WorldWideScience

Sample records for orbital giant resonances

  1. Outward Migration of Giant Planets in Orbital Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, G.; Marzari, F.

    2013-05-01

    A pair of giant planets interacting with a gaseous disk may be subject to convergent orbital migration and become locked into a mean motion resonance. If the orbits are close enough, the tidal gaps produced by the planets in the disk may overlap. This represents a necessary condition to activate the outward migration of the pair. However, a number of other conditions must also be realized in order for this mechanism to operate. We have studied how disk properties, such as turbulence viscosity, temperature, surface density gradient, mass, and age, may affect the outcome of the outward migration process. We have also investigated the implications on this mechanism of the planets' gas accretion. If the pair resembles Jupiter and Saturn, the 3:2 orbital resonance may drive them outward until they reach stalling radii for migration, which are within ~10 AU of the star for disks representative of the early proto-solar nebula. However, planet post-formation conditions in the disk indicate that such planets become typically locked in the 1:2 orbital resonance, which does not lead to outward migration. Planet growth via gas accretion tends to alter the planets' mass-ratio and/or the disk accretion rate toward the star, reducing or inhibiting outward migration. Support from NASA Outer Planets Research Program and NASA Origins of Solar Systems Program is gratefully acknowledged.

  2. Giant nuclear resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snover, K.A.

    1989-01-01

    Giant nuclear resonances are elementary mods of oscillation of the whole nucleus, closely related to the normal modes of oscillation of coupled mechanical systems. They occur systematically in most if not all nuclei, with oscillation energies typically in the range 10-30 MeV. One of the best - known examples is the giant electric dipole (El) resonance, in which all the protons and all the neutrons oscillate with opposite phase, producing a large time - varying electric dipole moment which acts as an effective antenna for radiating gamma ray. This paper discusses this mode as well as quadrupole and monopole modes

  3. Isotopic effect giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buenerd, M.; Lebrun, D.; Martin, P.; Perrin, G.; Saintignon, P. de; Chauvin, J.; Duhamel, G.

    1981-10-01

    The systematics of the excitation energy of the giant dipole, monopole, and quadrupole resonances are shown to exhibit an isotopic effect. For a given element, the excitation energy of the transition decreases faster with the increasing neutron number than the empirical laws fitting the overall data. This effect is discussed in terms of the available models

  4. Isoscalar giant resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngblood, D. H. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station (USA). Cyclotron Inst.; Ikegami, H.; Muraoka, M. [eds.

    1980-01-01

    The current status of the knowledges of giant quadrupole resonance (GQR), low energy octupole resonance (LEOR), and giant monopole resonance (GMR), is described. In the lowest order of multipole resonance, both isoscalar and isovector modes can occur. The characteristics of the GQR in light nuclei are apparent in the experimental result for Mg-24. All of the isoscalar E2 strength are known in Mg-24. The Goldhaber-Teller model is preferred over the Steinwedel-Jensen model for the giant dipole resonance (GDR) transition density. A few interesting and puzzling features have been seen in Pb-208. There is some conflict between inelastic alpha and electron scatterings. About LEOR, the RPA calculation of Liu and Brown was compared to the data for 3/sup -/ strength in Ca-40, Zr-90 and Pb-208. The calculation was employed the residual interaction of the Skyrme type. The agreement in Zr-90 was excellent. The effect of quadrupole deformation on the LEOR in Sm isotopes was large. The inelastic alpha scattering data on Al-27, Ca-40, Ti-48, Ni-58, Zn-64 and 66, Zr-90, Sn-116, 118, 120 and 124, Sm-144, 148 and 154, and Pb-208 were utilized in order to identify the GMR, and the GMR parameters were obtained. The GMR exhausting a large fraction of the sum rule was apparent in the nuclei with mass larger than 90. The splitting of the GDR and the broadening of the GQR in permanently deformed nuclei were established. The splitting of GMR was seen in Sm-154. The studies with heavy ions are also described.

  5. Hadron excitation of giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morsch, H.-P.

    1985-01-01

    A review is given on giant resonance studies in heavy nuclei using scattering of different hadronic probes. Concerning isoscalar giant resonances compression modes are discussed with the possibility to obtain more detailed structure information. From detailed studies of α scattering the distribution of isoscalar strengths of multipolarity up to L=6 was obtained. Some recent aspects of heavy ion excitation of collective modes are mentioned. The possibility to study isovector giant resonances in hadron charge exchange reactions is discussed. Finally, a comparison is made between α and 200 MeV proton scattering from which isoscalar and spin-isospin continuum response are extracted. (orig.)

  6. Statistical decay of giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, H.; Teruya, N.; Wolynec, E.

    1986-01-01

    Statistical calculations to predict the neutron spectrum resulting from the decay of Giant Resonances are discussed. The dependence of the resutls on the optical potential parametrization and on the level density of the residual nucleus is assessed. A Hauser-Feshbach calculation is performed for the decay of the monople giant resonance in 208 Pb using the experimental levels of 207 Pb from a recent compilation. The calculated statistical decay is in excelent agreement with recent experimental data, showing that the decay of this resonance is dominantly statistical, as predicted by continuum RPA calculations. (Author) [pt

  7. Statistical decay of giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, H.; Teruya, N.; Wolynec, E.

    1986-02-01

    Statistical calculations to predict the neutron spectrum resulting from the decay of Giant Resonances are discussed. The dependence of the results on the optical potential parametrization and on the level density of the residual nucleus is assessed. A Hauser-Feshbach calculation is performed for the decay of the monopole giant resonance in 208 Pb using the experimental levels of 207 Pb from a recent compilation. The calculated statistical decay is in excellent agreement with recent experimental data, showing that decay of this resonance is dominantly statistical, as predicted by continuum RPA calculations. (Author) [pt

  8. Giant first-forbidden resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krmpotic, F.; Nakayama, K.; Sao Paulo Univ.; Pio Galeao, A.; Sao Paulo Univ.

    1983-01-01

    Recent experimental data on first-forbidden charge-exchange resonances are discussed in the framework of a schematic model. We also evaluate the screening of the weak coupling constants induced by both the giant resonances and the δ-isobar. It is shown that the last effect does not depend on the multipolarity of the one-particle moment. Due to the same reason, the fraction of the reaction strength pushed up into the δ-resonance region is always the same regardless of the quantum numbers carried by the excitation. Simple expressions are derived for the dependence of the excitation energies of the first-forbidden giant resonances on the mass number and isospin of the target. The model reproduces consistently both the Gamow-Teller and the first-forbidden resonances. (orig.)

  9. Giant resonances: reaction theory approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledo Piza, A.F.R. de; Foglia, G.A.

    1989-09-01

    The study of giant resonances through the use of reaction theory approach is presented and discussed. Measurements of cross-sections to the many available decay channels following excitation of giant multipole resonances (GMR) led one to view these phenomena as complicated dynamical syndromes so that theoretical requirements for their study must be extended beyond the traditional bounds of nuclear structure models. The spectra of decay products following GMR excitation in heavy nuclei are well described by statistical model (Hauser-Feshback, HF) predictions indicated that spreading of the collective modes plays a major role in shaping exclusive cross-sections. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  10. Excitation of giant resonances in heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehn, W.

    1991-01-01

    Introduction: What are Giant Resonances? General Features of Giant Resonances, Macroscopic Description and Classification, Basic Excitation Mechanisms, Decay Modes, Giant Resonances Built on Excited States, Relativistic Coulomb Excitation of Giant Resonances, Experimental Situation. (orig.)

  11. Giant multipole resonances: perspectives after ten years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand, F.E.

    1980-01-01

    Nearly ten years ago evidence was published for the first of the so-called giant multipole resonances, the giant quadrupole resonance. During the ensuing years research in this field has spread to many nuclear physics laboratories throughout the world. The present status of electric giant multipole resonances is reviewed. 24 figures, 1 table

  12. Giant resonances on excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besold, W.; Reinhard, P.G.; Toepffer, C.

    1984-01-01

    We derive modified RPA equations for small vibrations about excited states. The temperature dependence of collective excitations is examined. The formalism is applied to the ground state and the first excited state of 90 Zr in order to confirm a hypothesis which states that not only the ground state but every excited state of a nucleus has a giant resonance built upon it. (orig.)

  13. Determination of giant resonance strengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serr, F.E.

    1983-01-01

    Using theoretical strength functions to describe the different giant resonances expected at excitation energies of the order of (60-85)/Asup(1/3) MeV, we calculate the double differential cross sections d 2 sigma/dΩ dE associated with the reactions 208 Pb(α, α') and 90 Zr(α, α') (Esub(α) = 152 MeV). The angular distributions for the giant quadrupole and giant monopole resonances obtained from fits to these spectra, making simple, commonly used assumptions for the peak shapes and background, are compared to the original angular distributions. The differences between them are an indication of some of the uncertainties affecting the giant resonance strengths extracted from hadron inelastic scattering data. Fits to limited angular regions lead to errors of up to 50% in the value of the energy-weighted sum rule, depending on the angles examined. While it seems possible to extract the correct EWSR for the GMR by carrying out the analyses at 0 0 , no single privileged angle seems to exist in the case of the GQR. (orig.)

  14. On Landau Vlasov simulations of giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pi, M.; Schuck, P.; Suraud, E.; Gregoire, C.; Remaud, B.; Sebille, F.

    1987-05-01

    We present VUU calculations of giant resonances obtained in energetic heavy ion collisions. Also is considered the case of the giant dipole in 40 Ca and the possibility of studying the effects of rotation on such collective modes

  15. Giant multipole resonances: an experimental review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand, F.E.

    1979-01-01

    During the past several years experimental evidence has been published for the existance of nondipole giant resonances. These giant multipole resonances, the so-called new giant resonances were first observed through inelastic hadron and electron scattering and such measurements have continued to provide most of the information in this field. A summary is provided of the experimental evidence for these new resonances. The discussion deals only with results from inelastic scattering and only with the electric multipoles. Emphasis is placed on the recent observations of the giant monopole resonance. Results from recent heavy-ion and pion inelastic scattering are discussed. 38 references

  16. Giant resonances in heavy-ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, M.S.

    1982-11-01

    The several roles of multipole giant resonances in heavy-ion reactions are discussed. In particular, the modifications in the effective ion-ion potencial due to the virtual excitation of giant resonances at low energies, are considered and estimated for several systems. Real excitation of giant resonances in heavy-ion reactions at intermediate energies are then discussed and their importance in the approach phase of deeply inelastic processes in emphasized. Several demonstrative examples are given. (Author) [pt

  17. Giant dipole resonance in hot nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mau, N.V.

    1993-01-01

    Giant resonances built on an excited state of the nucleus at a finite temperature T are studied. The following questions are investigated: how long such collective effects occur in a nucleus when T increases. How the properties of the giant resonances vary when the temperature increases. How the study of giant resonances in hot nuclei can give information on the structure of the nucleus in a highly excited state. The special case of the giant dipole resonance is studied. Some of the experimental results are reviewed and in their theoretical interpretation is discussed. (K.A.). 56 refs., 20 figs., 4 tabs

  18. Electromagnetic decay of giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beene, J.R.; Bertrand, F.E.; Halbert, M.L.; Auble, R.L.; Hensley, D.C.; Horen, D.J.; Robinson, R.L.; Sayer, R.O.; Sjoreen, T.P.

    1985-01-01

    Coincidence experiments were done to investigate the photon and neutron emission from the giant resonance regions of 208 Pb and 90 Zr using the ORNL Spin Spectrometer, a 72-segment NaI detector system. We have determined the total gamma-decay probability, the ground-state gamma branching ratio, and the branching ratios to a number of low-lying states as a function of excitation energy in 208 Pb to approx.15 MeV. Similar data were also obtained on 90 Zr. The total yield of ground-state E2 gamma radiation in 208 Pb and the comparative absence of such radiation in 90 Zr can only be understood if decay of compound (damped) states is considered. Other observations in 208 Pb include the absence of a significant branch from the giant quadrupole resonance (GQR) to the 3 - state at 2.6 MeV, a strong branch to a 3 - state at 4.97 MeV from the same region, and transitions to various 1 - states between 5 to 7 MeV from the E* approx. 14 MeV region (EO resonance)

  19. Electromagnetic decay of giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beene, J.R.; Bertrand, F.E.; Halbert, M.L.; Auble, R.L.; Hensley, D.C.; Horen, D.J.; Robinson, R.L.; Sayer, R.O.; Sjoreen, T.P.

    1985-01-01

    Coincidence experiments are carried out to investigate the photon and neutron emission from the giant resonance regions of 208 Pb and 90 Zr using the ORNL Spin Spectrometer, a 72-segment NaI detector system. The authors determined the total gamma-decay probability, the ground-state gamma branching ratio, and the branching ratios to a number of low-lying states as a function of excitation energy in 208 Pb to ∼15 MeV. Similar data were also obtained on 90 Zr. The total yield of ground-state E2 gamma radiation in 208 Pb and the comparative absence of such radiation in 90 Zr can only be understood if decay of compound (damped) states is considered. (Auth.)

  20. Multipole giant resonances in highly excited nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Keding; Cai Yanhuang

    1989-01-01

    The isoscalar giant surface resonance and giant dipole resonance in highly excited nuclei are discussed. Excitation energies of the giant modes in 208 Pb are calculated in a simplified model, using the concept of energy wieghted sum rule (EWSR), and the extended Thomas-Fermi approximation at the finite temperature is employed to describe the finite temperature is employed to describe the finite temperature equilibrium state. It is shown that EWSR and the energy of the resonance depend only weakly on temperature in the system. This weak dependence is analysed

  1. Static electromagnetic properties of giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, W.K.

    1986-03-01

    Static electric monopole and quadrupole matrix elements, which are related to the mean square radius and quadrupole moment respectively, are derived for giant resonances of arbitrary multipolarity. The results furnish information on the size and shape of the nucleus in the excited giant states. (author)

  2. Orbital resonances around black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink, Jeandrew; Geyer, Marisa; Hinderer, Tanja

    2015-02-27

    We compute the length and time scales associated with resonant orbits around Kerr black holes for all orbital and spin parameters. Resonance-induced effects are potentially observable when the Event Horizon Telescope resolves the inner structure of Sgr A*, when space-based gravitational wave detectors record phase shifts in the waveform during the resonant passage of a compact object spiraling into the black hole, or in the frequencies of quasiperiodic oscillations for accreting black holes. The onset of geodesic chaos for non-Kerr spacetimes should occur at the resonance locations quantified here.

  3. Looking inside giant resonance fine structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponomarev, V.Yu.; Voronov, V.V.

    1993-01-01

    Microscopic calculations of the fine structure of giant resonances for spherical nuclei are presented. Excited states are treated by wave function which takes into account coupling of simple one-phonon configurations with more complex ones. Nuclear structure calculations are applied to the description of the γ-decay of resonances into the ground and low-lying excited states. 16 refs.; 4 figs

  4. Excitation of giant resonances through inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kailas, S.

    1981-01-01

    In the last few years, exciting developments have taken place in the study of giant resonances (GR). In addition to the already well known gjant dipole resonance (GDR), the presence of at least two more new GRs viz. giant quadrupole resonance (GQR) and giant monopole resonance (GMR) has been experimentally established. The systematics covering these GRs is found to be consistent with the theoretical expectation. Though the existence of higher multipoles has been predjcted by theory, so far only some of these have been found to be excited experimentally. Various probe particles - electrons, protons (polarized and unpolarized), light and heavy ions and pions - at different bombarding energies have been used to excite the GR region, primarily through the inelastic scattering process. Detailed experiments, looking at the decay modes of GR region, have also been performed. These studies have contributed significantly to a better understanding of the phenomenon of nuclear collective excitation. In this report, the current status of 'GR' research is reviewed. (author)

  5. Collective motion and giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelmi, Z.; Kicinska-Habior, M.

    1984-01-01

    The report contains 15 papers devoted to problems of giant collective excitations of nuclei, heavy-ion induced reactions and their bearing on various aspects of nuclear structure. In some of them the numerical data are given. (A.S.)

  6. Isovector giant quadrupole resonance in 63Cu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolynec, E.; Pastura, V.F.S.; Martins, M.N.

    1988-01-01

    The decay of the isovector E2 giant resonance in 63 Cu has been studied by measuring the (e,2n) cross section, in the incident electron energy range 22-45 MeV. The photodisintegration induced by bremsstrahlung was also measured. The electrodisintegration results have been analyzed using the distorted wave Born approximation E1 and E2 virtual photon spectra to obtain these multipole components in the corresponding (γ,2n) cross section. It is found that the isovector E2 giant resonance decays dominantly by two-neutron emission in 63 Cu. This decay channel exhausts 65 percent of the energy weighted E2 sum. (author0 [pt

  7. Macroscopic description of isoscalar giant multipole resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nix, J.R.; Sierk, A.J.

    1980-01-01

    On the basis of a simple macroscopic model, we calculate the isoscalar giant-resonance energy as a function of mass number and multipole degree. The restoring force is determined from the distortion of the Fermi surface, and the inertia is determined for the incompressible, irrotational flow of nucleons with unit effective mass. With no adjustable parameters, the resulting closed expression reproduces correctly the available experimental data, namely the magnitude and dependence upon mass number of the giant quadrupole energy and the magnitude of the giant octupole energy for 208 Pb. We also calculate the isoscalar giant-resonance width as a function of mass number and multipole degree for various macroscopic damping mechanisms, including two-body viscosity, one-body dissipation, and modified one-body dissipation. None of these damping mechanisms reproduces correctly all features of the available experimental data, namely the magnitude and dependence upon mass number of the giant quadrupole width and the magnitude of the giant octupole width for 208 Pb

  8. Study of giant resonances with pions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, H.W.

    1984-01-01

    Recent results on giant resonances obtained with pion-inelastic scattering and with single- and double-charge-exchange scattering are reviewed. The states discussed are isobaric analog states, double-isobaric analog states, and isovector L = 0, 1, and 2 collective states. 36 references

  9. Giant resonances in the deformed continuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsukasa, T.; Yabana, K.

    2004-01-01

    Giant resonances in the continuum for deformed nuclei are studied with the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory in real time and real space. The continuum effect is effectively taken into account by introducing a complex Absorbing Boundary Condition (ABC). (orig.)

  10. Giant dipole resonances built on excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snover, K.A.

    1983-01-01

    The properties of giant dipole resonances built on excited nuclear states are reviewed, with emphasis on recent results. Nonstatistical (p,γ) reactions in light nuclei, and statistical complex-particle reactions in light and heavy nuclei are discussed. 27 references

  11. Giant dipole resonance by many levels theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondaini, R.P.

    1977-01-01

    The many levels theory is applied to photonuclear effect, in particular, in giant dipole resonance. A review about photonuclear dipole absorption, comparing with atomic case is done. The derivation of sum rules; their modifications by introduction of the concepts of effective charges and mass and the Siegert theorem. The experimental distributions are compared with results obtained by curve adjustment. (M.C.K.) [pt

  12. Stability of the giant dipole resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espino, J.M.; Gallardo, M.

    1987-01-01

    The Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR), because of its stability and its typical period of vibration, can be used as a test for compound nucleus reactions at high temperatures. This stability is studied in a simple model up to 6 MeV of temperature. The experimental methods for getting the properties of the GDR at T ≠ 0 are also commented. (author)

  13. Electroexcitation of giant resonances in 181Ta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, R.S.; Auer, I.P.; Bergstrom, J.C.; Caplan, H.S.

    1977-01-01

    The giant resonance region of 181 Ta has been investigated by means of inelastic electron scattering with primary electron energies of 79.1 to 118.3 MeV. A peak-fitting procedure was employed to separate the measured spectrum into nine different resonance components. Multipolarity and strength assignments were deduced using DWBA analysis with the Goldhaber-Teller and Steinwedel-Jensen models. In addition to the well-known giant dipole structure, other resonances were identified at 23.2+-0.3 MeV (E2), 9.5+-0.2 and 11.5+-0.2 MeV (E2 or E0), 19.5+-0.8 MeV (E3), 3.70+-0.14 MeV (E3 or E4), and 5.40+-0.15 MeV (E4 or E5). The model dependence of the analysis is discussed. (Auth.)

  14. Study of giant resonances in heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cataldi, M.I.C.

    1986-01-01

    The electrodisintegration cross section for 181 Ta, 208 Pb and 209 Bi was measured by counting the emitted neutrons, with incident electrons in the energy range 8-22 MeV. The data was analysed using the virtual photon method, in order to obtain a multipole decomposition and the intensities of Magnetic Dipole and Electric Quadrupole, isoscalar and isovector, in the Giant Resonance. The results obtained for the isovector Giant Quadrupole Resonance are compared with the measured photodisintegration cross section, using data from Saclay and Livermore. This comparision indicates that the photodisintegration data can be well explained assuming an isovector E2 Resonance located between 120 and 130 A -1/3 MeV, with an intensity of one isovector E2 sum. (author) [pt

  15. A GIANT CONGENITAL ORBITAL TUMOR - AN UNUSUAL PRESENTATION OF RETINOBLASTOMA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ZWAAN, CM; DEWAAL, FC; KOOLE, FD; MENKO, FH; VANDERVALK, P; SLATER, RM; SCHEFFER, H; VANWAVEREN, G; MOLL, AC; SCHOUTENVANMEETEREN, AYN; TAN, KEWP

    1994-01-01

    We report a case of an unusual giant congential tumor presenting in a newborn infant as a large exophytic mass emerging from the left orbit. After enucleation orbital recurrence developed within 14 days. No anti-tumor treatment was given and the child died at the age of 4 weeks. The

  16. Photon scattering by the giant dipole resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowles, T.J.; Holt, R.J.; Jackson, H.E.; McKeown, R.D.; Specht, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    Although many features of the giant dipole resonance are well known, the coupling between the basic dipole oscillation and other nuclear collective degrees of freedom such as surface vibrations and rotations is poorly understood. This aspect was investigated by elastic and inelastic bremsstrahlung scattering of tagged photons over the energy range 15 to 22 MeV. Target nuclei were 60 Ni, 52 Cr, 56 Fe, 92 Mo, and 96 Mo. Scattering and absorption cross sections are tabulated, along with parameters obtained from a two-Lorentzian analysis of the scattering cross sections; measured spectra are shown. It was necessary to remove Thomson scattering from the experimental results. It was found that coupling to surface vibrations in the giant dipole resonance is much weaker than the dynamic collective model suggests. The elastic scattering cross section for all targets but 60 Ni showed structure that is not evident in the absorption cross section measurement. 12 figures, 2 tables

  17. Triple Giant Resonance Excitations: A Microscopic Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanza, E.G.; Andres, M.V.; Catara, F.; Chomaz, Ph.; Fallot, M.; Scarpaci, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    We present, for the first time, microscopic calculations of inelastic cross sections of the triple excitation of giant resonances induced by heavy ion probes. We start from a microscopic approach based on RPA. The mixing of three-phonon states among themselves and with two- and one-phonon states is considered within a boson expansion with Pauli corrections. In this way we go beyond the standard harmonic approximations and get anharmonic excitation spectra. At the same time we also introduce non-linearities in the external field. The calculations are done by solving semiclassical coupled channel equations, the channels being superpositions of one-, two- and three-phonon states. Previous calculations for the Double Giant Resonance excitation show good agreement with experimental cross sections. The inclusion of the three phonon components confirms the previous results for the DGR and produces a strong increase in the Triple GR energy region

  18. Giant resonance effects in radiative capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snover, K.A.

    1979-01-01

    The technique of capture reaction studies of giant resonance properties is described, and a number of examples are given. Most of the recent work of interest has been in proton capture, in part because of the great utility (and availability) of polarized beams; most of the discussion concerns this reaction. Alpha capture, which has been a useful tool for exploring isoscalar E2 strength, and neutron capture are, however, also treated. 46 references, 14 figures

  19. Isotopic dependence of giant multipole resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bar Touv, J.; Moalem, A.; Shlomo, S.

    1980-01-01

    A procedure is presented which allows the application of linear response theory and the random phase approximation to an open shell. The procedure is applied to Ca isotopes. The general features of giant multipole resonances are found to vary smoothly with the mass. The resonances exhibit more structure in the open lfsub(7/2) shell nuclei. While the energy-weighted dipole sum is practically constant in all isotopes, the isoscalar quadrupole and octupole energy weighted sums increase continuously by approx. 30% from 40 Ca to 48 Ca. (orig.)

  20. High temperature giant dipole and isoscalar resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro, J.; Barranco, M.; Garcias, F.; Suraud, E.

    1990-01-01

    We present a systematic study of the Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) at high temperatures (T > ∼ 4 MeV) in the framework of a semi-classical approximation that uses the m 1 and m 3 RPA sum rules to estimate the GDR mean energy. We focus on the evolution with T of the collective nature of the GDR and of the L = 0,2,3 and 4 isoscalar resonances. We find that the GDR remains particularly collective at high T, suggesting that it might be possible to observe it experimentally even at temperatures close to the maximum one a nucleus can sustain

  1. Actual problems of giant resonance physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhalov, M.B.; Sliv, L.A.

    1982-01-01

    The raper deals with the discussion of theoretical problems associated with investigation into nuclear giant multipole resoonances (GMR). Analysis of test data on inelastic scattering of particles on nuclei is carried out to obtain the main GMR characteristics from the present experimental data. Giant isoscalar resonances and their structures in the random phase approximatmion (RPA) with Skyrm forces described by the microscopic theory are discussed. Cross section of 40 Ca excitation in reaction of α-particle inelastic scattering calculated in RPA with exact accountancy of one-nucleon continuum is graphically displayed as an example. Modified RPA used for calculation of GMR width is suggested. Conducted is comparison of energies of 40 Ca, 58 Ni, 90 Zr, 208 Pb nuclei isoscalar resonances calculated in RPA and their contributions to energy weighted sum rule the results of which are tabulated. Integral strength of resonance excitation in RPA by inelastic-scattered α particles and protons on 40 Ca and 208 Pb nuclei is considered. Channels of GMR disintegration are discussed. The most significant theoretical and experimental problems the solution of which is necessary for complete investigation of GMR are pointed out

  2. Excitation of giant monopole and quadrupole resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogata, H. [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Research Center for Nuclear Physics; Yamagata, T.; Tanaka, M. [and others; Ikegami, H.; Muraoka, M. [eds.; Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Research Center for Nuclear Physics

    1980-01-01

    Recent studies on the giant monopole resonance (GMR) and the giant quadrupole resonance (GQR) in /sup 144/Sm and /sup 208/Pb using the ..cap alpha..-scattering performed at RCNP are summarized. The observed angular range covered 1.6/sup 0/ -- 7/sup 0/ with a coupled system of a dipole and a triplet quadrupole magnet. The incident energy was changed from 84 to 119 MeV. The resonance shapes and energy-weighted sum-rule strengths of the GMR and the GQR were reliably deduced as a function of incident energy. The quadrupole strength of --20% was found in the GMR region. The observed excitation function of the GMR was compared with the DWBA calculation, in which the Satchler's Version I was used as a form factor representing the compressional motion of the nucleus. It was found that the experimental excitation function of the GMR shows steeper decrease as lowering the incident energy than the DWBA prediction whereas that of the GQR is successfully described by the DWBA. This suggests that examination of the model describing the GMR is necessary.

  3. Monopole Giant Resonances and TDHF boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, P.D.; Almehed, D.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Maruhn, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Using time-dependent Hartree-Fock, we induce isoscalar and isovector monopole vibrations and follow the subsequent vibrations of both the same and opposite isospin nature in the N Z nucleus 132 Sn. By suitable scaling of the proton and neutron parts of the excitation operators, the coupling between the modes is studied, and the approximate normal modes found. Chaotic dynamics are then analysed in the isoscalar giant monopole resonance by using reflecting boundaries in a large space to build up a large number of 0 + states whose spacings are then analysed. A Wigner-like distribution is found

  4. Temperature dependence of giant dipole resonance width

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vdovin, A.I.; Storozhenko, A.N.

    2005-01-01

    The quasiparticle-phonon nuclear model extended to finite temperature within the framework of the thermo field dynamics is applied to calculate a temperature dependence of the spreading width Γ d own of a giant dipole resonance. Numerical calculations are made for 12S n and 208 Pb nuclei. It is found that the width Γ d own increases with T. The reason of this effect is discussed as well as a relation of the present approach to other ones existing in the literature

  5. Collective Hamiltonians for dipole giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, L.I.

    1991-07-01

    The collective hamiltonian for the Giant Dipole resonance (GDR), in the Goldhaber-Teller-Model, is analytically constructed using the semiclassical and generator coordinates method. Initially a conveniently parametrized set of many body wave functions and a microscopic hamiltonian, the Skyrme hamiltonian - are used. These collective Hamiltonians are applied to the investigation of the GDR, in He 4 , O 16 and Ca 40 nuclei. Also the energies and spectra of the GDR are obtained in these nuclei. The two sets of results are compared, and the zero point energy effects analysed. (author)

  6. Isoscalar giant resonances in a relativistic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L'Huillier, M.; Nguyen Van Giai.

    1988-07-01

    Isoscalar giant resonances in finite nuclei are studied in a relativistic Random Phase Approximation (RRPA) approach. The model is self-consistent in the sense that one set of coupling constants generates the Dirac-Hartree single-particle spectrum and the residual particle-hole interaction. The RRPA is used to calculate response functions of multipolarity L = 0,2,3, and 4 in light and medium nuclei. It is found that monopole and quadrupole modes exhibit a collective character. The peak energies are overestimated, but not as much as one might think if the bulk properties (compression modulus, effective mass) were the only relevant quantities

  7. Evidence for deformation effect on the giant monopole resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buenerd, M.; Lebrun, D.; Martin, P.; de Saintignon, P.; Perrin, C.

    1980-01-01

    The giant monopole resonance in the region of deformed nuclei has been investigated by inelastic scattering of 108.5 MeV 3 He at very small scattering angles. Evidence is reported for coupling between the giant monopole and giant quadrupole vibrations, based both on energy shift and transition strength

  8. The sympletic model for giant monopole resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, M.M.B.M.

    1985-01-01

    Following recently published articles, it's investigated how to apply the sympletic model to the study of giant monopole resonances in spherical nuclei. The results obtained agree with those already published for monopole mode energies, wave functions, radii and nuclear incompressibility of 16 O and 40 Ca nuclei. An analyse of how the spurious center-of-mass motion influence resonance energies is made. The sum rules of the monopole operator, m-bar e , o ≤ e ≤ 3, are calculated, demonstrating at first that they are conserved in the sympletic model. Then it's studied, for those sum rules, the importance of n-boson correlations in the fundamental state, which is an extension of those sum rules, of the analysis for the nuclear incompressibility, performed in above mentioned articles. (Author) [pt

  9. Giant resonances in hot rotating nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ring, P.

    1992-01-01

    Present theoretical descriptions of the giant resonances in hot rotating nuclei are reviewed. Mean field theory is used as a basis for the description of the hot compound states. Starting from the static solution at finite temperature and with fixed angular momentum small amplitude collective vibrations are calculated in the frame work of finite temperature random phase approximation for quasi-particles. The effect of pairing at low temperatures as well as the effect of rotations on the position of the resonance maxima are investigated. Microscopic and phenomenological descriptions of the damping mechanisms are reviewed. In particular it turns out that fluctuations play an important role in understanding of the behaviour of the width as a function of the temperature. Motional narrowing is critically discussed. (author). 99 refs., 5 figs

  10. Condensed matter view of giant resonance phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zangwill, A.

    1987-01-01

    The intent of this article is to present a view of giant resonance phenomena (an essentially atomic phenomenon) from the perspective of a condensed matter physicist with an interest in the optical properties of matter. As we shall see, this amounts to a particular prejudice about how one should think about many-body effects in a system of interacting electrons. Some of these effects are special to condensed matter systems and will be dealt with in the second half of this paper. However, it turns out that the authors view of the main ingredient to a giant resonance differs significantly from that normally taken by scientists trained in the traditional methods of atomic physics. Therefore, in the first section the author will take advantage of the fact that his contribution to this volume was composed and delivered to the publishers somewhat after the conclusion of the School (rather than before as requested by the organizers) and try to clearly distinguish the differences of opinion presented by the lecturers from the unalterable experimental facts. 46 references, 9 figures

  11. Decay of giant resonance E2 isoscalar in heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herdade, S.B.

    1980-01-01

    In this work, it is made a study of the giant resonance E2 isoscalar, in heavy nuclei. Fission probabilities for this resonance were determined by various authors, in different experiments, for 238 U. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  12. New properties of giant resonances in highly excited nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morsch, H.P.

    1991-01-01

    Studies on the giant dipole resonance in very hot nuclei investigated in heavy ion-induced particle-γ coincidence experiments are reviewed. A signature is found in the γ-decay of excited nuceli which shows direct decay of the giant dipole resonance. This provides a new dimension in giant resonance studies and the possibility to study the dependence of giant resonance energy, width and sum rule strength on excitation energy and rotation of the system. Further, the fact that the giant resonance splits in deformed nuclei provides a unique way to get information on the shape of hot nuclei. First results are obtained on the following questions: (i)What is the nuclear shape at high temperature (T≥2 MeV)? (ii)Is there a phase transition in the nuclear shape at T∼1.7 MeV? (iii)Does motional narrowing exist in hot nuclei? (author). 19 refs., 11 figs

  13. Semimicroscopic description of the giant quadrupole resonances in deformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurchev, G.; Malov, L.A.; Nesterenko, V.O.; Soloviev, V.G.

    1976-01-01

    The calculation results of the giant quadrupole isoscalar and isovector resonances performed within the random phase approximation are represented. The strength functions for E2-transitions are calculated for doubly even deformed nuclei in the regions 150 (<=) A < 190 and 228 (<=) A < 248 in the energy interval (0-40) MeV. The following integral characteristics of giant quadrupole resonances are obtained: the position, widths, the contribution to the energy weighted sum rule and the contribution to the total cross section of photoabsorption. The calculations have shown that giant quadrupole resonances are common for all the considered nuclei. The calculated characteristics of the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance agree with the available experimental data. The calculations also show that the semimicroscopic theory can be successfully applied for the description of giant multipole resonances

  14. Orbital Resonances in the Vinti Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurita, L. D.

    As space becomes more congested, contested, and competitive, high-accuracy orbital predictions become critical for space operations. Current orbit propagators use the two-body solution with perturbations added, which have significant error growth when numerically integrated for long time periods. The Vinti Solution is a more accurate model than the two-body problem because it also accounts for the equatorial bulge of the Earth. Unfortunately, the Vinti solution contains small divisors near orbital resonances in the perturbative terms of the Hamiltonian, which lead to inaccurate orbital predictions. One approach to avoid the small divisors is to apply transformation theory, which is presented in this research. The methodology of this research is to identify the perturbative terms of the Vinti Solution, perform a coordinate transformation, and derive the new equations of motion for the Vinti system near orbital resonances. An analysis of these equations of motion offers insight into the dynamics found near orbital resonances. The analysis in this research focuses on the 2:1 resonance, which includes the Global Positioning System. The phase portrait of a nominal Global Positioning System satellite orbit is found to contain a libration region and a chaotic region. Further analysis shows that the dynamics of the 2:1 resonance affects orbits with semi-major axes ranging from -5.0 to +5.4 kilometers from an exactly 2:1 resonant orbit. Truth orbits of seven Global Positioning System satellites are produced for 10 years. Two of the satellites are found to be outside of the resonance region and three are found to be influenced by the libration dynamics of the resonance. The final satellite is found to be influenced by the chaotic dynamics of the resonance. This research provides a method of avoiding the small divisors found in the perturbative terms of the Vinti Solution near orbital resonances.

  15. Atomic many-body theory of giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, H.P.; Altun, Z.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper the use of many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) to include effects of electron correlations is discussed. The various physical processes contributing to the broad photoionization cross sections of the rare gases are studied in terms of the relevant many-body diagrams. Use of the random phase approximation with exchange (RPAE) is discussed by Amusia and Cherepkov. Calculations using the relativistic RPAE are reviewed by Johnson. In addition, many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) is used to study resonances which are due to excitation of bound states degenerate with the continuum. Very interesting giant resonance structure can occur when an inner shell electron is excited into a vacant open-shell orbital of the same principal quantum number. A particular example which is studied is the neutral manganese atom 3p 6 3d 5 4s 2 ( 6 S), in which the spins of the five 3d electrons are aligned. A very large resonance occurs in the 3d and 4s cross sections due to 3p → 3d excitation near 51 eV, and calculations of this resonance by MBPT and RPAE are discussed. A second example of this type of resonance occurs in open-shell rare-earth atoms with configurations 4d 10 4f/sup n/5s 2 5p 6 s 2 . Calculations and experimental results will be discussed for the case of europium with a half-filled sub-shell 4f 7 . 71 references, 15 figures

  16. Nuclear isovector giant resonances excited by pion single charge exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, B.H.

    1993-07-01

    This thesis is an experimental study of isovector giant resonances in light nuclei excited by pion single charge exchange reactions. Giant dipole resonances in light nuclei are known to be highly structured. For the mass 9 and 13 giant dipole resonances, isospin considerations were found to be very important to understanding this structure. by comparing the excitation functions from cross section measurements of the (π + , π 0 ) and (π, π 0 ) inclusive reactions, the authors determined the dominant isospin structure of the analog IVGR's. The comparison was made after decomposing the cross section into resonant and non-resonant components. This decomposition is made in the framework of strong absorption and quasi-free scattering. Measurements in the region of the isovector giant dipole resonances (IVGDR) were made to cover the inclusive angular distributions out to the second minimum. Study of the giant resonance decay process provides further understanding of the resonances. This study was carried out by observing the (π + , π 0 p) coincident reactions involving the resonances of 9 B and 13 N excited from 9 Be and 13 C nuclei. These measurements determined the spectra of the decay protons. This method also permitted a decomposition of the giant resonances into their isospin components. The multipolarities of the resonances were revealed by the decay proton angular correlations which, for dipoles, are of the form 1 + A 2 P 2 (cos θ)

  17. Features of the giant E1 resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergere, R.

    1976-01-01

    Since most of the available experimental data concerning the giant dipole E1 resonance (GDR) have been obtained with real photons, the characteristics of real photon sources are reviewed with an attempt to connect the experimental particularities of each of them to the specific parameters of the GDR which it is best suited to reach. Some systematic properties gathered from experimental data of GDR (average energy, splitting and broadening of the GDR) are compared with the predictions of the static and dynamic collective models of the nuclei. The position in energy and the fine structure of the GDR are more closely connected to shell model predictions as nuclei get lighter, the various experimental integrated cross sections being also more easily understood by comparisons with microscopic models. Most of the reported data refer to the doorway state through which GDR is excited, however the competition between the decay channels for GDR states is also emphasized

  18. Unusual intraconal localization of orbital giant cell angiofibroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekin, Meryem Altin; Ugurlu, Seyda Karadeniz; Cakalagaoglu, Fulya

    2018-01-01

    Giant cell angiofibroma (GCA) is a recently reported rare soft-tissue tumor that can develop in various sites including orbit. Orbital GCAs were mainly located in the eyelid or extraconal regions such as lacrimal gland and conjunctiva. We report an atypical case of a GCA arising in the intraconal area of the orbit in a 65-year-old male patient. The tumor was excised in total by lateral orbitotomy. Histological and immunohistochemical features were consistent with the diagnosis of GCA. No recurrence was observed during the follow-up of over 2 years. GCA is a rare tumor that should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intraconal orbital tumors. Complete surgical removal is the current optimal treatment option.

  19. Unusual intraconal localization of orbital giant cell angiofibroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meryem Altin Ekin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell angiofibroma (GCA is a recently reported rare soft-tissue tumor that can develop in various sites including orbit. Orbital GCAs were mainly located in the eyelid or extraconal regions such as lacrimal gland and conjunctiva. We report an atypical case of a GCA arising in the intraconal area of the orbit in a 65-year-old male patient. The tumor was excised in total by lateral orbitotomy. Histological and immunohistochemical features were consistent with the diagnosis of GCA. No recurrence was observed during the follow-up of over 2 years. GCA is a rare tumor that should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intraconal orbital tumors. Complete surgical removal is the current optimal treatment option.

  20. Spin isovector giant resonances in (n,p) reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spicer, B.M.

    1997-01-01

    The present status of the study of spin-flip isovector giant resonances, using the (n,p) charge exchange reaction, is reviewed. After a brief history of the discovery of these giant resonances, a critical appraisal of the interpretation of the data in terms of giant resonances is given, along with some of the theoretical advances that impact on the interpretation of these data. A sampling of the results obtained for typical targets is given, followed by the interpretation of these results. A brief statement is made concerning the way forward in experimental technique for nuclear structure research using charge exchange reactions

  1. THE FORMATION MECHANISM OF GAS GIANTS ON WIDE ORBITS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodson-Robinson, Sarah E.; Veras, Dimitri; Ford, Eric B.; Beichman, C. A.

    2009-01-01

    The recent discoveries of massive planets on ultra-wide orbits of HR 8799 and Fomalhaut present a new challenge for planet formation theorists. Our goal is to figure out which of three giant planet formation mechanisms-core accretion (with or without migration), scattering from the inner disk, or gravitational instability-could be responsible for Fomalhaut b, HR 8799 b, c and d, and similar planets discovered in the future. This paper presents the results of numerical experiments comparing the long-period planet formation efficiency of each possible mechanism in model A star, G star, and M star disks. First, a simple core accretion simulation shows that planet cores forming beyond 35 AU cannot reach critical mass, even under the most favorable conditions one can construct. Second, a set of N-body simulations demonstrates that planet-planet scattering does not create stable, wide-orbit systems such as HR 8799. Finally, a linear stability analysis verifies previous work showing that global spiral instabilities naturally arise in high-mass disks. We conclude that massive gas giants on stable orbits with semimajor axes a ∼> 35 AU form by gravitational instability in the disk. We recommend that observers examine the planet detection rate as a function of stellar age, controlling for the planets' dimming with time. Any age trend would indicate that planets on wide orbits are transient relics of scattering from the inner disk. If planet detection rate is found to be independent of stellar age, it would confirm our prediction that gravitational instability is the dominant mode of producing detectable planets on wide orbits. We also predict that the occurrence ratio of long-period to short-period gas giants should be highest for M dwarfs due to the inefficiency of core accretion and the expected small fragment mass (∼10 M Jup ) in their disks.

  2. Excitation of giant resonances via charge exchange reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, C.D.

    1979-01-01

    Charge-exchange reactions can be useful for identifying isovector resonances. At present the most promising use of charge-exchange reactions with respect to giant resonances is to locate and study Gamow-Teller (GT) resonances. Detailed comparisons between GT and M1 strengths can yield further structure information. 7 figures

  3. Measuring Precise Radii of Giants Orbiting Giants to Distinguish Between Planet Evolution Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunblatt, Samuel; Huber, Daniel; Lopez, Eric; Gaidos, Eric; Livingston, John

    2017-10-01

    Despite more than twenty years since the initial discovery of highly irradiated gas giant planets, the mechanism for planet inflation remains unknown. However, proposed planet inflation mechanisms can now be separated into two general classes: those which allow for post-main sequence planet inflation by direct irradiation from the host star, and those which only allow for slowed cooling of the planet over its lifetime. The recent discovery of two inflated warm Jupiters orbiting red giant stars with the NASA K2 Mission allows distinction between these two classes, but uncertainty in the planet radius blurs this distinction. Observing transits of these planets with the Spitzer Space Telescope would reduce stellar variability and thus planet radius uncertainties by approximately 50% relative to K2, allowing distinction between the two planet inflation model classes at a 3-sigma level. We propose to observe one transit of both known warm Jupiters orbiting red giant stars, K2-97b and EPIC228754001.01, to distinguish between planet model inflation classes and measure the planetary heating efficiency to 3-sigma precision. These systems are benchmarks for the upcoming NASA TESS Mission, which is predicted to discover an order of magnitude more red giant planet systems after launching next year.

  4. Nuclear elasticity applied to giant resonances of fast rotating nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, S.; Bouyssy, A.

    1987-06-01

    Isoscalar giant resonances in fast rotating nuclei are investigated within the framework of nuclear elasticity by solving the equation of motion of elastic nuclear medium in a rotating frame of reference. Both Coriolis and centrifugal forces are taken into account. The nuclear rotation removes completely the azimuthal degeneracy of the giant resonance energies. Realistic large values of the angular velocity, which are still small as compared to the giant resonance frequencies, are briefly reviewed in relation to allowed high angular momenta. It is shown that for the A=150 region, the Coriolis force is dominating for small values (< ∼ 0.05) of the ratio of angular velocity to resonance frequency, whereas the centrifugal force plays a prominent part in the shift of the split resonance energies for larger values of the ratio. Typical examples of the resonance energies and their fragmentation due to both rotation and deformation are given

  5. Fluid dynamics of giant resonances on high spin states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Nardo, M.; Di Toro, M.; Giansiracusa, G.; Lombardo, U.; Russo, G.

    1983-01-01

    We describe giant resonances built on high spin states along the yrast line as scaling solutions of a linearized Vlasov equation in a rotating frame obtained from a TDHF theory in phase space. For oblate cranked solutions we get a shift and a splitting of the isoscalar giant resonances in terms of the angular velocity. Results are shown for 40 Ca and 168 Er. The relative CM strengths are also calculated. (orig.)

  6. Giant resonances in free atoms and in clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brechignac, C.; Connerade, J.P.

    1994-01-01

    A review of recent developments in the study of giant resonances in free atoms and in clusters is presented, with particular emphasis on the transition from free atoms to atoms in the condensed phase. Giant resonances in alkali and related metallic clusters due to the excitation of closed shells of delocalized electrons are also reviewed and the relation between different types of collective oscillations is discussed. (author)

  7. Direct vs statistical decay of nuclear giant multipole resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, H.; Hussein, M.S.; Carlson, B.V.; Merchant, A.C.; Adhikari, S.K.

    1986-01-01

    A theoretical framework for the description of the decay of giant multipole resonances id developed. Besides the direct decay, both the pre-equilibrium and statistical (compound) decays are taken into account in a consistent way. It is shown that the statistical decay of the giant resonance is not necessarily described by the Hauser-Feshbach theory owing to the presence of a mixing parameter, which measures the degree of fragmentation. Applications are made to several cases. (Author) [pt

  8. Giant 4p-quadrupole resonances in the Rare Earths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthew, J.A.D.; Netzer, F.P.; Clark, C.W.; Morar, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    X-ray absorption of Ce obtained by partial secondary yield, is compared with previously obtained electron-energy loss measurements in reflection mode. The absence of a strong feature below 4p 3/2 threshold in photon absorption provides confirmation that the peak in EELS is nondipole in character. Theoretical analysis supports interpretation in terms of a p-f giant quadrupole resonance, a result which broadens the analogy between giant resonances in atomic and nuclear physics

  9. Giant dipole resonance in hot rotating nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakrabarty, D.R. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Nuclear Physics Division, Mumbai (India); Dinh Dang, N. [RIKEN, Nishina Centre for Accelerator-based Science, Saitama (Japan); VINATOM, Institute of Nuclear Science and Technique, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Datar, V.M. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, INO Cell, Mumbai (India)

    2016-05-15

    Over the last several decades, extensive experimental and theoretical work has been done on the giant dipole resonance (GDR) in excited nuclei covering a wide range of temperature (T), angular momentum (J) and nuclear mass. A reasonable stability of the GDR centroid energy and an increase of the GDR width with T (in the range∝1-3 MeV) and J are the two well-established results. Some experiments have indicated the saturation of the GDR width at high T. The gradual disappearance of the GDR vibration at much higher T has been observed. Experiments on the Jacobi transition and the GDR built on superdeformed shapes at high rotational frequencies have been reported in a few cases. Theoretical calculations on the damping of the collective dipole vibration, characterised by the GDR width, have been carried out within various models such as the thermal shape fluctuation model and the phonon damping model. These models offer different interpretations of the variation of the GDR width with T and J and have met with varying degrees of success in explaining the experimental data. In this review, the present experimental and theoretical status in this field is discussed along with the future outlook. The interesting phenomenon of the pre-equilibrium GDR excitation in nuclear reactions is briefly addressed. (orig.)

  10. Giant resonances in atoms and in fluorine cage molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansfield, M.W.D.

    1987-01-01

    Giant resonances in the photoabsorption spectra of atoms occur in the extreme ultraviolet region of the electromagnetic spectrum. In order to observe absorption spectra in this region it is necessary to generate columns of atomic vapor which will often by very hot and chemically aggressive, and to contain them without solid windows between two regions of high vacuum, the spectrometer and the light source, usually an electron synchrotron. The technical problems are often formidable so that although it had long been recognized that giant resonances in solid lanthanides were essentially atomic phenomena (Fomichev et al. 1967, Dehmer et al. 1971) earlier investigations of giant resonances in atoms were limited to the more manageable elements which precede the transition rows, the inert gases, alkali and alkaline earth elements. In this paper the authors discusses the spectra of transition row atoms in order of decreasing localization (Smith and Kmetko 1983) viz. 4d → f, 5d → f, 3p → d, 4p → d and 5p → d. He tends to avoid discussion of the giant resonances themselves because their profiles and interpretation will be discussed comprehensively by other contributors. Instead he concentrates on the detailed analyses which have been attempted of the discrete structure which usually accompanies giant resonances in atoms. Interpretation of this structure can provide accurate determinations of thresholds for inner shell excitation in atoms and can also be used to anticipate structure which may overlie the giant resonances and distort their profiles. 75 references, 21 figures

  11. Excitation and photon decay of giant multipole resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand, F.E.; Beene, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    A brief review of the excitation of giant multipole resonances via Coulomb excitation is given which emphasizes the very large cross sections that can be realized through this reaction for both isoscalar and isovector resonances. Discussion and results where available, are provide for the measurement of the photon decay of one and two phonon giant resonances. It is pointed out throughout the presentation that the use of E1 photons as a ''tag'' provides a means to observe weakly excited resonances that cannot be observed in the singles spectra. 14 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab

  12. Electromagnetic spin–orbit interaction and giant spin-Hall effect in dielectric particle clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yineng [Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Zhang, Xiangdong, E-mail: zhangxd@bit.edu.cn [School of Physics and Beijing Key Laboratory of Nanophotonics and Ultrafine Optoelectronic Systems, Beijing Institute of Technology, 100081, Beijing (China)

    2013-12-09

    We report a phenomenon that electromagnetic spin–orbit interactions can be tailored by dielectric nanoparticles, and self-similar giant spin-Hall effect has been observed in the dielectric particle cluster. The near-field phase singularities and phase vorticity in the longitudinal component of scattered field can also be controlled by such a dielectric structure. The origin of phenomena is believed to be due to the collective resonance excitation in the dielectric particle cluster. It is expected to find applications in optics information processing and designing new nanophotonic devices.

  13. New results on multiple excitations of giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mordechai, S.; Texas Univ., Austin, TX; Moore, C.F.

    1993-01-01

    Exotic excitations like the double giant dipole were predicted for many years but not observed experimentally until recently. Several experiments have been carried out at Los Alamos National laboratory to search for these new collective modes of the nucleus. The results discover two previously unobserved types of double giant resonances. This work presents the recent pion double charge exchange data and the analysis that support the existence of two such exotic vibrational nuclear modes

  14. Recent Results From Skyrme-TDHF: Giant Resonances and Collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, Paul D.

    2007-01-01

    Using fully three-dimensional Time-Dependent Hartree-Fock with Skyrme forces allows one to explore small and large amplitude collective motion in nuclei using only an effective interaction fitted to ground state and nuclear matter properties as input. In this talk, results are presented for TDHF calculations of giant resonances and nuclear collisions. We examine deformation splitting of the giant dipole resonance on ground and excited intrinsic superdeformed states, showing the interplay between Landau splitting and deformation splitting, including effects of triaxiality[1]. In the case of giant monopole resonances, isospin-mixing is examined, showing that the isovector and isoscalar parts of strength functions are strongly coupled [2]. The role of absorption in the TDHF approach to linear and nonlinear regimes is examined[3]. Calculations of nuclear collisions are also explored, showing that the effects of fully relaxed symmetry produce new modes of energy loss not found in previous calculations [4]. (Author)

  15. The direct neutron decay of giant resonances in 208Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bracco, A.

    1988-01-01

    The neutron decay of the giant multipole resonance region from 9 to 15 MeV of excitation energy in 208 Pb has been studied. Neutron branching ratios for the decay to the ground state and to the low-lying excited states of 207 Pb were measured as a function of the excitation energy of 208 Pb and compared to Hauser-Feshbach calculations. While the neutron branching ratios from the energy region of the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance are reproduced by the calculations, the ratios from the energy region of the isoscalar giant monopole resonance show a conspicuous excess with respect to the statistical model predictions. The neutron yield from this energy region was analysed in terms of a multistep model of the compound nucleus which includes collective doorway channels. The total direct escape width as well as the associated direct partial escape widths to the lowest five valence hole states of 207 Pb were determined. (orig.)

  16. Giant monopole resonance in transitional and deformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garg, U.; Bogucki, P.; Bronson, J.D.; Lui, Y.; Youngblood, D.H.

    1984-01-01

    Small-angle inelastic α-scattering measurements have been made at E/sub α/ = 129 MeV on /sup 144,148/Sm and /sup 142,146,150/Nd to investigate the giant monopole resonance in transitional and deformed nuclei. The experimental data reveal a mixing of L = 0 and L = 2 modes in 148 Sm resulting in almost identical angular distributions for the two components of the giant resonance peaks in the angular range 2 0 --6 0 . A ''splitting'' of the giant monopole resonance is observed in 150 Nd; the extent of this splitting is smaller than that reported for 154 Sm. Comparison is made with the predictions of various theoretical models

  17. Is There a Pronounced Giant Dipole Resonance in 4He?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efros, V.D.; Efros, V.D.; Leidemann, W.; Orlandini, G.; Orlandini, G.

    1997-01-01

    A four-nucleon calculation of the total 4 He photodisintegration cross section is performed. The full final-state interaction is taken into account for the first time. This is achieved via the method of the Lorentz integral transform. Semirealistic NN interactions are employed. Different from the known partial two-body 4 He( γ,n) 3 He and 4 He( γ,p) 3 H cross sections our total cross section exhibits a pronounced giant resonance. Thus, in contrast to older (γ,np) data, we predict quite a strong contribution of the (γ,np) channel at the giant resonance peak energy. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  18. Hybrid model for the decay of nuclear giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, M.S.

    1986-12-01

    The decay properties of nuclear giant multipole resonances are discussed within a hybrid model that incorporates, in a unitary consistent way, both the coherent and statistical features. It is suggested that the 'direct' decay of the GR is described with continuum first RPA and the statistical decay calculated with a modified Hauser-Feshbach model. Application is made to the decay of the giant monopole resonance in 208 Pb. Suggestions are made concerning the calculation of the mixing parameter using the statistical properties of the shell model eigenstates at high excitation energies. (Author) [pt

  19. Relativistic Coulomb excitation of giant resonances in the hydrodynamic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcellos Gomes, Ana Cristina de.

    1990-05-01

    We investigate the Coulomb excitation of giant dipole resonances in relativistic heavy ion collisions using a macroscopic hydrodynamical model for the harmonic vibrations of the nuclear fluid. The motion is treated as a combination of the Goldhaber-Teller displacement mode and the Steinwedel-Jensen acoustic mode, and the restoring forces are calculated using the droplet model. This model is used as input to study the characteristics of multiple excitation of giant dipole resonances in nuclei. Possible signatures for the existence of such states are also discussed quantitatively. (author). 52 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs

  20. A Boltzmann equation approach to the damping of giant resonances in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuck, P.; Winter, J.

    1983-01-01

    The Vlasov equation plus collision term (Boltzmann equation) represents an appropriate frame for the treatment of giant resonances (zero sound modes) in nuclei. With no adjustable parameters we obtain correct positions and widths for the giant quadrupole resonances. (author)

  1. A self-consistent semiclassical sum rule approach to the average properties of giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guoqiang; Xu Gongou

    1990-01-01

    The average energies of isovector giant resonances and the widths of isoscalar giant resonances are evaluated with the help of a self-consistent semiclassical Sum rule approach. The comparison of the present results with the experimental ones justifies the self-consistent semiclassical sum rule approach to the average properties of giant resonances

  2. Structure of the giant dipole resonance in 208Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Naggar, N.M.

    1977-01-01

    A new scheme is devised to study the giant resonance in the heavy magic nucleus 208 Pb. The effect of the 4 + and 5 - collective excitations of the nucleus core is demonstrated. The calculated cross section is compared with the experimental data. (author)

  3. A sum rule description of giant resonances at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, J.; Quentin, P.; Brack, M.

    1983-01-01

    A generalization of the sum rule approach to collective motion at finite temperature is presented. The m 1 and msub(-1) sum rules for the isovector dipole and the isoscalar monopole electric modes have been evaluated with the modified SkM force for the 208 Pb nucleus. The variation of the resulting giant resonance energies with temperature is discussed. (orig.)

  4. Extreme orbital evolution from hierarchical secular coupling of two giant planets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teyssandier, Jean; Naoz, Smadar; Lizarraga, Ian; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2013-01-01

    Observations of exoplanets over the last two decades have revealed a new class of Jupiter-size planets with orbital periods of a few days, the so-called 'hot Jupiters'. Recent measurements using the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect have shown that many (∼50%) of these planets are misaligned; furthermore, some (∼15%) are even retrograde with respect to the stellar spin axis. Motivated by these observations, we explore the possibility of forming retrograde orbits in hierarchical triple configurations consisting of a star-planet inner pair with another giant planet, or brown dwarf, in a much wider orbit. Recently, it was shown that in such a system, the inner planet's orbit can flip back and forth from prograde to retrograde and can also reach extremely high eccentricities. Here we map a significant part of the parameter space of dynamical outcomes for these systems. We derive strong constraints on the orbital configurations for the outer perturber (the tertiary) that could lead to the formation of hot Jupiters with misaligned or retrograde orbits. We focus only on the secular evolution, neglecting other dynamical effects such as mean-motion resonances, as well as all dissipative forces. For example, with an inner Jupiter-like planet initially on a nearly circular orbit at 5 AU, we show that a misaligned hot Jupiter is likely to be formed in the presence of a more massive planetary companion (>2 M J ) within ∼140 AU of the inner system, with mutual inclination >50° and eccentricity above ∼0.25. This is in striking contrast to the test particle approximation, where an almost perpendicular configuration can still cause large-eccentricity excitations, but flips of an inner Jupiter-like planet are much less likely to occur. The constraints we derive can be used to guide future observations and, in particular, searches for more distant companions in systems containing a hot Jupiter.

  5. Isovector giant monopole resonances: A sum-rule approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goeke, K.; Bonn Univ.; Castel, B.

    1980-01-01

    Several useful sum rules associated with isovector giant monopole resonances are calculated for doubly closed shell nuclei. The calculation is based on techniques known from constrained and adiabatic time-dependent Hartree-Fock theories and assume various Skyrme interactions. The results obtained form, together with the compiled literature, the basis for a quantitative description of the RPA strength distribution in terms of energy-weighted moments. These, together with strength distribution properties, are determined by a hierarchy of determinantal relations between moments. The isovector giant monopole resonance turns out to be a rather broad resonance centered at E = 46 Asup(-1/10) MeV with an extended width of more than 16 MeV. The consequences regarding isospin impurities in the nuclear ground state are discussed. (orig.)

  6. The natural line shape of the giant dipole resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, E.F.; Pitthan, R.

    1977-01-01

    Investigation of photoabsorption experiments in the spherical nucleus 141 Pr, the quasispherical dynamically deformed 197 Au, and the statically deformed 165 Ho showed that the function which describes best the energy dependence of the reduced transition probability is given by the Breit-Wigner form rather than the Lorentz form. However, the form of the resulting measured cross section is approximately of the Lorentz type. The dependence of the giant resonance width GAMMA on the excitation energy was also investigated, and found to be less than 1% per MeV if one considered the known isovector E2 resonance above the giant dipole resonance. Best fit values of the reduced transition probabilities for the three nuclei are given and compared to (e,e') results. (Auth.)

  7. Electromagnetic excitation of the two-phonon giant dipole resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emling, H.

    1994-03-01

    It is the aim of this article to summarize our present knowledge on the double isovector giant dipole resonance (DGDR) and our understanding of the electromagnetic excitation mechanism in heavy ion collisions in the relativistic energy regime. In the following chapter, a brief resume on the history of giant resonances is given and, based on their understanding, conclusions on the expected properties of multi-phonon resonances are drawn. In chapter 2, the essential features of electromagnetic heavy ion interactions at (near) relativistic velocities will be illuminated and the theoretical framework is presented, which describes such processes. New experimental methods were required for an appropriate study of Coulomb dissociation processes, which are discussed in chapter 3 together with the experimental results. Chapter 4 is dedicated to summarize the results from electromagnetic excitation studies, to compare with those from alternative methods and, in particular, to contrast experimental findings with theoretical predictions and to address open problems. (orig.)

  8. Collisional width of giant resonances and interplay with Landau damping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonasera, A.; Burgio, G.F.; Di Toro, M.; Wolter, H.H.

    1989-01-01

    We present a semiclassical method to calculate the widths of giant resonances. We solve a mean-field kinetic equation (Vlasov equation) with collision terms treated within the relaxation time approximation to construct a damped strength distribution for collective motions. The relaxation time is evaluated from the time evolution of distortions in the nucleon momentum distribution using a test-particle approach. The importance of an energy dependent nucleon-nucleon cross section is stressed. Results are shown for isoscalar giant quadrupole and octupole motions. A quite important interplay between self-consistent (Landau) and collisional damping is revealed

  9. Fragmentation of giant dipole resonance at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vdovin, A.

    2005-01-01

    It is well known that the main part of a width of a collective giant resonance built on the ground state in heavy nuclei is due to coupling of one-phonon vibrational states with more complex ones like two phonon or two-particle - two-hole. So it seems natural that the same idea was also explored in studying of the formation and dependence on temperature of a width of giant resonances built on a compound nuclear state. The first microscopic calculations of a giant dipole resonance width at finite temperature have demonstrated its weak dependence on T whereas the experimental width Γ exp strongly increases up to T≤3 MeV. The observed thermal behaviour of Γ exp was attributed mainly to thermal fluctuations of a nuclear shape at finite T . However, further theoretical studies of the problem have shown a strengthening of the GDR spreading with T. We calculate a fragmentation of the giant dipole resonance in hot spherical nuclei within the approach based on the quasiparticle-phonon model extended to finite temperature in with the formalism of thermofield dynamics. The fragmentation of collective giant dipole vibrations at finite T is due to the coupling with 'two-thermal phonon' configurations. The energies and structures of thermal phonon states are calculated from the thermal RPA temperature dependence of the variance σ th of a theoretical E1 strength function and the experimental GDR width Γ exp in 120 Sn. The coupling of thermal phonons is determined by their fermionic structure. The variance σ th of the E1 strength function is found continuously increasing with temperature. The main reason of this behavior is the coupling of the dipole phonons with very low-lying particle-particle (hole-hole) thermal phonons. These phonons are noncollective ones and they appear only at T≠0. The calculated T dependence of σ th is quite similar to that of the experimental width Γ exp in 120 Sn and 208 Pb

  10. Excitation of giant resonances through inelastic scattering of 170 at 84 MeV/u. Fission decay of giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabot, C.; Barrette, J.; Mark, S.K.; Turcotte, R.; Xing, J.; Van der Woude, A.; Van Den Berg, A. M.

    1991-01-01

    Inelastic scattering of 84 MeV/u 17 0 projectiles have been used to excite the giant resonances (GR) in various nuclei ranging from A=60 to A=232. For the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance (ISGQR), the energy and width of the resonance, as well as the EWSR obtained from the measured cross sections, are in agreement with the known systematics for A>40. The observed GMR strengths are close to 100% EWRS and are consistent with other recent experimental results using heavy ion projectiles. These results lead to a somewhat different picture than that provided by previous studies using light projectiles. Strength is also observed at high excitation energy. The analysis of these resonances is in progress. Our study of the fission decay of GR in 232 Th leads to a somewhat different conclusion than previously deduced from data obtained with light ion projectiles, where no evidence for the fission decay of the ISGQR has been found. In the present work, due to the very good peak-to-continuum ratio, a structure is observed in the fission coincidence spectrum around 10 MeV which can be attributed to the fission decay of giant resonances. The measured fission probability is consistent with a statistical decay of the ISGQR. 10 figs

  11. Study of giant multipole resonances in 40Ca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rost, H.

    1979-01-01

    In the present thesis giant resonance states in 40 Ca were studied by scattering of 104 MeV a particles on 40 Ca and by the reactions 39 K(p vector,p') 39 K and 39 K(p,α) 36 Ar. The scattered α-particles were measured at extreme forward angles (THETAsub(L) = 4 0 -16 0 C), because at forward angles the cross sections for the excitation of states with spin 0 and 1 strongly differ from those with higher spin. The aim of this experiment was first of all the study of the giant resonance region in 40 Ca on the contribution to 0 + or 1 - states. Beside the known electric giant quadrupole resonances at Esub(x) approx. equal to 18.5 MeV (25% EWSR) contributions of EO-strength at Esub(x) approx. equal to 21 MeV (6% EWSR) and indications to a (isoscalar) E1-strength at Esub(x) approx. equal to 14 MeV and Esub(x) approx. equal to 16 MeV were found. At the reactions 39 K(p vector,p') 39 K and 39 K(p,α) 36 Ar in the channels (p,p 0 ),(p,p 4 ), (p,αsub(o)), and (p,α 1 ) at incident energies at about 10 MeV (Esub(x)( 40 Ca) approx. equal to 18 MeV) resonant structures were observed. A scattering phase analysis performed for the elastic proton scattering didn't however yield quantitative results about the resonance parameter. An expansion of the cross sections by Legendre polynomials for the remaining reaction channel didn't allow a conclusion about the dominance of a certain L-value. The only indication to the connection of the observed resonant structures with the giant quadrupole resonance in 40 Ca is therefore the energetic position at about Esub(x) approx. equal to 18 MeV. Altogether the observed structures however were not very pronounced, so it can be concluded, that the excitation of the giant quadrupole resonance in 40 Ca by protons via the ground state of 39 K occurs not very strongly. (orig./HSI) [de

  12. Overtones of isoscalar giant resonances studied in direct particle decay measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunyadi, M; van den Berg, AM; Csatlos, M; Csige, L; Davids, B; Garg, U; Gulyas, J; Harakeh, MN; de Huu, MA; Krasznahorkay, A; Sohler, D; Wortche, HJ

    The isoscalar giant dipole resonance (ISGDR), which is the lowest-energy overtone mode of the isoscalar giant resonances, has been studied in some medium-heavy and heavy nuclei in coincidence measurements. The observation of the direct nucleon decay channels significantly helped to enhance giant

  13. Observation of the M1 giant resonance by resonance averaging in 106Pd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopecky, J.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation of capture of 2 keV and 24 keV neutrons in a 105 Pd target resulted in resonance-averaged intensities of primary gamma rays with energies between 5.2 and 9.5 MeV. From these intensities the gamma ray strength functions have been evaluated for E1, M1 and E2 radiation and compared with predictions of the giant resonance theory. The inclusion of an energy dependent spreading width for the E1 giant resonance is necessary. The energy distribution of M1 reduced strength is consistent with an interpretation of a broad resonance around 8.8 MeV. E2 data agrees satisfactorily with the giant extrapolation. (orig.)

  14. Statistical decay of giant monopole resonance in 208Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, H.; Wolynec, E.

    1984-01-01

    The neutron spectrum from the decay of the monopole giant resonance in 208 Pb is calculated using the known energy levels of 207 Pb. The particle vibrator model is used to assign spins parities to the measured 207 Pb levels, where these were not avaliable from experiments. The results of the Hauser-Feshbach calculation is in excellent agreement with the experimental spectrum, showing that the observed fast neutrons can be completely explained assuming a statistical decay. (Author) [pt

  15. The width of the giant dipole resonance at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mau, N.V.

    1992-01-01

    A method is proposed to evaluate the effect of the change of the Fermi sea on the width of the giant dipole resonance at finite temperature. In a schematic model it is found that, indeed, in 208 Pb the width increases very sharply up to about T=4 MeV but shows a much weaker variation for higher temperature. (author) 26 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Temperature dependence of spreading width of giant dipole resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storozhenko, A.N.; Vdovin, A.I.; Ventura, A.; Blokhin, A.I.

    2002-01-01

    The Quasiparticle-Phonon Nuclear Model extended to finite temperature within the framework of Thermo Field Dynamics is applied to calculate a temperature dependence of the spreading width Γ ↓ of a giant dipole resonance. Numerical calculations are made for 120 Sn and 208 Pb nuclei. It is found that Γ ↓ increases with T. The reason of this effect is discussed as well as a relation of the present approach to other ones, existing in the literature

  17. Quantized TDHF for isoscalar giant quadrupole resonances in spherical nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drozdz, S.; Okolowicz, J.; Ploszajczak, M.; Caurier, E.

    1988-01-01

    The time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory supplemented with the regularity and single-valuedness quantization condition for the gauge invariant component of the wavefunction is applied to the description of the centroid energy and escape width of isoscalar giant quadrupole resonances in 16 O, 40 Ca and 110 Zr. Calculations are performed using the Skyrme SIII effective interaction. An important role of the finite oscillation amplitude in the mean-field dynamics is emphasized. (orig.)

  18. Direct vs statistical decay of nuclear giant multipole resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, M.S.

    1986-07-01

    A theoretical framework for the description of the decay of giant multipole resonances is developed. Besides the direct decay, both the pre-equilibrium and statistical (compound) decays are taken into account in a consistent way. It is shown that the statistical decay of the GR is not necessarily correctly described by the Hauser-Feshbach theory owing to the presence of a mixing parameter, which measures the degree of fragmentation. Applications are made to several cases. (Author) [pt

  19. Statistical decay of the E1 giant resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teruya, N.; Dias, H.; Wolynec, E.

    1987-10-01

    Available esperimental data on neutron decay spectra from the E1 giant resonances in 208 Pb and 209 Bi are compared with the predicted spectra for statistical decay. The calculations are performed using the Hauser-Feshbach formalism with the experimental levels of the residual nuclei. The particle-vibrator model is used to assign spins and parities to experimental levels when those are unknown and also to predict the levels where there is not enough experimental information. (author) [pt

  20. Giant right atrial myxoma: characterization with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ridge, Carole A

    2012-02-01

    A 53-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with a 2-week history of dyspnoea and chest pain. Computed tomography pulmonary angiography was performed to exclude acute pulmonary embolism (PE). This demonstrated a large right atrial mass and no evidence of PE. Transthoracic echocardiography followed by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging confirmed a mobile right atrial mass. Surgical resection was then performed confirming a giant right atrial myxoma. We describe the typical clinical, radiologic, and pathologic features of right atrial myxoma.

  1. Optimization experiments on the study of giant resonance in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyubarskij, G.Ya.; Savitskij, G.A.; Fartushnyj, V.A.; Khazhmuradov, M.A.; Levandovskij, S.P.

    1988-01-01

    Optimum choice of the target exposure to a beam in experiments on the study of giant resonances in nuclei is considered. Optimization is aimed at reducing mean square errors of defined formfactors. Four different optimization quality criteria - variances of four form factor experimental values are considered. Variances resulting form optimization are 1.5-2 times as less as variances in real experiment. The effect of experiment design optimization criterion on form factors determination errors is ascertained. 1 ref.; 3 tabs

  2. Theoretical Predictions of Giant Resonances in 94Mo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Matthew; Bonasera, Giacomo; Shlomo, Shalom

    2016-09-01

    We perform Hartree-Fock based Random Phase Approximation using thirty-three common Skyrme interactions found in the literature for 94Mo. We calculate the strength functions and the Centroid Energies of the Isoscalar Giant Resonances for all multipolarities L0, L1, L2, L3. We compare the calculated Centroid Energies with the experimental value; we also study the Centroid Energy and any correlation it may have with the Nuclear Matter properties of each interaction.

  3. On the lunar node resonance of the orbital plane evolution of the Earth's satellite orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ting-Lei

    2018-06-01

    This paper aims to investigate the effects of lunar node resonance on the circular medium Earth orbits (MEO). The dynamical model is established in classical Hamiltonian systems with the application of Lie transform to remove the non-resonant terms. Resonant condition, stability and phase structures are studied. The lunar node resonance occurs when the secular changing rates of the orbital node (with respect to the equator) and the lunar node (with respect to the ecliptic) form a simple integer ratio. The resonant conditions are satisfied for both inclined and equatorial orbits. The orbital plane would have long period (with typical timescales of several centuries) fluctuation due to the resonance.

  4. Electron inelastic scattering by compound nuclei and giant multipole resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhavadov, A.V.; Mukhtarov, A.I.; Mirabutalybov, M.M.

    1980-01-01

    Multipole giant resonances in heavy nuclei have been investigated with the application of the Danos-Greiner dynamic collective theory to the Tassi model. The monopole giant resonance has been studied in 158 Gd, 166 Er, 184 W, 232 Th and 238 V nuclei at the incident electron energy E=200 MeV. Dependences of the form factor square of electron scattering by a 166 Er nucleus on the scattering angle obtained in the distorted-wave high-energy approximation (DWHEA) are presented. Giant dipole and quadrupole resonances in 60 Ni and 90 Zr nuclei have been studied. A comparison has been made of theoretical results obtained in the DWHEA for the dependence of the form factor square on the effective momentum transfer with the experimental data. The analysis of the obtained results led to the following conclusions. To draw a conclusion about the validity of one or another nuclear model and methods for calculating form factors, it is necessary to investigate, both theoretically and experimentally, electron scattering at great angles (THETA>=70 deg). To obtain a good agreement it is necessary to take account of the actual proton and neutron distributions in the ground state and their dynamic properties in an excited state [ru

  5. Random phase approximation: from Giant to Intra-doublet resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M.Ya.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss here the history and current achievements of one of the most powerful approaches of 20th century physics--the random phase approximation (RPA) that permits us to study collective or multiparticle effects in atoms, nuclei, molecules and clusters, as well as in quantum liquids. We concentrate on RPA application to studies of isolated atoms where it permits one to disclose the collective multielectron nature of so-called Giant resonances and predict a number of others, like Interference and Intra-doublet resonances. We present general theory as well as results of concrete calculations for a number of atoms

  6. Random phase approximation: from Giant to Intra-doublet resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amusia, M.Ya. E-mail: amusia@vms.huji.ac.il

    2004-06-01

    We discuss here the history and current achievements of one of the most powerful approaches of 20th century physics--the random phase approximation (RPA) that permits us to study collective or multiparticle effects in atoms, nuclei, molecules and clusters, as well as in quantum liquids. We concentrate on RPA application to studies of isolated atoms where it permits one to disclose the collective multielectron nature of so-called Giant resonances and predict a number of others, like Interference and Intra-doublet resonances. We present general theory as well as results of concrete calculations for a number of atoms.

  7. Electroexcitation of giant multipole resonances in 208Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasao, M.; Torizuka, Y.

    1977-01-01

    Electroexcitation of the nuclear continuum for 208 Pb at excitation energies up to 100 MeV has been measured at momentum transfers in the range from 0.45 to 1.2 fm -1 . Unfolding of the radiation tail was performed using a tail function which takes into account the multiple-photon emission effect. The spectra at these momentum transfers deviate significantly from the prediction of the Fermi-gas model but are consistent with the sum of the multipole strengths of the random-phase approximation; the excess cross section on the low excitation energy side indicates the excitation of multipole resonances. A series of 208 Pb spectra at low momentum transfers was expanded into E1, E2 (E0), E3, and higher multipole components using the q dependence of the Tassie model for isoscalar modes and the Goldhaber-Teller or Steinwedel-Jensen model for isovector modes. The giant dipole resonance thus obtained is consistent with that from photoreactions. Isoscalar and isovector giant quadrupole resonances are seen, respectively, at 11 and 22.5 MeV and an octupole resonance at 16 MeV. A monopole resonance is suggested at 13.5 MeV. The reduced 2 > 2 , B (E1), B (E2), and B (E3) consume most of the corresponding energy weighted sum rule if the q dependences of the Tassie and Goldhaber-Teller models are assumed. The results with these models are consistent with the random-phase approximation

  8. Giant resonance phenomena in the electron impact ionization of heavy atoms and ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younger, S.M.

    1986-01-01

    Heavy atoms and ions offer an interesting opportunity to study atomic physics in a region where the atomic structure is dominated by the interelectronic interactions. One illustration of this is the profound term dependence of atomic orbitals for certain configurations of heavy atoms and ions. The appearance of giant scattering resonances in the cross sections for ionization of heavy atoms by electron impact is a manifestation of resonance behavior. Such resonant structures arise from the double well nature of the scattering potential and have recently been identified in the cross sections for the electron impact ionization of several xenon-like ions. The results of calculations showing effects for a variety of other ions are summarized. 7 refs., 4 figs

  9. Extrasolar Giant Planet in Earth-like Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-07-01

    companion . iota Hor b has an orbital period of 320 days. From this period, the known mass of the central star (1.03 solar masses) and the amplitude of the velocity changes, a mass of at least 2.26 times that of planet Jupiter is deduced for the planet. It revolves around the host star in a somewhat elongated orbit (the eccentricity is 0.16). If it were located in our own solar system, this orbit would stretch from just outside the orbit of Venus (at 117 million km or 0.78 Astronomical Units from the Sun) to just outside the orbit of the Earth (the point farthest from the Sun, at 162 million km or 1.08 Astronomical Units) The new giant planet is thus moving in an orbit not unlike that of the Earth. In fact, of all the planets discovered so far, the orbit of iota Hor b is the most Earth-like. Also, with a spectral type of G0 V , its host star is quite similar to the Sun (G2 V). iota Hor b is, however, at least 720 times more massive than the Earth and it is probably more similar to planet Jupiter in our own solar system. While the radial velocity technique described above only determines a minimum value for the planet's mass, an analysis of the velocity with which the star turns around its own axis suggests that the true mass of iota Hor b is unlikely to be much higher. A difficult case Natural phenomena with periods near one solar year always present a particular challenge to astronomers. This is one of the reasons why it has been necessary to observe the iota Hor system for such a long time to be absolutely sure about the present result. First, special care must be taken to verify that the radial velocity variations found in the data are not an artefact of the Earth's movement around the Sun. In any case, the effect of this movement on the measurements must be accurately accounted for; it reaches about ± 30 km/sec over one year, i.e. much larger than the effect of the new planet. In the present case of iota Hor , this was thoroughly tested and any residual influence of

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of large and giant intracranial aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumura, Kenichi; Saito, Akira; Nakasu, Yoko; Matsuda, Masayuki; Handa, Jyoji [Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga (Japan); Todo, Giro

    1990-06-01

    Twelve large or giant intracranial aneurysms were studied with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and the findings were compared with those from computed tomographic (CT) scanning. Characteristic MR features of such aneurysms are: round, extra-axial mass with hypointensity rim; signal void, paradoxical enhancement, or even-echo rephasing due to blood flow; and laminated, eccentric thrombus with increased signal intensity when fresh, perianeurysmal hemorrhage occurs in the acute or subacute stage after aneurysmal rupture. MR imaging, however, often fails to identify or characterize the area of calcification. For the diagnosis of large or giant intracranial aneurysms, MR imaging is apparently superior to CT scanning in differentiating aneurysms from tumors, delineating the blood flow and intraluminal thrombus, and detecting the exact size of the aneurysm. It may also provide useful information concerning the growth mechanisms of aneurysms with or without thrombus formation. (author).

  11. Isotopic dependence of the giant quadrupole resonance in the stable even-mass molybdenum nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moalem, A.; Gaillard, Y.; Bemolle, A.M.; Buenerd, M.; Chauvin, J.; Duhamel, G.; Lebrun, D.; Martin, P.; Perrin, G.; de Saintignon, P.

    1979-01-01

    Inelastic scattering of 110 MeV 3 He particles is used to probe the quadrupole strength in the even Mo isotopes. The peak position of the giant quadrupole resonance is found to decrease more rapidly than predicted by the A/sup -1/3/ law, a behavior very similar to that exhibited by the photonuclear giant dipole resonance. The width and strength of the giant quadrupole resonance are practically constant in 92 Mo through 100 Mo

  12. Giant resonance of electrical multipole from droplet model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tauhata, L.

    1984-01-01

    The formalism of the electrical multipole resonance developed from the Droplet nuclear model is presented. It combines the approaches of Goldhaber-Teller (GT) and Steinwedel-Jensen (SJ) and it shows the relative contribution of Coulomb, superficial and neutron excess energies. It also discusses the calculation of half-width. The model evaluates correctly the resonance energies as a function of nuclear mass and allows, through the Mixture Index, the prediction of the complementary participation of modes SJ and GT in the giant nuclear resonance. Values of the mixture index, for each multipolarity, reproduce well the form factors obtained from experiments of charged particle inelastic scattering. The formalism presented for the calculation of the half-width gives a macroscopic description of the friction mechanism. The establishment of the macroscopic structure of the Dissipation Function is used as a reference in the comparison of microscopic calculations. (Author) [pt

  13. Form factors and radiation widths of the giant multipole resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisov, V.Yu.

    1990-01-01

    Simple analytic relations for the form factors of inelastic electron scattering in the Born approximation and radiation widths of the isovector and isoscalar giant multipole resonances are derived. The dynamic relationship between the volume and surface density vibrations were taken into account in this calculation. The form factors in the Born approximation were found to be in satisfactory agreement with experimental data in the region of small transferred momenta. The radiation widths of isoscalar multipole resonances increase when the number of nucleons increase as A 1/3 , and for isovector resonances this dependence has the form f(A)A 1/3 , where f(A) is a slowly increasing function of A. Radiation widths well fit the experimental data

  14. Excitation and photon decay of giant resonances excited by intermediate energy heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand, F.E.; Beene, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Inelastic scattering of medium energy heavy ions provides very large cross sections and peak-to-continuum ratios for excitation of giant resonances. For energies above about 50 MeV/nucleon, giant resonances are excited primarily through Coulomb excitation, which is indifferent to isospin, thus providing a good probe for the study of isovector giant resonances. The extremely large cross sections available from heavy ion excitation permit the study of rare decay modes of the giant resonances. In particular, recent measurements have been made of the photon decay of giant resonances following excitation by 22 and 84 MeV/nucleon 17 O projectiles. The singles results at 84 MeV/nucleon yield peak cross sections for the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance and the isovector giant dipole resonance of approximately 0.8 and 3 barns/sr, respectively. Data on the ground state decay of the isoscalar giant quadrupole and isovector giant dipole resonances are presented and compared with calculations. Decays to low-lying excited states are also discussed. Preliminary results from an experiment to isolate the 208 Pb isovector quadrupole resonance using its gamma decay are presented. 22 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab

  15. Resonant Orbital Dynamics in LEO Region: Space Debris in Focus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Sampaio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing number of objects orbiting the earth justifies the great attention and interest in the observation, spacecraft protection, and collision avoidance. These studies involve different disturbances and resonances in the orbital motions of these objects distributed by the distinct altitudes. In this work, objects in resonant orbital motions are studied in low earth orbits. Using the two-line elements (TLE of the NORAD, resonant angles and resonant periods associated with real motions are described, providing more accurate information to develop an analytical model that describes a certain resonance. The time behaviors of the semimajor axis, eccentricity, and inclination of some space debris are studied. Possible irregular motions are observed by the frequency analysis and by the presence of different resonant angles describing the orbital dynamics of these objects.

  16. Fission decay properties of nuclear giant multipole resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, H.; Arruda Neto, J.D.T.; Hussein, M.S.; Carlson, B.V.

    1986-05-01

    The statistical fission decay properties of the giant dipole, quadrupole and monopole resonances in 236 U are investigated with the aid of the Hauser-Feshbach model. It is found, contrary to several recent claims, that the GQR fission decay probability is as large as that of the GDR, at energies higher than the fission barrier. At energies close to the f.b., the GQR fission probability is found to be appreciably larger than that of the GDR. The GMR fission probability follows closely that of the GQR. (Author) [pt

  17. Measurement of isovector giant quadrupole resonance in 40Ca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sims, D.A.; Thompson, M.N.; Rassool, R.; Adler, J.O.; Andersson, B.E.; Hansen, K.; Issaksson, L.; Nilsson, B.; Ruijter, H.; Schroeder, B.; Annand, J.R.M.; McGeorge, J.C.; Crawford, G.I.; Miller, G.J.

    1997-01-01

    The 40 Ca(γ,n) reaction was measured using tagged photons in the energy range 25-50 MeV. Neutrons were detected using two 9-element, liquid scintillator, neutron detectors placed at angles of 55 deg and 125 deg at flight path of 3.2 m. The absolute cross section was determined relative to that for D (γ,n)p, which was measured using a heavy water target. The forward/backward asymmetry in the 40 Ca (γ, n) cross section, resulting from E1/E2 interference has been used to locate and parametrize the isovector giant quadrupole resonance (IVQR). 6 refs., 2 figs

  18. The giant resonances in hot nuclei. Linear response calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braghin, F.L.; Vautherin, D.; Abada, A.

    1995-01-01

    The isovector response function of hot nuclear matter is calculated using various effective Skyrme interactions. For Skyrme forces with a small effective mass the strength distribution is found to be nearly independent of temperature, and shows little collective effects. In contrast effective forces with an effective mass close to unity produce at zero temperature sizeable collective effects which disappear at temperatures of a few MeV. The relevance of these results for the saturation of the multiplicity of photons emitted by the giant dipole resonance in hot nuclei observed in recent experiments beyond T = 3 MeV is discussed. (authors). 12 refs., 3 figs

  19. LONG-LIVED CHAOTIC ORBITAL EVOLUTION OF EXOPLANETS IN MEAN MOTION RESONANCES WITH MUTUAL INCLINATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Rory; Deitrick, Russell; Quinn, Thomas R. [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Box 951580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Greenberg, Richard [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, 1629 E. University Boulevard, Tucson, AZ 86716 (United States); Raymond, Sean N., E-mail: rory@astro.washington.edu [NASA Astrobiology Institute-Virtual Planetary Laboratory Lead Team (United States)

    2015-03-10

    We present N-body simulations of resonant planets with inclined orbits that show chaotically evolving eccentricities and inclinations that can persist for at least 10 Gyr. A wide range of behavior is possible, from fast, low amplitude variations to systems in which eccentricities reach 0.9999 and inclinations 179.°9. While the orbital elements evolve chaotically, at least one resonant argument always librates. We show that the HD 73526, HD 45364, and HD 60532 systems may be in chaotically evolving resonances. Chaotic evolution is apparent in the 2:1, 3:1, and 3:2 resonances, and for planetary masses from lunar- to Jupiter-mass. In some cases, orbital disruption occurs after several gigayears, implying the mechanism is not rigorously stable, just long-lived relative to the main sequence lifetimes of solar-type stars. Planet-planet scattering appears to yield planets in inclined resonances that evolve chaotically in about 0.5% of cases. These results suggest that (1) approximate methods for identifying unstable orbital architectures may have limited applicability, (2) the observed close-in exoplanets may be produced during epochs of high eccentricit induced by inclined resonances, (3) those exoplanets' orbital planes may be misaligned with the host star's spin axis, (4) systems with resonances may be systematically younger than those without, (5) the distribution of period ratios of adjacent planets detected via transit may be skewed due to inclined resonances, and (6) potentially habitable planets may have dramatically different climatic evolution than Earth. The Gaia spacecraft is capable of discovering giant planets in these types of orbits.

  20. LONG-LIVED CHAOTIC ORBITAL EVOLUTION OF EXOPLANETS IN MEAN MOTION RESONANCES WITH MUTUAL INCLINATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, Rory; Deitrick, Russell; Quinn, Thomas R.; Greenberg, Richard; Raymond, Sean N.

    2015-01-01

    We present N-body simulations of resonant planets with inclined orbits that show chaotically evolving eccentricities and inclinations that can persist for at least 10 Gyr. A wide range of behavior is possible, from fast, low amplitude variations to systems in which eccentricities reach 0.9999 and inclinations 179.°9. While the orbital elements evolve chaotically, at least one resonant argument always librates. We show that the HD 73526, HD 45364, and HD 60532 systems may be in chaotically evolving resonances. Chaotic evolution is apparent in the 2:1, 3:1, and 3:2 resonances, and for planetary masses from lunar- to Jupiter-mass. In some cases, orbital disruption occurs after several gigayears, implying the mechanism is not rigorously stable, just long-lived relative to the main sequence lifetimes of solar-type stars. Planet-planet scattering appears to yield planets in inclined resonances that evolve chaotically in about 0.5% of cases. These results suggest that (1) approximate methods for identifying unstable orbital architectures may have limited applicability, (2) the observed close-in exoplanets may be produced during epochs of high eccentricit induced by inclined resonances, (3) those exoplanets' orbital planes may be misaligned with the host star's spin axis, (4) systems with resonances may be systematically younger than those without, (5) the distribution of period ratios of adjacent planets detected via transit may be skewed due to inclined resonances, and (6) potentially habitable planets may have dramatically different climatic evolution than Earth. The Gaia spacecraft is capable of discovering giant planets in these types of orbits

  1. The Droplet model of the Giant Fipole Resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, W.D.; Kodama, T.; El-Jaick, L.J.; Hilf, E.R.

    1976-10-01

    The nuclear Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) energies are calculated using a macroscopic hydronamical model with two new features. The motion is treated as a combination of the usual Goldhaber-Teller (GT) and Steinwedel-Jensen (SJ) modes, and the restoring forces are all calculated using the Droplet Model. The A dependence of the resonance energies is well reproduced without any adjustable parameters, and the measured magnitude of the energies serves to fix the value of the effective mass m* used in the theory. The GDR is found to consist mainly of a GT-type motion with the SJ-mode becoming more important for heavy nuclei. The width P of the GDR is also estimated on the basis of an expression for one-body damping [pt

  2. The isoscalar giant dipole resonance and nuclear incompressibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garg, U.

    2000-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The current status of the experimental work on the ISOSCALAR giant dipole resonance (ISGDR) will be reviewed. ISGDR is an exotic mode of collective nuclear vibration and can be described as a hydrodynamical density oscillation in which the volume of the nucleus remains constant and the state can be visualized in the form of a compression wave-analogous to a sound wave-oscillating back and forth through the nucleus. [1] Convincing evidence for the ISGDR has now been obtained in inelastic α-scattering measurements at 200 MeV (IUCF) [2], 240 MeV (Texas A and M) [3] and 400 MeV (RCNP, Osaka) [4]. In all nuclei studied so far, the ISGDR strength is observed to be spread over a rather wide excitation-energy range (up to ∼ 15 MeV). The excitation energy of the ISGDR is related to the nuclear incompressibility, K ∞ . The ISGDR results so far point to a value for K ∞ that is ∼ 30-40% lower than the obtained from the energies of the other compressional mode, the giant monopole resonance. Results from recent theoretical attempts to reconcile this difference will be presented. This work has been supported in part by the U.S. National Science Foundation. (author)

  3. Structure and direct decay of Giant Monopole Resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avez, B.; Simenel, C.

    2013-01-01

    We study structure and direct decay of the Giant Monopole Resonance (GMR) at the Random Phase Approximation (RPA) level using the time-dependent energy density functional method in the linear response regime in a few doubly magic nuclei. A proper treatment of the continuum, through the use of large coordinate space, allows for a separation between the nucleus and its emitted nucleons. The microscopic structure of the GMR is investigated with the decomposition of the strength function into individual single-particle quantum numbers. A similar microscopic decomposition of the spectra of emitted nucleons by direct decay of the GMR is performed. In this harmonic picture of giant resonance, shifting every contribution by the initial single-particle energy allows to reconstruct the GMR strength function. The RPA residual interaction couples bound 1-particle 1-hole states to unbound ones, allowing for the total decay of the GMR. In this article, we then intend to get an understanding of the direct decay mechanism from coherent one-particle-one-hole superpositions, while neglecting more complex configurations. Time-dependent beyond mean-field approaches should be used, in the future, to extend this method. (orig.)

  4. Role of giant resonance excitation in heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catara, F.; Chomaz, Ph.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper we discuss several aspects of heavy ion collisions involving collective vibrational modes. In our approach the relative motion is treated in a semiclassical approximation, while the intrinsic degrees of freedom are described microscopically within the RPA. The differences with respect to macroscopic models are analyzed in the appendix. First we present some results on the inelastic scattering cross section and we show that the structures observed experimentally can be explained in terms of multiple excitation of the Giant Quadrupole Resonance. After we calculate an adiabatic polarization potential describing the coupling to the collective vibrational modes and show that it produces a strong enhancement of the subbarrier fusion cross section. This enhancement is found to be enough to reproduce the experimental data for symmetric systems, while for asymmetric reactions the coupling to other degrees of freedom, like transfer, is needed. Finally we report some preliminary results on a dynamical calculation of the real and imaginary parts of the polarization potential. We show that at high incident energies (E/A > 20MeV) the role of the Giant Quadrupole Resonance becomes dominant

  5. TERRESTRIAL PLANET FORMATION DURING THE MIGRATION AND RESONANCE CROSSINGS OF THE GIANT PLANETS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lykawka, Patryk Sofia; Ito, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The newly formed giant planets may have migrated and crossed a number of mutual mean motion resonances (MMRs) when smaller objects (embryos) were accreting to form the terrestrial planets in the planetesimal disk. We investigated the effects of the planetesimal-driven migration of Jupiter and Saturn, and the influence of their mutual 1:2 MMR crossing on terrestrial planet formation for the first time, by performing N-body simulations. These simulations considered distinct timescales of MMR crossing and planet migration. In total, 68 high-resolution simulation runs using 2000 disk planetesimals were performed, which was a significant improvement on previously published results. Even when the effects of the 1:2 MMR crossing and planet migration were included in the system, Venus and Earth analogs (considering both orbits and masses) successfully formed in several runs. In addition, we found that the orbits of planetesimals beyond a ∼ 1.5-2 AU were dynamically depleted by the strengthened sweeping secular resonances associated with Jupiter's and Saturn's more eccentric orbits (relative to the present day) during planet migration. However, this depletion did not prevent the formation of massive Mars analogs (planets with more than 1.5 times Mars's mass). Although late MMR crossings (at t > 30 Myr) could remove such planets, Mars-like small mass planets survived on overly excited orbits (high e and/or i), or were completely lost in these systems. We conclude that the orbital migration and crossing of the mutual 1:2 MMR of Jupiter and Saturn are unlikely to provide suitable orbital conditions for the formation of solar system terrestrial planets. This suggests that to explain Mars's small mass and the absence of other planets between Mars and Jupiter, the outer asteroid belt must have suffered a severe depletion due to interactions with Jupiter/Saturn, or by an alternative mechanism (e.g., rogue super-Earths)

  6. The temperature dependence of giant resonances in high-excited nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ming; Song Hongqiu

    1991-01-01

    The Hartree-Fock equation and the linear response theory in finite temperature are used to calculate the positions and transition strenghths of the giant resonances of high-excited nucleus Pb 208 . The result shows a downward shift and a broadening of the giant resonance energies as temperatrue increases

  7. Reaction theory for analysis of nuclear giant resonances production and decay processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foglia, G.A.

    1991-01-01

    The existence of mixing parameters connected to the different decay forms of the giant resonances was theoretically justified, and their energy dependence determined as well using a reaction theory which treats in a consistent manner the giant multipolar resonances formation and their different decay modes. (L.C.J.A.)

  8. Periodic orbits near the particle resonance in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Contopoulos, George

    1978-01-01

    Near the particle resonance of a spiral galaxy the almost circular periodic orbits that exist inside the resonance (direct) or outside it (retrograde) are replaced by elongated trapped orbits around the maxima of the potential L/sub 4/ and L/sub 5/. These are the long- period trapped periodic orbits. The long-period orbits shrink to the points L/sub 4/, L/sub 5/ for a critical value of the Hamiltonian h. For still larger h, a family of short-period trapped orbits appears, with continuously growing size. The evolution of the periodic orbits with h is followed, theoretically and numerically, from the untrapped orbits to the long-periodic orbits and then to the short-periodic orbits, mainly in the case of a bar. In a tight spiral case an explanation of the asymmetric periodic and banana orbits is given, and an example of short-period orbits not surrounding L/sub 4/ or L/sub 5/ is provided. Another family of periodic orbits reaching corotation is trapped at the inner Lindblad resonance. (5 refs).

  9. Orbital resonances of Taiwan's FORMOSAT-2 remote sensing satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shin-Fa; Hwang, Cheinway

    2018-06-01

    Unlike a typical remote sensing satellite that has a global coverage and non-integral orbital revolutions per day, Taiwan's FORMOSAT-2 (FS-2) satellite has a non-global coverage due to the mission requirements of one-day repeat cycle and daily visit around Taiwan. These orbital characteristics result in an integer number of revolutions a day and orbital resonances caused by certain components of the Earth's gravity field. Orbital flight data indicated amplified variations in the amplitudes of FS-2's Keplerian elements. We use twelve years of orbital observations and maneuver data to analyze the cause of the resonances and explain the differences between the simulated (at the pre-launch stage) and real orbits of FS-2. The differences are quantified using orbital perturbation theories that describe secular and long-period orbital evolutions caused by resonances. The resonance-induced orbital rising rate of FS-2 reaches +1.425 m/day, due to the combined (modeled) effect of resonances and atmospheric drags (the relative modeling errors remote sensing mission similar to FS-2, especially in the early mission design and planning phase.

  10. Charge-exchange giant resonances as probes of nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomgren, J.

    2001-09-01

    Giant resonances populated in charge-exchange reactions can reveal detailed information about nuclear structure properties, in spite of their apparent featurelessness. The (p,n) and (n,p) reactions - as well as their analog reactions - proceed via the same nuclear matrix element as beta decay. Thereby, they are useful for probing electroweak properties in nuclei, especially for those not accessible to beta decay. The nuclear physics aspects of double beta decay might be investigated in double charge-exchange reactions. detailed nuclear structure information, such as the presence of ground-state correlations, can be revealed via identification of 'first-forbidden' transitions. In addition, astrophysics aspects and halo properties of nuclei have been investigated in charge exchange. Finally, these experiments have questioned our knowledge of the absolute strength of the strong interaction

  11. The giant quadrupole resonance in highly excited rotating nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Civitarese, O.; Furui, S.; Ploszajczak, M.; Faessler, A.

    1983-01-01

    The giant quadrupole resonance in highly excited, fast rotating nuclei is studied as a function of both the nuclear temperature and the nuclear angular momentum. The photo-absorption cross sections for quadrupole radiation in 156 Dy, 160 Er and 164 Er are evaluated within the linear response theory. The strength functions of the γ-ray spectrum obtained from the decay of highly excited nuclear states by deexcitation of the isoscalar quadrupole mode show a fine structure, which depends on the temperature T, the angular momentum I and the deformation of the nucleus β. The splitting of the modes associated with the signature-conserving and signature-changing components of the quadrupole field is discussed. (orig.)

  12. Phase-space exploration in nuclear giant resonance decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drozdz, S.; Nishizaki, S.; Wambach, J.; Speth, J.

    1995-01-01

    The rate of phase-space exploration in the decay of isovector and isoscalar giant quadrupole resonances in 40 Ca is analyzed. The study is based on the time dependence of the survival probability and of the spectrum of generalized entropies evaluated in the space of one-particle--one-hole (1p-1h) and 2p-2h states. Three different cases for the level distribution of 2p-2h background states, corresponding to (a) high degeneracy, (b) classically regular motion, and (c) classically chaotic motion, are studied. In the latter case the isovector excitation evolves almost statistically while the isoscalar excitation remains largely localized, even though it penetrates the whole available phase space

  13. The giant resonance and the shape of hot nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracco, A; Camera, F; Million, B; Pignanelli, M [Milan Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica; Gaardhoje, J J; Maj, A; Atac, A [Niels Bohr Inst., Copenhagen (Denmark)

    1992-08-01

    The gamma decay of the giant dipole resonance is a sensitive tool for investigating how nuclear shape changes with spin and excitation energy, but the information is coded in a subtle way, inasmuch as the shape and orientation of nuclei at finite temperature display large fluctuations. At the time of the conference, the three systems {sup 109-110}Sn, {sup 161-162}Yb and {sup 165-167}Er had recently been studied on the HECTOR spectrometer. The Sn nuclei are spherical in their ground states, and are expected to become oblate under the stress of rotation. The Yb and Er nuclei are prolate, and are expected to become first spherical, then oblate. While the patterns of the measured angular anisotropies are consistent with this general picture, many questions still remain open. 3 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  14. Decay of the giant monopole resonance in heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandenburg, S.

    1985-01-01

    In this thesis an experimental study of the properties of the giant monopole resonance (GMR) in nuclei is described. The main subject is the study of the neutron decay of the GMR in 208 Pb, and the fission decay of the GMR in 238 U. Furthermore the strength distribution and decay properties of the monopole strength in 24 Mg and 40 Ca were studied. The strength distribution of the isoscalar monopole (and also of the isoscalar dipole) strength as obtained from the angular distribution of the excited strength at small scattering angles are discussed. For the excitation of the GMR inelastic scattering at very small scattering angles, including 0 0 , of 120 MeV α-particles was employed. The experimental technique for performing this type of measurements at the KVI was developed in the course of this study and is the subject of a separate chapter. (Auth.)

  15. A hot Saturn on an eccentric orbit around the giant star K2-132

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M. I.; Brahm, R.; Espinoza, N.; Jordán, A.; Rojas, F.; Rabus, M.; Drass, H.; Zapata, A.; Soto, M. G.; Jenkins, J. S.; Vučković, M.; Ciceri, S.; Sarkis, P.

    2018-06-01

    Although the majority of radial velocity detected planets have been found orbiting solar-type stars, a fraction of them have been discovered around giant stars. These planetary systems have revealed different orbital properties when compared to solar-type star companions. In particular, radial velocity surveys have shown that there is a lack of giant planets in close-in orbits around giant stars, in contrast to the known population of hot Jupiters orbiting solar-type stars. It has been theorized that the reason for this distinctive feature in the semimajor axis distribution is the result of the stellar evolution and/or that it is due to the effect of a different formation/evolution scenario for planets around intermediate-mass stars. However, in the past few years a handful of transiting short-period planets (P ≲ 10 days) have been found around giant stars, thanks to the high-precision photometric data obtained initially by the Kepler mission, and later by its two-wheel extension K2. These new discoveries have allowed us for the first time to study the orbital properties and physical parameters of these intriguing and elusive substellar companions. In this paper we report on an independent discovery of a transiting planet in field 10 of the K2 mission, also reported recently by Grunblatt et al. (2017, AJ, 154, 254). The host star has recently evolved to the giant phase, and has the following atmospheric parameters: Teff = 4878 ± 70 K, log g = 3.289 ± 0.004, and [Fe/H] = -0.11 ± 0.05 dex. The main orbital parameters of K2-132 b, obtained with all the available data for the system are: P = 9.1708 ± 0.0025 d, e = 0.290 ± 0.049, Mp = 0.495 ± 0.007 MJ and Rp = 1.089 ± 0.006 RJ. This is the fifth known planet orbiting any giant star with a K2-132 b a very interesting object. Tables of the photometry and of the radial velocities are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  16. Strength function for the giant isovector monopole resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, W.M.; Birse, M.C.

    1984-01-01

    The theory of the strength function for giant resonances is extended to exhibit the explicit energy dependence of the width and shift functions for the giant isovector monopole. An integral sum rule on the width GAMMA/sub M/(E) relates its normalization to the second moment M 2 of the strength function and leads to a relation GAMMA/sub M/(E/sub M/)GAMMA/sub s//4 = M 2 between M 2 and the width at the maximum, which involves the width GAMMA/sub s/ of the distribution in energy of the spreading matrix elements. An estimate of GAMMA/sub M/(E/sub M/)approx. =8 MeV based on the absorptive part of the optical potential together with random-phase approximation calculations of M 2 leads to the result GAMMA/sub s//2approx. =2hω, supporting the intermediate coupling model of Lane, Thomas, and Wigner. Using the sum rule expressions of Lane and Mekjian to evaluate the Coulomb matrix element M/sub A/M between an isobaric analog state and its corresponding isovector monopole, we test this strength function for the isovector monopole by calculating the spreading widths for the ground state analogs of nuclei from 38 Cl to 208 Pb. The good agreement with the systematic dependence upon mass number and isospin resolves the long-standing discrepancy between the estimate GAMMA/sub M/(E/sub M/)approx.8--10 MeV and the value GAMMA/sub M/(E/sub A/)< or =2 MeV needed to account for the spreading widths of the isobaric analog state

  17. A SECOND GIANT PLANET IN 3:2 MEAN-MOTION RESONANCE IN THE HD 204313 SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, Paul; Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D.; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Brugamyer, Erik J.; Barnes, Stuart I.; Caldwell, Caroline; Horner, J.; Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Simon, Attila E.

    2012-01-01

    We present eight years of high-precision radial velocity (RV) data for HD 204313 from the 2.7 m Harlan J. Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory. The star is known to have a giant planet (Msin i = 3.5 M J ) on a ∼1900 day orbit, and a Neptune-mass planet at 0.2 AU. Using our own data in combination with the published CORALIE RVs of Ségransan et al., we discover an outer Jovian (Msin i = 1.6 M J ) planet with P ∼ 2800 days. Our orbital fit suggests that the planets are in a 3:2 mean motion resonance, which would potentially affect their stability. We perform a detailed stability analysis and verify that the planets must be in resonance.

  18. Photoionization of lanthanum and its ions in the region of the 'giant' resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M.Ya.

    1989-01-01

    The photoionization cross sections of outer and intermediate shells including 4d of La and its ions are calculated in the region of the 'giant' resonance. The prominent effects of both intershell correlational effects and rearrangement are demonstrated. (orig.)

  19. Inelastic scattering of 9Be of 27 MeV/A to giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebrun, D.; Buenerd, M.; Bini, M.; Harvey, B.G.; Legrain, R.; Mahoney, J.; Symons, T.J.M.; Van Bibber, K.

    1980-07-01

    Inelastic scattering spectra have been measured with 245 MeV incident energy 9 Be ions, on 208 Pb target. They show large excitation of the 208 Pb giant quadrupole resonance. DWBA calculations are reported and compared with the data

  20. (p,n) and (n,p) reactions as probes of isovector giant monopole resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auerbach, N.; Bowman, J.D.; Franey, M.A.; Love, W.G.

    1983-01-01

    Nucleon charge exchange reactions are explored as prospective probes of isovector giant monopole resonances. Using charge exchange transition densities based on random-phase approximation sum rules, distorted wave impulse approximation calculations are made for the (p,n) and (n,p) reactions exciting the isovector giant monopole resonances in several nuclei at bombarding energies of 120 and 800 MeV. Based on our calculations, the charge exchange reactions at 800 MeV appear more promising

  1. Statistical contribution in the giant multipolar resonance decay in hevay nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teruya, N.

    1986-01-01

    Statistical calculations are made for the decay in the electric monopole giant resonance in 208 Pb and electric dipole giant resonance in 209 Bi, using the Hauser-Feshbach formalism. Calculations are done using the experimental energy levels of the corresponding residual nuclei. The particle-vibrator model is used for those experimental levels without spin and parity determination. The influence of different parametrizations of the optical potential in the statistical calculation result is also studied. (L.C.) [pt

  2. Influence of complex particle emission on properties of giant dipole resonance of hot nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Wanxin; Jin Genming

    2003-01-01

    The possible reasons for the discrepancy between calculation results based on the statistical evaporation model and experimental data of giant dipole resonance of very hot nuclei are discussed. Both of simulations with the standard CASCADE code and the code coupling complex particle emission are carried out. It is shown that the complex particle emission affects the properties of giant dipole resonance of very hot nuclei

  3. A PLANET IN A 0.6 AU ORBIT AROUND THE K0 GIANT HD 102272

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedzielski, A.; Gozdziewski, K.; Nowak, G.; Zielinski, P.; Wolszczan, A.; Konacki, M.

    2009-01-01

    We report the discovery of one or more planet-mass companions to the K0-giant HD 102272 with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope. In the absence of any correlation of the observed periodicities with the standard indicators of stellar activity, the observed radial velocity variations are most plausibly explained in terms of a Keplerian motion of at least one planet-mass body around the star. With an estimated stellar mass of 1.9 M sun , the minimum mass of the confirmed planet is 5.9 M J . The planet's orbit is characterized by a small but nonzero eccentricity e = 0.05 and a semimajor axis of 0.61 AU, which makes it the most compact planet discovered so far around GK spectral type giants. This detection adds to the existing evidence that, as predicted by theory, the minimum size of planetary orbits around intermediate-mass giants is affected by both planet-formation processes and stellar evolution. The currently available evidence of another planet around HD 102272 is insufficient to obtain an unambiguous two-orbit solution.

  4. Spectroscopic factors of the alpha decay of isoscalar giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, Yu.F.; Chuvil'skij, Yu.M.

    1983-01-01

    A system which enables to connect Ssub(α) spectroscopic factors (SF) for α-decay of the isoscalar giant resonance (GR) states E0 and E2 with SF values for ground and low lying nucleus states has been developed. This method permits to consider initial nucleus GR decay with a transition to the residual nucleus-GR. It is necessary to know only SF for GR decay to the daughter nucleus ground state with the emission of an excited cluster in the common case. The above method is based on properties of infinitesimal operators of Sp(2, R), Sp(6, R) groups and uses SU(3)-symmetry of wave functions of initial nucleus, cluster and residual nucleus, Values of ratios of α-particle SF are presented for 8 Be, HH2C, 16 O, 20 Ne, 24 Mg, 28 Si, 40 Ca, 44 Ti nuclei and Ssub(α) transitions to GR states of residual nucleus for 16 O, 20 Ne and 40 Ca nuclei. Noticeable Ssub(α) values for virtual α-decay of an initial nucleus ground state to residual nucleus GR poins out that α-particle knock out processes may be also accompanied by the final nucleus GR excitation

  5. Studies of the giant resonances in heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cataldi, M.I.C.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the eletrodisintegration cross section in 181 Ta, 208 Pb and 209 Bi nuclei are made in the Linear Accelerator of the IFUSP-Brazil. The cross section is obtained by the direct counting of the emitted neutrons, in an electron excitation energy range between 8 to 22 MeV. The experimental data are analysed throught the virtual photon method, with the aim of obtaining the isoscalar and isovectorial electric quadrupole giant resonance (E2GR) intensities, as well as the magnetic dipole intensity. For each studied nucleus the results obtained for the E2GR, isoscalar and isovectorial, are compared with the photodisintegration cross section measured by the Saclay and Livermore laboratories. From this comparison, it is observed that the photodisintegration cross sections are compatibles with the existence of an isovector E2GR, located between 120 to 130 A -1/3 Mev and which exhaust around 100% of the Energy-Weighted Sum rules (EWSR). (L.C.) [pt

  6. Giant quadrupole resonance in 12C, 24Mg, and 27Al observed via deuteron inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.C.; Didelez, J.P.; Kwiatowski, K.; Wo, J.R.

    1977-06-01

    Giant quadrupole resonance in 12 C, 24 Mg, and 27 Al was studied using 70 MeV deuteron beam. The results clearly show, in all three targets, resonance-like structures peaked at E/sub x/ approximately 63A/sup -1/3/ MeV, with a width of about 10 MeV. The experimental angular distributions for these resonances agree well with the l = 2 DWBA prediction. For 12 C, a binary splitting was observed, and for 24 Mg, there are indications of finer structure in the main giant quadrupole resonance region

  7. Concerning the generation of geomagnetic giant pulsations by drift-bounce resonance ring current instabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.-H. Glassmeier

    Full Text Available Giant pulsations are nearly monochromatic ULF-pulsations of the Earth's magnetic field with periods of about 100 s and amplitudes of up to 40 nT. For one such event ground-magnetic observations as well as simultaneous GEOS-2 magnetic and electric field data and proton flux measurements made in the geostationary orbit have been analysed. The observations of the electromagnetic field indicate the excitation of an odd-mode type fundamental field line oscillation. A clear correlation between variations of the proton flux in the energy range 30-90 keV with the giant pulsation event observed at the ground is found. Furthermore, the proton phase space density exhibits a bump-on-the-tail signature at about 60 keV. Assuming a drift-bounce resonance instability as a possible generation mechanism, the azimuthal wave number of the pulsation wave field may be determined using a generalized resonance condition. The value determined in this way, 
    m
    = - 21 ± 4, is in accord with the value m = - 27 ± 6 determined from ground-magnetic measurements. A more detailed examination of the observed ring current plasma distribution function f shows that odd-mode type eigenoscillations are expected for the case ∂f / ∂W > 0, much as observed. This result is different from previous theoretical studies as we not only consider local gradients of the distribution function in real space, but also in velocity space. It is therefore concluded that the observed giant pulsation is the result of a drift-bounce resonance instability of the ring current plasma coupling to an odd-mode fundamental standing wave. The generation of the bump-on-the-tail distribution causing ∂f / ∂W > 0 can be explained due to velocity dispersion of protons injected into the ring current. Both this velocity dispersion and the necessary substorm activity causing the injection of protons into the nightside magnetosphere are observed

  8. Concerning the generation of geomagnetic giant pulsations by drift-bounce resonance ring current instabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.-H. Glassmeier

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Giant pulsations are nearly monochromatic ULF-pulsations of the Earth's magnetic field with periods of about 100 s and amplitudes of up to 40 nT. For one such event ground-magnetic observations as well as simultaneous GEOS-2 magnetic and electric field data and proton flux measurements made in the geostationary orbit have been analysed. The observations of the electromagnetic field indicate the excitation of an odd-mode type fundamental field line oscillation. A clear correlation between variations of the proton flux in the energy range 30-90 keV with the giant pulsation event observed at the ground is found. Furthermore, the proton phase space density exhibits a bump-on-the-tail signature at about 60 keV. Assuming a drift-bounce resonance instability as a possible generation mechanism, the azimuthal wave number of the pulsation wave field may be determined using a generalized resonance condition. The value determined in this way,  m = - 21 ± 4, is in accord with the value m = - 27 ± 6 determined from ground-magnetic measurements. A more detailed examination of the observed ring current plasma distribution function f shows that odd-mode type eigenoscillations are expected for the case ∂f / ∂W > 0, much as observed. This result is different from previous theoretical studies as we not only consider local gradients of the distribution function in real space, but also in velocity space. It is therefore concluded that the observed giant pulsation is the result of a drift-bounce resonance instability of the ring current plasma coupling to an odd-mode fundamental standing wave. The generation of the bump-on-the-tail distribution causing ∂f / ∂W > 0 can be explained due to velocity dispersion of protons injected into the ring current. Both this velocity dispersion and the necessary substorm activity causing the injection of protons into the nightside magnetosphere are observed.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (energetic particles , trapped

  9. Isoscalar giant resonances and Landau parameters with density-dependent effective interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohno, Michio; Ando, Kazuhiko

    1979-01-01

    Discussion is given on the relations between the Landau parameters and the isoscalar giant (quadrupole- and monopole-) resonance energies by using general density-dependent interactions. In the limit of infinite nuclear matter, the isoscalar giant quadrupole energy is shown to depend not only on the effective mass but also on the Landau parameter F 2 . Collective energies of the isoscalar giant resonances are calculated for 16 O and 40 Ca with four different effective interactions, G-0, B1, SII and SV, by using the scaling- and constrained Hartree-Fock-methods. It is shown that the dependence of the collective energies on the effective interactions is essentially determined by the Landau parameters. The G-0 force is found to be most successful in reproducing the giant resonance energies. Validity of the RPA-moment theorems is examined for the case of local density-dependent interactions. (author)

  10. Giant spin-orbit-induced spin splitting in two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenide semiconductors

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Zhiyong

    2011-10-14

    Fully relativistic first-principles calculations based on density functional theory are performed to study the spin-orbit-induced spin splitting in monolayer systems of the transition-metal dichalcogenides MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, and WSe2. All these systems are identified as direct-band-gap semiconductors. Giant spin splittings of 148–456 meV result from missing inversion symmetry. Full out-of-plane spin polarization is due to the two-dimensional nature of the electron motion and the potential gradient asymmetry. By suppression of the Dyakonov-Perel spin relaxation, spin lifetimes are expected to be very long. Because of the giant spin splittings, the studied materials have great potential in spintronics applications.

  11. Giant spin-orbit-induced spin splitting in two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenide semiconductors

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Zhiyong; Cheng, Yingchun; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2011-01-01

    Fully relativistic first-principles calculations based on density functional theory are performed to study the spin-orbit-induced spin splitting in monolayer systems of the transition-metal dichalcogenides MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, and WSe2. All these systems are identified as direct-band-gap semiconductors. Giant spin splittings of 148–456 meV result from missing inversion symmetry. Full out-of-plane spin polarization is due to the two-dimensional nature of the electron motion and the potential gradient asymmetry. By suppression of the Dyakonov-Perel spin relaxation, spin lifetimes are expected to be very long. Because of the giant spin splittings, the studied materials have great potential in spintronics applications.

  12. Giant Cu 2p Resonances in CuO Valence-Band Photoemission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjeng, L.H.; Chen, C.T.; Ghijsen, J.; Rudolf, P.; Sette, F.

    1991-01-01

    We report the observation of a giant resonance in the Cu 2p resonant-photoemission spectra of CuO. The study allows the unambiguous identification of the local Cu 3d8 configuration in the valence-band photoemission spectrum, providing conclusive evidence for the charge-transfer nature of the

  13. Spin motion at and near orbital resonance in storage rings with Siberian snakes I. At orbital resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, D.P.; Vogt, M.

    2006-12-01

    Here, and in a sequel, we invoke the invariant spin field to provide an in-depth study of spin motion at and near low order orbital resonances in a simple model for the effects of vertical betatron motion in a storage ring with Siberian Snakes. This leads to a clear understanding, within the model, of the behaviour of the beam polarization at and near so-called snake resonances in proton storage rings. (orig.)

  14. Collisional damping of giant monopole and quadrupole resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yildirim, S.; Gokalp, A.; Yilmaz, O.; Ayik, S.

    2001-01-01

    Collisional damping widths of giant monopole and quadrupole excitations for 120 Sn and 208 Pb at zero and finite temperatures are calculated within Thomas-Fermi approximation by employing the microscopic in-medium cross-sections of Li and Machleidt and the phenomenological Skyrme and Gogny forces, and are compared with each other. The results for the collisional widths of giant monopole and quadrupole vibrations at zero temperature as a function of the mass number show that the collisional damping of giant monopole vibrations accounts for about 30 - 40% of the observed widths at zero temperature, while for giant quadrupole vibrations it accounts for only 20 - 30% of the observed widths at zero temperature. (orig.)

  15. Searching sequences of resonant orbits between a spacecraft and Jupiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formiga, J K S; Prado, A F B A

    2013-01-01

    This research shows a study of the dynamical behavior of a spacecraft that performs a series of close approaches with the planet Jupiter. The main idea is to find a sequence of resonant orbits that allows the spacecraft to stay in the region of the space near the orbit of Jupiter around the Sun gaining energy from each passage by the planet. The dynamical model considers the existence of only two massive bodies in the systems, which are the Sun and Jupiter. They are assumed to be in circular orbits around their center of mass. Analytical equations are used to obtain the values of the parameters required to get this sequence of close approaches. Those equations are useful, because they show which orbits are physically possible when taking into account that the periapsis distances have to be above the surface of the Sun and that the closest approach distances during the passage by Jupiter have to be above its surface

  16. Thermal and rotational effect on giant dipole resonances in rotating nuclei at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugawara-Tanabe, Kazuko; Tanabe, Kosai.

    1986-01-01

    Microscopic calculations are carried out for the giant dipole resonances excited on the thermal high spin states in 162 Er and 166 Er based on the thermal linear response theory with realistic forces and large single-particle space. The dynamical strength function is compared with the experimental γ-ray absorption cross section. The general trend that the resonance energy decreases and the resonance width increases with increasing angular momentum and temperature is well reproduced by the calculations. (author)

  17. SHOCKS AND A GIANT PLANET IN THE DISK ORBITING BP PISCIUM?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melis, C.; Zuckerman, B.; Gielen, C.; Chen, C. H.; Rhee, Joseph H.; Song, Inseok

    2010-01-01

    Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph data support the interpretation that BP Piscium, a gas and dust enshrouded star residing at high Galactic latitude, is a first-ascent giant rather than a classical T Tauri star. Our analysis suggests that BP Piscium's spectral energy distribution can be modeled as a disk with a gap that is opened by a giant planet. Modeling the rich mid-infrared emission line spectrum indicates that the solid-state emitting grains orbiting BP Piscium are primarily composed of ∼75 K crystalline, magnesium-rich olivine; ∼75 K crystalline, magnesium-rich pyroxene; ∼200 K amorphous, magnesium-rich pyroxene; and ∼200 K annealed silica (cristobalite). These dust grains are all sub-micron sized. The giant planet and gap model also naturally explains the location and mineralogy of the small dust grains in the disk. Disk shocks that result from disk-planet interaction generate the highly crystalline dust which is subsequently blown out of the disk mid-plane and into the disk atmosphere.

  18. Decay of giant resonance E2 isoscalar in heavy nuclei. Decaimento da ressonancia gigante E2 isoescalar em nucleos pesados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herdade, S B [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    1980-01-01

    In this work, it is made a study of the giant resonance E2 isoscalar, in heavy nuclei. Fission probabilities for this resonance were determined by various authors, in different experiments, for {sup 238}U. (A.C.A.S.).

  19. Giant dipole resonances in hot nuclear matter in the model of self-relaxing mean field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okolowicz, J.; Ploszajczak, M.; Drozdz, S.; Caurier, E.

    1989-01-01

    The extended time-dependent Hartree-Fock approach is applied for the description of the isovector giant dipole resonance in 40 Ca at finite temperatures. The thermalization process is described using the relaxation-time ansatz for the collision integral. Strong inhibition of the giant-dipole-resonance γ-decay is found due to the fast vaporization of the nuclear surface for thermal excitation energies above E * /A ≅ 4.5 MeV. This pre-equilibrium emission of particles in the vapor phase is associated with the radial expansion of nucleus and with the vanishing particle binding energies mainly for protons. (orig.)

  20. Deformation-induced splitting of the monopole giant resonance in 24Mg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kvasil J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The strong deformation splitting of the isoscalar giant monopole resonance (ISGMR, recently observed in (α, α′ reaction in prolate 24Mg, is analyzed in the framework of the Skyrme quasiparticle randomphase-approximation (QRPA approach with the Skyrme forces SkM*, SVbas and SkPδ. The calculations with these forces give close results and confirm that the low-energy E0-peak is caused by the deformation-induced coupling of ISGMR with the K = 0 branch of the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance.

  1. Sum rule approach to the study of statistical decay properties of nuclear giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhikari, S.K.; Hussein, M.S.

    1987-03-01

    Corrections to the well-known statistical sum rule that relates the summed transmission coefficients on the one hand and 2πΓ C.N. .ρ C.N. On the other, in the context of the statistical decay properties of nuclear giant resonances, are discussed. These corrections arise both from pre-equilibrium processes as well as from the giant resonance itself. It is shown that the compound nucleus average width is reduced as a result of these corrections. (Author) [pt

  2. Polaronic and dressed molecular states in orbital Feshbach resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junjun; Qi, Ran

    2018-04-01

    We consider the impurity problem in an orbital Feshbach resonance (OFR), with a single excited clock state | e ↑⟩ atom immersed in a Fermi sea of electronic ground state | g ↓⟩. We calculate the polaron effective mass and quasi-particle residue, as well as the polaron to molecule transition. By including one particle-hole excitation in the molecular state, we find significant correction to the transition point. This transition point moves toward the BCS side for increasing particle densities, which suggests that the corresponding many-body physics is similar to a narrow resonance.

  3. Solar radiation pressure resonances in Low Earth Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessi, Elisa Maria; Schettino, Giulia; Rossi, Alessandro; Valsecchi, Giovanni B.

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this work is to highlight the crucial role that orbital resonances associated with solar radiation pressure can have in Low Earth Orbit. We review the corresponding literature, and provide an analytical tool to estimate the maximum eccentricity which can be achieved for well-defined initial conditions. We then compare the results obtained with the simplified model with the results obtained with a more comprehensive dynamical model. The analysis has important implications both from a theoretical point of view, because it shows that the role of some resonances was underestimated in the past, and also from a practical point of view in the perspective of passive deorbiting solutions for satellites at the end-of-life.

  4. Distribution functions for resonantly trapped orbits in the Galactic disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monari, Giacomo; Famaey, Benoit; Fouvry, Jean-Baptiste; Binney, James

    2017-11-01

    The present-day response of a Galactic disc stellar population to a non-axisymmetric perturbation of the potential has previously been computed through perturbation theory within the phase-space coordinates of the unperturbed axisymmetric system. Such an Eulerian linearized treatment, however, leads to singularities at resonances, which prevent quantitative comparisons with data. Here, we manage to capture the behaviour of the distribution function (DF) at a resonance in a Lagrangian approach, by averaging the Hamiltonian over fast angle variables and re-expressing the DF in terms of a new set of canonical actions and angles variables valid in the resonant region. We then follow the prescription of Binney, assigning to the resonant DF the time average along the orbits of the axisymmetric DF expressed in the new set of actions and angles. This boils down to phase-mixing the DF in terms of the new angles, such that the DF for trapped orbits depends only on the new set of actions. This opens the way to quantitatively fitting the effects of the bar and spirals to Gaia data in terms of DFs in action space.

  5. Spin-flip measurements in the proton inelastic scattering on 12C and giant resonance effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Leo, R.; D'Erasmo, G.; Ferrero, F.; Pantaleo, A.; Pignanelli, M.

    1975-01-01

    Differential cross sections and spin-flip probabilities (SFP) for the inelastic scattering of protons, exciting the 2 + state at 4.43 MeV in 12 C, have been measured at several incident energies between 15.9 and 37.6 MeV. The changes in the shape of the SFP angular distributions are rather limited, while the absolute values show a pronounced increase, resonant like, in two energy regions centered at about 20 and 29 MeV. The second resonance reproduces very closely the energy dependence of the E2 giant quadrupole strength found in a previous experiment. The resonance at 20 MeV should correspond to a substructure of the E1 giant dipole resonance. (Auth.)

  6. Search for magnetic dipole strength and giant spin-flip resonances in heavy nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horen, D. J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA); Ikegami, H.; Muraoka, M. [eds.; Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Research Center for Nuclear Physics

    1980-01-01

    A description is given of the use of high resolution (n, n) scattering and the (p, n) reaction as tools to investigate highly excited states with emphasis on information pertaining to magnetic dipole strength and giant spin-flip resonances in heavy nuclei. It is shown how the ability to uniquely determine the spins and parities of resonances observed in neutron scattering has been instrumental to an understanding of the distribution of M1 strength in sup(207,208)Pb. Some recent results of (p, n) studies with intermediate energy protons are discussed. Energy systematics of the giant Gamow-Teller (GT) resonance as well as a new ..delta..l = 1, ..delta..S = 1 resonance with J sup(..pi..) = (1,2)/sup -/ are presented. It is shown how the (p, n) reaction might be useful to locate M1 strength in heavy nuclei.

  7. Study of the giant multipole resonances, especially the isoscalar giant E2 resonance in 208Pb by inelastic electron scattering with medium and high energy resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehner, E.G.F.

    1982-01-01

    In the nucleus 208 Pb giant multipole resonances were looked for by inelastic electron scattering up to excitation energies of Esub(x) = 35 MeV. Twelve spectra were taken up at incident energies of Esub(o) = 45-65 MeV under scattering angles from upsilon = 93 0 to 165 0 . The cross sections extracted from this were analyzed by means of DWBA calculations using RPA amplitudes from a model with separable residual interaction. Basing on this analysis for the first time it could be shown that the maximum in the electron scattering cross section at Esub(x) approx.= 14 MeV can be consistently described as a superposition of the Jsup(π) = 1 - , ΔT = 1 with a Jsup(π) = 0 + , ΔT = 0 giant resonance. Furthermore the spectra under backward scattering angles indicate the existence of a magnetic excitation at Esub(x) approx.= 15 MeV which is interpreted as Jsup(π) = 3 + giant resonance. Besides under forwards angles a further weak excitation appears at Esub(x) approx.= 14.6 MeV which is very well compatible with Jsup(π) = 2 + . At Esub(x) = 17.5 MeV a Jsup(π) = 3 - resonance was found which recently is also observed in (α,α') scattering experiments and therefore gets a ΔT = 0 assignment. A further resonance at Esub(x) approx.= 21 MeV has also Jsup(π) = 3 - character but has partly to be assigned to a Jsup(π) = 1 - , ΔT = 0 excitation. At Esub(x) = 23.8 MeV a Jsup(π) = 2 + excitation was found which gels because of model predictions a ΔT = 1 assignment. (orig./HSI) [de

  8. Study of the giant multipole resonances especially of the isoscalar giant E2 resonance in 208Pb by medium and high energy resolution inelastic electron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehner, G.

    1982-01-01

    In the nucleus 208 Pb giant multipole resonances up to excitation energies of Esub(x) = 35 MeV were looked for by medium resolution inelastic electron scattering. Twelve spectra were taken up at incident energies of E 0 = 45-65 MeV under scattering angles from upsilon = 93 0 to 165 0 . The cross sections extracted from this were analyzed by means of DWBA calculations using RPA amplitudes from a model with separable residual interaction. On the base of this analysis for the first time it could be shown that the maximum in the electron scattering cross section at Esub(x) approx.= 14 MeV can be consistently described as superposition of the Jsup(π) = 1 - , ΔT = 1 with a Jsup(π) = 0 + , ΔT = 0 giant resonance. Furthermore the spectra under backward scattering angles indicate the existence of a magnetic excitation at Esub(x) approx.= 15 MeV which is interpreted as Jsup(π) = 3 + giant resonance. Besides under forward angles a further weak excitation at Esub(x) approx.= 14.6 MeV appears which is very well compatible with Jsup(π) = 2 + . At Esub(x) = 17.5 MeV a Jsup(π) = 3 - resonance was found which recently is observed also in (α, α') experiments and therefore gets a ΔT = 0 assignment. A further resonance at Esub(x) approx.= 21 MeV has also a Jsup(π) = 3 - character but has to be partly assigned to a Jsup(π) = 1 - , ΔT = 0 excitation. At Esub(x) = 23.8 MeV a Jsup(π) = 2 + excitation was found which gets because of model predictions a ΔT = 1 assignment. (orig./HSI) [de

  9. Double giant resonances in time-dependent relativistic mean-field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ring, P.; Podobnik, B.

    1996-01-01

    Collective vibrations in spherical nuclei are described in the framework of time-dependent relativistic mean-field theory (RMFT). Isoscalar quadrupole and isovector dipole oscillations that correspond to giant resonances are studied, and possible excitations of higher modes are investigated. We find evidence for modes which can be interpreted as double resonances. In a quantized RMFT they correspond to two-phonon states. (orig.)

  10. Electromagnetic transitions between giant resonances within a continuum-RPA approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodin, VA; Dieperink, AEL

    2002-01-01

    A general continuum-RPA approach is developed to describe electromagnetic transitions between giant resonances. Using a diagrammatic representation for the three-point Green's function, an expression for the transition amplitude is derived which allows one to incorporate effects of mixing of single

  11. Can we learn about the spin-flip giant dipole resonances with pions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, H.W.

    1982-01-01

    Data and calculations for the 40 Ca(π+-,π 0 ) reactions at 164 MeV are shown which indicate that pion scattering possesses a unique signature for separately identifying the 1 - and 2 - spin-isospin components of the giant dipole resonance

  12. Direct neutron decay from the giant monopole resonance in 208Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bracco, A.; Beene, J.R.; Van Giai, N.; Bortignon, P.F.; Zardi, F.; Broglia, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental values of partial direct escape widths for the giant monopole resonance (GMR) in 208 Pb are presented and compared with predictions from various RPA models. It is found that different model Hamiltonians that reproduce equally well the energy and strength of the GMR in 208 Pb lead to direct escape width which may differ by a large factor. 1 tab

  13. Coupling effects of giant resonances on the elastic and inelastic scattering of fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaroche, J.P.; Tornow, W.

    1983-01-01

    While the inelastic scattering of high energy hadrons is commonly used for the study of giant resonances in nuclei, it is just recently that one has thought to take into account these states in the analysis of proton scattering at low incident energies (E 0 and S 1 . (Auth.)

  14. The temperature dependence of the width of the giant-dipole resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ormand, W.E.; Bortignon, P.F.; Broglia, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    The giant-dipole resonance (GDR) in 120 Sn and 208 Pb is studied as a function of excitation energy, angular momentum, and intrinsic width within the context of the adiabatic model. Theoretical evaluations of the full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) for the GDR strength function are compared with recent experimental data and are found to be in good agreement. (orig.)

  15. Data systematics and semidirect decay probability of the giant dipole resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishkhanov, B.S.; Kapitonov, I.M.; Tutyn', I.A.

    1998-01-01

    Information on probability of semidirect decay of giant dipole resonance of nuclei of sd- and fp-shells (A = 16-58) is elaborated on the base of the recent (γ, χγ ' ) experimental results. The shell effect in A-dependence of this probability is discovered

  16. Isovector giant dipole resonance in hot rotating light nuclei in the calcium region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanmugam, G.; Thiagasundaram, M.

    1989-01-01

    The isovector giant dipole resonances in hot rotating light nuclei in the calcium region are studied using a rotating anisotropic harmonic oscillator potential and a separable dipole-dipole residual interaction. The influence of temperature on the isovector giant dipole resonance is assumed to occur through the change of deformation of the average field only. Calculations are performed for the three nuclei /sup 40,42/Ca and /sup 46/Ti which have spherical, oblate, and prolate ground states, respectively, to see how their shape transitions at higher excited states affect the isovector giant resonance frequencies built on them. It is seen that, while the width fluctuations present at T = 0 vanish at T = 0.5 MeV in /sup 40,42/Ca, they persist up to T = 1.5 MeV in the case of /sup 46/Ti. This behavior brings out the role of temperature on shell effects which in turn affects the isovector giant dipole resonance widths

  17. The photoionization of atomic Eu in the vicinity of its giant resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M.Ya.

    1989-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the partial photoionization cross sections of outer subshells of atomic Eu in the giant resonance region are determined by the action of the 4d-electron excitations. The cross section for photoionization of the semifilled 4f 7 subshell is also entirely dominated by the interaction with 4d 10 electrons. (orig.)

  18. Collective doorways and statistical doorways: The decay properties of giant multipole resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, H.; Hussein, M.S.; Adhikari, S.K.

    1985-01-01

    A theoretical framework for the description of the decay of giant multipole resonances is developed. It is shown that the statistical decay of the GMR is not necessarily described by the Hauser-Feschbach theory owing to the existence of a mixing parameter. The contribution of pre-equilibrium emission to the GMR decay is also discussed. (Author) [pt

  19. Direct and statistical gamma decay of the giant quadrupole resonance of 208Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, H.; Hussein, M.S.; Carlson, B.V.; Merchant, A.C.

    1986-03-01

    The gamma decay of the giant quadrupole resonance of 208 Pb is discussed. The relative contribution of the decay via the compound nucleus is calculated from the statistical theory. It is found that the compound decay is as important as the direct decay. (Author) [pt

  20. Neutron-skin thickness from the study of the anti-analog giant dipole resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krasznahorkay, A.; Stuhl, L.; Csatlós, M.; Algora, A.; Gulyás, J.; Timár, J.; Paar, N.; Vretenar, D.; Boretzky, K.; Heil, M.; Litvinov, Yu A.; Rossi, D.; Scheidenberger, C.; Simon, H.; Weick, H.; Bracco, A.; Brambilla, S.; Blasi, N.; Camera, F.; Giaz, A.; Million, B.; Pellegri, L.; Riboldi, S.; Wieland, O.; Altstadt, S.; Fonseca, M.; Glorius, J.; Göbel, K.; Heftrich, T.; Koloczek, A.; Kräckmann, S.; Langer, C.; Plag, R.; Pohl, M.; Rastrepina, G.; Reifarth, R.; Schmidt, S.; Sonnabend, K.; Weigand, M.; Harakeh, M. N.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Rigollet, C.; Bagchi, S.; Najafi, M. A.; Aumann, T.; Atar, L.; Heine, M.; Holl, M.; Movsesyan, A.; Schrock, P.; Volkov, V.; Wamers, F.; Fiori, E.; Löher, B.; Marganiec, J.; Savran, D.; Johansson, H. T.; Fernández, P. Diaz; Garg, U.; Balabanski, D. L.

    2012-01-01

    The gamma-decay of the anti-analog of the giant dipole resonance (AGDR) has been measured to the isobaric analog state excited in the p(124Sn,n) reaction at a beam energy of 600 MeV/nucleon. The energy of the transition was also calculated with state-of-the-art self-consistent random-phase

  1. A collective model description of the low lying and giant dipole resonant properties of 40424446Ca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weise, J.I.

    1982-01-01

    The low-lying and giant dipole resonant properties of the even-even calcium isotopes are calculated within the framework of the Gneuss-Greiner model and compared with the experimental data. In the low energy region, comparison is also made with the predictions of a coexistence model

  2. Constraints on the pre-impact orbits of Solar system giant impactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Alan P.; Gabriel, Travis S. J.; Asphaug, Erik I.

    2018-03-01

    We provide a fast method for computing constraints on impactor pre-impact orbits, applying this to the late giant impacts in the Solar system. These constraints can be used to make quick, broad comparisons of different collision scenarios, identifying some immediately as low-probability events, and narrowing the parameter space in which to target follow-up studies with expensive N-body simulations. We benchmark our parameter space predictions, finding good agreement with existing N-body studies for the Moon. We suggest that high-velocity impact scenarios in the inner Solar system, including all currently proposed single impact scenarios for the formation of Mercury, should be disfavoured. This leaves a multiple hit-and-run scenario as the most probable currently proposed for the formation of Mercury.

  3. Giant Optical Polarization Rotation Induced by Spin-Orbit Coupling in Polarons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casals, Blai; Cichelero, Rafael; García Fernández, Pablo; Junquera, Javier; Pesquera, David; Campoy-Quiles, Mariano; Infante, Ingrid C.; Sánchez, Florencio; Fontcuberta, Josep; Herranz, Gervasi

    2016-07-01

    We have uncovered a giant gyrotropic magneto-optical response for doped ferromagnetic manganite La2 /3Ca1 /3MnO3 around the near room-temperature paramagnetic-to-ferromagnetic transition. At odds with current wisdom, where this response is usually assumed to be fundamentally fixed by the electronic band structure, we point to the presence of small polarons as the driving force for this unexpected phenomenon. We explain the observed properties by the intricate interplay of mobility, Jahn-Teller effect, and spin-orbit coupling of small polarons. As magnetic polarons are ubiquitously inherent to many strongly correlated systems, our results provide an original, general pathway towards the generation of magnetic-responsive gigantic gyrotropic responses that may open novel avenues for magnetoelectric coupling beyond the conventional modulation of magnetization.

  4. Giant magnetic modulation of a planar, hybrid metamolecule resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, Simon A; Stenning, Gavin B G; Bowden, Graham J; De Groot, Peter A J; Zheludev, Nikolay I

    2014-01-01

    Coupling magnetic elements to metamaterial structures creates hybrid metamolecules with new opportunities. Here we report on the magnetic control of a metamolecule resonance, by utilizing the interaction between a single split ring resonator (SRR) and a magnetic thin film of permalloy. To suppress eddy current shielding, the permalloy films are patterned into arrays of 30–500 μm diameter discs. Strong hybridized resonances were observed at the anticrossing between the split ring resonance and the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) of the permalloy. In particular, it is possible to achieve 40 dB modulation of the electric (symmetric) mode of the SRR on sweeping the applied magnetic field through the SRR/FMR anticrossing. The results open the way to the design of planar metamaterials, with potential applications in nonlinear metamaterials, tunable metamaterials and spintronics. (papers)

  5. (e,e'f) coincidence experiments for fission decay of giant resonances in 235,238U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, T.; Heil, R.D.; Kneissl, U.; Pecho, W.; Wilke, W.; Emrich, H.J.; Kihm, T.; Knoepfle, K.T.

    1988-01-01

    Extending previous work on 238 U, 235 U(e,e'f) coincidence data were taken at 4 momentum transfers yielding both E1, E2/E0 and E3 form factors and the respective multipole strength distributions in the giant resonance region of 238 U (4 x x /Γ a is obtained as a function of excitation energy for separated multipoles. The giant E2 resonance exhibits an increased symmetric fission contribution compared to E1 and E3 resonances. (orig.)

  6. Giant resonances in the transition regions of the periodic table

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, C.W.; Lucatorto, T.B.

    1987-01-01

    In the transition regions of the periodic table of the elements, atomic d or f orbitals undergo a fairly sudden change from hydrogenic to fully collapsed form. This transition involves a large reduction in the mean orbital radius - by about 95% for the 4f orbital - and results in corresponding qualitative changes in physical processes sensitive to orbital size (e.g. excitation cross sections, bonding character). It is caused by a shift, as the nuclear charge Z increases, in the close balance between repulsive centrifugal and attractive atomic forces on the electron. The balance can also be tilted within a given element in the transition region, for instance by a change in the occupancy of its core or valence orbitals, or by the formation of a molecular bond. Transition region elements are thus characterized by an unusual sensitivity of gross orbital properties to external perturbations; and, from the standpoint of theoretical representation, to the effects of electron correlation, LS term dependence, and special relativity. This paper reports some experimental and theoretical work directed towards exploring this sensitivity. The approach of tracing physical processes along isoelectronic, isonuclear, and isoionic sequences which span particular transition regions is taken. The experimental work described here consists of soft x-ray photoabsorption studies of alkaline earth atoms and ions in the gas phase. It is based upon techniques of time-resolved sequential laser and soft x-ray excitation, which enable them to obtain the subvalence photoabsorption spectra of ground and excited states of an atom and its ions. The theoretical work is based primarily upon single- and multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock calculations, with particular attention to effects of orbital term dependence. 40 references, 7 figures, 3 tables

  7. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Giant Resonances in Atoms, Molecules, and Solids

    CERN Document Server

    Esteva, J; Karnatak, R

    1987-01-01

    Often, a new area of science grows at the confines between recognised subject divisions, drawing upon techniques and intellectual perspectives from a diversity of fields. Such growth can remain unnoticed at first, until a characteristic fami ly of effects, described by appropriate key words, has developed, at which point a distinct subject is born. Such is very much the case with atomic 'giant resonances'. For a start, their name itself was borrowed from the field of nuclear collective resonances. The energy range in which they occur, at the juncture of the extreme UV and the soft X-rays, remains to this day a meeting point of two different experimental techniques: the grating and the crystal spectrometer. The impetus of synchrotron spectroscopy also played a large part in developing novel methods, described by many acronyms, which are used to study 'giant resonances' today. Finally, although we have described them as 'atomic' to differentiate them from their counterparts in Nuclear Physics, their occurrence ...

  8. Isoscalar and isovector giant resonances in a self-consistent phonon coupling approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyutorovich, N.; Tselyaev, V. [Physical Faculty, St. Petersburg State University, RU-198504 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Speth, J., E-mail: J.Speth@fz-juelich.de [Institut für Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Krewald, S.; Grümmer, F. [Institut für Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Reinhard, P.-G. [Institut für Theoretische Physik II, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-10-07

    We present fully self-consistent calculations of isoscalar giant monopole and quadrupole as well as isovector giant dipole resonances in heavy and light nuclei. The description is based on Skyrme energy-density functionals determining the static Hartree–Fock ground state and the excitation spectra within random-phase approximation (RPA) and RPA extended by including the quasiparticle-phonon coupling at the level of the time-blocking approximation (TBA). All matrix elements were derived consistently from the given energy-density functional and calculated without any approximation. As a new feature in these calculations, the single-particle continuum was included thus avoiding the artificial discretization usually implied in RPA and TBA. The step to include phonon coupling in TBA leads to small, but systematic, down shifts of the centroid energies of the giant resonances. These shifts are similar in size for all Skyrme parametrizations investigated here. After all, we demonstrate that one can find Skyrme parametrizations which deliver a good simultaneous reproduction of all three giant resonances within TBA.

  9. Isoscalar and isovector giant resonances in a self-consistent phonon coupling approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Lyutorovich

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We present fully self-consistent calculations of isoscalar giant monopole and quadrupole as well as isovector giant dipole resonances in heavy and light nuclei. The description is based on Skyrme energy-density functionals determining the static Hartree–Fock ground state and the excitation spectra within random-phase approximation (RPA and RPA extended by including the quasiparticle-phonon coupling at the level of the time-blocking approximation (TBA. All matrix elements were derived consistently from the given energy-density functional and calculated without any approximation. As a new feature in these calculations, the single-particle continuum was included thus avoiding the artificial discretization usually implied in RPA and TBA. The step to include phonon coupling in TBA leads to small, but systematic, down shifts of the centroid energies of the giant resonances. These shifts are similar in size for all Skyrme parametrizations investigated here. After all, we demonstrate that one can find Skyrme parametrizations which deliver a good simultaneous reproduction of all three giant resonances within TBA.

  10. A microscopic study of giant resonances in nuclei near drip lines

    CERN Document Server

    Sagawa, H; Zhang, X Z

    1999-01-01

    We study giant resonances using the self-consistent Hartree-Fock calculation plus the random phase approximation with Skyrme interactions. Including simultaneously both the isoscalar and the isovector correlation the RPA response function is calculated in the coordinate space so as to take properly into account the continuum effect. Giant monopole states are discussed in relation with the nuclear compression modulus of the nuclear matter K sub n sub m. The core polarization charges are also discussed in comparison with recent empirical data in sup 1 sup 0 sup 0 Sn region.

  11. Isoscalar giant resonances for nuclei with mass between 56 and 60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lui, Y.-W.; Youngblood, D.H.; Clark, H.L.; Tokimoto, Y.; John, B.

    2006-01-01

    The giant resonance region from 10 MeV x 56 Fe, 58 Ni, and 60 Ni has been studied with inelastic scattering of 240 MeV α particles at small angles, including 0 deg. Most of the expected isoscalar E0 and E2 strength has been identified below E x =40 MeV. Between 56 and 72% of the isoscalar E1 strength has been located in these nuclei. The mass dependence of the giant monopole energy between A=40 and 90 is compared to relativistic and nonrelativistic calculations for interactions with compressibility of nuclear matter K NM ∼211-225 MeV

  12. THE ANGLO-AUSTRALIAN PLANET SEARCH. XXI. A GAS-GIANT PLANET IN A ONE YEAR ORBIT AND THE HABITABILITY OF GAS-GIANT SATELLITES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinney, C. G.; Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Bailey, Jeremy A.; Horner, J.; Butler, R. Paul; Jones, Hugh R. A.; O'Toole, Simon J.; Carter, Brad D.

    2011-01-01

    We have detected the Doppler signature of a gas-giant exoplanet orbiting the star HD 38283, in an eccentric orbit with a period of almost exactly one year (P = 363.2 ± 1.6 d, m sin i = 0.34 ± 0.02 M Jup , e = 0.41 ± 0.16). The detection of a planet with period very close to one year critically relied on year-round observation of this circumpolar star. Discovering a planet in a 1 AU orbit around a G dwarf star has prompted us to look more closely at the question of the habitability of the satellites of such planets. Regular satellites orbit all the giant planets in our solar system, suggesting that their formation is a natural by-product of the planet formation process. There is no reason for exomoon formation not to be similarly likely in exoplanetary systems. Moreover, our current understanding of that formation process does not preclude satellite formation in systems where gas giants undergo migration from their formation locations into the terrestrial planet habitable zone. Indeed, regular satellite formation and Type II migration are both linked to the clearing of a gap in the protoplanetary disk by a planet, and so may be inextricably linked. Migration would also multiply the chances of capturing both irregular satellites and Trojan companions sufficiently massive to be habitable. The habitability of such exomoons and exo-Trojans will critically depend on their mass, whether or not they host a magnetosphere, and (for the exomoon case) their orbital radius around the host exoplanet.

  13. X-rays from HD 100546- A Young Herbig Star Orbited by Giant Protoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Stephen

    A protoplanetary system consisting of at least two giant planets has beendetected orbiting the young nearby Herbig Be star HD 100546. The inner protoplanet orbits inside a gap within 14 AU of the star and is exposed to strong stellar UV and X-ray radiation. The detection of very warm disk gas provides evidence that stellar heating is affecting physical conditions in the planet-forming environment. We obtained a deep 74 ksec X-ray observation of HD 100546 in 2015 with XMM-Newton yielding an excellent-quality spectrum. We propose here to analyze the XMM-Newton data to determine the X-ray ionization and heating rates in the disk. X-ray ionization and heating affect the thermal and chemical structure of the disk and are key parameters for constructing realistic planet formation models. We are requesting ADAP funding to support the analysis and publication of this valuable XMM-Newton data set, which is now in the public archive.

  14. EUV-driven ionospheres and electron transport on extrasolar giant planets orbiting active stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadney, J. M.; Galand, M.; Koskinen, T. T.; Miller, S.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Unruh, Y. C.; Yelle, R. V.

    2016-03-01

    The composition and structure of the upper atmospheres of extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) are affected by the high-energy spectrum of their host stars from soft X-rays to the extreme ultraviolet (EUV). This emission depends on the activity level of the star, which is primarily determined by its age. In this study, we focus upon EGPs orbiting K- and M-dwarf stars of different ages - ɛ Eridani, AD Leonis, AU Microscopii - and the Sun. X-ray and EUV (XUV) spectra for these stars are constructed using a coronal model. These spectra are used to drive both a thermospheric model and an ionospheric model, providing densities of neutral and ion species. Ionisation - as a result of stellar radiation deposition - is included through photo-ionisation and electron-impact processes. The former is calculated by solving the Lambert-Beer law, while the latter is calculated from a supra-thermal electron transport model. We find that EGP ionospheres at all orbital distances considered (0.1-1 AU) and around all stars selected are dominated by the long-lived H+ ion. In addition, planets with upper atmospheres where H2 is not substantially dissociated (at large orbital distances) have a layer in which H3+ is the major ion at the base of the ionosphere. For fast-rotating planets, densities of short-lived H3+ undergo significant diurnal variations, with the maximum value being driven by the stellar X-ray flux. In contrast, densities of longer-lived H+ show very little day/night variability and the magnitude is driven by the level of stellar EUV flux. The H3+ peak in EGPs with upper atmospheres where H2 is dissociated (orbiting close to their star) under strong stellar illumination is pushed to altitudes below the homopause, where this ion is likely to be destroyed through reactions with heavy species (e.g. hydrocarbons, water). The inclusion of secondary ionisation processes produces significantly enhanced ion and electron densities at altitudes below the main EUV ionisation peak, as

  15. Surface and temperature effects in isovector giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipparini, E.; Stringari, S.

    1988-01-01

    Using the liquid droplet model (LDM) we investigate three different sum rules for the isovector dipole and monopole excitations. Analytical formulae are derived for the excitation energies of these resonances and the predictions are compared with experiments. The role of the surface and the effects of temperature are explicitly discussed. (orig.)

  16. Semiclassical description of resonant tunnel effect: bifurcations and periodic orbits in the resonant current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouben, D.C.

    1997-01-01

    A semiclassical method for resonant tunneling in a quantum well in the presence of a magnetic field tilted with regard to an electric field is developed. In particular a semiclassical formula is derived for the total current of electrons after the second barrier of the quantum well. The contribution of the stable and unstable orbits is studied. It appears that the parameters which describe the classical chaos in the quantum well have an important effect on the tunneling current. A numerical experiment is led, the contributions to the current of some particular orbits are evaluated and the results are compared with those given by the quantum theory. (A.C.)

  17. Angular correlation experiments for the study of giant multipole resonances and currents of the second kind in atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-03-01

    The project dealt with angular correlation experiments for the study of giant multipole resonances and currents of the second kind in atomic nuclei. Both partial projects were worked in the period of the report. (orig.) [de

  18. Damping of isovector giant dipole resonances in hot even-even spherical nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang, N.D.

    1989-01-01

    An approach based on the finite temperature quasiparticle phonon nuclear model (FT-QPNM) with the couplings to (2p2h) states at finite temperature taken into account is suggested for calculations of the damping of giant multipole resonances in hot even-even spherical nuclei. The strength functions for the isovector giant dipole resonance (IV-GDR) are calculated in 58 Ni and 90 Zr for a range of temperatures up to 3 MeV. The results show that the contribution of the interactions with (2p2h) configurations to the IV-GDR spreading width changes weakly with varying temperature. The IV-GDR centroid energy decreases slightly with increasing temperature. The nonvanishing superfluid pairing gap due to thermal fluctuations is included. (orig.)

  19. Multipole giant resonances of 12C nucleus electro excitation in intermediate coupling model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharova, N.G.; Zhivopistsev, F.A.

    1977-01-01

    Multipole giant resonances in 12 C electroexcitation are considered using the shell model with coupling. Cross sections are calculated for the states of 1 - , 2 - , 3 - , 4 - , at T=1. The distributions of the transverse form factor at transferred momenta equal to q approximately 0.75, 1.04, 1.22 and 1.56 Fm -1 and the longitudinal form factor for q = 0.75, 1.04, 1.56 Fm -1 are presented. For the excitation energies in the range from 18 to 28 MeV positive-parity states have a small contribution in the cross section. The distribution of the total form factor in the excitation energies is given. It is concluded that the multipole giant resonances of anomalous parity levels calculated within the interatomic-coupling shell model show a satisfactorily close agreement with the behavior of experimental form factors in the excitation energy range from 18 to 28 MeV

  20. Dramatic distortion of the 4d giant resonance by the C{sub 60} fullerene shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amusia, M Ya [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Baltenkov, A S [Arifov Institute of Electronics, Akademgorodok, 700125 Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Chernysheva, L V [A F Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, St Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Felfli, Z [Department of Physics and Center for Theoretical Studies of Physical Systems, Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, GA 30314 (United States); Msezane, A Z [Department of Physics and Center for Theoretical Studies of Physical Systems, Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, GA 30314 (United States)

    2005-05-28

    The photoionization cross section for the endohedral Xe at C{sub 60} atom is investigated within the framework of representing the C{sub 60} by a delta-type potential. Results demonstrate that in Xe at C{sub 60}, the 4d giant resonance is distorted significantly when compared with that of the isolated Xe atom. The reflection of the photoelectron waves by the C{sub 60} causes strong oscillations in the photoionization cross section resulting in the replacement of the Xe 4d giant resonance by four prominent peaks. The approximation of C{sub 60} by an infinitely thin real potential preserves reasonably well the sum rule for the 4d electrons but modifies the dipole polarizability of the 4d shell. (letter to the editor)

  1. A study of artificial satellite resonance orbits due to lunisolar perturbations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, S.

    1978-01-01

    A study of artificial satellite resonance orbits due to lunisolar perturbations is given. Particular emphasis is placed on the following aspects: the classification of resonance orbits according to their commensurability condition; the form of the commensurability condition when expressed in terms of the orbital elements of a satellite; the predominant resonant terms for each commensurability condition; and criteria which determine the existence or non-existence of a particular commensurability condition. (author)

  2. The giant-dipole-resonance effect in coulomb excitation of 10B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vermeer, W.J.; Zabel, T.H.; Esat, M.T.; Kuehner, J.A.; Spear, R.H.; Baxter, A.M.

    1982-04-01

    Coulomb excitation of the 0.718-MeV, Jsup(π) = 1 + , first excited state of 10 B has been studied using projectile excitation by 208 Pb and observing the backward scattered particles. The results give a clear indication of the virtual excitation of the giant dipole resonance as a second-order effect. The observed magnitude is consistent with the usual hydrodynamic model estimate and with a recent shell-model calculation

  3. Decay of giant resonances states in radiative pion capture by 1p shell nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogotar, G.E.

    1978-01-01

    The decay of the giant resonance states excited in tthe radiative pion capture on the 9 Be, 11 B, 13 C and 14 N nuclei is considered in the shell model with intermediate coupling. It is shown that the excited states in the daughter nuclei (A-1, Z-1) are mainly populated by intermediate states with spin by two units larger than the spin of the target nuclei. Selected coincidence experiments are proposed

  4. Nuclear giant resonances in coordinate space. A semiclassical density functional approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleissl, P.; Brack, M.; Meyer, J.; Quentin, P.

    1987-01-01

    We discuss the semiclassical description of nuclear giant resonances (GR) using a realistic Skyrme force (SkM*) and complete ETF density functionals. We present monopole (0 + ) eigenmodes of isoscalar (I=0) and isovector (I=1) type, which are in good agreement with experiment, and the corresponding m 1 and m 3 sum rules. We also present the temperature dependence of some typical GR energies (0 + , I=0,1; 1 - , I=1; 2 + , I=0) in 208 Pb

  5. Orbital State Manipulation of a Diamond Nitrogen-Vacancy Center Using a Mechanical Resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H. Y.; MacQuarrie, E. R.; Fuchs, G. D.

    2018-04-01

    We study the resonant optical transitions of a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center that is coherently dressed by a strong mechanical drive. Using a gigahertz-frequency diamond mechanical resonator that is strain coupled to a NV center's orbital states, we demonstrate coherent Raman sidebands out to the ninth order and orbital-phonon interactions that mix the two excited-state orbital branches. These interactions are spectroscopically revealed through a multiphonon Rabi splitting of the orbital branches which scales as a function of resonator driving amplitude and is successfully reproduced in a quantum model. Finally, we discuss the application of mechanical driving to engineering NV-center orbital states.

  6. First measurement of isoscalar giant resonances in a stored-beam experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Zamora

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A new technique developed for measuring nuclear reactions at low momentum transfer with stored beams in inverse kinematics was successfully used to study isoscalar giant resonances. The experiment was carried out at the experimental heavy-ion storage ring (ESR at the GSI facility using a stored 58Ni beam at 100 MeV/u and an internal helium gas-jet target. In these measurements, inelastically scattered α-recoils at very forward center-of-mass angles (θcm≤1.5° were detected with a dedicated setup, including ultra-high vacuum compatible detectors. Experimental results indicate a dominant contribution of the isoscalar giant monopole resonance at this very forward angular range. It was found that the monopole contribution exhausts 79−11+12% of the energy-weighted sum rule (EWSR, which agrees with measurements performed in normal kinematics. This opens up the opportunity to investigate the giant resonances in a large domain of unstable and exotic nuclei in the near future. It is a fundamental milestone towards new nuclear reaction studies with stored ion beams.

  7. Decay of the isoscalar giant monopole resonance in 208Pb and 238U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woude, A. van der

    1985-01-01

    In this paper, the neutron decay of the giant monopole resonance (GMR) of 208 Pb and the alpha decay of the GMR of 238 U is studied. The GMR is excited by inelastic alpha-scattering at small angles (0-3deg) using 120 MeV alpha particles. The interference of other processes like the knock-out process with the particle decay of these resonances is considered. Coincidence neutron and alpha spectra are presented, as well as E2/E0 strength distributions. (Auth.)

  8. Photoexcitation by gamma-ray scattering near threshold and giant dipole resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakosi, L.; Safar, J.; Veres, A.; Sekine, T.; Kaji, H.; Yoshihara, K.

    1993-01-01

    Photoexcitation of 4.5 h half-life 115m In and 56 min half-life 103m Rh isomers by inelastic gamma-ray scattering near threshold and in the giant dipole resonance region has been reviewed. In disagreement with earlier experimental results available in the literature, but in good agreement with our experiments published recently, present calculations indicate that above the photoneutron emission threshold the isomer excitation drops abruptly and remains orders of magnitude smaller than at the threshold, even around resonance maximum. (author)

  9. Giant magnetic quadrupole resonance studied with 180 deg. electron scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Neumann-Cosel, P V

    1999-01-01

    The nuclei sup 4 sup 8 Ca and sup 9 sup 0 Zr were investigated in 180 deg. high-resolution inelastic electron scattering for momentum transfers q approx =0.35-0.8 fm sup - sup 1. Complete M2 strength distributions could be extracted in both nuclei up to excitation energies of about 15 MeV utilizing a fluctuation analysis technique. Second-RPA calculations successfully describe the experimentally observed strong fragmentation of the M2 mode. The quenching of the spin part is found to be comparable to the M1 case, contrary to previous claims suggesting a stronger reduction. A quantitative reproduction of the data requires the presence of appreciable orbital strength which can be interpreted as a torsional elastic vibration (the so-called twist mode).

  10. On the Diversity in Mass and Orbital Radius of Giant Planets Formed via Disk Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Simon; Helled, Ravit; Mayer, Lucio

    2018-02-01

    We present a semi-analytical population synthesis model of protoplanetary clumps formed by disk instability at radial distances of 80–120 au. Various clump density profiles, initial mass functions, protoplanetary disk models, stellar masses, and gap opening criteria are considered. When we use more realistic gap opening criteria, we find that gaps open only rarely, which strongly affects clump survival rates and their physical properties (mass, radius, and radial distance). The inferred surviving population is then shifted toward less massive clumps at smaller radial distances. We also find that populations of surviving clumps are very sensitive to the model assumptions and used parameters. Depending on the chosen parameters, the protoplanets occupy a mass range between 0.01 and 16 M J and may either orbit close to the central star or as far out as 75 au, with a sweet spot at 10–30 au for the massive ones. However, in all of the cases we consider, we find that massive giant planets at very large radial distances are rare, in qualitative agreement with current direct imaging surveys. We conclude that caution should be taken in deriving population synthesis models as well as when comparing the models’ results with observations.

  11. The Orbital and Planetary Phase Variations of Jupiter-sized Planets: Characterizing Present and Future Giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorga, Laura C.; Jackiewicz, Jason; Rages, Kathy; West, Robert; Knowles, Ben; Lewis, Nikole K.; Marley, Mark S.

    2018-01-01

    Knowledge of how the brightness and color of a planet varies with viewing angle is essential for the design of future direct imaging missions and deriving constraints on atmospheric properties. However, measuring the phase curves for the solar system gas giants is impossible from the ground. Using data Cassini/ISS obtained during its flyby of Jupiter, I measured Jupiter's phase curve in six bands spanning 400-1000 nm. I found that Jupiter's brightness is less than that of a Lambertian scatterer and that its color varies more with phase angle than predicted by theoretical models. For hot Jupiters, the light from the planet cannot be spatially isolated from that of the star. As a result, determining the planetary phase curve requires removing the phase-dependent contributions from the host star. I consider the effect of varying the stellar model and present a parameterization of the Doppler beaming amplitude that depends upon the planetary mass, orbital period, and the stellar temperature. I consider the detectability of Doppler beaming amplitudes with data from TESS and find that TESS will be less sensitive to this signal than Kepler. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program and the New Mexico Higher Education Department Graduate Scholarship Program.

  12. Semiclassical approach to giant resonances of rotating nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, J.

    1983-01-01

    Quadrupole and isovector dipole resonances of rotating nuclei are investigated in the frame-work of Vlasov equations transformed to a rotating system of reference, which are based on the time-dependent Hartree-method for schematic forces. The parameter free model of the self-consistent vibrating harmonic oscillator potential for the quadrupole mode is extended to a coupling to rotation, which also includes large-amplitude behaviour. A generalization to an exactly solvable two-liquid model describing the isovector mode is established; for rotating nuclei Hilton's explicit result for the eigenfrequencies is obtained. The advantage of using the concept of the classical kinetic momentum in a rotating system also in quantum-mechanical descriptions is demonstrated. It completes the standard transformation of density matrices by a time-odd part realized in a phase-factor and permits a more direct interpretation of rotation effects in terms of the classical forces of inertia. (author)

  13. Two-phonon giant resonances in 136Xe, 208Pb, and 238U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boretzky, K.; Gruenschloss, A.; Ilievski, S.; Adrich, P.; Aumann, T.; Bertulani, C.A.; Cub, J.; Dostal, W.; Eberlein, B.; Elze, T.W.; Emling, H.; Fallot, M.; Holeczek, J.; Holzmann, R.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kratz, J.V.; Kulessa, R.; Leifels, Y.; Leistenschneider, A.; Lubkiewicz, E.; Mordechai, S.; Ohtsuki, T.; Reiter, P.; Simon, H.; Stelzer, K.; Stroth, J.; Suemmerer, K.; Surowiec, A.; Wajda, E.; Walus, W.

    2003-07-01

    The excitation of the double-phonon giant dipole resonance was observed in heavy projectile nuclei impinging on targets of high nuclear charge with energies of 500-700 MeV/nucleon. New experimental data are presented for 136 Xe and 238 U together with further analysis of earlier data on 208 Pb. Differential cross sections dσ/dE * and dσ/dθ for electromagnetic excitations were deduced. Depending on the isotope, cross sections appear to be enhanced in comparison to those expected from a purely harmonic nuclear dipole response. The cumulative effect of excitations of two-phonon states composed of one dipole and one quadrupole phonon, of predicted anharmoniticies in the double-phonon dipole response, and of damping of the dipole resonance during the collision may account for the discrepancy. In addition, decay properties of two-phonon resonances were studied and compared to that of a statistical decay. (orig.)

  14. Survey of the (3He,t) reaction: Excitation of the isobaric analog of the giant dipole resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabor, S.L.; Chang, C.C.; Collins, M.T.; Wagner, G.J.; Wu, J.R.; Halderson, D.W.; Petrovich, F.

    1982-01-01

    The ( 3 He,t) reaction at 130 and 170 MeV has been investigated on targets of 12 C, 16 O, 27 Al, 28 Si, 40 Ca, 46 Ti, and 90 Zr. Data for the ( 3 He, 3 He') reaction were measured simultaneously for reference purposes. Structure is observed in the spectra from the ( 3 He, 3 He') and ( 3 He,t) reaction at the expected positions of the giant quadrupole resonance and the isobaric analog of the giant dipole resonance, respectively. An angular distribution was measured for the suspected giant dipole resonance structure in the 40 Ca( 3 He,t) 40 Sc reaction at 130 MeV. The data are reasonably described by a collective model calculation based on the Goldhaber-Teller model for the giant dipole resonance. Several other strong peaks at excitation energies below the giant dipole resonance are observed in the ( 3 He,t) spectra. Most notable of these are the ones at the expected positions for analogs of well known 1 + states and 1hω stretched states in the targets

  15. Decay of the giant quadrupoles resonance and higher excitation states in 40Ca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamanos, N.; Fernandez, B.; Gillibert, A.

    1991-01-01

    Light charged particles have been measured in coincidence with inelastically scattered fragments from the 40 Ca + 40 Ca reaction at 50 MeV/N. Such a measurement allows to unravel the different reaction mechanisms contributing to the inelastic spectrum: pick-up break-up reactions, knock out and inelastic excitations. The giant quadrupole resonance in 40 Ca is shown to present a 30% non statistical decay branch. A prominent structure at 34 MeV is attributed to target excitation, the decay of this structure is studied

  16. Atlas of giant dipole resonances. Parameters and graphs of photonuclear reaction cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varlamov, A.V.; Varlamov, V.V.; Rudenko, D.S.; Stepanov, M.E.

    1999-01-01

    Parameters of giant dipole resonances (GDR) observed in photonuclear reaction cross sections using various beams of incident photons are presented. Data, given for 200 stable isotopes from 2 H to 243 Am including their natural compositions, were collected from papers published over the years 1951-1996. GDR parameters, such as energy positions, amplitudes and widths, are included into the table and organized by element, isotope and reaction. Graphs of the majority of the photonuclear reaction cross sections, included in the international nuclear data library EXFOR by the end of 1998, are presented. The graphs are provided for 182 stable isotopes and natural compositions. (author)

  17. Internal pair decay of giant resonances- signature from ISGMR in hot and heavy nucleus?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, S.R.

    1996-01-01

    The experimental observation of isoscalar giant monopole resonance built on highly excited nuclear states is still eluding the experimental nuclear physicists although a lot of effort has been put into it. Two very highly sophisticated specific detector systems had been constructed for this study and intense experimental activities were indulged in. Stony Brook pair detector array is being augmented currently to cover about 60% solid angle. There will be another spate of experimental activities and new results will be coming in, but presently there is no experimental observation of ISGMR in hot nucleus

  18. Study of the giant Gamow-Teller resonance in nuclear beta-decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dicklage, R.D. von; Hansen, P.G.

    1984-01-01

    A strong effort has been devoted to the development of new target-ion-source systems at ISOLDE which would give higher yields of proton-rich nuclei. The first break-trough has been obtained for the element argon where one recently was able to produce about three orders of magnitude higher yields than in the first experiments. This makes it possible to perform experiments, involving β-delayed protons and gamma-rays, which may give information about the giant Gamow-Teller resonance. This paper gives a report on the status of these experiments

  19. Correlated ground state and E2 giant resonance built on it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohyama, Mitsuru

    1995-01-01

    Taking 16 O as an example of realistic nuclei, we demonstrate that a correlated ground state can be obtained as a long time solution of a time-dependent density-matrix formalism (TDDM) when the residual interaction is adiabatically treated. We also study in TDDM the E2 giant resonance of 16 O built on the correlated ground state and compare it with that built on the Hartree-Fock ground state. It is found that a spurious mixing of low frequency components seen in the latter is eliminated by using the correlated ground state. (author)

  20. A study of the giant dipole resonance in doubly even tellurium and cerium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepretre, A.; Beil, H.; Bergere, R.; Carlos, P.; Fagot, J.; Miniac, A. de; Veyssiere, A.

    1976-01-01

    The partial photoneutron cross sections [sigma(γ,n)+sigma(γ,pn)] and sigma(γ,2n) of 124 Te, 126 Te, 128 Te, 130 Te and 140 Ce, 142 Ce were measured in the giant dipole resonance region by means of the monochromatic photon beam installation at SACLAY. Absolute total photoneutron cross sections, Lorentz line parameters and integrated cross sections are evaluated. The experimental behaviour of the GDR for the above nuclei and in particular its spreading, is then tentatively interpreted in terms of the improved dynamic collective model using the concept of potential energy surfaces. (Auth.)

  1. Nonperturbative study of the damping of giant resonances in hot nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Blasio, F.V.; Cassing, W.; Tohyama, M.; Bortignon, P.F.; Broglia, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    The damping of dipole and quadrupole motion in 16 O and 40 Ca at zero and finite temperature is studied including particle-particle and particle-hole interactions to all orders of perturbation. We find that the dipole dynamics in these light nuclei is well described in terms of mean-field theory (time-dependent Hartree-Fock), while the quadrupole motion is strongly damped through the coupling to more complicated configurations. Both the centroid and the damping width of the quadrupole and dipole giant resonances show a clear stability with temperature as a consequence of the weakening of the interaction, which contrasts with the increase of the phase space

  2. Chaos-driven decay of nuclear giant resonances: Quantum route to self-organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drozdz, S.; Nishizaki, S.; Wambach, J.

    1994-01-01

    The influence of background states with increasing level of complexity on the strength distribution of the isoscalar and isovector giant quadrupole resonance in 40 Ca is studied. It is found that the background characteristics, typical for chaotic systems, strongly affect the fluctuation properties of the strength distribution. In particular, the small components of the wave function obey a scaling law analogous to self-organized systems at the critical state. This appears to be consistent with the Porter-Thomas distribution of the transition strength

  3. Impact-parameter dependence of giant resonance excitations in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruenschloss, A.; Boretzky, K.; Aumann, T.

    1999-09-01

    Angular distributions of Xe fragments produced in peripheral collisions of a 136 Xe beam (700 MeV/nucleon) with 208 Pb and nat Sn targets were measured. Equivalent sharp-cutoff minimum impact parameters were derived on the basis of a semi-classical description for the electromagnetic excitation of one- and two-phonon giant resonances. The results are compared with current standard parametrizations of minimum impact parameters and with the soft-spheres model using realistic mass density distributions for projectile and targets. (orig.)

  4. Quantum chaos in nuclear single-particle motion and damping of giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, Santanu; Mukhopadhyay, Tapan

    1995-01-01

    The spectral statistics of single particle motion in deformed cavities with axial symmetry are presented. The single particle motion in the cavities considered are non-integrable and the systematics of the fluctuation measures of the spectra reveal a transition from regular to chaotic regime in the corresponding classical systems. Quantitative estimate of the degree of chaos enables us to introduce a correction factor to the one-body wall formula for the damping widths of isoscalar giant resonances. The damping widths calculated with this correction factor give much better agreement with experimental values than earlier calculations of one-body damping widths. (author). 21 refs., 5 figs

  5. A particle-hole-rotator coupling model for the giant resonance of carbon-12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDougall, A.; Spicer, B.M.

    1975-01-01

    A collective correlations calculation has been made for the giant resonance of 12 C. The low-lying states are treated as members of two rotational bands, and higher energy low-lying states are included in the coupling procedure in an attempt to examine the connection of these states with structure in the 30-35 MeV region, and to examine a proposed rotational band of states built on the 7.65 MeV (0 + ) level. The calculation fails to transfer strength to the extent expected. (author)

  6. Studies of photonuclear reactions and photon activation analysis in the giant dipole resonance region using microtrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Duc Thiep; Nguyen Van Do; Nguyen Khac Thi; Truong Thi An; Nguyen Ngoc Son

    2004-01-01

    Microtrons are accelerators of electrons and are simultaneous source of Bremsstrahlung photon flux and fission neutrons. In 1982, a microtron of seventeen trajectories Microtron MT - 17 was put into operation at the National Institute of Physics of Vietnam. Though very modest, microtrons are very useful for developing countries such as Vietnam in both fundamental and applied physics research. During the recent years by using the above mentioned MT - 17 and microtrons from other institutes we have carried out different investigation. In this report we present some results obtained in the studies of photonuclear reactions and photon activation analysis in the giant dipole resonance region. (author)

  7. Fine structure of the giant M1 resonance in 90Zr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusev, G; Tsoneva, N; Dönau, F; Frauendorf, S; Schwengner, R; Tonchev, A P; Adekola, A S; Hammond, S L; Kelley, J H; Kwan, E; Lenske, H; Tornow, W; Wagner, A

    2013-01-11

    The M1 excitations in the nuclide 90Zr have been studied in a photon-scattering experiment with monoenergetic and linearly polarized beams from 7 to 11 MeV. More than 40 J(π)=1+ states have been identified from observed ground-state transitions, revealing the fine structure of the giant M1 resonance with a centroid energy of 9 MeV and a sum strength of 4.17(56) μ(N)(2). The result for the total M1 strength and its fragmentation are discussed in the framework of the three-phonon quasiparticle-phonon model.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging aspects of giant-cell tumours of bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Helcio Mendoncça; Marchiori, Edson; Severo, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of giant-cell tumours of bone. We analysed the clinical and MRI features of patients diagnosed with giant-cell tumours of bone confirmed by histopathology at our institution between 2010 and 2012. The peak incidence was between the second and third decades of life. There was no gender predominance. The most frequent locations were the knee and wrist. Pain and swelling were the prevailing symptoms. Fifty-one per cent of the patients were found to have associated secondary aneurysmal bone cysts on histopathology. On MRI, lesions demonstrated signal intensity equal to that of skeletal muscle on T1-weighted images and low signal intensity on T2-weighted images in 90% of cases. In gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted images, 76.6% of cases demonstrated heterogeneous enhancement. We observed cystic components involving more than 50% of the lesion in 17 cases (56.6%). There was extra-osseous involvement in 13 cases (43.3%). MRI offers a valuable diagnostic tool for giant-cell tumours of bone. Contrast-enhanced MRI can distinguish between cystic and solid components of the tumour. MRI is also the imaging modality of choice for evaluation of soft-tissue involvement, offering a complete preoperative diagnosis.

  9. RADIAL VELOCITY OBSERVATIONS AND LIGHT CURVE NOISE MODELING CONFIRM THAT KEPLER-91b IS A GIANT PLANET ORBITING A GIANT STAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barclay, Thomas; Huber, Daniel; Rowe, Jason F.; Quintana, Elisa V.; Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D.; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Kepler-91b is a rare example of a transiting hot Jupiter around a red giant star, providing the possibility to study the formation and composition of hot Jupiters under different conditions compared to main-sequence stars. However, the planetary nature of Kepler-91b, which was confirmed using phase-curve variations by Lillo-Box et al., was recently called into question based on a re-analysis of Kepler data. We have obtained ground-based radial velocity observations from the Hobby-Eberly Telescope and unambiguously confirm the planetary nature of Kepler-91b by simultaneously modeling the Kepler and radial velocity data. The star exhibits temporally correlated noise due to stellar granulation which we model as a Gaussian Process. We hypothesize that it is this noise component that led previous studies to suspect Kepler-91b to be a false positive. Our work confirms the conclusions presented by Lillo-Box et al. that Kepler-91b is a 0.73 ± 0.13 M Jup planet orbiting a red giant star

  10. Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath of the hand - magnetic resonance image and orthopaedic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirova, G.; Monovska, T.; Jablanski, V.; Alexieva, K.; Velev, M.

    2009-01-01

    Giant cell tumour of the tendon sheath (GCT-TS), also known as localized nodular tenosynovitis, is a benign neoplasm that occurs dominantly on the digits. These tumours most commonly occur in patients aged 30-50 years and are associated with degenerative joint disease. GCT-TS usually arises from the synovium of tendon sheets, affecting interfalangeal joints of the hand, feet, ankle and knees. Magnetic Resonance Imaging is able to depict characteristic signal intensities and can accurately assess the tumor size and degree of extent around the phalanx. We present a case of a 36 years-old male patient with GCT-TS in the flexor tendon of his left second finger, diagnosed with Magnetic Resonance imaging. The mass was excised widely with preservation of the flexor tendon without recurrence. (authors)

  11. Neutron components of isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance states in 58,60,62,64Ni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antalik, R.

    1989-01-01

    The neutron-proton matrix element ratios (η) for isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance states of even Ni isotopes are investigated within the framework of the shell model quasiparticle random-phase approximation. The dependence of η ratios on radial neutron and proton ground state density distribution differences (Δ np ) is found to be about 1.0-1.5 Δ np . The theoretical η ratios are 14-23% lower than the hydrodynamical limit. The agreement between theoretical and experimental η ratios is observed for 58 Ni and 60 Ni isotopes. The η ratios for 62 Ni and 64 Ni suggested by the resonance π ± inelastic scattering cannot be interpreted even including the radial variations of the neutron fields. 18 refs.; 3 tabs

  12. Time-dependent shape fluctuations and the giant dipole resonance in hot nuclei: Realistic calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alhassid, Y.; Bush, B.; Yale Univ., New Haven, CT

    1990-01-01

    The effects of time-dependent shape fluctuations on the giant dipole resonance (GDR) in hot rotating nuclei are investigated. Using the framework of the Landau theory of shape transitions we develop a realistic macroscopic stochastic model to describe the quadrupole time-dependent shape fluctuations and their coupling to the dipole degrees of freedom. In the adiabatic limit the theory reduces to a previous adiabatic theory of static fluctuations in which the GDR cross section is calculated by averaging over the equilibrium distribution with the unitary invariant metric. Nonadiabatic effects are investigated in this model and found to cause structural changes in the resonance cross section and motional narrowing. Comparisons with experimental data are made and deviations from the adiabatic calculations can be explained. In these cases it is possible to determine from the data the damping of the quadrupole motion at finite temperature. (orig.)

  13. Inelastic electron scattering, fine structure of M1 giant resonances and Gamow-Teller states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, A.

    1983-01-01

    Recent progress in obtaining detailed fine structure distributions of magnetic giant resonances in nuclei using high resolution inelastic electron scattering at low energy is discussed. Specific examples chosen are the medium heavy nuclei 40 42 44 48 Ca in which M1 excitations are due to neutron spin-flip transitions and the N=28 isotones 50 Ti, 52 Cr and 54 Fe where in addition also proton excitations contribute to the measured M1 strength. It is found that the M1 strength is very fragmented and considerably quenched in comparison to predictions of shell model calculations in a model space that includes up to 2p-2h excitations. Finally, the old problem of M1 strength in 208 Pb is revisited and the results of a form factor measurement of a recently discovered low lying Jsup(π)=1 + state by nuclear resonance fluorescence are presented. (Auth.)

  14. Deformation dependence of the isovector giant dipole resonance: The neodymium isotopic chain revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.M. Donaldson

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Proton inelastic scattering experiments at energy Ep=200 MeV and a spectrometer scattering angle of 0° were performed on 144,146,148,150Nd and 152Sm exciting the IsoVector Giant Dipole Resonance (IVGDR. Comparison with results from photo-absorption experiments reveals a shift of resonance maxima towards higher energies for vibrational and transitional nuclei. The extracted photo-absorption cross sections in the most deformed nuclei, 150Nd and 152Sm, exhibit a pronounced asymmetry rather than a distinct double-hump structure expected as a signature of K-splitting. This behaviour may be related to the proximity of these nuclei to the critical point of the phase shape transition from vibrators to rotors with a soft quadrupole deformation potential. Self-consistent random-phase approximation (RPA calculations using the SLy6 Skyrme force provide a relevant description of the IVGDR shapes deduced from the present data.

  15. Deformation dependence of the isovector giant dipole resonance: The neodymium isotopic chain revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, L. M.; Bertulani, C. A.; Carter, J.; Nesterenko, V. O.; von Neumann-Cosel, P.; Neveling, R.; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Usman, I. T.; Adsley, P.; Brummer, J. W.; Buthelezi, E. Z.; Cooper, G. R. J.; Fearick, R. W.; Förtsch, S. V.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; Jingo, M.; Kleinig, W.; Kureba, C. O.; Kvasil, J.; Latif, M.; Li, K. C. W.; Mira, J. P.; Nemulodi, F.; Papka, P.; Pellegri, L.; Pietralla, N.; Richter, A.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Smit, F. D.; Steyn, G. F.; Swartz, J. A.; Tamii, A.

    2018-01-01

    Proton inelastic scattering experiments at energy Ep = 200 MeV and a spectrometer scattering angle of 0° were performed on 144,146,148,150Nd and 152Sm exciting the IsoVector Giant Dipole Resonance (IVGDR). Comparison with results from photo-absorption experiments reveals a shift of resonance maxima towards higher energies for vibrational and transitional nuclei. The extracted photo-absorption cross sections in the most deformed nuclei, 150Nd and 152Sm, exhibit a pronounced asymmetry rather than a distinct double-hump structure expected as a signature of K-splitting. This behaviour may be related to the proximity of these nuclei to the critical point of the phase shape transition from vibrators to rotors with a soft quadrupole deformation potential. Self-consistent random-phase approximation (RPA) calculations using the SLy6 Skyrme force provide a relevant description of the IVGDR shapes deduced from the present data.

  16. Giant quadrupole resonance in 24Mg, 27Al, and 28Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youngblood, D.H.; Rozsa, C.M.; Moss, J.M.; Brown, D.R.; Bronson, J.D.

    1977-01-01

    The giant-resonance region of 24 Mg, 27 Al, and 28 Si was studied by inelastic scattering of 126-MeV α particles. In contrast to results at 96 MeV, considerable clustering of E2 strength was observed for 27 Al at E/sub x/ approx. 20.1 MeV with GAMMA approx. 7.6 MeV exhausting about 35% of the E2 energy weighted sum rule. E2 strength was also located in 24 Mg in two clusters of states at E-bar/sub x/ approx. 18.2, 24.4 MeV; however, contributions from other multipoles cannot be neglected. In 28 Si a multipeaked group was observed at E/sub x/ approx. 19.4 MeV with GAMMA approx. 4 MeV but no L assignment was made. The energy dependence of the cross section for the giant quadrupole resonance was found to be consistent with distorted-wave Born approximation predictions

  17. Breaking of axial symmetry in excited heavy nuclei as identified in giant dipole resonance data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosse, E.; Massarczyk, R. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics, Dresden (Germany); Junghans, A.R. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiation Physics, Dresden (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    A recent theoretical prediction of a breaking of axial symmetry in quasi all heavy nuclei is confronted to a new critical analysis of photon strength functions of nuclei in the valley of stability. For the photon strength in the isovector giant dipole resonance (IVGDR) regime a parameterization of GDR shapes by the sum of three Lorentzians (TLO) is extrapolated to energies below and above the IVGDR. The impact of non-GDR modes adding to the low energy slope of photon strength is discussed including recent data on photon scattering and other radiative processes. These are shown to be concentrated in energy regions where various model calculations predict intermediate collective strength; thus they are obviously separate from the IVGDR tail. The triple Lorentzian (TLO) ansatz for giant dipole resonances is normalized in accordance to the dipole sum rule. The nuclear droplet model with surface dissipation accounts well for positions and widths without local, nuclide specific, parameters. Very few and only global parameters are needed when a breaking of axial symmetry already in the valley of stability is admitted and hence a reliable prediction for electric dipole strength functions also outside of it is expected. (orig.)

  18. The 132Sn giant dipole resonance as a constraint on nuclear matter properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Brandon; Bonasera, Giacomo; Shlomo, Shalom

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear giant resonances provide a sensitive method for constraining the properties of nuclear matter (NM) - many of which have large uncertainties - and thereby improve the nuclear energy-density functional. In this work, self-consistent Hartree-Fock random-phase approximation (HF-RPA) theory was employed to calculate the strength function and energy of the isovector giant dipole resonance (IVGDR) in the doubly-magic 132Sn nucleus. Several (17) commonly-used Skyrme-type interactions were employed. The correlations between the IVGDR centroid energy and each nuclear matter property were explored, as were correlations between the nuclear matter properties and the 132Sn neutron skin thickness rn -rp . Experimental data for the IVGDR centroid energy was used to constrain the symmetry energy density, the symmetry energy, and its first and second derivatives, respectively, of NM. Further investigation, particularly of nuclides far from stability, will be needed to extend the nuclear energy-density functional to the extremes of density and neutron abundance found in neutron stars and astrophysical nucleosynthesis environments.

  19. Total and differential cross sections for pion production via coherent isobar and giant resonance formation in heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutchman, P.A.; Norbury, J.W.; Townsend, L.W.

    1985-01-01

    A quantal many-body formalism is presented that investigates pion production through the coherent formation of a nucleonic isobar in the projectile and its subsequent decay to various pion charge states along with concomitant excitation of the target to a coherent spin-isospin giant resonance via a peripheral collision of relativistic heavy ions. Total cross sections as a function of the incident energy per nucleon and Lorentz-invariant differential cross sections as a function of pion energy and angle are calculated. It is shown that the pion angular distributions, in coincidence with the target giant resonance excitations, might provide a well-defined signature for these coherent processes

  20. The Influence of Orbital Resonances on the Water Transport to Objects in the Circumprimary Habitable Zone of Binary Star Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancelin, David; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke; Maindl, Thomas I.; Ragossnig, Florian; Schäfer, Christoph

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the role of secular and mean motion resonances on the water transport from a belt of icy asteroids onto planets or embryos orbiting inside the circumprimary habitable zone (HZ) of a binary star system. In addition, the host-star has an accompanying gas giant planet. For a comparison, we perform two case studies where a secular resonance (SR) is located either inside the HZ close to 1.0 au (causing eccentric motion of a planet or embryos therein) or in the asteroid belt, beyond the snow line. In the latter case, a higher flux of icy objects moving toward the HZ is expected. Collisions between asteroids and objects in the HZ are treated analytically. Our purely dynamical study shows that the SR in the HZ boosts the water transport however, collisions can occur at very high impact speeds. In this paper, we treat for the first time, realistic collisions using a GPU 3D-SPH code to assess the water loss in the projectile. Including the water loss into the dynamical results, we get more realistic values for the water mass fraction of the asteroid during an impact. We highlight that collisions occurring at high velocities greatly reduce the water content of the projectile and thus the amount of water transported to planets or embryos orbiting inside the HZ. Moreover, we discuss other effects that could modify our results, namely the asteroid’s surface rate recession due to ice sublimation and the atmospheric drag contribution on the asteroids’ mass loss.

  1. Formation of giant molecular clouds in global spiral structures: the role of orbital dynamics and cloud-cloud collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, W.W. Jr.; Stewart, G.R.

    1987-01-01

    The different roles played by orbital dynamics and dissipative cloud-cloud collisions in the formation of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in a global spiral structure are investigated. The interstellar medium (ISM) is simulated by a system of particles, representing clouds, which orbit in a spiral-perturbed, galactic gravitational field. The overall magnitude and width of the global cloud density distribution in spiral arms is very similar in the collisional and collisionless simulations. The results suggest that the assumed number density and size distribution of clouds and the details of individual cloud-cloud collisions have relatively little effect on these features. Dissipative cloud-cloud collisions play an important steadying role for the cloud system's global spiral structure. Dissipative cloud-cloud collisions also damp the relative velocity dispersion of clouds in massive associations and thereby aid in the effective assembling of GMC-like complexes

  2. Electric quadrupole giant resonance in the photofission of sup(238)U IFUSP-P--140

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhandari, B.S.; Arruda Neto, J.D.T.; Herdade, S.B.; Nascimento, I.C.

    1978-02-01

    The 238 U nucleus was studied measuring the electrofission yield and angular distributions of fission fragments, in the energy range of 5.5 to 28.3 MeV, using a new method of analysis. An E2 isoscalar giant resonance was found in the photofission cross section of 238 U. This resonance exhausts (71 + -7)% of the EWSR and is located at 9.9 + -0.2 MeV with a width of 6.8 + -0.4 MeV. The position of this resonance is in reasonable agreement with the Bohr and Mottelson prediction (58.Asup( - 1/3MeV). The width of 6.8 + -0.4 MeV is compatible with a possible triple splitting of the resonance. From the angular distributions of photofission fragments and yield measurements of multipoles other than E1, evidence of an M1 mixture in the energy region 6-7 MeV was found

  3. Giant thermo-optical relaxation oscillations in millimeter-size whispering gallery mode disk resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diallo, Souleymane; Lin, Guoping; Chembo, Yanne K

    2015-08-15

    In this Letter, we show that giant thermo-optical oscillations can be triggered in millimeter (mm)-size whispering gallery mode (WGM) disk resonators when they are pumped by a resonant continuous-wave laser. Our resonator is an ultrahigh-Q barium fluoride cavity that features a positive thermo-optic coefficient and a negative thermo-elastic coefficient. We demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that the complex interplay between these two thermic coefficients and the intrinsic Kerr nonlinearity yields very sharp slow-fast relaxation oscillations with a slow timescale that can be exceptionally large, typically of the order of 1 s. We use a time-domain model to gain understanding into this instability, and we find that both the experimental and theoretical results are in excellent agreement. The understanding of these thermal effects is an essential requirement for every WGM-related application and our study demonstrates that even in the case of mm-size resonators, such effects can still be accurately analyzed using nonlinear time-domain models.

  4. Cardiac Sarcoidosis or Giant Cell Myocarditis? On Treatment Improvement of Fulminant Myocarditis as Demonstrated by Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Bogabathina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell myocarditis, but not cardiac sarcoidosis, is known to cause fulminant myocarditis resulting in severe heart failure. However, giant cell myocarditis and cardiac sarcoidosis are pathologically similar, and attempts at pathological differentiation between the two remain difficult. We are presenting a case of fulminant myocarditis that has pathological features suggestive of cardiac sarcoidosis, but clinically mimicking giant cell myocarditis. This patient was treated with cyclosporine and prednisone and recovered well. This case we believe challenges our current understanding of these intertwined conditions. By obtaining a sense of severity of cardiac involvement via delayed hyperenhancement of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, we were more inclined to treat this patient as giant cell myocarditis with cyclosporine. This resulted in excellent improvement of patient’s cardiac function as shown by delayed hyperenhancement images, early perfusion images, and SSFP videos.

  5. Conditions of Passage and Entrapment of Terrestrial Planets in Spin-Orbit Resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-10

    May 25 ABSTRACT The dynamical evolution of terrestrial planets resembling Mercury in the vicinity of spin-orbit resonances is investigated using... planet and assuming a zero obliquity. We find that a Mercury -like planet with a current value of orbital eccentricity (0.2056) is always captured in... Mercury rarely fails to align itself into this state of unstable equilibrium before it traverses 2:1 resonance. Key words: celestial mechanics – planets

  6. KEPLER-63b: A GIANT PLANET IN A POLAR ORBIT AROUND A YOUNG SUN-LIKE STAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Winn, Joshua N.; Albrecht, Simon; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard; Howard, Andrew W.; Johnson, John Asher; Torres, Guillermo; Carter, Joshua A.; Dawson, Rebekah I.; Geary, John C.; Campante, Tiago L.; Chaplin, William J.; Davies, Guy R.; Lund, Mikkel N.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Everett, Mark E.; Fischer, Debra A.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Horch, Elliott P.

    2013-01-01

    We present the discovery and characterization of a giant planet orbiting the young Sun-like star Kepler-63 (KOI-63, m Kp = 11.6, T eff = 5576 K, M * = 0.98 M ☉ ). The planet transits every 9.43 days, with apparent depth variations and brightening anomalies caused by large starspots. The planet's radius is 6.1 ± 0.2 R ⊕ , based on the transit light curve and the estimated stellar parameters. The planet's mass could not be measured with the existing radial-velocity data, due to the high level of stellar activity, but if we assume a circular orbit, then we can place a rough upper bound of 120 M ⊕ (3σ). The host star has a high obliquity (ψ = 104°), based on the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect and an analysis of starspot-crossing events. This result is valuable because almost all previous obliquity measurements are for stars with more massive planets and shorter-period orbits. In addition, the polar orbit of the planet combined with an analysis of spot-crossing events reveals a large and persistent polar starspot. Such spots have previously been inferred using Doppler tomography, and predicted in simulations of magnetic activity of young Sun-like stars

  7. KEPLER-63b: A GIANT PLANET IN A POLAR ORBIT AROUND A YOUNG SUN-LIKE STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Winn, Joshua N.; Albrecht, Simon [Department of Physics, and Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Howard, Andrew W. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Johnson, John Asher [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Torres, Guillermo; Carter, Joshua A.; Dawson, Rebekah I.; Geary, John C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Campante, Tiago L.; Chaplin, William J.; Davies, Guy R. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Lund, Mikkel N. [Stellar Astrophysics Centre (SAC), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Buchhave, Lars A. [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Everett, Mark E. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Ave, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Fischer, Debra A. [Astronomy Department, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States); Gilliland, Ronald L. [Center for Exoplanets and Habitable Worlds, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Horch, Elliott P. [Southern Connecticut State University, New Haven, CT 06515 (United States); and others

    2013-09-20

    We present the discovery and characterization of a giant planet orbiting the young Sun-like star Kepler-63 (KOI-63, m{sub Kp} = 11.6, T{sub eff} = 5576 K, M{sub *} = 0.98 M{sub ☉}). The planet transits every 9.43 days, with apparent depth variations and brightening anomalies caused by large starspots. The planet's radius is 6.1 ± 0.2 R{sub ⊕}, based on the transit light curve and the estimated stellar parameters. The planet's mass could not be measured with the existing radial-velocity data, due to the high level of stellar activity, but if we assume a circular orbit, then we can place a rough upper bound of 120 M{sub ⊕} (3σ). The host star has a high obliquity (ψ = 104°), based on the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect and an analysis of starspot-crossing events. This result is valuable because almost all previous obliquity measurements are for stars with more massive planets and shorter-period orbits. In addition, the polar orbit of the planet combined with an analysis of spot-crossing events reveals a large and persistent polar starspot. Such spots have previously been inferred using Doppler tomography, and predicted in simulations of magnetic activity of young Sun-like stars.

  8. Fingerprints of orbital physics in magnetic resonant inelastic X-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Pasquale

    2012-09-01

    Orbital degrees of freedom play a major role in the physics of many strongly correlated transition metal compounds. However, they are still very difficult to access experimentally, in particular by neutron scattering. We propose here how to reveal orbital occupancies of the system ground state by magnetic resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS). This is possible because, unlike in neutron scattering, the intensity of the magnetic excitations in RIXS depends essentially on the symmetry of the orbitals where the spins are in.

  9. Comment on '(p,n) and (n,p) reactions as probes of isovector giant monopole resonances'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauhoff, W.

    1984-01-01

    The importance of medium corrections in the excitation of the isovector giant monopole resonance by nucleons is investigated. A large reduction of the cross-section, compared to calculations with free t-matrices, is found at projectile energies around 100 MeV. This will make observation of the isovector monopole at these energies even more difficult than estimated by Auerbach et al

  10. The structure of the Gamow-Teller giant resonance and consequences for beta-delayed neutron spectra and element synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klapdor, H.V.

    1976-01-01

    Recent results in β-delayed neutron emission are interpreted by structure of the Gamow-Teller giant resonance not included in the 'gross-theory' of β-decay. Inclusion of this structure of the β-decay function is important for calculations of β-decay production rates for heavy nuclides by astrophysical processes and thermonuclear explosions. (Auth.)

  11. Interacting sp-boson model with isospin: an unified description of giant multipole resonances and other collective motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.H.-T.

    1980-10-01

    A unified description of the following classes of nuclear collective states in terms of an interacting sp-boson model is proposed: (i) Low-lying collective states in the light nuclei, both odd-odd and even-even; (ii) Giant multipole resonances (GMR), and (iii) pairing collective motions. (Author) [pt

  12. Sequential changes of magnetic resonance images of intracavernous giant aneurysm following carotid ligation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinjo, Toshihiko; Mukawa, Jiro; Takara, Eiichi; Mekaru, Susumu; Ishikawa, Yasunari

    1986-01-01

    A case of intracavernous giant aneurysm treated by combined carotid ligation and extracranial-intracranial vein-graft bypass is reported with special reference to the sequential changes of Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI). A 29-year-old female was admitted to our clinic with complaint of diplopia. She had no neurological deficit except for left abducens palsy. Left carotid angiogram revealed an intracavernous giant aneurysm, and vertebral angiogram revealed a fenestration at right and an aneurysm-like buldging at left vertebral artery. Gradual carotid occlusion after extracranial-intracranial bypass via grafted saphnous vein was successfully performed without any neurological complications. Sequential changes of MRI were as follows: The aneurysm was shown by absent intensity both in spin echo (SE) and inversion recovery (IR) methods before the treatment. It became isointensity in SE and two-tone intensity, iso at the center and high at the margin, in IR 15 days after, and, furtheremore, became slight high intensity in SE but decreased in two-tone intensity, low at the center and high at the margin, in IR 37 days after complete carotid occlusion. Coronal view was usefull to understand anatomical relationship. In conclusion, MRI, especially coronal IR method is of more diagnostic value than X-ray CT to follow the thrombosis of intracavernous aneurysm. (author)

  13. A density variational approach to nuclear giant resonances at zero and finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleissl, P.; Brack, M.; Quentin, P.; Meyer, J.

    1989-02-01

    We present a density functional approach to the description of nuclear giant resonances (GR), using Skyrme type effective interactions. We exploit hereby the theorems of Thouless and others, relating RPA sum rules to static (constrained) Hartree-Fock expectation values. The latter are calculated both microscopically and, where shell effects are small enough to allow it, semiclassically by a density variational method employing the gradient-expanded density functionals of the extended Thomas-Fermi model. We obtain an excellent overall description of both systematics and detailed isotopic dependence of GR energies, in particular with the Skyrme force SkM. For the breathing modes (isoscalar and isovector giant monopole modes), and to some extent also for the isovector dipole mode, the A-dependence of the experimental peak energies is better described by coupling two different modes (corresponding to two different excitation operators) of the same spin and parity and evaluating the eigenmodes of the coupled system. Our calculations are also extended to highly excited nuclei (without angular momentum) and the temperature dependence of the various GR energies is discussed

  14. Quantal and thermal dampings of the hot giant dipole resonance due to complex configuration mixing

    CERN Document Server

    Dang, N D; Arima, A

    1999-01-01

    An approach is presented to study the width of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) at non-zero temperature T, which includes all forward-going processes up to two-phonon ones. Calculations are performed in sup 1 sup 2 sup 0 Sn and sup 2 sup 0 sup 8 Pb. An overall agreement between theory and experiment is found. The total width of the GDR due to coupling of the GDR phonon to all ph, pp and hh configurations increases sharply as T increases up to T approx 3 MeV and saturates at T approx 4-6 MeV. The quantal width GAMMA sub Q due to coupling to ph configurations decreases with increasing T. It is almost independent of T if the contribution of two-phonon processes at T not =0 is omitted.

  15. Giant angular resonance and the structure of the lowest-lying nuclear states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhajlov, I.N.; Usmanov, P.N.; Yuldashbaeva, Eh.Kh.

    1987-01-01

    The analysis is given of the Hamiltonian of the two-rotor model, which is based on the assumption that the giant angular resonance exists, i.e. that it is possible to rotate the neutron component of a deformed nucleus as a whole with respect to the proton component. The realization of the projections on the intrinsic axes of the angular momentum operators is found, the Hamiltonian matrix is determined in the basis convenient for the case of strong neutron-proton coupling. The spectrum of the two-rotor model is determined taking into account the nondiagonal matrix elements in the lowest order of the perturbation theory. The g factors and the probabilities of the M1 transitions are discussed

  16. Damping width of giant dipole resonances of cold and hot nuclei: A macroscopic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mughabghab, S.F.; Sonzogni, A.A.

    2002-01-01

    A phenomenological macroscopic model of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) damping width of cold and hot nuclei with ground-state spherical and near-spherical shapes is developed. The model is based on a generalized Fermi liquid model which takes into account the nuclear surface dynamics. The temperature dependence of the GDR damping width is accounted for in terms of surface and volume components. Parameter-free expressions for the damping width and the effective deformation are obtained. The model is validated with GDR measurements of the following nuclides: 39,40 K, 42 Ca, 45 Sc, 59,63 Cu, 109-120 Sn, 147 Eu, 194 Hg, and 208 Pb, and is compared with the predictions of other models

  17. Temperature dependence and fragmentation of the particle-hole giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seva, E.C.; Sofia, H.M.

    1997-01-01

    We evaluate the spreading width of the giant multipole resonances at finite temperature using the discontinuity in the second derivative of the Green close-quote s function of the vibrational boson, in the Matsubara close-quote s framework. Our method allows us to identify the processes that contribute to the spreading width in terms of the Feynman diagrammatic expansion of the full boson propagator. We have applied the calculation of the spreading width to the 208 Pb and the 90 Zr obtaining an increment of the spreading width with the temperature. We have not reached any saturation of the spreading width increment, at least up to the temperature of our calculation. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  18. Study of the giant dipole resonance built on highly excited states in Sn and Dy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolk, A.

    1988-01-01

    A study is presented of the giant dipole resonance built on highly excited states. The aim is to get more detailed information on the properties of the GDR and to use it as a tool for the investigation of nuclear structure at high excitation energy. The high energy γ-rays seen from the decay of excited state GDRs in heavy ion fusion reactions reflect the average properties of the states populated by the γ-emission. The measurements at different initial excitation energies of 114 Sn provide information on the nuclear level density near the particle separation energy at an average angular momentum of 10ℎ. The study of shape changes at very high spin in 152-156 Dy nuclei is presented. A theoretical model developed to describe fusion-evaporation reactions is presented. 149 refs.; 63 figs.; 13 tabs

  19. Fine structure of the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance in 40Ca due to Landau damping?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usman, I.; Buthelezi, Z.; Carter, J.; Cooper, G.R.J.; Fearick, R.W.; Foertsch, S.V.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; Kalmykov, Y.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Neveling, R.; Papakonstantinou, P.; Richter, A.; Roth, R.; Shevchenko, A.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Smit, F.D.

    2011-01-01

    The fragmentation of the Isoscalar Giant Quadrupole Resonance (ISGQR) in 40 Ca has been investigated in high energy-resolution experiments using proton inelastic scattering at E p =200 MeV. Fine structure is observed in the region of the ISGQR and its characteristic energy scales are extracted from the experimental data by means of a wavelet analysis. The experimental scales are well described by Random Phase Approximation (RPA) and second-RPA calculations with an effective interaction derived from a realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction by the Unitary Correlation Operator Method (UCOM). In these results characteristic scales are already present at the mean-field level pointing to their origination in Landau damping, in contrast to the findings in heavier nuclei and also to SRPA calculations for 40 Ca based on phenomenological effective interactions, where fine structure is explained by the coupling to two-particle-two-hole (2p-2h) states.

  20. Origin of fine structure of the giant dipole resonance in s d -shell nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearick, R. W.; Erler, B.; Matsubara, H.; von Neumann-Cosel, P.; Richter, A.; Roth, R.; Tamii, A.

    2018-04-01

    A set of high-resolution zero-degree inelastic proton scattering data on 24Mg, 28Si, 32S, and 40Ca provides new insight into the long-standing puzzle of the origin of fragmentation of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) in s d -shell nuclei. Understanding is achieved by comparison with random phase approximation calculations for deformed nuclei using for the first time a realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction derived from the Argonne V18 potential with the unitary correlation operator method and supplemented by a phenomenological three-nucleon contact interaction. A wavelet analysis allows one to extract significant scales both in the data and calculations characterizing the fine structure of the GDR. The fair agreement for scales in the range of a few hundred keV supports the surmise that the fine structure arises from ground-state deformation driven by α clustering.

  1. The description of neutron and giant resonances within the quasiparticle-phonon nuclear model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soloviev, V.G.

    1978-01-01

    The general assumptions of the quasiparticle-phonon model of complex nuclei are given. The choice of the model Hamiltonian as an average field and residual forces is discussed. The phonon description and quasiparticle-phonon interaction are presented. The system of basic equations and their approximate solutions are obtained. The approximation is chosen so as to obtain the most correct description of few-quasiparticle components rather than of the whole wave function. The method of strength functions is presented, which plays a decisive role in practical realization of the quasiparticle-phonon model for the description of some properties of complex nuclei. The range of applicability of the quasiparticle-phonon nuclear model is determined as few-quasiparticle components of the wave functions at low, intermediate and high excitation energies averaged in a certain energy interval. The fragmentation of single-particle states in deformed nuclei is studied within this model. The dependence of neutron strength functions on the excitation energy is investigated for the transfer reactions of the type (d,p) and (d,t). The s - ,p - , and d-wave neutron strength functions are calculated at the neutron binding energy Bsub(n). A satisfactory agreement with experiment is obtained. A correct description of the radiative strength functions in spherical nuclei is obtained. The influence of the tail of the giant dipole resonance on the E1-strength functions is studied. The energies and EΛ-strength functions for giant multipole resonances in spherical and deformed nuclei are calculated. A correct description of their widths is obtained. (author)

  2. Dynamics of Orbits near 3:1 Resonance in the Earth-Moon System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichmann, Donald J.; Lebois, Ryan; Carrico, John P., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) spacecraft is currently in a highly elliptical orbit around Earth with a period near 3:1 resonance with the Moon. Its orbit is oriented so that apogee does not approach the Moon. Simulations show this orbit to be remarkably stable over the next twenty years. This article examines the dynamics of such orbits in the Circular Restricted 3-Body Problem (CR3BP). We look at three types of periodic orbits, each exhibiting a type of symmetry of the CR3BP. For each of the orbit types, we assess the local stability using Floquet analysis. Although not all of the periodic solutions are stable in the mathematical sense, any divergence is so slow as to produce practical stability over several decades. We use Poincare maps with twenty-year propagations to assess the nonlinear stability of the orbits, where the perturbation magnitudes are related to the orbit uncertainty for the IBEX mission. Finally we show that these orbits belong to a family of orbits connected in a bifurcation diagram that exhibits exchange of stability. The analysis of these families of period orbits provides a valuable starting point for a mission orbit trade study.

  3. The value of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of orbital floor fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freund, Michael; Haehnel, Stefan; Sartor, Klaus

    2002-01-01

    The value of MRI in the diagnosis of acute orbital floor fractures has not been clearly defined. We therefore compared MR findings with CT findings in patients with orbital trauma. In 30 patients with isolated orbital trauma both coronal CT and coronal MRI were used to examine the orbits and the adjacent paranasal sinuses. Visualization of anatomical landmarks, the kind and extent of traumatic lesions, as well as artifacts were scored. The scores were compared using the Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank test. Interexamination agreement between the two methods was calculated using a kappa analysis. All examinations had diagnostic quality: 30 fractures of the orbital floor (9 right and 21 left orbital floor fractures) were identified. In addition, CT showed fractures of the medial orbital wall in 19 patients (63.3%), of the lateral wall in 10 patients (33.3%), of the zygomatic arch in 2 patients (6.7%), and of the maxillary sinus in 4 patients (13.3%). Soft tissue herniation was shown in 13 patients (inferior rectus muscle twice, orbital fat in 11 cases). Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated soft tissue herniation in 21 patients: muscle in 4, orbital fat in 17 cases. Magnetic resonance imaging is able to demonstrate orbital floor fractures as sensitively as CT, but CT is superior to MRI in showing small and associated fractures; therefore, CT remains in orbital fractures the imaging modality of choice. Magnetic resonance imaging is superior to CT in showing soft tissue herniations; therefore, MRI may have a role as an adjunct to CT if soft tissue entrapment remains unclear. (orig.)

  4. Nuclear fluid dynamics with long-mean-free-path dissipation: Multipole vibrations and isoscalar giant resonance widths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasse, R.W.; Ghosh, G.

    1982-01-01

    The long-mean-free-path nuclear fluid dynamics is extended to include damping. First the damping stress is derived from the solution of the Boltzmann equation for a breathing spherical container filled with a Fermi gas. Then the corresponding damping force is incorporated into Euler equations of motion and energies and widths of low lying collective resonances are computed as eigenfrequencies of a vibrating nucleus under surface tension and Coulomb potential as well as the high lying isoscalar giant resonances as eigenfrequencies of an elastic nucleus. Maximum damping is obtained if the particle frequency approximately resonates with the wall frequency. Theoretical results are compared with experimental data and future improvements are indicated

  5. On some aspects of the semiclassical approach to giant resonances of rotating nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, J.

    1985-01-01

    Quadrupole and isovector dipole resonances of rotating nuclei are investigated in the frame-work of Vlasov equations transformed to a rotating system of reference, which are based on the time-dependent Hartree-method for schematic forces. The parameter free model of the self-consistent vibrating harmonic oscillator potential for the quadrupole mode is extended to a coupling to rotation, which also includes large amplitude behaviour. A generalization to an exactly solvable two-liquid model describing the isovector mode is established; for rotating nuclei Hilton's explicit result for the eigenfrequencies is obtained. - The advantage of using the concept of the classical kinetic momentum in a rotating system also in quantum-mechanical descriptions is demonstrated. It completes the standard transformation of density matrices by a time-odd part realized in a phase-factor and permits a more direct interpretation of rotation effects in terms of the classical forces of inertia. - In its generalization from constant angular velocity to constant angular momentum, our model is used to demonstrate that cranking calculations of rotating giant resonances should be corrected for an oscillation of the cranking parameter to assure angular-momentum conservation. (orig.)

  6. Main channels of the decay of the giant dipole resonance in the 20,22Ne nuclei and isospin splitting of the giant dipole resonance in the 22Ne nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varlamov, V.V.; Stepanov, M.E.

    2002-01-01

    Data published in the literature on various photonuclear reactions for the 20,22 Ne isotopes and for their natural mixture are analyzed with the aim of exploring special features of the decay of giant-dipole-resonance states in these two isotopes. With the aid of data on the abundances of the isotopes and on the energy reaction thresholds, the cross sections for the reactions 20,22 Ne[(γ, n) + (γ, np)] and 20,22 Ne[(γ, p) + (γ, np)] are broken down into the contributions from the one-nucleon reactions (γ, n) and (γ, p) and the contributions from the reactions (γ, np). The cross sections evaporation model used here to treat the deexcitation of residual nucle(γ, p) 19,21 F in the energy range E γ = 16.0-28.0 MeV and the cross sections for the reactions 20,22 Ne(γ, np) 18,20 F in the energy range E γ = 23.3-28.0 MeV are estimated. The behavior of the cross-section ratio r = σ(γ, p)/σ(γ, n) for the 22 Ne nucleus as a function of energy is analyzed, and the isospin components of the giant dipole resonance in the 22 Ne nucleus are identified. The contributions of the isospin components of the giant dipole resonance in the 22 Ne nucleus to the cross sections for various photonuclear reactions are determined on the basis of an analysis of the diagram of the excitation and decay of pure isospin states in the 22 Ne nucleus and in nuclei neighboring it, which are members of the corresponding isospin multiplets. The isospin splitting of the giant dipole resonance and the ratio of the intensities of the isospin components are determined to be ΔE = 4.57 ± 0.69 MeV and R = 0.24 ± 0.04, respectively

  7. Semiclassical description of resonant tunnel effect: bifurcations and periodic orbits in the resonant current; Description semiclassique de l`effet tunnel resonant: bifurcations et orbites periodiques dans le courant resonant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouben, D C

    1997-11-28

    A semiclassical method for resonant tunneling in a quantum well in the presence of a magnetic field tilted with regard to an electric field is developed. In particular a semiclassical formula is derived for the total current of electrons after the second barrier of the quantum well. The contribution of the stable and unstable orbits is studied. It appears that the parameters which describe the classical chaos in the quantum well have an important effect on the tunneling current. A numerical experiment is led, the contributions to the current of some particular orbits are evaluated and the results are compared with those given by the quantum theory. (A.C.) 70 refs.

  8. Probing evolution of binaries influenced by the spin–orbit resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, A; Gopakumar, A

    2014-01-01

    We evolve isolated comparable mass spinning compact binaries experiencing Schnittman’s post-Newtonian spin–orbit resonances in an inertial frame associated with j 0 , the initial direction of the total angular momentum. We argue that accurate gravitational wave (GW) measurements of the initial orientations of the two spins and orbital angular momentum from j 0 should allow us to distinguish between the two possible families of spin–orbit resonances. Therefore, these measurements have the potential to provide direct observational evidence of possible binary formation scenarios. The above statements should also apply for binaries that do not remain in a resonant plane when they become detectable by GW interferometers. The resonant plane, characterized by the vanishing scalar triple product involving the two spins and the orbital angular momentum, naturally appears in the one parameter family of equilibrium solutions, discovered by Schnittman. We develop a prescription to compute the time-domain inspiral templates for binaries residing in these resonant configurations and explore their preliminary data analysis consequences. (paper)

  9. Giant resonance spectroscopy of 40Ca with the (e,e'x) reaction (I): Experiments and overview of results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diesener, H.; Helm, U.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Richter, A.; Schrieder, G.; Stascheck, A.; Stiller, A.; Carter, J.

    2001-01-01

    The 40 Ca(e,e'x; x=p,α) reaction has been measured in the giant resonance excitation region for E x ≅8-26 MeV. The present article is the first out of three describing the experiments and giving an overview of the results. Data were taken at four momentum transfers in the range q=0.26-0.66 fm -1 . Angular correlations for decay to the ground state and low-lying states of 39 K and 36 Ar could be extracted as a function of excitation energy in 40 Ca. Excitation energy spectra integrated over the particle emission angle were generated for the various resolved decay channels. Comparisons of the giant resonance cross-section distributions with results using other electromagnetic or hadronic probes have been made and good agreement is found in most cases

  10. Modification of the Xe 4d giant resonance by the C60 shell in molecular Xe at C60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M. Ya.; Baltenkov, A. S.; Chernysheva, L. V.; Felfli, Z.; Msezane, A. Z.

    2006-01-01

    It is demonstrated that in photoabsorption of the 4d 10 subshell of a Xe atom in molecular Xe at C 60 , the 4d giant resonance that characterizes the isolated Xe atom is distorted significantly. The reflection of photoelectron waves by the C 60 shell leads to profound oscillations in the photoionization cross section such that the Xe giant resonance is transformed into four strong peaks. Similarly, the angular anisotropy parameters, both dipole and nondipole, are also modified. The method of calculation is based on the approximation of the C 60 shell by an infinitely thin bubble potential that leaves the sum rule for the 4d-electrons almost unaffected, but noticeably modifies the dipole polarizability of the 4d-shell

  11. Time-dependent Hartree-Fock calculation of the escape width of the giant monopole resonance in 16O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco, J.M.; Maglione, E.; Broglia, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    The damping of the giant monopole resonance in 16 O is calculated within the framework of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock approximation. The strength function contains two peaks, centered at around 25 and 33 MeV, with escape widths of ∼11 and ∼2 MeV, associated with the 1p(0p) -1 and 1s(0s) -1 configurations, respectively

  12. Peripheral collisions of heavy ions induced by 40Ar at intermediate energies: giant resonance high energy structures and projectile fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumenfeld, Y.

    1987-09-01

    The results obtained in similar studies at low incident energies are first of all reviewed. The time of flight spectrometer built for the experiments is then described. A study of the properties of the projectile-like fragments shows numerous deviations from the relativistic energy fragmentation model. Evidence for a strong surface transfer reaction component is given and the persistence of mean field effects at intermediate energies is stressed. A calculation of the contribution of the transfer evaporation mechanism to the inelastic spectra shows that this mechanism is responible for the major part of the background measured at high excitation energy and can in some cases induce narrow structures in the spectra. The inelastic spectra shows a strong excitation of the giant quadrupole resonance. In the region between 20 and 80 MeV excitation energy narrow structures are present for all the studied systems. Statistical and Fourier analysises allow to quantify the probabilities of existence, the widths and the excitation energies of these structures. A transfer evaporation hypothesis cannot consistently reproduce all the observed structures. The excitation energies of the structures can be well described by phenomenological laws where the energies are proportional to the -1/3 power of the target mass. Complete calculations of the excitation probabilities of giant resonances and multiphonon states are performed within a model where the nuclear excitation are calculated microscopically in the Random Phase Approximation. It is shown that a possible interpretation of the structures is the excitation of multiphonon states built with 2 + giant resonances [fr

  13. Elastic and Raman scattering of photons from the giant dipole resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bar-Noy, T.

    1978-12-01

    In the present work we investigated nuclear Raman and elastic scattering of photons from the Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) of medium and heavy nuclei. The photons beams were obtained from thermal neutron capture on V, Fe, Ni, Cu and Cr discs, utilizing the IRR-2 reactor. Nine targets, 159 Tb, 165 Ho, 175 Lu, 181 Ta, 197 Au, 209 Bi, 232 Th, 237 Np, and 238 U, representing all spherical and deformed nuclei in the region of medium and heavy nuclei, were used. As preliminary works, we discovered and investigated the 11.4 MeV γ-line, measured the attenuation coefficients at 9 and 11.4 MeV, performed a numerical calculation of Delbrueck amplitudes and modified the Simple Rotator Model (SRM). The absolute scattering cross-sections were measured for each scatterer at 4-8 different energies, and angular distributions in the range 90 deg to 140 deg were carried out at 9 MeV and 11.4 MeV. The experimental results were compared with theoretical predictions of the modified SRM and the Dynamic Collective Model (DCM). The results proved that the modified SRM describes appropriately the scattering from the GDR, including elastic and Raman absolute cross-sections and their angular distributions. (author)

  14. Distribution of radiative strength with excitation energy: the E1 and M1 giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.E.; Speth, J.

    1979-01-01

    Calculations of the giant dipole resonance in the particle-hole model, employing empirical values for the unperturbed particle and hole energies, have been unsuccessful in pushing the dipole state to a sufficiently high energy. it is argued that unperturbed levels correspondign to an effective mass of m*/m approx. 0.6 to 0.7 should be employed. The couplings of particles and holes to vibrations are the crucial ingredients in these considerations. More generally, it is argued that the effective mass relevant to excitations near the Fermi surface is that corresponding to empirical single-particle levels, m*/m greater than or equal to 1.0. For particle-hole excitations above the Fermi surface, it is a decreasing function of excitation energy, reaching the above values 0.6 to 0.7 for E greater than or equal to 2 dirac constant/b omega, dirac constant/sub omega/ being the shell spacing. This has the consequence of spreading out the M1 strength. A new interpretation of experimental strengths is proposed

  15. On the role of anti-bound states in the RPA description of the giant monopole resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertse, T.; Bang, J.

    1989-01-01

    The limit of the applicability of the resonant Random Phase Approximation (RPA) method is tested by calculating escape widths in the giant monopole resonance of 16 O and comparing them to the results of a time dependent Hartree-Fock calculation. Though the widths of the narrow s-wave component agree reasonably well, the broad p-wave component shows large disagreement, which cannot be cured by complementing the basis with anti-bound states in the RPA calculation. (author) 18 refs.; 3 tabs

  16. Excitation of giant monopole resonance in {sup 208}Pb and {sup 116}Sn using inelastic deuteron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, D.; Garg, U. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Itoh, M. [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Akimune, H. [Department of Physics, Konan University, Kobe 568-8501 (Japan); Berg, G.P.A. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Fujiwara, M. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Harakeh, M.N. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, 9747 AA Groningen (Netherlands); GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, 14076 Caen (France); Iwamoto, C. [Department of Physics, Konan University, Kobe 568-8501 (Japan); Kawabata, T. [Division of Physics and Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Kawase, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Matta, J.T. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Murakami, T. [Division of Physics and Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Okamoto, A. [Department of Physics, Konan University, Kobe 568-8501 (Japan); Sako, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Schlax, K.W. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Takahashi, F. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); White, M. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Yosoi, M. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2014-07-30

    The excitation of the isoscalar giant monopole resonance (ISGMR) in {sup 208}Pb and {sup 116}Sn has been investigated using small-angle (including 0°) inelastic scattering of 100 MeV/u deuteron and multipole-decomposition analysis (MDA). The extracted strength distributions agree well with those from inelastic scattering of 100 MeV/u α particles. These measurements establish deuteron inelastic scattering at E{sub d}∼100 MeV/u as a suitable probe for extraction of the ISGMR strength with MDA, making feasible the investigation of this resonance in radioactive isotopes in inverse kinematics.

  17. Fine structure of the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance from high-resolution inelastic proton scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shevchenko, A.

    2005-02-01

    In the present work the phenomenon of fine structure in the region of the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance in a number of heavy and medium-heavy nuclei is systematically investigated for the first time. High energy-resolution inelastic proton scattering experiments were carried out in September-October 2001 and in October 2003 at the iThemba LABS cyclotron facility in South Africa with an incident proton energy of 200 MeV. The obtained data with the energy resolution of triangle E 58 Ni, 89 Y, 90 Zr, 120 Sn, 142 Nd, 166 Er, 208 Pb), thereby establishing the global character of this phenomenon. Fine structure can be described using characteristic energy scales, appearing as a result of the decay of collective modes towards the compound nucleus through a hierarchy of couplings to complex degrees of freedom. For the extraction of the characteristic energy scales from the spectra an entropy index method and a novel technique based on the wavelet analysis are utilized. The global analysis of available data shows the presence of three groups of scales, according to their values. To the first group belong the scales with the values around and below 100 keV, which were detected in all the nuclei studied. The second group contains intermediate scales in the range of 100 keV to 1 MeV. These scales show large variations depending on the nuclear structure of the nucleus. The largest scales above 1 MeV are classified to the third group, describing the global structure of the resonance (the width). The interpretation of the observed scales is realized via the comparison with microscopic model calculations including the coupling of the initial one-particle-one-hole excitations to more complex configurations. A qualitative agreement of the experimentally observed scales with those obtained from the theoretical predictions supports the suggestion of the origin of fine structure from the coupling to the two-particle-two-hole states. However, quantitatively, large deviations are

  18. ORBITAL PHASE VARIATIONS OF THE ECCENTRIC GIANT PLANET HAT-P-2b

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, Nikole K.; Showman, Adam P.; Knutson, Heather A.; Désert, Jean-Michel; Kao, Melodie; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Laughlin, Gregory; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Burrows, Adam; Bakos, Gáspár Á.; Hartman, Joel D.; Deming, Drake; Crepp, Justin R.; Mighell, Kenneth J.; Agol, Eric; Charbonneau, David; Fischer, Debra A.; Hinkley, Sasha; Johnson, John Asher; Howard, Andrew W.

    2013-01-01

    We present the first secondary eclipse and phase curve observations for the highly eccentric hot Jupiter HAT-P-2b in the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 μm bands of the Spitzer Space Telescope. The 3.6 and 4.5 μm data sets span an entire orbital period of HAT-P-2b (P = 5.6334729 d), making them the longest continuous phase curve observations obtained to date and the first full-orbit observations of a planet with an eccentricity exceeding 0.2. We present an improved non-parametric method for removing the intrapixel sensitivity variations in Spitzer data at 3.6 and 4.5 μm that robustly maps position-dependent flux variations. We find that the peak in planetary flux occurs at 4.39 ± 0.28, 5.84 ± 0.39, and 4.68 ± 0.37 hr after periapse passage with corresponding maxima in the planet/star flux ratio of 0.1138% ± 0.0089%, 0.1162% ± 0.0080%, and 0.1888% ± 0.0072% in the 3.6, 4.5, and 8.0 μm bands, respectively. Our measured secondary eclipse depths of 0.0996% ± 0.0072%, 0.1031% ± 0.0061%, 0.071% -0.013% +0.029, and 0.1392% ± 0.0095% in the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 μm bands, respectively, indicate that the planet cools significantly from its peak temperature before we measure the dayside flux during secondary eclipse. We compare our measured secondary eclipse depths to the predictions from a one-dimensional radiative transfer model, which suggests the possible presence of a transient day side inversion in HAT-P-2b's atmosphere near periapse. We also derive improved estimates for the system parameters, including its mass, radius, and orbital ephemeris. Our simultaneous fit to the transit, secondary eclipse, and radial velocity data allows us to determine the eccentricity (e = 0.50910 ± 0.00048) and argument of periapse (ω = 188.°09 ± 0.°39) of HAT-P-2b's orbit with a greater precision than has been achieved for any other eccentric extrasolar planet. We also find evidence for a long-term linear trend in the radial velocity data. This trend suggests the presence of

  19. ORBITAL PHASE VARIATIONS OF THE ECCENTRIC GIANT PLANET HAT-P-2b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Nikole K.; Showman, Adam P. [Department of Planetary Sciences and Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Knutson, Heather A.; Desert, Jean-Michel; Kao, Melodie [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Cowan, Nicolas B. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2131 Tech Drive, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Laughlin, Gregory; Fortney, Jonathan J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Burrows, Adam; Bakos, Gaspar A.; Hartman, Joel D. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Deming, Drake [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Crepp, Justin R. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Mighell, Kenneth J. [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States); Agol, Eric [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Charbonneau, David [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Fischer, Debra A. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Hinkley, Sasha; Johnson, John Asher [Department of Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Howard, Andrew W., E-mail: nklewis@mit.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); and others

    2013-04-01

    We present the first secondary eclipse and phase curve observations for the highly eccentric hot Jupiter HAT-P-2b in the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 {mu}m bands of the Spitzer Space Telescope. The 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m data sets span an entire orbital period of HAT-P-2b (P = 5.6334729 d), making them the longest continuous phase curve observations obtained to date and the first full-orbit observations of a planet with an eccentricity exceeding 0.2. We present an improved non-parametric method for removing the intrapixel sensitivity variations in Spitzer data at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m that robustly maps position-dependent flux variations. We find that the peak in planetary flux occurs at 4.39 {+-} 0.28, 5.84 {+-} 0.39, and 4.68 {+-} 0.37 hr after periapse passage with corresponding maxima in the planet/star flux ratio of 0.1138% {+-} 0.0089%, 0.1162% {+-} 0.0080%, and 0.1888% {+-} 0.0072% in the 3.6, 4.5, and 8.0 {mu}m bands, respectively. Our measured secondary eclipse depths of 0.0996% {+-} 0.0072%, 0.1031% {+-} 0.0061%, 0.071%{sub -0.013%}{sup +0.029,} and 0.1392% {+-} 0.0095% in the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 {mu}m bands, respectively, indicate that the planet cools significantly from its peak temperature before we measure the dayside flux during secondary eclipse. We compare our measured secondary eclipse depths to the predictions from a one-dimensional radiative transfer model, which suggests the possible presence of a transient day side inversion in HAT-P-2b's atmosphere near periapse. We also derive improved estimates for the system parameters, including its mass, radius, and orbital ephemeris. Our simultaneous fit to the transit, secondary eclipse, and radial velocity data allows us to determine the eccentricity (e = 0.50910 {+-} 0.00048) and argument of periapse ({omega} = 188. Degree-Sign 09 {+-} 0. Degree-Sign 39) of HAT-P-2b's orbit with a greater precision than has been achieved for any other eccentric extrasolar planet. We also find evidence for a long

  20. High order resonances in the evolution of the lunar orbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalevsky, J.

    1983-01-01

    This paper deals with the long term evolution of the motion of the Moon or any other natural satellite under the combined influence of gravitational forces (lunar theory) and the tidal effects. The author studied the equations that are left when all the periodic non-resonant terms are eliminated. They describe the evolution of the mean elements of the Moon. Only the equations involving the variation of the semi-major axis are considered here. Simplified equations, preserving the Hamiltonian form of the lunar theory are first considered and solved. It is shown that librations exist only for those terms which have a coefficient in the lunar theory larger than a quantity A which is a function of the magnitude of the tidal effects. The solution of the general case can be derived from a Hamiltonian solution by a method of variation of constants. The crossing of a libration region causes a retardation in the increase of the semi-major axis. These results are confirmed by numerical integration and orders of magnitude of this retardation are given. (Auth.)

  1. Resonant x-ray scattering in manganites: study of the orbital degree of freedom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Sumio; Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2002-01-01

    The orbital degree of freedom of electrons and its interplay with spin, charge and lattice degrees of freedom are some of the central issues in colossal magnetoresistive manganites. The orbital degree of freedom has until recently remained hidden, since it does not couple directly to most experimental probes. Development of synchrotron light sources has changed the situation; by the resonant x-ray scattering (RXS) technique the orbital ordering has successfully been observed. In this article, we review progress in the recent studies of RXS in manganites. We start with a detailed review of the RXS experiments applied to the orbital-ordered manganites and other correlated electron systems. We derive the scattering cross section of RXS, where the tensor character of the atomic scattering factor (ASF) with respect to the x-ray polarization is stressed. Microscopic mechanisms of the anisotropic tensor character of the ASF are introduced and numerical results of the ASF and the scattering intensity are presented. The azimuthal angle scan is a unique experimental method to identify RXS from the orbital degree of freedom. A theory of the azimuthal angle and polarization dependence of the RXS intensity is presented. The theoretical results show good agreement with the experiments in manganites. Apart from the microscopic description of the ASF, a theoretical framework of RXS to relate directly to the 3d orbital is presented. The scattering cross section is represented by the correlation function of the pseudo-spin operator for the orbital degree of freedom. A theory is extended to the resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and methods to observe excitations of the orbital degree of freedom are proposed. (author)

  2. CONDITIONS OF PASSAGE AND ENTRAPMENT OF TERRESTRIAL PLANETS IN SPIN-ORBIT RESONANCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarov, Valeri V.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamical evolution of terrestrial planets resembling Mercury in the vicinity of spin-orbit resonances is investigated using comprehensive harmonic expansions of the tidal torque taking into account the frequency-dependent quality factors and Love numbers. The torque equations are integrated numerically with a small step in time, including the oscillating triaxial torque components but neglecting the layered structure of the planet and assuming a zero obliquity. We find that a Mercury-like planet with a current value of orbital eccentricity (0.2056) is always captured in 3:2 resonance. The probability of capture in the higher 2:1 resonance is approximately 0.23. These results are confirmed by a semi-analytical estimation of capture probabilities as functions of eccentricity for both prograde and retrograde evolutions of spin rate. As follows from analysis of equilibrium torques, entrapment in 3:2 resonance is inevitable at eccentricities between 0.2 and 0.41. Considering the phase space parameters at the times of periastron, the range of spin rates and phase angles for which an immediate resonance passage is triggered is very narrow, and yet a planet like Mercury rarely fails to align itself into this state of unstable equilibrium before it traverses 2:1 resonance.

  3. (π±, π±' N) reactions on 12C and 208Pb near the giant resonance region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Sung Hoon.

    1990-05-01

    Angular distributions for the 12 C(π ± , π ± ' p) and 208 Pb(π ± , π ± ' p or n) reactions near the giant resonance region have been measured at T π = 180 MeV, and found different between π + and π - data. This observation is interpreted as evidence for different excitation mechanisms dominating the π - -nucleus and π + -nucleus interactions in the giant resonance region of these targets. A comparison with the single-nucleon knock-out distorted-wave impulse approximation calculations shows, even though these calculations underestimate (π ± , π ± ' N) data for both targets, the dominance of direct process for (π + , π + ' p) or (π - , π - ' n) in contrast to (π - , π - ' p) or (π + , π + ' n). In the (π + , π + ' p) reaction proton-proton hole states are excited directly and appear to have a large probability for direct decay with escape width, whereas in (π - , π - ' p) the preferentially excited neutron-neutron hole doorway states couple to resonance states and decay with spreading width. This interpretation led us to suggest that the ratio of cross-sections for inelastic scattering to the giant resonance region should be written in terms of an incoherent sum of cross-sections to neutron and proton doorway states. In a heavy nucleus such as 208 Pb, neutron and proton doorway states. In a heavy nucleus such as 208 Pb, neutron and proton doorway states contribute incoherently because the different decay processes do not populate the same final states of the residual nucleus

  4. Scattering resonances in a low-dimensional Rashba-Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupled quantum gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Su-Ju; Blume, D.

    2017-04-01

    Confinement-induced resonances allow for the tuning of the effective one-dimensional coupling constant. When the scattering state associated with the ground transverse mode is brought into resonance with the bound state attached to the energetically excited transverse modes, the atoms interact through an infinitely strong repulsion. This provides a route to realize the Tonks-Girardeau gas. On the other hand, the realization of synthetic gauge fields in cold atomic systems has attracted a lot of attention. For instance, bound-state formation is found to be significantly modified in the presence of spin-orbit coupling in three dimensions. This motivates us to study ultracold collisions between two Rashba-Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupled atoms in a quasi-one-dimensional geometry. We develop a multi-channel scattering formalism that accounts for the external transverse confinement and the spin-orbit coupling terms. The interplay between these two single-particle terms is shown to give rise to new scattering resonances. In particular, it is analyzed what happens when the scattering energy crosses the various scattering thresholds that arise from the single-particle confinement and the spin-orbit coupling. Support by the NSF is gratefully acknowledged.

  5. RESONANT X-RAY SCATTERING AS A PROBE OF ORBITAL AND CHARGE ORDERING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NELSON, C.S.; HILL, J.P.; GIBBS, D.

    2002-01-01

    Resonant x-ray scattering is a powerful experimental technique for probing orbital and charge ordering. It involves tuning the incident photon energy to an absorption edge of the relevant ion and observing scattering at previously 'forbidden' Bragg peaks, and it allows high-resolution, quantitative studies of orbital and charge order--even from small samples. Further, resonant x-ray scattering from orbitally ordered systems exhibits polarization- and azimuthal-dependent properties that provide additional information about the details of the orbital order that is difficult, or impossible, to obtain with any other technique. In the manganites, the sensitivity to charge and orbital ordering is enhanced when the incident photon energy is tuned near the Mn K absorption edge (6.539 keV), which is the lowest energy at which a 1s electron can be excited into an unoccupied state. In this process, the core electron is promoted to an intermediate excited state, which decays with the emission of a photon. The sensitivity to charge ordering is believed to be due to the small difference in K absorption edges of the Mn 3+ and Mn 4+ sites. For orbital ordering, the sensitivity arises from a splitting--or difference in the weight of the density of states [239]--of the orbitals occupied by the excited electron in the intermediate state. In the absence of such a splitting, there is no resonant enhancement of the scattering intensity. In principle, other absorption edges in which the intermediate state is anisotropic could be utilized, but the strong dipole transition to the Mn 4p levels--and their convenient energies for x-ray diffraction--make the K edge well-suited to studies of manganites. The Mn 4p levels are affected by the symmetry of the orbital ordering, which makes the technique sensitive to the orbital degree of freedom. Therefore resonant x-ray scattering can be used to obtain important quantitative information concerning the details of this electronic order. Two

  6. Photoionization of Xe inside C60: Atom-fullerene hybridization, giant cross-section enhancement, and correlation confinement resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madjet, Mohamed E.; Renger, Thomas; Hopper, Dale E.; McCune, Matthew A.; Chakraborty, Himadri S.; Rost, Jan-M.; Manson, Steven T.

    2010-01-01

    A theoretical study of the subshell photoionization of the Xe atom endohedrally confined in C 60 is presented. Powerful hybridization of the Xe 5s state with the bottom edge of C 60 π band is found that induces strong structures in the 5s ionization, causing the cross section to differ significantly from earlier results that omit this hybridization. The hybridization also affects the angular distribution asymmetry parameter of Xe 5p ionization near the Cooper minimum. The 5p cross section, on the other hand, is greatly enhanced by borrowing considerable oscillator strength from the C 60 giant plasmon resonance via the atom-fullerene dynamical interchannel coupling. Beyond the C 60 plasmon energy range the atomic subshell cross sections display confinement-induced oscillations in which, over the large 4d shape resonance region, the dominant 4d oscillations induce their ''clones'' in all degenerate weaker channels known as correlation confinement resonances.

  7. Scattering phases for particles with nonzero orbital momenta and resonance regimes in the Pais approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruk, Yulii M; Voloshchuk, Aleksandr N

    2012-01-01

    The functional Pais equation for scattering phases with nonzero orbital momenta is solved in the case of low-energy particles. For short-range screened potentials, in particular, Yukawa or Thomas-Fermi potentials, the Pais equation is shown to reduce to transcendental equations. For the potentials varying ∼r - n , n > 0, simple algebraic equations are obtained for determining the phases δ l , l≠0. Possible applications of the Pais approximation to the problem of finding resonance regimes in the scattering of low-energy particles with nonzero orbital momenta are discussed. (methodological notes)

  8. The Orbital Dynamics of Synchronous Satellites: Irregular Motions in the 2 : 1 Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarbas Cordeiro Sampaio

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The orbital dynamics of synchronous satellites is studied. The 2 : 1 resonance is considered; in other words, the satellite completes two revolutions while the Earth completes one. In the development of the geopotential, the zonal harmonics J20 and J40 and the tesseral harmonics J22 and J42 are considered. The order of the dynamical system is reduced through successive Mathieu transformations, and the final system is solved by numerical integration. The Lyapunov exponents are used as tool to analyze the chaotic orbits.

  9. Deciphering the Hot Giant Atmospheres Orbiting Nearby Extrasolar Systems with JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrin Badhan, Mahmuda; Batalha, Natasha; Deming, Drake; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn; HEBRARD, Eric; Kopparapu, Ravi Kumar; Irwin, Patrick Gerard Joseph

    2016-10-01

    Unique and exotic planets give us an opportunity to understand how planetary systems form and evolve over their lifetime, by placing our own planetary system in the context of the vastly different extrasolar systems that are being continually discovered by present space missions. With orbital separations that are less than one-tenth of the Mercury-Sun distance, these close-in planets provide us with valuable insights about the host stellar atmosphere and planetary atmospheres subjected to their enormous stellar insolation. Observed spectroscopic signatures reveal all spectrally active species in a planet, along with information about its thermal structure and dynamics, allowing us to characterize the planet's atmosphere. NASA's upcoming missions will give us the high-resolution spectra necessary to constrain the atmospheric properties with unprecedented accuracy. However, to interpret the observed signals from exoplanetary transit events with any certainty, we need reliable atmospheric retrieval tools that can model the expected observables adequately. In my work thus far, I have built a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) convergence scheme, with an analytical radiative equilibrium formulation for the thermal structures, within the NEMESIS atmospheric modeling tool, to allow sufficient (and efficient) exploration of the parameter space. I also augmented the opacity tables to improve the speed and reliability of retrieval models. I then utilized this upgraded version to infer the pressure-temperature (P-T) structures and volume-mixing ratios (VMRs) of major gas species in hot Jupiter dayside atmospheres, from their emission spectra. I have employed a parameterized thermal structure to retrieve plausible P-T profiles, along with altitude-invariant VMRs. Here I show my retrieval results on published datasets of HD189733b, and compare them with both medium and high spectral resolution JWST/NIRSPEC simulations. In preparation for the upcoming JWST mission, my current work

  10. YOUNG SOLAR SYSTEM's FIFTH GIANT PLANET?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesvorný, David

    2011-01-01

    Studies of solar system formation suggest that the solar system's giant planets formed and migrated in the protoplanetary disk to reach the resonant orbits with all planets inside ∼15 AU from the Sun. After the gas disk's dispersal, Uranus and Neptune were likely scattered by the gas giants, and approached their current orbits while dispersing the transplanetary disk of planetesimals, whose remains survived to this time in the region known as the Kuiper Belt. Here we performed N-body integrations of the scattering phase between giant planets in an attempt to determine which initial states are plausible. We found that the dynamical simulations starting with a resonant system of four giant planets have a low success rate in matching the present orbits of giant planets and various other constraints (e.g., survival of the terrestrial planets). The dynamical evolution is typically too violent, if Jupiter and Saturn start in the 3:2 resonance, and leads to final systems with fewer than four planets. Several initial states stand out in that they show a relatively large likelihood of success in matching the constraints. Some of the statistically best results were obtained when assuming that the solar system initially had five giant planets and one ice giant, with the mass comparable to that of Uranus and Neptune, and which was ejected to interstellar space by Jupiter. This possibility appears to be conceivable in view of the recent discovery of a large number of free-floating planets in interstellar space, which indicates that planet ejection should be common.

  11. Young Solar System's Fifth Giant Planet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesvorný, David

    2011-12-01

    Studies of solar system formation suggest that the solar system's giant planets formed and migrated in the protoplanetary disk to reach the resonant orbits with all planets inside ~15 AU from the Sun. After the gas disk's dispersal, Uranus and Neptune were likely scattered by the gas giants, and approached their current orbits while dispersing the transplanetary disk of planetesimals, whose remains survived to this time in the region known as the Kuiper Belt. Here we performed N-body integrations of the scattering phase between giant planets in an attempt to determine which initial states are plausible. We found that the dynamical simulations starting with a resonant system of four giant planets have a low success rate in matching the present orbits of giant planets and various other constraints (e.g., survival of the terrestrial planets). The dynamical evolution is typically too violent, if Jupiter and Saturn start in the 3:2 resonance, and leads to final systems with fewer than four planets. Several initial states stand out in that they show a relatively large likelihood of success in matching the constraints. Some of the statistically best results were obtained when assuming that the solar system initially had five giant planets and one ice giant, with the mass comparable to that of Uranus and Neptune, and which was ejected to interstellar space by Jupiter. This possibility appears to be conceivable in view of the recent discovery of a large number of free-floating planets in interstellar space, which indicates that planet ejection should be common.

  12. Dynamical evolution of space debris on high-elliptical orbits near high-order resonance zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, Eduard; Zakharova, Polina

    Orbital evolution of objects on Molniya-type orbits is considered near high-order resonance zones. Initial conditions correspond to high-elliptical orbits with the critical inclination 63.4 degrees. High-order resonances are analyzed. Resonance orders are more than 5 and less than 50. Frequencies of perturbations caused by the effect of sectorial and tesseral harmonics of the Earth's gravitational potential are linear combinations of the mean motion of a satellite, angular velocities of motion of the pericenter and node of its orbit, and the angular velocity of the Earth. Frequencies of perturbations were calculated by taking into account secular perturbations from the Earth oblateness, the Moon, the Sun, and a solar radiation pressure. Resonance splitting effect leads to three sub-resonances. The study of dynamical evolution on long time intervals was performed on the basis of the results of numerical simulation. We used "A Numerical Model of the Motion of Artificial Earth's Satellites", developed by the Research Institute of Applied Mathematics and Mechanics of the Tomsk State University. The model of disturbing forces taken into account the main perturbing factors: the gravitational field of the Earth, the attraction of the Moon and the Sun, the tides in the Earth’s body, the solar radiation pressure, taking into account the shadow of the Earth, the Poynting-Robertson effect, and the atmospheric drag. Area-to-mass ratio varied from small values corresponding to satellites to big ones corresponding to space debris. The locations and sizes of resonance zones were refined from numerical simulation. The Poynting-Robertson effect results in a secular decrease in the semi-major axis of a spherically symmetrical satellite. In resonance regions the effect weakens slightly. Reliable estimates of secular perturbations of the semi-major axis were obtained from the numerical simulation. Under the Poynting-Robertson effect objects pass through the regions of high

  13. Giant Vertebral Notochordal Rest: Magnetic Resonance and Diffusion Weighted Imaging Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oner, Ali Yusuf; Akpek, Sergin; Tali, Turgut; Ucar, Murat

    2009-01-01

    A giant vertebral notochordal rest is a newly described, benign entity that is easily confused with a vertebral chordoma. As microscopic notochordal rests are rarely found in adult autopsies, the finding of a macroscopic vertebral lesion is a new entity with only seven previously presented cases. We report here radiological findings, including diffusion weighted images, of a patient with a giant notochordal remnant confined to the L5 vertebra, with an emphasis on its distinction from a chordoma

  14. Orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Guochang

    2008-01-01

    This is the first book of the satellite era which describes orbit theory with analytical solutions of the second order with respect to all possible disturbances. Based on such theory, the algorithms of orbits determination are completely revolutionized.

  15. A KECK HIRES DOPPLER SEARCH FOR PLANETS ORBITING METAL-POOR DWARFS. II. ON THE FREQUENCY OF GIANT PLANETS IN THE METAL-POOR REGIME

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sozzetti, Alessandro; Torres, Guillermo; Latham, David W.; Stefanik, Robert P.; Korzennik, Sylvain G.; Boss, Alan P.; Carney, Bruce W.; Laird, John B.

    2009-01-01

    We present an analysis of three years of precision radial velocity (RV) measurements of 160 metal-poor stars observed with HIRES on the Keck 1 telescope. We report on variability and long-term velocity trends for each star in our sample. We identify several long-term, low-amplitude RV variables worthy of followup with direct imaging techniques. We place lower limits on the detectable companion mass as a function of orbital period. Our survey would have detected, with a 99.5% confidence level, over 95% of all companions on low-eccentricity orbits with velocity semiamplitude K ∼> 100 m s -1 , or M p sin i ∼> 3.0 M J (P/yr) (1/3) , for orbital periods P ∼ p p ≅ 1%. Our results can usefully inform theoretical studies of the process of giant-planet formation across two orders of magnitude in metallicity.

  16. Distribution functions for orbits trapped at the resonances in the Galactic disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monari, G.

    2017-12-01

    The present-day response of a Galactic disc stellar population to a non-axisymmetric perturbation of the potential has previously been computed through perturbation theory within the phase-space coordinates of the unperturbed axisymmetric system. Such an Eulerian linearized treatment however leads to singularities at resonances, which prevent quantitative comparisons with data. Monari et al. manage to capture the behaviour of the distribution function (DF) at a resonance in a Lagrangian approach, by averaging the Hamiltonian over fast angle variables and re-expressing the DF in terms of a new set of canonical actions and angles variables valid in the resonant region. They then follow the prescription of Binney (2016), assigning to the resonant DF the time average along the orbits of the axisymmetric DF expressed in the new set of actions and angles. This boils down to phase-mixing the DF in terms of the new angles, such that the DF for trapped orbits only depends on the new set of actions. This opens the way to quantitatively fitting the effects of the bar and spirals to Gaia data in terms of distribution functions in action space.

  17. Heavy ion coulomb excitation and gamma decay studies of the one and two phonon giant dipole resonances in 208Pb and 209Bi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, P.E.; Beene, J.R.; Bertrand, F.E.; Halbert, M.L.; Olive, D.H.; Varner, R.L.; Sherrill, B.; Thoennessen, M.; Lautridou, P.; Lefevre, F.; Marques, M.; Matulewicz, T.; Mittig, W.; Ostendorf, R.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Schutz, Y.; Pol, J. van; Wilschut, H.W.; Diaz, J.; Ferrero, J.L.; Marin, A.

    1994-01-01

    Projectile - phonon coincidences were measured for the scattering of an 80 MeV/nucleon 64 Zn beam from 208 Pb and 209 Bi targets at the GANIL heavy ion accelerator facility. Projectile-like particles between 0.5 and 4.5 relative to the incident beam direction were detected in the SPEG energy loss spectrometer where their momentum, charge, and mass were determined. Photons were detected in the BaF 2 scintillation detector array TAPS. Light charged particles produced in the reaction were detected in the KVI Forward Wall. The analysis of the data acquired in this experiment is focused on three different phenomena: (1) the two phonon giant dipole resonance, (2) time dependence of the decay of the one phonon giant dipole resonance, and (3) giant resonance strength in projectile nuclei. (orig.)

  18. Using Schumann Resonance Measurements for Constraining the Water Abundance on the Giant Planets - Implications for the Solar System Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoes, Fernando; Pfaff, Robert; Hamelin, Michel; Klenzing, Jeffrey; Freudenreich, Henry; Beghin, Christian; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Bromund, Kenneth; Grard, Rejean; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; hide

    2012-01-01

    The formation and evolution of the Solar System is closely related to the abundance of volatiles, namely water, ammonia, and methane in the protoplanetary disk. Accurate measurement of volatiles in the Solar System is therefore important to understand not only the nebular hypothesis and origin of life but also planetary cosmogony as a whole. In this work, we propose a new, remote sensing technique to infer the outer planets water content by measuring Tremendously and Extremely Low Frequency (TLF-ELF) electromagnetic wave characteristics (Schumann resonances) excited by lightning in their gaseous envelopes. Schumann resonance detection can be potentially used for constraining the uncertainty of volatiles of the giant planets, mainly Uranus and Neptune, because such TLF-ELF wave signatures are closely related to the electric conductivity profile and water content.

  19. USING SCHUMANN RESONANCE MEASUREMENTS FOR CONSTRAINING THE WATER ABUNDANCE ON THE GIANT PLANETS—IMPLICATIONS FOR THE SOLAR SYSTEM'S FORMATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simões, Fernando; Pfaff, Robert; Klenzing, Jeffrey; Freudenreich, Henry; Bromund, Kenneth; Martin, Steven; Rowland, Douglas; Hamelin, Michel; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Béghin, Christian; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Grard, Rejean; Sentman, Davis; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Yair, Yoav

    2012-01-01

    The formation and evolution of the solar system is closely related to the abundance of volatiles, namely water, ammonia, and methane in the protoplanetary disk. Accurate measurement of volatiles in the solar system is therefore important for understanding not only the nebular hypothesis and origin of life but also planetary cosmogony as a whole. In this work, we propose a new remote sensing technique to infer the outer planets' water content by measuring Tremendously and Extremely Low Frequency (TLF-ELF) electromagnetic wave characteristics (Schumann resonances) excited by lightning in their gaseous envelopes. Schumann resonance detection can be potentially used for constraining the uncertainty of volatiles of the giant planets, mainly Uranus and Neptune, because such TLF-ELF wave signatures are closely related to the electric conductivity profile and water content.

  20. Orbital

    OpenAIRE

    Yourshaw, Matthew Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Orbital is a virtual reality gaming experience designed to explore the use of traditional narrative structure to enhance immersion in virtual reality. The story structure of Orbital was developed based on the developmental steps of 'The Hero's Journey,' a narrative pattern identified by Joseph Campbell. Using this standard narrative pattern, Orbital is capable of immersing the player quickly and completely for the entirety of play time. MFA

  1. Empty-electronic-state evolution for Sc and electron dynamics at the 3p-3d giant dipole resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Y.; Wagener, T.J.; Gao, Y.; Weaver, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    Inverse photoemission has been used to study the developing electronic states of an early transition metal, Sc, during thin-film growth and to investigate the effects of these states on the 3p-3d giant dipole resonance. Energy- and coverage-dependent intensity variations of the empty Sc states show that the 3d maximum moves 1.1 eV toward the Fermi level as the thickness of the Sc film increases from 1 to 300 A as measured with an incident electron energy of 41.25 eV, an effect attributed to metallic band formation via hybridization of atomic 4s and 3d states. Incident-energy-dependent intensity variations for these empty Sc features show resonant photon emission for incident electron energies above the 3p threshold, with maxima at 43 and 44 eV for 300- and 5-A-thick films, respectively. Considerations of hybridization-induced energy shifts of the empty Sc 3d states demonstrate that the radiative energy changes very little with Sc coverages. These studies indicate coupling of decay channels involving the inverse photoemission continuum and the recombination of the atomic 3p-3d giant dipole transition, the energy of the latter being determined by atomic 3p-3d excitation processes

  2. Fingerprints of entangled spin and orbital physics in itinerant ferromagnets via angle-resolved resonant photoemission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Pieve, F.

    2016-01-01

    A method for mapping the local spin and orbital nature of the ground state of a system via corresponding flip excitations is proposed based on angle-resolved resonant photoemission and related diffraction patterns, obtained here via an ab initio modified one-step theory of photoemission. The analysis is done on the paradigmatic weak itinerant ferromagnet bcc Fe, whose magnetism, a correlation phenomenon given by the coexistence of localized moments and itinerant electrons, and the observed non-Fermi-Liquid behavior at extreme conditions both remain unclear. The combined analysis of energy spectra and diffraction patterns offers a mapping of local pure spin-flip, entangled spin-flip-orbital-flip excitations and chiral transitions with vortexlike wave fronts of photoelectrons, depending on the valence orbital symmetry and the direction of the local magnetic moment. Such effects, mediated by the hole polarization, make resonant photoemission a promising tool to perform a full tomography of the local magnetic properties even in itinerant ferromagnets or macroscopically nonmagnetic systems.

  3. Study of quadrupolar transitions by 108.5 MeV 3He inelastic scattering at small angles. Anomalous behaviour of giant quadrupole resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouhelal, O.K.

    1982-07-01

    Giant resonances have been studied through the inelastic scattering of 108.5 MeV 3 He on several nuclei. At the very small angles (theta 0 ), the quadrupole giant resonance experimental cross-section is about twice the value predicted by DWBA calculations based on a collective model. The comparison of the experimental data and the theoretical data calculations confirms the validity of DWBA for the first excited state of low energy and same multipolarity L = 2 at the very small angles. The angular distribution for L = 0 transition of energy close to that of the quadrupole giant resonance reaches its maximum at 0 0 . The presence of an L = 0 component permits to describe the shape of the quadrupole giant resonance angular distribution, but difficulties are encountered when applying the sum rule for the heavy nuclei. Better agreement with the experimental angular distribution at small angles is obtained if a semimicroscopic convolution model of the quadrupole resonance is assumed. For excited states of low energy and multipolarity L not equal to 2, the results from the convolution model are as good as those from the standard collective model. The 2 + state in heavy nuclei is, however, much better described by the collective model [fr

  4. Orbital alignment effects in near-resonant Rydberg atoms-rare gas collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaacs, W.A.; Morrison, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical studies of near-resonant energy transfer collisions involving rare-gas atoms and alkali or alkaline earth atoms which have been initially excited to an aligned state via one or more linearly polarized rasters have yielded a wealth of insight into orbital alignment and related effects. We have extended this inquiry to initially aligned Rydberg states, examining state-to-state and alignment-selected cross sections using quantum collision theory augmented by approximations appropriate to the special characteristics of the Rydberg state (e.g., the quasi-free-electron model and the impulse approximation)

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of ocular and orbital disease in 5 dogs and a cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, R.V.; Ring, R.D.; Ward, D.A.; Adams, W.H.

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images were acquired in five dogs and one cat with ocular and orbital disease. MR images were obtained in the dorsal or oblique dorsal, and oblique sagittal planes. Pathologic changes identified in MR images included inflammatory lesions, cystic structures, and neoplasms. All abnormalities were readily apparent in TI-weighted images. MR findings in affected animals were often similar in signal intensity, location, and growth pattern to those found in people with comparable diseases. Although no MR changes were considered pathognomonic for a given disease, MR imaging provided detailed information on the homogeneity, extent and invasiveness of the lesions

  6. Steady state obliquity of a rigid body in the spin-orbit resonant problem: application to Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhotka, Christoph

    2017-12-01

    We investigate the stable Cassini state 1 in the p : q spin-orbit resonant problem. Our study includes the effect of the gravitational potential up to degree and order 4 and p : q spin-orbit resonances with p,q≤ 8 and p≥ q. We derive new formulae that link the gravitational field coefficients with its secular orbital elements and its rotational parameters. The formulae can be used to predict the orientation of the spin axis and necessary angular momentum at exact resonance. We also develop a simple pendulum model to approximate the dynamics close to resonance and make use of it to predict the libration periods and widths of the oscillatory regime of motions in phase space. Our analytical results are based on averaging theory that we also confirm by means of numerical simulations of the exact dynamical equations. Our results are applied to a possible rotational history of Mercury.

  7. Tilting Saturn without Tilting Jupiter: Constraints on Giant Planet Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasser, R.; Lee, Man Hoi

    2015-11-01

    The migration and encounter histories of the giant planets in our solar system can be constrained by the obliquities of Jupiter and Saturn. We have performed secular simulations with imposed migration and N-body simulations with planetesimals to study the expected obliquity distribution of migrating planets with initial conditions resembling those of the smooth migration model, the resonant Nice model and two models with five giant planets initially in resonance (one compact and one loose configuration). For smooth migration, the secular spin-orbit resonance mechanism can tilt Saturn’s spin axis to the current obliquity if the product of the migration timescale and the orbital inclinations is sufficiently large (exceeding 30 Myr deg). For the resonant Nice model with imposed migration, it is difficult to reproduce today’s obliquity values, because the compactness of the initial system raises the frequency that tilts Saturn above the spin precession frequency of Jupiter, causing a Jupiter spin-orbit resonance crossing. Migration timescales sufficiently long to tilt Saturn generally suffice to tilt Jupiter more than is observed. The full N-body simulations tell a somewhat different story, with Jupiter generally being tilted as often as Saturn, but on average having a higher obliquity. The main obstacle is the final orbital spacing of the giant planets, coupled with the tail of Neptune’s migration. The resonant Nice case is barely able to simultaneously reproduce the orbital and spin properties of the giant planets, with a probability ˜ 0.15%. The loose five planet model is unable to match all our constraints (probability <0.08%). The compact five planet model has the highest chance of matching the orbital and obliquity constraints simultaneously (probability ˜0.3%).

  8. Study of orbitally excited $B$ mesons and evidence for a new $B\\pi$ resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero; Amidei, Dante E; Anastassov, Anton Iankov; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, Giorgio; Appel, Jeffrey A; Arisawa, Tetsuo; Artikov, Akram Muzafarovich; Asaadi, Jonathan A; Ashmanskas, William Joseph; Auerbach, Benjamin; Aurisano, Adam J; Azfar, Farrukh A; Badgett, William Farris; Bae, Taegil; Barbaro-Galtieri, Angela; Barnes, Virgil E; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Barria, Patrizia; Bartos, Pavol; Bauce, Matteo; Bedeschi, Franco; Behari, Satyajit; Bellettini, Giorgio; Bellinger, James Nugent; Benjamin, Douglas P; Beretvas, Andrew F; Bhatti, Anwar Ahmad; Bland, Karen Renee; Blumenfeld, Barry J; Bocci, Andrea; Bodek, Arie; Bortoletto, Daniela; Boudreau, Joseph Francis; Boveia, Antonio; Brigliadori, Luca; Bromberg, Carl Michael; Brucken, Erik; Budagov, Ioulian A; Budd, Howard Scott; Burkett, Kevin Alan; Busetto, Giovanni; Bussey, Peter John; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buzatu, Adrian; Calamba, Aristotle; Camarda, Stefano; Campanelli, Mario; Canelli, Florencia; Carls, Benjamin; Carlsmith, Duncan L; Carosi, Roberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Casal Larana, Bruno; Casarsa, Massimo; Castro, Andrea; Catastini, Pierluigi; Cauz, Diego; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Chen, Yen-Chu; Chertok, Maxwell Benjamin; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chlachidze, Gouram; Cho, Kihyeon; Chokheli, Davit; Clark, Allan Geoffrey; Clarke, Christopher Joseph; Convery, Mary Elizabeth; Conway, John Stephen; Corbo, Matteo; Cordelli, Marco; Cox, Charles Alexander; Cox, David Jeremy; Cremonesi, Matteo; Cruz Alonso, Daniel; Cuevas Maestro, Javier; Culbertson, Raymond Lloyd; D'Ascenzo, Nicola; Datta, Mousumi; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demortier, Luc M; Marchese, Luigi; Deninno, Maria Maddalena; Devoto, Francesco; D'Errico, Maria; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruzza, Benedetto; Dittmann, Jay Richard; D'Onofrio, Monica; Donati, Simone; Dorigo, Mirco; Driutti, Anna; Ebina, Koji; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Elagin, Andrey L; Erbacher, Robin D; Errede, Steven Michael; Esham, Benjamin; Farrington, Sinead Marie; Feindt, Michael; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Field, Richard D; Flanagan, Gene U; Forrest, Robert David; Franklin, Melissa EB; Freeman, John Christian; Frisch, Henry J; Funakoshi, Yujiro; Galloni, Camilla; Garfinkel, Arthur F; Garosi, Paola; Gerberich, Heather Kay; Gerchtein, Elena A; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Gibson, Karen Ruth; Ginsburg, Camille Marie; Giokaris, Nikos D; Giromini, Paolo; Giurgiu, Gavril A; Glagolev, Vladimir; Glenzinski, Douglas Andrew; Gold, Michael S; Goldin, Daniel; Golossanov, Alexander; Gomez, Gervasio; Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim T; González López, Oscar; Gorelov, Igor V; Goshaw, Alfred T; Goulianos, Konstantin A; Gramellini, Elena; Grinstein, Sebastian; Grosso-Pilcher, Carla; Group, Robert Craig; Barreiro Guimaraes da Costa, Joao; Hahn, Stephen R; Han, Ji-Yeon; Happacher, Fabio; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Matthew Frederick; Harr, Robert Francis; Harrington-Taber, Timothy; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Hays, Christopher Paul; Heinrich, Joel G; Herndon, Matthew Fairbanks; Hocker, James Andrew; Hong, Ziqing; Hopkins, Walter Howard; Hou, Suen Ray; Hughes, Richard Edward; Husemann, Ulrich; Hussein, Mohammad; Huston, Joey Walter; Introzzi, Gianluca; Iori, Maurizio; Ivanov, Andrew Gennadievich; James, Eric B; Jang, Dongwook; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha Anjalike; Jeon, Eun-Ju; Jindariani, Sergo Robert; Jones, Matthew T; Joo, Kyung Kwang; Jun, Soon Yung; Junk, Thomas R; Kambeitz, Manuel; Kamon, Teruki; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kasmi, Azeddine; Kato, Yukihiro; Ketchum, Wesley Robert; Keung, Justin Kien; Kilminster, Benjamin John; Kim, DongHee; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Jieun; Kim, Min Jeong; Kim, Soo Bong; Kim, Shin-Hong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kim, Young-Jin; Kimura, Naoki; Kirby, Michael H; Knoepfel, Kyle James; Kondo, Kunitaka; Kong, Dae Jung; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Kotwal, Ashutosh Vijay; Kreps, Michal; Kroll, IJoseph; Kruse, Mark Charles; Kuhr, Thomas; Kurata, Masakazu; Laasanen, Alvin Toivo; Lammel, Stephan; Lancaster, Mark; Lannon, Kevin Patrick; Latino, Giuseppe; Heck, Martin; Lee, Hyun Su; Lee, Jaison; Leo, Sabato; Leone, Sandra; Lewis, Jonathan D; Limosani, Antonio; Lipeles, Elliot David; Lister, Alison; Liu, Hao; Liu, Qiuguang; Liu, Tiehui Ted; Lockwitz, Sarah E; Loginov, Andrey Borisovich; Lucà, Alessandra; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lueck, Jan; Lujan, Paul Joseph; Lukens, Patrick Thomas; Lungu, Gheorghe; Lys, Jeremy E; Lysak, Roman; Madrak, Robyn Leigh; Maestro, Paolo; Malik, Sarah Alam; Manca, Giulia; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Marino, Christopher Phillip; Martínez-Perez, Mario; Matera, Keith; Mattson, Mark Edward; Mazzacane, Anna; Mazzanti, Paolo; McNulty, Ronan; Mehta, Andrew; Mehtala, Petteri; Mesropian, Christina; Miao, Ting; Mietlicki, David John; Mitra, Ankush; Miyake, Hideki; Moed, Shulamit; Moggi, Niccolo; Moon, Chang-Seong; Moore, Ronald Scott; Morello, Michael Joseph; Mukherjee, Aseet; Muller, Thomas; Murat, Pavel A; Mussini, Manuel; Nachtman, Jane Marie; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Naganoma, Junji; Nakano, Itsuo; Napier, Austin; Nett, Jason Michael; Neu, Christopher Carl; Nigmanov, Turgun S; Nodulman, Lawrence J; Noh, Seoyoung; Norniella Francisco, Olga; Oakes, Louise Beth; Oh, Seog Hwan; Oh, Young-do; Oksuzian, Iuri Artur; Okusawa, Toru; Orava, Risto Olavi; Ortolan, Lorenzo; Pagliarone, Carmine Elvezio; Palencia, Jose Enrique; Palni, Prabhakar; Papadimitriou, Vaia; Parker, William Chesluk; Pauletta, Giovanni; Paulini, Manfred; Paus, Christoph Maria Ernst; Phillips, Thomas J; Piacentino, Giovanni M; Pianori, Elisabetta; Pilot, Justin Robert; Pitts, Kevin T; Plager, Charles; Pondrom, Lee G; Poprocki, Stephen; Potamianos, Karolos Jozef; Prokoshin, Fedor; Pranko, Aliaksandr Pavlovich; Ptohos, Fotios K; Punzi, Giovanni; Ranjan, Niharika; Redondo Fernández, Ignacio; Renton, Peter B; Rescigno, Marco; Rimondi, Franco; Ristori, Luciano; Robson, Aidan; Rodriguez, Tatiana Isabel; Rolli, Simona; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roser, Robert Martin; Rosner, Jonathan L; Ruffini, Fabrizio; Ruiz Jimeno, Alberto; Russ, James S; Rusu, Vadim Liviu; Sakumoto, Willis Kazuo; Sakurai, Yuki; Santi, Lorenzo; Sato, Koji; Saveliev, Valeri; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Schlabach, Philip; Schmidt, Eugene E; Schwarz, Thomas A; Scodellaro, Luca; Scuri, Fabrizio; Seidel, Sally C; Seiya, Yoshihiro; Semenov, Alexei; Sforza, Federico; Shalhout, Shalhout Zaki; Shears, Tara G; Shepard, Paul F; Shimojima, Makoto; Shochet, Melvyn J; Tecker-Shreyber, Irina; Simonenko, Alexander V; Sliwa, Krzysztof Jan; Smith, John Rodgers; Snider, Frederick Douglas; Sorin, Maria Veronica; Song, Hao; Stancari, Michelle Dawn; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stentz, Dale James; Strologas, John; Sudo, Yuji; Sukhanov, Alexander I; Suslov, Igor M; Takemasa, Ken-ichi; Takeuchi, Yuji; Tang, Jian; Tecchio, Monica; Teng, Ping-Kun; Thom, Julia; Thomson, Evelyn Jean; Thukral, Vaikunth; Toback, David A; Tokar, Stanislav; Tollefson, Kirsten Anne; Tomura, Tomonobu; Tonelli, Diego; Torre, Stefano; Torretta, Donatella; Totaro, Pierluigi; Trovato, Marco; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Uozumi, Satoru; Vázquez-Valencia, Elsa Fabiola; Velev, Gueorgui; Vellidis, Konstantinos; Vernieri, Caterina; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Vizán Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Vogel, Marcelo; Volpi, Guido; Wagner, Peter; Wallny, Rainer S; Wang, Song-Ming; Waters, David S; Wester, William Carl; Whiteson, Daniel O; Wicklund, Arthur Barry; Wilbur, Scott; Williams, Hugh H; Wilson, Jonathan Samuel; Wilson, Peter James; Winer, Brian L; Wittich, Peter; Wolbers, Stephen A; Wolfe, Homer; Wright, Thomas Roland; Wu, Xin; Wu, Zhenbin; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Yamato, Daisuke; Yang, Tingjun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yu Chul; Yao, Wei-Ming; Yeh, Gong Ping; Yi, Kai; Yoh, John; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Takuo; Yu, Geum Bong; Yu, Intae; Zanetti, Anna Maria; Zeng, Yu; Zhou, Chen; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2014-07-28

    Using the full CDF Run II data sample, we report evidence for a new resonance, which we refer to as B(5970), found simultaneously in the $B^0\\pi^+$ and $B^+\\pi^-$ mass distributions with a significance of 4.4 standard deviations. We further report the first study of resonances consistent with orbitally excited $B^{+}$ mesons and an updated measurement of the properties of orbitally excited $B^0$ and $B_s^0$ mesons. Using samples of approximately 8400 $B^{**0}$, 3300 $B^{**+}$, 1350 $B^{**0}_s$, 2600 $B(5970)^0$, and 1400 $B(5970)^+$ decays, we measure the masses and widths of all states, as well as the product of the relative production rate of $B_1$ and $B_2^*$ states times the branching fraction into a $B^{0,+}$ meson and a charged particle. Furthermore, we measure the branching fraction of the $B_{s2}^{*0} \\rightarrow B^{*+} K^-$ decay relative to the $B_{s2}^{*0} \\rightarrow B^{+} K^-$ decay, the production rate times the branching fraction of the B(5970) state relative to the $B_{2}^{*0,+}$ state, and th...

  9. Photon nuclear scattering on lead and bismuth in the region of the giant resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamas, Gabriel.

    1976-01-01

    The results of monochromatic photon nuclear scattering studies on natural lead and bismuth targets are presented. The cross sections for the inelastic scattering leading to the first excited levels of 204 Pb, 206 Pb and 207 Pb are important, in agreement with theoretical predictions. The elastic scattering amplitude is related to the total photon absorption by dispersion relations. It is then possible to determine the spin of resonances excited by the reaction studied. Precise measurements carried out between 14 and 20MeV revealed that the angular distribution cannot be explained by a single dipolar resonance. A quadrupolar resonance at E 2 =14MeV must be introduced [fr

  10. Excitation of giant resonances in 20Ne + 90Zr and 208Pb inelastic scattering at 40 MeV/u1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suomijaervi, T.; Beaumel, D.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Chomaz, P.; Frascaria, N.; Garron, J.P.; Jacmart, J.C.; Roynette, J.C.; Kraus, L.; Link, I.

    1988-01-01

    The giant resonance region in the inelastic spectra from the reactions 20 Ne + 90 Zr and 20 Ne + 208 Pb at 40 MeV/nucleon has been studied with a good energy and angular resolutions. The strength distributions of the different multipolarities contributing to the cross section were obtained by a resonance shape independent analysis. In the case of 208 Pb the GDR strength was found to be strongly shifted towards lower excitation energies which can be explained by the exponentially decreasing Coulomb excitation probability. Furthermore, indications for a high multipolarity component in the resonance structure were found in both reactions

  11. Mercury's capture into the 3/2 spin-orbit resonance as a result of its chaotic dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Alexandre C M; Laskar, Jacques

    2004-06-24

    Mercury is locked into a 3/2 spin-orbit resonance where it rotates three times on its axis for every two orbits around the sun. The stability of this equilibrium state is well established, but our understanding of how this state initially arose remains unsatisfactory. Unless one uses an unrealistic tidal model with constant torques (which cannot account for the observed damping of the libration of the planet) the computed probability of capture into 3/2 resonance is very low (about 7 per cent). This led to the proposal that core-mantle friction may have increased the capture probability, but such a process requires very specific values of the core viscosity. Here we show that the chaotic evolution of Mercury's orbit can drive its eccentricity beyond 0.325 during the planet's history, which very efficiently leads to its capture into the 3/2 resonance. In our numerical integrations of 1,000 orbits of Mercury over 4 Gyr, capture into the 3/2 spin-orbit resonant state was the most probable final outcome of the planet's evolution, occurring 55.4 per cent of the time.

  12. Spin-orbit driven ferromagnetic resonance: a nanoscale magnetic characterisation technique

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fang, D.; Kurebayashi, H.; Wunderlich, Joerg; Výborný, Karel; Zarbo, Liviu; Campion, R. P.; Casiraghi, A.; Gallagher, B. L.; Jungwirth, Tomáš; Ferguson, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 7 (2011), s. 413-417 ISSN 1748-3387 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN400100652; GA MŠk LC510; GA AV ČR KJB100100802; GA MŠk(CZ) 7E08087 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 214499 - NAMASTE; European Commission(XE) 215368 - SemiSpinNet Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) AP0801 Program:Akademická prémie - Praemium Academiae Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : ferromagnetic resonance * spin-orbit coupling * nanomagnets Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnet ism Impact factor: 27.270, year: 2011

  13. Bodily tides near the 1:1 spin-orbit resonance: correction to Goldreich's dynamical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, James G.; Efroimsky, Michael

    2012-12-01

    Spin-orbit coupling is often described in an approach known as " the MacDonald torque", which has long become the textbook standard due to its apparent simplicity. Within this method, a concise expression for the additional tidal potential, derived by MacDonald (Rev Geophys 2:467-541, 1994), is combined with a convenient assumption that the quality factor Q is frequency-independent (or, equivalently, that the geometric lag angle is constant in time). This makes the treatment unphysical because MacDonald's derivation of the said formula was, very implicitly, based on keeping the time lag frequency-independent, which is equivalent to setting Q scale as the inverse tidal frequency. This contradiction requires the entire MacDonald treatment of both non-resonant and resonant rotation to be rewritten. The non-resonant case was reconsidered by Efroimsky and Williams (Cel Mech Dyn Astron 104:257-289, 2009), in application to spin modes distant from the major commensurabilities. In the current paper, we continue this work by introducing the necessary alterations into the MacDonald-torque-based model of falling into a 1-to-1 resonance. (The original version of this model was offered by Goldreich (Astron J 71:1-7, 1996). Although the MacDonald torque, both in its original formulation and in its corrected version, is incompatible with realistic rheologies of minerals and mantles, it remains a useful toy model, which enables one to obtain, in some situations, qualitatively meaningful results without resorting to the more rigorous (and complicated) theory of Darwin and Kaula. We first address this simplified model in application to an oblate primary body, with tides raised on it by an orbiting zero-inclination secondary. (Here the role of the tidally-perturbed primary can be played by a satellite, the perturbing secondary being its host planet. A planet may as well be the perturbed primary, its host star acting as the tide-raising secondary). We then extend the model to a

  14. Charge-Orbital Ordering and Verwey Transition in Magnetite Measured by Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, D.J.; Lin, H.-J.; Okamoto, J.; Hsu, C.-H.; Huang, C.-M.; Yang, C.S.; Chao, K.S.; Wu, W.B.; Jeng, H.-T.; Guo, G.Y.; Ling, D.C.; Chen, C.T.

    2006-01-01

    We report experimental evidence for the charge-orbital ordering in magnetite below the Verwey transition temperature T V . Measurements of O K-edge resonant x-ray scattering on magnetite reveal that the O 2p states in the vicinity of the Fermi level exhibit a charge-orbital ordering along the c axis with a spatial periodicity of the doubled lattice parameter of the undistorted cubic phase. Such a charge-orbital ordering vanishes abruptly above T V and exhibits a thermal hysteresis, correlating closely with the Verwey transition in magnetite

  15. Excitation of the giant quadrupole resonance in /sup 58/Ni with /sup 20/Ne

    CERN Document Server

    Bohlen, H G; Ingold, G; Lettau, H; Ossenbrink, H; von Oertzen, W

    1981-01-01

    The heavy-ion induced excitation of the quadrupole resonance in /sup 58/Ni has been studied with /sup 20/Ne beams of 14.5 and 19.6 MeV/N incident energy. The broad resonance structure is clearly observed; the strength exhausts 44% and 60% of the energy weighted sum rule (EWSR) at the two incident energies, respectively. The background is partly explained by a three-body reaction mechanism, which is based on the one-nucleon pick-up reaction into unbound states followed by one- nucleon emission. The remaining part is interpreted as inelastic excitation of other multipoles. (11 refs).

  16. Universal relations for spin-orbit-coupled Fermi gas near an s -wave resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Sun, Ning

    2018-04-01

    Synthetic spin-orbit-coupled quantum gases have been widely studied both experimentally and theoretically in the past decade. As shown in previous studies, this modification of single-body dispersion will in general couple different partial waves of the two-body scattering and thus distort the wave function of few-body bound states which determines the short-distance behavior of many-body wave function. In this work, we focus on the two-component Fermi gas with one-dimensional or three-dimensional spin-orbit coupling (SOC) near an s -wave resonance. Using the method of effective field theory and the operator product expansion, we derive universal relations for both systems, including the adiabatic theorem, viral theorem, and pressure relation, and obtain the momentum distribution matrix 〈ψa†(q ) ψb(q ) 〉 at large q (a ,b are spin indices). The momentum distribution matrix shows both spin-dependent and spatial anisotropic features. And the large momentum tail is modified at the subleading order thanks to the SOC. We also discuss the experimental implication of these results depending on the realization of the SOC.

  17. AD Leonis: Radial Velocity Signal of Stellar Rotation or Spin–Orbit Resonance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuomi, Mikko; Jones, Hugh R. A.; Barnes, John R.; Anglada-Escudé, Guillem; Butler, R. Paul; Kiraga, Marcin; Vogt, Steven S.

    2018-05-01

    AD Leonis is a nearby magnetically active M dwarf. We find Doppler variability with a period of 2.23 days, as well as photometric signals: (1) a short-period signal, which is similar to the radial velocity signal, albeit with considerable variability; and (2) a long-term activity cycle of 4070 ± 120 days. We examine the short-term photometric signal in the available All-Sky Automated Survey and Microvariability and Oscillations of STars (MOST) photometry and find that the signal is not consistently present and varies considerably as a function of time. This signal undergoes a phase change of roughly 0.8 rad when considering the first and second halves of the MOST data set, which are separated in median time by 3.38 days. In contrast, the Doppler signal is stable in the combined High-Accuracy Radial velocity Planet Searcher and High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer radial velocities for over 4700 days and does not appear to vary in time in amplitude, phase, period, or as a function of extracted wavelength. We consider a variety of starspot scenarios and find it challenging to simultaneously explain the rapidly varying photometric signal and the stable radial velocity signal as being caused by starspots corotating on the stellar surface. This suggests that the origin of the Doppler periodicity might be the gravitational tug of a planet orbiting the star in spin–orbit resonance. For such a scenario and no spin–orbit misalignment, the measured v\\sin i indicates an inclination angle of 15.°5 ± 2.°5 and a planetary companion mass of 0.237 ± 0.047 M Jup.

  18. Evaluation of characteristics of some giant multipole resonances within a many-particle approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steshenko, A.J.

    1994-01-01

    Within a microscopic approach including the many-particle basis of longitudinal-vibration functions (Sp 2 (2,R))-basis) the widths and energies of some gigantic isoscalar monopole and quadrupole resonances in light magic and near-magic nuclei have been calculated. The theoretical results are in agreement with the available experimental data

  19. Giant Negative Magnetoresistance Driven by Spin-Orbit Coupling at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, M; Monteiro, A M R V L; Mattoni, G; Cobanera, E; Hyart, T; Mulazimoglu, E; Bovenzi, N; Beenakker, C W J; Caviglia, A D

    2015-07-03

    The LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface hosts a two-dimensional electron system that is unusually sensitive to the application of an in-plane magnetic field. Low-temperature experiments have revealed a giant negative magnetoresistance (dropping by 70%), attributed to a magnetic-field induced transition between interacting phases of conduction electrons with Kondo-screened magnetic impurities. Here we report on experiments over a broad temperature range, showing the persistence of the magnetoresistance up to the 20 K range--indicative of a single-particle mechanism. Motivated by a striking correspondence between the temperature and carrier density dependence of our magnetoresistance measurements we propose an alternative explanation. Working in the framework of semiclassical Boltzmann transport theory we demonstrate that the combination of spin-orbit coupling and scattering from finite-range impurities can explain the observed magnitude of the negative magnetoresistance, as well as the temperature and electron density dependence.

  20. MMT/AO 5 μm IMAGING CONSTRAINTS ON THE EXISTENCE OF GIANT PLANETS ORBITING FOMALHAUT AT ∼13-40 AU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenworthy, Matthew A.; Hinz, Philip M.; Meyer, Michael R.; Miller, Douglas L.; Sivanandam, Suresh; Freed, Melanie; Mamajek, Eric E.; Heinze, Aren N.

    2009-01-01

    A candidate ∼ Jup extrasolar planet was recently imaged by Kalas et al. using Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys and Keck II at 12.''7 (96 AU) separation from the nearby (d = 7.7 pc) young (∼200 Myr) A2V star Fomalhaut. Here, we report results from M-band (4.8 μm) imaging of Fomalhaut on 2006 December 5 using the Clio IR imager on the 6.5 m MMT with the adaptive secondary mirror. Our images are sensitive to giant planets at orbital radii comparable to the outer solar system (∼10-40 AU). Comparing our 5σ M-band photometric limits to theoretical evolutionary tracks for substellar objects, our results rule out the existence of planets with masses >2 M Jup from ∼13 to 40 AU and objects >13 M Jup from ∼8 to 40 AU.

  1. Calculations of the giant-dipole-resonance photoneutrons using a coupled EGS4-morse code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J.C.; Nelson, W.R.; Kase, K.R.; Mao, X.S.

    1995-10-01

    The production and transport of the photoneutrons from the giant-dipoleresonance reaction have been implemented in a coupled EGS4-MORSE code. The total neutron yield (including both the direct neutron and evaporation neutron components) is calculated by folding the photoneutron yield cross sections with the photon track length distribution in the target. Empirical algorithms based on the measurements have been developed to estimate the fraction and energy of the direct neutron component for each photon. The statistical theory in the EVAP4 code, incorporated as a MORSE subroutine, is used to determine the energies of the evaporation neutrons. These represent major improvements over other calculations that assumed no direct neutrons, a constant fraction of direct neutrons, monoenergetic direct neutron, or a constant nuclear temperature for the evaporation neutrons. It was also assumed that the slow neutrons ( 2 θ, which have a peak emission at 900. Comparisons between the calculated and the measured photoneutron results (spectra of the direct, evaporation and total neutrons; nuclear temperatures; direct neutron fractions) for materials of lead, tungsten, tantalum and copper have been made. The results show that the empirical algorithms, albeit simple, can produce reasonable results over the interested photon energy range

  2. A DISK AROUND THE PLANETARY-MASS COMPANION GSC 06214-00210 b: CLUES ABOUT THE FORMATION OF GAS GIANTS ON WIDE ORBITS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowler, Brendan P.; Liu, Michael C.; Kraus, Adam L.; Mann, Andrew W.; Ireland, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    We present Keck OSIRIS 1.1-1.8 μm adaptive optics integral field spectroscopy of the planetary-mass companion to GSC 06214-00210, a member of the ∼5 Myr Upper Scorpius OB association. We infer a spectral type of L0 ± 1, and our spectrum exhibits multiple signs of youth. The most notable feature is exceptionally strong Paβ emission (EW = –11.4 ± 0.3 Å), which signals the presence of a circumplanetary accretion disk. The luminosity of GSC 06214-00210 b combined with its age yields a model-dependent mass of 14 ± 2 M Jup , making it the lowest-mass companion to show evidence of a disk. With a projected separation of 320 AU, the formation of GSC 06214-00210 b and other very low mass companions on similarly wide orbits is unclear. One proposed mechanism is formation at close separations followed by planet-planet scattering to much larger orbits. Since that scenario involves a close encounter with another massive body, which is probably destructive to circumplanetary disks, it is unlikely that GSC 06214-00210 b underwent a scattering event in the past. This implies that planet-planet scattering is not solely responsible for the population of gas giants on wide orbits. More generally, the identification of disks around young planetary companions on wide orbits offers a novel method to constrain the formation pathway of these objects, which is otherwise notoriously difficult to do for individual systems. We also refine the spectral type of the primary from M1 to K7 and detect a mild (2σ) excess at 22 μm using Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer photometry.

  3. Excitation of the giant resonance in the radiative pion capture on lp shell nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogotar', G.E.

    1978-01-01

    The spin-dipole transitions in the (π - ,γ) reaction on 6 Li, 7 Li, 9 Be, 13 C and 14 N are calculated in the framework of shell model and are compared with experiment. The discussion includes the gross structure and the quantum numbers of the resonance, relative branchings, prominent partial transitions and total yields. General findings is that the calculated (π - ,γ) yield distributions describe the data well in those cases where also the photonuclear data are well reproduced, although the amplitudes of the elementary processes are different. In the case considered, the best agreement is obtained for A=9 and 14. The configurational splitting of the resonances is clearly seen in the A=6 and 7 cases, to somewhat less extent also for A=9. For heavier nuclei the contribution from hole excitation is small and is spread out. For A=7 and 11 the calculated main peaks are at too low intrinsic excitation energies as compared with histograms

  4. The importance of the giant resonances in hadron and muon induced fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartfiel, J.

    1985-01-01

    In the first part of the thesis the fission probability of 238 U by means of the reaction 238 U(α,α'f) is studied at an incident energy of 480 MeV and a scattering angle of 3.4 0 . In the measured spectrum of the inelastically scattered α particles a strong resonance is found in the excitation energy range from 8 to 13 MeV. The center of mass of the resonance lies at 11 MeV. Its width extends to 4.5 MeV. In the second part of the thesis the muon induced fission of 235 U, 238 U, 237 Np, 242 Pu, and 244 Pu is studied. Thereby both fission fragments are detected in coincidence by two surface barrier detectors. By this it is possible for the first time to measure the mass and kinetic energy distribution of the fission fragments. (orig./HSI) [de

  5. Development and test of the e+e- pair spectrometer for the detection of the electromagnetic decay of the E0 giant resonance state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, I.; Fujita, Y.; Fujiwara, M.; Morinobu, S.; Ikegami, H.

    1978-01-01

    A lens type pair spectrometer of electron and positron has been developed and tested in order to detect the electromagnetic decay (pair creation) of the E0 giant resonance state. It was found from the one day machine time test (targets: natural Mo and Pb, beam:α, 70 MeV) that the improvement of the apparatus is necessary for getting a definite information on the yield of high energy electron pairs. (author)

  6. Spin-Orbital Excitations in Ca2RuO4 Revealed by Resonant Inelastic X-Ray Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Das, L.; Forte, F.; Fittipaldi, R.

    2018-01-01

    The strongly correlated insulator Ca2RuO4 is considered as a paradigmatic realization of both spin-orbital physics and a band-Mott insulating phase, characterized by orbitally selective coexistence of a band and a Mott gap. We present a high resolution oxygen K-edge resonant inelastic x-ray scatt......-Mott scenario. The high-energy excitations correspond to intra-atomic singlet-triplet transitions at an energy scale set by Hund's coupling. Our findings give a unifying picture of the spin and orbital excitations in the band-Mott insulator Ca2RuO4.......The strongly correlated insulator Ca2RuO4 is considered as a paradigmatic realization of both spin-orbital physics and a band-Mott insulating phase, characterized by orbitally selective coexistence of a band and a Mott gap. We present a high resolution oxygen K-edge resonant inelastic x......-ray scattering study of the antiferromagnetic Mott insulating state of Ca2RuO4. A set of low-energy (about 80 and 400 meV) and high-energy (about 1.3 and 2.2 eV) excitations are reported, which show strong incident light polarization dependence. Our results strongly support a spin-orbit coupled band...

  7. Electric giant resonances in sup 4 sup 0 Ca and sup 4 sup 8 Ca probed with electron and proton scattering coincidence experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Strauch, S

    1999-01-01

    Excitation and particle decay of electric giant resonances in sup 4 sup 0 Ca and sup 4 sup 8 Ca are studied with electron and proton beams. Recent results of a sup 4 sup 8 Ca(e,e'n) measurement performed at the S-DALINAC in Darmstadt with kinematics that selectively populate electric monopole, dipole and quadrupole excitations are presented. The extracted B(E1) strength distribution is in good agreement with photo nuclear data and the predictions of microscopic calculations. The summed B(E2+E0) strength distribution, however disagrees with the result of these calculations. The neutron emission of the giant dipole resonance in sup 4 sup 8 Ca shows a large fraction of direct decay to sup 4 sup 7 Ca hole states. In addition, isoscalar giant monopole resonance strength in sup 4 sup 0 Ca was extracted from (e,e'alpha sub 0) and (e,e'alpha sub 1) angular correlations. A study of the quadrupole strength in the alpha sub 0 decay channel of sup 4 sup 0 Ca with a (p,p'alpha) coincidence measurement reiterates the unsol...

  8. Self-consistent treatment of nuclear collective motion with an application to the giant-dipole resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liran, S.; Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa. Dept. of Physics)

    1977-01-01

    This paper extends the recent theory of Liran, Scheefer, Scheid and Greiner on non-adiabatic cranking and nuclear collective motion. In the present work we show the self-consistency conditions for the collective motion, which are indicated by appropriate time-dependent Lagrange multipliers, can be treated explicitly. The energy conservation and the self-consistency condition in the case of one collective degree of freedom are expressed in differential form. This leads to a set of coupled differential equations in time for the many-body wave function, for the collective variable and for the Lagrange multiplier. An iteration procedure similar to that of the previous work is also presented. As an illustrative example, we investigate Brink's single-particle description of the giant-dipole resonance. In this case, the important role played by non-adiabaticity and self-consistency in determining the collective motion is demonstrated and discussed. We also consider the fact that in this example of a fast collective motion, the adiabatic cranking model of Inglis gives the correct mass parameter. (orig.) [de

  9. Improvement of photoneutron spectrum measurement produced by bombardment of 2 GeV electrons above giant dipole resonance region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H. S.; Park, J. S.; Choi, H. D.; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Shin, Kasuo; Ban, Syuichi

    2000-01-01

    Above the Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) region, high energy photoneutron spectra produced by irradiation of 2.04 GeV electrons into Pb target were measured by Time-of-Flight (TOF) technique. The differential photoneutron yields were obtained at a fixed angle of 90 degrees to the electron beam direction. The TOF system consists of Pilot-U plastic scintillation detector, which has fast response time, and the high speed multiscaler or CAMAC TDC. In the improvement of experimental setup to extend the flight distance to 10.4 m lead to make the measurable energy to 500 MeV from 300 MeV. And using the TDC based electronics lead to use a veto counter. The results were compared with the calculated one by using EGS4 and Modified PICA95. The characteristics of this TOF system was introduced in this paper and the results for several measuring conditions, which are flight distance, TOF electronics, and type of neutron detector, were discussed to improve the accuracy of this measurement

  10. Solid state deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance detection of transmembrane-potential-driven tetraphenylphosphonium redistribution across Giant Unilamellar Vesicle bilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franzin, Carla Maria Mirella

    1995-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance ( 2 H NMR) of Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs) consisting of specifically choline-deuterated 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), plus 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (POPG) and cholesterol can be used to monitor the transbilayer redistribution of tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP + ) in response to a transmembrane potential (δψ tm ). The 2 H quadrupolar splittings (δν Q 's) measured reflect the level of TPP + bound at the membrane surface due to the latter's effect on the membrane surface electrostatic potential, ψ s . Results reveal the appearance of two distinct δν Q 's, due to differences in bound TPP + at the inner versus the outer monolayer in response to a δψ tm . The observed values of the δν Q 's agree with theoretical predictions based on a derived mathematical model that takes into account δψ tm , plus ψ s , plus the equilibrium binding of TPP + from solution onto the membrane surface, plus the sensitivity of δν Q to the amount of bound TPP + . This model identifies experimental factors that lead to improvements in spectral resolution. Henceforth, 2 H NMR is a valuable tool for quantifying transmembrane asymmetries of ψ s . (author)

  11. Giant resonance spectroscopy of 40Ca with the (e,e'x) reaction (III): Direct versus statistical decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, J.; Diesener, H.; Helm, U.; Herbert, G.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Richter, A.; Schrieder, G.; Strauch, S.

    2001-01-01

    The present article is the third out of three on a study of the 40 Ca(e,e'x) reaction discussing the role of direct and statistical contributions to the decay of the observed giant resonance strengths. The proton and α decay modes leading to low-lying final states in 36 Ar and 39 K were investigated. The branching ratios for the p 0 , p 123 , α 0 and α 1 channels are compared to statistical model calculations. In the excitation region of dominant isoscalar E2 strength (E x =12-18 MeV) good agreement is observed. Model predictions of direct E2 decay for the (α 0 +α 1 )/(p 0 +p 1 ) ratio describe the data poorly. In the isovector E1 excitation region large excess strength is found in the population of low-lying states in 39 K. A fluctuation analysis shows the direct contributions to the p 0 , p 1 channels to be ≥85%. The presence of preequilibrium components is indicated by the significant nonstatistical decay to the p 3 level which has a dominant 'phonon·hole' structure. Cross correlations reveal no significant branching between the different channels. The correlations between different electron scattering angles in the p 0 , p 1 and p 3 decay result in an interaction radius compatible with the whole nucleus acting as an emitting source

  12. Isomeric ratios in photonuclear reactions of molybdenum isotopes induced by bremsstrahlung in the giant dipole resonance region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Duc Thiep; Truong Thi An; Phan Viet Cuong; Nguyen The Vinh; Bui Minh Hue; Belov, A.G.; Maslov, O.D.; Mishinsky, G.V.; Zhemenik, V.I.

    2017-01-01

    We have determined the isomeric ratios of isomeric pairs "9"7"m","gNb, "9"5"m","gNb and "9"1"m","gMo produced in "9"8Mo(γ, p)"9"7"m","gNb, "9"6Mo(γ, p)"9"5"m","gNb and "9"2Mo(γ, n)"9"1"m","gMo photonuclear reactions in the giant dipole resonance (GDR) region by the activation method. The results were analyzed, discussed and compared with the similar data from literature to examine the role of excitation energy, neutron configuration, channel effect, and direct and pre-equilibrium processes in (γ, p) photonuclear reactions. In this work the isomeric ratios for "9"7"m","gNb from 14 to 19 MeV, for "1"9"5"m","gNb from 14 to 24 MeV except 20 and 23.5 MeV and for "9"1"m","gMo at 14 and 15 MeV were first measured.

  13. Comment on 'Angular momentum gated giant dipole resonance measurements in the reaction 28Si+58Ni at E(28Si)=100 and 125 MeV'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heckman, P.; Thoennessen, M.

    2003-01-01

    In a recent paper, the giant dipole resonance width was studied as a function of angular momentum in the nucleus 86 Mo. The width of the resonance was found to be constant over a spin range of (0-40)(ℎ/2π). It was concluded that the angular momentum dependence for 86 Mo differs from that of Sn isotopes. We compared both datasets with a phenomenological formula based on the thermal fluctuation theory. The 86 Mo data are inconsistent with the formula in contrast to the previously analyzed Sn data, which seems to indicate that the angular momentum dependence of the phenomenological model is not universally applicable

  14. Giant intracranial aneurysms; Magnetic resonance imaging follow-up and clinical symptoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondoh, Takeshi; Fujita, Katsuzo; Tamaki, Norihiko; Matsumoto, Satoshi [Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Yamashita, Haruo; Shirakata, Masaya

    1991-06-01

    Twenty-four intracranial aneurysms over 20 mm in diameter were studied with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. MR imaging follow-up of eight cases revealed induced thrombus with homogeneous intensity and decreased size even after complete intraluminal thrombosis. Most cases demonstrated homogeneous intensity thrombus in contrast to the heterogeneous intensity of spontaneous thrombus. The clinical symptoms could not be explained retrospectively by the thrombus characteristics. Perianeurysmal high intensity, indicating cerebral edema, was detected in one case presenting with a rapid increase in size. MR imaging is useful for following these pathological intra- and perianeurysmal changes. (author).

  15. Third cranial nerve palsy (ptosis, diplopia accompanied by orbital swelling: case report of unusual clinical presentation of giant cell arteritis associated with polymyalgia rheumatica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prassede Bravi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionGiant cell arteritis (GCA is the most common systemic vasculitis in older individuals, characterized by granulomatosus inflammation of the wall of large and medium-sized arteries. The wide spectrum of arterial sites involved leads to ischemia of different organs resulting in a wide range of clinical signs and symptoms. Temporal artery is commonly involved (temporal arteritis. Unusual patterns of presentation, such as extraocular motility disorders and orbital swelling, may be early and transient manifestations of GCA and precede the permanent visual loss due to ischemic optic neuropathy.Case reportWe describe a patient with uncommon manifestations of GCA consisting of transient recurrent diplopia, ptosis, orbital swelling together with more typical clinical features of the disease such as musculoskeletal manifestations (polymyalgia rheumatica and facial pain: all signs and symptoms promptly resolved under corticosteroid therapy without relapse.Conclusions A high level of suspicion of GCA in individuals over the age of 50 years is needed to prevent the development of severe complications. Clinicians should be aware of uncommon manifestations of the disease such as head–neck swelling and ophthalmoplegia: management guidelines have stated that prompt administration of adequate dose of corticosteroids as soon as ocular manifestations of GCA are noted may almost totally prevent blindness.

  16. Role of orbital dynamics and cloud-cloud collisions in the formation of giant molecular clouds in global spiral structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, W.W. Jr.; Stewart, G.R.

    1987-01-01

    The role of orbit crowding and cloud-cloud collisions in the formation of GMCs and their organization in global spiral structure is investigated. Both N-body simulations of the cloud system and a detailed analysis of individual particle orbits are used to develop a conceptual understanding of how individual clouds participate in the collective density response. Detailed comparisons are made between a representative cloud-particle simulation in which the cloud particles collide inelastically with one another and give birth to and subsequently interact with young star associations and stripped down simulations in which the cloud particles are allowed to follow ballistic orbits in the absence of cloud-cloud collisions or any star formation processes. Orbit crowding is then related to the behavior of individual particle trajectories in the galactic potential field. The conceptual picture of how GMCs are formed in the clumpy ISMs of spiral galaxies is formulated, and the results are compared in detail with those published by other authors. 68 references

  17. QPM Analysis of 205Tl Nuclear Excitations below the Giant Dipole Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benouaret, N.; Beller, J.; Isaak, J.; Kelley, J. H.; Pai, H.; Pietralla, N.; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Raut, R.; Romig, C.; Rusev, G.; Savran, D.; Scheck, M.; Schnorrenberger, L.; Sonnabend, K.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Weller, H. R.; Zweidinger, M.

    2015-05-01

    We analysed our experimental recent findings of the dipole response of the odd-mass stable nucleus 205Tl within the quasi-particle phonon model. Using the phonon basis constructed for the neighbouring 204Hg and wave function configurations for 205Tl consisting of a mixture of quasiparticle ⊗ N-phonon configurations (N=0,1,2), only one group of fragmented dipole excited states has been reproduced at 5.5 MeV in comparison to the experimental distribution which shows a second group at about 5 MeV. The computed dipole transition strengths are mainly of E1 character which could be associated to the pygmy dipole resonance.

  18. QPM Analysis of 205Tl Nuclear Excitations below the Giant Dipole Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benouaret N.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We analysed our experimental recent findings of the dipole response of the odd-mass stable nucleus 205Tl within the quasi-particle phonon model. Using the phonon basis constructed for the neighbouring 204Hg and wave function configurations for 205Tl consisting of a mixture of quasiparticle ⊗ N-phonon configurations (N=0,1,2, only one group of fragmented dipole excited states has been reproduced at 5.5 MeV in comparison to the experimental distribution which shows a second group at about 5 MeV. The computed dipole transition strengths are mainly of E1 character which could be associated to the pygmy dipole resonance.

  19. Monte-Carlo Orbit/Full Wave Simulation of Fast Alfven Wave (FW) Damping on Resonant Ions in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, M.; Chan, V.S.; Pinsker, R.I.; Tang, V.; Bonoli, P.; Wright, J.

    2005-01-01

    To simulate the resonant interaction of fast Alfven wave (FW) heating and Coulomb collisions on energetic ions, including finite orbit effects, a Monte-Carlo code ORBIT-RF has been coupled with a 2D full wave code TORIC4. ORBIT-RF solves Hamiltonian guiding center drift equations to follow trajectories of test ions in 2D axisymmetric numerical magnetic equilibrium under Coulomb collisions and ion cyclotron radio frequency quasi-linear heating. Monte-Carlo operators for pitch-angle scattering and drag calculate the changes of test ions in velocity and pitch angle due to Coulomb collisions. A rf-induced random walk model describing fast ion stochastic interaction with FW reproduces quasi-linear diffusion in velocity space. FW fields and its wave numbers from TORIC are passed on to ORBIT-RF to calculate perpendicular rf kicks of resonant ions valid for arbitrary cyclotron harmonics. ORBIT-RF coupled with TORIC using a single dominant toroidal and poloidal wave number has demonstrated consistency of simulations with recent DIII-D FW experimental results for interaction between injected neutral-beam ions and FW, including measured neutron enhancement and enhanced high energy tail. Comparison with C-Mod fundamental heating discharges also yielded reasonable agreement

  20. Measurement of resonance parameters of orbitally excited narrow B0 mesons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; González, B Alvarez; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzurri, P; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burke, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Chwalek, T; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Almenar, C Cuenca; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Luci, C; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlok, J; Fernandez, P Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Griso, S Pagan; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Trovato, M; Tsai, S-Y; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wynne, S M; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2009-03-13

    We report a measurement of resonance parameters of the orbitally excited (L=1) narrow B0 mesons in decays to B;{(*)+}pi;{-} using 1.7 fb;{-1} of data collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The mass and width of the B_{2};{*0} state are measured to be m(B_{2};{*0})=5740.2_{-1.8};{+1.7}(stat)-0.8+0.9(syst) MeV/c;{2} and Gamma(B_{2};{*0})=22.7_{-3.2};{+3.8}(stat)-10.2+3.2(syst) MeV/c;{2}. The mass difference between the B_{2};{*0} and B10 states is measured to be 14.9_{-2.5};{+2.2}(stat)-1.4+1.2(syst) MeV/c;{2}, resulting in a B10 mass of 5725.3_{-2.2};{+1.6}(stat)-1.5+1.4(syst) MeV/c;{2}. This is currently the most precise measurement of the masses of these states and the first measurement of the B_{2};{*0} width.

  1. Spin-orbit coupling and electric-dipole spin resonance in a nanowire double quantum dot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi-Hai; Li, Rui; Hu, Xuedong; You, J Q

    2018-02-02

    We study the electric-dipole transitions for a single electron in a double quantum dot located in a semiconductor nanowire. Enabled by spin-orbit coupling (SOC), electric-dipole spin resonance (EDSR) for such an electron can be generated via two mechanisms: the SOC-induced intradot pseudospin states mixing and the interdot spin-flipped tunneling. The EDSR frequency and strength are determined by these mechanisms together. For both mechanisms the electric-dipole transition rates are strongly dependent on the external magnetic field. Their competition can be revealed by increasing the magnetic field and/or the interdot distance for the double dot. To clarify whether the strong SOC significantly impact the electron state coherence, we also calculate relaxations from excited levels via phonon emission. We show that spin-flip relaxations can be effectively suppressed by the phonon bottleneck effect even at relatively low magnetic fields because of the very large g-factor of strong SOC materials such as InSb.

  2. Properties of Hot and Fast Rotating Atomic Nuclei Studied by Means of Giant Dipole Resonance in Exclusive Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maj, A.

    2000-01-01

    This work entitled ''Properties of hot and fast rotating atomic nuclei studied by means of Giant Dipole Resonance in exclusive experiments'', is the habilitation thesis of dr. Adam Maj. It consists of the review (in Polish) of performed research and of attached reprints from 16 original publications (in English) which A. Maj is the main or one of the main authors. All the studies were performed in collaboration with the groups from Milano and Copenhagen, using the HECTOR array equipment (described in chapter V). The Giant Dipole Resonance couples to the quadrupole degrees of freedom of the nucleus, and therefore constitutes a unique probe to test the shapes of atomic nuclei. In addition, the γ decay of the GDR from highly excited nuclei is a very fast process, it can compete with other modes of nuclear decay, and therefore can provide the information on the initial stages of excited nuclei. The presented investigations were concentrated on the following aspects: the shapes and thermal shape fluctuations, the origin of the behaviour of the GDR width, the properties of some exotic nuclei (Jacobi shapes, superdeformation, superheavy nuclei) and on ''entrance channel'' effects. The GDR γ decay was measured for nuclei with very different masses: from light nuclei with A≅45, through A≅110, 145,170,190, up to superheavy nuclei with A≅270. The shapes of hot nuclei are not fixed but fluctuate. The extent of these fluctuations and their influence on the measured quantities (GDR strength function, angular distribution and effective shape) is discussed in chapter VI.1. The observed width of the GDR is found to arise from the interplay of two effects: the thermal shape fluctuations, which are controlled by the nuclear temperature, and the deformation effects, controlled by the angular momentum. The ''collisional damping'' effect, which should influence the intrinsic GDR width, was found to be negligible (chapter VI.2). The GDR γ decay from hot superheavy nucleus 272 Hs

  3. High-Resolution Measurement of the {sup 4}He({gamma},n) Reaction in the Giant Resonance Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, Bjoern

    2003-03-01

    A comprehensive near-threshold {sup 4}He(gamma,n) absolute cross section measurement has been performed at the high-resolution tagged-photon facility MAX-lab located in Lund, Sweden. The 20 < Eg < 45 MeV tagged photons (covering the Giant Dipole Resonance energy region) were directed towards a liquid {sup 4}He target, and knocked-out neutrons were detected in a pair of 60 cm x 60 cm vetoed NE213A liquid scintillator arrays. The intense and varying charge-neutral experimental backgrounds were carefully quantified and removed from the data using a precision fitting procedure. Eight average laboratory angles (30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 105, 120, and 135 deg) were investigated for eight photon energy bins (25, 27, 29, 31, 35, 36, 39, and 41 MeV), resulting in 64 differential cross sections. These angular distributions were integrated to produce total cross sections as a function of photon energy. The resulting cross sections peak at 1.9 mb at a photon energy of 27 MeV, and fall off to a near-constant value of 1.1 mb by 36 MeV. Further, they are in excellent agreement with those measured by Sims et al. using tagged photons in the Quasi-Deuteron energy region. Overall, the results favor modern theoretical models which are based upon a charge-symmetric nucleon-nucleon force, in marked contrast to the recommendations made by Calarco et al. in 1983 based on the sparse {sup 4}He(gamma,n) data available at the time.

  4. Spin-Orbital Excitations in Ca_{2}RuO_{4} Revealed by Resonant Inelastic X-Ray Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Das

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The strongly correlated insulator Ca_{2}RuO_{4} is considered as a paradigmatic realization of both spin-orbital physics and a band-Mott insulating phase, characterized by orbitally selective coexistence of a band and a Mott gap. We present a high resolution oxygen K-edge resonant inelastic x-ray scattering study of the antiferromagnetic Mott insulating state of Ca_{2}RuO_{4}. A set of low-energy (about 80 and 400 meV and high-energy (about 1.3 and 2.2 eV excitations are reported, which show strong incident light polarization dependence. Our results strongly support a spin-orbit coupled band-Mott scenario and explore in detail the nature of its exotic excitations. Guided by theoretical modeling, we interpret the low-energy excitations as a result of composite spin-orbital excitations. Their nature unveils the intricate interplay of crystal-field splitting and spin-orbit coupling in the band-Mott scenario. The high-energy excitations correspond to intra-atomic singlet-triplet transitions at an energy scale set by Hund’s coupling. Our findings give a unifying picture of the spin and orbital excitations in the band-Mott insulator Ca_{2}RuO_{4}.

  5. Giant spin rotation under quasiparticle-photoelectron conversion: Joint effect of sublattice interference and spin-orbit coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Rashba, E I

    2009-01-01

    Spin- and angular-resolved photoemission spectroscopy is a basic experimental tool for unveiling spin polarization of electron eigenstates in crystals. We prove, by using spin-orbit coupled graphene as a model, that photoconversion of a quasiparticle inside a crystal into a photoelectron can...... be accompanied with a dramatic change in its spin polarization, up to a total spin flip. This phenomenon is typical of quasiparticles residing away from the Brillouin-zone center and described by higher rank spinors and results in exotic patterns in the angular distribution of photoelectrons....

  6. Using periodic orbits to compute chaotic transport rates between resonance zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattari, Sulimon; Mitchell, Kevin A.

    2017-11-01

    Transport properties of chaotic systems are computable from data extracted from periodic orbits. Given a sufficient number of periodic orbits, the escape rate can be computed using the spectral determinant, a function that incorporates the eigenvalues and periods of periodic orbits. The escape rate computed from periodic orbits converges to the true value as more and more periodic orbits are included. Escape from a given region of phase space can be computed by considering only periodic orbits that lie within the region. An accurate symbolic dynamics along with a corresponding partitioning of phase space is useful for systematically obtaining all periodic orbits up to a given period, to ensure that no important periodic orbits are missing in the computation. Homotopic lobe dynamics (HLD) is an automated technique for computing accurate partitions and symbolic dynamics for maps using the topological forcing of intersections of stable and unstable manifolds of a few periodic anchor orbits. In this study, we apply the HLD technique to compute symbolic dynamics and periodic orbits, which are then used to find escape rates from different regions of phase space for the Hénon map. We focus on computing escape rates in parameter ranges spanning hyperbolic plateaus, which are parameter intervals where the dynamics is hyperbolic and the symbolic dynamics does not change. After the periodic orbits are computed for a single parameter value within a hyperbolic plateau, periodic orbit continuation is used to compute periodic orbits over an interval that spans the hyperbolic plateau. The escape rates computed from a few thousand periodic orbits agree with escape rates computed from Monte Carlo simulations requiring hundreds of billions of orbits.

  7. Study of Gamow-Teller giant resonance in /sup 90/Nb by the /sup 90/Zr(/sup 3/He,t)/sup 90/Nb reaction at 90 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, M.; Fujita, Y.; Katayama, I.; Morinobu, S.; Yamazaki, T.; Itahashi, T.; Ikegami, H. [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Research Center for Nuclear Physics; Hayakawa, S. I.; Ikegami, Hidetsugu; Muraoka, Mitsuo [eds.; Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Research Center for Nuclear Physics

    1980-01-01

    A Gamow-Teller giant resonance in /sup 90/Nb was excited by the /sup 90/Zr(/sup 3/He, t) reaction at 89.5 MeV. The strength of the resonance was localized in the energy region of Ex = 4.5 - 7.5 MeV. The transition was found to be dominated by the L = 2 transfer.

  8. MICROSCOPIC FERMI-LIQUID APPROACH TO THE RESONANT EFFECTS OF SPIN-ORBIT INTERACTION IN SOLIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Александр КЛЮКАНОВ

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Kondo effect, saturation magnetization and heat capacity of ferromagnetic are calculated from the first principles in the spirit of Landau’s Fermi-liquid theory. Temperature dependence of resistivity of metal with magnetic impurity is obtained in a good agreement with existing experimental data. Resistance curves demonstrate a minimum due to the resonance character of the interaction between spins of the localized and conduction electrons. It has been demonstrated that both temperature dependence of magnetic momentum and internal energy of ferromagnetic are in a good agreement with those predicted by the Heisenberg’s model.METODA FERMI-LICHID MICROSCOPICĂ PENTRU EFECTELE DE REZONANȚĂ A INTERACȚIUNII SPIN-ORBITE ÎN SUBSTANȚELE SOLIDEEfectul Kondo, magnetizarea de saturație și căldura specifică a unui feromagnet sunt calculate folosind principiile fundamentale în spiritul teoriei Fermi-lichid Landau. Dependența de temperatură a rezistenței  metalului cu impurități magnetice este în concordanță cu experimentul. Rezistența minimă este legată de natura rezonantă a interacțiunii unui electron de conducție cu un electron localizat. Se arată că dependența de temperatură a momentului magnetic și energia interioară este în bună concordanță cu modelul Heisenberg.

  9. Three dimensional orbital magnetic resonance T2-mapping in the evaluation of patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Kai; Ai, Tao; Hu, Wei-Kun; Luo, Ban; Wu, Yi-Ping; Liu, Rong

    2017-12-01

    The clinical application of orbital magnetic resonance (MR) T2-mapping imaging in detecting the disease activity of Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO), and the predictive values of therapy response to intravenous glucocorticoid (ivGC) were investigated. Approved by the local institutional review board (IRB), 106 consecutive patients with GO were included in this prospective study. All subjects were divided into two groups according to the patients' clinical activity score (CAS): the CAS positive group (CAS ≥3) or the CAS negative group (CAS T2 relaxation time of extraocular muscles (T2RT; ms) and the areas of four extra-ocular muscles (AEOMs; mm 2 ) were measured by 3D T2-mapping MR sequence before and after methylprednisolone treatment, so as the CAS and some ophthalmic examinations including visual acuity, intra-ocular pressure, eyeball movement, diplopia and proptosis. In addition, 24 healthy volunteers were recruited as the control group. The mean T2RT and AEOMs in CAS positive group were higher than those in CAS negative group. Both CAS positive and negative groups had significantly higher mean T2RT and AEOMs than the control group (Pevaluate the activity of GO, CAS was mostly related to inflammation symptoms of ocular surface, more than that, T2RT and AEOMs were also related to abnormal findings of the ophthalmic examinations including high ocular pressure, impaired eyeball movement, diplopia and proptosis. T2RT and AEOMs can reflex the inflammation state of ocular muscles better. CAS combined with 3D T2-mapping MR imaging could improve the sensitivity of detection of active GO so as the prediction and evaluation of the response to methylprednisolone treatment.

  10. A review of orbital and intracranial magnetic resonance imaging in 79 canine and 13 feline patients (2004-2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Micki D; Broome, Michael; Dell'Anna, Giuseppe; Blades, Natalie J; Esson, Douglas W

    2011-07-01

    To review the distribution of orbital and intracranial disease in canine and feline patients undergoing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) following referral to a veterinary ophthalmologist and to correlate results of MRI with pathologic conditions including neoplasia, suspected optic neuritis (ON) and orbital cellulitis. Recognized and emerging imaging techniques are reviewed. Medical records of 79 canine and 13 feline patients were reviewed. Neoplasia was diagnosed in 53/92 (57.6%) of patients. The most prevalent types of neoplasia were carcinoma (16/53, 30.1%), sarcoma (11/53, 20.8%), lymphoma (8/53, 15.1%) and presumptive meningioma (9/53, 17.0%). Carcinomas and sarcomas were characterized by bony lysis and intracranial/sinonasal extension. Lymphoma was generally unilateral, less invasive and originated from the ventromedial orbit. Intracranial masses representing presumptive meningiomas frequently exhibited a 'dural tail' sign. Diagnosis of suspected ON was made in 13 of 92 (14.1%) patients. Results of MRI in patients with suspected ON included unilateral optic nerve hyperintensity (3/13, 23.0%), bilateral optic nerve hyperintensity (1/13, 7.7%) and optic chiasmal hyperintensity (3/13, 23.0%). Seven suspected ON patients demonstrated intracranial multifocal patchy contrast enhancement (7/13, 53.8%). Diagnosis of orbital cellulitis was made in 12/92 (13.0%) patients. Orbital neoplasia was the most common pathologic condition detected. Essential Roentgen characteristics are helpful when diagnosing pathologic processes and providing prognoses in cases of orbital or intracranial disease. Magnetic resonance imaging comprises an important diagnostic component in cases of suspected ON. Emerging contrast and functional MRI techniques as well as SI data may increase our ability to characterize disease processes. © 2011 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  11. Effects of the radial electric field resonances on the particle orbits and loss cones in TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guasp, J.; Liniers, M.

    1997-07-01

    The effects of the radial electric field resonances on the trapping and confinement of low and intermediate energy ions (0.1-1 keV) for the Reference configuration of TJ-II have been analysed. In TJ-II these resonances appear for electric potentials that grow with pitch and with the square root of the initial kinetic energy and are placed inside strips whose width increases with the initial radius and with the absolute value of initial pitch. The 0-Resonance is the most important one for particle trapping, it appears for high electric potential (between 1000 and 3000 V for 0.5 keV ions) with the same sign than pitch, inside very wide strips (several thousands of V). Along these band periphery, for potential intensities below the central resonant values, there exists a very strong increase of particle trapping. Instead, around the resonance center, the trapping is inhibited and a very strong increase of the passing particle population appears. This increase is higher for the torus external side (Theta approximately 0 degree centigree) and for small initial radius. For peripherical particles wide loss strips appear along the border of the resonant band corresponding to more positive potential. The 2-Resonance has small effect on trapping but affects strongly to the of peripherical passing particles. It appears for moderate electric potential (between 400 and 1000 V for 0.5 keV ions) with sign opposite than pitch and inside narrow bands than the 0-Resonance. In this case a loss of peripherical passing particles appears, placed also along the more positive potential band side. The other Resonances (except the -4) have much less effect on particle trapping and confinement. All these phenomena have been explained by the action of magnetic barriers and different mechanisms for particle orbit modification. (Author) 8 refs

  12. Spin Polarization Oscillations without Spin Precession: Spin-Orbit Entangled Resonances in Quasi-One-Dimensional Spin Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Berman

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Resonant behavior involving spin-orbit entangled states occurs for spin transport along a narrow channel defined in a two-dimensional electron gas, including an apparent rapid relaxation of the spin polarization for special values of the channel width and applied magnetic field (so-called ballistic spin resonance. A fully quantum-mechanical theory for transport using multiple subbands of the one-dimensional system provides the dependence of the spin density on the applied magnetic field and channel width and position along the channel. We show how the spatially nonoscillating part of the spin density vanishes when the Zeeman energy matches the subband energy splittings. The resonance phenomenon persists in the presence of disorder.

  13. Width and strength of the hot giant dipole resonance. The role of the life time of the compound nucleus and the transition from order to chaos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomaz, P.

    1996-01-01

    A bump in the γ decay spectrum is observed at high energies which is due to the excitation of the Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) in the compound nucleus. The fact is discussed that the total width of the γ-ray spectrum of the GDR transitions must contain twice the width of the compound nucleus levels. This implies that one must except a rapid increase of the width of the GDR. This increase contributes to the observed saturation of the photon multiplicity. A new suppression factor due to the lost of collectivity induced by the fast particle emission is proposed. (K.A.)

  14. Isotopic Dependence of the Giant Monopole Resonance in the Even-A 112-124Sn Isotopes and the Asymmetry Term in Nuclear Incompressibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, T.; Garg, U.; Liu, Y.; Marks, R.; Nayak, B. K.; Rao, P. V. Madhusudhana; Fujiwara, M.; Hashimoto, H.; Kawase, K.; Nakanishi, K.; Okumura, S.; Yosoi, M.; Itoh, M.; Ichikawa, M.; Matsuo, R.; Terazono, T.; Uchida, M.; Kawabata, T.; Akimune, H.; Iwao, Y.

    2007-01-01

    The strength distributions of the giant monopole resonance (GMR) have been measured in the even-A Sn isotopes (A=112-124) with inelastic scattering of 400-MeV α particles in the angular range 0 deg. - 8.5 deg. We find that the experimentally observed GMR energies of the Sn isotopes are lower than the values predicted by theoretical calculations that reproduce the GMR energies in 208 Pb and 90 Zr very well. From the GMR data, a value of K τ =-550±100 MeV is obtained for the asymmetry term in the nuclear incompressibility

  15. Isotopic Dependence of the Giant Monopole Resonance in the Even-A Sn112 124 Isotopes and the Asymmetry Term in Nuclear Incompressibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, T.; Garg, U.; Liu, Y.; Marks, R.; Nayak, B. K.; Rao, P. V. Madhusudhana; Fujiwara, M.; Hashimoto, H.; Kawase, K.; Nakanishi, K.; Okumura, S.; Yosoi, M.; Itoh, M.; Ichikawa, M.; Matsuo, R.; Terazono, T.; Uchida, M.; Kawabata, T.; Akimune, H.; Iwao, Y.; Murakami, T.; Sakaguchi, H.; Terashima, S.; Yasuda, Y.; Zenihiro, J.; Harakeh, M. N.

    2007-10-01

    The strength distributions of the giant monopole resonance (GMR) have been measured in the even-A Sn isotopes (A=112 124) with inelastic scattering of 400-MeV α particles in the angular range 0° 8.5°. We find that the experimentally observed GMR energies of the Sn isotopes are lower than the values predicted by theoretical calculations that reproduce the GMR energies in Pb208 and Zr90 very well. From the GMR data, a value of Kτ=-550±100MeV is obtained for the asymmetry term in the nuclear incompressibility.

  16. Testing the mutually enhanced magicity effect in nuclear incompressibility via the giant monopole resonance in the {sup 204,206,208}Pb isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, D. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Garg, U., E-mail: garg@nd.edu [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Fujiwara, M. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Adachi, T. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, 9747 AA Groningen (Netherlands); Akimune, H. [Department of Physics, Konan University, Kobe 568-8501 (Japan); Berg, G.P.A. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Harakeh, M.N. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, 9747 AA Groningen (Netherlands); GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, 14076 Cean (France); Itoh, M. [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Iwamoto, C. [Department of Physics, Konan University, Kobe 568-8501 (Japan); Long, A.; Matta, J.T. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Murakami, T. [Division of Physics and Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Okamoto, A. [Department of Physics, Konan University, Kobe 568-8501 (Japan); Sault, K. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Talwar, R. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Uchida, M. [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8850 (Japan); and others

    2013-10-07

    Using inelastic α-scattering at extremely forward angles, including 0°, the strength distributions of the isoscalar giant monopole resonance (ISGMR) have been measured in the {sup 204,206,208}Pb isotopes in order to examine the proposed mutually enhanced magicity (MEM) effect on the nuclear incompressibility. The MEM effect had been suggested as a likely explanation of the “softness” of nuclear incompressibility observed in the ISGMR measurements in the Sn and Cd isotopes. Our experimental results rule out any manifestation of the MEM effect in nuclear incompressibility and leave the question of the softness of the open-shell nuclei unresolved still.

  17. Wavelet signatures of K-splitting of the Isoscalar Giant Quadrupole Resonance in deformed nuclei from high-resolution (p,p‧) scattering off 146, 148, 150Nd

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kureba, C. O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Carter, J.; Cooper, G. R. J.; Fearick, R. W.; Förtsch, S. V.; Jingo, M.; Kleinig, W.; Krugmann, A.; Krumbolz, A. M.; Kvasil, J.; Mabiala, J.; Mira, J. P.; Nesterenko, V. O.; von Neumann-Cosel, P.; Neveling, R.; Papka, P.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Richter, A.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Smit, F. D.; Steyn, G. F.; Swartz, J. A.; Tamii, A.; Usman, I. T.

    2018-04-01

    The phenomenon of fine structure of the Isoscalar Giant Quadrupole Resonance (ISGQR) has been studied with high energy-resolution proton inelastic scattering at iThemba LABS in the chain of stable even-mass Nd isotopes covering the transition from spherical to deformed ground states. A wavelet analysis of the background-subtracted spectra in the deformed 146, 148, 150Nd isotopes reveals characteristic scales in correspondence with scales obtained from a Skyrme RPA calculation using the SVmas10 parameterization. A semblance analysis shows that these scales arise from the energy shift between the main fragments of the K = 0 , 1 and K = 2 components.

  18. Extreme secular excitation of eccentricity inside mean motion resonance. Small bodies driven into star-grazing orbits by planetary perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichierri, Gabriele; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Lai, Dong

    2017-09-01

    Context. It is well known that asteroids and comets fall into the Sun. Metal pollution of white dwarfs and transient spectroscopic signatures of young stars like β-Pic provide growing evidence that extra solar planetesimals can attain extreme orbital eccentricities and fall into their parent stars. Aims: We aim to develop a general, implementable, semi-analytical theory of secular eccentricity excitation of small bodies (planetesimals) in mean motion resonances with an eccentric planet valid for arbitrary values of the eccentricities and including the short-range force due to General Relativity. Methods: Our semi-analytic model for the restricted planar three-body problem does not make use of series expansion and therefore is valid for any eccentricity value and semi-major axis ratio. The model is based on the application of the adiabatic principle, which is valid when the precession period of the longitude of pericentre of the planetesimal is much longer than the libration period in the mean motion resonance. In resonances of order larger than 1 this is true except for vanishingly small eccentricities. We provide prospective users with a Mathematica notebook with implementation of the model allowing direct use. Results: We confirm that the 4:1 mean motion resonance with a moderately eccentric (e' ≲ 0.1) planet is the most powerful one to lift the eccentricity of planetesimals from nearly circular orbits to star-grazing ones. However, if the planet is too eccentric, we find that this resonance is unable to pump the planetesimal's eccentricity to a very high value. The inclusion of the General Relativity effect imposes a condition on the mass of the planet to drive the planetesimals into star-grazing orbits. For a planetesimal at 1 AU around a solar mass star (or white dwarf), we find a threshold planetary mass of about 17 Earth masses. We finally derive an analytical formula for this critical mass. Conclusions: Planetesimals can easily fall into the central star

  19. Decay of the isoscalar 1(h/2π)ω giant E3 resonance in 92Mo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    By means of the Heidelberg tandem-post accelerator combination the decay of the isoscalar 1 (h/2π)ω giant E3 resonance (LEOR) in 92 Mo was studied by (α, α', γ) coincidence measurements. At an incident energy of 50.4 MeV of the α particles the scattered helium nuclei were spectroscoped by eight semiconductor detectors in a maximum of the L=3 angular distribution. The γ quanta emitted coincidently by the excited target nuclei were detected in three high-resolution Ge diodes. Because of the good resolution both in the alpha and in the gamma branch for about 30 states in the excitation energy range of 1-7 MeV branching ratios for the gamma decay could be measured. For 16 of these levels lifetimes were determined by the Doppler-shift attenuation method. Starting from the determined branching ratios and typical lifetimes (40-90 fs) for 3 - states in the excitation-energy range of the LEOR (5-10 MeV) an earlier reported strong ground-state decay (8%) of the LEOR can be excluded. Rather the LEOR decays so as it is expected by the model of the statistical decay namely dominantly to low-lying 3 - , 4 - , and above all 5 - levels. A likewise reported strong E1-decay of the LEOR to the 2 + 1 state in 90 Zr which is implicated in the framework of a collective model in connection with the E3 ground-state transitions can in 92 Mo also not be confirmed. In spite of the strongly collective nature of the first 2 + state in 92 Mo an increased LEOR decay to this level was not observed. Against that in the LEOR region ground-state transitions of 1 - states with isoscalar nature were spectroscoped. The observation of these levels is also reproduced by performed RPA calculations. A parallel measurement on 90 Zr confirms the results of this thesis. (orig./HSI) [de

  20. Description of giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, A.M.

    1975-01-01

    The history of collective theories in nuclear physics is briefly reviewed. It is emphasised that some theories (like RPA) allow collectivity to emerge from calculations, while others (like GCM) essentially impose a collective framework from teh start. The former class has the incidental merit that it treats spreading of collective states arising from interaction with (discrete and continuum) particle excitations. A problem with the RPA calculations is that they are almost too detailed if one's interest is in exposing systematic qualitative features. The speaker (along with co-authors) has developed a sum-rule method for exposing such trends. It is based on the fact that one can readily evaluate three sum-rules; in addition to the familiar one with plus-one power of energy-weighting, those with minus-one and plus-three powers can be evaluated for RPA states in closed form. From the three moments, the energy and spread of the collective state can be obtained. Amongst other things, the approach gives a very simple derivation of the Suzuki-Mottelson result that collective energy equals √2 times the oscillator quantum. (orig.) [de

  1. USING SCHUMANN RESONANCE MEASUREMENTS FOR CONSTRAINING THE WATER ABUNDANCE ON THE GIANT PLANETS-IMPLICATIONS FOR THE SOLAR SYSTEM'S FORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simoes, Fernando; Pfaff, Robert; Klenzing, Jeffrey; Freudenreich, Henry; Bromund, Kenneth; Martin, Steven; Rowland, Douglas [NASA/GSFC, Heliophysics Science Division, Space Weather Laboratory (Code 674), Greenbelt, MD (United States); Hamelin, Michel; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques [LATMOS/IPSL, UPMC, Paris (France); Beghin, Christian; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre [LPC2E, CNRS/Universite d' Orleans (France); Grard, Rejean [ESA/ESTEC, Research Scientific Support Department, Noordwijk (Netherlands); Sentman, Davis [Institute of Geophysics, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK (United States); Takahashi, Yukihiro [Department of Geophysics, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Yair, Yoav [Department Life Natural Sciences, Open University of Israel, Raanana (Israel)

    2012-05-01

    The formation and evolution of the solar system is closely related to the abundance of volatiles, namely water, ammonia, and methane in the protoplanetary disk. Accurate measurement of volatiles in the solar system is therefore important for understanding not only the nebular hypothesis and origin of life but also planetary cosmogony as a whole. In this work, we propose a new remote sensing technique to infer the outer planets' water content by measuring Tremendously and Extremely Low Frequency (TLF-ELF) electromagnetic wave characteristics (Schumann resonances) excited by lightning in their gaseous envelopes. Schumann resonance detection can be potentially used for constraining the uncertainty of volatiles of the giant planets, mainly Uranus and Neptune, because such TLF-ELF wave signatures are closely related to the electric conductivity profile and water content.

  2. Destruction of /sup 18/O in red giants. A search for a sub-threshold resonance in the /sup 18/O+p system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Champagne, A E; Pitt, M L

    1986-09-08

    The /sup 18/O(/sup 3/He,d)/sup 19/F reaction has been used to determine if a presumed sub-threshold resonance at Esub(c.m.)=-94 KeV in the /sup 18/O(p,..cap alpha..)/sup 15/N reaction exists at an astrophysically significant level. No evidence for this state was observed which implies a dimensionless reduced width thetasub(p)/sup 2/<5 . 10/sup -5/. In addition, a proton width GAMMAsub(p)=2 x 10/sup -19/ eV has been determined for a d-wave resonance located at Esub(c.m.)=20 keV. The resulting thermonuclear reaction rate is slow enough to ensure that /sup 18/O is not destroyed at red-giant temperatures.

  3. Contribution of giant resonances in elastic and inelastic scattering of polarized protons on 12C between 19 and 23MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaillard, Y.R.

    1975-01-01

    Angular distributions of analyzing power and differential cross section have been measured for the elastic and inelastic scattering of polarized protons on 12 C, up to 12.7MeV excitation energy. Incident energy varied from 19 to 23MeV by steps of about 200keV, the cyclotron beam energy, varying by steps of about 1MeV, was measured using crossover techniques. Fine steps of energy were obtained by use of carbon absorbers. Elastic scattering data were analyzed using a linear energy-dependent optical model. Data for the level at 4.4MeV excitation energy were analyzed using coupled channel calculations. Preliminary results for the level (1 - , Esub(x)=12.7MeV) were analyzed including giant resonances as doorways states in inelastic scattering, according to Geramb-Amos formalism. This analysis shows that it should be possible to study high-lying giant resonances through their contribution to low-lying state excitation [fr

  4. Effect of magnet sorting using a simple resonance cancellation method on the RMS orbit distortion at the APS injector synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, F.; Koul, R.; Mills, F.E.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source injector synchrotron is a 7-GeV positron machine with a standard alternating gradient lattice. The calculated effect of dipole magnet strength errors on the orbit distortion, simulated by Monte Carlo, was reduced by sorting pairs of magnets having the closest simulated measured strengths to reduce the driving the term of the integer resonance nearest the operating point. This method resulted in a factor of four average reduction in the rms orbit distortion when all 68 magnets were sorted at once. The simulated effect of magnet measurement experimental resolution was found to limit the actual improvement. The Β-beat factors were similarly reduced by sorting the quadrupole magnets according to their gradients

  5. DYNAMICAL EVOLUTION AND SPIN–ORBIT RESONANCES OF POTENTIALLY HABITABLE EXOPLANETS: THE CASE OF GJ 581d

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarov, Valeri V.; Berghea, Ciprian; Efroimsky, Michael

    2012-01-01

    GJ 581d is a potentially habitable super-Earth in the multiple system of exoplanets orbiting a nearby M dwarf. We investigate this planet's long-term dynamics with an emphasis on its probable final rotation states acquired via tidal interaction with the host. The published radial velocities for the star are re-analyzed with a benchmark planet detection algorithm to confirm that there is no evidence for the recently proposed two additional planets (f and g). Limiting the scope to the four originally detected planets, we assess the dynamical stability of the system and find bounded chaos in the orbital motion. For the planet d, the characteristic Lyapunov time is 38 yr. Long-term numerical integration reveals that the system of four planets is stable, with the eccentricity of the planet d changing quasi-periodically in a tight range around 0.27, and with its semimajor axis varying only a little. The spin-orbit interaction of GJ 581d with its host star is dominated by the tides exerted by the star on the planet. We model this interaction, assuming a terrestrial composition of the mantle. Besides the triaxiality-caused torque and the secular part of the tidal torque, which are conventionally included in the equation of motion, we also include the tidal torques' oscillating components. It turns out that, depending on the mantle temperature, the planet gets trapped into the 2:1 or an even higher spin-orbit resonance. It is very improbable that the planet could have reached the 1:1 resonance. This improves the possibility of the planet being suitable for sustained life.

  6. Electron paramagnetic resonance g-tensors from state interaction spin-orbit coupling density matrix renormalization group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayfutyarova, Elvira R.; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2018-05-01

    We present a state interaction spin-orbit coupling method to calculate electron paramagnetic resonance g-tensors from density matrix renormalization group wavefunctions. We apply the technique to compute g-tensors for the TiF3 and CuCl42 - complexes, a [2Fe-2S] model of the active center of ferredoxins, and a Mn4CaO5 model of the S2 state of the oxygen evolving complex. These calculations raise the prospects of determining g-tensors in multireference calculations with a large number of open shells.

  7. Effects of the electron-electron interaction in the spin resonance in 2D systems with Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishtopenko, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of the electron-electron interaction on the spin-resonance frequency in two-dimensional electron systems with Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling is investigated. The oscillatory dependence of many-body corrections on the magnetic field is demonstrated. It is shown that the consideration of many-body interaction leads to a decrease or an increase in the spin-resonance frequency, depending on the sign of the g factor. It is found that the term cubic in quasimomentum in Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling partially decreases exchange corrections to the spin resonance energy in a two-dimensional system

  8. Effects of the electron-electron interaction in the spin resonance in 2D systems with Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishtopenko, S. S., E-mail: sergey.krishtopenko@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation)

    2015-02-15

    The effect of the electron-electron interaction on the spin-resonance frequency in two-dimensional electron systems with Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling is investigated. The oscillatory dependence of many-body corrections on the magnetic field is demonstrated. It is shown that the consideration of many-body interaction leads to a decrease or an increase in the spin-resonance frequency, depending on the sign of the g factor. It is found that the term cubic in quasimomentum in Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling partially decreases exchange corrections to the spin resonance energy in a two-dimensional system.

  9. Time Dependent Density Functional Theory description of giant resonances in transition metal complexes: The photoionization dynamics of Cr(CO)6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stener, M.; Fronzoni, G.; Decleva, P.

    2009-01-01

    The photoionization dynamics of Cr(CO) 6 has been calculated at the TDDFT level, employing a basis set of multicentric B-spline functions with the explicit treatment of the photoelectron continuum. The cross section and the asymmetry parameter profiles of all the valence orbitals have been considered and compared with the available experimental data. The most interesting spectral feature is the intense autoionization resonance Cr 3p → Cr 3d observed in the experiment of band A, which is very well reproduced by present calculation at the TDDFT level. Other observed spectral features have been ascribed to shape resonances and assigned according to the dipole-prepared continuum orbital nature. The present TDDFT scheme proves accurate and practicable on large and complex systems containing transition metal compounds, for the description and the interpretation of the photoionization dynamics.

  10. Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering: From band mapping to inter-orbital excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luning, J.; Hague, C.F.

    2008-01-01

    Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (also known as resonant X-ray Raman spectroscopy when only valence and conduction states are involved in the final state excitation) has developed into a major tool for understanding the electronic properties of complex materials. Presently it provides access to electron excitations in the few hundred meV range with element and bulk selectivity. Recent progress in X-ray optics and synchrotron radiation engineering have opened up new perspectives for this powerful technique to improve resolving power and efficiency. We briefly present the basics of the method and illustrate its potential with examples chosen from the literature. (authors)

  11. Systematic study of the giant monopolar resonance via inelastic scattering of 108.5 MeV 3He. Measurement of the nuclear compressibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebrun, Didier.

    1981-09-01

    The giant monopole resonance has been studied via inelastic scattering of 108.5 MeV 3 He at very small angles (including 0 0 ) on approximately 50 nuclei. Its angular distribution reaches its maximum in this region and leads to clear separation with GQR. DWBA analysis shows a smooth increase of the strength from few per cent of the sum rule in light nuclei up to 100% in heavier ones. The excitation energy analysis shows a crossing effect of the monopole and quadrupole frequencies in A = 40-50 region, a coupling effect between the two modes in deformed nuclei, an asymmetry effect in several series of isotopes. Compressibility moduli of nuclear matter Ksub(infinity), surface Ksub(s) and asymmetry Ksub(tau) have seen extracted, as well as the Landau parameter F 0 at saturation [fr

  12. Giant monopole resonance in even-A Cd isotopes, the asymmetry term in nuclear incompressibility, and the 'softness' of Sn and Cd nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, D. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Garg, U., E-mail: garg@nd.edu [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Fujiwara, M. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Akimune, H. [Department of Physics, Konan University, Kobe 568-8501 (Japan); Berg, G.P.A. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Harakeh, M.N. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, 9747 AA Groningen (Netherlands); Itoh, M. [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Kawabata, T. [Center for Nuclear Studies, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kawase, K. [Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Nayak, B.K. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Ohta, T. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Ouchi, H. [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Piekarewicz, J. [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Uchida, M. [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8850 (Japan); Yoshida, H.P. [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Yosoi, M. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2012-12-05

    The isoscalar giant monopole resonance (ISGMR) in even-A Cd isotopes has been studied by inelastic {alpha}-scattering at 100 MeV/u and at extremely forward angles, including 0 Degree-Sign . The asymmetry term in the nuclear incompressibility extracted from the ISGMR in Cd isotopes is found to be K{sub {tau}}=-555{+-}75 MeV, confirming the value previously obtained from the Sn isotopes. ISGMR strength has been computed in relativistic RPA using NL3 and FSUGold effective interactions. Both models significantly overestimate the centroids of the ISGMR strength in the Cd isotopes. Combined with other recent theoretical effort, the question of the 'softness' of the open-shell nuclei in the tin region remains open still.

  13. Spin-flip isovector giant resonances from the 90Zr (n,p) 90Y reaction at 200 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raywood, K.J.; Spicer, B.M.

    1989-01-01

    Doubly differential cross sections of the reaction 90 Zr(n,p) 90 Y have been measured at 200 MeV for excitations up to 38 MeV in the residual nucleus. An overall resolution of 1.3 MeV was achieved. The spectra show qualitative agreement in shape and magnitude with recent RPA calculations; however all of the calculations underestimate the high excitation region of the spectra. A multipole decomposition of the data has been performed using differential cross sections calculated in the DWIA. An estimate of the Gamow-Teller strength in the reaction is given. The isovector spin-flip dipole giant resonance has been identified and there is also an indication of isovector monopole strength. 39 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab

  14. The isomeric ratios in photonuclear reactions of natural barium induced by bremsstrahlungs with endpoint energies in the giant dipole resonance region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Duc Thiep; Truong Thi An; Phan Viet Cuong; Nguyen The Vinh

    2012-01-01

    We have determined the isomeric ratios in 130 Ba(γ, n) 129m,g Ba, 132 Ba(γ, n) 131m,g Ba and 134 Ba(γ, n) 133m,g Ba photonuclear reactions of natural barium induced by bremsstrahlungs with end-point energies in the giant dipole resonance region. The investigated samples were irradiated at electron accelerator Microtron MT-25 of the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reaction, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia. The gamma spectra of the samples irradiated were measured with spectroscopic system consisting of 8192 channel analyzer and high-energy resolution (180 keV at gamma ray 1332 keV of 60 Co) HP(Ge) semiconductor detector Canberra. The GENIE2000 (Canberra) computer program was used for data processing. The results were discussed and compared with those of other authors. (author)

  15. Magnetic resonance tomography of the orbit: First experiences with the paramagnetic contrast medium gadolinium-DTPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markl, A.; Vogl, T.; Scheidhauer, K.; Riedel, K.G.; Oeckler, R.

    1986-01-01

    In 21 patients with orbital mass lesions MRI was performed before and after administration of paramagnetic contrast medium, gadolinium-DPTA. In comparison to the plain scan the differentiation of the tumorous tissue against the surrounding structures was improved after application of contrast medium despite a partially moderate increase in signal intensity. Especially highly vascular tumors and vessel diseases show a significant contrast enhancement. With increasing experience in larger number of patients a tissue differentiation seems to be possible. (orig.) [de

  16. Spin-orbit-induced strong coupling of a single spin to a nanomechanical resonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pályi, András; Struck, P R; Rudner, Mark

    2012-01-01

    as a realization of the Jaynes-Cummings model of quantum electrodynamics in the strong-coupling regime. A quantized flexural mode of the suspended tube plays the role of the optical mode and we identify two distinct two-level subspaces, at small and large magnetic field, which can be used as qubits in this setup......We theoretically investigate the deflection-induced coupling of an electron spin to vibrational motion due to spin-orbit coupling in suspended carbon nanotube quantum dots. Our estimates indicate that, with current capabilities, a quantum dot with an odd number of electrons can serve...

  17. Kinetic magnetic resonance imaging of orbital blowout fracture with restricted ocular movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totsuka, Nobuyoshi; Koide, Ryouhei; Inatomi, Makoto; Fukado, Yoshinao; Hisamatsu, Katsuji.

    1992-01-01

    We analyzed the mechanism of gaze limitation in blowout fracture in 19 patients by means of kinetic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We could identify herniation of fat tissue and rectus muscles with connective tissue septa in 11 eyes. Depressed rectus muscles were surrounded by fat tissue. In no instance was the rectus muscle actually incarcerated. Entrapped connective tissue septa seemed to prevent movement of affected rectus muscle. We occasionally observed incarcerated connective tissue septa to restrict motility of the optic nerve. (author)

  18. Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling induced spin-polarization and resonance-split in n-well semiconductor superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Chengzhi; Xue Rui; Nie, Y.-H.; Liang, J.-Q.

    2009-01-01

    Using the transfer matrix method, we investigate the electron transmission over multiple-well semiconductor superlattices with Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling in the potential-well regions. The superlattice structure enhances the effect of spin polarization in the transmission spectrum. The minibands of multiple-well superlattices for electrons with different spin can be completely separated at the low incident energy, leading to the 100% spin polarization in a broad energy windows, which may be an effective scheme for realizing spin filtering. Moreover, for the transmission over n-quantum-well, it is observed that the resonance peaks in the minibands split into n-folds or (n-1)-folds depending on the well-width and barrier-thickness, which is different from the case of tunneling through n-barrier structure

  19. Special Features in the Structure of Resonant Perturbations of Uncontrollable Objects of Glonass and GPS Navigating Systems. Influence on the Orbital Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomilova, I. V.; Bordovitsyna, T. V.

    2017-08-01

    Results of investigation into the resonant structure of perturbations and long-term orbital evolution of space vehicles of GLONASS and GPS global navigating satellite systems (GNSS) under assumption that all of them have lost control on 08/01/2015 are presented. It is demonstrated that the majority of the examined objects are in the range of action of the secular resonances of various types. In addition, practically all satellites of the GPS system are within the scope of the 2:1 orbital resonance with rotation of the Earth. Results of the MEGNO analysis demonstrate that the motion of all objects of the GLONASS system during the 100-year period is regular, whereas the motion of the majority of objects of the GPS system is subject to chaotization.

  20. Building CX peanut-shaped disk galaxy profiles. The relative importance of the 3D families of periodic orbits bifurcating at the vertical 2:1 resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsis, P. A.; Harsoula, M.

    2018-05-01

    Context. We present and discuss the orbital content of a rather unusual rotating barred galaxy model, in which the three-dimensional (3D) family, bifurcating from x1 at the 2:1 vertical resonance with the known "frown-smile" side-on morphology, is unstable. Aims: Our goal is to study the differences that occur in the phase space structure at the vertical 2:1 resonance region in this case, with respect to the known, well studied, standard case, in which the families with the frown-smile profiles are stable and support an X-shaped morphology. Methods: The potential used in the study originates in a frozen snapshot of an N-body simulation in which a fast bar has evolved. We follow the evolution of the vertical stability of the central family of periodic orbits as a function of the energy (Jacobi constant) and we investigate the phase space content by means of spaces of section. Results: The two bifurcating families at the vertical 2:1 resonance region of the new model change their stability with respect to that of most studied analytic potentials. The structure in the side-on view that is directly supported by the trapping of quasi-periodic orbits around 3D stable periodic orbits has now an infinity symbol (i.e. ∞-type) profile. However, the available sticky orbits can reinforce other types of side-on morphologies as well. Conclusions: In the new model, the dynamical mechanism of trapping quasi-periodic orbits around the 3D stable periodic orbits that build the peanut, supports the ∞-type profile. The same mechanism in the standard case supports the X shape with the frown-smile orbits. Nevertheless, in both cases (i.e. in the new and in the standard model) a combination of 3D quasi-periodic orbits around the stable x1 family with sticky orbits can support a profile reminiscent of the shape of the orbits of the 3D unstable family existing in each model.

  1. Giant deep orbital dermoid cyst presenting early in infancy in a Nigerian child: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fasina Oluyemi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Dermoid cysts are the most common orbital cystic lesions seen in children. While superficial orbital dermoid cysts present early in life, deep dermoid cysts remain clinically occult until adolescence or adulthood. We here present a case of a deep orbital dermoid cyst in a Nigerian child that became symptomatic early in infancy. Case presentation A female Nigerian infant of Yoruba ethnicity presented at three months of age with left non-axial proptosis and a hazy cornea. A superotemporal cystic orbital mass was seen on ultrasonography, and her parents were counseled for simple tumor excision. They however defaulted, only for their child to re-present two years later with gradually progressive proptosis, an enlarged orbit and keratinized ocular surface, necessitating orbital exenteration. Conclusion Deep orbital dermoid cysts may be symptomatic from birth. Late presentation may result in an irreversible loss of vision, as demonstrated in our case. The need for public enlightenment on early presentation and prompt management of such benign lesions is emphasized.

  2. X-ray excited photoluminescence near the giant resonance in solid-solution Gd(1-x)Tb(x)OCl nanocrystals and their retention upon solvothermal topotactic transformation to Gd(1-x)Tb(x)F3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waetzig, Gregory R; Horrocks, Gregory A; Jude, Joshua W; Zuin, Lucia; Banerjee, Sarbajit

    2016-01-14

    Design rules for X-ray phosphors are much less established as compared to their optically stimulated counterparts owing to the absence of a detailed understanding of sensitization mechanisms, activation pathways and recombination channels upon high-energy excitation. Here, we demonstrate a pronounced modulation of the X-ray excited photoluminescence of Tb(3+) centers upon excitation in proximity to the giant resonance of the host Gd(3+) ions in solid-solution Gd1-xTbxOCl nanocrystals prepared by a non-hydrolytic cross-coupling method. The strong suppression of X-ray excited optical luminescence at the giant resonance suggests a change in mechanism from multiple exciton generation to single thermal exciton formation and Auger decay processes. The solid-solution Gd1-xTbxOCl nanocrystals are further topotactically transformed with retention of a nine-coordinated cation environment to solid-solution Gd1-xTbxF3 nanocrystals upon solvothermal treatment with XeF2. The metastable hexagonal phase of GdF3 can be stabilized at room temperature through this topotactic approach and is transformed subsequently to the orthorhombic phase. The fluoride nanocrystals indicate an analogous but blue-shifted modulation of the X-ray excited optical luminescence of the Tb(3+) centers upon X-ray excitation near the giant resonance of the host Gd(3+) ions.

  3. Monte-Carlo Orbit/Full Wave Simulation of Fast Alfvén Wave (FW) Damping on Resonant Ions in Tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, M.; Chan, V. S.; Tang, V.; Bonoli, P.; Pinsker, R. I.; Wright, J.

    2005-09-01

    To simulate the resonant interaction of fast Alfvén wave (FW) heating and Coulomb collisions on energetic ions, including finite orbit effects, a Monte-Carlo code ORBIT-RF has been coupled with a 2D full wave code TORIC4. ORBIT-RF solves Hamiltonian guiding center drift equations to follow trajectories of test ions in 2D axisymmetric numerical magnetic equilibrium under Coulomb collisions and ion cyclotron radio frequency quasi-linear heating. Monte-Carlo operators for pitch-angle scattering and drag calculate the changes of test ions in velocity and pitch angle due to Coulomb collisions. A rf-induced random walk model describing fast ion stochastic interaction with FW reproduces quasi-linear diffusion in velocity space. FW fields and its wave numbers from TORIC are passed on to ORBIT-RF to calculate perpendicular rf kicks of resonant ions valid for arbitrary cyclotron harmonics. ORBIT-RF coupled with TORIC using a single dominant toroidal and poloidal wave number has demonstrated consistency of simulations with recent DIII-D FW experimental results for interaction between injected neutral-beam ions and FW, including measured neutron enhancement and enhanced high energy tail. Comparison with C-Mod fundamental heating discharges also yielded reasonable agreement.

  4. Giant grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitch-Devlin, M.A.; Millar, T.J.; Williams, D.A.

    1976-01-01

    Infrared observations of the Orion nebula have been interpreted by Rowan-Robinson (1975) to imply the existence of 'giant' grains, radius approximately 10 -2 cm, throughout a volume about a parsec in diameter. Although Rowan-Robinson's model of the nebula has been criticized and the presence of such grains in Orion is disputed, the proposition is accepted, that they exist, and in this paper situations in which giant grains could arise are examined. It is found that, while a giant-grain component to the interstellar grain density may exist, it is difficult to understand how giant grains arise to the extent apparently required by the Orion nebula model. (Auth.)

  5. Giant Planets: Good Neighbors for Habitable Worlds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgakarakos, Nikolaos; Eggl, Siegfried; Dobbs-Dixon, Ian

    2018-04-01

    The presence of giant planets influences potentially habitable worlds in numerous ways. Massive celestial neighbors can facilitate the formation of planetary cores and modify the influx of asteroids and comets toward Earth analogs later on. Furthermore, giant planets can indirectly change the climate of terrestrial worlds by gravitationally altering their orbits. Investigating 147 well-characterized exoplanetary systems known to date that host a main-sequence star and a giant planet, we show that the presence of “giant neighbors” can reduce a terrestrial planet’s chances to remain habitable, even if both planets have stable orbits. In a small fraction of systems, however, giant planets slightly increase the extent of habitable zones provided that the terrestrial world has a high climate inertia. In providing constraints on where giant planets cease to affect the habitable zone size in a detrimental fashion, we identify prime targets in the search for habitable worlds.

  6. Delocalization and occupancy effects of 5f orbitals in plutonium intermetallics using L3-edge resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booth, C. H.; Medling, S. A.; Jiang, Yu; Bauer, E. D.; Tobash, P. H.; Mitchell, J. N.; Veirs, D. K.; Wall, M. A.; Allen, P. G.; Kas, J. J.; Sokaras, D.; Nordlund, D.; Weng, T. -C.

    2014-06-24

    Although actinide (An) L3 -edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy has been very effective in determining An oxidation states in insulating, ionically bonded materials, such as in certain coordination compounds and mineral systems, the technique fails in systems featuring more delocalized 5f orbitals, especially in metals. Recently, actinide L3-edge resonant X-ray emission spec- troscopy (RXES) has been shown to be an effective alternative. This technique is further demonstrated here using a parameterized partial unoccupied density of states method to quantify both occupancy and delocalization of the 5f orbital in ?-Pu, ?-Pu, PuCoGa5 , PuCoIn5 , and PuSb2. These new results, supported by FEFF calculations, highlight the effects of strong correlations on RXES spectra and the technique?s ability to differentiate between f-orbital occupation and delocalization.

  7. Dipole strength distribution below the giant dipole resonance in {sup 92}Mo, {sup 98}Mo and {sup 100}Mo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusev, G.Y.

    2006-07-01

    Investigations of the dipole-strength distributions in {sup 92}Mo, {sup 98}Mo and {sup 100}Mo were carried out by means of the method of nuclear resonance fluorescence. The low-lying excitations in the nuclides {sup 92}Mo, {sup 98}Mo and {sup 100}Mo have been studied in photon-scattering experiments at an electron energy of 6 MeV at the ELBE accelerator and at electron energies from 3.2 to 3.8 MeV at the Dynamitron accelerator. Five levels were observed in {sup 92}Mo. Five levels in {sup 98}Mo and 14 in {sup 100}Mo were identified for the first time in the energy range from 2 to 4 MeV. Dipole-strength distributions up to the neutron-separation energies in the nuclides {sup 92}Mo, {sup 98}Mo and {sup 100}Mo have been investigated at the ELBE accelerator. Because of the possible observation of transitions in the neighboring nuclei produced via ({gamma},n) reaction, additional measurements at electron energies of 8.4 and 7.8 MeV, below the neutron-separation energy, were performed on {sup 98}Mo and {sup 100}Mo, respectively. The number of transitions assigned to {sup 92}Mo, {sup 98}Mo and {sup 100}Mo is 340, 485 and 499, respectively, the main part of them being dipole transitions. Statistical properties of the observed transitions are obtained. The continuum contains the ground-state transitions as well as the branching transitions to the low-lying levels and the subsequent deexcitations of these levels. (orig.)

  8. LONG RANGE OUTWARD MIGRATION OF GIANT PLANETS, WITH APPLICATION TO FOMALHAUT b

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crida, Aurelien; Masset, Frederic; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    Recent observations of exoplanets by direct imaging reveal that giant planets orbit at a few dozens to more than a hundred AU from their central star. The question of the origin of these planets challenges the standard theories of planet formation. We propose a new way of obtaining such far planets, by outward migration of a pair of planets formed in the 10 AU region. Two giant planets in mean motion resonance in a common gap in the protoplanetary disk migrate outward, if the inner one is significantly more massive than the outer one. Using hydrodynamical simulations, we show that their semimajor axes can increase by almost 1 order of magnitude. In a flared disk, the pair of planets should reach an asymptotic radius. This mechanism could account for the presence of Fomalhaut b; then, a second, more massive planet, should be orbiting Fomalhaut at about 75 AU.

  9. X-ray excited photoluminescence near the giant resonance in solid-solution Gd1-xTbxOCl nanocrystals and their retention upon solvothermal topotactic transformation to Gd1-xTbxF3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waetzig, Gregory R.; Horrocks, Gregory A.; Jude, Joshua W.; Zuin, Lucia; Banerjee, Sarbajit

    2015-12-01

    Design rules for X-ray phosphors are much less established as compared to their optically stimulated counterparts owing to the absence of a detailed understanding of sensitization mechanisms, activation pathways and recombination channels upon high-energy excitation. Here, we demonstrate a pronounced modulation of the X-ray excited photoluminescence of Tb3+ centers upon excitation in proximity to the giant resonance of the host Gd3+ ions in solid-solution Gd1-xTbxOCl nanocrystals prepared by a non-hydrolytic cross-coupling method. The strong suppression of X-ray excited optical luminescence at the giant resonance suggests a change in mechanism from multiple exciton generation to single thermal exciton formation and Auger decay processes. The solid-solution Gd1-xTbxOCl nanocrystals are further topotactically transformed with retention of a nine-coordinated cation environment to solid-solution Gd1-xTbxF3 nanocrystals upon solvothermal treatment with XeF2. The metastable hexagonal phase of GdF3 can be stabilized at room temperature through this topotactic approach and is transformed subsequently to the orthorhombic phase. The fluoride nanocrystals indicate an analogous but blue-shifted modulation of the X-ray excited optical luminescence of the Tb3+ centers upon X-ray excitation near the giant resonance of the host Gd3+ ions.Design rules for X-ray phosphors are much less established as compared to their optically stimulated counterparts owing to the absence of a detailed understanding of sensitization mechanisms, activation pathways and recombination channels upon high-energy excitation. Here, we demonstrate a pronounced modulation of the X-ray excited photoluminescence of Tb3+ centers upon excitation in proximity to the giant resonance of the host Gd3+ ions in solid-solution Gd1-xTbxOCl nanocrystals prepared by a non-hydrolytic cross-coupling method. The strong suppression of X-ray excited optical luminescence at the giant resonance suggests a change in mechanism

  10. Relation of photofission cross sections and delayed neutron photoproduction in the range of E1-giant resonance. Sootnoshenie mezhdu secheniyami fotodeleniya i fotoobrazovaniya zapazdyvayushchikh nejtronov v oblasti E1-gigantskogo rezonansa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganich, P P; Parlag, O A; Sikora, D I; Sychev, S I

    1989-03-01

    Relation between yields and cross sections of photofission and photoproduction is studied in order to use them in the methods for analysis of fissile nuclides. Total yield of delayed neutrons from the {sup 232}Th target and ratios of total yields from {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th targets were measured in the M=300 microtron in 6-18 MeV energy range. Efficiency of the suggested method for refining the {sup 238}U photofission cross sections in the range of E1-giant resonance is shown.

  11. Giant resonance spectroscopy of 40Ca with the (e,e'x) reaction (II): Multipole decomposition of 4π-integrated spectra and angular correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diesener, H.; Helm, U.; Huck, V.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Rangacharyulu, C.; Richter, A.; Schrieder, G.; Stascheck, A.; Strauch, S.; Ryckebusch, J.; Carter, J.

    2001-01-01

    The present article is the second out of three on a study of the 40 Ca(e,e'x) reaction discussing the multipole decomposition of the measured cross sections and the analysis of angular correlations. The decomposition of the strongly overlapping E0, E1 and E2 giant resonance strengths using the (e,e'x; x=p,α) reaction in 40 Ca is discussed for excitation energies between 10 and about 21 MeV. Two extraction methods are presented based on the variation of the form factors for the different multipoles. The resulting B(E1) strength distribution is in good agreement with (γ,x) photoabsorption data. The summed B(E2) and B(E0) strength is highly fragmented and spread out over the energy region investigated. Microscopic continuum RPA calculations including the coupling of the basic particle-hole states to the low-lying surface vibrations are capable of reproducing the strength distributions quite accurately. Exhaustion of the energy-weighted sum rules (EWSR) for the various decay channels is presented. A complete decomposition of E0, E1 and E2 contributions in 40 Ca is possible for (e,e'α) angular correlations populating the 36 Ar ground state. Contrary to expectations, the form factors of isoscalar E0 and E2 strengths in the 40 Ca(e,e'α 0 ) reaction exhibit increasing differences towards smaller momentum transfers. Angular correlations for proton decay into low-lying states of 39 K are compared to a self-consistent continuum RPA calculation which allows a systematic description of the strong variations observed as a function of 40 Ca excitation energy and momentum transfer. The success implies that direct knock-out models of the 40 Ca(e,e'p) reaction are too simple. Furthermore, the shapes of the angular correlations seem to be determined largely by the final-state interaction, in particular by charge exchange reactions in the nuclear medium

  12. Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nils Holger

    2014-01-01

    A chapter in a book about terminology within the field of medievalism: the chapter discusses the resonance of medieval music and ritual in modern (classical) music culture and liturgical practice.......A chapter in a book about terminology within the field of medievalism: the chapter discusses the resonance of medieval music and ritual in modern (classical) music culture and liturgical practice....

  13. Free radicals in an adamantane matrix. XIII. Electron paramagnetic resonance study of sigma* - π* orbital crossover in fluorinated pyridine anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yim, M.B.; DiGregorio, S.; Wood, D.E.

    1977-01-01

    Pentafluoropyridine,2,3,4,6-tetrafluoropyridine, 2,6-difluoropyridine, and 2-fluoropyridine anion radicals were produced by x irradiation of an adamantane matrix which was doubly doped with the aromatic precursors and Me 3 NBH 3 and their EPR spectra obtained. The large fluorine hyperfine splitting constants (hfsc) of penta- and 2,3,4,6-tetrafluoropyridine anions and the small fluorine hfsc's of 2,6-di- and 2-fluoropyridine anions suggest that the former two are sigma radicals while the latter two are π radicals. The sigma*-π* orbital crossover phenomenon observed in these fluorinated pyridine anions is explained in terms of the combined effects of stabilization of sigma* orbitals and destabilization of π* orbitals. The EPR results show that nitrogen has a negligible contribution to the unpaired electron sigma* orbitals. INDO calculations were performed for the various states and the results compared with experiment

  14. Giant cystic craniopharyngiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, S.C.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Nowell, M.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.; Hackney, D.B.; Grossman, R.I.; Goldberg, H.I.

    1987-01-01

    Three cases of giant cystic craniopharyngiomas with large areas of extension beyond the suprasellar area are presented. The magnetic resonance (MR) appearance in one case is described. These giant tumors had large, multilobulated cysts that comprised the bulk of the tumors. In one case, there was an unusual extension of the large tumor cyst into the lateral ventricle. In two cases, the tumors extended to the level of the foramen magnum. On CT, the cyst contents of these two tumors were hyperdense and became hypodense postoperatively. All three tumors harbored calcifications in the form of clumps in the suprasellar region and rim calcifications around the cysts. None of the tumors exhibited contrast enhancement. A literature review of the radiographic features of craniopharyngiomas is discussed. (orig.)

  15. Study of leading strange meson resonances and spin-orbit splittings in K-p → K-π+n at 11 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honma, A.K.

    1980-11-01

    The results from a high-statistics study of Kπ elastic scattering in the reaction K - p → K - π + n are presented. The data for this analysis are taken from an 11-GeV/c K - p experiment performed on the Large Aperture Solenoidal Spectrometer (LASS) facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). By selecting the very forward produced K - π + events, a sample consisting of data for the Kπ → Kπ elastic scattering reaction was extracted. The angular distribution for this meson-meson scattering is studied by use of both a spherical harmonic moments analysis and a partial-wave analysis (PWA). The previously established leading natural spin-parity strange meson resonances (the J/sup P/ = 1 - K*(895), the 2 + K*(1430), and the 3 - K*(1780)) are observed in the results from both the moments analysis and the PWA. In addition, evidence for a new spin 4 - K* resonance with a mass of 2080 MeV and a width of about 225 MeV is presented. The results from the PWA confirm the existence of a 0 + kappa (1490) and propose the existence of a second scalar meson resonance, the 0 + kappa' (1900). Structure in the P-wave amplitude indicates resonance behavior in the mass region near 1700 MeV. In two of the four ambiguous solutions for the mass region above 1800 MeV, there is strong evidence for another P-wave resonant structure near 2100 MeV. The observed strange meson resonances are found to have a natural interpretation in terms of states predicted by the quark model. In particular, the mass splittings of the leading trajectory natural spin-parity strange meson states and the mass splittings between the spin-orbit triplet states are discussed. 59 figures, 17 tables

  16. Study of leading strange meson resonances and spin-orbit splittings in K/sup -/p. -->. K/sup -/. pi. /sup +/n at 11 GeV/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honma, A.K.

    1980-11-01

    The results from a high-statistics study of K..pi.. elastic scattering in the reaction K/sup -/p ..-->.. K/sup -/..pi../sup +/n are presented. The data for this analysis are taken from an 11-GeV/c K/sup -/p experiment performed on the Large Aperture Solenoidal Spectrometer (LASS) facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). By selecting the very forward produced K/sup -/..pi../sup +/ events, a sample consisting of data for the K..pi.. ..-->.. K..pi.. elastic scattering reaction was extracted. The angular distribution for this meson-meson scattering is studied by use of both a spherical harmonic moments analysis and a partial-wave analysis (PWA). The previously established leading natural spin-parity strange meson resonances (the J/sup P/ = 1/sup -/ K*(895), the 2/sup +/ K*(1430), and the 3/sup -/ K*(1780)) are observed in the results from both the moments analysis and the PWA. In addition, evidence for a new spin 4/sup -/ K* resonance with a mass of 2080 MeV and a width of about 225 MeV is presented. The results from the PWA confirm the existence of a 0/sup +/ kappa (1490) and propose the existence of a second scalar meson resonance, the 0/sup +/ kappa' (1900). Structure in the P-wave amplitude indicates resonance behavior in the mass region near 1700 MeV. In two of the four ambiguous solutions for the mass region above 1800 MeV, there is strong evidence for another P-wave resonant structure near 2100 MeV. The observed strange meson resonances are found to have a natural interpretation in terms of states predicted by the quark model. In particular, the mass splittings of the leading trajectory natural spin-parity strange meson states and the mass splittings between the spin-orbit triplet states are discussed. 59 figures, 17 tables.

  17. A resonant chain of four transiting, sub-Neptune planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Sean M; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Migaszewski, Cezary; Ford, Eric B; Petigura, Erik; Isaacson, Howard

    2016-05-26

    Surveys have revealed many multi-planet systems containing super-Earths and Neptunes in orbits of a few days to a few months. There is debate whether in situ assembly or inward migration is the dominant mechanism of the formation of such planetary systems. Simulations suggest that migration creates tightly packed systems with planets whose orbital periods may be expressed as ratios of small integers (resonances), often in a many-planet series (chain). In the hundreds of multi-planet systems of sub-Neptunes, more planet pairs are observed near resonances than would generally be expected, but no individual system has hitherto been identified that must have been formed by migration. Proximity to resonance enables the detection of planets perturbing each other. Here we report transit timing variations of the four planets in the Kepler-223 system, model these variations as resonant-angle librations, and compute the long-term stability of the resonant chain. The architecture of Kepler-223 is too finely tuned to have been formed by scattering, and our numerical simulations demonstrate that its properties are natural outcomes of the migration hypothesis. Similar systems could be destabilized by any of several mechanisms, contributing to the observed orbital-period distribution, where many planets are not in resonances. Planetesimal interactions in particular are thought to be responsible for establishing the current orbits of the four giant planets in the Solar System by disrupting a theoretical initial resonant chain similar to that observed in Kepler-223.

  18. Giant Chancroid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhushan Kumar

    1980-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of giant chancroid following rupture of inguinal bubo and having systemic symptoms is described. Response with sulfa and streptomycin combination was excellent and the lesion healed completely in 3 weeks. Early diagnosis and treatment of chancroid will prevent this debilitating complication.

  19. Giant microelectronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Della Sala, D.; Privato, C.; Di Lazzaro, P.; Fortunato, G.

    1999-01-01

    Giant microelectronics, on which the technology of flat liquid-crystal screens is based, is an example of fruitful interaction among independently-developed technologies, in this case thin film micro devices and laser applications. It typifies the interdisciplinary approach needed to produce innovations in microelectronics [it

  20. Resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    an impetus or drive to that account: change, innovation, rupture, or discontinuity. Resonances: Historical Essays on Continuity and Change explores the historiographical question of the modes of interrelation between these motifs in historical narratives. The essays in the collection attempt to realize...

  1. Kepler-36: a pair of planets with neighboring orbits and dissimilar densities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carter, J.A.; Agol, E.; Chaplin, W.J.; Basu, S.; Bedding, T.R.; Buchhave, L.A.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Deck, K.M.; Elsworth, Y.; Fabrycky, D.C.; Ford, E.B.; Fortney, J.J.; Hale, S.J.; Handberg, R.; Hekker, S.; Holman, M.J.; Huber, D.; Karoff, C.; Kawaler, S.D.; Kjeldsen, H.; Lissauer, J.J.; Lopez, E.D.; Lund, M.N.; Lundkvist, M.; Metcalfe, T.S.; Miglio, A.; Rogers, L.A.; Stello, D.; Borucki, W.J.; Bryson, S.; Christiansen, J.L.; Cochran, W.D.; Geary, J.C.; Gilliland, R.L.; Haas, M.R.; Hall, J.; Howard, A.W.; Jenkins, J.M.; Klaus, T.; Koch, D.G.; Latham, D.W.; MacQueen, P.J.; Sasselov, D.; Steffen, J.H.; Twicken, J.D.; Winn, J.N.

    2012-01-01

    In the solar system, the planets’ compositions vary with orbital distance, with rocky planets in close orbits and lower-density gas giants in wider orbits. The detection of close-in giant planets around other stars was the first clue that this pattern is not universal and that planets’ orbits can

  2. Assessment of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in the differentiation of malignant from benign orbital masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Ying [Department of Radiology, Shanghai Ninth People' s Hospital, Affiliated to JiaoTong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200011 (China); Kuai, Xin-Ping [Department of Radiology, Changshu Second People' s Hospital, Jiangsu Province 215500 (China); Department of Radiology, Changzheng Hospital, Affiliated to Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China); Chen, Xiao-Song [Comprehensive Breast Health Center, Ruijin Hospital Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, 197 Ruijin Er Road, Shanghai 20025 (China); Tao, Xiao-Feng, E-mail: cjr.taoxiaofeng@vip.163.com [Department of Radiology, Shanghai Ninth People' s Hospital, Affiliated to JiaoTong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200011 (China)

    2013-09-15

    Objective: Dynamic contrast enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI) allows imaging of the physiology of the microcirculation. The purpose of this study was to determine the diagnostic efficacy of time intensity curve (TIC) and DCE parameters for characterization of orbital masses. Methods: Fifty-nine patients with untreated orbital lesions underwent DCE-MRI before surgery. For each lesion, peak height (PH), maximum enhancement ratio (ER{sub max}), time of peak enhancement (T{sub peak}) and maximum rise slope (Slope{sub max}) were plotted and calculated. Receiver operator characteristics (ROC) analysis was conducted to assess the appropriate cut-off value. Results: All 26 lesions that demonstrated persistent pattern (type-I) TICs were benign. Most of the masses with the washout pattern (type-III) TIC were malignant (10/14), including lymphoma (n = 6) and melanoma (n = 4). The Slope{sub max} of benign lesions was statistically lower than malignant ones, while the ER{sub max} and T{sub peak} values of benign lesions were significantly higher. No statistical difference was found in PH (P = 0.121). The AUC for ER{sub max}, T{sub peak} and Slope{sub max} in differentiating benign orbital lesions from malignant ones were 0.683, 0.837 and 0.738, respectively. In the three DCE parameters, Slope{sub max} cut-off value of 1.10 provided the highest sensitivity of 93.8%; however, the corresponding specificity was low (58.1%). The ER{sub max} cut-off value of 1.37 and T{sub peak} cut-off value of 35.14 respectively offered the best diagnostic performances. Conclusion: DCE-MRI, especially the qualitative TIC pattern and quantitative value of Slope{sub max}, ER{sub max} and T{sub peak}, could be a complementary investigation in distinguishing malignant orbital tumor from benign ones.

  3. Dynamical Evolution and Spin-Orbit Resonances of Potentially Habitable Exoplanets. The Case of GJ 667C

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-10

    on habitability and atmosphere properties. The major planets of the solar system, with the notable exception of Venus and Mercury , rotate at...energy. The lat- ter kind of librations is expected to damp relatively quickly for Mercury -like planets (Peale 2005), with a characteristic damp- ing...is even shorter than that for Mercury . The planet is certain to be in one of the low-order resonances, that is, its current rotation with respect to

  4. Unilateral blindness with third cranial nerve palsy and abnormal enhancement of extraocular muscles on magnetic resonance imaging of orbit after the ingestion of methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Tae Nyoung; Kim, Sun Wook; Park, Yoo Seok; Park, Incheol

    2010-05-01

    Methanol is generally known to cause visual impairment and various systemic manifestations. There are a few reported specific findings for methanol intoxication on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. A case is reported of unilateral blindness with third cranial nerve palsy oculus sinister (OS) after the ingestion of methanol. Unilateral damage of the retina and optic nerve were confirmed by fundoscopy, flourescein angiography, visual evoked potential and electroretinogram. The optic nerve and extraocular muscles (superior rectus, medial rectus, inferior rectus and inferior oblique muscle) were enhanced by gadolinium-DTPA on MRI of the orbit. This is the first case report of permanent monocular blindness with confirmed unilateral damage of the retina and optic nerve, combined with third cranial nerve palsy after methanol ingestion.

  5. RCNP E398 {sup 16}O,{sup 12}C(p,p’) experiment: Measurement of the γ-ray emission probability from giant resonances in relation to {sup 16}O,{sup 12}C(ν,ν’) reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ou, I.; Yamada, Y.; Mori, T.; Yano, T.; Sakuda, M. [Department of Physics, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Tamii, A.; Suzuki, T.; Yosoi, M.; Aoi, N.; Ideguchi, E.; Hashimoto, T.; Miki, K.; Ito, T.; Iwamoto, C.; Yamamoto, T. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Akimune, H. [Department of Physics, Konan University, Okamoto 8-9-1, Higashinada, Kobe 658-8501 (Japan)

    2015-05-15

    We propose to measure the γ-ray emission probability from excited states above 5 MeV including giant resonance of {sup 16}O and {sup 12}C as a function of excitation energy in 1-MeV step. Here, we measure both the excitation energy (E{sub x}=5-30MeV) at the forward scattering angles (0°-3°) of the {sup 16}O, {sup 12}C (p, p’) reaction using Grand-Raiden Spectrometer and the energy of γ-rays (E{sub γ}) using an array of NaI(Tl) counters. The purpose of the experiment is to provide the basic and important information not only for the γ-ray production from primary neutral-current neutrino-oxygen (-carbon) interactions but also for that from the secondary hadronic (neutron-oxygen and -carbon) interactions.

  6. Detection and Characterization of Extrasolar Planets through Mean-motion Resonances. II. The Effect of the Planet’s Orbital Eccentricity on Debris Disk Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabeshian, Maryam; Wiegert, Paul A., E-mail: mtabeshi@uwo.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2017-09-20

    Structures observed in debris disks may be caused by gravitational interaction with planetary or stellar companions. These perturbed disks are often thought to indicate the presence of planets and offer insights into the properties of both the disk and the perturbing planets. Gaps in debris disks may indicate a planet physically present within the gap, but such gaps can also occur away from the planet’s orbit at mean-motion resonances (MMRs), and this is the focus of our interest here. We extend our study of planet–disk interaction through MMRs, presented in an earlier paper, to systems in which the perturbing planet has moderate orbital eccentricity, a common occurrence in exoplanetary systems. In particular, a new result is that the 3:1 MMR becomes distinct at higher eccentricity, while its effects are absent for circular planetary orbits. We also only consider gravitational interaction with a planetary body of at least 1 M {sub J}. Our earlier work shows that even a 1 Earth mass planet can theoretically open an MMR gap; however, given the narrow gap that can be opened by a low-mass planet, its observability would be questionable. We find that the widths, locations, and shapes of two prominent structures, the 2:1 and 3:1 MMRs, could be used to determine the mass, semimajor axis, and eccentricity of the planetary perturber and present an algorithm for doing so. These MMR structures can be used to narrow the position and even determine the planetary properties (such as mass) of any inferred but as-yet-unseen planets within a debris disk. We also briefly discuss the implications of eccentric disks on brightness asymmetries and their dependence on the wavelengths with which these disks are observed.

  7. Dynamic Portrait of the Retrograde 1:1 Mean Motion Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yukun; Li, Miao; Li, Junfeng; Gong, Shengping

    2018-06-01

    Asteroids in mean motion resonances with giant planets are common in the solar system, but it was not until recently that several asteroids in retrograde mean motion resonances with Jupiter and Saturn were discovered. A retrograde co-orbital asteroid of Jupiter, 2015 BZ509 is confirmed to be in a long-term stable retrograde 1:1 mean motion resonance with Jupiter, which gives rise to our interests in its unique resonant dynamics. In this paper, we investigate the phase-space structure of the retrograde 1:1 resonance in detail within the framework of the circular restricted three-body problem. We construct a simple integrable approximation for the planar retrograde resonance using canonical contact transformation and numerically employ the averaging procedure in closed form. The phase portrait of the retrograde 1:1 resonance is depicted with the level curves of the averaged Hamiltonian. We thoroughly analyze all possible librations in the co-orbital region and uncover a new apocentric libration for the retrograde 1:1 resonance inside the planet’s orbit. We also observe the significant jumps in orbital elements for outer and inner apocentric librations, which are caused by close encounters with the perturber.

  8. Radiology of orbital trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.K.; Lazo, A.; Metes, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    Computed tomography has become the gold standard against which to measure orbital imaging modalities. The simultaneous display of bone, soft tissues, paranasal sinuses, and intracranial structures is a unique advantage. Radiation dose and cost have been cited as disadvantages. These would suggest that CT be reserved for the patient with significant orbital injury or difficult diagnostic problems. Magnetic resonance is limited in the investigation of orbital trauma

  9. Orbital Decay in Binaries with Evolved Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Meng; Arras, Phil; Weinberg, Nevin N.; Troup, Nicholas; Majewski, Steven R.

    2018-01-01

    Two mechanisms are often invoked to explain tidal friction in binary systems. The ``dynamical tide” is the resonant excitation of internal gravity waves by the tide, and their subsequent damping by nonlinear fluid processes or thermal diffusion. The ``equilibrium tide” refers to non-resonant excitation of fluid motion in the star’s convection zone, with damping by interaction with the turbulent eddies. There have been numerous studies of these processes in main sequence stars, but less so on the subgiant and red giant branches. Motivated by the newly discovered close binary systems in the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE-1), we have performed calculations of both the dynamical and equilibrium tide processes for stars over a range of mass as the star’s cease core hydrogen burning and evolve to shell burning. Even for stars which had a radiative core on the main sequence, the dynamical tide may have very large amplitude in the newly radiative core in post-main sequence, giving rise to wave breaking. The resulting large dynamical tide dissipation rate is compared to the equilibrium tide, and the range of secondary masses and orbital periods over which rapid orbital decay may occur will be discussed, as well as applications to close APOGEE binaries.

  10. Tracking Advanced Planetary Systems (TAPAS) with HARPS-N. V. A Massive Jupiter orbiting the very-low-metallicity giant star BD+03 2562 and a possible planet around HD 103485

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaver, E.; Niedzielski, A.; Wolszczan, A.; Nowak, G.; Kowalik, K.; Adamów, M.; Maciejewski, G.; Deka-Szymankiewicz, B.; Maldonado, J.

    2017-10-01

    planetary companions, they represent systems orbiting very evolved stars with very low metallicities, a challenge to the conditions required for the formation of massive giant gas planets. Based on observations obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, and Georg-August-Universität Göttingen.Based on observations made with the Italian Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) operated on the island of La Palma by the Fundación Galileo Galilei of the INAF (Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica) at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.

  11. Rapid formation of gas giants, ice giants and super-Earths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boss, A P [DTM, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Road, NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States)], E-mail: boss@dtm.ciw.edu

    2008-08-15

    Giant planets might have been formed by either of the two basic mechanisms, top-down (disk instability) or bottom-up (core accretion). The latter mechanism is the most generally accepted mechanism and it begins with the collisional accumulation of solid cores that may then accrete sufficient gas to become gas giants. The former mechanism is more heretical and begins with the gravitational instability of the protoplanetary disk gas, leading to the formation of self-gravitating protoplanets, within which the dust settles to form a solid core. The disk instability mechanism has been thought of primarily as a mechanism for the formation of gas giants, but if it occurs in a disk that is being photoevaporated by the ultraviolet radiation from nearby massive stars, then the outer gaseous protoplanets can be photoevaporated as well and stripped of their gaseous envelopes. The result would then be ice giants (cold super-Earths), such as the objects discovered recently by microlensing orbiting two presumed M dwarf stars. M dwarfs that form in regions of future high-mass star formation would be expected to produce cold super-Earths orbiting at distances of several astronomical units (AU) and beyond, while M dwarfs that form in regions of low-mass star formation would be expected to have gas giants at those distances. Given that most stars are born in the former rather than in the latter regions, M dwarfs should have significantly more super-Earths than gas giants on orbits of several AU or more.

  12. Rapid formation of gas giants, ice giants and super-Earths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boss, A P

    2008-01-01

    Giant planets might have been formed by either of the two basic mechanisms, top-down (disk instability) or bottom-up (core accretion). The latter mechanism is the most generally accepted mechanism and it begins with the collisional accumulation of solid cores that may then accrete sufficient gas to become gas giants. The former mechanism is more heretical and begins with the gravitational instability of the protoplanetary disk gas, leading to the formation of self-gravitating protoplanets, within which the dust settles to form a solid core. The disk instability mechanism has been thought of primarily as a mechanism for the formation of gas giants, but if it occurs in a disk that is being photoevaporated by the ultraviolet radiation from nearby massive stars, then the outer gaseous protoplanets can be photoevaporated as well and stripped of their gaseous envelopes. The result would then be ice giants (cold super-Earths), such as the objects discovered recently by microlensing orbiting two presumed M dwarf stars. M dwarfs that form in regions of future high-mass star formation would be expected to produce cold super-Earths orbiting at distances of several astronomical units (AU) and beyond, while M dwarfs that form in regions of low-mass star formation would be expected to have gas giants at those distances. Given that most stars are born in the former rather than in the latter regions, M dwarfs should have significantly more super-Earths than gas giants on orbits of several AU or more

  13. Giant arachnoid granulation in a patient with benign intracranial hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiroglu, Yilmaz; Yaqci, Baki; Cirak, Bayram; Karabulut, Nevzat

    2008-01-01

    We report magnetic resonance (MR), computed tomography (CT) and angiographic imaging of an unusual giant arachnoid granulation in the superior sagittal sinus in a man with headache and vertigo. Intrasinus pressure measurements revealed a significant pressure gradient across the lesion. MR imaging is useful to identify giant arachnoid granulation and dural sinus thrombosis, whereas dural sinus pressure measurement in certain cases of giant arachnoid granulations can be used to evaluate the lesion as the cause of the patient's symptoms. (orig.)

  14. Giant arachnoid granulation in a patient with benign intracranial hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiroglu, Yilmaz; Yaqci, Baki; Cirak, Bayram; Karabulut, Nevzat [Pamukkale University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Denizli (Turkey)

    2008-10-15

    We report magnetic resonance (MR), computed tomography (CT) and angiographic imaging of an unusual giant arachnoid granulation in the superior sagittal sinus in a man with headache and vertigo. Intrasinus pressure measurements revealed a significant pressure gradient across the lesion. MR imaging is useful to identify giant arachnoid granulation and dural sinus thrombosis, whereas dural sinus pressure measurement in certain cases of giant arachnoid granulations can be used to evaluate the lesion as the cause of the patient's symptoms. (orig.)

  15. Correlation of orbital muscle changes evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging and thyroid-stimulating antibody in patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, M.; Yoshimura, M.; Inada, M.

    1993-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between eye changes and autoantibody to the thyrotropin receptor in patients with Graves' disease, the authors evaluated the eye changes using magnetic resonance imaging and the results were correlated with thyroid-stimulating antibody, thyrotropin binding inhibitor immunoglobulin and thyroid growth activity. Subjects were 15 patients with Graves' disease who had Graves' ophthalmopathy, including exophthalmos and other signs and symptoms, and 9 patients without ophthalmopathy; all were maintained in a euthyroid state by antithyroid drugs. The thyrotropin-binding inhibitor imunoglobulin was measured by a kit, and thyroid-stimulating antibody and thyroid growth activity were evaluated by cyclic adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate production and [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation, respectively, by cultured functional rat thyroid lined cells. The sum of the swelling ratios of the four extraocular muscles correlated well with the degree of exophthalmos. The thyrotropin-binding inhibitor immunoglobulin was positive in 9 out of 15 patients with ophthalmopathy; however, no correlation was observed between the activity and exophthalmos or muscle swelling. No significant correlation was observed between muscle changes and thyroid growth activity either. On the other hand, thyroid-stimulating antibody in Graves' patients with ophthalmopathy was significantly higher than that in patients without ophthalmopathy. Moreover, the level of the stimulating activity in Graves' patients with ophthalmopathy showed a significant positive correlation with the sum of the swelling ratios of the individual eight eye muscles. These results suggest that thyroid-stimulating antibody has a close relation to Graves' ophthalmopathy. 23 refs., 4 figs

  16. HD 181068: A Red Giant in a Triply Eclipsing Compact Hierarchical Triple System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Derekas, A.; Kiss, Lazlo L.; Borkovits, T.

    2011-01-01

    by ground-based spectroscopy and interferometry, which show it to be a hierarchical triple with two types of mutual eclipses. The primary is a red giant that is in a 45-day orbit with a pair of red dwarfs in a close 0.9-day orbit. The red giant shows evidence for tidally induced oscillations that are driven...

  17. Teetering Stars: Resonant Excitation of Stellar Obliquities by Hot and Warm Jupiters with External Companions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kassandra; Lai, Dong

    2018-04-01

    Stellar spin-orbit misalignments (obliquities) in hot Jupiter systems have been extensively probed in recent years thanks to Rossiter-McLaughlin observations. Such obliquities may reveal clues about hot Jupiter dynamical and migration histories. Common explanations for generating stellar obliquities include high-eccentricity migration, or primordial disk misalignment. This talk investigates another mechanism for producing stellar spin-orbit misalignments in systems hosting a close-in giant planet with an external, inclined planetary companion. Spin-orbit misalignment may be excited due to a secular resonance, occurring when the precession rate of the stellar spin axis (due to the inner orbit) becomes comparable to the precession rate of the inner orbital axis (due to the outer companion). Due to the spin-down of the host star via magnetic braking, this resonance may be achieved at some point during the star's main sequence lifetime for a wide range of giant planet masses and orbital architectures. We focus on both hot Jupiters (with orbital periods less than ten days) and warm Jupiters (with orbital periods around tens of days), and identify the outer perburber properties needed to generate substantial obliquities via resonant excitation, in terms of mass, separation, and inclination. For hot Jupiters, the stellar spin axis is strongly coupled to the orbital axis, and resonant excitation of obliquity requires a close perturber, located within 1-2 AU. For warm Jupiters, the spin and orbital axes are more weakly coupled, and the resonance may be achieved for more distant perturbers (at several to tens of AU). Resonant excitation of the stellar obliquity is accompanied by a decrease in the planets' mutual orbital inclination, and can thus erase high mutual inclinations in two-planet systems. Since many warm Jupiters are known to have outer planetary companions at several AU or beyond, stellar obliquities in warm Jupiter systems may be common, regardless of the

  18. Dynamics of the retrograde 1/1 mean motion resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yukun; Li, Miao; Li, Junfeng; Gong, Shengping

    2018-04-01

    Mean motion resonances are very common in the solar system. Asteroids in mean motion resonances with giant planets have been studied for centuries. But it was not until recently that asteroids in retrograde mean motion resonances with Jupiter and Saturn were discovered. The newly discovered asteroid, 2015 BZ509 is confirmed to be the first asteroid in retrograde 1:1 mean motion resonance (or retrograde co-orbital resonance) with Jupiter, which gives rise to our interests in its unique resonant dynamics. In this study, we thoroughly investigate the phase-space structure of the retrograde 1:1 resonance within the framework of the circular restricted three-body problem. We begin by constructing a simple integrable approximation for the planar retrograde resonance with the Hamiltonian approach and show that the variables definition of the retrograde resonance is very different to the prograde one. When it comes to the disturbing function, we abandon the classical series expansion approach, whereas numerically carry out the averaging process on the disturbing function in closed form. The phase portrait of the retrograde 1:1 resonance is depicted with the level curves of the averaged Hamiltonian. We find that the topological structure of phase space for the retrograde 1:1 resonance is very different to other resonances, due to the consistent existence of the collision separatrix. And the surprising bifurcation of equilibrium point around 180° (i.e., the apocentric libration center) has never been found in any other mean motion resonances before. We thoroughly analyze the novel apocentric librations and find that close encounter with the planet does not always lead to the disruption of a stable apocentric libration. Afterwards, we examine the Kozai dynamics inside the mean motion resonance with the similar Hamiltonian approach and explain why the exact resonant point does not exist in the 3D retrograde 1:1 resonance model.

  19. Transforming giants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    2008-01-01

    Large corporations have long been seen as lumbering, inflexible, bureaucratic--and clueless about global developments. But recently some multinationals seem to be transforming themselves: They're engaging employees, moving quickly, and introducing innovations that show true connection with the world. Harvard Business School's Kanter ventured with a research team inside a dozen global giants--including IBM, Procter & Gamble, Omron, CEMEX, Cisco, and Banco Real--to discover what has been driving the change. After conducting more than 350 interviews on five continents, she and her colleagues came away with a strong sense that we are witnessing the dawn of a new model of corporate power: The coordination of actions and decisions on the front lines now appears to stem from widely shared values and a sturdy platform of common processes and technology, not from top-down decrees. In particular, the values that engage the passions of far-flung workforces stress openness, inclusion, and making the world a better place. Through this shift in what might be called their guidance systems, the companies have become as creative and nimble as much smaller ones, even while taking on social and environmental challenges of a scale that only large enterprises could attempt. IBM, for instance, has created a nonprofit partnership, World Community Grid, through which any organization or individual can donate unused computing power to research projects and see what is being done with the donation in real time. IBM has gained an inspiring showcase for its new technology, helped business partners connect with the company in a positive way, and offered individuals all over the globe the chance to contribute to something big.

  20. Giant Cell Arteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giant cell arteritis is a disorder that causes inflammation of your arteries, usually in the scalp, neck, and arms. ... arteries, which keeps blood from flowing well. Giant cell arteritis often occurs with another disorder called polymyalgia ...

  1. K- and L-edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) and Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) Determination of Differential Orbital Covalency (DOC) of Transition Metal Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Michael L; Mara, Michael W; Yan, James J; Hodgson, Keith O; Hedman, Britt; Solomon, Edward I

    2017-08-15

    Continual advancements in the development of synchrotron radiation sources have resulted in X-ray based spectroscopic techniques capable of probing the electronic and structural properties of numerous systems. This review gives an overview of the application of metal K-edge and L-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), as well as K resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS), to the study of electronic structure in transition metal sites with emphasis on experimentally quantifying 3d orbital covalency. The specific sensitivities of K-edge XAS, L-edge XAS, and RIXS are discussed emphasizing the complementary nature of the methods. L-edge XAS and RIXS are sensitive to mixing between 3d orbitals and ligand valence orbitals, and to the differential orbital covalency (DOC), that is, the difference in the covalencies for different symmetry sets of the d orbitals. Both L-edge XAS and RIXS are highly sensitive to and enable separation of and donor bonding and back bonding contributions to bonding. Applying ligand field multiplet simulations, including charge transfer via valence bond configuration interactions, DOC can be obtained for direct comparison with density functional theory calculations and to understand chemical trends. The application of RIXS as a probe of frontier molecular orbitals in a heme enzyme demonstrates the potential of this method for the study of metal sites in highly covalent coordination sites in bioinorganic chemistry.

  2. Study of the neutron decays of giant resonances excited by the inelastic scattering of 36 Ar on 90 Zr and 94 Zr targets at 44 MeV/u: a signature of multiphonon states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascalon-Rozier, V.

    1997-01-01

    In inelastic heavy ion scattering, to angles near to the grazing angle, giant resonances (GR) are excited with very large differential cross sections. It has been shown that multiphonon states, states built with several GR quanta, can also been excited. These states can be revealed through the measurement of their decay by light particle emission. In this thesis, we report on the study of inelastic scattering of 36 Ar at 44 MeV/u on target of 90 Zr and 94 Zr, measured in coincidence with neutrons detected with the EDEN multidetector. The analysis of the inelastic spectra show evidence for a structure at high excitation energy, exhibiting characteristics compatible with a two-photon excitation. The construction of missing energy spectra allows us to the study of the GR and the high energy structure. In both nuclei, the GR presents a direct decay branch of 8%, which yields informations on the microscopic structure of the resonance. A two phonon state, interpreted as two weakly coupled GR's, built on one top of the other, and each phonon is expected to exhibit the same direct decay pattern as the GR. Such a simple decay is observed in the data, proving that the structure observed is due to the excitation of the two phonon state in both nuclei studied. Finally, we present a theoretical development based on Random Phase Approximation calculation, predicting that the two phonon state should be very harmonic. This result is in agreement with experimental studies of double phonon states over a large range of nuclei (from A = 12 to 208) carried out with several different probes. (author)

  3. Electron scattering studies of selected electric and magnetic dipole and quadrupole transitions in light and heavy nuclei, the new multipole giant resonances and atomic transitions - recent results from the DALINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, A.

    1977-01-01

    Recent experimental work from the Darmstadt electron linear accelerator (DALINAC) is briefly summarized. Particular emphasis is given to the following topics: high resolution inelastic electron scattering (ΔE approximately 30 keV FWHM) has been used to study the radiative width and magnetization density of the 2 + , T = 1 state at 16.11 MeV in 12 C, E2 strength distribution in 28 Si below an excitation energy of 13 MeV and the isospin forbidden E1 electroexcitation of the 1 - , T = 0 state at 6.95 MeV in 40 Ca. High resolution inelastic electron scattering was also employed to determine certain M1 transitions in 14 N, 28 Si, 39 K, 58 Ni, 90 Zr and 208 Pb and the M2 strength distribution in the two heaviest nuclei. At medium energy resolution (ΔE approximately 200 keV FWHM) spectra at various angles and bombarding energies have been measured from (4-31) MeV for 208 Pb. They are being analyzed in order to determine E0, E1, E2, E3 and M1 giant resonance strength in the continuum. The Z and E dependence and the scaling behaviour of the atomic inner shell ionization cross section at relativistic electron impact is studied on gaseous and solid targets. (orig./BJ) [de

  4. ORBITS AND MASSES OF THE SATELLITES OF THE DWARF PLANET HAUMEA (2003 EL61)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragozzine, D.; Brown, M. E.

    2009-01-01

    Using precise relative astrometry from the Hubble Space Telescope and the W. M. Keck Telescope, we have determined the orbits and masses of the two dynamically interacting satellites of the dwarf planet (136108) Haumea, formerly 2003 EL61. The orbital parameters of Hi'iaka, the outer, brighter satellite, match well the previously derived orbit. On timescales longer than a few weeks, no Keplerian orbit is sufficient to describe the motion of the inner, fainter satellite Namaka. Using a fully interacting three-point-mass model, we have recovered the orbital parameters of both orbits and the mass of Haumea and Hi'iaka; Namaka's mass is marginally detected. The data are not sufficient to uniquely determine the gravitational quadrupole of the nonspherical primary (described by J 2 ). The nearly coplanar nature of the satellites, as well as an inferred density similar to water ice, strengthen the hypothesis that Haumea experienced a giant collision billions of years ago. The excited eccentricities and mutual inclination point to an intriguing tidal history of significant semimajor axis evolution through satellite mean-motion resonances. The orbital solution indicates that Namaka and Haumea are currently undergoing mutual events and that the mutual event season will last for next several years.

  5. Determination of Structures and Energetics of Small- and Medium-Sized One-Carbon-Bridged Twisted Amides using ab Initio Molecular Orbital Methods: Implications for Amidic Resonance along the C-N Rotational Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szostak, Roman; Aubé, Jeffrey; Szostak, Michal

    2015-08-21

    Twisted amides containing nitrogen at the bridgehead position are attractive practical prototypes for the investigation of the electronic and structural properties of nonplanar amide linkages. Changes that occur during rotation around the N-C(O) axis in one-carbon-bridged twisted amides have been studied using ab initio molecular orbital methods. Calculations at the MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level performed on a set of one-carbon-bridged lactams, including 20 distinct scaffolds ranging from [2.2.1] to [6.3.1] ring systems, with the C═O bond on the shortest bridge indicate significant variations in structures, resonance energies, proton affinities, core ionization energies, frontier molecular orbitals, atomic charges, and infrared frequencies that reflect structural changes corresponding to the extent of resonance stabilization during rotation along the N-C(O) axis. The results are discussed in the context of resonance theory and activation of amides toward N-protonation (N-activation) by distortion. This study demonstrates that one-carbon-bridged lactams-a class of readily available, hydrolytically robust twisted amides-are ideally suited to span the whole spectrum of the amide bond distortion energy surface. Notably, this study provides a blueprint for the rational design and application of nonplanar amides in organic synthesis. The presented findings strongly support the classical amide bond resonance model in predicting the properties of nonplanar amides.

  6. Orbits in weak and strong bars

    CERN Document Server

    Contopoulos, George

    1980-01-01

    The authors study the plane orbits in simple bar models embedded in an axisymmetric background when the bar density is about 1% (weak), 10% (intermediate) or 100% (strong bar) of the axisymmetric density. Most orbits follow the stable periodic orbits. The basic families of periodic orbits are described. In weak bars with two Inner Lindblad Resonances there is a family of stable orbits extending from the center up to the Outer Lindblad Resonance. This family contains the long period orbits near corotation. Other stable families appear between the Inner Lindblad Resonances, outside the Outer Lindblad Resonance, around corotation (short period orbits) and around the center (retrograde). Some families become unstable or disappear in strong bars. A comparison is made with cases having one or no Inner Lindblad Resonance. (12 refs).

  7. Large Mn25 single-molecule magnet with spin S = 51/2: magnetic and high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic characterization of a giant spin state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugesu, Muralee; Takahashi, Susumu; Wilson, Anthony; Abboud, Khalil A; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Hill, Stephen; Christou, George

    2008-10-20

    The synthesis and structural, spectroscopic, and magnetic characterization of a Mn25 coordination cluster with a large ground-state spin of S = 51/2 are reported. Reaction of MnCl2 with pyridine-2,6-dimethanol (pdmH2) and NaN3 in MeCN/MeOH gives the mixed valence cluster [Mn25O18(OH)2(N3)12(pdm)6(pdmH)6]Cl2 (1; 6Mn(II), 18Mn(III), Mn(IV)), which has a barrel-like cage structure. Variable temperature direct current (dc) magnetic susceptibility data were collected in the 1.8-300 K temperature range in a 0.1 T field. Variable-temperature and -field magnetization (M) data were collected in the 1.8-4.0 K and 0.1-7 T ranges and fit by matrix diagonalization assuming only the ground state is occupied at these temperatures. The fit parameters were S = 51/2, D = -0.020(2) cm(-1), and g = 1.87(3), where D is the axial zero-field splitting parameter. Alternating current (ac) susceptibility measurements in the 1.8-8.0 K range and a 3.5 G ac field oscillating at frequencies in the 50-1500 Hz range revealed a frequency-dependent out-of-phase (chi(M)'') signal below 3 K, suggesting 1 to be a single-molecule magnet (SMM). This was confirmed by magnetization vs dc field sweeps, which exhibited hysteresis loops but with no clear steps characteristic of resonant quantum tunneling of magnetization (QTM). However, magnetization decay data below 1 K were collected and used to construct an Arrhenius plot, and the fit of the thermally activated region above approximately 0.5 K gave U(eff)/k = 12 K, where U(eff) is the effective relaxation barrier. The g value and the magnitude and sign of the D value were independently confirmed by detailed high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (HFEPR) spectroscopy on polycrystalline samples. The combined studies confirm both the high ground-state spin S = 51/2 of complex 1 and that it is a SMM that, in addition, exhibits QTM.

  8. Thrombosis of orbital varices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boschi Oyhenart, J.; Tenyi, A.; Boschi Pau, J.

    2002-01-01

    Orbital varices are venous malformations produced by an abnormal dilatation of one or more orbital veins, probably associated with congenital weakness of the vascular wall. They are rare lesions, usually occurring in young patients, that produce intermittent proptosis related to the increase in the systemic venous pressure. The presence of hemorrhage or thrombosis is associated with rapid development of proptosis, pain and decreased ocular motility. We report the cases of two adult patients with orbital varices complicated by thrombosis in whom the diagnosis was based on computed tomography. The ultrasound and magnetic resonance findings are also discussed. (Author) 16 refs

  9. Giant Planets Can Act as Stabilizing Agents on Debris Disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muñoz-Gutiérrez, M. A.; Pichardo, B.; Peimbert, A., E-mail: mmunoz.astro@gmail.com [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. postal 70-264 Ciudad Universitaria, México (Mexico)

    2017-07-01

    We have explored the evolution of a cold debris disk under the gravitational influence of dwarf-planet-sized objects (DPs), both in the presence and absence of an interior giant planet. Through detailed long-term numerical simulations, we demonstrate that when the giant planet is not present, DPs can stir the eccentricities and inclinations of disk particles, in linear proportion to the total mass of the DPs; on the other hand, when the giant planet is included in the simulations, the stirring is approximately proportional to the mass squared. This creates two regimes: below a disk mass threshold (defined by the total mass of DPs), the giant planet acts as a stabilizing agent of the orbits of cometary nuclei, diminishing the effect of the scatterers; above the threshold, the giant contributes to the dispersion of the particles.

  10. Giant cell angiofibroma or localized periorbital lymphedema?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Michael C; Chung, Catherine G; Specht, Charles S; Wilkinson, Michael; Clarke, Loren E

    2013-12-01

    Giant cell angiofibroma represents a rare soft tissue neoplasm with a predilection for the orbit. We recently encountered a mass removed from the lower eyelid of a 56-year-old female that histopathologically resembled giant cell angiofibroma. The process consisted of haphazardly arranged CD34-positive spindled and multinucleated cells within an edematous, densely vascular stroma. However, the patient had recently undergone laryngectomy and radiotherapy for a laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma. A similar mass had arisen on the contralateral eyelid, and both had developed several months post-therapy. Lymphedema of the orbit can present as tumor-like nodules and in some cases may share histopathologic features purported to be characteristic of giant cell angiofibroma. A relationship between giant cell angiofibroma and lymphedema has not been established, but our case suggests there may be one. The potential overlap of these two conditions should be recognized, as should other entities that may enter the differential diagnosis. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. PLUTINO DETECTION BIASES, INCLUDING THE KOZAI RESONANCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawler, S. M.; Gladman, B.

    2013-01-01

    Because of their relative proximity within the trans-Neptunian region, the plutinos (objects in the 3:2 mean-motion resonance with Neptune) are numerous in flux-limited catalogs, and well-studied theoretically. We perform detailed modeling of the on-sky detection biases for plutinos, with special attention to those that are simultaneously in the Kozai resonance. In addition to the normal 3:2 resonant argument libration, Kozai plutinos also show periodic oscillations in eccentricity and inclination, coupled to the argument of perihelion (ω) oscillation. Due to the mean-motion resonance, plutinos avoid coming to pericenter near Neptune's current position in the ecliptic plane. Because Kozai plutinos are restricted to certain values of ω, perihelion always occurs out of the ecliptic plane, biasing ecliptic surveys against finding these objects. The observed Kozai plutino fraction f koz obs has been measured by several surveys, finding values between 8% and 25%, while the true Kozai plutino fraction f koz true has been predicted to be between 10% and 30% by different giant planet migration simulations. We show that f koz obs varies widely depending on the ecliptic latitude and longitude of the survey, so debiasing to find the true ratio is complex. Even a survey that covers most or all of the sky will detect an apparent Kozai fraction that is different from f koz true . We present a map of the on-sky plutino Kozai fraction that would be detected by all-sky flux-limited surveys. This will be especially important for the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope projects, which may detect large numbers of plutinos as they sweep the sky. f koz true and the distribution of the orbital elements of Kozai plutinos may be a diagnostic of giant planet migration; future migration simulations should provide details on their resonant Kozai populations.

  12. Orbital Dynamics of Exomoons During Planet–Planet Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yu-Cian; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Nicholson, Philip; Raymond, Sean N.

    2018-04-01

    Planet–planet scattering is the leading mechanism to explain the broad eccentricity distribution of observed giant exoplanets. Here we study the orbital stability of primordial giant planet moons in this scenario. We use N-body simulations including realistic oblateness and evolving spin evolution for the giant planets. We find that the vast majority (~80%–90% across all our simulations) of orbital parameter space for moons is destabilized. There is a strong radial dependence, as moons past are systematically removed. Closer-in moons on Galilean-moon-like orbits (system, be captured by another planet, be ejected but still orbiting its free-floating host planet, or survive on heliocentric orbits as "planets." The survival rate of moons increases with the host planet mass but is independent of the planet's final (post-scattering) orbits. Based on our simulations, we predict the existence of an abundant galactic population of free-floating (former) moons.

  13. Giant Cell Angiofibroma in Unusual Localization: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emel Ebru Pala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell angiofibroma (GCA was initially described as a potentially recurrent tumor in the orbit of adults. However, it is now recognized that it can also present in other locations. The morphological hallmark is a richly vascularized patternless spindle cell proliferation containing pseudovascular spaces and floret like multinucleate giant cells. Our case was a 32-years-old female complaining of painless solitary nodule arising on the occipital region of the scalp, which was diagnosed as giant cell angiofibroma. We report the case because of its extremely rare localization.

  14. Dynamically hot Super-Earths from outer giant planet scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Chelsea X.; Petrovich, Cristobal; Deibert, Emily

    2016-01-01

    The hundreds of multiple planetary systems discovered by the \\textit{Kepler} mission are typically observed to reside in close-in ($\\lesssim0.5$ AU), low-eccentricity, and low-inclination orbits. We run N-body experiments to study the effect that unstable outer ($\\gtrsim1$ AU) giant planets, whose end orbital configurations resemble those in the Radial Velocity population, have on these close-in multiple super-Earth systems. Our experiments show that the giant planets greatly reduce the multi...

  15. Nanodielectrics with giant permittivity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Following the prediction, during the last couple of years we have investigated the effect of giant permittivity in one-dimensional systems of conventional metals and conjugated polymer chains. In this article, we have tried to summarize the works on giant permittivity and finally the fabrication of nanocapacitor using metal ...

  16. Harmonically excited orbital variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, T.

    1985-01-01

    Rephrasing the equations of motion for orbital maneuvers in terms of Lagrangian generalized coordinates instead of Newtonian rectangular cartesian coordinates can make certain harmonic terms in the orbital angular momentum vector more readily apparent. In this formulation the equations of motion adopt the form of a damped harmonic oscillator when torques are applied to the orbit in a variationally prescribed manner. The frequencies of the oscillator equation are in some ways unexpected but can nonetheless be exploited through resonant forcing functions to achieve large secular variations in the orbital elements. Two cases are discussed using a circular orbit as the control case: (1) large changes in orbital inclination achieved by harmonic excitation rather than one impulsive velocity change, and (2) periodic and secular changes to the longitude of the ascending node using both stable and unstable excitation strategies. The implications of these equations are also discussed for both artificial satellites and natural satellites. For the former, two utilitarian orbits are suggested, each exploiting a form of harmonic excitation. 5 refs

  17. Pseudo-orbit approach to trajectories of resonances in quantum graphs with general vertex coupling: Fermi rule and high-energy asymptotics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Exner, Pavel; Lipovský, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 4 (2017), č. článku 042101. ISSN 0022-2488 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-01706S Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : self-adjoint coupling * high-energy regime * resonances in quantum graphs Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics OBOR OECD: Atomic, molecular and chemical physics ( physics of atoms and molecules including collision, interaction with radiation, magnetic resonances, Mössbauer effect) Impact factor: 1.077, year: 2016

  18. Using collisions and resonances to tilting Uranus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogoszinski, Zeeve; Hamilton, Douglas

    2018-01-01

    Uranus’ large obliquity (98°) is widely thought to have occurred from a polar strike with an Earth sized object. Morbidelli et al. (2012) argue that two or more collisions are required in order to explain the prograde motion of Uranus’ satellites. These impactors could have been less massive by about a factor of ten, but multiple polar strikes are still improbable as even larger mass impactors would be needed for more equatorial collisions. Here we explore an alternative non-collisional model inspired by the explanation to Saturn’s significant tilt (27°). Ward and Hamilton (2004) & Hamilton and Ward (2004) argue that a secular resonance currently between Saturn’s spin axis and Neptune’s orbital pole is responsible for Saturn’s large obliquity. Unfortunately, Uranus’ axial precession frequency today is too long to match any of the current planets’ fundamental frequencies. Boué and Laskar (2010) explain that Uranus may have harbored an improbably large moon in the past which could have sped up the planet’s axial precession frequency enough to resonate with the regression of its own orbital pole. We explore another scenario which requires only the interactions between the giant planets.Thommes et al. (1999, 2002, 2003) argue that at least the cores of Uranus and Neptune were formed in between Jupiter and Saturn, as the density of the protoplanetary disk was greater there. If Neptune was scattered outward before Uranus, then a secular spin-orbit resonance between the two planets is possible. However, driving Uranus’ obliquity to near 90° with a resonance capture requires a timescale on the order of 100 Myr. If Neptune migrated out quicker or its orbital inclination was initially larger, then we find that the resulting resonance kick can tilt Uranus more than 40° in a reasonable timespan. This could replace one of the impactors required in the collisional scenario described by Morbidelli et al. (2012), but in most situations the effect of such a

  19. Orbit Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoliy Klimyk

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, properties of orbit functions are reviewed and further developed. Orbit functions on the Euclidean space E_n are symmetrized exponential functions. The symmetrization is fulfilled by a Weyl group corresponding to a Coxeter-Dynkin diagram. Properties of such functions will be described. An orbit function is the contribution to an irreducible character of a compact semisimple Lie group G of rank n from one of its Weyl group orbits. It is shown that values of orbit functions are repeated on copies of the fundamental domain F of the affine Weyl group (determined by the initial Weyl group in the entire Euclidean space E_n. Orbit functions are solutions of the corresponding Laplace equation in E_n, satisfying the Neumann condition on the boundary of F. Orbit functions determine a symmetrized Fourier transform and a transform on a finite set of points.

  20. Giant resonances: unification of different approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, A.M.

    1978-01-01

    The RPA is generally accepted as the best theory for providing numerical fits to data on collective vibrations. However, being heavily computational, it does not readily reveal its physical content. For this reason, it is physically instructive to relate RPA to other collective theories, which have more immediate physical identity. First, there are the semi-classical theories that aim to construct a classical kind of Hamiltonian; there are three versions: ''cranking'' theory, momentum-constrained theory, adiabatic time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory. These theories have problems arising from the need to quantise unambiguously, and from the fact that they do not use eigenstates of the collective coordinates. These problems are removed by using the ''generator coordinate method,'' (GCM) which may be viewed as intermediate between the semi-classical theories and the RPA. One can readily express the true relation between the RPA theory and the semi-classical or GCM theories in terms of moments of the RPA strength distribution. (author)

  1. History of Giant Resonances and Quenching

    CERN Document Server

    Arima, A

    1999-01-01

    The history of nuclear magnetic moments and Gamow-Teller transitions is reviewed. The importance of configuration mixing and core polarization to explain the quenching phenomena is shown, and discussed in the context of the recent measurement of the Gamow-Teller strength in sup 9 sup 0 Nb. It is confirmed that the contribution of the DELTA-hole excitation to the quenching of spin matrix elements is small.

  2. Supernova neutrinos, giant resonances, and nucleosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haxton, W.

    1990-01-01

    Almost all of the 3·10 53 ergs liberated in a core collapse supernova is radiated as neutrinos by the cooling neutron star. The neutrinos can excite nuclei in the mantle of the star by their neutral and charged current reactions. I argue that the resulting spallation reactions are an important nucleosynthesis mechanism that may be responsible for the galactic abundances of 7 Li, 11 B, 19 F, 138 La, 180 Ta, and approximately a dozen other light nuclei. 18 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  3. RESONANCE TRAPPING IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. I. COPLANAR SYSTEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Aaron T.; Thommes, Edward W.; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2009-01-01

    Mean-motion resonances (MMRs) are likely to play an important role both during and after the lifetime of a protostellar gas disk. We study the dynamical evolution and stability of planetary systems containing two giant planets on circular orbits near a 2:1 resonance and closer. We find that by having the outer planet migrate inward, the two planets can capture into either the 2:1, 5:3, or 3:2 MMR. We use direct numerical integrations of ∼1000 systems in which the planets are initially locked into one of these resonances and allowed to evolve for up to ∼10 7 yr. We find that the final eccentricity distribution in systems which ultimately become unstable gives a good fit to observed exoplanets. Next, we integrate ∼500 two-planet systems in which the outer planet is driven to continuously migrate inward, resonantly capturing the inner planet; the systems are evolved until either instability sets in or the planets reach the star. We find that although the 5:3 resonance rapidly becomes unstable under migration, the 2:1 and 3:2 are very stable. Thus the lack of observed exoplanets in resonances closer than 2:1, if it continues to hold up, may be a primordial signature of the planet formation process.

  4. Lipase polystyrene giant amphiphiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velonia, Kelly; Rowan, Alan E; Nolte, Roeland J M

    2002-04-24

    A new type of giant amphiphilic molecule has been synthesized by covalently connecting a lipase enzyme headgroup to a maleimide-functionalized polystyrene tail (40 repeat units). The resulting biohybrid forms catalytic micellar rods in water.

  5. Metaphyseal giant cell tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, L.F.; Hemais, P.M.P.G.; Aymore, I.L.; Carmo, M.C.R. do; Cunha, M.E.P.R. da; Resende, C.M.C.

    1986-01-01

    Three cases of metaphyseal giant cell tumor are presented. A review of the literature is done, demostrating the lesion is rare and that there are few articles about it. Age incidence and characteristics of the tumor are discussed. (Author) [pt

  6. Giant CP stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loden, L.O.; Sundman, A.

    1989-01-01

    This study is part of an investigation of the possibility of using chemically peculiar (CP) stars to map local galactic structure. Correct luminosities of these stars are therefore crucial. CP stars are generally regarded as main-sequence or near-main-sequence objects. However, some CP stars have been classified as giants. A selection of stars, classified in literature as CP giants, are compared to normal stars in the same effective temperature interval and to ordinary 'non giant' CP stars. There is no clear confirmation of a higher luminosity for 'CP giants', than for CP stars in general. In addition, CP characteristics seem to be individual properties not repeated in a component star or other cluster members. (author). 50 refs., 5 tabs., 3 figs

  7. (1) Majorana fermions in pinned vortices; (2) Manipulating and probing Majorana fermions using superconducting circuits; and (3) Controlling a nanowire spin-orbit qubit via electric-dipole spin resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nori, Franco

    2014-03-01

    We study a heterostructure which consists of a topological insulator and a superconductor with a hole. This system supports a robust Majorana fermion state bound to the vortex core. We study the possibility of using scanning tunneling spectroscopy (i) to detect the Majorana fermion in this setup and (ii) to study excited states bound to the vortex core. The Majorana fermion manifests itself as an H-dependent zero-bias anomaly of the tunneling conductance. The excited states spectrum differs from the spectrum of a typical Abrikosov vortex, providing additional indirect confirmation of the Majorana state observation. We also study how to manipulate and probe Majorana fermions using super-conducting circuits. In we consider a semiconductor nanowire quantum dot with strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC), which can be used to achieve a spin-orbit qubit. In contrast to a spin qubit, the spin-orbit qubit can respond to an external ac electric field, i.e., electric-dipole spin resonance. We develop a theory that can apply in the strong SOC regime. We find that there is an optimal SOC strength ηopt = √ 2/2, where the Rabi frequency induced by the ac electric field becomes maximal. Also, we show that both the level spacing and the Rabi frequency of the spin-orbit qubit have periodic responses to the direction of the external static magnetic field. These responses can be used to determine the SOC in the nanowire. FN is partly supported by the RIKEN CEMS, iTHES Project, MURI Center for Dynamic Magneto-Optics, JSPS-RFBR Contract No. 12-02-92100, Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (S), MEXT Kakenhi on Quantum Cybernetics, and the JSPS via its FIRST program.

  8. ORBITAL INJURIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Kansky

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Orbit is involved in 40% of all facial fractures. There is considerable variety in severity, ranging from simple nondisplaced to complex comminuted fractures. Complex comminuted fractures (up to 20% are responsible for the majority of complications and unfavorable results. Orbital fractures are classified as internal orbital fractures, zygomatico-orbital fractures, naso-orbito-ethmoidal fractures and combined fractures. The ophtalmic sequelae of midfacial fractures are usually edema and ecchymosis of the soft tissues, subconjuctival hemorrhage, diplopia, iritis, retinal edema, ptosis, enophthalmos, ocular muscle paresis, mechanical restriction of ocular movement and nasolacrimal disturbances. More severe injuries such as optic nerve trauma and retinal detachments have also been reported. Within the wide range of orbital fractures small group of complex fractures causes most of the sequelae. Therefore identification of severe injuries and adequate treatment is of major importance. The introduction of craniofacial techniques made possible a wide exposure even of large orbital wall defects and their reconstruction by bone grafts. In spite of significant progress, repair of complex orbital wall defects remains a problem even for the experienced surgeons.Results. In 1999 121 facial injuries were treated at our department (Clinical Centre Ljubljana Dept. Of Maxillofacial and Oral Surgery. Orbit was involved in 65% of cases. Isolated inner orbital fractures presented 4% of all fractures. 17 (14% complex cases were treated, 5 of them being NOE, 5 orbital (frame and inner walls, 3 zygomatico-orbital, 2 FNO and 2 maxillo-orbital fractures.Conclusions. Final result of the surgical treatment depends on severity of maxillofacial trauma. Complex comminuted fractures are responsable for most of the unfavorable results and ocular function is often permanently damaged (up to 75% in these fractures.

  9. Congenital orbital encephalocele, orbital dystopia, and exophthalmos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Han Joon

    2012-07-01

    We present here an exceedingly rare variant of a nonmidline basal encephalocele of the spheno-orbital type, and this was accompanied with orbital dystopia in a 56-year-old man. On examination, his left eye was located more inferolaterally than his right eye, and the patient said this had been this way since his birth. The protrusion of his left eye was aggravated when he is tired. His naked visual acuity was 0.7/0.3, and the ocular pressure was 14/12 mm Hg. The exophthalmometry was 10/14 to 16 mm. His eyeball motion was not restricted, yet diplopia was present in all directions. The distance from the midline to the medial canthus was 20/15 mm. The distance from the midline to the midpupillary line was 35/22 mm. The vertical dimension of the palpebral fissure was 12/9 mm. The height difference of the upper eyelid margin was 11 mm, and the height difference of the lower eyelid margin was 8 mm. Facial computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed left sphenoid wing hypoplasia and herniation of the left anterior temporal pole and dura mater into the orbit, and this resulted into left exophthalmos and encephalomalacia in the left anterior temporal pole. To the best of our knowledge, our case is the second case of basal encephalocele and orbital dystopia.

  10. [Orbital inflammation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouriaux, F; Coffin-Pichonnet, S; Robert, P-Y; Abad, S; Martin-Silva, N

    2014-12-01

    Orbital inflammation is a generic term encompassing inflammatory pathologies affecting all structures within the orbit : anterior (involvement up to the posterior aspect of the globe), diffuse (involvement of intra- and/or extraconal fat), apical (involvement of the posterior orbit), myositis (involvement of only the extraocular muscles), dacryoadenitis (involvement of the lacrimal gland). We distinguish between specific inflammation and non-specific inflammation, commonly referred to as idiopathic inflammation. Specific orbital inflammation corresponds to a secondary localization of a "generalized" disease (systemic or auto-immune). Idiopathic orbital inflammation corresponds to uniquely orbital inflammation without generalized disease, and thus an unknown etiology. At the top of the differential diagnosis for specific or idiopathic orbital inflammation are malignant tumors, represented most commonly in the adult by lympho-proliferative syndromes and metastases. Treatment of specific orbital inflammation begins with treatment of the underlying disease. For idiopathic orbital inflammation, treatment (most often corticosteroids) is indicated above all in cases of visual loss due to optic neuropathy, in the presence of pain or oculomotor palsy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. THE McDONALD OBSERVATORY PLANET SEARCH: NEW LONG-PERIOD GIANT PLANETS AND TWO INTERACTING JUPITERS IN THE HD 155358 SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, Paul; Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D.; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Brugamyer, Erik J.; Barnes, Stuart I.; Caldwell, Caroline; Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Horner, J.; Simon, Attila E.

    2012-01-01

    We present high-precision radial velocity (RV) observations of four solar-type (F7-G5) stars—HD 79498, HD 155358, HD 197037, and HD 220773—taken as part of the McDonald Observatory Planet Search Program. For each of these stars, we see evidence of Keplerian motion caused by the presence of one or more gas giant planets in long-period orbits. We derive orbital parameters for each system and note the properties (composition, activity, etc.) of the host stars. While we have previously announced the two-gas-giant HD 155358 system, we now report a shorter period for planet c. This new period is consistent with the planets being trapped in mutual 2:1 mean-motion resonance. We therefore perform an in-depth stability analysis, placing additional constraints on the orbital parameters of the planets. These results demonstrate the excellent long-term RV stability of the spectrometers on both the Harlan J. Smith 2.7 m telescope and the Hobby-Eberly telescope.

  12. MASSIVE SATELLITES OF CLOSE-IN GAS GIANT EXOPLANETS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassidy, Timothy A.; Johnson, Robert E.; Mendez, Rolando; Arras, Phil; Skrutskie, Michael F.

    2009-01-01

    We study the orbits, tidal heating and mass loss from satellites around close-in gas giant exoplanets. The focus is on large satellites which are potentially observable by their transit signature. We argue that even Earth-size satellites around hot Jupiters can be immune to destruction by orbital decay; detection of such a massive satellite would strongly constrain theories of tidal dissipation in gas giants, in a manner complementary to orbital circularization. The star's gravity induces significant periodic eccentricity in the satellite's orbit. The resulting tidal heating rates, per unit mass, are far in excess of Io's and dominate radioactive heating out to planet orbital periods of months for reasonable satellite tidal Q. Inside planet orbital periods of about a week, tidal heating can completely melt the satellite. Lastly, we compute an upper limit to the satellite mass loss rate due to thermal evaporation from the surface, valid if the satellite's atmosphere is thin and vapor pressure is negligible. Using this upper limit, we find that although rocky satellites around hot Jupiters with orbital periods less than a few days can be significantly evaporated in their lifetimes, detectable satellites suffer negligible mass loss at longer orbital periods.

  13. PLANETS AROUND THE K-GIANTS BD+20 274 AND HD 219415

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gettel, S.; Wolszczan, A.; Niedzielski, A.; Nowak, G.; Adamów, M.; Zieliński, P.; Maciejewski, G.

    2012-01-01

    We present the discovery of planet-mass companions to two giant stars by the ongoing Penn State-Toruń Planet Search conducted with the 9.2 m Hobby-Eberly Telescope. The less massive of these stars, K5-giant BD+20 274, has a 4.2 M J minimum mass planet orbiting the star at a 578 day period and a more distant, likely stellar-mass companion. The best currently available model of the planet orbiting the K0-giant HD 219415 points to a ∼> Jupiter-mass companion in a 5.7 year, eccentric orbit around the star, making it the longest period planet yet detected by our survey. This planet has an amplitude of ∼18 m s –1 , comparable to the median radial velocity 'jitter', typical of giant stars.

  14. EFFECTS OF DYNAMICAL EVOLUTION OF GIANT PLANETS ON SURVIVAL OF TERRESTRIAL PLANETS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Soko; Ida, Shigeru; Nagasawa, Makiko

    2013-01-01

    The orbital distributions of currently observed extrasolar giant planets allow marginally stable orbits for hypothetical, terrestrial planets. In this paper, we propose that many of these systems may not have additional planets on these ''stable'' orbits, since past dynamical instability among giant planets could have removed them. We numerically investigate the effects of early evolution of multiple giant planets on the orbital stability of the inner, sub-Neptune-like planets which are modeled as test particles, and determine their dynamically unstable region. Previous studies have shown that the majority of such test particles are ejected out of the system as a result of close encounters with giant planets. Here, we show that secular perturbations from giant planets can remove test particles at least down to 10 times smaller than their minimum pericenter distance. Our results indicate that, unless the dynamical instability among giant planets is either absent or quiet like planet-planet collisions, most test particles down to ∼0.1 AU within the orbits of giant planets at a few AU may be gone. In fact, out of ∼30% of survived test particles, about three quarters belong to the planet-planet collision cases. We find a good agreement between our numerical results and the secular theory, and present a semi-analytical formula which estimates the dynamically unstable region of the test particles just from the evolution of giant planets. Finally, our numerical results agree well with the observations, and also predict the existence of hot rocky planets in eccentric giant planet systems.

  15. Secondary resonances and the boundary of effective stability of Trojan motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Páez, Rocío Isabel; Efthymiopoulos, Christos

    2018-02-01

    One of the most interesting features in the libration domain of co-orbital motions is the existence of secondary resonances. For some combinations of physical parameters, these resonances occupy a large fraction of the domain of stability and rule the dynamics within the stable tadpole region. In this work, we present an application of a recently introduced `basic Hamiltonian model' H_b for Trojan dynamics (Páez and Efthymiopoulos in Celest Mech Dyn Astron 121(2):139, 2015; Páez et al. in Celest Mech Dyn Astron 126:519, 2016): we show that the inner border of the secondary resonance of lowermost order, as defined by H_b, provides a good estimation of the region in phase space for which the orbits remain regular regardless of the orbital parameters of the system. The computation of this boundary is straightforward by combining a resonant normal form calculation in conjunction with an `asymmetric expansion' of the Hamiltonian around the libration points, which speeds up convergence. Applications to the determination of the effective stability domain for exoplanetary Trojans (planet-sized objects or asteroids) which may accompany giant exoplanets are discussed.

  16. Planets around the evolved stars 24 Boötis and γ Libra: A 30 d-period planet and a double giant-planet system in possible 7:3 MMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takarada, Takuya; Sato, Bun'ei; Omiya, Masashi; Harakawa, Hiroki; Nagasawa, Makiko; Izumiura, Hideyuki; Kambe, Eiji; Takeda, Yoichi; Yoshida, Michitoshi; Itoh, Yoichi; Ando, Hiroyasu; Kokubo, Eiichiro; Ida, Shigeru

    2018-05-01

    We report the detection of planets around two evolved giant stars from radial velocity measurements at Okayama Astrophysical observatory. 24 Boo (G3 IV) has a mass of 0.99 M_{⊙}, a radius of 10.64 R_{⊙}, and a metallicity of [Fe/H] = -0.77. The star hosts one planet with a minimum mass of 0.91 MJup and an orbital period of 30.35 d. The planet has one of the shortest orbital periods among those ever found around evolved stars using radial-velocity methods. The stellar radial velocities show additional periodicity with 150 d, which can probably be attributed to stellar activity. The star is one of the lowest-metallicity stars orbited by planets currently known. γ Lib (K0 III) is also a metal-poor giant with a mass of 1.47 M_{⊙}, a radius of 11.1 R_{⊙}, and [Fe/H] = -0.30. The star hosts two planets with minimum masses of 1.02 MJup and 4.58 MJup, and periods of 415 d and 964 d, respectively. The star has the second-lowest metallicity among the giant stars hosting more than two planets. Dynamical stability analysis for the γ Lib system sets the minimum orbital inclination angle to be about 70° and suggests that the planets are in 7:3 mean-motion resonance, though the current best-fitting orbits for the radial-velocity data are not totally regular.

  17. Orbital benign and malignant lymphoproliferative disorders: Differentiation using semi-quantitative and quantitative analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Hao; Xu, Xiao-Quan; Liu, Hu; Hong, Xun-Ning; Shi, Hai-Bin; Wu, Fei-Yun

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the value of dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI) in differentiating benign from malignant orbital lymphoproliferative disorders (OLPDs). Methods: Thirty-nine patients with orbital lymphoproliferative disorders (21 malignant and 18 benign) underwent DCE-MRI scan for pre-treatment evaluation from March 2013 to December 2015. Both semi-quantitative (TTP, AUC, Slope max ) and quantitative (K trans , k ep , v e ) parameters were calculated, and compared between two groups. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses were used to determine the diagnostic value of each significant parameter. Results: Malignant OLPDs showed significantly higher k ep , lower v e , and lower AUC than benign OLPDs, while no significant differences were found on K trans , TTP and Slope max . ROC analyses indicated that v e exhibited the best diagnostic performance in predicting malignant OLPDs (cutoff value, 0.211; area under the curve, 0.896; sensitivity, 76.2%; specificity, 94.9%), followed by k ep (cutoff value, 0.853; area under the curve, 0.839; sensitivity, 85.7%; specificity, 89.9%). Conclusion: DCE-MRI and specially its derived quantitative parameters of k ep and v e are promising metrics for differentiating malignant from benign OLPDs.

  18. Orbital benign and malignant lymphoproliferative disorders: Differentiation using semi-quantitative and quantitative analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Hao; Xu, Xiao-Quan [Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Liu, Hu [Department of Ophthalmology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Hong, Xun-Ning; Shi, Hai-Bin [Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Wu, Fei-Yun, E-mail: wfydd_njmu@163.com [Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China)

    2017-03-15

    Objectives: To assess the value of dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI) in differentiating benign from malignant orbital lymphoproliferative disorders (OLPDs). Methods: Thirty-nine patients with orbital lymphoproliferative disorders (21 malignant and 18 benign) underwent DCE-MRI scan for pre-treatment evaluation from March 2013 to December 2015. Both semi-quantitative (TTP, AUC, Slope{sub max}) and quantitative (K{sup trans}, k{sub ep}, v{sub e}) parameters were calculated, and compared between two groups. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses were used to determine the diagnostic value of each significant parameter. Results: Malignant OLPDs showed significantly higher k{sub ep}, lower v{sub e}, and lower AUC than benign OLPDs, while no significant differences were found on K{sup trans}, TTP and Slope{sub max}. ROC analyses indicated that v{sub e} exhibited the best diagnostic performance in predicting malignant OLPDs (cutoff value, 0.211; area under the curve, 0.896; sensitivity, 76.2%; specificity, 94.9%), followed by k{sub ep} (cutoff value, 0.853; area under the curve, 0.839; sensitivity, 85.7%; specificity, 89.9%). Conclusion: DCE-MRI and specially its derived quantitative parameters of k{sub ep} and v{sub e} are promising metrics for differentiating malignant from benign OLPDs.

  19. Giant hepatic regenerative nodules in Alagille syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapp, Jordan B.; Bellah, Richard D.; Anupindi, Sudha A.; Maya, Carolina; Pawel, Bruce R.

    2017-01-01

    Children with Alagille syndrome undergo surveillance radiologic examinations as they are at risk for developing cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. There is limited literature on the imaging of liver masses in Alagille syndrome. We report the ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of incidental benign giant hepatic regenerative nodules in this population. To describe the imaging findings of giant regenerative nodules in patients with Alagille syndrome. A retrospective search of the hospital database was performed to find all cases of hepatic masses in patients with Alagille syndrome during a 10-year period. Imaging, clinical charts, laboratory data and available pathology were reviewed and analyzed and summarized for each patient. Twenty of 45 patients with confirmed Alagille syndrome had imaging studies. Of those, we identified six with giant focal liver masses. All six patients had large central hepatic masses that were remarkably similar on US and MRI, in addition to having features of cirrhosis. In each case, the mass was located in hepatic segment VIII and imaging showed the mass splaying the main portal venous branches at the hepatic hilum, as well as smaller portal and hepatic venous branches coursing through them. On MRI, signal intensity of the mass was isointense to liver on T1-weighted sequences in four of six patients, but hyperintense on T1 in two of six patients. In all six cases, the mass was hypointense on T2- weighted sequences. The mass post-contrast was isointense to adjacent liver in all phases in five the cases. Five out of six patients had pathological correlation demonstrating preserved ductal architecture confirming the final diagnosis of a regenerative nodule. Giant hepatic regenerative nodules with characteristic US and MR features can occur in patients with Alagille syndrome with underlying cirrhosis. Recognizing these lesions as benign giant hepatic regenerative nodules should, thereby, mitigate any need for

  20. Giant hepatic regenerative nodules in Alagille syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, Jordan B. [Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University, Department of Radiology, Temple University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bellah, Richard D.; Anupindi, Sudha A. [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Maya, Carolina [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Pawel, Bruce R. [University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-02-15

    Children with Alagille syndrome undergo surveillance radiologic examinations as they are at risk for developing cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. There is limited literature on the imaging of liver masses in Alagille syndrome. We report the ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of incidental benign giant hepatic regenerative nodules in this population. To describe the imaging findings of giant regenerative nodules in patients with Alagille syndrome. A retrospective search of the hospital database was performed to find all cases of hepatic masses in patients with Alagille syndrome during a 10-year period. Imaging, clinical charts, laboratory data and available pathology were reviewed and analyzed and summarized for each patient. Twenty of 45 patients with confirmed Alagille syndrome had imaging studies. Of those, we identified six with giant focal liver masses. All six patients had large central hepatic masses that were remarkably similar on US and MRI, in addition to having features of cirrhosis. In each case, the mass was located in hepatic segment VIII and imaging showed the mass splaying the main portal venous branches at the hepatic hilum, as well as smaller portal and hepatic venous branches coursing through them. On MRI, signal intensity of the mass was isointense to liver on T1-weighted sequences in four of six patients, but hyperintense on T1 in two of six patients. In all six cases, the mass was hypointense on T2- weighted sequences. The mass post-contrast was isointense to adjacent liver in all phases in five the cases. Five out of six patients had pathological correlation demonstrating preserved ductal architecture confirming the final diagnosis of a regenerative nodule. Giant hepatic regenerative nodules with characteristic US and MR features can occur in patients with Alagille syndrome with underlying cirrhosis. Recognizing these lesions as benign giant hepatic regenerative nodules should, thereby, mitigate any need for

  1. RE-INFLATED WARM JUPITERS AROUND RED GIANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, Eric D. [Institute for Astronomy, Royal Observatory Edinburgh, University of Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Fortney, Jonathan J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2016-02-10

    Since the discovery of the first transiting hot Jupiters, models have sought to explain the anomalously large radii of highly irradiated gas giants. We now know that the size of hot Jupiter radius anomalies scales strongly with a planet's level of irradiation and numerous models like tidal heating, ohmic dissipation, and thermal tides have since been developed to help explain these inflated radii. In general, however, these models can be grouped into two broad categories: models that directly inflate planetary radii by depositing a fraction of the incident irradiation into the interior and models that simply slow a planet's radiative cooling, allowing it to retain more heat from formation and thereby delay contraction. Here we present a new test to distinguish between these two classes of models. Gas giants orbiting at moderate orbital periods around post-main-sequence stars will experience enormous increases to their irradiation as their host stars move up the sub-giant and red-giant branches. If hot Jupiter inflation works by depositing irradiation into the planet's deep interiors then planetary radii should increase in response to the increased irradiation. This means that otherwise non-inflated gas giants at moderate orbital periods of >10 days can re-inflate as their host stars evolve. Here we explore the circumstances that can lead to the creation of these “re-inflated” gas giants and examine how the existence or absence of such planets can be used to place unique constraints on the physics of the hot Jupiter inflation mechanism. Finally, we explore the prospects for detecting this potentially important undiscovered population of planets.

  2. Giant Electric Field Control of Magnetism and Narrow Ferromagnetic Resonance Linewidth in FeCoSiB/Si/SiO2/PMN PT Multiferroic Heterostructures (Open Access Author’s Manuscript)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-06

    the widely used lead zirconate titanate ceramics which have a typical piezoelectric coefficient d31 of ~- 200pC/N, PMN-PT single crystals used in...substrate clamping effect, therefore, a relatively giant tunability can be obtained. However, the normally large roughness of piezoelectric layer...is the saturation magnetostriction constant, Y the Young’s modulus of the magnetic film, deff the effective piezoelectric coefficient, E

  3. Giant adrenal cyst - a case report and classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitaki, Sergio Augusto Munhoz; Louveira, Maria Helena

    1999-01-01

    Cystic lesions of the adrenal gland are relatively rare, but they must be considering in the differential diagnosis of abdominal masses. The authors report a case of a giant adrenal cyst assessed by ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, and outline their features and classification. (author)

  4. Giant cell tumor of soft tissue: a case report with emphasis on MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Moon Young; Jee, Won-Hee [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Seocho-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Chan Kwon [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Pathology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Seocho-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Ie Ryung [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Seocho-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Yang-Guk [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Seocho-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-03

    Giant cell tumor of soft tissue is a rare neoplasm, histologically resembling giant cell tumor of bone. In this report, we describe a deep and solid giant cell tumor of soft tissue interpreted as a benign soft tissue tumor based on magnetic resonance (MR) findings with hypointense to intermediate signals on T2-weighted images and impeded diffusivity (water movement) on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), which could suggest a giant-cell-containing benign soft tissue tumor, despite the malignancy suggested by {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography in a 35-year-old male. To our knowledge, this report introduces the first deep, solid giant cell tumor of soft tissue with MR features of a giant-cell-containing benign soft tissue tumor, despite the malignancy-mimicking findings on {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT. (orig.)

  5. Giant Congenital Melanocytic Nevus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Bo Sonnich; Henriksen, Trine Foged; Kølle, Stig-Frederik Trojahn

    2015-01-01

    Giant congenital melanocytic nevi (GCMN) occur in 1:20,000 livebirths and are associated with increased risk of malignant transformation. The treatment of GCMN from 1981 to 2010 in a tertiary referral center was reviewed evaluating the modalities used, cosmetic results, associated complications...

  6. Waking the Sleeping Giant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ollenburger, Mary H.; Descheemaeker, Katrien; Crane, Todd A.; Sanogo, Ousmane M.; Giller, Ken E.

    2016-01-01

    The World Bank argued that West Africa's Guinea Savannah zone forms part of “Africa's Sleeping Giant,” where increases in agricultural production could be an engine of economic growth, through expansion of cultivated land in sparsely populated areas. The district of Bougouni, in southern Mali,

  7. from the Giant Panda

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-03

    Jun 3, 2009 ... 1College of Life Science, China West Normal University, 44# Yuying Road, 637002, Nanchong, China. 2Zhan Jiang educational ... in Escherichia coli and the RPS28 protein fusioned with the N-terminally GST -tagged protein gave rise ... long Conservation Center of the Giant Panda, Sichuan, China. The.

  8. Giant scrotal elephantiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuepper, Daniel

    2005-02-01

    How much can a man carry? Penoscrotal elephantiasis is a debilitating syndrome. This is a case report of a patient with giant genital elephantiasis secondary to long-standing lymphogranuloma venereum infection in Ethiopia. Complete surgical resection of the pathologic tissue and penile reconstruction was undertaken with good cosmetic and functional results.

  9. Giant vesical calculus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Giant vesical calculus. A case report. H. H. LAUBSCHER. Summary. An exceptional case of bladder stone is presented. The case is unusual as regards the size of the stone and the fact that the patient did··not seek medical assistance much earlier, as this was readily avail- able. Furthermore, recovery after removal of the.

  10. Juvenile giant fibroadenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipul Yagnik

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Fibroadenomas are benign solid tumor associated with aberration of normal lobular development. Juvenile giant fibroadenoma is usually single and >5 cm in size /or >500 gms in weight. Important differential diagnoses are: phyllodes tumor and juvenile gigantomastia. Simple excision is the treatment of choice.

  11. Giant abdominal cystic lymphangioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, V.; Florencio, I.; Boluda, F.

    1996-01-01

    We present a case of giant abdominal cystic lymphangioma in a 10-year-old boy. Despite numerous consultations with physicians to identify the underlying problem, it had originally been attributed to ascites of unknown cause. We review the characteristics of this lesion and the diagnostic features that aid in differentiating it from ascites

  12. Giant peritoneal loose bodies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-03-27

    Mar 27, 2015 ... not be familiar with the entity, can potentially be confused with malignant or parasitic lesions. Familiarity with their characteristic computed tomographic ... preventing unnecessary surgical intervention in an asymptomatic patient.3,4 It is important to differentiate giant peritoneal loose bodies from lesions such ...

  13. A Secular Resonant Origin for the Loneliness of Hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalding, Christopher; Batygin, Konstantin

    2017-09-01

    Despite decades of inquiry, the origin of giant planets residing within a few tenths of an astronomical unit from their host stars remains unclear. Traditionally, these objects are thought to have formed further out before subsequently migrating inwards. However, the necessity of migration has been recently called into question with the emergence of in situ formation models of close-in giant planets. Observational characterization of the transiting subsample of close-in giants has revealed that “warm” Jupiters, possessing orbital periods longer than roughly 10 days more often possess close-in, co-transiting planetary companions than shorter period “hot” Jupiters, that are usually lonely. This finding has previously been interpreted as evidence that smooth, early migration or in situ formation gave rise to warm Jupiter-hosting systems, whereas more violent, post-disk migration pathways sculpted hot Jupiter-hosting systems. In this work, we demonstrate that both classes of planet may arise via early migration or in situ conglomeration, but that the enhanced loneliness of hot Jupiters arises due to a secular resonant interaction with the stellar quadrupole moment. Such an interaction tilts the orbits of exterior, lower-mass planets, removing them from transit surveys where the hot Jupiter is detected. Warm Jupiter-hosting systems, in contrast, retain their coplanarity due to the weaker influence of the host star’s quadrupolar potential relative to planet-disk interactions. In this way, hot Jupiters and warm Jupiters are placed within a unified theoretical framework that may be readily validated or falsified using data from upcoming missions, such as TESS.

  14. Orbital transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oertel, H. Jr.; Koerner, H.

    1993-01-01

    The Third Aerospace Symposium in Braunschweig presented, for the first time, the possibility of bringing together the classical disciplines of aerospace engineering and the natural science disciplines of meteorology and air chemistry in a european setting. In this way, aspects of environmental impact on the atmosphere could be examined quantitatively. An essential finding of the european conference, is the unrestricted agreement of the experts that the given launch frequencies of the present orbital transport result in a negligible amount of pollutants being released in the atmosphere. The symposium does, however, call attention to the increasing need to consider the effect of orbital and atmospheric environmental impact of a future increase in launch frequencies of orbital transport in connection with future space stations. The Third Aerospace Symposium, 'Orbital Transport, Technical, Meteorological and Chemical Aspects', constituted a first forum of discussion for engineers and scientists. Questions of new orbital transport technologies and their environmental impact were to be discussed towards a first consensus. Through the 34 reports and articles, the general problems of space transportation and environmental protection were addressed, as well as particular aspects of high temperatures during reentry in the atmosphere of the earth, precision navigation of flight vehicles or flow behavior and air chemistry in the stratosphere. (orig./CT). 342 figs

  15. Pervasive orbital eccentricities dictate the habitability of extrasolar earths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Ryosuke; Rasio, Frederic; Takeda, Genya

    2010-09-01

    The long-term habitability of Earth-like planets requires low orbital eccentricities. A secular perturbation from a distant stellar companion is a very important mechanism in exciting planetary eccentricities, as many of the extrasolar planetary systems are associated with stellar companions. Although the orbital evolution of an Earth-like planet in a stellar binary system is well understood, the effect of a binary perturbation on a more realistic system containing additional gas-giant planets has been very little studied. Here, we provide analytic criteria confirmed by a large ensemble of numerical integrations that identify the initial orbital parameters leading to eccentric orbits. We show that an extrasolar earth is likely to experience a broad range of orbital evolution dictated by the location of a gas-giant planet, which necessitates more focused studies on the effect of eccentricity on the potential for life.

  16. Microwave plasmatrons for giant integrated circuit processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrin, A.B.

    2000-02-01

    A method for calculating the interaction of a powerful microwave with a plane layer of magnetoactive low-pressure plasma under conditions of electron cyclotron resonance is presented. In this paper, the plasma layer is situated between a plane dielectric layer and a plane metal screen. The calculation model contains the microwave energy balance, particle balance, and electron energy balance. The equation that expressed microwave properties of nonuniform magnetoactive plasma is found. The numerical calculations of the microwave-plasma interaction for a one-dimensional model of the problem are considered. Applications of the results for microwave plasmatrons designed for processing giant integrated circuits are suggested.

  17. Giant tubercular brainstem abscess: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragati Chigurupati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tubercular brain abscesses are uncommon and tubercular brainstem abscesses are rarely reported. Most of these cases occur in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of giant brainstem abscess in a 5-year-old human immunodeficiency virus-seronegative female child who presented with complaints of headache, diplopia and unsteadiness of gait since 6 months. Diagnosis was made by a magnetic resonance imaging scan of brain. The patient demonstrated a remarkable clinical recovery after microsurgery combined with a course of antituberculous therapy. Microbiological and histological findings confirmed the diagnosis of a tuberculous abscess.

  18. PLUTINO DETECTION BIASES, INCLUDING THE KOZAI RESONANCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawler, S. M.; Gladman, B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 6224 Agricultural Road, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    Because of their relative proximity within the trans-Neptunian region, the plutinos (objects in the 3:2 mean-motion resonance with Neptune) are numerous in flux-limited catalogs, and well-studied theoretically. We perform detailed modeling of the on-sky detection biases for plutinos, with special attention to those that are simultaneously in the Kozai resonance. In addition to the normal 3:2 resonant argument libration, Kozai plutinos also show periodic oscillations in eccentricity and inclination, coupled to the argument of perihelion ({omega}) oscillation. Due to the mean-motion resonance, plutinos avoid coming to pericenter near Neptune's current position in the ecliptic plane. Because Kozai plutinos are restricted to certain values of {omega}, perihelion always occurs out of the ecliptic plane, biasing ecliptic surveys against finding these objects. The observed Kozai plutino fraction f{sub koz}{sup obs} has been measured by several surveys, finding values between 8% and 25%, while the true Kozai plutino fraction f{sub koz}{sup true} has been predicted to be between 10% and 30% by different giant planet migration simulations. We show that f{sub koz}{sup obs} varies widely depending on the ecliptic latitude and longitude of the survey, so debiasing to find the true ratio is complex. Even a survey that covers most or all of the sky will detect an apparent Kozai fraction that is different from f{sub koz}{sup true}. We present a map of the on-sky plutino Kozai fraction that would be detected by all-sky flux-limited surveys. This will be especially important for the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope projects, which may detect large numbers of plutinos as they sweep the sky. f{sub koz}{sup true} and the distribution of the orbital elements of Kozai plutinos may be a diagnostic of giant planet migration; future migration simulations should provide details on their resonant Kozai populations.

  19. Migration of planetesimals during last stages of giant planet accumulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ipatov, S.I.

    1989-01-01

    The migration and accumulation of bodies from the giant planet's feeding zones are investigated after the main part of mass of these planets had been formed. These investigations are based on the computer simulation results for the evolving spatial disks which initially consisted of a few almost formed planets and hundreds of identical bodies in Uranus and Neptune zone. It is shown that the total mass of bodies penetrated in the asteroid zone from the giant planet zones could be ten times as large as the Earth mass. The beyond-Neptune belt could form during accumulation of the giant planets. Evolution of the planet orbits under encounters of planets with planetesimals is investigated

  20. Capture of terrestrial-sized moons by gas giant planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Darren M

    2013-04-01

    Terrestrial moons with masses >0.1 M (symbol in text) possibly exist around extrasolar giant planets, and here we consider the energetics of how they might form. Binary-exchange capture can occur if a binary-terrestrial object (BTO) is tidally disrupted during a close encounter with a giant planet and one of the binary members is ejected while the other remains as a moon. Tidal disruption occurs readily in the deep gravity wells of giant planets; however, the large encounter velocities in the wells make binary exchange more difficult than for planets of lesser mass. In addition, successful capture favors massive binaries with large rotational velocities and small component mass ratios. Also, since the interaction tends to leave the captured moons on highly elliptical orbits, permanent capture is only possible around planets with sizable Hill spheres that are well separated from their host stars.

  1. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery for giant polyps of the rectum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levic, K; Bulut, O; Hesselfeldt, P

    2014-01-01

    in the rectum. We present our results with TEM in the removal of giant polyps equal or greater than 4 cm in diameter. METHODS: In the period between 1998 and 2012, TEM was performed in 39 patients with rectal polyps measuring at least 4 cm in diameter. Transrectal ultrasound and/or magnetic resonance imaging......, these recurrences were treated with endoscopic removal or re-TEM. The remaining 5 underwent total mesorectal excision and/or chemotherapy. CONCLUSIONS: Full-thickness TEM provides a safe and efficient treatment for excision of giant polyps. In case of unexpected cancer, TEM can be curative. Local recurrence can...

  2. Giant duodenal ulcers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eric Benjamin Newton; Mark R Versland; Thomas E Sepe

    2008-01-01

    Giant duodenal ulcers (GDUs) are a subset of duodenal ulcers that have historically resulted in greater morbidity than usual duodenal ulcers. Until recently,few cases had been successfully treated with medical therapy. However, the widespread use of endoscopy,the introduction of H-2 receptor blockers and proton pump inhibitors, and the improvement in surgical techniques all have revolutionized the diagnosis,treatment and outcome of this condition. Nevertheless,GDUs are still associated with high rates of morbidity,mortality and complications. Thus, surgical evaluation of a patient with a GDU should remain an integral part of patient care. These giant variants, while usually benign, can frequently harbor malignancy. A careful review of the literature highlights the important differences when comparing GDUs to classical peptic ulcers and why they must be thought of differently than their more common counterpart.

  3. Multispin giant magnons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobev, N. P.; Rashkov, R. C.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate giant magnons from classical rotating strings in two different backgrounds. First we generalize the solution of Hofman and Maldacena and investigate new magnon excitations of a spin chain which are dual to a string on RxS 5 with two nonvanishing angular momenta. Allowing string dynamics along the third angle in the five sphere, we find a dispersion relation that reproduces the Hofman and Maldacena one and the one found by Dorey for the two spin case. In the second part of the paper we generalize the two 'spin' giant magnon to the case of β-deformed AdS 5 xS 5 background. We find agreement between the dispersion relation of the rotating string and the proposed dispersion relation of the magnon bound state on the spin chain

  4. Red giants seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosser, B.; Samadi, R.; Belkacem, K.

    2013-11-01

    The space-borne missions CoRoT and Kepler are indiscreet. With their asteroseismic programs, they tell us what is hidden deep inside the stars. Waves excited just below the stellar surface travel throughout the stellar interior and unveil many secrets: how old is the star, how big, how massive, how fast (or slow) its core is dancing. This paper intends to paparazze the red giants according to the seismic pictures we have from their interiors.

  5. Giant Otters in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Schenk C.; Staib E.

    1992-01-01

    We are in the second year of fieldwork surveying for Giant Otters in the southeastern rainforest of Peru, in three areas with differing levels of legal protection. While there is some illegal hunting still happening outside the protected areas, the main threat to the otters is badly-conducted tourism. Well-organised tourism can be a promising argument for establishing protected areas like national parks.

  6. Intraoral giant condyloma acuminatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta R

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available A case of intraoral giant condyloma acuminatum is reported in a 50- year- old Indian. He did not respond to topical application of podophyllin 20% but responded partially to electric cauterisation. Surgical excision was done to get rid of the warty growh completely. Since there were no skin or genital lesions and no history of marital or extramarital sexual contact the lesion was probably acquired from environmental sources. Nonsexual transmission should be considered especially when the lesions are extragenital.

  7. Giant prolactinomas in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delgrange, Etienne; Raverot, Gerald; Bex, Marie

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterise distinctive clinical features of giant prolactinomas in women. DESIGN: A multicentre, retrospective case series and literature review. METHODS: We collected data from 15 female patients with a pituitary tumour larger than 4 cm and prolactin levels above 1000 μg/l and id......OBJECTIVE: To characterise distinctive clinical features of giant prolactinomas in women. DESIGN: A multicentre, retrospective case series and literature review. METHODS: We collected data from 15 female patients with a pituitary tumour larger than 4 cm and prolactin levels above 1000 μg....../l and identified 19 similar cases from the literature; a gender-based comparison of the frequency and age distribution was obtained from a literature review. RESULTS: The initial PubMed search using the term 'giant prolactinomas' identified 125 patients (13 women) responding to the inclusion criteria. The female......:male ratio was 1:9. Another six female patients were found by extending the literature search, while our own series added 15 patients. The median age at diagnosis was 44 years in women compared with 35 years in men (Pwomen (n=34), we...

  8. Inner Super-Earths, Outer Gas Giants: How Pebble Isolation and Migration Feedback Keep Jupiters Cold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Jeffrey; Lee, Eve J.

    2018-06-01

    The majority of gas giants (planets of masses ≳102 M ⊕) are found to reside at distances beyond ∼1 au from their host stars. Within 1 au, the planetary population is dominated by super-Earths of 2–20 M ⊕. We show that this dichotomy between inner super-Earths and outer gas giants can be naturally explained should they form in nearly inviscid disks. In laminar disks, a planet can more easily repel disk gas away from its orbit. The feedback torque from the pile-up of gas inside the planet’s orbit slows down and eventually halts migration. A pressure bump outside the planet’s orbit traps pebbles and solids, starving the core. Gas giants are born cold and stay cold: more massive cores are preferentially formed at larger distances, and they barely migrate under disk feedback. We demonstrate this using two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of disk–planet interaction lasting up to 105 years: we track planet migration and pebble accretion until both come to an end by disk feedback. Whether cores undergo runaway gas accretion to become gas giants or not is determined by computing one-dimensional gas accretion models. Our simulations show that in an inviscid minimum mass solar nebula, gas giants do not form inside ∼0.5 au, nor can they migrate there while the disk is present. We also explore the dependence on disk mass and find that gas giants form further out in less massive disks.

  9. Computed tomographic features of orbital lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, C.M. de; Hoch, H.; Azevedo, M. de L.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this m anuscript is to present the use of CT in the evaluation of 42 cases of orbital lesions studied at the National Institute of Cancer in an one year and half period. Correlation with clinical and pathological data was performed and the results compared with those of the literature. Four cases of rare lesions are shown: alveolar soft tissue sarcoma, giant cell tumor and hematogenic metastatic deposits of a clear cell sarcoma and epidermoid carcinoma. The value of CT in the evaluation of all orbital masses is emphasized. (author) [pt

  10. Long Term Evolution of Planetary Systems with a Terrestrial Planet and a Giant Planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgakarakos, Nikolaos; Dobbs-Dixon, Ian; Way, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    We study the long term orbital evolution of a terrestrial planet under the gravitational perturbations of a giant planet. In particular, we are interested in situations where the two planets are in the same plane and are relatively close. We examine both possible configurations: the giant planet orbit being either outside or inside the orbit of the smaller planet. The perturbing potential is expanded to high orders and an analytical solution of the terrestrial planetary orbit is derived. The analytical estimates are then compared against results from the numerical integration of the full equations of motion and we find that the analytical solution works reasonably well. An interesting finding is that the new analytical estimates improve greatly the predictions for the timescales of the orbital evolution of the terrestrial planet compared to an octupole order expansion. Finally, we briefly discuss possible applications of the analytical estimates in astrophysical problems.

  11. Multicentric Giant Cell Tumor of Bone: Synchronous and Metachronous Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiner Wirbel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 27-year-old man treated 2.5 years ago for synchronous multicentric giant cell tumor of bone located at the right proximal humerus and the right 5th finger presented now with complaints of pain in his right hip and wrist of two-month duration. Radiology and magnetic resonance revealed multicentric giant cell tumor lesions of the right proximal femur, the left ileum, the right distal radius, and the left distal tibia. The patient has an eighteen-year history of a healed osteosarcoma of the right tibia that was treated with chemotherapy, resection, and allograft reconstruction. A literature review establishes this as the first reported case of a patient with synchronous and metachronous multicentric giant cell tumor who also has a history of osteosarcoma.

  12. Giant Ulcerative Dermatofibroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turgut Karlidag

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatofibroma is a slowly growing common benign cutaneous tumor characterized by hard papules and nodules. The rarely seen erosions and ulcerations may cause difficulties in the diagnosis. Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, which is clinically and histopathologically of malignant character, displays difficulties in the diagnosis since it has similarities with basal cell carcinoma, epidermoid carcinoma, and sarcomas. Head and neck involvement is very rare. In this study, a giant dermatofibroma case, which is histopathologically, ulcerative dermatofibroma, the biggest lesion of the head and neck region and seen rarely in the literature that has characteristics similar to dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, has been presented.

  13. GIANT PROSTHETIC VALVE THROMBUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth Kumar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical prosthetic valves are predisposed to bleeding, thrombosis & thromboembolic complications. Overall incidence of thromboembolic complications is 1% per year who are on oral anticoagulants, whereas bleeding complications incidence is 0.5% to 6.6% per year. 1, 2 Minimization of Scylla of thromboembolic & Charybdis of bleeding complication needs a balancing act of optimal antithrombotic therapy. We are reporting a case of middle aged male patient with prosthetic mitral valve presenting in heart failure. Patient had discontinued anticoagulants, as he had subdural hematoma in the past. He presented to our institute with a giant prosthetic valve thrombus.

  14. A Giant Urethral Calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigdel, G; Agarwal, A; Keshaw, B W

    2014-01-01

    Urethral calculi are rare forms of urolithiasis. Majority of the calculi are migratory from urinary bladder or upper urinary tract. Primary urethral calculi usually occur in presence of urethral stricture or diverticulum. In this article we report a case of a giant posterior urethral calculus measuring 7x3x2 cm in a 47 years old male. Patient presented with acute retention of urine which was preceded by burning micturition and dribbling of urine for one week. The calculus was pushed in to the bladder through the cystoscope and was removed by suprapubic cystolithotomy.

  15. Giant paraganglioma in

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alka Gupta

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Paraganglioma is a rare neuroendocrine catecholamine producing tumour in childhood which arises outside the adrenal medulla. We present a 12 year old girl with giant paraganglioma with severe hypertension and end organ damage. Diagnosis was confirmed with 24 h urinary Vanillymandelic Acid (VMA and CT scan. Preoperative blood pressure was controlled with intravenous nitroprusside, and oral prazosin, amlodepine, labetalol and metoprolol. General anaesthesia with epidural analgesia was given. Intra operative blood pressure rise was managed with infusion of nitriglycerine (NTG, esmolol, nitroprusside and propofol.

  16. GIANT INTRACANALICULAR FIBROADENOMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Clyn; Parsons, Robert J.; Bogart, William M.

    1951-01-01

    Five cases of giant intracanalicular fibroadenoma (“cystosarcoma phylloides”) were observed at one hospital in a period of three years. In a search of the literature, additional reports of breast tumors of this kind, not included in previous reviews, were noted. As there is record of 229 cases, it would appear that this rapidly growing benign tumor should be kept in mind in the diagnosis of masses in the breast. If removal is incomplete, there may be recurrence. Simple mastectomy is the treatment of choice. Radical mastectomy should be avoided. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2.Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:14848732

  17. ZZ-CENPL, Chinese Evaluated Nuclear Parameter Library. ZZ CENPL-DLS, Discrete Level Schemes and Gamma Branching Ratios Library; ZZ CENPL-FBP, Fission Barrier Parameter Library; ZZ CENPL-GDRP, Giant Dipole Resonance Parameter Library; ZZ CENPL-NLD, Nuclear Level Density Parameter Library; ZZ CENPL-MCC, Nuclear Ground State Atomic Masses Library; ZZ CENPL-OMP, Optical Model Parameter Library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Zongdi

    1995-01-01

    Description of program or function: CENPL - GDRP (Giant Dipole Resonance Parameters for Gamma-Ray): - Format: special format described in documentation; - Nuclides: V, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Rh, Pd, Ag, Cd, In, Sn, Sb, Te, I, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Ho, Er, Lu, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, Pt, Au, Hg, Pb, Bi, Th, U, Np, Pu. - Origin: Experimental values offered by S.S. Dietrich and B.L. Berman. CENPL - FBP (Fission Barrier Parameter Sub-Library): - Format: special format described in documentation; - Nuclides: (1) 51 nuclei region from Th-230 to Cf-255, (2) 46 nuclei region from Th-229 to Cf-253, (3) 24 nuclei region from Pa-232 to Cf-253; - Origin: (1) Lynn, (2) Analysis of experimental data by Back et al., (3) Ohsawa. CENPL - DLS (Discrete level scheme and branch ratio of gamma decay: - Format: Special format described in documentation; - Origin: ENSDF - BNL. CENPL - NLD (Nuclear Level Density): - Format: Special format described in documentation; - Origin: Huang Zhongfu et al. CENPL - OMP (Optical model parameter sub-library): - Format: special format described in documentation ; - Origin: CENDL, ENDF/B-VI, JENDL-3. CENPL - MC (I) and (II) (Atomic masses and characteristic constants for nuclear ground states) : - Format: Brief table format; - Nuclides: 4760 nuclides ranging from Z=0 A=1 to Z=122 A=318. - Origin: Experimental data and systematic results evaluated by Wapstra, theoretical results calculated by Moller, ENSDF - BNL and Nuclear Wallet Cards. CENPL contains the following six sub-libraries: 1. Atomic Masses and Characteristic Constants for nuclear ground states (MCC). This data consists of calculated and in most cases also measured mass excesses, atomic masses, total binding energies, spins, parities, and half-lives of nuclear ground states, abundances, etc. for 4800 nuclides. 2. Discrete Level Schemes and branching ratios of gamma decay (DLS). The data on nuclear discrete levels are based on the Evaluated

  18. Orbit analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michelotti, L.

    1995-01-01

    The past fifteen years have witnessed a remarkable development of methods for analyzing single particle orbit dynamics in accelerators. Unlike their more classic counterparts, which act upon differential equations, these methods proceed by manipulating Poincare maps directly. This attribute makes them well matched for studying accelerators whose physics is most naturally modelled in terms of maps, an observation that has been championed most vigorously by Forest. In the following sections the author sketchs a little background, explains some of the physics underlying these techniques, and discusses the best computing strategy for implementing them in conjunction with modeling accelerators

  19. Brane orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Bergshoeff, Eric A; Riccioni, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    We complete the classification of half-supersymmetric branes in toroidally compactified IIA/IIB string theory in terms of representations of the T-duality group. As a by-product we derive a last wrapping rule for the space-filling branes. We find examples of T-duality representations of branes in lower dimensions, suggested by supergravity, of which none of the component branes follow from the reduction of any brane in ten-dimensional IIA/IIB string theory. We discuss the constraints on the charges of half-supersymmetric branes, determining the corresponding T-duality and U-duality orbits.

  20. Orbit analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelotti, L.

    1995-01-01

    The past fifteen years have witnessed a remarkable development of methods for analyzing single particle orbit dynamics in accelerators. Unlike their more classic counterparts, which act upon differential equations, these methods proceed by manipulating Poincare maps directly. This attribute makes them well matched for studying accelerators whose physics is most naturally modelled in terms of maps, an observation that has been championed most vigorously by Forest. In the following sections the author sketchs a little background, explains some of the physics underlying these techniques, and discusses the best computing strategy for implementing them in conjunction with modeling accelerators.