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Sample records for organic petrological study

  1. Organic petrology in the service of archaeology

    Teichmueller, M.

    1992-02-01

    The techniques of organic petrology have been used to study the nature and provenance of 81 ornaments ranging in age from the Celtic (dated as late Hallstatt-early La Tene times, 500-300 B.C.) to Roman (1st-4th Century A.D.) periods, which have been recovered from graves and settlements in Germany and Switzerland. The ornaments were mainly black or dark brown armlets but also included beads, buttons and medallions. The most commonly used source material was jet (22 objects) which is derived from bituminized drift woods found in Liassic oil shale, probably mainly of English provenance. Eleven objects were made from Carboniferous cannel coal and four from boghead coal, both of unknown geographic provenance. Only one object proved to be made from {ital Posidonia} shale, a liassic oil shale from southern Germany. The identification of two distinctive sapropelites, used mainly for the production of armlets, is of particular interest. These sapropelites are the 'Schwarte' from the top of the Kounova Seam (Stephanian) of northern Bohemia (15 objects) and the Kimmeridge 'coal' of Dorset, England (19 objects). The recognition of these organic materials was made possible by the study of fresh rock samples. All the armlets made from 'Schwarte' were excavated in the Celtic oppidum at Manching in southern Germany; the armlets made from Kimmeridge 'coal' were found in Celtic and Roman graves. These discoveries suggest the existence of early trade routes crossing the English Channel and passing south to Switzerland, probably along the River Rhine. A very few armlets were made from dark tuff (probably of Bohemian origin), black glass or dark brown bone. These materials were probably all used as substitutes for jet and/or sapropelites. It is interesting to note that all these dark armlets were thought to possess magic properties, which may explain their frequency. 26 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Fifteenth annual meeting of the Society for Organic Petrology. Abstracts and program. Volume 15

    Mukhopadhyay, P.K.; Avery, M.P.; Calder, J.H.; Goodarzi, F. (eds.)

    1998-01-01

    The theme of the conference was 'Sailing into the new millennium'. Abstracts of the papers are included in this volume. Topics covered included: environmental implications of fossil fuel use - geochemical and petrological perspectives; environment, coal structure, and applied coal petrology; new innovations in coal microscopy and petrology/geochemistry of coal and coke; Eastern Canadian basins with implications for hydrocarbon resources; and organic petrology/geochemistry and petroleum system - world basin perspectives. Abstracts of the poster presentations are also included. Papers will be published in an issue of the International Journal of Coal Geology.

  3. Review and update of the applications of organic petrology: Part 2, geological and multidisciplinary applications

    Suarez-Ruiz, Isabel; Flores, Deolinda; Mendonça Filho, João Graciano; Hackley, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    The present paper is focused on organic petrology applied to unconventional and multidisciplinary investigations and is the second part of a two part review that describes the geological applications and uses of this branch of earth sciences. Therefore, this paper reviews the use of organic petrology in investigations of: (i) ore genesis when organic matter occurs associated with mineralization; (ii) the behavior of organic matter in coal fires (self-heating and self-combustion); (iii) environmental and anthropogenic impacts associated with the management and industrial utilization of coal; (iv) archeology and the nature and geographical provenance of objects of organic nature such as jet, amber, other artifacts and coal from archeological sites; and (v) forensic science connected with criminal behavior or disasters. This second part of the review outlines the most recent research and applications of organic petrology in those fields.

  4. Hydrocarbon Prospectivity of Nigeria's Inland Basins: From the View Point of Organic Geochemistry and Organic Petrology

    Obaje, N. G.; Abubakar, M. B.; Jauro, A.; Tukur, A.; Wehner, H.

    2003-01-01

    The inland basins of Nigeria comprise the Anambra basin, the lower, middle and upper Benue trough, the southeastern sector of the Chad basin, the Mid-Niger (Bida) basin, and the Sokoto basin. Organic geochemical and organic petrologic studies indicate that coal beds constitute major potential source rocks in the whole of the Benue trough (Anambra basin inclusive). The generation and production of liquid and i gaseous hydrocarbons from coal beds presently is world-wide indisputable. In the Anambra basin, the coal beds in the Mamu Formation have TOC contents of up to 60.8wt%, mean Hydrogen Index (HI) of 364mgHC/gTOC, vitrinite reflectivity (Ro) of 0.54 to 0.56% and Tmax 430 to 433degrees C. Biomarker data indicate a dominance of high molecular weight : n-alkanes, very high pristane/phytane ratios, pronounced odd-over-even predominance (OEP), preponderance of C29 regular steranes but with also relatively high contents of C28. In the middle Benue trough, the coal beds of the Awgu Formation have TOC contents of up to 79.1 Owt%, Ro of 0.83 to 1.07%, and mean HI of 281 mgHC/gTOC; unimodal distributions of both low and high molecular weight n-alkanes with no obvious OEP, and a predominance of C29 steranes but also with relatively high contents of C27 and C28. Coal beds from the Lamja Formation in the upper Benue trough yielded TOC contents of up to 50.7wt% with HI of 184mgHC/gTOC, Ro of 0.70 to 0.73%, low and high molecular weights n- alkane dominance with an unpronounced OEP, high pristane/phytane ratios, and very high contents of C29 regular steranes. On a basinal evaluation level, incorporating source rock data from the other formations in the respective sectors, plots on the modified Van Krevelen diagram alongside biomarker and maceral data indicate good i to fair source rock qualities (oil and gas) in the Anambra basin and middle Benue trough; and fair to poor (gaseous to dry) in the upper Benue trough and the Chad basin, with sporadic good to fair source rock

  5. Petrology and organic geochemistry of the lower Miocene lacustrine sediments (Most Basin, Eger Graben, Czech Republic)

    Havelcová, Martina; Sýkorová, Ivana; Mach, K.; Trejtnarová, Hana; Blažek, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 139, Special issue (2015), s. 26-39 ISSN 0166-5162 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-18482S Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : Most Basin * Miocene * coal facies indices * coal petrology * organic geochemistry Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 3.294, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0166516214001529#

  6. Organic petrological and organic geochemical characterisation of the Tertiary coal-bearing sequence of Batu Arang, Selangor, Malaysia

    Wan Hasiah, Abdullah; Abolins, Peter

    1998-08-01

    The Tertiary coal-bearing sequence at Batu Arang in Selangor, Peninsular Malaysia consists of a sandstone-coal-oil shale facies assemblage. A detailed organic petrological and organic geochemical study was carried out on several organic-rich sediments from this sequence. The oil shales are dominated by Botryococcus-derived telalginite and Pediastrum-derived lamalginite. The coals, hypautochthonous in origin, are mainly duroclarite-type, although other minor microlithotypes also occur. Alginite is not observed in the coals, but other liptinitic constituents are very common, particularly thin-walled cutinite and sporinite. The oil shales and the coals are thermally immature. This immaturity has a considerable influence on the biomarker distributions, particularly so on the triterpanes which are dominated by C 31αβ 22R and C 30ββ compounds. Interestingly, for Tertiary aged sediments of continental origin, the diagnostic biomarker compounds such as 18 α(H)-oleanane and bicadinanes, normally linked to the higher land plant group of angiosperms, are not observed in the samples analysed. Tricyclic terpanes occur only in very low relative abundance or are virtually absent. A clear distinction, however, in the biomarker distributions of the shales and the coals/carbargilite can be made based upon the distribution of C 27-C 29 regular steranes: the shales, with a source input being predominantly planktonic algae, are dominated by 5 α(H),14 α(H),17 α(H) 20R cholestane, while the coals/carbargilites, with a source input consisting mainly of higher plant material, are dominated by 5 α(H),14 α(H),17 α(H) 20R ethyl cholestane. The depositional environment of the Batu Arang coal-bearing sequence is interpreted as varying from an alluvial flood plain peat-swamp to fluvio-lacustrine depositional setting.

  7. INAA and petrological study of sandstones from the Angkor monuments

    Kucera, J.; Kranda, K.; Soukal, L.; Novak, J.K.; Lang, M.; Poncar, J.; Krausova, I.; Cunin, O.

    2008-01-01

    We determined 35 major, minor and trace elements in sandstone samples taken from building blocks of 19 Angkor temples and from an old and a new quarry using INAA. We also characterized the sandstone samples with conventional microscopy and electron microprobe analysis. Using cluster analysis, we found no straightforward correlation between the chemical/petrological properties of the sandstones and a presumed period of individual temples construction. The poor correlation may result either from the inherent inhomogeneity of sandstone or just reflect the diversity of quarries that supplied building blocks for the construction of any particular temple. (author)

  8. Organic petrology and geochemistry of the Carboniferous coal seams from the Central Asturian Coal Basin (NW Spain)

    Piedad-Sanchez, Noe; Martinez, Luis; Izart, Alain; Elie, Marcel [UMR G2R/7566, Geologie et Gestion des Ressources Minerales et Energetiques, Faculte des Sciences, Universite Henri Poincare, Nancy 1, BP-239, Boulevard des Aiguillettes, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex 54506 (France); Suarez-Ruiz, Isabel [Instituto Nacional del Carbon (CSIC), C/ Francisco Pintado Fe, 26, Ap. Co., 73, Oviedo 33011 (Spain); Keravis, Didier [Institut des Sciences de la Terre (ISTO), CNRS-Universite d' Orleans, Batiment Geosciences, BP 6759, Orleans 45067 (France)

    2004-03-23

    This paper presents for the first time a petrological and geochemical study of coals from the Central Asturian Coal Basin (North Spain) of Carboniferous (Pennsylvanian), mainly of Moscovian, age. A paleoenvironmental approach was used, taking into account both petrographic and organic geochemical studies. Vitrinite reflectance (R{sub r}) ranges from 0.5% to 2.5%, which indicates a high volatile bituminous to semianthracite and anthracite coal rank. The coal samples selected for paleoenvironmental reconstruction are located inside the oil-gas-prone phase, corresponding to the interval between the onset of oil generation and first gas generation and efficient expulsion of oil. This phase is represented by coals that have retained their hydrocarbon potential and also preserved biomarker information. Paleodepositional reconstruction based on maceral and petrographic indices points to a swamp environment with vitrinite-rich coal facies and variable mineral matter content. The gelification index (GI) and groundwater influence index (GWI) indicate strong gelification and wet conditions. The biomarkers exhibit a high pristane/phytane ratio, suggesting an increase in this ratio from diagenetic processes, and a high diterpanes ratio. This, in turn, would seem to indicate a high swamp water table and a humid climate. The maximum point of coal accumulation occurred during the regressive part of the Late Moscovian sequence and in the most humid climate described for this period of time in the well-known coal basins of Europe and North America.

  9. Petrology, isotopic and fluid inclusion studies of eclogites from Sujiahe, NW Dabie Shan (China), July 1 2002

    Fu, B.; Zheng, Y.-F.; Touret, J.L.R.

    2002-01-01

    In addition to the Triassic Hong'an low-T-high-P eclogite and the Xinxian coesite-bearing kyanite-glaucophane eclogite, Silurian coesite-free amphibole eclogites occur in the Sujiahe region, NW Dabie Shan of central China. A comprehensive study of petrology, Nd-Sr, O-H isotopes and fluid inclusions

  10. Study of petrological characteristics of uranium-bearing sandstone in the south of ordos basin, China

    Tian Cheng; Jia Licheng; Li Song; Zhang Zimin

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses the relation between uranium-bearing abundance and texture constituent of sedimentary rock, on the basis of the research of petrological characteristic of sandstone in the south of Ordos basin. The influence of infiltration of sandstone and uranium migration and accumulation by the major diagenesis of compaction and cementation, clay minerals evolution, corrosion and forming of secondary porosity are discussed. Uranium-bearing sandstones are divided into four types and their petrological characteristics are discussed. After mineralization conditions being summed up, the uranium-mineralization model of sandstone-type is built. Reliable petrological evidences for evaluating favourable uranium mineralization rich areas are furnished. (authors)

  11. Organic petrology and geochemistry of Eocene Suzak bituminous marl, north-central Afghanistan: Depositional environment and source rock potential

    Hackley, Paul C.; Sanfilipo, John

    2016-01-01

    Organic geochemistry and petrology of Eocene Suzak bituminous marl outcrop samples from Madr village in north-central Afghanistan were characterized via an integrated analytical approach to evaluate depositional environment and source rock potential. Multiple proxies suggest the organic-rich (TOC ∼6 wt.%) bituminous marls are ‘immature’ for oil generation (e.g., vitrinite Ro  1) indicating organic input from marine algae and/or bacterial biomass, and sterane/hopane ratios are low (0.12–0.14). Monoaromatic steroids are dominated by C28clearly indicating a marine setting. High gammacerane index values (∼0.9) are consistent with anoxia stratification and may indicate intermittent saline-hypersaline conditions. Stable C isotope ratios also suggest a marine depositional scenario for the Suzak samples, consistent with the presence of marine foraminifera including abundant planktic globigerinida(?) and rare benthic discocyclina(?) and nummulites(?). Biomarker 2α-methylhopane for photosynthetic cyanobacteria implies shallow photic zone deposition of Madr marls and 3β-methylhopane indicates presence of methanotrophic archaea in the microbial consortium. The data presented herein are consistent with deposition of Suzak bituminous marls in shallow stratified waters of a restricted marine basin associated with the southeastern incipient or proto-Paratethys. Geochemical proxies from Suzak rock extracts (S content, high polar content, C isotopes, normal (αααR) C27–29 steranes, and C29/C30 and C26/C25 hopane ratios) are similar to extant data from Paleogene oils produced to the north in the Afghan-Tajik Basin. This observation may indicate laterally equivalent strata are effective source rocks as suggested by previous workers; however, further work is needed to strengthen oil-source correlations.

  12. Organic petrology, mineralogy and depositional environment of the Kipra lignite seam, Maritza-West basin, Bulgaria

    Kostova, Irena [Department of Geology and Palaeontology, Sofia University ' ' St. Kliment Ohridski' ' , 1000, Sofia (Bulgaria); Zdravkov, Alexander [Department of Economic Geology, University of Mining and Geology ' ' St. Ivan Rilski' ' , 1700, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2007-08-01

    The aim of the present study is to provide additional information about the properties and depositional environment of the Kipra lignite seam, which was deposited during the regressive stage of development of the Maritza-West basin. Petrographical and mineralogical data, along with ash yields and sulphur contents of 24 samples from a seam profile, have been used to study the vertical variation of the depositional settings during peat accumulation and subsequent coalification. The Kipra lignite is characterized by high ash yields and sulphur contents. It formed in a rheotrophic, low-lying mire with alkaline pH value. Vegetation with low preservation potential dominated within the palaeomire. During peat formation, frequent changes of the water level controlled the depositional environment. During the deposition of units 1 and 2, high water energy caused the transportation of high amounts of inorganic material into the mire, resulting in the formation of weakly gelified mineral-rich lignite. The organic matter from units 3 and 4 is characterized by enhanced gelification, which probably reflects the decreasing energy of the system. Good positive correlation between sulphur contents and the GI values was established in units 4, indicating that the gelification of the tissues was probably mainly controlled by the bacterial activity. In contrast, the gelification of the samples from unit 3 of the Kipra seam was probably governed by the redox conditions. The organic matter deposited under relatively wet conditions, in which the thermal and oxidative destruction of the tissues, was limited. A variety of major, minor and accessory minerals are present in Maritza-West lignite. The mineral composition is dominated mainly by pyrite, gypsum and calcite, and to a lesser extent limonite, quartz, kaolinite, montmorillonite, illite, chlorite and plagioclase. Jarosite, hematite, halloysite, mica, K-feldspar, aragonite, siderite, and dolomite were also determined in very low

  13. Mineralogy and organic petrology of oil shales in the Sangkarewang Formation, Ombilin Basin, West Sumatra, Indonesia

    Fatimah [School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052 (Australia)]|[Centre for Geological Resources, Department of Mines and Energy, Jalan Soekarno Hatta No. 444, Bandung 40254 (Indonesia); Ward, Colin R. [School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052 (Australia)

    2009-01-31

    The Ombilin Basin is filled by late Eocene to early Oligocene marginal fan deposits (Brani Formation) and lacustrine shales (Sangkarewang Formation), unconformably overlain by a late Oligocene to early Miocene fluvial sequence (Sawahlunto and Sawahtambang Formations) and capped by an early to mid-Miocene marine sequence (Ombilin Formation). Significant oil shale deposits occur in the Sangkarewang Formation, intercalated with thin laminated greenish-grey calcareous sandstones. X-ray diffraction shows that the sediments consist mainly of quartz, feldspar, carbonates and a range of clay minerals, together in some cases with minor proportions of sulphides, evaporites and zeolites. Feldspar and non-kaolinite clay minerals decrease up the sequence, relative to kaolinite, suggesting a changing sediment source as the basin was filled. Calcite, thought to be mainly of authigenic origin, is also more abundant in the middle and upper parts of the sequence. The organic matter in the oil shales of the sequence is dominated by liptinite macerals, particularly alginite (mainly lamalginite) and sporinite. Cutinite also occurs in some samples, along with resinite and traces of bituminite. The dominance of lamalginite in the liptinite components suggests that the material can be described as a lamosite. Samples from the Sangkarewang Formation have vitrinite reflectance values ranging between 0.37% and 0.55%. These are markedly lower than the vitrinite reflectance for coal from the overlying Sawahlunto Formation (0.68%), possibly due to suppression associated with the abundant liptinite in the oil shales. Fischer assay data on outcrop samples indicate that the oil yield is related to the organic carbon content. Correlations with XRD data show that, with one exception, the oil yield and organic carbon can also be correlated directly to the abundance of carbonate (calcite) and inversely to the abundance of quartz plus feldspar. This suggests that the abundance of algal material in the

  14. Mineralogy, petrology and geochemistry of the Pocos de Caldas analogue study sites, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Waber, M.

    1991-01-01

    The thorium-rare-earth element deposit at Morro do Ferro is of supergene origin and was formed under lateritic weathering conditions. The ore body forms shallow NW-SE elongated argillaceous lenses that extend from the top of the hill downwards along its south-eastern slope. The deposit is capped by a stockwork of magnetite veins which have protected the underlying, highly argillaceous host rock from excessive erosion. The surrounding country rocks comprise a sequence of subvolcanic phonolite intrusions that have been strongly altered by hydrothermal and supergene processes. From petrological, mineralogical and geochemical studies and mass balance calculations, it is inferred that the highly weathered host rock was originally carbonatic in composition and was initially enhanced in thorium and rare-earth elements compared to the surrounding silicate rocks. Intrusion of the carbonatite produced fenitic alteration of the surrounding phonolites, consisting of an early potassic alteration followed by a vein-type Th-REE mineralization with associated fluorite, carbonate, pyrite and zircon. Subsequent lateritic weathering has completely destroyed the carbonatite, forming a residual supergene enrichment of Th and REEs. Initial weathering of the carbonatite leading to solutions enriched in carbonate and phosphate may have appreciably restricted the dissolution of the primary Th-REE phases. Strongly oxidic weathering has resulted in a fractionation between cerium and the other light rare-earth elements. Ce 3+ is oxidized to Ce 4+ and retained together with thorium by secondary mineral formation and adsorption on poorly crystalline iron- and aluminium-hydroxides. In contrast, the trivalent LREEs are retained to a lesser degree and are thus more available for secondary mineral formation and adsorption at greater depths down the weathering column. (author) figs., tabs., 60 refs

  15. Petrology, palynology and organic geochemistry of Eocene lignite of Matanomadh, Kutch Basin, western India: Implications to depositional environment and hydrocarbon source potential

    Dutta, Suryendu; Mathews, Runcie P.; Saraswati, Pratul K.; Banerjee, Santanu [Department of Earth Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay (India); Singh, Bhagwan D.; Tripathi, Suryakant M.; Singh, Alpana [Birbal Sahni Institute of Palaeobotany, Lucknow (India); Mann, Ulrich [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). Institut fuer chemie und Dynamik der Geosphaere

    2011-01-01

    Petrological, palynological and organic-geochemical investigations were undertaken to determine the source vegetation, depositional conditions and hydrocarbon source potential of Eocene Matanomadh lignites from Kutch Basin, western India. The maceral study reveals that studied lignites are rich in huminite (av. 63%) with sub-ordinate amount of liptinite (av. 19%) and low inertinite (av. 3%), along with low to moderately high associated mineral matters (av. 15%). The overall petrographic composition points to a lagoonal condition for the formation of these lignites. The mean huminite reflectance values (R{sub r}: 0.28-0.34%, av. 0.31%) as well as low Rock-Eval T{sub max} (av. 417 C) values for the seams, suggest brown coal or lignitic stage/rank for the studied lignites. The palynological assemblages, dominated by tropical angiospermic pollen, suggest prevalence of warm humid tropical climate during the deposition of these lignites. The total organic carbon (TOC) content of lignites ranges between 26 and 58 wt.%, whereas the TOC content of the associated carbonaceous shales is around 4 wt.%. The Hydrogen Index (HI) ranging from 23 to 452 mg HC/g TOC indicates that the lignite sequence has the potential to produce mixed oil and gaseous hydrocarbons on maturation. The major pyrolysis products of lignites, derived from Curie point pyrolysis-GC-MS, are straight chain aliphatics, phenols and cadalene-based C{sub 15} bicyclic sesquiterpenoids. The exclusive occurrence of C{sub 15} bicyclic sesquiterpenoids suggests that these compounds are derived from dammar resin of angiosperm plants, belonging to family Dipterocarpaceae. (author)

  16. Organic petrology of subbituminous carbonaceous shale samples from Chalaw, Kabul Province, Afghanistan: Considerations for paleoenvironment and energy resource potential

    Hackley, Paul C.; SanFilipo, John R. [U.S. Geological Survey, MS 956 National Center, Reston VA, 20192 (United States); Azizi, Gul Pacha [Afghanistan Geological Survey, Macroryan Square, Kabul (Afghanistan); Davis, Philip A. [U.S. Geological Survey, 520 N. Park Avenue, Tucson AZ, 85719 (United States); Starratt, Scott W. [U.S. Geological Survey, MS 910, 345 Middlefield Rd, Menlo Park CA, 94025 (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Neogene (?) subbituminous carbonaceous shale deposits from Chalaw, Afghanistan, were investigated through organic petrology techniques and standard coal analyses to determine paleoenvironment and potential for resource utilization. The Chalaw deposit, approximately 30 km southeast of Kabul, currently is exploited for brick making and domestic heating and cooking. Three multiple-bench channel samples of the mined bed at Chalaw were collected and evaluated. The presence of significant huminite (ranging from 0.2 to 59.0 vol.%, mineral-inclusive basis) is suggestive of a terrestrial lignin-rich precursor plant material. Measured reflectance values of 0.38-0.55% indicate subbituminous rank. This rank suggests burial depths of approximately 1500 m and maximum temperatures of approximately 50 C. Structured liptinite macerals generally are absent except for some fluorescing morphologies interpreted to be poorly-preserved root cork suberinite. Sponge spicule bioliths including gemmoscleres and megascleres are common. These petrographic observations, in addition to high mineral matter content (33 to > 95 vol.%), medium to high sulfur content (2.1-11.5 wt.%, dry basis; db), and the presence of common gastropod? shell fragments and an aragonite-needle chalk bed are consistent with, but not directly indicative of, a marginal marine or estuarine mangrove depositional environment. However, additional data are necessary to confirm this hypothesis and deposition in a freshwater environment cannot be ruled out at this time. Commercial-scale development and utilization of the Chalaw deposit as a thermal fuel resource may be possible using a fluidized bed combustion system which could accept the low-quality mine product currently produced. Samples examined herein contain high-ash yield (45-90 wt.%, db), high total moisture content (17-39 wt.%), low calorific value (980-6860 Btu/lb, m,mmf), and have poor agglomerating properties (FSI = 0), consistent with fuels utilized in fluidized

  17. Organic petrology and Rock-Eval characteristics in selected surficial samples of the Tertiary Formation, South Sumatra Basin

    M. H. Hermiyanto

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.17014/ijog.vol4no3.20096Organic petrologic data of the DOM of Talangakar and Muaraenim Formations show that the organic matter consisting mainly of vitrinite group is essentially composed of telocollinite (1.0 – 70.8 % and desmocollinite (0.8 – 66.6 % with minor telinite (0.6 – 9.4 %, detrovitrinite (0.6 – 6.0 %, and cor- pocollinite (0.6 – 2.0 %. Minor exinite (0.4 – 7.8 % and inertinite (0.4 – 8.0 % are also determined. However, mineral matter varies from 0.6 – 99.44 %. Downwards, the increase in vitrinite reflectance (0.33 – 0.48 % is concomitant with the depth of each formation. Furthermore, based on Rock-eval pyrolysis, TOC value of the Talangakar Formation ranges from 0.09 – 15.38 %, Gumai 0.34 – 0.39 %, Airbenakat 0.32 – 4.82 %, and Muaraenim between 0.08 – 15.22 %. Moreover the PY (Potential Yield value variation of the Talangakar, Gumai, Airbenakat, and Muaraenim Formations are between 0.04 – 36.61 mg HC/g rock, 0.53 – 0.81 mg HC/g rock, 0.1 – 4.37 mg HC/g rock, and 0.07 – 129.8 mg HC/g rock respectively. Therefore, on the basis of those two parameters, the four formations are included into a gas - oil prone source rock potential. However, the Talangakar and Muaraenim Formations are poor to excellent category, whereas the Air Benakat tends to indicate a poor – fair category and Gumai Formation are only within a poor category. Tmax value of the Talangakar ranges from 237 – 4380 C, Gumai 316 – 3590 C, Airbenakat 398 – 4340 C with exceptions of 4970 C and 5180 C, and Muaraenim Forma- tions 264 – 4250 C. The Talangakar Formation contains kerogen Type II dan III, with the HI (Hydrogen Index value varies from 45.16 – 365.43. However two samples show value of 0. The organic content of the Gumai and Air Benakat Formations are included into kerogen type III, with HI value ranges from11.87 – 40.82, and 19 – 114 respectively. Moreover the Muaraenim Formation has two category of

  18. Organization within Organization Studies

    Lopdrup-Hjorth, Thomas

    This paper explores how prevalent contemporary problematizations of organizations coincide with a widespread assessment that Organization Studies (OS) has run out of steam. This impasse, the paper argues, is largely due to the emergence of an organization-phobia that has come to seize several...... strands of theorizing. By attending to the wide-ranging and far-reaching history of this organization-phobia, the paper argues that OS has become increasingly incapable of speaking about its core object. I show how organizations went from being conceptualized as entities of major importance to becoming...... credibility and legitimacy to begin with, the organization-phobia resulting from this history has been implicated in dismantling organizations, and in making OS progressively irrelevant to a wider public....

  19. Petrological and geochemical studies of mantle xenoliths from La Palma, Canary Islands

    Janisch, Astrid; Ntaflos, Theodoros

    2015-04-01

    .7 to 91.6. Cr# in sp extends from 50.4 to 87.9 suggesting that all pre-existing sp has been influenced by melt percolation. A striking feature of these rocks is the presence of intergranular glasses as an effect of melt percolation. The composition of the glasses is phonolitic, trachytic and basanitic. Such compositions correspond to the rock types found in the south of La Palma along the Cumbre Vieja ridge indicating that the xenoliths besides the modal metasomatism have experienced host basalt infiltration. The peculiarity of one sample is haüyne, localized within veins in association with amphibole, olivine and clinopyroxene. Evidently in this sample, the host-basalt infiltrated the mantle xenolith for haüyne is commonly part of basaltic lava. Equilibration temperatures calculated using two-pyroxene-thermometer of Brey and Koehler (1990) are estimated to be in the wide range of 726 to 1105°C at 1.5 GPa pressure, indicating that the studied xenoliths sample various depths of the oceanic lithosphere underneath the Canary Islands. References BREY, G.P. & KOEHLER, T. (1990). Geothermobarometry in four-phase lherzolites II. New thermobarometers, and practical assessment of existing thermobarometers. Journal of Petrology 31, 1353-1378.

  20. Meeting of Commission of International Committee on Petrology of Coals

    Timofeev, P P; Bogolyubova, L I

    1982-03-01

    In Urbana, Illinois from 18-20 May 1979 the XXXII session of the International Committee on Petrology met. Reports were made on standards for the study of bituminous and anthracite coals. Use of reflective capacity of vitrain to determine coalification of coals was discussed along with a proposition to establish numerical boundaries between brown, bituminous and anthracite coals. The re-editing of the International Dictionary on Petrology of Coals was agreed upon in view of new facts on microcomponents of coal and methods of studying them. The next meeting of the Commission took place at Ostrav, Czechoslovakia from 14-26 April 1980. At the plenary session, new officials were elected and agreement to re-edit the Dictionary on Petrology of Coals was confirmed. At the meeting of the Commission on Coal Petrography the question of the determination of components of coal by quantitative diagnosis, and results of determining components of vitrain by measuring its reflective capacity were reported on. At the meeting of the Committee on Applying Facts of Petrology in Geology, the classification of solid oil bitumen and organic substance of sediments was discussed. At the meeting of the Committee on the Application of the Petrology of Coals in Industry, attention was given to discussing basic parameters for the international classification of coals to be presented at the meeting of the Economic Commission of Europe in Geneva. In the final plenary session of the commission, results of discussions were summarized. The next session was to be held in France in 1981. (In Russian)

  1. Towards modern petrological collections

    Kriegsman, L.M.

    2004-01-01

    Petrological collections result from sampling for academic research, for aesthetic or commercial reasons, and to document natural diversity. Selection criteria for reducing and enhancing collections include adequate documentation, potential for future use, information density, time and money

  2. Organic geochemistry and petrology of oil source rocks, Carpathian Overthrust region, southeastern Poland - Implications for petroleum generation

    Kruge, M.A.; Mastalerz, Maria; Solecki, A.; Stankiewicz, B.A.

    1996-01-01

    The organic mailer rich Oligocene Menilite black shales and mudstones are widely distributed in the Carpathian Overthrust region of southeastern Poland and have excellent hydrocarbon generation potential, according to TOC, Rock-Eval, and petrographic data. Extractable organic matter was characterized by an equable distribution of steranes by carbon number, by varying amounts of 28,30-dinor-hopane, 18??(H)-oleanane and by a distinctive group of C24 ring-A degraded triterpanes. The Menilite samples ranged in maturity from pre-generative to mid-oil window levels, with the most mature in the southeastern portion of the study area. Carpathian petroleum samples from Campanian Oligocene sandstone reservoirs were similar in biomarker composition to the Menilite rock extracts. Similarities in aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon distributions between petroleum asphaltene and source rock pyrolyzates provided further evidence genetically linking Menilite kerogens with Carpathian oils.

  3. Sequence stratigraphy, organic petrology and chemistry applied to the upper and lower coal seams in the Candiota Coalfield, Parana Basin, RS, Brazil

    Oliveira, J.S. de; Kalkreuth, W. [Instituto de Geociencias, UFRGS, Porto Alegre (Brazil)

    2010-12-01

    The Permian age coal seams in the Candiota Coalfield represent the largest coal deposit of the country. Currently two seams are mined, called ''Camada Candiota Superior'' and ''Camada Candiota Inferior''. The other coal seams of the coalfield, seams S1-S9 (upper seams) and I1-I5 (lower seams) have as yet not been exploited. The objective of this paper is to perform a detailed sequence stratigraphic, petrologic and chemical study of the upper and lower coal seams, thereby generating data for assisting in the development and better use of the coal-bearing interval. The methodology includes application of the concepts of sequence stratigraphy, which includes the lithological interpretation of the core to establish the depositional environments and genetic correlation between facies associations to define parasequences and bounding surfaces; coal petrology (analysis of the reflectance of vitrinite, determination of the petrographic composition of the coals by maceral analyses), and chemical analyses such as sulphur determination, proximate analyses (ash, moisture, volatile matter, and fixed carbon), and elemental analyses. Three main depositional systems were so far identified: alluvial fan, fluvial system, lagoonal estuary system. This study shows that coal development was controlled by accommodation/accumulation rates, with coal seams with greater thickness and lateral continuity being formed within the transgressive systems tract (lagoonal depositional system) of parasequence 2 (PS2), indicating that the accumulation rates of the peat and distribution of the coal seams were controlled by stratigraphic setting. Vitrinite reflectances for the upper and lower coal seams are indicative of subbituminous rank (Rrandom = 0.36-0.47%), with evidence that anomalously low reflectance values are related to high mineral-matter contents. Maceral composition is highly variable, with some coal seams being extremely rich in inertinite (up to

  4. Lunar Science Conference, 4th, Houston, Tex., March 5-8, 1973, Proceedings. Volume 1 - Mineralogy and petrology. Volume 2 - Chemical and isotope analyses. Organic chemistry. Volume 3 - Physical properties

    Gose, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    The mineralogy, petrology, chemistry, isotopic composition, and physical properties of lunar materials are described in papers detailing methods, results, and implications of research on samples returned from eight lunar landing sites: Apollo 11, 12, 14, 15, 16, 17, and Luna 16 and 20. The results of experiments conducted or set up on the lunar surface by the astronauts are also described along with observations taken from Command Modules and subsatellites. Major topics include general geology, soil and breccia studies, petrologic studies, mineralogic analyses, elemental compositions, radiometric age determinations, rare gas chemistry, radionuclides, organogenic compounds, particle track records, thermal properties, seismic studies, resonance studies, orbital mapping, lunar atmosphere, magnetic studies, electrical studies, optical properties, and microcratering. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  5. Petrological study of the eastern part of Rio Maria batholith located in the SE of Para State

    Medeiros, H. de.

    1987-01-01

    This work is a petrological and geochronological study in the eastern part of Rio Maria batholith located in the SE of Para State (Brazil), in which granodioritic composition predominates. Selected samples including all varieties present in the eastern portion of Rio Maria granodioritic batholith were analyzed for major, minor and some trace elements. The results suggest two differentiation trends. The first is (BHGd + HBGd) - HBM sub(z)G, with decrease in CaO, TiO sub(2), Fe total, MgO and Sr contents, whereas K2O and Rb increase. The second trend is (BHGd + HBGd) - BGd, where the BGd have the highest values of SiO sub(2), and low CaO, TiO sub(2), Fe total, MgO and Sr contents. This results are in agreement with that obtained to the calc-alkaline rock series. Six selected samples, including all varieties, were dated by the Rb/Sr Whole-rock method, producing a isochronic age of 2564 +- 68 m.y. with an initial Sr sup(87)/Sr sup(86) ratio of 0.70288 +- 00092. The crystallization sequence proposed to the BHGd and BHGd, when correlated to the experimental results obtained in the rocks of granodioritic composition, suggests that the magma crystallization was in low pressure conditions (2 to 4kb). The temperature interval would be between 950 and +- 700 sup(0)C. The best explanation to the granodioritic magma origin is by partial fusion in the crustal base, with contribution of mantle material or not. The association of the rock units, including granodiorites, trondhjemites, meta-volcan-sedimentary sequences and gneisses of tonalitic to granodioritic composition observed in the Rio Maria region, and the Archaeyan ages obtained by the Rb/Sr method suggest that this region can be correlated with granite-greenstone terrains exposed in the Rhodesian, Kaapvaal and western Australia cratons. (author)

  6. Organic petrology and geochemistry of mudrocks from the lacustrine Lucaogou Formation, Santanghu Basin, northwest China: Application to lake basin evolution

    Hackley, Paul C.; Fishman, Neil; Wu, Tao; Baugher, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Exploration for tight oil in the frontier Santanghu Basin of northwest China has resulted in recent commercial discoveries sourced from the lacustrine Upper Permian Lucaogou Formation, already considered a “world class source rock” in the Junggar Basin to the west. Here we apply an integrated analytical program to carbonate-dominated mudrocks from the Lucaogou Formation in Santanghu Basin to document the nature of organic matter (OM) in the context of an evolving lake system. The organic-rich samples (TOC 2.8–11.4 wt%; n = 10) were widely spaced from an ~ 200 m cored section, interpreted from textural and mineralogical evidence to document transition from a lower under-filled to an overlying balanced-filled lake. Organic matter is dominated by moderate to strongly fluorescent amorphous material with Type I geochemical signature (HI values 510–755; n = 10) occurring in a continuum from lamellar stringers, 10–20 μm thick, some ≥ 1 mm in length (possible microbial mat; preserved only in lower under-filled section) to finely-disseminated amorphous groundmass intimately intermixed with mineral matrix. Biomarkers for methanotrophs and photosynthetic cyanobacteria indicate a complex microbial consortium. A unicellular prasinophyte green alga(?), similar to Tasmanites in marine rocks, is present as discrete flattened discs 50–100 μm in diameter. Type III OM including vitrinite (some fluorescent) and inertinite also is abundant. Solid bitumen, indicating local kerogen conversion, fills voids and occurs throughout the cored section. Vitrinite reflectance values are 0.47–0.58%, consistent with strong OM fluorescence but may be “suppressed”. Other proxies, e.g., biomarker parameters, indicate the Lucaogou Formation is in the early oil window at this location. On average, slightly more amorphous OM and telalginite are present in the lower section, consistent with a shallow, stratified, saline environment with low sediment dilution. More

  7. INAA and petrological study of sandstones from Khmer temples in Angkor

    Kucera, J.; Kranda, K.; Novak, J.K.; Poncar, J.; Krausova, I.; Soukal, L.

    2009-01-01

    INAA was used to determine 35 major, minor and trace elements in sandstone samples taken from building blocks of 21 Khmer temples in Angkor, Cambodia. The sandstone samples were also characterized by conventional optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis and electron microprobe analysis. The aim of this work was to examine the hypothesis that a particular elemental and/or mineral composition of the building materials can be characteristic of a particular architectural style/building period in the history of constructing the Angkor monuments. Preliminary results of this study are presented

  8. Petrographical, geochemical and petrological study of the xenoliths associating the basalt of (Southwest, Syria)

    Safarjalani, A.; Nasir, S.

    1998-01-01

    Alkali basalt spread northeast part of Shamah volcanic field (Southwest of Syria) belonging to the Neogene and Quaternary ages, which are coexisted with a great quantity of mafic and ultramafic xenoliths and megacrysts. Field observations and data of geochemical and petrographical studies results, for xenoliths coexisted with alkali basalt speared over the northwest part of the arabian plate (Syria) indicate availability of a proper environment where various kinds of xenoliths of lower crustal and upper mantle were formed, this indicates that these xenoliths have been formed under different thermo barometric conditions. The study of available mineral para genesis and geothermobarometrics on coexisting minerals suggests equilibration conditions, ranging between 6-8 kba for pressure and 850-920 Centigrade for temperature, and that is for xenoliths of gabbroic nature formed in the lower crustal between 20-27 km depth. With regard to the formation conditions of the xenoliths formed in the upper mantle (Pyroxenite and Lherzolite); they rang between 13.5 - 14.5 kba for pressure and 950-1060 Centigrade for temperature. (Author)

  9. Coordinated Oxygen Isotopic and Petrologic Studies of CAIS Record Varying Composition of Protosolar

    Simon, Justin I.; Matzel, J. E. P.; Simon, S. B.; Weber, P. K.; Grossman, L.; Ross, D. K.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    2012-01-01

    Ca-, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) record the O-isotope composition of Solar nebular gas from which they grew [1]. High spatial resolution O-isotope measurements afforded by ion microprobe analysis across the rims and margin of CAIs reveal systematic variations in (Delta)O-17 and suggest formation from a diversity of nebular environments [2-4]. This heterogeneity has been explained by isotopic mixing between the O-16-rich Solar reservoir [6] and a second O-16-poor reservoir (probably nebular gas) with a "planetary-like" isotopic composition [e.g., 1, 6-7], but the mechanism and location(s) where these events occur within the protoplanetary disk remain uncertain. The orientation of large and systematic variations in (Delta)O-17 reported by [3] for a compact Type A CAI from the Efremovka reduced CV3 chondrite differs dramatically from reports by [4] of a similar CAI, A37 from the Allende oxidized CV3 chondrite. Both studies conclude that CAIs were exposed to distinct, nebular O-isotope reservoirs, implying the transfer of CAIs among different settings within the protoplanetary disk [4]. To test this hypothesis further and the extent of intra-CAI O-isotopic variation, a pristine compact Type A CAI, Ef-1 from Efremovka, and a Type B2 CAI, TS4 from Allende were studied. Our new results are equally intriguing because, collectively, O-isotopic zoning patterns in the CAIs indicate a progressive and cyclic record. The results imply that CAIs were commonly exposed to multiple environments of distinct gas during their formation. Numerical models help constrain conditions and duration of these events.

  10. Petrological significance of REE in uraninite

    Feng Mingyue; Li Yuexiang; Xu Zhan.

    1992-01-01

    According to the petrological study of Zhuguangshan and Huanglongmiao granites and REE in uraninite from these granites, it can be concluded that REE contents in uraninite and granites are positively correlative; the partition characteristics of REE in uraninite are related to the acidity of initial rocks; and the fractionation degree of REE in uraninite reflects the differentiation degree of initial rocks

  11. Petrological significance of REE in uraninite

    Mingyue, Feng; Yuexiang, Li; Zhan, Xu

    1992-09-01

    According to the petrological study of Zhuguangshan and Huanglongmiao granites and REE in uraninite from these granites, it can be concluded that REE contents in uraninite and granites are positively correlative; the partition characteristics of REE in uraninite are related to the acidity of initial rocks; and the fractionation degree of REE in uraninite reflects the differentiation degree of initial rocks.

  12. Petrology of the Sutherland commanage melilite intrusives

    Viljoen, K.S.

    1990-01-01

    The petrology of the Sutherland Commonage olivine melilitite intrusives have been investigated using petrographic and chemical methods. The results of the geochemical study suggest that the Commonage melilites were derived by the melting of a recently metasomatised region of the asthenosphere, probably under the influence of an ocean-island-type hotspot situated in the lower mantle

  13. Geochemical, microtextural and petrological studies of the Samba prospect in the Zambian Copperbelt basement: a metamorphosed Palaeoproterozoic porphyry Cu deposit.

    Master, Sharad; Mirrander Ndhlovu, N.

    2015-04-01

    Ever since Wakefield (1978, IMM Trans., B87, 43-52) described a porphyry-type meta-morphosed Cu prospect, the ca 50 Mt, 0.5% Cu Samba deposit (12.717°S, 27.833°E), hosted by porphyry-associated quartz-sericite-biotite schists in northern Zambia, there has been controversy about its origin and significance. This is because it is situated in the basement to the world's largest stratabound sediment-hosted copper province, the Central African Copperbelt, which is hosted by rocks of the Neoproterozoic Katanga Supergroup. Mineralization in the pre-Katangan basement has long played a prominent role in ore genetic models, with some authors suggesting that basement Cu mineralization may have been recycled into the Katangan basin through erosion and redeposition, while others have suggested that the circulation of fluids through Cu-rich basement may have leached out the metals which are found concentrated in the Katangan orebodies. On the basis of ca 490-460 Ma Ar-Ar ages, Hitzman et al. (2012, Sillitoe Vol., SEG Spec. Publ., 16, 487-514) suggested that Samba represents late-stage impregnation of copper mineralization into the basement, and that it was one of the youngest copper deposits known in the Central African Copperbelt. If the Samba deposit really is that young, then it would have post-dated regional deformation and metamorphism (560-510 Ma), and it ought to be undeformed and unmetamorphosed. The Samba mineralization consists of chalcopyrite and bornite, occurring as disseminations, stringers and veinlets, found in a zone >1 km along strike, in steeply-dipping lenses up to 10m thick and >150m deep. Our new major and trace element XRF geochemical data (14 samples) show that the host rocks are mainly calc-alkaline metadacites. Cu is correlated with Ag (Cu/Ag ~10,000:1) with no Au or Mo. Our study focused on the microtextures and petrology of the Samba ores. We confirm that there is alteration of similar style to that accompanying classical porphyry Cu mineralization

  14. Petrological features of selected components of the Cergowa sandstones (Outer Carpathians) recorded by scanning electron microscopy - preliminary study

    Pszonka, Joanna

    2017-11-01

    The scanning electron microscope analysis of the Cergowa sandstones brings new data on their petrological features and chemical composition. Previous work in standard petrographic examination, e.g. polarising (PL) or cathodoluminescence (CL) microscopy, displayed limited information on grain surface topography and only assumptions to their geochemistry. Both identification and characterisation of minerals are fundamental in the progress of mining and minerals processing systems. Detrital grains of the Cergowa sandstones are bound by calcite and dolomitic cement and commonly corroded by diagenetic fluids, however, in varying degrees, which is illustrated here by feldspar, quartz and dolomite minerals. Dissolution processes of marginal parts of these mineral grains resulted in corrosion, which increased the contact surface between the grains and the cement. The difference in resistance to these processes was observed not only among distinct groups of minerals, but also within the group of feldspars: between K-feldspars and minerals of plagioclase. That combination resulted in exceptionally strong cementation of the Cergowa sandstones, which is expressed by their high hardness and resistance to abrasion, freezing, and thawing. Inherent parameters of sandstones are characterised by their petrographical properties.

  15. Petrological features of selected components of the Cergowa sandstones (Outer Carpathians recorded by scanning electron microscopy – preliminary study

    Pszonka Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The scanning electron microscope analysis of the Cergowa sandstones brings new data on their petrological features and chemical composition. Previous work in standard petrographic examination, e.g. polarising (PL or cathodoluminescence (CL microscopy, displayed limited information on grain surface topography and only assumptions to their geochemistry. Both identification and characterisation of minerals are fundamental in the progress of mining and minerals processing systems. Detrital grains of the Cergowa sandstones are bound by calcite and dolomitic cement and commonly corroded by diagenetic fluids, however, in varying degrees, which is illustrated here by feldspar, quartz and dolomite minerals. Dissolution processes of marginal parts of these mineral grains resulted in corrosion, which increased the contact surface between the grains and the cement. The difference in resistance to these processes was observed not only among distinct groups of minerals, but also within the group of feldspars: between K–feldspars and minerals of plagioclase. That combination resulted in exceptionally strong cementation of the Cergowa sandstones, which is expressed by their high hardness and resistance to abrasion, freezing, and thawing. Inherent parameters of sandstones are characterised by their petrographical properties.

  16. Journal of Mineralogical and Petrological Sciences

    Official journal of Japan Association of Mineralogical Sciences (JAMS), focusing on mineralogical and petrological sciences and their related fields. Journal of Mineralogical and Petrological Sciences (JMPS) is the successor journal to both “Journal of Mineralogy, Petrology and Economic Geology” and “Mineralogical Journal”. Journal of Mineralogical and Petrological Sciences (JMPS) is indexed in the ISI database (Thomson Reuters), the Science Citation Index-Expanded, Current Contents/Physical, Chemical & Earth Sciences, and ISI Alerting Services.

  17. Comparative organic petrology of interlayered sandstones, siltstones, mudstones and coals in the Upper Carboniferous Ruhr basin, northwest Germany, and their thermal history and methane generation

    Scheidt, G.; Littke, R. (Harress Geotechnik GmbH, Floersheim (Germany, F.R.))

    1989-01-01

    In the coal-mining Ruhr-area, Upper Carboniferous rocks consist of interlayered sandstones, siltstones, mudstones and coals. They were deposited in a tropical, paralic environment where alternating fluvial sedimentation, occasional marine ingressions, and swamp growth resulted in an irregular cyclic succession. The total sedimentary package contains on an average 6 Vol.% of organic manner. About 70 Vol. % of the organic matter occurs in coal seams, the rest as dispersed organic matter in clastic rocks. The organic matter is autochthonous in the coals and allochthonous in associated sandstones and siltstones. It consists of about 70% vitrinite, 20% inertinite, and 10% liptinite. The overall maceral group composition is the same for coals and dispersed organic matter. This surprising similarity is caused by a nearly exclusive input of land-plant derived organic matter to swamps and fluvial systems and a similar degree of preservation. Highest average liptinite contents were found in unrooted mudstones, highest average inertinite contents in coarse-grained siltstones and highest average vitrinite percentages in sandstones. Maturities of the sediments studied are well within the hydrocarbon generation window, e.g. vitrinite reflectivities range from 0.6% to 1.6%. Reflectivities measured on dispersed particles in clastic rocks are similar to those measured in coal seams. Calculations of the amount of methane generated indicate that coal seams contributed more to the total hydrocarbon generation than dispersed organic matter. 51 refs., 13 figs.

  18. Channel flow and localized fault bounded slice tectonics (LFBST): Insights from petrological, structural, geochronological and geospeedometric studies in the Sikkim Himalaya, NE India

    Chakraborty, Sumit; Mukhopadhyay, Dilip K.; Chowdhury, Priyadarshi; Rubatto, Daniela; Anczkiewicz, Robert; Trepmann, Claudia; Gaidies, Fred; Sorcar, Nilanjana; Dasgupta, Somnath

    2017-06-01

    One of the enduring debates in the study of the Himalayan orogen (and continental collision zones in general) is whether the salient observed features are explained (a) by localized deformation along discrete, narrow fault zones/ductile shear zones separating individual blocks or slices (e.g. critical taper or wedge tectonic models), or (b) by distributed deformation dominated by wide zones of visco-plastic flow in the solid or a partially molten state (e.g. channel flow models). A balanced cross-section from Sikkim in the eastern Himalaya that is based on structural data and is drawn to satisfy petrological and geophysical constraints as well, is used in combination with information from petrology, geochronology, geospeedometry and microstructural data to address this question. We discuss that any tectonic model needs to be thermally, rheologically, geometrically and temporally viable in order to qualify as a suitable description of a system; models such as channel flow and critical taper are considered in this context. It is shown that channel flow models may operate with or without an erosional porthole (channel with tunnel and funnel mode vs. channels with only the tunnel mode) and that the predicted features differ significantly between the two. Subsequently, we consider a large body of data from Sikkim to show that a channel flow type model (in the tunneling without funneling mode), such as the ones of Faccenda et al. (2008), describes features formed at high temperatures very well, while features formed at lower temperatures are more consistent with the operation of localized, fault-bounded, slice tectonics, (LFBST, be it in the form of critical taper, wedge tectonics, or something else). Thus, the two modes are not competing, but collaborating, processes and both affect a given rock unit at different points of time during burial, metamorphism and exhumation. A transitional stage separates the two end-member styles of tectonic evolution. The proposed models

  19. Research on uranium and thorium elements exploration through the study of petrography, petrology and geophysical method in the Saghand Area (Central Iran) Islamic Republic of Iran

    Iranmanesh, J.; Fattahi, V.; Raziani, S.

    2014-01-01

    This study is a research on uranium and thorium exploration by use of the petrography, petrology and radiometric data in the Saghand area, Central Iran plateau. The lithologies of this area comprise of granite and metasomatized granite. As a result of metasomatic process, uranium and thorium bearing minerals such as davidite and alanite were formed. Sericitization and albitization are the main alterations detected in the study area and thorium mineralization is more common in albitization. By investigation of the chemical classification, non-radioactive specimens, rock types include: diorite and granodiorite, while radioactive specimens consist of gabbroic rocks (basalt). According to the magma source graphs, these rocks formed by calc-alkaline series magma. A scintillometer and spectrometer (MGS-150) were used for radiometric data acquisition. 1001 data points have been obtained from 11 profiles and total counts for, K, U, Th were measured. After primary data processing, data logarithms were calculated for normalizing, and the radiometric data show that uranium and thorium enrichment is more than potassium, while thorium and uranium enrichment are approximately equal. After data integration, two probable anomalies were determined in northwest and northeast parts of the study area. (author)

  20. The use of petrology in Philippine geothermal system

    Reyes, A.G.

    1992-01-01

    Petrology is used in the various stages of exploration, development and exploitation of a geothermal area, often in conjunction with other fields of study. It is an effective operations tool for predicting syn- and post-drilling conditions in a well, for field and well maintenance, and to a small extent for monitoring fluids passing through the pipelines and steam turbines. Petrological data and interpretations are important in assessing an exploration area, and in formulating and developing strategy of a geothermal field. (auth.). 11 figs

  1. Soil organic matter studies

    1977-01-01

    A total of 77 papers were presented and discussed during this symposium, 37 are included in this Volume II. The topics covered in this volume include: biochemical transformation of organic matter in soils; bitumens in soil organic matter; characterization of humic acids; carbon dating of organic matter in soils; use of modern techniques in soil organic matter research; use of municipal sludge with special reference to heavy metals constituents, soil nitrogen, and physical and chemical properties of soils; relationship of soil organic matter and plant metabolism; interaction between agrochemicals and organic matter; and peat. Separate entries have been prepared for those 20 papers which discuss the use of nuclear techniques in these studies

  2. Fiction and Organization Studies

    Savage, P. (Paul); J.P. Cornelissen (Joep); Franck, H. (Henrika)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe topic of fiction is in itself not new to the domain of organization studies. However, prior research has often separated fiction from the reality of organizations and used fiction metaphorically or as a figurative source to describe and interpret organizations. In this article, we go

  3. Seismic anisotropy and compositionally induced velocity anomalies in the lithosphere above mantle plumes: a petrological and microstructural study of mantle xenoliths from French Polynesia

    Tommasi, Andréa; Godard, Marguerite; Coromina, Guilhem; Dautria, Jean-Marie; Barsczus, Hans

    2004-11-01

    In addition to thermal erosion, plume/lithosphere interaction may induce significant changes in the lithosphere chemical composition. To constrain the extent of this process in an oceanic environment and its consequences on the lithosphere seismic properties, we investigated the relationship between petrological processes and microstructure in mantle xenoliths from different hotspots tracks in South Pacific Superswell region: the Austral-Cook, Society, and Marquesas islands in French Polynesia. Olivine forsterite contents in the studied spinel peridotites vary continuously from Fo91 to Fo83. Dunites and wehrlites display the lowest forsterite contents. Their microstructure and high Ni contents preclude a cumulate origin, suggesting that these rocks result from melt/rock reactions involving olivine precipitation and pyroxene dissolution. In addition, lherzolites and wehrlites display evidence of late crystallization of clinopyroxene, which may result from a near-solidus melt-freezing reaction. These data suggest that the lithosphere above a mantle plume undergoes a complex sequence of magmatic processes that significantly change its composition. These compositional changes, particularly iron enrichment in olivine, result in lower P- and S-waves velocities. Relative to normal lithospheric mantle, compositionally induced seismic anomalies may attain -2.2% for S-waves and -1% for P-waves. Smaller negative anomalies for P-waves are due to a higher sensitivity to modal composition. Conversely, crystal-preferred orientations (CPO) and seismic anisotropy are little affected by these processes. Lherzolites and harzburgites, independent from composition, show high-temperature porphyroclastic microstructures and strong olivine CPO. Dunites and wehrlites display annealing microstructures to which is associated a progressive dispersion of the olivine CPO. Very weak, almost random olivine CPO is nevertheless rare, suggesting that CPO destruction is restricted to domains of

  4. Widespread melt/rock interaction and seismic properties of the lithosphere above mantle plumes: A petrological and microstructural study of mantle xenoliths from French Polynesia

    Tommasi, A.; Godard, M.

    2002-12-01

    In addition to thermal erosion, plume/lithosphere interaction may induce significant changes in the lithosphere chemical composition. To constrain the extent of this process in an oceanic environment and its consequences on the lithosphere seismic properties, we studied the relationship between petrological processes and microstructure in mantle xenoliths from the Austral-Cook, Society and Marquesas islands. Olivine forsterite contents in our sp-peridotites vary continuously from Fo91 to Fo83, the lowest Fo being observed in dunites and wehrlites. Yet, their high Ni content (up to 2500 ppm) precludes a cumulate origin. These rocks are rather interpreted as resulting from melt/rock reactions involving olivine precipitation and pyroxene dissolution, the dunites indicating high melt-rock ratios. Moreover, wehrlites display poikiloblastic diopside enclosing corroded olivines. Late crystallization of clinopyroxene, also observed in lherzolites, may result from a near-solidus melt-freezing reaction occurring at the boundary of a partial melting domain developed at the expenses of lithospheric mantle. These data suggest that the lithosphere above a mantle plume undergoes a complex sequence of magmatic processes that significantly change its composition. Yet, crystal preferred orientations and thus seismic anisotropy are little affected by these processes. Lherzolites and harzburgites, independent from composition, show high-temperature porphyroclastic microstructures and strong olivine CPO. Although dunites and wehrlites display annealing microstructures to which is associated a progressive dispersion of the olivine CPO, very weak CPO are limited to a few dunites and wehrlites, suggesting that CPO destruction is restricted to domains of intense magma-rock interaction due to localized flow or accumulation of magmas. Conversely, the compositional changes result in lower seismic velocities for P- and S-waves. Relative to normal mantle, seismic anomalies may attain -2

  5. Organic petrology of the Aptian-age section in the downdip Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, Mississippi, USA: Observations and preliminary implications for thermal maturation history

    Valentine, Brett J.; Hackley, Paul C.; Enomoto, Catherine B.; Bove, Alana M.; Dulong, Frank T.; Lohr, Celeste D.; Scott, Krystina R.

    2014-01-01

    This study identifies a thermal maturity anomaly within the downdip Mississippi Interior Salt Basin (MISB) of southern Mississippi, USA, through examination of bitumen reflectance data from Aptian-age strata (Sligo Formation, Pine Island Shale, James Limestone, and Rodessa Formation). U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) reconnaissance investigations conducted in 2011–2012 examined Aptian-age thermal maturity trends across the onshore northern Gulf of Mexico region and indicated that the section in the downdip MISB is approaching the wet gas/condensate window (Ro~1.2%). A focused study in 2012–2013 used 6 whole core, one sidewall core, and 49 high-graded cutting samples (depth range of 13,000–16,500 ft [3962.4–5029.2 m] below surface) collected from 15 downdip MISB wells for mineralogy, fluid inclusion, organic geochemistry, and organic petrographic analysis. Based on native solid bitumen reflectance (Ro generally > 0.8%; interpreted to be post-oil indigenous bitumens matured in situ), Ro values increase regionally across the MISB from the southeast to the northwest. Thermal maturity in the eastern half of the basin (Ro range 1.0 to 1.25%) appears to be related to present-day burial depth and shows a gradual increase with respect to depth. To the west, thermal maturity continues to increase even as the Aptian section shallows structurally on the Adams County High (Ro range 1.4 to > 1.8%). After evaluating the possible thermal agents responsible for increasing maturity at shallower depths (i.e., igneous activity, proximity to salt, variations in regional heat flux, and uplift), we tentatively propose that either greater paleoheat flow or deeper burial coupled with uplift in the western part of the MISB could be responsible for the thermal maturity anomaly. Further research and additional data are needed to determine the cause(s) of the thermal anomaly.

  6. A combined study of gas geochemistry, petrology, and lava effusion at Bagana, a unique persistently active lava cone in Papua New Guinea

    McCormick, B. T.; Salem, L. C.; Edmonds, M.; D'Aleo, R. N. M.; Aiuppa, A.; Arellano, S. R.; Wallius, J.; Galle, B.; Barry, P. H.; Ballentine, C. J.; Mulina, K.; Sindang, M.; Itikarai, I.; Wadge, G.; Lopez, T. M.; Fischer, T. P.

    2016-12-01

    Bagana volcano (Bougainville Island, Papua New Guinea) has exhibited nearly continuous extrusion of andesitic lava for over a century, but has largely been studied by satellite remote sensing. Satellite UV spectroscopy has revealed Bagana to be among the largest volcanic sources of sulfur dioxide worldwide. Satellite radar measurements of lava extrusion rate suggest that the entire edifice could have been built in only a few centuries. Bagana is dominantly constructed from lava flows, but also exhibits violent PDC-forming explosive eruptions, which threaten local populations.We present new multi-parameter data from fieldwork on Bagana in September 2016. UV spectrometers were deployed to ground-truth satellite observations of SO2 emissions, and track sub-daily variations in gas output. In situ measurements and sampling of emissions provide the first gas composition data for this volcano. Aerial imagery filmed by UAV was obtained to generate a high resolution DEM of the edifice for use in calibrating ongoing satellite radar studies of deformation and extrusion rate. Lava and tephra samples were gathered, with the aim of comparing melt composition and volatile content between eruptions of different style. The combination of gas geochemistry, geophysical monitoring from space, and petrology will be used to build a model framework to understand the pulsatory nature of Bagana's lava extrusion, and transitions to explosive activity.A campaign to a continuously active but poorly-studied volcano affords many opportunities for education and outreach. The campaign participants included early career scientists from five countries, who planned and carried out the fieldwork and exchanged expertise in a range of techniques. All work was undertaken in close collaboration with Rabaul Volcano Observatory, and was informed by their strategic monitoring goals, a valuable experience for the field team of synergising research activities with more operational concerns. Footage obtained

  7. Organic chemistry and petrology of barven and Mo-Ni-PGE mineralized marine black Thales of the Lower Cambrian Niutitang Formation (South China)

    Kříbek, B.; Sýkorová, Ivana; Pašava, J.; Machovič, Vladimír

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 72, 3-4 (2007), s. 240-256 ISSN 0166-5162 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300460510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : organic particles * reflectance * micro-Raman spectra Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 1.625, year: 2007

  8. A petrological study of Paleoarchean rocks of the Onverwacht Group: New insights into the geologic evolution of the Barberton Greenstone Belt, South Africa

    Grosch, E. G.; Mcloughlin, N.; Abu-Alam, T. S.; Vidal, O.

    2012-12-01

    This study presents a multi-disciplinary petrological approach applied to surface samples and a total of 800 m of scientific drill core that furthers our understanding of the geologic evolution of the ca. 3.5 to 3.2 Ga Onverwacht Group of the Barberton greenstone belt (BGB), South Africa. Detrital zircon grains in coarse (diamictite) to fine-grained clastic sedimentary rocks of the Noisy formation (drill core KD2a) that unconformably overlies the volcanic ca. 3472 Ma Hooggenoeg Formation, are investigated by laser ablation LA-ICP-MS to constrain their 207Pb/206Pb ages for depositional age and provenance. A wide range in 207Pb/206Pb ages between ca. 3600 and 3430 Ma is reported, corresponding to surrounding TTG plutons and the ca.3667-3223 Ma Ancient Gneiss Complex. The youngest detrital zircon grain identified has an age of 3432 ± 10 Ma. Given the short time interval for a major change in geologic environment between ca. 3472 Ma and ca. 3432 Ma, it is argued here, that the Noisy formation is the earliest tectonic basin in the BGB, which developed during major tectonic uplift at ca. 3432 Ma. In the overlying ca. 3334 Ma Kromberg type-section, application of a chlorite thermodynamic multi-equilibrium calculation, dioctahedral mica hydration-temperature curve and pseudosection modelling, indicates a wide range in metamorphic conditions from sub-greenschist to the uppermost greenschist facies across the Kromberg type-section. A central mylonitic fuchsite-bearing zone, referred to as the Kromberg Section Mylonites, records at least two metamorphic events: a high-T, low-P (420 ± 30oC, sedimentary sequence contains detrital and diagenetic pyrites with a significant variation in Δ33S of -0.62 to +1.4‰ and δ34SCDT between -7.00 and +12.6‰ in the upper turbidite unit, to more narrow isotopic ranges with magmatic-atmospheric values in the underlying polymictitic diamictite. A sedimentary quartz-pyrite vein in the diamictite records the largest range and most negative

  9. Petrologic studies of drill cores USW-G2 and UE25b-1H, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Caporuscio, F.; Vaniman, D.; Bish, D.; Broxton, D.; Arney, B.; Heiken, G.; Byers, F.; Gooley, R.; Semarge, E.

    1982-07-01

    The tuffs of the Nevada Test Site are currently under investigation as a possible deep geologic site for high-level radioactive waste disposal. This report characterizes tuff retrieved in core from two drill holes, USW-G2 and UE25b-1H, at the Yucca Mountain block. The USW-G2 drill core is from the northernmost extent of the block, whereas UE25b-1H is adjacent to an earlier drill hole, UE25a-1. The drill cores USW-G2 and UE25b-1H bottomed at 6000 and 4200 ft, respectively. Petrographic and x-ray diffraction studies of the two drill cores are presented in this report and indicate that tuffs (composed primarily of variably welded ash flows) are partially recrystallized to secondary minerals. Correlations of stratigraphy are also made with previous drill cores from Yucca Mountain

  10. An Integrated Geochronological, Petrological, Geochemical and Paleomagnetic Study of Paleoproterozoic and Mesoproterozoic Mafic Dyke Swarms in the Nain Craton, Labrador

    Sahin, Tugce

    The Nain craton comprises the western, Labrador segment of the larger North Atlantic craton (NAC) which exposes Early through Late Archean gneisses. The NAC is bounded on all sides by Paleoproterozoic collisional orogens that involved either considerable structural reworking (Torngat-Nagssugtoqidian-Lewisian) or the accretion of juvenile arc magmas (Ketilidian-Makkovik). The NAC remains poorly understood compared to other Archean crustal blocks now dispersed globally. Compounding this problem is a lack of reliable paleomagnetic poles for NAC units that predate its assembly into the supercontinent Laurentia by ca. 1800 Ma, which could be used to test neighboring relationships with other cratonic fragments. In order to understand the history of the NAC as part of a possible, larger supercontinent, the record of mafic dyke swarms affecting the craton, particularly those that postdate the Late Archean terrane assembly, were examined in this study. Diabase or gabbroic dyke swarms are invaluable in such studies because their geometries offer possible locus points, they often have a punctuated emplacement and precisely datable crystallization histories, and they have cooling histories and oxide mineralogy amenable to recovering robust paleopoles. Coastal Labrador exposes a number of mafic dykes, some of which are demonstrably Paleoproterozoic (e.g. 2235 Ma Kikkertavak dykes; 2121 Ma Tikkigatsiagak dykes) or Mesoproterozoic (e.g. 1280-1270 Ma Nain and Harp dykes) in age (U-Pb; baddeleyite or zircon). The southern half of the Nain craton (Hopedale block) in particular preserves a rich array of mafic dykes. Dyke cross-cutting relationships are numerous and relatively well exposed, permitting multiple opportunities for paleomagnetic field tests (e.g. baked contact). The results presented here allow understanding of the tectonic evolution of the NAC with implications for strengthened Labrador-Greenland correlations, and testing possible Paleoproterozoic supercontinent

  11. Organic geochemistry and petrology of subsurface Paleocene-Eocene Wilcox and Claiborne Group coal beds, Zavala County, Maverick Basin, Texas, USA

    Hackley, Paul C.; Warwick, Peter D.; Hook, Robert W.; Alimi, Hossein; Mastalerz, Maria; Swanson, Sharon M.

    2012-01-01

    Coal samples from a coalbed methane exploration well in northern Zavala County, Maverick Basin, Texas, were characterized through an integrated analytical program. The well was drilled in February, 2006 and shut in after coal core desorption indicated negligible gas content. Cuttings samples from two levels in the Eocene Claiborne Group were evaluated by way of petrographic techniques and Rock–Eval pyrolysis. Core samples from the Paleocene–Eocene Indio Formation (Wilcox Group) were characterized via proximate–ultimate analysis in addition to petrography and pyrolysis. Two Indio Formation coal samples were selected for detailed evaluation via gas chromatography, and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and 13C CPMAS NMR spectroscopy. Samples are subbituminous rank as determined from multiple thermal maturity parameters. Elevated rank (relative to similar age coal beds elsewhere in the Gulf Coast Basin) in the study area is interpreted to be a result of stratigraphic and/or structural thickening related to Laramide compression and construction of the Sierra Madre Oriental to the southwest. Vitrinite reflectance data, along with extant data, suggest the presence of an erosional unconformity or change in regional heat flow between the Cretaceous and Tertiary sections and erosion of up to >5 km over the Cretaceous. The presence of liptinite-rich coals in the Claiborne at the well site may indicate moderately persistent or recurring coal-forming paleoenvironments, interpreted as perennially submerged peat in shallow ephemeral lakes with herbaceous and/or flotant vegetation. However, significant continuity of individual Eocene coal beds in the subsurface is not suggested. Indio Formation coal samples contain abundant telovitrinite interpreted to be preserved from arborescent, above-ground woody vegetation that developed during the middle portion of mire development in forested swamps. Other petrographic criteria suggest enhanced biological, chemical and physical

  12. Organizing education by drawing on organization studies

    Romme, A.G.L.

    2003-01-01

    This study explores how scholars researching organizations and organizing processes can use and exploit their knowledge not only in terms of course contents, but also in organizing and managing students' learning activity. A design-oriented research approach is used in order to develop grounded

  13. Petrologic Applications of Tourmaline

    London, D.; Morgan, G. B., VI; Wolf, M. B.; Guttery, B. M.

    2011-12-01

    (tourmaline is isotopically light with respect to the fluid), but it is pressure-dependent at least up to 200 MPa. This isotopic range is narrow in relation to vast tourmaline-producing magmatic-hydrothermal systems, such as the granites of Cornwall, UK. Preliminary experiments by Hervig et. al. (2002) report a large variation of Δ11B between aqueous fluid and granitic melt over small ranges of T, such that the isotopic composition of tourmaline should shift dramatically to higher (vapor) or lower (melt) values when crystallization occurs from a two-phase fluid system. Existing studies of consanguineous granite-pegmatite systems show nearly no variation of δ11B from common tourmaline in source granites to elbaite in the most fractionated pegmatites; the values correspond to those of tourmaline-melt, with little evidence for crystallization from vapor. Tourmaline may prove useful as a geothermometer in the same way as other AFM minerals, but the complexities of coupled substitutions in relation to the multitude of site occupancies in tourmaline will make experimental calibration a difficult, if not futile effort. Elemental fractionation between the polar ends of tourmaline, and its tendency for unidirectional growth, further complicate any quantitative treatment of its chemical composition.

  14. Petrology of seamounts in the Central Indian Ocean Basin: Evidence for near-axis origin

    Mukhopadhyay, R.; Batiza, R.; Iyer, S.D.

    Previous studies on the distribution and morphology of ancient seamount chains (>50 Ma) in the Central Indian Ocean basin (CIOB) indicated their generation from the fast spreading Southeast Indian Ridge. The petrology of some of these seamounts...

  15. Multimodality in organization studies

    Van Leeuwen, Theo

    2017-01-01

    This afterword reviews the chapters in this volume and reflects on the synergies between organization and management studies and multimodality studies that emerge from the volume. These include the combination of strong sociological theorizing and detailed multimodal analysis, a focus on material...

  16. Adiabat_1ph 3.0 and the MAGMA website: educational and research tools for studying the petrology and geochemistry of plate margins

    Antoshechkina, P. M.; Asimow, P. D.

    2010-12-01

    features to be incorporated into adiabat_1ph after its release was the ability to simulate flux melting, in which a metasomatic fluid or melt, of fixed composition, was added to the system before each equilibration step. This idea was further developed in the coupled dynamic and petrological subduction zone model GyPSM, so that fluid flux into the wedge was controlled by the location of dehydration reactions in the slab. The adiabat_1ph release candidate includes a similar option so that the user may specify assimilated compositions, which evolve as the calculation proceeds. This added flexibility opens up a number of possibilities, such as more realistic simulations of melt-rock reactions at mid-ocean ridges. Adiabat_1ph files may be downloaded from the MAGMA website at http://magmasource.caltech.edu/ and feedback is welcomed at a dedicated forum, especially ideas for new software features. MAGMA is an online resource for the study of mantle melting and magma evolution, hosted by Caltech. As well as MELTS-related resources, there are tools for visualization of binary and ternary phase diagrams. Flash movies of phase diagrams for adiabatic decompression melting of peridotite and pyroxenite sources can be played in a web browser or downloaded from a server.

  17. Looking at the roots of the highest mountains: the lithospheric structure of the Himalaya-Tibet and the Zagros orogens. Results from a geophysical-petrological study

    Tunini, L.; Jimenez-Munt, I.; Fernandez, M.; Villasenor, A.; Afonso, J. C.; Verges, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Himalaya-Tibet and Zagros orogens are the two most prominent mountain belts built by continental collision. They are part of a huge belt of Cenozoic age which runs from the Pyrenees to Burma. In its central sector, the collision with the southern margin of the Eurasian plate has resulted not only in the building of mountain ranges over the north-eastern edges of the Arabian and Indian plates but also in widespread deformation 1000-3000 km from the suture zones. Zagros and Himalaya-Tibet orogens share many geodynamic processes but at different rates, amount of convergence and stage of development. The study of their present-day structures provides new insights into their quasi coeval collisional event pointing out differences and similarities in the mountain building processes. We present 2D crust and upper mantle cross-sections down to 400 km depth, along four SW-NE trending profiles. Two profiles cross the Zagros Mountains, running from the Mesopotamian Foreland Basin up to the Alborz and Central Iran. Two other profiles run through the Himalaya-Tibetan orogen: the western transect crosses the western Himalaya, Tarim Basin, Tian Shan Mountains and Junggar Basin; the eastern transect runs from the Indian shield to the Beishan Basin, crossing the eastern Himalaya, Tibetan Plateau, Qaidam Basin and Qilian Mountains. We apply the LitMod-2D code which integrates potential fields (gravity and geoid), isostasy (elevation) and thermal (heat flow and temperature distribution) equations, and mantle petrology. The resulting crust and upper mantle structure is constrained by available data on elevation, Bouguer anomaly, geoid height, surface heat flow and seismic data including P- and S-wave tomography models. Our results show distinct deformation patterns between the crust and the lithospheric mantle beneath the Zagros and Himalaya-Tibetan orogens, indicating a strong strain partitioning in both areas. At crustal level, we found a thickening beneath the Zagros and the

  18. Studying Organizations on Instagram

    Uta Russmann

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available With the rise of social media platforms based on the sharing of pictures and videos, the question of how such platforms should be studied arises. Previous research on social media (content has mainly focused on text (written words and the rather text-based social media platforms Twitter and Facebook. Drawing on research in the fields of visual, political, and business communication, we introduce a methodological framework to study the fast-growing image-sharing service Instagram. This methodological framework was developed to study political parties’ Instagram accounts and tested by means of a study of Swedish political parties during the 2014 election campaign. In this article, we adapt the framework to also study other types of organizations active on Instagram by focusing on the following main questions: Do organizations only use Instagram to share one-way information, focusing on disseminating information and self-presentation? Or is Instagram used for two-way communication to establish and cultivate organization-public relationships? We introduce and discuss the coding of variables with respect to four clusters: the perception of the posting, image management, integration, and interactivity.

  19. Petrology and radiogeology of the Stripa pluton

    Wollenberg, Harold; Flexser, Steve; Andersson, Lennart

    1980-01-01

    To better define the character of the rock encompassing the thermomechanical and hydrological experiments at the Stripa mine in central Sweden, and to help determine the size of the Stripa pluton, detailed studies were conducted of the petrology and radiogeology of the quartz monzonite and adjacent rocks. Petrologic studies emphasized optical petrography, with supplementary X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence and microprobe analyses. Radiogeologic investigations were based primarily on surface and underground gamma-ray spectrometric measurements of uranium, thorium and potassium, supplemented by laboratory gamma spectrometric analyses and fission-track radiographic determinations of the locations and abundance of uranium in the rock matrix. Both the quartz monzonite and the metavolcanic leptite which it intruded are strongly fractured. Two stages of fracture filling are evident; an earlier stage encompassing quartz, sericite, feldspar, epidote, and chlorite, and a later stage dominated by carbonate minerals. The Stripa quartz monzonite is chemically and mineralogically distinct from other plutons in the region. Muscovite is the predominant mica in the quartz monzonite; biotite has been altered to chlorite, hornblende is absent, and accessory minerals are scarce. In contrast, in other plutons in the Stripa region biotite and hornblende are prominent mafic minerals and accessory minerals are abundant. The Stripa quartz monzonite is also considerably more radioactive than the leptite and other plutons in the region. Uranium and thorium abundances are both- 30 ppm, considerably higher than in 'normal' granitic rocks where the thorium-to-uranium ratio generally exceeds 2. Potassium-argon dating of muscovite from the Stripa quartz monzonite indicates that this rock may be older, at 1691 million years than granitic rock of the neighboring Gusselby and Kloten massifs, whose ages, based on K-Ar dating of biotite, are respectively 1604 and 1640 m.y. Heat flow and heat

  20. Petrology and radiogeology of the Stripa pluton

    Wollenberg, Harold; Flexser, Steve; Andersson, Lennart

    1980-12-01

    To better define the character of the rock encompassing the thermomechanical and hydrological experiments at the Stripa mine in central Sweden, and to help determine the size of the Stripa pluton, detailed studies were conducted of the petrology and radiogeology of the quartz monzonite and adjacent rocks. Petrologic studies emphasized optical petrography, with supplementary X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence and microprobe analyses. Radiogeologic investigations were based primarily on surface and underground gamma-ray spectrometric measurements of uranium, thorium and potassium, supplemented by laboratory gamma spectrometric analyses and fission-track radiographic determinations of the locations and abundance of uranium in the rock matrix. Both the quartz monzonite and the metavolcanic leptite which it intruded are strongly fractured. Two stages of fracture filling are evident; an earlier stage encompassing quartz, sericite, feldspar, epidote, and chlorite, and a later stage dominated by carbonate minerals. The Stripa quartz monzonite is chemically and mineralogically distinct from other plutons in the region. Muscovite is the predominant mica in the quartz monzonite; biotite has been altered to chlorite, hornblende is absent, and accessory minerals are scarce. In contrast, in other plutons in the Stripa region biotite and hornblende are prominent mafic minerals and accessory minerals are abundant. The Stripa quartz monzonite is also considerably more radioactive than the leptite and other plutons in the region. Uranium and thorium abundances are both- 30 ppm, considerably higher than in "normal" granitic rocks where the thorium-to-uranium ratio generally exceeds 2. Potassium-argon dating of muscovite from the Stripa quartz monzonite indicates that this rock may be older, at 1691 million years than granitic rock of the neighboring Gusselby and Kloten massifs, whose ages, based on K-Ar dating of biotite, are respectively 1604 and 1640 m.y. Heat flow and heat

  1. The formation of FeO-rich pyroxene and enstatite in unequilibrated enstatite chondrites: A petrologic-trace element (SIMS) study

    Weisberg, M. K.; Prinz, M.; Fogel, R. A.; Shimizu, N.

    1993-01-01

    Enstatite (En) chondrites record the most reducing conditions known in the early solar system. Their oxidation state may be the result of condensation in a nebular region having an enhanced C/O ratio, reduction of more oxidized materials in a reducing nebula, reduction during metamorphic reheating in a parent body, or a combination of these events. The presence of more oxidized Fe-rich silicates, two types of En (distinguished by red and blue CL), and the juxtaposition of FeO-rich pyroxenes (Fe-pyx) surrounded by blue En (enstatite) in the UEC's (unequilibrated enstatite chondrites) is intriguing and led to the examination of the question of enstatite chondrite formation. Previously, data was presented on the petrologic-geochemical characteristics of the Fe-pyx and coexisting red and blue En. Here minor and trace element abundances (determined by ion probe-SIMS) on these three types of pyroxenes are reported on in the following meteorites: Kota Kota and LEW87223 (EH3), MAC88136 (EL3), St. Marks (EH4), and Hvittis (EL6). More data are currently being collected.

  2. Colour and Organization Studies

    Beyes, Timon

    2017-01-01

    Colour is inescapable. It fills and forms the world, shaping what can be felt and known, desired and expressed. It thus becomes social technology and organizational tool. At the same time, however, colour betrays, undermines and subverts the attempts to manage it. Based on an understanding...... of colour as aesthetic force and medium of transformation, the essay presents a montage of scenes that set up encounters with what colour does: how it affects organization, and how it is affected by organization; how it organizes what is given to perception, knowledge and organization itself, and how...

  3. The geological and petrological studies of the subduction boundaries and suggestion for the geological future work in Japan - How to avoid ultra-mega-earthquakes -

    Ishii, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Pacific plate is surrounded by circum-Pacific active margin, along which volcanic and seismic activities are very high. Ultra-Mega-Earthquakes (=UMEs, M>9.0) are occasionally observed along the margin, where sedimentary rocks of subducting slaves contact with the accreted sedimentary rocks of subducted slaves. But, those UME have never been occured along western Pacific islandarc-trench system including Izu-Ogasawara (=Bonin)-Mariana-Yap-Palau-Philippine-Tonga-Kermadec Trenches. I assume that the geological and petrological characteristics of the subduction boundaries are very important to understand those different seismic activities. Along the above mentioned trench inner wall, especially in the southern Mariana, mantle peridotites are widely distributed. Subducting slave contacts directly with the olivine dominant mantle peridotites of subducted slave, serpentinite layer can be deposited easily under hydrous oceanic sub-bottom environment and very slippery subduction boundaries are left along the subduction zone.On the other hand, those geological evidences give us some ideas on how to avoid UMEs in the Japanese Islands along Japan Trench and Nankai Trough in future. We will be able to change artificially from normal subduction boundaries with asperity zone into slippery subduction boundaries with serpentine layer, by means of serpentine mud injection toward the subduction boundaries interior by combining the following improved drilling technologies A and B. (A) Deep Sea Drilling Vessel CHIKYU has a drilling ability to reach subduction boundary with asperity zone in the Nankai Trough. (B) Advanced drilling technology in the shale gas industry is tremendous, that is, after one vertical deep drilling, horizontal drilling towards several direction are performed, then shale gas is collected by hydraulic fracturing method. I hope that, after several generations, our posterity will be able to avoid UMEs by continuous serpentine mud injection.

  4. Petrologic Characteristics of the Lunar Surface.

    Wang, Xianmin; Pedrycz, Witold

    2015-11-27

    Petrologic analysis of the lunar surface is critical for determining lunar formation and evolution. Here, we report the first global petrologic map that includes the five most important lunar lithological units: the Ferroan Anorthositic (FAN) Unit, the Magnesian Suite (MS) Unit, the Alkali Suite (AS) Unit, the KREEP Basalt (KB) Unit and the Mare Basalt (MB) Unit. Based on the petrologic map and focusing on four long-debated and important issues related to lunar formation and evolution, we draw the following conclusions from the new insights into the global distribution of the five petrologic units: (1) there may be no petrogenetic relationship between MS rocks and KB; (2) there may be no petrogenetic link between MS and AS rocks; (3) the exposure of the KREEP component on the lunar surface is likely not a result of MB volcanism but is instead mainly associated with the combined action of plutonic intrusion, KREEP volcanism and celestial collision; (4) the impact size of the South Pole-Aitken basin is constrained, i.e., the basin has been excavated through the whole crust to exhume a vast majority of lower-crustal material and a very limited mantle components to the lunar surface.

  5. Petrology of lunar rocks and implication to lunar evolution

    Ridley, W. I.

    1976-01-01

    Recent advances in lunar petrology, based on studies of lunar rock samples available through the Apollo program, are reviewed. Samples of bedrock from both maria and terra have been collected where micrometeorite impact penetrated the regolith and brought bedrock to the surface, but no in situ cores have been taken. Lunar petrogenesis and lunar thermal history supported by studies of the rock sample are discussed and a tentative evolutionary scenario is constructed. Mare basalts, terra assemblages of breccias, soils, rocks, and regolith are subjected to elemental analysis, mineralogical analysis, trace content analysis, with studies of texture, ages and isotopic composition. Probable sources of mare basalts are indicated.

  6. Boredom and Organization Studies

    Johnsen, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    able to tell and endure time in an organized manner, boredom is a perceived loss of meaning inferred by the lived experience of a discrepancy between the involvement with transient means in everyday life and their value in a larger vision of existence. But boredom also signifies a concurrent protest...

  7. Semantically Enabling Knowledge Representation of Metamorphic Petrology Data

    West, P.; Fox, P. A.; Spear, F. S.; Adali, S.; Nguyen, C.; Hallett, B. W.; Horkley, L. K.

    2012-12-01

    More and more metamorphic petrology data is being collected around the world, and is now being organized together into different virtual data portals by means of virtual organizations. For example, there is the virtual data portal Petrological Database (PetDB, http://www.petdb.org) of the Ocean Floor that is organizing scientific information about geochemical data of ocean floor igneous and metamorphic rocks; and also The Metamorphic Petrology Database (MetPetDB, http://metpetdb.rpi.edu) that is being created by a global community of metamorphic petrologists in collaboration with software engineers and data managers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. The current focus is to provide the ability for scientists and researchers to register their data and search the databases for information regarding sample collections. What we present here is the next step in evolution of the MetPetDB portal, utilizing semantically enabled features such as discovery, data casting, faceted search, knowledge representation, and linked data as well as organizing information about the community and collaboration within the virtual community itself. We take the information that is currently represented in a relational database and make it available through web services, SPARQL endpoints, semantic and triple-stores where inferencing is enabled. We will be leveraging research that has taken place in virtual observatories, such as the Virtual Solar Terrestrial Observatory (VSTO) and the Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO); vocabulary work done in various communities such as Observations and Measurements (ISO 19156), FOAF (Friend of a Friend), Bibo (Bibliography Ontology), and domain specific ontologies; enabling provenance traces of samples and subsamples using the different provenance ontologies; and providing the much needed linking of data from the various research organizations into a common, collaborative virtual observatory. In addition to better

  8. Sedimentary Petrology: from Sorby to the globalization of Sedimentary Geology

    Alonso-Zarza, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    We describe here the most important milestones and contributions to Sedimentary Petrology compared to other geological disciplines. We define the main aim of our study and the scientific and economic interests involved in Sedimentary Petrology. The body of the paper focuses upon the historical development of this discipline from Henry Sorby's initial work until the present day. The major milestones in its history include: 1) initial descriptive works; 2) experimental studies; 3) the establishment of the different classifications of sedimentary rocks; 4) studies into facies and sedimentary environments; 5) advances in the study of diagenetic processes and their role in hydrocarbon prospection; and 6) the development of Sedimentary Geochemistry. Relationships and coincidences with Sedimentology are discussed. We go on to look at the advances that have taken place over the last 30 years, in which the study of sedimentary rocks is necessarily included in the wider field of Sedimentary Geology as a logical result of the proposal of global models of a changing Earth in which Sedimentary Geology plays a significant part. Finally we mention the notable contributions of Spanish sedimentary petrologists to this whole field of science. (Author) 120 refs.

  9. Assessment of fire-damaged concrete. Combining metamorphic petrology and concrete petrography

    Larbi, J.A.; Nijland, T.G.

    2001-01-01

    Metamorphic petrology is a branch of geology that deals with the study of changes in rocks due changing physio-chemical conditions. As conditions shift in or out of the thermodynamic stability field of phases, new phases may appear whereas others disappear. A basic approach is mapping of so-called

  10. Petrological cycles and caldera-forming events

    Bachmann, O.; Deering, C. D.

    2012-12-01

    Many caldera-forming events can be framed within broad petrological cycles; volcanic stratigraphy typically defines a trend from mafic to more silicic magmas with time, culminating in the catastrophic evacuation of an upper crustal reservoir filled with the silicic magma, followed by a return to the eruption of more mafic magmas shortly after caldera collapse. Understanding how such cycles develop has clear implications for characterizing the current state of an active system. Here, we focus on a detailed examination of the well-exposed Quaternary Kos-Nisyros eruptive sequence (eastern Aegean arc) to frame a potential model for such cycles. On the basis of zircon U/Th/Pb ages, building the upper crustal magma chamber large enough to induce caldera collapse required at least a few hundred thousand years. This timeframe is necessary not only for the accumulation of large amounts of viscous, gas-rich silicic magma, but also to heat the upper crust sufficiently to allow the developing reservoir to be maintained above the solidus. In the Kos-Nisyros volcanic center, small eruptions precede the caldera-forming event and mark this period of thermal maturation as the system transitions from intermediate to silicic magma, reaching the most-evolved state only shortly prior to the caldera-forming event, the Kos Plateau Tuff (> 60 km3 of volatile-rich, high-silica rhyolite). The Kos Plateau Tuff was then followed by small-volume eruptions of more mafic magma (basaltic andesite, andesite, and dacites) that are characterized by a drier mineral assemblage. With time, the system transitioned back to cold, wet, high-SiO2 rhyolite. We suggest that the changes in magma composition and mineralogy following the caldera-forming event are due to a near-complete crystallization of the non-erupted mush in the upper crustal reservoir as it is abruptly decompressed during eruption. This rapid crystallization (1) leads to the formation of a porphyritic texture in the crystalline residual - a

  11. Petrology of the Devonian gas-bearing shale along Lake Erie helps explain gas shows

    Broadhead, R.F.; Potter, P.E.

    1980-11-01

    Comprehensive petrologic study of 136 thin sections of the Ohio Shale along Lake Erie, when combined with detailed stratigraphic study, helps explain the occurrence of its gas shows, most of which occur in the silty, greenish-gray, organic poor Chagrin Shale and Three Lick Bed. Both have thicker siltstone laminae and more siltstone beds than other members of the Ohio Shale and both units also contain more clayshales. The source of the gas in the Chagrin Shale and Three Lick Bed of the Ohio Shale is believed to be the bituminous-rich shales of the middle and lower parts of the underlying Huron Member of the Ohio Shale. Eleven petrographic types were recognized and extended descriptions are provided of the major ones - claystones, clayshales, mudshales, and bituminous shales plus laminated and unlaminated siltstones and very minor marlstones and sandstones. In addition three major types of lamination were identified and studied. Thirty-two shale samples were analyzed for organic carbon, whole rock hydrogen and whole rock nitrogen with a Perkin-Elmer 240 Elemental Analyzer and provided the data base for source rock evaluation of the Ohio Shale.

  12. A Magnetic Petrology Database for Satellite Magnetic Anomaly Interpretations

    Nazarova, K.; Wasilewski, P.; Didenko, A.; Genshaft, Y.; Pashkevich, I.

    2002-05-01

    A Magnetic Petrology Database (MPDB) is now being compiled at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center in cooperation with Russian and Ukrainian Institutions. The purpose of this database is to provide the geomagnetic community with a comprehensive and user-friendly method of accessing magnetic petrology data via Internet for more realistic interpretation of satellite magnetic anomalies. Magnetic Petrology Data had been accumulated in NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, United Institute of Physics of the Earth (Russia) and Institute of Geophysics (Ukraine) over several decades and now consists of many thousands of records of data in our archives. The MPDB was, and continues to be in big demand especially since recent launching in near Earth orbit of the mini-constellation of three satellites - Oersted (in 1999), Champ (in 2000), and SAC-C (in 2000) which will provide lithospheric magnetic maps with better spatial and amplitude resolution (about 1 nT). The MPDB is focused on lower crustal and upper mantle rocks and will include data on mantle xenoliths, serpentinized ultramafic rocks, granulites, iron quartzites and rocks from Archean-Proterozoic metamorphic sequences from all around the world. A substantial amount of data is coming from the area of unique Kursk Magnetic Anomaly and Kola Deep Borehole (which recovered 12 km of continental crust). A prototype MPDB can be found on the Geodynamics Branch web server of Goddard Space Flight Center at http://core2.gsfc.nasa.gov/terr_mag/magnpetr.html. The MPDB employs a searchable relational design and consists of 7 interrelated tables. The schema of database is shown at http://core2.gsfc.nasa.gov/terr_mag/doc.html. MySQL database server was utilized to implement MPDB. The SQL (Structured Query Language) is used to query the database. To present the results of queries on WEB and for WEB programming we utilized PHP scripting language and CGI scripts. The prototype MPDB is designed to search database by major satellite magnetic

  13. A re-evaluation of palaeoclimatic conditions during the Pleistocene and Holocene from the western continental shelf of India - Evidences from the petrology of the limestones

    Rao, V.P.; Nair, R.R.

    and 150 m water depth were studied for their petrology and to evaluate the palaeoclimatic conditions during Quaternary. The limestones characteristic of abundant microspar and pseudospar are found at water depths 65 and 95 m, respectively...

  14. Studying institutional work in organizations

    Bjerregaard, Toke

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – In order to provide new and other directions to institutional studies in organization theory, Lawrence and Suddaby forward the notion of institutional work of actors aimed at maintaining, changing and disrupting institutions. The purpose of this paper is to further theory and method...... in studying the institutional work of people in organizations. Design/methodology/approach – Methodological insights from the ways in which theories of human agency in institutional contexts have co-evolved with field study methodologies are analyzed in related fields of research, particularly in sociology...... and anthropology. Findings – The ways have been analyzed in which social theories of human agency in institutional contexts and field methodology have co-evolved in an inter-disciplinary perspective. The analysis shows how field methodologies may provide inspirations to theory and method in studying institutional...

  15. Organized crime impact study highlights

    Porteous, S D

    1998-10-01

    A study was conducted to address the issue of how organized crime impacts on Canadians and their communities both socially and economically. As far as environmental crime is concerned, three main areas of concern have been identified: (1) illicit trade in ozone depleting substances, (2) illicit hazardous waste treatment, and (3) disposal of illicit trade in endangered species. To gauge the magnitude of organized crime activity, the market value of worldwide illegal trafficking in illicit drugs was estimated to be as high as $100 billion worldwide (between $1.4 to 4 billion in Canada). It is suspected that Canada supplies a substantial portion of the U.S. black market in chlorofluorocarbons with most of the rest being supplied from Mexico. Another area of concern involves the disposal of hazardous wastes. Canada produces approximately 5.9 million tonnes of hazardous waste annually. Of these, 3.2 million tonnes are sent to off-site disposal facilities for specialized treatment and recycling. The treatment of hazardous waste is a very profitable business, hence vulnerable to fraudulent practices engaged in by organized crime groups. Environmental implications of this and other environmental crimes, as well as their economic, commercial, health and safety impact were examined. Other areas of organized crime activity in Canada (drugs, economic crimes, migrant trafficking, counterfeit products, motor vehicle theft, money laundering) were also part of the study.

  16. Subduction of Proterozoic to Late Triassic continental basement in the Guatemala suture zone: A petrological and geochronological study of high-pressure metagranitoids from the Chuacús complex

    Maldonado, Roberto; Ortega-Gutiérrez, Fernando; Ortíz-Joya, Guillermo A.

    2018-05-01

    Many continental subduction complexes contain abundant granitic rocks coexisting with minor volumes of eclogite-facies rocks. Characterization of granitic protoliths is crucial to decipher the origin of subducted continental crust, whereas knowledge of its metamorphic evolution is required to constrain the mechanisms of burial and exhumation. In this work we present geochronological and petrological evidence that demonstrate the occurrence of a subducted Proterozoic to Late Triassic granitic basement in the Chuacús complex of central Guatemala. Metagranitoids exposed in this area are interlayered with eclogite and other high-pressure rocks, and their structure is considerably variable due to strain partitioning during deformation. Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry U-Pb zircon data from two ferroan metagranites yield protolith crystallization ages of ca. 1.1 Ga and their trace-element abundances suggest an origin related to intraplate magmatism, while a high-silica, peraluminous metagranite is dated at 1.0 Ga and was probably originated by partial melting of a high-grade continental crust. On the other hand, two megacrystic to augen metagranitoids yield protolith crystallization ages of ca. 224 Ma, which are identical within errors to the protolith age of hosted eclogitic metabasites. Their high incompatible trace element abundances together with the observed spatial-temporal relationships with mafic protoliths suggest that Late Triassic bimodal magmatism in the Chuacús complex was probably originated in a within-plate setting. Regardless of their age or structure, the studied metagranites preserve evidences for high-pressure metamorphic equilibration, such as the occurrence of Ca-rich garnet (XCa up to 0.52) in association with phengite (Si contents of up to 3.4 pfu) and rutile. The integration of Zr-in-rutile thermometry and phengite barometry allows the peak metamorphic conditions to be constrained at 640-680 °C and 13 kbar. This

  17. Petrography and petrology of the Hamadan pegmatites

    Valizadeh, M.V.; Torkian, A.

    2000-01-01

    Petrological investigation on the pegmatites of Hamadan area was carried out for their abundance, mineralogical variations and their distribution. They reveal the genesis of Granitoid of Alvand in western parts of Iran in Sanandaj - Sirjan metamorphic belt. Field investigations show that pegmatites are mainly dispersed both on north and south of Alvand mass. They mainly consist of Graphic - pegmatites, Tourmaline Pegmatites, Aluminosilicate - pegmatites and Quartz veins. Muscovite - Aluminosilicate pegmatites are located only in south and outside of granitoid mass, for example near Dehnow Asad - Ol - llah - Khan and Manga villages. Regarding to field investigation, mineralogical characteristics and based on radiometric dating the age of biotites of granitoid is a bout 70-80 M.Y. and the age of Muscovite - pegmatites is about 100 M.Y. Therefore, pegmatites are prior to Alvand emplacement. This is in accordance with pegmatites genesis idea proposed by Winkler and von Platen. So, we suppose that pegmatites of Alvand are metamorphic and their formation do not follow normal magmatic trends. Our petrologic investigation shows that as a result of movement of Arabic plate towards Iranian pa lte (SW - NE), sedimentary rocks composing of metamorphed clays (meta-sediments) in 680-800 d eg C and 2-5 kbar was melted resulting in aplitic melt to come upwards. With the present of thermal dome, transportation of water and mineralizing gas large crystals of Muscovite and Tourmaline were formed slowly and gradually pegmatites were formed. In this condition a melt from sandstone-shale source began to move upward and in different T-P condition it formed aluminosilicate pegmatites. Each of these assemblages present specific conditions of formation

  18. Application of organic-geochemistry, coal-petrology and isotope-geochemistry to facies-analysis and hydrocarbon exploration in the NE-Paris Basin (Trias-Lias Luxemburg)

    Flekken, P.M.

    1978-01-01

    Triassic and Liassic sediments of NE-Paris Basin (Luxemburg) were investigated by organic-geochemical, coal petrographical and isotope-geochemical methods. The objective was to characterize the stratigraphic stages and to investigate the facies relations between them with a view to possible hydrocarbon exploration. The sediments contain an average of 3.1% organic carbon, 413 ug/g extractable organic matter (bitumen) and 0.65% insoluble, isolatable organic particles which constitute part of the kerogen. The non-isolatable kerogen is 2.4% of the whole rock. (orig./BR) [de

  19. A Virtual Petrological Microscope for All Apollo 11 Lunar Samples

    Pillnger, C. T.; Tindle, A. G.; Kelley, S. P.; Quick, K.; Scott, P.; Gibson, E. K.; Zeigler, R. A.

    2014-01-01

    A means of viewing, over the Internet, polished thin sections of every rock in the Apollo lunar sample collections via software, duplicaing many of the functions of a petrological microscope, is described.

  20. CSR and Feminist Organization Studies

    Grosser, Kate; Moon, Jeremy

    2017-01-01

    Although corporate social responsibility (CSR) practice increasingly addresses gender issues, and gender and CSR scholarship is expanding, feminist theory is rarely explicitly referenced or discussed in the CSR literature. We contend that this omission is a key limitation of the field. We argue...... that CSR theorization and research on gender can be improved through more explicit and systematic reference to feminist theories, and particularly those from feminist organization studies (FOS). Addressing this gap, we review developments in feminist organization theory, mapping their relevance to CSR....... With reference to six major theoretical perspectives in CSR scholarship, we note feminist research relating to each. Drawing upon FOS theory and CSR theory, we then develop an integrated theoretical framework for the analysis of gender issues in CSR. Our framework enables us to identify research strengths...

  1. Petrological studies of plutonic rocks of Ecuador

    Aly, S.

    1980-01-01

    The feldspars of many tonalitic plutonic rocks in the coastal regions and West Andean regions are zoned. This leads to the conclusion that they are relatively flat intrusions and to some extent transition rocks in the subvulcanite direction. This is in accordance with the genetic and chronological relationship between plutonites and the surrounding vulcanites of the Basic Igreous Complex (BIC). The composition of representative minerals, e.g. alkali feldspar, plagioclase feldspar, biotite, chlorite, and amphibole has been determined as well as the age of plutonite samples by the K/Ar dating method. (DG) [de

  2. Geology and petrology of alkaline Massif from Ilha de Vitoria, Sao Paulo State

    Motoki, A.

    1986-01-01

    Geological and petrological studies of the Vitoria Island Alkaline Complex, State of Sao Paulo, have been carried out by means of photo interpretation; field work, thin section studies, whole-rock chemical analysis, x-ray diffractometry, EPMA mineral analysis, and K-Ar and Rb-Sr dating. Radiometric dating indicates a late Cretaceous age for the Vitoria Island Alkaline Complex, which is concordant with the ages of other neighbouring alkaline bodies. (author)

  3. Mineralogy, Petrology, Chronology, and Exposure History of the Chelyabinsk Meteorite and Parent Body

    Righter, K.; Abell, P.; Agresti, D.; Berger, E. L.; Burton, A. S.; Delaney, J. S.; Fries, M. D.; Gibson, E. K.; Harrington, R.; Herzog, G. F.; hide

    2015-01-01

    The Chelyabinsk meteorite fall on February 15, 2013 attracted much more attention worldwide than do most falls. A consortium led by JSC received 3 masses of Chelyabinsk (Chel-101, -102, -103) that were collected shortly after the fall and handled with care to minimize contamination. Initial studies were reported in 2013; we have studied these samples with a wide range of analytical techniques to better understand the mineralogy, petrology, chronology and exposure history of the Chelyabinsk parent body.

  4. Mineralogy, petrology and geochemistry of carbonaceous chondritic clasts in the LEW 85300 polymict eucrite

    Zolensky, M. E.; Hewins, R. H.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Lindstrom, M. M.; Xiao, X.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1992-01-01

    We have performed a detailed petrologic and mineralogic study of two chondritic clasts from the polymict eucrite Lewis Cliff (LEW) 85300, and performed chemical analyses by INAA and RNAA on one of these. Petrologically, the clasts are identified and are composed of dispersed aggregates, chondrules, and chondrule fragments supported by matrix. The aggregates and chondrules are composed of olivine, orthopyroxene, plus some diopside. The matrix consists of fine-grained olivine, and lesser orthopyroxene and augite. Fine-grained saponite is common in the matrix. The bulk major composition of the clast studied by INAA and RNAA shows unusual abundance patterns for lithophile, siderophile and chalcophile elements but is basically chondritic. The INAA/RNAA data preclude assignment of the LEW 85300,15 clast to any commonly accepted group of carbonaceous chondrite.

  5. The Run-up to Volcanic Eruption Unveiled by Forensic Petrology and Geophysical Observations

    Rasmussen, D. J.; Plank, T. A.; Roman, D. C.

    2017-12-01

    Volcanoes often warn of impending eruptions. However, one of the greatest challenges in volcano research is translating precursory geophysical signals into physical magmatic processes. Petrology offers powerful tools to study eruption run-up that benefit from direct response to magmatic forcings. Developing these tools, and tying them to geophysical observations, will help us identify eruption triggers (e.g., magmatic recharge, gas build-up, tectonic events) and understand the significance of monitored signals of unrest. We present an overview of petrologic tools used for studying eruption run-up, highlighting results from our study of the 1999 eruption of Shishaldin volcano. Olivine crystals contain chemical gradients, the consequence of diffusion following magma mixing events, which is modeled to determine mixing timescales. Modeled timescales provide strong evidence for at least three mixing events, which were triggered by magmatic recharge. Petrologic barometers indicate these events occurred at very shallow depths (within the volcanic edifice). The first mixing event occurred nine months before eruption, which was signaled by a swarm of deep-long period earthquake. Minor recharge events followed over two months, which are indicated by a second deep-long period earthquake swarm and a change in the local stress orientation measured by shear-wave splitting. Following these events, the system was relatively quiet until a large mixing event occurred 45 days prior to eruption, which was heralded by a large earthquake (M5.2). Following this event, geophysical signals of unrest intensified and became continuous. The final mixing event, beginning roughly a week before eruption, represents the final perturbation to the system before eruption. Our findings point to a relatively long run-up, which was subtle at first and intensified several weeks before eruption. This study highlights the strong link between geophysical signals of volcanic unrest and magmatic events, and

  6. The Spectacle and Organization Studies

    Flyverbom, Mikkel; Reinecke, Juliane

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this essay is to revisit Guy Debord’s critical theory of the spectacle as formulated 50 years ago in the ‘Society of the Spectacle’ in light of the contemporary production of spectacles. Debord’s arguments about appearance, visibility and celebrity are echoed in the way organizations......-reality or performativity, this essay invites organization scholars to examine the organization of the real and the making of organizations through processes of spectacular representation including discursive practices, visual images and theatrical performances....

  7. Petrology of basalts from Loihi Seamount, Hawaii

    Hawkins, James; Melchior, John

    1983-12-01

    Loihi Seamount is the southeasternmost active volcano of the Emperor-Hawaii linear volcanic chain. It comprises a spectrum of basalt compositional varieties including basanite, alkali basalt, transitional basalt and tholeiite. Samples from four dredge collections made on Scripps Institution of Oceanography Benthic Expedition in October 1982 are tholeiite. The samples include highly vesicular, olivine-rich basalt and dense glass-rich pillow fragments containing olivine and augite phenocrysts. Both quartz-normative and olivine-normative tholeiites are present. Minor and trace element data indicate relatively high abundances of low partition coefficient elements (e.g., Ti, K, P. Rb, Ba, Zr) and suggest that the samples were derived by relatively small to moderate extent of partial melting, of an undepleted mantle source. Olivine composition, MgO, Cr and Ni abundances, and Mg/(Mg+Fe), are typical of moderately fractionated to relatively unfractionated "primary" magmas. The variations in chemistry between samples cannot be adequately explained by low-pressure fractional crystallization but can be satisfied by minor variations in extent of melting if a homogeneous source is postulated. Alternatively, a heterogeneous source with variable abundances of certain trace elements, or mixing of liquids, may have been involved. Data for 3He/ 4He, presented in a separate paper, implies a mantle plume origin for the helium composition of the Loihi samples. There is little variation in the helium isotope ratio for samples having different compositions and textures. The helium data are not distinctive enough to unequivocally separate the magma sources for the tholeiitic rocks from the other rock types such as Loihi alkalic basalts and the whole source region for Loihi may have a nearly uniform helium compositions even though other element abundances may be variable. Complex petrologic processes including variable melting, fractional crystallization and magma mixing may have blurred

  8. Review of the petrology of the Auckland Volcanic Field

    Smith, I.E.M.; McGee, L.E.; Lindsay, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Research has long shown that the petrology of suites of volcanic rock can be used to define and understand the fundamental parameters of the magmatic systems that feed volcanoes. The geochemistry of volcanic rocks provides information about the nature of the source rocks, depths and amounts of melting, the processes that act on magmas as they rise to the surface and, most importantly, the rates of these processes. In turn, the answers to fundamental petrological questions can provide input to important questions concerning volcano hazard scenarios and hazard mitigation challenges. The multi-disciplinary DEVORA research programme, launched in 2008, is a GNS Science-University of Auckland collaboration with the aim of DEtermining VOlcanic Risk in Auckland. One of its main themes is the development of an integrated geological model for the Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF) by investigating the physical controls on magma generation, ascent and eruption though detailed structural and petrological investigations. A key data set underpinning this theme is a comprehensive geochemical database for the rocks of the AVF. This report, Review of the Petrology of the Auckland Volcanic Field, is a synthesis and commentary of all petrological and geochemical data currently available for the AVF. It represents one of several reports carried out as part of the 'synthesis' phase of DEVORA, whereby existing data from previous work is collated and summarised, so that gaps in current knowledge can be appropriately addressed. In this report we utilise published and unpublished sources to summarise the petrological data available up to May 2009, and identify where new data and approaches will improve our understanding of the magmatic system which feeds the field. (author). 53 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Lunar Science Conference, 5th, Houston, Tex., March 18-22, 1974, Proceedings. Volume 1 - Mineralogy and petrology. Volume 2 Chemical and isotope analyses. Organic chemistry. Volume 3 - Physical properties

    Gose, W. A.

    1974-01-01

    Numerous studies on the properties of the moon based on Apollo findings and samples are presented. Topics treated include ages of the lunar nearside light plains and maria, orange material in the Sulpicius Gallus formation at the southwestern edge of Mare Serenitatis, impact-induced fractionation in the lunar highlands, igneous rocks from Apollo 16 rake samples, experimental liquid line of descent and liquid immiscibility for basalt 70017, ion microprobe mass analysis of plagioclase from 'non-mare' lunar samples, grain size and the evolution of lunar soils, chemical composition of rocks and soils at Taurus-Littrow, the geochemical evolution of the moon, U-Th-Pb systematics of some Apollo 17 lunar samples and implications for a lunar basin excavation chronology, volatile-element systematics and green glass in Apollo 15 lunar soils, solar wind nitrogen and indigenous nitrogen in Apollo 17 lunar samples, lunar trapped xenon, solar flare and lunar surface process characterization at the Apollo 17 site, and the permanent and induced magnetic dipole moment of the moon. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  10. Organizing Education by Drawing on Organizational Studies

    Romme, A.G.L.

    2002-01-01

    This study explores how scholars researching organizations and organizing processes can use and exploit their knowledge not only in terms of course contents, but also in organizing and managing students' learning activity.A design-oriented research approach is used in order to develop grounded

  11. A petrological view of early Earth geodynamics

    Herzberg, C.

    2003-04-01

    Xenoliths of low T Archean cratonic mantle consist mostly of harzburgite and lherzolite with geochemical depletions that are characterisitc of igneous residues. Many authors have identified the complementary magmas as komatiites. This model is re-examined in light of work presented in Herzberg & O'Hara (2002) and found to be problematic. Munro-type alumina-undepleted komatiites from Alexo, Pyke Hill, and other locations often contain olivine phenocrysts with maximum Mg# \\cong 94. Residues of fractional melting would consist of pure dunite having Mg# = 97-98, but these are not observed. Residues of equilibrium melting would also be pure dunite with Mg# = 94, but these are also not observed. Olivines with Mg# = 94 are found in rare harzburgites, indicating that residues of alumina-undepleted komatiite have either been overprinted by subsequent magmatism or they have been geodynamically eroded. Alumina-undepleted komatiites can be successfully modeled with a primary magma containing 30% MgO produced by 0.5 mass fractions of equilibrium melting of depleted peridotite. A hot plume interpretation is consistent with both the petrology and helium isotopic compositions of alumina-undepleted komatiites. But what about cratonic mantle? The FeO and MgO contents of residues of fertile mantle peridotite formed by both equilibrium and fractional melting can be predicted and applied to xenoliths of cratonic mantle in most cases. Application to xenoliths from the Kaapvaal and Slave cratons is not possible owing to a second stage of Opx enrichment, but results can be applied to most xenoliths from Siberia, Tanzania, Somerset Island, and east Greenland as they contain less than 45% SiO_2. These xenoliths are very similar to residues produced by fractional melting. Pressures of initial melting were mostly 3 to 5 GPa, but can be as high 7 GPa. Pressures of final melting were highly variable and can be as low as 1 GPa. Potential temperatures (T_P) were typically 1450 to 1600oC and

  12. Geochemistry and petrology of basaltic rocks from the Marshall Islands

    Davis, Alice S.; Schwab, William C.; Haggerty, Janet A.

    1986-01-01

    A variety of volcanic rock was recovered from the flanks of seamounts, guyots, atolls, and islands in the Ratak chain of the Marshall Islands on the U.S. Geological Survey cruise L9-84-CP. The main objective of this cruise was to study the distribution and composition of ferromanganese oxide crusts. Preliminary results of managanese crust composition are reported by Schwab et al. (1985) and detailed studies are in preparation (Schwab et al., 1986). A total of seven seafloor edifices were studied using 12 khz, 3.5 khz and air gun seismic reflection, chain dredge and box corer. Bathymetry and ship track lines are presented by Schwab and Bailey (1985). Of the seven edifices surveyed two support atolls (Majuro and Taongi) and one is a tiny island (Jemo). Dredge locations and water depths are given in Table 1 and dredge locations are shown in Figure 1. Due to equipment failures depths of dredge hauls were limited to shallow depth for all except the first two sites occupied. Recovery consisted mostly of young, poorly-consolidated limestone of fore-reef slope deposit and minor volcanogenic breccia and loose talus. The breccia and pieces of talus are thickly encrusted with ferromanganese oxide, whereas the young limestone is only coated by a thin layer. Four of the seven sites surveyed yielded volcanic rock. The volcanic rock, volumetrically a minor part of each dredge haul, consists mostly of lapilli and cobble-size clasts in a calcareous matrix or as loose talus. Most clasts show evidence of reworking, being sub- to well rounded, sometimes with a thin ferromanganese crust of their own. This paper reports preliminary findings on the petrology and geochemistry of volcanic rock recovered.

  13. Relationships between coal-quality and organic-geochemical parameters: A case study of the Hafik coal deposits (Sivas Basin, Turkey)

    Erik, N. Yalcin; Sancar, S. [Cumhuriyet University, Department of Geological Engineering, Sivas (Turkey)

    2010-09-01

    This study provides coal-quality, organic-petrographic and organic-geochemical data on Tertiary subbituminous coal of the Hafik area, northwestern part of the Sivas Basin, Turkey. Coal-petrological studies along with proximate and ultimate analyses were undertaken to determine the organic-petrographic characteristics of the Hafik coals. Huminite reflectances were found to be between 0.38 and 0.48% (corresponding to an organic-material-rich and coal layers), values characteristic of low maturity. This parameter shows a good correlation with calorific values (average 21,060 kJ/kg) and average T{sub max} (422 C) mineral-matter diagenesis, indicating immaturity. The studied coals and organic material underwent only low-grade transformation, a consequence of low lithostatic pressure. Therefore, the Hafik coals are actually subbituminous in rank. Rock-Eval analysis results show types II/III and III kerogens. The organic fraction of the coals is mostly comprised of humic-group macerals (gelinites), with small percentages derived from the inertinite and liptinite groups. In this study, organic-petrographic, organic-geochemical and coal quality data were compared. The Hafik deposit is a high-ash, high-sulfur coal. The mineral matter of the coals is comprised mainly of calcite and clay minerals. (author)

  14. Petrology and Geochemistry of Unbrecciated Harzburgitic Diogenite MIL 07001: A Window Into Vestan Geological Evolution

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Peng, Z. X.; Mertzman, S. A.; Mertzman, K. R.

    2014-01-01

    There is a strong case that asteroid 4 Vesta is the parent of the howardite, eucrite and diogenite (HED) meteorites. Models developed for the geological evolution of Vesta can satisfy the compositions of basaltic eucrites that dominate in the upper crust. The bulk compositional characteristics of diogenites - cumulate harzburgites and orthopyroxenites from the lower crust - do not fit into global magma ocean models that can describe the compositions of basaltic and cumulate eucrites. Recent more detailed formation models do make provision for a more complicated origin for diogenites, but this model has yet to be completely vetted. Compositional studies of bulk samples has led to the hypothesis that many diogenites were formed late by interaction of their parent melts with a eucritic crust, but those observations may alternatively be explained by subsolidus equilibration of trace elements between orthopyroxene and plagioclase and Ca-phosphate in the rocks. Differences in radiogenic Mg-26 content between diogenites and eucrites favors early formation of the former, not later formation. Understanding the origin of diogenites is crucial for understanding the petrologic evolution of Vesta. We have been doing coordinated studies of a suite of diogenites including petrologic investigations, bulk rock major and trace element studies, and in situ trace element analyses of orthopyroxene. Here we will focus on an especially unusual, and potentially key, diogenite, MIL 07001.

  15. The organization of nuclear plants environmental studies

    Le Marechal, M.

    1980-01-01

    The author first defines the objectives of environmental studies. Next, he describes the scope and organization of sites studies as well as biological and radioecological general studies. At last, he puts forward the available means that are used for such studies and the different offices responsible for their achievement [fr

  16. Study of interfaces in organic semiconductor heterojunctions

    Maheshwari, P; Dutta, D; Sudarshan, K; Sharma, S K; Pujari, P K; Samanta, S; Singh, A; Aswal, D K

    2011-01-01

    The defect structure at the organic heterojunctions is studied using slow positron beam. The structural and electronic properties of heterojunctions are of technological and fundamental importance for understanding and optimization of electronic processes in organic devices. Interface trap centres play a significant role in the electrical conduction through the junctions. Depth dependent Doppler broadened annihilation measurements have been carried out in p- and n-type organic semiconductor thin films (30-80 nm) both single as well as multilayers grown on quartz substrate. The objective of the present study is to investigate the defect structure and to understand the behavior of positrons at the charged organic interfaces. Our result shows the sensitivity of positrons to the interfacial disorders that may be a convoluted effect of the presence of defects as well as the influence of the charge dipole in multilayers.

  17. Recontextualizing Anthropomorphic Metaphors in Organization Studies

    Schoeneborn, Dennis; Blaschke, Steffen; Kaufmann, Ina Maria

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss critically the use of “anthropomorphic” metaphors in organization studies (e.g., organizational knowledge, learning, and memory). They argue that, although these metaphors are potentially powerful, because of frequent usage they are at risk of becoming taken...... in organizational knowledge, learning, and memory, which originate in a state of permanent restlessness.......-sensitive use of metaphors in organization studies. They illustrate this approach by developing the new metaphor of organizational insomnia, which is informed by recent neuroscientific research on human sleep and its disruptions. The insomnia metaphor provides an alternative way of explaining deficits...

  18. TR and fluorescence study of organic nanostructures

    Zheludeva, S.; Novikova, N.; Myagkov, I.; Yurieva, E.

    2000-01-01

    The development of several x-ray scattering techniques based on total external fluorescence study and x-ray standing wave method is presented and used for characterization of organic nano-structures on the base of Langmuir-Blodgett films of fatty acid salts and phospholipids. Spectral selectivity of data obtained permits to detect alien interfacial layers and ions in organic structures, to get information about inter-diffusion at the interfaces, about ion permeation through organic bilayers - models of bio-membranes. The perspectives of investigation of protein - lipid bilayers on liquid surface by above mentioned techniques at SR source are discussed. Such study may allow to explore conformation structure and biological functions of membrane proteins and channel forming molecules in their native environment. The facilities of X-ray spectrometer designed and constructed for this purpose are presented. (author)

  19. Petrology, mineralogy and geochemistry of surficial uranium deposits

    Pagel, M.

    1984-01-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the petrology, mineralogy, and geochemistry of surficial uranium ore deposits is important for developing prospecting and evaluation strategies. Carnotite is the main uranium mineral and is found in those deposits that have the greatest potential uranium resources. The following uranium-bearing minerals have been reported to occur in surficial deposits: carnotite, tyuyamunite, soddyite, weeksite, haiweeite, uranophane, betauranophane, metaankoleite, torbernite, autunite, phosphuranylite, schroeckingerite, Pb-V-U hydroxide (unnamed mineral), uraninite and organourano complexes. The interrelationships between some of the minerals of the host rocks (especially the clays) are not well understood. (author)

  20. Petrology, Palynology, and Geochemistry of Gray Hawk Coal (Early Pennsylvanian, Langsettian in Eastern Kentucky, USA

    James C. Hower

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study presents recently collected data examining the organic petrology, palynology, mineralogy and geochemistry of the Gray Hawk coal bed. From the Early Pennsylvanian, Langsettian substage, Gray Hawk coal has been mined near the western edge of the eastern Kentucky portion of the Central Appalachian coalfield. While the coal is thin, rarely more than 0.5-m thick, it has a low-ash yield and a low-S content, making it an important local resource. The Gray Hawk coal palynology is dominated by Lycospora spp., and contains a diverse spectrum of small lycopods, tree ferns, small ferns, calamites, and gymnosperms. The maceral assemblages show an abundance of collotelinite, telinite, vitrodetrinite, fusinite, and semifusinite. Fecal pellet-derived macrinite, albeit with more compaction than is typically seen in younger coals, was observed in the Gray Hawk coal. The minerals in the coal are dominated by clay minerals (e.g., kaolinite, mixed-layer illite/smectite, illite, and to a lesser extent, pyrite, quartz, and iron III hydroxyl-sulfate, along with traces of chlorite, and in some cases, jarosite, szomolnokite, anatase, and calcite. The clay minerals are of authigenic and detrital origins. The occurrence of anatase as cell-fillings also indicates an authigenic origin. With the exception of Ge and As, which are slightly enriched in the coals, the concentrations of other trace elements are either close to or much lower than the averages for world hard coals. Arsenic and Hg are also enriched in the top bench of the coal and probably occur in pyrite. The elemental associations (e.g., Al2O3/TiO2, Cr/Th-Sc/Th indicate a sediment-source region with intermediate and felsic compositions. Rare metals, including Ga, rare earth elements and Ge, are highly enriched in the coal ashes, and the Gray Hawk coals have a great potential for industrial use of these metals. The rare earth elements in the samples are weakly fractionated or are characterized by heavy

  1. Organic Tanks Safety Program: Waste aging studies

    Camaioni, D.M.; Samuels, W.D.; Lenihan, B.D.; Clauss, S.A.; Wahl, K.L.; Campbell, J.A.

    1994-11-01

    The underground storage tanks at the Hanford Complex contain wastes generated from many years of plutonium production and recovery processes, and mixed wastes from radiological degradation processes. The chemical changes of the organic materials used in the extraction processes have a direct on several specific safety issues, including potential energy releases from these tanks. This report details the first year's findings of a study charged with determining how thermal and radiological processes may change the composition of organic compounds disposed to the tank. Their approach relies on literature precedent, experiments with simulated waste, and studies of model reactions. During the past year, efforts have focused on the global reaction kinetics of a simulated waste exposed to γ radiation, the reactions of organic radicals with nitrite ion, and the decomposition reactions of nitro compounds. In experiments with an organic tank non-radioactive simulant, the authors found that gas production is predominantly radiolytically induced. Concurrent with gas generation they observe the disappearance of EDTA, TBP, DBP and hexone. In the absence of radiolysis, the TBP readily saponifies in the basic medium, but decomposition of the other compounds required radiolysis. Key organic intermediates in the model are C-N bonded compounds such as oximes. As discussed in the report, oximes and nitro compounds decompose in strong base to yield aldehydes, ketones and carboxylic acids (from nitriles). Certain aldehydes can react in the absence of radiolysis to form H 2 . Thus, if the pathways are correct, then organic compounds reacting via these pathways are oxidizing to lower energy content. 75 refs

  2. Petrological and geochemical characteristics of Paleoproterozoic ...

    Centre of Advanced Study, Department of Geology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005, India ... A number of ENE–WSW trending Paleoproterozoic dykes and plugs of mafic, ultramafic, alkaline and ...... 2005 Integrating ultramafic lamprophyres into the IUGS classification of igneous rocks: Rational and implications;.

  3. Petrologic Constraints on Iceland's Lower Crust

    Kelley, D. F.; Leftwich, T. E.; Barton, M.

    2005-05-01

    Iceland is an area of relatively thick ocean crust that straddles the spreading MAR. Iceland was created by seafloor spreading originating about 55 Ma above abnormally hot mantle. The high temperatures resulted in greater melt volumes that enhanced crustal thickening. Geophysical investigations provide fundamental insight on crustal features, but results are contradictory. Early seismic, magneto-telluric, and resistivity studies predicted thin crust with partial melt regions at depths of 10-15 km beneath the neovolcanic zones. Reinterpretations based on recent seismic studies suggest thicker and cooler crust. These studies have shown magma lenses at shallow depths beneath volcanic centers, but cannot confirm their presence in the lower crust. Knowledge of the depth of magma chambers is critical to constrain the geothermal gradients in Icelandic crust and to resolve discrepancies in interpretation of geophysical data. Analyses of glasses in Icelandic lavas erupted from 11 volcanic centers throughout the rift zones have been compiled. The pressures of equilibration of these liquids with ol, high-Ca pyx, and plag were estimated qualitatively from projections into the pseudoternary system Ol-Di-Qtz. The results (ca. 0.6 GPa) indicate crystallization in magma chambers located at about 20 km depth. Equilibrium pressures also have been calculated quantitatively. These results (0.6±0.2 GPa) indicate magma chambers at 19.8±6.5 km depth beneath the volcanic centers. Magma chamber at these depths are located in the lower crust inferring that it must be relatively warm. Geothermal gradients have been calculated using the depths of the sourcing magma chambers and any shallow seismically detected magma chambers at each location. An average crustal composition has been calculated from the compiled geochemical data and was used to calculate density variations and seismic velocities along the geotherms. The distribution of sample locations in this study provides sufficient data

  4. Granites petrology, structure, geological setting, and metallogeny

    Nédélec, Anne; Bowden, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Granites are emblematic rocks developed from a magma that crystallized in the Earth’s crust. They ultimately outcrop at the surface worldwide. This book, translated and updated from the original French edition Pétrologie des Granites (2011) is a modern presentation of granitic rocks from magma genesis to their crystallization at a higher level into the crust. Segregation from the source, magma ascent and shapes of granitic intrusions are also discussed, as well as the eventual formation of hybrid rocks by mingling/mixing processes and the thermomechanical aspects in country rocks around granite plutons. Modern techniques for structural studies of granites are detailed extensively. Granites are considered in their geological spatial and temporal frame, in relation with plate tectonics and Earth history from the Archaean eon. A chapter on granite metallogeny explains how elements of economic interest are concentrated during magma crystallization, and examples of Sn, Cu, F and U ore deposits are presented. Mi...

  5. Developmental studies of avian brain organization.

    Puelles, Luis

    2018-01-01

    Avian brain organization or brain Bauplan is identical with that of vertebrates in general. This essay visits avian studies that contained advances or discussions about brain organization, trying to explain critically what they contributed. In order to start from a specific background, the new prevailing paradigm as regards brain organization, the prosomeric model, is presented first. Next a brief historic survey is made of how ideas on this topic evolved from the start of modern neuromorphology at the end of the 19th century. Longitudinal zonal organization with or without transverse segmentation (neuromeres) was the first overall concept applied to the brain. The idea of neuromeric structure later decayed in favour of a columnar model. This emphasized functional correlations rather than causal developmental content, assimilating forebrain functions to hindbrain ones. Though it became prevalent in the post-world-war period of neuroscience, in the last decades of the 20th century advances in molecular biology allowed developmental genes to be mapped, and it became evident that gene expression patterns support the old neuromeric model rather than the columnar one. This was also corroborated by modern experimental approaches (fate-mapping and analysis of patterning).

  6. Organic richness and organic matter quality studies of source rocks ...

    The hydrocarbon potential of the Upper Cretaceous units (Maastrichtian Mamu Formation) exposed at Imiegba and environs of the Benin Flank, Western Anambra Basin was assessed by Total Organic Carbon (TOC) and Rock-Eval Pyrolysis Analyses. The investigated sections of the Mamu Formation consist of dark grey to ...

  7. Physical organic studies of organometallic reactions

    Bergman, Robert G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1981-01-01

    The mechanisms of reactions of organotransition metal complexes have only begun to be understood in detail during the last ten years. The complementary interaction of techniques and concepts developed earlier in studies of organic reaction mechanisms, with those commonly used in inorganic chetnistry, has played a crucial role in helping to elucidate organor.1etall.ic reaction mechanisms. A few systems in which this interaction has proved especially fruitful are discussed in this article.

  8. Case studies in organic contaminant hydrogeology

    Baker, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    The effective management of domestic solid waste and hazardous, toxic, and radioactive waste is a major problem in the area of environmental geology and water sciences throughout the world. A series of case studies is presented of organic contaminants from both solid and hazardous waste disposal facilities to provide examples of these problems. The facilities were investigated to determine risks and liabilities before acquisition, to determine the site hydrogeologic conditions for design of appropriate groundwater monitoring plans, and/or to determine the potential for groundwater contamination. The case studies are of disposal facilities located in glacial tills, carbonaceous weathered clay soils, weathered shale, limestone bedrock, dolomite bedrock, and alluvial and sedimentary deposits. The results of these studies and investigations show certain relationships in the distribution of organic pollutants to the different geologic and hydrogeologic characteristics of each facility. In each of the four case studies, all 129 priority pollutants were analyzed in private wells and/or monitoring wells. The 31 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of the priority pollutant list were the majority of organic compounds detected. When VOCs are found in groundwater impacted by disposal facilities, they are present in groups and tend to be distributed in patterns based on their relative concentrations. It is rare to find only one or two VOCs from facilities where leakage has been detected. The ethylenes and ethanes appear to be more prevalent and mobile than aromatic VOCs. The aromatics are restricted primarily to leachates and wastes and in monitoring wells located adjacent to facilities. 2 refs., 15 figs

  9. Petrology and geochemistry of Late Proterozoic hornblende gabbros from southeast of Fariman, Khorasan Razavi province, Iran

    Seyed Masoud Homam

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Hornblende-bearing gabbroic rocks are quite common in subduction-related magmatic suites and considered to represent magmatic differentiation process in arc magmas (Heliker, 1995; Hickey-Vargas et al., 1995; Mandal and Ray, 2012. The presence of hornblende as an important mineral phase in gabbroic rocks of subduction zone has been considered either as an early crystallizing mineral from water-bearing mafic magmas (Beard and Borgia 1989; Mandal and Ray, 2012 or as a product of reaction of early crystallized minerals (olivine, pyroxene and plagioclase and water-rich evolved melt/aqueous fluid (Costa et al., 2002; Mandal and Ray, 2012. The careful study of petrology and geochemistry of hornblende-bearing gabbroic rocks from Chahak area, of Neoproterozoic age, can provide important information about their petrogenesis. Because of the special characteristics of Chahak hornblende gabbros according to their age and their situation in the main structural units of Iran, their study can present critical keys for the knowledge of geological history of Iran specially central Iran zone. Material and Methods This study carried out in two parts including field and laboratory works. Sampling and structural studies were carried out during field work. Geological map for the study area was also prepared. 65 thin and polished thin sections for petrographical purpose were studied. Major oxides, rare earth elements and trace elements were analyzed for 4 samples (92P-1, 92P-3, B1and B6 from hornblende gabbros on the basis of 4AB1 method using ICP-MS of ACME Laboratory from Canada. In addition, major oxides of three hornblende gabbro samples (89P-62, 89P-59 and 89P-46 were used from Partovifar (Partovifar, 2012. Results and discussion Fariman metamorphic terrains, of Proterozoic age, consist of metamorphosed sedimentary and igneous (plutonic and volcanic rocks. Hornblende gabbros of the study area include plagioclase, hornblende, biotite pyroxene and

  10. Petrology and geochemistry of greywackes of Middle Aravalli supergroup, NW India: evidence for active margin processes

    Absar, Nurul; Sreenivas, B.

    2013-01-01

    Aravalli Mountain Belt (AMB) of Northwestern, India represents one of the major Proterozoic accretionary orogens of the world, preserving two Wilson cycles; viz. Paleoproterozoic Aravalli Supergroup and Mesoproterozoic Delhi Supergroup. Although two gross Wilson cycles involving opening and closing of Paleoproterozoic Aravalli ocean and Mesoproterozoic Delhi ocean are recognized, the finer details of the evolution of the orogen are still poorly understood. We have carried out geochemical and petrological study of the well-preserved greywacke horizon of the 'Middle Aravalli Supergroup' in order to place constraints on early evolution of the Aravalli basin. These greywackes are enriched in Fe, Mg and K; and depleted in Na in comparison to normal greywackes and can be classified as ferroan potassic sandstone. Petrographic examination indicate that the greywacke samples contain about 30 to 50% matrix that is mainly composed of biotite/chlorite and interspersed with fine Fe-Ti rich opaque mineral phases

  11. Musa massif: mapping, petrology and petrochemical, Rio Maria, SE from Para State

    Gastal, M.C.P.

    1987-01-01

    The petrological, geochemical and geochronological studies allow some insight on the genesis and evolution of the Musa Massif. The different facies of the granitic body are cogenetic, although each of these facies presents some peculiarities in its genesis and evolution. These data suggests that the granite magma evolution was complex or, alternatively, that the facies were generated by liquids derived from different sources. A model of magmatic emplacement, genesis and differentiation is proposed and discussed. The granitic facies show a calc-alkaline compositions, exhibiting strong analogies with cordilleran granites or magnetite granites. An age of 1692 +- 11 Ma (Rb/Sr) with IR of 0,70777 +- 0,00023 was obtained for different facies of Massif. A preliminary attempt to individualize geochronology the principal facies was done and showed that there is a coincidence between the ages and the emplacement sequence of these facies of the pluton. (author)

  12. Teaching Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology Through Guided Inquiry Projects

    McMillan, N. J.

    2003-12-01

    Undergraduate Petrology at New Mexico State University (GEOL 399) has been taught using three, 5-6 week long projects in place of lectures, lab, and exams for the last six years. Reasons for changing from the traditional format include: 1) to move the focus from identification and memorization to petrologic thinking; 2) the need for undergraduate students to apply basic chemical, structural, and field concepts to igneous and metamorphic rocks; 3) student boredom in the traditional mode by the topic that has captivated my professional life, in spite of my best efforts to offer thrilling lectures, problems, and labs. The course has three guided inquiry projects: volcanic, plutonic, and pelitic dynamothermal. Two of the rock suites are investigated during field trips. Each project provides hand samples and thin sections; the igneous projects also include whole-rock major and trace element data. Students write a scientific paper that classifies and describes the rocks, describes the data (mineralogical and geochemical), and uses data to interpret parameters such as tectonic setting, igneous processes, relationship to phase diagrams, geologic history, metamorphic grade, metamorphic facies, and polymetamorphic history. Students use the text as a major resource for self-learning; mini-lectures on pertinent topics are presented when needed by the majority of students. Project scores include evaluation of small parts of the paper due each Friday and participation in peer review as well as the final report. I have found that petrology is much more fun, although more difficult, to teach using this method. It is challenging to be totally prepared for class because students are working at different speeds on different levels on different aspects of the project. Students enjoy the course, especially the opportunity to engage in scientific investigation and debate. A significant flaw in this course is that students see fewer rocks and have less experience in rock classification

  13. Nonlinear optical studies of organic monolayers

    Shen, Y.R.

    1988-02-01

    Second-order nonlinear optical effects are forbidden in a medium with inversion symmetry, but are necessarily allowed at a surface where the inversion summary is broken. They are often sufficiently strong so that a submonolayer perturbation of the surface can be readily detected. They can therefore be used as effective tools to study monolayers adsorbed at various interfaces. We discuss here a number of recent experiments in which optical second harmonic generation (SHG) and sum-frequency generation (SFG) are employed to probe and characterize organic monolayers. 15 refs., 5 figs

  14. STUDY OF ORGANIC ACIDS IN ALMOND LEAVES

    Lenchyk L.V.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Almond (Amygdalus communis is a stone fruit, from the Rosaceae family, closest to the peach. It is spread throughout the entire Mediterranean region and afterwards to the Southwestern USA, Northern Africa, Turkey, Iran, Australia and South Africa. It is sensitive to wet conditions, and therefore is not grown in wet climates. Iran is located in the semi-arid region of the world. Because of its special tolerance to water stress, almond is one of the main agricultural products in rainfed condition in Iran. Almond leaves have been investigated for their phenolic content and antioxidant activity. It was found that total antioxidant activity and phenolic compounds exhibited variations according to season, plant organ (leaf and stem and variety. Analysis of previous research on almonds focused on investigating compounds mostly in seeds and phenolic compounds in leaves, but organic acids in leaves have not been studied. Aim of this study was investigation of organic acids in leaves of almond variety which is distributed in Razavi Khorasan province of Iran. Materials and Methods. In August 2012 almond leaves were collected in Iran, dried and grinded. The study of qualitative composition and quantitative determination of carboxylic acids in almond leaves was carried out by gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection. For determination organic acids content, to 50 mg of dried plant material in 2 ml vial internal standard (50 μg of tridecane in hexane was added and filled up with 1.0 ml of methylating agent (14 % BCl3 in methanol, Supelco 3-3033. The mixture was kept in a sealed vial during 8 hours at 65 °C. At this time fatty oil was fully extracted, and hydrolyzed into its constituent fatty acids and their methylation was done. At the same time free organic and phenolcarbonic acids were methylated too. The reaction mixture was poured from the plant material sediment and was diluted with 1 ml of distilled water. To extract methyl

  15. MARKETING STUDIES OF VETERINARY PHARMACY ORGANIZATIONS ASSORTMENT

    A. A. Deltsov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays there is an active growth of veterinary pharmacy organizations and consumed medicinal drugs for veterinary use. Content-analysis showed that there was an insufficient number of studies devoted to the activity of veterinary pharmacies. The purpose of our work was the analysis of correspondence of range fullness of veterinary pharmacies to the contemporary state of pharmaceutical market of drugs for veterinary use. Veterinary clinics and pharmacies of Moscow and Moscow oblast were the object of our study. We have applied sociological methods (questionnaire, interview, marketing and statistic analysis methods. We have established that liquid dosage forms (53% occupy the biggest part of drugs in the State Registry of Veterinary Drugs. Solutions occupy 68% of this amount. Antimicrobial drugs for systematic use (40% are the most numerous drugs from pharmacotheraperutic group represented in the State Registry. Assortment of veterinary drugs is targeted mainly on a farm livestock (more than 50%. 58% of the market share is domestic drugs. Principal commodity groups which are released by veterinary pharmacies are feed-stuff (31% and drugs (30%. Pharmacy organizations does not have sufficient number of drugs in their assortment (fullness coefficient 7.9% which speaks about nonconformity of the assortment fullness.

  16. Petrologic, morphologic and functional analyses of ground and abrasive stone tools from Rug Bair, Ovche Pole valley

    Boev, Blazho; Dimitrovska, Vasilka

    2011-01-01

    This paper represents the results of the ground and abrasive stone tools analyses based on the finds collected during the excavation of Rug Bair undertaken in 1970, and today stored in the Museum and Institute for Protection of Shtip. The studies were made possible with the help from the Faculty of Natural and Technical Sciences, Shtip, Republic of Macedonia. Through the stone material, an attempt was made a more comprehensive picture of the raw material, petrologic, technical and typo logical characteristics of the Neolithic stone industry at this site to be gained as well as its relationship with related simultaneously industries. (Author)

  17. Coal geology of the Paleocene-Eocene Calvert Bluff Formation (Wilcox Group) and the Eocene Manning Formation (Jackson Group) in east-central Texas; field trip guidebook for the Society for Organic Petrology, Twelfth Annual Meeting, The Woodlands, Texas, August 30, 1995

    Warwick, Peter D.; Crowley, Sharon S.

    1995-01-01

    The Jackson and Wilcox Groups of eastern Texas (fig. 1) are the major lignite producing intervals in the Gulf Region. Within these groups, the major lignite-producing formations are the Paleocene-Eocene Calvert Bluff Formation (Wilcox) and the Eocene Manning Formation (Jackson). According to the Keystone Coal Industry Manual (Maclean Hunter Publishing Company, 1994), the Gulf Coast basin produces about 57 million short tons of lignite annually. The state of Texas ranks number 6 in coal production in the United States. Most of the lignite is used for electric power generation in mine-mouth power plant facilities. In recent years, particular interest has been given to lignite quality and the distribution and concentration of about a dozen trace elements that have been identified as potential hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. As pointed out by Oman and Finkelman (1994), Gulf Coast lignite deposits have elevated concentrations of many of the HAPs elements (Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Hg, Mn, Se, U) on a as-received gm/mmBtu basis when compared to other United States coal deposits used for fuel in thermo-electric power plants. Although regulations have not yet been established for acceptable emissions of the HAPs elements during coal burning, considerable research effort has been given to the characterization of these elements in coal feed stocks. The general purpose of the present field trip and of the accompanying collection of papers is to investigate how various aspects of east Texas lignite geology might collectively influence the quality of the lignite fuel. We hope that this collection of papers will help future researchers understand the complex, multifaceted interrelations of coal geology, petrology, palynology and coal quality, and that this introduction to the geology of the lignite deposits of east Texas might serve as a stimulus for new ideas to be applied to other coal basins in the U.S. and abroad.

  18. The Foucault Effect in Organization Studies

    Raffnsøe, Sverre; Mennicken, Andrea; Miller, Peter

    2017-01-01

    s. Here, an important body of international research investigating governmental technologies operating on subjects as free persons in sites such as education, accounting, medicine and psychiatry emerged. The fourth and last wave arose out of a critical engagement with earlier Foucauldian......Since the establishment of Organization Studies in 1980, Michel Foucault’s oeuvre has had a remarkable and continuing influence on its field. This article traces the different ways in which organizational scholars have engaged with Foucault’s writings over the past thirty years or so. We identify...... of the twentieth century, the second wave led to a focus on discourses as intermediaries that condition ways of viewing and acting. This wave drew mainly on Foucault’s early writings on language and discourse. The third wave was inspired by Foucault’s seminal lectures on governmentality towards the end of the 1970...

  19. The Marbat metamorphic core-complex (Southern Arabian Peninsula) : reassessment of the evolution of a Neoproterozoic island-arc from petrological, geochemical and U-Pb zircon data

    Barbey, P.; Denele, Y.; Paquette, J. L.; Berger, J.; Ganne, Jérôme; Roques, D.

    2018-01-01

    The Marbat basement (Sultanate of Oman) belongs to the Neoproterozoic accretion domain of the Arabian-Nubian shield. We present new geochronological, petrological and geochemical data as an extension of our previous study (Denele et al., 2017) re-interpreting this basement as a metamorphic core complex (MCC). We showed that this MCC consists of a metamorphic unit (Juffa complex) separated by an extensional detachment from a plutonic unit (Sadh complex and Tonalite plutons). Geochemical data s...

  20. Geochemistry and petrology of selected coal samples from Sumatra, Kalimantan, Sulawesi, and Papua, Indonesia

    Belkin, Harvey E.; Tewalt, Susan J. [U.S. Geological Survey, 956 National Center, Reston, VA 20192 (United States); Hower, James C. [University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, 2540 Research Park Drive, Lexington, KY 40511 (United States); Stucker, J.D. [University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, 2540 Research Park Drive, Lexington, KY 40511 (United States)]|[University of Kentucky Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); O' Keefe, J.M.K. [Morehead State University, Department of Physical Science, Morehead, KY 40351 (United States)

    2009-01-31

    Indonesia has become the world's largest exporter of thermal coal and is a major supplier to the Asian coal market, particularly as the People's Republic of China is now (2007) and perhaps may remain a net importer of coal. Indonesia has had a long history of coal production, mainly in Sumatra and Kalimantan, but only in the last two decades have government and commercial forces resulted in a remarkable coal boom. A recent assessment of Indonesian coal-bed methane (CBM) potential has motivated active CBM exploration. Most of the coal is Paleogene and Neogene, low to moderate rank and has low ash yield and sulfur (generally < 10 and < 1 wt.%, respectively). Active tectonic and igneous activity has resulted in significant rank increase in some coal basins. Eight coal samples are described that represent the major export and/or resource potential of Sumatra, Kalimantan, Sulawesi, and Papua. Detailed geochemistry, including proximate and ultimate analysis, sulfur forms, and major, minor, and trace element determinations are presented. Organic petrology and vitrinite reflectance data reflect various precursor flora assemblages and rank variations, including sample composites from active igneous and tectonic areas. A comparison of Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) elements abundance with world and US averages show that the Indonesian coals have low combustion pollution potential. (author)

  1. Geochemistry and petrology of selected coal samples from Sumatra, Kalimantan, Sulawesi, and Papua, Indonesia

    Belkin, Harvey E.; Tewalt, Susan J.; Hower, James C.; Stucker, J.D.; O'Keefe, J.M.K.

    2009-01-01

    Indonesia has become the world's largest exporter of thermal coal and is a major supplier to the Asian coal market, particularly as the People's Republic of China is now (2007) and perhaps may remain a net importer of coal. Indonesia has had a long history of coal production, mainly in Sumatra and Kalimantan, but only in the last two decades have government and commercial forces resulted in a remarkable coal boom. A recent assessment of Indonesian coal-bed methane (CBM) potential has motivated active CBM exploration. Most of the coal is Paleogene and Neogene, low to moderate rank and has low ash yield and sulfur (generally < 10 and < 1 wt.%, respectively). Active tectonic and igneous activity has resulted in significant rank increase in some coal basins. Eight coal samples are described that represent the major export and/or resource potential of Sumatra, Kalimantan, Sulawesi, and Papua. Detailed geochemistry, including proximate and ultimate analysis, sulfur forms, and major, minor, and trace element determinations are presented. Organic petrology and vitrinite reflectance data reflect various precursor flora assemblages and rank variations, including sample composites from active igneous and tectonic areas. A comparison of Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) elements abundance with world and US averages show that the Indonesian coals have low combustion pollution potential. (author)

  2. Culture: The Missing Concept in Organization Studies.

    Schein, Edgar H.

    1996-01-01

    Inattention to social systems in organizations has led researchers to underestimate the importance of culture--shared norms, values, and assumptions--in how organizations function. The failure of organizational learning can be understood by examining typical responses to change by members of several broad occupational cultures (operators,…

  3. Organizations in America: Analyzing Their Structures and Human Resource Practices Based on the National Organizations Study.

    Kalleberg, Arne L.; Knoke, David; Marsden, Peter V.; Spaeth, Joe L.

    In 1991 the National Organizations Study (NOS) surveyed a number of U.S. businesses about their structure, context, and personnel practices to produce a database for answering questions about social behavior in work organizations. This book presents the results of that survey. The study aimed to create a national database on organizations--based…

  4. Petrologic comparisons of Cayley and Descartes on the basis of Apollo 16 soils from stations 4 and 11

    Basu, A.; Mckay, D. S.

    1984-01-01

    Petrologic aspects of the Cayley and Descartes formations are reviewed in the light of new data on Apollo 16 soils. Specific comparison of the modal abundances of lithic fragments in drive tube sample 64001/2 from the slopes of Stone Mountain (station 4) and in soil 67941 from the North Ray Crater rim (station 11) shows that melt rocks, especially poikilitic rocks, are more abundant at station 4 than at station 11; the reverse is true for fragmental breccias. Such lithologic differences suggest that stations 4 and 11 do not belong to the same geologic formation. Metamorphosed breccias are pervasive in both the formations and may represent a local component that has been reworked and diluted as fresh materials were added. Lithologic compositions inferred from the study of soil samples are different from lithologic compositions inferred from the study of rake samples or breccia clasts. This difference may be related to a mixing of material of different grain size distributions. The petrology of soils at the Apollo 16 site may not accurately reflect original material associated with either the Descartes or the Cayley formation because of extensive mixing with local material.

  5. Geochemical and petrological considerations about the basalts of upper aluminium in the Fildes Peninsula. (Rei George), Antartica

    Machado, A.; Fernandes de Lima, E.; Chemale, F.

    1998-01-01

    Petrographic, geochemical and petrological studies of lower Tertiary basaltic rocks from Fildes Peninsula in Antarctica were made to characterize their source and magmatic evolution. These basaltic rocks have porphyritic, glomeroporphyritic, intergranular and intersertal textures. The phenocrysts are of plagioclase (An), augite, pigeonite and Ti-magnetite. These basaltic rocks have AL O from 16 to 22%, Ni from 6 to 88 ppm, Co from 24 to 33 ppm and Cr from 54 to 123 ppm. Enrichment of Rb. Ba, Sr and LREE with respect to HREE is observed as relative depleted in HFSE is detected. The mass balance realized to understand the evolution of liquid that gave source the different basaltic rocks. Showed that the extracted mineral fractions were 76% of plagioclase, 2% of clinopiroxene and 21% of olivine. The intermediate volcanic rocks of Fildes Peninsula can be explained by cristalization fractionation of a basic liquid. The isotopic dates showed initial rations of Sr/Sr <0,704 and positive values of Nd epsilon. These results are strong support a mantelic source for basaltic rocks of Fildes Peninsula. On basis of geochemical, petrological and isotopic characteristics is possible concluded that these rocks were formed in an island are environment with parcial melting of mantle wedge. (author)

  6. Petrological and geochemical studies of ultramafic–mafic rocks from ...

    rocks from the North Puruliya Shear Zone (eastern India). Aditi Mandal∗ ..... quently replaced by hornblende along margin and are greater in ...... tion and accumulation. ..... J. Petrol. 43(2) 219–241. Das D K 1977 A review on sulphide zone around Belamu hill, ... implication for trans-continental Gondwanaland correla-.

  7. Petrology of Oligocene Ghaleh Yaghmesh granitoids in the west of Yazd province

    Bahareh Fazeli

    2017-02-01

    that magma mixing process was likely responsible for the formation of the rocks being studied. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the University of Isfahan for the financial support. We also thank the Southern Methodist University (SMU (Dallas - USA for the XRF chemical analysis undertaken for this project. References Alavi, M., 1994. Tectonics of Zagros orogenic belt of Iran, new data and interpretation. Tectonophysics, 229(3: 211–238. Chappell, B.W. and White, A.J., 1974. Two contrasting granite types. Pacific Geology, 8: 173-174. Clemens, J.D., Stevens G., and Farina, F., 2011. The enigmatic sources of I-type granites: The peritectic conexión. Lithos, 126(3: 174–181. Didier, J., 1991. The main types of enclaves in the Hercynian granitoids of the Massif Central, France. In: J. Didier and B. Barbarin (Editors, Enclaves and Granite Petrology. Developments in Petrology, V. 13. Elsevier, Amsterdam, pp. 47–61. Didier, J. and Barbarin, B., 1991. Enclaves and granite petrology.Developments in Petrology, V. 13. Elsevier, Amsterdam, 625 pp. Ellis, D.J. and Thompson, A.B., 1986. Subsolidus and partial melting reactions in the quartz-excess and water deficient conditions of peraluminous melts from mafic rocks. Journal of Petrology, 27(1: 91-121. Honarmand, M., Rashidnejad-Omran, N., Corfu , F., Emami, M. H. and Nabatian, G., 2013. Geochronology and magmatic history of a calc-alkaline plutonic complex in the Urumieh-Dokhtar Magmatic Belt, Central Iran: Zircon ages as evidence for two major plutonic episodes. Neues Jahrbuch fur Mineralogie, Abhandlungen, 190(1: 67–77. Kananian, A., Sarjoughian, F., Nadimi A., Ahmadian, J. and Ling, W., 2014. Geochemical characteristics of the Kuh-e Dom intrusion, Urumieh–Dokhtar Magmatic Arc (Iran: Implications for source regions and magmatic evolution. Journal of Asian Earth Sciences, 90: 137-148. Sepahi, A.A. and Malvandi, F., 2008. Petrology of the Bouein Zahra-Naein Plutonic Complexes, Urumieh-Dokhtar Belt, Iran: With

  8. The petrology and petrogenesis of the Swaldale region, Motzfeldt Center, South Greenland

    Reekie, Callum; Finch, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    Motzfeldt is one of several high-level alkaline plutonic centers that collectively define the mid-Proterozoic Gardar Province of South Greenland. Despite pyrochlore-hosted Ta-enrichment (± Nb-Zr-REE), the petrology, geochemistry and petrogenesis across the center remain to be fully constrained. We present petrological and geochemical data for the Swaldale region, an arcuate band of nepheline syenite and associated intrusives on Motzfeldt's NW margin. Work for this present study was undertaken in collaboration with the license holder, Regency Mines plc. Swaldale comprises two geochemically distinct magmatic members. The largest, the Motzfeldt Sø Formation (MSF; EuN/Eu*N = 0.35), is a suite of diverse syenite variants that show significant petrological and geochemical heterogeneity. These rocks have a relatively restricted SiO2 range (57.4-62.9 wt.%) with concurrent variation in (Na+K)/Al (0.75-0.95), Mg/(Mg+Fe) (2.18-19.82) and ΣREE (595.0-3095.9 ppm), emphasizing their evolved but not peralkaline nature. Fractionation is mirrored by pyroxene geochemistry with evolution from aegirine-augite, aegirine-hedenbergite, to aegirine. Accessory pyrochlore, titanite, and zircon are rare; however, anomalous facies of zircon-rich (~2 wt.%) syenite are observed. Intercumulus fluorite is a common accessory within MSF rocks. Hydrothermal alteration, marked by hematized alkali-feldspar, is pervasive and ubiquitous. Further peraluminous syenite of the Geologfjeld Formation ((Na+K)/Al = 0.74; EuN/Eu*N = 1.60) marks the truncated remnant of an early syenite stock to the north of the MSF. These rocks contain salite, which, in addition to a lower ΣREE and higher Mg/(Mg+Fe) (18.01), demonstrates the less-fractionated nature of this stock in comparison with the MSF. Sheeted intrusions of peralkaline syenite ((Na+K)/Al = 1.1; Ta = 32.4 ppm) truncate the MSF across central Swaldale. On a mineralogical basis, it is hypothesized that such intrusions reflect outward sheeting of the

  9. A STUDY OF ORGANIZATIONS ATTITUDES TOWARDS TELEWORKING

    H. FİLİZ ALKAN MEŞHUR

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Current development of information and communication technologies has brought about is the ability for employees to work anytime and anywhere. They can work anywhere including home, hotels, airplanes etc. Telecommunications services are substituted for transportation to a conventional office or other workplace. This practice is called "teleworking". The main goal of this paper is to evaluate the viewpoint of organizations to telework. The paper begins with a brief summary of telework concept. Then, a sample survey was conducted in order to conceive the attitude of organizations to telework. Finally, recommendations were suggested related to telework implementation in Turkey.

  10. Organization Development: A Case Study in Blockages.

    McIntyre, Martin

    1981-01-01

    Organization Development is a management science that defines and solves organizational problems. Procedures include: (1) diagnosis of problem; (2) gathering of data related to problem; (3) obtaining feedback; (4) developing various change strategies; (5) developing an action plan; and (6) implementing the plan. (CJ)

  11. A New Approach to Teaching Petrology: Active Learning in a Studio Classroom

    Perkins, D.

    2003-12-01

    During the past 15 years it has become clear that the traditional lecture and lab approach to college science teaching leaves much to be desired. The traditional approach is instructor oriented and based on passive learning. In contrast, current studies show that most students learn best when actively engaged in the learning process. Inquiry based learning and open ended projects have been shown to especially enhance learning by promoting higher order thinking. Recognizing the need for change, however, does not mean the changes are simple. The task of overhauling a course, replacing traditional approaches with more student oriented activities, requires a great deal of time and effort. It also involves much uncertainty and risk. At UND we have been experimenting with alternative pedagogies for a number of years. Change has been incremental, but this year we made wholesale changes in our petrology class. We converted it from the standard three lecture and one lab format to two 3-hour studio sessions per week. The distinction between lab and lecture is gone. In fact, there really are no lectures. The instructor talks for no more than 15 or 20 minutes at a time. Students spend most of their time doing, not listening. We emphasize collaborative active learning projects, some quite short and others lengthy and involved, and use a wide variety of activities. To assess the class, we have an outside consultant and we carry out weekly assessments to measure (1) how students are reacting to the various pedagogical approaches, and (2) how much student learning is actually occurring. This allows us to make adjustments and fine tune as necessary. We could not have made such changes a few years ago, simply because of the amount of work involved to create and test the necessary classroom materials. Today, however, there are many resources available to the reform minded teacher, and the resource base continues to grow. We borrowed heavily from other instructors at other

  12. Advancing the field of organizations through the study of military organizations

    Augier, Mie; Knudsen, Torbjorn; McNab, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    This article argues that the field of organization studies may learn from closer study of decision-making and behaviors in military organizations. It describes some of the intellectual roots of organizational studies within a strategic, military context; discusses some recent characteristics...

  13. Petrology of Terra Nova pluton, Brazil, and associated ultrapotassic dykes

    Silva Filho, A.F. da; Thompson, R.N.; Leat, P.T.

    1987-01-01

    The Upper Precambrian Terra Nova Pluton, situated 550 Km inland from Recife, Brazil, is 220 Km 2 in area and intrudes deformed metasedimentary rocks of the Pianco-Alto Brigida Mobile Belt. The Pluton shows complex petrological relationships. It consists of subalkaline quartz-monzonites and quartz-syenites, and the major minerals are K-feldspars, albite, hornblende, and quartz. The pluton is intermediate in composition (SiO 2 = 58.9-65.6 wt%, MgO=0.9-3.7 wt%) and is dominantly potassic (K 2 O=3.3-5.6 wt %; K 2 O/Na 2 O=0.9-1.8). Ba (up to 2.300 ppm) and Sr (up to 1,100 ppm) are abundant in the rocks, and LREE are enriched relative to HREE (La N /Lu N = 25.6-43.2). There is no significant Eu Anomaly. Rounded autoliths within the pluton are similar, but more mafic in composition (SiO 2 =54.6-57.5 wt %; MgO=4.9-6.4 wt %). A suite of dykes cut pluton and the surrounding country rocks. These dykes are varied in composition, encompassing most of the chemical range shown by the pluton and associated autoliths. The dykes are holocrystalline, peralkaline, and strongly enriched in both K 2 O(K 2 O=5.3-11.4 wt %) and Ba (Ba=2,400 ppm-10,500 ppm), which are considered to be magmatic abundances. The dykes have similar REE and other trace elements and ratios to the autoliths and plutonic rocks, and the dykes and the pluton are thought to be chemically related. The Terra Nova Pluton records the fractionation of mantle-derived ultrapotassic magma from mafic to intermediate compositions. (author) [pt

  14. Geophysical, petrological and mineral physics constraints on Earth's surface topography

    Guerri, Mattia; Cammarano, Fabio; Tackley, Paul J.

    2015-04-01

    Earth's surface topography is controlled by isostatically compensated density variations within the lithosphere, but dynamic topography - i.e. the topography due to adjustment of surface to mantle convection - is an important component, specially at a global scale. In order to separate these two components it is fundamental to estimate crustal and mantle density structure and rheological properties. Usually, crustal density is constrained from interpretation of available seismic data (mostly VP profiles) based on empirical relationships such those in Brocher [2005]. Mantle density structure is inferred from seismic tomography models. Constant coefficients are used to interpret seismic velocity anomalies in density anomalies. These simplified methods are unable to model the effects that pressure and temperature variations have on mineralogical assemblage and physical properties. Our approach is based on a multidisciplinary method that involves geophysical observables, mineral physics constraints, and petrological data. Mantle density is based on the thermal interpretation of global seismic tomography models assuming various compositional structures, as in Cammarano et al. [2011]. We further constrain the top 150 km by including heat-flow data and considering the thermal evolution of the oceanic lithosphere. Crustal density is calculated as in Guerri and Cammarano [2015] performing thermodynamic modeling of various average chemical compositions proposed for the crust. The modeling, performed with the code PerpleX [Connolly, 2005], relies on the thermodynamic dataset from Holland and Powell [1998]. Compressional waves velocity and crustal layers thickness from the model CRUST 1.0 [Laske et al., 2013] offer additional constrains. The resulting lithospheric density models are tested against gravity (GOCE) data. Various crustal and mantle density models have been tested in order to ascertain the effects that uncertainties in the estimate of those features have on the

  15. Solid Organic Deposition During Gas Injection Studies

    Dandekar, Abhijit Y.; Andersen, Simon Ivar; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2000-01-01

    Recently a series of first contact miscibility (swelling) experiments have been performed on undersaturated light and heavy oils using LPG rich and methane rich injection gases, in which solid organic deposition was observed. A compositional gradient in the oils during the gas injection process....... The asphaltene content of the different oil samples were determined by the TP 143 method. The standard asphaltenes and the solid organic deposit recovered from the swelling tests were analyzed using FTIR, HPLC-SEC and H-1 NMR. The aim of these analyses is to reveal the molecular nature of the deposits formed...... during the gas injection process in comparison with the standard asphaltenes in order to understand the mechanisms involved in asphaltene deposition....

  16. Organic insulator studies at Los Alamos

    Parkin, D.M.; Clinard, F.W.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of radiation on the structural and electrical properties of organic insulators to be used in superconducting magnets in fusion devices has been identified as a critical materials problem. These materials will be exposed to both γ-ray and neutron radiation. LANL has been asked by the OFE Materials Branch to look at the relationship between the effects of γ-ray and neutron radiation effects. Some thoughts on planning the program are outlined

  17. Organizations

    Hatch, Mary Jo

    and considers many more. Mary Jo Hatch introduces the concept of organizations by presenting definitions and ideas drawn from the a variety of subject areas including the physical sciences, economics, sociology, psychology, anthropology, literature, and the visual and performing arts. Drawing on examples from......Most of us recognize that organizations are everywhere. You meet them on every street corner in the form of families and shops, study in them, work for them, buy from them, pay taxes to them. But have you given much thought to where they came from, what they are today, and what they might become...... prehistory and everyday life, from the animal kingdom as well as from business, government, and other formal organizations, Hatch provides a lively and thought provoking introduction to the process of organization....

  18. Strategies for success among OPOs: a study of three organ procurement organizations.

    Shafer, T J; Kappel, D F; Heinrichs, D F

    1997-03-01

    Productivity among organ procurement organizations varies widely in the US, and the pressure to determine critical success factors increases as the organ pool shrinks and managed care expands. This study compared three successful organ procurement organizations, identified commonalities among them in cost of doing business, and examined direct and indirect expenses, staffing, specialized requestor programs, and professional and public education programs. The three organ procurement organizations were chosen because of their performance in terms of donors per million population, complexity, and size. The following key indicators were compared and analyzed: annual operating budget, size and composition of staff, funds and resources invested in professional education versus public education, tissue recovery operations, results of minority initiatives, and employee compensation programs.

  19. Field occurrences and petrology of eclogites from the Dabie Mountains, Anhui, central China

    Wang, X.; Jing, Y.; Liou, J. G.; Pan, G.; Liang, W.; Xia, M.; Maruyama, S.

    1990-11-01

    Four distinct types of eclogites are recognized according to their field occurrences and mineral parageneses in a gneiss terrane of the Dabie Mountains, a collision zone between the Sino-Korean and Yangtze cratons in central China. Some eclogites contain coesite and its quartz pseudomorphs enclosed in garnet and omphacite. Type I eclogites occur as layers in serpentinites and contain garnet, clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene, phengite, rutile, and coesite pseudomorph. Type II eclogites occur as lenticular bodies inside serpentinites and contain garnet, clinopyroxene, quartz, rutile, and edenitic hornblende. Type III eclogites occur as blocks of 2 cm to 20 m in size in a matrix of hornblende gneiss and biotite gneiss, and Type IV eclogites occur as thin layers interbedded with amphibolites. P- T estimates for these different eclogites indicate that they were formed under different physical conditions. All the eclogites were affected by later regional metamorphism for which the P- T conditions are estimated. This paper provides an introduction to the abundant eclogites from central China which have not been reported previously in Western literature. Specifically, the mode of field occurrence, petrography, mineral chemistry and formation conditions of the four types of eclogites are described. The paper is thus designed to establish a petrological framework for future detailed studies of the eclogites and their country rocks in an ancient zone of collision.

  20. Mineralogical, petrological and geochemical aspects of alkaline and alkaline-carbonatite associations from Brazil

    Morbidelli, L.; Gomes, C. B.; Beccaluva, L.; Brotzu, P.; Conte, A. M.; Ruberti, E.; Traversa, G.

    1995-12-01

    A general description of Mesozoic and Tertiary (Fortaleza) Brazilian alkaline and alkaline-carbonatite districts is presented with reference to mineralogy, petrology, geochemistry and geochronology. It mainly refers to scientific results obtained during the last decade by an Italo-Brazilian research team. Alkaline occurrences are distributed across Brazilian territory from the southern (Piratini, Rio Grande do Sul State) to the northeastern (Fortaleza, Ceará State) regions and are mainly concentrated along the borders of the Paraná Basin generally coinciding with important tectonic lineaments. The most noteworthy characteristics of these alkaline and alkaline-carbonatite suites are: (i) prevalence of intrusive forms; (ii) abundance of cumulate assemblages (minor dunites, frequent clinopyroxenites and members of the ijolite series) and (iii) abundance of evolved rock-types. Many data demonstrate that crystal fractionation was the main process responsible for magma evolution of all Brazilian alkaline rocks. A hypothesis is proposed for the genesis of carbonatite liquids by immiscibility processes. The incidence of REE and trace elements for different major groups of lithotypes, belonging both to carbonatite-bearing and carbonatite-free districts, are documented. Sr and preliminary Nd isotopic data are indicative of a mantle origin for the least evolved magmas of all the studied occurrences. Mantle source material and melting models for the generation of the Brazilian alkaline magma types are also discussed.

  1. Formation of cratonic lithosphere: An integrated thermal and petrological model

    Herzberg, Claude; Rudnick, Roberta

    2012-09-01

    The formation of cratonic mantle peridotite of Archean age is examined within the time frame of Earth's thermal history, and how it was expressed by temporal variations in magma and residue petrology. Peridotite residues that occupy the lithospheric mantle are rare owing to the effects of melt-rock reaction, metasomatism, and refertilization. Where they are identified, they are very similar to the predicted harzburgite residues of primary magmas of the dominant basalts in greenstone belts, which formed in a non-arc setting (referred to here as "non-arc basalts"). The compositions of these basalts indicate high temperatures of formation that are well-described by the thermal history model of Korenaga. In this model, peridotite residues of extensive ambient mantle melting had the highest Mg-numbers, lowest FeO contents, and lowest densities at ~ 2.5-3.5 Ga. These results are in good agreement with Re-Os ages of kimberlite-hosted cratonic mantle xenoliths and enclosed sulfides, and provide support for the hypothesis of Jordan that low densities of cratonic mantle are a measure of their high preservation potential. Cratonization of the Earth reached its zenith at ~ 2.5-3.5 Ga when ambient mantle was hot and extensive melting produced oceanic crust 30-45 km thick. However, there is a mass imbalance exhibited by the craton-wide distribution of harzburgite residues and the paucity of their complementary magmas that had compositions like the non-arc basalts. We suggest that the problem of the missing basaltic oceanic crust can be resolved by its hydration, cooling and partial transformation to eclogite, which caused foundering of the entire lithosphere. Some of the oceanic crust partially melted during foundering to produce continental crust composed of tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG). The remaining lithosphere gravitationally separated into 1) residual eclogite that continued its descent, and 2) buoyant harzburgite diapirs that rose to underplate cratonic nuclei

  2. On the Grand Challenges in Physical Petrology: the Multiphase Crossroads

    Bergantz, G. W.

    2014-12-01

    Rapid progress in experimental, micro-analytical and textural analysis at the crystal scale has produced an unprecedented record of magmatic processes. However an obstacle to further progress is the lack of understanding of how mass, energy and momentum flux associated with crystal-rich, open-system events produces identifiable outcomes. Hence developing a physically-based understanding of magmatic systems linking micro-scale petrological observations with a physical template operating at the macro-scale presents a so-called "Grand Challenge." The essence of this challenge is that magmatic systems have characteristic length and feedback scales between those accessible by classical continuum and discrete methods. It has become increasingly obvious that the old-school continuum methods have limited resolution and power of explanation for multiphase (real) magma dynamics. This is, in part, because in crystal-rich systems the deformation is non-affine, and so the concept of constitutive behavior is less applicable and likely not even relevant, especially if one is interested in the emergent character of micro-scale processes. One expression of this is the cottage industry of proposing viscosity laws for magmas, which serves as "blunt force" de facto corrections for what is intrinsically multiphase behavior. Even in more fluid-rich systems many of these laws are not suitable for use in the very transport theories they aim to support. The alternative approach is the discrete method, where multiphase interactions are explicitly resolved. This is a daunting prospect given the numbers of crystals in magmas. But perhaps all crystals don't need to be modeled. I will demonstrate how discrete methods can recover critical state behavior, resolve crystal migration, the onset of visco-elastic behavior such as melt-present shear bands which sets the large-scale mixing volumes, some of the general morpho-dynamics that underlies purported rheological models, and transient controls on

  3. Organics Verification Study for Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, Washington

    Kohn, Nancy P.; Brandenberger, Jill M.; Niewolny, Laurie A.; Johnston, Robert K.

    2006-09-28

    Sinclair and Dyes Inlets near Bremerton, Washington, are on the State of Washington 1998 303(d) list of impaired waters because of fecal coliform contamination in marine water, metals in sediment and fish tissue, and organics in sediment and fish tissue. Because significant cleanup and source control activities have been conducted in the inlets since the data supporting the 1998 303(d) listings were collected, two verification studies were performed to address the 303(d) segments that were listed for metal and organic contaminants in marine sediment. The Metals Verification Study (MVS) was conducted in 2003; the final report, Metals Verification Study for Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, Washington, was published in March 2004 (Kohn et al. 2004). This report describes the Organics Verification Study that was conducted in 2005. The study approach was similar to the MVS in that many surface sediment samples were screened for the major classes of organic contaminants, and then the screening results and other available data were used to select a subset of samples for quantitative chemical analysis. Because the MVS was designed to obtain representative data on concentrations of contaminants in surface sediment throughout Sinclair Inlet, Dyes Inlet, Port Orchard Passage, and Rich Passage, aliquots of the 160 MVS sediment samples were used in the analysis for the Organics Verification Study. However, unlike metals screening methods, organics screening methods are not specific to individual organic compounds, and are not available for some target organics. Therefore, only the quantitative analytical results were used in the organics verification evaluation. The results of the Organics Verification Study showed that sediment quality outside of Sinclair Inlet is unlikely to be impaired because of organic contaminants. Similar to the results for metals, in Sinclair Inlet, the distribution of residual organic contaminants is generally limited to nearshore areas already within the

  4. Using a Differential Scanning Calorimeter to Teach Phase Equilibria to Students of Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology

    Maria, Anton H.; Millam, Evan L.; Wright, Carrie L.

    2011-01-01

    As an aid for teaching phase equilibria to undergraduate students of igneous and metamorphic petrology, we have designed a laboratory exercise that allows them to create a phase diagram from data produced by differential scanning calorimetry. By preparing and analyzing samples of naphthalene and phenanthrene, students acquire hands-on insight into…

  5. Upper Cretaceous to Pleistocene melilitic volcanic rocks of the Bohemian Massif: Petrology and mineral chemistry

    Skála, Roman; Ulrych, Jaromír; Krmíček, Lukáš; Fediuk, F.; Balogh, K.; Hegner, E.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 3 (2015), s. 197-216 ISSN 1335-0552 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : Bohemian Massif * Cenozoic volcanism * isotope geochemistry * melilitic rock * mineralogy * petrology Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.523, year: 2015

  6. Geochemistry and petrology of mafic Proterozoic and Permian dykes on Bornholm, Denmark:

    Holm, Paul Martin; Pedersen, Lise E.; Højsteeen, Birte

    2010-01-01

    More than 250 dykes cut the mid Proterozoic basement gneisses and granites of Bornholm. Most trend between NNW and NNE, whereas a few trend NE and NW. Field, geochemical and petrological evidence suggest that the dyke intrusions occurred as four distinct events at around 1326 Ma (Kelseaa dyke...

  7. A Meta-Analysis of Advance-Organizer Studies.

    Stone, Carol Leth

    Long term studies of advance organizers (AO) were analyzed with Glass's meta-analysis technique. AO's were defined as bridges from reader's previous knowledge to what is to be learned. The results were compared with predictions from Ausubel's model of assimilative learning. The results of the study indicated that advance organizers were associated…

  8. Petrologic and petrophysical evaluation of the Dallas Center Structure, Iowa, for compressed air energy storage in the Mount Simon Sandstone.

    Heath, Jason E.; Bauer, Stephen J.; Broome, Scott Thomas; Dewers, Thomas A.; Rodriguez, Mark A

    2013-03-01

    The Iowa Stored Energy Plant Agency selected a geologic structure at Dallas Center, Iowa, for evaluation of subsurface compressed air energy storage. The site was rejected due to lower-than-expected and heterogeneous permeability of the target reservoir, lower-than-desired porosity, and small reservoir volume. In an initial feasibility study, permeability and porosity distributions of flow units for the nearby Redfield gas storage field were applied as analogue values for numerical modeling of the Dallas Center Structure. These reservoir data, coupled with an optimistic reservoir volume, produced favorable results. However, it was determined that the Dallas Center Structure cannot be simplified to four zones of high, uniform permeabilities. Updated modeling using field and core data for the site provided unfavorable results for air fill-up. This report presents Sandia National Laboratories petrologic and petrophysical analysis of the Dallas Center Structure that aids in understanding why the site was not suitable for gas storage.

  9. Magmatic and petrologic evolution of the mesozvic vulcanic acid rocks from Piraju-Ourinhos region (SP-PR)

    Raposo, M.I.B.

    1987-01-01

    This work presents the result of geological, petrological and geochemical studies, on the volcanic rocks from Piraju-Ourinhos region, SP, with special emphasis on the rocks. A geological mapping was carried out by using images from Landsat satellite. Petrographic and chemical analyses have defined a suite represented by basic lithotype - tholeutic andesibasalt - with high TiO 2 , rich in incompable elements - mainly Sr, Zr, La, Ce, and Ba - and by acid lithotype - rhyolite - rhyodacite. k-Ar ages are determined in feldspar concentrated, and indicate an age of 133+- 4m,y, for the volcanic acid rocks. Determinations of Sr isotopes. In order to explain the genesis of Chapeco type acid magnas quantitative models were tested using both fractional Crystallization [pt

  10. Petrologic insights into basaltic volcanism at historically active Hawaiian volcanoes: Chapter 6 in Characteristics of Hawaiian volcanoes

    Helz, Rosalind L.; Clague, David A.; Sisson, Thomas W.; Thornber, Carl R.; Poland, Michael P.; Takahashi, T. Jane; Landowski, Claire M.

    2014-01-01

    Study of the petrology of Hawaiian volcanoes, in particular the historically active volcanoes on the Island of Hawai‘i, has long been of worldwide scientific interest. When Dr. Thomas A. Jaggar, Jr., established the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) in 1912, detailed observations on basaltic activity at Kīlauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes increased dramatically. The period from 1912 to 1958 saw a gradual increase in the collection and analysis of samples from the historical eruptions of Kīlauea and Mauna Loa and development of the concepts needed to evaluate them. In a classic 1955 paper, Howard Powers introduced the concepts of magnesia variation diagrams, to display basaltic compositions, and olivine-control lines, to distinguish between possibly comagmatic and clearly distinct basaltic lineages. In particular, he and others recognized that Kīlauea and Mauna Loa basalts must have different sources.

  11. Recent progress in high-pressure studies on organic conductors

    Syuma Yasuzuka and Keizo Murata

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent high-pressure studies of organic conductors and superconductors are reviewed. The discovery of the highest Tc superconductivity among organics under high pressure has triggered the further progress of the high-pressure research. Owing to this finding, various organic conductors with the strong electron correlation were investigated under high pressures. This review includes the pressure techniques using the cubic anvil apparatus, as well as high-pressure studies of the organic conductors up to 10 GPa showing extraordinary temperature and pressure dependent transport phenomena.

  12. Studying cerebral organization through embodied artificial evolution

    Janssen, J.H.; Goosen, A.E.A.; Sprinkhuizen-Kuyper, I.G.; Haselager, W.F.G.; Goosen, A.E.A.; Janssen, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    In this study embodied embedded agents are evolved in order to gain a better understanding of the distribution of cognitive functions in the brain. We found that the evolution of the two hemispheres is influenced by the structure of the body plan. Furthermore, it is seen that individuals with an

  13. The depositional environment and petrology of the White Rim Sandstone Member of the Permian Cutler Formation, Canyonlands National Park, Utah

    Steele-Mallory, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    The White Rim Sandstone Member of the Cutler Formation of Permian age in Canyonlands National Park, Utah, was deposited in coastal eolian and associated interdune environments. This conclusion is based on stratigraphic relationships primary sedimentary structures, and petrologic features. The White Rim consists of two major genetic units. The first represents a coastal dune field and the second represents related interdune ponds. Distinctive sedimentary structures of the coastal dune unit include large- to medium-scale, unidirectional, tabular-planar cross-bedding; high-index ripples oriented parallel to dip direction of the foresets; coarse-grained lag layers; avalanche or slump marks; and raindrop impressions. Cross-bedding measurements suggest the dunes were deposited as transverse ridges by a dominantly northwest to southeast wind. Distinctive sedimentary structures of the interdune pond unit include wavy, horizontally laminated bedding, adhesion ripples, and desiccation polygons. These features may have been produced by alternate wetting and drying of sediment during water-table fluctuations. Evidence of bioturbation is also present in this unit. Petrologic characteristics of the White Rim helped to define the depositional environment as coastal. A crinoid fragment was identified at one location; both units are enriched in heavy minerals, and small amounts of well rounded, reworked glauconite were found in the White Rim throughout the study area. Earlier work indicates that the White Rim sandstone is late Wolfcampian to early Leonardian in age. During this time, the Canyonlands area was located in a depositional area alternately dominated by marine and nonmarine environments. Results of this study suggest the White Rim represents a coastal dune field that was deposited by predominantly on-shore winds during a period of marine transgression.

  14. Analytic study of organic matters in Lodeve uranium ore

    Campuzano, E.J.

    1981-01-01

    Exploitation of uranium in the Permian basin of Lodeve is difficult because of simultaneous extraction of organic matters which are found, in small proportion, in ammonium diuranate and a supplementary purification is required. Available information on natural organic matters are briefly reviewed. Natural organic matters contained in the Lodeve uranium ore processing fluid is separated and fractionated. Physicochemical properties of ligands in each fraction are studied. The existence of bonds between these ligands and dissolved uranium is experimentally demonstrated [fr

  15. Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism: a comparative study.

    Hiren Karathia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Model organisms are used for research because they provide a framework on which to develop and optimize methods that facilitate and standardize analysis. Such organisms should be representative of the living beings for which they are to serve as proxy. However, in practice, a model organism is often selected ad hoc, and without considering its representativeness, because a systematic and rational method to include this consideration in the selection process is still lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work we propose such a method and apply it in a pilot study of strengths and limitations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism. The method relies on the functional classification of proteins into different biological pathways and processes and on full proteome comparisons between the putative model organism and other organisms for which we would like to extrapolate results. Here we compare S. cerevisiae to 704 other organisms from various phyla. For each organism, our results identify the pathways and processes for which S. cerevisiae is predicted to be a good model to extrapolate from. We find that animals in general and Homo sapiens in particular are some of the non-fungal organisms for which S. cerevisiae is likely to be a good model in which to study a significant fraction of common biological processes. We validate our approach by correctly predicting which organisms are phenotypically more distant from S. cerevisiae with respect to several different biological processes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The method we propose could be used to choose appropriate substitute model organisms for the study of biological processes in other species that are harder to study. For example, one could identify appropriate models to study either pathologies in humans or specific biological processes in species with a long development time, such as plants.

  16. Organ culture studies for pancreatic islet transplantation

    Reemtsma, K.; Weber, C.J.; Pi-Sunyer, F.X.; Lerner, R.; Zimmerman, E.; Hardy, M.A.

    1979-01-01

    Data support the usefulness of tissue culture in isolation and preservation of islets prior to transplantation. Rodent islet viability in culture was demonstrated histologically and by functional analyses of hormone production. For reasons that remain to be defined, acinar cells disappeared rapidly in tissue culture, yielding an implant preparation relatively rich in islets and devoid of pancreatic exocrine elements. Isografts of cultured and noncultured islets were well tolerated intraperitoneally and intramuscularly; and prompt and lasting reversal of short- and long-standing experimental diabetes was observed regularly. In vitro studies of rodent islet viability after immunosuppressive treatment of donors or islet cultures showed insulin production comparable to that of control experiments, suggesting that immunologic modification of donors or islets might be feasible in eventual human islet allotransplantation

  17. Sustaining Latina Student Organizations: An Exploratory Instrumental Case Study

    Castellanos, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing the exploratory case study methodology, the author examines the conditions that support and limit a Latina-based student organization at a predominately White institution of higher education. Seven organizational structures were found to influence the organization's ability to advance its aims, from interviews, documents, observations,…

  18. Histological Studies of Some Organs of Squirrels ( Xerus erythropus ...

    Histological Studies of Some Organs of Squirrels ( Xerus erythropus ) in Tropical Ecological Zone. ... The ground squirrels were trapped using rodent traps, anesthetized identified to species level and dissected to expose the viscera. The organs (liver brain, heart, gonads (testes and ovaries) were dissected out, clean off ...

  19. Morphological Studies Of Vomeronasal Organ In The Wild Juvenile ...

    The vomeronasal organ (VNO) of the juvenile Red-flanked duiker (Cephalophus rufilatus) weighingbetween 0814 kg was studied by gross dissection and light mcroscopy. The organ was found to be present at the base of the nasal septum completely housed by the vomeronasal cartilage, but the various soft tissue ...

  20. Drosophila melanogaster as a model organism to study nanotoxicity.

    Ong, Cynthia; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry; Cai, Yu; Bay, Boon-Huat; Baeg, Gyeong-Hun

    2015-05-01

    Drosophila melanogaster has been used as an in vivo model organism for the study of genetics and development since 100 years ago. Recently, the fruit fly Drosophila was also developed as an in vivo model organism for toxicology studies, in particular, the field of nanotoxicity. The incorporation of nanomaterials into consumer and biomedical products is a cause for concern as nanomaterials are often associated with toxicity in many in vitro studies. In vivo animal studies of the toxicity of nanomaterials with rodents and other mammals are, however, limited due to high operational cost and ethical objections. Hence, Drosophila, a genetically tractable organism with distinct developmental stages and short life cycle, serves as an ideal organism to study nanomaterial-mediated toxicity. This review discusses the basic biology of Drosophila, the toxicity of nanomaterials, as well as how the Drosophila model can be used to study the toxicity of various types of nanomaterials.

  1. Petrology and Rock Magnetism of the peridotites of Pindos Ophiolite (Greece), insights into the serpentinization process

    Bonnemains, D.; Carlut, J. H.; Mevel, C.; Andreani, M.; Escartin, J.; Debret, B.

    2015-12-01

    We present a petrological and magnetic study of a suite of serpentinized peridotites from the Pindos ophiolite spanning a wide range in the degree of serpentinization (from ~10 to 100%). The Pindos ophiolite, in Northern Greece, is a portion of Late Triassic oceanic lithosphere obducted during the convergence of the Apulian and Pelagonian micro-continents. This ophiolite is interpreted mainly as the result of a supra-subduction zone spreading process but its complete history remains largely unknown. Therefore, it is not clear when the ultramafic section was exposed to fluid circulation that resulted in its serpentinization. Element partitioning during serpentinization reactions is dependent on parameters such as temperature and water-rock ratio. In particular, they affect the behavior of the iron released by olivine, which can be taken up either by magnetite, serpentine and/or brucite. Analyses of the reaction products are therefore a key to constrain the conditions during the main stage of the alteration. Our study was designed to gain insight on the conditions prevailing during hydration. Our results indicate that even fully serpentinized samples have a very low magnetization and magnetite content. Moreover, microprobe and μXanes results show that serpentine is the main host of iron in the divalent but also trivalent form. These results are compared with a set of data from serpentinized ultramafics sampled from the ocean floors, as well as from various other ophiolites. We suggest that serpentinization at Pindos occurred at relatively low-temperature (less than 200 °C), therefore not at a ridge environment. In addition, we stress that the presence of trivalent iron in serpentine indicates that serpentinization may remain a producer of hydrogen even when very little magnetite is formed.

  2. Petrological Geodynamics of Mantle Melting II. AlphaMELTS + Multiphase Flow: Dynamic Fractional Melting

    Tirone, Massimiliano

    2018-03-01

    In this second installment of a series that aims to investigate the dynamic interaction between the composition and abundance of the solid mantle and its melt products, the classic interpretation of fractional melting is extended to account for the dynamic nature of the process. A multiphase numerical flow model is coupled with the program AlphaMELTS, which provides at the moment possibly the most accurate petrological description of melting based on thermodynamic principles. The conceptual idea of this study is based on a description of the melting process taking place along a 1-D vertical ideal column where chemical equilibrium is assumed to apply in two local sub-systems separately on some spatial and temporal scale. The solid mantle belongs to a local sub-system (ss1) that does not interact chemically with the melt reservoir which forms a second sub-system (ss2). The local melt products are transferred in the melt sub-system ss2 where the melt phase eventually can also crystallize into a different solid assemblage and will evolve dynamically. The main difference with the usual interpretation of fractional melting is that melt is not arbitrarily and instantaneously extracted from the mantle, but instead remains a dynamic component of the model, hence the process is named dynamic fractional melting (DFM). Some of the conditions that may affect the DFM model are investigated in this study, in particular the effect of temperature, mantle velocity at the boundary of the mantle column. A comparison is made with the dynamic equilibrium melting (DEM) model discussed in the first installment. The implications of assuming passive flow or active flow are also considered to some extent. Complete data files of most of the DFM simulations, four animations and two new DEM simulations (passive/active flow) are available following the instructions in the supplementary material.

  3. Petrology And Geochemistry Of Barite Mineralisation Around Azara North Central Nigeria

    Tanko

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The Azara barite deposits formed parts of Middle Benue Trough which is located in an elongated rift or faulted-bounded mega structural depression trending NE-SW to a length of over 1000 km and a width of 100 km.Petrological and geochemical investigations of Azrara barite deposits were carried out. Eight 8 selected samples of barites were collected from the veins four from known veins V1V3V17 and V 18 and four from new veins VAVBVCand VD werecarried out with the aim of determining their mineralisation potentials using petrographic studies and gravimetric method of analyses. The Petrographic studies of some of the thin section of the samples conducted using a polarizing microscope to determine the contents distributions and textures of the various veins Table 1. The weight percentage composition of barite in the samples are V1 86.39 VC82.61 V1881.48 V3 81.17 V17 79.82 VA78.94 VB76.82 and VD 70.55 respectively. It is deduced from this work that the chemical weathering of the carbonates resulted in two distinct types of barites Barite associated with mainly quartz SiO2 and limonite FeOOH.nH2O as major gangue and barite with siderite Ferrous Carbonate with high amount of Mg ankerite Ca Fe Mg CO3 and Calcite CaCO3. The outcomes were compared with the barite specification of Weigal1937 of 95.00 and were found to be good for making drilling mud for use in the oil industry paints and other chemicals

  4. Brazilian Healthcare Professionals: A Study of Attitudes Toward Organ Donation.

    Araujo, C; Siqueira, M

    2016-12-01

    Healthcare professionals have a crucial role in organ donation and transplantation processes. Their attitude toward organ donation can affect public opinion and the donation decision made by deceased donors' relatives. The objectives of the study were to analyze the attitude of medical and nursing personnel toward deceased organ donation in two hospitals in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and the factors that can affect this attitude. A random sample (n = 162) was selected from the population of nurses and physicians in the hospitals analyzed. The sample was stratified by age, sex, marital status, religion, professional category, and educational level. A validated questionnaire addressing psychosocial aspects of organ donation was used to evaluate attitudes. The χ 2 and Mann-Whitney U tests were applied for statistical analysis. Of personnel surveyed, 86.4% (n = 140) were in favor of deceased organ donation, whereas 11.1% (n = 18) were not sure and 2.5% (n = 4) were against. The favorable attitude was related to the following aspects: (1) educational level, (2) having spoken with family members about organ donation, (3) having a chronic disease, (4) favorable attitude of one's family, (5) belief that organ donation can save lives, (6) concerns about body manipulation, illegal trade of organs, and organ donation being against God's will, (7) feeling proud of working with organ donation/transplantation, (8) self-assessment of experience and knowledge in organ donation/transplantation activities (P organ donation is well accepted among the healthcare professionals surveyed, and the attitude is affected by socio-personal variables. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Geological and petrological considerations relevant to the disposal of radioactive wastes by hydraulic fracturing: an example at the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Haase, C.S.

    1982-01-01

    At Oak Ridge National Laboratory the Pumpkin Valley Shale is used as a host formation for hydraulic-fracturing waste disposal. Determination of the relationships between the distribution of different lithologies and porosity-permeability trends within this host formation allows these properties, important to hydraulic-fracturing operations, to be related to measurable and mappable geological and petrological parameters. It also permits extrapolation of such patterns to little-studied portions of the Pumpkin Valley Shale. Such knowledge better allows for the satisfactory operation and assessment of the hydraulic fracturing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  6. Geological and petrological considerations relevant to the disposal of radioactive wastes by hydraulic fracturing: an example at the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Haase, C.S.

    1983-01-01

    At Oak Ridge National Laboratory the Pumpkin Valley Shale is used as a host formation for hydraulic fracturing waste disposal. Determination of the relationships between the distribution of different lithologies and porosity-permeability trends within this host formation allows these properties, important to hydraulic fracturing operations, to be related to measurable and mappable geological and petrological parameters. It also permits extrapolation of such patterns to little-studied portions of the Pumpkin Valley Shale. Such knowledge better allows for the satisfactory operation and assessment of the hydraulic fracturing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  7. Coupled petrological-geodynamical modeling of a compositionally heterogeneous mantle plume

    Rummel, Lisa; Kaus, Boris J. P.; White, Richard W.; Mertz, Dieter F.; Yang, Jianfeng; Baumann, Tobias S.

    2018-01-01

    Self-consistent geodynamic modeling that includes melting is challenging as the chemistry of the source rocks continuously changes as a result of melt extraction. Here, we describe a new method to study the interaction between physical and chemical processes in an uprising heterogeneous mantle plume by combining a geodynamic code with a thermodynamic modeling approach for magma generation and evolution. We pre-computed hundreds of phase diagrams, each of them for a different chemical system. After melt is extracted, the phase diagram with the closest bulk rock chemistry to the depleted source rock is updated locally. The petrological evolution of rocks is tracked via evolving chemical compositions of source rocks and extracted melts using twelve oxide compositional parameters. As a result, a wide variety of newly generated magmatic rocks can in principle be produced from mantle rocks with different degrees of depletion. The results show that a variable geothermal gradient, the amount of extracted melt and plume excess temperature affect the magma production and chemistry by influencing decompression melting and the depletion of rocks. Decompression melting is facilitated by a shallower lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary and an increase in the amount of extracted magma is induced by a lower critical melt fraction for melt extraction and/or higher plume temperatures. Increasing critical melt fractions activates the extraction of melts triggered by decompression at a later stage and slows down the depletion process from the metasomatized mantle. Melt compositional trends are used to determine melting related processes by focusing on K2O/Na2O ratio as indicator for the rock type that has been molten. Thus, a step-like-profile in K2O/Na2O might be explained by a transition between melting metasomatized and pyrolitic mantle components reproducible through numerical modeling of a heterogeneous asthenospheric mantle source. A potential application of the developed method

  8. Study of organic waste for production of hydrogen in reactor

    Guzmán Chinea, Jesús Manuel; Guzmán Marrero, Elizabeth; Pérez Ponce, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Biological processes have long been used for the treatment of organic waste makes, especially our study is based on the anaerobic process in reactors, using residual organic industry. Without excluding other non-industrial we have studied. Fundamental objectives treating organic waste is to reduce the pollutant load to the environment, another aim is to recover the waste recovering the energy contained in it. In this context, the biological hydrogen production from organic waste is an interesting alternative because it has low operating costs and raw material is being used as a residue in any way should be treated before final disposal. Hydrogen can be produced sustainable by anaerobic bacteria that grow in the dark with rich carbohydrate substrates giving as final products H 2 , CO 2 and volatile fatty acids. The whey byproduct from cheese production, has great potential to be used for the generation of hydrogen as it has a high carbohydrate content and a high organic load. The main advantages of using anaerobic processes in biological treatment of organic waste, are the low operating costs, low power consumption, the ability to degrade high organic loads, resistance biomass to stay long in the absence of substrate, without lose their metabolic activity, and low nutritional requirements and increase the performance of 0.9 mol H2 / mol lactose. (full text)Biological processes have long been used for the treatment of organic waste makes, especially our study is based on the anaerobic process in reactors, using residual organic industry. Without excluding other non-industrial we have studied. Fundamental objectives treating organic waste is to reduce the pollutant load to the environment, another aim is to recover the waste recovering the energy contained in it. In this context, the biological hydrogen production from organic waste is an interesting alternative because it has low operating costs and raw material is being used as a residue in any way should be treated

  9. STUDY REGARDING CONSUMPTION OF ORGANIC PRODUCTS IN ROMANIA

    Toma Adrian DINU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The recent statistical data and market studies have shown that the organic products market is on a continuouslyupward trend in Europe and globally. For Romania, organic agriculture represents a market niche that is stillinsufficiently exploited, with a definite and real development potential of the agricultural sector. The role of theconsumer is decisive for the evolution trends and future prospects of any market. A questionnaire based quantitativeresearch was done to find out the Romanian consumers’ behaviour related to organic products, which allowed theestablishment of the weight of organic products consumers within the population interviewed, the extent to whichthe characteristics of organic products, brands and categories known and consumed are acknowledged. The studyalso pursued the evaluation of motivational factors which determine the purchase, market appraisal between thealleged favourable attitude towards organic products and product consumption, the evaluation of the way in whichthe Romanian organic products’ quality is perceived in relation with their price.The study shows an increase in consumer interest for “healthy” products, so that the change according to theirbehaviour shall generate an increase in the organic products market in Romania.

  10. Controlled experimental soil organic matter modification for study of organic pollutant interactions in soil

    Ahmed, Ashour A.; Kühn, Oliver; Leinweber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Interactions of organic pollutants with soil organic matter can be studied by adsorption of the pollutants on well-characterized soil samples with constant mineralogy but different organic matter compositions. Therefore, the objectives of the current study are establishing a set of different, well-characterized soil samples by systematic modifications of their organic matter content and molecular composition and prove these modifications by advanced complementary analytical techniques. Modifications were done by off-line pyrolysis and removal/addition of hot-water extracted organic fraction (HWE) from/to the original soil sample. Both pyrolysis-field ionization mass spectrometry (Py-FIMS) and synchrotron-based C- and N- X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy (XANES) were applied to investigate the composition of the soil organic matter. These complementary analytical methods in addition to elemental analysis agreed in showing the following order of organic matter contents: pyrolyzed soil < soil residue < original soil < soil + 3 HWE < soil + 6 HWE < HWE. The addition of HWE to the soil sample increases the relative proportions of carbohydrates, N-containing heterocyclic compounds and peptides, and decreases the relative proportions of phenols, lignin monomers and dimers, and lipids. The most abundant organic compound classes in the pyrolyzed sample are aromatics, aliphatic nitriles, aldehydes, five- and six-membered N-containing heterocyclic compounds, and aliphatic carboxylic acids. It can be expected that removal or addition of HWE, that mimic biomass inputs to soil or soil amendments, change the binding capacity for organic pollutants less intensively than heat impact, e.g. from vegetation burning. It will be possible to interpret kinetic data on the pollutants adsorption by these original and modified soil samples on the basis of the bond- and element-specific speciation data through C-XANES and N-XANES and the molecular-level characterization

  11. Artificial neural network study on organ-targeting peptides

    Jung, Eunkyoung; Kim, Junhyoung; Choi, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Minkyoung; Rhee, Hokyoung; Shin, Jae-Min; Choi, Kihang; Kang, Sang-Kee; Lee, Nam Kyung; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Jung, Dong Hyun

    2010-01-01

    We report a new approach to studying organ targeting of peptides on the basis of peptide sequence information. The positive control data sets consist of organ-targeting peptide sequences identified by the peroral phage-display technique for four organs, and the negative control data are prepared from random sequences. The capacity of our models to make appropriate predictions is validated by statistical indicators including sensitivity, specificity, enrichment curve, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (the ROC score). VHSE descriptor produces statistically significant training models and the models with simple neural network architectures show slightly greater predictive power than those with complex ones. The training and test set statistics indicate that our models could discriminate between organ-targeting and random sequences. We anticipate that our models will be applicable to the selection of organ-targeting peptides for generating peptide drugs or peptidomimetics.

  12. A Case Study in Organizing for Livable and Sustainable Communities

    Jerry Marx

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Citizens in the U.S. are making organized efforts to demand a new approach to planning urban communities, one that results in more sustainable and livable communities. The profession of social work in the U.S. once had a primary role in organizing urban residents to advocate for healthier environments in their neighborhoods. Yet, recent research documents the diminishing emphasis on community organization as an intervention method in social work. This paper offers a descriptive case study of a successful community organizing effort to promote a more livable city in Portland, Maine (USA. Data was collected by the authors using in-depth personal interviews; archival records (census data, architect models; documents (e-mails, newspaper clippings as well as direct observation of the impacted community and development site. Implications for social work practitioners and educators involved in community organization promoting healthy communities are presented.

  13. A study of organic working fluids of an organic Rankine cycle for solar concentrating power plant

    Saifaoui, D.; Elmaanaoui, Y.; Faik, A.

    2014-01-01

    This work is a comparative study between four different configurations of an organic Rankine cycle (ORC) in order to find the configuration that gives the best performances. This study also made a comparison between seven organic fluids used as working fluids in the four ORC configurations. These fluids are all hydrocarbons. Then we made a parametric analysis of the results obtained in this first part. In a second part, we developed the binary mixtures of the seven pure hydrocarbons with the NIST software REFPROP 9 and we used them in our four ORC configurations. The obtained results are given and discussed. (author)

  14. Electronic properties of metal-organic and organic-organic interfaces studied by photoemission and photoabsorption spectroscopy

    Molodtsova, Olga

    2006-07-01

    In this work systematic studies of the organic semiconductor CuPc have been presented. In general the investigation can be devided in three parts. In the first one we have studied the electronic structure of clean CuPc thin film. The next two parts are devoted to organic-organic and metal-organic interface formation, where one of the interface components is CuPc thin film. The main results of this thesis are: - The electronic structure of the pristine organic semiconductor CuPc has been obtained by a combination of conventional and resonant photoemission, near-edge X-ray absorption, as well as by theoretical ab initio quantum-chemical calculations. The contributions of different atomic species as well as sites of the CuPc molecule to the electronic DOS has been established. A combined experimental and theoretical study of the unoccupied electronic density of states of CuPc was presented. - The electronic properties of the organic heterointerfaces between fullerite and pristine copper phthalocyanine were studied. Both interfaces, CuPc/C{sub 60} and C{sub 60}/CuPc, were found to be non-reactive with pronounced shifts of the vacuum level pointing to the formation of an interfacial dipole mainly at the CuPc side of the heterojunctions. The dipole values are close to the difference of the work functions of the two materials. Important interface parameters and hole-injection barriers were obtained. The sequence of deposition does not influence the electronic properties of the interfaces. - CuPc doped with potassium was studied by means of photoemission and photoabsorption spectroscopy. A detailed analysis of the core-level PE spectra allows one to propose possible lattice sites, which harbor the potassium ions. The films prepared in this thesis showed no finite electronic density of states at the Fermi level. - Two stages of the In/CuPc interface formation have been distinguished. The low-coverage stage is characterized by a strong diffusion of the In atoms into the

  15. Mineralogy, petrology and whole-rock chemistry data compilation for selected samples of Yucca Mountain tuffs

    Connolly, J.R.

    1991-12-01

    Petrologic, bulk chemical, and mineralogic data are presented for 49 samples of tuffaceous rocks from core holes USW G-1 and UE-25a number-sign 1 at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Included, in descending stratigraphic order, are 11 samples from the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff, 12 samples from the Tuffaceous Beds of Calico Hills, 3 samples from the Prow Pass Member of the Crater Flat Tuff, 20 samples from the Bullfrog Member of the Crater Flat Tuff and 3 samples from the Tram Member of the Crater Flat Tuff. The suite of samples contains a wide variety of petrologic types, including zeolitized, glassy, and devitrified tuffs. Data vary considerably between groups of samples, and include thin section descriptions (some with modal analyses for which uncertainties are estimated), electron microprobe analyses of mineral phases and matrix, mineral identifications by X-ray diffraction, and major element analyses with uncertainty estimates

  16. Investigating combined influence of petrology and technological parameters on strength of porous coke body

    Dinel' t, V.M.; Shkoller, M.B.; Stankevich, A.S.; Korchuganova, G.S.

    1983-09-01

    The VUKhIN branch in Kuznetsk investigated effects of coal petrology and coking conditions on structural strength of coke in blast furnaces. Structural strength of coke produced from black coal from the Kuzbass as well as structural strength of coke partially gasified by carbon dioxide under conditions similar to those in blast furnaces was investigated. Fourteen samples of coal mixtures from the Kuzbass were used. Regression analysis was applied. Equations for forecasting coke properties on the basis of coal petrology and selected parameters characterizing coking were derived. Analyses showed that coke structural strength was decisively influenced by coefficients which characterized the average reflectivity of vitrinite in a coal mixture and its average density. After partial coke gasification by carbon dioxide effects of coefficients which characterized coal mixture nonhomogeneity (fluctuations of vitrinite reflectivity) and coal mixture density increased. Increasing coal density partially compensated negative effects of fluctuations of vitrinite reflectivity on coke structural strength. (10 refs.) (In Russian)

  17. PETRO.CALC.PLOT, Microsoft Excel macros to aid petrologic interpretation

    Sidder, G.B.

    1994-01-01

    PETRO.CALC.PLOT is a package of macros which normalizes whole-rock oxide data to 100%, calculates the cation percentages and molecular proportions used for normative mineral calculations, computes the apices for ternary diagrams, determines sums and ratios of specific elements of petrologic interest, and plots 33 X-Y graphs and five ternary diagrams. PETRO.CALC.PLOT also may be used to create other diagrams as desired by the user. The macros run in Microsoft Excel 3.0 and 4.0 for Macintosh computers and in Microsoft Excel 3.0 and 4.0 for Windows. Macros provided in PETRO.CALC.PLOT minimize repetition and time required to recalculate and plot whole-rock oxide data for petrologic analysis. ?? 1994.

  18. Organic Contamination Baseline Study on NASA JSC Astromaterial Curation Gloveboxes

    Calaway, Michael J.; Allton, J. H.; Allen, C. C.; Burkett, P. J.

    2013-01-01

    Future planned sample return missions to carbon-rich asteroids and Mars in the next two decades will require strict handling and curation protocols as well as new procedures for reducing organic contamination. After the Apollo program, astromaterial collections have mainly been concerned with inorganic contamination [1-4]. However, future isolation containment systems for astromaterials, possibly nitrogen enriched gloveboxes, must be able to reduce organic and inorganic cross-contamination. In 2012, a baseline study was orchestrated to establish the current state of organic cleanliness in gloveboxes used by NASA JSC astromaterials curation labs that could be used as a benchmark for future mission designs.

  19. Petrological and geochemical characteristics of Shuixigou group in Yili basin

    Wang Jinping; Min Maozhong

    2003-01-01

    The Shuixigou Group, Lower-Middle Jurassic is the uranium-hosting formation of in-situ leachable sandstone-type uranium deposits in Yili basin. Rocks of the Shuixigou Group were extensively corroded during the diagenesis by the CO 2 -and organic acid-rich water derived from the organic matter existing in the strata. As a result, sandstones became loose and porous. Data of geochemical background such as uranium, organic carbon and major element contents in this paper are the achievement of authors. The results indicate that the distribution of uranium, organic matter and major elements is closely associated with the formation of epigenetic interlayer oxidation zone sandstone-type uranium deposits, and with the discrimination of ore-hosting and barren interlayer oxidation zones

  20. Sedimentary Petrology: from Sorby to the globalization of Sedimentary Geology; La Petrologia Sedimentaria: desde Sorby a la globalizacion de la Geologia Sedimentaria

    Alonso-Zarza, A M

    2013-02-01

    We describe here the most important milestones and contributions to Sedimentary Petrology compared to other geological disciplines. We define the main aim of our study and the scientific and economic interests involved in Sedimentary Petrology. The body of the paper focuses upon the historical development of this discipline from Henry Sorby's initial work until the present day. The major milestones in its history include: 1) initial descriptive works; 2) experimental studies; 3) the establishment of the different classifications of sedimentary rocks; 4) studies into facies and sedimentary environments; 5) advances in the study of diagenetic processes and their role in hydrocarbon prospection; and 6) the development of Sedimentary Geochemistry. Relationships and coincidences with Sedimentology are discussed. We go on to look at the advances that have taken place over the last 30 years, in which the study of sedimentary rocks is necessarily included in the wider field of Sedimentary Geology as a logical result of the proposal of global models of a changing Earth in which Sedimentary Geology plays a significant part. Finally we mention the notable contributions of Spanish sedimentary petrologists to this whole field of science. (Author) 120 refs.

  1. Sedimentary Petrology: from Sorby to the globalization of Sedimentary Geology; La Petrologia Sedimentaria: desde Sorby a la globalizacion de la Geologia Sedimentaria

    Alonso-Zarza, A. M.

    2013-02-01

    We describe here the most important milestones and contributions to Sedimentary Petrology compared to other geological disciplines. We define the main aim of our study and the scientific and economic interests involved in Sedimentary Petrology. The body of the paper focuses upon the historical development of this discipline from Henry Sorby's initial work until the present day. The major milestones in its history include: 1) initial descriptive works; 2) experimental studies; 3) the establishment of the different classifications of sedimentary rocks; 4) studies into facies and sedimentary environments; 5) advances in the study of diagenetic processes and their role in hydrocarbon prospection; and 6) the development of Sedimentary Geochemistry. Relationships and coincidences with Sedimentology are discussed. We go on to look at the advances that have taken place over the last 30 years, in which the study of sedimentary rocks is necessarily included in the wider field of Sedimentary Geology as a logical result of the proposal of global models of a changing Earth in which Sedimentary Geology plays a significant part. Finally we mention the notable contributions of Spanish sedimentary petrologists to this whole field of science. (Author) 120 refs.

  2. Separation of organic ion exchange resins from sludge - engineering study

    Duncan, J.B.

    1998-01-01

    This engineering study evaluates the use of physical separation technologies to separate organic ion exchange resin from KE Basin sludge prior to nitric acid dissolution. This separation is necessitate to prevent nitration of the organics in the acid dissolver. The technologies under consideration are: screening, sedimentation, elutriation. The recommended approach is to first screen the Sludge and resin 300 microns then subject the 300 microns plus material to elutriation

  3. Separation of organic ion exchange resins from sludge -- engineering study

    Duncan, J.B.

    1998-08-25

    This engineering study evaluates the use of physical separation technologies to separate organic ion exchange resin from KE Basin sludge prior to nitric acid dissolution. This separation is necessitate to prevent nitration of the organics in the acid dissolver. The technologies under consideration are: screening, sedimentation, elutriation. The recommended approach is to first screen the Sludge and resin 300 microns then subject the 300 microns plus material to elutriation.

  4. Contribution to the study of radioactivity in marine organisms

    Santos Gouvea, R. de C. dos; Santos, P.L. dos

    1986-01-01

    The bioaccumulation of natural radionuclides in marine organisms along the Rio de Janeiro coast was studied. Significant levels of 210 Po were found in the edible bivalve Perna perna linnaeus, 1758. The level of 210 Po in the soft tissue of bivalves collected along the Ponta Negra rock there was three times higher than that of similar organisms collected near Boa Viagem. (M.A.C.) [pt

  5. Apollo 12 feldspathic basalts 12031, 12038, and 12072; petrology, comparison and interpretations

    Beaty, E.W.; Hill, S.M.R.; Albee, A.L.; Baldridge, W.S.

    1979-01-01

    Modal and chemical data indicate that 12072, 12038, and 12031, the Apollo 12 feldspathic basalts, form a well-defined group which cannot be related to the other Apollo 12 rock types. 12072 contains phenocrysts of olivine and pigeonite and microphenocrysts of Cr-spinel set in a fine-grained, variolitic groundmass. 12038 is a medium-grained, equigranular basalt with a texture indicating it was multiply saturated. 12031 is a coarse-grained rock with granular to graphic intergrowths of pyroxene and plagioclase; it was also multiply saturated. Petrologic observations, as well as the bulk chemistry, are consistent with the interpretation that 12031 could be derived from 12072 through fractionation of Cr-spinel, olivine, and pigeonite, the observed phenocryst assemblage. 12038, however, contains more pigeonite, less olivine, three times as much Ca-phosphate minerals, one-fifth as much troilite, and much more sodic plagioclase than 12072. These differences indicate that 12038 must have come from a separate igneous body. Consideration of the bulk compositions indicates that neither 12072 and 12031 nor 12038 could have been derived from the Apollo 12 olivine, pigeonite, or ilmenite basalts by crystal--liquid fractionation. The general petrologic similarities between 12072, 12031, and the other Apollo 12 basalts suggests that they were produced in either the same or similar source regions. 12038, however, is petrologically and chemically unique, and is probably exotic to the Apollo 12 landing site

  6. Political Ideology: A Comparative Study of Three Chicano Youth Organizations.

    Garcia, Richard A.

    The study investigated the political ideology of three Chicano youth groups in El Paso, Texas: Mexican American Youth Association (MAYA), Mexican American Political Association (MAPA), and the Alianza. Purpose of the study was to identify and compare the political ideas and attitudes of the three organizations. Questionnaires were administered to…

  7. a Study of the Origin of Atmospheric Organic Aerosols

    Hildemann, Lynn Mary

    1990-01-01

    The sources of ambient organic particulate matter in urban areas are investigated through a program of emission source measurements, atmospheric measurements, and mathematical modeling of source/receptor relationships. A dilution sampler intended to collect fine organic aerosol from combustion sources is designed to simulate atmospheric cooling and dilution processes, so that organic vapors which condense under ambient conditions will be collected as particulate matter. This system is used to measure the emissions from a boiler burning distillate oil, a home fireplace, catalyst and noncatalyst automobiles, heavy-duty diesel trucks, natural gas home appliances, and meat cooking operations. Alternate techniques are used to sample the particulate matter emitted from cigarette smoking, a roofing tar pot, paved road dust, brake lining wear, tire wear, and vegetative detritus. The bulk chemical characteristics of the fine aerosol fraction are presented for each source. Over half of the fine aerosol mass emitted from automobiles, wood burning, meat cooking, home appliances, cigarettes, and tar pots is shown to consist of organic compounds. The organic material collected from these sources is analyzed using high-resolution gas chromatography. Using a simple analytical protocol, a quantitative, 50-parameter characterization of the elutable fine organic aerosol emitted from each source type is obtained, which proves to be a unique fingerprint that can be used to distinguish most sources from each other. A mathematical model is used to predict the characteristics of fine ambient organic aerosol in the Los Angeles area that would prevail if the primary organic emissions are transported without chemical reaction. The model is found to track the seasonal variations observed in the ambient aerosol at the three sites studied. Emissions from vehicles and fireplaces are identified as significant sources of solvent-extractable organic aerosol. Differences between the model

  8. Cosorption study of organic pollutants and dissolved organic matter in a soil

    Flores-Cespedes, F. [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Almeria, La Canada de San Urbano s/n, 04120 Almeria (Spain); Fernandez-Perez, M. [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Almeria, La Canada de San Urbano s/n, 04120 Almeria (Spain)]. E-mail: mfernand@ual.es; Villafranca-Sanchez, M. [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Almeria, La Canada de San Urbano s/n, 04120 Almeria (Spain); Gonzalez-Pradas, E. [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Almeria, La Canada de San Urbano s/n, 04120 Almeria (Spain)

    2006-08-15

    In this study we have evaluated the effects of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on sorption of imidacloprid, 3,4-dichloroaniline (3,4-DCA) and 4-bromoaniline (4-BA) on a typical calcareous soil (Luvic Xerosol) from south-eastern Spain. Two different types of DOM were used, that is to say, dissolved natural organic matter extracts from a commercial peat (DNOM) and a high-purity tannic acid (TA) solution. The experiments were carried out in a 0.01 M CaCl{sub 2} aqueous medium at 25 deg. C. The results indicated that the presence of both DNOM and TA, over a concentration range of 15-100 mg L{sup -1}, produced an increase in the amount of 3,4-DCA and 4-BA sorbed and a decrease in the amount of imidacloprid retained on the soil studied. A modified distribution coefficient, K {sub doc}, has been proposed as a safer parameter for soil sorption predictions of organic pollutants and it could be of help to model the fate of these in the environment. - Cosorption of organic pollutants and DOM.

  9. Cosorption study of organic pollutants and dissolved organic matter in a soil

    Flores-Cespedes, F.; Fernandez-Perez, M.; Villafranca-Sanchez, M.; Gonzalez-Pradas, E.

    2006-01-01

    In this study we have evaluated the effects of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on sorption of imidacloprid, 3,4-dichloroaniline (3,4-DCA) and 4-bromoaniline (4-BA) on a typical calcareous soil (Luvic Xerosol) from south-eastern Spain. Two different types of DOM were used, that is to say, dissolved natural organic matter extracts from a commercial peat (DNOM) and a high-purity tannic acid (TA) solution. The experiments were carried out in a 0.01 M CaCl 2 aqueous medium at 25 deg. C. The results indicated that the presence of both DNOM and TA, over a concentration range of 15-100 mg L -1 , produced an increase in the amount of 3,4-DCA and 4-BA sorbed and a decrease in the amount of imidacloprid retained on the soil studied. A modified distribution coefficient, K doc , has been proposed as a safer parameter for soil sorption predictions of organic pollutants and it could be of help to model the fate of these in the environment. - Cosorption of organic pollutants and DOM

  10. Exploring Chondrule and CAI Rims Using Micro- and Nano-Scale Petrological and Compositional Analysis

    Cartwright, J. A.; Perez-Huerta, A.; Leitner, J.; Vollmer, C.

    2017-12-01

    As the major components within chondrites, chondrules (mm-sized droplets of quenched silicate melt) and calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAI, refractory) represent the most abundant and the earliest materials that solidified from the solar nebula. However, the exact formation mechanisms of these clasts, and whether these processes are related, remains unconstrained, despite extensive petrological and compositional study. By taking advantage of recent advances in nano-scale tomographical techniques, we have undertaken a combined micro- and nano-scale study of CAI and chondrule rim morphologies, to investigate their formation mechanisms. The target lithologies for this research are Wark-Lovering rims (WLR), and fine-grained rims (FGR) around CAIs and chondrules respectively, present within many chondrites. The FGRs, which are up to 100 µm thick, are of particular interest as recent studies have identified presolar grains within them. These grains predate the formation of our Solar System, suggesting FGR formation under nebular conditions. By contrast, WLRs are 10-20 µm thick, made of different compositional layers, and likely formed by flash-heating shortly after CAI formation, thus recording nebular conditions. A detailed multi-scale study of these respective rims will enable us to better understand their formation histories and determine the potential for commonality between these two phases, despite reports of an observed formation age difference of up to 2-3 Myr. We are using a combination of complimentary techniques on our selected target areas: 1) Micro-scale characterization using standard microscopic and compositional techniques (SEM-EBSD, EMPA); 2) Nano-scale characterization of structures using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and elemental, isotopic and tomographic analysis with NanoSIMS and atom probe tomography (APT). Preliminary nano-scale APT analysis of FGR morphologies within the Allende carbonaceous chondrite has successfully discerned

  11. Petrology, Geochemistry and Tectonomagmatic Setting of Farmahin Volcanic Rocks (North of Arak

    Reza Zarei Sahamieh

    2018-04-01

    fractional crystallization (AFC were the dominant processes in the genesis of the studied volcanic rocks. As a conclusion and according to field evidence and geochemical characteristics presented in this article, the studied area is composed of lava flows and pyroclastic rocks such as andesite, dacite, rhyodacite, ignimbrite, tuff and tuffits that cross cut by younger dykes and belong to the middle to late Eocene age (middle to upper Lutetien. According to Sm/Yb vs. Sm diagram (Aldanmaz et al., 2000, all the studied samples in terms of composition are similar to enriched mantle-derived melts that are generated by varying degrees of partial melting (10% - 20% from a spinel lherzolite to spinel-garnet lherzolite source. Considering the evidences, all rocks in the studied area belong to the subduction zone and the parent magma originated from mantle and was contaminated with continental crust during eruption and rising. Acknowledgments The authors wish to thank the Journal Manager and reviewers who critically reviewed the manuscript and made valuable suggestions for its improvement. References Aldanmaz, E., Pearce, J.A., Thirlwall, M.F. and Mitchell, J.G., 2000. Petrogenetic evolution of late Cenozoic, post-collision volcanism in western Anatolia, Turkey. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 102(1–2: 67–95. Ghasemi, A. and Talbot, C.J., 2006. A new scenario for the Sanandaj-Sirjan zone (Iran. Journal of Asian Earth Sciences, 26 (6: 683–693. Hajian, J., 1970. Geological map of Farmahin, scale1:100000. Geological Survey of Iran. Irvine, T.N. and Baragar, W.R.A., 1971. A guide to the chemical classification of the common volcanic rocks. Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, 8(5: 523–548. Le Bas, M.J., Le Maitre, R.W., Streckeisen, A. and Zanettin, B., 1986. A chemical classification of volcanic rocks based on the total alkali silica diagram. Journal of Petrology, 27 (3:745–750. Morimoto, N., Fabrise, J., Ferguson, A., Ginzburg, I.V., Ross, M., Seifert, F

  12. Organics.

    Chian, Edward S. K.; DeWalle, Foppe B.

    1978-01-01

    Presents water analysis literature for 1978. This review is concerned with organics, and it covers: (1) detergents and surfactants; (2) aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons; (3) pesticides and chlorinated hydrocarbons; and (4) naturally occurring organics. A list of 208 references is also presented. (HM)

  13. Organizers.

    Callison, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on "organizers," tools or techniques that provide identification and classification along with possible relationships or connections among ideas, concepts, and issues. Discusses David Ausubel's research and ideas concerning advance organizers; the implications of Ausubel's theory to curriculum and teaching; "webbing," a…

  14. Proceedings of the Regional Colloquium on Soil Organic Matter Studies

    Cerri, C.C.; Athie, D.; Sodrzeieski, D.

    1982-01-01

    Isotope techniques are applied to soil organic matter studies, with special emphasis to decomposition studies. The effect of N fertilizers on the development of wheat and soybean crops is studied, as well as N-fixation. 14 C and 15 N are used as tracers; 13 C/ 12 C ratios are determined in humic horizons of soils. The influence of carbon sources addition on the degradation of the pesticide carbaril in soils is evaluated. (M.A.) [pt

  15. Field and Laboratory Studies of Atmospheric Organic Aerosol

    Coggon, Matthew Mitchell

    This thesis is the culmination of field and laboratory studies aimed at assessing processes that affect the composition and distribution of atmospheric organic aerosol. An emphasis is placed on measurements conducted using compact and high-resolution Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (AMS). The first three chapters summarize results from aircraft campaigns designed to evaluate anthropogenic and biogenic impacts on marine aerosol and clouds off the coast of California. Subsequent chapters describe laboratory studies intended to evaluate gas and particle-phase mechanisms of organic aerosol oxidation. The 2013 Nucleation in California Experiment (NiCE) was a campaign designed to study environments impacted by nucleated and/or freshly formed aerosol particles. Terrestrial biogenic aerosol with > 85% organic mass was observed to reside in the free troposphere above marine stratocumulus. This biogenic organic aerosol (BOA) originated from the Northwestern United States and was transported to the marine atmosphere during periodic cloud-clearing events. Spectra recorded by a cloud condensation nuclei counter demonstrated that BOA is CCN active. BOA enhancements at latitudes north of San Francisco, CA coincided with enhanced cloud water concentrations of organic species such as acetate and formate. Airborne measurements conducted during the 2011 Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment (E-PEACE) were aimed at evaluating the contribution of ship emissions to the properties of marine aerosol and clouds off the coast of central California. In one study, analysis of organic aerosol mass spectra during periods of enhanced shipping activity yielded unique tracers indicative of cloud-processed ship emissions (m/z 42 and 99). The variation of their organic fraction (f42 and f 99) was found to coincide with periods of heavy (f 42 > 0.15; f99 > 0.04), moderate (0.05 controlled organic plume emitted from the R/V Point Sur. Under sunny conditions, nucleated particles composed

  16. Love and Organization Studies: Moving beyond the Perspective of Avoidance

    S. Tasselli (Stefano)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractDespite its undoubted centrality in modern society, Love has not received the attention it deserves in the study of organizations. Among the reasons for this avoidance is the fact that love is passionate and not authoritative; personal and subjective but not public. To understand the way

  17. Cognitive organization of roadway scenes : an empirical study.

    Gundy, C.M.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes six studies investigating the cognitive organization of roadway scenes. These scenes were represented by still photographs taken on a number of roads outside of built-up areas. Seventy-eight drivers, stratified by age and sex to simulate the Dutch driving population,

  18. A Meta-Analysis of Advanced Organizer Studies.

    Stone, Carol Leth

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-nine reports yielding 112 studies were analyzed with Glass's meta-analysis technique, and results were compared with predictions from Ausubel's model of assimilative learning. Overall, advance organizers were shown to be associated with increased learning and retention of material to be learned. (Author)

  19. Architecture Alignment in a Large Government Organization: A Case Study

    Wieringa, Roelf J.; van Eck, Pascal; Blanken, Henk; Grabis, J.; Persson, A.; Stirna, J.

    In this paper we view IT architecture as the structures presentin the entire information technology support used by an organization. We report on a detailed case study of an operational IT architecture process, in which we investigated the relationship between IT architecture and business context.We

  20. The Future of the Past in Management and Organization Studies

    Wadhwani, Dan; Bucheli, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    This chapter examines the opportunities and challenges presented by the incorporation of historical research and reasoning into management and organizational studies, and argues that the value of history lies in its ability to offer unique perspectives on management, organizations, and markets......, rather than in providing a longitudinal version of social scientific explanations. Researchers interested in the use of history will need to recognize its distinct epistemic assumptions and its employment of a retrospective viewpoint to understand organizational behavior and cognition, and to understand...... Organizations in Time: History, Theory, Methods and frames them in relationship to the broad topic of historical methods in organizational research....

  1. Petrology and Geochemistry of Serpentinized Peridotites from a Bonin Fore-arc Seamount

    Tian, L.; Tuoyu, W.; Dong, Y. H.; Gao, J.; Wu, S.

    2016-12-01

    Serpentinites, which contain up to 13 wt.% of water, are an important reservoir for chemical recycling in subduction zones. During the last two decades, many observations documented the occurrence of fore-arc mantle serpentinites in different locations. Here, we present petrology and whole rock chemistry for serpentinized peridotites dredged from the Hahajima Seamount, which is located 20-60 km west of the junction of the Bonin Trench and the Mariana Trench. Combined with published geochemical data of serpentinites from the Torishima Seamount, Conical Seamount and South Chamorro Seamount in the Izu-Bonin-Mariana fore-arc region, it will allow us to better understand the average composition of serpentinized fore-arc mantle overlying the subducting slab and the role of serpentinized mantle playing in the subduction zone geochemical cycle. The studied ultramafic rocks from the Hahajima Seamount are extensively serpentinized and hydrated (73 to 83%), with loss of ignition values ranging between 13 and 15 wt.%. Our results show that the serpentinized peridotites have Mg number from 88 to 90, and the average MgO/SiO2 is 0.93. The average Al2O3 (0.48 wt.%) and CaO (0.23 wt.%) contents are very low, consistent with low clinopyroxene abundances, and the overall depleted character of the mantle harzburgite protoliths. The serpentinized peridotites from the Hahajima Seamount exhibit similar "U" shape rare earth element (REE) patterns ([La/Sm]N = 3.1-3.6), at higher overall abundances, to the Conical and South Chamorro Seamount suites. One exceptional sample shows the similar REE pattern as serpentinized peridotites from the Torishima Seamount, with depleted light REE concentration ([La/Sm]N =0.7). All the serpentinized peridotites from these four fore-arc seamounts show strong enrichment in fluid-mobile and lithophile elements (U, Pb, Sr and Li). The geochemical signature of the serpentinized peridotites from the seamounts in the Izu-Bonin-Mariana fore-arc region could be

  2. Petrology of forearc basalt-related isotropic gabbros from the Bonin Ridge, Izu-Bonin forearc

    Garcia, S. E.; Loocke, M. P.; Snow, J. E.

    2017-12-01

    The early arc volcanic rocks exposed on the Bonin Ridge (BR), a large forearc massif in the Izu-Bonin arc, have provided us with a natural laboratory for the study of subduction initiation and early arc development. The BR has been the subject of focused sampling by way of dredging, diving, and drilling (IODP EXP352) expeditions which have revealed a composite stratigraphy consisting, from bottom to top, of intercalated peridotites and gabbros, isotropic gabbros, sheeted dykes, and a lava sequence which transitions from forearc basalt (FAB) to more arc-like volcanics up section. Although little has been published regarding the moho-transition zone rocks of the BR in comparison to the volcanic rocks, even less work has been published regarding the isotropic gabbros recovered in close association with FABs. Ishizuka et al. (2011) determined that the isotropic gabbros are compositionally and temporally related to the FABs. We provide the first petrologic characterization, including petrography and electron probe microanalysis, of a suite of FAB-related gabbros recovered by dredge D42 of the 2007 R/V Hakuho Maru KH07-02 dredging cruise. Preliminary petrographic observations of the fourteen thin sections reveal that all of the samples contain variable amounts of relict orthopyroxene and consist of five disseminated oxide gabbros, 5 oxide gabbros, and 2 gabbros. We note that all of the D42 gabbros exhibit strong textural variability akin to the varitextured gabbros described in the dyke-gabbro transition of ophiolites (e.g., MacLeod and Yaouancq, 2000). Geochemical data from this critically understudied horizon have the potential to inform regarding the nature of crustal accretion during subduction initiation and the formation, migration, and evolution of FABs. Further, with many authors comparing the volcanic record and crustal stratigraphy of the BR to ophiolites (e.g., Ishizuka et al., 2014), these data would provide another in situ analogue for comparison with the

  3. Petrologic and chemical changes in ductile shear zones as a function of depth in the continental crust

    Yang, Xin-Yue

    Petrologic and geochemical changes in ductile shear zones are important for understanding deformational and geochemical processes of the continental crust. This study examines three shear zones that formed under conditions varying from lower greenschist facies to upper amphibolite facies in order to document the petrologic and geochemical changes of deformed rocks at various metamorphic grades. The studied shear zones include two greenschist facies shear zones in the southern Appalachians and an upper amphibolite facies shear zone in southern Ontario. The mylonitic gneisses and mylonites in the Roses Mill shear zone of central Virginia are derived from a ferrodiorite protolith and characterized by a lower greenschist facies mineral assemblage. Both pressure solution and recrystallization were operative deformation mechanisms during mylonitization in this shear zone. Strain-driven dissolution and solution transfer played an important role in the mobilization of felsic components (Si, Al, K, Na, and Ca). During mylonitization, 17% to 32% bulk rock volume losses of mylonites are mainly attributed to removal of these mobile felsic components by a fluid phase. Mafic components (Fe, Mg, Ti, Mn and P) and trace elements, REE, Y, V and Sc, were immobile. At Rosman, North Carolina, the Brevard shear zone (BSZ) shows a deformational transition from the coarse-grained Henderson augen gneiss (HAG) to proto-mylonite, mylonite and ultra-mylonite. The mylonites contain a retrograde mineral assemblage as a product of fluid-assisted chemical breakdown of K-feldspar and biotite at higher greenschist facies conditions. Recrystallization and intra-crystalline plastic deformation are major deformation mechanisms in the BSZ. Fluid-assisted mylonitization in the BSZ led to 6% to 23% bulk volume losses in mylonites. During mylonitization, both major felsic and mafic elements and trace elements, Rb, Sr, Zr, V, Sc, and LREE were mobile; however, the HREEs were likely immobile. A shear zone

  4. Organic tanks safety program FY95 waste aging studies

    Camaioni, D.M.; Samuels, W.D.; Clauss, S.A.; Lenihan, B.D.; Wahl, K.L.; Campbell, J.A.; Shaw, W.J.

    1995-09-01

    This report gives the second year's findings of a study of how thermal and radiological processes may change the composition of organic compounds in the underground tanks at Hanford. Efforts were focused on the global reaction kinetics in a simulated waste exposed to γ rays and the reactions of organic radicals with nitrite ion. The gas production is predominantly radiolytic. Decarboxylation of carboxylates is probably an aging pathway. TBP was totaly consumed in almost every run. Radiation clearly accelerated consumption of the other compounds. EDTA is more reactive than citrate. Oximes and possibly organic nitro compounds are key intermediates in the radiolytic redox reactions of organic compounds with nitrate/nitrite. Observations are consistent with organic compounds being progressively degraded to compounds with greater numbers of C-O bonds and fewer C-H and C-C bonds, resulting in an overall lower energy content. If the radwaste tanks are adequately ventilated and continually dosed by radioactivity, their total energy content should have declined. Level of risk depends on how rapidly carboxylate salts of moderate energy content (including EDTA fragments) degrade to low energy oxalate and formate

  5. The role of amphibole in Merapi arc magma petrogenesis: insights from petrology and geochemistry of lava hosted xenoliths and xenocrysts

    Chadwick, J. P.; Troll, V. R.; Schulz, B.; Dallai, L.; Freda, C.; Schwarzkopf, L. M.; Annersten, H.; Skogby, H.

    2010-05-01

    Recently, increasing attention has been paid to the role of amphibole in the differentiation of arc magmas. The geochemical composition of these magmas suggests that deep to mid crustal fractionation of amphibole has occurred. However, this phase is typically an infrequent modal phenocryst phase in subduction zone eruptive deposits(1). Nevertheless, erupted material only represents a portion of the magmatism produced in subduction zone settings, with many opportunities for melts to stall on route to the surface. This discrepancy between whole rock geochemistry and petrological interpretation of arc magmas has lead many scientists to postulate that, at mid to deep crustal levels, there may be significant volumes of amphibole bearing lithologies. Amphibole instability at shallow levels can also contribute to its scarcity in eruptive deposits. This argument is strengthened by field and petrological evidence, including the widespread occurrence of amphibole-rich intrusive rocks in exhumed orogenicbelts formed during subduction zone activity, e.g. the Adamello batholith (2),as well as the presence of amphibole-rich xenoliths and xenocrysts preserved in arc lavas worldwide, e.g. in Indonesia, Antilles, and Central America. Thus, amphibole appears to play an integral role in subduction zone magmatism and identifying and constraining this role is central to understanding arc magma petrogenisis. Amphibole-rich melts or bodies in the deep to mid crust could be a significant hydrous reservoir for intra-crustal melts and fluids (1). In this preliminary study, we have carried out petrological and geochemical analyses of recent basaltic andesite and amphibole bearing crystalline igneous inclusions and xenocrysts from Merapi volcano in Java, Indonesia. The basaltic andesite geochemistry is consistent with amphibole fractionation and the crystalline inclusions are cogenetic to the Merapi magmatic system. These inclusions are likely to represent fractionation residues reflecting

  6. Cosorption study of organic pollutants and dissolved organic matter in a soil.

    Flores-Céspedes, F; Fernández-Pérez, M; Villafranca-Sánchez, M; González-Pradas, E

    2006-08-01

    In this study we have evaluated the effects of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on sorption of imidacloprid, 3,4-dichloroaniline (3,4-DCA) and 4-bromoaniline (4-BA) on a typical calcareous soil (Luvic Xerosol) from south-eastern Spain. Two different types of DOM were used, that is to say, dissolved natural organic matter extracts from a commercial peat (DNOM) and a high-purity tannic acid (TA) solution. The experiments were carried out in a 0.01 M CaCl2 aqueous medium at 25 degrees C. The results indicated that the presence of both DNOM and TA, over a concentration range of 15-100 mg L(-1), produced an increase in the amount of 3,4-DCA and 4-BA sorbed and a decrease in the amount of imidacloprid retained on the soil studied. A modified distribution coefficient, K(doc), has been proposed as a safer parameter for soil sorption predictions of organic pollutants and it could be of help to model the fate of these in the environment.

  7. Petrography and petrology of Quaternary volcanic rocks from Ghezel Ghaleh, northwest Qorveh

    Alireza Bajelan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In the east and northeast of Sanandaj in the Qorveh-Bijar-Takab axis, there are series of basaltic composition volcanoes with Quaternary age. The study area is part of the Sanandaj-Sirjan zone and is located between 47°52' and 47°57' E longitudes and 35°26 and '35°30' N latitudes. Due to the location of the volcanic cone on Pliocene clastic sediments and Quaternary travertine, the age of these volcanoes is considered to be Quaternary. The cones mostly consist of low scoria, ash, volcanic bombs, lapilli deposits and basaltic lava (Moein Vaziri and Aminsobhani, 1985. Petrological and geochemical studies have been carried out to evaluate Quaternary magmatism in the area and to determine the nature of the lithological characteristics, such as the evaluation of source rocks and magma type, degree of partial melting and the tectonic setting of Ghezel Ghaleh rocks (Moein Vaziri, 1997. Simplified geological map of the study area is characterized by ER-Mapper software. Materials and methods In the course of field studies in the region, 40 samples were taken, 30 thin sections were prepared and polished. XRD analyses were performed on some whole rock samples. All major, minor and trace elements were assessed by ICP-MS at Lab Weft Laboratory in Australia. Results Based on the classification of structural zones, the area is located in the Sanandaj-Sirjan zone, hundred kilometers away from the main Zagros thrust along the NW-SE direction. After early Cimmerian orogeny, andesitic volcanic activity took place (Moein Vaziri and Aminsobhani, 1985. A major secondary mineral in these rocks is iddingsite, formed by hydration and oxidation of the olivine (Shelley, 1993. According to SiO2 against Na2O + K2O (TAS diagram (Irvine and Baragar , 1971 and cationic R1 and R2 diagram (De La Roche et el., 1980, volcanic rocks of the area indicate alkaline series. Discussion To obtain more information on the tectonic setting of these rocks, the Zr/Y-Zr diagram

  8. Servant leadership in organizations : a cross-national study.

    Chin, David Teckleong

    2017-01-01

    The primary purpose of the study is to gain a clearer understanding of the phenomenon of servant leadership through the analysis of historical and contemporary empirical data. The study was prompted by recent reports of leadership practices in progressive organizations from leading economies where the traditional way of leading by command and control i.e. the authoritarian type of leadership, is giving way to a more humane and inclusive form of leadership. "Servant leadership" describes leade...

  9. Petrologic perspectives on tectonic evolution of a nascent basin (Okinawa Trough) behind Ryukyu Arc:A review

    YAN Quanshu; SHI Xuefa

    2014-01-01

    Okinawa Trough is a back-arc, initial marginal sea basin, located behind the Ryukyu Arc-Trench System. The formation and evolution of the Okinawa Trough is intimately related to the subduction process of the Philippine Sea Plate beneath the Eurasian Plate since the late Miocene. The tectonic evolution of the trough is similar to other active back-arcs, such as the Mariana Trough and southern Lau Basin, all of which are experiencing the initial rifting and subsequent spreading process. This study reviews all petrologic and geochemical data of mafic volcanic lavas from the Okinawa Trough, Ryukyu Arc, and Philippine Sea Plate, combined with geophysical data to indicate the relationship between the subduction sources (input) and arc or back-arc magmas (output) in the Philippine Sea Plate-Ryukyu Arc-Okinawa Trough system (PROS). The results obtained showed that several components were variably involved in the petrogenesis of the Oki-nawa Trough lavas:sub-continental lithospheric mantle underlying the Eurasian Plate, Indian mid-oceanic ridge basalt (MORB)-type mantle, and Pacific MORB-type mantle. The addition of shallow aqueous fluids and deep hydrous melts from subducted components with the characteristics of Indian MORB-type mantle into the mantle source of lavas variably modifies the primitive mantle wedge beneath the Ryukyu and sub-continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) beneath the Okinawa Trough. In the northeastern end of the trough and arc, instead of Indian MORB-type mantle, Pacific MORB-type mantle dominates the magma source. Along the strike of the Ryukyu Arc and Okinawa Trough, the systematic variations in trace element ratios and isotopic compositions reflect the first-order effect of variable subduction input on the magma source. In general, petrologic data, combined with geophysical data, imply that the Okinawa Trough is experiencing the“seafloor spreading”process in the southwest segment,“rift propagation”process in the middle seg-ment, and

  10. Light Scattering Studies of Organic Field Effect Transistors

    Adil, Danish

    Organic semiconductors hold a great promise of enabling new technology based on low cost and flexible electronic devices. While much work has been done in the field of organic semiconductors, the field is still quite immature when compared to that of traditional inorganic based devices. More work is required before the full potential of organic field effect transistors (OFETs), organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), and organic photovoltaics (OPVs) is realized. Among such work, a further development of diagnostic tools that characterize charge transport and device robustness more efficiently is required. Charge transport in organic semiconductors is limited by the nature of the metal-semiconductor interfaces where charge is injected into the semiconductor film and the semiconductor-dielectric interface where the charge is accumulated and transported. This, combined with that fact that organic semiconductors are especially susceptible to having structural defects induced via oxidation, charge transport induced damage, and metallization results in a situation where a semiconductor film's ability to conduct charge can degrade over time. This degradation manifests itself in the electrical device characteristics of organic based electronic devices. OFETs, for example, may display changes in threshold voltage, lowering of charge carrier mobilities, or a decrease in the On/Off ratio. All these effects sum together to result in degradation in device performance. The work begins with a study where matrix assisted pulsed laser deposition (MAPLE), an alternative organic semiconductor thin film deposition method, is used to fabricate OFETs with improved semiconductor-dielectric interfaces. MAPLE allows for the controlled layer-by-layer growth of the semiconductor film. Devices fabricated using this technique are shown to exhibit desirable characteristics that are otherwise only achievable with additional surface treatments. MAPLE is shown to be viable alternative to other

  11. Appreciation to Organic Agriculture Function: Case Study of Rice Farming

    Tinjung Mary Prihtanti

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural activities are not only producing the visible (tangible output in the form of food but also the non-visible output (non-marketable goods/non-tangible services. Non-visible output refers to a multifunctionality to supply food to ensure the food sufficiency of farmer household and job opportunities at rural area. The article aims to compare the capability of organic rice farming to conventional, to ensure the food sufficiency of farmer household, the economic value of rice farming to produce food, and the economic estimation of rice farming to its function as an job opportunities. The data for the research is collected in Gentungan Village, Mojogedang District, Karanganyar Regency during the crop year of 2015. In order to study the differences of two rice farming systems, the total of 60 farmers, 30 farmers are dealing with organic farming and other 30 farmers from conventional farming, are subjected for the interview in this research. The results found that the food security of organic farming is higher than conventional farming. The organic rice farming gives the economic value as the food producing and the labor-absorbing function in the study area is higher than the  conventional farming.

  12. Study on the Ozonation of Organic Wastes (1)

    Kim, Ki Hong; Kang, Il Sik; Hong, Dae Seok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Ozone is often used in combination with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, UV, peroxides, and the catalyst. These combined processes have the purpose to increase OH radicals, so this combination process is called the advanced oxidation process (AOP, Advanced Oxidation Process). In this study, the possibility of the oxidation treatment of LSC Cocktail solution by using a combination of ozone and hydrogen peroxide was investigated. The addition of a suitable amount of hydrogen peroxide increases the efficiency of the oxidation process during ozonation of the organic materials. But on the contrary, the excess addition of hydrogen they can play a role as a scavenger consuming the hydroxyl radicals generated during the ozonation process. So it is very important to find the amount of volume of hydrogen peroxide. The efficiency of oxidation treatment of organic materials is greatly depended on the properties of liquid waste (pH, concentration and chemical type of organics), the process temperature, the flow rate (waste and ozone gas), the ozone concentration, the hydrogen peroxide concentration and the presence or absence of scavengers. In this study, by using an ozone contactor (hydrophobic hollow fiber membrane type), the basic experiments were carried out to evaluate the applicability of ozonation to the organic wastes. First of all, the oxidation treatment was evaluated by ozone alone, and secondly was evaluated according to the changes of the amount of hydrogen peroxide and a pH of wastes.

  13. Study on the Ozonation of Organic Wastes (1)

    Kim, Ki Hong; Kang, Il Sik; Hong, Dae Seok

    2014-01-01

    Ozone is often used in combination with H 2 O 2 , UV, peroxides, and the catalyst. These combined processes have the purpose to increase OH radicals, so this combination process is called the advanced oxidation process (AOP, Advanced Oxidation Process). In this study, the possibility of the oxidation treatment of LSC Cocktail solution by using a combination of ozone and hydrogen peroxide was investigated. The addition of a suitable amount of hydrogen peroxide increases the efficiency of the oxidation process during ozonation of the organic materials. But on the contrary, the excess addition of hydrogen they can play a role as a scavenger consuming the hydroxyl radicals generated during the ozonation process. So it is very important to find the amount of volume of hydrogen peroxide. The efficiency of oxidation treatment of organic materials is greatly depended on the properties of liquid waste (pH, concentration and chemical type of organics), the process temperature, the flow rate (waste and ozone gas), the ozone concentration, the hydrogen peroxide concentration and the presence or absence of scavengers. In this study, by using an ozone contactor (hydrophobic hollow fiber membrane type), the basic experiments were carried out to evaluate the applicability of ozonation to the organic wastes. First of all, the oxidation treatment was evaluated by ozone alone, and secondly was evaluated according to the changes of the amount of hydrogen peroxide and a pH of wastes

  14. Let's dance: Organization studies, medical sociology and health policy.

    Currie, Graeme; Dingwall, Robert; Kitchener, Martin; Waring, Justin

    2012-02-01

    This Special Issue of Social Science & Medicine investigates the potential for positive inter-disciplinary interaction, a 'generative dance', between organization studies (OS), and two of the journal's traditional disciplinary foundations: health policy and medical sociology. This is both necessary and timely because of the extent to which organizations have become a neglected topic within medical sociology and health policy analysis. We argue there is need for further and more sustained theoretical and conceptual synergy between OS, medical sociology and health policy, which provides, on the one-hand a cutting-edge and thought-provoking basis for the analysis of contemporary health reforms, and on the other hand, enables the development and elaboration of theory. We emphasize that sociologists and policy analysts in healthcare have been leading contributors to our understanding of organizations in modern society, that OS enhances our understanding of medical settings, and that organizations remain one of the most influential actors of our time. As a starting point to discussion, we outline the genealogy of OS and its application to healthcare settings. We then consider how medical sociology and health policy converge or diverge with the concerns of OS in the study of healthcare settings. Following this, we focus upon the material environment, specifically the position of business schools, which frames the generative dance between OS, medical sociology and health policy. This sets the context for introducing the thirteen articles that constitute the Special Issue of Social Science & Medicine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Seismic, petrological and geodynamical constraints on thermal and compositional structure of the upper mantle: global thermochemical models

    Cammarano, Fabio; Tackley, Paul J.; Boschi, Lapo

    2011-01-01

    Mapping the thermal and compositional structure of the upper mantle requires a combined interpretation of geophysical and petrological observations. Based on current knowledge of material properties, we interpret available global seismic models for temperature assuming end-member compositional...... structures. In particular, we test the effects of modelling a depleted lithosphere, which accounts for petrological constraints on continents. Differences between seismicmodels translate into large temperature and density variations, respectively, up to 400K and 0.06 g cm-3 at 150 km depth. Introducing...... lateral compositional variations does not change significantly the thermal interpretation of seismic models, but gives a more realistic density structure. Modelling a petrological lithosphere gives cratonic temperatures at 150 km depth that are only 100 K hotter than those obtained assuming pyrolite...

  16. Research on petrologic, geochemical characteristics and genesis of volcanic rocks in Dachangsha basin

    Wei Sanyuan

    1999-01-01

    On the basis of research on petrologic, geochemical characteristics and isotope composition of volcanic rocks in Dachangsha basin, the author concludes that the volcanic rocks formed from magma of different genesis and depth are double-cycle effusive. It is proposed that the magma forming the intermediate-basic volcanics of the first cycle comes from the mixing of the partial melting of the deep crust and mantle, and the intermediate-acidic volcanics of the secondary cycle are derived from the remelting of the upper crust

  17. New Petrology, Mineral Chemistry and Stable MG Isotope Compositions of an Allende CAI: EK-459-7-2

    Jeffcoat, C. R.; Kerekgyarto, A. G.; Lapen, T. J.; Righter, M.; Simon, J. I.; Ross, D. K.

    2016-01-01

    Calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) are the key to understanding physical and chemical conditions in the nascent solar nebula. These inclusions have the oldest radiometric ages of solar system materials and are composed of phases that are predicted to condense early from a gas of solar composition. Thus, their chemistry and textures record conditions and processes in the earliest stages of development of the solar nebula. Type B inclusions are typically larger and more coarse grained than other types with substantial evidence that many of them were at least partially molten. Type B inclusions are further subdivided into Type B1 (possess thick melilite mantle) and Type B2 (lack melilite mantle). Despite being extensively studied, the origin of the melilite mantles of Type B1 inclusions remains uncertain. We present petrologic and chemical data for a Type B inclusion, EK-459-7-2, that bears features found in both Type B1 and B2 inclusions and likely represents an intermediate between the two types. Detailed studies of more of these intermediate objects may help to constrain models for Type B1 rim formation.

  18. Synchrotron radiation studies of inorganic-organic semiconductor interfaces

    Evans, D.A.; Steiner, H.J.; Vearey-Roberts, A.R.; Bushell, A.; Cabailh, G.; O'Brien, S.; Wells, J.W.; McGovern, I.T.; Dhanak, V.R.; Kampen, T.U.; Zahn, D.R.T.; Batchelor, D.

    2003-01-01

    Organic semiconductors (polymers and small molecules) are widely used in electronic and optoelectronic technologies. Many devices are based on multilayer structures where interfaces play a central role in device performance and where inorganic semiconductor models are inadequate. Synchrotron radiation techniques such as photoelectron spectroscopy (PES), near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and X-ray standing wave spectroscopy (XSW) provide a powerful means of probing the structural, electronic and chemical properties of these interfaces. The surface-specificity of these techniques allows key properties to be monitored as the heterostructure is fabricated. This methodology has been directed at the growth of hybrid organic-inorganic semiconductor interfaces involving copper phthalocyanine as the model organic material and InSb and GaAs as the model inorganic semiconductor substrates. Core level PES has revealed that these interfaces are abrupt and chemically inert due to the weak bonding between the molecules and the inorganic semiconductor. NEXAFS studies have shown that there is a preferred orientation of the molecules within the organic semiconductor layers. The valence band offsets for the heterojunctions have been directly measured using valence level PES and were found to be very different for copper phthalocyanine on InSb and GaAs (0.7 and -0.3 eV respectively) although an interface dipole is present in both cases

  19. Morphological Study of Insoluble Organic Matter Residues from Primitive

    Changela, H. G.; Stroud, R. M.; Peeters, Z.; Nittler, L. R.; Alexander, C. M. O'D.; DeGregorio, B. T.; Cody, G. D.

    2012-01-01

    Insoluble organic matter (IOM) constitutes a major proportion, 70-99%, of the total organic carbon found in primitive chondrites [1, 2]. One characteristic morphological component of IOM is nanoglobules [3, 4]. Some nanoglobules exhibit large N-15 and D enrichments relative to solar values, indicating that they likely originated in the ISM or the outskirts of the protoplanetary disk [3]. A recent study of samples from the Tagish Lake meteorite with varying levels of hydrothermal alteration suggest that nanoglobule abundance decreases with increasing hydrothermal alteration [5]. The aim of this study is to further document the morphologies of IOM from a range of primitive chondrites in order to determine any correlation of morphology with petrographic grade and chondrite class that could constrain the formation and/or alteration mechanisms.

  20. Studies on uptake and loss of radionuclides by marine organisms

    Koyanagi, Taku; Suzuki, Hamaji; Hirano, Shigeki; Nakahara, Motokazu; Ishii, Toshiaki

    1978-01-01

    Uptake and loss of 137 Cs, 95 Zr- 95 Nb and 59 fe by marine fishes were observed by the radio-isotope tracer experiments under laboratory conditions and concentration factors and biological half-lives for these radionuclides by the fishes were estimated. Concentration factors of 137 Cs by fish muscles calculated at 200th day as 17.5 - 27.5 were lower than the values obtained by the field survey on stable or radioactive cesium suggesting slow turnover in fish muscles and contribution of food to the accumulation of the nuclide. Transfer of radionuclides associated with sediment to marine benthic organisms was examined by rearing the organisms in contaminated sediment or administering the sediment orally to the organisms. The transfer ratios of the nuclides from sediment to organisms were less than the concentration factors based on seawater by the factors ranging from around 100 to about 5,000 depending on the species of organisms or radionuclides. Accumulation of radionuclides through food chain in marine ecosystem was studied by feeding shellfishes with labelled phytoplankton and seaweeds by feeding fishes with assorted feeds labelled by radioisotopes. Absorption of 60 Co by abalones was affected by the species of the seaweeds as food and 47% of the administered dose was retained through Laminaria japonica, whereas 31% through Undaria and 26% through Eisenia. Absorption of the radionuclides by the fishes fed with labelled feeds was most significant in the case of 137 Cs and 65 Zn and transfer rate showed the maximum values at 48 hours after feeding as 100 and 24%, respectively. About 45% of the former distributed in muscle and 52% of the latter in digestive tract and blood of the fishes. (author)

  1. Studies about behavior of microbial degradation of organic compounds

    Ohtsuka, Makiko

    2003-02-01

    Some of TRU waste include organic compounds, thus these organic compounds might be nutrients for microbial growth at disposal site. This disposal system might be exposed to high alkali condition by cement compounds as engineering barrier material. In the former experimental studies, it has been supposed that microbial exist under pH = 12 and the microbial activity acclimated to high alkali condition are able to degrade asphalt under anaerobic condition. Microbes are called extremophile that exist in cruel habitat as high alkali or reductive condition. We know less information about the activity of extremophile, though any recent studies reveal them. In this study, the first investigation is metabolic pathway as microbial activity, the second is microbial degradation of aromatic compounds in anaerobic condition, and the third is microbial activity under high alkali. Microbial metabolic pathway consist of two systems that fulfill their function each other. One system is to generate energy for microbial activities and the other is to convert substances for syntheses of organisms' structure materials. As these systems are based on redox reaction between substances, it is made chart of the microbial activity region using pH, Eh, and depth as parameter, There is much report that microbe is able to degrade aromatic compounds under aerobic or molecular O 2 utilizing condition. For degradation of aromatic compounds in anaerobic condition, supplying electron acceptor is required. Co-metabolism and microbial consortia has important role, too. Alcalophile has individual transporting system depending Na + and acidic compounds contained in cell wall. Generating energy is key for survival and growth under high alkali condition. Co-metabolism and microbial consortia are effective for microbial degradation of aromatic compounds under high alkali and reductive condition, and utilizable electron acceptor and degradable organic compounds are required for keeping microbial activity and

  2. Studies in organic and physical photochemistry - an interdisciplinary approach.

    Oelgemöller, Michael; Hoffmann, Norbert

    2016-08-21

    Traditionally, organic photochemistry when applied to synthesis strongly interacts with physical chemistry. The aim of this review is to illustrate this very fruitful interdisciplinary approach and cooperation. A profound understanding of the photochemical reactivity and reaction mechanisms is particularly helpful for optimization and application of these reactions. Some typical reactions and particular aspects are reported such as the Norrish-Type II reaction and the Yang cyclization and related transformations, the [2 + 2] photocycloadditions, particularly the Paternò-Büchi reaction, photochemical electron transfer induced transformations, different kinds of catalytic reactions such as photoredox catalysis for organic synthesis and photooxygenation are discussed. Particular aspects such as the structure and reactivity of aryl cations, photochemical reactions in the crystalline state, chiral memory, different mechanisms of hydrogen transfer in photochemical reactions or fundamental aspects of stereoselectivity are discussed. Photochemical reactions are also investigated in the context of chemical engineering. Particularly, continuous flow reactors are of interest. Novel reactor systems are developed and modeling of photochemical transformations and different reactors play a key role in such studies. This research domain builds a bridge between fundamental studies of organic photochemical reactions and their industrial application.

  3. PROBLEMS AND METHODOLOGY OF THE PETROLOGIC ANALYSIS OF COAL FACIES.

    Chao, Edward C.T.

    1983-01-01

    This condensed synthesis gives a broad outline of the methodology of coal facies analysis, procedures for constructing sedimentation and geochemical formation curves, and micro- and macrostratigraphic analysis. The hypothetical coal bed profile has a 3-fold cycle of material characteristics. Based on studies of other similar profiles of the same coal bed, and on field studies of the sedimentary rock types and their facies interpretation, one can assume that the 3-fold subdivision is of regional significance.

  4. Information Assurance in Saudi Organizations - An Empirical Study

    Nabi, Syed Irfan; Mirza, Abdulrahman A.; Alghathbar, Khaled

    This paper presents selective results of a survey conducted to find out the much needed insight into the status of information security in Saudi Arabian organizations. The purpose of this research is to give the state of information assurance in the Kingdom and to better understand the prevalent ground realities. The survey covered technical aspects of information security, risk management and information assurance management. The results provide deep insights in to the existing level of information assurance in various sectors that can be helpful in better understanding the intricate details of the prevalent information security in the Kingdom. Also, the results can be very useful for information assurance policy makers in the government as well as private sector organizations. There are few empirical studies on information assurance governance available in literature, especially about the Middle East and Saudi Arabia, therefore, the results are invaluable for information security researchers in improving the understanding of information assurance in this region and the Kingdom.

  5. Composition of uppermost mantle beneath the Northern Fennoscandia - numerical modeling and petrological interpretation

    Virshylo, Ivan; Kozlovskaya, Elena; Prodaivoda, George; Silvennoinen, Hanna

    2013-04-01

    Studying of the uppermost mantle beneath the northern Fennoscandia is based on the data of the POLENET/LAPNET passive seismic array. Firstly, arrivals of P-waves of teleseismic events were inverted into P-wave velocity model using non-linear tomography (Silvennoinen et al., in preparation). The second stage was numerical petrological interpretation of referred above velocity model. This study presents estimation of mineralogical composition of the uppermost mantle as a result of numerical modeling. There are many studies concerning calculation of seismic velocities for polymineral media under high pressure and temperature conditions (Afonso, Fernàndez, Ranalli, Griffin, & Connolly, 2008; Fullea et al., 2009; Hacker, 2004; Xu, Lithgow-Bertelloni, Stixrude, & Ritsema, 2008). The elastic properties under high pressure and temperature (PT) conditions were modelled using the expanded Hook's law - Duhamel-Neumann equation, which allows computation of thermoelastic strains. Furthermore, we used a matrix model with multi-component inclusions that has no any restrictions on shape, orientation or concentration of inclusions. Stochastic method of conditional moment with computation scheme of Mori-Tanaka (Prodaivoda, Khoroshun, Nazarenko, & Vyzhva, 2000) is applied instead of traditional Voigt-Reuss-Hill and Hashin-Shtrikman equations. We developed software for both forward and inverse problem calculation. Inverse algorithm uses methods of global non-linear optimization. We prefer a "model-based" approach for ill-posed problem, which means that the problem is solved using geological and geophysical constraints for each parameter of a priori and final models. Additionally, we are checking at least several different hypothesis explaining how it is possible to get the solution with good fit to the observed data. If the a priori model is close to the real medium, the nearest solution would be found by the inversion. Otherwise, the global optimization is searching inside the

  6. Organic chemical degradation by remote study of the redox conditions

    Fernandez, P. M.; Revil, A.; Binley, A. M.; Bloem, E.; French, H. K.

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring the natural (and enhanced) degradation of organic contaminants is essential for managing groundwater quality in many parts of the world. Contaminated sites often have limited access, hence non-intrusive methods for studying redox processes, which drive the degradation of organic compounds, are required. One example is the degradation of de-icing chemicals (glycols and organic salts) released to the soil near airport runways during winter. This issue has been broadly studied at Oslo airport, Gardermoen, Norway using intrusive and non-intrusive methods. Here, we report on laboratory experiments that aim to study the potential of using a self-potential, DCresistivity, and time-domain induced polarization for geochemical characterization of the degradation of Propylene Glycol (PG). PG is completely miscible in water, does not adsorb to soil particles and does not contribute to the electrical conductivity of the soil water. When the contaminant is in the unsaturated zone near the water table, the oxygen is quickly consumed and the gas exchange with the surface is insufficient to ensure aerobic degradation, which is faster than anaerobic degradation. Since biodegradation of PG is highly oxygen demanding, anaerobic pockets can exist causing iron and manganese reduction. It is hypothesised that nitrate would boost the degradation rate under such conditions. In our experiment, we study PG degradation in a sand tank. We provide the system with an electron highway to bridge zones with different redox potential. This geo-battery system is characterized by self-potential, resistivity and induced polarization anomalies. An example of preliminary results with self-potential at two different times of the experiment can be seen in the illustration. These will be supplemented with more direct information on the redox chemistry: in-situ water sampling, pH, redox potential and electrical conductivity measurements. In parallel, a series of batch experiments have been

  7. European Lithospheric Mantle; geochemical, petrological and geophysical processes

    Ntaflos, Th.; Puziewicz, J.; Downes, H.; Matusiak-Małek, M.

    2017-04-01

    The second European Mantle Workshop occurred at the end of August 2015, in Wroclaw, Poland, attended by leading scientists in the study the lithospheric mantle from around the world. It built upon the results of the first European Mantle Workshop (held in 2007, in Ferrara, Italy) published in the Geological Society of London Special Publication 293 (Coltorti & Gregoire, 2008).

  8. Petrology and geochemistry of igneous inclusions in recent Merapi deposits

    Chadwick, J.P.; Troll, V.R.; Waight, Tod Earle

    2013-01-01

    Recent basaltic-andesite lavas from Merapi volcano contain abundant and varied igneous inclusions suggesting a complex sub-volcanic magmatic system for Merapi volcano. In order to better understand the processes occurring beneath Merapi, we have studied this suite of inclusions by petrography, ge...

  9. The Private Lives of Minerals: Social Network Analysis Applied to Mineralogy and Petrology

    Hazen, R. M.; Morrison, S. M.; Fox, P. A.; Golden, J. J.; Downs, R. T.; Eleish, A.; Prabhu, A.; Li, C.; Liu, C.

    2016-12-01

    Comprehensive databases of mineral species (rruff.info/ima) and their geographic localities and co-existing mineral assemblages (mindat.org) reveal patterns of mineral association and distribution that mimic social networks, as commonly applied to such varied topics as social media interactions, the spread of disease, terrorism networks, and research collaborations. Applying social network analysis (SNA) to common assemblages of rock-forming igneous and regional metamorphic mineral species, we find patterns of cohesion, segregation, density, and cliques that are similar to those of human social networks. These patterns highlight classic trends in lithologic evolution and are illustrated with sociograms, in which mineral species are the "nodes" and co-existing species form "links." Filters based on chemistry, age, structural group, and other parameters highlight visually both familiar and new aspects of mineralogy and petrology. We quantify sociograms with SNA metrics, including connectivity (based on the frequency of co-occurrence of mineral pairs), homophily (the extent to which co-existing mineral species share compositional and other characteristics), network closure (based on the degree of network interconnectivity), and segmentation (as revealed by isolated "cliques" of mineral species). Exploitation of large and growing mineral data resources with SNA offers promising avenues for discovering previously hidden trends in mineral diversity-distribution systematics, as well as providing new pedagogical approaches to teaching mineralogy and petrology.

  10. Petrological and geochemical characterization of the plutonic rocks of the Sierra de La Aguada, Province of San Luis, Argentina: Genetic implications with the Famatinian magmatic arc

    E. Cristofolini

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a synthesis on the geology of the crystalline complex that constitute the Sierra de la Aguada, San Luis province, Argentine, from an approach based on field relations, petrologic and structural features and geochemical characteristic. This mountain range exposes a basement dominated by intermediate to mafic calcalkaline igneous rocks and peraluminous felsic granitoids, both emplaced in low to medium grade metamorphic rocks stabilized under low amphibolite facies. All this lithological terrane has been grouped in the El Carrizal-La Aguada Complex. Field relations, petrographic characterization and geochemical comparison of the plutonic rocks from the study area with those belonging to the Ordovician Famatinian suit exposed in the Sierra Grande de San Luis, suggest a genetic and temporal relation linked to the development of the Famatinian magmatic arc.

  11. Organic geochemical study of domanik deposits, Tatarstan Republic.

    Nosova, F. F.; Pronin, N. V.

    2010-05-01

    High-bituminous argillo-siliceous carbonate deposits of domanik formation (DF) occurring within pale depressions and down warps in the east of the Russian platform are treated by many investigators as a main source of oil and gas in the Volga-Ural province. In this study a special attention was turned to organic-rich rocks DF witch outcrop in the central part (Uratminskaya area 792, 806 boreholes) and in the west part (Sviyagskaya, 423) of the Tatarstan Republic. The aim of the present paper is to characterize the organic matter: origin, depositional environments, thermal maturity and biodegradation-weathering effects. Nowadays the most informative geochemical parameters are some biomarkers which qualitatively and are quantitatively defined from distributions of n-alkanes and branched alkanes. Biomarkers - it's original fingerprints of biomass of organic matter, that reflect molecular hydrocarbonic structure. The bulk, molecular composition of oil is initially a function of the type and maturity of the source rock from which it has been expelled, while the source rock type reflects both the nature of precursor organisms and the conditions of its deposition. Methodology used in this study included sampling, bitumen extraction, liquid-column chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analyses. The bitumen was fractionated by column chromatography on silica gel. Non-aromatic or alifatics, aromatics and polar compounds were obtained. Alifatic were analysed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry Percin Elmer. The hydrocarbons present in the sediments of DF and have a carbon numbers ranging from 12 through 38. The samples contain variably inputs from both terrigenous and non-terrigenous (probably marine algal) organic matter as evident in bimodal GC fingerprints of some samples. Pristane and phytane, also, occur in very high concentration in sample extracts. The relatively low Pr/Ph ratios, CPI and OEP<1 imply that the domanik organic matter was deposited

  12. Experimental petrology and origin of rocks from the Descartes Highlands

    Walker, D.; Longhi, J.; Grove, T. L.; Stolper, E.; Hays, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    Petrographic studies of Apollo 16 samples indicate that rocks 62295 and 68415 are crystallization products of highly aluminous melts. 60025 is a shocked, crushed and partially annealed plagioclase cumulate. 60315 is a recrystallized noritic breccia of disputed origin. 60335 is a feldspathic basalt filled with xenoliths and xenocrysts of anorthosite, breccia, and anorthite. The Fe/(Fe+Mg) of plagioclase appears to be a relative crystallization index. Low pressure melting experiments with controlled Po2 indicate that the igneous samples crystallized at oxygen fugacities well below the Fe/FeO buffer. Crystallization experiments at various pressures suggest that the 62295 and 68415 compositions were produced by partial or complete melting of lunar crustal materials, and not by partial melting of the deep lunar interior.

  13. BIOMEDICINE AND BIOMATERIAL: A STUDY OF ARTIFICIAL ORGANS AND XENOTRANSPLANTATION

    So Yeon Yoon

    2012-01-01

    Organ demand is outpacing the supply of donated organs. In order to solve this problem, biomedicine is a rising trend in the science world. Biomedicine is a branch of medical science that applies biologic and other natural-science principles to clinical practice such as developing artificial organs. As biomedicine progressed artificial organs and xenotransplantation, which is transplantation of organs from one species to another, advanced. Biomedicine is hope to lots of people who are sufferi...

  14. Study on self organized criticality of China power grid blackouts

    Zhao, Xingyong; Zhang, Xiubin; He, Bin [Department of Electrical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Minhang District, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2009-03-15

    Based on the complex system theory and the concept of self organized criticality (SOC) theory, the mechanism of China power grid blackout is studied by analyzing the blackout data in the China power system from 1981 to 2002. The probability distribution functions of various measures of blackout size have a power tail. The analysis of scaled window variance and rescaled range statistics of the time series show moderate long time correlations. The blackout data seem consistent with SOC; the results obtained show that SOC dynamics may play an important role in the dynamics of power systems blackouts. It would be possible to propose novel approaches for understanding and controlling power systems blackouts. (author)

  15. Study on self organized criticality of China power grid blackouts

    Zhao Xingyong [Department of Electrical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Minhang District, Shanghai 200240 (China)], E-mail: zhaoxingyong@sjtu.edu.cn; Zhang Xiubin; He Bin [Department of Electrical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Minhang District, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2009-03-15

    Based on the complex system theory and the concept of self organized criticality (SOC) theory, the mechanism of China power grid blackout is studied by analyzing the blackout data in the China power system from 1981 to 2002. The probability distribution functions of various measures of blackout size have a power tail. The analysis of scaled window variance and rescaled range statistics of the time series show moderate long time correlations. The blackout data seem consistent with SOC; the results obtained show that SOC dynamics may play an important role in the dynamics of power systems blackouts. It would be possible to propose novel approaches for understanding and controlling power systems blackouts.

  16. Refining Southern California Geotherms Using Seismologic, Geologic, and Petrologic Constraints

    Thatcher, W. R.; Chapman, D. S.; Allam, A. A.; Williams, C. F.

    2017-12-01

    Lithospheric deformation in tectonically active regions depends on the 3D distribution of rheology, which is in turn critically controlled by temperature. Under the auspices of the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) we are developing a 3D Community Thermal Model (CTM) to constrain rheology and so better understand deformation processes within this complex but densely monitored and relatively well-understood region. The San Andreas transform system has sliced southern California into distinct blocks, each with characteristic lithologies, seismic velocities and thermal structures. Guided by the geometry of these blocks we use more than 250 surface heat-flow measurements to define 13 geographically distinct heat flow regions (HFRs). Model geotherms within each HFR are constrained by averages and variances of surface heat flow q0 and the 1D depth distribution of thermal conductivity (k) and radiogenic heat production (A), which are strongly dependent on rock type. Crustal lithologies are not always well known and we turn to seismic imaging for help. We interrogate the SCEC Community Velocity Model (CVM) to determine averages and variances of Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs versus depth within each HFR. We bound (A, k) versus depth by relying on empirical relations between seismic wave speed and rock type and laboratory and modeling methods relating (A, k) to rock type. Many 1D conductive geotherms for each HFR are allowed by the variances in surface heat flow and subsurface (A, k). An additional constraint on the lithosphere temperature field is provided by comparing lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) depths identified seismologically with those defined thermally as the depth of onset of partial melting. Receiver function studies in Southern California indicate LAB depths that range from 40 km to 90 km. Shallow LAB depths are correlated with high surface heat flow and deep LAB with low heat flow. The much-restricted families of geotherms that intersect peridotite

  17. Petrologic Modeling of Magmatic Evolution in The Elysium Volcanic Province

    Susko, D.; Karunatillake, S.; Hood, D.

    2017-12-01

    The Elysium Volcanic Province (EVP) on Mars is a massive expanse of land made up of many hundreds of lava flows of various ages1. The variable surface ages within this volcanic province have distinct elemental compositions based on the derived values from the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) suite2. Without seismic data or ophiolite sequences on Mars, the compositions of lavas on the surface provide some of the only information to study the properties of the interior of the planet. The Amazonian surface age and isolated nature of the EVP in the northern lowlands of Mars make it ideal for analyzing the mantle beneath Elysium during the most recent geologic era on Mars. The MELTS algorithm is one of the most commonly used programs for simulating compositions and mineral phases of basaltic melt crystallization3. It has been used extensively for both terrestrial applications4 and for other planetary bodies3,5. The pMELTS calibration of the algorithm allows for higher pressure (10-30 kbars) regimes, and is more appropriate for modeling melt compositions and equilibrium conditions for a source within the martian mantle. We use the pMELTS program to model how partial melting of the martian mantle could evolve magmas into the surface compositions derived from the GRS instrument, and how the mantle beneath Elysium has changed over time. We attribute changes to lithospheric loading by long term, episodic volcanism within the EVP throughout its history. 1. Vaucher, J. et al. The volcanic history of central Elysium Planitia: Implications for martian magmatism. Icarus 204, 418-442 (2009). 2. Susko, D. et al. A record of igneous evolution in Elysium, a major martian volcanic province. Scientific Reports 7, 43177 (2017). 3. El Maarry, M. R. et al. Gamma-ray constraints on the chemical composition of the martian surface in the Tharsis region: A signature of partial melting of the mantle? Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research 185, 116-122 (2009). 4. Ding, S. & Dasgupta, R. The

  18. The Transcendent Organization : A treatise on consciousness in organizations: theoretical discussion, conceptual development and empirical studies

    Gustavsson, Bengt

    1992-01-01

    Organizations are human constructs, and unless the organizational analysis takes into account a wider discussion of the relationship between the subject and the object the analysis ends up in relativism, anarchism, and confusion. There is a danger when we make the organization objective to such extent that it is viewed as an entity outside ourselves. Understanding of an organization is a collective phenomenon given by the prevailing fundamental assumptions in society, and is transferred by sy...

  19. Single Molecule Study of DNA Organization and Recombination

    Xiao, Botao

    We have studied five projects related to DNA organization and recombination using mainly single molecule force-spectroscopy and statistical tools. First, HU is one of the most abundant DNA-organizing proteins in bacterial chromosomes and participates in gene regulation. We report experiments that study the dependence of DNA condensation by HU on force, salt and HU concentration. A first important result is that at physiological salt levels, HU only bends DNA, resolving a previous paradox of why a chromosome-compacting protein should have a DNA-stiffening function. A second major result is quantitative demonstration of strong dependencies of HU-DNA dissociation on both salt concentration and force. Second, we have used a thermodynamic Maxwell relation to count proteins driven off large DNAs by tension, an effect important to understanding DNA organization. Our results compare well with estimates of numbers of proteins HU and Fis in previous studies. We have also shown that a semi-flexible polymer model describes our HU experimental data well. The force-dependent binding suggests mechano-chemical mechanisms for gene regulation. Third, the elusive role of protein H1 in chromatin has been clarified with purified H1 and Xenopus extracts. We find that H1 compacts DNA by both bending and looping. Addition of H1 enhances chromatin formation and maintains the plasticity of the chromatin. Fourth, the topology and mechanics of DNA twisting are critical to DNA organization and recombination. We have systematically measured DNA extension as a function of linking number density from 0.08 to -2 with holding forces from 0.2 to 2.4 pN. Unlike previous proposals, the DNA extension decreases with negative linking number. Finally, DNA recombination is a dynamic process starting from enzyme-DNA binding. We report that the Int-DBD domain of lambda integrase binds to DNA without compaction at low Int-DBD concentration. High concentration of Int-DBD loops DNA below a threshold force

  20. Private sector accountable care organization development: a qualitative study.

    Scheck McAlearney, Ann; Hilligoss, Brian; Song, Paula H

    2017-03-01

    To explore accountable care organizations (ACOs) as they develop in the private sector, including their motivation for development, perspectives from consumers regarding these emerging ACOs, and the critical success factors associated with ACO development. Comprehensive organizational case studies of 4 full-risk private sector ACOs that included in-person interviews with providers and administrators and focus groups with local consumers. Sixty-eight key informant interviews conducted during site visits, supplemented by document collection and telephone interviews, and 5 focus groups were held with 52 consumers associated with the study ACOs. We found 3 main motivators for private sector ACO development: 1) opportunity to improve quality and efficiency, 2) potential to improve population health, and 3) belief that payment reform is inevitable. With respect to consumer perspectives, consumers were unaware they received care from an ACO. From the perspectives of ACO stakeholders, these ACOs noted that they prefer to focus on patients' relationships with providers and typically do not emphasize the ACO name or entity. Critical success factors for private sector ACO development included provider engagement, strategic buy-in, prior experience managing risk, IT infrastructure, and leadership, all meant to shift the culture to a focus on value instead of volume. These organizations perceived that pursuing an accountable care strategy allowed them to respond to policy changes anticipated to impact the way healthcare is delivered and reimbursed. Increased understanding of factors that have been important for more mature private sector ACOs may help other healthcare organizations as they strive to enhance value and advance in their ACO journeys.

  1. Segmenting health maintenance organizations to study productivity and profitability.

    Sobol, M G

    2000-01-01

    As the decade ended, health maintenance organizations (HMOs) were increasing in popularity as a means of health care delivery. These groups take many forms, so it is important for the analyst to see if the efficiency and financial results for these different forms vary. The four major forms are profit vs. not-for-profit, chain vs. non-chain, group/staff vs. individual practice association (IPA), and federally qualified vs. non-federally qualified. Using a nationwide database of all the HMOs in the United States, the article compares liquidity rates, leverage ratios, profitability ratios, marketing, and per member ratios across the four groups using paired t tests. The two classifications that showed the most differences were group/staff vs. IPA and federally qualified vs. non-federally qualified. IPAs have a better liquidity position and lower leverage ratios than group/staff but their administrative costs are higher and the time to receive payments and to pay debts is higher. Non-federally qualified have somewhat higher liquidity ratios and higher profitability ratios. These significant differences in financial outcomes indicate that studies of HMOs should segment different major forms of organizations and study them separately before trying to show the effects of different policies on HMO efficiency and effectiveness.

  2. Studying the Foreign Experience of Evaluating Intellectual Potential of Organizations

    Pererva Petro G.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of intellectual capital (IC is considered in developed countries as a strategic management tool for achievement of the organizations' success in innovative activities. The article is aimed at studying the foreign experience of evaluating intellectual potential of organizations and identifying directions for its advancement and use at the domestic enterprises to improve their innovative activity. An approach to capital structure has been developed, in which the following three parts are allocated: human capital, structural capital, capital of interactions. The proposed general model for research of IC in terms of firm or region allows to evaluate not only the potential, but also several important lines of communication, namely: industrial-technological, market-customer, business environment and society, commercial operations (technology, value creation and the overall development strategy. In the proposed version of studying the IC potential, analytics are combined with management of both strategy and development tactics, based on use of resources of intellectual capital. The scheme of development management through the system of the activities of influence is recommended as well. The end result of the analytical project work provides the development package, which is issued as a supporting document of development strategy. Evaluation of the development level of intellectual capital in the context of individual enterprises and of regional complex in general has been recommended to include in the Regional innovation system (RIS as one of its functional tasks

  3. Use of carbon-14 in soil organic matter studies

    Vimal, O.P.; Kamath, M.B.

    1974-01-01

    Despite a great deal of research work on various aspects of soil organic matter, there are many gaps in the knowledge of the process of humus formation. These limitations arise mainly from the complex and heterogenous nature of soil humus substances, analytical problems in separating the fresh and decomposable materials from the old stabilized true humus substances and the lack of a clear understanding of the chemical structure of the humic acid molecule. During recent years, the use of carbon-14 has helped to trace within soil, transformation of a number of metabolites upto the point where they turn into humus. These studies have changed the concepts of the formation and stability of soil humus substances, their colloidal chemical properties and the uptake of organomolecules by plant roots. The present paper presents a synoptic view of the use of radiocarbon in studying the kinetics of humification, nature of precursors in humic acid formation, turnover of soil organic matter and the direct effects of humus substances on plant growth. (author)

  4. Fast reactions of organic anion radicals with organic halides in hexamethylphosphoric triamide studied by pulse radiolysis

    Honda, Eiji; Tokuda, Masao; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Ogasawara, Masaaki

    1987-01-01

    Fast reactions of diethyl fumarate anion radical (DEF - ) and fluorenone anion radical (Fl - ) with various organic halides (RX) in hexamethylphosphoric triamide have been studied by means of ns pulse radiolysis at room temperature. Reactions of acetophenone anion radical were also studied for comparison. It was found that the reaction rate of Fl - was subject to the steric and resonance effects of R groups of RX in accord with the classical concept of S N 2 reactions: the rate constant was reduced by 2 orders of magnitude by the steric effect when R was changed from ethyl to bulky isopropyl or t-butyl, and it was still large by the resonance effect of R even if R was changed from ethyl to an allyl or a benzyl group. While the reaction rate of DEF - was not much affected when R was changed to more bulky groups, the rate constant was correlated to the reduction potential of RX. The results were interpreted in terms of a VB correlation diagram approach or rate-equilibrium relationship within a framework of S N 2 reactions. (author)

  5. Educational Management Organizations as High Reliability Organizations: A Study of Victory's Philadelphia High School Reform Work

    Thomas, David E.

    2013-01-01

    This executive position paper proposes recommendations for designing reform models between public and private sectors dedicated to improving school reform work in low performing urban high schools. It reviews scholarly research about for-profit educational management organizations, high reliability organizations, American high school reform, and…

  6. Surface study of fusion research in universities linkage organization

    Miyahara, Akira.

    1980-04-01

    The surface studies for nuclear fusion research consist of the studies on the surface process and the surface damage. The problems with the surface study are different at different research stages. The plasma-wall interaction in the ignition stage is mainly concerned with heating. The impurity control becomes important in the breakeven stage. In the longer burn experiment, the problems of plasma contamination and ash accumulation are serious, and the blistering is also a problem. From the reactor aspect, the reduction of life of wall due to the irradiation of high fluence must be considered. The surface damage due to plasma disruption is a very big problem. The activities concerning the surface studies in university-linked organizations are the surface characterization for fusion reactor materials by low energy ion scattering spectroscopy, the high power ion irradiation test for CTR first wall, data compilation on plasma-wall interaction, the studies of sputtering process and surface coating, and the study on hydrogen isotope permeation through metals for fusion reactors. Other activities such as the sample characterization at many universities using the SUS 304 samples from the same lot, and the collaboration works on JIPP-T-2 plasma wall experiments are introduced. Concerning the surface study, US-Japan or international collaboration are strongly expected. (Kato, T.)

  7. Petrological, geochemical and isotopic characteristics of lignite and calcified lignite from mining area Pesje, Velenje Basin, Slovenia

    Vrabec, Mirijam; Markič, Miloš; Vrabec, Marko; Jaćimović, Radojko; Kanduč, Tjaša

    2014-05-01

    Lignite (organic rich) and calcified lignite (inorganic rich) samples from excavation field -50c mining area Pesje, Velenje Basin, Slovenia were investigated. During geological and structural mapping lignite and calcified lignite samples were systematically taken for determination of their petrological, geochemical and isotopic characteristics. Lignite is composed of fine detritical gelified matrix. At least five different types of calcified lignite were recognized forming laminations, calcifications after wood, petrified wood and complete replacements of lignite with carbonate. All measured parameters so far indicate geochemical processes during sedimentation of the Velenej Basin. After macroscopic description samples were split to organic and inorganic component (Ward, 1984) and powdered in an agate mortar for geochemical and isotopic analyses. Major and trace elements (As, B, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mn, Mo, Sb, Se, Th, U, Zn) in these samples were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) using k-0 standardization method (Jaćimović et al, 2002). The isotopic composition of carbon and nitrogen was determined using a Europa 20-20 continuous flow IRMS ANCA-SL preparation module. A 1 mg amount of a sample was weighed in a tin capsule for carbon and 10 mg for nitrogen analysis. Samples for carbon analyses were pretreated with 1 M HCl to remove carbonates. Carbonate samples from carbonate-rich strata and calcified xylite were first roasted at 450 deg C (Krantz et al., 1987). Three miligrams of carbonate sample was transformed into CO2 by reaction with anhydrous H3PO4 at 55 deg C under vacuum (McCrea, 1950) and measured with GV 2003 isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Measured isotopic composition of oxygen as VPDB values was recalculated to the VSMOW reference standard to enable the comparison with data from other coal basins. SEM/EDXS of carbonate rich sediments was performed with JEOL JSM 5800 electron microanalyzer scanning electron microscope

  8. Biogas recovery from waste organic materials: a comparative experimental study

    Beschkov, V.; Angelov, I.; Petrova, P.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Biogas production from organic waste is already traditional method for treatment of agricultural waste with simultaneous energy recovery in the form of biogas. However, biogas can also be produced efficiently treating organic waste from beverage industries and biodiesel production. In the latter case, huge amounts of crude glycerol are released posing severe problems with their treatment. The main obstacle to the efficient waste treatment by anaerobic digestion is the sensitivity of the methanogenic bacteria toward pH variations. When the digester is overloaded, high concentrations of organic acids are produced damping the activity of methanogenes. This problem can be overcome by separating the digester into different compartments, enabling the development of the consecutive processes of hydrolysis, acidogenesis and methanogenesis in different spaces.; In the present study results of biogas production from poultry litter, stillage from ethanol production, and crude glycerol from biodiesel manufacturing are presented. The experiments were carried out in a continuous baffled anaerobic reactor. It was established that the process with glycerol utilization was too sensitive toward the loading because of intensive acid formation as intermediates. The process with stillage as substrate was stable and well steered for months with very high biogas yield (350 I/kg COD) at high production rate, i.e. up to 4 wd ' . The microbial profiles, the pH values and the intermediate concentrations along the reactor were determined and correlated with the biogas yield. Different microbial strains and profiles for the different substrates were observed. In the case of glycerol digestion, almost one bacterial genus, i.e. Klebsiella sp., was detected besides the methanogenes, which enables to make speculations about the pathway of competitive intermediate, biogas, and final products formation

  9. Guidelines for Qualitative Research in Organization Studies: Controversy and Possibilities

    Maria Fernanda Rios Cavalcanti

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present article is to tackle the controversy of establishing guidelines for qualitative research in Organization and Management Theory (OMT and to present a summary of suggestions on how to conduct good qualitative research given by methodologists on top-tier international publications. In order to do so, the article discusses: general guidelines for qualitative research; how to achieve coherence and transparency in a qualitative empirical study; the meaning and importance of the concept of reflexivity; and, finally how to establish a theoretical contribution and transferability of findings in such context. The work presents a valuable contribution because such guidelines, concepts, and approaches can be adopted by students and researchers when conducting a qualitative research proposal, and by periodic reviewers to evaluate the quality of existing empirical studies.

  10. Insights from human genetic studies of lung and organ fibrosis.

    Garcia, Christine Kim

    2018-01-02

    Genetic investigations of fibrotic diseases, including those of late onset, often yield unanticipated insights into disease pathogenesis. This Review focuses on pathways underlying lung fibrosis that are generalizable to other organs. Herein, we discuss genetic variants subdivided into those that shorten telomeres, activate the DNA damage response, change resident protein expression or function, or affect organelle activity. Genetic studies provide a window into the downstream cascade of maladaptive responses and pathways that lead to tissue fibrosis. In addition, these studies reveal interactions between genetic variants, environmental factors, and age that influence the phenotypic spectrum of disease. The discovery of forces counterbalancing inherited risk alleles identifies potential therapeutic targets, thus providing hope for future prevention or reversal of fibrosis.

  11. Leadership and productivity in planning organizations: a case study.

    Whitcomb, G R; Williams, E G

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a case study dealing mainly with the effects of two divergent leadership styles on the productivity of a planning organization. Changes in various kinds of participation in the agency's activities--an important side effect--are also linked to the two leadership patterns. The agency studied, a private health and welfare council in a medium-sized American city, varied considerably in its output of planning activities and decision making depending on whether it had a participative or a directive leader. The results indicated that there was a trade-off between such highly revered social values as leadership and the extent of participation by staff, board members, and local agency administrators. Implications focus on ways to achieve diversity in communication style among managers and the role of productivity measures in determining the overall effectiveness of planning agencies.

  12. Concept and Feasibility Study of Self-Organized Electrochemical Devices

    Moorehead, William

    2002-01-01

    .... In this work, using attractive and repulsive London-van der Waals forces, a self-organized, interpenetrating, separator-free rechargeable lithium ion battery called a self-organized battery system (SBS) is proposed...

  13. Teaching Mineralogy, Petrology and Geochemistry in the 21st Century: Instructional Resources for Geoscience Faculty

    Mogk, D. W.; Beane, R. J.; Whitney, D. L.; Nicolaysen, K. E.; Panero, W. R.; Peck, W. H.

    2011-12-01

    Mineralogy, petrology and geochemistry (MPG) are pillars of the geoscience curriculum because of their relevance in interpreting Earth history and processes, application to geo-hazards, resources, and environmental issues, and contributions to emerging fields such as geology and human health. To keep faculty current in scientific advances in these fields, and in modern instructional methods, the On the Cutting Edge program convened a workshop at the University of Minnesota in August, 2011. This workshop builds on the previous 15 year's work that has been focused on identifying, aggregating, and developing high-quality collections of teaching activities and related resources, and in building a community of scholars in support of excellence in instruction in MPG courses. The goals of the workshop were to: a) develop an integrated, comprehensive and reviewed curriculum for MPG courses, and to seek ways to make connections with the larger geoscience curriculum; b) to explore emerging topics in MPG such as geobiology and climate change; c) demonstrate effective methods in teaching MPG in the context of Earth system science; d) share effective teaching activities and strategies for the classroom, laboratory and field including advances in pedagogy, assessments and research on learning; e) keep faculty current on recent advances in mineralogy, petrology and geochemistry research and to apply these findings to our teaching; f) explore and utilize current societal and global issues that intersect mineralogy, petrology and geochemistry to heighten the relevancy of course content for students; and h) meet colleagues and foster future teaching and research collaborations. A significant outcome of this workshop is a peer reviewed of collection of 300+ existing teaching activities, and a gap analysis to identify teaching activities needed to make these collections comprehensive and coherent. In addition, a series of thematic collections were developed to assist high priority

  14. Pathology of knowledge strategy barriers in organization: a case study

    Mehdi Kheirandish

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge management plays an important role on the success of organizations but there are several reasons that many organizations fail to talk a full advantage of the benefits of knowledge management implementation. In this paper, we perform an empirical investigation on supreme audit court organization of Iran. The survey uses a standard questionnaire and distributes 116 questionnaires among 228 people who worked for this organization. Cronbach alpha yields 0.817, which is well above the mi...

  15. Stability in Organic Milk Farm Prices: A Comparative Study

    Su, Ye; Brown, Scott; Cook, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    The organic milk pay price is more stable year round and increases every year. However, the conventional milk price varies within the year and from year to year. As an emerging segment of the milk industry, consumer demand for organic milk is increasing rapidly. The growth in demand relative to supply provides organic milk producers and processors large premiums over the conventional milk price. Many conventional dairy farms have converted to organic operations for the more stable price. The ...

  16. Organic Dairy Production Systems in Pennsylvania: A Case Study Evaluation

    Rotz, C.A.; Kamphuis, G.H.; Karsten, H.D.; Weaver, R.D.

    2007-01-01

    The current market demand and price for organic milk is encouraging dairy producers, particularly those on smaller farms, to consider organic production as a means for improving the economic viability of their operations. Organic production systems vary widely in scale, in practices, and across

  17. Use of stable isotope techniques in soil organic matter studies

    Gerzabek, M.H.

    1998-01-01

    Plants differ distinctly in their C-isotopic composition. The largest differences occur between plant species with different photosynthetic pathways. C 3 - and C 4 -plants are differentiated by approximately 1.4% on the δ-scale (approx. -2.7% 13 C versus -1.3% 13 C). Modern elemental analyser - mass spectrometer combinations reach accuracies of at least 0.01% δ 13 C. Therefore, the difference between C 3 and C 4 plants is sufficient to be used for tracer studies. Several investigations of soil organic mater (SOM) turnover under field conditions were undertaken using the fact that the vegetation cover changed between C 3 and C 4 plants. The discrimination between SOM originating from indigenous vegetation (forest, C 3 ) and sugar cane (C 4 ) after 50 years of cropping introducing two SOM compartments of different stability was described. Another example is the change from prairie vegetation (C 4 ) to different C 3 -crops and the evaluation of the carbon origin at or near equilibrium. More recent studies use 15 N-labelled C 4 -plant residues or 13 C-labelled C 3 -plants to elucidate the fate of carbon and nitrogen in soils developed under C 3 -vegetation. Both in situ experiments and laboratory incubations were used to evaluate carbon and nitrogen fluxes from crop residues. Physical fractionation of bulk soil into particle sizes proved to be of advantage to follow short and long-term dynamics of crop residues within SOM. Changes in the natural abundance of 13 C and 15 N within soil profiles can elucidate leaching or mineralization of humic substances. Changes in the natural abundance of stable isotopes are also possible due to the application of organic manures, quantification, however is not easy because of the small isotopic differences between soil and manure carbon and nitrogen. 15 N labelling of soil nitrogen has been widely used in the last two decades to quantify biological nitrogen fixation. Considerable progress has been made due to the isotope dilution

  18. An experimental and petrologic investigation of the source regions of lunar magmatism in the context of the primordial differentiation of the moon

    Elardo, Stephen M.

    -degree partial melting of late-stage LMO cumulates to generate Fe-rich partial melts. Chapter 3 presents datasets from NWA 032 that document one of the only occurrences of oscillatory zoning in lunar minerals. A model is presented that explains the zoning patterns in olivine and pyroxene by convection in a differentially cooling magma chamber. Constraints from mineral chemistry and isotopic compositions show that magma mixing was not a factor during this convection. Lastly, chapter 4 presents the results of high-pressure, high-temperature petrologic experiments on the compositions of the LAP 02205 group basalts, and NEA 003A, the latter of which is also one of the youngest basalts from the Moon. These results show that the LAP group basalts are likely the result of extreme olivine fractionation, whereas NEA 003A not only has the deepest known multiple saturation point amongst crystalline mare basalts, but also may be a near-primary melt. Possible parental melt compositions are calculated for these basalts, and models are presents for the petrogenesis of these basalts and discussed in the context of a cooling lunar mantle. These studies illustrate the importance of different LMO cumulate source regions in lunar magmatism at very different points in the thermal and magmatic evolution of the Moon.

  19. Petrology and geochemistry of Granitoids at Khanchay-Aliabad region, Tarom sub-zone, East of Zanjan

    Arefeh Saiedi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Khanchay-Aliabad area as a part of Tarom magmatic belt contains some shallow depth intrusions which are intruded the Eocene volcanic- sedimentary rocks and have very close association with Cu mineralization. The Eocene volcanic- sedimentary rocks include alternation of basalt, basaltic andesite and andesite, various kinds of tuff, tuffaceous sandstone, sandstone, siltstone and occasionally shale. Petrographical studies demonstrate that intrusions are pyroxene quartz monzonite and olivine gabbro in composition. The Khanchay pyroxene quartz monzonite have porphyritic to porphyroidic, hetero-granular to sereitic, ophitic and sub- ophitic textures and composed of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, hornblende, quartz, K-feldspar and biotite. The Aliabad pyroxene quartz monzonite shows porphyritic to porphyroidic textures composing of plagioclase, clinopyroxene and hornblende in the quartz- feldspatic matrix. The Khanchay olivine gabbro is characterized by the presence of coarse grained granular, ophitic and sub- ophitic textures as well as the occurrence of plagioclase, clinopyroxene and olivine. Geochemical studies indicate that the Khanchay- Aliabad pyroxene quartz monzonitic intrusions have SiO2 content varying from 59.58 to 61.34 %. These intrusions have high- K calc- alkaline nature and are classified as I-type metaluminous granitoids. Their similar patterns on spider diagrams are indication of genetic relation of these intrusions. On these diagrams LILEs (Ba, K, Th and Pb enrichment along with negative anomalies of HFSEs (Nb and Ti are observed. Moreover, the Chondrite normalized REE patterns demonstrate LREE enrichment with high ratio of LREE/HREE and Lan/Ybn ratio ranging from 3.08 to 3.72. The overall  field investigation, petrological and geochemical studies as well as  tectonic setting discrimination diagrams confirm that the Khanchay- Aliabad high-K intrusions were formed from a subduction related metasomatized lithospheric mantle in a post

  20. Azolla--a model organism for plant genomic studies.

    Qiu, Yin-Long; Yu, Jun

    2003-02-01

    The aquatic ferns of the genus Azolla are nitrogen-fixing plants that have great potentials in agricultural production and environmental conservation. Azolla in many aspects is qualified to serve as a model organism for genomic studies because of its importance in agriculture, its unique position in plant evolution, its symbiotic relationship with the N2-fixing cyanobacterium, Anabaena azollae, and its moderate-sized genome. The goals of this genome project are not only to understand the biology of the Azolla genome to promote its applications in biological research and agriculture practice but also to gain critical insights about evolution of plant genomes. Together with the strategic and technical improvement as well as cost reduction of DNA sequencing, the deciphering of their genetic code is imminent.

  1. Microchemistry, geochemistry and geochronology of the Lagoa Real Uranium Province (BA) magmatic association: petrological and evolutionary significance

    Amorim, Lucas Eustaquio Dias

    2016-01-01

    The Lagoa Real Uranium Province (PULR) is located in the center-south of the Bahia State, in the central part of Sao Francisco Craton and consists of an association of Paleoproterozoic meta-granites, alkali-gneiss, albitites, meta-leucodiorite and charnockites. This work has as objective the studies of the magmatic association, trying to understand its petrological and evolutionary meaning. For this purpose, representative bodies were sampled in order to develop unpublished studies of litogeochemistry, isotopes, geochronology and mineral chemistry. These analyzes were performed in: different preserved granitoid facies (Lagoa do Barro, Sao Timoteo, Juazeirinho and late pegmatitic phases), the meta-leucodiorites and charnockite. The data obtained using several modern methodologies, such as geochronology and mineral chemistry by LA-ICP-MS, provided results that allowed the characterization of two magmatic lithologies not described in the literature (Juazeirinho granite e late pegmatitic phases), and also a lithology preliminarily described (Lagoa do Barro granite). Moreover, these data contributed to elucidate the origin and meaning of the leucodiorite and charnoquito varieties, and made it possible to verify new compositional and mineral chemistry tendencies of Sao Timoteo granite. The data presented show that the studied granites were affected by albititization events (tardi or post-magmatic), which have different micro-chemical characteristics from the processes of albite formation related to the non-mineralized albitites bodies. Three albititization events were identified: a) An event that affected the granites characterized by the formation of albite with Rb and U, (b) Another event related to fluids associated with late pegmatitic bodies that formed albite with high levels of U, Rb and Ba, and partially affected the granites of the next pegmatoids portions; and (c) a final albititization event that caused the formation of the albite gneiss bodies, with albite

  2. Magmatic plumbing system of Kilauea Volcano: Insights from Petrologic and Geochemical Monitoring

    Garcia, M. O.; Pietruszka, A. J.; Marske, J.; Greene, A.; Lynn, K. J.

    2016-12-01

    Monitoring the petrology and geochemistry of lavas from active volcanoes in near realtime affords the opportunity to formulate and evaluate models for magma transport, mixing, and storage to help predict eruption scenarios with greater confidence and better understand magmatic plumbing systems (e.g., Poland et al. 2012, Nat. Geosci. 5, 295-300). Continous petrologic and geochemical monitoring of two ongoing eruptions at the summit and east rift zone of Kilauea Volcano on the Island of Hawaii have revealed much about the dynamics of magmatic processes. When the composition of lava shifted to a more MgO-rich composition in April 1983, we predicted that the Puu Oo eruption would not be short-lived. We had no idea it would continue for over 33 years. Subsequent changes in lava composition have highlighted the interplay between mixing pockets of rift-zone stored magma with new mantle-derived magma and the cooling-induced crystal fractionation during brief (usually days) eruption hiatuses. Surprisingly, the mantle derived magma has continued to change in composition including several 10-year cycles in Pb isotope ratios superimposed on a progressive depletion in highly incompatible elements (Greene et al. 2013, G3, doi: 10.1002/ggge.20285). These compositional trends are contrary to those observed for sustained basaltic eruptions on continents and argue for melt extraction from a multi-component source with 1-3 km wide heterogeneities. Compositional zoning within olivine phenocrysts, created by diffusive re-equilibration, also provide insights into magma mixing, storage, and transport at Kilauea. Timescales modeling of Fe-Mg and Ni concentration gradients within Puu Oo olivine indicate that crystals can be stored at magmatic temperatures for months to a few years before eruption (Shea et al. 2015, Geology 43, 935-938). Kilauea's ongoing eruptions continue to provide a dynamic laboratory for positing and testing models for the generation and evolution of basaltic magma.

  3. South-Tibetan partially molten batholiths: geophysical characterization and petrological assessment of their origin

    Hetényi, G.; Pistone, M.; Nabelek, P. I.; Baumgartner, L. P.

    2017-12-01

    Zones of partial melt in the middle crust of Lhasa Block, Southern Tibet, have been geophysically observed as seismically reflective "bright spots" in the past 20 years. These batholiths bear important relevance for geodynamics as they serve as the principal observation at depth supporting channel-flow models in the Himalaya-Tibet orogen. Here we assess the spatial abundance of and partial melt volume fraction within these crustal batholiths, and establish lower and upper estimate bounds using a joint geophysical-petrological approach.Geophysical imaging constrains the abundance of partial melt zones to 5.6 km3 per surface-km2 on average (minimum: 3.1 km3/km2, maximum: 7.6 km3/km2 over the mapped area). Physical properties detected by field geophysics and interpreted by laboratory measurements constrain the amount of partial melt to be between 5 and 26 percent.We evaluate the compatibility of these estimates with petrological modeling based on geotherms, crustal bulk rock compositions and water contents consistent with the Lhasa Block. These simulations determine: (a) the physico-chemical conditions of melt generation at the base of the Tibetan crust and its transport and emplacement in the middle crust; (b) the melt percentage produced at the source, transported and emplaced to form the observed "bright spots". Two main mechanisms are considered: (1) melting induced by fluids produced during mineral dehydration reactions in the underthrusting Indian lower crust; (2) dehydration-melting reactions caused by heating within the Tibetan crust. We find that both mechanisms demonstrate first-order match in explaining the formation of the partially molten "bright spots". Thermal modelling shows that the Lhasa Block batholiths have only small amounts of melt and only for geologically short times (features of the geodynamic evolution. Their transience excludes both long-distance and long-lasting channel flow transport in Tibet.

  4. Petrological Geodynamics of Mantle Melting I. AlphaMELTS + Multiphase Flow: Dynamic Equilibrium Melting, Method and Results

    Massimiliano Tirone

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The complex process of melting in the Earth's interior is studied by combining a multiphase numerical flow model with the program AlphaMELTS which provides a petrological description based on thermodynamic principles. The objective is to address the fundamental question of the effect of the mantle and melt dynamics on the composition and abundance of the melt and the residual solid. The conceptual idea is based on a 1-D description of the melting process that develops along an ideal vertical column where local chemical equilibrium is assumed to apply at some level in space and time. By coupling together the transport model and the chemical thermodynamic model, the evolution of the melting process can be described in terms of melt distribution, temperature, pressure and solid and melt velocities but also variation of melt and residual solid composition and mineralogical abundance at any depth over time. In this first installment of a series of three contributions, a two-phase flow model (melt and solid assemblage is developed under the assumption of complete local equilibrium between melt and a peridotitic mantle (dynamic equilibrium melting, DEM. The solid mantle is also assumed to be completely dry. The present study addresses some but not all the potential factors affecting the melting process. The influence of permeability and viscosity of the solid matrix are considered in some detail. The essential features of the dynamic model and how it is interfaced with AlphaMELTS are clearly outlined. A detailed and explicit description of the numerical procedure should make this type of numerical models less obscure. The general observation that can be made from the outcome of several simulations carried out for this work is that the melt composition varies with depth, however the melt abundance not necessarily always increases moving upwards. When a quasi-steady state condition is achieved, that is when melt abundance does not varies significantly

  5. Multifunctionality of Organic Farming: Case Study from Southern Poland

    Śpiewak Ruta

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this article is to answer the question whether organic farming, which is developing in some parts of Poland, can be considered as a form of multifunctional farming and contribute so to non-commodity functions and the process of change in a particular territory of given areas. The analyses are based on data obtained from 2013 of several points in the south of Poland representing a cluster of organic market oriented farmers. The results show that namely market organic farming may serve as multifunctional one, but only under certain conditions and for a specific type of farming. Through specific functions, organic farming facilitates the changes, primarily on a local scale. The existence of a strong integrated organic farming sector might influences development and change, resulting in not only the improvement of economic welfare of organic farmers, but also of whole local communities, strengthening the bonds amongst them, mobilising the social resources.

  6. Study of the interactions between organic matter and transuranic elements

    Moulin, V.; Billon, A.; Theyssier, M.; Dellis, T.

    1991-01-01

    The study of the occurrence of humic substances present in natural waters and their physico-chemical properties, in particular their complexing behaviour, constitutes the main objectives of this research programme. In the first part, the report presents the description of the selected aquifer (representative of a granitic geological formation: Fanay-Augeres), the method for the collection and concentration of the humic substances (a sorption technique) and their characterization by different physico-chemical techniques (elementary and mineral composition, spectroscopic properties, size, proton capacity, datation). The results show that Fanay-Augeres humic substances (considered as site-specific humic substances) represent 41% of the total organic carbon (TOC) present in the aquifer (2ppm) and have properties similar to other aquatic humic substances. The second part describes the study of the interactions occurring between these humic substances and trivalent cations (Eu and Am). Two different analytical methods have been developed to perform these investigations: spectrophotometry and size-exclusion chromatography. Interaction constants and complexing capacities have been determined and compared with literature data. Fanay-Augeres humic substances present complexing for trivalent actinides which agrees with published data. Further developments needed in complexation studies are described. 10 figs.; 15 tabs.; 39 refs

  7. A study on applying image dictionary to inner organ registration

    Matsuno, Takamichi; Asai, Takeshi; Iwata, Takuya; Hontani, Hidekata

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we report on selecting image features that are useful for registering organ surface in medical image based on image dictionary constructed for the organ. Here, the image dictionary denotes a basis set, which is non-orthogonal and over-complete one and is designed to represent images of the target organ. We propose a method that refers to a combination of the basis obtained for reconstructing a given image in order to estimate the location of the target organ. (author)

  8. Petrology and oxygen isotope geochemistry of the Pucon ignimbrite - Southern Andean volcanic zone, Chile: Implications for genesis of mafic ignimbrites

    McCurry, Michael; Schmidt, Keegan

    2001-01-01

    Although mafic components of dominantly intermediate to silicic ignimbrites are rather common, voluminous, dominantly mafic ignimbrites are rare (e.g., Smith, 1979; cf. Freundt and Schmincke, 1995). Volcan Villarrica, the most active composite volcano in South America, located in the Southern Andean Volcanic Zone (SAVZ, Lopez-Escobar and Moreno, 1994a), has produced two such ignimbrites, respectively the Lican and Pucon Ignimbrites, in the last 14,000 years (Clavero, 1996). The two ignimbrites are low-Si andesite and basaltic-andesite to low-Si andesite, respectively, the former about twice as voluminous as the later (10 and 5 km 3 ). Eruption of the ignimbrites produced calderas respectively 5 and 2 km in diameter (Moreno, 1995; Clavero, 1996). In addition to its mafic bulk composition, the Pucon Ignimbrite (PI) is also distinguished by numerous xenolithic fragments among and also within magmatic pyroclasts. Many of these are fragments of granitoid rocks. Volcan Villarrica has also produced numerous smaller mafic ignimbrites and pyroclastic surge deposits, as well as dominantly basaltic fallout and lava flows (Lopez-Escobar and Moreno, 1994; Moreno, 1995; Clavero, 1996; Hickey-Vargas et al., 1989; Tormey et al., 1991). Reasons for the unusual style of mafic explosive activity at Volcan Villarrica are unclear. Clavero (1996), based upon an exemplary thesis-study of the physical volcanology and petrology of the PI, suggests it formed in response to a sequence of events beginning with injection of a shallow basaltic andesite magma chamber by hotter basaltic magma. In his model mixing and heat transfer between the two magmas initiated a violent Strombolian eruption that destabilized the chamber causing infiltration of large amounts of meteoric-water saturated country rocks. The Pucon Ignimbrite formed in response to subsequent phreatomagmatic interactions. In contrast, Lopez-Escobar and Moreno (1994) infer on geochemical grounds that volatiles leading to the explosive

  9. A crustal-upper mantle model for southeastern Sicily (Italy) from the integration of petrologic and geophysical data

    Manuella, Fabio Carmelo; Brancato, Alfonso; Carbone, Serafina; Gresta, Stefano

    2013-05-01

    An interdisciplinary approach is proposed to investigate the structure and composition of the Permo-Triassic basement of the Hyblean Plateau and Sicily Channel. Comparisons of published data on peridotites and spinels from different geodynamic settings, and new data on Hyblean spinels, reveal the affinity of the Hyblean basement with an ultra-slow spreading oceanic lithosphere, rather than with the Africa continental plate. Similar results derive from volcanic rocks of the studied area, whose Nb/Yb vs. Th/Yb ratio hints at their affinity with the MORB-OIB array, even excluding any possible contamination with continental crust lithologies, unlike North Africa lavas. The comparison of He isotopic ratios from Hyblean Plateau and Sicily Channel highlights their similarity with values measured in fluids emitted from the Rainbow and Logatchev hydrothermal fields in Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Based on petrologic and geochemical evidence for the oceanic nature of the Permo-Triassic basement in southeastern Sicily, and the occurrence of serpentinized harzburgite xenoliths in Hyblean diatremes, the P-wave velocity model proposed for the investigated area is used to estimate lithospheric pressure, density, degree of serpentinization and magnetic susceptibility also considering both abyssal and ophiolitic serpentinites. The resulting values suggest the presence of peridotites affected by different degrees of serpentinization (35-100 vol.%) ranging to a depth of 8-19 km. As a whole, combined seismic, gravimetric and magnetic data indicate the presence of a marked anomaly at a depth of about 19 km. As a consequence, we consider the Moho discontinuity as a serpentinization front, by fixing the relative top at a depth of 19 km. Our results suggest that the oceanic lithospheric model for southeastern Sicily could be broadened to the Sicily Channel, which is possibly correlated to the adjacent Ionian oceanic basin, inferred as belonging to the Oman-Iraq-Levantine-Sicily seaway.

  10. X-ray and neutron scattering study of organic-organic heterolayers for organic electronics and biointerfaces

    Huth, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The presented work deals with fundamental research to develop an all-organic sensor device capable of detecting changes of the electrical potential, e.g. neural activity, in a biologically relevant environment. In this approach the active area of the sensor is built from organic materials only. The effective interface between the sensor and the cells is an artificial cell membrane decorated with a synthetic binding unit, which has been constructed adopting the methods found in nature. The sensor itself is an organic thin film transistor (OTFT), obtaining its sensitivity from the properties of the organic semiconductor and from having an active layer with a thickness of only 50 nm. The fabricated multilayer systems were characterized with X-ray and neutron diffraction using giant equipment (synchrotron, reactor). A major focus of the presented thesis lies on discovering and manipulating the structure of the involved materials on the molecular scale. At first, an overview on aggregation mechanism and molecular interaction with surfaces depending on the shape of the molecules is given. The experimental part deals with the growth of the organic semiconductor, pentacene (C 22 H 14 ) on various surfaces. By chemically modifying diamond surfaces, controlled pentacene film growth in a standing or lying configuration was achieved. Furthermore, the encapsulation with an alkane, tetratetracontane (TTC, C 44 H 90 ), which has been achieved using vacuum deposition. Applying the correct process parameters, the electronically best suited ''thin film phase'' of pentacene could be conserved. Coating of the pentacene film with a TTC layer was possible in a way that a transducer device showed stable operation in ionic aqueous environment, which is the essential step towards sensor technology. On the other hand we succeeded in constructing a versatile functional coating, providing a surface which cells accept as their ''natural'' environment. On the basis of a supported lipid bilayer

  11. X-ray and neutron scattering study of organic-organic heterolayers for organic electronics and biointerfaces

    Huth, Martin

    2010-12-23

    The presented work deals with fundamental research to develop an all-organic sensor device capable of detecting changes of the electrical potential, e.g. neural activity, in a biologically relevant environment. In this approach the active area of the sensor is built from organic materials only. The effective interface between the sensor and the cells is an artificial cell membrane decorated with a synthetic binding unit, which has been constructed adopting the methods found in nature. The sensor itself is an organic thin film transistor (OTFT), obtaining its sensitivity from the properties of the organic semiconductor and from having an active layer with a thickness of only 50 nm. The fabricated multilayer systems were characterized with X-ray and neutron diffraction using giant equipment (synchrotron, reactor). A major focus of the presented thesis lies on discovering and manipulating the structure of the involved materials on the molecular scale. At first, an overview on aggregation mechanism and molecular interaction with surfaces depending on the shape of the molecules is given. The experimental part deals with the growth of the organic semiconductor, pentacene (C{sub 22}H{sub 14}) on various surfaces. By chemically modifying diamond surfaces, controlled pentacene film growth in a standing or lying configuration was achieved. Furthermore, the encapsulation with an alkane, tetratetracontane (TTC, C{sub 44}H{sub 90}), which has been achieved using vacuum deposition. Applying the correct process parameters, the electronically best suited ''thin film phase'' of pentacene could be conserved. Coating of the pentacene film with a TTC layer was possible in a way that a transducer device showed stable operation in ionic aqueous environment, which is the essential step towards sensor technology. On the other hand we succeeded in constructing a versatile functional coating, providing a surface which cells accept as their &apos

  12. X-ray and neutron scattering study of organic-organic heterolayers for organic electronics and biointerfaces

    Huth, Martin

    2010-12-23

    The presented work deals with fundamental research to develop an all-organic sensor device capable of detecting changes of the electrical potential, e.g. neural activity, in a biologically relevant environment. In this approach the active area of the sensor is built from organic materials only. The effective interface between the sensor and the cells is an artificial cell membrane decorated with a synthetic binding unit, which has been constructed adopting the methods found in nature. The sensor itself is an organic thin film transistor (OTFT), obtaining its sensitivity from the properties of the organic semiconductor and from having an active layer with a thickness of only 50 nm. The fabricated multilayer systems were characterized with X-ray and neutron diffraction using giant equipment (synchrotron, reactor). A major focus of the presented thesis lies on discovering and manipulating the structure of the involved materials on the molecular scale. At first, an overview on aggregation mechanism and molecular interaction with surfaces depending on the shape of the molecules is given. The experimental part deals with the growth of the organic semiconductor, pentacene (C{sub 22}H{sub 14}) on various surfaces. By chemically modifying diamond surfaces, controlled pentacene film growth in a standing or lying configuration was achieved. Furthermore, the encapsulation with an alkane, tetratetracontane (TTC, C{sub 44}H{sub 90}), which has been achieved using vacuum deposition. Applying the correct process parameters, the electronically best suited ''thin film phase'' of pentacene could be conserved. Coating of the pentacene film with a TTC layer was possible in a way that a transducer device showed stable operation in ionic aqueous environment, which is the essential step towards sensor technology. On the other hand we succeeded in constructing a versatile functional coating, providing a surface which cells accept as their ''natural'' environment. On the basis of a

  13. Studies on the use of haloperoxidases in organic synthesis

    Franssen, M.C.R.

    1987-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the use of haloperoxidases in synthetic organic chemistry. Haloperoxidases are enzymes capable of halogenating a variety of organic compounds. They require hydrogen peroxide and halide ions as cosubstrates. The enzymes operate under mild conditions, compared to

  14. STUDY OF PERFORMANCES OF ORGANIC SOLAR CELLS BY ...

    30 juin 2011 ... results of analysis of performances of organic solar cells by using what one call the datamining materials. ... Keywords: organic solar cells, gap energie, effiency, PCA. Author Correspondence .... oubli est malencontreux car le type de données disponibles influence toujours la direction de la recherche.

  15. The Political Economy of Interlibrary Organizations: Two Case Studies.

    Townley, Charles T.

    J. Kenneth Benson's political economy model for interlibrary cooperation identifies linkages and describes interactions between the environment, the interlibrary organization, and member libraries. A tentative general model for interlibrary organizations based on the Benson model was developed, and the fit of this adjusted model to the realities…

  16. LOSS OF ORGANIC CHEMICALS IN SOIL: PURE COMPOUND TREATABILITY STUDIES

    Comprehensive screening data on the treatability of 32 organic chemicals in soil were developed. Of the evaluated chemicals, 22 were phenolic compounds. Aerobic batch laboratory microcosm experiments were conducted using two soils: an acidic clay soil with <1% organic matter and ...

  17. Organ utilization from increased infectious risk donors: An observational study.

    L'Huillier, Arnaud G; Humar, Atul; Payne, Clare; Kumar, Deepali

    2017-12-01

    Donors with an increased risk of transmitting human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), or hepatitis C virus (HCV) (increased risk donors [IRDs]) are a potential source of organs for transplant. Organs from IRDs can be utilized with appropriate recipient consent and post-transplant follow-up. We reviewed the characteristics and utilization of IRDs in our Organ Procurement Organization (OPO) over a 2-year period. Donor information from April 1, 2013 to March 31, 2015 was obtained through the OPO database. Only consented donors were included. Donors were categorized as IRDs according to Health Canada/Canadian Standards Association (CSA) criteria. A total of 494 potential donors were identified, of which 92 (18.6%) were IRDs. Of these, at least one organ was transplanted from 76 (82.6%). Risk factors for IRDs included injection drug user (IDU) (12%), men having sex with men (MSM) (7%), commercial sex worker (CSW) (4%), and incarceration (24%). Fifty-nine percent (253/429) of IRD organs were utilized. The most frequently used organ was kidney, followed by liver. Median number of organs recovered per IRD was 3 (interquartile range: 2-5). Nucleic acid testing (NAT) was performed in 18.5% (17/92) of IRDs. Reasons for NAT were IDU (n = 2), MSM (n = 2), CSW (n = 2), and previous incarceration (n = 7). Organ utilization from donors that had NAT was similar to donors who did not (94% vs 80%, P = .29). Follow-up NAT was done in multiple factors contribute to the perception of infectious risk from such organs. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Organics on Mars : Laboratory studies of organic material under simulated martian conditions

    Kate, Inge Loes ten

    2006-01-01

    The search for organic molecules and traces of life on Mars has been a major topic in planetary science for several decades, and is the future perspective of several missions to Mars. In order to determine where and what those missions should be looking for, laboratory experiments under simulated

  19. Preliminary study on the occurrence of brominated organic compounds in Dutch marine organisms

    Kotterman, M.J.J.; Veen, van der I.; Hesselingen, van J.M.; Leonards, P.E.G.; Osinga, R.; Boer, de J.

    2003-01-01

    The extracts of three marine organisms; the ascidian Ciona intestinalis, the brown seaweed Sargassum muticum and the sponge Halichondria panicea, all elicited a number of brominated compounds, some of which were tentatively identified. Tribromophenol was observed in all species. This compound, also

  20. Laboratory Calibration Studies in Support of ORGANICS on the International Space Station: Evolution of Organic Matter in Space

    Ruiterkamp, R.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Halasinski, T.; Salama, F.; Foing, B.; Schmidt, W.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the scientific overview and current status of ORGANICS an exposure experiment performed on the International Space Station (ISS) to study the evolution of organic matter in space (PI: P. Ehrenfreund), with supporting laboratory experiments performed at NASA Ames. ORGANICS investigates the chemical evolution of samples submitted to long-duration exposure to space environment in near-Earth orbit. This experiment will provide information on the nature, evolution, and survival of carbon species in the interstellar medium (ISM) and in solar system targets.

  1. Laboratory studies of monoterpene secondary organic aerosol formation and evolution

    Thornton, J. A.; D'Ambro, E.; Zhao, Y.; Lee, B. H.; Pye, H. O. T.; Schobesberger, S.; Shilling, J.; Liu, J.

    2017-12-01

    We have conducted a series of chamber experiments to study the molecular composition and properties of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed from monoterpenes under a range of photochemical and dark conditions. We connect variations in the SOA mass yield to molecular composition and volatility, and use a detailed Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM) based chemical box model with dynamic gas-particle partitioning to examine the importance of various peroxy radical reaction mechanisms in setting the SOA yield and properties. We compare the volatility distribution predicted by the model to that inferred from isothermal room-temperature evaporation experiments using the FIGAERO-CIMS where SOA particles collected on a filter are allowed to evaporate under humidified pure nitrogen flow stream for up to 24 hours. We show that the combination of results requires prompt formation of low volatility SOA from predominantly gas-phase mechanisms, with important differences between monoterpenes (alpha-Pinene and delta-3-Carene) followed by slower non-radical particle phase chemistry that modulates both the chemical and physical properties of the SOA. Implications for the regional evolution of atmospheric monoterpene SOA are also discussed.

  2. An Enterprise Information Architecture: A Case Study for Decentralized Organizations

    Watson, R.W.

    1999-01-01

    As enterprises become increasingly information based, making improvements in their information activities is a top priority to assure their continuing competitiveness. A key to achieving these improvements is developing an Enterprise Information Architecture (EIA). An EIA can be viewed as a structured set of multidimensional interrelated elements that support all information processes. The current ad hoc EIAs in place within many enterprises can not meet their future needs because of a lack of a coherent framework, incompatibilities, missing elements, few and poorly understood standards, uneven quality and unnecessary duplications. This paper discusses the EIA developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory as a case study, for other information based enterprises, particularly those with decentralized and autonomous organization structures and cultures. While the architecture is important, the process by which it is developed and sustained over time is equally important. This paper outlines the motivation for an EIA and discusses each of the interacting elements identified. It also presents an organizational structure and processes for building a sustainable EIA activity

  3. THE CONCEPT OF PERFORMANCE IN BUSINESS ORGANIZATIONS – CASE STUDY ON THE EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE IN ROMANIAN BUSINESS ORGANIZATIONS

    COSMIN OCTAVIAN DOBRIN; GHEORGHE N. POPESCU; VERONICA ADRIANA POPESCU; CRISTINA RALUCA POPESCU

    2012-01-01

    The general economic recession generated by the world financial crisis, with direct implications on funding, economic actors’ interactions, economic and social environment, technological progress and knowledge development, imposes the rethinking of the concept of performance in business organizations worldwide. Our study aims to present the importance held by performance at the level of business organizations in terms of a historical and multidisciplinary approach, in order to determine the b...

  4. Organizing for Innovation in a Shared Services Organization: A Case Study of Ericsson

    Tsagkari, Kleopatra-Zoi

    2016-01-01

    Intense global competition and rapid technological advances have seen innovation become central towards enabling firms to adapt and rejuvenate themselves. While firms become increasingly focused on innovation, the challenge of managing innovation and developing innovation capabilities still remains. The purpose of this thesis is to analyse and evaluate the innovation capabilities of Ericsson’s Shared Services Organization (SSO). To do so, the existing literature and theories are synthesized a...

  5. Posthumous organ donation beliefs of college students: A qualitative study

    Hongxia Liu

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: Despite positive attitudes towards posthumous organ donation, college students are hesitant to become donors because of lack of knowledge/publicity; cultural disdain; and lack of governmental assurance.

  6. Pathology of knowledge strategy barriers in organization: a case study

    Mehdi Kheirandish

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge management plays an important role on the success of organizations but there are several reasons that many organizations fail to talk a full advantage of the benefits of knowledge management implementation. In this paper, we perform an empirical investigation on supreme audit court organization of Iran. The survey uses a standard questionnaire and distributes 116 questionnaires among 228 people who worked for this organization. Cronbach alpha yields 0.817, which is well above the minimum acceptable level. Kolmogorov–Smirnov test has been performed to examine the normality of the data and yields 1.71 for management attributes, 1.78 is for resource factors and 1.73 for environment factors and P-value for all three factors is 0.000. The preliminary results of our survey indicate that management is the first important factor followed by resources and environment factors.

  7. Study of influence on micro-fabricated resistive switching organic ...

    3Northwest Electric Power Design Institute of China Power Engineering Consulting Group, Xi'an,. Shaanxi ... gives rise to an important application of organic thin film devices as ... This C-AFM measurement system is consisted with an AFM.

  8. Studying the Interaction of the Epistemology in e-Government, Organization Studies and Information Systems

    Meneklis, Vassilis; Douligeris, Christos

    Although there are significant differences between Organization Studies, Information Systems and e-Government, certain boundaries between them have started to dissolve in the light of recent developments. Even though influences can be traced among all three concerning research results, epistemological interaction could produce interesting outcomes. In this paper we propose such an interaction in epistemology, and particularly in methods following the interpretive tradition, which has been notably underused. We present a brief review of literature in e-Government and after sketching its route, we propose ways to integrate in it perceptions and methods from Organization Studies and Information Systems.

  9. Studies on radioactivity monitoring proceedure for marine organisms

    Koyanagi, Taku; Hirano, Shigeki

    1978-01-01

    Suitability of several species of mollusca and seaweeds as indicator organisms for radioactivity monitoring of marine environment was examined by radioisotope tracer experiments or stable elements analyses from the standpoints of the affinities for radionuclides, the sampling procedures, and the distribution of radioactive and stable elements in the body of these organisms. Extremely high concentration factor of 54 Mn was shown by kidney of scallop suggesting the suitability for the efficient monitoring of the nuclide though the contribution of kidney to the weight of scallop was very small. Higher concentration of 54 Mn in midgut gland rather than kidney was observed in the case of other species of shellfishes but distribution of the nuclide among organs or tissues of the organisms varied during the period of intake and excretion. Ununiform distribution of radioactive and stable elements among the species of seaweeds and in the body of seaweeds observed by the tracer experiments and stable element analyses suggested the necessity of careful selection of the samples for monitoring of these nuclides. From the results of tracer experiments carried out in order to elucidate the relation between existing state of radionuclides in seawater and uptake by marine organisms, it was supposed that the complexed forms with inorganic or organic ligands in seawater were predominant species of radioactive cerium in seawater. (author)

  10. Weathering of Igneous, Metamorphic, and Sedimentary Rocks in a Semi-arid Climate - An Engineering Application of Petrology

    Harrison, W. J.; Wendlandt, R. F.

    2003-12-01

    Over the last 10 years, analytical methods have been introduced to students in CSM's undergraduate geological engineering program through a multi-year and multi-course approach. Beginning with principles and simple applications of XRD and SEM in sophomore Mineralogy and building on these skills in subsequent junior and senior year courses, geological engineers acquire proficiency in analytical methods. Essential workplace skills are thus acquired without adding an extra course in the undergraduate program. The following exercise is completed by juniors in an integrated Ig.-Met.-Sed. petrology course. The identification of clay mineral assemblages in soils provides a unique opportunity to demonstrate how basic principles of petrology and geochemistry are applied to engineering design criteria in construction site preparation. Specifically, the problem investigates the conditions leading to the formation of smectite in soils and the resulting construction risk due to soil expansion. Students examine soils developed on igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks near Denver, Colorado. The field locations are areas of suburban growth and several have expansive soil problems. The 2-week exercise includes sample collection, description, and preparation, determining clay mineralogy by XRD, and measurement of Atterberg Plasticity Indices. Teaching materials may be found at: http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/petrology03/. This exercise accomplishes three objectives: First, skills in XRD analysis are developed by introducing students to concepts of particle size separation, particle orientation, and sequential analysis steps which are standard practices in clay characterization. Second, lecture material on the geochemistry of weathering of different rock types is reinforced. Students interpret the origin of clay mineral assemblages developed in soils derived from Precambrian gneisses, lower Paleozoic feldspathic sandstones, upper Paleozoic marine shales, and Tertiary

  11. Study on the effect of organic fertilizers on soil organic matter and enzyme activities of soil in forest nursery

    Piaszczyk Wojciech

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to assess the effects of organic fertilization on selected chemical properties of the soil and the activity of dehydrogenase and β-glucosidase in the soil of forest nursery. The main goal was to evaluate the role of organic fertilizers in carbon storage in the forest nursery soil. Sample plots were located in northern Poland in the Polanów Forest District on a forest nursery. Soil samples were collected from horizon 0–20 cm for laboratory analyzes. In soil samples pH, soil texture, and organic carbon, nitrogen, base cation contents, dehydrogenase activity and β-glucosidase activity were determined. The obtained results were used to evaluate the carbon storage. The results confirm the beneficial effect of the applied organic fertilizer on chemical properties of the soils under study and their biological activity. The applied organic fertilizers had an impact on increased accumulation of soil organic matter. In the soils investigated, there was an increase in the activity of such enzymes as dehydrogenases and β-glucosidase.

  12. Organic thermometry for chondritic parent bodies

    Cody, G. D.; Alexander, C. M. O'D.; Yabuta, H.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Araki, T.; Ade, H.; Dera, P.; Fogel, M.; Militzer, B.; Mysen, B. O.

    2008-07-01

    A unique spectroscopic feature has been identified in a study of twenty-five different samples of meteoritic insoluble organic matter (IOM) spanning multiple chemical classes, groups, and petrologic types, using carbon X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The intensity of this feature, a 1s - σ* exciton, appears to provide a precise measure of parent body metamorphism. The intensity of this exciton is also shown to correlate well with a large negative paramagnetic shift observed through solid state 13C NMR. Experiments reveal that upon heating primitive IOM is transformed into material that is indistinguishable from that in thermally processed chondrites, including the development of the 1s - σ* exciton. A thermo-kinetic expression is derived from the experimental data that allows the intensity of the 1s - σ* exciton to be used to estimated the effective temperature integrated over time. A good correlation is observed between the intensity of the 1s - σ* exciton and previously published microRaman spectral data. These data provide a self-consistent organic derived temperature scale for the purpose of calibrating Raman based thermometric expressions.

  13. Origins of cratonic mantle discontinuities: A view from petrology, geochemistry and thermodynamic models

    Aulbach, Sonja; Massuyeau, Malcolm; Gaillard, Fabrice

    2017-01-01

    Geophysically detectible mid-lithospheric discontinuities (MLD) and lithosphere-asthenosphere boundaries (LAB) beneath cratons have received much attention over recent years, but a consensus on their origin has not yet emerged. Cratonic lithosphere composition and origin is peculiar due to its ultra-depletion during plume or accretionary tectonics, cool present-day geothermal gradients, compositional and rheological stratification and multiple metasomatic overprints. Bearing this in mind, we integrate current knowledge on the physical properties, chemical composition, mineralogy and fabric of cratonic mantle with experimental and thermodynamic constraints on the formation and migration of melts, both below and within cratonic lithosphere, in order to find petrologically viable explanations for cratonic mantle discontinuities. LABs characterised by strong seismic velocity gradients and increased conductivity require the presence of melts, which can form beneath intact cratonic roots reaching to 200-250 km depth only in exceptionally warm and/or volatile-rich mantle, thus explaining the paucity of seismical LAB observations beneath cratons. When present, pervasive interaction of these - typically carbonated - melts with the deep lithosphere leads to densification and thermochemical erosion, which generates topography at the LAB and results in intermittent seismic LAB signals or conflicting seismic, petrologic and thermal LAB depths. In rare cases (e.g. Tanzanian craton), the tops of live melt percolation fronts may appear as MLDs and, after complete lithosphere rejuvenation, may be sites of future, shallower LABs (e.g. North China craton). Since intact cratons are presently tectonomagmatically quiescent, and since MLDs produce both positive and negative velocity gradients, in some cases with anisotropy, most MLDs may be best explained by accumulations (metasomes) of seismically slow minerals (pyroxenes, phlogopite, amphibole, carbonates) deposited during past

  14. Estimation of Water Within the Lithospheric Mantle of Central Tibet from Petrological-Geophysical Investigations

    Vozar, J.; Fullea, J.; Jones, A. G.

    2013-12-01

    Investigations of the lithosphere and sub-lithospheric upper mantle by integrated petrological-geophysical modeling of magnetotelluric (MT) and seismic surface-wave data, which are differently sensitive to temperature and composition, allows us to reduce the uncertainties associated with modeling these two data sets independently, as commonly undertaken. We use selected INDEPTH MT data, which have appropriate dimensionality and large penetration depths, across central Tibet for 1D modeling. Our deep resistivity models from the data can be classified into two different and distinct groups: (i) the Lhasa Terrane and (ii) the Qiangtang Terrane. For the Lhasa Terrane group, the models show the existence of upper mantle conductive layer localized at depths of 200 km, whereas for the Qiangtang Terrane, this conductive layer is shallower at depths of 120 km. We perform the integrated geophysical-petrological modeling of the MT and surface-wave data using the software package LitMod. The program facilitates definition of realistic temperature and pressure distributions within the upper mantle for given thermal structure and oxide chemistry in the CFMAS system. This allows us to define a bulk geoelectric and seismic model of the upper mantle based on laboratory and xenolith data for the most relevant mantle minerals, and to compute synthetic geophysical observables. Our results suggest an 80-120 km-thick, dry lithosphere in the central part of the Qiangtang Terrane. In contrast, in the central Lhasa Terrane the predicted MT responses are too resistive for a dry lithosphere regardless its thickness; according to seismic and topography data the expected lithospheric thickness is about 200 km. The presence of small amounts of water significantly decreases the electrical resistivity of mantle rocks and is required to fit the MT responses. We test the hypothesis of small amounts of water (ppm scale) in the nominally anhydrous minerals of the lithospheric mantle. Such a small

  15. Carbon trading as incentive for conversion to organic agriculture. Case study. Organic peanuts in Tanzania

    Bodnar, F.

    2005-12-15

    In this pilot project, the climate effects of the conversion from conventional to organic cultivation of peanuts are evaluated. We could aim at voluntary carbon credits that do not comply with the CDM (Clean Development Mechanisms) rules, but we try to meet the CDM rules by combining it with a agroforestry component. However, in the example of Tanzania meeting the CDM rules was a problem. The agricultural system in Tanzania consists of a rotation of several years cultivation and several years fallow. This fallow of grass, shrubs and trees could be considered as 'forest'. Taking fallow land into cultivation would then be deforestation, which would make the planting of trees no longer eligible under CDM. This is a shame because the traditional 'slash and burn' system emits a lot of greenhouse gases.

  16. Information Systems Evaluation: A Study in Hospital Organizations

    Laís Coelho Ayala

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Given increasing demand for timely and accurate information to support decision making, hospitals, a particularly complex type of service organization, have increasingly resorted to a wide range of tools such as the Clinical Information Systems (CIS. However, research has shown that such systems do not always meet hospital managers’ needs, and assessment processes are necessary both before and after CIS implementation. Aiming to identify whether the CIS do meet hospital managers’ information needs and do fit in the specificities of such organizations, this paper reports on the assessment of four CIS based on the perspective of their users in four hospitals in the Metropolitan Region of Belo Horizonte, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The data was collected by means of semi-structured interviews and non-obtrusive observation. On the one hand, the result shows that the four organizations have difficulties in using their systems, such as accessibility problems, inadequate training and system underutilization. On the other hand, they also benefit from such systems, as they make processes faster and enable information control. One can say that the results from this research contribute to a better understanding of evaluating information systems in hospitals. Managers of such organizations can benefit from these results when seeking to evaluate and improve their information systens.

  17. Secondary Professional Socialization through Professional Organizations: An Exploratory Study

    Richards, K. Andrew; Eberline, Andrew D.; Templin, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Secondary professional socialization is a phase of occupational socialization theory that focuses on graduate education in preparation for a career in academia. Due to the need to present and publish research and make professional contacts, professional organizations likely serve an important socializing function during graduate education. The…

  18. Study of neural cells on organic semiconductor ultra thin films

    Bystrenova, Eva; Tonazzini, Ilaria; Stoliar, Pablo; Greco, Pierpaolo; Lazar, Adina; Dutta, Soumya; Dionigi, Chiara; Cacace, Marcello; Biscarini, Fabio [ISMN-CNR, Bologna (Italy); Jelitai, Marta; Madarasz, Emilia [IEM- HAS, Budapest (Hungary); Huth, Martin; Nickel, Bert [LMU, Munich (Germany); Martini, Claudia [Dept. PNPB, Univ. of Pisa (Italy)

    2008-07-01

    Many technological advances are currently being developed for nano-fabrication, offering the ability to create and control patterns of soft materials. We report the deposition of cells on organic semiconductor ultra-thin films. This is a first step towards the development of active bio/non bio systems for electrical transduction. Thin films of pentacene, whose thickness was systematically varied, were grown by high vacuum sublimation. We report adhesion, growth, and differentiation of human astroglial cells and mouse neural stem cells on an organic semiconductor. Viability of astroglial cells in time was measured as a function of the roughness and the characteristic morphology of ultra thin organic film, as well as the features of the patterned molecules. Optical fluorescence microscope coupled to atomic force microscope was used to monitor the presence, density and shape of deposited cells. Neural stem cells remain viable, differentiate by retinoic acid and form dense neuronal networks. We have shown the possibility to integrate living neural cells on organic semiconductor thin films.

  19. Architecture Alignment in a Large Government Organization: A Case Study

    Wieringa, Roelf J.; van Eck, Pascal; Blanken, Henk

    In this paper we view IT architecture as the structures present in the entire information technology support used by an organization. Research into IT architecture either is of a strategic nature, yielding no operational guidelines for the practicing IT-architect, or it is part of software

  20. How to Brand an International Organization. NATO Case Study

    Gigi Mihaita

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Branding products and companies has always been associated with private enterprises and less, if ever, with international intergovernmental organizations. International organizations now have a long history behind them, a history often marked by contradictory events. In the last decade the international organizations developed their own public relations department in an attempt to communicate promptly and transmit the general audience their version of reality. Having this in mind we will try to briefly present in the current work the main reasons why we believe that the international organizations, NATO in particular, have started to see themselves as brand and to create a so called “commercial identity” by becoming a brand. By applying the conceptual and analytical framework used in analyzing the marketing strategies of the private companies we will try to see whether NATO is about to become a brand. Our starting point will be a 2008 statement of Jean-François Bureau, deputy general secretary responsible with NATO’s public diplomacy: “We have the green light to think about a branding policy for NATO”. Nowadays global society, perceptions tend to become more important than reality itself, and thus positive perceptions tend to become crucial. NATO has suffered an image decline in the last decade, therefore some new communication measures tend to impose themselves. The distinction between soft power and propaganda must be carefully analyzed when we speak about branding NATO. Thus we hope to bring some necessary clarifications in the area of NATO branding. Is there a brand? Is a brand going to be constructed? How does it differ from a commercial society? Does NATO need its own TV channel? Raising questions and offering a new perspective is, in the end, our primary goal, as a debate on this subject is a must that offers a new perspective in the area of theory of international organizations.

  1. Petrology of Ortsog-Uul peridotite-gabbro massif in Western Mongolia

    Shapovalova, M.; Tolstykh, N.; Shelepaev, R.; Cherdantseva, M.

    2017-12-01

    The Ortsog-Uul mafic-ultramafic massif of Western Mongolia is located in a tectonic block with overturned bedding. The massif hosts two intrusions: a rhythmically-layered peridotite-gabbro association (Intrusion 1) and massive Bt-bearing amphibole-olivine gabbro (Intrusion 2). Intrusions 1 and 2 have different petrology features. Early Intrusion 1 (278±2.5Ma) is characterized by lower concentrations of alkalis, titanium and phosphorus than late Intrusion 2 (272±2Ma). The chondrite-normalized REE and primitive mantle-normalized rare elements patterns of Ortsog-Uul intrusions have similar curves of elements distribution. However, Intrusion 2 is characterized higher contents of REE and rare elements. High concentrations of incompatible elements are indicative of strong fractionation process. It has been suggested that Intrusions 1 and 2 derived from compositionally different parental melts. Model calculations (COMAGMAT-3.57) show that parental melts of two intrusions were close to high-Mg picrobasaltic magmas. The concentration of MgO in melt is 16.21 (Intrusion 1) and 16.17 (Intrusion 2). Isotopic data of Ortsog-Uul magmatic rocks exhibit different values of εNd (positive and negative) for Intrusion 1 and 2, respectively.

  2. The petrologic evolution and pre-eruptive conditions of the rhyolitic Kos Plateau Tuff (Aegean arc)

    Bachmann, Olivier

    2010-09-01

    The Kos Plateau Tuff is a large (>60 km3) and young (160 k.y.) calc-alkaline, high-SiO2 rhyolitic ignimbrite from the active Kos-Nisyros volcanic center in the Aegean arc (Greece). Combined textural, petrological and geochemical information suggest that (1) the system evolved dominantly by crystal fractionation from (mostly unerupted) more mafic parents, (2) the magma chamber grew over ≥ 250 000 years at shallow depth (˜1.5-2.5 kb) and was stored as a H2O-rich crystalline mush close to its solidus (˜670-750°C), (3) the eruption occurred after a reheating event triggered by the intrusion of hydrous mafic magma at the base of the rhyolitic mush. Rare banded pumices indicate that the mafic magma only mingled with a trivial portion of resident crystal-rich rhyolite; most of the mush was remobilized following partial melting of quartz and feldspars induced by advection of heat and volatiles from the underplated, hotter mafic influx.

  3. Geologic map of Harrat Hutaymah, with petrologic classification and distribution of ultramafic inclusions, Saudi Arabia

    Thornber, Carl R.

    1990-01-01

    This map shows detailed geology of the Quaternary and Tertiary volcanic deposits that comprise Harrat Hutaymah and an updated and generalized compilation of the underlying Proterozoic and Paleozoic basement rocks. Quaternary alluvial cover and details of basement geology (that is, faults, dikes, and other features) are not shown. Volcanic unit descriptions and contact relations are based upon field investigation by the author and on compilation and revision of mapping Kellogg (1984; northern half of area) and Pallister (1984; southern half of area). A single K-Ar date of 1.80 ± 0.05 Ma for an alkali olivine basalt flow transected by the Al Hutaymah tuff ring (Pallister, 1984) provides the basis for an estimated late Tertiary to Quaternary age range for all harrat volcanic units other than unit Qtr (tuff reworked during Quaternary age time). Contact relations and unit descriptions for the basement rocks were compiled from Pallister (1984), Kellogg (1984 and 1985), DuBray (1984), Johnson and Williams (1984), Vaslet and others (1987), Cole and Hedge (1986), and Richter and others (1984). All rock unit names in this report are informal and capitalization follows Saudi Arabian stratigraphic nomenclature (Fitch, 1980). Geographic information was compiled from Pallister (1984), Kellogg (1984), and Fuller (in Johnson and Williams, 1984) and from field investigation by the author in 1986. The pie diagrams on the map show the distribution and petrology of ultramafic xenoliths of Harrat Hutaymah. The pie diagrams are explained by a detailed classification of ultramafic xenoliths that is introduced in this report.

  4. Studies on the treatment of organic wastes. Part 5

    Eschrich, H.; Humblet, L.; Geel, J. van.

    1980-09-01

    The Eurowatt process involves the quantitative extraction of tributyl phosphate (TBP), degradation products, and radionuclides from spent solvent mixtures by anhydrous phosphoric acid resulting in the recovery of a decontaminated diluent phase. The purified diluent can be reused or disposed of by burning. The radioactive TBP-phosphoric acid phase is heated to about 200 0 C to decompose the organic compounds to volatile hydrocarbons and non-volatile inorganic phosphoric acids. The inactive organic compounds are burned; the residual phosphoric acids, containing all the radionuclides, are conditioned for final storage by conversion into a phosphate glass or ceramic. Eurochemic's Eurowatt pilot installation is described and essential process data and results are given. (author)

  5. Organic tanks safety program FY96 waste aging studies

    Camaioni, D.M.; Samuels, W.D.; Linehan, J.C.; Clauss, S.A.; Sharma, A.K.; Wahl, K.L.; Campbell, J.A.

    1996-10-01

    Uranium and plutonium production at the Hanford Site produced large quantities of radioactive by-products and contaminated process chemicals, which are stored in underground tanks awaiting treatment and disposal. Having been made strongly alkaline and then subjected to successive water evaporation campaigns to increase storage capacity, the wastes now exist in the physical forms of salt cakes, metal oxide sludges, and partially saturated aqueous brine solutions. The tanks that contain organic process chemicals mixed with nitrate/nitrite salt wastes may be at risk for fuel- nitrate combustion accidents. The purpose of the Waste Aging Task is to elucidate how chemical and radiological processes will have aged or degraded the organic compounds stored in the tanks. Ultimately, the task seeks to develop quantitative measures of how aging changes the energetic properties of the wastes. This information will directly support efforts to evaluate the hazard as well as to develop potential control and mitigation strategies

  6. A Comparative Study of Accounting Entities Under Different Business Organizations

    LUO Hong-lan; XU Guo-xin; FAN Jin

    2001-01-01

    In terms of accounting, all types of business enterprises regardless of their organizational form are separate accounting entities. But different types of organization forms entail remarkable differences in the establishments, legal positions, liabilities, taxation obligations and accounting practices of the business enterprises as accounting entities. A good knowledge of such difference is beneficial to the promotion of the development of all types of business enterprises in China.

  7. Origin and role of gap states in organic semiconductor studied by UPS: as the nature of organic molecular crystals

    Yang, Jin-Peng; Bussolotti, Fabio; Kera, Satoshi; Ueno, Nobuo

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews experimental studies on ‘bridging electronic structure and charge transport property of organic semiconductors’ performed using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) and related methods mainly in Chiba University, Japan, in particular on the investigation of the origin and the role of electronic states existing in the highest occupied molecular orbital band–lowest unoccupied molecular orbital band (HOMO–LUMO) gap. We summarize experimental observations including direct measurements of ‘invisible’ gap states with ultrahigh sensitivity UPS, which demonstrate that there exist intrinsic gap states in organic semiconductors. We firstly describe the nature of organic molecular solids to understand features of organic semiconductors because such intrinsic gap states are a result of the interplay of these features, which give the principal difference between the organic semiconductor and inorganic counterpart. We then discuss (i) the origin and role of the band gap states in relation to intermolecular interaction/band dispersion and electron–phonon coupling, (ii) the Fermi level pinning issue in organic semiconductors, and (iii) the method of computing the Fermi level position within the HOMO–LUMO gap for experimental groups. The gap states of organic semiconductors appear easily when a weak perturbation is applied to the organic system, namely by contact with other material, by injecting a charge, by elevating temperature, and by exposure to 1 atm gas. What we finally found is that tailing states of HOMO and LUMO always exist, and their energy distributions must not be symmetric; they thus produce a larger Fermi level shift from the mid gap position than previously thought. Furthermore, as shown by computational work, Fermi level pinning , which is a well-known phenomena in semiconductor devices field, occurs in weakly interacting organic/conductor systems without any gap states if the system temperature is not zero ( T

  8. Origin and role of gap states in organic semiconductor studied by UPS: as the nature of organic molecular crystals

    Yang, Jin-Peng; Bussolotti, Fabio; Kera, Satoshi; Ueno, Nobuo

    2017-10-01

    This article reviews experimental studies on ‘bridging electronic structure and charge transport property of organic semiconductors’ performed using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) and related methods mainly in Chiba University, Japan, in particular on the investigation of the origin and the role of electronic states existing in the highest occupied molecular orbital band-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital band (HOMO-LUMO) gap. We summarize experimental observations including direct measurements of ‘invisible’ gap states with ultrahigh sensitivity UPS, which demonstrate that there exist intrinsic gap states in organic semiconductors. We firstly describe the nature of organic molecular solids to understand features of organic semiconductors because such intrinsic gap states are a result of the interplay of these features, which give the principal difference between the organic semiconductor and inorganic counterpart. We then discuss (i) the origin and role of the band gap states in relation to intermolecular interaction/band dispersion and electron-phonon coupling, (ii) the Fermi level pinning issue in organic semiconductors, and (iii) the method of computing the Fermi level position within the HOMO-LUMO gap for experimental groups. The gap states of organic semiconductors appear easily when a weak perturbation is applied to the organic system, namely by contact with other material, by injecting a charge, by elevating temperature, and by exposure to 1 atm gas. What we finally found is that tailing states of HOMO and LUMO always exist, and their energy distributions must not be symmetric; they thus produce a larger Fermi level shift from the mid gap position than previously thought. Furthermore, as shown by computational work, Fermi level pinning, which is a well-known phenomena in semiconductor devices field, occurs in weakly interacting organic/conductor systems without any gap states if the system temperature is not zero (T  >  0). We

  9. A study of organic binding of incorporated tritium by means of the organic components of human urine

    Szilagyi, M.

    1976-01-01

    The change in tritium activity of metabolytic fractions of urine of persons working in the production of tritium labelled compounds was studied. The radioactivity of the separated fractions was measured during a 20 day period. A carbamide fraction proved to be the most sensitive to incorporative cases owing to its organic component fractioned together with the carbamide. (K.A.)

  10. Sordaria macrospora, a model organism to study fungal cellular development.

    Engh, Ines; Nowrousian, Minou; Kück, Ulrich

    2010-12-01

    During the development of multicellular eukaryotes, the processes of cellular growth and organogenesis are tightly coordinated. Since the 1940s, filamentous fungi have served as genetic model organisms to decipher basic mechanisms underlying eukaryotic cell differentiation. Here, we focus on Sordaria macrospora, a homothallic ascomycete and important model organism for developmental biology. During its sexual life cycle, S. macrospora forms three-dimensional fruiting bodies, a complex process involving the formation of different cell types. S. macrospora can be used for genetic, biochemical and cellular experimental approaches since diverse tools, including fluorescence microscopy, a marker recycling system and gene libraries, are available. Moreover, the genome of S. macrospora has been sequenced and allows functional genomics analyses. Over the past years, our group has generated and analysed a number of developmental mutants which has greatly enhanced our fundamental understanding about fungal morphogenesis. In addition, our recent research activities have established a link between developmental proteins and conserved signalling cascades, ultimately leading to a regulatory network controlling differentiation processes in a eukaryotic model organism. This review summarizes the results of our recent findings, thus advancing current knowledge of the general principles and paradigms underpinning eukaryotic cell differentiation and development. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Petrological and zircon evidence for the Early Cretaceous granulite-facies metamorphism in the Dabie orogen, China

    Gao, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Qiang-Qiang; Zheng, Yong-Fei; Chen, Yi-Xiang

    2017-07-01

    An integrated study of petrology, mineralogy, geochemistry, and geochronology was carried out for contemporaneous mafic granulite and diorite from the Dabie orogen. The results provide evidence for granulite-facies reworking of the ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphic rock in the collisional orogen. Most zircons from the granulite are new growth, and their U-Pb ages are clearly categorized into two groups at 122-127 Ma and 188 ± 2 Ma. Although these two groups of zircons show similarly steep HREE patterns and variably negative Eu anomalies, the younger group has much higher U, Th and REE contents and Th/U ratios, much lower εHf(t) values than the older group. This suggests their growth is associated with different types of dehydration reactions. The older zircon domains contain mineral inclusions of garnet + clinopyroxene ± quartz, indicating their growth through metamorphic reactions at high pressures. In contrast, the young zircon domains only contain a few quartz inclusions and the garnet-clinopyroxene-plagioclase-quartz barometry yields pressures of 4.9 to 12.5 kb. In addition, the clinopyroxene-garnet Fe-Mg exchange thermometry gives temperatures of 738-951 °C. Therefore, the young zircon domains would have grown through peritectic reaction at low to medium pressures. The younger granulite-facies metamorphic age is in agreement not only with the adjacent diorite at 125 ± 1 Ma in this study but also the voluminous emplacement of coeval mafic and felsic magmas in the Dabie orogen. Mineral separates from both mafic granulite and its adjacent diorite show uniformly lower δ18O values than normal mantle, similar to those for UHP eclogite-facies metaigneous rocks in the Dabie orogen. In combination with major-trace elements and zircon Lu-Hf isotope compositions, it is inferred that the protolith of mafic granulites shares with the source rock of diorites, both being a kind of mafic metasomatites at the slab-mantle interface in the continental subduction channel

  12. A-type granites from the Guéra Massif, Central Chad: Petrology, geochemistry, geochronology, and petrogenesis.

    Pham, Ngoc Ha T.; Shellnutt, J. Gregory; Yeh, Meng-Wan; Lee, Tung-Yi

    2017-04-01

    The poorly studied Saharan Metacraton of North-Central Africa is located between the Arabian-Nubian Shield in the east, the Tuareg Shield in the west and the Central African Orogenic Belt in the south. The Saharan Metacraton is composed of Neoproterozoic juvenile crust and the relics of pre-Neoproterozoic components reactivated during the Pan-African Orogeny. The Republic of Chad, constrained within the Saharan Metacraton, comprises a Phanerozoic cover overlying Precambrian basement outcroppings in four distinct massifs: the Mayo Kebbi, Tibesti, Ouaddaï, and the Guéra. The Guéra massif is the least studied of the four massifs but it likely preserves structures that were formed during the collision between Congo Craton and Saharan Metacraton. The Guéra Massif is composed of mostly granitic rocks. The granitoids have petrologic features that are consistent with A-type granite, such as micrographic intergrowth of sodic and potassic feldspar, the presence of sodic- and iron-rich amphibole, and iron-rich biotite. Compositionally, the granitic rocks of the Guéra Massif have high silica (SiO2 ≥ 68.9 wt.%) content and are metaluminous to marginally peraluminous. The rocks are classified as ferroan calc-alkalic to alkali-calcic with moderately high to very high Fe* ratios. The first zircon U/Pb geochronology of the silicic rocks from the Guéra Massif yielded three main age groups: 590 Ma, 570 Ma, 560 Ma, while a single gabbro yielded an intermediate age ( 580 Ma). A weakly foliated biotite granite yielded two populations, in which the emplacement age is interpreted to be 590 ± 10 Ma, whereas the younger age (550 ± 11 Ma) is considered to be a deformation age. Furthermore, inherited Meso- to Paleoproterozoic zircons are found in this sample. The geochemical and geochronology data indicate that there is a temporal evolution in the composition of rocks with the old, high Mg# granitoids shifting to young, low Mg# granitoids. This reveals that the A-type granites in

  13. The mineralogy and petrology of I-type cosmic spherules: Implications for their sources, origins and identification in sedimentary rocks

    Genge, Matthew J.; Davies, Bridie; Suttle, Martin D.; van Ginneken, Matthias; Tomkins, Andrew G.

    2017-12-01

    I-type cosmic spherules are micrometeorites that formed by melting during atmospheric entry and consist mainly of iron oxides and FeNi metal. I-types are important because they can readily be recovered from sedimentary rocks allowing study of solar system events over geological time. We report the results of a study of the mineralogy and petrology of 88 I-type cosmic spherules recovered from Antarctica in order to evaluate how they formed and evolved during atmospheric entry, to constrain the nature of their precursors and to establish rigorous criteria by which they may be conclusively identified within sediments and sedimentary rocks. Two textural types of I-type cosmic spherule are recognised: (1) metal bead-bearing (MET) spherules dominated by Ni-poor (100 and suggest that metal from H-group ordinary, CM, CR and iron meteorites may form the majority of particles. Oxidation during entry heating increases in the series MET 80 wt% Ni comprising a particle mass fraction of exchange of Ni between wüstite and metal, and magnetite and wüstite are suggested as proxies for the rate of oxidation and cooling rate respectively. Variations in magnetite and wüstite crystal sizes are also suggested to relate to cooling rate allowing relative entry angle of particles to be evaluated. The formation of secondary metal in the form of sub-micron Ni-rich or Pt-group nuggets and as symplectite with magnetite was also identified and suggested to occur largely due to the exsolution of metallic alloys during decomposition of non-stoichiometric wüstite. Weathering is restricted to replacement of metal by iron hydroxides. The following criteria are recommended for the conclusive identification of I-type spherules within sediments and sedimentary rocks: (i) spherical particle morphologies, (ii) dendritic crystal morphologies, (iii) the presence of wüstite and magnetite, (iv) Ni-bearing wüstite and magnetite, and (v) the presence of relict FeNi metal.

  14. Removal of Separable Organic From Tank 241-C-103 Scoping Study

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-05-16

    This study is based on previous evaluations/proposals for removing the floating organic layer in C-103. A practical method is described with assumptions, cost and schedule estimates, and risks. Proposed operational steps include bulk organic removal, phase separation, organic washing and offsite disposal, followed by an in-situ polishing process.

  15. Removal of Separable Organic From Tank 241-C-103 Scoping Study

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-01-01

    This study is based on previous evaluations/proposals for removing the floating organic layer in C-103. A practical method is described with assumptions, cost and schedule estimates, and risks. Proposed operational steps include bulk organic removal, phase separation, organic washing and offsite disposal, followed by an in-situ polishing process

  16. Organic Chemistry Educators' Perspectives on Fundamental Concepts and Misconceptions: An Exploratory Study

    Duis, Jennifer M.

    2011-01-01

    An exploratory study was conducted with 23 organic chemistry educators to discover what general chemistry concepts they typically review, the concepts they believe are fundamental to introductory organic chemistry, the topics students find most difficult in the subject, and the misconceptions they observe in undergraduate organic chemistry…

  17. Organic food product purchase behaviour: a pilot study for urban consumers in the South of Italy

    Gracia, A.; de Magistris, T.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to explain factors that influence organic food purchases of urban consumers in the South of Italy. To achieve this goal, a multivariate limited dependent variable model has been specified to simultaneously analyse consumers’ organic food purchases, the intention to purchase organic food products and the level of organic knowledge. This study uses survey data gathered from 200 consumers in Naples in 2003. Results indicate that consumers who are more willing to buy orga...

  18. Affective Commitment to Organizations: a Comparison Study of Reverse Mentoring Versus Traditional Mentoring Among Millennials

    Hechl, Catrin

    2017-01-01

    A current topic of interest in management and organization research is the phenomenon of a generation shift in the workforce and how this shift will affect organizations in the near future. Millennials represent the largest generational cohort in the American workforce. Organizations find themselves challenged with retention efforts as Millennials tend to leave an organization after short tenures. The problem this study addressed is the high turnover rates among millennial employees. Speci...

  19. In Vivo RNAi-Based Screens: Studies in Model Organisms

    Miki Yamamoto-Hino

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi is a technique widely used for gene silencing in organisms and cultured cells, and depends on sequence homology between double-stranded RNA (dsRNA and target mRNA molecules. Numerous cell-based genome-wide screens have successfully identified novel genes involved in various biological processes, including signal transduction, cell viability/death, and cell morphology. However, cell-based screens cannot address cellular processes such as development, behavior, and immunity. Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans are two model organisms whose whole bodies and individual body parts have been subjected to RNAi-based genome-wide screening. Moreover, Drosophila RNAi allows the manipulation of gene function in a spatiotemporal manner when it is implemented using the Gal4/UAS system. Using this inducible RNAi technique, various large-scale screens have been performed in Drosophila, demonstrating that the method is straightforward and valuable. However, accumulated results reveal that the results of RNAi-based screens have relatively high levels of error, such as false positives and negatives. Here, we review in vivo RNAi screens in Drosophila and the methods that could be used to remove ambiguity from screening results.

  20. Studies on concentration of radionuclides by marine organisms

    Anon.

    1974-01-01

    Materials used were more than 20 kinds of fishes. 85 Sr chiefly localized in the hard tissue, such as the scale, bone, and gill, 60 Co in the liver, 65 Zn in the digestive organs, such as the liver, stomach, and intestine, 144 Ce in the gill, scale and liver, 106 Ru in the liver and intestine, and 131 I in the digestive organs, especially in the gallbladder. However, all these nuclides showed only slight localization in the edible parts of fish bodies. The concentration of radionuclides in immature anchovy was examined using 85 Sr, 137 Cs, 144 Ce and so on, as tracers. The concentration factor of 137 Cs was 10 times that of 85 Sr, though, the loss of 137 Cs was very rapid compared to that of 85 Sr. 144 Ce pollution of immature anchovy was chiefly by adsorption to the surface of fish bodies. As to shells radionuclides were remarkably taken up in the mid-gut gland, among them, 144 Ce taken up in shell bodies was not excreated but accumulated in the bodies. In algae, 85 Sr, 106 Ru, and 59 Fe seemed to pollute algae physico-chemically by adsorption, and 131 I, 137 Cs, and 60 Co seemed to be taken up through inorganic metabolism showing their concentration factor 100 times that in fishes. (JPN)

  1. Organic Contamination Baseline Study: In NASA JSC Astromaterials Curation Laboratories. Summary Report

    Calaway, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    In preparation for OSIRIS-REx and other future sample return missions concerned with analyzing organics, we conducted an Organic Contamination Baseline Study for JSC Curation Labsoratories in FY12. For FY12 testing, organic baseline study focused only on molecular organic contamination in JSC curation gloveboxes: presumably future collections (i.e. Lunar, Mars, asteroid missions) would use isolation containment systems over only cleanrooms for primary sample storage. This decision was made due to limit historical data on curation gloveboxes, limited IR&D funds and Genesis routinely monitors organics in their ISO class 4 cleanrooms.

  2. A Qualitative Study of Turning Points or Aha! Moments in Older Adults' Discussions About Organ Donation.

    Downing, Kimberly; Jones, Linda L

    2018-01-01

    Older adults (50-70 years old) have lower organ donor registration rates than younger adults. Older adults have different informational needs and donor registration behavior than younger age groups. The objective of this qualitative study was to understand insights of older adults about organ donation to effectively address the barriers to becoming an organ donor. This study identified turning points as "Aha!" moments that occurred during a dialogue intervention where older adults discussed benefits, barriers, and process to organ donation. Dialogues were held with small groups of older adults in 11 communities in a Midwestern organ procurement organization service area. Participants were positive to organ donation, but not registered as an organ donor. Methods/Approach: Qualitative analysis of verbatim comments from the dialogue and a follow-up survey were used to examine turning points or "Aha!" moments of participants' decision-making about organ donation and organ donor registration. Twenty-one separate in-depth dialogues were conducted with 198 participants, with mean age of 60.57 years. There were 2757 separate comments coded with 465 of the comments (17%) identified as providing Aha! moments during the dialogue. Three themes include benefits of organ donation (30%), barriers about organ donation (39%), and organ donation process (31%). The research identified moments in the dialogue where possible learning about organ donation may have occurred. After participation in the dialogue process, there was an increase in intent to register to be an organ donor, organ donation discussion with family and friends, and organ donor registration.

  3. THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE ORGANIC AQUACULTURE. CASE STUDY: ROMANIA

    Silvius STANCIU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aquaculture contribute ever more to the production of aquatic food worldwide, even if the sustainable limits for majority of wild fish stocks, are now almost reached or even exceeded. In the EU, aquaculture is an important economic activity in many coastal and continental regions. Aquaculture plays an important role in terms of access to food resources and it is necessary to use its potential to contribute to sustainable development, food security, economic growth and employment. In this regard, starting from EU aquaculture objectives, the paper intend to make an analysis of the national situation of aquaculture and its current potential. The paper presented the progress of Romanian investments in aquaculture, identifying needs and opportunities for the Romanian aquaculture development. Taking into consideration the natural resources available and the growth of global request of organic product, the development of ecologic aquaculture might represent o niche market for local producers.

  4. A new approach to the unrest and subsequent eruption at El Hierro Island (2011) based on petrological, seismological, geodetical and gravimetric data

    Meletlidis, Stavros; Di Roberto, Alessio; Domínguez Cerdeña, Itahiza; Pompilio, Massimo; García-Cañada, Laura; Bertagnini, Antonella; Benito Saz, Maria Angeles; Del Carlo, Paola; Sainz-Maza Aparicio, Sergio; Lopez Moreno, Carmen; Moure García, David

    2014-05-01

    A shallow submarine eruption took place on 10th October 2011, about 1.8 km off the coast of La Restinga, a small village located in El Hierro (Canary Islands, Spain). The eruption lasted for about four months and ended by early March 2012. The eruption was preceded by an unrest episode that initiated about three months before, in July 2011, and characterized by more than 10,000 localized earthquakes accompanied by up to 5 cm of vertical ground deformation. In the Canary Islands, this event represents the first case of an eruption that was monitored since the unrest to the end by the monitoring network of IGN (Instituto Geográfico National), providing a huge dataset that includes geophysical (seismic, magnetic and gravimetric), geodetic, geochemistry and petrological data. In this work we use the seismic, GPS and gravity records collected by IGN along with the petrological data derived from the study of various lava balloons, scoriaceous fragments and ash.Geophysical and geochemical monitoring tools provide a variety of information that need to be interpreted in terms of magma movement and/or interaction of magma with host rocks. We present a model, based on this data, which describes the intrusion and ascent of the magma. According to this model, a major intrusion beneath and around preexisting high-density magmatic bodies, localized in the central sector of the island, led to an eruption in the Southern sector of the island. After a failed attempt to reach the surface, while various dykes were emplaced, through a low fractured area in the Central and Northern parts of the island, the ascending magma finally found its way in the submarine area of La Restinga, in the South rift zone, at a depth of 350 m below sea level. Feeding of the eruption was achieved by the ascension of an important volume of material from the upper mantle which was emplaced near the crust-mantle boundary. However, the very energetic post-eruptive unrests - we had five episodes up today with

  5. Field-trip guide to Mount St. Helens, Washington - An overview of the eruptive history and petrology, tephra deposits, 1980 pyroclastic density current deposits, and the crater

    Pallister, John S.; Clynne, Michael A.; Wright, Heather M.; Van Eaton, Alexa R.; Vallance, James W.; Sherrod, David R.; Kokelaar, B. Peter

    2017-08-02

    This field trip will provide an introduction to several fascinating features of Mount St. Helens. The trip begins with a rigorous hike of about 15 km from the Johnston Ridge Observatory (9 km north-northeast of the crater vent), across the 1980 Pumice Plain, to Windy Ridge (3.6 km northeast of the crater vent) to examine features that document the dynamics and progressive emplacement of pyroclastic flows. The next day, we examine classic tephra outcrops of the past 3,900 years and observe changes in thickness and character of these deposits as we traverse their respective lobes. We examine clasts in the deposits and discuss how the petrology and geochemistry of Mount St. Helens deposits reveal the evolution of the magmatic system through time. We also investigate the stratigraphy of the 1980 blast deposit and review the chronology of this iconic eruption as we travel through the remains of the blown-down forest. The third day is another rigorous hike, about 13 km round trip, climbing from the base of Windy Ridge (elevation 1,240 m) to the front of the Crater Glacier (elevation 1,700 m). En route we examine basaltic andesite and basalt lava flows emplaced between 1,800 and 1,700 years before present, a heterolithologic flow deposit produced as the 1980 blast and debris avalanche interacted, debris-avalanche hummocks that are stranded on the north flank and in the crater mouth, and shattered dacite lava domes that were emplaced between 3,900 and 2,600 years before present. These domes underlie the northern part of the volcano. In addition, within the crater we traverse well-preserved pyroclastic-flow deposits that were emplaced on the crater floor during the summer of 1980, and a beautiful natural section through the 1980 deposits in the upper canyon of the Loowit River.Before plunging into the field-trip log, we provide an overview of Mount St. Helens geology, geochemistry, petrology, and volcanology as background. The volcano has been referred to as a

  6. Petrology of blueschist and meta-greywacke along the Turkmeni-Ordib fault (Turkmeni area, SE of Anarak

    Fereshteh Bayat

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The occurrence of blueschist metamorphic facies is believed to mark the existence of former subduction zones. This facies is represented in the main constituents of subduction-accretion complexes, where it occurs in separate tectonic sheets, imbricated slices, lenses, or exotic blocks within a serpentinite mélange (Volkova et al., 2011. The evidence of the presence and maturity of Paleo- Tethys oceanic crust in the CEIM (define this in Paleo-Tethys branches, subduction and collision has been studied by various authors (Bagheri, 2007; Zanchi et al., 2009; Bayat and Torabi, 2011; Torabi 2011. Late Paleozoic blueschists have recognized in the western part of the CEIM (e. g. Anarak, Chupanan and Turkmeni in linear trends. Metamorphic rocks of the Turkmeni area (SE of Anarak are composed of blueschist and meta-greywacke and are situated along the Turkmeni-Ordib fault associated with Paleozoic rock units and serpentinized peridotite bodies. Turkmeni blueschist and meta-greywackes have not been studied by previous workers. The Turkmeni blueschists consist of albite, winchite, actinolite and epidote. Granoblastic, nematoblastic and lepidoblastic are main textures in these rocks. Winchite is found in the matrix and around epidote grains. This sodic-calcic amphibole serves as an index mineral in blueschist facies. Actinolite and epidote formed during retrograde metamorphism of blueschists in the greenschist facies. The mineral assemblage of albite, epidote, chlorite and phengite ± garnet is present in meta-greywackes in the Turkmeni blueschists. Veins of garnet, muscovite, quartz and opaque minerals are extensive in these rocks. Epidote and chlorite formed in meta-greywackes by retrograde metamorphism in the greenschist facies. The aim of the present study is to determine the petrological and geochemical characteristics, P-T condition of blueschists and meta-greywackes, as well as the geotectonic setting of primary basaltic rocks of the

  7. New insights on the petrology of submarine volcanics from the Western Pontine Archipelago (Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy)

    Conte, A. M.; Perinelli, C.; Bianchini, G.; Natali, C.; Martorelli, E.; Chiocci, F. L.

    2016-11-01

    The Pontine Islands form a volcanic archipelago in the Tyrrhenian Sea. It consists of two edifices, the islands of Ponza, Palmarola and Zannone and the islands of Ventotene and Santo Stefano, respectively. The Archipelago developed during two main volcanic cycles in the Plio-Pleistocene: 1) the Pliocene episode erupted subalkaline, silica-rich volcanic units, which constitute the dominant products in the western edifice (Ponza and Zannone Islands); 2) the Pleistocene episode erupted more alkaline products, represented by evolved rocks (trachytes to peralkaline rhyolites) in the islands of Ponza and Palmarola and by basic to intermediate rocks in the eastern edifice (Ventotene and Santo Stefano Islands). In this paper we present new geochemical and petrological data from submarine rock samples collected in two oceanographic cruises and a scuba diving survey. The main result is the recovery of relatively undifferentiated lithotypes that provide further insights on the magmatic spectrum existing in the Pontine Archipelago, allowing modelling of the whole suite of rocks by fractional crystallization processes. New major and trace element data and thermodynamic constrains (by the software PELE) indicate the existence of three distinct evolutionary trends corresponding to a HK calcalkaline series in the Pliocene, followed by a transitional and then by a shoshonite series in the Pleistocene. In particular, the transitional series, so far overlooked in the literature, is required in order to explain the genesis of several peralkaline felsic rocks recognized in the Archipelago. On the whole, the new geochemical data i) confirm the orogenic signature of the suites, ii) allow to rule out an anatectic origin for both subalkaline and peralkaline rhyolites and iii) indicate highly heterogeneous mantle sources, due to crustal components variously recycled in the mantle via subduction.

  8. Decarbonation in an intracratonic setting: Insight from petrological-thermomechanical modeling

    Gonzalez, Christopher M.; Gorczyk, Weronika

    2017-08-01

    Cratons form the stable core roots of the continental crust. Despite long-term stability, cratons have failed in the past. Cratonic destruction (e.g., North Atlantic Craton) due to chemical rejuvenation at the base of the lithosphere remains poorly constrained numerically. We use 2-D petrological-thermomechanical models to assess cratonic rifting characteristics and mantle CO2 degassing in the presence of a carbonated subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM). We test two tectonothermal SCLM compositions: Archon (depleted) and Tecton (fertilized) using 2 CO2 wt % in the bulk composition to represent a metasomatized SCLM. We parameterize cratonic breakup via extensional duration (7-12 Ma; full breakup), tectonothermal age, TMoho (300-600°C), and crustal rheology. The two compositions with metasomatized SCLMs share similar rifting features and decarbonation trends during initial extension. However, we show long-term (>67 Ma) stability differences due to lithospheric density contrasts between SCLM compositions. The Tecton model shows convective removal and thinning of the metasomatized SCLM during failed rifting. The Archon composition remained stable, highlighting the primary role for SCLM density even when metasomatized at its base. In the short-term, three failed rifting characteristics emerge: failed rifting without decarbonation, failed rifting with decarbonation, and semifailed rifting with dry asthenospheric melting and decarbonation. Decarbonation trends were greatest in the failed rifts, reaching peak fluxes of 94 × 104 kg m-3. Increased TMoho did not alter the effects of rifting or decarbonation. Lastly, we show mantle regions where decarbonation, mantle melting in the presence of carbonate, and preservation of carbonated mantle occur during rifting.

  9. Petrological mineralogical and geochemical characterization of the granitoids and fracture fillings developed in Ratones Mines (Spain)

    Buil Gutierrez, B.

    2002-01-01

    The petrological, mineralogical and geochemical characterisation of the granitoids and fracture fillings developed in the Ratones Mine (Caceres, Spain) has been done in order to understand rock-water interaction processes which control water geochemical parameters. Special interest has been devoted to the analysis and interpretation of REE patterns in the solid phase (granitoids and fracture fillings) because they constitute geochemical tracers in water-rock interaction process. Moreover, REE are considered as actinide analogues. In order to characterise the solid phase (granitoids and fracture fillings) several investigation scales (system, outcrop, whole rock, mineral and geochemical components) have been considered and different types of samples have been analysed. These factors control the methodological approach used in this investigation. The analytical methods we have used in this investigation are microscope, qualitative and semi-quantitative methods (XRD, SEM,EDAX) and quantitative methods (ICP-MS, XRF, EM, LAM-IC-MS). The bulk of the granitoids located around the Ratones Mine Belongs to the alkaline feldspar granite-sienogranite lihotype and they show a peraluminous and subalkaline pattern. From the mineralogical point of view, they are composed by quartz, K-feldspar (Or>90%), showing sericitation, moscovitization and turmolinization altherations, alkaline plagioclase (An-=-3%), usually altered to sericite, saussirite and less frequently affected by moscovitization processes, Fe-Al biotite, frequently affected by chloritization processes and sometimes replaced by muscovite, and finally muscovite (>2% celadonite and <4% paragonite) both of primary and secondary origin. The differences observed between the different lithotypes are related with the modal proportion of the principal minerals,with the presence or absence of certain accessory minerals ( turmaline, cordierite), with specific textural patterns, grain size and also with the richness in specific

  10. Petrologic evolution of CM chondrites: The difficulty of discriminating between nebular and parent-body effects

    Kerridge, J. F.; McSween, H. Y., Jr.; Bunch, T. E.

    1994-07-01

    We wish to draw attention to a major controversy that has arisen in the area of CM-chondrite petrology. The problem is important because its resolution will have profound implications for ideas concerning nebular dynamics, gas-solid interactions in the nebula, and accretionary processes in the nebula, among other issues. On the one hand, cogent arguments have been presented that 'accretionary dust mantles,' were formed in the solar nebula prior to accretion of the CM parent asteroid(s). On the other hand, no-less-powerful arguments have been advanced that a significant fraction of the CM lithology is secondary, produced by aqueous alteration in the near-surface regions of an asteroid-sized object. Because most, if not all, CM chondrites are breccias, these two views could coexist harmoniously, were it not for the fact that some of the coarse-grained lithologies surrounded by 'accretion dust mantles' are themselves of apparently secondary origin. Such an observation must clearly force a reassessment of one or both of the present schools of thought. Our objective here is to stimulate such a reassessment. Four possible resolutions of this conflict may be postulated. First, perhaps nature found a way of permitting such secondary alteration to take place in the nebula. Second, maybe dust mantles could form in a regolith, rather than a nebular, environment. Third, it is possible that dust mantles around secondary lithologies are different from those around primary lithologies. Finally, perhaps formation of CM chondrites involved a more complex sequence of events than visualized so far, so that some apparently 'primary' processes postdated certain 'secondary' processes.

  11. Petrological constraints on melt generation beneath the Asal Rift (Djibouti) using quaternary basalts

    Pinzuti, Paul; Humler, Eric; Manighetti, Isabelle; Gaudemer, Yves

    2013-08-01

    The temporal evolution of the mantle melting processes in the Asal Rift is evaluated from the chemical composition of 56 new lava flows sampled along 10 km of the rift axis and 9 km off-axis (i.e., erupted within the last 620 kyr). Petrological and primary geochemical results show that most of the samples of the inner floor of the Asal Rift are affected by plagioclase accumulation. Trace element ratios and major element compositions corrected for mineral accumulation and crystallization show a symmetric pattern relative to the rift axis and preserved a clear signal of mantle melting depth variations. While FeO, Fe8.0, Zr/Y, and (Dy/Yb)N decrease from the rift shoulders to the rift axis, SiO2, Na/Ti, Lu/Hf increase and Na2O and Na8.0 are constant across the rift. These variations are qualitatively consistent with shallow melting beneath the rift axis and deeper melting for off-axis lava flows. Na8.0 and Fe8.0 contents show that beneath the rift axis, melting paths are shallow, from 81 ± 4 to 43 ± 5 km. These melting paths are consistent with adiabatic melting in normal-temperature fertile asthenosphere, beneath an extensively thinned mantle lithosphere. On the contrary, melting on the rift shoulders (from 107 ± 7 to 67 ± 8 km) occurred beneath thicker lithosphere, requiring a mantle solidus temperature 100 ± 40°C hotter. In this geodynamic environment, the calculated rate of lithospheric thinning appears to be 4.0 ± 2.0 cm yr-1, a value close to the mean spreading rate (2.9 ± 0.2 cm yr-1) over the last 620 kyr.

  12. Facilitating Research and Learning in Petrology and Geochemistry through Classroom Applications of Remotely Operable Research Instrumentation

    Ryan, J. G.

    2012-12-01

    Bringing the use of cutting-edge research tools into student classroom experiences has long been a popular educational strategy in the geosciences and other STEM disciplines. The NSF CCLI and TUES programs have funded a large number of projects that placed research-grade instrumentation at educational institutions for instructional use and use in supporting undergraduate research activities. While student and faculty response to these activities has largely been positive, a range of challenges exist related to their educational effectiveness. Many of the obstacles these approaches have faced relate to "scaling up" of research mentoring experiences (e.g., providing training and time for use for an entire classroom of students, as opposed to one or two), and to time tradeoffs associated with providing technical training for effective instrument use versus course content coverage. The biggest challenge has often been simple logistics: a single instrument, housed in a different space, is difficult to integrate effectively into instructional activities. My CCLI-funded project sought primarily to knock down the logistical obstacles to research instrument use by taking advantage of remote instrument operation technologies, which allow the in-classroom use of networked analytical tools. Remote use of electron microprobe and SEM instruments of the Florida Center for Analytical Electron Microscopy (FCAEM) in Miami, FL was integrated into two geoscience courses at USF in Tampa, FL. Remote operation permitted the development of whole-class laboratory exercises to familiarize students with the tools, their function, and their capabilities; and it allowed students to collect high-quality chemical and image data on their own prepared samples in the classroom during laboratory periods. These activities improve student engagement in the course, appear to improve learning of key concepts in mineralogy and petrology, and have led to students pursuing independent research projects, as

  13. Studies on selected organic-metal interactions of importance in the environment

    Mason, Ian.

    1995-10-01

    This research project investigated the interaction between natural organics acids and selected metal ions. The aims of the project was to provide quantitative data on the speciation of metal ions when placed in systems containing natural organic acids. It was envisaged that such data will assist in the risk assessment of the Drigg low level waste site in Cumbria. The formation and complexing ability of these natural organic acids is discussed and the classing of these acids into high molecular weight organic acids and low molecular weight organic acids. Initial investigations used a potentiometric technique to study the interaction between nickel and europium and selected low molecular weight organic acids which were thought to occur in significant concentrations in soils and groundwaters. These experiments confirmed existing critically assessed literature values, and provided an experimental methodology for further 'in-house' measurement of such values. In addition, studies were also performed on systems containing two competing organic acids. (author)

  14. Study and assessment of compost of different organic mixtures and effect of organic compost tea on plant diseases

    Znaïdi, Akram; Daami, Megda; Ben Kheder, Mohamed; Mahjoub, Mohamed

    2002-01-01

    Four compost treatments representing different organic mixtures were studied: - Treatment T1: 100% cattle manure - Treatment T2: 80% cattle manure and 20% sheep manure - Treatment T3: 70% cattle manure, 20% sheep manure and 10% poultry manure. - Treatment T4: 50% cattle manure, 20% sheep manure, 20% poultry manure and 10% crushed wheat straw. The results showed that the temperature was higher for the 4th treatment which was richer in carbon than the other treat...

  15. Magneto-optical studies of low-dimensional organic conductors

    Hitoshi Ohta, Motoi Kimata and Yugo Oshima

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Our periodic orbit resonance (POR results on quasi-two-dimensional (q2D, highly anisotropic q2D and quasi-one-dimensional (q1D organic conductors are reviewed together with our rotational cavity magneto-optical measurement system. Higher order POR up to seventh order has been observed in the q2D system (BEDT-TTF2Br(DIA, and the experimental conditions to observe POR and the cyclotron resonance (CR are discussed. Highly anisotropic q2D Fermi surface (FS in β''-(BEDT-TTF(TCNQ, which was considered to have q1D FS previously, is proposed by our POR measurements, and the possible interpretations of other experimental results of β''-(BEDT-TTF(TCNQ are discussed assuming the highly anisotropic q2D FS. Finally, detailed q1D FS of (DMET2I3, obtained from our POR results, is discussed in connection with the typical q1D system (TMTSF2ClO4.

  16. Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (OLEDs) and Optically-Detected Magnetic Resonance (ODMR) studies on organic materials

    Cai, Min [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Organic semiconductors have evolved rapidly over the last decades and currently are considered as the next-generation technology for many applications, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) in flat-panel displays (FPDs) and solid state lighting (SSL), and organic solar cells (OSCs) in clean renewable energy. This dissertation focuses mainly on OLEDs. Although the commercialization of the OLED technology in FPDs is growing and appears to be just around the corner for SSL, there are still several key issues that need to be addressed: (1) the cost of OLEDs is very high, largely due to the costly current manufacturing process; (2) the efficiency of OLEDs needs to be improved. This is vital to the success of OLEDs in the FPD and SSL industries; (3) the lifetime of OLEDs, especially blue OLEDs, is the biggest technical challenge. All these issues raise the demand for new organic materials, new device structures, and continued lower-cost fabrication methods. In an attempt to address these issues, we used solution-processing methods to fabricate highly efficient small molecule OLEDs (SMOLEDs); this approach is costeffective in comparison to the more common thermal vacuum evaporation. We also successfully made efficient indium tin oxide (ITO)-free SMOLEDs to further improve the efficiency of the OLEDs. We employed the spin-dependent optically-detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) technique to study the luminescence quenching processes in OLEDs and organic materials in order to understand the intrinsic degradation mechanisms. We also fabricated polymer LEDs (PLEDs) based on a new electron-accepting blue-emitting polymer and studied the effect of molecular weight on the efficiency of PLEDs. All these studies helped us to better understand the underlying relationship between the organic semiconductor materials and the OLEDs’ performance, and will subsequently assist in further enhancing the efficiency of OLEDs. With strongly improved device performance (in addition to

  17. A Study of Corporate Entrepreneurship in a Department of Defense Organization

    2011-03-01

    A STUDY OF CORPORATE ENTREPRENUERSHIP IN A DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ORGANIZATION THESIS Wade W. Brower, Civilian AFIT/GEM/ENV...CORPORATE ENTREPRENUERSHIP IN A DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ORGANIZATION THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Systems and Engineering...2011 APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED AFIT/GEM/ENV/11-M01 A STUDY OF CORPORATE ENTREPRENUERSHIP IN A DEPARTMENT OF

  18. Studying the Indian Ocean Ridge System: Agenda for the new century

    Mukhopadhyay, R.; Iyer, S.D.; Banerjee, R.; Drolia, R.K.

    Studies on the Indian Ocean Ridge System, though sporadic, was aimed to map the complete IORS petrologically and tectonically. Three areas are placed for immediate investigation; one in the slow spreading Carlsberg Ridge area, the second, along...

  19. Design and Co-design of Project-organized Studies

    Nielsen, Jørgen Lerche; Andreasen, Lars Birch

    2014-01-01

    The chapter contributes to discussions on design processes in relation to education, presenting different notions of design research and demonstrating how professors and students are involved together in designing innovative and constructive study processes that can help foster students' engagement...

  20. Human population studies and the World Health Organization.

    de Chadarevian, Soraya

    2015-01-01

    This essay draws attention to the role of the WHO in shaping research agendas in the biomedical sciences in the postwar era. It considers in particular the genetic studies of human populations that were pursued under the aegis of the WHO from the late 1950s to 1970s. The study provides insights into how human and medical genetics entered the agenda of the WHO. At the same time, the population studies become a focus for tracking changing notions of international relations, cooperation, and development and their impact on research in biology and medicine in the post-World War I era. After a brief discussion of the early history of the WHO and its position in Cold War politics, the essay considers the WHO program in radiation protection and heredity and how the genetic study of "vanishing" human populations and a world-wide genetic study of newborns fitted this broader agenda. It then considers in more detail the kind of support offered by the WHO for these projects. The essay highlights the role of single individuals in taking advantage of WHO support for pushing their research agendas while establishing a trend towards cooperative international projects in biology.

  1. Air Force Nuclear Enterprise Organization: A Case Study

    2016-09-15

    changes. To address the objectives of this study, five investigative questions ( IQ ) are posed: IQ1. What constitutes the Air Force Nuclear Enterprise...are an effective tool being used to raise the level of training. But it is not only necessary to move away from training that merely checks a box...down to an authoritative brain trust of just a few pertinent players (e.g. AFGSC/CC, HAF/A10 Director, AFNWC/CC, etc). As this study has portrayed

  2. Study of molecular movements in some organic crystals by NMR

    Alexandre, M.

    1971-01-01

    After a discussion on molecular crystals (generalities, movements within molecular solids, study of movements, complexes by charge transfer) and some specific ones (molecular complexes of trinitrobenzene or TNB), this research thesis reports the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to study molecular movements: generalities on broadband NMR, spin relaxation and strong field network, observation of the absorption signal and measurement of the second moment. The last part reports and discusses experimental results obtained on TNB-naphthalene, on TNB-azulene, on TNB-benzothiophene, and on TNB-indole

  3. How users organize electronic files on their workstations in the office environment: a preliminary study of personal information organization behaviour

    Christopher S.G. Khoo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available An ongoing study of how people organize their computer files and folders on the hard disk of their office workstations. A questionnaire was used to collect information on the subjects, their work responsibilities and characteristics of their workstations. Data on file and folder names and file structure were extracted from the hard disk using a computer program STG FolderPrint Plus, DOS command and screen capture. A semi-structured interview collected information on subjects' strategies in naming and organizing files and folders, and in locating and retrieving files. The data were analysed mainly through qualitative analysis and content analysis. The subjects organized their folders in a variety of structures, from broad and shallow to narrow and deep hierarchies. One to three levels of folders is common. The labels for first level folders tended to be task-based or project-based. Most subjects located files by browsing the folder structure, with searching used as a last resort. The most common types of folder names were document type, organizational function or structure, and miscellaneous or temporary. The frequency of folders of different types appear related to the type of occupation.

  4. Optical, Electrical and Magnetic Studies of Pi-Conjugated Organic Semiconductor Systems

    Vardeny, Zeev Valentine [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Over the duration of this grant our group has studied the transient and cw optical response of various π-conjugated polymers, oligomers, single crystals, fullerene molecules and blends of organic donor-acceptor molecules. We have been also involved in complementary experiments such as magneto-optical studies and spin-physics. We have advanced the field of photophysics of these materials by providing information on their excited state energies and primodal and long-lived photoexcitations such as singlet excitons, triplet excitons, polaron-pairs, excimers and exciplexes. We also fabricated various organic optoelectronic devices such as organic light emitting diodes (OLED), electrochemical cells, organic diodes, organic spin-valves (OSV), and organic photovoltaic (OPV) solar cells. These devices benefited the society in terms of cheap and energy saving illumination, as well as harnessing the solar energy.

  5. Knowledge and attitudes toward organ donation: a community-based study comparing rural and urban populations

    Alghanim Saad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was set to determine whether knowledge and attitudes toward organ dona-tion differ according to geographical location. Self-administered questionnaires were employed to collect data such as demographic characteristics, basic knowledge, attitudes and source of information about organ donation from subjects in rural and urban areas. The questionnaires were distributed randomly to 1,000 individuals in both areas during 2008. The data were analyzed in a descriptive fashion. Despite similarities in knowledge and attitudes of respondents in both areas, rural res-pondents were less likely to have information about organ donation, to report willingness to donate organs, and to have knowledge about "brain death" or the "organ donation card" than their counter-parts in urban areas. The study identified that the principle respondents′ source of information about organ donation was the television. More than 90% of respondents in rural and urban areas reported that the contribution of health care providers in providing them with knowledge about organ dona-tion and transplantation was "none" or "little". Respondents identified several reasons, which may influence their decisions to donate organs. In conclusion, the deficit in knowledge and attitudes of rural respondents about organ donation may be justified by the lack of information about this signi-ficant issue. Accordingly, health facilities, local mass media and educational institutions should provide intensive educational programs to encourage the public donate organs.

  6. Petrological and geochemical studies of alkaline rocks from continental Brazil. The tunas massif, state of Parana

    Gomes, C.B.; Barbieri, M.

    1987-01-01

    The Tunas massif, outcropping 80 km from the city of Curitiba, Parana State, southern Brazil, covers about 22 km 2 . It intruded into Precambrian metaigneous and metasedimentary units about 80 Ma ago (K/Ar and Rb/Sr data); five subcircular volcanic structures are recognized. Syenites and alkali syenites (plus some pulaskites) are the main rock-types, with subordinate alkali gabbros, syenogabbros, essexites and syenodiorites; small late syenitic dikes are also found. Magmatic breccias containing clasts of all rock-types are widespread. Main minerals are feldspars (both alkali feldspars and plagioclases, varying from bytownite to more sodic members), Ca-pyroxenes (Ti-salites grading towards ferrosalites and aegirine-augites), amphiboles (mainly pargasites, although kaersutites and katophorites are also present), Fe-biotites (sometimes enriched in Ti), olivines (hortonolites to ferrohortonolites), quartz and feldspathoids (both fresh and altered nephelines and sodalites); main accessories are Ti-magnetites (with exsolved ilmenite) and apatite. In the AFM diagram, whole rock chemistry depicts a typical alkaline trend. Binary variation diagrams (D.I. vs. several elements) show positive correlation for Si, Na and K, and negative slopes for Mg and Ca. The variation in the amounts of Ni, Cr and V with differentiation can be explained by withdrawal of olivine, Ca-pyroxenes and magnetite, and that of Sr and Ba by the fractionation of feldspars. The rocks are also relatively enriched in REE, a trend which is more pronounced for the light REE. Mass balance calculations show that the overall differentiation trend of the Tunas rocks can be explained by crystal fractionation, although several complexities arise and point to more complex genetic patterns. Isotopic Rb/Sr ratios are consistent with a mantle origin for the parental magma; dike rocks, however, with 87 Sr 86 Sr i = 0.70777 - 0.70806, were probably contaminated by crustal material. (author) [pt

  7. Geochemical and petrological study of the anphibolites from Cassia Region, MG

    Correia, C.T.; Girardi, V.A.V.

    1989-01-01

    The orthoamphibolites of the Cassia Region, Minas Gerais State, belong to two different groups distinguished by their TiO 2 contents (average contents 2.67% respectively). (La, Nb, V, Zr, Ce, and Zn). The titanium-poor group is slightly enriched in SiO 2 . The remarkable differences in incompatible element ratios between ATi and BTi(e.g., 4-,5 and 11-fold for Ce/Y, Zr/Nb and Y/La, respectively) indicate that the parent basaltic rocks of both groups were not derived either by fractional crystallizatin or by partial melting from a homogeneous source. It is suggested that the parent basilitic rocks of ATi and BTi were related to chemically hetrogeneous mantles materials. The clear discrimination of both groups in the Ti-Zr-Y diagram is attributed to geochemical characteristics of their genesis and does not necessarily indicate different environments. Metamorphic grade in the Cassia region increases from SSW to NNE. In the amphibolites, progresssive metamorphism is indicated by increase in the anorthite content of plagioclase; by changes of colour and composition of the amphiboles, which vary from tschermakitic hornblendes (green) to edenitic hornblendes (brownish-green to brown); and by increase in the pyrope content of garnet. The temperatures obtained through geothermometry of the amplhibolities vary from 650 0 C to slightly greater than 725 0 C. Minimum pressures are estimated around 6.5Kb [pt

  8. A geochemical and petrological study of the Late Cretaceous banatites from the Apuseni Mountains, Romania

    Vander Auwera, Jacqueline; Berza, Tudor; Dupont, Alain; Gesels, Julie; Pin, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Banatites from western Romania belong to the more than 1000 km long and 30 to 70 km wide Late Cretaceous magmatic belt that spreads across southeastern Europe (Apuseni-Banat-Timok-Srednogorie). These banatites (Apuseni Mts. in the north and Banat in the south) occupy a particularly important area as they were emplaced across a major boundary between the Tisza and Dacia mega-units. Given their calc-alkaline signature and depletion in HFSE, they are interpreted as subduction related. Mineralogical, geochemical and isotopic (Sr, Nd) data were acquired on a series of samples from a selection of intrusions of the Apuseni Mountains in order to model their possible differentiation processes and to compare them with published results on banatites from Banat and Serbia (Timok and Ridanj-Krepolijn). Samples from the Apuseni Mts. display high-K calc-alkaline differentiation trends of decreasing FeOt, MgO, CaO, P2O5, TiO2, Sr, Zn, Co, V and increasing Rb and Th with increasing SiO2 (54.4 wt. % to 72 wt. %). Mixing is a plausible differentiation process as mingling relationships have been observed between microdiorites and granodiorites in Pietroasa but is not supported by geochemical data. These are better predicted by fractional crystallization but phenocrysts unmixing cannot be precluded. The fractional crystallization process has been modelled in three steps using the least square regression method : a gabbronoritic cumulate is subtracted in the first step whereas apatite-bearing dioritic cumulates are subtracted in the two later steps with a more albitic plagioclase in the third cumulate. The trace elements composition of the samples support the proposed model. The composition of the least differentiated samples collected in the Apuseni Mts. preclude them as being primary magmas in equilibrium with a mantle source. We however suggest that these least differentiated compositions were derived by limited differentiation of a mantle-derived magma that either was trapped in the lower crust because of its high density or was not sampled because of poor exposure in the Apuseni Mts. The major and trace elements composition of the Apuseni banatites is very similar to that of banatites from Banat but the two sets of samples display strikingly different isotopic compositions. In an epsilon Ndt versus Sri diagram, three groups are observed. One group made of some of the Banat samples plots close to the mantle array and the composition of the enriched mantle. A second group, comprising most of the banatites from Banat has mildly positive epsilon Nd and clusters around a Sri of 0.705. The third group comprises most of the Apuseni samples and display negative epsilon Nd and high Sri. It is possible that the first group broadly witnesses the isotopic composition of the enriched mantle source whereas the other two groups evidence crustal contamination. Moreover, we suggest that two different crustal contaminants were involved in Banat and Apuseni in agreement with their emplacement in two different mega-units. This hypothesis is corroborated by published data on banatites from Serbia.

  9. studies on growth, organs weight and haematological parameters of ...

    user

    2012-06-01

    Jun 1, 2012 ... Maize which is the most available basal energy feedstuff is in constant demand for human and animal nutrition and for industrial processing (Esonu, 2000). The study was conducted to evaluate the effect of feeding graded level of cassava root meal flour on haematological and growth performance of broiler.

  10. Intergovernmental Information Highways for Local Police Organizations: A Case Study

    Vidal, Denise Helena

    2013-01-01

    A lack of communication, information sharing, and a centralized and unified intelligence repository to gather, maintain, and analyze intelligence information before the September 11, 2001 (9/11) terrorist attacks limited the ability of U.S. law enforcement to share intelligence. The problem addressed in this case study was the lack of multiagency…

  11. An Empirical Study of Logistics Organization, Electronic Linkage, and Performance

    1993-01-01

    Anvari, M., "Electronic Data Interchange and Inventories," International Journal of Production Economics , 26, 1-3 (1992), 135-143. Baker, R. H., EDI: What...Electronic Data Interchange -- A Study of Norwegian Freight Forwarders Using EDI," International Journal of Production Economics , 24 (1991), 91-101. Henry, G

  12. Intellectual Failure and Ideological Success in Organization Studies

    Alvesson, Mats; Kärreman, Dan

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the current self-confidence and apparent success—at least by market/popularity measures—of leadership studies (LS) in general and transformational leadership (TFL) in particular. An alternative interpretation is offered, suggesting that it is the ideological character...

  13. Instituting Cultural Change at a Major Organization: A Case Study

    Dulek, Ronald E.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the development and implementation of a strategic cultural change program from a case study perspective. Initially, the article describes how the program was developed, including an explanation as to how a communication component was integrated into the program from inception. This integration helped reduce the anxiety that…

  14. Studies on the biological effects of deuteriated organic compounds

    Dinh-Nguyen, Nguyen; Vincent, J.

    1976-01-01

    The antifungal activity of some perdeuterated fatty acids with a normal chain of 11 to 18 carbon atoms was investigated on common dermatophytes Epidermophyton floccosum, Microsporum canis, Trichophyton mentagrophytes and T. rubrum under in vitro conditions. A perdeuterated compound is one in which most of the hydrogen atoms in the molecule are replaced by deuterium. These studies were performed by the dilution technique with respiratory measurements. Perdeuteration of of some fatty acids increases their inhibitory effect on the dermatophyte growth. Perdeuterated n-hendecanoic acid proved to be the most active of the substances tested. Possible mechanisms behind the enhanced antifungal activity due to the perdeuteration of fatty acids are discussed. The present study investigates the antifungal properties of some perdeuterated fatty acids on dermatophytes in vitro

  15. Progress in 1988 1990 with computer applications in the ``hard-rock'' arena: Geochemistry, mineralogy, petrology, and volcanology

    Rock, Nicholas M. S.

    This review covers rock, mineral and isotope geochemistry, mineralogy, igneous and metamorphic petrology, and volcanology. Crystallography, exploration geochemistry, and mineral exploration are excluded. Fairly extended comments on software availability, and on computerization of the publication process and of specimen collection indexes, may interest a wider audience. A proliferation of both published and commercial software in the past 3 years indicates increasing interest in what traditionally has been a rather reluctant sphere of geoscience computer activity. However, much of this software duplicates the same old functions (Harker and triangular plots, mineral recalculations, etc.). It usually is more efficient nowadays to use someone else's program, or to employ the command language in one of many general-purpose spreadsheet or statistical packages available, than to program a specialist operation from scratch in, say, FORTRAN. Greatest activity has been in mineralogy, where several journals specifically encourage publication of computer-related activities, and IMA and MSA Working Groups on microcomputers have been convened. In petrology and geochemistry, large national databases of rock and mineral analyses continue to multiply, whereas the international database IGBA grows slowly; some form of integration is necessary to make these disparate systems of lasting value to the global "hard-rock" community. Total merging or separate addressing via an intelligent "front-end" are both possibilities. In volcanology, the BBC's videodisk Volcanoes and the Smithsonian Institution's Global Volcanism Project use the most up-to-date computer technology in an exciting and innovative way, to promote public education.

  16. Garnet Signatures in Geophysical and Geochemical Observations: Insights into the Thermo-Petrological Structure of Oceanic Upper Mantle

    Grose, C. J.; Afonso, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    We have developed new physically comprehensive thermal plate models of the oceanic lithosphere which incorporate temperature- and pressure-dependent heat transport properties and thermal expansivity, melting beneath ridges, hydrothermal circulation near ridge axes, and insulating oceanic crust. These models provide good fits to global databases of seafloor topography and heat flow, and seismic evidence of thermal structure near ridge axes. We couple these thermal plate models with thermodynamic models to predict the petrology of oceanic lithosphere. Geoid height predictions from our models suggest that there is a strong anomaly in geoid slope (over age) above ~25 Ma lithosphere due to the topography of garnet-field mantle. A similar anomaly is also present in geoid data over fracture zones. In addition, we show that a new assessment of a large database of ocean island basalt Sm/Yb systematics indicates that there is an unmistakable step-like increase in Sm/Yb values around 15-20 Ma, indicating the presence of garnet. To explain this feature, we have attempted to couple our thermo-petrological models of oceanic upper mantle with an open system, non-modal, dynamic melting model with diffusion kinetics to investigate trace element partitioning in an ascending mantle column.

  17. Study of wet incineration of organic matters under ultrasounds

    Rey-Gaurez, F.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the potentiality of power ultrasound for minimizing the volumes of solid waste and effluents generated by the spent nuclear fuel refining industry. In the first part, the advantages of power ultrasound for the decontamination of ion exchange resins (IER) is demonstrated: 1) sonication allows to remove 100 % of the 137 Cs and more than 20 % of the 60 Co initially present in the contaminated resins, 2) the decontamination is fast, 3) very simple experimental conditions are necessary (water, air or argon as saturating gas and weak electric intensity). The study of different chemical and sono-chemical parameters shows that decontamination seems to be related to the effects induced by cavitation: micro-streaming and solid erosion or disruption. In the second part, the selectivity of power ultrasound for the elimination of nitrogen (nitrate, nitro) aliphatic derivatives diluted in the PUREX process solvent is established. The nitrogen derivatives of butane or dodecane are removed under sonication while the solvent is scarcely damaged. The nitrogen derivatives of butane are quickly eliminated according to a thermal way in the cavitation bubble. A great number of kinetic data have been obtained and the influence of different parameters has been studied. The mechanisms are complex and initiated mainly by the homolytic cleavage of the O-N bond of butyl nitrate or nitrite and the C-N bond of nitrobutane. The elimination of nitrogen derivatives of dodecane is slower than the four-carbon component one. This preliminary kinetic study was difficult as the kinetic order was undetermined and a steady state concentration was reached after a short time of sonication. Unlike the four-carbon derivatives, the decomposition rate was not controlled by the boiling point of the long-chain derivatives. Nevertheless, good carbon balance (dodecane is the major product) has been obtained and led to potential mechanisms. (author) [fr

  18. Leadership in transformation: a longitudinal study in a nursing organization.

    Viitala, Riitta

    2014-01-01

    Not only does leadership produce changes, but those changes produce leadership in organisations. The purpose of this paper is to present a theoretical and empirical analysis of the transformation of leadership at two different historical points in a health care organisation. It leans on the perspective of social constructionism, drawing especially from the ideas of Berger and Luckmann (1966). The paper seeks to improve understanding of how leaders themselves construct leadership in relation to organisational change. The empirical material was gathered in a longitudinal case study in a nursing organisation in two different historical and situational points. It consists of written narratives produced by nurse leaders that are analysed by applying discourse analysis. The empirical study revealed that the constructions of leadership were dramatically different at the two different historical and situational points. Leadership showed up as a complex, fragile and changing phenomenon, which fluctuates along with the other organisational changes. The results signal the importance of agency in leadership and the central role of "significant others". The paper questions the traditional categorisation and labelling of leadership as well as the cross-sectional studies in understanding leadership transformation. Its originality relates to the longitudinal perspective on transformation of leadership in the context of a health care organisation.

  19. SKPM study on organic-inorganic perovskite materials

    Song, Kena; Wu, Yinghui; Chen, Xi; He, Yi; Liu, Liyu; Chen, Guo; Liu, Ruchuan

    2018-03-01

    We report Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Scanning Kelvin Probe Microscopy (SKPM) studies on the surface morphology and surface potential properties of CH3NH3PbI3, CH3NH3PbI3-xClx, CH3NH3PbI3-xBrx and CH3NH3PbBr3-xClx, respectively. For CH3NH3PbI3 rod structure, its surface potential is independent of the precursor concentration, suggesting a robust electronic feature. Surface potential studies of CH3NH3PbI3 particle reveal that the Fermi level within CH3NH3PbI3 is strongly influenced by the substrate. In the case of CH3NH3PbI3-xClx, its surface potential depends on precursor concentrations and we suspect that chlorine concentrated solutions might lead to more chlorine incorporation in the final products, thus lowering its Fermi level. Also, we studied the surface potentials of CH3NH3PbI3-xBrx and CH3NH3PbBr3-xClxwith specified halide ratios. The surface potential differences between different samples are related to their work function variations. These results are helpful to the understanding of the structural and electronic properties of perovskite materials.

  20. Record of late Pleistocene glaciation and deglaciation in the southern Cascade Range. I. Petrological evidence from lacustrine sediment in Upper Klamath Lake, southern Oregon

    Reynolds, R.L.; Rosenbaum, J.G.; Rapp, J.; Kerwin, M.W.; Bradbury, J.P.; Colman, S.; Adam, D.

    2004-01-01

    Petrological and textural properties of lacustrine sediments from Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon, reflect changing input volumes of glacial flour and thus reveal a detailed glacial history for the southern Cascade Range between about 37 and 15 ka. Magnetic properties vary as a result of mixing different amounts of the highly magnetic, glacially generated detritus with less magnetic, more weathered detritus derived from unglaciated parts of the large catchment. Evidence that the magnetic properties record glacial flour input is based mainly on the strong correlation between bulk sediment particle size and parameters that measure the magnetite content and magnetic mineral freshness. High magnetization corresponds to relatively fine particle size and lower magnetization to coarser particle size. This relation is not found in the Buck Lake core in a nearby, unglaciated catchment. Angular silt-sized volcanic rock fragments containing unaltered magnetite dominate the magnetic fraction in the late Pleistocene sediments but are absent in younger, low magnetization sediments. The finer grained, highly magnetic sediments contain high proportions of planktic diatoms indicative of cold, oligotrophic limnic conditions. Sediment with lower magnetite content contains populations of diatoms indicative of warmer, eutrophic limnic conditions. During the latter part of oxygen isotope stage 3 (about 37-25 ka), the magnetic properties record millennial-scale variations in glacial-flour content. The input of glacial flour was uniformly high during the Last Glacial Maximum, between about 21 and 16 ka. At about 16 ka, magnetite input, both absolute and relative to hematite, decreased abruptly, reflecting a rapid decline in glacially derived detritus. The decrease in magnetite transport into the lake preceded declines in pollen from both grass and sagebrush. A more gradual decrease in heavy mineral content over this interval records sediment starvation with the growth of marshes at the margins

  1. Deposits, petrology and mechanism of the 2010-2013 eruption of Kizimen volcano in Kamchatka, Russia

    Auer, A.; Belousov, A.; Belousova, M.

    2018-04-01

    Kizimen volcano in Kamchatka is well known as a source of highly heterogeneous poorly mingled magmas ranging from dacites to basaltic andesites. In 2010-2013, the volcano produced its first historical magmatic eruption with the deposition of 0.27 km3 of block and ash pyroclastic flows accompanied by slow extrusion of a 200-m-thick, highly viscous (1010-1011 Pa s) block lava flow with a volume of 0.3 km3. The total volume of erupted magma comprised approximately 0.4 km3 DRE. We provide description of the eruption chronology, as well as the lithology and petrology of eruptive products. The erupted material is represented by banded dacite and high-silica andesite. The dacitic magma was formed during a long dormancy after the previous magmatic eruption several hundred years ago with mineral compositions indicating average pre-eruptive temperatures of 810 °C, fO2 of 0.9-1.6 log units above the nickel-nickel oxide (NNO) buffer and shallow crustal storage conditions at 123 MPa. The silica-rich andesite represents a hybrid magma, which shows signs of recent thermal and compositional disequilibrium. We suggest that the hybrid magma started to form in 1963 when a swarm of deep earthquakes indicated an input of mafic magma from depth into the 6-11-km-deep silicic magma chamber. It took the following 46 years until the magma filling the chamber reached an eruptible state. Poor mingling of the two melts is attributed to its unusually high viscosity that could be associated with the pre-eruptive long-term leakage of volatiles from the chamber through a regional tectonic fault. Our investigations have shown that shallow magma chambers of dormant volcanoes demonstrating strong persistent fumarolic activity can contain highly viscous, degassed magma of evolved composition. Reactivation of such magma chambers by injection of basic magma takes a long time (several decades). Thus, eruption forecasts at such volcanoes should include a possibility of long time lag between a swarm of

  2. Stratigraphy and Petrology of the Grande Soufriere Hills Volcano, Dominica, Lesser Antilles

    Daly, G.; Smith, A. L.; Garcia, R.; Killingsworth, N.

    2007-12-01

    O2, Sr, V, and Sc and increasing values for Na2O, K2O, Ba, Rb, and Zr with increasing silica. Samples from the megabreccia can be chemically distinguished from the younger rocks of this center. Petrologic models suggest that the younger rocks from the Grand Soufriere Hills can be produced by fractional crystallization of basaltic magma such as those erupted from other centers (such as Morne Anglais to the west). Minor variations within this suite of andesites can be related to upper crustal fractionation of phenocryst phases.

  3. Petrology of the axial ridge of the Mariana Trough backarc spreading center

    Hawkins, J.W.; Lonsdale, P.F.; Macdougall, J.D.; Volpe, A.M.

    1990-01-01

    The axial ridge of the Mariana Trough backarc basin, between 17deg40'N and 18deg30'N rises as much as 1 km above the floor of a 10-15 km wide rift valley. Physiographic segmentation, with minor ridge offsets and overlaps, coincides with a petrologic segmentation seen in trace element and isotope chemistry. Analyses of 239 glass and 40 aphyric basalt samples, collected with ALVIN and by dredging, show that the axial ridge is formed largely of (olivine) hypersthene-normative tholeiitic basalt. About half of these are enriched in both LIL elements and volatiles, but are depleted in HFS elements like other rocks found throughout much of the Mariana Trough. The LIL enrichments distinguish these rocks from N-MORB even though Nd and Sr isotope ratios indicate that much of the crust formed from a source similar to that for N-MORB. In addition to LIL-enriched basalt there is LIL depleted basalts even more closely resembling N-MORB in major and trace elements as well as Sr, Nd and Pb isotopes. Both basalt varieties have higher Al and lower total Fe than MORB at equivalent Mg level. Mg ranges from relatively ''primitive'' (e.g. Mg 65-70) to more highly fractionated (e.g. Mg 45-50). Highest parts of the axial ridge are capped by pinnacles with elongated pillows of basaltic andesite (e.g. 52-56%) SiO 2 . These are due to extreme fractional crystallization of basalts forming the axial ridge. Active hydrothermal vents with chimneys and mats of opaline silica, barite, sphalerite and lesser amounts of pyrite, chalcopyrite and galena formed near these silicic rocks. The vents are surrounded by distinctive vent animals, polychaete worms, crabs and barnacles. Isotope data indicate that the Mariana Trough crust was derived from a heterogeneous source including mantle resembling the MORB-source and an ''arc-source'' component. The latter was depleted in HFS elements in previous melting events and later modified by addition of H 2 O and LIL elements. (orig.)

  4. A coupled petrological-geodynamical model to investigate the evolution of crustal magmatic systems

    Kaus, B. J. P.; Rummel, L.; White, R. W.

    2017-12-01

    The evolution of crustal magmatic systems can be analyzed from different physical and chemical perspectives. Most previous work focus either on the petrological side (considering thermal effects and ignoring mechanics), or on the mechanical evolution (assuming a fixed melt chemistry). Here, we consider both by combining a 2D finite element code, MVEP2, with a thermodynamic modelling approach (Perple_X). Density, melt fraction and the chemical composition of the liquid and solid phase are computed for different starting rock compositions and the evolving chemistry is tracked on markers via 10 main oxides (SiO2-TiO2-Al2O3-Cr2O3-MgO-FeO-CaO-Na2O-K2O-H2O). As soon as the local chemistry changes due to melt extraction, new phase diagrams are computed based on the residual solid chemistry for the deflated magma chamber or on the liquid chemistry for newly generated magma filled fractures. To investigate the chemical evolution in magma chambers and magma filled fractures, we inject mafic sills periodically at varying depth levels into the continental crust. The initial sill injections are focused in either one or two main zones in the crust and may interact with each other. The formation of magma filled fractures from this partially molten zone is tracked with a semi analytical dike initiation algorithm that forms new dikes as a function of the local stress field above the partially molten region and subsequently depletes and compacts the magma source region. Dike generation is thus affected by the background strain rate, amount and depth of melt accumulations as well as parameters that control the plastic and viscous behaviour of the crust (e.g. cohesion, viscous creep flow low etc.). Results show that magma filled fractures triggered by sill injections preferentially form under extensional conditions, particularly within the middle crust (in ca. 25 km depth). Magma chambers in the lower continental crust, on the other hand, are stable over a longer period of time due a

  5. [Acceptance of post-mortem organ donation in Germany : Representative cross-sectional study].

    Tackmann, E; Dettmer, S

    2018-02-01

    The German post-mortem organ donation rate has dropped by one third since 2010. Furthermore, 958 patients died in 2015 in Germany while waiting for an organ. To decrease organ shortage, an amendment of the transplantation law was established in 2012. An information package including an organ donor card is sent to all German citizens via the postal service. A voluntary national transplantation register was introduced in 2016 to improve transparency in the organ donation process. The influence of several transplantation scandals starting in 2012 on organ donation rates is in question. Therefore, the objective of this article is to discuss approval and objections to post-mortem organ donation among the next of kin of potential donors and the general public in Germany. Binary logistic regression of data from the 2014 survey by the Federal Centre for Health Education on attitudes towards organ and tissue donation in Germany was conducted, aiming to identify influencing factors on the likelihood of organ donor card possession. Additionally, data of the German Organ Transplantation Foundation on post-mortem organ donations in Germany in 2014 were studied to highlight reasons for approval and objections by next of kin of potential and explanted post-mortem organ donors. Methods of documentation of the deceased's will according to data of the German Organ Transplantation Foundation were analyzed. Male gender and lack of knowledge about organ donation decrease the likelihood of having an organ donor card. Of the respondents in the survey of the Federal Centre for Health Education 71.0% would donate their own organs, whereas only one third possess an organ donor card. Health insurances and physicians are the most important providers of organ donor cards in Germany. An increase in the percentage of organ donor card possession following the amendment of the transplantation law could not be observed by 2016. Fear of organ trade and unjust organ allocation are the main reasons

  6. Study on electrohydrodynamic jetting performance of organic solvents

    Lee, Soo Hong; Nguyen, Xuan Hung; Gim, Yeong Hyeon; Ko, Han Seo [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    The electrohydrodynamic (EHD) inkjet method is a printing technology using electricity. This technique allows for the printing of EML (Emission layer) materials, usually used for OLED devices, on a substrate. In this study, ejection experiments were performed with various solvents to verify which of them is properly ejected in the EHD method. The solvents employed were dielectric liquids with low viscosity and it was confirmed that among them two solvents, 1,2-Dichlorobenzene (DCB) and 1,2-Dichloroethane (DCE), produced the pulsating cone-Jet mode and stable cone-jet mode well. In addition, experiments were conducted to find out how the voltage and applied flux influence the ejection mode, in order to apply the result to the ejection control. It was found that the selected solvent was easily ejected and printed, due to the free surface charge and charge density determined by the dielectric constant. Finally, a patterning experiment was performed to verify proper printing.

  7. Intact organism, short-term studies using 11C

    Spence, R.D.; Sharpe, P.J.H.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental investigation of biochemical pathways and biophysical mechanisms is difficult because in many cases more than one pathway or mechanism is involved. Ideally, a physiological tracer should be used to follow the uptake, transport, and assimilation of materials such as carbon and nitrogen to characterize the movements and mechanisms of physiological processes. Real-time measurements of net photosynthesis and dark respiration of plants have been possible since the development of the infrared gas analyzer (IRGA), allowing the intensive investigation of mechanisms and dynamics of CO 2 assimilation in green plants. Comparable research on the movement of carbon within the plant, however, requires another technique that allows real-time observations of carbon transport. This chapter describes how the short-lived radioisotope 11 C can be used to conduct plant physiological studies that are difficult or impossible to make using other isotopes such as 14 C

  8. Effects of Short-Term Thermal Alteration on Organic Matter in Experimentally-Heated Tagish Lake Observed by Raman Spectroscopy

    Chan, Q. H. S.; Nakato, A.; Zolensky, M. E.; Nakamura, T.; Kebukawa, Y.; Maisano, J.; Colbert, M.; Martinez, J. E.

    2017-01-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites exhibit a wide range of aqueous and thermal alteration characteristics, while some are known to demonstrate mineralogical and petrologic evidence of having been thermally metamorphosed after aqueous alteration. This group of meteorites are commonly referred as thermally met-amorphosed carbonaceous chondrites (TMCCs), and their reflectance spectra show resemblances to that of C-type asteroids which typically have low albedos. This suggests that the surfaces of the C-type asteroids are also composed of both hydrous and dehydrated minerals, and thus TMCCs are among the best samples that can be studied in laboratory to reveal the true nature of the C-type asteroids. Although TMCCs are usually meteorites that were previously categorized as CI and CM chondrites, they are not strictly CI/CM because they exhibit isotopic and petrographic characteristics that significantly deviate from typical CI/CM. More appropriately, they are called CI-like and/or CM-like chondrites. Typical examples of TMCCs include the C2-ung/CM2TIV Belgica (B)-7904 and Yamato (Y) 86720. Thermal alteration is virtually complete in these meteorites and thus they are considered typical end-members of TMCCs exhibiting complete dehydration of matrix phyllosilicates. The estimated heating conditions are 10 to 103 days at 700 C to 1 to 100 hours at 890 C, i.e. short-term heating induced by impact and/or solar radiation. While the petrology and chemistry of TMCCs have only recently been extensively characterized, we have just begun to study in detail their organic contents. In order to understand how short-term heating affects the maturity of insoluble organic matter (IOM) in hydrous chondrites, we investigated experimentally-heated Tagish Lake meteorite using Raman spectroscopy, as the chemical and bulk oxygen isotopic compositions of the matrix of the carbonate (CO3)-poor lithology of the Tagish Lake (hereafter Tag) meteorite bears similarities to the TMCCs.

  9. Theoretical study of adsorption of organic phosphines on transition metal surfaces

    Lou, Shujie; Jiang, Hong

    2018-04-01

    The adsorption properties of organic phosphines on transition metal (TM) surfaces (Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, Ir, Pt, and Au) have been studied to explore the possibility of building novel heterogeneous chiral catalytic systems based on organic phosphines. Preferred adsorption sites, adsorption energies and surface electronic structures of a selected set of typical organic phosphines adsorbed on TM surfaces are calculated with density-functional theory to obtain a systematic understanding on the nature of adsorption interactions. All organic phosphines considered are found to chemically adsorb on these TM surfaces with the atop site as the most preferred one, and the TM-P bond is formed via the lone-pair electrons of the P atom and the directly contacted TM atom. These findings imply that it is indeed possible to build heterogeneous chiral catalytic systems based on organic phosphines adsorbed on TM surfaces, which, however, requires a careful design of molecular structure of organic phosphines.

  10. Study of the Entrepreneurship in Universities as Learning Organization Based on Senge Model

    Nejad, Bahareh Azizi; Abbaszadeh, Mir Mohammad Seiied; Hassani, Mohammad; Bernousi, Iraj

    2012-01-01

    Learning organization and entrepreneurship are the most important issues that are focused on different themes in management. The purpose of present research was to study the relationship between learning organization elements and entrepreneurship among academic faculty members of the West Azarbaijan State Universities. The research method was…

  11. The Munich MIDY Pig Biobank – A unique resource for studying organ crosstalk in diabetes

    Andreas Blutke

    2017-08-01

    Conclusions: The broad spectrum of well-defined biosamples in the Munich MIDY Pig Biobank that will be available to the scientific community provides a unique resource for systematic studies of organ crosstalk in diabetes in a multi-organ, multi-omics dimension.

  12. Case Study: Employee Use of Information and Communication Technologies in a Healthcare Organization

    Aponte, Jorge I.

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative case study explored the employee use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in a southern Puerto Rico healthcare organization. Thirty-two employees of a southern Puerto Rico healthcare organization provided their perspectives regarding their use of ICT in the workplace. The findings distinguished how employees use ICT…

  13. The organizers' ecology: An empirical study of foreign banks in Shanghai

    J.G. Kuilman (Jeroen); J. Li (Jiatao)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe organizing stages that predate entry into an organizational population were studied from an ecological perspective. Based on a detailed analysis of foreign banks in Shanghai, findings are presented that suggest that the likelihood of moving from the organizing phase to the

  14. The Importance of Undergraduate General and Organic Chemistry to the Study of Biochemistry in Medical School.

    Scimone, Anthony; Scimone, Angelina A.

    1996-01-01

    Investigates chemistry topics necessary to facilitate the study of biochemistry in U.S. medical schools. Lists topics considered especially important and topics considered especially unimportant in general chemistry and organic chemistry. Suggests that in teaching undergraduate general or organic chemistry, the topics categorized as exceptionally…

  15. Person-Organization (Culture) Fit and Employee Commitment under Conditions of Organizational Change: A Longitudinal Study

    Meyer, John P.; Hecht, Tracy D.; Gill, Harjinder; Toplonytsky, Laryssa

    2010-01-01

    This longitudinal study examines how person-organization fit, operationalized as congruence between perceived and preferred organizational culture, relates to employees' affective commitment and intention to stay with an organization during the early stages of a strategic organizational change. Employees in a large energy company completed surveys…

  16. Relationships between Islamic religiosity and attitude toward deceased organ donation among American Muslims: a pilot study.

    Padela, Aasim I; Zaganjor, Hatidza

    2014-06-27

    Religion-rooted beliefs and values are often cited as barriers to organ donation among Muslims. Yet how Islamic religiosity relates to organ donation attitude among Muslims is less studied. Using a community based participatory research approach, we recruited adults from mosque communities to self-administer a questionnaire assessing levels of Islamic religiosity, attitude toward deceased organ donation, and sociodemographic descriptors. Of the 97 respondents, there were nearly equal numbers of men and women. Over a third were Arab American (n=36), and nearly a quarter were either South Asian (n=23) or African American (n=25). Respondents viewing difficulties in life as punishment from God had a decreased odds of believing deceased organ donation to be justified (OR 0.85, PArab Muslims were more likely to believe deceased organ donation to be justified than South Asian or African Americans (OR 7.06, PAmerican health-care system, were not significantly associated with attitude toward deceased organ donation. Higher levels of intrinsic religiosity or adherence to Islamic ethics do not appear to associate with negative attitudes toward deceased organ donation. Negative religious coping appears, however, to be related to lower rates of believing deceased organ donation to be justified. Future studies with larger samples that incorporate additional measures of religiosity can further clarify relationships between religiosity and organ donation attitude among Muslim communities.

  17. Hospital enterprise Architecture Framework (Study of Iranian University Hospital Organization).

    Haghighathoseini, Atefehsadat; Bobarshad, Hossein; Saghafi, Fatehmeh; Rezaei, Mohammad Sadegh; Bagherzadeh, Nader

    2018-06-01

    Nowadays developing smart and fast services for patients and transforming hospitals to modern hospitals is considered a necessity. Living in the world inundated with information systems, designing services based on information technology entails a suitable architecture framework. This paper aims to present a localized enterprise architecture framework for the Iranian university hospital. Using two dimensions of implementation and having appropriate characteristics, the best 17 enterprises frameworks were chosen. As part of this effort, five criteria were selected according to experts' inputs. According to these criteria, five frameworks which had the highest rank were chosen. Then 44 general characteristics were extracted from the existing 17 frameworks after careful studying. Then a questionnaire was written accordingly to distinguish the necessity of those characteristics using expert's opinions and Delphi method. The result showed eight important criteria. In the next step, using AHP method, TOGAF was chosen regarding having appropriate characteristics and the ability to be implemented among reference formats. In the next step, enterprise architecture framework was designed by TOGAF in a conceptual model and its layers. For determining architecture framework parts, a questionnaire with 145 questions was written based on literature review and expert's opinions. The results showed during localization of TOGAF for Iran, 111 of 145 parts were chosen and certified to be used in the hospital. The results showed that TOGAF could be suitable for use in the hospital. So, a localized Hospital Enterprise Architecture Modelling is developed by customizing TOGAF for an Iranian hospital at eight levels and 11 parts. This new model could be used to be performed in other Iranian hospitals. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Annual Study of the PM2.5 Organic Composition in Chapineria

    Pindado, O.; Perez, R. M.; Garcia, S.

    2013-01-01

    The annual study of organic fraction of atmospheric aerosol in a rural area of Madrid is shown. Almost 90 organic compounds, among them aliphatic hydrocarbons, PAH and polar species such as alcohols and acids have been identified and quantified in PM2.5 fraction. Compounds concentration ranged between pg m - 3 and ng m - 3. The seasonal variability and also a comparison to others studies have been studied. (Author) 76 refs.

  19. A STUDY ON DETERMINATION OF THE ORGANIZATION PERCEIVED QUALITY, SATISFACTION LEVEL AND REVISIT: THE CASE STUDY OF FIFA UNDER - 20 WORLD CUP ORGANIZATION

    Cemal Ersin SİLİK

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the study is to determine the organization quality perception of foreign spectators who visited Turkey for FIFA (Federation Inter nationale de Football Association Under - 20 World Cup Organization in 2013. The matches are performed in seven cities (İstanbul, Bursa, Antalya, Kayseri, Gaziantep, Trabzon, Rize and the population of the study is foreign spectators in İstanbul and Bursa due to the population, number of games played and the capacity of stadiums in the cities. Perception of organization quality scale which developed by Shonk (2006 is used to collect data from the population and surveyed men (f=74, woman (26 total of 100 foreign spectators who come to Turkey to watch World Cup matches. Foreign spectators participated in research are asked to evaluate the perceived quality about access quality, accommodation quality, venue quality and contest quality and asked to evaluate s atisfaction levels of organization, intent to return and quality of sport tourism. The t test and one - way analysis of variance (ANOVA is used to determine differences between foreign spectators‟ individual characteristics with perceptions of quality of or ganization. In addition, simple correlation analysis is conducted to determine level and direction relationship between foreign spectators‟ satisfaction levels of organization, perceptions of quality of sport tourism and intent to return. According to anal ysis, there are not any significant differences with perception of quality of organization between individual characteristics (age and gender. However, there are a significant relationship between spectators‟ satisfaction levels of organization with venue quality (r=.200; p=.046 and contest quality (r=.394; p=.000. There is not any significant relationship between access quality and accommodation quality with participants‟ satisfaction levels of organization and there is not also any relationship between sport tourism quality and

  20. Petrology and geochemistry of the Miocene-Pliocene fluvial succession, Katawaz Basin, Western Pakistan: Implications on provenance and source area weathering

    Kasi, Aimal K.; Kassi, Aktar Muhammad; Friis, Henrik

    Petrology and geochemistry of sandstones and mudstones of the Miocene Dasht Murgha Group (DMG) and Pliocene Malthanai Formation (MF) of the Pishin Belt (Katawaz Basin), northwestern Pakistan have been carried out to find out their provenance and source area weathering. Sandstones of the Dasht...

  1. Organic saffron position in the future household consumption basket and effective structures (Case study

    Ahmadreza Shahpouri

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Considering the importance of planning at the production level, it is necessary to identify the consumer's future behavior towards organic products. Thus, using seemingly unrelated regression and data of 2012 for 200 households in mashhad, in the present study we have tried to determine the future share of these products in the household's basket and also survey the effective factors on this share in organic saffron. The results showed that households in mashhad tend to allocate an average of 34 percent of their future consumption basket for organic saffron. The regression results illustrated that while children below 10 years old in the households, willingness to pay the price differential compared with non-organic products and organic labeling positively affected the willingness to pay for organic products, environmental concerns variables created by non-organic products had a negative effect on their willingness. Considering the research results, helping to raise people's awareness about food through different educational and advertising approaches, providing a mechanism to label organic products and assessing the strengths and weaknesses of producing and distributing the organic products are provided as suggestions.

  2. Selection of organisms for the co-evolution-based study of protein interactions.

    Herman, Dorota; Ochoa, David; Juan, David; Lopez, Daniel; Valencia, Alfonso; Pazos, Florencio

    2011-09-12

    The prediction and study of protein interactions and functional relationships based on similarity of phylogenetic trees, exemplified by the mirrortree and related methodologies, is being widely used. Although dependence between the performance of these methods and the set of organisms used to build the trees was suspected, so far nobody assessed it in an exhaustive way, and, in general, previous works used as many organisms as possible. In this work we asses the effect of using different sets of organism (chosen according with various phylogenetic criteria) on the performance of this methodology in detecting protein interactions of different nature. We show that the performance of three mirrortree-related methodologies depends on the set of organisms used for building the trees, and it is not always directly related to the number of organisms in a simple way. Certain subsets of organisms seem to be more suitable for the predictions of certain types of interactions. This relationship between type of interaction and optimal set of organism for detecting them makes sense in the light of the phylogenetic distribution of the organisms and the nature of the interactions. In order to obtain an optimal performance when predicting protein interactions, it is recommended to use different sets of organisms depending on the available computational resources and data, as well as the type of interactions of interest.

  3. A method for generating large datasets of organ geometries for radiotherapy treatment planning studies

    Hu, Nan; Cerviño, Laura; Segars, Paul; Lewis, John; Shan, Jinlu; Jiang, Steve; Zheng, Xiaolin; Wang, Ge

    2014-01-01

    With the rapidly increasing application of adaptive radiotherapy, large datasets of organ geometries based on the patient’s anatomy are desired to support clinical application or research work, such as image segmentation, re-planning, and organ deformation analysis. Sometimes only limited datasets are available in clinical practice. In this study, we propose a new method to generate large datasets of organ geometries to be utilized in adaptive radiotherapy. Given a training dataset of organ shapes derived from daily cone-beam CT, we align them into a common coordinate frame and select one of the training surfaces as reference surface. A statistical shape model of organs was constructed, based on the establishment of point correspondence between surfaces and non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) representation. A principal component analysis is performed on the sampled surface points to capture the major variation modes of each organ. A set of principal components and their respective coefficients, which represent organ surface deformation, were obtained, and a statistical analysis of the coefficients was performed. New sets of statistically equivalent coefficients can be constructed and assigned to the principal components, resulting in a larger geometry dataset for the patient’s organs. These generated organ geometries are realistic and statistically representative

  4. The Study of Effect Factors on Organic Products Productivity on Farmer Income in Golestan Province

    shahram nessabian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the efficiency resulting from optimization of energy consumptionin organic farming, the amount of consumption and production inputs and their costs, obtained profit, cultivated area and … was estimated in conjuction with the three crop of wheat, canola and tomato in Iran over a five year period 2006-2011. Using the objective function and constraints, the DEA method was used to analyze the data. All the processes of models estimation was performed using DEAP software. To calculate the energy amount in external inputs consumption in conventional and organic farming were used coefficients to convert the amount of energy input consumption, too. Finally, the energy consumptions were compared in the two cultures. According to these results, the use of organic fertilizers and biological inputs (in consequence of more energy consumption in organic specific inputs leads to lower productivity growth in organic products. These results were significant in the 5 and 1 percent levels, respectively. Due to the type of used inputs in the inorganic products, in fuel inputs, nitrogen fertilizer, phosphate fertilizer, insecticide and fungicide, inorganic products had more consumption and hence the amount of energy inputs for organic products was higher. In the case of biofertilizer and biocontrol were also used in organic production, input energy in this part was more than input energy of inorganic products. Organic farms with lower energy consumption of imports and inputs, led to production of more energy in output. Thus the efficiency besides saving of energy consumption occurred in organic products.

  5. THE FARMING AND MARKETING OF ORGANIC LETTUCE: STUDY AT BOBOSAN VILLAGE, KEDUNGBANTENG SUB-DISTRICT, BANYUMAS

    Irene Kartika Eka Wijayanti

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Banyumas has great potential as a producer of organic lettuce in term of condition of natural, human resources and availability of market. The centre producer of organic lettuce is located in district of Kedungbanteng, and managed by farmers group "abdi tani". The aim of this study is to analyze: 1. The cost and income farming of organic lettuce; 2. Financial feasibility of organic lettuce farm; 3. The channel and structure of organic lettuce market. Processing and data analysis performed qualitatively and quantitatively. The data used is to the production and marketing of organic lettuce in period of June-July 2016. Quantitative analysis performed using analysis of cost, farm income, and R/C. Qualitative analysis was conducted to determine the channel and structure of organic lettuce market. The results showed that organic lettuce farm income generating positive value and the value of R/C is greater than one (R/C >1, the farming is profitable and feasible. Organic lettuce marketing channels through the use of one channel, such farmers, traders, retailers (supermarket. Farmers faced monopsony market structure, while traders and retailers deal with oligopoly one

  6. Community Preferences for the Allocation & Donation of Organs--the PAraDOx Study.

    Howard, Kirsten; Jan, Stephen; Rose, John; Chadban, Steven; Allen, Richard D M; Irving, Michelle; Tong, Allison; Wong, Germaine; Craig, Jonathan C; Cass, Alan

    2011-05-25

    Transplantation is the treatment of choice for people with severe organ failure. However, demand substantially exceeds supply of suitable organs; consequently many people wait months, or years to receive an organ. Reasons for the chronic shortage of deceased organ donations are unclear; there appears to be no lack of 'in principle' public support for organ donation. The PAraDOx Study examines community preferences for organ donation policy in Australia. The aims are to 1) determine which factors influence decisions by individuals to offer their organs for donation and 2) determine the criteria by which the community deems the allocation of donor organs to be fair and equitable. Qualitative and quantitative methods will be used to assess community preferences for organ donation and allocation.Focus group participants from the general community, aged between 18-80, will be purposively sampled to ensure a variety of cultural backgrounds and views on organ donation. Each focus group will include a ranking exercise using a modified nominal group technique. Focus groups of organ recipients, their families, and individuals on a transplant waiting list will also be conducted.Using the qualitative work, a discrete choice study will be designed to quantitatively assess community preferences. Discrete choice methods are based on the premise that goods and services can be described in terms of a number of separate attributes. Respondents are presented with a series of choices where levels of attributes are varied, and a mathematical function is estimated to describe numerically the value respondents attach to different options. Two community surveys will be conducted in approximately 1000 respondents each to assess community preferences for organ donation and allocation. A mixed logit model will be used; model results will be expressed as parameter estimates (β) and the odds of choosing one option over an alternative. Trade-offs between attributes will also be calculated. By

  7. Community Preferences for the Allocation &Donation of Organs - The PAraDOx Study

    Irving Michelle

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transplantation is the treatment of choice for people with severe organ failure. However, demand substantially exceeds supply of suitable organs; consequently many people wait months, or years to receive an organ. Reasons for the chronic shortage of deceased organ donations are unclear; there appears to be no lack of 'in principle' public support for organ donation. Methods/Design The PAraDOx Study examines community preferences for organ donation policy in Australia. The aims are to 1 determine which factors influence decisions by individuals to offer their organs for donation and 2 determine the criteria by which the community deems the allocation of donor organs to be fair and equitable. Qualitative and quantitative methods will be used to assess community preferences for organ donation and allocation. Focus group participants from the general community, aged between 18-80, will be purposively sampled to ensure a variety of cultural backgrounds and views on organ donation. Each focus group will include a ranking exercise using a modified nominal group technique. Focus groups of organ recipients, their families, and individuals on a transplant waiting list will also be conducted. Using the qualitative work, a discrete choice study will be designed to quantitatively assess community preferences. Discrete choice methods are based on the premise that goods and services can be described in terms of a number of separate attributes. Respondents are presented with a series of choices where levels of attributes are varied, and a mathematical function is estimated to describe numerically the value respondents attach to different options. Two community surveys will be conducted in approximately 1000 respondents each to assess community preferences for organ donation and allocation. A mixed logit model will be used; model results will be expressed as parameter estimates (β and the odds of choosing one option over an alternative

  8. A concept mapping study on organic food consumers in Shanghai, China.

    Hasimu, Huliyeti; Marchesini, Sergio; Canavari, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    Despite some similarities with developed countries, the growth of organic market in China seems to follow a different path. Thus, important questions are how Chinese urban consumers perceive organic food, and what are the main concepts associated to the organic attribute. We aimed at representing in graphic form the network of mental associations with the organic concept. We used an adapted version of the "Brand concept mapping" method to acquire, process, and draw individual concept networks perceived by 50 organic food consumers in Shanghai. We then analyzed the data using network and cluster analysis to create aggregated maps for two distinct groups of consumers. Similarly to their peers in developed countries, Chinese consumers perceive organic food as healthy, safe and expensive. However, organic is not necessarily synonymous with natural produce in China, also due to a translation of the term that conveys the idea of a "technology advanced" product. Organic overlaps with the green food label in terms of image and positioning in the market, since they are easily associated and often confused. The two groups we identified show clear differences in the way the organic concept is associated to other concepts and features. The study provides useful information for practitioners: marketers of organic products in China should invest in communication to emphasize the differences with Green Food products and they should consider the possibility of segmenting organic consumers; Chinese policy makers should consider implementing information campaigns aimed at achieving a better understanding of the features of these quality labels among consumers. For researchers, the study confirms that the BCM method is effective and its integration with network and cluster analysis improves the interpretation of individual and aggregated maps. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Time trends in organ donation after neurologic determination of death: a cohort study

    Kramer, Andreas H.; Baht, Ryan; Doig, Christopher J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The cause of brain injury may influence the number of organs that can be procured and transplanted with donation following neurologic determination of death. We investigated whether the distribution of causes responsible for neurologic death has changed over time and, if so, whether this has had an impact on organ quality, transplantation rates and recipient outcomes. Methods: We performed a cohort study involving consecutive brain-dead organ donors in southern Alberta between 2003 and 2014. For each donor, we determined last available measures of organ injury and number of organs transplanted, and compared these variables for various causes of neurologic death. We compared trends to national Canadian data for 2000-2013 (2000-2011 for Quebec). Results: There were 226 brain-dead organ donors over the study period, of whom 100 (44.2%) had anoxic brain injury, 63 (27.9%) had stroke, and 51 (22.6%) had traumatic brain injury. The relative proportion of donors with traumatic brain injury decreased over time (> 30% in 2003-2005 v. 6%-23% in 2012-2014) (p = 0.004), whereas that with anoxic brain injury increased (14%-37% v. 46%-80%, respectively) (p organs transplanted per donor was 3.6 with anoxic brain injury versus 4.5 with traumatic brain injury or stroke (p = 0.002). Interpretation: Anoxic brain injury has become a leading cause of organ donation after neurologic determination of death in Canada. Organs from donors with anoxic brain injury have a greater degree of injury, and fewer are transplanted. These findings have implications for availability of organs for transplantation in patients with end-stage organ failure. PMID:28401114

  10. Depositional setting, petrology and chemistry of Permian coals from the Parana Basin: 2. South Santa Catarina Coalfield, Brazil

    Kalkreuth, W.; Mexias, A.; Balbinot, M.; Levandowski, J. [Instituto de Geociencias, UFRGS, Porto Alegre (Brazil); Holz, M. [Inst. de Geociencias, UFBA, Salvador, Bahia (Brazil); Willett, J.; Finkelman, R. [U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States); Burger, H. [Freie Universitaet Berlin, Geoinformatik, (Germany)

    2010-12-01

    In Brazil economically important coal deposits occur in the southern part of the Parana Basin, where coal seams occur in the Permian Rio Bonito Formation, with major coal development in the states of Rio Grande de Sul and Santa Catarina. The current paper presents results on sequence stratigraphic interpretation of the coal-bearing strata, and petrological and geochemical coal seam characterization from the South Santa Catarina Coalfield, Parana Basin. In terms of sequence stratigraphic interpretation the precursor mires of the Santa Catarina coal seams formed in an estuarine-barrier shoreface depositional environment, with major peat accumulation in a high stand systems tract (Pre-Bonito and Bonito seams), a lowstand systems tract (Ponta Alta seam, seam A, seam B) and a transgressive systems tract (Irapua, Barro Branco and Treviso seams). Seam thicknesses range from 1.70 to 2.39 m, but high proportions of impure coal (coaly shale and shaley coal), carbonaceous shale and partings reduce the net coal thickness significantly. Coal lithoypes are variable, with banded coal predominant in the Barro Branco seam, and banded dull and dull coal predominantly in Bonito and Irapua seams, respectively. Results from petrographic analyses indicate a vitrinite reflectance range from 0.76 to 1.63 %Rrandom (HVB A to LVB coal). Maceral group distribution varies significantly, with the Barro Branco seam having the highest vitrinite content (mean 67.5 vol%), whereas the Irapua seam has the highest inertinite content (33.8 vol%). Liptinite mean values range from 7.8 vol% (Barro Branco seam) to 22.5 vol% (Irapua seam). Results from proximate analyses indicate for the three seams high ash yields (50.2 - 64.2 wt.%). Considering the International Classification of in-Seam Coals, all samples are in fact classified as carbonaceous rocks (> 50 wt.% ash). Sulfur contents range from 3.4 to 7.7 wt.%, of which the major part occurs as pyritic sulfur. Results of X-ray diffraction indicate the

  11. Insight into the construction of metal-organic polyhedra: Metal-organic cubes as a case study

    Al Kordi, Mohamed; Belof, Jonathan L.; Rivera, Edwin R.; Wojtas, Łukasz; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Systematic studies were conducted to gain a better understanding of the metal-organic cubes (MOCs) directed assembly and their crystallization under predetermined reaction conditions, i.e. charge and size of metal ions, solvent type, counter anions, pH, and temperature. Four novel metal-organic materials are constructed via solvothermal reactions of different metal ions and 2,2′-(1H-imidazole-4,5-diyl)di-1,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidine, namely [Co8(C11N6H15)12]Cl 12·4H2O (1), [Ni4(C11N 6H15)4](NO3)4· 4DMF (2), {Cd(C11N6H15)(NO3) ·DMF}n (3), and [In8(C11N 6H15)12](NO3)12· 4H2O (4). In addition, syntheses and crystal structures for compounds 1(a-f), constructed under deliberately modified reaction conditions of 1, are reported. In compounds 1(a-f), the CoIII-based cationic MOCs crystallize in various packing arrangements in the presence of different counter-ions. Discrete MOCs retain their structural integrity, when crystalline solid was dissolved in water, under various pH (2.03-8.07) and temperatures (298-333 K), as confirmed by solution NMR studies. The assembly of the discrete MOC, from its basic molecular building blocks under mild reaction conditions, is demonstrated and monitored through solution NMR and UV-vis studies. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011.

  12. Studies on structure and organization of calcium carbonate deposits in algae

    Kerkar, V.; Untawale, A.G.

    The structure and organization of calcium carbonate deposits is studied in species of Halimeda, Udotea, Neomeris (Chlorophyta) and Padina (Phaeophyta). It was found that in Halimeda aragonite deposition takes place outside the cell wall...

  13. Can education alter attitudes, behaviour and knowledge about organ donation? A pretest–post-test study

    McGlade, Donal; Pierscionek, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Objective The emergence of evidence suggests that student nurses commonly exhibit concerns about their lack of knowledge of organ donation and transplantation. Formal training about organ donation has been shown to positively influence attitude, encourage communication and registration behaviours and improve knowledge about donor eligibility and brain death. The focus of this study was to determine the attitude and behaviour of student nurses and to assess their level of knowledge about organ donation after a programme of study. Design A quantitative questionnaire was completed before and after participation in a programme of study using a pretest–post-test design. Setting Participants were recruited from a University based in Northern Ireland during the period from February to April 2011. Participants 100 preregistration nurses (female : male=96 : 4) aged 18–50 years (mean (SD) 24.3 (6.0) years) were recruited. Results Participants’ knowledge improved over the programme of study with regard to the suitability of organs that can be donated after death, methods available to register organ donation intentions, organ donation laws, concept of brain death and the likelihood of recovery after brain death. Changes in attitude postintervention were also observed in relation to participants’ willingness to accept an informed system of consent and with regard to participants’ actual discussion behaviour. Conclusions The results provide support for the introduction of a programme that helps inform student nurses about important aspects of organ donation. PMID:24381257

  14. Solid organ transplantation after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a retrospective, multicenter study of the EBMT

    Koenecke, C; Hertenstein, B; Schetelig, J

    2010-01-01

    To analyze the outcome of solid organ transplantation (SOT) in patients who had undergone allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), a questionnaire survey was carried out within 107 European Group of Blood and Marrow Transplantation centers. This study covered HSCT between 1984...... for underlying malignant diseases was 4% at 5 years (95% CI, 0% to 12%). In summary, this study shows that selected patients receiving SOT after HSCT have a remarkably good overall and organ survival. These data indicate that SOT should be considered in selected patients with single organ failure after HSCT....

  15. Parametric Study on the Organic Iodide Behavior during a Severe Accident

    Ryu, Myung Hyun; Kim, Han Chul; Kim, Do Sam

    2011-01-01

    Iodine is a major contributor to the potential health risk for the public following a severe accident from a nuclear power plant. Most of metal-iodides, the major form of iodine that enters the containment, can be readily dissolved in the sump water and result in iodide ions. These will be oxidized to form volatile I 2 through a large number of reactions such as radiolysis and hydrolysis. The organic radicals, made from organics such as paint in the sump water, react with iodine to produce organic iodides. Volatile iodine moves from the sump water to the atmosphere mainly by diffusion and natural convection, and react with surfaces and air radiolysis products (ARPs). Painted surfaces act as a sink for I 2 and as a source for organic iodides through adsorption and desorption. ARPs react with I 2 to form iodine oxides, which leads to the decrease of I 2 and organic iodides. Among the large number of iodine species, organic iodides have been extensively studied recently due to their volatility and very low retention. Qualified tools for modeling these phenomena have been developed and validated by several experiments such as EPICUR, PARIS and OECD-BIP. While mechanistic codes model a large number of reactions and species, semiempirical codes such as IODE or IMOD treat major ones. KINS developed a simple iodine model, RAIM (Radio-active iodine chemistry model), based on the IMOD methodology in order to deal with organic iodides conveniently, coupling with an integrated severe-accident analysis code. There are a number of mechanisms that affect the behavior of organic iodides. In this study, effects of pH of the aqueous phase, temperature, radiation dose rate, surface area of organic paints, initial iodine loads that are known to be important to organic iodide formation were studied analytically with RAIM, and also theoretically

  16. Parametric Study on the Organic Iodide Behavior during a Severe Accident

    Ryu, Myung Hyun; Kim, Han Chul; Kim, Do Sam [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Iodine is a major contributor to the potential health risk for the public following a severe accident from a nuclear power plant. Most of metal-iodides, the major form of iodine that enters the containment, can be readily dissolved in the sump water and result in iodide ions. These will be oxidized to form volatile I{sub 2} through a large number of reactions such as radiolysis and hydrolysis. The organic radicals, made from organics such as paint in the sump water, react with iodine to produce organic iodides. Volatile iodine moves from the sump water to the atmosphere mainly by diffusion and natural convection, and react with surfaces and air radiolysis products (ARPs). Painted surfaces act as a sink for I{sub 2} and as a source for organic iodides through adsorption and desorption. ARPs react with I{sub 2} to form iodine oxides, which leads to the decrease of I{sub 2} and organic iodides. Among the large number of iodine species, organic iodides have been extensively studied recently due to their volatility and very low retention. Qualified tools for modeling these phenomena have been developed and validated by several experiments such as EPICUR, PARIS and OECD-BIP. While mechanistic codes model a large number of reactions and species, semiempirical codes such as IODE or IMOD treat major ones. KINS developed a simple iodine model, RAIM (Radio-active iodine chemistry model), based on the IMOD methodology in order to deal with organic iodides conveniently, coupling with an integrated severe-accident analysis code. There are a number of mechanisms that affect the behavior of organic iodides. In this study, effects of pH of the aqueous phase, temperature, radiation dose rate, surface area of organic paints, initial iodine loads that are known to be important to organic iodide formation were studied analytically with RAIM, and also theoretically

  17. Brine/Rock Interaction in Deep Oceanic Layered Gabbros: Petrological Evidence from Cl-Rich Amphibole, High-Temperature Hydrothermal Veins, and Experiments

    Currin Sala, A. M.; Koepke, J.; Almeev, R. R.; Teagle, D. A. H.; Zihlmann, B.; Wolff, P. E.

    2017-12-01

    Evidence of high temperature brine/rock interaction is found in hydrothermal veins and dykelets that cross-cut layered olivine gabbros in the deep palaeocrust of the Sumail Ophiolite, Sultanate of Oman. Here we present petrological and geochemical data from these samples, and an experimental attempt to simulate brine/gabbro interaction using externally heated cold seal pressure vessels. The studied natural veins and dykelets contain pargasite, hornblende, actinolite, and Cl-rich pargasite with up to 5 wt% Cl, showing a range of formation conditions from magmatic to metamorphic (hydrothermal) and thus a complex history of brine/rock interaction. In addition, the isotopic study of the radiogenic 87/86Sr and stable 18O in different amphibole types provide an estimate for the extent of seawater influence as alteration agent in the veins of the studied samples. Experiments performed at 750 °C and 200 MPa with different starting materials (chlorine-free amphibole, olivine gabbro powder) and 20 wt% NaCl aqueous brine, illustrate the process by which gabbro-hosted amphibole-rich veins evolve at subsolidus temperatures in the presence of a seawater-derived fluid. Our results demonstrate a decrease in olivine, plagioclase and magnetite content in favour of hastingsite, pargasite and magnesiohornblende, a decrease of IVAl and Ti in the starting amphibole, and an increase in Cl in amphibole, up to 0.2 Cl wt%. Our experiments show the change of magmatic pargasite towards more magnesium and silica-rich end members with results comparable to mildly chlorine-rich pargasites and hornblendes found in the natural samples studied. However, the experimental setup also presents limitations in the attainment of very high-chlorine amphibole (up to 5 wt%). Our analytical and experimental results provide further evidence for the existence of a hydrothermal cooling system in the deep oceanic crust.

  18. A retail market study of organic and conventional potatoes (Solanum tuberosum): mineral content and nutritional implications.

    Griffiths, Andrea M; Cook, David M; Eggett, Dennis L; Christensen, Merrill J

    2012-06-01

    Whether or not all foods marketed to consumers as organic meet specified standards for use of that descriptor, or are nutritionally different from conventional foods, is uncertain. In a retail market study in a Western US metropolitan area, differences in mineral composition between conventional potatoes and those marketed as organic were analysed. Potatoes marketed as organic had more copper and magnesium (p potatoes. Comparison of individual mineral concentrations between foodstuffs sold as organic or conventional is unlikely to establish a chemical fingerprint to objectively distinguish between organic and conventional produce, but more sophisticated chemometric analysis of multi-element fingerprints holds promise of doing so. Although statistically significant, these differences would only minimally affect total dietary intake of these minerals and be unlikely to result in measurable health benefits.

  19. Petrologic Aspects of Seamount and Guyot Volcanism on the Ancestral Mesozoic Pacific Plate: a Review

    Natland, J. H.

    2007-12-01

    Hundreds of large seamounts and guyots are widely scattered almost in a "shotgun-blast" arrangement in an area about the size of the United States west of the Mississippi River on the Mesozoic Pacific plate between the Mariana Trench and the Gilbert Islands. Most of these formed between ~160-100 Ma while the Pacific plate was surrounded by spreading ridges and growing outward in all directions. There is little to no indication that the seamounts and guyots formed along linear seamount chains; existing radiometric-age data show no age progressions. The volcanoes appear to have formed in response to a uniform stress configuration across the plate, which was either not moving or moving very slowly at the time (1, 2), much like the modern Antarctic plate. When the growing plate started to encounter subduction systems in the western Pacific at ~90 Ma, consistent stress patterns began to develop, and the broad linear Gilbert and Line volcanic ridge systems began to form. Even then, however, considerable overlapping of volcanism occurred, and only the most general age progressions are evident in existing data. Petrologic data from samples obtained from dozens of volcanic summits by dredging and beneath several carbonate platforms by drilling reveal considerable diversity in development of differentiated alkalic magmatic lineages rooted in diverse parental basaltic rocks. These include transitional, alkalic and basanitic compositions, with differentiates of hawaiite, mugearite, trachyte and one phonolite. Many of the basaltic rocks are partly to significantly transformed by alteration under oxidative conditions (dredged rocks) and both oxidative and non-oxidative conditions (drilled rocks). This can make estimations of mantle geochemical provenance difficult. Nevertheless, the province has been linked by backtracking techniques to the modern SOPITA region of the South Pacific (3), and its rocks show enrichments in trace elements and isotopic characteristics similar to

  20. Petrology and Wavespeeds in Central Tibet Indicate a Partially Melted Mica-Bearing Crust

    Hacker, B. R.; Ritzwoller, M. H.; Xie, J.

    2013-12-01

    S-wave speeds and Vp/Vs ratios in the middle to deep crust of Tibet are best explained by a partially melted, mica-bearing middle to lower crust with a subhorizontal to gently dipping foliation. Surface-wave tomography [e.g., Yang et al., 2012; Xie et al., 2013] shows that the central Tibetan Plateau (the Qiangtang block) is characterized by i) slow S-wave speeds of 3.3-3.5 km/s at depths from 20-25 km to 45-50 km, ii) S-wave radial anisotropy of at least 4% (Vsh > Vsv) with stronger anisotropy in the west than the east [Duret et al., 2010], and iii) whole-crust Vp/Vs ratios in the range of 1.73-1.78 [Xu et al., 2013]. The depth of the Curie temperature for magnetite inferred from satellite magnetic measurements [Alsdorf and Nelson, 1999], the depth of the α-β quartz transition inferred from Vp/Vs ratios [Mechie et al., 2004], and the equilibration pressures and temperatures of xenoliths erupted from the mid-deep crust [Hacker et al., 2000] indicate that the thermal gradient in Qiangtang is steep, reaching 1000°C at 30-40 km depth. This thermal gradient crosses the dehydration-melting solidi for crustal rocks at 20-30 km depth, implying the presence or former presence of melt in the mid-deep crust. These temperatures do not require the wholesale breakdown of mica at these depths, because F and Ti can stabilize mica to at least 1300°C [Dooley and Patino Douce, 1996]. Petrology suggests, then, that the Qiangtang middle to deep crust consists of a mica-bearing residue from which melt has been extracted or is being extracted. Wavespeeds calculated for mica-bearing rocks with a subhorizontal to gently dipping foliation and minor silicate melt are the best match to the wavespeeds and anisotropy observed by seismology. Alsdorf, D., and D. Nelson, The Tibetan satellite magnetic low: Evidence for widespread melt in the Tibetan crust?, Geology, 27, 943-946, 1999. Dooley, D.F., and A.F. Patino Douce, Fluid-absent melting of F-rich phlogopite + rutile +quartz, American

  1. Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance and Thermal Activation Spectroscopy Study of Organic Semiconductors

    Chang-Hwan Kim

    2003-01-01

    Organic electronic materials are a new class of emerging materials. Organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) are the most promising candidates for future flat panel display technologies. The photophysical characterization is the basic research step one must follow to understand this new class of materials and devices. The light emission properties are closely related to the transport properties of these materials. The objective of this dissertation is to probe the relation between transport and photophysical properties of organic semiconductors. The transport characteristics were evaluated by using thermally stimulated current and thermally stimulated luminescence techniques. The photoluminescence detected magnetic resonance and photoluminescence quantum yield studies provide valuable photophysical information on this class of materials. OLEDs are already in the market. However, detailed studies on the degradation mechanisms are still lacking. Since both optically detected magnetic resonance and thermal activation spectroscopy probe long-lived defect-related states in organic semiconductors, the combined study generates new insight on the OLED operation and degradation mechanisms

  2. Challenges of information security incident learning: An industrial case study in a Chinese healthcare organization.

    He, Ying; Johnson, Chris

    2017-12-01

    Security incidents can have negative impacts on healthcare organizations, and the security of medical records has become a primary concern of the public. However, previous studies showed that organizations had not effectively learned lessons from security incidents. Incident learning as an essential activity in the "follow-up" phase of security incident response lifecycle has long been addressed but not given enough attention. This paper conducted a case study in a healthcare organization in China to explore their current obstacles in the practice of incident learning. We interviewed both IT professionals and healthcare professionals. The results showed that the organization did not have a structured way to gather and redistribute incident knowledge. Incident response was ineffective in cycling incident knowledge back to inform security management. Incident reporting to multiple stakeholders faced a great challenge. In response to this case study, we suggest the security assurance modeling framework to address those obstacles.

  3. Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance and Thermal Activation Spectroscopy Study of Organic Semiconductors

    Kim, Chang-Hwan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Organic electronic materials are a new class of emerging materials. Organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) are the most promising candidates for future flat panel display technologies. The photophysical characterization is the basic research step one must follow to understand this new class of materials and devices. The light emission properties are closely related to the transport properties of these materials. The objective of this dissertation is to probe the relation between transport and photophysical properties of organic semiconductors. The transport characteristics were evaluated by using thermally stimulated current and thermally stimulated luminescence techniques. The photoluminescence detected magnetic resonance and photoluminescence quantum yield studies provide valuable photophysical information on this class of materials. OLEDs are already in the market. However, detailed studies on the degradation mechanisms are still lacking. Since both optically detected magnetic resonance and thermal activation spectroscopy probe long-lived defect-related states in organic semiconductors, the combined study generates new insight on the OLED operation and degradation mechanisms.

  4. STUDY ON THE LEVEL OF CONFIDENCE THAT ROMANIAN CONSUMERS HAVE REGARDING THE ORGANIC PRODUCTS

    Narcis Alexandru BOZGA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Organic agriculture is a domain that is growing rapidly both in Europe or worldwide and in Romania. However, there is a limited number of researches which, by the used methodology, are able to offer a definite and appropriate image of the Romanian market of organic products. In this respect, we considered as relevant to conduct certain market researches which can offer a wide image of the Romanian market of organic products. The present study aimed to briefly present some ideas learned from these researches concerning the level of confidence that the Romanian consumer has in organic products and the way in which the level of confidence may influence the purchasing behavior. Among the most important conclusions, it could be mentioned the low level of confidence that a large number of Romanian consumers has regarding the organic products, the decision to buy organic products is strongly influenced by the confidence expressed by the consumer, as well as the lack of confidence in organic products represents one of the main reasons for not buying it, in some cases being more important than the high price. After a deeper analysis, the final conclusion is that, at least partially, the low level of confidence in organic products is determined by the confusion and the low information level, on one hand, and by some producers' practices that so not seem to comply with the certification community norms.

  5. Organic and conventional nonflavored yogurts from the Italian market: study on sensory profiles and consumer acceptability.

    Toschi, Tullia Gallina; Bendini, Alessandra; Barbieri, Sara; Valli, Enrico; Cezanne, Marie Louise; Buchecker, Kirsten; Canavari, Maurizio

    2012-11-01

    The sensory properties of food products are an important success factor, especially in the organic market, where many producers and distributors of organic food claim superior taste for their products compared to the conventional alternative. For this reason consumer expectations and preferences, as well as the sensory properties of conventional and organic yogurt, have to be investigated in depth. In this work, the sensory profiling and consumer data of six nonflavored organic and conventional Italian yogurts were elaborated. Some results on the data segmentation (heavy and light users of organic food) and on the effect of information on liking (blind and labeled test) were obtained. Multivariate analysis was carried out to study how the sensory characteristics of 'natural yogurts' drive consumer liking. Consumers' preferences were oriented towards a creamy mouthfeel and smooth visual appearance and for a less acid and fresh taste. In particular, a conventional yogurt was the least accepted, because it was not creamy enough. This paper shows there is room to improve unflavored yogurt to better meet consumer expectations. Sensory profiling did not allow a distinction in odor/taste/texture between organic and conventional samples. However, three of four organic samples were in the region of highest consumer acceptability, fitting well consumers' preference. There was no clear tendency that heavy or light users scored differently in the blind and labeled tests regarding overall liking but, for all, the most liked conventional yogurt scored higher when labeled as organic. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Organic tank safety project: Preliminary results of energetics and thermal behavior studies of model organic nitrate and/or nitrite mixtures and a simulated organic waste

    Scheele, R.D.; Sell, R.L.; Sobolik, J.L.; Burger, L.L.

    1995-08-01

    As a result of years of production and recovery of nuclear defense materials and subsequent waste management at the Hanford Site, organic-bearing radioactive high-level wastes (HLW) are currently stored in large (up to 3. ML) single-shell storage tanks (SSTs). Because these wastes contain both fuels (organics) and the oxidants nitrate and nitrite, rapid energetic reactions at certain conditions could occur. In support of Westinghouse Hanford Company's (WHC) efforts to ensure continued safe storage of these organic- and oxidant-bearing wastes and to define the conditions necessary for reactions to occur, we measured the thermal sensitivities and thermochemical and thermokinetic properties of mixtures of selected organics and sodium nitrate and/or nitrite and a simulated Hanford organic-bearing waste using thermoanalytical technologies. These thermoanalytical technologies are used by chemical reactivity hazards evaluation organizations within the chemical industry to assess chemical reaction hazards

  7. Organic tank safety project: Preliminary results of energetics and thermal behavior studies of model organic nitrate and/or nitrite mixtures and a simulated organic waste

    Scheele, R.D.; Sell, R.L.; Sobolik, J.L.; Burger, L.L.

    1995-08-01

    As a result of years of production and recovery of nuclear defense materials and subsequent waste management at the Hanford Site, organic-bearing radioactive high-level wastes (HLW) are currently stored in large (up to 3. ML) single-shell storage tanks (SSTs). Because these wastes contain both fuels (organics) and the oxidants nitrate and nitrite, rapid energetic reactions at certain conditions could occur. In support of Westinghouse Hanford Company`s (WHC) efforts to ensure continued safe storage of these organic- and oxidant-bearing wastes and to define the conditions necessary for reactions to occur, we measured the thermal sensitivities and thermochemical and thermokinetic properties of mixtures of selected organics and sodium nitrate and/or nitrite and a simulated Hanford organic-bearing waste using thermoanalytical technologies. These thermoanalytical technologies are used by chemical reactivity hazards evaluation organizations within the chemical industry to assess chemical reaction hazards.

  8. Experimental Study of Soil Organic Matter Loss From Cultivated Field Plots In The Venezuelan Andes.

    Bellanger, B.; Huon, S.; Velasquez, F.; Vallès, V.; Girardin A, C.; Mariotti, A. B.

    The question of discriminating sources of organic matter in suspended particles of stream flows can be addressed by using total organic carbon (TOC) concentration and stable isotope (13C, 15N) measurements when constant fluxes of organic matter supply can be assumed. However, little is known on the dynamics of organic matter release during soil erosion and on the temporal stability of its isotopic signature. In this study, we have monitored soil organic carbon loss and water runoff using natural rainfall events on three experimental field plots with different vegetation cover (bare soil, maize and coffee fields), set up on natural slopes of a tropical mountainous watershed in NW Venezuela (09°13'32'' ­ 09°10'00''N, 70°13'49'' ­ 70°18'34''W). Runoff and soil loss are markedly superior for the bare field plot than for the coffee field plot: by a factor 15 ­ 36, respectively, for the five-month experiment, and by a factor 30 ­ 120, respectively, during a single rainfall event experiment. Since runoff and soil organic matter loss are closely linked during most of the flow (at the time scales of this study), TOC concentration in suspended matter is constant. Furthermore, stable isotope compositions reflect those of top-soil organic matter from which they originate.

  9. PETROLOGIC CONSTRAINTS ON AMORPHOUS AND CRYSTALLINE MAGNESIUM SILICATES: DUST FORMATION AND EVOLUTION IN SELECTED HERBIG Ae/Be SYSTEMS

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, MSC 03 2040, 1-University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-001 (United States); Nuth, Joseph A., E-mail: fransjmr@unm.edu [Astrochemistry Laboratory, Solar System Exploration Division, Code 691, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The Infrared Space Observatory, Spitzer Space Telescope, and Herschel Space Observatory surveys provided a wealth of data on the Mg-silicate minerals (forsterite, enstatite), silica, and ''amorphous silicates with olivine and pyroxene stoichiometry'' around Herbig Ae/Be stars. These incredible findings do not resonate with the mainstream Earth Sciences because of (1) disconnecting ''astronomical nomenclature'' and the long existing mineralogical and petrologic terminology of minerals and amorphous materials, and (2) the fact that Earth scientists (formerly geologists) are bound by the ''Principle of Actualism'' that was put forward by James Hutton (1726-1797). This principle takes a process-oriented approach to understanding mineral and rock formation and evolution. This paper will (1) review and summarize the results of laboratory-based vapor phase condensation and thermal annealing experiments, (2) present the pathways of magnesiosilica condensates to Mg-silicate mineral (forsterite, enstatite) formation and processing, and (3) present mineralogical and petrologic implications of the properties and compositions of the infrared-observed crystalline and amorphous dust for the state of circumstellar disk evolution. That is, the IR-observation of smectite layer silicates in HD142527 suggests the break-up of asteroid-like parent bodies that had experienced aqueous alteration. We discuss the persistence of amorphous dust around some young stars and an ultrafast amorphous to crystalline dust transition in HD 163296 that leads to forsterite grains with numerous silica inclusions. These dust evolution processes to form forsterite, enstatite {+-} tridymite could occur due to amorphous magnesiosilica dust precursors with a serpentine- or smectite-dehydroxylate composition.

  10. Incorporating Problem-Based Learning Into A Petrology Course Through A Research Project In The Local Northern Sierra Nevada

    Aird, H. M.

    2016-12-01

    A research project into the local petrology was integrated into the Spring 2016 Petrology and Optical Mineralogy course at California State University, Chico. This is a required majors course, typically taken during spring of the junior year, with an enrollment of 10-20 students. Since the labs for this course have a strong focus on petrography, a research project was introduced to give students experience in using a multi-faceted approach to investigate a problem. In many cases, this is their first taste of research. During the first week of the Spring 2016 class, students were introduced to the research question: In the broader context of Californian tectonic history, are the Bucks Lake and Grizzly plutons of the northern Sierra Nevada petrogenetically related? With faculty guidance over the course of the semester, students carried out fieldwork and sampling, lithologic description, selection of the best samples for further analysis, thin section production, petrographic description, and analysis and interpretation of published geochemical data. Research activities were strategically scheduled within the course framework such that students were academically prepared to carry out each task. Each student was responsible for generating all the data for one sample, and data were then collated as a class, so students wrote their individual final reports using all the data collected by the class. Careful scaffolding of writing assignments throughout the semester guided students through the preparation of an academic-style scientific report, while allowing for repeated feedback on their writing style and content. In mid-May, the class presented a group poster at the College of Natural Sciences annual poster symposium, and were awarded `Best Student Class Project' by the judges. Anecdotal student feedback indicated they highly valued the research experience and some were inspired to pursue individual undergraduate research projects under faculty supervision.

  11. The 2003 phreatomagmatic eruptions of Anatahan volcano - Textural and petrologic features of deposits at an emergent island volcano

    Pallister, J.S.; Trusdell, F.A.; Brownfield, I.K.; Siems, D.F.; Budahn, J.R.; Sutley, S.F.

    2005-01-01

    Stratigraphic and field data are used in conjunction with textural and chemical evidence (including data from scanning electron microscope, electron microprobe, X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, and instrumental neutron activation analysis) to establish that the 2003 eruption of Anatahan volcano was mainly phreatomagmatic, dominated by explosive interaction of homogeneous composition low-viscosity crystal-poor andesite magma with water. The hydromagmatic mode of eruption contributed to the significant height of initial eruptive columns and to the excavation and eruption of altered rock debris from the sub-volcanic hydrothermal system. Volatile contents of glass inclusions in equilibrium phenocrysts less abundances of these constituents in matrix glass times the estimated mass of juvenile magma indicate minimum emissions of 19 kt SO2 and 13 kt Cl. This petrologic estimate of SO2 emission is an order-of-magnitude less than an estimate from TOMS. Similarly, inferred magma volumes from the petrologic data are an order of magnitude greater than those modeled from deformation data. Both discrepancies indicate additional sources of volatiles, likely derived from a separate fluid phase in the magma. The paucity of near-source volcanic-tectonic earthquakes preceding the eruption, and the dominance of sustained long-period tremor are attributed to the ease of ascent of the hot low-viscosity andesite, followed by a shallow phreatomagmatic mode of eruption. Phreatomagmatic eruptions are probably more common at emergent tropical island volcanoes, where shallow fresh-water lenses occur at near-sea-level vents. These relations suggest that phreatomagmatic explosions contributed to the formation of many of the near-sea-level craters and possibly even to the small calderas at the other Mariana islands.

  12. PETROLOGIC CONSTRAINTS ON AMORPHOUS AND CRYSTALLINE MAGNESIUM SILICATES: DUST FORMATION AND EVOLUTION IN SELECTED HERBIG Ae/Be SYSTEMS

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.; Nuth, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    The Infrared Space Observatory, Spitzer Space Telescope, and Herschel Space Observatory surveys provided a wealth of data on the Mg-silicate minerals (forsterite, enstatite), silica, and ''amorphous silicates with olivine and pyroxene stoichiometry'' around Herbig Ae/Be stars. These incredible findings do not resonate with the mainstream Earth Sciences because of (1) disconnecting ''astronomical nomenclature'' and the long existing mineralogical and petrologic terminology of minerals and amorphous materials, and (2) the fact that Earth scientists (formerly geologists) are bound by the ''Principle of Actualism'' that was put forward by James Hutton (1726-1797). This principle takes a process-oriented approach to understanding mineral and rock formation and evolution. This paper will (1) review and summarize the results of laboratory-based vapor phase condensation and thermal annealing experiments, (2) present the pathways of magnesiosilica condensates to Mg-silicate mineral (forsterite, enstatite) formation and processing, and (3) present mineralogical and petrologic implications of the properties and compositions of the infrared-observed crystalline and amorphous dust for the state of circumstellar disk evolution. That is, the IR-observation of smectite layer silicates in HD142527 suggests the break-up of asteroid-like parent bodies that had experienced aqueous alteration. We discuss the persistence of amorphous dust around some young stars and an ultrafast amorphous to crystalline dust transition in HD 163296 that leads to forsterite grains with numerous silica inclusions. These dust evolution processes to form forsterite, enstatite ± tridymite could occur due to amorphous magnesiosilica dust precursors with a serpentine- or smectite-dehydroxylate composition.

  13. An Incremental Model for Cloud Adoption: Based on a Study of Regional Organizations

    Emre Erturk

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Many organizations that use cloud computing services intend to increase this commitment. A survey was distributed to organizations in Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand to understand their adoption of cloud solutions, in comparison with global trends and practices. The survey also included questions on the benefits and challenges, and which delivery model(s they have adopted and are planning to adopt. One aim is to contribute to the cloud computing literature and build on the existing adoption models. This study also highlights additional aspects applicable to various organizations (small, medium, large and regional. Finally, recommendations are provided for related future research projects.

  14. Study on the metabolism of contamination of radioactive materials in organism by autoradiographic techniques

    Zhu Shoupeng; Zhang Lansheng; Kang Baoan

    1988-08-01

    The metabolism of contamination of radioactive materials in organism was studied by diferent types of autoradiographic techniques, such as: (1) in body level by whole-body autoradiography; (2) in organ level by whole-organ autoradiography; (3) in cellular level by microautoradiography; (4) in subcellular level by electron microscopic autoradiography; (5) in combinative form by tissue fixative autoradiography; (6) in ionizing form by freezing autoradiography; (7) for radioactive mateials with two radionuclides by double radionuclide autoradiography; (8) for radioactive materials with low level of radionuclides by fluorescence sensitization autoradiography; (9) in dissociative products by chromatographic autoradiography

  15. High emergency organ allocation rule in lung transplantation: a simulation study.

    Riou, Julien; Boëlle, Pierre-Yves; Christie, Jason D; Thabut, Gabriel

    2017-10-01

    The scarcity of suitable organ donors leads to protracted waiting times and mortality in patients awaiting lung transplantation. This study aims to assess the short- and long-term effects of a high emergency organ allocation policy on the outcome of lung transplantation. We developed a simulation model of lung transplantation waiting queues under two allocation strategies, based either on waiting time only or on additional criteria to prioritise the sickest patients. The model was informed by data from the United Network for Organ Sharing. We compared the impact of these strategies on waiting time, waiting list mortality and overall survival in various situations of organ scarcity. The impact of a high emergency allocation strategy depends largely on the organ supply. When organ supply is sufficient (>95 organs per 100 patients), it may prevent a small number of early deaths (1 year survival: 93.7% against 92.4% for waiting time only) without significant impact on waiting times or long-term survival. When the organ/recipient ratio is lower, the benefits in early mortality are larger but are counterbalanced by a dramatic increase of the size of the waiting list. Consequently, we observed a progressive increase of mortality on the waiting list (although still lower than with waiting time only), a deterioration of patients' condition at transplant and a decrease of post-transplant survival times. High emergency organ allocation is an effective strategy to reduce mortality on the waiting list, but causes a disruption of the list equilibrium that may have detrimental long-term effects in situations of significant organ scarcity.

  16. Identifying Opinion Leaders to Promote Organ Donation on Social Media: Network Study

    Salmon, Charles T

    2018-01-01

    Background In the recent years, social networking sites (SNSs, also called social media) have been adopted in organ donation campaigns, and recruiting opinion leaders for such campaigns has been found effective in promoting behavioral changes. Objective The aim of this paper was to focus on the dissemination of organ donation tweets on Weibo, the Chinese equivalent of Twitter, and to examine the opinion leadership in the retweet network of popular organ donation messages using social network analysis. It also aimed to investigate how personal and social attributes contribute to a user’s opinion leadership on the topic of organ donation. Methods All messages about organ donation posted on Weibo from January 1, 2015 to December 31, 2015 were extracted using Python Web crawler. A retweet network with 505,047 nodes and 545,312 edges of the popular messages (n=206) was constructed and analyzed. The local and global opinion leaderships were measured using network metrics, and the roles of personal attributes, professional knowledge, and social positions in obtaining the opinion leadership were examined using general linear model. Results The findings revealed that personal attributes, professional knowledge, and social positions predicted individual’s local opinion leadership in the retweet network of popular organ donation messages. Alternatively, personal attributes and social positions, but not professional knowledge, were significantly associated with global opinion leadership. Conclusions The findings of this study indicate that health campaign designers may recruit peer leaders in SNS organ donation promotions to facilitate information sharing among the target audience. Users who are unverified, active, well connected, and experienced with information and communications technology (ICT) will accelerate the sharing of organ donation messages in the global environment. Medical professionals such as organ transplant surgeons who can wield a great amount of

  17. Identifying Opinion Leaders to Promote Organ Donation on Social Media: Network Study.

    Shi, Jingyuan; Salmon, Charles T

    2018-01-09

    In the recent years, social networking sites (SNSs, also called social media) have been adopted in organ donation campaigns, and recruiting opinion leaders for such campaigns has been found effective in promoting behavioral changes. The aim of this paper was to focus on the dissemination of organ donation tweets on Weibo, the Chinese equivalent of Twitter, and to examine the opinion leadership in the retweet network of popular organ donation messages using social network analysis. It also aimed to investigate how personal and social attributes contribute to a user's opinion leadership on the topic of organ donation. All messages about organ donation posted on Weibo from January 1, 2015 to December 31, 2015 were extracted using Python Web crawler. A retweet network with 505,047 nodes and 545,312 edges of the popular messages (n=206) was constructed and analyzed. The local and global opinion leaderships were measured using network metrics, and the roles of personal attributes, professional knowledge, and social positions in obtaining the opinion leadership were examined using general linear model. The findings revealed that personal attributes, professional knowledge, and social positions predicted individual's local opinion leadership in the retweet network of popular organ donation messages. Alternatively, personal attributes and social positions, but not professional knowledge, were significantly associated with global opinion leadership. The findings of this study indicate that health campaign designers may recruit peer leaders in SNS organ donation promotions to facilitate information sharing among the target audience. Users who are unverified, active, well connected, and experienced with information and communications technology (ICT) will accelerate the sharing of organ donation messages in the global environment. Medical professionals such as organ transplant surgeons who can wield a great amount of influence on their direct connections could also effectively

  18. Experience of Future Economists' Self-Study Organization in Foreign Higher Education Institutions

    Aliyev, Oktay

    2016-01-01

    The article consolidates information sources on the issues of future economists' self-study organization at foreign universities. There has been carried out the study of approaches to the interpretation of the term "self-study process" in the contemporary scientific thought abroad. There have been specified the productive ideas of…

  19. How to Maintain Creativity in Social Studies: Challenges for the Professional Organization.

    Hahn, Carole L.

    Social studies educators must marshal all creative resources to meet the global, national, and personal challenges that face them as members of the major social studies professional organization, the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS). Based on a continuation of current policies and lifestyles, dramatic global changes such as…

  20. COP-compost: a software to study the degradation of organic pollutants in composts.

    Zhang, Y; Lashermes, G; Houot, S; Zhu, Y-G; Barriuso, E; Garnier, P

    2014-02-01

    Composting has been demonstrated to be effective in degrading organic pollutants (OP) whose behaviour depends on the composting conditions, the microbial populations activated and interactions with organic matters. The fate of OP during composting involves complex mechanisms and models can be helpful tools for educational and scientific purposes, as well as for industrialists who want to optimise the composting process for OP elimination. A COP-Compost model, which couples an organic carbon (OC) module and an organic pollutant (OP) module and which simulates the changes of organic matter, organic pollutants and the microbial activities during the composting process, has been proposed and calibrated for a first set of OP in a previous study. The objectives of the present work were (1) to introduce the COP-Compost model from its convenient interface to a potential panel of users, (2) to show the variety of OP that could be simulated, including the possibility of choosing between degradation through co-metabolism or specific metabolism and (3) to show the effect of the initial characteristics of organic matter quality and its microbial biomass on the simulated results of the OP dynamic. In the model, we assumed that the pollutants can be adsorbed on organic matter according to the biochemical quality of the OC and that the microorganisms can degrade the pollutants at the same time as they degrade OC (by co-metabolism). A composting experiment describing two different (14)C-labelled organic pollutants, simazine and pyrene, were chosen from the literature because the four OP fractions simulated in the model were measured during the study (the mineralised, soluble, sorbed and non-extractable fractions). Except for the mineralised fraction of simazine, a good agreement was achieved between the simulated and experimental results describing the evolution of the different organic fractions. For simazine, a specific biomass had to be added. To assess the relative importance

  1. Geology and petrology of the basalts of Crater Flat: applications to volcanic risk assessment for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage investigations

    Vaniman, D.; Crowe, B.

    1981-06-01

    Volcanic hazard studies of the south-central Great Basin, Nevada, are being conducted for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations. This report presents the results of field and petrologic studies of the basalts of Crater Flat, a sequence of Pliocene to Quaternary-age volcanic centers located near the southwestern part of the Nevada Test Site. Crater Flat is one of several basaltic fields constituting a north-northeast-trending volcanic belt of Late Cenozoic age extending from southern Death Valley, California, through the Nevada Test Site region to central Nevada. The basalts of Crater Flat are divided into three distinct volcanic cycles. The cycles are characterized by eruption of basalt magma of hawaiite composition that formed cinder cone clusters and associated lava flows. Total volume of erupted magma for respective cycles is given. The basalts of Crater Flat are sparsely to moderately porphyritic; the major phenocryst phase is olivine, with lesser amounts of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, and rare amphibole. The consistent recurrence of evolved hawaiite magmas in all three cycles points to crystal fractionation from more primitive magmas at depth. A possible major transition in mantle source regions through time may be indicated by a transition from normal to Rb-depleted, Sr-enriched hawaiites in the younger basaltic cycles. The recurrence of small volumes of hawaiite magma at Crater Flat supports assumptions required for probability modeling of future volcanic activity and provides a basis for estimating the effects of volcanic disruption of a repository site in the southwestern Nevada Test Site region. Preliminary data suggest that successive basalt cycles at Crater Flat may be of decreasing volume but recurring more frequently

  2. Australian perioperative nurses' experiences of assisting in multi-organ procurement surgery: a grounded theory study.

    Smith, Zaneta; Leslie, Gavin; Wynaden, Dianne

    2015-03-01

    Multi-organ procurement surgical procedures through the generosity of deceased organ donors, have made an enormous impact on extending the lives of recipients. There is a dearth of in-depth knowledge relating to the experiences of perioperative nurses working closely with organ donors undergoing multi-organ procurement surgical procedures. The aim of this study was to address this gap by describing the perioperative nurses experiences of participating in multi-organ procurement surgical procedures and interpreting these findings as a substantive theory. This qualitative study used grounded theory methodology to generate a substantive theory of the experiences of perioperative nurses participating in multi-organ procurement surgery. Recruitment of participants took place after the study was advertised via a professional newsletter and journal. The study was conducted with participants from metropolitan, rural and regional areas of two Australian states; New South Wales and Western Australia. Thirty five perioperative nurse participants with three to 39 years of professional nursing experience informed the study. Semi structured in-depth interviews were undertaken from July 2009 to April 2010 with a mean interview time of 60 min. Interview data was transcribed verbatim and analysed using the constant comparative method. The study results draw attention to the complexities that exist for perioperative nurses when participating in multi-organ procurement surgical procedures reporting a basic social psychological problem articulated as hiding behind a mask and how they resolved this problem by the basic social psychological process of finding meaning. This study provides a greater understanding of how these surgical procedures impact on perioperative nurses by providing a substantive theory of this experience. The findings have the potential to guide further research into this challenging area of nursing practice with implications for clinical initiatives, management

  3. Consumer behaviour towards organic, natural and conventional skin care products: a pilot study

    Alina-Aida Drăgan; Dacinia-Crina Petrescu

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study is to outline consumers’ profile in terms of their interest in organic, natural and conventional skin care, their knowledge about these products and the differences between them, their opinion regarding the performance and price of organic skin care in relation to conventional skin care. The survey used a self-administered questionnaire and was conducted on a sample of 86 customers from Cluj-Napoca, Romania. The results indicate that consumers who pu...

  4. Facilitating control in growing organizations : A study of new requirements on systematization

    Flyman, Elin; Nilsson, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Organizational growth poses new challenges for top management. In small organizations, coordination and communication is spontaneous and require little structure to be efficient. However, as the organization grows, the increased number of individuals requires a larger amount of coordination and communication. In this study, our purpose is to increase understanding of why growing companies are experiencing challenges with coordination as well as to increase organizational control. To fulfill t...

  5. Communicating Ethical Arguments to Organic Consumers: A Study Across Five European Countries

    Simona Naspetti

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available  Additional ethical claims were tested with mock organic egg labels in five EU countries. The attitudes towards the advertising labels were assessed by multiple copy testing measures. A total of 156 individual responses were analysed. The study confirms the difficulty of conducting advertising research in a multicultural framework, and shows that additional local/ regional claims can reinforce the appeal of organic products.

  6. Screening of the pelvic organ prolapse without a physical examination; (a community based study

    Tehrani Fahimeh

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pelvic organ prolapse (POP is a silent disorder with a huge impact on women's quality of life. There is limited data from community-based studies conducted to determine the prevalence of POP as its assessment needs a pelvic examination. We aimed to develop a simple screening inventory for identification of pelvic organ prolapse and then evaluate its sensitivity and specificity. Methods This study had two phases. In the first phase in order to develop a simple inventory for assessment of POP, the Pelvic Floor Disorder Inventory (PFDI was completed for a convenience sample of 200 women, aged 18-45 years, referred for annual gynecologic examination, and their pelvic organ prolapse was assessed using the standard protocol. The most sensitive and specific questions were selected as pelvic organ prolapse simple screening inventory (POPSSI. In the second phase, using a stratified multistage probability cluster sampling method, the sensitivity and specificity of the POPSSI was investigated in a non selected sample of 954 women recruited from among reproductive aged women living in four randomly selected provinces of Iran. Results The sensitivity and specificity of POPSSI for identification of pelvic organ prolapse in the general population were 45.5 and 87.4% respectively; these values were 96.7 and 20% among those women who were aware of their pelvic dysfunction. Conclusion Community based screening studies on pelvic organ prolapse could be facilitated by using the POPSSI, the sensitivity of which would be enhanced through conducting of public awareness programs.

  7. Fundamental study on magnetic separation of aquatic organisms for preservation of marine ecosystem

    Sakaguchi, F.; Akiyama, Y.; Izumi, Y.; Nishijima, S.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, destruction and disturbance of marine ecosystem have been caused by changes in global environment and transplants of farmed fishes and shellfishes. To solve the problems, water treatment techniques to kill or to remove aquatic organisms are necessary. In this study, application of magnetic separation for removal of the aquatic organisms was examined in order to establish the process with high-speed, compact device and low environmental load. Techniques of magnetic seeding and magnetic separation using superconducting magnet are important for high-speed processing of aquatic organisms. Magnetic seeding is to adhere separating object to the surface of ferromagnetic particles, and magnetic separation is to remove aquatic organisms with magnetic force. First, we confirmed the possibility of magnetic seeding of aquatic organisms, and then interaction between aquatic organisms and ferromagnetic particles was examined. Next, for practical application of magnetic separation system using superconducting magnet for removal of aquatic organisms, particle trajectories were simulated and magnetic separation experiment using superconducting magnet was performed in order to design magnetic separation system to achieve high separation efficiency.

  8. A Correlational Study of Graphic Organizers and Science Achievement of English Language Learners

    Clarke, William Gordon

    English language learners (ELLs) demonstrate lower academic performance and have lower graduation and higher dropout rates than their non-ELL peers. The primary purpose of this correlational quantitative study was to investigate the relationship between the use of graphic organizer-infused science instruction and science learning of high school ELLs. Another objective was to determine if the method of instruction, socioeconomic status (SES), gender, and English language proficiency (ELP) were predictors of academic achievement of high school ELLs. Data were gathered from a New York City (NYC) high school fall 2012-2013 archival records of 145 ninth-grade ELLs who had received biology instruction in freestanding English as a second language (ESL) classes, followed by a test of their learning of the material. Fifty-four (37.2%) of these records were of students who had learned science by the conventional textbook method, and 91 (62.8%) by using graphic organizers. Data analysis employed the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software for multiple regression analysis, which found graphic organizer use to be a significant predictor of New York State Regents Living Environment (NYSRLE) test scores (p < .01). One significant regression model was returned whereby, when combined, the four predictor variables (method of instruction, SES, gender, and ELP) explained 36% of the variance of the NYSRLE score. Implications of the study findings noted graphic organizer use as advantageous for ELL science achievement. Recommendations made for practice were for (a) the adoption of graphic organizer infused-instruction, (b) establishment of a protocol for the implementation of graphic organizer-infused instruction, and (c) increased length of graphic organizer instructional time. Recommendations made for future research were (a) a replication quantitative correlational study in two or more high schools, (b) a quantitative quasi-experimental quantitative study to

  9. Experimental petrology for the thermobarometric determination of mineral paragenesis: the fluid inclusions; Petrologia experimental para la determinacion termobarometrica de paragenesis minerales: las inclusiones fluidas

    Gonzalez Partida, Eduardo; Torres Rodriguez, Vicente; Birkle, Peter [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1994-05-01

    There is a great number of phenomena in nature in which some fluid participates as the main component. Such is the case of oil deposits formation, of metallic minerals, geothermal systems, metamorphic and diagenetic deposits. The common denominator of all of them is that in some part of their stages important physico-chemical processes occurred in the related fluids, leaving evidence of such phenomena in the fluid inclusions. The Geothermal Department has petrologic vanguard tools for reservoir problems resolution, since it has laboratories for the study on fluid inclusions by means of the technique called cryoscopic-microthermometry that permits the definition of physico-chemical conditions of the brine that participated or participates in the hydrothermal systems formation. The method simultaneously permits to know the characteristics of the initial brine that participated in the interaction water-rock phenomenon, observe the boiling phenomena, and determine conditions of initial pressure in the reservoirs. [Espanol] Existe un gran numero de fenomenos en la naturaleza en los que participa algun fluido como componente principal. Tal es el caso de la formacion de yacimientos de petroleo, de minerales metalicos, de sistemas geotermicos, yacimientos metamorficos y diageneticos. El comun denominador de todos ellos es que en alguna de sus etapas ocurrieron procesos fisicoquimicos importantes en los fluidos relacionados, quedando evidencia de tales fenomenos en las inclusiones fluidas. El Departamento de Geotermia cuenta con herramientas petrologicas de vanguardia para la resolucion de problemas en yacimientos, ya que tiene laboratorios para el estudio de las inclusiones fluidas por medio de la tecnica denominada microtermometria-crioscopica que permite definir condiciones fisicoquimicas de la salmuera que participo o participa en la formacion de sistemas hidrotermales. El metodo permite simultaneamente conocer las caracteristicas de la salmuera inicial que participo en

  10. Petrological, geochemical, isotopic, and geochronological constraints for the Late Devonian-Early Carboniferous magmatism in SW Gondwana (27-32°LS): an example of geodynamic switching

    Dahlquist, Juan A.; Alasino, Pablo H.; Basei, Miguel A. S.; Morales Cámera, Matías M.; Macchioli Grande, Marcos; da Costa Campos Neto, Mario

    2018-04-01

    We report a study integrating 13 new U-Pb LA-MC-ICP-MS zircon ages and Hf-isotope data from dated magmatic zircons together with complete petrological and whole-rock geochemistry data for the dated granitic rocks. Sample selection was strongly based on knowledge reported in previous investigations. Latest Devonian-Early Carboniferous granite samples were collected along a transect of 900 km, from the inner continental region (present-day Eastern Sierras Pampeanas) to the magmatic arc (now Western Sierras Pampeanas and Frontal Cordillera). Based on these data together with ca. 100 published whole-rock geochemical analyses we conclude that Late Devonian-Early Carboniferous magmatism at this latitude represents continuous activity (ranging from 322 to 379 Ma) on the pre-Andean margin of SW Gondwana, although important whole-rock and isotopic compositional variations occurred through time and space. Combined whole-rock chemistry and isotope data reveal that peraluminous A-type magmatism started in the intracontinental region during the Late Devonian, with subsequent development of synchronous Carboniferous peraluminous and metaluminous A-type magmatism in the retro-arc region and calc-alkaline magmatism in the western paleomargin. We envisage that magmatic evolution was mainly controlled by episodic fluctuations in the angle of subduction of the oceanic plate (between flat-slab and normal subduction), supporting a geodynamic switching model. Subduction fluctuations were relatively fast (ca. 7 Ma) during the Late Devonian and Early Carboniferous, and the complete magmatic switch-off and switch-on process lasted for 57 Ma. Hf T DM values of zircon (igneous and inherited) from some Carboniferous peraluminous A-type granites in the retro-arc suggest that Gondwana continental lithosphere formed during previous orogenies was partly the source of the Devonian-Carboniferous granitic magmas, thus precluding the generation of the parental magmas from exotic terranes.

  11. A study on critical success factors on building IT based flat organization: A case study of Mellat Bank

    Farajollah Rahnavard; Azadeh Asefikia

    2014-01-01

    A flat organization is a firm that has an organizational structure with few or no levels of middle management between employee and executives. The idea is to take advantage of well-trained workers when they are more directly involved in the decision making process, rather than closely supervised by various layers of management. This paper presents an empirical investigation to determine critical success factors on building information technology (IT) based flat organization in a case study of...

  12. A study on international nuclear organizations and conventions for the globalization of Korean nuclear community

    Lee, Kwang Seok; Oh, Keun Bae; Lee, Byung Wook; Cho, Il Hoon; Lee, Jae Sung; Choi, Young Rok; Ko, Han Seok; Ham, Chul Hoon; Lee, Byung Woon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the current status of international nuclear organizations and conventions in systems perspective and suggest national strategies for utilizing them for the globalization of Korean nuclear community. This study analyzes the current status of international nuclear organizations such as IAEA(International Atomic Energy Agency) and international nuclear conventions related to nuclear accidents, nuclear liability, physical protection or nuclear safety. Based on the analysis, this study suggests national strategies, in general and specific terms, to utilize international nuclear organizations and conventions for the globalization of Korean nuclear community. Separately from this report this study publishes `IAEA Handbook`, which contains all about IAEA such as statute, membership, organizational structure, main activities, finance and budget, etc.. 9 tabs., 2 figs., 35 refs. (Author).

  13. A study on international nuclear organizations and conventions for the globalization of Korean nuclear community

    Lee, Kwang Seok; Oh, Keun Bae; Lee, Byung Wook; Cho, Il Hoon; Lee, Jae Sung; Choi, Young Rok; Ko, Han Seok; Ham, Chul Hoon; Lee, Byung Woon

    1995-12-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the current status of international nuclear organizations and conventions in systems perspective and suggest national strategies for utilizing them for the globalization of Korean nuclear community. This study analyzes the current status of international nuclear organizations such as IAEA(International Atomic Energy Agency) and international nuclear conventions related to nuclear accidents, nuclear liability, physical protection or nuclear safety. Based on the analysis, this study suggests national strategies, in general and specific terms, to utilize international nuclear organizations and conventions for the globalization of Korean nuclear community. Separately from this report this study publishes 'IAEA Handbook', which contains all about IAEA such as statute, membership, organizational structure, main activities, finance and budget, etc.. 9 tabs., 2 figs., 35 refs. (Author)

  14. Use of isotopes in organic matter studies: a discussion illustrated by recent applications

    Warembourg, F.R.

    1982-01-01

    After a presentation of the various concepts leading to the advantageous use of isotope tracers in soil organic matter and related studies, a discussion is proposed around three main types of methods which are related to the time scale of the processes occurring in the soil organic matter transformations. Examples help to illustrate the purpose. Static methods describing the state of soil organic matter such as carbon dating. Long term dynamic studies involving the use of labelled plant materials and their applications in situ. Short term dynamic studies as an insight into the short term lived processes such as biotic and abiotic energetic activivation, flushes, priming effect, nitrogen fixation. More than an exhaustive enumeration of the litterature, the main objective of this presentation will tend to be a comprehensive analysis of the many problems arising from the study of soil activities and of the modern approaches of investigation. (Author) [pt

  15. A CONFIRMATORY STUDY OF SUPPLY CHAIN PERFORMANCE AND COMPETITIVENESS OF INDIAN MANUFACTURING ORGANIZATIONS

    Amit Kumar Marwah

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents finding of a study on Indian manufacturing organizations. A conceptual model is proposed based on a rigorous literature review. The model so developed undergoes through a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA using Structural Equation Modeling (SEM approach. The paper highlights various factors responsible for supply chain performance (SCP, subsequently leading to competitiveness. The survey involves 361 manufacturing organizations across India and the data is gathered using 5-point Likert scale. The study a ttempts to integrate various factors contributing to SCP in a single study. It is proposed to further test the model using exploratory factor analysis (EFA.

  16. Adsorption of organic molecules on mineral surfaces studied by first-principle calculations: A review.

    Zhao, Hongxia; Yang, Yong; Shu, Xin; Wang, Yanwei; Ran, Qianping

    2018-04-09

    First-principle calculations, especially by the density functional theory (DFT) methods, are becoming a power technique to study molecular structure and properties of organic/inorganic interfaces. This review introduces some recent examples on the study of adsorption models of organic molecules or oligomers on mineral surfaces and interfacial properties obtained from first-principles calculations. The aim of this contribution is to inspire scientists to benefit from first-principle calculations and to apply the similar strategies when studying and tailoring interfacial properties at the atomistic scale, especially for those interested in the design and development of new molecules and new products. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Biosecurity and animal disease management in organic and conventional Swedish dairy herds: a questionnaire study.

    Emanuelson, Ulf; Sjöström, Karin; Fall, Nils

    2018-04-12

    Good animal health is a notion that is germane to organic dairy production, and it is expected that such herds would pay significant attention on the health of their animals. However, it is not known if the applied animal disease management is actually more adequate in organic dairy cattle herds than in conventional dairy herds. A questionnaire study on biosecurity and animal disease management activities was therefore conducted among Swedish farmers with organic and conventional dairy cattle herds. A total of 192 useable questionnaires were returned; response rates of 30.3 and 20.2% for organic and conventional farmers, respectively. Herd characteristics of the two herd types were very similar, except that pipeline/tie-stall systems were less common in organic farms and that organic farmers had a higher education level than their conventional counterparts. Also, very few systematic differences in general or specific disease management activities were observed between the two types of farms. The main exceptions being how milk from cows during antibiotic treatment was used, views on policy actions in relation to antibiotic use, and attitudes towards calling for veterinary support. Using milk from cows during antibiotic treatment was more common in conventional herds, although it was mainly given to bull calves. Farmers of organic herds were more positive to policy actions to reduce the use and need for antibiotics, and they reported waiting longer before contacting a veterinarian for calves with diarrhoea and cows with subclinical mastitis. The stated biosecurity and animal disease management was relatively equal in Swedish organic and conventional dairy herds. Our results thus indicate that animal health is as important in conventionally managed dairy herds in Sweden as in organically managed herds.

  18. Study into an organization for collecting, processing and removing of radioactive waste

    1983-09-01

    This report presents the results of a study into a new organization for the collection, processing and removal of radioactive waste. At present these activities are carried out by the Dutch Energy Research Foundation (ECN). The new organization has to offer guarantees for a qualititatively responsible retrieval and processing of radioactive waste. It also has to be certain that the waste offered will not be send back, or even refused, if stagnation occurs in the removal. Finally the tariffs have to be not so prohibitive that they hinder a responsible handling with radioactive waste by the producers. An organization is advised which is self-employed with regard to management, directorate and materials. It is recommended to submit this organization in a limited liability company. This form of government may be supplemented optionally with a slight form of a cooperative association. (author). 10 refs.; 3 figs.; 11 tabs

  19. Towards an Articulation of the Material and Visual Turn in Organization Studies

    Boxenbaum, Eva; Jones, Candace; Meyer, Renate

    2018-01-01

    Contemporary organizations increasingly rely on images, logos, videos, building materials, graphic and product design, and a range of other material and visual artifacts to compete, communicate, form identity and organize their activities. This Special Issue focuses on materiality and visuality...... on the articles in the special issue, we further explore the affordances and limits of the material and visual dimensions of organizing in relation to novelty. We conclude by pointing out theoretical avenues for advancing multimodal research, and discuss some of the ethical, pragmatic and identity...... in the course of objectifying and reacting to novel ideas, and, more broadly, contributes to organizational theory by articulating the emergent contours of a material and visual turn in the study of organizations. In this Introduction, we provide an overview of research on materiality and visuality. Drawing...

  20. A study of quantitative scale display of the organ uptake with gamma-camera

    Ishigami, K; Matsumoto, M [Kumamoto Univ. (Japan) School of Medicine

    1975-05-01

    The fundamental study of quantitative scale display of the organ uptake with ..gamma..-camera was performed in special respect of the thyroid gland and the pancreas. As one of the measurements on certain dimension of the organ, an optical progression outside the digital image was expressed, and was subjected to the quantitative scale with the use of the threshold level. And a rather satisfactory correlation was clinically obtained between the scale display and the thyroidal /sup 131/I uptake. For the purpose of revising the above scale display, the organ depth was measured with RI by the aid of the phantom. Then the pancreas depth determined by the count rate ratio curve of 140 and 270 keV peak of /sup 75/Se energies. However, the body background and the radioactive rays from the neighboring organs interfered with this curve.

  1. Studies on the distribution of zinc radioisotope 65Zn in an organism of pig

    Nowosad, R.; Simoni, J.; Kubok-Gottlieb, L.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of the studies was analysis of the distribution of radioactive 65 Zinc in an organism of pig and the degree of its bounding with protein fractions of certain parenchymatous organs. The animals were given intramuscularly the radioisotope of 65 Zn (20 uCi). After 48 hr since the injection the animals were slaughtered and selective organs and tissues were examined radiometrically. The results were presented as a percentage of the applied dose per 1.0 g of a sample x 10 2 . Taking into consideration the concentration of 65 Zn in the examined organs and tissues, they were divided into the following groups: I - (over 0.30%), parenchymatous organs, hypophyseal gland, suprarenal glands, II (0.20 - 0.30%) - uterus, lungs, small intestine, bile, III (0.10 - 0.20%) - salivary glands, tongue, stomach, colon, coecum, IV (0.01 - 0.1%) - the rest of the organs and tissues studied which activity differed to a small extent in comparison to the concentration of 65 Zn in blood after 48 hr since the application of the radioactive material. In various proteins and their fractions a degree of 65 Zn binding was insignificant in comparison to the content of Zn in a protein-free supernatant. (author)

  2. PSYCHOLOGICAL APPROACHES TO STUDY OF OPTIMAL MANAGEMENT ACTIVITIES IN LEADERS OF ETHNIC COMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS

    N T Kolesnik

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the main psychological approaches, and in particular, the system-synergetic approach to the study of the management activities of the leaders of ethnic community organizations. It also discusses the concept and essence of social self-organization of the ethnic group. It presents the methodological framework of the synergetic approach to the consideration of the study of complex self-organizing systems. The analysis of conditions of effectiveness of the process of self-organization of ethnic public associations is given. The basic principles of modern psychology of labor, which form the basis for the research of the optimal management activity of the leaders of ethnic community organizations, are highlighted. The presented theoretical analysis led to the conclusion that the integral research of the management activities of the heads of ethnic community organizations may be based on the psychological system-synergetic approach, from the point of which the management activities could be presented as a psychologically complex and open system.

  3. Laboratory Study of Aliphatic Organic Spectral Signatures and Applications to Ceres and Primitive Asteroids

    Kaplan, H. H.; Milliken, R.

    2017-12-01

    Aliphatic organics were recently discovered on the surface of Ceres with Dawn's Visible and InfraRed (VIR) mapping spectrometer, which has implications for prebiotic chemistry of Ceres and other asteroids. An absorption in the spectrum at 3.4 µm was used to identify and provide initial estimates of the amount of organic material. We have studied the 3.4 µm absorption in reflectance spectra of bulk rock and meteorite powders and isolated organic materials in the NASA RELAB facility at Brown University to determine how organic composition and abundance affects absorption strength. Reflectance spectra of insoluble organic matter (IOM) extracted from carbonaceous chondrites were measured from 0.35 - 25 µm. These IOM have known elemental (H, C, N, O) and isotopic compositions that were compared with spectral properties. Bulk meteorites were measured as chips and particulates over the same wavelength range. Despite overall low reflectance values (albedo IOM samples, specifically those with a H/C ratio greater than 0.4. The absorption strength (band depth) increases with increasing H/C ratio, which corroborates similar findings in our previous study of sedimentary rocks and isolated kerogens. The absorption strength in the bulk meteorites reflects both H/C of the IOM and the concentration of IOM in the inorganic (mineral) matrix. Overlapping absorptions from carbonates and phyllosilicates (OH/H2O) can also influence the aliphatic organic bands in bulk rocks and meteorites. This laboratory work provides a foundation that can be used to constrain the composition of Ceres' aliphatic organic matter using band depth as a proxy for H/C. Reflectance spectra collected for this work will also be used to model the Dawn VIR data and obtain abundance and H/C estimates assuming that the organic material on Ceres' surface is similar to carbonaceous chondrite IOM. These spectra and findings can aid interpretation of reflectance data from Ceres and other asteroid missions, such as

  4. Perceptual Organization and Operative Thought: A Study of Coherence in Memory.

    Heindel, Patricia; Kose, Gary

    Examined in three studies were the influence of perceptual organization on children's memory and the relationship between operational thought and memory performance. In the first study, 72 children at 5, 7, and 9 years of age were given a series of Piagetian tasks and a memory task. Subjects were presented with 10 color-shape pairs depicted in…

  5. Dispositional Antecedents and Outcomes of Political Skill in Organizations: A Four-Study Investigation with Convergence

    Liu, Yongmei; Ferris, Gerald R.; Zinko, Robert; Perrewe, Pamela L.; Weitz, Bart; Xu, Jun

    2007-01-01

    We developed a four-study research plan to examine the dispositional antecedents of political skill and its job performance consequences, and also to incorporate the mediating role of reputation, drawing upon a recent theoretical model of political skill in organizations. Study 1 established the psychometric properties of the two reputation scales…

  6. A compact multi-chamber setup for degradation and lifetime studies of organic solar cells

    Gevorgyan, Suren; Jørgensen, Mikkel; Krebs, Frederik C

    2011-01-01

    A controlled atmosphere setup designed for long-term degradation studies of organic solar cells under illumination is presented. The setup was designed with ease-of-use and compactness in mind and allows for multiple solar cells distributed on four glass substrates to be studied in four different...

  7. The Learning Organization Dimensions and Their Impact on Organizational Performance: Orange Jordan as a Case Study

    Farid M. Qawasmeh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to measure the impact of learning organization's seven key dimensions (continuous learning opportunities, inquiry and dialogue, employee empowerment, establish systems to capture and share learning, connect the organization to its environment, collaboration and team learning, strategic leadership on organizational performance in Jordan Telecom. It also aims to figure out the type and magnitude of correlation among these seven dimensions as well as to assess the credibility of the questionnaire in a different context such as the Arab business environment. The sample size was (312 employees in this case study. The study results are as follows: The status of the learning organization dimensions was moderate (3.44 out of 5 on 5-step Likert scale. A positive statistical correlation exists among the seven learning organization dimensions as well as a positive statistical correlation with organizational performance. The questionnaire proved to be suitable in the Arab business context. Finally, the study recommends that organizations must consider the seven learning organizations’ dimensions due to their role in enhancing organizational performance and assuring a competitive edge.

  8. Geology, Alteration, Mineralization, Geochemistry and Petrology of intrusive units in the Shah Soltan Ali prospect area (Southwest of Birjand, South Khorasan province

    Samaneh Nadermezerji

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The Shah Soltan Ali area is located 85 km southwest of Birjand in the South Khorasan province. This area is part of the Tertiary volcanic-plutonic rocks in the east of the Lut block. The Lut block is bounded to the east by the Nehbandan and associated faults, to the north by the Doruneh and related faults (Sabzevar zone, to the south by the Makran arc and Bazman volcanic complex and to the west by the Nayband Fault. The Lut block is the main metallogenic province in the east of Iran (Karimpour et al., 2012, that comprises of numerous porphyry Cu and Cu–Au deposits, low and high sulfidation epithermal Au deposits, iron oxide deposits, base-metal deposits and Cu–Pb–Zn vein-type deposits. The geology of Shah Soltan Ali area is dominated by volcanic rocks, comprised of andesite and basalt, which are intruded by subvolanic units such as monzonite porphyry, monzodiorite porphyry and diorite porphyry. Materials and methods 1. 170 thin sections of the rock samples as well as 25 polished and thin polished sections were prepared for petrography, alteration and mineralization. 2. Twenty five samples were analyzed for Cu, Pb, Zn, Sb, Mo and As elements by the Aqua regia method in the Zarazama laboratory in Tehran, Iran. 3. Nine samples were analyzed for trace elements [including rare earth elements (REEs]. As a result of these analyses, trace elements and REE were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS in the ACME Analytical Laboratories (Vancouver Ltd., Canada. 4. Ten samples were analyzed for major elements by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry in the East Amethyst laboratory in Mashhad, Iran. 5. Five samples were analyzed for Firre Assay analysis in the Zarazma Laboratory in Tehran, Iran. 6. The results of XRD analysis were used for 4 samples. Discussion and results Petrographic studies indicate that subvolcanic rocks consist of diorite porphyry, monzonite porphyry and monzodiorite

  9. The fate or organic matter during planetary accretion - Preliminary studies of the organic chemistry of experimentally shocked Murchison meteorite

    Tingle, Tracy N.; Tyburczy, James A.; Ahrens, Thomas J.; Becker, Christopher H.

    1992-01-01

    The fate of organic matter in carbonaceous meteorites during hypervelocity (1-2 km/sec) impacts is investigated using results of experiments in which three samples of the Murchison (CM2) carbonaceous chondrite were shocked to 19, 20, and 36 GPa and analyzed by highly sensitive thermal-desorption photoionization mass spectrometry (SALI). The thermal-desorptive SALI mass spectra of unshocked CM2 material revealed presence of indigenous aliphatic, aromatic, sulfur, and organosulfur compounds, and samples shocked to about 20 GPa showed little or no loss of organic matter. On the other hand, samples shocked to 36 GPa exhibited about 70 percent loss of organic material and a lower alkene/alkane ratio than did the starting material. The results suggest that it is unlikely that the indigenous organic matter in carbonaceous chondritelike planetesimals could have survived the impact on the earth in the later stages of earth's accretion.

  10. The reaction between iodine and organic coatings under severe PWR accident conditions. An experimental parameter study

    Hellmann, S; Funke, F; Greger, G U; Bleier, A; Morell, W [Siemens AG, Power Generation Group, Erlangen (Germany)

    1996-12-01

    An extensive experimental parameter study was performed on the deposition and on the resuspension kinetics in the reaction system iodine/organically coated surfaces. Both reactions in the gas phase and in the liquid phase were investigated and kinetic rate constants suitable for modelling were derived. Previous experimental studies on the reaction of iodine with organic coated surfaces were mostly limited to temperatures below 100{sup o}C. Thus, this parameter study aims at filling a gap and providing kinetic data on heterogeneous reactions with organic surfaces in the accident-relevant temperature range of 100-160{sup o}C. Two types of laboratory experiments carried out at Siemens/KWU using coatings representative for German power plants (epoxy-tape paint), namely gas phase tests and liquid phase tests. (author) 6 figs., 6 tabs., 5 refs.

  11. Engaging national organizations for knowledge translation: comparative case studies in knowledge value mapping.

    Lane, Joseph P; Rogers, Juan D

    2011-09-12

    Government sponsors of research and development, along with their funded investigators, are increasingly tasked with demonstrating evidence of knowledge use by nontraditional audiences. This requires efforts to translate their findings for effective communication. For technology-related knowledge, these audiences include clinicians, consumers, manufacturers, public policy agencies, and knowledge brokers. One potentially efficient approach is to communicate research findings through relevant national organizations. However, this requires an understanding of how such organizations view and treat research knowledge, which can be determined through knowledge-value mapping. Do knowledge values differ between national organizations representing different audiences? Can a deeper understanding of knowledge values help sponsors, investigators, and organizations better communicate research findings to stakeholders? A series of comparative case studies on knowledge-value mapping were derived through interviews with spokespersons for six national organizations. The semi-structured interviews followed a 10-item questionnaire to characterize different ways in which each organization engages with research-based knowledge. Each participating organization represents a particular stakeholder group, while all share a common interest in the research subject matter. Each national organization considers the value of the research knowledge in the context of their organization's mission and the interests of their members. All are interested in collaborating with researchers to share relevant findings, while they vary along the following dimensions of knowledge engagement: create, identify, translate, adapt, communicate, use, promote, absorptive capacity, and recommendations for facilitation. The principles of knowledge translation suggest that investigators can increase use by tailoring the format and context of their findings to the absorptive capacity of nonscholars. Greater absorption

  12. Engaging national organizations for knowledge translation: Comparative case studies in knowledge value mapping

    Rogers Juan D

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Government sponsors of research and development, along with their funded investigators, are increasingly tasked with demonstrating evidence of knowledge use by nontraditional audiences. This requires efforts to translate their findings for effective communication. For technology-related knowledge, these audiences include clinicians, consumers, manufacturers, public policy agencies, and knowledge brokers. One potentially efficient approach is to communicate research findings through relevant national organizations. However, this requires an understanding of how such organizations view and treat research knowledge, which can be determined through knowledge-value mapping. Do knowledge values differ between national organizations representing different audiences? Can a deeper understanding of knowledge values help sponsors, investigators, and organizations better communicate research findings to stakeholders? Methods A series of comparative case studies on knowledge-value mapping were derived through interviews with spokespersons for six national organizations. The semi-structured interviews followed a 10-item questionnaire to characterize different ways in which each organization engages with research-based knowledge. Each participating organization represents a particular stakeholder group, while all share a common interest in the research subject matter. Results Each national organization considers the value of the research knowledge in the context of their organization's mission and the interests of their members. All are interested in collaborating with researchers to share relevant findings, while they vary along the following dimensions of knowledge engagement: create, identify, translate, adapt, communicate, use, promote, absorptive capacity, and recommendations for facilitation. Conclusions The principles of knowledge translation suggest that investigators can increase use by tailoring the format and context of their

  13. Local and/or organic: A study on consumer preferences for organic food and food from different origins

    Feldmann , Corinna; Hamm, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to get a deeper insight into consumer preferences for different food products varying in their places of origin (i.e. local, Germany, neighbouring country, non-EU country) and production practices (i.e. organic vs. non-organic). Therefore, consumer surveys combined with choice experiments were conducted with 641 consumers in eight supermarkets in different parts of Germany. Multinomial and mixed logit models were estimated to draw conclusions on the preference str...

  14. Study of organic chlorine in soils and formation in biotic and abiotic conditions

    Osswald, Aurelie

    2016-01-01

    Chlorine has long been considered as the predominantly chlorine form present in the environment. However, recent studies have shown that chlorine is retained in the soil as an organic form and is formed by a natural process of chlorination mainly from the microbial activity of the soil still poorly documented. The aim of this study is to estimate the organic and inorganic forms of chlorine in contrasting soil and highlight the evolution of these forms according to certain environmental parameters or terms of incubations and to the activity of microorganisms. For this, the organo-mineral horizons of contrasting soil were studied (i) in situ: The amounts of chlorine and physico-chemical and microbiological parameters of soil were measured; (ii) in two experimental devices incubations under different conditions. Measurements of chlorine levels between the beginning and the end of the first experiment were measured by AOX analyzer. For the second experiment, the soil was previously enriched with Na 37 Cl and 37 Cl levels were measured by HR ICP MS. Soil samples from these incubations were analyzed by Xanes spectrometry to identify the speciation of chlorine forms in soils. Soil non-extractable organic chlorine contents represent almost all of the chlorine. The parameters that influence the distribution of chlorine contents in soils correspond to vegetation cover, pH, organic carbon content and quantities of microorganisms. The chlorine contents measured by AOX analyzer and by HR ICP MS highlight an organic chlorine formation over time in relation to the microorganisms in the soil. The measures carried out by HR ICP MS show also an organic chlorine formation in abiotic conditions. Conversely, XANES spectrometry measurements have shown any organic chlorine formation. In conclusion, the parameters that influence the distribution of chlorine contents in soils have been targeted. Similarly, the microbial origin of the chlorination process has been demonstrated, although a

  15. Application and results of whole-body autoradiography in distribution studies of organic solvents.

    Bergman, K

    1983-01-01

    With the growing concern for the health hazards of occupational exposure to toxic substances attention has been focused on the organic solvents, which are associated with both deleterious nervous system effects and specific tissue injuries. Relatively little is known about the distribution of organic solvents and their metabolites in the living organism. Knowledge of the specific tissue localizations and retention of solvents and solvent metabolites is of great value in revealing and understanding the sites and mechanisms of organic solvent toxicity. Whole-body autoradiography has been modified and applied to distribution studies of benzene, toluene, m-xylene, styrene, methylene chloride, chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethylene and carbon disulfide. The high volatility of these substances has led to the development of cryo-techniques. Whole-body autoradiographic techniques applicable to the study of volatile substances are reviewed. The localizations of nonvolatile solvent metabolites and firmly bound metabolites have also been examined. The obtained results are discussed in relation to toxic effects and evaluated by comparison with other techniques used in distribution studies of organic solvents and their metabolites.

  16. Study of the degradation of liquid-organic radioactive wastes by electrochemical methods

    Hernandez A, J. I.

    2015-01-01

    In this study degradation studies were performed on blank samples, in which two electrochemical cells with different electrodes were used, the first is constituted by mesh electrodes Ti/Ir-Ta/Ti and the second by rod electrodes Ti/Ddb, using as reference an electrolytic medium of scintillation liquid and scintillation liquid more water, applying different potentials ranging from 1 to 25 V. After obtaining the benchmarks, the treatment was applied to samples containing organic liquid radioactive waste, in this case a short half-life radioisotope as Sulfur-35, the degradation characterization of organic compounds was performed in infrared spectrometry. (Author)

  17. Organ Culture as a Model System for Studies on Enterotoxin Interactions with the Intestinal Epithelium

    Lorenzen, Ulver Spangsberg; Hansen, Gert H; Danielsen, E Michael

    2015-01-01

    Studies on bacterial enterotoxin-epithelium interactions require model systems capable of mimicking the events occurring at the molecular and cellular levels during intoxication. In this chapter, we describe organ culture as an often neglected alternative to whole-animal experiments or enterocyte......-like cell lines. Like cell culture, organ culture is versatile and suitable for studying rapidly occurring events, such as enterotoxin binding and uptake. In addition, it is advantageous in offering an epithelium with more authentic permeability/barrier properties than any cell line, as well...

  18. Traditions and Transitions in Quantitative Societal Culture Research in Organization Studies

    Peterson, Mark, F.; Søndergaard, Mikael

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative societal culture research (QSCR) in organization studies crystallizes a configuration of social science perspectives and methods that became prominent in the 1970s. We consider the qualities of and boundaries around cultural groups that this tradition emphasizes, and other...... characteristics of cultural groups that it does not emphasize. Current debates surrounding this tradition reflect both recent social science innovations and rediscoveries of early social science perspectives. Our analysis of quantitative cross-cultural societal research in organization studies considers...... this process of crystallization, innovation and rediscovery. We suggest ways to address current controversies and promote conversations with other research approaches....

  19. A pilot study to validate measures of the theory of reasoned action for organ donation behavior.

    Wong, Shui Hung; Chow, Amy Yin Man

    2018-04-01

    The present study aimed at taking the first attempt in validating the measures generated based on the theory of reasoned action (TRA). A total of 211 university students participated in the study, 95 were included in the exploratory factor analysis and 116 were included in the confirmatory factor analysis. The TRA measurements were established with adequate psychometric properties, internal consistency, and construct validity. Findings also suggested that attitude toward organ donation has both a cognitive and affective nature, while the subjective norm of the family seems to be important to students' views on organ donation.

  20. Organ donation in cardiac arrest patients treated with extracorporeal CPR: A single centre observational study.

    Casadio, Maria Chiara; Coppo, Anna; Vargiolu, Alessia; Villa, Jacopo; Rota, Matteo; Avalli, Leonello; Citerio, Giuseppe

    2017-09-01

    In a consecutive cohort of cardiac arrest (CA) treated with extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (eCPR), we describe the incidence of brain death (BD), the eligibility for organ donation and the short-term follow-up of the transplanted organs. All refractory in- and out-of-hospital CA admitted to our Cardiac Intensive Care Unit between January 2011 and September 2016 treated with eCPR were enrolled in the study. 112 CA patients received eCPR. 82 (73.2%) died in hospital, 25 BD (22.3%) and 57 for other causes (50.9%). At the time of first neurological evaluation after rewarming, variables related to evolution to BD were a lower GCS (3 [3-3] vs. 8 [3-11], pdonation in BD patients was 56%, with 39 donated organs: 23 kidneys, 12 livers, and 4 lungs. 89.74% of the transplanted organs reached an early good functional recovery. In refractory CA patients treated with eCPR, the prevalence of BD is high. This population has a high potential for considering organ donation. Donated organs have a good outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Intensive vs. free-range organic beef. A preference study through consumer liking and conjoint analysis.

    García-Torres, S; López-Gajardo, A; Mesías, F J

    2016-04-01

    This paper evaluates consumer liking and preferences towards organic beef from two production systems allowed by EU regulation: i) free-range and ii) intensive (fattened in feed-lot with organic feedstuff) as compared with conventionally produced beef. Data were obtained in April-May 2014 with a sample of 150 regular beef consumers who completed two tasks: firstly a sensory test where consumers tasted and rated the meats and secondly a conjoint analysis to study beef purchasing preferences. Willingness-to-pay for the different meats was also calculated from conjoint results. Results show that consumers preferred organic-from-concentrate beef at sensory level while organic beef from animals fed on grass was preferred when process characteristics (i.e. farming system) or attributes perceived at the point of purchase (i.e. colour) were evaluated. It was also found that the price-premium for organic beef is over 40%, with organic-fed-on grass beef preferred slightly over that fed-on-concentrate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A study on the effect of knowledge management on customer orientation in governmental organization

    Alireza Bakhshizadeh

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge management (KM plays an important role on increasing organizational performance especially governmental agencies where there are different skills and knowledge within the organization. In this study, we present a study to investigate the effect of KM on having more customer oriented organizations. We use a standard questionnaire among 146 randomly selected employees out of 170 people who work for four governmental organizations in city of Chahbahar, Iran. The collected information is analyzed using structural equation modeling and by validating the results using Cronbach alphas of more than the minimum desired level of 0.70, we determine the positive relationships between KM and three other variables including customer absorption, customer retention and customer relationship management. The results of this survey reveal that an increase of one unit in KM yields almost the same increase in three mentioned variables accordingly. In addition, an increase of one percent in KM will increase customer orientation by almost one percent.

  3. Generation of organic waste from institutions in Denmark: case study of the Technical University of Denmark

    Edjabou, Maklawe Essonanawe; Boldrin, Alessio; Scheutz, Charlotte

    at least 60% of organic waste – that cannot be prevented or reduced –generated by service sector, should be source-segregated and collected separately. In order to establish the baseline of the current situation, and to allow for any evaluation of performance against target indicators, data on solid waste...... generation and composition are required. The overall aim of this study was to quantify the potential for source-segregated organic waste as well as mixed waste from institution. This study was carried at the Department of Environmental Engineering at Technical University of Denmark. In the course...... and public holidays, when the offices were officially closed. Furthermore, the composition of source-segregated organic waste was analysed to investigate its purity. During the sampling period, the number of employees coming to work at the department was recorded. These data were used to investigate any...

  4. Carbon transfer from dissolved organic carbon to the cladoceran Bosmina: a mesocosm study

    Tang Yali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A mesocosm study illuminated possible transfer pathways for dissolved organic carbon from the water column to zooplankton. Organic carbon was added as 13C enriched glucose to 15 mesocosms filled with natural lake water. Stable isotope analysis and phospholipid fatty acids-based stable isotope probing were used to trace the incorporation of 13C into the cladoceran Bosmina and its potential food items. Glucose-C was shown to be assimilated into phytoplankton (including fungi and heterotrophic protists, bacteria and Bosmina, all of which became enriched with 13C during the experiment. The study suggests that bacteria play an important role in the transfer of glucose-C to Bosmina. Furthermore, osmotic algae, fungi and heterotrophic protists might also contribute to the isotopic signature changes observed in Bosmina. These findings help to clarify the contribution of dissolved organic carbon to zooplankton and its potential pathways.

  5. A study on relationship between knowledge management and organizational change in learning organizations: A case study of cable industry

    Mohammad Emami

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an empirical investigation to study the relationship between knowledge management and organizational change in one of Iranian producers of wire and cable. The proposed study of this paper designs a questionnaire consists of 23 questions in Likert scale and distributes it among 76 randomly people who work for this organization. The results of Spearman correlation coefficients show that harvest index, refining, organizing, disseminating and applying knowledge have positive and meaningful relationship with organizational change. Managers need to develop organizational change to integrate the wealth of knowledge in various sectors and having knowledge of internal and external forces.

  6. Organization of the independent work of students while studying engineering graphics

    Tel’noy Viktor Ivanovich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article reveals the possibility of creating and implementing teaching conditions for the rational organization of the independent work of first-year students in state of adaptation to the study of the course of engineering drawing. Theoretical and methodological aspects of students’ independent work are presented: types and forms of organization and control, training and methodological support of their independent work. The authors used such an approach to independent work organization: teacher-led classes during the main types of training activities (lectures, practical and laboratory work; form of organization of training (extracurricular, and also self study using innovative teaching methods promotes creative activities of students and the development of competencies of a future skilled construction industry professional. The role of modern information and communication technologies in independent work of students was specified. According to the degree of coverage of students, taking into account individual characteristics and different levels of preparedness, the following forms of independent work organization were detached: individual, differentiated and front.In the process of engineering graphics studying it is recommended to use the following basic forms of independent work: ongoing work with the lecture material; selection and study of literature and electronic sources of information on the problems of the discipline; preparation for the main classroom training; performing calculation and graphic works; work in student scientific societies and carrying out research work; participation in scientific conferences, seminars and other. Emphasis on the formation of students’ skills in working with different types of educational and scientific literature, the ability to analyze, organize information in electronical library systems, open educational resources.

  7. Interlaboratory study of a method for determining nonvolatile organic carbon in aquifer materials

    Caughey, M.E.; Barcelona, M.J.; Powell, R.M.; Cahill, R.A.; Gron, C.; Lawrenz, D.; Meschi, P.L.

    1995-01-01

    The organic carbon fraction in aquifer materials exerts a major influence on the subsurface mobilities of organic and organic-associated contaminants. The spatial distribution of total organic carbon (TOC) in aquifer materials must be determined before the transport of hydrophobic organic pollutants in aquifers can be modeled accurately. Previous interlaboratory studies showed that it is difficult to measure TOC concentrations 1%. We have tested a new analytical method designed to improve the accuracy and precision of nonvolatile TOC quantitation in geologic materials that also contain carbonate minerals. Four authentic aquifer materials and one NIST standard reference material were selected as test materials for a blind collaborative study. Nonvolatile TOC in these materials ranged from 0.05 to 1.4%, while TIC ranged from 0.46 to 12.6%. Sample replicates were digested with sulfurous acid, dried at 40??C, and then combusted at 950??C using LECO or UIC instruments. For the three test materials that contained >2% TIC, incomplete acidification resulted in a systematic positive bias of TOC values reported by five of the six laboratories that used the test method. Participants did not have enough time to become proficient with the new method before they analyzed the test materials. A seventh laboratory successfully used an alternative method that analyzed separate liquid and solid fractions of the acidified sample residues. ?? 1995 Springer-Verlag.

  8. Effect of organic molecules on hydrolysis of peptide bond: A DFT study

    Makshakova, Olga; Ermakova, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► DFT study of the effects of small organic molecules on the hydrolysis reactions of peptide bonds. ► Organic molecules can activate nonenzymatic hydrolysis reaction. ► Influence of organic acids on activation energy barrier correlates with their electronegativity. - Abstract: The activation and inhibition effects of small organic molecules on peptide hydrolysis have been studied using a model compound dialanine and DFT approach. Solvent-assisted and non-assisted concerted mechanisms were analyzed. Several transition states for the systems: alanine dipeptide–water molecule in complexes with alcohol molecules, acetonitrile, dimethylsulfoxide, propionic, lactic and pyruvic acids and water molecules were localized. The formation of hydrogen bonds between dipeptide, reactive water molecule and molecules of solvents influences the activation energy barrier of the peptide bond hydrolytic reaction. Strong effect of organic acids on the activation energy barrier correlates with their electronegativity. Acetonitrile can act as an inhibitor of reaction. Mechanisms of regulation of the activation energy barrier are discussed in the terms of donor-acceptor interactions

  9. Petrology, magnetostratigraphy and geochronology of the Miocene volcaniclastic Tepoztlán Formation: implications for the initiation of the Transmexican Volcanic Belt (Central Mexico)

    Lenhardt, Nils; Böhnel, Harald; Wemmer, Klaus; Torres-Alvarado, Ignacio; Hornung, Jens; Hinderer, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    The volcaniclastic Tepoztlán Formation (TF) represents an important rock record to unravel the early evolution of the Transmexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB). Here, a depositional model together with a chronostratigraphy of this Formation is presented, based on detailed field observations together with new geochronological, paleomagnetic, and petrological data. The TF consists predominantly of deposits from pyroclastic density currents and extensive epiclastic products such as tuffaceous sandstones...

  10. Chemometrics Study of the PM2.5 Annual Organic Composition in Chapineria

    Pindado, O.; Perez, R. M.; Garcia, S.

    2013-01-01

    Due to the huge number of data obtained from a annual study of atmospheric particulate matter, designing a statistics study in order to reveal all information it must be indispensable. Present study has led us to identify several sources of particulate matter among them crustal material, wax plants, fossil fuel combustion, microbial activity and secondary organic aerosol. Moreover, these sources have been able to relate to physical phenomenon such as temperature and atmospheric stability. (Author) 15 refs.

  11. Affective Commitment to Organizations: A Comparison Study of Reverse Mentoring Versus Traditional Mentoring Among Millennials

    Catrin Hechl

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A current topic of interest in management and organization research is the phenomenon of a generation shift in the workforce and how this shift will affect organizations in the near future.  Millennials represent the largest generational cohort in the American workforce.  Organizations find themselves challenged with retention efforts as Millennials tend to leave an organization after short tenures.  The problem this study addressed is the high turnover rates among millennial employees. Specifically, it was unknown whether Millennials who received reverse mentoring evidenced greater affective commitment to the organization as compared to Millennials who received standard mentoring.  The purpose of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that Millennials who received reverse mentoring evidenced greater affective commitment to the organization as compared to Millennials who received standard mentoring.  A two group post-test only quasi-experimental design was conducted.  A total of 90 participants (45 per group completed the survey.  The survey was conducted by Qualtrics, an online survey company.  The sample population included male and female individuals, born between 1982 and 1998, employed by all types of organizations in the United States and participating in a mentoring program at the time the survey was taken.  Affective commitment was greater in the reverse mentoring group (M = 36.683, SE = .959 compared to the traditional mentoring group (M = 34.984, SE = .959.  However, after adjustment for quality of relationship (LMX and length and frequency of mentoring (LFM there was no statistically significant difference (p < .05 between traditional mentoring and reverse mentoring on affective commitment to the organization indicated by F(1,86 = 1.569, p = .214.  Additional results of this study showed that two-thirds of the surveyed millennial employees had already exceeded the average length of employment of 12 to 18 months with

  12. Micro-Scale Characteristics of Insoluble Organic Matter in Chondrites: A Coordinated TEM, STXM and SIMS Study

    Nittler, L. R.; Alexander, C. M. O'd.; Cody, G. D.; de Gregorio, B. T.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Stroud, R. M.; Tiwari, A.

    2009-03-01

    A coordinated study of meteoritic insoluble organic matter reveals that hollow organic globules are chemically similar to other IOM, but abundances and sizes of globules vary between meteorites. IOM is sensitive to electron and X-ray induced beam damage.

  13. Investigation on type and origin of iron mineralization at Mesgar occurrence, south of Zanjan, using petrological, mineralogical and geochemical data

    Mohammad Ebrahimi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Mesgar iron occurrence is located in northwestern part of the Central Iran, 115 km south of Zanjan. Although there is a sequence of volcanic-pyroclastic rocks accompanied by iron mineralization, no detailed works had been conducted in the area. The present paper provides an overview of the geological framework, the mineralization characteristics, and the results of geochemical study of the Mesgar iron occurrence with an application to the ore genesis. Identification of these characteristics can be used as a model for exploration of this type of iron mineralization in the Central Iran and elsewhere. Materials and methods Detailed field work has been carried out at different scales in the Mesgar area. About 16 polished thin and thin sections from host rocks and mineralized and altered zones were studied by conventional petrographic and mineralogic methods at the Department of Geology, University of Zanjan. In addition, a total of 3 samples from least-altered volcanic host rocks and 2 samples from ore zones from the Mesgar occurrence were analyzed by ICP-MS and ICP-OES for whole-rock major and trace elements and REE compositions at the Zarazma Laboratories, Tehran, Iran. Results and Discussion Based on field observation, rock units exposed in the Mesgar area consist of Miocene sedimentary rocks and volcanic-pyroclastic units (Rādfar et al., 2005. The pyroclastic units consist of volcanic breccia and agglomerate. They lie concordantly on the Miocene sedimentary units, and are in turn concordantly overlain by andesitic basalt lavas. The lavas show porphyritic texture consisting of plagioclase (up to 3 mm in size and pyroxene phenocrysts set in a fine-grained to glassy groundmass. Seriate, cumulophyric, glomeroporphyritic and trachytic textures are also observed. Iron mineralization occurs as vein and lens-shaped bodies within and along the contacts of pyroclastic (footwall and andesitic basalt lavas (hanging wall. The veins reach up to

  14. A Study on Nursing Students' Knowledge, Attitude, and Educational Needs for Brain-Death Organ Transplantation and Donation and Intent to Donate Organs.

    Ju, M K; Sim, M K; Son, S Y

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the knowledge, attitude, educational needs, and will of nursing students on organ donation from brain-dead donors. Data were collected by using a 40-item questionnaire to measure knowledge, attitude, educational needs, and will for organ donation of 215 nursing college students in one university in Dangjin city from May 11 to May 31, 2017. The data were analyzed using SPSS 22 program (Data Solution Inc, Seoul). In the general characteristics, 85.1% of the subjects did not receive education on donation, and 99.5% of the subjects responded that education is needed. The desired methods of education were special lecture in school (55.3%), "webtoons" on the Internet (19.5%), formal curriculum (15.8%). Points to improve to increase brain-death organ transplantation and donation included "active publicity through pan-national campaign activities" (56.3%), "respecting prior consent from brain-dead donors" (21.9%), and "encouragement and increased support for organ donors" (12.1%). There was a significant difference in knowledge according to will for organ donation (t = 3.29, P = .001) and consent to brain-death organ donation in family members (t = 3.29, P = .001). There was a statistically significant positive correlation between attitude and knowledge of the subjects regarding brain-death organ donation. The knowledge, attitude, educational need, and will for organ donation of nursing students revealed in this study will be used as basic data to provide systematic transplant education including contents about organ transplantation in the regular nursing curriculum in the future. It will contribute to the activation of organ donation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Adoption of Social Media in Nonprofit Organizations : The Case Study of the United Nations Country Team in Thailand

    Panyam, Sinta

    2014-01-01

    The study examines the role of social media in non-profit organizations using the case study from the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) in Thailand Country office. As Social media become a significant channel to raise the visibility and promote the work of the organization. The focus of this research examines what drives organizations adopting social media through a model built round four key factors, 1.) The importance of social media, 2.) The impact to image of the organization, 3...

  16. Giddens à la carte? Appraising empirical applications of structuration theory in management and organization studies

    den Hond, F.; Boersma, F.K.; Heres, L.; Kroes, E.H.J.; van Oirschot, E.

    2012-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in the application of Structuration Theory in the fields of management and organization studies. Based upon a thorough literature review, we have come up with a data-set to assess how Structuration Theory has been used in empirical research. We use three key concepts

  17. Organized Dissonance and Emotionality: A Case Study of One Public Kindergarten in Moscow

    Konobeeva, E. A.

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates the organizational form of kindergarten through a particular case study. The article seeks to answer the question: how does kindergarten reconcile emotionality with formal rules and regulations, and how does this affect the structure of kindergarten as an organization? The features of bureaucratic and feminist…

  18. The future of organization development: A delphi study among Dutch experts

    Korten, F.; de Caluwe, L.I.A.; Geurts, J.

    2010-01-01

    From this Delphi study among Dutch experts, the future of organization development (OD) emerges as a loosely coupled community of practice, linking very diverse members, professionals as well as scholars. One finds different priorities and values in this community, some of them even dilemmatic. The

  19. Epilepsy and non-organic non-affective psychosis. National epidemiologic study

    Bredkjaer, S R; Mortensen, P B; Parnas, Josef

    1998-01-01

    : The incidences of the spectrum of non-organic non-affective psychosis, non-affective psychosis and schizophrenia were significantly increased both for men and women, even after exclusion of people diagnosed as suffering from a learning disability or substance misuse. CONCLUSION: This study supports the notion...

  20. The spatio-temporal organization of DNA-repair: a live cell study

    D. Hoogstraten (Deborah)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of the work outlined in this thesis is to gain more insight into the organization, dynamic properties and differential reaction kinetics of NER factors within living mammalian cell nuclei. To accomplish this, we made use of the green fluorescent protein technology to study TFIIH

  1. Organization development and performance improvement planning: a case study of STFA ENERCOM

    Düzgün, Alev

    1991-01-01

    Ankara : The Department of Management and the Graduate School of Business Administration of Bilkent Univ., 1991. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 1991. Includes bibliographical references. Organization Development is a guidance of the Performance Improvement Planning Method, which is widely used to operationalize organizational change. The fundemental assumption of this study is that the Process Consultation Technique is an effective means to facilitate organiz...

  2. Electronic Records Management and Archives in International Organizations: A RAMP Study with Guidelines.

    Dollar, Charles M.

    This study is a review of trends in information-handling technology and significant developments which are changing or will change the general environment within which archivists and records managers in international organizations will have to work. Trends in microelectronics, electronic storage, software, data transmission, computer architecture,…

  3. The Effects of Using Advance Organizers on Improving EFL Learners' Listening Comprehension: A Mixed Method Study

    Jafari, Khadijeh; Hashim, Fatimah

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of using two types of written advance organizers, key sentences and key vocabulary, on the improvement of EFL learners' listening comprehension. 108 second year university students at the higher and lower listening proficiency levels were randomly assigned to one control group and two experimental groups. Prior…

  4. Compromising social justice in fairtrade? : Case study of a fairtrade organization in India

    R. Das (Ranjana)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe study investigates whether Fair Trade Organizations (FTOs) are able to adhere to their principles of social justice and development goals as they enter mainstream markets which are dominated by neo-liberalism, unequal terms of trade and propagation of the "free market" principle.

  5. Mind the Gap: A Case Study of Values-Based Decision Making in a Nonprofit Organization

    Craft, Jana L.

    2013-01-01

    Using an exploratory case study approach, this research examined the consistency between espoused and enacted values within a large nonprofit organization known as an ethical leader in the human services industry. This research explored ethical business culture, ethical decision making, deontological and utilitarian moral paradigms and learning…

  6. NITRATE REDUCTION AND TRANSFORMATION IN ORGANIC COMPOST MEDIA: LABORATORY BATCH STUDIES

    We studied the effectiveness of three organic solid reactive media (cotton burr compost, mulch compost, and Canadian sphagnum peat) that may be potentially used in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) for groundwater nitrate removal. We aimed at answering the question about the na...

  7. Overview of surface study of fusion research in universities linkage organization, (2)

    Miyahara, Akira; Kamada, Kohji; Yamashina, Toshiro.

    1981-02-01

    Overview of surface material developments for fusion devices in university linkage organization has been described. Including subjects are surface properties investigations, surface diagnostics, coating technologies tritium related surface problems and permeation studies. Because surface material investigations are wide spread subjects, necessities of problem definitions from plasma physics side were recognized. (author)

  8. Pierre Bourdieu in management and organization studies-A citation context analysis and discussion of contributions

    Sieweke, Jost

    2014-01-01

    The work of the French sociologist Pierre Bourdieu has received increased attention in management and organization studies (MOS). However, the full potential of his work has so far rarely been exploited. This paper aims to pinpoint the contributions of Bourdieu's work to research in MOS. I conducted

  9. The strategic value of e-HRM: results from an exploratory study in a governmental organization

    Bondarouk, Tatiana; Ruel, Hubertus Johannes Maria

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents results from an exploratory study in a governmental organization on the strategic value of electronic human resource management (e-HRM). By applying the organizational capabilities approach, and by means of mixed research methods, data were collected on two generally acclaimed

  10. Transformation in Higher Education: A Case Study of Successful Organization Change and Rebirth

    Kirby, Janet A.

    2011-01-01

    This history and case study of the transformation of a private Catholic junior college to a branch campus of a private Catholic university system is one of successful organization change achieved through entrepreneurial leadership, resilient culture, teleological change processes, and sound business strategies. The use of the term…

  11. Studying culture in organizations : Not taking for granted the taken-for-granted

    Alvesson, Mats; Kärreman, Dan; Ybema, S.B.; Wilkinson, A.; Armstrong, S.J.; Lounsbury, M.

    2017-01-01

    In A. Wilkinson, S.J. Armstrong & M. Lounsbury (Eds.) . Oxford: Oxford University Press,   At the beginning of the 1980s the publication of several key books and special issues of journals in the field of organization and management studies heralded the arrival of a new field known today as

  12. Indicators for the dynamics of research organizations: A biomedical case study

    Braam, R.; van den Besselaar, P.A.A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports results on a bibliometric case study of the long-term development of research organizations, using an internationally leading biomedical institute as example. Using scientometric concepts, small group theory, organizational ecology, and process-based organizational theory, we

  13. CHARACTERIZATION OF MERCURY EMISSIONS AT A CHLOR-ALKALI PLANT: STUDY ORGANIZATION AND IMPLEMENTATION

    The paper describes the organization and implementation of a detailed emissions measurement campaign conducted over a 2-week period at the Olin Corporation's mercury chlor-alkali plant in Augusta, GA. (NOTE: Since data analysis is continuing, study results will be provided later...

  14. An experimental study to support the search for organics at Mars

    Poch, Olivier; Stalport, Fabien; Noblet, Audrey; Szopa, Cyril; Coll, Patrice

    2012-07-01

    Several evidences suggest that early Mars offered favorable conditions for long-term sustaining water. As a consequence, we can assume that processes related to prebiotic chemistry, and even the emergence of life, may have occurred on early Mars. In those days, organic matter may have been widespread on Mars, due to exogenous delivery from small bodies, or endogenous chemical processes. The search for these organic relics is one of the main objectives of Mars exploration missions to come. But for about 3 Gy, due to the harsh environmental conditions of the Mars surface (UV radiation, oxidants etc.), the inventory of organic compounds at the current surface or subsurface of Mars may have been narrowed. Two major questions raised by this putative evolution are: What is the evolution pattern of organics in the Martian environment? What types of molecules would have been preserved, and if so, in which conditions? We address these questions using an experimental device dedicated to simulate the processes susceptible to have an effect on organic matter in the current environmental conditions of the Mars surface and subsurface. This experimental setup is part of a project called MOMIE, for Mars Organic Molecules Irradiation and Evolution. We study the evolution of some of the most likely molecular compounds potentially synthesized or brought to Mars (amino acids, hydrocarbons, nucleobases etc.). Nanometers thin deposits of a molecular compound or of a mineral in which the molecular compound has been embedded are allowed to evolve at mean Martian pressure and temperature, under a UV radiation environment similar to the Martian one. Qualitative and quantitative changes of the sample are monitored during the simulation, especially using infrared spectroscopy. We will present and compare the evolution of several organics submitted to these conditions. These experiments will provide essential insights to guide and discuss in situ analyses at Mars, particularly during the

  15. Psychometric properties of the Intentions to Leave the Organization Scale (ILOS): a cross-cultural study

    Nisipeanu, Damar Sandbrand

    2015-01-01

    The focus of the present study is to introduce into organizational researches a new psychometric scale that identifies the intention of an employee to leave the company he works for, based only on external and internal aspects to the organization (e.g. payroll, work and life balance); aspects that could stimulate a person to leave or remain in his/her current job. The Intention to Leave the Organization Scale (ILOS) was built with 31 items, using the Likert Scale model, ranging from 1 – Total...

  16. Protein Dynamics in Organic Media at Varying Water Activity Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Wedberg, Nils Hejle Rasmus Ingemar; Abildskov, Jens; Peters, Günther H.J.

    2012-01-01

    In nonaqueous enzymology, control of enzyme hydration is commonly approached by fixing the thermodynamic water activity of the medium. In this work, we present a strategy for evaluating the water activity in molecular dynamics simulations of proteins in water/organic solvent mixtures. The method...... relies on determining the water content of the bulk phase and uses a combination of Kirkwood−Buff theory and free energy calculations to determine corresponding activity coefficients. We apply the method in a molecular dynamics study of Candida antarctica lipase B in pure water and the organic solvents...

  17. [Competency requirements for executives in healthcare and social services organizations: Results of a Delphi study].

    Pielach, Martin; Schubert, Hans-Joachim

    2018-02-07

    Leadership in social services and healthcare organizations is marked by high levels of complexity and contradiction, which cannot be fully explained by politically, economically, and socially induced changes. Rather, it is the particularities of service provision in healthcare and social services that confront executives with specific demands. This study aimed to capture and prioritize required leadership competencies in healthcare and social services organizations. A three-step Delphi study was conducted with executives and managerial staff, who are job holders and thus experts on their occupation. For the first step, an explorative qualitative approach was chosen to record general opinion without prior assumptions. The following two steps weighted and selected the competency requirements in step one using rating- and ranking procedures. Results of the Delphi inquiry imply high relevance of social and personal competencies. Approximately 66 % of the competencies assessed in round three were social and personal competencies. 12 out of the 15 highest rated competencies in Delphi step three can be assigned to these two competency categories. In contrast, the importance of professional as well as methodical competencies was rated as less important. Only two methodical competencies and one professional competency were rated as very important by the panel. Nevertheless, the importance of executive professional and methodical competencies in healthcare and social services organizations is emphasized by high ratings of the competencies "Sector-specific expertise" and "Analytical skills". The methodical competency "Analytical skills" was identified by the Delphi respondents as the most important competency requirement. Social and personal requirements are of primary importance for leadership in healthcare and social services organizations. These results mostly correspond to leadership requirements posited in the literature on leadership skills. Emphasis should be on the

  18. Subduction metamorphism in the Himalayan ultrahigh-pressure Tso Morari massif: An integrated geodynamic and petrological modelling approach

    Palin, Richard M.; Reuber, Georg S.; White, Richard W.; Kaus, Boris J. P.; Weller, Owen M.

    2017-06-01

    The Tso Morari massif is one of only two regions where ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphism of subducted crust has been documented in the Himalayan Range. The tectonic evolution of the massif is enigmatic, as reported pressure estimates for peak metamorphism vary from ∼2.4 GPa to ∼4.8 GPa. This uncertainty is problematic for constructing large-scale numerical models of the early stages of India-Asia collision. To address this, we provide new constraints on the tectonothermal evolution of the massif via a combined geodynamic and petrological forward-modelling approach. A prograde-to-peak pressure-temperature-time (P-T-t) path has been derived from thermomechanical simulations tailored for Eocene subduction in the northwestern Himalaya. Phase equilibrium modelling performed along this P-T path has described the petrological evolution of felsic and mafic components of the massif crust, and shows that differences in their fluid contents would have controlled the degree of metamorphic phase transformation in each during subduction. Our model predicts that peak P-T conditions of ∼2.6-2.8 GPa and ∼600-620 ∘C, representative of 90-100 km depth (assuming lithostatic pressure), could have been reached just ∼3 Myr after the onset of subduction of continental crust. This P-T path and subduction duration correlate well with constraints reported for similar UHP eclogite in the Kaghan Valley, Pakistan Himalaya, suggesting that the northwest Himalaya contains dismembered remnants of what may have been a ∼400-km-long UHP terrane comparable in size to the Western Gneiss Region, Norway, and the Dabie-Sulu belt, China. A maximum overpressure of ∼0.5 GPa was calculated in our simulations for a homogeneous crust, although small-scale mechanical heterogeneities may produce overpressures that are larger in magnitude. Nonetheless, the extremely high pressures for peak metamorphism reported by some workers (up to 4.8 GPa) are unreliable owing to conventional thermobarometry

  19. Conceptual study on HTGR-IS hydrogen supply system using organic hydrides

    Terada, Atsuhiko; Noguchi, Hiroki; Takegami, Hiroaki; Kamiji, Yu; Inagaki, Yoshiyuki

    2012-02-01

    We have proposed a hydrogen supply-chain system, which is a storage/supply system of large amount of hydrogen produced by HTGR-IS hydrogen production system. The organic chemical hydride method is one of the candidate techniques in the system for hydrogen storage and transportation. In this study, properties of organic hydrides and conventional hydrogen storage/supply system were surveyed to make use of the conceptual design of the hydrogen supply system using an organic hydrides method with VHTR-IS hydrogen production process (hydrogen production: 85,400 Nm 3 /h). Conceptual specifications of the main equipments were designed for the hydrogen supply system consisting of hydrogenation and dehydrogenation process. It was also clarified the problems of hydrogen supply system, such as energy efficiency and system optimization. (author)

  20. Study on the treatment of waste waster containing uranium by organic modified vermiculite

    Liu Wenjuan; Zeng Yanhong

    2012-01-01

    The adsorption capability of uranium on organic modified Vermiculite was studied. The influence factors of the amount of adsorbent, initial pH, initial concentration of uranium and adsorption time have been investigated too. Through the orthogonal test, the primary factors of impacting the adsorption treatment can be obtained. Finally, the preliminary research and analysis on the principle adsorption of organic modified vermiculite test of uranium have been conducted. The results show that: Modifying Vermiculite by CTMAB makes Vermiculite adsorption capacity stronger when treating solution containing uranium. Combined flocculants with vermiculite to treat with low concentration of uranium solution has synergy, significantly enhancing its adsorption capacity. The impact factors of organic modified vermiculite's adsorption of uranium are adsorbent dosage, pH, initial concentration of uranium solution and adsorption time. The best adsorption pH is between 5∼6.5. (authors)