UF 6 gas, and (b) provide a demonstration of ORNL Flow Monitor system in operation with UF 6 flow for a visiting R.F. delegation. These two objectives have been met by the PGDP demonstration, as presented in this paper

  15. Research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    Postma, H.

    1980-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a large (5300 people), US-government-funded laboratory, which performs research in many disciplines and in many technological areas. Programs and organization of ORNL are described for the People's Republic of China

  16. Requirements Definition for ORNL Trusted Corridors Project

    Walker, Randy M [ORNL; Hill, David E [ORNL; Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; DeNap, Frank A [ORNL; White, James D [ORNL; Gross, Ian G [ORNL; Gorman, Bryan L [ORNL; Hively, Lee M [ORNL; Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL

    2008-02-01

    The ORNL Trusted Corridors Project has several other names: SensorNet Transportation Pilot; Identification and Monitoring of Radiation (in commerce) Shipments (IMR(ic)S); and Southeastern Transportation Corridor Pilot (SETCP). The project involves acquisition and analysis of transportation data at two mobile and three fixed inspection stations in five states (Kentucky, Mississippi, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Washington DC). Collaborators include the State Police organizations that are responsible for highway safety, law enforcement, and incident response. The three states with fixed weigh-station deployments (KY, SC, TN) are interested in coordination of this effort for highway safety, law enforcement, and sorting/targeting/interdiction of potentially non-compliant vehicles/persons/cargo. The Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) in the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is interested in these deployments, as a Pilot test (SETCP) to identify Improvised Nuclear Devices (INDs) in highway transport. However, the level of DNDO integration among these state deployments is presently uncertain. Moreover, DHS issues are considered secondary by the states, which perceive this work as an opportunity to leverage these (new) dual-use technologies for state needs. In addition, present experience shows that radiation detectors alone cannot detect DHS-identified IND threats. Continued SETCP success depends on the level of integration of current state/local police operations with the new DHS task of detecting IND threats, in addition to emergency preparedness and homeland security. This document describes the enabling components for continued SETCP development and success, including: sensors and their use at existing deployments (Section 1); personnel training (Section 2); concept of operations (Section 3); knowledge discovery from the copious data (Section 4); smart data collection, integration and database development, advanced algorithms for multiple sensors, and

  17. Requirements Definition for ORNL Trusted Corridors Project

    Walker, Randy M; Hill, David E; Smith, Cyrus M; DeNap, Frank A; White, James D; Gross, Ian G; Gorman, Bryan L; Hively, Lee M; Abercrombie, Robert K

    2008-01-01

    The ORNL Trusted Corridors Project has several other names: SensorNet Transportation Pilot; Identification and Monitoring of Radiation (in commerce) Shipments (IMR(ic)S); and Southeastern Transportation Corridor Pilot (SETCP). The project involves acquisition and analysis of transportation data at two mobile and three fixed inspection stations in five states (Kentucky, Mississippi, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Washington DC). Collaborators include the State Police organizations that are responsible for highway safety, law enforcement, and incident response. The three states with fixed weigh-station deployments (KY, SC, TN) are interested in coordination of this effort for highway safety, law enforcement, and sorting/targeting/interdiction of potentially non-compliant vehicles/persons/cargo. The Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) in the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is interested in these deployments, as a Pilot test (SETCP) to identify Improvised Nuclear Devices (INDs) in highway transport. However, the level of DNDO integration among these state deployments is presently uncertain. Moreover, DHS issues are considered secondary by the states, which perceive this work as an opportunity to leverage these (new) dual-use technologies for state needs. In addition, present experience shows that radiation detectors alone cannot detect DHS-identified IND threats. Continued SETCP success depends on the level of integration of current state/local police operations with the new DHS task of detecting IND threats, in addition to emergency preparedness and homeland security. This document describes the enabling components for continued SETCP development and success, including: sensors and their use at existing deployments (Section 1); personnel training (Section 2); concept of operations (Section 3); knowledge discovery from the copious data (Section 4); smart data collection, integration and database development, advanced algorithms for multiple sensors, and

  18. ORNL Cray X1 evaluation status report

    Agarwal, P.K.; Alexander, R.A.; Apra, E.; Balay, S.; Bland, A.S; Colgan, J.; D'Azevedo, E.F.; Dongarra, J.J.; Dunigan, T.H. Jr.; Fahey, M.R.; Fahey, R.A.; Geist, A.; Gordon, M.; Harrison, R.J.; Kaushik, D.; Krishnakumar, M.; Luszczek, P.; Mezzacappa, A.; Nichols, J.A.; Nieplocha, J.; Oliker, L.; Packwood, T.; Pindzola, M.S.; Schulthess, T.C.; Vetter, J.S.; White III, J.B.; Windus, T.L.; Worley, P.H.; Zacharia, T.

    2004-01-01

    On August 15, 2002 the Department of Energy (DOE) selected the Center for Computational Sciences (CCS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to deploy a new scalable vector supercomputer architecture for solving important scientific problems in climate, fusion, biology, nanoscale materials and astrophysics. ''This program is one of the first steps in an initiative designed to provide U.S. scientists with the computational power that is essential to 21st century scientific leadership,'' said Dr. Raymond L. Orbach, director of the department's Office of Science. In FY03, CCS procured a 256-processor Cray X1 to evaluate the processors, memory subsystem, scalability of the architecture, software environment and to predict the expected sustained performance on key DOE applications codes. The results of the micro-benchmarks and kernel bench marks show the architecture of the Cray X1 to be exceptionally fast for most operations. The best results are shown on large problems, where it is not possible to fit the entire problem into the cache of the processors. These large problems are exactly the types of problems that are important for the DOE and ultra-scale simulation. Application performance is found to be markedly improved by this architecture: - Large-scale simulations of high-temperature superconductors run 25 times faster than on an IBM Power4 cluster using the same number of processors. - Best performance of the parallel ocean program (POP v1.4.3) is 50 percent higher than on Japan s Earth Simulator and 5 times higher than on an IBM Power4 cluster. - A fusion application, global GYRO transport, was found to be 16 times faster on the X1 than on an IBM Power3. The increased performance allowed simulations to fully resolve questions raised by a prior study. - The transport kernel in the AGILE-BOLTZTRAN astrophysics code runs 15 times faster than on an IBM Power4 cluster using the same number of processors. - Molecular dynamics simulations related to the phenomenon of

  19. ORNL Cray X1 evaluation status report

    Agarwal, P.K.; Alexander, R.A.; Apra, E.; Balay, S.; Bland, A.S; Colgan, J.; D' Azevedo, E.F.; Dongarra, J.J.; Dunigan Jr., T.H.; Fahey, M.R.; Fahey, R.A.; Geist, A.; Gordon, M.; Harrison, R.J.; Kaushik, D.; Krishnakumar, M.; Luszczek, P.; Mezzacappa, A.; Nichols, J.A.; Nieplocha, J.; Oliker, L.; Packwood, T.; Pindzola, M.S.; Schulthess, T.C.; Vetter, J.S.; White III, J.B.; Windus, T.L.; Worley, P.H.; Zacharia, T.

    2004-05-01

    On August 15, 2002 the Department of Energy (DOE) selected the Center for Computational Sciences (CCS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to deploy a new scalable vector supercomputer architecture for solving important scientific problems in climate, fusion, biology, nanoscale materials and astrophysics. ''This program is one of the first steps in an initiative designed to provide U.S. scientists with the computational power that is essential to 21st century scientific leadership,'' said Dr. Raymond L. Orbach, director of the department's Office of Science. In FY03, CCS procured a 256-processor Cray X1 to evaluate the processors, memory subsystem, scalability of the architecture, software environment and to predict the expected sustained performance on key DOE applications codes. The results of the micro-benchmarks and kernel bench marks show the architecture of the Cray X1 to be exceptionally fast for most operations. The best results are shown on large problems, where it is not possible to fit the entire problem into the cache of the processors. These large problems are exactly the types of problems that are important for the DOE and ultra-scale simulation. Application performance is found to be markedly improved by this architecture: - Large-scale simulations of high-temperature superconductors run 25 times faster than on an IBM Power4 cluster using the same number of processors. - Best performance of the parallel ocean program (POP v1.4.3) is 50 percent higher than on Japan s Earth Simulator and 5 times higher than on an IBM Power4 cluster. - A fusion application, global GYRO transport, was found to be 16 times faster on the X1 than on an IBM Power3. The increased performance allowed simulations to fully resolve questions raised by a prior study. - The transport kernel in the AGILE-BOLTZTRAN astrophysics code runs 15 times faster than on an IBM Power4 cluster using the same number of processors. - Molecular dynamics simulations

  20. Reportable Nuclide Criteria for ORNL Radioactive Waste Management Activities - 13005

    McDowell, Kip; Forrester, Tim; Saunders, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee generates numerous radioactive waste streams. Many of those streams contain a large number of radionuclides with an extremely broad range of concentrations. To feasibly manage the radionuclide information, ORNL developed reportable nuclide criteria to distinguish between those nuclides in a waste stream that require waste tracking versus those nuclides of such minimal activity that do not require tracking. The criteria include tracking thresholds drawn from ORNL onsite management requirements, transportation requirements, and relevant treatment and disposal facility acceptance criteria. As a management practice, ORNL maintains waste tracking on a nuclide in a specific waste stream if it exceeds any of the reportable nuclide criteria. Nuclides in a specific waste stream that screen out as non-reportable under all these criteria may be dropped from ORNL waste tracking. The benefit of these criteria is to ensure that nuclides in a waste stream with activities which meaningfully affect safety and compliance are tracked, while documenting the basis for removing certain isotopes from further consideration. (authors)

  1. 44 years of testing radioactive materials packages at ORNL

    Shappert, L.B.; Ludwig, S.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2004-07-01

    This paper briefly reviews the package testing at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1960 and then examines the trends in the testing activities that occurred during the same period. Radioactive material shipments have been made from ORNL since the 1940s. The first fully operating reactor built at the ORNL site was patterned after the graphite pile constructed by Enrico Fermi under Stagg Field in Chicago. After serving as a test bed for future reactors, it became useful as a producer of radioactive isotopes. The Isotopes Division was established at ORNL to furnish radioactive materials used in the medical community. Often these shipments have been transported by aircraft worldwide due to the short half-lives of many of the materials. This paper touches briefly on the lighter and smaller radioisotope packages that were being shipped from ORNL in large numbers and then deals with the testing of packages designed to handle large radioactive sources, such as spent fuel, and other fissile materials.

  2. 44 years of testing radioactive materials packages at ORNL

    Shappert, L.B.; Ludwig, S.B.

    2004-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the package testing at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1960 and then examines the trends in the testing activities that occurred during the same period. Radioactive material shipments have been made from ORNL since the 1940s. The first fully operating reactor built at the ORNL site was patterned after the graphite pile constructed by Enrico Fermi under Stagg Field in Chicago. After serving as a test bed for future reactors, it became useful as a producer of radioactive isotopes. The Isotopes Division was established at ORNL to furnish radioactive materials used in the medical community. Often these shipments have been transported by aircraft worldwide due to the short half-lives of many of the materials. This paper touches briefly on the lighter and smaller radioisotope packages that were being shipped from ORNL in large numbers and then deals with the testing of packages designed to handle large radioactive sources, such as spent fuel, and other fissile materials

  3. Yarn Pull-Out as a Mechanism for Dissipation of Ballistic Impact Energy in Kevlar KM-2 Fabric, Part 1: Quasi-Static Characterization of Yarn Pull-Out

    Kirkwood, Keith

    2004-01-01

    .... This study reports the effects of fabric length, number of yarns pulled, arrangement of yarns, and transverse tension on the force-displacement curves for yarn pull-out tests on Kevlar KM-2 fabric...

  4. Procedures manual for the ORNL Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) Program

    Myrick, T.E.; Berven, B.A.; Cottrell, W.D.; Goldsmith, W.A.; Haywood, F.F.

    1987-04-01

    The portion of the radiological survey program performed by ORNL is the subject of this Procedures Manual. The RASA group of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) at ORNL is responsible for the planning, conducting, and reporting of the results of radiological surveys at specified sites and associated vicinity properties. The results of these surveys are used by DOE in determining the need for and extent of remedial actions. Upon completion of the necessary remedial actions, the ORNL-RASA group or other OOS contractor may be called upon to verify the effectiveness of the remedial action. Information from these postremedial action surveys is included as part of the data base used by DOE in certifying a site for unrestricted use

  5. Procedures manual for the ORNL Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) Program

    Myrick, T.E.; Berven, B.A.; Cottrell, W.D.; Goldsmith, W.A.; Haywood, F.F.

    1987-04-01

    The portion of the radiological survey program performed by ORNL is the subject of this Procedures Manual. The RASA group of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) at ORNL is responsible for the planning, conducting, and reporting of the results of radiological surveys at specified sites and associated vicinity properties. The results of these surveys are used by DOE in determining the need for and extent of remedial actions. Upon completion of the necessary remedial actions, the ORNL-RASA group or other OOS contractor may be called upon to verify the effectiveness of the remedial action. Information from these postremedial action surveys is included as part of the data base used by DOE in certifying a site for unrestricted use.

  6. Safety analysis report for packaging: the ORNL loop transport cask

    Evans, J.H.; Chipley, K.K.; Nelms, H.A.; Crowley, W.K.; Just, R.A.

    1977-11-01

    An evaluation of the ORNL loop transport cask demonstrating its compliance with the regulations governing the transportation of radioactive and fissile materials is presented. A previous review of the cask is updated to demonstrate compliance with current regulations, to present current procedures, and to reflect the more recent technology

  7. Assessment of potential ORNL contributions to supply of molybdenum-99

    Ottinger, C.L.; Collins, E.D.

    1996-04-01

    The most widely used, and probably the most important, single radioisotope in commerce is 99 Mo. Although the present supply is adequate, there are many vulnerabilities in the supply picture. Resources available at ORNL could be applied to help ensure the continued availability of this critically needed radioisotope. This assessment considers the ways in which ORNL might participate in DOE efforts to develop and maintain a domestic source of 99 Mo for medical needs. The primary recommendation presented here is that ORNL obtain DOE support for development of an improved method for providing 99 Mo to the user community. Specifically, development and demonstration of a system based on irradiation of enriched stable 98 Mo, as opposed to fission of 235 U, is recommended. Such a system would (1) alleviate the need for using highly enriched uranium as target material (nonproliferation and criticality safety concerns); (2) alleviate the need to produce a large volume of unwanted fission product wastes (safety and cost concerns); (3) promote the need for enriched 98 Mo, which can be produced in the ORNL calutrons or plasma separation equipment; and (4) promote the need for a high-flux reactor, such as the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)

  8. Low level radioactive liquid waste treatment at ORNL

    Robinson, R.A.; Lasher, L.C.

    1977-01-01

    A new Process Waste Treatment Plant has been constructed at ORNL. The wastes are processed through a precipitation-clarification step and then through an ion exchange step to remove the low-level activity in the waste before discharge into White Oak Creek

  9. ECR-based atomic collision physics research at ORNL

    Meyer, F.W.; Bannister, M.E.; Hale, J.W.; Havener, C.C.

    1997-01-01

    After a brief summary of the present capability and configuration of the ORNL Multicharged Ion Research Facility (MIRF), and of upcoming upgrades and expansions, the presently on-line atomic collisions experiments are described. In the process, the utility of intense, cw ion beams extracted from ECR ion sources for low-signal rate experiments is illustrated

  10. Program planning for future improvement in managing ORNL's radioactive wastes

    1982-01-01

    This report is intended to serve as a reference document and guide in developing the long-term improvements section of ORNL's radioactive waste management plan. The report reviews ORNL's operations and future program needs in terms of currently applicable DOE regulations and also in terms of regulations and accepted practices of the commerical sector of the nuclear power industry so that the impact of potential future adoption of these regulations and standards on ORNL's operations can be fully evaluated. The principal conclusion reached after reviewing ORNL's waste management operations is that these operations are currently being conducted in a manner that does not endanger the health or safety of workers or the general public and that does not have an adverse effect on the environment. Although nineteen specific problem areas have been identified all of these problems can be attributed to one of the following: a) the legacy of past practices; b) gradual deterioration of systems which have reached (or are near to reaching) the end of their reasonable design lives; and c) potential changes in regulations applicable to ORNL. All of the programs designed to improve or correct these problem areas could be accomplished within a four year period. However, given current limitations on manpower and capital, these programs would more likely be spread out over a five to ten year period of time if they were all to be undertaken. The cost of undertaking all of these projects concurrently is estimated to be between 60 and 100 million dollars. Due to the many unknowns and uncertainties associated with the problem areas, actual total costs for specific projects could vary from those presented in this report by as much as 300 percent

  11. Needs and Requirements for Future Research Reactors (ORNL Perspectives)

    Ilas, Germina; Bryan, Chris; Gehin, Jess C.

    2016-01-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is a vital national and international resource for neutron science research, production of radioisotopes, and materials irradiation. While HFIR is expected to continue operation for the foreseeable future, interest is growing in understanding future research reactors features, needs, and requirements. To clarify, discuss, and compile these needs from the perspective of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) research and development (R&D) missions, a workshop, titled ''Needs and Requirements for Future Research Reactors'', was held at ORNL on May 12, 2015. The workshop engaged ORNL staff that is directly involved in research using HFIR to collect valuable input on the reactor's current and future missions. The workshop provided an interactive forum for a fruitful exchange of opinions, and included a mix of short presentations and open discussions. ORNL staff members made 15 technical presentations based on their experience and areas of expertise, and discussed those capabilities of the HFIR and future research reactors that are essential for their current and future R&D needs. The workshop was attended by approximately 60 participants from three ORNL directorates. The agenda is included in Appendix A. This document summarizes the feedback provided by workshop contributors and participants. It also includes information and insights addressing key points that originated from the dialogue started at the workshop. A general overview is provided on the design features and capabilities of high performance research reactors currently in use or under construction worldwide. Recent and ongoing design efforts in the US and internationally are briefly summarized, followed by conclusions and recommendations.

  12. Needs and Requirements for Future Research Reactors (ORNL Perspectives)

    Ilas, Germina [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bryan, Chris [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gehin, Jess C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-02-10

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is a vital national and international resource for neutron science research, production of radioisotopes, and materials irradiation. While HFIR is expected to continue operation for the foreseeable future, interest is growing in understanding future research reactors features, needs, and requirements. To clarify, discuss, and compile these needs from the perspective of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) research and development (R&D) missions, a workshop, titled “Needs and Requirements for Future Research Reactors”, was held at ORNL on May 12, 2015. The workshop engaged ORNL staff that is directly involved in research using HFIR to collect valuable input on the reactor’s current and future missions. The workshop provided an interactive forum for a fruitful exchange of opinions, and included a mix of short presentations and open discussions. ORNL staff members made 15 technical presentations based on their experience and areas of expertise, and discussed those capabilities of the HFIR and future research reactors that are essential for their current and future R&D needs. The workshop was attended by approximately 60 participants from three ORNL directorates. The agenda is included in Appendix A. This document summarizes the feedback provided by workshop contributors and participants. It also includes information and insights addressing key points that originated from the dialogue started at the workshop. A general overview is provided on the design features and capabilities of high performance research reactors currently in use or under construction worldwide. Recent and ongoing design efforts in the US and internationally are briefly summarized, followed by conclusions and recommendations.

  13. ORNL Pre-test Analyses of A Large-scale Experiment in STYLE

    Williams, Paul T.; Yin, Shengjun; Klasky, Hilda B.; Bass, Bennett Richard

    2011-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is conducting a series of numerical analyses to simulate a large scale mock-up experiment planned within the European Network for Structural Integrity for Lifetime Management non-RPV Components (STYLE). STYLE is a European cooperative effort to assess the structural integrity of (non-reactor pressure vessel) reactor coolant pressure boundary components relevant to ageing and life-time management and to integrate the knowledge created in the project into mainstream nuclear industry assessment codes. ORNL contributes work-in-kind support to STYLE Work Package 2 (Numerical Analysis/Advanced Tools) and Work Package 3 (Engineering Assessment Methods/LBB Analyses). This paper summarizes the current status of ORNL analyses of the STYLE Mock-Up3 large-scale experiment to simulate and evaluate crack growth in a cladded ferritic pipe. The analyses are being performed in two parts. In the first part, advanced fracture mechanics models are being developed and performed to evaluate several experiment designs taking into account the capabilities of the test facility while satisfying the test objectives. Then these advanced fracture mechanics models will be utilized to simulate the crack growth in the large scale mock-up test. For the second part, the recently developed ORNL SIAM-PFM open-source, cross-platform, probabilistic computational tool will be used to generate an alternative assessment for comparison with the advanced fracture mechanics model results. The SIAM-PFM probabilistic analysis of the Mock-Up3 experiment will utilize fracture modules that are installed into a general probabilistic framework. The probabilistic results of the Mock-Up3 experiment obtained from SIAM-PFM will be compared to those results generated using the deterministic 3D nonlinear finite-element modeling approach. The objective of the probabilistic analysis is to provide uncertainty bounds that will assist in assessing the more detailed 3D finite

  14. Historical information on ORNL proposals for ECCS testing

    1976-01-01

    This document contains a compilation of the correspondence and preliminary report which the Oak Ridge National Laboratory submitted to the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission on the subject of in situ testing of emergency core cooling systems (ECCS) in pressurized water reactors. Most of the correspondence, which was prepared four to five years ago, deals with an ORNL proposal to evaluate the merits of conducting an in situ ECCS test in a full-scale commercial power plant. The end result of this work was to be a report in which the feasibility of conducting such an experiment would be discussed and a ''rough'' cost estimate provided. In support of this proposal, ORNL prepared a brief preliminary prospectus which identified some of the key questions that were to be addressed should the evaluation study be funded

  15. Summary of the ORNL-sponsored reactor radwaste management workshop

    Kibbey, A.H.

    1977-01-01

    On January 12 to 14, 1977, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) sponsored a Radwaste Management Workshop in New Orleans, Louisiana, the object of which was to obtain operating data on the uses of evaporation, ion exchange, filtration, and on solid radwaste practices at nuclear power plants. The collected data are being used to update three earlier generic reports done by ORNL on the status of evaporation, ion exchange, and solid radwaste practices at nuclear power plants and to prepare a new one on filtration. All segments of the nuclear power industry were invited to participate, and a total of 188 representatives came. There were four major Workshop groups: volume reduction, solidification, physical and chemical separations, and corrosion. The major findings of each group are reported

  16. Treatment of ORNL liquid low-level waste

    Berry, J.B.; Brown, C.H. Jr.; Fowler, V.L.; Robinson, S.M.

    1988-01-01

    Discontinuation of the hydrofracture disposal method at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has caused intensive efforts to reduce liquid waste generation. Improving the treatment of slightly radioactive liquid waste, called process waste, has reduced the volume of the resulting contaminated liquid radioactive waste effluent by 66%. Proposed processing improvements could eliminate the contaminated liquid effluent and reduce solid low-level waste by an additional one-third. The improved process meets stringent discharge limits for radionuclides. Discharge limits for radionuclides are expected to be enforced at the outfall of the treatment plant to a creek; currently, limits are enforced at the reservation boundary. Plant discharge is monitored according to the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit for ORNL. 1 ref., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  17. An overview of the ORNL-NFS intercomparison

    Hensley, D.C.

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear Fuel Services sent more than 800 drums of nuclear waste to Oak Ridge National Laboratory, with the majority of the waste packaged into five different waste matrix types. A thorough and complete assay of the waste was performed at both NFS and at ORNL. A detailed comparing of the two assay sets provides valuable. insights into problems encountered in typical assay campaigns, particularly as there is, for the most part, excellent agreement between these two campaigns

  18. Evaluation of the ORNL area for future waste burial facilities

    Lomenick, T.F.; Byerly, D.W.; Gonzales, S.

    1983-10-01

    Additional waste-burial facilities will be needed at ORNL within this decade. In order to find environmentally acceptable sites, the ORNL area must be systematically evaluated. This document represents the first step in that selection process. Geologic and hydrologic data from the literature and minor field investigations are used to identify more favorable sites for Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 7. Also underway at this time is a companion study to locate a Central Waste Storage Area which could be used in the future to accommodate wastes generated by the X-10, Y-12, and K-25 facilities. From the several watershed options available, the Whiteoak Creek drainage basin is selected as the most promising hydrologic regime. This area contains all past and present waste-disposal facilities and is thus already well monitored. The seven bedrock units within the ORNL area are evaluated as potential burial media. Shales of the Conasauga Group, which are currently used for waste burial in the Whiteoak Creek drainage basin, and the Knox Group are considered the leading candidates. Although the residuum derived from and overlying the Knox dolomite has many favorable characteristics and may be regarded as having a high potential for burial of low-level wastes, at the present it is unproven. Therefore, the Conasauga shales are considered a preferable option for SWSA 7 within the ORNL area. Since the Conasauga interval is currently used for waste burial, it is better understood. One tract in Melton Valley that is underlain by Conasauga shales is nominated for detailed site-characterization studies, and several other tracts are recommended for future exploratory drilling. Exploration is also suggested for a tract in the upper Whiteoak Creek basin where Knox residuum is the shallow subsurface material

  19. ORNL: PWR-BDHT analysis procedure, a preliminary overview

    Cliff, S.B.

    1978-01-01

    The computer programs currently used in the analysis of the ORNL-PWR Blowdown Heat Transfer Separate-Effects Program are overviewed. The current linkages and relationships among the programs are given along with general comments about the future directions of some of these programs. The overview is strictly from the computer science point of view with only minimal information concerning the engineering aspects of the analysis procedure

  20. ORNL-PWR BDHT analysis procedure: an overview

    Cliff, S.B.

    1978-01-01

    The key computer programs currently used by the analysis procedure of the ORNL-PWR Blowdown Heat Transfer Separate Effects Program are overviewed with particular emphasis placed on their interrelationships. The major modeling and calculational programs, COBRA, ORINC, ORTCAL, PINSIM, and various versions of RELAP4, are summarized and placed into the perspective of the procedure. The supportive programs, REDPLT, ORCPLT, BDHTPLOT, OXREPT, and OTOCI, and their uses are described

  1. ORNL superconducting technology program for electric power systems

    Hawsey, R. A.

    1994-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Superconducting Technology Program is conducted as part of a national effort by the US Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to develop the technology base needed by US industry for commercial development of electric power applications of high-temperature superconductivity. The two major elements of this program are conductor development and applications development. This document describes the major research and development activities for this program together with related accomplishments. The technical progress reported was summarized from information prepared for the FY 1993 Annual Program Review held July 28--29, 1993. This ORNL program is highly leveraged by the staff and other resources of US industry and universities. In fact, nearly three-fourths of the ORNL effort is devoted to industrial competitiveness projects with private companies. Interlaboratory teams are also in place on a number of industry-driven projects. Patent disclosures, working group meetings, staff exchanges, and joint publications and presentations ensure that there is technology transfer to US industry. Working together, the collaborative teams are making rapid progress in solving the scientific and technical issues necessary for the commercialization of long lengths of practical high-temperature superconductor wire and wire products.

  2. Incremental localized boundary-domain integro-differential equations of elastic damage mechanics for inhomogeneous body

    Mikhailov, SE

    2006-01-01

    Copyright @ 2006 Tech Science Press A quasi-static mixed boundary value problem of elastic damage mechanics for a continuously inhomogeneous body is considered. Using the two-operator Green-Betti formula and the fundamental solution of an auxiliary homogeneous linear elasticity with frozen initial, secant or tangent elastic coe±cients, a boundary-domain integro-differential formulation of the elasto-plastic problem with respect to the displacement rates and their gradients is derived. Usin...

  3. 2010 Neutron Review: ORNL Neutron Sciences Progress Report

    Bardoel, Agatha A.; Counce, Deborah Melinda; Ekkebus, Allen E.; Horak, Charlie M.; Nagler, Stephen E.; Kszos, Lynn A.

    2011-01-01

    During 2010, the Neutron Sciences Directorate focused on producing world-class science, while supporting the needs of the scientific community. As the instrument, sample environment, and data analysis tools at High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR ) and Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) have grown over the last year, so has promising neutron scattering research. This was an exciting year in science, technology, and operations. Some topics discussed are: (1) HFIR and SNS Experiments Take Gordon Battelle Awards for Scientific Discovery - Battelle Memorial Institute presented the inaugural Gordon Battelle Prizes for scientific discovery and technology impact in 2010. Battelle awards the prizes to recognize the most significant advancements at national laboratories that it manages or co-manages. (2) Discovery of Element 117 - As part of an international team of scientists from Russia and the United States, HFIR staff played a pivotal role in the discovery by generating the berkelium used to produce the new element. A total of six atoms of ''ununseptium'' were detected in a two-year campaign employing HFIR and the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the heavy-ion accelerator capabilities at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna, Russia. The discovery of the new element expands the understanding of the properties of nuclei at extreme numbers of protons and neutrons. The production of a new element and observation of 11 new heaviest isotopes demonstrate the increased stability of super-heavy elements with increasing neutron numbers and provide the strongest evidence to date for the existence of an island of enhanced stability for super-heavy elements. (3) Studies of Iron-Based High-Temperature Superconductors - ORNL applied its distinctive capabilities in neutron scattering, chemistry, physics, and computation to detailed studies of the magnetic excitations of iron-based superconductors (iron pnictides and

  4. 2010 Neutron Review: ORNL Neutron Sciences Progress Report

    Bardoel, Agatha A [ORNL; Counce, Deborah M [ORNL; Ekkebus, Allen E [ORNL; Horak, Charlie M [ORNL; Nagler, Stephen E [ORNL; Kszos, Lynn A [ORNL

    2011-06-01

    During 2010, the Neutron Sciences Directorate focused on producing world-class science, while supporting the needs of the scientific community. As the instrument, sample environment, and data analysis tools at High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR ) and Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) have grown over the last year, so has promising neutron scattering research. This was an exciting year in science, technology, and operations. Some topics discussed are: (1) HFIR and SNS Experiments Take Gordon Battelle Awards for Scientific Discovery - Battelle Memorial Institute presented the inaugural Gordon Battelle Prizes for scientific discovery and technology impact in 2010. Battelle awards the prizes to recognize the most significant advancements at national laboratories that it manages or co-manages. (2) Discovery of Element 117 - As part of an international team of scientists from Russia and the United States, HFIR staff played a pivotal role in the discovery by generating the berkelium used to produce the new element. A total of six atoms of ''ununseptium'' were detected in a two-year campaign employing HFIR and the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the heavy-ion accelerator capabilities at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna, Russia. The discovery of the new element expands the understanding of the properties of nuclei at extreme numbers of protons and neutrons. The production of a new element and observation of 11 new heaviest isotopes demonstrate the increased stability of super-heavy elements with increasing neutron numbers and provide the strongest evidence to date for the existence of an island of enhanced stability for super-heavy elements. (3) Studies of Iron-Based High-Temperature Superconductors - ORNL applied its distinctive capabilities in neutron scattering, chemistry, physics, and computation to detailed studies of the magnetic excitations of iron-based superconductors (iron

  5. An experimental evaluation of the fully coupled hysteretic electro-mechanical behaviour of piezoelectric actuators

    Butcher, Mark [Department of Engineering, CERN, 1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Davino, Daniele, E-mail: davino@unisannio.it [Department of Engineering, University of Sannio, Benevento (Italy); Giustiniani, Alessandro; Masi, Alessandro [Department of Engineering, CERN, 1211 Geneva (Switzerland)

    2016-04-01

    Piezoelectrics are the most commonly used of the multifunctional smart materials in industrial applications, because of their relatively low cost and ease of use in electric and electronic oriented applications. Nevertheless, while datasheets usually give just small signal quasi-static parameters, their full potential can only be exploited only if a full characterization is available because the maximum stroke or the higher piezo coupling coefficients are available at different electro-mechanical biases, where often small signal analysis is not valid. In this paper a method to get the quasi-static fully coupled characterization is presented. The method is tested on a commercial piezo actuator but can be extended to similar devices.

  6. submitter An experimental evaluation of the fully coupled hysteretic electro-mechanical behaviour of piezoelectric actuators

    Butcher, Mark; Giustiniani, Alessandro; Masi, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Piezoelectrics are the most commonly used of the multifunctional smart materials in industrial applications, because of their relatively low cost and ease of use in electric and electronic oriented applications. Nevertheless, while datasheets usually give just small signal quasi-static parameters, their full potential can only be exploited only if a full characterization is available because the maximum stroke or the higher piezo coupling coefficients are available at different electro-mechanical biases, where often small signal analysis is not valid. In this paper a method to get the quasi-static fully coupled characterization is presented. The method is tested on a commercial piezo actuator but can be extended to similar devices.

  7. Acoustic noise and pattern recognition studies at ORNL

    Sides, W.H.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments in acoustic detection of boiling in sodium were performed in the Fuel Failure Mockup (FFM) Facility at ORNL under the Liquid-Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) Safety and Core Systems Program. The FFM is a sodium flow facility that has the capability of simulating LMFBR fuel subassemblies using 19 electric cartridge heaters having prototypic configuration, power density, pressure, specific flow, and temperature. The sodium boiling experiments were performed to measure the transient temperatures throughout the bundle to the start of boiling and to generate an acoustic signal for tests of the boiling detection system

  8. Progress report on JAERI-ORNL cooperative neutron scattering research

    Iizumi, Masashi

    1985-08-01

    One year activities done under the JAERI-DOE(ORNL) cooperative neutron scattering program are summarized. This period just followed the completion of the wide-angle neutron diffractometer dedicated to the cooperative research. The report contains results of the performance test of the instrument and early research activities. The latter part includes the time-resolved measurements of the transition kinetics in tin and Ni-Mn alloy as well as the single-crystal diffraction by the flat-cone method. (author)

  9. Computer modeling of ORNL storage tank sludge mobilization and mixing

    Terrones, G.; Eyler, L.L.

    1993-09-01

    This report presents and analyzes the results of the computer modeling of mixing and mobilization of sludge in horizontal, cylindrical storage tanks using submerged liquid jets. The computer modeling uses the TEMPEST computational fluid dynamics computer program. The horizontal, cylindrical storage tank configuration is similar to the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST) at Oak Ridge National (ORNL). The MVST tank contents exhibit non-homogeneous, non-Newtonian rheology characteristics. The eventual goals of the simulations are to determine under what conditions sludge mobilization using submerged liquid jets is feasible in tanks of this configuration, and to estimate mixing times required to approach homogeneity of the contents of the tanks

  10. ORNL diagnostic and modeling development for LAPD ICRF experiments

    Isler, R. C.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Lau, C.; Martin, E. H.; Perkins, R. J.; Compernolle, B. Van; Vincena, S.; Tripathi, S. K. P.; Gekelman, W.

    2017-10-01

    PPPL, UCLA, and ORNL scientists have recently collaborated on a three week ICRF campaign at the upgraded LAPD device to study near field-plasma interactions associated with a single strap antenna driven at 2.38 MHz with 100 kW of RF power. This poster highlights ORNL involvement through implementation of the following diagnostics: an optical emission probe to measure neutral density, a retarding field energy analyzer to measure fast ions, phase locked imaging to measure line integrated RF-driven optical emission fluctuations, and an RF compensated triple Langmuir probe to measure density and temperature. To interpret the results of the experimental campaign a 3D cold plasma finite element model with realistic antenna and vacuum vessel geometry was developed in COMSOL. A summary of these results will be discussed. Highlights include a proof of principle localized and spatially resolved measurement of the neutral density, a strong increase in RF-driven optical emission fluctuations directly in front of the RF antenna strap, a shift in fast ion energies near the plasma edge, and qualitative agreement between the COMSOL cold plasma model with the various diagnostics. Funded by the DOE OFES (DE-AC05-00OR22725, DE-AC02-09CH11466, and DE-FC02-07ER54918) and the Univ. of California (12-LR-237124).

  11. The ORNL Chemical Technology Division, 1950-1994

    Jolley, R.L.; Genung, R.K.; McNeese, L.E.; Mrochek, J.E.

    1994-10-01

    This document attempts to reconstruct the role played by the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the atomic era since the 1940`s related to the development and production of nuclear weapons and power reactors. Chem Tech`s early contributions were landmark pioneering studies. Unknown and dimly perceived problems like chemical hazards, radioactivity, and criticality had to be dealt with. New chemical concepts and processes had to be developed to test the new theories being developed by physicists. New engineering concepts had to be developed and demonstrated in order to build facilities and equipment that had never before been attempted. Chem Tech`s role was chemical separations, especially uranium and plutonium, and nuclear fuel reprocessing. With diversification of national and ORNL missions, Chem Tech undertook R&D studies in many areas including biotechnology; clinical and environmental chemistry; nuclear reactors; safety regulations; effective and safe waste management and disposal; computer modeling and informational databases; isotope production; and environmental control. The changing mission of Chem Tech are encapsulated in the evolving activities.

  12. Hardware implementation of the ORNL fissile mass flow monitor

    McEvers, J.; Sumner, J.; Jones, R.; Ferrell, R.; Martin, C.; Uckan, T.; March-Leuba, J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper provides an overall description of the implementation of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Fissile Mass Flow Monitor, which is part of a Blend Down Monitoring System (BDMS) developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The Fissile Mass Flow Monitor is designed to measure the mass flow of fissile material through a gaseous or liquid process stream. It consists of a source-modulator assembly, a detector assembly, and a cabinet that houses all control, data acquisition, and supporting electronics equipment. The development of this flow monitor was first funded by DOE/NE in September 95, and an initial demonstration by ORNL was described in previous INMM meetings. This methodology was chosen by DOE/NE for implementation in November 1996, and the hardware/software development is complete. Successful BDMS installation and operation of the complete BDMS has been demonstrated in the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), which is operated by Lockheed Martin Utility Services, Inc. for the US Enrichment Corporation and regulated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Equipment for two BDMS units has been shipped to the Russian Federation

  13. ORNL Remedial Action Program strategy (FY 1987-FY 1992)

    Trabalka, J.R.; Myrick, T.E.

    1987-12-01

    Over 40 years of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) operations have produced a diverse legacy of contaminated inactive facilities, research areas, and waste disposal areas that are potential candidates for remedial action. The ORNL Remedial Action Program (RAP) represents a comprehensive effort to meet new regulatory requirements and ensure adequate protection of on-site workers, the public, and the environment by providing appropriate corrective measures at over 130 sites contaminated historically with radioactive, hazardous chemical, or mixed wastes. A structured path of program planning, site characterization, alternatives assessment, technology development, engineering design, continued site maintenance and surveillance, interim corrective action, and eventual site closure or decommissioning is required to meet these objectives. This report documents the development of the Remedial Action Program, through its preliminary characterization, regulatory interface, and strategy development activities. It provides recommendations for a comprehensive, long-term strategy consistent with existing technical, institutional, and regulatory information, along with a six-year plan for achieving its initial objectives. 53 refs., 8 figs., 12 tabs

  14. Characterization of the BVEST waste tanks located at ORNL

    Keller, J.M.; Giaquinto, J.M.; Meeks, A.M.

    1997-01-01

    During the fall of 1996 there was a major effort to sample and analyze the Active Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) tanks at ORNL which include the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST) and the Bethel Valley Evaporator Service Tanks (BVEST). The characterization data summarized in this report was needed to address waste processing options, address concerns dealing with the performance assessment (PA) data for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), evaluate the waste characteristics with respect to the waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for WIPP and Nevada Test Site (NTS), address criticality concerns, and meet DOT requirements for transporting the waste. This report discusses the analytical characterization data for the supernatant and sludge in the BVEST waste tanks W-21, W-22, and W-23. The isotopic data presented in this report supports the position that fissile isotopes of uranium and plutonium were denatured as required by the administrative controls stated in the ORNL LLLW waste acceptance criteria (WAC). In general, the BVEST sludge was found to be hazardous based on RCRA characteristics and the transuranic alpha activity was well above the 100 nCi/g limit for TRU waste. The characteristics of the BVEST sludge relative to the WIPP WAC limits for fissile gram equivalent, plutonium equivalent activity, and thermal power from decay heat were estimated from the data in this report and found to be far below the upper boundary for any of the remote-handled transuranic waste (RH-TRU) requirements for disposal of the waste in WIPP

  15. Recent high-speed ballistics experiments at ORNL

    Combs, S.K.; Gouge, M.J.; Baylor, L.R.; Fisher, P.W.; Foster, C.A.; Foust, C.R.; Milora, S.L.; Qualls, A.L.

    1994-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing pellet injectors for plasma fueling experiments on magnetic confinement devices for almost 20 years. With these devices, pellets (1 to 8 mm in diameter) composed of hydrogen isotopes are formed (at temperatures <20 K) and typically accelerated to speeds of ∼ 1.0 to 2.0 km/s for injection into plasmas of experimental fusion devices. A variety of pellet injector designs have been developed at ORNL, including repeating pneumatic injectors (single- and multiple-barrel light gas guns) that can inject up to hundreds of pellets for long-pulse plasma operation. The repeating pneumatic injectors are of particular importance because long-pulse fueling is required for present large experimental fusion devices, with steady-state operation the objective for future fusion reactors. In this paper, recent advancements in the development of repeating pneumatic injectors are described, including (1) a small-bore (1.8-mm), high-firing-rate (10-Hz) version of a single-stage light gas gun; (2) a repeating single-stage light gas gun for 8-mm-diam tritium pellets; (3) a repeating two-stage light gas gun for operation at higher pellet velocities; and (4) a steady-state hydrogen extruder feed system

  16. Operation of the ORNL High Particle Flux Helicon Plasma Source

    Goulding, Richard Howell; Biewer, Theodore M.; Caughman, John B.; Chen, Guangye; Owen, Larry W.; Sparks, Dennis O.

    2011-01-01

    A high power, high particle flux rf-based helicon plasma source has been constructed at ORNL and operated at power levels up to 30 kW. High-density hydrogen and helium plasmas have been produced. The source has been designed as the basis for a linear plasma materials interaction (PMI) test facility that will generate particle fluxes Gamma(p) > 10(23) M-3 s(-1), and utilize additional ion and electron cyclotron heating to produce high parallel (to the magnetic field) heat fluxes of similar to 10 MW/m(2). An rf-based source for PMI research is of interest because high plasma densities are generated with no internal electrodes, allowing true steady state operation with minimal impurity generation. The ORNL helicon source has a diameter of 15 cm and to-date has operated at a frequency f = 13.56 MHz, with magnetic field strength vertical bar B vertical bar in the antenna region up to similar to 0.15 T. Maximum densities of 3 x 10(19) M-3 in He and 2.5 x 10(19) m(-3) in H have been achieved. Radial density profiles have been seen to be dependent on the axial vertical bar B vertical bar profile.

  17. Operation of the ORNL High Particle Flux Helicon Plasma Source

    Goulding, R. H.; Biewer, T. M.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Chen, G. C.; Owen, L. W.; Sparks, D. O.

    2011-01-01

    A high power, high particle flux rf-based helicon plasma source has been constructed at ORNL and operated at power levels up to 30 kW. High-density hydrogen and helium plasmas have been produced. The source has been designed as the basis for a linear plasma materials interaction (PMI) test facility that will generate particle fluxes Γ p 10 23 m -3 s -1 , and utilize additional ion and electron cyclotron heating to produce high parallel (to the magnetic field) heat fluxes of ∼10 MW/m 2 . An rf-based source for PMI research is of interest because high plasma densities are generated with no internal electrodes, allowing true steady state operation with minimal impurity generation. The ORNL helicon source has a diameter of 15 cm and to-date has operated at a frequency f = 13.56 MHz, with magnetic field strength |B| in the antenna region up to ∼0.15 T. Maximum densities of 3x10 19 m -3 in He and 2.5x10 19 m -3 in H have been achieved. Radial density profiles have been seen to be dependent on the axial |B| profile.

  18. ORNL superconducting technology program for electric energy systems

    Hawsey, R. A.

    1993-02-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Superconducting Technology Program is conducted as part of a national effort by the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy to develop the technology base needed by US industry for commercial development of electric power applications of high-temperature superconductivity. The two major elements of this program are wire development and systems development. This document describes the major research and development activities for this program together with related accomplishments. The technical progress reported was summarized from information prepared for the FY-92 Peer Review of Projects, which was conducted by DOE's Office of Program Analysis, Office of Energy Research. This ORNL program is highly leveraged by the staff and other resources of US industry and universities. Interlaboratory teams are also in place on a number of industry-driven projects. Patent disclosures, working group meetings, staff exchanges, and joint publications and presentations ensure that there is technology transfer to US industry. Working together, the collaborative teams are making tremendous progress in solving the scientific and technical issues necessary for the commercialization of long lengths of practical high-temperature superconductor wire and wire products.

  19. ORNL actinide materials and a new detection system for superheavy nuclei

    Rykaczewski Krzysztof P.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The actinide resources and production capabilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL are reviewed, including potential electromagnetic separation of rare radioactive materials. The first experiments at the Dubna Gas Filled Recoil Separator (DGFRS with a new digital detection system developed at ORNL and University of Tennessee Knoxville (UTK are presented. These studies used 240Pu material provided by ORNL and mixed-Cf targets made at ORNL. The proposal to use an enriched 251Cf target and a large dose of 58Fe beam to reach the N = 184 shell closure and to observe new elements with Z = 124, 122 and 120 is discussed.

  20. Strain and texture evolution of ED-rotated cubes during quasi-static and dynamic tensile testing of Al-Mg-Si-profiles in the as-extruded T1-temper condition

    Mathiesen, R.H.; Forbord, B.; Mardalen, J.; Furu, T.; Lange, H.I.

    2007-01-01

    High-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction has been used to study through-thickness deformation response in extruded Al-Mg-Si-profiles during tensile testing, in terms of micro- and mesoscopic distributions and dynamical evolution of elastic strains and grain rotations. Local averaging with analysis at intermediate length scales reveals strongly inhomogeneous through-profile elastic strains, caused by the presence of three distinct microstructure regions and the compatibility relations that apply at their interfaces. Variations in elastic strains at characteristic microstructure lengths are found to be large; typically 1σ Gaussian spreads for the different ε ij -components of the elastic strain tensor are minimal and of the order 1.0 x 10 -3 in the central profile region at low stresses. The spread increases with the tensile loads, but even more dramatically with decreasing distance to the surfaces where maximum 1σ spreads up to 6-7 x 10 -3 are encountered. The evolution and distribution of certain texture components have been analysed, showing grain rotations to be a non-negligible part of the deformation response that activates at quite modest plastic deformations. Inhomogeneous strain response at local and intermediate length scales together with the strain and texture component relations that apply across the microstructure region boundaries are found to be decisive to surface roughening. All together, the results point in the direction that strain and texture evolution should be considered together in order to provide a more complete description of microstructure mechanics in metals

  1. ORNL Trusted Corridors Project: Watts Bar Dam Inland Waterway Project

    Walker, Randy M.; Gross, Ian G.; Smith, Cyrus M.; Hill, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation has existed everywhere in the environment since the Earth's formation - in rocks, soil, water, and plants. The mining and processing of naturally occurring radioactive materials for use in medicine, power generation, consumer products, and industry inevitably generate emissions and waste. Radiological measuring devices have been used by industry for years to measure for radiation in undesired locations or simply identify radioactive materials. Since the terrorist attacks on the United States on 9-11-01 these radiation measuring devices have proliferated in many places in our nation's commerce system. DOE, TVA, the Army Corps and ORNL collaborated to test the usefulness of these devices in our nation's waterway system on this project. The purpose of the Watts Bar Dam ORNL Trusted Corridors project was to investigate the security, safety and enforcement needs of local, state and federal government entities for state-of-the-art sensor monitoring in regards to illegal cargo including utilization of the existing infrastructure. TVA's inland waterways lock system is a recognized and accepted infrastructure by the commercial carrier industry. Safety Monitoring activities included tow boat operators, commercial barges and vessels, recreational watercraft and their cargo, identification of unsafe vessels and carriers, and, monitoring of domestic and foreign commercial vessels and cargo identification. Safety Enforcement activities included cargo safety, tracking, identification of hazardous materials, waterway safety regulations, and hazardous materials regulations. Homeland Security and Law Enforcement Applications included Radiological Dispersive Devices (RDD) identification, identification of unsafe or illicit transport of hazardous materials including chemicals and radiological materials, and screening for shipments of illicit drugs. In the Fall of 2005 the SensorNet funding for the project expired. After several unsuccessful attempts to find a Federal sponsor

  2. ORNL Trusted Corridors Project: Watts Bar Dam Inland Waterway Project

    Walker, Randy M [ORNL; Gross, Ian G [ORNL; Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; Hill, David E [ORNL

    2011-11-01

    Radiation has existed everywhere in the environment since the Earth's formation - in rocks, soil, water, and plants. The mining and processing of naturally occurring radioactive materials for use in medicine, power generation, consumer products, and industry inevitably generate emissions and waste. Radiological measuring devices have been used by industry for years to measure for radiation in undesired locations or simply identify radioactive materials. Since the terrorist attacks on the United States on 9-11-01 these radiation measuring devices have proliferated in many places in our nation's commerce system. DOE, TVA, the Army Corps and ORNL collaborated to test the usefulness of these devices in our nation's waterway system on this project. The purpose of the Watts Bar Dam ORNL Trusted Corridors project was to investigate the security, safety and enforcement needs of local, state and federal government entities for state-of-the-art sensor monitoring in regards to illegal cargo including utilization of the existing infrastructure. TVA's inland waterways lock system is a recognized and accepted infrastructure by the commercial carrier industry. Safety Monitoring activities included tow boat operators, commercial barges and vessels, recreational watercraft and their cargo, identification of unsafe vessels and carriers, and, monitoring of domestic and foreign commercial vessels and cargo identification. Safety Enforcement activities included cargo safety, tracking, identification of hazardous materials, waterway safety regulations, and hazardous materials regulations. Homeland Security and Law Enforcement Applications included Radiological Dispersive Devices (RDD) identification, identification of unsafe or illicit transport of hazardous materials including chemicals and radiological materials, and screening for shipments of illicit drugs. In the Fall of 2005 the SensorNet funding for the project expired. After several unsuccessful attempts to

  3. Mechanical behavior and dynamic failure of high-strength ultrafine grained tungsten under uniaxial compression

    Wei, Q.; Jiao, T.; Ramesh, K.T.; Ma, E.; Kecskes, L.J.; Magness, L.; Dowding, R.; Kazykhanov, V.U.; Valiev, R.Z.

    2006-01-01

    We have systematically investigated the quasi-static and dynamic mechanical behavior (especially dynamic failure) of ultra-fine grained (UFG) tungsten (W) under uniaxial compression. The starting material is of commercial purity and large grain size. We utilized severe plastic deformation to achieve the ultrafine microstructure characterized by grains and subgrains with sizes of ∼500 nm, as identified by transmission electron microscopy. Results of quasi-static compression show that the UFG W behaves in an elastic-nearly perfect plastic manner (i.e., vanishing strain hardening), with its flow stress approaching 2 GPa, close to twice that of conventional coarse grain W. Post-mortem examinations of the quasi-statically loaded samples show no evidence of cracking, in sharp contrast to the behavior of conventional W (where axial cracking is usually observed). Under uniaxial dynamic compression (strain rate ∼10 3 s -1 ), the true stress-true strain curves of the UFG W exhibit significant flow softening, and the peak stress is ∼3 GPa. Furthermore, the strain rate sensitivity of the UFG W is reduced to half the value of the conventional W. Both in situ high-speed photography and post-mortem examinations reveal shear localization and as a consequence, cracking of the UFG W under dynamic uniaxial compression. These observations are consistent with recent observations on other body-centered cubic metals with nanocrystalline or ultrafine microstructures. The experimental results are discussed using existing models for adiabatic shear localization in metals

  4. Historical releases of radioactivity to the environment from ORNL

    Ohnesorge, W.F.

    1986-05-01

    This report gives a brief history and assessment of ORNL radionuclide releases to the environment. A short history and an inventory of radioactivity disposed of by shallow land burial and hydrofracture techniques are given along with a brief discussion of the potential environmental impact of these disposed materials. The data available for this report varied greatly in quality. Data on contaminated liquid waste and liquids discharged to the environment are much more reliable than early data on contaminated air discharges and contaminated solid waste. Data for more recent years are more complete and reliable than data obtained from records dating back to the early history of the laboratory. The data presented here do not include materials retrievably stored (with the exception of uranium solid waste data) or inventories of materials stored in operating or surplus facilities since these materials presently have no contact with or loss to the environment

  5. Recent activities at the ORNL multicharged ion research facility (MIRF)

    Meyer, F.W.; Bannister, M.E.; Hale, J.W.; Havener, C.C.; Krause, H.F.; Vane, C.R.; Deng, S.; Draganic, I.N.; Harris, P.R.

    2012-01-01

    Recent activities at the ORNL Multicharged Ion Research Facility (MIRF) are summarized. A brief summary of the MIRF high voltage (HV) platform and floating beam line upgrade is provided. An expansion of our research program to the use of molecular ion beams in heavy-particle and electron collisions, as well as in ion surface interactions is described, and a brief description is provided of the most recently added Ion Cooling and Characterization End-station (ICCE) trap. With the expansion to include molecular ion beams, the acronym MIRF for the facility, however, remains unchanged: 'M' can now refer to either 'Multicharged' or 'Molecular'. The paper is followed by the slides of the presentation. (authors)

  6. Recent Astrophysical Studies with Exotic Beams at ORNL

    Bardayan, Daniel W [ORNL

    2006-02-01

    The availability of exotic beams has produced great opportunities for advances in our understanding of the nucleosynthesis occurring in stellar burning and stellar explosions such as novae, X-ray bursts, and supernovae. In these extreme environments, synthesized radioactive nuclei can undergo subsequent nuclear processing before they decay, and thus to understand these events, we must understand reaction rates involving radioactive nuclei. At the ORNL Holi led Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF), we have made several recent measurements using proton-rich beams such as 18F and 7Be and neutron-rich beams such as 82Ge and 84Se that help clarify the structure of astrophysically-important nuclei. We are also poised to begin studies with doubly-magic 132Sn. The experimental methods and results are discussed.

  7. Recent Astrophysical Studies with Exotic Beams at ORNL

    Bardayan, Daniel W.

    2006-01-01

    The availability of exotic beams has produced great opportunities for advances in our understanding of the nucleosynthesis occurring in stellar burning and stellar explosions such as novae, X-ray bursts, and supernovae. In these extreme environments, synthesized radioactive nuclei can undergo subsequent nuclear processing before they decay, and thus to understand these events, we must understand reaction rates involving radioactive nuclei. At the ORNL Holi led Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF), we have made several recent measurements using proton-rich beams such as 18F and 7Be and neutron-rich beams such as 82Ge and 84Se that help clarify the structure of astrophysically-important nuclei. We are also poised to begin studies with doubly-magic 132Sn. The experimental methods and results are discussed.

  8. Rheology and TIC/TOC results of ORNL tank samples

    Pareizs, J. M.; Hansen, E. K.

    2013-01-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL)) was requested by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to perform total inorganic carbon (TIC), total organic carbon (TOC), and rheological measurements for several Oak Ridge tank samples. As received slurry samples were diluted and submitted to SRNL-Analytical for TIC and TOC analyses. Settled solids yield stress (also known as settled shear strength) of the as received settled sludge samples were determined using the vane method and these measurements were obtained 24 hours after the samples were allowed to settled undisturbed. Rheological or flow properties (Bingham Plastic viscosity and Bingham Plastic yield stress) were determined from flow curves of the homogenized or well mixed samples. Other targeted total suspended solids (TSS) concentrations samples were also analyzed for flow properties and these samples were obtained by diluting the as-received sample with de-ionized (DI) water

  9. Capability of the electromagnetic isotope-enrichment facility at ORNL

    Newman, E.

    1982-01-01

    The isotope separation program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) prepares and distributes electromagnetically enriched stable isotopes to the worldwide scientific community. Among the topics discussed in the present paper are the methods of enriching isotopes, the limitations that apply to the quantity and final assay of the separation products, and a generalized production flowsheet indicating the capability of the facility. A brief description of each of the production steps, from the selection and preparation of initial feedstock to the recovery and distribution of the isotopically enriched material, is presented. The future of the facility, the continued supply of enriched isotopes, and the response of the program to new and changing requirements are emphasized

  10. Geophysical investigations at ORNL solid waste storage area 3

    Rothschild, E.R.; Switek, J.; Llopis, J.L.; Farmer, C.D.

    1985-07-01

    Geophysical investigations at ORNL solid waste storage area 3 have been carried out. The investigations included very-low-frequency-electromagnetic resistivity (VLF-EM), electrical resistivity, and seismic refraction surveys. The surveys resulted in the measurement of basic geophysical rock properties, as well as information on the depth of weathering and the configuration of the bedrock surface beneath the study area. Survey results also indicate that a number of geophysical anomalies occur in the shallow subsurface at the site. In particular, a linear feature running across the geologic strike in the western half of the waste disposal facility has been identified. This feature may conduct water in the subsurface. The geophysical investigations are part of an ongoing effort to characterize the site's hydrogeology, and the data presented will be valuable in directing future drilling and investigations at the site. 10 refs., 6 figs

  11. Review of human factors in operator aids development at ORNL

    Sides, W.H. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Three related Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) projects in the area of human factors in diagnostic aids are described. The goal of the first, sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI RP2184), is to provide guidance to nuclear-utility engineers in the selection and retrofit of computer-generated display systems in nuclear-plant control rooms. The goal of the second, sponsored by the Office of Research of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), is to provide the NRC with a preview of some of the operator aids currently under development by industry for the purpose of assessing the applicability of current requirements. The goal of the third, also sponsored by the NRC, is to develop a methodology to determine the proper allocation of function between an operator and an automated system. The status of each project is given, together with the current and expected findings

  12. ICH antenna development on the ORNL RF Test Facility

    Gardner, W.L.; Bigelow, T.S.; Haste, G.R.; Hoffman, D.J.; Livesey, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    A compact resonant loop antenna is installed on the ORNL Radio Frequency Test Facility (RFTF). Facility characteristics include a steady-state magnetic field of ∼ 0.5 T at the antenna, microwave-generated plasmas with n e ∼ 10 12 cm -3 and T e ∼ 8 eV, and 100 kW of 25-MHz rf power. The antenna is tunable from ∼22--75 MHz, is designed to handle ≥1 MW of rf power, and can be moved 5 cm with respect to the port flange. Antenna characteristics reported and discussed include the effect of magnetic field on rf voltage breakdown at the capacitor, the effects of magnetic field and plasma on rf voltage breakdown between the radiating element and the Faraday shield, the effects of graphite on Faraday shield losses, and the efficiency of coupling to the plasma. 2 refs., 4 figs

  13. ORNL shielded facilities capable of remote handling of highly radioactive beta--gamma emitting materials

    Whitson, W.R.

    1977-09-01

    A survey of ORNL facilities having adequate shielding and containment for the remote handling of experimental quantities of highly radioactive beta-gamma emitting materials is summarized. Portions of the detailed descriptions of these facilities previously published in ORNL/TM-1268 are still valid and are repeated

  14. Accurate quasi static capacitance for abrupt homojunction under ...

    for the design and optimization of all these semiconductor devices (Mazhari and Mahajan ... Author for correspondence (boukredimidjamel@yahoo.fr). (holes and ..... Ghandi S K 1968 Theory and practice of microelectronics. (New York: Wiley).

  15. Inherent Conservatism in Deterministic Quasi-Static Structural Analysis

    Verderaime, V.

    1997-01-01

    The cause of the long-suspected excessive conservatism in the prevailing structural deterministic safety factor has been identified as an inherent violation of the error propagation laws when reducing statistical data to deterministic values and then combining them algebraically through successive structural computational processes. These errors are restricted to the applied stress computations, and because mean and variations of the tolerance limit format are added, the errors are positive, serially cumulative, and excessively conservative. Reliability methods circumvent these errors and provide more efficient and uniform safe structures. The document is a tutorial on the deficiencies and nature of the current safety factor and of its improvement and transition to absolute reliability.

  16. Electromagnetic angular momentum in quasi-static conditions

    Jiménez, J. L.; Campos, I.; E Roa-Neri, J. A.

    2017-07-01

    The correct definition of electromagnetic momentum in matter, either Abraham’s g A = (1/4πc) (E × H), or Minkowski’s g M = (1/4πc) (D × B) has been a theme of controversy for a century. Therefore, we can find those who favor one or the other of these proposals. We present here an alternative view, considering that both of the aforementioned equations are equivalent since they pertain to different balance equations derived from the macroscopic Maxwell equations. This is done through their application to a device proposed by Lai in 1980, and recovering his results. Advanced undergraduate and graduate students can find in this work an introduction to a controversial issue and an alternative point of view about it.

  17. Isogeometric Shape Optimization for Quasi-static and Transient Problems

    Wang, Z.P.

    2016-01-01

    The recently developed isogeometric analysis (IGA) was aimed, from the start, at integrating computer aided design (CAD) and analysis. This synthesis of geometry and analysis has naturally led to renewed interest in developing structural shape optimization. The advantages of using isogeometric

  18. Effect of strain rate and notch geometry on tensile properties and fracture mechanism of creep strength enhanced ferritic P91 steel

    Pandey, Chandan; Mahapatra, M. M.; Kumar, Pradeep; Saini, N.

    2018-01-01

    Creep strength enhanced ferritic (CSEF) P91 steel were subjected to room temperature tensile test for quasi-static (less than 10-1/s) strain rate by using the Instron Vertical Tensile Testing Machine. Effect of different type of notch geometry, notch depth and angle on mechanical properties were also considered for different strain rate. In quasi-static rates, the P91 steel showed a positive strain rate sensitivity. On the basis of tensile data, fracture toughness of P91 steel was also calculated numerically. For 1 mm notch depth (constant strain rate), notch strength and fracture toughness were found to be increased with increase in notch angle from 45° to 60° while the maximum value attained in U-type notch. Notch angle and notch depth has found a minute effect on P91 steel strength and fracture toughness. The fracture surface morphology was studied by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM).

  19. Structural analysis of ORNL underground gunite waste storage tanks

    Fricke, K.E.

    1995-01-01

    The North Tank Farm (NTF) and the South Tank Farm (STF) located at ORNL contains 8 underground waste storage tanks which were built around 1943. The tanks were used to collect and store the liquid portion of the radioactive and/or hazardous chemical wastes produced as part of normal facility operations at ORNL, but are no longer part of the active Low Level Liquid Waste system of the Laboratory. The tanks were constructed of gunite. The six STF tanks are 50 ft in diameter, and have a 12 ft sidewall, and an arched dome rising another 6.25 ft. The sidewall are 6 in. thick and have an additional 1.5 in. gunite liner on the inside. There is a thickened ring at the wall-dome juncture. The dome consists of two 5 in. layers of gunite. The two tanks in the NTF are similar, but smaller, having a 25 ft diameter, no inner liner, and a dome thickness of 3.5 in. Both sets of tanks have welded wire mesh and vertical rebars in the walls, welded wire mesh in the domes, and horizontal reinforcing hoop bars pre-tensioned to 35 to 40 ksi stress in the walls and thickened ring. The eight tanks are entirely buried under a 6 ft layer of soil cover. The present condition of the tanks is not accurately known, since access to them is extremely limited. In order to evaluate the structural capability of the tanks, a finite element analysis of each size tank was performed. Both static and seismic loads were considered. Three sludge levels, empty, half-full, and full were evaluated. In the STF analysis, the effects of wall deterioration and group spacing were evaluated. These analyses found that the weakest element in the tanks is the steel resisting the circumferential (or hoop) forces in the dome ring, a fact verified separately by an independent reviewer. However, the hoop steel has an adequate demand/capacity ratio. Buckling of the dome and the tank walls is not a concern

  20. Building a Trustworthy Environmental Science Data Repository: Lessons Learned from the ORNL DAAC

    Wei, Y.; Santhana Vannan, S. K.; Boyer, A.; Beaty, T.; Deb, D.; Hook, L.

    2017-12-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center (ORNL DAAC, https://daac.ornl.gov) for biogeochemical dynamics is one of NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) data centers. The mission of the ORNL DAAC is to assemble, distribute, and provide data services for a comprehensive archive of terrestrial biogeochemistry and ecological dynamics observations and models to facilitate research, education, and decision-making in support of NASA's Earth Science. Since its establishment in 1994, ORNL DAAC has been continuously building itself into a trustworthy environmental science data repository by not only ensuring the quality and usability of its data holdings, but also optimizing its data publication and management process. This paper describes the lessons learned from ORNL DAAC's effort toward this goal. ORNL DAAC has been proactively implementing international community standards throughout its data management life cycle, including data publication, preservation, discovery, visualization, and distribution. Data files in standard formats, detailed documentation, and metadata following standard models are prepared to improve the usability and longevity of data products. Assignment of a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) ensures the identifiability and accessibility of every data product, including the different versions and revisions of its life cycle. ORNL DAAC's data citation policy assures data producers receive appropriate recognition of use of their products. Web service standards, such as OpenSearch and Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC), promotes the discovery, visualization, distribution, and integration of ORNL DAAC's data holdings. Recently, ORNL DAAC began efforts to optimize and standardize its data archival and data publication workflows, to improve the efficiency and transparency of its data archival and management processes.

  1. ORNL long-range environmental and waste management plan

    Baldwin, J.S.; Bates, L.D.; Brown, C.H.; Easterday, C.A.; Hill, L.G.; Kendrick, C.M.; McNeese, L.E.; Myrick, T.E.; Payne, T.L.; Pepper, C.E.; Robinson, S.M.; Rohwer, P.S.; Scanlan, T.F.; Smith, M.A.; Stratton, L.E.; Trabalka, J.R.

    1989-09-01

    This report, the ORNL Long-Range Environmental and Waste Management Plan, is the annual update in a series begun in fiscal year 1985. Its primary purpose is to provide a thorough and systematic planning document to reflect the continuing process of site assessment, strategy development, and planning for the current and long-term control of environmental issues, waste management practices, and remedial action requirements. The document also provides an estimate of the resources required to implement the current plan. This document is not intended to be a budget document; it is, however, intended to provide guidance to both Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., and the US Department of Energy (DOE) management as to the near order of magnitude of the resources (primarily funding requirements) and the time frame required to execute the strategy in the present revision of the plan. As with any document of this nature, the near-term (one to three years) part of the plan is a pragmatic assessment of the current program and ongoing capital projects and reflects the efforts perceived to be necessary to comply with all current state and federal regulations and DOE orders. It also should be in general agreement with current budget (funding) requests and obligations for these immediate years. 55 figs., 72 tabs

  2. Characterization of the MVST waste tanks located at ORNL

    Keller, J.M.; Giaquinto, J.M.; Meeks, A.M.

    1996-12-01

    During the fall of 1996 there was a major effort to sample and analyze the Active Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) tanks at ORNL which include the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST) and the Bethel Valley Evaporator Service Tanks (BVEST). The characterization data summarized in this report was needed to address waste processing options, address concerns of the performance assessment (PA) data for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), evaluate the characteristics with respect to the waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for WIPP and Nevada Test Site (NTS), address criticality concerns, and meet DOT requirements for transporting the waste. This report only discusses the analytical characterization data for the MVST waste tanks. The isotopic data presented in this report support the position that fissile isotopes of uranium and plutonium were ``denatured`` as required by administrative controls. In general, MVST sludge was found to be both hazardous by RCRA characteristics and the transuranic alpha activity was well about the limit for TRU waste. The characteristics of the MVST sludge relative to the WIPP WAC limits for fissile gram equivalent, plutonium equivalent activity, and thermal power from decay heat, were estimated from the data in this report and found to be far below the upper boundary for any of the remote-handled transuranic waste requirements for disposal of the waste in WIPP.

  3. ORNL long-range environmental and waste management plan

    Baldwin, J.S.; Bates, L.D.; Brown, C.H.; Easterday, C.A.; Hill, L.G.; Kendrick, C.M.; McNeese, L.E.; Myrick, T.E.; Payne, T.L.; Pepper, C.E.; Robinson, S.M.; Rohwer, P.S.; Scanlan, T.F.; Smith, M.A.; Stratton, L.E.; Trabalka, J.R.

    1989-09-01

    This report, the ORNL Long-Range Environmental and Waste Management Plan, is the annual update in a series begun in fiscal year 1985. Its primary purpose is to provide a thorough and systematic planning document to reflect the continuing process of site assessment, strategy development, and planning for the current and long-term control of environmental issues, waste management practices, and remedial action requirements. The document also provides an estimate of the resources required to implement the current plan. This document is not intended to be a budget document; it is, however, intended to provide guidance to both Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., and the US Department of Energy (DOE) management as to the near order of magnitude of the resources (primarily funding requirements) and the time frame required to execute the strategy in the present revision of the plan. As with any document of this nature, the near-term (one to three years) part of the plan is a pragmatic assessment of the current program and ongoing capital projects and reflects the efforts perceived to be necessary to comply with all current state and federal regulations and DOE orders. It also should be in general agreement with current budget (funding) requests and obligations for these immediate years. 55 figs., 72 tabs.

  4. Electrode design and performance of the ORNL positive ion sources

    Whealton, J.H.; Gardner, W.L.; Haselton, H.H.

    1981-08-01

    The neutral beam development group at ORNL has designed, constructed, and shipped four 50-kV, 100-A sources to PPL to be used for neutral beam heating of the confined plasma on the PDX tokamak. These sources have higher current capability than scaled-down sources, and they are required to run for 0.5 s as opposed to the 0.3-s requirement for PLT and ISX-B sources. Due to an innovative electrode design, these higher power sources met these requirements and achieved a higher transmission efficiency - 76% of the total input power on target vs 60% for the original ISX-B and modified PLT sources or 40% for the original PLT sources. Using the same electrode design with a tetrode accelerating structure and a new, indirectly heated cathode, repeatable long pulse, high energy conditions of 70 kV, 7 A, 8 s, and 90 kV, 9 A, 5 s were achieved. Grid deformation calculations and Monte Carlo beam line gas deposition algorithms will be discussed. A direct-magnetic-electron-blocking, direct-recovery device is described, and theoretical considerations of it are discussed

  5. Design for the National RF Test Facility at ORNL

    Gardner, W.L.; Hoffman, D.J.; Becraft, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    Conceptual and preliminary engineering design for the National RF Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been completed. The facility will comprise a single mirror configuration embodying two superconducting development coils from the ELMO Bumpy Torus Proof-of-Principle (EBT-P) program on either side of a cavity designed for full-scale antenna testing. The coils are capable of generating a 1.2-T field at the axial midpoint between the coils separated by 1.0 m. The vacuum vessel will be a stainless steel, water-cooled structure having an 85-cm-radius central cavity. The facility will have the use of a number of continuous wave (cw), radio-frequency (rf) sources at levels including 600 kW at 80 MHz and 100 kW at 28 GHz. Several plasma sources will provide a wide range of plasma environments, including densities as high as approx. 5 x 10 13 cm -3 and temperatures on the order of approx. 10 eV. Furthermore, a wide range of diagnostics will be available to the experimenter for accurate appraisal of rf testing

  6. Treatment options for low-level radiologically contaminated ORNL filtercake

    Lee, Hom-Ti; Bostick, W.D.

    1996-04-01

    Water softening sludge (>4000 stored low level contaminated drums; 600 drums per year) generated by the ORNL Process Waste Treatment Plant must be treated, stabilized, and placed in safe storage/disposal. The sludge is primarily CaCO 3 and is contaminated by low levels of 90 Sr and 137 Cs. In this study, microwave sintering and calcination were evaluated for treating the sludge. The microwave melting experiments showed promise: volume reductions were significant (3-5X), and the waste form was durable with glass additives (LiOH, fly ash). A commercial vendor using surrogate has demonstrated a melt mineralization process that yields a dense monolithic waste form with a volume reduction factor (VR) of 7.7. Calcination of the sludge at 850-900 C yielded a VR of 2.5. Compaction at 4500 psi increased the VR to 4.2, but the compressed form is not dimensionally stable. Addition of paraffin helped consolidate fines and yielded a VR of 3.5. In conclusion, microwave melting or another form of vitrification is likely to be the best method; however for immediate implementation, the calculation/compaction/waxing process is viable

  7. Characterization of the MVST waste tanks located at ORNL

    Keller, J.M.; Giaquinto, J.M.; Meeks, A.M.

    1996-12-01

    During the fall of 1996 there was a major effort to sample and analyze the Active Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) tanks at ORNL which include the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST) and the Bethel Valley Evaporator Service Tanks (BVEST). The characterization data summarized in this report was needed to address waste processing options, address concerns of the performance assessment (PA) data for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), evaluate the characteristics with respect to the waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for WIPP and Nevada Test Site (NTS), address criticality concerns, and meet DOT requirements for transporting the waste. This report only discusses the analytical characterization data for the MVST waste tanks. The isotopic data presented in this report support the position that fissile isotopes of uranium and plutonium were ''denatured'' as required by administrative controls. In general, MVST sludge was found to be both hazardous by RCRA characteristics and the transuranic alpha activity was well about the limit for TRU waste. The characteristics of the MVST sludge relative to the WIPP WAC limits for fissile gram equivalent, plutonium equivalent activity, and thermal power from decay heat, were estimated from the data in this report and found to be far below the upper boundary for any of the remote-handled transuranic waste requirements for disposal of the waste in WIPP

  8. Analysis of dependent failures in the ORNL precursor study

    Ballard, G.M.

    1985-01-01

    The study of dependent failures (or common cause/mode failures) in the safety assessment of potentially hazardous plant is one of the significant areas of uncertainty in performing probabilistic safety studies. One major reason for this uncertainty is that data on dependent failures is apparently not readily available in sufficient quantity to assist in the development and validation of models. The incident reports that were compiled for the ORNL study on Precursors to Severe Core Damage Accidents (NUREG/CR-2497) provide an opportunity to look at the importance of dependent failures in the most significant incidents of recent reactor operations, to look at the success of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods in accounting for the contribution of dependent failures, and to look at the dependent failure incidents with the aim of identifying the most significant problem areas. In this paper an analysis has been made of the incidents compiled in NUREG/CR-2497 and events involving multiple failures which were not independent have been identified. From this analysis it is clear that dependent failures are a very significant contributor to the precursor incidents. The method of enumeration of accident frequency used in NUREG-2497 can be shown to take account of dependent failures and this may be a significant factor contributing to the apparent difference between the precursor accident frequency and typical PRA frequencies

  9. Safety analysis report for packaging: the ORNL DOT specification 6M - tritium trap package

    DeVore, J.R.

    1984-04-01

    The ORNL DOT Specification 6M--Tritium Trap Package was fabricated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the transport of Type B quantities of tritium as solid uranium tritide. The package was evaluated on the basis of tests performed by the Dow Chemical Company, Rocky Flats Division, on the DOT-6M container, a drop test performed by the ORNL Operations Division, and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) approvals on a similar tritium transport container. The results of these evaluations demonstrate that the package is in compliance with the applicable regulations for the transport of Type B quantities of tritium. 4 references, 8 figures

  10. Safety analysis report for packaging: the ORNL DOT specification 6M - special form package

    Schaich, R.W.

    1982-07-01

    The ORNL DOT Specification 6M - Special Form Package was fabricated at the Oak Ridge Nation al Laboratory (ORNL) for the transport of Type B solid non-fissile radioactive materials in special form. The package was evaluated on the basis of tests performed by the Dow Chemical Company, Rocky Flats Division, on the DOT-6M container and special form tests performed on a variety of stainless steel capsules at ORNL by Operations Division personnel. The results of these evaluations demonstrate that the package is in compliance with the applicable regulations for the transport of Type B quantities in special form of non-fissile radioactive materials.

  11. Safety analysis report for packaging: the ORNL DOT specification 6M - special form package

    Schaich, R.W.

    1982-07-01

    The ORNL DOT Specification 6M - Special Form Package was fabricated at the Oak Ridge Nation al Laboratory (ORNL) for the transport of Type B solid non-fissile radioactive materials in special form. The package was evaluated on the basis of tests performed by the Dow Chemical Company, Rocky Flats Division, on the DOT-6M container and special form tests performed on a variety of stainless steel capsules at ORNL by Operations Division personnel. The results of these evaluations demonstrate that the package is in compliance with the applicable regulations for the transport of Type B quantities in special form of non-fissile radioactive materials

  12. Year One Summary of X-energy Pebble Fuel Development at ORNL

    Helmreich, Grant W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hunn, John D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McMurray, Jake W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hunt, Rodney D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jolly, Brian C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Trammell, Michael P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brown, Daniel R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Blamer, Brandon J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Reif, Tyler J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kim, Howard T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-06-01

    The Advanced Reactor Concepts X-energy (ARC-Xe) Pebble Fuel Development project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has successfully completed its first year, having made excellent progress in accomplishing programmatic objectives. The primary focus of research at ORNL in support of X-energy has been the training of X-energy fuel fabrication engineers and the establishment of US pebble fuel production capabilities able to supply the Xe-100 pebble-bed reactor. These efforts have been strongly supported by particle fuel fabrication and characterization expertise present at ORNL from the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program.

  13. Bat Acoustic Survey Report for ORNL: Bat Species Distribution on the Oak Ridge Reservation

    McCracken, Kitty [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Giffen, Neil R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Haines, Angelina [XCEL Engineering Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Guge, B. J. [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States); Evans, James W. [Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA), Nashville, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    This report summarizes results of a three-year acoustic survey of bat species on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The survey was implemented through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Natural Resources Management Program and included researchers from the ORNL Environmental Sciences Division and ORNL Facilities and Operations Directorate, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency’s ORR wildlife manager, a student from Tennessee Technological University, and a technician contracted through Excel Corp. One hundred and twenty-six sites were surveyed reservation-wide using Wildlife Acoustics SM2+ Acoustic Bat Detectors.

  14. Development of stair-climbing mechanism with passive crawlers. Analysis of limitation for crawler rotation angle and test vehicle performance

    Hirasawa, Junji; Kimura, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a novel mechanism with passive crawlers that will realize a stair-climbing rescue robot with simple system. The proposed mechanism is called 'SMART-III', it is named after 'Simple Mechanism Adaptive for Rough Terrain'. Some quasi-static dynamic analysis were implemented and effectiveness of limitation for crawler rotation angle were verified. A prototype robot with the SMART-III mechanism had been improved. Experimental results show the effectiveness and performance of the proposed mechanism against a step and continuous stairs. (author)

  15. Preliminary analysis of the ORNL Liquid Low-Level Waste system

    Abraham, T.J.; DePaoli, S.M.; Robinson, S.M.; Walker, A.B.

    1994-08-01

    The objective of this report is to summarize the status of the Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) Systems Analysis project. The focus of this project has been to collect and tabulate data concerning the LLLW system, analyze the current LLLW system operation, and develop the information necessary for the development of long-term treatment options for the LLLW generated at ORNL. The data used in this report were collected through a survey of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) literature, various letter reports, and a survey of all current LLLW generators. These data are also being compiled in a user friendly database for ORNL-wide distribution. The database will allow the quick retrieval of all information collected on the ORNL LLLW system and will greatly benefit any LLLW analysis effort. This report summarizes the results for the analyses performed to date on the LLLW system

  16. ORNLs Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2010 Annual Report

    None, None

    2011-03-01

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, “Laboratory Directed Research and Development” (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE’s requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries of all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2010. The associated FY 2010 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2011/2) provides financial data and an internal evaluation of the program’s management process.

  17. ORNLs Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2009 Annual Report

    None, None

    2010-03-01

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, “Laboratory Directed Research and Development” (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE’s requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2009. The associated FY 2009 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2010/2) provides financial data and an internal evaluation of the program’s management process.

  18. ORNLs Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2008 Annual Report

    None, None

    2009-03-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, “Laboratory Directed Research and Development” (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE’s requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2008. The associated FY 2008 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2008/2) provides financial data and an internal evaluation of the program’s management process.

  19. ORNLs Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2013 Annual Report

    None, None

    2014-03-01

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reports its status to the US Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, “Laboratory Directed Research and Development” (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE’s requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries of all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2013. The associated FY 2013 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2014/2) provides financial data and an internal evaluation of the program’s management process.

  20. ORNLs Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2012 Annual Report

    None, None

    2013-03-01

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reports its status to the US Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, “Laboratory Directed Research and Development” (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE’s requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries of all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2012. The associated FY 2012 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2012/2) provides financial data and an internal evaluation of the program’s management process.

  1. ORNLs Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2011 Annual Report

    None, None

    2012-03-01

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, “Laboratory Directed Research and Development” (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE’s requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries of all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2011. The associated FY 2011 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2012/2) provides financial data and an internal evaluation of the program’s management process.

  2. Site characterization of ORNL D ampersand D facilities

    Kelsey, A.P.; Mandry, G.J.; Haghighi, M.H.

    1994-01-01

    Site characterization for decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) planning purposes was done for two surplus facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in late 1993 and early 1994. This site characterization includes measurements of radiological and chemical contaminants, assessment of general structural conditions, and investigation of unknown conditions within the buildings. It will serve as input to decisions on D ampersand D engineering, D ampersand D task sequences, radiological and contamination control, and waste management. This paper presents the methods used to investigate these facilities and discusses the preliminary results as they apply to D ampersand D planning. Investigation methods include gross alpha, beta, and gamma surveys; directional gamma surveys; gamma spectroscopy; concrete coring; photography; and collection of soil and miscellaneous samples that are analyzed for radiological and chemical contaminants. Data will be analyzed using radiological models to sort sources and estimate exposure rates and waste volumes due to D ampersand D. The former Waste Evaporator Facility (WEF), consisting of two concrete cells and an operating gallery, once contained a liquid radwaste evaporator. Subsequently it was used for an incinerator experiment and as a dressing area for remediation work on an adjacent tank farm. The building has been partially decontaminated. Figure 1 is a photograph of the WEF. The Fission Product Pilot Plant (FPPP) is a small concrete building containing two cells. It was used to extract isotopes of ruthenium, strontium, cesium, cerium, and other elements from liquid waste. This facility is highly contaminated. In 1960 all doors into FPPP were sealed with concrete block and mortar, and concrete block shielding was added to the external walls making them up to five feet thick. Prior to this study, almost nothing was known about the interior of this building

  3. ORNL facilities for testing first-wall components

    Tsai, C.C.; Becraft, W.R.; Gardner, W.L.; Haselton, H.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Menon, M.M.; Stirling, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    Future long-impulse magnetic fusion devices will have operating characteristics similar to those described in the design studies of the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX), the Fusion Engineering Device (FED), and the International Tokamak Reactor (INTOR). Their first-wall components (pumped limiters, divertor plates, and rf waveguide launchers with Faraday shields) will be subjected to intense bombardment by energetic particles exhausted from the plasma, including fusion products. These particles are expected to have particle energies of approx.100 eV, particle fluxes of approx.10 18 cm -2 .s -1 , and heat fluxes of approx.1 kW/cm 2 CW to approx.100 kW/cm 2 transient. No components are available to simultaneously handle these particle and heat fluxes, survive the resulting sputtering erosion, and remove exhaust gas without degrading plasma quality. Critical issues for research and development of first-wall components have been identified in the INTOR Activity. Test facilities are needed to qualify candidate materials and develop components. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), existing neutral beam and wave heating test facilities can be modified to simulate first-wall environments with heat fluxes up to 30 kW/cm 2 , particle fluxes of approx.10 18 cm -2 .s -1 , and pulse lengths up to 30 s, within test volumes up to approx.100 L. The characteristics of these test facilities are described, with particular attention to the areas of particle flux, heat flux, particle energy, pulse length, and duty cycle, and the potential applications of these facilities for first-wall component development are discussed

  4. History of target making activities at ORNL from 1957 to 1996

    Adair, H.L.

    1997-01-01

    A history of the target-making activities at the Oak Ridge national laboratory from 1957 to the present is detailed. The history includes the impetus for initiating such an activity at ORNL as well as a summary of the target-making activities in the 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, and thus far, in the 1990s. Some of the major accomplishments of the ORNL target program will be described. (orig.)

  5. CRADA Final Report for CRADA Number ORNL98-0521 : Development of an Electric Bus Inverter Based on ORNL Auxiliary Resonant Tank (ART) Soft-Switching Technology; TOPICAL

    Ayers, C.W.

    2001-01-01

    The Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has for many years been developing technologies for power converters for motor drives and many other applications. Some of the research goals are to improve efficiency and reduce audible and electromagnetic interference noise generation for inverters and the driven loads. The converters are being required to produce more power with reduced weight and volume, which requires improvements in heat removal from the electronics, as well as improved circuit designs that have fewer electrical losses. PEEMRC has recently developed and patented a soft-switching inverter topology called an Auxiliary Resonant Tank (ART), and this design has been tested and proven at ORNL using a 10-kW laboratory prototype. The objective of this project was to develop, test, and install the ART inverter technology in an electric transit bus with the final goal of evaluating performance of the ORNL inverter under field conditions in a vehicle. A scaled-up inverter with the capacity to drive a 22-e bus was built based on the 10-kW ORNL laboratory prototype ART soft-switching inverter. Most (if not all) commercially available inverters for traction drive and other applications use hard-switching inverters. A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement was established with the Chattanooga Area Regional Transit Authority (CARTA), the Electric Transit Vehicle Institute (ETVI), and Advanced Vehicle Systems (AVS), all of Chattanooga, along with ORNL. CARTA, which maintains and operates the public transit system in Chattanooga, provided an area for testing the vehicle alongside other similar vehicles in the normal operating environment. ETVI offers capabilities in standardized testing and reporting and also provides exposure in the electric transit vehicle arena for ORNL's technologies. The third Chattanooga partner, (AVS) manufactures all-electric and hybrid electric transit buses using

  6. Performance and applications of the ORNL local electrode atom probe

    Miller, M.K.; Russell, K.F.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The commercial introduction in 2003 of the local electrode atom probe (LEAP) developed by Imago Scientific Instruments has made dramatic, orders of magnitude improvements in the data acquisition rate and the size of the analyzed volume compared to previous types of three-dimensional atom probes and other scanning atom probes. This state-of-the-art instrument may be used for the analysis of traditional needle-shaped specimens and specimens fabricated from 'flat' specimens with focused ion beam (FIB) techniques. The advantage of this local electrode configuration is that significantly lower (∼50 %) standing and pulse voltages are required to produce the field strength required to field evaporate ions from the specimen. New high speed (200 kHz) pulse generators coupled with crossed delay line detectors and faster timing systems also enable significantly faster (up to 300 times) data acquisition rates to be achieved. This new design also permits a significantly larger field of view to be analyzed and results in data sets containing up to 10 8 atoms. In the local electrode atom probe, a ∼10-50 μm diameter aperture is typically positioned approximately one aperture diameter in front of the specimen. In order to accurately align the specimen to the aperture in the funnel-shaped electrode, the specimen is mounted on a three axis nanopositioning stage. An approximate alignment is performed while viewing the relative positions of the specimen and the local electrode with a pair of low magnification video cameras and then a pair of higher magnification video cameras attached to long range microscopes. The final alignment is performed with the use of the field evaporated ions from the specimen. A discussion on the alignment of the specimen with the local electrode, the effects of the fields on the specimen, and the effects of aperture size on aperture lifetime will be presented. The performance of the ORNL local electrode atom probe will be described. The

  7. PREPARING FOR EXASCALE: ORNL Leadership Computing Application Requirements and Strategy

    Joubert, Wayne [ORNL; Kothe, Douglas B [ORNL; Nam, Hai Ah [ORNL

    2009-12-01

    In 2009 the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF), a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) National Center for Computational Sciences (NCCS), elicited petascale computational science requirements from leading computational scientists in the international science community. This effort targeted science teams whose projects received large computer allocation awards on OLCF systems. A clear finding of this process was that in order to reach their science goals over the next several years, multiple projects will require computational resources in excess of an order of magnitude more powerful than those currently available. Additionally, for the longer term, next-generation science will require computing platforms of exascale capability in order to reach DOE science objectives over the next decade. It is generally recognized that achieving exascale in the proposed time frame will require disruptive changes in computer hardware and software. Processor hardware will become necessarily heterogeneous and will include accelerator technologies. Software must undergo the concomitant changes needed to extract the available performance from this heterogeneous hardware. This disruption portends to be substantial, not unlike the change to the message passing paradigm in the computational science community over 20 years ago. Since technological disruptions take time to assimilate, we must aggressively embark on this course of change now, to insure that science applications and their underlying programming models are mature and ready when exascale computing arrives. This includes initiation of application readiness efforts to adapt existing codes to heterogeneous architectures, support of relevant software tools, and procurement of next-generation hardware testbeds for porting and testing codes. The 2009 OLCF requirements process identified numerous actions necessary to meet this challenge: (1) Hardware capabilities must be

  8. PREPARING FOR EXASCALE: ORNL Leadership Computing Application Requirements and Strategy

    Joubert, Wayne; Kothe, Douglas B.; Nam, Hai Ah

    2009-01-01

    In 2009 the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF), a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) National Center for Computational Sciences (NCCS), elicited petascale computational science requirements from leading computational scientists in the international science community. This effort targeted science teams whose projects received large computer allocation awards on OLCF systems. A clear finding of this process was that in order to reach their science goals over the next several years, multiple projects will require computational resources in excess of an order of magnitude more powerful than those currently available. Additionally, for the longer term, next-generation science will require computing platforms of exascale capability in order to reach DOE science objectives over the next decade. It is generally recognized that achieving exascale in the proposed time frame will require disruptive changes in computer hardware and software. Processor hardware will become necessarily heterogeneous and will include accelerator technologies. Software must undergo the concomitant changes needed to extract the available performance from this heterogeneous hardware. This disruption portends to be substantial, not unlike the change to the message passing paradigm in the computational science community over 20 years ago. Since technological disruptions take time to assimilate, we must aggressively embark on this course of change now, to insure that science applications and their underlying programming models are mature and ready when exascale computing arrives. This includes initiation of application readiness efforts to adapt existing codes to heterogeneous architectures, support of relevant software tools, and procurement of next-generation hardware testbeds for porting and testing codes. The 2009 OLCF requirements process identified numerous actions necessary to meet this challenge: (1) Hardware capabilities must be

  9. CRADA Final Report for CRADA Number ORNL00-0605: Advanced Engine/Aftertreatment System R&D

    Pihl, Josh A [ORNL; West, Brian H [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL; Adelman, Brad [Navistar; Derybowski, Edward [Navistar

    2011-10-01

    compound experiments confirmed the previous results regarding hydrocarbon reactivity: 1-pentene was the most efficient LNT reductant, followed by toluene. Injection location had minimal impact on the reactivity of these two compounds. Iso-octane was an ineffective LNT reductant, requiring high doses (resulting in high HC emissions) to achieve reasonable NOx conversions. Diesel fuel reactivity was sensitive to injection location, with the best performance achieved through fuel injection downstream of the DOC. This configuration generated large LNT temperature excursions, which probably improved the efficiency of the NOx storage/reduction process, but also resulted in very high HC emissions. The ORNL team demonstrated an LNT desulfation under 'road load' conditions using throttling, EGR, and in-pipe injection of diesel fuel. Flow reactor characterization of core samples cut from the front and rear of the engine-aged LNT revealed complex spatially dependent degradation mechanisms. The front of the catalyst contained residual sulfates, which impacted NOx storage and conversion efficiencies at high temperatures. The rear of the catalyst showed significant sintering of the washcoat and precious metal particles, resulting in lower NOx conversion efficiencies at low temperatures. Further flow reactor characterization of engine-aged LNT core samples established that low temperature performance was limited by slow release and reduction of stored NOx during regeneration. Carbon monoxide was only effective at regenerating the LNT at temperatures above 200 C; propene was unreactive even at 250 C. Low temperature operation also resulted in unselective NOx reduction, resulting in high emissions of both N{sub 2}O and NH{sub 3}. During the latter years of the CRADA, the focus was shifted from LNTs to other aftertreatment devices. Two years of the CRADA were spent developing detailed ammonia SCR device models with sufficient accuracy and computational efficiency to be used in

  10. Electron-impact ionization of multicharged ions at ORNL: 1985--1992

    Gregory, D.C.; Bannister, M.E.

    1994-07-01

    Absolute cross sections are presented in graphs and tables for single ionization of forty-one ions, multiple ionization of four ions, and for dissociation and ionization of two molecular ions by electron impact. This memo is the third in a series of manuscripts summarizing previously published as well as unpublished ionization cross section measurements at ORNL; contents of the two previous memos are also referenced in this work. All work tabulated in this memo involved ion beams generated in the ORNL-ECR ion source and utilized the ORNL electron-ion crossed beams apparatus. Target ions range from atomic number Z = 8 (oxygen) to Z = 92 (uranium) in initial charge states from +1 to +16. Electron impact energies typically range from threshold to 1500 eV

  11. Data base management activities for the Remedial Action Program at ORNL, calendar year 1987

    Voorhees, L.D.; Hook, L.A.; Gentry, M.J.; McCord, R.A.; Faulkner, M.A.; Newman, K.A.; Owen, P.T.

    1988-05-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Remedial Action Program (RAP) was established in FY 1985 to apply corrective measures at areas contaminated with radioactive and/or hazardous chemical wastes. To achieve this goal, numerous and varied studies are being conducted to characterize the waste disposal sites. Environmental data collected in support of other programs at ORNL are also of use to RAP. These studies are generating a voluminous amount of data on a scale unprecedented for ORNL. A computerized Data and Information Management System (DIMS) was developed for RAP to (1) provide a centralized repository for data pertinent to RAP and (2) provide support for the investigations and assessments leading to the long-term remediation of contaminated facilities and sites. 10 refs., 25 figs., 16 tabs

  12. ORNL capability to conduct post irradiation examination of full-length commercial nuclear fuel rods

    Spellman, Donald J.

    2007-01-01

    Hot cells at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are nearing completion of a multi-year upgrade program to implement 21. century capabilities to meet the examination demands for higher burnup fuels and the future demands that will come from fuel recycling programs. Fuel reliability and zero tolerance for fuel failure is more than an industry goal. Fuel reliability is becoming a requirement that supports the renaissance of nuclear power generation. Thus, fuel development and management of new forms of waste that will come from programs such as the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) will require extensive use of the flexible, high-quality, technically advanced hot cells at ORNL. ORNL has the capability to perform post irradiation examination (PIE) of irradiated commercial nuclear fuel rods and the management structure to ensure a timely, cost-effective result. ORNL can: 1) Handle the transportation issues, 2) Perform macroscopic fuel rod examinations, 3) Perform microscopic fuel and clad examinations, and 4) Manage legacy material and waste disposal issues from PIE activities. All four of these items will be managed in a way that allows the customer day-to-day access to the results and data. Hot cell examination equipment that is necessary to determine the characteristics and performance of irradiated materials must operate in a hostile environment and is subject to long-term degradation that may result in reliability and quality assurance (QA) issues. ORNL has modernized its hot cell nuclear fuel examination equipment, installing state-of-the-art automated examination equipment and data gathering capabilities. ORNL is planning a major commitment to nuclear fuel examination and development, and future improvements will continue to be made over the next few years. (author)

  13. Implementation of Data Citations and Persistent Identifiers at the ORNL DAAC

    Cook, R. B.; Santhana Vannan, S.; Devarakonda, Ranjeet; McMurry, B. F.; Kidder, J. H.; Shanafield, H. A.; Palanisamy, G.

    2013-12-01

    As research in Earth Science becomes more data intensive, a critical requirement of data archives is that data needs to be easily discovered, accessed, and used. One approach to improving data discovery and access is through data citations coupled with Digital Object Identifiers (DOI). Beginning in 1998, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center (ORNL DAAC) has issued data product citations that have been accepted and used in AGU and other peer-reviewed journals. Citation elements established by the ORNL DAAC are similar to those used for journal articles (authors, titles, information to locate, and version), and beginning in 2007 included a DOI that is persistent, actionable, specific, and complete. The citation approach used at the DAAC also allows for referring to specific subsets of the data, by including within the citation the temporal and spatial portions of the data actually used. Citations allow others to find data and reproduce the results of the research article, and also use those data to test new hypotheses, design new sample collections, or construct or evaluate models. In addition to enhancing discovery and access of the data used in a research article, the citation gives credit to data generators, data centers and their funders, and, through citation indices, determine the scientific impact of a data set. The ORNL DAAC has developed a database that links research articles and their use of ORNL DAAC data products. The database allows determination of who, in which journal, and how the data have been used, in a manner analogous to author citation indices. The ORNL DAAC has been an initial contributor to the Thomson Reuters Data Citation Index. In addition, research data products deposited at the ORNL DAAC are linked using DOIs to relevant articles in Elsevier journals available on ScienceDirect. The ultimate goal of this implementation is that citations to data products become a routine part of the scientific process.

  14. Safety analysis report for packaging: the ORNL tungsten-shielded cask

    Evans, J.H.; Levine, D.L.; Just, R.A.

    1977-10-01

    The ORNL tungsten-shielded cask was designed and fabricated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the transport of Type B and large quantity nonfissile isotopes. The container was evaluated analytically to determine its compliance with the applicable regulations governing containers in which radioactive and fissile materials are transported. Computational methods were employed in a determination of the structural integrity and thermal behavior of the cask relative to the general standards for normal conditions of transport and to the standards for the hypothetical accident conditions. The results of these evaluations demonstrate that the container is in compliance with the applicable regulations

  15. Safety analysis report for packaging: the ORNL DOT Specification 20WC-5 - special form packaging

    Schaich, R.W.

    1982-10-01

    The ORNL DOT Specification 20WC-5 - Special Form Package was fabricated for the transport of large quantities of solid nonfissile radioactive materials in special form. The package was evaluated on the basis of tests performed at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico on an identical fire and impact shield and special form tests performed on a variety of stainless steel capsules at ORNL by Operations Division personnel. The results of these evaluations demonstrate that the package is in compliance with the applicable regulations for the transport of large quantities of nonfissile radioactive materials in special form

  16. Supplementary neutron-flux calculations for the ORNL Pool Critical Assembly Pressure Vessel Facility

    Maudlin, P.J.; Maerker, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    A three-dimensional Monte Carlo calculation using the MORSE code was performed to validate a procedure previously adopted in the ORNL discrete ordinate analysis of measurements made in the ORNL Pool Critical Assembly Pressure Vessel Facility. The results of these flux calculations agree, within statistical undertainties of about 5%, with those obtained from a discrete ordinate analysis employing the same procedure. This study therefore concludes that the procedure for combining several one- and two-dimensional discrete ordinate calculations into a three-dimensional flux is sufficiently accurate that it does not account for the existing discrepancies observed between calculations and measurements in this facility

  17. Supplementary neutron-flux calculations for the ORNL Pool Critical Assembly Pressure Vessel Facility

    Maudlin, P.J.; Maerker, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    A three-dimensional Monte Carlo calculation using the MORSE code was performed to validate a procedure previously adopted in the ORNL discrete ordinate analysis of measurements made in the ORNL Pool Critical Assembly Pressure Vessel Facility. The results of these flux calculations agree, within statistical undertainties of about 5%, with those obtained from a discrete ordinate analysis employing the same procedure. This study therefore concludes that the procedure for combining several one- and two-dimensional discrete ordinate calculations into a three-dimensional flux is sufficiently accurate that it does not account for the existing discrepancies observed between calculations and measurements in this facility.

  18. Use of remote sensing to identify waste sources at ORNL's SWSA 4

    Huff, D.D.; Doll, W.E.; Nyquist, J.E.

    1995-01-01

    Solid waste storage area (SWSA) 4, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), contributes 25% of the 90 Sr release from the ORNL complex. Disposal records were destroyed in a fire, thus limiting the ability to locate waste sources contributing to the releases. The use of remote sensing products, including photos and thermal spectra images, provided the needed information to allow field work to progress in an efficient and cost-effective manner. As a result, four major sources were identified. Preliminary estimates suggest that cost avoidance in excess of $5 million will be possible because of the detailed source location knowledge

  19. The Mouse House: a brief history of the ORNL mouse-genetics program, 1947-2009.

    Russell, Liane B

    2013-01-01

    The large mouse genetics program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is often remembered chiefly for the germ-cell mutation-rate data it generated and their uses in estimating the risk of heritable radiation damage. In fact, it soon became a multi-faceted research effort that, over a period of almost 60 years, generated a wealth of information in the areas of mammalian mutagenesis, basic genetics (later enriched by molecular techniques), cytogenetics, reproductive biology, biochemistry of germ cells, and teratology. Research in the area of germ-cell mutagenesis explored the important physical and biological factors that affect the frequency and nature of induced mutations and made several unexpected discoveries, such as the major importance of the perigametic interval (the zygote stage) for the origin of spontaneous mutations and for the sensitivity to induced genetic change. Of practical value was the discovery that ethylnitrosourea was a supermutagen for point mutations, making high-efficiency mutagenesis in the mouse feasible worldwide. Teratogenesis findings resulted in recommendations still generally accepted in radiological practice. Studies supporting the mutagenesis research added whole bodies of information about mammalian germ-cell development and about molecular targets in germ cells. The early decision to not merely count but propagate genetic variants of all sorts made possible further discoveries, such as the Y-chromosome's importance in mammalian sex determination and the identification of rare X-autosome translocations, which, in turn, led to the formulation of the single-active-X hypothesis and provided tools for studies of functional mosaicism for autosomal genes, male sterility, and chromosome-pairing mechanism. Extensive genetic and then molecular analyses of large numbers of induced specific-locus mutants resulted in fine-structure physical and correlated functional mapping of significant portions of the mouse genome and constituted a

  20. Mechanisms of dynamic deformation and dynamic failure in aluminum nitride

    Hu Guangli; Chen, C.Q.; Ramesh, K.T.; McCauley, J.W.

    2012-01-01

    Uniaxial quasi-static, uniaxial dynamic and confined dynamic compression experiments have been performed to characterize the failure and deformation mechanisms of a sintered polycrystalline aluminum nitride using a servohydraulic machine and a modified Kolsky bar. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are used to identify the fracture and deformation mechanisms under high rate and high pressure loading conditions. These results show that the fracture mechanisms are strong functions of confining stress and strain rate, with transgranular fracture becoming more common at high strain rates. Dynamic fracture mechanics and micromechanical models are used to analyze the observed fracture mechanisms. TEM characterization of fragments from the confined dynamic experiments shows that at higher pressures dislocation motion becomes a common dominant deformation mechanism in AlN. Prismatic slip is dominant, and pronounced microcrack–dislocation interactions are observed, suggesting that the dislocation plasticity affects the macroscopic fracture behavior in this material under high confining stresses.

  1. Advanced Fuel/Cladding Testing Capabilities in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Ott, Larry J.; Ellis, Ronald James; McDuffee, Joel Lee; Spellman, Donald J.; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom

    2009-01-01

    The ability to test advanced fuels and cladding materials under reactor operating conditions in the United States is limited. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and the newly expanded post-irradiation examination (PIE) capability at the ORNL Irradiated Fuels Examination Laboratory provide unique support for this type of advanced fuel/cladding development effort. The wide breadth of ORNL's fuels and materials research divisions provides all the necessary fuel development capabilities in one location. At ORNL, facilities are available from test fuel fabrication, to irradiation in HFIR under either thermal or fast reactor conditions, to a complete suite of PIEs, and to final product disposal. There are very few locations in the world where this full range of capabilities exists. New testing capabilities at HFIR have been developed that allow testing of advanced nuclear fuels and cladding materials under prototypic operating conditions (i.e., for both fast-spectrum conditions and light-water-reactor conditions). This paper will describe the HFIR testing capabilities, the new advanced fuel/cladding testing facilities, and the initial cooperative irradiation experiment that begins this year.

  2. ORNL Superconducting Technology Program for Electric Power Systems: Annual Report for FY 1999

    Hawsey, R.A.

    2000-06-13

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Superconducting Technology Program is conducted as part of a national effort by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to develop the science and technology base needed by U.S. industry for development of electric power applications of high-temperature superconductivity. The two major elements of this program are wire development and applications development. This document describes the major research and development activities for this program together with related accomplishments. The technical progress reported was summarized from recent open literature publications, presentations, and information prepared for the FY 1999 Annual Program Review held July 26-28, 1999. Aspects of ORNL's work that were presented at the International Cryogenic Materials Conference and the Cryogenic Engineering Conference (July 1999) are included in this report, as well. This ORNL program is highly leveraged by the staff and other resources of U.S. industry and universities. In fact, nearly three-fourths of the ORNL effort is devoted to cooperative projects with private companies. Interlaboratory teams are also in place on a number of industry-driven projects. Working group meetings, staff exchanges, and joint publications and presentations ensure that there is technology transfer with U.S. industry. Working together, the collaborative teams are making rapid progress in solving the scientific and technical issues necessary for the commercialization of long lengths of practical high-temperature superconductor wire and wire-using systems.

  3. ORNL Superconducting Technology Program for Electric Power Systems, Annual Report for FY 1999

    Hawsey, R.A.; Murphy, A.W

    2000-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Superconducting Technology Program is conducted as part of a national effort by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to develop the science and technology base needed by U.S. industry for development of electric power applications of high-temperature superconductivity. The two major elements of this program are wire development and applications development. This document describes the major research and development activities for this program together with related accomplishments. The technical progress reported was summarized from recent open literature publications, presentations, and information prepared for the FY 1999 Annual Program Review held July 26--28, 1999. Aspects of ORNL's work that were presented at the International Cryogenic Materials Conference and the Cryogenic Engineering Conference (July 1999) are included in this report, as well. This ORNL program is highly leveraged by the staff and other resources of U.S. industry and universities. In fact, nearly three-fourths of the ORNL effort is devoted to cooperative projects with private companies. Interlaboratory teams are also in place on a number of industry-driven projects. Working group meetings, staff exchanges, and joint publications and presentations ensure that there is technology transfer with U.S. industry. Working together, the collaborative teams are making rapid progress in solving the scientific and technical issues necessary for the commercialization of long lengths of practical high-temperature superconductor wire and wire-using systems.

  4. Summary and accomplishments of the ORNL program for nuclear piping design criteria

    Greenstreet, W.L.

    1975-11-01

    The ORNL Piping Program was defined and established to develop basic information on the structure behavior of nuclear power plant piping components and to prepare this information in forms suitable for use in design codes and standards. Charts are presented showing the percentage completion of the various program tasks

  5. ORNL ADCP POST-PROCESSING GUIDE AND MATLAB ALGORITHMS FOR MHK SITE FLOW AND TURBULENCE ANALYSIS

    Gunawan, Budi [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Neary, Vincent S [ORNL

    2011-09-01

    Standard methods, along with guidance for post-processing the ADCP stationary measurements using MATLAB algorithms that were evaluated and tested by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), are presented following an overview of the ADCP operating principles, deployment methods, error sources and recommended protocols for removing and replacing spurious data.

  6. DT fusion neutron irradiation of ORNL magnesium oxide crystals and BNL--LASL superconductor wires

    MacLean, S.C.

    1978-01-01

    The DT fusion neutron irradiation of two ORNL magnesium oxide crystals and eleven BNL-LASL superconductor wires is described. The sample position and neutron dose record are given. The maximum neutron fluence on any sample was 2.16 x 10 16 neutrons/cm 2

  7. ORNL R and D on advanced small and medium power reactors: selected topics

    White, J.D.; Trauger, D.B.

    1989-01-01

    From 1984-1985, ORNL studied several innovative small and medium power nuclear concepts with respect to viability. Criteria for assessment of market attractiveness were developed and are described here. Using these criteria and descriptions of selected advanced reactor concepts, an assessment of their projected market viability in the time period 2000-2010 was made. All of these selected concepts could be considered as having the potential for meeting the criteria but, in most cases, considerable R and D would be required to reduce uncertainties. This work and later studies of safety and licensing of advanced, passively safe reactor concepts by ORNL are described. The results of these studies are taken into account in most of the current (FY 1989) work at ORNL on advanced reactors. A brief outline of this current work is given. One of the current R and D efforts at ORNL which addresses the operability and safety of advanced reactors is the Advanced Controls Program. Selected topics from this Program are described

  8. Summary of ORNL high-temperature gas-cooled reactor program

    Kasten, P.R.

    1981-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) efforts on the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Program have been on HTGR fuel development, fission product and coolant chemistry, prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) studies, materials studies, graphite development, reactor physics and shielding studies, application assessments and evaluations and selected component testing

  9. ORNL R and D on advanced small and medium power reactors: Selected topics

    White, J.D.; Trauger, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    From 1984-1985, ORNL studied several innovative small and medium power nuclear concepts with respect to viability. Criteria for assessment of market attractiveness were developed and are described here. Using these criteria and descriptions of selected advanced reactor concepts, and assessment of their projected market viability in the time period 2000-2010 was made. All of these selected concepts could be considered as having the potential for meeting the criteria but, in most cases, considerable RandD would be required to reduce uncertainties. This work and later studies of safety and licensing of advanced, passively safe reactor concepts by ORNL are described. The results of these studies are taken into account in most of the current (FY 1989) work at ORNL on advanced reactors. A brief outline of this current work is given. One of the current RandD efforts at ORNL which addresses the operability and safety of advanced reactors is the Advanced Controls Program. Selected topics from this Program are described. 13 refs., 1 fig

  10. Results from ORNL Characterization of Nominal 350 (micro)m NUCO Kernels from the BWXT 59344 batch

    Hunn, John D.; Kercher, Andrew K.; Menchhofer, Paul A.; Price, Jeffery R.

    2005-01-01

    This document is a compilation of characterization data obtained on nominal 350 (micro)m natural enrichment uranium oxide/uranium carbide kernels (NUCO) produced by BWXT for the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program. These kernels were produced as part of a development effort at BWXT to address issues involving forming and heat treatment and were shipped to ORNL for additional characterization and for coating tests. The kernels were identified as G73N-NU-59344. 250 grams were shipped to ORNL. Size, shape, and microstructural analysis was performed. These kernels were preceded by G73B-NU-69300 and G73B-NU-69301, which were kernels produced and delivered to ORNL earlier in the development phase. Characterization of the kernels from G73B-NU-69300 was summarized in ORNL/CF-04/07 'Results from ORNL Characterization of Nominal 350 (micro)m NUCO Kernels from the BWXT 69300 composite'.

  11. Program planning for future improvement in managing ORNL's radioactive wastes

    1982-01-01

    This report is intended to serve as a reference document and guide in developing the long-term improvements section of ORNL's radioactive waste management plan. The report reviews ORNL's operations and future program needs in terms of currently applicable DOE regulations and also in terms of regulations and accepted practices of the commerical sector of the nuclear power industry so that the impact of potential future adoption of these regulations and standards on ORNL's operations can be fully evaluated. The principal conclusion reached after reviewing ORNL's waste management operations is that these operations are currently being conducted in a manner that does not endanger the health or safety of workers or the general public and that does not have an adverse effect on the environment. Although nineteen specific problem areas have been identified all of these problems can be attributed to one of the following: a) the legacy of past practices; b) gradual deterioration of systems which have reached (or are near to reaching) the end of their reasonable design lives; and c) potential changes in regulations applicable to ORNL. All of the programs designed to improve or correct these problem areas could be accomplished within a four year period. However, given current limitations on manpower and capital, these programs would more likely be spread out over a five to ten year period of time if they were all to be undertaken. The cost of undertaking all of these projects concurrently is estimated to be between 60 and 100 million dollars. Due to the many unknowns and uncertainties associated with the problem areas, actual total costs for specific projects could vary from those presented in this report by as much as 300 percent. (DMC)

  12. ORNL conference on the leachability of radioactive solids

    1980-01-01

    Abstracts of papers given at the following sessions are presented: leachability mechanisms and factors that influence leachability; methods used to measure leachability and present data; and empirical and theoretical models used to explain and to predict leachability - data and model accuracy

  13. Solvent degradation and cleanup: a survey and recent ORNL studies

    Mailen, J.C.; Tallent, O.K.

    1984-01-01

    This paper surveys the mechanisms for degradation of the tributyl phosphate and diluent components of Purex solvent by acid and radiation, reviews the problems encountered in plant operations resulting from the presence of these degradation products, and discusses methods for minimizing the formation of degradation products and accomplishing their removal. Scrubbing solutions containing sodium carbonate or hydroxylamine salts and secondary cleanup of solvents using solid sorbents are evaluated. Finally, recommendations for improved solvent cleanup are presented. 50 references, 4 figures, 3 tables

  14. Aging and loading rate effects on the mechanical behavior of equine bone

    Kulin, Robb M.; Jiang, Fengchun; Vecchio, Kenneth S.

    2008-06-01

    Whether due to a sporting accident, high-speed impact, fall, or other catastrophic event, the majority of clinical bone fractures occur under dynamic loading conditions. However, although extensive research has been performed on the quasi-static fracture and mechanical behavior of bone to date, few high-quality studies on the fracture behavior of bone at high strain rates have been performed. Therefore, many questions remain regarding the material behavior, including not only the loading-rate-dependent response of bone, but also how this response varies with age. In this study, tests were performed on equine femoral bone taken post-mortem from donors 6 months to 28 years of age. Quasi-static and dynamic tests were performed to determine the fracture toughness and compressive mechanical behavior as a function of age at varying loading rates. Fracture paths were then analyzed using scanning confocal and scanning-electron microscopy techniques to assess the role of various microstructural features on toughening mechanisms.

  15. Dynamic Response and Failure Mechanism of Brittle Rocks Under Combined Compression-Shear Loading Experiments

    Xu, Yuan; Dai, Feng

    2018-03-01

    A novel method is developed for characterizing the mechanical response and failure mechanism of brittle rocks under dynamic compression-shear loading: an inclined cylinder specimen using a modified split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system. With the specimen axis inclining to the loading direction of SHPB, a shear component can be introduced into the specimen. Both static and dynamic experiments are conducted on sandstone specimens. Given carefully pulse shaping, the dynamic equilibrium of the inclined specimens can be satisfied, and thus the quasi-static data reduction is employed. The normal and shear stress-strain relationships of specimens are subsequently established. The progressive failure process of the specimen illustrated via high-speed photographs manifests a mixed failure mode accommodating both the shear-dominated failure and the localized tensile damage. The elastic and shear moduli exhibit certain loading-path dependence under quasi-static loading but loading-path insensitivity under high loading rates. Loading rate dependence is evidently demonstrated through the failure characteristics involving fragmentation, compression and shear strength and failure surfaces based on Drucker-Prager criterion. Our proposed method is convenient and reliable to study the dynamic response and failure mechanism of rocks under combined compression-shear loading.

  16. Presentation of an approach for the analysis of the mechanical response of propellant under a large spectrum of loadings: numerical and mechanical issues

    Fanget, Alain

    2009-06-01

    Many authors claim that to understand the response of a propellant, specifically under quasi static and dynamic loading, the mesostructural morphology and the mechanical behaviour of each of its components have to be known. However the scale of the mechanical description of the behaviour of a propellant is relative to its heterogeneities and the wavelength of loading. The shorter it is, the more important the topological description of the material is. In our problems, involving the safety of energetic materials, the propellant can be subjected to a large spectrum of loadings. This presentation is divided into five parts. The first part describes the processes used to extract the information about the morphology of the meso-structure of the material and presents some results. The results, the difficulties and the perspectives for this part will be recalled. The second part determines the physical processes involved at this scale from experimental results. Taking into account the knowledge of the morphology, two ways have been chosen to describe the response of the material. One concerns the quasi static loading, the object of the third part, in which we show how we use the mesoscopic scale as a base of development to build constitutive models. The fourth part presents for low but dynamic loading the comparison between numerical analysis and experiments.

  17. ORNL Surplus Facilities Management Program maintenance and surveillance plan for fiscal year 1984

    Coobs, J.H.; Myrick, T.E.

    1986-10-01

    The Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) National SFMP, administered by the Richland Operations Office. The purpose and objectives of the national program are set forth in the current SFMP Program Plan and include (1) the maintenance and surveillance of facilities awaiting decommissioning, (2) planning for the orderly decommissioning of these facilities, and (3) implementation of a program to accomplish the facility disposition in a safe, cost-effective, and timely manner. As outlined in the national program plan, participating SFMP contractors are required to prepare a formal plan that documents the maintenance and surveillance (M and S) programs established for each site. This report has been prepared to provide this documentation for those facilties included in the ORNL SFMP

  18. Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the ORNL Decontamination and Decommissioning Program FY 1993--2002

    Ford, M.K.; Holder, L. Jr.

    1992-07-01

    The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration D ampersand D program. The purpose and objectivesof this program include: (1) surveillance and maintenance (S ampersand M) of facilities awaiting decommissioning; (2) planning for the orderly decommissioning of these facilities; and (3) implementation of a program to accomplish facility disposition in a safe, cost-effective, and timely manner. Participating D ampersand D contractors are required to prepare formal plans that document the S ampersand M programs established for each site. This report has been prepared to provide this documentation for those facilities included in the ORNL D ampersand D Program

  19. A comprehensive summary of the ORNL Groundwater Compliance and Surveillance Sampling Results Software System

    Loffman, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    Groundwater compliance and surveillance activities are conducted at ORNL to fulfill federal and state requirements for environmental monitoring. Information management is an important aspect of this and encompasses many activities which usually have spcific time frames and schedules. In addition to fulfilling these immediate requirements, the results for the monitoring activities are also used to determine the need for environmental remediation. ORNL performs this groundwater results data management and reporting utilizing a group of SAS reg-sign applications and tools which provide the ability to track samples, capture field measurements, verify and validate result data, manage data, and report results in a variety of ways and in a timely manner. This paper provides a comprehensive summary of these applications and tools

  20. Storms over the METER--ORNL Precipitation Network: the first six months

    Miller, R.L.; Patrinos, A.A.N.; Saylor, R.E.

    1979-06-01

    This report presents the first set of data collected by the METER--ORNL Precipitation Network. This network of 49 recording raingages and 5 recording windsets was installed in February 1978, around the Bowen Electric Generating Plant in northwest Georgia for the purpose of investigating the potential effect of the plant's cooling towers on rainfall. This study is conducted on behalf of the DOE Program on Meteorological Effects of Thermal Energy Releases (METER). Included in this report are the complete descriptions of 98 rainfall events which occurred over the METER--ORNL network during the period February 22--August 31, 1978. These descriptions are augmented by information and data supplied by the National Weather Service (NWS). Several stratifications of the rainfall events are performed for reference purposes

  1. Summary of ORNL work on NRC-sponsored HTGR safety research, July 1974-September 1980

    Ball, S.J.; Cleveland, J.C.; Conklin, J.C.; Delene, J.G.; Harrington, R.M.; Hatta, M.; Hedrick, R.A.; Johnson, L.G.; Sanders, J.P.

    1982-03-01

    A summary is presented of the major accomplishments of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) research program on High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) safety. This report is intended to help the nuclear Regulatory Commission establish goals for future research by comparing the status of the work here (as well as at other laboratories) with the perceived safety needs of the large HTGR. The ORNL program includes extensive work on dynamics-related safety code development, use of codes for studying postulated accident sequences, and use of experimental data for code verification. Cooperative efforts with other programs are also described. Suggestions for near-term and long-term research are presented

  2. Design of a 18F production system at ORNL 86-inch cyclotron

    Shaeffer, M.C.; Barreto, F.; Datesh, J.R.; Goldstein, B.R.

    1977-01-01

    A target system for the production of 18 F by proton bombardment of H 2 18 O was designed for the ORNL 86-inch cyclotron facility. The system consists of concentric titanium and aluminum cylinders. Oxygen-18-enriched H 2 O circulates through the inner titanium cylinder and through an external heat exchanger with cooling water flowing in the annulus. Yields of 5.0 curies are expected for a 250-μA proton beam current and 24-min irradiation time

  3. Contributions of the ORNL piping program to nuclear piping design codes and standards

    Moore, S.E.

    1975-11-01

    The ORNL Piping Program was conceived and established to develop basic information on the structural behavior of nuclear power plant piping components and to prepare this information in forms suitable for use in design analysis and codes and standards. One of the objectives was to develop and qualify stress indices and flexibility factors for direct use in Code-prescribed design analysis methods. Progress in this area is described

  4. The ORNL Modulating Heat Pump Design Tool User's Guide

    Rice, C.K.

    2001-06-01

    The ORNL Modulating Heat Pump Design Tool consists of a Modulating HPDM (Heat Pump Design Model) and a parametric-analysis (contour-data generating) front-end. Collectively the program is also referred to as MODCON which is in reference to the modulating and the contour data generating capabilities. The program was developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the Department of Energy to provide a publicly-available system design tool for variable- and single-speed heat pumps.

  5. The ORNL Modulating Heat Pump Design Tool -- Mark IV User's Guide

    Rice, C.K.

    2001-09-27

    The ORNL Modulating Heat Pump Design Tool consists of a Modulating HPDM (Heat Pump Design Model) and a parametric-analysis (contour-data generating) front-end. Collectively the program is also referred to as MODCON which is in reference to the modulating and the contour data generating capabilities. The program was developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the Department of Energy to provide a publicly-available system design tool for variable- and single-speed heat pumps.

  6. Design of a Fluorine-18 Production System at ORNL Cyclotron Facility. Part 2

    Chu, Y.E.; Engstrom, S.D.; Sundberg, D.G.

    1977-01-01

    A fluorine-18 recovery system using an anion-exchange side-stream column was designed for the H 2 18 O target at the ORNL 86-inch cyclotron. The extent of radiolysis was determined and a catalyst vessel, containing a palladium catalyst, was incorporated to recombine the radiolysis product gases. The preliminary design of an externally bombarded gas target for the production of 18 F 2 from 18 O 2 was also completed

  7. Initial ORNL site assessment report on the storage of 233U

    Bereolos, P.J.; Yong, L.K.; Sadlowe, A.R.; Ramey, D.W.; Krichinsky, A.M.

    1998-03-01

    The 233 U storage facility at ORNL is Building 3019. The inventory stored in Building 3019 consists of 426.5 kg of 233 U contained in 1,387.1 kg of total uranium. The inventory is primarily in the form of uranium oxides; however, uranium metal and other compounds are also stored. Over 99% of the inventory is contained in 1,007 packages stored in tube vaults within the facility. A tank of thorium nitrate solution, the P-24 Tank, contains 0.13 kg of 233 U in ∼ 4,000 gal. of solution. The facility is receiving additional 233 U for storage from the remediation of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at ORNL. Consolidation of material from sites with small holdings is also adding to the 233 U inventory. Additionally, small quantities ( 233 U are in other research facilities at ORNL. A risk assessment process was chosen to evaluate the stored material and packages based on available package records. The risk scenario was considered the failure of a package (or a group of similar packages) in the Building 3019 inventory. The probability of such a failure depends on packaging factors such as the age and material of construction of the containers. The consequence of such a failure depends on the amount and form of the material within the packages. One thousand seven packages were categorized with this methodology resulting in 859 low-risk packages, 147 medium-risk packages, and 1 high-risk package. This initial assessment also documents the status of the evaluation of the Building 3019 and its systems for safe storage of 233 U. The final assessment report for ORNL storage of 233 U is scheduled for June 1999. The report will document the facility assessments, the specific package inspection plan, and the results of initial package inspections

  8. The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) cold source project at ORNL

    Selby, D.L.; Lucas, A.T.; Chang, S.J.; Freels, J.D. . E-mail-yb2@ornl.gov

    1998-01-01

    Following the decision to cancel the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), it was determined that a hydrogen cold source should be retrofitted into an existing beam tube of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at ORNL. The preliminary design of this system has been completed and an 'approval in principle' of the design has been obtained from the internal ORNL safety review committees and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) safety review committee. The cold source concept is basically a closed loop forced flow supercritical hydrogen system. The supercritical approach was chosen because of its enhanced stability in the proposed high heat flux regions. Neutron and gamma physics of the moderator have been analyzed using the 3D Monte Carlo code MCNP 1 A D structural analysis model of the moderator vessel, vacuum tube, and beam tube was completed to evaluate stress loadings and to examine the impact of hydrogen detonations in the beam tube. A detailed ATHENA 2 system model of the hydrogen system has been developed to simulate loop performance under normal and off-normal transient conditions. Semi-prototypic hydrogen loop tests of the system have been performed at the Arnold Engineering Design Center (AEDC) located in Tullahoma, Tennessee to verify the design and benchmark the analytical system model. A 3.5 kW refrigerator system has been ordered and is expected to be delivered to ORNL by the end of this calendar year. Our present schedule shows the assembling of the cold source loop on site during the fall of 1999 for final testing before insertion of the moderator plug assembly into the reactor beam tube during the end of the year 2000. (author)

  9. The ORNL Indoor Air Quality Study: Re-cap, Context, and Assessment on Radon

    Tonn, Bruce Edward [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Rose, Erin M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ternes, Mark P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    As part of the retrospective evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy s low-income Weatherization Assistance Program that was led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), an assessment of the impacts of weatherization on indoor air quality (IAQ) was conducted. This assessment included nearly 500 treatment and control homes across the country. Homes were monitored for carbon monoxide, radon, formaldehyde, temperature and humidity pre- and post-weatherization. This report focuses on the topic of radon and addresses issues not thoroughly discussed in the original IAQ report. The size, scope and rigor of the radon component of the IAQ study are compared to previous studies that assessed the impacts of weatherization on indoor radon levels. It is found that the ORNL study is by far the most extensive study conducted to date, though the ORNL results are consistent with the findings of the other studies. However, the study does have limitations related to its reliance on short-term measurements of radon and inability to attribute changes in radon levels in homes post-weatherization to specific weatherization measures individually or in combination.

  10. Data and information management system for the ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) Remedial Action Program

    Voorhees, L.D.; Hook, L.A.; Gentry, M.J.; Owen, P.T.; Newman, K.A.; McCord, R.A.; Faulkner, M.A.; Bledsoe, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    A Remedial Action Program (RAP) was established in FY 1985 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to provide corrective measures at areas contaminated with radioactive and/or hazardous chemical wastes. To achieve this goal, numerous and varied studies are being conducted to characterize the waste disposal sites. Environmental data collected in support of other programs at ORNL are also of use to RAP. Collectively, these studies are generating a voluminous amount of data on a scale unprecedented for ORNL. A computerized Data and Information Management System (DIMS) was developed to (1) provide a centralized repository for data pertinent to RAP and (2) provide support for the investigations and assessments leading to the long-term remediation of contaminated sites and facilities. The current DIMS and its role in supporting RAP are described. The DIMS consists of three components: (1) the Bibliographic Data Base, (2) the Records Control Data Base, and (3) the Numeric Data Base. This paper/poster emphasizes the Numeric Data Base, including its development and organization, and also summarizes the status of other activities associated with management and use of such data (i.e., bibliographic information, records control, geographic information, and quality assurance). The types of data currently available have been summarized, and a synopsis of the contents of the RAP numeric data base has been compiled in a menu-driven program available on PC diskettes. The synopsis will be demonstrated at the conference

  11. Maryland Power Plant Siting Project: an application of the ORNL-Land Use Screening Procedure

    Dobson, J.E.

    1975-01-01

    Since 1974 the Resource Analysis Group in the Regional and Urban Studies Section of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been engaged in developing a procedure for regional and local siting analysis known as the ORNL Land Use Screening Procedure (LUSP). This document is the final report of the Maryland Power Plant Siting Project (MPPSP) in which the ORNL LUSP was used to identify candidate areas for power plant sites in northern Maryland. Numerous candidate areas are identified on the basis of four different siting objectives: the minimization of adverse ecologic impact, the minimization of adverse socioeconomic impact, the minimization of construction and operating costs, and a composite of all siting objectives. Siting criteria have been defined for each of these objectives through group processing techniques administered to four different groups of siting specialists. The siting priorities and opinions of each group have been expressed quantitatively and applied to a geographic information system containing 52 variables for each 91.8-acre cell in the northern eight counties of Maryland

  12. ORNL Superconducting Technology Program for electric power systems. Annual report for FY 1996

    Koncinski, W.S. [ed.; Hawsey, R.A. [comp.

    1997-05-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Superconducting Technology Program is conducted as part of a national effort by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to develop the science and technology base needed by US industry for commercial development of electric power applications of high temperature superconductivity. The two major elements of this program are wire development and applications development. This document describes the major research and development activities for this program together with related accomplishments. The technical progress reported was summarized from recent open literature publications, presentations, and information prepared for the FY 1996 Annual Program Review held July 31 and August 1, 1996. This ORNL program is highly leveraged by the staff and other resources of US industry and universities. In fact, nearly three-fourths of the ORNL effort is devoted to cooperative projects with private companies. Interlaboratory teams are also in place on a number of industry-driven projects. Patent disclosures, working group meetings, staff exchanges, and joint publications and presentations ensure that there is technology transfer with US industry. Working together, the collaborative teams are making rapid progress in solving the scientific and technical issues necessary for the commercialization of long lengths of practical high temperature superconductor wire and wire-using systems.

  13. A facility design for repackaging ORNL CH-TRU legacy waste in Building 3525

    Huxford, T.J.; Cooper, R.H. Jr.; Davis, L.E.; Fuller, A.B.; Gabbard, W.A.; Smith, R.B.; Guay, K.P.; Smith, L.C.

    1995-07-01

    For the last 25 years, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has conducted operations which have generated solid, contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste. At present the CH-TRU waste inventory at ORNL is about 3400 55-gal drums retrievably stored in RCRA-permitted, aboveground facilities. Of the 3400 drums, approximately 2600 drums will need to be repackaged. The current US Department of Energy (DOE) strategy for disposal of these drums is to transport them to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico which only accepts TRU waste that meets a very specific set of criteria documented in the WIPP-WAC (waste acceptance criteria). This report describes activities that were performed from January 1994 to May 1995 associated with the design and preparation of an existing facility for repackaging and certifying some or all of the CH-TRU drums at ORNL to meet the WIPP-WAC. For this study, the Irradiated Fuel Examination Laboratory (IFEL) in Building 3525 was selected as the reference facility for modification. These design activities were terminated in May 1995 as more attractive options for CH-TRU waste repackaging were considered to be available. As a result, this document serves as a final report of those design activities

  14. ORNL Superconducting Technology Program for electric power systems. Annual report for FY 1995

    Hawsey, R.A.; Turner, J.W.

    1996-05-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Superconducting Technology Program is conducted as part of a national effort by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to develop the science and technology base needed by U.S. industry for commercial development of electric power applications of high-temperature superconductivity. The two major elements of this program are wire development and systems development. This document describes the major research and development activities for this program together with related accomplishments. The technical progress reported was summarized from information prepared for the FY 1995 Annual Program Review held August 1-2, 1995. This ORNL program is highly leveraged by the staff and other resources of U.S. industry and universities. In fact, nearly three-fourths of the ORNL effort is devoted to cooperative projects with private companies. Interlaboratory teams are also in place on a number of industry-driven projects. Patent disclosures, working group meetings, staff exchanges, and joint publications and presentations ensure that there is technology transfer with U.S. industry. Working together, the collaborative teams are making rapid progress in solving the scientific and technical issues necessary for the commercialization of long lengths of practical high-temperature superconductor wire and wire-using systems

  15. Determination of Desorbed Species During Heating of AgI-Mordenite Provided by ORNL

    Croes, Kenneth James [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Garino, Terry J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mowry, Curtis D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nenoff, Tina M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-15

    This study is focused on describing the desorbed off gases due to heating of the AgIMordenite (MOR) produced at ORNL for iodine (I2) gas capture from nuclear fuel aqueous reprocessing. In particular, the interest is for the incorporation of the AgI-MOR into a waste form, which might be the Sandia developed, low temperature sintering, Bi-Si oxide based, Glass Composite Material (GCM). The GCM has been developed as a waste form for the incorporation any oxide based getter material. In the case where iodine may be released during the sintering process of the GCM, additional Ag flake is added as further insurance in total iodine capture and retention. This has been the case for the incorporated ORNL developed AgIMOR. Thermal analysis studies were carried out to determine off gasing processes of ORNL AgIMOR. Independent of sample size, ~7wt% of total water is desorbed by 225°C. This includes both bulk surface and occluded water, and are monitored as H2O and OH. Of that total, ~5.5wt% is surface water which is removed by 125°C, and 1.5wt% is occluded (in zeolite pore) water. Less than ~1 wt% total water continues to desorb, but is completely removed by 500°C. Above 300°C, the detectable remaining desorbing species observed are iodine containing compounds, including I and I2.

  16. Buried transuranic wastes at ORNL: Review of past estimates and reconciliation with current data

    Trabalka, J.R.

    1997-09-01

    Inventories of buried (generally meaning disposed of) transuranic (TRU) wastes at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have been estimated for site remediation and waste management planning over a period of about two decades. Estimates were required because of inadequate waste characterization and incomplete disposal records. For a variety of reasons, including changing definitions of TRU wastes, differing objectives for the estimates, and poor historical data, the published results have sometimes been in conflict. The purpose of this review was (1) to attempt to explain both the rationale for and differences among the various estimates, and (2) to update the estimates based on more recent information obtained from waste characterization and from evaluations of ORNL waste data bases and historical records. The latter included information obtained from an expert panel's review and reconciliation of inconsistencies in data identified during preparation of the ORNL input for the third revision of the Baseline Inventory Report for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The results summarize current understanding of the relationship between past estimates of buried TRU wastes and provide the most up-to-date information on recorded burials thereafter. The limitations of available information on the latter and thus the need for improved waste characterization are highlighted

  17. Status of the ORNL liquid low-level waste management upgrades

    Robinson, S.M.; Kent, T.E.; DePaoli, S.M.

    1995-08-01

    The strategy for management of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) radioactively contaminated liquid waste was reviewed. The latest information on waste characterization, regulations, US Department of Energy (DOE) budget guidance, and research and development programs was evaluated to determine how the strategy should be revised. Few changes are needed to update the strategy to reflect new waste characterization, research, and regulatory information. However, recent budget guidance from DOE indicates that minimum funding will not be sufficient to accomplish original objectives to upgrade the liquid low-level waste (LLLW) system to be in compliance with the Federal Facilities Agreement compliance, provide long-term LLLW treatment capability, and minimize Environmental Safety ampersand Health risks. Options are presented that might allow the ORNL LLLW system to continue operations temporarily but significantly reduce its capabilities to handle emergency situations, provide treatment for new waste streams, and accommodate waste from the Environmental Restoration Program and from decontamination and decommissioning of surplus facilities. These options are also likely to increase worker radiation exposure, risk of environmental insult, and generation of solid waste for on-site and off-site disposal/storage beyond existing facility capacities. The strategy will be fully developed after receiving additional guidance. The proposed budget limitations are too severe to allow ORNL to meet regulatory requirements or continue operations long term

  18. Maryland Power Plant Siting Project: an application of the ORNL-Land Use Screening Procedure

    Dobson, J.E.

    1975-01-01

    Since 1974 the Resource Analysis Group in the Regional and Urban Studies Section of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been engaged in developing a procedure for regional and local siting analysis known as the ORNL Land Use Screening Procedure (LUSP). This document is the final report of the Maryland Power Plant Siting Project (MPPSP) in which the ORNL LUSP was used to identify candidate areas for power plant sites in northern Maryland. Numerous candidate areas are identified on the basis of four different siting objectives: the minimization of adverse ecologic impact, the minimization of adverse socioeconomic impact, the minimization of construction and operating costs, and a composite of all siting objectives. Siting criteria have been defined for each of these objectives through group processing techniques administered to four different groups of siting specialists. The siting priorities and opinions of each group have been expressed quantitatively and applied to a geographic information system containing 52 variables for each 91.8-acre cell in the northern eight counties of Maryland.

  19. ORNL Superconducting Technology Program for Electric Power Systems--Annual Report for FY 2001

    Hawsey, RA

    2002-02-18

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Superconducting Technology Program is conducted as part of a national effort by the US Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to develop the science and technology base needed by US industry for development of electric power applications of high-temperature superconductivity. The two major elements of this program are wire development and applications development. A new part of the wire research effort was the Accelerated Coated Conductor Initiative. This document describes the major research and development activities for this program together with related accomplishments. The technical progress reported was summarized from recent open literature publications, presentations, and information prepared for the FY 2001 Annual Program Review held August 1-3, 2001. Aspects of ORNL's work that were presented at the International Cryogenic Materials Conference/Cryogenic Engineering Conference (July 2001) are included in this report as well. This ORNL program is highly leveraged by the staff and other resources of US industry and universities. Interlaboratory teams are also in place on a number of industry-driven projects. Working group meetings, staff exchanges, and joint publications and presentations ensure that there is technology transfer with US industry. Working together, the collaborative teams are making rapid progress in solving the scientific and technical issues necessary for the commercialization of long lengths of practical high-temperature superconductor wire and wire-using systems.

  20. Microstructures and mechanical behavior of Inconel 625 fabricated by solid-state additive manufacturing

    Rivera, O.G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Allison, P.G., E-mail: pallison@eng.ua.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Jordon, J.B.; Rodriguez, O.L. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Brewer, L.N. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); McClelland, Z. [US Army Corps of Engineers, Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS (United States); Whittington, W.R.; Francis, D. [Center of Advanced Vehicular Systems, Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS (United States); Su, J. [Aeroprobe Corporation, Christiansburg, VA (United States); Martens, R.L. [Central Analytical Facility, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Hardwick, N. [Aeroprobe Corporation, Christiansburg, VA (United States)

    2017-05-10

    Here we introduce a novel thermo-mechanical Solid State Additive Manufacturing (SSAM) process referred to as Additive Friction Stir (AFS) manufacturing that provides a new and alternative path to fusion-based additive manufacturing processes for developing fully-dense, near-net shape components with a refined-equiaxed grain morphology. This study is the first to investigate the beneficial grain refinement and densification produced by AFS in IN625 that results in advantageous mechanical properties (YS, UTS, εf) at both quasi-static and high strain rate. Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) observed grain refinement during the layer deposition in the AFS specimens, where the results identified fine equiaxed grain structures with even finer grain structures forming at the layer interfaces. The EBSD quantified grains as fine as 0.27 µm in these interface regions while the average grain size was approximately 1 µm. Additionally, this is the first study to report on the strain rate dependence of AFS IN625 through quasi-static (QS) (0.001/s) and high strain rate (HR) (1500/s) tensile experiments using a servo hydraulic frame and a direct tension-Kolsky bar, respectively, which captured both yield and ultimate tensile strengths increasing as strain rate increased. The HS results exhibited an approximately 200 MPa increase in engineering strength over the QS results, with the fracture surfaces at both strain rates aligned with the maximum shear plane and exhibiting localized microvoids.

  1. Microstructures and mechanical behavior of Inconel 625 fabricated by solid-state additive manufacturing

    Rivera, O.G.; Allison, P.G.; Jordon, J.B.; Rodriguez, O.L.; Brewer, L.N.; McClelland, Z.; Whittington, W.R.; Francis, D.; Su, J.; Martens, R.L.; Hardwick, N.

    2017-01-01

    Here we introduce a novel thermo-mechanical Solid State Additive Manufacturing (SSAM) process referred to as Additive Friction Stir (AFS) manufacturing that provides a new and alternative path to fusion-based additive manufacturing processes for developing fully-dense, near-net shape components with a refined-equiaxed grain morphology. This study is the first to investigate the beneficial grain refinement and densification produced by AFS in IN625 that results in advantageous mechanical properties (YS, UTS, εf) at both quasi-static and high strain rate. Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) observed grain refinement during the layer deposition in the AFS specimens, where the results identified fine equiaxed grain structures with even finer grain structures forming at the layer interfaces. The EBSD quantified grains as fine as 0.27 µm in these interface regions while the average grain size was approximately 1 µm. Additionally, this is the first study to report on the strain rate dependence of AFS IN625 through quasi-static (QS) (0.001/s) and high strain rate (HR) (1500/s) tensile experiments using a servo hydraulic frame and a direct tension-Kolsky bar, respectively, which captured both yield and ultimate tensile strengths increasing as strain rate increased. The HS results exhibited an approximately 200 MPa increase in engineering strength over the QS results, with the fracture surfaces at both strain rates aligned with the maximum shear plane and exhibiting localized microvoids.

  2. Effect of stacking angles on mechanical properties and damage propagation of plain woven carbon fiber laminates

    Zhuang, Weimin; Ao, Wenhong

    2018-03-01

    Damage propagation induced failure is a predominant damage mechanism. This study is aimed at assessing the damage state and damage propagation induced failure with different stacking angles, of woven carbon fiber/epoxy laminates subjected to quasi-static tensile and bending load. Different stages of damage processing and damage behavior under the bending load are investigated by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The woven carbon fiber/epoxy laminates which are stacked at six different angles (0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 75°) with eight plies have been analyzed: [0]8, [15]8, [30]8, [45]8, [60]8, [75]8. Three-point bending test and quasi-static tensile test are used in validating the woven carbon fiber/epoxy laminates’ mechanical properties. Furthermore, the damage propagation and failure modes observed under flexural loading is correlated with flexural force and load-displacement behaviour respectively for the laminates. The experimental results have indicated that [45]8 laminate exhibits the best flexural performance in terms of energy absorption duo to its pseudo-ductile behaviour but the tensile strength and flexural strength drastically decreased compared to [0]8 laminate. Finally, SEM micrographs of specimens and fracture surfaces are used to reveal the different types of damage of the laminates with different stacking angles.

  3. Investigation of the Mechanical Behaviour of Metal Diamond Composites

    Peroni, L; Bertarelli, A; Dallocchio, A; Mariani, N; Bizzaro, S

    2012-01-01

    Metal-Diamond Composites (Me-CD) are a novel class of materials which has typical applications in the field of thermal management. Usually, due to the high volume fraction of diamonds inside the matrix, the mechanical behavior of such materials is quite brittle with low level of fracture stress and strain. However, with advanced innovations in the sintering processes, it is possible to obtain composite materials with a good level of strength and toughness. The great advantage of these materials is the possibility to combine the high thermal and electrical conductivity of diamonds with the strength of metals. Aim of this work is the investigation of the mechanical behavior of Me-CD from quasi-static to high strain-rate loading conditions. The temperature influence on mechanical properties is also evaluated.

  4. Waste management regulatory compliance issues related to D ampersand D activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    Hitch, J.P.; Arnold, S.E.; Burwinkle, T.; Daugherty, D.

    1994-01-01

    The waste management activities at ORNL related to the decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) of radioactively contaminated buildings are divided into four categories: Operational facilities, inactive or surplus facilities, future facilities planning, and D ampersand D activities. This paper only discusses regulatory issues related to inactive or surplus facilities. Additionally, rather than attempting to address all resulting waste streams and related regulations, this paper highlights only a few of the ORNL waste streams that present key regulatory issues

  5. Multiaxial mechanical properties and constitutive modeling of human adipose tissue: a basis for preoperative simulations in plastic and reconstructive surgery.

    Sommer, Gerhard; Eder, Maximilian; Kovacs, Laszlo; Pathak, Heramb; Bonitz, Lars; Mueller, Christoph; Regitnig, Peter; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2013-11-01

    A preoperative simulation of soft tissue deformations during plastic and reconstructive surgery is desirable to support the surgeon's planning and to improve surgical outcomes. The current development of constitutive adipose tissue models, for the implementation in multilayer computational frameworks for the simulation of human soft tissue deformations, has proved difficult because knowledge of the required mechanical parameters of fat tissue is limited. Therefore, for the first time, human abdominal adipose tissues were mechanically investigated by biaxial tensile and triaxial shear tests. The results of this study suggest that human abdominal adipose tissues under quasi-static and dynamic multiaxial loadings can be characterized as a nonlinear, anisotropic and viscoelastic soft biological material. The nonlinear and anisotropic features are consequences of the material's collagenous microstructure. The aligned collagenous septa observed in histological investigations causes the anisotropy of the tissue. A hyperelastic model used in this study was appropriate to represent the quasi-static multiaxial mechanical behavior of fat tissue. The constitutive parameters are intended to serve as a basis for soft tissue simulations using the finite element method, which is an apparent method for obtaining promising results in the field of plastic and reconstructive surgery. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Mechanics of additively manufactured biomaterials.

    Zadpoor, Amir A

    2017-06-01

    Additive manufacturing (3D printing) has found many applications in healthcare including fabrication of biomaterials as well as bioprinting of tissues and organs. Additively manufactured (AM) biomaterials may possess arbitrarily complex micro-architectures that give rise to novel mechanical, physical, and biological properties. The mechanical behavior of such porous biomaterials including their quasi-static mechanical properties and fatigue resistance is not yet well understood. It is particularly important to understand the relationship between the designed micro-architecture (topology) and the resulting mechanical properties. The current special issue is dedicated to understanding the mechanical behavior of AM biomaterials. Although various types of AM biomaterials are represented in the special issue, the primary focus is on AM porous metallic biomaterials. As a prelude to this special issue, this editorial reviews some of the latest findings in the mechanical behavior of AM porous metallic biomaterials so as to describe the current state-of-the-art and set the stage for the other studies appearing in the issue. Some areas that are important for future research are also briefly mentioned. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. PCB extraction from ORNL tank WC-14 using a unique solvent

    Bloom, G.A.; Lucero, A.J.; Koran, L.J.; Turner, E.N.

    1995-09-01

    This report summarizes the development work of the Engineering Development Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for an organic extraction method for removing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from tank WC-14. Tank WC-14 is part of the ORNL liquid low-level radioactive tank waste system and does not meet new secondary containment and leak detection regulations. These regulations require the tank to be taken out of service, and remediated before tank removal. To remediate the tank, the PCBs must be removed; the tank contents can then be transferred to the Melton Valley Storage Tanks before final disposal. The solvent being used for the PCB extraction experiments is triethylamine, an aliphatic amine that is soluble in water below 60 degrees F but insoluble in water above 90 degrees F. This property will allow the extraction to be carried out under fully miscible conditions within the tank; then, after tank conditions have been changed, the solvent will not be miscible with water and phase separation will occur. Phase separation between sludge, water, and solvent will allow solvent (loaded with PCBs) to be removed from the tank for disposal. After removing the PCBs from the sludge and removing the sludge from the tank, administrative control of the tank can be transferred to ORNL's Environmental Restoration Program, where priorities will be set for tank removal. Experiments with WC-14 sludge show that greater than 90% extraction efficiencies can be achieved with one extraction stage and that PCB concentration in the sludge can be reduced to below 2 ppm in three extractions. It is anticipated that three extractions will be necessary to reduce the PCB concentration to below 2 ppm during field applications. The experiments conducted with tank WC-14 sludge transferred less than 0.03% of the original alpha contamination and less than 0.002% of the original beta contamination

  8. Benchmarking, Research, Development, and Support for ORNL Automated Image and Signature Retrieval (AIR/ASR) Technologies

    Tobin, K.W.

    2004-06-01

    This report describes the results of a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with Applied Materials, Inc. (AMAT) of Santa Clara, California. This project encompassed the continued development and integration of the ORNL Automated Image Retrieval (AIR) technology, and an extension of the technology denoted Automated Signature Retrieval (ASR), and other related technologies with the Defect Source Identification (DSI) software system that was under development by AMAT at the time this work was performed. In the semiconductor manufacturing environment, defect imagery is used to diagnose problems in the manufacturing line, train yield management engineers, and examine historical data for trends. Image management in semiconductor data systems is a growing cause of concern in the industry as fabricators are now collecting up to 20,000 images each week. In response to this concern, researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) developed a semiconductor-specific content-based image retrieval method and system, also known as AIR. The system uses an image-based query-by-example method to locate and retrieve similar imagery from a database of digital imagery using visual image characteristics. The query method is based on a unique architecture that takes advantage of the statistical, morphological, and structural characteristics of image data, generated by inspection equipment in industrial applications. The system improves the manufacturing process by allowing rapid access to historical records of similar events so that errant process equipment can be isolated and corrective actions can be quickly taken to improve yield. The combined ORNL and AMAT technology is referred to hereafter as DSI-AIR and DSI-ASR.

  9. Russian Pulsating Mixer Pump Deployment in the Gunite and Associated Tanks at ORNL

    Hatchell, Brian K.; Lewis, Ben; Johnson, Marshall A.; Randolph, J. G.

    2001-01-01

    In FY 1998, Pulsating Mixer Pump (PMP) technology, consisting of a jet mixer powered by a reciprocating air supply, was selected for deployment in one of the Gunite and Associated Tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to mobilize settled solids. The pulsating mixer pump technology was identified during FY 1996 and FY 1997 technical exchanges between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Tanks Focus Area Retrieval and Closure program, the DOE Environmental Management International Programs, and delegates from Russia as a promising technology that could be implemented in the DOE complex. During FY 1997, the pulsating mixer pump technology, provided by the Russian Integrated Mining Chemical Company, was tested at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to observe its ability to suspend settled solids. Based on the results of this demonstration, ORNL and DOE staff determined that a modified pulsating mixer pump would meet project needs for remote sludge mobilization of Gunite tank sludge and reduce the cost of operation and maintenance of more expensive mixing systems. The functions and requirements of the system were developed by combining the results and recommendations from the pulsating mixer pump demonstration at PNNL with the requirements identified by staff at ORNL involved with the remediation of the Gunite and Associated Tanks. The PMP is comprised of a pump chamber, check valve, a working gas supply pipe, a discharge manifold, and four jet nozzles. The pump uses two distinct cycles, fill and discharge, to perform its mixing action. During the fill cycle, vacuum is applied to the pump chamber by an eductor, which draws liquid into the pump. When the liquid level inside the chamber reaches a certain level, the chamber is pressurized with compressed air to discharge the liquid through the jet nozzles and back into the tank to mobilize sludge and settled solids.

  10. Influence of primary α-phase volume fraction on the mechanical properties of Ti-6Al-4V alloy at different strain rates and temperatures

    Ren, Yu; Zhou, Shimeng; Luo, Wenbo; Xue, Zhiyong; Zhang, Yajing

    2018-03-01

    Bimodal microstructures with primary α-phase volume fractions ranging from 14.3% to 57.1% were gained in Ti-6Al-4V (Ti-64) alloy through annealed in two-phase region at various temperatures below the β-transus point. Then the influence of the primary α-phase volume fraction on the mechanical properties of Ti-64 were studied. The results show that, at room temperature and a strain rate of 10‑3 s‑1, the yield stress decreases but the fracture strain augments with added primary α-phase volume fraction. The equiaxed primary α-phase possesses stronger ability to coordinate plastic deformation, leading to the improvement of the ductile as well as degradation of the strength of Ti-64 with higher primary α-phase volume fraction. As the temperature goes up to 473 K, the quasi-static yield stress and ultimate strength decrease first and then increase with the incremental primary α-phase volume fraction, due to the interaction between the work hardening and the softening caused by the DRX and the growth of the primary α-phase. At room temperature and a strain rate of 3×103 s‑1, the varying pattern of strength with the primary α-phase volume fraction resembles that at a quasi-static strain rate. However, the flow stress significantly increases but the strain-hardening rate decreases compared to those at quasi-static strain rate due to the competition between the strain rate hardening and the thermal softening during dynamic compression process.

  11. Safety analysis report for packaging: the ORNL gas-cylinder fire and impact shield

    Evans, J.H.; Levine, D.L.; Eversole, R.E.

    1977-10-01

    The ORNL radioactive gas-cylinder fire and impact shield was designed and fabricated at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant for the transport of cylinders filled with radioactive gases. The shield was evaluated analytically and experimentally to determine its compliance with the applicable regulations governing containers in which radioactive and fissile materials are transported. Computational and test procedures were used to determine the structural integrity and thermal behavior of the cask relative to the general standards for normal conditions of transport and the standards for hypothetical accident conditions. Results of the evaluation demonstrate that the container is in compliance with the applicable regulations

  12. Type B investigation report of curium-244 exposure at the ORNL TRU Facility, January 15, 1986

    Love, G.L.; Butler, H.M.; Duncan, D.T.; Oakes, T.W.

    1986-04-01

    This Type B Investigative Report provides an evaluation of relevant events and activities that led to, were a part of, or resulted from the release of curium-244 in the Building 7920 facility at ORNL in January 1986. Impacts have been evaluated with respect to employee exposures and the costs and loss of productivity resulting from increased bioassay analyses and activities of investigative committees. Management systems evaluated include (1) training of employees performing lab analyses, (2) adherence to procedures, and (3) response to unusual circumstances

  13. Radiological safety considerations in the design and operation of the ORNL Transuranium Research Laboratory (TRL)

    Haynes, C.E.

    1976-01-01

    The Transuranium Research Laboratory (TRL) is the central facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for chemical and physical research involving transuranium elements. Transuranium Research Laboratory investigations are about equally divided between studies of inorganic and structural chemistry of the heavy elements and nuclear structure and properties of their isotopes. Elements studied include neptunium, plutonium, americium, curium, berkelium, californium, and einsteinium, each in microgram-to-gram quantities depending upon availability and experimental requirements. This paper describes an eight-step safety procedure followed in planning and approving individual research projects. This procedure should provide an optimum margin of safety and should permit the accomplishment of successful research

  14. Cost Estimates for the Decontamination and Decommissioning of Eight ORNL Buildings

    Hogan, M.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) contains a number of buildings that are antiquated and no longer used. These buildings historically were used for the production of atomic weapons and often remain contaminated with radioactive materials. Certain costs and risks are associated with the long-term stewardship of the buildings. One way to reduce these liabilities is to eliminate the buildings that are no longer in use and are not expected to be used in the future. Some of these buildings at ORNL are located in an area known as 'Isotope Circle'. From this area, eight buildings that are expected to be decontaminated and decommissioned (D and D) in the next five to ten years were chosen to have cost estimates completed. The specific facilities are Buildings 3030, 3031, 3118, 3032, 3033, 3033 Annex, 3034, and 3093. There are many challenges for estimating the costs to D and D buildings potentially contaminated with radionuclides. Each building is unique, has various types and levels of contamination, and (as in this case) often lacks up-to-date information. Because of these limitations, order-of- magnitude cost estimates for each of the eight ORNL buildings were completed using parametric cost modeling software known as RACER TM (Remedial Action Cost Engineering and Requirements System). This type of cost estimate is useful for screening technical concepts and is used for budgetary planning. For the eight buildings evaluated in this study, the total cost to D and D was estimated to be nearly $6 M. This value includes the direct cost of approximately $3.5 M to complete D and D and $2.5 M in cost markups. Also, assuming the actual project does not begin until the year 2010, this total cost is escalated to almost $6.7 M, which accounts for expected inflation. Although the cost estimates in this study were expected to have a wide range in accuracy, there are various factors that could impact these estimates in a negative or positive fashion

  15. Analysis of traces at ORNL's new high-flux neutron activation laboratory

    Ricci, E.; Handley, T.H.; Dyer, F.F.

    1974-01-01

    The investigations are outlined, which are carried out in order to develop (preferably instrumental) methods for multielement analysis of various trace elements. For this reason a new High-Flux NAA Laboratory was constructed at ORNL's. A general review is given on the Laboratory, further some methods and applications are shown. In the field of comparator activation analysis comparative data are given on mercury determinations in various matrices, and on arsenic determination in grasshoppers. This later method was used to trace the transport of arsenic containing pesticides. Some data are given on absolute activation analysis of Na, Ci, Mn, Br, and Au, too. (K.A.)

  16. Safety analysis report for packaging: the ORNL gas-cylinder fire and impact shield

    Evans, J.H.; Levine, D.L.; Eversole, R.E.; Mouring, R.W.

    1983-04-01

    The ORNL gas-cylinder fire and impact shield was designed and fabricated at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant for the transport of cylinders filled with radioactive gases. The shield was evaluated analytically and experimentally to determine its compliance with the applicable regulations governing containers in which radioactive and fissile materials are transported, and the results are reported herein. Computational and test procedures were used to determine the structural integrity and thermal behavior of the cask relative to the general standards for normal conditions of transport and the standards for hypothetical accident conditions. Results of the evaluation demonstrate that the container is in compliance with the applicable regulations

  17. Supplementary neutron flux calculations for the ORNL pool critical assembly pressure vessel facility

    Maerker, R.E.; Maudlin, P.J.

    1981-02-01

    A three-dimensional Monte Carlo calculation was performed to estimate the neutron flux in the 8/7 configuration of the ORNL Pool Critical Assembly Pressure Vessel Facility. The calculational tool was the multigroup transport code MORSE operated in the adjoint mode. The MORSE flux results compared well with those using a previously adopted procedure for constructing a three-dimensional flux from one- and two-dimensional discrete ordinates calculations using the DOT-IV code. This study concluded that use of these discrete ordinates constructions in previous calculations is sufficiently accurate and does not account for the existing discrepancies between calculation and experiment.

  18. Supplementary neutron flux calculations for the ORNL pool critical assembly pressure vessel facility

    Maerker, R.E.; Maudlin, P.J.

    1981-02-01

    A three-dimensional Monte Carlo calculation was performed to estimate the neutron flux in the 8/7 configuration of the ORNL Pool Critical Assembly Pressure Vessel Facility. The calculational tool was the multigroup transport code MORSE operated in the adjoint mode. The MORSE flux results compared well with those using a previously adopted procedure for constructing a three-dimensional flux from one- and two-dimensional discrete ordinates calculations using the DOT-IV code. This study concluded that use of these discrete ordinates constructions in previous calculations is sufficiently accurate and does not account for the existing discrepancies between calculation and experiment

  19. ORNL experiments to characterize fuel release from the reactor primary containment in severe LMFBR accidents

    Wright, A.L.; Kress, T.S.; Smith, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents results from aerosol source term experiments performed in the ORNL Aerosol Release and Transport (ART) Program sponsored by the US NRC. The tests described were performed to provide information on fuel release from an LMFBR primary containment as a result of a hypothetical core-disruptive accident (HCDA). The release path investigated in these tests assumes that a fuel/sodium bubble is formed after disassembly that transports fuel and fission products through the sodium coolant and cover gas to be relased into the reactor secondary containment. Due to the excellent heat transfer characteristics of the sodium, there is potential for large attenuation of the maximum release

  20. Studies of (p, γ) reactions with the Daresbury Recoil Separator at ORNL'S HRIBF

    Fitzgerald, R.; Abbotoy, E.; Bardayan, D.W.; Blackmon, J.C.; Champagne, A.E.; Chen, A.A.; Greife, U.; Hill, D.W.; James, A.N.; Kozub, R.L.; Lewis, T.A.; Livesay, R.; Ma, Z.; Mahan, S.L.; McConnell, J.W.; Milner, W.T.; Moazen, B.H.; Parker, P.D.; Pierce, D.E.; Roettger, M.E.; Sahin, L.; Shapira, D.; Smith, M.S.; Strieder, F.; Swartz, K.B.; Thomas, J.S.; Visser, D.W.

    2005-01-01

    The fusion of protons with radioactive nuclei is important in stellar explosions such as novae and X-ray bursts and for the production of neutrinos in the sun. The Daresbury Recoil Separator and a windowless gas target system have been installed at ORNL's Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) for measurements of proton capture reactions in inverse kinematics with radioactive ion beams. The performance of the system has been characterized with a number of experiments using stable ion beams. We report on results from these commissioning measurements and plans for measurements of the 1 H( 17 F, 18 Ne) and 1 H( 7 Be, 8 B) reactions

  1. Safety analysis report for packaging: the ORNL HFIR unirradiated fuel element shipping container

    Evans, J.H.; Boulet, J.A.M.; Eversole, R.E.

    1977-11-01

    The ORNL HFIR unirradiated fuel element shipping container was designed and fabricated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the transport of HFIR unirradiated fuel elements. The container was evaluated analytically and experimentally to determine its compliance with the applicable regulations governing containers in which radioactive and fissile materials are transported, and the evaluation is the subject of this report. Computational and test procedures were used to determine the structural integrity and thermal behavior of the cask relative to the general standards for normal conditions of transport and the standards for the hypothetical accident conditions. The results of the evaluation demonstrate that the container is in compliance with the applicable regulations

  2. Safety analysis report for packaging: the ORNL in-pile capsule shipping cask

    Evans, J.H.; Chipley, K.K.; Haynie, C.B.; Crowley, W.K.; Just, R.A.

    1977-11-01

    The ORNL in-pile capsule shipping cask is used to transport irradiated experimental capsules and spent fuel elements. The cask was analytically evaluated to determine its compliance with the applicable regulations governing containers in which radioactive materials are transported. Computational procedures were used to determine the structural integrity and thermal behavior of the cask relative to the general standards for normal conditions of transport and the standards for the hypothetical accident conditions. The results of the evaluation show that the cask is in compliance with the applicable regulations

  3. FLANGE-ORNL, Flanged Pipe Joint Stress Analysis, Internal Pressure, Moment Loads, Temperature

    Rodabaugh, E.C.; Moore, S.E.

    1979-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: FLANGE-ORNL calculates appropriate loads, stresses, and displacements for the flanges, bolts, and gaskets that comprise a flanged piping joint for internal pressure or moment loading on the pipe, temperature difference between the flange hub and ring, and variations in bolt load that result from pressure, hub-ring temperature gradient and/or bolt-ring temperature differences. Flanges considered may be tapered-hub, straight or blind. 2 - Method of solution: The solution is based on discontinuity analysis and the theory of plates and shells

  4. Mechanical Modelling of Pultrusion Process: 2D and 3D Numerical Approaches

    Baran, Ismet; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Akkerman, Remko

    2015-01-01

    The process induced variations such as residual stresses and distortions are a critical issue in pultrusion, since they affect the structural behavior as well as the mechanical properties and geometrical precision of the final product. In order to capture and investigate these variations......, a mechanical analysis should be performed. In the present work, the two dimensional (2D) quasi-static plane strain mechanical model for the pultrusion of a thick square profile developed by the authors is further improved using generalized plane strain elements. In addition to that, a more advanced 3D thermo......-chemical-mechanical analysis is carried out using 3D quadratic elements which is a novel application for the numerical modelling of the pultrusion process. It is found that the 2D mechanical models give relatively reasonable and accurate stress and displacement evolutions in the transverse direction as compared to the 3D...

  5. Involvement of the ORNL Chemical Technology Division in contaminated air and water handling at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station

    Brooksbank, R.E.; King, L.J.

    1979-08-01

    The President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island requested that Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) generate documents concerning two areas in which ORNL personnel provided on-site assistance following the accident on March 28, 1979. These are: instrumentation diagnostics, and the treatment of radioactive wastes and liquid effluents stemming from the accident. This report describes the involvement of the ORNL Chemical Technology Division (CTD) in contaminated air and water handling at Three Mile Island

  6. Grout and vitrification formula development for immobilization of hazardous radioactive tank sludges at ORNL

    Gilliam, T.M.; Spence, R.D.

    1997-01-01

    Stabilization/solidification (S/S) has been identified as the preferred treatment option for hazardous radioactive sludges, and currently grouting and vitrification are considered the leading candidate S/S technologies. Consequently, a project was initiated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to define composition envelopes, or operating windows, for acceptable grout and glass formulations containing Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) sludges. The resulting data are intended to be used as guidance for the eventual treatment of the MVST sludges by the government and/or private sector. Wastewater at ORNL is collected, evaporated, and stored in the MVSTs pending treatment for disposal. The waste separates into two phases: sludge and supernate. The sludges in the tank bottoms have been accumulating for several years and contain a high amount of radioactivity, with some classified as transuranic (TRU) sludges. The available total constituent analysis for the MVST sludge indicates that the Resource and Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) metal concentrations are high enough to be potentially RCRA hazardous; therefore, these sludges have the potential to be designated as mixed TRU waste. S/S treatment must be performed to remove free liquids and reduce the leach rate of RCRA metals. This paper focuses on initial results for the development of the operating window for vitrification. However, sufficient data on grouting are presented to allow a comparison of the two options

  7. Development of in situ vitrification for remediation of ORNL contaminated soils

    Tixier, J.S.; Spalding, B.P.

    1994-08-01

    A full-scale field treatability study of in situ vitrification (ISV) is underway at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the remediation of radioactive liquid waste seepage pits and trenches that received over one million curies of mixed fission products (mostly 137 Cs and 90 Sr) during the 1950s and 1960s. The treatability study is being conducted on a portion of the original seepage pit and will support an Interim Record of Decision (IROD) for closure of one or more of the seven seepage pits and trenches in early fiscal year (FY) 1996. Mr treatability study will establish ft technical performance of ISV for remediation of the contaminated soil sites. Melt operations at ORNL are expected to begin in early FY 1994. This paper presents the latest accomplishments of the project in preparation for the field testing. Discussion centers on the results of a parametric crucible melt study, a description of the site characterization efforts, and the salient features of a new hood design

  8. Validation and verification of the ORNL Monte Carlo codes for nuclear safety analysis

    Emmett, M.B.

    1993-01-01

    The process of ensuring the quality of computer codes can be very time consuming and expensive. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Monte Carlo codes all predate the existence of quality assurance (QA) standards and configuration control. The number of person-years and the amount of money spent on code development make it impossible to adhere strictly to all the current requirements. At ORNL, the Nuclear Engineering Applications Section of the Computing Applications Division is responsible for the development, maintenance, and application of the Monte Carlo codes MORSE and KENO. The KENO code is used for doing criticality analyses; the MORSE code, which has two official versions, CGA and SGC, is used for radiation transport analyses. Because KENO and MORSE were very thoroughly checked out over the many years of extensive use both in the United States and in the international community, the existing codes were open-quotes baselined.close quotes This means that the versions existing at the time the original configuration plan is written are considered to be validated and verified code systems based on the established experience with them

  9. Data base management activities for the Remedial Action Program at ORNL: Calendar year 1988

    Voorhees, L.D.; Hook, L.A.; Gentry, M.J.; McCord, R.A.; Faulkner, M.A.; Bledsoe, J.L.; Newman, K.A.; Owen, P.T.; Rosen, A.E.

    1989-04-01

    The ORNL Remedial Action Program (RAP) was established in 1985 in response to state and federal regulations mandating corrective actions at contaminated sites. To achieve this goal, numerous and varied studies are being conducted to characterize the type and extent of contamination. Environmental data collected in support of other programs at ORNL are also of use to RAP. Collectively, these studies are generating a voluminous amount of data. A computerized Data and Information Management System (DIMS) was developed for RAP to (1) provide a centralized repository for data pertinent to RAP and (2) provide support for the investigations and assessments leading to the long-term remediation of contaminated facilities and sites. The current DIMS and its role in supporting RAP during 1988 are described. The DIMS consists of three components: (1) the Numeric Data Base, (2) the Bibliographic Data Base, and (3) the Records Control Data Base. This report addresses all three data bases, but focuses on a description of the contents of the Numeric Data Base. The types of numeric data currently available are summarized in the tables and figures. More detailed information on the contents of the RAP Numeric Data Base has been assembled in a menu-driven format on IBM PC diskettes, which are available upon request. 6 refs

  10. Grout and vitrification formula development for immobilization of hazardous radioactive tank sludges at ORNL

    Gilliam, T.M.; Spence, R.D.

    1997-12-31

    Stabilization/solidification (S/S) has been identified as the preferred treatment option for hazardous radioactive sludges, and currently grouting and vitrification are considered the leading candidate S/S technologies. Consequently, a project was initiated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to define composition envelopes, or operating windows, for acceptable grout and glass formulations containing Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) sludges. The resulting data are intended to be used as guidance for the eventual treatment of the MVST sludges by the government and/or private sector. Wastewater at ORNL is collected, evaporated, and stored in the MVSTs pending treatment for disposal. The waste separates into two phases: sludge and supernate. The sludges in the tank bottoms have been accumulating for several years and contain a high amount of radioactivity, with some classified as transuranic (TRU) sludges. The available total constituent analysis for the MVST sludge indicates that the Resource and Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) metal concentrations are high enough to be potentially RCRA hazardous; therefore, these sludges have the potential to be designated as mixed TRU waste. S/S treatment must be performed to remove free liquids and reduce the leach rate of RCRA metals. This paper focuses on initial results for the development of the operating window for vitrification. However, sufficient data on grouting are presented to allow a comparison of the two options.

  11. Production of Thorium-229 at the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Boll, Rose Ann; Garland, Marc A.; Mirzadeh, Saed

    2008-01-01

    The investigation of targeted cancer therapy using -emitters has developed considerably in recent years and clinical trials have generated promising results. In particular, the initial clinical trials for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia have demonstrated the effectiveness of the -emitter 213Bi in killing cancer cells. Pre-clinical studies have also shown the potential application of both 213Bi and its 225Ac parent radionuclide in a variety of cancer systems and targeted radiotherapy. Bismuth-213 is obtained from a radionuclide generator system from decay of the 10-d 225Ac parent, a member of the 7340-y 229Th chain. Currently, 233U is the only viable source for high purity 229Th; however, due to increasing difficulties associated with 233U safeguards, processing additional 233U is presently unfeasible. The recent decision to downblend and dispose of enriched 233U further diminished the prospects for extracting 229Th from 233U stock. Nevertheless, the anticipated growth in demand for 225Ac may soon exceed the levels of 229Th (∼40 g or ∼8 Ci; ∼80 times the current ORNL 229Th stock) present in the aged 233U stockpile. The alternative routes for the production of 229Th, 225Ra and 225Ac include both reactor and accelerator approaches. Here, we describe production of 229Th via neutron transmutation of 226Ra targets in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR).

  12. Grout and glass performance in support of stabilization/solidification of ORNL tank sludges

    Spence, R.D.; Mattus, C.H.; Mattus, A.J.

    1998-09-01

    Wastewater at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is collected, evaporated, and stored in the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST) and Bethel Valley Evaporator Storage Tanks (BVEST) pending treatment for disposal. In addition, some sludges and supernatants also requiring treatment remain in two inactive tank systems: the gunite and associated tanks (GAAT) and the old hydrofracture (OHF) tank. The waste consists of two phases: sludge and supernatant. The sludges contain a high amount of radioactivity, and some are classified as TRU sludges. Some Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metal concentrations are high enough to be defined as RCRA hazardous; therefore, these sludges are presumed to be mixed TRU waste. Grouting and vitrification are currently two likely stabilization/solidification alternatives for mixed wastes. Grouting has been used to stabilize/solidify hazardous and low-level radioactive waste for decades. Vitrification has been developed as a high-level radioactive alternative for decades and has been under development recently as an alternative disposal technology for mixed waste. The objective of this project is to define an envelope, or operating window, for grout and glass formulations for ORNL tank sludges. Formulations will be defined for the average composition of each of the major tank farms (BVEST/MVST, GAAT, and OHF) and for an overall average composition of all tank farms. This objective is to be accomplished using surrogates of the tank sludges with hot testing of actual tank sludges to check the efficacy of the surrogates

  13. Tissue-Level Mechanical Properties of Bone Contributing to Fracture Risk.

    Nyman, Jeffry S; Granke, Mathilde; Singleton, Robert C; Pharr, George M

    2016-08-01

    Tissue-level mechanical properties characterize mechanical behavior independently of microscopic porosity. Specifically, quasi-static nanoindentation provides measurements of modulus (stiffness) and hardness (resistance to yielding) of tissue at the length scale of the lamella, while dynamic nanoindentation assesses time-dependent behavior in the form of storage modulus (stiffness), loss modulus (dampening), and loss factor (ratio of the two). While these properties are useful in establishing how a gene, signaling pathway, or disease of interest affects bone tissue, they generally do not vary with aging after skeletal maturation or with osteoporosis. Heterogeneity in tissue-level mechanical properties or in compositional properties may contribute to fracture risk, but a consensus on whether the contribution is negative or positive has not emerged. In vivo indentation of bone tissue is now possible, and the mechanical resistance to microindentation has the potential for improving fracture risk assessment, though determinants are currently unknown.

  14. Mechanics of arterial subfailure with increasing loading rate.

    Stemper, Brian D; Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A

    2007-01-01

    Arterial subfailure leads to delayed symptomatology and high morbidity and mortality rates, particularly for the thoracic aorta and carotid arteries. Although arterial injuries occur during high-velocity automotive collisions, previous studies of arterial subfailure focused on quasi-static loading. This investigation subjected aortic segments to increasing loading rates to quantify effects on elastic, subfailure, and ultimate vessel mechanics. Sixty-two specimens were axially distracted, and 92% demonstrated subfailure before ultimate failure. With increasing loading rate, stress at initial subfailure and ultimate failure significantly increased, and strain at initial subfailure and ultimate failure significantly decreased. Present results indicate increased susceptibility for arterial subfailure and/or dissection under higher-rate extension. According to the present results, automotive occupants are at greater risk of arterial injury under higher velocity impacts due to greater body segment motions in addition to decreased strain tolerance to subfailure and catastrophic failure.

  15. Mechanical characterization of hybrid and functionally-graded aluminum open-cell foams with nanocrystalline-copper coatings

    Sun, Yi

    Cellular/foam materials found in nature such as bone, wood, and bamboo are usually functionally graded by having a non-uniform density distribution and inhomogenous composition that optimizes their global mechanical performance. Inspired by such naturally engineered products, the current study was conducted towards the development of functionally graded hybrid metal foams (FGHMF) with electrodeposited (ED) nanocrystalline coatings. First, the deformation and failure mechanisms of aluminum/copper (Al/Cu) hybrid foams were investigated using finite element analyses at different scales. The micro-scale behavior was studied based on single ligament models discretized using continuum elements and the macro-scale behavior was investigated using beam-element based finite element models of representative unit volumes consisting of multiple foam cells. With a detailed constitutive material behavior and material failure considered for both the aluminum ligament and the nano-copper coating, the numerical models were able to capture the unique behavior of Al/Cu hybrid foams, such as the typically observed sudden load drop after yielding. The numerical models indicate that such load drop is caused by the fracture of foam ligaments initiated from the rupture of the ED nano-copper coating due to its low ductility. This failure mode jeopardizes the global energy absorption capacity of hybrid foams, especially when a thick coating is applied. With the purpose of enhancing the performance of Al/Cu hybrid foams, an annealing process, which increased the ductility of the nanocrystalline copper coating by causing recovery, recrystallination and grain growth, was introduced in the manufacturing of Al/Cu hybrid foams. Quasi-static experimental results indicate that when a proper amount of annealing is applied, the ductility of the ED copper can be effectively improved and the compressive and tensile behavior of Al/Cu hybrid foams can be significantly enhanced, including better energy

  16. An investigation of dynamic mechanical behaviour of Ti6Al4V titanium alloy at room temperature

    Ran Chun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the high strain rate shear behaviour of Ti6Al4V titanium alloy, a series of dynamic compression experiments has been performed by split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB using Flat Hat-shaped specimen at room temperature. Macro true shear stress-true strain curves were obtained under different strain rate loading conditions at room temperature. The effects of strain hardening and strain rate hardening on the dynamic mechanical properties of Ti6Al4V titanium alloy were discussed. Results indicate that a The higher the strain rate, the higher the flow stress, therefore, the material has obvious strain rate hardening effect, b It is ductile failure for Ti6Al4V titanium alloy under quasi-static loading condition, c For dynamical tests, the values for true shear stress increase with increasing true strain till the maximum true shear stress, on the contrary, the values for true shear stress decrease with increasing the true strain after the maximum true shear stress and d The flow stress increases with increasing the true strain under quasi-static loading condition during the plastic deformation.

  17. The influence of peak stress on the mechanical behavior and the substructural evolution in shock-prestrained zirconium

    Cerreta, E.; Gray, G.T. III; Henrie, B.L.; Brown, D.W.; Hixson, R.S.; Rigg, P.A.

    2004-01-01

    The post shock mechanical behavior and substructure evolution of zirconium (Zr) under shock prestrained at 5.8 and 8 GPa, above and below the pressure induced α-ω phase transition, has been quantified. The reload yield stress of Zr shock prestrained to 8 GPa was found to exhibit enhanced shock hardening when compared to the flow stress measured quasi-statically at an equivalent strain. In contrast, the reload yield behavior of Zr specimens shocked to 5.8 GPa did not exhibit enhanced shock hardening. The microstructure of the as-annealed and shock prestrained materials were examined. The presence of a reduced available glide distance due to a relatively more well developed dislocation substructure and increased twinning over quasi-static specimens deformed to comparable strains correlates with the increased yield stresses after shock prestraining at 8 GPa. Additionally, the retention of ∼ 40% by volume metastable high-pressure ω-phase in specimens shocked to 8 GPa and its absence in the 5.8 GPa specimen, is thought to contribute to the increased yield stress in the 8 GPa specimens

  18. Urban Typologies: Towards an ORNL Urban Information System (UrbIS)

    KC, B.; King, A. W.; Sorokine, A.; Crow, M. C.; Devarakonda, R.; Hilbert, N. L.; Karthik, R.; Patlolla, D.; Surendran Nair, S.

    2016-12-01

    Urban environments differ in a large number of key attributes; these include infrastructure, morphology, demography, and economic and social variables, among others. These attributes determine many urban properties such as energy and water consumption, greenhouse gas emissions, air quality, public health, sustainability, and vulnerability and resilience to climate change. Characterization of urban environments by a single property such as population size does not sufficiently capture this complexity. In addressing this multivariate complexity one typically faces such problems as disparate and scattered data, challenges of big data management, spatial searching, insufficient computational capacity for data-driven analysis and modelling, and the lack of tools to quickly visualize the data and compare the analytical results across different cities and regions. We have begun the development of an Urban Information System (UrbIS) to address these issues, one that embraces the multivariate "big data" of urban areas and their environments across the United States utilizing the Big Data as a Service (BDaaS) concept. With technological roots in High-performance Computing (HPC), BDaaS is based on the idea of outsourcing computations to different computing paradigms, scalable to super-computers. UrbIS aims to incorporate federated metadata search, integrated modeling and analysis, and geovisualization into a single seamless workflow. The system includes web-based 2D/3D visualization with an iGlobe interface, fast cloud-based and server-side data processing and analysis, and a metadata search engine based on the Mercury data search system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Results of analyses will be made available through web services. We are implementing UrbIS in ORNL's Compute and Data Environment for Science (CADES) and are leveraging ORNL experience in complex data and geospatial projects. The development of UrbIS is being guided by an investigation of

  19. Constitutive relations in plasticity, damage and fracture mechanics based on a work property

    Marigo, J.J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper is devoted to restrictions imposed by a work property of Drucker-Iliushin's type on the general class of mechanical systems with an elastic range which contains plastic, damaged and cracked media. The analysis is purely mechanical and quasi-static. Starting from very weak assumptions relative to this constitutive class, we obtain a fundamental inequality which generalizes Hill's maximal work principle. So we can justify, for instance: the convexity of the elastic domain and the normality rule of the plastic strain rate in stress space for the infinitesimal and some finite plasticity theories, Griffith's criterion in brittle fracture mechanics, and we obtain some original results for elastic and elastic plastic damaged materials. It must be noted that the procedure is purely deductive, the assumptions are explicit and the results are implications

  20. Engineering Physics Division progress report for period ending November 30, 1978. [ORNL

    Maienschein, F.C.

    1979-01-01

    Research and other activities of the Engineering Physics Division (formerly Neutron Physics Division) of ORNL during the period February 28, 1977 to November 30, 1978, are reported. The format is that of abstracts and summaries of prepared papers. Work is summarized in the following general areas: measurements of neutron cross sections and related quantities; cross-section theory, evaluations, and evaluation techniques; cross-section processing, testing, and sensitivity analyses; integral experiments and their analyses; development of methods for shield and reactor analyses; analyses for specific systems or applications (liquid-metal fast breeder reactor program, gas-cooled reactor program, alternate fuel cycle program, magnetic fusion energy program, high-energy physics program, accelerator breeding studies, miscellaneous studies); and information analysis and distribution. Overviews of each of these areas are included. (RWR)

  1. High power electron cyclotron heating in ISX and ORMAK Upgrade at ORNL

    England, A.C.; Eldridge, O.C.; Marcus, F.B.; Sprott, J.C.; Namkung, W.; Wilgen, J.B.

    1976-05-01

    A phased program of plasma heating at the electron cyclotron frequency is proposed for the Oak Ridge tokamaks ISX and ORMAK Upgrade. The past history of the program of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) at ORNL on mirrors and in the ELMO Bumpy Torus has been successful. Future technological developments in the production of high power high frequency microwave tubes look promising at this time. The physics of wave propagation and particle heating are fairly well understood and indicate the viability of this technique. Studies on breakdown and on runaway electron reduction will provide useful information for larger machines. Recent experiments in the USSR on small tokamaks have shown that ECH is a viable heating technique. Providing that the microwave tubes become available, the engineering considerations suggest that the technique is practical and workable, based on present day technology

  2. Software architecture for the ORNL large-coil test facility data system

    Blair, E.T.; Baylor, L.R.

    1986-01-01

    The VAX-based data-acquisition system for the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility (IFSMTF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a second-generation system that evolved from a PDP-11/60-based system used during the initial phase of facility testing. The VAX-based software represents a layered implementation that provides integrated access to all of the data sources within the system, decoupling end-user data retrieval from various front-end data sources through a combination of software architecture and instrumentation data bases. Independent VAX processes manage the various front-end data sources, each being responsible for controlling, monitoring, acquiring, and disposing data and control parameters for access from the data retrieval software. This paper describes the software architecture and the functionality incorporated into the various layers of the data system

  3. ORNL Solid Waste Storage Area 6 trench photos and geologic descriptions, July 1984-September 1985

    Davis, E.C.; Marshall, D.S.; Stansfield, R.G.; Dreier, R.B.

    1986-03-01

    The Environmental Sciences Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has initiated a photographic and descriptive geologic study of low-level waste trenches opened in Solid Waste Storage Area 6 (SWSA-6). From July 1984 through September 1985, trenches were excavated, geologically described, and photographed before being filled and closed. Only three trenches (Nos. 438, 448, and 465) were excavated and closed before photography could be scheduled. It is recommended that the systematic trench characterization procedure outlined in this report be continued under the direction of ORNL's Operations Division with support from both Environmental Sciences and the Engineering divisions. Publication of such a compilation of trench photos on a yearly basis will serve not only as a part of Department of Energy trench documentation requirements but also as a component of a SWSA-6 geologic data base being developed for current research and development activities. 2 refs., 38 figs

  4. ORNL implementation of new health and safety requirements (DOE Order 5480.11)

    Abercrombie, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    New mandates in radiological protection outlined in DOE Order 5480. 11, include changes in the methodology for determining total radiation dose, ALARA program accountability, monitoring requirements, and standards for public entrance into controlled areas. The new order places distinct requirements concerning training at all DOE facilities. Radiation protection training requirements are addressed, including the effective communication of operations changes to all employees. This paper details the endeavors underway at ORNL in designing, developing, and delivering the training required by the new mandates. Strategies taken to reach the intended goals are explained. Efforts involve the design and implementation of the above mentioned radiation protection programs, a job-specific ALARA instructional package, and a Risk-Based Philosophy program matched to operational changes. 4 refs., 5 tabs

  5. Research and development at ORNL/CESAR towards cooperating robotic systems for hazardous environments

    Mann, R.C.; Fujimura, K.; Unseren, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    One of the frontiers in intelligent machine research is the understanding of how constructive cooperation among multiple autonomous agents can be effected. The effort at the Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research (CESAR)at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) focuses on two problem areas: (1) cooperation by multiple mobile robots in dynamic, incompletely known environments; and (2) cooperating robotic manipulators. Particular emphasis is placed on experimental evaluation of research and developments using the CESAR robot system testbeds, including three mobile robots, and a seven-axis, kinematically redundant mobile manipulator. This paper summarizes initial results of research addressing the decoupling of position and force control for two manipulators holding a common object, and the path planning for multiple robots in a common workspace. 15 refs., 3 figs

  6. Software architecture for the ORNL large coil test facility data system

    Blair, E.T.; Baylor, L.R.

    1986-01-01

    The VAX-based data acquisition system for the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility (IFSMTF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a second-generation system that evolved from a PDP-11/60-based system used during the initial phase of facility testing. The VAX-based software represents a layered implementation that provides integrated access to all of the data sources within the system, deoupling end-user data retrieval from various front-end data sources through a combination of software architecture and instrumentation data bases. Independent VAX processes manage the various front-end data sources, each being responsible for controlling, monitoring, acquiring and disposing data and control parameters for access from the data retrieval software. This paper describes the software architecture and the functionality incorporated into the various layers of the data system

  7. Modeling of the free space and focused magnetic field profiles of the ORNL superconducting motor

    Bailey, J.M.; Rader, M.; Sohns, C.W.; McKeever, J.; Schwenterly, S.W.

    1992-01-01

    The ORNL superconducting motor, is a device consisting of 4 DC superconducting magnets in a square cross section. These coils are arranged in a N-S-N-S configuration and at present have no iron flux return paths. Experimentally the device has been operated and has been shown to produce 102.3 kg-m of locked rotor torque at 100 Ampers winding current. The superconductors were operating at 40 Kelvin. The peak magnetic field at 2,100 amperes operating current was 2 Tesla on the cryostat face. Recently there has been an effort under way to improve the operating parameters of the device by improving the flux utilization of the device. This was to be accomplished by the use of flux focusing pole pieces. The effects of the pole pieces and the vacuum magnetic field have been modeled with the MSC EMAS code to see the possible benefit of adding pole pieces to the in situ experiment

  8. Software architecture for the ORNL large coil test facility data system

    Blair, E.T.; Baylor, L.R.

    1986-01-01

    The VAX based data acquisition system for the international fusion superconducting magnetic test facility (IFSMTF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a second generation system that evolved from a PDP-11/60 based system used during the initial phase of facility testing. The VAX based software represents a layered implementation that provides integrated access to all of the data sources within the system, decoupling en-user data retrieval from various front-end data sources through a combination of software architecture and instrumentation data bases. Independent VAX processes manage the various front-end data sources, each being responsible for controlling, monitoring, acquiring, and disposing data and control parameters for access from the data retrieval software

  9. Unique issues concerning ''placement'' vs ''movement'' of contaminated soils at ORNL's CERCLA sites

    Greer, J.K. Jr.; Schrof, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    At Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which is owned and operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE), there are several areas where hazardous wastes and/or radioactive materials have been placed in shallow land burial trenches or ''auger'' holes for disposal. Since Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) has been placed on the National Priority List (NPL) by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) applies to waste disposal sites at ORNL. Under CERCLA, the RCRA regulations, pertaining to the LDRs, apply to CERCLA activities if the regulations are deemed ''applicable or relevant and appropriate'' (ARARS) by the lead agency or by the EPA. This report discusses the following issue: Under what conditions will contaminated soil and debris generated at a Superfund site be subject to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) land disposal restrictions (LDRs) treatment standards?

  10. Review of ORNL-TSF shielding experiments for the gas-cooled Fast Breeder Reactor Program

    Abbott, L.S.; Ingersoll, D.T.; Muckenthaler, F.J.; Slater, C.O.

    1982-01-01

    During the period between 1975 and 1980 a series of experiments was performed at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility in support of the shield design for a 300-MW(e) Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Demonstration Plant. This report reviews the experiments and calculations, which included studies of: (1) neutron streaming in the helium coolant passageways in the GCFR core; (2) the effectiveness of the shield designed to protect the reactor grid plate from radiation damage; (3) the adequacy of the radial shield in protecting the PCRV (prestressed concrete reactor vessel) from radiation damage; (4) neutron streaming between abutting sections of the radial shield; and (5) the effectiveness of the exit shield in reducing the neutron fluxes in the upper plenum region of the reactor

  11. A proposed strategy for upgrade of the ORNL Process Wastewater Treatment Plant

    Kent, T.E.; Robinson, S.M.; Scott, C.B.

    1990-01-01

    An approach to the upgrade of the radiological Process Wastewater Treatment Plant (PWTP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developed that, if adopted, will result in significant cost reductions and improved water quality. The strategy described in this report satisfies the short-term upgrade needs of the PWTP and ultimately results in replacement of existing PWTP softening/ion- exchange technology with a zeolite molecular sieve treatment system for removal of radioactive contaminants from process wastewater. Use of zeolites will improve wastewater quality while reducing operating and disposal costs. The zeolite system would be constructed adjacent to the site now occupied by the Non-Radiological Process Wastewater Treatment Plant (NRWTP), thereby consolidating all process wastewater treatment systems at one location. 4 refs., 4 figs

  12. Initial formulation results for in situ grouting of a waste trench at ORNL Site No. 6

    Tallent, O.K.; McDaniel, E.W.; Spence, R.D.; Godsey, T.T.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation is being conducted by the Chemical Technology Division to assist the Environmental Sciences Division in developing a grout formulation for use in testing in situ grouting in a waste trench at ORNL Site 6. This final report satisfies the milestone of Subtack 12 entitled, ''Low Level Waste (LLW) Trench Grouting Assessment,'' which was initially issued as RAP-86-7, December 31, 1985. Grouts prepared from dry-solid blends containing Type I Portland cement, ASTM Class C or Class F fly ash, and bentonite, mixed water at ratios of 10 to 15 lb/gal, were evaluated. The grouts prepared with ASTM Class C fly ash exhibited significantly better properties than those prepared with ASTM Class F fly ash. The grouts containing ASTM Class C fly ash satisfy tentative performance criteria for the project. 8 refs., 7 tabs

  13. Safety analysis report for packaging: the ORNL lithium hydroxide fire and impact shield

    Evans, J.H.; Eversole, R.E.; Just, R.A.; Schaich, R.W.

    1984-07-01

    The ORNL Lithium Hydroxide Fire and Impact Shield and its packaging were designed and fabricated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to permit the transport of Type B quantities of radioactive material and limited quantities of fissionable material. The shield and its packaging were evaluated analytically and experimentally to determine its compliance with the applicable regulations governing containers in which radioactive and fissile materials are transported, and that evaluation is the subject of this report. Computational and test procedures were used to determine the structural integrity and thermal behavior of the shield relative to the general standards for normal conditions of transport and the standards for the hypothetical accident conditions. The results of the evaluation demonstrate that the shield and its packaging are in compliance with the applicable regulations. 16 references, 8 figures, 5 tables

  14. Safety analysis report for packaging: the ORNL lithium hydroxide fire and impact shield

    Evans, J.H.; Eversole, R.E.; Just, R.A.

    1977-11-01

    The ORNL lithium hydroxide fire and impact shield was designed and fabricated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to permit the transport of Type B and large quantities of radioactive material and limited quantities of fissionable material. The shield was evaluated analytically and experimentally to determine its compliance with the applicable regulations governing containers in which radioactive and fissile materials are transported, and that evaluation is the subject of this report. Computational and test procedures were used to determine the structural integrity and thermal behavior of the shield relative to the general standards for normal conditions of transport and the standards for the hypothetical accident conditions. The results of the evaluation demonstrate that the shield is in compliance with the applicable regulations

  15. A proposed strategy for upgrade of the ORNL process wastewater treatment plant

    Kent, T.E.; Robinson, S.M.; Scott, C.B.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on an approach to the upgrade of the radiological Process Wastewater Treatment Plant (PWTP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), which has been developed and that, if adopted, will result in significant cost reductions and improved water quality. The strategy described in this report satisfies the short-term upgrade needs of the PWTP and ultimately results in replacement of existing PWTP softening/ion-exchange technology with a zeolite molecular sieve treatment system for removal of radioactive contaminants from process wastewater. Use of zeolites will improve wastewater quality while reducing operating and disposal costs. The zeolite system would be constructed adjacent to the site now occupied by the Non-Radiological Process Wastewater Treatment Plant (NRWTP), thereby consolidating all process wastewater treatment systems at one location

  16. A multicomponent ion-exchange equilibrium model for chabazite columns treating ORNL wastewaters

    Perona, J.J.

    1993-06-01

    Planned near-term and long-term upgrades of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Process Waste Treatment Plant (PWTP) will use chabazite columns to remove 90 Sr and 137 Cs from process wastewater. A valid equilibrium model is required for the design of these columns and for evaluating their performance when influent wastewater composition changes. The cations exchanged, in addition to strontium and cesium, are calcium, magnesium, and sodium. A model was developed using the Wilson equation for the calculation of the solid-phase activity coefficients. The model was tested against chabazite column runs on two different wastewaters and found to be valid. A sensitivity analysis was carried out for the projected wastewater compositions, in which the model was used to predict changes in relative separation factors for strontium and cesium subject to changes in calcium, magnesium, and sodium concentrations

  17. Performance evaluation of the ORNL multi-elemental XRF analysis algorithms

    McElroy, Robert Dennis [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Hybrid K-Edge Densitometer (HKED) systems integrate both K-Edge Densitometry (KED) and X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) analyses to provide accurate rapid, assay results of the uranium and plutonium content of dissolver solution samples from nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities. Introduced for international safeguards applications in the late 1980s, the XRF component of the hybrid analyses is limited to quantification of U and Pu over a narrow range of U:Pu concentration ratios in the vicinity of ≈100. The analysis was further limited regarding the presence of minor actinide components where only a single minor actinide (typically Am) is included in the analysis and then only treated as an interference. The evolving nuclear fuel cycle has created the need to assay more complex dissolver solutions where uranium may no longer be the dominant actinide in the solution and the concentrations of the so called minor actinides (e.g., Th, Np, Am, and Cm) are sufficiently high that they can no longer be treated as impurities and ignored. Extension of the traditional HKED Region of Interest (ROI) based analysis to include these additional actinides is not possible due to the increased complexity of the XRF spectra. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed a spectral fitting approach to the HKED XRF measurement with an enhanced algorithm set to accommodate these complex XRF spectra. This report provides a summary of the spectral fitting methodology and examines the performance of these algorithms using data obtained from the ORNL HKED system, as well as data provided by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) on actual dissolver solutions.

  18. The ORNL Basemapping and Imagery Project: Data collection, processing and dissemination

    Tuttle, M.; Pace, P.

    1996-01-01

    Over the past three years, the GIS and Computer Modeling (GCM) Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), has been engaged in creating a very comprehensive geospatial data base for Department of Energy (DOE) installations managed by the DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO). This effort encompasses topographic, planimetric, land use/land cover, flood plain, digital elevation, and digital imagery data for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and surrounding areas. The ORR covers approximately 34,800 acres and includes ORNL, the K-25 Site and the Y-12 Plant. The geographic extent of the Base Mapping and Imagery Project covers the ORR and surrounding area and two other DOE plants (Portsmouth, Ohio and Paducah, Kentucky) for a total of 166,000 acres. The resulting data represent a major improvement in the spatial accuracy and currency of data which are used as a foundation for environmental restoration, facility studies, and other GIS data applications. A GIS data server was also created in order to store and disseminate the new basemapping data. This paper describes the history of the Base Mapping and Imagery Project with emphasis on the logistical aspects of data quality assessment. data tracking, and data product work flow for a large comprehensive spatial data base. The paper then describes the evolution of the GIS data server including its design from an FTP server to a NetScape-based World Wide Web interface. This combination of data and data access provides the ORR environmental community with a carefully configured and managed GIS dataset

  19. Development studies for the treatment of ORNL low-level liquid waste

    Campbell, D.O.; Lee, D.D.; Dillow, T.A.

    1991-11-01

    An experimental program is under way to investigate potential separation methods for application to specific problems relating to the management of low-level liquid wastes (LLLWs) at ORNL. This report summarizes experimental results that were acquired during fiscal year 1990 and have not been previously reported elsewhere. Measurements are presented for cesium and strontium removal from simulated high-salt waste compositions, using both inorganic ion- exchange sorbents and organic ion-exchange resins, and for one experiment with actual LLLW supernate solution from Melton Valley Storage Tank W-26, using inorganic sorbents. The purpose of the study was to acquire an extensive data base to support the development of flowsheets for decontamination of the LLLW currently stored at ORNL. Experimental measurements with inorganic ion exchangers focused on batch separations of cesium using several transition-metal hexacyanoferrate(2) compositions (ferrocyanides) and of strontium using titanium oxide-based sorbents. Cesium distribution coefficients in the range of 1 x 10 6 were generally observed with nickel and cobalt ferrocyanides at pH values ≤11, yielding DFs of about 100 with 100 ppm sorbent in a single-stage batch separation. Most organic ion-exchange resins are not very effective for cesium removal from such high salt concentrations, but a new resorcinol-based resin developed at the Savannah River Site was found to be considerably superior to any other such material tested. Several chelating resins were effective for removing strontium from the waste simulants. An ion-exchange column test successfully demonstrated the simultaneous removal of both cesium and strontium from a waste simulant solution

  20. Results of a Pilot-Scale Disinfection Test using Peracetic Acid (PAA) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Sewage Treatment Plant (STP)

    Taylor, Paul Allen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the results of a small pilot-scale test using PAA to disinfect a side stream of the effluent from the ORNL STP. These results provide the basis for requesting approval for full-scale use of PAA at the ORNL STP.

  1. Adjusting external doses from the ORNL and Y-12 facilities for the Oak Ridge Nuclear Facilities mortality study

    Watkins, J.P.; Cragle, D.L.; West, C.M.; Tankersley, W.G.; Frome, E.L.; Crawford-Brown, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents specific procedures used for adjusting radiation doses to radiation personnel at the ORNL and Y-12 plants during the early years. Topics discussed include: background information; selection of employment years to be considered; hardcopy monitoring methods and records; pocket meter data; and replacement of 1943 unmonitored employment years. These topics were discussed for both years

  2. Microstructure and mechanical behavior of direct metal laser sintered Inconel alloy 718

    Smith, Derek H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Bicknell, Jonathan; Jorgensen, Luke [Turbocam Energy Solutions, Turbocam International, Dover, NH 03820 (United States); Patterson, Brian M.; Cordes, Nikolaus L. [Materials Science Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Tsukrov, Igor [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Knezevic, Marko, E-mail: marko.knezevic@unh.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    In this paper, we investigate microstructure and quasi-static mechanical behavior of the direct metal laser sintered Inconel 718 superalloy as a function of build direction (BD). The printed material was further processed by annealing and double-aging, hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and machining. We characterize porosity fraction and distribution using micro X-ray computed tomography (μXCT), grain structure and crystallographic texture using electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD), and mechanical response in quasi-static tension and compression using standard mechanical testing at room temperature. Analysis of the μXCT imaging shows that majority of porosity develops in the outer layer of the printed material. However, porosity inside the material is also present. The EBSD measurements reveal formation of columnar grains, which favor < 001 > fiber texture components along the BD. These measurements also show evidence of coarse-grained microstructure present in the samples treated by HIP. Finally, analysis of grain boundaries reveal that HIP results in a large number of annealing twins compared to that in samples that underwent annealing and double-aging. The yield strength varies with the testing direction by approximately 7%, which is governed by a combination of grain morphology and crystallographic texture. In particular, we determine tension–compression asymmetry in the yield stress as well as anisotropy of the material flow during compression. We find that HIP lowers yield stress but improves ductility relative to the annealed and aged material. These results are discussed and critically compared with the data reported for wrought material in the same condition. - Highlights: • Microstructure and mechanical properties of DMLS Inconel 718 are studied in function of build direction. • Inhomogeneity of microstructure in the material in several conditions is quantified by μXCT and EBSD. • Anisotropy and asymmetry in the mechanical response are

  3. Microstructure and mechanical behavior of direct metal laser sintered Inconel alloy 718

    Smith, Derek H.; Bicknell, Jonathan; Jorgensen, Luke; Patterson, Brian M.; Cordes, Nikolaus L.; Tsukrov, Igor; Knezevic, Marko

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate microstructure and quasi-static mechanical behavior of the direct metal laser sintered Inconel 718 superalloy as a function of build direction (BD). The printed material was further processed by annealing and double-aging, hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and machining. We characterize porosity fraction and distribution using micro X-ray computed tomography (μXCT), grain structure and crystallographic texture using electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD), and mechanical response in quasi-static tension and compression using standard mechanical testing at room temperature. Analysis of the μXCT imaging shows that majority of porosity develops in the outer layer of the printed material. However, porosity inside the material is also present. The EBSD measurements reveal formation of columnar grains, which favor fiber texture components along the BD. These measurements also show evidence of coarse-grained microstructure present in the samples treated by HIP. Finally, analysis of grain boundaries reveal that HIP results in a large number of annealing twins compared to that in samples that underwent annealing and double-aging. The yield strength varies with the testing direction by approximately 7%, which is governed by a combination of grain morphology and crystallographic texture. In particular, we determine tension–compression asymmetry in the yield stress as well as anisotropy of the material flow during compression. We find that HIP lowers yield stress but improves ductility relative to the annealed and aged material. These results are discussed and critically compared with the data reported for wrought material in the same condition. - Highlights: • Microstructure and mechanical properties of DMLS Inconel 718 are studied in function of build direction. • Inhomogeneity of microstructure in the material in several conditions is quantified by μXCT and EBSD. • Anisotropy and asymmetry in the mechanical response are determined by

  4. Microstructure and mechanical properties of direct metal laser sintered TI-6AL-4V

    Becker, Thorsten Hermann

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS is a selective laser melting (SLM manufacturing process that can produce near net shape parts from metallic powders. A range of materials are suitable for SLM; they include various metals such as titanium, steel, aluminium, and cobalt-chrome alloys. This paper forms part of a research drive that aims to evaluate the material performance of the SLM-manufactured metals. It presents DMLS-produced Ti-6Al-4V, a titanium alloy often used in biomedical and aerospace applications. This paper also studies the effect of several heat treatments on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Ti-6Al-4V processed by SLM. It reports the achievable mechanical properties of the alloy, including quasi-static, crack growth behaviour, density and porosity distribution, and post-processing using various heat-treatment conditions.

  5. Demonstration of an in situ morphing hyperelliptical cambered span wing mechanism

    Manzo, Justin; Garcia, Ephrahim

    2010-01-01

    Research on efficient shore bird morphology inspired the hyperelliptical cambered span (HECS) wing, a crescent-shaped, aft-swept wing with vertically oriented wingtips. The wing reduces vorticity-induced circulation loss and outperforms an elliptical baseline when planar. Designed initially as a rigid wing, the HECS wing makes use of morphing to transition from a planar to a furled configuration, similar to that of a continuously curved winglet, in flight. A morphing wing concept mechanism is presented, employing shape memory alloy actuators to create a discretized curvature approximation. The aerodynamics for continuous wing shapes is validated quasi-statically through wind tunnel testing, showing enhanced planar HECS wing lift-to-drag performance over an elliptical wing, with the furled HECS wing showing minimal enhancements beyond this point. Wind tunnel tests of the active morphing wing prove the mechanism capable of overcoming realistic loading, while further testing may be required to establish aerodynamic merits of the HECS wing morphing maneuver

  6. Microstructures and mechanical properties of two-phase alloys based on NbCr{sub 2}

    Chen, K.C.; Kotula, P.G.; Cady, C.M.; Mauro, M.E.; Thoma, D.J.

    1999-07-01

    A two-phase, NbCrTi alloy (bcc + C15 Laves phase) has been developed using several alloy design methodologies. In efforts to understand processing-microstructure-property relationships, different processing routes were employed. The resulting microstructures and mechanical properties are discussed and compared. Plasma arc melted (PAM) samples served to establish baseline, as-cast properties. In addition, a novel processing technique, involving decomposition of a supersaturated and metastable precursor phase during hot isostatic pressing (HIP), was used to produce a refined, equilibrium two-phase microstructure. Quasi-static compression tests as a function of temperature were performed on both alloy types. Different deformation mechanisms were encountered based upon temperature and microstructure.

  7. Investigation of Gas Piston Actuated Opening-Closing Trunk Lid Mechanisms Used in Passenger Cars

    Ahmet YILDIZ

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the gas piston actuated opening-closing trunk lid mechanisms used in passenger cars are investigated theoretically and experimentally. First, the position analysis of the mechanism which is a four-bar linkage has been carried out. Then the quasi-static analyzes according to the principle of virtual work have been made, and so the hand force, one of the most important parameters in terms of ergonomics, required for opening and closing the trunk lid has been calculated. In order to verify this developed model, the hand force has been determined also experimentally, performing the physical tests on an existing vehicle at Turkish Automobile Factory Inc. (TOFAŞ. Eventually, it is observed that the results obtained from mathematical model and the experimental measurements are compatible each other. This established model will provide convenience for manufacturers to determine the hand force for different model of vehicles. 

  8. Lung tissue mechanics as an emergent phenomenon.

    Suki, Béla; Bates, Jason H T

    2011-04-01

    The mechanical properties of lung parenchymal tissue are both elastic and dissipative, as well as being highly nonlinear. These properties cannot be fully understood, however, in terms of the individual constituents of the tissue. Rather, the mechanical behavior of lung tissue emerges as a macroscopic phenomenon from the interactions of its microscopic components in a way that is neither intuitive nor easily understood. In this review, we first consider the quasi-static mechanical behavior of lung tissue and discuss computational models that show how smooth nonlinear stress-strain behavior can arise through a percolation-like process in which the sequential recruitment of collagen fibers with increasing strain causes them to progressively take over the load-bearing role from elastin. We also show how the concept of percolation can be used to link the pathologic progression of parenchymal disease at the micro scale to physiological symptoms at the macro scale. We then examine the dynamic mechanical behavior of lung tissue, which invokes the notion of tissue resistance. Although usually modeled phenomenologically in terms of collections of springs and dashpots, lung tissue viscoelasticity again can be seen to reflect various types of complex dynamic interactions at the molecular level. Finally, we discuss the inevitability of why lung tissue mechanics need to be complex.

  9. Development of a high-heat-flux target for multimegawatt, multisecond neutral beams at ORNL

    Combs, S.K.; Milora, S.L.; Bush, C.E.

    1984-01-01

    A high-heat-flux target has been developed for intercepting multimegawatt, multisecond neutral beam power at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Water-cooled copper swirl tubes are used for the heat transfer medium; these tubes exhibit an enhancement in burnout heat flux over conventional axial-flow tubes. The target consists of 126 swirl tubes (each 0.95 cm in outside diameter with 0.16-cm-thick walls and approx. =1 m long) arranged in a V-shape. Two arrays of parallel tubes inclined at an angle α to the beam axis form the V-shape, and this geometry reduces the surface heat flux by a factor of 1/sin α (for the present design, α =13 0 and 21 0 ). In tests with the ORNL long-pulse ion source (13- by 43-cm grid), the target has handled up to 3-MW, 30-s beam pulses with no deleterious effects. The peak power density was estimated at approx. =15 kW/cm 2 normal to the beam axis (5.4 kW/cm 2 maximum on tube surfaces). The water flow rate through the target was 41.6 L/s (660 gpm) or 0.33 L/s (5.2 gpm) per tube (axial flow velocity = 11.6 m/s). The corresponding pressure drop across the target was 1.14 MPa (165 psi) with an inlet pressure of 1.45 MPa (210 psia). Data are also presented from backup experiments in which individual tubes were heated by a small ion source (10-cm-diam grid) to characterize tube performance. These results suggest that the target should handle peak power densities in the range 25 to 30 kW/cm 2 normal to the beam axis (approx. =10 kW/cm 2 maximum on tube surfaces) with the present flow parameters. This translates to beam power levels of 5 to 6 MW for equivalent beam optics

  10. Monte Carlo calculations of lung dose in ORNL phantom for boron neutron capture therapy

    Krstic, D.; Markovic, V.M.; Jovanovic, Z.; Milenkovic, B.; Nikezic, D.; Atanackovic, J.

    2014-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were performed to evaluate dose for possible treatment of cancers by boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The computational model of male Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) phantom was used to simulate tumours in the lung. Calculations have been performed by means of the MCNP5/X code. In this simulation, two opposite neutron beams were considered, in order to obtain uniform neutron flux distribution inside the lung. The obtained results indicate that the lung cancer could be treated by BNCT under the assumptions of calculations. The difference in evaluated dose in cancer and normal lung tissue suggests that BNCT could be applied for the treatment of cancers. The difference in exposure of cancer and healthy tissue can be observed, so the healthy tissue can be spared from damage. An absorbed dose ratio of metastatic tissue-to-the healthy tissue was ∼5. Absorbed dose to all other organs was low when compared with the lung dose. Absorbed dose depth distribution shows that BNC therapy can be very useful in the treatments for tumour. The ratio of the tumour absorbed dose and irradiated healthy tissue absorbed dose was also ∼5. It was seen that an elliptical neutron field was better irradiation choice. (authors)

  11. Data Quality Assurance and Control for AmeriFlux Network at CDIAC, ORNL

    Shem, W.; Boden, T.; Krassovski, M.; Yang, B.

    2014-12-01

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) serves as the long-term data repository for the AmeriFlux network. Datasets currently available include hourly or half-hourly meteorological and flux observations, biological measurement records, and synthesis data products. Currently there is a lack of standardized nomenclature and specifically designed procedures for data quality assurance/control in processing and handling micrometeorological and ecological data at individual flux sites. CDIAC's has bridged this gap by providing efficient and accurate procedures for data quality control and standardization of the results for easier assimilation by the models used in climate science. In this presentation we highlight the procedures we have put in place to scrutinize continuous flux and meteorological data within Ameriflux network. We itemize some basic data quality issues that we have observed over the past years and include some examples of typical data quality issues. Such issues, e.g., incorrect time-stamping, poor calibration or maintenance of instruments, missing or incomplete metadata and others that are commonly over-looked by PI's, invariably impact the time-series observations.

  12. Preliminary shielding estimates for the proposed Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (RIBF)

    Johnson, J.O.; Gabriel, T.A.; Lillie, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has proposed designing and implementing a new target-ion source for production and injection of negative radioactive ion beams into the Hollifield tandem accelerator. This new facility, referred to as the Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (RIBF), will primarily be used to advance the scientific communities' capabilities for performing state-of-the-art cross-section measurements. Beams of protons or other light, stable ions from the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC) will be stopped in the RIBF target ion source and the resulting radioactive atoms will be ionized, charge exchanged, accelerated, and injected into the tandem accelerator. The ORIC currently operates with proton energies up to 60 MeV and beam currents up to 100 microamps with a maximum beam power less than 2.0 kW. The proposed RIBF will require upgrading the ORIC to generate proton energies up to 200 MeV and beam currents up to 200 microamps for optimum performance. This report summarizes the results of a preliminary one-dimensional shielding analysis of the proposed upgrade to the ORIC and design of the RIBF. The principal objective of the shielding analysis was to determine the feasibility of such an upgrade with respect to existing shielding from the facility structure, and additional shielding requirements for the 200 MeV ORIC machine and RIBF target room

  13. Modeling and analysis of ORNL horizontal storage tank mobilization and mixing

    Mahoney, L.A.; Terrones, G.; Eyler, L.L.

    1994-06-01

    The retrieval and treatment of radioactive sludges that are stored in tanks constitute a prevalent problem at several US Department of Energy sites. The tanks typically contain a settled sludge layer with non-Newtonian rheological characteristics covered by a layer of supernatant. The first step in retrieval is the mobilization and mixing of the supernatant and sludge in the storage tanks. Submerged jets have been proposed to achieve sludge mobilization in tanks, including the 189 m 3 (50,000 gallon) Melton Valley Storage tanks (MVST) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the planned 378 m 3 (100,000 gallon) tanks being designed as part of the MVST Capacity Increase Project (MVST-CIP). This report focuses on the modeling of mixing and mobilization in horizontal cylindrical tanks like those of the MVST design using submerged, recirculating liquid jets. The computer modeling of the mobilization and mixing processes uses the TEMPEST computational fluid dynamics program (Trend and Eyler 1992). The goals of the simulations are to determine under what conditions sludge mobilization using submerged liquid jets is feasible in tanks of this configuration, and to estimate mixing times required to approach homogeneity of the contents

  14. Progress report on the design of a Low-Level Waste Pilot Facility at ORNL

    Hensley, L.C.; Turner, V.L.; Pruitt, A.S.

    1980-01-01

    All low-level radioactive solid wastes, excluding TRU wastes, are disposed of by shallow land burial at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Contaminated liquids and sludges are hydrofractures. The TRU wastes are stored in a retrievable fashion in concrete storage facilities. Currently, the capacity for low-level radioactive waste burial at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is adequate for another six years of service at the current solids disposal rate which ranges between 80,000 and 100,000 cu ft per year. Decontamination and decommissioning of a number of ORNL facilities will be a significant activity in the next few years. Quantities of radioactive materials to be stored or disposed of as a result of these activities will be large; therefore, the technology to dispose of large quantities of low-level radioactive wastes must be demonstrated. The UCC-ND Engineering Division, in concert with divisions of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has been requested to prepare a conceptual design for a facility to both dispose of the currently produced low-level radioactive waste and also to provide a test bed for demonstration of other processes which may be used in future low-level radioactive wastes disposal facilities. This facility is designated as the Low-Level Waste Pilot Facility (LLWPF). This paper describes the status of the conceptual design of a facility for disposal of the subject radioactive waste

  15. Mathematics and Statistics Research Department progress report for period ending June 30, 1978. [ORNL

    Gardiner, D.A.; Lever, W.E.; Shepherd, D.E.; Ward, R.C.; Wilson, D.G. (comps.)

    1978-09-01

    This report is the twenty-first of a series of annual reports dating back to the February 28, 1957, report of the ORNL Mathematics Panel. The current report is divided into five parts: Mathematical and Statistical Research, Statistical and Mathematical Collaboration, Educational Activities, Presentations of Research Results, and Professional Activities. The section entitled Mathematical and Statistical Research contains summaries of the research conducted on Moving Boundary Problems, Multivariate Multipopulation Classification, Numerical Linear Algebra, Statistical Model Development and Evaluation, Materials Science Applications, Biomedical and Environmental Applications, and Complementary Areas. Recorded under Statistical and Mathematical Collaboration are brief accounts of consulting and collaboration with other scientists and engineers in the Nuclear Division of Union Carbide Corporation. These are in the areas of Analytical Chemistry, Biology, Chemistry and Physics, Engineering, Environmental Sciences, Materials Sciences, Security and Communication, and Uranium Resource Evaluation. The Educational Activities section contains descriptions of symposia, workshops, seminar series, short courses, lectures, and student and faculty participation in which the staff was engaged during the report period. The last two parts of the report list the staff's publications and oral presentations as well as its participation in the activities of professional societies and academic institutions. The summaries given here are quite brief; completed work is published in journals or reports as appropriate. 7 figures, 8 tables.

  16. Irradiation, annealing, and reirradiation research in the ORNL heavy-section steel irradiation program

    Nanstad, R.K.; Iskander, S.K.; McCabe, D.E.; Sokolov, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    One of the options to mitigate the effects of irradiation on reactor pressure vessels (RPV) is to thermally anneal them to restore the toughness properties that have been degraded by neutron irradiation. This paper summarizes experimental results from work performed as part of the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program managed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The HSSI Program focuses on annealing and re-embrittlement response of materials which are representative of those in commercial RPVs and which are considered to be radiation-sensitive. Experimental studies include (1) the annealing of materials in the existing inventory of previously irradiated materials, (2) reirradiation of previously irradiated/annealed materials in a collaborative program with the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), (3) irradiation/annealing/reirradiation of U.S. and Russian materials in a cooperative program with the Russian Research Center-Kurchatov Institute (RRC-KI), (4) the design and fabrication of an irradiation/anneal/reirradiation capsule and facility for operation at the University of Michigan Ford Reactor, (5) the investigation of potential for irradiation-and/or thermal-induced temper embrittlement in heat-affected zones (HAZs) of RPV steels due to phosphorous segregation at grain boundaries, and (6) investigation of the relationship between Charpy impact toughness and fracture toughness under all conditions of irradiation, annealing, and reirradiation

  17. An Investigation of the Applicability and Limitations of the ORNL Expanded Plug Test

    McAfee, Wallace J. [ORNL; Hemrick, James G. [ORNL

    2014-01-15

    The expanded plug test technique for measuring the circumferential tensile properties of irradiated nuclear fuel cladding was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and has been used successfully in several applications. The primary advantage of this technique over other procedures is its simplicity for application in the complex hot cell environment. During the development stage, efforts were made to both qualify the technique as much as possible regarding its experimental application and to develop and validate the data reduction procedures. However, since this is a new technique, the technical community is cautious in adopting a procedure that has not been fully vetted. The purpose of this effort was to address several baseline issues regarding the applicability of the technique and the precision of the use of experimental expanded ring load-deformation data to calculate material circumferential stress-strain properties. The tests performed, in conjunction with the developed data reduction procedures, demonstrate good reliability in the prediction of ring material stress-strain behavior for several materials of widely different strengths.

  18. Data base management activities for the Remedial Action Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL)

    Hook, L.A.; Voorhees, L.D.; Gentry, M.J.; Faulkner, M.A.; Shaakir-Ali, J.A.; Newman, K.A.; McCord, R.A.; Goins, L.F.; Owen, P.T.

    1990-07-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Remedial Action Program (RAP) was established in 1985 in response to state and federal regulations requiring comprehensive control over facility discharges and cleanup of contaminated sites. A computerized Data and Information Management System (DIMS) was developed for RAP to (1) provide a centralized repository for data pertinent to RAP and (2) provide support for the investigations and assessments leading to the long-term remediation of contaminated facilities and sites. The current status of DIMS and its role in supporting RAP during 1989 are described. The DIMS consists of three components: (1) the Numeric Data Base, (2) the Bibliographic Data Base, and (3) the Records Control Data Base. This report addresses all three data bases, but focuses on the contents of the Numeric Data Base. Significant progress was made last year with the geographic information system (GIS) and ARC/INFO, which can be interfaced with SAS/GRAPH to provide combined mapping and statistical graphic products. Several thematic layers of GIS data for the Oak Ridge Reservation are now available. 18 refs., 8 figs., 19 tabs.

  19. Dynamic tensile behaviour and deformational mechanism of C5191 phosphor bronze under high strain rates deformation

    Hu, Dao-chun [College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Taizhou Vocational & Technical College, Taizhou 318000 (China); Chen, Ming-he, E-mail: meemhchen@nuaa.edu.cn [College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Wang, Lei; Cheng, Hu [College of Mechanical Engineering, Taizhou University, Taizhou 318000 (China)

    2016-01-01

    High speed stamping process is used to high strength and high electrical conductivity phosphor bronze with extremely high strain rates more than 10{sup 3} s{sup −1}. This study on the dynamic tensile behaviour and deformational mechanism is to optimise the high speed stamping processes and improve geometrical precision in finished products. Thus, the tensile properties and deformation behaviour of C5191 phosphor bronze under quasi-static tensile condition at a strain rate of 0.001 s{sup −1} by electronic universal testing machine, and dynamic tensile condition at strain rate of 500, 1000 and 1500 s{sup −1} by split Hopkinson tensile bar (SHTB) apparatus were studied. The effects of strain rate and the deformation mechanism were investigated by means of SEM and TEM. The results showed that the yield strength and tensile strength of C5191 phosphor bronze under high strain rates deformation increased by 32.77% and 11.07% respectively compared with quasi-static condition, the strain hardening index increases from 0.075 to 0.251, and the strength of the material strain rates sensitivity index change from 0.005 to 0.022, which presented a clear sensitive to strain rates. Therefore, it is claimed that the dominant deformation mechanism was changed by the dislocation motion under different strain rates, and the ability of plastic deformation of C5191 phosphor bronze increased due to the number of movable dislocations increased significantly, started multi-line slip, and the soft effect of adiabatic temperature rise at the strain rate ranging from 500 to 1500 s{sup −1}.

  20. Effect of the sterilization process on physical and mechanical properties of the bonacryl bone cement

    Morejon, L.; Delgado, J.A.; Aguero, L.; Rapado, M.; Ginebra, M.P.; Gil, F.J.; Mendizabal, E.

    2008-01-01

    The use of bone cements of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) to fix artificial prosthesis to the human body is a habitual method in orthopedic surgery. The hip and the knee joints have a very complex biomechanics and support high loads, for these reasons, acrylic bone cements have to comply with international standards in order to secure the biofuncionality and durability of the implant. In this work we report the effect of sterilization by ethylene oxide or gamma radiation on the BONACRYL Cuban cement. We determined how sterilization methods affect the molecular weight of the polymer as well as its quasi-static mechanical properties. The results demonstrated that the gamma radiation modifies the molecular weight of the PMMA although the compression and bending strength were not affected by the sterilization process applied. (authors)

  1. Materials science. Dynamic mechanical behavior of multilayer graphene via supersonic projectile penetration.

    Lee, Jae-Hwang; Loya, Phillip E; Lou, Jun; Thomas, Edwin L

    2014-11-28

    Multilayer graphene is an exceptional anisotropic material due to its layered structure composed of two-dimensional carbon lattices. Although the intrinsic mechanical properties of graphene have been investigated at quasi-static conditions, its behavior under extreme dynamic conditions has not yet been studied. We report the high-strain-rate behavior of multilayer graphene over a range of thicknesses from 10 to 100 nanometers by using miniaturized ballistic tests. Tensile stretching of the membrane into a cone shape is followed by initiation of radial cracks that approximately follow crystallographic directions and extend outward well beyond the impact area. The specific penetration energy for multilayer graphene is ~10 times more than literature values for macroscopic steel sheets at 600 meters per second. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  2. Effect of Sphere Properties on Microstructure and Mechanical Performance of Cast Composite Metal Foams

    Matias Garcia-Avila

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum-steel composite metal foams (Al-S CMF are manufactured using steel hollow spheres, with a variety of sphere carbon content, surface roughness, and wall porosity, embedded in an Aluminum matrix through gravity casting technique. The microstructural and mechanical properties of the material were studied using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and quasi-static compressive testing. Higher carbon content and surface roughness in the sphere wall were responsible for an increase in formation of intermetallic phases which had a strengthening effect at lower strain levels, increasing the yield strength of the material by a factor of 2, while higher sphere wall porosity resulted in a decrease on the density of the material and improving its cushioning and ductility maintaining its energy absorption capabilities.

  3. Strain rate effects on mechanical properties in tension of aluminium alloys used in armour applications

    Cadoni, E.; Dotta, M.; Forni, D.; Bianchi, S.; Kaufmann, H.

    2012-08-01

    The mechanical properties in tension of two aluminium alloys (AA5059-H131 and AA7039-T651) used in armour applications were determined from tests carried out over a wide range of strain-rates on round specimens. The experimental research was developed in the DynaMat laboratory of the University of Applied Sciences of Southern Switzerland. The target strain rates were set at the following four levels: 10-3, 30, 300 and 1000s-1. The quasi-static tests were performed with a universal electromechanical machine, whereas a hydro-pneumatic machine and a Split Hopkinson Tensile Bar apparatus were used for medium and high strain-rates respectively. The required parameters by the Johnson-Cook constitutive law were also determined.

  4. Dynamic compressive properties and failure mechanism of glass fiber reinforced silica hydrogel

    Yang Jie; Li Shukui; Yan Lili; Huo Dongmei; Wang Fuchi

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic compressive properties of glass fiber reinforced silica (GFRS) hydrogel were investigated using a spilt Hopkinson pressure bar. Failure mechanism of GFRS hydrogel was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Result showed that dynamic compressive stresses were much higher than the quasi-static compressive stresses at the same strain. The dynamic compressive strength was directly proportional to the strain rate with same sample dimensions. The dynamic compressive strength was directly proportional to the sample basal area at same strain rate. Dynamic compressive failure strain was small. At high strain rates, glass fibers broke down and separated from the matrix, pores shrank rapidly. Failure resulted from the increase of lateral tensile stress in hydrogel under dynamic compression.

  5. Cost estimate of grouting the proposed test pits at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory using the ORNL-recommended grouts

    Spence, R.D.

    1987-08-01

    EG and G Idaho will construct three experimental pits to simulate the TRU waste trenches at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Two of these pits will be grouted and then one will be destructively examined as soon as the grout cures and the other will be monitored for 10 years. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is evaluating grouts and will recommend a grout to EG and G Idaho to reduce the permeability of the pit, fill the large voids, and encapsulate the waste. A previous ORNL report (ORNL/TM-9881) discusses the grouts evaluated and the grout recommended based on those evaluations. This report evaluates the economics of grouting the experimental pits. The cost of double grouting two of the EG and G Idaho design pits at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory using lance injection was estimated to be $100,000. Jet grouting the same two pits was estimated to cost $85,000. Both should be tried as part of the test EG and G Idaho is conducting

  6. Developing a strategy and closure criteria for radioactive and mixed waste sites in the ORNL remedial action program: Regulatory interface

    Trabalka, J.R.

    1987-09-01

    Some options for stabilization and treatment of contaminated sites can theoretically provide a once-and-for-all solution (e.g., removal or destruction of contaminants). Most realizable options, however, leave contaminants in place (in situ), potentially isolated by physical or chemical, but more typically, by hydrologic measures. As a result of the dynamic nature of the interactions between contaminants, remedial measures, and the environment, in situ stablization measures are likely to have limited life spans, and maintenance and monitoring of performance become an essential part of the scheme. The length of formal institutional control over the site and related questions about future uses of the land and waters are of paramount importance. Unique features of the ORNL site and environs appear to be key ingredients in achieving the very long term institutional control necessary for successful financing and implementation of in situ stabilization. Some formal regulatory interface is necessary to ensure that regulatory limitations and new guidance which can affect planning and implementation of the ORNL Remedial Action Program are communicated to ORNL staff and potential technical and financial limitations which can affect schedules or alternatives for achievement of long-term site stabilization and the capability to meet environmental regulations are provided to regulatory bodies as early as possible. Such an interface should allow decisions on closure criteria to be based primarily on technical merit and protection of human health and the environment. A plan for interfacing with federal and state regulatory authorities is described. 93 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  7. Closure of a unique mixed waste storage canal at the Dept. of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    Greer, J.K. Jr.; Etheridge, J.T.; Thompson, W.T.

    1994-01-01

    At the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) a unique closure was accomplished for a storage canal that contained both hazardous chemical contaminants controlled by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and radioactive contaminants controlled by the Atomic Energy Act (AEA). During 1991 and 1992, after approvals were received from the DOE and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), subcontractors to DOE's Construction Manager were mobilized and remote controlled equipment was operated on site to remove the RCRA and radioactive contamination (referred to hereafter as mixed wastes) from the 3001 Storage Canal at ORNL. After numerous open-quotes surprisesclose quotes during the removal activities, each requiring problem resolution and approvals from DOE and TDEC, the canal closure was completed in September 1992 and final closure certification was submitted to TDEC in October 1992. The following discussion describes the learning experiences that ORNL and DOE acquired from a RCRA closure project for a mixed waste storage canal containing high radiation levels. The project was successful, especially since worker exposures were minimized, but was lengthy, requiring 30 months from notification of a leak in the canal until final demobilization of the subcontractor, and expensive to complete (total overall cost of $3 million)

  8. How pinning and contact angle hysteresis govern quasi-static liquid drop transfer.

    Chen, H; Tang, T; Zhao, H; Law, K-Y; Amirfazli, A

    2016-02-21

    This paper presents both experimental and numerical simulations of liquid transfer between two solid surfaces with contact angle hysteresis (CAH). Systematic studies on the role of the advancing contact angle (θa), receding contact angle (θr) and CAH in determining the transfer ratio (volume of the liquid transferred onto the acceptor surface over the total liquid volume) and the maximum adhesion force (Fmax) were performed. The transfer ratio was found to be governed by contact line pinning at the end of the transfer process caused by CAH of surfaces. A map based on θr of the two surfaces was generated to identify the three regimes for liquid transfer: (I) contact line pinning occurs only on the donor surface, (II) contact line pinning occurs on both surfaces, and (III) contact line pinning occurs only on the acceptor surface. With this map, an empirical equation is provided which is able to estimate the transfer ratio by only knowing θr of the two surfaces. The value of Fmax is found to be strongly influenced by the contact line pinning in the early stretching stage. For symmetric liquid bridges between two identical surfaces, Fmax may be determined only by θa, only by θr, or by both θa and θr, depending on the magnitude of the contact angles. For asymmetric bridges, Fmax is found to be affected by the period when contact lines are pinned on both surfaces.

  9. Measuring and Calculative Complex for Registration of Quasi-Static and Dynamic Processes of Electromagnetic Irradiation

    V. I. Ovchinnikov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to the development of measuring device to register dynamic processes of electromagnetic irradiation during the treatment of materials with energy of explosion. Standard units to register main parameters of the explosion do not allow predict and control results of the process. So, to overcome disadvantages of former control units a new one has been developed applying Hall’s sensors. The device developed allows effectively register of the inductive component of the electromagnetic irradiation in wide range of temperature for many shot-time processes.

  10. A quasi-static approach to structure formation in black hole universes

    Durk, Jessie; Clifton, Timothy, E-mail: j.durk@qmul.ac.uk, E-mail: t.clifton@qmul.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-10-01

    Motivated by the existence of hierarchies of structure in the Universe, we present four new families of exact initial data for inhomogeneous cosmological models at their maximum of expansion. These data generalise existing black hole lattice models to situations that contain clusters of masses, and hence allow the consequences of cosmological structures to be considered in a well-defined and non-perturbative fashion. The degree of clustering is controlled by a parameter λ, in such a way that for λ ∼ 0 or 1 we have very tightly clustered masses, whilst for λ ∼ 0.5 all masses are separated by cosmological distance scales. We study the consequences of structure formation on the total net mass in each of our clusters, as well as calculating the cosmological consequences of the interaction energies both within and between clusters. The locations of the shared horizons that appear around groups of black holes, when they are brought sufficiently close together, are also identified and studied. We find that clustering can have surprisingly large effects on the scale of the cosmology, with models that contain thousands of black holes sometimes being as little as 30% of the size of comparable Friedmann models with the same total proper mass. This deficit is comparable to what might be expected to occur from neglecting gravitational interaction energies in Friedmann cosmology, and suggests that these quantities may have a significant influence on the properties of the large-scale cosmology.

  11. E-coil: an inverse boundary element method for a quasi-static problem

    Sanchez, Clemente Cobos; Garcia, Salvador Gonzalez; Power, Henry

    2010-01-01

    Boundary element methods represent a valuable approach for designing gradient coils; these methods are based on meshing the current carrying surface into an array of boundary elements. The temporally varying magnetic fields produced by gradient coils induce electric currents in conducting tissues and so the exposure of human subjects to these magnetic fields has become a safety concern, especially with the increase in the strength of the field gradients used in magnetic resonance imaging. Here we present a boundary element method for the design of coils that minimize the electric field induced in prescribed conducting systems. This work also details some numerical examples of the application of this coil design method. The reduction of the electric field induced in a prescribed region inside the coils is also evaluated.

  12. E-coil: an inverse boundary element method for a quasi-static problem

    Sanchez, Clemente Cobos; Garcia, Salvador Gonzalez [Depto. Electromagnetismo y F. de la Materia Facultad de Ciencias University of Granada Avda. Fuentenueva E-18071 (Spain); Power, Henry, E-mail: ccobos@ugr.e [School of Mechanical, Materials and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Nottingham, Nottingham Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-07

    Boundary element methods represent a valuable approach for designing gradient coils; these methods are based on meshing the current carrying surface into an array of boundary elements. The temporally varying magnetic fields produced by gradient coils induce electric currents in conducting tissues and so the exposure of human subjects to these magnetic fields has become a safety concern, especially with the increase in the strength of the field gradients used in magnetic resonance imaging. Here we present a boundary element method for the design of coils that minimize the electric field induced in prescribed conducting systems. This work also details some numerical examples of the application of this coil design method. The reduction of the electric field induced in a prescribed region inside the coils is also evaluated.

  13. Using the ALEGRA Code for Analysis of Quasi-Static Magnetization of Metals

    2015-09-01

    era was the most widespread in the electromagnetic literature. Further details on tensorial alge- bra and calculus can be found in a plethora of...conjugate gradient solver type was specified, with an iteration stopping tolerance of 10−16. 6.4 Initial and Boundary Conditions The ALEGRA

  14. Inelastic Deformation of Metals and Structures under Dynamic and Quasi-Static Cyclic Loading.

    1983-05-01

    the above inequa - lities is denoted by *. Note that ratchetting limits p corresponding to perfect plasticity material (Figo4b) can be generated from the...due to the employment of the kinematic hardening rule. In the intermediate regime R1 +R2, the behaviour changes from R1 to R2 when sufficient hardening

  15. Quasi-static electric fields, turbulence and VLF waves in the ionosphere and magnetosphere

    Temerin, M.A.

    1978-01-01

    Two rocket payloads launched from Greenland in December 1974 and January 1975 into the dayside auroral oval measured large scale electric fields. Sunward convection in regions of polar cusp type particle precipitation argues for the existence of a turbulent entry region at the magnetopause. Smaller scale changes in the electric field and energetic electron precipitation require field-aligned currents predominately at the boundaries of auroral arcs. Measurements of electric fields parallel to the magnetic field place upper limits to the parallel electric field. An analysis of the effect of zero-frequency electric field turbulence on the output of an electric field double probe detector is applied to data from two satellites, OVI-17 and S3-3. It is found that the electric field of high latitude low frequency turbulence is polarized perpendicular to the magnetic field and that the frequency is measured by the satellites is due to the Doppler shift of near zero frequency turbulence both in the ionosphere and magnetosphere. In addition, rocket measurements of low frequency turbulence in the dayside auroral oval reveal characteristics similar to those of the large electric field regions recently seen on S3-3 indicating that the turbulence from those regions extends into the ionosphere. VLF waves were also observed during the two rocket flights into the dayside auroral oval. The correlation of the VLF hiss intensity with the fluxes of precipitating electrons above 500 eV on a short spatial and time scale is often poor, even when a positive slope exists in the electron phase space density. The frequency of the lower hybrid waves were used to measure the ratio of NO + and O 2 + to O + . Electrostatic waves were observed during a barium release

  16. Quasi-static earthquake cycle simulation based on nonlinear viscoelastic finite element analyses

    Agata, R.; Ichimura, T.; Hyodo, M.; Barbot, S.; Hori, T.

    2017-12-01

    To explain earthquake generation processes, simulation methods of earthquake cycles have been studied. For such simulations, the combination of the rate- and state-dependent friction law at the fault plane and the boundary integral method based on Green's function in an elastic half space is widely used (e.g. Hori 2009; Barbot et al. 2012). In this approach, stress change around the fault plane due to crustal deformation can be computed analytically, while the effects of complex physics such as mantle rheology and gravity are generally not taken into account. To consider such effects, we seek to develop an earthquake cycle simulation combining crustal deformation computation based on the finite element (FE) method with the rate- and state-dependent friction law. Since the drawback of this approach is the computational cost associated with obtaining numerical solutions, we adopt a recently developed fast and scalable FE solver (Ichimura et al. 2016), which assumes use of supercomputers, to solve the problem in a realistic time. As in the previous approach, we solve the governing equations consisting of the rate- and state-dependent friction law. In solving the equations, we compute stress changes along the fault plane due to crustal deformation using FE simulation, instead of computing them by superimposing slip response function as in the previous approach. In stress change computation, we take into account nonlinear viscoelastic deformation in the asthenosphere. In the presentation, we will show simulation results in a normative three-dimensional problem, where a circular-shaped velocity-weakening area is set in a square-shaped fault plane. The results with and without nonlinear viscosity in the asthenosphere will be compared. We also plan to apply the developed code to simulate the post-earthquake deformation of a megathrust earthquake, such as the 2011 Tohoku earthquake. Acknowledgment: The results were obtained using the K computer at the RIKEN (Proposal number hp160221).

  17. Pore network modeling of drainage process in patterned porous media: a quasi-static study

    Zhang, Tao; Salama, Amgad; Sun, Shuyu; El-Amin, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    -saturation relationships, it is quite challenging to isolate its effects explicitly in real porous media applications. However, within the framework of pore network models, it is easy to highlight the effects of wettability conditions on the transport of two-phase systems

  18. Quasi-static cyclic tests of two prefabricated, reinforced masonry walls

    Braun, Bernard; Rupf, Michael; Beyer, Katrin; Dazio, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    In the second half of the 20th century, the majority of residential buildings in Switzerland have been built with unreinforced brick masonry walls and reinforced concrete floors. Following a re-evaluation of the seismic hazard in Switzerland, a country of moderate seismicity, the seismic design spectra have increased in the last revision (2003) of the Swiss building code. As a consequence, it has become very difficult to justify the use of unreinforced masonry walls as sufficient seismic resi...

  19. Quasi-static analysis of wave loadings on spine-based wave energy devices

    Lockett, F.P.; Peatfield, A.M.; West, M.J.

    1980-02-01

    A report is given on the Wave Energy Research Programme at Lanchester Polytechnic. Results are presented for both theoretical and experimental scale models for wave loadings on circular and rectangular spines of various lengths. The results are in good agreement over the operational wave range for the 1/50 scale model and for the more limited data on the 1/10 scale model.

  20. A quasi-static approach to structure formation in black hole universes

    Durk, Jessie; Clifton, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    Motivated by the existence of hierarchies of structure in the Universe, we present four new families of exact initial data for inhomogeneous cosmological models at their maximum of expansion. These data generalise existing black hole lattice models to situations that contain clusters of masses, and hence allow the consequences of cosmological structures to be considered in a well-defined and non-perturbative fashion. The degree of clustering is controlled by a parameter λ, in such a way that for λ ∼ 0 or 1 we have very tightly clustered masses, whilst for λ ∼ 0.5 all masses are separated by cosmological distance scales. We study the consequences of structure formation on the total net mass in each of our clusters, as well as calculating the cosmological consequences of the interaction energies both within and between clusters. The locations of the shared horizons that appear around groups of black holes, when they are brought sufficiently close together, are also identified and studied. We find that clustering can have surprisingly large effects on the scale of the cosmology, with models that contain thousands of black holes sometimes being as little as 30% of the size of comparable Friedmann models with the same total proper mass. This deficit is comparable to what might be expected to occur from neglecting gravitational interaction energies in Friedmann cosmology, and suggests that these quantities may have a significant influence on the properties of the large-scale cosmology.