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Sample records for orbital radiotherapy ocena

  1. Radiotherapy of lymphoid diseases of the orbit

    Austin-Seymour, M.M.; Donaldson, S.S.; Egbert, P.R.; McDougall, I.R.; Kriss, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    Thirty-two patients with orbital pseudotumor (18), reactive lymphoid hyperplasia (2), atypical lymphoid infiltrate (4) or malignant lymphoma (8) were treated in the Division of Radiation Therapy at Stanford University between January 1973 and May 1983. Of the 20 patients with pseudotumor or reactive lymphoid hyperplasia, 10 had unilateral lesions and 10 had bilateral lesions. Biopsy samples were obtained in 15 patients; in five patients with bilateral disease the diagnosis was made on the basis of computed tomography (CT) and clinical findings. The majority of patients were referred because of disease refractory to treatment with corticosteroids. The patients were given a mean dose of 2360 rad using complex, individualized megavoltage techniques including lens shielding. Radiotherapy was well tolerated with no significant acute or late complications. Fifteen patients had complete resolution of symptoms after treatment; five had continued symptoms. Of the 12 patients with malignant lymphoma or atypical lymphoid infiltrate, four had systemic lymphoma with orbital involvement and eight had orbital involvement only. A mean dose of 3625 rad was delivered to the orbit only. Most of the patients received complex megavoltage treatment using bolus. All patients in this group had a complete response and local control. Two patients developed cataracts. Carefullly planned orbital radiotherapy provides local control without symptomatic sequelae for orbital masses ranging from pseudotumor to malignant lymphoma

  2. Radiotherapy in the management of orbital lymphoma

    Bolek, Timothy W.; Moyses, H. Michael; Marcus, Robert B.; Gorden, Lemuel; Maiese, Russell L.; Almasri, Nidal M.; Mendenhall, Nancy Price

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: This retrospective study reviews the treatment technique, disease outcome, and complications of radiotherapy used in the management of lymphoma involving the orbits. Patients and Methods: Thirty-eight patients were treated between May 1969 and January 1995, with a median follow-up of 8.3 years. All patients had biopsy-proven orbital lymphoma. Twenty patients who had limited disease were treated with curative intent, and 18 patients who had known systemic disease were treated with palliative intent. Of the 20 patients treated with curative intent, 14 had low-grade and 6 had intermediate- or high-grade disease. None received chemotherapy. Most patients received treatment with 250 kVP or 60 Co radiation, using either an en face anterior field or wedged anterior and lateral fields. Median treatment dose was 25 Gy. Lens shielding was performed if possible. For patients treated for cure, cause-specific survival and freedom from distant relapse were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Control of disease in the orbit was achieved in all but 1 patient, who developed an out-of-field recurrence after irradiation of a lacrimal tumor and was salvaged with further radiotherapy. In the patients treated curatively, the 5-year rate of actuarial freedom from distant relapse was 61% for those with low-grade and 33% for those with intermediate/high-grade disease (p = 0.08). Cause-specific survival at 5 years was 89% for patients with low-grade and 33% for those with intermediate/high-grade disease (p = 0.005). Two patients with low-grade disease had contralateral orbital failures; both were salvaged with further irradiation. Acute toxicity was minimal. Cataracts developed in 7 of 21 patients treated without lens shielding and 0 of 17 patients treated with lens shielding. No patient developed significant late lacrimal toxicity. Conclusion: Radiotherapy is a safe and effective local treatment in the management of orbital lymphoma

  3. Radiotherapy in the management of orbital lymphoma

    Bolek, Timothy W.; Moyses, H. Michael; Marcus, Robert B.; Mendenhall, Nancy Price

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: This retrospective study reviews the treatment technique, disease outcome and complications of radiotherapy used in the management of lymphoma involving the orbits. Materials and Methods: Thirty-eight patients were treated between May 1969 and January 1995 with a median follow-up of 8.3 years. All patients had biopsy-proven orbital lymphoma. Therapy was delivered with curative intent in 20 patients and with palliative intent in 18 patients who had known systemic disease. Of the 20 patients treated with curative intent, 14 had low-grade and 6 had intermediate or high-grade disease. None received chemotherapy. Most patients received treatment with 250 kVP or 60 Co X rays, using either an en face anterior field or wedged anterior and lateral fields. Treatment dose ranged from 5 to 53 Gy with a median of 25 Gy. Lens shielding was performed using either a lead contact lens or a hanging brass shield. For patients treated for cure, cause-specific survival and freedom from distant relapse were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Control of disease in the orbit was achieved in all but 1 patient, who developed an out-of-field recurrence after irradiation of a lacrimal tumor. This patient was salvaged with further radiotherapy. In the patients treated curatively, 5 year actuarial freedom from distant relapse was 61% for those with low-grade and 33% for those with intermediate/high-grade disease (p = 0.08). Cause-specific survival at 5 years was 89% for patients with low-grade and 33% for those with intermediate/high grade disease (p = 0.005). There were 2 contralateral orbital failures, both in patients with low-grade disease, and both patients were salvaged with further irradiation. Treatment failed in nodal sites alone in 4 patients, and none were salvaged. Relapses occurred in both nodal and extra nodal sites in 3 patients, and 2 of them were treated successfully with chemotherapy. Acute toxicity was minimal. Cataracts developed in 7 of 21

  4. Supervoltage orbital radiotherapy for progressive Graves' ophthalmopathy

    Kriss, J.P.; McDougall, I.R.; Petersen, I.A.; Donaldson, S.S.

    1989-01-01

    Since 1968 we have employed supervoltage orbital radiation as treatment for severe progressive Graves' ophthalmopathy. A numerical ophthalmic index was used to asess pre- and post-treatment serverity. In the past 20 years we have treated 311 patients of whom 275 have been followed for ≤ 1 year or until any eye surgery was performed. An orbital radiation dosage of 2000 rads in 2 weeks was used for the majority of patients (Series I and III). Series II patients received an orbital dose of 3000 rads in 3 weeks. Demographic differences were observed between these series, thus mandating presentation of the results of each separately. Analyses excluded any result achieved by any post-radiation surgical procedure on the eyes. Post-theraphy worsening of ophtalmopathy occurred in only 29 of 1025 observations. Improvement or complete resolution was observed within each category of eye involvement, but lack of favorable response was also recorded in significant numbers. Improvement in proptosis occurred with the lowest frequency and magnitude. About 30% of the patients required eye muscle surgery to correct residual diplopia. Analysis of the data by step-wise linear regression analysis enabled us a. to derive formulae predicting the problable response to radiation therapy according to sign and severity, and b. identify parameters which diminished the likelihood or the extent of a favorable response. The latter included male sex, never thyrotoxic, age greater than 60 years, and requirement for concomitant treatment for hyperthyroidism. No long-term adverse reactions attributable to the radiotherapy have been observed. We conclude that supervoltage orbital radiotherapy, combined with later eye muscle surgery if necessary, is an effective treatment strategy for progressive Graves' ophthalmopathy. (author)

  5. Curative radiotherapy for primary orbital lymphoma

    Bhatia, Sudershan; Paulino, Arnold C.; Buatti, John M.; Mayr, Nina A.; Wen, B.-C.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To review our institutional experience with primary orbital lymphoma and determine the prognostic factors for survival, local control, and distant metastases. In addition, we also analyzed the risk factors for complications in the radiotherapeutic management of this tumor. Methods and Materials: Between 1973 and 1998, 47 patients (29 women [62%] and 18 men [38%], median age 69 years, range 32-89) with Stage IAE orbital lymphoma were treated with curative intent at one department. Five had bilateral orbital involvement. The tumor was located in the eyelid and extraocular muscles in 23 (44%), conjunctiva in 17 (33%), and lacrimal apparatus in 12 (23%). The histologic features according to the World Heath Organization classification of lymphoid neoplasms was follicular lymphoma in 25, extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue type in 8, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in 12, mantle cell lymphoma in 6, and peripheral T-cell lymphoma in 1. For the purposes of comparison with the existing literature on orbital lymphomas, the grading system according to the Working Formulation was also recorded. The histologic grade was low in 33 (63%), intermediate in 18 (35%), and high in 1 (2%). All patients were treated with primary radiotherapy alone. The median dose for low-grade tumors was 3000 cGy (range 2000-4020); the median dose for intermediate and high-grade tumors was 4000 cGy (range 3000-5100). A lens-sparing approach was used in 19 patients (37%). Late complications for the lens and cornea were scored according to the subjective, objective, management, and analytic (SOMA) scale of the Late Effects of Normal Tissue (LENT) scoring system. The median follow-up was 55 months (range 6-232). Results: The local control rate was 100% in the 52 orbits treated. The 5-year overall survival and relapse-free survival rate was 73.6% and 65.5%, respectively. Tumor grade and location did not predict for overall survival or relapse-free survival

  6. Orbital lymphoma: radiotherapy outcome and complications

    Stafford, Scott L.; Kozelsky, Timothy F.; Garrity, James A.; Kurtin, Paul J.; Leavitt, Jacqueline A.; Martenson, James A.; Habermann, Thomas M.

    2001-01-01

    Background and purpose: Orbital non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) have traditionally been treated with radiation. Forty-eight patients presenting with orbital NHL were treated with radiation and were evaluated for local control, overall survival, cause-specific survival, and complications. Materials and methods: Forty-five patients had low-grade and 3 patients had intermediate-grade histologic findings. Orbit-only disease occurred in 22 patients, the conjunctiva in 16, both in five, and lacrimal gland only in five. Patient age ranged from 35 to 94 years (median, 68). Ann Arbor stages were cIEA (34), cIIEA (six), cIIIEA (two), and cIVEA (six). Radiation doses ranged between 15 and 53.8 Gy (median, 27.5 Gy). Results: Follow-up ranged from 0.14 to 18.23 years (median, 5.35). Median overall survival and cause-specific survival were 6.5 and 15.5 years, respectively. Patients with clinical stage I or II disease had significantly better overall and cause-specific survival than patients with stage III or IV disease. Ten-year relapse-free survival in 41 patients with stage I or II disease was 66%. However, there was continued downward pressure on relapse-free survival out to 18 years. One local failure occurred. Twenty-five patients sustained acute complications. There were 17 minor and four major late complications. All major late complications occurred with doses more than 35 Gy. Conclusions: Excellent local control with radiation doses ranging from 15 to 30 Gy is achieved. Patients with stage I or II disease have better overall and cause-specific survival than patients with stage III or IV disease. Late relapse occurs in sites other than the treated orbit, even in patients with early-stage disease. Doses 35 Gy or higher result in significant late complications and are therefore not indicated for patients with low-grade tumors

  7. Effects of orbital radiotherapy in 199 cases of Graves' ophthalmopathy

    Beckendorf, Veronique; Bey, Pierre; George, Jean Louis; Maalouf, Toufic; Leclere, Jacques; Werhya, Gerard; Luporsi, Elisabeth

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Retrospective study to assess response of Graves' orbitopathy to standardized retrobulbar radiotherapy. Effects on different classes of signs are analysed and prognostic factors are searched. Indications of this treatment can be precise. Materials and methods: One hundred and ninety-nine consecutive patients who had clinically progressive Graves'orbitopathy were treated with radiotherapy between 1977 and 1996. All patients received a 6 MV Xrays orbital irradiation of 20 Gy in 10 fractions and 2 weeks. Signs and symptoms were classified before and after treatment directly or retrospectively according to the 'NO SPECS' recommended classification [J Clin Endocrinol Metab 1977;44:203]. Index of ophthalmopathy and responses were evaluated as described by Donaldson [J Clin Endocrinol Metab 1973;37:276]. Prognostic factors such as age, gender, therapies and response of hyperthyroidism, duration and associated treatment of eye disease are analysed. An investigation through letters sent to the patients and their ophthalmologists documents long term outcome of 128 patients with a mean follow-up of 6 years (2 to 16 years). Results: On 195 evaluable patients, 50 (26%) achieved a good or excellent response -GER-, 98 (50 %) had slight improvement, 37 (19 %) were stable, 10 (5 %) had progression of Grave's ophthalmopathy. By class of signs, GER occurred in 37%, 34%, 38%, 37.5% of cases, respectively for soft tissues involvement, proptosis, extra ocular muscle involvement and optic neuropathy. Corneal involvements yields the best results with 49% GER. Proptosis when moderate form had good results (55% GER), but advanced presentations had poor responses (17% GER). Proptosis decreased of 1 to 3 mm or remained stable. Six patients treated for optic neuropathy experienced aggravation. Same efficacy was observed when radiotherapy was applied as first line therapy or after failure of corticosteroids and when radiotherapy was delayed up to one year after beginning of

  8. Radiotherapy of indolent orbital lymphomas. Two radiation concepts

    Koenig, Laila; Stade, Robert; Rieber, Juliane; Debus, Juergen; Herfarth, Klaus [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Abteilung RadioOnkologie und Strahlentherapie, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    The aim of this work was to retrospectively analyze efficacy, toxicity, and relapse rates of conventional (CRT) and low-dose radiotherapy (LDRT) in patients with indolent orbital lymphomas. From 1987-2014, 45 patients (median age 64 years) with 52 lesions of indolent orbital lymphomas were treated with CRT (median dose 36 Gy, range 26-46 Gy) and 7 patients (median age 75 years) with 8 lesions were treated with LDRT (2 fractions of 2.0 Gy). Median follow-up was 133 months (range 2-329 months) in the CRT group and 25 months (range 10-41 months) in the LDRT group. Overall response rates were 97.7 % (CRT) and 100 % (LDRT). The 2- and 5-year local progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 93.5 and 88.6 %, distant PFS 95.0 and 89.9 %, and overall survival 100 and 85.6 % after CRT. In the LDRT group, 2-year local PFS and overall survival remained 100 %, respectively, and distant PFS 68.6 %. Acute radiotherapy-related complications (grades 1-2) were detected in virtually all eyes treated with CRT. Cataracts developed in only patients who were irradiated with more than 34 Gy. LDRT was well tolerated with only mild acute and late complications. Primary radiotherapy of indolent orbital lymphomas is an effective treatment with high response rates and excellent local control in CRT and LDRT. In combination with close follow-up, LDRT may be an attractive alternative since re-irradiation even with conventional doses is still feasible. (orig.) [German] Ziel der Arbeit war die Analyse von Effektivitaet, Nebenwirkungen und Rezidivraten nach konventioneller (CRT) und Niedrigdosisbestrahlung (LDRT) indolenter Orbitalymphome. Retrospektiv evaluiert wurden 45 zwischen 1987 und 2014 behandelte Patienten (medianes Alter 64 Jahre) mit insgesamt 52 Laesionen indolenter Orbitalymphome, die mittels CRT (mediane Dosis 36 Gy, 26-46 Gy) therapiert wurden.; 7 Patienten mit insgesamt 8 Laesionen erhielten eine LDRT (2 x 2,0 Gy). Das mediane Follow-Up betrug 133 Monate (2-239 Monate) in der CRT

  9. Kimura's Disease of the Orbit Successfully Treated with Radiotherapy Alone: A Case Report

    Yoshio Monzen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We performed radiotherapy in a 28-year-old patient with Kimura's disease of the orbit. Irradiation with 21.6 Gy was administered to the tumor bed with a single dose of 1.8 Gy in 5 weekly fractions delivered via a high-energy linear accelerator (6-MV X-ray. Complete remission of the tumor and improvements in the neurological findings were achieved. Neither tumor regrowth nor late complications were detected up to 84 months after radiotherapy. Radiotherapy is an effective treatment for Kimura's disease of the orbit.

  10. Reduced risk of compressive optic neuropathy using orbital radiotherapy in patients with active thyroid eye disease.

    Shams, Pari N; Ma, Roy; Pickles, Tom; Rootman, Jack; Dolman, Peter J

    2014-06-01

    To compare the risk of developing compressive optic neuropathy in patients with active thyroid eye disease (TED) treated with corticosteroids with or without orbital radiotherapy. Retrospective single-center case-control study. The clinical charts of 351 patients with active TED who received corticosteroids with or without orbital radiotherapy between 1999 and 2010 were reviewed. Patients with compressive optic neuropathy at the time of presentation were excluded. Group 1 received corticosteroids only and Group 2 received corticosteroids as well as orbital radiotherapy. The primary outcome measure was the development of compressive optic neuropathy. Secondary outcome measures were changes in other parameters indicating the activity of TED, including soft tissue inflammation, diplopia, ocular motility restriction, and appearance. There were 144 cases in Group 1 and 105 in Group 2. Both groups were matched for age, sex, and stability of thyroid function. The 2 groups differed only in the modality of treatment for active TED. The main indication for treatment in both groups was soft tissue inflammation. Corticosteroids were initiated an average of 2.6 months following symptom onset in Group 1 and 2.5 months in Group 2. Group 2 received orbital radiotherapy on average 4.2 months following the initiation of corticosteroid therapy and 8% (9/105) were intolerant to corticosteroids. At an average of 3.2 years follow-up, compressive optic neuropathy had developed in 17% (25/144) of Group 1 and 0% of Group 2 (P optic neuropathy was significantly lower and improvement in ocular motility greater in patients receiving orbital radiotherapy in addition to corticosteroids. Patients with active TED appear to have an effective and sustained response to orbital radiotherapy combined with corticosteroids that is protective against disease progression and the development of compressive optic neuropathy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The evaluation of results and complications of radiotherapy in children treated for orbital rhabdomyosarcoma

    Skowronska-Gardas, A.; Pedziwiatr, K.; Chojnacka, M.

    2002-01-01

    To analyse treatment results and late complications of radiotherapy in children treated for orbital rhabdomyosarcoma. Between the years 1980 and 2000 34 children (median age 7 yrs. range: 1-15) with orbital RMS, were treated in the 1st Department of the MCCMCC in Warsaw. All but two of the patients received induction chemotherapy; 3 children were treated after ablative surgery (exenteration); 6 children were irradiated due to recurrence after chemotherapy. All the children were treated with megavoltage radiotherapy from a Co-60 unit or linear accelerator. We applied individual lens and lacrimal apparatus shielding in 16 patients. Five children, treated between 1996-2000, received conformal radiotherapy, with CT and 3-D treatment planning system.To obtain information about late side effects, we developed a questionnaire, including questions about the status of the affected eye, appearance of the orbit and facial structures.Thirty one patients (91%) are still living (between 24 and 264 months - median 138 mos) after completion of radiotherapy and 28 (82%) with no recurrence. In six patients treated due to recurrent tumour OS and DFS was 80% and 60%, respectively. Late complications were evaluated in 24 patients. We observed lacrimal duct stenosis in 33%, cataract in 29%, enophtalmos in 20% of patients. Retinopathy developed in 2 children, glaucoma in 2 pts, and facial asymmetry in 3 pts. In one case enucleation of blind eye was performed. Thirteen children have preserved adequate vision in the treated eye. In children treated with conformal radiotherapy we did not observe any late complications. Radiotherapy in orbital RMS allows to obtain good local control and excellent survival rate. Late complications could be limited with the application of individual treatment planning and conformal radiotherapy. (author)

  12. Orbital Radiotherapy Combined With Corticosteroid Treatment for Thyroid Eye Disease-Compressive Optic Neuropathy.

    Gold, Katherine G; Scofield, Stacy; Isaacson, Steven R; Stewart, Michael W; Kazim, Michael

    To evaluate the effectiveness of orbital radiotherapy (ORT) in the treatment of thyroid eye disease (TED)-compressive optic neuropathy. A retrospective review of patients with corticosteroid-responsive compressive optic neuropathy due to TED treated with ORT. Study was conducted in compliance with Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. One hundred four patients (163 orbits) with a mean age of 61.7 years met inclusion criteria. Seventy-four percent (77/104) were female, and 32.7% (34/104) were current or previous smokers. A total absorbed dose of 2000 cGy fractionated in 10 treatment doses over the course of 2 weeks was administered to the retroocular tissues according to a standard protocol. The primary end point was failure of ORT, defined as persistent optic neuropathy following completion of radiotherapy that mandated urgent orbital decompression surgery. Ninety-eight of 104 (94%) patients or 152 of 163 (93.3%) orbits did not require orbital decompression surgery during the acute phase. Patients who responded successfully to ORT had similar improvements in visual acuity, color vision, Humphrey threshold visual field testing, and afferent pupillary defects compared with patients who failed ORT and underwent urgent decompression surgery. Only 36.7% of successfully treated patients ultimately underwent elective surgery, including orbital decompression, strabismus, or eyelid surgery, during the inactive phase of TED. The data from this study, the largest retrospective review reported to date, supports the use of ORT in eyes with corticosteroid-responsive TED-compressive optic neuropathy. ORT may favorably alter the natural history of active-phase TED by preventing recurrent compressive optic neuropathy after withdrawal of corticosteroids.

  13. Supervoltage orbital radiotherapy for progressive Graves' ophthalmopathy; Results of a twenty-year experience

    Kriss, J.P.; McDougall, I.R. (Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford Medical Center, Palo Alto, California (USA)); Petersen, I.A.; Donaldson, S.S. (Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford Medical Center, Palo Alto, California (USA))

    1989-01-01

    Since 1968 we have employed supervoltage orbital radiation as treatment for severe progressive Graves' ophthalmopathy. A numerical ophthalmic index was used to asess pre- and post-treatment serverity. In the past 20 years we have treated 311 patients of whom 275 have been followed for {le} 1 year or until any eye surgery was performed. An orbital radiation dosage of 2000 rads in 2 weeks was used for the majority of patients (Series I and III). Series II patients received an orbital dose of 3000 rads in 3 weeks. Demographic differences were observed between these series, thus mandating presentation of the results of each separately. Analyses excluded any result achieved by any post-radiation surgical procedure on the eyes. Post-theraphy worsening of ophtalmopathy occurred in only 29 of 1025 observations. Improvement or complete resolution was observed within each category of eye involvement, but lack of favorable response was also recorded in significant numbers. Improvement in proptosis occurred with the lowest frequency and magnitude. About 30% of the patients required eye muscle surgery to correct residual diplopia. Analysis of the data by step-wise linear regression analysis enabled us a. to derive formulae predicting the problable response to radiation therapy according to sign and severity, and b. identify parameters which diminished the likelihood or the extent of a favorable response. The latter included male sex, never thyrotoxic, age greater than 60 years, and requirement for concomitant treatment for hyperthyroidism. No long-term adverse reactions attributable to the radiotherapy have been observed. We conclude that supervoltage orbital radiotherapy, combined with later eye muscle surgery if necessary, is an effective treatment strategy for progressive Graves' ophthalmopathy. (author).

  14. Results of radiotherapy in patients with stage I orbital non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Letschert, J.G.J.; Gonzalez Gonzalez, D.; Oskam, J.; Koornneef, L.; Dijk, J.D.P. van; Boukes, R.; Bras, J.

    1991-01-01

    The results of radiotherapy in early stage orbital non-Hodgkin's lymphoma are described. From 1970-1985, 33 orbital localizations in 30 patients were treated. Total dose applied ranged from 21-57 Gy (2 Gy/fraction), 2/3 off all patients received a 40 Gy dose. Complete response rate was 94% and 10 years actuarial survival was 90%; between patients with low grade or intermediate grade lymphoma no significant difference in survival was observed. No local recurrence was detected during follow up and 20% of the patients developed generalized disease. Two optic nerve neuropathies and 3 retinopathies were observed in 5 patients, 4 of these occurred at a dose level of less than 43 Gy. Keratitis occurred in 58% of the patients treated, a sicca syndrome in 30% and cataract of different grades in 58%. Although local control was excellent, severe complications were observed in 13% of the patients who received a dose of less than 43 Gy. (author). 35 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs

  15. Radiotherapy

    Prosnitz, L.R.; Kapp, D.S.; Weissberg, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    This review highlights developments over the past decade in radiotherapy and attempts to summarize the state of the art in the management of the major diseases in which radiotherapy has a meaningful role. The equipment, radiobiology of radiotherapy and carcinoma of the lung, breast and intestines are highlighted

  16. Radiotherapy

    Rema Jyothirmayi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Conservative treatment in the form of limited surgery and post-operative radiotherapy is controversial in hand and foot sarcomas, both due to poor radiation tolerance of the palm and sole, and due to technical difficulties in achieving adequate margins.This paper describes the local control and survival of 41 patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the hand or foot treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy. The acute and late toxicity of megavoltage radiotherapy to the hand and foot are described. The technical issues and details of treatment delivery are discussed. The factors influencing local control after radiotherapy are analysed.

  17. Metastatic breast cancer in the eye and orbit, use three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. Our first experience

    Correa Pablos, Tamara; Caceres Toledo, Maria

    2009-01-01

    The eye and orbit metastases are a significant clinical problem, both by the inability and the deterioration in the quality of life that occur. The most common malignant tumors in the eye and orbit is metastasis. Cancer breast cancer is the most common tumor metastatic to the eye and orbit in a 40% and 50% of cases according to different series. With the introduction of Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in our hospital from In 2007 we were able to treat patients with cancer different regions with the technique (2D) was impossible because caused irreparable damage to surrounding healthy tissue in this way thanks to potential of 3D technology to shape the planning volume will ensure greater protection for critical organs. (Author)

  18. Radiotherapy

    Zedgenidze, G.A.; Kulikov, V.A.; Mardynskij, Yu.S.

    1984-01-01

    The technique for roentgenotopometric and medicamentous preparation of patients for radiotherapy has been reported in detail. The features of planning and performing of remote, intracavitary and combined therapy in urinary bladder cancer are considered. The more effective methods of radiotherapy have been proposed taking into account own experience as well as literature data. The comparative evaluation of treatment results and prognosis are given. Radiation pathomorphism of tumors and tissues of urinary bladder is considered in detail. The problems of diagnosis, prophylaxis and treatment of complications following radiodiagnosis and radiotherapy in patients with urinary bladder cancer are illustrated widely

  19. Radiotherapy With or Without Surgery for Patients With Idiopathic Sclerosing Orbital Inflammation Refractory or Intolerant to Steroid Therapy

    Lee, Jong Hoon; Kim, Yeon-Sil; Yang, Suk Woo; Cho, Won-Kyung; Lee, Sang Nam; Lee, Kyung Ji; Ryu, Mi-Ryeong; Jang, Hong Seok

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes of patients with idiopathic sclerosing orbital inflammation (ISOI) treated with radiotherapy with or without surgery. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 22 patients with histopathologically confirmed ISOI who had been refractory or intolerant to steroid therapy and treated with radiation with or without surgery. The radiation dose ranged from 20 to 40 Gy (median, 20 Gy) at 2 Gy per fraction. Presenting signs and treatment outcomes were assessed. Results: Proptosis was the most common sign at presentation, seen in 19 (86.3%) patients, followed by restriction of extraocular movements in 10 (45.4%) patients. Response to radiotherapy was complete in 15 (68.1%) patients, partial in 3 (13.6%) patients, and none in 4 (18.2%) patients. At the median follow-up of 34 months, 14 (63.6%) patients had progression-free state of symptoms and signs, with the progression-free duration ranging from 3 to 75 months (median, 41.5 months), whereas 8 (36.4%) patients had recurrent or persistent disease although they had received radiotherapy. Of the 14 progression-free patients, 6 underwent a bimodality treatment of debulking surgery of ocular disease and radiotherapy. They had had no recurrent disease. Cataract was the most common late complications, and 2 patients experienced a Grade 3 cataract. Conclusion: Our study suggests that for patients with ISOI who are refractory or intolerant to steroid therapy, 20 Gy of radiotherapy appears to be effective for the control of disease with acceptable complications, especially when it is combined with surgery.

  20. Radiotherapy

    Wannenmacher, M.; Debus, J.; Wenz, F.

    2006-01-01

    The book is focussed on the actual knowledge on the clinical radiotherapy and radio-oncology. Besides fundamental and general contributions specific organ systems are treated in detail. The book contains the following contributions: Basic principles, radiobiological fundamentals, physical background, radiation pathology, basics and technique of brachytherapy, methodology and technique of the stereotactic radiosurgery, whole-body irradiation, operative radiotherapy, hadron therapy, hpyerthermia, combined radio-chemo-therapy, biometric clinical studies, intensity modulated radiotherapy, side effects, oncological diagnostics; central nervous system and sense organs, head-neck carcinomas, breast cancer, thorax organs, esophagus carcinoma, stomach carcinoma, pancreas carcinoma, heptabiliary cancer and liver metastases, rectal carcinomas, kidney and urinary tract, prostate carcinoma, testicular carcinoma, female pelvis, lymphatic system carcinomas, soft tissue carcinoma, skin cancer, bone metastases, pediatric tumors, nonmalignant diseases, emergency in radio-oncology, supporting therapy, palliative therapy

  1. Radiotherapy.

    Krause, Sonja; Debus, Jürgen; Neuhof, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Solitary plasmocytoma occurring in bone (solitary plasmocytoma of the bone, SBP) or in soft tissue (extramedullary plasmocytoma, EP) can be treated effectively and with little toxicity by local radiotherapy. Ten-year local control rates of up to 90% can be achieved. Patients with multiple myeloma often suffer from symptoms such as pain or neurological impairments that are amenable to palliative radiotherapy. In a palliative setting, short treatment schedules and lower radiation doses are used to reduce toxicity and duration of hospitalization. In future, low-dose total body irradiation (TBI) may play a role in a potentially curative regimen with nonmyeloablative conditioning followed by allogenic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

  2. Orbits

    Xu, Guochang

    2008-01-01

    This is the first book of the satellite era which describes orbit theory with analytical solutions of the second order with respect to all possible disturbances. Based on such theory, the algorithms of orbits determination are completely revolutionized.

  3. Radiotherapy

    Pistenma, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    The need for radiotherapy research is exemplified by the 100,000 cancer patients who will fail treatment locally and/or regionally annually for the next several years but who would benefit from better local treatment modalities. Theoretically, all of the areas of investigation discussed in this projection paper have the potential to significantly improve local-regional treatment of cancer by radiotherapy alone or in combination with other modalities. In many of the areas of investigation discussed in this paper encouraging results have been obtained in cellular and animal tumor studies and in limited studies in humans as well. In the not too distant future the number of patients who would benefit from better local control may increase by tens of thousands if developments in chemotherapy and/or immunotherapy provide a means to eradicate disseminated microscopic foci of cancer. Thus the efforts to improve local-regional control take on even greater significance

  4. Orbital

    Yourshaw, Matthew Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Orbital is a virtual reality gaming experience designed to explore the use of traditional narrative structure to enhance immersion in virtual reality. The story structure of Orbital was developed based on the developmental steps of 'The Hero's Journey,' a narrative pattern identified by Joseph Campbell. Using this standard narrative pattern, Orbital is capable of immersing the player quickly and completely for the entirety of play time. MFA

  5. Visual sensations during megavoltage radiotherapy to the orbit attributable to Cherenkov radiation

    Newman, Francis; Asadi-Zeydabadi, Masoud; Durairaj, Vikram D.; Ding Meisong; Stuhr, Kelly; Kavanagh, Brian

    2008-01-01

    During megavoltage photon and electron beam radiotherapy treatment involving the eye, patients commonly report visual sensations; 'nerve stimulation' is the conventional explanation. We propose that the phenomenon can be attributed to Cherenkov radiation inside the eye. The threshold electron energy for Cherenkov radiation in water is 260 keV. The human retina is able to perceive approximately 5-14 visible photons in 0.001 s. A single 500 keV electron traversing 1 mm of water will induce nearly 15 Cherenkov visible range photons. We propose that a portal image involving the eye will produce sufficient Cherenkov radiation to be detected by the retina

  6. Ocena urodynamiczna nietrzymania moczu po radykalnej prostatektomii - studium przypadku

    Rafał Święcicki

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Nietrzymanie moczu po radykalnej prostatektomii we wczesnym okresie po zabiegu występuje u około 30% operowanych, natomiast w okresie późnym, ponad rok po zabiegu, objawy wysiłkowego nietrzymania moczu utrzymują się u około 5% badanych chorych. Obiektywnych danych na temat przyczyn i nasilenia nietrzymania moczu może dostarczyć kompleksowe badanie urodynamiczne. Zasadnicze znaczenie dla rokowania zależne jest od stopnia dysfunkcji aparatu zwieraczowego. Cel pracy: Celem pracy była ocena możliwości diagnostycznych pooperacyjnego nietrzymania moczu u chorego po prostatektomii radykalnej, na podstawie diagnostyki urodynamicznej. Materia! i metody: W pracowni urodynamicznej 10. Wojskowego Szpitala Klinicznego z Polikliniką (WSKzP wykonano kompleksowe badanie urodynamiczne u chorego skarżącego się na nietrzymanie moczu 12 miesięcy po radykalnej prostatektomii. W ramach badania wykonano przepływ cewkowy, cystometrię, badanie ciśnieniowo-przepływowe oraz profiłometrię spoczynkową. Wyniki: Maksymalne ciśnienie zamknięcia cewki moczowej było wyraźnie obniżone, do wartości 8 cm H20, c o sugerowało obecność wysiłkowego nietrzymania moczu. Stwierdzono również objawy niestabilności wypieracza oraz cechy uszkodzenia mechanizmu zwieraczowego. Wynik ten miał duże znaczenie dla dalszych możliwości leczenia chorego. Wnioski: Kompleksowe badanie urodynamiczne ma istotne znaczenie w diagnozowaniu chorych z pooperacyjnym nietrzymaniu moczu.

  7. Ocena potresne odpornosti družinske hiše v Grosuplju

    Žitnik, Luka

    2017-01-01

    V diplomski nalogi je predstavljena ocena potresne odpornosti zidane hiše v Grosuplju. Potresno analizo smo izvedli z metodo horizontalnih sil na podlagi zahtev, ki jih podajata standarda Evrokod 6 in Evrokod 8. Diploma je razdeljena na teoretični in praktični del. V teoretičnem delu so predstavljeni postopki za določitev potresne obtežbe, račun nosilnosti posameznih zidov ter oceno odpornosti celotne konstrukcije. Povečanje obremenitve zaradi vpliva slučajne ekscentričnosti smo upoštevali na...

  8. Quality of life assessment in patients with Graves' disease and progressive infiltrative ophthalmopathy during combined treatment with methylprednisolone and orbital radiotherapy

    Kulig, G.; Andrysiak-Mamos, E.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of the study was to assess quality of life (QoL) in patients with infiltrative form of Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO) during the combined pulse treatment with methylprednisolone and orbital radiotherapy, and also to search for the relation between the results of ophthalmopathy treatment and changes in QoL. Material and methods: The study involved 29 patients aged 25-74 (the mean age: 52 ±6 years) with infiltrative form of GO. They were classified for ophthalmopathy treatment on the basis of the following factors: the obtained euthyreosis, progressive character of eye changes, the level of eye changes determined on the basis of NO SPECS classification (at least class 3c), ophthalmopathy index (OI) according to Donaldson. 4. GO was diagnosed as active if CAS (clinical activity score) . 4. During the treatment, the patients received 6 cycles of methylprednisolone sodium succinate in doses of 1,0 g/24 h given as one-hour-long intravenous infusions for three successive days in a week. Between the 2 nd and 4 th cycle of Solu-Medrol, orbital radiotherapy with 10 MeV X-rays was performed. The control group was made up of healthy volunteers selected with regard to sex, age, educational background and nicotine addiction so as they corresponded with the study group. It involved 53 individuals aged 21-75 (the mean age: 52,4 ±14 years). QoL was assessed by means of the MOS SF-36 estionnaire. Results: Patients with GO evaluated their QoL lower than healthy individuals, which referred to physical functioning, physical and emotional role functioning, general health, vitality, social functioning, mental health and bodily pain. No correlation was found between quality of life and such factors as age, sex, or duration time of Graves disease and ophthalmopathy. Analogically, no relation was observed between the activity and stage of clinical development of eye changes and QoL. The use of the combined GO therapy contributed to a considerable decrease in the

  9. Clinical practice of radiotherapy

    Horiuchi, Junichi; Masaki, Norie; Onoyama, Yasuto

    1987-01-01

    This chapter presents in greater detail radiotherapy used in each clinical setting. The descriptions are given under the following sections: the tongue and oral cavity; the maxilla, larynx, and pharynx; brain tumors; the eyes and orbit; pediatric tumors; lung cancer; the esophagus; breast cancer; the abdominal digestive system; the urogenital system; the uterine cervix; the ovaries and vulva; bone and soft tissues; the skin; hematopoietic tumors; lymph node metastases; and radiotherapy as palliative treatment. (Namekawa, K.)

  10. Ocena efektywności podziału subwencji oświatowej dla gmin

    Jan Herczyński

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Celem przedstawionych analiz jest ocena dopasowania podziału pomiędzy gminy części oświatowej subwencji ogólnej do kosztów dostarczania usług edukacyjnych. W artykule zarysowano problematykę związaną z podziałem subwencji oświatowej pomiędzy gminy, opisano wagi stosowane w algorytmie podziału subwencji oświatowej, skoncentrowano się na zmianach wprowadzonych do algorytmu w 2015 r. i omówiono konsekwencje wynikające ze stosowania wag wiejskich, które mają stosunkowo duży wpływ na podział środków. W ostatniej części wprowadzono miarę nieefektywności algorytmu podziału części oświatowej subwencji ogólnej i zastosowano ją do oceny podziału środków subwencyjnych pomiędzy gminy. Miara ta pozwala m.in. ilościowo ocenić efekt zmian wprowadzonych do algorytmu w 2015 r. Zaproponowano możliwe korekty wag algorytmu pozwalające na redukcję nieefektywności i zjawiska tzw. przewrotnej motywacji organów prowadzących szkoły. W podsumowaniu przedstawiono główne wnioski wynikające z analiz.

  11. Radiotherapy physics

    Chen, G.T.Y.; Collier, J.M.; Lyman, J.T.; Pitluck, S.

    1982-01-01

    The Radiotherapy Physics Group works on the physical and biophysical aspects of charged particle radiotherapy. Our activities include the development of isosurvival beams (beams of uniform biological effect), computerized treatment planning development for charged particle radiotherapy, design of compensation to shape dose distributions, and development of dosimetry techniques to verify planned irradiations in both phantoms and patients

  12. External beam orbital radiotherapy (EBORT) in patients with retinoblastoma: a Saudi-Arabian experience with 120 children from 1976 to 1993

    Pradhan, D.G.; Sandridge, A.; Kandil, A.; Mullaney, P.; Abboud, EB.; Gray, A.J.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To characterize the patient population and treatment options for patients with Retinoblastoma (RB) diagnosed at KKESH and referred for radiation therapy (RT) to KFSH and RC, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia from 1976 to 1993 and to record the treatment outcomes. Material/Methods: A retrospective study of 120 patients (a total of 193 affected eyes) referred for RT. 75% of the eyes were staged Reese-Ellsworth (RE) Stage Va or Vb disease. In 75% family history was available, and showed consanguineous marriages in 65%, (42% first cousins). A familial history of RB was present in 15%. Male:Female ratio 1.8:1.0. Patients were divided into three groups. Group A, 60 patients (64 eyes) were treated with EBORT to the intact eye to preserve vision. 55 of these patients (92%) had bilateral disease and 5 had unilateral disease. 49 patients had one eye already removed as primary treatment. Mean age at diagnosis was 20 months (standard deviation (SD) 24.88), range 0-148. Major presenting symptom was leukokoria in 75% and poor vision in 24%. RE staging was I:12%, II:10%, III:12%, IV:23% and V:43%. 28 of 60 patients (47%) also received chemotherapy (CT) with vincristine, adriamycin and cyclophosphamide (VAC), 7% before, 10% during and 30% after EBORT. Mean follow-up was 48 months, (SD 43.85 months), range was 0-14 years. 4 patients received EBORT to both eyes. Standard treatment until 1992 was 45Gy in 12 fractions of 3.75Gy each, three times a week over 18 days with 6 or 8MV Photons or Cobalt-60. Assuming the (α(β)) ratio for tumor control at 10, Tk = 21 days, Tpot = 5 days then the Biological Equivalent Dose (BED) for this regime 62Gy 10 for early effect and 101Gy 3 for late effects. Since 1992 this has been reduced and is currently BED (early) 54Gy 10 and BED (late) 76Gy 3 (44Gy in 20 fractions in 26 days). Group B consisted of 23 patients (28 eyes) referred for RT to control local disease in the orbit usually after enucleation (23 eyes) and treated with curative intent

  13. Whither radiotherapy

    Ross, W M

    1987-03-01

    The 1986 Glyn Evans Memorial Lecture, given at the Joint Provincial Meeting of the Royal College of Radiologists, Sheffield, September 1986, sketches an outline of the history of radiotherapy and discusses the future development of the art. Topics included are siting of centres, training needs, the relationship of radiotherapy to other medical specialities, and the advantages and disadvantages of radiotherapy practitioners forming a separate medical College. (U.K.)

  14. Ocena tačnosti sistema samovođenja rakete zemlja-vazduh / Evaluation accuracy for homing system of ground-air missile

    Stevan Boarov

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available U ovom članku razmatra se ocena tačnosti sistema samovođenja raketa zemlja-vazduh računarskim simulacijama OFF-LINE. Izvršena je ocena zakona raspodele verovatnoće promašaja, za dva režima gađanja pod različitim početnim uglovima preticanja, kada na sistem deluju poremećaji izazvani slučajnim šumom u glavi za samovođenje. Simulacija je izvedena primenom metode Monte Carlo. Model koji je korišćen za simulacije uključuje linearizovani model kretanja rakete i glavne nelinearnosti sistema vođenja i upravljanja. / In this paper approach of evaluation accuracy for homing system of ground - air missile is showed by OFF-LINE computer simulations. Two ranges of action under different angles of approach are appraised in the case of the presence of the seeker noise. The probability density function and the root-mean-square estimation of the miss distance are realised by Monte - Carlo methods, using linearized model only of the missiles flight and main nonlinearity of guidance and control systems.

  15. OCENA WŁAŚCIWOŚCI PRZECIWPOŚLIZGOWYCH NAWIERZCHNI DROGOWYCH PRZY WYKORZYSTANIU URZĄDZEŃ TWO, CTM I DFT

    Marta WASILEWSKA

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Kompleksowa ocena właściwości przeciwpoślizgowych powinna być wykonywana w oparciu o ciągły pomiar współczynnika tarcia oraz parametrów dotyczących tekstury nawierzchni drogowych. W artykule przedstawiono ocenę właściwości przeciwpoślizgowych nawierzchni drogowych przeprowadzoną na podstawie pomiarów wykonanych zestawem pomiarowym TWO (Traction Watcher One oraz urządzeniami CTM (Circular Track Meter i DFT (Dynamic Friction Tester. Do badań wytypowano 11 odcinków testowych, których warstwy ścieralne były zróżnicowane pod względem technologii wykonania, okresu użytkowania i obciążenia ruchem samochodowym. Przy pomocy urządzenia CTM dokonano oceny makrotekstury (parametr MPD, a przy wykorzystaniu urządzenia DFT oceniano w sposób pośredni mikroteksturę powierzchni (współczynnik tarcia DFT20. Urządzenie TWO umożliwiło ciągły pomiar współczynnika tarcia z ustalonym poślizgiem 17,8% koła pomiarowego przy trzech prędkościach 30, 60, 90 km/h. W artykule ustalono zależności funkcyjne pomiędzy współczynnikiem tarcia µ z pomiarów TWO, a współczynnikiem DFT20 i parametrem MPD. Wykazano, że na wartość µ przy prędkości 30 km/h istotny wpływ ma jedynie mikrotekstura nawierzchni, a przy prędkości 60 i 90 km/h zarówno mikrotekstura i makrotekstura.

  16. Radiotherapy; Strahlentherapie

    Wannenmacher, M. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Abt. fuer Klinische Radiologie; Debus, J. [Univ. Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie; Wenz, F. (eds.) [Universitaetsklinikum Mannheim (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie

    2006-07-01

    The book is focussed on the actual knowledge on the clinical radiotherapy and radio-oncology. Besides fundamental and general contributions specific organ systems are treated in detail. The book contains the following contributions: Basic principles, radiobiological fundamentals, physical background, radiation pathology, basics and technique of brachytherapy, methodology and technique of the stereotactic radiosurgery, whole-body irradiation, operative radiotherapy, hadron therapy, hpyerthermia, combined radio-chemo-therapy, biometric clinical studies, intensity modulated radiotherapy, side effects, oncological diagnostics; central nervous system and sense organs, head-neck carcinomas, breast cancer, thorax organs, esophagus carcinoma, stomach carcinoma, pancreas carcinoma, heptabiliary cancer and liver metastases, rectal carcinomas, kidney and urinary tract, prostate carcinoma, testicular carcinoma, female pelvis, lymphatic system carcinomas, soft tissue carcinoma, skin cancer, bone metastases, pediatric tumors, nonmalignant diseases, emergency in radio-oncology, supporting therapy, palliative therapy.

  17. Radiotherapy apparatus

    Leung, P.M.; Webb, H.P.J.

    1985-01-01

    This invention relates to apparatus for applying intracavitary radiotherapy. In previously-known systems radioactive material is conveyed to a desired location within a patient by transporting a chain of balls pneumatically to and from an appropriately inserted applicator. According to this invention a ball chain for such a purpose comprises several radioactive balls separated by non-radioactive tracer balls of radiographically transparent material of lower density and surface hardness than the radioactive balls. The invention also extends to radiotherapy treatment apparatus comprising a storage, sorting and assembly system

  18. Orbit Functions

    Anatoliy Klimyk

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, properties of orbit functions are reviewed and further developed. Orbit functions on the Euclidean space E_n are symmetrized exponential functions. The symmetrization is fulfilled by a Weyl group corresponding to a Coxeter-Dynkin diagram. Properties of such functions will be described. An orbit function is the contribution to an irreducible character of a compact semisimple Lie group G of rank n from one of its Weyl group orbits. It is shown that values of orbit functions are repeated on copies of the fundamental domain F of the affine Weyl group (determined by the initial Weyl group in the entire Euclidean space E_n. Orbit functions are solutions of the corresponding Laplace equation in E_n, satisfying the Neumann condition on the boundary of F. Orbit functions determine a symmetrized Fourier transform and a transform on a finite set of points.

  19. Primary orbital squamous cell carcinoma

    Ana L. Campos Arbulú

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Primary orbital squamous cell carcinoma is a rare entity. There is little published literature. We report a case of primary squamous cell carcinoma of the orbital soft tissues. Surgical resection offered the best treatment for the patient. Complete resection of the lesion was achieved. The patient received adjuvant radiotherapy due to the proximity of the lesion to the surgical margins. Surgical treatment is feasible and should be considered as part of the surgeon's arsenal. However, therapeutic decisions must be made on a case-by-case basis

  20. ORBITAL INJURIES

    Andrej Kansky

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Orbit is involved in 40% of all facial fractures. There is considerable variety in severity, ranging from simple nondisplaced to complex comminuted fractures. Complex comminuted fractures (up to 20% are responsible for the majority of complications and unfavorable results. Orbital fractures are classified as internal orbital fractures, zygomatico-orbital fractures, naso-orbito-ethmoidal fractures and combined fractures. The ophtalmic sequelae of midfacial fractures are usually edema and ecchymosis of the soft tissues, subconjuctival hemorrhage, diplopia, iritis, retinal edema, ptosis, enophthalmos, ocular muscle paresis, mechanical restriction of ocular movement and nasolacrimal disturbances. More severe injuries such as optic nerve trauma and retinal detachments have also been reported. Within the wide range of orbital fractures small group of complex fractures causes most of the sequelae. Therefore identification of severe injuries and adequate treatment is of major importance. The introduction of craniofacial techniques made possible a wide exposure even of large orbital wall defects and their reconstruction by bone grafts. In spite of significant progress, repair of complex orbital wall defects remains a problem even for the experienced surgeons.Results. In 1999 121 facial injuries were treated at our department (Clinical Centre Ljubljana Dept. Of Maxillofacial and Oral Surgery. Orbit was involved in 65% of cases. Isolated inner orbital fractures presented 4% of all fractures. 17 (14% complex cases were treated, 5 of them being NOE, 5 orbital (frame and inner walls, 3 zygomatico-orbital, 2 FNO and 2 maxillo-orbital fractures.Conclusions. Final result of the surgical treatment depends on severity of maxillofacial trauma. Complex comminuted fractures are responsable for most of the unfavorable results and ocular function is often permanently damaged (up to 75% in these fractures.

  1. [Orbital inflammation].

    Mouriaux, F; Coffin-Pichonnet, S; Robert, P-Y; Abad, S; Martin-Silva, N

    2014-12-01

    Orbital inflammation is a generic term encompassing inflammatory pathologies affecting all structures within the orbit : anterior (involvement up to the posterior aspect of the globe), diffuse (involvement of intra- and/or extraconal fat), apical (involvement of the posterior orbit), myositis (involvement of only the extraocular muscles), dacryoadenitis (involvement of the lacrimal gland). We distinguish between specific inflammation and non-specific inflammation, commonly referred to as idiopathic inflammation. Specific orbital inflammation corresponds to a secondary localization of a "generalized" disease (systemic or auto-immune). Idiopathic orbital inflammation corresponds to uniquely orbital inflammation without generalized disease, and thus an unknown etiology. At the top of the differential diagnosis for specific or idiopathic orbital inflammation are malignant tumors, represented most commonly in the adult by lympho-proliferative syndromes and metastases. Treatment of specific orbital inflammation begins with treatment of the underlying disease. For idiopathic orbital inflammation, treatment (most often corticosteroids) is indicated above all in cases of visual loss due to optic neuropathy, in the presence of pain or oculomotor palsy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Interstitial radiotherapy

    Scardino, P.T.; Bretas, F.

    1987-01-01

    The authors now have 20 years of experience with modern techniques of brachytherapy. The large number of patients treated in medical centers around the world and the widespread use of this type of radiotherapy have provided us with substantial information about the indications and contraindications, advantages and disadvantages, pitfalls and complications, as well as the results of these techniques. Although the focus of this review is the experience at Baylor using the combined technique of gold seed implantation plus external beam irradiation, the alternative forms of brachytherapy will be described and compared. The authors' intention is to provide the busy clinician with a succinct and informative review indicating the status of modern interstitial radiotherapy and describing day-to-day approach and results

  3.  Ocena ryzyka na potrzeby audytu wewnętrznegojednostek sektora polskich finansów publicznych

    Marcin Tatoj

    2009-12-01

    ryzyka stanowi podstawę hierarchizacji obszarów podlegających audytowi wewnętrznemu w danym okresie, czyli wskazania najpilniejszych zadań audytowych, narażonych w jednostce na największe ryzyko. Ocena ryzyka jest procesem ciągłym. Ujawnione ryzyka wymagają stałego monitorowania, aby pojawiające się nowe ryzyka zostały w porę dostrzeżone, monitorowane i zaplanowane do audytowania.

  4. Ocena czynności nerek u dzieci leczonych metodę ESWL - doniesienie wstępne

    Ewa Straż-Żebrowska

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Kamica układu moczowego jest chorobą polegającą na tworzeniu się złogów w drogach moczowych w momencie zaburzenia równowagi pomiędzy promotorami i inhibitorami krystalizacji. Obecnie obserwuje się narastanie częstości występowania kamicy w społeczeństwach krajów wysoko uprzemysłowionych, w tym również w populacji dziecięcej. Problem ten dotyczy nawet 5% tej populacji, a coraz większą grupę stanowią dzieci w okresie niemowlęcym. Wśród metod leczenia wyróżniamy postępowanie zachowawcze lub zabiegowe. Leczeniu zachowawczemu najczęściej poddaje się złogi o średnicy do 5 mm, większe wymagają zastosowania metod inwazyjnych. Wśród metod zabiegowych wyróżniamy metody stosunkowo mało inwazyjne, takie jak: ESWL (kruszenie złogów falą generowaną pozaustrojowo, PCNL (przezskóma nefrolitotrypsja, LTRSL (endoskopowa litotrypsja. Obecnie znacznie rzadziej stosowane jest leczenie operacyjne. Zabieg ESWL poprzez działanie fali uderzeniowej powoduje dezintegrację złogu. Cel: Ocena bezpieczeństwa metody w aspekcie funkcji nerek u dzieci leczonych z powodu kamicy układu moczowego metodą ESWL. Materia! i metody: Badaniem objęto 16 dzieci (7 chłopców i 9 dziewczynek w wieku od 2,5 do 17,5 roku (średni wiek 9,5 roku. W ciągu 48 godzin przed wykonaniem zabiegu ESWL oznaczano morfologię krwi, wykładniki stanu zapalnego, stężenie parametrów nerkowych w surowicy (kreatynina, mocznik, cystatyna C, koagulogram. Wyliczano klirensy dla kreatyniny oraz cystatyny C. Mierzono wartości ciśnienia tętniczego. Ponownej oceny czynności nerek w oparciu o te same parametry dokonano w okresie od 1 do 5 miesięcy (średni czas 2,8 miesiąca po zabiegu. Wyniki: Średnie stężenia cystatyny C i kreatyniny oraz wartości klirensów kreatyniny i cystatyny C, mocznika, wartości ciśnienia skurczowego i rozkurczowego nie wykazały istotnych statystycznie różnic przed i po zabiegu ESWL. Stwierdzono statystycznie znamienne

  5. Palliative Radiotherapy

    Salinas, J.

    2003-01-01

    Palliative care does not attempt to prolong survival but to the achieve the highest quality of life both for the patient and their family covering their physical, psychological, social and spiritual needs. Radiotherapy (RT), one of the most important therapeutic modalities, has a great significance in palliative medicine for cancer since it attempts to reduce as much as possible the acute reaction associated with the treatment for the patient. (Author)

  6. Conformation radiotherapy and conformal radiotherapy

    Morita, Kozo

    1999-01-01

    In order to coincide the high dose region to the target volume, the 'Conformation Radiotherapy Technique' using the multileaf collimator and the device for 'hollow-out technique' was developed by Prof. S. Takahashi in 1960. This technique can be classified a type of 2D-dynamic conformal RT techniques. By the clinical application of this technique, the late complications of the lens, the intestine and the urinary bladder after radiotherapy for the maxillary cancer and the cervical cancer decreased. Since 1980's the exact position and shape of the tumor and the surrounding normal tissues can be easily obtained by the tremendous development of the CT/MRI imaging technique. As a result, various kinds of new conformal techniques such as the 3D-CRT, the dose intensity modulation, the tomotherapy have been developed since the beginning of 1990'. Several 'dose escalation study with 2D-/3D conformal RT' is now under way to improve the treatment results. (author)

  7. Ocena wpływu relaksacji poizometrycznej na napięcia mięśniowe u chorych z zawrotami głowy typu szyjnego

    Hanna Zielińska-Bliźniewska

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Wprowadzenie: Celem pracy była ocena wpływu relaksacji poizometrycznej na napięcia mięśniowe u chorych z zawrotami głowy typu szyjnego. Materiał i metody: Badania przeprowadzono na grupie losowo wybranych 100 chorych, w tym 65 kobiet w wieku 20–76 lat i 35 mężczyzn w wieku 20–73 lat, leczonych w Klinice Otolaryngologii i Onkologii Laryngologicznej Uniwersyteckiego Szpitala Klinicznego im. WAM w Łodzi. Pacjentów podzielono na 2 grupy: I – badaną, liczącą 50 chorych z zawrotami głowy pochodzenia szyjnego, II – porównawczą, składającą się z 50 zdrowych osób, bez zawrotów głowy. U wszystkich chorych przeprowadzono szczegółowy wywiad, badanie przedmiotowe otolaryngologiczne, otoneurologiczne, fizykalne oraz rutynowe badania laboratoryjne. Każdy chory był konsultowany neurologicznie, okulistycznie i internistycznie oraz miał wykonywane USG naczyń doczaszkowych, tomografię komputerową odcinka szyjnego kręgosłupa i głowy. U wszystkich pacjentów zastosowano indywidualnie dobrany cykl ćwiczeń, uwzględniający dotychczasowy przebieg choroby oraz ewentualne przeciwwskazania, obejmujący relaksację poizometryczną mięśni okołokręgosłupowych w odcinku szyjnym przez okres 2 miesięcy. Obiektywna ocena skuteczności zastosowanej terapii odbywa- ła się (przed rozpoczęciem terapii oraz po 2 tygodniach, po miesiącu i po 2 miesiącach za pomocą liniowych pomiarów czynnego zakresu ruchomości szyjnego odcinka kręgosłupa oraz siły mięśniowej według testu Lovetta w skali punktowej i oceny zawrotów głowy według kryteriów Silvoniemiego. Wyniki: Na podstawie przeprowadzonych badań stwierdzono, że pod wpływem kompleksowych ćwiczeń w grupie badanej nastąpiła znaczna poprawa ruchomości odcinka szyjnego kręgosłupa oraz siły mięśniowej. Wnioski: Zarówno w badaniach obiektywnych (pomiar ruchomości czynnej szyjnego odcinka kręgosłupa oraz siły mięśniowej, jak i subiektywnych (ocena wg

  8. Postmastectomy radiotherapy

    Shikama, Naoto; Koguchi, Masahiko; Sasaki, Shigeru; Kaneko, Tomoki; Shinoda, Atsunori; Nishikawa, Atsushi [Shinshu Univ., Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-10-01

    Since there have been few reports on postmastectomy radiotherapy having a high evidence level in Japan, the significance of postoperative radiotherapy and the irradiation techniques were reviewed based on reports from Western countries. Authors focused on the indications for postoperative irradiation, irradiation methods (irradiation sites, irradiation techniques; prosthetics, methods of irradiating the chest wall and lymph nodes, timing of irradiation), and complications, and discuss them. The factors thought to be adaptable to postmastectomy radiotherapy have been listed. Axillary lymph node metastasis and the size of the primary focus are thought to be important factors in locoregional recurrence. The chest wall and the supraclavicular lymph nodes are the usual sites of irradiation after mastectomy. The irradiation method consists of tangential irradiation of the chest wall and single-field irradiation of the supraclavicular lymph nodes, with 46-50 Gy in fractional doses of 1.8-2 Gy x 5/w is administered for 4.5-5.5 weeks. The timing of irradiation in the West is generally after chemotherapy. Adverse radiation effects include ischemic heart disease, pneumonitis, arm edema, rib fractures, and brachial plexus paralysis. The frequency of these complications is increased by the combined use of chemotherapy or surgery. The breast cancer cure rate in Japan is generally better than in the West. It remains to be determined whether the clinical data from Europe and America are applicable to the treatment of breast cancer in Japan. To address this issue, a clinical investigation should be performed in Japan with close cooperation between surgeons, physicians, pathologists, and radiotherapists. (K.H.)

  9. Tumors of protective system of eye, eyeball and orbit

    Vajnshtejn, E.S.; Brovkina, A.F.; Burdyanskaya, E.I.; Zarubej, G.D.

    1985-01-01

    Peculiarities of eyelid tissues, eyeball and orbit reaction on ionizing radiation are considered. Methods of radiotherapy in ophthalmology - X-ray therapy, gamma therapy, beta therapy - used for treatment of eyelid tumors, tumors of tear secretion tracts, epibulbar tumors, intraocular tumors, and orbit tumors, are described

  10. The value of irradiation in the combined treatment of craniopharyngioma; Ocena wartosci radioterapii w skojarzonym leczeniu czaszkogardlaka (craniopharyngioma)

    Skowronska-Gardas, A.; Zawadzka, B.; Palinski, K.; Danczak-Ginalska, Z. [Centrum Onkologii, Instytut im. M. Sklodowskiej-Curie, Warsaw (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    From 1968 till 1990 in the First Radiotherapy Department of the Center of Oncology in Warsaw 32 patients after non-radical surgery were treated with external beam irradiation. 20 were pediatric. We obtained overall 5-year survival in 78% and NED survival in 72% of patients. Significantly better results in pediatric group were observed. 68% of living patients are in good clinical state, able to work or learning. (author). 15 refs, 1 fig.

  11. Radiotherapy in bladder cancer

    Rozan, R.

    1992-01-01

    In 1992, the problem of the vesical radiotherapy is not resolved. The author presents the situation and the different techniques of radiotherapy in bladder cancers: external radiotherapy, only and associated with surgery, interstitial curietherapy and non-classical techniques as per operative radiotherapy, neutron therapy and concurrent radiotherapy with chemotherapy. In order to compare their efficiency, the five-year survival are given in all cases.(10 tabs)

  12. Orbital transport

    Oertel, H. Jr.; Koerner, H.

    1993-01-01

    The Third Aerospace Symposium in Braunschweig presented, for the first time, the possibility of bringing together the classical disciplines of aerospace engineering and the natural science disciplines of meteorology and air chemistry in a european setting. In this way, aspects of environmental impact on the atmosphere could be examined quantitatively. An essential finding of the european conference, is the unrestricted agreement of the experts that the given launch frequencies of the present orbital transport result in a negligible amount of pollutants being released in the atmosphere. The symposium does, however, call attention to the increasing need to consider the effect of orbital and atmospheric environmental impact of a future increase in launch frequencies of orbital transport in connection with future space stations. The Third Aerospace Symposium, 'Orbital Transport, Technical, Meteorological and Chemical Aspects', constituted a first forum of discussion for engineers and scientists. Questions of new orbital transport technologies and their environmental impact were to be discussed towards a first consensus. Through the 34 reports and articles, the general problems of space transportation and environmental protection were addressed, as well as particular aspects of high temperatures during reentry in the atmosphere of the earth, precision navigation of flight vehicles or flow behavior and air chemistry in the stratosphere. (orig./CT). 342 figs

  13. Orbital and conunctival lymphoma treatment and prognosis

    Bessell, E.M.; Henk, J.M.; Whitelocke, R.A.F.; Wright, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    115 patients with lymphoid tumours presenting in the orbit were seen between 1970 and 1984. The histological types were high-grade malignant lymphoma - 18, low-grade malignant lymphoma - 43, and indeterminate lymphocytic lesions - 54. Eighteen patients were found to have disseminated lymphoma at presentation. The majority of the patients received radiotherapy to the orbit; local control was achieved in all cases and the ocular morbidity from radiotherapy was low with 11 patients developing lens opacities and 5 a dry eye. Survival of patients with stage I low-grade lymphoma adn indeterminate lymphocytic lesions was similar to that of a normal population of the same age distribution. The clinic features and dissemination pattern of the low-grade malignant lymphomata and the indeterminate lymphocytic lesions were identical, suggesting that most, if not all, lymphoid masses presenting in the orbit are neoplastic rather than reactive in nature. 28 refs.; 4 figs.; 5 tabs

  14. Orbital and conunctival lymphoma treatment and prognosis

    Bessell, E M; Henk, J M; Whitelocke, R A.F.; Wright, J E

    1988-12-01

    115 patients with lymphoid tumours presenting in the orbit were seen between 1970 and 1984. The histological types were high-grade malignant lymphoma - 18, low-grade malignant lymphoma - 43, and indeterminate lymphocytic lesions - 54. Eighteen patients were found to have disseminated lymphoma at presentation. The majority of the patients received radiotherapy to the orbit; local control was achieved in all cases and the ocular morbidity from radiotherapy was low with 11 patients developing lens opacities and 5 a dry eye. Survival of patients with stage I low-grade lymphoma adn indeterminate lymphocytic lesions was similar to that of a normal population of the same age distribution. The clinic features and dissemination pattern of the low-grade malignant lymphomata and the indeterminate lymphocytic lesions were identical, suggesting that most, if not all, lymphoid masses presenting in the orbit are neoplastic rather than reactive in nature. 28 refs.; 4 figs.; 5 tabs.

  15. Obiektywna ocena skuteczności leczenia etanerceptem pacjentów z młodzieńczym idiopatycznym zapaleniem stawów

    Urszula Bauerfeind

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Cel pracy: Celem pracy była obiektywna ocena skutecznościleczenia etanerceptem u pacjentów z młodzieńczym idiopatycz -nym zapaleniem stawów (MIZS. Materiał i metody: Badanie przeprowadzono w grupie 33 dzieciprzed i po zastosowaniu leczenia etanerceptem: po 6 mies.(33 dzieci, po roku (24 dzieci, po 1,5 roku (18 dzieci i po 2 latach(13 dzieci. Do badania wykorzystano Index Disease Activity ScoreDAS28, metodę sondażu diagnostycznego i systematyczną analizędokumentacji medycznej pacjentów zakwalifikowanych do programuleczenia biologicznego. Wyniki: Z analizy wynika, że przed rozpoczęciem terapii dziecichore na MIZS wykazywały znamiennie statystycznie wyższy średnipoziom aktywności choroby (X = 5,82 ±0,77 niż w 6. mies. trwanialeczenia (X = 2,65 ±1,03 (t = 2,48, p 0,05. Wnioski: Leczenie biologiczne u dzieci z MIZS powoduje znacznązmianę aktywności choroby w ocenie obiektywnej, przynosząckorzystne efekty terapeutyczne.

  16. Radiotherapy of bronchogenic carcinoma

    Heilmann, H.P.

    1982-01-01

    Radiotherapy of branchogenic carcinoma comprises; palliative treatment, postoperative or pre-operative radiotherapy, radiotherapy as part of a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy of small cell carcinoma and curative radiotherapy of non-operable non-small cell carcinoma. Atelectasis and obstruction are indications for palliative radiotherapy. Postoperative radiotherapy is given only in cases of incomplete resection or mediastinal metastases. In the treatment of small cell carcinoma by combined irradiation and chemotherapy the mediastinum and primary tumour are irradiated, generally after chemotherapy, and the C.N.S. receives prophylactic radiotherapy. Curative radiotherapy is indicated in cases of non-operable small cell carcinoma. Irradiation with doses of 60-70 Gy produced 5-years-survival rates of 10-14% in cases classified as T 1 -T 2 N 0 M 0 . (orig.) [de

  17. Ocena rozpowszechnienia dolegliwości reumatycznych wśród osób w przedziale wiekowym 18-25 lat = Assessment of the prevalence of rheumatic ailments among people aged 18-25 years

    Kitowska, Wioleta

    2016-01-01

    Kitowska Wioleta. Ocena rozpowszechnienia dolegliwości reumatycznych wśród osób w przedziale wiekowym 18-25 lat = Assessment of the prevalence of rheumatic ailments among people aged 18-25 years. Journal of Education, Health and Sport. 2016;6(1):17-26. eISSN 2391-8306. DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.44536 http://ojs.ukw.edu.pl/index.php/johs/article/view/44536 http://pbn.nauka.gov.pl/works/689921 Formerly Journal of Health Sciences. ISSN 1429-9623 / 2300-665X. Archives 2011–...

  18. National arrangements for radiotherapy

    2007-01-01

    After a presentation of several letters exchanged between the French health ministry and public agencies in charge of public health or nuclear safety after a radiotherapy accident in Epinal, this report comments the evolution of needs in cancerology care and the place given to radiotherapy. It outlines the technological and organisational evolution of radiotherapy and presents the distribution of radiotherapy equipment, of radio-therapists and other radiotherapy professionals in France. Within the context of radiotherapy accidents which occurred in 2007, it presents the regulatory arrangements which aimed at improving the safety, short term and middle term arrangements which are needed to support and structure radiotherapy practice quality. It stresses the fact that the system will deeply evolve by implementing a radiotherapy vigilance arrangement and a permanent follow-on and adaptation plan based on surveys and the creation of a national committee

  19. Radiotherapy of malignant lymphomas

    Kujawska, J [Instytut Onkologii, Krakow (Poland)

    1979-01-01

    The paper discusses current views on the role of radiotherapy in the treatment of patients with malignant lymphomas. Principles of radiotherapy employed in the Institute of Oncology in Cracow in case of patients with malignant lymphomas are also presented.

  20. Hyperthermia and radiotherapy

    Fitspatrick, C.

    1990-01-01

    Hyperthermia and radiotherapy have for long been used to assist in the control of tumours, either as separate entities, or, in a combined treatment scheme. This paper outlines why hyperthermia works, thermal dose and the considerations required in the timing when hyperthermia is combined with radiotherapy. Previously reported results for hyperthermia and radiotherapy used together are also presented. 8 refs., 8 tabs

  1. An evaluation of supervoltage orbital irradiation for Graves' opthalmopathy

    Teng, C.S.; Crombie, A.L.; Hall, R.; Ross, W.M.

    1980-01-01

    Twenty patients with moderately severe ophthalmopathy due to Graves' disease or ophtalmic Graves' disease were treated by supervoltage orbital radiotherapy generated by a linear accelerator. Seven patients (35%) showed some response within 3 weeks of the treatment, four patients (20%) improved minimally while nine patients (45%) were unchanged. Improvement was noted mainly in soft tissue changes while proptosis decreased in only four patients. With one exception, ophthalmoplegia did not improve after the radiotherapy. The benefit obtained with the treatment was not impressive. (author)

  2. Orbit analysis

    Michelotti, L.

    1995-01-01

    The past fifteen years have witnessed a remarkable development of methods for analyzing single particle orbit dynamics in accelerators. Unlike their more classic counterparts, which act upon differential equations, these methods proceed by manipulating Poincare maps directly. This attribute makes them well matched for studying accelerators whose physics is most naturally modelled in terms of maps, an observation that has been championed most vigorously by Forest. In the following sections the author sketchs a little background, explains some of the physics underlying these techniques, and discusses the best computing strategy for implementing them in conjunction with modeling accelerators

  3. Brane orbits

    Bergshoeff, Eric A; Riccioni, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    We complete the classification of half-supersymmetric branes in toroidally compactified IIA/IIB string theory in terms of representations of the T-duality group. As a by-product we derive a last wrapping rule for the space-filling branes. We find examples of T-duality representations of branes in lower dimensions, suggested by supergravity, of which none of the component branes follow from the reduction of any brane in ten-dimensional IIA/IIB string theory. We discuss the constraints on the charges of half-supersymmetric branes, determining the corresponding T-duality and U-duality orbits.

  4. Orbit analysis

    Michelotti, L.

    1995-01-01

    The past fifteen years have witnessed a remarkable development of methods for analyzing single particle orbit dynamics in accelerators. Unlike their more classic counterparts, which act upon differential equations, these methods proceed by manipulating Poincare maps directly. This attribute makes them well matched for studying accelerators whose physics is most naturally modelled in terms of maps, an observation that has been championed most vigorously by Forest. In the following sections the author sketchs a little background, explains some of the physics underlying these techniques, and discusses the best computing strategy for implementing them in conjunction with modeling accelerators.

  5. Radiotherapy for the primary ocular adnexal lymphoma

    Yu Dahai; Sun Sanyuan; Zhuo Shichao; Wang Haiwei

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the pathological and clinical characteristics of primary lymphoma of ocular adnexae, analyze the treatment results and discuss the methods to prevent radiation complications. Methods: From Feb. 1995 to Feb. 2004, 25 patients with primary ocular adnexal lymphoma were treated in the second hospital and the forth hospital of Xuzhou, including 11 males and 14 females. The diagnosis was confirmed pathologically by biopsy in 19 patients and lumpectomy in 6 patients, including 22 mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma and 3 non-MALT lymphoma. According to the Ann Arbor Staging System, there were 21 patients with tumor in stage I E, 3 in stage II E and 1 in stage III E. The primary tumor was found in the eyelid or conjunctiva in 19 eyes and orbit in 9 eyes. Radiotherapy were given to 22 patients (25 eyes) by deep X-rays, 60 Co γ-rays or mixed beams. The total irradiation dose ranged from 30.0 to 57.6 Gy. Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate the survival rate and Logrank test was used to detect the difference between the different groups. Results: The 5-, 10-year accumulated survival rates (SR) of the whole group were 90% and 82%. The 10-year SR of patients with primary, eyelid or conjunctiva tumor and orbit tumor were 100% and 58% (P=0.032). The local control rates of the radiotherapy group and non-radiotherapy group were 92% and 33 % (P=0.006). The 10-year SR of patients with tumor completely removed and those with residues were 83% and 82% (P=0.907). The 10-year SR of MALT lymphoma and non-MALT lymphoma were 90.0% and 33.3% (P=0.009). After radiotherapy, 8 eyes (36%) had cataract formation and 7 eyes (28%) had xerophalmic symptoms. Conclusions: The results of radiothera- py for the primary ocular adnexal lymphoma are satisactory. The prognosis of patients with primary, eyelid or conjunctiva tumor is better than those with orbit tumor. The vast majority of the primary ocular adnexal lymphomas are MALT lymphomas. The survival rate of

  6. The metabolic radiotherapy. La radiotherapie metabolique

    Begon, F.; Gaci, M. (Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 86 - Poitiers (France))

    In this article, the authors recall the principles of the metabolic radiotherapy and present these main applications in the treatment of thyroid cancers, hyperthyroidism, polycythemia, arthritis, bone metastases, adrenergic neoplasms. They also present the radioimmunotherapy.

  7. Radiosensitive orbital metastasis as presentation of occult colonic adenocarcinoma.

    Ludmir, Ethan B; McCall, Shannon J; Czito, Brian G; Palta, Manisha

    2014-09-19

    An 82-year-old man presented with progressive right frontal headaches. The patient's history was significant for benign polyps on surveillance colonoscopy 2 years prior, without high-grade dysplasia or carcinoma. MRI revealed an enhancing lesion arising within the superomedial aspect of the right orbit. Lesion biopsy demonstrated histological appearance and immunophenotype suggestive of colonic adenocarcinoma. Staging positron emission tomography/CT showed visceral metastases and diffuse activity in the posterior rectosigmoid, consistent with metastatic colon cancer. Treatment of the orbital lesion with external beam radiotherapy to 30 Gy resulted in significant palliation of the patient's headaches. The patient expired 2 months following treatment completion due to disease progression. Orbital metastasis as the initial presentation of an occult colorectal primary lesion is exceedingly rare, and occurred in this patient despite surveillance colonoscopy. Radiotherapy remains an efficacious modality for treatment of orbital metastases. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  8. Dosimetric Study of Current Treatment Options for Radiotherapy in Retinoblastoma

    Eldebawy, Eman [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Children' s Cancer Hospital, Cairo (Egypt); Parker, William, E-mail: william.parker@mcgill.ca [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Abdel Rahman, Wamied [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Freeman, Carolyn R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To determine the best treatment technique for patients with retinoblastoma requiring radiotherapy to the whole eye. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans for 3 patients with retinoblastoma were developed using 10 radiotherapy techniques including electron beams, photon beam wedge pair (WP), photon beam three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), fixed gantry intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), photon volumetric arc therapy (VMAT), fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, and helical tomotherapy (HT). Dose-volume analyses were carried out for each technique. Results: All techniques provided similar target coverage; conformity was highest for VMAT, nine-field (9F) IMRT, and HT (conformity index [CI] = 1.3) and lowest for the WP and two electron techniques (CI = 1.8). The electron techniques had the highest planning target volume dose gradient (131% of maximum dose received [D{sub max}]), and the CRT techniques had the lowest (103% D{sub max}) gradient. The volume receiving at least 20 Gy (V{sub 20Gy}) for the ipsilateral bony orbit was lowest for the VMAT and HT techniques (56%) and highest for the CRT techniques (90%). Generally, the electron beam techniques were superior in terms of brain sparing and delivered approximately one-third of the integral dose of the photon techniques. Conclusions: Inverse planned image-guided radiotherapy delivered using HT or VMAT gives better conformity index, improved orbital bone and brain sparing, and a lower integral dose than other techniques.

  9. Radiotherapy in small countries.

    Barton, Michael B; Zubizarreta, Eduardo H; Polo Rubio, J Alfredo

    2017-10-01

    To examine the availability of radiotherapy in small countries. A small country was defined as a country with a population less than one million persons. The economic status of each country was defined using the World Bank Classification. The number of cancers in each country was obtained from GLOBOCAN 2012. The number of cancer cases with an indication or radiotherapy was calculated using the CCORE model. There were 41 countries with a population of under 1 million; 15 were classified as High Income, 15 Upper Middle Income, 10 Lower Middle Income and one Low Income. 28 countries were islands. Populations ranged from 799 (Holy See) to 886450 (Fiji) and the total number of cancer cases occurring in small countries was 21,043 (range by country from 4 to 2476). Overall the total number of radiotherapy cases in small countries was 10982 (range by country from 2 to 1239). Radiotherapy was available in all HIC islands with 80 or more new cases of cancer in 2012 but was not available in any LMIC island. Fiji was the only LMIC island with a large radiotherapy caseload. Similar caseloads in non-island LMIC all had radiotherapy services. Most non-island HIC did not have radiotherapy services presumably because of the easy access to radiotherapy in neighbouring countries. There are no radiotherapy services in any LMIC islands. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Ocena możliwości implementacji standardów IPSAS do systemu rachunkowości podmiotów sektora publicznego w Polsce

    Aleksandra Szewieczek

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ocena możliwości implementacji standardów IPSAS do systemu rachunkowości podmiotów sektora publicznego w Polsce In recent years, there has been a noticeable increase in activity in the field of standardization of public sector accounting, which has an international scope and takes the form of the International Public Sector Accounting Standards (IPSAS. It has been planned that the EU Member States, and consequently Poland, will implement obligatory uniform accounting standards in the public sector – EPSAS – which are to be largely based on the content of IPSAS. The purpose of this paper is to assess the possibilities and factors of IPSAS implementation in the accounting system of public finance sector entities in Poland in relation to the currently applicable accounting regulations and the intelligibility criterion for potential users. The assessment was carried out based on a study of the foreign and domestic literature and existing legislation, while for the conclusions, the deductive and synthetic methods were used. The paper demonstrates that despite the relatively long period of operation of IPSAS, their level of implementation into the accounting system of public sector entities in Poland is negligible. The same applies to the works on the European standards, EPSAS, which have been significantly delayed in relation to the original assumptions. Knowledge of international standards is weak, and consequently their dissemination too. In spite of IPSAS implementation problems, there are still a number of reasons for their use. One of the arguments in favor of introducing uniform standards on the European market is the fact that the common market is in operation, and another one is the strong embedding of the need to consolidate the public sector’s international financial data at the central level of the Community. The conducted research confirmed the possibility of implementing IPSAS into Polish public sector entities’ accounting

  11. Autologous fat graft in irradiated orbit postenucleation for retinoblastoma.

    Klinger, Francesco; Maione, Luca; Vinci, Valeriano; Lisa, Andrea; Barbera, Federico; Balia, Laura; Caviggioli, Fabio; Di Maria, Alessandra

    2018-01-05

    Autologous fat grafting has been extensively and successfully adopted in a number of pathologic conditions in regenerative surgery especially on irradiated fields in order to improve pain symptoms and tissue trophism promoting scar release. In the present study, we report our experience with autologous fat grafting for the treatment of postirradiation fibrosis and pain on three consecutive patients undergoing orbital enucleation for locally advanced retinoblastoma (RB) and subsequent radiotherapy. We selected three consecutive patients who underwent orbital enucleation for locally advanced RB and subsequent local radiotherapy showing severe reduction in orbital volume and eyelid length and retraction due to fibrosis, spontaneous local pain exacerbated after digital pressure with no possibility to place an ocular implant. They underwent autologous fat grafting in the orbital cavity and results were evaluated by clinical examination at 5 and 14 days, and 1, 3, 6 months, and 1 year after surgery. A significant release of scar retraction, reduction of fibrosis and orbital rim contraction together with an important improvement of pain symptoms was observed in all patients. The local changes observed enabled an ease placement of an ocular prosthetic implant (implant). No local or systemic complication occurred. Fat grafting is a promising treatment for patients showing radiotherapy related complication in the orbital area and it should be adopted by all oculoplastic surgeon in order to improve pain syndrome creating the ideal local conditions for the placement of an ocular prosthetic implant.

  12. ERS orbit control

    Rosengren, Mats

    1991-12-01

    The European remote sensing mission orbit control is addressed. For the commissioning phase, the orbit is defined by the following requirements: Sun synchronous, local time of descending node 10:30; three days repeat cycle with 43 orbital revolutions; overhead Venice tower (12.508206 deg east, 45.314222 deg north). The launch, maneuvers for the initial acquisition of the operational orbit, orbit maintenance maneuvers, evaluation of the orbit control, and the drift of the inclination are summarized.

  13. PLANNING NATIONAL RADIOTHERAPY SERVICES

    Eduardo eRosenblatt

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Countries, states and island nations often need forward planning of their radiotherapy services driven by different motives. Countries without radiotherapy services sponsor patients to receive radiotherapy abroad. They often engage professionals for a feasibility study in order to establish whether it would be more cost-beneficial to establish a radiotherapy facility. Countries where radiotherapy services have developed without any central planning, find themselves in situations where many of the available centres are private and thus inaccessible for a majority of patients with limited resources. Government may decide to plan ahead when a significant exodus of cancer patients travel to another country for treatment, thus exposing the failure of the country to provide this medical service for its citizens. In developed countries the trigger has been the existence of highly visible waiting lists for radiotherapy revealing a shortage of radiotherapy equipment.This paper suggests that there should be a systematic and comprehensive process of long-term planning of radiotherapy services at the national level, taking into account the regulatory infrastructure for radiation protection, planning of centres, equipment, staff, education pr

  14. Zespół rowka nerwu łokciowego – ocena efektów leczenia operacyjnego = Cubital tunnel syndrome - evaluation of the effects of surgical treatment

    Kamila Woźniak

    2016-09-01

    • 2.        Katedra i Klinika Rehabilitacji, Collegium Medicum im. Ludwika Rydygiera w Bydgoszczy, Uniwersytet Mikołaja Kopernika w Toruniu       Streszczenie   Wstęp Zespół rowka nerwu łokciowego jest to zespół chorobowy wywołany uciskiem na nerw łokciowy. Choroba najczęściej jest konsekwencją zwężenia kanału łokciowego (struktura anatomiczna utworzona przez nadkłykieć przyśrodkowy kości ramiennej, więzadło ramienno-łokciowe i rozcięgno położone pomiędzy głowami zginacza łokciowego nadgarstka. Przyczynami zwężenia są urazy, stany zapalne lub zmiany zwyrodnieniowe stawów. Cel pracy Celem niniejszej pracy była ocena efektów leczenia operacyjnego u pacjentów z zespołem rowka nerwu łokciowego bezpośrednio po zabiegu operacyjnym oraz w okresie 14 dni po zabiegu operacyjnym. Materiał i metody W okresie od stycznia 2012 roku do czerwca 2016 roku w Klinice Neurochirurgii, Neurotraumatologii i Neurochirurgii Dziecięcej Szpitala Uniwersyteckiego nr 1 w Bydgoszczy do zabiegu operacyjnego zakwalifikowano 20 chorych, u których stwierdzono jednostronny zespół rowka nerwu łokciowego o różnym stopniu nasilenia. Badanie skuteczności metody operacyjnej obejmowało ocenę obiektywnych i subiektywnych objawów klinicznych w okresie po zabiegu operacyjnym – w 1 i 14 dobie. Wyniki Analiza dotychczasowych wyników leczenia wykazała, że po zastosowanej metodzie u większości pacjentów następuje zmniejszenie bądź ustąpienie dolegliwości bólowych i zaburzeń wegetatywnych w obszarze zaopatrywanym przez nerw łokciowy oraz poprawa funkcji chorej ręki. Wnioski Zastosowane leczenie operacyjne jest skutecznym postępowaniem u chorych, u których zostały wyczerpane możliwości leczenia farmakologicznego oraz fizjoterapeutycznego. Ocena zależności efektów terapii wymaga dalszych badań na większej liczbie pacjentów.   Słowa kluczowe: zespół rowka nerwu łokciowego, nerw łokciowy, leczenie operacyjne  

  15. To understand radiotherapy

    2009-01-01

    Dealing with the use of radiotherapy for adults, this guide indicates when a radiotherapy is suggested, how it acts, how the treatment is chosen, which are the professionals involved. It describes how an external radiotherapy takes place and its various techniques, the different types of side effects (general, specific to the treated zone, late effects). It indicates which organs can be treated by curie-therapy, the different curie-therapy treatment modalities, how a curie-therapy takes place and which are its side effects. It outlines how to better cope with radiotherapy (how to be supported, the important role of relatives, everyday life questions, rights). It indicates and comments the different measures adopted for the safety and quality of radiotherapy

  16. CONGENITAL ORBITAL TERATOMA

    was done without contrast and 3mm/5mm/10mm slices were obtained to cover the orbit, skull base and brain. The findings included a soft tissue mass arising from the orbit. The left eye ball was extra orbital. There was no defect .... love's Short Practice of Surgery. 7 Edition,. Levis London, 1997; 45-64. 2. Orbital tumor Part 1, ...

  17. Historical review of radiotherapy

    Onai, Yoshio

    1993-01-01

    The techniques of radiotherapy have been improved by development of particle accelerators, radionuclides and computers. This paper presents a historical review of the physical and technical aspects of radiotherapy in Japan. Changes in the kinds of radiation, such as X-rays, gamma rays, electrons, neutrons and protons used for external radiotherapy, and the equipment involved are described chronologically, and historical changes in the quality of radiotherapy apparatus are outlined. Patient data acquisition equipment, such as X-ray simulator and X-ray CT, beam modifying devices, patient setup devices, and devices to verify treatment fields and patient doses are reviewed historically. Radiation sources for brachytherapy and internal radiotherapy, and remotely controlled afterloading systems are reviewed chronologically. Historical changes in methods to evaluate absorbed doses, dose monitor systems and beam data acquisition systems are outlined. Changes in methods of calculating dose distributions for external X-ray and electron therapy, brachytherapy and internal radiotherapy by unsealded radionuclides are described and calculation techniques for treatment planning system are reviewed. Annual figures in the numbers of radiotherapy equipment, such as telecobalt and telecesium units, linear accelerators, betatrons, microtrons, stereotactic gamma units, conformation radiotherapy units, remotely controlled afterloading systems, and associated equipment such as X-ray simulators and treatment planning systems are provided, as are changes in the number of accelerators by maximum X-ray energy and maximum electron energy, and in the number of licensed hospitals and clinics using small sealed sources. Changes in techniques of external radiotherapy and brachytherapy are described briefly from the point of view of dose distributions. (author)

  18. Radiological incidents in radiotherapy

    Hobzova, L.; Novotny, J.

    2008-01-01

    In many countries a reporting system of radiological incidents to national regulatory body exists and providers of radiotherapy treatment are obliged to report all major and/or in some countries all incidents occurring in institution. State Office for Nuclear Safety (SONS) is providing a systematic guidance for radiotherapy departments from 1997 by requiring inclusion of radiation safety problems into Quality assurance manual, which is the basic document for obtaining a license of SONS for handling with sources of ionizing radiation. For that purpose SONS also issued the recommendation 'Introduction of QA system for important sources in radiotherapy-radiological incidents' in which the radiological incidents are defined and the basic guidance for their classification (category A, B, C, D), investigation and reporting are given. At regular periods the SONS in co-operation with radiotherapy centers is making a survey of all radiological incidents occurring in institutions and it is presenting obtained information in synoptic communication (2003 Motolske dny, 2005 Novy Jicin). This presentation is another summary report of radiological incidents that occurred in our radiotherapy institutions during last 3 years. Emphasis is given not only to survey and statistics, but also to analysis of reasons of the radiological incidents and to their detection and prevention. Analyses of incidents in radiotherapy have led to a much broader understanding of incident causation. Information about the error should be shared as early as possible during or after investigation by all radiotherapy centers. Learning from incidents, errors and near misses should be a part of improvement of the QA system in institutions. Generally, it is recommended that all radiotherapy facilities should participate in the reporting, analyzing and learning system to facilitate the dissemination of knowledge throughout the whole country to prevent errors in radiotherapy.(authors)

  19. Radiovolumetry of the orbit

    Abujamra, S.

    1983-01-01

    The authors present a method called ''Radiovolumetry of the orbit'' that permits the evaluation of the orbital volume from anteroposterior skull X-Rays (CALDWELL 30 0 position). The research was based in the determination of the orbital volume with lead spheres, in 1010 orbits of 505 dry skulls of Anatomy Museums. After the dry skulls was X-rayed six frontal orbital diameters were made, with care to correct the radiographic amplification. PEARSON correlation coeficient test was applied between the mean orbital diameter and the orbital volume. The result was r = 0,8 with P [pt

  20. Radiotherapy indications - rectum cancer

    2009-05-01

    This document is addressed to oncologists radiotherapists and to any health professional concerned by rectum cancer treatment. Rectum cancer therapy is based on various technical procedures including surgery, radiotherapy and systemic treatments defined for each patient according to his clinical situation. This document precises the specific situations where radiotherapy can be employed. However, the radiotherapy decision must be taken with respect to other therapeutic alternatives. Such a decision must be validated and must be the object of a discussion in the framework of a pluri-disciplinary consultation. (J.S.)

  1. Radiotherapy injuries in children

    Kalifa, G.; Bennet, J.; Couanet, D.; Masselot, J.

    1985-01-01

    Side effects of radiotherapy in pediatrics are reviewed including bone injuries and radio-induced bone tumors; nervous system injuries with emphasis on hypothalamus, pituitary gland, brain and spinal cord; lung, digestive system and urinary tract injuries [fr

  2. The metabolic radiotherapy

    Begon, F.; Gaci, M.

    1993-01-01

    In this article, the authors recall the principles of the metabolic radiotherapy and present these main applications in the treatment of thyroid cancers, hyperthyroidism, polycythemia, arthritis, bone metastases, adrenergic neoplasms. They also present the radioimmunotherapy

  3. Radiotherapy of Graves' ophthalmopathy. State of the art and review of the literature; Radiotherapie der endokrinen Orbitopathie. State of the Art und Literaturuebersicht

    Eich, H.T. [Klinikum der Univ. Koeln (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie; Micke, O. [Franziskus-Hospital Bielefeld (Germany). Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie; Seegenschmiedt, M.H. [Alfried-Krupp Krankenhaus Essen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie

    2007-07-01

    Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO), the most frequent extrathyroidal manifestation of Graves' disease, is a disorder of autoimmune origin, the pathogenic mechanisms of which are still incompletely understood. Although GO is severe in only 3-5% of affected individuals, quality of life is severely impaired even in patients with mild GO. The role of radiotherapy in the management of GO is discussed controversially. However, recent randomized clinical trials have, with one exception, confirmed that orbital radiotherapy is an effective and safe therapeutic procedure for GO. This article describes the sequences, dosages and fractionation schemes as well as the risks and side effects of the radiotherapy. (orig.)

  4. Clinical practice of radiotherapy

    Tobias, J.S.

    1992-01-01

    After describing the recent advances in radiotherapy, this brief article presents in tabular form the changing indications for radiotherapy for tumours of the skin, head and neck, adult CNS, lung, thyroid, thymus, breast, female genital tract, soft tissue sarcoma, genitourinary tract, bone sarcoma, Hodgkin's disease, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, multiple myeloma, leukemia and paediatric malignancy. For each tumour type, information is provided for the radiosensitivity, the radiocurability, complications and five-year survival. Combined modality treatment is also briefly discussed. (UK)

  5. Nanoparticle-guided radiotherapy

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method and nano-sized particles for image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of a target tissue. More specifically, the invention relates to nano-sized particles comprising X-ray-imaging contrast agents in solid form with the ability to block x-rays, allowing for simult...... for simultaneous or integrated external beam radiotherapy and imaging, e.g., using computed tomography (CT)....

  6. Patients and radiotherapy

    Eardley, A.

    1986-01-01

    The results of interviews with thirty discharged patients who had undergone radical radiotherapy for cancer of the head and neck are presented. Patients were asked whether their side-effects had got worse or had stayed the same, what effect their side effects had had on eating and drinking and whether they had felt depressed during this period. Measures which could be taken to improve patients' experiences of radiotherapy are discussed. (U.K.)

  7. Radiotherapy and oral cancer

    Sealy, R [Cape Town Univ. (South Africa). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    1982-08-01

    A general review article for the non-radiotherapist. The historical, physical and biological background is briefly reviewed. Mention is made of the effects of fraction size, hyperbaric oxygen, neutron beams and radiation sensitizers. The use of chemotherapy and radiotherapy is discussed, as well as the selection of patients for radiotherapy and the treatment of neck nodes. The author suggests a therapeutic approach to the various disease sites and finally reviews some of the literature on radiation caries and jaw necrosis.

  8. Current clinical research of immunoglobulin G4-related orbital disease

    Yang Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulin G4-related disease(IgG4-related diseasehas received lots of attention in medical community as a recently recognized fibro-inflammatory condition. It is characterized by infiltration of IgG4-immunopositive plasmacytes and concentration of elevated serum IgG4. IgG4-related disease shows organ enlargement or nodular/hyperplastic lesions in various organs including the pancreas, hepatobiliary tract and orbit, which is called IgG4-related orbital disease. The diagnostic criteria for IgG4-related disease and IgG4-related orbital disease has recently been established, which is based on clinical, imaging and histopathologic features of the orbital lesions. Besides, attention should be drawn to the differentiation from other diseases. The treatment is empirical including corticosteroids, immunosuppressive drugs, radiotherapy, and rituximab. This article reviews clinical progression of IgG4-related orbital disease.

  9. Localized paediatric orbital rhabdomyosarcoma: Influence of imaging on treatment

    Burns, B.J.; McHugh, K.; McDowell, H.P.; Anslow, P.; Mitchell, C.

    2001-01-01

    AIM: Orbital rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common primary malignant orbital tumour in children and has a good prognosis. The purpose of this paper was to review the imaging and consequent treatment of patients with localized orbital rhabdomyosarcoma from around the U.K. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients were identified through the U.K. Chilren's Cancer Study Group (UKCCSG) database. Investigations and therapy were dictated by the Malignant Mesenchymal Tumour '89 (MMT89) protocol. Imaging and radiological reports of 16 patients from 12 centres were reviewed. The number of patients receiving radiotherapy, timing of radiotherapy, and adherence to treatment protocols were assessed. RESULTS: Local radiologists' reports and imaging techniques varied between sequential examinations and centres. The imaging was adequate for management. No reports quoted measurements of the tumours. Treatment protocols were not always followed rigidly with regard to a residual mass at day 80 post-diagnosis. However, the protocol was not explicit for all outcomes. Fifteen out of 16 patients eventually received radiotherapy. CONCLUSION: There is no standardization of imaging between centres. The presence or absence of a post-therapeutic residue should be stated in the radiology report. Further investigation is needed to differentiate between fibrosis and recurrent tumour. Radiotherapy for residual mass at day 80 is probably more important than standardizing radiological technique. Burns B.J. et al. (2001)

  10. Traumatic orbital CSF leak

    Borumandi, Farzad

    2013-01-01

    Compared to the cerebrospinalfluid (CSF) leak through the nose and ear, the orbital CSF leak is a rare and underreported condition following head trauma. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman with oedematous eyelid swelling and ecchymosis after a seemingly trivial fall onto the right orbit. Apart from the above, she was clinically unremarkable. The CT scan revealed a minimally displaced fracture of the orbital roof with no emphysema or intracranial bleeding. The fractured orbital roof in combination with the oedematous eyelid swelling raised the suspicion for orbital CSF leak. The MRI of the neurocranium demonstrated a small-sized CSF fistula extending from the anterior cranial fossa to the right orbit. The patient was treated conservatively and the lid swelling resolved completely after 5 days. Although rare, orbital CSF leak needs to be included in the differential diagnosis of periorbital swelling following orbital trauma. PMID:24323381

  11. Clinical evaluation of radiotherapy for endocrine ophthalmopathy

    Okada, Kayoko; Oshitani, Takashi; Mieda, Chieko

    1990-01-01

    Ten patients with severe endocrine ophthalmopathy were treated by radiotherapy at Hyogo Medical Center for Adults from May 1984 to February 1988. All but one of the patients had poorly responded to previous systemic or topical corticosteroid therapy. The target of the radiotherapy was both retrobulbar tissues. The radiation field used was about 4 x 4 cm, excluding the pituitary gland and the brain, and was angled 5deg posteriorly to avoid the contralateral lens. A total of 2000 cGy was given to each patient over a 2 week-period. Eight of the ten patients showed some response, with 5 of them (50%) having a good to excellent response. Treatment was more effective for soft tissue changes, proptosis and keratopathy, while myopathy was less responsive. As for the duration of the eye signs and symptoms, those of a shorter duration (less than 12 months) responded better. It was also noted that the degree of the eye muscle enlargement on the pre-treatment orbital CT scan was directly correlated to the results of the treatment. Although three of the patients experienced transient headache, there were no serious acute reactions or long term complications. In conclusion, retrobulbar radiotherapy is a well-tolerated, safe and effective treatment for sever endocrine ophthalmopathy. (author)

  12. Meibomian Gland Dysfunction Associated With Periocular Radiotherapy.

    Woo, Young Jun; Ko, JaeSang; Ji, Yong Woo; Kim, Tae-Im; Yoon, Jin Sook

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the influence of periocular radiotherapy on meibomian glands. We evaluated 28 patients (40 eyes) who received radiotherapy (RT group) for conjunctival or orbital lymphoma and 30 age-matched control subjects (60 eyes). Subjects underwent slit-lamp examination of the eyelids, Schirmer test, meibography, and evaluation of tear film breakup time (TBUT), Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) scores, meibomian glands evaluation (meiboscore, meibum expressibility, and lid margin abnormality scores), and tear film lipid layer thickness using an ocular surface interferometer. These parameters were compared between subjects in the RT and control groups. Meiboscores as well as meibum expressibility and OSDI scores in the RT group were significantly higher compared with those in the control group (1.6 ± 0.9 vs. 0.4 ± 0.6, 1.6 ± 1.0 vs. 0.2 ± 0.4, and 48.1 ± 21.4 vs. 6.2 ± 4.4, respectively, P radiotherapy exhibited relatively high tear film instability induced by meibomian gland dysfunction, contributing to the high severity of dry eye symptoms.

  13. Clinical evaluation of radiotherapy for endocrine ophthalmopathy

    Okada, Kayoko; Oshitani, Takashi; Mieda, Chieko (Hyogo Medical Center for Adults, Hyogo (Japan)) (and others)

    1990-06-01

    Ten patients with severe endocrine ophthalmopathy were treated by radiotherapy at Hyogo Medical Center for Adults from May 1984 to February 1988. All but one of the patients had poorly responded to previous systemic or topical corticosteroid therapy. The target of the radiotherapy was both retrobulbar tissues. The radiation field used was about 4 x 4 cm, excluding the pituitary gland and the brain, and was angled 5deg posteriorly to avoid the contralateral lens. A total of 2000 cGy was given to each patient over a 2 week-period. Eight of the ten patients showed some response, with 5 of them (50%) having a good to excellent response. Treatment was more effective for soft tissue changes, proptosis and keratopathy, while myopathy was less responsive. As for the duration of the eye signs and symptoms, those of a shorter duration (less than 12 months) responded better. It was also noted that the degree of the eye muscle enlargement on the pre-treatment orbital CT scan was directly correlated to the results of the treatment. Although three of the patients experienced transient headache, there were no serious acute reactions or long term complications. In conclusion, retrobulbar radiotherapy is a well-tolerated, safe and effective treatment for sever endocrine ophthalmopathy. (author).

  14. Eye and orbital cavity

    Panfilova, G.V.; Koval', G.Yu.

    1984-01-01

    Radioanatomy of eyes and orbit is described. Diseases of the orbit (developmental anomalies, inflammatory diseases, lacrimal apparatus deseases, toxoplasmosis, tumors and cysts et al.), methods of foreign body localization in the eye are considered. Roentgenograms of the orbit and calculation table for foreign body localization in spherical eyes of dissimilar diameter are presented

  15. Introducing Earth's Orbital Eccentricity

    Oostra, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Most students know that planetary orbits, including Earth's, are elliptical; that is Kepler's first law, and it is found in many science textbooks. But quite a few are mistaken about the details, thinking that the orbit is very eccentric, or that this effect is somehow responsible for the seasons. In fact, the Earth's orbital eccentricity is…

  16. Advice concerning radiotherapy

    1984-01-01

    Dutch National cancer incidence figures were calculated by using the reliable data on cancer incidence in the Eindhoven area and population forecasts and information obtained from the Central Bureau of Statistics. Several radiotherapy departments suffer from under capacity (a lack of resources and understaffing). Data have also shown that 35% of cancer patients receive radiotherapy, instead of 50%. Calculations have been made by the committee on the present and future needs with regard to equipment and staff. In 1983, the number of megavoltage therapy units amounted to 38, but should have been 65. It should be 80 in 1990 and 90 in 2000. Since building and installing such equipment is a lengthy process a considerable effort is needed to make up for the arrears. The committee advocates the extension of the system of regional cooperation in cancer care (comprehensive cancer centres), in which radiotherapy departments play a crucial role. Working parties from the committee provided a comprehensive description of current radiotherapy practice with reference to physical, technical, clinical and management aspects. Another working party assessed the results of cancer treatment with regard to many different tumour sites. Recent and expected developments were analysed or indicated. The Radiotherapy Committee commissioned an external team to conduct a project to achieve a picture of future developments using methods different to those of the committee's. An interim advice has been added on this subject. (Auth.)

  17. Space station orbit maintenance

    Kaplan, D. I.; Jones, R. M.

    1983-01-01

    The orbit maintenance problem is examined for two low-earth-orbiting space station concepts - the large, manned Space Operations Center (SOC) and the smaller, unmanned Science and Applications Space Platform (SASP). Atmospheric drag forces are calculated, and circular orbit altitudes are selected to assure a 90 day decay period in the event of catastrophic propulsion system failure. Several thrusting strategies for orbit maintenance are discussed. Various chemical and electric propulsion systems for orbit maintenance are compared on the basis of propellant resupply requirements, power requirements, Shuttle launch costs, and technology readiness.

  18. Nontraumatic orbital roof encephalocele.

    Hoang, Amber; Maugans, Todd; Ngo, Thang; Ikeda, Jamie

    2017-02-01

    Intraorbital meningoencephaloceles occur most commonly as a complication of traumatic orbital roof fractures. Nontraumatic congenital orbital meningoncephaloceles are very rare, with most secondary to destructive processes affecting the orbit and primary skull defects. Treatment for intraorbital meningoencephaloceles is surgical repair, involving the excision of herniated brain parenchyma and meninges and reconstruction of the osseous defect. Most congenital lesions present in infancy with obvious globe and orbital deformities; we report an orbital meningoencephalocele in a 3-year-old girl who presented with ptosis. Copyright © 2017 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Chemotherapy disruption of efficient radiotherapy

    Nervi, C.; Friedman, M.

    1974-01-01

    Studies on the use of chemotherapy in combination with radiotherapy are reviewed. Some topics discussed are: indications for the use of combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy; improvement of the therapeutic ratio following the use of methotrexate; advantages of preirradiation and postirradiation chemotherapy; side effects following simultaneous chemotherapy and radiotherapy; and effects of chemotherapy on cure rate of radiosensitive and radioresistant tumors. (U.S.)

  20. Radiotherapy of Graves' ophthalmopathy. State of the art and review of the literature

    Eich, H.T.; Micke, O.; Seegenschmiedt, M.H.

    2007-01-01

    Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO), the most frequent extrathyroidal manifestation of Graves' disease, is a disorder of autoimmune origin, the pathogenic mechanisms of which are still incompletely understood. Although GO is severe in only 3-5% of affected individuals, quality of life is severely impaired even in patients with mild GO. The role of radiotherapy in the management of GO is discussed controversially. However, recent randomized clinical trials have, with one exception, confirmed that orbital radiotherapy is an effective and safe therapeutic procedure for GO. This article describes the sequences, dosages and fractionation schemes as well as the risks and side effects of the radiotherapy. (orig.)

  1. Radiotherapy of pineal tumors

    Danoff, B.; Sheline, G.E.

    1984-01-01

    Radiotherapy has universally been used in the treatment of pineal tumors and suprasellar germinomas. Recently however, major technical advances related to the use of the operating microscope and development of microsurgical techniques have prompted a renewed interest in the direct surgical approach for biopsy and/or excision. This interest has resulted in a controversy regarding the role of surgery prior to radiotherapy. Because of the heterogeneity of tumors occurring in the pineal region (i.e., germ cell tumors, pineal parenchymal tumors, glial tumors, and cysts) and their differing biological behavior, controversy also surrounds aspects of radiotherapy such as: the optimal radiation dose, the volume to be irradiated, and indications for prophylactic spinal irradiation. A review of the available data is presented in an attempt to answer these questions

  2. Cancer research and radiotherapy

    Matsuzawa, Taiju

    1978-01-01

    An actual condition of cancer, and the basis and a future view of radiotherapy were described by adding generally established biological and biochemical knowledge to the author's research. It was described that the relapse of cancer after irradiation was induced from outside of cancerous mass, and the nature of relapsed cancerous cells group was also stated. The histological structure of cancer from a view of cell movement and radioresistant cancerous cells group were described. The differentiation of cancerous cells were described, and a study of inhibition of cancer by redifferentiation was considered. It is important to grasp characteristics and a limit of radiotherapy for cancer, to systematize and materialize reasonable therapy which uses drug and immunotherapy together with surgery, and to use radiotherapy reasonably together with redifferentiation therapy of cancerous cells by extracting characteristics and a limit of radiationtherapy from an actual condition of cancer. (Serizawa, K.)

  3. Deadly Sunflower Orbits

    Hamilton, Douglas P.

    2018-04-01

    Solar radiation pressure is usually very effective at removing hazardous millimeter-sized debris from distant orbits around asteroidsand other small solar system bodies (Hamilton and Burns 1992). Theprimary loss mechanism, driven by the azimuthal component of radiationpressure, is eccentricity growth followed by a forced collision withthe central body. One large class of orbits, however, neatly sidestepsthis fate. Orbits oriented nearly perpendicular to the solar directioncan maintain their face-on geometry, oscillating slowly around a stableequilibrium orbit. These orbits, designated sunflower orbits, arerelated to terminator orbits studied by spacecraft mission designers(Broschart etal. 2014).Destabilization of sunflower orbits occurs only for particles smallenough that radiation pressure is some tens of percent the strength ofthe central body's direct gravity. This greatly enhanced stability,which follows from the inability of radiation incident normal to theorbit to efficiently drive eccentricities, presents a threat tospacecraft missions, as numerous dangerous projectiles are potentiallyretained in orbit. We have investigated sunflower orbits insupport of the New Horizons, Aida, and Lucy missions and find thatthese orbits are stable for hazardous particle sizes at asteroids,comets, and Kuiper belt objects of differing dimensions. Weinvestigate the sources and sinks for debris that might populate suchorbits, estimate timescales and equilibrium populations, and willreport on our findings.

  4. Orbital fractures: a review

    Jeffrey M Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey M Joseph, Ioannis P GlavasDivision of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, New York University, New York, NY, USA; Manhattan Eye, Ear, and Throat Hospital, New York, NY, USAAbstract: This review of orbital fractures has three goals: 1 to understand the clinically relevant orbital anatomy with regard to periorbital trauma and orbital fractures, 2 to explain how to assess and examine a patient after periorbital trauma, and 3 to understand the medical and surgical management of orbital fractures. The article aims to summarize the evaluation and management of commonly encountered orbital fractures from the ophthalmologic perspective and to provide an overview for all practicing ophthalmologists and ophthalmologists in training.Keywords: orbit, trauma, fracture, orbital floor, medial wall, zygomatic, zygomatic complex, zmc fracture, zygomaticomaxillary complex fractures 

  5. Radiotherapy for the medulloblastoma

    Gose, Kyuhei; Imajo, Yoshinari; Imanaka, Kazufumi

    1983-01-01

    Eighteen patients with medulloblastoma, treated between 1972 and 1981, at Kobe University School of Medicine, were retrospectively studied. Of those completing post operative irradiation, 50% have survived for 2 years, 15% for 5 years and mean survival periods was 22.2 months. 13 out of 18 patients developed local recurrence and spinal dissemination. The mean time from the initial radiotherapy to recurrence was 8.5 months. It was suggested that posterior fossa should recieve 5,000 rad, the spine should 2,000 rad and recurrences should be treated by the combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. (author)

  6. Arterial disease after radiotherapy

    Bigot, J.M.; Mathieu, D.; Reizine, D.

    1983-01-01

    Disease of the large arterial vessels is a relatively unknown complication of radiotherapy. However, it should be considered in the same manner as the other complications of irradiation when a tumour recurrence is suspected. The experimental studies of Kirkpatrick and Konings, demonstrating the synergy between irradiation and hypercholesterolemia in the precocity and gravity of vascular complications are recalled. The different localisations reported in the litterature are discussed: coronary, pulmonary, thoracic aorta, supra aortic, renal, digestive and ilio-femoral arteries. Finally, the difficulty of diagnosis of post-radiotherapy without clinical, radiological or anatomopathological confirmation, is underlined [fr

  7. Second cancers following radiotherapy

    Tubiana, M.

    1983-01-01

    Published reports have shown that there is an increased incidence of second malignancies, particularly sarcomas, following high dose radiotherapy in cancer treatment. However, this increased risk is very small and is relatively negligeable when one considers the beneficial effects of radiotherapy in cancer treatment. This incidence of radiation induced cancer appears to be higher in certain groups of patients, such as children and patients with Hodgkin's disease. In view of scarcity of published data, controlled surveys remain necessary for the quantitative assessment of the cancer risk in various subgroups of irradited patients [fr

  8. Xerostomia induced by radiotherapy

    Alimi D

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available David Alimi Department of Anesthesiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USAWe read with great interest the excellent review on xerostomia induced by radiotherapy, by Pinna et al.1 The authors should be congratulated for a very detailed review of the physiopathology, clinical symptoms, and therapeutic management of an extremely difficult condition. Although we agree that the use of anticholinergic medication represents treatment, it requires the patient to have residual salivary gland function. Unfortunately, it is well established that in most cases radiotherapy destroys most of the salivary gland and associated salivary secretions.     

  9. Wstępna ocena ryzyka zawodowego fizjoterapeuty za pomocą metody SWP = Preliminary evaluation of occupational risk for physiotherapists using the SWP method

    Kinga Dorota Kulczycka

    2016-09-01

      Wstępna ocena ryzyka zawodowego fizjoterapeuty za pomocą metody SWP Preliminary evaluation of occupational risk for physiotherapists using the SWP method   Kinga Kulczycka, Marcin Domagała, Ewa Stychno   Katedra i Zakład Zarządzania w  Pielęgniarstwie Wydział Nauk o  Zdrowiu Uniwersytet Medyczny w Lublinie Chair and Department of Management in Nursing Faculty Health Sciences Medical University of Lublin   Słowa kluczowe: Narażenie zawodowe, Fizjoterapeuci, Obciążenie pracą Key words: Occupational exposure, Physical therapists, Workload       Dr n. med. Kinga Kulczycka, mgr. Marcin Domagała, dr n.med. Ewa Stychno   Doctor of Medical Sciences Kinga Kulczycka, Holder of University Degree Marcin Domagała, Doctor of Medical Sciences Ewa Stychno     Streszczenie  Sposób wykonywania pracy, w warunkach znacznego obciążenia  ma wielkie znaczenie w profilaktyce zaburzeń układu mięśniowo-szkieletowego. Praca fizjoterapeutów często wiąże się z koniecznością przyjmowania niefizjologicznych  pozycji ciała, w trakcie których może dojść do urazów. Celem badania jest rozpoznanie pozycji ciała przyjmowanych przez fizjoterapeutów podczas pracy, które mogą stanowić  czynniki ryzyka związane ze  sposobem wykonywania pracy fizjoterapeuty. Materiał i metody  Badania przeprowadzono w 2014 r. z udziałem 100 fizjoterapeutów pracujących na oddziałach rehabilitacji, na terenie województwa Świętokrzyskiego. Wyniki Respondenci oceniali jako niewłaściwe przyjmowane  pozycje ciała, które zaobserwowali podczas wykonywania czynności zawodowych związane są z  pochylaniem podczas wykonywania czynności,  zgięcie odcinka lędźwiowego kręgosłupa i częste rotacje. Jako dodatkowe obciążenia w pracy uważali zginanie głowy do przodu lub skręcenie karku. Ruchy ramion stanowią znaczną uciążliwość dla fizjoterapeutów i występują podczas podnoszenia rąk do przodu i przesuwaniu ich w kierunku klatki piersiowej

  10. Management of periorbital basal cell carcinoma with orbital invasion.

    Sun, Michelle T; Wu, Albert; Figueira, Edwin; Huilgol, Shyamala; Selva, Dinesh

    2015-11-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common eyelid malignancy; however, orbital invasion by periocular BCC is rare, and management remains challenging. Established risk factors for orbital invasion by BCC include male gender, advanced age, medial canthal location, previous recurrences, large tumor size, aggressive histologic subtype and perineural invasion. Management requires a multidisciplinary approach with orbital exenteration remaining the treatment of choice. Globe-sparing treatment may be appropriate in selected patients and radiotherapy and chemotherapy are often used as adjuvant therapies for advanced or inoperable cases, although the evidence remains limited. We aim to summarize the presentation and treatment of BCC with orbital invasion to better guide the management of this complex condition.

  11. Orbital metastasis: A rare manifestation of scapular bone osteosarcoma

    Mohammad Taher Rajabi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report a case of orbital metastasis from scapular bone osteosarcoma. Case Report: A 55-year-old man who was a known case of scapular bone osteosarcoma, was referred to our clinic with ocular symptoms including acute painful decreased vision, proptosis, conjunctival injection, and chemosis. He had undergone surgical excision of the original tumor and received systemic chemotherapy 4 months before. Imaging studies and incisional biopsy were performed for the orbital lesion, the histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of metastatic osteosarcoma. The patient was referred to the oncologist for palliative chemotherapy and further intervention; however, he deceased 2 months later due to sepsis in the context of immunosuppression. Conclusion: Metastatic involvement of the orbit due to osteosarcoma is a rare condition manifesting with orbital mass, pain, diplopia and ocular motility disturbance. Although there is no effective treatment, the combination of modalities such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and surgery may delay progression of the disease.

  12. Radiation retinopathy after orbital irradiation for Graves' ophthalmopathy

    Kinyoun, J.L.; Kalina, R.E.; Brower, S.A.; Mills, R.P.; Johnson, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    Recent reports indicate that orbital irradiation for Graves' ophthalmopathy is sometimes beneficial, particularly for dysthyroid optic neuropathy, and is not associated with serious complications. We are aware, however, of four patients who were found to have radiation retinopathy after orbital irradiation for Grave's ophthalmopathy. All four patients have decreased central acuity, and three of the four are legally blind in one or both eyes. Computer reconstruction of the dosimetry, based on computed tomography and beam profiles, shows that errors in dosage calculations and radiotherapy technique probably account for the radiation retinopathy in three of the four patients. Radiotherapy for Graves' ophthalmopathy should be administered only by competent radiotherapists who are experienced in the treatment of this disease. Similar errors in dosage calculations and treatment techniques may account for other reports of radiation retinopathy after reportedly safe dosages

  13. Erythropoietin and radiotherapy; Erythropoietine et radiotherapie

    Le Fur, E.; Albarghach, M.N.; Pradier, O. [CHU de Morvan, Dept. de radiotherapie, 29 - Brest (France)

    2010-01-15

    Erythropoietin (E.P.O.) is a glycoprotein hormone. This hormone is a growth factor for red blood cells precursors in the bone marrow. The decrease of oxygen partial pressure, a reduced number of erythrocytes caused by bleeding or excessive destruction, or increased tissues oxygen requirements lead to increased secretion of E.P.O.. Its action takes place on bone marrow erythroblastic cells through specific receptors. E.P.O. stimulates the proliferation of red cell precursors stem cells in the bone marrow, thus increasing their production in one to two weeks. The effectiveness of E.P.O. at increasing haemoglobin and improving patients quality of life has been demonstrated by several studies. However, its use in radiotherapy remains controversial. While tumour hypoxia caused by anaemia is a factor of radio resistance and thus a source of local failure, tumour expression of E.P.O. receptors presents a significant risk for tumour progression and neo-angiogenesis, which would be increased during the administration of E.P.O.. The purpose of this article is to answer the question: is there a place for E.P.O. in combination with radiotherapy in the management of cancer?

  14. Multileaf collimator in radiotherapy

    Jeraj, M.; Robar, V.

    2004-01-01

    Background. Basic goal of radiotherapy treatment is the irradiation of a target volume while minimizing the amount of radiation absorbed in healthy tissue. Shaping the beam is an important way of minimizing the absorbed dose in healthy tissue and critical structures. Conventional collimator jaws are used for shaping a rectangular treatment field; but, as usually treatment volume is not rectangular, additional shaping is required. On a linear accelerator, lead blocks or individually made Cerroben TM blocks are attached onto the treatment head under standard collimating system. Another option is the use of multileaf collimator (MLC). Conclusions. Multileaf collimator is becoming the main tool for beam shaping on the linear accelerator. It is a simple and useful system in the preparation and performance of radiotherapy treatment. Multileaf collimators are reliable, as their manufacturers developed various mechanisms for their precision, control and reliability, together with reduction of leakage and transmission of radiation between and through the leaves. Multileaf collimator is known today as a very useful clinical system for simple field shaping, but its use is getting even more important in dynamic radiotherapy, with the leaves moving during irradiation. This enables a precise dose delivery on any part of a treated volume. Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), the therapy of the future, is based on the dynamic use of MLC. (author)

  15. [Radiotherapy of oropharynx carcinoma].

    Servagi Vernat, S; Tochet, F; Vieillevigne, L; Pointreau, Y; Maingon, P; Giraud, P

    2016-09-01

    Indication, doses, technique of radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy for oropharynx carcinoma are presented. The recommendations for delineation of the target volumes and organs at risk are detailed. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Quality indicators in radiotherapy

    Cionini, Luca; Gardani, Gianstefano; Gabriele, Pietro; Magri, Secondo; Morosini, Pier Luigi; Rosi, Antonella; Viti, Vincenza

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: There is a widespread and increasing tendency to develop hospital performance indicators in the field of accreditation/certification systems and quality benchmarking. A study has been undertaken to develop a set of performance indicators for a typical radiotherapy Centre and to evaluate their ability to provide a continuous quality improvement. Materials and methods: A working group consisting of radiation oncologists, medical physicists and radiation technologists under the coordination of experts in health technology assessment has elaborated a set of general indicators able to monitor performances and the quality level of a typical radiotherapy Centre. The work has been carried out through four steps: a preliminary set of indicators was selected; data on these indicators were collected in a number of Italian radiotherapy Centres and medical physics Services; problems in collection and analysis of data were discussed; a final set of indicators was developed. Results: A final set of 13 indicators is here presented. They concern general structural and/or operational features, health physics activities and accuracy and technical complexity of the treatment. Conclusions: The indicators tested in a few Italian Centres of radiotherapy and medical physics Services are now ready to be utilized by a larger community

  17. Bowel disease after radiotherapy

    Schofield, P.F.; Holden, D.; Carr, N.D. (Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Inst., Manchester (UK))

    1983-06-01

    The clinical presentation, operative findings and outcome in 40 patients who required surgery for bowel disease after radiotherapy are presented. The type of presentation varied according to the time after radiotherapy. In the first month, many patients had a proctitis but none required surgery. Five patients were operated on within one month, 2 for radiation-induced acute ileitis and 3 for exacerbations of pre-existing disease (diverticular disease 2, ulcerative colitis 1). The commonest time of presentation was between 3 and 18 months after radiotherapy, when 20 patients needed surgery for bowel disease caused by radiation-induced local ischaemia. Twelve of these patients had chronic perforation, 6 had severe rectal bleeding and 2 had painful anorectal ulceration. Fifteen patients presented between 2 and 24 years after radiotherapy, usually with incomplete intestinal obstruction due to a fibrous stricture, but 2 patients had rectal carcinoma. Wide resection of the involved bowel was the principal method of treatment but any anastomosis was protected by a proximal defunctioning stoma. There was no operative mortality but 10 patients have died subsequently. The danger of dismissing these patients as having incurable malignancy is stressed because, although the condition is infrequent, it is usually amenable to adequate surgery.

  18. Radiotherapy of breast fibrosis

    Heibel, J.H.

    1979-01-01

    In a retrospective study radiotherapy of breast fibrosis in hormone-treated men with histologically confirmed prostate carcinoma was examined. 10 patients had received hormones even before irradiation, 113 obtained hormone administration only after irradiation. The objective size of the glandular body and the overall size of the breast were measured with a special method developed by the author. 46 patients indicated complaints. With hypertrophic mamma and hypertrophic mamilla in 67 examined patients, 127 different symptoms resulted in total. Four patients of the group who had obtained hormones before irradiation, suffered from subjective symptoms. It resulted that radiotherapy of breast fibrosis carried out during hormone treatment is no gynecomastia prophylaxis, that already existent mamma hypertrophies are irreversible, but that existent sensations were notably reduced within 6 months after irradiation therapy. These results indicate the necessity of a radiotherapy of the mamma fibrosis before the hormone treatment is begun. Particularly in cases of higher operative risks, also the possibility of preferring radiotherapy to mastectomy should be fully utilized, in view of adequate or even better therapeutic results. (orig./MG) [de

  19. Gamma apparatuses for radiotherapy

    Sul'kin, A.G.

    1986-01-01

    Scientific and technical achievements in development and application of gamma therapeutic apparatuses for external and intracavity irradiations are generalized. Radiation-physical parameters of apparatuses providing usability of progressive methods in radiotherapy of onclogical patients are given. Optimization of main apparatus elements, ensurance of its operation reliability, reduction of errors of irradiation plan reproduction are considered. Attention is paid to radiation safety

  20. Four R's of radiotherapy

    Withers, H.R.

    1975-01-01

    Radiotherapy given as multiple doses can be effective in sterilizing cancers, but the processes whereby the neoplasm is eradicated and the normal tissues are preserved are not fully understood. The differential between normal tissue and tumor response is enhanced by dose fractionation, single doses resulting in severe normal tissue injury when the dose is sufficient to control a proportion of treated tumors. Data are reviewed from radiobiological studies on laboratory animals and cultured cells that have thrown some light on four of the phenomena that influence the outcome of fractionated-dose radiotherapy, one or more of which may account for the relative sparing of normal tissues. These are repair of sublethal injury in normal and neoplastic cells, reoxygenation of the tumor, redistribution through the division cycle, and regeneration of surviving normal and malignant cells between dose fractions. These have been called the four R's of fractionated radiotherapy. Other factors are involved in the outcome of multifraction radiotherapy, including maintenance of the architectural integrity of the normal tissues, the volume of tissue irradi []ted, the tumor bed, and the immunocompetence of the host. (90 references) (CH)

  1. Quality assurance in radiotherapy

    2003-03-01

    Good radiotherapy results and safety of treatment require the radiation to be optimally applied to a specified target area and the correct dose. According to international recommendations, the average uncertainty in therapeutic dose should not exceed 5%. The need for high precision in therapeutic dose requires quality assurance covering the entire radiotherapy process. Besides the physical and technical characteristics of the therapy equipment, quality assurance must include all radiotherapy equipment and procedures that are significant for the correct magnitude and precision of application of the therapeutic dose. The duties and responsibilities pertaining to various stages of treatment must also be precisely defined. These requirements may be best implemented through a quality system. The general requirements for supervision and quality assurance of medical radiation apparatus are prescribed in section 40 of the Radiation Act (592/1991, amendment 1142/1998) and in sections 18 and 32 of the Decree of the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health on the medical use of radiation (423/2000). Guide ST 2.2 imposes requirements on structural radiation shielding of radiotherapy equipment and the premises in which it is used, and on warning and safety arrangements. Guide ST 1.1 sets out the general safety principles for radiation practices and regulatory control procedure for the use of radiation. Guide ST 1.6 provides general requirements for operational measures in the use of radiation. This Guide sets out the duties of responsible parties (the party running a radiation practice) in respect of arranging and maintaining radiotherapy quality assurance. The principles set out in this Guide and Guide ST 6.3 may be applied to radionuclide therapy

  2. Radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    Krause, S.; Herfarth, K.

    2011-01-01

    With the development of modern radiation techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), a dose escalation in the definitive radiotherapy of prostate cancer and a consecutive improvement in biochemical recurrence-free survival (BFS) could be achieved. Among others, investigators at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) saw 5-year BFS rates of up to 98%. A further gain in effectiveness and safety is expected of hypofractionation schedules, as suggested by data published by Kupelian et al., who saw a low 5-year rate of grade ≥2 rectal side-effects of 4.5%. However, randomized studies are just beginning to mature. Patients with intermediate or high-risk tumors should receive neoadjuvant (NHT) and adjuvant (AHT) androgen deprivation. Bolla et al. could show an increase in 5-year overall survival from 62-78%. The inclusion of the whole pelvis in the treatment field (WPRT) is still controversial. The RTOG 94-13 study showed a significant advantage in disease-free survival after 60 months but long-term data did not yield significant differences between WPRT and irradiation of the prostate alone. The German Society of Urology strongly recommends adjuvant radiotherapy of the prostate bed for pT3 N0 tumors with positive margins. In a pT3 N0 R0 or pT2 N0 R+ situation, adjuvant radiotherapy should at least be considered. So far, no randomized data on NHT and AHT have been published, so androgen deprivation remains an individual decision in the postoperative setting. In a retrospective analysis Spiotto et al. reported a positive effect for adjuvant WPRT and biochemical control. This article summarizes the essential publications on definitive and adjuvant radiotherapy and discusses the additional use of androgen deprivation and WPRT. (orig.) [de

  3. Radiotherapy and brachytherapy

    2007-02-01

    This presentation first defines the radiotherapy and brachytherapy techniques, indicates the used ionizing radiations (electromagnetic and particles), describes the mechanisms and processes of action of ionizing radiations: they can be physical by photon-matter interactions (Compton effect and photoelectric effect) or due to electron-matter interactions (excitation, ionization), physical-chemical by direct or indirect action (DNA damage), cellular (mitotic or apoptotic death), tissue (sane and tumorous tissues and differential effect). It discusses the biological efficiency of these treatments which depends on different parameters: intrinsic radio-sensitivity, time (session fractioning and organisation in time), oxygen, radiation quality, cellular cycle, dose rate, temperature. It presents the different types of radiotherapy: external radiotherapy (general sequence, delineation, dosimetry, protection of critical organs, treatment session, quality control, monitoring consultation) and briefly presents some specific techniques (total body irradiation, total cutaneous electron therapy, pre-operation radiotherapy, radio-surgery, hadron-therapy). It proposes an overview of the main indications for this treatment: brain tumours, upper aero digestive tract tumours, bronchial tumours, oesophagus, stomach and pancreas tumours, breast tumours, cervix cancer, rectum tumour, and so on, and indicates the possible associated treatments. The next part addresses brachytherapy. It presents the principles and comments the differences with radiotherapy. It indicates the used radio-elements (Caesium 137, Iridium 192, Iodine 125), describes the implementation techniques (plastic tubes, use of iodine 125, intracavitary and endo-luminal radiation therapy). It proposes an overview of the different treated tumours (skin, breast, prostates, bronchial, oesophagus, ENT) and indicates possible early and late secondary effects for different organs

  4. Congenital orbital teratoma

    Aiyub, Shereen; Chan, Weng Onn; Szetu, John; Sullivan, Laurence J; Pater, John; Cooper, Peter; Selva, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of mature congenital orbital teratoma managed with lid-sparing exenteration and dermis fat graft. This is a case report on the management of congenital orbital teratoma. A full-term baby was born in Fiji with prolapsed right globe which was surrounded by a nonpulsatile, cystic mass. Clinical and imaging features were consistent with congenital orbital teratoma. Due to limited surgical expertise, the patient was transferred to Adelaide, Australia for further management. The p...

  5. Pictorial essay: Orbital tuberculosis

    Narula, Mahender K; Chaudhary, Vikas; Baruah, Dhiraj; Kathuria, Manoj; Anand, Rama

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis of the orbit is rare, even in places where tuberculosis is endemic. The disease may involve soft tissue, the lacrimal gland, or the periosteum or bones of the orbital wall. Intracranial extension, in the form of extradural abscess, and infratemporal fossa extension has been described. This pictorial essay illustrates the imaging findings of nine histopathologically confirmed cases of orbital tuberculosis. All these patients responded to antituberculous treatment

  6. Radiology of orbital trauma

    Kelly, J.K.; Lazo, A.; Metes, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    Computed tomography has become the gold standard against which to measure orbital imaging modalities. The simultaneous display of bone, soft tissues, paranasal sinuses, and intracranial structures is a unique advantage. Radiation dose and cost have been cited as disadvantages. These would suggest that CT be reserved for the patient with significant orbital injury or difficult diagnostic problems. Magnetic resonance is limited in the investigation of orbital trauma

  7. Neonatal orbital abscess

    Khalil M Al-Salem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Orbital complications due to ethmoiditis are rare in neonates. A case of orbital abscess due to acute ethmoiditis in a 28-day-old girl is presented. A Successful outcome was achieved following antimicrobial therapy alone; spontaneous drainage of the abscess occurred from the lower lid without the need for surgery. From this case report, we intend to emphasize on eyelid retraction as a sign of neonatal orbital abscess, and to review all the available literature of similar cases.

  8. Orbital glass in HTSC

    Kusmartsev, F.V.

    1992-10-01

    The physical reasons why the orbital glass may exist in granular high-temperature superconductors and the existing experimental data appeared recently are discussed. The orbital glass is characterized by the coexistence of the orbital paramagnetic state with the superconducting state and occurs at small magnetic fields H c0 c1 . The transition in orbital glass arises at the critical field H c0 which is inversely proportional to the surface cross-area S of an average grain. In connection with theoretical predictions the possible experiments are proposed. (author). 10 refs

  9. Orbital manifestations in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    Sodhi, Punita Kumari

    2014-01-01

    The orbital manifestations of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome(AIDS) are uncommon. To provide a review of orbital manifestations of AIDS, the predisposing factors, investigations, treatment and outcome. Meticulous and systematic literature search of Pubmed to identify manuscripts describing orbital manifestations of AIDS was done and the articles were reviewed.The keywords used in the search were “orbit and AIDS”, “HIV positive and orbit”,“orbit manifestations in AIDS”, “orbital disease and AIDS” and “orbital infections and AIDS”. The orbital involvement in AIDS may present with opportunistic infections from organisms like fungi, viruses, bacteria and protozoa or with malignancies like Kaposi’s sarcoma, squamous cell carcinoma, smooth muscle cell tumors and lymphoma.The predisposing factors for orbital involvement in AIDS are low CD4+ cell count and the immunosuppressive states like diabetes, diabetic ketoacidosis, intravenous drug abuse and neutropenia. A patient may present with fever, headache, nausea, vomiting,decreased vision, ocular pain, and, in cases of mass formation, there is periorbital swelling, axial proptosis, globe displacement and swollen optic disc. Radiologically,mass formation, orbital bony destruction, and spread of disease to contiguous structures including the central nervous system may be seen. The medical management includes therapy for infection and HIV-1 protease inhibitors (highly active antiretroviral therapy)to suppress HIV-1 replication. For tumors, radical surgery including debulking followed by postoperative radiotherapy is generally needed. Orbital involvements with AIDS in any form, infective or malignancy, causes significant morbidity and mortality and should be diagnosed and managed as early as possible.

  10. Congenital orbital encephalocele, orbital dystopia, and exophthalmos.

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Han Joon

    2012-07-01

    We present here an exceedingly rare variant of a nonmidline basal encephalocele of the spheno-orbital type, and this was accompanied with orbital dystopia in a 56-year-old man. On examination, his left eye was located more inferolaterally than his right eye, and the patient said this had been this way since his birth. The protrusion of his left eye was aggravated when he is tired. His naked visual acuity was 0.7/0.3, and the ocular pressure was 14/12 mm Hg. The exophthalmometry was 10/14 to 16 mm. His eyeball motion was not restricted, yet diplopia was present in all directions. The distance from the midline to the medial canthus was 20/15 mm. The distance from the midline to the midpupillary line was 35/22 mm. The vertical dimension of the palpebral fissure was 12/9 mm. The height difference of the upper eyelid margin was 11 mm, and the height difference of the lower eyelid margin was 8 mm. Facial computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed left sphenoid wing hypoplasia and herniation of the left anterior temporal pole and dura mater into the orbit, and this resulted into left exophthalmos and encephalomalacia in the left anterior temporal pole. To the best of our knowledge, our case is the second case of basal encephalocele and orbital dystopia.

  11. Titan Orbiter Aerorover Mission

    Sittler Jr., E. C.; Acuna, M.; Burchell, M. J.; Coates, A.; Farrell, W.; Flasar, M.; Goldstein, B. E.; Gorevan, S.; Hartle, R. E.; Johnson, W. T. K.

    2001-01-01

    We propose a combined Titan orbiter and Titan Aerorover mission with an emphasis on both in situ and remote sensing measurements of Titan's surface, atmosphere, ionosphere, and magnetospheric interaction. The biological aspect of the Titan environment will be emphasized by the mission (i.e., search for organic materials which may include simple organics to 'amono' analogues of amino acids and possibly more complex, lightening detection and infrared, ultraviolet, and charged particle interactions with Titan's surface and atmosphere). An international mission is assumed to control costs. NASA will provide the orbiter, launch vehicle, DSN coverage and operations, while international partners will provide the Aerorover and up to 30% of the cost for the scientific instruments through collaborative efforts. To further reduce costs we propose a single PI for orbiter science instruments and a single PI for Aerorover science instruments. This approach will provide single command/data and power interface between spacecraft and orbiter instruments that will have redundant central DPU and power converter for their instruments. A similar approach could be used for the Aerorover. The mission profile will be constructed to minimize conflicts between Aerorover science, orbiter radar science, orbiter radio science, orbiter imaging science, and orbiter fields and particles (FP) science. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. Orbital and adnexal sarcoidosis

    Prabhakaran, Venkatesh C.; Saeed, Perooz; Esmaeli, Bita; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Mcnab, Alan; Davis, Garry; Valenzuela, Alejandra; Leibovitch, Igal; Kesler, Anat; Sivak-Callcott, Jennifer; Hoyama, Erika; Selva, Dinesh

    2007-01-01

    To present the clinical features and management in a series of patients with orbital and adnexal sarcoidosis. This multicenter retrospective study included patients with biopsy-proven noncaseating granuloma involving the orbit or adnexa and evidence of systemic sarcoidosis. Clinical records were

  13. Update on orbital reconstruction.

    Chen, Chien-Tzung; Chen, Yu-Ray

    2010-08-01

    Orbital trauma is common and frequently complicated by ocular injuries. The recent literature on orbital fracture is analyzed with emphasis on epidemiological data assessment, surgical timing, method of approach and reconstruction materials. Computed tomographic (CT) scan has become a routine evaluation tool for orbital trauma, and mobile CT can be applied intraoperatively if necessary. Concomitant serious ocular injury should be carefully evaluated preoperatively. Patients presenting with nonresolving oculocardiac reflex, 'white-eyed' blowout fracture, or diplopia with a positive forced duction test and CT evidence of orbital tissue entrapment require early surgical repair. Otherwise, enophthalmos can be corrected by late surgery with a similar outcome to early surgery. The use of an endoscope-assisted approach for orbital reconstruction continues to grow, offering an alternative method. Advances in alloplastic materials have improved surgical outcome and shortened operating time. In this review of modern orbital reconstruction, several controversial issues such as surgical indication, surgical timing, method of approach and choice of reconstruction material are discussed. Preoperative fine-cut CT image and thorough ophthalmologic examination are key elements to determine surgical indications. The choice of surgical approach and reconstruction materials much depends on the surgeon's experience and the reconstruction area. Prefabricated alloplastic implants together with image software and stereolithographic models are significant advances that help to more accurately reconstruct the traumatized orbit. The recent evolution of orbit reconstruction improves functional and aesthetic results and minimizes surgical complications.

  14. Orbital wall fractures

    Iinuma, Toshitaka; Ishio, Ken-ichirou; Yoshinami, Hiroyoshi; Kuriyama, Jun-ichi; Hirota, Yoshiharu.

    1993-01-01

    A total of 59 cases of mild facial fractures (simple orbital wall fractures, 34 cases, other facial fractures, 25 cases) with the clinical suspects of orbital wall fractures were evaluated both by conventional views (Waters' and Caldwell views) and coronal CT scans. Conventional views were obtained, as an average, after 4 days and CT after 7 days of injuries. Both the medial wall and the floor were evaluated at two sites, i.e., anterior and posterior. The ethmoid-maxillary plate was also included in the study. The degree of fractures was classified as, no fractures, fractures of discontinuity, dislocation and fragmentation. The coronal CT images in bone window condition was used as reference and the findings were compared between conventional views and CT. The correct diagnosis was obtained as follows: orbital floor (anterior, 78%, posterior, 73%), medial orbital wall (anterior, 72%, posterior, 72%) and ethmoid-maxillary plate (64%). The false positive diagnosis was as follows: orbital floor (anterior only, 13%), medial orbital wall (anterior only, 7%) and ethmoid-maxillary plate (11%). The false negative diagnosis was as follows: orbital floor (anterior, 9%, posterior, 10%), medial orbital wall (anterior, 21%, posterior, 28%) and ethmoid-maxillary plate (21%). The results were compared with those of others in the past. (author)

  15. Peripheral orbit model

    Hara, Yasuo

    1975-01-01

    Peripheral orbit model, in which an incoming hadron is assumed to revolve in a peripheral orbit around a target hadron, is discussed. The non-diffractive parts of two-body reaction amplitudes of hadrons are expressed in terms of the radius, width an absorptivity of the orbit. The radius of the orbit is about 1 fm and the width of the orbit is determined by the range of the interaction between the hadrons. The model reproduces all available experimental data on differential cross-sections and polarizations of $K^{-}p\\to K^{-}p$ and $\\bar K^{\\circ}n$ reactions for all angles successfully. This contribution is not included in the proceedings since it will appear in Progress of Theoretical Physics Vol. 51 (1974) No 2. Any person interested in the subject may apply for reprints to the author.

  16. External audit in radiotherapy dosimetry

    Thwaites, D.I.; Western General Hospital, Edinburgh

    1996-01-01

    Quality audit forms an essential part of any comprehensive quality assurance programme. This is true in radiotherapy generally and in specific areas such as radiotherapy dosimetry. Quality audit can independently test the effectiveness of the quality system and in so doing can identify problem areas and minimize their possible consequences. Some general points concerning quality audit applied to radiotherapy are followed by specific discussion of its practical role in radiotherapy dosimetry, following its evolution from dosimetric intercomparison exercises to routine measurement-based on-going audit in the various developing audit networks both in the UK and internationally. Specific examples of methods and results are given from some of these, including the Scottish+ audit group. Quality audit in radiotherapy dosimetry is now well proven and participation by individual centres is strongly recommended. Similar audit approaches are to be encouraged in other areas of the radiotherapy process. (author)

  17. Radiotherapy of lymphogranulomatosis

    Roettinger, E.M.; Sack, H.

    1976-01-01

    Increased knowledge about the course of lymphogranulomatosis and technological progress in radiotherapy during the past 20 years have brought permanent recovery for a major part of patients from this disease which had been infaust before. The supplementation of the local radiotherapy by the systematic effects of chemotherapy enables us at the same time to control the infiltrations and disseminations which cannot be manifested clinically especially in malignant forms and later stages. The good healing results obtained presuppose careful clinical examination of the patient and attentive care during the therapy with regard to the potential complications of radio- and chemotherapy. As potential complications which may occur according to the method used we may name damage to the kidneys, radiopneumonia or pulmonal fibrosis, myocarditis or pericarditis, oeosophagitis, enteritis, and hepatitis. Relatively seldom we see the permanent depression of the bone marrow, induction of leucaemia, and myxoedema. All these complications can occure more frequently in the case of additional chemotherapy. (orig./MG) [de

  18. Combined radiotherapy-chemotherapy

    Steel, G.G.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the clinically confirmed benefits of combined chemotherapy-radiotherapy. They have been found in a small group of diseases that respond to chemotherapy alone. According to the author, only when a drug or drug combination has the ability to eradicate occult disease or substantially to reduce the size of objectively measurable disease is there likely to be an demonstrable benefit from its use in conjunction with radiotherapy. It is the author's belief that the immediate future lies in selecting drugs and patients in which a good chemotherapeutic response can be expected, avoiding drugs that seriously enhance radiation damage to normal tissues and keeping drug and radiation treatments far enough apart in time to minimize interactions

  19. Conformal radiotherapy: a glossary

    Dubray, B.; Giraud, P.; Beaudre, A.

    1999-01-01

    Most of the concepts and terms related to conformal radiotherapy were produced by English-speaking authors and eventually validated by international groups of experts, whose working language was also English. Therefore, a significant part of this literature is poorly accessible to the French-speaking radiation oncology community. The present paper gathers the 'official' definitions already published in French, along with propositions for the remaining terms which should be submitted to a more formal and representative validation process. (author)

  20. Imagination in radiotherapy

    Pourrez, A.; Truc, G.; Santona, M.; Crehange, G.; Peignaux, K.; Martin, E.; Maingon, P.

    2010-01-01

    Based on a questionnaire given to the patients of a radiotherapy department and to the personnel of a centre of struggle against cancer, the study aimed at revealing imagination and representations about such an advanced medical technology, radio-physics and radioactivity. The patients and personnel were asked to answer the questionnaire with free words, images, or by expressing their own intimate or cultural visions of this environment. Implications on patients' anguish are foreseen. Short communication

  1. The pioneer of radiotherapy

    Camilleri, J.P.; Coursaget, J.

    2005-09-01

    This work narrates the history of the birth of a new field, the radiology and its application to radiotherapy for these multiform pathologies that are the cancers. Two leading figures will favour this field: Marie Curie, physicist and twice awarded by nobel price, and Claudius Regaud, histologist and become a specialist of the action of ionizing radiations on tissues. They will create the Curie Institute, in relation with the Radium Institute and the support of the Pasteur Institute in 1920. (N.C.)

  2. Quality control in radiotherapy

    Batalla, A.

    2009-01-01

    The authors discuss the modalities and periodicities of internal quality control on radiotherapy installations. They indicate the different concerned systems and the aspects and items to be controlled (patient and personnel security, apparatus mechanical characteristics, beam quality, image quality, isodose and irradiation duration calculation, data transfer). They present the measurement instruments and tools used for the mechanical controls, dose measurement, beam homogeneity and symmetry, anatomic data acquisition systems, and dose distribution and control imagery calculation

  3. Radiotherapy of endocrine orbitopathy

    Weischedel, U.; Wieland, C.

    1985-01-01

    After a review of the history and a discussion of recent theories about pathogenesis of endocrine ophthalmopathy the authros give a report on their radiotherapeutical treatment results with cobalt-60-γ-rays in 50 patients. Amelioration was achieved in 50% of the cases, in the other 50% no progression was seen. Radiotherapy is of antiphlogistic and functional effectivity and should be integrated in the treatment regime in early stages. (orig.) [de

  4. Surveillance after prostate cancer radiotherapy

    Supiot, S.; Rio, E.; Clement-Colmou, K.; Bouchot, O.; Rigaud, J.

    2011-01-01

    Follow-up after prostate cancer radiotherapy aims at detecting local or metastatic relapse, as well as long-term toxicity, requiring adapted treatments. Several scientific societies have published guidelines including clinical, biological and imaging recommendations. More data suggest a role for aggressive salvage therapy in case of local failure following radiotherapy. An adequate follow-up is required for the sake of patients' safety, i.e. to a posteriori validate dose constraints and radiation technique in each radiotherapy department. (authors)

  5. Radiotherapy of vertebral hemangiomas

    Sakata, Kohichi; Hareyama, Masato; Oouchi, Atushi; Sido, Mitsuo; Nagakura, Hisayasu; Tamakawa, Mituharu; Akiba, Hidenari; Morita, Kazuo

    1997-01-01

    Between 1975 and 1996, 14 patients (11 females, 3 males) with vertebral hemangioma received treatment with radiotherapy. Thirteen patients had a history of back pain or lumbago and 2 patients had neurological symptoms such as sensory impairment or paraplegia. The standard dose administered was 36 Gy in 18 fractions (five treatments per week). In the 13 patients with pain, this was completely or partially relieved. The condition of a man with hypesthesia of the legs deteriorated and a woman with paraplegia who was treated with decompressive laminectomy followed by radiotherapy recovered completely after irradiation. CT scan before irradiation showed thickened trabeculae as small punctate areas of sclerosis in all patients. At MR imaging before irradiation, T2-weighted MR images showed areas of high intensity in all patients and MR images demonstrated lesion enhancement. However, none of the patients who were treated successfully with radiation demonstrated any changes of the affected vertebra in the conventional radiographic films, CT scan or MR imaging, even 5 years after irradiation. Radiological imaging is indispensable for the diagnosis of vertebral hemangiomas but does not appear to be useful for evaluating the effects of radiotherapy. (orig.)

  6. Radiotherapy in Cancer Management

    Abdel-Wahab, M.

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy has been used for curative or palliative treatment of cancer, either alone or increasingly as part of a multimodality approach in conjunction with chemotherapy, immunotherapy or surgery. Radiation must be delivered in the safest and most effective way. The use of radiologic and nuclear medicine diagnostic techniques, e.g., the use of CT (Computerized Tomography) and PET/CT allow better detection and staging of diseases by displaying both morphological and functional abnormalities within the affected organs and are essential in the process of radiotherapy planning. Technical advances in radiotherapy have allowed better targeting of tumors, sparing of normal tissue and, in the case of radiosurgery, a decrease in the number of treatments. The IAEA Programme in Human Health aims to enhance the capabilities in Member States to address needs related to the treatment of diseases, including cancer, through the application of nuclear techniques. The Programme supports quality assurance in radiation medicine; DIRAC, the only radiation oncology-specific resource database world-wide; significant, innovative education and training programmes through telemedicine and e-learning accessible via the human health campus website. Technical expertise for country– and region–specific technical cooperation radiation-medicine projects is provided to establish or enhance radiation medicine worldwide. (author)

  7. Topology of tokamak orbits

    Rome, J.A.; Peng, Y.K.M.

    1978-09-01

    Guiding center orbits in noncircular axisymmetric tokamak plasmas are studied in the constants of motion (COM) space of (v, zeta, psi/sub m/). Here, v is the particle speed, zeta is the pitch angle with respect to the parallel equilibrium current, J/sub parallels/, and psi/sub m/ is the maximum value of the poloidal flux function (increasing from the magnetic axis) along the guiding center orbit. Two D-shaped equilibria in a flux-conserving tokamak having β's of 1.3% and 7.7% are used as examples. In this space, each confined orbit corresponds to one and only one point and different types of orbits (e.g., circulating, trapped, stagnation and pinch orbits) are represented by separate regions or surfaces in the space. It is also shown that the existence of an absolute minimum B in the higher β (7.7%) equilibrium results in a dramatically different orbit topology from that of the lower β case. The differences indicate the confinement of additional high energy (v → c, within the guiding center approximation) trapped, co- and countercirculating particles whose orbit psi/sub m/ falls within the absolute B well

  8. Harmonically excited orbital variations

    Morgan, T.

    1985-01-01

    Rephrasing the equations of motion for orbital maneuvers in terms of Lagrangian generalized coordinates instead of Newtonian rectangular cartesian coordinates can make certain harmonic terms in the orbital angular momentum vector more readily apparent. In this formulation the equations of motion adopt the form of a damped harmonic oscillator when torques are applied to the orbit in a variationally prescribed manner. The frequencies of the oscillator equation are in some ways unexpected but can nonetheless be exploited through resonant forcing functions to achieve large secular variations in the orbital elements. Two cases are discussed using a circular orbit as the control case: (1) large changes in orbital inclination achieved by harmonic excitation rather than one impulsive velocity change, and (2) periodic and secular changes to the longitude of the ascending node using both stable and unstable excitation strategies. The implications of these equations are also discussed for both artificial satellites and natural satellites. For the former, two utilitarian orbits are suggested, each exploiting a form of harmonic excitation. 5 refs

  9. Quark Orbital Angular Momentum

    Burkardt Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Definitions of orbital angular momentum based on Wigner distributions are used as a framework to discuss the connection between the Ji definition of the quark orbital angular momentum and that of Jaffe and Manohar. We find that the difference between these two definitions can be interpreted as the change in the quark orbital angular momentum as it leaves the target in a DIS experiment. The mechanism responsible for that change is similar to the mechanism that causes transverse single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering.

  10. Thrombosis of orbital varices

    Boschi Oyhenart, J.; Tenyi, A.; Boschi Pau, J.

    2002-01-01

    Orbital varices are venous malformations produced by an abnormal dilatation of one or more orbital veins, probably associated with congenital weakness of the vascular wall. They are rare lesions, usually occurring in young patients, that produce intermittent proptosis related to the increase in the systemic venous pressure. The presence of hemorrhage or thrombosis is associated with rapid development of proptosis, pain and decreased ocular motility. We report the cases of two adult patients with orbital varices complicated by thrombosis in whom the diagnosis was based on computed tomography. The ultrasound and magnetic resonance findings are also discussed. (Author) 16 refs

  11. Congenital orbital teratoma.

    Aiyub, Shereen; Chan, Wengonn; Szetu, John; Sullivan, Laurence J; Pater, John; Cooper, Peter; Selva, Dinesh

    2013-12-01

    We present a case of mature congenital orbital teratoma managed with lid-sparing exenteration and dermis fat graft. This is a case report on the management of congenital orbital teratoma. A full-term baby was born in Fiji with prolapsed right globe which was surrounded by a nonpulsatile, cystic mass. Clinical and imaging features were consistent with congenital orbital teratoma. Due to limited surgical expertise, the patient was transferred to Adelaide, Australia for further management. The patient underwent a lid-sparing exenteration with frozen section control of the apical margin. A dermis fat graft from the groin was placed beneath the lid skin to provide volume. Histopathology revealed mature tissues from each of the three germ cell layers which confirmed the diagnosis of mature teratoma. We describe the successful use of demis fat graft in socket reconstruction following lid-sparing exenteration for congenital orbital teratoma.

  12. Congenital orbital teratoma

    Shereen Aiyub

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of mature congenital orbital teratoma managed with lid-sparing exenteration and dermis fat graft. This is a case report on the management of congenital orbital teratoma. A full-term baby was born in Fiji with prolapsed right globe which was surrounded by a nonpulsatile, cystic mass. Clinical and imaging features were consistent with congenital orbital teratoma. Due to limited surgical expertise, the patient was transferred to Adelaide, Australia for further management. The patient underwent a lid-sparing exenteration with frozen section control of the apical margin. A dermis fat graft from the groin was placed beneath the lid skin to provide volume. Histopathology revealed mature tissues from each of the three germ cell layers which confirmed the diagnosis of mature teratoma. We describe the successful use of demis fat graft in socket reconstruction following lid-sparing exenteration for congenital orbital teratoma.

  13. PS Booster Orbit Correction

    Chanel, M; Rumolo, G; Tomás, R; CERN. Geneva. AB Department

    2008-01-01

    At the end of the 2007 run, orbit measurements were carried out in the 4 rings of the PS Booster (PSB) for different working points and beam energies. The aim of these measurements was to provide the necessary input data for a PSB realignment campaign during the 2007/2008 shutdown. Currently, only very few corrector magnets can be operated reliably in the PSB; therefore the orbit correction has to be achieved by displacing (horizontally and vertically) and/or tilting some of the defocusing quadrupoles (QDs). In this report we first describe the orbit measurements, followed by a detailed explanation of the orbit correction strategy. Results and conclusions are presented in the last section.

  14. Demand for radiotherapy in Spain.

    Rodríguez, A; Borrás, J M; López-Torrecilla, J; Algara, M; Palacios-Eito, A; Gómez-Caamaño, A; Olay, L; Lara, P C

    2017-02-01

    Assessing the demand for radiotherapy in Spain based on existing evidence to estimate the human resources and equipment needed so that every person in Spain has access to high-quality radiotherapy when they need it. We used data from the European Cancer Observatory on the estimated incidence of cancer in Spain in 2012, along with the evidence-based indications for radiotherapy developed by the Australian CCORE project, to obtain an optimal radiotherapy utilisation proportion (OUP) for each tumour. About 50.5 % of new cancers in Spain require radiotherapy at least once over the course of the disease. Additional demand for these services comes from reradiation therapy and non-melanoma skin cancer. Approximately, 25-30 % of cancer patients with an indication for radiotherapy do not receive it due to factors that include access, patient preference, familiarity with the treatment among physicians, and especially resource shortages, all of which contribute to its underutilisation. Radiotherapy is underused in Spain. The increasing incidence of cancer expected over the next decade and the greater frequency of reradiations necessitate the incorporation of radiotherapy demand into need-based calculations for cancer services planning.

  15. Antisymmetric Orbit Functions

    Anatoliy Klimyk

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, properties of antisymmetric orbit functions are reviewed and further developed. Antisymmetric orbit functions on the Euclidean space $E_n$ are antisymmetrized exponential functions. Antisymmetrization is fulfilled by a Weyl group, corresponding to a Coxeter-Dynkin diagram. Properties of such functions are described. These functions are closely related to irreducible characters of a compact semisimple Lie group $G$ of rank $n$. Up to a sign, values of antisymmetric orbit functions are repeated on copies of the fundamental domain $F$ of the affine Weyl group (determined by the initial Weyl group in the entire Euclidean space $E_n$. Antisymmetric orbit functions are solutions of the corresponding Laplace equation in $E_n$, vanishing on the boundary of the fundamental domain $F$. Antisymmetric orbit functions determine a so-called antisymmetrized Fourier transform which is closely related to expansions of central functions in characters of irreducible representations of the group $G$. They also determine a transform on a finite set of points of $F$ (the discrete antisymmetric orbit function transform. Symmetric and antisymmetric multivariate exponential, sine and cosine discrete transforms are given.

  16. Local orbit feedback

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    Critically aligned experiments are sensitive to small changes in the electron beam orbit. At the NSLS storage rings, the electron beam and photon beam motions have been monitored over the past several years. In the survey conducted in 1986 by the NSLS Users Executive Committee, experimenters requested the vertical beam position variation and the vertical angle variation, within a given fill, remain within 10 μm and 10 μr, respectively. This requires improvement in the beam stability by about one order of magnitude. At the NSLS and SSRL storage rings, the beam that is originally centered on the position monitor by a dc orbit correction is observed to have two kinds of motion: a dc drift over a storage period of several hours and a beam bounce about its nominal position. These motions are a result of the equilibrium orbit not being held perfectly stable due to time-varying errors introduced into the magnetic guide field by power supplies, mechanical vibration of the magnets, cooling water temperature variations, etc. The approach to orbit stabilization includes (1) identifying and suppressing as many noise sources on the machine as possible, (2) correcting the beam position globally (see Section 6) by controlling a number of correctors around the circumference of the machine, and (3) correcting the beam position and angle at a given source location by position feedback using local detectors and local orbit bumps. The third approach, called Local Orbit Feedback will be discussed in this section

  17. Bystander effects and radiotherapy.

    Marín, Alicia; Martín, Margarita; Liñán, Olga; Alvarenga, Felipe; López, Mario; Fernández, Laura; Büchser, David; Cerezo, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects are defined as biological effects expressed after irradiation by cells whose nuclei have not been directly irradiated. These effects include DNA damage, chromosomal instability, mutation, and apoptosis. There is considerable evidence that ionizing radiation affects cells located near the site of irradiation, which respond individually and collectively as part of a large interconnected web. These bystander signals can alter the dynamic equilibrium between proliferation, apoptosis, quiescence or differentiation. The aim of this review is to examine the most important biological effects of this phenomenon with regard to areas of major interest in radiotherapy. Such aspects include radiation-induced bystander effects during the cell cycle under hypoxic conditions when administering fractionated modalities or combined radio-chemotherapy. Other relevant aspects include individual variation and genetics in toxicity of bystander factors and normal tissue collateral damage. In advanced radiotherapy techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the high degree of dose conformity to the target volume reduces the dose and, therefore, the risk of complications, to normal tissues. However, significant doses can accumulate out-of-field due to photon scattering and this may impact cellular response in these regions. Protons may offer a solution to reduce out-of-field doses. The bystander effect has numerous associated phenomena, including adaptive response, genomic instability, and abscopal effects. Also, the bystander effect can influence radiation protection and oxidative stress. It is essential that we understand the mechanisms underlying the bystander effect in order to more accurately assess radiation risk and to evaluate protocols for cancer radiotherapy.

  18. Radiotherapy and pulmonary fibrosis

    Sone, S; Miyata, Y; Tachiiri, H [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1975-04-01

    Clinical findings of radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis were outlined, and the relationship between occurence of these disorders and radiotherapy, clinical findings and X-ray picture were studied. Standard radiation dose as cell lethal response of carcinoma of the lung were 4,500 to 5,500 rad in 4 to 5.5 weeks in undifferentiated carcinoma, 6,000 to 7,000 rad in 6 to 7 weeks in squamous cell carcinoma, 7,000 to 9,000 rad in 7 to 9 weeks in adenocarcinoma, 4,500 to 5,000 rad in 4 to 5 weeks in the large sized cancer of the esophagus, 6,500 to 7,000 rad in 5 to 7 weeks in the small sized cancer of the esophagus, and irradiation of these amount of dose caused hazards in pulmonary function. Pathological and clinical findings of pulmonary hazards within 6 month period after irradiation, factors causing them and changes in X-ray pictures before and after irradiation were observed and discussed in clinical cases: the case of breast cancer in which 3,000 R/6 times/18 days of 5.5 MeV Liniac electron was irradiated to the chest wall, and the case of pulmonary cancer in which 5,000 rad/25 times/34 days of 6 MeV Liniac X-ray was irradiated in opposite 2 ports radiation beam treatment. The former revealed alveolar lesion and interlobular pleuritis at 4 month later, and remarkable lesion of pulmonary fibrosis was followed at 9 month after radiotherapy. The later developed radiation pneumonitis 1 month after radiotherapy, of which lesion extended to the upper part by 3 months later, and cancer recurred 6.5 month later.

  19. Radiotherapy for eyelid cancer

    Saika, Kazumi

    2001-01-01

    Some studies on radiotherapy for eyelid cancer have been reported, but the optimal radiation doses for different histological types and tumor sizes have not been detailed. So I studied the optimal radiation doses in radiotherapy for eyelid cancer. The patients were fourteen and histological diagnoses were made on the basis of biopsies or surgery before radiotherapy. Surgical cut margins were positive in 10 cases. In 5 of these cases, tumors were visible. There were 9 sebaceous adenocarcinomas (SAC), 4 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), and 1 basal cell carcinoma (BCC). In 13 of 14 cases, radiation was applied to eyelids in which tumor-surgical cut margin distances were 3 mm or less. The eyeballs were covered with lead or tungsten shields, and the eyelids were irradiated with a total dose of 50 to 66.6 Gy. In 5 cases, radiation was applied prophylactically for ipsilateral pre-auricle lymph node areas. 11 of 13 cases were locally controlled. I gave greater radiation doses for SAC than for SCC or BCC. I also gave greater doses for in visible tumors than for invisible ones. In the acute phase dermatitis, inflammation of the cornea, conjunctivitis, etc. occurred but they were mild. Later reactions were decreased cilia, dry eye, inflammation of cornea, conjunctivitis, discomfort of the scar, etc. Cataracts were also seen, but they were of senile origen. Because 81.8% of the tumors were controlled, this radiation method was useful with salvage therapies to select an optimal radiation dose according to the differences among histological types and tumor sizes. 60% of visible tumors were also controlled so I think that radical therapy using radiation alone is possible. (author)

  20. Radiotherapy of benign diseases

    Haase, W.

    1982-01-01

    Still today radiotherapy is of decisive relevance for several benign diseases. The following ones are briefly described in this introductory article: 1. Certain inflammatory and degenerative diseases as furuncles in the face, acute thrombophlebitis, recurrent sudoriparous abscesses, degenerative skeletal diseases, cervical syndrome and others; 2. rheumatic joint diseases; 3. Bechterew's disease; 4. primary presenile osteoporosis; 5. synringomyelia; 6. endocrine ophthalmopathy; 7. hypertrophic processes of the connective tissue; 8. hemangiomas. A detailed discussion and a profit-risk analysis is provided in the individual chapters of the magazine. (MG) [de

  1. Large field radiotherapy

    Vanasek, J.; Chvojka, Z.; Zouhar, M.

    1984-01-01

    Calculations may prove that irradiation procedures, commonly used in radiotherapy and represented by large-capacity irradiation techniques, do not exceed certain limits of integral doses with favourable radiobiological action on the organism. On the other hand integral doses in supralethal whole-body irradiation, used in the therapy of acute leukemia, represent radiobiological values which without extreme and exceptional further interventions and teamwork are not compatible with life, and the radiotherapeutist cannot use such high doses without the backing of a large team. (author)

  2. Microplanar beams for radiotherapy

    Company, F.Z.; Allen, B.J.

    1996-01-01

    Recent advances in synchrotron generated X-ray beams with high fluence rate permit the investigation of the application of an array of closely spaced, parallel or converging microbeams in radiotherapy. The proposed technique takes advantage of the hypothesised repair mechanism of capillary cells between alternate microbeam zones, which replaces the lethally irradiated endothelial cells. In this study using the Monte Carlo method, the lateral and depth dose of a single planar microbeam of 100 keV in a tissue/lung/tissue phantom is investigated. Poster 195. (author)

  3. Breast cancer radiotherapy: controversies and prospectives

    YU Jin-ming; WANG Yong-sheng

    2008-01-01

    @@ Despite consensus on breast cancer radiotherapy, there are still some controversies over post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in patients with 1-3 positive lymph nodes, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI), appropriate sequence of radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormonal treatment, and radiotherapy after preoperative systemic therapy.

  4. Radiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    Oshitani, Takashi; Kuwata, Yoichiro; Kano, Kyoko

    1988-01-01

    Esophageal carcinoma were treated by high-dose-rate intracavitary irradiation using specially designed balloon application at Hyogo medical Center for Adults. 32 patients were treated from January 1982 through July 1986. According to the stage of UICC (1978), 10 patients were classified into stage I, 7 into II, 13 into III and 2 into IV. Acturial 5 year survival rate was 17.9 % in all 32 patients and that of 23 patients who received radical radiotherapy was 24 %. Local CR rate was 66 %. However, since 9 (53 %) of 17 CR patients were relapsed, local control rate for 2 years was 25 %. Mild adverse effects were experienced in 9 (47 %) of 19 CR patients. Our balloon applicator was easily fixed, could have an adequate space from esophageal mucosa and clarify the tumor site by filling with 20 % gastrografin. It is concluded that high-dose-rate intracavitary irradiation with our balloon applicator is an effective boost therapy and decline a lethal adverse effect in radiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma. (author)

  5. Radiotherapy in free practice

    Schmelz, H.P.

    1974-01-01

    Relating the X-ray ordinance cases of the fourth quarter 1971 to the whole year a total surface and incident dose of 2,107,656 R was administered in 2,189 cases (1,881 patients) in the course of 16,574 sessions. During the same period, 364 patients were treated in the 14 consultation rooms by radiotherapy because of malignant diseases. The genetically significant dose of 0,6 mrem/a is composed of the GSD of 0,194 in practice and 0,407 mrem in clinics and corresponds in its proportions to the GSD calculated and estimated in recent times. Compared with GSD values from other spheres of the application of ionizing radiation in medical practice, the calculated GSD of 0,6 mrem/a in radiotherapy for benign diseases corresponds to the GSD of approximately 0,5 mrem/a for the nuclear medicine in West-Berlin as stated by Hinz and Weil. It corresponds to 1% of the GSD of approximately/a as estimated recently for X-ray diagnostic applications. (orig./HP) [de

  6. Radiotherapy of bladder cancer

    Ikeda, Yoshiyuki

    1978-01-01

    Methods of treating bladder cancer include surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, as well as various combinations of these. The author investigated clinically and histopathologically the therapeutic results of preoperative irradiation in cases of bladder cancer. 1. The survival rates (crude survival rates) in forty cases of bladder cancer were 90% after one year, 62.5% after three years and 46% after five years from the treatment. 2. As the result of irradiation, urogram improved in 25%, which was comparatively remarkable in high stage cases. There were no cases of deterioration of urogram findings caused by irradiation. Cystoscopy revealed disappearance or remarkable shrinkage of the tumors in 35% of the total cases and effects of the irradiation was observed not correlated to the stage and grade. 3. With respect to the histopathological changes, the changes became greater as the dosage increased and the higher the stage and grade were the more remarkable tendency was observed. 4. From our clinical observations such as urogram, cystoscopy and histopathologically, we estimated the optimum dosage of preoperative irradiation for bladder cancer is 3000 - 4000 rad. Thus, we concluded that the radiotherapy is effective in reducing both surgical invasion and postoperative recurrence. (author)

  7. Proton minibeam radiotherapy

    Girst, Stefanie

    2016-03-08

    The risk of developing adverse side effects in the normal tissue after radiotherapy is often limiting for the dose that can be applied to the tumor. Proton minibeam radiotherapy, a spatially fractionated radiotherapy method using sub-millimeter proton beams, similar to grid therapy or microbeam radiation radiotherapy (MRT) using X-rays, has recently been invented at the ion microprobe SNAKE in Munich. The aim of this new concept is to minimize normal tissue injuries in the entrance channel and especially in the skin by irradiating only a small percentage of the cells in the total irradiation field, while maintaining tumor control via a homogeneous dose in the tumor, just like in conventional broad beam radiotherapy. This can be achieved by optimizing minibeam sizes and distances according to the prevailing tumor size and depth such that after widening of the minibeams due to proton interactions in the tissue, the overlapping minibeams produce a homogeneous dose distribution throughout the tumor. The aim of this work was to elucidate the prospects of minibeam radiation therapy compared to conventional homogeneous broad beam radiotherapy in theory and in experimental studies at the ion microprobe SNAKE. Treatment plans for model tumors of different sizes and depths were created using the planning software LAPCERR, to elaborate suitable minibeam sizes and distances for the individual tumors. Radiotherapy-relevant inter-beam distances required to obtain a homogeneous dose in the target volume were found to be in the millimeter range. First experiments using proton minibeams of only 10 μm and 50 μm size (termed microchannels in the corresponding publication Zlobinskaya et al. 2013) and therapy-conform larger dimensions of 100 μm and 180 μm were performed in the artificial human in-vitro skin model EpiDermFT trademark (MatTek). The corresponding inter-beam distances were 500 μm, 1mm and 1.8 mm, respectively, leading to irradiation of only a few percent of the cells

  8. General principles of radiotherapy

    Easson, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    The daily practice of any established branch of medicine should be based on some acceptable principles. This chapter is concerned with the general principles on which the radiotherapy of the Manchester school is based. Though many radiotherapists in other centres would doubtless accept these principles, there are sufficiently wide differences in practice throughout the world to suggest that some therapists adhere to a fundamentally different philosophy. The authors believe it is important, especially for those beginning their formal training in radiotherapy, to subscribe to an internally consistent school of thought, employing methods of treatment for each type of lesion in each anatomical site that are based on accepted principles and subjected to continuous rigorous scrutiny to test their effectiveness. Not only must each therapeutic technique be evaluated, but the underlying principles too must be questioned if and when this seems indicated. It is a feature of this hospital that similar lesions are all treated by the same technique, so long as statistical evidence justifies such a policy. All members of the staff adhere to the accepted policy until or unless reliable reasons are adduced to change this policy

  9. Fertility impairment in radiotherapy

    Marta Biedka

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Infertility as a result of antineoplastic therapy is becoming a very important issue due to the growing incidence of neoplastic diseases. Routinely applied antineoplastic treatments and the illness itself lead to fertility disorders. Therapeutic methods used in antineoplastic treatment may cause fertility impairment or sterilization due to permanent damage to reproductive cells. The risk of sterilization depends on the patient’s sex, age during therapy, type of neoplasm, radiation dose and treatment area. It is known that chemotherapy and radiotherapy can lead to fertility impairment and the combination of these two gives an additive effect. The aim of this article is to raise the issue of infertility in these patients. It is of growing importance due to the increase in the number of children and young adults who underwent radiotherapy in the past. The progress in antineoplastic therapy improves treatment results, but at the same time requires a deeper look at existential needs of the patient. Reproductive function is an integral element of self-esteem and should be taken into account during therapy planning.

  10. Transverse tomography and radiotherapy

    Leer, J.W.H.

    1982-01-01

    This study was intended to delineate the indications for radiotherapy treatment-planning with the help of computerized axial tomography (C.T.) and transverse analog tomography (T.A.T.). Radiotherapy localisation procedures with the conventional method (simulator), with the CT-scanner and with the transverse analog tomograph (T.A.T., Simtomix, Oldelft) were compared. As criterium for evaluation differences in reconstruction drawing based on these methods were used. A certain method was judged ''superior'' to another if the delineation of the target volume was more accurate, if a better impression was gained of the site of (for irradiation) organs at risk, or if the localisation could only be performed with that method. The selected group of patients consisted of 120 patients for whom a reconstruction drawing in the transverse plane was made according to the treatment philosophy. In this group CT-assisted localisation was judged on 68 occasions superior to the conventional method. In a number of cases it was found that a ''standard'' change in a standard target volume, on the base of augmented anatomical knowledge, made the conventional method sufficient. The use of CT-scanner for treatment planning was estimated. For ca. 270/1000 new patients a CT-scan is helpful (diagnostic scan), for 140 of them the scan is necessary (planning scan). The quality of the anatomical information obtained with the T.A.T. does not yet fall within acceptable limits, but progress has been made. (Auth.)

  11. Concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy

    Fu, K.K.

    1985-01-01

    The principal objective of combining chemotherapy with radiotherapy (XRT) for the treatment of advanced head and neck cancer is to improve the therapeutic ratio through the enhancement of local control and reduction of distant metastases without excessively enhancing normal tissue effects. Improved tumour control can result from sole additivity of either therapy or direct interactions between drug and radiation leading to increased tumour cell kill. Chemotherapy may sensitize the cells to radiation, interfere with repair of sublethal or potentially lethal radiation damage, induce cell synchrony, and reduce tumour mass leading to reoxygenation and decreased fraction of resistant hypoxic cells. Radiation may improve drug accessibility to tumour cells and reduce tumour volume leading to increased cell proliferation and chemosensitivity. If the enhanced effects of combined therapy are purely additive, then the two modalities can be administered either sequentially or concurrently with the same results. However, if the enhanced effects result from the direct interaction between drug and radiation, it is necessary that the two modalities be administered concurrently and in close temporal proximity. This review summarizes the results of clinical studies in which chemotherapy was administered concurrently during the course of radiotherapy for patients with previously untreated advanced squamous cell carcinoma in the head and neck

  12. Erythropoietin and radiotherapy

    Le Fur, E.; Albarghach, M.N.; Pradier, O.

    2010-01-01

    Erythropoietin (E.P.O.) is a glycoprotein hormone. This hormone is a growth factor for red blood cells precursors in the bone marrow. The decrease of oxygen partial pressure, a reduced number of erythrocytes caused by bleeding or excessive destruction, or increased tissues oxygen requirements lead to increased secretion of E.P.O.. Its action takes place on bone marrow erythroblastic cells through specific receptors. E.P.O. stimulates the proliferation of red cell precursors stem cells in the bone marrow, thus increasing their production in one to two weeks. The effectiveness of E.P.O. at increasing haemoglobin and improving patients quality of life has been demonstrated by several studies. However, its use in radiotherapy remains controversial. While tumour hypoxia caused by anaemia is a factor of radio resistance and thus a source of local failure, tumour expression of E.P.O. receptors presents a significant risk for tumour progression and neo-angiogenesis, which would be increased during the administration of E.P.O.. The purpose of this article is to answer the question: is there a place for E.P.O. in combination with radiotherapy in the management of cancer?

  13. Advances in radiotherapy

    Mackie, T.R.

    2005-01-01

    Radiation therapy is in the midst of a rebirth largely driven by the use of computers for treatment planning and beam delivery. The first edge of this renaissance was the advent of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3-D CRT). This was enabled by the widespread availability and utilization of three-dimensional imaging such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance scanning, themselves products of the computer revolution. For the first time this allowed radiation oncologists to segment and visualize the tumor in association with it neighboring sensitive soft-tissue structures. Software tools to visualize the beam paths through the body enabled the beam directions and beam shapes to be manually optimized. Simultaneously, improved dose calculations utilizing the CT images of the patient anatomy produced more accurate distributions of dose. The dose was delivered with custom-shaped blocks or recently collimators with multiple leaves that allow complex shaped fields to be delivered without the need for block fabrication. In the last couple of decades new treatment delivery methodologies have emerged. The first has been stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) which is the purview of neurosurgeons (who call it SRS) as well as radiation oncologists (who usually call it SRT). SRS and SRT are premised on multiple beams focusing on one location typically with circular aperture collimators but increasingly with fields shaped by multi-leaved collimators. Often only a single treatment session (the usual for SRS) is used when the treatment volume is small, but for larger lesions several treatment sessions, or fractions, are used (most often for SRT) to allow for normal tissue repair. The new equipment market for SRS and SRT is about 10% of the total for radiation therapy. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is the latest treatment methodology and its adoption has been extremely rapid, particularly in the United States. IMRT uses

  14. E-Orbit Functions

    Jiri Patera

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We review and further develop the theory of $E$-orbit functions. They are functions on the Euclidean space $E_n$ obtained from the multivariate exponential function by symmetrization by means of an even part $W_{e}$ of a Weyl group $W$, corresponding to a Coxeter-Dynkin diagram. Properties of such functions are described. They are closely related to symmetric and antisymmetric orbit functions which are received from exponential functions by symmetrization and antisymmetrization procedure by means of a Weyl group $W$. The $E$-orbit functions, determined by integral parameters, are invariant withrespect to even part $W^{aff}_{e}$ of the affine Weyl group corresponding to $W$. The $E$-orbit functions determine a symmetrized Fourier transform, where these functions serve as a kernel of the transform. They also determine a transform on a finite set of points of the fundamental domain $F^{e}$ of the group $W^{aff}_{e}$ (the discrete $E$-orbit function transform.

  15. [Secondary orbital lymphoma].

    Basanta, I; Sevillano, C; Álvarez, M D

    2015-09-01

    A case is presented of an 85 year-old Caucasian female with lymphoma that recurred in the orbit (secondary ocular adnexal lymphoma). The orbital tumour was a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma according to the REAL classification (Revised European-American Lymphoma Classification). Orbital lymphomas are predominantly B-cell proliferations of a variety of histological types, and most are low-grade tumours. Patients are usually middle-aged or elderly, and it is slightly more common in women. A palpable mass, proptosis and blepharoptosis are the most common signs of presentation. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Large orbit neoclassical transport

    Lin, Z.; Tang, W.M.; Lee, W.W.

    1997-01-01

    Neoclassical transport in the presence of large ion orbits is investigated. The study is motivated by the recent experimental results that ion thermal transport levels in enhanced confinement tokamak plasmas fall below the open-quotes irreducible minimum levelclose quotes predicted by standard neoclassical theory. This apparent contradiction is resolved in the present analysis by relaxing the basic neoclassical assumption that the ions orbital excursions are much smaller than the local toroidal minor radius and the equilibrium scale lengths of the system. Analytical and simulation results are in agreement with trends from experiments. The development of a general formalism for neoclassical transport theory with finite orbit width is also discussed. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  17. Radiotherapy gel dosimetry

    Baldock, C.

    2002-01-01

    In radiotherapy, the primary objective is to deliver a prescribed dose of radiation to a tumour or lesion within a patient while minimising the dose delivered to the surrounding healthy tissue. Traditional radiotherapy treatments usually involve simple external or internal irradiations of a tumour. External irradiations are normally achieved in the clinic with photon or electron beams produced by high energy linear accelerators. The photon or electron beams are collimated into regular shapes as they emerge from the treatment head of the unit which is supported by a gantry that can be rotated isocentrically to any position. A discrete number of photon or electron beams with different angles of incidence that intersect at the iso-centre are used to produce a region of high dose around the tumour volume (positioned at the iso-centre). Internal irradiations are normally achieved in the clinic by implanting radioactive sources in and around the tumour or lesion. Such irradiations are characterised by very high doses local to the tumour. Radioactive sources are also used to prevent post-angioplasty restenosis by inserting sources into arteries. Usually when treating a tumour, a compromise is made between tumour control and complications arising from normal tissue damage. One measure of this compromise, the therapeutic ratio, is defined as the radiation dose producing complications in 50% of patients divided by the dose providing tumour control in 50% of the patients. The therapeutic ratio depends on the radiobiological characteristics of the cancerous tissue and surrounding healthy tissues and on the radiation dose distribution achieved by the radiotherapy treatment. It is generally believed that the therapeutic ratio can be minimised by optimising the conformation of the radiation dose distribution to the target volume. This is difficult with traditional radiotherapy techniques since they do not produce dose distributions that adequately cover tumour volumes of complex

  18. Long-term results of radiotherapy for 104 patients with Graves' orbitopathy

    Qu Baolin; Yang Dong; Feng Linchun; Luo Zhiyuan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the long-term outcome and the sequelae of Graves' orbitopathy treated with radiotherapy, and to specify the prognostic factors. Methods: From 1979 to 1999, 104 patients with progressive Graves' orbitopathy were treated with conventional orbital radiotherapy. Post globe and pituitary irradiation of 25-35 Gy was given to 56 patients, which was followed by a boost of 15-20 Gy to the pituitary. Follow-up time was 7.5 - 25.0 years. The result of radiotherapy was analyzed. Results: Overall response rate was 71.1%. The response rate of patients with soft-tissue infiltration, corneal involvement, proptosis, sight loss and extraocular muscle dysfunction was 88.4%, 75.1%, 55.6%, 68.8% and 64.4%, respectively. Twelve patients (11.5%) developed cataracts 2.5-18.3 years (median 11.2 years) after irradiation. One patient developed left-eye retinopathy 3.2 years after irradiation. No patient developed secondary tumor within the irradiation field. Conclusions: Orbital radiotherapy for progressive Graves' orbitopathy, being effective and safe, can control the disease progression and improve the symptoms. The side effect of radiotherapy is fewer than other treatment modalities. (authors)

  19. Place of radiotherapy in the treatment of Graves' orbitopathy

    Beckendorf, Veronique; Maalouf, Toufic; George, Jean-Luc; Bey, Pierre; Leclere, Jacques; Luporsi, Elisabeth

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the response of Graves' orbitopathy to irradiation, and to specify the prognostic factors allowing one to better define the indications of orbital radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: From 1977 to 1996, 199 patients received bilateral orbital irradiation delivering 20 Gy in 10 fractions and 2 weeks for a progressive Graves' orbitopathy. 195 patients were seen between 1 and 6 months after radiotherapy. The different symptoms were studied and their response to radiation was analyzed. Factors such as age, sex, evolution of thyroid disease, history of symptoms, and previous or combined treatments were analyzed. Results: The results revealed that 50 patients (26%) had a good or excellent response, 98 (50%) had a partial response, 37 (19%) were stable, 10 (5%) had a progression of disease. The signs that best responded to radiotherapy were the infiltration of soft tissues and the corneal involvement. Responses of proptosis or oculomotor disorders were more complete when these signs were not advanced at the time of treatment. Irradiation seemed to have the same efficacy when applied as first-line treatment or after failure of corticosteroids. Neither modality of treatment of hyperthyroidism nor thyroid status at the time of orbital irradiation modified the results. The best results were recorded for early or moderately advanced presentation (p = 0.05). Patients treated within a delay of 7 months after the beginning of the ophthalmopathy had better responses than patients treated later (p = 0.10). Conclusion: Radiation therapy was successful in Graves' orbitopathy by stopping the progression of disease in almost all cases, by improving the comfort of patients, by obtaining objective responses, and by avoiding surgical treatments particularly when signs were moderate

  20. Stereotactic radiotherapy in pediatric indications

    Bernier-Chastagner, V.; Supiot, S.; Carrie, C.; Helfre, S.

    2012-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy is a very high precision procedure, which has been limited to radiosurgery for a long time. Technological improvements allowed the development of radiotherapy in stereotactic conditions, leading to a lot of innovations. Previously indicated for cerebral pathologies, this procedure is now developed for extra-cerebral locations. In paediatrics, stereotactic radiotherapy is still limited, delivered precociously, due to the possibility of long-term late effects that needs to be addressed. This review reports the different useful conditions, technical evolutions, and the current validated paediatric indications, with differences from adults, and future directions. (authors)

  1. Adaptive Motion Compensation in Radiotherapy

    Murphy, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    External-beam radiotherapy has long been challenged by the simple fact that patients can (and do) move during the delivery of radiation. Recent advances in imaging and beam delivery technologies have made the solution--adapting delivery to natural movement--a practical reality. Adaptive Motion Compensation in Radiotherapy provides the first detailed treatment of online interventional techniques for motion compensation radiotherapy. This authoritative book discusses: Each of the contributing elements of a motion-adaptive system, including target detection and tracking, beam adaptation, and pati

  2. Development of targeted radiotherapy systems

    Ferro, Guillermina; Villarreal, Jose E.; Garcia, Laura; Tendilla, Jose I.; Paredes, Lydia; Murphy, Consuelo A.; Pedraza, Martha

    2001-01-01

    Conventional or external beam radiotherapy, has been a viable alternative for cancer treatment. Although this technique is effective, its use is limited if the patient has multiple malignant lesions (metastases). An alternative approach is based on the design of radiopharmaceuticals that, to be administered in the patient, are directed specifically toward the target cell producing a selective radiation delivery. This treatment is known as targeted radiotherapy. We have summarized and discussed some results related to our investigations on the development of targeted radiotherapy systems, including aspects of internal dosimetry

  3. The dosimetric control in radiotherapy

    Veres, A.

    2009-01-01

    The author first presents the thermoluminescent dosimetry method developed by the Equal-Estro Laboratory to control radiotherapy systems, according to which dosimeters are mailed by the radiotherapy centres to the laboratory, and then analyzed with respect to the level of dose bias. In a second part, he discusses the different techniques used for the dosimetric control of new radiotherapy methods (intensity-modulated radiation therapy, tomo-therapy) for which film dosimetry is applied. He also evokes the development of new phantoms and the development of a method for the dosimetric control of proton beams

  4. PET/CT and radiotherapy

    Messa, C.; CNR, Milano; S. Gerardo Hospital, Monza; Di Muzio, N.; Picchio, M.; Bettinardi, V.; Gilardi, M.C.; CNR, Milano; San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano; Fazio, F.; CNR, Milano; San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano; San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the state of the art of PET/CT applications in radiotherapy, specifically its use in disease staging, patient selection, treatment planning and treatment evaluation. Diseases for which radiotherapy with radical intent is indicated will be considered, as well as those in which PET/CT may actually change the course of disease. The methodological and technological aspects of PET/CT in radiotherapy are discussed, focusing on the problem of target volume definition with CT and PET functional imaging and the problem of tumor motion with respect to imaging and dose delivery

  5. Orbital welding technique

    Hoeschen, W.

    2003-01-01

    The TIG (Tungsten-inert gas) orbital welding technique is applied in all areas of pipe welding. The process is mainly used for austenitic and ferritic materials but also for materials like aluminium, nickel, and titanium alloys are commonly welded according to this technique. Thin-walled as well as thick-walled pipes are welded economically. The application of orbital welding is of particular interest in the area of maintenance of thick-walled pipes that is described in this article. (orig.) [de

  6. Mean Orbital Elements for Geosynchronous Orbit - II - Orbital inclination, longitude of ascending node, mean longitude

    Kyu-Hong Choi

    1990-06-01

    Full Text Available The osculating orbital elements include the mean, secular, long period, and short period terms. The iterative algorithm used for conversion of osculating orbital elements to mean orbital elements is described. The mean orbital elements of Wc, Ws, and L are obtained.

  7. Tumours following retinoblastoma radiotherapy

    Mollot, J.-P.

    1978-01-01

    Radioinduced tumours in young patients irradiated in childhood for retinoblastoma take on a particularly deadly aspect. The onset of this true clinical entity characterized by a long post-irradiation latency period induced by a dose above 6000 rads is a real tragedy. The vast majority of patients then enter into a long martyrdom ending in death. The only cure is surgical, but seldom possible. Treatment is limited to palliative radiotherapy, effective for a while, and chemiotherapy as a last resort but often difficult to prescribe. Prevention alone is the answer. The quality and reliability of the radiotherapeutic treatment depend not only on the personal talent of the radiotherapist but above all on the standard of the equipment. A strong reduction in the doses employed as well as recent technological progress improving the material, its precision and reproducibility appear already to have lowered the frequency curve of these fatal radioinduced tumours [fr

  8. [Radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma].

    Maingon, P; Blanchard, P; Bidault, F; Calmels, L

    2016-09-01

    Nasapharyngeal carcinoma is a rare disease. Oftenly, the diagnostic is made for advanced disease. Localized tumors, T1 or T2 NO observed a good prognosis and are locally controlled in more than 90 % of the cases by radiotherapy alone. The standard treatment of locally advanced disease is combined chemoradiation. A special vigilance of fast decrease of the volume of the pathological lymph nodes, sometimes associated to loss of weight might indicate an adaptive dosimetric revision. The treatment of recurrent disease is of great importance. Surgical indications are limited but should be discussed in multidisciplinary tumor board when possible. Surgical nodal sampling has to be proposed for nodal recurrence as well as reirradiation, which could be indicated according to the technical issues. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  9. Image guided multibeam radiotherapy

    Freijo, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides an outlook of the status of the first development stages for an updated design of radiotherapy conformal system based on tumor 3D images obtained as an output the last generation imaging machines as PET, CT and MR which offer a very valuable output in cancer diagnosis. Prospective evaluation of current software codes and acquisition of useful experience in surgical planning involves a multidisciplinary process as an initial and unavoidable stage to develop an expert software and user skills which assures the delivery of the radiation dose is done correctly in geometry and value in each voxel as a radiation protection basic condition. The validation of the images obtained has been done by the production of anatomical models of interest regions by rapid proto typing of the 3D segmented images and its evaluation by contrasting with the real regions during surgical procedures. (author)

  10. Device for radiotherapy

    Levinta, A.

    2002-01-01

    The invention refers to medicine, in particular to radiology. Summary of the invention consists in that the device for the radiotherapy includes a base a headrest, a mechanism for head fixation, means for placement of the formation element, the mechanism for head fixation representing a semicircle situated in horizontal position and fixed to the base with the possibility of displacement, in the centre of which it is installed a fixing arm, and the means for placement of the formation elements representing at least two semicircles, mounted in vertical position and fixed into supports with the possibility of mutual swiveling of each of them, between the headrest and the base being installed the neck support

  11. Radiotherapy. 2. rev. ed.

    Wannenmacher, Michael; Debus, Juergen; Wenz, Frederik

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this medical specialty book, besides presenting the state of the art in clinical radiotherapy and radiooncology, is to explain the basic principles of medical physics and radiobiology. Following a number of chapters on general topics and theory it provides detailed coverage of the individual organ systems, briefly addressing future aspects in the process. The authors relate their view that radiooncology as a medical specialty will continue to be under pressure to change and that it will take continuous innovation to secure its status within the interdisciplinary context around the treatment of cancer patients. The authors of this, the textbook's second edition, have dedicated much space to modern methods and techniques in order to do justice to these developments.

  12. Radiotherapy on hidradenocarcinoma.

    Lalya, Issam; Hadadi, Khalid; Tazi, El Mehdi; Lalya, Ilham; Bazine, Amine; Andaloussy, Khalid; Elmarjany, Mohamed; Sifat, Hassan; Hassouni, Khalid; Kebdani, Tayeb; Mansouri, Hamid; Benjaafar, Noureddine; Elgueddari, Brahim Khalil

    2011-01-01

    Clear cell Hidradenocarcinoma is a rare carcinoma arising from sweat glands. It is an aggressive tumor that most metastasizes to regional lymph nodes and distant viscera; surgery with safe margins is the mainstay of treatment. We report a case of 68-year-old woman who presented with an invasive clear cell hidradenocarcinoma situated in the left parotid area which recurred 5 months after surgery, this recurrence was managed successfully by high-dose irradiation of the tumor bed (66 Gy) and regional lymphatic chains (50 Gy), after a follow-up of more than 15 months, the patient is in good local control without significant toxicity. POST OPERATIVE RADIOTHERAPY ALLOWS BETTER LOCAL CONTROL AND SHOULD BE MANDATORY WHEN HISTOLOGICAL FEATURES PREDICTIVE OF RECURRENCE ARE PRESENT: positive margins, histology poorly differentiated, perineural invasion, vascular and lymphatic invasion, lymph node involvement, and extracapsular spread.

  13. Anatomical imaging for radiotherapy

    Evans, Philip M

    2008-01-01

    The goal of radiation therapy is to achieve maximal therapeutic benefit expressed in terms of a high probability of local control of disease with minimal side effects. Physically this often equates to the delivery of a high dose of radiation to the tumour or target region whilst maintaining an acceptably low dose to other tissues, particularly those adjacent to the target. Techniques such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), stereotactic radiosurgery and computer planned brachytherapy provide the means to calculate the radiation dose delivery to achieve the desired dose distribution. Imaging is an essential tool in all state of the art planning and delivery techniques: (i) to enable planning of the desired treatment, (ii) to verify the treatment is delivered as planned and (iii) to follow-up treatment outcome to monitor that the treatment has had the desired effect. Clinical imaging techniques can be loosely classified into anatomic methods which measure the basic physical characteristics of tissue such as their density and biological imaging techniques which measure functional characteristics such as metabolism. In this review we consider anatomical imaging techniques. Biological imaging is considered in another article. Anatomical imaging is generally used for goals (i) and (ii) above. Computed tomography (CT) has been the mainstay of anatomical treatment planning for many years, enabling some delineation of soft tissue as well as radiation attenuation estimation for dose prediction. Magnetic resonance imaging is fast becoming widespread alongside CT, enabling superior soft-tissue visualization. Traditionally scanning for treatment planning has relied on the use of a single snapshot scan. Recent years have seen the development of techniques such as 4D CT and adaptive radiotherapy (ART). In 4D CT raw data are encoded with phase information and reconstructed to yield a set of scans detailing motion through the breathing, or cardiac, cycle. In ART a set of

  14. Decision logics in radiotherapy

    Gauwerky, F.

    1979-01-01

    Decisions in planning procedures can generally, at least for beam therapy to deep seated tumors, be based on a self-consistent system of criteria of optimization, namely: 1. The absorbed dose to the target volume must be applied as uniformly as possible. 2. Absorbed doses to organs (volumes) at risk must be as low as possible, at least below an accepted limit. 3. Radiation effects to outside volumes must be kept as low as possible. Whereas these criteria, as being reduced to the simplest possible requirements, have to be regarded as the stable elements, the radiotherapy parameters, such as geometric arrangements, special techniques, absorbed dose contributions to reference points or systems, have to be taken as the variables within decision processes. The properties of the criteria which have widely proved to be valuable in routine clinical practice, have been investigated in relation to the theoretical system of axioms as it is e.g. offered by Karl Popper's general logics of scientific research. An axiomatic system, as it is demanded (after Popper) must be a) free of discrepancies, i.e. self-consistent (not any sentence can be derived), b) independent, that is, one axiom cannot be derived from another one within the system, c) sufficient for deduction of statements needed, d) necessary, that is complete. All these requirements are fitting also to the offered system of radiotherapy optimization criteria. It has been demonstrated, that Popper's axiomatic system can be regarded as to be the general case for all scientific fields of application, the set of optimization criteria being a special system for radiation therapy, which would have been derivable from Popper's theory. Also practical use could be demonstrated. (orig./ORU) [de

  15. Bohr orbit theory revisited

    Harcourt, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    Bohr orbit theory is used to calculate energies for the 1S, 2P, 3D, 4F and 5G states of the helium muonic atom, when the muon is excited. These energies are close to those which have been calculated variationally by Huang (1977, Phys. Rev. A 15 1832-8). (author)

  16. Why Radiotherapy Works. Chapter 6

    Tashiro, S.; Nishibuchi, I.; Wondergem, J.

    2017-01-01

    The history of radiotherapy began in 1895, when Röntgen discovered X rays, and in the following year, radiation was used for medical treatment. In the early days, the development of radiotherapy was based extensively on empiricism. Radiotherapists worked closely with radiation biologists in attempting to describe and understand the phenomena produced by ionizing radiation in the clinic and in biological systems. During the ensuing 120 years, radiotherapy has been improved significantly and, in addition to radiation biology, medical physics has played an important role in the design and development of equipment, quality assurance and dosimetry. Over recent decades, advances have been made in the field of molecular biology. Currently available techniques enable us to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of cellular response to ionizing irradiation, and it is anticipated that the role and contributions of radiation biology in radiotherapy will remain relevant. This chapter describes the clinically important biological points, including knowledge from current molecular biology.

  17. Radiotherapy in the Hodgkin's disease

    Pinto, A.C.L.C.; Moura, J.E.F.M. de; Leite, M.T.T.; Santa Casa de Misericordia de Belo Horizonte

    1983-01-01

    An up-to-date summary of Hodgkin's disease is presented taking into account its natural history, dissemination patterns, history, staging and therapeutic sugestions, with special regard to radiotherapy. (Author) [pt

  18. Targeted intraoperative radiotherapy in oncology

    Keshtgar, Mohammed; Wenz, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    Targeted intraoperative radiotherapy is a major advance in the management of cancer patients. With an emphasis on practical aspects, this book offers an ideal introduction to this innovative  technology for clinicians.

  19. The biological basis of radiotherapy

    Steel, G.G.; Adams, G.E.; Horwich, A.

    1989-01-01

    The focus of this book is the biological basis of radiotherapy. The papers presented include: Temporal stages of radiation action:free radical processes; The molecular basis of radiosensitivity; and Radiation damage to early-reacting normal tissue

  20. Meteoroid Orbits from Observations

    Campbell-Brown, Margaret

    2018-04-01

    Millions of orbits of meteoroids have been measured over the last few decades, and they comprise the largest sample of orbits of solar system bodies which exists. The orbits of these objects can shed light on the distribution and evolution of comets and asteroids in near-Earth space (e.g. Neslusan et al. 2016). If orbits can be measured at sufficiently high resolution, individual meteoroids can be traced back to their parent bodies and, in principle, even to their ejection time (Rudawska et al. 2012). Orbits can be measured with multi-station optical observations or with radar observations.The most fundamental measured quantities are the speed of the meteor and the two angles of the radiant, or point in the sky from which the meteor appears to come. There are many methods used to determine these from observations, but not all produce the most accurate results (Egal et al. 2017). These three measured quantities, along with the time and location of the observation, are sufficient to obtain an orbit (see, e.g., Clark & Wiegert 2011), but the measurements must be corrected for the deceleration of the meteoroid in the atmosphere before it was detected, the rotation of the Earth, and the gravitational attraction of the Earth (including higher order moments if great precision is necessary).Once meteor orbits have been determined, studies of the age and origin of meteor showers (Bruzzone et al., 2015), the parent bodies of sporadic sources (Pokorny et al. 2014), and the dynamics of the meteoroid complex as a whole can be constrained.Bruzzone, J. S., Brown, P., Weryk, R., Campbell-Brown, M., 2015. MNRAS 446, 1625.Clark, D., Wiegert, P., 2011. M&PS 46, 1217.Egal, A., Gural, P., Vaubaillon, J., Colas, F., Thuillot, W., 2017. Icarus 294, 43.Neslusan, L., Vaubaillon, J., Hajdukova, M., 2016. A&A 589, id.A100.Pokorny, P., Vokrouhlicky, D., Nesvorny, D., Campbell-Brown, M., Brown, P., 2014. ApJ 789, id.25.Rudawska, R., Vaubaillon, J., Atreya, P., 2012. A&A 541, id.A2

  1. Radiotherapy of presenile spinal osteoporosis

    Keim, H.M.; Schiebusch, M.

    1982-01-01

    Painfull conditions of presenile spinal osteoporosis may no longer respond to medication or physical therapy. Analgesic radiotherapy coupled with mild physical therapy and if necessary supported by orthopedic measures frequently results in pain relief and physical stability. Fifty-two cases of osteoporosis and osteoporotic spinal fractures illustrate how better longterm results are achieved by increasing the customary dosage and speeding up radiotherapy. (orig.) [de

  2. Ocena zdolności do kontynuowania działalności polskich spółek giełdowych w czasie kryzysu za pomocą modeli wielowymiarowej analizy dyskryminacyjnej

    Paweł Kopczyński

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ocena zdolności do kontynuowania działalności polskich spółek giełdowych w czasie kryzysu za pomocą modeli wielowymiarowej analizy dyskryminacyjnej The Global Financial Crisis, which began in 2007, had a huge influence on the situation on world stock markets. The behavior of investors is often affected by various factors which can impact their investment decisions. As they do not always act rationally, have a tendency to overreact and cannot remove all emo-tional components from their decision-making process, it may be difficult to explain their behavior and investment decisions during the crisis, especially those concerning the sale of shares. The huge drop in share prices on world stock markets was visible in the early stages of the crisis, but it probably was not justified by actual deterioration of the financial situation of listed companies. The Global Financial Crisis triggered a wave of panic selling of shares on the Warsaw Stock Exchange (WSE. As the fluctuations in share prices do not always reflect the real economic situation of the companies, it is worth to examine whether the financial standing of companies listed on WSE actually deteriorated and whether the number of companies facing bankruptcy grew during the 2007 Crisis. The main purpose of this article is to evalu-ate the influence of the recent financial crisis on the financial situation and performance of Polish listed companies. Eight multiple discriminant analysis models were utilized to evaluate the real changes in the financial situation of Polish listed companies during the crisis (years 2006-2011. The aforementioned models enable prediction of corporate bankruptcy and measurement of financial health of companies. Theoretically, the number of companies facing bankruptcy should increase in time of crisis. As many as 175 joint-stock companies listed on the regulated market of the WSE were covered by the study. Their financial data were extracted from the Notoria

  3. Contact radiotherapy. Report of technological assessment

    Ortholan, Cecile; Melin, Nicole; Lee-Robin, Sun Hae; David, Denis Jean; Pages, Frederique; Devaud, Christine; Noel, Georges; Biga, Julie; Moty-Monnereau, Celine; Canet, Philippe; Lascols, Sylvie; Lamas, Muriel; Ramdine, Jessica; Tuil, Louise

    2008-10-01

    This report aims at assessing safety, indications, the role in therapeutic strategy, and efficiency of contact radiotherapy. It also aims at answering questions like: is the contact radiotherapy technique validated? What are the indications for contact radiotherapy? What about the efficiency and safety of contact radiotherapy? After a presentation of preliminary notions on radiotherapy (radiation types, dose, and irradiation techniques), the report presents this specific technique of contact radiotherapy: definition, devices, use recommendations, issues of radiation protection, modalities of performance of a contact radiotherapy session, and concerned pathologies. Then, based on a literature survey, this report addresses the various concerned tumours (skin, rectum, brain, breast), indicates some general information about these tumours (epidemiological data, anatomy and classification, therapeutic options, radiotherapy), and proposes an assessment of the efficiency and safety of contact radiotherapy

  4. Intraoperative radiotherapy in breast cancer: literature review

    Alfaro Hidalgo, Sabrina A.

    2013-01-01

    A literature review was performed on intraoperative radiotherapy of breast cancer. The strength and attractiveness is established of techniques of partial irradiation in the treatment of breast cancer. The benefit is originated to restrict the area immediate of radiotherapy to the tumor bed or quadrant index and identifying the benefit of being applied during the radiotherapy while surgical lumpectomy. The impact of local recurrence has been established using intraoperative radiotherapy. The advantages of intraoperative radiotherapy was compared in the management of the conservative surgery in early stages of breast cancer with external radiotherapy. Different methods of intraoperative radiotherapy have been compared and individual impact on local recurrence ranges. Intraoperative radiotherapy has had many advantages: radiobiological, technical, clinical, psychological and economical in the handling of conservative surgery in early stages of breast cancer, compared with external radiotherapy [es

  5. Bone Health and Pelvic Radiotherapy.

    Higham, C E; Faithfull, S

    2015-11-01

    Survivors who have received pelvic radiotherapy make up many of the long-term cancer population, with therapies for gynaecological, bowel, bladder and prostate malignancies. Individuals who receive radiotherapy to the pelvis as part of their cancer treatment are at risk of insufficiency fractures. Symptoms of insufficiency fractures include pelvic and back pain and immobility, which can affect substantially quality of life. This constellation of symptoms can occur within 2 months of radiotherapy up to 63 months post-treatment, with a median incidence of 6-20 months. As a condition it is under reported and evidence is poor as to the contributing risk factors, causation and best management to improve the patient's bone health and mobility. As radiotherapy advances, chronic symptoms, such as insufficiency fractures, as a consequence of treatment need to be better understood and reviewed. This overview explores the current evidence for the effect of radiotherapy on bone health and insufficiency fractures and identifies what we know and where gaps in our knowledge lie. The overview concludes with the need to take seriously complaints of pelvic pain from patients after pelvic radiotherapy and to investigate and manage these symptoms more effectively. There is a clear need for definitive research in this field to provide the evidence-based guidance much needed in practice. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Education in physics of radiotherapy

    Kessler, Judith; Feld, Diana B.; Portillo, Perla A.; Casal, Mariana R.; Menendez, Pablo R.

    2008-01-01

    Radiotherapy is the clinical application which requires the highest precision in dose delivery because of the very high doses administrated to patients, taking into account that new diagnostic methods and new modalities and treatment machines give greater possibilities of dose escalation. These higher doses may also produce serious side effects if not accurately administered. High qualified personnel is therefore needed for dealing with these new complex modalities, assuring that dose prescribed is correctly administered and providing adequate radiation protection to patients, public and staff. Education in Physics of Radiotherapy aims to provide students with solid theoretical and practical basis in order to be able to work with great responsibility and understanding in a Radiotherapy Department and assure that appropriate radiation protection to patients, public and staff. Since 1964 the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) gives course related to Radiotherapy and since 2002, due to a collaborative project, these courses are given at the Oncology Institute 'Angel H. Roffo' (IOAR) which belongs to the University of Buenos Aires (UBA). The IOAR is well equipped in Radiotherapy and new techniques are continuously introduced. That is why, being a University Institution and having highly specialized staff, it is the ideal hospital for teaching Radiotherapy in Buenos Aires, not only for regular courses but also for implementing workshops, seminars and updating courses as well. Continuous education helps to create and increase awareness of the importance of radiation protection in patients as well as in public and staff. (author)

  7. Gene therapy and radiotherapy in malignant tumor

    Zhang Yaowen; Cao Yongzhen; Li Jin; Wang Qin

    2008-01-01

    Tumor treatment is one of the most important fields in medical research. Nowadays, a novel method which is combined gene therapy with radiotherapy plays an important role in the field of cancer research, and mainly includes immune gene therapy combined with radiotherapy, suicide gene therapy or tumor suppressor gene therapy combined with radiotherapy, antiangiogenesis gene therapy combined with radiotherapy and protective gene therapy combined with radiotherapy based on the technical features. This review summarized the current status of combined therapies of gene therapy and radiotherapy and possible mechanism. (authors)

  8. Long-term effects in children treated with radiotherapy for head and neck rhabdomyosarcoma

    Paulino, Arnold C.; Simon, James H.; Zhen Weining; Wen, B.-C.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the long-term effects of treatment in children receiving radiotherapy for head and neck rhabdomyosarcoma. Methods: From 1967 to 1994, a total of 30 children with head and neck rhabdomyosarcoma received megavoltage radiotherapy at one institution. Seventeen patients (57%) have survived and have at least a 5-year follow-up. There were 11 males and 6 females, with a median age of 5.7 years (range 2.2-11.6) at the time of radiotherapy. Tumor location was orbit in 6 patients, infratemporal fossa in 4, paranasal sinuses in 2, and supraglottic larynx in 2; the nasopharynx, pterygopalatine fossa, and parotid gland were sites for the remaining children. All but 2 patients had tumors of embryonal histology. The Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study (IRS) Group was I in 2, II in 3, and III in 11 children; 1 patient had a recurrent tumor after surgery alone. Radiotherapy volume was the primary tumor or tumor bed in 13, tumor and whole brain in 3, and tumor and craniospinal axis in 1. Median radiotherapy dose to the primary site was 5,040 cGy (range 4,140-6,500) and to the whole brain was 3,000 cGy. All but 1 were treated with 150-200-cGy fractions; 1 patient received 250-cGy fractions for a tumor in the larynx. Chemotherapy was vincristine (V), actinomycin-D (A), and cyclophosphamide (C) in 10 patients, VAC + adriamycin in 2, VA in 1, VA + ifosfamide in 1, VC + adriamycin in 1, and none in 2. One patient had salvage chemotherapy consisting of cisplatin and etoposide. Median follow-up time was 20 years (range 7.5-33). Results: Late effects of treatment were seen in all patients and included facial growth retardation in 11, neuroendocrine dysfunction in 9, visual/orbital problems in 9, dental abnormalities in 7, hearing loss in 6, and hypothyroidism in 3. Intellectual and academic delays were documented in 3 patients who had received whole brain radiotherapy. While neuroendocrine, thyroid, dental, and cognitive sequelae were primarily attributed to radiotherapy

  9. Radioprotectors in Radiotherapy

    Nair, C.K.K. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Parida, D.K.; Nomura, Taisei

    2001-03-01

    This review article focuses on clinically relevant radioprotectors and their mechanisms of radioprotection. Radiotherapy is the most common modality of human cancer therapy. Obtaining optimal results requires a judicious balance between the total dose of radiotherapy delivered and the threshold limit of critical surrounding normal tissues, and the normal tissues need to be protected against radiation injury to obtain better tumor control by using a higher dose. For this reason, radiation-protective agents play an important role in clinical radiotherapy. Radiation-protective agents can be classified into three groups: radioprotectors, adaptogens, and absorbents. The first group generally consists of sulfhydryl compounds and other antioxidants. They include several myelo-, entero-, and cerebro-protectors. Adaptogens act as promotors of radioresistance. They are natural protectors that offer chemical protection against low levels of ionizing radiation. Absorbents protect organs from internal radiation and chemicals. They include drugs that prevent incorporation of radioiodine by the thyroid gland and absorption of radionuclides. This article thoroughly describes the properties, mechanisms of action, and perspectives on clinical application of the following categories of radioprotectors: sulfhydryl compounds (e.g., cysteine, cysteamine, glutathione, AET, WR 2127, and other WR-compounds), antioxidants (e.g., tempace, Hoechst 33342, vitamin A, E, and C, TMG, melatonin), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (e.g., captopril, elanopril, penicillamine, pentoxifylline, L-158, 809), cytoprotective agents (mesna, dexrazoxane, and amifostin), metalloelements (e.g., manganese chloride, cadmium salts, bismuth subnitrate), immunomodulators (gamma-interferon, polysaccharides AM5, AM218, heat-killed lactobacillus cells, broncho-vaxom, trehalose dicorynomycolate, and AS101), lipopolysaccharides and prostaglandins, plant extracts and compounds isolated from plants (curcmin

  10. Local orbitals by minimizing powers of the orbital variance

    Jansik, Branislav; Høst, Stinne; Kristensen, Kasper

    2011-01-01

    's correlation consistent basis sets, it is seen that for larger penalties, the virtual orbitals become more local than the occupied ones. We also show that the local virtual HF orbitals are significantly more local than the redundant projected atomic orbitals, which often have been used to span the virtual...

  11. GOC: General Orbit Code

    Maddox, L.B.; McNeilly, G.S.

    1979-08-01

    GOC (General Orbit Code) is a versatile program which will perform a variety of calculations relevant to isochronous cyclotron design studies. In addition to the usual calculations of interest (e.g., equilibrium and accelerated orbits, focusing frequencies, field isochronization, etc.), GOC has a number of options to calculate injections with a charge change. GOC provides both printed and plotted output, and will follow groups of particles to allow determination of finite-beam properties. An interactive PDP-10 program called GIP, which prepares input data for GOC, is available. GIP is a very easy and convenient way to prepare complicated input data for GOC. Enclosed with this report are several microfiche containing source listings of GOC and other related routines and the printed output from a multiple-option GOC run

  12. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in brain tumors and cervical region. Experience of the Dean Funes Medical Center, first experience in stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery inside the country

    Castro Vita, H.; Brunetto, M.; Derechinsky, V; Derechinsky, G.; Derechinsky, M.; Gonzalez, S.; Marinello, A.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: A retrospective study to analyze the results of 53 patients treated with stereotactic radiotherapy in 'Centro Medico Dean Funes' was performed. The patients had brain and head and neck tumors. Patients and methods: From November 1997 to March 2003, 53 patients were treated with stereotactic radiotherapy in 'Centro Medico Dean Funes'. The daily dose administered varied from 1.8 to 2 Gy and the total dose from 30 to 70 Gy. The minimal follow up was 2 months, and the medium follow up 32 months. Local control and survival were analyzed in all patients, as well as tolerance and the complications of the treatment. Results: Since these series represented a very heterogeneous group of patients, the final results were very difficult to compare with other alternative treatments. However, an excellent tolerance to therapy was observed. Some subsets of patients had good results to treatment: patients with metastasis to the orbit, patients with lesions to the sellar and parasellar regions and some who relapsed following conventional radiotherapy, mainly lymphomas. Conclusions: Stereotactic radiotherapy is a valid therapeutic method to treat tumors of the brain and head and neck, as long as the tumor has a moderate size (6 cm. or less) and the shape is cylindrical or ellipsoid. Stereotactic radiation improves the therapeutic ratio as compared with the conventional radiotherapy. It has advantages over the 3D technique, and could compete with IMRT (Intensity modulated radiation therapy). (author) [es

  13. Orbital debris: a technical assessment

    Committee on Space Debris, National Research Council

    ..., and other debris created as a byproduct of space operations. Orbital Debris examines the methods we can use to characterize orbital debris, estimates the magnitude of the debris population, and assesses the hazard that this population poses to spacecraft...

  14. Postenucleation orbits in retinoblastoma: treatment with 125I brachytherapy

    Stannard, Clare; Sealy, Ross; Hering, Egbert; Hough, Jan; Knowles, Ruth; Lecuona, Karin; Reddi, V. Bala

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Children with retinoblastoma that extends into or through the choroid, sclera, or optic nerve are at risk of developing orbital disease, as well as metastases. Previously, these enucleated orbits were treated with external beam radiotherapy in addition to chemotherapy. 125 I brachytherapy for tumors in and around the eye was pioneered by Sealy in Cape Town, South Africa, in 1974. In 1983, he developed a technique to irradiate the contents of the orbit while limiting the dose to the bony orbit and eyelids. Methods and Materials: Six nylon tubes containing 125 I seeds were implanted through the eyelids around the periphery of the orbit. Each contained a metal gutter that screens the outer part of the seeds from the bony orbit. A seventh unscreened tube was placed in the center, and a metal disc with 125 I seeds on its posterior surface was secured beneath the eyelids. Between 1983 and 2000, 57 orbits were treated in 56 children with retinoblastoma. Thirty-six were treated prophylactically and 21, with tumor at the resection line of the nerve, extrascleral tumor, or metastases, were treated therapeutically. They received a median dose of 34 Gy in 70 h; 30 also received chemotherapy. Children with tumor at the resection line of the nerve also received treatment to the craniospinal axis. Results: The median follow-up of the 35 patients treated prophylactically was 35 months (range 0-187). Seven patients died, 6 of metastases, at a median of 10 months (range 4-29) after the implant. Eight of the 13 patients with microscopic extraocular tumor survived a median of 29 months (range 5-156). None of the 8 patients presenting with orbital tumor or metastases survived. No orbital recurrences developed in any of the patients. Cosmesis was considerably improved compared with previous forms of irradiation. Conclusion: Orbital brachytherapy is an effective method of irradiating the orbit to prevent recurrent tumor, the treatment time is short, and the cosmesis is much more

  15. Ocena funkcjonalna zawodników uprawiających futbol amerykański z wykorzystaniem testu Functional Movement Screen = Functional evaluation of competitors practicing American football with using Functional Movement Screen test

    Bartosz Kochański

    2015-10-01

    5Wydział Kultury Fizycznej, Zdrowia i Turystyki, Uniwersytet Kazimierza Wielkiego w Bydgoszczy   Streszczenie   Wstęp. Functional Movement Screen (FMS jest narzędziem służącym do kompleksowej oceny funkcjonalnej. FMS pozwala na ocenę ryzyka wystąpienia kontuzji, ocenę jakości wykonywanych wzorców ruchowych oraz określenie występowania ograniczeń i asymetrii w obrębie narządu ruchu. Cel pracy. Celem pracy jest ocena funkcjonalna zawodników futbolu amerykańskiego z wykorzystaniem testu Functional Movement Screen (FMS oraz określenie korelacji pomiędzy wynikiem testu FMS, a przebytymi urazami i kontuzjami u zawodników futbolu amerykańskiego. Materiał i metody. Badania przeprowadzono na grupie 30 profesjonalnych zawodników futbolu amerykańskiego reprezentujących klub „KS Bydgoszcz Archers”. Ocenę funkcjonalną wykonano z wykorzystaniem testu Functional Movement Screen. Badania zostały przeprowadzone w trakcie trwania sezonu z wykorzystaniem urządzenia oraz protokołu do testu FMS. Wyniki. Średni wynik w teście FMS uzyskany przez osoby uprawiające futbol amerykański wynosi 14,5/21 punktów. Średnia ocen z większości prób oscyluje koło 2 punktów, co oznacza, że wzorce ruchowe wykonywane są  z kompensacją. U zawodników futbolu amerykańskiego zaobserwowano istotną statystycznie korelację pomiędzy przebytymi urazami i kontuzjami, a wynikami osiąganymi w próbie 2, 4 i 6 w teście FMS. Wnioski. 1. U zawodników futbolu amerykańskiego obserwuje się nieprawidłowości we wzorcach mobilności, stabilności oraz koordynacji nerwowo-mięśniowej w teście FMS. 2. Ryzyko wystąpienia kontuzji i urazów u zawodników futbolu amerykańskiego według testu FMS jest relatywnie duże. 3. Wynik testu FMS koreluje z przebytymi urazami i kontuzjami u zawodników futbolu amerykańskiego.   Abstract   Introduction. Functional Movement Screen (FMS is a tool for comprehensive functional assessment. FMS allows the assessment of risk

  16. Ocena jakości życia przed i po protezowaniu narządu słuchu = The impact of hearing aids on the quality of life

    Patrycja Witczak

    2016-09-01

      Ocena jakości życia przed i po protezowaniu narządu słuchu The impact of hearing aids on the quality of life     Patrycja Witczak1, Dominik Olejniczak2, Joanna Skonieczna2     1 Absolwentka kierunku Zdrowie Publiczne Wydział Nauki o Zdrowiu Warszawski Uniwersytet Medyczny   2 Warszawski Uniwersytet Medyczny Zakład Zdrowia Publicznego ul. Banacha 1a, 02-097 Warszawa     Słowa kluczowe: aparaty słuchowe, jakoś życia, niedosłuch Key words: Hearing aids, Quality of life, Hearing impairment     Streszczenie   Wprowadzenie i cel pracy: Problem niedosłuchu dotyczy ok. 12% populacji. Liczba osób dotkniętych wadą słuchu systematycznie wzrasta. Jest to ważny aspekt medyczny i społeczny. U osób u których stwierdzono niedosłuch jedną z metod rehabilitacji narządu słuchu jest użytkowanie aparatu słuchowego. Podstawowym celem protezowania narządu słuchu jest poprawa komunikowania się osoby niedosłyszącej z otoczeniem oraz zwiększenie komfortu jej życia. Głównym celem badania była ocena jakości życia i korzyści z użytkowania aparatów słuchowych u osób po 60 roku życia. Materiał i metoda: Zastosowaną metodą badawczą był sondaż diagnostyczny, techniką ankieta, a narzędziem kwestionariusz standaryzowany oceny jakości życia przed i po protezowaniu narządu słuchu. Grupą badaną jest populacja osób w wieku powyżej 60 lat. Łączna ilość osób przebadanych stanowiła grupę 60 pacjentów z wadami słuchu stosujących aparaty słuchowe. Wyniki: Narażenie środowiska pracy na hałas zadeklarowało blisko 61% badanych. Jedynie 30,5% zna podstawowe uwarunkowania zdrowia mające znaczenie w przypadku niedosłuchu. Około 75% badanych uznało, że aparat słuchowy pomógł im w życiu codziennym przynajmniej w stopniu dobrym. Wnioski: Z uwagi na dużą poprawę jakości życia po protezowaniu narządu słuchu, konieczne jest edukowanie i informowanie pacjentów w zakresie tej metody leczenia i podnoszenia jakości

  17. Voice following radiotherapy

    Stoicheff, M.L.

    1975-01-01

    This study was undertaken to provide information on the voice of patients following radiotherapy for glottic cancer. Part I presents findings from questionnaires returned by 227 of 235 patients successfully irradiated for glottic cancer from 1960 through 1971. Part II presents preliminary findings on the speaking fundamental frequencies of 22 irradiated patients. Normal to near-normal voice was reported by 83 percent of the 227 patients; however, 80 percent did indicate persisting vocal difficulties such as fatiguing of voice with much usage, inability to sing, reduced loudness, hoarse voice quality and inability to shout. Amount of talking during treatments appeared to affect length of time for voice to recover following treatments in those cases where it took from nine to 26 weeks; also, with increasing years since treatment, patients rated their voices more favorably. Smoking habits following treatments improved significantly with only 27 percent smoking heavily as compared with 65 percent prior to radiation therapy. No correlation was found between smoking (during or after treatments) and vocal ratings or between smoking and length of time for voice to recover. There was no relationship found between reported vocal ratings and stage of the disease

  18. Proton radiotherapy: some perspectives

    Kirn, T.F.

    1988-01-01

    A news article highlighting the use of protons in radiotherapy is presented. Development of stereotaxic radiosurgery is the result of contributions from physicists, radiologists, and neurosurgeons, says Jacob Fabrikant, MD, head of the Arteriovenous Malformation Program at the University of California's Lawrence Berkeley laboratory. It also appears to have been the product of Harvard University (Boston) and University of California (Berkeley) cooperation. Robert R. Wilson, PhD, now a professor emeritus at Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, is credited with proposing the medical use of charged particles. Wilson, a physicist, says that the idea occurred to him while he was at Berkeley in the mid-1940's, designing the cyclotron to be built at Harvard. Although he was aware of their work, he does not remember discussing it with Robert Stone, MD, or John Lawrence, MD, who only a few years earlier at Berkeley had begun the initial medical experiments with neutrons. Wilson says that it simply occurred to him that in certain instances charged particles had two advantages over x-rays

  19. Automatization in radiotherapy

    Schraub, S.; Dutou, L.; Bernard, D.; Koechlin, M.; Beer-Gabel, J.

    1978-01-01

    Data-processing in external radiotherapy has to be adapted to each local situation, taking into account the patients to be treated, the irradiation equipment, the data-processing centers available locally, regionally, and nationally, and the rentability of the data-processing system required. It should be recalled that most dosimetric methods used today can be treated manually, and the question of rentability has to be kept in mind when deciding to buy a data-processing system. The radiotherapist should, therefore, prepare a list of costs for each situation, and verify the validity of each programme proposed by the supplier. It is difficult to make a definite choice between the presently available systems. The radiotherapist has to choose in relation to his activity, his availability and the systems available to him. It can sometimes be more advantageous to have a terminal linked to a large computer, rather than to readapt a series of programmes for a data-processing system available locally: many such solutions, though original, cannot be 'exported'. It should be recalled that a large number of dosimetries can be obtained manually, and on the rare occasions when the aid of a computer is essential, the assistance of better equipped neighbouring centers can be obtained. The decision as to whether a data-processing system needs to be acquired has to take all these imperatives into account [fr

  20. Erythropoietin in radiotherapy

    Guttenburger, R.

    2003-01-01

    A high blood hemoglobin level is an independent factor for good prognosis as demonstrated in retrospective and prospective studies in a number of cancer sites. However, there is still debate on how hemoglobin affects outcome after radiotherapy. The issues are: 1. How about the predictive power and the magnitude of effect in various tumor entities? 2. Are all potential mechanisms for the hemoglobin effect considered? 3. Do EPO receptors found on tumor and normal cells outside the bone marrow play a role? Experimental and clinical data on anemia and its treatment have been extensively discussed. So far, the means to manipulate the hemoglobin level, their indication and administration are to be clarified. The issues are: 1. Why does transfusion not improve prognosis? 2. What have we learned from trials using EPO to stimulate endogenous Hb production? 3. What are the potential pitfalls of correcting anemia with EPO? 4. What is the optimal design of EPO-RT trials? Although there are still more questions than answers, the therapeutic potential of erythropoietin is of considerable interest to radiation oncologists. This report gives a summary reviewing the topic and ends on a note of caution: Mild anemia in cancer patients is no indication to use EPO outside clinical trials

  1. Intensity modulated conformal radiotherapy

    Noel, Georges; Moty-Monnereau, Celine; Meyer, Aurelia; David, Pauline; Pages, Frederique; Muller, Felix; Lee-Robin, Sun Hae; David, Denis Jean

    2006-12-01

    This publication reports the assessment of intensity-modulated conformal radiotherapy (IMCR). This assessment is based on a literature survey which focussed on indications, efficiency and safety on the short term, on the risk of radio-induced cancer on the long term, on the role in the therapeutic strategy, on the conditions of execution, on the impact on morbidity-mortality and life quality, on the impact on the health system and on public health policies and program. This assessment is also based on the opinion of a group of experts regarding the technical benefit of IMCR, its indications depending on the cancer type, safety in terms of radio-induced cancers, and conditions of execution. Before this assessment, the report thus indicates indications for which the use of IMCR can be considered as sufficient or not determined. It also proposes a technical description of IMCR and helical tomo-therapy, discusses the use of this technique for various pathologies or tumours, analyses the present situation of care in France, and comments the identification of this technique in foreign classifications

  2. Hyperthermia and radiotherapy

    Dietzel, F.

    1979-01-01

    Of decisive importance for superadditive enhancement is the close temporal correlation of hyperthermia and radiotherapy. It is recommended to first irradiate and then use heat treatment in order to ensure that dividable tumour cells are irradiated before hyperthermia. To achieve an optimal enhancing effect, temperatures of appr. 42 0 are sufficient. In order to be able to neglect temperature regulation and convection effects, hyperthermia for clinical use must be carried out in doses high enough to ensure that it can be finished within 3-4 minutes. It is necessary to make efforts to find out which forms of application can be realised in order to reach deeper tissue regions, thus making possible at least a half-depth-therapy. Up to day, only the 2 cm near to the surface can be heated in a sufficiently homogeneous way. In the FRG, there are more than 200 high-volt-therapy systems, including electron accelerators and telegamma systems. This is a dense network of radiation-therapeutical supply. An improved therapy effect of loose ionising rays which, with the help of the hypertherming, would almost be equal to irradiation with high ionisation density, is not only of scientific interest, but also of high interest for public health. (orig./MG) 891 MG/orig.- 892 RDG [de

  3. Orbiter OMS and RCS technology

    Boudreaux, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    Orbiter Orbital Maneuver Subsystem (OMS) and Reaction Control Subsystem (RCS) tankage has proved to be highly successful in shuttle flights on-orbit propellant transfer tests were done. Tank qualification tests along with flight demonstrations were carried out future uses of storable propellants are cited.

  4. Image-guided radiotherapy for effective radiotherapy delivery

    Karlsson, Ulf Lennart

    2016-01-01

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) is a new radiotherapy technology that combines the rapid dose fall off associated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and daily tumor imaging allowing for high precision tumor dose delivery and effective sparing of surrounding normal organs. The new radiation technology requires close collaboration between radiologists, nuclear medicine specialists, and radiation oncologists to avoid marginal miss. Modern diagnostic imaging such as positron emission tomography (PET) scans, positron emission tomography with Computed Tomograpgy (PET-CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows the radiation oncologist to target the positive tumor with high accuracy. As the tumor is well visualized during radiation treatment, the margins required to avoid geographic miss can be safely reduced , thus sparing the normal organs from excessive radiation. When the tumor is located close to critical radiosensitive structures such as the spinal cord, IGRT can deliver a high dose of radiatio...

  5. Epigenetics in radiotherapy: Where are we heading?

    Smits, Kim M.; Melotte, Veerle; Niessen, Hanneke E.C.; Dubois, Ludwig; Oberije, Cary; Troost, Esther G.C.; Starmans, Maud H.W.; Boutros, Paul C.; Vooijs, Marc; Engeland, Manon van; Lambin, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy is an important component of anti-cancer treatment. However, not all cancer patients respond to radiotherapy, and with current knowledge clinicians are unable to predict which patients are at high risk of recurrence after radiotherapy. There is therefore an urgent need for biomarkers to guide clinical decision-making. Although the importance of epigenetic alterations is widely accepted, their application as biomarkers in radiotherapy has not been studied extensively. In addition, it has been suggested that radiotherapy itself introduces epigenetic alterations. As epigenetic alterations can potentially be reversed by drug treatment, they are interesting candidate targets for anticancer therapy or radiotherapy sensitizers. The application of demethylating drugs or histone deacetylase inhibitors to sensitize patients for radiotherapy has been studied in vitro, in vivo as well as in clinical trials with promising results. This review describes the current knowledge on epigenetics in radiotherapy

  6. Technological advances in radiotherapy of rectal cancer

    Appelt, Ane L; Sebag-Montefiore, David

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review summarizes the available evidence for the use of modern radiotherapy techniques for chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer, with specific focus on intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) techniques. RECENT FINDINGS: The dosimetric...

  7. Locally Advanced Oncocytic Carcinoma of the Nasal Cavity Treated With Surgery and Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy

    Yu-Wen Hu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Oncocytic carcinomas of the nasal cavity are extremely rare. We report 1 patient whose primary tumor and neck lymphadenopathies were under control nearly 2 years after combined surgery and radiotherapy. An 80-year-old man with a history of nasal oncocytoma had received excision twice previously. Computed tomography demonstrated locally advanced recurrent tumor invading the paranasal sinuses and orbit with lymphadenopathies in the right neck. Skull base surgery was performed. Pathological examination revealed oncocytic carcinoma. Positron emission tomography showed hypermetabolic lesions in the surgical bed and right neck. The patient subsequently received intensity-modulated radiotherapy to the primary site and the whole neck. Follow-up computed tomography 4 months later showed marked shrinkage of the neck lymphadenopathies. There was no progression after nearly 2 years. Although these tumors have historically been regarded as radioresistant, the combined treatment of surgery followed by radiotherapy may offer the best chance for control of locally advanced disease.

  8. Protection of patient In radiotherapy

    Deiyi, P.

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this project is to clarify some aspects about protection of patient in radiotherapy. Therefore, some basic information about how the use of ionizing radiation in medicine has brought tremendous health benefits to the population globally, the requirement of radiation protection (Justification of practices, Dose limitation and Optimization of protection), and the deterministic and stochastic effects of radiation are presented. The aim of radiotherapy is to use ionizing radiation to cure diseases or make the symptoms of a disease less severe. Also presented are layout of a radiotherapy facility (controlled areas, supervised areas, mazes, door and interlocks, patient observation and communication, and warning sign and lights), radionuclides commonly used for radiation therapy and their main emissions, equipment and devices used in radiotherapy, aspect of protection of patient in radiotherapy such as: leakage test, source on/off, emergency buttons, radiation oncology team, treatment planning, room monitoring, equipment or for protection and Cobalt-60 unit stuck source. The advantages of brachytherapy, leakage from the treatment head and radiation incidents resulting from incorrect dose calibration are discussed. The importance of minimization dose exposure, by considering the basic principles of: time, distance and shielding are also stated. These principles prevent deterministic effects and limit stochastic effects of radiation. (author)

  9. Small animal radiotherapy research platforms

    Verhaegen, Frank; Granton, Patrick [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Tryggestad, Erik, E-mail: frank.verhaegen@maastro.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States)

    2011-06-21

    Advances in conformal radiation therapy and advancements in pre-clinical radiotherapy research have recently stimulated the development of precise micro-irradiators for small animals such as mice and rats. These devices are often kilovolt x-ray radiation sources combined with high-resolution CT imaging equipment for image guidance, as the latter allows precise and accurate beam positioning. This is similar to modern human radiotherapy practice. These devices are considered a major step forward compared to the current standard of animal experimentation in cancer radiobiology research. The availability of this novel equipment enables a wide variety of pre-clinical experiments on the synergy of radiation with other therapies, complex radiation schemes, sub-target boost studies, hypofractionated radiotherapy, contrast-enhanced radiotherapy and studies of relative biological effectiveness, to name just a few examples. In this review we discuss the required irradiation and imaging capabilities of small animal radiation research platforms. We describe the need for improved small animal radiotherapy research and highlight pioneering efforts, some of which led recently to commercially available prototypes. From this, it will be clear that much further development is still needed, on both the irradiation side and imaging side. We discuss at length the need for improved treatment planning tools for small animal platforms, and the current lack of a standard therein. Finally, we mention some recent experimental work using the early animal radiation research platforms, and the potential they offer for advancing radiobiology research. (topical review)

  10. Small animal radiotherapy research platforms

    Verhaegen, Frank; Granton, Patrick; Tryggestad, Erik

    2011-06-01

    Advances in conformal radiation therapy and advancements in pre-clinical radiotherapy research have recently stimulated the development of precise micro-irradiators for small animals such as mice and rats. These devices are often kilovolt x-ray radiation sources combined with high-resolution CT imaging equipment for image guidance, as the latter allows precise and accurate beam positioning. This is similar to modern human radiotherapy practice. These devices are considered a major step forward compared to the current standard of animal experimentation in cancer radiobiology research. The availability of this novel equipment enables a wide variety of pre-clinical experiments on the synergy of radiation with other therapies, complex radiation schemes, sub-target boost studies, hypofractionated radiotherapy, contrast-enhanced radiotherapy and studies of relative biological effectiveness, to name just a few examples. In this review we discuss the required irradiation and imaging capabilities of small animal radiation research platforms. We describe the need for improved small animal radiotherapy research and highlight pioneering efforts, some of which led recently to commercially available prototypes. From this, it will be clear that much further development is still needed, on both the irradiation side and imaging side. We discuss at length the need for improved treatment planning tools for small animal platforms, and the current lack of a standard therein. Finally, we mention some recent experimental work using the early animal radiation research platforms, and the potential they offer for advancing radiobiology research.

  11. Small animal radiotherapy research platforms

    Verhaegen, Frank; Granton, Patrick; Tryggestad, Erik

    2011-01-01

    Advances in conformal radiation therapy and advancements in pre-clinical radiotherapy research have recently stimulated the development of precise micro-irradiators for small animals such as mice and rats. These devices are often kilovolt x-ray radiation sources combined with high-resolution CT imaging equipment for image guidance, as the latter allows precise and accurate beam positioning. This is similar to modern human radiotherapy practice. These devices are considered a major step forward compared to the current standard of animal experimentation in cancer radiobiology research. The availability of this novel equipment enables a wide variety of pre-clinical experiments on the synergy of radiation with other therapies, complex radiation schemes, sub-target boost studies, hypofractionated radiotherapy, contrast-enhanced radiotherapy and studies of relative biological effectiveness, to name just a few examples. In this review we discuss the required irradiation and imaging capabilities of small animal radiation research platforms. We describe the need for improved small animal radiotherapy research and highlight pioneering efforts, some of which led recently to commercially available prototypes. From this, it will be clear that much further development is still needed, on both the irradiation side and imaging side. We discuss at length the need for improved treatment planning tools for small animal platforms, and the current lack of a standard therein. Finally, we mention some recent experimental work using the early animal radiation research platforms, and the potential they offer for advancing radiobiology research. (topical review)

  12. Curative radiotherapy of supraglottic cancer

    Kim, Yong Ho; Chai, Gyu Young

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of curative radiotherapy in the management of supraglottic cancer. Twenty-one patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the supraglottis were treated with radiotherapy at Gyeongsang National University Hospital between 1990 and 1994. Median follow-up period was 36 months and 95% were observed for at least 2 years. Actuarial survival rate at 5 years was 39.3% for 21 patients. The 5-year actuarial survival rate was 75.0% in Stage I, 42.9% in Stage II, 33.3% in Stage III, and 28.6% in Stage IV(p=0.54). The 5-year local control rate was 52.0% for 21 patients. The 5-year local control rate was 75.0% in Stage I, 57.1% in Stage II, 66.7% in Stage III, and 28.6% in Stage IV(p=0.33). Double primary cancer was developed in 3 patients and those were all esophageal cancers. In early stage(Stage I and II) supraglottic cancer, curative radiotherapy would be a treatment of choice and surgery would be better to be reserved for salvage of radiotherapy failure. In advanced stage(Stage III and IV), radiotherapy alone is inadequate for curative therapy and combination with surgery should be done in operable patients. This report emphasizes the importance of esophagoscopy and esophagogram at the follow-up of patients with supraglottic cancer

  13. Radiotherapy and skin tumors; Radiotherapie et tumeurs curanees

    Calitchi, E.; KIrova, Y.; Le bourgeois, J.P. [Hopital Henri-Mondor, 94 - Creteil (France)

    1998-09-01

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in treatment of skin tumours. For skin carcinomas, external irradiation (kilo-voltage X-rays or electrons according to clinical characteristics) is more valuable than interstitial brachytherapy, which is recommended for tumours of the lip and of the nasal vestibule. In mycosis fungoides, total cutaneous electron beam radiation therapy is efficient for patients with limited superficial plaques. In the classical form of Kaposi`s sarcoma, radiotherapy can achieve local control-whereas it obtains good palliative results in the epidemic form. (author)

  14. X-ray radiotherapy

    Tronc, D.

    1995-01-01

    Full text: The most common form of radio therapy is X-ray therapy, where a beam of photons or their parent electrons break down hydrogen bonds within the body's cells and remove certain DNA information necessary for cell multiplication. This process can eradicate malignant cells leading to complete recovery, to the remission of some cancers, or at least to a degree of pain relief. The radiotherapy instrument is usually an electron linac, and the electrons are used either directly in 'electrotherapy' for some 10% of patients, or the electrons bombard a conversion target creating a broad beam of high energy photons or 'penetration X-rays'. The simplest machine consists of several accelerating sections at around 3 GHz, accelerating electrons to 6 MeV; a cooled tungsten target is used to produce a 4 Gray/min X-ray field which can be collimated into a rectangular shape at the patient position. This tiny linac is mounted inside a rotating isocentric gantry above the patient who must remain perfectly still. Several convergent beams can also be used to increase the delivered dose. More sophisticated accelerators operate at up to 18 MeV to increase penetration depths and decrease skin exposure. Alternatively, electrotherapy can be used with different energies for lower and variable penetration depths - approximately 0.5 cm per MeV. In this way surface tissue may be treated without affecting deeper and more critical anatomical regions. This type of linac, 1 to 2 metres long, is mounted parallel to the patient with a bending magnet to direct the beam to the radiotherapy system, which includes the target, thick movable collimator jaws, a beam field equalizer, dose rate and optical field simulation and energy controls. There are over 2000 acceleratorbased X-ray treatment units worldwide. Western countries have up to two units per million population, whereas in developing countries such as Bangladesh, the density is only one per 100 million. Several

  15. Stereotactic radiotherapy for vestibular schwannoma

    Muzevic, Dario; Legcevic, Jelena; Splavski, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vestibular schwannomas (acoustic neuromas) are common benign tumours that arise from the Schwann cells of the vestibular nerve. Management options include observation with neuroradiological follow-up, microsurgical resection and stereotactic radiotherapy. OBJECTIVES: To assess...... the effect of stereotactic radiotherapy compared to observation, microsurgical resection, any other treatment modality, or a combination of two or more of the above approaches for vestibular schwannoma. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials; PubMed; EMBASE; CINAHL......; Web of Science; CAB Abstracts; ISRCTN and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. The date of the search was 24 July 2014. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) exploring the efficacy of stereotactic radiotherapy compared with observation alone, microsurgical...

  16. Dosimetry in radiotherapy. V.1

    1988-01-01

    A series of symposia on dosimetry in medicine and biology have been held by the IAEA in co-operation with WHO. The present symposium was the first one focusing on ''Dosimetry in Radiotherapy''. The papers presented reflected the different steps in the calibration chain such as the calibration standards established by the National Standards Laboratories and the conversion of the reading of calibrated instruments to the desired quantity, i.e. absorbed dose to water at a reference point in the user's beam at the radiotherapy clinic. The programme further examined the procedures necessary for optimization of the treatment of the patient, such as treatment planning methods, dose distribution studies, new techniques of dose measurement, improvements in the physical dose distributions/conformation therapy and special problems involved in total body treatments. Results of quality assurance in radiotherapy were presented from local hospitals as well as from national and international studies. Refs, figs and tabs

  17. Computerised tomography in radiotherapy planning

    Badcock, P.C.

    1983-01-01

    This study evaluates the effectiveness of computed tomography as an adjunct to radiotherapy planning. Until recently, acquisition of accurate data concerning tumour anatomy lagged behind other developments in radiotherapy. With the advent of computer-tomography (CT), these data can be displayed and transmitted to a treatment planning computer. It is concluded that the greatest inaccuracies in the radiation treatment of patients are to be found in both the inadequate delineation of the target volume within the patient and changes in body outline relative to the target volume over the length of the irradiated volume. The technique was useful in various subgroups (pelvic, intra-thoracic and chest-wall tumours) and for those patients being treated palliatively. With an estimated improvement in cure rate of 4.5% and cost-effective factors of between 3.3 and 5, CT-assisted radiotherapy planning appears to be a worthwhile procedure. (orig.)

  18. Expanding global access to radiotherapy.

    Atun, Rifat; Jaffray, David A; Barton, Michael B; Bray, Freddie; Baumann, Michael; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Hanna, Timothy P; Knaul, Felicia M; Lievens, Yolande; Lui, Tracey Y M; Milosevic, Michael; O'Sullivan, Brian; Rodin, Danielle L; Rosenblatt, Eduardo; Van Dyk, Jacob; Yap, Mei Ling; Zubizarreta, Eduardo; Gospodarowicz, Mary

    2015-09-01

    Radiotherapy is a critical and inseparable component of comprehensive cancer treatment and care. For many of the most common cancers in low-income and middle-income countries, radiotherapy is essential for effective treatment. In high-income countries, radiotherapy is used in more than half of all cases of cancer to cure localised disease, palliate symptoms, and control disease in incurable cancers. Yet, in planning and building treatment capacity for cancer, radiotherapy is frequently the last resource to be considered. Consequently, worldwide access to radiotherapy is unacceptably low. We present a new body of evidence that quantifies the worldwide coverage of radiotherapy services by country. We show the shortfall in access to radiotherapy by country and globally for 2015-35 based on current and projected need, and show substantial health and economic benefits to investing in radiotherapy. The cost of scaling up radiotherapy in the nominal model in 2015-35 is US$26·6 billion in low-income countries, $62·6 billion in lower-middle-income countries, and $94·8 billion in upper-middle-income countries, which amounts to $184·0 billion across all low-income and middle-income countries. In the efficiency model the costs were lower: $14·1 billion in low-income, $33·3 billion in lower-middle-income, and $49·4 billion in upper-middle-income countries-a total of $96·8 billion. Scale-up of radiotherapy capacity in 2015-35 from current levels could lead to saving of 26·9 million life-years in low-income and middle-income countries over the lifetime of the patients who received treatment. The economic benefits of investment in radiotherapy are very substantial. Using the nominal cost model could produce a net benefit of $278·1 billion in 2015-35 ($265·2 million in low-income countries, $38·5 billion in lower-middle-income countries, and $239·3 billion in upper-middle-income countries). Investment in the efficiency model would produce in the same period an even

  19. Hyperthermia and radiotherapy

    Lindholm, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    Combined hyperthermia (HT 45 min once or twice per week) and low dose radiotherapy (LDRT 30-34.5 Gy in 2-3 weeks) have been given to 182 locally recurrent or metastatic superficial tumours in 133 patients. Tumour response was analysed in 137 tumours in 100 patients. The overall complete response (CR) was 50% with a median duration (DCR) of 13±3 months. When mammary carcinoma, representing 62% of the treated tumours, were analysed, CR was 62% with a DCR of 14±4 months. In a comparative, non-randomized study, on 34 matched tumour pairs in 24 patients, treatment was given with LDRT+HT to the larger and the same LDRT to the smaller tumour, the patients acting as their own control. A significant difference in CR was obtained in favour of the combined treatment (p=0.0013 all diagnosis and p=0.0027 mammary carcinoma). There was no significant difference in DCR between the two modalities. No significant difference in CR was seen when tumours were randomely treated with HT once (CR 56%) or twice (CR 69%) per week combined with the same LDRT. Predictive factors for CR, multivariately analysed (15 parameters), in mammary carcinoma recurring in earlier irradiated regions, were; the present LDRT absorbed dose (p=0.02) and the average minimum temperature in the best HT session (p=0.03). Significant skin toxicity was seen in 28% of all the 182 heated regions. Prognostic factors for skin damage, multivariately analysed, were; the extension of the heated region (p=0.007) and the highest average maximum temperature in any of the HT sessions (p=0.04). Pain was in some way correlated to severe toxicity but was not considered to be an optimal monitor for HT as many patients with severe and moderate pain were without any serious skin reactions, while slight or no pain sometimes were associated with severe reactions. 401 refs

  20. Orbit Propagation and Determination of Low Earth Orbit Satellites

    Ho-Nien Shou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents orbit propagation and determination of low Earth orbit (LEO satellites. Satellite global positioning system (GPS configured receiver provides position and velocity measures by navigating filter to get the coordinates of the orbit propagation (OP. The main contradictions in real-time orbit which is determined by the problem are orbit positioning accuracy and the amount of calculating two indicators. This paper is dedicated to solving the problem of tradeoffs. To plan to use a nonlinear filtering method for immediate orbit tasks requires more precise satellite orbit state parameters in a short time. Although the traditional extended Kalman filter (EKF method is widely used, its linear approximation of the drawbacks in dealing with nonlinear problems was especially evident, without compromising Kalman filter (unscented Kalman Filter, UKF. As a new nonlinear estimation method, it is measured at the estimated measurements on more and more applications. This paper will be the first study on UKF microsatellites in LEO orbit in real time, trying to explore the real-time precision orbit determination techniques. Through the preliminary simulation results, they show that, based on orbit mission requirements and conditions using UKF, they can satisfy the positioning accuracy and compute two indicators.

  1. Clinical quality standards for radiotherapy

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study The technological progress that is currently being witnessed in the areas of diagnostic imaging, treatment planning systems and therapeutic equipment has caused radiotherapy to become a high-tech and interdisciplinary domain involving staff of various backgrounds. This allows steady improvement in therapy results, but at the same time makes the diagnostic, imaging and therapeutic processes more complex and complicated, requiring every stage of those processes to be planned, organized, controlled and improved so as to assure high quality of services provided. The aim of this paper is to present clinical quality standards for radiotherapy as developed by the author. Material and methods In order to develop the quality standards, a comparative analysis was performed between European and Polish legal acts adopted in the period of 1980-2006 and the universal industrial ISO 9001:2008 standard, defining requirements for quality management systems, and relevant articles published in 1984-2009 were reviewed, including applicable guidelines and recommendations of American, international, European and Polish bodies, such as the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), the European Society for Radiotherapy & Oncology (ESTRO), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI) on quality assurance and management in radiotherapy. Results As a result, 352 quality standards for radiotherapy were developed and categorized into the following three groups: 1 – organizational standards; 2 – physico-technical standards and 3 – clinical standards. Conclusion Proposed clinical quality standards for radiotherapy can be used by any institution using ionizing radiation for medical purposes. However, standards are of value only if they are implemented, reviewed, audited and improved, and if there is a clear mechanism in place to monitor and address failure to meet agreed standards. PMID:23788854

  2. Costing in Radiotherapy. Chapter 18

    Zubizarreta, E.; Lievens, Y.; Levin, V.C.; Van Der Merwe, D.

    2017-01-01

    The available literature on the cost of radiotherapy yields a large variation in data related to the specifics of the methodology used (the viewpoint of the analysis, time frame, health care system, etc.) and to the cost components and radiotherapy activities included. To overcome this difficulty, the reimbursement paid by medical insurance is commonly used as a proxy for the actual radiotherapy costs. Costs, however, generally bear little or no resemblance to charges, as the latter also include allowances for non-capacity use and profit margins. Accurate resource cost data are therefore more valid and should ideally be used in the context of economic evaluations and public health provisions. In addition to the theoretical problems related to obtaining accurate costs, it is difficult to interpret cost data across country borders because of differences in economics. If this is already the case for high income countries, using these cost data for low and middle income countries (LMICs) is even more problematic. Thus, there clearly is a need for calculations performed from the viewpoint of LMICs to prevent misapprehensions based on conclusions derived from data from their high income counterparts. The IAEA endeavours to assist Member States in accumulating appropriate and sufficient cost data for the initiation or expansion of radiation oncology services. Although relatively simple and easy to understand, the IAEA has found that in many countries where it has been involved in the establishment of new radiotherapy departments, the basic principles of cost calculation for radiotherapy facilities were not followed by the local planners. Radiotherapy needs careful planning, organization and a strong quality assurance (QA) programme in order to deliver safe treatments, due to the complexity of the planning and treatment process and the possibility of systematic errors. Administrators should be aware that the cost of building a radiotherapy facility and buying machines

  3. Who risk profile in radiotherapy

    Barton, M.; Sharfiq, J.; Nobleet, D.; Lemer, C.

    2009-01-01

    The different steps of a treatment in radiotherapy are: patient evaluation, decision to treat, prescription of the treatment protocol, positioning and immobilization, simulation, imaging and volume determination, planning and implementation of materials and software, transfer of treatment data, patient positioning, treatment realisation, treatment checking and follow-up. It exist processes of safety for any step of a radiotherapy realisation: patient identification, accreditation of equipment and processes, evaluation of the personnel competencies, quality assurance of equipment and management of the processes quality, redundancy during the data transfer, control of processes, errors reports and quality improvement, external controls, appropriateness of the workforce. (N.C.)

  4. Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma treated with radiotherapy

    Janaki M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a rare, highly vascular, benign, locally aggressive tumor, affecting boys of adolescent age. The aggressiveness and high vascularity makes surgery and even a biopsy difficult in majority of cases. Although surgery is the treatment of choice in early cases, considerable debate exists regarding the treatment of advanced disease with intracranial extension. Radiotherapy provides a good response and also avoids surgery-associated morbidity. We are herewith reporting a case of nasopharyngeal angiofibroma who showed complete hemostasis and improvement in vision to radiotherapy

  5. Metrological issues in molecular radiotherapy

    D'Arienzo, Marco; Capogni, Marco; Smyth, Vere; Cox, Maurice; Johansson, Lena; Bobin, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic effect from molecular radiation therapy (MRT), on both tumour and normal tissue, is determined by the radiation absorbed dose. Recent research indicates that as a consequence of biological variation across patients the absorbed dose can vary, for the same administered activity, by as much as two orders of magnitude. The international collaborative EURAMET-EMRP project Metrology for molecular radiotherapy (MetroMRT) is addressing this problem. The overall aim of the project is to develop methods of calibrating and verifying clinical dosimetry in MRT. In the present paper an overview of the metrological issues in molecular radiotherapy is provided. (authors)

  6. Therapeutic Results of Radiotherapy in Rectal Carcinoma -Comparison of Sandwich Technique Radiotherapy with Postoperative Radiotherapy

    Huh, Gil Cha; Suh, Hyun Suk; Lee, Hyuk Sang; Kim, Re Hwe; Kim, Chul Soo; Kim, Hong Yong; Kim, Sung Rok

    1996-01-01

    Purpose : To evaluate the potential advantage for 'sandwich' technique radiotherapy compared to postoperative radiotherapy in respectable rectal cancer. Between January 1989 and May 1994, 60 patients with respectable rectal cancer were treated at Inje University Seoul and Sanggye Paik Hospital.Fifty one patients were available for analysis : 20 patients were treated with sandwich technique radiotherapy and 31 patients were treated with postoperative radiotherapy. In sandwich technique radiotherapy(RT), patients were treated with preoperative RT 1500 cGy/5fx followed by immediate curative resection. Patients staged as Astler-Coller B2, C were considered for postoperative RT with 2500-4500 cGy. In postoperative RT, total radiation dose of 4500-6120 cGy, 180 cGy daily at 4-6 weeks was delivered. Patients were followed for median period of 25 months. Results : The overall 5-year survival rates for sandwich technique RT group and postoperative RT group were 60% and 71%, respectively(p>0.05). The 5-year disease free survival rates for each group were 63%. There was no difference in local failure rate between two groups(11% versus 7%). Incidence of distant metastasis was 11%(2/20) in the sandwich technique RT group and 20%(6/31) in the postoperative RT group(p>0.05). The frequencies of acute and chronic complications were comparable in both groups. Conclusion : The sandwich technique radiotherapy group shows local recurrence and survival similar to those of postoperative RT alone group but reduced distant metastasis compared to postoperative RT group. But long term follow-up and large number of patients is needed to make an any firm conclusion regarding the value of this sandwich technique RT

  7. Ocena lokalnego i systemowego stanu zapalnego u chorych na przewlekłą obturacyjną chorobę płuc w okresie stabilnym i w zaostrzeniu

    Sylwia Kwiatkowska

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Wstęp: Przewlekłą obturacyjną chorobę płuc (POChP charakteryzuje ograniczenie przepływu powietrza przez drogi oddechowe będące wynikiem nadmiernej reakcji zapalnej na wdychane pyły i gazy, głównie dym tytoniowy. W patogenezie tej choroby odgrywają rolę trzy czynniki: proces zapalny, stres oksydacyjny oraz zaburzenia równowagi pomiędzy proteinazami i antyproteinazami. W ostatnich latach coraz więcej danych wskazuje na obecność u chorych na POChP zmian pozapłucnych, takich jak wyniszczenie, osteoporoza czy depresja. Celem pracy była ocena stanu zapalnego lokalnego oraz systemowego u chorych na POChP. Ma te riał i me to dy: Badania przeprowadzono u 23 chorych na POChP dwukrotnie – w stabilnym okresie choroby oraz w zaostrzeniu. Grupę kontrolną stanowiło 16 asymptomatycznych palaczy papierosów. Analizie poddano: 1 w kondensacie powietrza wydechowego (kpw stężenie nadtlenku wodoru (H2O2 oraz prozapalnych cytokin TNF-a i IL-6; 2 w surowicy poziom TNF-a i IL-6. Wy ni ki: Stwierdzono, że u chorych na POChP w okresie stabilnym w kpw poziom H2O2 był znamiennie wyższy niż w grupie kontrolnej osób zdrowych. W trakcie zaostrzenia choroby ulegał on dalszemu wzrostowi (p0,05. Mierzalny poziom TNF-a zanotowano jedynie u chorych z zaostrzeniem POChP. Zarówno w okresie stabilnym, jak i w zaostrzeniu choroby poziom H2O2 w kpw korelował z FEV1% wartości należnej. Chorych na stabilną POChP charakteryzowało podwyższone w surowicy zarówno stężenie TNF-a, jak i IL-6 w porównaniu z grupą asymptomatycznych palaczy. W okresie zaostrzenia badane cytokiny nie ulegały istotnym zmianom (p>0,05. Wnio ski: U chorych na POChP wykazano obecność lokalnego stresu oksydacyjnego, który w trakcie zaostrzenia choroby ulegał dalszemu znamiennemu nasileniu. Obok reakcji w kompartmencie oddechowym chorzy ze stabilną postacią POChP charakteryzowali się obecnością systemowej reakcji zapalnej mierzonej poziomem TNF-a i IL-6 w surowicy

  8. Ocena poziomu lęku i depresji u rodziców dzieci z zespołem nerczycowym – sposoby radzenia sobie z nimi i metody wsparcia

    Monika Pawlak-Bratkowska

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Wstęp i cele pracy: Idiopatyczny zespół nerczycowy w wieku rozwojowym przebiega nawrotowo i trwale zmie‑ nia życie dzieci oraz ich rodziców. Celem badania była ocena poziomu lęku i depresji u rodziców dzieci z zespo‑ łem nerczycowym. Materiał i metodyka: Badanie zaplanowano jako przekrojową próbę kliniczną wśród rodzi‑ ców dzieci chorujących na zespół nerczycowy w odniesieniu do rodziców dzieci zdrowych. Wszyscy badani (46 rodziców wypełniali: ankietę dotyczącą przebiegu choroby u dziecka, kwestionariusz STAI (Inwentarz stanu i cechy lęku, kwestionariusz Skali depresji Becka, kwestionariusz Skali kontroli emocji (CECS. Grupę kontrolną stanowiło 20 rodziców dzieci zdrowych. Wyniki: Rodzice dzieci z zespołem nerczycowym charakteryzowali się istotnie wyższym poziomem depresji (Skala depresji Becka 8,7 vs 4,9, t = 2,18, p < 0,05. U ojców zaobserwo‑ wano wyższe subiektywne uczucie kontrolowania własnych reakcji w porównaniu z matkami – wyższy wynik CECS, suma u ojców (55,1 vs 47,2, t = 2,53, p < 0,05. U matek odnotowano wyższe wskaźniki zarówno w ska‑ lach mierzących poziom lęku jako cechy (STAI – cecha 45,7 vs 36,1, t = 3,19, p < 0,05 i stanu (STAI – stan 42,8 vs 33,4, t = 2,8, p < 0,05, jak i w kwestionariuszu badającym poziom depresji (10,62 vs 4,86, t = 2,66, p < 0,05. Rodzice, którzy wykazywali tendencję do obwiniania się o chorobę dziecka, podczas jej pierwszego epizodu uzyskali statystycznie istotny wyższy wynik w testach badających poziom depresji. Wnioski: Rodzice dzieci cierpiących na zespół nerczycowy charakteryzowali się istotnie wyższym poziomem depresji niż rodzice dzieci zdrowych. Ważne wydaje się objęcie szczególną opieką matek, mającą na celu obniżenie poziomu lęku i objawów depresji, oraz ojców skłonnych do tłumienia przeżywanych emocji.

  9. A Typical Presentation of Orbital Pseudotumor Mimicking Orbital Cellulitis

    J. Ayatollahi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Orbital pseudotumor, also known as idiopathic orbital inflammatory syndrome (IOIS, is a benign, non- infective inflammatory condition of the orbit without identifiable local or systemic causes. The disease may mimics a variety of pathologic conditions. We pre-sent a case of pseudotumor observed in a patient admitted under the name of orbital celluli-ties. Case Report: A 26-year-old woman reffered to our hospital with the history of left ocular pain and headache 2 days before her visit.. Ophthalmological examination of the patient was normal except for the redness and lid edema, mild chemosis and conjunctival injection. Gen-eral assessment was normal but a low grade fever was observed. She was hospitalized as an orbital cellulitis patient. She was treated with intravenous antibiotics. On the third day , sud-denly diplopia, proptosis in her left eye and ocular pain in her right side appeared. MRI re-vealed bilateral enlargement of extraocular muscles. Diagnosis of orbital pseudotumor was made and the patient was treated with oral steroid.She responded promptly to the treatment. Antibiotics were discontinued and steroid was tapered in one month period under close fol-low up. Conclusion: The clinical features of orbital pseudotumor vary widely . Orbital pseudotumor and orbital cellulitis can occasionally demonstrate overlapping features.. Despite complete physical examination and appropriate imaging, sometimes correct diagnosis of the disease would be difficult (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2013; 20 (3:256-259

  10. Construction of a remote radiotherapy planning system

    Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Nemoto, Kenji; Takahashi, Chiaki; Takai, Yoshihiro; Yamada, Shogo; Seiji, Hiromasa; Sasaki, Kazuya

    2005-01-01

    We constructed a remote radiotherapy planning system, and we examined the usefulness of and faults in our system in this study. Two identical radiotherapy planning systems, one installed at our institution and the other installed at an affiliated hospital, were used for radiotherapy planning. The two systems were connected by a wide area network (WAN), using a leased line. Beam data for the linear accelerator at the affiliated hospital were installed in the two systems. During the period from December 2001 to December 2002, 43 remote radiotherapy plans were made using this system. Data were transmitted using a file transfer protocol (FTP) software program. The 43 radiotherapy plans examined in this study consisted of 13 ordinary radiotherapy plans, 28 radiotherapy plans sent to provide assistance for medical residents, and 2 radiotherapy plans for emergency cases. There were ten minor planning changes made in radiotherapy plans sent to provide assistance for medical residents. Our remote radiotherapy planning system based on WAN using a leased line is useful for remote radiotherapy, with advantages for both radiation oncologists and medical residents. (author)

  11. Radiotherapy of chondrosarcoma of bone

    Harwood, A.R.; Krajbich, J.I.; Fornasier, V.L.

    1980-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of 31 cases of chondrosarcoma of bone treated by radiotherapy is presented. In comparison with other large series, our group of patients were found to have been unfavourably selected with respect to the known prognostic factors: histology site, adequacy of operative treatment, and presenting symptoms. Twelve patients with primary chondrosarcoma were radically irradiated; 6 of these 12 have been alive and well without tumor for periods ranging from three and a half to 16 years and 3 of these are alive and well for 15 years or more following radiotherapy. The other 6 patients responded or desease stabilized following radiotherapy for periods ranging from 16 months to eight years. One poorly differentiated tumor was radically irradiated and did not respond. Eleven patients were irradiated palliatively, generally with low doses of irradiation, and only 4 responded transiently for periods ranging from three to 12 months. Seven patients with mesenchymal and dedifferentiated tumors were radically irradiated. Four responded or disease stabilized, and 1 of these patients was alive and well at 3 years; 3 did not respond. Six died with distant metastasis. It is concluded that chondrosarcoma of bone is a radioresponsive tumor and the place of radiotherapy in the treatment of this disease and the reason for its being labelled a radioresistant tumor are discussed. The problems of assessing response of chondrosarcoma to therapy are also discussed. It is suggested that chemotherapy may have a role in the management of mesenchymal and dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma

  12. Genetic Radiotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    2004-12-01

    14. Lamberts SWJ, van der Lely A-J, de Herder WW, Hofland 30. Danielson S, Kilstrup M, Barilla K, Jochimsen B, Neuhard LJ. Octreotide. N Engl J Med...Kilstrup M, Barilla K, et al: Characteriza- Cobngcysiedans xpsin,5furytieexposure, and radiotherapy increases cytotoxicity to cholangio- tion of the

  13. Palliative radiotherapy in developing countries

    Allen, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: The International Agency for Research on Cancer predicts that cancer incidence in developing countries will increase dramatically in the first two decades of this millennium. Already some 80% of cancer patients in developing countries present with incurable disease. [n many cases pain is a severe problem and palliation is needed to improve quality of life as well as extending survival. This paper will consider the physical and clinical aspects of palliative radiotherapy (PRT), choice of radiation modality, alternative approaches to imaging and therapy and cost-benefit considerations. The potential benefits of a dedicated palliative centre include lower cost and therefore more centres, enabling more patients access to regional palliative care. Whilst there is an obvious need for palliative radiotherapy, simple curative treatments could also be managed. C060 radiotherapy has important advantages in developing countries, because of the higher initial cost of a linear accelerator, as well as the need for reliable power supply and the level of skill required by linac technicians and physicists. The beam characteristics of both C060 units and low energy linacs are compared and both are found to be acceptable for palliation. The concept of telemedicine is also discussed, using mobile phones and internet communication to allow rural clinics to receive support from specialists based in the cities, to send images for remote diagnosis and remote dose planning for radiotherapy. (author)

  14. Radiotherapy in primary cerebral lymphoma

    Legros, L.; Benezery, K.; Lagrange, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    Primary cerebral lymphoma is a rare disease with an unfavorable prognosis. Whole brain radiotherapy has been the standard treatment, but neither the optimal radiation fields nor optimal dose level of the regimen are as yet firmly establisheD. From this review of the literature, it seems that the whole brain must be treated, and a boost to the area of the primary site must be discussed. With regard to dose, the radiation dose-response relationship is not clearly proven. Yet, a minimum dose of 40 Gy is necessary, and the maximum dose is set at 50 Gy because of late neurological sequelae. Because of the poor prognosis of this disease and the risk of late sequelae, other avenues have been explored. Chemotherapy has been studied, seem to have a survival advantage and combinations of radiotherapy and chemotherapy, especially with high-dose methotrexate. Because primary cerebral lymphoma is an uncommon disease, randomized clinical trials that compare radiotherapy alone to chemotherapy plus radiotherapy may not be feasible. Finally, even if chemotherapy seems to have a survival advantage, the regimen of chemotherapy is still a matter of debate. (authors)

  15. Thalassaemic osteoarthropathy treated with radiotherapy

    Davies, A.N.

    1993-01-01

    Patients with beta thalassaemia may develop a specific osteoarthropathy involving the feet. A number of different treatments for this condition have been tried, including rest, analgesia and hypertransfusion. We report a case of a patient with thalassaemic osteoarthropathy who responded to radiotherapy after failing conventional treatment. (author)

  16. Arterial occlusive disease after radiotherapy

    Piedbois, P.; Mazeron, J.J.; Le Bourgeois, J.P.; Becquemin, J.P.; Blanc, I.; Lange, F.; Melliere, D.

    1990-01-01

    Fourteen cases of arterial occlusion or severe narrowing following radiotherapy are studied in order to assess the possible etiological role of such therapy in arterial lesion. Surgical results are also discussed in terms of long-term efficacy. The average time of occurrence after radiotherapy was 8 years post-radiotherapy. This series includes 7 supra-aortic trunk stenoses and 7 abdominal aorta trunk stenoses. The doses received in the volumes iradiated ranged from 47 to 70 Gy with standard fractionation. Association of atherosclerotic risk factors was present in 12 patients, but stenoses were usually confined to irradiated areas, and at imes occurred in uncommon sites. Surgical management included 11 by-passes, 2 endarterectomies and one percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. All patients experienced immediate and satisfactory functional improvements. Three patients were re-operated on because of the re-occlusion of the by-pass and graft infection. On the whole, stenoses in previously irradiated areas showed no particular difficulties for surgical treatment. It was concluded that radiotherapy seems to be a definite risk factor for arterial occlusion or narrowing, especially in association in association with atherosclerotic risk factors. (author). 45 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs

  17. Radiotherapy in ocular tumours

    Pinto, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Ocular tumours at the Tata Memorial Hospital, Bombay, form about 0.14% of all the proved cancer cases. In case of unilateral retinoblastoma with the other eye being not non-seeing for any reason, enucleation is advised, as the diagnosis may sometimes be in doubt. If after enucleation, optic nerve and/or peribulbar tissues are found to be involved, post-operative irradiation is given to the whole orbit. In bilateral retinoblastoma the more affected eye is enucleated and an attempt is made to preserve vision in the other eye. A tumour dose of 3500 to 4000 rad in about 4 weeks is given with a cobalt beam using a direct anterior field. A cataract that may develop has to be taken care of. Lateral and/or medial fields are used with deep X-rays. In certain cases, an implant of cobalt-60 or gold-198 grain is done. For carcinoma of conjuctiva, small lesions or early lesions are excised and a beta radiation dose of 2000 rad weekly for about 4 to 5 weeks is given; larger lesions require enucleation or exenteration followed by irradiation with super-voltage radiation. Post-irradiation sarcomas may develop many years later. Irradiation is repeated for recurrences. (M.G.B.)

  18. Orbital preservation in a maxillectomy

    Tanaka, Katsuhiko; Nishikawa, Hitomi; Kumagai, Masahiko; Dosaka, Yoshihiro; Kuroda, Toru; Atago, Yoshihiro; Nishio, Masamichi [Sapporo National Hospital (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    In the past 9 years, 38 patients of the maxillary cancer were treated by a combination of radiation and surgery. Sixteen patients showed the orbital involvement as confirmed by a CT scan and/or MRI. An orbital excenteration was necessary in 6 patients, due mainly to deep intraorbital invasion, while in 10, the orbital contents were preserved despite the involvement of the orbital capsule. The local rate of the orbital region in the latter patients evaluated at 48 months after the initial surgery was 44%. For the treatment of the recurrence at the orbital capsule. The application of gold grain (Au{sup 198}) thus appeared to be a useful tool for further preserving the eye. (author)

  19. Orbital preservation in a maxillectomy

    Tanaka, Katsuhiko; Nishikawa, Hitomi; Kumagai, Masahiko; Dosaka, Yoshihiro; Kuroda, Toru; Atago, Yoshihiro; Nishio, Masamichi

    1999-01-01

    In the past 9 years, 38 patients of the maxillary cancer were treated by a combination of radiation and surgery. Sixteen patients showed the orbital involvement as confirmed by a CT scan and/or MRI. An orbital excenteration was necessary in 6 patients, due mainly to deep intraorbital invasion, while in 10, the orbital contents were preserved despite the involvement of the orbital capsule. The local rate of the orbital region in the latter patients evaluated at 48 months after the initial surgery was 44%. For the treatment of the recurrence at the orbital capsule. The application of gold grain (Au 198 ) thus appeared to be a useful tool for further preserving the eye. (author)

  20. External radiotherapy of pituitary adenomas

    Zierhut, Dietmar; Flentje, Michael; Adolph, Juergen; Erdmann, Johannes; Raue, Friedhelm; Wannenmacher, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate therapeutic outcome and side effects of radiotherapy in pituitary adenomas as sole or combined treatment. Methods and Materials: Retrospective analysis of 138 patients (74 male, 64 female) irradiated for pituitary adenoma from 1972 to 1991 was performed. Mean age was 49.7 years (15-80 years). Regular follow-up (in the mean 6.53 ± 3.99 years) included radiodiagnostical [computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), x-ray], endocrinological, and ophthalmological examinations. Seventy patients suffered from nonfunctional pituitary adenoma, 50 patients suffered from growth-hormone producing adenomas, 11 had prolactinomas, and 7 patients had adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) producing pituitary adenomas. In 99 patients surgery was followed by radiotherapy in case of suspected remaining tumor (invasive growth of the adenoma, assessment of the surgeon, pathologic CT after surgery, persisting hormonal overproduction). Twenty-three patients were treated for recurrence of disease after surgery and 16 patients received radiation as primary treatment. Total doses from 40-60 Gy (mean: 45.5 Gy) were given with single doses of 2 Gy 4 to five times a week. Results: Tumor control was achieved in 131 patients (94.9%). In seven patients, recurrence of disease was diagnosed in the mean 2.9 years (9-98 months) after radiotherapy and salvaged by surgery. A statistically significant dose-response relationship was found in favor of doses ≥ 45 Gy. Ninety percent of the patients with hormonally active pituitary adenomas had a benefit from radiotherapy in means of complete termination (38%) or at least reduction (52%) of hormonal overproduction. Partial or complete hypopituitarism after radiotherapy developed, depending on hormonal axis, in 12 (prolactin) to 27% (follicle-stimulating hormone FSH) of patients who had not already had hypopituitarism prior to radiation. Two out of 138 patients suffered reduction of visual acuity, which was, in part

  1. Exploratory orbit analysis

    Michelotti, L.

    1989-03-01

    Unlike the other documents in these proceedings, this paper is neither a scientific nor a technical report. It is, rather, a short personal essay which attempts to describe an Exploratory Orbit Analysis (EOA) environment. Analyzing the behavior of a four or six dimensional nonlinear dynamical system is at least as difficult as analyzing events in high-energy collisions; the consequences of doing it badly, or slowly, would be at least as devastating; and yet the level of effort and expenditure invested in the latter, the very attention paid to it by physicists at large, must be two orders of magnitude greater than that given to the former. It is difficult to choose the model which best explains the behavior of a physical device if one does not first understand the behavior of the available models. The time is ripe for the development of a functioning EOA environment, which I will try to describe in this paper to help us achieve this goal

  2. Orbiting radiation stars

    Foster, Dean P; Langford, John; Perez-Giz, Gabe

    2016-01-01

    We study a spherically symmetric solution to the Einstein equations in which the source, which we call an orbiting radiation star (OR-star), is a compact object consisting of freely falling null particles. The solution avoids quantum scale regimes and hence neither relies upon nor ignores the interaction of quantum mechanics and gravitation. The OR-star spacetime exhibits a deep gravitational well yet remains singularity free. In fact, it is geometrically flat in the vicinity of the origin, with the flat region being of any desirable scale. The solution is observationally distinct from a black hole because a photon from infinity aimed at an OR-star escapes to infinity with a time delay. (paper)

  3. Exploratory orbit analysis

    Michelotti, L.

    1989-03-01

    Unlike the other documents in these proceedings, this paper is neither a scientific nor a technical report. It is, rather, a short personal essay which attempts to describe an Exploratory Orbit Analysis (EOA) environment. Analyzing the behavior of a four or six dimensional nonlinear dynamical system is at least as difficult as analyzing events in high-energy collisions; the consequences of doing it badly, or slowly, would be at least as devastating; and yet the level of effort and expenditure invested in the latter, the very attention paid to it by physicists at large, must be two orders of magnitude greater than that given to the former. It is difficult to choose the model which best explains the behavior of a physical device if one does not first understand the behavior of the available models. The time is ripe for the development of a functioning EOA environment, which I will try to describe in this paper to help us achieve this goal.

  4. Orbital Eccrine Hidrocystoma

    Deniz Marangoz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A 29-year-old female patient presented with a painless mass on her upper eyelid medially. She noticed the mass 4 years earlier and it had increased in size over time. She had no diplopia, eyelid swelling, skin lesion overlying the mass, or visual disturbances. On ocular examination, eye movements and funduscopy were normal. The mass was movable and painless with palpation. Magnetic resonance imaging with contrast showed a 12x8x7 mm well-circumscribed cystic lesion with no contrast dye appearance. Surgical removal was performed delicately and no capsular rupture occured. Pathological examination revealed an eccrine hidrocystoma. Our aim is to underline that eccrine hidrocystoma should be included in differential diagnosis of orbital masses.

  5. Solitonic natural orbitals

    Cioslowski, Jerzy

    2018-04-01

    The dependence of the natural amplitudes of the harmonium atom in its ground state on the confinement strength ω is thoroughly investigated. A combination of rigorous analysis and extensive, highly accurate numerical calculations reveals the presence of only one positive-valued natural amplitude ("the normal sign pattern") for all ω ≥1/2 . More importantly, it is shown that unusual, weakly occupied natural orbitals (NOs) corresponding to additional positive-valued natural amplitudes emerge upon sufficient weakening of the confinement. These solitonic NOs, whose shapes remain almost invariant as their radial positions drift toward infinity upon the critical values of ω being approached from below, exhibit strong radial localization. Their asymptotic properties are extracted from the numerical data and their relevance to calculations on fully Coulombic systems is discussed.

  6. Stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy: Dose prescription

    Schlienger, M.; Lartigau, E.; Nataf, F.; Mornex, F.; Latorzeff, I.; Lisbona, A.; Mahe, M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article was the study of the successive steps permitting the prescription of dose in stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy, which includes radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. The successive steps studied are: the choice of stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy among the therapeutic options, based on curative or palliative treatment intent, then the selection of lesions according to size/volume, pathological type and their number permitting the choice between radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, which have the same methodological basis. Clinical experience has determined the level of dose to treat the lesions and limit the irradiation of healthy adjacent tissues and organs at risk structures. The last step is the optimization of the different parameters to obtain a safe compromise between the lesion dose and healthy adjacent structures. Study of dose-volume histograms, coverage indices and 3D imaging permit the optimization of irradiation. For lesions close to or included in a critical area, the prescribed dose is planned using the inverse planing method. Implementation of the successively described steps is mandatory to insure the prescription of an optimized dose. The whole procedure is based on the delineation of the lesion and adjacent healthy tissues. There are sometimes difficulties to assess the delineation and the volume of the target, however improvement of local control rates and reduction of secondary effects are the proof that the totality of the successive procedures are progressively improved. In practice, stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy is a continually improved treatment method, which constantly benefits from improvements in the choice of indications, imaging, techniques of irradiation, planing/optimization methodology and irradiation technique and from data collected from prolonged follow-up. (authors)

  7. Stellar orbits around Sgr A*

    Trippe, S; Gillessen, S; Ott, T; Eisenhauer, F; Paumard, T; Martins, F; Genzel, R; Schoedel, R; Eckart, A; Alexander, T

    2006-01-01

    In this article we present and discuss the latest results from the observations of stars (''S-stars'') orbiting Sgr A* . With improving data quality the number of observed S-stars has increased substantially in the last years. The combination of radial velocity and proper motion information allows an ever more precise determination of orbital parameters and of the mass of and the distance to the supermassive black hole in the centre of the Milky Way. Additionally, the orbital solutions allow us to verify an agreement between the NIR source Sgr A* and the dynamical centre of the stellar orbits to within 2 mas

  8. Accelerated testing for synchronous orbits

    Mcdermott, P.

    1981-01-01

    Degradation of batteries during synchronous orbits is analyzed. Discharge and recharge rates are evaluated. The functional relationship between charge rate and degradation is mathematically determined.

  9. The conservation of orbital symmetry

    Woodward, R B

    2013-01-01

    The Conservation of Orbital Symmetry examines the principle of conservation of orbital symmetry and its use. The central content of the principle was that reactions occur readily when there is congruence between orbital symmetry characteristics of reactants and products, and only with difficulty when that congruence does not obtain-or to put it more succinctly, orbital symmetry is conserved in concerted reaction. This principle is expected to endure, whatever the language in which it may be couched, or whatever greater precision may be developed in its application and extension. The book ope

  10. Effect of radiotherapy on immunity function of cancer patients receiving radiotherapy

    Li Xinli; Zhu Shentao; Xu Jiuhong

    2003-01-01

    Objective: In order to observe the effect of radiotherapy on immunity function of cancer patients receiving radiotherapy. Methods: Cellular immunity is determined by APAAP; Humoral immunity is determined by transmission method. Results: The items of cellular immunity is lower than the control after radiotherapy. These items decrease continually. The difference between before and after radiotherapy has statistic significance. Of all Humoral immunity items, IgA, IgM decreased after radiotherapy and the difference has statistic significance. Conclusions: Radiotherapy can damage patients' immunity function

  11. Clinical and Treatment Features of Orbital Neurogenic Tumors

    Pınar Bingöl Kızıltunç

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the clinical and treatment features of orbital neurogenic tumors. Material and Method: The records of 35 patients with orbital neurogenic tumors who were diagnosed and treated at Ankara University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Ophthalmology, between 1998 and 2011 were evaluated retrospectively. Results: Orbitotomy via a cutaneous approach was performed in 21 (60% cases and orbitotomy via a transconjunctival approach was performed in 7 (20% cases. Three (8% cases had been operated at different centers. Four (12% cases were diagnosed clinically. Total excisional biopsy was performed in 11 (31.4% cases, subtotal excisional biopsy was performed in 7 (20%, and incisional biopsy was performed in 10 (28.6% cases. 14 (40% 35 cases were diagnosed as meningioma, 12 (34% as peripheral nerve sheath tumor, and 9 (26% cases were diagnosed as optic nerve glioma. Six (43% meningioma cases were optic nerve sheath meningioma, 5 (36% were sphenoid wing meningioma, 2 (14% were ectopic meningioma, and 1 (7% was perisellar meningioma. Six (50% of peripheral nerve sheath tumors were schwannoma, 2 (16% were solitary neurofibroma, 4 (34% were plexiform neurofibroma. External beam radiotherapy was performed in 15 (42.8% cases, cyberknife radiosurgery in 1 (2.8% , chemotherapy in 1 (2.8%, and enucleation ( because of neovascular glaucoma and vitreous hemorrhage was performed in 1 (2.8% case. Discussion: The most common orbital neurogenic tumors are meningioma, peripheral nerve sheath tumor, and optic nerve glioma. For meningioma and glioma, external beam radiotherapy is required; for schwannoma and solitary neurofibroma, total excisional biopsy is the preferred treatment. The success of visual and anatomic results are high after treatment. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2013; 43: 335-9

  12. Intraoperative radiotherapy - Current status

    Gunderson, Leonard L.; Willett, Christopher G.; Harrison, Louis B.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Intraoperative irradiation (IORT) in its broadest sense refers to the delivery of irradiation at the time of an operation. This refresher course will discuss the use of both electrons (IOERT) and high dose rate brachytherapy (IOHDR) in conjunction with surgical exploration and resection ± external irradiation/chemotherapy. Both IORT methods have evolved with similar philosophies as an attempt to achieve higher effective doses of irradiation while dose limiting structures are surgically displaced. The rationale for each is supported by excellent local control ± survival results achieved with brachytherapy alone or as a boost to external irradiation in organ preservation efforts in traditional sites (head and neck, breast, gynecologic) wherein a boost dose could be delivered to smaller volumes than could usually be accomplished with external irradiation alone. IOERT has been a tool in modern radiotherapy in Japan since the 1960's and in the U.S. since the mid 1970's. Results from randomized and nonrandomized trials will be presented in the refresher course with major emphasis on GI sites (gastric, pancreas, colorectal) since the data is more mature. While the largest clinical experience with IOERT (± external irradiation/chemotherapy, maximal resection) has been with gastrointestinal cancers in adults, moderate experience has also been obtained with locally advanced retroperitoneal sarcomas and recurrent genitourinary and gynecologic cancers. With primary colorectal cancers that are unresectable for cure or for locally recurrent colorectal cancers, both local control and long-term survival appear to be improved with the aggressive combinations including IOERT when compared to results achieved with conventional treatment. When residual disease exists after resection of gastric cancers, IOERT ± external radiation has achieved optimistic survival results in trials in Japan, the U.S., Spain and China. With locally unresectable pancreatic cancer, an

  13. PyORBIT: A Python Shell For ORBIT

    Jean-Francois Ostiguy; Jeffrey Holmes

    2003-07-01

    ORBIT is code developed at SNS to simulate beam dynamics in accumulation rings and synchrotrons. The code is structured as a collection of external C++ modules for SuperCode, a high level interpreter shell developed at LLNL in the early 1990s. SuperCode is no longer actively supported and there has for some time been interest in replacing it by a modern scripting language, while preserving the feel of the original ORBIT program. In this paper, we describe a new version of ORBIT where the role of SuperCode is assumed by Python, a free, well-documented and widely supported object-oriented scripting language. We also compare PyORBIT to ORBIT from the standpoint of features, performance and future expandability.

  14. Orbital Chondroma: A rare mesenchymal tumor of orbit

    Ruchi S Kabra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available While relatively common in the skeletal system, cartilaginous tumors are rarely seen originating from the orbit. Here, we report a rare case of an orbital chondroma. A 27-year-old male patient presented with a painless hard mass in the superonasal quadrant (SNQ of left orbit since 3 months. On examination, best-corrected visual acuity of both eyes was 20/20, with normal anterior and posterior segment with full movements of eyeballs and normal intraocular pressure. Computerized tomography scan revealed well defined soft tissue density lesion in SNQ of left orbit. Patient was operated for anteromedial orbitotomy under general anesthesia. Mass was excised intact and sent for histopathological examination (HPE. HPE report showed lobular aggregates of benign cartilaginous cells with mild atypia suggesting of benign cartilaginous tumor - chondroma. Very few cases of orbital chondroma have been reported in literature so far.

  15. PyORBIT: A Python Shell For ORBIT

    Jean-Francois Ostiguy; Jeffrey Holmes

    2003-01-01

    ORBIT is code developed at SNS to simulate beam dynamics in accumulation rings and synchrotrons. The code is structured as a collection of external C++ modules for SuperCode, a high level interpreter shell developed at LLNL in the early 1990s. SuperCode is no longer actively supported and there has for some time been interest in replacing it by a modern scripting language, while preserving the feel of the original ORBIT program. In this paper, we describe a new version of ORBIT where the role of SuperCode is assumed by Python, a free, well-documented and widely supported object-oriented scripting language. We also compare PyORBIT to ORBIT from the standpoint of features, performance and future expandability

  16. Infected orbital cyst following exenteration.

    Barak, A; Hirsh, A; Rosner, M; Rosen, N

    1996-09-01

    An orbital cyst is a rare complication of orbital trauma and exenteration. Infections of such cysts have not been described, and are potentially dangerous unless treated immediately. The authors describe a case of delayed treatment of such an infected cyst, which resolved following surgical drainage. The potentially hazardous outcome makes knowledge of such cases important.

  17. GridOrbit public display

    Ramos, Juan David Hincapie; Tabard, Aurélien; Bardram, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    We introduce GridOrbit, a public awareness display that visualizes the activity of a community grid used in a biology laboratory. This community grid executes bioin-formatics algorithms and relies on users to donate CPU cycles to the grid. The goal of GridOrbit is to create a shared awareness about...

  18. Diplopia and Orbital Wall Fractures

    Boffano, P.; Roccia, F.; Gallesio, C.; Karagozoglu, K.H.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2014-01-01

    Diplopia is a symptom that is frequently associated with orbital wall fractures. The aim of this article was to present the incidence and patterns of diplopia after orbital wall blow-out fractures in 2 European centers, Turin and Amsterdam, and to identify any correlation between this symptom and

  19. Diplopia and orbital wall fractures

    Boffano, P.; Roccia, F.; Gallesio, C.; Karagozoglu, K.H.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2014-01-01

    Diplopia is a symptom that is frequently associated with orbital wall fractures. The aim of this article was to present the incidence and patterns of diplopia after orbital wall blow-out fractures in 2 European centers, Turin and Amsterdam, and to identify any correlation between this symptom and

  20. National arrangements for radiotherapy; Mesures nationales pour la radiotherapie. Travail collectif des missions

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    After a presentation of several letters exchanged between the French health ministry and public agencies in charge of public health or nuclear safety after a radiotherapy accident in Epinal, this report comments the evolution of needs in cancerology care and the place given to radiotherapy. It outlines the technological and organisational evolution of radiotherapy and presents the distribution of radiotherapy equipment, of radio-therapists and other radiotherapy professionals in France. Within the context of radiotherapy accidents which occurred in 2007, it presents the regulatory arrangements which aimed at improving the safety, short term and middle term arrangements which are needed to support and structure radiotherapy practice quality. It stresses the fact that the system will deeply evolve by implementing a radiotherapy vigilance arrangement and a permanent follow-on and adaptation plan based on surveys and the creation of a national committee.

  1. The situation of radiotherapy in 2011

    2012-06-01

    Published within the frame of the French 2009-2013 cancer plan, this report proposes an analysis of the situation of radiotherapy in France. More particularly, it analyses the French offer in terms of radiotherapy treatments and the French position in Europe. A second part analyses equipment (accelerators and other equipment) and techniques aimed at radiotherapy treatment preparation and delivery. The following techniques are addressed: three-dimensional conformational, intensity modulation, intracranial and extracranial stereotactic, image-guided, total body irradiation, hadron-therapy, and peri-operative radiotherapy. The last parts analyse the activity of radiotherapy centres in terms of treated patients, of patient age structure, of sessions and preparations, and of treated pathologies, the medical and paramedical personnel in charge of radiotherapy, and financial and cost aspects

  2. Psychosocial effects of radiotherapy after mastectomy

    Hughson, A.V.M.; Cooper, A.F.; Smith, D.C.; McArdle, C.S.

    1987-01-01

    Psychosocial morbidity was measured in 47 patients who received postoperative radiotherapy and in 38 who received no further treatment after mastectomy. Roughly one third of all patients experienced depression or anxiety. One month after operation, before radiotherapy, there were no significant differences between the two groups in any of the measures of psychosocial morbidity. Knowledge of impending treatment did not seem to influence morbidity. At three months patients who had completed radiotherapy had significantly more somatic symptoms and social dysfunction than those not so treated. At six months the radiotherapy group continued to show more somatic symptoms, but a year after operation there were no significant differences between the groups. Although several patients who received radiotherapy were upset by their treatment, the study failed to confirm that depression and anxiety were commoner among those given radiotherapy than among patients given no further treatment. (author)

  3. Gel dosimetry for conformal radiotherapy

    Gambarini, G [Department of Physics of the University and INFN, Milan (Italy)

    2005-07-01

    With the continuum development of conformal radio therapies, aimed at delivering high dose to tumor tissue and low dose to the healthy tissue around, the necessities has appeared of suitable improvement of dosimetry techniques giving the possibility of obtaining dose images to be compared with diagnostic images. Also if wide software has been developed for calculating dose distributions in the fields of various radiotherapy units, experimental verifications are necessary, in particular in the case of complex geometries in conformal radiotherapy. Gel dosimetry is a promising method for imaging the absorbed dose in tissue-equivalent phantoms, with the possibility of 3D reconstruction of the spatial dose distribution, with milli metric resolution. Optical imaging of gel dosimeters, based on visible light absorbance analysis, has shown to be a reliable technique for achieving dose distributions. (Author)

  4. Conformal radiotherapy: principles and classification

    Rosenwald, J.C.; Gaboriaud, G.; Pontvert, D.

    1999-01-01

    'Conformal radiotherapy' is the name fixed by usage and given to a new form of radiotherapy resulting from the technological improvements observed during the last ten years. While this terminology is now widely used, no precise definition can be found in the literature. Conformal radiotherapy refers to an approach in which the dose distribution is more closely 'conformed' or adapted to the actual shape of the target volume. However, the achievement of a consensus on a more specific definition is hampered by various difficulties, namely in characterizing the degree of 'conformality'. We have therefore suggested a classification scheme be established on the basis of the tools and the procedures actually used for all steps of the process, i.e., from prescription to treatment completion. Our classification consists of four levels: schematically, at level 0, there is no conformation (rectangular fields); at level 1, a simple conformation takes place, on the basis of conventional 2D imaging; at level 2, a 3D reconstruction of the structures is used for a more accurate conformation; and level 3 includes research and advanced dynamic techniques. We have used our personal experience, contacts with colleagues and data from the literature to analyze all the steps of the planning process, and to define the tools and procedures relevant to a given level. The corresponding tables have been discussed and approved at the European level within the Dynarad concerted action. It is proposed that the term 'conformal radiotherapy' be restricted to procedures where all steps are at least at level 2. (author)

  5. Radiotherapy Proton Interactions in Matter

    Gottschalk, Bernard

    2018-01-01

    A survey of physics useful to proton radiotherapy, centered on stopping, scattering and hard scatters: 1. Introduction 2. The fundamental formula dose = fluence x mass stopping power. Practical units, comments on effective stopping power. 3. Range: experimental definition, Beth-Bloch CSDA theory, range-energy tables and approximations, range straggling. 4. Multiple Coulomb Scattering: suggested reading, elements of Moliere theory, the Gaussian approximation, scattering power. 5. Hard scatters...

  6. Breast post-radiotherapy angiosarcoma

    Chavez, O.; Ocampo, P.; Repetto, M.; Schulz, D.; Rompato, S.; Batagelj, E.; Spadavecchia, G.

    2007-01-01

    Breast angiosarcoma after radiotherapy represents a rare pathology that have been increasing in the recent years because of the tendency to treat breast cancer with conservative therapeutic treatments. The forecast depends on the histological degree being the majority of high degree, with frequent lymphatic and local recurrences plus distance metastasis. The selected treatment is the mastectomy and also should be considered the adjuvant chemotherapy [es

  7. Fingerprints identification of radiotherapy patients

    Lartigau, E.F.; Forrest, M.; Audebaud, S.; Dewitte, A.; Giscard, S.; Leclercq, B.

    2012-01-01

    The identification of patient plays a key role in the quality and safety of radiotherapy. It does impact on all professional staff and on patients. After the regulatory authority approval (Cnil), a pilot study has been performed on 1901 patients. Acceptance has been very high (> 93%) with a low risk of mis-identification (< 0.1%). The next step will be to implement and test a bimodal system in order to improve registration capacity and sensitivity. (authors)

  8. Ptanning radiotherapy of brain neoplasms

    Smirnov, R.V.

    1982-01-01

    It is emphasized that radiotherapy planing of neuro-oncologicai patients secures maximum optimization of radiation treatment. The planning involves preparation of anatomical profile diagrams of patient's head with plotted focal contrours; choise of ionizinq radiation type, directions of the working beam and dimensions and number of irradiation fields; choise of single dose vaiues and detemination of optimat distribution of integarl does in time; determination of focal projection on head surface of patients

  9. Effect of radiation in radiotherapy

    Hirata, Hideki; Fujibuchi, Toshio; Saito, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    The title subject is easily explained for the deterministic effect, secondary cancer formation and case reports of accidental exposure at radiotherapy. For the deterministic effect, the dose-effect relationship is sigmoidal in normal and cancer tissues, and the more separated are their curves, the more favorable is the radiotherapy. TD 5/5 is the tolerable dose to yield <5% of irreversible radiation injury to the normal tissue within 5 years after the therapy and is generally dose-limiting. The curves are of various shapes depending on the tissue composition that its functional subunit (FSU) is parallel like lobules of the liver, or in series like neuron. Symptoms appear complicated on these factors. Recent development of CT-based therapeutic planning has made it possible to analyze the partial tissue volume to be irradiated and its absorbed dose by the relationship (dose volume histogram, DVH) between the electron density vs CT value regardless to anatomy. The normal tissue complication probability is a model composed from the physical DVH and biological factors of FSU composition and cellular radiation susceptibility, and is a measure of the irreversible late effect manifested in normal tissues. Epidemiology has shown the increased risk of secondary cancer formation by radiotherapy. Children are highly susceptible to this, and in adults undergoing the therapy of a certain cancer, it is known that the risk of radiation carcinogenesis is increased in the particular tissue. There are presented such case reports of accidental excessive exposure at radiotherapy as caused by an inappropriate use of detector, partial loss of data in a therapeutic planning device, reading of reversed MRI image, and too much repeated use of the old-type electric portal imaging device. (T.T.)

  10. Digital linear accelerator: The advantages for radiotherapy

    Andric, S.; Maksimovic, M.; Dekic, M.; Clark, T.

    1998-01-01

    Technical performances of Digital Linear Accelerator were presented to point out its advantages for clinical radiotherapy treatment. The accelerator installation is earned out at Military Medical Academy, Radiotherapy Department, by Medes and Elekta companies. The unit offers many technical advantages with possibility of introduction new conformal treatment techniques as stereotactic radiosurgery, total body and total skin irradiation. In the paper are underlined advantages in relation to running conventional accelerator units at Yugoslav radiotherapy departments, both from technical and medical point of view. (author)

  11. Experiment on radiotherapy of postnatal mastitis

    Zhut'ko, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    The results of radiotherapy of postnatal mastitis in 78 women are presented. It is shown that the radiotherapy is the method of choice. Application of radiotherapy at different stages of disease promotes either complete resolution of infiltration (1-2 irradiations) or stipulates the decrease in temperature, abatement of pains and improvement of general state (at the presence of purulent fusion of mammary tissue). X-ray therapy of postnatal mastitis has does not affect the lactational function of mammary gland

  12. Natural history of intracranial meningioma after radiotherapy

    Monzen, Yoshio

    1999-01-01

    The author examined the natural history of intracranial meningioma after radiotherapy using CT or MR imaging. Twenty patients with intracranial meningioma received radiotherapy from a high-energy linear accelerator (4-10 MV X rays) from 1980 to 1996. The total doses were 50 Gy to the tumor bed in single doses of 2 Gy in 5 weekly fractions. Meningiomas in 10 of 20 patients were reduced within 1 to 38 months after radiotherapy, the average being 11 months. The tumors were controlled for a median of 60 months after radiotherapy (range 19-126 months). Four other patients have shown no change in tumor size after radiotherapy. The tumors were controlled for a median of 70 months after radiotherapy (range 37-127 months). The other six patients have shown tumor growth within 3 to 25 months after radiotherapy, after which the tumors stopped growing for a median of 71 months (range 2-181 months). Neither tumor size nor histological type was related to response. The growth of tumors was controlled by radiotherapy for a median duration of 43 months in the meningothelial type, 52 months in the fibroblastic type, and 61 months in the transitional type. The median duration for all benign tumors was 52 months. A moderate correlation was noted between tumor response and functional outcome after radiotherapy in 9 patients with neurological deficits. The natural histories of intracranial meningiomas after radiotherapy were grouped into three categories. Some tumors showed no change in size over a long period. This was a characteristic response after radiotherapy that differed from that of other brain tumors. The results of this study provide important information for the follow-up of intracranial meningiomas after radiotherapy. (author)

  13. Malignant astrocytoma following radiotherapy for craniopharyngioma

    Menon G

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation induced gliomas are uncommon. Occurrence of glioma following radiotherapy for craniopharyngiomas is extremely uncommon and only eight case reports have been so far published. We present our experience with one similar case of temporal gliomas occurring twelve years following radiotherapy for a sub totally excised craniopharyngioma. Although the exact mechanism of gliomas formation is unclear, their occurrence following conventional radiotherapy is a distinct possibility and signifies a poor prognosis.

  14. Risk-adapted targeted intraoperative radiotherapy versus whole-breast radiotherapy for breast cancer

    Vaidya, Jayant S; Wenz, Frederik; Bulsara, Max

    2014-01-01

    The TARGIT-A trial compared risk-adapted radiotherapy using single-dose targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT) versus fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for breast cancer. We report 5-year results for local recurrence and the first analysis of overall survival....

  15. Radiotherapy in digestive tumours in elderly patients; Radiotherapie dans les tumeurs digestives chez le patient age

    Guillerme, F.; Clavier, J.B.; Nehme-Schuster, H.; Schumacher, C.; Noel, G. [Centre de lutte contre le cancer Paul-Strauss, Strasbourg (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors comment the taking into care of a digestive cancer in the case of elderly patient. These patients are treated by radiotherapy, operative radiotherapy with concomitant chemotherapy, or pre-operative radiotherapy, depending on the age, on the cancer type, with an adaptation of the total dose or with a hypo-fractionation of the treatment. Short communication

  16. Stereotactic radiotherapy in oligometastatic cancer.

    Kennedy, Thomas A C; Corkum, Mark T; Louie, Alexander V

    2017-09-01

    Oligometastatic cancer describes a disease state somewhere between localized and metastatic cancer. Proposed definitions of oligometastatic disease have typically used a cut-off of five or fewer sites of disease. Treatment of oligometastatic disease should have the goal of long-term local control, and in selected cases, disease remission. While several retrospective cohorts argue for surgical excision of limited metastases (metastasectomy) as the preferred treatment option for several clinical indications, limited randomized data exists for treating oligometastases. Alternatively, stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is a radiotherapy technique that combines high radiation doses per fraction with precision targeting with the goal of achieving long-term local control of treated sites. Published cohort studies of SABR have demonstrated excellent local control rates of 70-90% in oligometastatic disease, with long-term survival in some series approaching 20-40%. A recent randomized phase 2 clinical trial by Gomez et al. demonstrated significantly improved progression free survival with aggressive consolidative therapy (surgery, radiotherapy ± chemotherapy or SABR) in oli-gometastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). As additional randomized controlled trials are ongoing to determine the efficacy of SABR in oligometastatic disease, SABR is increasingly being used within routine clinical practice. This review article aims to sum-marize the history and current paradigm of the oligometastatic state, review recently pub-lished literature of SABR in oligometastatic cancer and discuss ongoing trials and future directions in this context.

  17. Extracranial radiotherapy in stereotaxic conditions

    Noel, Georges; Moty-Monnereau, Celine; Meyer, Aurelia; David, Pauline; Pages, Frederique; Muller, Felix; Lee-Robin, Sun Hae; David, Denis Jean

    2006-12-01

    This document reports a literature survey and the discussion of an expert group with the objective to assess the use of extracranial radiotherapy devices in stereotaxic conditions. After a brief overview of the technological context, the authors proposes a technical description of radiotherapy in stereotaxic conditions, of the CyberKnife, of others radiotherapy techniques in stereotaxic conditions for extracranial indications, and of alternate techniques. They give an overview of concerned pathologies: skeleton, hepatic, bronchopulmonary, pancreas, prostate, kidney, and paediatric tumours. They describe the present care condition in France in terms of classification of medial acts, and of patient homogeneous groups. They provide the identification of this practice in foreign nomenclature. In the next part, they report the assessment, first through a critical analysis of published data and information in terms of act feasibility, efficiency and safety, of act role in the therapeutic strategy, of conditions of execution, and of impact on public health, and secondly through a statement of opinion of the working group in terms of terminology, indications, safety, and conditions of execution

  18. [Head and neck adaptive radiotherapy].

    Graff, P; Huger, S; Kirby, N; Pouliot, J

    2013-10-01

    Onboard volumetric imaging systems can provide accurate data of the patient's anatomy during a course of head and neck radiotherapy making it possible to assess the actual delivered dose and to evaluate the dosimetric impact of complex daily positioning variations and gradual anatomic changes such as geometric variations of tumors and normal tissues or shrinkage of external contours. Adaptive radiotherapy is defined as the correction of a patient's treatment planning to adapt for individual variations observed during treatment. Strategies are developed to selectively identify patients that require replanning because of an intolerable dosimetric drift. Automated tools are designed to limit time consumption. Deformable image registration algorithms are the cornerstones of these strategies, but a better understanding of their limits of validity is required before adaptive radiotherapy can be safely introduced to daily practice. Moreover, strict evaluation of the clinical benefits is yet to be proven. Copyright © 2013 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Patient Radiation Protection in Radiotherapy

    Hegazy, M.

    2010-01-01

    The Role of Radiotherapy is treatment modalities for cancer which is generally assumed that 50 to 60% of cancer patients will benefit from radiotherapy. It constitutes a peaceful application of ionizing radiation and an essential part of cancer management. The two aims of radiation protection Prevention is of deterministic effect and Reduction of the probability of stochastic effects. The Shielding fundamentals is to limit radiation exposure of staff, patients, visitors and the public to acceptable levels it also optimize protection of patients, staff and the public. Diagnosis is important for target design and the dose required for cure or palliation while Simulator is often used twice in the radiotherapy process where Patient data acquisition - target localization, contours, outlines and Verification. The Prescription is the responsibility of individual clinicians, depending on the patient’s condition, equipment available, experience and training. An ultimate check of the actual treatment given can only be made by using in vivo dosimetry. Treatment records must be kept of all relevant aspects of the treatment – including Session and Summary Record information, Records all treatment parameters, Dose Calculations and Dose Measurements

  20. Rehabilitation of orbital cavity after orbital exenteration using polymethyl methacrylate orbital prosthesis

    Sumeet Jain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma of the eyelid is the second most common malignant neoplasm of the eye with the incidence of 0.09 and 2.42 cases/100 000 people. Orbital invasion is a rare complication but, if recognized early, can be treated effectively with exenteration. Although with advancements in technology such as computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing, material science, and retentive methods like implants, orbital prosthesis with stock ocular prosthesis made of methyl methacrylate retained by anatomic undercuts is quiet effective and should not be overlooked and forgotten. This clinical report describes prosthetic rehabilitation of two male patients with polymethyl methacrylate resin orbital prosthesis after orbital exenteration, for squamous cell carcinoma of the upper eyelid. The orbital prosthesis was sufficiently retained by hard and soft tissue undercuts without any complications. The patients using the prosthesis are quite satisfied with the cosmetic results and felt comfortable attending the social events.

  1. The role of radiotherapy in hospice care

    Nishimura, Tetsuo; Sugiyama, Akira; Shimizu, Teppei; Ichinohe, Kenji; Teshima, Takeshi; Kaneko, Masao; Hara, Yoshio; Chihara, Satoshi.

    1989-01-01

    The aim of palliative radiotherapy for the terminally ill is to improve the quality of the remaining span of life. From November 1982 to September 1987, 69 patients in the Seirei Hospice have been treated with such radiotherapy, and symptomatic relief was obtained in 64% of these patients. Radiotherapy also proved useful in achieving an improvement in their performance status. While the aim of hospice care is not directed towards treatment of the underlying disease, the use of radiotherapy is considered to have an important role in hospice care. (author)

  2. Guide of external radiotherapy procedures 2007

    Anon.

    2008-01-01

    This work aims at participating in the permanent optimization of the returned medical service and the ratio profit-risk. This first version of the guide of external radiotherapy procedures 2007 processes only techniques of external radiotherapy, by opposition to the techniques of brachytherapy which use radioactive sources (iridium 192 , iodine 125 , cesium 137 ) placed in the contact of the tumor to be irradiated. Only, also, will be considered the irradiations of the most frequent cunning(malignant) tumors with the exception of the radiotherapy of the mild pathologies and the re-irradiations after a first radiotherapy. The first part is shared in eight chapters as follow: introduction, the steps of a treatment by radiotherapy, infrastructure, equipment and human resources, radiobiology mechanism of action of ionising radiations in radiotherapy, dose in radiotherapy, quality of treatment and radiation protection of patients in radiotherapy, prevention and risk management in radiotherapy, quality assurance and radiation protection for the pediatrics cancers and the case of pregnant women. The second part gives the tumoral localizations and the procedures; the third part is a glossary and different annexes such regulations and legislative texts. (N.C.)

  3. Otologic disorders following radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Wakisaka, Hiroyuki; Hyodo, Masamitsu; Motoyoshi, Kazumi; Yamada, Hiroyuki

    2007-01-01

    Radiotherapy is widely accepted as the first choice for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Delayed otitis of both external and middle ears is sometimes seen as a complication after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer, especially for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. They are usually hard to manage and some produces cochlear damages, finally resulting in a sensorineural hearing loss. However, these otologic disorders are tends to be overlooked, because physicians pay less attention to them than the concerning for cancer recurrence. Therefore, studies on the otologic disorders following radiotherapy are lacking. In this study, we analyzed 24 nasopharyngeal carcinoma cases retrospectively to clarify the incidence of otologic disorders induced by radiotherapy. (author)

  4. Targeting IAP proteins in combination with radiotherapy

    Fulda, Simone

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of radiotherapy critically depends on the activation of intrinsic cell death programs in cancer cells. This implies that evasion of cell death, a hallmark of human cancers, can contribute to radioresistance. Therefore, novel strategies to reactivate cell death programs in cancer cells are required in order to overcome resistance to radiotherapy. Since Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP) proteins are expressed at high levels in multiple cancers and block cell death induction at a central point, therapeutic targeting of IAP proteins represents a promising approach to potentiate the efficacy of radiotherapy. The current review discusses the concept of targeting IAP proteins in combination with radiotherapy

  5. Adjuvant and Definitive Radiotherapy for Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    Sabolch, Aaron; Feng, Mary; Griffith, Kent; Hammer, Gary; Doherty, Gerard; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of both adjuvant and definitive radiotherapy on local control of adrenocortical carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Outcomes were analyzed from 58 patients with 64 instances of treatment for adrenocortical carcinoma at the University of Michigan's Multidisciplinary Adrenal Cancer Clinic. Thirty-seven of these instances were for primary disease, whereas the remaining 27 were for recurrent disease. Thirty-eight of the treatment regimens involved surgery alone, 10 surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy, and 16 definitive radiotherapy for unresectable disease. The effects of patient, tumor, and treatment factors were modeled simultaneously using multiple variable Cox proportional hazards regression for associations with local recurrence, distant recurrence, and overall survival. Results: Local failure occurred in 16 of the 38 instances that involved surgery alone, in 2 of the 10 that consisted of surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy, and in 1 instance of definitive radiotherapy. Lack of radiotherapy use was associated with 4.7 times the risk of local failure compared with treatment regimens that involved radiotherapy (95% confidence interval, 1.2-19.0; p = 0.030). Conclusions: Radiotherapy seems to significantly lower the risk of local recurrence/progression in patients with adrenocortical carcinoma. Adjuvant radiotherapy should be strongly considered after surgical resection.

  6. Every second cancer patient receives radiotherapy

    Ojala, A.

    1996-01-01

    Radiotherapy to treat cancer was given for the first time exactly one hundred years ago. Today, radiotherapy and surgery are the two main modes of treating cancer. One in two cancer patients receives radiotherapy at some point during the course of treatment for the disease. Radiotherapy is applied most commonly in cases where surgery is not possible. Moreover, these two modes of treatment are often used together to supplement each other. About half of new cancer cases detected today can be ordered. The estimate given by the EU for cancers cured is 45 per cent, which is divided between the various treatment modes as follows: surgery 22 %, radiotherapy 12 %, surgery plus radiotherapy 6 %, and drug therapy 6 %. In addition to curative treatment, radiotherapy plays a crucial role in palliative treatment, i.e. treatment that alleviates symptoms. The sensitivity of malignant tumours to radiotherapy varies over a wide range; the same is true for healthy tissues. Radiotherapy can only be used to cure a tumour that is more sensitive to radiation than the surrounding healthy tissue. The tumour must also be sufficiently small in size and limited to a relatively small area. (orig.)

  7. Prognostic factors in the radiotherapy of Graves' ophthalmopathy

    Petersen, I.A.; Kriss, J.P.; McDougall, I.R.; Donaldson, S.S.

    1990-01-01

    Between April 1968 and February 1988, 311 patients with symptomatic and progressive Graves' ophthalmopathy were treated with megavoltage orbital radiotherapy. The patients were divided into three groups: I treated with 20 Gy/2 weeks; II treated with 30 Gy/3 weeks, and III received 20 Gy/2 weeks. The degree of eye involvement was evaluated numerically before and after therapy for each of five parameters: soft tissue signs, proptosis, eye muscle impairment, corneal involvement, and sight loss. Pre-treatment and current thyroid diagnosis and status were also noted. To evaluate the effects of radiotherapy alone, follow-up was terminated at the time any eye surgery was done; for those not treated surgically the minimum follow-up was 12 months. Because there were significant demographic differences between the patient groups, the results of each group were analyzed separately. A stepwise linear regression analysis was performed to determine if there were any significant variables affecting outcome. Based on these data formulae were derived which enable outcome to be predicted in any patient. Before therapy more than 90% of patients in all groups had soft tissue and eye muscle involvement, whereas 65-75% had proptosis and about half 50% had some degree of sight loss. Radiotherapy arrested progression of ophthalmic parameters in all but 1-6% of the patients. Objective and symptomatic improvement was noted for all parameters assessed, but there was marked individual variability. The best responses were noted for soft tissue, corneal involvement, and sight loss; however over half the patients had some improvement in eye muscle function and proptosis. Factors which resulted in less favorable outcome included male gender, advanced age, need for concurrent therapy for hyperthyroidism, and no history of hyperthyroidism. No complications have been observed

  8. Orbital Evolution and Orbital Phase Resolved Spectroscopy of the ...

    binary. We have carried out orbital phase resolved spectroscopy to mea- ... agreement with a simple model of a spherically symmetric stellar wind from the .... has a set of Narrow Field Instruments (NFI) comprising one Low Energy Concen-.

  9. Orbital Infarction due to Sickle Cell Disease without Orbital Pain

    Cameron L. McBride

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease is a hemoglobinopathy that results in paroxysmal arteriolar occlusion and tissue infarction that can manifest in a plurality of tissues. Rarely, these infarcted crises manifest in the bony orbit. Orbital infarction usually presents with acute onset of periorbital tenderness, swelling, erythema, and pain. Soft tissue swelling can result in proptosis and attenuation of extraocular movements. Expedient diagnosis of sickle cell orbital infarction is crucial because this is a potentially sight-threatening entity. Diagnosis can be delayed since the presentation has physical and radiographic findings mimicking various infectious and traumatic processes. We describe a patient who presented with sickle cell orbital crisis without pain. This case highlights the importance of maintaining a high index of suspicion in patients with known sickle cell disease or of African descent born outside the United States in a region where screening for hemoglobinopathy is not routine, even when the presentation is not classic.

  10. Computed tomography of orbital myositis

    Dresner, S.C.; Rothfus, W.E.; Slamovits, T.L.; Kennerdell, J.S.; Curtin, H.D.

    1984-01-01

    The computerized tomographic (CT) scans of 11 consecutive patients with orbital myositis were reviewed to better characterize the CT appearance of this condition. The findings in this series differed from those of previous reports in several ways. Multiple muscle involvement predominated. Bilateral involvement was more frequent than previously reported. Enlargement of the tendon as well as the muscle was a frequent finding, but a normal tendinous insertion did not preclude the diagnosis of orbital myositis. Although the CT appearance of orbital myositis is often helpful, the findings are not pathognomonic; correlation with history, clinical findings, and therapeutic response must be considered in making the diagnosis

  11. JSC Orbital Debris Website Description

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The website provides information about the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office at JSC, which is the lead NASA center for orbital debris research. It is recognized world-wide for its leadership in addressing orbital debris issues. The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has taken the international lead in conducting measurements of the environment and in developing the technical consensus for adopting mitigation measures to protect users of the orbital environment. Work at the center continues with developing an improved understanding of the orbital debris environment and measures that can be taken to control its growth. Major Contents: Orbital Debris research is divided into the following five broad efforts. Each area of research contains specific information as follows: 1) Modeling - NASA scientists continue to develop and upgrade orbital debris models to describe and characterize the current and future debris environment. Evolutionary and engineering models are described in detail. Downloadable items include a document in PDF format and executable software. 2) Measurements - Measurements of near-Earth orbital debris are accomplished by conducting ground-based and space-based observations of the orbital debris environment. The data from these sources provide validation of the environment models and identify the presence of new sources. Radar, optical and surface examinations are described. External links to related topics are provided. 3) Protection - Orbital debris protection involves conducting hypervelocity impact measurements to assess the risk presented by orbital debris to operating spacecraft and developing new materials and new designs to provide better protection from the environment with less weight penalty. The data from this work provides the link between the environment defined by the models and the risk presented by that environment to operating spacecraft and provides recommendations on design and operations procedures to reduce the risk as

  12. Ocena jakości życia pacjentów żywionych pozajelitowo w domu = Evaluation of the quality of life of patients fed parenterally at home

    Bożena Muraczyńska

    2016-12-01

    3 Department of Oncology, Faculty of Oncology and Environmental Health Care, Faculty of Health Sciences, Medical University of Lublin   Streszczenie             Żywienie pozajelitowe w warunkach domowych (HPN stosuje się u osób, które z różnych przyczyn nie mogą odżywiać się w sposób naturalny. Ten sposób żywienia stosowany jest od ponad 30 lat, co znacznie obniża koszty leczenia, głównie ze względu na zmniejszenie kosztów hospitalizacji, jak i poprawę jakości życia tych pacjentów [16]. Celem pracy była ocena wpływu żywienia pozajelitowego na jakość życia pacjentów żywionych pozajelitowo w domu. Materiał i metody. Kwestionariusz ankiety wypełniło 107 pacjentów przebywających lub przyjeżdżających na badania kontrolne do Kliniki Chirurgii Ogólnej i Żywienia Klinicznego w Warszawie. Grupę badaną stanowiły osoby w wieku od 19 do 78 lat. W badaniach własnych wykorzystano kwestionariusz World Health Organization Quality of LifeTest-Bref (WHOQOL-BREF, który zawierał 26 pytań analizujących cztery domeny/dziedziny życia: fizyczną, psychologiczną, społeczną i środowiskową oraz dwa pytania, analizowane oddzielnie tj.: pytanie 1. dotyczące indywidualnej, ogólnej percepcji jakości życia i pytanie 2. dotyczące indywidualnej percepcji własnego zdrowia. Punktacja pytań zawierała się w przedziale od 1 do 5 i miała kierunek pozytywny – im większa liczba punktów, tym lepsza jakość życia. Badanie uzyskało zgodę Komisji Bioetycznej przy Warszawskim Uniwersytecie Medycznym. Wyniki badań. Przeprowadzone analizy skłoniły autorów do postawienia następujących wniosków: Ogólna jakość życia  pacjentów żywionych pozajelitowo w domu została oceniona na poziomie ani dobrej ani złej, stan zdrowia, natomiast, na poziomie niezadowalającym. Najwyższą jakość życia, pacjenci żywieni pozajelitowo, osiągają w domenie socjalnej i środowiskowej a najniższą w domenie somatycznej oraz

  13. Ocena oraz porównanie zachowań żywieniowych u osób uprawiających sport zawodowo i amatorsko = Evaluation and comparison of nutritional behavior of people practicing professional and amateur sport

    Krystian Kałużny

    2016-02-01

      Streszczenie Wstęp. Regularna aktywność fizyczna i liczne obciążenia, jakim poddawani są sportowcy przy nieodpowiednio dobranej diecie może powodować niedobory pokarmowe. Jakościowe i ilościowe nieprawidłowości żywienia i zachowań żywieniowych mogą wpływać na spadek zdolności motorycznych, obniżenie koncentracji, zaburzenie procesów regeneracyjnych oraz większą podatność na przemęczenie i przeciążenia organizmu sportowca. Cel pracy. Celem pracy jest ocena oraz porównanie zachowań żywieniowych u osób uprawiających sport zawodowo i amatorsko. Materiał i metody. Badania przeprowadzono na grupie 100 osób, w tym 50 osób uprawiających sport zawodowo (zrzeszonych i reprezentujących kluby sportowe oraz 50 uprawiających sport amatorsko. Ocenę zachowań żywieniowych dokonano z wykorzystaniem autorskiej ankiety. Wyniki. Z analizy przeprowadzonych badań wynika, że znaczny odsetek osób uprawiających sport zawodowo i amatorsko nie przestrzega zaleceń dotyczących liczby i pory spożywania posiłków. W obu grupach występowały nieprawidłowości w nawadnianiu, zarówno w ciągu dnia, jak również przed, w trakcie i po treningu. Z badań wynika, że regularne spożywanie napojów energetycznych deklaruje 81% zawodowców oraz 75% amatorów. Spożywanie alkoholu kilka razy w tygodniu zaobserwowano u 35% zawodowców oraz 67% amatorów sportu. Grupa zawodowców istotnie statystycznie częściej spożywała posiłki najpóźniej do 2h przed snem, częściej uzupełniała płyny wodą mineralną oraz spożywała mniej alkoholu niż grupa amatorów. Wnioski. 1. Zachowania żywieniowe u osób uprawiających sport zawodowo i amatorsko są nieprawidłowe. 2. Częstość występowania prawidłowych zachowań żywieniowych wśród osób uprawiających sport zawodowo i amatorsko jest na zbliżonym poziomie.     Abstract Introduction. Regular physical activity and frequent load in athletes with inappropriately chosen diet can cause

  14. Post-radiation mucocele in two patients treated for nasopharyngeal cancer; Mucocele apres radiotherapie chez deux patients traites pour cancer du nasopharynx

    Mnejja, M.; Hammami, B.; Achour, I.; Chakroun, A.; Charfeddine, I.; Ghorbel, A. [Service ORL et chirurgie cervico-faciale, CHU Habib-Bourguiba, 3029 Sfax (Tunisia); Frikha, M. [Service de carcinologie, CHU Habib-Bourguiba, 3029 Sfax (Tunisia); Daoud, J. [Service de radiotherapie, CHU Habib-Bourguiba, 3029 Sfax (Tunisia)

    2011-06-15

    A 30-year-old woman, with a history of nasopharyngeal carcinoma, which was treated by radiotherapy nine years previously, presented with occasional diplopia and recent headaches. A nasopharyngeal biopsy showed no recurrence. The imaging revealed a sphenoidal sinus mucocele. Endoscopic marsupialization of the mucocele allowed clinical improvement. A 56-year-old woman presented, five years after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma, with a fronto-orbital mass. CT-scan revealed a fronto-ethmoidal mucocele. Nasopharyngeal biopsy showed tumour recurrence. Marsupialization of mucocele was performed. Recurrence of the carcinoma was treated by radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Sphenoidal sinus mucocele developing after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma has rarely been reported. CT scan and MRI are useful tools in making the diagnosis. Biopsy is required to diagnose recurrence or associated radio-induced tumor. Endoscopic approach gives good results. (authors)

  15. Cost Per Pound From Orbit

    Merriam, M. L.

    2002-01-01

    Traditional studies of Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) designs have focused on designs that are completely reusable except for the fuel. This may not be realistic with current technology . An alternate approach is to look at partially reusable launch vehicles. This raises the question of which parts should be reused and which parts should be expendable. One approach is to consider the cost/pound of returning these parts from orbit. With the shuttle, this cost is about three times the cost/pound of launching payload into orbit. A subtle corollary is that RLVs are much less practical for higher orbits, such as the one on which the International Space Station resides, than they are for low earth orbits.

  16. NASA Orbital Debris Baseline Populations

    Krisko, Paula H.; Vavrin, A. B.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has created high fidelity populations of the debris environment. The populations include objects of 1 cm and larger in Low Earth Orbit through Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit. They were designed for the purpose of assisting debris researchers and sensor developers in planning and testing. This environment is derived directly from the newest ORDEM model populations which include a background derived from LEGEND, as well as specific events such as the Chinese ASAT test, the Iridium 33/Cosmos 2251 accidental collision, the RORSAT sodium-potassium droplet releases, and other miscellaneous events. It is the most realistic ODPO debris population to date. In this paper we present the populations in chart form. We describe derivations of the background population and the specific populations added on. We validate our 1 cm and larger Low Earth Orbit population against SSN, Haystack, and HAX radar measurements.

  17. Lidar Orbital Angular Momentum Sensor

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The recognition in recent decades that electromagnetic fields have angular momentum (AM) in the form of not only polarization (or spin AM) but also orbital (OAM) has...

  18. Real and Hybrid Atomic Orbitals.

    Cook, D. B.; Fowler, P. W.

    1981-01-01

    Demonstrates that the Schrodinger equation for the hydrogenlike atom separates in both spheroconal and prolate spheroidal coordinates and that these separations provide a sound theoretical basis for the real and hybrid atomic orbitals. (Author/SK)

  19. High Power Orbit Transfer Vehicle

    Gulczinski, Frank

    2003-01-01

    ... from Virginia Tech University and Aerophysics, Inc. to examine propulsion requirements for a high-power orbit transfer vehicle using thin-film voltaic solar array technologies under development by the Space Vehicles Directorate (dubbed PowerSail...

  20. Treatment outcome in patients with vulvar cancer: comparison of concurrent radiotherapy to postoperative radiotherapy

    Lee, Ja Young; Kim, Sung Hwan; Kim, Ki Won; Park, Dong Choon; Yoon, Joo Hee; Yoon, Sei Chul [St. Vincent' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Mina [St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    To evaluate outcome and morbidity in patients with vulvar cancer treated with radiotherapy, concurrent chemoradiotherapy or postoperative radiotherapy. The records of 24 patients treated with radiotherapy for vulvar cancer between July 1993 and September 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received once daily 1.8-4 Gy fractions external beam radiotherapy to median 51.2 Gy (range, 19.8 to 81.6 Gy) on pelvis and inguinal nodes. Seven patients were treated with primary concurrent chemoradiotherapy, one patient was treated with primary radiotherapy alone, four patients received palliative radiotherapy, and twelve patients were treated with postoperative radiotherapy. Twenty patients were eligible for response evaluation. Response rate was 55% (11/20). The 5-year disease free survival was 42.2% and 5-year overall survival was 46.2%, respectively. Fifty percent (12/24) experienced with acute skin complications of grade III or more during radiotherapy. Late complications were found in 8 patients. 50% (6/12) of patients treated with lymph node dissection experienced severe late complications. One patient died of sepsis from lymphedema. However, only 16.6% (2/12) of patients treated with primary radiotherapy developed late complications. Outcome of patients with vulvar cancer treated with radiotherapy showed relatively good local control and low recurrence. Severe late toxicities remained higher in patients treated with both node dissection and radiotherapy.

  1. An investigation of anxiety about radiotherapy deploying the radiotherapy categorical anxiety scale

    Shimotsu, Sakie; Karasawa, Kumiko; Ito, Kana; Saito, Anneyuko I.; Izawa, Hiromi; Kawase, Eri; Horikawa, Naoshi

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the major methods for treating cancer, but many patients undergoing radiotherapy have deep concerns about receiving radiation treatment. This problem is not generally appreciated and has not been adequately studied. The objective of this investigation was to empirically investigate the anxieties that cancer patients feel towards radiotherapy by using questionnaires to classify and quantitatively measure their concerns. A preliminary interview to develop a questionnaire was carried out with 48 patients receiving radiotherapy to discover their anxieties about on-going treatments. Subsequently, a main study was performed using a questionnaire with 185 patients to classify their types of anxiety and to ascertain the reliability and validity of the responses. Confirmatory factor analysis was then carried out with a 17-item Radiotherapy Categorical Anxiety Scale. Three anxiety factors were abstracted by factor analysis: adverse effects of radiotherapy, environment of radiotherapy, and treatment effects of radiotherapy. Reliability, content validity, and concurrent validity were obtained. The adequacy of the three-factor model of anxiety concerning radiotherapy was confirmed. A 17-item Radiotherapy Categorical Anxiety Scale was formulated to quantitatively measure the specific types of anxiety among cancer patients receiving radiotherapy. (author)

  2. Topological imprint for periodic orbits

    Martín, Jesús San; Moscoso, Ma José; Gómez, A González

    2012-01-01

    The more self-crossing points an orbit has the more complex it is. We introduce the topological imprint to characterize crossing points and focus on the period-doubling cascade. The period-doubling cascade topological imprint determines the topological imprint for orbits in chaotic bands. In addition, there is a closer link between this concept and the braids studied by Lettelier et al (2000 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 33 1809–25). (paper)

  3. Radiotherapy and Brachytherapy : Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Study Institute on Physics of Modern Radiotherapy & Brachytherapy

    Lemoigne, Yves

    2009-01-01

    This volume collects a series of lectures presented at the tenth ESI School held at Archamps (FR) in November 2007 and dedicated to radiotherapy and brachytherapy. The lectures focus on the multiple facets of radiotherapy in general, including external radiotherapy (often called teletherapy) as well as internal radiotherapy (called brachytherapy). Radiotherapy strategy and dose management as well as the decisive role of digital imaging in the associated clinical practice are developed in several articles. Grouped under the discipline of Conformal Radiotherapy (CRT), numerous modern techniques, from Multi-Leaf Collimators (MLC) to Intensity Modulated RadioTherapy (IMRT), are explained in detail. The importance of treatment planning based upon patient data from digital imaging (Computed Tomography) is also underlined. Finally, despite the quasi- totality of patients being presently treated with gamma and X-rays, novel powerful tools are emerging using proton and light ions (like carbon ions) beams, bound to bec...

  4. Fractionated external beam radiotherapy of skull base metastases with cranial nerve involvement

    Droege, L.H.; Hinsche, T.; Hess, C.F.; Wolff, H.A. [University Hospital of Goettingen, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Goettingen (Germany); Canis, M. [University of Goettingen, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Goettingen (Germany); Alt-Epping, B. [University of Goettingen, Department of Palliative Medicine, Goettingen (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    Skull base metastases frequently appear in a late stage of various tumor entities and cause pain and neurological disorders which strongly impair patient quality of life. This study retrospectively analyzed fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) as a palliative treatment approach with special respect to neurological outcome, feasibility and acute toxicity. A total of 30 patients with skull base metastases and cranial nerve disorders underwent EBRT with a mean total dose of 31.6 Gy. Neurological status was assessed before radiotherapy, during radiotherapy and 2 weeks afterwards categorizing orbital, parasellar, middle fossa, jugular foramen and occipital condyle involvement and associated clinical syndromes. Neurological outcome was scored as persistence of symptoms, partial response, good response and complete remission. Treatment-related toxicity and overall survival were assessed. Before EBRT 37 skull base involvement syndromes were determined with 4 patients showing more than 1 syndrome. Of the patients 81.1 % responded to radiotherapy with 10.8 % in complete remission, 48.6 % with good response and 21.6 % with partial response. Grade 1 toxicity of the skin occurred in two patients and grade 1 hematological toxicity in 1 patient under concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Median overall survival was 3.9 months with a median follow-up of 45 months. The use of EBRT for skull base metastases with symptomatic involvement of cranial nerves is marked by good therapeutic success in terms of neurological outcome, high feasibility and low toxicity rates. These findings underline EBRT as the standard therapeutic approach in the palliative setting. (orig.)

  5. Fractionated external beam radiotherapy of skull base metastases with cranial nerve involvement

    Droege, L.H.; Hinsche, T.; Hess, C.F.; Wolff, H.A.; Canis, M.; Alt-Epping, B.

    2014-01-01

    Skull base metastases frequently appear in a late stage of various tumor entities and cause pain and neurological disorders which strongly impair patient quality of life. This study retrospectively analyzed fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) as a palliative treatment approach with special respect to neurological outcome, feasibility and acute toxicity. A total of 30 patients with skull base metastases and cranial nerve disorders underwent EBRT with a mean total dose of 31.6 Gy. Neurological status was assessed before radiotherapy, during radiotherapy and 2 weeks afterwards categorizing orbital, parasellar, middle fossa, jugular foramen and occipital condyle involvement and associated clinical syndromes. Neurological outcome was scored as persistence of symptoms, partial response, good response and complete remission. Treatment-related toxicity and overall survival were assessed. Before EBRT 37 skull base involvement syndromes were determined with 4 patients showing more than 1 syndrome. Of the patients 81.1 % responded to radiotherapy with 10.8 % in complete remission, 48.6 % with good response and 21.6 % with partial response. Grade 1 toxicity of the skin occurred in two patients and grade 1 hematological toxicity in 1 patient under concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Median overall survival was 3.9 months with a median follow-up of 45 months. The use of EBRT for skull base metastases with symptomatic involvement of cranial nerves is marked by good therapeutic success in terms of neurological outcome, high feasibility and low toxicity rates. These findings underline EBRT as the standard therapeutic approach in the palliative setting. (orig.)

  6. A CLINICAL STUDY ON ORBITAL COMPLICATIONS OF NASAL AND PARANASAL SINUS DISEASES IN A TERTIARY GOVERNMENT HOSPITAL

    Binu Raju George

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The orbit is an area of considerable interest to the otolaryngologist because of its close anatomical relationship to the Paranasal Sinuses (PNS. PNS may be involved in various types of pathology arising in the nose and paranasal sinuses. Surgical procedures of the nose and PNS may sometimes involve the orbit or its contents. Infections of the paranasal sinuses may spread to the orbit through suture lines, congenital or acquired bony dehiscence and retrograde thrombophlebitis and by bone necrosis or bony erosion. Neoplasms of the PNS also can involve the orbit. Hence, knowledge of the anatomy of the orbit is very important. The several of diseases of PNS in a tertiary hospital were included in the study and the data analysed. The aim of the study is to determine the type of orbital complications of nasal and paranasal sinus diseases and to evaluate the management protocol in orbital complications of nasal and paranasal sinus diseases. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study included forty patients (40 with orbital complaints of diseases of nose and PNS. These patients had CT scan evidence of invasion of the orbit. After laboratory, radiological study and wherever necessary HPE is done. The entire patient’s data was analysed. The orbital complications were classified and analysed. RESULTS Among the 40 patients, the age range was 10 to 80 years. 14 patients were females and 26 were males. 36 patients had symptoms pertaining to the orbit while 4 patients without. 26 patients underwent surgical management. 4 patients underwent medical treatment. 6 patients were treated with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Among the 40 patients, 8 patients were diagnosed to have frontal mucocele, 8 patients with carcinoma of maxilla, 4 patients with inverted papilloma, 6 patients with lymphoma, 4 patients with osteomyelitis of the maxilla, 2 patients with osteomyelitis of the frontal bone, 4 patients with orbital cellulitis, 2 patients with mucormycosis and 2

  7. Three dimensional conformal postoperative radiotherapy for ...

    Introduction: Postoperative radiotherapy of the parotid gland could be achieved with various radiotherapy techniques. However they irradiate differently the surrounding organs at risk (OARs) in particular the cochlea, oral cavity & contralateral parotid causing significant increase in the risk of oral mucositis, xerostomia, and ...

  8. Radiological protection of the radiotherapy patient?

    Waligorski, M.P.R.; Lesiak, J.

    2001-01-01

    We propose that the system and concepts of radiation protection should not be used with reference to radiotherapy patients. We justify this on conceptual grounds. The patient undergoing radiotherapy procedures, as prescribed by the medical practitioner, is protected by the quality assurance system legally required for medical exposures. (author)

  9. Radioactivity helps out in Medicine. Radiotherapy

    Douis, Michel; Olombel, Andre

    1978-01-01

    Some notions on the action of radiations on tissues are followed by a review of the different radiotherapic techniques: metabolic radiotherapy, curietherapy, transcutaneous radiotherapy. The radioelements used in these various techniques are then described, together with the way in which they are conditioned (colloids, applicators, sources) [fr

  10. Different styles of image-guided radiotherapy

    van Herk, Marcel

    2007-01-01

    To account for geometric uncertainties during radiotherapy, safety margins are applied. In many cases, these margins overlap organs at risk, thereby limiting dose escalation. The aim of image-guided radiotherapy is to improve the accuracy by imaging tumors and critical structures on the machine just

  11. Reducing radiation induced emesis in abdominal radiotherapy

    Griffin, K.

    1994-01-01

    In patients with seminoma testes, a comparison was made between radiation induced emesis suffered by patients receiving 'dogleg' radiotherapy with those suffered by patients who received para-aortic radiotherapy. The same comparisons were made between the effects suffered by those patients who received the anti-emetic, Ondansetron, and those suffered by patients who received conventional anti-emetics. (UK)

  12. Approaches for improving cancer radiotherapy

    Kalia, Vijay K.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation and cancer are intricately related. Radiotherapy, either alone or in combination with surgery and/or chemotherapy, is used for treatment of 60% of cancers. It will continue to be the mainstay for multi-modality treatment protocols unit new molecular therapies can be developed and brought to the stage of clinical trials. It will continue to be relevant thereafter, to compare the efficacy and cost effectiveness of the novel drugs under development. And it could also be useful as an adjuvant therapy, to augment the effects of novel drugs, at optimum dose levels. However, radiation is a well documented carcinogenic agent. Several studies have shown a statistically significant, though small enhancement in the risk of second malignancies, particularly in long-term survivors. The above discussions suggest that it is imperative to carry out preclinical radiobiological research for increasing tumor cell damage, while reducing the effective radiation doses. Development of radiobiological research programs in our institutions of higher learning such as post graduate medical institutions, cancer centers and universities could lead to the generation of a wealth of radiobiological data with potential clinical applications. Radiobiologists could utilize the infra-structure such as expensive radiotherapy equipment as well as clinical materials. For example, tumour biopsies readily available in the medical and cancer centers. However, if these studies have clinically meaningful implications it will be important to facilitate very close interactions between the basic scientists and clinicians. Some of the approaches for improving radiotherapy of cancer will be very briefly reviewed. Our current work about the effects of radiation-drug and drug-drug interactions for increasing cellular damage and death in brain tumor cells will also be presented. (author)

  13. Radiotherapy for Oligometastatic Lung Cancer

    Derek P. Bergsma

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC typically presents at an advanced stage, which is often felt to be incurable, and such patients are usually treated with a palliative approach. Accumulating retrospective and prospective clinical evidence, including a recently completed randomized trial, support the existence of an oligometastatic disease state wherein select individuals with advanced NSCLC may experience historically unprecedented prolonged survival with aggressive local treatments, consisting of radiotherapy and/or surgery, to limited sites of metastatic disease. This is reflected in the most recent AJCC staging subcategorizing metastatic disease into intra-thoracic (M1a, a single extra thoracic site (M1b, and more diffuse metastases (M1c. In the field of radiation oncology, recent technological advances have allowed for the delivery of very high, potentially ablative, doses of radiotherapy to both intra- and extra-cranial disease sites, referred to as stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic body radiotherapy (or SABR, in much shorter time periods compared to conventional radiation and with minimal associated toxicity. At the same time, significant improvements in systemic therapy, including platinum-based doublet chemotherapy, molecular agents targeting oncogene-addicted NSCLC, and immunotherapy in the form of checkpoint inhibitors, have led to improved control of micro-metastatic disease and extended survival sparking newfound interest in combining these agents with ablative local therapies to provide additive, and in the case of radiation and immunotherapy, potentially synergistic, effects in order to further improve progression-free and overall survival. Currently, despite the tantalizing potential associated with aggressive local therapy in the setting of oligometastatic NSCLC, well-designed prospective randomized controlled trials sufficiently powered to detect and measure the possible added benefit afforded by this approach are

  14. Space Tourism: Orbital Debris Considerations

    Mahmoudian, N.; Shajiee, S.; Moghani, T.; Bahrami, M.

    2002-01-01

    Space activities after a phase of research and development, political competition and national prestige have entered an era of real commercialization. Remote sensing, earth observation, and communication are among the areas in which this growing industry is facing competition and declining government money. A project like International Space Station, which draws from public money, has not only opened a window of real multinational cooperation, but also changed space travel from a mere fantasy into a real world activity. Besides research activities for sending man to moon and Mars and other outer planets, space travel has attracted a considerable attention in recent years in the form of space tourism. Four countries from space fairing nations are actively involved in the development of space tourism. Even, nations which are either in early stages of space technology development or just beginning their space activities, have high ambitions in this area. This is worth noting considering their limited resources. At present, trips to space are available, but limited and expensive. To move beyond this point to generally available trips to orbit and week long stays in LEO, in orbital hotels, some of the required basic transportations, living requirements, and technological developments required for long stay in orbit are already underway. For tourism to develop to a real everyday business, not only the price has to come down to meaningful levels, but also safety considerations should be fully developed to attract travelers' trust. A serious hazard to space activities in general and space tourism in particular is space debris in earth orbit. Orbiting debris are man-made objects left over by space operations, hazardous to space missions. Since the higher density of debris population occurs in low earth orbit, which is also the same orbit of interest to space tourism, a careful attention should be paid to the effect of debris on tourism activities. In this study, after a

  15. Radical radiotherapy for T3 laryngeal cancers

    Uno, T.; Itami, J.; Kotaka, K.; Toriyama, M.

    1996-01-01

    From 1974 through 1992, 37 previously untreated patients with T3 laryngeal cancer (supraglottic 15, glottic 22) were treated with initial radical radiotherapy and surgery for salvage. Two-year local control rate with radiotherapy alone, ultimate voice preservation rate, and ultimate local control rate for T3 supraglottic cancer were 33%, 33%, and 60%, respectively. Corresponding figures for T3 glottic cancer were 32%, 23%, and 77%, respecitvely. Five-year cause-specific survival rate for T3 supraglottic cancer and glottic cancer were 47% and 77%, respectively. In T3 supraglottic cancer, none of the 4 patients with subglottic tumor extension attained local control by radiotherapy alone, and local-regional recurrence-free time were significantly shorter in patients with subglottic tumor extension or tracheostomy before radiotherapy. There were no serious late complications such as chondronecrosis, rupture of carotid artery attributed to radical radiotherapy, while 3 patients had severe laryngeal edema requiring total laryngectomy. (orig.) [de

  16. Radiotherapy in patients with connective tissue diseases.

    Giaj-Levra, Niccolò; Sciascia, Savino; Fiorentino, Alba; Fersino, Sergio; Mazzola, Rosario; Ricchetti, Francesco; Roccatello, Dario; Alongi, Filippo

    2016-03-01

    The decision to offer radiotherapy in patients with connective tissue diseases continues to be challenging. Radiotherapy might trigger the onset of connective tissue diseases by increasing the expression of self-antigens, diminishing regulatory T-cell activity, and activating effectors of innate immunity (dendritic cells) through Toll-like receptor-dependent mechanisms, all of which could potentially lead to breaks of immune tolerance. This potential risk has raised some debate among radiation oncologists about whether patients with connective tissue diseases can tolerate radiation as well as people without connective tissue diseases. Because the number of patients with cancer and connective tissue diseases needing radiotherapy will probably increase due to improvements in medical treatment and longer life expectancy, the issue of interactions between radiotherapy and connective tissue diseases needs to be clearer. In this Review, we discuss available data and evidence for patients with connective tissue diseases treated with radiotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiotherapy in the maxillofacial region

    Niederdellmann, H.; Otten, J.E.; Lachard, J.

    1984-01-01

    Radiotherapeutic treatment of patients with tumours in the oral, perignathic, facial, and neck region can lead to considerable complications under irradiation and any time after irradiation if dental aspects are not considered. A dental treatment should therefore be planned in close cooperation with a dental-, oral-, and orthodontic centre before starting radiotherapy. In many cases, a preparing treatment is not possible for important reasons. Therefore, it is very important that patients who are being or have been treated with radiation are dealt with extremely carefully. (orig.) [de

  18. Quality and safety in radiotherapy

    Pawlicki, Todd

    2010-01-01

    The first text to focus solely on quality and safety in radiotherapy, this work encompasses not only traditional, more technically oriented, quality assurance activities, but also general approaches of quality and safety. It includes contributions from experts both inside and outside the field to present a global view. The task of assuring quality is no longer viewed solely as a technical, equipment-dependent endeavor. Instead, it is now recognized as depending on both the processes and the people delivering the service. Divided into seven broad categories, the text covers: Quality Management

  19. Radiobiology of human cancer radiotherapy

    Andrews, J.R.

    1978-01-01

    The author has systematically collected and collated the scientific literature correlating the basic and clinical sciences in this field in order to produce a definitive treatise. The book thoroughly reviews the biology and biochemistry relevant to radiobiology and describes the critical locus for the extinction of cell reproductive capacity. Extensive coverage is given to oxygen effect, hyperthermia, high linear energy transfer, cell populations, and similar topics. Separate sections cover time, dose, and fractionation; radiation hematology; cancer chemotherapy; and cancer immunology. The book also contains invaluable discussions of techniques for optimizing radiotherapy alone and in combination with other therapies

  20. Basic radiotherapy physics and biology

    Chang, David S; Das, Indra J; Mendonca, Marc S; Dynlacht, Joseph R

    2014-01-01

    This book is a concise and well-illustrated review of the physics and biology of radiation therapy intended for radiation oncology residents, radiation therapists, dosimetrists, and physicists. It presents topics that are included on the Radiation Therapy Physics and Biology examinations and is designed with the intent of presenting information in an easily digestible format with maximum retention in mind. The inclusion of mnemonics, rules of thumb, and reader-friendly illustrations throughout the book help to make difficult concepts easier to grasp. Basic Radiotherapy Physics and Biology is a

  1. Angles-only relative orbit determination in low earth orbit

    Ardaens, Jean-Sébastien; Gaias, Gabriella

    2018-06-01

    The paper provides an overview of the angles-only relative orbit determination activities conducted to support the Autonomous Vision Approach Navigation and Target Identification (AVANTI) experiment. This in-orbit endeavor was carried out by the German Space Operations Center (DLR/GSOC) in autumn 2016 to demonstrate the capability to perform spaceborne autonomous close-proximity operations using solely line-of-sight measurements. The images collected onboard have been reprocessed by an independent on-ground facility for precise relative orbit determination, which served as ultimate instance to monitor the formation safety and to characterize the onboard navigation and control performances. During two months, several rendezvous have been executed, generating a valuable collection of images taken at distances ranging from 50 km to only 50 m. Despite challenging experimental conditions characterized by a poor visibility and strong orbit perturbations, angles-only relative positioning products could be continuously derived throughout the whole experiment timeline, promising accuracy at the meter level during the close approaches. The results presented in the paper are complemented with former angles-only experience gained with the PRISMA satellites to better highlight the specificities induced by different orbits and satellite designs.

  2. An Orbit Propagation Software for Mars Orbiting Spacecraft

    Young-Joo Song

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available An orbit propagation software for the Mars orbiting spacecraft has been developed and verified in preparations for the future Korean Mars missions. Dynamic model for Mars orbiting spacecraft has been studied, and Mars centered coordinate systems are utilized to express spacecraft state vectors. Coordinate corrections to the Mars centered coordinate system have been made to adjust the effects caused by Mars precession and nutation. After spacecraft enters Sphere of Influence (SOI of the Mars, the spacecraft experiences various perturbation effects as it approaches to Mars. Every possible perturbation effect is considered during integrations of spacecraft state vectors. The Mars50c gravity field model and the Mars-GRAM 2001 model are used to compute perturbation effects due to Mars gravity field and Mars atmospheric drag, respectively. To compute exact locations of other planets, JPL's DE405 ephemerides are used. Phobos and Deimos's ephemeris are computed using analytical method because their informations are not released with DE405. Mars Global Surveyor's mapping orbital data are used to verify the developed propagator performances. After one Martian day propagation (12 orbital periods, the results show about maximum ±5 meter errors, in every position state components(radial, cross-track and along-track, when compared to these from the Astrogator propagation in the Satellite Tool Kit. This result shows high reliability of the developed software which can be used to design near Mars missions for Korea, in future.

  3. Radiotherapy for breast cancer and pacemaker

    Menard, J.; Campana, F.; Bollet, M.A.; Dendale, R.; Fournier-Bidoz, N.; Marchand, V.; Mazal, A.; Fourquet, A.; Kirova, Y.M.; Kirov, K.M.; Esteve, M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. - Patients with permanent cardiac pacemakers occasionally require radiotherapy. Therapeutic Irradiation may cause pacemakers to malfunction due to the effects of ionizing radiation or electromagnetic interference. We studied the breast cancer patients who needed breast and/or chest wall and lymph node irradiation to assess the feasibility and tolerance in this population of patients. Patients and methods. - From November 2008 to December 2009, more than 900 patients received radiotherapy for their breast cancer in our department using megavoltage linear accelerator (X 4-6 MV and electrons). Among them, seven patients were with permanent pacemaker. All patients have been treated to the breast and chest wall and/or lymph nodes. Total dose to breast and/or chest wall was 50 Gy/25 fractions and 46 Gy/23 fractions to lymph nodes. Patients who underwent conserving surgery followed by breast irradiation were boosted when indicated to tumour bed with 16 Gy/8 fractions. All patients were monitored everyday in presence of radiation oncologist to follow the function of their pacemaker. All pacemakers were controlled before and after radiotherapy by the patients' cardiologist. Results. - Seven patients were referred in our department for postoperative breast cancer radiotherapy. Among them, only one patient was declined for radiotherapy and underwent mastectomy without radiotherapy. In four cases the pacemaker was repositioned before the beginning of radiotherapy. Six patients, aged between 48 and 84 years underwent irradiation for their breast cancer. Four patients were treated with conserving surgery followed by breast radiotherapy and two with mastectomy followed by chest wall and internal mammary chain, supra- and infra-clavicular lymph node irradiation. The dose to the pacemaker generator was kept below 2 Gy. There was no pacemaker dysfunction observed during the radiotherapy. Conclusion. - The multidisciplinary work with position change of the pacemaker before

  4. Family physicians' perspectives regarding palliative radiotherapy

    Samant, Rajiv S.; Fitzgibbon, Edward; Meng, Joanne; Graham, Ian D.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To assess family physicians' views on common indications for palliative radiotherapy and to determine whether this influences patient referral. Methods and materials: A 30-item questionnaire evaluating radiotherapy knowledge and training developed at the Ottawa Regional Cancer Centre (ORCC) was mailed to a random sample of 400 family physicians in eastern Ontario, Canada. The completed surveys were collected and analyzed, and form the basis of this study. Results: A total of 172 completed surveys were received for a net response rate of 50% among practicing family physicians. Almost all of the physicians (97%) had recently seen cancer patients in their offices, with 85% regularly caring for patient with advanced cancer. Fifty-four percent had referred patients in the past for radiotherapy and 53% had contacted a radiation oncologist for advice. Physicians who were more knowledgeable about the common indications for palliative radiotherapy were significantly more likely to refer patients for radiotherapy (P<0.01). Inability to contact a radiation oncologist was correlated with not having referred patients for radiotherapy (P<0.01). Only 10% of the physicians had received radiotherapy education during their formal medical training. Conclusions: Many of the family physicians surveyed were unaware of the effectiveness of radiotherapy in a variety of common palliative situations, and radiotherapy referral was correlated with knowledge about the indications for palliative radiotherapy. This was not surprising given the limited education they received in this area and the limited contact they have had with radiation oncologists. Strategies need to be developed to improve continuing medical education opportunities for family physicians and to facilitate more interaction between these physicians and radiation oncologists

  5. Unilateral solitary choroid metastasis from breast cancer: Rewarding results of external radiotherapy

    Nirmala S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraocular metastatic tumor is the commonest intraocular malignancy in adults, with uveal tract the commonest site. In nearly 85% of cases the choroid is the afflicted site due to its vascularity. Breast and lung are the common primaries. In breast primaries, this could be the first metastatic disease. This condition should always be kept in mind in patients with visual symptoms. Fundus examination, ultrasonography and CT/MRI of the orbit help in diagnosis. Early recognition and timely treatment can save the visual function thus imparting good quality of life to the patient. External beam radiotherapy is a good local form of treatment. Hormone therapy in hormone receptor positive tumors can have additional benefits. Here we report a case of unilateral solitary choroid metastasis in a case of breast cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy.

  6. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for craniopharyngiomas

    Schulz-Ertner, Daniela; Frank, Claudia; Herfarth, Klaus K.; Rhein, Bernhard; Wannenmacher, Michael; Debus, Juergen

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate outcome and toxicity after fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) in patients with craniopharyngiomas. Methods and Materials: Twenty-six patients with craniopharyngiomas were treated with FSRT between May 1989 and February 2001. Median age was 33.5 years (range: 5-57 years). Nine patients received FSRT after surgery as primary treatment, and 17 patients were irradiated for recurrent tumor or progressive growth after initial surgery. Median target dose was 52.2 Gy (range: 50.0-57.6 Gy) with conventional fractionation. Follow-up included MRI and neurologic, ophthalmologic, and endocrinologic examinations. Results: The median follow-up was 43 months (range: 7-143 months). The actuarial local control rate and actuarial overall survival rates were 100% and 100%, respectively, at 5 years and 100% and 83%, respectively, at 10 years. Four patients showed complete response, 14 patients showed partial response, and 8 patients remained stable. In 5 patients, vision improved after radiation therapy. Acute toxicity was mild. One patient required cyst drainage 3 months after radiotherapy. Late toxicity after radiotherapy included impairment of hormone function in 3 out of 18 patients at risk. We did not observe any vision impairment, radionecrosis, or secondary malignancies. Conclusions: FSRT is effective and safe in the treatment of cystic craniopharyngiomas. Toxicity is extremely low using this conformal technique

  7. Palliative radiotherapy for liver metastases

    Eble, M.J.; Gademann, G.; Wannenmacher, M.

    1993-01-01

    The role of palliative irradiation was analysed in 55 patients with liver metastases from colorectal, breast and lung cancer, treated with irradiation doses more than 10 Gy. In 47 patients irradiation alone was done. In 29 patients the disease involved not only the liver, but was disseminated. A mean dose of 23.8 Gy was delivered, with daily fractions of 1.5, 1.8 or 2 Gy. Complete and near complete pain relief was obtained in six and nine patients. Normalized and near normalized values of bilirubin serum levels were obtained in five and seven patients. Relief of pain as well as normalisation of cholestasis were significantly correlated with the irradiation doses applied. Median survival was 36.5 days for patients with lung cancer, 70.5 and 73 days for patients with breast and colorectal cancer. Irradiation doses given and the status of disease were significantly correlated to prognosis. In the majority of our patients with clinical symptoms, i.e. pain or cholestase, irradiation alone was sufficient for palliation of these symptoms. Prognosis is limited because of the disseminated state of disease in 62% of the patients. In a group of patients, suffering from colorectal cancer with good prognostic criteria, the simultaneous application of radiotherapy and systemic chemotherapy was able to increase significantly the survival with minor toxicity. The use of a three-dimensional treatment planning could optimize the radiotherapy, due to the dose-volume histogram analysis. (orig./MG) [de

  8. Optimization of human cancer radiotherapy

    Swan, George W

    1981-01-01

    The mathematical models in this book are concerned with a variety of approaches to the manner in which the clinical radiologic treatment of human neoplasms can be improved. These improvements comprise ways of delivering radiation to the malignan­ cies so as to create considerable damage to tumor cells while sparing neighboring normal tissues. There is no unique way of dealing with these improvements. Accord­ ingly, in this book a number of different presentations are given. Each presentation has as its goal some aspect of the improvement, or optimization, of radiotherapy. This book is a collection of current ideas concerned with the optimization of human cancer radiotherapy. It is hoped that readers will build on this collection and develop superior approaches for the understanding of the ways to improve therapy. The author owes a special debt of thanks to Kathy Prindle who breezed through the typing of this book with considerable dexterity. TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter GENERAL INTRODUCTION 1. 1 Introduction 1...

  9. Craniospinal radiotherapy in adult medulloblastoma

    Selek, U.; Zorlu, F.; Hurmuz, P.; Cengiz, M.; Gurkaynak, M.; Turker, A.; Soylemezoglu, F.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome and prognostic factors of adult patients with medulloblastoma. Patients and Methods: 26 adult medulloblastoma patients with a median age of 27 were subjected to craniospinal radiotherapy. A dose of 30.6 Gy with 1.8 Gy/fraction/day was prescribed to M0 patients, while 36 Gy were to be applied in patients with positive cerebrospinal liquor findings. The posterior fossa was boosted to 54 Gy. While 20 patients underwent external-beam radiotherapy alone, only six received sequential adjuvant chemotherapy. Results: Male/female ratio was 1.2. Preradiotherapy Karnofsky performance status was recorded as median 100%. 50% were classified as poor risk (n = 10, subtotal resection; n = 3, M+). The median follow-up time was 46.5 months. The 5-year actuarial survival rates for recurrence-free, distant metastasis-free, disease-free, and overall survival were 82.5%, 90.8%, 73.5%, and 89.7%, respectively. Patient characteristics, treatment factors and tumor characteristics failed to show any significance in univariate analysis. Grade 3 or 4 late morbidities were not observed. Conclusion: Yet, the current standard of care seems to remain craniospinal irradiation after maximal surgical resection of the primary neoplasm without clear indications for adjuvant chemotherapy. (orig.)

  10. Quality control programme for radiotherapy

    Campos de Araujo, A.M.; Viegas, C.C.B.; Viamonte, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    A 3 years pilot programme started in January 2000 with 33 philanthropic cancer institutions that provides medical services to 60% of the patients from the national social security system. Brazil has today 161 radiotherapy services (144 operating with megavoltage equipment). These 33 institutions are distributed over 19 Brazilian states. The aim of this programme is: To create conditions to allow the participants to apply the radiotherapy with quality and efficacy; To promote up dating courses for the physicians, physicists and technicians of these 33 Institutions. With the following objectives: To recommend dosimetric and radiological protection procedures in order to guarantee the tumor prescribed dose and safe working conditions; To help in establishing and implementing these procedures. The main activities are: local quality control evaluations, postal TLD audits in reference conditions, postal TLD audits in off axis conditions and training. The local quality control program has already evaluated 22 institutions with 43 machines (25 Co-60 and 18 linear accelerators). In these visits we perform dosimetric, electrical, mechanical and safety tests. As foreseen, we found more problems among the old Co-60 machines i.e., field flatness, size, symmetry and relative output factors; lasers positioning system alignment; optical distance indicator; radiation and light field coincidence; optical and mechanical distance indicators agreement, than among the linear accelerators i.e., field flatness and size; lasers positioning system alignment; tray interlocking and wedge filter factors

  11. ORO dental complications of radiotherapy

    Kaumuri, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    Radiation and radioactivity were discovered more than 100 years ago. Since then, radiation has become important in cancer treatment. Approximately one million people will develop invasive cancer each year. Of these, 40% will receive curative benefit from surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, or a combination modality. Normal body tissues vary in their response to radiation. As with tumors, normal tissues in which cells are quickly dividing may be affected. This causes some of the side effects of radiation treatment. Since radiation is a local treatment, side effects depend on the area of the body being treated. The early effects of radiation may be seen a few days or weeks after treatments have started and may go on for several weeks after treatments have ended. Other effects may not show up until months, or even years, later. As radiotherapy is a viable treatment modality for head and neck cancer, however a wide range of potentially debilitating dental complications may accompany this treatment. The orofacial tissues of dental significance that may be affected by head and neck radiotherapy are the salivary glands, mucous membranes, taste buds, bone and teeth. (author)

  12. Customized mold radiotherapy with prosthetic apparatus for oral cancers

    Noguchi, Tadahide; Tsuchiya, Yoshiyuki; Hayasaka, Junichi; Itoh, Hiroto; Jinbu, Yoshinori; Kusama, Mikio; Takahashi, Satoru; Nakazawa, Masanori

    2014-01-01

    Eight patients (6 males, 2 females; median age, 78 years; age range, 31-94 years) were treated by mold radiotherapy with a prosthetic apparatus for oral cancers between October 2006 and March 2013. The primary sites were the tongue in 3 cases, hard palate and buccal mucosa in 2 cases each, and oral floor in 1 case. The type of treatment consisted of radical radiotherapy and palliative radiotherapy in 2 cases each, and preoperative radiotherapy, postoperative radiotherapy, additional radiotherapy after external beam radiotherapy and systemic chemotherapy in 1 case each. Patients received 40-50 Gy in 8-10 fractions with mold radiotherapy. Two patients who received radical radiotherapy showed no signs of recurrence or metastasis. The present therapy contributed to patients' palliative, postoperative, and preoperative therapy. Mold radiotherapy with a prosthetic appliance was performed safely and was a useful treatment for several types of oral cancer. (author)

  13. Reconstruction of Midface and Orbital Wall Defects After Maxillectomy and Orbital Content Preservation With Titanium Mesh and Fascia Lata: 3-Year Follow-Up.

    Motiee-Langroudi, Maziar; Harirchi, Iraj; Amali, Amin; Jafari, Mehrdad

    2015-12-01

    To describe the authors' experience in the reconstruction of patients after total maxillectomy with preservation of orbital contents for maxillary tumors using titanium mesh and autogenous fascia lata, where no setting for free flap reconstruction is available. Twelve consecutive patients with paranasal sinus tumors underwent total maxillectomy without orbital exenterations and primary reconstruction. The defects were reconstructed by titanium mesh in combination with autogenous fascia lata in the orbital floor performed by 1 surgical team. Titanium mesh (0.2 mm thick) was contoured and fixed to reconstruct the orbital floor and obtain midface projection. Fascia lata was used to cover the titanium mesh along the orbital floor to prevent fat entrapment in the mesh holes. The most common pathology was squamous cell carcinoma (50%). Patients' mean age was 45.66 years (33 to 74 yr). The mean follow-up period was 35.2 months (30 to 49 months). During follow-up, no infection or foreign body reaction was encountered. Extrusion of titanium mesh occurred in 4 patients who underwent postoperative radiotherapy. Two cases of mild diplopia at extreme gaze occurred early during the postoperative period that resolved after a few months. Placing fascia lata between the titanium mesh surface of the orbital implant and the orbital contents was successful in preventing long-term diplopia or dystopia. Nevertheless, exposure of the titanium implant through the skin surface represented a complication of this technique in 25% of patients. Further studies are required with head-to-head comparisons of artificial materials and free flaps for reconstruction of maxillectomy defects. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Eccentric Behavior of Nearly Frozen Orbits

    Sweetser, Theodore H.; Vincent, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Frozen orbits are orbits which have only short-period changes in their mean eccentricity and argument of periapse, so that they basically keep a fixed orientation within their plane of motion. Nearly frozen orbits are those whose eccentricity and argument of periapse have values close to those of a frozen orbit. We call them "nearly" frozen because their eccentricity vector (a vector whose polar coordinates are eccentricity and argument of periapse) will stay within a bounded distance from the frozen orbit eccentricity vector, circulating around it over time. For highly inclined orbits around the Earth, this distance is effectively constant over time. Furthermore, frozen orbit eccentricity values are low enough that these orbits are essentially eccentric (i.e., off center) circles, so that nearly frozen orbits around Earth are bounded above and below by frozen orbits.

  15. The method of coadjoint orbits

    Delius, G.W.; Van Nieuwenhuizen, P.; Rodgers, V.G.J.

    1990-01-01

    The method of coadjoint orbits produces for any infinite dimensional Lie (super) algebra A with nontrivial central charge an action for scalar (super) fields which has at least the symmetry A. In this article, the authors try to make this method accessible to a larger audience by analyzing several examples in more detail than in the literature. After working through the Kac-Moody and Virasoro cases, we apply the method to the super Virasoro algebra and reobtain the super-symmetric extension of Polyakov's local nonpolynomial action for two-dimensional quantum gravity. As in the Virasoro case this action corresponds to the coadjoint orbit of a pure central extension. The authors further consider the actions corresponding to the other orbits of the super Virasoro algebra. As a new result the authors construct the actions for the N = 2 super Virasoro algebra

  16. Gravity Probe B orbit determination

    Shestople, P; Ndili, A; Parkinson, B W; Small, H; Hanuschak, G

    2015-01-01

    The Gravity Probe B (GP-B) satellite was equipped with a pair of redundant Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers used to provide navigation solutions for real-time and post-processed orbit determination (OD), as well as to establish the relation between vehicle time and coordinated universal time. The receivers performed better than the real-time position requirement of 100 m rms per axis. Post-processed solutions indicated an rms position error of 2.5 m and an rms velocity error of 2.2 mm s −1 . Satellite laser ranging measurements provided independent verification of the GPS-derived GP-B orbit. We discuss the modifications and performance of the Trimble Advance Navigation System Vector III GPS receivers. We describe the GP-B precision orbit and detail the OD methodology, including ephemeris errors and the laser ranging measurements. (paper)

  17. MRI of orbital hydroxyapatite implants

    Flanders, A.E.; De Potter P.; Rao, V.M.; Tom, B.M.; Shields, C.L.; Shields, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    Our aim was to use MRI for the postsurgical assessment of a new form of integrated orbital implant composed of a porous calcium phosphate hydroxyapatite substrate. We studied ten patients 24-74 years of age who underwent enucleation and implantation of a hydroxyapatite ball; 5-13 months after surgery, each patient was examined by spin-echo MRI, with fat suppression and gadolinium enhancement. Fibrovascular ingrowth was demonstrated in all ten patients as areas of enhancement at the periphery of the hydroxyapatite sphere that extended to the center to a variable degree. The radiologist should aware of the MRI appearances of the coralline hydroxyapatite orbital implant since it is now widely used following enucleation. MRI is a useful means to determine successful incorporation of the substrate into the orbital tissues. The normal pattern of contrast enhancement should not be mistaken for recurrent tumor or infection. (orig.)

  18. Orbits on bodies of rotation

    Schröer, H.

    Orbits of small balls on revolutions solid shells are examined. Which velocity is necessary to stay in balance? The angular velocity remains constant. General revolution solid, revolution cone, revolution ellipsoid, ball, paraboloid and hyperboloid are treated. Chapter 1 represents the frictionless case. Chapter 2 deals with the friction case. The transformation from velocity to the belonging orbit height is calculated in chapter 3. In chapter 4 and 5 the macro revolution solids follow (without and with friction)is treated. The assumption of a homogeneous field is not possible here. The radial gravitational field must be used. In the last chapter we have orbits with non constant angular velocity that can be derived with the Lagrange-equations of the second kind in the frictionless case. Here is also possible to view different revolution solids. The book is recommended to all experimental-, theoretical and mathematical physicists. There is an english and a german edition.

  19. Orbital periods of recurrent novae

    Schaefer, B.E.

    1990-01-01

    The class of recurrent novae (RN) with thermonuclear runaways contains only three systems (T Pyx, U Sco, and V394 CrA), for which no orbital periods are known. This paper presents a series of photometric observations where the orbital periods for all three systems are discovered. T Pyx is found to have sinusoidal modulation with an amplitude of 0.08 mag and a period of 2.3783 h (with a possible alias of 2.6403 h). U Sco is found to be an eclipsing system with an eclipse amplitude of roughly 1.5 mag and an orbital period of 1.2344 days. V394 CrA is found to have sinusoidal modulation with an amplitude of 0.5 mag and a period of 0.7577 days. Thus two out of three RN with thermonuclear runaways (or five out of six for all RN) have evolved companions. 16 refs

  20. MR imaging of orbital disease

    Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Sato, Ryuiti; Sakamoto, Yuji; Kojima, Ryutaro; Takahashi, Mutsumasa; Maruoka, Syouko; Okamura, Ryoichi; Oguni, Tatsuro.

    1989-05-01

    Sixty five cases with orbital and ocular lesions were evaluated by MRI in comparison with high resolution CT. MRI was performed with spin echo techniques (short TR/TE and long TR/TE) using a 0.22 tesla resistive unit (Toshiba MRT-22A) or a 1.5 tesla superconductive unit (Siemens Magnetom). MRI was superior to CT in (1) detecting ocular lesions and vitreous changes, (2) differentiating a tumor from the adjacent extraocular muscles and optic nerves, (3) identifying the lesion in the orbital apex and demonstrating the posterior extent of the tumor and (4) detecting the abnormal flow in the orbital vascular structures. Although some tumors had specific signal intensities including hemangioma, menigioma, and pseudotumor, majority of tumors revealed non-sepcific signal intensities. CT was superior to MRI in detection for small and calcified lesions as well as visualization of bone details. (author).

  1. Adjuvant radiotherapy for stage I endometrial cancer.

    Kong, A; Johnson, N; Cornes, P; Simera, I; Collingwood, M; Williams, C; Kitchener, H

    2007-04-18

    The role of adjuvant radiotherapy (both pelvic external beam radiotherapy and vaginal intracavity brachytherapy) in stage I endometrial cancer following total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (TAH and BSO) remains unclear. To assess the efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy following surgery for stage I endometrial cancer. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CancerLit, Physician Data Query (PDQ) of National Cancer Institute. Handsearching was also carried out where appropriate. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) which compared adjuvant radiotherapy versus no radiotherapy following surgery for patients with stage I endometrial cancer were included. Quality of the studies was assessed and data collected using a predefined data collection form. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Secondary endpoints were locoregional recurrence, distant recurrence and endometrial cancer death. Data on quality of life (QOL) and morbidity were also collected. A meta-analysis on included trials was performed using the Cochrane Collaboration Review Manager Software 4.2. The meta-analysis was performed on four trials (1770 patients). The addition of pelvic external beam radiotherapy to surgery reduced locoregional recurrence, a relative risk (RR) of 0.28 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.17 to 0.44, p ASTEC; Lukka) are awaited. External beam radiotherapy carries a risk of toxicity and should be avoided in stage 1 endometrial cancer patients with no high risk factors.

  2. The development of radiotherapy in Slovenia

    Kuhelj, Janez; Ravnihar, Bozena

    1996-01-01

    The historical data on the development of radiotherapy in Slovenia are presented from its first use in this county in 1902 until the present. The Institute of Oncology in Ljubljana was established in 1938 with the intention of providing a sound development of radium and roentgen cancer treatment. After World War II, the development of radiotherapy was dynamic, which is evident from the data on new radiation sources in external beam therapy (accelerators, telecobalt units), in brachytherapy (various sealed radioisotopes) as well as in the introduction of therapy with unsealed radioisotopes. In 1947, a Chair of Oncology and Radiotherapy was instituted at the Medical Faculty of the University of Ljubljana (with the seat at the Institute of Oncology). In 1955, radiotherapy and oncology were officially recognized as separate branches of medicine requiring special obligatory postgraduate residency training. Within the Medical Society of Slovenia, the Section for Radiotherapy was established in 1987. The following year, the Section for Radiotherapy of Slovenia became a member of the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology. Considering the size of population of Slovenia (nearly 2 million), it was reasonable that by this time radiotherapy became almost completely concentrated in one central institution, the Institute of Oncology, whose core and cohesive activity were represented in the multidisciplinary cancer treatment approach

  3. Hypofractionated radiotherapy for invasive bladder cancer

    Scholten, Astrid N.; Leer, Jan-Willem H.; Collins, C. David; Wondergem, Jan; Hermans, Jo; Timothy, Adrian

    1997-01-01

    Background and purpose: The policy of the Radiotherapy Department of St. Thomas' Hospital in London for patients with invasive bladder cancer, used to be treatment with hypofractionated radiotherapy. The advantages of this fractionation scheme included reduction of the number of treatment sessions and better use of limited resources. Our results after hypofractionation were compared to series with more conventional radiotherapy. Material and methods: Between 1975 and 1985, 123 patients with a T2-T3 transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder were treated by a radical course of hypofractionated radiotherapy. Local control, survival and morbidity rates were analysed retrospectively. Results: The actuarial local control rates at 5 and 10 years were 31 and 29%, respectively. The actuarial cancer-specific 5- and 10-year survival rates were 48 and 39%, respectively. Acute side effects were observed in 87% of patients. The actuarial overall and severe late complication rates at 5 years were 33 and 9%, respectively. The local control, survival and early side effect rates we found, were in the same range as those reported in literature. Late radiation side effects however, were more common after hypofractionated radiotherapy compared to conventional radiotherapy schedules. Conclusions: We conclude that the potential advantage of a reduced number of treatment sessions may be lost in the long term, because of the higher incidence of late morbidity after hypofractionated radiotherapy. Hypofractionation however, remains a valuable technique for palliation and deserves further investigation for radical treatment where access to equipment is difficult or resources are limited

  4. Cancer occurring after radiotherapy and chemotherapy

    Holm, L.E.

    1990-01-01

    Radiotherapy and chemotherapy can effectively control cancer but can also cause new cancers to develop as long-term complications. Almost all types of cancer have been associated with radiotherapy. The breast, thyroid, and bone marrow are the organs most susceptible to radiation carcinogenesis. The bone marrow is also most frequently involved by chemotherapy and the leukemia risk is much higher than after radiotherapy. The combination of intensive radiotherapy and chemotherapy is particularly leukemogenic. The latent period between radiotherapy/chemotherapy and the appearance of a second primary cancer ranges from a few years to several decades. The risk for a second primary cancer following radiotherapy or chemotherapy emphasizes the need for life long follow-up of patients receiving such treatments. This is particularly the case in individuals with long life expectancy, for example, patients treated for childhood neoplasms. The benefits of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in oncology exceed the risks for second primary cancers. Efforts should be directed towards identifying those patients who will benefit from the treatments so that only they are exposed to the risk. 33 references

  5. Orbital computed tomography for exophthalmos

    Kim, Ok Keun; Lee, Hyun; Sol, Chang Hyo; Kim, Byung Soo

    1987-01-01

    Since exophthalmos is caused by any decrease in the size of bony orbit or occurrence of mass within the rigid orbit, the accurate diagnosis of its causes are essential in determining the therapeutic aims. Exophthalmos is one of the important signs being the indication for orbital computed tomography along with periorbital swelling, visual loss, orbital trauma and diplopia. CT as the diagnostic tool for the cause of exophthalmos not only displays a superb role with uncomparable quality in comparison to any conventional diagnostic methods but also has a decisive role in determining the therapeutic aims and the appropriate operative method when the operation is indicated. The orbital CT was performed from May in 1983 to May in 1985 whose with chief complaints were exophthalmos and 23 cases were confirmed by operation, biopsy, clinical progression or other diagnostic procedures. Here was report thoroughly analyzed 23 cases. The results were as follows : 1. The etiologic disease of exophthalmos were 6 cases of pseudotumor, 4 cases of thyroid ophthalmopathy, 4 cases of maxill ary sinus and nasal cavity Ca., 3 cases of mucocele and 1 case of alveolar soft part sarcoma, osteoma, dermoid cyst, pleomorphic adenoma, meningioma, and C.C.F. each. 2. The origin of the etiologic diseases of exophthalmos were 13 cases of primary within bony orbit and 10 cases of secondary from adjacent structure. 3. The site of lesions were 11 cases of intraconal and extraconal, 10 cases of extraconal, and 2 cases of intraconal origin. 4. The degree of exophthalmos in CT scan was in proportion to the volume of the mass except in the case of thyroid ophthalmopathy. The upper limit of normal range by CT scan using regression line equation was 16.2 mm in approximation. 5. CT was a very useful diagnostic tool in the accurate assessment of the kinds of lesion, its location, and its relationship to adjacent structures in the diagnosis of etiologic diseases of exophthalmos

  6. Theory of orbital magnetoelectric response

    Malashevich, Andrei; Souza, Ivo; Coh, Sinisa; Vanderbilt, David

    2010-01-01

    We extend the recently developed theory of bulk orbital magnetization to finite electric fields, and use it to calculate the orbital magnetoelectric (ME) response of periodic insulators. Working in the independent-particle framework, we find that the finite-field orbital magnetization can be written as a sum of three gauge-invariant contributions, one of which has no counterpart at zero field. The extra contribution is collinear with and explicitly dependent on the electric field. The expression for the orbital magnetization is suitable for first-principles implementations, allowing one to calculate the ME response coefficients by numerical differentiation. Alternatively, perturbation-theory techniques may be used, and for that purpose we derive an expression directly for the linear ME tensor by taking the first field-derivative analytically. Two types of terms are obtained. One, the 'Chern-Simons' term, depends only on the unperturbed occupied orbitals and is purely isotropic. The other, 'Kubo' terms, involve the first-order change in the orbitals and give isotropic as well as anisotropic contributions to the response. In ordinary ME insulators all terms are generally present, while in strong Z 2 topological insulators only the Chern-Simons term is allowed, and is quantized. In order to validate the theory, we have calculated under periodic boundary conditions the linear ME susceptibility for a 3D tight-binding model of an ordinary ME insulator, using both the finite-field and perturbation-theory expressions. The results are in excellent agreement with calculations on bounded samples.

  7. Orbital computed tomography for exophthalmos

    Kim, Ok Keun; Lee, Hyun; Sol, Chang Hyo; Kim, Byung Soo [College of Medicine, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-06-15

    Since exophthalmos is caused by any decrease in the size of bony orbit or occurrence of mass within the rigid orbit, the accurate diagnosis of its causes are essential in determining the therapeutic aims. Exophthalmos is one of the important signs being the indication for orbital computed tomography along with periorbital swelling, visual loss, orbital trauma and diplopia. CT as the diagnostic tool for the cause of exophthalmos not only displays a superb role with uncomparable quality in comparison to any conventional diagnostic methods but also has a decisive role in determining the therapeutic aims and the appropriate operative method when the operation is indicated. The orbital CT was performed from May in 1983 to May in 1985 whose with chief complaints were exophthalmos and 23 cases were confirmed by operation, biopsy, clinical progression or other diagnostic procedures. Here was report thoroughly analyzed 23 cases. The results were as follows : 1. The etiologic disease of exophthalmos were 6 cases of pseudotumor, 4 cases of thyroid ophthalmopathy, 4 cases of maxill ary sinus and nasal cavity Ca., 3 cases of mucocele and 1 case of alveolar soft part sarcoma, osteoma, dermoid cyst, pleomorphic adenoma, meningioma, and C.C.F. each. 2. The origin of the etiologic diseases of exophthalmos were 13 cases of primary within bony orbit and 10 cases of secondary from adjacent structure. 3. The site of lesions were 11 cases of intraconal and extraconal, 10 cases of extraconal, and 2 cases of intraconal origin. 4. The degree of exophthalmos in CT scan was in proportion to the volume of the mass except in the case of thyroid ophthalmopathy. The upper limit of normal range by CT scan using regression line equation was 16.2 mm in approximation. 5. CT was a very useful diagnostic tool in the accurate assessment of the kinds of lesion, its location, and its relationship to adjacent structures in the diagnosis of etiologic diseases of exophthalmos.

  8. GLONASS orbit/clock combination in VNIIFTRI

    Bezmenov, I.; Pasynok, S.

    2015-08-01

    An algorithm and a program for GLONASS satellites orbit/clock combination based on daily precise orbits submitted by several Analytic Centers were developed. Some theoretical estimates for combine orbit positions RMS were derived. It was shown that under condition that RMS of satellite orbits provided by the Analytic Centers during a long time interval are commensurable the RMS of combine orbit positions is no greater than RMS of other satellite positions estimated by any of the Analytic Centers.

  9. Quality Audits In Radiotherapy. Chapter 20

    Izewska, J.

    2017-01-01

    It is widely recognized that quality audits constitute a vital component of quality management in radiotherapy [20.1–20.3]. The main reason why quality audits are considered an important activity is that they help to review the quality of radiotherapy services and improve them. Quality audits check whether radiotherapy practices are adequate, i.e. that what should be done is being done; and in case it is not, audits provide recommendations to encourage improvements to be made. Without some form of auditing, it would be difficult to determine whether radiotherapy services are safe and effective for cancer treatment. In other words, a quality audit in radiotherapy is a method of reviewing whether the quality of activities in a radiotherapy department adheres to the standards of good practices to ensure that the treatment to the cancer patient is optimal. Overall, audits lead to improvements of professional practices and the general quality of services delivered. There are many recommendations regarding quality in radiotherapy practice, both national and international. Practices vary depending on the economic level of States, including specific procedures, equipment and facilities, as well as available resources. Good practices evolve with research developments, including new clinical trial results, progress in evidence based medicine and developments in radiotherapy technology. Quality audits involve the process of fact finding and comparing the findings against criteria for good practices in radiotherapy. Various issues and gaps may be identified by the auditors in the audit process, for example insufficiencies in structure, inadequacies in technology or deviations in procedures. This way the weak points or areas of concern are documented and recommendations for the audited centre are formulated that address these areas with the purpose of improving quality.

  10. Hormone levels in radiotherapy treatment related fatigue

    Biswal, B.M.; Mallik, G.S.

    2003-01-01

    Radiotherapy is known to cause debilitating treatment related fatigue. Fatigue in general is a conglomeration of psychological, physical, hematological and unknown factors influencing the internal milieu of the cancer patient. Radiotherapy can add stress at the cellular and somatic level to aggravate further fatigue in cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Stress related hormones might be mediating in the development of fatigue. This is an ongoing prospective study to evaluate if the hormonal profile related to stress is influenced by radiotherapy treatment related fatigue. The study was conducted from September 2002 onwards in the division of Radiotherapy and Oncology of our Medical School. Previously untreated patients with histopathology proof of malignancy requiring external beam radiotherapy were considered for this study. Selection criteria were applied to exclude other causes of fatigue. Initial fatigue score was obtained using Pipers Fatigue Score questionnaire containing 23 questions, subsequently final fatigue score was obtained at the end of radiotherapy. Blood samples were obtained to estimate the levels of ACTH, TSH, HGH, and cortisol on the final assessment. The hormone levels were compared with resultant post radiotherapy fatigue score. At the time of reporting 50 patients were evaluable for the study. The total significant fatigue score was observed among 12 (24%) patients. The individual debilitating fatigue score were behavioral severity 14 (28%), affective meaning 14(28%), Sensory 13 (26%) and cognitive mood 10 (20%) respectively. From the analysis of hormonal profile, growth hormone level > 1 ng/mL and TSH <0.03 appears to be associated with high fatigue score (though statistically not significant); whereas there was no correlation with ACTH and serum cortisol level. In our prospective study severe radiotherapy treatment related fatigue was found among our patient population. Low levels of TSH and high levels of GH appear to be associated

  11. Radiotherapy-induced emesis. An overview

    Feyer, P.; Buchali, A.; Hinkelbein, M.; Budach, V.; Zimmermann, J.S.; Titlbach, O.J.

    1998-01-01

    Background: A significant number of patients receiving radiotherapy experience the distressing side effects of emesis and nausea. These symptoms are some of the most distressing problems for the patients influencing their quality of life. Methods: International study results concerning radiotherapy-induced emesis are demonstrated. A German multicenter questionnaire examining the strategies to prevent or to treat radiotherapy-induced nausea and emesis is presented. An international analysis concerning incidence of emesis and nausea in fractionated radiotherapy patients is discussed. Finally the consensus of the consensus conference on antiemetic therapy from the Perugia International Cancer Conference V is introduced. Results: Untreated emesis can lead to complications like electrolyte disorders, dehydration, metabolic disturbances and nutrition problems with weight loss. Prophylactic antiemetics are often given to patients receiving single high-dose radiotherapy to the abdomen. A survey has revealed that antiemetic prophylaxis is not routinely offered to the patients receiving fractionated radiotherapy. However, there is a need for an effective treatment of emesis for use in this group of patients, too. In 20% of patients nausea and emesis can cause a treatment interruption because of an inadequate control of symptoms. Like in chemotherapy strategies there exist high, moderate, and low emetogenic treatment regimens in radiotherapy as well. The most emetogenic potential has the total body irradiation followed by radiotherapy to the abdomen. Radiotherapy induced emesis can be treated effectively with conventional antiemetics up to 50%. Conclusions: Studies with total body irradiation, fractionated treatment and high-dose single exposures have cleary demonstrated the value of 5-HT3-receptor antagonist antiemetics. There is a response between 60 and 97%. There is no difference in the efficacy of the different 5-HT3-antagonists. High-risk patients should be prophylactic

  12. Radiotherapy for MTRA/RT; Strahlentherapie fuer MTRA/RT

    Luetter, Christiana [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Radiologische Klinik

    2012-07-01

    The radiological practice textbook covers the following issues: tumor diseases, tumor diagnostics, fundamentals of radiotherapy, DIN, irradiation planning, documentation and quality assurance, strategies of tumor therapy, basic physics of radiotherapy and dosimetry, radiation protection - regulations and guidelines, radiobiology, biological radiation effects, special organ toxicity, psychological and medical attendance of patients, special oncology of the most important organ carcinomas, palliative radiotherapy, radiotherapy of benign diseases, other indications of radiotherapy, supportive therapy.

  13. Precise GPS orbits for geodesy

    Colombo, Oscar L.

    1994-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) has become, in recent years, the main space-based system for surveying and navigation in many military, commercial, cadastral, mapping, and scientific applications. Better receivers, interferometric techniques (DGPS), and advances in post-processing methods have made possible to position fixed or moving receivers with sub-decimeter accuracies in a global reference frame. Improved methods for obtaining the orbits of the GPS satellites have played a major role in these achievements; this paper gives a personal view of the main developments in GPS orbit determination.

  14. Orbital resonances around black holes.

    Brink, Jeandrew; Geyer, Marisa; Hinderer, Tanja

    2015-02-27

    We compute the length and time scales associated with resonant orbits around Kerr black holes for all orbital and spin parameters. Resonance-induced effects are potentially observable when the Event Horizon Telescope resolves the inner structure of Sgr A*, when space-based gravitational wave detectors record phase shifts in the waveform during the resonant passage of a compact object spiraling into the black hole, or in the frequencies of quasiperiodic oscillations for accreting black holes. The onset of geodesic chaos for non-Kerr spacetimes should occur at the resonance locations quantified here.

  15. Orbital effects in actinide systems

    Lander, G.H.

    1983-01-01

    Actinide magnetism presents a number of important challenges; in particular, the proximity of 5f band to the Fermi energy gives rise to strong interaction with both d and s like conduction electrons, and the extended nature of the 5f electrons means that they can interact with electron orbitals from neighboring atoms. Theory has recently addressed these problems. Often neglected, however, is the overwhelming evidence for large orbital contributions to the magnetic properties of actinides. Some experimental evidence for these effects are presented briefly in this paper. They point, clearly incorrectly, to a very localized picture for the 5f electrons. This dichotomy only enhances the nature of the challenge

  16. AA, closed orbit observation pickup

    1980-01-01

    Electrostatic pickups around the circumference of the AA served for the measurement of the closed orbits across the wide momentum range of +- 3% to either side of central orbit. The pickups were of the "shoebox" type, with diagonal cuts, a horizontal and a vertical one mechanically coupled together. They were located where they would not require extra space. The small ones, like the one we see here, were inserted into the vacuum chamber of the BLG (long and narrow) bending magnets. See also 8001372, 8010042, 8010045

  17. AA, closed orbit observation pickup

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    Electrostatic pickups around the circumference of the AA served for the measurement of the closed orbits across the wide momentum range of +- 3% to either side of central orbit. The pickups were of the "shoebox" type, with diagonal cuts, a horizontal and a vertical one mechanically coupled together. They were located where they would not require extra space. The wide ones (very wide indeed: 70 cm), like the one we see here, were placed inside the vacuum chamber of the wide quadrupoles QFW, at maximum dispersion. See also 8001372, 8001383, 8010045

  18. AA, closed orbit observation pickup

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    Electrostatic pickups around the circumference of the AA served for the measurement of the closed orbits across the wide momentum range of +- 3% to either side of central orbit. The pickups were of the "shoebox" type, with diagonal cuts, a horizontal and a vertical one mechanically coupled together. They were located where they would not require extra space. The wide ones (very wide indeed: 70 cm), like the one we see here, were placed inside the vacuum chamber of the wide quadrupoles, QFW, at maximum dispersion. See also 8001372,8001383, 8010042

  19. AA, closed orbit observation pickup

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    Electrostatic pickups around the circumference of the AA served for the measurement of the closed orbits across the wide momentum range of +- 3% to either side of central orbit. The pickups were of the "shoebox" type, with diagonal cuts, a horizontal and a vertical one mechanically coupled together. They were located where they would not require extra space. The small ones, like the one we see here, were inserted into the vacuum chamber of the BLG (long and narrow) bending magnets. Werner Sax contemplates his achievement. See also 8001383, 8010042, 8010045.

  20. Energy and the Elliptical Orbit

    Nettles, Bill

    2009-03-01

    In the January 2007 issue of The Physics Teacher, Prentis, Fulton, Hesse, and Mazzino describe a laboratory exercise in which students use a geometrical analysis inspired by Newton to show that an elliptical orbit and an inverse-square law force go hand in hand. The historical, geometrical, and teamwork aspects of the exercise are useful and important. This paper presents an exercise which uses an energy/angular momentum conservation model for elliptical orbits. This exercise can be done easily by an individual student and on regular notebook-sized paper.

  1. Radiotherapy for solitary plasmacytoma and multiple myeloma

    Schmaus, M.C.; Neuhof, D.

    2014-01-01

    Solitary plasmacytoma and multiple myeloma require a differentiated radiotherapy. The irradiation for plasmacytoma with an adequate total dose (medullary 40-50 Gy or extramedullary 50-60 Gy) leads to a high degree of local control with a low rate of side effects. In cases of multiple myeloma radiotherapy will achieve effective palliation, both in terms of recalcification as well as reduction of neurological symptoms and analgesia. In terms of analgesia the rule is the higher the single dose fraction the faster the reduction of pain. As part of a conditioning treatment prior to stem cell transplantation radiotherapy contributes to the establishment of a graft versus myeloma effect (GVM). (orig.) [de

  2. Carotid artery stenosis after neck radiotherapy

    Shimamura, Munehisa; Hashimoto, Yoichiro; Kasuya, Junji; Terasaki, Tadashi [Kumamoto City Hospital (Japan); Uchino, Makoto

    2000-02-01

    Carotid artery stenosis sometimes occurs after cervical radiotherapy. We report a 70-year-old woman with a history of radiotherapy for thyroid cancer at the age of 28 years. She had no signs and symptoms except the skin lesion at the irradiation site. Duplex ultrasonography revealed heterogeneous plaques showing 50% stenosis of bilateral common carotid arteries. Those lesions were observed within segment of irradiation, where atheromatous plaque usually seldom occurs. These indicated that the carotid stenosis was induced by radiotherapy. Although the efficacy of antiplatelet therapy for radiation-induced plaque is not clear, the plaques remained unchanged for 4 years in spite of aspirin administration. (author)

  3. Intraoperative radiotherapy for adenocarcinoma of the pancreas

    Yasue, Mitsunori; Yasui, Kenzo; Morimoto, Takeshi; Miyaishi, Seiichi; Morita, Kozo

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-six patients were given intraoperative radiotherapy for adenocarcinoma of the pancreas between April 1980 and March 1986. Twenty-six of those with well-advanced cancer underwent palliative intraoperative radiotherapy of their main primary lesions (1,500 to 3,000 rads). Fourteen of the 19 patients in this group who had intractable back pain before surgery achieved relief within one week after treatment. Of the remaining 10 patients who underwent pancreatectomy and received adjuvant intraoperative radiotherapy (2,000 to 3,000 rads), two remain clinically free of disease five years and six months and four years and six months after palliative distal pancreatectomy. (author)

  4. Radiological diagnostics and radiotherapy in Wilms' tumor

    Kutzner, J

    1981-01-01

    The possibilities of diagnosing Wilms' tumor correctly have been greatly extended by the introduction of computerised tomography and ultrasonic examination. In view of the fact that Wilms' tumor is subjected to combined treatment involving chemotherapy, surgery and radiotherapy, it appears justified to reduce the dose to 20-30 Gy, depending upon the age of the child and the extension of the tumor. It is believed that preoperative radiotherapy will yield better surgical possibilities in large tumours. Radiotherapy can be omitted in infants in the stages I and II as well as in children in stage I.

  5. Imaging and concomitant dose in radiotherapy

    Negi, P.S.

    2008-01-01

    Image guidance in radiotherapy now involves multiple imaging procedures for planning, simulation, set-up inter and intrafraction monitoring. Presently ALARA (i.e. as low as reasonable achievable) is the principle of management of dose to radiation workers and patients in any diagnostic imaging procedures including image guided surgery. The situation is different in repeated radiographic/fluoroscopic imaging performed for simulation, dose planning, patient positioning and set-up corrections during preparation/execution of Image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) as well as for Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT). Reported imaging and concomitant doses will be highlighted and discussed for the management and optimization of imaging techniques in IMRT and IGRT

  6. Dermatologic radiotherapy and breast cancer

    Goldschmidt, H.; Gorson, R.O.; Lassen, M.

    1982-01-01

    This study was set up to provide quantitative data to evaluate unsubstantiated claims that improper dermatologic radiation techniques may cause breast cancer. A thin mylar window ionization rate meter placed at the location of the right breast of an Alderson-RANDO anthropomorphic phantom was used to measure direct and scatter radiation reaching the female breast during radiotherapy of the facial region (as given for acne). The results indicate that scatter doses are very small; they are influenced by radiation quality and the use or nonuse of a treatment cone. Quantitative risk estimates show that the very small risk of breast cancer induction can be reduced even further by the use of proper radiation protection measures. (orig.)

  7. Radiotherapy: an interactive learning tool

    Frenzel, T.; Kruell, A.; Schmidt, R.; Dobrucki, W.; Malys, B.

    1998-01-01

    The program is primarily intended for radiological medical technicians, student nurses, students of medicine and physics, and doctors. It is designed as a tool for vocational training and further training and gives comprehensive insight into the daily routines of a radiotherapy unit. The chapters deal with: fundamental biological aspects - fundamental physical aspects - radiation sources and irradiation systems - preparatory examinations - therapies and concepts - irradiation planning - irradiation performance - termination of irradiation treatment. For every page displayed, spoken texts and written, on-screen keywords, illustrations, animated sequences and a large number of videos have been combined in a way easy to digest. The software of the program permits handling also by learners less familiar with computer-based learning. (orig./) [de

  8. External radiotherapy in thyroid cancer

    Samuel, A.M.; Shah, D.H.

    1999-01-01

    In the management of thyroid carcinoma (TC) of any histological type, surgery is the primary mode of treatment. The second modality for the management is treatment with radioactive iodine ( 131 I), especially, when the tumor has the ability to concentrate 131 I. External radiotherapy has a limited use in differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC). It is useful in the management of bulky residual tissue which is not completely resected, metastatic disease which does not concentrated radioiodine and as a palliative treatment for reliving pain in patients with distant metastases. The ER as an adjuvant treatment in both anaplastic and medullary carcinoma has a significant role to play and should be used more frequently than is presently being advocated and practiced

  9. Dermatologic radiotherapy and breast cancer

    Goldschmidt, H.; Gorson, R.O.; Lassen, M.

    1982-03-01

    This study was set up to provide quantitative data to evaluate unsubstantiated claims that improper dermatologic radiation techniques may cause breast cancer. A thin mylar window ionization rate meter placed at the location of the right breast of an Alderson-RANDO anthropomorphic phantom was used to measure direct and scatter radiation reaching the female breast during radiotherapy of the facial region (as given for acne). The results indicate that scatter doses are very small; they are influenced by radiation quality and the use or nonuse of a treatment cone. Quantitative risk estimates show that the very small risk of breast cancer induction can be reduced even further by the use of proper radiation protection measures.

  10. Postoperative interstitial radiotherapy of keloids

    Clavere, P.; Bonnafoux-Clavere, A.; Roullet, B.; Morzel, A.; Rhein, B.; Bonnetblanc, J.M.; Olivier, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    During an 8-year period, 21 patients with keloids (27 keloids) were treated with keloidectomy and post-operative interstitial radiotherapy by an iridium 192 wire. Only one patient had been previously treated by corticoids, without results. A dose of 12 Gy (three patients) to 15 Gy (18 patients) was delivered at a point 2.5 mm from the axis of the wire. The follow-up time was from 2 - 104 months. The success rate, at 7 months, was close to 88%. Ao recurrence occurred in three patients without relation to the method used, the lesion-age or the localization of the lesions. There were no side-effects. This method represents an effective, non-constraining and safe treatment for keloids if the contra-indications are respected

  11. Radiotherapy of malignant eyelid tumors

    Morozov, A.I.; Chentsova, O.B.; Korshunov, A.I.; Biryukov, V.A.

    1986-01-01

    Immediate, early and delayed results of short-remote and combined radiotherapy in 348 patients with malignant eyelid neoplasms were presented. A single focal dose was 1.5.-2.5 Gy, an integral dose 45-80 Gy with relation to tumor prevalence and histological strucute. The eyeball was protected with the help of a lead lens (''eye prosthesis'') and a universal tun.gsten membrane. The devices ensured nearly 100% protection of the eyelid against ionizing radiation. Direct clinical cure was noted in 342 patients, partial tumor resorption in 6 patients. Three-year recurrence-free survival was noted in 330 patients (94.8%), five-year survival in 319 (92.8%)

  12. Palliative radiotherapy for multiple myeloma

    Furusawa, Mitsuhiro; Baba, Yuji; Murakami, Ryuji; Yokoyama, Toshimi; Nishimura, Ryuichi; Uozumi, Hideaki; Takada, Chitose; Takahashi, Mutsumasa

    1995-01-01

    This study reviews the experience of palliative radiotherapy to patients with multiple myeloma to define the optimal dose for pain relief. The records of 31 patients (66 sites) with multiple myeloma irradiated for palliation at Kumamoto University hospital between 1985 and 1994 were reviewed. Total dose ranged from 8 to 50 Gy, with a mean of 32.2 Gy. Symptoms included pain (78.1%), neurological abnormalities (28.1%), and palpable masses (34.3%). Symptomatic remission was obtained in 45 of 46 evaluable sites (97.8%). Complete remission of symptoms were obtained in 28.3%, and partial remission in 69.6%. According to fraction size, there was no significant difference between 3-5 Gy and 1.8-2 Gy. The incidence of complete remission increased when a total dose of more than 20 Gy was given. When the quality of life is considered, hypofractionation was recommended for the palliative radiation therapy of multiple myeloma. (author)

  13. Radiotherapy for early rectal cancer

    Rich, T.A.

    1988-01-01

    A literature review of 10 series using electrocoagulation, fulguration, or local excision demonstrates that about 70% of all patients had tumors smaller than 3 cm and the remainder had tumors measuring between 4 cm and 7 cm. Although primary tumor size in rectal cancer has little prognostic value per se, it is obviously important when determining the appropriateness of local therapy. Selecting patients for local therapy based on tumor size alone seems reasonable, since the recurrence and survival rates for the patients are similar to those achieved with radical surgery. Since patients treated with local excision alone have predominantly T1 or T2 tumors, a comparison with the data of others illustrates the prognostic utility of the degree of bowel penetration and shows five-year survival rates of 71% to 76% for patients with limited disease. In this chapter, the author describes an additional group of patients who also did well following postoperative radiotherapy after conservative surgical treatment

  14. Tomodensitometry images: integration in radiotherapy

    Dessy, F; Hoornaert, M T [Jolimont Hospital, Haine Saint Paul (France). Cancer and Nuclear Medicine Dept.; Malchair, F [Biomed Engineering, Boncelles (France)

    1995-12-01

    With a view to utilization of CT scan images in radiotherapy, the effective energy and the linearity of four different scanners (Siemens somatom CR, HiQS, Plus and Picker PQ 2000) and two non standard scanners, simulators with CT option (Webb 1990) (Varian Ximatron and Oldelft Simulx CT) has been measured using the method described by White and Speller in 1980. When the linearity relation in presented using the density or the electron density as the abscissa, a blurred area where two different components of equal density or electron density can have two different Hounsfield`s numbers. Using the linearity relation, the density of Rando`s lung heterogeneity is determined. We calculated a treatment planning (TP) using this value and made a comparison between the TP and the real absorbed dose with was measured using diodes. The comparison between the TP and the relative Absorbed doses showed a difference of up to 4.5%.

  15. Evolution of radiotherapy at MOH

    Passi, Kamalesh

    2016-01-01

    Mohan Dai Oswal Cancer Institute was started by Oswals, a philanthropist family of industrialists, in the memory of their mother Smt Mohan Dai Oswal, who died of cancer. This was the first of its kind charitable institute in the private sector in north providing comprehensive cancer care under one roof. The large number of patients that the hospital attracted in the very first year revealed the huge lacuna in cancer care that had been existent in the region. Since then this hospital has been catering to all of Punjab, Himachal, J and K and a large area of Haryana. It has built a reputation for high-tech, yet cost-effective, care. There are multiple dimensions to the evolution of Radiotherapy at MDOH- build-up of technical hardware, growth of skilled personnel, laying down and development of protocols and processes and the evolution of a unique work culture

  16. Intraoperative radiotherapy for pancreatic carcinoma

    Nishimura, Akira; Iida, Koyo; Sato, Shigehiro; Sakata, Suo

    1986-01-01

    Twenty-eight patients with pancreatic carcinoma, 23 (82 %) of whom had Stage III or IV, received intraoperative radiotherapy (IOR) with curative or non-curative surgery. Electron beams (10 to 18 MeV) with doses of 20 to 40 Gy were delivered to the tumor. Eight of 26 patients with unresectable tumor had postoperative external irradiation of 10.5 to 50 Gy. Abdominal and back pain relief was achieved after IOR in 12 (71 %) and in 6 (60 %) of the 26 patients, respectively. Appetite was promoted in 11 patients. In the case of unresectable carcinoma, survival time tended to prolong in the 8 patients receiving both IOR and postoperative external irradiation. One patient developed perforation of the colon probably caused by IOR. (Namekawa, K.)

  17. Proton radiotherapy of skin carcinomas

    Umebayashi, Y.; Uyeno, K.; Otsuka, F.

    1994-01-01

    At the Proton Medical Research Centre, University of Tsukuba, a pilot study of proton-beam radiotherapy was performed in 12 patients with the following types of carcinoma: Bowen's disease (4), oral verrucous carcinoma (5), and squamous cell carcinoma (3). They received total doses of 51-99.2 Gy in fractions of 2-12.5 Gy. All tumours responded well to the treatment. All four lesions of Bowen's disease, three of the five oral verrucous carcinomas, and the three squamous cell carcinomas completely regressed following irradiation. Two squamous cell carcinomas recurred during the follow-up period. One recurrent squamous cell carcinoma was successfully treated by a salvage surgical operation, and in the other case the patient refused further therapy. In two verrucous carcinomas there was 90% regression of tumour volume. No severe radiation-related complication occurred. (Author)

  18. Stereotactic radiotherapy for brain metastasis

    Noel, G.; Daisne, J.F.; Thillays, F.

    2012-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is now well implanted in the radiotherapy treatment tools of brain metastasis. The dose can be delivered in one or multiple sessions. Results seem equivalent. CT scan and MRI imaging are required to delineate and calculate dosimetry. Doses are variable according to the size of the metastases, localization, pathology or equipment. Stabilization or reduction of tumour size is the rules after stereotactic treatment. Impact in terms of overall survival is more difficult to apprehend because of the general context of the disease. Many questions remain unresolved, such as the usefulness of whole brain irradiation, adaptation of the treatment schedule to tumour pathophysiology, role of stereotactic treatment after surgery of metastases, etc. (authors)

  19. Radiogenomics and radiotherapy response modeling

    El Naqa, Issam; Kerns, Sarah L.; Coates, James; Luo, Yi; Speers, Corey; West, Catharine M. L.; Rosenstein, Barry S.; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    2017-08-01

    Advances in patient-specific information and biotechnology have contributed to a new era of computational medicine. Radiogenomics has emerged as a new field that investigates the role of genetics in treatment response to radiation therapy. Radiation oncology is currently attempting to embrace these recent advances and add to its rich history by maintaining its prominent role as a quantitative leader in oncologic response modeling. Here, we provide an overview of radiogenomics starting with genotyping, data aggregation, and application of different modeling approaches based on modifying traditional radiobiological methods or application of advanced machine learning techniques. We highlight the current status and potential for this new field to reshape the landscape of outcome modeling in radiotherapy and drive future advances in computational oncology.

  20. Orbital computed tomography: technical aspects

    Beck, T.J.; Rosenbaum, A.E.; Miller, N.R.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomographic scanning has revolutionized the diagnosis and management of orbital disease. The best use of this methodology requires knowledge of the principles and appropriate attention to scanning protocols. Computed tomographic scanning of the orbit is a demanding technique requiring thin sections through planes precisely positioned from the topographical anatomy. Ideally, orbital CT should include both transverse axial and coronal sections: The pathological condition and its plane of growth will influence the selection of the optimal plane or section. Coronal sections may be obtained either directly or indirectly by computer reconstruction from contiguous transverse images. Sagittal or oblique sections or both also are useful and may be obtained directly or indirectly. Difficulty in patient positioning may preclude direct sagittal imaging, however. The use of intravenous contrast enhancement is not necessary as a routine technique unless a mass is identified or suspected. Where surgical resection or biopsy of a space-occupying lesion is contemplated, contrast enhancement can be valuable in assessing relative vascularity and aiding diagnostic specificity. It should be continually emphasized that CT is a powerful technology which, in orbital diagnosis, produces the highest yield when clinician and radiologist collaborate in the radiodiagnostic workup. The clinical information supplied by the referring ophthalmologist is used by the radiologist both in the selection of the appropriate techniques for investigation and in striving to achieve the most specific conclusion

  1. Getting a Crew into Orbit

    Riddle, Bob

    2011-01-01

    Despite the temporary setback in our country's crewed space exploration program, there will continue to be missions requiring crews to orbit Earth and beyond. Under the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, NASA should have its own heavy launch rocket and crew vehicle developed by 2016. Private companies will continue to explore space, as well. At the…

  2. Closed orbit analysis for RHIC

    Milutinovic, J.; Ruggiero, A.G.

    1989-01-01

    We examine the effects of four types of errors in the RHIC dipoles and quadrupoles on the on-momentum closed orbit in the machine. We use PATRIS both to handle statistically the effects of kick-modeled errors and to check the performance of the Fermilab correcting scheme in a framework of a more realistic modeling. On the basis of the accepted rms values of the lattice errors, we conclude that in about 40% of all studied cases the lattice must be to some extent pre-corrected in the framework of the so-called ''first turn around strategy,'' in order to get a closed orbit within the aperture limitations at all and, furthermore, for approximately 2/3 of the remaining cases we find that a single pass algorithm of the Fermilab scheme is not sufficient to bring closed orbit distortions down to acceptable levels. We have modified the scheme and have allowed repeated applications of the otherwise unchanged three bump method and in doing so we have been able to correct the orbit in a satisfactory manner. 4 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  3. DOT strategies versus orbiter strategies

    Rutten, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    The Dutch Open Telescope is a high-resolution solar imager coming on-line at La Palma. The definition of the DOT science niche, strategies, and requirements resemble Solar Orbiter considerations and deliberations. I discuss the latter in the light of the former, and claim that multi-line observation

  4. CONGENITAI, ORBITAL, TERATOMIA IN A

    Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Unit, National Orthopaedic Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria. ABSTRAC"H". Congenital orbital teratomas are rare. This is a case report of an otherwise .... aspirate showed fairly cloudy, blood-tinged straw- coloured fluid with no malignant cells or organisms. Two histopathology reports of 3cm/ ...

  5. THREE PLANETS ORBITING WOLF 1061

    Wright, D. J.; Wittenmyer, R. A.; Tinney, C. G.; Bentley, J. S.; Zhao, Jinglin, E-mail: duncan.wright@unsw.edu.au [Department of Astronomy and Australian Centre for Astrobiology, School of Physics, University of New South Wales, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2016-02-01

    We use archival HARPS spectra to detect three planets orbiting the M3 dwarf Wolf 1061 (GJ 628). We detect a 1.36 M{sub ⊕} minimum-mass planet with an orbital period P = 4.888 days (Wolf 1061b), a 4.25 M{sub ⊕} minimum-mass planet with orbital period P = 17.867 days (Wolf 1061c), and a likely 5.21 M{sub ⊕} minimum-mass planet with orbital period P = 67.274 days (Wolf 1061d). All of the planets are of sufficiently low mass that they may be rocky in nature. The 17.867 day planet falls within the habitable zone for Wolf 1061 and the 67.274 day planet falls just outside the outer boundary of the habitable zone. There are no signs of activity observed in the bisector spans, cross-correlation FWHMs, calcium H and K indices, NaD indices, or Hα indices near the planetary periods. We use custom methods to generate a cross-correlation template tailored to the star. The resulting velocities do not suffer the strong annual variation observed in the HARPS DRS velocities. This differential technique should deliver better exploitation of the archival HARPS data for the detection of planets at extremely low amplitudes.

  6. Orbital meningioma, the Utrecht experience

    Mourits, Maarten Ph.; Berkelbach van der Sprenkel, Jan Willem

    2001-01-01

    AIMS. 1) To evaluate epidemiological data (age, gender, initial complaints, and ophthalmic findings) of a patient cohort with a primary or secondary orbital meningioma. 2) To evaluate the clinical course of these patients. 3) To evaluate the outcome of treatment. PATIENTS AND METHODS. All

  7. Nuclear propulsion for orbital transfer

    Beale, G.A.; Lawrence, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    The state of the art in nuclear propulsion for orbital transfer is discussed. Cryogenic propulsion, electric propulsion, solar-thermal propulsion and direct nuclear propulsion are examined in this context. New technologies with exceptional promise are addressed, emphasizing the particle test bed nuclear engine

  8. Postoperative radiotherapy for intracranial meningioma

    Chun, Ha Chung; Lee, Myung Za

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and tolerance of postoperative external radiotherapy for patients with intracranial meningiomas. The records of thirty three patients with intracranial meningiomas who were treated with postoperative external irradiation at our institution between Feb, 1988 and Nov, 1999 were retrospectively analyzed. Median age of patients at diagnosis was 53 years with range of 17 to 68 years. Sites of involvement were parasagital, cerebral convexity, sphenoid ridge, parasellar and tentorium cerebella. Of 33 evaluated patients, 15 transitional, 10 meningotheliomatous, 4 hemangiopericytic, 3 atypical and 1 malignant meningioma were identified. Four patients underwent biopsy alone and remaining 29 patients underwent total tumor resection. A dose of 50 to 60 Gy was delivered in 28-35 daily fractions over a period of 5 to 7 weeks. Follow-up period ranged from 12 months to 8 years. The actuarial survival rates at 5 and 7 years for entire group of patients were 78% and 67%, respectively. The corresponding disease free survival rates were 73% and 61 %, respectively. The overall local control rate at 5 years was 83%. One out of 25 patients in benign group developed local failure, while 4 out of 8 patients in malignant group did local failure (p <0.05), Of 4 patients who underwent biopsy alone, 2 developed local failure. There was no significant difference in 5 year actuarial survival between patients who underwent total tumor resection and those who did biopsy alone. Patients whose age is under 60 showed slightly better survival than those whose age is 60 or older, although this was not statistically significant. There was no documented late complications in any patients. Based on our study, we might conclude that postoperative external beam radiotherapy tends to improve survival of patients with intracranial meningiomas comparing with surgery alone

  9. Orbital roof encephalocele mimicking a destructive neoplasm.

    Alsuhaibani, Adel H; Hitchon, Patrick W; Smoker, Wendy R K; Lee, Andrew G; Nerad, Jeffrey A

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this case report is to report an orbital roof encephalocele mimicking a destructive orbital neoplasm. Orbital roof encephalocele is uncommon but can mimic neoplasm. One potential mechanism for the orbital roof destruction is a post-traumatic "growing orbital roof fracture." The growing fracture has been reported mostly in children but can occur in adults. Alternative potential etiologies for the encephalocele are discussed, including Gorham syndrome. Orbital roof encephalocele is uncommon in adults, and the findings can superficially resemble an orbital neoplasm. Radiographic and clinical features that might suggest the correct diagnosis include a prior history of trauma, overlying frontal lobe encephalomalacia without significant mass effect or edema, and an orbital roof defect. The "growing fracture" mechanism may be a potential explanation for the orbital roof destruction in some cases.

  10. The globe and orbit in Laron syndrome.

    Kornreich, L; Konen, O; Lilos, P; Laron, Z

    2011-09-01

    Patients with LS have an inborn growth hormone resistance, resulting in failure to generate IGF-1. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the size of the eye and orbit in LS. We retrospectively reviewed the MR imaging of the brain in 9 patients with LS for the following parameters: axial diameter of the globe, interzygomatic distance, perpendicular distance from the interzygomatic line to margins of the globe, medial-to-lateral diameter of the orbit at the anterior orbital rim, distance from the anterior orbital rim to the anterior globe, maximal distance between the medial walls of the orbits, lateral orbital wall angle, lateral orbital wall length, and mediolateral thickness of the intraorbital fat in the most cranial image of the orbit. All measurements were made bilaterally. Twenty patients referred for MR imaging for unrelated reasons served as control subjects. Compared with the control group, the patients with LS had a significantly smaller maximal globe diameter and shallower but wider orbits due to a shorter lateral wall, a smaller medial distance between the orbits, and a larger angle of the orbit. The ratio between the most anterior orbital diameter and the globe was greater than that in controls. The position of the globe was more anterior in relation to the interzygomatic line. Shallow and wide orbits and small globes relative to orbital size are seen in LS and may be secondary to IGF-1 deficiency.

  11. Pregnancy and radiotherapy for breast cancer

    Karasawa, Kumiko

    2013-01-01

    Cancer in pregnancy is relatively uncommon but breast cancer is one of the most common malignancy occur with pregnancy. Prescribed doses of radiotherapy are significantly higher than those of diagnostic procedures. Fetal exposure and damage can occur during radiotherapy within target area. Because of those risks, radiotherapy during pregnancy is basically has to avoid. Even though, feral damage depends on fetal dose and has some threshold dose. Practically, even in stochastic effect, there are some minimal doses. A most important point is careful estimation of fetal dose before radiation. The physician has to inform the patient about risk and benefit of radiotherapy to fetus and to mother and have an ethical balance to help the mother and family to make a final decision. (author)

  12. Radiotherapy for advanced breast cancer. Immediate results

    Lederman, M.V.; Silveira Filho, L.; Martorelli Filho, B.

    1976-01-01

    Seventy-four patients with advanced breast cancer were submited to local radiotherapy of the affected regions. The response of 155 metastatic lesions are recorded. Early results are good, with objective and functional clinical improvement [pt

  13. Heavy particle radiotherapy: prospects and pitfalls

    Faju, M.R.

    1980-01-01

    The use of heavy particles in radiotherapy of tumor volumes is examined. Particles considered are protons, helium ions, heavy ions, negative pions, and fast neutrons. Advantages and disadvantages are discussed

  14. Historical aspects of heavy ion radiotherapy

    Raju, M.R.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents historical developments of heavy-ion radiotherapy including discussion of HILAC and HIMAC and discussion of cooperation between Japan and the United States, along with personal reflections

  15. Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in bilateral retinoblastoma

    Atalar, Banu; Ozyar, Enis; Gunduz, Kaan; Gungor, Gorkem

    2010-01-01

    External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for retinoblastoma has traditionally been done with conventional radiotherapy techniques which resulted high doses to the surrounding normal tissues. A 20 month-old girl with group D bilateral retinoblastoma underwent intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to both eyes after failing chemoreduction and focal therapies including cryotherapy and transpupillary thermotherapy. In this report, we discuss the use of IMRT as a method for reducing doses to adjacent normal tissues while delivering therapeutic doses to the tumour tissues compared with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). At one year follow-up, the patient remained free of any obvious radiation complications. Image guided IMRT provides better dose distribution than 3DCRT in retinoblastoma eyes, delivering the therapeutic dose to the tumours and minimizing adjacent tissue damage

  16. Pancreatic insufficiency secondary to abdominal radiotherapy

    Dookeran, K.A.; Thompson, M.M.; Allum, W.H.

    1993-01-01

    Delayed post-irradiation steatorrhoea secondary to acute pancreatic insufficiency is rare. The authors describe a case occurring in a patient 23 years following radical abdominal radiotherapy for testicular seminoma. (Author)

  17. Pancreatic insufficiency secondary to abdominal radiotherapy

    Dookeran, K.A.; Thompson, M.M.; Allum, W.H. (Leicester Royal Infirmary (United Kingdom). Dept. of Surgery)

    1993-02-01

    Delayed post-irradiation steatorrhoea secondary to acute pancreatic insufficiency is rare. The authors describe a case occurring in a patient 23 years following radical abdominal radiotherapy for testicular seminoma. (Author).

  18. The radiotherapy affects the cognitive processes

    Anon.

    2009-01-01

    Researchers from the medical center of the free university of Amsterdam report that the radiotherapy can hinder the cognitive functions of patients affected by cerebral tumors treated after a surgery. Even low dose radiation could contribute in their opinion, to the progressive cognitive decline of patients suffering of low grade gliomas, the most commune cerebral tumor. To get these conclusions, 65 patients, whom half of them received a radiotherapy, had a neurological and psychological evaluation twelve years after their treatment. Results: 53% of patients treated by radiotherapy present disorders of attention, memory, execution and speed of information treatment against 27% of these ones that received an only surgery. The researchers conclude to the necessity to take into account this risk in the choice of treatment, or even to avoid radiotherapy in this precise case. (N.C.)

  19. Urological sequelae following radiotherapy of gynecological tumors

    Burgkhardt, M.; Jacob, J.; Burgkhardt, C.

    1983-01-01

    After radiotherapy of malign tumors of the female genitals early and late radiation effects, resp. of the urogenital system may arise. Reversible as well as irreversible radiation injuries appear and very often develop fistulae of different kinds

  20. Radiological protection and its organization in radiotherapy

    Gaona, E.; Canizal, C.; Garcia, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    By means of a research carried out in Radiotherapy Centers in Mexico City, divided in 7 public institutions and 5 private, aspects related to the radiological safety and its organization in radiotherapy were evaluated. The population being studied was: medical and technical personnel, that works in the selected radiotherapy centers. The survey was made with 36 dichotomic variables, being obtained 90 surveys. The personnel characteristics are: 76% works for more than 3 years in radiotherapy, 93% has updated information about radiological protection, 67% knows the general radiological safety regulations, 93% knows the radiological emergency project and 95% makes use of personal dosemeter. As result of this research we found that the main problems that the radiological protection have are: lack of personnel training in radiological protection, although the 93% states to have updated information, the few number of persons that takes part in clinical meetings and professional associations. (authors). 7 refs., 3 tabs

  1. Geographic delivery models for radiotherapy services

    Roberts, G.H.; Dunscombe, P.B.; Samant, R.S.

    2002-01-01

    The study described here was undertaken to quantify the societal cost of radiotherapy in idealized urban and rural populations and, hence, to generate a measure of impediment to access. The costs of centralized, distributed comprehensive and satellite radiotherapy delivery formats were examined by decomposing them into institutional, productivity and geographical components. Our results indicate that centralized radiotherapy imposes the greatest financial burden on the patient population in both urban and rural scenarios. The financial burden faced by patients who must travel for radiotherapy can be interpreted as one component of the overall impediment to access. With advances in remote-monitoring systems, it is possible to maintain technical quality while enhancing patient access. However, the maintenance of professional competence will remain a challenge with a distributed service-delivery format. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  2. Stereotactic body radiotherapy a practical guide

    Gaya, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Collecting the key information in this burgeoning field into a single volume, this handbook for clinical oncology trainees and consultants covers all of the basic aspects of stereotactic radiotherapy systems and treatment and includes plenty of case studies.

  3. Estimating the Risks of Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    Taylor, Carolyn; Correa, Candace; Duane, Frances K

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Radiotherapy reduces the absolute risk of breast cancer mortality by a few percentage points in suitable women but can cause a second cancer or heart disease decades later. We estimated the absolute long-term risks of modern breast cancer radiotherapy. Methods First, a systematic literature...... review was performed of lung and heart doses in breast cancer regimens published during 2010 to 2015. Second, individual patient data meta-analyses of 40,781 women randomly assigned to breast cancer radiotherapy versus no radiotherapy in 75 trials yielded rate ratios (RRs) for second primary cancers...... and cause-specific mortality and excess RRs (ERRs) per Gy for incident lung cancer and cardiac mortality. Smoking status was unavailable. Third, the lung or heart ERRs per Gy in the trials and the 2010 to 2015 doses were combined and applied to current smoker and nonsmoker lung cancer and cardiac mortality...

  4. Radiotherapy for advanced breast cancer. Immediate results

    Lederman, M V; Silveira Filho, L; Martorelli Filho, B [Sao Paulo Univ. (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    1976-01-01

    Seventy-four patients with advanced breast cancer were submited to local radiotherapy of the affected regions. The response of 155 metastatic lesions are recorded. Early results are good, with objective and functional clinical improvement.

  5. Radiotherapy. Radiological oncology. Strahlentherapie. Radiologische Onkologie

    Scherer, E [ed.; Essen Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany, F.R.). Radiologisches Zentrum

    1976-01-01

    This book attempts to give a survey of the present status of radiological tumour therapy with some emphasis on the clinical aspect of neoplasms. The physical and radiobiological fundamentals important for practical radiotherapy are discussed in great detail.

  6. Atomic and molecular data for radiotherapy

    Okamoto, K.

    1989-03-01

    This is the summary report of the First Research Co-ordination Meeting of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on Atomic and Molecular Data for Radiotherapy, convened by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section in Vienna, from 30 January to 2 February 1989. The main objectives of the CRP are to generate, compile and evaluate the important atomic and molecular data relevant to radiotherapy. (author). 38 refs, 7 figs, 10 tabs

  7. Radiotherapy and immune reaction of oncologic patients

    Pankina, V.Kh.; Sarkisyan, Yu.KH.

    1978-01-01

    Represented is a review of data accumulated in literature (1970-1976) on oppression of protection of oncologic patients and more oppression of immune reactions during radiotherapy. Underlined is the significance of studying immune homeostasis in a clinic of radiotherapy to evaluate total resistance of patients before the beginning and in the process of treatment. The prognostic significance of immunodepressive disturbances in patients with malignant tumors is elucidated

  8. The result of radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma

    Lee, H. J.; Yang, K. M.; Suh, S. H.

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the prognostic factors for disease-free survival and long-term results of radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma. The study involved a retrospective review of outcome in a series of 27 patients with pituitary adenoma, between 1984 and 1995 at Paik hospital. The study included 20 patients treated with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy and 7 with radiotherapy alone. The patients were followed for 12-146 months (median: 97 months). Seventeen were men and 10 were women. The numbers of functioning and non-functioning pituitary adenoma were 22 and 5 respectively and those of microadenoma and macroadenoma were 4 and 23 respectively. The radiation doses of 5040-5580cGy(median: 5040cGy) were delivered over 5-7 weeks, using 4MV LINAC. The prognostic factors were analyzed by log-rank test. For radiation therapy alone, the 5 YSR was 100% and progression free survival rate was 85.8%. The tumor was controlled in 6/7 (85.8%). For surgery and postoperative radiotherapy , the 5YSR, progression free survival rate and local control rate were 95%, 84.8%, and 89.5% respectively. The parameters of tumor size, hormone secretion, radiation dose, radiotherapy field size were evaluated in a uni- and multivariate analysis and all the factors were not statistically significant (P>0.05). Eleven of 12 (92%) with visual field defect experienced normalization or improvement, and 5 for 7 evaluable patients with hyperprolactinoma achieved normalization in 4 and decrement in 5 patients. Only 2 patients developed mild degree of panhypopituitarism. The radiotherapy appears to be effective in controlling clinical symptoms and signs resulting from pituitary adenoma. Local control rate with radiotherapy alone or with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy was comparable. There was a trend toward high recurrence rate in patients with nonfunctioning or prolactin secreting tumor and larger radiation field sizes. (author)

  9. The result of radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma

    Lee, H. J.; Yang, K. M.; Suh, S. H. [Inje Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine; Cho, H. L.; Shon, S. C. [Pusan Paik Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-01

    To evaluate the prognostic factors for disease-free survival and long-term results of radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma. The study involved a retrospective review of outcome in a series of 27 patients with pituitary adenoma, between 1984 and 1995 at Paik hospital. The study included 20 patients treated with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy and 7 with radiotherapy alone. The patients were followed for 12-146 months (median: 97 months). Seventeen were men and 10 were women. The numbers of functioning and non-functioning pituitary adenoma were 22 and 5 respectively and those of microadenoma and macroadenoma were 4 and 23 respectively. The radiation doses of 5040-5580cGy(median: 5040cGy) were delivered over 5-7 weeks, using 4MV LINAC. The prognostic factors were analyzed by log-rank test. For radiation therapy alone, the 5 YSR was 100% and progression free survival rate was 85.8%. The tumor was controlled in 6/7 (85.8%). For surgery and postoperative radiotherapy , the 5YSR, progression free survival rate and local control rate were 95%, 84.8%, and 89.5% respectively. The parameters of tumor size, hormone secretion, radiation dose, radiotherapy field size were evaluated in a uni- and multivariate analysis and all the factors were not statistically significant (P>0.05). Eleven of 12 (92%) with visual field defect experienced normalization or improvement, and 5 for 7 evaluable patients with hyperprolactinoma achieved normalization in 4 and decrement in 5 patients. Only 2 patients developed mild degree of panhypopituitarism. The radiotherapy appears to be effective in controlling clinical symptoms and signs resulting from pituitary adenoma. Local control rate with radiotherapy alone or with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy was comparable. There was a trend toward high recurrence rate in patients with nonfunctioning or prolactin secreting tumor and larger radiation field sizes. (author).

  10. 31-P NMR spectroscopy in radiotherapy

    Kiricuta, I.C.; Schmitt, W.G.H.; Beyer, H.K.

    1987-01-01

    Results suggest 31-P NMR spectroscopy to allow a discrimination between good and bad blood supply to the tumour owing to different metabolic behaviour and to furnish important information on tumour response to radiotherapy just a few hours after the application of a relatively low dose. Spectroscopy showed the radiation-sensitive tumour cells to behave relatively uniformly after radiotherapy suggesting this behaviour to be interpreted as therapeutical effectiveness. (orig./SHA) [de

  11. Implementation of patients radiation protection in radiotherapy

    Pridal, I.; Klaclova, T.; Novotny, J.; Zackova, H.

    1998-01-01

    Current status of quality assurance programmes in the Czech Republic is highlighted and the structure of quality audits is explained. The results of radiotherapy department auditing are given in a tabular form. It is shown that deviations from tolerable levels are mostly due to obsolete equipment and lack of health physicists at radiotherapy departments. The audits can help rectify the situation in part at least. (P.A.)

  12. Acute myocardial infarction after mediastinal radiotherapy

    Gagliardi, Juan; Tezanos Pinto, Miguel; Avalos, Adolfo; Sarubbi, Augusto; Padilla, Lucio; Espinosa, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Mediastinal radiotherapy can affect the heart and great vessels to different degrees. It may turn up as coronary heart disease and less frequently as acute myocardial infarction. We report the case of a patient without coronary risk factors and an antecedent of mediastinal radiotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma. Considerations about mediastinal radiation as a risk factor for early development of coronary heart diseases are exposed. (author) [es

  13. MR-only Radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    Maspero, Matteo

    2018-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a local approach that involves the use of ionising radiation by exploiting its cell-killing effect to cure cancer. This effect, however, is not specific to damage only cancerous cells and spare healthy cells. Therefore, developments in radiotherapy aimed at reducing treatment uncertainties such that therapeutic radiation dose may be delivered to a malignant tumour while decreasing the dose received by healthy tissues. The recent advances in imaging techniques impacted and radi...

  14. Value of radiotherapy of gastric carcinomas

    Duehmke, E.

    1985-01-01

    Radiotherapy of gastric carcinoma, in contrast to malignant lymphoma, is not commonly in use, until today. Provided that there is a close cooperation between surgeons and radiooncologists, radiotherapy with sufficient, tolerable doses should be considered in any case of complete resection in order to improve the control of subclinical disease as well as cure from cancer. But also in non-resectable carcinoma of the stomach suitable radiotherapeutic approaches may give helpful palliation. (orig.) [de

  15. Cancer patients and delay in radiotherapy

    Klausen, O.G.; Olofsson, J.; Rosengren, B.

    1989-01-01

    Radiotherapeutical resources in Norway are inadequate, which was further verified in this retrospective study of 73 patients with cancer of head and neck. The average duration of symptoms before the first ear-nose-throat examination was 153 days, and it took about 10 days after the examination to get the diagnosis. An unacceptably long time (mean 30 days) elapsed between the decision on therapy until the radiotherapy was initiated. There is no doubt that radiotherapy departments in Norway need better resources

  16. Manipulation and application of orbital ordering

    Sheng Zhigao; Sun Yuping

    2014-01-01

    Under certain conditions, the orbits of the outmost shell electrons in strong correlated materials can be localized in order, which gives birth to so-called orbital ordering. During the construction or destruction of the orbital ordering, strongly correlated materials show fruitful quantum critical phenomena with great potential for future applications. We first present the mechanism for the construction of orbital ordering. Then, some physical properties associated with orbits are discussed. Finally, we emphasize the key points and progress in the research of orbital ordering controlling. (authors)

  17. Radiotherapy for Vestibular Schwannomas: A Critical Review

    Murphy, Erin S.; Suh, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Vestibular schwannomas are slow-growing tumors of the myelin-forming cells that cover cranial nerve VIII. The treatment options for patients with vestibular schwannoma include active observation, surgical management, and radiotherapy. However, the optimal treatment choice remains controversial. We have reviewed the available data and summarized the radiotherapeutic options, including single-session stereotactic radiosurgery, fractionated conventional radiotherapy, fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, and proton beam therapy. The comparisons of the various radiotherapy modalities have been based on single-institution experiences, which have shown excellent tumor control rates of 91-100%. Both stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy have successfully improved cranial nerve V and VII preservation to >95%. The mixed data regarding the ideal hearing preservation therapy, inherent biases in patient selection, and differences in outcome analysis have made the comparison across radiotherapeutic modalities difficult. Early experience using proton therapy for vestibular schwannoma treatment demonstrated local control rates of 84-100% but disappointing hearing preservation rates of 33-42%. Efforts to improve radiotherapy delivery will focus on refined dosimetry with the goal of reducing the dose to the critical structures. As future randomized trials are unlikely, we suggest regimented pre- and post-treatment assessments, including validated evaluations of cranial nerves V, VII, and VIII, and quality of life assessments with long-term prospective follow-up. The results from such trials will enhance the understanding of therapy outcomes and improve our ability to inform patients.

  18. Radiotherapy of adult nodal non Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Gamen, G.; Thirion, P.

    1999-01-01

    The role of radiotherapy in the treatment of nodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma has been modified by the introduction of efficient chemotherapy and the development of different pathological classifications. The recommended treatment of early-stage aggressive lymphomas is primarily a combination chemotherapy. The interest of adjuvant radiotherapy remains unclear and has to be established through large prospective trials. If radiation therapy has to be delivered, the historical results of exclusive radiation therapy showed that involved-fields and a dose of 35-40 Gy (daily fraction of 1.8 Gy, 5 days a week) are the optimal schedule. The interest of radiotherapy in the treatment of advanced-stage aggressive lymphoma is yet to be proven. Further studies had to stratify localized stages according to the factors of the International Prognostic Index. For easy-stage low-grade lymphoma, radiotherapy remains the standard treatment. However, the appropriate technique to use is controversial. Involved-field irradiation at a dose of 35 Gy seems to be the optimal schedule, providing a 10 year disease-free survival rate of 50 % and no major toxicity. There is no standard indication of radiotherapy in the treatment advanced-stage low-grade lymphoma. For 'new' nodal lymphoma's types, the indication of radiotherapy cannot be established (mantle-zone lymphoma, marginal zone B-cell lymphoma) or must take into account the natural history (Burkitt's lymphoma, peripheral T-cell lymphoma) and the sensibility to others therapeutic methods. (authors)

  19. External beam radiotherapy for rectal adenocarcinoma

    Taylor, R.E.; Kerr, G.R.; Arnott, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    A series of 243 patients with adenocarcinoma of the rectum treated with radiotherapy is presented. Radiotherapy was combined with 5-fluorouracil, or given alone. Seventy-four patients were treated with radical external beam radiotherapy for recurrent or inoperable rectal adenocarcinoma. One hundred and forty-five patients with advanced pelvic tumours or metastases were treated with palliative pelvic radiotherapy. Twenty-four patients with small-volume residual pelvic tumour or who were felt to be at high risk of pelvic recurrence following radical resection received postoperative radiotherapy. Complete tumour regression was seen in 38% of radically treated patients, and 24% of palliatively treated patients. Partial regression was observed in 56% of radically treated patients, and 58% of palliatively treated patients. Long-term local tumour control was more commonly observed for small tumours (< 5 cm diameter). Fifty-eight % of patients treated with postoperative radiotherapy remained free of local recurrence. Survival was significantly better with small tumours. The addition of 5FU did not appear to improve survival or tumour control. (author)

  20. The use of Osseointegration and Orbital Implants in the Management of Orbital Exenteration or Severe Contracted Sockets

    Emine Esra Karaca

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the results of bony integrated implants used in the management of exenterated or contracted sockets. Materials and Methods: Ten eyes of 10 cases underwent bony integrated implants for the management of exenterated (7 eyes or contracted (3 eyes sockets. The procedure was performed in two steps in a two-month period. The first step included placement of screws by preparing the osteotomy site, whereas the second step included implantation of magnetic implants over these screws that will adhere to the orbital implant. The patients were retrospectively evaluated for age, gender, etiology, surgical timing, history of radiotherapy, and time of application of epithesis. The presence of infection at the surgical site, implant loss, functional or cosmetic problems at the perisurgical area, the usage of epithesis during the social life were evaluated. Results: There were 7 female and 3 male patients. The mean age was 34 (5-75 years. The indications for enucleation or exenteration were: retinoblastoma (4 cases, malignant melanoma (2 cases, basal cell carcinoma (1 case, squamous cell carcinoma (1 case, rhabdomyosarcoma (1 case and sinoorbital mucormycosis (1 case. The epitheses were applied 3 to 156 months (mean 51 months following the intervention. All of the implantations were performed successfully. During follow-up, one case had lost the implant and one case had local infection that responded to antibiotic treatment. Three cases were reoperated and the implants were replaced after a 2-year follow-up time due to the deterioration of the magnetic effect of the implants. Conclusion: Bony integrated orbital implants have an important role in solution of esthetic problems encountered in the exenterated orbit and severe contracted socket. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 127-31

  1. Preoperative radiotherapy for bone and soft tissue sarcoma

    Matsumoto, Seiichi; Kawaguchi, Noriyoshi; Amino, Katsuhisa; Manabe, Jun; Yamashita, Takashi; Kaneta, Kouichi; Furuya, Kohtaro; Isobe, Yasushi.

    1989-01-01

    The role of preoperative radiotherapy was evaluated in 16 cases with soft tissue sarcoma and 13 cases with osteosarcoma. Nine osteosarcoma cases underwent radiotherapy of whole lesion, and 4 cases had radiotherapy only of the surgically uncurable portion. There were no local recurrences in M0 cases, but skin necrosis occurred in the whole radiation group. As for the soft tissue sarcomas, local recurrence was not seen in virgin cases, but two cases which had received previous treatment showed local recurrence. There were no cases with severe side effects. Partial radiotherapy was effective as preoperative treatment for osteosarcoma. Preoperative radiotherapy is better than postoperative radiotherapy from many standpoints. (author)

  2. Radiotherapy for pain management of bone metastases

    Rezende Junior, Ismar de; Mattos, Marcos Duarte de; Nakamura, Ricardo; Lemes Junior, Joaquim; Vanzelli, Talita Lozano, E-mail: rezende.med@terra.com.br [Radioterapia do Hospital de Cancer de Barretos, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: This is the first Brazilian study intended to evaluate the response of pain relief with radiotherapy in three different fractionation and the clinical differences in managing pain in patients with painful bone metastases. Methods: Prospective study of patients with painful bone metastases referred to the Radiotherapy Sector of the Hospital de Cancer de Barretos for pain-relieving radiotherapy between March and December 2010. It is known that radiotherapy seems to alter the activation of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption, relieving pain in cases of painful bone metastases. Patients were assessed in relation to the status of pain intensity before and after the initiation of radiotherapy. Either a single fraction of 8Gy, five fractions of 4Gy or ten fractions of 3Gy were given. A visual analog scale (VAS) was applied by doctors, nurses and nursing technicians to assess pain intensity at each session of radiotherapy, and follow-up at 8, 30 and 90 days from the end of treatment. Results: We evaluated 92 consecutive patients, 48 male and 44 female, with a median age of 58 years. We found that 14% of patients referred from the Palliative Care or Clinical Oncology sectors need better pharmacological analgesia due to severe pain, compared with 40.5% of patients from the other sectors (p = 0.004). We also found that the onset of pain relief to patients receiving 10 fractions of 300cGy analgesia without changing the pre-radiotherapy analgesia occurred with significance after the fifth fraction. Improvement in pain experienced within 90 days of follow-up was found in eighty percent of patients, independent of fractionated radiotherapy, site of metastases and the clinical condition of the patient. Discussion/Conclusion: The Palliative Care and Clinical Oncology sectors expressed greater concern in regards to analgesia for the patient with painful bone metastases. Radiotherapy is an effective pain-relieving treatment in different fractionation studied, even though the

  3. Radiotherapy for pain management of bone metastases

    Rezende Junior, Ismar de; Mattos, Marcos Duarte de; Nakamura, Ricardo; Lemes Junior, Joaquim; Vanzelli, Talita Lozano

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This is the first Brazilian study intended to evaluate the response of pain relief with radiotherapy in three different fractionation and the clinical differences in managing pain in patients with painful bone metastases. Methods: Prospective study of patients with painful bone metastases referred to the Radiotherapy Sector of the Hospital de Cancer de Barretos for pain-relieving radiotherapy between March and December 2010. It is known that radiotherapy seems to alter the activation of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption, relieving pain in cases of painful bone metastases. Patients were assessed in relation to the status of pain intensity before and after the initiation of radiotherapy. Either a single fraction of 8Gy, five fractions of 4Gy or ten fractions of 3Gy were given. A visual analog scale (VAS) was applied by doctors, nurses and nursing technicians to assess pain intensity at each session of radiotherapy, and follow-up at 8, 30 and 90 days from the end of treatment. Results: We evaluated 92 consecutive patients, 48 male and 44 female, with a median age of 58 years. We found that 14% of patients referred from the Palliative Care or Clinical Oncology sectors need better pharmacological analgesia due to severe pain, compared with 40.5% of patients from the other sectors (p = 0.004). We also found that the onset of pain relief to patients receiving 10 fractions of 300cGy analgesia without changing the pre-radiotherapy analgesia occurred with significance after the fifth fraction. Improvement in pain experienced within 90 days of follow-up was found in eighty percent of patients, independent of fractionated radiotherapy, site of metastases and the clinical condition of the patient. Discussion/Conclusion: The Palliative Care and Clinical Oncology sectors expressed greater concern in regards to analgesia for the patient with painful bone metastases. Radiotherapy is an effective pain-relieving treatment in different fractionation studied, even though the

  4. Pursuit/evasion in orbit

    Kelley, H. J.; Cliff, E. M.; Lutze, F. H.

    1981-01-01

    Maneuvers available to a spacecraft having sufficient propellant to escape an antisatellite satellite (ASAT) attack are examined. The ASAT and the evading spacecraft are regarded as being in circular orbits, and equations of motion are developed for the ASAT to commence a two-impulse maneuver sequence. The ASAT employs thrust impulses which yield a minimum-time-to-rendezvous, considering available fuel. Optimal evasion is shown to involve only in-plane maneuvers, and begins as soon as the ASAT launch information is gathered and thrust activation can be initiated. A closest approach, along with a maximum evasion by the target spacecraft, is calculated to be 14,400 ft. Further research to account for ASATs in parking orbit and for generalization of a continuous control-modeled differential game is indicated.

  5. Neutron stars with orbiting light

    Lukacs, B.

    1987-11-01

    There is a wide-spread belief in the literature of relativistic astrophysics concerning nonsingular final states of the stellar evolution: the external gravitational field of a physically nonsingular central symmetric body (e.g. a neutron star) is asymptotically empty and simple, i.e. there are no closed or trapped light-like causal geodesics. Present paper shows that this belief is false: some examples are presented for nonsingular bodies with various equations of state, around which there are closed light-like trajectories: 'orbiting light'. The reality of the used equations of state is discussed in detail. Present state of particle physics does not establish the existence of matter with such equations of state, but the hypothetical subquark level of matter may have such equation of state, thus 'subquark-stars' may exist with orbiting light around them. So the criterion of 'nonsingularity' must be further analyzed and accurately defined. (D.Gy.) 24 refs.; 5 figs

  6. Orbit monitoring in the SLC

    Sanchez-Chopitea, L.; Emma, P.; Van Olst, D.

    1991-05-01

    Beam orbits in the SLC are monitored in real time and the data is stored for future trend and correlation analysis. A background process acquires Beam Position Monitor (BPM) and Toroid data on a periodic basis and saves the general quantities such as orbit RMS and beam intensity in addition to the individual readings. Some of this data is archived by the SLC History Buffer facility and the rest is saved in files for later analysis. This has permitted the tracing of interaction point instabilities to specific devices as far away as the damping rings. In addition, the data is displayed for the operators both in summary and in full form. The different displays can be configured from the control consoles. 2 refs., 5 figs

  7. [Orbital decompression in Grave's ophtalmopathy].

    Longueville, E

    2010-01-01

    Graves disease orbitopathy is a complex progressive inflammatory disease. Medical treatment remains in all cases the proposed treatment of choice. Surgical treatment by bone decompression can be considered as an emergency mainly in cases of optic neuropathy or ocular hypertension not being controlled medically or in post-traumatic exophthalmos stage. Emergency bone decompression eliminates compression or stretching of the optic nerve allowing visual recovery. The uncontrolled ocular hypertension will benefit from decompression. The normalization of intraocular pressure may be obtained by this surgery or if needed by the use of postoperative antiglaucoma drops or even filtration surgery. In all operated cases, the IOP was normalized with an average decrease of 7.71 mmHg and a cessation of eye drops in 3/7 cases. Regarding sequelae, our therapeutic strategy involves consecutively surgery of the orbit, extraocular muscles and eyelids. The orbital expansion gives excellent results on the cosmetic level and facilitates the implementation of subsequent actions.

  8. Robustness analysis method for orbit control

    Zhang, Jingrui; Yang, Keying; Qi, Rui; Zhao, Shuge; Li, Yanyan

    2017-08-01

    Satellite orbits require periodical maintenance due to the presence of perturbations. However, random errors caused by inaccurate orbit determination and thrust implementation may lead to failure of the orbit control strategy. Therefore, it is necessary to analyze the robustness of the orbit control methods. Feasible strategies which are tolerant to errors of a certain magnitude can be developed to perform reliable orbit control for the satellite. In this paper, first, the orbital dynamic model is formulated by Gauss' form of the planetary equation using the mean orbit elements; the atmospheric drag and the Earth's non-spherical perturbations are taken into consideration in this model. Second, an impulsive control strategy employing the differential correction algorithm is developed to maintain the satellite trajectory parameters in given ranges. Finally, the robustness of the impulsive control method is analyzed through Monte Carlo simulations while taking orbit determination error and thrust error into account.

  9. Management of ocular, orbital, and adnexal trauma

    Spoor, T.C.; Nesi, F.A.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 20 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Ruptured Globe: Primary Care; Corneal Trauma, Endophthalmitis; Antibiotic Usage; Radiology of Orbital Trauma; Maxillofacial Fractures; Orbital Infections; and Basic Management of Soft Tissue Injury

  10. [Simultaneous repairing defects of orbital floor and palate with the modified temporalis muscle flap after the maxillectomy].

    Zhong, Q; Huang, Z G; Fang, J G; Chen, X J; Chen, X H; Hou, L Z; Li, P D; Ma, H Z; He, S Z

    2016-09-07

    Objective: To evaluate the outcome of one-stage reconstruction of maxillary and orbital defects with modified temporalis muscle flap (TMF) following the removal of malignant neoplasms. Methods: In this retrospective study, 15 patients underwent the reconstruction of defects of orbital floor and palate after maxillectomy for malignant tumor were included from June 2008 to June 2014. The modified temporalis muscle flap was used to repair the defects after surgery, and functional outcomes were analyzed. Results: All the patients were followed up for 12-81 months. Three cases of them received preoperative radiotherapy and 12 cases underwent postoperative radiotherapy. All flaps were survived. Epithelization of the tissues in oral and nasal cavity was completed in 4-6 weeks. Good functional reconstruction on swallowing and speaking functional results were achieved with maxillary and orbital reconstruction and no secondary deformity of external nose was observed. The eye positions in all cases were normal. Diplopia, diminution and loss of vision were not found. Conclusion: The modified TMF can be used for simultaneous reconstruction for the defects of orbital floor and palate after maxillectomy in patients whom free tissue flap can not be applied to, showing better cosmetic and functional results.

  11. Dynamique des orbites fortement elliptiques

    Lion , Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    Most of the orbits of artificial satellites around the Earth have relatively low eccentricities. The calculation of their trajectories is very well under control, either by means of numerical methods when it comes to focus on accuracy and comparing observations, or either through analytical or semi-analytical theories to optimize the speed of calculations. This second category is used, in particular, for computing many long-term trajectories that could help to ensure the security and safety o...

  12. Superbanana orbits in stellarator geometries

    Derr, J.A.; Shohet, J.L.

    1979-04-01

    The presence of superbanana orbit types localized to either the interior or the exterior of stellarators and torsatrons is numerically investigated for 3.5 MeV alpha particles. The absence of the interior superbanana in both geometries is found to be due to non-conservation of the action. Exterior superbananas are found in the stellarator only, as a consequence of the existence of closed helical magnetic wells. No superbananas of either type are found in the torsatron

  13. Orbital Volumetry in Graves' Orbitopathy

    Al-Bakri, Moug; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh; Thomsen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    were retrospectively analyzed. Thirteen patients imaged for unilateral orbital fractures served as controls. Results. The retrobulbar muscle volume was 2.1 ± 0.5 cm(3) (mean ± SD) in controls, 4.3 ± 1.5 cm(3) in GO without DON, and 4.7 ± 1.7 cm(3) in GO with DON. The retrobulbar fat volume was 5.4 ± 1...

  14. Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    Eleanor E. R. Harris

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT for early stage breast cancer is a technique for partial breast irradiation. There are several technologies in clinical use to perform breast IORT. Regardless of technique, IORT generally refers to the delivery of a single dose of radiation to the periphery of the tumor bed in the immediate intraoperative time frame, although some protocols have performed IORT as a second procedure. There are two large prospective randomized trials establishing the safety and efficacy of breast IORT in early stage breast cancer patients with sufficient follow-up time on thousands of women. The advantages of IORT for partial breast irradiation include: direct visualization of the target tissue ensuring treatment of the high-risk tissue and eliminating the risk of marginal miss; the use of a single dose coordinated with the necessary surgical excision thereby reducing omission of radiation and the selection of mastectomy for women without access to a radiotherapy facility or unable to undergo several weeks of daily radiation; favorable toxicity profiles; patient convenience and cost savings; radiobiological and tumor microenvironment conditions which lead to enhanced tumor control. The main disadvantage of IORT is the lack of final pathologic information on the tumor size, histology, margins, and nodal status. When unexpected findings on final pathology such as positive margins or positive sentinel nodes predict a higher risk of local or regional recurrence, additional whole breast radiation may be indicated, thereby reducing some of the convenience and low-toxicity advantages of sole IORT. However, IORT as a tumor bed boost has also been studied and appears to be safe with acceptable toxicity. IORT has potential efficacy advantages related to overall survival related to reduced cardiopulmonary radiation doses. It may also be very useful in specific situations, such as prior to oncoplastic reconstruction to improve accuracy of

  15. Adapting radiotherapy to hypoxic tumours

    Malinen, Eirik; Søvik, Åste; Hristov, Dimitre; Bruland, Øyvind S.; Rune Olsen, Dag

    2006-10-01

    In the current work, the concepts of biologically adapted radiotherapy of hypoxic tumours in a framework encompassing functional tumour imaging, tumour control predictions, inverse treatment planning and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were presented. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCEMRI) of a spontaneous sarcoma in the nasal region of a dog was employed. The tracer concentration in the tumour was assumed related to the oxygen tension and compared to Eppendorf histograph measurements. Based on the pO2-related images derived from the MR analysis, the tumour was divided into four compartments by a segmentation procedure. DICOM structure sets for IMRT planning could be derived thereof. In order to display the possible advantages of non-uniform tumour doses, dose redistribution among the four tumour compartments was introduced. The dose redistribution was constrained by keeping the average dose to the tumour equal to a conventional target dose. The compartmental doses yielding optimum tumour control probability (TCP) were used as input in an inverse planning system, where the planning basis was the pO2-related tumour images from the MR analysis. Uniform (conventional) and non-uniform IMRT plans were scored both physically and biologically. The consequences of random and systematic errors in the compartmental images were evaluated. The normalized frequency distributions of the tracer concentration and the pO2 Eppendorf measurements were not significantly different. 28% of the tumour had, according to the MR analysis, pO2 values of less than 5 mm Hg. The optimum TCP following a non-uniform dose prescription was about four times higher than that following a uniform dose prescription. The non-uniform IMRT dose distribution resulting from the inverse planning gave a three times higher TCP than that of the uniform distribution. The TCP and the dose-based plan quality depended on IMRT parameters defined in the inverse planning procedure (fields

  16. Adapting radiotherapy to hypoxic tumours

    Malinen, Eirik; Soevik, Aste; Hristov, Dimitre; Bruland, Oeyvind S; Olsen, Dag Rune

    2006-01-01

    In the current work, the concepts of biologically adapted radiotherapy of hypoxic tumours in a framework encompassing functional tumour imaging, tumour control predictions, inverse treatment planning and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were presented. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCEMRI) of a spontaneous sarcoma in the nasal region of a dog was employed. The tracer concentration in the tumour was assumed related to the oxygen tension and compared to Eppendorf histograph measurements. Based on the pO 2 -related images derived from the MR analysis, the tumour was divided into four compartments by a segmentation procedure. DICOM structure sets for IMRT planning could be derived thereof. In order to display the possible advantages of non-uniform tumour doses, dose redistribution among the four tumour compartments was introduced. The dose redistribution was constrained by keeping the average dose to the tumour equal to a conventional target dose. The compartmental doses yielding optimum tumour control probability (TCP) were used as input in an inverse planning system, where the planning basis was the pO 2 -related tumour images from the MR analysis. Uniform (conventional) and non-uniform IMRT plans were scored both physically and biologically. The consequences of random and systematic errors in the compartmental images were evaluated. The normalized frequency distributions of the tracer concentration and the pO 2 Eppendorf measurements were not significantly different. 28% of the tumour had, according to the MR analysis, pO 2 values of less than 5 mm Hg. The optimum TCP following a non-uniform dose prescription was about four times higher than that following a uniform dose prescription. The non-uniform IMRT dose distribution resulting from the inverse planning gave a three times higher TCP than that of the uniform distribution. The TCP and the dose-based plan quality depended on IMRT parameters defined in the inverse planning procedure

  17. A new kinematical definition of orbital eccentricity

    Ninković S.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A new concept of orbital eccentricity is given. The dimensionless quantities proposed in the present paper to serve as orbital eccentricities have a kinematical nature. The purpose is to use them in describing the motion for the case of three-dimensional orbits. A comparison done for nearly planar orbits shows that the values of the eccentricities proposed here do not differ significantly from those corresponding to the eccentricities of geometric nature usually applied.

  18. An Ontological Architecture for Orbital Debris Data

    Rovetto, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    The orbital debris problem presents an opportunity for inter-agency and international cooperation toward the mutually beneficial goals of debris prevention, mitigation, remediation, and improved space situational awareness (SSA). Achieving these goals requires sharing orbital debris and other SSA data. Toward this, I present an ontological architecture for the orbital debris domain, taking steps in the creation of an orbital debris ontology (ODO). The purpose of this ontological system is to ...

  19. Algorithms for orbit control on SPEAR

    Corbett, J.; Keeley, D.; Hettel, R.; Linscott, I.; Sebek, J.

    1994-06-01

    A global orbit feedback system has been installed on SPEAR to help stabilize the position of the photon beams. The orbit control algorithms depend on either harmonic reconstruction of the orbit or eigenvector decomposition. The orbit motion is corrected by dipole corrector kicks determined from the inverse corrector-to-bpm response matrix. This paper outlines features of these control algorithms as applied to SPEAR

  20. Primary antral carcinoma managed by en-bloc radical maxillectomy with orbital exenteration

    Sajal Kumar Sarkar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The prognosis of maxillary sinus carcinomas is not very promising. Maxillary sinus carcinomas are usually diagnosed at advanced stages and the proximity of important organs such as the eyes and cranial nerves makes complete surgical resection difficult. We here present a case that presented late with squamous cell carcinoma and was treated by radiotherapy (RT followed by radical maxillectomy with en-bloc orbital exenteration. Patients who undergo RT followed by en-bloc radical maxillectomy with orbital exenteration as salvage, in these cases may have promising results. We had raised forehead fascio cutaneous flap and translocated it deep to the upper eyelid to bridge the cutaneous defect. Forehead defect was covered with split-thickness skin taken from left thigh. No microvascular surgery was done, but cosmetic results were comparable. In rural setups of developing countries where facilities for microvascular surgery are lacking flap translocation may have a positive outcome.

  1. Radiotherapy for breast cancer and pacemaker; Radiotherapie pour un cancer du sein et stimulateur cardiaque

    Menard, J.; Campana, F.; Bollet, M.A.; Dendale, R.; Fournier-Bidoz, N.; Marchand, V.; Mazal, A.; Fourquet, A.; Kirova, Y.M. [Oncologie-radiotherapie, institut Curie, 26, rue d' Ulm, 75005 Paris (France); Kirov, K.M.; Esteve, M. [Departement d' anesthesie-reanimation-douleur, institut Curie, 75005 Paris (France)

    2011-06-15

    Purpose. - Patients with permanent cardiac pacemakers occasionally require radiotherapy. Therapeutic Irradiation may cause pacemakers to malfunction due to the effects of ionizing radiation or electromagnetic interference. We studied the breast cancer patients who needed breast and/or chest wall and lymph node irradiation to assess the feasibility and tolerance in this population of patients. Patients and methods. - From November 2008 to December 2009, more than 900 patients received radiotherapy for their breast cancer in our department using megavoltage linear accelerator (X 4-6 MV and electrons). Among them, seven patients were with permanent pacemaker. All patients have been treated to the breast and chest wall and/or lymph nodes. Total dose to breast and/or chest wall was 50 Gy/25 fractions and 46 Gy/23 fractions to lymph nodes. Patients who underwent conserving surgery followed by breast irradiation were boosted when indicated to tumour bed with 16 Gy/8 fractions. All patients were monitored everyday in presence of radiation oncologist to follow the function of their pacemaker. All pacemakers were controlled before and after radiotherapy by the patients' cardiologist. Results. - Seven patients were referred in our department for postoperative breast cancer radiotherapy. Among them, only one patient was declined for radiotherapy and underwent mastectomy without radiotherapy. In four cases the pacemaker was repositioned before the beginning of radiotherapy. Six patients, aged between 48 and 84 years underwent irradiation for their breast cancer. Four patients were treated with conserving surgery followed by breast radiotherapy and two with mastectomy followed by chest wall and internal mammary chain, supra- and infra-clavicular lymph node irradiation. The dose to the pacemaker generator was kept below 2 Gy. There was no pacemaker dysfunction observed during the radiotherapy. Conclusion. - The multidisciplinary work with position change of the pacemaker

  2. Status of Radiotherapy around the World: Radiotherapy in China. Chapter 25.6

    Zhu, Ci; Yin, Wei Bo; Chen, Bo; Zhang, Chun Li; Zhang, Hong Zhi; Li, Ye Xiong

    2017-01-01

    China’s experience of using radiotherapy to treat cancer began with the installation of the first superficial X ray machine at Peking Union Medical College Hospital in early 1920, followed by the first 200 kV deep X ray machine installed at the French Hospital in Shanghai in 1923, and the first Chinese radiotherapy department established at the Affiliated Hospital of Peking University in 1932. However, the field of radiotherapy in China was still in its infancy between the 1930s and 1960s, as all operating machines were imported from foreign countries, making radiotherapy very difficult to access for cancer patients. Progress was slow until the mid-1970s, when the first batch of megavoltage machines (cobalt-60 machines and linacs) was produced by Chinese manufacturers. Owing to the efforts of radiotherapy pioneers such as Wu Huanxing, Gu Xianzhi, Liu Taifu, and Yin Weibo, who brought radiotherapy to China and shaped how Chinese patients would be treated today, radiotherapy was installed as one of the mainstream modalities of cancer treatment. In 1986, the China Society for Radiation Oncology (CSTRO) was founded, indicating that a network advancing radiation oncology practice in China was taking shape. One year later, the first issue of the Chinese Journal of Radiation Oncology was published, offering a platform for the timely exchange and sharing of laboratory and clinical research outcomes among radiation oncology professions across the country. During the past two decades, with the introduction of the gamma knife and stereotactic radiotherapy, 3-D conformal radiotherapy, IMRT, IGRT and other advanced techniques, China experienced not only a big jump in its radiotherapy equipment and facilities, but also a dramatic growth in the excellence of radiation oncology specialist staff nationwide

  3. Radiotherapy Treatment Planning for Testicular Seminoma

    Wilder, Richard B.; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Beard, Clair J.

    2012-01-01

    Virtually all patients with Stage I testicular seminoma are cured regardless of postorchiectomy management. For patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy, late toxicity is a major concern. However, toxicity may be limited by radiotherapy techniques that minimize radiation exposure of healthy normal tissues. This article is an evidence-based review that provides radiotherapy treatment planning recommendations for testicular seminoma. The minority of Stage I patients who choose adjuvant treatment over surveillance may be considered for (1) para-aortic irradiation to 20 Gy in 10 fractions, or (2) carboplatin chemotherapy consisting of area under the curve, AUC = 7 × 1−2 cycles. Two-dimensional radiotherapy based on bony anatomy is a simple and effective treatment for Stage IIA or IIB testicular seminoma. Centers with expertise in vascular and nodal anatomy may consider use of anteroposterior–posteroanterior fields based on three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy instead. For modified dog-leg fields delivering 20 Gy in 10 fractions, clinical studies support placement of the inferior border at the top of the acetabulum. Clinical and nodal mapping studies support placement of the superior border of all radiotherapy fields at the top of the T12 vertebral body. For Stage IIA and IIB patients, an anteroposterior–posteroanterior boost is then delivered to the adenopathy with a 2-cm margin to the block edge. The boost dose consists of 10 Gy in 5 fractions for Stage IIA and 16 Gy in 8 fractions for Stage IIB. Alternatively, bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin chemotherapy for 3 cycles or etoposide and cisplatin chemotherapy for 4 cycles may be delivered to Stage IIA or IIB patients (e.g., if they have a horseshoe kidney, inflammatory bowel disease, or a history of radiotherapy).

  4. Radiotherapy Treatment Planning for Testicular Seminoma

    Wilder, Richard B., E-mail: richardbwilder@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Buyyounouski, Mark K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Efstathiou, Jason A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Beard, Clair J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Virtually all patients with Stage I testicular seminoma are cured regardless of postorchiectomy management. For patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy, late toxicity is a major concern. However, toxicity may be limited by radiotherapy techniques that minimize radiation exposure of healthy normal tissues. This article is an evidence-based review that provides radiotherapy treatment planning recommendations for testicular seminoma. The minority of Stage I patients who choose adjuvant treatment over surveillance may be considered for (1) para-aortic irradiation to 20 Gy in 10 fractions, or (2) carboplatin chemotherapy consisting of area under the curve, AUC = 7 Multiplication-Sign 1-2 cycles. Two-dimensional radiotherapy based on bony anatomy is a simple and effective treatment for Stage IIA or IIB testicular seminoma. Centers with expertise in vascular and nodal anatomy may consider use of anteroposterior-posteroanterior fields based on three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy instead. For modified dog-leg fields delivering 20 Gy in 10 fractions, clinical studies support placement of the inferior border at the top of the acetabulum. Clinical and nodal mapping studies support placement of the superior border of all radiotherapy fields at the top of the T12 vertebral body. For Stage IIA and IIB patients, an anteroposterior-posteroanterior boost is then delivered to the adenopathy with a 2-cm margin to the block edge. The boost dose consists of 10 Gy in 5 fractions for Stage IIA and 16 Gy in 8 fractions for Stage IIB. Alternatively, bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin chemotherapy for 3 cycles or etoposide and cisplatin chemotherapy for 4 cycles may be delivered to Stage IIA or IIB patients (e.g., if they have a horseshoe kidney, inflammatory bowel disease, or a history of radiotherapy).

  5. Traumatic orbital encephalocele: Presentation and imaging.

    Wei, Leslie A; Kennedy, Tabassum A; Paul, Sean; Wells, Timothy S; Griepentrog, Greg J; Lucarelli, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic orbital encephalocele is a rare but severe complication of orbital roof fractures. We describe 3 cases of orbital encephalocele due to trauma in children. Retrospective case series from the University of Wisconsin - Madison and Medical College of Wisconsin. Three cases of traumatic orbital encephalocele in pediatric patients were found. The mechanism of injury was motor vehicle accident in 2 patients and accidental self-inflicted gunshot wound in 1 patient. All 3 patients sustained orbital roof fractures (4 mm to 19 mm in width) and frontal lobe contusions with high intracranial pressure. A key finding in all 3 cases was progression of proptosis and globe displacement 4 to 11 days after initial injury. On initial CT, all were diagnosed with extraconal hemorrhage adjacent to the roof fractures, with subsequent enlargement of the mass and eventual diagnosis of encephalocele. Orbital encephalocele is a severe and sight-threatening complication of orbital roof fractures. Post-traumatic orbital encephalocele can be challenging to diagnose on CT as patients with this condition often have associated orbital and intracranial hematoma, which can be difficult to distinguish from herniated brain tissue. When there is a high index of suspicion for encephalocele, an MRI of the orbits and brain with contrast should be obtained for additional characterization. Imaging signs that should raise suspicion for traumatic orbital encephalocele include an enlarging heterogeneous orbital mass in conjunction with a roof fracture and/or widening fracture segments.

  6. [1012.5676] The Exoplanet Orbit Database

    : The Exoplanet Orbit Database Authors: Jason T Wright, Onsi Fakhouri, Geoffrey W. Marcy, Eunkyu Han present a database of well determined orbital parameters of exoplanets. This database comprises parameters, and the method used for the planets discovery. This Exoplanet Orbit Database includes all planets

  7. The orbital record in stratigraphy

    Fischer, Alfred G.

    1992-01-01

    Orbital signals are being discovered in pre-Pleistocene sediments. Due to their hierarchical nature these cycle patterns are complex, and the imprecision of geochronology generally makes the assignment of stratigraphic cycles to specific orbital cycles uncertain, but in sequences such as the limnic Newark Group under study by Olsen and pelagic Cretaceous sequence worked on by our Italo-American group the relative frequencies yield a definitive match to the Milankovitch hierarchy. Due to the multiple ways in which climate impinges on depositional systems, the orbital signals are recorded in a multiplicity of parameters, and affect different sedimentary facies in different ways. In platform carbonates, for example, the chief effect is via sea-level variations (possibly tied to fluctuating ice volume), resulting in cycles of emergence and submergence. In limnic systems it finds its most dramatic expression in alternations of lake and playa conditions. Biogenic pelagic oozes such as chalks and the limestones derived from them display variations in the carbonate supplied by planktonic organisms such as coccolithophores and foraminifera, and also record variations in the aeration of bottom waters. Whereas early studies of stratigraphic cyclicity relied mainly on bedding variations visible in the field, present studies are supplementing these with instrumental scans of geochemical, paleontological, and geophysical parameters which yield quantitative curves amenable to time-series analysis; such analysis is, however, limited by problems of distorted time-scales. My own work has been largely concentrated on pelagic systems. In these, the sensitivity of pelagic organisms to climatic-oceanic changes, combined with the sensitivity of botton life to changes in oxygen availability (commonly much more restricted in the Past than now) has left cyclic patterns related to orbital forcing. These systems are further attractive because (1) they tend to offer depositional continuity

  8. Prospective Ukrainian lunar orbiter mission

    Shkuratov, Y.; Litvinenko, L.; Shulga, V.; Yatskiv, Y.; Kislyuk, V.

    Ukraine has launch vehicles that are able to deliver about 300 kg to the lunar orbit. Future Ukrainian lunar program may propose a polar orbiter. This orbiter should fill principal information gaps in our knowledge about the Moon after Clementine and Lunar Prospector missions and the future missions, like Smart-1, Lunar-A, and Selene. We consider that this can be provided by radar studies of the Moon with supporting optical polarimetric observations from lunar polar orbit. These experiments allow one to better understand global structure of the lunar surface in a wide range of scales, from microns to kilometers. We propose three instruments for the prospective lunar orbiter. They are: a synthetic aperture imaging radar (SAR), ground-penetrating radar (GPR), and imaging polarimeter (IP). The main purpose of SAR is to study with high resolution (50 m) the permanently shadowed sites in the lunar polar regions. These sites are cold traps for volatiles, and have a potential of resource utilization. Possible presence of water ice in the regolith in the sites makes them interesting for permanent manned bases on the Moon. Radar imaging and mapping of other interesting regions could be also planned. Multi-frequencies multi-polarization soun d ing of the lunar surface with GPR can provide information about internal structure of the lunar surface from meters to several hundred meters deep. GPR can be used for measuring the megaregolith layer properties, detection of cryptomaria, and studies of internal structure of the largest craters. IP will be a CCD camera with an additional suite of polarizers. Modest spatial resolution (100 m) should provide a total coverage or a large portion of the lunar surface in oblique viewing basically at large phase angles. Polarization degree at large (>90°) phase angles bears information about characteristic size of the regolith particles. Additional radiophysical experiments are considered with the use of the SAR system, e.g., bistatic radar

  9. Multileaf collimator for radiotherapy machines

    Nunan, C.S.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes an apparatus for radiotherapy treatment of a patient. It comprises: an electron linear accelerator means for generating x-rays at an x-ray source target; a set of four moveable jaws mounted on a jaw frame between the x-ray source target and the patient. The set of jaws defining a rectangular x-ray field; mounting means for mounting a leaf means on the jaw frame; the mounting means including a main leaf support frame; a pair of subframes, each of which is linearly movable mounted from the frame. The subframes being coplanar; a multiplicity of leaves of material substantially opaque to x-rays. The leaves provided with means to make them linearly movable relative to each subframe, each leaf being capable of extension beyond a field mid-line, the length of each leaf being shorter than half of a maximum field length capability of the jaws measured in the direction and plane of the leaves; leaf drive means; and computer control means for controlling the subframe drive means and the leaf drive means to provide a dynamically changing radiation field shape during the course of radiation treatment of the patient

  10. Systemic radiotherapy with monoclonal antibodies

    Sautter-Bihl, M.L.; Matzku, S.; Bihl, H.

    1993-01-01

    In this experimental study, feasibility and efficiency of systematic radiotherapy with the I-131 labelled monoclonal antibody BW575/9 (radioimmunotherapy) are investigated using human SK-N-SH neuroblastoma transplated into nude mice. Series of six nude mice were treated with intravenous application of 400 μCi (group 1), 700 μCi (group 2) of the I-131 labelled and of the unlabelled MAb (group 3). An untreated group (group 4) served as control. Tumors of group (3) and (4) showed an identical growth. In group (1), tumor growth was arrested for seven days. In group (2), the tumor showed complete regression after eight days which lasted for 55 days. Thereafter, the tumor started to regrow. This growth characteristics are correlated with the doses achieved in the tumor using a medical radiation dose (MIRD) formulation. The biodistribution data necessary for MIRD calculation were obtained by previously performed experiments with the I-125 labelled MAb. The doses assessed in the tumor turned out to be five to ten times greater than those in normal tissues (liver, bone, etc.) These results confirm feasibility, selectivity and efficiency of radioimmunotherapy in the above described model. Moreover, this in vivo model seems suitable for further investigations concerning fundamental issues of radioimunotherapy. (orig.) [de

  11. Symptomatic splenomegaly and palliative radiotherapy

    Yaneva, M.; Vlaikova, M.

    2005-01-01

    We analysed the effect of irradiation of an enlarged spleen in some hematologic diseases: chronic myelaemia, osteomyelophybrosis and chronic lymphadenosis, where splenectomy had been contraindicated and where pain has been a leading symptom and also the discomfort because of an enlarged spleen. For 20 years in the Clinic of Radiotherapy have been treated 23 patients with the above mentioned diseases. We have irradiated all patients using X-ray and later- Co-60. To reach a palliative effect we have irradiated patients with single doses from 50 cGy to 100 cGy with an interval of 2-3 days between each fraction, but the total doses have been different- from 400 cGy to 1500 cGy. The enlarged spleen has reached the pelvis in 3 cm to 17 cm below the costal margin, and in some patients has crossed the median line of the body going in some centimetres on the other side. The reduction of splenic size and volume is as follows: full reduction in 6 patients (26.1%) and partial in 17 (73.9%). All patients resulted in decreases in pain and tension in abdomen and the total discomfort. No serious side haematologic effects were encountered. Our experience indicates that cautious splenic irradiation can be a safe and useful therapeutic alternative. The symptomatic palliation in patients, where splenectomy is not an option, is effective and is an additional alternative for an improvement of their general condition

  12. Post Pelvic Radiotherapy Bony Changes

    Huh, Seung Jae [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-03-15

    There has been recent interest in radiation-induced bone injury in clinical conditions, especially for pelvic insufficiency fracture (PIF). A PIF is caused by the effect of normal or physiological stress on bone with demineralization and decreased elastic resistance. Pelvic radiotherapy (RT) can also contribute to the development of a PIF. A PIF has been regarded as a rare complication with the use of megavoltage equipment. However, recent studies have reported the incidence of PIFs as 8.2{approx}20% after pelvic RT in gynecological patients, an incidence that was higher than previously believed. The importance of understanding a PIF lies in the potential for misdiagnosis as a bony metastasis. If patients complain of pelvic pain after whole-pelvis radiation therapy, the presence of a PIF must be considered in the differential diagnosis. The use of multibeam arrangements and conformal RT to reduce the volume and dose of irradiated pelvic bone can be helpful to minimize the risk of fracture. In addition to a PIF, osteonecrosis and avascular necrosis of the femoral head can develop after radiation therapy. Osteoradionecrosis of the pelvic bone is a clinical diagnostic challenge that must be differentiated from an osseous metastasis. A post-radiation bone sarcoma can result as a long-term sequela of pelvic irradiation for uterine cervical cancer.

  13. Parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma (including the orbit): results of orbital irradiation

    Jereb, B.; Haik, B.G.; Ong, R.; Ghavimi, F.

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-three patients with parameningeal (including orbital rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS)) were treated at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) between July 1971 and January 1983. Twenty were children with a mean age of 6 and 3 were adults. In 6 patients, the primary tumor was from the orbit, whereas the remaining 17 had other parameningeal primary sites. The tumors were in a very progressive local stage, with extensive destruction of the facial bones in 19 patients. Eight patients were treated with T2 chemotherapy protocol and 15 received T6. Seven patients received 5,000 to 7,200 rad delivered to the primary tumor in 11-16 weeks, 15 patients received between 4,500 to 5,000 rad in 4-7 weeks, and 1 patient received 3,000 rad in 3 weeks for residual microscopic disease following surgery. Two patients were treated with radiation to the whole brain; no patients received radiation of the whole central nervous axis (CNA). Fifteen of the 23 patients (65%) are alive and well with a medical follow-up time of 5 years. Two patients died of therapeutic complications and six died of tumor spread. In five patients, involvement of the central nervous system (CNS) was the cause of death. The prognosis of orbital RMS with parameningeal involvement is no better than in other tumors of parameningeal sites. In those patients who had impaired vision because of optic nerve damage prior to treatment, the vision did not improve following treatment. There was no impaired vision seen due to radiation damage of eye structures except in the lens

  14. A neurosurgery/stereotactic radiotherapy dedicated PACS for conformal radiotherapy

    Lefkopoulos, D.; Bocquiault, P.; Levrier, M.; Merienne, L.; Schlienger, M.

    1995-01-01

    To realise conformal cerebral stereotactic irradiations we use a Neurosurgery/stereotactic dedicated PACS between two distant hospitals. It connects the stereotactic neurosurgery planification imaging system NEUROAXIS (Sopelem-Sofretec/Ste Anne Hospital) with the dosimetric TPS ARTEMIS-3D/Dosigray (Tenon Hospital). NEUROAXIS is a computer aided stereotactic biopsies and stereo-electroencephalographies, used by surgeons in operating room. The system determines the precise location data for Talairach radiological equipment (X ray source at 5 meters from film) and the geometry of scanner and MRI stereotactical referentials. It provides a full set of features for lesion localization, geometrical computations, surgical planifications, picture archiving, stereotactic angiography, CT and MRI image processing and networking. It sends images through the French public digital network ISDN (NUMERIS/France Telecom : 2x64 Kbits/s) from Ste Anne to Tenon Hospital. Stereotactic angiographic and CT images are reformatted into the DOSIGRAY image processing environment where 3-D dose distributions, displays and DVHs are computed to determine the optimal treatment. ARTEMIS-3D/Dosigray is a TPS for stereotactic radiotherapy devised by the Tenon Hospital for clinical methodology and 3D dose calculations, optimization software development and the Dosigray company for multimodality imaging, (2D(3D)) computer graphics for dose and anatomical representation and data networking. Communication within the radiation oncology department is provided by local area ETHERNET network, linking heterogeneous systems (Vaxstations-3200; Decstation (5000(240))) by means of different protocols. The works in progress are to send back via the same network the 3-D dose matrix to Neurosurgery department NEUROAXIS system. Our PACS is used since six months to treat patients. It has permitted to improve the treatment quality in comparison with our first version TPS ARTEMIS-3D

  15. Similarity in Bilateral Isolated Internal Orbital Fractures.

    Chen, Hung-Chang; Cox, Jacob T; Sanyal, Abanti; Mahoney, Nicholas R

    2018-04-13

    In evaluating patients sustaining bilateral isolated internal orbital fractures, the authors have observed both similar fracture locations and also similar expansion of orbital volumes. In this study, we aim to investigate if there is a propensity for the 2 orbits to fracture in symmetrically similar patterns when sustaining similar trauma. A retrospective chart review was performed studying all cases at our institution of bilateral isolated internal orbital fractures involving the medial wall and/or the floor at the time of presentation. The similarity of the bilateral fracture locations was evaluated using the Fisher's exact test. The bilateral expanded orbital volumes were analyzed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test to assess for orbital volume similarity. Twenty-four patients with bilateral internal orbital fractures were analyzed for fracture location similarity. Seventeen patients (70.8%) had 100% concordance in the orbital subregion fractured, and the association between the right and the left orbital fracture subregion locations was statistically significant (P < 0.0001). Fifteen patients were analyzed for orbital volume similarity. The average orbital cavity volume was 31.2 ± 3.8 cm on the right and 32.0 ± 3.7 cm on the left. There was a statistically significant difference between right and left orbital cavity volumes (P = 0.0026). The data from this study suggest that an individual who suffers isolated bilateral internal orbital fractures has a statistically significant similarity in the location of their orbital fractures. However, there does not appear to be statistically significant similarity in the expansion of the orbital volumes in these patients.

  16. Value of intraoperative radiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

    Ferenschild, Floris T. J.; Vermaas, Maarten; Nuyttens, Joost J. M. E.; Graveland, Wilfried J.; Marinelli, Andreas W. K. S.; van der Sijp, Joost R.; Wiggers, Theo; Verhoef, Cornelis; Eggermont, Alexander M. M.; de Wilt, Johannes H. W.

    PURPOSE: This study was designed to analyze the results of a multimodality treatment using preoperative radiotherapy, followed by surgery and intraoperative radiotherapy in patients with primary locally advanced rectal cancer. METHODS: Between 1987 and 2002, 123 patients with initial unresectable

  17. Surgery and radiotherapy in the treatment of cutaneous melanoma

    Testori, A; Rutkowski, P; Marsden, J

    2009-01-01

    on individual circumstances. Radiotherapy is indicated as a treatment option in select patients with lentigo maligna melanoma and as an adjuvant in select patients with regional metastatic disease. Radiotherapy is also indicated for palliation, especially in bone and brain metastases....

  18. Rehabilitation in radiotherapy of osteosarcomas in children and adolescents

    Bizer, V.A.

    1985-01-01

    Rehabilitation in radiotherapy of osteosarcomas in children and adolescents is manifested in rational planning of radiotherapy and in simplest orthopedic measures carried out simultaneously with irradiation and aimed at removal of contractures in limb joints

  19. Combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy for head and neck cancer

    Inuyama, Yukio; Fujii, Masato; Tanaka, Juichi; Takaoka, Tetsuro; Hosoda, Hyonosuke; Kawaura, Mitsuhiro; Toji, Masao

    1988-01-01

    There are 4 modalities of combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy which include (1) concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy, (2) sequential use of radiotherapy and chemotherapy (pre-radiation chemotherapy), (3) pre-radiation chemotherapy followed by concurrent radiation and chemotherapy, and (4) alternating use of radiotherapy and chemotherapy based upon Looney's hypothesis. We studied concurrent use of radiotherapy and UFT by means of animal experimentation and clinical trials. The results obtained revealed that UFT was a most suitable agent together with 5-fluorouracil for concurrent application of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy including pre-radiation chemotherapy was also studied in cases of maxillary sinus carcinoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. From the results, it seemed desirable to use cisplatin and bleomycin analogs sequentially in combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy should be studied successively to improve local tumor control rates and prevent distant metastases. For future perspectives, new trials of alternating radiotherapy and chemotherapy based upon Looney's hypothesis seem necessary. (author)

  20. Correlative study on anemia and radiotherapy effects in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Chen Jinsheng; Jiang Yuanshi; Cao Xibiao; Zhan Yongzhong; Yang Liye; Chen Jianxiu; Chen Chengwu; Li Yang

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of oxygen-carrying ability of blood efficacy of radiotherapy for patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods: Altogether 161 cases of patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma were classified according to severity of anemia, and Hb, RBC, MCH, HCT, MCV, MCHC and RDW were tested before, during and after radiotherapy. The patients were followed-up for up to 5 years, the relationship and mechanism among anemia, radiotherapy effects and survival rate was discussed. Results: The survival rate between anemia group and non-anemia group was different significantly (P<0.05). Anemia before radiotherapy, anemia appearance or anemia deterioration during radiotherapy were sensitive factors affecting radiotherapy results. The anemia more severe, the radiotherapy worse. Conclusion: Anemia-hypohemoglobinemia leads to decrease of oxygen-carrying capacity of blood, resulting in oxygen deficiency of tumor cells and their radiotherapy resistance. Therefore this method is worthy of further studies

  1. Procedures for the definitive calibration of radiotherapy equipment

    1993-01-01

    Recommendations from the Institute of Physical Sciences in Medicine are given for the definition calibration of external beam radiotherapy treatment machines and radiation dose measuring equipment used in radiotherapy. (UK)

  2. Radiotherapy for bladder cancer and kidney cancer

    Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Keiichi; Iizumi, Takashi; Shimizu, Shosei; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Kimura, Tomokazu; Nishiyama, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    This paper explained the current state of radiotherapy for bladder cancer and kidney cancer, and discussed the role of radiotherapy in curative treatment and the future development. In the diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer, it is important to judge the existence of pathological muscular layer invasion based on transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TUR-BT). In surgical results in Japan, the U.S., and Switzerland, 5-year survival rate is about 60 to 70%. Standard treatment for bladder cancer with muscle layer invasion had been surgery, and radiotherapy had been applied to the cases without resistance to surgery. Three combined therapy with TUR-BT and simultaneous chemoradiotherapy is the current standard bladder conserving therapy. The 5-year survival rate is approximately 60%, which is superior to the treatment with irradiation alone. Radiotherapy for kidney cancer is most often used as perioperative treatment for locally advanced cancer or as symptomatic treatment for metastatic lesions. However, due to recent improvement in radiotherapy technology, correspondence to respiratory movement and high dose administration associated with improvement in dose concentration have been realized, and stereotactic irradiation using a high single dose for inoperable disease cases or surgery refusal disease cases has come to be clinically applied. (A.O.)

  3. Radiotherapy of primary gastric malignant lymphoma

    Monzen, Yoshio; Mutsukura, Masahide; Moriuchi, Yukiyoshi

    2017-01-01

    Fifteen patients with primary gastric malignant lymphoma who underwent radiotherapy were examined. Median age was 68 years, and male to female ratio was 1:2. All the cases were stage I including 7 cases of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), 7 cases of MALT lymphoma, and 1 case of follicular lymphoma. Therapy methods were as follows. For DLBCL, 30 Gy of radiotherapy was performed after chemotherapy. For six cases of MALT lymphomas, 30 Gy of radiotherapy was performed. For one patient diagnosed as high-grade gastric MALT lymphoma was treated in the same way as DLBCL. For one patient with follicular lymphoma, 30 Gy of radiotherapy was performed. The radiotherapy was applied with 3-dimensional fixed multi-portal irradiation, with the reduced irradiation of the liver and kidney. There was no recurrence of disease in all cases, and all patients have been alive, and no-recurrence living periods are 20 to 120 months. There was no harmful adverse event, and the tumor had disappeared with 30 Gy of radiation therapy in all cases. Considering the occurrence of secondary cancer, it was considered that a dosage of more than 30 Gy was not necessary for primary gastric malignant lymphoma. (J.P.N.)

  4. Survey on deep learning for radiotherapy.

    Meyer, Philippe; Noblet, Vincent; Mazzara, Christophe; Lallement, Alex

    2018-05-17

    More than 50% of cancer patients are treated with radiotherapy, either exclusively or in combination with other methods. The planning and delivery of radiotherapy treatment is a complex process, but can now be greatly facilitated by artificial intelligence technology. Deep learning is the fastest-growing field in artificial intelligence and has been successfully used in recent years in many domains, including medicine. In this article, we first explain the concept of deep learning, addressing it in the broader context of machine learning. The most common network architectures are presented, with a more specific focus on convolutional neural networks. We then present a review of the published works on deep learning methods that can be applied to radiotherapy, which are classified into seven categories related to the patient workflow, and can provide some insights of potential future applications. We have attempted to make this paper accessible to both radiotherapy and deep learning communities, and hope that it will inspire new collaborations between these two communities to develop dedicated radiotherapy applications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Radiotherapy in early stage dupuytren's contracture

    Adamietz, B.; Sauer, R.; Gruenert, J.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: In early stage Dupuytren's contracture radiotherapy was applied to prevent disease progression. Long-term results and late toxicity of this treatment were evaluated in a retrospective analysis. Patients and Methods: Between 1982 and 1994, 99 patients (176 hands) received orthovoltage radiotherapy, which consisted of two courses with 5 x 3 Gy (total dose: 30 Gy, daily fractionated; 120 kV, 4 mm Al), separated by a 6 to 8-week pause. The Dupuytren's contracture was staged according to the classification of Tubiana et al. The long-term outcome was analyzed at last follow-up between July and November 1999. The median follow-up was 10 years (range 7-18 years). Late toxicity was assessed using the LENT-SOMA criteria. Results: In Stage N 84% and Stage N/I 67% of cases remained stable. 65% of the cases in Stage I and 83% in Stage II showed progressive nodules and cords. In case of progression we saw no complications after a second radiotherapy or salvage operation. Conclusion: Radiotherapy effectively prevents disease progression for early stage Dupuytren's contracture (Stage N, N/I). Moreover, in case of disease progression despite radiotherapy salvage surgery is still feasible. (orig.) [de

  6. Image-guided and adaptive radiotherapy

    Louvel, G.; Chajon, E.; Henry, O.; Cazoulat, G.; Le Maitre, A.; Simon, A.; Bensadoun, R.J.; Crevoisier, R. de

    2012-01-01

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) aims to take into account anatomical variations occurring during irradiation by visualization of anatomical structures. It may consist of a rigid registration of the tumour by moving the patient, in case of prostatic irradiation for example. IGRT associated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is strongly recommended when high-dose is delivered in the prostate, where it seems to reduce rectal and bladder toxicity. In case of significant anatomical deformations, as in head and neck tumours (tumour shrinking and decrease in volume of the salivary glands), re-planning appears to be necessary, corresponding to the adaptive radiotherapy. This should ideally be 'monitored' and possibly triggered based on a calculation of cumulative dose, session after session, compared to the initial planning dose, corresponding to the concept of dose-guided adaptive radiotherapy. The creation of 'planning libraries' based on predictable organ positions (as in cervical cancer) is another way of adaptive radiotherapy. All of these strategies still appear very complex and expensive and therefore require stringent validation before being routinely applied. (authors)

  7. Chemo-radiotherapy for malignant brain tumors

    Kochi, Masato; Ushio, Yukitaka [Kumamoto Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-05-01

    Malignant gliomas: Randomized clinical trials conducted in the USA showed that radiotherapy plus chemotherapy with nitrosoureas offered a long-term survival advantage to patients younger than 60 years old with malignant gliomas. Combination chemotherapy, such as procarbazine/CCNU/vincristine (PCV) must be tested further, and intra-arterial chemotherapy with nitrosoureas offered no survival advantage. Combination chemotherapy with PCV showed efficacy for patients with anaplastic oligodendroglioma and anaplastic oligoastrocytoma. Medulloblastoma: The addition of chemotherapy to radiotherapy improved the survival of patients with poor risk medulloblastoma, and may reduce the required craniospinal radiation dose in patients with good risk medulloblastoma. Primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL): Combination of chemotherapy with high-dose MTX and radiotherapy improved survival of patients with PCNSL; however, the neurotoxicity produced by this treatment modality is a serious problem in older patients. Intracranial germ cell tumors: The addition of chemotherapy to radiotherapy may produce long term survival with good quality of life in patients with germinoma. Neoadjuvant therapy consisting of chemotherapy and radiotherapy followed by complete surgical excision improved survival of patients with intracranial nongerminomatous germ cell tumors. (author)

  8. Chemo-radiotherapy for malignant brain tumors

    Kochi, Masato; Ushio, Yukitaka

    2002-01-01

    Malignant gliomas: Randomized clinical trials conducted in the USA showed that radiotherapy plus chemotherapy with nitrosoureas offered a long-term survival advantage to patients younger than 60 years old with malignant gliomas. Combination chemotherapy, such as procarbazine/CCNU/vincristine (PCV) must be tested further, and intra-arterial chemotherapy with nitrosoureas offered no survival advantage. Combination chemotherapy with PCV showed efficacy for patients with anaplastic oligodendroglioma and anaplastic oligoastrocytoma. Medulloblastoma: The addition of chemotherapy to radiotherapy improved the survival of patients with poor risk medulloblastoma, and may reduce the required craniospinal radiation dose in patients with good risk medulloblastoma. Primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL): Combination of chemotherapy with high-dose MTX and radiotherapy improved survival of patients with PCNSL; however, the neurotoxicity produced by this treatment modality is a serious problem in older patients. Intracranial germ cell tumors: The addition of chemotherapy to radiotherapy may produce long term survival with good quality of life in patients with germinoma. Neoadjuvant therapy consisting of chemotherapy and radiotherapy followed by complete surgical excision improved survival of patients with intracranial nongerminomatous germ cell tumors. (author)

  9. Radiotherapy Results of Early Uterine Cervix Cancer

    Choi, Doo Ho; Huh, Seung Jae

    1996-01-01

    Purpose : This study was done to analyze survivals, patterns of failure, and complications of early uterine cervix cancer after curative radiotherapy. Methods and Materials : Eighty patients with uterine cervix cancer FIGO Stage IB (48 cases) and Stage IIA (32 cases) treated with radiotherapy were analyzed retrospectively. Patients were treated from November 1985 to May 1993, and minimum follow up period was 24 months. and 6 cases were lost to follow up. All of them were treated with external radiotherapy and different fractions of high dose rate intracavitary radiotherapy. Survival rates, failure patterns, complication rates and degrees of severity were analyzed according to several factors. Results : Overall 5 year survival rate and relapse free survival rate were 72.3%, and 72.8% respectively. Prognostic factors were stage, size, pathology, RT response and there was no significant survival difference among the reasons of radiotherapy choice. There were 19 cases of treatment failure, another 3 cases were not tumor related death, and most of treatment related failure occurred within 24 months. Late complication rate of bladder and rectum were 8.8%, 15% respectively, frequency and severity of complication were correlated with ICR fractionation dose and total dose. Conclusion : These results showed that survival rates of early stage radiation treated cervix cancer patients were comparable to surgical series, but more aggressive treatment methods needed for stage IIA poor prognostic patients, To decrease late complication, choice of proper ICR dose and meticulous vaginal packing is needed

  10. Orbits in weak and strong bars

    Contopoulos, George

    1980-01-01

    The authors study the plane orbits in simple bar models embedded in an axisymmetric background when the bar density is about 1% (weak), 10% (intermediate) or 100% (strong bar) of the axisymmetric density. Most orbits follow the stable periodic orbits. The basic families of periodic orbits are described. In weak bars with two Inner Lindblad Resonances there is a family of stable orbits extending from the center up to the Outer Lindblad Resonance. This family contains the long period orbits near corotation. Other stable families appear between the Inner Lindblad Resonances, outside the Outer Lindblad Resonance, around corotation (short period orbits) and around the center (retrograde). Some families become unstable or disappear in strong bars. A comparison is made with cases having one or no Inner Lindblad Resonance. (12 refs).

  11. Kalman Orbit Optimized Loop Tracking

    Young, Lawrence E.; Meehan, Thomas K.

    2011-01-01

    Under certain conditions of low signal power and/or high noise, there is insufficient signal to noise ratio (SNR) to close tracking loops with individual signals on orbiting Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receivers. In addition, the processing power available from flight computers is not great enough to implement a conventional ultra-tight coupling tracking loop. This work provides a method to track GNSS signals at very low SNR without the penalty of requiring very high processor throughput to calculate the loop parameters. The Kalman Orbit-Optimized Loop (KOOL) tracking approach constitutes a filter with a dynamic model and using the aggregate of information from all tracked GNSS signals to close the tracking loop for each signal. For applications where there is not a good dynamic model, such as very low orbits where atmospheric drag models may not be adequate to achieve the required accuracy, aiding from an IMU (inertial measurement unit) or other sensor will be added. The KOOL approach is based on research JPL has done to allow signal recovery from weak and scintillating signals observed during the use of GPS signals for limb sounding of the Earth s atmosphere. That approach uses the onboard PVT (position, velocity, time) solution to generate predictions for the range, range rate, and acceleration of the low-SNR signal. The low- SNR signal data are captured by a directed open loop. KOOL builds on the previous open loop tracking by including feedback and observable generation from the weak-signal channels so that the MSR receiver will continue to track and provide PVT, range, and Doppler data, even when all channels have low SNR.

  12. Success Stories in Radiotherapy Development Projects: Lessons Learned from Radiotherapy Development Projects. Chapter 29

    Zubizarreta, E.; Van Der Merwe, D.

    2017-01-01

    This chapter examines some problems found to be common in the process of setting up, running or expanding radiotherapy facilities. The establishment of radiotherapy services is essential to consolidate any national cancer control plan. In other words, such a plan cannot exist without radiotherapy. The IAEA guidance on setting up a radiotherapy programme covering the clinical, medical physics, radiation protection and safety aspects gives an estimate of one teletherapy machine needed per million population]. The IAEA’s Directory of Radiotherapy Centres (DIRAC) shows that the number of megavoltage (MV) machines per million population varies from 8.2 in the United States of America to 5.5 in western Europe. There are still many countries without a single radiotherapy department, especially in Africa, and many others have very low coverage, e.g. up to one external beam radiotherapy machine to cover a population of 35 million, which is close to having no coverage. There are many possible reasons for this situation. In many low income countries, the combination of lower life expectancy, low income taxes, a small budget for public health, and unmet basic needs such as housing, prevention and/or treatment of infectious diseases (malaria, tuberculosis, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), diarrhoea), drinkable water and sewerage makes the cancer control problem a lower priority. The indicators shown illustrate these points. Establishing a radiotherapy programme requires careful planning, including the requirement for successive phases. Resources should be available for designing, building, purchasing, maintaining and replacing equipment, and for providing training in its use. In the case of a first radiotherapy facility with basic staffing levels, there is not likely to be enough expertise to guide and oversee the process in many or all of these areas.

  13. Postoperative radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Morbidity of local-only or local-plus-pelvic radiotherapy

    Waldstein, Cora; Poetter, Richard; Widder, Joachim; Goldner, Gregor; Doerr, Wolfgang

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this work was to characterise actuarial incidence and prevalence of early and late side effects of local versus pelvic three-dimensional conformal postoperative radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Based on a risk-adapted protocol, 575 patients received either local (n = 447) or local-plus-pelvic (n = 128) radiotherapy. Gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) side effects (≥grade 2 RTOG/EORTC criteria) were prospectively assessed. Maximum morbidity, actuarial incidence rate, and prevalence rates were compared between the two groups. For local radiotherapy, median follow-up was 68 months, and the mean dose was 66.7 Gy. In pelvic radiotherapy, the median follow-up was 49 months, and the mean local and pelvic doses were 66.9 and 48.3 Gy respectively. Early GI side effects ≥ G2 were detected in 26% and 42% of patients respectively (p < 0.001). Late GI adverse events were detected in 14% in both groups (p = 0.77). The 5-year actuarial incidence rates were 14% and 14%, while the prevalence rates were 2% and 0% respectively. Early GU ≥ G2 side effects were detected in 15% and 16% (p = 0.96), while late GU morbidity was detected in 18% and 24% (p = 0.001). The 5-year actuarial incidence rates were 16% and 35% (p = 0.001), while the respective prevalence rates were 6% and 8%. Despite the low prevalence of side effects, postoperative pelvic radiotherapy results in significant increases in the actuarial incidence of early GI and late GU morbidity using a conventional 4-field box radiotherapy technique. Advanced treatment techniques like intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) should therefore be considered in pelvic radiotherapy to potentially reduce these side effects. (orig.) [de

  14. A retrospective analysis of different modalities for treatment of primary orbital non-Hodgkin's lymphomas

    Esik, Olga; Ikeda, H.; Mukai, K.; Kaneko, A.

    1996-01-01

    We have reviewed 37 patients with primary orbital lymphoma, using the Ann Arbor criteria and the Working Formulation and its modification. Thirty-one patients had stage I disease, four stage II, one stage III and one stage IV. The male to female ratio was 2.7:1. There were 34 low-grade tumours (including 24 mantle zone) and three intermediate-grade. Patients were divided into three groups according to their primary treatment. Group 1: radiotherapy (17 cases); Group 2: surgery alone (13 cases); Group 3: chemotherapy (seven cases). Patients were followed up from 5 months to 24.3 years, with a mean and median of 7.6 and 6.2 years, respectively. The BMDP software package was used for survival estimation (Kaplan-Meier) and determination of prognostic variable (univariate Cox regression). Local relapse-free survival at 10 years was 100% in Group 1, 0% in Group 2 and 42% in Group 3 with a statistically significant difference (p < 0.01) in favour of radiotherapy. Statistically significant good prognostic features were: complete remission (CR) in response to initial treatment, primary radiotherapy and older age. For stage I cases, there was no difference in distant relapse-free survival in the three groups. The overall cause-specific survival for stage I patients at 10 years was 100% for each group and at 20 years was 100, 67 and 0% for Group 1, 2 and 3. The difference between the primary radiotherapy and chemotherapy-treated groups was significant at the p = 0.08 level. Statistically significant prognostic factors were early stage, low-grade histology and primary radiotherapy. In one patient, ptosis and diplopia appeared after surgery. One case of glaucoma required enucleation, one patient suffered severe dry eye syndrome. All patients ((11(11))) in whom the lens received direct radiation developed cataracts of different degrees if follow-up was long enough. Cataract formation was prevented by adequate lens shielding. One patient in CR from a stage I low-grade tumour died

  15. Computerized tomography of orbital lesions

    Kuroiwa, Mayumi

    1981-01-01

    Two different types of computerized tomography scanners (CT scanner), i.e. a whole-body CT scanner (GE-CT/T8800) and a cerebral CT scanner (EMI-1010), were compared in the assessment and diagnosis of various orbital lesions. The whole-body CT scanner was found to be advantageous over the cerebral CT scanner for the following reasons: (1) CT images were more informative due to thinner slices associated with smaller-sized and larger-numbered matrices; (2) less artifacts derived from motion of the head or eyeball were produced because of the shorter scanning time; (3) with a devised gantry, coronal dissections were available whenever demanded. (author)

  16. Orbiter fuel cell improvement assessment

    Johnson, R.E.

    1981-08-01

    The history of fuel cells and the theory of fuel cells is given. Expressions for thermodynamic and electrical efficiencies are developed. The voltage losses due to electrode activation, ohmic resistance and ionic diffusion are discussed. Present limitations of the Orbiter Fuel Cell, as well as proposed enhancements, are given. These enhancements are then evaluated and recommendations are given for fuel cell enhancement both for short-range as well as long-range performance improvement. Estimates of reliability and cost savings are given for enhancements where possible

  17. On-Orbit Software Analysis

    Moran, Susanne I.

    2004-01-01

    The On-Orbit Software Analysis Research Infusion Project was done by Intrinsyx Technologies Corporation (Intrinsyx) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center (ARC). The Project was a joint collaborative effort between NASA Codes IC and SL, Kestrel Technology (Kestrel), and Intrinsyx. The primary objectives of the Project were: Discovery and verification of software program properties and dependencies, Detection and isolation of software defects across different versions of software, and Compilation of historical data and technical expertise for future applications

  18. Prevention and treatment of the orofacial complications of radiotherapy

    Rothwell, B.R.

    1987-01-01

    Radiotherapy of malignant head and neck tumors often causes extensive, permanent changes in salivary glands, peridental alveolar bone, and mucosal structures. Dental neglect and inappropriate dental management can cause complications. The potential orofacial side effects of radiotherapy are reviewed, as are preventive strategies for the dental treatment of patients scheduled to undergo radiotherapy

  19. Combined effects of radiotherapy and non-specific immunotherapy

    Yamashita, Takashi; Hayakawa, Yukiko; Mochizuki, Yukio

    1985-01-01

    Local and systemic effects of the combined use of radiotherapy and administration of OK-432 were examined using tumor-bearing mice. Tumor regrowth was inhibited by local administration of OK-432 following radiotherapy. Systemic inhibitory effects of OK-432 on tumors were not seen. When radiotherapy is performed in combination with administration of OK-432, synergistic effects will be observed. (Namekawa, K.)

  20. Minimal requirements for quality controls in radiotherapy with external beams

    1999-01-01

    Physical dosimetric guidelines have been developed by the Italian National Institute of Health study group on quality assurance in radiotherapy to define protocols for quality controls in external beam radiotherapy. While the document does not determine strict rules or firm recommendations, it suggests minimal requirements for quality controls necessary to guarantee an adequate degree of accuracy in external beam radiotherapy [it