WorldWideScience

Sample records for orbit stability

  1. Orbit Stabilization of Nanosat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JOHNSON,DAVID J.

    1999-12-01

    An algorithm is developed to control a pulsed {Delta}V thruster on a small satellite to allow it to fly in formation with a host satellite undergoing time dependent atmospheric drag deceleration. The algorithm uses four short thrusts per orbit to correct for differences in the average radii of the satellites due to differences in drag and one thrust to symmetrize the orbits. The radial difference between the orbits is the only input to the algorithm. The algorithm automatically stabilizes the orbits after ejection and includes provisions to allow azimuthal positional changes by modifying the drag compensation pulses. The algorithm gives radial and azimuthal deadbands of 50 cm and 3 m for a radial measurement accuracy of {+-} 5 cm and {+-} 60% period variation in the drag coefficient of the host. Approaches to further reduce the deadbands are described. The methodology of establishing a stable orbit after ejection is illustrated in an appendix. The results show the optimum ejection angle to minimize stabilization thrust is upward at 86{sup o} from the orbital velocity. At this angle the stabilization velocity that must be supplied by the thruster is half the ejection velocity. An ejection velocity of 0.02 m/sat 86{sup o} gives an azimuthal separation after ejection and orbit stabilization of 187 m. A description of liquid based gas thrusters suitable for the satellite control is included in an appendix.

  2. Orbit stability in billiards in magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Kovács, Z

    1997-01-01

    We study the stability properties of orbits in dispersing billiards in a homogeneous magnetic field by using a modified formalism based on the Bunimovich-Sinai curvature (horocycle method). We identify simple periodic orbits that can be stabilized by the magnetic field in the four-disk model and the square-lattice Lorentz gas. The stable orbits can play a key role in determining the transport properties of these models.

  3. Stability of Frozen Orbits Around Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso Dos Santos, Josué; Vilhena de Moraes, R.; Carvalho, J. S.

    2013-05-01

    Abstract (2,250 Maximum Characters): A planetary satellite of interest at the present moment for the scientific community is Europa, one of the four largest moons of Jupiter. There are some missions planned to visit Europa in the next years, for example, Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO, NASA) and Jupiter IcyMoon Explorer (JUICE, ESA). In this work we are formulating theories and constructing computer programs to be used in the design of aerospace tasks as regards the stability of artificial satellite orbits around planetary satellites. The studies are related to translational motion of orbits around planetary satellites considering polygenic perturbations due to forces, such as the nonspherical shape of the central body and the perturbation of the third body. The equations of motion will be developed in closed form to avoid expansions in eccentricity and inclination. For a description of canonical formalism are used the Delaunay canonical variables. The canonical set of equations, which are nonlinear differential equations, will be used to study the stability of orbits around Europa. We will use a simplified dynamic model, which considers the effects caused by non-uniform distribution of mass of Europa (J2, J3 and C22) and the gravitational attraction of Jupiter. Emphasis will be given to the case of frozen orbits, defined as having almost constant values of eccentricity, inclination, and argument of pericentre. An approach will be used to search for frozen orbits around planetary satellites and study their stability by applying a process of normalization of Hamiltonian. Acknowledges: FAPESP

  4. Study of orbit stability in the SSRF storage ring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Zhi-Min; LIU Gui-Min; HUANG Nan

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, analysis of the beam orbit stability and conceptual study of the dynamic orbit feedback inthe SSRF storage ring are presented. It is shown that beam orbit position movement at the photon source points issmaller than the orbit stability requirements in horizontal plane, but exceeds the orbit stability requirements in verticalplane. A dynamic global orbit feedback system, which consists of 38 high-bandwidth air-coil correctors and 40high-precise BPMs, is proposed to suppress the vertical beam orbit position movement. Numerical simulations showthat this dynamic orbit feedback system can stabilize the vertical beam orbit position movement in the frequencyrange up to 100 Hz.

  5. Stability of pulsar rotational and orbital periods

    CERN Document Server

    Kopeikin, Sergei

    2009-01-01

    Millisecond and binary pulsars are the most stable astronomical standards of frequency. They can be applied to solving a number of problems in astronomy and time-keeping metrology including the search for a stochastic gravitational wave background in the early universe, testing general relativity, and establishing a new time-scale. The full exploration of pulsar properties requires that proper unbiased estimates of spin and orbital parameters of the pulsar be obtained. These estimates depend essentially on the random noise components present in pulsar timing residuals. The instrumental white noise has predictable statistical properties and makes no harm for interpretation of timing observations, while the astrophysical/geophysical low-frequency noise corrupts them, thus, reducing the quality of tests of general relativity and decreasing the stability of the pulsar time scale.

  6. Lunar Orbit Stability for Small Satellite Mission Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dono, Andres

    2015-01-01

    The irregular nature of the lunar gravity field will severely affect the orbit lifetime and behavior of future lunar small satellite missions. These spacecraft need stable orbits that do not require large deltaV budgets for station-keeping maneuvers. The initial classical elements of any lunar orbit are critical to address its stability and to comply with mission requirements. This publication identifies stable regions according to different initial conditions at the time of lunar orbit insertion (LOI). High fidelity numerical simulations with two different gravity models were performed. We focus in low altitude orbits where the dominant force in orbit propagation is the existence of unevenly distributed lunar mass concentrations. These orbits follow a periodic oscillation in some of the classical elements that is particularly useful for mission design. A set of orbital maintenance strategies for various mission concepts is presented.

  7. Analytic robust stability analysis of SVD orbit feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Pfingstner, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Orbit feedback controllers are indispensable for the operation of modern particle accelerators. Many such controllers are based on the decoupling of the inputs and outputs of the system to be controlled with the help of the singular value decomposition (SVD controller). It is crucial to verify the stability of SVD controllers, also in the presence of mismatches between the used accelerator model and the real machine (robust stability problem). In this paper, analytical criteria for guaranteed stability margins of SVD orbit feedback systems for three different types of model mismatches are presented: scaling errors of actuators and BPMs (beam position monitors) and additive errors of the orbit response matrix. For the derivation of these criteria, techniques from robust control theory have been used, e.g the small gain theorem. The obtained criteria can be easily applied directly to other SVD orbit feedback systems. As an example, the criteria were applied to the orbit feedback system of the Compact Linear ...

  8. Stability of Stellar Systems Orbiting SgrA*

    CERN Document Server

    Kahil, Magd E

    2015-01-01

    Path equations of different orbiting objects in the presence of very strong gravitational fields are essential to examine the impact of its gravitational effect on the stability of each system. Implementing an analogous method, used to examine the stability of planetary systems by solving the geodesic deviation equations to obtain a finite value of the magnitude of its corresponding deviation vectors. Thus, in order to know whether a system is stable or not, the solution of corresponding deviation equations may give an indication about the status of the stability for orbiting systems.Accordingly, two questions must be addressed based on the status of stability of stellar objects orbiting super-massive black holes in the galactic center. 1. Would the deviation equations play the same relevant role of orbiting planetary systems for massive spinning objects such as neutron stars or black holes? 2. What type of field theory which describes such a strong gravitational field ?

  9. Circular orbits, Lyapunov stability and Manev-type forces

    CERN Document Server

    Blaga, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    In this article we study the stability in the sense of Lyapunov of the circular orbits in the generalized Manev two bodies problem. First, we explore the existence of the circular orbits and determine their radius. Then, using the first integrals of motion we build a positive definite function, known as a Lyapunov function. It's existence proves that the circular orbit is stable in the sense of Lyapunov. In the end, we consider several real systems of two bodies and compare the characteristics of the circular orbits in Newtonian and modified Manev gravitational field, arguing about our possibilities to observe the differences between the motion in these two fields.

  10. Orbital stability of Gausson solutions to logarithmic Schrodinger equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex H. Ardila

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article we prove of the orbital stability of the ground state for logarithmic Schrodinger equation in any dimension and under nonradial perturbations. This general stability result was announced by Cazenave and Lions [9, Remark II.3], but no details were given there.

  11. Long-Term Stability of Horseshoe Orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Ćuk, Matija; Holman, Matthew J

    2012-01-01

    Unlike Trojans, horseshoe coorbitals are not generally considered to be long-term stable (Dermott and Murray, 1981; Murray and Dermott, 1999). As the lifetime of Earth's and Venus's horseshoe coorbitals is expected to be about a Gyr, we investigated the possible contribution of late-escaping inner planet coorbitals to the lunar Late Heavy Bombardment. Contrary to analytical estimates, we do not find many horseshoe objects escaping after first 100 Myr. In order to understand this behaviour, we ran a second set of simulations featuring idealized planets on circular orbits with a range of masses. We find that horseshoe coorbitals are generally long lived (and potentially stable) for systems with primary-to-secondary mass ratios larger than about 1200. This is consistent with results of Laughlin and Chambers (2002) for equal-mass pairs or coorbital planets and the instability of Jupiter's horseshoe companions (Stacey and Connors, 2008). Horseshoe orbits at smaller mass ratios are unstable because they must approa...

  12. Stabilities of asteroid orbits in resonances

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A map of the asteroid motion is studied carefully. An exponential diffusion law in the chaotic sea and an algebraic law in the mixed region are observed. The effects of perturbations on diffusion are also discussed. The fixed points, their stabilities and the diffusion properties of the map give qualitative explanations of the distribution of asteroids, i.e. the depletion and accumulation of asteroids in the outer main belt, particularly in the first order mean motion resonances with Jupiter.

  13. Long-term orbital stability of exosolar planetary systems with highly eccentric orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadou, Kyriaki I

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, many extrasolar planetary systems possessing at least one planet on a highly eccentric orbit have been discovered. In this work, we study the possible long-term stability of such systems. We consider the general three body problem as our model. Highly eccentric orbits are out of the Hill stability regions. However, mean motion resonances can provide phase protection and orbits with long-term stability exist. We construct maps of dynamical stability based on the computation of chaotic indicators and we figure out regions in phase space, where the long-term stability is guaranteed. We focus on regions where at least one planet is highly eccentric and attempt to associate them with the existence of stable periodic orbits. The values of the orbital elements, which are derived from observational data, are often given with very large deviations. Generally, phase space regions of high eccentricities are narrow and thus, our dynamical analysis may restrict considerably the valid domain of the system's locat...

  14. Long-term orbital stability of exosolar planetary systems with highly eccentric orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniadou, Kyriaki I.; Voyatzis, George

    2016-10-01

    Nowadays, many extrasolar planetary systems possessing at least one planet on a highly eccentric orbit have been discovered. In this work, we study the possible long-term stability of such systems. We consider the general three body problem as our model. Highly eccentric orbits are out of the Hill stability regions. However, mean motion resonances can provide phase protection and orbits with long-term stability exist. We construct maps of dynamical stability based on the computation of chaotic indicators and we figure out regions in phase space, where the long-term stability is guaranteed. We focus on regions where at least one planet is highly eccentric and attempt to associate them with the existence of stable periodic orbits. The values of the orbital elements, which are derived from observational data, are often given with very large deviations. Generally, phase space regions of high eccentricities are narrow and thus, our dynamical analysis may restrict considerably the valid domain of the system's location.

  15. Exomoon habitability constrained by energy flux and orbital stability

    CERN Document Server

    Heller, René

    2012-01-01

    Detecting massive satellites of extrasolar planets has now become feasible, which led naturally to questions about their habitability. In a previous study we presented constraints on the habitability of moons from stellar and planetary illumination as well as from tidal heating. Here I refine our model by including the effect of eclipses on the orbit-averaged illumination. Moons in low-mass stellar systems must orbit their planet very closely to remain bound, which puts them at risk of strong tidal heating. I first describe the effect of eclipses on stellar illumination of satellites. Then I calculate the orbit-averaged energy flux including illumination from the planet and tidal heating. Habitability is defined by a scaling relation at which a moon loses its water by the runaway greenhouse process. As a working hypothesis, orbital stability is assumed if the moon's orbital period is less than 1/9 of the planet's orbital period. Due to eclipses, a satellite in a close orbit can experience a reduction in orbit...

  16. Linear and nonlinear stability of periodic orbits in annular billiards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmann, Carl P; Fain, Vitaly

    2017-04-01

    An annular billiard is a dynamical system in which a particle moves freely in a disk except for elastic collisions with the boundary and also a circular scatterer in the interior of the disk. We investigate the stability properties of some periodic orbits in annular billiards in which the scatterer is touching or close to the boundary. We analytically show that there exist linearly stable periodic orbits of an arbitrary period for scatterers with decreasing radii that are located near the boundary of the disk. As the position of the scatterer moves away from a symmetry line of a periodic orbit, the stability of periodic orbits changes from elliptic to hyperbolic, corresponding to a saddle-center bifurcation. When the scatterer is tangent to the boundary, the periodic orbit is parabolic. We prove that slightly changing the reflection angle of the orbit in the tangential situation leads to the existence of Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser islands. Thus, we show that there exists a decreasing to zero sequence of open intervals of scatterer radii, along which the billiard table is not ergodic.

  17. Long-term stability of orbits in storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warnock, R.L.; Ruth, R.D.

    1990-06-01

    We describe a numerical method to establish long-term bounds on nonlinear Hamiltonian motion. By bounding the change in a nearly constant action variable, uniformly in initial condition, one can predict stability for N turns by tracking many orbits for a member of turns of N{sub 0} much less than N. In a first application to a model sextupole lattice in a region of strong nonlinearity, we predict stability of betatron motion in two degrees of freedom for 10{sup 8} turns. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Orbital stability zones about asteroids. II - The destabilizing effects of eccentric orbits and of solar radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.; Burns, Joseph A.

    1992-03-01

    Recently, Hamilton and Burns (1991) characterized the size and shape of a stability zone around an asteroid on a circular heliocentric orbit within which asteroid material could remain bound for an extended period of time. The present paper considers two additional effects: the asteroid's nonzero heliocentric eccentricity and solar radiation pressure. Results of numerical analyses show that, for an asteroid on an eccentric orbit, the stability zone scales roughly as the size of the Hill sphere calculated at the asteroid's pericenter. It was also found that solar radiation pressure is a very efficient mechanism for removing small (on the order of 0.1 mm) particles from circular asteroidal zone. Particles larger than a few centimeters are only slightly affected by radiation pressure. The results are applied to the Gaspra 951 asteroid.

  19. LHC Beam Stability and Feedback Control - Orbit and Energy -

    CERN Document Server

    Steinhagen, R J

    2007-01-01

    This report presents the stability and control of the Large Hadron Collider's (LHC) two beam orbits and their particle momenta using beam-based feedback systems. The LHC, presently being built at CERN, will store, accelerate and provide particle collisions with a maximum particle momentum of 7TeV/c and a nominal luminosity of L = 10^34 cm^−2s^−1. The presence of two beams, with both high intensity as well as high particle energies, requires excellent control of particle losses inside a superconducting environment, which will be provided by the LHC Cleaning and Machine Protection System. The performance and function of this and other systems depends critically on the stability of the beam and may eventually limit the LHC performance. Environmental and accelerator-inherent sources as well as failure of magnets and their power converters may perturb and reduce beam stability and may consequently lead to an increase of particle loss inside the cryogenic mass. In order to counteract these disturbances, c...

  20. Aerodynamic Stability of Satellites in Elliptic Low Earth Orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Bailey, Matthew; Mancas, Stefan C; Udrea, Bogdan; Umeadi, Uchenna

    2013-01-01

    Topical observations of the thermosphere at altitudes below $200 \\, km$ are of great benefit in advancing the understanding of the global distribution of mass, composition, and dynamical responses to geomagnetic forcing, and momentum transfer via waves. The perceived risks associated with such low altitude and short duration orbits has prohibited the launch of Discovery-class missions. Miniaturization of instruments such as mass spectrometers and advances in the nano-satellite technology, associated with relatively low cost of nano-satellite manufacturing and operation, open an avenue for performing low altitude missions. The time dependent coefficients of a second order non-homogeneous ODE which describes the motion have a double periodic shape. Hence, they will be approximated using Jacobi elliptic functions. Through a change of variables the original ODE will be converted into Hill's ODE for stability analysis using Floquet theory. We are interested in how changes in the coefficients of the ODE affect the ...

  1. Orbital stability of the restricted three body problem in General Relativity

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    We consider the problem of orbital stability of the motion of a test particle in the restricted three-body problem, by using the orbital moment and its time derivative. We show that it is possible to get some insight into the stability properties of the motion of test particles, without knowing the exact solutions of the motion equations.

  2. Orbital stability of the restricted three-body problem in General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abishev, M.; Quevedo, H.; Toktarbay, S.; Zhami, B.

    We consider the problem of orbital stability of the motion of a test particle in the restricted three-body problem, by using the orbital moment and its time derivative. We show that it is possible to get some insight into the stability properties of the motion of test particles, without knowing the exact solutions of the motion equations.

  3. Orbital stability of the restricted three body problem in General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Abishev, M; Toktarbay, S; Zhami, B

    2015-01-01

    We consider the problem of orbital stability of the motion of a test particle in the restricted three-body problem, by using the orbital moment and its time derivative. We show that it is possible to get some insight into the stability properties of the motion of test particles, without knowing the exact solutions of the motion equations.

  4. Existence,Orbital Stability and Instability of Solitary Waves for Coupled BBM Equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-wei Cui

    2009-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the orbital stability/instability of solitary waves for coupled BBM equations which have Hamiltonian form.The explicit solitary wave solutions will be worked out first.Then by detailed spectral analysis and decaying estimates of solutions for the initial value problem,we obtain the orbital stability/instability of solitary waves.

  5. On the dynamical stability of the proposed planetary system orbiting NSVS 14256825

    CERN Document Server

    Wittenmyer, Robert A; Marshall, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    We present a detailed dynamical analysis of the orbital stability of the two circumbinary planets recently proposed to orbit the evolved eclipsing binary star system NSVS 14256825. As is the case for other recently proposed circumbinary planetary systems detected through the timing of mutual eclipses between the central binary stars, the proposed planets do not stand up to dynamical scrutiny. The proposed orbits for the two planets are extremely unstable on timescales of less than a thousand years, regardless of the mutual inclination between the planetary orbits. For the scenario where the planetary orbits are coplanar, a small region of moderate stability was observed, featuring orbits that were somewhat protected from destabilisation by the influence of mutual 2:1 mean-motion resonance between the orbits of the planets. Even in this stable region, however, the systems tested typically only survived on timescales of order 1 million years, far shorter than the age of the system. Our results suggest that, if ...

  6. Stability of orbits around planetary satellites considering a disturbing body in an elliptical orbit: Applications to Europa and Ganymede

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso dos Santos, Josué; Carvalho, Jean Paulo; Vilhena de Moraes, Rodolpho

    Europa and Ganymede are two of the four Jupiter’s moons which compose the Galilean satellite. These ones are planetary satellites of greater interest at the present moment among the scientific community. There are some missions being planned to visit them and and the Jovian system. One of them is the cooperation between NASA and ESA for the Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM). In this mission are planned the insertion of the spacecrafts JEO (Jupiter Europa Orbiter) and JGO (Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter) into Europa and Ganymede’s orbit. Thus, there is a great necessity for having a better comprehension of the dynamics of the orbits around this planetary satellite. This comprehension is essential for the success of this type of mission. In this context, this work aims to perform a search for low-altitude orbits around these planetary satellites. An emphasis is given in polar orbits. These orbits can be useful in the planning of aerospace activities to be conducted around this planetary satellite, with respect to the stability of orbits of artificial satellites. The study considers orbits of an artificial satellite around Europa and Ganymede under the influence of the third-body perturbation (the gravitational attraction of Jupiter) and the polygenic perturbations. These last ones occur due to forces such as the non-uniform distribution of mass (J2 and J3) of the main (central) body. A simplified dynamic model for polygenic perturbations is used. A new model for the third-body disturbance is presented considering it in an elliptical orbit. The Lagrange planetary equations, which compose a system of nonlinear differential equations, are used to describe the orbital motion of the artificial satellite around Ganymede. The equations showed here are developed in closed form to avoid expansions in inclination and eccentricity.

  7. Static and dynamic stability analysis of the space shuttle vehicle-orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chyu, W. J.; Cavin, R. K.; Erickson, L. L.

    1978-01-01

    The longitudinal static and dynamic stability of a Space Shuttle Vehicle-Orbiter (SSV Orbiter) model is analyzed using the FLEXSTAB computer program. Nonlinear effects are accounted for by application of a correction technique in the FLEXSTAB system; the technique incorporates experimental force and pressure data into the linear aerodynamic theory. A flexible Orbiter model is treated in the static stability analysis for the flight conditions of Mach number 0.9 for rectilinear flight (1 g) and for a pull-up maneuver (2.5 g) at an altitude of 15.24 km. Static stability parameters and structural deformations of the Orbiter are calculated at trim conditions for the dynamic stability analysis, and the characteristics of damping in pitch are investigated for a Mach number range of 0.3 to 1.2. The calculated results for both the static and dynamic stabilities are compared with the available experimental data.

  8. Pilot-wave dynamics in a harmonic potential: Quantization and stability of circular orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labousse, M.; Oza, A. U.; Perrard, S.; Bush, J. W. M.

    2016-03-01

    We present the results of a theoretical investigation of the dynamics of a droplet walking on a vibrating fluid bath under the influence of a harmonic potential. The walking droplet's horizontal motion is described by an integro-differential trajectory equation, which is found to admit steady orbital solutions. Predictions for the dependence of the orbital radius and frequency on the strength of the radial harmonic force field agree favorably with experimental data. The orbital quantization is rationalized through an analysis of the orbital solutions. The predicted dependence of the orbital stability on system parameters is compared with experimental data and the limitations of the model are discussed.

  9. Pilot-wave dynamics in a harmonic potential: Quantization and stability of circular orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Labousse, Matthieu; Perrard, Stéhane; Bush, John W M

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a theoretical investigation of the dynamics of a droplet walking on a vibrating fluid bath under the influence of a harmonic potential. The walking droplet's horizontal motion is described by an integro-differential trajectory equation, which is found to admit steady orbital solutions. Predictions for the dependence of the orbital radius and frequency on the strength of the radial harmonic force field agree favorably with experimental data. The orbital quantization is rationalized through an analysis of the orbital solutions. The predicted dependence of the orbital stability on system parameters is compared with experimental data and the limitations of the model are discussed.

  10. Orbital Eccentricity and the Stability of Planets in the Alpha Centauri System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissauer, Jack

    2016-01-01

    Planets on initially circular orbits are typically more dynamically stable than planets initially having nonzero eccentricities. However, the presence of a major perturber that forces periodic oscillations of planetary eccentricity can alter this situation. We investigate the dependance of system lifetime on initial eccentricity for planets orbiting one star within the alpha Centauri system. Our results show that initial conditions chosen to minimize free eccentricity can substantially increase stability compared to planets on circular orbits.

  11. Design and Stability of an On-Orbit Attitude Control System Using Reaction Control Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Robert A.; Hough, Steven; Orphee, Carolina; Clements, Keith

    2016-01-01

    NASA is providing preliminary design and requirements for the Space Launch System Exploration Upper Stage (EUS). The EUS will provide upper stage capability for vehicle ascent as well as on-orbit control capability. Requirements include performance of on-orbit burn to provide Orion vehicle with escape velocity. On-orbit attitude control is accommodated by a on-off Reaction Control System (RCS). Paper provides overview of approaches for design and stability of an attitude control system using a RCS.

  12. On the Conditions for the Orbitally Asymptotical Stability of the Almost

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@This paper studies the behaviors of the solutions in the vicinity of a givenalmost periodic solution of the autonomous system x′=f(x), x Rn , (1) where f C1 (Rn ,Rn ). Since the periodic solutions of the autonomous system are not Liapunov asymptotic stable, we consider the weak orbitally stability.   For the planar autonomous systems (n=2), the classical result of orbitally stability about its periodic solution with period w belongs to Poincare, i.e.

  13. Orbital stability of coplanar two-planet exosystems with high eccentricities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniadou, Kyriaki I.; Voyatzis, George

    2016-10-01

    The long-term stability of the evolution of two-planet systems is considered by using the general three body problem (GTBP). Our study is focused on the stability of systems with adjacent orbits when at least one of them is highly eccentric. In these cases, in order for close encounters, which destabilize the planetary systems, to be avoided, phase protection mechanisms should be considered. Additionally, since the GTBP is a non-integrable system, chaos may also cause the destabilization of the system after a long time interval. By computing dynamical maps, based on Fast Lyapunov Indicator, we reveal regions in phase space with stable orbits even for very high eccentricities (e > 0.5). Such regions are present in mean motion resonances (MMRs). We can determine the position of the exact MMR through the computation of families of periodic orbits in a rotating frame. Elliptic periodic orbits are associated with the presence of apsidal corotation resonances (ACRs). When such solutions are stable, they are associated with neighbouring domains of initial conditions that provide long-term stability. We apply our methodology so that the evolution of planetary systems of highly eccentric orbits is assigned to the existence of such stable domains. Particularly, we study the orbital evolution of the extrasolar systems HD 82943, HD 3651, HD 7449, HD 89744 and HD 102272 and discuss the consistency between the orbital elements provided by the observations and the dynamical stability.

  14. Orbital Stability of Solitary Waves of The Long Wave—Short Wave Resonance Equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BolingGUO; LinCHEN

    1996-01-01

    This paper concerns the orbital stability for soliary waves of the long wave short wave resonance equations.By using a different method from[15] ,applying the abstract rsults of Grillakis et al.[8][9] and detailed spectral analysis.we obtain the necessary and sufficient condition for the stability of the solitary waves.

  15. Orbital stability of periodic traveling-wave solutions for the log-KdV equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natali, Fábio; Pastor, Ademir; Cristófani, Fabrício

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we establish the orbital stability of periodic waves related to the logarithmic Korteweg-de Vries equation. Our motivation is inspired in the recent work [3], in which the authors established the well-posedness and the linear stability of Gaussian solitary waves. By using the approach put forward recently in [20] to construct a smooth branch of periodic waves as well as to get the spectral properties of the associated linearized operator, we apply the abstract theories in [13] and [25] to deduce the orbital stability of the periodic traveling waves in the energy space.

  16. Continuation and stability deduction of resonant periodic orbits in three dimensional systems

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadou, Kyriaki I; Varvoglis, Harry

    2014-01-01

    In dynamical systems of few degrees of freedom, periodic solutions consist the backbone of the phase space and the determination and computation of their stability is crucial for understanding the global dynamics. In this paper we study the classical three body problem in three dimensions and use its dynamics to assess the long-term evolution of extrasolar systems. We compute periodic orbits, which correspond to exact resonant motion, and determine their linear stability. By computing maps of dynamical stability we show that stable periodic orbits are surrounded in phase space with regular motion even in systems with more than two degrees of freedom, while chaos is apparent close to unstable ones. Therefore, families of stable periodic orbits, indeed, consist backbones of the stability domains in phase space.

  17. Control and stability problems of remote orbital capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, M. H.; Nadkarni, A. A.

    1977-01-01

    Certain space shuttle missions may require retrieval of passive spinning and precessing satellites. One proposed means of retrieval utilizes a free-flying teleoperator launched from the shuttle. A study of misalignment, stability, and certain control aspects during capture of an object is reported here. The approach used is to model the dynamics by a Lagrangian formulation and apply torque components to dissipate motion. Differential angular rates between teleoperator and object are assumed, and control responses after capture are reviewed.

  18. Variational Approach to the Orbital Stability of Standing Waves of the Gross-Pitaevskii Equation

    KAUST Repository

    Hadj Selem, Fouad

    2014-08-26

    This paper is concerned with the mathematical analysis of a masssubcritical nonlinear Schrödinger equation arising from fiber optic applications. We show the existence and symmetry of minimizers of the associated constrained variational problem. We also prove the orbital stability of such solutions referred to as standing waves and characterize the associated orbit. In the last section, we illustrate our results with few numerical simulations. © 2014 Springer Basel.

  19. Orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Guochang

    2008-01-01

    This is the first book of the satellite era which describes orbit theory with analytical solutions of the second order with respect to all possible disturbances. Based on such theory, the algorithms of orbits determination are completely revolutionized.

  20. The Proposed Quadruple System SZ Herculis: Revised LITE Model and Orbital Stability Study

    CERN Document Server

    Hinse, T C; Lee, J W; Haghighipour, N; Lee, C -U

    2012-01-01

    In a recent study, Lee et al. presented new photometric follow-up timing observations of the semi-detached binary system SZ Herculis and proposed the existence of two hierarchical cirumbinary companions. Based on the light-travel time effect, the two low-mass M-dwarf companions are found to orbit the binary pair on moderate to high eccentric orbits. The derived periods of these two companions are close to a 2:1 mean-motion orbital resonance. We have studied the stability of the system using the osculating orbital elements as presented by Lee et al. Results indicate an orbit-crossing architecture exhibiting short-term dynamical instabilities leading to the escape of one of the proposed companions. We have examined the system's underlying model parameter-space by following a Monte Carlo approach and found an improved fit to the timing data. A study of the stability of our best-fitting orbits also indicates that the proposed system is generally unstable. If the observed anomalous timing variations of the binary ...

  1. Formation of Wide-orbit Gas Giants Near the Stability Limit in Multi-stellar Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, A.; Ida, S.

    2017-09-01

    We have investigated the formation of a circumstellar wide-orbit gas giant planet in a multiple stellar system. We consider a model of orbital circularization for the core of a giant planet after it is scattered from an inner disk region by a more massive planet, which was proposed by Kikuchi et al. We extend their model for single star systems to binary (multiple) star systems, by taking into account tidal truncation of the protoplanetary gas disk by a binary companion. As an example, we consider a wide-orbit gas giant in a hierarchical triple system, HD131399Ab. The best-fit orbit of the planet is that with semimajor axis ˜80 au and eccentricity ˜0.35. As the binary separation is ˜350 au, it is very close to the stability limit, which is puzzling. With the original core location ˜20-30 au, the core (planet) mass ˜50 M E and the disk truncation radius ˜150 au, our model reproduces the best-fit orbit of HD131399Ab. We find that the orbit after the circularization is usually close to the stability limit against the perturbations from the binary companion, because the scattered core accretes gas from the truncated disk. Our conclusion can also be applied to wider or more compact binary systems if the separation is not too large and another planet with ≳20-30 Earth masses that scattered the core existed in inner region of the system.

  2. Vertical stability of circular orbits in relativistic razor-thin disks

    CERN Document Server

    Vieira, Ronaldo S S; Saa, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    During the last few decades, there has been a growing interest in exact solutions of Einstein equations describing razor-thin disks. Despite the progress in the area, the analytical study of geodesic motion crossing the disk plane in these systems is not yet so developed. In the present work, we propose a definite vertical stability criterion for circular equatorial timelike geodesics in static, axially symmetric thin disks, possibly surrounded by other structures preserving axial symmetry. It turns out that the strong energy condition for the disk stress-energy content is sufficient for vertical stability of these orbits. Moreover, adiabatic invariance of the vertical action variable gives us an approximate third integral of motion for oblique orbits which deviate slightly from the equatorial plane. Such new approximate third integral certainly points to a better understanding of the analytical properties of these orbits. The results presented here, derived for static spacetimes, may be a starting point to s...

  3. THE PROPOSED QUADRUPLE SYSTEM SZ HERCULIS: REVISED LITE MODEL AND ORBITAL STABILITY STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinse, Tobias Cornelius; Lee, Jae Woo; Lee, Chung-Uk [Advanced Astronomy and Space Science Division, Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Gozdziewski, Krzysztof [Nicolaus Copernicus University, Torun Centre for Astronomy, PL-87-100 Torun (Poland); Haghighipour, Nader, E-mail: tchinse@gmail.com [Institute for Astronomy and NASA Astrobiology Institute, University of Hawaii, 96822 HI (United States)

    2012-08-15

    In a recent study, Lee et al. presented new photometric follow-up timing observations of the semidetached binary system SZ Herculis and proposed the existence of two hierarchical cirumbinary companions. Based on the light-travel time effect, the two low-mass M-dwarf companions are found to orbit the binary pair on moderate to high eccentric orbits. The derived periods of these two companions are close to a 2:1 mean-motion orbital resonance. We have studied the stability of the system using the osculating orbital elements as presented by Lee et al. Results indicate an orbit-crossing architecture exhibiting short-term dynamical instabilities leading to the escape of one of the proposed companions. We have examined the system's underlying model parameter space by following a Monte Carlo approach and found an improved fit to the timing data. A study of the stability of our best-fitting orbits also indicates that the proposed system is generally unstable. If the observed anomalous timing variations of the binary period is due to additional circumbinary companions, then the resulting system should exhibit a long-term stable orbital configuration much different from the orbits suggested by Lee et al. We, therefore, suggest that based on Newtonian-dynamical considerations, the proposed quadruple system cannot exist. To uncover the true nature of the observed period variations of this system, we recommend future photometric follow-up observations that could further constrain eclipse-timing variations and/or refine light-travel time models.

  4. Effects of relaxed static longitudinal stability on a single-stage-to-orbit vehicle design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, D. C., Jr.; Wilhite, A. W.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of relaxing longitudinal stability requirements on single stage to orbit space vehicles is studied. A comparison of the mass and performance characteristics of two vehicles, one designed for positive levels of longitudinal stability and the other designed with relaxed stability requirements in a computer aided design process is presented. Both vehicles, required to meet the same mission characteristics are described. Wind tunnel tests, conducted over a Mach number range from 0.3 to 4.63 to verify estimated aerodynamic characteristics, are discussed.

  5. Orbital stability analysis and chaotic dynamics of exoplanets in multi-stellar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyal, Suman

    The advancement in detection technology has substantially increased the discovery rate of exoplanets in the last two decades. The confirmation of thousands of exoplanets orbiting the solar type stars has raised new astrophysical challenges, including the studies of orbital dynamics and long-term stability of such planets. Continuous orbital stability of the planet in stellar habitable zone is considered vital for life to develop. Hence, these studies furthers one self-evident aim of mankind to find an answer to the century old question: Are we alone?. This dissertation investigates the planetary orbits in single and binary star systems. Within binaries, a planet could orbit either one or both stars as S-type or P-type, respectively. I have considered S-type planets in two binaries, gamma Cephei and HD 196885, and compute their orbits by using various numerical techniques to assess their periodic, quasi-periodic or chaotic nature. The Hill stability (HS) function, which measures the orbital perturbation induced by the nearby companion, is calculated for each system and then its efficacy as a new chaos indicator is tested against Maximum Lyapunov Exponents (MLE) and Mean Exponential Growth factor of Nearby Orbits (MEGNO). The dynamics of HD 196885 AB is further explored with an emphasis on the planet's higher orbital inclination relative to the binary plane. I have quantitatively mapped out the chaotic and quasi-periodic regions of the system's phase space, which indicates a likely regime of the planet's inclination. In, addition, the resonant angle is inspected to determine whether alternation between libration and circulation occurs as a consequence of Kozai oscillations, a probable mechanism that can drive the planetary orbit to a large inclination. The studies of planetary system in GJ 832 shows potential of hosting multiple planets in close orbits. The phase space of GJ 832c (inner planet) and the Earth-mass test planet(s) are analyzed for periodic

  6. Vertical stability of circular orbits in relativistic razor-thin disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Ronaldo S. S.; Ramos-Caro, Javier; Saa, Alberto

    2016-11-01

    During the last few decades, there has been a growing interest in exact solutions of Einstein equations describing razor-thin disks. Despite the progress in this area, the analytical study of geodesic motion crossing the disk plane in these systems has not yet been well developed. In the present work, we propose a definite vertical stability criterion for circular equatorial timelike geodesics in static, axially symmetric thin disks, possibly surrounded by other structures preserving axial symmetry. It turns out that the strong energy condition for the disk stress-energy content is sufficient for the vertical stability of these orbits. Moreover, adiabatic invariance of the vertical action variable gives us an approximate third integral of motion for oblique orbits that deviate slightly from the equatorial plane. This new approximate third integral certainly points to a better understanding of the analytical properties of these orbits. The results presented here, derived for static spacetimes, may be a starting point to study the motion around rotating, stationary razor-thin disks. Our results also allow us to conjecture that the strong energy condition should be sufficient to assure transversal stability of periodic orbits for any singular timelike hypersurface, provided it is invariant under the geodesic flow.

  7. The Orbital Stability of Planets Trapped in the First-Order Mean-Motion Resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, Yuji; Ida, Shigeru

    2012-01-01

    Many extrasolar planetary systems containing multiple super-Earths have been discovered. N-body simulations taking into account standard type-I planetary migration suggest that protoplanets are captured into mean-motion resonant orbits near the inner disk edge at which the migration is halted. Previous N-body simulations suggested that orbital stability of the resonant systems depends on number of the captured planets. In the unstable case, through close scattering and merging between planets, non-resonant multiple systems are finally formed. In this paper, we investigate the critical number of the resonantly trapped planets beyond which orbital instability occurs after disk gas depletion. We find that when the total number of planets ($N$) is larger than the critical number ($N_{\\rm crit}$), crossing time that is a timescale of initiation of the orbital instability is similar to non-resonant cases, while the orbital instability never occurs within the orbital calculation time ($10^8$ Kepler time) for $N\\leq ...

  8. Enumeration and stability analysis of simple periodic orbits in β-Fermi Pasta Ulam lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonone, Rupali L., E-mail: vaidehisonone@gmail.com; Jain, Sudhir R., E-mail: vaidehisonone@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune-411007, India and Nuclear Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai - 400085 (India)

    2014-04-24

    We study the well-known one-dimensional problem of N particles with a nonlinear interaction. The special case of quadratic and quartic interaction potential among nearest neighbours is the β-Fermi-Pasta-Ulam model. We enumerate and classify the simple periodic orbits for this system and find the stability zones, employing Floquet theory. Such stability analysis is crucial to understand the transition of FPU lattice from recurrences to globally chaotic behavior, energy transport in lower dimensional system, dynamics of optical lattices and also its impact on shape parameter of bio-polymers such as DNA and RNA.

  9. On the use of stabilizing transformations for detecting unstable periodic orbits in high-dimensional flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crofts, Jonathan J; Davidchack, Ruslan L

    2009-09-01

    We explore the possibility of extending the stabilizing transformations approach [J. J. Crofts and R. L. Davidchack, SIAM J. Sci. Comput. (USA) 28, 1275 (2006)]. to the problem of locating large numbers of unstable periodic orbits in high-dimensional flows, in particular those that result from spatial discretization of partial differential equations. The approach has been shown to be highly efficient when detecting large sets of periodic orbits in low-dimensional maps. Extension to low-dimensional flows has been achieved by the use of an appropriate Poincare surface of section [D. Pingel, P. Schmelcher, and F. K. Diakonos, Phys. Rep. 400, 67 (2004)]. For the case of high-dimensional flows, we show that it is more efficient to apply stabilizing transformations directly to the flows without the use of the Poincare surface of section. We use the proposed approach to find many unstable periodic orbits in the model example of a chaotic spatially extended system-the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation. The performance of the proposed method is compared against other methods such as Newton-Armijo and Levenberg-Marquardt algorithms. In the latter case, we also argue that the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, or any other optimization-based approach, is more efficient and simpler in implementation when applied directly to the detection of periodic orbits in high-dimensional flows without the use of the Poincare surface of section or other additional constraints.

  10. Orbital stability of coplanar two-planet exosystems with high eccentricities

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadou, Kyriaki I

    2016-01-01

    The long-term stability of the evolution of two-planet systems is considered by using the general three body problem (GTBP). Our study is focused on the stability of systems with adjacent orbits when at least one of them is highly eccentric. In these cases, in order for close encounters, which destabilize the planetary systems, to be avoided, phase protection mechanisms should be considered. Additionally, since the GTBP is a non-integrable system, chaos may also cause the destabilization of the system after a long time interval. By computing dynamical maps, based on Fast Lyapunov Indicator, we reveal regions in phase space with stable orbits even for very high eccentricities (e>0.5). Such regions are present in mean motion resonances (MMR). We can determine the position of the exact MMR through the computation of families of periodic orbits in a rotating frame. Elliptic periodic orbits are associated with the presence of apsidal corotation resonances (ACR). When such solutions are stable, they are associated ...

  11. On the Possibility of Habitable Moons in the System of HD 23079: Results from Orbital Stability Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Cuntz, M; Eberle, J; Shukayr, A

    2013-01-01

    The aim of our study is to investigate the possibility of habitable moons orbiting the giant planet HD 23079b, a Jupiter-mass planet, which follows a low-eccentricity orbit in the outer region of HD 23079's habitable zone. We show that HD 23079b is able to host habitable moons in prograde and retrograde orbits, as expected, noting that the outer stability limit for retrograde orbits is increased by nearly 90% compared to that of prograde orbits, a result consistent with previous generalized studies. For the targeted parameter space it was found that the outer stability limit for habitable moons varies between 0.05236 and 0.06955 AU (prograde orbits) and between 0.1023 and 0.1190 AU (retrograde orbits) depending on the orbital parameters of the Jupiter-type planet if a minimum mass is assumed. These intervals correspond to 0.306 and 0.345 (prograde orbits) and 0.583 and 0.611 (retrograde orbits) of the planet's Hill radius. Larger stability limits are obtained if an increased value for the planetary mass m_p i...

  12. Analysis of stability boundaries of satellite's equilibrium attitude in a circular orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    An asymmetric satellite equipped with control momentum gyroscopes (CMGs) with the center of mass of the system moving uniformly in a circular orbit was considered. The stability of a relative equilibrium attitude of the satellite was analyzed using Lyapunov's direct method. The Lyapunov function V is a positive definite integral of the total energy of the perturbed motion of the system. The asymptotic stability analysis of the stationary motion of the conservative system was based on the Barbashin-Krasovskii theorem on the nonexistence of integer trajectories of the set dot V, which was obtained using the differential equations of motion of the satellite with CMGs. By analyzing the sign definiteness of the quadratic part of V, it was found earlier by V.V. Sazonov that the stability region is described by four strict inequalities. The asymptotic stability at the stability boundary was analyzed by sequentially turning these inequalities into equalities with terms of orders higher than the second taken into account in V. The sign definiteness analysis of the inhomogeneous function V at the stability boundary involved a huge amount of computations related to the multiplication, expansion, substitution, and factorization of symbolic expressions. The computations were performed by applying a computer algebra system on a personal computer.

  13. An Orbital Stability Study of the Proposed Companions of SW Lyncis

    CERN Document Server

    Hinse, Tobias C; Wittenmyer, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the dynamical stability of the proposed companions orbiting the Algol type short-period eclipsing binary SW Lyncis (Kim et al. 2010). The two candidate companions are of stellar to sub-stellar nature, and were inferred from timing measurements of the system's primary and secondary eclipses. We applied well-tested numerical techniques to accurately integrate the orbits of the two companions and to test for chaotic dynamical behaviour. We carried out the stability analysis within a systematic parameter survey varying both the geometries and orientation of the orbits of the companions, as well as their masses. In all our numerical integrations we found that the proposed SW Lyn multi-body system is highly unstable on time-scales on the order of 1000 years. Our results cast doubt on the interpretation that the timing variations are caused by two companions. This work demonstrates that a straightforward dynamical analysis can help to test whether a best-fit companion-based model is a physically...

  14. Orbital Stability of Multi-Planet Systems: Behavior at High Masses

    CERN Document Server

    Morrison, Sarah J

    2016-01-01

    In the coming years, high contrast imaging surveys are expected to reveal the characteristics of the population of wide-orbit, massive, exoplanets. To date, a handful of wide planetary mass companions are known, but only one such multi-planet system has been discovered: HR8799. For low mass planetary systems, multi-planet interactions play an important role in setting system architecture. In this paper, we explore the stability of these high mass, multi-planet systems. While empirical relationships exist that predict how system stability scales with planet spacing at low masses, we show that extrapolating to super-Jupiter masses can lead to up to an order of magnitude overestimate of stability for massive, tightly packed systems. We show that at both low and high planet masses, overlapping mean motion resonances trigger chaotic orbital evolution, which leads to system instability. We attribute some of the difference in behavior as a function of mass to the increasing importance of second order resonances at h...

  15. The moon as a radiometric reference source for on-orbit sensor stability calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, T.C.

    2009-01-01

    The wealth of data generated by the world's Earth-observing satellites, now spanning decades, allows the construction of long-term climate records. A key consideration for detecting climate trends is precise quantification of temporal changes in sensor calibration on-orbit. For radiometer instruments in the solar reflectance wavelength range (near-UV to shortwave-IR), the Moon can be viewed as a solar diffuser with exceptional stability properties. A model for the lunar spectral irradiance that predicts the geometric variations in the Moon's brightness with ???1% precision has been developed at the U.S. Geological Survey in Flagstaff, AZ. Lunar model results corresponding to a series of Moon observations taken by an instrument can be used to stabilize sensor calibration with sub-percent per year precision, as demonstrated by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS). The inherent stability of the Moon and the operational model to utilize the lunar irradiance quantity provide the Moon as a reference source for monitoring radiometric calibration in orbit. This represents an important capability for detecting terrestrial climate change from space-based radiometric measurements.

  16. Orbit Stability of OSIRIS-REx in the Vicinity of Bennu Using a High-Fidelity Solar Radiation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Trevor; Hughes, Kyle; Mashiku, Alinda; Longuski, James

    2015-01-01

    The OSIRIS-REx mission (Origins Spectral Interpretation Resource Identification Security Regolith EXPlorer) is an asteroid sample return mission to Bennu (RQ36) that is scheduled to launch in 2016. The planned science operations precluding the small retrieval involve operations in terminator orbits (orbit plane is perpendicular to the sun). Over longer durations the solar radiation pressure (SRP) perturbs the orbit causing it to precess. Our work involves: modeling high fidelity SRP model to capture the perturbations during attitude changes; design a stable orbit from the high fidelity models to analyze the stability over time.

  17. On the Stability of Classical Orbits of the Hydrogen Ground State in Stochastic Electrodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodorus M. Nieuwenhuizen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available De la Peña 1980 and Puthoff 1987 show that circular orbits in the hydrogen problem of Stochastic Electrodynamics connect to a stable situation, where the electron neither collapses onto the nucleus nor gets expelled from the atom. Although the Cole-Zou 2003 simulations support the stability, our recent numerics always lead to self-ionisation. Here the de la Peña-Puthoff argument is extended to elliptic orbits. For very eccentric orbits with energy close to zero and angular momentum below some not-small value, there is on the average a net gain in energy for each revolution, which explains the self-ionisation. Next, an 1 / r 2 potential is added, which could stem from a dipolar deformation of the nuclear charge by the electron at its moving position. This shape retains the analytical solvability. When it is enough repulsive, the ground state of this modified hydrogen problem is predicted to be stable. The same conclusions hold for positronium.

  18. On the Stability of Extrasolar Planetary Systems and other Closely Orbiting Pairs

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, Fred C

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers the stability of tidal equilibria for planetary systems in which stellar rotation provides a significant contribution to the angular momentum budget. We begin by applying classic stability considerations for two bodies to planetary systems --- where one mass is much smaller than the other. The application of these stability criteria to a subset of the Kepler sample indicates that the majority of the systems are not in a stable equilibrium state. Motivated by this finding, we generalize the stability calculation to include the quadrupole moment for the host star. In general, a stable equilibrium requires that the total system angular momentum exceeds a minimum value (denoted here as $L_X$) and that the orbital angular momentum of the planet exceeds a minimum fraction of the total. Most, but not all, of the observed planetary systems in the sample have enough total angular momentum to allow an equilibrium state. Even with the generalizations of this paper, however, most systems have too lit...

  19. Defining the Spacecraft Angular Position in the Orbital Stabilization Mode from the Angular Rate Sensor Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Oleynik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The spacecraft orientation mode relative to given reference point is implemented using the sensor equipment, which measures the spacecraft angular position relative to given reference coordinate system and the angular rate of the spacecraft rotation relative to inertial space. In case one or another sensor equipment fails, to implement the orientation mode a method for estimating the missing component of the state vector should be developed.This work states a task to estimate a spacecraft angular position vector relative to orbital coordinate system using the measurement readings of an angular rate sensor. This formulation of the research is typically used to build the reserve algorithms of the orbital stabilization.The solution of this problem uses an approach based on the decomposition of the linearized model for the angular motion of the spacecraft and the theory of identification by the method of exact placement of the poles. To maximize the convergence rate of the algorithm we choose a zero of the discrete system eigenvalues.The simulation results proved the efficiency of the resulting algorithm to estimate the angular position of the spacecraft relative to orbital coordinate system. In accordance with the analysis of the computational cost of the algorithm we can conclude that its real-time implementation is possible. This is of great importance when implementing this algorithm in the onboard computer of the spacecraft.This work is a logical continuation of authors’ previous publications. The earlier works investigated the possibility to construct the linear observing devices for nonlinear dynamic systems. There were also solved the problems of building an orbital and inertial orientation, according to the results of a measuring position of the spacecraft relative to specified reference points (Earth, stars when the angular velocity sensor failed.

  20. Tracking on-orbit stability of the response versus scan angle for the S-NPP VIIRS reflective solar bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Aisheng; Xiong, Xiaoxiong (Jack); Cao, Changyong

    2016-09-01

    Built on strong heritage of the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) sensor, the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) carried on Suomi NPP (National Polar-orbiting Partnership) satellite (http://npp.gsfc.nasa.gov/viirs.html) has been in operation for nearly five fives. The on-board calibration of the VIIRS reflective solar bands (RSB) relies on a solar diffuser (SD) located at a fixed scan angle and a solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM). The VIIRS response versus scan angle (RVS) was characterized prelaunch in lab ambient conditions and is currently used to determine the on orbit response for all scan angles relative to the SD scan angle. Since the RVS is vitally important to the quality of calibrated level 1B products, it is important to monitor its on-orbit stability. In this study, the RVS stability is examined based on reflectance trends collected from 16-day repeatable orbits over preselected pseudo-invariant desert sites in Northern Africa. These trends cover nearly entire Earth view scan range so that any systematic drifts in the scan angle direction would indicate a change in RVS. This study also compares VIIRS RVS on-orbit stability results with those from Aqua and Terra MODIS over the first four years of mission for a few selected bands, which provides further information on potential VIIRS RVS on-orbit changes.

  1. Asymptotic formation and orbital stability of phase-locked states for the Kuramoto model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young-Pil; Ha, Seung-Yeal; Jung, Sungeun; Kim, Yongduck

    2012-04-01

    We discuss the asymptotic formation and nonlinear orbital stability of phase-locked states arising from the ensemble of non-identical Kuramoto oscillators. We provide an explicit lower bound for a coupling strength on the formation of phase-locked states, which only depends on the diameters of natural frequencies and initial phase configurations. We show that, when the phases of non-identical oscillators are distributed over the half circle and the coupling strength is sufficiently large, the dynamics of Kuramoto oscillators exhibits two stages (transition and relaxation stages). In a transition stage, initial configurations shrink to configurations whose diameters are strictly less than {π}/{2} in a finite-time, and then the configurations tend to phase-locked states asymptotically. This improves previous results on the formation of phase-locked states by Chopra-Spong (2009) [26] and Ha-Ha-Kim (2010) [27] where their attention were focused only on the latter relaxation stage. We also show that the Kuramoto model is ℓ1-contractive in the sense that the ℓ1-distance along two smooth Kuramoto flows is less than or equal to that of initial configurations. In particular, when two initial configurations have the same averaged phases, the ℓ1-distance between them decays to zero exponentially fast. For the configurations with different phase averages, we use the method of average adjustment and translation-invariant of the Kuramoto model to show that one solution converges to the translation of the other solution exponentially fast. This establishes the orbital stability of the phase-locked states. Our stability analysis does not employ any standard linearization technique around the given phase-locked states, but instead, we use a robust ℓ1-metric functional as a Lyapunov functional. In the formation process of phase-locked states, we estimate the number of collisions between oscillators, and lower-upper bounds of the transversal phase differences.

  2. Dynamical Stability of Earth-Like Planetary Orbits in Binary Systems

    CERN Document Server

    David, E M; Fatuzzo, M; Adams, F C; David, Eva-Marie; Quintana, Elisa V.; Fatuzzo, Marco; Adams, Fred C.

    2003-01-01

    This paper explores the stability of an Earth-like planet orbiting a solar mass star in the presence of an outer-lying intermediate mass companion. The overall goal is to estimate the fraction of binary systems that allow Earth-like planets to remain stable over long time scales. We numerically determine the planet's ejection time $\\tauej$ over a range of companion masses ($M_C$ = 0.001 -- 0.5 $M_\\odot$), orbital eccentricities $\\epsilon$, and semi-major axes $a$. This suite of $\\sim40,000$ numerical experiments suggests that the most important variables are the companion's mass $M_C$ and periastron distance $\\rmin$ = $a(1-\\epsilon)$ to the primary star. At fixed $M_C$, the ejection time is a steeply increasing function of $\\rmin$ over the range of parameter space considered here (although the ejection time has a distribution of values for a given $\\rmin$). Most of the integration times are limited to 10 Myr, but a small set of integrations extend to 500 Myr. For each companion mass, we find fitting formulae ...

  3. Nonlinear attitude stability of a spacecraft on a stationary orbit around an asteroid subjected to gravity gradient torque

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yue

    2014-01-01

    The classical problem of attitude stability in a central gravity field is generalized to that on a stationary orbit around a uniformly-rotating asteroid. This generalized problem is studied in the framework of geometric mechanics. Based on the natural symplectic structure, the non-canonical Hamiltonian structure of the problem is derived. The Poisson tensor, Casimir functions and equations of motion are obtained in a differential geometric method. The equilibrium of the equations of motion, i.e. the equilibrium attitude of the spacecraft, is determined from a global point of view. Nonlinear stability conditions of the equilibrium attitude are obtained with the energy-Casimir method. The nonlinear attitude stability is then investigated versus three parameters of the asteroid, including the ratio of the mean radius to the stationary orbital radius, the harmonic coefficients C20 and C22. It is found that when the spacecraft is located on the intermediate-moment principal axis of the asteroid, the nonlinear stab...

  4. Heteroclinic orbits, mobility parameters and stability for thin film type equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard. S. Laugesen

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available We study the phase space of the evolution equation $$ h_t = -(h^n h_{xxx}_x - mathcal{B} (h^m h_x_x , $$ where $h(x,t geq 0$. The parameters $n>0$, $m in mathbb{R}$, and the Bond number $mathcal{B}>0$ are given. We find numerically, for some ranges of $n$ and $m$, that perturbing the positive periodic steady state in a certain direction yields a solution that relaxes to the constant steady state. Meanwhile perturbing in the opposite direction yields a solution that appears to touch down or `rupture' in finite time, apparently approaching a compactly supported `droplet' steady state. We then investigate the structural stability of the evolution by changing the mobility coefficients, $h^n$ and $h^m$. We find evidence that the above heteroclinic orbits between steady states are perturbed but not broken, when the mobilities are suitably changed. We also investigate touch-down singularities, in which the solution changes from being everywhere positive to being zero at isolated points in space. We find that changes in the mobility exponent $n$ can affect the number of touch-down points per period, and affect whether these singularities occur in finite or infinite time.

  5. On the orbital stability of Gaussian solitary waves in the log-KdV equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carles, Rémi; Pelinovsky, Dmitry

    2014-12-01

    We consider the logarithmic Korteweg-de Vries (log-KdV) equation, which models solitary waves in anharmonic chains with Hertzian interaction forces. By using an approximating sequence of global solutions of the regularized generalized KdV equation in H^1({R}) with conserved L2 norm and energy, we construct a weak global solution of the log-KdV equation in a subset of H^1({R}) . This construction yields conditional orbital stability of Gaussian solitary waves of the log-KdV equation, provided that uniqueness and continuous dependence of the constructed solution holds. Furthermore, we study the linearized log-KdV equation at the Gaussian solitary wave and prove that the associated linearized operator has a purely discrete spectrum consisting of simple purely imaginary eigenvalues in addition to the double zero eigenvalue. The eigenfunctions, however, do not decay like Gaussian functions but have algebraic decay. Using numerical approximations, we show that the Gaussian initial data do not spread out but produce visible radiation at the left slope of the Gaussian-like pulse in the time evolution of the linearized log-KdV equation.

  6. New Light-Travel Time Models and Orbital Stability Study of the Proposed Planetary System HU Aquarii

    CERN Document Server

    Hinse, Tobias C; Gozdziewski, Krzysztof; Haghighipour, Nader; Lee, Chung-Uk; Scullion, Eamon M

    2011-01-01

    In this work we propose a new orbital architecture for the two proposed circumbinary planets around the polar eclipsing binary HU Aquarii. We base the new two-planet, light-travel time model on the result of a Monte Carlo simulation driving a least-squares Levenberg-Marquardt minimisation algorithm on the observed eclipse egress times. Our best-fitting model with $\\chi_{r}^2=1.43$ resulted in high final eccentricities for the two companions leading to an unstable orbital configuration. From a large ensemble of initial guesses we examined the distribution of final eccentricities and semi-major axes for different $\\chi_{r}^2$ parameter intervals and encountered qualitatively a second population of best-fitting parameters. The main characteristic of this population is described by low-eccentric orbits favouring long-term orbital stability of the system. We present our best-fitting model candidate for the proposed two-planet system and demonstrate orbital stability over one million years using numerical integrati...

  7. Entry dynamics of space shuttle orbiter with longitudinal stability and control uncertainties at supersonic and hypersonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, H. W.; Powell, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    A six-degree-of-freedom simulation analysis was conducted to examine the effects of longitudinal static aerodynamic stability and control uncertainties on the performance of the space shuttle orbiter automatic (no manual inputs) entry guidance and control systems. To establish the acceptable boundaries, the static aerodynamic characteristics were varied either by applying a multiplier to the aerodynamic parameter or by adding an increment. With either of two previously identified control system modifications included, the acceptable longitudinal aerodynamic boundaries were determined.

  8. Structural Stability Assessment of the High Frequency Antenna for Use on the Buccaneer CubeSat in Low Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Structural Stability Assessment of the High Frequency Antenna for Use on the Buccaneer CubeSat in Low Earth...DSTO-TN-1295 ABSTRACT The Buccaneer CubeSat will be fitted with a high frequency antenna made from spring steel measuring tape. The geometry...High Frequency Antenna for Use on the Buccaneer CubeSat in Low Earth Orbit Executive Summary The Buccaneer CubeSat will be fitted with a

  9. The binary near-Earth asteroid (175706) 1996 FG3 - An observational constraint on its orbital stability

    CERN Document Server

    Scheirich, P; Jacobson, S A; Ďurech, J; Kušnirák, P; Hornoch, K; Mottola, S; Mommert, M; Hellmich, S; Pray, D; Polishook, D; Krugly, Yu N; Inasaridze, R Ya; Kvaratskhelia, O I; Ayvazian, V; Slyusarev, I; Pittichová, J; Jehin, E; Manfroid, J; Gillon, M; Galád, A; Pollock, J; Licandro, J; Alí-Lagoa, V; Brinsfield, J; Molotov, I E

    2014-01-01

    Using our photometric observations taken between April 1996 and January 2013 and other published data, we derive properties of the binary near-Earth asteroid (175706) 1996 FG3 including new measurements constraining evolution of the mutual orbit with potential consequences for the entire binary asteroid population. We also refined previously determined values of parameters of both components, making 1996 FG3 one of the most well understood binary asteroid systems. We determined the orbital vector with a substantially greater accuracy than before and we also placed constraints on a stability of the orbit. Specifically, the ecliptic longitude and latitude of the orbital pole are 266{\\deg} and -83{\\deg}, respectively, with the mean radius of the uncertainty area of 4{\\deg}, and the orbital period is 16.1508 +\\- 0.0002 h (all uncertainties correspond to 3sigma). We looked for a quadratic drift of the mean anomaly of the satellite and obtained a value of 0.04 +\\- 0.20 deg/yr^2, i.e., consistent with zero. The drif...

  10. Entry dynamics of space shuttle orbiter with lateral-directional stability and control uncertainties at supersonic and hypersonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, H. W.; Powell, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    A six-degree-of-freedom simulation analysis was conducted to examine the effects of the lateral-directional static aerodynamic stability and control uncertainties on the performance of the automatic (no manual inputs) entry-guidance and control systems of the space shuttle orbiter. To establish the acceptable boundaries of the uncertainties, the static aerodynamic characteristics were varied either by applying a multiplier to the aerodynamic parameter or by adding an increment. Control-system modifications were identified that decrease the sensitivity to off-nominal aerodynamics. With these modifications, the acceptable aerodynamic boundaries were determined.

  11. Stabilization of prescribed values and periodic orbits with regular and pulse target oriented control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braverman, E., E-mail: maelena@ucalgary.ca; Chan, B. [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive N.W., Calgary AB T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    2014-03-15

    Investigating a method of chaos control for one-dimensional maps, where the intervention is proportional to the difference between a fixed value and a current state, we demonstrate that stabilization is possible in one of the two following cases: (1) for small values, the map is increasing and the slope of the line connecting the points on the line with the origin is decreasing; (2) the chaotic map is locally Lipschitz. Moreover, in the latter case we prove that any point of the map can be stabilized. In addition, we study pulse stabilization when the intervention occurs each m-th step and illustrate that stabilization is possible for the first type of maps. In the context of population dynamics, we notice that control with a positive target, even if stabilization is not achieved, leads to persistent solutions and prevents extinction in models which experience the Allee effect.

  12. Stabilization of prescribed values and periodic orbits with regular and pulse target oriented control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, E.; Chan, B.

    2014-03-01

    Investigating a method of chaos control for one-dimensional maps, where the intervention is proportional to the difference between a fixed value and a current state, we demonstrate that stabilization is possible in one of the two following cases: (1) for small values, the map is increasing and the slope of the line connecting the points on the line with the origin is decreasing; (2) the chaotic map is locally Lipschitz. Moreover, in the latter case we prove that any point of the map can be stabilized. In addition, we study pulse stabilization when the intervention occurs each m-th step and illustrate that stabilization is possible for the first type of maps. In the context of population dynamics, we notice that control with a positive target, even if stabilization is not achieved, leads to persistent solutions and prevents extinction in models which experience the Allee effect.

  13. Orbital stability of spatially synchronized solitary waves of an m-coupled nonlinear Schrödinger system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuangye; Nguyen, Nghiem V.; Wang, Zhi-Qiang

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate the orbital stability of solitary-wave solutions for an m-coupled nonlinear Schrödinger system i /∂ ∂ t u j + /∂ 2 ∂ x 2 u j + ∑ i = 1 m b i j |" separators=" u i | 2 u j = 0 , j = 1 , … , m , where m ≥ 2, uj are complex-valued functions of (x, t) ∈ ℝ2, bjj ∈ ℝ, j = 1, 2, …, m, and bij, i ≠ j are positive coupling constants satisfying bij = bji. It will be shown that spatially synchronized solitary-wave solutions of the m-coupled nonlinear Schrödinger system exist and are orbitally stable. Here, by synchronized solutions we mean solutions in which the components are proportional to one another. Our results completely settle the question on the existence and stability of synchronized solitary waves for the m-coupled system while only partial results were known in the literature for the cases of m ≥ 3 heretofore. Furthermore, the conditions imposed on the symmetric matrix B = (bij) satisfied here are both sufficient and necessary for the m-coupled nonlinear Schrödinger system to admit synchronized ground-state solutions.

  14. Stability of the Moons orbits in Solar system in the restricted three-body problem

    CERN Document Server

    Ershkov, Sergey V

    2015-01-01

    We consider the equations of motion of three-body problem in a Lagrange form (which means a consideration of relative motions of 3-bodies in regard to each other). Analyzing such a system of equations, we consider in details the case of moon motion of negligible mass m3 around the 2-nd of two giant-bodies m1, m2 (which are rotating around their common centre of masses on Kepler trajectories), the mass of which is assumed to be less than the mass of central body. Under assumptions of R3BP, we obtain the equations of motion which describe the relative mutual motion of the centre of mass of 2-nd giant-body m2 (Planet) and the centre of mass of 3-rd body (Moon) with additional effective mass placed in that centre of mass. They should be rotating around their common centre of masses on Kepler elliptic orbits. For negligible effective mass it gives the equations of motion which should describe a quasi-elliptic orbit of 3-rd body (Moon) around the 2-nd body m2 (Planet) for most of the moons of the Planets in Solar s...

  15. The applicability of Lyapunov characteristic numbers in the study of the stability of satellite orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broucke, R.

    1982-01-01

    It is pointed out that the Lyapunov Characteristic Numbers constitute a new tool for determining stability of trajectories of dynamical systems, or, even more generally, of solutions of systems of ordinary differential equations. In contrast with the characteristic exponents, which apply only to periodic solutions, the Lyapunov Characteristic Numbers apply to arbitrary nonperiodic solutions as well. A description is presented of the numerical experiments which have been made in order to investigate the practical value of the Lyapunov Characteristic Number and the Kolmogorov Entropy for the purpose of estimating the stability of trajectories and/or numerical integration methods in celestial mechanics. It is found that the Lyapunov Characteristic Numbers are extremely useful for the classification of the solutions of nonintegrable dynamical systems, especially in order to distinguish between quasi-periodic and chaotic solutions. However, the Lyapunov Characteristics Numbers do not appear to be useful for the purpose of evaluating numerical integration methods.

  16. The applicability of Lyapunov characteristic numbers in the study of the stability of satellite orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broucke, R.

    1982-01-01

    It is pointed out that the Lyapunov Characteristic Numbers constitute a new tool for determining stability of trajectories of dynamical systems, or, even more generally, of solutions of systems of ordinary differential equations. In contrast with the characteristic exponents, which apply only to periodic solutions, the Lyapunov Characteristic Numbers apply to arbitrary nonperiodic solutions as well. A description is presented of the numerical experiments which have been made in order to investigate the practical value of the Lyapunov Characteristic Number and the Kolmogorov Entropy for the purpose of estimating the stability of trajectories and/or numerical integration methods in celestial mechanics. It is found that the Lyapunov Characteristic Numbers are extremely useful for the classification of the solutions of nonintegrable dynamical systems, especially in order to distinguish between quasi-periodic and chaotic solutions. However, the Lyapunov Characteristics Numbers do not appear to be useful for the purpose of evaluating numerical integration methods.

  17. Orbital stability of periodic waves in the class of reduced Ostrovsky equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Edward R.; Pelinovsky, Dmitry E.

    2016-09-01

    Periodic travelling waves are considered in the class of reduced Ostrovsky equations that describe low-frequency internal waves in the presence of rotation. The reduced Ostrovsky equations with either quadratic or cubic nonlinearities can be transformed to integrable equations of the Klein-Gordon type by means of a change of coordinates. By using the conserved momentum and energy as well as an additional conserved quantity due to integrability, we prove that small-amplitude periodic waves are orbitally stable with respect to subharmonic perturbations, with period equal to an integer multiple of the period of the wave. The proof is based on construction of a Lyapunov functional, which is convex at the periodic wave and is conserved in the time evolution. We also show numerically that convexity of the Lyapunov functional holds for periodic waves of arbitrary amplitudes.

  18. The Stability of Electron Orbital Shells based on a Model of the Riemann-Zeta Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harney M.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that the atomic number Z is prime at the beginning of the each s1, p1, d1, and f1 energy levels of electrons, with some fluctuation in the actinide and lanthanide series. The periodic prime number boundary of s1, p1, d1, and f1 is postulated to occur because of stability of Schrodinger’s wave equation due to a fundamental relationship with the Riemann-Zeta function.

  19. Stability Analysis of Periodic Orbits in a Class of Duffing-Like Piecewise Linear Vibrators

    KAUST Repository

    El Aroudi, A.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we study the dynamical behavior of a Duffing-like piecewise linear (PWL) springmass-damper system for vibration-based energy harvesting applications. First, we present a continuous time single degree of freedom PWL dynamical model of the system. From this PWL model, numerical simulations are carried out by computing frequency response and bifurcation diagram under a deterministic harmonic excitation for different sets of system parameter values. Stability analysis is performed using Floquet theory combined with Fillipov method.

  20. Radiometric calibration stability and inter-calibration of solar-band instruments in orbit using the moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, T.C.

    2008-01-01

    With the increased emphasis on monitoring the Earth's climate from space, more stringent calibration requirements are being placed on the data products from remote sensing satellite instruments. Among these are stability over decade-length time scales and consistency across sensors and platforms. For radiometer instruments in the solar reflectance wavelength range (visible to shortwave infrared), maintaining calibration on orbit is difficult due to the lack of absolute radiometric standards suitable for flight use. The Moon presents a luminous source that can be viewed by all instruments in Earth orbit. Considered as a solar diffuser, the lunar surface is exceedingly stable. The chief difficulty with using the Moon is the strong variations in the Moon's brightness with illumination and viewing geometry. This mandates the use of a photometric model to compare lunar observations, either over time by the same instrument or between instruments. The U.S. Geological Survey in Flagstaff, Arizona, under NASA sponsorship, has developed a model for the lunar spectral irradiance that explicitly accounts for the effects of phase, the lunar librations, and the lunar surface reflectance properties. The model predicts variations in the Moon's brightness with precision ???1% over a continuous phase range from eclipse to the quarter lunar phases. Given a time series of Moon observations taken by an instrument, the geometric prediction capability of the lunar irradiance model enables sensor calibration stability with sub-percent per year precision. Cross-calibration of instruments with similar passbands can be achieved with precision comparable to the model precision. Although the Moon observations used for intercomparison can be widely separated in phase angle and/or time, SeaWiFS and MODIS have acquired lunar views closely spaced in time. These data provide an example to assess inter-calibration biases between these two instruments.

  1. Luminosity control and beam orbit stability with beta star leveling at LHC and HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Gorzawski, Arkadiusz Andrzej; Wenninger, Jorg

    This thesis describes the wide subject of the luminosity leveling and its requirements for the LHC and the HL-LHC. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different leveling methods focusing the thesis on the beta star leveling technique. We review the beams offset build--up due to the environmental (i.e. natural ground motion) and mechanical (i.e. moving quadrupole) sources. We quantify the instrumentation requirements for the reliable and reproducible operation with small offsets at the interaction points. Last but not least, we propose a novel method for the beam offset stabilization at the collision point based on the feedback from the luminosity.

  2. Landsat-7 ETM+ On-Orbit Reflective-Band Radiometric Stability and Absolute Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Brian L.; Thome, Kurtis J.; Barsi, Julia A.; Kaita, Ed; Helder, Dennis L.; Barker, John L.

    2003-01-01

    The Landsat-7 spacecraft carries the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) instrument. This instrument images the Earth land surface in eight parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, termed spectral bands. These spectral images are used to monitor changes in the land surface, so a consistent relationship, i.e., calibration, between the image data and the Earth surface brightness, is required. The ETM+ has several on- board calibration devices that are used to monitor this calibration. The best on-board calibration source employs a flat white painted reference panel and has indicated changes of between 0.5% to 2% per year in the ETM+ response, depending on the spectral band. However, most of these changes are believed to be caused by changes in the reference panel, as opposed to changes in the instrument's sensitivity. This belief is based partially on on-orbit calibrations using instrumented ground sites and observations of "invariant sites", hyper-arid sites of the Sahara and Arabia. Changes determined from these data sets indicate are 0.1% - 0.6% per year. Tests and comparisons to other sensors also indicate that the uncertainty of the calibration is at the 5% level.

  3. Structural Stability Driven by the Spin-Orbit Coupling and the Superconductivity in simple-cubic Polonium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Chang-Jong; Kim, Kyoo; Min, B. I.

    2013-03-01

    Polonium is the only element which has the simple-cubic (SC) structure in the periodic table. We have studied its structural stability based on the phonon dispersion calculations using the first-principles all-electron full-potential band method. We have demonstrated that the strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in SC-Po suppresses the Peierls instability and makes the SC structure stable. We have also discussed the structural chirality realized in beta-Po, as a consequence of the phonon instability. Further, we have investigated the possible superconductivity in SC-Po, and predicted that it becomes a superconductor with Tc ~ 4 K at ambient pressure. The transverse soft phonon mode at q ~ 2/3 R, which is greatly affected by the SOC, plays an important role both in the structural stability and the superconductivity in SC-Po. We have explored effects of the SOC and the volume variation on the phonon dispersions and superconducting properties of SC-Po.

  4. Ground state and orbital stability for the NLS equation on a general starlike graph with potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciapuoti, Claudio; Finco, Domenico; Noja, Diego

    2017-08-01

    We consider a nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLS) posed on a graph (or network) composed of a generic compact part to which a finite number of half-lines are attached. We call this structure a starlike graph. At the vertices of the graph interactions of δ-type can be present and an overall external potential is admitted. Under general assumptions on the potential, we prove that the NLS is globally well-posed in the energy domain. We are interested in minimizing the energy of the system on the manifold of constant mass (L 2-norm). When existing, the minimizer is called ground state and it is the profile of an orbitally stable standing wave for the NLS evolution. We prove that a ground state exists for sufficiently small masses whenever the quadratic part of the energy admits a simple isolated eigenvalue at the bottom of the spectrum (the linear ground state). This is a wide generalization of a result previously obtained for a star-graph with a single vertex. The main part of the proof is devoted to prove the concentration compactness principle for starlike structures; this is non trivial due to the lack of translation invariance of the domain. Then we show that a minimizing, bounded, H 1 sequence for the constrained NLS energy with external linear potentials is in fact convergent if its mass is small enough. Moreover we show that the ground state bifurcates from the vanishing solution at the bottom of the linear spectrum. Examples are provided with a discussion of the hypotheses on the linear part.

  5. Radiometric calibration stability of the EO-1 advanced land imager: 5 years on-orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, B.L.; Ong, L.; Barsi, J.A.; Mendenhall, J.A.; Lencioni, D.E.; Helder, D.L.; Hollaren, D.M.; Morfitt, R.

    2006-01-01

    The Advanced Land Imager (ALI) was developed as a prototype sensor for follow on missions to Landsat-7. It was launched in November 2000 on the Earth Observing One (EO-1) satellite as a nominal one-year technology demonstration mission. As of this writing, the sensor has continued to operate in excess of 5 years. Six of the ALl's nine multi-spectral (MS) bands and the panchromatic band have similar spectral coverage as those on the Landsat-7 ETM+. In addition to on-board lamps, which have been significantly more stable than the lamps on ETM+, the ALI has a solar diffuser and has imaged the moon monthly since launch. This combined calibration dataset allows understanding of the radiometric stability of the ALI system, its calibrators and some differentiation of the sources of the changes with time. The solar dataset is limited as the mechanism controlling the aperture to the solar diffuser failed approximately 18 months after launch. Results over 5 years indicate that: the shortest wavelength band (443 nm) has degraded in response about 2%; the 482 nm and 565 nm bands decreased in response about 1%; the 660 nm, 790 nm and 868 nm bands each degraded about 5%; the 1250 nm and 1650 nm bands did not change significantly and the 2215 nm band increased in response about 2%.

  6. Study of the Molecular Geometry, Electronic Structure, and Thermal Stability of Phosphazene and Heterophosphazene Rings with ab Initio Molecular Orbital Calculations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaeger, C.R.; Debowski, M.A.; Manners, I.; Vancso, G.J.

    1999-01-01

    Ab initio molecular orbital calculations at the MP2/6-31G* level of theory have been used to study the molecular geometry, electronic structure, and the thermal stability of six-membered phosphazene and heterophosphazene rings. The studies included the phosphazene ring [NPCl2]3, the carbophosphazene

  7. The dynamics and control of large flexible space structures. Volume 3, part B: The modelling, dynamics, and stability of large Earth pointing orbiting structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainum, P. M.; Kumar, V. K.

    1980-01-01

    The dynamics and stability of large orbiting flexible beams, and platforms and dish type structures oriented along the local horizontal are treated both analytically and numerically. It is assumed that such structures could be gravitationally stabilized by attaching a rigid light-weight dumbbell at the center of mass by a spring loaded hinge which also could provide viscous damping. For the beam, the small amplitude inplane pitch motion, dumbbell librational motion, and the anti-symmetric elastic modes are all coupled. The three dimensional equations of motion for a circular flat plate and shallow spherical shell in orbit with a two-degree-of freedom gimballed dumbbell are also developed and show that only those elastic modes described by a single nodal diameter line are influenced by the dumbbell motion. Stability criteria are developed for all the examples and a sensitivity study of the system response characteristics to the key system parameters is carried out.

  8. Structures and stabilities of group 17 fluorides EF3 (E = I, At, and element 117) with spin-orbit coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dong-Dong; Wang, Fan

    2012-12-05

    In this work, a recently developed CCSD(T) approach with spin-orbit coupling (SOC) as well as density functional theory (DFT) using various exchange-correlation (XC) functionals are employed to investigate structures and stabilities of group 17 fluorides EF(3) (E = I, At, and element 117). These molecules are predicted to have bent T-shaped C(2v) structures according to the second-order Jahn-Teller (SOJT) effects or the valance shell electron pair repulsion (VSEPR) theory. For IF(3) and (117)F(3), our results are consistent with previous SOC-DFT calculations. However, different XC functionals provide different results for AtF(3) and our SOC-CCSD(T) calculations show that both the C(2v) and D(3h) structures are minima on the potential energy surface and the C(2v) structure is the global minimum for AtF(3). The performance of XC functionals on structures and stabilities of IF(3) and AtF(3) is found to depend on the fraction of the Hartree-Fock exchange (HFX) included in the XC functionals and the M06-2X functional with 54% of HFX providing results that agree best with CCSD(T) results. In addition, although both the C(2v) and D(3h) structures are minima for AtF(3), the energy barrier between them is only 8 kJ mol(-1) for the C(2v) structure and 0.05 kJ mol(-1) for the D(3h) structure. This indicates that the D(3h) structure could not possibly be observed experimentally and AtF(3) can convert easily between the three C(2v) structures. The SOJT term is shown to be reduced by electron correlation for IF(3) and AtF(3). On the other hand, although SOC decreases the energy difference between the C(2v) and D(3h) structures and reduces the deviation of the C(2v) structure from the D(3h) structure, it decreases the frequency of the bond bending mode, which may indicate that SOC actually increases the SOJT term. This could be related to mixing of spin-singlet E' states to low-energy spin-triplet states due to SOC.

  9. Attitude Control and Orbital Dynamics Challenges of Removing the First 3-Axis Stabilized Tracking and Data Relay Satellite from the Geosynchronous ARC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benet, Charles A.; Hofman, Henry; Williams, Thomas E.; Olney, Dave; Zaleski, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Launched on April 4, 1983 onboard STS 6 (Space Shuttle Challenger), the First Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS 1) was retired above the Geosynchronous Orbit (GEO) on June 27, 2010 after having provided real-time communications with a variety of low-orbiting spacecraft over a 26-year period. To meet NASA requirements limiting orbital debris 1, a team of experts was assembled to conduct an End-Of-Mission (EOM) procedure to raise the satellite 350 km above the GEO orbit. Following the orbit raising via conventional station change maneuvers, the team was confronted with having to deplete the remaining propellant and passivate all energy storage or generation sources. To accomplish these tasks within the time window, communications (telemetry and control links), electrical power, propulsion, and thermal constraints, a spacecraft originally designed as a three-axis stabilized satellite was turned into a spinner. This paper (a companion paper to Innovative Approach Enabled the Retirement of TDRS 1, paper # 1699, IEEE 2011 Aerospace Conference, March 5-12, 2011 sup 2) focuses on the challenges of maintaining an acceptable spinning dynamics, while repetitively firing thrusters. Also addressed are the effects of thruster firings on the orbit characteristics and how they were mitigated by a careful scheduling of the fuel depletion operations. Periodic thruster firings for spin rate adjustment, nutation damping, and precession of the momentum vector were also required in order to maintain effective communications with the satellite. All operations were thoroughly rehearsed and supported by simulations thus lending a high level of confidence in meeting the NASA EOM goals.

  10. The Stability of the Orbits of Earth-mass Planets in and near the Habitable Zones of Known Exoplanetary Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, B W; Sleep, P N; Underwood, David R

    2003-01-01

    We have shown that Earth-mass planets could survive in variously restricted regions of the habitable zones (HZs) of most of a sample of nine of the 93 main-sequence exoplanetary systems confirmed by May 2003. In a preliminary extrapolation of our results to the other systems, we estimate that roughly a third of the 93 systems might be able to have Earth-mass planets in stable, confined orbits somewhere in their HZs. Clearly, these systems should be high on the target list for exploration for terrestrial planets. We have reached this conclusion by launching putative Earth-mass planets in various orbits and following their fate with a mixed-variable symplectic integrator.

  11. Providing hydrogen maser timing stability to orbiting VLBI radio telescope observations by post-measurement compensation of linked frequency standard imperfections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springett, James C.

    1994-01-01

    Orbiting VLBI (OVLBI) astronomical observations are based upon measurements acquired simultaneously from ground-based and earth-orbiting radio telescopes. By the mid-1990s, two orbiting VLBI observatories, Russia's Radioastron and Japan's VSOP, will augment the worldwide VLBI network, providing baselines to earth radio telescopes as large as 80,000 km. The challenge for OVLBI is to effectuate space to ground radio telescope data cross-correlation (the observation) to a level of integrity currently achieved between ground radio telescopes. VLBI radio telescopes require ultrastable frequency and timing references in order that long term observations may be made without serious cross-correlation loss due to frequency source drift and phase noise. For this reason, such instruments make use of hydrogen maser frequency standards. Unfortunately, space-qualified hydrogen maser oscillators are currently not available for use on OVLBI satellites. Thus, the necessary long-term stability needed by the orbiting radio telescope may only be obtained by microwave uplinking a ground-based hydrogen maser derived frequency to the satellite. Although the idea of uplinking the frequency standard intrinsically seems simple, there are many 'contaminations' which degrade both the long and short term stability of the transmitted reference. Factors which corrupt frequency and timing accuracy include additive radio and electronic circuit thermal noise, slow or systematic phase migration due to changes of electronic circuit temporal operating conditions (especially temperature), ionosphere and troposphere induced scintillations, residual Doppler-incited components, and microwave signal multipath propagation. What is important, though, is to realize that ultimate stability does not have to be achieved in real-time. Instead, information needed to produce a high degree of coherence in the subsequent cross-correlation operation may be derived from a two-way coherent radio link, recorded and later

  12. The stability of tightly-packed, evenly-spaced systems of Earth-mass planets orbiting a Sun-like star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obertas, Alysa; Van Laerhoven, Christa; Tamayo, Daniel

    2017-09-01

    Many of the multi-planet systems discovered to date have been notable for their compactness, with neighbouring planets closer together than any in the Solar System. Interestingly, planet-hosting stars have a wide range of ages, suggesting that such compact systems can survive for extended periods of time. We have used numerical simulations to investigate how quickly systems go unstable in relation to the spacing between planets, focusing on hypothetical systems of Earth-mass planets on evenly-spaced orbits (in mutual Hill radii). In general, the further apart the planets are initially, the longer it takes for a pair of planets to undergo a close encounter. We recover the results of previous studies, showing a linear trend in the initial planet spacing between 3 and 8 mutual Hill radii and the logarithm of the stability time. Investigating thousands of simulations with spacings up to 13 mutual Hill radii reveals distinct modulations superimposed on this relationship in the vicinity of first and second-order mean motion resonances of adjacent and next-adjacent planets. We discuss the impact of this structure and the implications on the stability of compact multi-planet systems. Applying the outcomes of our simulations, we show that isolated systems of up to five Earth-mass planets can fit in the habitable zone of a Sun-like star without close encounters for at least 109 orbits.

  13. Orbital stability of standing waves of a class of fractional Schrödinger equations with Hartree-type nonlinearity

    KAUST Repository

    Cho, Yonggeun

    2016-05-04

    This paper is devoted to the mathematical analysis of a class of nonlinear fractional Schrödinger equations with a general Hartree-type integrand. We show the well-posedness of the associated Cauchy problem and prove the existence and stability of standing waves under suitable assumptions on the nonlinearity. Our proofs rely on a contraction argument in mixed functional spaces and the concentration-compactness method. © 2015 World Scientific Publishing Company

  14. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: VII. Confirmation of 27 planets in 13 multiplanet systems via Transit Timing Variations and orbital stability

    CERN Document Server

    Steffen, Jason H; Agol, Eric; Ford, Eric B; Morehead, Robert C; Cochran, William D; Lissauer, Jack J; Adams, Elisabeth R; Borucki, William J; Bryson, Steve; Caldwell, Douglas A; Dupree, Andrea; Jenkins, Jon M; Robertson, Paul; Rowe, Jason F; Seader, Shawn; Thompson, Susan; Twicken, Joseph D

    2012-01-01

    We confirm 27 planets in 13 planetary systems by showing the existence of statistically significant anti-correlated transit timing variations (TTVs), which demonstrates that the planet candidates are in the same system, and long-term dynamical stability, which places limits on the masses of the candidates---showing that they are planetary. %This overall method of planet confirmation was first applied to \\kepler systems 23 through 32. All of these newly confirmed planetary systems have orbital periods that place them near first-order mean motion resonances (MMRs), including 6 systems near the 2:1 MMR, 5 near 3:2, and one each near 4:3, 5:4, and 6:5. In addition, several unconfirmed planet candidates exist in some systems (that cannot be confirmed with this method at this time). A few of these candidates would also be near first order MMRs with either the confirmed planets or with other candidates. One system of particular interest, Kepler-56 (KOI-1241), is a pair of planets orbiting a 12th magnitude, giant sta...

  15. Spin-orbit coupling effects on the stability of two competing structures in Pb/Si(111) and Pb/Ge(111)

    CERN Document Server

    Ren, Xiao-Yan; Yi, Seho; Jia, Yu; Cho, Jun-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    Using first-principles density-functional theory (DFT) calculations, we investigate the 4/3-monolayer structure of Pb on the Si(111) or Ge(111) surface within the two competing structural models termed the H$_3$ and T$_4$ structures. We find that the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) influences the relative stability of the two structures in both the Pb/Si(111) and Pb/Ge(111) systems: i.e., our DFT calculation without including the SOC predicts that the T$_4$ structure is energetically favored over the H$_3$ structure by ${\\Delta}E$ = 25 meV for Pb/Si(111) and 22 meV for Pb/Ge(111), but the inclusion of SOC reverses their relative stability as ${\\Delta}E$ = $-$12 and $-$7 meV, respectively. Our analysis shows that the SOC-induced switching of the ground state is attributed to a more asymmetric surface charge distribution in the H$_3$ structure, which gives rise to a relatively larger Rashba spin splitting of surface states as well as a relatively larger pseudo-gap opening compared to the T$_4$ structure. By the nudge...

  16. Stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad H. Al-Malack

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fuel oil flyash (FFA produced in power and water desalination plants firing crude oils in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is being disposed in landfills, which increases the burden on the environment, therefore, FFA utilization must be encouraged. In the current research, the effect of adding FFA on the engineering properties of two indigenous soils, namely sand and marl, was investigated. FFA was added at concentrations of 5%, 10% and 15% to both soils with and without the addition of Portland cement. Mixtures of the stabilized soils were thoroughly evaluated using compaction, California Bearing Ratio (CBR, unconfined compressive strength (USC and durability tests. Results of these tests indicated that stabilized sand mixtures could not attain the ACI strength requirements. However, marl was found to satisfy the ACI strength requirement when only 5% of FFA was added together with 5% of cement. When the FFA was increased to 10% and 15%, the mixture’s strength was found to decrease to values below the ACI requirements. Results of the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP, which was performed on samples that passed the ACI requirements, indicated that FFA must be cautiously used in soil stabilization.

  17. Radiometric stability of the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) following 15 years on-orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruegge, Carol J.; Val, Sebastian; Diner, David J.; Jovanovic, Veljko; Gray, Ellyn; Di Girolamo, Larry; Zhao, Guangyu

    2014-09-01

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) has successfully operated on the EOS/ Terra spacecraft since 1999. It consists of nine cameras pointing from nadir to 70.5° view angle with four spectral channels per camera. Specifications call for a radiometric uncertainty of 3% absolute and 1% relative to the other cameras. To accomplish this, MISR utilizes an on-board calibrator (OBC) to measure camera response changes. Once every two months the two Spectralon panels are deployed to direct solar-light into the cameras. Six photodiode sets measure the illumination level that are compared to MISR raw digital numbers, thus determining the radiometric gain coefficients used in Level 1 data processing. Although panel stability is not required, there has been little detectable change in panel reflectance, attributed to careful preflight handling techniques. The cameras themselves have degraded in radiometric response by 10% since launch, but calibration updates using the detector-based scheme has compensated for these drifts and allowed the radiance products to meet accuracy requirements. Validation using Sahara desert observations show that there has been a drift of ~1% in the reported nadir-view radiance over a decade, common to all spectral bands.

  18. Monitoring on-orbit calibration stability of the Terra MODIS and Landsat 7 ETM+ sensors using pseudo-invariant test sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chander, G.; Xiong, X.(J.); Choi, T.(J.); Angal, A.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to detect and quantify changes in the Earth's environment depends on sensors that can provide calibrated, consistent measurements of the Earth's surface features through time. A critical step in this process is to put image data from different sensors onto a common radiometric scale. This work focuses on monitoring the long-term on-orbit calibration stability of the Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Landsat 7 (L7) Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) sensors using the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) reference standard pseudo-invariant test sites (Libya 4, Mauritania 1/2, Algeria 3, Libya 1, and Algeria 5). These sites have been frequently used as radiometric targets because of their relatively stable surface conditions temporally. This study was performed using all cloud-free calibrated images from the Terra MODIS and the L7 ETM+ sensors, acquired from launch to December 2008. Homogeneous regions of interest (ROI) were selected in the calibrated images and the mean target statistics were derived from sensor measurements in terms of top-of-atmosphere (TOA) reflectance. For each band pair, a set of fitted coefficients (slope and offset) is provided to monitor the long-term stability over very stable pseudo-invariant test sites. The average percent differences in intercept from the long-term trends obtained from the ETM + TOA reflectance estimates relative to the MODIS for all the CEOS reference standard test sites range from 2.5% to 15%. This gives an estimate of the collective differences due to the Relative Spectral Response (RSR) characteristics of each sensor, bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF), spectral signature of the ground target, and atmospheric composition. The lifetime TOA reflectance trends from both sensors over 10 years are extremely stable, changing by no more than 0.4% per year in its TOA reflectance over the CEOS reference standard test sites. ?? 2009 Elsevier Inc.

  19. Orbital cellulitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hemolytic streptococci may also cause orbital cellulitis. Orbital cellulitis infections in children may get worse very quickly and ... in the space around the eye. An orbital cellulitis infection can get worse very quickly. A person with ...

  20. Conformational stability, molecular orbital studies (chemical hardness and potential), vibrational investigation and theoretical NBO analysis of 4-tert-butyl-3-methoxy-2,6-dinitrotoluene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, S; Balachandran, V; Vishwanathan, K

    2014-04-24

    The FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 4-tert-butyl-3-methoxy-2,6-dinitrotoluene (musk ambrette) have been recorded in the regions 4000-400 cm(-1) and 3500-100 cm(-1), respectively. The total energy calculations of musk ambrette were tried for the possible conformers. The molecular structure, geometry optimization, vibrational frequencies were obtained by the density functional theory (DFT) using B3LYP and LSDA method with 6-311G(d,p) basis set for the most stable conformer "C1". The complete assignments were performed on the basis of the potential energy distribution (PED) of the vibrational modes, calculated and the scaled values were compared with experimental FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra. The observed and the calculated frequencies are found to be in good agreement. The stability of the molecule arising from hyper conjugate interactions and the charge delocalization has been analyzed using bond orbital (NBO) analysis. The HOMO and LUMO energy gap reveals that the energy gap reflects the chemical activity of the molecule. The dipole moment (μ), polarizability (α), anisotropy polarizability (Δα) and first hyperpolarizability (βtot) of the molecule have been reported. The thermodynamic functions (heat capacity, entropy and enthalpy) were obtained for the range of temperature 100-1000 K. Information about the size, shape, charge density distribution and site of chemical reactivity of the molecule has been obtained by mapping electron density isosurface with molecular electrostatic potential (MEP).

  1. Stability Analysis of the In-Orbit Satellite Atomic Clocks%GPS在轨卫星原子钟的稳定性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李长会; 闫国锋

    2012-01-01

    导航卫星星载原子钟的相位或频率数据,作为导航系统应用研究的基础,将直接影响导航系统时间尺度建立以及定位的精度和准确性.本文针对由IGS官网提供的四种GPS卫星钟的钟差数据,采用修正阿伦方差进行了稳定性分析,得到了一些有益的结论.%As the application research basis of navigation system, the phase or frequency data of in - orbit satellite atomic clocks directly affect the precision and accuracy of navigation system. This paper analyzes the stability of four types of data of GPS satellite a-tomic clocks which is provided by the official website of IGS using Allan variance method and reaches some beneficial conclusions.

  2. Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada S. Abdelwahab

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The present work concerns with the development of stability indicating the RP-HPLC method for simultaneous determination of guaifenesin (GUF and pseudoephedrine hydrochloride (PSH in the presence of guaifenesin related substance (Guaiacol. GUC, and in the presence of syrup excepients with minimum sample pre-treatment. In the developed RP-HPLC method efficient chromatographic separation was achieved for GUF, PSH, GUC and syrup excepients using ODS column as a stationary phase and methanol: water (50:50, v/v, pH = 4 with orthophosphoric acid as a mobile phase with a flow rate of 1 mL min−1 and UV detection at 210 nm. The chromatographic run time was approximately 10 min. Calibration curves were drawn relating the integrated area under peak to the corresponding concentrations of PSH, GUF and GUC in the range of 1–8, 1–20, 0.4–8 μg mL−1, respectively. The developed method has been validated and met the requirements delineated by ICH guidelines with respect to linearity, accuracy, precision, specificity and robustness. The validated method was successfully applied for determination of the studied drugs in triaminic chest congestion® syrup; moreover its results were statistically compared with those obtained by the official method and no significant difference was found between them.

  3. Small Orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Borsten, L; Ferrara, S; Marrani, A; Rubens, W

    2012-01-01

    We study both the "large" and "small" U-duality charge orbits of extremal black holes appearing in D = 5 and D = 4 Maxwell-Einstein supergravity theories with symmetric scalar manifolds. We exploit a formalism based on cubic Jordan algebras and their associated Freudenthal triple systems, in order to derive the minimal charge representatives, their stabilizers and the associated "moduli spaces". After recalling N = 8 maximal supergravity, we consider N = 2 and N = 4 theories coupled to an arbitrary number of vector multiplets, as well as N = 2 magic, STU, ST^2 and T^3 models. While the STU model may be considered as part of the general N = 2 sequence, albeit with an additional triality symmetry, the ST^2 and T^3 models demand a separate treatment, since their representative Jordan algebras are Euclidean or only admit non-zero elements of rank 3, respectively. Finally, we also consider minimally coupled N = 2, matter coupled N = 3, and "pure" N = 5 theories.

  4. Periodic orbits for three and four co-orbital bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrier, P. E.; McInnes, C. R.

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the natural families of periodic orbits associated with the equilibrium configurations of the planar-restricted 1 + n-body problem for the case 2 ≤ n ≤ 4 equal-mass satellites. Such periodic orbits can be used to model both trojan exoplanetary systems and parking orbits for captured asteroids within the Solar system. For n = 2, there are two families of periodic orbits associated with the equilibria of the system: the well-known horseshoe and tadpole orbits. For n = 3, there are three families that emanate from the equilibrium configurations of the satellites, while for n = 4, there are six such families as well as numerous additional connecting families. The families of periodic orbits are all of the horseshoe or tadpole type, and several have regions of neutral linear stability.

  5. Periodic orbits for 3 and 4 co-orbital bodies

    CERN Document Server

    Verrier, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the natural families of periodic orbits associated with the equilibrium configurations of the the planar restricted $1+n$ body problem for the case $2\\leq n \\leq 4$ equal mass satellites. Such periodic orbits can be used to model both trojan exoplanetary systems and parking orbits for captured asteroids within the solar system. For $n=2$ there are two families of periodic orbits associated with the equilibria of the system: the well known horseshoe and tadpole orbits. For $n=3$ there are three families that emanate from the equilibrium configurations of the satellites, while for $n=4$ there are six such families as well as numerous additional connecting families. The families of periodic orbits are all of the horseshoe or tadpole type, and several have regions of neutral linear stability.

  6. {beta}-decay studies at the N=28 shell closure: indications for a weakening of the spin-orbit force far from stability?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grevy, S. [Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire de Caen, IN2P3-CNRS, ENSICAEN et Universite de Caen, F-14050 Caen Cedex (France)]. E-mail: grevy@in2p3.fr; Angelique, J.C.; Baumann, P.; Borcea, C.; Buta, A.; Canchel, G.; Catford, W.N.; Courtin, S.; Daugas, J.M.; Oliveira, F. de; Dessagne, P.; Dlouhy, Z.; Knipper, A.; Kratz, K.L.; Lecolley, F.R.; Lecouey, J.L.; Lehrsenneau, G.; Lewitowicz, M.; Lienard, E.; Lukyanov, S.; Marechal, F.; Miehe, C.; Mrazek, J.; Negoita, F.; Orr, N.A.; Pantelica, D.; Penionzhkevich, Y.; Peter, J.; Pfeiffer, B.; Pietri, S.; Poirier, E.; Sorlin, O.; Stanoiu, M.; Stefan, I.; Stodel, C.; Timis, C

    2004-12-27

    A {beta}-decay experiment on nuclei in the region of N=28 has been performed at the GANIL facility. New measured half-lives for the Si isotopes from N=25 to N=28 are reported and discussed in the light of the deformation occurring in this region. Comparison with QRPA calculations suggests that a weakening of the spin-orbit force occurs for the very neutron-rich Si isotopes.

  7. The Transient Accereting X-Ray Pulsar XTE J1946+274: Stability of the X-Ray Properties at Low Flux and Updated Orbital Solution

    CERN Document Server

    Marcu-Cheatham, Diana M; Kühnel, Matthias; Müller, Sebastian; Falkner, Sebastian; Caballero, Isabel; Finger, Mark H; Jenke, Peter J; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A; Fürst, Felix; Grinberg, Victoria; Hemphill, Paul B; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Klochkov, Dmitry; Rothschild, Richard E; Terada, Yukikatsu; Enoto, Teruaki; Iwakiri, Wataru; Wolff, Michael T; Becker, Peter A; Wood, Kent S; Wilms, Jöern

    2015-01-01

    We present a timing and spectral analysis of the X-ray pulsar XTE J1946+274 observed with Suzaku during an outburst decline in 2010 October and compare with previous results. XTE J1946+274 is a transient X-ray binary consisting of a Be-type star and a neutron star with a 15.75 s pulse period in a 172 d orbit with 2-3 outbursts per orbit during phases of activity. We improve the orbital solution using data from multiple instruments. The X-ray spectrum can be described by an absorbed Fermi-Dirac cutoff power law model along with a narrow Fe K line at 6.4 keV and a weak Cyclotron Resonance Scattering Feature (CRSF) at ~35 keV. The Suzaku data are consistent with the previously observed continuum flux versus iron line flux correlation expected from fluorescence emission along the line of sight. However, the observed iron line flux is slightly higher, indicating the possibility of a higher iron abundance or the presence of non-uniform material. We argue that the source most likely has only been observed in the sub...

  8. Orbital pseudotumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Goodlick TA, Kay MD, Glaser JS, Tse DT, Chang WJ. Orbital disease and neuro-ophthalmology. In: Tasman ... 423. Review Date 8/20/2016 Updated by: Franklin W. Lusby, MD, ophthalmologist, Lusby Vision Institute, La ...

  9. Foreign body orbital cyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdanfard, Younes; Heegard, Steffen; Fledelius, Hans C.

    2001-01-01

    Ophthalmology, penetrating orbital injury, orbital foreign body, ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), histology......Ophthalmology, penetrating orbital injury, orbital foreign body, ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), histology...

  10. THE TRANSIENT ACCRETING X-RAY PULSAR XTE J1946+274: STABILITY OF X-RAY PROPERTIES AT LOW FLUX AND UPDATED ORBITAL SOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcu-Cheatham, Diana M.; Pottschmidt, Katja [CRESST and Department of Physics, University of Maryland Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD 21250 (United States); Kühnel, Matthias; Müller, Sebastian; Falkner, Sebastian; Kreykenbohm, Ingo [Dr. Karl Remeis-Observatory and ECAP, University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Sternwartstr. 7, Bamberg (Germany); Caballero, Isabel [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/IRFU, CNRS/INSU, Université Paris Diderot, CEA DSM/IRFU/SAp, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Finger, Mark H. [Universities Space Research Association, National Space Science and Technology Center, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Jenke, Peter J. [University of Alabama in Huntsville, 301 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A. [Astrophysics Office, ZP 12, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Fürst, Felix [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Grinberg, Victoria [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Hemphill, Paul B.; Rothschild, Richard E. [University of California, San Diego, Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0424 (United States); Klochkov, Dmitry [Institut für Astronomie und Astrophysik, Universität Tübingen (IAAT), Sand 1, Tübingen (Germany); Terada, Yukikatsu [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Simo-Ohkubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama City, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); and others

    2015-12-10

    We present a timing and spectral analysis of the X-ray pulsar XTE J1946+274 observed with Suzaku during an outburst decline in 2010 October and compare with previous results. XTE J1946+274 is a transient X-ray binary consisting of a Be-type star and a neutron star with a 15.75 s pulse period in a 172 days orbit with 2–3 outbursts per orbit during phases of activity. We improve the orbital solution using data from multiple instruments. The X-ray spectrum can be described by an absorbed Fermi–Dirac cut-off power-law model along with a narrow Fe Kα line at 6.4 keV and a weak Cyclotron Resonance Scattering Feature (CRSF) at ∼35 keV. The Suzaku data are consistent with the previously observed continuum flux versus iron line flux correlation expected from fluorescence emission along the line of sight. However, the observed iron line flux is slightly higher, indicating the possibility of a higher iron abundance or the presence of non-uniform material. We argue that the source most likely has only been observed in the subcritical (non-radiation dominated) state since its pulse profile is stable over all observed luminosities and the energy of the CRSF is approximately the same at the highest (∼5 × 10{sup 37} erg s{sup −1}) and lowest (∼5 × 10{sup 36} erg s{sup −1}) observed 3–60 keV luminosities.

  11. New orbit correction method uniting global and local orbit corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, N.; Takaki, H.; Sakai, H.; Satoh, M.; Harada, K.; Kamiya, Y.

    2006-01-01

    A new orbit correction method, called the eigenvector method with constraints (EVC), is proposed and formulated to unite global and local orbit corrections for ring accelerators, especially synchrotron radiation(SR) sources. The EVC can exactly correct the beam positions at arbitrarily selected ring positions such as light source points, simultaneously reducing closed orbit distortion (COD) around the whole ring. Computer simulations clearly demonstrate these features of the EVC for both cases of the Super-SOR light source and the Advanced Light Source (ALS) that have typical structures of high-brilliance SR sources. In addition, the effects of errors in beam position monitor (BPM) reading and steering magnet setting on the orbit correction are analytically expressed and also compared with the computer simulations. Simulation results show that the EVC is very effective and useful for orbit correction and beam position stabilization in SR sources.

  12. Fundamental insights into conformational stability and orbital interactions of antioxidant (+)-catechin species and complexation of (+)-catechin with zinc(II) and oxovanadium(IV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasarawan, Nuttawisit; Thipyapong, Khajadpai; Sirichai, Somsak; Ruangpornvisuti, Vithaya

    2013-09-01

    Conformational stability of (+)-catechin species in water has been examined with density functional theory, associated with the polarizable continuum model (PCM) of solvation. Factors such as electron delocalization, lone-pair electron donation and intramolecular hydrogen bonding substantially contribute to the conformational stabilization. Upon deprotonation, the HOMO and LUMO energies for (+)-catechin are both elevated; the energy gaps for the deprotonated species are narrower than the energy gap for the neutral species. The preferential deprotonation occurs at the C3'-, C5-, C7- and C4'-OH groups successively. The pKa value at 9.3 predicted for the most acidic OH group agrees well with previous experimental data; however the values are overestimated for the less acidic OH groups due to limitations of the PCM for charged solutes and/or complex nature of true deprotonation pathways. Formation of hydrogen radicals should be promoted at high pH values following the bond dissociation enthalpies. Complexation of (+)-catechin with either zinc(II) or oxovanadium(IV) is favored at the 1:1 metal-to-ligand (M:L) mole ratio, with the oxovanadium(IV) complex showing higher reaction preference. At M:L = 1:2, formation of two isomeric complexes are plausible for each type of metal ion. Effects of stoichiometry and isomerism on the computational spectral features of the possibly formed metal complexes have been described.

  13. Solar Orbiter Status Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Holly; St. Cyr, Orville Chris; Mueller, Daniel; Zouganelis, Yannis; Velli, Marco

    2017-08-01

    With the delivery of the instruments to the spacecraft builder, the Solar Orbiter mission is in the midst of Integration & Testing phase at Airbus in Stevenage, U.K. This mission to “Explore the Sun-Heliosphere Connection” is the first medium-class mission of ESA’s Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 program and is being jointly implemented with NASA. The dedicated payload of 10 remote-sensing and in-situ instruments will orbit the Sun as close as 0.3 A.U. and will provide measurments from the photosphere into the solar wind. The three-axis stabilized spacecraft will use Venus gravity assists to increase the orbital inclination out of the ecliptic to solar latitudes as high as 34 degrees in the extended mission. The science team of Solar Orbiter has been working closely with the Solar Probe Plus scientists to coordinate observations between these two highly-complementary missions. This will be a status report on the mission development; the interested reader is referred to the recent summary by Müller et al., Solar Physics 285 (2013).

  14. Geometric orbit datum and orbit covers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁科; 侯自新

    2001-01-01

    Vogan conjectured that the parabolic induction of orbit data is independent of the choice of the parabolic subgroup. In this paper we first give the parabolic induction of orbit covers, whose relationship with geometric orbit datum is also induced. Hence we show a geometric interpretation of orbit data and finally prove the conjugation for geometric orbit datum using geometric method.

  15. On periodic orbits in discrete-time cascade systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huimin Li

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We present some results on existence, minimum period, number of periodic orbits, and stability of periodic orbits in discrete-time cascade systems. Some examples are presented to illustrate these results.

  16. Liouville theory and special coadjoint Virasoro orbits

    OpenAIRE

    Gorsky, A.; Johansen, A.

    1993-01-01

    We describe the Hamiltonian reduction of the coajoint Kac-Moody orbits to the Virasoro coajoint orbits explicitly in terms of the Lagrangian approach for the Wess-Zumino-Novikov-Witten theory. While a relation of the coajoint Virasoro orbit $Diff \\; S^1 /SL(2,R)$ to the Liouville theory has been already studied we analyse the role of special coajoint Virasoro orbits $Diff \\; S^1/\\tilde{T}_{\\pm ,n}$ corresponding to stabilizers generated by the vector fields with double zeros. The orbits with ...

  17. Orbit analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelotti, L.

    1995-01-01

    The past fifteen years have witnessed a remarkable development of methods for analyzing single particle orbit dynamics in accelerators. Unlike their more classic counterparts, which act upon differential equations, these methods proceed by manipulating Poincare maps directly. This attribute makes them well matched for studying accelerators whose physics is most naturally modelled in terms of maps, an observation that has been championed most vigorously by Forest. In the following sections the author sketchs a little background, explains some of the physics underlying these techniques, and discusses the best computing strategy for implementing them in conjunction with modeling accelerators.

  18. Orbital entanglement in quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Boguslawski, Katharina

    2014-01-01

    The basic concepts of orbital entanglement and its application to chemistry are briefly reviewed. The calculation of orbital entanglement measures from correlated wavefunctions is discussed in terms of reduced $n$-particle density matrices. Possible simplifications in their evaluation are highlighted in case of seniority-zero wavefunctions. Specifically, orbital entanglement allows us to dissect electron correlation effects in its strong and weak contributions, to determine bond orders, to assess the quality and stability of active space calculations, to monitor chemical reactions, and to identify points along the reaction coordinate where electronic wavefunctions change drastically. Thus, orbital entanglement represents a useful and intuitive tool to interpret complex electronic wavefunctions and to facilitate a qualitative understanding of electronic structure and how it changes in chemical processes.

  19. Inflammation of the Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Eye Exams, Study Finds Additional Content Medical News Inflammation of the Orbit (Inflammatory Orbital Pseudotumor) By James ... Introduction to Eye Socket Disorders Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis Inflammation of the Orbit Orbital Cellulitis Preseptal Cellulitis Tumors ...

  20. Imaging of Orbital Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed Hassan Mostafavi

    2010-01-01

    Preseptal and orbital cellulitis occur more commonly in children than adults. The history and physical examination are crucial in distinguishing between preseptal and orbital cellulitis. The orbital septum delineates the anterior eyelid soft tissues from the orbital soft tissue. Infections anterior to the orbital septum are classified as preseptal cellulitis and those posterior to the orbital septum are termed orbital cellulitis. "nRecognition of orbital involvement is important not only...

  1. Reducing or enhancing chaos using periodic orbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelard, R; Chandre, C; Leoncini, X

    2006-06-01

    A method to reduce or enhance chaos in Hamiltonian flows with two degrees of freedom is discussed. This method is based on finding a suitable perturbation of the system such that the stability of a set of periodic orbits changes (local bifurcations). Depending on the values of the residues, reflecting their linear stability properties, a set of invariant tori is destroyed or created in the neighborhood of the chosen periodic orbits. An application on a paradigmatic system, a forced pendulum, illustrates the method.

  2. Effect of Rashba Spin-Orbit Interaction on the Stability of Spin-Vortex-Induced Loop Current in Hole-Doped Cuprate Superconductors: A Scenario for the Appearance of Magnetic Field Enhanced Charge Order and Fermi Surface Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisaki, Tsubasa; Wakaura, Hikaru; Koizumi, Hiroyasu

    2017-10-01

    Rashba type spin-orbit interaction is included in the model Hamiltonian for the spin-vortex-induced loop current (SVILC) mechanism of superconductivity for hole doped cuprate superconductors and its effects are investigated. We assume that a Rashba interaction appears around the small polarons formed by the doped holes in the bulk; its internal electric field is assumed to be in the direction perpendicular to the CuO2 plane and stabilizes the spin polarization lying in the CuO2 plane. We examine 4 × 4, 4 × 6, and 4 × 8 spin-vortex-quartet (SVQ) and perform Monte Carlo simulations to estimate the superconducting transition temperature Tc, where each SVQ is a n × m two dimensional region (in the units of the lattice constant) containing four holes, four spin-vortices, and four SVILCs. We find that the 4 × 6 SVQ is the most stable one among them with the highest Tc; in this case, the hole concentration per Cu atom is x = 0.167, which is close to the optimal doping value x = 0.170, suggesting that the optimal doping may be related to the stabilization of the superconducting state by the Rashba interaction. We also find that the 4 × 8 SVQ becomes more stable than the 4 × 6 SVQ in a current flowing situation; this indicates that the conversion from the 4 × 6 SVQs to 4 × 8 SVQs may occur upon the emergence of a macroscopic current by the application of a magnetic field. This conversion may explain the enhancement of the charge order around x = 0.125 and the Fermi surface reconstruction upon an application of a magnetic field.

  3. Orbital liposarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borbolla-Pertierra, A M; Morales-Baños, D R; Martínez-Nava, L R; Garrido-Sánchez, G A; López-Hernández, C M; Velasco-Ramos, P

    2017-02-01

    The case is presented of a 46-year-old male with right eye proptosis and conjunctival hyperaemia, of 18 months onset. A well-defined intraconal mass was found in the computed tomography. In magnetic resonance this was hypo-intense on T1, enhanced with gadolinium and hyperintense on T2. Excisional biopsy was performed, which was reported as a well-differentiated liposarcoma in the histopathology study. Liposarcoma is a malignant adipose tissue tumour. It is very rare in the orbit, with 5 histological types, the most common being myxoid. The treatment of choice is wide surgical excision and may be accompanied with radiotherapy. As it is an infiltrative tumour, It has a high rate of recurrence. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Small Mercury Relativity Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Peter L.; Vincent, Mark A.

    1989-01-01

    The accuracy of solar system tests of gravitational theory could be very much improved by range and Doppler measurements to a Small Mercury Relativity Orbiter. A nearly circular orbit at roughly 2400 km altitude is assumed in order to minimize problems with orbit determination and thermal radiation from the surface. The spacecraft is spin-stabilized and has a 30 cm diameter de-spun antenna. With K-band and X-band ranging systems using a 50 MHz offset sidetone at K-band, a range accuracy of 3 cm appears to be realistically achievable. The estimated spacecraft mass is 50 kg. A consider-covariance analysis was performed to determine how well the Earth-Mercury distance as a function of time could be determined with such a Relativity Orbiter. The minimum data set is assumed to be 40 independent 8-hour arcs of tracking data at selected times during a two year period. The gravity field of Mercury up through degree and order 10 is solved for, along with the initial conditions for each arc and the Earth-Mercury distance at the center of each arc. The considered parameters include the gravity field parameters of degree 11 and 12 plus the tracking station coordinates, the tropospheric delay, and two parameters in a crude radiation pressure model. The conclusion is that the Earth-Mercury distance can be determined to 6 cm accuracy or better. From a modified worst-case analysis, this would lead to roughly 2 orders of magnitude improvement in the knowledge of the precession of perihelion, the relativistic time delay, and the possible change in the gravitational constant with time.

  5. Updates in Orbital Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nila; F.Moeloek

    1993-01-01

    Orbital anatomy, the clinical features of orbital tumors, the recent development of the diagnosis and management of orbital tumors were described. The incidence of orbital tumors in Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital in the past years were introduced. The principle of management of orbital tumors and their prognosis were discussed.

  6. Periodic Orbits in Rotating Second Degree and Order Gravity Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Duo Hu; Daniel J.Scheeres

    2008-01-01

    Periodic orbits in an arbitrary 2nd degree and order uniformly rotating gravity field are studied. We investigate the four equilibrium points in this gravity field. We see that close relation exists between the stability of these equilibria and the existence and stability of their nearby periodic orbits. We check the periodic orbits with non-zero periods. In our searching procedure for these periodic orbits, we remove the two unity eigenvalues from the state transition matrix to find a robust, non-singular linear map to solve for the periodic orbits. The algorithm converges well, especially for stable periodic orbits. Using the searching procedure, which is relatively automatic, we find five basic families of periodic orbits in the rotating second degree and order gravity field for planar motion, and discuss their existence and stability at different central body rotation rates.

  7. Multiple-Orbit Simulations of Binary Neutron Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Suh, InSaeng; Haywood, J Reese; Lan, N Q

    2016-01-01

    We study the general relativistic hydrodynamic evolution of neutron stars in binary orbits and analyze the equation of state dependence of the orbits as the stars approach the inner most last stable circular orbit. We show that by employing a conformally flat condition on the metric, one can stably numerically evolve ~100 quasi-circular orbits and could straightforwardly extend the calculation to the ~10,000 orbits needed to follow stars through the LIGO frequency band. We apply this code to orbiting neutron stars in the quasi-circular orbit approximation to both demonstrate the stability of this approach and explore the equation of state dependence of the orbital properties. We employ variety of available realistic neutron star equations of state as well as a Gamma=2 polytrope. We confirm that both the orbital and emergent gravity wave frequency evolve more slowly for a softer equation of state as the stars approach the innermost stable circular orbit.

  8. Imaging of Orbital Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hassan Mostafavi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Preseptal and orbital cellulitis occur more commonly in children than adults. The history and physical examination are crucial in distinguishing between preseptal and orbital cellulitis. The orbital septum delineates the anterior eyelid soft tissues from the orbital soft tissue. Infections anterior to the orbital septum are classified as preseptal cellulitis and those posterior to the orbital septum are termed orbital cellulitis. "nRecognition of orbital involvement is important not only because of the threatened vision loss associated with orbital cellulitis but also because of the potential for central nervous system complications including cavernous sinus thrombosis, meningitis, and death. "nOrbital imaging should be obtained in all patients suspected of having orbital cellulitis. CT is preferred to MR imaging, as the orbital tissues have high con-trast and the bone can be well visualized. Orbital CT scanning allows localization of the disease process to the preseptal area, the extraconal or intraconal fat, or the subperiosteal space. Axial CT views allow evaluation of the medial orbit and ethmoid sinuses, whereas coronal scans image the orbital roof and floor and the frontal and maxillary sinuses. If direct coronal imaging is not possible, reconstruction of thin axial cuts may help the assessment of the orbital roof and floor. Potential sources of orbital cellulitis such as sinusitis, dental infection, and facial cellulitis are often detectable on CT imaging. "nIn this presentation, the imaging considerations of the orbital infections; including imaging differentiation criteria of all types of orbital infections are reviewed.

  9. Preseptal Cellulitis, Orbital Cellulitis, Orbital Abscess

    OpenAIRE

    Rana Altan Yaycıoğlu

    2012-01-01

    Patients with orbital infections present to our clinic usually with unilateral pain, hyperemia, and edema of the eyelids. The differentiation between preseptal and orbital cellulitis is utmost important in that the second requires hospitalization. Since in orbital cellulitis, the tissues posterior to the orbital septum are involved, signs such as conjunctival chemosis, limited eye movement, decreased vision, as well as afferent pupil defect secondary to optic nerve involvement may al...

  10. Bilateral orbital cavernous haemangiomas.

    OpenAIRE

    Fries, P D; Char, D. H.

    1988-01-01

    Simultaneous bilateral orbital lesions are rare. The differential diagnosis includes orbital pseudotumour, metastasis, leukaemia, lymphoma, Wegener's granulomatosis, and neurofibromatosis. We report what we believe to be the first case of bilateral orbital cavernous haemangiomas.

  11. Controlling Spatiotemporal Chaos in Coupled Map Lattices to Periodic Orbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUKai-En; CHENTian-Lun; BIANGuo-Xing

    2003-01-01

    Two methods are presented for controlling spatiotemporal chaotic motion in coupled map lattices to a kind of periodic orbit where the dynamicM variables of all lattice sites are equM and act periodically as time evolves. Stability analysis of the periodic orbits is presented. We prove that especially the second controlling method can stabilize all the periodic orbits we concern. Basin of attraction and noise problem are discussed.

  12. Orbital dystopia due to orbital roof defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rha, Eun Young; Joo, Hong Sil; Byeon, Jun Hee

    2013-01-01

    We performed a retrospective review of patients who presented with delayed dystopia as a consequence of an orbital roof defect due to fractures and nontraumatic causes to search for a correlation between orbital roof defect size and surgical indications for the treatment thereof. Retrospective analyses were performed in 7 patients, all of whom presented with delayed dystopia due to orbital roof defects, between January 2001 and June 2011. The causes of orbital roof defects were displaced orbital roof fractures (5 cases), tumor (1 case), and congenital sphenoid dysplasia (1 case). All 7 patients had initially been treated conservatively and later presented with significant dystopia. The sizes of the defects were calculated on computed tomographic scans. Among the 7 patients, aspiration of cerebrospinal fluid, which caused ocular symptoms, in 1 patient with minimal displaced orbital roof and reconstruction with calvarial bone, titanium micromesh, or Medpor in 6 other patients were performed. The minimal size of the orbital roof in patients who underwent orbital roof reconstruction was 1.2 cm (defect height) x 1.0 cm (defect length), 0.94 cm(2). For all patients with orbital dystopia, displacement of the globe was corrected without any complications, regardless of whether the patient was evaluated grossly or by radiology. In this retrospective study, continuous monitoring of clinical signs and active surgical management should be considered for cases in which an orbital roof defect is detected, even if no definite symptoms are noted, to prevent delayed sequelae.

  13. Rehabilitation of orbital defect with silicone orbital prosthesis retained by dental implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttal, Satyabodh Shesharaj; Desai, Jhanvi; Kudva, Adarsh; Patil, Basavaraj R

    2016-01-01

    Orbital defects can result from cancer, birth anomalies, or trauma leading to an onslaught of problems in the function and psyche of the patient. These defects are restored by surgical reconstruction and followed by placement of orbital prosthesis for cosmetic makeup. The use of dental implants in retaining orbital prosthesis improves patient acceptance of the prosthesis owing to better retention and stability than conventional adhesive retained prosthesis. This case report describes a custom-made magnetic retentive assembly anchored by a dental implant which offers the orbital prosthesis the simplicity of self-alignment and ease of use. PMID:26953033

  14. Rehabilitation of orbital defect with silicone orbital prosthesis retained by dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttal, Satyabodh Shesharaj; Desai, Jhanvi; Kudva, Adarsh; Patil, Basavaraj R

    2016-01-01

    Orbital defects can result from cancer, birth anomalies, or trauma leading to an onslaught of problems in the function and psyche of the patient. These defects are restored by surgical reconstruction and followed by placement of orbital prosthesis for cosmetic makeup. The use of dental implants in retaining orbital prosthesis improves patient acceptance of the prosthesis owing to better retention and stability than conventional adhesive retained prosthesis. This case report describes a custom-made magnetic retentive assembly anchored by a dental implant which offers the orbital prosthesis the simplicity of self-alignment and ease of use.

  15. Periodic orbits around areostationary points in the Martian gravity field

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Xiaodong; Ma, Xingrui

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the problem of areostationary orbits around Mars in the three-dimensional space. Areostationary orbits are expected to be used to establish a future telecommunication network for the exploration of Mars. However, no artificial satellites have been placed in these orbits thus far. In this paper, the characteristics of the Martian gravity field are presented, and areostationary points and their linear stability are calculated. By taking linearized solutions in the planar case as the initial guesses and utilizing the Levenberg-Marquardt method, families of periodic orbits around areostationary points are shown to exist. Short-period orbits and long-period orbits are found around linearly stable areostationary points, and only short-period orbits are found around unstable areostationary points. Vertical periodic orbits around both linearly stable and unstable areostationary points are also examined. Satellites in these periodic orbits could depart from areostationary points by a few degree...

  16. Preseptal Cellulitis, Orbital Cellulitis, Orbital Abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Altan Yaycıoğlu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Patients with orbital infections present to our clinic usually with unilateral pain, hyperemia, and edema of the eyelids. The differentiation between preseptal and orbital cellulitis is utmost important in that the second requires hospitalization. Since in orbital cellulitis, the tissues posterior to the orbital septum are involved, signs such as conjunctival chemosis, limited eye movement, decreased vision, as well as afferent pupil defect secondary to optic nerve involvement may also be observed. Prompt intravenous antibiotic treatment should be started, and surgical drainage may be performed if patient shows failure to improve in 48 hours despite optimal management. Without treatment, the clinical course may progress to subperiosteal or orbital abscess, and even to cavernous sinus thrombosis. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2012; 42: Supplement 52-6

  17. Precision Orbit Determination for the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter: orbit quality and gravity field estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazarico, E.; Rowlands, D. D.; Neumann, G. A.; Lemoine, F. G.; Torrence, M. H.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.; Mao, D.

    2010-12-01

    We present results of the Precision Orbit Determination work undertaken by the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) Science Team for the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) mission, in order to meet the position knowledge accuracy requirements (50-m total position) and to precisely geolocate the LRO datasets. In addition to the radiometric tracking data, one-way laser ranges (LR) between Earth stations and the spacecraft are made possible by a small telescope mounted on the spacecraft high-gain antenna. The photons received from Earth are transmitted to one LOLA detector by a fiber optics bundle. The LOLA timing system enables 5-s LR normal points with precision better than 10cm. Other types of geodetic constraints are derived from the altimetric data itself. The orbit geometry can be constrained at the times of laser groundtrack intersections (crossovers). Due to the Moon's slow rotation, orbit solutions and normal equations including altimeter crossovers are processed and created in one month batches. Recent high-resolution topographic maps near the lunar poles are used to produce a new kind of geodetic constraints. Purely geometric, those do not necessitate actual groundtrack intersections. We assess the contributions of those data types, and the quality of our orbits. Solutions which use altimetric crossover meet the horizontal 50-m requirement, and perform usually better (10-20m). We also obtain gravity field solutions based on LRO and historical data. The various LRO data are accumulated into normal equations, separately for each one month batch and for each measurement type, which enables the final weights to be adjusted during the least-squares inversion step. Expansion coefficients to degree and order 150 are estimated, and a Kaula rule is still needed to stabilize the farside field. The gravity field solutions are compared to previous solutions (GLGM-3, LP150Q, SGM100h) and the geopotential predicted from the latest LOLA spherical harmonic expansion.

  18. Periodic orbits around areostationary points in the Martian gravity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Dong; Baoyin, Hexi; Ma, Xing-Rui

    2012-05-01

    This study investigates the problem of areostationary orbits around Mars in three-dimensional space. Areostationary orbits are expected to be used to establish a future telecommunication network for the exploration of Mars. However, no artificial satellites have been placed in these orbits thus far. The characteristics of the Martian gravity field are presented, and areostationary points and their linear stability are calculated. By taking linearized solutions in the planar case as the initial guesses and utilizing the Levenberg-Marquardt method, families of periodic orbits around areostationary points are shown to exist. Short-period orbits and long-period orbits are found around linearly stable areostationary points, but only short-period orbits are found around unstable areostationary points. Vertical periodic orbits around both linearly stable and unstable areostationary points are also examined. Satellites in these periodic orbits could depart from areostationary points by a few degrees in longitude, which would facilitate observation of the Martian topography. Based on the eigenvalues of the monodromy matrix, the evolution of the stability index of periodic orbits is determined. Finally, heteroclinic orbits connecting the two unstable areostationary points are found, providing the possibility for orbital transfer with minimal energy consumption.

  19. Periodic orbits around areostationary points in the Martian gravity field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Dong Liu; Hexi Baoyin; Xing-Rui Ma

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the problem of areostationary orbits around Mars in three-dimensional space.Areostationary orbits are expected to be used to establish a future telecommunication network for the exploration of Mars.However,no artificial satellites have been placed in these orbits thus far.The characteristics of the Martian gravity field are presented,and areostationary points and their linear stability are calculated.By taking linearized solutions in the planar case as the initial guesses and utilizing the Levenberg-Marquardt method,families of periodic orbits around areostationary points are shown to exist.Short-period orbits and long-period orbits are found around linearly stable areostationary points,but only short-period orbits are found around unstable areostationary points.Vertical periodic orbits around both linearly stable and unstable areostationary points are also examined.Satellites in these periodic orbits could depart from areostationary points by a few degrees in longitude,which would facilitate observation of the Martian topography.Based on the eigenvalues of the monodromy matrix,the evolution of the stability index of periodic orbits is determined.Finally,heteroclinic orbits connecting the two unstable areostationary points are found,providing the possibility for orbital transfer with minimal energy consumption.

  20. Orbit design for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gerhard; HEINZEL; Albrecht; RDIGER

    2010-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a joint ESA-NASA mission for detecting low-frequency gravitational waves in the frequency range from 0.1 mHz to 1 Hz, by using accurate laser interferometry between three spacecrafts, which will be launched around 2018 and one year later reach their operational orbits around the Sun. In order to operate successfully, it is crucial for the constellation of the three spacecrafts to have extremely high stability. Based on the study of operational orbits for a 2015 launch, we design the operational orbits of beginning epoch on 2019-03-01, and introduce the method of orbit design and optimization. We design the orbits of the transfer from Earth to the operational orbits, including launch phase and separation phase; furthermore, the relationship between energy requirement and flight time of these two orbit phases is investigated. Finally, an example of the whole orbit design is presented.

  1. Lunar Orbiter Photo Gallery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lunar Orbiter Photo Gallery is an extensive collection of over 2,600 high- and moderate-resolution photographs produced by all five of the Lunar Orbiter...

  2. ASC Champ Orbit Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Troels; Jørgensen, John Leif

    1999-01-01

    This documents describes a test of the implementation of the ASC orbit model for the Champ satellite.......This documents describes a test of the implementation of the ASC orbit model for the Champ satellite....

  3. Polygons in billiard orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Don, Henk

    2011-01-01

    We study the geometry of billiard orbits on rectangular billiards. A truncated billiard orbit induces a partition of the rectangle into polygons. We prove that thirteen is a sharp upper bound for the number of different areas of these polygons.

  4. Traumatic transconjunctival orbital emphysema.

    OpenAIRE

    Stroh, E M; Finger, P T

    1990-01-01

    Orbital emphysema can be produced by trans-conjunctival migration of air from a high pressure airgun. In an industrial accident an 8 mm conjunctival laceration was produced in the superior fornix which acted as a portal of entry for air into the subconjunctival, subcutaneous, and retrobulbar spaces. Computed tomography revealed no evidence of orbital fracture and showed that traumatic orbital emphysema occurred without a broken orbital bone.

  5. Introducing Earth's Orbital Eccentricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oostra, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Most students know that planetary orbits, including Earth's, are elliptical; that is Kepler's first law, and it is found in many science textbooks. But quite a few are mistaken about the details, thinking that the orbit is very eccentric, or that this effect is somehow responsible for the seasons. In fact, the Earth's orbital eccentricity is…

  6. Stabilit\\'e orbitale pour le syst\\`eme de Vlasov-Poisson gravitationnel, d'apr\\`es Lemou-M\\'ehats-Rapha\\"el, Guo, Lin, Rein et al. [Orbital stability for the gravitational Vlasov-Poisson system, after Lemou-M\\'ehats-Rapha\\"el, Guo, Lin, Rein et al.

    CERN Document Server

    Mouhot, Clément

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent mathematical progresses made on the study of the orbital stability properties for the gravitational Vlasov-Poisson system. We present in details the paper of Lemou, M\\'ehats and Rapha\\"el (Inventiones 2011) and we review also the previous works by Dolbeault, Guo, Hadzic, Lin, Rein, S\\'anchez, Soler, Wan, Wolansky. We also include a discussion of the history of this topic and the pioneering works by physicists like Antonov, Lynden-Bell and Aly. This is the text of a Bourbaki seminar given in november 2011 (in french).

  7. Painless orbital myositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul T Chakor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic orbital inflammation is the third most common orbital disease, following Graves orbitopathy and lymphoproliferative diseases. We present a 11 year old girl with 15 days history of painless diplopia. There was no history of fluctuation of symptoms, drooping of eye lids or diminished vision. She had near total restricted extra-ocular movements and mild proptosis of the right eye. There was no conjunctival injection, chemosis, or bulb pain. There was no eyelid retraction or lid lag. Rest of the neurological examination was unremarkable.Erythrocyte sedimentation rate was raised with eosinophilia. Antinuclear antibodies were positive. Liver, renal and thyroid functions were normal. Antithyroid, double stranded deoxyribonucleic acid and acetylcholine receptor antibodies were negative. Repetitive nerve stimulation was negative. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the orbit was typical of orbital myositis. The patient responded to oral steroids. Orbital myositis can present as painless diplopia. MRI of orbit is diagnostic in orbital myositis.

  8. Orbital fractures: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey M Joseph, Ioannis P GlavasDivision of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, New York University, New York, NY, USA; Manhattan Eye, Ear, and Throat Hospital, New York, NY, USAAbstract: This review of orbital fractures has three goals: 1 to understand the clinically relevant orbital anatomy with regard to periorbital trauma and orbital fractures, 2 to explain how to assess and examine a patient after periorbital trauma, and 3 to understand the medical and surgical management of orbital fractures. The article aims to summarize the evaluation and management of commonly encountered orbital fractures from the ophthalmologic perspective and to provide an overview for all practicing ophthalmologists and ophthalmologists in training.Keywords: orbit, trauma, fracture, orbital floor, medial wall, zygomatic, zygomatic complex, zmc fracture, zygomaticomaxillary complex fractures 

  9. Glow phenomenon surrounding the vertical stabilizer and OMS pods

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This 35mm frame, photographed as the Space Shuttle Columbia was orbiting Earth during a 'night' pass, documents the glow phenomenon surrounding the vertical stabilizer and the Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) pods of the spacecraft.

  10. Enthalpies of Formation of Gas-Phase N3, N3-, N5+, and N5- from Ab Initio Molecular Orbital Theory, Stability Predictions for N5+N3- and N5+N5-, and Experimental Evidence for the Instability of N5+N3-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, David A.; Feller, David F.; Christe, Karl O.; wilson, william W.; vij, Ashwani; vij, vandana; Jenkins, H. Donald Brooke; olson, ryan M.; Gordon, Mark S.

    2004-01-28

    Ab initio molecular orbital theory has been used to calculate accurate enthalpies of formation and adiabatic electron affinities or ionization potentials for N3, N3-, N5+, and N5- from total atomization energies. Born-Haber cycle calculations, using estimated lattice energies and the adiabatic ionization potentials of the anions and electron affinities of the cations, permit for the first time reliable stability predictions for the hypothetical N5+N3- and N5+N5- salts. Contrary to previous predictions, it is shown that neither salt can be stabilized, decomposing spontaneously to N3 radicals and N2. This conclusion was experimentally confirmed by low-temperature metathetical reactions between N5SbF6 and alkali metal azides in different solvents, resulting in violent reactions with spontaneous nitrogen evolution. It is also shown that the vertical ionization potentials and electron affinities, used in previous stability predictions, must not be used in stability predictions involving species, such as N5 ions, because the resulting N5 radicals are not vibrationally stable and undergo spontaneous further decomposition. The use of the vertical values, that neglects this highly exothermic secondary decomposition of N5 to N3 and N2, results in large errors of about 100 kcal/mol for each N5 unit.

  11. The Exoplanet Orbit Database

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, Jason T; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Han, Eunkyu; Feng, Ying; Johnson, John Asher; Howard, Andrew W; Valenti, Jeff A; Anderson, Jay; Piskunov, Nikolai

    2010-01-01

    We present a database of well determined orbital parameters of exoplanets. This database comprises spectroscopic orbital elements measured for 421 planets orbiting 357 stars from radial velocity and transit measurements as reported in the literature. We have also compiled fundamental transit parameters, stellar parameters, and the method used for the planets discovery. This Exoplanet Orbit Database includes all planets with robust, well measured orbital parameters reported in peer-reviewed articles. The database is available in a searchable, filterable, and sortable form on the Web at http://exoplanets.org through the Exoplanets Data Explorer Table, and the data can be plotted and explored through the Exoplanets Data Explorer Plotter. We use the Data Explorer to generate publication-ready plots giving three examples of the signatures of exoplanet migration and dynamical evolution: We illustrate the character of the apparent correlation between mass and period in exoplanet orbits, the selection different biase...

  12. Preseptal and orbital cellulitis

    OpenAIRE

    Emine Akçay; Gamze Dereli Can; Nurullah Çağıl

    2014-01-01

    Preseptal cellulitis (PC) is defined as an inflammation of the eyelid and surrounding skin, whereas orbital cellulitis (OC) is an inflammation of the posterior septum of the eyelid affecting the orbit and its contents. Periorbital tissues may become infected as a result of trauma (including insect bites) or primary bacteremia. Orbital cellulitis generally occurs as a complication of sinusitis. The most commonly isolated organisms are Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, S. epid...

  13. Orbital inflammation: Corticosteroids first.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagi Glass, Lora R; Freitag, Suzanne K

    2016-01-01

    Orbital inflammation is common, and may affect all ages and both genders. By combining a thorough history and physical examination, targeted ancillary laboratory testing and imaging, a presumptive diagnosis can often be made. Nearly all orbital inflammatory pathology can be empirically treated with corticosteroids, thus obviating the need for histopathologic diagnosis prior to initiation of therapy. In addition, corticosteroids may be effective in treating concurrent systemic disease. Unless orbital inflammation responds atypically or incompletely, patients can be spared biopsy.

  14. Geometric orbit datum and orbit covers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG; Ke(

    2001-01-01

    [1]Vogan, D. , Dixmier algebras, sheets and representation theory (in Actes du colloque en I' honneur de Jacques Dixmier),Progress in Math. 92, Boston: Birkhauser Verlag, 1990, 333-397.[2]McGovern, W., Dixmier Algebras and Orbit Method, Operator Algebras, Unitary Representations and Invariant Theory,Boston: Birkhauser, 1990, 397-416.[3]Liang, K. , Parabolic inductions of nilpotent geometric orbit datum, Chinese Science Bulletin (in Chinese) , 1996, 41 (23):2116-2118.[4]Vogan, D., Representations of Real Reductive Lie Groups, Boston-Basel-Stuttgart: Birkhauser, 1981.[5]Lustig, G., Spaltenstein, N., Induced unipotent class, J. London Math. Soc., 1997, 19. 41-52.[6]Collingwood, D. H. , McGovern, W. M. , Nilpotent Orbits in Semisimple Lie Algebras, New York: Van Nostremt Reinhold,1993.

  15. Family of Orbiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image shows the paths of three spacecraft currently in orbit around Mars, as well as the path by which NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander will approach and land on the planet. The t-shaped crosses show where the orbiters will be when Phoenix enters the atmosphere, while the x-shaped crosses show their location at landing time. All three orbiters, NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, NASA's Mars Odyssey and the European Space Agency's Mars Express, will be monitoring Phoenix during the final steps of its journey to the Red Planet. Phoenix will land just south of Mars's north polar ice cap.

  16. Rigorous KAM results around arbitrary periodic orbits for Hamiltonian systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapela, Tomasz; Simó, Carles

    2017-03-01

    We set up a methodology for computer assisted proofs of the existence and the KAM stability of an arbitrary periodic orbit for Hamiltonian systems. We give two examples of application for systems with two and three degrees of freedom. The first example verifies the existence of tiny elliptic islands inside large chaotic domains for a quartic potential. In the 3-body problem we prove the KAM stability of the well-known figure eight orbit and two selected orbits of the so called family of rotating eights. Some additional theoretical and numerical information is also given for the dynamics of both examples.

  17. Congenital orbital encephalocele, orbital dystopia, and exophthalmos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Han Joon

    2012-07-01

    We present here an exceedingly rare variant of a nonmidline basal encephalocele of the spheno-orbital type, and this was accompanied with orbital dystopia in a 56-year-old man. On examination, his left eye was located more inferolaterally than his right eye, and the patient said this had been this way since his birth. The protrusion of his left eye was aggravated when he is tired. His naked visual acuity was 0.7/0.3, and the ocular pressure was 14/12 mm Hg. The exophthalmometry was 10/14 to 16 mm. His eyeball motion was not restricted, yet diplopia was present in all directions. The distance from the midline to the medial canthus was 20/15 mm. The distance from the midline to the midpupillary line was 35/22 mm. The vertical dimension of the palpebral fissure was 12/9 mm. The height difference of the upper eyelid margin was 11 mm, and the height difference of the lower eyelid margin was 8 mm. Facial computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed left sphenoid wing hypoplasia and herniation of the left anterior temporal pole and dura mater into the orbit, and this resulted into left exophthalmos and encephalomalacia in the left anterior temporal pole. To the best of our knowledge, our case is the second case of basal encephalocele and orbital dystopia.

  18. Patterns of orbital disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasubramanian Thiagarajan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses various patterns of presentations of orbital lesions. Since this article has been authored by an otolaryngologist, the entire concept has been viewed from otolaryngologist's angle. With the advent of nasal endoscope trans nasal access to orbit is becoming the order of the day. Major advantage being that external skin incision is avoided.

  19. LUNISOLAR INVARIANT RELATIVE ORBITS

    OpenAIRE

    Walid Ali Rahoma

    2013-01-01

    The present study deal with constructing an analytical model within Hamiltonian formulation to design invariant relative orbits due to the perturbation of J2 and the lunisolar attraction. To fade the secular drift separation over the time between two neighboring orbits, two second order conditions that guarantee that drift are derived and enforced to be equal.

  20. Reticulohistiocytoma of the Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, Heather M.; Hayek, Brent R.; Grossniklaus, Hans E.

    2015-01-01

    Reticulohistiocytoma is a rare, benign histiocytic proliferation of the skin or soft tissue. While ocular involvement has been documented in the past, there have been no previously reported cases of reticulohistiocytoma of the orbit. In this report, the authors describe a reticulohistiocytoma of the orbit in a middle-aged woman. PMID:24807799

  1. COEXISTING PERIODIC ORBITS IN VIBRO-IMPACTING DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李群宏; 陆启韶

    2003-01-01

    A method is presented to seek for coexisting periodic orbits which may be stable or unstable in piecewise-linear vibro-impacting systems. The conditions for coexistence of single impact periodic orbits are derived, and in particular, it is investigated in details how to assure that no other impacts will happen in an evolution period of a single impact periodic motion. Furthermore, some criteria for nonexistence of single impact periodic orbits with specific periods are also established. Finally, the stability of coexisting periodic orbits is discussed, and the corresponding computation formula is given. Examples of numerical simulation are in good agreement with the theoretic analysis.

  2. Orbital Plots Using Gnuplot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Brian G.

    2000-06-01

    The plotting program Gnuplot is freely available, general purpose, easy to use, and available on a variety of platforms. Complex three-dimensional surfaces, including the familiar angular parts of the hydrogen atom orbitals, are easily represented using Gnuplot. Contour plots allow viewing the radial and angular variation of the probability density in an orbital. Examples are given of how Gnuplot is used in an undergraduate physical chemistry class to view familiar atomic orbitals in new ways or to generate views of orbital functions that the student may have not seen before. Gnuplot may also be easily integrated into the environment of a Web page; an example of this is discussed (and is available at http://onsager.bd.psu.edu/~moore/orbitals_gnuplot). The plotting commands are entered with a form and a CGI script is used to run Gnuplot and display the result back to the browser.

  3. Results of Long-Duration Simulation of Distant Retrograde Orbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Turner

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Distant Retrograde Orbits in the Earth–Moon system are gaining in popularity as stable “parking” orbits for various conceptual missions. To investigate the stability of potential Distant Retrograde Orbits, simulations were executed, with propagation running over a thirty-year period. Initial conditions for the vehicle state were limited such that the position and velocity vectors were in the Earth–Moon orbital plane, with the velocity oriented such that it would produce retrograde motion about Moon. The resulting trajectories were investigated for stability in an environment that included the eccentric motion of Moon, non-spherical gravity of Earth and Moon, gravitational perturbations from Sun, Jupiter, and Venus, and the effects of radiation pressure. The results indicate that stability may be enhanced at certain resonant states within the Earth–Moon system.

  4. Quark Orbital Angular Momentum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkardt Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Definitions of orbital angular momentum based on Wigner distributions are used as a framework to discuss the connection between the Ji definition of the quark orbital angular momentum and that of Jaffe and Manohar. We find that the difference between these two definitions can be interpreted as the change in the quark orbital angular momentum as it leaves the target in a DIS experiment. The mechanism responsible for that change is similar to the mechanism that causes transverse single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering.

  5. Prototyping LHC Orbit Control

    CERN Document Server

    Wijnands, Thijs; Srinivasan, B

    2002-01-01

    Orbit correction consists in adjusting the strengths of the corrector magnets to make the measured beam position match a predefined reference. In the LHC, this involves around 2000 sensors and more than 1000 actuators that are distributed along both rings. The orbit correction scheme should be able to compensate for very slow orbit drifts in the range of a 10-2 Hz but also for fast motions (vibrations) up to 1 Hz. In this paper we investigate correction schemes that could be used in either case. The choice of design formalisms is based on the experience we gained with the SPS and the LEP.

  6. Periodic orbits of planets in binary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voyatzis, G.

    2017-03-01

    Periodic solutions of the three body problem are very important for understanding its dynamics either in a theoretical framework or in various applications in celestial mechanics. In this paper we discuss the computation and continuation of periodic orbits for planetary systems. The study is restricted to coplanar motion. Starting from known results of two-planet systems around single stars, we perform continuation of solutions with respect to the mass and approach periodic orbits of single planets in two-star systems. Also, families of periodic solutions can be computed for fixed masses of the primaries. When they are linearly stable, we can conclude about the existence of phase space domains of long-term orbital stability.

  7. Orbital deletion procedure and its applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    莫亦荣; 林梦海; 吴玮; 张乾二

    1999-01-01

    The orbital deletion procedure is introduced, which is suited to quantitatively investigating the electronic delocalization effiect in earboeations and boranes. While the routine, ab initio molecular orbital methods can generate wavefunetions for real systems where all electrons are delocalized, the present orbital deletion procedure can generate wavefunctions for hypothetical reference molecules where electronic delocalization effect is deactivated. The latter wavefunetion normlly corresponds In the most stable resonance structure in terms of the resonance theory. By comparing and analyzing the delocalized and the localized wavefunetions, one can obtain a quantitative and instinct pieture to show how electronic deloealizalion inside a molecule affects the molecular structure, energy as well as other physical properties. Two examples are detailedly discussed. The first is related to the hypercoujugation of alkyl groups in carbocations and a comparison of the order of stability of carbocations is made, T

  8. Distant retrograde orbits for the Moon's exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorenko, Vladislav

    We discuss the properties of the distant retrograde orbits (which are called quasi-satellite orbits also) around Moon. For the first time the distant retrograde orbits were described by J.Jackson in studies on restricted three body problem at the beginning of 20th century [1]. In the synodic (rotating) reference frame distant retrograde orbit looks like an ellipse whose center is slowly drifting in the vicinity of minor primary body while in the inertial reference frame the third body is orbiting the major primary body. Although being away the Hill sphere the third body permanently stays close enough to the minor primary. Due to this reason the distant retrograde orbits are called “quasi-satellite” orbits (QS-orbits) too. Several asteroids in solar system are in a QS-orbit with respect to one of the planet. As an example we can mention the asteroid 2002VE68 which circumnavigates Venus [2]. Attention of specialists in space flight mechanics was attracted to QS-orbits after the publications of NASA technical reports devoted to periodic moon orbits [3,4]. Moving in QS-orbit the SC remains permanently (or at least for long enough time) in the vicinity of small celestial body even in the case when the Hill sphere lies beneath the surface of the body. The properties of the QS-orbit can be studied using the averaging of the motion equations [5,6,7]. From the theoretical point of view it is a specific case of 1:1 mean motion resonance. The integrals of the averaged equations become the parameters defining the secular evolution of the QS-orbit. If the trajectory is robust enough to small perturbations in the simplified problem (i.e., restricted three body problem) it may correspond to long-term stability of the real-world orbit. Our investigations demonstrate that under the proper choice of the initial conditions the QS-orbits don’t escape from Moon or don’t impact Moon for long enough time. These orbits can be recommended as a convenient technique for the large

  9. Congenital orbital teratoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shereen Aiyub

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of mature congenital orbital teratoma managed with lid-sparing exenteration and dermis fat graft. This is a case report on the management of congenital orbital teratoma. A full-term baby was born in Fiji with prolapsed right globe which was surrounded by a nonpulsatile, cystic mass. Clinical and imaging features were consistent with congenital orbital teratoma. Due to limited surgical expertise, the patient was transferred to Adelaide, Australia for further management. The patient underwent a lid-sparing exenteration with frozen section control of the apical margin. A dermis fat graft from the groin was placed beneath the lid skin to provide volume. Histopathology revealed mature tissues from each of the three germ cell layers which confirmed the diagnosis of mature teratoma. We describe the successful use of demis fat graft in socket reconstruction following lid-sparing exenteration for congenital orbital teratoma.

  10. Envelopes of Cometary Orbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijajlović, Ž.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available We discuss cometary orbits from the standpoint of Nonstandard (Leibnitz analysis, a relatively new branch of mathematics. In particular, we consider parabolic cometary paths. It appears that, in a sense, every parabola is an ellipse.

  11. 二维自旋轨道耦合电子气中持续自旋螺旋态的稳定性的研究%Study of stability of persistent spin helix in two-dimensional electron gases with spin-orbit coupling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张磊; 李辉武; 胡梁宾

    2012-01-01

    本文利用半经典的自旋密度矩阵方法对二维自旋轨道耦合电子气中持续自旋螺旋态的稳定性进行了一些研究,重点研究了自旋螺旋态的寿命与其波矢、载流子迁移率、温度、自旋轨道耦合强度、外电场强度等因素之间的关系,并将部分理论计算结果与最近的一些相关实验结果进行了比较,发现两者之间大致是符合的.%We study theoretically the stability of persistent spin helix in two-dimensional electron gases with spin-orbit coupling by a semi-classical spin density matrix method. The possible influences of disordering scattering, temperature, spin-orbit coupling strength and external electric field on the lifetime of persistent spin helix state are investigated. The theoretical results are found to be in agreement with some recent relevant experimental results.

  12. Orbital interactions in chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Albright, Thomas A; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Explains the underlying structure that unites all disciplines in chemistry Now in its second edition, this book explores organic, organometallic, inorganic, solid state, and materials chemistry, demonstrating how common molecular orbital situations arise throughout the whole chemical spectrum. The authors explore the relationships that enable readers to grasp the theory that underlies and connects traditional fields of study within chemistry, thereby providing a conceptual framework with which to think about chemical structure and reactivity problems. Orbital Interactions

  13. Antisymmetric Orbit Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoliy Klimyk

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, properties of antisymmetric orbit functions are reviewed and further developed. Antisymmetric orbit functions on the Euclidean space $E_n$ are antisymmetrized exponential functions. Antisymmetrization is fulfilled by a Weyl group, corresponding to a Coxeter-Dynkin diagram. Properties of such functions are described. These functions are closely related to irreducible characters of a compact semisimple Lie group $G$ of rank $n$. Up to a sign, values of antisymmetric orbit functions are repeated on copies of the fundamental domain $F$ of the affine Weyl group (determined by the initial Weyl group in the entire Euclidean space $E_n$. Antisymmetric orbit functions are solutions of the corresponding Laplace equation in $E_n$, vanishing on the boundary of the fundamental domain $F$. Antisymmetric orbit functions determine a so-called antisymmetrized Fourier transform which is closely related to expansions of central functions in characters of irreducible representations of the group $G$. They also determine a transform on a finite set of points of $F$ (the discrete antisymmetric orbit function transform. Symmetric and antisymmetric multivariate exponential, sine and cosine discrete transforms are given.

  14. Space shuttle pogo studies. [systems stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppolino, R. N.; Lock, M. H.; Rubin, S.

    1977-01-01

    Topics covered include: (1) pogo suppression for main propulsion subsystem operation; (2) application of quarter-scale low pressure oxidizer turbopump transfer functions; (3) pogo stability during orbital maneuvering subsystem operation; and (4) errors in frequency response measurements.

  15. On the stability of Crandall gyropendulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samantaray, A. K.; Bhattacharyya, R.; Mukherjee, A.

    2008-01-01

    The gyroscopic stabilization domain of a non-conservative Crandall gyropendulum, in the presence of circulatory forces, is obtained through eigenvalue analysis and later by following an orbital-work-balance approach.

  16. [Orbital complications of sinusitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šuchaň, M; Horňák, M; Kaliarik, L; Krempaská, S; Koštialová, T; Kovaľ, J

    2014-12-01

    Orbital complications categorised by Chandler are emergency. They need early diagnosis and agresive treatment. Stage and origin of orbital complications are identified by rhinoendoscopy, ophtalmologic examination and CT of orbite and paranasal sinuses. Periorbital cellulitis and early stage of orbital cellulitis can be treated conservatively with i. v. antibiotics. Monitoring of laboratory parameters and ophtalmologic symptoms is mandatory. Lack of improvement or worsening of symptoms within 24-48 hours and advanced stages of orbital complications are indicated for surgery. The purpose of the study is to evaluate epidemiology, clinical features and management of sinogenic orbital complications. Retrospective data of 8 patients with suspicion of orbital complication admited to hospital from 2008 to 2013 were evaluated. Patients were analyzed in terms of gender, age, CT findings, microbiology, clinical features, stage and treatment. Male and female were afected in rate 1,66:1. Most of patients were young adult in 3rd. and 4th. decade of life (62,5 %). Acute and chronic sinusitis were cause of orbital complication in the same rate. The most common origin of orbital complication was ethmoiditis (62,5 %), than maxillary (25 %) and frontal (12,5 %) sinusitis. Polysinusitis with affection of ethmoidal, maxillary and frontal sinuses (75 %) was usual CT finding. Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus were etiological agens in half of cases. Periorbital oedema (100 %), proptosis, chemosis (50 %), diplopia and glaucoma (12,5 %) were observed. Based on examinations, diagnosis of periorbital oedema/preseptal cellulitis was made in 3 (37,5 %), orbital cellulitis in 3 (37,5 %) and subperiosteal abscess in 2 cases (25 %). All patients underwent combined therapy - i. v. antibiotics and surgery within 24 hours. Eradication of disease from ostiomeatal complex (OMC), drainage of affected sinuses and drainage of subperiosteal abscess were done via fuctional endonasal

  17. Orbit Propagation and Determination of Low Earth Orbit Satellites

    OpenAIRE

    Ho-Nien Shou

    2014-01-01

    This paper represents orbit propagation and determination of low Earth orbit (LEO) satellites. Satellite global positioning system (GPS) configured receiver provides position and velocity measures by navigating filter to get the coordinates of the orbit propagation (OP). The main contradictions in real-time orbit which is determined by the problem are orbit positioning accuracy and the amount of calculating two indicators. This paper is dedicated to solving the problem of tradeoffs. To plan t...

  18. Orbits for sixteen binaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvetković Z.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper orbits for 13 binaries are recalculated and presented. The reason is that recent observations show higher residuals than the corresponding ephemerides calculated by using the orbital elements given in the Sixth Catalog of Orbits of Visual Binary Stars. The binaries studied were: WDS 00182+7257 = A 803, WDS 00335+4006 = HO 3, WDS 00583+2124 = BU 302, WDS 01011+6022 = A 926, WDS 01014+1155 = BU 867, WDS 01112+4113 = A 655, WDS 01361−2954 + HJ 3447, WDS 02333+5219 = STT 42 AB,WDS 04362+0814 = A 1840 AB,WDS 08017−0836 = A 1580, WDS 08277−0425 = A 550, WDS 17471+1742 = STF 2215 and WDS 18025+4414 = BU 1127 Aa-B. In addition, for three binaries - WDS 01532+1526 = BU 260, WDS 02563+7253 = STF 312 AB and WDS 05003+3924 = STT 92 AB - the orbital elements are calculated for the first time. In this paper the authors present not only the orbital elements, but the masses dynamical parallaxes, absolute magnitudes and ephemerides for the next five years, as well.

  19. Helioseismology with Solar Orbiter

    CERN Document Server

    Löptien, Björn; Gizon, Laurent; Schou, Jesper; Appourchaux, Thierry; Rodríguez, Julián Blanco; Cally, Paul S; Dominguez-Tagle, Carlos; Gandorfer, Achim; Hill, Frank; Hirzberger, Johann; Scherrer, Philip H; Solanki, Sami K

    2014-01-01

    The Solar Orbiter mission, to be launched in July 2017, will carry a suite of remote sensing and in-situ instruments, including the Polarimetric and Helioseismic Imager (PHI). PHI will deliver high-cadence images of the Sun in intensity and Doppler velocity suitable for carrying out novel helioseismic studies. The orbit of the Solar Orbiter spacecraft will reach a solar latitude of up to 21 deg (up to 34 deg by the end of the extended mission) and thus will enable the first local helioseismology studies of the polar regions. Here we consider an array of science objectives to be addressed by helioseismology within the baseline telemetry allocation (51 Gbit per orbit, current baseline) and within the science observing windows (baseline 3 x 10 days per orbit). A particularly important objective is the measurement of large-scale flows at high latitudes (rotation and meridional flow), which are largely unknown but play an important role in flux transport dynamos. The full range of Earth-Sun-spacecraft angles provi...

  20. Orbital Fluid Resupply Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, Ralph N.

    1989-01-01

    Orbital fluid resupply can significantly increase the cost-effectiveness and operational flexibility of spacecraft, satellites, and orbiting platforms and observatories. Reusable tankers are currently being designed for transporting fluids to space. A number of options exist for transporting the fluids and propellant to the space-based user systems. The fluids can be transported to space either in the Shuttle cargo bay or using expendable launch vehicles (ELVs). Resupply can thus be accomplished either from the Shuttle bay, or the tanker can be removed from the Shuttle bay or launched on an ELV and attached to a carrier such as the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) or Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV) for transport to the user to be serviced. A third option involves locating the tanker at the space station or an unmanned platform as a quasi-permanent servicing facility or depot which returns to the ground for recycling once its tanks are depleted. Current modular tanker designs for monopropellants, bipropellants, and water for space station propulsion are discussed. Superfluid helium tankers are addressed, including trade-offs in tanker sizes, shapes to fit the range of ELVs currently available, and boil-off losses associated with longer-term (greater than 6-month) space-basing. It is concluded that the mixed fleet approach to on-orbit consumables resupply offers significant advantages to the overall logistics requirements.

  1. Extended duration orbiter (EDO) insignia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Extended duration orbiter (EDO) insignia incorporates a space shuttle orbiter with payload bay doors (PLBDs) open and a spacelab module inside. Trailing the orbiter are the initials EDO. The EDO-modified Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, will be flown for the first EDO mission, STS-50.

  2. Vertical orbital dystopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S T; Ashworth, G; Czypionka, S; Poole, M D; Briggs, M

    1996-06-01

    Many pathologic processes may lead to vertical orbital dystopia. We reviewed 47 consecutive cases seen over a 13-year period. Twenty-nine patients underwent eye leveling procedures to improve cosmesis, 2 of these by camouflage procedures and 27 by orbital translocation. Ten patients had 16 secondary operations. There was one death, serious complications occurred in 3 patients, and nuisance complications occurred in 20 others. Seven patients developed diplopia postoperatively, and in 6 patients it was troublesome. In these, it resolved fully in 2 patients, improved to be of no consequence in 2, and in the remaining 2 troublesome symptoms persisted requiring inferior oblique muscle recession in 1. Binocular vision was never restored when not present preoperatively, and in 3 patients temporary loss occurred. There was an overall modest but significant improvement in appearance after surgery. It is concluded that vertical orbital translocation is rewarding and worthwhile.

  3. Deceleration Orbit Improvements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, M.

    1991-04-26

    During the accelerator studies period of 12/90-1/91 much study time was dedicated to improving the E760 deceleration ramps. 4 general goals were in mind: (1) Reduce the relative orbit deviations from the nominal reference orbit as much as possible. This reduces the potential error in the orbit length calculation - which is the primary source of error in the beam energy calculation. (2) Maximize the transverse apertures. This minimizes beam loss during deceleration and during accidental beam blow-ups. (3) Measure and correct lattice parameters. Knowledge of {gamma}{sub T}, {eta}, Q{sub h}, Q{sub v}, and the dispersion in the straight sections allows for a more accurate energy calculation and reliable SYNCH calculations. (4) Minimize the coupling. This allows one to discern between horizontal and vertical tunes.

  4. [Secondary orbital lymphoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basanta, I; Sevillano, C; Álvarez, M D

    2015-09-01

    A case is presented of an 85 year-old Caucasian female with lymphoma that recurred in the orbit (secondary ocular adnexal lymphoma). The orbital tumour was a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma according to the REAL classification (Revised European-American Lymphoma Classification). Orbital lymphomas are predominantly B-cell proliferations of a variety of histological types, and most are low-grade tumours. Patients are usually middle-aged or elderly, and it is slightly more common in women. A palpable mass, proptosis and blepharoptosis are the most common signs of presentation. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Enthalpies of formation of gas-phase N3, N3-, N5+, and N5- from Ab initio molecular orbital theory, stability predictions for N5(+)N3(-) and N5(+)N5(-), and experimental evidence for the instability of N5(+)N3(-).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, David A; Feller, David; Christe, Karl O; Wilson, William W; Vij, Ashwani; Vij, Vandana; Jenkins, H Donald Brooke; Olson, Ryan M; Gordon, Mark S

    2004-01-28

    Ab initio molecular orbital theory has been used to calculate accurate enthalpies of formation and adiabatic electron affinities or ionization potentials for N3, N3-, N5+, and N5- from total atomization energies. The calculated heats of formation of the gas-phase molecules/ions at 0 K are DeltaHf(N3(2Pi)) = 109.2, DeltaHf(N3-(1sigma+)) = 47.4, DeltaHf(N5-(1A1')) = 62.3, and DeltaHf(N5+(1A1)) = 353.3 kcal/mol with an estimated error bar of +/-1 kcal/mol. For comparison purposes, the error in the calculated bond energy for N2 is 0.72 kcal/mol. Born-Haber cycle calculations, using estimated lattice energies and the adiabatic ionization potentials of the anions and electron affinities of the cations, enable reliable stability predictions for the hypothetical N5(+)N3(-) and N5(+)N5(-) salts. The calculations show that neither salt can be stabilized and that both should decompose spontaneously into N3 radicals and N2. This conclusion was experimentally confirmed for the N5(+)N3(-) salt by low-temperature metathetical reactions between N5SbF6 and alkali metal azides in different solvents, resulting in violent reactions with spontaneous nitrogen evolution. It is emphasized that one needs to use adiabatic ionization potentials and electron affinities instead of vertical potentials and affinities for salt stability predictions when the formed radicals are not vibrationally stable. This is the case for the N5 radicals where the energy difference between vertical and adiabatic potentials amounts to about 100 kcal/mol per N5.

  6. Optical orbital angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Stephen M.; Babiker, Mohamed; Padgett, Miles J.

    2017-01-01

    We present a brief introduction to the orbital angular momentum of light, the subject of our theme issue and, in particular, to the developments in the 13 years following the founding paper by Allen et al. (Allen et al. 1992 Phys. Rev. A 45, 8185 (doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.45.8185)). The papers by our invited authors serve to bring the field up to date and suggest where developments may take us next. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Optical orbital angular momentum’. PMID:28069775

  7. Optical orbital angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Stephen M.; Babiker, Mohamed; Padgett, Miles J.

    2017-02-01

    We present a brief introduction to the orbital angular momentum of light, the subject of our theme issue and, in particular, to the developments in the 13 years following the founding paper by Allen et al. (Allen et al. 1992 Phys. Rev. A 45, 8185 (doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.45.8185)). The papers by our invited authors serve to bring the field up to date and suggest where developments may take us next. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  8. STABILITY AND INSTABILITY OF SOLITARY WAVES FOR ABSTRACT COMPLEX HAMILTONIAN SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Ye

    2005-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the orbital stability and orbital instability of solitary waves for some complex Hamiltonian systems in abstract form. Under some assumptions on the spectra of the related operator and the decaying estimates of the semigroup, the sufficient conditions on orbital stability and instability are obtained.

  9. Local orbitals by minimizing powers of the orbital variance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansik, Branislav; Høst, Stinne; Kristensen, Kasper;

    2011-01-01

    It is demonstrated that a set of local orthonormal Hartree–Fock (HF) molecular orbitals can be obtained for both the occupied and virtual orbital spaces by minimizing powers of the orbital variance using the trust-region algorithm. For a power exponent equal to one, the Boys localization function...... is obtained. For increasing power exponents, the penalty for delocalized orbitals is increased and smaller maximum orbital spreads are encountered. Calculations on superbenzene, C60, and a fragment of the titin protein show that for a power exponent equal to one, delocalized outlier orbitals may...

  10. Lyapunov Orbits in the Jupiter System Using Electrodynamic Tethers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokelmann, Kevin; Russell, Ryan P.; Lantoine, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Various researchers have proposed the use of electrodynamic tethers for power generation and capture from interplanetary transfers. The effect of tether forces on periodic orbits in Jupiter-satellite systems are investigated. A perturbation force is added to the restricted three-body problem model and a series of simplifications allows development of a conservative system that retains the Jacobi integral. Expressions are developed to find modified locations of equilibrium positions. Modified families of Lyapunov orbits are generated as functions of tether size and Jacobi integral. Zero velocity curves and stability analyses are used to evaluate the dynamical properties of tether-modified orbits.

  11. Beyond periodic orbits: An example in nonhydrogenic atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dando, P.A.; Monteiro, T.S.; Delande, D.; Taylor, K.T. (Department of Mathematics, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey, TW20 0EX (United Kingdom) Laboratoire Kastler-Brossel, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France) Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom))

    1995-02-13

    The spectrum of hydrogen in a magnetic field is a paradigm of quantum chaos and may be analyzed accurately by periodic-orbit-type theories. In nonhydrogenic atoms, the core induces pure quantum effects, especially additional spectral modulations, which cannot be analyzed reliably in terms of classical orbits and their stability parameters. Provided core-scattered waves are included consistently, core-scattered modulations as well as corrected amplitudes for primitive orbits are in excellent agreement with quantum results. We consider whether these systems correspond to quantum chaos.

  12. Beyond Periodic Orbits: An Example in Nonhydrogenic Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, P. A.; Monteiro, T. S.; Delande, D.; Taylor, K. T.

    1995-02-01

    The spectrum of hydrogen in a magnetic field is a paradigm of quantum chaos and may be analyzed accurately by periodic-orbit-type theories. In nonhydrogenic atoms, the core induces pure quantum effects, especially additional spectral modulations, which cannot be analyzed reliably in terms of classical orbits and their stability parameters. Provided core-scattered waves are included consistently, core-scattered modulations as well as corrected amplitudes for primitive orbits are in excellent agreement with quantum results. We consider whether these systems correspond to quantum chaos.

  13. Lyapunov Orbits in the Jupiter System Using Electrodynamic Tethers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokelmann, Kevin; Russell, Ryan P.; Lantoine, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Various researchers have proposed the use of electrodynamic tethers for power generation and capture from interplanetary transfers. The effect of tether forces on periodic orbits in Jupiter-satellite systems are investigated. A perturbation force is added to the restricted three-body problem model and a series of simplifications allows development of a conservative system that retains the Jacobi integral. Expressions are developed to find modified locations of equilibrium positions. Modified families of Lyapunov orbits are generated as functions of tether size and Jacobi integral. Zero velocity curves and stability analyses are used to evaluate the dynamical properties of tether-modified orbits.

  14. Mercury Orbiter: Report of the Science Working Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, John W.; Slavin, James A.; Armstrong, Thomas P.; Farquhar, Robert W.; Akasofu, Syun I.; Baker, Daniel N.; Cattell, Cynthia A.; Cheng, Andrew F.; Chupp, Edward L.; Clark, Pamela E.

    1991-01-01

    The results are presented of the Mercury Orbiter Science Working Team which held three workshops in 1988 to 1989 under the auspices of the Space Physics and Planetary Exploration Divisions of NASA Headquarters. Spacecraft engineering and mission design studies at the Jet Propulsion Lab were conducted in parallel with this effort and are detailed elsewhere. The findings of the engineering study, summarized herein, indicate that spin stabilized spacecraft carrying comprehensive particles and fields experiments and key planetology instruments in high elliptical orbits can survive and function in Mercury orbit without costly sun shields and active cooling systems.

  15. Automatic control and tracking of periodic orbits in chaotic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Hiroyasu; Boccaletti, S; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2007-06-01

    Based on an automatic feedback adjustment of an additional parameter of a dynamical system, we propose a strategy for controlling periodic orbits of desired periods in chaotic dynamics and tracking them toward the set of unstable periodic orbits embedded within the original chaotic attractor. The method does not require information on the system to be controlled, nor on any reference states for the targets, and it overcomes some of the difficulties encountered by other techniques. Assessments of the method's effectiveness and robustness are given by means of the application of the technique to the stabilization of unstable periodic orbits in both discrete- and continuous-time systems.

  16. Sedna Orbit Animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This animation shows the location of the newly discovered planet-like object, dubbed 'Sedna,' in relation to the rest of the solar system. Starting at the inner solar system, which includes the orbits of Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars (all in yellow), the view pulls away through the asteroid belt and the orbits of the outer planets beyond (green). Pluto and the distant Kuiper Belt objects are seen next until finally Sedna comes into view. As the field widens the full orbit of Sedna can be seen along with its current location. Sedna is nearing its closest approach to the Sun; its 10,000 year orbit typically takes it to far greater distances. Moving past Sedna, what was previously thought to be the inner edge of the Oort cloud appears. The Oort cloud is a spherical distribution of cold, icy bodies lying at the limits of the Sun's gravitational pull. Sedna's presence suggests that this Oort cloud is much closer than scientists believed.

  17. Myxoma of the orbit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rambhatla Saptagirish

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Myxomas are rare, benign neoplasms of mesenchymal origin that usually develop in soft tissues. As the clinical manifestations are non-specific, it is difficult to diagnose the tumour without biopsy and histopathological examination. We report a case of orbital myxoma with histopathological correlation.

  18. Sedna Orbit Animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This animation shows the location of the newly discovered planet-like object, dubbed 'Sedna,' in relation to the rest of the solar system. Starting at the inner solar system, which includes the orbits of Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars (all in yellow), the view pulls away through the asteroid belt and the orbits of the outer planets beyond (green). Pluto and the distant Kuiper Belt objects are seen next until finally Sedna comes into view. As the field widens the full orbit of Sedna can be seen along with its current location. Sedna is nearing its closest approach to the Sun; its 10,000 year orbit typically takes it to far greater distances. Moving past Sedna, what was previously thought to be the inner edge of the Oort cloud appears. The Oort cloud is a spherical distribution of cold, icy bodies lying at the limits of the Sun's gravitational pull. Sedna's presence suggests that this Oort cloud is much closer than scientists believed.

  19. Status of Precise Orbit Determination for Jason-2 Using GPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melachroinos, S.; Lemoine, F. G.; Zelensky, N. P.; Rowlands, D. D.; Pavlis, D. E.

    2011-01-01

    The JASON-2 satellite, launched in June 2008, is the latest follow-on to the successful TOPEX/Poseidon (T/P) and JASON-I altimetry missions. JASON-2 is equipped with a TRSR Blackjack GPS dual-frequency receiver, a laser retroreflector array, and a DORIS receiver for precise orbit determination (POD). The most recent time series of orbits computed at NASA GSFC, based on SLR/DORIS data have been completed using both ITRF2005 and ITRF2008. These orbits have been shown to agree radially at 1 cm RMS for dynamic vs SLRlDORIS reduced-dynamic orbits and in comparison with orbits produced by other analysis centers (Lemoine et al., 2010; Zelensky et al., 2010; Cerri et al., 2010). We have recently upgraded the GEODYN software to implement model improvements for GPS processing. We describe the implementation of IGS standards to the Jason2 GEODYN GPS processing, and other dynamical and measurement model improvements. Our GPS-only JASON-2 orbit accuracy is assessed using a number of tests including analysis of independent SLR and altimeter crossover residuals, orbit overlap differences, and direct comparison to orbits generated at GSFC using SLR and DORIS tracking, and to orbits generated externally at other centers. Tests based on SLR and the altimeter crossover residuals provide the best performance indicator for independent validation of the NASAlGSFC GPS-only reduced dynamic orbits. For the ITRF2005 and ITRF2008 implementation of our GPS-only obits we are using the IGS05 and IGS08 standards. Reduced dynamic versus dynamic orbit differences are used to characterize the remaining force model error and TRF instability. We evaluate the GPS vs SLR & DORIS orbits produced using the GEODYN software and assess in particular their consistency radially and the stability of the altimeter satellite reference frame in the Z direction for both ITRF2005 and ITRF2008 as a proxy to assess the consistency of the reference frame for altimeter satellite POD.

  20. Neurosurgical involvement in tumors of the orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, D M

    1985-01-01

    The neurosurgeon has a great deal to offer in the therapy of orbital tumors. Dr. Dandy's supposition that all orbital tumors could be approached by the intracranial route is certainly correct, but technical advances have made the medial and lateral approaches to the orbit more useful for most tumors which are confined to the orbit (22, 25). For those which involve the posterior orbit and canal and have intracranial extensions, the intracranial approach is excellent. Since Dandy's first description of the procedure in 1922, there have been 29 patient reports concerning the results of transcranial canalicular decompression for non-traumatic causes. The most common diagnosis was meningioma (15), and other tumor diagnoses were fibrous dysplasia (7) and hemangioma (2). One-third of the patients were improved; one-third had vision stabilized; and one-third were made worse by surgery. Modern techniques with the microscope and high speed drill have greatly improved these results. Our own experience in the decompression of 15 canals in 11 patients is as follows. There were six patients with meningioma, and two were bilateral. Three patients were found to have a vascular dolichoectasis and one patient had an hemangioma, and in two patients no compression was identified. Immediately postoperatively, two-thirds of the patients were improved, and only one eye (representing 6.7% of the nerves decompressed) was worsened. This resulted from an attempt to totally remove an adherent sheath meningioma. Long-term follow-up median 34 months has demonstrated maintenance of these gains. Eighty percent of the patients have improved or remained stable. These data indicate that the procedure described can be done safely without major risk of visual loss. The neurosurgeon should play an increasingly important role in the evaluation and therapy of posteriorly placed orbital tumors and unexplained compressive optic neuropathy.

  1. Engineering spin-orbit torque in Co/Pt multilayers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Kuo-Feng; Wang, Ding-Shuo; Lai, Chih-Huang, E-mail: chlai@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Lin, Hsiu-Hau [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2015-12-07

    To address thermal stability issues for spintronic devices with a reduced size, we investigate spin-orbit torque in Co/Pt multilayers with strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Note that the spin-orbit torque arises from the global imbalance of the spin currents from the top and bottom interfaces for each Co layer. By inserting Ta or Cu layers to strengthen the top-down asymmetry, the spin-orbit torque efficiency can be greatly modified without compromised perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Above all, the efficiency builds up as the number of layers increases, realizing robust thermal stability and high spin-orbit-torque efficiency simultaneously in the multilayers structure.

  2. Engineering spin-orbit torque in Co/Pt multilayers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kuo-Feng; Wang, Ding-Shuo; Lin, Hsiu-Hau; Lai, Chih-Huang

    2015-12-01

    To address thermal stability issues for spintronic devices with a reduced size, we investigate spin-orbit torque in Co/Pt multilayers with strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Note that the spin-orbit torque arises from the global imbalance of the spin currents from the top and bottom interfaces for each Co layer. By inserting Ta or Cu layers to strengthen the top-down asymmetry, the spin-orbit torque efficiency can be greatly modified without compromised perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Above all, the efficiency builds up as the number of layers increases, realizing robust thermal stability and high spin-orbit-torque efficiency simultaneously in the multilayers structure.

  3. Statins in therapy: understanding their hydrophilicity, lipophilicity, binding to 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, ability to cross the blood brain barrier and metabolic stability based on electrostatic molecular orbital studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Clifford W

    2014-10-06

    various statins can undergo endogenous oxidative metabolism. The absolute chemical hardness is also an indicator of the stability of the statins, and may be a useful indicator for drug design.

  4. Unusual Sclerosing Orbital Pseudotumor Infiltrating Orbits and Maxillofacial Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Toprak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic orbital pseudotumor (IOP is a benign inflammatory condition of the orbit without identifiable local or systemic causes. Bilateral massive orbital involvement and extraorbital extension of the IOP is very rare. We present an unusual case of IOP with bilateral massive orbital infiltration extending into maxillofacial regions and discuss its distinctive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI features that help to exclude other entities during differential diagnoses.

  5. Orbit correction algorithm for SSRF fast orbit feedback system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ming; YIN Chongxian; LIU Dekang

    2009-01-01

    A fast orbit feedback system is designed at SSRF to suppress beam orbit disturbance within sub-micron in the bandwidth up to 100 Hz.The SVD (Singular value decomposition) algorithm is applied to calculate the inverse response matrix in global orbit correction.The number of singular eigenvalues will influence orbit noise suppression and corrector strengths.The method to choose singular eigenvalue rejection threshold is studied in this paper,and the simulation and experiment results are also presented.

  6. Comparison of Low Earth Orbit and Geosynchronous Earth Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    The technological, environmental, social, and political ramifications of low Earth orbits as compared to geosynchronous Earth orbits for the solar power satellite (SPS) are assessed. The capital cost of the transmitting facilities is dependent on the areas of the antenna and rectenna relative to the requirement of high efficiency power transmission. The salient features of a low orbit Earth orbits are discussed in terms of cost reduction efforts.

  7. Attitude Analysis and Robust Adaptive Backstepping Sliding Mode Control of Spacecrafts Orbiting Irregular Asteroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhui Liang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Attitude stability analysis and robust control algorithms for spacecrafts orbiting irregular asteroids are investigated in the presence of model uncertainties and external disturbances. Rigid spacecraft nonlinear attitude models are considered and detailed attitude stability analysis of spacecraft subjected to the gravity gradient torque in an irregular central gravity field is included in retrograde orbits and direct orbits using linearized system model. The robust adaptive backstepping sliding mode control laws are designed to make the attitude of the spacecrafts stabilized and responded accurately to the expectation in the presence of disturbances and parametric uncertainties. Numerical simulations are included to illustrate the spacecraft performance obtained using the proposed control laws.

  8. Charge Order Induced in an Orbital Density-Wave State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dheeraj Kumar; Takimoto, Tetsuya

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by recent angle resolved photoemission measurements [D. V. Evtushinsky et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 147201 (2010)] and evidence of the density-wave state for the charge and orbital ordering [J. García et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 107202 (2012)] in La0.5Sr1.5MnO4, the issue of charge and orbital ordering in a two-orbital tight-binding model for layered manganite near half doping is revisited. We find that the charge order with the ordering wavevector 2{Q} = (π ,π ) is induced by the orbital order of d-/d+-type having B1g representation with a different ordering wavevector Q, where the orbital order as the primary order results from the strong Fermi-surface nesting. It is shown that the induced charge order parameter develops according to TCO - T by decreasing the temperature below the orbital ordering temperature TCO, in addition to the usual mean-field behavior of the orbital order parameter. Moreover, the same orbital order is found to stabilize the CE-type spin arrangement observed experimentally below TCE < TCO.

  9. Analytical model for orbital debris environmental management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talent, David L.

    1990-01-01

    A differential equation, also referred to as the PIB (particle-in-a-box) model, expressing the time rate of change of the number of objects in orbit, is developed, and its applicability is illustrated. The model can be used as a tool for the assessment of LEO environment stability, and as a starting point for the development of numerical evolutionary models. Within the context of the model, evolutionary scenarios are examined, and found to be sensitive to the growth rate. It is determined that the present environment is slightly unstable to catastrophic growth, and that the number of particles on orbit will continue to increase until approximately 2250-2350 AD, with a maximum of 2,000,000. The model is expandable to the more realistic (complex) case of multiple species in a multiple-tier system.

  10. Orbit design for a space ambulance vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Walter C.

    A number of rendezvous maneuvers between space stations in geocentric orbits at altitudes ranging between 200 km and geosynchronous altitude are examined. Minimum time to complete rendezvous is studied for purposes of expediting crew patient transfer to an orbiting medical base station (MBS) for the stabilization of trauma and definitive care. The vehicle to be used for the crew patient transfer to the MBS is the space ambulance vehicle (SAV). The SAV is assumed to use two velocity impulses to complete rendezvous maneuvers between an SS and the MBS: an accelerating impulse when departing the SS and a second decelerating impulse prior to docking with the MBS. Recommendations are made concerning the planning of space operations which will reduce both time and propulsive energy for rendezvous maneuvers. It is suggested that throttleable engines be used when transferring a crew patient whose trauma could be exacerbated by excessive acceleration of the carrier vehicle.

  11. Analytical model for orbital debris environmental management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talent, David L.

    1990-01-01

    A differential equation, also referred to as the PIB (particle-in-a-box) model, expressing the time rate of change of the number of objects in orbit, is developed, and its applicability is illustrated. The model can be used as a tool for the assessment of LEO environment stability, and as a starting point for the development of numerical evolutionary models. Within the context of the model, evolutionary scenarios are examined, and found to be sensitive to the growth rate. It is determined that the present environment is slightly unstable to catastrophic growth, and that the number of particles on orbit will continue to increase until approximately 2250-2350 AD, with a maximum of 2,000,000. The model is expandable to the more realistic (complex) case of multiple species in a multiple-tier system.

  12. Diplopia secondary to orbital surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbert, David I; Matta, Noelle S; Singman, Eric L

    2012-01-01

    Diplopia may occur following any type of ocular or pericocular surgery. The surgeries most frequently associated with postoperative diplopia include: repair of orbital fracture, endoscopic sinus surgery (from inadvertent orbital penetration), and orbital decompression for thyroid-related immune orbitopathy (TRIO). Postoperative diplopia after orbital tumor resection has been reported--e.g., after excision of fibrous dysplasia and osteoma. However, a recent case series suggests diplopia after orbital tumor resection is uncommon and transient. Surgical intervention for orbital trauma carries the highest risk of postoperative diplopia and will be the focus of this review. We will also present a case report of worsening diplopia following repair of orbital floor fracture to highlight potential motility issues that can arise when implants are employed to treat orbital floor fractures.

  13. Topics in orbit equivalence

    CERN Document Server

    Kechris, Alexander S

    2004-01-01

    This volume provides a self-contained introduction to some topics in orbit equivalence theory, a branch of ergodic theory. The first two chapters focus on hyperfiniteness and amenability. Included here are proofs of Dye's theorem that probability measure-preserving, ergodic actions of the integers are orbit equivalent and of the theorem of Connes-Feldman-Weiss identifying amenability and hyperfiniteness for non-singular equivalence relations. The presentation here is often influenced by descriptive set theory, and Borel and generic analogs of various results are discussed. The final chapter is a detailed account of Gaboriau's recent results on the theory of costs for equivalence relations and groups and its applications to proving rigidity theorems for actions of free groups.

  14. Preseptal and orbital cellulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Akçay

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Preseptal cellulitis (PC is defined as an inflammation of the eyelid and surrounding skin, whereas orbital cellulitis (OC is an inflammation of the posterior septum of the eyelid affecting the orbit and its contents. Periorbital tissues may become infected as a result of trauma (including insect bites or primary bacteremia. Orbital cellulitis generally occurs as a complication of sinusitis. The most commonly isolated organisms are Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, S. epidermidis, Haempphilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis and S. pyogenes. The method for the diagnosis of OS and PS is computed tomography. Using effective antibiotics is a mainstay for the treatment of PC and OC. There is an agreement that surgical drainage should be performed in cases of complete ophthalmoplegia or significant visual impairment or large abscesses formation. This infections are also at a greater risk of acute visual loss, cavernous sinus thrombosis, meningitis, cerebritis, endophthalmitis, and brain abscess in children. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are crucial to control the infection. Diagnosis, treatment, management and complications of PC and OC are summarized in this manuscript. J MicrobiolInfect Dis 2014; 4(3: 123-127

  15. Stability Limits in Resonant Planetary Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, Rory

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between the boundaries for Hill and Lagrange stability in orbital element space is modified in the case of resonantly interacting planets. Hill stability requires the ordering of the planets to remain constant while Lagrange stability also requires all planets to remain bound to the central star. The Hill stability boundary is defined analytically, but no equations exist to define the Lagrange boundary, so we perform numerical experiments to estimate the location of this boundary. To explore the effect of resonances, we consider orbital element space near the conditions in the HD 82943 and 55 Cnc systems. Previous studies have shown that, for non-resonant systems, the two stability boundaries are nearly coincident. However the Hill stability formula are not applicable to resonant systems, and our investigation shows how the two boundaries diverge in the presence of a mean-motion resonance, while confirming that the Hill and Lagrange boundaries are similar otherwise. In resonance the region of...

  16. Chaos Behaviour of Molecular Orbit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shu-Tang; SUN Fu-Yan; SHEN Shu-Lan

    2007-01-01

    Based on H(u)ckel's molecular orbit theory,the chaos and;bifurcation behaviour of a molecular orbit modelled by a nonlinear dynamic system is studied.The relationship between molecular orbit and its energy level in the nonlinear dynamic system is obtained.

  17. Orbiter OMS and RCS technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreaux, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    Orbiter Orbital Maneuver Subsystem (OMS) and Reaction Control Subsystem (RCS) tankage has proved to be highly successful in shuttle flights on-orbit propellant transfer tests were done. Tank qualification tests along with flight demonstrations were carried out future uses of storable propellants are cited.

  18. Ideal Stabilization

    CERN Document Server

    Nesterenko, Mikhail

    2009-01-01

    We define and explore the concept of ideal stabilization. The program is ideally stabilizing if its every state is legitimate. Ideal stabilization allows the specification designer to prescribe with arbitrary degree of precision not only the fault-free program behavior but also its recovery operation. Specifications may or may not mention all possible states. We identify approaches to designing ideal stabilization to both kinds of specifications. For the first kind, we state the necessary condition for an ideally stabilizing solution. On the basis of this condition we prove that there is no ideally stabilizing solution to the leader election problem. We illustrate the utility of the concept by providing examples of well-known programs and proving them ideally stabilizing. Specifically, we prove ideal stabilization of the conflict manager, the alternator, the propagation of information with feedback and the alternating bit protocol.

  19. Extension of Earth-Moon libration point orbits with solar sail propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiligers, Jeannette; Macdonald, Malcolm; Parker, Jeffrey S.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents families of libration point orbits in the Earth-Moon system that originate from complementing the classical circular restricted three-body problem with a solar sail. Through the use of a differential correction scheme in combination with a continuation on the solar sail induced acceleration, families of Lyapunov, halo, vertical Lyapunov, Earth-centred, and distant retrograde orbits are created. As the solar sail circular restricted three-body problem is non-autonomous, a constraint defined within the differential correction scheme ensures that all orbits are periodic with the Sun's motion around the Earth-Moon system. The continuation method then starts from a classical libration point orbit with a suitable period and increases the solar sail acceleration magnitude to obtain families of orbits that are parametrised by this acceleration. Furthermore, different solar sail steering laws are considered (both in-plane and out-of-plane, and either fixed in the synodic frame or fixed with respect to the direction of Sunlight), adding to the wealth of families of solar sail enabled libration point orbits presented. Finally, the linear stability properties of the generated orbits are investigated to assess the need for active orbital control. It is shown that the solar sail induced acceleration can have a positive effect on the stability of some orbit families, especially those at the L2 point, but that it most often (further) destabilises the orbit. Active control will therefore be needed to ensure long-term survivability of these orbits.

  20. Regular and chaotic orbits in the dynamics of exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadou, Kyriaki I

    2016-01-01

    Many of exoplanetary systems consist of more than one planet and the study of planetary orbits with respect to their long-term stability is very interesting. Furthermore, many exoplanets seem to be locked in a mean-motion resonance (MMR), which offers a phase protection mechanism, so that, even highly eccentric planets can avoid close encounters. However, the present estimation of their initial conditions, which may change significantly after obtaining additional observational data in the future, locate most of the systems in chaotic regions and consequently, they are destabilized. Hence, dynamical analysis is imperative for the derivation of proper planetary orbital elements. We utilize the model of spatial general three body problem, in order to simulate such resonant systems through the computation of families periodic orbits. In this way, we can figure out regions in phase space, where the planets in resonances should be ideally hosted in favour of long-term stability and therefore, survival. In this revi...

  1. Beam model for non-planar orbits in synchrotrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Month, M.

    1984-03-26

    A framework has been developed for a beam model in the case of synchrotron orbits not confined to a plane. An appropriate moving reference system for the analysis of beam stability has been introduced. As examples of strong perturbations to median plane symmetry, two geometries for the overpass for the Tevatron collider are considered.

  2. Orbit Propagation and Determination of Low Earth Orbit Satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Nien Shou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents orbit propagation and determination of low Earth orbit (LEO satellites. Satellite global positioning system (GPS configured receiver provides position and velocity measures by navigating filter to get the coordinates of the orbit propagation (OP. The main contradictions in real-time orbit which is determined by the problem are orbit positioning accuracy and the amount of calculating two indicators. This paper is dedicated to solving the problem of tradeoffs. To plan to use a nonlinear filtering method for immediate orbit tasks requires more precise satellite orbit state parameters in a short time. Although the traditional extended Kalman filter (EKF method is widely used, its linear approximation of the drawbacks in dealing with nonlinear problems was especially evident, without compromising Kalman filter (unscented Kalman Filter, UKF. As a new nonlinear estimation method, it is measured at the estimated measurements on more and more applications. This paper will be the first study on UKF microsatellites in LEO orbit in real time, trying to explore the real-time precision orbit determination techniques. Through the preliminary simulation results, they show that, based on orbit mission requirements and conditions using UKF, they can satisfy the positioning accuracy and compute two indicators.

  3. Galactic Habitable Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, A.; Mao, S.; Kawata, D.

    2014-03-01

    The fossil record shows that the Earth has experienced several mass extinctions over the past 500 million years1, and it has been suggested that there is a periodicity in extinction events on timescales of tens1 and/or hundreds of millions of years. Various hypotheses have been proposed to explain the cause of the mass extinctions, including the suggestion that the Earth's ozone layer may have been destroyed by intense radiation from a nearby supernovae2- 3, exposing the Earth's surface to damaging UV radiation. Recent observations of cores taken from the ocean floor revealed atoms of a very rare isotope of iron (60Fe) believed to have arrived on Earth around 2 million years ago as fallout from a nearby supernovae4. Astronomical evidence for that past supernovae was recently found in the debris of a young cluster of massive stars5, by tracing its past orbit, putting it at the right place at the right time to explain the mild extinction event. Here we report new high-resolution (both in space and time) N-body chemodynamical simulations (carried out with our novel code GCD+6) of the evolution of a model Milky Way Galaxy, tracing the orbit of èsun-like' stars over a 500 million year period, checking the proximity to supernovae throughout the history of the orbit and comparing the times when this occurs with past mass extinctions on Earth. We additionally explain the important effects of the spiral arm pattern, radial migration of stars and Galactic chemistry on habitability.

  4. Review of orbital imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goh, P.S. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, National University Hospital, 5 Lower Kent Ridge Road, Singapore 119074 (Singapore)], E-mail: dnrgohps@nus.edu.sg; Gi, M.T. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, National University Hospital, 5 Lower Kent Ridge Road, Singapore 119074 (Singapore); Charlton, A. [Department of Pathology, National University Hospital, 5 Lower Kent Ridge Road, Singapore 119074 (Singapore); Tan, C.; Gangadhara Sundar, J.K.; Amrith, S. [Department of Ophthalmology, National University Hospital, 5 Lower Kent Ridge Road, Singapore 119074 (Singapore)

    2008-06-15

    CT and MRI are commonly used in the evaluation of patients with suspected orbital disease. Many different diseases may present within this small anatomical space. The purpose of this article is to present a diagnostic strategy based on a compartment model. Localizing pathology to sinus, bone, extraconal space, muscle cone, intraconal space, optic nerve, globe or lacrimal fossa allows significant reduction in the number of differential diagnoses as these compartments contain different tissues which disease may involve or arise from. Certain diseases may also present in multiple compartments. Common diseases which might present in one or multiple compartments will be discussed.

  5. Lunar Exploration Orbiter (LEO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaumann, R.; Spohn, T.; Hiesinger, H.; Jessberger, E. K.; Neukum, G.; Oberst, J.; Helbert, J.; Christensen, U.; Keller, H. U.; Mall, U.; Böhnhardt, H.; Hartogh, P.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Auster, H.-U.; Moreira, A.; Werner, M.; Pätzold, M.; Palme, H.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R.; Mandea, M.; Lesur, V.; Häusler, B.; Hördt, A.; Eichentopf, K.; Hauber, E.; Hoffmann, H.; Köhler, U.; Kührt, E.; Michaelis, H.; Pauer, M.; Sohl, F.; Denk, T.; van Gasselt, S.

    2007-08-01

    The Moon is an integral part of the Earth-Moon system, it is a witness to more than 4.5 b. y. of solar system history, and it is the only planetary body except Earth for which we have samples from known locations. The Moon is our closest companion and can easily be reached from Earth at any time, even with a relatively modest financial budget. Consequently, the Moon was the first logical step in the exploration of our solar system before we pursued more distant targets such as Mars and beyond. The vast amount of knowledge gained from the Apollo and other lunar missions of the late 1960's and early 1970's demonstrates how valuable the Moon is for the understanding of our planetary system. Even today, the Moon remains an extremely interesting target scientifically and technologically, as ever since, new data have helped to address some of our questions about the Earth-Moon system, many questions remained. Therefore, returning to the Moon is the critical stepping-stone to further exploring our immediate planetary neighborhood. In this concept study, we present scientific and technological arguments for a national German lunar mission, the Lunar Explorations Orbiter (LEO). Numerous space-faring nations have realized and identified the unique opportunities related to lunar exploration and have planned missions to the Moon within the next few years. Among these missions, LEO will be unique, because it will globally explore the Moon in unprecedented spatial and spectral resolution. LEO will significantly improve our understanding of the lunar surface composition, surface ages, mineralogy, physical properties, interior, thermal history, gravity field, regolith structure, and magnetic field. The Lunar Explorations Orbiter will carry an entire suite of innovative, complementary technologies, including high-resolution camera systems, several spectrometers that cover previously unexplored parts of the electromagnetic spectrum over a broad range of wavelengths, microwave and

  6. Control of Orbit and Control of Chaos in a Class of Dynamic System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The problem of control of orbit for the dynamic system ~ + x ( 1 -x ) ( x - a ) = 0 is discussed. Any unbounded orbit of the dynamic system can be controlled to become a bounded periodic orbit by adding a periodic stepexcitation to the system. By using a nonlinear feedback control law presented in this paper the chaos of the dynamicsystem with excitation and damping is stabilized. This method is more effectual than the linear feedback control

  7. Accurate determination of heteroclinic orbits in chaotic dynamical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jizhou; Tomsovic, Steven

    2017-03-01

    Accurate calculation of heteroclinic and homoclinic orbits can be of significant importance in some classes of dynamical system problems. Yet for very strongly chaotic systems initial deviations from a true orbit will be magnified by a large exponential rate making direct computational methods fail quickly. In this paper, a method is developed that avoids direct calculation of the orbit by making use of the well-known stability property of the invariant unstable and stable manifolds. Under an area-preserving map, this property assures that any initial deviation from the stable (unstable) manifold collapses onto them under inverse (forward) iterations of the map. Using a set of judiciously chosen auxiliary points on the manifolds, long orbit segments can be calculated using the stable and unstable manifold intersections of the heteroclinic (homoclinic) tangle. Detailed calculations using the example of the kicked rotor are provided along with verification of the relation between action differences and certain areas bounded by the manifolds.

  8. 3D periodic orbits in the restricted four body problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltagiannis, A.; Papadakis, K.

    2013-09-01

    One big body (Sun) of mass m1 and two other small bodies of masses m2 and m3 correspondingly, move in circular orbits keeping an equilateral triangle configuration, about the center of mass of the system fixed at the origin of the coordinate system. A massless particle is moving under the Newtonian gravitational attraction of the primaries and does not affect the motion of the three bodies. Using the vertical-critical orbits of planar families of symmetric periodic orbits as starting points, we determine and present in this paper, families of three-dimensional periodic solutions of the problem. Characteristic curves of the 3D-families which emanate from the plane are presented. The stability of every three-dimensional periodic orbit which numerically calculated is also studied.

  9. From order to chaos in Earth satellite orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Gkolias, Ioannis; Gachet, Fabien; Rosengren, Aaron J

    2016-01-01

    We consider Earth satellite orbits in the range of semi-major axes where the perturbing effects of Earth's oblateness and lunisolar gravity are of comparable order. This range covers the medium-Earth orbits (MEO) of the Global Navigation Satellite Systems and the geosynchronous orbits (GEO) of the communication satellites. We recall a secular and quadrupolar model, based on the Milankovitch vector formulation of perturbation theory, which governs the long-term orbital evolution subject to the predominant gravitational interactions. We study the global dynamics of this two-and-a-half degrees of freedom Hamiltonian system by means of the fast Lyapunov indicator (FLI), used in a statistical sense. Specifically, we characterize the degree of chaoticity of the action space using angles-averaged normalized FLI maps, thereby overcoming the angle dependencies of the conventional stability maps. Emphasis is placed upon the phase-space structures near secular resonances which are of first importance to the space debris...

  10. Earth Orbit Raise Design for the Artemis Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiffen, Gregory J.; Sweetser, Theodore H.

    2011-01-01

    The Artemis mission is an extension of the Themis mission. The Themis mission1 consisted of five identical spacecraft in varying sized Earth orbits designed to make simultaneous measurements of the Earth's electric and magnetic environment. Themis was designed to observe geomagnetic storms resulting from solar wind's interaction with the Earth's magnetosphere. Themis was meant to answer the age old question of why the Earth's aurora can change rapidly on a global scale. The Themis spacecraft are spin stabilized with 20 meter long electric field booms as well as several shorter magnetometer booms. The goal of the Artemis2 mission extension is to deliver the field and particle measuring capabilities of two of the Themis spacecraft to the vicinity of the Moon. The Artemis mission required transferring two Earth orbiting Themis spacecraft on to two different low energy trans-lunar trajectories ultimately ending in lunar orbit. This paper describes the processes that resulted in successful orbit raise designs for both spacecraft.

  11. Orbital debris issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, D. J.

    Orbital debris issues fall into three major topics: Environment Definition, Spacecraft Hazard, and Space Object Management. The major issue under Environment Definition is defining the debris flux for sizes smaller (10 cm in diameter) than those tracked by the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD). Sources for this size debris are fragmentation of larger objects, either by explosion or collision, and solid rocket motor products. Modeling of these sources can predict fluxes in low Earth orbit which are greater than the meteoroid environment. Techniques to measure the environment in the size interval between 1 mm and 10 cm are being developed, including the use of telescopes and radar both on the ground and in space. Some impact sensors designed to detect meteoroids may have detected solid rocket motor products. Once the environment is defined, it can be combined with hypervelocity impact data and damage criteria to evaluate the Spacecraft Hazard. Shielding may be required to obtain an acceptable damage level. Space Object Management includes techniques to control the environment and the desired policy to effectively minimize the hazard to spacecraft. One control technique - reducing the likelihood of future explosions in space - has already been implemented by NASA. The effectiveness of other techniques has yet to be evaluated.

  12. Stabilizing Low Frequency Beam Motion in the Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Ranjbar, Vahid H

    2005-01-01

    A feed back orbit stabilization system has been developed using a set of BPMS and existing Tevatron corrector magnets to stabilize beam motion up to 50 microns below 25 Hz. The construction of this system is described and the stability limits and magnitude of beam motion reduction is explored.

  13. Asymptotic orbits in the ( N+1)-body ring problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, K. E.

    2009-10-01

    In this paper we study the asymptotic solutions of the ( N+1)-body ring planar problem, N of which are finite and ν= N-1 are moving in circular orbits around their center of masses, while the Nth+1 body is infinitesimal. ν of the primaries have equal masses m and the Nth most-massive primary, with m 0= β m, is located at the origin of the system. We found the invariant unstable and stable manifolds around hyperbolic Lyapunov periodic orbits, which emanate from the collinear equilibrium points L 1 and L 2. We construct numerically, from the intersection points of the appropriate Poincaré cuts, homoclinic symmetric asymptotic orbits around these Lyapunov periodic orbits. There are families of symmetric simple-periodic orbits which contain as terminal points asymptotic orbits which intersect the x-axis perpendicularly and tend asymptotically to equilibrium points of the problem spiraling into (and out of) these points. All these families, for a fixed value of the mass parameter β=2, are found and presented. The eighteen (more geometrically simple) families and the corresponding eighteen terminating homo- and heteroclinic symmetric asymptotic orbits are illustrated. The stability of these families is computed and also presented.

  14. [Endoscopic approaches to the orbit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebula, H; Lahlou, A; De Battista, J C; Debry, C; Froelich, S

    2010-01-01

    During the last decade, the use of endoscopic endonasal approaches to the pituitary has increased considerably. The endoscopic endonasal and transantral approaches offer a minimally invasive alternative to the classic transcranial or transconjunctival approaches to the medial aspect of the orbit. The medial wall of the orbit, the orbital apex, and the optic canal can be exposed through a middle meatal antrostomy, an anterior and posterior ethmoidectomy, and a sphenoidotomy. The inferomedial wall of the orbit can be also perfectly visualized through a sublabial antrostomy or an inferior meatal antrostomy. Several reports have described the use of an endoscopic approach for the resection or the biopsy of lesions located on the medial extraconal aspect of the orbit and orbital apex. However, the resection of intraconal lesions is still limited by inadequate instrumentation. Other indications for the endoscopic approach to the orbit are the decompression of the orbit for Graves' ophthalmopathy and traumatic optic neuropathy. However, the optimal management of traumatic optic neuropathy remains very controversial. Endoscopic endonasal decompression of the optic nerve in case of tumor compression could be a more valid indication in combination with radiation therapy. Finally, the endoscopic transantral treatment of blowout fracture of the floor of the orbit is an interesting option that avoids the eyelid or conjunctive incision of traditional approaches. The collaboration between the neurosurgeon and the ENT surgeon is mandatory and reduces the morbidity of the approach. Progress in instrumentation and optical devices will certainly make this approach promising for intraconal tumor of the orbit.

  15. Noise destroys the coexistence of periodic orbits of a piecewise linear map

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Can-Jun; Yang Ke-Li; Qu Shi-Xian

    2013-01-01

    The effects of Gaussian white noise and Gaussian colored noise on the periodic orbits of period-5 (P-5) and period-6 (P-6) in their coexisting domain of a piecewise linear map are investigated numerically.The probability densities of some orbits are calculated.When the noise intensity is D =0.0001,only the orbits of P-5 exist,and the coexisting phenomenon is destroyed.On the other hand,the self-correlation time τ of the colored noise also affects the coexisting phenomenon.When τc < τ < τe',only the orbits of P-5 appear,and the stability of the orbits of P-5 is enhanced.However,when τ > τ'c(τc and τ'c are critical values),only the orbits of P-6 exist,and the stability of the P-6 orbits is enhanced greatly.When τ < τc,the orbits of P-5 and P-6 coexist,but the stability of the P-5 orbits is enhanced and that of P-6 is weakened with τ increasing.

  16. A Typical Presentation of Orbital Pseudotumor Mimicking Orbital Cellulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ayatollahi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Orbital pseudotumor, also known as idiopathic orbital inflammatory syndrome (IOIS, is a benign, non- infective inflammatory condition of the orbit without identifiable local or systemic causes. The disease may mimics a variety of pathologic conditions. We pre-sent a case of pseudotumor observed in a patient admitted under the name of orbital celluli-ties. Case Report: A 26-year-old woman reffered to our hospital with the history of left ocular pain and headache 2 days before her visit.. Ophthalmological examination of the patient was normal except for the redness and lid edema, mild chemosis and conjunctival injection. Gen-eral assessment was normal but a low grade fever was observed. She was hospitalized as an orbital cellulitis patient. She was treated with intravenous antibiotics. On the third day , sud-denly diplopia, proptosis in her left eye and ocular pain in her right side appeared. MRI re-vealed bilateral enlargement of extraocular muscles. Diagnosis of orbital pseudotumor was made and the patient was treated with oral steroid.She responded promptly to the treatment. Antibiotics were discontinued and steroid was tapered in one month period under close fol-low up. Conclusion: The clinical features of orbital pseudotumor vary widely . Orbital pseudotumor and orbital cellulitis can occasionally demonstrate overlapping features.. Despite complete physical examination and appropriate imaging, sometimes correct diagnosis of the disease would be difficult (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2013; 20 (3:256-259

  17. Stability of 2-body orbits in retarded gravitation theory (RGT)

    CERN Document Server

    Raju, C K

    2015-01-01

    The recently formulated retarded gravitation theory (RGT) explains the non-Newtonian velocities of stars in spiral galaxies, *without any new hypothesis*, and may hence be tested even in the laboratory. However, doubts have been expressed that those higher rotation velocities in RGT may be due to instabilities. We resolve these doubts by solving the full functional differential equations of RGT for a model 2-body planetary system. The solution is stable and closely agrees with the Newtonian solution for this planetary case. Thus, the big difference between RGT and Newtonian gravity for a spiral galaxy is not due to any instability in RGT.

  18. Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, T.; Chin, G.

    2007-08-01

    NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) plans to launch in October 2008 with a companion secondary impactor mission, LCROSS, as the inaugural missions for the Exploration System Mission Directorate. LRO is a pathfinder whose objective is to obtain the needed information to prepare for eventual human return to the Moon. LRO will undertake at least one baseline year of operation with additional extended mission phase sponsored by NASA's Science Mission Directorate. LRO will employ six individual instruments to produce accurate maps and high-resolution images of future landing sites, to assess potential lunar resources, and to characterize the radiation environment. LRO will also test the feasibility of one advanced technology demonstration package. The LRO payload includes: Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) which will determine the global topography of the lunar surface at high resolution, measure landing site slopes, surface roughness, and search for possible polar surface ice in shadowed regions; Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) which will acquire targeted narrow angle images of the lunar surface capable of resolving meter-scale features to support landing site selection, as well as wide-angle images to characterize polar illumination conditions and to identify potential resources; Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) which will map the flux of neutrons from the lunar surface to search for evidence of water ice, and will provide space radiation environment measurements that may be useful for future human exploration; Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment (DLRE) which will chart the temperature of the entire lunar surface at approximately 300 meter horizontal resolution to identify cold-traps and potential ice deposits; Lyman-Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) which will map the entire lunar surface in the far ultraviolet. LAMP will search for surface ice and frost in the polar regions and provide images of permanently shadowed regions illuminated only

  19. Orbital State Uncertainty Realism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwood, J.; Poore, A. B.

    2012-09-01

    Fundamental to the success of the space situational awareness (SSA) mission is the rigorous inclusion of uncertainty in the space surveillance network. The *proper characterization of uncertainty* in the orbital state of a space object is a common requirement to many SSA functions including tracking and data association, resolution of uncorrelated tracks (UCTs), conjunction analysis and probability of collision, sensor resource management, and anomaly detection. While tracking environments, such as air and missile defense, make extensive use of Gaussian and local linearity assumptions within algorithms for uncertainty management, space surveillance is inherently different due to long time gaps between updates, high misdetection rates, nonlinear and non-conservative dynamics, and non-Gaussian phenomena. The latter implies that "covariance realism" is not always sufficient. SSA also requires "uncertainty realism"; the proper characterization of both the state and covariance and all non-zero higher-order cumulants. In other words, a proper characterization of a space object's full state *probability density function (PDF)* is required. In order to provide a more statistically rigorous treatment of uncertainty in the space surveillance tracking environment and to better support the aforementioned SSA functions, a new class of multivariate PDFs are formulated which more accurately characterize the uncertainty of a space object's state or orbit. The new distribution contains a parameter set controlling the higher-order cumulants which gives the level sets a distinctive "banana" or "boomerang" shape and degenerates to a Gaussian in a suitable limit. Using the new class of PDFs within the general Bayesian nonlinear filter, the resulting filter prediction step (i.e., uncertainty propagation) is shown to have the *same computational cost as the traditional unscented Kalman filter* with the former able to maintain a proper characterization of the uncertainty for up to *ten

  20. Radial-orbit instability in modified Newtonian dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Nipoti, Carlo; Londrillo, Pasquale

    2011-01-01

    The stability of radially anisotropic spherical stellar systems in modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) is explored by means of numerical simulations performed with the N-body code N-MODY. We find that Osipkov-Merritt MOND models require for stability larger minimum anisotropy radius than equivalent Newtonian systems (ENSs) with dark matter, and also than purely baryonic Newtonian models with the same density profile. The maximum value for stability of the Fridman-Polyachenko-Shukhman parameter in MOND models is lower than in ENSs, but higher than in Newtonian models with no dark matter. We conclude that MOND systems are substantially more prone to radial-orbit instability than ENSs with dark matter, while they are able to support a larger amount of kinetic energy stored in radial orbits than purely baryonic Newtonian systems. An explanation of these results is attempted, and their relevance to the MOND interpretation of the observed kinematics of globular clusters, dwarf spheroidal and elliptical galaxies is b...

  1. Precise Orbit Determination for ALOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Ryo; Nakamura, Shinichi; Kudo, Nobuo; Katagiri, Seiji

    2007-01-01

    The Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) has been developed to contribute to the fields of mapping, precise regional land coverage observation, disaster monitoring, and resource surveying. Because the mounted sensors need high geometrical accuracy, precise orbit determination for ALOS is essential for satisfying the mission objectives. So ALOS mounts a GPS receiver and a Laser Reflector (LR) for Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR). This paper deals with the precise orbit determination experiments for ALOS using Global and High Accuracy Trajectory determination System (GUTS) and the evaluation of the orbit determination accuracy by SLR data. The results show that, even though the GPS receiver loses lock of GPS signals more frequently than expected, GPS-based orbit is consistent with SLR-based orbit. And considering the 1 sigma error, orbit determination accuracy of a few decimeters (peak-to-peak) was achieved.

  2. COADJOINT ORBITS FOR THE CENTRAL EXTENSION OF Diff+(S1) AND THEIR REPRESENTATIVES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dai Jialing(戴佳玲); Doug Pickrell

    2004-01-01

    According to Kirillov's idea, the irreducible unitary representations of a Lie group G roughly correspond to the coadjoint orbits O. In the forward direction one applies the methods of geometric quantization to produce a representation, and in the reverse direction one computes a transform of the character of a representation, to obtain a coadjoint orbit. The method of orbits in the representations of Lie groups suggests the detailed study of coadjoint orbits of a Lie group G in the space g* dual to the Lie algebra g of G.In this paper, two primary goals are achieved: one is to completely classify the smooth coadjoint orbits of Virasoro group for nonzero central charge c; the other is to find representatives for coadjoint orbits. These questions have been considered previously by Segal,Kirillov, and Witten, but their results are not quite complete. To accomplish this, the authors start by describing the coadjoint action of D-the Lie group of all orientation preserving diffeomorphisms on the circle S1, and its central extension (~D), then the authors will give a complete classification of smooth coadjoint orbits. In fact, they can be parameterized by a subspace of conjugacy classes of PSU(1, 1). Finally, the authors will show how to find representatives of coadjoint orbits by analyzing the vector fields stabilizing the orbits, and describe the amazing connection between the characteristic (trace) of conjugacy classes of PSU(1, 1) and that of vector fields stabilizing orbits.

  3. Orbital Eccrine Hidrocystoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Marangoz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A 29-year-old female patient presented with a painless mass on her upper eyelid medially. She noticed the mass 4 years earlier and it had increased in size over time. She had no diplopia, eyelid swelling, skin lesion overlying the mass, or visual disturbances. On ocular examination, eye movements and funduscopy were normal. The mass was movable and painless with palpation. Magnetic resonance imaging with contrast showed a 12x8x7 mm well-circumscribed cystic lesion with no contrast dye appearance. Surgical removal was performed delicately and no capsular rupture occured. Pathological examination revealed an eccrine hidrocystoma. Our aim is to underline that eccrine hidrocystoma should be included in differential diagnosis of orbital masses.

  4. Exploratory orbit analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelotti, L.

    1989-03-01

    Unlike the other documents in these proceedings, this paper is neither a scientific nor a technical report. It is, rather, a short personal essay which attempts to describe an Exploratory Orbit Analysis (EOA) environment. Analyzing the behavior of a four or six dimensional nonlinear dynamical system is at least as difficult as analyzing events in high-energy collisions; the consequences of doing it badly, or slowly, would be at least as devastating; and yet the level of effort and expenditure invested in the latter, the very attention paid to it by physicists at large, must be two orders of magnitude greater than that given to the former. It is difficult to choose the model which best explains the behavior of a physical device if one does not first understand the behavior of the available models. The time is ripe for the development of a functioning EOA environment, which I will try to describe in this paper to help us achieve this goal.

  5. Orbital angular momentum microlaser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Pei; Zhang, Zhifeng; Sun, Jingbo; Walasik, Wiktor; Longhi, Stefano; Litchinitser, Natalia M.; Feng, Liang

    2016-07-01

    Structured light provides an additional degree of freedom for modern optics and practical applications. The effective generation of orbital angular momentum (OAM) lasing, especially at a micro- and nanoscale, could address the growing demand for information capacity. By exploiting the emerging non-Hermitian photonics design at an exceptional point, we demonstrate a microring laser producing a single-mode OAM vortex lasing with the ability to precisely define the topological charge of the OAM mode. The polarization associated with OAM lasing can be further manipulated on demand, creating a radially polarized vortex emission. Our OAM microlaser could find applications in the next generation of integrated optoelectronic devices for optical communications in both quantum and classical regimes.

  6. Orbital science's 'Bermuda Triangle'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrill, Thomas J.

    1991-02-01

    The effects of a part of the inner Van Allen belt lying closest to the earth, known as the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) upon spacecraft including the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), are discussed. The area consists of positively charged ions and electrons from the Van Allen Belt which become trapped in the earth's dipole field. Contor maps representing the number of protons per square centimeter per second having energies greater than 10 million electron volts are presented. It is noted that the HST orbit causes it to spend about 15 percent of its time in the SAA, but that, unlike the experience with earlier spacecraft, the satellite's skin, internal structure, and normal electronic's packaging provides sufficient protection against eletrons, although some higher energy protons still get through. Various charged particle effects which can arise within scientific instruments including fluorescence, Cerenkov radiation, and induced radioactivity are described.

  7. Geology orbiter comparison study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutts, J. A. J.; Blasius, K. R.; Davis, D. R.; Pang, K. D.; Shreve, D. C.

    1977-01-01

    Instrument requirements of planetary geology orbiters were examined with the objective of determining the feasibility of applying standard instrument designs to a host of terrestrial targets. Within the basic discipline area of geochemistry, gamma-ray, X-ray fluorescence, and atomic spectroscopy remote sensing techniques were considered. Within the discipline area of geophysics, the complementary techniques of gravimetry and radar were studied. Experiments using these techniques were analyzed for comparison at the Moon, Mercury, Mars and the Galilean satellites. On the basis of these comparative assessments, the adaptability of each sensing technique was judged as a basic technique for many targets, as a single instrument applied to many targets, as a single instrument used in different mission modes, and as an instrument capability for nongeoscience objectives.

  8. Orbit Determination Toolbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, James R.; Berry, Kevin; Gregpru. Late; Speckman, Keith; Hur-Diaz, Sun; Surka, Derek; Gaylor, Dave

    2010-01-01

    The Orbit Determination Toolbox is an orbit determination (OD) analysis tool based on MATLAB and Java that provides a flexible way to do early mission analysis. The toolbox is primarily intended for advanced mission analysis such as might be performed in concept exploration, proposal, early design phase, or rapid design center environments. The emphasis is on flexibility, but it has enough fidelity to produce credible results. Insight into all flight dynamics source code is provided. MATLAB is the primary user interface and is used for piecing together measurement and dynamic models. The Java Astrodynamics Toolbox is used as an engine for things that might be slow or inefficient in MATLAB, such as high-fidelity trajectory propagation, lunar and planetary ephemeris look-ups, precession, nutation, polar motion calculations, ephemeris file parsing, and the like. The primary analysis functions are sequential filter/smoother and batch least-squares commands that incorporate Monte-Carlo data simulation, linear covariance analysis, measurement processing, and plotting capabilities at the generic level. These functions have a user interface that is based on that of the MATLAB ODE suite. To perform a specific analysis, users write MATLAB functions that implement truth and design system models. The user provides his or her models as inputs to the filter commands. The software provides a capability to publish and subscribe to a software bus that is compliant with the NASA Goddard Mission Services Evolution Center (GMSEC) standards, to exchange data with other flight dynamics tools to simplify the flight dynamics design cycle. Using the publish and subscribe approach allows for analysts in a rapid design center environment to seamlessly incorporate changes in spacecraft and mission design into navigation analysis and vice versa.

  9. The conservation of orbital symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Woodward, R B

    2013-01-01

    The Conservation of Orbital Symmetry examines the principle of conservation of orbital symmetry and its use. The central content of the principle was that reactions occur readily when there is congruence between orbital symmetry characteristics of reactants and products, and only with difficulty when that congruence does not obtain-or to put it more succinctly, orbital symmetry is conserved in concerted reaction. This principle is expected to endure, whatever the language in which it may be couched, or whatever greater precision may be developed in its application and extension. The book ope

  10. Homogeneous orbit closures and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lindenstrauss, Elon

    2011-01-01

    We give new classes of examples of orbits of the diagonal group in the space of unit volume lattices in R^d for d > 2 with nice (homogeneous) orbit closures, as well as examples of orbits with explicitly computable but irregular orbit closures. We give Diophantine applications to the former, for instance we show that if x is the cubic root of 2 then for any y,z in R liminf |n|=0 (as |n| goes to infinity), where denotes the distance of a real number c to the integers.

  11. Orbit Alignment in Triple Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokovinin, Andrei

    2017-08-01

    The statistics of the angle Φ between orbital angular momenta in hierarchical triple systems with known inner visual or astrometric orbits are studied. A correlation between apparent revolution directions proves the partial orbit alignment known from earlier works. The alignment is strong in triples with outer projected separation less than ∼50 au, where the average Φ is about 20^\\circ . In contrast, outer orbits wider than 1000 au are not aligned with the inner orbits. It is established that the orbit alignment decreases with the increasing mass of the primary component. The average eccentricity of inner orbits in well-aligned triples is smaller than in randomly aligned ones. These findings highlight the role of dissipative interactions with gas in defining the orbital architecture of low-mass triple systems. On the other hand, chaotic dynamics apparently played a role in shaping more massive hierarchies. The analysis of projected configurations and triples with known inner and outer orbits indicates that the distribution of Φ is likely bimodal, where 80% of triples have {{Φ }}< 70^\\circ and the remaining ones are randomly aligned.

  12. The Problem of Three Stars: Stability Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valtonen, M.; Mylläri, A.; Orlov, V.; Rubinov, A.

    2008-05-01

    The problem of three stars arises in many connections in stellar dynamics: three-body scattering drives the evolution of star clusters, and bound triple systems form long-lasting intermediate structures in them. Here we address the question of stability of triple stars. For a given system the stability is easy to determine by numerical orbit calculation. However, we often have only statistical knowledge of some of the parameters of the system. Then one needs a more general analytical formula. Here we start with the analytical calculation of the single encounter between a binary and a single star by Heggie (1975). Using some of the later developments we get a useful expression for the energy change per encounter as a function of the pericenter distance, masses, and relative inclination of the orbit. Then we assume that the orbital energy evolves by random walk in energy space until the accumulated energy change leads to instability. In this way we arrive at a stability limit in pericenter distance of the outer orbit for different mass combinations, outer orbit eccentricities and inclinations. The result is compared with numerical orbit calculations.

  13. Controls of interaction dynamics of orbital assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Renjeng

    1991-01-01

    Building structures and spacecraft in orbit will require technologies for positioning, docking/berthing, and joining orbital structures. A fundamental problem underlying the operation of docking and berthing is that of controlling the contact dynamics of mechanical structures actuated by active mechanisms such as robotic devices. Control systems must be designed to control these active mechanisms so that both the free space motions and contact motions are stable and satisfy specifications on position accuracy and bounds on contact forces. For the large orbital structures of the future, the problem of interactive dynamics and control is fundamentally different in several ways than it was for spacecraft docking in the past. First, future space structures must be treated as flexible structures - the operations of docking, berthing, and assembly will need to respect the vibrations of the structures. Second, the assembly of these structures will require multiple-point contact, rather than the essentially single-point positioning of conventional spacecraft docking. Third, some assembly operations require the subassemblies to be brought and held in contact so that successful joining can be accomplished. A preliminary study of contact stability and compliance control design has resulted in the development of an analytical method and a design method to analyze stability. The analytical method analyzes the problem of stability when an actively-controlled structure contacts a passive structure. This method makes it possible to accurately estimate the stiffness of the passive structures with which the contact motion will become unstable. The analytic results suggest that passivity is neither achievable in practice, nor necessary as a design concept. A contact control system need only be passive up to a certain frequency; beyond that frequency the system can be stabilized with sufficiently small gains. With this concept the Center developed a design methodology for achieving

  14. Dynamics of Neptune's Trojans: II. Eccentric orbits and observed ones

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Li-Yong; Sun, Yi-Sui

    2010-01-01

    In a previous paper, we have presented a global view of the stability of Neptune Trojan (NT hereafter) on inclined orbit. We discuss in this paper the dependence of stability of NT orbits on the eccentricity. High-resolution dynamical maps are constructed using the results of extensive numerical integrations of orbits initialized on the fine grids of initial semimajor axis (a0) versus eccentricity (e0). The extensions of regions of stable orbits on the (a0, e0) plane at different inclinations are shown. The maximum eccentricities of stable orbits in three most stable regions at low (0, 12deg.), medium (22,36deg.) and high (51, 59deg.) inclination, are found to be 0.10, 0.12 and 0.04, respectively. The fine structures in the dynamical maps are described. Via the frequency analysis method, the mechanisms that portray the dynamical maps are revealed. The secondary resonances, concerning the frequency of the librating resonant angle and the frequency of the quasi 2:1 mean motion resonance between Neptune and Uran...

  15. Structural Stability of Planar Bimodal Linear Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep Ferrer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural stability ensures that the qualitative behavior of a system is preserved under small perturbations. We study it for planar bimodal linear dynamical systems, that is, systems consisting of two linear dynamics acting on each side of a given hyperplane and assuming continuity along the separating hyperplane. We describe which one of these systems is structurally stable when (real spiral does not appear and when it does we give necessary and sufficient conditions concerning finite periodic orbits and saddle connections. In particular, we study the finite periodic orbits and the homoclinic orbits in the saddle/spiral case.

  16. Stability Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Burns, Daniel; Wang, Zuoqin

    2008-01-01

    In this article we discuss the role of stability functions in geometric invariant theory and apply stability function techniques to problems in toric geometry. In particular we show how one can use these techniques to recover results of Burns-Guillemin-Uribe and Shiffman-Tate-Zelditch on asymptotic properties of sections of holomorphic line bundles over toric varieties.

  17. PyORBIT: A Python Shell For ORBIT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jean-Francois Ostiguy; Jeffrey Holmes

    2003-07-01

    ORBIT is code developed at SNS to simulate beam dynamics in accumulation rings and synchrotrons. The code is structured as a collection of external C++ modules for SuperCode, a high level interpreter shell developed at LLNL in the early 1990s. SuperCode is no longer actively supported and there has for some time been interest in replacing it by a modern scripting language, while preserving the feel of the original ORBIT program. In this paper, we describe a new version of ORBIT where the role of SuperCode is assumed by Python, a free, well-documented and widely supported object-oriented scripting language. We also compare PyORBIT to ORBIT from the standpoint of features, performance and future expandability.

  18. Orbital Chondroma: A rare mesenchymal tumor of orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi S Kabra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available While relatively common in the skeletal system, cartilaginous tumors are rarely seen originating from the orbit. Here, we report a rare case of an orbital chondroma. A 27-year-old male patient presented with a painless hard mass in the superonasal quadrant (SNQ of left orbit since 3 months. On examination, best-corrected visual acuity of both eyes was 20/20, with normal anterior and posterior segment with full movements of eyeballs and normal intraocular pressure. Computerized tomography scan revealed well defined soft tissue density lesion in SNQ of left orbit. Patient was operated for anteromedial orbitotomy under general anesthesia. Mass was excised intact and sent for histopathological examination (HPE. HPE report showed lobular aggregates of benign cartilaginous cells with mild atypia suggesting of benign cartilaginous tumor - chondroma. Very few cases of orbital chondroma have been reported in literature so far.

  19. Stability of habitable exomoons of circumbinary planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyal, Suman; Haghighipour, Nader; Quarles, Billy

    2015-12-01

    Among the currently known Kepler circumbinary planets, three, namely Kepler-453b, Kepler-16b, and Kepler-47c are in the binary habitable zone (HZ). Given the large sizes of these planets, it is unlikely that they would be habitable. However, similar to the giant planets in our solar system, these planets may have large moons, which orbit their host planets while in the HZ. These exomoons, if exist, present viable candidates for habitability. As a condition for habitability, the planet-moon system has to maintain its orbital stability for long time. Usually, the empirical formula by Holeman & Wiegert (1999) is used as a measure of orbital stability in circumbinary systems. However, this formula was obtained by assuming planets to be test particles and therefore does not include possible perturbation of the planet on the binary. In this work, we present results of more realistic calculations of stability of circumbinary planets where the interactions between planets and their central binaries are taken into account. We map the region of stability, which in this case will be specific to each system, and determine the range of the orbital parameters of the moons for which their orbits will be long-term stable.

  20. Diplopia and orbital wall fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boffano, P.; Roccia, F.; Gallesio, C.; Karagozoglu, K.H.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2014-01-01

    Diplopia is a symptom that is frequently associated with orbital wall fractures. The aim of this article was to present the incidence and patterns of diplopia after orbital wall blow-out fractures in 2 European centers, Turin and Amsterdam, and to identify any correlation between this symptom and su

  1. [Enophthalmos in an orbital tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Bianca; Szabo, I; Nicula, Cristina; Popescu, Livia Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Enophtalmus is an unusual sign of the orbital tumors often represented by proptosis. One patient with enophtalmus and intraorbital tumor and aplasy is presented. The treatment of choice of orbital tumor is complete surgical excision and careful follow-up. Considering the more aggressive course followed by recurrent tumor, correct diagnosis and management is essential.

  2. Diffractive molecular-orbital tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Chunyang; Zhu, Xiaosong; Lan, Pengfei; Wang, Feng; He, Lixin; Shi, Wenjing; Li, Yang; Li, Min; Zhang, Qingbin; Lu, Peixiang

    2017-03-01

    High-order-harmonic generation in the interaction of femtosecond lasers with atoms and molecules opens the path to molecular-orbital tomography and to probe the electronic dynamics with attosecond-Ångström resolutions. Molecular-orbital tomography requires both the amplitude and phase of the high-order harmonics. Yet the measurement of phases requires sophisticated techniques and represents formidable challenges at present. Here we report a scheme, called diffractive molecular-orbital tomography, to retrieve the molecular orbital solely from the amplitude of high-order harmonics without measuring any phase information. We have applied this method to image the molecular orbitals of N2, CO2, and C2H2 . The retrieved orbital is further improved by taking account the correction of Coulomb potential. The diffractive molecular-orbital tomography scheme, removing the roadblock of phase measurement, significantly simplifies the molecular-orbital tomography procedure and paves an efficient and robust way to the imaging of more complex molecules.

  3. GridOrbit public display

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramos, Juan David Hincapie; Tabard, Aurélien; Bardram, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    We introduce GridOrbit, a public awareness display that visualizes the activity of a community grid used in a biology laboratory. This community grid executes bioin-formatics algorithms and relies on users to donate CPU cycles to the grid. The goal of GridOrbit is to create a shared awareness about...

  4. Diplopia and orbital wall fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boffano, P.; Roccia, F.; Gallesio, C.; Karagozoglu, K.H.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2014-01-01

    Diplopia is a symptom that is frequently associated with orbital wall fractures. The aim of this article was to present the incidence and patterns of diplopia after orbital wall blow-out fractures in 2 European centers, Turin and Amsterdam, and to identify any correlation between this symptom and

  5. Low Earth Orbiter: Terminal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Steven E.; Bundick, Steven N.

    1999-01-01

    In response to the current government budgetary environment that requires the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to do more with less, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility has developed and implemented a class of ground stations known as a Low Earth Orbiter-Terminal (LEO-T). This development thus provides a low-cost autonomous ground tracking service for NASA's customers. More importantly, this accomplishment provides a commercial source to spacecraft customers around the world to purchase directly from the company awarded the NASA contract to build these systems. A few years ago, NASA was driven to provide more ground station capacity for spacecraft telemetry, tracking, and command (TT&C) services with a decreasing budget. NASA also made a decision to develop many smaller, cheaper satellites rather than a few large spacecraft as done in the past. In addition, university class missions were being driven to provide their own TT&C services due to the increasing load on the NASA ground-tracking network. NASA's solution for this ever increasing load was to use the existing large aperture systems to support those missions requiring that level of performance and to support the remainder of the missions with the autonomous LEO-T systems. The LEO-T antenna system is a smaller, cheaper, and fully autonomous unstaffed system that can operate without the existing NASA support infrastructure. The LEO-T provides a low-cost, reliable space communications service to the expanding number of low-earth orbiting missions around the world. The system is also fostering developments that improve cost-effectiveness of autonomous-class capabilities for NASA and commercial space use. NASA has installed three LEO-T systems. One station is at the University of Puerto Rico, the second system is installed at the Poker Flat Research Range near Fairbanks, Alaska, and the third system is installed at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. This paper

  6. TINJAUAN KLASIK DAN RELATIVISTIK KESTABILAN ORBIT HAMPIR MELINGKAR DALAM MEDAN GAYA SENTRAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endi Suhendi

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Perbedaan tinjauan partikel yang bergerak dalam orbit hampir melingkar yang dipengaruhi medan gaya sentral secara klasik dan relativistik telah dianalisis. Dalam kasus khusus dimana medan gaya sentralnya atraktif dan nilainya berbanding dengan n r1 , telah ditemukan bahwa nilai momentum sudut dan kestabilan orbit hampir melingkar untuk kedua tinjauan terdapat perbedaan. Nilai momentum sudut dan kestabilan orbit hampir melingkar dalam kasus relativistik untuk 2 < n < 3 tidak selalu stabil, tidak seperti pada kasus klasik. Kata kunci: Gaya Sentral, Momentum Sudut, Kestabilan Orbit

  7. A Class of Selenocentric Retrograde Orbits With Innovative Applications to Human Lunar Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamo, Daniel R.; Lester, Daniel F.; Thronson, Harley A.; Barbee, Brent

    2014-01-01

    Selenocentric distant retrograde orbits with radii from approx. 12,500 km to approx. 25,000 km are assessed for stability and for suitability as crewed command and control infrastructure locations in support of telerobotic lunar surface operations and interplanetary human transport. Such orbits enable consistent transits to and from Earth at virtually any time if they are coplanar with the Moon's geocentric orbit. They possess multiple attributes and applications distinct from NASA's proposed destination orbit for a redirected asteroid about 70,000 km from the Moon.

  8. Video Orbits of the Geminids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajdukova, M.

    2014-07-01

    Geminid meteoroids, observed by the video technique, were analysed with the aim of determining the actual dispersion of their reciprocal semimajor axes 1/a within the stream. Orbits were selected from the European Video Meteor Network Database, EDMOND, (Kornos et al., 2013), from the SonotaCo Shower Catalogue (SonotaCo, 2009), and from the Czech Catalogue of Video Meteor Orbits (Koten et al., 2003). The observed orbital dispersion, including the measurement errors, was compared with that obtained from the precisely-reduced photographic orbits of Geminids from the IAU Meteor Data Center (Lindblad et al., 2003). In this paper, we concentrate on the influence of errors on the orbital dispersion. The size and distribution of observational errors determined from the long-period meteoroid streams (Hajdukova 2013), were applied to determine the real dispersion within this short-period meteoroid stream. The observed dispersions, described by the median absolute deviation in terms of 1/a, range from 0.041 to 0.050 1/au. The deviation of the median reciprocal semimajor axis from the parent (3200) Phaethon, obtained from Japanese video orbits, is 0.009 1/au, and that from the EDMOND data 0.01 1/au. This deviation obtained from the photographic orbits of the IAU Meteor Data Center was significantly greater (Hajdukova 2009). Similar results were obtained from the Czech Video Orbits Catalogue, where the value is 0.05 1/au. The investigation showed that semimajor axes of meteor orbits in both the SonotaCo and EDMOND datasets are systematically biased as a consequence of the method used for the video orbit determination, probably because corrections for atmospheric deceleration were either incorrectly made or were not done at all. Thus, the determined heliocentric velocities are underestimated, and the semimajor axes medians shifted towards smaller values. The observed distributions in 1/a from these video data become biased towards higher values of 1/a. The orbits of the Geminid

  9. Measuring Scars of Periodic Orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, L

    1999-01-01

    The phenomenon of periodic orbit scarring of eigenstates of classically chaotic systems is attracting increasing attention. Scarring is one of the most important ``corrections'' to the ideal random eigenstates suggested by random matrix theory. This paper discusses measures of scars and in so doing also tries to clarify the concepts and effects of eigenfunction scarring. We propose a new, universal scar measure which takes into account an entire periodic orbit and the linearized dynamics in its vicinity. This measure is tuned to pick out those structures which are induced in quantum eigenstates by unstable periodic orbits and their manifolds. It gives enhanced scarring strength as measured by eigenstate overlaps and inverse participation ratios, especially for longer orbits. We also discuss off-resonance scars which appear naturally on either side of an unstable periodic orbit.

  10. The 2009 Mars Telecommunications Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, G. R.; Depaula, R.; Diehl, R. E.; Edwards, C. D.; Fitzgerald, R. J.; Franklin, S. F.; Gibbs, R. G.; Kerridge, S. A.; Komarek, T. A.; Noreen, G. K.

    The first spacecraft with a primary function of providing communication links while orbiting a foreign planet has begun development for a launch in 2009. NASA's Mars Telecommunications Orbiter would use three radio bands to magnify the benefits of other future Mars missions and enable some types of missions otherwise impractical. It would serve as the Mars hub for a growing interplanetary Internet. And it would pioneer the use of planet-to-planet laser communications to demonstrate the possibility for even great networking capabilities in the future. During its nearly 10-year mission in orbit, Mars Telecommunications Orbiter would aid navigation of arriving spacecraft to their martian landing sites and monitor critical events during landings and orbit insertions. In addition, it would enable data-transmission volumes great enough to bring a virtual Mars presence to the public through a range of Internet and video features.

  11. Planar resonant periodic orbits in Kuiper belt dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Voyatzis, G; Voyatzis, George; Kotoulas, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    In the framework of the planar restricted three body problem we study a considerable number of resonances associated to the Kuiper Belt dynamics and located between 30 and 48 a.u. Our study is based on the computation of resonant periodic orbits and their stability. Stable periodic orbits are surrounded by regular librations in phase space and in such domains the capture of trans-Neptunian object is possible. All the periodic orbits found are symmetric and there is evidence for the existence of asymmetric ones only in few cases. In the present work first, second and third order resonances are under consideration. In the planar circular case we found that most of the periodic orbits are stable. The families of periodic orbits are temporarily interrupted by collisions but they continue up to relatively large values of the Jacobi constant and highly eccentric regular motion exists for all cases. In the elliptic problem and for a particular eccentricity value of the primary bodies the periodic orbits are isolated...

  12. Can a Pseudo Periodic Orbit Avoid a Catastrophic Transition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueta, Tetsushi; Ito, Daisuke; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2015-12-01

    We propose a resilient control scheme to avoid catastrophic transitions associated with saddle-node bifurcations of periodic solutions. The conventional feedback control schemes related to controlling chaos can stabilize unstable periodic orbits embedded in strange attractors or suppress bifurcations such as period-doubling and Neimark-Sacker bifurcations whose periodic orbits continue to exist through the bifurcation processes. However, it is impossible to apply these methods directly to a saddle-node bifurcation since the corresponding periodic orbit disappears after such a bifurcation. In this paper, we define a pseudo periodic orbit which can be obtained using transient behavior right after the saddle-node bifurcation, and utilize it as reference data to compose a control input. We consider a pseudo periodic orbit at a saddle-node bifurcation in the Duffing equations as an example, and show its temporary attraction. Then we demonstrate the suppression control of this bifurcation, and show robustness of the control. As a laboratory experiment, a saddle-node bifurcation of limit cycles in the BVP oscillator is explored. A control input generated by a pseudo periodic orbit can restore a stable limit cycle which disappeared after the saddle-node bifurcation.

  13. Asymptotic orbits in the restricted four-body problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, K. E.

    2007-07-01

    This paper studies the asymptotic solutions of the restricted planar problem of four bodies, three of which are finite, moving in circular orbits around their center of masses, while the fourth is infinitesimal. Two of the primaries have equal mass and the most-massive primary is located at the origin of the system. We found the invariant unstable and stable manifolds around the hyperbolic Lyapunov periodic orbits which emanate from the collinear equilibrium points Li,i=1,…,4, as well as the invariant manifolds from the Lagrangian critical points L5 and L6. We construct numerically, applying forward and backward integration from the intersection points of the appropriate Poincaré cuts, homo- and hetero-clinic, symmetric and non-symmetric asymptotic orbits. We present the characteristic curves of the 24 families which consist of symmetric simple-periodic orbits of the problem for a fixed value of the mass parameter b. The stability of the families is computed and also presented. Sixteen families contain as terminal points asymptotic periodic orbits which intersect the x-axis perpendicularly and tend asymptotically to L5 for t→+∞ and to L6 for t→-∞, spiralling into (and out of) these points. The corresponding 16 terminating heteroclinic asymptotic orbits, for b=2, are illustrated.

  14. From Order to Chaos in Earth Satellite Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkolias, Ioannis; Daquin, Jérôme; Gachet, Fabien; Rosengren, Aaron J.

    2016-11-01

    We consider Earth satellite orbits in the range of semimajor axes where the perturbing effects of Earth’s oblateness and lunisolar gravity are of comparable order. This range covers the medium-Earth orbits (MEO) of the Global Navigation Satellite Systems and the geosynchronous orbits (GEO) of the communication satellites. We recall a secular and quadrupolar model, based on the Milankovitch vector formulation of perturbation theory, which governs the long-term orbital evolution subject to the predominant gravitational interactions. We study the global dynamics of this two-and-a-half degrees-of-freedom Hamiltonian system by means of the fast Lyapunov indicator (FLI), used in a statistical sense. Specifically, we characterize the degree of chaoticity of the action space using angle-averaged normalized FLI maps, thereby overcoming the angle dependencies of the conventional stability maps. Emphasis is placed upon the phase-space structures near secular resonances, which are of primary importance to the space debris community. We confirm and quantify the transition from order to chaos in MEO, stemming from the critical inclinations and find that highly inclined GEO orbits are particularly unstable. Despite their reputed normality, Earth satellite orbits can possess an extraordinarily rich spectrum of dynamical behaviors and, from a mathematical perspective, have all the complications that make them very interesting candidates for testing the modern tools of chaos theory.

  15. Dynamics of two planets in co-orbital motion

    CERN Document Server

    Giuppone, C A; Michtchenko, T A; Ferraz-Mello, S

    2010-01-01

    We study the stability regions and families of periodic orbits of two planets locked in a co-orbital configuration. We consider different ratios of planetary masses and orbital eccentricities, also we assume that both planets share the same orbital plane. Initially we perform numerical simulations over a grid of osculating initial conditions to map the regions of stable/chaotic motion and identify equilibrium solutions. These results are later analyzed in more detail using a semi-analytical model. Apart from the well known quasi-satellite (QS) orbits and the classical equilibrium Lagrangian points L4 and L5, we also find a new regime of asymmetric periodic solutions. For low eccentricities these are located at $(\\sigma,\\Delta\\omega) = (\\pm 60\\deg, \\mp 120\\deg)$, where \\sigma is the difference in mean longitudes and \\Delta\\omega is the difference in longitudes of pericenter. The position of these Anti-Lagrangian solutions changes with the mass ratio and the orbital eccentricities, and are found for eccentricit...

  16. Halo orbit to science orbit captures at planetary moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokelmann, Kevin A.; Russell, Ryan P.

    2017-05-01

    Ballisticly connecting halo orbits to science orbits in the circular-restricted three-body problem is investigated. Two classes of terminal science orbits are considered: low-altitude, tight orbits that are deep in the gravity well of the secondary body, and high-altitude, loose orbits that are strongly perturbed by the gravity of the primary body. General analytic expressions are developed to provide a minimum bound on impulse cost in both the circular restricted and the Hill's approximations. The equations are applied to a broad range of planetary moons, providing a mission design reference. Systematic grid search methods are developed to numerically find feasible transfers from halo orbits at Europa, confirming the analytical lower bound formulas. The two-impulse capture options in the case of Europa reveal a diverse set of potential solutions. Tight captures result in maneuver costs of 425-550 m/s while loose captures are found with costs as low as 30 m/s. The terminal orbits are verified to avoid escape or impact for at least 45 days.

  17. VSOP-2 Orbit Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, H.; VSOP-2 Orbit Determination Sub-Working Group

    2009-08-01

    Precise orbit determination (POD) is a key factor to enable phase referencing observations with Astro-G. A POD accuracy of 30 cm is required for efficient X-band phase referencing observations, accuracy of 6 cm for K-band observations, and accuracy of 3 cm for Q-band observations. For the POD, Astro-G will be equipped with a GPS/Galileo receiver and a SLR (Satellite Laser Ranging) retroreflector array. Four POD antennas will be equipped on four sides of the satellite body, to cover all directions. The SLR will be used as a complement to the GPS at middle-to-high altitude. Because the refroreflector array should always face to the Earth direction, it will be set up on the Ka-link antenna gimbal. The most significant perturbing force for the Astro-G is solar radiation pressure (SRP). The reflectivity of each surface component should be preliminary measured in detail to model the SRP. The estimated achievable POD accuracy at apogee is 10 ˜ 30 cm in nominal case. Phase referencing observations in K- or Q-band can be performed if the enough amount of SLR tracking data can be obtained at high altitudes.

  18. Ensuring Stability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    "Stable"will be a key word for China’s economy in 2012.That’s the beat set at the annual Central Economic Work Conference held in Beijing on December 12-14,which reviewed this year’s development and mapped out plans for the next year.Policymakers at the conference decided to keep macroeconomic policies stable,seek a stable and relatively fast economic growth,stabilize consumer prices and maintain social stability in 2012.On the basis of stability,the government will transform the development model,deepen reform and improve people’s livelihood.

  19. Hydrogenoid orbitals revisited: From Slater orbitals to Coulomb Sturmians

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Danilo Calderini; Simonetta Cavalli; Cecilia Coletti; Gaia Grossi; Vincenzo Qquilanti

    2012-01-01

    The simple connection between the Slater orbitals, venerable in quantum chemistry, and the Coulomb Sturmian orbitals, more recently employed in atomic and molecular physics, is pointed out explicitly in view of the renewed interest in both as basis sets in applied quantum mechanics. Research in Slater orbitals mainly concerns multicentre, many-body integrals, whereas that on Sturmians exploits their orthonormality and completeness with no need of continuum states. An account of recent progress is outlined, also with reference to relationships between the two basis sets, and with the momentum space and hyperspherical harmonics representations.

  20. Stabilizing Niger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hahonou, Eric Komlavi

    international intervention in Niger. Their main objective is to secure their own strategic, economic and political interests by strengthening the Nigerien authorities through direct intervention and capacity building activities. For western states reinforcing state security institutions and stabilizing elite...

  1. Effective stability of the Trojan asteroids

    CERN Document Server

    Skokos, C; Skokos, Ch.

    2001-01-01

    We study the spatial circular restricted problem of three bodies in the light of Nekhoroshev theory of stability over large time intervals. We consider in particular the Sun-Jupiter model and the Trojan asteroids in the neighborhood of the Lagrangian point $L_4$. We find a region of effective stability around the point $L_4$ such that if the initial point of an orbit is inside this region the orbit is confined in a slightly larger neighborhood of the equilibrium (in phase space) for a very long time interval. By combining analytical methods and numerical approximations we are able to prove that stability over the age of the universe is guaranteed on a realistic region, big enough to include one real asteroid. By comparing this result with the one obtained for the planar problem we see that the regions of stability in the two cases are of the same magnitude.

  2. SPHERES Mars Orbiting Sample Return External Orbiting Capture Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA's Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission scenario utilizes a small Orbiting Sample (OS) satellite, launched from the surface of Mars, which will rendezvous with an...

  3. Orbital Infarction due to Sickle Cell Disease without Orbital Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron L. McBride

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease is a hemoglobinopathy that results in paroxysmal arteriolar occlusion and tissue infarction that can manifest in a plurality of tissues. Rarely, these infarcted crises manifest in the bony orbit. Orbital infarction usually presents with acute onset of periorbital tenderness, swelling, erythema, and pain. Soft tissue swelling can result in proptosis and attenuation of extraocular movements. Expedient diagnosis of sickle cell orbital infarction is crucial because this is a potentially sight-threatening entity. Diagnosis can be delayed since the presentation has physical and radiographic findings mimicking various infectious and traumatic processes. We describe a patient who presented with sickle cell orbital crisis without pain. This case highlights the importance of maintaining a high index of suspicion in patients with known sickle cell disease or of African descent born outside the United States in a region where screening for hemoglobinopathy is not routine, even when the presentation is not classic.

  4. [Orbital tumor emergencies in childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morax, S; Desjardins, L

    2009-05-01

    Emergencies in childhood orbital tumorals are rare. The absolute emergency involves malignant primary orbital tumors, such as rhabdomyosarcoma or secondary malignant tumors (metastatic neuroblastoma, leukemia), involving a vital prognosis requiring prompt diagnosis. Delayed emergencies are usually vascular lesions. Among these lesions, immature orbital hemangioma, with a good prognosis, must be distinguished from orbital adnexal lymphangiomas, which are less frequent but can lead to dramatic cosmetic and functional disorders. In rare cases, they can be responsible for sudden, painful proptosis, due to orbital hemorrhage, with a risk of optic nerve compression, requiring emergency surgical treatment. Neurogenous lesions, either isolated, such as in gliomas, or associated with a systemic disease, such as Recklinghausen neurofibromatosis, threaten the functional prognosis. Diagnosis of pediatric orbital tumors is based on a good clinical examination, precise imaging investigations, and evaluation of the locoregional extension of the tumor. Biopsy is required in emergency situations, when rhabdomyosarcoma is suspected, in order to start the chemotherapy. However, the biopsy can be superfluous, and even useless or dangerous, when clinical and imaging investigations are sufficient to provide a diagnosis of capillary hemangioma, lymphangioma, or metastatic tumor from an abdominal malignancy. Treatment is closely related to the etiopathogenesis of the tumor. The outcomes are vital, functional and cosmetic. They may require orbital surgery (biopsy, tumoral resection, orbital decompression in case of a compressive hemorrhage), systemic corticotherapy (as in immature adnexal hemangioma), radiation, and chemotherapy (rhabdomyosarcoma, secondary malignant tumor). These diseases require a pediatric ophthalmological medical center specializing in orbital surgery, with close collaboration of multiple specialists such as onco-pediatricians and neurosurgeons.

  5. Ocular complications of orbital venography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safer, J N; Guibor, P

    1975-03-01

    Three ocular complications directly related to orbital venography are described, one resulting in permanent loss of vision,. The patient had lymphangioma of the orbit which evidently had bled secondary to increased venous pressure and injection of contrast bolus. Both of the 2 patients with transient visual disturbances had diabetic retinopathy. The common factor is felt to be an imparied vascular bed which cannot meet the stress of increased venous pressure and contrast medium injection. Conditions which predispose to ocular-orbital stasis and/or hemorrhage are discussed.

  6. Orbit correction using an eigenvector method with constraints for synchrotron radiation sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, Kentaro [Photon Factory, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1, Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)], E-mail: kentaro.harada@kek.jp; Obina, Takashi; Kobayashi, Yukinori [Photon Factory, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1, Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Nakamura, Norio; Takaki, Hiroyuki; Sakai, Hiroshi [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5, Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan)

    2009-06-11

    An eigenvector method with constraints (EVC) is proposed as a new orbit correction scheme for synchrotron light sources. EVC efficiently corrects the global orbit in a storage ring, and can simultaneously perform exact correction of local orbits without deterioration of the global orbit. To demonstrate the advantages of EVC over the ordinary eigenvector method (EV), we carried out experimental studies at the Photon Factory storage ring (PF-ring) and the Photon Factory Advanced Ring (PF-AR) at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). The performance of EVC was systematically examined at PF-ring and PF-AR. The experimental results agreed well with the simulated ones. Consequently, we confirmed that EVC easily realized orbit correction for both global and local orbits, and that it was very effective for the beam stabilization of synchrotron radiation (SR) sources.

  7. Orbit correction using an eigenvector method with constraints for synchrotron radiation sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Kentaro; Obina, Takashi; Kobayashi, Yukinori; Nakamura, Norio; Takaki, Hiroyuki; Sakai, Hiroshi

    2009-06-01

    An eigenvector method with constraints (EVC) is proposed as a new orbit correction scheme for synchrotron light sources. EVC efficiently corrects the global orbit in a storage ring, and can simultaneously perform exact correction of local orbits without deterioration of the global orbit. To demonstrate the advantages of EVC over the ordinary eigenvector method (EV), we carried out experimental studies at the Photon Factory storage ring (PF-ring) and the Photon Factory Advanced Ring (PF-AR) at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). The performance of EVC was systematically examined at PF-ring and PF-AR. The experimental results agreed well with the simulated ones. Consequently, we confirmed that EVC easily realized orbit correction for both global and local orbits, and that it was very effective for the beam stabilization of synchrotron radiation (SR) sources.

  8. CODIMENSION 3 BIFURCATIONS OF HOMOCLINIC ORBITS WITH ORBIT FLIPS AND INCLINATION FLIPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHUI SHULIANG; ZHU DEMING

    2004-01-01

    The homoclinic bifurcations in four dimensional vector fields are investigated by setting up a local coordinates near the homoclinic orbit. This homoclinic orbit is nonprincipal in the meanings that its positive semi-orbit takes orbit flip and its unstable foliation takes inclination flip. The existence, nonexistence, uniqueness and coexistence of the 1-homoclinic orbit and the 1-periodic orbit are studied. The existence of the twofold periodic orbit and three-fold periodic orbit are also obtained.

  9. Thermodynamic performance testing of the orbiter flash evaporator system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaax, J. R.; Melgares, M. A.; Frahm, J. P.

    1980-01-01

    System level testing of the space shuttle orbiter's development flash evaporator system (FES) was performed in a thermal vacuum chamber capable of simulating ambient ascent, orbital, and entry temperature and pressure profiles. The test article included the evaporator assembly, high load and topping exhaust duct and nozzle assemblies, and feedwater supply assembly. Steady state and transient heat load, water pressure/temperature and ambient pressure/temperature profiles were imposed by especially designed supporting test hardware. Testing in 1978 verified evaporator and duct heater thermal design, determined FES performance boundaries, and assessed topping evaporator plume characteristics. Testing in 1979 combined the FES with the other systems in the orbiter active thermal control subsystem (ATCS). The FES met or exceeded all nominal and contingency performance requirements during operation with the integrated ATCS. During both tests stability problems were encountered during steady state operations which resulted in subsequent design changes to the water spray nozzle and valve plate assemblies.

  10. Neutral test particle orbits in the Kerr--Newman spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Pugliese, Daniela; Ruffini, Remo

    2013-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the orbital circular motion of electrically neutral test particles on the equatorial plane of the Kerr-Newman spacetime. Many details of the motion in the cases of black hole and naked singularity sources are pointed out. We identify four different types of orbital regions, which depend on the properties of the orbital angular momentum, and define four different kinds of naked singularities, according to the values of the charge-to-mass ratio of the source. It is shown that the presence of a particular type of counter-rotating test particles is sufficient to uniquely identify naked singularities. It is pointed out that the structure of the stability regions can be used to differentiate between black holes and naked singularities.

  11. Applications Study of Aero-Maneuvering Orbit-to-Orbit Shuttle (AMOOS), Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, J.

    1976-01-01

    Preliminary designs and the supporting analysis for both the Aeromaneuvering Orbit-to-Orbit Shuttle (AMOOS) and the Aeromaneuvering Recovery System (AMRS) are presented. The AMOOS design is shown to yield from twice to almost three times the high energy, round-trip payloads as a purely propulsive vehicle of the same weight. Typically AMOOS can perform a crew rotation mission to equatorial geosynchronous orbit in one space shuttle launch. The flight test program analysis modeled parameters such as maximum dynamic pressure, heating rates, guidance, stability and recovery. Two model flight schedules were developed, one consisting of four flights and the other of two flights. The former is considered a very low risk, high information return program whereas the latter is a minimal cost program consistent with reasonable data returns and chance of success. The AMOOS and AMRS guidance scheme developed using linear regulator theory proved a precise and accurate guidance scheme. Both it and a classical linear system's based scheme were evaluated using 65 simulated trajectories in which the position in the entry corridor and the atmospheric density were varied randomly.

  12. Orbit and Attitude Control of Asymmetric Satellites in Polar Near-Circular Orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhao

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the general problem about the orbit and attitude dynamic model is discussed. A feedback linearization control method is introduced for this model. Due to the asymmetric structure, the orbital properties of such satellites are the same as traditional symmetric ones, but the attitude properties are greatly different from the symmetric counterparts. With perturbations accumulate with time, the attitude angles increase periodically with time, but the orbital elements change much slower than the attitude angles. In the attitude dynamic model, chaos could appear. Traditional linear controllers can not compensate enough for asymmetric satellite when the mission is complex, especially in maneuver missions. Thus nonlinear control method is required to solve such problem in large scale. A feedback linearization method, one robust nonlinear control method, is introduced and applied to the asymmetric satellite in this paper. Some simulations are also given and the results show that feedback linearization controller not only stabilizes the system, but also exempt the chaos in the system.

  13. Which Orbit for the GRASP Mission ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollet, A.; Coulot, D.; Zoulida, M.; Deleflie, F.; Biancale, R.; Mandea, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Geodetic Reference Antenna in Space (GRASP) mission was first proposed in 2011 by JPL in response to the NASA NNH11ZDA012O call for Earth Venture-2 mission. Recently, considering the recommendation of the Prospective Scientific Seminar, CNES expresses its interest and the possibility to participate in a next new JPL proposal. GRASP is a spacecraft system designed to build an enduring and stable Terrestrial Reference Frame (TRF) for accurately measuring and understanding changes in sea level, ice sheets and other elements of the dynamic Earth system. These objectives set the 1 mm accuracy and 0.1 mm/year stability (GGOS, Meeting the Requirements of a Global Society on a Changing Planet in 2020, Plag and Pearlman, 2009) as the goals for the TRF; goals which are an order of magnitude more accurate than the current performance of the TRF. For that, GRASP will carry very precise sensor systems for all the key geodetic techniques used to define and monitor the TRF: a Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) receiver, a Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) retroreflector, a Doppler Orbitography and Radio-positioning Integrated by Satellite (DORIS) receiver, and a novel Very Large Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) beacon. To reach mission goals, the first step is to determine the optimal orbit of this satellite. In this study, we present an original approach for determining such orbits, using evolutionary algorithms. The method allows us to optimize orbits according to specific criteria such as the visibility of the satellite from ground stations and satellites; especially the visibility of GRASP by at least two VLBI stations, with the longest possible baseline, and by GNSS satellites.

  14. Arbitrary orbital angular momentum of photons

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Yue; Ren, Zhi-Cheng; Wang, Xi-Lin; Tu, Chenghou; Li, Yongnan; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2015-01-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) of photons, as a new fundamental degree of freedom, has excited a great diversity of interest, because of a variety of emerging applications. Arbitrarily tunable OAM has gained much attention, but its creation remains still a tremendous challenge. We demonstrate the realization of well-controlled arbitrary OAM in both theory and experiment. We present the concept of general OAM, which extends the OAM carried by the scalar vortex field to the OAM carried by the azimuthally varying polarized vector field. The arbitrary OAM has the same characteristics as the well-defined integer OAM: intrinsic OAM, uniform local OAM and intensity ring, and propagation stability. The arbitrary OAM has unique natures: it is allowed to be flexibly tailored and the radius of the focusing ring can have various choices for a desired OAM, which are of great significance to the benefit of surprising applications of the arbitrary OAM.

  15. Support systems of the orbiting quarantine facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    The physical support systems, the personnel management structure, and the contingency systems necessary to permit the Orbiting Quarantine Facility (OQF) to function as an integrated system are described. The interactions between the subsystems within the preassembled modules are illustrated. The Power Module generates and distributes electrical power throughout each of the four modules, stabilizes the OQF's attitude, and dissipates heat generated throughout the system. The Habitation Module is a multifunctional structure designed to monitor and control all aspects of the system's activities. The Logistics Module stores the supplies needed for 30 days of operation and provides storage for waste materials generated during the mission. The Laboratory Module contains the equipment necessary for executing the protocol, as well as an independent life support system.

  16. Real and Hybrid Atomic Orbitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, D. B.; Fowler, P. W.

    1981-01-01

    Demonstrates that the Schrodinger equation for the hydrogenlike atom separates in both spheroconal and prolate spheroidal coordinates and that these separations provide a sound theoretical basis for the real and hybrid atomic orbitals. (Author/SK)

  17. [Orbital metastasis in malignant melanoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroli, G L; Hamedani, M; Barraco, P; Oubaaz, A; Morax, S

    2001-03-01

    We report the case of a 60-year-old man presenting bilateral progressive proptosis with diplopia, weight loss, tachycardia, nervosity, and stomach pain. These signs seemed at first to favor a diagnosis of Graves'ophthalmopathy. Thyroid tests were negative and the initial orbital CT scan was considered normal. A new radiological investigation 4 months later in our hospital revealed typical hypertrophy of the extraocular muscles compatible with orbital metastasis. The systemic investigations demonstrated a pulmonary tumor, multiple hepatic lesions, and several pigmented nodules of gastric mucosa. The pathology of pulmonary and gastric specimens confirmed the diagnosis of malignant melanoma. The primary lesion remains unknown. The authors discuss the differential diagnoses of orbital metastasis and the radiological characteristics of orbital metastasis in malignant melanoma.

  18. NASA Orbital Debris Baseline Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krisko, Paula H.; Vavrin, A. B.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has created high fidelity populations of the debris environment. The populations include objects of 1 cm and larger in Low Earth Orbit through Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit. They were designed for the purpose of assisting debris researchers and sensor developers in planning and testing. This environment is derived directly from the newest ORDEM model populations which include a background derived from LEGEND, as well as specific events such as the Chinese ASAT test, the Iridium 33/Cosmos 2251 accidental collision, the RORSAT sodium-potassium droplet releases, and other miscellaneous events. It is the most realistic ODPO debris population to date. In this paper we present the populations in chart form. We describe derivations of the background population and the specific populations added on. We validate our 1 cm and larger Low Earth Orbit population against SSN, Haystack, and HAX radar measurements.

  19. Quark spin-orbit correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Lorcé, Cédric

    2014-01-01

    The proton spin puzzle issue focused the attention on the parton spin and orbital angular momentum contributions to the proton spin. However, a complete characterization of the proton spin structure requires also the knowledge of the parton spin-orbit correlation. We showed that this quantity can be expressed in terms of moments of measurable parton distributions. Using the available phenomenological information about the valence quarks, we concluded that this correlation is negative, meaning that the valence quark spin and kinetic orbital angular momentum are, in average, opposite. The quark spin-orbit correlation can also be expressed more intuitively in terms of relativistic phase-space distributions, which can be seen as the mother distributions of the standard generalized and transverse-momentum dependent parton distributions. We present here for the first time some examples of the general multipole decomposition of these phase-space distributions.

  20. ORBITAL MANIFESTATIONS OF SINUS DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyothirmayi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM : To study the orbital manifestations in patients with sinus disease. METHODS : Patients wit h paranasal sinus disease presenting to OPD at Government ENT Hospital, AMC, Visakhapatnam from January 2012 to June 2014 were screened for orbital manifestations. Out of these, thirteen patients with orbital disease were referred to GREH, AMC, Visakhapatn am and were thoroughly investigated and managed appropriately. RESULTS : Out of the 14 patients 4 were female and 10 were male. Age ranged from 19 years to 70 years. 5 had maxillary sinus disease (4 - carcinoma and 1 case of mucormycosis. Frontal sinus dis ease was seen in two patients, one fibrous dysplasia and one malignancy. Five patients had ethmoidal sinus disease of which three patients were found to have ethmoidal sinus tumour (Malignant melanoma, Squamous cell Carcinoma. More than two sinuses were i nvolved in 2 patients. CONCLUSIONS : Early screening of patients with sinus disease by an Ophthalmologist can help in preventing severe vision threatening orbital complications.

  1. Closed Orbits in Phase Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Andrew; Haestad, Jace; Morgan, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    We report characteristics of closed classical orbits in an electric field in phase space produced in photoabsorption. Rydberg states of atomic and molecular hydrogen and helium are considered. The core potential used for the hydrogen molecule is an effective one electron one center core potential evaluated at the internuclear equilibrium distance. Poincare surfaces of section in phase space are generated by integrating the equations of motion in semiparabolic coordinates u = (r + z) 1 / 2 and v = (r - z) 1 / 2, and plotting the location in phase space (pv versus v) whenever u = 0, with the electric field in the z direction. Combination orbits produced by Rydberg electron core scattering are studied and the evolution in phase space of these combination orbits due to scattering from one closed orbit into another is investigated. Connections are made to measured laser photoabsorption experiments that excite Rydberg states (20 recurrence spectra. The phase space structures responsible for the spectra are identified.

  2. A Case of Orbital Histoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakauer, Mark; Prendes, Mark Armando; Wilkes, Byron; Lee, Hui Bae Harold; Fraig, Mostafa; Nunery, William R

    2016-01-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum var capsulatum is a dimorphic fungus endemic to the Ohio and Mississippi River Valleys of the United States. In this case report, a 33-year-old woman who presented with a right orbital mass causing progressive vision loss, diplopia, and facial swelling is described. Lateral orbitotomy with lateral orbital wall bone flap was performed for excisional biopsy of the lesion. The 1.5 × 1.8 × 2.3 cm cicatricial mass demonstrated a granulomatous lesion with necrosis and positive staining consistent with Histoplasma capsulatum var capsulatum infection. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of orbital histoplasmosis to be reported in the United States and the first case worldwide of orbital histoplasmosis due to Histoplasma capsulatum var capsulatum.

  3. Formation around planetary displaced orbit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Sheng-ping; LI Jun-feng; BAOYIN He-xi

    2007-01-01

    The paper investigates the relative motion around the planetary displaced orbit. Several kinds of displaced orbits for geocentric and martian cases were discussed. First, the relative motion was linearized around the displaced orbits. Then, two seminatural control laws were investigated for each kind of orbit and the stable regions were obtained for each case. One of the two control laws is the passive control law that is very attractive for engineering practice. However, the two control laws are not very suitable for the Martian mission. Another special semi-natural control law is designed based on the requirement of the Martian mission. The results show that large stable regions exist for the control law.

  4. How to Orbit the Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quimby, Donald J.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the geometry, algebra, and logic involved in the solution of a "Mindbenders" problem in "Discover" magazine and applies it to calculations of satellite orbital velocity. Extends the solution of this probe to other applications of falling objects. (JM)

  5. Exoplanet's Atmospheres Characteristics vs. Exoplanet's Orbital Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molaverdikhani, Karan

    2009-10-01

    400 years after Galileo Galilei was detected Jovian system, we know about 400 exoplanets in other stellar systems. But we identify just about their major properties like some of orbital elements, planet's radii or density. Also, there are many scientists who interested in searching for life or habitability on these planets. They are working in different ways such as planetary formation, planetary orbital stability or immigration, HabStars, composition of atmospheres, most probable zone in sky for exoplanets detection, etc. In this research we distinct and defined some main characteristics of terrestrial planet's atmospheres with surveying on solar system's planets and matching with current theorems on atmosphere formation. On the other hand, we were modeled Mars, Venus, Titan, single Hadley Earth and virtual Venus with different tilt angel (applying Global Circulation Modeling) to finding a critical limit on Polar Vortex formation in our last research. With extension this method on hypothetical terrestrial planets in constraint mass between 0.7 to 2.5 Earth's mass on Green Belt and applying host stars from 0.5 to 1.5 Sun's mass, we found some limitations on planet's atmosphere formation and estimation values of atmosphere's main characteristics.

  6. Real weights, bound states and duality orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Marrani, Alessio; Romano, Luca

    2015-01-01

    We show that the duality orbits of extremal black holes in supergravity theories with symmetric scalar manifolds can be derived by studying the stabilizing subalgebras of suitable representatives, realized as bound states of specific weight vectors of the corresponding representation of the duality symmetry group. The weight vectors always correspond to weights that are real, where the reality properties are derived from the Tits-Satake diagram that identifies the real form of the Lie algebra of the duality symmetry group. Both N=2 magic Maxwell-Einstein supergravities and the semisimple infinite sequences of N=2 and N=4 theories in D=4 and 5 are considered, and various results, obtained over the years in the literature using different methods, are retrieved. In particular, we show that the stratification of the orbits of these theories occurs because of very specific properties of the representations: in the case of the theory based on the real numbers, whose symmetry group is maximally non-compact and there...

  7. ACTS Multibeam Antenna On-Orbit Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, R.; Wright, D.; Mitchell, Kenneth

    1996-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) launched in September 1993 introduces several new technologies including a multibeam antenna (MBA) operating at Ka-band. The MBA with fixed and rapidly reconfigurable spot beams serves users equipped with small aperture terminals within the coverage area. The antenna produces spot beams with approximately 0.3 degrees beamwidth and gains of approximately 50 dBi. A number of MBA performance evaluations have been performed since the ACTS launch. These evaluations were designed to assess MBA performance (e.g., beam pointing stability, beam shape, gain, etc.) in the space environment. The on-orbit measurements found systematic environmental perturbation to the MBA beam pointing. These perturbations were found to be imposed by satellite attitude control system, antenna and spacecraft mechanical alignments, on-orbit thermal effects, etc. As a result, the footprint coverage of the MBA may not exactly cover the intended service area at all times. This report describes the space environment effects on the ACTS MBA performance as a function of time of the day and time of the year and compensation approaches for these effects.

  8. Orbital mechanics near Lagrange's points

    OpenAIRE

    Utashima, Masayoshi; 歌島 昌由

    1997-01-01

    The first libration-point satellite ISEE-3 (International Sun-Earth Explorer-3) was launched in 1978. Though, no libration-point satellites were realized after the launch of the ISEE-3, NASA launched the ESA's Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft into the halo orbit in the sun-earth system in late 1995. The halo orbit in the sun-earth system is adequate for missions such as solar observation, astronomical observation, NEO (Near Earth Objects) observation, communications with t...

  9. Orbit Determination Analysis for SSAPurposes

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Space Situational Awareness (SSA) is the characterization of the space environmentand of space activities. The fundament of SSA is the access to information about theorbit of space objects. There exist several techniques to determine the orbit of objects inspace, both from space-based and from ground-based observations. This Master's Thesisproject aims at investigating orbit determinations from ground-based radar observations.In particular, the use of the EISCAT Ultra-High-Frequency (UHF) inc...

  10. Orbits in a logarithmic potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooverman, R. H.

    2014-04-15

    The characteristics of charged particle orbits in the logarithmic electrostatic potential field surrounding a straight conducting wire at a fixed potential are investigated. The equations of motion of an electron in a logarithmic potential are derived, the limiting cases are considered, and the results of numerical integration of the equations of motion are presented along with sketches of a few representative orbits. (C.E.S.)

  11. Diplopia and orbital wall fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boffano, Paolo; Roccia, Fabio; Gallesio, Cesare; Karagozoglu, K Hakki; Forouzanfar, Tymour

    2014-01-01

    Diplopia is a symptom that is frequently associated with orbital wall fractures. The aim of this article was to present the incidence and patterns of diplopia after orbital wall blow-out fractures in 2 European centers, Turin and Amsterdam, and to identify any correlation between this symptom and such fractures. This study is based on 2 databases that have continuously recorded data of patients hospitalized with maxillofacial fractures between 2001 and 2010. On the whole, 447 patients (334 males, 113 females) with pure blow-out orbital wall fractures were included. The most frequently involved orbital site was the floor (359 fractures), followed by medial wall (41 fractures) and lateral wall (5 fractures). At presentation, 227 patients (50.7%) had evidence of diplopia. In particular, in most patients, a diplopia in all directions was referred (78 patients). Statistically significant associations were found between diplopia on eye elevation and orbital floor fractures (P diplopia and medial wall fractures (P diplopia on eye elevation and horizontal diplopia at presentation could be useful clinical indicators orbital floor and medial wall fractures, respectively.

  12. Microbiological profile of orbital abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Suneetha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Knowledge of the culture and sensitivity pattern is necessary, for the institution of appropriate empirical antibiotic therapy in orbital abscess. Objective: The objective of this study is to describe culture and sensitivity patterns of specimens from the orbit and surrounding structures. Materials and Methods: Retrospectively the medical records of 56 cases of orbital abscess were reviewed. Results: Cultures were positive in 38/56 (68.8% orbital specimens and the organisms included Staphylococcus aureus 18, Streptococci 7, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 3, 2 each of Enterobactersp, Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Acinetobacter sp. and 1 each of Actinomyces israelii, Diptheroids, Coagulase negative Staphylococcus, Citrobacter freundii, Methicillin-resistant S. aureus and Enterococcus faecalis. Four had polymicrobial infection. Culture of purulent nasal discharge, swabs taken from foci of infection on the face, and blood cultures were done in 26/56, and positive cultures were obtained in 16/26 (61.5% specimens. In 12 patients, there was a concurrence in the organism cultured from the orbit and from cultures from other sites. Gram-negative organisms were associated with increased ocular morbidity. Conclusion: Gram-positive cocci, especially S. aureus are the most common organisms isolated from orbital abscesses. Infections by Gram-negative organisms were associated with more complications. Empirical intravenous antibiotic therapy should have a broad spectrum of activity effective against a wide range of Staphylococcal organisms and Gram-negative bacilli.

  13. Low Earth orbit communications satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroney, D.; Lashbrook, D.; Mckibben, B.; Gardener, N.; Rivers, T.; Nottingham, G.; Golden, B.; Barfield, B.; Bruening, J.; Wood, D.

    1992-01-01

    A current thrust in satellite communication systems considers a low-Earth orbiting constellations of satellites for continuous global coverage. Conceptual design studies have been done at the time of this design project by LORAL Aerospace Corporation under the program name GLOBALSTAR and by Motorola under their IRIDIUM program. This design project concentrates on the spacecraft design of the GLOBALSTAR low-Earth orbiting communication system. Overview information on the program was gained through the Federal Communications Commission licensing request. The GLOBALSTAR system consists of 48 operational satellites positioned in a Walker Delta pattern providing global coverage and redundancy. The operational orbit is 1389 km (750 nmi) altitude with eight planes of six satellites each. The orbital planes are spaced 45 deg., and the spacecraft are separated by 60 deg. within the plane. A Delta 2 launch vehicle is used to carry six spacecraft for orbit establishment. Once in orbit, the spacecraft will utilize code-division multiple access (spread spectrum modulation) for digital relay, voice, and radio determination satellite services (RDSS) yielding position determination with accuracy up to 200 meters.

  14. Orbital Volumetry in Graves' Orbitopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Bakri, Moug; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh; Thomsen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    .6 cm(3) in controls, 8.7 ± 8.0 cm(3) in GO without DON, and 9.4 ± 3.1 cm(3) in GO with DON. The muscle and fat volumes were higher in patients with GO than in controls (P orbits with and without DON were not significantly different. The volume of the optic nerve were...... similar in the 3 groups. The number of apical, coronal 2 mm thick slices with no fat was 2.9 ± 0.9 in normal orbits, it was 4.1 ± 1.0 in GO orbits without DON and 5.3 ± 0.8 in GO orbits with DON (P = 0.007). Conclusion. Apical muscle enlargement may be more important than orbital fat enlargement......Purpose. We wanted to investigate the relative significance of fat and muscle enlargement in the development of dysthyroid optic neuropathy (DON) in Graves' orbitopathy (GO). Methods. Preoperative coronal CT scans of 13 patients with and without DON who subsequently underwent orbital decompression...

  15. Dissipation-Induced Heteroclinic Orbits in Tippe Tops

    OpenAIRE

    Bou-Rabee, Nawaf M.; Marsden, Jerrold E.; Romero, Louis A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that the conditions for the existence of a dissipation-induced heteroclinic orbit between the inverted and noninverted states of a tippe top are determined by a complex version of the equations for a simple harmonic oscillator: the modified Maxwell–Bloch equations. A standard linear analysis reveals that the modified Maxwell–Bloch equations describe the spectral instability of the noninverted state and Lyapunov stability of the inverted state. Standard nonlinear analys...

  16. Stabilizing chaotic-scattering trajectories using control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ying-Cheng; Tél, Tamás; Grebogi, Celso

    1993-08-01

    The method of stabilizing unstable periodic orbits in chaotic dynamical systems by Ott, Grebogi, and Yorke (OGY) is applied to control chaotic scattering in Hamiltonian systems. In particular, we consider the case of nonhyperbolic chaotic scattering, where there exist Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser (KAM) surfaces in the scattering region. It is found that for short unstable periodic orbits not close to the KAM surfaces, both the probability that a particle can be controlled and the average time to achieve control are determined by the initial exponential decay rate of particles in the hyperbolic component. For periodic orbits near the KAM surfaces, due to the stickiness effect of the KAM surfaces on particle trajectories, the average time to achieve control can greatly exceed that determined by the hyperbolic component. The applicability of the OGY method to stabilize intermediate complexes of classical scattering systems is suggested.

  17. PARALLEL STABILIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.L.LIONS

    1999-01-01

    A new algorithm for the stabilization of (possibly turbulent, chaotic) distributed systems, governed by linear or non linear systems of equations is presented. The SPA (Stabilization Parallel Algorithm) is based on a systematic parallel decomposition of the problem (related to arbitrarily overlapping decomposition of domains) and on a penalty argument. SPA is presented here for the case of linear parabolic equations: with distrjbuted or boundary control. It extends to practically all linear and non linear evolution equations, as it will be presented in several other publications.

  18. Space Tourism: Orbital Debris Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudian, N.; Shajiee, S.; Moghani, T.; Bahrami, M.

    2002-01-01

    Space activities after a phase of research and development, political competition and national prestige have entered an era of real commercialization. Remote sensing, earth observation, and communication are among the areas in which this growing industry is facing competition and declining government money. A project like International Space Station, which draws from public money, has not only opened a window of real multinational cooperation, but also changed space travel from a mere fantasy into a real world activity. Besides research activities for sending man to moon and Mars and other outer planets, space travel has attracted a considerable attention in recent years in the form of space tourism. Four countries from space fairing nations are actively involved in the development of space tourism. Even, nations which are either in early stages of space technology development or just beginning their space activities, have high ambitions in this area. This is worth noting considering their limited resources. At present, trips to space are available, but limited and expensive. To move beyond this point to generally available trips to orbit and week long stays in LEO, in orbital hotels, some of the required basic transportations, living requirements, and technological developments required for long stay in orbit are already underway. For tourism to develop to a real everyday business, not only the price has to come down to meaningful levels, but also safety considerations should be fully developed to attract travelers' trust. A serious hazard to space activities in general and space tourism in particular is space debris in earth orbit. Orbiting debris are man-made objects left over by space operations, hazardous to space missions. Since the higher density of debris population occurs in low earth orbit, which is also the same orbit of interest to space tourism, a careful attention should be paid to the effect of debris on tourism activities. In this study, after a

  19. Orbital, subconjunctival, and subcutaneous emphysema after an orbital floor fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ababneh OH

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Osama H Ababneh Department of Ophthalmology, The University of Jordan and Jordan University Hospital, Amman, Jordan Abstract: A 16-year-old boy presented to the emergency department with the complaint of a sudden, painful left eye and proptosis after an episode of sneezing. A few hours earlier, he had sustained a blunt trauma to the left orbit as the result of a fistfight. The initial examination showed subcutaneous and subconjunctival emphysema. Visual acuity in the left eye was 20/30 (0.67, the pupils were reactive with no relative afferent pupillary defect, and there were mild limitations in levoduction and supraduction. A slit-lamp examination showed normal anterior and posterior segments with an intraocular pressure of 26 mmHg. An orbital computed tomography scan showed orbital, subconjunctival, and subcutaneous emphysema associated with a small fracture of the orbital floor. Following conservative management with broad-spectrum oral antibiotics, a topical antiglaucoma drug, and lubricating eye drops, the patient improved dramatically within one week. Keywords: emphysema, orbital fracture, trauma

  20. Influence of Orbital Motion of Inner Cylinder on Eccentric Taylor Vortex Flow of Newtonian and Power-Law Fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Shun-Xin; FU Song

    2007-01-01

    The effects of inner cylinder orbital motion on Taylor vortex flow of Newtonian and power-law fluid are studied numerically. The results demonstrate that when the eccentricity is not small, the orbital motion influences the stability of the flow in a non-monotonic manner. The variations of the flow-induced forces on the inner cylinder versus orbital motion are also different from the cases in which the flow is two-dimensional and laminar.

  1. Radial Velocities of Stars with Multiple Co-orbital Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Dobrovolskis, Anthony R

    2014-01-01

    To date, well over a thousand planets have been discovered orbiting other stars, hundreds of them in multi-planet systems. Most of these exoplanets have been detected by either the transit method or the radial velocity method, rather than by other methods such as astrometry or direct imaging. Both the radial velocity and astrometric methods rely upon the reflex motion of the parent star induced by the gravitational attraction of its planets. However, this reflex motion is subject to misinterpretation when a star has two or more planets with the same orbital period. Such co-orbital planets may effectively "hide" from detection by current algorithms. In principle, any number of planets can share the same orbit; the case where they all have the same mass has been studied most. Salo and Yoder (A & A 205, 309--327, 1988) have shown that more than 8 planets of equal mass sharing a circular orbit must be equally spaced for dynamical stability, while fewer than 7 equal-mass planets are stable only in a configurat...

  2. A retrograde co-orbital asteroid of Jupiter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegert, Paul; Connors, Martin; Veillet, Christian

    2017-03-29

    Recent theoretical work in celestial mechanics has revealed that an asteroid may orbit stably in the same region as a planet, despite revolving around the Sun in the sense opposite to that of the planet itself. Asteroid 2015 BZ509 was discovered in 2015, but with too much uncertainty in its measured orbit to establish whether it was such a retrograde co-orbital body. Here we report observations and analysis that demonstrates that asteroid 2015 BZ509 is indeed a retrograde co-orbital asteroid of the planet Jupiter. We find that 2015 BZ509 has long-term stability, having been in its current, resonant state for around a million years. This is long enough to preclude precise calculation of the time or mechanism of its injection to its present state, but it may be a Halley-family comet that entered the resonance through an interaction with Saturn. Retrograde co-orbital asteroids of Jupiter and other planets may be more common than previously expected.

  3. A retrograde co-orbital asteroid of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegert, Paul; Connors, Martin; Veillet, Christian

    2017-03-01

    Recent theoretical work in celestial mechanics has revealed that an asteroid may orbit stably in the same region as a planet, despite revolving around the Sun in the sense opposite to that of the planet itself. Asteroid 2015 BZ509 was discovered in 2015, but with too much uncertainty in its measured orbit to establish whether it was such a retrograde co-orbital body. Here we report observations and analysis that demonstrates that asteroid 2015 BZ509 is indeed a retrograde co-orbital asteroid of the planet Jupiter. We find that 2015 BZ509 has long-term stability, having been in its current, resonant state for around a million years. This is long enough to preclude precise calculation of the time or mechanism of its injection to its present state, but it may be a Halley-family comet that entered the resonance through an interaction with Saturn. Retrograde co-orbital asteroids of Jupiter and other planets may be more common than previously expected.

  4. Macroeconomic stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    It is demonstrated that full employment and sustainable development not necessarily are conflicting goals. On the other hand macroeconomic stability cannot be obtained without a deliberate labour sharing policy and a shift in the composition of private consumption away from traditional material...

  5. Orbit graphs and face-transitivity of k-orbit polytopes

    OpenAIRE

    Cunningham, Gabe

    2012-01-01

    The orbit graph of a k-orbit polytope is a graph on k nodes that shows how the flag orbits are related by flag adjacency. Using orbit graphs, we classify k-orbit polytopes and determine when a k-orbit polytope is i-transitive. We then provide an explicit classification of three-orbit polytopes, and we describe a generating set for their automorphism groups.

  6. Tumor pathology of the orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Héran, F; Bergès, O; Blustajn, J; Boucenna, M; Charbonneau, F; Koskas, P; Lafitte, F; Nau, E; Roux, P; Sadik, J C; Savatovsky, J; Williams, M

    2014-10-01

    The term orbital tumor covers a wide range of benign and malignant diseases affecting specific component of the orbit or developing in contact with them. They are found incidentally or may be investigated as part of the assessment of a systemic disorder or because of orbital signs (exophthalmos, pain, etc.). Computed tomography, MRI and Color Doppler Ultrasound (CDU), play a varying role depending on the clinical presentation and the disease being investigated. This article reflects long experience in a reference center but does not claim to be exhaustive. We have chosen to consider these tumors from the perspective of their usual presentation, emphasizing the most common causes and suggestive radiological and clinical presentations (progressive or sudden-onset exophthalmos, children or adults, lacrimal gland lesions, periorbital lesions and enophthalmos). We will describe in particular muscle involvement (thyrotoxicosis and tumors), vascular lesions (cavernous sinus hemangioma, orbital varix, cystic lymphangioma), childhood lesions and orbital hematomas. We offer straightforward useful protocols for simple investigation and differential diagnosis. Readers who wish to go further to extend their knowledge in this fascinating area can refer to the references in the bibliography.

  7. First Spacecraft Orbit of Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-03-01

    After a 7.9-billion-kilometer flight since its launch on 3 August 2004—which included flybys of Earth, Venus, and Mercury—NASA's MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft entered a planned, highly elliptical orbit around the closest planet to our Sun on 17 March. Engineers in the mission operations center at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) in Laurel, Md., which manages the mission for NASA, received radiometric signals indicating a successful orbit insertion at 9:10 P.M. local time. "Tonight we will have orbited the fifth planet in the solar system. This is a major accomplishment," Ed Weiler, NASA assistant administrator for the Science Mission Directorate, said at a 17 March public forum at JHU/APL, noting that spacecraft have previously entered orbit around several other planets. "You only go into orbit for the first time around Mercury once in human history, and that is what was accomplished tonight."

  8. Featured Image: Globular Cluster Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-04-01

    This figure (click for the full view) shows the meridional galactic orbits of 12 globular clusters that orbit the Milky Way. The recent release of stellar parallax data from Gaia allowed a team of scientists at Dartmouth College to improve measurements of a number of galactic globular clusters very old clusters of stars that can either orbit within the galactic disk and bulge or more distantly in the galactic halo. In a recent publication led by Erin OMalley, the team presents their findings and combines their new measurements for the clusters with proper motions from past studies to calculate the orbits that these globulars take. These calculations show us whether the clusters reside in the galactic disk and bulge (as only NGC 104 does in the sample shown here, since its orbit is confined to 8 kpc radially and 4 kpc vertically of the galactic center), or if they are halo clusters. To learn more about the authors work, you can check out the paper below!CitationErin M. OMalley et al 2017 ApJ 838 162. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/aa6574

  9. ROGER a potential orbital space debris removal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starke, Juergen; Bischof, Bernd; Foth, W.-O.; -J., J.; Günther

    The previous activities in the field of On Orbit Servicing studied in the 1990's included in partic-ular the capability of vehicles in GEO to capture and support satellites (mainly communication satellites) to enable repair and continuation of operations, and finally the controlled transfer the target into a permanent graveyard orbit. The specific capture tools for these applications were mostly based on robotic systems to capture and fix the target under specific dynamic constraints (e.g. slowly tumbling target) without damage, and to allow the stabilization, re-orientation and potential repair of the target and subsequent release or transport to the final disposal orbit. Due to the drastically increasing number of debris particularly in the Low Earth Orbits (SSO) the active debris removal is now necessary to counteract to the predicted debris production cascade (Kessler Syndrome), which means the pollution of the total sphere in low earth orbit and not only the SSO area. In most of the debris congresses it was recommended to start removal with the still integrated systems as soon as possible. In the case of large debris objects, the soft capture system can be replaced by a simpler and robust system able to operate from a safe distance to the target and flexible enough to capture and hold different types of targets such as deactivated and/or defective satellites, upper stages and big fragments. These nominally non -cooperative targets might be partially destroyed by the capture process, but the production of additional debris shall be avoided. A major argument for the commercial applications is a multi-target mission potential, which is possible at GEO because the transfer propellant requirement to the disposal orbit and the return to the orbit of the next potential target is relative low (orbits with similar inclination and altitude). The proposed ROGER system is designed as a spacecraft with rendezvous capabilities including inspection in the vicinity of the

  10. Effective resonant stability of Mercury

    CERN Document Server

    Sansottera, M; Lemaître, A

    2015-01-01

    Mercury is the unique known planet that is situated in a 3:2 spin-orbit resonance nowadays. Observations and models converge to the same conclusion: the planet is presently deeply trapped in the resonance and situated at the Cassini state $1$, or very close to it. We investigate the complete non-linear stability of this equilibrium, with respect to several physical parameters, in the framework of Birkhoff normal form and Nekhoroshev stability theory. We use the same approach adopted for the 1:1 spin-orbit case with a peculiar attention to the role of Mercury's non negligible eccentricity. The selected parameters are the polar moment of inertia, the Mercury's inclination and eccentricity and the precession rates of the perihelion and node. Our study produces a bound to both the latitudinal and longitudinal librations (of 0.1 radians) for a long but finite time (greatly exceeding the age of the solar system). This is the so-called effective stability time. Our conclusion is that Mercury, placed inside the 3:2 s...

  11. The Eccentric Behavior of Nearly Frozen Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetser, Theodore H.; Vincent, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Frozen orbits are orbits which have only short-period changes in their mean eccentricity and argument of periapse, so that they basically keep a fixed orientation within their plane of motion. Nearly frozen orbits are those whose eccentricity and argument of periapse have values close to those of a frozen orbit. We call them "nearly" frozen because their eccentricity vector (a vector whose polar coordinates are eccentricity and argument of periapse) will stay within a bounded distance from the frozen orbit eccentricity vector, circulating around it over time. For highly inclined orbits around the Earth, this distance is effectively constant over time. Furthermore, frozen orbit eccentricity values are low enough that these orbits are essentially eccentric (i.e., off center) circles, so that nearly frozen orbits around Earth are bounded above and below by frozen orbits.

  12. MRI of orbital hydroxyapatite implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flanders, A.E. [Dept. of Radiology, Thomas Jefferson Univ. Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); De Potter, P. [Dept. of Ophthalmology, Wills Eye Inst., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Rao, V.M. [Dept. of Radiology, Thomas Jefferson Univ. Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Tom, B.M. [Dept. of Radiology, Thomas Jefferson Univ. Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Shields, C.L. [Dept. of Ophthalmology, Wills Eye Inst., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Shields, J.A. [Dept. of Ophthalmology, Wills Eye Inst., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Our aim was to use MRI for the postsurgical assessment of a new form of integrated orbital implant composed of a porous calcium phosphate hydroxyapatite substrate. We studied ten patients 24-74 years of age who underwent enucleation and implantation of a hydroxyapatite ball; 5-13 months after surgery, each patient was examined by spin-echo MRI, with fat suppression and gadolinium enhancement. Fibrovascular ingrowth was demonstrated in all ten patients as areas of enhancement at the periphery of the hydroxyapatite sphere that extended to the center to a variable degree. The radiologist should aware of the MRI appearances of the coralline hydroxyapatite orbital implant since it is now widely used following enucleation. MRI is a useful means to determine successful incorporation of the substrate into the orbital tissues. The normal pattern of contrast enhancement should not be mistaken for recurrent tumor or infection. (orig.)

  13. Orbital Evolution of 4179 Toutatis

    CERN Document Server

    Siregar, Suryadi

    2013-01-01

    Asteroid 1934 CT;1989 AC, well known as 4179 Toutatis, is an Apollo and Mars-crosser asteroid with a chaotic orbit produced by a 3:1 resonance with Jupiter and a 1:4 resonance with the Earth, and frequent close approaches to the Earth. It is listed as a potential hazardous object (PHA). The aim of this study is to investigate the possibility of 4179 Toutatis to be ejected from the Solar System. This paper presents an orbital evolution of 4179 Toutatis in time interval of ~300 kyr. Investigation of its orbital evolution is conducted by using the Mercury subroutine package, where the gravitational perturbations of eight major planets in the Solar System are considered. Over very short time scales (~300 kyr) relative to the Solar System life time (~10 Gyr), the asteroid 4179 Toutatis gave an example of chaotic motion that can cause asteroid to move outward and may be followed by escaping from the Solar System.

  14. Oncocytic Adenocarcinoma of the Orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Gerald J; Paul, Sean; Hunt, Bryan C

    Oncocytic adenocarcinoma of the orbit is a rare tumor, with 1 case of nonlacrimal sac, nonlacrimal gland origin, and a poor outcome previously reported. An 85-year-old man with a 2-month history of left-sided epiphora, enlarging eyelid nodules, and diplopia in left gaze was found on imaging to have a poorly circumscribed, nodular mass of uniform radiodensity in the inferomedial orbit. Incisional biopsy revealed morphologic and immunohistochemical features of oncocytic adenocarcinoma with origin in the caruncle suspected, and CT of the neck, chest, abdomen, and pelvis showed no metastases or remote primary tumor source. Based on multidisciplinary consensus, orbital exenteration with adjuvant radiation therapy was performed, and there was no evidence of residual or recurrent tumor 2 years after treatment.

  15. Multiple Myeloma of the Orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors report a case of a 62-year-old female with history of multiple myeloma who presents with complains of swelling and pain in her right eye. On examination, it was found that she has proptosis, chemosis, and diplopia along with decreased vision. Initial workup and treatment did not yield significant results, eventually she was found to have myelomatous changes in her right orbit on MRI and was diagnosed with multiple myeloma of the orbit which resolved solely with radiation. This case tends to highlight the importance of considering myeloma of the orbit as a very important and early differential diagnosis in a patient with a history of multiple myeloma presenting with a swollen and painful eye.

  16. GridOrbit public display

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramos, Juan David Hincapie; Tabard, Aurélien; Bardram, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    We introduce GridOrbit, a public awareness display that visualizes the activity of a community grid used in a biology laboratory. This community grid executes bioin-formatics algorithms and relies on users to donate CPU cycles to the grid. The goal of GridOrbit is to create a shared awareness about...... the research taking place in the biology laboratory. This should promote contribu-tions to the grid, and thereby mediate the appropriation of the grid technology. GridOrbit visualizes the activity in the grid, shows information about the different active projects, and supports a messaging functionality where...... people comment on projects. Our work explores the usage of interactive technologies as enablers for the appropriation of an otherwise invisible infrastructure....

  17. Orbital computed tomography for exophthalmos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ok Keun; Lee, Hyun; Sol, Chang Hyo; Kim, Byung Soo [College of Medicine, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-06-15

    Since exophthalmos is caused by any decrease in the size of bony orbit or occurrence of mass within the rigid orbit, the accurate diagnosis of its causes are essential in determining the therapeutic aims. Exophthalmos is one of the important signs being the indication for orbital computed tomography along with periorbital swelling, visual loss, orbital trauma and diplopia. CT as the diagnostic tool for the cause of exophthalmos not only displays a superb role with uncomparable quality in comparison to any conventional diagnostic methods but also has a decisive role in determining the therapeutic aims and the appropriate operative method when the operation is indicated. The orbital CT was performed from May in 1983 to May in 1985 whose with chief complaints were exophthalmos and 23 cases were confirmed by operation, biopsy, clinical progression or other diagnostic procedures. Here was report thoroughly analyzed 23 cases. The results were as follows : 1. The etiologic disease of exophthalmos were 6 cases of pseudotumor, 4 cases of thyroid ophthalmopathy, 4 cases of maxill ary sinus and nasal cavity Ca., 3 cases of mucocele and 1 case of alveolar soft part sarcoma, osteoma, dermoid cyst, pleomorphic adenoma, meningioma, and C.C.F. each. 2. The origin of the etiologic diseases of exophthalmos were 13 cases of primary within bony orbit and 10 cases of secondary from adjacent structure. 3. The site of lesions were 11 cases of intraconal and extraconal, 10 cases of extraconal, and 2 cases of intraconal origin. 4. The degree of exophthalmos in CT scan was in proportion to the volume of the mass except in the case of thyroid ophthalmopathy. The upper limit of normal range by CT scan using regression line equation was 16.2 mm in approximation. 5. CT was a very useful diagnostic tool in the accurate assessment of the kinds of lesion, its location, and its relationship to adjacent structures in the diagnosis of etiologic diseases of exophthalmos.

  18. On the Special Role of Symmetric Periodic Orbits in a Chaotic System

    CERN Document Server

    Bénet, L; Papenbrock, T; Seligman, T H

    1998-01-01

    After early work of Henon it has become folk knowledge that symmetric periodic orbits are of particular importance. We reinforce this belief by additional studies and we further find that invariant closed symplectic submanifolds caused by discrete symmetries prove to be an important complement to the long known role of the orbits. The latter have particular importance in semi-classics. Based on the structural stability of hyperbolic horseshoes we give an argument that opens an avenue to the understanding of these facts.

  19. Energy and the Elliptical Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, Bill

    2009-03-01

    In the January 2007 issue of The Physics Teacher, Prentis, Fulton, Hesse, and Mazzino describe a laboratory exercise in which students use a geometrical analysis inspired by Newton to show that an elliptical orbit and an inverse-square law force go hand in hand. The historical, geometrical, and teamwork aspects of the exercise are useful and important. This paper presents an exercise which uses an energy/angular momentum conservation model for elliptical orbits. This exercise can be done easily by an individual student and on regular notebook-sized paper.

  20. AA, closed orbit observation pickup

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    Electrostatic pickups around the circumference of the AA served for the measurement of the closed orbits across the wide momentum range of +- 3% to either side of central orbit. The pickups were of the "shoebox" type, with diagonal cuts, a horizontal and a vertical one mechanically coupled together. They were located where they would not require extra space. The wide ones (very wide indeed: 70 cm), like the one we see here, were placed inside the vacuum chamber of the wide quadrupoles QFW, at maximum dispersion. See also 8001372, 8001383, 8010045

  1. AA, closed orbit observation pickup

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    Electrostatic pickups around the circumference of the AA served for the measurement of the closed orbits across the wide momentum range of +- 3% to either side of central orbit. The pickups were of the "shoebox" type, with diagonal cuts, a horizontal and a vertical one mechanically coupled together. They were located where they would not require extra space. The wide ones (very wide indeed: 70 cm), like the one we see here, were placed inside the vacuum chamber of the wide quadrupoles, QFW, at maximum dispersion. See also 8001372,8001383, 8010042

  2. Orbital resonances around black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink, Jeandrew; Geyer, Marisa; Hinderer, Tanja

    2015-02-27

    We compute the length and time scales associated with resonant orbits around Kerr black holes for all orbital and spin parameters. Resonance-induced effects are potentially observable when the Event Horizon Telescope resolves the inner structure of Sgr A*, when space-based gravitational wave detectors record phase shifts in the waveform during the resonant passage of a compact object spiraling into the black hole, or in the frequencies of quasiperiodic oscillations for accreting black holes. The onset of geodesic chaos for non-Kerr spacetimes should occur at the resonance locations quantified here.

  3. AA, closed orbit observation pickup

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Electrostatic pickups around the circumference of the AA served for the measurement of the closed orbits across the wide momentum range of +- 3% to either side of central orbit. The pickups were of the "shoebox" type, with diagonal cuts, a horizontal and a vertical one mechanically coupled together. They were located where they would not require extra space. The small ones, like the one we see here, were inserted into the vacuum chamber of the BLG (long and narrow) bending magnets. See also 8001372, 8010042, 8010045

  4. AA, closed orbit observation pickup

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    Electrostatic pickups around the circumference of the AA served for the measurement of the closed orbits across the wide momentum range of +- 3% to either side of central orbit. The pickups were of the "shoebox" type, with diagonal cuts, a horizontal and a vertical one mechanically coupled together. They were located where they would not require extra space. The small ones, like the one we see here, were inserted into the vacuum chamber of the BLG (long and narrow) bending magnets. Werner Sax contemplates his achievement. See also 8001383, 8010042, 8010045.

  5. Primary orbital squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana L. Campos Arbulú

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Primary orbital squamous cell carcinoma is a rare entity. There is little published literature. We report a case of primary squamous cell carcinoma of the orbital soft tissues. Surgical resection offered the best treatment for the patient. Complete resection of the lesion was achieved. The patient received adjuvant radiotherapy due to the proximity of the lesion to the surgical margins. Surgical treatment is feasible and should be considered as part of the surgeon's arsenal. However, therapeutic decisions must be made on a case-by-case basis

  6. Nodular Fasciitis of the Orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Christopher J; Clark, Jeremy D; Thompson, Matthew P; Lee, Hui Bae H; Nunery, William R

    A 13-month-old boy was presented with new onset proptosis of the right eye. CT scan and MRI showed an enhancing mass in the right superior orbit with local bone remodeling and erosion. A craniotomy was performed for biopsy and sub-total resection. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry confirmed the lesion to be nodular fasciitis. Nodular fasciitis lesions are classically found in the anterior ocular adnexa, especially in pediatric patients. This is the first reported case of nodular fasciitis arising in the posterior orbit of a child younger than 16.

  7. Gravitational Fragmentation in Galaxy Mergers: A Stability Criteria

    CERN Document Server

    Escala, Andres; del Valle, Luciano; Castillo, Esteban

    2012-01-01

    We study the gravitational stability of gaseous streams in the complex environment of a galaxy merger, because mergers are known to be places of ongoing massive cluster formation and bursts of star formation. We find an analytic stability parameter for case of gaseous streams orbiting around the merger remnant. We test our stability criteria using hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy mergers, obtaining satisfactory results. We find that our criteria successfully predicts the streams that will be gravitationally unstable to fragment into clumps.

  8. Third-Body Perturbation in the Case of Elliptic Orbits for the Disturbing Body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Domingos

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a semi-analytical and numerical study of the perturbation caused in a spacecraft by a third-body using a double averaged analytical model with the disturbing function expanded in Legendre polynomials up to the second order. The important reason for this procedure is to eliminate terms due to the short periodic motion of the spacecraft and to show smooth curves for the evolution of the mean orbital elements for a long-time period. The aim of this study is to calculate the effect of lunar perturbations on the orbits of spacecrafts that are traveling around the Earth. An analysis of the stability of near-circular orbits is made, and a study to know under which conditions this orbit remains near circular completes this analysis. A study of the equatorial orbits is also performed.

  9. Tomographic imaging of asymmetric molecular orbitals with a two-color multicycle laser field

    CERN Document Server

    Qin, Meiyan; Zhang, Qingbin; Lu, Peixiang

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically demonstrate a scheme for tomographic reconstruction of asymmetric molecular orbitals based on high-order harmonic generation with a two-color multicycle laser field. It is shown that by adjusting the relative phase of the two fields, the returning electrons can be forced to recollide from one direction for all the orientations of molecules. Thus the reconstruction of the asymmetric orbitals can be carried out with multicycle laser field. This releases the stringent requirement of a single-cycle pulse with a stabilized and controllable carrier-envelop phase for the tomographic imaging of asymmetric molecular orbitals.

  10. Optimal Reorientation Of Spacecraft Orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelnokov Yuriy Nikolaevich

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of optimal reorientation of the spacecraft orbit is considered. For solving the problem we used quaternion equations of motion written in rotating coordinate system. The use of quaternion variables makes this consideration more efficient. The problem of optimal control is solved on the basis of the maximum principle. An example of numerical solution of the problem is given.

  11. DOT strategies versus orbiter strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    The Dutch Open Telescope is a high-resolution solar imager coming on-line at La Palma. The definition of the DOT science niche, strategies, and requirements resemble Solar Orbiter considerations and deliberations. I discuss the latter in the light of the former, and claim that multi-line observation

  12. Three planets orbiting Wolf 1061

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, D J; Tinney, C G; Bentley, J S; Zhao, Jinglin

    2015-01-01

    We use archival HARPS spectra to detect three planets orbiting the M3 dwarf Wolf1061 (GJ 628). We detect a 1.36 Mearth minimum-mass planet with an orbital period P = 4.888d (Wolf1061b), a 4.25 Mearth minimum-mass planet with orbital period P = 17.867d (Wolf1061c), and a likely 5.21 Mearth minimum-mass planet with orbital period P = 67.274d (Wolf1061d). All of the planets are of sufficiently low mass that they may be rocky in nature. The 17.867d planet falls within the habitable zone for Wolf 1061 and the 67.274d planet falls just outside the outer boundary of the habitable zone. There are no signs of activity observed in the bisector spans, cross-correlation full-width-half-maxima, Calcium H & K indices, NaD indices, or H-alpha indices near the planetary periods. We use custom methods to generate a cross-correlation template tailored to the star. The resulting velocities do not suffer the strong annual variation observed in the HARPS DRS velocities. This differential technique should deliver better exploi...

  13. Orbital abscess: Management and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Suneetha

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To discuss the diagnosis, management and outcome of various types of orbital abscess. Methods: The medical records of 13 patients diagnosed and treated for orbital abscess were reviewed. The sources of infection included: paranasal sinusitis (n = 5, odontogenic origin of infection (n = 4, one each, temporal fossa abscess, palatal abscess, furuncle on the nose, and secondary to retrobulbar injection of steroid. Computed tomographic scans revealed the presence of an abscess in all 13 cases. Associated findings on CT scan included: sinus disease (n = 8, cavernous sinus thrombosis (n = 2 and subdural empyema (n = 2. All patients were treated with intensive, multiple, intravenous antibiotics and early surgical drainage. Results: Purulent material collected surgically from the orbit cultured Staphylococcus aureus (n = 3, two each Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis, Acinetobacter species and one each β-haemolytic Streptococci, Citrobacter frundi and Enterobacter. Final visual acuity was good in 6 patients (6/12 - 6/6 and no light perception in 6 others. Visual acuity could not be recorded in the infant. The other complications were intracranial abscess (n = 4, cavernous sinus thrombosis (n = 2 and restricted ocular motility (n = 1. Conclusions: A high index of suspicion is necessary, along with early institution of appropriate diagnostic imaging, and aggressive medical and surgical treatment for a favourable outcome in cases of orbital abscess.

  14. Myeloid Sarcoma in the Orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xiaoxiao; Gigantelli, James W; Abromowitch, Minnie; Morgan, Linda A; Suh, Donny W

    2016-12-08

    The authors describe a case of myeloid sarcoma of the orbit in a pediatric patient. An 8-month-old male infant presented to the ophthalmology clinic with a left orbital mass, which had been increasing in size over the previous 2 months. The mass was initially diagnosed at another clinic as an infantile hemangioma, and had been treated with a topical formulation of timolol. In the ophthalmology clinic, orbital magnetic resonance imaging showed a solid enhancing mass. A biopsy was performed, and histopathology revealed myeloid sarcoma. The disease responded well to a standard chemotherapy regimen. Myeloid sarcoma is a rare, extra-medullary presentation that can occur as an isolated tumor, concurrently with or at relapse of acute myeloid leukemia. Because few cases of myeloid sarcoma in the orbit have been reported, this case report aids in the management of myeloid sarcoma in pediatric patients. The report describes an 8-month-old male infant, the youngest patient to develop myeloid sarcoma without preexisting acute myeloid leukemia. [J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2016;53:e64-e68.].

  15. Getting a Crew into Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddle, Bob

    2011-01-01

    Despite the temporary setback in our country's crewed space exploration program, there will continue to be missions requiring crews to orbit Earth and beyond. Under the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, NASA should have its own heavy launch rocket and crew vehicle developed by 2016. Private companies will continue to explore space, as well. At the…

  16. Energy and the Elliptical Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, Bill

    2009-01-01

    In the January 2007 issue of "The Physics Teacher," Prentis, Fulton, Hesse, and Mazzino describe a laboratory exercise in which students use a geometrical analysis inspired by Newton to show that an elliptical orbit and an inverse-square law force go hand in hand. The historical, geometrical, and teamwork aspects of the exercise are useful and…

  17. Removing Orbital Debris with Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Phipps, Claude R; Bradford, Brian; George, E Victor; Libby, Stephen B; Liedahl, Duane A; Marcovici, Bogdan; Olivier, Scot S; Pleasance, Lyn D; Reilly, James P; Rubenchik, Alexander; Strafford, David N; Valley, Michael T

    2011-01-01

    Orbital debris in low Earth orbit (LEO) are now sufficiently dense that the use of LEO space is threatened by runaway collisional cascading. A problem predicted more than thirty years ago, the threat from debris larger than about 1 cm demands serious attention. A promising proposed solution uses a high power pulsed laser system on the Earth to make plasma jets on the objects, slowing them slightly, and causing them to re-enter and burn up in the atmosphere. In this paper, we reassess this approach in light of recent advances in low-cost, light-weight modular design for large mirrors, calculations of laser-induced orbit changes and in design of repetitive, multi-kilojoule lasers, that build on inertial fusion research. These advances now suggest that laser orbital debris removal (LODR) is the most cost-effective way to mitigate the debris problem. No other solutions have been proposed that address the whole problem of large and small debris. A LODR system will have multiple uses beyond debris removal. Internat...

  18. THREE PLANETS ORBITING WOLF 1061

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, D. J.; Wittenmyer, R. A.; Tinney, C. G.; Bentley, J. S.; Zhao, Jinglin, E-mail: duncan.wright@unsw.edu.au [Department of Astronomy and Australian Centre for Astrobiology, School of Physics, University of New South Wales, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2016-02-01

    We use archival HARPS spectra to detect three planets orbiting the M3 dwarf Wolf 1061 (GJ 628). We detect a 1.36 M{sub ⊕} minimum-mass planet with an orbital period P = 4.888 days (Wolf 1061b), a 4.25 M{sub ⊕} minimum-mass planet with orbital period P = 17.867 days (Wolf 1061c), and a likely 5.21 M{sub ⊕} minimum-mass planet with orbital period P = 67.274 days (Wolf 1061d). All of the planets are of sufficiently low mass that they may be rocky in nature. The 17.867 day planet falls within the habitable zone for Wolf 1061 and the 67.274 day planet falls just outside the outer boundary of the habitable zone. There are no signs of activity observed in the bisector spans, cross-correlation FWHMs, calcium H and K indices, NaD indices, or Hα indices near the planetary periods. We use custom methods to generate a cross-correlation template tailored to the star. The resulting velocities do not suffer the strong annual variation observed in the HARPS DRS velocities. This differential technique should deliver better exploitation of the archival HARPS data for the detection of planets at extremely low amplitudes.

  19. NATO: In-orbit experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capulli, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    The performance of the NATO-111-A and NATO 111-B satellite battery is reported. The electrical power subsystem is briefly described. The electrical characteristics and the reconditioning experience of the batteries is cited. The in-orbit experience is compared with results of preflight accelerated life tests.

  20. Orbit/CLASP is required for myosin accumulation at the cleavage furrow in Drosophila male meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daishi Kitazawa

    Full Text Available Peripheral microtubules (MTs near the cell cortex are essential for the positioning and continuous constriction of the contractile ring (CR in cytokinesis. Time-lapse observations of Drosophila male meiosis showed that myosin II was first recruited along the cell cortex independent of MTs. Then, shortly after peripheral MTs made contact with the equatorial cortex, myosin II was concentrated there in a narrow band. After MT contact, anillin and F-actin abruptly appeared on the equatorial cortex, simultaneously with myosin accumulation. We found that the accumulation of myosin did not require centralspindlin, but was instead dependent on Orbit, a Drosophila ortholog of the MT plus-end tracking protein CLASP. This protein is required for stabilization of central spindle MTs, which are essential for cytokinesis. Orbit was also localized in a mid-zone of peripheral MTs, and was concentrated in a ring at the equatorial cortex during late anaphase. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments indicated that Orbit is closely associated with F-actin in the CR. We also showed that the myosin heavy chain was in close proximity with Orbit in the cleavage furrow region. Centralspindlin was dispensable in Orbit ring formation. Instead, the Polo-KLP3A/Feo complex was required for the Orbit accumulation independently of the Orbit MT-binding domain. However, orbit mutations of consensus sites for the phosphorylation of Cdk1 or Polo did not influence the Orbit accumulation, suggesting an indirect regulatory role of these protein kinases in Orbit localization. Orbit was also necessary for the maintenance of the CR. Our data suggest that Orbit plays an essential role as a connector between MTs and the CR in Drosophila male meiosis.

  1. Asteroid 2015 DB216: a recurring co-orbital companion to Uranus

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente Marcos, C.; de la Fuente Marcos, R.

    2015-10-01

    Minor bodies trapped in 1:1 co-orbital resonances with a host planet could be relevant to explain the origin of captured satellites. Among the giant planets, Uranus has one of the smallest known populations of co-orbitals, three objects, and all of them are short-lived. Asteroid 2015 DB216 has an orbital period that matches well that of Uranus, and here we investigate its dynamical state. Direct N-body calculations are used to assess the current status of this object, reconstruct its immediate dynamical past, and explore its future orbital evolution. A covariance matrix-based Monte Carlo scheme is presented and applied to study its short-term stability. We find that 2015 DB216 is trapped in a temporary co-orbital resonance with Uranus, the fourth known minor body to do so. A detailed analysis of its dynamical evolution shows that it is an unstable but recurring co-orbital companion to Uranus. It currently follows an asymmetric horseshoe trajectory that will last for at least 10 kyr, but it may remain inside Uranus' co-orbital zone for millions of years. As in the case of other transient Uranian co-orbitals, complex multibody ephemeral mean motion resonances trigger the switching between the various resonant co-orbital states. The new Uranian co-orbital exhibits a secular behaviour markedly different from that of the other known Uranian co-orbitals because of its higher inclination, nearly 38°. Given its rather unusual discovery circumstances, the presence of 2015 DB216 hints at the existence of a relatively large population of objects moving in similar orbits.

  2. Stabilizing Niger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hahonou, Eric Komlavi

    international intervention in Niger. Their main objective is to secure their own strategic, economic and political interests by strengthening the Nigerien authorities through direct intervention and capacity building activities. For western states reinforcing state security institutions and stabilizing elite...... rule constitute the only realistic path to defend their own interests. The report suggests that international support of Nigerien security forces could be counter-productive for the re-establishment of state authority and legitimacy in the long-term. Brutal repression and violation of human rights...

  3. Shadowing Lemma and Chaotic Orbit Determination

    CERN Document Server

    Spoto, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Orbit determination is possible for a chaotic orbit of a dynamical system, given a finite set of observations, provided the initial conditions are at the central time. In a simple discrete model, the standard map, we tackle the problem of chaotic orbit determination when observations extend beyond the predictability horizon. If the orbit is hyperbolic, a shadowing orbit is computed by the least squares orbit determination. We test both the convergence of the orbit determination iterative procedure and the behaviour of the uncertainties as a function of the maximum number $n$ of map iterations observed. When the initial conditions belong to a chaotic orbit, the orbit determination is made impossible by numerical instability beyond a computability horizon, which can be approximately predicted by a simple formula. Moreover, the uncertainty of the results is sharply increased if a dynamical parameter is added to the initial conditions as parameter to be estimated. The uncertainty of the dynamical parameter decrea...

  4. The globe and orbit in Laron syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornreich, L; Konen, O; Lilos, P; Laron, Z

    2011-09-01

    Patients with LS have an inborn growth hormone resistance, resulting in failure to generate IGF-1. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the size of the eye and orbit in LS. We retrospectively reviewed the MR imaging of the brain in 9 patients with LS for the following parameters: axial diameter of the globe, interzygomatic distance, perpendicular distance from the interzygomatic line to margins of the globe, medial-to-lateral diameter of the orbit at the anterior orbital rim, distance from the anterior orbital rim to the anterior globe, maximal distance between the medial walls of the orbits, lateral orbital wall angle, lateral orbital wall length, and mediolateral thickness of the intraorbital fat in the most cranial image of the orbit. All measurements were made bilaterally. Twenty patients referred for MR imaging for unrelated reasons served as control subjects. Compared with the control group, the patients with LS had a significantly smaller maximal globe diameter and shallower but wider orbits due to a shorter lateral wall, a smaller medial distance between the orbits, and a larger angle of the orbit. The ratio between the most anterior orbital diameter and the globe was greater than that in controls. The position of the globe was more anterior in relation to the interzygomatic line. Shallow and wide orbits and small globes relative to orbital size are seen in LS and may be secondary to IGF-1 deficiency.

  5. Regimes of stability of accelerator modes

    CERN Document Server

    Hihinashvili, R; Avizrats, Y S; Iomin, A; Fishman, S; Guarneri, I; Hihinashvili, Rebecca; Oliker, Tali; Avizrats, Yaniv S.; Iomin, Alexander; Fishman, Shmuel; Guarneri, Italo

    2006-01-01

    The phase diagram of a simple area-preserving map, which was motivated by the quantum dynamics of cold atoms, is explored analytically and numerically. Periodic orbits of a given winding ratio are found to exist within wedge-shaped regions in the phase diagrams, which are analogous to the Arnol'd tongues which have been extensively studied for a variety of dynamical systems, mostly dissipative ones. A rich variety of bifurcations of various types are observed, as well as period doubling cascades. Stability of periodic orbits is analyzed in detail.

  6. [Orbital mycetoma: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueye, N N; Seck, S M; Diop, Y; Ndiaye Sow, M N; Agboton, G; Diakhaté, M; Dieng, M; Dieng, M T

    2013-05-01

    Mycetomas are pathological processes through which exogenous fungal or actinomycotic etiological agents produce grains. These etiological agents live in the soil and plants of endemic areas. They are introduced traumatically, primarily into the foot. The orbital location is rare. We report the case of a 17-year-old student admitted for progressive left proptosis over 2 years, following penetrating trauma by a fork in a rural setting. Examination revealed a heterogenous orbital mass with multiple fistulae, producing pus and black grains, and suggested, due to the color of the grains, a diagnosis of fungal mycetoma. MRI revealed a destructive process at the level of the lamina papracea of the ethmoid and the orbital floor. Anatomopathological examination confirmed the fungal nature of the infection, while culture in Sabouraud's medium was inconclusive. The outcome was favorable after exenteration and debridementof the ipsilateral maxillary sinus and nasal cavities, along with 4 months of ketoconazole. No recurrence has been observed for 14 months after surgery. Mycetomas are endemic to northwest Africa. Most frequently located in the foot, they are seldom seen in the orbit. The color of the grains provides a clue as to the etiology. Black-grain mycetomas are always fungal and are treated surgically--essentially like cancer--as the persistence of a single grain will cause a recurrence. The orbital location of a mycetoma is rare. In the present case report, the concept of port of entry, the clinical appearance, and the color of the grains guided the diagnosis. The histological examination of the surgical specimen confirmed the diagnosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Space Shuttle Orbiter-Illustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This illustration is an orbiter cutaway view with callouts. The orbiter is both the brains and heart of the Space Transportation System (STS). About the same size and weight as a DC-9 aircraft, the orbiter contains the pressurized crew compartment (which can normally carry up to seven crew members), the huge cargo bay, and the three main engines mounted on its aft end. There are three levels to the crew cabin. Uppermost is the flight deck where the commander and the pilot control the mission. The middeck is where the gallery, toilet, sleep stations, and storage and experiment lockers are found for the basic needs of weightless daily living. Also located in the middeck is the airlock hatch into the cargo bay and space beyond. It is through this hatch and airlock that astronauts go to don their spacesuits and marned maneuvering units in preparation for extravehicular activities, more popularly known as spacewalks. The Space Shuttle's cargo bay is adaptable to hundreds of tasks. Large enough to accommodate a tour bus (60 x 15 feet or 18.3 x 4.6 meters), the cargo bay carries satellites, spacecraft, and spacelab scientific laboratories to and from Earth orbit. It is also a work station for astronauts to repair satellites, a foundation from which to erect space structures, and a hold for retrieved satellites to be returned to Earth. Thermal tile insulation and blankets (also known as the thermal protection system or TPS) cover the underbelly, bottom of the wings, and other heat-bearing surfaces of the orbiter to protect it during its fiery reentry into the Earth's atmosphere. The Shuttle's 24,000 individual tiles are made primarily of pure-sand silicate fibers, mixed with a ceramic binder. The solid rocket boosters (SRB's) are designed as an in-house Marshall Space Flight Center project, with United Space Boosters as the assembly and refurbishment contractor. The solid rocket motor (SRM) is provided by the Morton Thiokol Corporation.

  8. Circular orbit spacecraft control at the L4 point using Lyapunov functions

    CERN Document Server

    Agrawal, Rachana

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work is to demonstrate the utility of Lyapunov functions in control synthesis for the purpose of maintaining and stabilizing a spacecraft in a circular orbit around the L4 point in the circular restricted three body problem (CRTBP). Incorporating the requirements of a fixed radius orbit and a desired angular momentum, a Lyapunov function is constructed and the requisite analysis is performed to obtain a controller. Asymptotic stability is proved in a defined region around the L4 point using LaSalle's principle.

  9. The approximate state transition matrix based on non-orthogonal decomposition and its application in orbit determination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The Unit Vector Method (UVM) is an orbit determination method extensively applied. In this paper, the UVM and classical Differential Orbit Improvement (DOI) are compared, and a fusion method is given for the orbit determination with different kind data. Based on non-orthogonal decomposition of position and velocity vectors, an approximation scheme is constructed to calculate the state transition matrix. This method simplifies the calculation of the approximate state transition matrix, analyzes the convergence mechanism of the UVM, and makes clear the defect of weight strategy in UVM. Results of orbit the determination with simulating and real data show that this method has good numerical stability and rational weight distribution.

  10. 'Orbital volume restoration rate after orbital fracture'; a CT-based orbital volume measurement for evaluation of orbital wall reconstructive effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wi, J M; Sung, K H; Chi, M

    2017-01-13

    PurposeTo evaluate the effect of orbital reconstruction and factors related to the effect of orbital reconstruction by assessing of orbital volume using orbital computed tomography (CT) in cases of orbital wall fracture.MethodsIn this retrospective study, 68 patients with isolated blowout fractures were evaluated. The volumes of orbits and herniated orbital tissues were determined by CT scans using a three-dimensional reconstruction technique (the Eclipse Treatment Planning System). Orbital CT was performed preoperatively, immediately after surgery, and at final follow ups (minimum of 6 months). We evaluated the reconstructive effect of surgery making a new formula, 'orbital volume reconstruction rate' from orbital volume differences between fractured and contralateral orbits before surgery, immediately after surgery, and at final follow up.ResultsMean volume of fractured orbits before surgery was 23.01±2.60 cm(3) and that of contralateral orbits was 21.31±2.50 cm(3) (P=0.005). Mean volume of the fractured orbits immediately after surgery was 21.29±2.42 cm(3), and that of the contralateral orbits was 21.33±2.52 cm(3) (P=0.921). Mean volume of fractured orbits at final follow up was 21.50±2.44 cm(3), and that of contralateral orbits was 21.32±2.50 cm(3) (P=0.668). The mean orbital volume reconstruction rate was 100.47% immediately after surgery and 99.17% at final follow up. No significant difference in orbital volume reconstruction rate was observed with respect to fracture site or orbital implant type. Patients that underwent operation within 14 days of trauma had a better reconstruction rate at final follow up than patients who underwent operation over 14 days after trauma (P=0.039).ConclusionComputer-based measurements of orbital fracture volume can be used to evaluate the reconstructive effect of orbital implants and provide useful quantitative information. Significant reduction of orbital volume is observed immediately after orbital wall

  11. Secular Orbital Dynamics of Hierarchical Two Planet Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Veras, Dimitri

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of multi-planet extrasolar systems has kindled interest in using their orbital evolution as a probe of planet formation. Accurate descriptions of planetary orbits identify systems which could hide additional planets or be in a special dynamical state, and inform targeted follow-up observations. We combine published radial velocity data with Markov Chain Monte Carlo analyses in order to obtain an ensemble of masses, semimajor axes, eccentricities and orbital angles for each of 5 dynamically active multi-planet systems: HD 11964, HD 38529, HD 108874, HD 168443, and HD 190360. We dynamically evolve these systems using 52,000 long-term N-body integrations that sample the full range of possible line-of-sight and relative inclinations, and we report on the system stability, secular evolution and the extent of the resonant interactions. We find that planetary orbits in hierarchical systems exhibit complex dynamics and can become highly eccentric and maybe significantly inclined. Additionally we incorpo...

  12. ORBIT FEEDBACK CONTROL FOR THE LHC Prototyping at the SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Steinhagen, Ralph J

    2004-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the next generation proton collider that is presently built at CERN. The LHC will be installed in the former LEP (Large Electron Positron Collider) tunnel. The presence of a high intensity beam in an environment of cryogenic magnets requires an excellent control of particle losses from the beam. Eventually the performance of the LHC may be limited by the ability to control the beam losses. The performance of the LHC cleaning system depends critically on the beam position stability. Ground motion, field and alignment imperfections and beam manipulations may cause orbit movements. The role of the future LHC Orbit Feedback System is the minimisation of closed orbit perturbations by periodically measuring and steering the transverse beam position back to its reference position. This diploma thesis focuses on the design and prototyping of an orbit feedback system at the SPS. The design is based on a separation of the steering problem into space and time. While the correction in s...

  13. Alignment of supermassive black hole binary orbits and spins

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, M Coleman

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies of accretion onto supermassive black hole binaries suggest that much, perhaps most, of the matter eventually accretes onto one hole or the other. If so, then for binaries whose inspiral from ~1 pc to 0.001 - 0.01 pc is driven by interaction with external gas, both the binary orbital axis and the individual black hole spins can be reoriented by angular momentum exchange with this gas. Here we show that, unless the binary mass ratio is far from unity, the spins of the individual holes align with the binary orbital axis in a time few-100 times shorter than the binary orbital axis aligns with the angular momentum direction of the incoming circumbinary gas; the spin of the secondary aligns more rapidly than that of the primary by a factor ~(m_1/m_2)^{1/2}>1. Thus the binary acts as a stabilizing agent, so that for gas-driven systems, the black hole spins are highly likely to be aligned (or counteraligned if retrograde accretion is common) with each other and with the binary orbital axis. This alignm...

  14. Electron orbits in the microwave inverse FEL accelerator (MIFELA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, T.B.; Marshall, T.C. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The MIFELA is a new device based on stimulated absorption of microwaves by electrons moving along an undulator. An intense microwave field is used (a{sub s} = eE{sub s}/k{sub s} m c{sup 2} = 0.2) as well as a large undulator field (a{sub w}/{gamma} = eB{sub {perpendicular}}/{gamma}k{sub w} mc{sup 2} = 1/2) to accelerate electrons emitted at 6MeV from a rf gun to 20MeV in 1.5m. The spiral radius of the electrons in the undulator is 8mm, in a waveguide of diameter 34mm, with undulator period about 10cm. There is a small guiding field, and the electrons move in type I orbits. We describe three problems connected with the orbital motion of the electrons in this structure: (i) injecting the electrons in an increasing undulator field prior to entering the MIFELA; (ii) orbital motion and stability inside the MIFELA; (iii) extraction of electrons from the spiral orbit in the accelerator into an axially-propagating beam, obtaining {Beta}{sub {perpendicular}} < 0.02. These studies have application to a MIFELA which is under construction at Yale University by Omega-P.

  15. Coordinated orbit-tracking control of second-order non-linear agents with directed communication topologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.-Y.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, C.-L.; Wei, P.

    2016-12-01

    This paper deals with two-dimensional and three-dimensional cooperative control of multiple agents formation tracking a set of given closed orbits, where each agent has intrinsic second-order non-linear dynamics and the communication topology among agents is directed. By using our previous curve extension method, the cooperative control system can be regarded as a cascade system composed of the orbit-tracking subsystem and the formation subsystem with the orbit-tracking error as input. A novel solution is established by separatively designing the orbit-tracking control law and the formation control protocol ignoring the perturbation at first and then applying input-to-state stability theory to analyse the asymptotic stability of the cascade system. It is shown that the closed-loop system is asymptotic stability if the directed communication topology contains a directed spanning tree. The effectiveness of the analytical results is verified by numerical simulations.

  16. [Rhino-orbital mucormycosis with orbital abscess: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatar, Emel Cadallı; Sürenoğlu, Unzile Akpınar; Işık, Eray; Tütüncü, Ediz; Korkmaz, Hakan

    2011-01-01

    Sinonasal mucormycosis is a rare, life-threatening and insidious fungal infection. Uncontrolled diabetes mellitus and immunsupression are the most important risk factors. The infection is clinically characterized by black necrotic tissues and crusting in the nasal cavity. In acute fulminant rhinosinusitis and particularly in infections caused by mucor species, black scar tissues seen on the nasal mucosa are pathognomonic. High level of suspicion in the risk group the diagnosis is confirmed by histopathological examination. The rhinoorbital form is even rarer and the findings may range from orbital pain to ophtalmoplegia and blindness. In this report we present a 72-year-old female patient with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus who was admited with the complaints of exophtalmos in the left eye, diplopia and headache. In the physical examination there was purulent discharge in the middle meatus and left orbital abscess was detected on computed tomography. We performed an emergency endoscopic sinus surgery. While we did not observe any necrotic tissues, granulation tissues were detected and pus was drained from the orbital cavity. The result of the histopathological examination was reported as invasive mucormycosis. We presented this case to emphasize the importance of early diagnosis and treatment of rhinoorbital mucormycosis.

  17. Floquet-based chaos control for continuous-time systems with stability analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamoto, Noboru [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)]. E-mail: sakamoto@nuae.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2006-08-14

    In this Letter, a framework for controlling continuous-time chaotic systems is proposed. The framework is based on the Floquet theory of linear periodic differential equations and provides a practical method to stabilize unstable periodic orbits (UPOs) and a stability analysis of the closed loop systems. An example of controlling the circular restricted three-body problem known as halo orbits is illustrated. It is also reported that stabilization of UPOs can be effective by using the maximum principle to select a nominal orbit. It also turns out that the proposed framework enables us to give a theoretical account of the well-known occasional proportional feedback (OPF)

  18. Stabilizing brokerage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovel, Katherine; Golub, Benjamin; Milgrom, Eva M Meyersson

    2011-12-27

    A variety of social and economic arrangements exist to facilitate the exchange of goods, services, and information over gaps in social structure. Each of these arrangements bears some relationship to the idea of brokerage, but this brokerage is rarely like the pure and formal economic intermediation seen in some modern markets. Indeed, for reasons illuminated by existing sociological and economic models, brokerage is a fragile relationship. In this paper, we review the causes of instability in brokerage and identify three social mechanisms that can stabilize fragile brokerage relationships: social isolation, broker capture, and organizational grafting. Each of these mechanisms rests on the emergence or existence of supporting institutions. We suggest that organizational grafting may be the most stable and effective resolution to the tensions inherent in brokerage, but it is also the most institutionally demanding.

  19. STABILIZATION PONDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunarsih Sunarsih

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a model for natural syst ems used in Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP Sewon Bantul. The model is m odeling development, derived from the physical and biochemical phenomena involved in the biological treatment process. The numerical solution of the resulting on 13 simultaneous systems of nonlinear equations by the Quasi_Newton. Data validation is measured by facultative pond at the inlet and outlet of the pond to the concentration of b acteria, algae, zooplankton, organic matter, detritus, organic nitrogen, NH3, organi c phosphor, dissolved phosphorus, Dissolved Oxygen (DO, total coliform, faecal coliform and Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD. A simulation model is presented to predict performance regime steady state of domestic wastewater treatment facultative stabilization pond. The high degree of significant of at least 10% indicates that the effluent parameters can be reasonably accurately predicted.

  20. Aiming at a 1-cm orbit for low earth orbiters: Reduced-dynamic and kinematic precise orbit determination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, P.N.A.M.; Van den IJssel, J.

    2003-01-01

    The computation of high-accuracy orbits is a prerequisite for the success of Low Earth Orbiter (LEO) missions such as CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE. The mission objectives of these satellites cannot be reached without computing orbits with an accuracy at the few cm level. Such a level of accuracy might be a

  1. Bifurcations and stability of nondegenerated homoclinic loops for higher dimensional systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yinlai; Li, Feng; Xu, Han; Li, Jing; Zhang, Liqun; Ding, Benyan

    2013-01-01

    By using the foundational solutions of the linear variational equation of the unperturbed system along the homoclinic orbit as the local current coordinates system of the system in the small neighborhood of the homoclinic orbit, we discuss the bifurcation problems of nondegenerated homoclinic loops. Under the nonresonant condition, existence, uniqueness, and incoexistence of 1-homoclinic loop and 1-periodic orbit, the inexistence of k-homoclinic loop and k-periodic orbit is obtained. Under the resonant condition, we study the existence of 1-homoclinic loop, 1-periodic orbit, 2-fold 1-periodic orbit, and two 1-periodic orbits; the coexistence of 1-homoclinic loop and 1-periodic orbit. Moreover, we give the corresponding existence fields and bifurcation surfaces. At last, we study the stability of the homoclinic loop for the two cases of non-resonant and resonant, and we obtain the corresponding criterions.

  2. Orbital and spin ordering physics of the Mn3O4 spinel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Santanu; Lal, Siddhartha

    2017-08-01

    Motivated by recent experiments, we present a comprehensive theoretical study of the geometrically frustrated strongly correlated magnetic insulator Mn3O4 spinel oxide based on a microscopic Hamiltonian involving lattice, spin, and orbital degrees of freedom. Possessing the physics of degenerate eg orbitals, this system shows a strong Jahn-Teller effect at high temperatures. Further, careful attention is paid to the special nature of the superexchange physics arising from the 90∘ Mn-O-Mn bonding angle. The Jahn-Teller and superexchange-based orbital-spin Hamiltonians are then analyzed in order to track the dynamics of orbital and spin ordering. We find that a high-temperature structural transition results in orbital ordering the nature of which is mixed with respect to the two originally degenerate eg orbitals. This ordering of orbitals is shown to relieve the intrinsic geometric frustration of the spins on the spinel lattice, leading to ferrimagnetic Yafet-Kittel ordering at low temperatures. Finally, we develop a model for a magnetoelastic coupling in Mn3O4 , enabling a systematic understanding of the experimentally observed complexity in the low-temperature structural and magnetic phenomenology of this spinel. Our analysis predicts that a quantum fluctuation-driven orbital-spin liquid phase may be stabilized at low temperatures upon the application of pressure.

  3. WMAP Observatory Thermal Design and On-Orbit Thermal Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazer, Stuart D.; Brown, Kimberly D.; Michalek, Theodore J.; Ancarrow, Walter C.

    2003-01-01

    The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) observatory, launched June 30, 2001, is designed to measure the cosmic microwave background radiation with unprecedented precision and accuracy while orbiting the second Lagrange point (L2). The instrument cold stage must be cooled passively to <95K, and systematic thermal variations in selected instrument components controlled to less than 0.5 mK (rms) per spin period. This paper describes the thermal design and testing of the WMAP spacecraft and instrument. Flight thermal data for key spacecraft and instrument components are presented from launch through the first year of mission operations. Effects of solar flux variation due to the Earth's elliptical orbit about the sun, surface thermo-optical property degradations, and solar flares on instrument thermal stability are discussed.

  4. Charge Orbits of Extremal Black Holes in Five Dimensional Supergravity

    CERN Document Server

    Cerchiai, Bianca L; Marrani, Alessio; Zumino, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    We derive the U-duality charge orbits, as well as the related moduli spaces, of "large" and "small" extremal black holes in non-maximal ungauged Maxwell-Einstein supergravities with symmetric scalar manifolds in d=5 space-time dimensions. The stabilizer groups of the various classes of orbits are obtained by determining and solving suitable U-invariant sets of constraints, both in "bare" and "dressed" charges bases, with various methods. After a general treatment of attractors in real special geometry (also considering non-symmetric cases), the N=2 "magic" theories, as well as the N=2 Jordan symmetric sequence, are analyzed in detail. Finally, the half-maximal (N=4) matter-coupled supergravity is also studied in this context.

  5. Orbit and attitude control of spacecraft formation flying

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhi-guo; LI Jun-feng

    2008-01-01

    Formation flying is a novel concept of distributing the flmctionality of large spacecraft among several smaller, less expensive, cooperative satellites. Some applica-tions require that a controllable satellite keeps relative position and attitude to observe a specific surface of another satellite among the cluster. Specially, the target space vehi- cle is malfunctioning. The present paper focuses on the problem that how to control a chaser satellite to fly around an out-of-work target satellite closely in earth orbit and to track a specific surface. Relative attitude and first approximate relative orbital dynamics equations are presented. Control strategy is derived based on feedback linearization and Lyapunov theory of stability. Further, considering the uncertainty of inertia, an adaptive control method is developed to obtain the correct inertial ratio. The numerical simulation is given to verify the validity of proposed control scheme.

  6. Stability analysis of single planet systems and their habitable zones

    CERN Document Server

    Kopparapu, Ravi kumar

    2010-01-01

    We study the dynamical stability of planetary systems consisting of one hypothetical terrestrial mass planet ($1 $ or $10 \\mearth$) and one massive planet ($10 \\mearth - 10 \\mjup$). We consider masses and orbits that cover the range of observed planetary system architectures (including non-zero initial eccentricities), determine the stability limit through N-body simulations, and compare it to the analytic Hill stability boundary. We show that for given masses and orbits of a two planet system, a single parameter, which can be calculated analytically, describes the Lagrange stability boundary (no ejections or exchanges) but which diverges significantly from the Hill stability boundary. However, we do find that the actual boundary is fractal, and therefore we also identify a second parameter which demarcates the transition from stable to unstable evolution. We show the portions of the habitable zones of $\\rho$ CrB, HD 164922, GJ 674, and HD 7924 which can support a terrestrial planet. These analyses clarify th...

  7. Robustness analysis method for orbit control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingrui; Yang, Keying; Qi, Rui; Zhao, Shuge; Li, Yanyan

    2017-08-01

    Satellite orbits require periodical maintenance due to the presence of perturbations. However, random errors caused by inaccurate orbit determination and thrust implementation may lead to failure of the orbit control strategy. Therefore, it is necessary to analyze the robustness of the orbit control methods. Feasible strategies which are tolerant to errors of a certain magnitude can be developed to perform reliable orbit control for the satellite. In this paper, first, the orbital dynamic model is formulated by Gauss' form of the planetary equation using the mean orbit elements; the atmospheric drag and the Earth's non-spherical perturbations are taken into consideration in this model. Second, an impulsive control strategy employing the differential correction algorithm is developed to maintain the satellite trajectory parameters in given ranges. Finally, the robustness of the impulsive control method is analyzed through Monte Carlo simulations while taking orbit determination error and thrust error into account.

  8. Overview of the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateer, B.; Graf, J.; Zurek, R.; Jones, R.; Eisen, H.; Johnston, M.; Jai, D. B.

    2002-01-01

    The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter will deliver to Mars orbit a payload to conduct remote sensing science observations, characterize sites for future landers, and provide critical telecom/navigation relay capability for follow-on missions.

  9. Tumors of the orbit; Orbitatumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller-Forell, Wibke [Klinikum der Univ. Mainz (Germany). Inst. fuer Neuroradiologie

    2008-09-15

    This short review will present an overview not only of the findings in imaging, but the main clinical symptoms of the different orbital space occupying lesions, (not only different tumors, but even tumor-like lesions), as those should be included in differential diagnostic consideration. This should lead to a targeted diagnostic procedure in the individual patient. Basic knowledge of orbital anatomy is as important as the knowledge of the pros and contra's of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which should influence the examination protocol. Imaging findings of the most important tumors/lesions of the globe, the intraconal and extraconal space as well as of the optic nerve are presented with different examples (without any demand of completeness). (orig.)

  10. Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Webster

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The radar system described here (CMOR comprises a basic 5-element receiving system, co-located with a pulsed transmitter, specifically designed to observe meteor echoes and to determine their position in space with an angular resolution of ~1° and a radial resolution of ~3 km. Two secondary receiving sites, a few km distant and arranged to form approximately a right angle with the base station, allow the determination of the velocity (speed and direction of the meteor that, together with the time of occurrence, lead to an estimate of the orbit of the original meteoroid. Some equipment details are presented along with a method used to determine the orbits. Representative echoes are shown and observations on the 2002 Leonid shower presented.

  11. SILEX in-orbit performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planche, Gilles; Chorvalli, Vincent

    2004-06-01

    PASTEL embarked on-board SPOT4, French LEO earth observation satellite, and OPALE mounted on-board ARTEMIS, European GEO telecommunication satellite are the key components of SILEX (Semi-conductor Inter-satellite Link Experiment) system. Launched in March 1998, PASTEL terminal was first verified via star tracking. Then, first SILEX optical communication was successfully performed in December 2001 with ARTEMIS at 31000 km. Following 12 months ARTEMIS orbit rising, SILEX commissioning phase was successfully achieved in spring 2003. Today, more than hundred successful optical communications have been achieved. On 1st of October 2003, the SILEX optical link was declared fully operational by the European and French space agencies. After a recall of SILEX architecture, design and on-ground verification, this paper reports on in-orbit results.

  12. The rehybridization of electronic orbitals in carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ouyang Yu; Peng Jing-Cui; Wang Hui; Peng Zhi-Hua

    2008-01-01

    Rehybridization of electronic orbitals in carbon nanotubes contains tilting angles of π orbital, electrons wavefunc-tions of π orbital and σ orbital, degrees of hybridization, etc. In this paper, we have obtained analytical formulas of tilting angle of π orbital relative to tube surface, electrons wavefunctions of π orbital and σ orbital, degrees of hybridization, separately, as well as the numerical results.

  13. Anteromedial Approach to the Orbit

    OpenAIRE

    DEDA, Haluk; Ugur, Hasan Çaglar; Yorulmaz, Irfan; Kucuk, Babur

    2001-01-01

    This study evaluated the surgical results of the anteromedial approach for treatment of orbital lesions in 16 patients. Pre- and postoperatively, all patients underwent a complete physical examination focusing on the head and neck area including a thorough ophthalmologic evaluation, computerized tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. The surgical approach was limited to a medial orbitotomy in five patients; the remaining 11 patients underwent a medial orbitotomy combined with an external...

  14. Radial-orbit instability in modified Newtonian dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nipoti, Carlo; Ciotti, Luca; Londrillo, Pasquale

    2011-07-01

    The stability of radially anisotropic spherical stellar systems in modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) is explored by means of numerical simulations performed with the N-body code N-MODY. We find that Osipkov-Merritt MOND models require for stability larger minimum anisotropy radii than equivalent Newtonian systems (ENSs) with the dark matter, and also than purely baryonic Newtonian models with the same density profile. The maximum value for stability of the Fridman-Polyachenko-Shukhman parameter in MOND models is lower than in ENSs, but higher than in Newtonian models with no dark matter. We conclude that MOND systems are substantially more prone to radial-orbit instability than ENSs with dark matter, while they are able to support a larger amount of kinetic energy stored in radial orbits than purely baryonic Newtonian systems. An explanation of these results is attempted and their relevance to the MOND interpretation of the observed kinematics of globular clusters, dwarf spheroidal and elliptical galaxies is briefly discussed.

  15. Spacecraft orbit lifetime within two binary near-Earth asteroid systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damme, Friedrich; Hussmann, Hauke; Oberst, Jürgen

    2017-10-01

    We studied the motion of medium-sized and small spacecraft orbiting within the binary asteroid systems 175,706 (1996 FG3) and 65,803 Didymos (1996 GT). We have considered spacecraft motion within the binary systems distance regimes between 0.4 and 2.5 km for Didymos and 0.8-4 km for 1996 FG3. Orbital motion of spacecraft, beginning from 20,000 initial conditions lying in the orbital planes of the secondary, were simulated and evaluated for lifespan. The simulations include the effects of (1) the asteroid's mass, shape, and rotational parameters, (2) the secondary's mass and orbit parameters, (3) the spacecraft mass, surface area, and reflectivity (representing large box-wing-shaped medium-sized spacecraft as well as small satellites), and (4) the time of the mission, and therefore the relative position of the system to the sun. Stable orbital motion (i.e., not requiring thrusting maneuvers) was achieved using the Lagrange points L4/L5 and orbital resonances. This allows for long motion arcs, e.g. of 90 days (L4) and 35 days (resonance) in the Didymos system. The accuracy necessary to deploy a probe into L4, so it can remain there for 35 day, is evaluated by comparisons. Retrograde orbits were found assuring 90 days of low eccentric orbiting for a compact small satellite for a great variety of initial conditions. The comparison of simulations at aphelion and perihelion as well as the different spacecraft show the critical impact of solar radiation pressure on orbital stability. 65,803 Didymos (1996 GT) is shown to be more suitable for orbit phases at the close distances we studied compared to 175,706 (1996 FG3). Two possible obliquities of the Didymos system were considered to study the effects of the inclination on perturbing forces at equinox and solstice, showing that cases of low obliquity or times of equinox are beneficial for spacecraft orbiting.

  16. A new kinematical definition of orbital eccentricity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninković S.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A new concept of orbital eccentricity is given. The dimensionless quantities proposed in the present paper to serve as orbital eccentricities have a kinematical nature. The purpose is to use them in describing the motion for the case of three-dimensional orbits. A comparison done for nearly planar orbits shows that the values of the eccentricities proposed here do not differ significantly from those corresponding to the eccentricities of geometric nature usually applied.

  17. Understanding pediatric bacterial preseptal and orbital cellulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez Mithra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric preseptal and orbital cellulitis are infectious disorders that result in periorbital inflammation. Preseptal cellulitis is often associated with breaches in the skin barrier whereas orbital cellulitis is commonly associated with paranasal sinusitis. Orbital cellulitis may be associated with subperiosteal abscess. It is important to distinguish between preseptal from orbital cellulitis. Clinical examination and diagnostic imaging are useful in determining appropriate management. Patients are usually treated with broad spectrum antibiotics and surgery when indicated.

  18. Spin-orbit ferromagnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    In conventional magnetic resonance techniques the magnitude and direction of the oscillatory magnetic field are (at least approximately) known. This oscillatory field is used to probe the properties of a spin ensemble. Here, I will describe experiments that do the inverse. I will discuss how we use a magnetic resonance technique to map out the current-induced effective magnetic fields in the ferromagnetic semiconductors (Ga,Mn)As and (Ga,Mn)(As,P). These current-induced fields have their origin in the spin-orbit interaction. Effective magnetic fields are observed with symmetries which resemble the Dresselhaus and Rashba spin-orbit interactions and which depend on the diagonal and off-diagonal strain respectively. Ferromagnetic semiconductor materials of different strains, annealing conditions and concentrations are studied and the results compared with theoretical calculations. Our original study measured the rectification voltage coming from the product of the oscillatory magnetoresistance, during magnetisation precession, and the alternating current. More recently we have developed an impedance matching technique which enables us to extract microwave voltages from these high resistance (10 k Ω) samples. In this way we measure the microwave voltage coming from the product of the oscillating magneto-resistance and a direct current. The direct current is observed to affect the magnetisation precession, indicating that anti-damping as well as field-like torques can originate from the spin-orbit interaction.

  19. Proxima's orbit around Alpha Centauri

    CERN Document Server

    Kervella, P

    2016-01-01

    Proxima and Alpha Centauri AB have almost identical distances and proper motions with respect to the Sun. Although the probability of such similar parameters is in principle very low, the question whether they actually form a single gravitationally bound triple system has been open since the discovery of Proxima one century ago. Owing to recent high precision radial velocity measurements and the revision of the parameters of the Alpha Cen pair, we show that Proxima and Alpha Cen are gravitationally bound with a high degree of confidence. The orbital period of Proxima is approximately 600 000 years, with a moderate excentricity of 0.42 +0.07 -0.08. Proxima comes within 5.3 -0.9 +1.2 kAU of Alpha Cen at periastron, and the apastron occurs at 12.9 +0.3 -0.1 kAU. This orbital motion may have influenced the formation or evolution of the recently discovered planet orbiting Proxima as well as circumbinary planet formation around Alpha Cen.

  20. The geostationary orbit and developing countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, E. R.

    1982-01-01

    The geostationary orbit is becoming congested due to use by several countries throughout the world, and the request for use of this orbit is increasing. There are 188 geostationary stations in operation. An equitable distribution of stations on this orbit is requested.

  1. Information Measures for Statistical Orbit Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashiku, Alinda K.

    2013-01-01

    The current Situational Space Awareness (SSA) is faced with a huge task of tracking the increasing number of space objects. The tracking of space objects requires frequent and accurate monitoring for orbit maintenance and collision avoidance using methods for statistical orbit determination. Statistical orbit determination enables us to obtain…

  2. The History of the Molniya Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettering Group

    Arthur C. Clarke's name is often linked with the Geostationary orbit as a result of his 1945 paper in Wireless World. Less well-known is where the credit for discovering the Molniya orbit should lie. This paper presents the evidence uncovered to date concerning the original concept and provides some insight into the ways in which the orbit has subsequently been exploited.

  3. Atomic Orbitals for the New Millennium

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, J M

    1999-01-01

    This very short article introduces a set of nested atomic orbitals, called MCAS, to replace the current s, p, d, and f orbitals. The simplest orbital is a tetrahedrally directed, four lobed, mono-orbital instead of the spherical s orbital. All the other orbitals, no matter what their energy (shell) level is, are nested with this one. All the electrons have the same spin and only one electron is allotted to each orbital. Electron spin pairing is accomplished through opposing orbitals instead of actual electron spin reversal. Orbital energy level is maintained by nuclear propulsion through perigee kick. Orbitals hybridize as Aufbau proceeds, in contrast to the inflexible, current building model. The inert gases have completely uniform electronic shells that contain only one orbital type per shell. Since outer completed shells have only one type of orbital, all eight outer electrons are identical rather than being of two types as occurs in the current model; hence, Lewis' electron-dot octet. Hydrogen should resi...

  4. Return to Venus of AKATSUKI, the Japanese Venus Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, M.; Iwagami, N.; Satoh, T.; Taguchi, M.; Watanabe, S.; Takahashi, Y.; Imamura, T.; Suzuki, M.; Ueno, M.; Yamazaki, A.; Fukuhara, T.; Yamada, M.; Ishii, N.; Ogohara, K.

    2011-12-01

    Japanese Venus Climate Orbiter 'AKATSUKI' (PLANET-C) was proposed in 2001 with strong support by international Venus science community and approved as an ISAS mission soon after the proposal. AKATSUKI and ESA's Venus Express complement each other in Venus climate study. Various coordinated observations using the two spacecraft have been planned. Also participating scientists from US have been selected. Its science target is to understand the climate of Venus. The mission life we expected was more than 2 Earth years in Venus orbit. AKATSUKI was successfully launched at 06:58:22JST on May 21, by H-IIA F17. After the separation from H-IIA, the telemetry from AKATSUKI was normally detected by DSN Goldstone station (10:00JST) and the solar cell paddles' expansion was confirmed. AKATSUKI was put into the 3-axis stabilized mode in the initial operation from Uchinoura station and the critical operation was finished at 20:00JST on the same day. The malfunction, which happened during the Venus Orbit Insertion (VOI) on7 Dec, 2010 is as follows. We set all commands on Dec. 5. Attitude control for Venus orbit insertion (VOI) was automatically done on Dec. 6. Orbital maneuver engine (OME) was fired 08:49 JST on Dec. 7. 1min. after firing the spacecraft went into the occultation region and we had no telemetry, but we expected to continuous firing for 12min. Recording on the spacecraft told us later that, unfortunately the firing continued just 152sec. and stopped. The reason of the malfunction of the OME was the blocking of check valve of the gas pressure line to push the fuel to the engine. We failed to make the spacecraft the Venus orbiter, and it is rotating the sun with the orbital period of 203 days. As the Venus orbit the sun with the period of 225 days, AKATSUKI has a chance to meet Venus again in 5 or 6 years depending on the orbit correction plan. Let us summarize the present situation of AKATSUKI. Most of the fuel still remains. But the condition of the propulsion

  5. The orbital record in stratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Alfred G.

    1992-01-01

    Orbital signals are being discovered in pre-Pleistocene sediments. Due to their hierarchical nature these cycle patterns are complex, and the imprecision of geochronology generally makes the assignment of stratigraphic cycles to specific orbital cycles uncertain, but in sequences such as the limnic Newark Group under study by Olsen and pelagic Cretaceous sequence worked on by our Italo-American group the relative frequencies yield a definitive match to the Milankovitch hierarchy. Due to the multiple ways in which climate impinges on depositional systems, the orbital signals are recorded in a multiplicity of parameters, and affect different sedimentary facies in different ways. In platform carbonates, for example, the chief effect is via sea-level variations (possibly tied to fluctuating ice volume), resulting in cycles of emergence and submergence. In limnic systems it finds its most dramatic expression in alternations of lake and playa conditions. Biogenic pelagic oozes such as chalks and the limestones derived from them display variations in the carbonate supplied by planktonic organisms such as coccolithophores and foraminifera, and also record variations in the aeration of bottom waters. Whereas early studies of stratigraphic cyclicity relied mainly on bedding variations visible in the field, present studies are supplementing these with instrumental scans of geochemical, paleontological, and geophysical parameters which yield quantitative curves amenable to time-series analysis; such analysis is, however, limited by problems of distorted time-scales. My own work has been largely concentrated on pelagic systems. In these, the sensitivity of pelagic organisms to climatic-oceanic changes, combined with the sensitivity of botton life to changes in oxygen availability (commonly much more restricted in the Past than now) has left cyclic patterns related to orbital forcing. These systems are further attractive because (1) they tend to offer depositional continuity

  6. Stability of the hydrogen atom of classical electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    De Luca, J

    2004-01-01

    We study the stability of the circular orbits of the electromagnetic two-body problem of classical electrodynamics. We introduce the concept of resonant dissipation, i.e. a motion that radiates the center-of-mass energy while the interparticle distance performs bounded oscillations about a metastable orbit. The stability mechanism is established by the existence of a quartic resonant constant generated by the stiff eigenvalues of the linear stability problem. This constant bounds the particles together during the radiative recoil. The condition of resonant dissipation predicts angular momenta for the metastable orbits in reasonable agreement with the Bohr atom. The principal result is that the emission lines agree with the predictions of quantum electrodynamics (QED) with 1 percent average error even up to the $40^{th}$ line. Our angular momenta depend logarithmically on the mass of the heavy body, such that the deuterium and the muonium atoms have essentially the same angular momenta, in agreement with QED. ...

  7. Continuous control of chaos based on the stability criterion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong Jie; Liu, Yan Zhu; Peng, Jian Hua

    2004-06-01

    A method of chaos control based on stability criterion is proposed in the present paper. This method can stabilize chaotic systems onto a desired periodic orbit by a small time-continuous perturbation nonlinear feedback. This method does not require linearization of the system around the stabilized orbit and only an approximate location of the desired periodic orbit is required which can be automatically detected in the control process. The control can be started at any moment by choosing appropriate perturbation restriction condition. It seems that more flexibility and convenience are the main advantages of this method. The discussions on control of attitude motion of a spacecraft, Rössler system, and two coupled Duffing oscillators are given as numerical examples.

  8. On-Orbit Noise Characterization for MODIS Reflective Solar Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, X.; Xie, X.; Angal, A.

    2008-01-01

    Since launch, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) has operated successfully on-board the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra and EOS Aqua spacecraft. MODIS is a passive cross-track scanning radiometer that makes observations in 36 spectral bands with spectral wavelengths from visible (VIS) to long-wave infrared. MODIS bands 1-19 and 26 are the reflective solar bands (RSB) with wavelengths from 0.41 to 2.2 micrometers. They are calibrated on-orbit using an on-board solar diffuser (SD) and a SD stability monitor (SDSM) system. For MODIS RSB, the level 1B calibration algorithm produces top of the atmosphere reflectance factors and radiances for every pixel of the Earth view. The sensor radiometric calibration accuracy, specified at each spectral band's typical scene radiance, is 2% for the RSB reflectance factors and 5% for the RSB radiances. Also specified at the typical scene radiance is the detector signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), a key sensor performance parameter that directly impacts its radiometric calibration accuracy and stability, as well as the image quality. This paper describes an on-orbit SNR characterization approach developed to evaluate and track MODIS RSB detector performance. In order to perform on-orbit SNR characterization, MODIS RSB detector responses to the solar illumination reflected from the SD panel must be corrected for factors due to variations of the solar angles and the SD bi-directional reflectance factor. This approach enables RSB SNR characterization to be performed at different response levels for each detector. On-orbit results show that both Terra and Aqua MODIS RSB detectors have performed well since launch. Except for a few noisy or inoperable detectors which were identified pre-launch, most RSB detectors continue to meet the SNR design requirements and are able to maintain satisfactory short-term stability. A comparison of on-orbit noise characterization results with results derived from pre

  9. Molecular orbitals for properties and spectroscopies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert, Vincent [Laboratoire de Chimie Quantique, Institut de Chimie, Université de Strasbourg, 1 rue Blaise Pascal 67000 Strasbourg-France (France); Domingo, Alex [Quantum Chemistry and Physical Chemistry Celestijnenlaan 200f, 3001 Heverlee - Belgium (Belgium); Braunstein, Pierre; Danopoulos, Andreas; Monakhov, Kirill [Laboratoire de Chimie de Coordination, Institut de Chimie, Université de Strasbourg, 4 rue Blaise Pascal 67081 Strasbourg-France (France)

    2015-12-31

    The description and clarification of spectroscopies and properties goes through ab initio calculations. Wave function based calculations (CASSCF/CASPT2) are particularly appealing since they offer spectroscopic accuracy and means of interpretation. we performed such calculations to elucidate the origin of unusual structural changes and intramolecular electron transfer phenomenon. Based on optimized molecular orbitals and a reading of the multireference wave function, it is suggested that intimate interactions are likely to considerably modify the standard pictures. A so-called PIMA (polarization-induced metalâĹŠarene) interaction similar to the more familiar anion-π interaction is responsible for a significant deviation from sp{sup 3} geometry and an energetic stabilization of 50 kJ/mol in Cr(II) benzyl organometallic complexes. In a similar fashion, it is proposed that the energetic profile of the IVCT (inter valence charge transfer) exhibits strong similarities to the Marcus’ theory, suggesting a response behaviour of the ensemble of electrons as electron transfer occurs in Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} bimetallic compound. The electronic reorganization induced by the IVCT process accounts for 11.8 eV, a very large effect that reduces the transfer energy down to 0.89 eV, in very good agreement with experiments.

  10. Cislunar Near Rectilinear Halo Orbit for Human Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, Ryan; Martinez, Roland; Condon, Gerald; Williams, Jacob; Lee, David; Davis, Diane; Barton, Gregg; Bhatt, Sagar; Jang, Jiann-Woei; Clark, Fred; Hinkel, Heather

    2016-01-01

    . In fact, a given NRO is not identified by a set of Keplerian orbit parameters, and a valid epoch specific state vector must be first obtained from a multi-body dynamical model. In this paper, the significant performance and operational challenges of conducting human missions to the NRO are evaluated. First, a systematic process for generating full ephemeris based ballistic NROs of various families is outlined to demonstrate the relative ease in which a multi-­-revolution orbit can be found for any epoch and for various orbit geometries. In the Earth-­-Moon system, NROs, which are halo orbits with close passage over a lunar pole, can exist with respect to libration point 1 (L1) or libration point 2 (L2) and are either from a North or South family orbit class with respect to the ecliptic. Second, the ability to maintain the orbit over the lifetime of a habitat mission by applying a reliable station-keeping strategy is investigated. The NRO, while similar to the quasi-­-halo orbits that the Artemis mission flew, requires an updated station keeping strategy. This is due to several dynamical differences such as the increased relative stability of the NRO compared to other halo orbits and the close passage over the lunar surface as shown in Figure 1. Multiple station-keeping strategies are being investigated to ensure a human spacecraft remains on a predictable path. As the NRO is not described in simple two-­-body parameters, analysis must determine the best strategy for targeting a reference NRO as well as how closely a future state should be constrained. In addition, costs will be minimized by determining maneuver directionality based on an identified pattern in the optimal station-keeping solutions or an analytically derived relationship. The candidate station-keeping algorithm must be stable and robust to environmental and vehicle uncertainties as well to navigation estimation and flight control execution errors. To that end, navigation accuracies, the impact on

  11. Orbital, subconjunctival, and subcutaneous emphysema after an orbital floor fracture

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Osama H Ababneh Department of Ophthalmology, The University of Jordan and Jordan University Hospital, Amman, Jordan Abstract: A 16-year-old boy presented to the emergency department with the complaint of a sudden, painful left eye and proptosis after an episode of sneezing. A few hours earlier, he had sustained a blunt trauma to the left orbit as the result of a fistfight. The initial examination showed subcutaneous and subconjunctival emphysema. Visual acuity in the left eye was 20/30 (0.67...

  12. A Survey of Research on Service-Spacecraft Orbit Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yue; ZHANG Jian-xin; ZHANG Qiang; WEI Xiao-peng

    2013-01-01

    On-orbit service spacecraft orbit problem has been addressed for decades. The research of on-orbit service spacecraft orbit can be roughly divided into orbit design and orbit optimization. The paper mainly focuses on the orbit design problem. We simply summarize of the previous works, and point out the main content of the on-orbit service spacecraft orbit design. We classify current on-orbit service spacecraft orbit design problem into parking-orbit design, maneuvering-orbit design and servicing-orbit design. Then, we give a detail description of the three specific orbits, and put forward our own ideas on the existed achievements. The paper will provide a meaningful reference for the on-orbit service spacecraft orbital design research.

  13. The Stabilizing Effects in Gold Carbene Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes Dos Santos Comprido, Laura; Klein, Johannes E M N; Knizia, Gerald; Kästner, Johannes; Hashmi, A Stephen K

    2015-08-24

    Bonding and stabilizing effects in gold carbene complexes are investigated by using Kohn-Sham density functional theory (DFT) and the intrinsic bond orbital (IBO) approach. The π-stabilizing effects of organic substituents at the carbene carbon atom coordinated to the gold atom are evaluated for a series of recently isolated and characterized complexes, as well as intermediates of prototypical 1,6-enyne cyclization reactions. The results indicate that these effects are of particular importance for gold complexes especially because of the low π-backbonding contribution from the gold atom. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Food Fortification Stability Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirmons, T.; Cooper, M.; Douglas, G.

    2017-01-01

    NASA has established the goal of traveling beyond low-Earth orbit and extending manned exploration to Mars. The length of proposed Mars missions and the lack of resupply missions increases the importance of nutritional content in the food system, which will need a five-year shelf life. The purpose of this research is to assess the stability of vitamin supplementation in traditionally processed spaceflight foods. It is expected that commercially available fortification nutrients will remain stable through a long duration exploration mission at sufficient levels if compatible formulation, processing, and storage temperatures are achieved. Five vitamins (vitamin E, vitamin K, pantothenic acid, folic acid, and thiamin) were blended into a vitamin premix (DSM, Freeport, TX) such that the vitamin concentration per serving equaled 25% of the recommended daily intake after two years of ambient storage. Four freeze-dried foods (Scrambled Eggs, Italian Vegetables, Potatoes Au Gratin, Noodles and Chicken) and four thermo-stabilized foods (Curry Sauce with Vegetables, Chicken Noodle Soup, Grilled Pork Chop, Rice with Butter) were produced, with and without the vitamin premix, to assess the impact of the added fortification on color and taste and to determine the stability of supplemental vitamins in spaceflight foods. The addition of fortification to spaceflight foods did not greatly alter the organoleptic properties of most products. In most cases, overall acceptability scores remained above 6.0 (minimum acceptable score) following six months and one year of low-temperature storage. Likewise, the color of fortified products appears to be preserved over one year of storage. The only exceptions were Grilled pork Chop and Chicken Noodle Soup whose individual components appeareddegrade rapidly over one year of storage. Finally, most vitamins appeared to be stable during long-term storage. The only exception was thiamin, which degraded rapidly during the first year of storage at

  15. New Orbit Propagator to Be Used in Orbital Debris Evolutionary Models

    OpenAIRE

    Narumi, Tomohiro; Hanada, Toshiya

    2007-01-01

    An orbital environment debris evolutionary model for low Earth orbit has been developed at Kyushu University. A fast orbit propagator is essentially needed in such an evolutionary model because the number of space debris larger than 1 cm in low earth orbit is very large and it takes much time to compute long-term orbital changes of space debris. The effects of orbital perturbations are investigated for hundreds of years, and the rate of change in orbital elements were invented by earlier publ...

  16. Orbital period determination in an eclipsing dwarf nova HT Cas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bąkowska, Karolina; Olech, Arkadiusz

    2014-09-01

    HT Cassiopeiae was discovered over seventy years ago (Hoffmeister 1943). Unfortunately, for 35 years this object did not receive any attention, until the eclipses of HT Cas were observed by Bond. After a first analysis, Patterson (1981) called HT Cas "a Rosetta stone among dwarf novae". Since then, the literature on this star is still growing, reaching several dozens of publications. We present an orbital period determination of HT Cas during the November 2010 super-outburst, but also during a longer time span, to check its stability.

  17. Space Shuttle Orbiter auxiliary power unit status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reck, M.; Loken, G.; Horton, J.; Lukens, W.; Scott, W.; Baughman, J.; Bauch, T.

    An overview of the United States Space Shuttle Orbiter APU, which provides power to the Orbiter vehicle hydraulic system, is presented. Three complete APU systems, each with its own separate fuel system, supply power to three dedicated hydraulic systems. These in turn provide power to all Orbiter vehicle critical flight functions including launch, orbit, reentry, and landing. The basic APU logic diagram is presented. The APU includes a hydrazine-powered turbine that drives a hydraulic pump and various accessories through a high-speed gearbox. The APU also features a sophisticated thermal management system designed to ensure safe and reliable operation in the various launch, orbit, reentry, and landing environments.

  18. Astrometric Determination of VSOP-2 Orbital Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomalont, E.; Moellenbrock, G.; Claussen, M.

    2009-08-01

    VSOP-2 phase referencing, needed to image faint sources and to determine accurate positions, will require an orbit accuracy of about 2 cm at 23 GHz. This accuracy, however, may not be obtainable by direct orbital measurements. We propose an observation scheme, similar to that used at the VLBA, to be included during a phase referencing observation of about one orbit in order to determine a more accurate orbit determination. We show the effects of orbit errors, explain the suggested observations and reduction methods, and discuss the potential problems that might impede the use of this technique.

  19. Novel Surgical Approaches to the Orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Ashley A; Grob, Seanna R; Yoon, Michael K

    2015-01-01

    Determining safe surgical access to the orbit can be difficult given the complex anatomy and delicacy of the orbital structures. When considering biopsy or removal of an orbital tumor or repair of orbital fractures, careful planning is required to determine the ideal approach. Traditionally, this has at times necessitated invasive procedures with large incisions and extensive bone removal. The purpose of this review was to present newly techniques and devices in orbital surgery that have been reported over the past decade, with aims to provide better exposure and/or minimally invasive approaches and to improve morbidity and/or mortality.

  20. Holonomy invariance, orbital resonances, and kilohertz QPOs

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowicz, M A; Kluzniak, W; Thampan, A V; Wallinder, F

    2002-01-01

    Quantized orbital structures are typical for many aspects of classical gravity (Newton's as well as Einstein's). The astronomical phenomenon of orbital resonances is a well-known example. Recently, Rothman, Ellis and Murugan (2001) discussed quantized orbital structures in the novel context of a holonomy invariance of parallel transport in Schwarzschild geometry. We present here yet another example of quantization of orbits, reflecting both orbital resonances and holonomy invariance. This strong-gravity effect may already have been directly observed as the puzzling kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in the X-ray emission from a few accreting galactic black holes and several neutron stars.

  1. The harmonic structure of generic Kerr orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Grossman, Rebecca; Perez-Giz, Gabe

    2011-01-01

    Generic Kerr orbits exhibit intricate three-dimensional motion. We offer a classification scheme for these intricate orbits in terms of periodic orbits. The crucial insight is that for a given effective angular momentum $L$ and angle of inclination $\\iota$, there exists a discrete set of orbits that are geometrically $n$-leaf clovers in a precessing {\\it orbital plane}. When viewed in the full three dimensions, these orbits are periodic in $r-\\theta$. Each $n$-leaf clover is associated with a rational number, $1+q_{r\\theta}=\\omega_\\theta/\\omega_r$, that measures the degree of perihelion precession in the precessing orbital plane. The rational number $q_{r\\theta}$ varies monotonically with the orbital energy and with the orbital eccentricity. Since any bound orbit can be approximated as near one of these periodic $n$-leaf clovers, this special set offers a skeleton that illuminates the structure of all bound Kerr orbits, in or out of the equatorial plane.

  2. Orbital compression syndrome presenting as orbital cellulitis in a child with sickle cell anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douvoyiannis, Miltiadis; Fakioglu, Esra; Litman, Nathan

    2010-04-01

    Orbital bone infarction with subsequent orbital compression syndrome presenting as orbital cellulitis is reported in a child with sickle cell anemia. She deteriorated despite the use of antibiotics and improved after the surgical drainage of the collection. Radiographic findings, absence of sinusitis, hemorrhagic nature of the collection, and negative cultures all were consistent with orbital compression syndrome secondary to a vasoocclusive crisis. This condition needs to be differentiated from the more common orbital cellulitis secondary to sinusitis.

  3. Combination of absorbable mesh and demineralized bone matrix in orbital wall fracture for preventing herniation of orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tak, Kyoung Seok; Jung, Min Su; Lee, Byeong Ho; Kim, Joo Hyun; Ahn, Duk Kyun; Jeong, Hii Sun; Park, Young Kyu; Suh, In Suck

    2014-07-01

    After restoration of orbit wall fracture, preventing sequelae is important. An absorbable mesh is commonly used in orbit wall fracture, yet it has limitation due to orbit sagging when bony defect is larger than the moderate size (1 × 1 cm2). In this study, the authors present a satisfactory result in treating orbit wall fracture larger than the moderate size with a combination of absorbable mesh and demineralized bone matrix.From 2009 to 2012, 63 patients with bony defect larger than the moderate size, who were treated with a combination of absorbable mesh and demineralized bone matrix, were reviewed retrospectively. The site of bony defect, size, and applied amount of demineralized bone matrix were reviewed, and a 2-year follow-up was done. Facial computed tomography scans were checked preoperative, immediate postoperative, and 2-year postoperative.Among the 63 patients, there were 52 men and 11 women. Mean age was 33.3 years. The most common cause was blunt blow (35 cases); mean defect size was 13.36 × 12.82 mm2 in inferior wall fracture and 20.69 × 14.41 mm2 in medial wall fracture. There was no complication except for 3 cases of infraorbital nerve hypoesthesia. A 2-year follow-up computed tomography showed that the surgical site preserved bony formation without herniation. In treating moderate-sized bony defect in orbit wall fracture, absorbable mesh and demineralized bone matrix can maintain structural stability through good bony formation even after degradation of absorbable mesh.

  4. Kalman Orbit Optimized Loop Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lawrence E.; Meehan, Thomas K.

    2011-01-01

    Under certain conditions of low signal power and/or high noise, there is insufficient signal to noise ratio (SNR) to close tracking loops with individual signals on orbiting Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receivers. In addition, the processing power available from flight computers is not great enough to implement a conventional ultra-tight coupling tracking loop. This work provides a method to track GNSS signals at very low SNR without the penalty of requiring very high processor throughput to calculate the loop parameters. The Kalman Orbit-Optimized Loop (KOOL) tracking approach constitutes a filter with a dynamic model and using the aggregate of information from all tracked GNSS signals to close the tracking loop for each signal. For applications where there is not a good dynamic model, such as very low orbits where atmospheric drag models may not be adequate to achieve the required accuracy, aiding from an IMU (inertial measurement unit) or other sensor will be added. The KOOL approach is based on research JPL has done to allow signal recovery from weak and scintillating signals observed during the use of GPS signals for limb sounding of the Earth s atmosphere. That approach uses the onboard PVT (position, velocity, time) solution to generate predictions for the range, range rate, and acceleration of the low-SNR signal. The low- SNR signal data are captured by a directed open loop. KOOL builds on the previous open loop tracking by including feedback and observable generation from the weak-signal channels so that the MSR receiver will continue to track and provide PVT, range, and Doppler data, even when all channels have low SNR.

  5. Analytical slave-spin mean-field approach to orbital selective Mott insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komijani, Yashar; Kotliar, Gabriel

    2017-09-01

    We use the slave-spin mean-field approach to study particle-hole symmetric one- and two-band Hubbard models in the presence of Hund's coupling interaction. By analytical analysis of the Hamiltonian, we show that the locking of the two orbitals vs orbital selective Mott transition can be formulated within a Landau-Ginzburg framework. By applying the slave-spin mean field to impurity problems, we are able to make a correspondence between impurity and lattice. We also consider the stability of the orbital selective Mott phase to the hybridization between the orbitals and study the limitations of the slave-spin method for treating interorbital tunnelings in the case of multiorbital Bethe lattices with particle-hole symmetry.

  6. On-orbit Passive Thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Patricia A.; Winfree, William P.; Cramer, K. Elliott

    2008-01-01

    On July 12, 2006, British-born astronaut Piers Sellers became the first person to conduct thermal nondestructive evaluation experiments in space, demonstrating the feasibility of a new tool for detecting damage to the reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) structures of the Shuttle. This new tool was an EVA (Extravehicular Activity, or spacewalk) compatible infrared camera developed by NASA engineers. Data was collected both on the wing leading edge of the Orbiter and on pre-damaged samples mounted in the Shuttle s cargo bay. A total of 10 infrared movies were collected during the EVA totaling over 250 megabytes of data. Images were downloaded from the orbiting Shuttle to Johnson Space Center for analysis and processing. Results are shown to be comparable to ground-based thermal inspections performed in the laboratory with the same type of camera and simulated solar heating. The EVA camera system detected flat-bottom holes as small as 2.54cm in diameter with 50% material loss from the back (hidden) surface in RCC during this first test of the EVA IR Camera. Data for the time history of the specimen temperature and the capability of the inspection system for imaging impact damage are presented.

  7. Kepler's Constant and WDS Orbit

    CERN Document Server

    Siregar, S

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work are to find a Kepler's constant by using polynomial regression of the angular separation \\rho = \\rho(t) and the position angle \\theta = \\theta(t). The Kepler's constant obtained is used to derive the element of orbit. As a case study the angular separation and the position angle of the WDS 00063 +5826 and the WDS 04403-5857 were investigated. For calculating the element of orbit the Thiele-Innes van den Bos method is used. The rough data of the angular separation \\rho(t) and the position angle \\theta(t) are taken from the US Naval Observatory, Washington. This work also presents the masses and absolute bolometric magnitudes of each star.These stars include into the main-sequence stars with the spectral class G5V for WDS04403-5857and the type of spectrum G3V for WDS 00063+5826. The life time of the primary star and the secondary star of WDS 04403-5857 nearly equal to 20 Gyr. The life time of the primary star and the secondary star of WDS 00063+5826 are 20 Gyr and 19 Gyr, respectively.

  8. Fungal infections of the orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bipasha Mukherjee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal infections of the orbit can lead to grave complications. Although the primary site of inoculation of the infective organism is frequently the sinuses, the patients can initially present to the ophthalmologist with ocular signs and symptoms. Due to its varied and nonspecific clinical features, especially in the early stages, patients are frequently misdiagnosed and even treated with steroids which worsen the situation leading to dire consequences. Ophthalmologists should be familiar with the clinical spectrum of disease and the variable presentation of this infection, as early diagnosis and rapid institution of appropriate therapy are crucial elements in the management of this invasive sino-orbital infection. In this review, relevant clinical, microbiological, and imaging findings are discussed along with the current consensus on local and systemic management. We review the recent literature and provide a comprehensive analysis. In the immunocompromised, as well as in healthy patients, a high index of suspicion must be maintained as delay in diagnosis of fungal pathology may lead to disfiguring morbidity or even mortality. Obtaining adequate diagnostic material for pathological and microbiological examination is critical. Newer methods of therapy, particularly oral voriconazole and topical amphotericin B, may be beneficial in selected patients.

  9. Introducing the Moon's Orbital Eccentricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oostra, Benjamin

    2014-11-01

    I present a novel way to introduce the lunar orbital eccentricity in introductory astronomy courses. The Moon is perhaps the clearest illustration of the general orbital elements such as inclination, ascending node, eccentricity, perigee, and so on. Furthermore, I like the students to discover astronomical phenomena for themselves, by means of a guided exercise, rather than just telling them the facts.1 The inclination and nodes may be found by direct observation, monitoring carefully the position of the Moon among the stars. Even the regression of the nodes may be discovered in this way2 To find the eccentricity from students' observations is also possible,3 but that requires considerable time and effort. if a whole class should discover it in a short time, here is a method more suitable for a one-day class or home assignment. The level I aim at is, more or less, advanced high school or first-year college students. I assume them to be acquainted with celestial coordinates and the lunar phases, and to be able to use algebra and trigonometry.

  10. The earth orbiting space debris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi A.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The space debris population is similar to the asteroid belt, since it is subject to a process of high-velocity mutual collisions that affects the long-term evolution of its size distribution. Presently, more than 10 000 artificial debris particles with diameters larger than 10 cm (and more than 300 000 with diameters larger than 1 cm are orbiting the Earth, and are monitored and studied by a large network of sensors around the Earth. Many objects of different kind compose the space debris population, produced by different source mechanisms ranging from high energy fragmentation of large spacecraft to slow diffusion of liquid metal. The impact against a space debris is a serious risk that every spacecraft must face now and it can be evaluated with ad-hoc algorithms. The long term evolution of the whole debris population is studied with computer models allowing the simulation of all the known source and sink mechanisms. One of these codes is described in this paper and the evolution of the debris environment over the next 100 years, under different traffic scenarios, is shown, pointing out the possible measures to mitigate the growth of the orbital debris population. .

  11. Orbital variations, climate and paleoecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlein, P J; Prentice, I C

    1989-07-01

    One of the most exciting discoveries in the earth sciences in recent decades has been the proof that ice ages are governed by deterministic variations in the earth's orbit. These variations modify the latitudinal and seasonal distribution of solar radiation at periods ranging from 103 to 10(5) years, and alternately produce conditions for building and melting continental ice. The same solar radiation variations also govern other aspects of world climate, including the temperatures of the midlatitude continental interiors, the intensity of upwelling in the tropical oceans, and the strength and extent of the monsoons. The interplay of solar radiation, seasonality and ice-sheet changes is responsible for the complex ecological history documented in the fossil record of the past 20 000 years. But the orbital variations have occurred throughout earth's history, and have caused periodic environmental changes in both terrestrial and marine environments even during times when there was no ice. Species have responded to these changes by range migration, an evolved ability that may maintain their genetic coherence in the face of a continually changing environment.

  12. LROC - Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, M. S.; Eliason, E.; Hiesinger, H.; Jolliff, B. L.; McEwen, A.; Malin, M. C.; Ravine, M. A.; Thomas, P. C.; Turtle, E. P.

    2009-12-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) went into lunar orbit on 23 June 2009. The LRO Camera (LROC) acquired its first lunar images on June 30 and commenced full scale testing and commissioning on July 10. The LROC consists of two narrow-angle cameras (NACs) that provide 0.5 m scale panchromatic images over a combined 5 km swath, and a wide-angle camera (WAC) to provide images at a scale of 100 m per pixel in five visible wavelength bands (415, 566, 604, 643, and 689 nm) and 400 m per pixel in two ultraviolet bands (321 nm and 360 nm) from the nominal 50 km orbit. Early operations were designed to test the performance of the cameras under all nominal operating conditions and provided a baseline for future calibrations. Test sequences included off-nadir slews to image stars and the Earth, 90° yaw sequences to collect flat field calibration data, night imaging for background characterization, and systematic mapping to test performance. LRO initially was placed into a terminator orbit resulting in images acquired under low signal conditions. Over the next three months the incidence angle at the spacecraft’s equator crossing gradually decreased towards high noon, providing a range of illumination conditions. Several hundred south polar images were collected in support of impact site selection for the LCROSS mission; details can be seen in many of the shadows. Commissioning phase images not only proved the instruments’ overall performance was nominal, but also that many geologic features of the lunar surface are well preserved at the meter-scale. Of particular note is the variety of impact-induced morphologies preserved in a near pristine state in and around kilometer-scale and larger young Copernican age impact craters that include: abundant evidence of impact melt of a variety of rheological properties, including coherent flows with surface textures and planimetric properties reflecting supersolidus (e.g., liquid melt) emplacement, blocks delicately perched on

  13. Long-term evolution of navigation satellite orbits: GPS/GLONASS/GALILEO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, C.; Gick, R.

    Earlier studies conducted a The Aerospace Corporation discovered that the GPSt Block II satellites placed in disposal orbits can eventually, perhaps in 20 to 40 years, reenter into the operating constellation. This is because the disposal orbits, while circular initially, evolve int o orbits with significant eccentricity mostly as the result of sun-moon gravitational perturbations. Options of minimizing the eccentricity growth include reducing initial eccentricity of the disposal orbit and inserting into an orbit with a favorable argument of perigee. A recent study was performed to examine whether the same long-term eccentricity evolution exists for the disposal orbits of other navigation satellite systems such as GLONASS and GALILEO. The non-operational GPS Block I satellites are included in the study as well, because the orbits are at 63.4 deg inclination, which is different from that of the GPS Block II satellites. Similar to the earlier studies, long-term perturbations and stability of these orbits were understood through analytical and numerical investigations. Two-hundred-year semi-analytic integration revealed interesting facts about the orbit stability. Initially near circular, these types of orbits may evolve into orbits with large eccentricity (as much as 0.7 over 150 years). Analytical approximations through doubly-averaged equations reveal that the cause is due to the resonance induced by Sun/moon and J2 secular perturbations. A total of 113 non-operational GLONASS satellites and upper stages and 10 GPS/Block I satellites were propagated for 200 years using a high-precision semi-analytical propagator (MEANPROP). Results show that the GLONASS satellites will start to enter the operating GPS constellation after 40 years. The uncovered resonance effect is strongly dependent on o bit inclination and altitude. The effect becomes morer pronounced for GALILEO orbits due to a higher altitude, 3000 km above GPS. Strategies to minimize the significant

  14. LLOFX earth orbit to lunar orbit delta V estimation program user and technical documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    The LLOFX computer program calculates in-plane trajectories from an Earth-orbiting space station to Lunar orbit in such a way that the journey requires only two delta V burns (one to leave Earth circular orbit and one to circularize into Lunar orbit). The program requires the user to supply the Space Station altitude and Lunar orbit altitude (in km above the surface), and the desired time of flight for the transfer (in hours). It then determines and displays the trans-Lunar injection (TLI) delta V required to achieve the transfer, the Lunar orbit insertion (LOI) delta V required to circularize the orbit around the Moon, the actual time of flight, and whether the transfer orbit is elliptical or hyperbolic. Return information is also displayed. Finally, a plot of the transfer orbit is displayed.

  15. Synchronization and Antisynchronization of a Planar Oscillation of Satellite in an Elliptic Orbit via Active Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Shahzad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the synchronization and antisynchronization behaviour of two identical planar oscillation of a satellite in elliptic orbit evolving from different initial conditions using the active control technique based on the Lyapunov stability theory and the Routh-Hurwitz criteria. The designed controller, with our own choice of the coefficient matrix of the error dynamics that satisfy the Lyapunov stability theory and the Routh-Hurwitz criteria, is found to be effective in the stabilization of the error states at the origin, thereby, achieving synchronization and antisynchronization between the states variables of two nonlinear dynamical systems under consideration. The results are validated by numerical simulations using mathematica.

  16. Analytical representations of precise orbit predictions for Earth orbiting space objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Jizhang; Li, Bin; Chen, Junyu; Zhang, Pin; Ning, Jinsheng

    2017-01-01

    Accurate orbits of Earth orbiting space objects are usually generated from an orbit determination/prediction process using numerical integrators, and presented to users in a tabulated form or a state vector including force model parameters. When dealing with hundreds of thousands of space objects such as in the space conjunction assessment, the memory required for the tabulated orbits or the computing time for propagating orbits using the state vector are both confronting to users. This paper presents two methods of analytically representing numerical orbits considering the accuracy, computing efficiency and memory. The first one is a two-step TLE-based method in which the numerical orbits are first fitted into a TLE set and then correction functions are applied to improve the position accuracy. In the second method, the orbit states are represented in equinoctial elements first, and then again correction functions are applied to reduce the position errors. Experiments using six satellite laser ranging (SLR) satellites and 12 debris objects with accurate orbits show that both methods can represent the accurate orbits over 5 days in an accuracy of a few dozens of meters for the circular orbits and several hundred meters for the eccentric orbits. The computing time is similar to that using the NORAD TLE/SGP4 algorithm, and storage for the orbit elements and function coefficients is about 3-5 KB. These features could make the two methods beneficial for the maintenance of orbit catalog of large numbers of space objects.

  17. Homoclinic Bifurcation of Orbit Flip with Resonant Principal Eigenvalues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian Si ZHANG; De Ming ZHU

    2006-01-01

    Codimension-3 bifurcations of an orbit-flip homoclinic orbit with resonant principal eigenvalues are studied for a four-dimensional system. The existence, number, co-existence and non-coexistence of 1-homoclinic orbit, 1-periodic orbit, 2n-homoclinic orbit and 2n-periodic orbit are obtained. The bifurcation surfaces and existence regions are also given.

  18. Degenerate Orbit Flip Homoclinic Bifurcations with Higher Dimensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ran Chao WU; Jian Hua SUN

    2006-01-01

    Bifurcations of a degenerate homoclinic orbit with orbit flip in high dimensional system are existence and uniqueness of 1-homoclinic orbit and 1-periodic orbit are given. Also considered is the existence of 2-homoclinic orbit and 2-periodic orbit. In additon, the corresponding bifurcation surfaces are given.

  19. Radial orbital anisotropy and the Fundamental Plane of elliptical galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Nipoti, C; Ciotti, L; Nipoti, Carlo; Londrillo, Pasquale; Ciotti, Luca

    2002-01-01

    The existence of the Fundamental Plane (FP) imposes strong constraints on the structure and dynamics of elliptical galaxies, and thus contains important information on the processes of their formation and evolution. Here we focus on the relations between the FP thinness and tilt and the amount of radial orbital anisotropy. By using N-body simulations of galaxy models characterized by observationally motivated density profiles, and also allowing for the presence of live, massive dark matter halos, we explore the impact of radial orbital anisotropy and instability on the FP properties. The numerical results confirm a previous semi--analytical finding: the requirement of stability matches almost exactly the thinness of the FP. In other words, galaxy models that are radially anisotropic enough to be found outside the observed FP (with their isotropic parent models lying on the FP) are unstable, and their end--products fall back on the FP itself. We also find that a systematic increase of radial orbit anisotropy w...

  20. MODIS On-Orbit Performance and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Salomonson, Vince

    2011-01-01

    MODIS is a key instrument for the NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) and has successfully operated for more than 11 and 9 years, respectively, on-board the Terra and Aqua spacecraft. MODIS collects data in 36 spectral bands, covering wavelengths from visible (VIS) to long-wave infrared (LWIR). To date, both Terra and Aqua MODIS have produced an unprecedented amount of data products and significantly contributed to the earth remote sensing studies and applications. MODIS was developed with stringent calibration requirements and was, consequently, designed and built with a set of on-board calibrators (OBC), which include a solar diffuser (SD), a solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM), a blackbody (BB), and a spectroradiometric calibration assembly (SRCA). This presentation briefly reviews MODIS instrument operation and various calibration and characterization activities, It demonstrates both the instrument and the OBC on-orbit performance and discusses lessons learned, particularly focusing on on-orbit changes in sensor responses, optics degradation, and major challenging issues. As expected, Terra and Aqua MODIS on-orbit performance and lessons learned will continue to benefit the operation and calibration of future sensors, such as NPP/JPSS VIIRS and GOES-R ABI.

  1. Long-term Stability of Planets in the α Centauri System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarles, B.; Lissauer, Jack J.

    2016-05-01

    We evaluate the extent of the regions within the α Centauri AB star system where small planets are able to orbit for billion-year timescales, and we calculate the positions on the sky plane where planets on stable orbits about either stellar component may appear. We confirm the qualitative results of Wiegert and Holman (AJ 113, 1445, 1997) regarding the approximate size of the regions of stable orbits, which are larger for retrograde orbits relative to the binary than for prograde orbits. Additionally, we find that mean motion resonances with the binary orbit leave an imprint on the limits of orbital stability, and the effects of the Lidov-Kozai mechanism are also readily apparent.

  2. Long-Term Stability of Planets in the $\\alpha$ Centauri System

    CERN Document Server

    Quarles, Billy

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate the extent of the regions within the $\\alpha$ Centauri AB star system where small planets are able to orbit for billion-year timescales, and we calculate the positions on the sky plane where planets on stable orbits about either stellar component may appear. We confirm the qualitative results of Wiegert and Holman (AJ 113, 1445, 1997) regarding the approximate size of the regions of stable orbits, which are larger for retrograde orbits relative to the binary than for prograde orbits. Additionally, we find that mean motion resonances with the binary orbit leave an imprint on the limits of orbital stability, and the effects of the Lidov-Kozai mechanism are also readily apparent.

  3. Continuation of Sets of Constrained Orbit Segments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schilder, Frank; Brøns, Morten; Chamoun, George Chaouki

    Sets of constrained orbit segments of time continuous flows are collections of trajectories that represent a whole or parts of an invariant set. A non-trivial but simple example is a homoclinic orbit. A typical representation of this set consists of an equilibrium point of the flow and a trajecto...... orbit segments, this is very disadvantageous in practice. In this talk we will present an algorithm that allows the efficient continuation of sets of constrained orbit segments together with the solution of the full variational problem.......Sets of constrained orbit segments of time continuous flows are collections of trajectories that represent a whole or parts of an invariant set. A non-trivial but simple example is a homoclinic orbit. A typical representation of this set consists of an equilibrium point of the flow and a trajectory...

  4. Orbital behavior around a nonuniform celestial body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosson, Z.; Hall, F.; Vogel, T.

    2016-09-01

    To effectively model the orbit around a nonuniform celestial body, detailed information needs to be determined of the perturbations. This research looked at one of the most crucial perturbations: the nonuniform gravitational field of a celestial body. Given an orbiting particle (a satellite), we utilized numerical methods to calculate its orbit in two dimensions around a discretized center mass structure. The gravitational acceleration imposed on the particle due to each mass point sums vectorally as the particle completes each infinitesimal time step of one orbit. There are noticeable effects on the orbit as the conditions of the center mass change. The development of a simulation code allows for the modelling of the orbit about an irregular body with satisfactory accuracy.

  5. Electronic structure interpolation via atomic orbitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mohan; Guo, G-C; He, Lixin

    2011-08-17

    We present an efficient scheme for accurate electronic structure interpolation based on systematically improvable optimized atomic orbitals. The atomic orbitals are generated by minimizing the spillage value between the atomic basis calculations and the converged plane wave basis calculations on some coarse k-point grid. They are then used to calculate the band structure of the full Brillouin zone using the linear combination of atomic orbitals algorithms. We find that usually 16-25 orbitals per atom can give an accuracy of about 10 meV compared to the full ab initio calculations, and the accuracy can be systematically improved by using more atomic orbitals. The scheme is easy to implement and robust, and works equally well for metallic systems and systems with complicated band structures. Furthermore, the atomic orbitals have much better transferability than Shirley's basis and Wannier functions, which is very useful for perturbation calculations.

  6. On Orbital Period Changes in Nova Outbursts

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Rebecca G; Schaefer, Bradley E

    2011-01-01

    We propose a new mechanism that produces an orbital period change during a nova outburst. When the ejected material carries away the specific angular momentum of the white dwarf, the orbital period increases. A magnetic field on the surface of the secondary star forces a fraction of the ejected material to corotate with the star, and hence the binary system. The ejected material thus takes angular momentum from the binary orbit and the orbital period decreases. We show that for sufficiently strong magnetic fields on the surface of the secondary star, the total change to the orbital period could even be negative during a nova outburst, contrary to previous expectations. Accurate determinations of pre- and post-outburst orbital periods of recurrent nova systems could test the new mechanism, in addition to providing meaningful constraints on otherwise difficult to measure physical quantities. We apply our mechanism to outbursts of the recurrent nova U Sco.

  7. The nu Andromedae System: Models and Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepinski, Tomasz F.; Malhotra, Renu; Black, David C.

    2000-01-01

    Radial velocity observations of the F8 V star nu Andromedae taken at Lick and at Whipple Observatories have revealed evidence of three periodicities in the line-of-sight velocity of the star. These periodicities have been interpreted as evidence for at least three low-mass companions (LMCs) revolving around nu Andromedae. The mass and orbital parameters inferred for these companions raise questions about the dynamical stability of the system. We report here results from our independent analysis of the published radial velocity data, as well as new unpublished data taken at Lick Observatory. Our results confirm the finding of three periods in the data. Our best fits to the data, on the assumption that these periods arise from the gravitational perturbations of companions in Keplerian orbits, are also generally in agreement but with some differences from the earlier findings. We find that the available data do not constrain well the orbital eccentricity of the middle companion in a three-companion model of the data. We also find that in order for our best-fit model to the Lick data to be dynamically stable over the lifetime of the star (approximately 2 billion years), the system must have a mean inclination to the plane of the sky greater than 13 deg. The corresponding minimum inclination for the best fit to the Whipple data set is 19 deg. These values imply that the maximum mass for the outer companion can be no greater than about 20 Jupiter masses. Our analysis of the stability of the putative systems also places constraints on the relative inclinations of the orbital planes of the companions. We comment on global versus local (i.e., method of steepest descent) means of finding best-fit orbits from radial velocity data sets.

  8. Longitudinal dynamic stability of a shuttle vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinh, N. X.; Laitone, E. V.

    1972-01-01

    Analytical study of the longitudinal dynamic stability of a nonrolling, lifting vehicle gliding at hypersonic speeds. The analysis applies to shuttle vehicles designed for operating up to the rim of a planetary atmosphere. A general nondimensional time transformation is introduced to derive a unified second-order linear differential equation for the angle of attack, valid for all types of reentry of a general type of vehicle. The stability of motion is discussed for two fundamental regimes of flight that are based on widely different assumptions. For near ballistic entry along a straight line trajectory, the equation reduces to a confluent hypergeometric equation, the solution of which can be expressed in terms of Whittaker's function. Using a theorem in the theory of stability of differential equations, criteria for damped oscillations are derived. It is shown that the aerodynamic criteria for stability are the same as for the case of ballistic entry. In addition, for each vehicle configuration, and specified planetary atmosphere, there exists an altitude range where the angle of attack frequency is nearly equal to the orbital frequency causing instability in pitch. This resonance instability is due to the ellipticity of the orbit. Criteria for eccentricity instability are derived.

  9. High Precision Orbit Determination of CHAMP Satellite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Qile; LIU Jingnan; GE Maorong

    2006-01-01

    The precision orbit determination of challenging minisatellite payload(CHAMP) satellite was done based on position and navigation data analyst(PANDA) software which is developed in Wuhan University, using the onboard GPS data of year 2002 from day 126 to 131. The orbit accuracy was assessed by analyzing the difference from GFZ post-processed science orbits (PSO), the GPS carrier and pseudo-range data residuals and the satellite laser ranging (SLR) residuals.

  10. Wavefunction Intensity Statistics from Unstable Periodic Orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, L

    1998-01-01

    We examine the effect of short unstable periodic orbits on wavefunction statistics in a classically chaotic system, and find that the tail of the wavefunction intensity distribution in phase space is dominated by scarring associated with the least unstable periodic orbits. In an ensemble average over systems with classical orbits of different instabilities, a power law tail is found, in sharp contrast to the exponential prediction of random matrix theory. The calculations are compared with numerical data and quantitative agreement is obtained

  11. Mercury's resonant rotation from secular orbital elements

    OpenAIRE

    Stark, Alexander; Oberst, Jürgen; Hussmann, Hauke

    2015-01-01

    We used recently produced Solar System ephemerides, which incorporate 2 years of ranging observations to the MESSENGER spacecraft, to extract the secular orbital elements for Mercury and associated uncertainties. As Mercury is in a stable 3:2 spin-orbit resonance, these values constitute an important reference for the planet’s measured rotational parameters, which in turn strongly bear on physical interpretation of Mercury’s interior structure. In particular, we derive a mean orbital period o...

  12. Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the orbit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shetty S

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH accounts for less than 1% of all orbital tumours. Though rare, orbital involvement in LCH is not uncommon. Most reports so far have been in Western literature. We report here a case of LCH of orbit with intracranial extension. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of single system multifocal LCH reported from India.

  13. The Atomic orbitals of the topological atom

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos-Cordoba, Eloy; Salvador Sedano, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    The effective atomic orbitals have been realized in the framework of Bader's atoms in molecules theory for a general wavefunction. This formalism can be used to retrieve from any type of calculation a proper set of orthonormalized numerical atomic orbitals, with occupation numbers that sum up to the respective Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) atomic populations. Experience shows that only a limited number of effective atomic orbitals exhibit significant occupation numbers. These c...

  14. Growth and development of the orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Aaron J; Kahn, David

    2012-11-01

    Every surgeon operating on the face, and particularly around the eye, should possess a working knowledge of the critical details related to development of the human orbit and recognized changes that occur during the course of aging. The anatomy of the orbit and periorbital region is complex, and the diagnosis and treatment of patients with orbital/periorbital disease requires expertise in congenital differences and awareness of the changes that occur as individuals age.

  15. Semiclassical quantization with short periodic orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Vergini, E G; Vergini, Eduardo G.; Carlo, Gabriel

    2000-01-01

    We apply a recently developed semiclassical theory of short peridic orbits to the stadium billiard. We give explicit expresions for the resonances of periodic orbits and for the application of the semiclassical Hamiltonian operator to them. Then, by using the 3 shortest periodic orbits and 2 more living in the bouncing ball region, we obtain the first 25 odd-odd eigenfunctions with surprising accuracy.

  16. SMOS Instrument Performance and Calibration after 3 Years in Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Neira, Manuel; Corbella, Ignasi; Torres, Francesc; Kainulainen, Juha; Oliva, Roger; Closa, Josep; Cabot, François; Castro, Rita; Barbosa, Jose; Gutierrez, Antonio; Anterrieu, Eric; Tenerelli, Joe; Martin-Porqueras, Fernando; Buenadicha, Guillermo; Delwart, Steven; Crapolicchio, Raffaele; Suess, Martin

    2013-04-01

    ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission has been in orbit for already over 3 years which has allowed the calibration and data processing team consolidating both the calibration strategy and the Level-1 processor which transforms the raw visibility samples into polarimetric brightness temperature images. The payload on board SMOS, MIRAS, is quite unique in that it is the first microwave radiometer in space ever capable to generate wide field of view images at every snapshot measurement. This means that most of the calibration as well as image processing techniques are being developed for the first time with little heritage from any previous space mission. Issues intrinsically attached to its wide field of view such as spatial ripples across the snapshot images are particular to MIRAS and to no other earlier radiometer. Even the fundamental theory behind the instrument was put at test, first on ground inside an electromagnetic compatibility chamber, and now in orbit when imaging the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation of the cold sky. A groundbreaking effort is being carried out by the SMOS project team to understand and master all calibration and image reconstruction issues of this novel microwave interferometer payload. MIRAS in-orbit performance is driven by the amplitude of spatial ripples across the image and orbital and seasonal radiometer stability. Spatial ripples are unique to interferometric radiometers and are produced by (a) a limited knowledge of the antenna patterns and, in general, of the model of the instrument, (b) some fundamental limitations related to the inverse problem of image reconstruction in undetermined conditions and (c) subtle data processing inconsistencies which are discovered and corrected. To reduce the spatial ripples sea surface salinity retrievals are performed by first removing the brightness temperature spatial errors using a uniform region of the Pacific Ocean. However soil moisture retrievals cannot benefit of

  17. Orbit IMU alignment: Error analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corson, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    A comprehensive accuracy analysis of orbit inertial measurement unit (IMU) alignments using the shuttle star trackers was completed and the results are presented. Monte Carlo techniques were used in a computer simulation of the IMU alignment hardware and software systems to: (1) determine the expected Space Transportation System 1 Flight (STS-1) manual mode IMU alignment accuracy; (2) investigate the accuracy of alignments in later shuttle flights when the automatic mode of star acquisition may be used; and (3) verify that an analytical model previously used for estimating the alignment error is a valid model. The analysis results do not differ significantly from expectations. The standard deviation in the IMU alignment error for STS-1 alignments was determined to the 68 arc seconds per axis. This corresponds to a 99.7% probability that the magnitude of the total alignment error is less than 258 arc seconds.

  18. The Orbital Workshop Shower Compartment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    This photograph shows technicians performing a checkout of the Metabolic Analyzer (center background) and the Ergometer (foreground) in the Orbital Workshop (OWS). The shower compartment is at right. The Ergometer (Skylab Experiment M171) evaluated man's metabolic effectiveness and cost of work in space environment. Located in the experiment and work area of the OWS, the shower compartment was a cylindrical cloth enclosure that was folded flat when not in use. The bottom ring of the shower was fastened to the floor and contained foot restraints. The upper ring contained the shower head and hose. To use the shower, the astronaut filled a pressurized portable bottle with heated water and attached the bottle to the ceiling. A flexible hose cornected the water bottle to a handheld shower head. The astronaut pulled the cylindrical shower wall up into position and bathed, using liquid soap. Both soap and water were carefully rationed, having been premeasured for economical use.

  19. Airbreathing Acceleration Toward Earth Orbit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, J C

    2007-05-09

    As flight speed increases, aerodynamic drag rises more sharply than the availability of atmospheric oxygen. The ratio of oxygen mass flux to dynamic pressure cannot be improved by changing altitude. The maximum possible speed for airbreathing propulsion is limited by the ratio of air capture area to vehicle drag area, approximately Mach 6 at equal areas. Simulation of vehicle acceleration shows that the use of atmospheric oxygen offers a significant potential for minimizing onboard consumables at low speeds. These fundamental calculations indicate that a practical airbreathing launch vehicle would accelerate to near steady-state speed while consuming only onboard fuel, then transition to rocket propulsion. It is suggested that an aircraft carrying a rocket-propelled vehicle to approximately Mach 5 could be a realistic technical goal toward improving access to orbit.

  20. Phonons with orbital angular momentum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayub, M. K. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, P. O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); National Centre for Physics, Shahdra Valley Road, Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Ali, S. [National Centre for Physics, Shahdra Valley Road, Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Mendonca, J. T. [IPFN, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2011-10-15

    Ion accoustic waves or phonon modes are studied with orbital angular momentum (OAM) in an unmagnetized collissionless uniform plasma, whose constituents are the Boltzmann electrons and inertial ions. For this purpose, we have employed the fluid equations to obtain a paraxial equation in terms of ion density perturbations and discussed its Gaussian beam and Laguerre-Gauss (LG) beam solutions. Furthermore, an approximate solution for the electrostatic potential problem is presented, allowing to express the components of the electric field in terms of LG potential perturbations. The energy flux due to phonons is also calculated and the corresponding OAM is derived. Numerically, it is shown that the parameters such as azimuthal angle, radial and angular mode numbers, and beam waist, strongly modify the profiles of the phonon LG potential. The present results should be helpful in understanding the phonon mode excitations produced by Brillouin backscattering of laser beams in a uniform plasma.

  1. The orbital TUS detector simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinyuk, A.; Grebenyuk, V.; Khrenov, B.; Klimov, P.; Lavrova, M.; Panasyuk, M.; Sharakin, S.; Shirokov, A.; Tkachenko, A.; Tkachev, L.; Yashin, I.

    2017-04-01

    The TUS space experiment is aimed at studying energy and arrival distribution of UHECR at E > 7 × 1019 eV by using the data of EAS fluorescent radiation in atmosphere. The TUS mission was launched at the end of April 2016 on board the dedicated ;Lomonosov; satellite. The TUSSIM software package has been developed to simulate performance of the TUS detector for the Fresnel mirror optical parameters, the light concentrator of the photo detector, the front end and trigger electronics. Trigger efficiency crucially depends on the background level which varies in a wide range: from 0.2 × 106 to 15 × 106 ph/(m2 μ s sr) at moonless and full moon nights respectively. The TUSSIM algorithms are described and the expected TUS statistics is presented for 5 years of data collection from the 500 km solar-synchronized orbit with allowance for the variability of the background light intensity during the space flight.

  2. Orbital cysticercosis: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damani, Mehul; Mehta, Vinod C.; Baile, Rahul B.; Nakwa, Bhalachandra

    2012-01-01

    A 22 years old male presented to us with a history of lid swelling and chemosis of conjunctiva since 2 days. The patient had a history of convulsions 4 days back and 2 months back. The patient had undergone a CT scan which showed granulomas in temporal and parietal lobes. The patient was started on Anti tuberculosis treatment by the Physician. The Patient underwent USG B scan which revealed cysticercosis cyst in the anterior orbit inferiorly .The patient was treated with albendazole and wysolone for a month. The patient was reviewed after 1 month .The lesion resolved with the treatment both clinically and on USG. PMID:23961034

  3. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Wrapper Script

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladden, Roy; Fisher, Forest; Khanampornpan, Teerapat

    2008-01-01

    The MRO OLVM wrapper script software allows Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) sequence and spacecraft engineers to rapidly simulate a spacecraft command product through a tool that simulates the onboard sequence management software (OLVM). This script parses sequence files to determine the appropriate time boundaries for the sequence, and constructs the script file to be executed by OLVM to span the entirety of the designated sequence. It then constructs script files to be executed by OLVM, constructs the appropriate file directories, populates these directories with needed input files, initiates OLVM to simulate the actual command product that will be sent to the spacecraft, and captures the results of the simulation run to an external file for later review. Additionally, the tool allows a user to manually construct the script, if desired, and then execute the script with a simple command line.

  4. Spin-orbit-coupled superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Shun-Tsung; Lin, Shih-Wei; Wang, Yi-Ting; Lin, Sheng-Di; Liang, C-T

    2014-06-25

    Superconductivity and spin-orbit (SO) interaction have been two separate emerging fields until very recently that the correlation between them seemed to be observed. However, previous experiments concerning SO coupling are performed far beyond the superconducting state and thus a direct demonstration of how SO coupling affects superconductivity remains elusive. Here we investigate the SO coupling in the critical region of superconducting transition on Al nanofilms, in which the strength of disorder and spin relaxation by SO coupling are changed by varying the film thickness. At temperatures T sufficiently above the superconducting critical temperature T(c), clear signature of SO coupling reveals itself in showing a magneto-resistivity peak. When T superconductivity. By studying such magneto-resistivity peaks under different strength of spin relaxation, we highlight the important effects of SO interaction on superconductivity.

  5. Managing resonant trapped orbits in our Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Binney, James

    2016-01-01

    Galaxy modelling is greatly simplified by assuming the existence of a global system of angle-action coordinates. Unfortunately, global angle-action coordinates do not exist because some orbits become trapped by resonances, especially where the radial and vertical frequencies coincide. We show that in a realistic Galactic potential such trapping occurs only on thick-disc and halo orbits (speed relative to the guiding centre >~80 km/s). We explain how the Torus Mapper code (TM) behaves in regions of phase space in which orbits are resonantly trapped, and we extend TM so trapped orbits can be manipulated as easily as untrapped ones. The impact that the resonance has on the structure of velocity space depends on the weights assigned to trapped orbits. The impact is everywhere small if each trapped orbit is assigned the phase space density equal to the time average along the orbit of the DF for untrapped orbits. The impact could be significant with a different assignment of weights to trapped orbits.

  6. Impulsive orbit control for spacecraft around asteroid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔祜涛; 崔平远; 栾恩杰

    2003-01-01

    An impulse feedback control law to change the mean orbit elements of spacecraft around asteroid is presented. First, the mean orbit elements are transferred to the osculating orbit elements at the burning time.Then, the feedback control law based on Gauss' s perturbation equations of motion is given. And the impulse control for targeting from the higher circulation orbit to the specified periapsis is developed. Finally, the numerical simulation is performed and the simulation results show that the presented impulse control law is effective.

  7. The fundamental group of the orbit space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hattab Hawete

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Let G be a subgroup of the group Homeo(X of homeomorphisms of a topological space X. Let G¯$\\bar G$ be the closure of G in Homeo(X. The class of an orbit O of G is the union of all orbits having the same closure as O. We denote by X/G˜$X/\\widetildeG$ the space of classes of orbits called the orbit class space. In this paper, we study the fundamental group of the spaces X/G, X/G¯$X/\\bar G$ and X/G˜$X/\\widetildeG$

  8. Primary orbital neuroblastoma in a neonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirzai Hasan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma is an undifferentiated malignant tumor of the primitive neuroblasts. Orbital neuroblastoma is typically a metastatic tumor. We describe a two-days-old girl, who presented with a large tumor in her left orbit. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed that the tumor originated from the retrobulbar area, extending into the upper and lateral orbit. She was operated on the fifth day of life. A histopathologic diagnosis of neuroblastoma was made. Medical evaluation including chest roentgenogram, ultrasonography of the abdomen, whole body computerized tomogram and bone scintigraphy showed no evidence of systemic involvement or metastasis. Neuroblastoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of neonatal orbital tumors.

  9. Sun-synchronous satellite orbit determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Der-Ming; Zhai, Shen-You

    2004-02-01

    The linearized dynamic equations used for on-board orbit determination of Sun-synchronous satellite are derived. Sun-synchronous orbits are orbits with the secular rate of the right ascension of the ascending node equal to the right ascension rate of the mean sun. Therefore the orbit is no more a closed circle but a tight helix about the Earth. In the paper, instead of treating the orbit as a closed circle, the actual helix orbit is taken as nominal trajectory. The details of the linearized equations of motion for the satellite in the Sun-synchronous orbit are derived. The linearized equations are obtained by perturbing the Keplerian motion with the J2 correction and the effect of sun's attraction being neglected. Combined with the GPS navigation equations, the Kalman filter formulation is given. The particular application considered is the circular Sun-synchronous orbit with the altitude of 800 km and inclination of 98.6°. The numerical example simulated by MATLAB® shows that only the pseudo-range data used in the algorithm still gives acceptable results. Based on the simulation results, we can use the on-board GPS receivers' signal only as an alternative to determine the orbit of Sun-Synchronous satellite and therefore circumvents the need for extensive ground support.

  10. Frontal mucocele with an accompanying orbital abscess mimicking a fronto-orbital mucocele: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akkuzu Guzin

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mucoceles are slowly expanding cystic lesions with respiratory epithelium containing mucus most commonly affecting the frontal and ethmoidal sinuses. They are caused by obstruction of sinus ostium. Mucoceles exert pressure on the bony boundaries and due to the proximity to the brain and orbit extension to these areas are common. Case presentation A case of a frontal mucocele with an accompanying orbital abscess mimicking a fronto-orbital mucocele is reported. A 77 year old female patient suffering from left sided proptosis and pain around the left eye was admitted to our department. She had a history of left frontal sinus mucocele one year ago that was offered an osteoplastic frontal sinus surgery that the patient refused. Patient had limitation of eye movements. Fundoscopic examination revealed a minimal papilledema. Coronal computerized tomography and orbital magnetic resonance imaging showed a frontal mucocele with suspicious erosion of the orbital roof and a superiorly localized extraconal mass displacing the orbit lateroinferiorly. Frontal and orbital masses had similar intensities. Thus surgery was planned for a fronto-orbital mucocele. During surgery no defect was found on the orbital roof. Frontal mucocele and orbital cystic mass was removed separately. Pathological examination showed a frontal mucocele and an orbital abscess wall. Postoperatively eye movements returned to normal and papilledema resolved. Conclusion Fronto-orbital mucoceles are commonly encountered pathologies, but frontal mucocele with an orbital abscess is a rarely seen and should be kept in mind because their treatments differ.

  11. Direct Detection and Orbit Analysis of the Exoplanets HR 8799 bcd from Archival 2005 Keck/NIRC2 Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Thayne; Fukagawa, Misato; Thalmann, Christian; Matsumura, Soko; Plavchan, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We present previously unpublished July 2005 H-band coronagraphic data of the young, planet-hosting star HR 8799 from the newly-released Keck/NIRC2 archive. Despite poor observing conditions, we detect three of the planets (HR 8799 bcd), two of them (HR 8799 bc) without advanced image processing. Comparing these data with previously published 1998-2011 astrometry and that from re-reduced October 2010 Keck data constrains the orbits of the planets. Analyzing the planets' astrometry separately, HR 8799 d's orbit is likely inclined at least 25 deg from face-on and the others may be on in inclined orbits. For semimajor axis ratios consistent with a 4:2:1 mean-motion resonance our analysis yields precise values for HR 8799 bcd's orbital parameters and strictly constrains the planets' eccentricities to be less than 0.18-0.3. However, we find no acceptable orbital solutions with this resonance that place the planets in face-on orbits; HR 8799 d shows the largest deviation from such orbits. Moreover, few orbits make HR 8799 d coplanar with b and c, whereas dynamical stability analyses used to constrain the planets' masses typically assume coplanar and/or fare.on orbits. This paper illustrates the significant science gain enabled with the release of the NIRC2 archive.

  12. The effects of oblateness and solar radiation pressure on halo orbits in the photogravitational Sun-Earth system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Vineet K.; Kumar, Jai; Kushvah, Badam Singh

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we construct a third-order analytic approximate solution using the Lindstedt-Poincare method in the photogravitational circular restricted three body problem considering the Sun as a radiating source and the Earth as an oblate spheroid for computing halo orbits around the collinear Lagrangian points L1 and L2. Further, the well-known differential correction and continuation schemes are used to compute halo orbits and their families numerically. The effects of solar radiation pressure and oblateness on the orbit are studied around both Lagrangian points. From the study, it is noticed that time period of the halo orbit increases around L1 and L2 accounting oblateness of the Earth and solar radiation pressure of the Sun. It is also found that stability of halo orbits is a weak function of the out-of-plane amplitude and mass reduction factor.

  13. Accumulation of unstable periodic orbits and the stickiness in the two-dimensional piecewise linear map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaishi, A.; Shudo, A.

    2009-12-01

    We investigate the stickiness of the two-dimensional piecewise linear map with a family of marginal unstable periodic orbits (FMUPOs), and show that a series of unstable periodic orbits accumulating to FMUPOs plays a significant role to give rise to the power law correlation of trajectories. We can explicitly specify the sticky zone in which unstable periodic orbits whose stability increases algebraically exist, and find that there exists a hierarchy in accumulating periodic orbits. In particular, the periodic orbits with linearly increasing stability play the role of fundamental cycles as in the hyperbolic systems, which allows us to apply the method of cycle expansion. We also study the recurrence time distribution, especially discussing the position and size of the recurrence region. Following the definition adopted in one-dimensional maps, we show that the recurrence time distribution has an exponential part in the short time regime and an asymptotic power law part. The analysis on the crossover time Tc∗ between these two regimes implies Tc∗˜-log[μ(R)] where μ(R) denotes the area of the recurrence region.

  14. FIRST BEAM TESTS OF THE APS MBA UPGRADE ORBIT FEEDBACK CONTROLLER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sereno, N. S.; Arnold, N.; Brill, A.; Bui, H.; Carwardine, J.; Decker, G.; Deriy, B.; Emery, L.; Farnsworth, R.; Fors, T.; Keane, R.; Lenkszus, F.; Lill, R.; Paskvan, D.; Pietryla, A.; Shang, H.; Shoaf, S.; Veseli, S.; Wang, J.; Xu, S.; Yang, B.X.

    2017-03-25

    The new orbit feedback system required for the APS multi-bend acromat (MBA) ring must meet challenging beam stability requirements. The AC stability requirement is to correct rms beam motion to 10 % the rms beam size at the insertion device source points from 0.01 to 1000 Hz. The vertical plane represents the biggest challenge for AC stability which is required to be 400 nm rms for a 4 micron vertical beam size. In addition long term drift over a period of 7 days is required to be 1 micron or less at insertion de- vice BPMs and 2 microns for arc bpms. We present test re- sults of theMBA prototype orbit feedback controller (FBC) in the APS storage ring. In this test, four insertion device BPMs were configured to send data to the FBC for process- ing into four fast corrector setpoints. The configuration of four bpms and four fast correctors creates a 4-bump and the configuration of fast correctors is similar to what will be implemented in the MBA ring. We report on performance benefits of increasing the sampling rate by a factor of 15 to 22.6 kHz over the existing APS orbit feedback system, lim- itations due to existing storage ring hardware and extrapo- lation to theMBA orbit feedback design. FBC architecture, signal flow and processing design will also be discussed.

  15. Plutonium inventories for stabilization and stabilized materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, A.K.

    1996-05-01

    The objective of the breakout session was to identify characteristics of materials containing plutonium, the need to stabilize these materials for storage, and plans to accomplish the stabilization activities. All current stabilization activities are driven by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 94-1 (May 26, 1994) and by the recently completed Plutonium ES&H Vulnerability Assessment (DOE-EH-0415). The Implementation Plan for accomplishing stabilization of plutonium-bearing residues in response to the Recommendation and the Assessment was published by DOE on February 28, 1995. This Implementation Plan (IP) commits to stabilizing problem materials within 3 years, and stabilizing all other materials within 8 years. The IP identifies approximately 20 metric tons of plutonium requiring stabilization and/or repackaging. A further breakdown shows this material to consist of 8.5 metric tons of plutonium metal and alloys, 5.5 metric tons of plutonium as oxide, and 6 metric tons of plutonium as residues. Stabilization of the metal and oxide categories containing greater than 50 weight percent plutonium is covered by DOE Standard {open_quotes}Criteria for Safe Storage of Plutonium Metals and Oxides{close_quotes} December, 1994 (DOE-STD-3013-94). This standard establishes criteria for safe storage of stabilized plutonium metals and oxides for up to 50 years. Each of the DOE sites and contractors with large plutonium inventories has either started or is preparing to start stabilization activities to meet these criteria.

  16. Trimer effects in fragment molecular orbital-linear combination of molecular orbitals calculation of one-electron orbitals for biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobori, Tomoki; Sodeyama, Keitaro; Otsuka, Takao; Tateyama, Yoshitaka; Tsuneyuki, Shinji

    2013-09-07

    The fragment molecular orbital (FMO)-linear combination of molecular orbitals (LCMO) method incorporates as an efficient post-process calculation of one-electron orbitals of the whole system after the FMO total energy calculation. A straightforward way to increase the accuracy is inclusion of the trimer effect. Here, we derive a comprehensive formulation called the FMO3-LCMO method. To keep the computational costs of the trimer term low enough, we use a matrix-size reduction technique. We evaluated the accuracy and efficiency of the FMO3-LCMO scheme in model biological systems (alanine oligomer and chignolin). The results show that delocalized electronic orbitals with covalent and hydrogen bonds are better described at the trimer level, and the FMO3-LCMO method is applicable to quantitative evaluations of a wide range of frontier orbitals in large biosystems.

  17. Small Orbital Stereo Tracking Camera Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Tom; MacLeod, Todd; Gagliano, Larry

    2016-01-01

    On-Orbit Small Debris Tracking and Characterization is a technical gap in the current National Space Situational Awareness necessary to safeguard orbital assets and crew. This poses a major risk of MOD damage to ISS and Exploration vehicles. In 2015 this technology was added to NASA's Office of Chief Technologist roadmap. For missions flying in or assembled in or staging from LEO, the physical threat to vehicle and crew is needed in order to properly design the proper level of MOD impact shielding and proper mission design restrictions. Need to verify debris flux and size population versus ground RADAR tracking. Use of ISS for In-Situ Orbital Debris Tracking development provides attitude, power, data and orbital access without a dedicated spacecraft or restricted operations on-board a host vehicle as a secondary payload. Sensor Applicable to in-situ measuring orbital debris in flux and population in other orbits or on other vehicles. Could enhance safety on and around ISS. Some technologies extensible to monitoring of extraterrestrial debris as well To help accomplish this, new technologies must be developed quickly. The Small Orbital Stereo Tracking Camera is one such up and coming technology. It consists of flying a pair of intensified megapixel telephoto cameras to evaluate Orbital Debris (OD) monitoring in proximity of International Space Station. It will demonstrate on-orbit optical tracking (in situ) of various sized objects versus ground RADAR tracking and small OD models. The cameras are based on Flight Proven Advanced Video Guidance Sensor pixel to spot algorithms (Orbital Express) and military targeting cameras. And by using twin cameras we can provide Stereo images for ranging & mission redundancy. When pointed into the orbital velocity vector (RAM), objects approaching or near the stereo camera set can be differentiated from the stars moving upward in background.

  18. Revealing the network of periodic orbits in galaxy models with a prolate or an oblate dark matter halo component

    CERN Document Server

    Zotos, Euaggelos E

    2016-01-01

    Locating the position of periodic orbits in galaxies is undoubtedly an issue of paramount importance. We reveal the position and the stability of periodic orbits of stars moving in the meridional plane $(R,z)$ of an axially symmetric galactic model with a disk, a spherical nucleus, and a biaxial dark matter halo component. In particular, we study how all the involved parameters of the dynamical system influence the position and the stability of all resonant families. To locate the position and measure the stability of periodic orbits we use a highly sensitive numerical code which is able to identify resonant periodic orbits of the type $n:m$. Two cases are studied for every parameter: (i) the case where the dark matter halo component is prolate and (ii) the case where an oblate dark matter halo is present. Our numerical exploration reveals that all the dynamical quantities affect, more or less, the position and the stability of the periodic orbits. It is shown that the mass of the nucleus, the mass of the dis...

  19. A strange attractor in the unfolding of an orbit-flip homoclinic orbit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naudot, [No Value

    2002-01-01

    An orbit-flip homoclinic orbit Gamma of a vector field defined on R-3 is a homoclinic orbit to an equilibrium point for which the one-dimensional unstable manifold of the equilibrium point is connected to the one-dimensional strong stable manifold. In this paper, we show that in a generic unfolding

  20. Predictability in orbital reconstruction: a human cadaver study: part I: endoscopic-assisted orbital reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubois, L.; Jansen, J.; Schreurs, R.; Saeed, P.; Beenen, L.; Maal, T.J.J.; Gooris, P.J.J.; Becking, A.G.

    2015-01-01

    In the treatment of orbital defects, surgeon errors may lead to incorrect positioning of orbital implants and, consequently, poor clinical outcomes. Endoscopy can provide additional visualization of the orbit through the transantral approach. We aimed to evaluate whether endoscopic guidance during o

  1. Predictability in orbital reconstruction: A human cadaver study. Part II: Navigation-assisted orbital reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubois, L.; Schreurs, R.; Jansen, J; Maal, T.J.J.; Essig, H.; Gooris, P.J.; Becking, A.G.

    2015-01-01

    Preformed orbital reconstruction plates are useful for treating orbital defects. However, intraoperative errors can lead to misplaced implants and poor outcomes. Navigation-assisted surgery may help optimize orbital reconstruction. We aimed to explore whether navigation-assisted surgery is more pred

  2. Predictability in orbital reconstruction: A human cadaver study. Part I: Endoscopic-assisted orbital reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubois, L.; Jansen, J; Schreurs, R.; Saeed, P.; Beenen, L.; Maal, T.J.J.; Gooris, P.J.; Becking, A.G.

    2015-01-01

    In the treatment of orbital defects, surgeon errors may lead to incorrect positioning of orbital implants and, consequently, poor clinical outcomes. Endoscopy can provide additional visualization of the orbit through the transantral approach. We aimed to evaluate whether endoscopic guidance during o

  3. Predictability in orbital reconstruction: a human cadaver study: part II: navigation-assisted orbital reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubois, L.; Schreurs, R.; Jansen, J.; Maal, T.J.J.; Essig, H.; Gooris, P.J.J.; Becking, A.G.

    2015-01-01

    Preformed orbital reconstruction plates are useful for treating orbital defects. However, intraoperative errors can lead to misplaced implants and poor outcomes. Navigation-assisted surgery may help optimize orbital reconstruction. We aimed to explore whether navigation-assisted surgery is more pred

  4. On-orbit performance of the MODIS SWIR bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angal, Amit; Wu, Aisheng; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Geng, Xu; Link, Daniel O.; Chen, Hongda

    2014-11-01

    The 36 MODIS spectral bands, with wavelengths ranging from 0.41 μm to 14.2 μm, are distributed on four focal plane assemblies: visible (VIS), near-infrared (NIR), short- and mid-wave infrared (SMIR), and long-wave infrared (LWIR). The MODIS reflective solar bands (RSB) are calibrated onorbit using a solar diffuser (SD), with its reflectance degradation monitored using a solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM). The Terra MODIS SD degradation at 0.936 μm, as measured by the SDSM, is 2.4% after 14 years on-orbit. The Aqua MODIS SD degradation at 0.936 μm is 0.6% after 12 years on-orbit. The SWIR bands with spectral wavelengths centered at 1.24 μm (band 5), 1.37 μm (band 26), 1.64 μm (band 6), and 2.13 μm (band 7), are beyond the SDSM wavelength coverage (0.412 μm to 0.936 μm). Consequently, the gain of the SWIR bands is computed without factoring in the possible degradation of the SD. A technique to monitor the long-term stability of the MODIS SWIR bands is developed using pseudo-invariant desert targets. Results indicate a long-term drift of up to 1.5% of band 5 of Terra MODIS. The long-term stability of other Terra MODIS SWIR bands is seen to be within 0.5%. Similar results for Aqua MODIS indicate no observable drift, with changes within 0.5%. An implementation strategy to account for this correction in the MODIS Level 1 B (L1B) is also discussed.

  5. An innovative exercise method to simulate orbital EVA work - Applications to PLSS automatic controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, Renee; Vykukal, H.; Webbon, Bruce

    1987-01-01

    An exercise method has been proposed which may satisfy the current need for a laboratory simulation representative of muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, and thermoregulatory responses to work during orbital extravehicular activity (EVA). The simulation incorporates arm crank ergometry with a unique body support mechanism that allows all body position stabilization forces to be reacted at the feet. By instituting this exercise method in laboratory experimentation, an advanced portable life support system (PLSS) thermoregulatory control system can be designed to more accurately reflect the specific work requirements of orbital EVA.

  6. Gravity-gradient dynamics experiments performed in orbit utilizing the Radio Astronomy Explorer (RAE-1) spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walden, H.

    1973-01-01

    Six dynamic experiments were performed in earth orbit utilizing the RAE spacecraft in order to test the accuracy of the mathematical model of RAE dynamics. The spacecraft consisted of four flexible antenna booms, mounted on a rigid cylindrical spacecraft hub at center, for measuring radio emissions from extraterrestrial sources. Attitude control of the gravity stabilized spacecraft was tested by using damper clamping, single lower leading boom operations, and double lower boom operations. Results and conclusions of the in-orbit dynamic experiments proved the accuracy of the analytic techniques used to model RAE dynamical behavior.

  7. Objective measurement of motion in the orbit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abramoff, M.D.

    2001-01-01

    The research described in the thesis had two major aims: to find methods for objective measurement of motion in the orbit, and to determine the clinical use of these methods in patients with orbital disorders. This implied that a number of research questions had to be answered in the fields of both

  8. Orbital pseudotumor imaged with Ga-67 citrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaikishen, P.; Bateman, J.L.; Shreeve, W.W. (Veterans Administration Medical Center, Northport, NY (USA))

    1989-11-01

    An orbital pseudotumor causing proptosis, diplopia, and gaze palsy was imaged with Ga-67 citrate and showed persistent intense activity for five days. This may be the first case of gallium uptake into an orbital pseudotumor to be reported in the literature. This case report demonstrates the use of Ga-67 citrate imaging in the early diagnostic workup of this disorder.

  9. The Homoclinic Orbits in Nonlinear Schroedinger Equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PengchengXU; BolingGUO; 等

    1998-01-01

    The persistence of Homoclinic orbits for perturbed nonlinear Schroedinger equation with five degree term under een periodic boundary conditions is considered.The exstences of the homoclinic orbits for the truncation equation is established by Melnikov's analysis and geometric singular perturbation theory.

  10. Orbiter Water Dump Nozzles Redesign Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotter, Hank

    2017-01-01

    Hank Rotter, NASA Technical Fellow for Environmental Control and Life Support System, will provide the causes and lessons learned for the two Space Shuttle Orbiter water dump icicles that formed on the side of the Orbiter. He will present the root causes and the criticality of these icicles, along with the redesign of the water dump nozzles and lessons learned during the redesign phase.

  11. Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma of the orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah M Al-Osaily

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma (EMC is a rare soft tissue tumor. Numerous cases of EMC have been reported in different anatomical locations. There is currently only a single case of EMC of the orbit and that was reported in 1985. We report a second case of orbital EMC in a 34-year-old healthy male.

  12. Orbital dissection defatting technique for Graves disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, S D; Guibor, P; Wolfley, D; Wiggs, E O

    1984-04-01

    Five patients with Graves disease and bilateral proptosis were treated with different incisional approaches. They all underwent orbital decompression by removal of the anterior medial orbital walls, the anterior ethmoidal sinuses, the orbital floors, and multiple incisions of the orbital periosteums . The defatting technique, which consists of applying manual anterior orbital pressure with alternate removing of small lobules of fat, was added when it was intraoperatively decided by Hertel exophthalmometer measurement that more decompression was needed. It is estimated that one-third more reduction in proptosis resulted. An average total decrease in proptosis of 9 mm per orbit occurred. Both visual accuities and visual fields returned to normal. The only important complication was the development of hypertropia in down gaze in one patient. A potential value of this technique is its use with orbital floor decompression alone. It may be possible to avoid removing the medial and lateral walls of the orbit, thereby decreasing complications. Defatting may also be a valuable addition in those rare cases where all decompression techniques available are needed to affect an adequate decompression.

  13. Posttraumatic Orbital Emphysema: A Numerical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Skorek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Orbital emphysema is a common symptom accompanying orbital fracture. The pathomechanism is still not recognized and the usually assumed cause, elevated pressure in the upper airways connected with sneezing or coughing, does not always contribute to the occurrence of this type of fracture. Observations based on the finite model (simulating blowout type fracture of the deformations of the inferior orbital wall after a strike in its lower rim. Authors created a computer numeric model of the orbit with specified features—thickness and resilience modulus. During simulation an evenly spread 14400 N force was applied to the nodular points in the inferior rim (the maximal value not causing cracking of the outer rim, but only ruptures in the inferior wall. The observation was made from 1·10-3 to 1·10-2 second after a strike. Right after a strike dislocations of the inferior orbital wall toward the maxillary sinus were observed. Afterwards a retrograde wave of the dislocation of the inferior wall toward the orbit was noticed. Overall dislocation amplitude reached about 6 mm. Based on a numeric model of the orbit submitted to a strike in the inferior wall an existence of a retrograde shock wave causing orbital emphysema has been found.

  14. Optimal parking orbits for manned Mars missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupples, Michael L.; Nordwall, Jill A.

    This paper summarizes a Mars parking orbit optimization effort. This parking orbit study includes the selection of optimal elliptic Mars parking orbits that meet mission constraints and that include pertinent apsidal misalignment losses. Mars missions examined are for the opportunity years of 2014, 2016, and 2018. For these mission opportunities, it is shown that the optimal parking orbits depend on the year that the mission occurs and are coupled with the outbound, Mars stay, and return phases of the mission. Constraints included in the parking orbit optimization process are periapsis lighting angle (related to a daylight landing requirement), periapsis latitude (related to a landing latitude range requirement) and the vehicle Trans-Earth-Injection stage mass. Also, effects of mission abort requirements on optimal parking orbits are investigated. Off-periapsis maneuvers for Mars orbit capture were found to be cost effective in reducing the mission delta-V for the 2016 abort from Mars capture scenario. The total capture and departure delta-V was `split' between the capture maneuver and the departure maneuver to reduce the 2016 Mars departure delta-V to below the level of the corresponding stage of the 2014 baseline mission. Landing results are provided that show Mars landing site access from the optimal elliptic parking orbits for Mars excursion vehicles with low (0.2) and high (1.3 and 1.6) lift to drag ratio.

  15. Linear Magnetoelectric Effect by Orbital Magnetism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scaramucci, A.; Bousquet, E.; Fechner, M.; Mostovoy, M.; Spaldin, N. A.

    2012-01-01

    We use symmetry analysis and first-principles calculations to show that the linear magnetoelectric effect can originate from the response of orbital magnetic moments to the polar distortions induced by an applied electric field. Using LiFePO4 as a model compound we show that spin-orbit coupling part

  16. Spin-Orbit induced semiconductor spin guides

    OpenAIRE

    Valin-Rodriguez, Manuel; Puente, Antonio; Serra, Llorens

    2002-01-01

    The tunability of the Rashba spin-orbit coupling allows to build semiconductor heterostructures with space modulated coupling intensities. We show that a wire-shaped spin-orbit modulation in a quantum well can support propagating electronic states inside the wire only for a certain spin orientation and, therefore, it acts as an effective spin transmission guide for this particular spin orientation.

  17. Three Temperate Neptunes Orbiting Nearby Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Fulton, Benjamin J; Weiss, Lauren M; Sinukoff, Evan; Petigura, Erik A; Isaacson, Howard; Hirsch, Lea; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Henry, Gregory W; Grunblatt, Samuel K; Huber, Daniel; von Braun, Kaspar; Boyajian, Tabetha S; Kane, Stephen R; Wittrock, Justin; Horch, Elliott P; Ciardi, David R; Howell, Steve B; Wright, Jason T; Ford, Eric B

    2016-01-01

    We present the discovery of three modestly-irradiated, roughly Neptune-mass planets orbiting three nearby Solar-type stars. HD 42618 b has a minimum mass of $15.4 \\pm 2.4$ M$_{\\oplus}$, a semi-major axis of 0.55 AU, an equilibrium temperature of 337 K, and is the first planet discovered to orbit the solar analogue host star, HD 42618. We also discover new planets orbiting the known exoplanet host stars HD 164922 and HD 143761 ($\\rho$ CrB). The new planet orbiting HD 164922 has a minimum mass of $12.9 \\pm 1.6$ M$_{\\oplus}$ and orbits interior to the previously known Jovian mass planet orbiting at 2.1 AU. HD 164922 c has a semi-major axis of 0.34 AU and an equilibrium temperature of 418 K. HD 143761 c orbits with a semi-major axis of 0.44 AU, has a minimum mass of $25 \\pm 2$ M$_{\\oplus}$, and is the warmest of the three new planets with an equilibrium temperature of 445 K. It orbits exterior to the previously known warm Jupiter in the system. A transit search using space-based CoRoT data and ground-based photom...

  18. Orbital infarction in sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, J P; Gill, F M

    1981-06-01

    Bone infarction is a common occurrence in sickle cell disease. Described are three cases in which frontal headache, proptosis, and lid edema were seen with infarction of the orbital bone. Radionuclide scanning was useful in distinguished bone infarction from orbital infection in one case.

  19. On-Orbit Propulsion OMS/RCS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlbert, Eric A.

    2001-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Space Shuttle's On-Orbit Propulsion systems: the Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) and the Reaction Control System (RCS). The functions of each of the systems is described, and the diagrams of the systems are presented. The OMS/RCS thruster is detailed and a trade study comparison of non-toxic propellants is presented.

  20. The Orbits of Saturn's Small Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitale, J. N.; Jacobson, R. A.; Porco, C. C.; Owen, W. M.; Charnoz, S.

    2005-05-01

    We report on the orbits of the small, inner Saturnian satellites, either recovered or newly-discovered in recent Cassini imaging observations (excluding Helene, Telesto and Calypso, which will be discussed by another group). Using combined Cassini and Voyager observations, the mean motions of Pan and Atlas have been refined by several orders of magnitude. The Atlas orbit is based on a numerical integration perturbed by all of the massive Saturnian satellites including Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, and Epimetheus. We find that the dominant perturber is Prometheus. Cassini, Voyager, HST, and Earth-based data have been used to refine the orbits of Janus, Epimetheus, Prometheus and Pandora. The orbits of the co-orbitals, Janus and Epimetheus, remain stable; their orbital swap does not occur until Februrary, 2006. The orbits of Prometheus and Pandora remain close to recent values (Jacobson and French 2004, Icarus, 172, 382). Six new objects have been discovered to date -- three (S/2004 S3, S4, S6) in close proximity to the F ring, two (S/2004 S1(Methone), S/2004 S2(Pallene)) between the orbits of Mimas and Enceladus, and one (S/2004 S5(Polydeuces)) co-orbital with Dione, trailing by ˜60 deg (Porco et al., Science 307, 25 Feb 2005). One of the F-ring objects -- S/2004 S3 -- was seen over a 118-day interval, but none of those objects, including S/2004 S3, were subsequently recovered in an F-ring movie acquired on 15 November 2004 (29 days after the last sighting of S/2004 S3) with an image scale of 4 km/pixel, in which all were expected to appear. Consequently, we are confident only that Methone, Pallene and Polydeuces are solid satellites; S/2004 S3, S4 and S6 may be transient clumps. Our orbital fits, both precessing ellipse models and orbital integrations, suggest that Pallene is the same object as S/1981 S14, imaged by Voyager 2 on 23 August 1981, contrary to our initial reports (IAU circular 8389). The orbital inclination and eccentricity of Methone are considerably