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Sample records for orally delivered antigen

  1. Bacterial antigen expression is an important component in inducing an immune response to orally administered Salmonella-delivered DNA vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle E Gahan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The use of Salmonella to deliver heterologous antigens from DNA vaccines is a well-accepted extension of the success of oral Salmonella vaccines in animal models. Attenuated S. typhimurium and S. typhi strains are safe and efficacious, and their use to deliver DNA vaccines combines the advantages of both vaccine approaches, while complementing the limitations of each technology. An important aspect of the basic biology of the Salmonella/DNA vaccine platform is the relative contributions of prokaryotic and eukaryotic expression in production of the vaccine antigen. Gene expression in DNA vaccines is commonly under the control of the eukaryotic cytomegalovirus (CMV promoter. The aim of this study was to identify and disable putative bacterial promoters within the CMV promoter and evaluate the immunogenicity of the resulting DNA vaccine delivered orally by S. typhimurium. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The results reported here clearly demonstrate the presence of bacterial promoters within the CMV promoter. These promoters have homology to the bacterial consensus sequence and functional activity. To disable prokaryotic expression from the CMV promoter a series of genetic manipulations were performed to remove the two major bacterial promoters and add a bacteria transcription terminator downstream of the CMV promoter. S. typhimurium was used to immunise BALB/c mice orally with a DNA vaccine encoding the C-fragment of tetanus toxin (TT under control of the original or the modified CMV promoter. Although both promoters functioned equally well in eukaryotic cells, as indicated by equivalent immune responses following intramuscular delivery, only the original CMV promoter was able to induce an anti-TT specific response following oral delivery by S. typhimurium. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that prokaryotic expression of the antigen and co-delivery of this protein by Salmonella are at least partially responsible for the successful

  2. Oral microflora in infants delivered vaginally and by caesarean section

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelun Barfod, Mette; Magnusson, Kerstin; Lexner, Michala Oron

    2011-01-01

    International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry 2011 Background. Early in life, vaginally delivered infants exhibit a different composition of the gut flora compared with infants delivered by caesarean section (C-section); however, it is unclear whether this also applies to the oral cavity. Aim....... To investigate and compare the oral microbial profile between infants delivered vaginally and by C-section. Design. This is a cross-sectional case-control study. Eighty-four infants delivered either vaginally (n = 42) or by C-section (n = 42) were randomly selected from the 2009 birth cohort at the County...

  3. Oral microflora in infants delivered vaginally and by caesarean section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelun Barfod, Mette; Magnusson, Kerstin; Lexner, Michala Oron; Blomqvist, Susanne; Dahlén, Gunnar; Twetman, Svante

    2011-11-01

    BACKGROUND.  Early in life, vaginally delivered infants exhibit a different composition of the gut flora compared with infants delivered by caesarean section (C-section); however, it is unclear whether this also applies to the oral cavity. AIM.  To investigate and compare the oral microbial profile between infants delivered vaginally and by C-section. DESIGN.  This is a cross-sectional case-control study. Eighty-four infants delivered either vaginally (n = 42) or by C-section (n = 42) were randomly selected from the 2009 birth cohort at the County Hospital in Halmstad, Sweden. Medically compromised and premature children (oral health need to be further investigated.

  4. Carbohydrate Biopolymers Enhance Antibody Responses to Mucosally Delivered Vaccine Antigens

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    Bacon, A.; Makin, J.; Sizer, P. J.; Jabbal-Gill, I.; Hinchcliffe, M.; Illum, L.; Chatfield, S.; Roberts, M.

    2000-01-01

    We have evaluated the ability of two carbohydrate biopolymers, chitosan and gellan, to enhance antibody responses to subunit influenza virus vaccines delivered to the respiratory tracts of mice. Groups of mice were vaccinated three times intranasally (i.n.) with 10 μg of purified influenza B/Panama virus surface antigens (PSAs), which consist of hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), either alone or admixed with chitosan or gellan solutions. Separate groups were vaccinated subcutaneously (s.c.) with PSAs adsorbed to Alhydrogel or chitosan or gellan alone i.n. Serum antibody responses were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for influenza virus-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) and by HA inhibition (HAI) and NA inhibition (NAI) assays. The local respiratory immune response was measured by assaying for influenza virus-specific IgA antibody in nasal secretions and by enumerating nasal and pulmonary lymphocytes secreting IgA, IgG, and IgM anti-influenza virus-specific antibodies by enzyme-linked immunospotting (ELISPOT). When administered alone i.n., B/Panama PSA was poorly immunogenic. Parenteral immunization with B/Panama PSA with Alhydrogel elicited high titers of anti-B/Panama antibodies in serum but a very poor respiratory anti-B/Panama IgA response. In contrast, i.n. immunization with PSA plus chitosan stimulated very strong local and systemic anti-B/Panama responses. Gellan also enhanced the local and serum antibody responses to i.n. PSA but not to the same extent as chitosan. The ability of chitosan to augment the immunogenicity of influenza vaccines given i.n. was confirmed using PSA prepared from an influenza A virus (A/Texas H1N1). PMID:10992483

  5. Analytical characterization of an orally-delivered peptide pharmaceutical product.

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    Kelley, Wayne P; Chen, Shujun; Floyd, Philip D; Hu, Ping; Kapsi, Shiva G; Kord, Alireza S; Sun, Mingjiang; Vogt, Frederick G

    2012-05-15

    The characterization of orally-delivered peptide pharmaceuticals presents several challenges to analytical methods in comparison to characterization of conventional small-molecule drugs. These challenges include the analysis and characterization of difficult-to-separate impurities, secondary structure, the amorphous solid-state form, and the integrity of enteric-coated drug delivery systems. This work presents the multidisciplinary analytical characterization of a parathyroid hormone (PTH) peptide active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and an oral formulation of this API within enteric-coated sucrose spheres. The analysis of impurities and degradation products in API and formulated drug product was facilitated by the development of an ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) method for analysis by high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS). The use of UHPLC allowed for additional resolution needed to detect impurities and degradation products of interest. The secondary structure was probed using a combination of solution-state NMR, infrared, and circular dichroism spectroscopic methods. Solid-state NMR is used to detect amorphous API in a nondestructive manner directly within the coated sucrose sphere formulation. Fluorescence and Raman microscopy were used in conjunction with Raman mapping to show enteric coating integrity and observe the distribution of API beneath the enteric-coating on the sucrose spheres. The methods are combined in a multidisciplinary approach to characterize the quality of the enteric-coated peptide product.

  6. Multiple antigens of Yersinia pestis delivered by live recombinant attenuated Salmonella vaccine strains elicit protective immunity against plague.

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    Sanapala, Shilpa; Rahav, Hannah; Patel, Hetal; Sun, Wei; Curtiss, Roy

    2016-05-05

    Based on our improved novel Salmonella vaccine delivery platform, we optimized the recombinant attenuated Salmonella typhimurium vaccine (RASV) χ12094 to deliver multiple Yersinia pestis antigens. These included LcrV196 (amino acids, 131-326), Psn encoded on pYA5383 and F1 encoded in the chromosome, their synthesis did not cause adverse effects on bacterial growth. Oral immunization with χ12094(pYA5383) simultaneously stimulated high antibody titers to LcrV, Psn and F1 in mice and presented complete protection against both subcutaneous (s.c.) and intranasal (i.n.) challenges with high lethal doses of Y. pestis CO92. Moreover, no deaths or other disease symptoms were observed in SCID mice orally immunized with χ12094(pYA5383) over a 60-day period. Therefore, the trivalent S. typhimurium-based live vaccine shows promise for a next-generation plague vaccine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. ABO blood group antigens in oral mucosa. What is new?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, Erik

    2002-01-01

    which represent secondary gene products. They are synthesized in a stepwise fashion from a precursor by the action of different glycosyltransferases. In non-keratinized oral mucosa, a sequential elongation of the carbohydrates is associated with differentiation of epithelial cells, resulting...... in expression of precursors on basal cells and A/B antigens on spinous cells. Reduction or complete deletion of A/B antigen expression in oral carcinomas has been reported, a phenotypic change that is correlated with invasive and metastatic potential of the tumours and with the mortality rates of the patients....... Disappearance of the antigens is ascribed to the absence of A or B transferase gene expression. Several studies have shown that loss of A and B antigen expression is associated with increased cell motility, invasion in matrigel, and tumourigenecity in syngenic animals. In vivo studies of human oral wound...

  8. Use of in vivo-regulated promoters to deliver antigens from attenuated Salmonella enterica var. Typhimurium.

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    Dunstan, S J; Simmons, C P; Strugnell, R A

    1999-10-01

    This study describes the construction and analysis of three in vivo-inducible promoter expression plasmids, containing pnirB, ppagC, and pkatG, for the delivery of foreign antigens in the DeltaaroAD mutant of Salmonella enterica var. Typhimurium (hereafter referred to as S. typhimurium). The reporter genes encoding beta-galactosidase and firefly luciferase were used to assess the comparative levels of promoter activity in S. typhimurium in vitro in response to different induction stimuli and in vivo in immunized mice. It was determined that the ppagC construct directed the expression of more beta-galactosidase and luciferase in S. typhimurium than the pnirB and pkatG constructs, both in vitro and in vivo. The gene encoding the C fragment of tetanus toxin was expressed in the aroAD mutant of S. typhimurium (BRD509) under the control of the three promoters. Mice orally immunized with attenuated S. typhimurium expressing C fragment under control of the pagC promoter [BRD509(pKK/ppagC/C frag)] mounted the highest tetanus toxoid-specific serum antibody response. Levels of luciferase expression in vivo and C-fragment expression in vitro from the pagC promoter appeared to be equivalent to if not lower than the levels of expression detected with the constitutive trc promoter. However, mice immunized with BRD509(pKK/ppagC/C frag) induced significantly higher levels of tetanus toxoid-specific antibody than BRD509(pKK/C frag)-immunized mice, suggesting that the specific location of foreign antigen expression may be important for immunogenicity. Mutagenesis of the ribosome binding sites (RBS) in the three promoter/C fragment expression plasmids was also performed. Despite optimization of the RBS in the three different promoter elements, the expression levels in vivo and overall immunogenicity of C fragment when delivered to mice by attenuated S. typhimurium were not affected. These studies suggest that in vivo-inducible promoters may give rise to enhanced immunogenicity and

  9. Basophil degranulation induced by oral poison ivy antigen.

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    Shelley, W B; Resnik, S S

    1965-08-01

    Seven subjects shown by patch test to be sensitive to poison ivy oleoresin were challenged with graded oral doses of ivy extract. In each instance the circulating basophil leukocytes showed significant degranulation within one hour of challenge. This finding was interpreted as evidence of the presence of immediate-type circulating antibody to ivy antigen in these subjects. No drop in the absolute basophil count was noted, but with higher oral doses the degranulation persisted for several days. Thirteen control subjects showed no change in the basophil morphology or count, indicating that the resin at these levels was not toxic to this cell. All but one of the sensitive subjects showed objective patch test evidence of hyposensitization following the intensive three-week course of oral poison ivy antigen.

  10. Yeast lysates carrying the nucleoprotein from measles virus vaccine as a novel subunit vaccine platform to deliver Plasmodium circumsporozoite antigen

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Daria Jacob; Claude Ruffie; Chantal Combredet; Pauline Formaglio; Rogerio Amino; Robert Menard; Frederic Tangy; Monica Sala

    2017-01-01

    .... In this study, Pichia pastoris yeast lysates carrying the nucleoprotein (N) from the measles vaccine virus were evaluated as a novel subunit vaccine platform to deliver the circumsporozoite surface antigen (CS) of Plasmodium...

  11. Oral vaccination of fish- antigen preparations, uptake and immune induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen eMutoloki

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The oral route offers the most attractive approach of immunization of fish for a number of reasons: the ease of administration of antigens, it is less stressful than parenteral delivery and in principle, it is applicable to small and large sized fish; it also provides a procedure for oral boosting during grow-out periods in cages or ponds. There are however not many commercial vaccines available at the moment due to lack of efficacy and challenges associated with production of large quantities of antigens. These are required to stimulate an effective immune response locally and systemically, and need to be protected against degradation before they reach the sites where immune induction occurs. The hostile stomach environment is believed to be particularly important with regard to degradation of antigens in certain species. There is also a poor understanding about the requirements for proper immune induction following oral administration on one side, and the potential for induction of tolerance on the other. To what extent primary immunization via the oral route will elicit both local and systemic responses is not understood in detail. Furthermore, to what extent parenteral delivery will protect mucosal/gut surfaces and vice-versa is also not fully understood. We review the work that has been done on the subject and discuss it in light of recent advances that include mass production of antigens including the use of plant systems. Different encapsulation techniques that have been developed in the quest to protect antigens against digestive degradation, as well as to target them for appropriate immune induction are also highlighted.

  12. Delivering a powerful oral presentation: all the world's a stage.

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    Papanas, N; Maltezos, E; Lazarides, M K

    2011-04-01

    Oral presentations are, to a great extent, a matter of talent, but they can be practised and improved. There are three kinds of presentations: the short talk (5-10 minutes), the intermediate talk (15 minutes) and the long talk (approximately 45 minutes). Whatever the kind of the presentation, careful preparation is mandatory. The speaker needs to know how long the presentation is expected to be, who the audience is and what main messages should be conveyed. Power point and other visual aids may be appropriately used to facilitate communication. The information presented by these aids should be simple, concrete and intelligible, and the presenter should refrain from reading out the slides word for word. During the presentation, several pitfalls should be avoided: wrong type of presentation, exceeding the allocated time, poor structure, inadequate use of power point and/or other visual aids, poor control of language, poor control of voice, poor appearance on the podium, and poor control of nerves. Ideally, the successful oral presentation is a performance. Thus, the speaker may make the most of appearance, voice, eye contact and movement, in order to increase eloquence.

  13. Oral immunogenicity of potato-derived antigens to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Zhang; Suting Chen; Jiayun Li; Yuan Liu; Yuanlei Hu; Hong Cai

    2012-01-01

    The novel use of transgenic plants as vectors for the expression of viral and bacterial antigens has been increasingly tested as an alternative methodology for the production and delivery of experimental oral vaccines.Here,we examined the immunogenicity of combined plant-made vaccines that include four genes encoding immune-dominant antigens from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.Compared with the wild type and other control groups,mice treated with the combined plant-made vaccines showed significantly higher levels of interferon-γ and interleukin-2 production in response to all four proteins,and higher levels of antigenspecific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses and immunoglobulin (lg) G and IgA titers.These results suggest that combined plant-made vaccines can induce immunogenicity against M.tuberculosis through the induction of stronger Th1-associated immune responses.This is the first report of an orally delivered combined plant-made vaccine against tuberculosis priming an antigen-specific Th1 response,a comprehensive effect including both mucosal and systemic immune responses.

  14. Immunological evaluation of colonic delivered Hepatitis B surface antigen loaded TLR-4 agonist modified solid fat nanoparticles.

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    Sahu, Kantrol Kumar; Pandey, Ravi Shankar

    2016-10-01

    Hepatitis B is one of the leading liver diseases and remains a major global health problem. Currently available vaccines provide protection but often results in weaker/minimal mucosal immunity. Thus the present study is devoted to the development and in-vivo exploration of the colonically delivered biomimetic nanoparticles which capably enhance humoral as well as cellular immune response. In present work, Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) entrapped nanoparticles containing Monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) (HB+L-NP) were prepared by solvent evaporation method and characterized for particle size (~210nm), shape, zeta potential (-24mV±0.68), entrapment efficiency (58.45±1.68%), in-vitro release and antigen integrity. Dose escalation study was done to confirm prophylactic immune response following defined doses of prepared nanoparticulate formulations with or without MPLA. Intramuscular administered alum based marketed HBsAg (Genevac B) was used as standard (10μg) and were able to induce significant systemic (IgG) but remarkably low mucosal immune (IgA) response. Notably, HB+L-NP (0.5ml-10μg) induced strong systemic and robust mucosal immunity (510 and 470 mIU/ml respectively, p<0.001) from which mucosal was more significant due to the involvement of Common Mucosal Immune System (CMIS). Likewise, significant cellular immune response was elicited by HB+L-NP through T-cell activation (mixed Th1 and Th2) as confirmed by significantly increased cytokines level (IL-2 and Interferon-γ) in spleen homogenates. This study supports that delivery of HBsAg to the colon may open new vista in designing oral vaccines later being one of most accepted route for potential vaccines in future.

  15. Immure response induced by oral DNA vaccination against FMDV delivered by attenuated Salm onella choleraesuis C500

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Mingqiu; Niu Xiaofeng; Yan Jingran; Yan Weiyao; Zheng Zhaoxin

    2006-01-01

    A recombinant strain of Salmonella choleraesuis C500,containing a eukaryotic expression plasmid pBO1 with the immune-dominant epitope of foot-and-mouth disease virus,was constructed.Specific immune response to this recombinant strain was evaluated by oral administration of the recombinant live bacteria pBO1/S.cho in rabbits.Results showed that T cell response and specific antibody production were elicited.This approach may present a general strategy for eliciting immune responses with DNA vaccine delivered by live bacterial vectors.The stimulated indexes of T lymphoproliferation by specific antigens of FMDV in rabbits,can reach up to 11.0 and an antibody titer of 1/32 as detected in the erum with liquid block ELISA.

  16. Induction of Oral Tolerance with Transgenic Plants Expressing Antigens for Prevention/Treatment of Autoimmune, Allergic and Inflammatory Diseases.

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    Ma, Shengwu; Liao, Yu-Cai; Jevnikar, Anthony M

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence and incidence of autoimmune and allergic diseases have increased dramatically over the last several decades, especially in the developed world. The treatment of autoimmune and allergic diseases is typically with the use of non-specific immunosuppressive agents that compromise the integrity of the host immune system and therefore, increase the risk of infections. Antigenspecific immunotherapy by reinstating immunological tolerance towards self antigens without compromising immune functions is a much desired goal for the treatment of autoimmune and allergic diseases. Mucosal administration of antigen is a long-recognized method of inducing antigen-specific immune tolerance known as oral tolerance, which is viewed as having promising potential in the treatment of autoimmune and allergic diseases. Plant-based expression and delivery of recombinant antigens provide a promising new platform to induce oral tolerance, having considerable advantages including reduced cost and increased safety. Indeed, in recent years the use of tolerogenic plants for oral tolerance induction has attracted increasing attention, and considerable progress has been made. This review summarizes recent advances in using plants to deliver tolerogens for induction of oral tolerance in the treatment of autoimmune, allergic and inflammatory diseases.

  17. Alphavirus replicon particles acting as adjuvants promote CD8+ T cell responses to co-delivered antigen.

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    Thompson, Joseph M; Whitmore, Alan C; Staats, Herman F; Johnston, Robert E

    2008-08-05

    Alphavirus replicon particles induce strong antibody and CD8+ T cell responses to expressed antigens in numerous experimental systems. We have recently demonstrated that Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) possess adjuvant activity for systemic and mucosal antibody responses. In this report, we demonstrate that VRP induced an increased and balanced serum IgG subtype response to co-delivered antigen, with simultaneous induction of antigen-specific IgG1 and IgG2a antibodies, and increased both systemic and mucosal antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses, as measured by an IFN-gamma ELISPOT assay. Additionally, VRP further increased antigen-specific T cell immunity in an additive fashion following co-delivery with the TLR ligand, CpG DNA. VRP infection led to recruitment of CD8+ T cells into the mucosal compartment, possibly utilizing the mucosal homing receptor, as this integrin was upregulated on CD8+ T cells in the draining lymph node of VRP-infected animals, where VRP-infected dendritic cells reside. This newly recognized ability of VRP to mediate increased T cell response towards co-delivered antigen provides the potential to both define the molecular basis of alphavirus-induced immunity, and improve alphavirus-based vaccines.

  18. Characterization of O-antigen delivered by Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens (GMMA) vaccine candidates against nontyphoidal Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Benedetto, G; Alfini, R; Cescutti, P; Caboni, M; Lanzilao, L; Necchi, F; Saul, A; MacLennan, C A; Rondini, S; Micoli, F

    2017-01-11

    Invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella disease (iNTS) is a leading cause of death and morbidity in Africa. The most common pathogens are Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis. The O-antigen portion of their lipopolysaccharide is a target of protective immunity and vaccines targeting O-antigen are currently in development. Here we investigate the use of Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens (GMMA) as delivery system for S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis O-antigen. Gram-negative bacteria naturally shed outer membrane in a blebbing process. By deletion of the tolR gene, the level of shedding was greatly enhanced. Further genetic modifications were introduced into the GMMA-producing strains in order to reduce reactogenicity, by detoxifying the lipid A moiety of lipopolysaccharide. We found that genetic mutations can impact on expression of O-antigen chains. All S. Enteritidis GMMA characterized had an O-antigen to protein w/w ratio higher than 0.6, while the ratio was 0.7 for S. Typhimurium ΔtolR GMMA, but decreased to less than 0.1 when further mutations for lipid A detoxification were introduced. Changes were also observed in O-antigen chain length and level and/or position of O-acetylation. When tested in mice, the GMMA induced high levels of anti-O-antigen-specific IgG functional antibodies, despite variation in density and O-antigen structural modifications. In conclusion, simplicity of manufacturing process and low costs of production, coupled with encouraging immunogenicity data, make GMMA an attractive strategy to further investigate for the development of a vaccine against iNTS.

  19. Brief Report: Remotely Delivered Video Modeling for Improving Oral Hygiene in Children with ASD: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popple, Ben; Wall, Carla; Flink, Lilli; Powell, Kelly; Discepolo, Keri; Keck, Douglas; Mademtzi, Marilena; Volkmar, Fred; Shic, Frederick

    2016-01-01

    Children with autism have heightened risk of developing oral health problems. Interventions targeting at-home oral hygiene habits may be the most effective means of improving oral hygiene outcomes in this population. This randomized control trial examined the effectiveness of a 3-week video-modeling brushing intervention delivered to patients over…

  20. A strategy of antigen incorporation into exosomes: comparing cross-presentation levels of antigens delivered by engineered exosomes and by lentiviral virus-like particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattanzi, Laura; Federico, Maurizio

    2012-11-26

    Among strategies aimed at developing new nanoparticle-based vaccines, exosomes hold much promise. They are nanovesicles released by basically all eukaryotic cell types originating from intraluminal vesicles which accumulate in multivesicular bodies. Exosomes have immunogenic properties whose strength correlates with the amounts of associated antigens. Engineering antigens to target them in exosomes represents the last frontier in terms of nanoparticle-based vaccines. Here we report a new method to incorporate protein antigens in exosomes relying on the unique properties of a mutant of the HIV-1 Nef protein, Nef(mut). This is a biologically inactive mutant we found incorporating into exosomes at high levels also when fused at its C-terminus with foreign proteins. We compared both biochemical and antigenic properties of Nef(mut) exosomes with those of previously characterized Nef(mut) -based lentiviral virus-like particles (VLPs). We found that exosomes incorporate Nef(mut) and fusion protein derivatives with similar efficiency of VLPs. When an envelope fusion protein was associated with both exosomes and VLPs to favor cross-presentation of associated antigens, Nef(mut) and its derivatives incorporated in exosomes were cross-presented at levels at least similar to what observed when the antigens were delivered by engineered VLPs. This occurred despite exosomes entered target cells with an apparent lower efficiency than VLPs. The unique properties of HIV-1 Nef(mut) in terms of exosome incorporation efficiency, carrier of foreign antigens, and lack of anti-cellular effects open the way toward the development of a flexible, safe, cost-effective exosome-based CD8(+) T cell vaccine platform.

  1. Importance of gastrointestinal ingestion and macromolecular antigens in the vein for oral tolerance induction

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    Wakabayashi, Ayako; Kumagai, Yoshihiro; Watari, Eiji; Shimizu, Masumi; Utsuyama, Masanori; Hirokawa, Katsuiku; Takahashi, Hidemi

    2006-01-01

    Oral administration of a certain dose of antigen can generally induce immunological tolerance against the same antigen. In this study, we showed the temporal appearance of ovalbumin (OVA) antigens in both portal and peripheral blood of mice after the oral administration of OVA. Furthermore, we detected 45 000 MW OVA in mouse serum 30 min after the oral administration of OVA. Based on this observation, we examined whether the injection of intact OVA into the portal or peripheral vein induces immunological tolerance against OVA. We found that the intravenous injection of intact OVA did not induce immunological tolerance but rather enhanced OVA-specific antibody production in some subclasses, suggesting that OVA antigens via the gastrointestinal tract but not intact OVA may contribute to establish immunological tolerance against OVA. Therefore, we examined the effects of digesting intact OVA in the gastrointestinal tract on the induction of oral tolerance. When mice were orally administered or injected into various gastrointestinal organs, such as the stomach, duodenum, ileum, or colon and boosted with intact OVA, OVA-specific antibody production and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response were significantly enhanced in mice injected into the ileum or colon, compared with orally administered mice. These results suggest that although macromolecular OVA antigens are detected after oral administration of OVA in tolerant-mouse serum, injection of intact OVA cannot contribute to tolerance induction. Therefore, some modification of macromolecular OVA in the gastrointestinal tract and ingestion may be essential for oral tolerance induction. PMID:16796692

  2. Orally delivered β-glucans aggravate dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinsbroek, Sigrid E M; Williams, David L; Welting, Olaf; Meijer, Sybren L; Gordon, Siamon; de Jonge, Wouter J

    2015-12-01

    β-Glucans have beneficial health effects due to their immune modulatory properties. Oral administration of β-glucans affects tumour growth, microbial infection, sepsis, and wound healing. We hypothesized that pre-treatment with orally delivered soluble and particulate β-glucans could ameliorate the development of aggravate dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) induced intestinal inflammation. To study this, mice were orally pre-treated with β-glucans for 14 days. We tested curdlan (a particulate β-(1,3)-glucan), glucan phosphate (a soluble β-(1,3)-glucan), and zymosan (a particle made from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which contains around 55% β-glucans). Weight loss, colon weight, and feces score did not differ between β-glucan and vehicle treated groups. However, histology scores indicated that β-glucan-treated mice had increased inflammation at a microscopic level suggesting that β-glucan treatment worsened intestinal inflammation. Furthermore, curdlan and zymosan treatment led to increased colonic levels of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, compared to vehicle. Glucan phosphate treatment did not significantly affect cytokine and chemokine levels. These data suggest that particulate and soluble β-glucans differentially affect the intestinal immune responses. However, no significant differences in other clinical colitis scores between soluble and particulate β-glucans were found in this study. In summary, β-glucans aggravate the course of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced intestinal inflammation at the level of the mucosa.

  3. IPNV Antigen Uptake and Distribution in Atlantic Salmon Following Oral Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihan Chen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available One impediment to the successful oral vaccination in fish is the hostile stomach environment that antigens must cross. Furthermore, uptake of antigens from the gut to systemic distribution is required for induction of systemic immunity, the dynamics of which are poorly understood. In the present study, groups of Atlantic salmon parr were intubated with live or inactivated infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV, either orally or anally. At 1, 24 and 72 h post infection (p.i., the fish were sacrificed. Serum was used for assessing IPNV by ELISA, while formalin-fixed head-kidney, spleen, liver and intestine tissues were used for the demonstration of antigens by immunohistochemistry. Both live and inactivated IPNV antigens were observed in enterocytes of the intestines and in immune cells of the head-kidneys and spleens of all groups. In the liver, no antigens were observed in any of the groups. Significantly higher serum antigen OD values (p < 0.04 were observed in orally- compared to anally-intubated fish. By contrast, no difference (p = 0.05 was observed in tissue antigens between these groups by immunohistochemistry. No significant difference (p = 0.05 in serum antigens was observed between groups intubated with live and inactivated IPNV, while in tissues, significantly more antigens (p < 0.03 were observe in the latter compared to the former. These findings demonstrate that both live and inactivated IPNV are taken up by enterocytes in the intestines of Atlantic salmon, likely by receptor-mediated mechanisms. Higher IPNV uptake by the oral compared to anal route suggests that both the anterior and posterior intestines are important for the uptake of the virus and that IPNV is resistant to gastric degradation of the Atlantic salmon stomach.

  4. Analysis of expression profiles of MAGE-A antigens in oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines

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    Reichert Torsten E

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The immunological response to solid tumours is insufficient. Therefore, tumour specific antigens have been explored to facilitate the activation of the immune system. The cancer/testis antigen class of MAGE-A antigens is a possible target for vaccination. Their differential expression profiles also modulate the course of the cancer disease and its response to antineoplastic drugs. Methods The expression profiles of MAGE-A2, -A3, -A4, -A6 and -A10 in five own oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines were characterised by rt-PCR, qrt-PCR and immunocytochemistry with a global MAGE-A antibody (57B and compared with those of an adult keratinocyte cell line (NHEK. Results All tumour cell lines expressed MAGE-A antigens. The antigens were expressed in groups with different preferences. The predominant antigens expressed were MAGE-A2, -A3 and -A6. MAGE-A10 was not expressed in the cell lines tested. The MAGE-A gene products detected in the adult keratinocyte cell line NHEK were used as a reference. Conclusion MAGE-A antigens are expressed in oral squamous cell carcinomas. The expression profiles measured facilitate distinct examinations in forthcoming studies on responses to antineoplastic drugs or radiation therapy. MAGE-A antigens are still an interesting aim for immunotherapy.

  5. Oral delivery of the Sj23LHD-GST antigen by Salmonella typhimurium type III secretion system protects against Schistosoma japonicum infection in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Chen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Schistosomiasis japonica is a zoonotic parasitic disease and oral vaccine delivery system would be benefit for prevention of this disease. Although attenuated salmonella has been used as an antigen expression vector for oral vaccine development, the membrane-bound vacuoles in which bacteria reside hinders the presentation of expressed heterologous antigens to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecules. The present work used an attenuated Salmonella typhimurium strain VNP20009 to secretory expression of Sj23LHDGST bivalent antigen from Schistosoma japonicum and tested the protective efficacy against S. japonicum infection in orally immunized mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Promoters (nirB or pagC were used to express the antigen (Sj23LHDGST and the Salmonella type III or α-hemolysin secretion system was employed to secrete it. The immunoblotting analysis and fluorescent microscopy revealed that the antigen was effectively expressed and delivered to the cytosol of macrophages in vitro. Among recombinant vaccine strains, an engineered VNP20009 which expressed the antigen by nirB promoter and secreted it through type III secretion system (nirB-sopE(1-104-Sj23LHD-GST efficiently protected against S. japonicum infection in a mouse model. This strain elicited a predominantly IgG(2a antibody response and a markedly increase in the production of IL-12 and IFN-γ. The flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that this strain caused T cell activation as evidenced by significantly increased expression of CD44 and CD69. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Oral delivery of antigen by nirB-driven Salmonella typhimurium type III secretion system is a novel, safe, inexpensive, efficient and convenient approach for schistosome vaccine development.

  6. Enteric trimethyl chitosan nanoparticles containing hepatitis B surface antigen for oral delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhadian, Asma; Dounighi, Naser Mohammadpour; Avadi, Mohammadreza

    2015-01-01

    Oral vaccination is the preferred route of immunization. However, the degradative condition of the gastrointestinal tract and the higher molecular size of peptides pose major challenges in developing an effective oral vaccination system. One of the most excellent methods used in the development of oral vaccine delivery system relies on the entrapment of the antigen in polymeric nanoparticles. In this work, trimethyl chitosan (TMC) nanoparticles were fabricated using ionic gelation teqnique by interaction hydroxypropyl methylcellulose phthalate (HPMCP), a pH-sensitive polymer, with TMC and the utility of the particles in the oral delivery of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was evaluated employing solutions that simulated gastric and intestinal conditions. The particle size, morphology, zeta potential, loading capacity, loading efficiency, in vitro release behavior, structure, and morphology of nanoparticles were evaluated, and the activity of the loaded antigen was assessed. Size of the optimized TMC/HPMCP nanoparticles and that of the antigen-loaded nanoparticles were 85 nm and 158 nm, respectively. Optimum loading capacity (76.75%) and loading efficiency (86.29%) were achieved at 300 µg/mL concentration of the antigen. SEM images revealed a spherical shape as well as a smooth and near-homogenous surface of nanoparticles. Results of the in vitro release studies showed that formulation with HPMCP improved the acid stability of the TMC nanoparticles as well as their capability to preserve the loaded HBsAg from gastric destruction. The antigen showed good activity both before and after loading. The results suggest that TMC/HPMCP nanoparticles could be used in the oral delivery of HBsAg vaccine.

  7. Antigen-Specific lgA B Memory Cell Responses to Shigella Antigens Elicited in Volunteers Immunized with Live Attenuated Shigella flexneri 2a Oral Vaccine Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    cell responses to Shigella antigens elicited in volunteers immunized with live attenuated Shigella flexneri 2a oral vaccine candidates J.K. Simona,b... Shigella ;. B cell memory; Immunoglobulin lgA; Mucosal immunity Abstract We studied the induction of antigen-specific lgA memory B cells (BM) in...volunteers who received live attenuated Shigella flexneri 2a vaccines. Subjects ingested a single oral dose of 107 , 108 or 109 CFU of S. flexneri 2a with

  8. Brucella abortus Omp19 recombinant protein subcutaneously co-delivered with an antigen enhances antigen-specific T helper 1 memory responses and induces protection against parasite challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coria, Lorena M; Ibañez, Andrés E; Pasquevich, Karina A; Cobiello, Paula L González; Frank, Fernanda M; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H; Cassataro, Juliana

    2016-01-20

    The discovery of effective adjuvants for many vaccines especially those with limited commercial appeal, such as vaccines to poverty-related diseases, is required. In this work, we demonstrated that subcutaneous co-administration of mice with the outer membrane protein U-Omp19 from Brucella spp. plus OVA as antigen (Ag) increases Ag-specific T cell proliferation and T helper (Th) 1 immune responses in vitro and in vivo. U-Omp19 treated dendritic cells promote IFN-γ production by specific CD4(+) T cells and increases T cell proliferation. U-Omp19 co-administration induces the production of Ag specific effector memory T cell populations (CD4(+) CD44(high) CD62L(low) T cells). Finally, subcutaneous co-administration of U-Omp19 with Trypanosoma cruzi Ags confers protection against virulent parasite challenge, reducing parasitemia and weight loss while increasing mice survival. These results indicate that the bacterial protein U-Omp19 when delivered subcutaneously could be a suitable component of vaccine formulations against infectious diseases requiring Th1 immune responses.

  9. Orally delivered thioketal nanoparticles loaded with TNF-α-siRNA target inflammation and inhibit gene expression in the intestines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, D. Scott; Dalmasso, Guillaume; Wang, Lixin; Sitaraman, Shanthi V.; Merlin, Didier; Murthy, Niren

    2010-11-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) directed against proinflammatory cytokines have the potential to treat numerous diseases associated with intestinal inflammation; however, the side-effects caused by the systemic depletion of cytokines demands that the delivery of cytokine-targeted siRNAs be localized to diseased intestinal tissues. Although various delivery vehicles have been developed to orally deliver therapeutics to intestinal tissue, none of these strategies has demonstrated the ability to protect siRNA from the harsh environment of the gastrointestinal tract and target its delivery to inflamed intestinal tissue. Here, we present a delivery vehicle for siRNA, termed thioketal nanoparticles (TKNs), that can localize orally delivered siRNA to sites of intestinal inflammation, and thus inhibit gene expression in inflamed intestinal tissue. TKNs are formulated from a polymer, poly-(1,4-phenyleneacetone dimethylene thioketal), that degrades selectively in response to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Therefore, when delivered orally, TKNs release siRNA in response to the abnormally high levels of ROS specific to sites of intestinal inflammation. Using a murine model of ulcerative colitis, we demonstrate that orally administered TKNs loaded with siRNA against the proinflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) diminish TNF-α messenger RNA levels in the colon and protect mice from ulcerative colitis.

  10. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of recombinant Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara candidate vaccines delivering West Nile virus envelope antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volz, Asisa; Lim, Stephanie; Kaserer, Martina; Lülf, Anna; Marr, Lisa; Jany, Sylvia; Deeg, Cornelia A; Pijlman, Gorben P; Koraka, Penelope; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Martina, Byron E; Sutter, Gerd

    2016-04-07

    West Nile virus (WNV) cycles between insects and wild birds, and is transmitted via mosquito vectors to horses and humans, potentially causing severe neuroinvasive disease. Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) is an advanced viral vector for developing new recombinant vaccines against infectious diseases and cancer. Here, we generated and evaluated recombinant MVA candidate vaccines that deliver WNV envelope (E) antigens and fulfil all the requirements to proceed to clinical testing in humans. Infections of human and equine cell cultures with recombinant MVA demonstrated efficient synthesis and secretion of WNV envelope proteins in mammalian cells non-permissive for MVA replication. Prime-boost immunizations in BALB/c mice readily induced circulating serum antibodies binding to recombinant WNV E protein and neutralizing WNV in tissue culture infections. Vaccinations in HLA-A2.1-/HLA-DR1-transgenic H-2 class I-/class II-knockout mice elicited WNV E-specific CD8+ T cell responses. Moreover, the MVA-WNV candidate vaccines protected C57BL/6 mice against lineage 1 and lineage 2 WNV infection and induced heterologous neutralizing antibodies. Thus, further studies are warranted to evaluate these recombinant MVA-WNV vaccines in other preclinical models and use them as candidate vaccine in humans.

  11. Controlled and targeted release of antigens by intelligent shell for improving applicability of oral vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Zeng, Zhanzhuang; Hu, Chaohua; Bellis, Susan L; Yang, Wendi; Su, Yintao; Zhang, Xinyan; Wu, Yunkun

    2016-01-01

    Conventional oral vaccines with simple architecture face barriers with regard to stimulating effective immunity. Here we describe oral vaccines with an intelligent phase-transitional shielding layer, poly[(methyl methacrylate)-co-(methyl acrylate)-co-(methacrylic acid)]-poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PMMMA-PLGA), which can protect antigens in the gastro-intestinal tract and achieve targeted vaccination in the large intestine. With the surface immunogenic protein (SIP) from group B Streptococcus (GBS) entrapped as the antigen, oral administration with PMMMA-PLGA (PTRBL)/Trx-SIP nanoparticles stimulated robust immunity in tilapia, an animal with a relatively simple immune system. The vaccine succeeded in protecting against Streptococcus agalactiae, a pathogen of worldwide importance that threatens human health and is transmitted in water with infected fish. After oral vaccination with PTRBL/Trx-SIP, tilapia produced enhanced levels of SIP specific antibodies and displayed durability of immune protection. 100% of the vaccinated tilapia were protected from GBS infection, whereas the control groups without vaccines or vaccinated with Trx-SIP only exhibited respective infection rates of 100% or >60% within the initial 5 months after primary vaccination. Experiments in vivo demonstrated that the recombinant antigen Trx-SIP labeled with FITC was localized in colon, spleen and kidney, which are critical sites for mounting an immune response. Our results revealed that, rather than the size of the nanoparticles, it is more likely that the negative charge repulsion produced by ionization of the carboxyl groups in PMMMA shielded the nanoparticles from uptake by small intestinal epithelial cells. This system resolves challenges arising from gastrointestinal damage to antigens, and more importantly, offers a new approach applicable for oral vaccination.

  12. Efficacy of Orally Delivered Cochleates Containing Amphotericin B in a Murine Model of Aspergillosis

    OpenAIRE

    Delmas, G.; Park, S.; Chen, Z W; Tan, F.; Kashiwazaki, R.; Zarif, L.; Perlin, D. S.

    2002-01-01

    Cochleates containing amphotericin B (CAMB) were administered orally at doses ranging from 0 to 40 mg/kg of body weight/day for 14 days in a murine model of systemic aspergillosis. The administration of oral doses of CAMB (20 and 40 mg/kg/day) resulted in a survival rate of 70% and a reduction in colony counts of more than 2 logs in lungs, livers, and kidneys. Orally administered CAMB shows promise for the treatment of aspergillosis.

  13. Efficacy of orally delivered cochleates containing amphotericin B in a murine model of aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmas, G; Park, S; Chen, Z W; Tan, F; Kashiwazaki, R; Zarif, L; Perlin, D S

    2002-08-01

    Cochleates containing amphotericin B (CAMB) were administered orally at doses ranging from 0 to 40 mg/kg of body weight/day for 14 days in a murine model of systemic aspergillosis. The administration of oral doses of CAMB (20 and 40 mg/kg/day) resulted in a survival rate of 70% and a reduction in colony counts of more than 2 logs in lungs, livers, and kidneys. Orally administered CAMB shows promise for the treatment of aspergillosis.

  14. Stabilization of serum antibody responses triggered by initial mucosal contact with the antigen independently of oral tolerance induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.A. Verdolin

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Initial contacts with a T-dependent antigen by mucosal routes may result in oral tolerance, defined as the inhibition of specific antibody formation after subsequent parenteral immunizations with the same antigen. We describe here an additional and permanent consequence of these initial contacts, namely, the blockade of secondary-type responsiveness to subsequent parenteral contacts with the antigen. When repeatedly boosted ip with small doses (3 µg of ovalbumin (OVA (or lysozyme, primed B6D2F1 mice showed progressively higher antibody responses. In contrast, mice primed after a single oral exposure to the antigen, although repeatedly boosted, maintained their secondary antibody titers on a level which was inversely proportional to the dose of antigen in the oral pretreatment. This phenomenon also occurred in situations in which oral tolerance was not induced. For example, senile 70-week-old B6D2F1 mice pretreated with a single gavage of 20 mg OVA did not become tolerant, i.e., they formed the same secondary levels of anti-OVA antibodies as non-pretreated mice. However, after 4 weekly challenges with 3 µg OVA ip, orally pretreated mice maintained the same anti-OVA serum levels, whereas the levels of control mice increased sequentially. This "stabilizing" effect of mucosal exposure was dose dependent, occurred with different proteins and was triggered by single or multiple oral or nasal exposures to the antigen.

  15. Targeting nanosystems to human DCs via Fc receptor as an effective strategy to deliver antigen for immunotherapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cruz, L.J.; Rueda, F.; Cordobilla, B.; Simon, L.; Hosta, L.; Albericio, F.; Domingo, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are increasingly being explored as cellular vaccines for tumor immunotherapy, since they provide an effective system of antigen presentation both in vitro and in vivo. An additional advantage of this cell type is that it is possible to target specific antigens through the

  16. Therapeutic Efficacy of Orally Delivered Doxorubicin Nanoparticles in Rat Tongue Cancer Induced by 4-Nitroquinoline 1-Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monir Moradzadeh Khiavi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Oral cancer is one of the most significant cancers in the world, and squamous cell carcinoma makes up about 94% of oral malignancies. The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of doxorubicin plus methotrexate - loaded nanoparticles on tongue squamous cell carcinoma induced by 4NQO and compare it with the commercial doxorubicin and methotrexate delivered orally on seventy SD male rats. Methods: 70 rats were divided into five groups. During the study, the animals were weighed by a digital scale once a week. Number of mortalities was recorded in the data collection forms. At the end of the treatment, biopsy samples were taken from rat tongues in order to evaluate the severity of dysplasia and the extent of cell proliferation. The results were analyzed using ANOVA, descriptive statistics and chi-square test. Results: No statistically significant difference was found in the mean weight of five groups (p>0.05. No significant relationship was found between groups and mortality rate (P = 0. 39. In addition, there was a significant relationship between groups and the degree of dysplasia (P <0.001. The statistical analysis showed a significant relationship between groups and the rate of cell proliferation (p <0.001. Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that the use of doxorubicin plus methotrexate - loaded nanoparticles orally had more therapeutic effects than commercial doxorubicin plus methotrexate.

  17. Helicobacter Pylori - Specific Antigen Tests in Saliva to Identify an Oral Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yajie; Zhao, Lin; Wang, Shumin; Yee, John Kc

    2017-05-01

    Over the past twenty years, the existence of oral Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection has been controversial and is still disputed. It proposes that living H. pylori do not exist in the oral cavity. However, the progressive loss of efficacy of standard eradication therapies has made the treatment of H. pylori more challenging than ever due to oral H. pylori infection. We conducted a study to explore the existence of oral H. pylori infection among 4321 adults. A total 4321 adults (age range, 20-89 years old) comprising 2849 men and 1472 women were recruited by annual physical exam and evaluated using the saliva H. pylori antigen test (HPS) to diagnose oral H. pylori infection and the urea breath test (UBT) to diagnose stomach H. pylori infection. According to the classification on age grouping of World Health Organization, patients were divided into three age groups: A group, the young age subgroup (pylori was 59.59% in the 95% confidence interval (CI) ranges on A group. The lowest positive rate of H. pylori in D group was 25.48% in the 95% confidence interval CI ranges. There was a statistically significant difference (ppylori infection of individuals who have no risk for H. pylori gastric infection. The positive rate of oral H. pylori was 59.59% and this varies across different age groups. This information was not provided by UBT methods. It further identified that the prevalence of oral H. pylori infection is lower in the elder group that may be associated with fewer number of teeth. © 2017 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  18. Influence of glucosamine on the bioactivity of insulin delivered subcutaneously and in an oral nanodelivery system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Kurdi ZI

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Zakieh I Al-Kurdi,1,2 Babur Z Chowdhry,2 Stephen A Leharne,2 Nidal A Qinna,3 Mahmoud MH Al Omari,1 Adnan A Badwan1 1The Jordanian Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Company (PLC, Naor, Jordan; 2Faculty of Engineering and Science, University of Greenwich, Medway Campus, Kent, UK; 3Department of Pharmacology and Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, University of Petra, Amman, Jordan Abstract: The aim of the work reported herein was to study the effect of glucosamine HCl (GlcN·HCl on the bioactivity (BA of insulin, administered via subcutaneous (SC and oral routes, in adult male Sprague Dawley rats. The oral insulin delivery system (insulin–chitosan reverse micelle [IC-RM] was prepared by solubilizing insulin–chitosan (13 kDa polyelectrolyte complex in a RM system consisting of oleic acid, PEG-8 caprylic/capric glycerides, and polyglycerol-6-dioleate. The BA of insulin in vivo was evaluated by measuring blood glucose level using a blood glucose meter; the results revealed that the extent of hypoglycemic activity of SC insulin was GlcN·HCl dose dependent when they were administered simultaneously. A significant reduction in blood glucose levels (P<0.05 was found for the insulin:GlcN·HCl at mass ratios of 1:10 and 1:20, whereas lower ratios (eg, 1:1 and 1:4 showed no significant reduction. Furthermore, enhancement of the action of SC insulin was achieved by oral administration of GlcN·HCl for 5 consecutive days prior to insulin injection (P<0.05. For oral insulin administration via the IC-RM system, the presence of GlcN·HCl increased the hypoglycemic activity of insulin (P<0.05. The relative BA were 6.7% and 5.4% in the presence and absence of GlcN·HCl (ie, the increase in the relative BA was approximately 23% due to incorporating GlcN·HCl in the IC-RM system, respectively. The aforementioned findings offer an opportunity to incorporate GlcN·HCl in oral insulin delivery systems in order to enhance a reduction in blood

  19. Gastric Helicobacter Infection Inhibits Development of Oral Tolerance to Food Antigens in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matysiak-Budnik, Tamara; van Niel, Guillaume; Mégraud, Francis; Mayo, Kathryn; Bevilacqua, Claudia; Gaboriau-Routhiau, Valérie; Moreau, Marie-Christiane; Heyman, Martine

    2003-01-01

    The increase in the transcellular passage of intact antigens across the digestive epithelium infected with Helicobacter pylori may interfere with the regulation of mucosal immune responses. The aim of this work was to study the capacity of Helicobacter infection to inhibit the development of oral tolerance or to promote allergic sensitization and the capacity of a gastro-protective agent, rebamipide, to interfere with these processes in mice. Oral tolerance to ovalbumin (OVA) was studied in 48 C3H/He 4-week-old mice divided into four groups: (i) OVA-sensitized mice; (ii) OVA-“tolerized” mice (that is, mice that were rendered immunologically tolerant); (iii) H. felis-infected, OVA-tolerized mice; (iv) and H. felis-infected, OVA-tolerized, rebamipide-treated mice. Oral sensitization to hen egg lysozyme (HEL) was studied in 48 mice divided into four groups: (i) controls; (ii) HEL-sensitized mice; (iii) H. felis-infected, HEL-sensitized mice; and (iv) H. felis-infected, HEL-sensitized, rebamipide-treated mice. Specific anti-OVA or anti-HEL immunoglobulin E (IgE) and IgG1/IgG2a serum titers were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Additionally, the capacity of rebamipide to interfere with antigen presentation and T-cell activation in vitro, as well as absorption of rebamipide across the epithelial monolayer, was tested. H. felis infection led to the inhibition of oral tolerance to OVA, but rebamipide prevented this inhibitive effect of H. felis. H. felis infection did not enhance the sensitization to HEL, but rebamipide inhibited the development of this sensitization. Moreover, rebamipide inhibited in a dose-dependent manner antigen presentation and T-cell activation in vitro and was shown to be able to cross the epithelium at a concentration capable of inducing this inhibitory effect. We conclude that H. felis can inhibit the development of oral tolerance to OVA in mice and that this inhibition is prevented by rebamipide. PMID:12933867

  20. Development and characterisation of semisolid systems to deliver propolis in the oral cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADRIANA NAKAHARA HIRATA

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Pharmaceutical formulations containing poloxamer 407 (P407, Carbopol 934P (C934P or gelatin (GELA, with ethanolic propolis extract (PE, were designed for the treatment of oral mucosal diseases. PE was produced and its quality was assessed by measuring its specific gravity, pH, weight of dry residue and total flavonoid content. Monopolymeric and binary polymeric formulations were prepared and their gelling temperature (Tsol/gel, pH, continuous flow rheology and mucoadhesion were studied. PE exhibited good quality and the formulations were easy to prepare and showed a wide range of consistency. Most of the formulations showed thermoresponsive behaviour and only those containing 15% P407, plus 0.20% C934P or 1.0 % GELA, displayed Tsol/gel suitable for application to the oral mucosa. Monopolymeric formulations, containing C934P or GELA, and binary formulations exhibited pseudoplastic flow and low degrees of thixotropy. Monopolymeric formulations containing P407 exhibited pseudoplastic flow and rheopexy. The mucoadhesive properties of the systems could not be assessed. Fragments of formulation were found to remain stuck to parts of the mucin disc, owing to cohesive failure of the samples and of the sample/mucin interface. The data obtained on these formulations indicate a potentially useful role in the treatment of oral mucosal diseases. Keywords: Propolis. Mucoadhesion. Poloxamer 407. Carbopol 934P. Gelatin. RESUMO Desenvolvimento e caracterização de sistemas semi-sólidos para liberação de própolis na cavidade bucal Formulações farmacêuticas contendo poloxamer 407 (P407, Carbopol 934P (C934P ou gelatina (GELA, e extrato de própolis (EP foram desenvolvidos para o tratamento de doenças da mucosa oral. EP foi produzido e sua qualidade foi avaliada quanto ao resíduo seco e ao teor de flavonóides totais. Formulações monopoliméricas e poliméricas binárias foram produzidas e a temperatura de gelificação (Tsol/gel, o pH, a

  1. Influence of glucosamine on the bioactivity of insulin delivered subcutaneously and in an oral nanodelivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kurdi, Zakieh I; Chowdhry, Babur Z; Leharne, Stephen A; Qinna, Nidal A; Al Omari, Mahmoud M H; Badwan, Adnan A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the work reported herein was to study the effect of glucosamine HCl (GlcN·HCl) on the bioactivity (BA) of insulin, administered via subcutaneous (SC) and oral routes, in adult male Sprague Dawley rats. The oral insulin delivery system (insulin-chitosan reverse micelle [IC-RM]) was prepared by solubilizing insulin-chitosan (13 kDa) polyelectrolyte complex in a RM system consisting of oleic acid, PEG-8 caprylic/capric glycerides, and polyglycerol-6-dioleate. The BA of insulin in vivo was evaluated by measuring blood glucose level using a blood glucose meter; the results revealed that the extent of hypoglycemic activity of SC insulin was GlcN·HCl dose dependent when they were administered simultaneously. A significant reduction in blood glucose levels (Poral administration of GlcN·HCl for 5 consecutive days prior to insulin injection (Poral insulin administration via the IC-RM system, the presence of GlcN·HCl increased the hypoglycemic activity of insulin (Poral insulin delivery systems in order to enhance a reduction in blood glucose levels.

  2. Repeated oral administration of chitosan/DNA nanoparticles delivers functional FVIII with the absence of antibodies in hemophilia A mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhadwar, S S; Kiernan, J; Wen, J; Hortelano, G

    2010-12-01

    Current treatment of hemophilia A is expensive and involves regular infusions of factor (F)VIII concentrates. The supply of functional FVIII is further compromised by the generation of neutralizing antibodies. Thus, the development of an alternative safe, cost effective, non-invasive treatment that circumvents immune response induction is desirable. To evaluate the feasibility of oral administration of chitosan nanoparticles containing FVIII DNA to provide sustainable FVIII activity in hemophilia A mice. Nanoparticles were characterized for morphology, DNA protection and transfection efficiency. Oral administration of nanoparticles containing canine FVIII in C57Bl/6 FVIII(-/-) hemophilia A mice was evaluated for biodistribution, plasma FVIII activity and phenotypic correction. Sustainable FVIII expression was elucidated after repeated nanoparticle administration. Immune responses to repeated oral nanoparticle administration were also investigated. Chitosan nanoparticles had a particle size range of 200-400 nm and protected DNA from endonuclease and pH degradation. In addition, nanoparticles transfected HEK 293 cells resulted in expression of eGFP, luciferase and FVIII. Hemophilia A mice that ingested chitosan nanoparticles demonstrated transient canine FVIII expression reaching > 100 mU 1 day after treatment, together with partial phenotypic correction. The delivered FVIII plasmid DNA was detected in the intestine and, to a lesser extent, in the liver. Importantly, repeated weekly administrations restored FVIII activity. Furthermore, inhibitors and non-neutralizing FVIII antibodies were not detectable. Repeat oral administration of FVIII DNA formulated in chitosan nanoparticles resulted in sustained FVIII activity in hemophilic mice, and thus may provide a non-invasive alternative treatment for hemophilia A. © 2010 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  3. Pharmacokinetics of artemisinin delivered by oral consumption of Artemisia annua dried leaves in healthy vs. Plasmodium chabaudi-infected mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weathers, Pamela J.; Elfawal, Mostafa A.; Towler, Melissa J.; Acquaah-Mensah, George K.; Rich, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological Relevance The Chinese have used Artemisia annua as a tea infusion to treat fever for > 2,000 yrs. The active component is artemisinin. Previously we showed that when compared to mice fed an equal amount of pure artemisinin, a single oral dose of dried leaves of Artemisia annua (pACT) delivered to Plasmodium chabaudi-infected mice reduced parasitemia at least fivefold. Dried leaves also delivered >40 times more artemisinin in the blood with no toxicity. The pharmacokinetics (PK) of artemisinin delivered from dried plant material has not been adequately studied. Material and Methods Healthy and P. chabaudi-infected mice were oral gavaged with pACT to deliver a 100 mg kg−1 body weight dose of artemisinin. Concentrations of serum artemisinin and one of its liver metabolites, deoxyartemisinin, were measured over two hours by GCMS. Results The first order elimination rate constant for artemisinin in pACT-treated healthy mice was estimated to be 0.80 hr−1 with an elimination half-life (T½) of 51.6 min. The first order absorption rate constant was estimated at 1.39 hr−1. Cmax and Tmax were 4.33 mg L−1 and 60 min, respectively. The area under the curve (AUC) was 299.5 mg·min L−1. In contrast, the AUC for pACT-treated infected mice was significantly greater at 435.6 mg·min L−1. Metabolism of artemisinin to deoxyartemisinin was suppressed in infected mice over the period of observation. Serum levels of artemisinin in the infected mice continued to rise over the 120 min of the study period, and as a result, the elimination T½ was not determined; the Cmax and Tmax were estimated at ≥ 6.64 mg L−1 and ≥ 120 min, respectively. Groups of healthy mice were also fed either artemisinin or artemisinin mixed in mouse chow. When compared at 60 min, artemisinin was undetectable in the serum of mice fed 100 mg AN kg−1 body weight. When plant material was present either as mouse chow or A. annua pACT, artemisinin levels in the serum rose to 2

  4. Fusion proteins containing neuropeptides as novel insect contol agents: snowdrop lectin delivers fused allatostatin to insect haemolymph following oral ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitches, Elaine; Audsley, Neil; Gatehouse, John A; Edwards, John P

    2002-12-01

    The mannose-binding lectin from snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin: GNA), when fed to insects, binds to the gut epithelium and passes into the haemolymph. The potential for GNA to act as a carrier protein to deliver an insect neuropeptide, Manduca sexta allatostatin (Manse-AS), to the haemolymph of lepidopteran larvae has been examined by expressing a GNA/Manse-AS fusion protein (FP) in Escherichia coli, and feeding purified FP to larvae of the tomato moth Lacanobia oleracea. FP, administered at 1.5 or 0.5% of dietary proteins, was found to strongly inhibit feeding and prevent growth of fifth stadium larvae, whereas neither GNA nor Manse-AS alone, nor a mixture of GNA and Manse-AS in control treatments, had deleterious effects at similar levels. Elevated levels of material reacting with anti-Manse-AS antibodies were detected in the haemolymph of insects fed diets containing FP, suggesting that transport of the peptide had occurred. Evidence for the delivery of intact FP to the haemolymph was provided by the co-elution of Manse-AS-like immunoreactivity with standard FP after size exclusion chromatography of haemolymph from FP-fed larvae. GNA/Manse-AS and similar fusion proteins offer a novel and effective strategy for delivering insect neuropeptides by oral administration, which could be used in conjunction with expression in transgenic plants to give crop protection in the field.

  5. Cytokine response to the RSV antigen delivered by dendritic cell-directed vaccination in congenic chicken lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucksová, Jitka; Plachý, Jiří; Staněk, Ondřej; Hejnar, Jiří; Kalina, Jiří; Benešová, Barbora; Trefil, Pavel

    2017-04-05

    Systems of antigen delivery into antigen-presenting cells represent an important novel strategy in chicken vaccine development. In this study, we verified the ability of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) antigens fused with streptavidin to be targeted by specific biotinylated monoclonal antibody (anti-CD205) into dendritic cells and induce virus-specific protective immunity. The method was tested in four congenic lines of chickens that are either resistant or susceptible to the progressive growth of RSV-induced tumors. Our analyses confirmed that the biot-anti-CD205-SA-FITC complex was internalized by chicken splenocytes. In the cytokine expression profile, several significant differences were evident between RSV-challenged progressor and regressor chicken lines. A significant up-regulation of IL-2, IL-12, IL-15, and IL-18 expression was detected in immunized chickens of both regressor and progressor groups. Of these cytokines, IL-2 and IL-12 were most up-regulated 14 days post-challenge (dpc), while IL-15 and IL-18 were most up-regulated at 28 dpc. On the contrary, IL-10 expression was significantly down-regulated in all immunized groups of progressor chickens at 14 dpc. We detected significant up-regulation of IL-17 in the group of immunized progressors. LITAF down-regulation with iNOS up-regulation was especially observed in the progressor group of immunized chickens that developed large tumors. Based on the increased expression of cytokines specific for activated dendritic cells, we conclude that our system is able to induce partial stimulation of specific cell types involved in cell-mediated immunity.

  6. Modulation of the Effects of Lung Immune Response on Bone Marrow by Oral Antigen Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Xavier-Elsas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergic airway inflammation is attenuated by oral tolerization (oral exposure to allergen, followed by conventional sensitization and challenge with homologous antigen, which decreases airway allergen challenge-induced eosinophilic infiltration of the lungs and bone marrow eosinophilia. We examined its effects on bone marrow eosinophil and neutrophil production. Mice of wild type (BP-2, BALB/c, and C57BL/6 and mutant strains (lacking iNOS or CD95L were given ovalbumin (OVA or water (vehicle orally and subsequently sensitized and challenged with OVA (OVA/OVA/OVA and H2O/OVA/OVA groups, resp.. Anti-OVA IgG and IgE, bone marrow eosinophil and neutrophil numbers, and eosinophil and neutrophil production ex vivo were evaluated. T lymphocytes from OVA/OVA/OVA or control H2O/OVA/OVA donors were transferred into naïve syngeneic recipients, which were subsequently sensitized/challenged with OVA. Alternatively, T lymphocytes were cocultured with bone marrow eosinophil precursors from histocompatible sensitized/challenged mice. OVA/OVA/OVA mice of the BP-2 and BALB/c strains showed, relative to H2O/OVA/OVA controls, significantly decreased bone marrow eosinophil counts and ex vivo eosinopoiesis/neutropoiesis. Full effectiveness in vivo required sequential oral/subcutaneous/intranasal exposures to the same allergen. Transfer of splenic T lymphocytes from OVA/OVA/OVA donors to naive recipients prevented bone marrow eosinophilia and eosinopoiesis in response to recipient sensitization/challenge and supressed eosinopoiesis upon coculture with syngeneic bone marrow precursors from sensitized/challenged donors.

  7. An oral Sindbis virus replicon-based DNA vaccine containing VP2 gene of canine parvovirus delivered by Escherichia coli elicits immune responses in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahiya, S S; Saini, M; Kumar, P; Gupta, P K

    2011-01-01

    A Sindbis virus replicon-based DNA vaccine containing VP2 gene of canine parvovirus (CPV) was delivered by Escherichia coli to elicit immune responses. The orally immunized dogs developed CPV-specific serum IgG and virus neutralizing antibody responses. The cellular immune responses analyzed using lymphocyte proliferation test and flow cytometry indicated CPV-specific sensitization of both CD3+CD4+ and CD3+CD8+ lymphocytes. This study demonstrated that the oral CPV DNA vaccine delivered by E. coli can be considered as a promising approach for vaccination of dogs against CPV.

  8. Performance properties of the population bioequivalence approach for in vitro delivered dose for orally inhaled respiratory products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Beth; Strickland, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory agencies, industry, and academia have acknowledged that in vitro assessments serve a role in establishing bioequivalence for second-entry drug product approvals as well as innovator post-approval drug product changes. For orally inhaled respiratory products (OIPs), the issues of correctly analyzing in vitro data and interpreting the results within the broader context of therapeutic equivalence have garnered significant attention. One of the recommended statistical tests for in vitro data is the population bioequivalence method (PBE). The current literature for assessing the PBE statistical approach for in vitro data assumes a log normal distribution. This paper focuses on an assessment of that assumption for in vitro delivered dose. Concepts in development of a statistical model are presented. The PBE criterion and hypotheses are written for the case when data follows a normal distribution, rather than log normal. Results of a simulation study are reported, characterizing the performance of the PBE approach when data are expected to be normally distributed, rather than log normal. In these cases, decisions using the PBE approach are not consistent for the same absolute mean difference that the test product is from the reference product. A conclusion of inequivalency will occur more often if the test product dose is lower than the reference product for the same deviation from target. These features suggest that more research is needed for statistical equivalency approaches for in vitro data.

  9. Vaccination of prostate cancer patients with modified vaccinia ankara delivering the tumor antigen 5T4 (TroVax): a phase 2 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Robert J; Drury, Noel; Naylor, Stuart; Jac, Jaroslaw; Saxena, Somya; Cao, Amy; Hernandez-McClain, Joan; Harrop, Richard

    2008-01-01

    The attenuated vaccinia virus, modified vaccinia Ankara, has been engineered to deliver the tumor antigen 5T4 (TroVax). TroVax has been evaluated in an open-label phase 2 trial in hormone refractory prostate cancer patients in which the vaccine was administered either alone or in combination with granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). The comparative safety and immunologic and clinical efficacy of TroVax alone or in combination with GM-CSF was determined. Twenty-seven patients with metastatic hormone refractory prostate cancer were treated with TroVax alone (n=14) or TroVax+GM-CSF (n=13). 5T4-specific cellular and humoral responses were monitored throughout the study. Clinical responses were assessed by quantifying prostate-specific antigen concentrations and measuring changes in tumor burden by computer-assisted tomography scan. TroVax was well tolerated in all patients with no serious adverse events attributed to vaccination. Of 24 immunologically evaluable patients, all mounted 5T4-specific antibody responses. Periods of disease stabilization from 2 to >10 months were observed. Time to progression was significantly greater in patients who mounted 5T4-specific cellular responses compared with those who did not (5.6 vs. 2.3 mo, respectively). There were no objective clinical responses seen in this study. In this study, the combination of GM-CSF with TroVax showed similar clinical and immunologic responses to TroVax alone. The high frequency of 5T4-specific immune responses and relationship with enhanced time to progression is encouraging and warrants further investigation.

  10. Use of retroviral-mediated gene transfer to deliver and test function of chimeric antigen receptors in human T-cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana C. Parente-Pereira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs are genetically delivered fusion molecules that elicit T-cell activation upon binding of a native cell surface molecule. These molecules can be used to generate a large number of memory and effector T-cells that are capable of recognizing and attacking tumor cells. Most commonly, stable CAR expression is achieved in T-cells using retroviral vectors. In the method described here, retroviral vectors are packaged in a two-step procedure. First, H29D human retroviral packaging cells (a derivative of 293 cells are transfected with the vector of interest, which is packaged transiently in vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV G pseudotyped particles. These particles are used to deliver the vector to PG13 cells, which achieve stable packaging of gibbon ape leukaemia virus (GALV-pseudotyped particles that are suitable for infection of human T-cells. The key advantage of the method reported here is that it robustly generates polyclonal PG13 cells that are 100% positive for the vector of interest. This means that efficient gene transfer may be repeatedly achieved without the need to clone individual PG13 cells for experimental pre-clinical testing. To achieve T-cell transduction, cells must first be activated using a non-specific mitogen. Phytohemagglutinin (PHA provides an economic and robust stimulus to achieve this. After 48-72 h, activated T-cells and virus-conditioned medium are mixed in RetroNectin-coated plasticware, which enhances transduction efficiency. Transduced cells are analyzed for gene transfer efficiency by flow cytometry 48 h following transduction and may then be tested in several assays to evaluate CAR function, including target-dependent cytotoxicity, cytokine production and proliferation.

  11. Augmentation of the antibody response of Atlantic salmon by oral administration of alginate-encapsulated IPNV antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihan Chen

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to assess the effect of alginate-encapsulated infectious pancreatic necrosis virus antigens in inducing the immune response of Atlantic salmon as booster vaccines. One year after intraperitoneal injection with an oil-adjuvanted vaccine, post-smolts were orally boosted either by 1 alginate-encapsulated IPNV antigens (ENCAP; 2 soluble antigens (UNENCAP or 3 untreated feed (control. This was done twice, seven weeks apart. Sampling was done twice, firstly at 7 weeks post 1st oral boost and the 2nd, at 4 weeks after the 2nd oral boost. Samples included serum, head kidney, spleen and hindgut. Serum antibodies were analyzed by ELISA while tissues were used to assess the expression of IgM, IgT, CD4, GATA3, FOXP3, TGF-β and IL-10 genes by quantitative PCR. Compared to controls, fish fed with ENCAP had a significant increase (p<0.04 in serum antibodies following the 1st boost but not after the 2nd boost. This coincided with significant up-regulation of CD4 and GATA3 genes. In contrast, serum antibodies in the UNENCAP group decreased both after the 1st and 2nd oral boosts. This was associated with significant up-regulation of FOXP3, TGF-β and IL-10 genes. The expression of IgT was not induced in the hindgut after the 1st oral boost but was significantly up-regulated following the 2nd one. CD4 and GATA3 mRNA expressions exhibited a similar pattern to IgT in the hindgut. IgM mRNA expression on the other hand was not differentially regulated at any of the times examined. Our findings suggest that 1 Parenteral prime with oil-adjuvanted vaccines followed by oral boost with ENCAP results in augmentation of the systemic immune response; 2 Symmetrical prime and boost (mucosal with ENCAP results in augmentation of mucosal immune response and 3 Symmetrical priming and boosting (mucosal with soluble antigens results in the induction of systemic immune tolerance.

  12. Development of a heat-stable and orally delivered recombinant M2e-expressing B. subtilis spore-based influenza vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guangyu; Miao, Yu; Guo, Yan; Qiu, Hongjie; Sun, Shihui; Kou, Zhihua; Yu, Hong; Li, Junfeng; Chen, Yue; Jiang, Shibo; Du, Lanying; Zhou, Yusen

    2014-01-01

    Highly conserved ectodomain of influenza virus M2 protein (M2e) is an important target for the development of universal influenza vaccines. Today, the use of chemical or genetic fusion constructs have been undertaken to overcome the low immunogenicity of M2e in vaccine formulation. However, current M2e vaccines are neither orally delivered nor heat-stable. In this study, we evaluated the immune efficacy of an orally delivered recombinant M2e vaccine containing 3 molcules of M2e consensus sequence of influenza A viruses, termed RSM2e3. To accomplish this, CotB, a spore coat of Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis), was used as a fusion partner, and heat-stable nonpathogenic B. subtilis spores were used as the carrier. Our results showed that CotB-M2e3 fusion had no effect on spore structure or function in the resultant recombinant RSM2e3 strain and that heterologous influenza virus M2e protein was successfully displayed on the surface of the recombinant RSM2e3 spore. Importantly, recombinant RSM2e3 spores elicited strong and long-term M2e-specific systemic and mucosal immune responses, completely protecting immunized mice from lethal challenge of A/PR/8/34(H1N1) influenza virus. Taken together, our study forms a solid basis for the development of a novel orally delivered and heat-stable influenza vaccine based on B. subtilis spore surface display.

  13. Regulated delayed expression of rfc enhances the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a heterologous antigen delivered by live attenuated Salmonella enterica vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Qingke; Liu, Qing; Jansen, Angela M; Curtiss, Roy

    2010-08-23

    The Salmonella rfc gene encodes the O-antigen polymerase. We constructed three strains in which we replaced the native rfc promoter with the arabinose-dependent araC P(BAD) promoter so that rfc expression was dependent on exogenously supplied arabinose provided during in vitro growth. The three mutant strains were designed to synthesize different amounts of Rfc by altering the ribosome-binding sequence and start codon. We examined these strains for a number of in vitro characteristics compared to an isogenic Deltarfc mutant and the wild-type parent strain. One promoter-replacement mutation, DeltaP(rfc174), yielded an optimal profile, exhibiting wild-type characteristics when grown with arabinose, and Deltarfc characteristics when grown without arabinose. In addition, when administered orally, the DeltaP(rfc174) strain was completely attenuated in for virulence in mice. The DeltaP(rfc174) mutation was introduced into attenuated Salmonella vaccine strain chi9241 (DeltapabA DeltapabB DeltaasdA) followed by introduction of an Asd(+) balanced-lethal plasmid to designed for expression of the pneumococcal surface protein PspA. Mice immunized with either chi9241 or its DeltaP(rfc174) derivative expressing pspA were protected against S. pneumoniae challenge.

  14. Generation of protective immune response against anthrax by oral immunization with protective antigen plant-based vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorantala, Jyotsna; Grover, Sonam; Rahi, Amit; Chaudhary, Prerna; Rajwanshi, Ravi; Sarin, Neera Bhalla; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2014-04-20

    In concern with frequent recurrence of anthrax in endemic areas and inadvertent use of its spores as biological weapon, the development of an effective anthrax vaccine suitable for both human and veterinary needs is highly desirable. A simple oral delivery through expression in plant system could offer promising alternative to the current methods that rely on injectable vaccines extracted from bacterial sources. In the present study, we have expressed protective antigen (PA) gene in Indian mustard by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and in tobacco by plastid transformation. Putative transgenic lines were verified for the presence of transgene and its expression by molecular analysis. PA expressed in transgenic lines was biologically active as evidenced by macrophage lysis assay. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) and oral immunization with plant PA in murine model indicated high serum PA specific IgG and IgA antibody titers. PA specific mucosal immune response was noted in orally immunized groups. Further, antibodies indicated lethal toxin neutralizing potential in-vitro and conferred protection against in-vivo toxin challenge. Oral immunization experiments demonstrated generation of immunoprotective response in mice. Thus, our study examines the feasibility of oral PA vaccine expressed in an edible plant system against anthrax.

  15. The fenestrin antigen in submembrane skeleton of the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila is proposed as a marker of cell polarity during cell division and in oral replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczanowska, Janina; Joachimiak, Ewa; Kiersnowska, Mauryla; Krzywicka, Anna; Golinska, Krystyna; Kaczanowski, Andrzej

    2003-07-01

    Tetrahymena thermophila cells have two types of polarized morphogenesis: divisional morphogenesis and oral reorganization (OR). The aim of this research is the analysis of cortical patterns of immunostaining during cell division and in OR using previously characterized antibodies against fenestrin and epiplasm B proteins. During cell division, the anarchic field of basal body proliferation of the new developing oral apparatus (AF) showed concomitant strong binding of the fenestrin antigen and withdrawal of a signal of the epiplasm B antigen. At a specific stage, the fenestrin antigen also appeared as a character of the anterior cortex pole, with a co-localized decrease in the detected epiplasm B antigen. The fenestrin antigen also showed a polarity of duplicating basal bodies in ciliary rows. Indirect immunofluorescence and immunogold labeling experiments were performed in the absence and presence of an inhibitor of activity of serine/threonine kinases, 6-dimethylaminopurine (6-DMAP) as an inducer of the oral replacement process. In the presence of 6-DMAP, one class of cells started OR, and some others were trapped and affected in cell division. Both types of cells showed an instability of oral structures and formed enlarged primordial oral fields. These anarchic fields (AFs) bind the fenestrin antigen, with disappearance of epiplasmic antigen staining. Only one protein (about 64 kDa) is detected in western blots by the anti-fenestrin antibody and it accumulated in 6-DMAP-treated cells that are involved in uncompleted morphogenetic activity. At a defined stage of oral development, both during cell division and in OR, the fenestrin antigen served as a marker of polarity of the cell of the anterior pole character.

  16. Oral Vaccination Against Anthrax Using a Transgenic Plant Expressing Protective Antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-09-01

    need for effective vaccines which will induce the mucosal immunity system against this highly lethal human pathogen. Characterization of virulence factor...colonizing the mucosal tissue in the gut and therefore may induce mucosal immunity to F I antigen through association with the Peyer’s patches... mucosal immunity , the antigen must first be stable in the gut and then be able to penetrate the epithelial cells to facilitate absorption by M cells. For

  17. Evaluation of immunogenicity and protective efficacy of orally delivered Shigella type III secretion system proteins IpaB and IpaD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, Shannon J; Diaz-McNair, Jovita; Martinez-Becerra, Francisco J; Choudhari, Shyamal P; Clements, John D; Picking, Wendy L; Pasetti, Marcela F

    2013-06-19

    Shigella spp. are food- and water-borne pathogens that cause shigellosis, a severe diarrheal and dysenteric disease that is associated with a high morbidity and mortality in resource-poor countries. No licensed vaccine is available to prevent shigellosis. We have recently demonstrated that Shigella invasion plasmid antigens (Ipas), IpaB and IpaD, which are components of the bacterial type III secretion system (TTSS), can prevent infection in a mouse model of intranasal immunization and lethal pulmonary challenge. Because they are conserved across Shigella spp. and highly immunogenic, these proteins are excellent candidates for a cross-protective vaccine. Ideally, such a vaccine could be administered to humans orally to induce mucosal and systemic immunity. In this study, we investigated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of Shigella IpaB and IpaD administered orally with a double mutant of the Escherichia coli heat labile toxin (dmLT) as a mucosal adjuvant. We characterized the immune responses induced by oral vs. intranasal immunization and the protective efficacy using a mouse pulmonary infection model. Serum IgG and fecal IgA against IpaB were induced after oral immunization. These responses, however, were lower than those obtained after intranasal immunization despite a 100-fold dosage increase. The level of protection induced by oral immunization with IpaB and IpaD was 40%, while intranasal immunization resulted in 90% protective efficacy. IpaB- and IpaD-specific IgA antibody-secreting cells in the lungs and spleen and T-cell-derived IL-2, IL-5, IL-17 and IL-10 were associated with protection. These results demonstrate the immunogenicity of orally administered IpaB and IpaD and support further studies in humans.

  18. Reduced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis after intranasal and oral administration of recombinant lactobacilli expressing myelin antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.B.M. Maassen (Kitty); J.D. Laman (Jon); C. van Holten-Neelen; L. Hoogteijling (L.); L. Groenewegen (Lizet); L. Visser (Lizette); M.M. Schellekens (M.); W.G. Boersma (Wim); H.J.H.M. Claassen (Eric)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractOral administration of autoantigens is a safe and convenient way to induce peripheral T-cell tolerance in autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS). To increase the efficacy of oral tolerance induction and obviate the need for large-scale purification of human myelin proteins, we

  19. Reduced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis after intranasal and oral administration of recombinant lactobacilli expressing meyelin antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maassen, C.B.M.; Holten-Neelen, van J.C.P.A.; Groenewegen, L.; Hoogteijling, L.; Visser, L.; Boersma, W.J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Oral administration of autoantigens is a safe and convenient way to induce peripheral T-cell tolerance in autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS). To increase the efficacy of oral tolerance induction and obviate the need for large-scale purification of human myelin proteins, we use genetica

  20. Effects of Immediate Feedback Delivered by Peer Tutors on the Oral Presentation Skills of Adolescents with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheeler, Mary Catherine; Macluckie, Michelle; Albright, Kristen

    2010-01-01

    High school graduation requirements are becoming increasingly demanding. In addition to meeting academic benchmarks, some school districts have added performance requirements such as oral presentations to their criteria for earning a high school diploma. This type of requirement may present an additional challenge for students with learning…

  1. Oral Delivery of a Novel Recombinant Streptococcus mitis Vector Elicits Robust Vaccine Antigen-Specific Oral Mucosal and Systemic Antibody Responses and T Cell Tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Xie

    Full Text Available The pioneer human oral commensal bacterium Streptococcus mitis has unique biologic features that make it an attractive mucosal vaccine or therapeutic delivery vector. S. mitis is safe as a natural persistent colonizer of the mouth, throat and nasopharynx and the oral commensal bacterium is capable of inducing mucosal antibody responses. A recombinant S. mitis (rS. mitis that stably expresses HIV envelope protein was generated and tested in the germ-free mouse model to evaluate the potential usefulness of this vector as a mucosal vaccine against HIV. Oral vaccination led to the efficient and persistent bacterial colonization of the mouth and the induction of both salivary and systemic antibody responses. Interestingly, persistently colonized animals developed antigen-specific systemic T cell tolerance. Based on these findings we propose the use of rS. mitis vaccine vector for the induction of mucosal antibodies that will prevent the penetration of the mucosa by pathogens such as HIV. Moreover, the first demonstration of rS. mitis having the ability to elicit T cell tolerance suggest the potential use of rS. mitis as an immunotherapeutic vector to treat inflammatory, allergic and autoimmune diseases.

  2. Oral Vaccination with Attenuated Salmonella typhimurium-Delivered TsPmy DNA Vaccine Elicits Protective Immunity against Trichinella spiralis in BALB/c Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Wang, Xiaohuan; Bi, Kuo; Sun, Ximeng; Yang, Jing; Gu, Yuan; Huang, Jingjing; Zhan, Bin; Zhu, Xinping

    2016-01-01

    Background Our previous studies showed that Trichinella spiralis paramyosin (TsPmy) is an immunomodulatory protein that inhibits complement C1q and C8/C9 to evade host complement attack. Vaccination with recombinant TsPmy protein induced protective immunity against T. spiralis larval challenge. Due to the difficulty in producing TsPmy as a soluble recombinant protein, we prepared a DNA vaccine as an alternative approach in order to elicit a robust immunity against Trichinella infection. Methods and Findings The full-length TsPmy coding DNA was cloned into the eukaryotic expression plasmid pVAX1, and the recombinant pVAX1/TsPmy was transformed into attenuated Salmonella typhimurium strain SL7207. Oral vaccination of mice with this attenuated Salmonella-delivered TsPmy DNA vaccine elicited a significant mucosal sIgA response in the intestine and a systemic IgG antibody response with IgG2a as the predominant subclass. Cytokine analysis also showed a significant increase in the Th1 (IFN-γ, IL-2) and Th2 (IL-4, 5, 6, 10) responses in lymphocytes from the spleen and MLNs of immunized mice upon stimulation with TsPmy protein. The expression of the homing receptors CCR9/CCR10 on antibody secreting B cells may be related to the translocation of IgA-secreted B cells to local intestinal mucosa. The mice immunized with Salmonella-delivered TsPmy DNA vaccine produced a significant 44.8% reduction in adult worm and a 46.6% reduction in muscle larvae after challenge with T. spiralis larvae. Conclusion Our results demonstrated that oral vaccination with TsPmy DNA delivered by live attenuated S. typhimurium elicited a significant local IgA response and a mixed Th1/Th2 immune response that elicited a significant protection against T. spiralis infection in mice. PMID:27589591

  3. Orally-Induced Intestinal CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ Treg Controlled Undesired Responses towards Oral Antigens and Effectively Dampened Food Allergic Reactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Lorena Smaldini

    Full Text Available The induction of peripheral tolerance may constitute a disease-modifying treatment for allergic patients. We studied how oral immunotherapy (OIT with milk proteins controlled allergy in sensitized mice (cholera toxin plus milk proteins upon exposure to the allergen. Symptoms were alleviated, skin test was negativized, serum specific IgE and IgG1 were abrogated, a substantial reduction in the secretion of IL-5 and IL-13 by antigen-stimulated spleen cells was observed, while IL-13 gene expression in jejunum was down-regulated, and IL-10 and TGF-β were increased. In addition, we observed an induction of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ cells and IL-10- and TGF-β-producing regulatory T cells in the lamina propria. Finally, transfer experiments confirmed the central role of these cells in tolerance induction. We demonstrated that the oral administration of milk proteins pre- or post-sensitization controlled the Th2-immune response through the elicitation of mucosal IL-10- and TGF-β-producing Tregs that inhibited hypersensitivity symptoms and the allergic response.

  4. No protection in chickens immunized by the oral or intra-muscular immunization route with Ascaridia galli soluble antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Janne Pleidrup; Norup, Liselotte R.; Dalgaard, Tina S.

    2013-01-01

    In chickens, the nematode Ascaridia galli is found with prevalences of up to 100% causing economic losses to farmers. No avian nematode vaccines have yet been developed and detailed knowledge about the chicken immune response towards A. galli is therefore of great importance. The objective...... of this study was to evaluate the induction of protective immune responses to A. galli soluble antigen by different immunization routes. Chickens were immunized with a crude extract of A. galli via an oral or intra-muscular route using cholera toxin B subunit as adjuvant and subsequently challenged with A....... galli. Only chickens immunized via the intra-muscular route developed a specific A. galli antibody response. Frequencies of γδ T cells in spleen were higher 7 days after the first immunization in both groups but only significantly so in the intra-muscularly immunized group. In addition, systemic...

  5. Lactic acid bacteria as antigen delivery vehicles for oral immunization purposes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouwels, P.H.; Leer, R.J.; Shaw, M.; Heijne Den Bak-Glashouwer, M.J.; Tielen, F.D.; Smit, E.; Martinez, B.; Jore, J.; Conway, P.L.

    1998-01-01

    In vaccination programmes in which large numbers of subjects are involved, the oral route of administration is more convenient as compared to the more frequently used parenteral route. This is particularly relevant when vaccines are to be applied in less industrialized countries. Lactic acid bacteri

  6. Antiarthritic activity of an orally active C5a receptor antagonist against antigen-induced monarticular arthritis in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Trent M; Strachan, Anna J; Dryburgh, Nathan; Shiels, Ian A; Reid, Robert C; Fairlie, David P; Taylor, Stephen M

    2002-09-01

    To determine if the new, orally active C5a receptor antagonist, the cyclic peptide AcF-[OPdChaWR], reduces the severity of pathology in a rat model of immune-mediated monarticular arthritis. Arthritis was induced in the right knee of previously sensitized rats by the intraarticular injection of methylated bovine serum albumin. Rats were examined for either 14 days or 28 days, or for 49 days following a second antigen challenge at 28 days. The C5a antagonist (1 or 3 mg/kg/day) and/or ibuprofen (30 mg/kg/day) were administered orally on a daily basis either before or after arthritis induction. Rats receiving AcF-[OPdChaWR] had significant reductions in right knee swelling, gait disturbance, lavaged joint cell numbers, and right knee histopathology, as well as in serum levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) and intraarticular levels of interleukin-6 and TNFalpha on day 14. In the 14- and 28-day studies, ibuprofen resulted in a similar reduction in gait abnormalities and intraarticular inflammatory cells compared with the C5a antagonist, but was less effective in reducing knee swelling over the course of the study and had no effect on knee histopathology. Combination therapy with AcF-[OPdChaWR] and ibuprofen resulted in no greater efficacy than with the C5a antagonist alone. Rats injected twice with the antigen in the 49-day study displayed the most severe histopathology and this, as well as knee swelling and gait abnormalities, was significantly reduced by repeated treatment with the C5a antagonist. An agent that inhibits the action of C5a in this model significantly reduced joint pathology, while ibuprofen was not effective. C5a antagonists could therefore have broader therapeutic benefits than nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs as antiarthritic agents for rheumatoid arthritis.

  7. Effects of orally ingested Bifidobacterium longum on the mucosal IgA response of mice to dietary antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, T; Nakagawa, E; Nara, T; Yajima, T; Kuwata, T

    1998-01-01

    To study the effects of lactic acid bacteria on the mucosal defence against dietary protein antigens, we compared the mucosal IgA responses to beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG) of two groups of mice fed a whey protein diet with and without a culture condensate of Bifidobacterium longum. Both total IgA and anti-beta-LG IgA levels in tissue extracts of the small intestinal wall were significantly higher in mice fed the B. longum diet for 2 weeks than in control ones. Peyer's patch (PP) cells from B. longum-fed mice had a much larger increase in in vitro IgA production than ones from control mice. Furthermore, the in vitro IgA response to beta-LG was detected only when PP cells from B. longum-fed mice were assayed. These results suggest that orally ingested lactic acid bacteria may protect a host from invasion of the intestinal mucosa by dietary antigens that have escaped enzymatic digestion in the intestine.

  8. Acceptability of using electronic vending machines to deliver oral rapid HIV self-testing kits: a qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean D Young

    Full Text Available Rates of unrecognized HIV infection are significantly higher among Latino and Black men who have sex with men (MSM. Policy makers have proposed that HIV self-testing kits and new methods for delivering self-testing could improve testing uptake among minority MSM. This study sought to conduct qualitative assessments with MSM of color to determine the acceptability of using electronic vending machines to dispense HIV self-testing kits.African American and Latino MSM were recruited using a participant pool from an existing HIV prevention trial on Facebook. If participants expressed interest in using a vending machine to receive an HIV self-testing kit, they were emailed a 4-digit personal identification number (PIN code to retrieve the test from the machine. We followed up with those who had tested to assess their willingness to participate in an interview about their experience.Twelve kits were dispensed and 8 interviews were conducted. In general, participants expressed that the vending machine was an acceptable HIV test delivery method due to its novelty and convenience.Acceptability of this delivery model for HIV testing kits was closely associated with three main factors: credibility, confidentiality, and convenience. Future research is needed to address issues, such as user-induced errors and costs, before scaling up the dispensing method.

  9. An oral recombinant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium mutant elicits systemic antigen-specific CD8+ T cell cytokine responses in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin'ombe Nyasha

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The induction of antigen-specific CD8+ T cell cytokine responses against an attenuated, oral recombinant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine expressing a green fluorescent protein (GFP model antigen was investigated. A GFP expression plasmid was constructed in which the gfp gene was fused in-frame with the 5' domain of the Escherichia coli β-galactosidase α-gene fragment with expression under the lac promoter. Groups of mice were orally immunized three times with the bacteria and systemic CD8+ T cell cytokine responses were evaluated. Results High level of the GFP model antigen was expressed by the recombinant Salmonella vaccine vector. Systemic GFP-specific CD8+ T cell cytokine (IFN-γ and IL-4 immune responses were detected after mice were orally vaccinated with the bacteria. It was shown that 226 net IFN-γ and 132 net IL-4 GFP-specific SFUs/10e6 splenocytes were formed in an ELISPOT assay. The level of IFN-γ produced by GFP peptide-stimulated cells was 65.2-fold above background (p Conclusion These results suggested that a high expressing recombinant Salmonella vaccine given orally to mice would elicit antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses in the spleen. Salmonella bacteria may, therefore, be used as potential mucosal vaccine vectors.

  10. Comparison between acute oral/respiratory and chronic stomatitis/gingivitis isolates of feline calicivirus: pathogenicity, antigenic profile and cross-neutralisation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulet, H; Brunet, S; Soulier, M; Leroy, V; Goutebroze, S; Chappuis, G

    2000-01-01

    Feline calicivirus (FCV) is a major oral and respiratory pathogen of cats, able to induce subclinical infection as well as acute disease. It is also characterized by a high degree of antigenic variation. This work sought to address the question of the existence of distinct biotypes of FCV. Eight French, 6 British and 9 American FCV isolates, responsible for acute oral/respiratory disease or chronic gingivitis/stomatitis, were compared for their pathogenicity, antigenic profiles and serological relationships. Antigenic profiles were assessed by an indirect immunofluorescence assay with a large panel of characterized monoclonal antibodies. Cross-neutralisation assays were performed with specific cat antisera collected at 30 days p.i., then analysed by calculation of antigenic bilateral relatedness and dominance. Whatever their pathogenic origin, all the isolates induced an acute upper-respiratory tract infection in oronasally infected SPF kittens. Their antigenic profiles were different and did not correlate with their geographical or pathological origin. Cross-neutralisation studies and calculation of the mean bilateral relatedness allowed us to distinguish chronic original isolates from acute original ones. This study did not confirm the existence of FCV biotypes but showed that the chronic carrier state is related to the emergence of antigenically distant viruses.

  11. Fusion proteins containing insect-specific toxins as pest control agents: snowdrop lectin delivers fused insecticidal spider venom toxin to insect haemolymph following oral ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitches, Elaine; Edwards, Martin G; Mee, Christopher; Grishin, Eugene; Gatehouse, Angharad M R; Edwards, John P; Gatehouse, John A

    2004-01-01

    The mannose-specific snowdrop lectin (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin: GNA), when fed to insects, binds to the gut epithelium and passes into the haemolymph. The ability of GNA to act as a carrier protein to deliver an insecticidal spider venom neurotoxin (Segestria florentina toxin 1: SFI1) to the haemolymph of lepidopteran larvae was investigated. Constructs encoding SFI1 and an SFI1/GNA fusion protein were expressed in Pichia pastoris. The insecticidal activity of purified recombinant proteins on injection was found to be comparable to published values for SfI1 purified from spider venom [Toxicon 40 (2002) 125]. Whereas neither GNA nor SFI1 alone showed acute toxicity when fed to larvae of tomato moth (Lacanobia oleracea), feeding SFI1/GNA fusion at 2.5% of dietary proteins was insecticidal to first stadium larvae, causing 100% mortality after 6 days. The protein also showed a significant, dose dependent, toxicity towards fourth and fifth stadium larvae, with growth reduced by up to approximately 90% over a 4-day assay period compared to controls. Delivery of intact SFI1/GNA to the haemolymph in these insects was shown by western blotting; haemolymph samples from fusion-fed larvae contained a GNA-immunoreactive protein of the same molecular weight as the SFI1/GNA fusion. SFI1/GNA and similar fusion proteins offer a novel and effective approach for delivering haemolymph active toxins by oral administration, which could be used in crop protection by expression in transgenic plants.

  12. Oral vaccination with salmonella simultaneously expressing Yersinia pestis F1 and V antigens protects against bubonic and pneumonic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinghong; Hinnebusch, B Joseph; Trunkle, Theresa; Bosio, Catharine M; Suo, Zhiyong; Tighe, Mike; Harmsen, Ann; Becker, Todd; Crist, Kathryn; Walters, Nancy; Avci, Recep; Pascual, David W

    2007-01-15

    The gut provides a large area for immunization enabling the development of mucosal and systemic Ab responses. To test whether the protective Ags to Yersinia pestis can be orally delivered, the Y. pestis caf1 operon, encoding the F1-Ag and virulence Ag (V-Ag) were cloned into attenuated Salmonella vaccine vectors. F1-Ag expression was controlled under a promoter from the caf1 operon; two different promoters (P), PtetA in pV3, PphoP in pV4, as well as a chimera of the two in pV55 were tested. F1-Ag was amply expressed; the chimera in the pV55 showed the best V-Ag expression. Oral immunization with Salmonella-F1 elicited elevated secretory (S)-IgA and serum IgG titers, and Salmonella-V-Ag(pV55) elicited much greater S-IgA and serum IgG Ab titers than Salmonella-V-Ag(pV3) or Salmonella-V-Ag(pV4). Hence, a new Salmonella vaccine, Salmonella-(F1+V)Ags, made with a single plasmid containing the caf1 operon and the chimeric promoter for V-Ag allowed the simultaneous expression of F1 capsule and V-Ag. Salmonella-(F1+V)Ags elicited elevated Ab titers similar to their monotypic derivatives. For bubonic plague, mice dosed with Salmonella-(F1+V)Ags and Salmonella-F1-Ag showed similar efficacy (>83% survival) against approximately 1000 LD(50) Y. pestis. For pneumonic plague, immunized mice required immunity to both F1- and V-Ags because the mice vaccinated with Salmonella-(F1+V)Ags protected against 100 LD(50) Y. pestis. These results show that a single Salmonella vaccine can deliver both F1- and V-Ags to effect both systemic and mucosal immune protection against Y. pestis.

  13. Knock down of Whitefly Gut Gene Expression and Mortality by Orally Delivered Gut Gene-Specific dsRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Meenal; Raza, Amir; Ali, Muhammad Yousaf; Ashraf, Muhammad Aleem; Mansoor, Shahid; Shahid, Ahmad Ali; Brown, Judith K

    2017-01-01

    Control of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Genn.) agricultural pest and plant virus vector relies on the use of chemical insecticides. RNA-interference (RNAi) is a homology-dependent innate immune response in eukaryotes, including insects, which results in degradation of the corresponding transcript following its recognition by a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) that shares 100% sequence homology. In this study, six whitefly 'gut' genes were selected from an in silico-annotated transcriptome library constructed from the whitefly alimentary canal or 'gut' of the B biotype of B. tabaci, and tested for knock down efficacy, post-ingestion of dsRNAs that share 100% sequence homology to each respective gene target. Candidate genes were: Acetylcholine receptor subunit α, Alpha glucosidase 1, Aquaporin 1, Heat shock protein 70, Trehalase1, and Trehalose transporter1. The efficacy of RNAi knock down was further tested in a gene-specific functional bioassay, and mortality was recorded in 24 hr intervals, six days, post-treatment. Based on qPCR analysis, all six genes tested showed significantly reduced gene expression. Moderate-to-high whitefly mortality was associated with the down-regulation of osmoregulation, sugar metabolism and sugar transport-associated genes, demonstrating that whitefly survivability was linked with RNAi results. Silenced Acetylcholine receptor subunit α and Heat shock protein 70 genes showed an initial low whitefly mortality, however, following insecticide or high temperature treatments, respectively, significantly increased knockdown efficacy and death was observed, indicating enhanced post-knockdown sensitivity perhaps related to systemic silencing. The oral delivery of gut-specific dsRNAs, when combined with qPCR analysis of gene expression and a corresponding gene-specific bioassay that relates knockdown and mortality, offers a viable approach for functional genomics analysis and the discovery of prospective dsRNA biopesticide targets. The approach can

  14. Knock down of Whitefly Gut Gene Expression and Mortality by Orally Delivered Gut Gene-Specific dsRNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Muhammad Yousaf; Ashraf, Muhammad Aleem; Mansoor, Shahid; Shahid, Ahmad Ali; Brown, Judith K.

    2017-01-01

    Control of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Genn.) agricultural pest and plant virus vector relies on the use of chemical insecticides. RNA-interference (RNAi) is a homology-dependent innate immune response in eukaryotes, including insects, which results in degradation of the corresponding transcript following its recognition by a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) that shares 100% sequence homology. In this study, six whitefly ‘gut’ genes were selected from an in silico-annotated transcriptome library constructed from the whitefly alimentary canal or ‘gut’ of the B biotype of B. tabaci, and tested for knock down efficacy, post-ingestion of dsRNAs that share 100% sequence homology to each respective gene target. Candidate genes were: Acetylcholine receptor subunit α, Alpha glucosidase 1, Aquaporin 1, Heat shock protein 70, Trehalase1, and Trehalose transporter1. The efficacy of RNAi knock down was further tested in a gene-specific functional bioassay, and mortality was recorded in 24 hr intervals, six days, post-treatment. Based on qPCR analysis, all six genes tested showed significantly reduced gene expression. Moderate-to-high whitefly mortality was associated with the down-regulation of osmoregulation, sugar metabolism and sugar transport-associated genes, demonstrating that whitefly survivability was linked with RNAi results. Silenced Acetylcholine receptor subunit α and Heat shock protein 70 genes showed an initial low whitefly mortality, however, following insecticide or high temperature treatments, respectively, significantly increased knockdown efficacy and death was observed, indicating enhanced post-knockdown sensitivity perhaps related to systemic silencing. The oral delivery of gut-specific dsRNAs, when combined with qPCR analysis of gene expression and a corresponding gene-specific bioassay that relates knockdown and mortality, offers a viable approach for functional genomics analysis and the discovery of prospective dsRNA biopesticide targets. The

  15. Oral immunogenicity of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus antigen expressed in transgenic banana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Hui-Ting; Chia, Min-Yuan; Pang, Victor Fei; Jeng, Chian-Ren; Do, Yi-Yin; Huang, Pung-Ling

    2013-04-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a persistent threat of economically significant influence to the swine industry worldwide. Recombinant DNA technology coupled with tissue culture technology is a viable alternative for the inexpensive production of heterologous proteins in planta. Embryogenic cells of banana cv. 'Pei chiao' (AAA) have been transformed with the ORF5 gene of PRRSV envelope glycoprotein (GP5) using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and have been confirmed. Recombinant GP5 protein levels in the transgenic banana leaves were detected and ranged from 0.021%-0.037% of total soluble protein. Pigs were immunized with recombinant GP5 protein by orally feeding transgenic banana leaves for three consecutive doses at a 2-week interval and challenged with PRRSV at 7 weeks postinitial immunization. A vaccination-dependent gradational increase in the elicitation of serum and saliva anti-PRRSV IgG and IgA was observed. Furthermore, significantly lower viraemia and tissue viral load were recorded when compared with the pigs fed with untransformed banana leaves. The results suggest that transgenic banana leaves expressing recombinant GP5 protein can be an effective strategy for oral delivery of recombinant subunit vaccines in pigs and can open new avenues for the production of vaccines against PRRSV.

  16. Factors that Influence the Immunological Adjuvant Effect of Lactobacillus fermentum PC1 on Specific Immune Responses in Mice to Orally Administered Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meera Esvaran

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the influences of the dosage of the adjuvant, the nature of the antigen and the host genetics on the capacity of L. fermentum PC1 (PC1 to function as an oral adjuvant. BALB/c and DBA/1 mice were vaccinated with either ovalbumin (OVA or Salmonella Typhimurium on days 0 and 14, Mice were also dosed with the PC1 (108 CFU or 1011 CFU per dose per mouse with the antigens (days 0 and 14 and alone (days −1 and 13. The higher PC1 dose elicited a greater specific serum IgG2a response than IgG1 for both antigens and mice strains, indicating a Th1-biased humoral immune response. The Th1 bias was also observed at the cellular level with greater specific IFN-γ levels than IL-4 and IL-10 with both antigen types and mouse strains. With the particulate antigen, the lower dose of PC1 elicited a Th1 bias at the cellular level, but a balanced Th1/Th2 response at the systemic humoral level. With the soluble antigen, a strong Th1-biased response occurred at the cellular level while the systemic humoral response was Th2-biased. In conclusion, PC1 at the higher dose was an excellent Th1 adjuvant, which was unaffected by the nature of the antigen or the host’s genetic background.

  17. Immunization with recombinant DNA and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) vectors delivering PSCA and STEAP1 antigens inhibits prostate cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupa, Magdalena; Canamero, Marta; Gomez, Carmen E; Najera, Jose L; Gil, Jesus; Esteban, Mariano

    2011-02-04

    Despite recent advances in early detection and improvement of conventional therapies, there is an urgent need for development of additional approaches for prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer, and the use of immunotherapeutic modalities, such as cancer vaccines, is one of the most promising strategies. In this study, we evaluated the prophylactic efficacy of an active immunization protocol against prostate cancer associated antigens mPSCA and mSTEAP1 in experimental prostate cancer. Two antigen delivery platforms, recombinant DNA and MVA vectors, both encoding either mPSCA or mSTEAP1 were used in diversified DNA prime/MVA boost vaccination protocol. Antitumour activity was evaluated in TRAMP-C1 subcutaneous syngeneic tumour model and TRAMP mice. DNA prime/MVA boost immunization against either mPSCA or mSTEAP1, delayed tumour growth in TRAMP-C1 cells-challenged mice. Furthermore, simultaneous vaccination with both antigens produced a stronger anti-tumour effect against TRAMP-C1 tumours than vaccination with either mPSCA or mSTEAP1 alone. Most importantly, concurrent DNA prime/MVA boost vaccination regimen with those antigens significantly decreased primary tumour burden in TRAMP mice without producing any apparent adverse effects. Histopathological analysis of prostate tumours from vaccinated and control TRAMP mice revealed also that mPSCA/mSTEAP1 based-vaccination was effective at reducing the severity of prostatic lesions and incidence of high-grade poorly differentiated prostate cancer. Suppression of the disease progression in TRAMP mice was correlated with decreased proliferation index and increased infiltration of T-cells in prostate tissue. Active immunization against PSCA and STEAP1 using DNA prime/MVA boost strategy is a promising approach for prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer.

  18. A single, low dose oral antigen exposure in newborn piglets primes mucosal immunity if administered with CpG oligodeoxynucleotides and polyphosphazene adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasternak, J Alex; Ng, Siew Hon; Wilson, Heather L

    2014-10-15

    By definition, soluble antigens ingested orally trigger mucosal tolerance such that any subsequent re-exposure by a systemic route results in suppression of immunity. We propose that antigens introduced in extreme early life can readily traverse the gut wall and therefore circumvent induction of mucosal tolerance and instead induce immunity. Piglets were drenched with low-doses of ovalbumin (OVA; 5mg or 0.05 mg) alone, OVA plus adjuvants (CpG oligodeoxynucleotides and PCEP polyphosphazene) or saline within 6h of birth. At 28 days of age, they were administered 10mg OVA plus 1:1 Montanide adjuvant (or saline) via the intraperitoneal (i.p.) route or via the oral route. Serum was obtained on day 28 and day 49 to measure OVA-specific antibodies titres. All piglets boosted orally with OVA plus Montanide, regardless of prior OVA exposure, failed to induce immunity. As expected, piglets drenched with saline but boosted via the i.p. route with OVA plus Montanide showed significant induction of anti-OVA IgA, IgG, IgG1 and IgG2 relative to saline control piglets. Newborn animals drenched with 5mg or 0.05 mg OVA failed to induce oral immunity. A second intramuscular injection in adulthood triggered immunity in the piglets that were drenched with 0.05 mg OVA and boosted initially by the i.p. route suggesting that some systemic lymphocytes were primed despite initial lack of induction of humoral immunity. In contrast, piglets orally immunized with 5mg or 0.05 mg OVA plus adjuvants resulted in significant induction of anti-OVA IgA (5mg only), IgM, IgG, IgG1 and IgG2 in serum relative to saline control piglets as well as significant induction of anti-OVA IgA, IgM (5mg only) IgG, IgG1 (5mg only) or IgG2 relative to piglets drenched with OVA alone. These data clearly show that the response was sensitive to the oral vaccine components and was not simply a response to the i.p. immunization at day 28. This work demonstrates that newborn piglets respond to oral antigens with immunity

  19. Responses of Juvenile Black-Tailed Prairie Dogs ( Cynomys ludovicianus ) to a Commercially Produced Oral Plague Vaccine Delivered at Two Doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas-Canales, Elsa M; Wolfe, Lisa L; Tripp, Daniel W; Rocke, Tonie E; Abbott, Rachel C; Miller, Michael W

    2017-05-02

    We confirmed safety and immunogenicity of mass-produced vaccine baits carrying an experimental, commercial-source plague vaccine (RCN-F1/V307) expressing Yersinia pestis V and F1 antigens. Forty-five juvenile black-tailed prairie dogs ( Cynomys ludovicianus ) were randomly divided into three treatment groups (n=15 animals/group). Animals in the first group received one standard-dose vaccine bait (5×10(7) plaque-forming units [pfu]; STD). The second group received a lower-dose bait (1×10(7) pfu; LOW). In the third group, five animals received two standard-dose baits and 10 were left untreated but in contact. Two vaccine-treated and one untreated prairie dogs died during the study, but laboratory analyses ruled out vaccine involvement. Overall, 17 of 33 (52%; 95% confidence interval for binomial proportion [bCI] 34-69%) prairie dogs receiving vaccine-laden bait showed a positive anti-V antibody response on at least one sampling occasion after bait consumption, and eight (24%; bCI 11-42%) showed sustained antibody responses. The STD and LOW groups did not differ (P≥0.78) in their proportions of overall or sustained antibody responses after vaccine bait consumption. Serum from one of the nine (11%; bCI 0.3-48%) surviving untreated, in-contact prairie dogs also had detectable antibody on one sampling occasion. We did not observe any adverse effects related to oral vaccination.

  20. Responses of juvenile black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) to a commercially produced oral plague vaccine delivered at two doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas-Canales, Elsa M.; Wolfe, Lisa L.; Tripp. Daniel W.,; Rocke, Tonie E.; Abbott, Rachel C.; Miller, Michael W.

    2017-01-01

    We confirmed safety and immunogenicity of mass-produced vaccine baits carrying an experimental, commercial-source plague vaccine (RCN-F1/V307) expressing Yersinia pestis V and F1 antigens. Forty-five juvenile black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) were randomly divided into three treatment groups (n=15 animals/group). Animals in the first group received one standard-dose vaccine bait (5×107 plaque-forming units [pfu]; STD). The second group received a lower-dose bait (1×107 pfu; LOW). In the third group, five animals received two standard-dose baits and 10 were left untreated but in contact. Two vaccine-treated and one untreated prairie dogs died during the study, but laboratory analyses ruled out vaccine involvement. Overall, 17 of 33 (52%; 95% confidence interval for binomial proportion [bCI] 34−69%) prairie dogs receiving vaccine-laden bait showed a positive anti-V antibody response on at least one sampling occasion after bait consumption, and eight (24%; bCI 11–42%) showed sustained antibody responses. The STD and LOW groups did not differ (P≥0.78) in their proportions of overall or sustained antibody responses after vaccine bait consumption. Serum from one of the nine (11%; bCI 0.3–48%) surviving untreated, in-contact prairie dogs also had detectable antibody on one sampling occasion. We did not observe any adverse effects related to oral vaccination.

  1. Oral Escherichia coli colonization factor antigen I fimbriae ameliorate arthritis via IL-35, not IL-27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochetkova, Irina; Thornburg, Theresa; Callis, Gayle; Holderness, Kathryn; Maddaloni, Massimo; Pascual, David W

    2014-01-15

    A Salmonella therapeutic expressing enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli colonization factor Ag I (CFA/I) fimbriae protects against collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) by eliciting two regulatory T cell (Treg) subsets: TGF-β-producing Foxp3(-)CD39(+)CD4(+) T cells and IL-10-producing Foxp3(+)CD39(+)CD4(+) T cells. However, it is unclear whether CFA/I fimbriae alone are protective and whether other regulatory cytokines are involved, especially in the context for the EBI3-sharing cytokines, Treg-derived IL-35 and APC-derived IL-27, both capable of suppressing Th17 cells and regulating autoimmune diseases. Subsequent evaluation revealed that a single oral dose of purified, soluble CFA/I fimbriae protected against CIA as effectively as did Salmonella-CFA/I and found that Foxp3(+)CD39(+)CD4(+) T cells were the source of secreted IL-35, whereas IL-27 production by CD11c(+) cells was inhibited. Inquiring into their relevance, CFA/I fimbriae-treated IL-27R-deficient (WSX-1(-/-)) mice were equally protected against CIA as were wild-type mice, suggesting a limited role for IL-27. In contrast, CFA/I fimbriae-mediated protection was abated in EBI3(-/-) mice, accompanied by the loss of TGF-β- and IL-10-producing Tregs. Adoptive transfer of C57BL/6 CD39(+)CD4(+) T cells to EBI3(-/-) mice with concurrent CFA/I plus IL-35 treatment effectively stimulated Tregs suppressing proinflammatory collagen II-specific Th cells. In contrast, recipients cotransferred with C57BL/6 and EBI3(-/-) CD39(+)CD4(+) T cells and treated with CFA/I plus IL-35 were not protected, implicating the importance of endogenous IL-35 for conferring CFA/I-mediated protection. Thus, CFA/I fimbriae stimulate IL-35 required for the coinduction of TGF-β and IL-10.

  2. Evaluation of rhodamine B as an orally delivered biomarker for rodents and a feed-through transtadial biomarker for phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascari, T M; Foil, L D

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of rhodamine B as an orally delivered biomarker for rodents and a feed-through transtadial biomarker for phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae). Rhodamine B-treated hamsters were visibly marked for up to 8 wk, and their feces were fluorescent when examined under a fluorescence microscope. The development and survival of sand fly larvae fed feces of rhodamine B-treated hamsters were not significantly different from control sand flies. Adult male and female sand flies, that had been fed as larvae the feces of rhodamine B-treated hamsters, were fluorescent when examined using fluorescent microscopy and could be distinguished from control sand flies. Adult female sand flies that took bloodmeals from rhodamine B-treated hamsters were fluorescent when examined immediately after feeding. Rhodamine B incorporated rodent baits could be used to detect adult male and female sand flies that fed on the feces of baited rodents as larvae, or adult female sand flies that have taken a bloodmeal from bait-fed rodents. This would allow the delineation of specific foci with rodent-sand fly associations that would be susceptible to control by using feed-through or systemic insecticides.

  3. Premalignant and malignant oral lesions are associated with changes in the glycosylation pattern of carbohydrates related to ABH blood group antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, Erik; Clausen, H; Holmstrup, P

    1988-01-01

    The distribution of carbohydrate structures related to the ABO(H) blood group antigen system was studied in biopsies from eight squamous cell carcinomas, and eight erythroplakias with epithelial dysplasia. Twenty oral lesions without histological evidence of malignancy (13 lichen planus lesions...... and 7 homogeneous leukoplakias) were also examined. The distribution of Lex, Ley, H type 2 chain, and N-acetyllactosamine, all type 2 chain carbohydrate structures, was investigated by immunohistological staining using monoclonal antibodies with selected specificity. The histological pattern...

  4. The mucosal and systemic immune responses in chickens orally immunised with Campylobacter jejuni antigen entrapped in poly-lactide-co-glycolide microparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Maphilindawati Noor

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available An oral immunisation in chickens with antigen entrapping in biodegradable microparticles was evaluated in order to achieve optimal antibody responses following oral vaccination. This study was adapted to Campylobacter jejuni antigen in chickens to observe its stimulation both mucosal and systemic immune responses. A group of 5 embryonated chicken eggs was immunised with heat-killed C. jejuni entrapped in poly-lactide-co-glycolide (PLG microparticles at day 17 of incubation deposited into the amniotic fluid. Seven days after hatching the chickens were oral boostered, these was design to as Group A. In the Group B, each embryonated egg was immunised with soluble C. jejuni as in the same as Group A. Immune responses of post vaccination were observed at day-14, the humoral immunity was evaluated with an ELISA and whereas mucosal antibody response was detected by fluorescent histology. The serum IgG and IgA antibody responses, and also the bile and intestinal scrapping IgA antibody responses to campylobacter in Group A were significantly higher than those of the soluble antigen of Group B (P<0.05. Total number of immunoglobulin-containing cells for IgG, IgM, and IgA isotypes in the ileum in Group A chickens were also significantly higher than those of Group B (P<0.05 but was not in the duodenum and spleen.

  5. Oral Escherichia coli Colonization Factor Antigen I (CFA/I) Fimbriae Ameliorate Arthritis via IL-35, not IL-27

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochetkova, Irina; Thornburg, Theresa; Callis, Gayle; Holderness, Kathryn; Maddaloni, Massimo; Pascual, David W.

    2014-01-01

    A Salmonella therapeutic expressing enterotoxigenic E. coli colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) fimbriae protects against collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) by eliciting two regulatory T cell (Treg) subsets: TGF-β-producing Foxp3−CD39+CD4+ and IL-10-producing Foxp3+CD39+CD4+ T cells. However, it is unclear if CFA/I fimbriae alone are protective, and if other regulatory cytokines are involved especially in the context for the EBI3-sharing cytokines, Treg-derived IL-35 and APC-derived IL-27, both capable of suppressing Th17 cells and regulating autoimmune diseases. Subsequent evaluation revealed that a single oral dose of purified, soluble CFA/I fimbriae protected against CIA as effectively as Salmonella-CFA/I, and found Foxp3+CD39+CD4+ T cells as the source of secreted IL-35, whereas IL-27 production by CD11c+ cells was inhibited. Inquiring into their relevance, CFA/I fimbriae-treated IL-27 receptor-deficient (WSX-1−/−) mice were equally protected against CIA as wild-type mice suggesting a limited role for IL-27. In contrast, CFA/I fimbriae-mediated protection was abated in EBI3−/− mice accompanied by the loss of TGF-β- and IL-10-producing Tregs. Adoptive transfer of B6 CD39+CD4+ T cells to EBI3−/− mice with concurrent CFA/I plus IL-35 treatment effectively stimulated Tregs suppressing proinflammatory CII-specific Th cells. Opposingly, recipients co-transferred with B6 and EBI3−/− CD39+CD4+ T cells and treated with CFA/I plus IL-35 failed in protecting mice implicating the importance for endogenous IL-35 to confer CFA/I-mediated protection. Thus, CFA/I fimbriae stimulate IL-35 required for the co-induction of TGF-β and IL-10. PMID:24337375

  6. Association of oral lichen planus with hepatitis C virus, surface antigen of hepatitis B virus, and diabetes: A clinical and biochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavani Donempudi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral lichen planus is an inflammatory mucocutaneous disease commonly encountered in the dental clinic. The etiology of oral lichen planus is still unknown. The probable factors associated with oral lichen planus include anxiety, trauma, malnutrition, infection, and autoimmunity. Objectives: The aim of the study was to evaluate the serum levels of fasting and postprandial blood sugar levels, surface antigen of hepatitis B virus (HBsAg, and hepatitis C virus (HCV autoantibodies in oral lichen planus patients and controls, and to assess the association of oral lichen planus with diabetes, HCV, and HBsAg. Study Design: The study included a total of 25 oral lichen planus patients. Twenty-five individuals who did not have the above clinical conditions were also included in the study and comprised the control group. Both the study and control groups consisted of both sexes in the age group of 20–70 years. Patients were clinically diagnosed as oral lichen planus after obtaining a detailed history and was later confirmed by histopathologic examination. Materials and Methods: Blood samples were collected from both the oral lichen planus patients and controls. Biochemical analysis of blood glucose levels, i.e., fasting and postprandial blood glucose levels, HBsAg, hepatitis C autoantibodies were done by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Blood glucose levels, i.e., fasting and postprandial blood glucose levels, were found to be statistically increased in oral lichen planus patients when compared with controls. There was no significant change in HCV autoantibodies and HBsAg. The results of the present study also showed a significant association of oral lichen planus with diabetes. However, there was no significant association of oral lichen planus with HCV and HBsAg in patients when compared with controls. Conclusion: There was a direct relation of oral lichen planus with diabetes whereas there was no significant association with HCV

  7. Towards the development of an oral vaccine against porcine cysticercosis: expression of the protective HP6/TSOL18 antigen in transgenic carrots cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monreal-Escalante, Elizabeth; Govea-Alonso, Dania O; Hernández, Marisela; Cervantes, Jacquelynne; Salazar-González, Jorge A; Romero-Maldonado, Andrea; Rosas, Gabriela; Garate, Teresa; Fragoso, Gladis; Sciutto, Edda; Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio

    2016-03-01

    The Taenia solium HP6/TSOL18 antigen was produced in carrot cells, yielding an immunogenic protein that induced significant protection in an experimental murine model against T. crassiceps cysticercosis when orally administered. This result supports the potential of HP6/TSOL18-carrot as a low-cost anti-cysticercosis vaccine candidate. Cysticercosis is a zoonosis caused by Taenia solium that can be prevented by interrupting the parasite life cycle through pig vaccination. Several injectable vaccine candidates have been reported, but the logistic difficulties and costs for its application limited its use in nationwide control programs. Oral plant-based vaccines can deal with this limitation, because of their easy administration and low cost. A stable expression of the HP6/TSOL18 anti-T. solium cysticercosis protective antigen in carrot calli transformed with an optimized transgene is herein reported. An antigen accumulation up to 14 µg g(-1) of dry-weight biomass was achieved in the generated carrot lines. Mouse immunization with one of the transformed calli induced both specific IgG and IgA anti-HP6/TSOL18 antibodies. A statistically significant reduction in the expected number of T. crassiceps cysticerci was observed in mice orally immunized with carrot-made HP6/TSOL18, in a similar extent to that obtained by subcutaneous immunization with recombinant HP6/TSOL18 protein. In this study, a new oral plant-made version of the HP6/TSOL18 anti-cysticercosis vaccine is reported. The vaccine candidate should be further tested against porcine cysticercosis.

  8. Suppression of inhibitor formation against FVIII in a murine model of hemophilia A by oral delivery of antigens bioencapsulated in plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Alexandra; Su, Jin; Lin, Shina; Wang, Xiaomei; Herzog, Roland W; Daniell, Henry

    2014-09-04

    Hemophilia A is the X-linked bleeding disorder caused by deficiency of coagulation factor VIII (FVIII). To address serious complications of inhibitory antibody formation in current replacement therapy, we created tobacco transplastomic lines expressing FVIII antigens, heavy chain (HC) and C2, fused with the transmucosal carrier, cholera toxin B subunit. Cholera toxin B-HC and cholera toxin B-C2 fusion proteins expressed up to 80 or 370 µg/g in fresh leaves, assembled into pentameric forms, and bound to GM1 receptors. Protection of FVIII antigen through bioencapsulation in plant cells and oral delivery to the gut immune system was confirmed by immunostaining. Feeding of HC/C2 mixture substantially suppressed T helper cell responses and inhibitor formation against FVIII in mice of 2 different strain backgrounds with hemophilia A. Prolonged oral delivery was required to control inhibitor formation long-term. Substantial reduction of inhibitor titers in preimmune mice demonstrated that the protocol could also reverse inhibitor formation. Gene expression and flow cytometry analyses showed upregulation of immune suppressive cytokines (transforming growth factor β and interleukin 10). Adoptive transfer experiments confirmed an active suppression mechanism and revealed induction of CD4(+)CD25(+) and CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells that potently suppressed anti-FVIII formation. In sum, these data support plant cell-based oral tolerance for suppression of inhibitor formation against FVIII. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  9. Co-delivery of polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid and flagellin by poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) MPs synergistically enhances immune response elicited by intranasally delivered hepatitis B surface antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiaojing; He, Jintian; Zhang, Ruxia; Wu, Guanghao; Xiong, Fangfang; Zhao, Baohua

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the synergistic effect between toll-like receptor (TLR) 3 ligand polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (pI:C) and TLR5 ligand flagellin (FLN) on immune responses induced by nasally delivered hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg). Mannan and chitosan oligosaccharide-modified, pH-responsive poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (MC-PLGA) microparticles (MPs) containing HBsAg, FLN, pI:C or both ligands were prepared with a double-emulsion method. In vitro uptake experiments show that cellular uptake of MC-PLGA MPs by macrophages was through energy-dependent, receptor-mediated endocytosis mechanism. After uptake of MPs by macrophages, MC-PLGA MPs existed both in the endo-some and in the cytoplasm. FLN and pI:C in solution or MP formulation could synergize to activate macrophages and induce higher pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6, IL-12, interferon-γ and anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 compared to single TLR ligand (P<0.05). In vivo immunogenicity studies indicated that co-delivery of FLN and pI:C within MC-PLGA MPs synergistically induced higher serum anti-HBsAg IgG levels and Th1 cytokine levels compared with MC-PLGA MPs encapsulated single TLR ligand plus MPs encapsulated HBsAg (P<0.05). These results suggest that synergic TLR3 and TLR5 stimulation might be a promising novel tool for nasally delivered HBsAg. PMID:28924346

  10. Oral Gavage Delivery of PR8 Antigen with β-Glucan-Conjugated GRGDS Carrier to Enhance M-Cell Targeting Ability and Induce Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Yi; Nurunnabi, Md; Kang, Sung Hun; Nafiujjaman, Md; Huh, Kang Moo; Lee, Yong-Kyu; Kim, Yeu-Chun

    2017-04-10

    Oral gavage is known as one of most convenient routes for therapeutic administration in comparison with other available routes such as intravenous, intra muscular, suppository, etc. An oral vaccine delivery system has additional potential as it may provide a convenient way to prevent infectious diseases by introducing optimum immunization in mucus. Although oral vaccine delivery has attracted tremendous interest in vaccine delivery research, various limitations have prevented its rate of progress up to the level that was initially expected. However, the major problems of oral vaccine delivery are vaccine instability and lack of absorbability, resulting from degradation of the sophisticated antigens in the acidic medium in the stomach. In order to obtain adequate microfold-cell (M-cell) targeting and uptake, the therapeutic material is required to pass through the stomach and reach the small intestine without degradation. In this project, we have introduced a conjugate of β-glucan and Glycine-Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid-Serine (GRGDS) that is effective for simultaneous protection of the antigen (PR8) and M-cell targeting. According to the experimental results, the cationic β-glucan-GRGDS conjugate can encapsulate a certain amount of anionic PR8 through electrostatic interaction, which forms nanoparticles with a range of diameter of 200-250 nm. Also, the PR8 incorporated nanoparticles showed high cell viability and stability in diverse environments. Finally, excellent M-cell targeting ability was verified in an in vitro M-cell model. Most importantly, the in vivo test obviously demonstrated the superiority of this system, which significantly increases antibody concentration in serum, intestine, and mucus as measured 21 days after immunization.

  11. Yeast expressing hepatitis B virus surface antigen determinants on its surface: Implications for a possible oral vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, M.P.; Deen, C.; Boersma, W.J.A.; Pouwels, P.H.; Klis, F.M.

    1996-01-01

    The two major hydrophilic regions of the hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) have been expressed in the outer mannoprotein layer of the cell wall of 'Bakers Yeast', Saccharomyces cerevisiae, by fusing them between the yeast invertase signal sequence and the yeast α-agglutinin carboxyterminal c

  12. Histo-blood group ABO antigen in oral potentially malignant lesions and squamous cell carcinoma--genotypic and phenotypic characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Shan; Bennett, Erik Paul; Reibel, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    to establish the ABO genotype. Total and patchy loss of A/B antigen expression was found in 24/32 carcinomas, 6/7 leukoplakias with severe dysplasia, 12/17 leukoplakias with mild and moderate dysplasia, and 6/17 leukoplakias without dysplasia. Specific A/B allele loss was found in 8/24 cases with carcinoma...

  13. Vaccination of renal cell cancer patients with modified vaccinia Ankara delivering the tumor antigen 5T4 (TroVax) alone or administered in combination with interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha): a phase 2 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Robert J; Shingler, William; Goonewardena, Madusha; de Belin, Jackie; Naylor, Stuart; Jac, Jaroslaw; Willis, James; Saxena, Somyata; Hernandez-McClain, Joan; Harrop, Richard

    2009-09-01

    Attenuated vaccinia virus, modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) has been engineered to deliver the tumor antigen 5T4 (TroVax). MVA-5T4 has been evaluated in an open-label phase 2 trial in metastatic renal cell cancer patients in which the vaccine was administered alone or in combination with interferon-alpha-2b (IFN-alpha). The safety, immunologic, and clinical efficacy of MVA-5T4 with or without IFN-alpha was determined. Twenty-eight patients with metastatic renal cell cancer were treated with MVA-5T4 alone (13) or plus IFN-alpha (15). The 5T4-specific cellular and humoral responses were monitored throughout the study. Clinical responses were assessed by measuring changes in tumor burden by computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging scan. MVA-5T4 was well tolerated with no serious adverse event attributed to vaccination. Of 23 intent-to-treat patients tested for immune responses postvaccination, 22 (96%) mounted 5T4-specific antibody and/or cellular responses. One patient treated with MVA-5T4 plus IFN-alpha showed a partial response for >7 months, whereas an additional 14 patients (7 receiving MVA-5T4 plus IFN and 7 receiving MVA-5T4 alone) showed periods of disease stabilization ranging from 1.73 to 9.60 months. Median progression free survival and overall survival for all intent-to-treat patients was 3.8 months (range: 1 to 11.47 mo) and 12.1 months (range: 1 to 27 mo), respectively. MVA-5T4 administered alone or in combination with IFN-alpha was well tolerated in all patients. Despite the high frequency of 5T4-specific immune responses, it is not possible to conclude that patients are receiving clinical benefit. The results are encouraging and warrant further investigation.

  14. Bioavailability of Orally Delivered Alpha- tocopherol by Poly(Lactic-Co-Glycolic) Acid (PLGA) Nanoparticles and Chitosan Covered PLGA Nanoparticles in F344 Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Lacey C. Simon; Stout, Rhett W.; Cristina Sabliov

    2016-01-01

    t is hypothesized that the bioavailability of αT (alpha- tocopherol), an antioxidant, can be improved when delivered by poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanopar‐ ticles (NPs) and chitosan covered PLGA nanoparticles (PLGA-Chi NPs), and that the mucoadhesive properties of chitosan may enhance absorption of αT. PLGA and PLGA- Chi NPs were characterized by measuring entrapment efficiency, size, polydispersity, and zeta potential. Nano‐ particle physical stability, chemical stability of entrap...

  15. Oral Administration of Heat-Killed Lactobacillus gasseri OLL2809 Reduces Cedar Pollen Antigen-Induced Peritoneal Eosinophilia in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiro Sashihara

    2008-01-01

    Conclusions: We demonstrated that the oral administration of heat-killed L. gasseri OLL2809 suppresses eosinophilia via the modulation of Th1/Th2 balance. These observations suggested that heat-killed L. gasseri OLL2809 might potentially ameliorate the increased number of eosinophils in patients with Japanese cedar pollinosis.

  16. Oral Health Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About | Contact InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Children's Oral Health Mouth Breathing Can Cause Major Health Problems Over ... news feeds delivered directly to your desktop! more... Oral Health Glossary Article Chapters Oral Health Glossary print full ...

  17. Prediction of recurrence using exfoliative cytology and melanoma-associated antigen-A mRNA analysis following wide excision of oral squamous cell carcinoma: short report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollaoglu, N; Metzler, P; Zenk, J; Nkenke, E; Neukam, F W; Ries, J

    2011-12-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the sixth most common cancer. The local recurrence of OSSC might result from the existence of occult cancer cells around tumour margins. Exfoliative cytology has lately gained great importance as a method for obtaining RNA samples from suspicious oral mucosal lesions in order to carry out molecular diagnosis. In addition, melanoma associated-A antigens (MAGE-A) are expressed in various tumours and their detection is a highly accurate sign that cancer cells are present. The prediction of a recurrence using MAGE-A mRNA expression analysis to follow-up OSCC cases using a newly established molecular diagnostic technique applied to cytological materials. RNA was extracted from three recurrent OSCC cases and from 20 healthy volunteers as a control group using a cytobrush. The expression of MAGE-A3, A4, A6, A10 and A12 was investigated in these specimens using quantitative real-time (RT-PCR). There was no expression of MAGE-A in the specimens of normal oral mucosa. However, the expression analysis of five different MAGE-A genes indicated a high potential for malignant change in biopsy-proven recurrent OSCC cases. Except for MAGE-A10, the rest of the genes were expressed in different ratios by the three recurrent cases, which had been determined on histopathology to be OSCC or carcinoma in situ. It is suggested that analysis of MAGE-A expression may be used as a risk prediction method in the diagnosis of recurrence after wide excision of OSCC to enhance the accuracy of exfoliative cytology, which has limitations due to false negative and false positive results. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Effect of codon optimization and subcellular targeting on Toxoplasma gondii antigen SAG1 expression in tobacco leaves to use in subcutaneous and oral immunization in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacono María L

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Codon optimization and subcellular targeting were studied with the aim to increase the expression levels of the SAG178-322 antigen of Toxoplasma gondii in tobacco leaves. The expression of the tobacco-optimized and native versions of the SAG1 gene was explored by transient expression from the Agrobacterium tumefaciens binary expression vector, which allows targeting the recombinant protein to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and the apoplast. Finally, mice were subcutaneously and orally immunized with leaf extracts-SAG1 and the strategy of prime boost with rSAG1 expressed in Escherichia coli was used to optimize the oral immunization with leaf extracts-SAG1. Results Leaves agroinfiltrated with an unmodified SAG1 gene accumulated 5- to 10-fold more than leaves agroinfiltrated with a codon-optimized SAG1 gene. ER localization allowed the accumulation of higher levels of native SAG1. However, no significant differences were observed between the mRNA accumulations of the different versions of SAG1. Subcutaneous immunization with leaf extracts-SAG1 (SAG1 protected mice against an oral challenge with a non-lethal cyst dose, and this effect could be associated with the secretion of significant levels of IFN-γ. The protection was increased when mice were ID boosted with rSAG1 (SAG1+boost. This group elicited a significant Th1 humoral and cellular immune response characterized by high levels of IFN-γ. In an oral immunization assay, the SAG1+boost group showed a significantly lower brain cyst burden compared to the rest of the groups. Conclusion Transient agroinfiltration was useful for the expression of all of the recombinant proteins tested. Our results support the usefulness of endoplasmic reticulum signal peptides in enhancing the production of recombinant proteins meant for use as vaccines. The results showed that this plant-produced protein has potential for use as vaccine and provides a potential means for protecting humans and

  19. Growth kinetics, antigen profiling, and proteinase activity of Egyptian Trichomonas tenax isolates derived from patients having oral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sibaei, Mahmoud M; Abdel-Fattah, Nashwa S; Ahmed, Sabah A; Abou-Seri, Hanan M

    2012-04-01

    The role of Trichomonas tenax as a pathogen had been clearly implicated in various pathological processes that arise outside the boundaries of the mouth. Although a relationship between the increased occurrence of this protozoan and progression of periodontal disease has been demonstrated, the ability of T. tenax in causing oral infections and the precise mechanism of tissue damage is not well known. The present study aimed to investigate different isolates of T.tenax from individuals having oral infections. Plaques and/or calculi samples were collected from 70 individuals who were diagnosed as having periodontitis and/or gingivitis, then subjected to parasitological examination and culture on modified trypticase, yeast and iron medium (TYI-S-33). Isolates successfully maintained in culture were further subjected to analysis of protein profile of lysates by Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate-Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and analysis of proteinases by non-denaturing gelatin-SDS-PAGE. Comparison of growth kinetics of seven T. tenax isolates showed a wide variability in the growth characteristics. Protein profiles of the seven isolates revealed a total 53 bands ranged in molecular weight (MW) from 5 to 95kDa using 12% resolution gel. Also, T. tenax isolates were found to possess 19 proteinase bands ranged in MW from 14 to 66kDa. The proteolytic bands were intensified by a cysteine proteinase activator and totally disappeared by treatment with a cysteine proteinase inhibitor suggesting that the proteinases were of cysteine proteinases type. The high frequency of T. tenax detected (28.6%) along with the variability in protein profiling and proteolytic activity of the isolates supports the possible pathogenicity of T. tenax and clarifies a conclusion that different strains with possibility of variable pathogenic potential may exist. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Constitutive Expression of the Vi Polysaccharide Capsular Antigen in Attenuated Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi Oral Vaccine Strain CVD 909

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin Yuan; Noriega, Fernando R.; Galen, James E.; Barry, Eileen; Levine, Myron M.

    2000-01-01

    Live oral Ty21a and parenteral Vi polysaccharide vaccines provide significant protection against typhoid fever, albeit by distinct immune mechanisms. Vi stimulates serum immunoglobulin G Vi antibodies, whereas Ty21a, which does not express Vi, elicits humoral and cell-mediated immune responses other than Vi antibodies. Protection may be enhanced if serum Vi antibody as well as cell-mediated and humoral responses can be stimulated. Disappointingly, several new attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi oral vaccines (e.g., CVD 908-htrA and Ty800) that elicit serum O and H antibody and cell-mediated responses following a single dose do not stimulate serum Vi antibody. Vi expression is regulated in response to environmental signals such as osmolarity by controlling the transcription of tviA in the viaB locus. To investigate if Vi antibodies can be stimulated if Vi expression is rendered constitutive, we replaced PtviA in serovar Typhi vaccine CVD 908-htrA with the constitutive promoter Ptac, resulting in CVD 909. CVD 909 expresses Vi even under high-osmolarity conditions and is less invasive for Henle 407 cells. In mice immunized with a single intranasal dose, CVD 909 was more immunogenic than CVD 908-htrA in eliciting serum Vi antibodies (geometric mean titer of 160 versus 49, P = 0.0007), whereas O antibody responses were virtually identical (geometric mean titer of 87 versus 80). In mice challenged intraperitoneally with wild-type serovar Typhi 4 weeks after a single intranasal immunization, the mortality of those immunized with CVD 909 (3 of 8) was significantly lower than that of control mice (10 of 10, P = 0.043) or mice given CVD 908-htrA (9 of 10, P = 0.0065). PMID:10899868

  1. Bacillus subtilis spores expressing the VP28 antigen: a potential oral treatment to protect Litopenaeus vannamei against white spot syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Anh T V; Pham, Cuong K; Pham, Huong T T; Pham, Hang L; Nguyen, Anh H; Dang, Lua T; Huynh, Hong A; Cutting, Simon M; Phan, Tuan-Nghia

    2014-09-01

    The envelope protein VP28 of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is considered a candidate antigen for use in a potential vaccine to this important shrimp pathogen (the cause of white spot syndrome, WSS). Here, we used spores of Bacillus subtilis to display VP28 on the spore surface. Trials were conducted to evaluate their ability to protect shrimps against WSSV infection. The gene cotB-vp28 was integrated into the chromosome of the laboratory strain B. subtilis PY79, and expression of CotB-VP28 was detected by Western blotting and immunofluorescence. Expression of CotB-VP28 was equivalent to 1000 molecules per spore. PY79 and CotB-VP28 spores were mixed with pellets for feeding of whiteleg shrimps (Litopenaeus vannamei), followed by WSSV challenge. Superoxidase dismutase (SOD), phenoloxidase activities and mortality rates of the two shrimp groups were evaluated. Groups fed with PY79 and CotB-VP28 spores at day 7 had increased SOD activities of 29% and increased phenoloxidase activities of 15% and 33%, respectively, compared to those of the control group. Fourteen days postchallenge, 35% of vaccinated shrimps had died compared to 49% of those fed naked spores (PY79) and 66% untreated, unchallenged animals. These data suggest that spores expressing VP28 have potential as a prophylactic treatment of WSS.

  2. Influence of a Commercial Lead Apron on Patient Skin Dose Delivered During Oral and Maxillofacial Examinations under Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Ralf Kurt Willy; Sazgar, Mahssa; Karle, Heiko; de Las Heras Gala, Hugo

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of a commercial lead apron on patient skin dose delivered during maxillofacial CBCT in five critical regions by means of solid-state-dosimetry. Five anatomical regions (thyroid gland, left and right breast, gonads, back of the phantom torso) in an adult female anthropomorphic phantom were selected for dose measurement by means of the highly sensitive solid-state dosimeter QUART didoSVM. Ten repeated single exposures were assessed for each patient body region for a total of five commercial CBCT devices with and without a lead apron present. Shielded and non-shielded exposures were compared under the paired Wilcoxon test, with absolute and relative differences computed. Reproducibility was expressed as the coefficient of variation (CV) between the 10 repeated assessments. The highest doses observed at skin level were found at the thyroid (mean shielded ± SD: 450.5 ± 346.7 μGy; non-shielded: 339.2 ± 348.8 μGy, p = 0.4922). Shielding resulted in a highly significant (p shielded dose of approximately 35 μGy. Dose reduction was also significantly lower for the back-region (mean: -65%, p shielded situation. Reproducibility was inversely correlated to skin dose (Rspearman = -0.748, p lead apron, which did not shield this region. Dose reduction by means of a commercial lead apron was significant in all other regions, particularly in the region of the female breast.

  3. Development and characterization of guar gum nanoparticles for oral immunization against tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Mandeep; Malik, Basant; Garg, Tarun; Rath, Goutam; Goyal, Amit K

    2015-05-01

    The main aim of this study was to develop an effective carrier system containing Ag85A-loaded guar gum nanoparticles for oral vaccination against tuberculosis. Nanoparticles were prepared by Nanoprecipitation method. The developed particles with mean diameter 895.5 ± 14.73 nm and high antigen entrapment seem to be optimum for oral vaccine delivery. The acid protection assay, Peyer's patch uptake study and in-vitro antigen study confirmed that the developed formulations can protect the antigen from harsh gastric environment and can safely deliver the antigen to the intestinal region. In vivo studies data indicated that the developed nanocarriers can induce a strong mucosal as well as systemic immune response. Therefore, the experimental evidence suggests that guar-gum nanoparticle findings indicated that the guar gum nanoparticles can be utilized for safe and effective vaccine delivery via oral route.

  4. Low-dose oral tolerance due to antigen in the diet suppresses differentially the cholera toxin-adjuvantized IgE, IgA and IgG response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hanne Risager; Kjær, Tanja; Frøkiær, Hanne

    2003-01-01

    Background: Cholera toxin (CT) is used as a mucosal adjuvant amongst other applications for studying food allergy because oral administration of antigen with CT induces an antigen-specific type 2 response, including IgE and IgA production. Priorly established oral tolerance due to antigen...... soy-trypsin inhibitor (KSTI) (F0 mice) and mice fed a soy-free diet (F2 mice) were orally immunized with KSTI and CT. KSTI-specific serum IgG1, IgG2a, IgA and IgE and fecal IgA were monitored. KSTI-stimulated cell proliferation and interleukin (IL)-6 production were determined. Results: The anti......-KSTI IgE and IgA responses in the F0 mice were substantially suppressed, while the IgG1 and IgG2a responses were not suppressed after five oral immunizations. The response suppression tended to decline with increasing numbers of immunizations suggesting that the suppression could be overcome by multiple...

  5. Safety and immunogenicity of an oral DNA vaccine encoding Sip of Streptococcus agalactiae from Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus delivered by live attenuated Salmonella typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, L Y; Wang, K Y; Xiao, D; Chen, D F; Geng, Y; Wang, J; He, Y; Wang, E L; Huang, J L; Xiao, G Y

    2014-05-01

    Attenuated Salmonella typhimurium SL7207 was used as a carrier for a reconstructed DNA vaccine against Streptococcus agalactiae. A 1.02 kb DNA fragment, encoding for a portion of the surface immunogenic protein (Sip) of S. agalactiae was inserted into pVAX1. The recombinant plasmid pVAX1-sip was transfected in EPC cells to detect the transient expression by an indirect immunofluorescence assay, together with Western blot analysis. The pVAX1-sip was transformed by electroporation into SL7207. The stability of pVAX1-sip into Salmonella was over 90% after 50 generations with antibiotic selection in vitro while remained stable over 80% during 35 generations under antibiotic-free conditions. The LD50 of SL/pVAX1-sip was 1.7 × 10(11) CFU/fish by intragastric administration which indicated a quite low virulence. Tilapias were inoculated orally at 10(8) CFU/fish, the recombinant bacteria were found present in intestinal tract, spleens and livers and eventually eliminated from the tissues 4 weeks after immunization. Fish immunized at 10(7), 10(8) and 10(9) CFU/fish with different immunization times caused various levels of serum antibody and an effective protection against lethal challenge with the wild-type strain S. agalactiae. Integration studies showed that the pVAX1-sip did not integrate with tilapia chromosomes. The DNA vaccine SL/pVAX1-sip was proved to be safe and effective in protecting tilapias against S. agalactiae infection.

  6. Oral administration of recombinant Neisseria meningitidis PorA genetically fused to H. pylori HpaA antigen increases antibody levels in mouse serum, suggesting that PorA behaves as a putative adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Abel E; Manzo, Ricardo A; Soto, Daniel A; Barrientos, Magaly J; Maldonado, Aurora E; Mosqueira, Macarena; Avila, Anastasia; Touma, Jorge; Bruce, Elsa; Harris, Paul R; Venegas, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    The Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane protein PorA from a Chilean strain was purified as a recombinant protein. PorA mixed with AbISCO induced bactericidal antibodies against N. meningitidis in mice. When PorA was fused to the Helicobacter pylori HpaA antigen gene, the specific response against H. pylori protein increased. Splenocytes from PorA-immunized mice were stimulated with PorA, and an increase in the secretion of IL-4 was observed compared with that of IFN-γ. Moreover, in an immunoglobulin sub-typing analysis, a substantially higher IgG1 level was found compared with IgG2a levels, suggesting a Th2-type immune response. This study revealed a peculiar behavior of the purified recombinant PorA protein per se in the absence of AbISCO as an adjuvant. Therefore, the resistance of PorA to proteolytic enzymes, such as those in the gastrointestinal tract, was analyzed, because this is an important feature for an oral protein adjuvant. Finally, we found that PorA fused to the H. pylori HpaA antigen, when expressed in Lactococcus lactis and administered orally, could enhance the antibody response against the HpaA antigen approximately 3 fold. These observations strongly suggest that PorA behaves as an effective oral adjuvant.

  7. Sublingual administration of an adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5)-based vaccine confirms Toll-like receptor agonist activity in the oral cavity and elicits improved mucosal and systemic cell-mediated responses against HIV antigens despite preexisting Ad5 immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appledorn, Daniel M; Aldhamen, Yasser A; Godbehere, Sarah; Seregin, Sergey S; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    HIV/AIDS continue to devastate populations worldwide. Recent studies suggest that vaccines that induce beneficial immune responses in the mucosal compartment may improve the efficacy of HIV vaccines. Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5)-based vectors remain a promising platform for the development of effective vaccines. In an effort to improve the efficacy of Ad5-based vaccines, even in the presence of preexisting Ad5 immunity, we evaluated the potential for an Ad5-based HIV vaccine to induce antigen-specific immune responses following sublingual (s.l.) administration, a route not previously tested in regard to Ad-based vaccines. s.l. vaccination with an Ad5-based HIV-Gag vaccine resulted in a significant induction of Gag-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses in both the systemic and the mucosal compartment. We also show that s.l. immunization not only avoided preexisting Ad5 immunity but also elicited a broad repertoire of antigen-specific CTL clones. Additionally, we confirm for the first time that oral delivery of a vaccine expressing a potent Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist can stimulate innate immune responses through induction of cytokines and chemokines and activation of NK cells, NKT cells, and macrophages in vivo. These results positively correlated with improved antigen-specific CTL responses. These results could be achieved both in Ad5-naïve mice and in mice with preexisting immunity to Ad5. The simplicity of the s.l. vaccination regimen coupled with augmentation of TLR-dependent pathways active in the oral cavity makes s.l. delivery a promising method for HIV vaccine development specifically, as well as for many other vaccine applications in general.

  8. High expression of prostate-specific membrane antigen in the tumor-associated neo-vasculature is associated with worse prognosis in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haffner, Michael C; Laimer, Johannes; Chaux, Alcides; Schäfer, Georg; Obrist, Peter; Brunner, Andrea; Kronberger, Irmgard E; Laimer, Klaus; Gurel, Bora; Koller, Johann-Benedikt; Seifarth, Christof; Zelger, Bettina; Klocker, Helmut; Rasse, Michael; Doppler, Wolfgang; Bander, Neil H

    2012-08-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a transmembrane protein expressed in prostate cancer as well as in the neo-vasculature of nonprostatic solid tumors. Here, we determined the expression pattern of PSMA in the vasculature of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Using a previously validated antibody, PSMA staining distribution and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) expression status was evaluated in a cohort of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (n=96) using immunohistochemistry and was correlated with clinicopathological features as well as outcome. Twenty-four (25%) cases showed no detectable PSMA staining, 48 (50%) demonstrated positive immunoreactivity for PSMA in less than 50% of microvessels and 24 (25%) cases showed strong endothelial PSMA expression in more than 50% of tumor-associated microvessels. High endothelial PSMA expression was associated with greatly reduced survival (18.2 vs 77.3 months; P=0.0001) and maintained prognostic significance after adjusting for grade and stage in multivariate analysis (hazard ratio=2.19, P=0.007). Furthermore, we observed a strong association between endothelial PSMA and cancer cell-specific COX2 expression. In conclusion, we provide the first evidence for the prognostic significance of endothelial PSMA expression in oral squamous cell carcinoma and, suggest a potential interaction between arachidonic acid metabolites and endothelial PSMA expression in the tumor neo-vasculature.

  9. Why Is Oral Health Important for Women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About | Contact InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Children's Oral Health Mouth Breathing Can Cause Major Health Problems Over ... delivered directly to your desktop! more... Why Is Oral Health Important for Women? Article Chapters Why Is Oral ...

  10. Why Is Oral Health Important for Men?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About | Contact InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Children's Oral Health Mouth Breathing Can Cause Major Health Problems Over ... delivered directly to your desktop! more... Why is Oral Health Important for Men? Article Chapters Why is Oral ...

  11. Algae-based oral recombinant vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Elizabeth A; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant subunit vaccines are some of the safest and most effective vaccines available, but their high cost and the requirement of advanced medical infrastructure for administration make them impractical for many developing world diseases. Plant-based vaccines have shifted that paradigm by paving the way for recombinant vaccine production at agricultural scale using an edible host. However, enthusiasm for "molecular pharming" in food crops has waned in the last decade due to difficulty in developing transgenic crop plants and concerns of contaminating the food supply. Microalgae could be poised to become the next candidate in recombinant subunit vaccine production, as they present several advantages over terrestrial crop plant-based platforms including scalable and contained growth, rapid transformation, easily obtained stable cell lines, and consistent transgene expression levels. Algae have been shown to accumulate and properly fold several vaccine antigens, and efforts are underway to create recombinant algal fusion proteins that can enhance antigenicity for effective orally delivered vaccines. These approaches have the potential to revolutionize the way subunit vaccines are made and delivered - from costly parenteral administration of purified protein, to an inexpensive oral algae tablet with effective mucosal and systemic immune reactivity.

  12. Algae-based oral recombinant vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Specht

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant subunit vaccines are some of the safest and most effective vaccines available, but their high cost and the requirement of advanced medical infrastructure for administration make them impractical for many developing world diseases. Plant-based vaccines have shifted that paradigm by paving the way for recombinant vaccine production at agricultural scale using an edible host. However, enthusiasm for molecular pharming in food crops has waned in the last decade due to difficulty in developing transgenic crop plants and concerns of contaminating the food supply. Microalgae are poised to become the next candidate in recombinant subunit vaccine production, and they present several advantages over terrestrial crop plant-based platforms including scalable and contained growth, rapid transformation, easily obtained stable cell lines, and consistent transgene expression levels. Algae have been shown to accumulate and properly fold several vaccine antigens, and efforts are underway to create recombinant algal fusion proteins that can enhance antigenicity for effective orally-delivered vaccines. These approaches have the potential to revolutionize the way subunit vaccines are made and delivered – from costly parenteral administration of purified protein, to an inexpensive oral algae tablet with effective mucosal and system immune reactivity.

  13. Contato com antígenos paternos pela mucosa vaginal e oral e o aborto de repetição Contact with paternal antigens in oral and vaginal mucosa and recurrent abortion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosiane Mattar

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: determinar se a prática do sexo oral e vaginal, com ou sem exposição ao ejaculado, diminui a ocorrência de abortamento recorrente. MÉTODO: estudo caso-controle desenvolvido entre maio de 2000 e abril de 2003. Foi aplicado questionário no qual foram assinaladas algumas características de antecedentes clínicos, obstétricos e sexuais da mulher. Foram constituídos dois grupos de estudo: grupo caso, com 116 mulheres com antecedente obstétrico de dois ou mais abortamentos espontâneos, sem a ocorrência prévia de gestação acima de 22 semanas, e grupo controle, com 241 mulheres cujo antecedente obstétrico mostrasse uma ou mais gestações a termo com filho vivo e sem a presença de abortamentos. As variáveis analisadas relacionaram-se ao número de parceiros com os quais a mulher manteve relações sexuais, uso rotineiro de preservativo masculino, prática de sexo oral e exposição da mucosa oral feminina ao material ejaculado. RESULTADOS: relataram somente um parceiro 38,8% das mulheres do grupo caso e 35,7% das do grupo controle. Em ambos os grupos cerca de 75% das mulheres relataram que seus parceiros não usavam rotineiramente preservativo. Aproximadamente 55% das mulheres de ambos os grupos referiram que praticavam sexo oral, sendo que 13,8% das com aborto de repetição e 20,3% das com história de sucesso gestacional o faziam com exposição da mucosa oral ao ejaculado. Não houve diferença entre as pacientes com aborto de repetição e as com sucesso gestacional quanto ao número de parceiros, uso de preservativo, prática de sexo oral e exposição da mucosa oral ao ejaculado pelo parceiro. CONCLUSÃO: nossos resultados não confirmam a hipótese de que o comportamento sexual tenha influência sobre a ocorrência do aborto espontâneo de repetição.PURPOSE: to evaluate whether oral and vaginal sex practice, with or without exposure to semen, decrease the occurrence of recurrent spontaneous abortion. METHOD: this

  14. Oral and parenteral immunization with synthetic retro-inverso peptides induce antibodies that cross-react with native peptides and parent antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Peter; Comis, Alfio; Tyler, Margaret; Howden, Merlin

    2007-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether certain retro-inverso peptides have the potential to act as synthetic vaccines in mice, when immunized by injection or orally. Immunization of mice parenterally with conjugates of three such retro-inverso peptides and orally with the unconjugated peptides elicited generally high titres of anti-peptide antibodies. Antibodies against the same three peptides cross-reacted by binding strongly in ELISA to the native peptides and vice versa, regardless of the mode of immunization. Antibodies against a retro-inverso diphtheria peptide also reacted strongly with diphtheria toxin. Seven of 8 mice, immunized by injection of the conjugate of a retro-inverso derivative of robustoxin [a lethal spider (Atrax robustus) venom toxin] were protected from challenge involving injection with twice the minimum lethal dose of A. robustus venom containing the toxin.

  15. Oral Immunization with a Recombinant Lactococcus lactis-Expressing HIV-1 Antigen on Group A Streptococcus Pilus Induces Strong Mucosal Immunity in the Gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamcha, Venkateswarlu; Jones, Andrew; Quigley, Bernard R; Scott, June R; Amara, Rama Rao

    2015-11-15

    The induction of a potent humoral and cellular immune response in mucosal tissue is important for the development of an effective HIV vaccine. Most of the current HIV vaccines under development use the i.m. route for immunization, which is relatively poor in generating potent and long-lived mucosal immune responses. In this article, we explore the ability of an oral vaccination with a probiotic organism, Lactococcus lactis, to elicit HIV-specific immune responses in the mucosal and systemic compartments of BALB/c mice. We expressed the HIV-1 Gag-p24 on the tip of the T3 pilus of Streptococcus pyogenes as a fusion to the Cpa protein (LL-Gag). After four monthly LL-Gag oral immunizations, we observed strong Gag-specific IgG and IgA responses in serum, feces, and vaginal secretions. However, the Gag-specific CD8 T cell responses in the blood were at or below our detection limit. After an i.m. modified vaccinia Ankara/Gag boost, we observed robust Gag-specific CD8 T cell responses both in systemic and in mucosal tissues, including intraepithelial and lamina propria lymphocytes of the small intestine, Peyer's patches, and mesenteric lymph nodes. Consistent with strong immunogenicity, the LL-Gag induced activation of CD11c(+) CD11b(+) dendritic cells in the Peyer's patches after oral immunization. Our results demonstrate that oral immunization with L. lactis expressing an Ag on the tip of the group A Streptococcus pilus serves as an excellent vaccine platform to induce strong mucosal humoral and cellular immunity against HIV.

  16. TC-2 Satellite Delivered

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    On April 18, 2005, TC-2, the second satellite of Double Star Program (DSP), which was jointly developed by CNSA and ESA, was approved to be delivered to the user after the on-board test and trial operation. The satellite is working well and the performance can meet the user's need. The satellite has collected large amount of valuable scientific data

  17. Microarray assessment of fibronectin, collagen and integrin expression and the role of fibronectin-collagen coating in the growth of normal, SV40 T-antigen-immortalised and malignant human oral keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarang, Zsolt; Haig, Ylva; Hansson, Annette; Vondracek, Martin; Wärngård, Lars; Grafström, Roland

    2003-12-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins affect the growth and survival of epithelial tissues. Accordingly, surface coating with fibronectin and collagen is a common practice for promoting keratinocyte culture. In this study, the expression of fibronectin and collagen-related factors, including integrins, by normal (NOK), SV40 T-antigen-immortalised (SVpgC2a) and malignant (SqCC/Y1) human oral keratinocytes, under standardised, serum-free conditions, was investigated by using microarray analysis. Cell growth was also studied in the presence and absence of a matrix consisting of human fibronectin and bovine collagen type I (FN-COL). Fibronectin transcripts were abundant in all cells, whereas 16 of 29 collagen chains and 14 of 24 integrin subunits were variably detected. With regard to both the expression level and the number of transcripts, higher collagen and lower integrin expression was observed in SVpgC2a cells than in NOKs and SqCC/Y1 cells. The cell types differed with regard to colony-forming efficiency and the rate and kinetics of growth at high cell density. For all cell types, FN-COL coating consistently stimulated cell migration, without influencing growth in mass culture or clonal density. The results demonstrate the transcription of genes associated with the formation and function of fibronectin and collagen in oral epithelium, and variably altered expression patterns in transformed states, and show that keratinocyte lines can be successfully transferred without the stimulus from extracellular FN-COL.

  18. Changes in antigen-specific T cell number and function during oral desensitization in cow’s milk allergy enabled with omalizumab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedoret, D; Singh, A K; Shaw, V; Hoyte, E G; Hamilton, R; DeKruyff, R H; Schneider, L C; Nadeau, K C; Umetsu, D T

    2012-01-01

    Food allergy is a major public health problem for which there is no effective treatment. We examined the immunological changes that occurred in a group of children with significant cow’s milk allergy undergoing a novel and rapid high dose oral desensitization protocol enabled by treatment with omalizumab (anti-IgE mAb). Within a week of treatment, the CD4+ T cell response to milk was nearly eliminated, suggesting anergy in, or deletion of, milk-specific CD4+ T cells. Over the following three months while the subjects remained on high doses of daily oral milk, the CD4+ T cell response returned, characterized by a shift from IL-4 to IFN-γ production. Desensitization was also associated with reduction in milk-specific IgE and a 15-fold increase in milk-specific IgG4. These studies suggest that high dose oral allergen desensitization may be associated with deletion of allergen-specific T cells, without the apparent development of allergen-specific Foxp3+ regulatory T cells. PMID:22318492

  19. A vaccine candidate for post-weaning diarrhea in swine constructed with a live attenuated Salmonella delivering Escherichia coli K88ab, K88ac, FedA, and FedF fimbrial antigens and its immune responses in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Jin; Stein, Barry D; Lee, John Hwa

    2012-07-01

    In order to construct a novel vaccine candidate for preventing post-weaning diarrhea in swine, the individual genes for Escherichia coli K88ab, K88ac, FedA, and FedF fimbriae were inserted into a secretion plasmid pBP244 containing asd, lepB, secA, and secB. These were transformed into Salmonella Typhimurium Δlon ΔcpxR Δasd. Secretion of the individual recombinant fimbrial antigens was confirmed by immunoblot analysis. Groups 1 and 2 mice received a single oral dose of the vaccine mixture and S. Typhimurium carrying pBP244 only as a control, respectively. In groups 3 and 4, mice were primed and boosted with the vaccine mixture and S. Typhimurium carrying pBP244 only as a control, respectively. In general, all immunized mice had significantly increased serum immunoglobulin (Ig)G (P immunized mice. Thus, the vaccine candidate can be highly immunogenic and be safe to the environment.

  20. Prolongation of survival of dogs with oral malignant melanoma treated by en bloc surgical resection and adjuvant CSPG4-antigen electrovaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piras, L A; Riccardo, F; Iussich, S; Maniscalco, L; Gattino, F; Martano, M; Morello, E; Lorda Mayayo, S; Rolih, V; Garavaglia, F; De Maria, R; Lardone, E; Collivignarelli, F; Mignacca, D; Giacobino, D; Ferrone, S; Cavallo, F; Buracco, P

    2016-05-04

    Reported post-surgery 1-year survival rate for oral canine malignant melanoma (cMM) is around 30%; novel treatments are needed as the role of adjuvant chemotherapy is unclear. This prospective study regards adjuvant electrovaccination with human chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan-4 (hCSPG4)-encoded plasmid in 23 dogs with resected II/III-staged CSPG4-positive oral cMM compared with 19 dogs with resected only II/III-staged CSPG4-positive oral cMM. Vaccination resulted in 6-, 12-, 18- and 24-month survival rate of 95.6, 73.9, 47.8 and 30.4%, respectively [median survival time (MST) 684 days, range 78-1694, 8 of 23 dogs alive] and 6-, 12-, 18- and 24-month disease-free interval (DFI) rate of 82.6, 47.8, 26.1 and 17.4%, respectively (DFI 477 days, range 50-1694). Non-vaccinated dogs showed 6-, 12-, 18- and 24-month survival rate of 63.2, 26.3, 15.8 and 5.3%, respectively (MST 200 days, range 75-1507, 1 of 19 dogs alive) and 6-, 12-, 18- and 24-month DFI rate of 52.6, 26.3, 10.5 and 5.3%, respectively (DFI 180 days, range 38-1250). Overall survival and DFI of vaccinated dogs was longer in those <20 kg. In vaccinated and non-vaccinated dogs local recurrence rate was 34.8 and 42%, respectively while lung metastatic rate was 39 and 79%, respectively.

  1. Oral selenium supplementation has no effect on prostate-specific antigen velocity in men undergoing active surveillance for localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, M Suzanne; Algotar, Amit M; Ranger-Moore, James; Stratton, Steven P; Slate, Elizabeth H; Hsu, Chiu-Hsieh; Thompson, Patricia A; Clark, Larry C; Ahmann, Frederick R

    2010-08-01

    The Nutritional Prevention of Cancer trial showed a 52% lower incidence of prostate cancer in men supplemented with selenium. As a result, our study was designed to assess whether selenium supplementation attenuates the progression of prostate cancer. A phase 2 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted in men with localized nonmetastatic prostate cancer who had elected to forgo active treatment and be followed by active surveillance. A total of 140 men were randomized to placebo (n = 46), 200 microg/d (n = 47), or 800 microg/d (n = 47) selenium p.o. (as selenized yeast) and followed every 3 months for up to 5 years. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) velocity was used as a marker of prostate cancer progression and was estimated using mixed-effects regression. Adjusting for age, body mass index, baseline selenium, smoking, baseline PSA, race, PSA method, and Gleason score, PSA velocities for the 200 microg/d and 800 microg/d treatment groups were not statistically significantly different from placebo (P = 0.32 and P = 0.61, respectively). In the highest quartile of baseline selenium, men supplemented with 800 microg selenium showed statistically significantly higher PSA velocity as compared with placebo (P = 0.018). Selenium supplementation did not show a protective effect on PSA velocity in subjects with localized prostate cancer. On the contrary, supplementation with high-dose selenium was observed to be a risk factor for increased PSA velocity in men with high baseline plasma selenium concentrations.

  2. Oral immunisation of mice with transgenic rice calli expressing cholera toxin B subunit fused to consensus dengue cEDIII antigen induces antibodies to all four dengue serotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi-Young; Kim, Byeong-Young; Oh, Sun-Mi; Reljic, Rajko; Jang, Yong-Suk; Yang, Moon-Sik

    2016-10-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection is an emerging global health threat. DENV consists of four distinct serotypes, necessitating a tetravalent vaccine. In this study, expression of consensus envelope protein domain III (cEDIII) fused to cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) in transgenic rice calli was improved using the luminal binding protein BiP at the N-terminus and the SEKDEL signal sequences at the C-terminus, targeting the recombinant protein to endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We found that the fusion protein showed higher levels of expression when compared to the fusion proteins using rice amylase 3D (RAmy3D) or CTB native signal sequence only. The CTB-cEDIII fusion protein was evaluated as an oral dengue vaccine candidate in mice. Serotype specific systemic IgG antibodies and specific IgA response in feces were detected and furthermore, T cell proliferation and high frequency antibody-secreting B cells were detected in the spleen. These results suggest the possible use of plant-based dengue tetravalent vaccine targeted to the mucosal immune system for induction of systemic and mucosal immune responses to DENV infection.

  3. 1000th magnet delivered!

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    On Monday 20 February members of the AT Department marked the delivery of the 1000th superconducting dipole magnet to CERN. Only 232 more of the dipole magnets are needed for the LHC. The 35-tonne-dipoles are 15 meters long and are being manufactured by three companies: Babcock Noell Nuclear in Germany (which completed its contract in November 2005), Ansaldo Superconduttori in Italy and Alstom-Jeumont in France. 'The production is proceeding well and we expect to be complete in October as foreseen,' said Lucio Rossi, Head of the Magnets and Superconductors Group (AT-MAS). In total, 1650 main magnets are needed for the LHC, of which 1300 have already been delivered.

  4. 1000th magnet delivered!

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    On Monday 20 February members of the AT Department marked the delivery of the 1000th superconducting dipole magnet to CERN. Only 232 more of the dipole magnets are needed for the LHC. The 35 tonne-dipoles are 15 meters long and are being manufactured by three companies: Babcock Noell Nuclear in Germany (which finished its contract in November 2005), Ansaldo Superconduttori in Italy and Alstom-Jeumont in France. "The production is proceeding well and we expect to be complete in October as previously foreseen," said Lucio Rossi, Head of the Magnets and Superconductors Group (AT-MAS). In total, 1650 main magnets are needed for the LHC, of which 1300 have been delivered.

  5. Protection of Penaeus monodon against white spot syndrome by continuous oral administration of a low concentration of Bacillus subtilis spores expressing the VP28 antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, K-C; Tran, H T T; Van Doan, C; Le, P H; Van Nguyen, A T; Nguyen, H A; Hong, H A; Cutting, S M; Phan, T-N

    2017-03-01

    In this study, Bacillus subtilis spores expressing a chimeric protein, CotB-VP28, were used as a probiotic vaccine to protect black tiger shrimps (Penaeus monodon) against white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection. Oral administration of pellets coated with CotB-VP28 spores (at ≥1 × 10(9 ) CFU per g pellet) to shrimps induced immune-relating phenoloxydase activity (PO) in shrimps after 14 days of feeding (prior challenge) and at day 3 post challenge (1·26 and 1·70 fold increase respectively). A 75% protection rate was obtained by continuous feeding of the spore-coated pellets at ≥1 × 10(9 ) CFU per g for 14 days prior to WSSV challenge and during all the postchallenge period. Even when the amount of CotB-VP28 spores in feed pellets was reduced down to ≥5 × 10(7)  CFU per g and ≥1 × 10(6)  CFU per g, relatively high protection rates of 70 and 67·5%, respectively, were still obtained. By contrast, feeding pellets without spores (untreated group) and with naked spores (PY79 group) at ≥1 × 10(9)  CFU per g could not protect shrimps against WSSV. These data suggest that supplementation of CotB-VP28 spores at low dose of ≥1 × 10(6)  CFU per g could be effective as a prophylactic treatment of WSS for black tiger shrimps.

  6. Oral delivery of BCG Moreau Rio de Janeiro gives equivalent protection against tuberculosis but with reduced pathology compared to parenteral BCG Danish vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Simon O; Kelly, Dominic L F; Badell, Edgar; Castello-Branco, Luiz Roberto; Aldwell, Frank; Winter, Nathalie; Lewis, David J M; Marsh, Philip D

    2010-10-08

    There is a need for an improved vaccine to better control human tuberculosis (TB), as the only currently available TB vaccine, bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) delivered parenterally, offers variable levels of efficacy. Therefore, recombinant strains expressing additional antigens are being developed alongside alternative routes to parenteral delivery. There is strong evidence that BCG Moreau (RdJ) is a safe and effective vaccine in humans when given by the oral route. This study compared the efficacy of a single oral dose of wild type BCG Moreau Rio de Janeiro (RdJ), or a recombinant RdJ strain expressing Ag85B-ESAT6 fusion protein, formulated with and without lipid to enhance oral delivery, with subcutaneous BCG Danish 1331 and saline control groups in a guinea pig aerosol infection model of pulmonary tuberculosis. Protection was measured as survival at 30 weeks post-challenge and reduced bacterial load and histopathology in lungs and spleen. Results showed that a single oral dose of BCG Moreau (RdJ) or recombinant BCG Moreau (RdJ)-Ag85B-ESAT6, formulated with or without lipid, gave protection equivalent to subcutaneously delivered BCG Danish in the 30 weeks post-challenge survival study. The orally delivered vaccines gave reduced pathology scores in the lungs (three of the four formulations) and spleens (all four formulations) compared to subcutaneously delivered BCG Danish. The oral wild type BCG Moreau (RdJ) in lipid and the unformulated oral wild type BCG Moreau (RdJ) vaccine also gave statistically lower bacterial loads in the lungs and spleens, respectively, compared to subcutaneously delivered BCG Danish. This study provides further evidence to show that lipid formulation does not impair vaccine efficacy and may enhance the delivery and stability of oral vaccines intended for use in countries with poor health infrastructure. Oral delivery also avoids needles (and associated cross-infection risks) and immunisation without the need for specially trained

  7. Intranasal formulations: promising strategy to deliver vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riese, Peggy; Sakthivel, Priya; Trittel, Stephanie; Guzmán, Carlos A

    2014-10-01

    The emergence of new diseases and the lack of efficient vaccines against numerous non-treatable pathogens require the development of novel vaccination strategies. To date, only a few mucosal vaccines have been approved for humans. This was in part due to i) the use of live attenuated vaccines, which are not suitable for certain groups of individuals, ii) safety concerns derived from implementation in humans of some mucosal vaccines, iii) the poor stability, absorption and immunogenicity of antigens delivered by the mucosal route and iv) the limited number of available technologies to overcome the bottlenecks associated with mucosal antigen delivery. Recent advances make feasible the development of efficacious mucosal vaccines with adequate safety profile. Thus, currently intranasal vaccines represent an attractive and valid alternative to conventional vaccines. The present review is focused on the potentials and limitations of market-approved intranasal vaccines and promising candidates undergoing clinical investigations. Furthermore, emerging strategies to overcome main bottlenecks including efficient breaching of the mucosal barrier and safety concerns by implementation of new adjuvants and delivery systems are discussed. The rational design of intranasal vaccines requires an in-depth understanding of the anatomic, physicochemical and barrier properties of the nasal mucosa, as well as the molecular mechanisms governing the activation of the local innate and adaptive immune system. This would provide the critical knowledge to establish effective approaches to deliver vaccine antigens across the mucosal barrier, supporting the stimulation of a long-lasting protective response at both mucosal and systemic levels. Current developments in the area of adjuvants, nanotechnologies and mucosal immunology, together with the identification of surface receptors that can be exploited for cell targeting and manipulating their physiological properties, will become instrumental

  8. Oral vaccination with LcrV from Yersinia pestis KIM delivered by live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium elicits a protective immune response against challenge with Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia enterocolitica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branger, Christine G; Torres-Escobar, Ascención; Sun, Wei; Perry, Robert; Fetherston, Jacqueline; Roland, Kenneth L; Curtiss, Roy

    2009-08-27

    The use of live recombinant attenuated Salmonella vaccines (RASV) synthesizing Yersinia proteins is a promising approach for controlling infection by Yersinia species. In this study, we constructed attenuated Salmonella strains which synthesize a truncated form of LcrV, LcrV196 and evaluated the immune response and protective efficacy elicited by these strains in mice against two other major species of Yersinia: Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia enterocolitica. Surprisingly, we found that the RASV strain alone was sufficient to afford nearly full protection against challenge with Y. pseudotuberculosis, indicating the likelihood that Salmonella produces immunogenic cross-protective antigens. In contrast, lcrV196 expression was required for protection against challenge with Y. enterocolitica strain 8081, but was not sufficient to achieve significant protection against challenge with Y. enterocolitica strain WA, which expressed a divergent form of lcrV. Nevertheless, we are encouraged by these findings to continue pursuing our long-term goal of developing a single vaccine to protect against all three human pathogenic species of Yersinia.

  9. Cell wall anchoring of the Campylobacter antigens to Lactococcus lactis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrycja Anna Kobierecka

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni is the most frequent cause of human food-borne gastroenteritis and chicken meat is the main source of infection. Recent studies showed that broiler chicken immunization against Campylobacter should be the most efficient way to lower the number of human infections by this pathogen. Induction of the mucosal immune system after oral antigen administration should provide protective immunity to chickens. In this work we tested the usefulness of Lactococcus lactis, the most extensively studied lactic acid bacterium, as a delivery vector for Campylobacter antigens. First we constructed hybrid protein – CjaA antigen presenting CjaD peptide epitopes on its surface. We showed that specific rabbit anti-rCjaAD serum reacted strongly with both CjaA and CjaD produced by a wild type Campylobacter jejuni strain. Next, rCjaAD and CjaA were fused to the C-terminus of the L. lactis YndF containing the LPTXG motif. The genes expressing these proteins were transcribed under control of the L. lactis Usp45 promoter and their products contain the Usp45 signal sequences. This strategy ensures a cell surface location of both analysed proteins, which was confirmed by immunofluorescence assay. In order to evaluate the impact of antigen location on vaccine prototype efficacy, a L. lactis strain producing cytoplasm-located rCjaAD was also generated. Animal experiments showed a decrease of Campylobacter cecal load in vaccinated birds as compared with the control group and showed that the L. lactis harboring the surface-exposed rCjaAD antigen afforded greater protection than the L. lactis producing cytoplasm-located rCjaAD. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to employ LAB (Lactic Acid Bacteria strains as a mucosal delivery vehicle for chicken immunization. Although the observed reduction of chicken colonization by Campylobacter resulting from vaccination was rather moderate, the experiments showed that LAB strains can be considered

  10. Delivering SKA Science

    CERN Document Server

    Quinn, Peter; Bird, Ian; Dodson, Richard; Szalay, Alex; Wicenec, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The SKA will be capable of producing a stream of science data products that are Exa-scale in terms of their storage and processing requirements. This Google-scale enterprise is attracting considerable international interest and excitement from within the industrial and academic communities. In this chapter we examine the data flow, storage and processing requirements of a number of key SKA survey science projects to be executed on the baseline SKA1 configuration. Based on a set of conservative assumptions about trends for HPC and storage costs, and the data flow process within the SKA Observatory, it is apparent that survey projects of the scale proposed will potentially drive construction and operations costs beyond the current anticipated SKA1 budget. This implies a sharing of the resources and costs to deliver SKA science between the community and what is contained within the SKA Observatory. A similar situation was apparent to the designers of the LHC more than 10 years ago. We propose that it is time for...

  11. Antigenic variation of Streptococcus mutans colonizing gnotobiotic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratthall, D; Gibbons, R J

    1975-12-01

    Strains of Streptococcus mutans representative of serotypes b and d exhibited antigenic variation in both the oral cavity and in the intestinal canal of gnotobiotic rats. Laboratory-maintained cultures did not vary. The antigenic alterations observed were: (i) loss of detectable levels of both weakly reacting "strain" antigens and the type antigen; (ii) decreased production of the type antigen; (ii) production of altered type antigen; and (iv) production of an antigen not possessed by the parent strain. Immunization of animals before monoinfection with S. mutans strain Bob-1 (serotype d) appeared to increase the rate of emergence of antigenically altered mutants in the intestinal canal, and more diversely altered isolates were obtained. Antigenic variation may account in part for the variation noted by several investigators in attempting to immunize animals against S. mutans-induced dental caries.

  12. Immune responses to vaccines delivered by encapsulation into and/or adsorption onto cationic lipid-PLGA hybrid nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lanxia; Ma, Pingchuan; Wang, Hai; Zhang, Chao; Sun, Hongfan; Wang, Chun; Song, Cunxian; Leng, Xigang; Kong, Deling; Ma, Guilei

    2016-03-10

    In this study, we used cationic lipid-poly(lactide-co-glycolide) acid (PLGA) hybrid nanoparticles as antigen delivery carriers to investigate how antigen-loading methods affect antigen exposure to the immune system and evaluated the resulting antigen-specific immune responses. We formulated three classes of antigen adsorbed and/or encapsulated cationic lipid-PLGA hybrid nanoparticles; we designated antigen-adsorbed (out), antigen-encapsulated (in), and antigen-adsorbed/encapsulated (both) nanoparticles. Our results demonstrate significantly more efficient lysosomal escape and cross-presentation of antigen from dendritic cells (DCs) that were exposed to "both" and "in" nanoparticles. In vivo experiments further revealed that "both" nanoparticles significantly more effectively provided not only adequate initial antigen exposure but also long-term antigen persistence at the injection site. Data from flow cytometry and ELISA analyses demonstrated elevated in vivo immune responses from mice that were immunized with nanoparticles-delivered OVA when compared with free OVA. In addition, "in" and "both" nanoparticles elicited significantly higher antigen-specific immune response than "out" nanoparticles and free OVA. These results suggest that the location of antigen entrapment is an important factor in modulating the immune responses of antigens delivered by nanoparticles. Overall, we propose here a promising approach for the future design of vaccines using cationic lipid-PLGA nanoparticles.

  13. Development and preclinical evaluation of safety and immunogenicity of an oral ETEC vaccine containing inactivated E. coli bacteria overexpressing colonization factors CFA/I, CS3, CS5 and CS6 combined with a hybrid LT/CT B subunit antigen, administered alone and together with dmLT adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmgren, J; Bourgeois, L; Carlin, N; Clements, J; Gustafsson, B; Lundgren, A; Nygren, E; Tobias, J; Walker, R; Svennerholm, A-M

    2013-05-07

    A first-generation oral inactivated whole-cell enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) vaccine, comprising formalin-killed ETEC bacteria expressing different colonization factor (CF) antigens combined with cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), when tested in phase III studies did not significantly reduce overall (generally mild) ETEC diarrhea in travelers or children although it reduced more severe ETEC diarrhea in travelers by almost 80%. We have now developed a novel more immunogenic ETEC vaccine based on recombinant non-toxigenic E. coli strains engineered to express increased amounts of CF antigens, including CS6 as well as an ETEC-based B subunit protein (LCTBA), and the optional combination with a nontoxic double-mutant heat-labile toxin (LT) molecule (dmLT) as an adjuvant. Two test vaccines were prepared under GMP: (1) A prototype E. coli CFA/I-only formalin-killed whole-cell+LCTBA vaccine, and (2) A "complete" inactivated multivalent ETEC-CF (CFA/I, CS3, CS5 and CS6 antigens) whole-cell+LCTBA vaccine. These vaccines, when given intragastrically alone or together with dmLT in mice, were well tolerated and induced strong intestinal-mucosal IgA antibody responses as well as serum IgG and IgA responses to each of the vaccine CF antigens as well as to LT B subunit (LTB). Both mucosal and serum responses were further enhanced (adjuvanted) when the vaccines were co-administered with dmLT. We conclude that the new multivalent oral ETEC vaccine, both alone and especially in combination with the dmLT adjuvant, shows great promise for further testing in humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae serves as novel carrier for oral DNA vaccines in Carassius auratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Nana; Xu, Kun; Li, Xinyi; Liu, Yuwan; Bai, Yichun; Zhang, Xiaohan; Han, Baoquan; Chen, Zhilong; Zhang, Zhiying

    2015-12-01

    Oral delivery of DNA vaccines represents a promising vaccinating method for fish. Recombinant yeast has been proved to be a safe carrier for delivering antigen proteins and DNAs to some species in vivo. However, whether recombinant yeast can be used to deliver functional DNAs for vaccination to fish is still unknown. In this study, red crucian carp (Carassius auratus) was orally administrated with recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae harboring CMV-EGFP expression cassette. On day 5 post the first vaccination, EGFP expression in the hindgut was detected under fluorescence microscope. To further study whether the delivered gene could induce specific immune responses, the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA) was used as immunogen, and oral administrations were conducted with recombinant S. cerevisiae harboring pCMV-OVA mammalian gene expression cassette as gene delivery or pADH1-OVA yeast gene expression cassette as protein delivery. Each administration was performed with three different doses, and the OVA-specific serum antibody was detected in all the experimental groups by western blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). ELISA assay also revealed that pCMV-OVA group with lower dose (pCMV-OVA-L) and pADH1-OVA group with moderate dose (pADH1-OVA-M) triggered relatively stronger antibody response than the other two doses. Moreover, the antibody level induced by pCMV-OVA-L group was significantly higher than pADH1-OVA-M group at the same serum dilutions. All the results suggested that recombinant yeast can be used as a potential carrier for oral DNA vaccines and would help to develop more practical strategies to control infectious diseases in aquaculture.

  15. Intranasal Immunization with the Cholera Toxin B Subunit-Pneumococcal Surface Antigen A Fusion Protein Induces Protection against Colonization with Streptococcus pneumoniae and Has Negligible Impact on the Nasopharyngeal and Oral Microbiota of Mice

    OpenAIRE

    F.C. Pimenta; Miyaji, E. N.; Arêas, A. P. M.; Oliveira, M. L. S.; de Andrade, A. L. S. S.; Ho, P.L.; Hollingshead, S. K.; Leite, L. C. C.

    2006-01-01

    One of the candidate proteins for a mucosal vaccine antigen against Streptococcus pneumoniae is PsaA (pneumococcal surface antigen A). Vaccines targeting mucosal immunity may raise concerns as to possible alterations in the normal microbiota, especially in the case of PsaA, which was shown to have homologs with elevated sequence identity in other viridans group streptococci. In this work, we demonstrate that intranasal immunization with a cholera toxin B subunit-PsaA fusion protein is able to...

  16. 鳞状细胞癌抗原(SCC-Ag)在口腔鳞癌患者血清中表达的临床意义%Clinical significance of serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen expression in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘凌峰; 李幼华

    2012-01-01

    Serum level of squamous cell carcinoma antigen( SCC- Ag ) in 36 patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma( OSCC ), 11 with other oral and maxillofacial malignant tumor,45 with oral and maxillofacial benign tumor and 70 healthy people was measured by chemolumi-nescence method. Serum level of the SCC-Ag in patients with OSCC was significantly higher than that in those with other malignant tumors( P <0.05 ) or with benign tumors( P < 0. 01 ) or in healthy people( P < 0.01 ). Serum SCC3-Ag level may be an indicator in diagnosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma.%用化学发光法检测36 例口腔鳞癌、11 例口腔颌面部其他恶性肿瘤、45 例口腔颌面部良性肿瘤患者以及70 例正常人血清中SCC- Ag水平.鳞癌组SCC- Ag水平明显高于良性肿瘤组(P<0.01)、正常组(P<0.01)以及其他恶性肿瘤组(P<0.05).SCC- Ag可作为口腔鳞癌患者辅助诊断指标.

  17. Oral delivery of wafers made from HBsAg-expressing maize germ induces long-term immunological systemic and mucosal responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Celine A; Fischer, Maria E; Andrews, Bryan L; Chilton, Hayley C; Turner, Debra D; Walker, John H; Tizard, Ian R; Howard, John A

    2015-06-09

    The hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) has been administered over the last 20 years as a parenteral vaccine against the hepatitis B virus (HBV). Despite high seroconversion rates, chronic infection rates are still high worldwide. Orally delivered vaccines provide a practical alternative to injected vaccines, potentially helping poorly responding populations and providing a viable alternative for populations in remote locations. Anamnestic responses are vital to establishing the efficacy of a given vaccine and have been assessed in this study using a plant-based oral delivery platform expressing HBsAg. Long-term immunological memory was assessed in mice injected with a primary dose of Recombivax and boosted with orally-delivered HBsAg wafers, control wafers, or parenterally-delivered commercial vaccine (Recombivax). Mice boosted with HBsAg orally-administered wafers displayed sharp increases in mucosal IgA titers in fecal material and steep increases in serum IgA, whereas mice boosted with Recombivax showed no detectable levels of IgA in either fecal or serum samples following four boosting treatments. Long-term memory in the orally-treated mice was evidenced by sustained fecal IgA, and serum IgA, IgG, and mIU/mL over one year, while Recombivax-treated mice displayed sustained serum IgG and mIU/mL. Furthermore, sharp increases in these same antibodies were induced after re-boosting at 47 and 50 weeks post-primary injection. Orally-delivered vaccines can provide long-term immune responses mucosally and systemically. For sexually-transmitted diseases that can be acquired at mucosal surfaces, such as HBV, an oral delivery platform may provide added protection over a conventional parenterally administered vaccine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Will Large DSO-Managed Group Practices Be the Predominant Setting for Oral Health Care by 2025? Two Viewpoints: Viewpoint 1: Large DSO-Managed Group Practices Will Be the Setting in Which the Majority of Oral Health Care Is Delivered by 2025 and Viewpoint 2: Increases in DSO-Managed Group Practices Will Be Offset by Models Allowing Dentists to Retain the Independence and Freedom of a Traditional Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, James R; Dodge, William W; Findley, John S; Young, Stephen K; Horn, Bruce D; Kalkwarf, Kenneth L; Martin, Max M; Winder, Ronald L

    2015-05-01

    This Point/Counterpoint article discusses the transformation of dental practice from the traditional solo/small-group (partnership) model of the 1900s to large Dental Support Organizations (DSO) that support affiliated dental practices by providing nonclinical functions such as, but not limited to, accounting, human resources, marketing, and legal and practice management. Many feel that DSO-managed group practices (DMGPs) with employed providers will become the setting in which the majority of oral health care will be delivered in the future. Viewpoint 1 asserts that the traditional dental practice patterns of the past are shifting as many younger dentists gravitate toward employed positions in large group practices or the public sector. Although educational debt is relevant in predicting graduates' practice choices, other variables such as gender, race, and work-life balance play critical roles as well. Societal characteristics demonstrated by aging Gen Xers and those in the Millennial generation blend seamlessly with the opportunities DMGPs offer their employees. Viewpoint 2 contends the traditional model of dental care delivery-allowing entrepreneurial practitioners to make decisions in an autonomous setting-is changing but not to the degree nor as rapidly as Viewpoint 1 professes. Millennials entering the dental profession, with characteristics universally attributed to their generation, see value in the independence and flexibility that a traditional practice allows. Although DMGPs provide dentists one option for practice, several alternative delivery models offer current dentists and future dental school graduates many of the advantages of DMGPs while allowing them to maintain the independence and freedom a traditional practice provides.

  19. Inactivated poliovirus type 2 vaccine delivered to rat skin via high density microprojection array elicits potent neutralising antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, David A; Pearson, Frances E; Fernando, Germain J P; Agyei-Yeboah, Christiana; Owens, Nick S; Corrie, Simon R; Crichton, Michael L; Wei, Jonathan C J; Weldon, William C; Oberste, M Steven; Young, Paul R; Kendall, Mark A F

    2016-02-25

    Polio eradication is progressing rapidly, and the live attenuated Sabin strains in the oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) are being removed sequentially, starting with type 2 in April 2016. For risk mitigation, countries are introducing inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) into routine vaccination programs. After April 2016, monovalent type 2 OPV will be available for type 2 outbreak control. Because the current IPV is not suitable for house-to-house vaccination campaigns (the intramuscular injections require health professionals), we developed a high-density microprojection array, the Nanopatch, delivered monovalent type 2 IPV (IPV2) vaccine to the skin. To assess the immunogenicity of the Nanopatch, we performed a dose-matched study in rats, comparing the immunogenicity of IPV2 delivered by intramuscular injection or Nanopatch immunisation. A single dose of 0.2 D-antigen units of IPV2 elicited protective levels of poliovirus antibodies in 100% of animals. However, animals receiving IPV2 by IM required at least 3 immunisations to reach the same neutralising antibody titres. This level of dose reduction (1/40th of a full dose) is unprecedented for poliovirus vaccine delivery. The ease of administration coupled with the dose reduction observed in this study points to the Nanopatch as a potential tool for facilitating inexpensive IPV for mass vaccination campaigns.

  20. Inactivated poliovirus type 2 vaccine delivered to rat skin via high density microprojection array elicits potent neutralising antibody responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, David A.; Pearson, Frances E.; Fernando, Germain J.P.; Agyei-Yeboah, Christiana; Owens, Nick S.; Corrie, Simon R.; Crichton, Michael L.; Wei, Jonathan C.J.; Weldon, William C.; Oberste, M. Steven; Young, Paul R.; Kendall, Mark A. F.

    2016-01-01

    Polio eradication is progressing rapidly, and the live attenuated Sabin strains in the oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) are being removed sequentially, starting with type 2 in April 2016. For risk mitigation, countries are introducing inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) into routine vaccination programs. After April 2016, monovalent type 2 OPV will be available for type 2 outbreak control. Because the current IPV is not suitable for house-to-house vaccination campaigns (the intramuscular injections require health professionals), we developed a high-density microprojection array, the Nanopatch, delivered monovalent type 2 IPV (IPV2) vaccine to the skin. To assess the immunogenicity of the Nanopatch, we performed a dose-matched study in rats, comparing the immunogenicity of IPV2 delivered by intramuscular injection or Nanopatch immunisation. A single dose of 0.2 D-antigen units of IPV2 elicited protective levels of poliovirus antibodies in 100% of animals. However, animals receiving IPV2 by IM required at least 3 immunisations to reach the same neutralising antibody titres. This level of dose reduction (1/40th of a full dose) is unprecedented for poliovirus vaccine delivery. The ease of administration coupled with the dose reduction observed in this study points to the Nanopatch as a potential tool for facilitating inexpensive IPV for mass vaccination campaigns. PMID:26911254

  1. Oral Allergy Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuto Kondo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral allergy syndrome (OAS is defined as the symptoms of IgE-mediated immediate allergy localized in the oral mucosa, and the characteristics depend on the lability of the antigen. Another term used for this syndrome is pollen-food allergy (PFS; the patient is sensitized with pollen via the airways and exhibits an allergic reaction to food antigen with a structural similarity to the pollen (class 2 food allergy. In addition to PFS, latex-fruit syndrome is also well-known as the disease exhibiting OAS. In treating the condition, it must be noted that most but not all symptoms of PFS are those of OAS. In many cases, antigens become edible by heating, but some are resistant to heating. Also, since the exacerbation of atopic dermatitis is occasionally observed after the intake of cooked antigens in asymptomatic individuals, careful inquiry of the history is important in designing the treatment. Immunotherapy against the cross-reacting pollen has also been attempted in PFS.

  2. Vaccination with Bivalent DNA Vaccine of α1-Giardin and CWP2 Delivered by Attenuated Salmonella typhimurium Reduces Trophozoites and Cysts in the Feces of Mice Infected with Giardia lamblia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-Min Feng

    Full Text Available Giardia lamblia is one of the most common infectious protozoans in human that may cause diarrhea in travelers. Searching for antigens that induced effectively protective immunity has become a key point in the development of vaccine against giardiasis.Mice vaccinated with G. lamblia trophozozite-specific α1-giardin DNA vaccine delivered orally by attenuated Salmonella typhimurium SL7027 elicited 74.2% trophozoite reduction, but only 28% reduction in cyst shedding compared with PBS buffer control. Oral vaccination with Salmonella-delivered cyst-specific CWP2 DNA produced 89% reduction in cysts shedding in feces of vaccinated mice. Significantly, the mice vaccinated with Salmonella-delivered bivalent α1-giardin and CWP2 DNA vaccines produced significant reduction in both trophozoite (79% and cyst (93% in feces of vaccinated mice. This parasite reduction is associated with the strong local mucosal IgA secretion and the IgG2a-dominant systemic immune responses in vaccinated mice.The results demonstrate that bivalent vaccines targeting α1-giardin and CWP2 can protect mice against the colonization of Giardia trophozoite and block the transformation of cyst in host at the same time, and can be used to prevent Giardia infection and block the transmission of giardiasis.

  3. Vaccination with Bivalent DNA Vaccine of α1-Giardin and CWP2 Delivered by Attenuated Salmonella typhimurium Reduces Trophozoites and Cysts in the Feces of Mice Infected with Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xian-Min; Zheng, Wen-Yu; Zhang, Hong-Mei; Shi, Wen-Yan; Li, Yao; Cui, Bai-Ji; Wang, Hui-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Giardia lamblia is one of the most common infectious protozoans in human that may cause diarrhea in travelers. Searching for antigens that induced effectively protective immunity has become a key point in the development of vaccine against giardiasis. Mice vaccinated with G. lamblia trophozozite-specific α1-giardin DNA vaccine delivered orally by attenuated Salmonella typhimurium SL7027 elicited 74.2% trophozoite reduction, but only 28% reduction in cyst shedding compared with PBS buffer control. Oral vaccination with Salmonella-delivered cyst-specific CWP2 DNA produced 89% reduction in cysts shedding in feces of vaccinated mice. Significantly, the mice vaccinated with Salmonella-delivered bivalent α1-giardin and CWP2 DNA vaccines produced significant reduction in both trophozoite (79%) and cyst (93%) in feces of vaccinated mice. This parasite reduction is associated with the strong local mucosal IgA secretion and the IgG2a-dominant systemic immune responses in vaccinated mice. The results demonstrate that bivalent vaccines targeting α1-giardin and CWP2 can protect mice against the colonization of Giardia trophozoite and block the transformation of cyst in host at the same time, and can be used to prevent Giardia infection and block the transmission of giardiasis.

  4. Oral administration of heat-inactivated Mycobacterium bovis reduces the response of farmed red deer to avian and bovine tuberculin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Vladimir; González-Barrio, David; Lima-Barbero, José Francisco; Ortiz, José Antonio; Domínguez, Lucas; Juste, Ramón; Garrido, Joseba M; Sevilla, Iker A; Alberdi, Pilar; de la Fuente, José; Gortázar, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Orally delivered mycobacterial antigens may not sensitize the immunized animals causing a positive tuberculin skin test response. As the first step to address this critical issue, we characterized the response of farmed red deer (Cervus elaphus) to orally delivered heat-inactivated Mycobacterium bovis. Thirty-two adult red deer hinds from a farm known to be free of tuberculosis (TB) were randomly assigned to two different treatment groups, immunized (n=24) and control (n=8). Immunized hinds were dosed orally with 2 ml of PBS containing 6 × 10(6) heat-inactivated M. bovis. The mean skin test response of immunized deer to both avian purified protein derivative (aPPD) and bovine PPD (bPPD) was consistently lower in immunized than in control hinds. One year after immunization, immunized hinds had a significant reduction in the skin test response to aPPD and in the ELISA antibody levels against both aPPD and bPPD (24-36% reduction; P<0.05). By contrast, no significant change was observed in the skin test response to phytohaemagglutinin, or in the ELISA antibody levels against the M. bovis specific antigen MPB70. The mRNA levels for C3, IFN-γ and IL-1β and serum protein levels for IFN-γ and IL-1β did not vary between immunized and control deer. However, serum C3 protein levels were significantly higher (P=0.001) in immunized than in control deer six months after immunization. These results confirm that oral heat-inactivated M. bovis does not sensitize farmed red deer and therefore does not cause false-positive responses in the tuberculin skin test. The absence of sensitization in orally immunized deer opens the possibility of testing the vaccine in deer and possibly other ruminants without the risk of causing false-positive reactions in TB-tests. This study also provided the first evidence that orally-delivered inactivated mycobacterial antigens elicit some kind of immune response in a ruminant.

  5. Oral antibiotics enhance antibody responses to keyhole limpet hemocyanin in orally but not muscularly immunized chickens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murai, Atsushi; Kitahara, Kazuki; Okumura, Shouta; Kobayashi, Misato; Horio, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    .... We aimed to determine whether the modification of gut microbiota by oral co‐administration of two antibiotics, ampicillin and neomycin, would lead to changes in the antibody response to antigens in chickens...

  6. Immunological aspects of oral vaccination in fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, P.H.M.

    1997-01-01

    In this thesis immunological consequences of oral vaccination in fish have been described. The efficacy of oral vaccination can be increased by protection of the antigen against degradation in the foregut, in order to reach the hindgut in sufficient quantities for uptake and subsequent activation of

  7. Oral Medication

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Oral Medication The first treatment for type 2 diabetes blood ... new — even over-the-counter items. Explore: Oral Medication How Much Do Oral Medications Cost? Save money ...

  8. Oral myiasis

    OpenAIRE

    Thalaimalai Saravanan; Mathan A Mohan; Meera Thinakaran; Saneem Ahammed

    2015-01-01

    Myiasis is a pathologic condition in humans occurring because of parasitic infestation. Parasites causing myiasis belong to the order Diptera. Oral myiasis is seen secondary to oral wounds, suppurative lesions, and extraction wounds, especially in individuals with neurological deficit. In such cases, neglected oral hygiene and halitosis attracts the flies to lay eggs in oral wounds resulting in oral myiasis. We present a case of oral myiasis in 40-year-old male patient with mental disability ...

  9. Melatonin and oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Murat İnanç; Cengiz, Seda; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2012-01-01

    While initially the oral cavity was considered to be mainly a source of various bacteria, their toxins and antigens, recent studies showed that it may also be a location of oxidative stress and periodontal inflammation. Accordingly, this paper focuses on the involvement of melatonin in oxidative stress diseases of oral cavity as well as on potential therapeutic implications of melatonin in dental disorders. Melatonin has immunomodulatory and antioxidant activities, stimulates the proliferation of collagen and osseous tissue, and acts as a protector against cellular degeneration associated with aging and toxin exposure. Arising out of its antioxidant actions, melatonin protects against inflammatory processes and cellular damage caused by the toxic derivates of oxygen. As a result of these actions, melatonin may be useful as a coadjuvant in the treatment of certain conditions of the oral cavity. However, the most important effect of melatonin seems to result from its potent antioxidant, immunomodulatory, protective, and anticancer properties. Thus, melatonin could be used therapeutically for instance, locally, in the oral cavity damage of mechanical, bacterial, fungal, or viral origin, in postsurgical wounds caused by tooth extractions and other oral surgeries. Additionally, it can help bone formation in various autoimmunological disorders such as Sjorgen syndrome, in periodontal diseases, in toxic effects of dental materials, in dental implants, and in oral cancers.

  10. Melatonin and Oral Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat İnanç Cengiz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available While initially the oral cavity was considered to be mainly a source of various bacteria, their toxins and antigens, recent studies showed that it may also be a location of oxidative stress and periodontal inflammation. Accordingly, this paper focuses on the involvement of melatonin in oxidative stress diseases of oral cavity as well as on potential therapeutic implications of melatonin in dental disorders. Melatonin has immunomodulatory and antioxidant activities, stimulates the proliferation of collagen and osseous tissue, and acts as a protector against cellular degeneration associated with aging and toxin exposure. Arising out of its antioxidant actions, melatonin protects against inflammatory processes and cellular damage caused by the toxic derivates of oxygen. As a result of these actions, melatonin may be useful as a coadjuvant in the treatment of certain conditions of the oral cavity. However, the most important effect of melatonin seems to result from its potent antioxidant, immunomodulatory, protective, and anticancer properties. Thus, melatonin could be used therapeutically for instance, locally, in the oral cavity damage of mechanical, bacterial, fungal, or viral origin, in postsurgical wounds caused by tooth extractions and other oral surgeries. Additionally, it can help bone formation in various autoimmunological disorders such as Sjorgen syndrome, in periodontal diseases, in toxic effects of dental materials, in dental implants, and in oral cancers.

  11. AntigenMap 3D: an online antigenic cartography resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, J Lamar; Yang, Jialiang; Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2012-05-01

    Antigenic cartography is a useful technique to visualize and minimize errors in immunological data by projecting antigens to 2D or 3D cartography. However, a 2D cartography may not be sufficient to capture the antigenic relationship from high-dimensional immunological data. AntigenMap 3D presents an online, interactive, and robust 3D antigenic cartography construction and visualization resource. AntigenMap 3D can be applied to identify antigenic variants and vaccine strain candidates for pathogens with rapid antigenic variations, such as influenza A virus. http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap3D

  12. Tumor Antigen-Derived Peptides Delivery for Cancer Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenxue, Ma

    2014-02-05

    Tumor antigenic peptides therapeutics is a promising field for cancer immunotherapy. Benefits include the ease and rapid synthesis of antigenic peptides and capacity for modifications. In the past years, many peptide-based cancer vaccines have been tested in clinical trials with a limited success because of the difficulties associated with peptide stability and delivery approaches, consequently, resulting in inefficient antigen presentation and low response rates in patients with cancer. The development of suitable and efficient vaccine carrier systems still remains a major challenge. This article aims to describe a new delivery approach for tumor antigenic peptides and rationales of dendritic cells (DCs)-based vaccination. In order to elicit enhanced immune responses, poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA), which has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the use of drug delivery, diagnostics and other applications of clinical and basic science research were employed for the formulation of making nanoparticles (NPs) while delivering tumor antigenic peptides.

  13. Partial purification of protective antigens from Nippostrongylus brasiliensis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhalem, A; Bourdieu, C; Luffau, G; Pery, P

    1988-01-01

    The purification of antigens from Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, through their ability to provoke cellular proliferation of immune cells and through their recognition by antibodies, led to an antigenic preparation which was extracted from adult worms and which contained only two proteins (MW 14 and 43 Kd). Mice which were vaccinated by the oral route after the entrapment of these two proteins in liposomes were strongly protected.

  14. Gene delivery to dendritic cells by orally administered recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiflmariam, Meron G; Yang, Hanjiang; Zhang, Zhiying

    2013-02-27

    DNA vaccination has caught the attention of many for triggering humoral as well as cellular immune responses. And delivering DNA into the antigen presenting cells (APCs) in order to induce efficient immunoresponse has become the backbone of this field. It has been confirmed that Saccharomyces cerevisiae, though non-pathogenic, is being engulfed by the dendritic cells and macrophages and delivers not only proteins, but also DNA materials (already confirmed in vitro). In this research, S. cerevisiae is used to deliver green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene controlled under cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter in living organism (mice). The recombinant yeast, transfected with the plasmid containing the GFP gene, was heat killed and orally administered to mice. After 60 h of yeast administration, mice were sacrificed and intestine was separated, washed and frozen in liquid nitrogen. Tissues were cut at the size of 10 μm using Cryostat machine, and GFP expression was successfully detected under a fluorescence microscope. After 45 days Western blot was able to detect GFP antibody in the blood of mice. These results imply that S. cerevisiae, being non-pathogenic, cheap, and easy to culture could be a good candidate to deliver DNA materials to the immune cells for vaccination.

  15. Eosinofil Sel Penyaji Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safari Wahyu Jatmiko

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sel eosinofil merupakan jenis sel lekosit yang terlibat dalam berbagai patogenesis penyakit. Sel eosinofil pada awalnya dikenal sebagai sel efektor  dari sistem imunitas alamiah. Akan tetapi, kemampuan sel eosinofil dalam memfagositosis patogen menimbulkan dugaan bahwa sel eosinofil ikut berperan sebagai sel penyaji antigen. Hal ini dianalogikan dengan sel makrofag dan sel dendritik yang bisa memfagositosis dan menyajikan antigen sebagai hasil dari degradasi patogen yang difagositosis. Untuk menjawab permasalahan ini, penulis melakukan penelusuran artikel tentang eosinofil sebagai sel penyaji antigen melalui US National Library of Medicine National Institute of Healthdengan kata kunci eoshinophil dan antigen presenting cell. Hasil penelusuran adalah ditemukannya 10 artikel yang relevan dengan topik. Hasil dari sintesis kesepuluh jurnal tersebut adalah sel eosinofil mampu berperan sebagai sel penyaji antigen yang profesional (professionalantigenpresentng cell

  16. Oral myiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thalaimalai Saravanan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myiasis is a pathologic condition in humans occurring because of parasitic infestation. Parasites causing myiasis belong to the order Diptera. Oral myiasis is seen secondary to oral wounds, suppurative lesions, and extraction wounds, especially in individuals with neurological deficit. In such cases, neglected oral hygiene and halitosis attracts the flies to lay eggs in oral wounds resulting in oral myiasis. We present a case of oral myiasis in 40-year-old male patient with mental disability and history of epilepsy.

  17. Oral Thrush

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... feeding mothers In addition to the distinctive white mouth lesions, infants may have trouble feeding or be fussy ... candidiasis (yeast infection) patient information. American Academy of Oral & Maxillofacial Pathology. http://www.aaomp.org/public/oral-candidiasis.php. ...

  18. Oral Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    鈴木, 規子; スズキ, ノリコ; Noriko, SUZUKI

    2004-01-01

    The major oral functions can be categorized as mastication, swallowing, speech and respiratory functions. Dysfunction of these results in dysphagia, speech disorders and abnormal respiration (such as Sleep Apnea). These functions relate to dentistry in the occurrence of : (1) oral preparatory and oral phases, (2) articulation disorders and velopharyngeal incompetence (VPI), and (3) mouth breathing, respiratory and blowing disorders. These disorders are related to oral and maxillofacial diseas...

  19. CEA (Carcinoembryonic Antigen) Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as: CEA Formal name: Carcinoembryonic Antigen Related tests: Tumor Markers , CSF Analysis , Body Fluid Analysis , CA 19-9 , Calcitonin , AFP Tumor Markers All content on Lab Tests Online has been ...

  20. Genetic and epigenetic alterations of the blood group ABO gene in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Shan; Worm, Jesper; Guldberg, Per

    2004-01-01

    Loss of histo-blood group A and B antigen expression is a frequent event in oral carcinomas and is associated with decreased activity of glycosyltransferases encoded by the ABO gene. We examined 30 oral squamous cell carcinomas for expression of A and B antigens and glycosyltransferases. We also ...

  1. Caries prevalence in Danish pre-school children delivered vaginally and by caesarean section

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Mette Nelun; Christensen, Lisa Bøge; Twetman, Svante Henrik Agardh;

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The mode of delivery may significantly influence the diversity and composition of the oral microflora and facilitate early acquisition of mutans streptococci. The aim was to compare caries prevalence and experience in 3-year-old children delivered vaginally and by caesarean section (C...

  2. Oral antibiotics enhance antibody responses to keyhole limpet hemocyanin in orally but not muscularly immunized chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, Atsushi; Kitahara, Kazuki; Okumura, Shouta; Kobayashi, Misato; Horio, Fumihiko

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies have emphasized the crucial role of gut microbiota in triggering and modulating immune response. We aimed to determine whether the modification of gut microbiota by oral co-administration of two antibiotics, ampicillin and neomycin, would lead to changes in the antibody response to antigens in chickens. Neonatal chickens were given or not given ampicillin and neomycin (0.25 and 0.5 g/L, respectively) in drinking water. At 2 weeks of age, the chicks were muscularly or orally immunized with antigenic keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), and then serum anti-KLH antibody levels were examined by ELISA. In orally immunized chicks, oral antibiotics treatment enhanced antibody responses (IgM, IgA, IgY) by 2-3-fold compared with the antibiotics-free control, while the antibiotics did not enhance antibody responses in the muscularly immunized chicks. Concomitant with their enhancement of antibody responses, the oral antibiotics also lowered the Lactobacillus species in feces. Low doses of antibiotics (10-fold and 100-fold lower than the initial trial), which failed to change the fecal Lactobacillus population, did not modify any antibody responses when chicks were orally immunized with KLH. In conclusion, oral antibiotics treatment enhanced the antibody response to orally exposed antigens in chickens. This enhancement of antibody response was associated with a modification of the fecal Lactobacillus content, suggesting a possible link between gut microbiota and antibody response in chickens. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  3. Transcutaneous antigen delivery system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-Young Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcutaneous immunization refers to the topical applicationof antigens onto the epidermis. Transcutaneous immunizationtargeting the Langerhans cells of the skin has received muchattention due to its safe, needle-free, and noninvasive antigendelivery. The skin has important immunological functions withunique roles for antigen-presenting cells such as epidermalLangerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells. In recent years,novel vaccine delivery strategies have continually beendeveloped; however, transcutaneous immunization has not yetbeen fully exploited due to the penetration barrier representedby the stratum corneum, which inhibits the transport ofantigens and adjuvants. Herein we review recent achievementsin transcutaneous immunization, focusing on the variousstrategies for the enhancement of antigen delivery andvaccination efficacy. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(1: 17-24

  4. LcrV delivered via type III secretion system of live attenuated Yersinia pseudotuberculosis enhances immunogenicity against pneumonic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Sanapala, Shilpa; Henderson, Jeremy C; Sam, Shandiin; Olinzock, Joseph; Trent, M Stephen; Curtiss, Roy

    2014-10-01

    Here, we constructed a Yersinia pseudotuberculosis mutant strain with arabinose-dependent regulated and delayed shutoff of crp expression (araC P(BAD) crp) and replacement of the msbB gene with the Escherichia coli msbB gene to attenuate it. Then, we inserted the asd mutation into this construction to form χ10057 [Δasd-206 ΔmsbB868::P(msbB) msbB(EC) ΔP(crp21)::TT araC P(BAD) crp] for use with a balanced-lethal Asd-positive (Asd(+)) plasmid to facilitate antigen synthesis. A hybrid protein composed of YopE (amino acids [aa]1 to 138) fused with full-length LcrV (YopE(Nt138)-LcrV) was synthesized in χ10057 harboring an Asd(+) plasmid (pYA5199, yopE(Nt138)-lcrV) and could be secreted through a type III secretion system (T3SS) in vitro and in vivo. Animal studies indicated that mice orally immunized with χ10057(pYA5199) developed titers of IgG response to whole-cell lysates of Y. pestis (YpL) and subunit LcrV similar to those seen with χ10057(pYA3332) (χ10057 plus an empty plasmid). However, only immunization of mice with χ10057(pYA5199) resulted in a significant secretory IgA response to LcrV. χ10057(pYA5199) induced a higher level of protection (80% survival) against intranasal (i.n.) challenge with ~240 median lethal doses (LD50) (2.4 × 10(4) CFU) of Y. pestis KIM6+(pCD1Ap) than χ10057(pYA3332) (40% survival). Splenocytes from mice vaccinated with χ10057(pYA5199) produced significant levels of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and interleukin-17 (IL-17) after restimulation with LcrV and YpL antigens. Our results suggest that it is possible to use an attenuated Y. pseudotuberculosis strain delivering the LcrV antigen via the T3SS as a potential vaccine candidate against pneumonic plague.

  5. Oral surgery in patients undergoing chemoradiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demian, Nagi M; Shum, Jonathan W; Kessel, Ivan L; Eid, Ahmed

    2014-05-01

    Oral health care in patients undergoing chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy can be complex. Care delivered by a multidisciplinary approach is timely and streamlines the allocation of resources to provide prompt care and to attain favorable outcomes. A hospital dentist, oral and maxillofacial surgeon, and a maxillofacial prosthodontist must be involved early to prevent avoidable oral complications. Prevention and thorough preparation are vital before the start of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Oral complications must be addressed immediately and, even with the best management, can cause delays and interruption in treatment, with serious consequences for the outcome and prognosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Oral histoplasmosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patil Karthikeya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Histoplasmosis is a systemic fungal disease that takes various clinical forms, among which oral lesions are rare. The disseminated form of the disease that usually occurs in association with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV is one of the AIDS-defining diseases. Isolated oral histoplasmosis, without systemic involvement, with underlying immunosuppression due to AIDS is very rare. We report one such case of isolated oral histoplasmosis in a HIV-infected patient.

  7. UNIQUE ORAL DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raphael M. Ottenbrite; ZHAO Ruifeng; Sam Milstein

    1995-01-01

    An oral drug delivery system using proteinoid microspheres is discussed with respect to its unique dependence on pH. It has been found that certain drugs such as insulin and heparin can be encapsulated in proteinoid spheres at stomach pH's (1-3). These spheres also dissemble at intestinal pH's (6-7) releasing the drug for absorption. Using this technique low molecular weight heparin and human growth hormone have been orally delivered successfully to several animal species. Future work has been proposed to study the interaction and binding of the specific drugs with synthesized oligopeptides.

  8. Systemic and Mucosal Antibody Responses to Soluble and Nanoparticle-Conjugated Antigens Administered Intranasally

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savannah E. Howe

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles (NPs are increasingly being used for drug delivery, as well as antigen carriers and immunostimulants for the purpose of developing vaccines. In this work, we examined how intranasal (i.n. priming followed by i.n. or subcutaneous (s.c. boosting immunization affects the humoral immune response to chicken ovalbumin (Ova and Ova conjugated to 20 nm NPs (NP-Ova. We show that i.n. priming with 20 mg of soluble Ova, a dose known to trigger oral tolerance when administered via gastric gavage, induced substantial systemic IgG1 and IgG2c, as well as mucosal antibodies. These responses were further boosted following a s.c. immunization with Ova and complete Freund’s adjuvant (Ova+CFA. In contrast, 100 µg of Ova delivered via NPs induced an IgG1-dominated systemic response, and primed the intestinal mucosa for secretion of IgA. Following a secondary s.c. or i.n. immunization with Ova+CFA or NP-Ova, systemic IgG1 titers significantly increased, and serum IgG2c and intestinal antibodies were induced in mice primed nasally with NP-Ova. Only Ova- and NP-Ova-primed mice that were s.c.-boosted exhibited substantial systemic and mucosal titers for up to 6 months after priming, whereas the antibodies of i.n.-boosted mice declined over time. Our results indicate that although the amount of Ova delivered by NPs was 1000-fold less than Ova delivered in soluble form, the antigen-specific antibody responses, both systemic and mucosal, are essentially identical by 6 months following the initial priming immunization. Additionally, both i.n.- and s.c.-boosting strategies for NP-Ova-primed mice were capable of inducing a polarized Th1/Th2 immune response, as well as intestinal antibodies; however, it is only by using a heterogeneous prime-boost strategy that long-lasting antibody responses were initiated. These results provide valuable insight for future mucosal vaccine development, as well as furthering our understanding of mucosal antibody responses.

  9. Biochemical and biophysical characterization of maize-derived HBsAg for the development of an oral vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Shweta; Hayden, Celine A; Fischer, Maria E; Rao, A Gururaj; Howard, John A

    2015-12-15

    Although a vaccine against hepatitis B virus (HBV) has been available since 1982, it is estimated that 600,000 people die every year due to HBV. An affordable oral vaccine could help alleviate the disease burden and to this end the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was expressed in maize. Orally delivered maize material induced the strongest immune response in mice when lipid was extracted by CO2 supercritical fluid extraction (SFE), compared to full fat and hexane-extracted material. The present study provides a biochemical and biophysical basis for these immunological differences by comparing the active ingredient in the differently treated maize material. Purified maize-derived HBsAg underwent biophysical characterization by gel filtration, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), UV-CD, and fluorescence. Gel filtration showed that HBsAg forms higher-order oligomers and TEM demonstrated virus-like particle (VLP) formation. The VLPs obtained from SFE were more regular in shape and size compared to hexane or full fat material. In addition, SFE-derived HBsAg showed the greatest extent of α-helical structure by far UV-CD spectrum. Fluorescence experiments also revealed differences in protein conformation. This work establishes SFE-treated maize material as a viable oral vaccine candidate and advances the development of the first oral subunit vaccine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Dietary antigens limit mucosal immunity by inducing regulatory T cells in the small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang Soon; Hong, Sung-Wook; Han, Daehee; Yi, Jaeu; Jung, Jisun; Yang, Bo-Gie; Lee, Jun Young; Lee, Minji; Surh, Charles D

    2016-02-19

    Dietary antigens are normally rendered nonimmunogenic through a poorly understood "oral tolerance" mechanism that involves immunosuppressive regulatory T (Treg) cells, especially Treg cells induced from conventional T cells in the periphery (pTreg cells). Although orally introducing nominal protein antigens is known to induce such pTreg cells, whether a typical diet induces a population of pTreg cells under normal conditions thus far has been unknown. By using germ-free mice raised and bred on an elemental diet devoid of dietary antigens, we demonstrated that under normal conditions, the vast majority of the small intestinal pTreg cells are induced by dietary antigens from solid foods. Moreover, these pTreg cells have a limited life span, are distinguishable from microbiota-induced pTreg cells, and repress underlying strong immunity to ingested protein antigens.

  11. Delivering HPC Systems to 132 Dock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kettering, Brett Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-23

    The intention of this document is to provide the subcontractor with information to enable trucks delivering HPC (High Performance Computing) systems to the 03-0132, computer rooms with the information they need to do so successfully.

  12. Time Outdoors May Deliver Better Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_163389.html Time Outdoors May Deliver Better Sleep Camping and exposure to natural light helps prime ... Spending time in the outdoors may improve your sleep, a small study suggests. Researchers found that a ...

  13. Feasibilty of oral immunisation with LTB-based edible vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lauterslager, Tosca Genevieve Maria

    2003-01-01

    This thesis describes the research to explore the feasibility of plants for oral vaccination. The research focussed on a model of LTB produced in potato tubers or ovalbumin (OVA) as antigen and tested in mice. A general introduction into the backgrounds of oral immunisation is given in Chapter 1. Th

  14. Dendritic Cell Targeting of Bacillus anthracis Protective Antigen Expressed by Lactobacillus acidophilus Protects Mice from Lethal Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-28

    Dendritic cell targeting of Bacillus anthracis protective antigen expressed by Lactobacillus acidophilus protects mice from lethal challenge M...lethal chal- lenge. A vaccine strategy was established by using Lactobacillus acidophilus to deliver Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA) via...include species of Lactobacillus , Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, Pedio- coccus, and Streptococcus. It is widely accepted that Lactobacillus species play a

  15. Oral Histoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folk, Gillian A; Nelson, Brenda L

    2017-02-20

    A 44-year-old female presented to her general dentist with the chief complaint of a painful mouth sore of 2 weeks duration. Clinical examination revealed an irregularly shaped ulcer of the buccal and lingual attached gingiva of the anterior mandible. A biopsy was performed and microscopic evaluation revealed histoplasmosis. Histoplasmosis, caused by Histoplasma capsulate, is the most common fungal infection in the United States. Oral lesions of histoplasmosis are generally associated with the disseminated form of histoplasmosis and may present as a fungating or ulcerative lesion of the oral mucosa. The histologic findings and differential diagnosis for oral histoplasmosis are discussed.

  16. Oral leukoplakia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmstrup, Palle; Dabelsteen, Erik

    2016-01-01

    The idea of identifying oral lesions with a precancerous nature, i.e. in the sense of pertaining to a pathologic process with an increased risk for future malignant development, of course is to prevent frank malignancy to occur in the affected area. The most common oral lesion with a precancerous...... nature is oral leukoplakia, and for decades it has been discussed how to treat these lesions. Various treatment modalities, such as systemic therapies and surgical removal, have been suggested. The systemic therapies tested so far include retinoids, extracts of green tea, inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-2...

  17. Oral manifestations of hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrozzo, Marco; Scally, Kara

    2014-06-28

    Extrahepatic manifestations (EHMs) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can affect a variety of organ systems with significant morbidity and mortality. Some of the most frequently reported EHM of HCV infection, involve the oral region predominantly or exclusively. Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory condition that is potentially malignant and represents cell-mediated reaction to a variety of extrinsic antigens, altered self-antigens, or super antigens. Robust epidemiological evidence support the link between OLP and HCV. As the virus may replicate in the oral mucosa and attract HCV-specific T lymphocytes, HCV may be implicated in OLP pathogenesis. Sjögren syndrome (SjS) is an autoimmune exocrinopathy, characterized by dryness of the mouth and eyes and a multitude of other systemic signs and symptoms. SjS patients have also an increased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Patients with chronic hepatitis C do frequently have histological signs of Sjögren-like sialadenitis with mild or even absent clinical symptoms. However, it is still unclear if HCV may cause a disease mimicking SjS or it is directly responsible for the development of SjS in a specific subset of patients. Oral squamous cell carcinoma is the most common oral malignant tumour and at least in some part of the world could be linked to HCV.

  18. Oral pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemiec, Brook A

    2008-05-01

    Oral disease is exceedingly common in small animal patients. In addition, there is a very wide variety of pathologies that are encountered within the oral cavity. These conditions often cause significant pain and/or localized and systemic infection; however, the majority of these conditions have little to no obvious clinical signs. Therefore, diagnosis is not typically made until late in the disease course. Knowledge of these diseases will better equip the practitioner to effectively treat them. This article covers the more common forms of oral pathology in the dog and cat, excluding periodontal disease, which is covered in its own chapter. The various pathologies are presented in graphic form, and the etiology, clinical signs, recommended diagnostic tests, and treatment options are discussed. Pathologies that are covered include: persistent deciduous teeth, fractured teeth, intrinsically stained teeth, feline tooth resorption, caries, oral neoplasia, eosinophilic granuloma complex, lymphoplasmacytic gingivostomatitis, enamel hypoplasia, and "missing" teeth.

  19. Herpes - oral

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000606.htm Herpes - oral To use the sharing features on this page, ... 374. Read More Atopic dermatitis Cancer Fever Genital herpes Mouth ulcers Vesicles Review Date 8/14/2015 Updated ...

  20. A Review of Intra- and Extracellular Antigen Delivery Systems for Virus Vaccines of Finfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munang'andu, Hetron Mweemba; Evensen, Øystein

    2015-01-01

    Vaccine efficacy in aquaculture has for a long time depended on evaluating relative percent survival and antibody responses after vaccination. However, current advances in vaccine immunology show that the route in which antigens are delivered into cells is deterministic of the type of adaptive immune response evoked by vaccination. Antigens delivered by the intracellular route induce MHC-I restricted CD8+ responses while antigens presented through the extracellular route activate MHC-II restricted CD4+ responses implying that the route of antigen delivery is a conduit to induction of B- or T-cell immune responses. In finfish, different antigen delivery systems have been explored that include live, DNA, inactivated whole virus, fusion protein, virus-like particles, and subunit vaccines although mechanisms linking these delivery systems to protective immunity have not been studied in detail. Hence, in this review we provide a synopsis of different strategies used to administer viral antigens via the intra- or extracellular compartments. Further, we highlight the differences in immune responses induced by antigens processed by the endogenous route compared to exogenously processed antigens. Overall, we anticipate that the synopsis put together in this review will shed insights into limitations and successes of the current vaccination strategies used in finfish vaccinology.

  1. A Review of Intra- and Extracellular Antigen Delivery Systems for Virus Vaccines of Finfish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hetron Mweemba Munang’andu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccine efficacy in aquaculture has for a long time depended on evaluating relative percent survival and antibody responses after vaccination. However, current advances in vaccine immunology show that the route in which antigens are delivered into cells is deterministic of the type of adaptive immune response evoked by vaccination. Antigens delivered by the intracellular route induce MHC-I restricted CD8+ responses while antigens presented through the extracellular route activate MHC-II restricted CD4+ responses implying that the route of antigen delivery is a conduit to induction of B- or T-cell immune responses. In finfish, different antigen delivery systems have been explored that include live, DNA, inactivated whole virus, fusion protein, virus-like particles, and subunit vaccines although mechanisms linking these delivery systems to protective immunity have not been studied in detail. Hence, in this review we provide a synopsis of different strategies used to administer viral antigens via the intra- or extracellular compartments. Further, we highlight the differences in immune responses induced by antigens processed by the endogenous route compared to exogenously processed antigens. Overall, we anticipate that the synopsis put together in this review will shed insights into limitations and successes of the current vaccination strategies used in finfish vaccinology.

  2. Disparities in Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2020: Oral Health Objectives Site Map Disparities in Oral Health Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Oral health ... to get and keep dental insurance. Disparities in Oral Health Some of the oral health disparities that exist ...

  3. Structural and Functional Variation within the Alanine-Rich Repetitive Domain of Streptococcal Antigen I/II

    OpenAIRE

    Demuth, Donald R; Irvine, Douglas C.

    2002-01-01

    Members of the antigen I/II family of cell surface proteins are highly conserved, multifunctional adhesins that mediate interactions of oral streptococci with other oral bacteria, with cell matrix proteins (e.g., type I collagen), and with salivary glycoproteins, e.g., gp340. The interaction of gp340 (formerly designated salivary agglutinin) with Streptococcus mutans requires an alanine-rich repetitive domain (A region) of antigen I/II that is highly conserved in all members of this family of...

  4. Delay Efficient Method for Delivering IPTV Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangamesh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Internet Protocol Television (IPTV is a system through which Internet television services are delivered using the architecture and networking methods of the Internet Protocol Suite over a packet-switched network infrastructure, e.g., the Internet and broadband Internet access networks, instead of being delivered through traditional radio frequency broadcast, satellite signal, and cable television (CATV formats. IPTV provides mainly three services: live TV, catch up TV, and video on demand (VoD.This paper focuses on delivering the live TV services by exploiting the virtualised cloud architecture of the IPTV and statistical multiplexing. The VoD tasks are prescheduled so that there will be less Instant Channel Change (ICC delay. We select a proper scheduling algorithm for rescheduling the VoD tasks. We then implement the scheduling algorithm for preshifting the VoD tasks.

  5. Microfluidic squeezing for intracellular antigen loading in polyclonal B-cells as cellular vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee Szeto, Gregory; van Egeren, Debra; Worku, Hermoon; Sharei, Armon; Alejandro, Brian; Park, Clara; Frew, Kirubel; Brefo, Mavis; Mao, Shirley; Heimann, Megan; Langer, Robert; Jensen, Klavs; Irvine, Darrell J.

    2015-05-01

    B-cells are promising candidate autologous antigen-presenting cells (APCs) to prime antigen-specific T-cells both in vitro and in vivo. However to date, a significant barrier to utilizing B-cells as APCs is their low capacity for non-specific antigen uptake compared to “professional” APCs such as dendritic cells. Here we utilize a microfluidic device that employs many parallel channels to pass single cells through narrow constrictions in high throughput. This microscale “cell squeezing” process creates transient pores in the plasma membrane, enabling intracellular delivery of whole proteins from the surrounding medium into B-cells via mechano-poration. We demonstrate that both resting and activated B-cells process and present antigens delivered via mechano-poration exclusively to antigen-specific CD8+T-cells, and not CD4+T-cells. Squeezed B-cells primed and expanded large numbers of effector CD8+T-cells in vitro that produced effector cytokines critical to cytolytic function, including granzyme B and interferon-γ. Finally, antigen-loaded B-cells were also able to prime antigen-specific CD8+T-cells in vivo when adoptively transferred into mice. Altogether, these data demonstrate crucial proof-of-concept for mechano-poration as an enabling technology for B-cell antigen loading, priming of antigen-specific CD8+T-cells, and decoupling of antigen uptake from B-cell activation.

  6. Intermolecular forces and enthalpies in the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans and antigen I/II deficient mutant to laminin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, H.J.; Belt-Gritter, van de B.; Dijkstra, R.J.B.; Norde, W.; Mei, van der H.C.

    2007-01-01

    The antigen I/II family of surface proteins is expressed by most oral streptococci, including Streptococcus mutans, and mediates specific adhesion to, among other things, salivary films and extracellular matrix proteins. In this study we showed that antigen I/II-deficient S. mutans isogenic mutant I

  7. Is International Accounting Education Delivering Pedagogical Value?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Chris; Millanta, Brian; Tweedie, Dale

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines whether universities are delivering pedagogical value to international accounting students commensurate with the costs of studying abroad. The paper uses survey and interview methods to explore the extent to which Chinese Learners (CLs) in an Australian postgraduate accounting subject have distinct learning needs. The paper…

  8. TC-1 Satellite of DSP Delivered

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SunQing

    2004-01-01

    TC-1 satellite of Double Star Program (DSP), a near-earth equatorial satellite, was delivered to the representative of the end user, the Research Center for Space Science and Application under the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) on April 12, 2004, which symbolized that TC-1 satellite was put into operation formally.

  9. Interactivity in an Electronically Delivered Marketing Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Paul D.

    2002-01-01

    In a marketing course delivered using Lotus Notes, 32 students were randomly assigned to large or small groups with heavy or light coaching. No differences in interactivity appeared related to group size or gender. More coaching increased the quantity, not quality, of interactivity. Quality seemed to decrease as quantity increased. (Contains 35…

  10. Is International Accounting Education Delivering Pedagogical Value?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Chris; Millanta, Brian; Tweedie, Dale

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines whether universities are delivering pedagogical value to international accounting students commensurate with the costs of studying abroad. The paper uses survey and interview methods to explore the extent to which Chinese Learners (CLs) in an Australian postgraduate accounting subject have distinct learning needs. The paper…

  11. Science Ⅲ marine research ship delivered

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gong Wei

    2006-01-01

    @@ On August 18, China's most advanced marine research ship Science Ⅲ was commissioned into operation at Qingdao and became an official member of China's marine research fleet. Designed and built by CSIC, the ship was delivered at Shanghai to the Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  12. Delivering Online Examinations: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John MESSING

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Delivering Online Examinations: A Case Study Jason HOWARTH John MESSING Irfan ALTAS Charles Sturt University Wagga Wagga-AUSTRALIA ABSTRACT This paper represents a brief case study of delivering online examinations to a worldwide audience. These examinations are delivered in partnership with a commercial online testing company as part of the Industry Master’s degree at Charles Sturt University (CSU. The Industry Master’s degree is an academic program for students currently employed in the IT industry. Using Internet Based Testing (IBT, these students are examined in test centres throughout the world. This offers many benefits. For example, students have the freedom of sitting exams at any time during a designated interval. Computer-based testing also provides instructors with valuable feedback through test statistics and student comments. In this paper, we document CSU’s use of the IBT system, including how tests are built and delivered, and how both human and statistical feedback is used to evaluate and enhance the testing process.

  13. Delivering best care in war and peace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Alison

    2014-06-24

    Col Alan Finnegan, the fi rst Ministry of Defence professor of nursing, is driving forward research into preparing nurses for deployment and ensuring they deliver the best care possible in war and peace. Research topics range from the role of autonomous practitioners to the effects on soldiers of injuries to their genitalia.

  14. Immunological Properties of Hepatitis B Core Antigen Fusion Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Michael J.; Hastings, Gillian Z.; Brown, Alan L.; Grace, Ken G.; Rowlands, David J.; Brown, Fred; Clarke, Berwyn E.

    1990-04-01

    The immunogenicity of a 19 amino acid peptide from foot-and-mouth disease virus has previously been shown to approach that of the inactivated virus from which it was derived after multimeric particulate presentation as an N-terminal fusion with hepatitis B core antigen. In this report we demonstrate that rhinovirus peptide-hepatitis B core antigen fusion proteins are 10-fold more immunogenic than peptide coupled to keyhole limpet hemocyanin and 100-fold more immunogenic than uncoupled peptide with an added helper T-cell epitope. The fusion proteins can be readily administered without adjuvant or with adjuvants acceptable for human and veterinary application and can elicit a response after nasal or oral dosing. The fusion proteins can also act as T-cell-independent antigens. These properties provide further support for their suitability as presentation systems for "foreign" epitopes in the development of vaccines.

  15. Adenovirus retargeting to surface expressed antigens on oral mucosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zeeburg, Hester J. T.; van Beusechem, Victor W.; Huizenga, Aafke; Haisma, Hidde J.; Korokhov, Nick; Gibbs, Susan; Leemans, C. Rene; Brakenhoff, Ruud H.

    Background Head and neck squamous cell carcinomas develop in preneoplastic mucosal fields that can extend over several centimeters in diameter. Most of these fields are microscopically recognized as dysplasias. These fields are often not adequately treated and might cause local relapse. Previous

  16. Cancer testis antigen and immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnadas DK

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Deepa Kolaseri Krishnadas, Fanqi Bai, Kenneth G Lucas Department of Pediatrics, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Louisville, KY, USA Abstract: The identification of cancer testis (CT antigens has been an important advance in determining potential targets for cancer immunotherapy. Multiple previous studies have shown that CT antigen vaccines, using both peptides and dendritic cell vaccines, can elicit clinical and immunologic responses in several different tumors. This review details the expression of melanoma antigen family A, 1 (MAGE-A1, melanoma antigen family A, 3 (MAGE-A3, and New York esophageal squamous cell carcinoma-1 (NY-ESO-1 in various malignancies, and presents our current understanding of CT antigen based immunotherapy. Keywords: cancer testis antigens, immunotherapy, vaccine

  17. Amphotericin B cochleates: a vehicle for oral delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlin, David S

    2004-02-01

    Cochleates are a novel lipid-based delivery vehicle consisting of crystalline phospholipid-cation structures that form spiral lipid sheets. They represent a new technology platform for oral delivery of clinically important drugs that possess poor oral bioavailability. Orally administered cochleates containing amphotericin B (CAMB) showed broad-spectrum activity in murine infection models of candidiasis, aspergillosis and cryptococcosis. Initial biodistribution studies of CAMB administered orally in mice demonstrated that cochleates delivered significant levels of AMB to target organs. The lipid particulate nature of cochleates also imparted reduced toxicity that mimics other lipid-amphotericin B complexes. Cochleates are a promising new vehicle for oral delivery of amphotericin B at therapeutic levels.

  18. Seed-based oral vaccines as allergen-specific immunotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaiwa, Fumio

    2011-03-01

    Plant-based vaccines have advantages over conventional vaccines in terms of scalability, lack of requirement for cold chain logistics, stability, safety, cost-effectiveness and needle-free administration. In particular, when antigen is expressed in seeds, high production is possible and immunogenicity is not lost even if stocked at ambient temperature for several years. Induction of immune tolerance (desensitization) to allergen is a principle strategy for controlling allergic diseases, and is generally carried out by subcutaneous injection. Seed-based oral administration offers a straightforward and inexpensive alternative approach to deliver vaccines effectively to the GALT without loss of activity. Consumption of transgenic seeds containing modified hypo-allergenic tolerogen or T-cell epitope peptides derived from allergens has no or very few severe side effects and can induce immune tolerance leading to reduction of allergen-specific IgE production, T-cell proliferation and release of histamine. Suppression of allergen-specific clinical symptoms results. Thus, seed-based allergy vaccines offer an innovative and convenient allergen-specific immunotherapeutic approach as an alternative to conventional allergen-specific immunotherapy.

  19. Oral candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millsop, Jillian W; Fazel, Nasim

    2016-01-01

    Oral candidiasis (OC) is a common fungal disease encountered in dermatology, most commonly caused by an overgrowth of Candida albicans in the mouth. Although thrush is a well-recognized presentation of OC, it behooves clinicians to be aware of the many other presentations of this disease and how to accurately diagnose and manage these cases. The clinical presentations of OC can be broadly classified as white or erythematous candidiasis, with various subtypes in each category. The treatments include appropriate oral hygiene, topical agents, and systemic medications. This review focuses on the various clinical presentations of OC and treatment options.

  20. Oral myiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Treville Pereira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Myiasis is a relatively rare condition arising from the invasion of body tissues or cavities of living animals or humans by maggots or larvae of certain species of flies. It is an uncommon clinical condition, being more frequent in underdeveloped countries and hot climate regions, and is associated with poor hygiene, suppurative oral lesions; alcoholism and senility. Its diagnosis is made basically by the presence of larvae. The present article reports a case of oral myiasis involving 20 larvae in a patient with neurological deficiency.

  1. Oral health promotion interventions on oral yeast in hospitalised and medically compromised patients: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Otto L T; Bandara, H M H N; Samaranayake, Lakshman P; McGrath, Colman; Li, Leonard S W

    2012-03-01

    Yeast are major aetiological agents of localised oral mucosal lesions, and are also leading causes of nosocomial bloodstream infections. The purpose of this systematic review was to examine the effectiveness of oral health promotion interventions on the prevalence and incidence of these opportunistic oral pathogens in hospitalised and medically compromised patients. The PubMed, ISI Web of Science and Cochrane Library databases were searched for clinical trials assessing the effect of oral health promotion interventions on oral yeast. Chlorhexidine delivered in a variety of oral hygiene products appeared to have some effect on oral yeast, although some studies found equivocal effects. Although a wide array of other compounds have also been investigated, their clinical effectiveness remains to be substantiated. Likewise, the utility of mechanical oral hygiene interventions and other oral health promotion measures such as topical application of salivary substitute, remains unsettled. Although many chemical agents contained in oral hygiene products have proven in vitro activity against oral yeast, their clinical effectiveness and potential role as adjuncts or alternative therapies to conventional treatment remains to be confirmed by further high-quality randomised controlled trials. This is pertinent, given the recent emergence of yeast resistance to conventional antifungal agents.

  2. TMS delivered for A-3 Test Stand

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    A state-of-the-art thrust measurement system for the A-3 Test Stand under construction at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center was delivered March 17. Once completed, the A-3 stand (seen in background) will allow simulated high-altitude testing on the next generation of rocket engines for America's space program. Work on the stand began in 2007, with activation scheduled for 2012. The stand is the first major test structure to be built at Stennis since the 1960s. The recently delivered TMS was fabricated by Thrust Measurement Systems in Illinois. It is an advanced calibration system capable of measuring vertical and horizontal thrust loads with an accuracy within 0.15 percent at 225,000 pounds.

  3. Oral calcitonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdy RC

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ronald C Hamdy,1,2 Dane N Daley11Osteoporosis Center, College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, 2Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Johnson City, TN, USAAbstract: Calcitonin is a hormone secreted by the C-cells of the thyroid gland in response to elevations of the plasma calcium level. It reduces bone resorption by inhibiting mature active osteoclasts and increases renal calcium excretion. It is used in the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis, Paget's disease of bone, and malignancy-associated hypercalcemia. Synthetic and recombinant calcitonin preparations are available; both have similar pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles. As calcitonin is a peptide, the traditional method of administration has been parenteral or intranasal. This hinders its clinical use: adherence with therapy is notoriously low, and withdrawal from clinical trials has been problematic. An oral formulation would be more attractive, practical, and convenient to patients. In addition to its effect on active osteoclasts and renal tubules, calcitonin has an analgesic action, possibly mediated through β-endorphins and the central modulation of pain perception. It also exerts a protective action on cartilage and may be useful in the management of osteoarthritis and possibly rheumatoid arthritis. Oral formulations of calcitonin have been developed using different techniques. The most studied involves drug-delivery carriers such as Eligen® 8-(N-2hydroxy-5-chloro-benzoyl-amino-caprylic acid (5-CNAC (Emisphere Technologies, Cedar Knolls, NJ. Several factors affect the bioavailability and efficacy of orally administered calcitonin, including amount of water used to take the tablet, time of day the tablet is taken, and proximity to intake of a meal. Preliminary results looked promising. Unfortunately, in two Phase III studies, oral calcitonin (0.8 mg with 200 mg 5-CNAC, once a day for postmenopausal osteoporosis and twice a day for osteoarthritis failed to

  4. 口服sST2质粒DNA在炎症性肠病小鼠中的免疫水平%Effect of orally delivered plasmid DNA expressing sST2 on inflammatory Th2 cells in intestine of mice with DSS-induced colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱俊丰; 徐莹; 桑力轩; 杨芳莉; 李岩; 尉冰; 高云峰; 孙逊; 吕昌龙

    2016-01-01

    目的:制备口服可溶性ST2(Soluble ST2,sST2)质粒,观察其对于小鼠炎症性结肠黏膜免疫应答水平。方法提取小鼠脾脏总RNA,扩增sST2基因,并克隆至pcDNA3.1/myc-HisA载体,构建pcDNA3.1-sST2-myc-HisA质粒,借此转染COS-7细胞,使之表达 sST2-myc-HisA融合蛋白。利用脂质体LipofectamineTM 2000包裹,制备口服sST2质粒,经灌胃给予用葡聚糖硫酸钠( Dextran sulfate sodium, DSS)诱生溃疡性结肠炎的C57BL/6实验小鼠,并用组织病理学方法观察结肠黏膜组织形态变化。用Real-timePCR检测sST2基因表达,用免疫印迹检测sST2质粒融合蛋白的表达;用ELISA检测小鼠肠固有层淋巴细胞培养上清中细胞因子( IL-4、IL-5和IL-13)的分泌水平。结果 Real-time PCR检测到sST2基因的正确表达,经双酶切及测序鉴定,证明质粒pcDNA3.1-sST2-myc-HisA构建成功,免疫印迹试验在转染的COS-7细胞检测到sST2-myc-HisA融合蛋白的表达,其相对分子质量与预期的相符;观察到结肠黏膜组织形态发生的变化;Real-time PCR结果显示,sST2质粒组在结肠黏膜组织内sST2的表达水平明显高于pcDNA3.1组和生理盐水组(P<0.01);ELISA结果显示sST2质粒组结肠固有层淋巴细胞培养上清中IL-4、IL-5和IL-13的分泌水平高于pcDNA3.1组和生理盐水组(P<0.05)。结论实验成功制备口服sST2质粒;该质粒可抑制小鼠炎症性结肠黏膜组织内Th2型免疫应答。%Objective To prepare an oral sST2 DNA plasmid and observe its effect on the immuno-regulation of intestinal mucosa of mice with DSS induced colitis. Methods The gene coding sST2 was amplified from total RNA of mice spleen and then inserted into the vector pcDNA3. 1/myc-HisA to construct a recombinant expression plasmid pcDNA3. 1-sST2-myc-HisA, which was transfected to COS-7 cells and made up of a capsule wrapped by LipofectamineTM2000. The capsule was orally dilivered to C57BL/6 mouse with DSS induced colitis, and

  5. Antigen antibody interactions

    CERN Document Server

    DeLisi, Charles

    1976-01-01

    1. 1 Organization of the Immune System One of the most important survival mechanisms of vertebrates is their ability to recognize and respond to the onslaught of pathogenic microbes to which they are conti- ously exposed. The collection of host cells and molecules involved in this recognition­ 12 response function constitutes its immune system. In man, it comprises about 10 cells 20 (lymphocytes) and 10 molecules (immunoglobulins). Its ontogenic development is c- strained by the requirement that it be capable of responding to an almost limitless variety of molecular configurations on foreign substances, while simultaneously remaining inert to those on self components. It has thus evolved to discriminate, with exquisite precision, between molecular patterns. The foreign substances which induce a response, called antigens, are typically large molecules such as proteins and polysaccharides. The portions of these with which immunoglobulins interact are called epitopes or determinants. A typical protein epitope m...

  6. Liposome-coupled antigens are internalized by antigen-presenting cells via pinocytosis and cross-presented to CD8 T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuriko Tanaka

    Full Text Available We have previously demonstrated that antigens chemically coupled to the surface of liposomes consisting of unsaturated fatty acids were cross-presented by antigen-presenting cells (APCs to CD8+ T cells, and that this process resulted in the induction of antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. In the present study, the mechanism by which the liposome-coupled antigens were cross-presented to CD8+ T cells by APCs was investigated. Confocal laser scanning microscopic analysis demonstrated that antigens coupled to the surface of unsaturated-fatty-acid-based liposomes received processing at both MHC class I and class II compartments, while most of the antigens coupled to the surface of saturated-fatty-acid-based liposomes received processing at the class II compartment. In addition, flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that antigens coupled to the surface of unsaturated-fatty-acid-liposomes were taken up by APCs even in a 4°C environment; this was not true of saturated-fatty-acid-liposomes. When two kinds of inhibitors, dimethylamiloride (DMA and cytochalasin B, which inhibit pinocytosis and phagocytosis by APCs, respectively, were added to the culture of APCs prior to the antigen pulse, DMA but not cytochalasin B significantly reduced uptake of liposome-coupled antigens. Further analysis of intracellular trafficking of liposomal antigens using confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that a portion of liposome-coupled antigens taken up by APCs were delivered to the lysosome compartment. In agreement with the reduction of antigen uptake by APCs, antigen presentation by APCs was significantly inhibited by DMA, and resulted in the reduction of IFN-γ production by antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. These results suggest that antigens coupled to the surface of liposomes consisting of unsaturated fatty acids might be pinocytosed by APCs, loaded onto the class I MHC processing pathway, and presented to CD8+ T cells. Thus, these liposome-coupled antigens

  7. Trypanosoma cruzi: circulating antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Bongertz

    1981-03-01

    Full Text Available Circulating antigens were detected in sera of mice experimentally infected with a high close of Trypanosoma cruzi by reaction with sera from chronically infected mice. The immunodiffusion reaction between homologous acute and chronic sera produced four precipitation lines. By reaction with chronic mouse serum, circulating antingens were detected in sera from heavily infected hamsters, dogs, rabbits and in sera from chagasic patients. A reaction was also found in urine from acutely infected mice and dogs. Trypanosoma cruzi exoantigen was detected in trypanosome culture medium and in the supernatant of infected cell cultures. Attempts to isolate the antigens are described.Antígenos circulantes foram detectados em soros de camundongos infectados experimentalmente com elevadas doses de Trypanosoma cruzi pela reação com soros obtidos de camundongos em fase crônica de infecção. A reação de imunodifusão entre soros homólogos agudo e crônico produziu quatro linhas de precipitação. Por reação com soro crônico de camundongo antígenos circulantes foram detectados em soros de crícetos, cães e coelhos infectados com doses elevadas de Trypanosoma cruzi e em soros de pacientes chagásicos. Uma reação foi também observada com urina de camundongos e cães infectados de forma aguda. Exoantígeno de Trypanosoma cruzi foi detectado em meio de cultura de tripanosomas e em sobrenadantes de culturas de células infectadas. Tentativas de isolamento dos antigenos são descritas.

  8. Delivering Educational Multimedia Contents through an Augmented Reality Application: A Case Study on Its Impact on Knowledge Acquisition and Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Lopez, David; Contero, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a study to analyze the use of augmented reality (AR) for delivering multimedia content to support the teaching and learning process of the digestive and circulatory systems at the primary school level, and its impact on knowledge retention. Our AR application combines oral explanations and 3D models and animations of anatomical…

  9. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics > Oral Cancer > Oral Cancer Exam Video Oral Cancer Exam Video This video shows what happens during an oral cancer examination. Quick and painless, the exam can detect ...

  10. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics > Oral Cancer > Oral Cancer Exam Video Oral Cancer Exam Video This video shows what happens during an oral cancer examination. Quick and painless, the exam can detect ...

  11. Radioimmunoassays of hidden viral antigens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neurath, A.R. (Lindsley F. Kimbell Research Inst., New York, NY); Strick, N.; Baker, L.; Krugman, S.

    1982-07-01

    Antigens corresponding to infectious agents may be present in biological specimens only in a cryptic form bound to antibodies and, thus, may elude detection. We describe a solid-phase technique for separation of antigens from antibodies. Immune complexes are precipitated from serum by polyethylene glycol, dissociated with NaSCN, and adsorbed onto nitrocellulose or polystyrene supports. Antigens remain topographically separated from antibodies after removal of NaSCN and can be detected with radiolabeled antibodies. Genomes from viruses immobilized on nitrocellulose can be identified by nucleic acid hybridization. Nanogram quantities of sequestered hepatitis B surface and core antigens and picogram amounts of hepatitis B virus DNA were detected. Antibody-bound adenovirus, herpesvirus, and measles virus antigens were discerned by the procedure.

  12. Radioimmunoassays of hidden viral antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neurath, A R; Strick, N; Baker, L; Krugman, S

    1982-01-01

    Antigens corresponding to infectious agents may be present in biological specimens only in a cryptic form bound to antibodies and, thus, may elude detection. We describe a solid phase technique for separation of antigens from antibodies. Immune complexes are precipitated from serum by polyethylene glycol, dissociated with NaSCN, and adsorbed onto nitrocellulose or polystyrene supports. Antigens remain topographically separated from antibodies after removal of NaSCN and can be detected with radiolabeled antibodies. Genomes from viruses immobilized on nitrocellulose can be identified by nucleic acid hybridization. Nanogram quantities of sequestered hepatitis B surface and core antigens and picogram amounts of hepatitis B virus DNA were detected. Antibody-bond adenovirus, herpesvirus, and measles virus antigens were discerned by the procedure. Images PMID:6956871

  13. Antigenic Variation in Bacterial Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Guy H; Bankhead, Troy; Seifert, H Steven

    2016-02-01

    Antigenic variation is a strategy used by a broad diversity of microbial pathogens to persist within the mammalian host. Whereas viruses make use of a minimal proofreading capacity combined with large amounts of progeny to use random mutation for variant generation, antigenically variant bacteria have evolved mechanisms which use a stable genome, which aids in protecting the fitness of the progeny. Here, three well-characterized and highly antigenically variant bacterial pathogens are discussed: Anaplasma, Borrelia, and Neisseria. These three pathogens display a variety of mechanisms used to create the structural and antigenic variation needed for immune escape and long-term persistence. Intrahost antigenic variation is the focus; however, the role of these immune escape mechanisms at the population level is also presented.

  14. Effective cutaneous vaccination using an inactivated chikungunya virus vaccine delivered by Foroderm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, Penny A; Raphael, Anthony P; Yamada, Miko; Nufer, Kaitlin L; Gardner, Joy; Le, Thuy T T; Prow, Natalie A; Dang, Nhung; Schroder, Wayne A; Prow, Tarl W; Suhrbier, Andreas

    2015-09-22

    Foroderm is a new cutaneous delivery technology that uses high-aspect ratio, cylindrical silica microparticles, that are massaged into the skin using a 3D-printed microtextured applicator, in order to deliver payloads across the epidermis. Herein we show that this technology is effective for delivery of a non-adjuvanted, inactivated, whole-virus chikungunya virus vaccine in mice, with minimal post-vaccination skin reactions. A single topical Foroderm-based vaccination induced T cell, Th1 cytokine and antibody responses, which provided complete protection against viraemia and disease after challenge with chikungunya virus. Foroderm vaccination was shown to deliver fluorescent, virus-sized beads across the epidermis, with beads subsequently detected in draining lymph nodes. Foroderm vaccination also stimulated the egress of MHC II(+) antigen presenting cells from the skin. Foroderm thus has potential as a simple, cheap, effective, generic, needle-free technology for topical delivery of vaccines.

  15. Fine oral filaments in Paramecium: a biochemical and immunological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerot, J; Iftode, F; Budin, K; Jeanmaire-Wolf, R; Coffe, G; Fleury-Aubusson, A

    2001-01-01

    In Paramecium, several kinds of the oral networks of fine filaments are defined at the ultrastructural level. Using the sodium chloride-treated oral apparatus of Paramecium as an antigen to produce monoclonal antibodies, we have begun to identify the proteins constituting these networks. Immunoblotting showed that all positive antibodies were directed against three bands (70-, 75-and 83-kD), which corresponded to quantitatively minor components of the antigen; there was no antibody specific for the quantitatively major components (58- and 62-kD). Immunolocalization with four of these antibodies directed against one or several of these three bands showed that these proteins are components of the fine filaments supporting the oral area; a decoration of the basal bodies and the outer lattice was also observed on the cortex. Immunofluorescence on interphase cells suggested that the three proteins colocalized on the left side of the oral apparatus, whereas only the 70-kD band was detected on the right side. During division, the antigens of the antibodies were detected at different stages after oral basal body assembly. The antibodies cross-reacted with the tetrins, which are oral filament-forming proteins in Tetrahymena, demonstrating that tetrin-related proteins are quantitatively minor components of the oral and the somatic cytoskeleton of Paramecium.

  16. Comparative Analysis of Gingival Tissue Antigen Presentation Pathways in Aging and Periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, O.A.; Novak, M.J.; Kirakodu, S.; Orraca, L.; Chen, K.C.; Strom-berg, A.; Gonzalez-Martinez, J.; Ebersole, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    Aim Gingival tissues of periodontitis lesions contribute to local elevations in mediators, including both specific T cell and antibody immune responses to oral bacterial antigens. Thus, antigen processing and presentation activities must exist in these tissues to link antigen-presenting cells with adaptive immunity. We hypothesized that alterations in the transcriptome of antigen processing and presentation genes occur in aging gingival tissues and that periodontitis enhances these differences reflecting tissues less capable of immune resistance to oral pathogens. Materials and Methods Rhesus monkeys (n=34) from 3–23 years of age were examined. A buccal gingival sample from healthy or periodontitis sites were obtained, total RNA isolated, and microarray analysis was used to describe the transcriptome. Results The results demonstrated increased transcription of genes related to the MHC class II and negative regulation of NK cells with aging in healthy gingival tissues. In contrast, both adult and aging periodontitis tissues showed decreased transcription of genes for MHC class II antigens, coincident with up-regulation of MHC class I-associated genes. Conclusion These transcriptional changes suggest a response of healthy aging tissues through the class II pathway (i.e., endocytosed antigens) and altered responses in periodontitis that could reflect host-associated self-antigens or targeting cytosolic intra-cellular microbial pathogens. PMID:24304139

  17. Oral dirofilariasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R S Desai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dirofilaria is parasitic nematodes of domestic and wild animals that can infect humans accidentally via vectors. Its occurrence in the oral cavity is extremely rare. The most frequent presentation of human dirofilariasis is a single submucosal nodule without signs of inflammation. We hereby, report a case of human dirofilariasis affecting the buccal mucosa in a 32-year-old farmer caused by D. repens.

  18. Oral leiomyomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damm, D D; Neville, B W

    1979-04-01

    Oral leiomyomas are considered to be rare neoplasms, but they may be encountered more frequently than generally believed. Three types of leiomyomas are commonly described: solid leiomyomas, angiomyomas, and epithelioid leiomyomas. Three cases of solid leiomyoma are presented, all of which occurred in the anterior mandibular mucobuccal fold. Leiomyomas can be easily confused with other spindle-cell tumors. The necessity of using special stains, especially Mallory's phosphotungstic acid hematoxylin, is discussed.

  19. School based oral health promotional intervention: Effect on knowledge, practices and clinical oral health related parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjun Gauba

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: No organized school oral health program is existent in India. Aim: The aim of this study is to test the feasibility and efficacy of an economical school oral health promotional intervention with educational and preventive components. Settings and Design: School oral health promotional intervention carried out in one of the randomly selected school and evaluated through short duration prospective model. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 children with an age range of 10-12 years with no previous history of dental intervention were enrolled. Interventions comprised of oral health education (delivered through lecture and demonstrations by an undergraduate dental student and topical antibacterial therapy (fluoride varnish and povidone iodine. Outcomes consisted of Knowledge and practices (KAP regarding oral health, clinical oral health related parameters such as plaque index (PI, gingival index (GI and caries activity as per Modified Snyder′s test. These were reported at baseline, 3 weeks and 6 months follow-up examination by a calibrated examiner. Statistical Analysis: McNemar Bowker′s test, Student′s t-test, Pearson Chi-square tests were used. Results: Highly significant (P < 0.001 improvements in KAP scores, PI scores, GI scores and caries activity were reported at 3 weeks and 6 months follow-up examination. Conclusion: This small economical school oral health program positively influenced oral health related practices and parameters of oral health such as oral cleanliness, gingival health and caries activity.

  20. Oral health promotion interventions on oral reservoirs of staphylococcus aureus: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, O L T; McGrath, C; Bandara, H M H N; Li, L S W; Samaranayake, L P

    2012-04-01

    The oral cavity serves as a reservoir of Staphylococcus aureus for infection of the lower respiratory tract and cross-infection to other patients. This systematic review was designed to examine the effectiveness of oral health promotion interventions on this pathogen. The PubMed, ISI Web of Science, and Cochrane Library databases were searched for clinical trials assessing the effect of oral health promotion interventions on oral and oropharyngeal carriage of S. aureus. Oral health promotion interventions on oral reservoirs of S. aureus in both systemically healthy and medically compromised groups consisted of oral hygiene interventions only. There was a lack of evidence pertaining to the effectiveness of mechanical oral hygiene interventions against this pathogen. Chlorhexidine delivered in oral hygiene products such as mouthrinses, gels, and sprays appeared to have some utility against S. aureus, although some studies found equivocal effects. There was a dearth of studies investigating the efficacy of other chemical agents. Although many chemical agents contained in oral hygiene products have proven in vitro activity against S. aureus, their clinical effectiveness and potential role as adjuncts or alternative therapies to conventional treatment remain to be confirmed by further high-quality randomized controlled trials.

  1. Delivering IT and eBusiness value

    CERN Document Server

    Willcocks, Leslie

    2001-01-01

    Delivering Business Value from IT' is focused on the evaluation issue in IT and how IT evaluation can proceed across the life-cycle of any IT investment and be linked positively to improving business performance. .Chapters 1,2 and 3 detail an approach to IT evaluation whilst chapters 4 and 5 build on these by showing two distinctive approaches to linking IT to business performance. The remaining three chapters deal with a range of evaluation issues emerging as important - specifically Internet evaluation, Y2K and beyond, EMU, quality outsourcing, infrastructure, role of benchmarking, and cost

  2. COLONOSCOPY AND CARCINOEMBRYONIC ANTIGEN VARIATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita G SOUSA

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Context Colonoscopy is essential for synchronous and metachronous cancer detection. Carcinoembryonic antigen is a colorectal cancer tumor marker, important as a follow-up tool in patients with previous colorectal cancer. False-positive carcinoembryonic antigen elevation results in multiples exams and in patient anxiety. In literature, there is reference to transient carcinoembryonic antigen increase with colonoscopy. Objective To evaluate the influence of bowel preparation and colonoscopy in carcinoembryonic antigen blood levels. Methods We prospectively studied subjects that underwent routine colonoscopy in our institution. Blood samples were collected (1 before bowel cleaning, (2 before colonoscopy and (3 immediately after colonoscopy. Blood carcinoembryonic antigen levels were determined by “Sandwich” immunoassay. The statistical methods used were the paired t-test and ANOVA. Results Thirty-seven patients (22M/15F were included; age range 28-84 (mean 56 years. Mean carcinoembryonic antigen values were 1.9, 2 and 1.8 for (1, (2 and (3, respectively. An increase in value (2 compared with (1 was observed in 20/37 patients (P = 0.018, mainly in younger patients and in patients requiring more endoluminal interventions. In 29/37 patients, the CEA value decreased from (2 to (3 (P = 1.3x10-7. Conclusions A trend for carcinoembryonic antigen increase after bowel cleaning was observed, especially in younger patients and in patients with more endoluminal interventions, but without clinical meaning.

  3. DESIGNS MATTER: Delivering Information Sources for Tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margie A. Nolasco

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Tourism has benefits not just for travelers, but also to the local economy. Since, Bicol Region has natural and cultural attractions; it is a potential travel destination in the country. Technology in delivering information sources played vital role for the success of the tourism industry in the Region. This allows travel enthusiasts to get more information about various tourist attractions. This paper analyzes the effectiveness of delivering information sources such as web advertisement and desktop publishing for tourist promotion in the Bicol Region. Specifically, it determined the status of tourism, and identified common forms of promotions for tourism development. The study adopted mixed method of research. This method was utilized to confirm and validate findings. Interviews and focus group discussions were used to gather data from the respondents of the selected Local Government Units, Department of Tourism, Travel Agencies and Hotel Agents in the Region. Based on the findings, of the total foreign visitors in the country, only 9.14% visited Bicol Region in 2014. That is why, domestic tourist showed high percentage against foreign visitors with 25.7%. Brochures with EZ maps as most commonly used desktop publishing materials and websites and social media for web advertisement. Thus, there is a need to reevaluate promotional activities by the DOT and other agencies. Adoption suggestive features for creative desktop publishing materials and web services should be considered to increase tourist visitors in the Region.

  4. Oral intoxication of mice with Shiga toxin type 2a (Stx2a) and protection by anti-Stx2a monoclonal antibody 11E10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, L M; Melton-Celsa, A R; Smith, M A; Smith, M J; O'Brien, A D

    2014-03-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains cause food-borne outbreaks of hemorrhagic colitis and, less commonly, a serious kidney-damaging sequela called the hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Stx, the primary virulence factor expressed by STEC, is an AB5 toxin with two antigenically distinct forms, Stx1a and Stx2a. Although both toxins have similar biological activities, Stx2a is more frequently produced by STEC strains that cause HUS than is Stx1a. Here we asked whether Stx1a and Stx2a act differently when delivered orally by gavage. We found that Stx2a had a 50% lethal dose (LD50) of 2.9 μg, but no morbidity occurred after oral intoxication with up to 157 μg of Stx1a. We also compared several biochemical and histological parameters in mice intoxicated orally versus intraperitoneally with Stx2a. We discovered that both intoxication routes caused similar increases in serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen, indicative of kidney damage, as well as electrolyte imbalances and weight loss in the animals. Furthermore, kidney sections from Stx2a-intoxicated mice revealed multifocal, acute tubular necrosis (ATN). Of particular note, we detected Stx2a in kidney sections from orally intoxicated mice in the same region as the epithelial cell type in which ATN was detected. Lastly, we showed reduced renal damage, as determined by renal biomarkers and histopathology, and full protection of orally intoxicated mice with monoclonal antibody (MAb) 11E10 directed against the toxin A subunit; conversely, an irrelevant MAb had no therapeutic effect. Orally intoxicated mice could be rescued by MAb 11E10 6 h but not 24 h after Stx2a delivery.

  5. Oral mucosal immunization using glucomannosylated bilosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Sanyog; Indulkar, Anura; Harde, Harshad; Agrawal, Ashish K

    2014-06-01

    The present study embarks on the feasibility of GM-bilosomes as a rationally designed vehicle for oral mucosal immunization. Bilosomes containing BSA as a model antigen were found to have vesicle size of 157 +/- 3 nm, PDI of 0.287 +/- 0.045, zeta potential of -21.8 +/- 2.01 mV and entrapment efficiency of 71.3 +/- 4.3%. Bilosomal formulations were freeze dried and entrapped BSA in freeze dried formulations was found to retain its structural and conformational stability as evident by SDS-PAGE and CD analysis. The GM-bilosomes were also found stable in different simulated biological fluids and bile salt solutions of different concentrations. In-vitro drug release revealed that GM-bilosomes were able to sustain drug release up to 24 h. In-vitro cell uptake in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells demonstrated significantly higher uptake of GM-bilosomes in comparison with bilosomes and free antigen. Intestinal uptake studies on excised rat intestinal sections further demonstrated higher uptake of vesicular systems throughout the intestinal region in comparison with free antigen. Significantly higher (p alum adsorbed BSA (BSA-AL) following oral administration. The immune response observed in case of GM-bilosomes was comparable to BSA-AL administered through im route without any significant difference (p > 0.05). More importantly, GM-bilosomes were found capable of inducing mucosal immune response as well as cell mediated immune response which was not induced by im BSA-AL. In conclusion, GM-bilosomes could be considered as promising carrier and adjuvant system for oral mucosal immunization and productively exploited for oral delivery of other candidate antigens.

  6. Quantification of oral palatine Langerhans cells in HIV/AIDS associated oral Kaposi sarcoma with and without oral candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jivan, Vibha; Meer, Shabnum

    2016-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are effective antigen-presenting cells that function as "custodians" of mucosa, modifying the immune system to pathogen entry, and tolerance to self-antigen and commensal microbes. A reduction in number of LCs in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals may predispose to local mucosal infections. To quantitatively determine the number of oral mucosal LCs in HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) associated oral Kaposi sarcoma (KS) with/without oral candidiasis (OC) and to define in situ interrelationships between the cells, OC, and HIV infection. Thirty-two periodic acid-Schiff. (PAS) stained histologic sections of palatal HIV/AIDS associated KS with intact oral epithelium were examined for Candida and divided into two groups: . (1) KS coinfected with Candida and. (2) KS noninfected with Candida. Sections were immunohistochemically stained with CD1a. The standard length of surface epithelium was measured and number of positively stained LCs counted per unit length. Control cases included non-Candida infected palatal mucosa overlying pleomorphic adenoma. (PA) and oral mucosa infected with Candida in otherwise healthy individuals. LC number per unit length of surface epithelium was statistically significantly greatest in uninfected PA mucosa and lowest in KS coinfected with Candida (P = 0.0001). A statistically significant difference was also noted between uninfected PA mucosa and non-Candida infected KS (P = 0.0014), in KS coinfected with Candida and non-infected KS (P = 0.0035), between OC and PA (P = 0.0001), and OC and KS coinfected with Candida (P = 0.0247). LC numbers are significantly reduced in oral tissues of HIV/AIDS infected patients by Candida infection when compared to oral tissues without.

  7. Nanoscale artificial antigen presenting cells for T cell immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perica, Karlo; De León Medero, Andrés; Durai, Malarvizhi; Chiu, Yen Ling; Bieler, Joan Glick; Sibener, Leah; Niemöller, Michaela; Assenmacher, Mario; Richter, Anne; Edidin, Michael; Oelke, Mathias; Schneck, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC), which deliver stimulatory signals to cytotoxic lymphocytes, are a powerful tool for both adoptive and active immunotherapy. Thus far, aAPC have been synthesized by coupling T cell activating proteins such as CD3 or MHC-peptide to micron-sized beads. Nanoscale platforms have different trafficking and biophysical interaction properties and may allow development of new immunotherapeutic strategies. We therefore manufactured aAPC based on two types of nanoscale particle platforms: biocompatible iron-dextran paramagnetic particles (50-100 nm in diameter) and avidin-coated quantum dot nanocrystals (~30 nm). Nanoscale aAPC induced antigen-specific T cell proliferation from mouse splenocytes and human peripheral blood T cells. When injected in vivo, both iron-dextran particles and quantum dot nanocrystals enhanced tumor rejection in a subcutaneous mouse melanoma model. This is the first description of nanoscale aAPC that induce antigen-specific T cell proliferation in vitro and lead to effective T cell stimulation and inhibition of tumor growth in vivo. Artifical antigen presenting cells could revolutionize the field of cancer-directed immunotherapy. This team of investigators have manufactured two types of nanoscale particle platform-based aAPCs and demonstrates that both iron-dextran particles and quantum dot nanocrystals enhance tumor rejection in a melanoma model, providing the first description of nanoscale aAPCs that lead to effective T cell stimulation and inhibition of tumor growth. © 2013.

  8. Oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclennan, A H

    1987-12-01

    Over 60 million women use highly efficient and safe modern combined oral contraceptives (OCs) every day. A women who takes the oral contraceptive for 5 years before the age of 30 will actually live 12 days longer, although a woman taking the pill for the 1st time for 5 years after the age of 30 will have her life span reduced on the average by 80 days. OC related morbidity and mortality mostly occur in women over 35 who smoke. Combined low dose OCs are safe for women who do not smoke, at least to 45 years of age and probably to the menopause. The prescription of OCs is also safe to the young adolescent. The pill does not interfere with maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary ovarian axis and does not increase the incidence of amenorrhoea, oligomenorrhoea or infertility in later life. Patients with contraindications to estrogen therapy are excluded from OC use (history of thromboembolism, major heart disease, liver disease, breast cancer). Low-dose (30-35 mcg estrogen-containing monophasic or triphasic) pills are recommended. Combined oral contraceptives contain either ethinyl estradiol (1.7 to 2 times more potent) or mestranol. After absorption the progestagens, norethisterone acetate, ethynodiol diacetate and lynoestrenol are all metabolized to norethisterone. The progestagen-only pill has about a 2% failure rate and poorer cycle control than the combined pill, but it lacks estrogenic, progestagenic and androgenic side effects. This pill is suitable for the lactating mother, for smokers over 35, for hypertensive patients, and for those with a history of thrombosis. The efficacy of the progestagen-only pill is restored in 3 days of pill taking. Postcoital contraception is an alternative: treatment can be given for at least 72 hours after intercourse. The Yuzpe method calls for the patient to take 2 combined oral contraceptive tablets containing levonorgestrel and ethinyl estradiol (Eugynon or Ovral) followed by a further 2 tablets 12 hours later. This regimen

  9. Oncogenic cancer/testis antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten F; Andersen, Mads H; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments have set the stage for immunotherapy as a supplement to conventional cancer treatment. Consequently, a significant effort is required to further improve efficacy and specificity, particularly the identification of optimal therapeutic targets for clinical testing. Cancer....../testis antigens are immunogenic, highly cancer-specific, and frequently expressed in various types of cancer, which make them promising candidate targets for cancer immunotherapy, including cancer vaccination and adoptive T-cell transfer with chimeric T-cell receptors. Our current understanding of tumor...... immunology and immune escape suggests that targeting oncogenic antigens may be beneficial, meaning that identification of cancer/testis antigens with oncogenic properties is of high priority. Recent work from our lab and others provide evidence that many cancer/testis antigens, in fact, have oncogenic...

  10. Epicutaneous sensitization with protein antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Lin Liu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the past few decades there has been a progressive understanding that epicutaneous sensitization with protein antigen is an important sensitization route in patients with atopic dermatitis. A murine protein-patch model has been established, and an abundance of data has been obtained from experiments using this model. This review discusses the characteristics of epicutaneous sensitization with protein antigen, the induced immune responses, the underlying mechanisms, and the therapeutic potential.

  11. People deliver eye care: managing human resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayode Odusote

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available People deliver health. Effective health care needs an efficient and motivated health workforce, which is the totality of individuals who directly or indirectly contribute to the promotion, protection and improvement of the health of the population.Community eye health is about providing eye health care to the people as close as possible to where they live and as much as possible at a price they can afford. It promotes people-centred care rather than the traditional disease-centred eye care services. In order to provide effective and efficient eye care services, we need an adequate number of well-qualified, well-motivated and equitably distributed eye health workers (EHWs.

  12. ISES Experience in Delivering Space Weather Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boteler, David

    The International Space Environment Service has over eighty years experience in providing space weather services to meet a wide variety of user needs. This started with broadcast on December 1, 2008 from the Eiffel Tower about radio conditions. The delivery of information about ionospheric effects on high frequency (HF) radio propagation continue to be a major concern in many parts of the world. The movement into space brought requirements for a new set of space weather services, ranging from radiation dangers to man in space, damage to satellites and effects on satellite communication and navigation systems. On the ground magnetic survey, power system and pipeline operators require information about magnetic disturbances that can affect their operations. In the past these services have been delivered by individual Regional Warning Centres. However, the needs of new trans-national users are stimulating the development of new collaborative international space weather services.

  13. Delivering Hubble Discoveries to the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhamer, B.; Villard, R.; Weaver, D.; Cordes, K.; Knisely, L.

    2013-04-01

    Today's classrooms are significantly influenced by current news events, delivered instantly into the classroom via the Internet. Educators are challenged daily to transform these events into student learning opportunities. In the case of space science, current news events may be the only chance for educators and students to explore the marvels of the Universe. Inspired by these circumstances, the education and news teams developed the Star Witness News science content reading series. These online news stories (also available in downloadable PDF format) mirror the content of Hubble press releases and are designed for upper elementary and middle school level readers to enjoy. Educators can use Star Witness News stories to reinforce students' reading skills while exposing students to the latest Hubble discoveries.

  14. Combining Technologies to Deliver Distance Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicki Freeman

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1997 a Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA grant was awarded to the Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences (CLS at The University of Texas Medical Branch - Galveston (UTMB for support of the Laboratory Education and Advancement Project (LEAP. The project entailed three primary objectives, targeting laboratory practitioners in rural and medically underserved areas of Texas for delivering a bachelor's degree, laboratory-intensive course of study via distance education. Several delivery mechanisms were utilized and evaluated for their effectiveness and friendliness to both the faculty and students. The authors discuss and describe the mechanisms utilized for delivery of courses, the advantages and disadvantages encountered with each mechanism, and subjective evaluation of the effectiveness of the courses. Also discussed are the lessons learned and plans for future development.

  15. Empathic engineering: helping deliver dignity through design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosking, Ian; Cornish, Katie; Bradley, Mike; Clarkson, P. John

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Dignity is a key value within healthcare. Technology is also recognized as being a fundamental part of healthcare delivery, but also a potential cause of dehumanization of the patient. Therefore, understanding how medical devices can be designed to help deliver dignity is important. This paper explores the role of empathy tools as a way of engendering empathy in engineers and designers to enable them to design for dignity. A framework is proposed that makes the link between empathy tools and outcomes of feelings of dignity. It represents a broad systems view that provides a structure for reviewing the evidence for the efficacy of empathy tools and also how dignity can be systematically understood for particular medical devices. PMID:26453036

  16. Delivering advanced therapies: The big pharma approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnowski, J; Krishna, D; Jespers, L; Ketkar, A; Haddock, R; Imrie, J; Kili, S

    2017-07-24

    After two decades of focused development and some recent clinical successes, cell and gene therapy (CGT) is emerging as a promising approach to personalized medicines. Genetically engineered cells as a medical modality are poised to stand alongside or in combination with small molecule and biopharmaceutical approaches to bring new therapies to patients globally. Big pharma can play a vital role in industrializing CGT by focusing on diseases with high un-met medical need and compelling genetic evidence. Pharma should invest in manufacturing and supply chain solutions that deliver reproducible, high quality therapies at a commercially viable cost. Due to the fast pace of innovation in this field proactive engagement with regulators is critical. It is also vital to understand the needs of patients all along the patient care pathway and to establish product pricing that is accepted by prescribers, payers, and patients.Gene Therapy accepted article preview online, 24 July 2017. doi:10.1038/gt.2017.65.

  17. Oral Tolerance: Therapeutic Implications for Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. C. Faria

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral tolerance is classically defined as the suppression of immune responses to antigens (Ag that have been administered previously by the oral route. Multiple mechanisms of tolerance are induced by oral Ag. Low doses favor active suppression, whereas higher doses favor clonal anergy/deletion. Oral Ag induces Th2 (IL-4/IL-10 and Th3 (TGF-β regulatory T cells (Tregs plus CD4+CD25+ regulatory cells and LAP+T cells. Induction of oral tolerance is enhanced by IL-4, IL-10, anti-IL-12, TGF-β, cholera toxin B subunit (CTB, Flt-3 ligand, anti-CD40 ligand and continuous feeding of Ag. In addition to oral tolerance, nasal tolerance has also been shown to be effective in suppressing inflammatory conditions with the advantage of a lower dose requirement. Oral and nasal tolerance suppress several animal models of autoimmune diseases including experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE, uveitis, thyroiditis, myasthenia, arthritis and diabetes in the nonobese diabetic (NOD mouse, plus non-autoimmune diseases such as asthma, atherosclerosis, colitis and stroke. Oral tolerance has been tested in human autoimmune diseases including MS, arthritis, uveitis and diabetes and in allergy, contact sensitivity to DNCB, nickel allergy. Positive results have been observed in phase II trials and new trials for arthritis, MS and diabetes are underway. Mucosal tolerance is an attractive approach for treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases because of lack of toxicity, ease of administration over time and Ag-specific mechanism of action. The successful application of oral tolerance for the treatment of human diseases will depend on dose, developing immune markers to assess immunologic effects, route (nasal versus oral, formulation, mucosal adjuvants, combination therapy and early therapy.

  18. Dose and timing requirements for immunogenicity of viral poultry vaccine antigen: investigations of emulsion-based depot function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Theo; Hofmans, Marij P M; Theelen, Marc J G; Manders, Frans G A; Schijns, Virgil E J C

    2007-10-01

    The release requirements for vaccine antigens delivered by adjuvants with presumed depot function are poorly understood. Water-in-oil (W/O) emulsions are routinely used in many poultry vaccines. They strongly activate antibody production, and are regarded as a depot from which antigens are slowly released, resulting in prolonged antigen residence. However, from earlier studies we concluded that W/O adjuvant activity is partly based on the immunostimulatory activity of the oil phase. Here we assess the dose and regimen requirements for viral antigen in immunization experiments in chickens. Three-week-old to 4-week-old White Leghorn chickens were repeatedly injected with inactivated infectious bursal disease virus antigen over 48 days. Our aim was to compare the antibody responses in repeatedly injected animals, receiving fractioned doses of antigen, with the responses in animals receiving only one injection of the full dose of antigen formulated in either a W/O emulsion or in saline. We observed that repeated administration of small amounts of antigen results in a gradual increase of specific humoral immune responses during the immunization regimen. Immunization with a higher first dose evoked an early higher antibody response, which, however, reached a similar plateau level at the end of the regimen. When compared with lower first-dose regimens, a slow decline of serum antibody titre 2 weeks after the end of antigen injections indicated that repeated injection of small doses of antigen indeed mimics the efficacy of depot-forming adjuvants. All regimens of fractioned antigen in saline, however, proved less effective, when compared with a single-dose vaccination of the cumulative amount of antigen formulated in a W/O emulsion. From our data we confirm that W/O emulsions are very effective vaccine vehicles for improving antigen-specific humoral responses in chickens, owing to a combination of antigen residence-prolonging activity and direct immune stimulation.

  19. Intermolecular forces and enthalpies in the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans and an antigen I/II-deficient mutant to laminin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, Henk J.; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Dijkstra, Rene J. B.; Norde, Willem; Petersen, Fernanda C.; Scheie, Anne A.; van der Mei, Henny C.

    2007-01-01

    The antigen I/II family of surface proteins is expressed by most oral streptococci, including Streptococcus mutans, and mediates specific adhesion to, among other things, salivary films and extracellular matrix proteins. In this study we showed that antigen I/II-deficient S. mutans isogenic mutant I

  20. Helicobacter pylori Stool Antigen Feco-prevalence in Food Workers in Van, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanifi Körkoca

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Helicobacter pylori contributes to the pathogenesis of peptic ulcers, cancer, and may also cause extra gastric infections. These bacteria can be transmitted by means of fecal-oral, oral-oral, and gastro-oral via an infected person. The present study aims to investigate the existence of H.pylori antigens in the stools of workers employed in the food industry. Methods: The existence of the H.pylori stool antigen (HpSA in the stool of food industry workers was researched via the stool antigen test. Results: The H.pylori stool antigen was detected in 74 out of 154 people taking part in this study (48.05%. No statistical differences were found between the HpSA positivity and the branches of their works. Conclusions: The fact that 48.05% HpSA was detected in the workers employed in the food industry reveals the potential significance of these people in terms of the H.pylori infections and the need for further studies on this subject. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2015;5(1: 10-14

  1. Tolerization of an established αb-crystallin-reactive T-cell response by intravenous antigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, R.; Mark, K. van der; Wawrousek, E.F.; Plomp, A.C.; Noort, J.M. van

    2007-01-01

    Tolerance induction to prevent activation of a naïve T-cell repertoire has been well documented in rodents and can be readily achieved by intravenous, oral or intranasal administration of antigen in the absence of adjuvants. In autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) the presence of an e

  2. Vaccination of mice with liposome-entrapped adult antigens of Nippostrongylus brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhalem, A; Bourdieu, C; Luffau, G; Pery, P

    1988-01-01

    An immunization procedure was developed to induce protection of mice against the gastrointestinal helminth Nippostrongylus brasiliensis. Mice immunized by the oral route with antigens which were released by adult worms during their in vitro survival in a detergent-containing medium and which were entrapped in liposomes were protected against a challenge infection.

  3. Interaction forces between salivary proteins and Streptococcus mutans with and without antigen I/II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, C.P.; Belt-Gritter, van de B.; Dijkstra, R.J.B.; Norde, W.; Mei, van der H.C.; Busscher, H.J.

    2007-01-01

    The antigen I/II family of surface proteins is expressed by oral streptococci, including Streptococcus mutans, and mediates specific binding to, among others, salivary films. The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction forces between salivary proteins and S. mutans with (LT11) and witho

  4. Interaction forces between salivary proteins and Streptococcus mutans with and without antigen I/II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Chun-Ping; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Dijkstra, Rene J. B.; Norde, Willem; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.

    2007-01-01

    The antigen I/II family of surface proteins is expressed by oral streptococci, including Streptococcus mutans, and mediates specific binding to, among others, salivary films. The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction forces between salivary proteins and S. mutans with (LT11) and

  5. Mucosal response in African catfish after administration of Vibrio anguillarum O2 antigens via different routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervarcke, Stefaan; Ollevier, Frans; Kinget, Renaat; Michoel, Armand

    2005-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of mucosal vaccination in African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) with Vibrio anguillarum O2 bacterins. The antigen was administered via different routes: anal intubation, oral administration, intraperitoneal injection and immersion. To monitor the antigen uptake, a competitive ELISA was used. The antibody response was measured using an indirect ELISA. Increased antibody levels were found in bile and mucus upon anal intubation, which was not the case after intraperitoneal injection. The data indicate that oral vaccination of fish may be possible when antigens can reach the second gut segment in sufficient quantities and in the right form as confirmed by the recorded substantial induction of systemic and mucosal immunity. The results obtained are a strong indication for mucosal immune response and the two compartmental models for immune response in fish.

  6. Lymphocyte blastogenic responses to food antigens in cats showing clinical symptoms of food hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Rinei; Kurata, Keigo; Masuda, Kenichi; Ohno, Koichi; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2012-06-01

    Three cats were diagnosed as having food hypersensitivity by food elimination and oral food provocation tests. Twelve allergenic food ingredients were identified by oral food provocation test in the 3 cats. Of the 12 food ingredients, 9 offending food antigens were shown to be positive in a lymphocyte stimulation test; however, none of them were positive in antigen-specific IgE testing, and only four food antigens were positive in intradermal testing. The stimulation indices in the lymphocyte stimulation tests for the 9 food ingredients were found to be decreased after the cats were fed elimination diets. The present study demonstrates that the lymphocyte stimulation test reflects an immunologic reaction involved in food hypersensitivity and can help identify allergenic food ingredients in feline food hypersensitivity.

  7. Blood Group Antigen Recognition via the Group A Streptococcal M Protein Mediates Host Colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Oliveira, David M. P.; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren; Everest-Dass, Arun; Day, Christopher J.; Dabbs, Rebecca A.; Ve, Thomas; Kobe, Bostjan; Nizet, Victor; Packer, Nicolle H.; Walker, Mark J.; Jennings, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus [GAS]) is responsible for over 500,000 deaths worldwide each year. The highly virulent M1T1 GAS clone is one of the most frequently isolated serotypes from streptococcal pharyngitis and invasive disease. The oral epithelial tract is a niche highly abundant in glycosylated structures, particularly those of the ABO(H) blood group antigen family. Using a high-throughput approach, we determined that a strain representative of the globally disseminated M1T1 GAS clone 5448 interacts with numerous, structurally diverse glycans. Preeminent among GAS virulence factors is the surface-expressed M protein. M1 protein showed high affinity for several terminal galactose blood group antigen structures. Deletion mutagenesis shows that M1 protein mediates glycan binding via its B repeat domains. Association of M1T1 GAS with oral epithelial cells varied significantly as a result of phenotypic differences in blood group antigen expression, with significantly higher adherence to those cells expressing H antigen structures compared to cells expressing A, B, or AB antigen structures. These data suggest a novel mechanism for GAS attachment to host cells and propose a link between host blood group antigen expression and M1T1 GAS colonization. PMID:28119471

  8. Design Environment for Novel Vertical Lift Vehicles: DELIVER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore, Colin

    2016-01-01

    This is a 20 minute presentation discussing the DELIVER vision. DELIVER is part of the ARMD Transformative Aeronautics Concepts Program, particularly the Convergent Aeronautics Solutions Project. The presentation covers the DELIVER vision, transforming markets, conceptual design process, challenges addressed, technical content, and FY2016 key activities.

  9. Oral dirofilariasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahija Janardhanan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Filariasis affecting animals can rarely cause infections in human beings through the accidental bite of potential vectors. The resulting infection in man, known as zoonotic filariasis occur worldwide. Human dirofilariasis, the most common zoonotic filariasis, is caused by the filarial worm belonging to the genus Dirofilaria. Dirofilarial worms, which are recognized as pathogenic in man can cause nodular lesions in the lung, subcutaneous tissue, peritoneal cavity or eyes. Oral dirofilariasis is extremely rare and only a few cases have been documented. We report an interesting case of dirofilariasis due to Dirofilaria repens involving buccal mucosa in a patient who presented with a facial swelling. The clinical features, diagnostic issues and treatment aspects are discussed. This paper stresses the importance of considering dirofilariasis as differential diagnosis for subcutaneous swelling of the face, especially in areas where it is endemic.

  10. Oral sex, oral health and orogenital infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saini Rajiv

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral sex is commonly practiced by sexually active male-female and same-gender couples of various ages, including adolescents. The various type of oral sex practices are fellatio, cunnilingus and analingus. Oral sex is infrequently examined in research on adolescents; oral sex can transmit oral, respiratory, and genital pathogens. Oral health has a direct impact on the transmission of infection; a cut in your mouth, bleeding gums, lip sores or broken skin increases chances of infection. Although oral sex is considered a low risk activity, it is important to use protection and safer sex precautions. There are various methods of preventing infection during oral sex such as physical barriers, health and medical issues, ethical issues and oral hygiene and dental issues. The lesions or unhealthy periodontal status of oral cavity accelerates the phenomenon of transmission of infections into the circulation. Thus consequences of unhealthy or painful oral cavity are significant and oral health should be given paramount importance for the practice of oral sex.

  11. Oral amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Lima Arrais Ribeiro

    Full Text Available A amiloidose é uma doença complexa rara de difícil diagnóstico que ocorre devido à deposição de substância amilóide no meio extracelular. Ao ser diagnosticado na cavidade bucal, deve-se monitorar o paciente a fim de avaliar possíveis complicações sistêmicas da doença. Diante disso, o objetivo do presente estudo é relatar um caso de amiloidose oral em uma paciente do gênero feminino de 72 anos de idade. Baseado nos sinais clínicos observados, a hipótese diagnóstica foi de fibroma traumático. Após realização de biópsia e exame histopatológico, o diagnóstico foi de amiloidose oral, o que foi confirmado com a coloração do espécime com o reagente vermelho congo. Depósitos de amilóide foram encontrados no tecido conjuntivo, na avaliação através da luz polarizada, que apresentou birrefringência. Tal achado foi preocupante, já que a amiloidose geralmente acomete diversos tecidos levando a comprometimentos sistêmicos. Por essa razão a paciente foi encaminhada a procurar atendimento médico. No entanto, houve abandono do tratamento e a mesma veio a óbito 6 meses após o diagnóstico da doença. Lesões orais aparentemente simples podem revelar doenças raras e de difícil tratamento. O diagnóstico preciso e acompanhamentos médicos são fundamentais na sobrevida do paciente.

  12. Comparative study of number and distribution of IgG+ cells in oral lichen planus and oral lichenoid lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parichehr Ghalayani

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral lichen planus is a common mucocutaneous disorder with unknown etiology. While current data suggest that oral lichen planus is a cell-mediated disease, differential diagnosis of this disease and oral lichenoid lesions is very problematic, both clinically and histopathologically. This study aimed to compare immunohistochemical features of these similar diseases. Methods: This was a descriptive-analytic study in which formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tis-sue sections of 30 oral lichen planus and 30 oral lichenoid lesions were immunohistochemically ana-lyzed for number and distribution of IgG + cells. A standard biotin-streptavidin procedure after anti-gen retrieval was used. Data were analyzed in SPSS software using Mann-Whitney U test. Results: There were some significant differences in distribution of IgG + cells among different loca-tions in oral lichen planus and also in oral lichenoid lesions separately; but the differences between distribution of IgG + cells between the two groups of oral lichen planus and oral lichenoid lesions were not significant. Conclusion: There was no significant difference in number and distribution of IgG + cells between the two groups. So, this study can suggest that location of IgG is similar in samples of oral lichen planus and oral lichenoid lesions and consequently, this marker cannot help us differentiate them from each other. Other markers can be analyzed in further studies in order to find an appropriate distinguisher between the two lesions.

  13. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for signs of oral cancer. For Patients and the Public Oral Cancer Pamphlet that describes the risk factors, signs and symptoms of oral cancer, and the importance of detecting the disease in its early ...

  14. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Programs Careers in Dental Research See All Continuing Education Practical Oral Care for People With Developmental Disabilities – ... detection and treatment of oral cancers. Note: For materials specific to African American men, please see: Oral ...

  15. Oral Lichen Planus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oral lichen planus Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Oral lichen planus (LIE-kun PLAY-nus) is an ongoing (chronic) ... that affects mucous membranes inside your mouth. Oral lichen planus may appear as white, lacy patches; red, ...

  16. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for signs of oral cancer. For Patients and the Public Oral Cancer Pamphlet that describes the risk factors, signs and symptoms of oral cancer, and the importance of detecting the disease in its early ...

  17. Happiness, subjective and objective oral health status, and oral health behaviors among Korean elders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyun-Seo; Kim, Hae-Young; Patton, Lauren L; Chun, Jin-Ho; Bae, Kwang-Hak; Lee, Mi-Ok

    2013-10-01

    This study aims to comprehensively assess the association of subjective and objective oral health status and oral health behaviors with happiness, under consideration of demographic, socioeconomic, and general health-related factors. This study also aims to test whether subjective oral health outcomes are better predictors of happiness compared with objective oral health outcomes. The data were collected from 479 community-dwelling elders aged 65 years or over selected by a cluster sampling method. A questionnaire and an oral examination were implemented. A multiple regression method was conducted to assess associations with happiness index (HI). The mean age of the elders was 74.6 years. Mean (standard deviation, SD) HI, EuroQol-visual analog scale (EQ-VAS) and 14-item oral health impact profile (OHIP-14) index were 5.7 (SD 2.3), 59.8 (SD 21.1), and 16.3 (SD 13.1). In the final model, a significant association with HI of the OHIP-14 index (P = 0.091) among all the participants and significant associations of oral symptoms (P = 0.038), wearing a removable denture (P = 0.039), and of the oral health behavior of daily toothbrushing (P = 0.007) among poorer oral health QoL group were confirmed under consideration of other related factors. While correlations of HI to subjective measures of health, EQ-VAS and OHIP-14 score were moderate to weak, those to objective measures of health were only weak or insignificant. Oral impacts which might persistently affect one's daily life need to be considered in designing and delivering public services aimed to promote people's happiness. With oral health impacts and behaviors accounting for 10% of happiness among elders, public and community services for the elderly that support oral health and daily toothbrushing for the dentate are critical for the well-being of our elders. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Delivering enhanced testosterone replacement therapy through nanochannels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrati, Silvia; Nicolov, Eugenia; Bansal, Shyam; Zabre, Erika; Geninatti, Thomas; Ziemys, Arturas; Hudson, Lee; Ferrari, Mauro; Goodall, Randal; Khera, Mohit; Palapattu, Ganesh; Grattoni, Alessandro

    2015-02-18

    Primary or secondary hypogonadism results in a range of signs and symptoms that compromise quality of life and requires life-long testosterone replacement therapy. In this study, an implantable nanochannel system is investigated as an alternative delivery strategy for the long-term sustained and constant release of testosterone. In vitro release tests are performed using a dissolution set up, with testosterone and testosterone:2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (TES:HPCD) 1:1 and 1:2 molar ratio complexes release from the implantable nanochannel system and quantify by HPLC. 1:2 TES:HPCD complex stably achieve 10-15 times higher testosterone solubility with 25-30 times higher in vitro release. Bioactivity of delivered testosterone is verified by LNCaP/LUC cell luminescence. In vivo evaluation of testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH), and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) levels by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and multiplex assay is performed in castrated Sprague-Dawley rats over 30 d. Animals are treated with the nanochannel implants or degradable testosterone pellets. The 1:2 TES:HPCD nanochannel implant exhibits sustained and clinically relevant in vivo release kinetics and attains physiologically stable plasma levels of testosterone, LH, and FSH. In conclusion, it is demonstrated that by providing long-term steady release 1:2 TES:HPCD nanochannel implants may represent a major breakthrough for the treatment of male hypogonadism.

  19. Where should noninvasive ventilation be delivered?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Nicholas S

    2009-01-01

    Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) has assumed an important role in the management of certain types of respiratory failure in acute-care hospitals. However, the optimal location for NIV has been a matter of debate. Some have argued that all patients begun on NIV in the acute-care setting should go to an intensive care unit (ICU), but this is impractical because ICU beds are often unavailable, and it may not be a sensible use of resources. Also, relatively few studies have examined the question of location for NIV. One problem is that various units' capabilities to deliver NIV differ substantially, even in the same hospital. Choosing the appropriate environment for NIV requires consideration of the patient's need for monitoring, the monitoring capabilities of the unit, including both technical and personnel resources (nursing and respiratory therapy), and the staff's skill and experience. In some hospitals NIV is begun most often in the emergency department, but is most often managed in an ICU. Step-down units are often good locations for NIV, but many institutions do not have step-down units. With ICU beds at a premium, many hospitals are forced to manage some NIV patients on general wards, which can be safely done with more stable patients if the ward is suitably monitored and experienced. When deciding where to locate the patient, clinicians must be familiar with the capabilities of the units in their facility and try to match the patient's need for monitoring and the unit's capabilities.

  20. Delivering new physics at impressive speed

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    The speed with which the heavy ion run at the LHC is delivering new physics is impressive not only for the insights it is bringing to the early Universe, but also for the clear demonstration it gives of the value of competition and complementarity between the experiments.   ALICE was the first off the mark to publish papers from the ion run, as you’d expect from the LHC’s dedicated ion experiment, but results emerging from ATLAS and CMS are bringing new understanding in their own right. Each collaboration’s result plays to the strengths of its detector, and it is by taking all the results together that our knowledge advances. The creation, observation and understanding of the hot dense matter that would have existed in the early Universe, normally known as Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP), is complex science and one of the ion programme’s key goals. Many signals for QGP exist, and like pieces of a puzzle, we must assemble all of them to get the full picture. At th...

  1. Changes in nurse education: delivering the curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Graham

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine changes in pre-registration nursing education through the personal accounts of nurse teachers. This paper is based on 37 in-depth interviews within a central London Healthcare Faculty. Each interview was subjected to a process of content analysis described by Miles and Huberman. The interviews took place between August 2003 and March 2004 and totalled 34.4 hours or 305,736 words. There were thirty female and seven male participants, who shared 1015 years of nursing experience, averaging at 27.4 years (min 7-max 42). These were supplemented by 552 years of teaching practice, the average being 15 years (min 0.5-max 29). This paper--delivering the nursing curriculum--identifies that the nature of nursing has changed as it has both expanded and contracted. Participants identified three major changes; the nature of nursing, selection of future nurses and the current impact that large cohorts have on our traditional model of person-centred education. The practice placements remain central to nursing education and it is the nursing role that should define the curriculum and the values of higher education should be supportive of this identity.

  2. Urban poverty: delivering babies in the slum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, M

    1998-01-01

    Government of India statistics indicate that about 3 million of New Delhi's 11 million people live in slums, while another 3 million people, most fleeing rural poverty, are expected to migrate to the capital by 2000. ASHA Community Health and Development Society is a nongovernmental organization currently working in 23 of India's slums, serving a population of about 150,000 people. The group has pioneered the use of community-based networks in New Delhi to improve health in the poorest communities. While ASHA has a small, full-time staff, most of the daily health care work is conducted by slum volunteers. Ekta Vihar is a slum community of 1800 residents. Community members' primary source of health care are Vimla Rana and Sobha, two illiterate women who reside in the community and are part of a team of community health workers trained by ASHA. Rana and Sobha deliver almost all of the babies born annually in the slum and care for community members when they become ill.

  3. A Study on Oral Mucosal Lesions in 3500 Patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a great variety of diseases, which affect the oral tissues and those were .... The pattern of BMZ staining depends on its ultra-structural morphology in each tissue. .... of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) with geographic tongue .... brown to brownish black in color. All the ... symptoms such as anhidrosis, thin and sparse hair, dry.

  4. Reduced frequency of nickel allergy upon oral nickel contact at an early age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Hoogstraten, I M; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Von Blomberg, B M

    1991-01-01

    From animal studies we know that oral administration of T-dependent antigens before sensitization effectively induces systemic immune unresponsiveness. Such 'oral tolerance' is persistent, dose-dependent, antigen-specific and presumably T suppressor cell-mediated. Oral tolerance induction could...... the feasibility of oral prevention of undesired T cell-mediated immunity in man. Potentially tolerizing (oral nickel contacts via orthodontic braces) as well as sensitizing (ear piercing) events were studied retrospectively in 2176 patients attending nine European patch test clinics. Patients were interviewed...... by means of a confidential questionnaire. The results show that ear piercing strongly favoured development of nickel ACH. More importantly, patients having had oral contacts with nickel-releasing appliances (dental braces) at an early age, but only if prior to ear piercing, showed a reduced frequency...

  5. The amount of care delivered : challenges of indices in oral health studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dommelen, Paula; Schuller, Annemarie A

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Untreated dental caries is the most prevalent medical condition worldwide, with considerable variations in prevalence between regions and countries. The care index (CI) and the restorative index (RI) are generally used to make comparisons between and within countries of levels of care de

  6. Immunogenicity and efficacy of a rough Brucella suis vaccine delivered orally or parenterally to feral swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucella suis strain 353-1 is a stable vaccine strain that is clinically safe, does not cause positive serologic responses on conventional brucellosis surveillance tests, and induces humoral and cellular immunity in swine after vaccination. In this study, we evaluated tissue clearance and immunologi...

  7. Immune response after rabies oral immunization in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Sloboda Pacheco da Silva

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to formulate an anti-rabies oral vaccine from the cell culture vaccine PV TECPAR to elicit the production of antibodies against the rabies in mice. A vaccine was developed using 10(7.5 DL50/0.03 ml viral antigens homogenised in lanovaseline to facilitate oral administration. Mice were vaccinated two times for seroconversion. Sera of the vaccinated mice showed a higher level of antibody production than the control group. These results could be used to direct the development of an anti-rabies oral vaccine.

  8. Retrovirus-delivered siRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devroe Eric

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability of transfected synthetic small interfering (si RNAs to suppress the expression of specific transcripts has proved a useful technique to probe gene function in mammalian cells. However, high production costs limit this technology's utility for many laboratories and experimental situations. Recently, several DNA-based plasmid vectors have been developed that direct transcription of small hairpin RNAs, which are processed into functional siRNAs by cellular enzymes. Although these vectors provide certain advantages over chemically synthesized siRNAs, numerous disadvantages remain including merely transient siRNA expression and low and variable transfection efficiency. Results To overcome several limitations of plasmid-based siRNA, a retroviral siRNA delivery system was developed based on commerically available vectors. As a pilot study, a vector was designed to target the human Nuclear Dbf2-Related (NDR kinase. Cells infected with the anti-NDR siRNA virus dramatically downregulate NDR expression, whereas control viruses have no effect on total NDR levels. To confirm and extend these findings, an additional virus was constructed to target a second gene, transcriptional coactivator p75. Conclusion The experiments presented here demonstrate that retroviruses are efficient vectors for delivery of siRNA into mammalian cells. Retrovirus-delivered siRNA provides significant advancement over previously available methods by providing efficient, uniform delivery and immediate selection of stable "knock-down" cells. This development should provide a method to rapidly assess gene function in established cell lines, primary cells, or animals.

  9. More Soil Delivered to Phoenix Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image, taken by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager, documents the delivery of a soil sample from the 'Snow White' trench to the Wet Chemistry Laboratory. A small pile of soil is visible on the lower edge of the second cell from the top.This deck-mounted lab is part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA). The delivery was made on Sept. 12, 2008, which was Sol 107 (the 107th Martian day) of the mission, which landed on May 25, 2008. The Wet Chemistry Laboratory mixes Martian soil with an aqueous solution from Earth as part of a process to identify soluble nutrients and other chemicals in the soil. Preliminary analysis of this soil confirms that it is alkaline, and composed of salts and other chemicals such as perchlorate, sodium, magnesium, chloride and potassium. This data validates prior results from that same location, said JPL's Michael Hecht, the lead scientist for MECA. In the coming days, the Phoenix team will also fill the final four of eight single-use ovens on another soil-analysis instrument, the Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer, or TEGA. The team's strategy is to deliver as many samples as possible before the power produced by Phoenix's solar panels declines due to the end of the Martian summer. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  10. Oral delivery strategies for nutraceuticals: Delivery vehicles and absorption enhancers

    OpenAIRE

    Gleeson, John P.; Ryan, Sinéad M.; Braden, David James

    2016-01-01

    Lifestyle issues contribute to the development of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Together with appropriate diet and exercise, nutraceuticals may contribute to managing prevention at an early stage prior to therapeutic intervention. However, many useful food-derived bioactive compounds will not sufficiently permeate the small intestine to yield efficacy without appropriate oral delivery technology. The pharmaceutical industry uses commercialised approaches for oral deliv...

  11. Oral vaccination through Peyer's Patches: update on particle uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Edna; Borges, Olga

    2017-08-25

    Oral immunization has numerous advantages over parenteral administrations. In addition to ease administration, more effective pathogen elimination on the mucosa before spreading into the blood circulation, constitutes the main benefit. This is particularly true for pathogens that enter the body through the oral route. On the other hand, it is the most challenging administration route for peptides, proteins and recombinant antigens due to gastrointestinal (GI) tract numerous barriers including the harsh environment and the inherent weak immunogenicity. In addition to the adjuvant properties, polymeric particles arise as the most promising strategy to overcome poor antigen bioavailability/stability upon oral administration. The Peyer's patches have been considered an important structure of the gut associate lymphoid tissue (GALT) for the initiation of the immune response towards particulate oral antigens. The transport mechanism of both, nano and microparticles across intestinal mucosa, particularly throughout Peyer's patches, is discussed in this review. We provide a short and concise update (last decade) focused on the importance of particle physicochemical properties, M-cell ligands and size-dependent transport and intracellular fate concerning Peyer's patches targeted oral vaccination. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Identification of toxocara canis antigens by Western blot in experimentally infected rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MORALES Olga Lucía

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxocariasis is a frequent helminthiasis that can cause visceral and ocular damage in humans specially in children. The identification of specific antigens of Toxocara canis is important in order to develop better diagnostic techniques. Ten rabbits were infected orally with a dose of 5000 Toxocara canis embryonated eggs. Rabbits were bled periodically and an ELISA assay was performed to determine levels of specific Toxocara IgG antibodies. ELISA detected antibodies at day 15 after infection. Western blot (WB assay was performed using excretory/secretory antigens (E/S of T. canis second stage larvae. Different antigen concentrations were evaluated: 150, 200, 250 and 300 µg/mL. The concentration of 250 µg/mL was retained for analysis. Rabbit sera were diluted 1:100. Secondary antibody was used at a dilution of 1:1000. Results of WB indicated that in the first month after infection specific antibodies against the 200 KDa, 116 KDa, 92 KDa and 35 KDa antigens were detected; antibodies against the 92 KDa, 80 KDa, 66 KDa, 45 KDa, 31 KDa and 28 KDa antigens appeared later. All positive sera in the ELISA test were also positive in WB. Two antigen bands, 92 KDa and 35 KDa, were identified since the beginning and throughout the course of infection. These antigens merit further evaluation as candidates for use in diagnosis.

  13. Social Media–Delivered Sexual Health Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Sheana S.; Levine, Deborah; Black, Sandra R.; Schmiege, Sarah; Santelli, John

    2012-01-01

    Background Youth are using social media regularly and represent a group facing substantial risk for sexually transmitted infection (STI). Although there is evidence that the Internet can be used effectively in supporting healthy sexual behavior, this hasn't yet extended to social networking sites. Purpose To determine whether STI prevention messages delivered via Facebook are efficacious in preventing increases in sexual risk behavior at 2 and 6 months. Design Cluster RCT, October 2010–May 2011. Setting/participants Individuals (seeds) recruited in multiple settings (online, via newspaper ads and face-to-face) were asked to recruit three friends, who in turn recruited additional friends, extending three waves from the seed. Seeds and waves of friends were considered networks and exposed to either the intervention or control condition. Intervention Exposure to Just/Us, a Facebook page developed with youth input, or to control content on 18–24 News, a Facebook page with current events for 2 months. Main outcome measures Condom use at last sex and proportion of sex acts protected by condoms. Repeated measures of nested data were used to model main effects of exposure to Just/Us and time by treatment interaction. Results 1578 participants enrolled, with 14% Latino and 35% African-American; 75% of participants completed at least one study follow-up. Time by treatment effects were observed at 2 months for condom use (intervention 68% vs control 56%, p=0.04) and proportion of sex acts protected by condoms (intervention 63% vs control 57%, p=0.03) where intervention participation reduced the tendency for condom use to decrease over time. No effects were seen at 6 months. Conclusions Social networking sites may be venues for efficacious health education interventions. More work is needed to understand what elements of social media are compelling, how network membership influences effects, and whether linking social media to clinical and social services can be beneficial

  14. Antigen-driven focal inflammatory death of malaria liver stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganchimeg eBayarsaikhan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Multiple immunizations using live irradiated sporozoites, the infectious plasmodial stage delivered into the host skin during a mosquito bite, can elicit sterile immunity to malaria. CD8+ T cells seem to play an essential role in this protective immunity, since their depletion consistently abolishes sterilizing protection in several experimental models. So far, only a few parasite antigens are known to induce CD8+ T cell-dependent protection, but none of them can reach the levels of protection afforded by live attenuated parasites. Systematic attempts to identify novel antigens associated with this efficient cellular protection were so far unsuccessful. In addition, the precise mechanisms involved in the recognition and elimination of parasitized hepatocytes in vivo by CD8+ T cells still remain obscure. Recently, it has been shown that specific effector CD8+ T cells, after recognition of parasitized hepatocytes, recruit specific and non-specific activated CD8+ T cells to the site of infection, resulting in the formation of cellular clusters around and in the further elimination of intracellular parasites. The significance of this finding is discussed in the perspective of a general mechanism of antigen-dependent focalized inflammation and its consequences for the elimination of malaria liver stages.

  15. Concepts and applications for influenza antigenic cartography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Influenza antigenic cartography projects influenza antigens into a two or three dimensional map based on immunological datasets, such as hemagglutination inhibition and microneutralization assays. A robust antigenic cartography can facilitate influenza vaccine strain selection since the antigenic map can simplify data interpretation through intuitive antigenic map. However, antigenic cartography construction is not trivial due to the challenging features embedded in the immunological data, such as data incompleteness, high noises, and low reactors. To overcome these challenges, we developed a computational method, temporal Matrix Completion-Multidimensional Scaling (MC-MDS), by adapting the low rank MC concept from the movie recommendation system in Netflix and the MDS method from geographic cartography construction. The application on H3N2 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza A viruses demonstrates that temporal MC-MDS is effective and efficient in constructing influenza antigenic cartography. The web sever is available at http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap. PMID:21761589

  16. Are Financial Variables Inputs in Delivered Production Functions? Are Financial Variables Inputs in Delivered Production Functions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Kiguel

    1995-03-01

    Full Text Available Fischer's classic (1974 paper develops conditions under which it is appropriate to use money as an input in a 'delivered' production function. In this paper, we extend Fischer's model I (the Baumol-Tobin inventory approach by incorporating credit into the analysis. Our investigation of the extended model brings out a very restrictive but necessary implicit assumption employed by Fischer to treat money as an input. Namely. that there exists a binding constraint on the use of money! A similar result holds for our more general model. Fischer's classic (1974 paper develops conditions under which it is appropriate to use money as an input in a 'delivered' production function. In this paper, we extend Fischer's model I (the Baumol-Tobin inventory approach by incorporating credit into the analysis. Our investigation of the extended model brings out a very restrictive but necessary implicit assumption employed by Fischer to treat money as an input. Namely. that there exists a binding constraint on the use of money! A similar result holds for our more general model.

  17. [Oral health care volunteering in developing countries 2. Providing care effectively].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palenstein Helderman, W.H. van; Slater, J.J.; Vugt, P. van; Rietmeijer, A.G.

    2012-01-01

    Oral health care volunteering in developing countries based on the traditional Western model does not contribute to sustainable improvement and has, presumably, negative consequences for the local health care system. The oral health care can and should be delivered more efficacious. To achieve effic

  18. Surface expression of Helicobacter pylori HpaA adhesion antigen on Vibrio cholerae, enhanced by co-expressed enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli fimbrial antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Joshua; Lebens, Michael; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Holmgren, Jan; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2017-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection can cause peptic ulceration and is associated with gastric adenocarcinoma. This study aimed to construct and characterize a non-virulent Vibrio cholerae O1 strain, which grows more rapidly than H. pylori, as vector for H. pylori antigens for possible use as a vaccine strain against H. pylori. This was done by recombinant expression of the H. pylori adhesion antigen HpaA alone or, as a proof of principle, together with different colonization factor (CF) antigens of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) which may enhance immune responses against HpaA. A recombinant V. cholerae strain co-expressing HpaA and a fimbrial CF antigens CFA/I or CS5, but not the non-fimbrial CF protein CS6, was shown to express larger amounts of HpaA on the surface when compared with the same V. cholerae strain expressing HpaA alone. Mutations in the CFA/I operon showed that the chaperon, possibly together with the usher, was involved in enhancing the surface expression of HpaA. Oral immunization of mice with formaldehyde-inactivated recombinant V. cholerae expressing HpaA alone or together with CFA/I induced significantly higher serum antibody responses against HpaA than mice similarly immunized with inactivated HpaA-expressing H. pylori bacteria. Our results demonstrate that a non-virulent V. cholerae strain can be engineered to allow strong surface expression of HpaA, and that the expression can be further increased by co-expressing it with ETEC fimbrial antigens. Such recombinant V. cholerae strains expressing HpaA, and possibly also other H. pylori antigens, may have the potential as oral inactivated vaccine candidates against H. pylori. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Chylomicrons promote intestinal absorption and systemic dissemination of dietary antigen (ovalbumin in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuehui Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A small fraction of dietary protein survives enzymatic degradation and is absorbed in potentially antigenic form. This can trigger inflammatory responses in patients with celiac disease or food allergies, but typically induces systemic immunological tolerance (oral tolerance. At present it is not clear how dietary antigens are absorbed. Most food staples, including those with common antigens such as peanuts, eggs, and milk, contain long-chain triglycerides (LCT, which stimulate mesenteric lymph flux and postprandial transport of chylomicrons through mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN and blood. Most dietary antigens, like ovalbumin (OVA, are emulsifiers, predicting affinity for chylomicrons. We hypothesized that chylomicron formation promotes intestinal absorption and systemic dissemination of dietary antigens. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Absorption of OVA into MLN and blood was significantly enhanced when OVA was gavaged into fasted mice together with LCT compared with medium-chain triglycerides (MCT, which do not stimulate chylomicron formation. The effect of LCT was blocked by the addition of an inhibitor of chylomicron secretion, Pluronic L-81. Adoptively transferred OVA-specific DO11.10 T-cells proliferated more extensively in peripheral lymph nodes when OVA was gavaged with LCT than with MCT or LCT plus Pluronic L-81, suggesting that dietary OVA is systemically disseminated. Most dietary OVA in plasma was associated with chylomicrons, suggesting that these particles mediate systemic antigen dissemination. Intestinal-epithelial CaCo-2 cells secreted more cell-associated, exogenous OVA when stimulated with oleic-acid than with butyric acid, and the secreted OVA appeared to be associated with chylomicrons. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Postprandial chylomicron formation profoundly affects absorption and systemic dissemination of dietary antigens. The fat content of a meal may affect immune responses to dietary antigens by modulating

  20. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG secreting an antigen and Interleukin-2 translocates across the gastrointestinal tract and induces an antigen specific immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, Matheswaran; Selvakumari Jayasurya, Anita; Moochhala, Shabbir; Huat Bay, Boon; Kun Lee, Yuan; Mahendran, Ratha

    2011-10-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG (LGG) is a probiotic organism. In this present study, LGG that express the green fluorescence protein (LGG-GFP) and IL-2 and GFP as a fusion protein (LGG-IL-2-GFP) were used to examine bacterial uptake and the immune response induced by oral immunization. Using TEM to examine the intestinal tissue, the Lactobacilli were localized in M cells and in venules. After oral immunization, most of the bacteria were excreted in feces only a small fraction (0.15%) was retained in the intestine at 48 hr. However, more LGG-IL-2-GFP was found in the MLN and spleen than LGG-GFP. The loop ligation method was used to evaluate LGG uptake and both LGG-GFP and LGG-IL-2-GFP were found to translocate at the same rate. Analysis of LGG internalization in J774 macrophage cells indicated that IL-2 increased survival of LGG and this may explain the increased presence of these bacteria in the MLN for a longer period. After oral immunization, specific mucosal antibody production as well as GFP specific CTL activity was demonstrated. IL-2 co-expression with GFP further enhanced antibody production and CTL activity. In conclusion, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG expressing an antigen could generate an effective immune response to the antigen and IL-2 improved the response generated probably by increasing LGG expressing antigen survival in immune cells.

  1. Oral DNA Vaccine in Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Davoud Jazayeri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Attenuated Salmonella has been used as a carrier for DNA vaccine. However, in vitro and in vivo studies on the bacteria following transfection of plasmid DNA were poorly studied. In this paper, eukaryotic expression plasmids encoding avian influenza virus (AIV subtype H5N1 genes, pcDNA3.1/HA, NA, and NP, were transfected into an attenuated Salmonella enteric typhimurium SV4089. In vitro stability of the transfected plasmids into Salmonella were over 90% after 100 generations. The attenuated Salmonella were able to invade MCF-7 (1.2% and MCF-10A (0.5% human breast cancer cells. Newly hatched specific-pathogen-free (SPF chicks were inoculated once by oral gavage with 109 colony-forming unit (CFU of the attenuated Salmonella. No abnormal clinical signs or deaths were recorded after inoculation. Viable bacteria were detected 3 days after inoculation by plating from spleen, liver, and cecum. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH and polymerase chain reaction (PCR were carried out for confirmation. Salmonella was not detected in blood cultures although serum antibody immune responses to Salmonella O antiserum group D1 factor 1, 9, and 12 antigens were observed in all the inoculated chickens after 7 days up to 35 days. Our results showed that live attenuated S. typhimurium SV4089 harboring pcDNA3.1/HA, NA, and NP may provide a unique alternative as a carrier for DNA oral vaccine in chickens.

  2. Antigen Export Reduces Antigen Presentation and Limits T Cell Control of M. tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Smita; Grace, Patricia S; Ernst, Joel D

    2016-01-13

    Persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis results from bacterial strategies that manipulate host adaptive immune responses. Infected dendritic cells (DCs) transport M. tuberculosis to local lymph nodes but activate CD4 T cells poorly, suggesting bacterial manipulation of antigen presentation. However, M. tuberculosis antigens are also exported from infected DCs and taken up and presented by uninfected DCs, possibly overcoming this blockade of antigen presentation by infected cells. Here we show that the first stage of this antigen transfer, antigen export, benefits M. tuberculosis by diverting bacterial proteins from the antigen presentation pathway. Kinesin-2 is required for antigen export and depletion of this microtubule-based motor increases activation of antigen-specific CD4 T cells by infected cells and improves control of intracellular infection. Thus, although antigen transfer enables presentation by bystander cells, it does not compensate for reduced antigen presentation by infected cells and represents a bacterial strategy for CD4 T cell evasion.

  3. THE LYMPH SELF ANTIGEN REPERTOIRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eSantambrogio

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The lymphatic fluid originates from the interstitial fluid which bathes every parenchymal organ and reflects the omic composition of the tissue from which it originates in its physiological or pathological signature. Several recent proteomic analyses have mapped the proteome-degradome and peptidome of this immunologically relevant fluid pointing to the lymph as an important source of tissue-derived self-antigens. A vast array of lymph-circulating peptides have been mapped deriving from a variety of processing pathways including caspases, cathepsins, MMPs, ADAMs, kallikreins, calpains and granzymes, among others. These self peptides can be directly loaded on circulatory dendritic cells and expand the self-antigenic repertoire available for central and peripheral tolerance.

  4. The Use of Freshmen Seminar Programs to Deliver Personalized Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henslee, Amber M.; Correia, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    The current study tested the effectiveness of delivering personalized feedback to first-semester college freshmen in a group lecture format. Participants enrolled in semester-long courses were randomly assigned to receive either personalized feedback or general information about alcohol. Both lecture conditions were delivered during a standard…

  5. Delivering value to multiple stakeholders: 2013 and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, Michael E

    2012-12-01

    To deliver greater value, top payers and providers should: Measure the value they deliver to their business partners and customers, Create value through continuous performance improvement, Package and price value to optimize their margin, mission, and market share, Organize for value through new legal entities, employed medical groups, or both.

  6. 76 FR 35295 - Delivering an Efficient, Effective, and Accountable Government

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... June 16, 2011 Part III The President Executive Order 13576--Delivering an Efficient, Effective, and... 13576 of June 13, 2011 Delivering an Efficient, Effective, and Accountable Government By the authority... frequently analyzed ] and reviewed by agency leadership. Agencies shall update these metrics quarterly,...

  7. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of recombinant Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara candidate vaccines delivering West Nile virus envelope antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volz, Asisa; Lim, Stephanie; Kaserer, Martina; Pijlman, Gorben P.

    2016-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) cycles between insects and wild birds, and is transmitted via mosquito vectors to horses and humans, potentially causing severe neuroinvasive disease. Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) is an advanced viral vector for developing new recombinant vaccines against infectious

  8. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of recombinant Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara candidate vaccines delivering West Nile virus envelope antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volz, Asisa; Lim, Stephanie; Kaserer, Martina; Pijlman, Gorben P.

    2016-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) cycles between insects and wild birds, and is transmitted via mosquito vectors to horses and humans, potentially causing severe neuroinvasive disease. Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) is an advanced viral vector for developing new recombinant vaccines against infectious

  9. Different Vaccine Vectors Delivering the Same Antigen Elicit CD8plus T Cell Responses with Distinct Clonotype and Epitope Specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M Honda; R Wang; W Kong; M Kanekiyo; Q Akahata; L Xu; K Matsuo; K Natarajan; H Robinson; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Prime-boost immunization with gene-based vectors has been developed to generate more effective vaccines for AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis. Although these vectors elicit potent T cell responses, the mechanisms by which they stimulate immunity are not well understood. In this study, we show that immunization by a single gene product, HIV-1 envelope, with alternative vector combinations elicits CD8{sup +} cells with different fine specificities and kinetics of mobilization. Vaccine-induced CD8{sup +} T cells recognized overlapping third V region loop peptides. Unexpectedly, two anchor variants bound H-2D{sup d} better than the native sequences, and clones with distinct specificities were elicited by alternative vectors. X-ray crystallography revealed major differences in solvent exposure of MHC-bound peptide epitopes, suggesting that processed HIV-1 envelope gave rise to MHC-I/peptide conformations recognized by distinct CD8{sup +} T cell populations. These findings suggest that different gene-based vectors generate peptides with alternative conformations within MHC-I that elicit distinct T cell responses after vaccination.

  10. Cancer antigen 125 after delivery in women with a normal pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szecsi, Pal B; Andersen, Malene R; Bjørngaard, Brian;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To establish reference intervals for cancer antigen 125 (CA-125) in women with expected normal pregnancy, delivery, and early postpartum period. DESIGN: Prospective observational study. SETTING: Department of Clinical Biochemistry and Obstetrics, Copenhagen University Hospital, Gentofte......, Denmark. POPULATION: Eight hundred and one women with expected normal pregnancies were investigated. Of these, 640 delivered vaginally, 82 by emergency cesarean section, and 79 by elective cesarean section; 720 women had uncomplicated pregnancies. METHODS: Samples were collected at gestational weeks 13...

  11. Bacterial phospholipide antigens and their taxonomic significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karalnik, B V; Razbash, M P; Akhmetova, E A

    1981-01-01

    The investigation of interrelationships between the phospholipides of various microorganisms (33 strains of corynebacteria, mycobacteria and staphylococci) using crossed antibody neutralization reactions with phospholipide antigenic erythrocyte diagnostic was used for the assessment of the degree of antigenic propinquity and antigenic differences between the phospholipides of bacteria of the same species, genus, and of different genera. The role of the determinants of the corresponding (their own) and "foreign" genera in the antigenic differences between the phospholipides of the microorganisms investigated was established. On the basis of the results obtained the conclusion has been drawn that the method of assessment of antigenic interrelationships between phospholipides can be used for the study of some taxonomic problems.

  12. [HLA antigens in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumba, I V; Sochnev, A M; Kukaĭne, E M; Burshteĭn, A M; Benevolenskaia, L I

    1990-01-01

    Antigens of I class HLA system (locus A and B) were investigated in 67 patients of Latvian nationality suffering from juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). Associations of HLA antigens with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis partially coincided with the ones revealed earlier. Typing established an increased incidence of antigen B27 (p less than 0.01) and gaplotype A2, B40 (p less than 0.01). Antigen B15 possessed a protective action with respect to JRA. Interlocus combinations demonstrated a closer association with the disease than a single antigen. The authors also revealed markers of various clinico-anatomical variants of JRA.

  13. Evaluation of YadC protein delivered by live attenuated Salmonella as a vaccine against plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Olinzock, Joseph; Wang, Shifeng; Sanapala, Shilpa; Curtiss, Roy

    2014-03-01

    Yersinia pestis YadB and YadC are two new outer membrane proteins related to its pathogenicity. Here, codon-optimized yadC, yadC810 (aa 32-551), or yadBC antigen genes delivered by live attenuated Salmonella strains are evaluated in mice for induction of protective immune responses against Y. pestis CO92 through subcutaneous or intranasal challenge. Our findings indicate that mice immunized with Salmonella synthesizing YadC, YadC810, or YadBC develop significant serum IgG responses to purified recombinant YadC protein. For subcutaneous challenge (approximately 230 LD50 of Y. pestis CO92), mice immunized with Salmonella synthesizing YadC or YadC810 are afforded 50% protection, but no protection by immunization with the Salmonella strain synthesizing YadBC. None of these antigens provided protection against intranasal challenge (approximately 31 LD50 of Y. pestis CO92). In addition, subcutaneous immunization with purified YadC810 protein emulsified with alum adjuvant does not elicit a protective response against Y. pestis administered by either challenge route. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima Daneshpour

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Different research groups reported a negative correlation between cancers and parasitical infections. As an example, the prevalence of a hydatid cyst among patients with cancer was significantly lower than its prevalence among normal population. Tn antigens exist both in cancer and hydatid cyst. This common antigen may be involved in the effect of parasite on cancer growth. So in this work, common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers have been investigated. Materials and Methods: Different hydatid cyst antigens including hydatid fluid, laminated and germinal layer antigens, and excretory secretory antigens of protoscolices were run in SDS PAGE and transferred to NCP paper. In western immunoblotting, those antigens were probed with sera of patients with different cancer and also sera of non-cancer patients. Also, cross reaction among excretory secretory products of cancer cells and antisera raised against different hydatid cyst antigen was investigated. Results: In western immunoblotting, antisera raised against laminated and germinal layers of hydatid cyst reacted with excretory secretory products of cancer cells. Also, a reaction was detected between hydatid cyst antigens and sera of patients with some cancers. Conclusion: Results of this work emphasize existence of common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers. More investigation about these common antigens is recommended.

  15. Stable solid-phase Rh antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yared, M A; Moise, K J; Rodkey, L S

    1997-12-01

    Numerous investigators have attempted to isolate the Rh antigens in a stable, immunologically reactive form since the discovery of the Rh system over 56 years ago. We report here a successful and reproducible approach to solubilizing and adsorbing the human Rh antigen(s) to a solid-phase matrix in an antigenically active form. Similar results were obtained with rabbit A/D/F red blood cell antigens. The antigen preparation was made by dissolution of the red blood cell membrane lipid followed by fragmentation of the residual cytoskeleton in an EDTA solution at low ionic strength. The antigenic activity of the soluble preparations was labile in standard buffers but was stable in zwitterionic buffers for extended periods of time. Further studies showed that the antigenic activity of these preparations was enhanced, as was their affinity for plastic surfaces, in the presence of acidic zwitterionic buffers. Adherence to plastic surfaces at low pH maintained antigenic reactivity and specificity for antibody was retained. The data show that this approach yields a stable form of antigenically active human Rh D antigen that could be used in a red blood cell-free assay for quantitative analysis of Rh D antibody and for Rh D antibody immunoadsorption and purification.

  16. Common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshpour, Shima; Bahadoran, Mehran; Hejazi, Seyed Hossein; Eskandarian, Abas Ali; Mahmoudzadeh, Mehdi; Darani, Hossein Yousofi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Different research groups reported a negative correlation between cancers and parasitical infections. As an example, the prevalence of a hydatid cyst among patients with cancer was significantly lower than its prevalence among normal population. Tn antigens exist both in cancer and hydatid cyst. This common antigen may be involved in the effect of parasite on cancer growth. So in this work, common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers have been investigated. Materials and Methods: Different hydatid cyst antigens including hydatid fluid, laminated and germinal layer antigens, and excretory secretory antigens of protoscolices were run in SDS PAGE and transferred to NCP paper. In western immunoblotting, those antigens were probed with sera of patients with different cancer and also sera of non-cancer patients. Also, cross reaction among excretory secretory products of cancer cells and antisera raised against different hydatid cyst antigen was investigated. Results: In western immunoblotting, antisera raised against laminated and germinal layers of hydatid cyst reacted with excretory secretory products of cancer cells. Also, a reaction was detected between hydatid cyst antigens and sera of patients with some cancers. Conclusion: Results of this work emphasize existence of common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers. More investigation about these common antigens is recommended. PMID:26962511

  17. Antigen-loaded ER microsomes from APC induce potent immune responses against viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofra, Vassiliki; Mansour, Salah; Liu, Mengya; Gao, Bin; Primpidou, Elisavet; Wang, Ping; Li, Suling

    2009-01-01

    Although matured DC are capable of inducing effective primary and secondary immune responses in vivo, it is difficult to control the maturation and antigen loading in vitro. In this study, we show that ER-enriched microsomal membranes (microsomes) isolated from DC contain more peptide-receptive MHC I and II molecules than, and a similar level of costimulatory molecules to, their parental DC. After loading with defined antigenic peptides, the microsomes deliver antigenic peptide-MHC complexes (pMHC) to both CD4 and CD8 T cells effectively in vivo. The peptide-loaded microsomes accumulate in peripheral lymphoid organs and induce stronger immune responses than peptide-pulsed DC. The microsomal vaccines protect against acute viral infection. Our data demonstrate that peptide-MHC complexes armed microsomes from DC can be an important alternative to DC-based vaccines for protection from viral infection.

  18. Langerhans cells and their role in oral mucosal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhi Upadhyay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are arguably the most potent antigen-presenting cells and may be the only cells capable of initiating the adaptive immune response. The epithelial residents of dendritic cells are Langerhans cells, which serve as the "sentinels" of the mucosa, altering the immune system not only to pathogen entry but also of tolerance to self antigen and commensal microbes. Oral mucosal Langerhans cells are capable of engaging and internalizing a wide variety of pathogens and have been found responsive to nickel in patients with nickel allergies, oral Candida species, oral lichen planus, lichenoid drug eruptions, graft versus host diseases, periodontal diseases median rhomboid glossitis, human immunodeficiency virus infection, hairy leukoplakia of the tongue, and oral squamous cell carcinoma. Review focuses on the role of antigen-presenting cells in particular Langerhans cells to better understand the mechanisms underlying immune responses. In this review, comprehensive detail about mucosal diseases has been compiled using the PubMed database and through textbooks.

  19. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Deadlines Grant Application Forms Application Receipt Dates Electronic Submission of Applications Grants 101 (How to Write ... detection and treatment of oral cancers. Note: For materials specific to African American men, please see: Oral ...

  20. Oral Appliances Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your sleep doctor may schedule you for a sleep study to verify treatment success. Follow-Up Visits Follow-up visits with your dentist will be needed to ensure the optimal fit of the oral appliance. Effective oral appliances ...

  1. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... See All Oral Complications of Systemic Diseases Cancer Treatment Developmental Disabilities Diabetes Heart Disease HIV/AIDS See ... this brochure includes information on symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of oral cancer, along with definitions of selected ...

  2. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the exam can detect oral cancer early—when it can be treated more successfully. Publications​ For Health ... and the importance of detecting the disease in its early stages. The Oral Cancer Exam Step-by- ...

  3. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Oral Complications of Systemic Diseases Cancer Treatment Developmental Disabilities Diabetes Heart Disease HIV/AIDS See All Order ... Education Practical Oral Care for People With Developmental Disabilities – This booklet presents an overview of physical, mental, ...

  4. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... signs of oral cancer. For Patients and the Public Oral Cancer Pamphlet that describes the risk factors, ... not collect any actual information. External Web Site Policy This graphic notice ( ) means that you are leaving ...

  5. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diagnosis, and treatment of oral cancer, along with definitions of selected medical terms and resource information. Oral ... of Dental and Craniofacial Research National Institutes of Health Bethesda, MD 20892-2190 301-496-4261 NIH… ...

  6. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... See All Oral Complications of Systemic Diseases Cancer Treatment Developmental Disabilities Diabetes Heart Disease HIV/AIDS See ... this brochure includes information on symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of oral cancer, along with definitions of selected ...

  7. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and College Students Recent College Graduates Dental and Medical Students See All Careers & Training Opportunities Job Openings ... of oral cancer, along with definitions of selected medical terms and resource information. Oral Cancer A fact ...

  8. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... signs of oral cancer. For Patients and the Public Oral Cancer Pamphlet that ... any actual information. External Web Site Policy This graphic notice ( ) means that you are leaving ...

  9. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the exam can detect oral cancer early—when it can be treated more successfully. Publications​ For Health ... and the importance of detecting the disease in its early stages. The Oral Cancer Exam Step-by- ...

  10. HAD Oral History Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Jarita

    2014-01-01

    The Historical Astronomy Division is the recipient of an American Institute of Physics Neils Bohr Library Grant for Oral History. HAD has assembled a team of volunteers to conduct oral history interviews since May 2013. Each oral history interview varies in length between two and six hours. This presentation is an introduction to the HAD Oral History Project and the activities of the team during the first six months of the grant.

  11. Oral Steroids for Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Andrew D; Clarke, Jesse; Williams, Timothy K

    2015-01-01

    Contact/allergic dermatitis is frequently treated inappropriately with lower-than-recommended doses or inadequate duration of treatment with oral and intramuscular glucocorticoids. This article highlights a case of dermatitis in a Ranger Assessment and Selection Program student who was improperly treated over 2 weeks with oral steroids after being bit by Cimex lectularius, commonly known as bed bugs. The article also highlights the pitfalls of improper oral steroid dosing and provides reasoning for longer-duration oral steroid treatment.

  12. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contents NIDCR Home Oral Health Diseases and Conditions Gum Disease TMJ Disorders Oral Cancer Dry Mouth Burning Mouth Tooth Decay See All Oral Complications of Systemic Diseases Cancer Treatment Developmental Disabilities Diabetes Heart Disease HIV/AIDS See All Order Publications ...

  13. Oral Health and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Oral Health and Aging Oral Health and Aging Past Issues / Summer 2016 Table of ... years. He spoke with NIH MedlinePlus magazine about oral health issues common in older adults. What has been ...

  14. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) Improving the Nation's Oral Health National Institutes of Health Español Staff Directory A– ... Index Search Text size: Website Contents NIDCR Home Oral Health Diseases and Conditions Gum Disease TMJ Disorders Oral ...

  15. SELF EMULSIFYING DELIVERY SYSTEM -MOSTLY DISCUSSED BUT STILL REMAINED CHALLENGING ASPECT TO ENHANCE THE ORAL ABSORPTION OF LIPOPHILIC DRUG

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Niranjan Chivate; Kiran Wadkar; Rohit Shah; Anuradha Chivate

    2016-01-01

    ... in the gastro-intestinal lumen or other aqueous media. Therefore in order to be delivered orally and to achieve acceptable bioavailability, lipophilic drugs require a co-administered drug delivery system...

  16. Oral Health in Rural Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Guide Rural Health Topics & States Topics View more Oral Health in Rural Communities Adequate access to oral healthcare ... about oral health programs in my area? What oral health disparities are present in rural America? According to ...

  17. An oral vaccine against candidiasis generated by a yeast molecular display system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibasaki, Seiji; Aoki, Wataru; Nomura, Takashi; Miyoshi, Ayuko; Tafuku, Senji; Sewaki, Tomomitsu; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2013-12-01

    Enolase 1 (Eno1p) of Candida albicans is an immunodominant antigen. However, conventional technologies for preparing an injectable vaccine require purification of the antigenic protein and preparation of an adjuvant. To develop a novel type of oral vaccine against candidiasis, we generated Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells that display the Eno1p antigen on their surfaces. Oral delivery of the engineered S. cerevisiae cells prolonged survival rate of mice that were subsequently challenged with C. albicans. Given that a vaccine produced using molecular display technology avoids the need for protein purification, this oral vaccine offers a promising alternative to the use of conventional and injectable vaccines for preventing a range of infectious diseases.

  18. Plant-made oral vaccines against human infectious diseases-Are we there yet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Hui-Ting; Daniell, Henry

    2015-10-01

    Although the plant-made vaccine field started three decades ago with the promise of developing low-cost vaccines to prevent infectious disease outbreaks and epidemics around the globe, this goal has not yet been achieved. Plants offer several major advantages in vaccine generation, including low-cost production by eliminating expensive fermentation and purification systems, sterile delivery and cold storage/transportation. Most importantly, oral vaccination using plant-made antigens confers both mucosal (IgA) and systemic (IgG) immunity. Studies in the past 5 years have made significant progress in expressing vaccine antigens in edible leaves (especially lettuce), processing leaves or seeds through lyophilization and achieving antigen stability and efficacy after prolonged storage at ambient temperatures. Bioencapsulation of antigens in plant cells protects them from the digestive system; the fusion of antigens to transmucosal carriers enhances efficiency of their delivery to the immune system and facilitates successful development of plant vaccines as oral boosters. However, the lack of oral priming approaches diminishes these advantages because purified antigens, cold storage/transportation and limited shelf life are still major challenges for priming with adjuvants and for antigen delivery by injection. Yet another challenge is the risk of inducing tolerance without priming the host immune system. Therefore, mechanistic aspects of these two opposing processes (antibody production or suppression) are discussed in this review. In addition, we summarize recent progress made in oral delivery of vaccine antigens expressed in plant cells via the chloroplast or nuclear genomes and potential challenges in achieving immunity against infectious diseases using cold-chain-free vaccine delivery approaches. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Infant oral health and oral habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, A J; Warren, J J

    2000-10-01

    Many oral diseases and conditions, including dental caries (cavities) and malocclusions, have their origins early in life. Prudent anticipatory guidance by the medical and dental professions can help prevent many of the more common oral health problems. This article provides information on the rationale for early dental examination and instructions for pediatric and family practitioners in scheduling and conducting an early oral intervention appointment. In addition, feeding practices, non-nutritive sucking, mouth breathing, and bruxing are discussed, including their effects on orofacial growth and development.

  20. Oral steroid contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sech, Laura A; Mishell, Daniel R

    2015-11-01

    Oral steroid contraception is a popular method of family planning worldwide. Over the past several decades, this method of contraception has changed significantly by decreasing the estrogen dose, changing the progestin component, and reducing the hormone free interval. Despite the popularity of oral steroid contraception, there has been much criticism regarding the associated risks of venous thromboembolism and stroke. Despite these established, yet uncommon risks, oral steroid contraception has many important health benefits. This review highlights the available formulations of oral contraceptives along with their evidence-based associated risks and benefits. Highlights regarding future directions for development of novel oral contraceptives are also addressed.

  1. Delivering Physical Education in selected schools in Soweto, South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Delivering Physical Education in selected schools in Soweto, South Africa: ... Principals and sport masters of all five schools made up the 10 interviewees. ... preparedness of teachers, as well as the level of motivation and workload of teachers.

  2. Maximising the potential of social media to deliver academic library ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Maximising the potential of social media to deliver academic library services to ... that academic libraries in Kenya are currently using Facebook, WhatsApp, ... The Technical University of Kenya library, social media, social media marketing ...

  3. Capacity to deliver pharmaceutical care by community pharmacies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The capacity of community pharmacies to deliver pharmaceutical care was studied ... Ninety five percent (95%) of the respondents always educated customers on ... of the principles of Millennium Development Goals and pharmaceutical care ...

  4. Erythromycin treatment hinders the induction of oral tolerance to fed ovalbumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sydney E. Lambert

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The mucosal immune system is constantly exposed to antigen, whether it be food antigen, commensal bacteria, or harmful antigen. It is essential that the mucosal immune system can distinguish between harmful and non-harmful antigens, and initiate an active immune response to clear the harmful antigens, while initiating a suppressive immune response (tolerance to non-harmful antigens. Oral tolerance is an immunologic hyporesponsiveness to an orally administered antigen and is important in preventing unnecessary gastrointestinal (GI tract inflammation, which can result in a number of autoimmune and hypersensitivity diseases. Probiotics (beneficial intestinal bacteria, T regulatory cells (Tregs, and dendritic cells (DCs are all essential for generating tolerance. Antibiotics are commonly prescribed to fight infections and often necessary for maintaining health, but they can disrupt the normal intestinal probiotic populations. There is increasing epidemiologic evidence that suggests that antibiotic usage correlates with the development of atopic or irritable bowel disorders, which often result due to a breakdown in immune tolerance. This study investigated the effect of the antibiotic erythromycin on oral tolerance induction to ovalbumin (OVA. The results demonstrated that antibiotic treatment prior to exposure to fed antigen prevents tolerance to that antigen, which may be associated with a reduction in intestinal Lactobacillus populations. Furthermore, antibiotic treatment resulted in a significant decrease in the tolerogenic CD11c+/CD11b+/CD8α- MLN DCs independent of tolerizing treatment. These results provide evidence that antibiotic treatment, potentially through its effects on tolerogenic DCs and intestinal microflora, may contribute to autoimmune and atopic disorders via a breakdown in tolerance and support prior epidemiologic studies correlating increased antibiotic usage with the development of these disorders.

  5. Oral biopsy: Oral pathologist′s perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K L Kumaraswamy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many oral lesions may need to be diagnosed by removing a sample of tissue from the oral cavity. Biopsy is widely used in the medical field, but the practice is not quite widespread in dental practice. As oral pathologists, we have found many artifacts in the tissue specimen because of poor biopsy technique or handling, which has led to diagnostic pitfalls and misery to both the patient and the clinician. This article aims at alerting the clinicians about the clinical faults arising preoperatively, intraoperatively and postoperatively while dealing with oral biopsy that may affect the histological assessment of the tissue and, therefore, the diagnosis. It also reviews the different techniques, precautions and special considerations necessary for specific lesions.

  6. [Infectious hepatitis. I. Presence of HBs antigen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, E; Ridaura, C; Legorreta, J; Gómez, D; Ruiz, M; Kassian, A

    1975-01-01

    A prospective study in 268 patients of different pediatric ages affected with icteric hepatitis is presented, with a longitudinal follow-up of one year minimum. Different types of clinical evolution are described and related to the presence of HBs antigen. In 34 of the 268 patients HBs antigen was positive; in 20 of 28 patients with acute and long evolution, positivity of the antigen was transitory with an average of 46 days; in the remaining 8 of 28 patients it extended from 6 months to less than 2 years. The presence of HBs antigen is a risk that may be correlated with the tendency to extend the prolonged.

  7. [Antigenic relationships between Debaryomyces strains (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoycan, N

    1980-01-01

    The results of the agglutinations between homologous and heterologous Debaryomyces strains and their agglutinating sera are shown in table I. According to these findings, D. hansenii and D. marama are antigenically different from other Debaryomyces strains in this genus. In a previous study Aksoycan et al. have shown a common antigenic factor between D. hansenii, D. marama strains and Salmonella 0:7 antigen. This factor was not present in other six strains of Debaryomyces. These results also show that D. tamarii does not have any antigenic relationship with the other seven species of Debaryomyces in this genus.

  8. Effective Delivery of Antigen-Encapsulin Nanoparticle Fusions to Dendritic Cells Leads to Antigen-Specific Cytotoxic T Cell Activation and Tumor Rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bongseo; Moon, Hyojin; Hong, Sung Joon; Shin, Changsik; Do, Yoonkyung; Ryu, Seongho; Kang, Sebyung

    2016-08-23

    In cancer immunotherapy, robust and efficient activation of cytotoxic CD8(+) T cell immune responses is a promising, but challenging task. Dendritic cells (DCs) are well-known professional antigen presenting cells that initiate and regulate antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells that kill their target cells directly as well as secrete IFN-γ, a cytokine critical in tumor rejection. Here, we employed recently established protein cage nanoparticles, encapsulin (Encap), as antigenic peptide nanocarriers by genetically incorporating the OT-1 peptide of ovalbumin (OVA) protein to the three different positions of the Encap subunit. With them, we evaluated their efficacy in activating DC-mediated antigen-specific T cell cytotoxicity and consequent melanoma tumor rejection in vivo. DCs efficiently engulfed Encap and its variants (OT-1-Encaps), which carry antigenic peptides at different positions, and properly processed them within phagosomes. Delivered OT-1 peptides were effectively presented by DCs to naïve CD8(+) T cells successfully, resulting in the proliferation of antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells. OT-1-Encap vaccinations in B16-OVA melanoma tumor bearing mice effectively activated OT-1 peptide specific cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells before or even after tumor generation, resulting in significant suppression of tumor growth in prophylactic as well as therapeutic treatments. A large number of cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells that actively produce both intracellular and secretory IFN-γ were observed in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes collected from B16-OVA tumor masses originally vaccinated with OT-1-Encap-C upon tumor challenges. The approaches we describe herein may provide opportunities to develop epitope-dependent vaccination systems that stimulate and/or modulate efficient and epitope-specific cytotoxic T cell immune responses in nonpathogenic diseases.

  9. THE COMPARISON OF ORAL LANGUAGE ACQUISITION FOR GRADE 1-3 IN TAIWAN AND AMERICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Ping Wu

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on the English language teaching methodologies used by a small number of the ELD teachers in Fullerton school district in the United States and EFL teachers in ABC school in Taiwan. The instruments, interview, observation and field notes, were used to gather the evidences of useful oral language teaching methodologies. Results indicate that most of the methodologies utilized in the ELD and EFL programs are consistent with each other. However, the ELD teachers were more capable to provide valuable resolution of the obstacles of teaching oral language as well as the instances of delivering oral language methodologies. The researcher made an action plan targeted to findings of the following questions. 1. What materials are used to deliver oral language instruction in both countries? 2 What methodologies are the most useful and well-liked by students? 3. How are students motivated to acquire English oral language skills in both countries?

  10. Improvement of immunodetection of bacterial spore antigen by ultrasonic cavitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borthwick, Kathryn A J; Love, Tracey E; McDonnell, Martin B; Coakley, W Terence

    2005-11-15

    Ultrasonic cavitation was employed to enhance sensitivity of bacterial spore immunoassay detection, specifically, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and resonant mirror (RM) sensing. Bacillus spore suspensions were exposed to high-power ultrasound in a tubular sonicator operated at 267 kHz in both batch and flow modes. The sonicator was designed to deliver high output power and is in a form that can be cooled efficiently to avoid thermal denaturation of antigen. The 30-s batch and cooled flow (0.3 mL/min) sonication achieved an approximately 20-fold increase in ELISA sensitivity compared to unsonicated spores by ELISA. RM sensing of sonicated spores achieved detection sensitivity of approximately 10(6) spores/mL, whereas unsonicated spores were undetectable at the highest concentration tested. Improvements in detection were associated with antigen released from the spores. Equilibrium temperature increase in the tubular sonicator was limited to 14 K after 30 min and was maintained for 6 h with cooling and flow (0.3 mL/min). The work described here demonstrates the utility of the tubular sonicator for the improvement in the sensitivity of the detection of spores and its suitability as an in-line component of a rapid detection system.

  11. Oral lichen planus: focus on etiopathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payeras, Márcia Rodrigues; Cherubini, Karen; Figueiredo, Maria Antonia; Salum, Fernanda Gonçalves

    2013-09-01

    Lichen planus is a chronic mucocutaneous inflammatory disease, which frequently affects the oral mucosa of white females over 40 years old. Its aetiology remains uncertain and the pathogenesis is still the object of much speculation. The present paper presents the most well known antigens, and describes the action of different cells and proteins associated with the development of that disease, as well as the possible agents involved with its malignant transformation. Different external agents, especially virus, and internal agents, like stress, and the heat shock protein antigen expression, associated or not, can alter the basal keratinocytes of the oral mucosa making them susceptible to apoptosis by CD8(+) cytotoxic T cell as well as activate matrix metalloproteinase and mast cell degranulation, which produce a great range of inflammatory mediators and cytokines determining the clinical onset of the disease. Regarding carcinogenesis, since it is a complex process and presents multifactorial origin, it is believed that there may be a synergism between intrinsic, such as inflammation mediators, and extrinsic agents (tobacco, alcohol, viral infections) for the OLP malignant transformation to occur. However, further studies are needed to better understand the origin, pathogenesis and process of malignant transformation of OLP.

  12. Blastogenic response of human lymphocytes to early antigen(s) of human cytomegalovirus.

    OpenAIRE

    Waner, J L; Kong, N; Biano, S

    1983-01-01

    The lymphocytes of asymptomatic, seropositive donors demonstrated blastogenic responses to early antigens of human cytomegalovirus whether or not antibodies to early antigens were detectable. The lymphocytes of six of nine patients with active cytomegalovirus infections gave stimulation indexes of greater than or equal to 2.00 with antigens of productively infected cells, whereas only two patients demonstrated comparable stimulation indexes with early antigens. Four patients with stimulation ...

  13. Blastogenic response of human lymphocytes to early antigen(s) of human cytomegalovirus.

    OpenAIRE

    Waner, J L; Kong, N; Biano, S

    1983-01-01

    The lymphocytes of asymptomatic, seropositive donors demonstrated blastogenic responses to early antigens of human cytomegalovirus whether or not antibodies to early antigens were detectable. The lymphocytes of six of nine patients with active cytomegalovirus infections gave stimulation indexes of greater than or equal to 2.00 with antigens of productively infected cells, whereas only two patients demonstrated comparable stimulation indexes with early antigens. Four patients with stimulation ...

  14. Oral Care of Hospitalised Older Patients in the Acute Medical Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Salamone

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral health care is an essential aspect of nursing care. There are many variances in the quality and frequency of the oral care that is delivered to patients by nursing staff, such as oral care being given a low priority when compared to other nursing care elements, oral care being neglected, and oral care delivery being dependent on the nurse’s knowledge of oral hygiene. Additionally, there are some particular patient groups known to be at risk of oral health problems or who have existing oral diseases and conditions. As people age their susceptibility increases to chronic and life-threatening diseases, and they can be at increased risk of acute infections increases compromised by ageing immune systems. The aim of this literature review was to ignite the discussion related to the oral care practices of nurses for older acute medical hospitalised patients. The review revealed that nursing staff know that good nursing includes oral health care, but this knowledge does not always mean that oral health care is administered. Oral health care seems to be separated from other nursing activities and is not discussed when nursing care plans are written, only when oral problems are obvious.

  15. Integrated package approach in delivering interventions during immunisation campaigns in a complex environment in Papua New Guinea: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vince, John David; Datta, Siddhartha Sankar; Toikilik, Steven; Lagani, William

    2014-08-06

    Papua New Guinea's difficult and varied topography, poor transport infrastructure, changing dynamics of population and economy in recent times and understaffed and poorly financed health service present major challenges for successful delivery of vaccination and other preventative health interventions to both the rural majority and urban populations, thereby posing risks for vaccine preventable disease outbreaks in the country. The country has struggled to meet the vaccination coverage targets required for the eradication of poliomyelitis and elimination of measles. Escalation of inter and intra country migration resulting from major industrial developments, particularly in extraction industries, has substantially increased the risk of infectious disease importation. This case study documents the evolution of immunisation programmes since the introduction of supplementary immunisation activities (SIAs). Single antigen SIAs have advantages and disadvantages. In situations in which the delivery of preventative health interventions is difficult, it is likely that the cost benefit is greater for multiple than for single intervention. The lessons learned from the conduct of single antigen SIAs can be effectively used for programmes delivering multiple SIA antigens, routine immunisations, and other health interventions. This paper describes a successful and cost effective multiple intervention programme in Papua New Guinea. The review of the last SIA in Papua New Guinea showed relatively high coverage of all the interventions and demonstrated the operational feasibility of delivering multiple interventions in resource constrained settings. Studies in other developing countries such as Lesotho and Ethiopia have also successfully integrated health interventions with SIA. In settings such as Papua New Guinea there is a strong case for integrating supplementary immunisation activity with routine immunisation and other health interventions through a comprehensive outreach

  16. A computational framework for influenza antigenic cartography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhipeng Cai

    Full Text Available Influenza viruses have been responsible for large losses of lives around the world and continue to present a great public health challenge. Antigenic characterization based on hemagglutination inhibition (HI assay is one of the routine procedures for influenza vaccine strain selection. However, HI assay is only a crude experiment reflecting the antigenic correlations among testing antigens (viruses and reference antisera (antibodies. Moreover, antigenic characterization is usually based on more than one HI dataset. The combination of multiple datasets results in an incomplete HI matrix with many unobserved entries. This paper proposes a new computational framework for constructing an influenza antigenic cartography from this incomplete matrix, which we refer to as Matrix Completion-Multidimensional Scaling (MC-MDS. In this approach, we first reconstruct the HI matrices with viruses and antibodies using low-rank matrix completion, and then generate the two-dimensional antigenic cartography using multidimensional scaling. Moreover, for influenza HI tables with herd immunity effect (such as those from Human influenza viruses, we propose a temporal model to reduce the inherent temporal bias of HI tables caused by herd immunity. By applying our method in HI datasets containing H3N2 influenza A viruses isolated from 1968 to 2003, we identified eleven clusters of antigenic variants, representing all major antigenic drift events in these 36 years. Our results showed that both the completed HI matrix and the antigenic cartography obtained via MC-MDS are useful in identifying influenza antigenic variants and thus can be used to facilitate influenza vaccine strain selection. The webserver is available at http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap.

  17. A computational framework for influenza antigenic cartography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2010-10-07

    Influenza viruses have been responsible for large losses of lives around the world and continue to present a great public health challenge. Antigenic characterization based on hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay is one of the routine procedures for influenza vaccine strain selection. However, HI assay is only a crude experiment reflecting the antigenic correlations among testing antigens (viruses) and reference antisera (antibodies). Moreover, antigenic characterization is usually based on more than one HI dataset. The combination of multiple datasets results in an incomplete HI matrix with many unobserved entries. This paper proposes a new computational framework for constructing an influenza antigenic cartography from this incomplete matrix, which we refer to as Matrix Completion-Multidimensional Scaling (MC-MDS). In this approach, we first reconstruct the HI matrices with viruses and antibodies using low-rank matrix completion, and then generate the two-dimensional antigenic cartography using multidimensional scaling. Moreover, for influenza HI tables with herd immunity effect (such as those from Human influenza viruses), we propose a temporal model to reduce the inherent temporal bias of HI tables caused by herd immunity. By applying our method in HI datasets containing H3N2 influenza A viruses isolated from 1968 to 2003, we identified eleven clusters of antigenic variants, representing all major antigenic drift events in these 36 years. Our results showed that both the completed HI matrix and the antigenic cartography obtained via MC-MDS are useful in identifying influenza antigenic variants and thus can be used to facilitate influenza vaccine strain selection. The webserver is available at http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap.

  18. Radiation induced oral mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P S Satheesh Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy will receive some degree of oral mucositis The incidence of oral mucositis was especially high in patients: (i With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concerned. The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care. The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy. The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene

  19. Extraorally delivered photobiomodulation therapy for prevention of oropharyngeal mucositis in pediatric patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Christine N.; Yaroslavsky, Anna N.; London, Wendy B.; Juliano, Amy F.; Sonis, Stephen T.; Adnan, Ather; Treister, Nathaniel S.

    2017-02-01

    Background: Oral mucositis (OM) is a painful consequence of myeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Extraorally delivered photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT) is a promising novel intervention for the prevention of OM in children. Objectives: With funding from an NIDCR R34 planning grant, the objectives of this study are 1) to model the dosimetry of external PBMT and the optimal device parameters for the planned clinical trial, and 2) to plan and design a placebo-controlled Phase 2 multicenter clinical trial to determine whether extraorally delivered PBMT can reduce the duration of severe OM in children, with intent for implementation under subsequent U01 funding. Methods: External PBMT dosimetry will be evaluated using pediatric head and neck MRI studies to obtain serial measurements of different tissues that will then be used to develop a sophisticated computational model. We plan to conduct a placebocontrolled Phase 2 multicenter clinical trial in which patients 4 to 21 years of age will be randomized 1:1:1 to receive external PBMT dose 1x, external PBMT dose 2x, or sham PBMT starting from conditioning, daily until day +20 post- HCT. Significance: Extraorally delivered PBMT is a feasible, potentially efficacious intervention that could improve the quality of life for all children undergoing myeloablative HCT. The planned Phase 2 study, based on rigorous dose modeling and with detailed attention to uniform delivery of therapy and OM assessments, will provide critical efficacy data and the potential basis for a subsequent definitive Phase 3 trial. Grant Support: NIDCR R34 DE025908-01

  20. Antigen/Antibody Analyses in Leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-01

    antibodies in human sera with antigens of protozoan parasites . It was found that enzyme substrate reactions had distinct advantages over typical...autoradiographic procedures. Analyses of various sera identified a number of antigens of protozoan parasites which may be useful in discriminating infections

  1. Virosomes for antigen and DNA delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daemen, T; de Mare, A; Bungener, L; de Jonge, J; Huckriede, A; Wilschut, J

    2005-01-01

    Specific targeting and delivery as well as the display of antigens on the surface of professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are key issues in the design and development of new-generation vaccines aimed at the induction of both humoral and cell-mediated immunity. Prophylactic vaccination agains

  2. Dietary medium-chain triglycerides promote oral allergic sensitization and orally induced anaphylaxis to peanut protein in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianing; Wang, Yu; Tang, Lihua; de Villiers, Willem J S; Cohen, Donald; Woodward, Jerold; Finkelman, Fred D; Eckhardt, Erik R M

    2013-02-01

    The prevalence of peanut allergies is increasing. Peanuts and many other allergen sources contain significant amounts of triglycerides, which affect absorption of antigens but have unknown effects on sensitization and anaphylaxis. We recently reported that dietary medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs), which bypass mesenteric lymph and directly enter portal blood, reduce intestinal antigen absorption into blood compared with long-chain triglycerides (LCTs), which stimulate mesenteric lymph flow and are absorbed in chylomicrons through mesenteric lymph. We sought to test how dietary MCTs affect food allergy. C3H/HeJ mice were fed peanut butter protein in MCT, LCT (peanut oil), or LCT plus an inhibitor of chylomicron formation (Pluronic L81). Peanut-specific antibodies in plasma, responses of the mice to antigen challenges, and intestinal epithelial cytokine expression were subsequently measured. MCT suppressed antigen absorption into blood but stimulated absorption into Peyer patches. A single gavage of peanut protein with MCT, as well as prolonged feeding in MCT-based diets, caused spontaneous allergic sensitization. MCT-sensitized mice experienced IgG-dependent anaphylaxis on systemic challenge and IgE-dependent anaphylaxis on oral challenge. MCT feeding stimulated jejunal-epithelial thymic stromal lymphopoietin, Il25, and Il33 expression compared with that seen after LCT feeding and promoted T(H)2 cytokine responses in splenocytes. Moreover, oral challenges of sensitized mice with antigen in MCT significantly aggravated anaphylaxis compared with challenges with the LCT. Importantly, the effects of MCTs could be mimicked by adding Pluronic L81 to LCTs, and in vitro assays indicated that chylomicrons prevent basophil activation. Dietary MCTs promote allergic sensitization and anaphylaxis by affecting antigen absorption and availability and by stimulating T(H)2 responses. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All

  3. Bimaxillary Oral Focal Mucinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Sunil; Malik, Sunita; Mittal, Hitesh Chander; Singh, Gurdarshan; Kamra, Hemlata

    2016-10-01

    Oral focal mucinosis is considered as oral counterpart of cutaneous focal mucinosis. The preoperative diagnosis of mucinosis is almost impossible because of its rarity and clinical similarity to other lesions of various etiologies. The histological diagnosis of oral mucinosis is important to better understand the etiopathogenesis, treatment modalities, and any recurrence of the lesion besides differentiating from the other soft tissue lesions.The purpose of this paper is to report the first case of bimaxillary involvement with dome-shaped elevated, rounded, asymptomatic, normally colored swelling in left posterior palatal mucosa and left mandibular posterior region in a 25-year old woman who was diagnosed as oral focal mucinosis histopathologically.

  4. Chrysomya Bezziana oral myiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G S Vijay Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Myiasis is an opportunistic infestation of human and vertebrate animals with dipterous larvae. Oral myiasis is a rare condition associated with poor oral hygiene, mental disability, halitosis and other conditions. We present a case report of an adult mentally challenged woman with extensive necrotic oral lesion burrowing into the hard palate through which three live maggots (larvae were seen emerging out. The larvae were removed using forceps and the patient was treated with oral ivermectin. The maggots were identified as larvae of the Chrysomya bezziana fly.

  5. Oral microbiota and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jukka H. Meurman

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation caused by infections may be the most important preventable cause of cancer in general. However, in the oral cavity the role of microbiota in carcinogenesis is not known. Microbial populations on mouth mucosa differ between healthy and malignant sites and certain oral bacterial species have been linked with malignancies but the evidence is still weak in this respect. Nevertheless, oral microorganisms inevitably up-regulate cytokines and other inflammatory mediators that affect the complex metabolic pathways and may thus be involved in carcinogenesis. Poor oral health associates statistically with prevalence of many types of cancer, such as pancreatic and gastrointestinal cancer. Furthermore, several oral micro-organisms are capable of converting alcohol to carcinogenic acetaldehyde which also may partly explain the known association between heavy drinking, smoking, poor oral health and the prevalence of oral and upper gastrointestinal cancer. A different problem is the cancer treatment-caused alterations in oral microbiota which may lead to the emergence of potential pathogens and subsequent other systemic health problems to the patients. Hence clinical guidelines and recommendations have been presented to control oral microbiota in patients with malignant disease, but also in this area the scientific evidence is weak. More controlled studies are needed for further conclusion.

  6. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Receipt Dates Electronic Submission of Applications Grants 101 (How to Write a Grant) ... Continuing Education Practical Oral Care for People With Developmental Disabilities – ...

  7. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Writing Tips Careers & Training Fellowships and Internships ... Oral Care for People With Developmental Disabilities – This booklet presents an overview of physical, mental, ...

  8. Towards understanding oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaura, Egija; ten Cate, Jacob M

    2015-01-01

    During the last century, dental research has focused on unraveling the mechanisms behind various oral pathologies, while oral health was typically described as the mere absence of oral diseases. The term 'oral microbial homeostasis' is used to describe the capacity of the oral ecosystem to maintain microbial community stability in health. However, the oral ecosystem itself is not stable: throughout life an individual undergoes multiple physiological changes while progressing through infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood and old age. Recent discussions on the definition of general health have led to the proposal that health is the ability of the individual to adapt to physiological changes, a condition known as allostasis. In this paper the allostasis principle is applied to the oral ecosystem. The multidimensionality of the host factors contributing to allostasis in the oral cavity is illustrated with an example on changes occurring in puberty. The complex phenomenon of oral health and the processes that prevent the ecosystem from collapsing during allostatic changes in the entire body are far from being understood. As yet individual components (e.g. hard tissues, microbiome, saliva, host response) have been investigated, while only by consolidating these and assessing their multidimensional interactions should we be able to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the ecosystem, which in turn could serve to develop rational schemes to maintain health. Adapting such a 'system approach' comes with major practical challenges for the entire research field and will require vast resources and large-scale multidisciplinary collaborations.

  9. Oral controlled release drug delivery system and Characterization of oral tablets; A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Zaman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral route of drug administration is considered as the safest and easiest route of drug administration. Control release drug delivery system is the emerging trend in the pharmaceuticals and the oral route is most suitable for such kind of drug delivery system. Oral route is more convenient for It all age group including both pediatric and geriatrics. There are various systems which are adopted to deliver drug in a controlled manner to different target sites through oral route. It includes diffusion controlled drug delivery systems; dissolution controlled drug delivery systems, osmotically controlled drug delivery systems, ion-exchange controlled drug delivery systems, hydrodynamically balanced systems, multi-Particulate drug delivery systems and microencapsulated drug delivery system. The systems are formulated using different natural, semi-synthetic and synthetic polymers. The purpose of the review is to provide information about the orally controlled drug delivery system, polymers which are used to formulate these systems and characterizations of one of the most convenient dosage form which is the tablets. 

  10. Immunogenicity of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) M gene delivered by attenuated Salmonella typhimurium in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Ying; Liu, Jiawen; Huang, Xiaobo; Li, Yaqing; Zhang, Yudi; Chen, Jie; Wen, Xintian; Cao, Sanjie; Wen, Yiping; Wu, Rui; Yan, Qigui; Ma, Xiaoping

    2016-04-01

    Attenuated Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium) was selected as a transgenic vehicle for the development of live mucosal vaccines against transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) based on the M gene. An approximate 1.0 kb DNA fragment, encoding for glycoprotein M, was amplified by RT-PCR and cloned into eukaryotic expression vector pVAX1. The recombinant plasmid pVAX-M was transformed by electroporation into attenuated S. typhimurium SL7207, and the expression and translation of the pVAX-M delivered by recombinant S. typhimurium SL7207 (pVAX-M) was detected both in vitro and in vivo. BALB/c mice were inoculated orally with SL7207 (pVAX-M) at different dosages to evaluate safety of the vaccines. The bacterium was safe to mice at a dosage of 2 × 10(9) CFU, almost eliminated from the spleen and liver at week 4 post-immunization and eventually cleared at week 6. Mice immunized with 1 × 10(9) CFU of SL7207 (pVAX-M) elicited specific anti-TGEV local mucosal and humoral responses including levels of IgA, IgG, IL-4, and IFN-γ as measured by indirect ELISA assay. Moreover, the control groups (pVAX group, PBS group) maintained at a normal level during week 4-8 post-immunization. The results indicated that attenuated S. typhimurium could be used as a delivery vector for oral immunization of TGEV M gene vaccine.

  11. Protein antigen delivery by gene gun-mediated epidermal antigen incorporation (EAI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiblhofer, Sandra; Ritter, Uwe; Thalhamer, Josef; Weiss, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The gene gun technology can not only be employed for efficient transfer of gene vaccines into upper layers of the skin, but also for application of protein antigens. As a tissue rich in professional antigen presenting cells, the skin represents an attractive target for immunizations. In this chapter we present a method for delivery of the model antigen ovalbumin into the skin of mice termed epidermal antigen incorporation and describe in detail how antigen-specific proliferation in draining lymph nodes can be followed by flow cytometry.

  12. Tumor antigens as related to pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, T M; Holyoke, E D; Douglass, H O

    1980-01-01

    Data are presented suggesting the presence of pancreas tumor-associated antigens. Slow progress has been made during the past few years in the identification of pancreatic tumor antigens that may be of clinical usefulness and it seems unlikely that many of the practical problems now being faced in identification and isolation of these antigens and in development of a specific, sensitive assay will be solved by conventional immunochemical approaches. The study of antigen and/or antibody purified from immune complexes in the host and the application of leukocyte adherence inhibition techniques to immunodiagnosis of pancreatic cancer are among the new approaches that may provide effective alternatives in the study of pancreatic tumor antigens.

  13. Nutrition and oral health considerations in children with special health care needs: implications for oral health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moursi, Amr M; Fernandez, Jill B; Daronch, Marcia; Zee, Lena; Jones, Cassandra L

    2010-01-01

    Children with special health care needs are at increased risk for oral diseases. The purpose of this article was to discuss: nutritional and oral health factors routinely observed in most chronic childhood disorders; dietary modifications associated with select systemic disorders and how they may impact oral health in children; and the following factors common to chronic disorders associated with diet modifications-decreased appetite and increased nutritional risk; frequency of food intake; parental overindulgence; long-term use of cariogenic medications; and xerostomia. Characteristics of childhood disorders that require dietary modifications (congenital heart disease, cystic fibrosis, cancer, AIDS/HIV, diabetes mellitus, and phenylketonuria) are summarized. In addition, healthy dietary modifications and oral health recommendations are suggested. Implementation of these recommendations can assist the dentist and dental team as they join physicians and nutritionists in delivering the best possible care to children with special health care needs.

  14. Squamous epitheliotropism of Enterovirus A71 in human epidermis and oral mucosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phyu, Win Kyaw; Ong, Kien Chai; Kong, Chee Kwan; Alizan, Abdul Khalil; Ramanujam, Tindivanam Muthurangam; Wong, Kum Thong

    2017-01-01

    Hand-foot-and-mouth disease is a self-limiting paediatric infectious disease commonly caused by Enterovirus A71 (Genus: Enterovirus, Family: Picornaviridae). Typical lesions in and around the hands, feet, oral cavity and other places may rarely be complicated by acute flaccid paralysis and acute encephalomyelitis. Although virus is readily cultured from skin vesicles and oral secretions, the cellular target/s of Enterovirus A71 in human skin and oral mucosa are unknown. In Enterovirus A71-infected human skin and oral mucosa organotypic cultures derived from the prepuce and lip biopsies, focal viral antigens and viral RNA were localized to cytoplasm of epidermal and mucosal squamous cells as early as 2 days post-infection. Viral antigens/RNA were associated with cytoplasmic vacuolation and cellular necrosis. Infected primary prepuce epidermal keratinocyte cultures showed cytopathic effects with concomitant detection of viral antigens from 2 days post-infection. Supernatant and/or tissue homogenates from prepuce skin organotypic cultures and primary prepuce keratinocyte cultures showed viral titres consistent with active viral replication. Our data strongly support Enterovirus A71 squamous epitheliotropism in the human epidermis and oral mucosa, and suggest that these organs are important primary and/or secondary viral replication sites that contribute significantly to oral and cutaneous viral shedding resulting in person-to-person transmission, and viraemia, which could lead to neuroinvasion. PMID:28322333

  15. Phase I randomised clinical trial of an HIV-1(CN54, clade C, trimeric envelope vaccine candidate delivered vaginally.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Lewis

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: We conducted a phase 1 double-blind randomised controlled trial (RCT of a HIV-1 envelope protein (CN54 gp140 candidate vaccine delivered vaginally to assess immunogenicity and safety. It was hypothesised that repeated delivery of gp140 may facilitate antigen uptake and presentation at this mucosal surface. Twenty two healthy female volunteers aged 18-45 years were entered into the trial, the first receiving open-label active product. Subsequently, 16 women were randomised to receive 9 doses of 100 µg of gp140 in 3 ml of a Carbopol 974P based gel, 5 were randomised to placebo solution in the same gel, delivered vaginally via an applicator. Participants delivered the vaccine three times a week over three weeks during one menstrual cycle, and were followed up for two further months. There were no serious adverse events, and the vaccine was well tolerated. No sustained systemic or local IgG, IgA, or T cell responses to the gp140 were detected following vaginal immunisations. Repeated vaginal immunisation with a HIV-1 envelope protein alone formulated in Carbopol gel was safe, but did not induce local or systemic immune responses in healthy women. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00637962.

  16. Antigen-Specific Th17 Cells Are Primed by Distinct and Complementary Dendritic Cell Subsets in Oropharyngeal Candidiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Trautwein-Weidner

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Candida spp. can cause severe and chronic mucocutaneous and systemic infections in immunocompromised individuals. Protection from mucocutaneous candidiasis depends on T helper cells, in particular those secreting IL-17. The events regulating T cell activation and differentiation toward effector fates in response to fungal invasion in different tissues are poorly understood. Here we generated a Candida-specific TCR transgenic mouse reactive to a novel endogenous antigen that is conserved in multiple distant species of Candida, including the clinically highly relevant C. albicans and C. glabrata. Using TCR transgenic T cells in combination with an experimental model of oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC we investigated antigen presentation and Th17 priming by different subsets of dendritic cells (DCs present in the infected oral mucosa. Candida-derived endogenous antigen accesses the draining lymph nodes and is directly presented by migratory DCs. Tissue-resident Flt3L-dependent DCs and CCR2-dependent monocyte-derived DCs collaborate in antigen presentation and T cell priming during OPC. In contrast, Langerhans cells, which are also present in the oral mucosa and have been shown to prime Th17 cells in the skin, are not required for induction of the Candida-specific T cell response upon oral challenge. This highlights the functional compartmentalization of specific DC subsets in different tissues. These data provide important new insights to our understanding of tissue-specific antifungal immunity.

  17. Nanoparticulate carriers (NPC) for oral pharmaceutics and nutraceutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, C M; Martins-Lopes, P; Souto, E B

    2010-02-01

    The introduction of nanoparticulate carriers (NPC) in the pharmaceutic and nutraceutic fields has changed the definitions of disease management and treatment, diagnosis, as well as the supply food chain in the agri-food sector. NPC composed of synthetic polymers, proteins or polysaccharides gather interesting properties to be used for oral administration of pharmaceutics and nutraceutics. Oral administration remains the most convenient way of delivering drugs (e.g. peptides, proteins and nucleic acids) since these suffer similar metabolic pathways as food supply. Recent advances in biotechnology have produced highly potent new molecules however with low oral bioavailability. A suitable and promising approach to overcome their sensitivity to chemical and enzymatic hydrolysis as well as the poor cellular uptake, would be their entrapment within suitable gastrointestinal (GI) resistant NPC. Increasing attention has been paid to the potential use of NPC for peptides, proteins, antioxidants (carotenoids, omega fatty acids, coenzyme Q10), vitamins, probiotics, for oral administration. This review focuses on the most important materials to produce NPC for oral administration, and the most recent achievements in the production techniques and bioactives successfully delivered by these means.

  18. Sarcoidosis: Oral and extra-oral manifestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease, which is usually associated with the formation of noncaseating granulomas in affected tissues and organs. It is mostly present with bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy, pulmonary infiltration, ocular, and cutaneous lesions. Oral manifestations of this disease are relatively rare. The present case report shows a 40-year-old male with lesions in the soft tissue of oral cavity (buccal mucosa, gingiva, and palate and a diagnosis of sarcoidosis was established following hematological, biochemical and pulmonary function tests, chest radiograph, and histopathological investigation.

  19. Oral Health of Drug Abusers: A Review of Health Effects and Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Ekhtiari

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Oral health problems, among the most prevalent comorbidities related to addiction, require more attention by both clinicians and policy-makers. Our aims were to review oral complications associated with drugs, oral health care in addiction rehabilitation, health services available, and barriers against oral health promotion among addicts. Drug abuse is associated with serious oral health problems including generalized dental caries, periodontal diseases, mucosal dysplasia, xerostomia, bruxism, tooth wear, and tooth loss. Oral health care has positive effects in recovery from drug abuse: patients’ need for pain control, destigmatization, and HIV transmission. Health care systems worldwide deliver services for addicts, but most lack oral health care programs. Barriers against oral health promotion among addicts include difficulty in accessing addicts as a target population, lack of appropriate settings and of valid assessment protocols for conducting oral health studies, and poor collaboration between dental and general health care sectors serving addicts. These interfere with an accurate picture of the situation. Moreover, lack of appropriate policies to improve access to dental services, lack of comprehensive knowledge of and interest among dental professionals in treating addicts, and low demand for non-emergency dental care affect provision of effective interventions. Management of drug addiction as a multi-organ disease requires a multidisciplinary approach. Health care programs usually lack oral health care elements. Published evidence on oral complications related to addiction emphasizes that regardless of these barriers, oral health care at various levels including education, prevention, and treatment should be integrated into general care services for addicts.

  20. Shared Oral Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hede, Børge; Elmelund Poulsen,, Johan; Christophersen, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    Shared Oral Care - Forebyggelse af orale sygdomme på plejecentre Introduktion og formål: Mangelfuld mundhygiejne hos plejekrævende ældre er et alment og veldokumenteret sundhedsproblem, der kan føre til massiv udvikling af tandsygdomme, og som yderligere kan være medvirkende årsag til alvorlige...

  1. Visual overview, oral detail

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Simonsen, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    and with the coordinating nurse, who is the main keeper of the whiteboard. On the basis of observations, we find that coordination is accomplished through a highly intertwined process of technologically mediated visual overview combined with orally communicated details. The oral details serve to clarify and elaborate...

  2. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Decay See All Oral Complications of Systemic Diseases Cancer Treatment Developmental Disabilities Diabetes Heart Disease HIV/AIDS See ... this brochure includes information on symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of oral cancer, along with definitions of selected medical terms and ...

  3. Oral Microbiology and Immunology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlén, Gunnar; Fiehn, Nils-Erik; Olsen, Ingar

    , dental assistants and trainees may find it a useful source of reference. The contents are based on general microbiology and immunology. Oral microbiology is given particular attention, with examples relevant to oral infectious diseases. Each chapter opens with a relatively short pre-reading section...

  4. Epilepsy and oral care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiske, Janice; Boyle, Carole

    2002-05-01

    Epilepsy is a common symptom of an underlying neurological disorder. The seizures can take a variety of forms. Both the condition and its medical management can affect oral health. Prevention of oral disease and carefully planned dental treatment are essential to the well-being of people with epilepsy.

  5. Oral environment and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Yasusei; Tada, Hidesuke; Fujiwara, Natsumi; Tada, Yoshiko; Tsunematsu, Takaaki; Miyake, Yoichiro; Ishimaru, Naozumi

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is now the leading cause of death in Japan. A rapid increase in cancer mortality is expected as Japan is facing a super-aged society. Many causes of cancer are known to be closely linked to life style factors, such as smoking, drinking, and diet. The oral environment is known to be involved in the pathogenesis and development of various diseases such as bronchitis, pneumonia, diabetes, heart disease, and dementia. Because the oral cavity acts as the bodily entrance for air and food, it is constantly exposed to foreign substances, including bacteria and viruses. A large number of bacteria are endemic to the oral cavity, and indigenous oral flora act to prevent the settlement of foreign bacteria. The oral environment is influenced by local factors, including dental plaque, tartar, teeth alignment, occlusion, an incompatible prosthesis, and bad lifestyle habits, and systemic factors, including smoking, consumption of alcohol, irregular lifestyle and eating habits, obesity, stress, hormones, and heredity. It has recently been revealed that the oral environment is associated with cancer. In particular, commensal bacteria in the oral cavity are involved in the development of cancer. Moreover, Candida, human papilloma virus and Epstein-Barr virus as well as commensal bacteria have been reported to be associated with the pathogenesis of cancer. In this review, we introduce recent findings of the correlation between the oral environment and cancer.

  6. Antigenic variation: Molecular and genetic mechanisms of relapsing disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruse, J.M.; Lewis, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. They are: Contemporary Concepts of Antigenic Variation; Antigenic Variation in the Influenza Viruses; Mechanisms of Escape of Visna Lentiviruses from Immunological Control; A Review of Antigenic Variation by the Equine Infectious Anemia Virus; Biologic and Molecular Variations in AIDS Retrovirus Isolates; Rabies Virus Infection: Genetic Mutations and the Impact on Viral Pathogenicity and Immunity; Immunobiology of Relapsing Fever; Antigenic Variation in African Trypanosomes; Antigenic Variation and Antigenic Diversity in Malaria; and Mechanisms of Immune Evasion in Schistosomiasis.

  7. [Papillomavirus in the genesis of oral leukoplakia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babichenko, I I; Rabinovich, O F; Ivina, A A; Rabinovich, I M; Togonidze, A A

    2014-01-01

    Immunohistochemical examination of the proliferative activity of cells was made investigating the expression of Ki-67 protein and the location of proteins associated with epithelial cell papillomavirus infection involving P16(INK4a) and HPV16 proteins in different cell areas of the intact mucosa, in leukoplakia with the signs of hyperplasia and dysplasia, and in squamous cell carcinoma. There was a positive correlation between the proliferative activity of cells in the parabasal cell areas and the expression of P16(INK4a) protein in oral leukoplakia with the signs of hyperplasia (r(s)=0.397; p=0.018). In oral leukoplakia with dysplastic changes, there was a positive correlation between the proliferation of cells in the parabasal and prickle cell layers and the location of HPV type 16 antigens (r(s)=0.515; p=0.041 and r(s)=0.651; p=0.006). Detection of papillomavirus infection in leukoplakia can solve not only the problems with its genesis, but this is also a morphological basis for the effective prevention and treatment of this common oral mucosal disease.

  8. Genomics of oral bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Margaret J

    2003-01-01

    Advances in bacterial genetics came with the discovery of the genetic code, followed by the development of recombinant DNA technologies. Now the field is undergoing a new revolution because of investigators' ability to sequence and assemble complete bacterial genomes. Over 200 genome projects have been completed or are in progress, and the oral microbiology research community has benefited through projects for oral bacteria and their non-oral-pathogen relatives. This review describes features of several oral bacterial genomes, and emphasizes the themes of species relationships, comparative genomics, and lateral gene transfer. Genomics is having a broad impact on basic research in microbial pathogenesis, and will lead to new approaches in clinical research and therapeutics. The oral microbiota is a unique community especially suited for new challenges to sequence the metagenomes of microbial consortia, and the genomes of uncultivable bacteria.

  9. Oral syringe use survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, J N; Wedemeyer, H F

    1980-09-01

    Use of oral syringes at children's and ASHP-accredited residency hospitals in the United States was surveyed. Questionnaires were mailed to 131 hospitals; 117 (89.3%) were returned. Of the responding hospitals, 54.5% of children's hospitals and 67.1% of residency hospitals used oral syringes. There was no definite preference for a particular brand or type (glass vs. plastic) of syringe. Patients who often required liquid dosage forms, including pediatric and geriatric patients and patients with nasogastric tubes, were most frequently included in oral syringe distribution systems. Twenty-six of the 73 hospitals utilizing oral syringes used them for most unit dose liquids in all drug distribution systems. The remainder reported use for specific medications or circumstances. Expiration dating policies varied from 24 hours to one year to the manufacturer's expiration dating. The survey indicates widespread use of oral syringes and identifies a need for evaluation of medication stability in these devices.

  10. [Oral fluid bacteriocidal activity in complex diagnostics of oral disbiosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovich, O F; Abramova, E S

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of examination of oral fluid bacteriocidal activity in complex diagnostics of oral mucosa disbiosis was evaluated. Thirty-seven patients were included in complex clinical and laboratory studies. The patients were divided in two groups: main group (30 patients exhibiting various grades of oral mucosa disbiosis) and control group (7 patients with no signs of oral disbiosis). The oral fluid bacteriocidal activity was examined by means of laser flow cytometry. Study results proved oral fluid bacteriocidal activity increase to correlate with the grade of oral mucosa disbiosis thus confirming the usefulness of the method in complex diagnostics of oral disbiosis.

  11. Human seroreactivity to gut microbiota antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christmann, Benjamin S; Abrahamsson, Thomas R; Bernstein, Charles N; Duck, L Wayne; Mannon, Peter J; Berg, Göran; Björkstén, Bengt; Jenmalm, Maria C; Elson, Charles O

    2015-11-01

    Although immune responses directed against antigens from the intestinal microbiota are observed in certain diseases, the normal human adaptive immune response to intestinal microbiota is poorly defined. Our goal was to assess the adaptive immune response to the intestinal microbiota present in 143 healthy adults and compare this response with the response observed in 52 children and their mothers at risk of having allergic disease. Human serum was collected from adults and children followed from birth to 7 years of age, and the serum IgG response to a panel of intestinal microbiota antigens was assessed by using a novel protein microarray. Nearly every subject tested, regardless of health status, had serum IgG that recognized a common set of antigens. Seroreactivity to the panel of antigens was significantly lower in atopic adults. Healthy infants expressed the highest level of IgG seroreactivity to intestinal microbiota antigens. This adaptive response developed between 6 and 12 months of age and peaked around 2 years of age. Low IgG responses to certain clusters of microbiota antigens during infancy were associated with allergy development during childhood. There is an observed perturbation of the adaptive response to antigens from the microbiota in allergic subjects. These perturbations are observable even in childhood, suggesting that optimal stimulation of the adaptive immune system by the microbiota might be needed to prevent certain immune-mediated diseases. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effectiveness of an Electronic Booster Session Delivered to Mandated Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linowski, Sally A; DiFulvio, Gloria T; Fedorchak, Diane; Puleo, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    College student drinking continues to be a problem in the United States. Students who have violated campus alcohol policy are at particularly high risk for dangerous drinking. While Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students (BASICS) has been found to be an effective strategy in reducing high-risk drinking and associated consequences, questions remain about ways to further reduce risk or sustain changes associated with a face-to face intervention. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a computer-delivered personalized feedback (electronic booster) delivered to policy violators who completed a mandated BASICS program. At 3-month post-intervention, 346 participants (60.4% male and 39.6% female) were randomized to one of two conditions: assessment only (n = 171) or electronic booster feedback (n = 175). Follow-up assessments were given to all participants at 3, 6, and 12-month post-initial intervention. Both groups showed reductions in drinking after the in-person BASICS intervention, but no additional reductions were seen with the addition of an electronic booster session. Findings suggest that although brief motivational interventions delivered in person to mandated students have been shown to be effective with mandated students, there is no additional benefit from an electronic booster session delivered 3-month post-intervention for this population.

  13. The Challenges of Globalisation: Delivering an MBA Programme in Eritrea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dence, Roger; O'Toole, John

    1999-01-01

    Describes the experiences of delivering an MBA (Master in Business Administration) program in Eritrea (North East Africa) through the United Kingdom's Open University. Discusses tutoring teams that travel to Eritrea, localizing case examples and assignments, sensitivity to local cultural contexts, writing assignments, student assessment, and…

  14. Lessons from VET Providers Delivering Degrees: Case Studies. Support Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callan, Victor J.; Bowman, Kaye

    2015-01-01

    The recent growth in the number of registered vocational education and training (VET) providers delivering associate degrees and bachelor degrees in their own right has been well publicized. However, little is known about why these VET providers have made this transition, what support is being provided to their staff and students, and how the…

  15. Justice Delivered Locally : Systems, Challenges, and Innovations in Solomon Islands

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This report presents the research findings of the Justice Delivered Locally (JDL) initiative of Solomon Islands' Ministry of Justice and Legal Affairs, which was supported by the World Bank's Justice for the Poor (J4P) program. JDL supports the Solomon Islands Government (SIG) policy of reinvigorating local-level justice systems. This is based on an understanding that developmentally impor...

  16. Designing and Delivering Intensive Interventions: A Teacher's Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Christy S.; Coleman, Meghan A.; Vaughn, Sharon; Wanzek, Jeanne; Roberts, Greg

    2012-01-01

    This toolkit provides activities and resources to assist practitioners in designing and delivering intensive interventions in reading and mathematics for K-12 students with significant learning difficulties and disabilities. Grounded in research, this toolkit is based on the Center on Instruction's "Intensive Interventions for Students Struggling…

  17. American Academy of Oral Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Statements Newsletters AAOM: Representing the Discipline of Oral Medicine Oral Medicine is the discipline of dentistry concerned with the ... offers credentialing, resources and professional community for oral medicine practitioners. Our membership provides care to thousands. We ...

  18. Literatura Oral Hispanica (Hispanic Oral Literature).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlpine, Dave

    As part of a class in Hispanic Oral Literature, students collected pieces of folklore from various Hispanic residents in the region known as "Siouxland" in Iowa. Consisting of some of the folklore recorded from the residents, this paper includes 18 "cuentos y leyendas" (tales and legends), 48 "refranes" (proverbs), 17…

  19. Attenuated Bordetella pertussis BPZE1 as a live vehicle for heterologous vaccine antigens delivery through the nasal route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Lim, Annabelle; Alonso, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    Whereas the great majority of the current vaccines are delivered through the parenteral route, mucosal administration has been increasingly considered for controlling infection and preventing disease. Mucosal vaccination can trigger both humoral and cell-mediated protection, not only at the targeted mucosal surface, but also systemically. In this regard, nasal vaccination has shown great potential. The live attenuated strain of Bordetella pertussis, BPZE1, is particularly attractive and promising as a nasal vaccine delivery vector of heterologous antigen vaccine candidates. BPZE1 was originally developed as a live nasal pertussis vaccine candidate, and is currently undergoing phase I clinical trial in human (http://www.child-innovac.org). Highly adapted to the human respiratory tract and offering several potential protein carriers for presentation of the heterologous antigen vaccine candidates, BPZE1 represents an appealing platform for the development of live recombinant vaccines delivered via the nasal route that would confer simultaneous protection against pertussis and the targeted infectious disease(s).

  20. Oral and anal vaccination confers full protection against enteric redmouth disease (ERM in rainbow trout.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper Rømer Villumsen

    Full Text Available The effect of oral vaccines against bacterial fish diseases has been a topic for debate for decades. Recently both M-like cells and dendritic cells have been discovered in the intestine of rainbow trout. It is therefore likely that antigens reaching the intestine can be taken up and thereby induce immunity in orally vaccinated fish. The objective of this project was to investigate whether oral and anal vaccination of rainbow trout induces protection against an experimental waterborne infection with the pathogenic enterobacteria Yersinia ruckeri O1 biotype 1 the causative agent of enteric redmouth disease (ERM. Rainbow trout were orally vaccinated with AquaVac ERM Oral (MERCK Animal Health or an experimental vaccine bacterin of Y. ruckeri O1. Both vaccines were tested with and without a booster vaccination four months post the primary vaccination. Furthermore, two groups of positive controls were included, one group receiving the experimental oral vaccine in a 50 times higher dose, and the other group receiving a single dose administered anally in order to bypass the stomach. Each group was bath challenged with 6.3 × 10(8 CFU/ml Y. ruckeri, six months post the primary vaccination. The challenge induced significant mortality in all the infected groups except for the groups vaccinated anally with a single dose or orally with the high dose of bacterin. Both of these groups had 100% survival. These results show that a low dose of Y. ruckeri bacterin induces full protection when the bacterin is administered anally. Oral vaccination also induces full protection, however, at a dose 50 times higher than if the fish were to be vaccinated anally. This indicates that much of the orally fed antigen is digested in the stomach before it reaches the second segment of the intestine where it can be taken up as immunogenic antigens and presented to lymphocytes.

  1. Oral and anal vaccination confers full protection against enteric redmouth disease (ERM) in rainbow trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villumsen, Kasper Rømer; Neumann, Lukas; Ohtani, Maki; Strøm, Helene Kragelund; Raida, Martin Kristian

    2014-01-01

    The effect of oral vaccines against bacterial fish diseases has been a topic for debate for decades. Recently both M-like cells and dendritic cells have been discovered in the intestine of rainbow trout. It is therefore likely that antigens reaching the intestine can be taken up and thereby induce immunity in orally vaccinated fish. The objective of this project was to investigate whether oral and anal vaccination of rainbow trout induces protection against an experimental waterborne infection with the pathogenic enterobacteria Yersinia ruckeri O1 biotype 1 the causative agent of enteric redmouth disease (ERM). Rainbow trout were orally vaccinated with AquaVac ERM Oral (MERCK Animal Health) or an experimental vaccine bacterin of Y. ruckeri O1. Both vaccines were tested with and without a booster vaccination four months post the primary vaccination. Furthermore, two groups of positive controls were included, one group receiving the experimental oral vaccine in a 50 times higher dose, and the other group receiving a single dose administered anally in order to bypass the stomach. Each group was bath challenged with 6.3 × 10(8) CFU/ml Y. ruckeri, six months post the primary vaccination. The challenge induced significant mortality in all the infected groups except for the groups vaccinated anally with a single dose or orally with the high dose of bacterin. Both of these groups had 100% survival. These results show that a low dose of Y. ruckeri bacterin induces full protection when the bacterin is administered anally. Oral vaccination also induces full protection, however, at a dose 50 times higher than if the fish were to be vaccinated anally. This indicates that much of the orally fed antigen is digested in the stomach before it reaches the second segment of the intestine where it can be taken up as immunogenic antigens and presented to lymphocytes.

  2. Antigen clasping by two antigen-binding sites of an exceptionally specific antibody for histone methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Takamitsu; Lai, Darson; Dementieva, Irina S.; Montaño, Sherwin P.; Kurosawa, Kohei; Zheng, Yupeng; Akin, Louesa R.; Świst-Rosowska, Kalina M.; Grzybowski, Adrian T.; Koide, Akiko; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Strahl, Brian D.; Kelleher, Neil L.; Ruthenburg, Alexander J.; Koide, Shohei

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies have a well-established modular architecture wherein the antigen-binding site residing in the antigen-binding fragment (Fab or Fv) is an autonomous and complete unit for antigen recognition. Here, we describe antibodies departing from this paradigm. We developed recombinant antibodies to trimethylated lysine residues on histone H3, important epigenetic marks and challenging targets for molecular recognition. Quantitative characterization demonstrated their exquisite specificity and high affinity, and they performed well in common epigenetics applications. Surprisingly, crystal structures and biophysical analyses revealed that two antigen-binding sites of these antibodies form a head-to-head dimer and cooperatively recognize the antigen in the dimer interface. This “antigen clasping” produced an expansive interface where trimethylated Lys bound to an unusually extensive aromatic cage in one Fab and the histone N terminus to a pocket in the other, thereby rationalizing the high specificity. A long-neck antibody format with a long linker between the antigen-binding module and the Fc region facilitated antigen clasping and achieved both high specificity and high potency. Antigen clasping substantially expands the paradigm of antibody–antigen recognition and suggests a strategy for developing extremely specific antibodies. PMID:26862167

  3. Stick to your gums: mechanisms of oral microbial adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobbs, A H; Jenkinson, H F; Jakubovics, N S

    2011-11-01

    Studies on the adherence properties of oral bacteria have been a major focus in microbiology research for several decades. The ability of bacteria to adhere to the variety of surfaces present in the oral cavity, and to become integrated within the resident microbial communities, confers growth and survival properties. Molecular analyses have revealed several families of Gram-positive bacterial surface proteins, including serine-rich repeat, antigen I/II, and pilus families, that mediate adherence to a variety of salivary and oral bacterial receptors. In Gram-negative bacteria, pili, auto-transporters, and extracellular matrix-binding proteins provide components for host tissue recognition and building of complex microbial communities. Future studies will reveal in greater detail the binding pockets for these adhesin families and their receptors. This information will be crucial for the development of new inhibitors or vaccines that target the functional regions of bacterial proteins that are involved in colonization and pathogenesis.

  4. Evaluation of mucoadhesive carrier adjuvant: toward an oral anthrax vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangal, Sharad; Pawar, Dilip; Agrawal, Udita; Jain, Arvind K; Vyas, Suresh P

    2014-02-01

    The aim of present study was to evaluate the potential of mucoadhesive alginate-coated chitosan microparticles (A-CHMp) for oral vaccine against anthrax. The zeta potential of A-CHMp was -29.7 mV, and alginate coating could prevent the burst release of antigen in simulated gastric fluid. The results indicated that A-CHMp was mucoadhesive in nature and transported it to the peyer's patch upon oral delivery. The immunization studies indicated that A-CHMp resulted in the induction of potent systemic and mucosal immune responses, whereas alum-adjuvanted rPA could induce only systemic immune response. Thus, A-CHMp represents a promising acid carrier adjuvant for oral immunization against anthrax.

  5. Immune tolerance elicited via unique ocular and oral routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashour, H M

    2015-01-01

    Immune tolerance can be induced by numerous methods. This review article aims to draw lines of similarity and contrast between two unique models of immune tolerance, namely Anterior Chamber Associated Immune Deviation (ACAID) and Nickel-induced oral tolerance. ACAID is an immune tolerance model that leads to the generation of CD4(+) T regulatory cells and CD8(+) T regulatory cells in the periphery after the injection of an antigen into the anterior chamber of the eye. Nickel-induced oral tolerance is another immune tolerance model that is induced by the contact allergen Nickel and leads to the generation of Nickel-specific CD4(+) CD25(+) T regulatory cells after oral exposure. The goal of comparing different models of immune tolerance is to identify which mechanisms are universal and which mechanisms are model-specific. The knowledge of such mechanisms would allow scientists and clinicians to better intervene in different immune deregulation scenarios.

  6. Novel methods for expression of foreign antigens in live vector vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin Yuan; Harley, Regina H.; Galen, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial live vector vaccines represent a vaccine development strategy that offers exceptional flexibility. In this approach, genes encoding protective antigens of unrelated bacterial, viral or parasitic pathogens are expressed in an attenuated bacterial vaccine strain that delivers these foreign antigens to the immune system, thereby eliciting relevant immune responses. Rather than expressing these antigens using low copy expression plasmids, here we pursue expression of foreign proteins from the live vector chromosome. Our strategy is designed to compensate for the inherent disadvantage of loss of gene dosage (vs. plasmid-based expression) by integrating antigen-encoding gene cassettes into multiple chromosomal sites already inactivated in an attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi vaccine candidate. We tested expression of a cassette encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFPuv) integrated separately into native guaBA, htrA or clyA chromosomal loci. Using single integrations, we show that expression levels of GFPuv are significantly affected by the site of integration, regardless of the inclusion of additional strong promoters within the incoming cassette. Using cassettes integrated into both guaBA and htrA, we observe cumulative synthesis levels from two integration sites superior to single integrations. Most importantly, we observe that GFPuv expression increases in a growth phase-dependent manner, suggesting that foreign antigen synthesis may be “tuned” to the physiology of the live vaccine. We expect this novel platform expression technology to prove invaluable in the development of a wide variety of multivalent live vector vaccines, capable of expressing multiple antigens from both chromosomal and plasmid-based expression systems within a single strain. PMID:23406777

  7. Demonstration of Antigenic Identity Between Purified Equine Infectious Anemia Virus and an Antigen Extracted from Infected Horse Spleen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hideo; Norcross, Neil L.; Coggins, Leroy

    1972-01-01

    Antigenic relationship between purified equine infectious anemia (EIA) virus and spleen-derived antigen from EIA-infected horses was examined by immunodiffusion. Identical antigenicity of these two antigens has been proven because precipitation lines formed between the two antigens and EIA antiserum connected with each other. The results indicate that the antigenic substance derived from infected spleen is a component of EIA virus. Images PMID:4629262

  8. Lambdapapillomavirus 2 in a gray wolf (Canis lupus) from Minnesota with oral papillomatosis and sarcoptic mange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Susan N.; Windels, Steve K.; Adams, Marie; Hall, Jeffrey S.

    2017-01-01

    Oral papillomatosis was diagnosed in a gray wolf (Canis lupus) with sarcoptic mange from Minnesota, USA found dead in February 2015. Intranuclear inclusion bodies were evident histologically, and papillomaviral antigens were confirmed using immunohistochemistry. Sequencing of the L1 papillomavirus gene showed closest similarity to Lambdapapillomavirus 2.

  9. A novel Multiple-Marker Method for the Early Diagnosis of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jutta Ries

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Melanoma associated antigens-A (MAGE-A expression is highly specific to cancer cells. Thus, they can be the most suitable targets for the diagnosis of malignancy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of multiple MAGE-A expression analysis for the diagnosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC.

  10. Oral tolerance induction with altered forms of ovalbumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stransky B.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available As a T cell-dependent phenomenon, oral tolerance is not expected to depend necessarily on native configuration of antigens. We investigated the induction of oral tolerance with modified ovalbumin (Ova. Oral administration of heat-denatured (HD-Ova and cyanogen bromide-degraded ovalbumin was less effective than native Ova in inducing oral tolerance in B6D2F1 mice. HD-Ova was effective in suppressing delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH reactions but did not suppress specific antibody formation. Injection of Ova directly into the stomach, but not into the ileum or cecum, suppressed subsequent immunization to DTH reactions. Gavage with protease inhibitors (aprotinin or ovomucoid before gavage with Ova was ineffective in blocking tolerance induction. Treatment with hydroxyurea to destroy cycling cells 24 h before gavage with Ova blocked oral tolerance induction and also the possibility to passively transfer tolerance to naive recipients with the serum of mice gavaged with Ova 1 h before. The implications of these findings about oral tolerance induction are discussed

  11. [Study of testicular cancer gene expression in samples of oral leukoplakia and squamous cell carcinoma of the mouth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorodumova, L O; Muraev, A A; Zakharova, E S; Shepelev, M V; Korobko, I V; Zaderenko, I A; Ivanov, S Iu; Gnuchev, N V; Georgiev, G P; Larin, S S

    2012-01-01

    Cancer-testis (CT) antigens are normally expressed mostly in human germ cells, there is also an aberrant expression in some tumor cells. This expression profile makes them potential tumor growth biomarkers and a promising target for tumor immunotherapy. Specificity of CT genes expression in oral malignant and potentially malignant diseases, e.g. oral leukoplakia, is not yet studied. Data on CT genes expression profile in leukoplakia would allow developing new diagnostic methods with potential value for immunotherapy and prophylaxis of leukoplakia malignization. In our study we compared CT genes expression in normal oral mucosa, oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma. We are the first to describe CT genes expression in oral leukoplakia without dysplasia. This findings make impossible differential diagnosis of oral leukoplakia and squamous cell carcinoma on the basis of CT genes expression. The prognostic value of CT genes expression is still unclear, therefore the longitudinal studies are necessary.

  12. Involvement of canine oral papillomavirus in generalized oral and cutaneous verrucosis in a Chinese Shar Pei dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, J P; Smith, E K; Herron, A J; Jenson, A B; Burk, R D; Van Ranst, M

    1994-03-01

    Severe papillomatosis developed in the oral cavity and spread throughout the haired skin of the trunk and limbs of an 8-month-old female Chinese Shar Pei dog. The dog had received corticosteroids prior to referral, which was associated with the onset of demodecosis and papillomatosis. Papillomavirus structural antigens were detected in biopsies by immunohistochemistry using a panel of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. An 8.2-kilobase papillomavirus-specific DNA molecule was detected in the cutaneous lesions by high stringency Southern blot hybridization using a cloned canine oral papillomavirus DNA probe. Restriction enzyme analysis revealed that the virus in the cutaneous lesions was identical to the canine oral papillomavirus. Discontinuation of the steroids combined with the use of a mitocide, antibiotics, and an autogenous vaccine resolved the demodecosis and papillomatosis. This case report suggests that corticosteroid-induced immunosuppression can expand the tissue tropism of papillomaviruses.

  13. Examining the association between oral health and oral HPV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Thanh Cong; Markham, Christine M; Ross, Michael Wallis; Mullen, Patricia Dolan

    2013-09-01

    Oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the cause of 40% to 80% of oropharyngeal cancers; yet, no published study has examined the role of oral health in oral HPV infection, either independently or in conjunction with other risk factors. This study examined the relation between oral health and oral HPV infection and the interactive effects of oral health, smoking, and oral sex on oral HPV infection. Our analyses comprised 3,439 participants ages 30 to 69 years for whom data on oral HPV and oral health were available from the nationally representative 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Results showed that higher unadjusted prevalence of oral HPV infection was associated with four measures of oral health, including self-rated oral health as poor-to-fair [prevalence ratio (PR) = 1.56; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.25-1.95], indicated the possibility of gum disease (PR = 1.51; 95% CI, 1.13-2.01), reported use of mouthwash to treat dental problems in the past week (PR = 1.28; 95% CI, 1.07-1.52), and higher number of teeth lost (Ptrend = 0.035). In multivariable logistic regression models, oral HPV infection had a statistically significant association with self-rated overall oral health (OR = 1.55; 95% CI, 1.15-2.09), independent of smoking and oral sex. In conclusion, poor oral health was an independent risk factor of oral HPV infection, irrespective of smoking and oral sex practices. Public health interventions may aim to promote oral hygiene and oral health as an additional measure to prevent HPV-related oral cancers.

  14. Oral insulin (human, murine, or porcine) does not prevent diabetes in the non-obese diabetic mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Minh N; Gibson, Claire; Rydén, Anna K E; Perdue, Nikole; Boursalian, Tamar E; Pagni, Philippe P; Coppieters, Ken; Skonberg, Christian; Porsgaard, Trine; von Herrath, Matthias; Vela, Jose Luis

    2016-03-01

    Studies have shown oral insulin prevents type 1 diabetes (T1D) in mouse models, however human trials were inconclusive. We tested the ability of different insulins to prevent T1D in non-obese diabetic mice. Mice received oral insulin or PBS twice weekly and disease was monitored. Contrary to previous studies, no insulin tested showed significant ability to prevent T1D, nor did testing of linked suppression in a delayed type hypersensitivity model have reproducible effect. To investigate delivery of antigen within the GI tract, blue dye was fed to mice. Dye traveled 5-8 cm from stomach to small intestine within 10s, suggesting orally administered antigen may not get digested in the stomach in mice. Insulin incubated with jejunum extracts was instantly digested. Thus, in humans large doses of insulin may be required to achieve tolerance as antigen may be more vulnerable to digestion in the stomach even before reaching the small intestine.

  15. C-Terminal Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin-Mediated Antigen Delivery for Nasal Pneumococcal Vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidehiko Suzuki

    Full Text Available Efficient vaccine delivery to mucosal tissues including mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues is essential for the development of mucosal vaccine. We previously reported that claudin-4 was highly expressed on the epithelium of nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT and thus claudin-4-targeting using C-terminal fragment of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (C-CPE effectively delivered fused antigen to NALT and consequently induced antigen-specific immune responses. In this study, we applied the C-CPE-based vaccine delivery system to develop a nasal pneumococcal vaccine. We fused C-CPE with pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA, an important antigen for the induction of protective immunity against Streptococcus pneumoniae infection, (PspA-C-CPE. PspA-C-CPE binds to claudin-4 and thus efficiently attaches to NALT epithelium, including antigen-sampling M cells. Nasal immunization with PspA-C-CPE induced PspA-specific IgG in the serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF as well as IgA in the nasal wash and BALF. These immune responses were sufficient to protect against pneumococcal infection. These results suggest that C-CPE is an efficient vaccine delivery system for the development of nasal vaccines against pneumococcal infection.

  16. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles as antigen carriers and adjuvants for vaccine delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Karishma T.; Popat, Amirali; Mahony, Donna; Cavallaro, Antonino S.; Yu, Chengzhong; Mitter, Neena

    2013-05-01

    Vaccines have been at the forefront of improving human health for over two centuries. The challenges faced in developing effective vaccines flow from complexities associated with the immune system and requirement of an efficient and safe adjuvant to induce a strong adaptive immune response. Development of an efficient vaccine formulation requires careful selection of a potent antigen, efficient adjuvant and route of delivery. Adjuvants are immunological agents that activate the antigen presenting cells (APCs) and elicit a strong immune response. In the past decade, the use of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) has gained significant attention as potential delivery vehicles for various biomolecules. In this review, we aim to highlight the potential of MSNs as vaccine delivery vehicles and their ability to act as adjuvants. We have provided an overview on the latest progress on synthesis, adsorption and release kinetics and biocompatibility of MSNs as next generation antigen carriers and adjuvants. A comprehensive summary on the ability of MSNs to deliver antigens and elicit both humoral and cellular immune responses is provided. Finally, we give insight on fundamental challenges and some future prospects of these nanoparticles as adjuvants.

  17. Intracellular transport routes for MHC class I and their relevance for antigen cross-presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cézaire Aimé Adiko

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cross-presentation, in which exogenous antigens are presented via MHC I complexes, is involved both in the generation of anti-infectious and anti-tumoral cytotoxic CD8+ T cells and in the maintenance of immune tolerance. While cross-presentation was described almost four decades ago and while it is now established that some dendritic cell subsets are better than others in processing and cross-presenting internalized antigens, the involved molecular mechanisms remain only partially understood. Some of the least explored molecular mechanisms in cross-presentation concern the origin of cross-presenting MHC I molecules and the cellular compartments where antigenic peptide loading occurs. This review focuses on MHC I molecules and their intracellular trafficking. We discuss the source of cross-presenting MHC I in dendritic cells as well as the role of the endocytic pathway in their recycling from the cell surface. Next, we describe the importance of the TAP peptide transporter for delivering peptides to MHC I during cross-presentation. Finally, we highlight the impact of innate immunity mechanisms on specific antigen cross-presentation mechanisms in which TLR activation modulates MHC I trafficking and TAP localization.

  18. Nanovaccines for malaria using Plasmodium falciparum antigen Pfs25 attached gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Ray, Paresh C; Datta, Dibyadyuti; Bansal, Geetha P; Angov, Evelina; Kumar, Nirbhay

    2015-09-22

    Malaria transmission-blocking vaccines (TBV) targeting sexual stages of the parasite represent an ideal intervention to reduce the burden of the disease and eventual elimination at the population level in endemic regions. Immune responses against sexual stage antigens impair the development of parasite inside the mosquitoes. Target antigens identified in Plasmodium falciparum include surface proteins Pfs230 and Pfs48/45 in male and female gametocytes and Pfs25 expressed in zygotes and ookinetes. The latter has undergone extensive evaluation in pre-clinical and phase I clinical trials and remains one of the leading target antigens for the development of TBV. Pfs25 has a complex tertiary structure characterized by four EGF-like repeat motifs formed by 11 disulfide bonds, and it has been rather difficult to obtain Pfs25 as a homogenous product in native conformation in any heterologous expression system. Recently, we have reported expression of codon-harmonized recombinant Pfs25 in Escherichia coli (CHrPfs25) and which elicited highly potent malaria transmission-blocking antibodies in mice. In the current study, we investigated CHrPfs25 along with gold nanoparticles of different shapes, size and physicochemical properties as adjuvants for induction of transmission blocking immunity. The results revealed that CHrPfs25 delivered with various gold nanoparticles elicited strong transmission blocking antibodies and suggested that gold nanoparticles based formulations can be developed as nanovaccines to enhance the immunogenicity of vaccine antigens.

  19. Versatile RHDV virus-like particles: incorporation of antigens by genetic modification and chemical conjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacey, Matthew; Wilson, Sarah; Baird, Margaret A; Ward, Vernon K

    2007-12-01

    Virus-like particles have proved to be excellent molecular scaffolds, yet the individual characteristics and immune responses generated against each VLP requires the development of a wide range of capsids for use as vaccines, molecular delivery vessels, and nanoscale templates. Here we describe the development of Rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV)-like particles as a rapidly versatile molecular workbench, overcoming limitations imposed by established genetic antigen incorporation procedures with chimeric VLP. Production of the RHDV capsid protein in a baculovirus system led to the self-assembly of VLP which were recovered at over 99% purity and manipulated both genetically and chemically. Fusion of small peptide sequences to RHDV VLP was well tolerated, forming chimeric capsids that enhanced the presentation of foreign peptide to hybridoma T helper cells 700-fold. Rapid and simple conjugation techniques employing the hetero-bifunctional chemical linker sulfo-SMCC enabled both small peptides and whole proteins to be conjugated to the surface of RHDV VLP, overcoming limitations imposed on VLP formation and yield experienced with chimeric VLP. Administration of VLP/ovalbumin conjugate provoked high titre ovalbumin-specific antibody in mice, demonstrating the immune stimulatory properties of the capsid were conferred to conjugated foreign antigen. VLP facilitated delivery of conjugated antigen to dendritic cells, eliciting proliferative responses in naïve TCR transgenic T helper cells that were at least 10-fold greater than ovalbumin antigen delivered alone.

  20. Oral tolerance El fenómeno de la tolerancia oral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín Correa

    1989-03-01

    Full Text Available

    The phenomenon of decreased systemic Immune response to orally administered antigens is known as oral tolerance (OT. Though It was anecdotically described many years ago, the mechanisms and potential applications of OT are still mostly speculative. Specificity and thymus-dependence are among its most remarkable features. OT is manifested by the absence of systemic antibodies, of delayed type hypersensitivity and of proliferate responses toward the specific antigen. Potential mechanisms of OT have been grouped in three types, namely: Immunologic, gastrointestinal and individual. The most Important of the immunologic mechanisms might be the existence of counter-suppressive cells but their intimate functioning has not been thoroughly elucidated. The study of OT opens a wide research field with Implications for the immunoprophylaxis and Immunotherapy of many diseases.

    Se da el nombre de tolerancia oral al estado de respuesta inmune sistémica disminuida a antígenos administrados por la vía oral. Si bien el fenómeno fue descrito anecdóticamente desde hace muchos años, sus mecanismos y posibles aplicaciones todavía son materia de especulación. Entre sus características notables se destacan la especificidad y la timodependencia. La tolerancia se manifiesta por ausencia de anticuerpos sistémicos, de hipersensibilidad de tipo retardado y de respuestas proliferativas al antígeno específico. Los posibles mecanismos responsables de la tolerancia oral se han agrupado en tres tipos: inmunológicos, gastrointestinales e individuales. En cuanto a los inmunológicos, el más importante podría ser la existencia de las células contrasupresoras, pero los mecanismos íntimos de funcionamiento de éstas no están completamente elaborados. El estudio del fenómeno de la tolerancia oral abre un amplio campo

  1. Oral health and nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pla, G W

    1994-03-01

    The relationships between oral health conditions, dietary practices and nutritional status, and general health status in the older American are complex, with many interrelating factors. Just as inadequate nutrition can affect oral health, poor oral health status affects food choices and, thus, nutritional status. It is clearly essential that the primary care practitioner and/or screening health professionals always include an evaluation of oral status in assessment of an elderly person. Effective care for the elderly dental patient requires knowledge about the disease of aging and the impact of those diseases on oral health and nutrition, pharmacology and drug interactions and their impact on oral health status, the biology of aging including sensory changes, the relationship of general medicine and systemic diseases, and psychology and sociology. The attitudes of empathy and understanding, caring and compassion, respect and a positive attitude toward the older patient, and flexibility in treatment planning are also critical elements. The interdisciplinary team of physicians, nurses, nutrition professionals, dentists, and social service professionals must all work together to ensure that good oral health status and adequate nutrition are maintained in older Americans. Recognizing and treating oral health and nutrition problems are important in improving the health and quality of life for the elderly population. Research that can provide more answers to health care problems in this growing group; educating professionals with respect to the relationships between oral health and nutrition; and public policy changes with regard to provision and funding of nutrition services, especially when provided by registered and/or licensed nutrition professionals, contribute to improving the health and quality of life for elders.

  2. Modulation of Immune Responses by Exosomes Derived from Antigen-Presenting Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoda, Botros B.; Ajit, Seena K.

    2016-01-01

    Exosome-mediated signaling is important in mediating the inflammatory response. To exert their biological or pathophysiological functions in the recipient cells, exosomes deliver a diverse array of biomacromolecules including long and short coding and non-coding RNAs, proteins, and lipids. Exosomes secreted by antigen-presenting cells can confer therapeutic benefits by attenuating or stimulating the immune response. Exosomes play a crucial role in carrying and presenting functional major histocompatibility peptide complexes to modulate antigen-specific T cell responses. Exosomes from Dendritic Cells (DCs) can activate T and B cells and have been explored for their immunostimulatory properties in cancer therapy. The immunosuppressive properties of exosomes derived from macrophages and DCs can reduce inflammation in animal models for several inflammatory disorders. This review focuses on the protective role of exosomes in attenuating inflammation or augmenting immune response, emphasizing studies on exosomes derived from DCs and macrophages. PMID:27660518

  3. Platelet antigens and antibodies. Literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Mineeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet antigens structure, role of platelet antibodies in the pathogenesis of various clinical conditions, characteristic of modern antibodies detection methods are presented in this article.

  4. Platelet antigens and antibodies. Literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Mineeva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Platelet antigens structure, role of platelet antibodies in the pathogenesis of various clinical conditions, characteristic of modern antibodies detection methods are presented in this article.

  5. evaluation of an antigen-antibody

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    BACKGROUND: Development of “combination” assays detecting in parallel, within a ... METHODS: We compared the Monolisa® HCV Antigen-Antibody Ultra (Bio-Rad Laboratories Limited, ... mediated response in these patients, a rapid viral.

  6. Antigen-specific memory B cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHeyzer-Williams, Louise J; McHeyzer-Williams, Michael G

    2005-01-01

    Helper T (Th) cell-regulated B cell immunity progresses in an ordered cascade of cellular development that culminates in the production of antigen-specific memory B cells. The recognition of peptide MHC class II complexes on activated antigen-presenting cells is critical for effective Th cell selection, clonal expansion, and effector Th cell function development (Phase I). Cognate effector Th cell-B cell interactions then promote the development of either short-lived plasma cells (PCs) or germinal centers (GCs) (Phase II). These GCs expand, diversify, and select high-affinity variants of antigen-specific B cells for entry into the long-lived memory B cell compartment (Phase III). Upon antigen rechallenge, memory B cells rapidly expand and differentiate into PCs under the cognate control of memory Th cells (Phase IV). We review the cellular and molecular regulators of this dynamic process with emphasis on the multiple memory B cell fates that develop in vivo.

  7. In vitro and in vivo models for the study of oral delivery of nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboa, Jennifer M; Leong, Kam W

    2013-06-15

    Oral delivery is an attractive route to deliver therapeutics via nanoparticles due to its ease of administration and patient compliance. This review discusses laboratory techniques for studying oral delivery of nanoparticles, which offer protection of cargo through the gastrointestinal tract. Some of the difficulties in modeling oral delivery include the harsh acidic environment, variable pH, and the tight monolayer of endothelial cells present throughout the gastrointestinal tract. The use of in vitro techniques including the Transwell ® system, simulated gastric/intestinal fluid, and diffusion chambers addresses these challenges. When studying effects after oral delivery in vivo, bioimaging of nanoparticle biodistribution using radioactive markers has been popular. Functional assays such as immune response and systemic protein concentration analysis can further define the merits of the oral delivery systems. As biologics become increasingly more important in chronic therapies, nanoparticle-mediated oral delivery will assume greater prominence, and more sophisticated in vitro and in vivo models will be required.

  8. Etiology of oral habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayardo, R E; Mejia, J J; Orozco, S; Montoya, K

    1996-01-01

    The pedodontic admission histories of 1600 Mexican children were analyzed, to determine general epidemiologic factors or oral habits, as well as their relationship with identifiable biopsychosociologic factors. Fifty-six percent of the children gave evidence of an oral habit, with significant predisposition among female patients, single children, subjects in poor physical health (particularly from allergies), as well as children with histories of chronic health problems. Oral habits should be considered a major health hazard because of their high incidence. Successful treatment requires a multidisciplinary approach to the basic cause of the problem.

  9. Microbioma oral humano

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Joana Pinto Oliveira e

    2016-01-01

    O microbioma oral humano é constituído por um vasto conjunto de microrganismos presentes na cavidade oral. Analisando a cavidade oral podemos verificar que nela existem mais de 700 espécies de bactérias responsáveis pelo domínio de parte do microbioma humano, tornando-a um importante local de estudo. É um dos habitats com maior diversidade no corpo humano onde esses microrganismos se apresentam de forma organizada e estruturada. Estes habitats estão intimamente relacionados ...

  10. Clinical efficacy of a chlorhexidine-delivering toothbrush

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Strydonck, D.A.C.; Timmerman, M.F.; van der Velden, U.; van der Weijden, G.A.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Evaluate the efficacy and safety of an experimental toothbrush with a slow-release system of chlorhexidine (CHX) and determine its ability to inhibit plaque, bleeding, staining and oral tissue abnormalities during 6 weeks of use. Material and Methods: One hundred and fifty healthy volunt

  11. MAGE-A Antigens and Cancer Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajac, Paul; Schultz-Thater, Elke; Tornillo, Luigi; Sadowski, Charlotte; Trella, Emanuele; Mengus, Chantal; Iezzi, Giandomenica; Spagnoli, Giulio C.

    2017-01-01

    MAGE-A antigens are expressed in a variety of cancers of diverse histological origin and germinal cells. Due to their relatively high tumor specificity, they represent attractive targets for active specific and adoptive cancer immunotherapies. Here, we (i) review past and ongoing clinical studies targeting these antigens, (ii) analyze advantages and disadvantages of different therapeutic approaches, and (iii) discuss possible improvements in MAGE-A-specific immunotherapies. PMID:28337438

  12. In vivo induced antigen technology (IVIAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, Sean M; Peppercorn, Amanda; Hang, Long; Hillman, Jeffrey D; Calderwood, Stephen B; Handfield, Martin; Ryan, Edward T

    2005-01-01

    In vivo induced antigen technology (IVIAT) is a technique that identifies pathogen antigens that are immunogenic and expressed in vivo during human infection. IVIAT is complementary to other techniques that identify genes and their products expressed in vivo. Genes and gene pathways identified by IVIAT may play a role in virulence or pathogenesis during human infection, and may be appropriate for inclusion in therapeutic, vaccine or diagnostic applications.

  13. Effect of the gastrointestinal microflora on induction and maintenance of oral tolerance to ovalbumin in C3H/HeJ mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Moreau, M C; Corthier, G

    1988-01-01

    The effect of the digestive microflora on oral tolerance to ovalbumin was studied by using axenic (germfree) and conventional C3H/HeJ mice. In contrast to reported results of studies with sheep erythrocytes, oral administration of ovalbumin induced tolerance in axenic mice, but the maintenance of tolerance was found to be of shorter duration than was with conventional mice. These data indicate that the contribution of the microflora to oral tolerance depends on the antigen used.

  14. Epithelial-mesenchymal interactions as a working concept for oral mucosa regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiarong; Mao, Jeremy J; Chen, Lili

    2011-02-01

    Oral mucosa consists of two tissue layers, the superficial epithelium and the underlying lamina propria. Together, oral mucosa functions as a barrier against exogenous substances and pathogens. In development, interactions of stem/progenitor cells of the epithelium and mesenchyme are crucial to the morphogenesis of oral mucosa. Previous work in oral mucosa regeneration has yielded important clues for several meritorious proof-of-concept approaches. Tissue engineering offers a broad array of novel tools for oral mucosa regeneration with reduced donor site trauma and accelerated clinical translation. However, the developmental concept of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions (EMIs) is rarely considered in oral mucosa regeneration. EMIs in postnatal oral mucosa regeneration likely will not be a simple recapitulation of prenatal oral mucosa development. Biomaterial scaffolds play an indispensible role for oral mucosa regeneration and should provide a conducive environment for pivotal EMIs. Autocrine and paracrine factors, either exogenously delivered or innately produced, have rarely been and should be harnessed to promote oral mucosa regeneration. This review focuses on a working concept of epithelial and mesenchymal interactions in oral mucosa regeneration.

  15. Antigen I/II encoded by integrative and conjugative elements of Streptococcus agalactiae and role in biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuzeville, Sarah; Dramsi, Shaynoor; Madec, Jean-Yves; Haenni, Marisa; Payot, Sophie

    2015-11-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (i.e. Group B streptococcus, GBS) is a major human and animal pathogen. Genes encoding putative surface proteins and in particular an antigen I/II have been identified on Integrative and Conjugative Elements (ICEs) found in GBS. Antigens I/II are multimodal adhesins promoting colonization of the oral cavity by streptococci such as Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus mutans. The prevalence and diversity of antigens I/II in GBS were studied by a bioinformatic analysis. It revealed that antigens I/II, which are acquired by horizontal transfer via ICEs, exhibit diversity and are widespread in GBS, in particular in the serotype Ia/ST23 invasive strains. This study aimed at characterizing the impact on GBS biology of proteins encoded by a previously characterized ICE of S. agalactiae (ICE_515_tRNA(Lys)). The production and surface exposition of the antigen I/II encoded by this ICE was examined using RT-PCR and immunoblotting experiments. Surface proteins of ICE_515_tRNA(Lys) were found to contribute to GBS biofilm formation and to fibrinogen binding. Contribution of antigen I/II encoded by SAL_2056 to biofilm formation was also demonstrated. These results highlight the potential for ICEs to spread microbial adhesins between species.

  16. Comparison of local Salmonella pullorum antigen with imported product in whole blood agglutination test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyani Medewewa

    Full Text Available Background: Salmonellosis is considered as one of the most important diseases in poultry as it causes devastating losses in chicken industry. Proper identification of the infected and carrier birds is required to control the disease among chickens. In field situation whole blood agglutination test is performed in order to identify carriers of Pullorum and Fowl typhoid particularly, in breeder operations. In this test, serum antibodies are detected by using a specially made antigen for this purpose. In Sri Lanka, three antigen products are used commonly in whole blood agglutination test. Objectives: This study was carried out to compare these two locally available S. Pullorum antigen products and to determine any difference in the efficacy. Methods:“Shaver Brown” commercial layer birds (70 in number were used in the experiment. Birds were inoculated orally with 1.8X109cfu/ml of S. Pullorum at 16 weeks age. After Three weeks post inoculation, blood was collected from each bird and Whole blood agglutination test was performed using both antigen products. Fifteen (15 inoculated hens were selected randomly and cloacal swabs were cultured on cultured Agar on same day of serum collected. Results: In this study, there was no significant difference observed between two antigens to detect carrier birds by whole blood agglutination test. Salmonella was not isolated from cloacal swabs since no observed excretion of Salmonella Pullorum through faces. All cloacal swabs gave negative results, when cultured on artificial Agar. Conclusion: Both antigen can be used effectively to detect carrier birds under the control program in country. [Vet World 2012; 5(9.000: 546-548

  17. [Acyclovir may modulate clonal expansion of cd8+ lymphocytes induced by the Cytomegalovirus antigen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavilán, F; Caballero, J; Cárdenas, M; Moreno, J; Martínez, L; Gallego, C; Sánchez-Guijo, P; Torre-Cisneros, J

    1999-10-01

    Although the potent antiviral effect of acyclovir on the Herpes-simplex (HSV) and Varicela-zoster (VZV) virus and the scarce effectiveness versus Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is known, some data suggest that it may have an immunodulator implicated in the control of these viral disease. The aim of this study was to characterize this possible effect of acyclovir versus the CMV antigen. We stimulated cultures of mononuclear cells obtained in 7 healthy patients who were seropositive for CMV and HSV with CMV antigen, HSV and with phitohemaglutinine (PHA). The proliferation index and culture cell phenotype were later determined in the absence and presence of acyclovir (2 micrograms/ml). In another group the proliferation index and cell phenotype following stimulation with the CMV antigen were studied prior to and after treating the same volunteers with acyclovir for one week (800 mg/6h). The CMV antigen and HSV induced T cell proliferation predominantly involving the CD8+ subpopulation leading to an inversion of the CD4/CD8 quotient. On addition of acyclovir to the cell culture a moderate reduction was produced in lymphoproliferative response versus the CMV antigen and HVS, characteristically modulating CD8+ cell proliferation, thereby leading to reestablishment of the CD4/CD8 quotient. However, the proliferation induced by PHA was not inhibited. These results were produced on oral administration of acyclovir. Acyclovir modulates the lymphoproliferative response induced by CMV antigen. Based on this observation, the authors hypothesize that this immunomodulation may be related to its preventive effect on CMV disease in transplanted patients.

  18. Presentation of antigen by B cells subsets. Pt. 2. The role of CD5 B cells in the presentation of antigen to antigen-specific T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimecki, Michal [Polish Academy of Sciences, Wroclaw (Poland). Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy; Kapp, Judith A. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Medicine

    1994-12-31

    We demonstrate that peritoneal B cells have a much higher ability to present antigen to antigen-specific T cell lines splenic B cells. Presentation of antigen by B cells is abrogated or drastically reduced after removal of Lyb-5{sup +} cells from the population of splenic or peritoneal B cells. Peritoneal B cells, precultured for 7 days prior to the antigen presentation assay, retain their antigen presenting cell (APC) function. Enrichment for CD5{sup +} cells in the peritoneal B cell population results in a more effective antigen presentation. Lastly, stimulation of B cells via CD5 antigen, by treatment of cells with anti-CD5 antibodies or cross-linking of CD5 receptors, enhances APC function of these cells. The results indicate, both indirectly and directly, that CD5{sup +} B cells play a predominant role in the presentation of conventional antigens to antigen-specific T cells. (author). 30 refs, 6 tabs.

  19. School Oral Health Program in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariga, Jitendra; Al-Mutawa, Sabiha; Nazar, Huda

    2014-01-01

    The School Oral Health Program (SOHP), Kuwait, is a joint venture between the Ministry of Health, Kuwait, and Forsyth Institute, Cambridge, Mass., USA. This program provides oral health education, prevention and treatment to almost 280,000 public school children in Kuwait. Services are delivered through a system of center- and school-based clinics and preventive mobile teams. One of the recent developments is the effective use of portable dental units for the delivery of preventive care to children in schools without the need for children to go to dental clinics. Preventive procedures performed under this program are the biannual application of fluoride varnish and the placement of pit and fissure sealants on newly erupted permanent molars and premolars. During recent years, the SOHP has improved its coverage of children, with prevention up to 80%. This has resulted in a considerable reduction in treatment needs, which is evident from the reduced number of composite restorations performed under this program during the last 6 years. This indicates that the disease level is on a decline, which can be confirmed from the results of the ongoing National Oral Health Survey on Kuwaiti school children.

  20. Near-infrared labeled, ovalbumin loaded polymeric nanoparticles based on a hydrophilic polyester as model vaccine: In vivo tracking and evaluation of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimian, Sima; Kleinovink, Jan Willem; Fransen, Marieke F; Mezzanotte, Laura; Gold, Henrik; Wisse, Patrick; Overkleeft, Hermen; Amidi, Maryam; Jiskoot, Wim; Löwik, Clemens W; Ossendorp, Ferry; Hennink, Wim E

    2015-01-01

    Particulate antigen delivery systems aimed at the induction of antigen-specific T cells form a promising approach in immunotherapy to replace pharmacokinetically unfavorable soluble antigen formulations. In this study, we developed a delivery system using the model protein antigen ovalbumin (OVA) encapsulated in nanoparticles based on the hydrophilic polyester poly(lactide-co-hydroxymethylglycolic acid) (pLHMGA). Spherical nanoparticles with size 300-400 nm were prepared and characterized and showed a strong ability to deliver antigen to dendritic cells for cross-presentation to antigen-specific T cells in vitro. Using near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dyes covalently linked to both the nanoparticle and the encapsulated OVA antigen, we tracked the fate of this formulation in mice. We observed that the antigen and the nanoparticles are efficiently co-transported from the injection site to the draining lymph nodes, in a more gradual and durable manner than soluble OVA protein. OVA-loaded pLHMGA nanoparticles efficiently induced antigen cross-presentation to OVA-specific CD8+ T cells in the lymph nodes, superior to soluble OVA vaccination. Together, these data show the potential of pLHMGA nanoparticles as attractive antigen delivery vehicles.

  1. Amiloidosis oral nodular Oral nodular amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Martos Díaz

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. La amiloidosis constituye una entidad marcada por el depósito de amiloide en diferentes tejidos. En la cavidad oral se manifiesta habitualmente en forma de macroglosia, y más raramente, como nódulos dispuestos en la superficie. Caso clínico. Varón afecto de Mieloma Múltiple, que comienza con lesiones nodulares en labio inferior y lengua. A raíz de estas lesiones, mediante estudio histológico, es diagnosticado de Amiloidosis Sistémica. Discusión. Los nódulos amiloideos en la cavidad oral, constituyen una manifestación rara de la amiloidosis sistémica. Su aparición conlleva la necesidad de realizar un diagnostico diferencial con otras entidades y el diagnostico de certeza se obtiene mediante el análisis histológico.Introduction. Amyloidosis is a condition characterized by the deposit of amyloid in different tissues. In the oral cavity it is usually manifested as macroglossia and, more rarely, as nodules on the surface. Clinical case. A man had multiple myeloma that began with nodular lesions of the lower lip and tongue. As a result of these lesions, the patient was diagnosed of systemic amyloidosis by histological study. Discussion. Amyloid nodules in the oral cavity are a rare manifestation of systemic amyloidosis. Its appearance entails the necessity to make I diagnose differential with other organizations and I diagnose of certainty is obtained by means of the histological analysis.

  2. Delivering Collaborative Web Labs as a Service for Engineering Education

    OpenAIRE

    Bochicchio, Mario A.; Antonella Longo

    2012-01-01

    As Internet speed grows up and academic networks reach more users, engineering schools take interest in online laboratories as a mean to increase the spectrum of offered services and to reduce costs by sharing expensive lab equipments. In this perspective, online labs must comply both with the scientific and pedagogic requirements coming from the lab users (students, researchers, …) and with the requirements coming from the administrative and technical staff in charge to manage and deliver th...

  3. FY-2E Delivered And FY-3A Performs Well

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ The FY-2E meteorological satellite was delivered to China Meteorological Administration (CMA) on May 19, 2009. Developed by Shanghai Academy of Spacefiight Technology (SAST), a subsidiary of CASC, the satellite was launched atop a LM-3A from Xichang Satellite Launch Center (XSLC). The satellite passed in-orbit testing on February 28,2009 and all the onboard systems performed well when the satellite was in the Earth's shadow.

  4. Delivering business analytics practical guidelines for best practice

    CERN Document Server

    Stubbs, Evan

    2013-01-01

    AVOID THE MISTAKES THAT OTHERS MAKE - LEARN WHAT LEADS TO BEST PRACTICE AND KICKSTART SUCCESS This groundbreaking resource provides comprehensive coverage across all aspects of business analytics, presenting proven management guidelines to drive sustainable differentiation. Through a rich set of case studies, author Evan Stubbs reviews solutions and examples to over twenty common problems spanning managing analytics assets and information, leveraging technology, nurturing skills, and defining processes. Delivering Business Analytics also outlines the Data Scientist's Code, fifteen principle

  5. Oral sex and oral health: An enigma in itself

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral sex is commonly practiced by sexually active couples of various age groups, including male-female and same-gender adolescents. The various type of oral sex practices are fellatio, cunnilingus, and analingus. Oral sex can transmit oral, respiratory, and genital infections from one site in body to the other. Oral health has a direct correlation on the transmission of infection; a cut in the mouth, bleeding gums, lip sores or broken skin increases chances of life-threatening infections. Although oral sex is considered a low risk activity, it is important to use protection such as physical barriers, health and medical issues, ethical issues, and oral hygiene and dental issues. The ulcerations or unhealthy periodontium in mouth accelerates the phenomenon of transmission of infections into the circulation. Thus, consequences of unhealthy or painful oral cavity are significant and oral health should be given paramount importance for the practice of oral sex.

  6. The efficacy of oral vaccination of mice with alginate encapsulated outer membrane proteins of Pasteurella haemolytica and One-Shot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidane, A; Guimond, P; Ju, T R; Sanchez, M; Gibson, J; Bowersock, T L

    2001-03-21

    The goal of this study was to examine the efficacy of oral delivery of alginate encapsulated outer membrane proteins (OMP) of Pasteurella haemolytica and a commercial One-Shot vaccine in inducing protection in mice against lethal challenge with virulent P. haemolytica. We examined two alginate microsphere formulations and compared them with oral unencapsulated and subcutaneously administered vaccines. Alginate microspheres were made by the emulsion-cross-linking technique. They were examined for size, hydrophobicity, and antigen loading efficiency before they were used in the study. Mice were vaccinated by administering 200 microg of antigens in 200 microl of microspheres suspension orally or subcutaneously. One group of mice received blank microspheres and a second group was given unencapsulated antigen orally. A third and a fourth group received different formulations of alginate encapsulated antigens by oral administration. Three groups received subcutaneous inoculations (alginate encapsulated, non-adjuvanted and unencapsulated antigens, and adjuvanted One-Shot), and one group received water (naïve group). Mice were vaccinated orally for four consecutive days and challenged with P. haemolytica 5 weeks after the first vaccination. Weekly serum and feces samples were assayed for antigen specific antibodies. The number of dead mice in each group 4 days post challenge was used to compare the efficacy of the various vaccination groups. The mean volume sizes of blank alginate microsphere formulations A, and AA were 15.9, 16 and 9.2 microm, respectively. Hydrophobicity of the microspheres was evaluated by measuring contact angle on a glass slide coated with the microspheres. The contact angles on A and AA were 37.8 and 74.3 degrees, respectively. Antigen concentration in a 1:1 w/w suspension of microspheres in water was 0.9 mg/ml. Rate of death for the blank group was 42.8% whereas for groups vaccinated with antigens encapsulated in A and AA the death rates were 40

  7. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Z Index Search Text size: Website Contents NIDCR Home Oral Health Diseases and Conditions Gum Disease TMJ ... site’s privacy policy when you follow the link. Home Contact Us Viewers and Players Site Map FOIA ...

  8. Oral Cancer Exam

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    Full Text Available ... Cancer Dry Mouth Burning Mouth Tooth Decay See All Oral Complications of Systemic Diseases Cancer Treatment Developmental Disabilities Diabetes Heart Disease HIV/AIDS See All Order Publications English and Spanish brochures available free ...

  9. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it can be treated more successfully. Publications​ For Health Professionals Detecting Oral Cancer: A Guide for Health Care Professionals A step-by-step, illustrated guide ...

  10. Oral Cancer Exam

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    Full Text Available ... Submission of Applications Grants 101 (How to Write a Grant) Questions and Answers Grant Writing Tips Careers & ... successfully. Publications​ For Health Professionals Detecting Oral Cancer: A Guide for Health Care Professionals A step-by- ...

  11. Oral Cancer Exam

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    Full Text Available ... Research Programs (Extramural Research) NIDCR Laboratories (Intramural Research) Science News in Brief Study Takes First Comprehensive Look ... Programs Careers in Dental Research See All Continuing Education Practical Oral Care for People With Developmental Disabilities – ...

  12. Oral Hypersensitivity Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... food, food additives, drugs, oral hygiene products, and dental materials. Q: Are there any specific foods that are ... dental treatment trigger a hypersensitivity reaction? A: Some dental materials used by the dentist can cause a hypersensitivity ...

  13. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... In Skip to Main Content National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) Improving the Nation's Oral ... High School and College Students Recent College Graduates Dental and Medical Students See All Careers & Training Opportunities ...

  14. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it can be treated more successfully. Publications​ For Health Professionals Detecting Oral Cancer: A Guide for Health Care Professionals A step-by-step, illustrated guide ...

  15. Leucoplasia oral: Conceptos actuales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Escribano-Bermejo

    Full Text Available La leucoplasia es la lesión premaligna más frecuente de la cavidad oral. La Organización Mundial de la Salud la define clínicamente como una lesión predominantemente blanca de la mucosa oral que no puede caracterizarse como ninguna otra lesión conocida y con una elevada tendencia a convertirse en un cáncer oral. El objetivo de esta revisión es hacer un repaso al conocimiento actual acerca de la leucoplasia oral prestando especial atención a su nomenclatura, su etiología, su potencial maligno y su tratamiento.

  16. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Main Content National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) Improving the Nation's Oral Health National Institutes ... Browse Studies by Topic NIDCR-Sponsored Clinical Trials Research NIDCR Strategic Plan Research Results Tools for Researchers ...

  17. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Medical Students See All Careers & Training Opportunities Job Openings Loan Repayment Programs Careers in Dental Research See All Continuing Education Practical Oral Care for People With Developmental Disabilities – ...

  18. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diabetes Heart Disease HIV/AIDS See All Order Publications English and Spanish brochures available free of charge. ... early—when it can be treated more successfully. Publications​ For Health Professionals Detecting Oral Cancer: A Guide ...

  19. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Submission of Applications Grants 101 (How to Write a Grant) Questions and Answers Grant Writing Tips Careers & ... successfully. Publications​ For Health Professionals Detecting Oral Cancer: A Guide for Health Care Professionals A step-by- ...

  20. Fostering oral presentation performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginkel, van Stan; Gulikers, Judith; Biemans, Harm; Mulder, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Previous research revealed significant differences in the effectiveness of various feedback sources for encouraging students’ oral presentation performance. While former studies emphasised the superiority of teacher feedback, it remains unclear whether the quality of feedback actually differs bet

  1. Oral Cancer Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... shown to participate in their development. These include lichen planus, an inflammatory disease of the oral soft ... at an uncontrolled rate, is unable to repair DNA damage within itself, or refuses to self destruct ...

  2. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Answers Grant Writing Tips Careers & Training Fellowships and Internships for... High School and College Students Recent College ... signs and symptoms of oral cancer, and the importance of detecting the disease in its early stages. ...

  3. Oral Cancer Exam

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Answers Grant Writing Tips Careers & Training Fellowships and Internships for... High School and College Students Recent College ... signs and symptoms of oral cancer, and the importance of detecting the disease in its early stages. ...

  4. Probiotics and oral health

    OpenAIRE

    Rastogi, Pavitra; Saini, Himani; Dixit, Jaya; Singhal, Rameshwari

    2011-01-01

    Probiotics utilize the naturally occurring bacteria to confer health benefits. Traditionally, probiotics have been associated with gut health, and are being mainly utilized for prevention or treatment of gastrointestinal infections and disease; however, recently, several studies have suggested the use of probiotics for oral health purposes. The aim of this review is to understand the potential mechanism of action of probiotic bacteria in the oral cavity and summarize their observed effects wi...

  5. Oral Somatosensory Awareness

    OpenAIRE

    De Boer, L. L.

    2014-01-01

    Oral somatosensory awareness refers to the somatic sensations arising within the mouth, and to the information these sensations provide about the state and structure of the mouth itself, and objects in the mouth. Because the oral tissues have a strong somatosensory innervation, they are the locus of some of our most intense and vivid bodily experiences. The salient pain of toothache, or the habit of running one's tongue over one's teeth when someone mentions "dentist", provide two very differ...

  6. Oral and esophageal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyer, C M; Simon, D

    1997-06-01

    This article focused on the approach to oral and esophageal disorders in patients with AIDS. Most of these disorders respond to various therapeutic regimens. Some of the oral complications can be prevented with dental prophylaxis, whereas recurrent esophageal disease in some patients may require long-term suppressive therapy. As patients with AIDS live longer with lower CD4 counts, gastroenterologists need to become familiar with the approach to and management of the more common lesions of the mouth and esophagus.

  7. Oral pigmentation: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreeja, C; Ramakrishnan, K; Vijayalakshmi, D; Devi, M; Aesha, I; Vijayabanu, B

    2015-08-01

    Pigmentations are commonly found in the mouth. They represent in various clinical patterns that can range from just physiologic changes to oral manifestations of systemic diseases and malignancies. Color changes in the oral mucosa can be attributed to the deposition of either endogenous or exogenous pigments as a result of various mucosal diseases. The various pigmentations can be in the form of blue/purple vascular lesions, brown melanotic lesions, brown heme-associated lesions, gray/black pigmentations.

  8. ON ORAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Svetitsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes a rise in the incidence of oral cancer in the Rostov Region since the 1990s. The study has indicated that this rise is associated with regional population growth due to the forced migrants after the collapse of the USSR. Financial problems, unbalanced nutrition, poor oral hygiene, and depression in this group of patients have contributed to the higher incidence of precancers and cancers.

  9. Maintaining women's oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, A L; Bonci, L

    2001-07-01

    Women must adopt health-promoting strategies for both general health and the oral cavity, because the health of a woman's body and oral cavity are bidirectional. For general health-maintenance strategies, dental practitioners should actively advise women to minimize alcohol use, abstain from or cease smoking, stay physically active, and choose the right foods to nourish both the body and mind. For oral health-maintenance strategies, dental practitioners should advise women on how to prevent or control oral infections, particularly dental caries and periodontal diseases. Specifically, women need to know how to remove plaque from the teeth mechanically, use appropriate chemotherapeutic agents and dentifrices, use oral irrigation, and control halitosis. Dental practitioners also need to stress the importance of regular maintenance visits for disease prevention. Adolescent women are more prone to gingivitis and aphthous ulcers when they begin their menstrual cycles and need advice about cessation of tobacco use, mouth protection during athletic activities, cleaning orthodontic appliances, developing good dietary habits, and avoiding eating disorders. Women in early to middle adulthood may be pregnant or using oral contraceptives with concomitant changes in oral tissues. Dental practitioners need to advise them how to take care of the oral cavity during these changes and how to promote the health of their infants, including good nutrition. Older women experience the onset of menopause and increased vulnerability to osteoporosis. They may also experience xerostomia and burning mouth syndrome. Dental practitioners need to help women alleviate these symptoms and encourage them to continue good infection control and diet practices.

  10. Oral vs. salivary diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Joana; Corby, Patricia M.; Barber, Cheryl A.; Abrams, William R.; Malamud, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    The field of "salivary diagnostics" includes studies utilizing samples obtained from a variety of sources within the oral cavity. These samples include; whole unstimulated saliva, stimulated whole saliva, duct saliva collected directly from the parotid, submandibular/sublingual glands or minor salivary glands, swabs of the buccal mucosa, tongue or tonsils, and gingival crevicular fluid. Many publications state "we collected saliva from subjects" without fully describing the process or source of the oral fluid. Factors that need to be documented in any study include the time of day of the collection, the method used to stimulate and collect the fluid, and how much fluid is being collected and for how long. The handling of the oral fluid during and post-collection is also critical and may include addition of protease or nuclease inhibitors, centrifugation, and cold or frozen storage prior to assay. In an effort to create a standard protocol for determining a biomarker's origin we carried out a pilot study collecting oral fluid from 5 different sites in the mouth and monitoring the concentrations of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines detected using MesoScaleDiscovery (MSD) electrochemiluminesence assays. Our data suggested that 3 of the cytokines are primarily derived from the submandibular gland, while 7 of the cytokines come from a source other than the major salivary glands such as the minor salivary glands or cells in the oral mucosae. Here we review the literature on monitoring biomarkers in oral samples and stress the need for determining the blood/saliva ratio when a quantitative determination is needed and suggest that the term oral diagnostic be used if the source of an analyte in the oral cavity is unknown.

  11. Evidence for a porcine respiratory coronavirus, antigenically similar to transmissible gastroenteritis virus, in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesley, R D; Woods, R D; Hill, H T; Biwer, J D

    1990-10-01

    A respiratory variant of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), designated PRCV-Ind/89, was isolated from a swine breeding stock herd in Indiana. The virus was readily isolated from nasal swabs of pigs of different ages and induced cytopathology on primary porcine kidney cells and and on a swine testicular (ST) cell line. An 8-week-old pig infected oral/nasally with the respiratory variant and a contact pig showed no signs of respiratory or enteric disease. These pigs did not shed virus in feces but did shed the agent from the upper respiratory tract for approximately 2 weeks. Baby pigs from 2 separate litters (2 and 3 days old) also showed no clinical signs following oral/nasal inoculation with PRCV-Ind/89. In a third litter, 5 of 7 piglets (5 days old) infected either oral/nasally or by stomach tube developed a transient mild diarrhea with villous atrophy. However, virus was not isolated from rectal swabs or ileal homogenates of these piglets, and viral antigen was not detected in the ileum by fluorescent antibody staining even though the virus was easily recovered from nasal swabs and lung tissue homogenates. Swine antisera produced against PRCV-Ind/89 or enteric TGEV cross-neutralized either virus. In addition, an anti-peplomer monoclonal antibody, 4F6, that neutralizes TGEV also neutralized the PRCV-Ind/89 isolate. Radioimmunoassays with a panel of monoclonal antibodies indicated that the Indiana respiratory variant and the European PRCV are antigenically similar.

  12. Activated human nasal epithelial cells modulate specific antibody response against bacterial or viral antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiou-Yueh Yeh

    Full Text Available Nasal mucosa is an immune responsive organ evidenced by eliciting both specific local secretory IgA and systemic IgG antibody responses with intra-nasal administration of antigens. Nevertheless, the role of nasal epithelial cells in modulating such responses is unclear. Human nasal epithelial cells (hNECs obtained from sinus mucosa of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis were cultured in vitro and firstly were stimulated by Lactococcus lactis bacterium-like particles (BLPs in order to examine their role on antibody production. Secondly, both antigens of immunodominant protein IDG60 from oral Streptococcus mutans and hemagglutinin (HA from influenza virus were tested to evaluate the specific antibody response. Stimulated hNECs by BLPs exhibited a significant increase in the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP. Conditioned medium of stimulated hNECs has effects on enhancing the proliferation of CD4+ T cells together with interferon-γ and IL-5 production, increasing the costimulatory molecules on dendritic cells and augmenting the production of IDG60 specific IgA, HA specific IgG, IgA by human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Such production of antigen specific IgG and IgA is significantly counteracted in the presence of IL-6 and TSLP neutralizing antibodies. In conclusion, properly stimulated hNECs may impart immuno-modulatory effects on the antigen-specific antibody response at least through the production of IL-6 and TSLP.

  13. Antigenic characterization of a formalin-inactivated poliovirus vaccine derived from live-attenuated Sabin strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tano, Yoshio; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Martin, Javier; Nishimura, Yorihiro; Simizu, Bunsiti; Miyamura, Tatsuo

    2007-10-10

    A candidate inactivated poliovirus vaccine derived from live-attenuated Sabin strains (sIPV), which are used in the oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV), was prepared in a large-production scale. The modification of viral antigenic epitopes during the formalin inactivation process was investigated by capture ELISA assays using type-specific and antigenic site-specific monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs). The major antigenic site 1 was modified during the formalin inactivation of Sabin 1. Antigenic sites 1-3 were slightly modified during the formalin inactivation of Sabin 2 strain. Sites 1 and 3 were altered on inactivated Sabin 3 virus. These alterations were different to those shown by wild-type Saukett strain, used in conventional IPV (cIPV). It has been previously reported that type 1 sIPV showed higher immunogenicity to type 1 cIPV whereas types 2 and 3 sIPV induced lower level of immunogenicity than their cIPV counterparts. Our results suggest that the differences in epitope structure after formalin inactivation may account, at least in part, for the observed differences in immunogenicity between Sabin and wild-type inactivated poliovaccines.

  14. Autoantigens produced in plants for oral tolerance therapy of autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, S; Jevnikar, A M

    1999-01-01

    Oral administration of protein antigens can induce antigen-specific immune hyporesponsiveness and may be useful in treating autoimmune diseases or preventing transplant rejection. However, the therapeutic value of oral tolerance may be limited when candidate autoantigens cannot be produced by conventional system in quantities sufficient for clinical studies. Plants may be ideally suited for this purpose, as they can produce hugh quantities of functional mammalian proteins at extremely competitive cost. Furthermore, transgenic food plants could provide a simple and direct method of autoantigen delivery for oral tolerance. Here we show that the diabetes-associated autoantigen glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) is efficiently expressed in both tobacco and potato plants, and that mice, when fed with fresh transgenic potato tubers, are fully protected from diabetes.

  15. Oral and systemic photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Andrew C; Damian, Diona L; Halliday, Gary M

    2014-01-01

    Photoprotection can be provided not only by ultraviolet (UV) blockers but also by oral substances. Epidemiologically identified associations between foods and skin cancer and interventional experiments have discovered mechanisms of UV skin damage. These approaches have identified oral substances that are photoprotective in humans. UV inhibits adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production causing an energy crisis, which prevents optimal skin immunity and DNA repair. Enhancing ATP production with oral nicotinamide protects from UV immunosuppression, enhances DNA repair and reduces skin cancer in humans. Reactive oxygen species also contribute to photodamage. Nontoxic substances consumed in the diet, or available as oral supplements, can protect the skin by multiple potential mechanisms. These substances include polyphenols in fruit, vegetables, wine, tea and caffeine-containing foods. UV-induced prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) contributes to photodamage. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and food substances reduce production of this lipid mediator. Fish oils are photoprotective, at least partially by reducing PGE2 . Orally consumed substances, either in the diet or as supplements, can influence cutaneous responses to UV. A current research goal is to develop an oral supplement that could be used in conjunction with other sun protective strategies in order to provide improved protection from sunlight.

  16. Personality and oral health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, W. Murray; Caspi, Avshalom; Poulton, Richie; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Broadbent, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated age-26 personality characteristics and age-32 oral health in a prospective study of a complete birth cohort born in Dunedin, New Zealand. Personality was measured using the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire (MPQ). Oral health was measured using the short-form Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14), a global measure, and dental examinations. Personality profiles were constructed for 916 individuals (50.8% men) using standardized MPQ scores, and multivariate analyses examined their association with oral health. Those reporting 1+ OHIP-14 impacts had higher Negative Emotionality scores (and lower Constraint and Positive Emotionality MPQ superfactor scores) than those who did not. After controlling for gender, clinical status, and the other two MPQ superfactors, those scoring higher on Negative Emotionality had a greater risk of reporting 1+ OHIP-14 impacts, as well as 3+ OHIP-14 impacts and worse-than-average oral health. They also had a greater risk of having lost at least one tooth from caries and of having 3+ decayed surfaces. Personality characteristics appear to shape self-reports of oral health. Personality is also a risk factor for clinical disease status, at least with respect to dental caries and its sequelae. Because the attitudes and values tapped into by personality tests can be altered by brief cognitive interventions, those might be useful in preventive dentistry. PMID:21896053

  17. Attenuated Escherichia coli strains expressing the colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) and a detoxified heat-labile enterotoxin (LThK63) enhance clearance of ETEC from the lungs of mice and protect mice from intestinal ETEC colonization and LT-induced fluid accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Wyatt; Boedeker, Edgar C

    2013-03-15

    Although enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infections are important causes of infantile and traveler's diarrhea there is no licensed vaccine available for those at-risk. Our goal is to develop a safe, live attenuated ETEC vaccine. We used an attenuated E. coli strain (O157:H7, Δ-intimin, Stx1-neg, Stx2-neg) as a vector (ZCR533) to prepare two vaccine strains, one strain expressing colonization factor antigen I (ZCR533-CFA/I) and one strain expressing CFA/I and a detoxified heat-labile enterotoxin (ZCR533-CFA/I+LThK63) to deliver ETEC antigens to mucosal sites in BALB/c mice. Following intranasal and intragastric immunization with the vaccine strains, serum IgG and IgA antibodies were measured to the CFA/I antigen, however, only serum IgG antibodies were detected to the heat-labile enterotoxin. Intranasal administration of the vaccine strains induced respiratory and intestinal antibody responses to the CFA/I and LT antigens, while intragastric administration induced only intestinal antibody responses with no respiratory antibodies detected to the CFA/I and LT antigens. Mice immunized intranasally with the vaccine strains showed enhanced clearance of wild-type (wt) ETEC bacteria from the lungs. Mice immunized intranasally and intragastrically with the vaccine strains were protected from intestinal colonization following oral challenge with ETEC wt bacteria. Mice immunized intragastrically with the ZCR533-CFA/I+LThK63 vaccine strain had less fluid accumulate in their intestine following challenge with ETEC wt bacteria or with purified LT as compared to the sham mice indicating that the immunized mice were protected from LT-induced intestinal fluid accumulation. Thus, mice intragastrically immunized with the ZCR533-CFA/I+LThK63 vaccine strain were able to effectively neutralize the activity of the LT enterotoxin. However, no difference in intestinal fluid accumulation was detected in the mice immunized intranasally with the vaccine strain as compared to the sham

  18. Oral and anal vaccination confers full protection against enteric redmouth disease (ERM) in rainbow trout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villumsen, Kasper Rømer; Neumann, Lukas; Otani, Maki

    2014-01-01

    The effect of oral vaccines against bacterial fish diseases has been a topic for debate for decades. Recently both M-like cells and dendritic cells have been discovered in the intestine of rainbow trout. It is therefore likely that antigens reaching the intestine can be taken up and thereby induce...... immunity in orally vaccinated fish. The objective of this project was to investigate whether oral and anal vaccination of rainbow trout induces protection against an experimental waterborne infection with the pathogenic enterobacteria Yersinia ruckeri O1 biotype 1 the causative agent of enteric redmouth...... disease (ERM). Rainbow trout were orally vaccinated with AquaVac ERM Oral (MERCK Animal Health) or an experimental vaccine bacterin of Y. ruckeri O1. Both vaccines were tested with and without a booster vaccination four months post the primary vaccination. Furthermore, two groups of positive controls were...

  19. Expression and Antigenic Evaluation of VacA Antigenic Fragment of Helicobacter Pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Hasanzadeh

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Helicobacter pylori, a human specific gastric pathogen is a causative agent of chronic active gastritis. The vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA is an effective virulence factor involved in gastric injury. The aim of this study was to construct a recombinant protein containing antigenic region of VacA gene and determine its antigenicity.   Materials and Methods: The antigenic region of VacA gene was detected by bioinformatics methods. The polymerase chain reaction method was used to amplify a highly antigenic region of VacA gene from chromosomal DNA of H. pylori. The eluted product was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pET32a. The target protein was expressed in the Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3 pLysS. The bacteria including pET32a-VacA plasmids were induced by IPTG. The antigenicity was finally studied by western blotting using sera of 15 H. pylori infected patients after purification. Results: Enzyme digestion analysis, PCR and DNA sequencing results showed that the target gene was inserted correctly into the recombinant vector. The expressed protein was purified successfully via affinity chromatography. Data indicated that antigenic region of VacA protein from Helicobacter pylori was recognized by all 15 patient’s sera. Conclusion : Our data showed that antigenic region of VacA protein can be expressed by in E. co.li. This protein was recognized by sera patients suffering from H. pylori infection. the recombinant protein has similar epitopes and close antigenic properties to the natural form of this antigen. Recombinant antigenic region of VacA protein also seems to be a promising antigen for protective and serologic diagnosis .

  20. A review of biodegradable polymeric systems for oral insulin delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yue Yuan; Xiong, Xiang Yuan; Tian, Yuan; Li, Zi Ling; Gong, Yan Chun; Li, Yu Ping

    2016-07-01

    Currently, repeated routine subcutaneous injections of insulin are the standard treatment for insulin-dependent diabetic patients. However, patients' poor compliance for injections often fails to achieve the stable concentration of blood glucose. As a protein drug, the oral bioavailability of insulin is low due to many physiological reasons. Several carriers, such as macromolecules and liposomes have been used to deliver drugs in vivo. In this review article, the gastrointestinal barriers of oral insulin administration are described. Strategies for increasing the bioavailability of oral insulin, such absorption enhancers, enzyme inhibitors, enteric coatings are also introduced. The potential absorption mechanisms of insulin-loaded nanoparticles across the intestinal epithelium, including intestinal lymphatic route, transcellular route and paracellular route are discussed in this review. Natural polymers, such as chitosan and its derivates, alginate derivatives, γ-PGA-based materials and starch-based nanoparticles have been exploited for oral insulin delivery; synthetic polymers, such as PLGA, PLA, PCL and PEA have also been developed for oral administration of insulin. This review focuses on recent advances in using biodegradable natural and synthetic polymers for oral insulin delivery along with their future prospects.

  1. HPV-associated oral warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, L; Khammissa, R A G; Wood, N H; Marnewick, J C; Meyerov, R; Lemmer, J

    2011-03-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is strictly epitheliotropic, infecting stratified squamous cutaneous and mucosal epithelial cells. Oral HPV infection may be subclinical or putatively associated with benign or malignant oral neoplasms. The benign HPV-associated oral lesions, focal epithelial hyperplasia (Heck disease), oral squamous cell papilloma, oral verruca vulgaris (common wart) and oral condyloma acuminatum, are collectively referred to as oral warts. Oral warts are usually asymptomatic, may be persistent or uncommonly, may regress spontaneously. HPV-associated oral warts have a prevalence of 0.5% in the general population, occur in up to 5% of HIV-seropositive subjects, and in up to 23% of HIV-seropositive subjects on highly active antiretroviral therapy. This paper is a clinico-pathological review of HPV-associated oral warts.

  2. Strengthening of oral health systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik

    2014-01-01

    Around the globe many people are suffering from oral pain and other problems of the mouth or teeth. This public health problem is growing rapidly in developing countries where oral health services are limited. Significant proportions of people are underserved; insufficient oral health care...... is either due to low availability and accessibility of oral health care or because oral health care is costly. In all countries, the poor and disadvantaged population groups are heavily affected by a high burden of oral disease compared to well-off people. Promotion of oral health and prevention of oral...... diseases must be provided through financially fair primary health care and public health intervention. Integrated approaches are the most cost-effective and realistic way to close the gap in oral health between rich and poor. The World Health Organization (WHO) Oral Health Programme will work...

  3. Transgenic carrot expressing fusion protein comprising M. tuberculosis antigens induces immune response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permyakova, Natalia V; Zagorskaya, Alla A; Belavin, Pavel A; Uvarova, Elena A; Nosareva, Olesya V; Nesterov, Andrey E; Novikovskaya, Anna A; Zav'yalov, Evgeniy L; Moshkin, Mikhail P; Deineko, Elena V

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains one of the major infectious diseases, which continues to pose a major global health problem. Transgenic plants may serve as bioreactors to produce heterologous proteins including antibodies, antigens, and hormones. In the present study, a genetic construct has been designed that comprises the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes cfp10, esat6 and dIFN gene, which encode deltaferon, a recombinant analog of the human γ-interferon designed for expression in plant tissues. This construct was transferred to the carrot (Daucus carota L.) genome by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. This study demonstrates that the fusion protein CFP10-ESAT6-dIFN is synthesized in the transgenic carrot storage roots. The protein is able to induce both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in laboratory animals (mice) when administered either orally or by injection. It should be emphasized that M. tuberculosis antigens contained in the fusion protein have no cytotoxic effect on peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

  4. Transgenic Carrot Expressing Fusion Protein Comprising M. tuberculosis Antigens Induces Immune Response in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia V. Permyakova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis remains one of the major infectious diseases, which continues to pose a major global health problem. Transgenic plants may serve as bioreactors to produce heterologous proteins including antibodies, antigens, and hormones. In the present study, a genetic construct has been designed that comprises the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes cfp10, esat6 and dIFN gene, which encode deltaferon, a recombinant analog of the human γ-interferon designed for expression in plant tissues. This construct was transferred to the carrot (Daucus carota L. genome by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. This study demonstrates that the fusion protein CFP10-ESAT6-dIFN is synthesized in the transgenic carrot storage roots. The protein is able to induce both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in laboratory animals (mice when administered either orally or by injection. It should be emphasized that M. tuberculosis antigens contained in the fusion protein have no cytotoxic effect on peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

  5. Antigen cross-presentation of immune complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platzer, Barbara; Stout, Madeleine; Fiebiger, Edda

    2014-01-01

    The ability of dendritic cells (DCs) to cross-present tumor antigens has long been a focus of interest to physicians, as well as basic scientists, that aim to establish efficient cell-based cancer immune therapy. A prerequisite for exploiting this pathway for therapeutic purposes is a better understanding of the mechanisms that underlie the induction of tumor-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses when initiated by DCs via cross-presentation. The ability of humans DC to perform cross-presentation is of utmost interest, as this cell type is a main target for cell-based immunotherapy in humans. The outcome of a cross-presentation event is guided by the nature of the antigen, the form of antigen uptake, and the subpopulation of DCs that performs presentation. Generally, CD8α(+) DCs are considered to be the most potent cross-presenting DCs. This paradigm, however, only applies to soluble antigens. During adaptive immune responses, immune complexes form when antibodies interact with their specific epitopes on soluble antigens. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) immune complexes target Fc-gamma receptors on DCs to shuttle exogenous antigens efficiently into the cross-presentation pathway. This receptor-mediated cross-presentation pathway is a well-described route for the induction of strong CD8(+) T cell responses. IgG-mediated cross-presentation is intriguing because it permits the CD8(-) DCs, which are commonly considered to be weak cross-presenters, to efficiently cross-present. Engaging multiple DC subtypes for cross-presentation might be a superior strategy to boost CTL responses in vivo. We here summarize our current understanding of how DCs use IgG-complexed antigens for the efficient induction of CTL responses. Because of its importance for human cell therapy, we also review the recent advances in the characterization of cross-presentation properties of human DC subsets.

  6. Leadership training for oral health professionals: a call to action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taichman, Russell S; Parkinson, Joseph W; Nelson, Bonnie A; Nordquist, Barbara; Ferguson-Young, Daphne C; Thompson, Joseph F

    2012-02-01

    With dramatic changes in the scope and mode of delivering oral health care on the horizon, a strategic approach to addressing the emerging opportunities and challenges is required. Such an approach will demand new and sustained initiatives to develop leaders with the skills, knowledge, and passion to guide oral health care into the future. The purpose of this position paper is to define the need for leadership training programs for dental and dental hygiene students to become future leaders. Whether these oral health professionals become leaders within a solo or group practice or at the local or national level of their profession, they must be given the mindset and tools to lead. This position paper will describe goals for leadership training and give examples of some programs that currently exist in dental education and other professional settings as the background for a call to action for dental education to provide leadership training opportunities for its students.

  7. Archaeal lipids in oral delivery of therapeutic peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Ann-Christin; Jensen, Sara M; Fricker, Gert;

    2017-01-01

    tetraether lipids. The inherent chemical stability and unique membrane-spanning characteristics of tetraether lipids render them interesting for oral drug delivery purposes. Archaeal lipids form liposomes spontaneously (archaeosomes) and may be incorporated in conventional liposomes (mixed vesicles). Both...... types of liposomes are promising to protect their drug cargo, such as therapeutic peptides, against the acidic environment of the stomach and proteolytic degradation in the intestine. They appear to withstand lipolytic enzymes and bile salts and may thus deliver orally administered therapeutic peptides...... to distant sections of the intestine or to the colon, where they may be absorbed, eventually by the help of absorption enhancers. Archaeal lipids and their semisynthetic derivatives may thus serve as biological source for the next generation oral drug delivery systems. The aim of this review is to present...

  8. Comparison of fiber delivered CO2 laser and electrocautery in transoral robot assisted tongue base surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, Murat; Gün, Taylan; Temelkuran, Burak; Aynacı, Engin; Kaya, Cem; Tekin, Ahmet Mahmut

    2017-05-01

    To compare intra-operative and post-operative effectiveness of fiber delivered CO2 laser to monopolar electrocautery in robot assisted tongue base surgery. Prospective non-randomized clinical study. Twenty moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients, non-compliant with Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP), underwent Transoral Robotic Surgery (TORS) using the Da Vinci surgical robot in our University Hospital. OSA was treated with monopolar electrocautery in 10 patients, and with flexible CO2 laser fiber in another 10 patients. The following parameters in the two sets are analyzed: Intraoperative bleeding that required cauterization, robot operating time, need for tracheotomy, postoperative self-limiting bleeding, length of hospitalization, duration until start of oral intake, pre-operative and post-operative minimum arterial oxygen saturation, pre-operative and post-operative Epworth Sleepiness Scale score, postoperative airway complication and postoperative pain. Mean follow-up was 12 months. None of the patients required tracheotomy and there were no intraoperative complications related to the use of the robot or the CO2 laser. The use of CO2 laser in TORS-assisted tongue base surgery resulted in less intraoperative bleeding that required cauterization, shorter robot operating time, shorter length of hospitalization, shorter duration until start of oral intake and less postoperative pain, when compared to electrocautery. Postoperative apnea-hypopnea index scores showed better efficacy of CO2 laser than electrocautery. Comparison of postoperative airway complication rates and Epworth sleepiness scale scores were found to be statistically insignificant between the two groups. The use of CO2 laser in robot assisted tongue base surgery has various intraoperative and post-operative advantages when compared to monopolar electrocautery.

  9. Levels and complexity of IgA antibody against oral bacteria in samples of human colostrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrechen, L N; Zago, F H; Sesso, M L T; Bertoldo, B B; Silva, C B; Azevedo, K P; de Lima Pereira, S A; Geraldo-Martins, V R; Ferriani, V P L; Nogueira, R D

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans (SM) have three main virulence antigens: glucan binding protein B (gbpB), glucosyltransferase (Gtf) and antigens I/II (Ag I/II) envolved in the capacity of those bacteria to adhere and accumulate in the dental biofilm. Also, the glycosyltransferases 153 kDa of Streptococcus gordonii (SGO) and 170kDa of Streptococcus sanguinis (SSA) were important antigens associated with the accumulation of those bacterias. Streptococcus mitis (SMI) present IgA1 protease of 202 kDa. We investigated the specificity and levels IgA against those antigens of virulence in samples of human colostrum. This study involved 77 samples of colostrum that were analyzed for levels of immunoglobulian A, M and G by Elisa. The specificity of IgA against extracts of SM and initials colonizators (SSA, SMI, SGO) were analyzed by the Western blot. The mean concentration of IgA was 2850.2 (±2567.2) mg/100 mL followed by IgM and IgG (respectively 321.8±90.3 and 88.3±51.5), statistically different (pbacteria antigens and theirs virulence antigens. To SM, the GbpB was significantly lower detected than others antigens of SM (p0.4). So, the breast milk from first hours after birth presented significant levels of IgA specific against important virulence of antigens those oral streptococci, which can disrupt the installation and accumulation process of these microorganisms in the oral cavity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Delivering Bad News: An Approach According to Jewish Scriptures

    OpenAIRE

    Naimer, Sody A.; Moshe Pero

    2014-01-01

    Despite a preoccupation in the medical literature with developing an effective approach for breaking bad news, the sources are based on personal opinion alone and only in some instances on qualitative research. Recognizing the gravity of this topic coupled with respect for the wisdom of the written and oral Jewish scriptures, this work is an attempt to delve into the diverse ancient writings to draw conclusions regarding a recommended methodology to guide and inform this task. It is inter...

  11. Immunogenicity of recombinant attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine strains carrying a gene that encodes Eimeria tenella antigen SO7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konjufca, Vjollca; Jenkins, Mark; Wang, Shifeng; Juarez-Rodriguez, Maria Dolores; Curtiss, Roy

    2008-12-01

    Recombinant attenuated Salmonella vaccines against avian coccidiosis were developed to deliver Eimeria species antigens to the lymphoid tissues of chickens via the type 3 secretion system (T3SS) and the type 2 secretion system (T2SS) of Salmonella. For antigen delivery via the T3SS, the Eimeria tenella gene encoding sporozoite antigen SO7 was cloned downstream of the translocation domain of the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium sopE gene in the parental pYA3868 and pYA3870 vectors to generate pYA4156 and pYA4157. Newly constructed T3SS vectors were introduced into host strain chi8879 (Delta phoP233 Delta sptP1033::xylE Delta asdA16), an attenuated derivative of the highly virulent UK-1 strain. The SopE-SO7 fusion protein was secreted by the T3SS of Salmonella. The vector pYA4184 was constructed for delivery of the SO7 antigen via the T2SS. The SO7 protein was toxic to Salmonella when larger amounts were synthesized; thus, the synthesis of this protein was placed under the control of the lacI repressor gene, whose expression in turn was dependent on the amount of available arabinose in the medium. The pYA4184 vector was introduced into host strain chi9242 (Delta phoP233 Delta asdA16 Delta araBAD23 Delta relA198::araC P(BAD) lacI TT [TT is the T4ipIII transcription terminator]). In addition to SO7, for immunization and challenge studies we used the EAMZ250 antigen of Eimeria acervulina, which was previously shown to confer partial protection against E. acervulina challenge when it was delivered via the T3SS. Immunization of chickens with a combination of the SO7 and EAMZ250 antigens delivered via the T3SS induced superior protection against challenge by E. acervulina. In contrast, chickens immunized with SO7 that was delivered via the T2SS of Salmonella were better protected from challenge by E. tenella.

  12. Seroreactivity of Salmonella-infected cattle herds against a fimbrial antigen in comparison with lipopolysaccharide antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoorfar, Jeffrey; Lind, Peter; Bell, M.M.

    1996-01-01

    The IgG seroreaction of Salmonella-infected cattle herds against a fimbrial antigen (SEF14) was compared with that against lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antigens. Sera from 23 dairy herds (n = 205) from an island with no occurrence of salmonellosis, four herds (n = 303) with recent outbreaks of S...

  13. The antigenic relationship between Brettanomyces-Debaryomyces strains and the Salmonella cholerae-suis O antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoycan, N; Sağanak, I; Wells, G

    1978-01-01

    The immune sera for Brettanomyces lambicus, B. claussenii, Debaryomyces hansenii and D. marama agglutinated Salmonella cholerae-suis (0:6(2), 7). The immune serum for S. cholerae-suis agglutinated B. lambicus, B. clausenni, D. hansenii and D. marama. Absorption and agglutination cross-tested demonstrated common antigen factor(s) in the tested yeasts and Salmonella 0:7 antigen.

  14. A Consistent Orally-Infected Hamster Model for Enterovirus A71 Encephalomyelitis Demonstrates Squamous Lesions in the Paws, Skin and Oral Cavity Reminiscent of Hand-Foot-and-Mouth Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phyu, Win Kyaw; Ong, Kien Chai; Wong, Kum Thong

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71) causes self-limiting, hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) that may rarely be complicated by encephalomyelitis. Person-to-person transmission is usually by fecal-oral or oral-oral routes. To study viral replication sites in the oral cavity and other tissues, and to gain further insights into virus shedding and neuropathogenesis, we developed a consistent, orally-infected, 2-week-old hamster model of HFMD and EV-A71 encephalomyelitis. Tissues from orally-infected, 2-week-old hamsters were studied by light microscopy, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization to detect viral antigens and RNA, respectively, and by virus titration. Hamsters developed the disease and died after 4-8 days post infection; LD50 was 25 CCID50. Macroscopic cutaneous lesions around the oral cavity and paws were observed. Squamous epithelium in the lip, oral cavity, paw, skin, and esophagus, showed multiple small inflammatory foci around squamous cells that demonstrated viral antigens/RNA. Neurons (brainstem, spinal cord, sensory ganglia), acinar cells (salivary gland, lacrimal gland), lymphoid cells (lymph node, spleen), and muscle fibres (skeletal, cardiac and smooth muscles), liver and gastric epithelium also showed varying amounts of viral antigens/RNA. Intestinal epithelium, Peyer's patches, thymus, pancreas, lung and kidney were negative. Virus was isolated from oral washes, feces, brain, spinal cord, skeletal muscle, serum, and other tissues. Our animal model should be useful to study squamous epitheliotropism, neuropathogenesis, oral/fecal shedding in EV-A71 infection, person-to-person transmission, and to test anti-viral drugs and vaccines.

  15. A Consistent Orally-Infected Hamster Model for Enterovirus A71 Encephalomyelitis Demonstrates Squamous Lesions in the Paws, Skin and Oral Cavity Reminiscent of Hand-Foot-and-Mouth Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Win Kyaw Phyu

    Full Text Available Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71 causes self-limiting, hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD that may rarely be complicated by encephalomyelitis. Person-to-person transmission is usually by fecal-oral or oral-oral routes. To study viral replication sites in the oral cavity and other tissues, and to gain further insights into virus shedding and neuropathogenesis, we developed a consistent, orally-infected, 2-week-old hamster model of HFMD and EV-A71 encephalomyelitis. Tissues from orally-infected, 2-week-old hamsters were studied by light microscopy, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization to detect viral antigens and RNA, respectively, and by virus titration. Hamsters developed the disease and died after 4-8 days post infection; LD50 was 25 CCID50. Macroscopic cutaneous lesions around the oral cavity and paws were observed. Squamous epithelium in the lip, oral cavity, paw, skin, and esophagus, showed multiple small inflammatory foci around squamous cells that demonstrated viral antigens/RNA. Neurons (brainstem, spinal cord, sensory ganglia, acinar cells (salivary gland, lacrimal gland, lymphoid cells (lymph node, spleen, and muscle fibres (skeletal, cardiac and smooth muscles, liver and gastric epithelium also showed varying amounts of viral antigens/RNA. Intestinal epithelium, Peyer's patches, thymus, pancreas, lung and kidney were negative. Virus was isolated from oral washes, feces, brain, spinal cord, skeletal muscle, serum, and other tissues. Our animal model should be useful to study squamous epitheliotropism, neuropathogenesis, oral/fecal shedding in EV-A71 infection, person-to-person transmission, and to test anti-viral drugs and vaccines.

  16. ORAL MYIASIS CONVERTING TO ORAL SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshay

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Oral Myiasis, a condition of infestation of the body by fly larvae (maggots is a rare pathology in humans. It is associated with poor oral hygiene, alcoholism, senility, suppurating lesions, severe halitosis. It is seen frequently in tropical countries and hot climatic regions. The reported cases in literature of oral Myiasis associated with oral cancer are few. The treatment is a mechanical removal of the maggots but a systemic treatment with Ivermectin, a semi - synthetic macrolide antibiotic, has been used successfully for treatment for oral m yiasis. We present a case of 55 yr old male alcoholic patient with oral myiasis with extensive proliferative growth of oral cavity. Our patient was managed with manual debridement and administration of systemic ivermect in along with antibiotic coverage. Incisional biopsy of the proliferative lesion showed well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. Thus our patient showed presence of oral myiasis in association with oral squamous cell carcinoma.

  17. Superexpression of tuberculosis antigens in plant leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorokhov, Yuri L; Sheveleva, Anna A; Frolova, Olga Y; Komarova, Tatjana V; Zvereva, Anna S; Ivanov, Peter A; Atabekov, Joseph G

    2007-05-01

    Recent developments in genetic engineering allow the employment of plants as factories for 1/foreign protein production. Thus, tuberculosis (TB) ESAT6 antigen was expressed in different plant systems, but the level of vaccine protein accumulation was extremely low. We describe the technology for superexpression of TB vaccine proteins (Ag85B, ESAT6, and ESAT6:Ag85B fusion) in plant leaves which involves: (i) construction of tobacco mosaic virus-based vectors with the coat protein genes substituted by those for TB antigens; (ii) Agrobacterium-mediated delivery to plant leaf tissues of binary vectors containing the cDNA copy of the vector virus genome; and (iii) replication of virus vectors in plant cells under conditions suppressing the virus-induced gene silencing. This technology enables efficient production of the TB vaccine proteins in plants; in particular, the level of Ag85B antigen accumulation was not less than 800 mg/kg of fresh leaves. Expression of TB antigens in plant cells as His(6)-tagged proteins promoted their isolation and purification by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. Deletion of transmembrane domains from Ag85B caused a dramatic increase in its intracellular stability. We propose that the strategy of TB antigens superproduction in a plant might be used as a basis for the creation of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine against TB.

  18. Antigen presentation by MHC-dressed cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masafumi eNakayama

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Professional antigen presenting cells (APCs such as conventional dendritic cells (DCs process protein antigens to MHC-bound peptides and then present the peptide-MHC complexes to T cells. In addition to this canonical antigen presentation pathway, recent studies have revealed that DCs and non-APCs can acquire MHC class I (MHCI and/or MHC class II (MHCII from neighboring cells through a process of cell-cell contact-dependent membrane transfer called trogocytosis. These MHC-dressed cells subsequently activate or regulate T cells via the preformed antigen peptide-MHC complexes without requiring any further processing. In addition to trogocytosis, intercellular transfer of MHCI and MHCII can be mediated by secretion of membrane vesicles such as exosomes from APCs, generating MHC-dressed cells. This review focuses on the physiological role of antigen presentation by MHCI- or MHCII-dressed cells, and also discusses differences and similarities between trogocytosis and exosome-mediated transfer of MHC.

  19. Development and Evaluation of a Rapid Antigen Detection and Serotyping Lateral Flow Antigen Detection System for Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuki Morioka

    Full Text Available We developed a lateral flow strip using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs which allows for rapid antigen detection and serotyping of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV. This FMDV serotyping strip was able to detect all 7 serotypes and distinguish serotypes O, A, C and Asia1. Its sensitivities ranged from 10(3 to 10(4 of a 50% tissue culture infectious dose of each FMDV stain; this is equal to those of the commercial product Svanodip (Boehringer Ingelheim Svanova, Uppsala, Sweden, which can detect all seven serotypes of FMDV, but does not distinguish them. Our evaluation of the FMDV serotyping strip using a total of 118 clinical samples (vesicular fluids, vesicular epithelial emulsions and oral and/or nasal swabs showed highly sensitive antigen detection and accuracy in serotyping in accordance with ELISA or RT-PCR. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on any FMDV serotyping strip that provides both rapid antigen detection and serotyping of FMDV at the same time on one strip without extra devices. This method will be useful in both FMD-free countries and FMD-infected countries, especially where laboratory diagnosis cannot be carried out.

  20. Oral allergy syndrome--the need of a multidisciplinary approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelava, Nikolina; Lugović-Mihić, Liborija; Duvancić, Tomislav; Romić, Renata; Situm, Mirna

    2014-06-01

    Oral allergy syndrome (OAS) is one of the most common types of food allergy. The syndrome includes itching and swelling of the lips, palate and tongue, usually after consuming fresh fruits and vegetables. The underlying pathogenic mechanism is cross-reactivity between IgE antibodies specific to pollen, and antigens in food, such as fresh fruits, vegetables and nuts that are structurally similar to pollen. Both pollen and food antigens can bind to IgE and trigger type I immune reaction. Diagnosis is primarily based on the patient's history, and confirmed by skin tests, in vitro tests, and oral provocation tests. Differential diagnoses include many diseases (such as burning mouth syndrome, angioedema, hay fever, various other oral diseases, etc.), and for this reason a multidisciplinary approach is necessary, as different specialists need to be involved in the diagnostic procedure. Therapy includes avoiding, or thermal processing of, fruit and vegetables known to trigger a reaction, and antihistamine medications. If a more severe anaphylactic reaction develops, more aggressive therapy is required. The goal of this article is to present OAS, its etiopathogenesis, clinical picture, and symptoms, diagnostic approach and therapy for OAS.

  1. Antigen vehiculization particles based on the Z protein of Junin virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borio Cristina S

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arenavirus matrix protein Z plays an important role in virus budding and is able to generate enveloped virus-like-particles (VLPs in absence of any other viral proteins. In these VLPs, Z protein is associated to the plasma membrane inner surface by its myristoyl residue. Budding induction and vesicle formation properties can be exploited to generate enveloped VLPs platform. These structures can be designed to carry specific antigen in the inner side or on the surface of VLPs. Vaccines based on VLPs are a highly effective type of subunit vaccines that mimic the overall structure of virus particles in absence of viral nucleic acid, being noninfectious. In this work we assayed the capacity of Junin Z protein to produce VLPs carrying the green fluorescent protein (eGFP, as a model antigen. Results In this report the Junin Z protein ability to produce VLPs from 293T cells and its capacity to deliver a specific antigen (eGFP fused to Z was evaluated. Confocal microscopy showed a particular membrane bending in cells expressing Z and a spot welded distribution in the cytoplasm. VLPs were detected by TEM (transmission electron microscopy and were purified from cell supernatant. The proteinase protection assay demonstrated the VLPs integrity and the absence of degradation of the fused antigen, thus indicating its internal localization. Finally, immunization of mice with purified VLPs produced high titres of anti-eGFP antibodies compared to the controls. Conclusions It was proved that VLPs can be generated from cells transfected with a fusion Junin virus Z-eGFP protein in absence of any other viral protein, and the capacity of Z protein to support fusions at the C-terminal, without impairing its budding activity, allowing vehiculization of specific antigens into VLPs.

  2. Promoting oral health as part of an interprofessional community-based women's health event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Shelia S; Funk, Amy D; Shockey, Alcinda K; Sharps, Gina M; Crout, Richard J; Frere, Cathryn L; Morgan, Susan K; DeBiase, Christina B; Hobbs, Gerald R

    2014-09-01

    Heart disease is the number one killer of women, and studies have shown connections between cardiovascular and oral health. However, interprofessional community-based participatory initiatives promoting women's oral health have received little research attention. This study evaluated the effectiveness of personalized oral health education (POHE) during a free one-day interprofessional women's health promotion event. The objectives were to 1) assess the participants' knowledge about the connection between oral health and heart disease; 2) disseminate information about oral-systemic linkages; 3) encourage comprehensive dental examinations; and 4) evaluate POHE outcomes. West Virginia University School of Dentistry faculty and students delivered POHE to the participants. These POHE instructors were calibrated with a standardized script regarding periodontal disease, health impact of tobacco, xerostomia-inducing medications, and oral hygiene instruction. Immediately prior to and following each POHE session, all the participants (N=165; 100 percent response rate) completed a number-coded questionnaire. The findings showed that the participants' knowledge of oral-systemic health linkages had increased following the POHE. The respondents received oral health kits and were offered discount vouchers toward the cost of a comprehensive oral examination at the dental school. This replicable model may prove useful to other dental schools in promoting women's oral health.

  3. Paracoccidioidomicosis en cavidad oral Oral cavity paracoccidioidomycosis

    OpenAIRE

    D. Antunes Freitas; C.I. Vergara Hernández; A. Díaz Caballero; G. Moreira

    2012-01-01

    La paracoccidioidomicosis (PCM) o blastomicosis suramericana es la micosis sistémica más importante de América latina que es relativamente común en Brasil, Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador y Argentina. Los casos esporádicos también pueden verse en algunos otros países, la cual es progresiva y con un infrecuente desenlace fatal si no es tratada a tiempo. Se considera como una enfermedad multifocal, con lesiones orales como la característica prominente. Es causada por un hongo dimórfico, Paracoccid...

  4. Oral Absorption of Mesobuthus eupeus Scorpion Venom in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Hosseini

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: To explore the oral absorption of scorpion venom an ELISA were designed in this study. Scorpions and their venom were been used for centuries as medical treatments in traditional medicine. The oral administration of drug referred as the convenient way, as there was not any publication about gastro-intestinal absorption of scorpion venom; this experiment checked oral absorption of Mesobuthus eupeus scorpion venom in mice. Methods: Six groups of mice orally received 0, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 2 and 5 mg/kg of M. eupeus venom and their blood samples were tacked after 15, 30, 60 min and 2, 4, 6, 24, 48 h after that. The presence of venom the blood samples were detected with a house- antigen capture ELISA. Results: The venom was absorbed after its feeding to mice. The animals expressed no signs of envenomation and, the venom was detectable by AC-ELISA as soon as 15 min after its feed. Maximum serum levels were 2 h after its meal. Conclusion: The orally administrated venom was absorbed to the blood circulation without any clinically symptoms.

  5. A service model for delivering care closer to home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Joanna; Taylor, Charlotte Elizabeth; Bunyan, Paul; White, Philippa Mary; Thomas, Siân Myra; Upton, Dominic

    2011-04-01

    Upton Surgery (Worcestershire) has developed a flexible and responsive service model that facilitates multi-agency support for adult patients with complex care needs experiencing an acute health crisis. The purpose of this service is to provide appropriate interventions that avoid unnecessary hospital admissions or, alternatively, provide support to facilitate early discharge from secondary care. Key aspects of this service are the collaborative and proactive identification of patients at risk, rapid creation and deployment of a reactive multi-agency team and follow-up of patients with an appropriate long-term care plan. A small team of dedicated staff (the Complex Care Team) are pivotal to coordinating and delivering this service. Key skills are sophisticated leadership and project management skills, and these have been used sensitively to challenge some traditional roles and boundaries in the interests of providing effective, holistic care for the patient.This is a practical example of early implementation of the principles underlying the Department of Health's (DH) recent Best Practice Guidance, 'Delivering Care Closer to Home' (DH, July 2008) and may provide useful learning points for other general practice surgeries considering implementing similar models. This integrated case management approach has had enthusiastic endorsement from patients and carers. In addition to the enhanced quality of care and experience for the patient, this approach has delivered value for money. Secondary care costs have been reduced by preventing admissions and also by reducing excess bed-days. The savings achieved have justified the ongoing commitment to the service and the staff employed in the Complex Care Team. The success of this service model has been endorsed recently by the 'Customer Care' award by 'Management in Practice'. The Surgery was also awarded the 'Practice of the Year' award for this and a number of other customer-focussed projects.

  6. Internet delivered diabetes self-management education: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Katherine; Phillips, Beth; Johnson, Constance; Vorderstrasse, Allison

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes self-management education is a cornerstone of successful diabetes management. Various methods have been used to reach the increasing numbers of patients with diabetes, including Internet-based education. The purpose of this article is to review various delivery methods of Internet diabetes education that have been evaluated, as well as their effectiveness in improving diabetes-related outcomes. Literature was identified in the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PubMed, Medline, EBSCO, the Cochrane Library, and the Web of Science databases through searches using the following terms: "type 2 diabetes AND internet/web based AND education" and "type 2 diabetes AND diabetes self-management education (DSME) AND web-based/internet OR technology assisted education." The search was limited to English language articles published in the last 10 years. The search yielded 111 articles; of these, 14 met criteria for inclusion in this review. Nine studies were randomized controlled trials, and study lengths varied from 2 weeks to 24 months, for a total of 2,802 participants. DSME delivered via the Internet is effective at improving measures of glycemic control and diabetes knowledge compared with usual care. In addition, results demonstrate that improved eating habits and increased attendance at clinic appointments occur after the online DSME, although engagement and usage of Internet materials waned over time. Interventions that included an element of interaction with healthcare providers were seen as attractive to participants. Internet-delivered diabetes education has the added benefit of easier access for many individuals, and patients can self-pace themselves through materials. More research on the cost-benefits of Internet diabetes education and best methods to maintain patient engagement are needed, along with more studies assessing the long-term impact of Internet-delivered DSME.

  7. Optimizing a Drone Network to Deliver Automated External Defibrillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutilier, Justin J; Brooks, Steven C; Janmohamed, Alyf; Byers, Adam; Buick, Jason E; Zhan, Cathy; Schoellig, Angela P; Cheskes, Sheldon; Morrison, Laurie J; Chan, Timothy C Y

    2017-03-02

    Background -Public access defibrillation programs can improve survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), but automated external defibrillators (AEDs) are rarely available for bystander use at the scene. Drones are an emerging technology that can deliver an AED to the scene of an OHCA for bystander use. We hypothesize that a drone network designed with the aid of a mathematical model combining both optimization and queuing can reduce the time to AED arrival. Methods -We applied our model to 53,702 OHCAs that occurred in the eight regions of the Toronto Regional RescuNET between January 1st 2006 and December 31st 2014. Our primary analysis quantified the drone network size required to deliver an AED one, two, or three minutes faster than historical median 911 response times for each region independently. A secondary analysis quantified the reduction in drone resources required if RescuNET was treated as one large coordinated region. Results -The region-specific analysis determined that 81 bases and 100 drones would be required to deliver an AED ahead of median 911 response times by three minutes. In the most urban region, the 90th percentile of the AED arrival time was reduced by 6 minutes and 43 seconds relative to historical 911 response times in the region. In the most rural region, the 90th percentile was reduced by 10 minutes and 34 seconds. A single coordinated drone network across all regions required 39.5% fewer bases and 30.0% fewer drones to achieve similar AED delivery times. Conclusions -An optimized drone network designed with the aid of a novel mathematical model can substantially reduce the AED delivery time to an OHCA event.

  8. Functional Specialty of CD40 and Dendritic Cell Surface Lectins for Exogenous Antigen Presentation to CD8(+) and CD4(+) T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wenjie; Gorvel, Laurent; Zurawski, Sandra; Li, Dapeng; Ni, Ling; Duluc, Dorothée; Upchurch, Katherine; Kim, JongRok; Gu, Chao; Ouedraogo, Richard; Wang, Zhiqing; Xue, Yaming; Joo, HyeMee; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Zurawski, Gerard; Oh, SangKon

    2016-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are major antigen-presenting cells that can efficiently prime and cross-prime antigen-specific T cells. Delivering antigen to DCs via surface receptors is thus an appealing strategy to evoke cellular immunity. Nonetheless, which DC surface receptor to target to yield the optimal CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cell responses remains elusive. Herein, we report the superiority of CD40 over 9 different lectins and scavenger receptors at evoking antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell responses. However, lectins (e.g., LOX-1 and Dectin-1) were more efficient than CD40 at eliciting CD4(+) T cell responses. Common and distinct patterns of subcellular and intracellular localization of receptor-bound αCD40, αLOX-1 and αDectin-1 further support their functional specialization at enhancing antigen presentation to either CD8(+) or CD4(+) T cells. Lastly, we demonstrate that antigen targeting to CD40 can evoke potent antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell responses in human CD40 transgenic mice. This study provides fundamental information for the rational design of vaccines against cancers and viral infections.

  9. Poly-functional and long-lasting anticancer immune response elicited by a safe attenuated Pseudomonas aeruginosa vector for antigens delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Chauchet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Live-attenuated bacterial vectors for antigens delivery have aroused growing interest in the field of cancer immunotherapy. Their potency to stimulate innate immunity and to promote intracellular antigen delivery into antigen-presenting cells could be exploited to elicit a strong and specific cellular immune response against tumor cells. We previously described genetically-modified and attenuated Pseudomonas aeruginosa vectors able to deliver in vivo protein antigens into antigen-presenting cells, through Type 3 secretion system of the bacteria. Using this approach, we managed to protect immunized mice against aggressive B16 melanoma development in both a prophylactic and therapeutic setting. In this study, we further investigated the antigen-specific CD8+ T cell response, in terms of phenotypic and functional aspects, obtained after immunizations with a killed but metabolically active P. aeruginosa attenuated vector. We demonstrated that P. aeruginosa vaccine induces a highly functional pool of antigen-specific CD8+ T cell able to infiltrate the tumor. Furthermore, multiple immunizations allowed the development of a long-lasting immune response, represented by a pool of predominantly effector memory cells which protected mice against late tumor challenge. Overall, killed but metabolically active P. aeruginosa vector is a safe and promising approach for active and specific antitumor immunotherapy.

  10. Confocal epifluorescence detection for microspheres delivered on disposable microfluidic chip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Honghua Hu; Xiyun Hou; Guoguang Yang

    2006-01-01

    @@ The laser induced fluorescence (LIF) detection system for 5-μm microspheres delivered on microfluidic chip is presented employing confocal optical scheme. The parameters of the optical system are specifically optimized for single microsphere detection. With the excitation laser spot size of 4.6 μm and optical sectioning power of 27 μm, the lowest concentration detection limit is 0.45 nmol/L, corresponding to only 122 molecules in probe volume. The microsphere detection is carried on successfully with the maximum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 55.7, which provides good detection sensitivity.

  11. Delivering a Remote Laboratory Course within an Undergraduate Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abul Azad

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the offering of anundergraduate laboratory course over the Internet. Thepaper provides a brief description of a modular Internetbasedlaboratory facility using commercially availablehardware and software, in-built password control and usertracking, and simultaneously accessibility to multipleclients. The modules are adaptable with a variety oflaboratory experiments with little effort. The facility wasused to deliver a remote laboratory course for anundergraduate digital electronics laboratory. An evaluationscheme was implemented to assess the effectiveness of thesystem as well students’ learning outcomes. In-builtcapability to collect systems’ operational data and weeklysurvey are used to evaluate the effectiveness of the system,while pre- and post-tests

  12. Bench Crater Meteorite: Hydrated Asteroidal Material Delivered to the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, K. H.; Messenger, S.; Zolensky, M. E.; Frank, D. R.; Kring, D. A.

    2013-01-01

    D/H measurements from the lunar regolith agglutinates [8] indicate mixing between a low D/H solar implanted component and additional higher D/H sources (e.g., meteoritic/ cometary/volcanic gases). We have determined the range and average D/H ratio of Bench Crater meteorite, which is the first direct D/H analysis of meteoritic material delivered to the lunar surface. This result provides an important ground truth for future investigations of lunar water resources by missions to the Moon.

  13. Twin delivery: how should the second twin be delivered?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olofsson, P; Rydhström, H

    1985-11-01

    In a series of 803 pairs of twins born between 1973 and 1982, 0.33% of second twins were delivered by cesarean section after vaginal delivery of the first twin. During the last year the frequency has increased to 7%, calling attention to the problem of declining obstetric skills and experience. This has caused us to update the routines of intrapartum management of twin gestations. In the present program only commonly available obstetric techniques are used. The potentially hazardous twin delivery is excluded from a trial of vaginal delivery. Hopefully, the program will help other obstetricians to decide in favor of vaginal delivery in selected twin gestations.

  14. Color View of 'Rosy Red' Delivered to TEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager took this false color image on Sol 72 (August 7, 2008), the 72nd Martian day after landing. It shows a soil sample from a trench informally called 'Rosy Red' after being delivered to a gap between partially opened doors on the lander's Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer, or TEGA. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  15. The role of accountable care organizations in delivering value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Halloran, Kevin; Depalma, Andres; Joseph, Vilma; Cobelli, Neil; Sharan, Alok

    2012-12-01

    The goal of Accountable Care Organizations is to improve patient outcomes while maximizing the value of the services provided. This will be achieved through the use of performance and quality measures that facilitate efficient, cost-effective, evidence-based care. By creating a network connecting primary care physicians, specialists, rehabilitation facilities and hospitals, patient care should be maximized while at the same time delivering appropriate value for those services provided. The Medicare Shared Savings Program will financially reward ACOs that meet performance standards while at the same time lowering costs. The orthopaedic surgeon can only benefit by understanding how to participate in and negotiate the complexities of these organizations.

  16. Delivering Sustainability Through Supply Chain Distribution Network Redesign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Ravet

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose - Companies could gain (cost, service, green/sustainable competitive advantage through the supply chain network. The goal of this article is to study how to deliver sustainability through the supply chain distribution network redesign.Design/methodology/approach - A literature review is conducted to examine research relating to sustainable supply chain strategies and supply chain distribution network redesign.Findings - A study of the supply chain literature reveals the importance to rethink the supply chain distribution network design and to treat sustainability as integral to operations.

  17. Cell-Specific Promoters Enable Lipid-Based Nanoparticles to Deliver Genes to Specific Cells of the Retina In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuhong; Rajala, Ammaji; Cao, Binrui; Ranjo-Bishop, Michelle; Agbaga, Martin-Paul; Mao, Chuanbin; Rajala, Raju V S

    2016-01-01

    Non-viral vectors, such as lipid-based nanoparticles (liposome-protamine-DNA complex [LPD]), could be used to deliver a functional gene to the retina to correct visual function and treat blindness. However, one of the limitations of LPD is the lack of cell specificity, as the retina is composed of seven types of cells. If the same gene is expressed in multiple cell types or is absent from one desired cell type, LPD-mediated gene delivery to every cell may have off-target effects. To circumvent this problem, we have tested LPD-mediated gene delivery using various generalized, modified, and retinal cell-specific promoters. We achieved retinal pigment epithelium cell specificity with vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD2), rod cell specificity with mouse rhodopsin, cone cell specificity with red/green opsin, and ganglion cell specificity with thymocyte antigen promoters. Here we show for the first time that cell-specific promoters enable lipid-based nanoparticles to deliver genes to specific cells of the retina in vivo. This work will inspire investigators in the field of lipid nanotechnology to couple cell-specific promoters to drive expression in a cell- and tissue-specific manner.

  18. The peripheral blood fibrocyte is a potent antigen-presenting cell capable of priming naive T cells in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesney, J; Bacher, M; Bender, A; Bucala, R

    1997-06-10

    Recent studies have identified a novel population of blood-borne cells, termed fibrocytes, that have a distinct cell surface phenotype (collagen+/CD13(+)/CD34(+)/CD45(+)), rapidly enter sites of tissue injury, and synthesize connective tissue matrix molecules. We found by flow cytometry that purified human fibrocytes express each of the known surface components that are required for antigen presentation, including class II major histocompatability complex molecules (HLA-DP, -DQ, and -DR), the costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86, and the adhesion molecules CD11a, CD54, and CD58. Human fibrocytes induced antigen-presenting cell-dependent T cell proliferation when cultured with specific antigen and this proliferative activity was significantly higher than that induced by monocytes and nearly as high as that induced by purified dendritic cells. Mouse fibrocytes also were found to express the surface components required for antigen presentation and to function as potent APCs in vitro. Mouse fibrocytes pulsed in vitro with the HIV-proteins p24 or gp120 and delivered to a site of cutaneous injury were found to migrate to proximal lymph nodes and to specifically prime naive T cells. These data suggest that fibrocytes play an early and important role in the initiation of antigen-specific immunity.

  19. Truncated VP28 as oral vaccine candidate against WSSV infection in shrimp: an uptake and processing study in the midgut of Penaeus monodon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulkarni, V.; Rombout, J.H.W.M.; Singh, I.S.B.; Sudheer, N.S.; Vlak, J.M.; Caipang, C.M.A.; Brinchmann, M.; Kiron, V.

    2013-01-01

    Several oral vaccination studies have been undertaken to evoke a better protection against white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), a major shrimp pathogen. Formalin-inactivated virus and WSSV envelope protein VP28 were suggested as candidate vaccine components, but their uptake mechanism upon oral deliver

  20. Antigenic typing Polish isolates of canine parvovirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizak, B. [National Veterinary Research Institute, Pulawy (Poland); Plucienniczak, A. [Polish Academy ofd Sciences. Microbiology and Virology Center, Lodz (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    Polish strains of canine parvovirus isolated between 1982 and 1993 were examined to determine the extent to which the virus has evolved antigenically and genetically over eleven years. Two CPV isolates obtained in Warsaw in 1982 and Pulawy in 1993, were examined using monoclonal antibody typing, restriction analysis and sequencing VP-2 protein gene. Five other isolates from Warsaw and Pulawy were tested with the panel of monoclonal antibodies specific to CPV-2, CPV-2a and common for canine parvovirus, feline panleukopenia virus and milk enteritis virus. Results of the studies demonstrated that all isolates tested represented CPV-2a antigenic type. Rapid antigenic strain replacement recorded by Parrish and Senda in the U.S.A and Japan was not confirmed in Poland. (author). 30 refs, 2 tabs.