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Sample records for orally administered drugs

  1. Evaluation of ATC as an Orally Administered Drug in Treatment of Cadmium Toxicity of Rat Organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nabilaldine Fatemi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of N-tetramethylene dithiocarbamate (ATC as a chelating agent on the excretion of cadmium was evaluated in cadmium-poisoned Wistar rats following administration through food and drink. The present research aimed to characterize the potential efficiency of ATC as an orally administered chelator drug after cadmium administration for 60 days. This chelator significantly enhanced the urinary and biliary excretion of cadmium and restored the altered levels of iron. Cadmium and iron concentrations in different tissues were determined by graphite furnace and flame atomic absorption spectrometry (GF AAS and F AAS methods, respectively. The chelation therapy results show that ATC is able to remove cadmium ions from different tissues while iron concentration returned to the normal level and the clinical symptoms were also reduced. In summary, we conclude that ATC is able to mobilize and promote the excretion of cadmium in rat organs and reduce the side effects and general symptoms of toxicity caused by cadmium and might be useful for preliminary testing of the efficacy of chelating agents in human body. However, these results should be confirmed in different experimental models before extrapolation to other systems. This testing procedure of course does not provide all the relevant answers for evaluating the efficiency of chelating agents in cadmium toxicity.

  2. Improving the prediction of the brain disposition for orally administered drugs using BDDCS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broccatelli, Fabio; Larregieu, Caroline A.; Cruciani, Gabriele;

    2012-01-01

    In modeling blood–brain barrier (BBB) passage, in silico models have yielded ~80% prediction accuracy, and are currently used in early drug discovery. Being derived from molecular structural information only, these models do not take into account the biological factors responsible for the in vivo...... were found to markedly distribute throughout the brain; this includes a number of BDDCS class 1 drugs shown to be Pgp substrates. This new perspective provides a further interpretation of how Pgp influences the sedative effects of H1-histamine receptor antagonists.......In modeling blood–brain barrier (BBB) passage, in silico models have yielded ~80% prediction accuracy, and are currently used in early drug discovery. Being derived from molecular structural information only, these models do not take into account the biological factors responsible for the in vivo...... outcome. Passive permeability and P-glycoprotein (Pgp, ABCB1) efflux have been successfully recognized to impact xenobiotic extrusion from the brain, as Pgp is known to play a role in limiting the BBB penetration of oral drugs in humans. However, these two properties alone fail to explain the BBB...

  3. Plasma Drug Concentrations of Orally Administered Rosuvastatin in Hispaniolan Amazon Parrots (Amazona ventralis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufrère, Hugues; Papich, Mark G; Brandão, João; Nevarez, Javier; Tully, Thomas N

    2015-03-01

    Atherosclerotic diseases are common in pet psittacine birds, in particular Amazon parrots. While hypercholesterolemia and dyslipidemia have not definitely been associated with increased susceptibility to atherosclerosis in parrots, these are important and well-known risk factors in humans. Therefore statin drugs such as rosuvastatin constitute the mainstay of human treatment of dyslipidemia and the prevention of atherosclerosis. No pharmacologic studies have been performed in psittacine birds despite the high prevalence of atherosclerosis in captivity. Thirteen Hispaniolan Amazon parrots were used to test a single oral dose of 10 mg/kg of rosuvastatin with blood sampling performed according to a balanced incomplete block design over 36 hours. Because low plasma concentrations were produced in the first study, a subsequent pilot study using a dose of 25 mg/kg in 2 Amazon parrots was performed. Most plasma samples for the 10 mg/kg dose and all samples for the 25 mg/kg dose had rosuvastatin concentration below the limits of quantitation. For the 10 mg/kg study, the median peak plasma concentration and time to peak plasma concentration were 0.032 μg/mL and 2 hours, respectively. Our results indicate that rosuvastatin does not appear suitable in Amazon parrots as compounded and used at the dose in this study. Pharmacodynamic studies investigating lipid-lowering effects of statins rather than pharmacokinetic studies may be more practical and cost effective in future studies to screen for a statin with more ideal properties for potential use in psittacine dyslipidemia and atherosclerotic diseases.

  4. International Guidelines for Bioequivalence of Systemically Available Orally Administered Generic Drug Products: A Survey of Similarities and Differences

    OpenAIRE

    Davit, Barbara; Braddy, April C.; Conner, Dale P.; Yu, Lawrence X.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this article is to discuss the similarities and differences among bioequivalence approaches used by international regulatory authorities when reviewing applications for marketing new generic drug products which are systemically active and intended for oral administration. We focused on the 13 jurisdictions and organizations participating in the International Generic Drug Regulators Pilot. These are Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Chinese Taipei, the European Medicines Assoc...

  5. A dynamic artificial gastrointestinal system for studying the behavior of orally administered drug dosage forms under various physiological conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanquet, S.; Zeijdner, E.; Beyssac, E.; Meunier, J.-P.; Denis, S.; Havenaar, R.; Alric, M.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the potential of a dynamic, multicompartmental in vitro system simulating the human stomach and small intestine (TIM-1) for studying the behavior of oral drug dosage forms under various physiological gastrointestinal conditions. Methods. Two mode

  6. International guidelines for bioequivalence of systemically available orally administered generic drug products: a survey of similarities and differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davit, Barbara; Braddy, April C; Conner, Dale P; Yu, Lawrence X

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this article is to discuss the similarities and differences among bioequivalence approaches used by international regulatory authorities when reviewing applications for marketing new generic drug products which are systemically active and intended for oral administration. We focused on the 13 jurisdictions and organizations participating in the International Generic Drug Regulators Pilot. These are Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Chinese Taipei, the European Medicines Association, Japan, Mexico, Singapore, South Korea, Switzerland, the USA, and the World Health Organization. We began with a comparison of how the various jurisdictions and organizations define a generic product and its corresponding reference product. We then compared the following bioequivalence approaches: recommended bioequivalence study designs, method of pharmacokinetic calculations and bioequivalence acceptance limits, recommendations for modifying bioequivalence study designs and limits for highly variable drugs and narrow therapeutic index drugs, provisions for waiving bioequivalence study requirements (granting biowaivers), and implementation of the Biopharmaceutics Classification System. We observed that, overall, there are more similarities than differences in bioequivalence approaches among the regulatory authorities surveyed.

  7. Time-and pH-dependent colon-specific drug delivery for orally administered diclofenac sodium and 5-aminosalicylic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang Cheng; Feng An; Mei-Juan Zou; Jin Sun; Xiu-Hua Hao; Yun-Xia He

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate Time- and pH-dependent colon-specific drug delivery systems (CDDS) for orally administered diclofenac sodium (DS) and 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA), respectively.METHODS: DS tablets and 5-ASA pellets were coated by ethylcellulose (EC) and methacrylic acid copolymers (Eudragit[] L100 and S100), respectively. The in vitro release behavior of the DS coated tablets and 5-ASA coated pellets were examined, and then in vivo absorption kinetics of DS coated tablets in dogs were further studied.RESULTS: Release profile of time-dependent DS coated tablets was not influenced by pH of the dissolution medium,but the lag time of DS release was primarily controlled by the thickness of the coating layer. The thicker the coating layer, the longer the lag time of DS release is. On the contrary, in view of the pH-dependent 5-ASA coated pellets,5-ASA release was significantly governed by pH. Moreover,the 5-ASA release features from the coated pellets depended upon both the combination ratio of the Eudragit[] L100 and S100 pH-sensitive copolymers in the coating formulation and the thickness of the coating layer. The absorption kinetic studies of the DS coated tablets in dogs demonstrated that in vivo lag time of absorption was in a good agreement with in vitro lag time of release.CONCLUSION: Two types of CDDS, prepared herein by means of the regular coating technique, are able to achieve site-specific drug delivery targeting at colon following oral administration, and provide a promising strategy to control drug release targeting the desired lower gastrointestinal region.

  8. Absorptive constituents and their metabolites in drug-containing urine samples from Wuzhishan miniature pigs orally administered with Buyang Huanwu decoction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dong-Hui; Ren, Xiang-Liang; Xu, Feng; Ma, Xiao-Qing; Liu, Guang-Xue; Li, Cang-Hai; Li, Chen; Cai, Shao-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Buyang Huanwu decoction (BYHWD), a famous traditional Chinese medicine prescription for the treatment of cerebrovascular diseases, is composed of seven commonly used Chinese herbs--Astragali Radix, Angelicae Sinensis Radix, Paeoniae Radix Rubra, Chuanxiong Rhizoma, Carthami Flos, Persicae Semen and Pheretima. To determine the main absorptive constituents and the metabolites of BYHWD in vivo, urine samples from Wuzhishan (WZS) miniature pigs orally administered with BYHWD (13.6 g crude drugs/kg) were collected to investigate the characteristic compounds. By comparing the high-performance liquid chromatography of a drug-containing urine sample with that of a drug-free sample, 17 characteristic compounds were isolated from the methanol extract of a drug-containing urine sample by column chromatography. Their structures, including 11 isoflavanoids, 2 pterocarpanoids and 4 isoflavonoids, were identified by spectroscopic means. Of the 17 compounds, 8 (1-8) were new compounds with the following structures: 3S-7,3',4'-trihydroxyisoflavan-3'-O-β-D-glucuronide (1), 3S-7,3',4'-trihydroxyisoflavan-4'-O-β-D-glucuronide (2), 3S-7,2',4'-trihydroxyisoflavan-2'-O-β-D-glucuronide (3), 3R-7,2'-dihydroxy-3',4'-dimethoxyisoflavan-2'-O-β-D-glucuronide (4), 3R-7,2'-dihydroxy-3',4'-dimethoxyisoflavan-2'-O-β-D-glucuronide-6"-methyl ester (5), 3R-7,2'-dihydroxy-3',4'-dimethoxyisoflavan-7-O-β-D-glucuronide-6"-methyl ester (6), 3R-7,2',3'-trihydroxy-4'-methoxyisoflavan-3'-O-β-D-glucuronide-6"-methyl ester (7), and 3S-7,4',5'-trihydroxy-2',3'-dimethoxyisoflavan-5'-O-β-D-glucuronide (8). Based on the possible relationship and metabolic pathways of the 17 compounds in vivo, 3R-7,2'-dihydroxy-3',4'-dimethoxyisoflavan (isomucronulatol, 11), 6aR,11aR-3-hydroxy-9,10-dimethoxypterocarpan (methylnissolin, astrapterocarpan, 13), 7,3'-dihydroxy-4'-methoxyisoflavone (calycosin, 16) and 7-hydroxy-4'-methoxyisoflavone (formononetin, 17) were thought to be the most important absorptive original

  9. Disposition of flunixin meglumine injectable preparation administered orally to healthy horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini-Masini, A; Poppenga, R H; Sweeney, R W

    2004-06-01

    An injectable preparation of flunixin meglumine was administered orally and intravenously at a dose of 1.1 mg/kg to six healthy adult horses in a cross-over design. Flunixin meglumine was detected in plasma within 15 min of administration and peak plasma concentrations were observed 45-60 min after oral administration. Mean bioavailability of the oral drug was 71.9 +/- 26.0%, with an absorption half-life of 0.76 h. The apparent elimination half-life after oral administration was 2.4 h. The injectable preparation of flunixin meglumine is suitable for oral administration to horses.

  10. Review: Ontogeny of oral drug absorption processes in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G. Mooij (Miriam); B.A.E. Koning, de (Barbara); M.L. Huijsman (Mark); S.N. de Wildt (Saskia)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractA large proportion of prescribed drugs to children are administered orally. Age-related change in factors affecting oral absorption can have consequences for drug dosing. Areas covered: For each process affecting oral drug absorption, a systematic search has been performed using Medline

  11. Review: Ontogeny of oral drug absorption processes in children

    OpenAIRE

    Mooij, Miriam; Koning, De; Huijsman, Mark; de Wildt, Saskia

    2012-01-01

    textabstractA large proportion of prescribed drugs to children are administered orally. Age-related change in factors affecting oral absorption can have consequences for drug dosing. Areas covered: For each process affecting oral drug absorption, a systematic search has been performed using Medline to identify relevant articles (from inception till February 2012) in humans. This review presents the findings on age-related changes of the following processes affecting oral drug absorption: gast...

  12. Explication of Definitional Description and Empirical Use of Fraction of Orally Administered Drugs Absorbed From the Intestine (Fa) and Intestinal Availability (Fg): Effect of P-glycoprotein and CYP3A on Fa and Fg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yuta; Kitamura, Yoshiaki; Maeda, Kazuya; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2016-02-01

    Conventionally, it is believed that the fraction of orally administered drugs absorbed from the intestine (Fa) and intestinal availability (Fg) are independently determined by the apical membrane permeation and intestinal metabolism, respectively. However, the validity of this belief has not been well discussed, and Fa and Fg are often used without careful definition. In this review, Fa and Fg are mathematically described based on their definitions under the linear kinetics of metabolism and transport. Even considering with different models, intestinal metabolic enzymes such as cytochrome P450 3A affected both Fa and Fg, whereas apical efflux transporters including P-glycoprotein had no influence on Fg at least under the linear condition. To determine whether Fa and Fg calculated using different clinical methods are identical, empirical Fa and Fg were mathematically described based on "feces method" and "grapefruit juice method" and compared with their definitions. Fa and Fg obtained by the feces method corresponded with their definitions whereas the grapefruit juice method provided smaller Fa and larger Fg particularly for dual substrates of P-glycoprotein and cytochrome P450 3A with low membrane permeability. Our analyses suggest that the definitions and calculation methods of Fa and Fg should be considered when we intend to separately determine these values.

  13. Urinary metabolites of daidzin orally administered in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, T; Ohsawa, K

    1998-09-01

    In a study on the metabolism of flavonoids, the isoflavone glycoside daidzin was orally administered to rats. Urine samples were collected and treated with beta-glucuronidase and arylsulfatase. Aglycone daidzein (M3) and other three metabolites, 3',4',7-trihydroxyisoflavone (M1), 4',7-dihydroxyisoflavanone (M2) and 4',7-dihydroxyisoflavan (M4) were isolated from the urine following treatment with enzymes. The structures of M1, M2 and M4 were determined on the basis of chemical and spectral data.

  14. Therapeutic effect of orally administered microencapsulated oxaliplatin for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanska, Aleksandra M; Karagiannis, Emmanouil D; Guajardo, Gonzalo; Langer, Robert S; Anderson, Daniel G

    2012-06-01

    Colorectal cancer is a significant source of morbidity and mortality in the United States and other Western countries. Oral delivery of therapeutics remains the most patient accepted form of medication. The development of an oral delivery formulation for local delivery of chemotherapeutics in the gastrointestinal tract can potentially alleviate the adverse side effects including systemic cytotoxicity, as well as focus therapy to the lesions. Here we develop an oral formulation of the chemotherapeutic drug oxaliplatin for the treatment of colorectal cancer. Oxaliplatin was encapsulated in pH sensitive, mucoadhesive chitosan-coated alginate microspheres. The microparticles were formulated to release the chemotherapeutics after passing through the acidic gastric environment thus targeting the intestinal tract. In vivo, these particles substantially reduced the tumor burden in an orthotopic mouse model of colorectal cancer, and reduced mortality.

  15. Biorelevant in vitro performance testing of orally administered dosage forms-workshop report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reppas, Christos; Friedel, Horst-Dieter; Barker, Amy R; Buhse, Lucinda F; Cecil, Todd L; Keitel, Susanne; Kraemer, Johannes; Morris, J Michael; Shah, Vinod P; Stickelmeyer, Mary P; Yomota, Chikako; Brown, Cynthia K

    2014-07-01

    Biorelevant in vitro performance testing of orally administered dosage forms has become an important tool for the assessment of drug product in vivo behavior. An in vitro performance test which mimics the intraluminal performance of an oral dosage form is termed biorelevant. Biorelevant tests have been utilized to decrease the number of in vivo studies required during the drug development process and to mitigate the risk related to in vivo bioequivalence studies. This report reviews the ability of current in vitro performance tests to predict in vivo performance and generate successful in vitro and in vivo correlations for oral dosage forms. It also summarizes efforts to improve the predictability of biorelevant tests. The report is based on the presentations at the 2013 workshop, Biorelevant In Vitro Performance Testing of Orally Administered Dosage Forms, in Washington, DC, sponsored by the FIP Dissolution/Drug Release Focus Group in partnership with the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) and a symposium at the AAPS 2012 Annual meeting on the same topic.

  16. Human metabolism of orally administered radioactive cobalt chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstein, H; Ranebo, Y; Rääf, C L

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the human gastrointestinal uptake (f1) and subsequent whole-body retention of orally administered inorganic radioactive cobalt. Of eight adult volunteers aged between 24 and 68 years, seven were given solutions of (57)Co (T1/2 = 272 d) containing a stable cobalt carrier, and six were given carrier-free (58)Co (T1/2 = 71 d). The administered activities ranged between 25 and 103 kBq. The observed mean f1, based on 6 days accumulated urinary excretion sampling and whole-body counting, was 0.028 ± 0.0048 for carrier-free (58)Co, and 0.016 ± 0.0021 for carrier-associated (57)Co. These values were in reasonable agreement with values reported from previous studies involving a single intake of inorganic cobalt. The time pattern of the total retention (including residual cobalt in the GI tract) included a short-term component with a biological half-time of 0.71 ± 0.03 d (average ± 1 standard error of the mean for the two nuclides), an intermediate component with a mean half-time of 32 ± 8.5 d, and a long-term component (observed in two volunteers) with half-times ranging from 80 to 720 d for the two isotopes. From the present data we conclude that for the short-lived (57)Co and (58)Co, more than 95% of the internal absorbed dose was delivered within 7 days following oral intake, with a high individual variation influenced by the transit time of the unabsorbed cobalt through the gastro-intestinal tract. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Toxicity and biodistribution of orally administered casein nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Ana Gloria; Irache, Juan Manuel; Peñuelas, Iván; González Navarro, Carlos Javier; López de Cerain, Adela

    2017-08-01

    In the last years, casein nanoparticles have been proposed as carriers for the oral delivery of biologically active compounds. However, till now, no information about their possible specific hazards in vivo was available. The aim of this work was to assess the safety of casein nanoparticles when administered orally to animals through a 90 days dose-repeated toxicity study (OECD guideline 408), that was performed in Wistar rats under GLP conditions. After 90 days, no evidences of significant alterations in animals treated daily with 50, 150 or 500 mg/kg bw of nanoparticles were found. This safety agrees well with the fact that nanoparticles were not absorbed and remained within the gut as observed by radiolabelling in the biodistribution study. After 28 days, there was a generalized hyperchloremia in males and females treated with the highest dose of 500 mg/kg bw, that was coupled with hypernatremia in the females. These effects were related to the presence of mannitol which was used as excipient in the formulation of casein nanoparticles. According to these results, the No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) could be established in 150 mg/kg bw/day and the Lowest Observed Effect Level (LOEL) could be established in 500 mg/kg bw/day. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Oral delivery of anticancer drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thanki, Kaushik; Gangwal, Rahul P; Sangamwar, Abhay T

    2013-01-01

    The present report focuses on the various aspects of oral delivery of anticancer drugs. The significance of oral delivery in cancer therapeutics has been highlighted which principally includes improvement in quality of life of patients and reduced health care costs. Subsequently, the challenges...... incurred in the oral delivery of anticancer agents have been especially emphasized. Sincere efforts have been made to compile the various physicochemical properties of anticancer drugs from either literature or predicted in silico via GastroPlus™. The later section of the paper reviews various emerging...... trends to tackle the challenges associated with oral delivery of anticancer drugs. These invariably include efflux transporter based-, functional excipient- and nanocarrier based-approaches. The role of drug nanocrystals and various others such as polymer based- and lipid based...

  19. UNIQUE ORAL DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raphael M. Ottenbrite; ZHAO Ruifeng; Sam Milstein

    1995-01-01

    An oral drug delivery system using proteinoid microspheres is discussed with respect to its unique dependence on pH. It has been found that certain drugs such as insulin and heparin can be encapsulated in proteinoid spheres at stomach pH's (1-3). These spheres also dissemble at intestinal pH's (6-7) releasing the drug for absorption. Using this technique low molecular weight heparin and human growth hormone have been orally delivered successfully to several animal species. Future work has been proposed to study the interaction and binding of the specific drugs with synthesized oligopeptides.

  20. Drug interactions with oral sulphonylurea hypoglycaemic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, J M; Christensen, L K

    1977-01-01

    The effect of the oral sulphonylurea hypoglycaemic drugs may be influenced by a large number of other drugs. Some of these combinations (e.g. phenylbutazone, sulphaphenazole) may result in cases of severe hypoglycaemic collapse. Tolbutamide and chlorpropamide should never be given to a patient without a prior careful check of which medicaments are already being given. Similarly, no drug should be given to a diabetic treated with tolbutamide and chlorpropamide without consideration of the possibility of interaction phenomena.

  1. Pharmacogenetics of oral antidiabetic drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.L. Becker (Matthijs); E. Pearson (Ewan); I. Tkáč (Ivan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractOral antidiabetic drugs (OADs) are used for more than a half-century in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Only in the last five years, intensive research has been conducted in the pharmacogenetics of these drugs based mainly on the retrospective register studies, but only a handful of as

  2. Developmental toxicity of orally administered sildenafil citrate (Viagra) in SWR/J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Tarboush, Faisal Mohamed; Abdel-Samad, Mohamed Fathy; Al-Meteri, Mokhlid Hamed

    2011-04-01

    Normal adult inbred SWR/J mice were used to investigate the teratogenic and other possible toxic effects of various dose levels of sildenafil citrate (Viagra) on fetuses. Multiple dose levels of 6.5, 13.0, 19.5, 26.0, 32.5 or 40.0 mg of sildenafil citrate/kg body weight (which correspond to the multiples of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 or 6 of human 50 mg Viagra, respectively) were orally administered into pregnant mice on days 7-9, 10-12 or 13-15 of gestation. On day 17 of pregnancy, all fetuses were removed and examined for toxic phenomena (embryo-fetal toxicity) and for external, internal and skeletal malformations. A total of 285 pregnant mice were used in the present study. None of the dams treated with sildenafil citrate at any of the oral dose levels used in the present study died during the experimental period and all dams treated with the drug failed to reveal overt signs of maternal toxicity. Moreover, the results of the present study clearly demonstrate that none of the multiple oral dose levels of the drug at any time interval used has induced any external, internal or skeletal malformations in the fetuses obtained from treated females. However, the dose level of 40 mg/kg body weight of sildenafil citrate has a growth suppressing effect on alive fetuses when it was administered at all the time intervals used in the present study. Furthermore, the dose levels 26.0, 32.5 and 40 mg/kg of the drug have embryo-fetal toxicity when the drug is applied on days 13-15 of gestation. The possible mechanisms involved in the embryo-fetal toxicity and fetal growth suppressing effects of sildenafil citrate were discussed. The results of this study have important implications for the widespread use of this drug.

  3. Bioequivalence in dogs of a meloxicam formulation administered as a transmucosal oral mist with an orally administered pioneer suspension product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, P; Cheng, Z; Keefe, T J; Weich, E; Bryd, J; Cedergren, R; Cozzi, E

    2013-02-01

    A mucosal mist formulation of meloxicam, administered as a spray into the mouth (test article), was compared for bioequivalence to a pioneer meloxicam suspension for oral administration (reference article). Pharmacokinetic profiles and average bioequivalence were investigated in 20 dogs. The study design comprised a two-period, two-sequence, two-treatment cross-over design, with maximum concentration (C(max)) and area under plasma concentration-time curve to last sampling time (AUC(last)) used as pivotal bioequivalence variables. Bioequivalence of the products was confirmed, based on relative ratios of geometric mean concentrations (and 90% confidence intervals within the range 0.80-1.25) for C(max) of 101.9 (97.99-106.0) and for AUC(last) of 97.24 (94.44-100.1). The initial absorption of meloxicam was more rapid for the test article, despite virtually identical C(max) values for the two products. Mean elimination half-lives were 29.6 h (test article) and 30.0 h (reference article). The meloxicam plasma concentration-time profiles were considered in relation to published data on the inhibition of the cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and COX-2 isoenzymes by meloxicam.

  4. Effects of orally self-administered bath salt constituent 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannon, Brenda M; Russell, Lauren N; Modi, Meet S; Rice, Kenner C; Fantegrossi, William E

    2017-10-01

    Synthetic cathinones in bath salts products are psychostimulant drugs of abuse, and 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) is a common constituent of these products. Oral MDPV has been show to stimulate locomotor activity but reinforcing, locomotor and appetitive stimulus effects of oral MDPV are unknown. Choice procedures evaluated preference for 0.03, 0.10, 0.30, and 1.00mg/mL MDPV solutions versus 0.10mg/mL quinine solution or water. To verify that oral MDPV produced pharmacological effects, locomotor activity was monitored during and after consumption of water, quinine, or MDPV solutions. Conditioned place preference (CPP) tested the apparent appetitive effects of a preferred concentration of oral MDPV with locomotor stimulant effects (0.30mg/mL), using water as a control, and compared with results from intraperitoneally-administered MDPV. Consumption of MDPV solutions (0.03-1.00mg/mL) was low when the alternative fluid was water, but a history of MDPV consumption increased MDPV choice. When paired with a quinine control solution, MDPV solutions (0.03-0.30mg/mL) were almost exclusively preferred, and treatment with the catecholamine synthesis inhibitor αMPT decreased MDPV choice. Consumption of MDPV concentrations (0.1-1.0mg/mL) stimulated locomotor activity. Chronic (10day) access to 0.30mg/mL MDPV resulted in escalated consumption, but locomotor effects did not systematically change across the access period. Finally, consumption of 0.30mg/mL MDPV elicited CPP with a magnitude similar to the preference observed following intraperitoneal administration of MDPV. Consistent with human abuse patterns, oral MDPV has reinforcing effects in the mouse which are most likely related to its psychostimulant-like pharmacological profile. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Absorption and distribution of orally administered jojoba wax in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaron, A; Samoiloff, V; Benzioni, A

    1982-03-01

    The liquid wax obtained from the seeds of the arid-land shrub jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) is finding increasing use in skin treatment preparations. The fate of this wax upon reaching the digestive tract was studied. 14C-Labeled wax was administered intragastrically to mice, and the distribution of the label in the body was determined as a function of time. Most of the wax was excreted, but a small amount was absorbed, as was indicated by the distribution of label in the internal organs and the epididymal fat. The label was incorporated into the body lipids and was found to diminish with time.

  6. MRI of colorectal cancer liver metastases: comparison of orally administered manganese with intravenously administered gadobenate dimeglumine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brismar, Torkel B.; Kartalis, Nikolaos; Albiin, Nils [Karolinska Institutet, Division of Medical Imaging and Technology, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Stockholm (Sweden); Kylander, Christian [Karolinska Institutet, Division of Surgery, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-03-15

    To compare the sensitivity of MRI to detect colorectal cancer liver metastases (CRLM) after ingestion of manganese-based contrast agent (CMC-001) with that of a comprehensive intravenous gadobenate dimeglumine protocol, and to assess the safety and acceptability of oral manganese. 20 patients suspected of having 1-6 CRLM were included prospectively in this randomised cross-over study. Liver MRI was performed with a one-week interval at 1.5 T and included T1-w VIBE and T2-HASTE, before and after administration of 1.6 g CMC-001 or 0.1 mmol/kg gadobenate dimeglumine. The metastasis-to-liver signal intensity (SI) ratio was calculated. Standard of reference was histopathology after surgery, or combination of other imaging studies and/or follow up. Adverse events (AE) and clinicolaboratory tests were monitored. Of 44 metastases, 41 were detected after CMC-001 (93%) and 42 after gadobenate dimeglumine (95%). Fifteen false-positive lesions were found after CMC-001 and 2 after gadobenate dimeglumine. The metastasis-to-liver SI ratio was significantly higher after CMC-001 than after gadobenate dimeglumine (0.51 and 0.21 respectively, P < 0.0001). More AE occurred after manganese compared to gadobenate dimeglumine. CMC-001 is as sensitive as an extensive intravenous gadobenate dimeglumine protocol in detecting CRLM. It was relatively well tolerated but had higher rates of gastrointestinal AE. (orig.)

  7. Techniques to administer oral, inhalational, and IV sedation in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Krystyna Harbuz

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Sedation in dentistry is a controversial topic given the variety of opinions regarding its safe practice. Aims This article evaluates the various techniques used to administer sedation in dentistry and specific methods practiced to form a recommendation for clinicians. Methods An extensive literature search was performed using PubMed, Medline, Google Scholar, Google, and local library resources. Results Most of the literature revealed a consensus that light sedation on low-risk American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA groups, that is ASA I, and possibly II, is the safest method for sedation in a dental outpatient setting. Conclusion Formal training is essential to achieve the safe practice of sedation in dentistry or medicine. The appropriate setting for sedation should be determined as there is an increased risk outside the hospital setting. Patients should be adequately assessed and medication titrated appropriately, based on individual requirements.

  8. Antinociceptive effects of Cremophor EL orally administered to mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Tabarelli

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Surfactants are frequently used to improve solubilization of lipophilic drugs. Cremophor EL (CrEL is a polyoxyethylated castor oil surfactant used to solubilize water-insoluble drugs such as anesthetic, antineoplastic, immunosuppressive and analgesic drugs, vitamins and new synthetic compounds, including potential analgesics. The antinociceptive effect of CrEL (3.2, 6.4 and 10.6 g/kg, in 10 ml/kg body weight, by gavage on the abdominal writhing response induced by intraperitoneal administration of acetic acid (0.8%, 10 ml/kg body weight and on the tail immersion test was investigated in mice. Control animals received castor oil (10 ml/kg body weight or saline (0.9% NaCl, 10 ml/kg body weight. CrEL reduced nociception in a dose-dependent manner in both tests. At 10.6 g/kg, CrEL caused antinociception similar to that induced by dipyrone (300 mg/kg, by gavage in the abdominal writhing test, and antinociception similar to that induced by morphine (20 mg/kg, by gavage in the tail immersion test. The effect of castor oil was similar to that of saline in both assays. These data indicate that the appropriate controls should be used when evaluating the effects of potential antinociceptive agents dissolved in CrEL.

  9. Tissue distribution and excretion kinetics of orally administered silica nanoparticles in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee JA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Jeong-A Lee,1 Mi-Kyung Kim,1 Hee-Jeong Paek,1 Yu-Ri Kim,2 Meyoung-Kon Kim,2 Jong-Kwon Lee,3 Jayoung Jeong,3 Soo-Jin Choi1 1Department of Food Science and Technology, Seoul Women’s University, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 2Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University Medical School and College, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 3Toxicological Research Division, National Institute of Food and Drug Safety Evaluation, Chungchungbuk–do, Republic of Korea Purpose: The effects of particle size on the tissue distribution and excretion kinetics of silica nanoparticles and their biological fates were investigated following a single oral administration to male and female rats. Methods: Silica nanoparticles of two different sizes (20 nm and 100 nm were orally administered to male and female rats, respectively. Tissue distribution kinetics, excretion profiles, and fates in tissues were analyzed using elemental analysis and transmission electron microscopy. Results: The differently sized silica nanoparticles mainly distributed to kidneys and liver for 3 days post-administration and, to some extent, to lungs and spleen for 2 days post-administration, regardless of particle size or sex. Transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy studies in tissues demonstrated almost intact particles in liver, but partially decomposed particles with an irregular morphology were found in kidneys, especially in rats that had been administered 20 nm nanoparticles. Size-dependent excretion kinetics were apparent and the smaller 20 nm particles were found to be more rapidly eliminated than the larger 100 nm particles. Elimination profiles showed 7%–8% of silica nanoparticles were excreted via urine, but most nanoparticles were excreted via feces, regardless of particle size or sex. Conclusion: The kidneys, liver, lungs, and spleen were found to be the target organs of orally-administered silica nanoparticles in rats, and this organ

  10. Effects of orally administered yeast-derived beta-glucans: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsen, Anne Berit C; Schrezenmeir, Jürgen; Knutsen, Svein H

    2014-01-01

    Yeast-derived beta-glucans (Y-BG) are considered immunomodulatory compounds suggested to enhance the defense against infections and exert anticarcinogenic effects. Specific preparations have received Generally Recognized as Safe status and acceptance as novel food ingredients by European Food Safety Authority. In human trials, orally administered Y-BG significantly reduced the incidence of upper respiratory tract infections in individuals susceptible to upper respiratory tract infections, whereas significant differences were not seen in healthy individuals. Increased salivary IgA in healthy individuals, increased IL-10 levels in obese subjects, beneficial changes in immunological parameters in allergic patients, and activated monocytes in cancer patients have been reported following Y-BG intake. The studies were conducted with different doses (7.5-1500 mg/day), using different preparations that vary in their primary structure, molecular weight, and solubility. In animal models, oral Y-BG have reduced the incidence of bacterial infections and levels of stress-induced cytokines and enhanced antineoplastic effects of cytotoxic agents. Protective effects toward drug intoxication and ischemia/reperfusion injury have also been reported. In conclusion, additional studies following good clinical practice principles are needed in which well-defined Y-BG preparations are used and immune markers and disease endpoints are assessed. Since optimal dosing may depend on preparation characteristics, dose-response curves might be assessed to find the optimal dose for a specific preparation. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Pharmacokinetics of oral gabapentin alone or co-administered with meloxicam in ruminant beef calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coetzee, Johann F; Mosher, Ruby A; Kohake, Laura E; Cull, Charley A; Kelly, Lindsey L; Mueting, Stacy L; KuKanich, Butch

    2011-10-01

    Gabapentin is a γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) analogue indicated for treatment of neuropathic pain. This study determined the pharmacokinetics of oral (PO) gabapentin alone or in combination with meloxicam in ruminant calves. Gabapentin capsules at 10mg/kg or gabapentin powder (from capsules at 15mg/kg) and meloxicam tablets (0.5mg/kg) were administered PO to six beef calves. Plasma drug concentrations were determined over 48h post-administration by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry followed by non-compartmental pharmacokinetic analysis. The mean (± standard deviation, SD) C(max), T(max) and elimination half-life (t(½)λz) for gabapentin (10mg/kg) alone was 2.97 ± 0.40μg/mL, 9.33 ± 2.73h and 11.02 ± 3.68h, respectively. The mean (± SD) C(max), T(max) and t(½)λz for gabapentin (15mg/kg) co-administered with meloxicam was 3.57±1.04μg/mL, 7.33 ± 1.63h and 8.12±2.11h, respectively. The mean (±SD) C(max), T(max) and t(½)λz for meloxicam was 2.11± 0.19μg/mL, 11.67 ± 3.44h and 20.47 ± 9.22h, respectively. Plasma gabapentin concentrations >2μg/mL were maintained for up to 15h and meloxicam concentrations >0.2μg/mL for up to 48h. The pharmacokinetic profile of oral gabapentin and meloxicam supported clinical evaluation of these compounds for management of neuropathic pain in cattle.

  12. Penetration of orally administered prulifloxacin into human prostate tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giberti, Claudio; Gallo, Fabrizio; Rosignoli, Maria T; Ruggieri, Alessandro; Barattè, Simona; Picollo, Rossella; Dionisio, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Prulifloxacin, a fluoroquinolone antibacterial agent, may be a useful addition to the antimicrobial armamentarium against prostatitis once the ability of its active metabolite, ulifloxacin, to penetrate prostatic tissue has been determined. This study set out to evaluate ulifloxacin penetration into the prostate following administration of the oral fluoroquinolone prodrug prulifloxacin in patients undergoing transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). This was a phase I, randomized, open-label, single-centre study involving 20 male Caucasian patients (mean age 63.1 years) requiring TURP for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Sixteen patients were randomized to receive prulifloxacin; the other four patients were not treated (controls) in order to validate the bioanalytical method. Patients in the active treatment groups were randomized to receive one or three once-daily doses of prulifloxacin 600 mg, with the last administration 3 hours prior to surgery. Central/transitional and peripheral zone prostatic tissue samples were obtained from the 6 o'clock and 9 o'clock positions in the prostate, and blood samples were collected concurrently. Ulifloxacin concentrations were determined in the tissue samples and plasma using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Safety was also assessed. Prostatic tissue concentrations of ulifloxacin always exceeded those in plasma. Mean ulifloxacin concentrations measured in samples collected from the 6 o'clock central/transitional zone of the prostate were higher in patients who received prulifloxacin for 3 days than in those who received a single dose. Mean prostatic tissue/plasma ulifloxacin concentration ratios after single and repeated prulifloxacin administration ranged from 3.8 to 7.1 and from 3.9 to 9.5, respectively. The highest mean ratio was found in the 6 o'clock central/transitional zone after repeated dosing. Prostatic levels of ulifloxacin were above the minimum inhibitory concentrations for the most

  13. Effects of orally administered bovine lactoperoxidase on dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kouichirou; Horigome, Ayako; Yamauchi, Koji; Takase, Mitsunori; Yaeshima, Tomoko; Iwatsuki, Keiji

    2008-07-01

    The effect of lactoperoxidase (LPO) on dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis was examined in mice. After 9 d of colitis induction, weight loss, colon shortening, and the histological score were significantly suppressed in mice orally administered LPO (62.5 mg/body/d) as compared to a group administered bovine serum albumin. These results suggest that LPO exhibits anti-inflammatory effects in the gastrointestinal tract.

  14. Pharmacogenetics of Oral Antidiabetic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthijs L. Becker

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs are used for more than a half-century in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Only in the last five years, intensive research has been conducted in the pharmacogenetics of these drugs based mainly on the retrospective register studies, but only a handful of associations detected in these studies were replicated. The gene variants in CYP2C9, ABCC8/KCNJ11, and TCF7L2 were associated with the effect of sulfonylureas. CYP2C9 encodes sulfonylurea metabolizing cytochrome P450 isoenzyme 2C9, ABCC8 and KCNJ11 genes encode proteins constituting ATP-sensitive K+ channel which is a therapeutic target for sulfonylureas, and TCF7L2 is a gene with the strongest association with type 2 diabetes. SLC22A1, SLC47A1, and ATM gene variants were repeatedly associated with the response to metformin. SLC22A1 and SLC47A1 encode metformin transporters OCT1 and MATE1, respectively. The function of a gene variant near ATM gene identified by a genome-wide association study is not elucidated so far. The first variant associated with the response to gliptins is a polymorphism in the proximity of CTRB1/2 gene which encodes chymotrypsinogen. Establishment of diabetes pharmacogenetics consortia and reduction in costs of genomics might lead to some significant clinical breakthroughs in this field in a near future.

  15. Transporter-Mediated Drug–Drug Interactions with Oral Antidiabetic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg König

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Uptake transporters (e.g., members of the SLC superfamily of solute carriers and export proteins (e.g., members of the ABC transporter superfamily are important determinants for the pharmacokinetics of drugs. Alterations of drug transport due to concomitantly administered drugs that interfere with drug transport may alter the kinetics of drug substrates. In vitro and in vivo studies indicate that many drugs used for the treatment of metabolic disorders and cardiovascular diseases (e.g., oral antidiabetic drugs, statins are substrates for uptake transporters and export proteins expressed in the intestine, the liver and the kidney. Since most patients with type 2 diabetes receive more than one drug, transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions are important molecular mechanisms leading to alterations in oral antidiabetic drug pharmacokinetics with the risk of adverse drug reactions. This review focuses on uptake transporters of the SLCO/SLC21 (OATP and SLC22 (OCT/OAT family of solute carriers and export pumps of the ABC (ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily (especially P-glycoprotein as well as the export proteins of the SLC47 (MATE family and their role for transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions with oral antidiabetic drugs.

  16. 30 CFR 250.1508 - What must I do when MMS administers written or oral tests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must I do when MMS administers written or oral tests? 250.1508 Section 250.1508 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Well Control...

  17. Patients with Advanced Ovarian Cancer Administered Oral Etoposide following Taxane as Maintenance Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Nagano

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The concept of maintenance therapy is one of the highly relevant approaches in the management of advanced ovarian cancer. The fundamental goal of maintenance therapy is to improve survival outcomes. We attempted to reinforce maintenance chemotherapy by adding oral etoposide following taxane administration. Cases: We retrospectively evaluated 14 patients with advanced ovarian cancer who had achieved clinically defined complete response to a primary platinum/taxane chemotherapy regimen and who were administered oral etoposide (50 mg/day × 21 days per cycle monthly for 3-5 cycles following paclitaxel or docetaxel administration as maintenance chemotherapy. With regard to oral etoposide toxicity, grade 2 oral mucositis and grade 3 anemia were observed in 1 patient each. Three to five cycles of etoposide were administered to all patients, though daily dosage was reduced to 25 mg in 2 patients due to toxicity. The median progression-free survival was 43.5 months, the median overall survival was 86 months, and 5-year overall survival was 77.1%. Conclusion: The results from this ovarian cancer treatment evaluation suggest that oral etoposide may be administered safely following paclitaxel or docetaxel as maintenance chemotherapy. We expect this regimen to contribute to the improvement in the survival outcomes of patients with advanced ovarian cancer.

  18. Recent advances in orally administered cell-specific nanotherapeutics for inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Xiao-Ying; Merlin, Didier; Xiao, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic relapsing disease in gastrointestinal tract. Conventional medications lack the efficacy to offer complete remission in IBD therapy, and usually associate with serious side effects. Recent studies indicated that nanoparticle-based nanotherapeutics may offer precise and safe alternative to conventional medications via enhanced targeting, sustained drug release, and decreased adverse effects. Here, we reviewed orally cell-specific nanotherapeutics developed in recent years. In addition, the various obstacles for oral drug delivery are also reviewed in this manuscript. Orally administrated cell-specific nanotherapeutics is expected to become a novel therapeutic approach for IBD treatment. PMID:27678353

  19. SELF EMULSIFYING DELIVERY SYSTEM -MOSTLY DISCUSSED BUT STILL REMAINED CHALLENGING ASPECT TO ENHANCE THE ORAL ABSORPTION OF LIPOPHILIC DRUG

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Niranjan Chivate; Kiran Wadkar; Rohit Shah; Anuradha Chivate

    2016-01-01

    ... in the gastro-intestinal lumen or other aqueous media. Therefore in order to be delivered orally and to achieve acceptable bioavailability, lipophilic drugs require a co-administered drug delivery system...

  20. Orally administered DTPA penta-ethyl ester for the decorporation of inhaled (241)Am.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueda, Katsuhiko; Sadgrove, Matthew P; Huckle, James E; Leed, Marina G D; Weber, Waylon M; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; Guilmette, Raymond A; Jay, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) is an effective decorporation agent to facilitate the elimination of radionuclides from the body, but its permeability-limited oral bioavailability limits its utility in mass-casualty emergencies. To overcome this limitation, a prodrug strategy using the penta-ethyl ester form of DTPA is under investigation. Pharmacokinetic and biodistribution studies were conducted in rats by orally administering [(14) C]DTPA penta-ethyl ester, and this prodrug and its hydrolysis products were analyzed as a single entity. Compared with a previous reporting of intravenously administered DTPA, the oral administration of this prodrug resulted in a sustained plasma concentration profile with higher plasma exposure and lower clearance. An assessment of the urine composition revealed that the bioactivation was extensive but incomplete, with no detectable levels of the penta- or tetra-ester forms. Tissue distribution at 12 h was limited, with approximately 73% of the administered dose being associated with the gastrointestinal tract. In the efficacy study, rats were exposed to aerosols of (241) Am nitrate before receiving a single oral treatment of the prodrug. The urinary excretion of (241) Am was found to be 19% higher than with the control. Consistent with prior reports of DTPA, the prodrug was most effective when the treatment delays were minimized. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  1. Orally administered DTPA penta-ethyl ester for the decorporation of inhaled 241Am

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueda, Katsuhiko; Sadgrove, Matthew P.; Huckle, James E.; Leed, Marina G. D.; Weber, Waylon M.; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; Guilmette, Raymond A.; Jay, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) is an effective decorporation agent to facilitate the elimination of radionuclides from the body, but its permeability-limited oral bioavailability limits its utility in mass-casualty emergencies. To overcome this limitation, a prodrug strategy using the penta-ethyl ester form of DTPA is under investigation. Pharmacokinetic and biodistribution studies were conducted in rats by orally administering [14C]DTPA penta-ethyl ester, and this prodrug and its hydrolysis products were analyzed as a single entity. Compared to a previous reporting of intravenously administered DTPA, the oral administration of this prodrug resulted in a sustained plasma concentration profile with higher plasma exposure and lower clearance. An assessment of the urine composition revealed that the bioactivation was extensive but incomplete, with no detectable levels of the penta- or tetra-ester forms. Tissue distribution at 12 h was limited, with approximately 73% of the administered dose being associated with the gastrointestinal tract. In the efficacy study, rats were exposed to aerosols of 241Am nitrate before receiving a single oral treatment of the prodrug. The urinary excretion of 241Am was found to be 19% higher than with the control. Consistent with prior reports of DTPA, the prodrug was most effective when the treatment delays were minimized. PMID:24619514

  2. Orally administered misoprostol for induction of labor with prelabor rupture of membranes at term.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radoff, Kari A

    2014-01-01

    Prelabor rupture of membranes (PROM) occurs in approximately 8% to 10% of women with term pregnancies. The management of PROM continues to be controversial. Approaches include expectant management and immediate induction of labor. The use of orally administered misoprostol for the management of women with PROM may provide significant advantages when they choose immediate induction of labor. This literature review presents current evidence that supports the use of oral misoprostol for women with PROM, including the benefits of a decreased interval time from PROM to vaginal birth, good safety profile, and reductions in the use of oxytocin augmentation and epidural anesthesia. In addition to clinically proven benefits to women of oral misoprostol for PROM, it also has the potential to reduce chorioamnionitis by reducing the number of sterile vaginal examinations performed thereby reducing the risk of ascending bacteria. Women have also reported acceptability and satisfaction when using oral misoprostol for immediate induction of labor. This review of literature discusses what is known about the use of orally administered misoprostol for the management of term PROM and makes recommendations for clinical use.

  3. Bioavailability of ketoprofen from orally administered ketoprofen-dextran ester prodrugs in the pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, C.; Jensen, Bodil Hamborg; Olesen, H. P.

    1991-01-01

    The bioavailability of ketoprofen after oral administration of aqueous solutions of various ketoprofen-dextran ester prodrugs in pigs was assessed. Conjugates derived from dextran fractions in the molecular weight range 10,000-500,000 were employed. Compared to the administration of an oral......-dextran esters. Thus, the present study adds support to a more versatile application of the dextran ester prodrug approach to providing selective colon delivery of drugs possessing a carboxylic acid functional group....

  4. 42 CFR 447.520 - FFP: Conditions relating to physician-administered drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false FFP: Conditions relating to physician-administered drugs. 447.520 Section 447.520 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF... § 447.520 FFP: Conditions relating to physician-administered drugs. (a) No FFP is available...

  5. A New Approach to the Oral Administration of Insulin and Other Peptide Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffran, Murray; Sudesh Kumar, G.; Savariar, Celin; Burnham, Jeffrey C.; Williams, Frederick; Neckers, Douglas C.

    1986-09-01

    The oral administration of peptide drugs is well known to be precluded by their digestion in the stomach and small intestine. As a new approach to oral delivery, peptide drugs were coated with polymers cross-linked with azoaromatic groups to form an impervious film to protect orally administered drugs from digestion in the stomach and small intestine. When the azopolymer-coated drug reached the large intestine, the indigenous microflora reduced the azo bonds, broke the cross-links, and degraded the polymer film, thereby releasing the drug into the lumen of the colon for local action or for absorption. The ability of the azopolymer coating to protect and deliver orally administered peptide drugs was demonstrated in rats with the peptide hormones vasopressin and insulin.

  6. Orally administered melatonin prevents lipopolysaccharide-induced neural tube defects in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Fu

    Full Text Available Lipopolysaccharide (LPS has been associated with adverse pregnant outcomes, including fetal demise, intra-uterine growth restriction (IUGR, neural tube defects (NTDs and preterm delivery in rodent animals. Previous studies demonstrated that melatonin protected against LPS-induced fetal demise, IUGR and preterm delivery. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of melatonin on LPS-induced NTDs. All pregnant mice except controls were intraperitoneally injected with LPS (25 µg/kg daily from gestational day (GD8 to GD12. Some pregnant mice were orally administered with melatonin (MT, 50 mg/kg before each LPS injection. A five-day LPS injection resulted in 27.5% of fetuses with anencephaly, exencephaly or encephalomeningocele. Additional experiment showed that maternal LPS exposure significantly down-regulated placental proton-coupled folate transporter (pcft and disturbed folate transport from maternal circulation through the placentas into the fetus. Interestingly, melatonin significantly attenuated LPS-induced down-regulation of placental pcft. Moreover, melatonin markedly improved the transport of folate from maternal circulation through the placentas into the fetus. Correspondingly, orally administered melatonin reduced the incidence of LPS-induced anencephaly, exencephaly or encephalomeningocele. Taken together, these results suggest that orally administered melatonin prevents LPS-induced NTDs through alleviating LPS-induced disturbance of folate transport from maternal circulation through the placenta into the fetus.

  7. An Oral Contraceptive Drug Interaction Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradstreet, Thomas E.; Panebianco, Deborah L.

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses on a two treatment, two period, two treatment sequence crossover drug interaction study of a new drug and a standard oral contraceptive therapy. Both normal theory and distribution-free statistical analyses are provided along with a notable amount of graphical insight into the dataset. For one of the variables, the decision on…

  8. An Oral Contraceptive Drug Interaction Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradstreet, Thomas E.; Panebianco, Deborah L.

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses on a two treatment, two period, two treatment sequence crossover drug interaction study of a new drug and a standard oral contraceptive therapy. Both normal theory and distribution-free statistical analyses are provided along with a notable amount of graphical insight into the dataset. For one of the variables, the decision on…

  9. Orally administered bisphenol a in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss): estrogenicity, metabolism, and retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerregaard, Poul; Andersen, Sidsel B; Pedersen, Knud L; Pedersen, Søren N; Korsgaard, Bodil

    2007-09-01

    The estrogenic effect of orally administered bisphenol A (BPA) was investigated in a rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) test system. Bisphenol A was administered orally to sexually immature rainbow trout every second day for up to 12 d in doses between 1.8 and 258 mg/kg every second day (/2d). Plasma vitellogenin was measured before and during the exposures, and the concentrations of BPA in plasma, liver, and muscle and the plasma concentrations of BPA glucuronic acid (BPAGA) were determined at the end of the experiments. Increases in average plasma vitellogenin levels were seen at oral exposure to 24 mg BPA/kg/2d; the most sensitive fish responded to 9.3 mg/kg/2d. At day 12, the 10, 50, and 90% effective doses for increase in vitellogenin synthesis were 13, 19, and 25 mg/kg/2d, respectively. Bisphenol A could be detected in liver, muscle, and plasma at the end of the exposure, generally in increasing concentrations with increasing doses; liver concentrations generally were higher than muscle concentrations. Four to five hours after the last feeding of doses between 3.6 and 24 mg BPA/kg, plasma BPA concentrations ranged between 400 and 1,200 nM, whereas BPAGA concentrations were between 2- and 10-fold higher. The difference between BPA and BPAGA concentrations increased with increasing BPA dose. Bisphenol A showed little tendency to bioaccumulate in rainbow trout; less than 1% of the total amount of BPA administered orally at doses between 1.8 and 258 mg/ kg/2d over the 10- or 12-d experimental period was retained in muscle and liver at 5 or 24 h after the end of the experiments.

  10. Effect of Orally Administered Glutathione-Montmorillonite Hybrid Systems on Tissue Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miri Baek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An ubiquitous tripeptide, glutathione (GSH, is assigned a role in detoxification, activation of immune system, intermediary metabolism, transport, and protection of cells against free radicals or reactive oxygen species. However, instability of orally administered GSH in gastrointestinal (GI tract leads to low absorption and low bioavailability in tissues. In this study, we attempted to synthesize GSH-montmorillonite (MMT hybrid systems by intercalating GSH into the interlayers of a cationic clay delivery carrier, MMT, to improve GSH bioavailability at the systemic level. Polymer coating of the hybrid with polyvinylacetal diethylaminoacetate (AEA was further performed to obtain better stability. Synthetic condition of both GSH-MMT and AEA-GSH-MMT hybrids was optimized, and then GSH-delivery efficiency was evaluated in various organs after oral administration in normal as well as GSH-deficient mice. The present GSH-MMT hybrids remarkably enhanced GSH concentration in the plasma, heart, kidney, and liver, especially when AEA-GSH-MMT hybrid was administered under GSH-deficient condition. Moreover, both hybrids did not induce acute oral toxicity up to 2000 mg/kg, suggesting their great potential for pharmaceutical application.

  11. Tolerability assessment of a lectin fraction from Tepary bean seeds (Phaseolus acutifolius orally administered to rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Ferriz-Martínez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Our previous studies have shown that a lectin rich fraction (TBLF extracted from Tepary bean seeds differentially inhibits cancer cells proliferation in vitro. Before testing the in vivo anticancer effect, the acute and subchronic toxicological assays in rats were conducted, where an oral dose of 50 mg/body weight kg was determined as the NOAEL. This study evaluated the resistance to digestion and complete blood count (CBC after 24 h of the orally administered 50 mg/kg TBLF. The digestion resistance test showed lectins activity retention after 72 h and the CBC study showed a high level of eosinophils, suggesting an allergic-like response. Tolerability was assayed after 6 weeks of treatment by dosing with an intragastric cannula every third day per week. It was observed a transient reduction in food intake and body weight in the first weeks, resulting in body weight gain reduction of 10% respect to the control group at the end of the study. Additionally, organs weight, histopathological analysis and blood markers for nutritional status and for liver, pancreas and renal function were not affected. Our results suggest that 50 mg/kg TBLF administered by oral route, exhibit no toxicity in rats and it was well tolerated. Further studies will focus on long-term studies.

  12. Pharmacogenomics of oral antiplatelet drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasmina, Alfi; de Boer, Anthonius; Klungel, Olaf H; Deneer, Vera H M

    2014-03-01

    Pharmacogenomics has been implicated in the response variability of antiplatelet drugs in coronary artery disease (CAD), particularly for aspirin and clopidogrel. A large number of studies and several meta-analyses have been published on this topic, but until recently, there have been no clear conclusions and no definite guidelines on the clinical use of pharmacogenetic testing before prescribing antiplatelet drugs for CAD. In this review, the available evidence is summarized. The most consistent results are on clopidogrel, where CYP2C19 loss-of-function alleles are associated with stent thrombosis events. We recommend to genotype for CYP2C19 loss-of-function alleles in patients with CAD who are to undergo percutaneous coronary intervention and stenting, and to adjust the antiplatelet treatment based on the genotyping results.

  13. Orally administered, insulin-loaded amidated pectin hydrogel beads sustain plasma concentrations of insulin in streptozotocin-diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musabayane, C T; Munjeri, O; Bwititi, P; Osim, E E

    2000-01-01

    We report successful oral administration of insulin entrapped in amidated pectin hydrogel beads in streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic rats, with a concomitant reduction in plasma glucose concentration. The pectin-insulin (PI) beads were prepared by the gelation of humilin-pectin solutions in the presence of calcium. Separate groups of STZ-diabetic rats were orally administered two PI beads (30 micrograms insulin) once or twice daily or three beads (46 micrograms) once daily for 2 weeks. Control non-diabetic and STZ-diabetic rats were orally administered pectin hydrogel drug-free beads. By comparison with control non-diabetic rats, untreated STZ-diabetic rats exhibited significantly low plasma insulin concentration (0.32+/-0. 03 ng/ml, n=6, compared with 2.60+/-0.44 ng/ml in controls, n=6) and increased plasma glucose concentrations (25.84+/-1.44 mmol/l compared with 10.72+/- 0.52 mmol/l in controls). Administration of two PI beads twice daily (60 micrograms active insulin) or three beads (46 micrograms) once a day to STZ-diabetic rats increased plasma insulin concentrations (0.89+/-0.09 ng/ml and 1.85+/- 0.26 ng/ml, respectively), with a concomitant reduction in plasma glucose concentration (15.45+/-1.63 mmol/l and 10.56+/-0.26 mmol/l, respectively). However, a single dose of PI beads (30 micrograms) did not affect plasma insulin concentrations, although plasma glucose concentrations (17.82+/-2.98 mmol/l) were significantly reduced compared with those in untreated STZ-diabetic rats. Pharmacokinetic parameters in STZ-diabetic rats show that the orally administered PI beads (30 micrograms insulin) were more effective in sustaining plasma insulin concentrations than was s.c. insulin (30 micrograms). The data from this study suggest that this insulin-loaded amidated pectin hydrogel bead formulation not only produces sustained release of insulin, but may also reduce plasma glucose concentration in diabetes mellitus.

  14. Application of the yeast-surface-display system for orally administered salmon calcitonin and safety assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ping-Nan; Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Chen, Yun-Song; Zang, Xiao-Nan

    2010-01-01

    High manufacturing costs and oral delivery are the constraints in clinical application of calcitonin. We selected surface-displayed Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a low-cost and safe carrier for oral delivery of salmon calcitonin (sCT). The sCT DNA fragment, optimized according to the codon preference of S. cerevisiae, was synthesized and cloned into the plasmid M-pYD1 to yield recombinant yAGA2-sCT, which was induced to express sCT by galactose for 0, 12, and 24 h. sCT expression was detected on the cell surface by indirect immunofluorescence and peaked at 12 h. About 65% recombinants expressed sCT on flow cytometry. The in vivo and in vitro activity of recombinant sCT was determined by detecting bioactivity of antiosteoclastic absorption on bone wafers and orally administering yAGA2-sCT to Wistar rats, respectively. For safety assessment of yAGA2-sCT, we observed abnormalities, morbidity, and mortality and determined body weight, serum chemistry parameters, hematological parameters, and organ weight. In vitro bioactivity of the recombinant sCT was similar to that of commercial sCT, Miacalcic; oral administration of 5 g/kg yAGA2-sCT induced a long-term hypocalcemic effect in Wistar rats and no adverse effects. This study demonstrates that yAGA2-sCT anchoring sCT protein on a S. cerevisiae surface has potential for low-cost and safe oral delivery of sCT.

  15. Safety evaluation of orally administered afoxolaner and milbemycin oxime in eight-week-old dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drag, M; Saik, J; Harriman, J; Letendre, L; Yoon, S; Larsen, D

    2016-11-27

    The safety profile of afoxolaner (an isoxazoline molecule) when combined with milbemycin oxime (a macrocyclic lactone) was evaluated according to the regulatory requirements when administered six times orally in a soft chewable formulation at a dose of at least 1×, 3×, or 5× the maximum exposure dose in 8-week-old Beagle dogs. Thirty-two healthy puppies (16 males and 16 females) were enrolled and allocated randomly to one of four treatment groups. Three doses were administered at 28-day intervals (Days 0, 28, and 56), followed by three additional doses administered with 14-day intervals (Days 84, 98, and 112). The study ended on Day 126. Treatment groups were as follows: Group 1: untreated, sham-dosed control; Group 2: afoxolaner/milbemycin oxime chews administered at a dose of at least 5 and 1 mg/kg, respectively (1×); Group 3: afoxolaner/milbemycin oxime chews administered at a dose of at least 15 and 3 mg/kg, respectively (3); and Group 4: afoxolaner/milbemycin oxime chews administered at a dose of at least 25 and 5 mg/kg, respectively (5×). All dogs were examined for general health twice a day beginning on Day -14. Physical examinations, and blood collections for clinical pathology analysis and afoxolaner and milbemycin oxime plasma concentrations, were performed throughout the study. No afoxolaner/milbemycin oxime treatment-related changes were observed in growth, physical variables, clinical pathology variables, or tissues examined histologically. No clinically relevant or statistically significant health abnormalities related to the administration of afoxolaner/milbemycin oxime were observed. No signs of macrocyclic lactone sensitivity were observed at any time during the study. Vomiting and diarrhea were observed sporadically across all groups including the controls. Based upon the results of this study, afoxolaner/milbemycin oxime soft chewables were shown to be safe when administered repeatedly at up to 5× the maximum exposure dose in dogs as

  16. Treatment of a Tuberculous Empyema with Simultaneous Oral and Intrapleural Antituberculosis Drugs

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    Richard Long

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A 71-year-old man was diagnosed with an uncomplicated tuberculous (TB empyema. Differential penetration of anti-TB drugs, believed to explain the phenomenon of acquired drug resistance in TB empyema, was confirmed by measurement of serum and pleural fluid anti-TB drug concentrations. Simultaneous oral and intrapleural anti-TB drugs were administered and a cure was achieved. The present case is discussed in the context of the literature on acquired drug resistance in TB empyema. It is argued that high-end doses of oral drugs or combined oral plus intrapleural drugs, along with tube thoracostomy or intermittent thoracentesis, will cure uncomplicated TB empyema without threatening to induce drug resistance or having to resort to surgery.

  17. The rule of five for non-oral routes of drug delivery: ophthalmic, inhalation and transdermal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Young Bin; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2011-05-01

    The Rule of Five predicts suitability of drug candidates, but was developed primarily using orally administered drugs. Here, we test whether the Rule of Five predicts drugs for delivery via non-oral routes, specifically ophthalmic, inhalation and transdermal. We assessed 111 drugs approved by FDA for those routes of administration and found that >98% of current non-oral drugs have physicochemical properties within the limits of the Rule of Five. However, given the inherent bias in the dataset, this analysis was not able to assess whether drugs with properties outside those limits are poor candidates. Indeed, further analysis indicates that drugs well outside the Rule of Five limits, including hydrophilic macromolecules, can be delivered by inhalation. In contrast, drugs currently administered across skin fall within more stringent limits than predicted by the Rule of Five, but new transdermal delivery technologies may make these constraints obsolete by dramatically increasing skin permeability. The Rule of Five does appear to apply well to ophthalmic delivery. We conclude that although current non-oral drugs mostly have physicochemical properties within the Rule of Five thresholds, the Rule of Five should not be used to predict non-oral drug candidates, especially for inhalation and transdermal routes.

  18. PHARMACOKINETICS OF ORALLY ADMINISTERED VORICONAZOLE IN AFRICAN PENGUINS (SPHENISCUS DEMERSUS) AFTER SINGLE AND MULTIPLE DOSES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, Michael W; Wiederhold, Nathan P; Hope, William W; Stott, Katharine E

    2017-06-01

    Aspergillosis is a common respiratory fungal disease in African penguins ( Spheniscus demersus ) under managed care, and treatment failures with itraconazole due to drug resistance are increasingly common, leading to recent use of voriconazole. Empirical dosing with voriconazole based on other avian studies has resulted in adverse clinical drug effects in penguins. The objective of this study was to determine oral voriconazole pharmacokinetics (PK) in African penguins (n = 18). Single and once daily multiple oral doses of 5 mg/kg voriconazole were evaluated with a 4-mo washout period between trials. Plasma voriconazole concentrations were determined via high-performance liquid chromatography. Data was modeled using 3-compartamental population methodologies that supported first-order elimination. Observed mean peak concentration (1.89 μg/ml) after single dosing PK analysis was determined within the first hour following voriconazole administration. In the multiple-dose trial average plasma voriconazole concentrations were significantly higher on days 4 and 7 as compared with day 2. The mean estimates for volume of distribution (V/F) and clearance (Cl/F) for the multiple-dose study were 3.34 L and 0.18 L/hr, respectively. Monte Carlo simulations determined the median area under the curve (AUC0-24) at 84 hr was 37.7 μg·h/ml. As this assessment was comparable with the average AUC in humans receiving the recommended human oral dosage 200 mg b.i.d., it suggests that 5 mg/kg p.o. s.i.d. could be a safe and effective regimen in African penguins for treatment of aspergillosis. However, due to potential drug accumulation and subsequent toxicity, therapeutic drug monitoring with dosage adjustments is recommended to individualize dosing.

  19. Safety evaluation of orally administered afoxolaner in 8-week-old dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drag, Marlene; Saik, Judith; Harriman, Jay; Larsen, Diane

    2014-04-02

    The safety profile of afoxolaner, a new isoxazoline molecule, was evaluated following the regulatory requirements when administered six times orally in a soft chewable formulation at a dose of at least 1×, 3× or 5× the maximum exposure dose (6.3mg/kg) in 8-week-old Beagle dogs. Thirty-two healthy puppies (16 males and 16 females) were enrolled and allocated randomly to one of four treatment groups. Treatments were administered at three, one-month dose intervals (Days 0, 28 and 56) followed by three, 2-week dose intervals (Days 84, 98 and 112). The study ended at Day 126. The groups were: Group 1: non-treated control; Group 2: afoxolaner chews administered at a dosage of at least 6.3mg/kg (1×); Group 3: afoxolaner chews administered at a dosage of at least 18.9 mg/kg (3×); and Group 4: afoxolaner chews administered at a dosage of at least 31.5mg/kg (5×). All dogs were examined for general health twice a day beginning on at least Day-14. Physical examinations, and blood collections for clinical pathology analysis and afoxolaner plasma concentrations, were performed throughout the study. On Day 126, 2 weeks following the last treatment, all dogs were humanely euthanized prior to the conduction of a full necropsy with tissue collection. No afoxolaner-related changes were observed in growth, physical variables, clinical pathology variables, or tissues examined histologically. No clinically or statistically significant health abnormalities related to the administration of afoxolaner were observed. Vomiting and diarrhea were observed sporadically across all groups including the controls. The kinetics of afoxolaner plasma concentrations was linear following 6 doses of 6.3, 18.9 and 31.5mg/kg and dose proportionality was demonstrated. There were no statistical differences (pafoxolaner was shown to be safe when administered repeatedly in a soft chewable formulation at up to 5× the maximum exposure dose in dogs as young as 8 weeks of age.

  20. Effect of papaverine and atropine on pharmacokinetics of paracetamol administered orally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcicki, J; Kaźmierczyk, J; Gawrońska-Szklarz, B; Samochowiec, L

    1979-01-01

    The effect of intramuscular injection of atropine and papaverine on the pharmacokinetics of a single oral dose of paracetamol in healthy men was investigated. The open two-compartment model was applied and the calculations were performed using a program for the Hewlett-Packard 9830 B system. An increase of the extent of bioavailability of paracetamol was observed after the atropine administration, however the absorption of the drug was delayed. The administration of papaverine did not change the AUC and Cmax, but tmax was significantly longer.

  1. Curative and preventive efficacy of orally administered afoxolaner against Ctenocephalides canis infestation in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Pascal; Gale, Boyd; Chester, Theodore S; Larsen, Diane L

    2014-04-02

    The efficacy of orally administered afoxolaner against adult dog fleas, Ctenocephalides canis, was evaluated in a controlled, blinded study. A total of 32 dogs were infested with 100 adult unfed fleas approximately 24h prior to treatment and then at weekly intervals for 5 weeks after treatment. Live fleas were counted upon removal at 12h (for 16 dogs) and 24h (for the remaining 16 dogs) after treatment (for counts performed the first week) or after infestation (for counts performed on subsequent weeks). In addition, flea eggs were collected from each pen and counted for the dogs with flea removal at 24h. Dosing of individual dogs was achieved using a combination of the chewable tablets to be as close as possible to the minimum effective dose of 2.5mg/kg. The percent efficacy of the afoxolaner treatment was ≥ 99.0% for all 24-h flea counts. For flea counts performed 12h after treatment or infestations, the percent efficacy was ≥ 94.1% up to Day 21. After Day 1, no flea eggs were recovered from the afoxolaner treated group, providing 100% reduction in numbers of flea eggs recovered versus untreated control group. This study confirmed that a single oral treatment with afoxolaner provided excellent efficacy against infestations by C. canis within 12-24h after treatment, prevented re-infestations, and completely prevented egg production from new flea infestations for up to 5 weeks.

  2. Recovery of Cognitive Dysfunction via Orally Administered Redox-Polymer Nanotherapeutics in SAMP8 Mice.

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    Pennapa Chonpathompikunlert

    Full Text Available Excessively generated reactive oxygen species are associated with age-related neurodegenerative diseases. We investigated whether scavenging of reactive oxygen species in the brain by orally administered redox nanoparticles, prepared by self-assembly of redox polymers possessing antioxidant nitroxide radicals, facilitates the recovery of cognition in 17-week-old senescence-accelerated prone (SAMP8 mice. The redox polymer was delivered to the brain after oral administration of redox nanoparticles via a disintegration of the nanoparticles in the stomach and absorption of the redox polymer at small intestine to the blood. After treatment for one month, levels of oxidative stress in the brain of SAMP8 mice were remarkably reduced by treatment with redox nanoparticles, compared to that observed with low-molecular-weight nitroxide radicals, resulting in the amelioration of cognitive impairment with increased numbers of surviving neurons. Additionally, treatment by redox nanoparticles did not show any detectable toxicity. These findings indicate the potential of redox polymer nanotherapeutics for treatment of the neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Urinary excretion of orally administered oxalic acid in saccharin and o-phenylphenol-fed NMRI mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salminen, E; Salminen, S

    1986-01-01

    Both saccharin and o-phenylphenol have been suggested to be carcinogenic to the urinary bladder in experimental animals, but the mechanism has remained unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of dietary saccharin and o-phenylphenol on the urinary excretion of dietary oxalic acid. Male NMRI mice were gradually adapted to either 3% o-phenylphenol or 5% saccharin in their diet. Having being adapted to these diets for 1 week or after consuming them for 3 months, the animals were fasted for 6 h and given a 2.5-microCi oral dose of U-14C-oxalic acid. Dosed animals were kept in metabolism cages for 48 h to monitor urinary and fecal excretion of the label. Adaptation to dietary o-phenylphenol appeared to increase the urinary excretion of orally administered U-14C-oxalic acid when food and water were available during urinary and fecal collections. Adaptation to dietary saccharin had little effect on urinary oxalate levels when compared to control animals. These results indicate that changes in urinary oxalate levels should be more carefully studied in connection with potential urinary bladder carcinogens to avoid the possibility of bladder irritation by increased urinary oxalate excretion.

  4. 21 CFR 310.529 - Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for oral use as insect...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... offered over-the-counter (OTC) for oral use as insect repellents. 310.529 Section 310.529 Food and Drugs... ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for oral use as insect repellents. (a) Thiamine hydrochloride... insect repellent (an orally administered drug product intended to keep insects away). There is a lack...

  5. Effect of Mesalamine and Prednisolone on TNBS Experimental Colitis, following Various Doses of Orally Administered Iron

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    John K. Triantafillidis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Experimental data suggest that oral iron (I. supplementation can worsen colitis in animals. Aim. To investigate the influence of various concentrations of orally administered I. in normal gut mucosa and mucosa of animals with TNBS colitis, as well as the influence of Mesalamine (M. and Prednisolone (P. on the severity of TNBS colitis following orally administered I. Methods and Materials. 156 Wistar rats were allocated into 10 groups. Colitis was induced by TNBS. On the 8th day, all animals were euthanatized. Activity of colitis and extent of tissue damage were assessed histologically. The levels of tissue tumor necrosis factor-α (t-TNF-α and tissue malondialdehyde (t-MDA were estimated in all animal groups. Results. Moderate and high I. supplementation induced inflammation in the healthy colon and increased the activity of the experimentally induced TNBS colitis. Administration of M. on TNBS colitis following moderate iron supplementation (0.3 g/Kg diet resulted in a significant improvement in the overall histological score as well as in two individual histological parameters. M. administration, however, did not significantly reduce the t-TNF-α levels (17.67±4.92 versus 14.58±5.71, P=0.102, although it significantly reduced the t-MDA levels (5.79±1.55 versus 3.67±1.39, P=0.000. Administration of M. on TNBS colitis following high iron supplementation (3.0 g/Kg diet did not improve the overall histological score and the individual histological parameters, neither reduced the levels of t-TNF-α (16.57 ± 5.61 versus 14.65±3.88, P=0.296. However, M. significantly reduced the t-MDA levels (5.99±1.37 versus 4.04±1.41, P=0.000. Administration of P. on TNBS colitis after moderate iron supplementation resulted in a significant improvement in the overall histological score as well as in three individual histological parameters. P. also resulted in a significant reduction in the t-TNF-α levels (17.67±4.92 versus 12.64±3

  6. Prevalence of potential drug-drug interactions in cancer patients treated with oral anticancer drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.W.F. van Leeuwen (Roelof); D.H.S. Brundel (D. H S); C. Neef (Cees); T. van Gelder (Teun); A.H.J. Mathijssen (Ron); D.M. Burger (David); F.G.A. Jansman (Frank)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Potential drug-drug interactions (PDDIs) in patients with cancer are common, but have not previously been quantified for oral anticancer treatment. We assessed the prevalence and seriousness of potential PDDIs among ambulatory cancer patients on oral anticancer treatment.

  7. Prevalence of potential drug-drug interactions in cancer patients treated with oral anticancer drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, R. W. F.; Brundel, D. H. S.; Neef, C.; van Gelder, T.; Mathijssen, R. H. J.; Burger, D. M.; Jansman, F. G. A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Potential drug-drug interactions (PDDIs) in patients with cancer are common, but have not previously been quantified for oral anticancer treatment. We assessed the prevalence and seriousness of potential PDDIs among ambulatory cancer patients on oral anticancer treatment. Methods: A

  8. Oral anticancer drugs in the elderly: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonardi, Sara; Bortolami, Alberto; Stefani, Micaela; Monfardini, Silvio

    2007-01-01

    The increasing number of elderly people in the world population has led to a parallel increase in the number of older cancer patients, with over 45% of all cancers in Europe occurring in patients >70 years of age. The increasing tendency to use oral chemotherapy is thus of interest in the elderly, given that both elderly patients and their physicians prefer to use less complex and toxic regimens when such treatments have equivalent efficacy to more complex regimens. However, data from studies designed to evaluate these therapies in the elderly are currently limited. Factors that must be considered before prescribing oral agents to this subset of patients include age-related physiological changes affecting clinical pharmacology, adherence, the patient's capability to self-administer medications, and safety issues concerning the older patient and his or her caregivers. The idea that elderly patients may benefit from the introduction of oral chemotherapy is very fashionable, but to date there is no proof that this approach is as effective as intravenous therapy in this age group, particularly since randomised trials are lacking. This review discusses these issues and reviews current information about the use of specific oral chemotherapeutic drugs for major neoplastic diseases in the elderly.

  9. Anti-inflammatory activity of orpanoxin administered orally and topically to rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, R R; Bonk, K R; Decker, G E; Miller, K E

    1985-07-01

    Orpanoxin, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) lacking gastric ulcerogenic effects in the therapeutic dose range in rats, was compared with six reference NSAIDs for oral activity in the rat paw carrageenin-induced edema assay. Tested NSAIDs were ranked on the basis of oral mg/kg ED50 values: piroxicam, 0.55; orpanoxin, 35.6; diflunisal, 59.6; benoxaprofen, greater than 300; tolmetin sodium, greater than 300; and sulindac, greater than 300. Zomepirac sodium was inactive. Only the three most potent compounds produced greater than 60% inhibition of edema. Inhibition was generally greater at 4 h than at 6 h post carrageenin for all compounds. Oral activity of orpanoxin was also demonstrated in the guinea-pig u.v.-induced erythema model (ED50 = 24.2 mg/kg p.o. when given 1 h before irradiation) and in the mouse ear croton oil induced edema test (ED50 value = 131 mg/kg p.o.). Topical activity of orpanoxin was assessed in both the guinea-pig and mouse models. In the guinea-pig u.v.-induced erythema model, application (1 h after u.v.) of 1, 5, and 10% (w/v) orpanoxin creams (containing 10% urea) significantly inhibited erythema at 2, 3, and 4 h post-irradiation. Orpanoxin, mefenamic acid, and indomethacin as 1% creams inhibited total erythema scores 70, 92 and 74%, respectively. Evidence for topical activity in the mouse ear assay was also obtained for orpanoxin in diethyl ether or 10% urea cream, but not in dimethylsulfoxide. It was concluded that orpanoxin has anti-inflammatory activity comparable to reference NSAIDs in the rat paw edema test, is active orally in rat, mouse, and guinea-pig models, and shows topical activity in the guinea-pig and the mouse.

  10. Oral targeted therapies: managing drug interactions, enhancing adherence and optimizing medication safety in lymphoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liewer, Susanne; Huddleston, Ashley N

    2015-04-01

    The advent of newer, targeted oral chemotherapy medications such as small molecule kinase inhibitors, ibrutinib and idelalisib, has created additional options for the treatment of lymphoma. The targeted nature of these agents offers many patient-identified advantages over older, intravenously administered chemotherapy regimens such as ease of self-administration and an increased sense of independence. However, newer oral agents also present unique challenges not previously experienced with older therapies that may affect safety, efficacy and patient adherence. In this article, we review oral agents for the treatment of lymphoma, how to evaluate and manage drug-drug and drug-food interactions with concomitant oral medications, and issues with patient adherence as well as methods to determine adherence for oral chemotherapy.

  11. The pharmacokinetics of a single oral or rectal dose of concurrently administered isoniazid, rifampin, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol in Asian elephants (Elephas maximus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    P Brock, A; Isaza, R; Egelund, E F; Hunter, R P; Peloquin, C A

    2014-10-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is a disease of concern in captive Asian elephants (Elephas maximus). Treatment for tuberculosis in elephants utilizes multidrug protocols combining isoniazid, rifampin, pyrazinamide, and/or ethambutol. In this study, a single, coformulated dose of isoniazid 5 mg/kg, rifampin 10 mg/kg, pyrazinamide 30 mg/kg, and ethambutol 30 mg/kg was administered orally to six Asian elephants, and rectally to five elephants using a cross-over design. Blood samples were collected serially over 24 h. Pyrazinamide and ethambutol concentrations were determined using validated gas chromatography assays. Isoniazid and rifampin concentrations were determined using validated high-performance liquid chromatography assays. Rectal isoniazid produced an earlier Tmax compared with oral administration. Oral isoniazid resulted in a comparatively lower Cmax , but higher AUC values compared with rectal isoniazid. Oral rifampin and oral ethambutol were well absorbed while rectal rifampin was not. Oral pyrazinamide produced comparatively higher Cmax and AUC values compared with rectal pyrazinamide. Results of this study indicate that currently recommended therapeutic monitoring sample collection times for rectal isoniazid and oral rifampin do not provide an accurate assessment of exposure for these drugs. This study demonstrates notable individual variability, indicating that dosing of these medications requires individual monitoring and provides additional information to guide the clinician when treating elephants.

  12. The fate of calcium carbonate nanoparticles administered by oral route: absorption and their interaction with biological matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee JA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Jeong-A Lee,1,* Mi-Kyung Kim,1,* Hyoung-Mi Kim,2,* Jong Kwon Lee,3 Jayoung Jeong,4 Young-Rok Kim,5 Jae-Min Oh,2 Soo-Jin Choi1 1Department of Food Science and Technology, Seoul Women’s University, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 2Department of Chemistry and Medical Chemistry, College of Science and Technology, Yonsei University, Wonju, Republic of Korea; 3Hazard Substances Analysis Division, Gwangju Regional Food and Drug Administration, Ministry of Food and Drug Safety, Gwangju, Republic of Korea; 4Toxicological Research Division, National Institute of Food and Drug Safety Evaluation, Ministry of Food and Drug Safety, Chungcheongbuk-do, Republic of Korea; 5Department of Food Science and Biotechnology, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Republic of Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Orally administered particles rapidly interact with biological fluids containing proteins, enzymes, electrolytes, and other biomolecules to eventually form particles covered by a corona, and this corona potentially affects particle uptake, fate, absorption, distribution, and elimination in vivo. This study explored relationships between the biological interactions of calcium carbonate particles and their biokinetics.Methods: We examined the effects of food grade calcium carbonates of different particle size (nano [N-Cal] and bulk [B-Cal]: specific surface areas of 15.8 and 0.83 m2/g, respectively on biological interactions in in vitro simulated physiological fluids, ex vivo biofluids, and in vivo in gastrointestinal fluid. Moreover, absorption and tissue distribution of calcium carbonates were evaluated following a single dose oral administration to rats.Results: N-Cal interacted more with biomatrices than bulk materials in vitro and ex vivo, as evidenced by high fluorescence quenching ratios, but it did not interact more actively with biomatrices in vivo. Analysis of coronas revealed that immunoglobulin, apolipoprotein, thrombin, and fibrinogen

  13. Preclinical and clinical pharmacology of oral anticancer drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostendorp, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays, more than 25% of all anticancer drugs are developed as oral formulations. Oral administration of drugs has several advantages over intravenous (i.v.) administration. It will on average be more convenient for patients, because they can take oral medication themselves, there is no need for

  14. Preclinical and clinical pharmacology of oral anticancer drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostendorp, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays, more than 25% of all anticancer drugs are developed as oral formulations. Oral administration of drugs has several advantages over intravenous (i.v.) administration. It will on average be more convenient for patients, because they can take oral medication themselves, there is no need for f

  15. Barriers to administering non-oral formulations in a paediatric population: A semi-structured interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venables, Rebecca; Batchelor, Hannah; Stirling, Heather; Marriott, John

    2016-01-30

    There is a paucity of research exploring barriers to non-oral medicines administration in paediatric patients; however, these undoubtedly influence medicines adherence. Studies conducted with healthcare professionals have identified various issues with the administration and acceptance of non-oral medicines and devices (Venables et al., 2012; Walsh et al., 2015). EMA (2014) guidelines specify that formulation teams should demonstrate 'acceptability' of paediatric formulations when developing pharmaceutical formulations. Semi-structured interviews exploring barriers to administering non-oral medicines were conducted with young persons and the parents/legal guardians of children (0-17 years) with chronic conditions at the University Hospital of Coventry and Warwickshire, UK. 90 children prescribed a total of 148 non-oral medicines were recruited to the study; 88 barriers to administering non-oral medicines were reported. The most commonly reported barriers were: poor acceptance of face mask/difficulties with spacer for inhaled formulations (38% of reports); disliking parenteral/preferring alternative formulations (38% of reports); greasy texture of topical preparations; difficulty with administering an ocular ointment and the large dose volume of a nasal preparation. Formulation teams should consider the use of child-friendly, age-appropriate designs to improve usability and acceptance, thus medicines adherence. These findings should be used to inform future development of non-oral formulations and devices, suitable in terms of safety, efficacy and acceptability to paediatric patients.

  16. Gene delivery to dendritic cells by orally administered recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiflmariam, Meron G; Yang, Hanjiang; Zhang, Zhiying

    2013-02-27

    DNA vaccination has caught the attention of many for triggering humoral as well as cellular immune responses. And delivering DNA into the antigen presenting cells (APCs) in order to induce efficient immunoresponse has become the backbone of this field. It has been confirmed that Saccharomyces cerevisiae, though non-pathogenic, is being engulfed by the dendritic cells and macrophages and delivers not only proteins, but also DNA materials (already confirmed in vitro). In this research, S. cerevisiae is used to deliver green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene controlled under cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter in living organism (mice). The recombinant yeast, transfected with the plasmid containing the GFP gene, was heat killed and orally administered to mice. After 60 h of yeast administration, mice were sacrificed and intestine was separated, washed and frozen in liquid nitrogen. Tissues were cut at the size of 10 μm using Cryostat machine, and GFP expression was successfully detected under a fluorescence microscope. After 45 days Western blot was able to detect GFP antibody in the blood of mice. These results imply that S. cerevisiae, being non-pathogenic, cheap, and easy to culture could be a good candidate to deliver DNA materials to the immune cells for vaccination.

  17. Identification and quantification of metabolites of orally administered naringenin chalcone in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Mineka; Sano, Atsushi; Kamei, Jun-Ichi; Obata, Akio

    2009-07-22

    Naringenin chalcone is the main active component of tomato skin extract, which has an antiallergic activity. In this study, naringenin chalcone was orally administered to rats, and the chemical structures and levels of the major metabolites in the plasma and urine of rats were determined. HPLC analysis indicated the presence of three major metabolites in the urine. LC-MS and NMR analyses tentatively identified these as naringenin chalcone-2'-O-beta-D-glucuronide, naringenin-7-O-beta-D-glucuronide, and naringenin-4'-O-beta-D-glucuronide. Naringenin chalcone-2'-O-beta-D-glucuronide was the only metabolite detected in the plasma, and its peak plasma level was observed 1 h after naringenin chalcone administration. Naringenin chalcone-2'-O-beta-D-glucuronide also inhibited histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells stimulated with compound 48/80. This activity might contribute to the antiallergic activity of naringenin chalcone in vivo. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this study is the first to report determination of naringenin chalcone metabolites in rat plasma and urine.

  18. Lichenoid Drug Eruptionfollowing Intravenous Applicationof Orally Formulated Diamorphine, a Semisynthetic Heroin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Kolm

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lichen planus is a common skin disorder of unknown etiology. Most cases are idiopathic, but substances such as gold, antimalarials, penicillamine, thiazide diuretics, β-blockers, arsenic and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have been implicated as trigger factors. Case Presentation: We report the case of a lichenoid eruption in a male drug addict who administered oral heroin (diamorphine intravenously. Diamorphine was stopped immediately. Following topical steroids, phototherapy and oral acitretin, the lesions gradually disappeared. A lymphocyte transformation test was negative for pure morphine and codeine. Discussion: A coincidental association between the intravenous application of orally formulated semisynthetic heroin and the lichenoid eruption cannot be completely ruled out. However, the diagnosis of a lichenoid drug eruption is favoured over idiopathic lichen planus because of the clear chronological correlation between drug use and appearance as well as drug withdrawal and disappearance of the skin lesions, and because of a flare-up following repeated intravenous application of diamorphine.

  19. Hypoglycemic activity and oral bioavailability of insulin-loaded liposomes containing bile salts in rats: the effect of cholate type, particle size and administered dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Mengmeng; Lu, Yi; Hovgaard, Lars; Guan, Peipei; Tan, Yanan; Lian, Ruyue; Qi, Jianping; Wu, Wei

    2012-06-01

    Oral delivery of protein or polypeptide drugs remains a challenge due to gastric and enzymatic degradation as well as poor permeation across the intestinal epithelia. In this study, liposomes containing bile salts were developed as a new oral insulin delivery system. The primary goal was to investigate the effect of cholate type, particle size and dosage of the liposomes on the hypoglycemic activity and oral bioavailability. Liposomes containing sodium glycocholate (SGC), sodium taurocholate (STC) or sodium deoxycholate (SDC) were prepared by a reversed-phase evaporation method. After oral administration, all liposomes elicited a certain degree of hypoglycemic effect in parallel with an increase in blood insulin level. The highest oral bioavailability of approximately 8.5% and 11.0% could be observed with subcutaneous insulin as reference for SGC-liposomes in non-diabetic and diabetic rats, respectively. Insulin-loaded liposomes showed slower and sustained action over a period of over 20 h with peak time around 8-12h. SGC-liposomes showed higher oral bioavailability than liposomes containing STC or SDC and conventional liposomes. The hypoglycemic effect was size-dependent with the highest at 150 nm or 400 nm and was proportionally correlated to the administered dose. The results supported the hypothesis of insulin absorption as intact liposomes.

  20. Experimental Adjustment on Drug Interactions through Intestinal CYP3A Activity in Rat: Impacts of Kampo Medicines Repeat Administered

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natsumi Kinoshita

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To provide the information that is necessary for making the proper use of kampo medicines, we have proposed the adequate methodology focused on the following issues: (i kampo medicines emphasize the effects produced by the combination of herbal drugs rather than the individual effect of any single herb and (ii Intestinal CYP3A has become a key factor for the bioavailability of orally administrated drugs. In the present study, we investigated both the in vivo and in vitro effects of Saireito and Hochuekkito (kampo formulas on CYP3A activities. From our study, oral pre-treatment with Saireito or Hochuekkito did not affect the pharmacokinetics of nifedipine after intravenous administration to rats. When nifedipine was administered to rat intrajejunum, a significant decrease of AUC was showed by pre-treatment with both kampo formulas. Saireito pre-treatment led to 80% decrease in max of nifedipine. Saireito caused significant increases in both protein expression and metabolic activity of CYP3A in intestinal microsome, whereas it had no effect on CYP3A in hepatic microsome. Our result also showed that this affect of Saireito can be gone by wash-out with 1 week. These findings demonstrated that Saireito may induce CYP3A activity of intestine but not of liver in rats. When resources for research are limited, well-designed scientific studies except clinical trials also have many advantages.

  1. Orally administered extract from Prunella vulgaris attenuates spontaneous colitis in mdr1a-/-mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kelley; MK; Haarberg; Meghan; J; Wymore; Brand; Anne-Marie; C; Overstreet; Catherine; C; Hauck; Patricia; A; Murphy; Jesse; M; Hostetter; Amanda; E; Ramer-Tait; Michael; J; Wannemuehler

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the ability of a Prunella vulgaris(P. vulgaris) ethanolic extract to attenuate spontaneous typhlocolitis in mdr1a-/- mice. METHODS: Vehicle(5% ethanol) or P. vulgaris ethanolic extract(2.4 mg/d) were administered daily by oral gavage to mdr1a-/- or wild type FVBWT mice from 6 wk of age up to 20 wk of age. Clinical signs of disease were noted by monitoring weight loss. Mice experiencingweight loss in excess of 15% were removed from the study. At the time mice were removed from the study, blood and colon tissue were collected for analyses that included histological evaluation of lesions, inflammatory cytokine levels, and myeloperoxidase activity. RESULTS: Administration of P. vulgaris extracts to mdr1a-/- mice delayed onset of colitis and reduced severity of mucosal inflammation when compared to vehicle-treated mdr1a-/- mice. Oral administration of the P. vulgaris extract resulted in reduced(P < 0.05) serum levels of IL-10(4.6 ± 2 vs 19.4 ± 4), CXCL9(1319.0 ± 277 vs 3901.0 ± 858), and TNFα(9.9 ± 3 vs 14.8 ± 1) as well as reduced gene expression by more than two-fold for Ccl2, Ccl20, Cxcl1, Cxcl9, IL-1 α, Mmp10, VCAM-1, ICAM, IL-2, and TNFα in the colonic mucosa of mdr1a-/- mice compared to vehicle-treated mdr1a-/-mice. Histologically, several microscopic parameters were reduced(P < 0.05) in P. vulgaris-treated mdr1a-/-mice, as was myeloperoxidase activity in the colon(2.49 ± 0.16 vs 3.36 ± 0.06, P < 0.05). The numbers of CD4+ T cells(2031.9 ± 412.1 vs 5054.5 ± 809.5) and germinal center B cells(2749.6 ± 473.7 vs 4934.0 ± 645.9) observed in the cecal tonsils of P. vulgaris-treated mdr1a-/- were significantly reduced(P < 0.05) from vehicle-treated mdr1a-/- mice. Vehicle-treated mdr1a-/- mice were found to produce serum antibodies to antigens derived from members of the intestinal microbiota, indicative of severe colitis and a loss of adaptive tolerance to the members of the microbiota. These serum antibodies were greatly reduced or

  2. In Vivo Curative and Protective Potential of Orally Administered 5-Aminolevulinic Acid plus Ferrous Ion against Malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shigeo; Hikosaka, Kenji; Balogun, Emmanuel O.; Komatsuya, Keisuke; Niikura, Mamoru; Kobayashi, Fumie; Takahashi, Kiwamu; Tanaka, Tohru; Nakajima, Motowo

    2015-01-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is a naturally occurring amino acid present in diverse organisms and a precursor of heme biosynthesis. ALA is commercially available as a component of cosmetics, dietary supplements, and pharmaceuticals for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Recent reports demonstrated that the combination of ALA and ferrous ion (Fe2+) inhibits the in vitro growth of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. To further explore the potential application of ALA and ferrous ion as a combined antimalarial drug for treatment of human malaria, we conducted an in vivo efficacy evaluation. Female C57BL/6J mice were infected with the lethal strain of rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium yoelii 17XL and orally administered ALA plus sodium ferrous citrate (ALA/SFC) as a once-daily treatment. Parasitemia was monitored in the infected mice, and elimination of the parasites was confirmed using diagnostic PCR. Treatment of P. yoelii 17XL-infected mice with ALA/SFC provided curative efficacy in 60% of the mice treated with ALA/SFC at 600/300 mg/kg of body weight; no mice survived when treated with vehicle alone. Interestingly, the cured mice were protected from homologous rechallenge, even when reinfection was attempted more than 230 days after the initial recovery, indicating long-lasting resistance to reinfection with the same parasite. Moreover, parasite-specific antibodies against reported vaccine candidate antigens were found and persisted in the sera of the cured mice. These findings provide clear evidence that ALA/SFC is effective in an experimental animal model of malaria and may facilitate the development of a new class of antimalarial drug. PMID:26324278

  3. Orally administered tylosin for the control of pneumonia in neonatal calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, T; Muenster, O A; Ose, E E; Tonkinson, L

    1980-08-16

    The effectiveness of orally administered tylosin tartrate for the control of naturally occurring pneumonia was determined in 287 neonatal calves. Tylosin tartrate was mixed with reconstituted milk replacer at the time of feeding. Daily doses of 1.0 g (0.5 g BID), 2.0 g (1.0 g BID) and 4.0 g (2.0 g BID) were evaluated for periods ranging from seven to 28 days. Tylosin at the optimum dose of 2.0 g daily reduced mortality to 12 out of 95 (12.6 per cent) compared to 38 out of 89 (42.7 per cent) in the non-medicated control calves. The 1.0 g daily dose did not reduce mortality. The number of calves with moderate to severe lung lesions was also reduced by treatment at 2.0 g daily to 13 out of 95 (13.7 per cent) compared to 45 out of 89 (50.6 per cent) in the control group. All dose levels had a similar effect in reducing the severity of clinical signs indicative of respiratory disease. Tylosin treatment at all dose levels reduced the number of Pasteurella multocida isolations from lung tissue to 15/146 (10.3 per cent) compared to 61/141 (43.3 per cent) for the controls. However, there were no differences between treated and controls in the number of P haemolytica isolations. The frequency of mycoplasma isolations from lung tissue were reduced significantly by tylosin treatment at the 4.0 g and 2.0 g dose levels to 36/93 (38.7 per cent) compared to 61/86 (70.9 per cent) for the control calves.

  4. Pharmacokinetics, safety, and hydrolysis of oral pyrroloquinazolinediamines administered in single and multiple doses in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qigui; Kozar, Michael P; Shearer, Todd W; Xie, Lisa H; Lin, Ai J; Smith, Kirsten S; Si, Yuanzheng; Anova, Lalaine; Zhang, Jing; Milhous, Wilbur K; Skillman, Donald R

    2007-08-01

    Pyrroloquinazolinediamine (PQD) derivatives such as tetra-acetamide PQD (PQD-A4) and bis-ethylcarbamyl PQD (PQD-BE) were much safer (with therapeutic indices of 80 and 32, respectively) than their parent compound, PQD (therapeutic index, 10). Further evaluation of PQD-A4 and PQD-BE in single and multiple pharmacokinetic (PK) studies as well as corresponding toxicity studies was conducted with rats. PQD-A4 could be converted to two intermediate metabolites (monoacetamide PQD and bisacetamide PQD) first and then to the final metabolite, PQD, while PQD-BE was directly hydrolyzed to PQD without precursor and intermediate metabolites. Maximum tolerant doses showed that PQD-A4 and PQD-BE have only 1/12 and 1/6, respectively, of the toxicity of PQD after a single oral dose. Compared to the area under the concentration-time curve for PQD alone (2,965 ng.h/ml), values measured in animals treated with PQD-A4 and PQD-BE were one-third (1,047 ng.h/ml) and one-half (1,381 ng.h/ml) as high, respectively, after an equimolar dosage, suggesting that PQD was the only agent to induce the toxicity. Similar results were also shown in multiple treatments; PQD-A4 and PQD-BE generated two-fifths and three-fifths, respectively, of PQD concentrations, with 8.8-fold and 3.8-fold safety margins, respectively, over the parent drug. PK data indicated that the bioavailability of oral PQD-A4 was greatly limited at high dose levels, that PQD-A4 was slowly converted to PQD via a sequential three-step process of conversion, and that PQD-A4 was significantly less toxic than the one-step hydrolysis drug, PQD-BE. It was concluded that the slow and smaller release of PQD was the main reason for the reduction in toxicity and that the active intermediate metabolites can still maintain antimalarial potency. Therefore, the candidate with multiple-step hydrolysis of PQD could be developed as a safer potential agent for malaria treatment.

  5. The pharmacokinetics of orally administered ivermectin in African elephants (Loxodonta africana): implications for parasite elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandolf, A Rae; Lifschitz, A; Stadler, C; Watson, B; Galvanek, L; Ballent, M; Lanusse, C

    2009-03-01

    Loxodonta africana are susceptible to a wide variety of parasites that are often treated with the broad spectrum antiparasitic ivermectin (IVM) based on empirical knowledge. The objectives of this study were to 1) measure plasma IVM levels following administration of 0.1 mg/kg IVM p.o., 2) compare plasma IVM levels following administration with regular versus restricted feed rations, 3) measure IVM excretion in feces, and 4) use these findings to generate dosing recommendations for this species. Using a crossover design, six African elephants were divided into two groups. Ivermectin was administered and typical grain rations were either provided or withheld for 2 hr. Blood and fecal samples were collected for 7 days following drug administration. After a 5-wk washout period, groups were switched and the procedure repeated. Plasma and fecal IVM were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography. There was no statistically significant difference detected in the pharmacokinetic data between the fed and fasted groups. Peak plasma concentration, area under the curve, and half-life for plasma ranged between 5.41-8.49 ng/ml, 17.1-20.3 ng x day/ml, and 3.12-4.47 day, respectively. High IVM concentrations were detected in feces. The peak concentration values in feces were between 264-311-fold higher than those obtained in plasma. The comparatively large area under the curve and short time to maximum concentration in feces indicate elimination prior to absorption of much of the drug. Plasma IVM concentrations were low when compared to other species. Based on these findings, administration of 0.2-0.4 mg/kg p.o. should be appropriate for eliminating many types of parasites in elephants, and could minimize development of parasite resistance.

  6. Orally administered DTPA di-ethyl ester for decorporation of (241)Am in dogs: Assessment of safety and efficacy in an inhalation-contamination model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckle, James E; Sadgrove, Matthew P; Pacyniak, Erik; Leed, Marina G D; Weber, Waylon M; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; Guilmette, Raymond A; Agha, Bushra J; Susick, Robert L; Mumper, Russell J; Jay, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Currently two injectable products of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) are U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved for decorporation of (241)Am; however, an oral product is considered more amenable in a mass casualty situation. The di-ethyl ester of DTPA, named C2E2, is being developed as an oral drug for treatment of internal radionuclide contamination. Single-dose decorporation efficacy of C2E2 administered 24-h post contamination was determined in beagle dogs using a (241)Am nitrate inhalation contamination model. Single and multiple dose toxicity studies in beagle dogs were performed as part of an initial safety assessment program. In addition, the genotoxic potential of C2E2 was evaluated by the in vitro bacterial reverse mutation Ames test, mammalian cell chromosome aberration cytogenetic assay and an in vivo micronucleus test. Oral administration of C2E2 significantly increased (241)Am elimination over untreated controls and significantly reduced the retention of (241)Am in tissues, especially liver, kidney, lung and bone. Daily dosing of 200 mg/kg/day for 10 days was well tolerated in dogs. C2E2 was found to be neither mutagenic or clastogenic. The di-ethyl ester of DTPA (C2E2) was shown to effectively enhance the elimination of (241)Am after oral administration in a dog inhalation-contamination model and was well tolerated in toxicity studies.

  7. Orally Administered DTPA Di-ethyl Ester for Decorporation of 241Am in dogs: Assessment of Safety and Efficacy in an Inhalation-Contamination Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckle, James E.; Sadgrove, Matthew P.; Pacyniak, Erik; Leed, Marina G. D.; Weber, Waylon M.; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; Guilmette, Raymond A.; Agha, Bushra J.; Susick, Robert L.; Mumper, Russell J.; Jay, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Currently two injectable products of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) are U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved for decorporation of 241Am, however, an oral product is considered more amenable in a mass casualty situation. The diethyl ester of DTPA, named C2E2, is being developed as an oral drug for treatment of internal radionuclide contamination. Materials and methods Single dose decorporation efficacy of C2E2 administered 24-hours post contamination was determined in beagle dogs using a 241Am nitrate inhalation contamination model. Single and multiple dose toxicity studies in beagle dogs were performed as part of an initial safety assessment program. In addition, the genotoxic potential of C2E2 was evaluated by the in vitro bacterial reverse mutation Ames test, mammalian cell chromosome aberration cytogenetic assay and an in vivo micronucleus test. Results Oral administration of C2E2 significantly increased 241Am elimination over untreated controls and significantly reduced the retention of 241Am in tissues, especially liver, kidney, lung and bone. Daily dosing of 200 mg/kg/day for 10 days was well tolerated in dogs. C2E2 was found to be neither mutagenic or clastogenic. Conclusions The di-ethyl ester of DTPA (C2E2) was shown to effectively enhance the elimination of 241Am after oral administration in a dog inhalation-contamination model and was well tolerated in toxicity studies. PMID:25912343

  8. Dietary fats and pharmaceutical lipid excipients increase systemic exposure to orally administered cannabis and cannabis-based medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zgair, Atheer; Wong, Jonathan Cm; Lee, Jong Bong; Mistry, Jatin; Sivak, Olena; Wasan, Kishor M; Hennig, Ivo M; Barrett, David A; Constantinescu, Cris S; Fischer, Peter M; Gershkovich, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    There has been an escalating interest in the medicinal use of Cannabis sativa in recent years. Cannabis is often administered orally with fat-containing foods, or in lipid-based pharmaceutical preparations. However, the impact of lipids on the exposure of patients to cannabis components has not been explored. Therefore, the aim of this study is to elucidate the effect of oral co-administration of lipids on the exposure to two main active cannabinoids, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD). In this study, oral co-administration of lipids enhanced the systemic exposure of rats to THC and CBD by 2.5-fold and 3-fold, respectively, compared to lipid-free formulations. In vitro lipolysis was conducted to explore the effect of lipids on the intestinal solubilisation of cannabinoids. More than 30% of THC and CBD were distributed into micellar fraction following lipolysis, suggesting that at least one-third of the administered dose will be available for absorption following co-administration with lipids. Both cannabinoids showed very high affinity for artificial CM-like particles, as well as for rat and human CM, suggesting high potential for intestinal lymphatic transport. Moreover, comparable affinity of cannabinoids for rat and human CM suggests that similar increased exposure effects may be expected in humans. In conclusion, co-administration of dietary lipids or pharmaceutical lipid excipients has the potential to substantially increase the exposure to orally administered cannabis and cannabis-based medicines. The increase in patient exposure to cannabinoids is of high clinical importance as it could affect the therapeutic effect, but also toxicity, of orally administered cannabis or cannabis-based medicines.

  9. Multiple-dose pharmacokinetics and tolerability of gemifloxacin administered orally to healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, A; Bygate, E; Vousden, M; Oliver, S; Johnson, M; Ward, C; Cheon, A; Choo, Y S; Kim, I

    2001-02-01

    Gemifloxacin mesylate (SB-265805-S, LB-20304a) is a potent, novel fluoroquinolone agent with a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity. The pharmacokinetics and tolerability of oral gemifloxacin were characterized in two parallel group studies in healthy male volunteers after doses of 160, 320, 480, and 640 mg once daily for 7 days. Multiple serum or plasma and urine samples were collected on days 1 and 7 and were analyzed for gemifloxacin by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-fluorescence (study 1) or HPLC-mass spectrometry (study 2). Safety assessments included vital signs, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) readings, hematology, clinical chemistry, urinalysis, and adverse experience monitoring. Gemifloxacin was rapidly absorbed, with a time to maximum concentration of approximately 1 h after dosing followed by a biexponential decline in concentration. Generally, maximum concentration and area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) increased linearly with dose after either single or repeat doses. Mean +/- standard deviation values of AUC(0-tau) on day 7 were 4.92 +/- 1.08, 9.06 +/- 2.20, 12.2 +/- 3.69, and 20.1 +/- 3.67 microg x h/ml following 160-, 320-, 480-, and 640-mg doses, respectively. The terminal-phase half-life was approximately 7 to 8 h, independent of dose, and was similar following single and repeated administrations. There was minimal accumulation of gemifloxacin after multiple dosing. Approximately 20 to 30% of the administered dose was excreted unchanged in the urine. The renal clearance was 160 ml/min on average after single and multiple doses, which was slightly greater than the accepted glomerular filtration rate (approximately 120 ml/min). These data show that the pharmacokinetics of gemifloxacin are linear and independent of dose. Gemifloxacin was generally well tolerated, although one subject was withdrawn from the study after 6 days at 640 mg for mild, transient elevations of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate

  10. Pharmacokinetics of orally administered ibuprofen in African and Asian elephants (Loxodonta africana and Elephas maximus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechert, Ursula; Christensen, J Mark

    2007-06-01

    The pharmacokinetic parameters of S(+) and R(-) ibuprofen were determined in 20 elephants after oral administration of preliminary 4-, 5-, and 6-mg/kg doses of racemic ibuprofen. Following administration of 4 mg/kg ibuprofen, serum concentrations of ibuprofen peaked at 5 hr at 3.9 +/- 2.07 microg/ml R(-) and 10.65 +/- 5.64 microg/ml S(+) (mean +/- SD) in African elephants (Loxodonta africana) and at 3 hr at 5.14 +/- 1.39 microg/ml R(-) and 13.77 +/- 3.75 microg/ml S(+) in Asian elephants (Elephas maximus), respectively. Six-milligram/kilogram dosages resulted in peak serum concentrations of 5.91 +/- 2.17 microg/ml R(-) and 14.82 +/- 9.71 microg/ml S(+) in African elephants, and 5.72 +/- 1.60 microg/ml R(-) and 18.32 +/- 10.35 microg/ml S(+) in Asian elephants. Ibuprofen was eliminated with first-order kinetics characteristic of a single-compartment model with a half-life of 2.2-2.4 hr R(-) and 4.5-5.1 hr S(+) in African elephants and 2.4-2.9 hr R(-) and 5.9-7.7 hr S(+) in Asian elephants. Serum concentrations of R(-) ibuprofen were undetectable at 24 hr, whereas S(+) ibuprofen decreased to below 5 microg/ml 24 hr postadministration in all elephants. The volume of distribution was estimated to be between 322 and 356 ml/kg R(-) and 133 and 173 ml/kg S(+) in Asian elephants and 360-431 ml/kg R(-) and 179-207 ml/kg S(+) in African elephants. Steady-state serum concentrations of ibuprofen ranged from 2.2 to 10.5 microg/ml R(-) and 5.5 to 32.0 microg/ml S(+) (mean: 5.17 +/- 0.7 R(-) and 13.95 +/- 0.9 S(+) microg/ml in African elephants and 5.0 +/- 1.09 microg/ml R(-) and 14.1 +/- 2.8 microg/ml S(+) in Asian elephants). Racemic ibuprofen administered at 6 mg/kg/12 hr for Asian elephants and at 7 mg/kg/12 hr for African elephants results in therapeutic serum concentrations of this antiinflammatory agent.

  11. Adherence to safe handling guidelines by health care workers who administer antineoplastic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiano, James M; Steege, Andrea L; Sweeney, Marie H

    2014-01-01

    The toxicity of antineoplastic drugs is well documented. Many are known or suspected human carcinogens where no safe exposure level exists. Authoritative guidelines developed by professional practice organizations and federal agencies for the safe handling of these hazardous drugs have been available for nearly three decades. As a means of evaluating the extent of use of primary prevention practices such as engineering, administrative and work practice controls, personal protective equipment (PPE), and barriers to using PPE, the National Institute for Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted a web survey of health care workers in 2011. The study population primarily included members of professional practice organizations representing health care occupations which routinely use or come in contact with selected chemical agents. All respondents who indicated that they administered antineoplastic drugs in the past week were eligible to complete a hazard module addressing self-reported health and safety practices on this topic. Most (98%) of the 2069 respondents of this module were nurses. Working primarily in hospitals, outpatient care centers, and physician offices, respondents reported that they had collectively administered over 90 specific antineoplastic drugs in the past week, with carboplatin, cyclophosphamide, and paclitaxel the most common. Examples of activities which increase exposure risk, expressed as percent of respondents, included: failure to wear nonabsorbent gown with closed front and tight cuffs (42%); intravenous (I.V.) tubing primed with antineoplastic drug by respondent (6%) or by pharmacy (12%); potentially contaminated clothing taken home (12%); spill or leak of antineoplastic drug during administration (12%); failure to wear chemotherapy gloves (12%); and lack of hazard awareness training (4%). The most common reason for not wearing gloves or gowns was "skin exposure was minimal"; 4% of respondents, however, reported skin contact during handling and

  12. Orally administered novel cyclic pentapeptide P-317 alleviates symptoms of diarrhoea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielińska, Marta; Chen, Chunqiu; Mokrowiecka, Anna; Cygankiewicz, Adam I; Zakrzewski, Piotr K; Sałaga, Maciej; Małecka-Panas, Ewa; Wlaź, Piotr; Krajewska, Wanda M; Fichna, Jakub

    2015-02-01

    The aim of our study was to characterize the effect of P-317, a novel cyclic derivative of morphiceptin, on gastrointestinal (GI) motility and abdominal pain in mouse models mimicking symptoms of diarrhoea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D). The effect of P-317 on mouse intestinal motility was characterized in vitro and in vivo in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. The antinociceptive action of P-317 was characterized in the mustard oil-induced abdominal pain model and the writhing test. Locomotor activity and grip-strength tests were used to evaluate the effect of P-317 in the central nervous system (CNS). To translate our study to clinical conditions, the semi-quantitative expression of μ-opioid receptors (MOP) and κ-opioid receptors (KOP) messenger RNA (mRNA) in human colonic samples from IBS-D patients was quantified. In vitro, P-317 (10(-10) -10(-6) M) inhibited colonic and ileal smooth muscle contractions in a concentration-dependent, β-funaltrexamine and nor-binaltorphimine-reversible manner. In vivo, P-317 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p. and 1 mg/kg, p.o.) inhibited GI transit, displayed a potent antinociceptive action in abdominal pain tests and did not influence the CNS. P-317 produced a potent analgesic and antidiarrhoeal action in the mouse GI tract after oral administration. Given lower expression of MOP and KOP mRNA in IBS-D patients, P-317 is a promising peptide-based drug candidate for IBS-D therapy. © 2014 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  13. Seromucosal transport of intravenously administered carbamazepine is not enhanced by oral doses of activated charcoal in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyer, Florian; Jung, Nicole; Neuberger, Heidi; Witte, Andreas; Poethko, Thorsten; Henke, Julia; Zilker, Thomas

    2008-03-01

    The fate of carbamazepine after intravenous injection in rats (n = 24) and the influence of activated charcoal on the kinetics was investigated. After randomization to four groups (n = 6, each), plasma concentration and the quantities of carbamazepine and metabolites excreted into bile, urine and intestine were determined using an in situ perfusion model of the small intestine (Ringer's solution) with or without orally administered activated charcoal (AC+; AC-) and with or without bile duct cannulation (BD+; BD-). The cumulative amount of carbamazepine and metabolites exsorbed into the small intestine within 3.5 hr after intravenous injection was about 15% in BD- animals and about 3% in BD+ animals. About 20% of the dose was detected in the externalized bile. Activated charcoal did not influence the amount exsorbed into the small intestine. Terminal half-life in plasma ranged from 159 min. to 194 min. within the four treatment groups without statistical significant difference (P = 0.751). Correspondingly, the area under the curve did not vary significantly and ranged between 1.13 and 1.41 g/min./l (P = 0.378). Excretion of carbamazepine and metabolites into urine varied between 3% and 6% of dose within all groups and showed close correlation with diuresis. In an identical experimental approach using a 2-fold intestinal perfusion rate (50 ml/hr; n = 8), no fundamental changes compared to the main experiment regarding pharmacokinetics of carbamazepine were observed. The lack of effect of activated charcoal on the elimination of carbamazepine and metabolites must be contributed to the small amount of the drug being exsorbed into the intestine and may be further influenced by reduced intestinal permeability of carbamazepine and metabolites or inadequate luminal stirring.

  14. The effects of four different drugs administered through catheters on slime production in coagulase negative Staphylococci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sedef Göçmen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Higher rate of slime production has been found in pathogen bacteria strains. Accordingly, the factors thatcontribute to higher slime production rate increase the infection risk, while the factors that reduce the slime productionrate will reduce the infection risk. The effect of some drugs that are administered through catheters in intensive careunits on slime production with coagulase negative Staphylococci was investigated.Materials and methods: In this study, the effect of four different preparations containing Glyceryl trinitrate (Perlinganit®, Dexmedetomidine (Precedex®, Esmolol (Brevibloc®, and Propofol (Propofol® on slime production of 24Staphylococcus epidermidis strains isolated from blood cultures of patients, and reference strain were investigated. Slimeproduction was determined using ‘the quantitative microdilution plaque test’ described by Christensen.Results: Under controlled medium, eight strains formed slimes, and in the media containing esmolol, glyceryl trinitrate,dexmedetomidine, and propofol slimes were positive for five, 21, 15, and 18 strains, respectively. The rate of slime productionin glyceryl trinitrate, dexmedetomidine, and propofol containing media were higher than that of the controls.Conclusions: In the light of the results of this study, it is concluded that the drugs and/or additives increase the rate ofslime production. The effects of the preparations administered through catheters on slime production should be investigated,and these effects should be kept in mind during their use. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2012; 2(4: 150-154Key words: Slime Production, Coagulase Negative Staphyloccoci, Parenteral drugs

  15. Early pharmaceutical profiling to predict oral drug absorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström, Christel A S; Holm, René; Jørgensen, Søren Astrup

    2014-01-01

    Preformulation measurements are used to estimate the fraction absorbed in vivo for orally administered compounds and thereby allow an early evaluation of the need for enabling formulations. As part of the Oral Biopharmaceutical Tools (OrBiTo) project, this review provides a summary of the pharmac......Preformulation measurements are used to estimate the fraction absorbed in vivo for orally administered compounds and thereby allow an early evaluation of the need for enabling formulations. As part of the Oral Biopharmaceutical Tools (OrBiTo) project, this review provides a summary...... and state-of-the art methodologies to study API properties impacting on oral absorption are reviewed. Assays performed during early development, i.e. physicochemical characterization, dissolution profiles under physiological conditions, permeability assays and the impact of excipients on these properties...

  16. Vagally mediated inhibition of acoustic stress-induced cortisol release by orally administered kappa-opioid substances in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, L; Gue, M; Fargeas, M J; Alvinerie, M; Junien, J L; Fioramonti, J

    1989-04-01

    The effects of oral vs. iv administration of kappa- and mu-opioid agonists on plasma cortisol release induced by acoustic stress (AS) were evaluated in fasted dogs with an implanted jugular catheter. AS was induced by 1 h of music (less than or equal to 86 decibels) played through earphones and was accompanied by a 382% maximal rise in plasma cortisol after 15-30 min. Administered orally 30 min before the AS session, both U-50488 (0.1 mg/kg) and PD 117-302 (0.05 mg/kg) significantly (P less than or equal to 0.01) decreased (by 71.2% and 80.9%, respectively) the maximal increase in plasma cortisol induced by AS, while bremazocine, morphine, as well as iv administration of U-50488 at similar doses were ineffective. The effects of U-50488 and PD 117-302 orally administered (0.1 mg/kg) on the hypercortisolemia induced by AS were abolished by pretreatment with iv naloxone (0.1 mg/kg) or MR 2266 (0.1 mg/kg). Naloxone given alone significantly (P less than 0.01) increased basal plasma cortisol, without affecting cortisol increase induced by AS. Vagotomy abolished the effects of orally administered U-50488 on the AS-induced increase in plasma cortisol. Neither U-50488 nor PD 117302 (0.1 mg/kg, orally) reduced the increase in plasma cortisol induced by intracerebroventricular administration of ovine CRF (100 ng/kg). It is concluded that kappa- but not mu-opioid agonists are able to inhibit the stimulation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis induced by AS by acting selectively on peripheral kappa-receptors located in the wall of the proximal gut. This action is neurally mediated through afferent vagal fibers affecting central nervous system release of CRF induced by a centrally acting stressor.

  17. Polymeric Micro- and Nanofabricatced Devices for Oral Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Cade Brylee

    While oral drug administration is by far the most preferred route, it is accompanied by many barriers that limit drug uptake such as the low pH of the stomach, metabolic and proteolytic enzymes, and limited permeability of the intestinal epithelium. As a result, many drugs ranging from small molecules to biological therapeutics have limited oral bioavailability, precluding them from oral administration. To address this issue, microfabrication has been applied to create planar, asymmetric devices capable of binding to the lining of the gastrointestinal tract and releasing drug at high concentrations, thereby increasing oral drug uptake. While the efficacy of these devices has been validated in vitro and in vivo, modifying their surfaces with nanoscale features has potential to refine their properties for enhanced drug delivery. This dissertation first presents an approach to fabricate polymeric microdevices coated with nanowires in a rapid, high throughput manner. The nanowires demonstrate rapid drug localization onto the surface of these devices via capillary action and increased adhesion to epithelial tissue, suggesting that this fabrication technique can be used to create devices with enhanced properties for oral drug delivery. Also presented are microdevices sealed with nanostraw membranes. The nanostraw membranes provide sustained drug release by limiting drug efflux from the devices, prevent drug degradation by limiting influx of outside biomolecules, and enhance device bioadhesion by penetrating into the mucus layer of the intestinal lining. Finally, an approach that dramatically increases the capacity and efficiency of drug loading into microdevices over previous methods is presented. A picoliter-volume printer is used to print drug directly into device reservoirs in an automated fashion. The technologies presented here expand the capabilities of microdevices for oral drug delivery by incorporating nanoscale structures that enhance device bioadhesion

  18. Toxicity of colloidal silica nanoparticles administered orally for 90 days in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim YR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Yu-Ri Kim,1,* Seung-Young Lee,3,* Eun Jeong Lee,1 Sung Ha Park,4 Nak-won Seong,3 Heung-Sik Seo,3 Sung-Sup Shin,3 Seon-Ju Kim,3 Eun-Ho Meang,3 Myeong-Kyu Park,3 Min-Seok Kim,3 Cheol-Su Kim,5 Soo-Ki Kim,5 Sang Wook Son,2 Young Rok Seo,6 Boo Hyon Kang,7 Beom Seok Han,8 Seong Soo A An,9 Beom-Jun Lee,10 Meyoung-Kon Kim1 1Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2Department of Dermatology, Korea University Medical School and College, 3General Toxicology Team, Korea Testing and Research Institute, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 4Department of Biochemistry, University of Bath, Bath, UK; 5Department of Microbiology, Wonju College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Gangwon, 6Department of Life Science, Institute of Environmental Medicine for Green Chemistry, Dongguk University, Seoul, 7Nonclinical Research Institute, Chemon Inc, Gyeonggi, 8Toxicological Research Center, Hoseo University, Chungnam, 9Department of Bionanotechnology, Gachon University, Gyeonggi, 10College of Veterinary Medicine, Chungbuk National University, Chungbuk, Republic of Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: This study was undertaken to investigate the potential toxicity and establish the no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL and target organ(s of negatively charged colloidal silica particles of different sizes, ie, SiO2EN,20(- (20 nm or SiO2EN,100(- (100 nm, administered by gavage in Sprague-Dawley rats. After verification of the physicochemical properties of the SiO2 particles to be tested, a preliminary dose range-finding study and 90-day repeated dose study were conducted according to the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development test guideline. Based on the results of the 14-day dose range-finding study, a high dose was determined to be 2,000 mg/kg, and middle and low doses were set at 1,000 and 500 mg/kg, respectively. In the 90-day toxicity study, there were no animal deaths in relation to administration of SiO2 particles of

  19. Bioequivalence study of two losartan formulations administered orally in healthy male volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienert, Agnieszka; Brzezińiski, Rafał; Szałek, Edyta; Dubai, Vitali; Grześkowiak, Edmund; Dyderski, Stanisław; Drobnik, Leon; Wolc, Anna; Olejniczak-Rabinek, Magdalena

    2006-01-01

    The bioavailability of a new losartan preparation (2-butyl-4-chloro-1-[p-(o-1H-tetrazol-5-ylphenyl)benzyl]imidazole-5-methanol monopotassium salt, CAS 114798-26-4) was compared with the reference preparation of the drug in 24 healthy male volunteers, aged between 19 and 32. The open, randomized, single-blind two-sequence, two-period crossover study design was performed. Under fasting conditions, each subject received a single oral dose of 100 mg losartan as a test or reference formulation. The plasma concentrations of losartan and its active metabolite were analyzed by a rapid and sensitive HPLC method with UV detection. The pharmacokinetic parameters included AUC0-36h, AUC0-infinity, Cmax, t1/2, and Ke. Values of AUC0-infinity demonstrate nearly identical bioavailability of losartan from the examined formulations. The AUC0-infinity of losartan was 2019.92+/-1002.90 and 2028.58+/-837.45 ng x h/ml for the test and reference formulation, respectively. The AUC0-infinity of the metabolite was 10851.52+/-4438.66 and 11041.18 +/-5015.81 ng x h/ml for test and reference formulation, respectively. The maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of losartan was 745.94+/-419.75 ng/ml for the test and 745.74+/-329.99 ng/ml for the reference product and the Cmax of the metabolite was 1805.77+/-765.39 and 1606.22 +/-977.22 ng/ml for the test and reference product, respectively. No statistical differences were observed for Cmax and the area under the plasma concentration-time curve for both losartan and its active metabolite. 90 % confidence limits calculated for Cmax and AUC from zero to infinity (AUC0-infinity) of losartan and its metabolite were included in the bioequivalence range (0.8-1.25 for AUC). This study shows that the test formulation is bioequivalent to the reference formulation for losartan and its main active metabolite.

  20. Strain-dependent induction of cytokine profiles in the gut by orally administered Lactobacillus strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maassen, C.B.M.; Holten-Neelen, C. van; Balk, F.; Bak-Glashouwer, M.-J.H. den; Leer, R.J.; Laman, J.D.; Boersma, W.J.A.; Claassen, E.

    2000-01-01

    Different Lactobacillus strains are frequently used in consumer food products. In addition, recombinant lactobacilli which contain novel expression vectors can now be used in immunotherapeutic applications such as oral vaccination strategies and in T cell tolerance induction approaches for

  1. Strain-dependent induction of cytokine profiles in the gut by orally administered Lactobacillus strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maassen, C.B.M.; Holten-Neelen, C. van; Balk, F.; Bak-Glashouwer, M.-J.H. den; Leer, R.J.; Laman, J.D.; Boersma, W.J.A.; Claassen, E.

    2000-01-01

    Different Lactobacillus strains are frequently used in consumer food products. In addition, recombinant lactobacilli which contain novel expression vectors can now be used in immunotherapeutic applications such as oral vaccination strategies and in T cell tolerance induction approaches for autoimmun

  2. Strain-dependent induction of cytokine profiles in the gut by orally administered Lactobacillus strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maassen, C.B.M.; Holten-Neelen, C. van; Balk, F.; Bak-Glashouwer, M.-J.H. den; Leer, R.J.; Laman, J.D.; Boersma, W.J.A.; Claassen, E.

    2000-01-01

    Different Lactobacillus strains are frequently used in consumer food products. In addition, recombinant lactobacilli which contain novel expression vectors can now be used in immunotherapeutic applications such as oral vaccination strategies and in T cell tolerance induction approaches for autoimmun

  3. Effectiveness and safety of orally administered immunotherapy for food allergies: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurmatov, Ulugbek; Devereux, Graham; Worth, Allison; Healy, Laura; Sheikh, Aziz

    2014-01-14

    The aim of using oral and sublingual immunotherapy with food allergies is to enable the safe consumption of foods containing these allergens in patients with food allergies. In the present study, a systematic review of intervention studies was undertaken; this involved the searching of eleven international databases for controlled clinical trials. We identified 1152 potentially relevant papers, from which we selected twenty-two reports of twenty-one eligible trials (i.e. eighteen randomised controlled trials and three controlled clinical trials). The meta-analysis revealed a substantially lower risk of reactions to the relevant food allergen in those receiving orally administered immunotherapy (risk ratios (RR) 0·21, 95 % CI 0·12, 0·38). The meta-analysis of immunological data demonstrated that skin prick test responses to the relevant food allergen significantly decreased with immunotherapy (mean difference - 2·96 mm, 95 % CI - 4·48, - 1·45), while allergen-specific IgG4 levels increased by an average of 19·9 (95 % CI 17·1, 22·6) μg/ml. Sensitivity analyses excluding studies at the highest risk of bias and subgroup analyses in relation to specific food allergens and treatment approaches generated comparable summary estimates of effectiveness and immunological changes. Pooling of the safety data revealed an increased risk of local (i.e. minor oropharyngeal/gastrointestinal) adverse reactions with immunotherapy (RR 1·47, 95 % CI 1·11, 1·95); there was a non-significant increased average risk of systemic adverse reactions with immunotherapy (RR 1·08, 95 % CI 0·97, 1·19). There is strong evidence that orally administered immunotherapy can induce immunomodulatory changes and thereby promote desensitisation to a range of foods. However, given the paucity of evidence on longer-term safety, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, orally administered immunotherapy should not be used outside experimental conditions presently.

  4. Analytical evaluation of five oral fluid drug testing devices

    OpenAIRE

    Isalberti, Cristina; Van Stechelman, Sylvie; Legrand, Sara-Ann; Van der Linden, Gertrude; Verstraete, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The correlation with blood drug presence and the easiness of sample collection make oral fluid an ideal matrix for roadside drug tests targeting impaired drivers. Aim: To evaluate the reliability of five oral fluid testing devices: Varian OraLab®6, Dräger DrugTest® 5000, Cozart® DDS 806, Mavand RapidSTAT® and Innovacon OrAlert. Method: More than 760 samples were collected from volunteers either at drug addiction treatment centres or during roadside sessions. Target drug ...

  5. A DETAILED REVIEW ON ORAL MUCOSAL DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radha Bhati

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Oral mucosal drug delivery system is widely applicable as novel site for administration of drug for immediate and controlled release action by preventing first pass metabolism and enzymatic degradation due to GI microbial flora. Oral mucosal drug delivery system provides local and systemic action. In this review, attention is focused to give regarding physiology of oral mucosal including tissue permeability, barriers to permeation and route of permeation, biopharmaceutics of buccal and sublingual absorption, factors affecting drug absorption, detailed information of penetration enhancers, design of oral mucosal drug delivery system and role of mucoadhesion and various theories of bioadhesion. Evaluation techniques and selection of animal model for in-vivo studies are also discussed.

  6. Oral controlled release drug delivery system and Characterization of oral tablets; A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Zaman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral route of drug administration is considered as the safest and easiest route of drug administration. Control release drug delivery system is the emerging trend in the pharmaceuticals and the oral route is most suitable for such kind of drug delivery system. Oral route is more convenient for It all age group including both pediatric and geriatrics. There are various systems which are adopted to deliver drug in a controlled manner to different target sites through oral route. It includes diffusion controlled drug delivery systems; dissolution controlled drug delivery systems, osmotically controlled drug delivery systems, ion-exchange controlled drug delivery systems, hydrodynamically balanced systems, multi-Particulate drug delivery systems and microencapsulated drug delivery system. The systems are formulated using different natural, semi-synthetic and synthetic polymers. The purpose of the review is to provide information about the orally controlled drug delivery system, polymers which are used to formulate these systems and characterizations of one of the most convenient dosage form which is the tablets. 

  7. 76 FR 59023 - Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Tylosin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 520 Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Tylosin... drug application (ANADA) filed by Cross Vetpharm Group, Ltd. The ANADA provides for use of tylosin..., Dublin 24, Ireland, filed ANADA 200-455 for use of TYLOMED-WS (tylosin tartrate), a water soluble powder...

  8. Esomeprazole administered through a nasogastric tube provides bioavailability similar to oral dosing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sostek, M B; Chen, Y; Skammer, W; Winter, H; Zhao, J; Andersson, T

    2003-09-15

    To determine if nasogastric tube administration of the enteric-coated pellets from an opened esomeprazole capsule provides bioavailability similar to oral dosing with the intact capsule. A randomized, single-centre, open-label, two-period crossover pharmacokinetic study consisting of two 5-day dosing periods separated by a 7- to 14-day washout period was conducted. Healthy subjects between the ages of 18 and 50 years received esomeprazole 40 mg once daily either orally as an intact capsule, or as a suspension of the enteric-coated pellets from an opened capsule in water through a nasogastric tube. In 47 evaluable subjects, the 90% confidence intervals were 0.87-1.08 and 0.93-1.25 for the geometric mean of the ratio of nasogastric tube administration relative to administration of the intact capsule for the area under the plasma concentration-time curve and for maximum plasma concentration, respectively, on day 1, demonstrating bioequivalence. Oral and nasogastric administration also demonstrated similar bioavailabilities on day 5. Esomeprazole was well tolerated regardless of the mode of administration. Nasogastric tube administration of the enteric-coated pellets from an opened esomeprazole 40 mg capsule provides bioavailability similar to oral dosing. Administration of the contents of an opened esomeprazole 40 mg capsule in water through a nasogastric tube is a practical alternative for patients with feeding tubes who require effective gastric acid suppression, but cannot swallow an oral preparation.

  9. Riluzole 5 mg/mL oral suspension: for optimized drug delivery in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyer AM

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ann Margaret Dyer, Alan Smith PharmaSci Consulting Limited, Nottingham, UK Abstract: The aim of the present work is to extensively evaluate the pharmaceutical attributes of currently available riluzole presentations. The article describes the limitations and risks associated with the administration of crushed tablets, including the potential for inaccurate dosing and reduced rate of absorption when riluzole is administered with high-fat foods, and the advantages that a recently approved innovative oral liquid form of riluzole confers on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS patients. The article further evaluates the patented and innovative controlled flocculation technology used in the pseudoplastic suspension formulation to reduce the oral anesthesia seen with crushed tablets, resulting in optimized drug delivery for riluzole. Riluzole is the only drug licensed for treating ALS, which is the most common form of motor neurone disease and a highly devastating neurodegenerative condition. The licensed indication is to extend life or the time to mechanical ventilation. Until recently, riluzole was only available as an oral tablet dosage form in the UK; however, an innovative oral liquid form, Teglutik® 5 mg/mL oral suspension, is now available. An oral liquid formulation provides an important therapeutic option for patients with ALS, >80% of who may become unable to swallow solid oral dosage forms due to disease-related dysphagia. Prior to the launch of riluzole oral suspension, the only way for many patients to continue to take riluzole as their disease progressed was through crushed tablets. A novel suspension formulation enables more accurate dosing and consistent ongoing administration of riluzole. There are clear and important advantages such as enhanced patient compliance compared with crushed tablets administered with food or via an enteral feeding tube and the potential for an improved therapeutic outcome and enhanced quality of life for

  10. Guidelines for European workplace drug testing in oral fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Gail; Moore, Christine; George, Claire; Pichini, Simona

    2011-05-01

    Over the past decade, oral fluid has established itself as a robust testing matrix for monitoring drug use or misuse. Commercially available collection devices provide opportunities to collect and test oral fluid by the roadside and near-patient testing with both clinical and criminal justice applications. One of the main advantages of oral fluid relates to the collection of the matrix which is non-invasive, simple, and can be carried out under direct observation making it ideal for workplace drug testing. Laboratories offering legally defensible oral fluid workplace drug testing must adhere to national and international quality standards (ISO/IEC 17025); however, these standards do not address issues specific to oral fluid testing. The European Workplace Drug Testing Society (EWDTS) recognizes the importance of providing best practice guidelines to organizations offering testing and those choosing to use oral fluid drug testing to test their employees. The aim of this paper is to present the EWDTS guidelines for oral fluid workplace drug testing. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Orally Administered Enoxaparin Ameliorates Acute Colitis by Reducing Macrophage-Associated Inflammatory Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lean, Qi Ying; Eri, Rajaraman D.; Randall-Demllo, Sarron; Sohal, Sukhwinder Singh; Stewart, Niall; Peterson, Gregory M.; Gueven, Nuri; Patel, Rahul P.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases, such as ulcerative colitis, cause significant morbidity and decreased quality of life. The currently available treatments are not effective in all patients, can be expensive and have potential to cause severe side effects. This prompts the need for new treatment modalities. Enoxaparin, a widely used antithrombotic agent, is reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties and therefore we evaluated its therapeutic potential in a mouse model of colitis. Acute colitis was induced in male C57BL/6 mice by administration of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). Mice were treated once daily with enoxaparin via oral or intraperitoneal administration and monitored for colitis activities. On termination (day 8), colons were collected for macroscopic evaluation and cytokine measurement, and processed for histology and immunohistochemistry. Oral but not intraperitoneal administration of enoxaparin significantly ameliorated DSS-induced colitis. Oral enoxaparin-treated mice retained their body weight and displayed less diarrhea and fecal blood loss compared to the untreated colitis group. Colon weight in enoxaparin-treated mice was significantly lower, indicating reduced inflammation and edema. Histological examination of untreated colitis mice showed a massive loss of crypt architecture and goblet cells, infiltration of immune cells and the presence of edema, while all aspects of this pathology were alleviated by oral enoxaparin. Reduced number of macrophages in the colon of oral enoxaparin-treated mice was accompanied by decreased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Oral enoxaparin significantly reduces the inflammatory pathology associated with DSS-induced colitis in mice and could therefore represent a novel therapeutic option for the management of ulcerative colitis. PMID:26218284

  12. Fecal Excretion of Orally Administered Collagen-Like Peptides in Rats: Contribution of the Triple-Helical Conformation to Their Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koide, Takaki; Yamamoto, Naoyuki; Taira, Kazuma B; Yasui, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Orally ingested peptides are generally digested in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and absorbed in the form of oligopeptides. We previously reported that intravenously administered collagen-like triple-helical peptides circulated in the bloodstream and were excreted in their intact forms in urine nearly quantitatively. In the present study, we investigated the fates of orally administered collagen-like peptides in rats. (Pro-Hyp-Gly)10 (Hyp: 4-hydroxyproline), which formed a stable triple-helical structure, was stable in the GI tract, and 72.3±13.0% of the peptide was excreted in the feces. Its recovery ratio was similar to that of all-D-(Pro-Pro-Gly)10 (75.1±15.7%), the indigestible control. In contrast, (Pro-Hyp-Gly)5 and (Pro-Pro-Gly)10, the random coil conformations of which were dominant at body temperature, were not detected in fecal samples, indicating that they were digested by proteases. The high stability of the triple-helical conformation in mammalian bodies suggests the potential use of collagen-like peptides as novel scaffolds of peptide drugs.

  13. Effects of Long-term Use of Polyphenols on the Absorption and Tissue Distribution of Orally Administered Metformin and Atenolol in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Abdulrahman Hussain

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the effect of long-term use of silibinin, epigallocatechin (ECGC, quercetin and rutin on the absorption and tissue distribution of metformin and atenolol. Materials and Methods: Thirty male rats were used, allocated into 5 groups and treated as follow: 1st group treated with olive oil and served as control; the other 4 groups were treated with either silibinin, EPGC, quercetin or rutin, administered orally as oily solutions for 30 days. At day 30, a 300mg/kg metformin and 50mg/kg atenolol were administered orally; 3.0 hrs later, the animals were sacrificed and blood samples, tissues of brain, kidney and liver were obtained for evaluation of the drugs level. Results: The polyphenols increased both serum and tissue levels of metformin compared with controls. This effect was relatively varied according to the structural differences among flavonoids. Conclusion: Long-term use of supraphysiological doses of flavonoids increase absorption of Zn, Cu and Fe and their tissue availability in brain, kidney and liver; this effect seems to be different with variations in structural features. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2013; 2(3.000: 147-154

  14. Effect of Orally Administered Enterococcus faecium EF1 on Intestinal Cytokines and Chemokines Production of Suckling Piglets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Huang§, Ya-li Li, Qin Huang, Zhi-wen Cui, Dong-you Yu, Imran Rashid Rajput, Cai-hong Hu and Wei-fen Li*

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the effect of orally administered Enterococcus faecium EF1 on intestinal cytokines and chemokines production in piglets. Twenty-four newborn piglets were randomly divided into two groups. The treatment group (T1, orally administered sterilized (110 ºC for 30 min skim milk 10% (2 ml/piglet/day with addition of viable E. faecium EF1 (5~6×108 cfu/ml on 1st, 3rd and 5th day after birth. The control group (T0, were fed the same volume of sterilized skim milk without addition of probiotics. Feeding trial was conducted for 25 days of suckling age. At the end of trail six piglets were randomly selected from each group to collect the samples of jejunum and ileum mucosa to observe the cytokines and chemokines production. The results showed that concentrations of IL-10 and TGF-β1 significantly increased in T1 group. Whereas, production of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12, IFN-γ and IL-8 decreased in T1 compared to T0. Levels of TNF-α were increased in jejunal mucosa, while decreased in ileal mucosa comparatively in T1 group. Our findings revealed that oral administration of E. faecium EF1 induced a strong anti-inflammatory response in the small intestine. These immunomodulatory effects of this bacterium might contribute to maintenance of immune homeostasis in the intestine of piglets.

  15. Orally administered Lactobacillus strains differentially affect the direction and efficacy of the immune response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maassen, C.B.M.; Holten, J.C.A.M. van; Balk, F.; Heijne den Bak-Glashouwer, M.J.; Leer, R.; Laman, J.D.; Boersma, W.J.A.; Claassen, E.

    1998-01-01

    In mice, strain dependent cytokine production profiles are induced after oral administration of Lactobacillus. Such a cytokine profile seems to determine the direction and efficacy of the humoral response. In SJL mice lactobacilli are able to enhance or inhibit the development of disease after

  16. Rat adipose tissue rapidly accumulates and slowly releases an orally-administered high vitamin D dose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, DAJ; van Beek, J; Ferwerda, H; Brugman, AM; van der Klis, FRM; Muskiet, FAJ

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the effect of oral high-dose cholecalciferol on plasma and adipose tissue cholecalciferol and its subsequent release, and on plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D). Female Wistar rats (n 126) received 37.5 mu g cholecalciferol/d for 14 d and were subsequently studied for a further 88 d

  17. EFFECTS OF ORALLY OR VAGINALLY ADMINISTERED LEVONOGESTREL TABLET ON LIPID METABOLISM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HEChang-Hai; YANGPei-Juan; GUIYou-Lun; LILa-Mei; SHIYONG-En

    1989-01-01

    Twenty healthy female volunteers of reproductive age were recruited and randomized into two groups with ten cases in each group. In Group A, each subject took five pills orally containing 0.75rag levonorgestrel (LNG)in each for postcoital contraception in each

  18. Differential impact of glucose administered intravenously or orally on bone turnover markers in healthy male subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westberg-Rasmussen, Sidse; Starup-Linde, Jakob; Hermansen, Kjeld

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with type-1 (T1D) and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) have an increased risk of hip fracture. The underlying mechanisms may involve disturbances in the incretin hormones. Our aim was to clarify if glucose administration i.e. orally or intravenously differentially affects bone ...

  19. Modulation of human humoral immune response through orally administered bovine colostrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, F; Tuomola, E; Arvilommi, H; Salminen, S

    2001-08-01

    Eighteen healthy volunteers were randomized into two treatment groups and consumed liquid prepackaged bovine colostrum whey and placebo for 7 days. On days 1, 3 and 5, an attenuated Salmonella typhi Ty21a oral vaccine was given to all subjects to mimic an enteropathogenic infection. The circulating antibody secreting cells and the expression of phagocytosis receptors of the subjects before and after oral immunization were measured with the ELISPOT assay and flow cytometry. All subjects responded well to the vaccine. No significant differences were observed in ELISPOT values for IgA, IgG, IgM, Fcgamma and CR receptor expression on neutrophils and monocytes between the two groups. There was a trend towards greater increase in specific IgA among the subjects receiving their vaccine with bovine colostrum. These results suggest that bovine colostrum may possess some potential to enhance human special immune responses.

  20. Amelioration of Chemotherapy-Induced Intestinal Mucositis by Orally Administered Probiotics in a Mouse Model

    OpenAIRE

    Chun-Yan Yeung; Wai-Tao Chan; Chun-Bin Jiang; Mei-Lien Cheng; Chia-Yuan Liu; Szu-Wen Chang; Jen-Shiu Chiang Chiau; Hung-Chang Lee

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Intestinal mucositis is a frequently encountered side effect in oncology patients undergoing chemotherapy. No well-established or up to date therapeutic strategies are available. To study a novel way to alleviate mucositis, we investigate the effects and safety of probiotic supplementation in ameliorating 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis in a mouse model. Methods Seventy-two mice were injected saline or 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) intraperitoneally daily. Mice were either orall...

  1. Orally administered S-1 suppresses circulating endothelial cell counts in metastatic breast cancer patients.

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    [Background]S-1 is an oral cytotoxic preparation that contains tegafur. Gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) is a metabolite of tegafur that is known to suppress vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-mediated angiogenic activity. The aim of this study was to determine the change in circulating endothelial cell (CEC) counts, GBL levels, and angiogenesis-related factors during S-1 administration in metastatic breast cancer (MBC) patients. [Methods]Patients with HER2-negative MBC were eligible. S-1 was...

  2. Novel engineered systems for oral, mucosal and transdermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hairui; Yu, Yuan; Faraji Dana, Sara; Li, Bo; Lee, Chi-Ying; Kang, Lifeng

    2013-08-01

    Technological advances in drug discovery have resulted in increasing number of molecules including proteins and peptides as drug candidates. However, how to deliver drugs with satisfactory therapeutic effect, minimal side effects and increased patient compliance is a question posted before researchers, especially for those drugs with poor solubility, large molecular weight or instability. Microfabrication technology, polymer science and bioconjugate chemistry combine to address these problems and generate a number of novel engineered drug delivery systems. Injection routes usually have poor patient compliance due to their invasive nature and potential safety concerns over needle reuse. The alternative non-invasive routes, such as oral, mucosal (pulmonary, nasal, ocular, buccal, rectal, vaginal), and transdermal drug delivery have thus attracted many attentions. Here, we review the applications of the novel engineered systems for oral, mucosal and transdermal drug delivery.

  3. Viper and cobra venom neutralization by alginate coated multicomponent polyvalent antivenom administered by the oral route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Sourav; Chakraborty, Mousumi; Mukhopadhyay, Piyasi; Kundu, P P; Mishra, Roshnara

    2014-08-01

    Snake bite causes greater mortality than most of the other neglected tropical diseases. Snake antivenom, although effective in minimizing mortality in developed countries, is not equally so in developing countries due to its poor availability in remote snake infested areas as, and when, required. An alternative approach in this direction could be taken by making orally deliverable polyvalent antivenom formulation, preferably under a globally integrated strategy, for using it as a first aid during transit time from remote trauma sites to hospitals. To address this problem, multiple components of polyvalent antivenom were entrapped in alginate. Structural analysis, scanning electron microscopy, entrapment efficiency, loading capacity, swelling study, in vitro pH sensitive release, acid digestion, mucoadhesive property and venom neutralization were studied in in vitro and in vivo models. Results showed that alginate retained its mucoadhesive, acid protective and pH sensitive swelling property after entrapping antivenom. After pH dependent release from alginate beads, antivenom (ASVS) significantly neutralized phospholipaseA2 activity, hemolysis, lactate dehydrogenase activity and lethality of venom. In ex vivo mice intestinal preparation, ASVS was absorbed significantly through the intestine and it inhibited venom lethality which indicated that all the components of antivenom required for neutralization of venom lethality were retained despite absorption across the intestinal layer. Results from in vivo studies indicated that orally delivered ASVS can significantly neutralize venom effects, depicted by protection against lethality, decreased hemotoxicity and renal toxicity caused by russell viper venom. Alginate was effective in entrapping all the structural components of ASVS, which on release and intestinal absorption effectively reconstituted the function of antivenom in neutralizing viper and cobra venom. Further research in this direction can strategize to

  4. Viper and Cobra Venom Neutralization by Alginate Coated Multicomponent Polyvalent Antivenom Administered by the Oral Route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Sourav; Chakraborty, Mousumi; Mukhopadhyay, Piyasi; Kundu, P. P.; Mishra, Roshnara

    2014-01-01

    Background Snake bite causes greater mortality than most of the other neglected tropical diseases. Snake antivenom, although effective in minimizing mortality in developed countries, is not equally so in developing countries due to its poor availability in remote snake infested areas as, and when, required. An alternative approach in this direction could be taken by making orally deliverable polyvalent antivenom formulation, preferably under a globally integrated strategy, for using it as a first aid during transit time from remote trauma sites to hospitals. Methodology/Principal Findings To address this problem, multiple components of polyvalent antivenom were entrapped in alginate. Structural analysis, scanning electron microscopy, entrapment efficiency, loading capacity, swelling study, in vitro pH sensitive release, acid digestion, mucoadhesive property and venom neutralization were studied in in vitro and in vivo models. Results showed that alginate retained its mucoadhesive, acid protective and pH sensitive swelling property after entrapping antivenom. After pH dependent release from alginate beads, antivenom (ASVS) significantly neutralized phospholipaseA2 activity, hemolysis, lactate dehydrogenase activity and lethality of venom. In ex vivo mice intestinal preparation, ASVS was absorbed significantly through the intestine and it inhibited venom lethality which indicated that all the components of antivenom required for neutralization of venom lethality were retained despite absorption across the intestinal layer. Results from in vivo studies indicated that orally delivered ASVS can significantly neutralize venom effects, depicted by protection against lethality, decreased hemotoxicity and renal toxicity caused by russell viper venom. Conclusions/Significance Alginate was effective in entrapping all the structural components of ASVS, which on release and intestinal absorption effectively reconstituted the function of antivenom in neutralizing viper and cobra

  5. Discovery of sarolaner: A novel, orally administered, broad-spectrum, isoxazoline ectoparasiticide for dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTier, Tom L; Chubb, Nathan; Curtis, Michael P; Hedges, Laura; Inskeep, Gregory A; Knauer, Christopher S; Menon, Sanjay; Mills, Brian; Pullins, Aleah; Zinser, Erich; Woods, Debra J; Meeus, Patrick

    2016-05-30

    The novel isoxazoline ectoparasiticide, sarolaner, was identified during a lead optimization program for an orally-active compound with efficacy against fleas and ticks on dogs. The aim of the discovery program was to identify a novel isoxazoline specifically for use in companion animals, beginning with de novo synthesis in the Zoetis research laboratories. The sarolaner molecule has unique structural features important for its potency and pharmacokinetic (PK) properties, including spiroazetidine and sulfone moieties. The flea and tick activity resides in the chirally pure S-enantiomer, which was purified to alleviate potential off-target effects from the inactive enantiomer. The mechanism of action was established in electrophysiology assays using CHO-K1 cell lines stably expressing cat flea (Ctenocephalides felis) RDL (resistance-to-dieldrin) genes for assessment of GABA-gated chloride channel (GABACls) pharmacology. As expected, sarolaner inhibited GABA-elicited currents at both susceptible (CfRDL-A285) and resistant (CfRDL-S285) flea GABACls with similar potency. Initial whole organism screening was conducted in vitro using a blood feeding assay against C. felis. Compounds which demonstrated robust activity in the flea feed assay were subsequently tested in an in vitro ingestion assay against the soft tick, Ornithodoros turicata. Efficacious compounds which were confirmed safe in rodents at doses up to 30mg/kg were progressed to safety, PK and efficacy studies in dogs. In vitro sarolaner demonstrated an LC80 of 0.3μg/mL against C. felis and an LC100 of 0.003μg/mL against O. turicata. In a head-to-head comparative in vitro assay with both afoxolaner and fluralaner, sarolaner demonstrated superior flea and tick potency. In exploratory safety studies in dogs, sarolaner demonstrated safety in dogs≥8 weeks of age upon repeated monthly dosing at up to 20mg/kg. Sarolaner was rapidly and well absorbed following oral dosing. Time to maximum plasma concentration

  6. Fate of orally administered {sup 15}N-labeled polyamines in rats bearing solid tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Masaki; Samejima, Keijiro; Goda, Hitomi; Niitsu, Masaru [Josai Univ., Sakado, Saitama (Japan). Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences; Xu Yongji [Qingdao Univ. of Science and Technology (China). Inst. of Chemical and Molecular Technology; Takahashi, Masakazu [Sasaki Inst., Tokyo (Japan); Hashimoto, Yoshiyuki [Kyoritsu Coll. of Pharmacy, Tokyo (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    We studied absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, and spermine) in the gastrointestinal tract using {sup 15}N-labeled polyamines as tracers and ionspray ionization mass spectrometry (IS-MS). The relatively simple protocol using rats bearing solid tumors provided useful information. Three {sup 15}N-labeled polyamines that were simultaneously administered were absorbed equally from gastrointestinal tract, and distributed within tissues at various concentrations. The uptake of {sup 15}N-spermidine seemed preferential to that of {sup 15}N-spermine since the concentrations of {sup 15}N-spermidine in the liver and tumors were higher, whereas those of {sup 15}N-spermine were higher in the kidney, probably due to the excretion of excess extracellular spermine. Most of the absorbed {sup 15}N-putrescine seemed to be lost, suggesting blood and tissue diamine oxidase degradation. Concentrations of {sup 15}N-spermidine and {sup 15}N-spermine in the tumor were low. We also describe the findings from two rats that were administered with {sup 15}N-spermine. The tissue concentrations of {sup 15}N-spermine were unusually high, and significant levels of {sup 15}N-spermidine were derived from {sup 15}N-spermine in these animals. (author)

  7. Assessment of the efficacy of orally administered afoxolaner against Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkle, Bruce; Daly, Sean; Dumont, Pascal; Drag, Marlene; Larsen, Diane

    2014-04-02

    Two studies were conducted to confirm that a single oral dose of the novel insecticide/acaricide afoxolaner is efficacious against existing infestations of Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato in dogs and can control re-infestation for up to 35 days. Each study utilized 16 purpose bred adult dogs using a controlled randomized block design. One or two days prior to treatment, all dogs were infested with 50 unfed adult ticks. On Day 0 one group was treated with an oral chewable formulation of afoxolaner at a dose as close as possible to the minimum dose of 2.5mg/kg. Weekly re-infestations with 50 adult unfed ticks were repeated for five weeks. Forty-eight hours after treatment and after each re-infestation, the number of remaining live ticks on each dog was counted. Treatment with afoxolaner resulted in efficacies of 98.8-100% within 48 h on existing tick infestations, while the efficacy against new tick infestations was >95.7% over five weeks.

  8. The effects of food on the bioavailability of fenofibrate administered orally in healthy volunteers via sustained-release capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Hwi-Yeol; Joo Lee, Eun; Youn Chung, Soo; Choi, Sun-Ok; Kee Kim, Hyung; Kwon, Jun-Tack; Kang, Wonku; Kwon, Kwang-Il

    2006-01-01

    To examine the effects of food on plasma concentration and bioavailability of fenofibrate administered as a sustained-release capsule. Twenty-four healthy Korean volunteers were enrolled in a randomised, open-label, balanced, three-treatment, three-period, three-sequence, single oral dose, crossover pharmacokinetic study. A single dose of fenofibrate (250 mg sustained-release capsule) was administered on three occasions -- after overnight fasting, after consumption of a standard breakfast and after a high-fat breakfast. Serial blood samples were collected for the next 72 hours. Plasma fenofibric acid concentrations were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography, and pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated. The pharmacokinetic parameters were significantly affected by food intake. The high-fat breakfast affected the rate of absorption of fenofibrate more than the standard breakfast and fasted conditions. Specifically, the area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero to infinity (AUC(infinity)) and peak plasma concentration (C(max)) increased 2.45-fold and 2.89-fold, respectively, between the fasted and standard-fed conditions (p fenofibric acid. In healthy volunteers, AUC(infinity) and C(max) of fenofibrate, when administered via sustained-release capsules immediately after the consumption of food, was increased significantly from the fasting conditions (p < 0.01). The greatest AUC(infinity) and C(max) occurred when the capsules were taken after a high-fat breakfast.

  9. Rationalizing the selection of oral lipid based drug delivery systems by an in vitro dynamic lipolysis model for improved oral bioavailability of poorly water soluble drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Arik; Hoffman, Amnon

    2008-07-02

    As a consequence of modern drug discovery techniques, there has been a consistent increase in the number of new pharmacologically active lipophilic compounds that are poorly water soluble. A great challenge facing the pharmaceutical scientist is making these molecules into orally administered medications with sufficient bioavailability. One of the most popular approaches to improve the oral bioavailability of these molecules is the utilization of a lipid based drug delivery system. Unfortunately, current development strategies in the area of lipid based delivery systems are mostly empirical. Hence, there is a need for a simplified in vitro method to guide the selection of a suitable lipidic vehicle composition and to rationalize the delivery system design. To address this need, a dynamic in vitro lipolysis model, which provides a very good simulation of the in vivo lipid digestion process, has been developed over the past few years. This model has been extensively used for in vitro assessment of different lipid based delivery systems, leading to enhanced understanding of the suitability of different lipids and surfactants as a delivery system for a given poorly water soluble drug candidate. A key goal in the development of the dynamic in vitro lipolysis model has been correlating the in vitro data of various drug-lipidic delivery system combinations to the resultant in vivo drug profile. In this paper, we discuss and review the need for this model, its underlying theory, practice and limitations, and the available data accumulated in the literature. Overall, the dynamic in vitro lipolysis model seems to provide highly useful initial guidelines in the development process of oral lipid based drug delivery systems for poorly water soluble drugs, and it predicts phenomena that occur in the pre-enterocyte stages of the intestinal absorption cascade.

  10. Survival and digestibility of orally-administered immunoglobulin preparations containing IgG through the gastrointestinal tract in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasion, Victoria S; Burnett, Bruce P

    2015-03-07

    Oral immunoglobulin (Ig) preparations are prime examples of medicinal nutrition from natural sources. Plasma products containing Ig have been used for decades in animal feed for intestinal disorders to mitigate the damaging effects of early weaning. These preparations reduce overall mortality and increase feed utilization in various animal species leading to improved growth. Oral administration of Ig preparations from human serum as well as bovine colostrum and serum have been tested and proven to be safe as well as effective in human clinical trials for a variety of enteric microbial infections and other conditions which cause diarrhea. In infants, children, and adults, the amount of intact IgG recovered in stool ranges from trace amounts up to 25% of the original amount ingested. It is generally understood that IgG can only bind to antigens within the GI tract if the Fab structure is intact and has not been completely denatured through acidic pH or digestive proteolytic enzymes. This is a comprehensive review of human studies regarding the survivability of orally-administered Ig preparations, with a focus on IgG. This review also highlights various biochemical studies on IgG which potentially explain which structural elements are responsible for increased stability against digestion.

  11. Amelioration of Chemotherapy-Induced Intestinal Mucositis by Orally Administered Probiotics in a Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chun-Bin; Cheng, Mei-Lien; Liu, Chia-Yuan; Chang, Szu-Wen; Chiang Chiau, Jen-Shiu; Lee, Hung-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Intestinal mucositis is a frequently encountered side effect in oncology patients undergoing chemotherapy. No well-established or up to date therapeutic strategies are available. To study a novel way to alleviate mucositis, we investigate the effects and safety of probiotic supplementation in ameliorating 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis in a mouse model. Methods Seventy-two mice were injected saline or 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) intraperitoneally daily. Mice were either orally administrated daily saline, probiotic suspension of Lactobacillus casei variety rhamnosus (Lcr35) or Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum (LaBi). Diarrhea score, pro-inflammatory cytokines serum levels, intestinal villus height and crypt depth and total RNA from tissue were assessed. Samples of blood, liver and spleen tissues were assessed for translocation. Results Marked diarrhea developed in the 5-FU groups but was attenuated after oral Lcr35 and LaBi administrations. Diarrhea scores decreased significantly from 2.64 to 1.45 and 0.80, respectively (Pprobiotics administration. We also found TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 mRNA expressions were up-regulated in intestinal mucositis tissues following 5-FU treatment (TNF-α: 4.35 vs. 1.18, IL-1β: 2.29 vs. 1.07, IL-6: 1.49 vs. 1.02) and that probiotics treatment suppressed this up-regulation (Pprobiotics Lcr35 and LaBi can ameliorate chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis in a mouse model. This suggests probiotics may serve as an alternative therapeutic strategy for the prevention or management of chemotherapy-induced mucositis in the future. PMID:26406888

  12. Fabrication and loading of microcontainers for oral drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ritika Singh

    is achieved. Characterization of spin coating of drug-polymer films is thoroughly performed using microscopy, profilometry, differential scanning calorimetry, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and microdissolution release tests. These films are applied for loading of microcontainers. Furosemide which......Oral drug delivery is considered as the most patient compliant delivery route. However, it faces many obstacles, especially due to the ever-increasing number of drugs that are poorly soluble and barely absorbed in the gastro-intestinal tract. Moreover, drugs can degrade in the harsh acidic...... environment of stomach before they reach the intestine. These issues lead to reduced bioavailability of active ingredients. To combat that novel oral drug delivery systems have been developed. Some of these systems that have gained significant interest in this field are reservoir based drug delivery...

  13. Gastroretentive behavior of orally administered radiolabeled tamarind seed formulations in rabbits validated by gamma scintigraphy

    OpenAIRE

    Razavi M; Karimian H; Yeong CH; Fadaeinasab M; Khaing SL; Chung LY; Mohamad Haron DE; Noordin MI

    2016-01-01

    Mahboubeh Razavi,1 Hamed Karimian,1 Chai Hong Yeong,2 Mehran Fadaeinasab,3 Si Lay Khaing,4 Lip Yong Chung,1 Didi Erwandi B Mohamad Haron,5 Mohamed Ibrahim Noordin1,6 1Department of Pharmacy, 2University Malaya Research Imaging Centre and Department of Biomedical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, 3Center for Natural Product Research and Drug Discovery (CENAR), 4Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, 5Shimadzu-UMMC Centre for Xenobiotics Studies, Pharmacology Department, Faculty of Medicin...

  14. Pharmacology of ketoprofen administered orally to pigs : an experimental and clinical study

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Ketoprofen is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug belonging to the 2-arylpropionic acid group. It has been widely used in domestic animals because of its anti-inflammatory, antipyretic and analgesic actions. Ketoprofen is a chiral compound existing in two enantiomeric forms, S (+) and R (-) ketoprofen. Each enantiomer has different pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties. The commercial products in veterinary medicine are 50:50 racemic mixtures of both enantiomers. Ketoprofen underg...

  15. Characterization of particulate drug delivery systems for oral delivery of Peptide and protein drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, Philip Carsten; Fano, Mathias; Saaby, Lasse;

    2015-01-01

    are summarized. Additionally, the paper provides an overview of recent studies on characterization of solid drug carriers for peptide/protein drugs, drug distribution in particles, drug release and stability in simulated GI fluids, as well as the absorption of peptide/protein drugs in cell-based models. The use......Oral drug delivery is a preferred route because of good patient compliance. However, most peptide/ protein drugs are delivered via parenteral routes because of the absorption barriers in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract such as enzymatic degradation by proteases and low permeability acrossthe...... biological membranes. To overcome these barriers, different formulation strategies for oral delivery of biomacromolecules have been proposed, including lipid based formulations and polymer-based particulate drug delivery systems (DDS). The aim of this review is to summarize the existing knowledge about oral...

  16. Phase I trial of orally administered pentosan polysulfate in patients with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J L; Wellstein, A; Rae, J; DeLap, R J; Phipps, K; Hanfelt, J; Yunmbam, M K; Sun, J X; Duchin, K L; Hawkins, M J

    1997-12-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is critically important to tumor growth and metastasis. We have shown that pentosan polysulfate (PPS) is an effective inhibitor of heparin-binding growth factors in vitro and can effectively inhibit the establishment and growth of tumors in nude mice. Following completion of our Phase I trial of s.c. administered PPS, we performed a Phase I trial of p.o. administered PPS in patients with advanced cancer to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and toxicity profile and to search for any evidence for biological activity in vivo. Patients diagnosed with advanced, incurable malignancies who met standard Phase I criteria and who did not have a history of bleeding complications were enrolled, in cohorts of three, to receive PPS p.o. t.i.d., at planned doses of 180, 270, 400, 600, and 800 mg/m2. Patients were monitored at least every 2 weeks with physical exams and weekly with hematological, chemistry, stool hemoccult, and coagulation blood studies, and serum and urine samples for PPS and basic fibroblastic growth factor (bFGF) levels were also taken. The PPS dose was escalated in an attempt to reach the MTD. Eight additional patients were enrolled at the highest dose to further characterize the toxicity profile and biological in vivo effects of PPS. A total of 21 patients were enrolled in the three cohorts of doses 180 (n = 4), 270 (n = 3), and 400 (n = 14) mg/m2. The most severe toxicities seen were grade 3 proctitis and grade 4 diarrhea; however, 20 of the 21 patients had evidence of grade 1 or 2 gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. These toxicities became evident at a much earlier time point as the dose was increased, but their severities were similar at all dose levels. There were no objective responses, although three patients had prolonged stabilization of previously progressing disease. Pharmacokinetic analysis suggested marked accumulation of PPS upon chronic administration. Serum and urine bFGF levels failed to show a consistent, interpretable

  17. Decorporation of systemically distributed americium by a novel orally administered diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) formulation in beagle dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, James P; Cobb, Ronald R; Dungan, Nathanael W; Matthews, Laura L; Eppler, Bärbel; Aiello, Kenneth V; Curtis, Shiro; Boger, Teannetta; Guilmette, Raymond A; Weber, Waylon; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; Talton, James D

    2015-03-01

    Novel decorporation agents are being developed to protect against radiological accidents and terrorists attacks. Radioactive americium is a significant component of nuclear fallout. Removal of large radioactive materials, such as 241Am, from exposed persons is a subject of significant interest due to the hazards they pose. The objective of this study was to evaluate the dose-related efficacy of daily doses of NanoDTPA™ Capsules for decorporating Am administered intravenously as a soluble citrate complex to male and female beagle dogs. In addition, the efficacy of the NanoDTPA™ Capsules for decorporating 241Am was directly compared to intravenously administered saline and DTPA. Animals received a single IV administration of 241Am(III)-citrate on Day 0. One day after radionuclide administration, one of four different doses of NanoDTPA™ Capsules [1, 2, or 6 capsules d(-1) (30 mg, 60 mg, or 180 mg DTPA) or 2 capsules BID], IV Zn-DTPA (5 mg kg(-1) pentetate zinc trisodium) as a positive control, or IV saline as a placebo were administered. NanoDTPA™ Capsules, IV Zn-DTPA, or IV saline was administered on study days 1-14. Animals were euthanized on day 21. A full necropsy was conducted, and liver, spleen, kidneys, lungs and trachea, tracheobronchial lymph nodes (TBLN), muscle samples (right and left quadriceps), gastrointestinal (GI) tract (stomach plus esophagus, upper and lower intestine), gonads, two femurs, lumbar vertebrae (L1-L4), and all other soft tissue remains were collected. Urinary and fecal excretion profiles were increased approximately 10-fold compared to those for untreated animals. Tissue contents were decreased compared to untreated controls. In particular, liver content was decreased by approximately eightfold compared to untreated animals. The results from this study further demonstrate that oral NanoDTPA™ Capsules are equally efficient compared to IV Zn-DTPA in decorporation of actinides.

  18. Biopharmaceutical aspects of oral drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faassen, Werenfriedus Adrianus

    2004-01-01

    Most drugs display their therapeutic activity on specific places in the human body and should reach the systemic circulation in order to be transported towards the site of action. Irrespective of the route of administration the same sequence of steps are of relevance for the exposure to a drug: rele

  19. Assessment of the effects of orally administered ferrous sulfate on Oncopeltus fasciatus (Heteroptera: Lygaeidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Amparo; Torreblanca, Amparo; Garcerá, María Dolores

    2017-03-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient needed for multiple biological processes, but it is also an effective pro-oxidant in its reduced form. Environmental sources of iron toxic species include reduced soils from rice plantations, polluted natural areas from metal industry waste, or iron oxides used in soil bioremediation. Few studies have been conducted to assess the toxicity of iron species in insects. The present work aims to assess the oxidative stress effects of ferrous sulfate administered in drinking water after acute exposure (96 h) to adults of the insect model Oncopeltus fasciatus (Dallas). Mortality was higher in exposed groups and significantly associated with iron treatment (OR [95% CI]; 11.8 [6.1-22.7]). Higher levels of body iron content were found in insects exposed to ferrous sulfate, with an increase of 5-6 times with respect to controls. Catalase activity and lipid peroxidation (TBARS content), but not glutathione S-transferase activity, were significantly higher in exposed insects and significantly correlated with body iron content (Pearson coefficient of 0.68 and 0.74, respectively) and between them (0.78). The present work demonstrates that, despite the disruption in water and food intake caused by iron administration, this metal is accumulated by insect causing lipid peroxidation and eliciting an antioxidant response mediated by catalase.

  20. Gastroretentive behavior of orally administered radiolabeled tamarind seed formulations in rabbits validated by gamma scintigraphy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razavi M

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mahboubeh Razavi,1 Hamed Karimian,1 Chai Hong Yeong,2 Mehran Fadaeinasab,3 Si Lay Khaing,4 Lip Yong Chung,1 Didi Erwandi B Mohamad Haron,5 Mohamed Ibrahim Noordin1,6 1Department of Pharmacy, 2University Malaya Research Imaging Centre and Department of Biomedical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, 3Center for Natural Product Research and Drug Discovery (CENAR, 4Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, 5Shimadzu-UMMC Centre for Xenobiotics Studies, Pharmacology Department, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 6Malaysian Institute of Pharmaceuticals and Nutraceuticals (IPharm, National Institutes of Biotechnology Malaysia, Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation, Penang, Malayasia Abstract: This study aimed to formulate floating gastroretentive tablets containing metformin hydrochloric acid (HCl, using various grades of hydrogel such as tamarind powders and xanthan to overcome short gastric residence time of the conventional dosage forms. Different concentrations of the hydrogels were tested to determine the formulation that could provide a sustained release of 12 h. Eleven formulations with different ratios of tamarind seed powder/tamarind kernel powder (TKP:xanthan were prepared. The physical parameters were observed, and in vitro drug-release studies of the prepared formulations were carried out. Optimal formulation was assessed for physicochemical properties, thermal stability, and chemical interaction followed by in vivo gamma scintigraphy study. MKP,3 formulation with a TKP:xanthan ratio of 3:2 was found to have 99.87% release over 12 h. Furthermore, in vivo gamma scintigraphy study was carried out for the optimized formulation in healthy New Zealand White rabbits, and the pharmacokinetic parameters of developed formulations were obtained. 153Sm2O3 was used to trace the profile of release in the gastrointestinal tract of the rabbits, and the drug release was analyzed. The time (Tmax at which the maximum concentration of metformin HCl

  1. Fate of orally administered radioactive fatty acids in the late-pregnant rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Luna, Pilar; Ortega-Senovilla, Henar; López-Soldado, Iliana; Herrera, Emilio

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the biodisponibility of placental transfer of fatty acids, rats pregnant for 20 days were given tracer amounts of [(14)C]palmitic (PA), oleic (OA), linoleic (LA), α-linolenic (LNA), or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) orally and euthanized at 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, or 8.0 h thereafter. Maternal plasma radioactivity in lipids initially increased only to decline at later times. Most of the label appeared first as triacylglycerols (TAG); later, the proportion in phospholipids (PhL) increased. The percentage of label in placental lipids was also always highest shortly after administration and declined later; again, PhL increased with time. Fetal plasma radioactivity increased with time, with its highest value at 8.0 h after DHA or LNA administration. DHA initially appeared primarily in the nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) and PA, OA, LA, and LNA as TAG followed by NEFA; in all cases, there was an increase in PhL at later times. Measurement of fatty acid concentrations allowed calculation of specific (radio)activities, and the ratio (fetal/maternal) of these in the plasmas gave an index of placental transfer activity, which was LNA > LA > DHA = OA > PA. It is proposed that a considerable proportion of most fatty acids transferred through the placenta are released into the fetal circulation in the form of TAG.

  2. Corn oil and milk enhance the absorption of orally administered allyl isothiocyanate in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippoushi, Katsunari; Ueda, Hiroshi; Takeuchi, Atsuko

    2013-11-15

    Allyl isothiocyanate, a chief component of mustard oil, exhibits anticancer effects in both cultured cancer cells and animal models. The accumulation of the N-acetylcysteine conjugate of allyl isothiocyanate, the final metabolite of allyl isothiocyanate, in urine was evaluated in rats that were orally coadministered allyl isothiocyanate with fluids (e.g., water, green tea, milk, and 10% ethanol) or corn oil. The N-acetylcysteine conjugate of allyl isothiocyanate content in urine when allyl isothiocyanate (2 or 4μmol) was coadministered with corn oil or milk showed a greater increase (1.4±0.22 or 2.7±0.34μmol or 1.2±0.32 or 2.5±0.36μmol, 1.6- to 1.8-fold or 1.5-fold, respectively) than when allyl isothiocyanate (2 or 4μmol) was coadministered with water (0.78±0.10 or 1.7±0.17μmol). This result demonstrates that corn oil and milk enhance the absorption of allyl isothiocyanate in rats.

  3. Orally administered whole egg demonstrates antidepressant-like effects in the forced swimming test on rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Mao; Otsuka, Tsuyoshi; Ogino, Yumi; Yoshida, Junki; Tomonaga, Shozo; Yasuo, Shinobu; Furuse, Mitsuhiro

    2014-08-01

    Several studies have reported that vegetarian diets are associated with a higher prevalence of major depression. Therefore, we hypothesised that the consumption of animal products, especially eggs, may have positive effects on mental health, especially on major depression, because a previous study reported that egg consumption produces numerous beneficial effects in humans. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of chronic whole-egg treatment on depression-like behaviours in Wistar rats, a control strain, and Wistar Kyoto rats, an animal model of depression. In both the rats, either whole-egg solution (5 ml/kg) or distilled water (5 ml/kg) was orally administrated for 35 days. During these periods, the open-field test (OFT) was conducted on the 21st day, and a forced swimming test (FST) was enforced on the 27th and 28th days. On the 36th day, the plasma and brain were collected. Chronic whole-egg treatment did not affect line crossing in the OFT, whereas it reduced the total duration of immobility in the FST on both strains. Furthermore, interestingly, the results indicated the possibility that whole-egg treatment elevated the incorporation of tryptophan into the brain, and the tryptophan concentration in the prefrontal cortex was actually increased by the treatment. This study demonstrated that whole-egg treatment exerts an antidepressant-like effect in the FST. It is suggested that whole egg may be an excellent food for preventing and alleviating the conditions of major depression.

  4. Estimation of parameters for the elimination of an orally administered test substance with unknown absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Josef A; Denzer, Christian

    2013-04-01

    Assessment of the elimination of an oral test dose based on plasma concentration values requires correction for the effect of gastric release and absorption. Irregular uptake processes should be described 'model independently', which requires estimation of a large number of absorption parameters. To limit the associated computational effort a new approach is developed with a reduced number of unknown parameters. A marginalized and regularized absorption approach (MRA) is defined, which uses for the uptake just one parameter to control rigidity of the uptake curve. For validation, elimination and absorption were reproduced using published IVIVC data and a synthetic data set for comparison with approaches using a 'model-free'--staircase function or mechanistic models to describe absorption. MRA performed almost as accurate as well specified mechanistic models, which gave the best reproduction. MRA demonstrated a 50fold increase in computational efficiency compared to other approaches. The absorption estimated for the IVIVC study demonstrated an in vivo-in vitro correlation comparable to published values. The newly developed MRA approach can be used to efficiently and accurately estimate elimination and absorption with a restricted number of adaptive parameters and with automatic adjustment of the complexity of the uptake.

  5. Effectiveness of orally administered cupric oxide needles in alleviating hypocupraemia in sheep and cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttle, N F

    1981-05-09

    The oral administration of a small dose of cupric oxide "needles" (CuOn), providing 0.5 g copper, to hypocupraemic ewes maintained on a copper-deficient diet alleviated hypocupraemia for 111 days when the diet was supplemented with molybdenum and sulphate and for 301 days when the diet was not supplemented. The same amount of copper given as cupric sulphate was approximately half as effective. The administration of a large dose of CuOn, providing 40 g copper, to hypocupraemic steers and heifers alleviated hypocupraemia for not less than 41 days, at which time a substantial reserve of copper (428 mg) remained in the liver. The absorbability of copper in CuOn was estimated to be 8.3 per cent and 3.8 per cent (depending on diet) for sheep. It was calculated that enough absorbable copper could be provided in a single dose to meet the net copper requirements of ewes for several years. This new form of copper therapy demands a totally different approach from that associated with parenteral copper usage.

  6. Antiosteoporotic effect of orally administered yolk-derived peptides on bone mass in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdou, Adham M; Watabe, Kazuya; Yamane, Tetsuro; Isono, Tadayuki; Okamura, Yoshitaka; Kawahito, Seiji; Takeshima, Kazuhito; Masuda, Kazuyuki; Kim, Mujo

    2014-05-01

    The main objective of this study was to verify the effect of oral intake of a yolk-derived peptide preparation (HYP) obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis of yolk water-soluble protein on bone markers and bone density in 65 perimenopausal women with an average age of 47.6 ± 5.2 years. Subjects were divided into three groups, and then enrolled in a 6-month, randomized, double-blind clinical trial. Bone formation and resorption markers were measured at 0, 3, and 6 months, while bone mineral density (BMD) in the lumbar spines was measured at 0 and 6 months. Although the bone formation marker levels showed the similarity changes among the groups, bone resorption markers in the test HYP group were significantly decreased after 3 and 6 months in comparison to other groups (P < 0.05). After 6 months, BMD in the test HYP group maintained at healthy numerical values whereas BMD values were decreased in other groups. Hence HYP would be an antiosteoporotic agent originated from natural food to maintain bone health, especially for women.

  7. Evaluation of the profile of drug therapy administered through enteral feeding tube in a general hospital in Rio de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Jorge Sobreira da Silva

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Enteral nutrition (EN is the method of choice for patients that cannot adequately receive oral feeding despite good gastrointestinal tract condition. Enteral diets may be administered through tube or ostomy placed in the stomach, duodenum or jejunum. The administration of drugs via enteral feeding tube (EFT is a common practice in hospitals due to patient clinical status, and requires special attention from professionals involved in this process. This study entailed an analysis of the profile of drug therapy through EFT based on evaluation of medical prescriptions of the Medical Clinic of the Hospital dos Servidores do Estado (HSE of Rio de Janeiro sent to the Pharmacy Service between January and June 2007, according to standard protocols in place. Prescription of drugs via EFT outside recommended guidelines was observed, besides potential drug-nutrient incompatibilities associated with this practice. These results point to the need for improvement of enteral route access and the adoption of measures to promote safe and effective use of drugs and nutritional therapy.A nutrição enteral (NE é o método de escolha para alimentar pacientes que não podem receber alimentação por via oral de forma adequada, mas que estejam com a função gastrointestinal satisfatória para a absorção dos nutrientes. As dietas enterais podem ser administradas através de cateteres ou ostomias, posicionados no estômago, duodeno ou jejuno. A administração de medicamentos através de cateter de nutrição enteral (CNE é uma prática muito comum no ambiente hospitalar, devido ao estado clínico do paciente, necessitando atenção especial dos profissionais envolvidos neste processo. O estudo constituiu uma análise do perfil da terapia medicamentosa através de CNE por meio de uma avaliação das prescrições médicas da Clínica Médica do Hospital dos Servidores do Estado (HSE do Rio de Janeiro encaminhadas ao Serviço de Farmácia, de janeiro a junho de 2007

  8. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug interactions between antiretrovirals and oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittle, Victoria; Bull, Lauren; Boffito, Marta; Nwokolo, Nneka

    2015-01-01

    More than 50 % of women living with HIV in low- and middle-income countries are of reproductive age, but there are limitations to the administration of oral contraception for HIV-infected women receiving antiretroviral therapy due to drug-drug interactions caused by metabolism via the cytochrome P450 isoenzymes and glucuronidation. However, with the development of newer antiretrovirals that use alternative metabolic pathways, options for contraception in HIV-positive women are increasing. This paper aims to review the literature on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral hormonal contraceptives when given with antiretroviral agents, including those currently used in developed countries, older ones that might still be used in salvage regimens, or those used in resource-limited settings, as well as newer drugs. Nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), the usual backbone to most combined antiretroviral treatments (cARTs) are characterised by a low potential for drug-drug interactions with oral contraceptives. On the other hand non-NRTIs (NNRTIs) and protease inhibitors (PIs) may interact with oral contraceptives. Of the NNRTIs, efavirenz and nevirapine have been demonstrated to cause drug-drug interactions; however, etravirine and rilpivirine appear safe to use without dose adjustment. PIs boosted with ritonavir are not recommended to be used with oral contraceptives, with the exception of boosted atazanavir which should be used with doses of at least 35 µg of estrogen. Maraviroc, an entry inhibitor, is safe for co-administration with oral contraceptives, as are the integrase inhibitors (INIs) raltegravir and dolutegravir. However, the INI elvitegravir, which is given in combination with cobicistat, requires a dose of estrogen of at least 30 µg. Despite the growing evidence in this field, data are still lacking in terms of large cohort studies, randomised trials and correlations to real clinical outcomes, such as pregnancy rates, in women

  9. Assessment of vitamin B(12) absorption based on the accumulation of orally administered cyanocobalamin on transcobalamin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardlei, Tore Forsingdal; Mørkbak, Anne Louise; Bor, Mustafa Vakur; Bailey, Lynn B; Hvas, Anne-Mette; Nexo, Ebba

    2010-03-01

    Vitamin B(12), or cobalamin (Cbl), is absorbed in the intestine and transported to the cells bound to transcobalamin (TC). We hypothesize that cyanocobalamin (CNCbl) is absorbed unchanged, thereby allowing measurement of the complex of CNCbl bound to TC (TC-CNCbl) to be used for studying the absorption of the vitamin. TC was immunoprecipitated from serum samples obtained from healthy donors at baseline and at 24 h after oral administration of three 9-microg CNCbl doses over 1 day. Cbl was released by treatment with subtilisin Carlsberg. The different forms of Cbl were isolated by HPLC and subsequently quantified with an ELISA-based Cbl assay. At baseline, the median TC-CNCbl concentration was 1 pmol/L (range, 0-10 pmol/L); the intraindividual variation (SD) was 1.6 pmol/L (n = 31). After CNCbl administration, the TC-CNCbl concentration increased significantly (P = 0.0003, paired t-test), whereas no major changes were observed in any of the other Cbl forms bound to TC (n = 10). Only a moderate additional increase in TC-CNCbl was observed with prolonged (5 days) CNCbl administration (n = 10). We designed an absorption test based on measuring TC-CNCbl at baseline and 24 h after CNCbl intake and established a reference interval for the increase in TC-CNCbl (n = 78). The median absolute increase was 23 pmol/L (range, 6-64 pmol/L), and the relative increase was >3-fold. Our data demonstrate that CNCbl is absorbed unchanged and accumulates on circulating TC. We suggest that measuring TC-CNCbl will improve the assessment of vitamin B(12) absorption.

  10. Pharmacokinetics of orally administered phenylbutazone in African and Asian elephants (Loxodonta africana and Elephas maximus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechert, Ursula; Christensen, J Mark; Nguyen, C; Neelkant, R; Bendas, E

    2008-06-01

    The pharmacokinetic parameters of phenylbutazone were determined in 18 elephants (Loxodonta africana and Elephas maximus) after single-dose oral administration of 2, 3, and 4 mg/kg phenylbutazone, as well as multiple-dose administrations with a 4-wk washout period between trials. After administration of 2 mg/kg phenylbutazone, mean serum concentrations peaked in approximately 7.5 hr at 4.3 +/- 2.02 microg/ml and 9.7 hr at 7.1 +/- 2.36 microg/ml for African and Asian elephants, respectively, while 3 mg/kg dosages resulted in peak serum concentrations of 7.2 +/- 4.06 microg/ml in 8.4 hr and 12.1 +/- 3.13 microg/ml in 14 hr. The harmonic mean half-life was long, ranging between 13 and 15 hr and 39 and 45 hr for African and Asian elephants, respectively. There was evidence of enterohepatic cycling of phenylbutazone in Asian elephants. Significant differences (P < 0.0001) in pharmacokinetic values occurred between African and Asian elephants for clearance (27.9 and 7.6 ml/hr/kg, respectively), terminal half-life (15.0 and 38.7 hr, respectively), and mean residence time (22.5 and 55.5 hr, respectively) using 2-mg/kg dosages as an example. This suggests that different treatment regimens for Asian and African elephants should be used. There were no apparent gender differences in these parameters for either elephant species.

  11. Gastroretentive behavior of orally administered radiolabeled tamarind seed formulations in rabbits validated by gamma scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Mahboubeh; Karimian, Hamed; Yeong, Chai Hong; Fadaeinasab, Mehran; Khaing, Si Lay; Chung, Lip Yong; Mohamad Haron, Didi Erwandi B; Noordin, Mohamed Ibrahim

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to formulate floating gastroretentive tablets containing metformin hydrochloric acid (HCl), using various grades of hydrogel such as tamarind powders and xanthan to overcome short gastric residence time of the conventional dosage forms. Different concentrations of the hydrogels were tested to determine the formulation that could provide a sustained release of 12 h. Eleven formulations with different ratios of tamarind seed powder/tamarind kernel powder (TKP):xanthan were prepared. The physical parameters were observed, and in vitro drug-release studies of the prepared formulations were carried out. Optimal formulation was assessed for physicochemical properties, thermal stability, and chemical interaction followed by in vivo gamma scintigraphy study. MKP3 formulation with a TKP:xanthan ratio of 3:2 was found to have 99.87% release over 12 h. Furthermore, in vivo gamma scintigraphy study was carried out for the optimized formulation in healthy New Zealand White rabbits, and the pharmacokinetic parameters of developed formulations were obtained. (153)Sm2O3 was used to trace the profile of release in the gastrointestinal tract of the rabbits, and the drug release was analyzed. The time (Tmax) at which the maximum concentration of metformin HCl in the blood (Cmax) was observed, and it was extended four times for the gastroretentive formulation in comparison with the formulation without polymers. Cmax and the half-life were found to be within an acceptable range. It is therefore concluded that MKP3 is the optimal formulation for sustained release of metformin HCl over a period of 12 h as a result of its floating properties in the gastric region.

  12. Gastroretentive behavior of orally administered radiolabeled tamarind seed formulations in rabbits validated by gamma scintigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Mahboubeh; Karimian, Hamed; Yeong, Chai Hong; Fadaeinasab, Mehran; Khaing, Si Lay; Chung, Lip Yong; Mohamad Haron, Didi Erwandi B; Noordin, Mohamed Ibrahim

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to formulate floating gastroretentive tablets containing metformin hydrochloric acid (HCl), using various grades of hydrogel such as tamarind powders and xanthan to overcome short gastric residence time of the conventional dosage forms. Different concentrations of the hydrogels were tested to determine the formulation that could provide a sustained release of 12 h. Eleven formulations with different ratios of tamarind seed powder/tamarind kernel powder (TKP):xanthan were prepared. The physical parameters were observed, and in vitro drug-release studies of the prepared formulations were carried out. Optimal formulation was assessed for physicochemical properties, thermal stability, and chemical interaction followed by in vivo gamma scintigraphy study. MKP3 formulation with a TKP:xanthan ratio of 3:2 was found to have 99.87% release over 12 h. Furthermore, in vivo gamma scintigraphy study was carried out for the optimized formulation in healthy New Zealand White rabbits, and the pharmacokinetic parameters of developed formulations were obtained. 153Sm2O3 was used to trace the profile of release in the gastrointestinal tract of the rabbits, and the drug release was analyzed. The time (Tmax) at which the maximum concentration of metformin HCl in the blood (Cmax) was observed, and it was extended four times for the gastroretentive formulation in comparison with the formulation without polymers. Cmax and the half-life were found to be within an acceptable range. It is therefore concluded that MKP3 is the optimal formulation for sustained release of metformin HCl over a period of 12 h as a result of its floating properties in the gastric region. PMID:28031701

  13. Characterization of particulate drug delivery systems for oral delivery of Peptide and protein drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, Philip Carsten; Fano, Mathias; Saaby, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    Oral drug delivery is a preferred route because of good patient compliance. However, most peptide/ protein drugs are delivered via parenteral routes because of the absorption barriers in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract such as enzymatic degradation by proteases and low permeability acrossthe...... biological membranes. To overcome these barriers, different formulation strategies for oral delivery of biomacromolecules have been proposed, including lipid based formulations and polymer-based particulate drug delivery systems (DDS). The aim of this review is to summarize the existing knowledge about oral...... delivery of peptide/protein drugs and to provide an overview of formulationand characterization strategies. For a better understanding of the challenges in oral delivery of peptide/protein drugs, the composition of GI fluids and the digestion processes of different kinds of excipients in the GI tract...

  14. Drug addiction: self-perception of oral health

    OpenAIRE

    Eduardo Luiz Da-ré; Gabriel Ferreira Bello; Gabriela Pereira Silva; Leandro Araújo Fernandes; Daniela Coelho de Lima

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To report the self-perception of substance-abusing individuals who were in a recovery process regarding sociodemographic conditions and general and oral health. Methods: Descriptive cross-sectional study conducted in a recovery center for drug addiction in Alfenas, Minas Gerais, Brazil, in 2015, with 39 men aged over 18 years old. Data were collected using a semi-structured questionnaire that addressed: socioeconomic status, selfperception of general and oral health, access to dent...

  15. Loading of microcontainers for oral drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marizza, Paolo

    , they are usually degraded before they are absorbed. These combined factors considerably reduce the bioavailability of many active ingredients. Several strategies have been developed to overcome these challenges. One of them are microfabricated drug delivery devices. Microreservoir based-systems are characterized...... of drugs and with the perspective of mass production. In a first instance, the suitability of inkjet printing as filling method was elucidated. Solutions containing furosemide and lipid based formulations of insulin were dispensed into microcontainers. Secondly, this technique was successfully utilized...... to dispense controlled amounts of polymer into microcontainers. Subsequently, polymer filled-containers were loaded with drug. To achieve this, supercritical impregnation technology was successfully employed. Furthermore, in vitro drug dissolution studies showed that the loading yields and the release...

  16. Efficacy of orally administered powdered aloe juice (Aloe ferox against ticks on cattle and ticks and fleas on dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.J. Fourie

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of orally administered powdered aloe juice (Aloe ferox was evaluated against ticks on cattle and against ticks and fleas on dogs. Twelve calves were each infested over a 25-day period with approximately 4000 larvae of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus decoloratus and allocated to 3 groups of 4 calves each. Three days after the last larval infestation and daily for 22 days thereafter, the calves in 1 group were fed 5 mg / kg body weight and those in another 25 mg / kg body weight of powdered aloe juice incorporated in game maintenance pellets, while the animals in the 3rd group received only pellets. Detached female ticks were collected daily and counted and the weights and the fertility of groups of 50 engorged female ticks collected from the animals were ascertained. The powdered aloe juice in the game maintenance pellets had no effect on the tick burdens of the calves or on the fertility of the ticks. Six dogs, in each of 2 groups, were treated daily for 15 consecutive days, commencing on Day -5 before the 1st tick infestation, with either 0.39 g or 0.74 g of powdered aloe juice, administered orally in gelatin capsules, while a 3rd group of 6 dogs served as untreated controls. All the dogs were challenged with Haemaphysalis leachi on Days 0 and +7, and with Ctenocephalides felis on Days+1and +8, and efficacy assessments were made 1 day after flea and 2 days after tick challenge, respectively. Treatment was not effective against ticks or fleas on the dogs.

  17. Attenuation of obesity-induced inflammation in mice orally administered with salmon cartilage proteoglycan, a prophylactic agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Shouhei; Asano, Krisana; Nakane, Akio

    2017-03-11

    Obesity is associated with chronic inflammation of adipose tissue and causes development of type 2 diabetes. M1 macrophage population was increased in adipose tissue of obese mouse. M1 macrophages induce insulin resistance through the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Our previous studies demonstrated that salmon cartilage proteoglycan (PG) suppresses excess inflammation in various mouse inflammatory diseases. In this study, we examined the effect of PG on type 2 diabetes using high-fat-diet (HFD) induced obese mouse model. Oral PG administration enhanced the population of small adipocytes (area less than 1000 μm(2)) without body and tissue weight gain. In addition, PG administration suppressed mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-6 and CXCL2 in adipose tissue. The proportion of M1 macrophages was decreased by PG administration. In addition, PG administration suppressed hyperglycemia after intraperitoneal glucose injection. Fasted serum insulin level was decreased in PG-administered mice. Moreover, insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt was enhanced in the liver and gastrocnemius skeletal muscle of PG-administered mice. These data suggested that PG administration improves hyperglycemia and insulin sensitivity in obese mice by modulation of M1 macrophages which secrete proinflammatory cytokines in adipose tissue and activation of Akt in liver and skeletal muscle.

  18. Orally administered P22 phage tailspike protein reduces salmonella colonization in chickens: prospects of a novel therapy against bacterial infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakeeba Waseh

    Full Text Available One of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in man and economically important animals is bacterial infections of the gastrointestinal (GI tract. The emergence of difficult-to-treat infections, primarily caused by antibiotic resistant bacteria, demands for alternatives to antibiotic therapy. Currently, one of the emerging therapeutic alternatives is the use of lytic bacteriophages. In an effort to exploit the target specificity and therapeutic potential of bacteriophages, we examined the utility of bacteriophage tailspike proteins (Tsps. Among the best-characterized Tsps is that from the Podoviridae P22 bacteriophage, which recognizes the lipopolysaccharides of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. In this study, we utilized a truncated, functionally equivalent version of the P22 tailspike protein, P22sTsp, as a prototype to demonstrate the therapeutic potential of Tsps in the GI tract of chickens. Bacterial agglutination assays showed that P22sTsp was capable of agglutinating S. Typhimurium at levels similar to antibodies and incubating the Tsp with chicken GI fluids showed no proteolytic activity against the Tsp. Testing P22sTsp against the three major GI proteases showed that P22sTsp was resistant to trypsin and partially to chymotrypsin, but sensitive to pepsin. However, in formulated form for oral administration, P22sTsp was resistant to all three proteases. When administered orally to chickens, P22sTsp significantly reduced Salmonella colonization in the gut and its further penetration into internal organs. In in vitro assays, P22sTsp effectively retarded Salmonella motility, a factor implicated in bacterial colonization and invasion, suggesting that the in vivo decolonization ability of P22sTsp may, at least in part, be due to its ability to interfere with motility… Our findings show promise in terms of opening novel Tsp-based oral therapeutic approaches against bacterial infections in production animals and potentially in

  19. [Oral chemotherapy: food-drug interactions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana Martínez, Sara; Marcos Rodríguez, José Antonio; Romero Carreño, Elia

    2015-07-01

    Introducción: el uso de citostáticos orales está cada vez más extendido en oncología. Presenta ventajas importantes, como la comodidad para el paciente, pero también supone nuevos retos que no se planteaban con la terapia intravenosa. Algunos de estos fármacos presentan interacciones con los alimentos, dando lugar a cambios en su biodisponibilidad. Al tratarse de fármacos de estrecho margen terapéutico, pueden dar lugar a alteraciones en su eficacia y/o toxicidad. Objetivos: evaluar el nivel de conocimiento sobre el modo de administración por parte de los pacientes que acuden a la consulta de pacientes externos de oncohematología del hospital de aquellos citostáticos orales que presentan alguna restricción respecto a su consumo con alimentos (deben tomarse o bien en ayunas. o bien con alimentos). Minimizar al máximo la administración incorrecta de los citostáticos dispensados y el riesgo de que se produzcan interacciones con los alimentos, proporcionando información a los pacientes acerca del modo correcto de administración. Material y métodos: una vez identificados los citostáticos orales con restricciones respecto a su consumo con alimentos, además de la información aportada por farmacia, se preguntó a los pacientes la información que habían recibido por parte del médico acerca de cómo debía administrarse el fármaco, el modo en que se lo tomaban finalmente y, en caso de no hacerlo adecuadamente, se les reforzó la información pertinente. En el siguiente ciclo se confirmó si efectivamente el paciente se lo administraba correctamente, en caso de hacerlo previamente de forma incorrecta (intervención aceptada/no aceptada). Resultados y conclusiones: un 40% de los pacientes entrevistados se administraban el fármaco incorrectamente. Los resultados muestran una gran diversidad en función del fármaco dispensado. Se realizaron un total de 39 intervenciones, que fueron aceptadas en un 95%. Los datos obtenidos sugieren la necesidad de

  20. AN OVERVIEW ON VARIOUS APPROACHES TO ORAL CONTROLLED DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM VIA GASTRORETENTIVE DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhalla.Neetika

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years scientific and technological advancements have been made in the research and development of oral drug delivery system. Oral sustained drug delivery system is complicated by limited gastric residence times (GRTs. In order to understand various physiological difficulties to achieve gastric retention, we have summarized important factors controlling gastric retention. To overcome these limitations, various approaches have been proposed to increase gastric residence of drug delivery systems in the upper part of the gastrointestinal tract includes floating drug dosage systems (FDDS, swelling or expanding systems , mucoadhesive systems , magnetic systems, modified-shape systems, high density system and other delayed gastric emptying devices.

  1. pH-triggered drug release from biodegradable microwells for oral drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Line Hagner; Nagstrup, Johan; Gordon, Sarah;

    2015-01-01

    Microwells fabricated from poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) were evaluated for their application as an oral drug delivery system using the amorphous sodium salt of furosemide (ASSF) as a model drug. Hot embossing of PLLA resulted in fabrication of microwells with an inner diameter of 240 μm and a height...... of microwell cavities with an Eudragit® layer prevented drug release in biorelevant gastric medium. An immediate release of the ASSF from coated microwells was observed in the intestinal medium. This pH-triggered release behavior demonstrates the future potential of PLLA microwells as a site-specific oral drug...

  2. New antiplatelet drugs and new oral anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig-Oberhuber, V; Filipovic, M

    2016-09-01

    In our daily anaesthetic practice, we are confronted with an increasing number of patients treated with either antiplatelet or anticoagulant agents. During the last decade, changes have occurred that make the handling of antithrombotic medication a challenging part of anaesthetic perioperative management. In this review, the authors discuss the most important antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs, the perioperative management, the handling of bleeding complications, and the interpretation of some laboratory analyses related to these agents.

  3. 21 CFR 330.3 - Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products... AS SAFE AND EFFECTIVE AND NOT MISBRANDED General Provisions § 330.3 Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products. A requirement to imprint an identification code on solid oral dosage form drug...

  4. Self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems for oral insulin delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ping; Tan, Angel; Prestidge, Clive A

    2014-01-01

    This study aims at evaluating the combination of self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (SNEDDS) and enteric-coated capsules as a potential delivery strategy for oral delivery of insulin. The SNEDDS preconcentrates, loaded with insulin-phospholipid complex at different levels (0, 2.5 and 10% w...

  5. Solid Phospholipid Dispersions for Oral Delivery of Poorly Soluble Drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fong, Sophia Yui Kau; Martins, Susana A. M.; Brandl, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Celecoxib (CXB) is a Biopharmaceutical Classification System class II drug in which its oral bioavailability is limited by poor aqueous solubility. Although a range of formulations aiming to increase the solubility of CXB have been developed, it is not completely understood, whether (1) an increase...

  6. Comparison of Urine and Oral Fluid for Workplace Drug Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casolin, Armand

    2016-09-01

    To determine the relative detection rates of urine versus oral fluid testing in a safety sensitive industry and the correlation with diagnosed substance use disorders and possible impairment at work. The trial involved 1,500 paired urine and oral fluid tests performed in accordance with Australian Standard/New Zealand Standard (AS/NZS) 4308:2008 and AS 4760:2006. Workers who returned a positive test were screened for substance use disorders, as defined by DSM-5, and for possible impairment at work following that particular episode of substance use. Substances were detected in 3.7% (n = 56) of urine samples and 0.5% (n = 8) of oral fluid samples (p drug or a controlled substance without a clinical indication and prescription. Nine workers tested positive on urine alone, one on oral fluid alone and two on both (p = 0.0114). Of note, 6/11 workers who tested positive on urine had possible impairment at work and 2/11 had a substance use disorder versus 2/3 and 0/3, respectively, who tested positive on oral fluid. Urine drug testing performed in accordance with AS/NZS 4308:2008 is more likely to detect overall substance use and illicit drug use than oral fluid testing conducted in accordance with AS 4760:2006. Urine testing performed in accordance with AS/NZS 4308:2008 may also be more likely to detect workers with possible impairment at work and substance use disorders than oral fluid testing performed in accordance with AS 4760:2006. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  7. A REVIEW ON SELF MICRO EMULSIFYING DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM: AN APPROACH TO ENHANCE THE ORAL BIOAVAILABILITY OF POORLY WATER SOLUBLE DRUGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukla Prachi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Technology Catalysts International reported in 2002 that approximately 35-40% of all new chemical compounds suffer from poor aqueous solubility and present a major challenge to modern drug delivery system, because of their low oral bioavailability. Several strategies to improve the solubility and dissolution of poorly water soluble drugs have been developed, which were at start primarily based on modifying the drug’s physicochemical properties. Realization that the oral bioavailability of poor water soluble drugs may be enhanced when co-administered with meal rich in fat has led to increasing recent interest in the formulation of poorly water soluble drugs in lipids. Lipid-based drug delivery systems have gained considerable interest after the commercial success of Sandimmune NeoralTM (Cyclosporine A, Novartis Pvt. Ltd. and Fortovase (Saquinavir, Roche Laboratories Inc. Self micro-emulsifying drug delivery systems are a class of lipid based drug delivery systems. Self micro emulsifying drug delivery systems are isotropic mixtures of oil, surfactant, and co-surfactant and are a vital tool in solving low bioavailability issues of poorly soluble drugs. Lipophilic drugs can be dissolved in these systems, enabling them to be administered as a unit dosage form for per-oral administration. When such a system is released in the lumen of the gastrointestinal tract, it disperses to form a fine w/o microemulsion with the aid of GI fluid. This leads to in situ solubilization of drug that can subsequently be absorbed by lymphatic pathways, bypassing the hepatic first-pass effect. This article represents a complete review on self micro-emulsifying drug delivery system.

  8. Microcontainers - an oral drug delivery system for poorly soluble drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Line Hagner; Petersen, Ritika Singh; Marizza, Paolo

    with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) by inkjet printing followed by supercritical CO2 impregnation of ketoprofen into the PVP matrix. As an alternative filling method, the powder of amorphous sodium salt of furosemide, (ASSF) was filled into the SU-8 microcontainers. The PLLA microcontainers were filled with drug formulation...

  9. Orally disintegrating films: A modern expansion in drug delivery system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Irfan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few decades, tendency toward innovative drug delivery systems has majorly increased attempts to ensure efficacy, safety and patient acceptability. As discovery and development of new chemical agents is a complex, expensive and time consuming process, so recent trends are shifting toward designing and developing innovative drug delivery systems for existing drugs. Out of those, drug delivery system being very eminent among pediatrics and geriatrics is orally disintegrating films (ODFs. These fast disintegrating films have superiority over fast disintegrating tablets as the latter are associated with the risks of choking and friability. This drug delivery system has numerous advantages over conventional fast disintegrating tablets as they can be used for dysphasic and schizophrenic patients and are taken without water due to their ability to disintegrate within a few seconds releasing medication in mouth. Various approaches are employed for formulating ODFs and among which solvent casting and spraying methods are frequently used. Generally, hydrophilic polymers along with other excipients are used for preparing ODFs which allow films to disintegrate quickly releasing incorporated active pharmaceutical ingredient (API within seconds. Orally disintegrating films have potential for business and market exploitation because of their myriad of benefits over orally disintegrating tablets. This present review attempts to focus on benefits, composition, approaches for formulation and evaluation of ODFs. Additionally, the market prospect of this innovative dosage form is also targeted.

  10. Micro and nano structures for biosensing and oral drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Anja

    2014-01-01

    , facilitating electrochemical measurements. In cantilever-­‐based sensing, micrometer sized cantilevers are functionalized on one side with probe molecules. As target analytes bind to the probe molecules the cantilever deflects due to changes in surface stress. This deflection is typically in the nm range...... spectroscopy on picoliter amount of sample. Vibrating micrometer sized strings can be used for efficient and sensitive mass detection and for chemical analysis of single nanoparticles. We will show examples from drug characterization and illustrate how the strings can be read-­‐out using blu-­‐ray optics....... Finally, we will show how agglutination based assays can be handled and read-­‐out using the disc platform – here targeting biomarkers for rapid diagnostics and prognostics. Micrometer sized containers can be used for oral drug delivery. The hypothesis is that oral drug delivery can be improved...

  11. Comparable lumefantrine oral bioavailability when co-administered with oil-fortified maize porridge or milk in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwebaza, Norah; Jerling, Markus; Gustafsson, Lars L; Obua, Celestino; Waako, Paul; Mahindi, Margarita; Ntale, Muhammad; Beck, Olof; Hellgren, Urban

    2013-07-01

    Co-administration of artemether-lumefantrine with milk is recommended to improve lumefantrine (L) absorption but milk may not be available in resource-limited settings. This study explored the effects of cheap local food in Uganda on oral bioavailability of lumefantrine relative to milk. In an open-label, four-period crossover study, 13 healthy adult volunteers were randomized to receive a single oral dose of artemether-lumefantrine (80 mg artemether/480 mg lumefantrine) with water, milk, maize porridge or maize porridge with oil on separate occasions. Plasma lumefantrine was assayed using high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. Pharmacokinetic exposure parameters were determined by non-compartmental methods using WinNonlin. Peak concentrations (Cmax ) and area under concentration-time curve restricted to 48 hr after single dosing (AUC(0-48) ) were selected for relative bioavailability evaluations using confidence interval approach for average bioequivalence. Lumefantrine exposure was comparable in milk and maize porridge plus oil study groups. When artemether-lumefantrine was administered with maize porridge plus oil, average bioequivalence ranges (means ratios 90% CI, 0.84-1.88 and 0.85-1.69 for Cmax and AUC(0-48) , respectively) were within and exceeded acceptance ranges relative to milk (90% CI, 0.80-1.25). Both fasted and maize porridge groups demonstrated similarly much lower ranges of lumefantrine exposures (bioinequivalence) relative to milk. If milk is not available, it is thus possible to recommend fortification of carbohydrate-rich food with little fat (maize porridge plus vegetable oil) to achieve similarly optimal absorption of lumefantrine after artemether-lumefantrine administration.

  12. Recent advances in oral delivery of drugs and bioactive natural products using solid lipid nanoparticles as the carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hung Lin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Chemical and enzymatic barriers in the gastrointestinal (GI tract hamper the oral delivery of many labile drugs. The GI epithelium also contributes to poor permeability for numerous drugs. Drugs with poor aqueous solubility have difficulty dissolving in the GI tract, resulting in low bioavailability. Nanomedicine provides an opportunity to improve the delivery efficiency of orally administered drugs. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs are categorized as a new generation of lipid nanoparticles consisting of a complete solid lipid matrix. SLNs used for oral administration offer several benefits over conventional formulations, including increased solubility, enhanced stability, improved epithelium permeability and bioavailability, prolonged half-life, tissue targeting, and minimal side effects. The nontoxic excipients and sophisticated material engineering of SLNs tailor the controllable physicochemical properties of the nanoparticles for GI penetration via mucosal or lymphatic transport. In this review, we highlight the recent progress in the development of SLNs for disease treatment. Recent application of oral SLNs includes therapies for cancers, central nervous system-related disorders, cardiovascular-related diseases, infection, diabetes, and osteoporosis. In addition to drugs that may be active cargos in SLNs, some natural compounds with pharmacological activity are also suitable for SLN encapsulation to enhance oral bioavailability. In this article, we systematically introduce the concepts and amelioration mechanisms of the nanomedical techniques for drug- and natural compound-loaded SLNs.

  13. An exploratory study of the combined effects of orally administered methylphenidate and delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on cardiovascular function, subjective effects, and performance in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollins, Scott H; Schoenfelder, Erin N; English, Joseph S; Holdaway, Alex; Van Voorhees, Elizabeth; O'Brien, Benjamin R; Dew, Rachel; Chrisman, Allan K

    2015-01-01

    Methylphenidate (MPH) is commonly prescribed for the treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and is often used illicitly by young adults. Illicit users often coadminister MPH with marijuana. Little is known about physiologic and subjective effects of these substances used in combination. In this double-blind, cross-over experiment, sixteen healthy adult subjects free from psychiatric illness (including ADHD) and reporting modest levels of marijuana use participated in 6 experimental sessions wherein all combinations of placebo or 10mg oral doses of delta-9-tetrahydocannibinol (THC); and 0mg, 10mg and 40 mg of MPH were administered. Sessions were separated by at least 48 hours. Vital signs, subjective effects, and performance measure were collected. THC and MPH showed additive effects on heart rate and rate pressure product (e.g., peak heart rate for 10mg THC+0mg, 10mg, and 40 mg MPH=89.1, 95.9, 102.0 beats/min, respectively). Main effects of THC and MPH were also observed on a range of subjective measures of drug effects, and significant THC dose × MPH dose interactions were found on measures of "Feel Drug," "Good Effects," and "Take Drug Again." THC increased commission errors on a continuous performance test (CPT) and MPH reduced reaction time variability on this measure. Effects of THC, MPH, and their combination were variable on a measure of working memory (n-back task), though in general, MPH decreased reaction times and THC mitigated these effects. These results suggest that the combination of low to moderate doses of MPH and THC produces unique effects on cardiovascular function, subjective effects and performance measures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Simultaneous determination of three polyphenols in rat plasma after orally administering hawthorn leaves extract by the HPLC method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Xixiang; Meng, Xiansheng; Wang, Siyuan; Wang, Dong; Li, Haibo; Wang, Bing; Du, Yang; Liu, Xun; Zhang, Wenjie; Kang, Tingguo

    2012-01-01

    A simple and sensitive HPLC method was developed to simultaneously determine three active compounds, vitexin-4″-O-glucoside (VG), vitexin-2″-O-rhamnoside (VR) and hyperoside (HP), in rat plasma after administering the hawthorn leaves extract (HLE). An HPLC assay with baicalin as the internal standard was carried out using a Phenomsil C₁₈ analytical column with UV detection at 332 nm. The mobile phase consisted of methanol-acetonitrile-tetrahydrofuran-1% glacial acetic acid (6 : 1.5 : 18.5 : 74, v/v/v/v). The calibration curves were linear over the range of 2.5-500, 0.2-25 and 0.25-12.5 µg mL⁻¹ for VG, VR and HP, respectively. The method was reproducible and reliable, with relative standard deviations of the intra- and inter-day precision between 1.2% and 13.2% for the analysis of the three analytes. The validated HPLC method herein described was successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic study of VG, VR and HP after oral administration of HLE to rats over the dose range of 2.5-10  mL kg⁻¹.

  15. Effect of orally administered collagen hydrolysate on gene expression profiles in mouse skin: a DNA microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oba, Chisato; Ito, Kyoko; Ichikawa, Satomi; Morifuji, Masashi; Nakai, Yuji; Ishijima, Tomoko; Abe, Keiko; Kawahata, Keiko

    2015-08-01

    Dietary collagen hydrolysate has been hypothesized to improve skin barrier function. To investigate the effect of long-term collagen hydrolysate administration on the skin, we evaluated stratum corneum water content and skin elasticity in intrinsically aged mice. Female hairless mice were fed a control diet or a collagen hydrolysate-containing diet for 12 wk. Stratum corneum water content and skin elasticity were gradually decreased in chronologically aged control mice. Intake of collagen hydrolysate significantly suppressed such changes. Moreover, we used DNA microarrays to analyze gene expression in the skin of mice that had been administered collagen hydrolysate. Twelve weeks after the start of collagen intake, no significant differences appeared in the gene expression profile compared with the control group. However, 1 wk after administration, 135 genes were upregulated and 448 genes were downregulated in the collagen group. This suggests that gene changes preceded changes of barrier function and elasticity. We focused on several genes correlated with functional changes in the skin. Gene Ontology terms related to epidermal cell development were significantly enriched in upregulated genes. These skin function-related genes had properties that facilitate epidermal production and differentiation while suppressing dermal degradation. In conclusion, our results suggest that altered gene expression at the early stages after collagen administration affects skin barrier function and mechanical properties. Long-term oral intake of collagen hydrolysate improves skin dysfunction by regulating genes related to production and maintenance of skin tissue.

  16. Dopamine Signaling in the Nucleus Accumbens of Animals Self-Administering Drugs of Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willuhn, Ingo; Wanat, Matthew J.; Clark, Jeremy J.; Phillips, Paul E. M.

    2013-01-01

    Abuse of psychoactive substances can lead to drug addiction. In animals, addiction is best modeled by drug self-administration paradigms. It has been proposed that the crucial common denominator for the development of drug addiction is the ability of drugs of abuse to increase extracellular concentrations of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). Studies using in vivo microdialysis and chronoamperometry in the behaving animal have demonstrated that drugs of abuse increase tonic dopamine concentrations in the NAcc. However, it is known that dopamine neurons respond to reward-related stimuli on a subsecond timescale. Thus, it is necessary to collect neurochemical information with this level of temporal resolution, as achieved with in vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV), to fully understand the role of phasic dopamine release in normal behavior and drug addiction. We review studies that investigated the effects of drugs of abuse on NAcc dopamine levels in freely-moving animals using in vivo microdialysis, chronoamperometry and FSCV. After a brief introduction of dopamine anatomy and signal transduction, and a section on current theories of dopamine in natural goal-directed behavior, a discussion of techniques for the in vivo assessment of extracellular dopamine behaving animals is presented. Then, we review studies using these techniques to investigate changes in phasic and tonic dopamine signaling in the NAcc during 1) response-dependent and –independent administration of abused drugs, 2) drug-conditioned stimuli and operant behavior in self-administration paradigms, 3) drug withdrawal, and 4) cue-induced reinstatement of drug seeking. These results are then integrated with current ideas on the role of dopamine in addiction with an emphasis on a model illustrating phasic and tonic NAcc dopamine signaling during different stages of drug addiction. This model predicts that phasic dopamine release in response to drug-related stimuli will be enhanced over

  17. PHARMACOKINETICS OF TRAMADOL HYDROCHLORIDE AND ITS METABOLITE O-DESMETHYLTRAMADOL FOLLOWING A SINGLE, ORALLY ADMINISTERED DOSE IN CALIFORNIA SEA LIONS (ZALOPHUS CALIFORNIANUS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonstra, Jennifer L; Barbosa, Lorraine; Van Bonn, William G; Johnson, Shawn P; Gulland, Frances M D; Cox, Sherry K; Martin-Jimenez, Tomas

    2015-09-01

    Tramadol is a synthetic, centrally acting, opiate-like analgesic that is structurally related to codeine and morphine. The objective of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetics of tramadol hydrochloride and its major active metabolite O-desmethyltramadol (M1) in the California sea lion (Zalophus californianus). A single dose of tramadol was administered orally in fish at 2 mg/kg to a total of 15 wild California sea lions admitted for rehabilitation. Twenty-four total blood samples were collected post drug administration at 10, 20, 30, and 45 min and at 1, 3, 5, 6, 8, 12, and 24 hr. Blood plasma was separated and stored at -80°C until analysis with high-performance liquid chromatography was performed to determine levels of tramadol and M1, the major active metabolite. The results indicate that the plasma levels of parent tramadol are low or negligible during the first 30-45 min and then reach the predicted mean maximum plasma concentration of 358 ng/ml at 1.52 hr. The M1 metabolite was not detectable in 21 of 24 plasma samples, below the level of quantification of 5 ng/ml in one sample, and detectable at 11 and 17 ng/ml in two of the samples. This study suggests that a 2 mg/kg dose would need to be administered every 6-8 hr to maintain concentrations of tramadol above the minimum human analgesic level for mild to moderate pain. Based on dosing simulations, a dose of 4 mg/kg q8 hr or q12 hr, on average, may represent an adequate compromise, but further studies are needed using a larger sample size. Pharmacodynamic studies are warranted to determine if tramadol provides analgesic effects in this species. The potential for tramadol toxicosis at any dose also has not been determined in this species.

  18. 21 CFR 310.517 - Labeling for oral hypoglycemic drugs of the sulfonylurea class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... sulfonylurea class. 310.517 Section 310.517 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... Devices § 310.517 Labeling for oral hypoglycemic drugs of the sulfonylurea class. (a) The University Group... to all other sulfonylurea drugs as well. Therefore, the labeling for oral hypoglycemic drugs of...

  19. An overview of herbal supplement utilization with particular emphasis on possible interactions with dental drugs and oral manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abebe, Worku

    2003-01-01

    Herbal medication in the United States is a popular form of therapy. This paper provides an overview of the utilization of herbal supplements with particular emphasis on possible interactions with oral health drugs and oral manifestations. Herbal supplements are regulated by the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA), which limits their regulation by the U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A number of studies indicate that there is a progressive increase in the utilization of herbal supplements. The majority of consumers of these products are white, middle-aged women who have some college education. Many of the consumers use pharmaceutical drugs concurrently, but most do not inform their health-care providers about their use of herbal supplements. Various herbal supplements have been reported or are suspected to interact with certain oral health drugs, the most important one being 1) bromelain, cayenne, chamomile, feverfew, dong quai, eleuthro/Seberian ginseng, garlic, ginkgo, ginger, ginseng and licorice interacting with aspirin; 2) aloe latex, ephedra, ginseng, rhubarb, cascara sagrada, licorice, and senna interacting with corticosteriods; 3) kava, St. John's wort, chamomile, and valerian interacting with central nervous system (CNS) depressant drugs; and 4) herbs acting on the gastrointestinal system, altering the absorption of several orally administered drugs. Further, the use of some herbal supplements has been reported to be associated with oral manifestations, including aphthous ulcers, lip and tongue irritation, and swelling with feverfew; gingival bleeding with feverfew and ginkgo; tongue numbness with echinacea; xerostomia with St. John's wort; oral and lingual dyskinesia with kava; and salivation with yohimbe. These potential effects of herbal supplements in conjunction with factors related to regulation restrictions suggest that the use of these products may be associated with various adverse reactions that can affect oral health and

  20. Silexan, an orally administered Lavandula oil preparation, is effective in the treatment of 'subsyndromal' anxiety disorder: a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Siegfried; Gastpar, Markus; Müller, Walter E; Volz, Hans-Peter; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Dienel, Angelika; Schläfke, Sandra

    2010-09-01

    This study was performed to investigate the anxiolytic efficacy of silexan, a new oral lavender oil capsule preparation, in comparison to placebo in primary care. In 27 general and psychiatric practices 221 adults suffering from anxiety disorder not otherwise specified (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental disorders-IV 300.00 or International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth revision F41.9) were randomized to 80 mg/day of a defined, orally administered preparation from Lavandula species or placebo for 10 weeks with visits every 2 weeks. A Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAMA) total score >or=18 and a total score >5 for the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) were required. The primary outcome measures were HAMA and PSQI total score decrease between baseline and week 10. Secondary efficacy measures included the Clinical Global Impressions scale, the Zung Self-rating Anxiety Scale, and the SF-36 Health Survey Questionnaire. Patients treated with silexan showed a total score decrease by 16.0+/-8.3 points (mean+/-SD, 59.3%) for the HAMA and by 5.5+/-4.4 points (44.7%) for the PSQI compared to 9.5+/-9.1 (35.4%) and 3.8+/-4.1 points (30.9%) in the placebo group (Poil preparation had a significant beneficial influence on quality and duration of sleep and improved general mental and physical health without causing any unwanted sedative or other drug specific effects. Lavandula oil preparation silexan is both efficacious and safe for the relief of anxiety disorder not otherwise specified. It has a clinically meaningful anxiolytic effect and alleviates anxiety related disturbed sleep.

  1. Prevalence of drugs in oral fluid from truck drivers in Brazilian highways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombana, Henrique Silva; Gjerde, Hallvard; Dos Santos, Marcelo Filonzi; Jamt, Ragnhild Elén Gjulem; Yonamine, Mauricio; Rohlfs, Waldo José Caram; Muñoz, Daniel Romero; Leyton, Vilma

    2017-03-01

    Traffic accidents are responsible for 1.25 million deaths worldwide and are the most common cause of death among those aged 15-29 years. In Brazil, traffic accidents caused more than 44,000 deaths in 2014. The use of psychoactive drugs is an important risk factor for being involved in traffic accidents. Previous studies have found that psychoactive substances are commonly used by truck drivers in Brazil to maintain their extensive work schedule and stay awake while driving during nighttime hours. The state of Sao Paulo is one of the most important states regarding goods transportation. Important highways cross through Sao Paulo to other regions from Brazil and to other countries in Latin America. This study aims to determine the prevalence of illicit drug use by truck drivers in the state of Sao Paulo through toxicological analyses of oral fluid. Truck drivers were randomly stopped by police officers on federal roads during morning hours. Oral fluid samples were collected using the Quantisal™ device. In addition, a questionnaire concerning sociodemographic characteristics and health information was administered. Oral fluid samples were screened for amphetamine, cocaine, and tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) by ELISA and the confirmation was performed using ultra performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry detection (UPLC-MS/MS). Of the 764 drivers stopped, 762 agreed to participate. The participants were driving an average of 614km and 9.4h a day. Of the total samples, 5.2% (n=40) tested positive for drugs. Cocaine was the most frequently found drug (n=21), followed by amphetamine (n=16) and Δ9-THC (n=8). All drivers were men with an average age of 42.5 years. With these results we were able to verify that many truck drivers were still consuming psychoactive drugs while driving, and cocaine was the most prevalent one. This reinforces the need for preventive measures aimed at controlling the use of illicit drugs by truck drivers in Brazil.

  2. A randomized controlled trial of the efficacy and safety of CCX282-B, an orally-administered blocker of chemokine receptor CCR9, for patients with Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keshav, Satish; Vaňásek, Tomáš; Niv, Yaron;

    2013-01-01

    CCX282-B, also called vercirnon, is a specific, orally-administered chemokine receptor CCR9 antagonist that regulates migration and activation of inflammatory cells in the intestine. This randomized, placebo-controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the safety and efficacy of CCX282-B in 436 pat...... this clinical trial led to initiation of Phase 3 clinical trials in Crohn's disease....

  3. 78 FR 75570 - Guidance for Industry on New Animal Drugs and New Animal Drug Combination Products Administered...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-12

    ... Judicious Use of Medically Important Antimicrobial Drugs in Food-Producing Animals,'' and to set timelines... antimicrobial drugs intended for use in food-producing animals, as well as data on antimicrobial resistance... Animals: Recommendations for Drug Sponsors for Voluntarily Aligning Product Use Conditions With...

  4. Oral fluid for workplace drug testing: laboratory implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Christine

    2012-02-01

    As oral fluid increases in popularity for workplace testing, due to its easy and observed collection, the ability to adapt existing laboratory instrumentation without further capital investment will allow more facilities to test oral fluid. The European Workplace Drug Testing Society (EWDTS) guidelines for oral fluid testing outline the maximum cut-off concentrations acceptable under the workplace drug testing programme. The recommended cut-off values may be subject to change as advances in technology or other considerations warrant identification of these substances at different concentrations; however, the instrumentation currently exists for routine screening using immunoassay and confirmation by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) or liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectral detection (LC-MS/MS) so laboratories can easily implement oral fluid analysis in their current systems. Immunoassays for the detection of the drug classes at recommended levels have been developed using various collection devices and different formats: liquid reagent chemistries and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) platforms. Immunoassays provide faster turnaround than mass spectral methods particularly when the number of specimens increases. Since the guidelines state that positive immunoassay results should not be reported without confirmation, fully validated methods using LC-MS/MS and/or GC-MS for all drugs are also widely available. All proposed concentrations are easily achievable using MS instruments currently in testing laboratories; however, the likelihood of a low number of positive specimens in workplace populations allows the test facility to screen specimens in a cost-effective manner using immunoassay, while ensuring scientific credibility and defensibility by confirming the positive results with a second test. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Preliminary efficacy investigations of oral fipronil against Anopheles arabiensis when administered to Zebu cattle (Bos indicus) under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poché, Richard M; Githaka, Naftaly; van Gool, Frans; Kading, Rebekah C; Hartman, Daniel; Polyakova, Larisa; Abworo, Edward Okoth; Nene, Vishvanath; Lozano-Fuentes, Saul

    2017-12-01

    Globally, malaria remains one of the most important vector-borne diseases despite the extensive use of vector control, including indoor residual spraying (IRS) and insecticide-treated nets (ITNs). These control methods target endophagic vectors, whereas some malaria vectors, such as Anopheles arabiensis, preferentially feed outdoors on cattle, making it a complicated vector to control using conventional strategies. Our study evaluated whether treating cattle with a capsule containing the active ingredient (AI) fipronil could reduce vector density and sporozoite rates, and alter blood feeding behavior, when applied in a small-scale field study. A pilot field study was carried out in the Samia District, Western Kenya, from May to July 2015. Four plots, each comprised of 50 huts used for sleeping, were randomly designated to serve as control or treatment. A week before cattle treatment, baseline mosquito collections were performed inside the houses using mechanical aspirators. Animals in the treatment (and buffer) were administered a single oral application of fipronil at ∼0.5mg/kg of body weight. Indoor mosquito collections were performed once a week for four weeks following treatment. Female mosquitoes were first identified morphologically to species complex, followed by PCR-based methods to obtain species identity, sporozoite presence, and the host source of the blood meal. All three species of anophelines found in the study area (An. gambiae s.s., An. arabiensis, An. funestus s.s.) were actively transmitting Plasmodium falciparum during the study period. The indoor resting density of An. arabiensis was significantly reduced in treatment plot one at three weeks post-treatment (T1) (efficacy=89%; T1 density=0.08, 95% credibility intervals [0.05, 0.10]; control plot density=0.78 [0.22, 0.29]) and at four weeks post-treatment (efficacy=64%; T1 density=0.16 [0.08, 0.14]; control plot density=0.48 [0.17, 0.22]). The reduction of An. arabiensis mosquitoes captured in

  6. Review of drug treatment of oral submucous fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chole, Revant H; Gondivkar, Shailesh M; Gadbail, Amol R; Balsaraf, Swati; Chaudhary, Sudesh; Dhore, Snehal V; Ghonmode, Sumeet; Balwani, Satish; Mankar, Mugdha; Tiwari, Manish; Parikh, Rima V

    2012-05-01

    This study undertook a review of the literature on drug treatment of oral submucous fibrosis. An electronic search was carried out for articles published between January 1960 to November 2011. Studies with high level of evidence were included. The levels of evidence of the articles were classified after the guidelines of the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. The main outcome measures used were improvement in oral ulceration, burning sensation, blanching and trismus. Only 13 publications showed a high level of evidence (3 randomized controlled trials and 10 clinical trials/controlled clinical trials), with a total of 1157 patients. Drugs like steroids, hyaluronidase, human placenta extracts, chymotrypsin and collagenase, pentoxifylline, nylidrin hydrochloride, iron and multivitamin supplements including lycopene, have been used. Only systemic agents were associated with few adverse effects like gastritis, gastric irritation and peripheral flushing with pentoxifylline, and flushingly warm skin with nylidrin hydrochloride; all other side-effects were mild and mainly local. Few studies with high levels of evidence were found. The drug treatment that is currently available for oral submucous fibrosis is clearly inadequate. There is a need for high-quality randomized controlled trials with carefully selected and standardized outcome measures.

  7. Acceptability of rapid oral fluid HIV testing among male injection drug users in Taiwan, 1997 and 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Shu-Yu; Morisky, Donald E; Yeh, Ching-Ying; Twu, Shiing-Jer; Peng, Eugene Yu-Chang; Malow, Robert M

    2011-04-01

    Rapid oral fluid HIV testing (rapid oral testing) is in the process of being adapted in Taiwan and elsewhere given its advantages over prior HIV testing methods. To guide this process, we examined the acceptability of rapid oral testing at two time points (i.e., 1997 and 2007) among one of the highest risk populations, male injection drug users (IDUs). For this purpose, an anonymous self-administered survey was completed by HIV-negative IDUs involved in the criminal justice system in 1997 (N (1)=137 parolees) and 2007 (N (2)=106 prisoners). A social marketing model helped guide the design of our questionnaire to assess the acceptability of rapid oral testing. This included assessing a new product, across four marketing dimensions: product, price, promotion, and place. Results revealed that in both 1997 and 2007, over 90% indicated that rapid oral testing would be highly acceptable, particularly if the cost was under US$6, and that a pharmacy would be the most appropriate and accessible venue for selling the rapid oral testing kits. The vast majority of survey respondents believed that the cost of rapid oral testing should be federally subsidized and that television and newspaper advertisements would be the most effective media to advertise for rapid oral testing. Both the 1997 and 2007 surveys suggested that rapid oral HIV testing would be particularly accepted in Taiwan by IDUs after release from the criminal justice system.

  8. A phase I and pharmacokinetic study of oral lapatinib administered once or twice daily in patients with solid malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burris, Howard A; Taylor, Charles W; Jones, Suzanne F; Koch, Kevin M; Versola, Melissa J; Arya, Niki; Fleming, Ronald A; Smith, Deborah A; Pandite, Lini; Spector, Neil; Wilding, George

    2009-11-01

    This study determined the range of tolerable doses, clinical safety, pharmacokinetics, and preliminary evidence of clinical activity following once or twice daily administration of lapatinib in patients with solid malignancies. Cancer patients (n = 81) received oral doses of lapatinib ranging from 175 to 1,800 mg once daily or 500 to 900 mg twice daily. Clinical assessments of safety and antitumor activity were recorded and blood was sampled for pharmacokinetic assessments. The effect of a low-fat meal on lapatinib pharmacokinetics was assessed in a subset of patients. Lapatinib was well tolerated, such that dose escalation was limited at 1,800 mg once daily only by pill burden. Twice-daily dosing was implemented to further explore tolerability, and was limited by diarrhea to 500 mg twice daily. The most commonly reported adverse events with once-daily dosing were diarrhea (48%), nausea (40%), rash (40%), and fatigue (38%) and with twice-daily dosing were diarrhea (85%), rash (54%), and nausea (34%). Lapatinib serum concentrations accumulated upon repeated dosing, increasing nearly in proportion with dose, and were significantly increased when dosed with food or administered twice daily. One patient with head and neck cancer achieved a confirmed complete response and 22 patients had stable disease of >or=8 weeks including three patients with stable disease of >10 months (renal, lung, and salivary gland cancers). Lapatinib was well tolerated following once and twice daily administration. Systemic exposure to lapatinib was dependent on the dose, duration and frequency of dosing, and prandial state. Clinical activity was observed.

  9. Adherence to Safe Handling Guidelines by Health Care Workers Who Administer Antineoplastic Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Boiano, James M.; Steege, Andrea L.; Sweeney, Marie H.

    2014-01-01

    The toxicity of antineoplastic drugs is well documented. Many are known or suspected human carcinogens where no safe exposure level exists. Authoritative guidelines developed by professional practice organizations and federal agencies for the safe handling of these hazardous drugs have been available for nearly three decades. As a means of evaluating the extent of use of primary prevention practices such as engineering, administrative and work practice controls, personal protective equipment ...

  10. Drug addiction: self-perception of oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Luiz Da-ré

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To report the self-perception of substance-abusing individuals who were in a recovery process regarding sociodemographic conditions and general and oral health. Methods: Descriptive cross-sectional study conducted in a recovery center for drug addiction in Alfenas, Minas Gerais, Brazil, in 2015, with 39 men aged over 18 years old. Data were collected using a semi-structured questionnaire that addressed: socioeconomic status, selfperception of general and oral health, access to dental care, relationship with the dentist, and other issues. In order to assess the self-perception of oral health, the variable was dichotomized into “satisfactory” and “unsatisfactory”, which refer to what the individual acknowledges as a good or poor condition of oral health, using Fisher’s exact test with 5% significance level. Results: Most frequent diseases were depression, 35.90% (n=14, insomnia, 35.9%, (n=14 and recurring headache (23.1%; n=9; however, 61.50% (n=24 of the participants reported not getting sick easily, which contrasts with their self-perception. Regarding oral health, only 30.50% (n=12 of the participants reported brushing their teeth three times a day; 53.80% (n=21 had dentinal hypersensitivity; 41.00% (n=16 had dry mouth and bad breath; 30.80% (n=12 claimed to have bruxism and reported having one or more loose teeth; 28.20% (n=11 reported clenching the teeth in an exaggerated way, and 33.30% (n=13 reported feeling tooth pain. Conclusion: The self-perception of individuals – under 30 years old, single, white or mulattos – regarding their general health was contradictory, as they rated it as good but have reported depression, insomnia and weight loss; additionally, oral health was considered poor with unsatisfactory conditions, which highlights the harmful effects of substance abuse.

  11. Oral drugs in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwakman, J J M; Punt, C J A

    2016-07-01

    Intravenous administration of fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy has been the cornerstone of treatment in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) for decades. The availability of oral capecitabine has improved the tolerability in monotherapy schedules, and has simplified combination schedules. Since then, other oral drugs have proven efficacy in this setting. We review the available evidence and most recent data concerning oral drugs with proven efficacy in mCRC, including capecitabine, S-1, trifluridine-tipiracil (TAS-102) and regorafenib. The use of capecitabine is widely implemented in the care of mCRC. However, with recent data supporting its prolonged use, the relatively high incidence of hand-foot syndrome (HFS) may impair quality of life. In Asian populations, S-1 is associated with equivalent efficacy but lower incidence of HFS compared to capecitabine. Further studies evaluating the effects of S-1 in Western populations are needed. Both regorafenib and TAS-102 improve the overall survival of patients in whom all other treatment options have failed. Since only a subset of patients appears to benefit, future studies to identify predictive biomarkers are needed.

  12. Bioavailability of orally administered rhGM-CSF: a single-dose, randomized, open-label, two-period crossover trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenping Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF is usually administered by injection, and its oral administration in a clinical setting has been not yet reported. Here we demonstrate the bioavailability of orally administered rhGM-CSF in healthy volunteers. The rhGM-CSF was expressed in Bombyx mori expression system (BmrhGM-CSF. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using a single-dose, randomized, open-label, two-period crossover clinical trial design, 19 healthy volunteers were orally administered with BmrhGM-CSF (8 microg/kg and subcutaneously injected with rhGM-CSF (3.75 microg/kg respectively. Serum samples were drawn at 0.0h, 0.5h ,0.75h,1.0h,1.5h,2.0h ,3.0h,4.0h,5.0h,6.0h,8.0h,10.0h and 12.0h after administrations. The hGM-CSF serum concentrations were determined by ELISA. The AUC was calculated using the trapezoid method. The relative bioavailability of BmrhGM-CSF was determined according to the AUC ratio of both orally administered and subcutaneously injected rhGM-CSF. Three volunteers were randomly selected from 15 orally administrated subjects with ELISA detectable values. Their serum samples at the 0.0h, 1.0h, 2.0h, 3.0h and 4.0h after the administrations were analyzed by Q-Trap MS/MS TOF. The different peaks were revealed by the spectrogram profile comparison of the 1.0h, 2.0h, 3.0h and 4.0h samples with that of the 0.0h sample, and further analyzed using both Enhanced Product Ion (EPI scanning and Peptide Mass Fingerprinting Analysis. The rhGM-CSF was detected in the serum samples from 15 of 19 volunteers administrated with BmrhGM-CSF. Its bioavailability was observed at an average of 1.0%, with the highest of 3.1%. The rhGM-CSF peptide sequences in the serum samples were detected by MS analysis, and their sizes ranging from 2,039 to 7,336 Da. CONCLUSIONS: The results demonstrated that the oral administered BmrhGM-CSF was absorbed into the blood. This study provides an approach for an oral administration of

  13. Goblet cell targeting nanoparticle containing drug-loaded micelle cores for oral delivery of insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peiwen; Xu, Yining; Zhu, Xi; Huang, Yuan

    2015-12-30

    Oral administration of insulin remains a challenge due to its poor enzymatic stability and inefficient permeation across epithelium. We herein developed a novel self-assembled polyelectrolyte complex nanoparticles by coating insulin-loaded dodecylamine-graft-γ-polyglutamic acid micelles with trimethyl chitosan (TMC). The TMC material was also conjugated with a goblet cell-targeting peptide to enhance the affinity of nanoparticles with epithelium. The developed nanoparticle possessed significantly enhanced colloid stability, drug protection ability and ameliorated drug release profile compared with graft copolymer micelles or ionic crosslinked TMC nanoparticles. For in vitro evaluation, Caco-2/HT29-MTX-E12 cell co-cultures, which composed of not only enterocyte-like cells but also mucus-secreting cells and secreted mucus layer, were applied to mimic the epithelium. Intracellular uptake and transcellular permeation of encapsulated drug were greatly enhanced for NPs as compared with free insulin or micelles. Goblet cell-targeting modification further increased the affinity of NPs with epithelium with changed cellular internalization mechanism. The influence of mucus on the cell uptake was also investigated. Ex vivo performed with rat mucosal tissue demonstrated that the nanoparticle could facilitate the permeation of encapsulated insulin across the intestinal epithelium. In vivo study preformed on diabetic rats showed that the orally administered nanoparticles elicited a prolonged hypoglycemic response with relative bioavailability of 7.05%.

  14. Polysaccharide-based aerogel microspheres for oral drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-González, C A; Jin, M; Gerth, J; Alvarez-Lorenzo, C; Smirnova, I

    2015-03-06

    Polysaccharide-based aerogels in the form of microspheres were investigated as carriers of poorly water soluble drugs for oral administration. These bio-based carriers may combine the biocompatibility of polysaccharides and the enhanced drug loading capacity of dry aerogels. Aerogel microspheres from starch, pectin and alginate were loaded with ketoprofen (anti-inflammatory drug) and benzoic acid (used in the management of urea cycle disorders) via supercritical CO2-assisted adsorption. Amount of drug loaded depended on the aerogel matrix structure and composition and reached values up to 1.0×10(-3) and 1.7×10(-3) g/m(2) for ketoprofen and benzoic acid in starch microspheres. After impregnation, drugs were in the amorphous state in the aerogel microspheres. Release behavior was evaluated in different pH media (pH 1.2 and 6.8). Controlled drug release from pectin and alginate aerogel microspheres fitted Gallagher-Corrigan release model (R(2)>0.99 in both cases), with different relative contribution of erosion and diffusion mechanisms depending on the matrix composition. Release from starch aerogel microspheres was driven by dissolution, fitting the first-order kinetics due to the rigid starch aerogel structure, and showed different release rate constant (k1) depending on the drug (0.075 and 0.160 min(-1) for ketoprofen and benzoic acid, respectively). Overall, the results point out the possibilities of tuning drug loading and release by carefully choosing the polysaccharide used to prepare the aerogels.

  15. Oral Drugs Related with Muscle Wasting and Sarcopenia. A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campins, Lluis; Camps, Marcella; Riera, Ariadna; Pleguezuelos, Eulogio; Yebenes, Juan Carlos; Serra-Prat, Mateu

    2017-01-01

    Sarcopenia is a geriatric syndrome characterized by progressive and generalized loss of skeletal muscle mass and function. Reported prevalence of this geriatric syndrome, differs depending on the definition, the population and the method used to identify sarcopenia. The causes of sarcopenia are multifactorial, and can include genetic influence, immobility or disuse, endocrine factors, inflammation and nutritional deficiencies. These disorders involve an imbalance between anabolic and catabolic pathways that rules muscle mass. Many drugs taken regularly for common conditions may interact with some mechanisms that can alter the balance between protein synthesis and degradation. This may lead to a harmful or a beneficial effect on muscle mass and strength. Widely prescribed drugs could play an important role during the time of onset and development of sarcopenia. In this paper, we reviewed the current understanding of how can drugs contribute positively or negatively on sarcopenia and muscle wasting. We decided to focus this review on oral common drugs, which are usually prescribed in older adults, leaving aside other drugs as hormone therapy. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Novel Nanostructured Solid Materials for Modulating Oral Drug Delivery from Solid-State Lipid-Based Drug Delivery Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dening, Tahnee J; Rao, Shasha; Thomas, Nicky; Prestidge, Clive A

    2016-01-01

    Lipid-based drug delivery systems (LBDDS) have gained significant attention in recent times, owing to their ability to overcome the challenges limiting the oral delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs...

  17. Oral Migalastat HCl Leads to Greater Systemic Exposure and Tissue Levels of Active α-Galactosidase A in Fabry Patients when Co-Administered with Infused Agalsidase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G Warnock

    Full Text Available Migalastat HCl (AT1001, 1-Deoxygalactonojirimycin is an investigational pharmacological chaperone for the treatment of α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A deficiency, which leads to Fabry disease, an X-linked, lysosomal storage disorder. The currently approved, biologics-based therapy for Fabry disease is enzyme replacement therapy (ERT with either agalsidase alfa (Replagal or agalsidase beta (Fabrazyme. Based on preclinical data, migalastat HCl in combination with agalsidase is expected to result in the pharmacokinetic (PK enhancement of agalsidase in plasma by increasing the systemic exposure of active agalsidase, thereby leading to increased cellular levels in disease-relevant tissues. This Phase 2a study design consisted of an open-label, fixed-treatment sequence that evaluated the effects of single oral doses of 150 mg or 450 mg migalastat HCl on the PK and tissue levels of intravenously infused agalsidase (0.2, 0.5, or 1.0 mg/kg in male Fabry patients. As expected, intravenous administration of agalsidase alone resulted in increased α-Gal A activity in plasma, skin, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs compared to baseline. Following co-administration of migalastat HCl and agalsidase, α-Gal A activity in plasma was further significantly increased 1.2- to 5.1-fold compared to agalsidase administration alone, in 22 of 23 patients (95.6%. Importantly, similar increases in skin and PBMC α-Gal A activity were seen following co-administration of migalastat HCl and agalsidase. The effects were not related to the administered migalastat HCl dose, as the 150 mg dose of migalastat HCl increased α-Gal A activity to the same extent as the 450 mg dose. Conversely, agalsidase had no effect on the plasma PK of migalastat. No migalastat HCl-related adverse events or drug-related tolerability issues were identified.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01196871.

  18. Skin test concentrations for systemically administered drugs -- an ENDA/EAACI Drug Allergy Interest Group position paper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brockow, K; Garvey, L H; Aberer, W

    2013-01-01

    search on skin test drug concentration in MEDLINE and EMBASE, reviewed and evaluated the literature in five languages using the GRADE system for quality of evidence and strength of recommendation. Where the literature is poor, we have taken into consideration the collective experience of the group...

  19. Medication adherence to oral anticancer drugs: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen-Chuan; Chen, Chung-Yu; Lin, Shun-Jin; Chang, Chao-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that non-adherence to oral anticancer drugs (OACDs) has challenged treatment efficacy. Otherwise, few validated tools exist to measure patients' adherence to medication regimen in clinical practice. To synthesize previous studies on adherence by cancer patients taking OACDs, especially in targeted therapy, a systematic search of several electronic databases was conducted. We analyzed existing scales' contents for various cancer patients and outcomes of studies assessing adherence. However, a well-validated scale designed particularly for OACD adherence is still lacking. Most adherence scales used in the studies reviewed contain items focused on measuring patients' medication-taking behavior more than their barriers to medication compliance and beliefs. However, non-adherence to OACDs is a complex phenomenon, and drug-taking barriers and patient beliefs significantly affect patients' non-adherence. To understand the key drivers and predisposing factors for non-adherence, we need to develop a well-validated, multidimensional scale.

  20. Effect of mefloquine administered orally at single, multiple, or combined with artemether, artesunate, or praziquantel in treatment of mice infected with Schistosoma japonicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shu-hua; Mei, Jing-yan; Jiao, Pei-ying

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of the study is to explore the efficacy of mefloquine administered orally at single, multiple doses, or in combination with artesuante, artemether, or praziquantel in mouse--Schistosoma japonicum model. A total of 205 mice were divided into 4 batches and each batch of mice was infected percutaneously with 40 S. japonicum cercariae for 35 days. The infected mice were treated orally with mefloquine at single doses, multiple daily doses, or combined with artesunate, artemether, or praziquantel, while infected but untreated mice served as control. All treated animals were killed 4 weeks post-treatment for assessment of effect. When infected mice were treated orally with mefloquine at single or multiple daily doses under the same total dose levels, the tendency to decrease the efficacy was seen. Particularly, when a lower single dose of 100 mg/kg was divided equally into five daily doses of 20 mg/kg, the efficacy decreased statistically significant (Pmefloquine or artesuante at a single dose of 100 mg/kg, a moderate effect against schistosomes was observed. No further significant reduction of total and female worm burdens was seen, when the two drugs combined together at the same dose level. On the other hand, administration of mefloquine combined with artesunate at single dose of 50 mg/kg, which exhibited no effect against schistosomes, resulted in significant reduction of total and female worm burdens in comparison with the groups treated with mefloquine and artesunate alone at the same dose level. Similar results were observed in treatment of infected mice with mefloquine in combination with artemether at the smaller dose of 50 mg/kg. The total worm burden was significantly lower than that of control and the female worm burden was also significant lower than that of groups treated with mefloquine and artemether alone. Interestingly, in administration of mefloquine 100 mg/kg combined with artemether 100 mg/kg to the infected mice, all female worms were

  1. Fibrin formation and dissolution in women receiving oral contraceptive drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, A P; McKee, P A

    1977-04-01

    Factors affecting fibrin formation and dissolution were compared for 15 women taking combined oral contraceptives and 15 women using nonpharmacological methods of birth control. The two groups were matched for age, body weight, time of blood collection, and day in menstrual cycle; none of the women was receiving other drugs known to affect the blood coagulation or fibrinolytic parameters measured in this study. Fibrinogen concentrations tended to be higher in the experimental group; the degree of fibrinogen degradation, number of fibrin cross-links, and levels of factor XIII and plasminogen were the same for both group. There were significant reductions in antithrombin activity, the euglobulin lysis time, and fibrinolytic inhibitor level in women using oral contraceptives. An estrogen dose effect was suggested for fibrinogen concentration and the degree of antithrombin activity. The increased fibrinolytic activity and decreased fibrinolytic inhibitor levels are consistent with in vitro observations that antithrombin also inhibits plasmin activity. Thus while oral contraceptive-induced depression of antithrombin III could possibly predispose to thrombosis by diminishing the inhibition of the serine protease clotting factors, the concomitant decreased level of plasmin inhibition might balance the system by favoring thrombolysis as well as the digestion and inactivation of certain clotting factors by plasmin.

  2. Steady Increase In Prices For Oral Anticancer Drugs After Market Launch Suggests A Lack Of Competitive Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennette, Caroline S; Richards, Catherine; Sullivan, Sean D; Ramsey, Scott D

    2016-05-01

    The cost of treating cancer has risen to unprecedented heights, putting tremendous financial pressure on patients, payers, and society. Previous studies have documented the rising prices of cancer drugs at launch, but less critical attention has been paid to the cost of these drugs after launch. We used pharmacy claims for commercially insured individuals to examine trends in postlaunch prices over time for orally administered anticancer drugs recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). In the period 2007-13, inflation-adjusted per patient monthly drug prices increased 5 percent each year. Certain market changes also played a role, with prices rising an additional 10 percent with each supplemental indication approved by the FDA and declining 2 percent with the FDA's approval of a competitor drug. Our findings suggest that there is currently little competitive pressure in the oral anticancer drug market. Policy makers who wish to reduce the costs of anticancer drugs should consider implementing policies that affect prices not only at launch but also later.

  3. Can the genotype or phenotype of two polymorphic drug metabolising cytochrome P450-enzymes identify oral lichenoid drug eruptions?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Camilla; Hansen, Claus; Reibel, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    Lichenoid drug eruptions (LDE) in the oral cavity are adverse drug reactions (ADR) that are impossible to differentiate from oral lichen planus (OLP) as no phenotypic criteria exist. Impaired function of polymorphic cytochrome 450-enzymes (CYPs) may cause increased plasma concentration of some dr...

  4. A D-octapeptide drug efflux pump inhibitor acts synergistically with azoles in a murine oral candidiasis infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayama, Kazumi; Ishibashi, Hiroko; Ishijima, Sanae A; Niimi, Kyoko; Tansho, Shigeru; Ono, Yasuo; Monk, Brian C; Holmes, Ann R; Harding, David R K; Cannon, Richard D; Abe, Shigeru

    2012-03-01

    Clinical management of patients undergoing treatment of oropharyngeal candidiasis with azole antifungals can be impaired by azole resistance. High-level azole resistance is often caused by the overexpression of Candida albicans efflux pump Cdr1p. Inhibition of this pump therefore represents a target for combination therapies that reverse azole resistance. We assessed the therapeutic potential of the D-octapeptide derivative RC21v3, a Cdr1p inhibitor, in the treatment of murine oral candidiasis caused by either the azole-resistant C. albicans clinical isolate MML611 or its azole-susceptible parental strain MML610. RC21v3, fluconazole (FLC), or a combination of both drugs were administered orally to immunosuppressed ICR mice at 3, 24, and 27 h after oral inoculation with C. albicans. FLC protected the mice inoculated with MML610 from oral candidiasis, but was only partially effective in MML611-infected mice. The co-application of RC21v3 (0.02 μmol per dose) potentiated the therapeutic performance of FLC for mice infected with either strain. It caused a statistically significant decrease in C. albicans cfu isolated from the oral cavity of the infected mice and reduced oral lesions. RC21v3 also enhanced the therapeutic activity of itraconazole against MML611 infection. These results indicate that RC21v3 in combination with azoles has potential as a therapy against azole-resistant oral candidiasis.

  5. Anti-inflammatory effects of orally administered glucosamine oligomer in an experimental model of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Kazuo; Osaki, Tomohiro; Kurozumi, Seiji; Kiyose, Masatoshi; Tsuka, Takeshi; Murahata, Yusuke; Imagawa, Tomohiro; Itoh, Norihiko; Minami, Saburo; Sato, Kimihiko; Okamoto, Yoshiharu

    2015-01-22

    Anti-inflammatory effects of oral administration of the glucosamine oligomers (chito-oligosaccharides: COS) were evaluated in an experimental model of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Oral administration of COS improved shortening of colon length and tissue injury (as assessed by histology) in mice. Oral administration of COS inhibited inflammation in the colonic mucosa by suppression of myeloperoxidase activation in inflammatory cells, as well as activation of nuclear factor-kappa B, cyclooxygenase-2, and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Oral administration of COS also reduced serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6). Moreover, it prolonged survival time in mice. These data suggest that COS have anti-inflammatory effects in an experimental model of IBD, and could be new functional foods for IBD patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A single, low dose oral antigen exposure in newborn piglets primes mucosal immunity if administered with CpG oligodeoxynucleotides and polyphosphazene adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasternak, J Alex; Ng, Siew Hon; Wilson, Heather L

    2014-10-15

    By definition, soluble antigens ingested orally trigger mucosal tolerance such that any subsequent re-exposure by a systemic route results in suppression of immunity. We propose that antigens introduced in extreme early life can readily traverse the gut wall and therefore circumvent induction of mucosal tolerance and instead induce immunity. Piglets were drenched with low-doses of ovalbumin (OVA; 5mg or 0.05 mg) alone, OVA plus adjuvants (CpG oligodeoxynucleotides and PCEP polyphosphazene) or saline within 6h of birth. At 28 days of age, they were administered 10mg OVA plus 1:1 Montanide adjuvant (or saline) via the intraperitoneal (i.p.) route or via the oral route. Serum was obtained on day 28 and day 49 to measure OVA-specific antibodies titres. All piglets boosted orally with OVA plus Montanide, regardless of prior OVA exposure, failed to induce immunity. As expected, piglets drenched with saline but boosted via the i.p. route with OVA plus Montanide showed significant induction of anti-OVA IgA, IgG, IgG1 and IgG2 relative to saline control piglets. Newborn animals drenched with 5mg or 0.05 mg OVA failed to induce oral immunity. A second intramuscular injection in adulthood triggered immunity in the piglets that were drenched with 0.05 mg OVA and boosted initially by the i.p. route suggesting that some systemic lymphocytes were primed despite initial lack of induction of humoral immunity. In contrast, piglets orally immunized with 5mg or 0.05 mg OVA plus adjuvants resulted in significant induction of anti-OVA IgA (5mg only), IgM, IgG, IgG1 and IgG2 in serum relative to saline control piglets as well as significant induction of anti-OVA IgA, IgM (5mg only) IgG, IgG1 (5mg only) or IgG2 relative to piglets drenched with OVA alone. These data clearly show that the response was sensitive to the oral vaccine components and was not simply a response to the i.p. immunization at day 28. This work demonstrates that newborn piglets respond to oral antigens with immunity

  7. Orally administered lactoperoxidase ameliorates dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in mice by up-regulating colonic interleukin-10 and maintaining peripheral regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kouichirou; Horigome, Ayako; Yamauchi, Koji; Yaeshima, Tomoko; Iwatsuki, Keiji

    2009-11-01

    We previously demonstrated orally administered bovine lactoperoxidase (LPO) ameliorated dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in mice. Here, we examine the mechanism of action of LPO. Three days after colitis induction, expression of interferon-gamma mRNA in colonic tissue was significantly decreased in mice administered LPO; while mRNA expression of interleukin (IL)-10 and regulatory T cell (Treg) marker, Foxp3, were significantly increased. The proportion of CD4+CD25+ Tregs in peripheral CD4+ T cells was also significantly elevated when LPO was administered. Nine days after colitis induction, the severity of colitis symptoms, including body weight loss and colon shortening, was reduced and expression of IL-10 mRNA was increased in mice administered LPO. The proportion of CD4+CD25+ Tregs in peripheral leukocytes was also significantly elevated when LPO was administered. These results suggest LPO ameliorates colitis by up-regulating colonic anti-inflammatory cytokines and maintaining peripheral regulatory T cells.

  8. The Effect on Treatment Adherence of Administering Drugs as Fixed-Dose Combinations versus as Separate Pills: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katy A. van Galen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Administering drugs as fixed-dose combinations (FDCs versus the same active drugs administered as separate pills is assumed to enhance treatment adherence. We synthesized evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs about the effect of FDCs versus separate pills on adherence. We searched PubMed for RCTs comparing a FDC with the same active drugs administered as separate pills, including a quantitative estimate of treatment adherence, without restriction to medical condition. The odds ratio (OR of optimal adherence with FDCs versus separate pills was used as common effect size and aggregated into a pooled effect estimate using a random effect model with inverse variance weights. Out of 1258 articles screened, only six studies fulfilled inclusion criteria. Across medical conditions, administering drugs as FDC significantly increased the likelihood of optimal adherence (OR 1.33 (95% CI, 1.03–1.71. Within subgroups of specific medical conditions, the favourable effect of FDCs on adherence was of borderline statistical significance for HIV infection only (OR 1.46 (95% CI, 1.00–2.13. We observed a remarkable paucity of RCTs comparing the effect on adherence of administering drugs as FDC versus as separate pills. Administering drugs as FDC improved medication adherence. However, this conclusion is based on a limited number of RCTs only.

  9. The Effect on Treatment Adherence of Administering Drugs as Fixed-Dose Combinations versus as Separate Pills: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Galen, Katy A; Nellen, Jeannine F; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T

    2014-01-01

    Administering drugs as fixed-dose combinations (FDCs) versus the same active drugs administered as separate pills is assumed to enhance treatment adherence. We synthesized evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) about the effect of FDCs versus separate pills on adherence. We searched PubMed for RCTs comparing a FDC with the same active drugs administered as separate pills, including a quantitative estimate of treatment adherence, without restriction to medical condition. The odds ratio (OR) of optimal adherence with FDCs versus separate pills was used as common effect size and aggregated into a pooled effect estimate using a random effect model with inverse variance weights. Out of 1258 articles screened, only six studies fulfilled inclusion criteria. Across medical conditions, administering drugs as FDC significantly increased the likelihood of optimal adherence (OR 1.33 (95% CI, 1.03-1.71)). Within subgroups of specific medical conditions, the favourable effect of FDCs on adherence was of borderline statistical significance for HIV infection only (OR 1.46 (95% CI, 1.00-2.13)). We observed a remarkable paucity of RCTs comparing the effect on adherence of administering drugs as FDC versus as separate pills. Administering drugs as FDC improved medication adherence. However, this conclusion is based on a limited number of RCTs only.

  10. Biodegradable microcontainers as an oral drug delivery system for poorly soluble drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Line Hagner; Nagstrup, Johan; Keller, Stephan Sylvest

    2013-01-01

    -equilibration of the dissolution cell with the intestinal medium, a release of furosemide was observed after 1 min with an increased release after 5 min of dissolution. CONCLUSIONS: Biodegradable microcontainers were successfully fabricated and loaded with drug. Coating with Eudragit L-100 proved to be useful for protecting drug......PURPOSE: To fabricate microcontainers in biodegradable polylactic acid (PLLA) polymer films using hot embossing, and investigate the application of fabricated microcontainers as an oral drug delivery system for a poorly soluble drug. METHODS: For fabrication of the PLLA microcontainers, a film...... of PLLA was produced by spin coating. The film was heated above the polymer glass transition temperature (Tg), and a stamp was forced into the film. Following cooling of the film the stamp was removed, exposing the formed microcontainers. Microcontainers were filled with amorphous furosemide sodium salt...

  11. The efficacy and plasma profiles of abamectin plus levamisole combination anthelmintics administered as oral and pour-on formulations to cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leathwick, D M; Miller, C M; Sauermann, C W; Candy, P M; Ganesh, S; Fraser, K; Waghorn, T S

    2016-08-30

    In phase I, faecal egg count reduction tests (FECRT) were conducted on six commercial cattle farms to compare the performance of two pour-on and one oral combination anthelmintic. Groups of 12-15 calves were sampled for faecal nematode egg count (FEC) before treatment with either abamectin oral, levamisole oral, an abamectin+levamisole oral combination or one of two abamectin+levamisole combination pour-ons. Samples were collected again 14days after treatment to calculate the percentage reduction in FEC. The proportions of infective stage larvae (L3) in faecal cultures were used to apportion egg counts to, and calculate efficacy against, the main parasite genera. Abamectin oral was effective against Ostertagia except on one farm where resistance was indicated, but had reduced efficacy against Cooperia on four farms. Levamisole oral was effective against Cooperia on all farms, but had variable efficacy against Ostertagia. The abamectin+levamisole oral was effective against both species on all farms. The abamectin+levamisole pour-ons were effective on some farms but not on others. In particular, pour-on 2 failed to achieve 95% efficacy in 45% of evaluations, 4/6 against Cooperia and 1/5 against Ostertagia. On some farms the combination pour-ons were less effective than their constituent actives administered alone as orals. In phase II, 8 groups of 6 calves, grazing parasite-free pasture, were infected with putatively ML-resistant isolates of Cooperia oncophora and Ostertagia ostertagi. Once infections were patent groups were treated with oral or pour-on formulations of abamectin alone, levamisole alone, abamectin+levamisole (two pour-ons) or remained untreated. Blood samples were collected for analysis and after 8days all calves were euthanized and abomasa and intestines recovered for worm counts. All treatments were effective against O. ostertagi and all treatments containing levamisole were effective against C. oncophora. Animals treated with the oral combination

  12. ORAL MULTIPARTICULATE PULSATILE DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaji Jessy

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Pulsatile drug delivery aims to release drugs in a planned pattern i.e. at appropriate time and/or at a suitable site of action. Pharmaceutical invention and research are increasingly focusing on delivery systems which enhance desirable therapeutic objectives while minimising side effects. However, in recent pharmaceutical applications involving pulsatile delivery, multiparticulate dosage forms are gaining much favour over single-unit dosage forms because of their potential benefits like predictable gastric emptying, no risk of dose dumping, flexible release patterns and increased bioavailability with less inter- and intra-subject variability. Based on these, the present review aims to study multiparticulate pulsatile delivery systems, for which the Reservoir systems with rupturable polymeric coatings and Reservoir systems with erodible polymer coatings are primarily involved in the control of release. Multiparticulate drug delivery systems provide tremendous opportunities for designing new controlled and delayed release oral formulations, thus extending the frontier of future pharmaceutical development. The development of low density floating multiparticulate pulsed-release dosage forms possessing gastric retention capabilities has also been addressed with increasing focus on the upcoming multiparticulate-pulsatile technologies being exploited on an industrial scale.

  13. Lipophilic drug transfer between liposomal and biological membranes: what does it mean for parenteral and oral drug delivery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahr, Alfred; van Hoogevest, Peter; Kuntsche, Judith; Leigh, Mathew L S

    2006-01-01

    This review presents the current knowledge on the interaction of lipophilic, poorly water soluble drugs with liposomal and biological membranes. The center of attention will be on drugs having the potential to dissolve in a lipid membrane without perturbing them too much. The degree of interaction is described as solubility of a drug in phospholipid membranes and the kinetics of transfer of a lipophilic drug between membranes. Finally, the consequences of these two factors on the design of lipid-based carriers for oral, as well as parenteral use, for lipophilic drugs and lead selection of oral lipophilic drugs is described. Since liposomes serve as model-membranes for natural membranes, the assessment of lipid solubility and transfer kinetics of lipophilic drug using liposome formulations may additionally have predictive value for bioavailability and biodistribution and the pharmacokinetics of lipophilic drugs after parenteral as well as oral administration.

  14. Anti-tumor properties of orally administered glucosamine and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine oligomers in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Sachie; Azuma, Kazuo; Kurozumi, Seiji; Kiyose, Masatoshi; Osaki, Tomohiro; Tsuka, Takeshi; Itoh, Norihiko; Imagawa, Tomohiro; Minami, Saburo; Sato, Kimihiko; Okamoto, Yoshiharu

    2014-10-13

    The current study evaluated the anti-tumor activities of N-acetyl-d-glucosamine oligomer (NACOS) and glucosamine oligomer (COS) after their oral administration in a tumor (colon 26)-bearing mouse model. Compared to the control group, NACOS and COS groups showed significantly suppressed tumor growth, and apparent, marked apoptosis in tumor tissues. Furthermore, serum interleukin-12p70 and interferon-γ levels significantly increased in the NACOS and COS groups compared to the corresponding levels in the control group. Collectively, the results indicate the oral administration of NACOS and COS could enhance innate immunity. Results of experiments in Myd-88 knockout mice revealed that the apparent effects were related to both Myd-88-dependent and Myd-88-independent pathways. The data indicated that oral administration of NACOS and COS produced anti-tumor effects through the induction of apoptosis and stimulation of the immune system, which suggests that NACOS and COS are candidate anti-tumor functional foods.

  15. Microdialysis sampling for investigations of bioavailability and bioequivalence of topically administered drugs: current state and future perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmgaard, R; Nielsen, J B; Benfeldt, E

    2010-01-01

    Microdialysis (MD) in the skin is a unique technique for in vivo sampling of topically as well as systemically administered drugs at the site of action, e.g. sampling the unbound tissue concentrations in the dermis and subcutaneous tissue. MD as a research method has undergone significant...... by skin disease or barrier perturbation. A comparison between MD and other tissue sampling techniques reveals the advantages and limitations of the method. Subsequently, an in-depth discussion of the application of MD for the evaluation of bioavailability and bioequivalence of topical formulations...... development, improvement and validation during the last decade and has proved to be a versatile, safe and valuable tool for pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies. This review gives an overview of the current state and future perspectives of dermal MD sampling. Methodological issues such as choice...

  16. Determinants and associated factors influencing medication adherence and persistence to oral anticancer drugs: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbrugghe, M; Verhaeghe, S; Lauwaert, K; Beeckman, D; Van Hecke, A

    2013-10-01

    The use of oral anticancer drugs has increased in modern oncology treatment. The move from intravenous treatments towards oral anticancer drugs has increased the patients' own responsibility to take oral anticancer drugs as being prescribed. High rates of non-adherence to oral anticancer drugs have been reported. A systematic literature review was conducted to gain insight into determinants and associated factors of non-adherence and non-persistence in patients taking oral anticancer therapy. PubMed, Cochrane, Web of Science and Cinahl were systematically searched for studies focusing on determinants and associated factors of medication non-adherence and non-persistence to oral anticancer drugs. The methodological quality of the included studies was assessed by two independent reviewers. No studies were excluded based on the quality assessment. Twenty-five studies were included and systematically reviewed. The quality of the studies was moderate. Associated factors influencing medication non-adherence and non-persistence to oral anticancer drugs are multifactorial and interrelated. Older and younger age, and the influence of therapy related side effects were found to be predominant factors. Non-adherence and non-persistence to oral anticancer drug therapy are complex phenomena. More qualitative research is needed to facilitate the development of patient tailored complex interventions by exploring patients' needs and underlying processes influencing medication non-adherence and non-persistence to oral anticancer drugs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Gas gangrene following intra-arterial injection of oral medication in a drug abuser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiart, D C; Andrade, B; Murie, J A

    1992-09-01

    We report a patient in whom intra-arterial injection of oral medication led to the development of fulminating gas gangrene and death, despite the initial clinical symptoms being minor. We believe that prophylactic antibiotics should be administered to patients following intra-arterial injection of oral medication especially if immunocompetence, such as from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, is likely.

  18. Nanotechnology Based Approaches for Enhancing Oral Bioavailability of Poorly Water Soluble Antihypertensive Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayank Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral administration is the most convenient route among various routes of drug delivery as it offers high patient compliance. However, the poor aqueous solubility and poor enzymatic/metabolic stability of drugs are major limitations in successful oral drug delivery. There are several approaches to improve problems related to hydrophobic drugs. Among various approaches, nanotechnology based drug delivery system has potential to overcome the challenges associated with the oral route of administration. Novel drug delivery systems are available in many areas of medicine. The application of these systems in the treatment of hypertension continues to broaden. The present review focuses on various nanocarriers available in oral drug administration for improving solubility profile, dissolution, and consequently bioavailability of hydrophobic antihypertensive drugs.

  19. New developments and opportunities in oral mucosal drug delivery for local and systemic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearnden, Vanessa; Sankar, Vidya; Hull, Katrusha; Juras, Danica Vidović; Greenberg, Martin; Kerr, A Ross; Lockhart, Peter B; Patton, Lauren L; Porter, Stephen; Thornhill, Martin H

    2012-01-01

    The oral mucosa's accessibility, excellent blood supply, by-pass of hepatic first-pass metabolism, rapid repair and permeability profile make it an attractive site for local and systemic drug delivery. Technological advances in mucoadhesives, sustained drug release, permeability enhancers and drug delivery vectors are increasing the efficient delivery of drugs to treat oral and systemic diseases. When treating oral diseases, these advances result in enhanced therapeutic efficacy, reduced drug wastage and the prospect of using biological agents such as genes, peptides and antibodies. These technologies are also increasing the repertoire of drugs that can be delivered across the oral mucosa to treat systemic diseases. Trans-mucosal delivery is now a favoured route for non-parenteral administration of emergency drugs and agents where a rapid onset of action is required. Furthermore, advances in drug delivery technology are bringing forward the likelihood of transmucosal systemic delivery of biological agents.

  20. Adverse drug reaction monitoring of newer oral anti diabetic drugs – a pharmacovigilance perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankita Bhattacharjee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To monitor and evaluate adverse drug reactions (ADRs of newer oral anti-diabetic drugs in type II diabetics by spontaneous/solicited ADR monitoring.Material and methods: Two hundred and thirty two diabetic patients on newer oral antidiabetic drugs were evaluated prospectively in a cross-sectional study over a period of eighteen months. All patients were followed up for ADRs which were evaluated for incidence, frequency, severity and causality. ADR severity was graded according to University of Virginia Health System Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting program criteria and causality assessment was done using WHO-UMC scale.Results: 190 out of 232 patients (42 patients lost to follow up were evaluated. ADRs were observed in 34 cases (17.9%. Most common ADRs were gastrointestinal (44.2% followed by musculoskeletal (17.6%, metabolic (14.7%, infections (5.9% and others (17.6%. The maximal frequency of ADRs was seen with sitagliptin (6.4% followed by vildagliptin(3.8%, saxagliptin(2.7%, saroglitazar(2.1%, linagliptin(1.6%, canagliflozin(1.6%. 25(73.5%, 8(23.5% and 1(3% ADRs were mild, moderate and severe respectively. 24(70% ADRs were classified as possible, 9(27% probable and 1(3% unlikely on causality assessment. Conclusion: Newer oral antidiabetic drugs like gliptins and SGLT-2 inhibitors have potential to cause ADRs. Gastro-intestinal, musculoskeletal, metabolic were most common ADRs. Active pharmacovigilance should be carried out for risk identification and management. 

  1. Pectin-based oral drug delivery to the colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sande, Sverre Arne

    2005-05-01

    This review presents an overview of studies concerning oral formulations intended for site-specific drug delivery to the colon with pectin as the main excipient. The biological aspects covered include gastrointestinal transit and the enzymatic degradation of pectin. Scintigraphic methods demonstrating the functionality of pectin formulations are discussed. The main focus is on the various formulations reported, including matrix tablets, multiparticulate formulations as pellets and hydrogel beads, and pectin-based coatings. Also included is an evaluation of common excipients employed to improve colon specificity by crosslinking or increasing the hydrophobicity. Finally, properties of the pectin molecules that are important for successful formulations are examined. The conclusion is that the studies found in the literature provide an excellent platform for the development of pectin-based colon delivery systems.

  2. Animal versus human oral drug bioavailability: do they correlate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musther, Helen; Olivares-Morales, Andrés; Hatley, Oliver J D; Liu, Bo; Rostami Hodjegan, Amin

    2014-06-16

    Oral bioavailability is a key consideration in development of drug products, and the use of preclinical species in predicting bioavailability in human has long been debated. In order to clarify whether any correlation between human and animal bioavailability exist, an extensive analysis of the published literature data was conducted. Due to the complex nature of bioavailability calculations inclusion criteria were applied to ensure integrity of the data. A database of 184 compounds was assembled. Linear regression for the reported compounds indicated no strong or predictive correlations to human data for all species, individually and combined. The lack of correlation in this extended dataset highlights that animal bioavailability is not quantitatively predictive of bioavailability in human. Although qualitative (high/low bioavailability) indications might be possible, models taking into account species-specific factors that may affect bioavailability are recommended for developing quantitative prediction.

  3. Bacterial antigen expression is an important component in inducing an immune response to orally administered Salmonella-delivered DNA vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle E Gahan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The use of Salmonella to deliver heterologous antigens from DNA vaccines is a well-accepted extension of the success of oral Salmonella vaccines in animal models. Attenuated S. typhimurium and S. typhi strains are safe and efficacious, and their use to deliver DNA vaccines combines the advantages of both vaccine approaches, while complementing the limitations of each technology. An important aspect of the basic biology of the Salmonella/DNA vaccine platform is the relative contributions of prokaryotic and eukaryotic expression in production of the vaccine antigen. Gene expression in DNA vaccines is commonly under the control of the eukaryotic cytomegalovirus (CMV promoter. The aim of this study was to identify and disable putative bacterial promoters within the CMV promoter and evaluate the immunogenicity of the resulting DNA vaccine delivered orally by S. typhimurium. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The results reported here clearly demonstrate the presence of bacterial promoters within the CMV promoter. These promoters have homology to the bacterial consensus sequence and functional activity. To disable prokaryotic expression from the CMV promoter a series of genetic manipulations were performed to remove the two major bacterial promoters and add a bacteria transcription terminator downstream of the CMV promoter. S. typhimurium was used to immunise BALB/c mice orally with a DNA vaccine encoding the C-fragment of tetanus toxin (TT under control of the original or the modified CMV promoter. Although both promoters functioned equally well in eukaryotic cells, as indicated by equivalent immune responses following intramuscular delivery, only the original CMV promoter was able to induce an anti-TT specific response following oral delivery by S. typhimurium. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that prokaryotic expression of the antigen and co-delivery of this protein by Salmonella are at least partially responsible for the successful

  4. In vitro characterization of microcontainers as an oral drug delivery system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Line Hagner; Keller, Stephan Sylvest; Petersen, Ritika Singh;

    We here present in vitro studies showing the promise of microcontainers (fabricated in either SU-8 or Poly(lactic acid) (PLLA)) as an oral drug delivery system for the poorly watersoluble drug, furosemide.......We here present in vitro studies showing the promise of microcontainers (fabricated in either SU-8 or Poly(lactic acid) (PLLA)) as an oral drug delivery system for the poorly watersoluble drug, furosemide....

  5. Effect of orally administered betel leaf (Piper betle Linn.) on digestive enzymes of pancreas and intestinal mucosa and on bile production in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, M S; Platel, K; Saraswathi, G; Srinivasan, K

    1995-10-01

    The influence of two varieties of betel leaf (Piper betle Linn.) namely, the pungent Mysore and non-pungent Ambadi, was examined on digestive enzymes of pancreas and intestinal mucosa and on bile secretion in experimental rats. The betel leaves were administered orally at two doses which were either comparable to human consumption level or 5 times this. The results indicated that while these betel leaves do not influence bile secretion and composition, they have a significant stimulatory influence on pancreatic lipase activity. Besides, the Ambadi variety of betel leaf has a positive stimulatory influence on intestinal digestive enzymes, especially lipase, amylase and disaccharidases. A slight lowering in the activity of these intestinal enzymes was seen when Mysore variety of betel leaf was administered, and this variety also had a negative effect on pancreatic amylase. Further, both the betel leaf varieties have shown decreasing influence on pancreatic trypsin and chymotrypsin activities.

  6. Oral Health of Drug Abusers: A Review of Health Effects and Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Ekhtiari

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Oral health problems, among the most prevalent comorbidities related to addiction, require more attention by both clinicians and policy-makers. Our aims were to review oral complications associated with drugs, oral health care in addiction rehabilitation, health services available, and barriers against oral health promotion among addicts. Drug abuse is associated with serious oral health problems including generalized dental caries, periodontal diseases, mucosal dysplasia, xerostomia, bruxism, tooth wear, and tooth loss. Oral health care has positive effects in recovery from drug abuse: patients’ need for pain control, destigmatization, and HIV transmission. Health care systems worldwide deliver services for addicts, but most lack oral health care programs. Barriers against oral health promotion among addicts include difficulty in accessing addicts as a target population, lack of appropriate settings and of valid assessment protocols for conducting oral health studies, and poor collaboration between dental and general health care sectors serving addicts. These interfere with an accurate picture of the situation. Moreover, lack of appropriate policies to improve access to dental services, lack of comprehensive knowledge of and interest among dental professionals in treating addicts, and low demand for non-emergency dental care affect provision of effective interventions. Management of drug addiction as a multi-organ disease requires a multidisciplinary approach. Health care programs usually lack oral health care elements. Published evidence on oral complications related to addiction emphasizes that regardless of these barriers, oral health care at various levels including education, prevention, and treatment should be integrated into general care services for addicts.

  7. COMMON DRUGS ADMINISTERED FOR DEPRESSION IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS: A CLINIC - BASED STUDY IN NOOR HOSPITAL (1996-98

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M MAROOFI

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. There are increasing interests about pharmacotherapy in depressed children and adolescents. Althought TCAs (such as imipramine are approved for use in enuresis and ADHD, but controlled studies have failed to demonstrate efficacy of them over placebo in the treatment of depressive disorders in both children or adolescents. On the other hand, a relatively more amount of studies address SSRls (such as fluoxetine, as the drug of choice for treatment of depressed children and adolescents, because of theire effectiveness and safety.
    Methods. In this retrospective study, 306 depressed child and adolescent (7-18 year old who admitted to a psychiatric out patient clinic were studied (196 male and 110 female. Imipramine and fluoxetin were administered for 47 percent and 43 percent of cases, respectively.
    Results. In imipramin geoup and fluoxetine group the symptoms of 126 (87 percent and 102 (77 percent patient was improved, respectively. The frequency of side effects was 21 percent for imipramin (specialy sedation, dizziness and palpitation and 22 percent for fluoxatine (specially headache, insomnia and agitation.
    Discussion. This study suggests that both imipramin and fluoxetine are efficient for tratment of children and adolescents depression. However, because of high theraputic index of fluoxetine, this drug may be a better choice.

  8. Physicochemical characterisation of fluids and soft foods frequently mixed with oral drug formulations prior to administration to children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, E; Barry, A; Klein, S

    2016-03-01

    Oral drug administration to children poses specific pharmaceutical challenges that are often not seen to the same extent in adults, and whose occurrence may also be age dependent. When an age-appropriate dosage form is not available, manipulation of adult dosage forms (e.g., splitting and crushing of tablets or opening of capsules) has been reported as a means to facilitate administration to children. To enhance swallowability and/or mask an unpleasant taste of the dosage form to be administered, crushed/split tablets or the contents of capsules are often mixed with food or drinks or suspended in a vehicle prior to administration. However, it seems that the risks and benefits of an approach whereby the dosage form is modified prior to administration in this manner are everything but clear. The aim of the present study was to gain an overview of the physicochemical properties of a number of fluids, soft foods and suspension vehicles that are commonly reported to be mixed with oral medications before administration to children to improve patient acceptability. For this purpose, physicochemical parameters of 15 different fluids, soft foods and suspension vehicles were measured. These included pH, buffer capacity, osmolality, surface tension and viscosity. Results of the study clearly show the differences in physicochemical properties of the test candidates. It is thus obvious that the type of fluid/food mixed with a drug product before administration may have a significant impact on bioavailability of the drug administered. Therefore, a risk-based assessment of such practices considering API properties, formulation features and physicochemical properties of the fluids and foods intended to be co-administered with the dosage form, in conjunction with the anatomical and physiological maturity of the gastro-intestinal tract in the intended paediatric population, should be an essential part of paediatric oral formulation development.

  9. Modification de la biodisponibilité orale des médicaments : interactions « Herb-Drugs » « Drugs- Drugs».

    OpenAIRE

    Dossou-Yovo, Flore

    2014-01-01

    Oral dosing is still seen as the silver bullet of drug administration, as it is cheaper andbetter adapted to patient comfort. However, oral route is still inaccessible to many drugssuch as biologics and biosimilars respectively certain anticancer drugs and antiretrovirals(ARV).The aim of this present study was to find new drugs enhancers that improve the oralbioavailability of drugs and xenobiotics. All the studies were realized in vitro using Ussingchambers technic. To achieve the set object...

  10. Phase I study to determine the maximal tolerated dose and dose-limiting toxicities of orally administered idarubicin in dogs with lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vail, D M; Husbands, B D; Kamerling, S G; Simpson, H; Kurzman, I D; McDonnell, A

    2012-01-01

    Idarubicin, a PO bioavailable anthracycline antibiotic-class chemotherapeutic, could have substantial convenience advantages over currently available similar class agents in use that require IV delivery. The primary objective of this study was to determine the maximally tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs), and basic pharmacokinetic parameters of oral idarubicin exposure in dogs with lymphoma after a single oral dose. A secondary objective was to document preliminary antitumor efficacy in an expanded treatment cohort using the established MTD. Client-owned dogs with measurable lymphoma. Dogs (n = 31) were enrolled in a prospective open label phase I study of oral idarubicin. By means of a 3 + 3 cohort design, dose escalations were made with 3 dogs per dose level, and the MTD was established based on the number of patients experiencing a DLT. Plasma concentrations of idarubicin and idarubicinol were determined by postdose sampling. Assessment of antitumor efficacy focused on evaluation of accessible, measurable lymph nodes and skin lesions by modified RECIST guidelines. The MTD in dogs > 15 kg body weight was 22 mg/m(2) . Adverse hematologic events (neutropenia and thrombocytopenia) were the predominant DLT and generally correlated with higher plasma concentrations of idarubicin and idarubicinol. PO administered idarubicin was generally well-tolerated and had preliminary antitumor activity in dogs with lymphoma. Furthermore, the potential clinical advantage of a safe and efficacious oral anthracycline alternative supports further investigations of this agent in repeated-dose, randomized clinical trials. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  11. Effects of Orally Administered Lactoferrin and Lactoperoxidase-Containing Tablets on Clinical and Bacteriological Profiles in Chronic Periodontitis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiju Shimizu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of oral administration of lactoferrin (LF and lactoperoxidase-(LPO-containing tablet on periodontal condition. Seventy-two individuals with chronic periodontitis were randomly assigned to take either bovine LF and LPO-containing tablets (test group, n=37 or control tablets (control group, n=35 every day for 12 weeks. Periodontal parameters and levels of subgingival plaque bacteria, human and bovine LF, and endotoxin in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF were evaluated at baseline, 1 week, 4 weeks, and 12 weeks. Significant differences were observed in GCF levels of bovine LF between the test and control groups throughout the study (P<.05. However, clinical and bacteriological parameter values proved comparable between the two groups at 1 week to 12 weeks. Therefore, the effect of oral administration of LF and LPO-containing tablets might be weak on periodontal and bacteriological profile in this study.

  12. Pharmacogenomics in type 2 diabetes: oral antidiabetic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, M A; Kan, C; Willmes, D M; Ismail, K; Pistrosch, F; Hopkins, D; Mingrone, G; Bornstein, S R; Birkenfeld, A L

    2016-10-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a fast progressing disease reaching pandemic proportions. T2DM is specifically harmful because of its severe secondary complications. In the course of the disease, most patients require treatment with oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs), for which a relatively large number of different options are available. The growing number of individuals affected by T2DM as well as marked interindividual differences in the response to treatment call for individualized therapeutic regimens that can maximize treatment efficacy and thus reduce side effects and costs. A large number of genetic polymorphisms have been described affecting the response to treatment with OADs; in this review, we summarize the most recent advances in this area of research. Extensive evidence exists for polymorphisms affecting pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of biguanides and sulfonylureas. Data on incretin-based medications as well as the new class of sodium/glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are just starting to emerge. With diabetes being a known comorbidity of several psychiatric disorders, we also review genetic polymorphisms possibly responsible for a common treatment response in both conditions. For all drug classes reviewed here, large prospective trials are necessary in order to consolidate the existing evidence and derive treatment schemes based on individual genetic traits.

  13. Buccal bioadhesive drug delivery--a promising option for orally less efficient drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhakar, Yajaman; Kuotsu, Ketousetuo; Bandyopadhyay, A K

    2006-08-10

    Rapid developments in the field of molecular biology and gene technology resulted in generation of many macromolecular drugs including peptides, proteins, polysaccharides and nucleic acids in great number possessing superior pharmacological efficacy with site specificity and devoid of untoward and toxic effects. However, the main impediment for the oral delivery of these drugs as potential therapeutic agents is their extensive presystemic metabolism, instability in acidic environment resulting into inadequate and erratic oral absorption. Parenteral route of administration is the only established route that overcomes all these drawbacks associated with these orally less/inefficient drugs. But, these formulations are costly, have least patient compliance, require repeated administration, in addition to the other hazardous effects associated with this route. Over the last few decades' pharmaceutical scientists throughout the world are trying to explore transdermal and transmucosal routes as an alternative to injections. Among the various transmucosal sites available, mucosa of the buccal cavity was found to be the most convenient and easily accessible site for the delivery of therapeutic agents for both local and systemic delivery as retentive dosage forms, because it has expanse of smooth muscle which is relatively immobile, abundant vascularization, rapid recovery time after exposure to stress and the near absence of langerhans cells. Direct access to the systemic circulation through the internal jugular vein bypasses drugs from the hepatic first pass metabolism leading to high bioavailability. Further, these dosage forms are self-administrable, cheap and have superior patient compliance. Developing a dosage form with the optimum pharmacokinetics is a promising area for continued research as it is enormously important and intellectually challenging. With the right dosage form design, local environment of the mucosa can be controlled and manipulated in order to

  14. Eficacia antihelmíntica de tres endectocidas administrados por vía oral en caballos Anthelmintic efficacy of three endectocides administered by oral route in horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. RUBILAR

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Con el propósito de evaluar la eficacia antihelmíntica de los endectocidas ivermectina, doramectina y moxidectina sobre el control del parasitismo gastrointestinal en equinos, se seleccionaron 20 caballos clínicamente sanos con recuentos fecales positivos a huevos de nemátodos. Los caballos fueron distribuidos homogéneamente considerando el peso vivo y el recuento fecal de huevos en 4 grupos de 5 animales cada uno. Grupo 1: control, sin tratamiento antihelmíntico; Grupo 2: tratados con ivermectina en dosis de 0,2 mg/kg vía oral; Grupo 3 tratados con doramectina inyectable , en dosis 0.2 mg/kg, reformulado mediante caolín y miel de abejas para la administración vía oral; Grupo 4: tratados con moxidectina , en dosis 0,4 mg/kg vía oral. De cada uno de los caballos se obtuvieron muestras de heces para recuento de huevos y coprocultivos, antes del tratamiento y a los 3, 6, 10, 20, 40, 60,90, 105, 125, 145 y 175 días post tratamiento. Los resultados obtenidos indican una reducción significativa (pIn naturally gastrointestinal nematodes infected horses the anthelmintic efficacy of the endectocides ivermectin (IVM, doramectin (DRM and moxidectin (MXD was evaluated. Animals were evenly distributed to 4 experimental groups: Group I, non treated horses, control; Group II treated with an oral dose of 0.2 mg/kg of IVM by oral route; Group III treated with a reformulated oral dose of 0,2 mg/kg of DRM; Group IV treated with an oral dose of 0.4 mg/kg of MXD. Faecal samples for parasites eggs count and larval cultures were collected before treatment at 3,6,10,20,40,60,90,105,125,145 and 175 days postreatment. Results obtained showed a significant reduction (p <0,05 in the faecal eggs count in treated group, from day 3 to day 145 post treatment. This level of significance remained until day 175 post treatment only in the group treated with moxidectin

  15. Efficacy of bath and orally administered praziquantel and fenbendazole against Lepidotrema bidyana Murray, a monogenean parasite of silver perch, Bidyanus bidyanus (Mitchell).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forwood, J M; Harris, J O; Deveney, M R

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the efficacy of praziquantel (PZQ) and fenbendazole (FBZ), each administered by bath and orally, against the monogenean Lepidotrema bidyana Murray, a gill parasite of the freshwater fish silver perch, Bidyanus bidyanus (Mitchell). PZQ and FBZ were each administered by bath at 10 mg L⁻¹ for 48 h and on surface-coated feed pellets at 75 mg kg⁻¹ per body weight (BW) per day for 6 days. Bath treatments of PZQ and FBZ had an efficacy of 99% and 91%, respectively, against adult L. bidyana. Oral treatments of PZQ and FBZ had an efficacy of 79% and 95%, respectively, against adult L. bidyana. Fish rejected feed pellets surface-coated with PZQ, suggesting that palatability of surface-coated PZQ-medicated feed is poor, which undermined efficacy. In all trials, some juvenile parasites were present on fish after treatment during efficacy assessment, indicating that efficacy may be lower against juvenile parasites or that recruitment occurred post-treatment, demonstrating that repeat treatments are necessary to effectively control L. bidyana in aquaculture.

  16. Dosage Form Developments of Nanosuspension Drug Delivery System for Oral Administration Route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ang; Shi, Ye; Yan, Zhiqiang; Hao, Hongxun; Zhang, Yong; Zhong, Jian; Hou, Huiming

    2015-01-01

    A large amount of new drug candidates are practically insoluble in aqueous solvents and are even simultaneously poorly soluble in organic solvents. Nanosuspension drug delivery system (DDS) was firstly developed in 1994 and has attracted more and more attention as a formation solution for the poorly soluble drugs. By nansizing the poorly soluble drugs, nanosuspensions have several outstanding advantages for drug delivery. Among many administration routes of drug delivery, oral administration is the most preferred route due to its advantages such as ease of ingestion, versatility to accommodate various types of drug candidates, low production cost, high safety, good patient compliance, and pain avoidance. Current marketed pharmaceutical nanosuspension DDS products are mostly for oral administration. This review is to systematically summarize the nanosuspension DDS dosage form developments of poorly soluble drugs for oral administration use.

  17. Effects of orally administered antioxidants on micronuclei and sister chromatid exchange frequency in workers professionally exposed to antineoplastic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrđanović, Jasminka; Jungić, Saša; Šolajić, Slavica; Bogdanović, Višnja; Jurišić, Vladimir

    2012-08-01

    The widespread use of antineoplastic drugs in cancer treatment increased concern about possible hazard to workers involved in the preparation and administration of these drugs. In the present study, the effects of commercial antioxidative drug Oligogal Se on genome protection were analyzed in 15 nurses handling the antineoplastic drugs at the Oncology Department in comparison to twenty healthy volunteers. The nurses took antioxidant mixture Oligogal Se, consisting of vitamins C, E, A and selenium, one capsule per day, over a period of 6 months. Genome damage was measured in peripheral blood lymphocytes by usage of sister chromatid exchange test and the cytokinesis-block micronuclei test. The frequency of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) and micronuclei (MN) in the exposed group was significantly higher when compared to the control group (SCE, p<0.05; MN, p<0.01 respectively). After antioxidant supplementation, the frequency of sister chromatid exchange and micronuclei decreased (p<0.05) when compared with the values from the beginning of the study, but were still above the values of the control group. The effects of confounding factors such as cigarette smoking and cytostatics exposure time were also evaluated. The data indicated that Oligogal Se contributed to the decreasing of genome damages in workers handling the cytostatics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Disposition of intravenously or orally administered silver nanoparticles in pregnant rats and the effect on the biochemical profile in urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, Timothy R; Mortensen, Ninell P; Black, Sherry R; Snyder, Rodney W; Levine, Keith E; Poitras, Eric; Harrington, James M; Wingard, Christopher J; Holland, Nathan A; Pathmasiri, Wimal; Sumner, Susan C J

    2017-05-01

    Few investigations have been conducted on the disposition and fate of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) in pregnancy. The distribution of a single dose of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-stabilized AgNP was investigated in pregnant rats. Two sizes of AgNP, 20 and 110 nm, and silver acetate (AgAc) were used to investigate the role of AgNP diameter and particle dissolution in tissue distribution, internal dose and persistence. Dams were administered AgNP or AgAc intravenously (i.v.) (1 mg kg(-1) ) or by gavage (p.o.) (10 mg kg(-1) ), or vehicle alone, on gestation day 18 and euthanized at 24 or 48 h post-exposure. The silver concentration in tissues was measured using inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The distribution of silver in dams was influenced by route of administration and AgNP size. The highest concentration of silver (μg Ag g(-1) tissue) at 48 h was found in the spleen for i.v. administered AgNP, and in the lungs for AgAc. At 48 h after p.o. administration of AgNP, the highest concentration was measured in the cecum and large intestine, and for AgAc in the placenta. Silver was detected in placenta and fetuses for all groups. Markers of cardiovascular injury, oxidative stress marker, cytokines and chemokines were not significantly elevated in exposed dams compared to vehicle-dosed control. NMR metabolomics analysis of urine indicated that AgNP and AgAc exposure impact the carbohydrate, and amino acid metabolism. This study demonstrates that silver crosses the placenta and is transferred to the fetus regardless of the form of silver. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Pharmacokinetics of a single dose of voriconazole administered orally with and without food to red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsley, Ruth A; Tell, Lisa A; Gehring, Ronette

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the pharmacokinetics of voriconazole administered PO with or without food to red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensus) and whether any observed variability could be explained by measured covariates to inform dose adjustments. ANIMALS 7 adult red-tailed hawks. PROCEDURES In a crossover study design, hawks were randomly assigned to first receive voriconazole (15 mg/kg, PO) injected into a dead mouse (n = 3; fed birds) or without food (4; unfed birds). Sixteen days later, treatments were reversed. Blood samples were collected at various points to measure plasma voriconazole concentrations by ultraperformance liquid chromatography. Pharmacokinetic data were analyzed by noncompartmental methods and fit to a compartmental model through nonlinear mixed-effects regression, with feeding status and body weight investigated as covariates. RESULTS Voriconazole was well absorbed, with quantifiable plasma concentrations up to 24 hours after administration. Mean plasma half-life was approximately 2 hours in fed and unfed birds. Administration of the voriconazole in food delayed absorption, resulting in a significant delay in time to maximum plasma concentration. The final compartmental model included a categorical covariate to account for this lag in absorption as well as body weight as a covariate of total body clearance (relative to unknown bioavailability). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE A single dose of voriconazole (15 mg/kg) administered PO to red-tailed hawks resulted in mean plasma voriconazole concentrations greater than the targeted value (1 μg/mL). Additional studies with larger sample sizes and multidose regimens are required before the model developed here can be applied in clinical settings.

  20. pH-triggered drug release from biodegradable microwells for oral drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Line Hagner; Nagstrup, Johan; Gordon, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    of 100 μm. The microwells were filled with ASSF using a modified screen printing technique, followed by coating of the microwell cavities with a gastroresistant lid of Eudragit® L100. The release behavior of ASSF from the coated microwells was investigated using a μ-Diss profiler and a UV imaging system......, and under conditions simulating the changing environment of the gastrointestinal tract. Biorelevant gastric medium (pH 1.6) was employed, after which a change to biorelevant intestinal release medium (pH 6.5) was carried out. Both μ-Diss profiler and UV imaging release experiments showed that sealing...... of microwell cavities with an Eudragit® layer prevented drug release in biorelevant gastric medium. An immediate release of the ASSF from coated microwells was observed in the intestinal medium. This pH-triggered release behavior demonstrates the future potential of PLLA microwells as a site-specific oral drug...

  1. The effects of orally administered Beta-glucan on innate immune responses in humans, a randomized open-label intervention pilot-study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenneke Leentjens

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: To prevent or combat infection, increasing the effectiveness of the immune response is highly desirable, especially in case of compromised immune system function. However, immunostimulatory therapies are scarce, expensive, and often have unwanted side-effects. β-glucans have been shown to exert immunostimulatory effects in vitro and in vivo in experimental animal models. Oral β-glucan is inexpensive and well-tolerated, and therefore may represent a promising immunostimulatory compound for human use. METHODS: We performed a randomized open-label intervention pilot-study in 15 healthy male volunteers. Subjects were randomized to either the β -glucan (n = 10 or the control group (n = 5. Subjects in the β-glucan group ingested β-glucan 1000 mg once daily for 7 days. Blood was sampled at various time-points to determine β-glucan serum levels, perform ex vivo stimulation of leukocytes, and analyze microbicidal activity. RESULTS: β-glucan was barely detectable in serum of volunteers at all time-points. Furthermore, neither cytokine production nor microbicidal activity of leukocytes were affected by orally administered β-glucan. CONCLUSION: The present study does not support the use of oral β-glucan to enhance innate immune responses in humans. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01727895.

  2. Lipoprotein lipase expression, serum lipid and tissue lipid deposition in orally-administered glycyrrhizic acid-treated rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ton So

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The metabolic syndrome (MetS is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities comprising visceral obesity, dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance (IR. With the onset of IR, the expression of lipoprotein lipase (LPL, a key regulator of lipoprotein metabolism, is reduced. Increased activation of glucocorticoid receptors results in MetS symptoms and is thus speculated to have a role in the pathophysiology of the MetS. Glycyrrhizic acid (GA, the bioactive constituent of licorice roots (Glycyrrhiza glabra inhibits 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 that catalyzes the activation of glucocorticoids. Thus, oral administration of GA is postulated to ameliorate the MetS. Results In this study, daily oral administration of 50 mg/kg of GA for one week led to significant increase in LPL expression in the quadriceps femoris (p p > 0.05 of the GA-treated rats compared to the control. Decrease in adipocyte size (p > 0.05 in both the visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue depots accompanies such selective induction of LPL expression. Consistent improvement in serum lipid parameters was also observed, with decrease in serum free fatty acid, triacylglycerol, total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol but elevated HDL-cholesterol (p > 0.05. Histological analysis using tissue lipid staining with Oil Red O showed significant decrease in lipid deposition in the abdominal muscle and quadriceps femoris (p p > 0.05. Conclusion Results from this study may imply that GA could counteract the development of visceral obesity and improve dyslipidaemia via selective induction of tissue LPL expression and a positive shift in serum lipid parameters respectively, and retard the development of IR associated with tissue steatosis.

  3. Phase I and pharmacokinetic study of XR11576, an oral topoisomerase I and II inhibitor, administered on days 1-5 of a 3-weekly cycle in patients with advanced solid tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J.A. de Jonge (Maja); S.B. Kaye (Stan); J. Verweij (Jaap); C. Brock (C.); S. Reade (Sarah); M. Scurr (M.); L. van Doorn (Leni); C. Verheij (Coleta); W.J. Loos (Walter); C. Brindley (C.); H.D. Mistry; M. Cooper (Meghan); I.R. Judson (Ian)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractXR11576 is an oral topoisomerase I and II inhibitor. The objectives of this phase I study were to assess the dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs), to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and to describe the pharmacokinetics (PKs) of XR11576 when administered orally on days 1-5 every 3 w

  4. Phase I and pharmacokinetic study of XR11576, an oral topoisomerase I and II inhibitor, administered on days 1-5 of a 3-weekly cycle in patients with advanced solid tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J.A. de Jonge (Maja); S.B. Kaye (Stan); J. Verweij (Jaap); C. Brock (C.); S. Reade (Sarah); M. Scurr (M.); L. van Doorn (Leni); C. Verheij (Coleta); W.J. Loos (Walter); C. Brindley (C.); H.D. Mistry; M. Cooper (Meghan); I.R. Judson (Ian)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractXR11576 is an oral topoisomerase I and II inhibitor. The objectives of this phase I study were to assess the dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs), to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and to describe the pharmacokinetics (PKs) of XR11576 when administered orally on days 1-5 every 3 w

  5. Piperin and piplartin as natural oral anticancer drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berlian Bidarisugma

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Since the last few decades, oral cancer as pathology has become an attention in medicine and dentistry. The majority cases of oral cancer are affecting people with smoking habit and alcohol consumption. Many herbs contain substances which can stop cancer cells proliferation, such as Piper retrofractum/Retrofracti fructus, an herb plant from Piperaceae family which contains piperin and piplartin. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the mechanism of piperin and pilplartin as natural oral anticancer drug. Reviews: Piperin and piplartin has function as antioxidant that can protect body cell from damage caused by free radicals. Piperin works synergistically with another bioactive substance like capsaicin and curcumin. Piperin increase the number of serum and life time of serum from a few nutrition substance like co-enzyme Q10 and beta-carotene. Beta-carotene can catch reactive O2 and peroxil radicals. The activity of anticancer piplartin related with obstruction of proliferation cell rate, observe form Ki67 reduction as antigen in nucleus that associated with G1, S, G2, and M phase in cell cycle. Comparing with piplartin, piperin is more potential to inhibit proliferation rate of Ki67, but piplartin’s antiproliferation mechanism will increase if supported by piperin. Conclusion: Piperin and piplartin contained in Javanese chili are potential for natural oral anticancer, by directly or indirectly suppress tumor cell development by increasing the number of immunity cells (immunomodulator, and by inhibiting cell proliferation with reduction of Ki67, nucleus antigen that associated with G1,S,G2, dan M phase of cell cycle.Latar belakang: Sejak beberapa dekade terakhir, patologi kanker rongga mulut telah banyak menjadi perhatian di bidang kedokteran dan kedokteran gigi. Risiko paling tinggi ditemukan pada penderita perokok dan peminum alkohol. Banyak tanaman herbal yang memiliki kandungan untuk menghambat pertumbuhan sel kanker

  6. From Leflunomide to Teriflunomide: Drug development and Immunosuppressive Oral Drugs in the Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Lilian; Hemmer, Bernhard; Korn, Thomas

    2016-12-08

    Immunosuppressive drugs have been used in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) for a long time. Today, the increased number of approved substances and the possibility of an oral availability of some immunomodulators improve the therapeutic repertory and increase patient satisfaction and compliance. Teriflunomide is indicated as first line oral disease modifying therapy (DMT) in relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS). Its immunosuppressive capacity results from an inhibition of de novo pyrimidine synthesis in rapidly proliferating lymphocytes. While Teriflunomide has been approved for the treatment of RRMS only since 2012, there is substantial therapeutic experience with its prodrug Leflunomide used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In MS, a daily dose of 14 mg Teriflunomide reduces the annualized relapse rate (ARR) by more than 30% and disability progression by 30% compared to placebo while it provides a reasonable safety profile. This review presents an overview on oral immunosuppressants used in the treatment of MS. With an emphasis on Teriflunomide it summarizes discovery, mechanism of action and clinical effectiveness in phase II and III trials as well as important aspects for treating physicians.

  7. Ability of Saudi mothers to appropriately and accurately use dosing devices to administer oral liquid medications to their children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almazrou S

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Saja Almazrou, Hind Alsahly, Huda Alwattar, Lamya Alturki, Mona Alamri Department of Clinical Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Background: Most liquid medications are packaged with administration devices, which may be used inappropriately or inaccurately, and sometimes are not used at all. Because of the importance of their proper use for children's health, this study was designed to assess Saudi mothers' experiences with measuring cups, syringes, and droppers for oral liquid medications; to compare accuracy of dosing across these devices; and to determine the effects of mothers' education statuses and pharmacist counseling on dosing accuracy. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study in which mothers were observed as they used a set of commonly available dosing devices which are a dosing cup, syringe, and dropper. Interviews were conducted in the outpatient pharmacy waiting area in several tertiary hospitals and primary clinics in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia between March and April 2013. Saudi women who were mothers of children aged 12 years old or younger and who gave their consent were eligible. Caregivers other than mothers and subjects with vision problems or cognitive/physical disabilities were excluded. We gathered demographic information such as age, number of children, and education status. Subjects were asked if they had had counseling on how to use measuring devices and which device they preferred. Then, the mothers were required to demonstrate how to measure 5 mL of paracetamol (acetaminophen syrup using a cup and a syringe and 1 mL of paracetamol syrup using a dropper. Dosing errors were evaluated visually as overdosing, underdosing, or no error (if the dose was accurate. The data were entered into Microsoft Excel and evaluated using Stata 11.1. Logistic regression was employed to determine relationships. Results: The results revealed that 58% of participants measured an accurate dose of paracetamol

  8. Design Features of Drug-Drug Interaction Trials Between Antivirals and Oral Contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Ruben C; Arya, Vikram; Younis, Islam R

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this work was to explore the major design features of drug-drug interaction trials between antiviral medications (AVs) and oral contraceptives (OCs). Information on these trials (n = 27) was collected from approved drug labels and clinical pharmacology reviews conducted by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The primary objective of all trials was to evaluate changes in OC exposure following the coadministration of AVs. In addition, an evaluation of potential pharmacodynamic interaction was performed in 10 of these trials. Twenty-two trials were open label with a fixed-sequence design, and 5 trials used a double-blind crossover design. The trials were conducted using one, two, or three 28-day ovulatory cycles in 10, 8, and 9 trials, respectively. Only 1 trial enrolled HIV-infected women. The median number of women in a trial was 20 (range, 12 to 52). Norethindrone/ethinyl estradiol (EE) combination was the most commonly used OC (n = 16, 59%) followed by norgestimate/EE (n = 9, 33%). Labeling recommendations were based on exposure changes in 25 cases and on safety observations in the trial in 2 cases. In conclusion, a wide variety of trial designs was used, and there is no preferred design. The answer to the exposure question can be achieved using multiple designs.

  9. 21 CFR 328.50 - Principal display panel of all OTC drug products intended for oral ingestion that contain alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... intended for oral ingestion that contain alcohol. 328.50 Section 328.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... PRODUCTS INTENDED FOR ORAL INGESTION THAT CONTAIN ALCOHOL Labeling § 328.50 Principal display panel of all OTC drug products intended for oral ingestion that contain alcohol. (a) The amount (percentage) of...

  10. Effect of orally administered L. fermentum NCIMB 5221 on markers of metabolic syndrome: an in vivo analysis using ZDF rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaro-Duchesneau, Catherine; Saha, Shyamali; Malhotra, Meenakshi; Jones, Mitchell L; Labbé, Alain; Rodes, Laetitia; Kahouli, Imen; Prakash, Satya

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome, encompassing type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease, is a growing health concern of industrialized countries. Ferulic acid (FA) is a phenolic acid found in foods normally consumed by humans that has demonstrated antioxidant activity, cholesterol-lowering capabilities, and anti-tumorigenic properties. Select probiotic bacteria, including Lactobacillus fermentum NCIMB 5221, produce FA due to intrinsic ferulic acid esterase activity. The aim of the present research was to investigate a FA-producing probiotic, L. fermentum NCIMB 5221, as a biotherapeutic for metabolic syndrome. The probiotic formulation was administered daily for 8 weeks to Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats, a model of hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia. Results show that the probiotic formulation reduced fasting insulin levels and insulin resistance, significantly reduced serum triglycerides (p = 0.016), lowered serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (p = 0.008), and significantly reduced the atherogenic (p = 0.016) and atherosclerosis (p = 0.012) index as compared to the control animals. In addition, the probiotic formulation significantly increased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (p = 0.041) as compared to the control animals. This research indicates that administration of the FA-producing L. fermentum NCIMB 5221 has the potential to reduce insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, hypercholesterolemia, and other markers involved in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome. Further studies are required to investigate the human clinical potential of the probiotic formulation in affecting the markers and pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome.

  11. Lipid-based formulations for oral administration of poorly water-soluble drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mu, Huiling; Holm, René; Müllertz, Anette

    2013-01-01

    Lipid-based drug delivery systems have shown great potentials in oral delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs, primarily for lipophilic drugs, with several successfully marketed products. Pre-dissolving drugs in lipids, surfactants, or mixtures of lipids and surfactants omits the dissolving....../dissolution step, which is a potential rate limiting factor for oral absorption of poorly water-soluble drugs. Lipids not only vary in structures and physiochemical properties, but also in their digestibility and absorption pathway; therefore selection of lipid excipients and dosage form has a pronounced effect...

  12. Orally administered betaine reduces photodamage caused by UVB irradiation through the regulation of matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity in hairless mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, A-Rang; Lee, Hee Jeong; Youn, Ui Joung; Hyun, Jin Won; Chae, Sungwook

    2016-01-01

    Betaine is widely distributed in plants, microorganisms, in several types of food and in medical herbs, including Lycium chinense. The administration of 100 mg betaine/kg body weight/day is an effective strategy for preventing ultraviolet irradiation‑induced skin damage. The present study aimed to determine the preventive effects of betaine on ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation‑induced skin damage in hairless mice. The mice were divided into three groups: Control (n=5), UVB‑treated vehicle (n=5) and UVB‑treated betaine (n=5) groups. The level of irradiation was progressively increased between 60 mJ/cm2 per exposure at week 1 (one minimal erythematous dose = 60 mJ/cm2) and 90 mJ/cm2 per exposure at week 7. The formation of wrinkles significantly increased following UVB exposure in the UVB‑treated vehicle group. However, treatment with betaine suppressed UVB‑induced wrinkle formation, as determined by the mean length, mean depth, number, epidermal thickness and collagen damage. Furthermore, oral administration of betaine also inhibited the UVB‑induced expression of mitogen‑activated protein kinase kinase (MEK), extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (ERK), and matrix metalloproteinase‑9 (MMP‑9). These findings suggested that betaine inhibits UVB‑induced skin damage by suppressing increased expression of MMP‑9 through the inhibition of MEK and ERK.

  13. Multicenter randomized prospective clinical evaluation of meloxicam administered via transmucosal oral spray in client-owned dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzi, E M; Spensley, M S

    2013-12-01

    The clinical safety and efficacy of a transmucosal oral spray (TMOS) formulation of meloxicam was evaluated for the control of pain and inflammation associated with osteoarthritis in dogs. A total of 280 client-owned dogs were enrolled at fourteen veterinary clinics: there were 187 dogs in the meloxicam TMOS group and 93 in the placebo control group. Dogs received placebo or treatment spray once daily for twenty-eight days. Improvement in signs of osteoarthritis was measured using client-specific outcome measures (CSOM) made at days 14 and 28 and veterinary assessments of lameness and pain on palpation made at day 28. A significantly higher number of dogs in the meloxicam TMOS group were treatment successes at 28 days (72.6%) compared with the placebo group (46.9%), based on CSOM scores. Total CSOM scores were significantly lower in the meloxicam TMOS-treated group compared with the placebo group at both 14 and 28 days. Differences between treatment groups were not observed in veterinary assessments. Gastrointestinal effects of meloxicam were observed in some animals. Meloxicam TMOS was found to be safe and effective in dogs for the control of pain and inflammation associated with osteoarthritis.

  14. Effect of orally administered soy milk fermented with Lactobacillus plantarum LAB12 and physical exercise on murine immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appukutty, M; Ramasamy, K; Rajan, S; Vellasamy, S; Ramasamy, R; Radhakrishnan, A K

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms that confer health benefits through the gastrointestinal microbiota. This nutritional supplement may benefit athletes who undergo rigorous training by maintaining their gastrointestinal functions and overall health. In this study the influence of moderate physical exercise using a graded treadmill exercise, alone or in combination with the consumption of a soy product fermented with Lactobacillus plantarum LAB12 (LAB12), on tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) responses was investigated in a murine model. Male BALB/c mice were randomly divided into four groups of six mice each (control, exercise alone, LAB12 and LAB12 + exercise). Mice treated with the potential probiotic LAB12 were orally gavaged for 42 days. At autopsy, blood and spleen from the animals were collected. The splenocytes were cultured in the presence of a mitogen, concanavalin A (Con A). The amount of TNF-α produced by the Con A-stimulated splenocytes was quantified using ELISA, while their proliferation was determined using the [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation method. This study shows that LAB12-supplemented and exercise-induced mice showed marked increase (P<0.05) in cell proliferation compared to the control animals. TNF-α production was suppressed (P<0.05) in the LAB12 group compared to the untreated mice. These results demonstrate that supplementation with LAB12 has immunomodulatory effects, under conditions of moderate physical exercise, which may have implications for human athletes. Further investigation in human trials is warranted to confirm and extrapolate these findings.

  15. Recent advances in lipid nanoparticle formulations with solid matrix for oral drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Surajit; Chaudhury, Anumita

    2011-03-01

    Lipid nanoparticles based on solid matrix have emerged as potential drug carriers to improve gastrointestinal (GI) absorption and oral bioavailability of several drugs, especially lipophilic compounds. These formulations may also be used for sustained drug release. Solid lipid nanoparticle (SLN) and the newer generation lipid nanoparticle, nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC), have been studied for their capability as oral drug carriers. Biodegradable, biocompatible, and physiological lipids are generally used to prepare these nanoparticles. Hence, toxicity problems related with the polymeric nanoparticles can be minimized. Furthermore, stability of the formulations might increase than other liquid nano-carriers due to the solid matrix of these lipid nanoparticles. These nanoparticles can be produced by different formulation techniques. Scaling up of the production process from lab scale to industrial scale can be easily achieved. Reasonably high drug encapsulation efficiency of the nanoparticles was documented. Oral absorption and bioavailability of several drugs were improved after oral administration of the drug-loaded SLNs or NLCs. In this review, pros and cons, different formulation and characterization techniques, drug incorporation models, GI absorption and oral bioavailability enhancement mechanisms, stability and storage condition of the formulations, and recent advances in oral delivery of the lipid nanoparticles based on solid matrix will be discussed. © 2010 American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists

  16. Lipid polymer hybrid as emerging tool in nanocarriers for oral drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallan, Supandeep Singh; Kaur, Prabhjot; Kaur, Veerpal; Mishra, Neeraj; Vaidya, Bhuvaneshwar

    2016-01-01

    The oral route for drug delivery is a widely accepted route. For that reason, many researchers are currently working to develop efficient oral drug delivery systems. Use of polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) and lipid carrier systems, including liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC), has limitations such as drug leakage and high water content of dispersions. Thus, lipid polymer hybrid nanoparticles (LPNs) have been explored by the researchers to provide a better effect using properties of both polymers and lipids. The present review is focused on the challenges, possibilities, and future perspectives of LPNs for oral delivery.

  17. Possible interaction of quinolone antibiotics with peptide transporter 1 in oral absorption of peptide-mimetic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Hiroshi; Kamioka, Hiroki; Kanagawa, Masahiko; Hatano, Yasuko; Idota, Yoko; Yano, Kentaro; Morimoto, Kaori; Ogihara, Takuo

    2016-01-01

    The study investigated whether quinolone antibiotics inhibit the PEPT1-mediated uptake of its substrates. Among the quinolones examined, lomefloxacin, moxifloxacin (MFLX) and purlifloxacin significantly inhibited the uptake of PEPT1 substrate phenylalanine-Ψ(CN-S)-alanine (Phe-Ψ-Ala) in HeLa/PEPT1 cells to 31.6 ± 1.3%, 27.6 ± 2.9%, 36.8 ± 2.2% and 32.6 ± 1.4%, respectively. Further examination showed that MFLX was an uncompetitive inhibitor, with an IC50 value of 4.29 ± 1.29 mm. In addition, MFLX significantly decreased the cephalexin and valacyclovir uptake in HeLa/PEPT1 cells. In an in vivo study in rats, the maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) of orally administered Phe-Ψ-Ala was significantly decreased in the presence of MFLX (171 ± 1 ng/ml) compared with that in its absence (244 ± 9 ng/ml). The area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) of orally administered Phe-Ψ-Ala in the presence of MFLX (338 ± 50 ng/ml · h) tended to decrease compared with that in its absence (399 ± 75 ng/ml · h). The oral bioavailability of Phe-Ψ-Ala in the presence and absence of MFLX was 41.7 ± 6.2% and 49.2 ± 9.2%, respectively. The results indicate that administration of quinolone antibiotics concomitantly with PEPT1 substrate drugs may potentially result in drug-drug interaction.

  18. Physicochemical Properties of Solid Phospholipid Particles as a Drug Delivery Platform for Improving Oral Absorption of Poorly Soluble Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Kohsaku; Miyazaki, Aoi; Fukushima, Mayuko; Sato, Keiko; Yamamura, Yuko; Mohri, Kohta; Sakuma, Shinji

    2017-01-01

    A novel drug delivery platform, mesoporous phospholipid particle (MPP), is introduced. Its physicochemical properties and ability as a carrier for enhancing oral absorption of poorly soluble drugs are discussed. MPP was prepared through freeze-drying a cyclohexane/t-butyl alcohol solution of phosphatidylcholine. Its basic properties were revealed using scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, hygroscopicity measurement, and so on. Fenofibrate was loaded to MPP as a poorly soluble model drug, and effect of MPP on the oral absorption behavior was observed. MPP is spherical in shape with a diameter typically in the range of 10-15 μm and a wide surface area that exceeds 10 m(2)/g. It has a bilayer structure that may accommodate hydrophobic drugs in the acyl chain region. When fenofibrate was loaded in MPP as a model drug, it existed partially in a crystalline state and improvement in the dissolution behavior was achieved in the presence of a surfactant, because of the formation of mixed micelles composed of phospholipids and surfactants in the dissolution media. MPP greatly improved the oral absorption of fenofibrate compared to that of the crystalline drug and its efficacy was almost equivalent to that of an amorphous drug dispersion. MPP is a promising option for improving the oral absorption of poorly soluble drugs based on the novel mechanism of dissolution improvement.

  19. Formulating a poorly water soluble drug into an oral solution suitable for paediatric patients; lorazepam as a model drug

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Van Der Vossen (Anna C.); I. Van Der Velde (Iris); O. Smeets (Oscar); Postma, D.J.; Eckhardt, M.; A. Vermes (Andras); B.C.P. Koch (Birgit C. P.); A.G. Vulto (Arnold); L.M. Hanff (Lidwien)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction Many drugs are unavailable in suitable oral paediatric dosage forms, and pharmacists often have to compound drugs to provide paediatric patients with an acceptable formulation in the right dose. Liquid formulations offer the advantage of dosing flexibility and ease of admini

  20. Metabolism of orally administered (/sup 3/H)ergocalciferol and (/sup 3/H)cholecalciferol by dairy calves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommerfeldt, J.L.; Napoli, J.L.; Littledike, E.T.; Beitz, D.C.; Horst, R.L.

    1983-12-01

    Concentrations of ergocalciferol, cholecalciferol, and their metabolites in plasma were determined after a single oral dose of (/sup 3/H)ergocalciferol or (/sup 3/H)cholecalciferol was given to 95- to 105-kg Jersey bull calves. One group (three calves) was given 365 muCi of (/sup 3/H)ergocalciferol (1.2 Ci/mmol) per calf, and the other group (three calves) was given 365 muCi of (/sup 3/H)cholecalciferol (1.2 Ci/mmol) per calf. Fourteen blood samples were taken from each calf during the 3 weeks after administration. Total plasma radioactivity was highest at 80 hours in both groups (8400 dpm/ml and 4600 dpm/ml in the (/sup 3/H)cholecalciferol- and (/sup 3/H)ergocalciferol-treated calves, respectively). For determination of the time-dependent appearance and disappearance of plasma vitamin D and vitamin D metabolites, the plasma /sup 3/H-labeled steroids were extracted and separated by high-performance liquid chromatography. In both groups, (/sup 3/H)vitamin D peaked at 24-48 hours and was the predominant radioactive form in plasma 10-15 hours after dosing. After 15 hours, 25-(/sup 3/H)hydroxyvitamin D became the predominant labeled metabolite, reaching its maximal concentration between 48 and 96 hours. Concentrations of 25-(/sup 3/H)hydroxycholecalciferol were about twice those of 25-(/sup 3/H)hydroxyergocalciferol. The appearance/disappearance profile of 25,26-(/sup 3/H)dihydroxycholecalciferol and 1,25(/sup 3/H)hydroxycholecalciferol resembled that of 25-(/sup 3/H)hydroxycholecalciferol.

  1. Sex-differential effect on infant mortality of oral polio vaccine administered with BCG at birth in Guinea-Bissau. A natural experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Christine Stabell; Fisker, Ane Baerent; Rodrigues, Amabelia

    2008-01-01

    was not available during several periods. We took advantage of this "natural experiment" to test the effect on mortality of receiving OPV at birth. METHODOLOGY: Between 2002 and 2004, the VAS trial randomised normal-birth-weight infants to 50,000 IU VAS or placebo administered with BCG. Provision of OPV at birth......BACKGROUND: The policy to provide oral polio vaccine (OPV) at birth was introduced in low-income countries to increase coverage. The effect of OPV at birth on overall child mortality was never studied. During a trial of vitamin A supplementation (VAS) at birth in Guinea-Bissau, OPV...... was not part of the trial, but we noted whether the infants received OPV or not. OPV was missing during several periods in 2004. We used Cox proportional hazards models to compute mortality rate ratios (MRR) of children who had received or not received OPV at birth. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 962 (22...

  2. Capromorelin oral solution (ENTYCE®) increases food consumption and body weight when administered for 4 consecutive days to healthy adult Beagle dogs in a randomized, masked, placebo controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollers, Bill; Rhodes, Linda; Heinen, Ernst

    2017-01-05

    Dogs can suffer from inappetence caused by a variety of medical conditions. This may present as anorexia (complete loss of appetite), hyporexia (decreased appetite) or dysrexia (change in food preferences). A drug with a new mechanism of action, capromorelin, has potential to stimulate appetite in dogs. Capromorelin is a ghrelin receptor agonist, which mimics the action of endogenous ghrelin. It is a member of the growth hormone secretagogue (GHS) class of drugs. Capromorelin oral solution (ENTYCE®) was tested in healthy adult male and female Beagle dogs (n = 6 males and 6 females per group) for its effect on food consumption and body weight. A randomized, masked, placebo controlled study was conducted to measure the effects of a daily 3 mg/kg oral dose given over 4 days. Dogs were observed for clinical signs, physical examinations were completed prior to and at the end of treatment, and blood was drawn before and after treatment for evaluation of serum chemistry and hematology parameters. Capromorelin was well-tolerated, with no abnormalities seen on physical examination or clinical pathology. Some dogs showed increased salivation. Capromorelin treated dogs had increased mean (±SD) food consumption compared to placebo treated dogs (60.55 ± 39.87% versus -11.15 ± 14.23% respectively, P dogs also had increased mean body weights compared to placebo treated dogs (5.96 ± 1.76% versus 0.053 ± 1.14% respectively, P dogs. Treatment with the oral solution resulted in dramatic increases in appetite, as measured by food consumption, of over 60% compared to placebo. The drug was well tolerated. Capromorelin is the first ghrelin receptor agonist developed for appetite stimulation in any species, and represents a novel mechanism of action for this clinical use.

  3. Genistein administered as a once-daily oral supplement had no beneficial effect on the tibia in rat models for postmenopausal bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Russell T; Iwaniec, Urszula T; Andrade, Juan E; Branscum, Adam J; Neese, Steven L; Olson, Dawn A; Wagner, Lindsay; Wang, Victor C; Schantz, Susan L; Helferich, William G

    2013-06-01

    Estrogen deficiency after menopause results in rapid bone loss, predisposing women to osteoporotic fractures. Genistein, a phytoestrogen present in high concentrations in soy, is an ingredient in dietary supplements aggressively marketed for bone health. However, in a recent long-duration clinical trial in postmenopausal women, the efficacy of soy extracts in reducing bone loss was disappointing. To better understand the failure of soy extracts to consistently induce a robust skeletal response in women, we investigated the long-term (5 mo) efficacy of genistein, administered as a daily oral supplement, (1) in preventing cancellous bone loss in skeletally mature virgin Long-Evans rats ovariectomized at 7 months of age and (2) in improving cancellous bone mass and architecture in aged retired-breeder rats ovariectomized at 16 or 22 months of age. Rats within each age group were randomly assigned into one of three treatment groups (n = 7-12 rats/group): (1) vehicle control, (2) genistein 485 μg/day, or (3) genistein 970 μg/day, resulting in mean (SE) serum genistein levels of 0.18 (0.10), 0.76 (0.15), and 1.48 (0.31) μM, respectively. Total tibia bone mass and density were evaluated using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, whereas cancellous bone mass and architecture in the tibial metaphysis, as well as cortical bone mass and architecture in the tibial diaphysis, were evaluated by micro-CT. Oral genistein administered as a dietary supplement did not influence the cumulative effects of ovariectomy, aging, and/or reproductive history on cancellous and cortical bone mass and architecture. Serum levels of genistein similar to those in women consuming a high-soy diet are ineffective in preventing or treating bone loss in rat models for postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  4. The effects of orally administered Bacillus coagulans and inulin on prevention and progression of rheumatoid arthritis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadijeh Abhari

    2016-07-01

    groups (P < 0.001, which was similar to the anti-inflammatory effect of indomethacin. Furthermore, no significant anti-inflammatory effects were observed following different treatments using α1 AGp as an RA indicator. Pretreatment with all supplied diets significantly inhibited the development of paw swelling induced by CFA (P < 0.001. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that the oral intake of probiotic B. coagulans and prebiotic inulin can improve the biochemical and clinical parameters of induced RA in rat.

  5. A multiple-dose, double-blind comparison of intramuscularly and orally administered ketorolac tromethamine and Ketogan in patients with pain following orthopaedic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebuhr, Peter Henrik; Soelberg, M; Strauss, W

    1994-01-01

    In this multiple-dose, double-blind study 100 patients with moderate, severe or very severe pain following orthopaedic surgery were randomly assigned to receive ketorolac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug with potent analgesic properties (10 mg), or the standard regimen of Ketogan (a......-mg doses of oral ketorolac are as effective as Ketogan for the treatment of pain following orthopaedic surgery. Ketorolac appears to be better tolerated than Ketogan since significantly fewer patients reported adverse events (P = 0.004) when taking ketorolac....

  6. Employment-Based Reinforcement of Adherence to Oral Naltrexone Treatment in Unemployed Injection Drug Users

    OpenAIRE

    Dunn, Kelly; DeFulio, Anthony; Everly, Jeffrey J.; Donlin, Wendy D.; Aklin, Will M.; Nuzzo, Paul A.; Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie S.; Umbricht, Annie; Fingerhood, Michael; Bigelow, George E.; Silverman, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Naltrexone has high potential for use as a relapse prevention pharmacotherapy for opiate dependence; however suffers from notoriously poor adherence when prescribed for oral self-administration. This study evaluated whether entry to a therapeutic workplace could be used to reinforce adherence with oral naltrexone. Opiate-dependent and cocaine-using injection drug users were detoxified, inducted onto oral naltrexone, and randomly assigned to a Contingency (n=35) or Prescription (n=32) group fo...

  7. An analytical evaluation of eight on-site oral fluid drug screening devices using laboratory confirmation results from oral fluid.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blencowe, T. Pehrsson, A. Lillsunde, P. Vimpari, K. Houwing, S. Smink, B. Mathijssen, R. Linden, T. van der Legrand, S.A. Pil, K. & Verstraete, A.

    2011-01-01

    The performance of eight on-site oral fluid drug screening devices was studied in Belgium, Finland and the Netherlands as a part of the EU-project DRUID. The main objective of the study was to evaluate the reliability of the devices for testing drivers suspected of driving under the influence of dru

  8. Engineered nanoparticulate drug delivery systems: the next frontier for oral administration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diab, Roudayna; Jaafar-Maalej, Chiraz; Fessi, Hatem; Maincent, Philippe

    2012-12-01

    For the past few decades, there has been a considerable research interest in the area of oral drug delivery using nanoparticle (NP) delivery systems as carriers. Oral NPs have been used as a physical approach to improve the solubility and the stability of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) in the gastrointestinal juices, to enhance the intestinal permeability of drugs, to sustain and to control the release of encapsulated APIs allowing the dosing frequency to be reduced, and finally, to achieve both local and systemic drug targeting. Numerous materials have been used in the formulation of oral NPs leading to different nanoparticulate platforms. In this paper, we review various aspects of the formulation and the characterization of polymeric, lipid, and inorganic NPs. Special attention will be dedicated to their performance in the oral delivery of drug molecules and therapeutic genes.

  9. Intestinal interleukin-10 mobilization as a contributor to the anti-arthritis effect of orally administered madecassoside: a unique action mode of saponin compounds with poor bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Wei, Zhifeng; Dou, Yannong; Yang, Yan; Leng, Dandan; Kong, Lingyi; Dai, Yue; Xia, Yufeng

    2015-03-01

    Madecassoside, a triterpenoid saponin present in Centella asiatica herbs with extremely low bioavailability, possesses excellent anti-rheumatoid arthritis property after oral administration. Such a disconnection between poor pharmacokinetic property and undoubted bioactivity also exists in many other herbal medicines. However, there is no reasonable explanation for this phenomenon to date. Here we showed that orally administered madecassoside displayed marked therapeutic effect on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats, which was accompanied by a systemic downregulation of inflammatory cytokines and an upregulation of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. In vitro assays demonstrated that neither madecassoside nor its main metabolite madecassic acid could directly interfere with the secretion of inflammatory cytokines and IL-10. Intraperitoneal injection of madecassoside or madecassic acid was absent of significant effects on CIA progression, which further excluded the possibility of systemic action and highlighted the indispensable role of intestinal tracts. Notably, madecassoside could dramatically enhance the secretion of IL-10 from the small intestine of CIA rats probably through increasing the number of Foxp3(+) T lymphocytes in the lamina propria. In conclusion, madecassoside displays anti-arthritis property not by absorption into blood or by its metabolite, but through an intestine-dependent manner. The action can be mediated by, at least partially, the mobilization of IL-10 that originates from small intestines.

  10. Mixed Antimony(V Complexes with Different Sugars to Modulate the Oral Bioavailability of Pentavalent Antimonial Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weverson A. Ferreira

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that the association of the drug meglumine antimoniate (MA with β-cyclodextrin can improve its bioavailability by the oral route. In this work, ribose and maltose were investigated for their ability to form mixed or association complexes with MA, release MA and modulate the serum levels of Sb after oral administration in mice. Analysis of the MA/ribose composition by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LCMS-IT-TOF revealed the presence of mixed meglumine-Sb-ribose and Sb-ribose complexes. Analysis of the MA/maltose composition suggested the formation of MA-maltose association compounds. Circular dichroism characterization of these compositions following dilution in water at 37 °C suggested a partial and slow dissociation of the association compounds. When the MA/ribose composition was administered orally and compared to MA, the serum concentration of Sb was significantly lower after 1 h and greater after 3 h. On the other hand, the MA/maltose composition showed similar serum Sb concentration after 1 h and higher level of Sb after 3 h, when compared to MA. In conclusion, the present study has demonstrated the formation of mixed or association complexes of MA with sugars, such as maltose and ribose, which promoted sustained serum level of Sb after oral administration.

  11. Effect of acidity of drugs on the prediction of human oral absorption by biopartitioning micellar chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Biopartitioning micellar chromatography(BMC)is a potentially high throughput and low cost alternative for in vitro prediction of drug absorption,which can mimic the drug partitioning process in biological systems.In this paper,a data set of 56 compounds representing acidic,basic,neutral and amphoteric drugs from various structure classes with human oral absorption(HOA)data available were employed to show the effect of acidity of drugs in oral absorption prediction.HOA was reciprocally correlated to the nega...

  12. [Novel oral anticancer drugs: a review of adverse drug reactions, interactions and patient adherence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartal, Alexandra; Mátrai, Zoltán; Szucs, Attila; Belinszkaja, Galina; Langmár, Zoltán; Rosta, András

    2012-01-15

    Each aspect of oncological care is widely affected by the spread of oral anticancer agents, which raises several questions in terms of safe medication use and patient adherence. Over the past decade targeted therapies have appeared in clinical practice and revolutionized the pharmacological treatment of malignancies. Regular patient - doctor visits and proper patient education is crucial in order to comply with the therapy previously agreed upon with the oncologist, to increase patient adherence, to detect and to treat adverse effects in early stages. Since the information on the new medicines in Hungarian language is sparse it is the intention of the authors to give an overview of the basic knowledge, patient safety issues, adverse effects and interactions. Official drug information summaries and data on pharmacokinetics, interactions and adverse effects from the literature are reviewed as the basis for this overview.

  13. Effects of the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen administered orally on normal food intake and intraperitoneally on fat intake in non-deprived rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bains, Rasneer S; Ebenezer, Ivor S

    2013-01-01

    It has been previously reported that the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen decreases food intake after oral administration and fat intake after intraperitoneal administration. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of baclofen (1-4 mg/ kg) administered orally (Experiment 1) on food intake in non-deprived rats (n=6) and intraperitoneally (Experiment 2) on fat intake in non-deprived rats (n=8) that were naïve to baclofen (1st set of trials) and in the same group of rats after they were sub-chronically exposed to baclofen (2nd set of trials). The results from Experiment 1 show that baclofen had no effects on food intake during the 1st set of trials, but the 2 and 4 mg/kg doses significantly increased food consumption during the 2nd set of trials. Baclofen produced sedation during the 1st set of trials, but tolerance occurred to this effect and was not apparent during the 2nd set of trials. These observations suggest that the motor effects may have competed with the hyperphagic effects of baclofen during the 1st set of trials. The data from Experiment 2 show that baclofen had no effects on fat intake during either the 1st or 2nd set of trials. The results of the study thus indicate that orally administrated baclofen increases food intake and intraperitoneal administration has no effect on fat intake in non-deprived rats under the conditions used in this study. These findings may have important implications for research on the use of baclofen in studies concerned with ingestive behaviours.

  14. 5-FU Metabolism in Cancer and Orally-Administrable 5-FU Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwao Sasaki

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU is a key anticancer drug that for its broad antitumor activity, as well as for its synergism with other anticancer drugs, has been used to treat various types of malignancies. In chemotherapeutic regimens, 5-FU has been combined with oxaliplatin, irinotecan and other drugs as a continuous intravenous infusion. Recent clinical chemotherapy studies have shown that several of the regimens with oral 5-FU drugs are not inferior compared to those involving continuous 5-FU infusion chemotherapy, and it is probable that in some regimens continuous 5-FU infusion can be replaced by oral 5-FU drugs. Historically, both the pharmaceutical industry and academia in Japan have been involved in the development of oral 5-FU drugs, and this review will focus on the current knowledge of 5-FU anabolism and catabolism, and the available information about the various orally-administrable 5-FU drugs, including UFT, S-1 and capecitabine. Clinical studies comparing the efficacy and adverse events of S-1 and capecitabine have been reported, and the accumulated results should be utilized to optimize the treatment of cancer patients. On the other hand, it is essential to elucidate the pharmacokinetic mechanism of each of the newly-developed drugs, to correctly select the drugs for each patient in the clinical setting, and to further develop optimized drug derivatives.

  15. pH-Responsive carriers for oral drug delivery: challenges and opportunities of current platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Yao, WenDong; Rao, YueFeng; Lu, XiaoYang; Gao, JianQing

    2017-11-01

    Oral administration is a desirable alternative of parenteral administration due to the convenience and increased compliance to patients, especially for chronic diseases that require frequent administration. The oral drug delivery is a dynamic research field despite the numerous challenges limiting their effective delivery, such as enzyme degradation, hydrolysis and low permeability of intestinal epithelium in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. pH-Responsive carriers offer excellent potential as oral therapeutic systems due to enhancing the stability of drug delivery in stomach and achieving controlled release in intestines. This review provides a wide perspective on current status of pH-responsive oral drug delivery systems prepared mainly with organic polymers or inorganic materials, including the strategies used to overcome GI barriers, the challenges in their development and future prospects, with focus on technology trends to improve the bioavailability of orally delivered drugs, the mechanisms of drug release from pH-responsive oral formulations, and their application for drug delivery, such as protein and peptide therapeutics, vaccination, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and bacterial infections.

  16. Adherence to oral anti-diabetic drugs among patients attending a Ghanaian teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce SP

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The burden of diabetes mellitus, especially Type-2, continues to increase across the world. Medication adherence is considered an integral component in its management. Poor glycemic controls due to medication nonadherence accelerates the development of long-term complications which consequently leads to increased hospitalization and mortality. Objective: This study examined the level of adherence to oral antidiabetic drugs among patients who visited the teaching hospital and explored the probable contributory factors to non-adherence. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study using systematic sampling to collect quantitative data was undertaken. Questionnaires were administered to out-patients of the medical department of a teaching hospital in Ghana. Logistic regression was performed with statistical significance determined at p<0.05. Results: A total of 200 diabetic patients participated in the study. Using the Morisky Medication Adherence scale, the level of adherence determined was 38.5%. There were significant correlations between level of adherence and educational level [(OR=1.508; (CI 0.805- 2.825, P=0.019, and mode of payment [(OR=1.631; (CI 0.997- 2.669, P=0.05. Conclusion: Adherence in diabetic patients was low among respondents and this can be improved through education, counseling and reinforcement of self-care. There were several possible factors that contributed to the low adherence rate which could benefit from further studies.

  17. Oral treatment of erectile dysfunction: from herbal remedies to designer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guirguis, W R

    1998-01-01

    The erect penis has always been a symbol of power, virility, and fertility. Inability to obtain or maintain an erection, known clinically as erectile dysfunction, is a major health problem. It can cause considerable distress, unhappiness, and relationship problems. The search has therefore continued from time immemorial to find an effective safe, and easy to administer treatment for erectile problems. Although a number of these treatments became available in the last two decades, they all had problems with efficacy, safety, or ease of administration. Clinicians in this field often are told at the end of an assessment interview, "I wish you have a magic pill". An effective and safe oral treatment is, no doubt, the most acceptable and easy to use option. Finding such a treatment has always been the dream of many scientists, and many attempts have been made over the years. These ranged from herbal remedies used by native healers, mostly in Eastern countries, to the more sophisticated designer drugs, which are based on a better understanding of the physiological mechanism of erection. This article describes some of these attempts.

  18. 78 FR 73199 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Bioequivalence Studies With Pharmacokinetic Endpoints for Drugs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Bioequivalence Studies With Pharmacokinetic Endpoints for Drugs Submitted Under an Abbreviated New Drug Application; Availability AGENCY: Food... guidances to industry on ``Bioavailability and Bioequivalence Studies for Orally Administered Drug...

  19. Effect of oral coadministration of drugs on the disposition of (/sup 14/C)-celiprolol HCl in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Town, C.; Knipe, J.; Taft, C.; Tantillo, N.; Klunk, L.; Grebow, P.

    1986-03-01

    Celiprolol HCL (C) is a cardioselective ..beta..-blocker undergoing clinical trials as an antihypertensive agent. Studies with rats indicated that the oral coadministration of 2.5 mg/kg of chlorthalidone (CT) caused a 40% decrease in the urinary excretion of radioactivity from a 40 mg/kg dose of (/sup 14/C)-C(C). In order to further understand the nature of this interaction, groups of 6 rats were given 40 mg/kg of (C) alone and, one week later,/sub R.(C) pluse the drug to be tested. The vehicle was 0.5% Methocel. After each dosing, urine was collected for 96 hours from each rat and the amount of total radioactivity excreted was compared between treatments. The results showed that oral coadministration of 2.5 mg/kg hydrochlorothiazide, 2.5 mg/kg furosemide, 2.5 mg/kg indapamide, 5.0 mg/kg cimetidine, 10.0 mg/kg theophylline, and 1.0 mg/kg digoxin were without effect on the disposition of orally administered (C). Conversely, 2.5 mg/kg CT, 2.5 mg/kg acetazolamide (AZ) and 5.0 mg/kg hydralazine (H) caused a significant (p < 0.05) decrease in the urinary excretio of orally administered (C). CT and AZ are both potent inhibitors of carbonic anhydrase and their action on this enzyme may cause the effect on the disposition of (C). The action of H may be due to its pharmacologic action and warrants further study.

  20. Development and characterisation of sustained release solid dispersion oral tablets containing the poorly water soluble drug disulfiram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shergill, Mandip; Patel, Mina; Khan, Siraj; Bashir, Ayesha; McConville, Christopher

    2016-01-30

    Administration of drugs via the oral route is the most common and preferred route due to its ease of administration, cost-effectiveness and flexibility in design. However, if the drug being administered has limited aqueous solubility it can result in poor bioavailability. Furthermore, the low pH of the stomach as well as enzymatic activity can result in drugs delivered via the oral route being rapidly metabolised and degraded. Here we demonstrate the development and characterisation of sustained release solid dispersion oral tablets, containing the poorly water-soluble drug disulfiram (DSF). The tablets, which are manufactured from two different polymers (Kolliphor(®) P 188 and P 237) specifically designed for the manufacture of solid dispersions and two different polymers (Kollidon(®) SR and HPMC) specifically designed to provide sustained release, can enhance the solubility of DSF, sustain its release, while protecting it from degradation in simulated gastric fluid (SGF). The paper demonstrates that when using the hot melt method at 80°C the DSF loading capacity of the Kolliphor(®) P 188 and P 237 polymers is approximately 43 and 46% respectively, with the DSF completely in an amorphous state. The addition of 80% Kollidon(®) SR to the formulation completely protected the DSF in SGF for up to 70 min with 16% degradation after 120 min, while 75% degradation occurred after 120 min with the addition of 80% HPMC. The release rate of DSF can be manipulated by both the loading and type of sustained release polymer used, with HPMC providing for a much faster release rate compared to Kollidon(®) SR.

  1. Encapsulation of Liposomes within pH Responsive Microspheres for Oral Colonic Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Barea

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel liposome-in-microsphere (LIM formulation has been created comprising drug-loaded liposomes within pH responsive Eudragit S100 microspheres. The liposomes contained the model drug 5-ASA and were coated with chitosan in order to protect them during encapsulation within the microspheres and to improve site-specific release characteristics. In vitro drug release studies showed that LIMs prevented drug release within simulated stomach and small intestine conditions with subsequent drug release occurring in large intestine conditions. The formulation therefore has potential for oral colonic drug delivery.

  2. SELF EMULSIFYING DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM: A CONVENTIONAL AND ALTERNATIVE APPPROACH TO IMPROVE ORAL BIOAVAILABILITY OF LIPOPHILIC DRUGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desai Tushar R

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Out of newly discovered drugs most of the drugs are found to be lipophilic and out of which up to 40 % of pharmacologically active new molecules failed to reach to market only due to little or no water solubility; a serious challenge for the successful development and commercialization of new drugs in the pharmaceutica lindustry. Therefore various formulation strategies have been investigated to improve the solubility and the rate of dissolut ion to enhance the oral bioavailability of lipophilic drugs. Amongst various approach self emulsifying drug delivery system has gained more attention due to enhanced oral bio-availability enabling reduction in dose, more consistent temporal profiles of drug absorption, selective targeting of drug(s toward specific absorption window in GIT, and protection of drug(s from the hostile environment in gut. The present review discussed the mechanisam of self emulsification, composition, formulation approaches, different techniques, evaluation, factors affecting SEDDS, advantages, draw backs, applications and future trends in SEDDS.

  3. Layer-by-Layer Assembled Milk Protein Coated Magnetic Nanoparticle Enabled Oral Drug Delivery with High Stability in Stomach and Enzyme-Responsive Release in Small Intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing; Shu, Qing; Wang, Liya; Wu, Hui; Wang, Andrew Y.; Mao, Hui

    2014-01-01

    We report a novel drug delivery system composed of layer-by-layer (LBL) milk protein casein (CN) coated iron oxide nanoparticles. Doxorubicin (DOX) and indocyanine green (ICG) were selected as model drug molecules, which were incorporated into the inner polymeric layer, and subsequently coated with casein. The resulting casein coated iron oxide nanoparticles (CN-DOX/ICG-IO) were stable in the acidic gastric condition with the presence of gastric protease. On the other hand, the loaded drugs were released when the casein outer layer was gradually degraded by the intestinal protease in the simulated intestine condition. Such unique properties enable maintenance of the bioactivity of the drugs and thus enhance the drug delivery efficiency. Ex vivo experiments showed that the LBL CN-DOX-IO improved the translocation of DOX across microvilli and its absorption in the small intestine sacs. In vivo imaging of mice that were orally administered with these LBL CN-ICG-IO nanostructures further confirmed that the reported drug delivery vehicles could pass the stomach without significant degradation, and then accumulated in the small intestine. In addition, the magnetic iron oxide nanoparticle core offered an MRI contrast enhancing capability for in vivo imaging guided drug delivery. Therefore, the reported LBL CN-DOX/ICG-IO is a promising oral drug delivery nanoplatform, especially for drugs that are poorly soluble in water or degradable in the gastric environment. PMID:25477177

  4. 77 FR 28252 - Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Change of Sponsor; Griseofulvin Powder; Levamisole...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 520 Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Change of.... Joseph, MO 64503, has informed FDA that it has transferred ownership of, and all rights and interest in... current format. This rule does not meet the definition of ``rule'' in 5 U.S.C. 804(3)(A) because it is a...

  5. 78 FR 57057 - Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Amprolium; Meloxicam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-17

    ...; Meloxicam AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug........... Ceva Sante MELOXIDYL Original approval 520.1350 Yes....... CE \\1\\. Animale, 10 (meloxicam) Oral as a....1367 Meloxicam. (a) Specifications--(1) Each milliliter of suspension contains 0.5 milligrams...

  6. Orally Administered Salacia reticulata Extract Reduces H1N1 Influenza Clinical Symptoms in Murine Lung Tissues Putatively Due to Enhanced Natural Killer Cell Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Pérez, Gustavo A.; Egashira, Masayo; Harada, Yuri; Tsuruta, Takeshi; Oda, Yuriko; Ueda, Fumitaka; Tsukahara, Takamitsu; Tsukamoto, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    Influenza is a major cause of respiratory tract infection. Although most cases do not require further hospitalization, influenza periodically causes epidemics in humans that can potentially infect and kill millions of people. To countermeasure this threat, new vaccines need to be developed annually to match emerging influenza viral strains with increased resistance to existing vaccines. Thus, there is a need for finding and developing new anti-influenza viral agents as alternatives to current treatments. Here, we tested the antiviral effects of an extract from the stems and roots of Salacia reticulata (SSRE), a plant rich in phytochemicals, such as salacinol, kotalanol, and catechins, on H1N1 influenza virus-infected mice. Following oral administration of 0.6 mg/day of SSRE, the incidence of coughing decreased in 80% of mice, and only one case of severe pulmonary inflammation was detected. Moreover, when compared with mice given Lactobacillus casei JCM1134, a strain previously shown to help increase in vitro natural killer (NK) cell activity, SSRE-administered mice showed greater and equal NK cell activity in splenocytes and pulmonary cells, respectively, at high effector cell:target cell ratios. Next, to test whether or not SSRE would exert protective effects against influenza in the absence of gut microbiota, mice were given antibiotics before being inoculated influenza virus and subsequently administered SSRE. SSRE administration induced an increase in NK cell activity in splenocytes and pulmonary cells at levels similar to those detected in mice not treated with antibiotics. Based on our results, it can be concluded that phytochemicals in the SSRE exerted protective effects against influenza infection putatively via modulation of the immune response, including enhancement of NK cell activity, although some protective effects were not necessarily through modulation of gut microbiota. Further investigation is necessary to elucidate the molecular mechanisms

  7. Orally administered Salacia reticulata extract reduces H1N1 influenza clinical symptoms in murine lung tissues putatively due to enhanced natural killer cell activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Adolfo Romero-Pérez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Influenza is a major cause of respiratory tract infection. Although most cases do not require further hospitalization, influenza periodically causes epidemics in humans that can potentially infect and kill millions of people. To countermeasure this threat, new vaccines need to be developed annually to match emerging influenza viral strains with increased resistance to existing vaccines. Thus, there is a need for finding and developing new anti-influenza viral agents as alternatives to current treatments. Here, we tested the antiviral effects of an extract from the stems and roots of Salacia reticulata (SSRE, a plant rich in phytochemicals such as salacinol, kotalanol and catechins, on H1N1 influenza virus-infected mice. Following oral administration of 0.6 mg/day of SSRE, the incidence of coughing decreased in 80% of mice, and only one case of severe pulmonary inflammation was detected. Moreover, when compared with mice given Lactobacillus casei JCM1134, a strain previously shown to help increase in vitro NK cell activity, SSRE-administered mice showed greater and equal NK cell activity in splenocytes and pulmonary cells, respectively, at high effector cell:target cell ratios. Next, to test whether or not SSRE would exert protective effects against influenza in the absence of gut microbiota, mice were given antibiotics before being inoculated influenza virus and subsequently administered SSRE. SSRE administration induced an increase in NK cell activity in splenocytes and pulmonary cells at levels similar to those detected in mice not treated with antibiotics. Based on our results, it can be concluded that phytochemicals in the SSRE exerted protective effects against influenza infection putatively via modulation of the immune response including enhancement of NK cell activity, although some protective effects were not necessarily through modulation of gut microbiota. Further investigation is necessary to elucidate the molecular mechanisms

  8. Self-Micro Emulsifying Drug Delivery Systems: a Strategy to Improve Oral Bioavailability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay K. Sharma

    Full Text Available Aim: Oral route has always been the favorite route of drug administration in many diseases and till today it is the first way investigated in the development of new dosage forms. The major problem in oral drug formulations is low and erratic bioavailability, which mainly results from poor aqueous solubility, thereby pose problems in their formulation. For the therapeutic delivery of lipophilic active moieties (BCS class II drugs, lipid based formulations are inviting increasing attention. Methods: To that aim, from the web sites of PubMed, HCAplus, Thomson, and Registry were used as the main sources to perform the search for the most significant research articles published on the subject. The information was then carefully analyzed, highlighting the most important results in the formulation and development of self-micro emulsifying drug delivery systems as well as its therapeutic activity. Results: Self-emulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS has gained more attention due to enhanced oral bio-availability enabling reduction in dose, more consistent temporal profiles of drug absorption, selective targeting of drug(s toward specific absorption window in GIT, and protection of drug(s from the unreceptive environment in gut. Conclusions: This article gives a complete overview of SMEDDS as a promising approach to effectively deal with the problem of poorly soluble molecules.

  9. Pectin matrix as oral drug delivery vehicle for colon cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Tin Wui; Colombo, Gaia; Sonvico, Fabio

    2011-03-01

    Colon cancer is the fourth most common cancer globally with 639,000 deaths reported annually. Typical chemotherapy is provided by injection route to reduce tumor growth and metastasis. Recent research investigates the oral delivery profiles of chemotherapeutic agents. In comparison to injection, oral administration of drugs in the form of a colon-specific delivery system is expected to increase drug bioavailability at target site, reduce drug dose and systemic adverse effects. Pectin is suitable for use as colon-specific drug delivery vehicle as it is selectively digested by colonic microflora to release drug with minimal degradation in upper gastrointestinal tract. The present review examines the physicochemical attributes of formulation needed to retard drug release of pectin matrix prior to its arrival at colon, and evaluate the therapeutic value of pectin matrix in association with colon cancer. The review suggests that multi-particulate calcium pectinate matrix is an ideal carrier to orally deliver drugs for site-specific treatment of colon cancer as (1) crosslinking of pectin by calcium ions in a matrix negates drug release in upper gastrointestinal tract, (2) multi-particulate carrier has a slower transit and a higher contact time for drug action in colon than single-unit dosage form, and (3) both pectin and calcium have an indication to reduce the severity of colon cancer from the implication of diet and molecular biology studies. Pectin matrix demonstrates dual advantages as drug carrier and therapeutic for use in treatment of colon cancer.

  10. 75 FR 54492 - Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Tiamulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-08

    ... application (NADA) filed by Novartis Animal Health US, Inc. The supplemental NADA provides for use of an..., filed a supplement to NADA 140-916 for DENAGARD (tiamulin) Liquid Concentrate administered in drinking... NADA provides for use of a 12.5 percent tiamulin concentrate solution. The supplemental NADA...

  11. Recommendations on bioanalytical method stability implications of co-administered and co-formulated drugs by Global CRO Council for Bioanalysis (GCC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowes, Steve; Boterman, Mark; Doig, Mira; Breda, Massimo; Jersey, Jim; Lelacheur, Richard; Shoup, Ronald; Garofolo, Fabio; Dumont, Isabelle; Martinez, Suzanne; Needham, Shane; Zimmer, Jennifer; Caturla, Maria Cruz; Couerbe, Philippe; Maltas, John; Steffen, Ray; Petrilla, James; Safavi, Afshin; Awaiye, Kayode; Bhatti, Masood; Sheldon, Curtis; Schiebl, Christine; Struwe, Petra; Turk, Douglas; Sangster, Timothy; Pattison, Colin; Fast, Douglas; Goodwin, Lee; Kamerud, John; Dinan, Andrew; Mamelak, Dan; Islam, Rafiq; Segers, Rudi; Lin, Zhongping John; Hillier, Jim; Garofolo, Wei; Folguera, Lois; Zimmer, Dieter; Zimmermann, Thomas; Pawula, Maria; Moussallie, Marc; de Souza Teixeira, Leonardo; Rocha, Thais; Allinson, John; Jardieu, Paula; Tang, Daniel; Gouty, Dominique; Wright, Laura; Truog, James; Lin, Jenny; Yamashita, Yasuhiro; Khan, Masood; Liu, Yansheng; Xu, Allan; Lundberg, Richard; Cox, Chris; Breau, Alan; Hayes, Roger; Bigogno, Chiara; Schoutsen, Dick; Dilger, Carmen; Jonker, Jianine; Bouhajib, Mohammed; Levesque, Ann; Gagnon-Carignan, Sofi; Harman, Jake; Nicholson, Robert; Jenkins, Rand; Warren, Mark; Lin, Ming Hung; Karnik, Shane; De Boer, Theo; Houghton, Richard; Green, Rachel; Demaio, William; Sable, Romuald; Smith, Kirk; Siethoff, Christoph; Cojocaru, Laura; Allen, Mike; Reuschel, Scott; Gonzalez, Pilar; Harter, Tammy; Fatmi, Saadya; Rock, Marie; Vija, Jenifer; Sayyarpour, Farhad; Malone, Michele; Nowatzke, William; Best, Stuart; Fang, Xinping

    2012-09-01

    An open letter written by the Global CRO Council for Bioanalysis (GCC) describing the GCC survey results on stability data from co-administered and co-formulated drugs was sent to multiple regulatory authorities on 14 December 2011. This letter and further discussions at different GCC meetings led to subsequent recommendations on this topic of widespread interest within the bioanalytical community over the past 2 years.

  12. A Novel Multilayered Multidisk Oral Tablet for Chronotherapeutic Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaheeda Khan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A Multilayered Multidisk Tablet (MLMDT comprising two drug-loaded disks enveloped by three drug-free barrier layers was developed for use in chronotherapeutic disorders, employing two model drugs, theophylline and diltiazem HCl. The MLMDT was designed to achieve two pulses of drug release separated by a lag phase. The polymer disk comprised hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC and ethylcellulose (EC granulated using an aqueous dispersion of EC. The polymeric barrier layers constituted a combination of pectin/Avicel (PBL (1st barrier layer and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC (HBL1 and HBL2 as the 2nd and 3rd barrier layers, respectively. Sodium bicarbonate was incorporated into the diltiazem-containing formulation for delayed drug release. Erosion and swelling studies confirmed the manner in which the drug was released with theophylline formulations exhibiting a maximum swelling of 97% and diltiazem containing formulations with a maximum swelling of 119%. FTIR spectra displayed no interactions between drugs and polymers. Molecular mechanics simulations were undertaken to predict the possible orientation of the polymer morphologies most likely affecting the MLMDT performance. The MLMDT provided two pulses of drug release, separated by a lag phase, and additionally it displayed desirable friability, hardness, and uniformity of mass indicating a stable formulation that may be a desirable candidate for chronotherapeutic drug delivery.

  13. Application of Savitzky-Golay differentiation filters and Fourier functions to simultaneous determination of cefepime and the co-administered drug, levofloxacin, in spiked human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Aziz, Omar; Abdel-Ghany, Maha F; Nagi, Reham; Abdel-Fattah, Laila

    2015-03-15

    The present work is concerned with simultaneous determination of cefepime (CEF) and the co-administered drug, levofloxacin (LEV), in spiked human plasma by applying a new approach, Savitzky-Golay differentiation filters, and combined trigonometric Fourier functions to their ratio spectra. The different parameters associated with the calculation of Savitzky-Golay and Fourier coefficients were optimized. The proposed methods were validated and applied for determination of the two drugs in laboratory prepared mixtures and spiked human plasma. The results were statistically compared with reported HPLC methods and were found accurate and precise.

  14. CONTEMPORARY APPROACHES FOR BI-LAYER TECHNOLOGY OF DRUGS THROUGH ORAL ROUTE: AN OVERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rishikesh*, M. A. Bhuiyan, S. M. Ashraful Islam, I. Dewan, Md. A. Islam and Md. S.- Ul H. Miah

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Bi-layer tablet technology for bimodal release of drug and co-administration of drugs via oral route has been engaged a significant place in the field of drug delivery technology. At present, several pharmaceutical companies are developing bilayer tablet for co-administration of drugs to improve the therapeutic efficacy as well as to reduce the chances of drug-drug interaction. This review indicates the different aspects of drug release mechanism, different strategies of drug release, various techniques for bilayer tablet, and the influence of different process and formulation parameters must be considered during the development of bilayer tablet. Bi-layer tablet is suitable for sequential release of two drugs in combination, separate two incompatible substances, and also for sustained release tablet in which one layer is immediate release as initial dose and second layer is maintenance dose.

  15. Preparation of multiparticulate systems for oral delivery of a micronized or nanosized poorly soluble drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerea, Matteo; Pattarino, Franco; Foglio Bonda, Andrea; Palugan, Luca; Segale, Lorena; Vecchio, Carlo

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of the present work was to prepare multiparticulate drug delivery systems for oral administration of a poorly soluble drug such as itraconazole. Multiparticulate systems were prepared by extrusion/spheronization technique using a mix of crospovidone, low viscosity hypromellose, microcrystalline cellulose, micronized drug and water. In order to improve the release performance of the multiparticulate systems, the micronized drug was suspended in water with polysorbate 20 and nanonized by a high-pressure homogenization. The suspension of drug nanoparticles was then spray-dried for enabling an easy handling of the drug and for preventing the over-wetting of the powders during extrusion/spheronization processing. Both multiparticulate units prepared with micronized or nanonized drug showed acceptable disintegrating properties. The nanosizing of micronized drug powder provided a significant improvement of drug dissolution rates of the multiparticulates.

  16. Effects of SiC nanoparticles orally administered in a rat model: Biodistribution, toxicity and elemental composition changes in feces and organs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozano, Omar, E-mail: omar.lozanogarcia@fundp.ac.be [Namur Nanosafety Center (NNC), NAmur Research Institute for LIfe Sciences (NARILIS), University of Namur - FUNDP, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Research Centre for the Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR-LARN), University of Namur (FUNDP), Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Laloy, Julie; Alpan, Lütfiye [Namur Nanosafety Center (NNC), NAmur Research Institute for LIfe Sciences (NARILIS), University of Namur - FUNDP, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Department of Pharmacy, NAMEDIC, Namur Thrombosis and Hemostasis Center (NTHC), University of Namur (FUNDP), Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Mejia, Jorge [Namur Nanosafety Center (NNC), NAmur Research Institute for LIfe Sciences (NARILIS), University of Namur - FUNDP, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Research Centre for the Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR-LARN), University of Namur (FUNDP), Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Rolin, Stéphanie [Namur Nanosafety Center (NNC), NAmur Research Institute for LIfe Sciences (NARILIS), University of Namur - FUNDP, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Department of Pharmacy, NAMEDIC, Namur Thrombosis and Hemostasis Center (NTHC), University of Namur (FUNDP), Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Toussaint, Olivier [Namur Nanosafety Center (NNC), NAmur Research Institute for LIfe Sciences (NARILIS), University of Namur - FUNDP, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Laboratory of Biochemistry and Cellular Biology (URBC), University of Namur (FUNDP), Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Dogné, Jean-Michel [Namur Nanosafety Center (NNC), NAmur Research Institute for LIfe Sciences (NARILIS), University of Namur - FUNDP, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Department of Pharmacy, NAMEDIC, Namur Thrombosis and Hemostasis Center (NTHC), University of Namur (FUNDP), Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); and others

    2012-10-15

    Background: Silicon carbide (SiC) presents noteworthy properties as a material such as high hardness, thermal stability, and photoluminescent properties as a nanocrystal. However, there are very few studies in regard to the toxicological potential of SiC NPs. Objectives: To study the toxicity and biodistribution of silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles in an in vivo rat model after acute (24 h) and subacute (28 days) oral administrations. The acute doses were 0.5, 5, 50, 300 and 600 mg·kg{sup −1}, while the subacute doses were 0.5 and 50 mg·kg{sup −1}. Results: SiC biodistribution and elemental composition of feces and organs (liver, kidneys, and spleen) have been studied by Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). SiC and other elements in feces excretion increased by the end of the subacute assessment. SiC did not accumulate in organs but some elemental composition modifications were observed after the acute assessment. Histopathological sections from organs (stomach, intestines, liver, and kidneys) indicate the absence of damage at all applied doses, in both assessments. A decrease in the concentration of urea in blood was found in the 50 mg·kg{sup −1} group from the subacute assessment. No alterations in the urine parameters (sodium, potassium, osmolarity) were found. Conclusion: This is the first study that assesses the toxicity, biodistribution, and composition changes in feces and organs of SiC nanoparticles in an in vivo rat model. SiC was excreted mostly in feces and low traces were retrieved in urine, indicating that SiC can cross the intestinal barrier. No sign of toxicity was however found after oral administration. -- Highlights: ► SiC nanoparticles were orally administered to rats in acute and subacute doses. ► SiC was found in low traces in urine. It is mostly excreted in feces within 5 days. ► SiC excretion rate, feces and organ elemental composition change with time. ► No morphological alteration were found on GI tract, liver, kidneys

  17. Role of nanoparticle size, shape and surface chemistry in oral drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Amrita; Qi, Jianping; Gogoi, Rohan; Wong, Jessica; Mitragotri, Samir

    2016-09-28

    Nanoparticles find intriguing applications in oral drug delivery since they present a large surface area for interactions with the gastrointestinal tract and can be modified in various ways to address the barriers associated with oral delivery. The size, shape and surface chemistry of nanoparticles can greatly impact cellular uptake and efficacy of the treatment. However, the interplay between particle size, shape and surface chemistry has not been well investigated especially for oral drug delivery. To this end, we prepared sphere-, rod- and disc-shaped nanoparticles and conjugated them with targeting ligands to study the influence of size, shape and surface chemistry on their uptake and transport across intestinal cells. A triple co-culture model of intestinal cells was utilized to more closely mimic the intestinal epithelium. Results demonstrated higher cellular uptake of rod-shaped nanoparticles in the co-culture compared to spheres regardless of the presence of active targeting moieties. Transport of nanorods across the intestinal co-culture was also significantly higher than spheres. The findings indicate that nanoparticle-mediated oral drug delivery can be potentially improved with departure from spherical shape which has been traditionally utilized for the design of nanoparticles. We believe that understanding the role of nanoparticle geometry in intestinal uptake and transport will bring forth a paradigm shift in nanoparticle engineering for oral delivery and non-spherical nanoparticles should be further investigated and considered for oral delivery of therapeutic drugs and diagnostic materials.

  18. Personalised treatment with oral anticoagulant drugs : clinical and economic issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, T.I.

    2013-01-01

    Coumarin derivatives such as acenocoumarol, phenprocoumon and warfarin are frequently used for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with atrial fibrillation or for the treatment of venous thromboembolism. These oral anticoagulants have a narrow therapeutic range and a large var

  19. Challenges in oral drug delivery in patients with esophageal dysphagia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kappelle, W.F.; Siersema, P.D.; Bogte, A.; Vleggaar, F.P.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Esophageal dysphagia is a commonly reported symptom with various benign and malignant causes. Esophageal dysphagia can impede intake of oral medication, which often poses a major challenge for both patients and physicians. The best way to address this challenge depends of the cause of

  20. 76 FR 25696 - Guidance for Industry on Dosage Delivery Devices for Orally Ingested OTC Liquid Drug Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry on Dosage Delivery Devices for Orally... entitled ``Dosage Delivery Devices for Orally Ingested OTC Liquid Drug Products.'' This document is... over-the-counter (OTC) liquid drug products packaged with dosage delivery devices (e.g.,...

  1. Bioequivalence study designs for generic solid oral anticancer drug products: scientific and regulatory considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Paramjeet; Chaurasia, Chandra S; Davit, Barbara M; Conner, Dale P

    2013-12-01

    The demonstration of bioequivalence (BE) between the test and reference products is an integral part of generic drug approval process. A sound BE study design is pivotal to the successful demonstration of BE of generic drugs to their corresponding reference listed drug product. Generally, BE of systemically acting oral dosage forms is demonstrated in a crossover, single-dose in vivo study in healthy subjects. The determination of BE of solid oral anticancer drug products is associated with its own unique challenges due to the serious safety risks involved. Unlike typical BE study in healthy subjects, the safety issues often necessitate conducting BE studies in cancer patients. Such BE studies of an anticancer drug should be conducted without disturbing the patients' therapeutic dosing regimen. Attributes such as drug permeability and solubility, pharmacokinetics, dosing regimen, and approved therapeutic indication(s) are considered in the BE study design of solid anticancer drug products. To streamline the drug approval process, the Division of Bioequivalence posts the Bioequivalence Recommendations for Specific Products guidances on the FDA public website. The objective of this article is to illustrate the scientific and regulatory considerations in the design of BE studies for generic solid oral anticancer drug products through examples.

  2. Orally administered glycidol and its fatty acid esters as well as 3-MCPD fatty acid esters are metabolized to 3-MCPD in the F344 rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onami, Saeko; Cho, Young-Man; Toyoda, Takeshi; Akagi, Jun-ichi; Fujiwara, Satoshi; Ochiai, Ryosuke; Tsujino, Kazushige; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi; Ogawa, Kumiko

    2015-12-01

    IARC has classified glycidol and 3-monochloropropane-1,2-diol (3-MCPD) as group 2A and 2B, respectively. Their esters are generated in foodstuffs during processing and there are concerns that they may be hydrolyzed to the carcinogenic forms in vivo. Thus, we conducted two studies. In the first, we administered glycidol and 3-MCPD and associated esters (glycidol oleate: GO, glycidol linoleate: GL, 3-MCPD dipalmitate: CDP, 3-MCPD monopalmitate: CMP, 3-MCPD dioleate: CDO) to male F344 rats by single oral gavage. After 30 min, 3-MCPD was detected in serum from all groups. Glycidol was detected in serum from the rats given glycidol or GL and CDP and CDO in serum from rats given these compounds. In the second, we examined if metabolism occurs on simple reaction with rat intestinal contents (gastric, duodenal and cecal contents) from male F344 gpt delta rats. Newly produced 3-MCPD was detected in all gut contents incubated with the three 3-MCPD fatty acid esters and in gastric and duodenal contents incubated with glycidol and in duodenal and cecal contents incubated with GO. Although our observation was performed at 1 time point, the results showed that not only 3-MCPD esters but also glycidol and glycidol esters are metabolized into 3-MCPD in the rat.

  3. Recent developments in oral lipid-based drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas, N.; Rades, T.; Müllertz, A.

    2013-01-01

    and characterization of LbDDS. In particular, the lack of standardized test protocols can be identified as the major obstacles for the broader application of LbDDS. This review seeks to summarize recent approaches in the field of lipid-based drug delivery that try to elucidate some critical steps in their development......The increasing number of poorly water-soluble drugs in development in the pharmaceutical industry has sparked interest in novel drug delivery options such as lipid-based drug delivery systems (LbDDS). Several LbDDS have been marketed successfully and have shown superior and more reliable...... bioavailability compared to conventional formulations. However, some reluctance in the broader application of LbDDS still appears, despite the growing commercial interest in lipids as a drug delivery platform. This reluctance might at least in part be related to the complexity associated with the development...

  4. The use of hypromellose in oral drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chi L; Martini, Luigi G; Ford, James L; Roberts, Matthew

    2005-05-01

    Hypromellose, formerly known as hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC), is by far the most commonly employed cellulose ether used in the fabrication of hydrophilic matrices. Hypromellose provides the release of a drug in a controlled manner, effectively increasing the duration of release of a drug to prolong its therapeutic effect. This review provides a current insight into hypromellose and its applicability to hydrophilic matrices in order to highlight the basic parameters that affect its performance. Topics covered include the chemical, thermal and mechanical properties of hypromellose, hydration of the polymer matrices, the mechanism of drug release and the influence of tablet geometry on drug-release rate. The inclusion of drug-release modifiers within hypromellose matrices, the effects of dissolution media and the influence of both the external environment and microenvironment pH within the gel matrix on the properties of the polymer are also discussed.

  5. Recent developments in oral lipid-based drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas, N.; Rades, T.; Müllertz, A.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing number of poorly water-soluble drugs in development in the pharmaceutical industry has sparked interest in novel drug delivery options such as lipid-based drug delivery systems (LbDDS). Several LbDDS have been marketed successfully and have shown superior and more reliable...... bioavailability compared to conventional formulations. However, some reluctance in the broader application of LbDDS still appears, despite the growing commercial interest in lipids as a drug delivery platform. This reluctance might at least in part be related to the complexity associated with the development...... and characterization of LbDDS. In particular, the lack of standardized test protocols can be identified as the major obstacles for the broader application of LbDDS. This review seeks to summarize recent approaches in the field of lipid-based drug delivery that try to elucidate some critical steps in their development...

  6. Lipid nanoparticles with a solid matrix (SLN, NLC, LDC) for oral drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muchow, Marc; Maincent, Philippe; Muller, Rainer H

    2008-12-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN), nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC), and lipid-drug conjugates (LDC), commonly produced by high-pressure homogenization, are interesting vectors for oral delivery of lipophilic and, to a certain extent, hydrophilic substances. Their production can be done without the use of organic solvents. Techniques to make them a physically stable delivery system have been developed. Scaling up of the production process from lab-size to large-scale dimensions using high-pressure homogenization can be easily achieved by using a different type of homogenizer. The machines used for large-scale production often yield an even better product quality than the lab-scale types. This review article covers the methods of production, characterization, mechanisms of oral bioavailability enhancement, scale-up, final oral dosage forms, and regulatory aspects of lipid nanoparticles for oral drug delivery. It focuses mainly on high-pressure homogenization production methods.

  7. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems for treatment of oral cancer: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calixto, Giovana; Bernegossi, Jéssica; Fonseca-Santos, Bruno; Chorilli, Marlus

    2014-01-01

    Oral cancer (oral cavity and oropharynx) is a common and aggressive cancer that invades local tissue, can cause metastasis, and has a high mortality rate. Conventional treatment strategies, such as surgery and chemoradiotherapy, have improved over the past few decades; however, they remain far from optimal. Currently, cancer research is focused on improving cancer diagnosis and treatment methods (oral cavity and oropharynx) nanotechnology, which involves the design, characterization, production, and application of nanoscale drug delivery systems. In medicine, nanotechnologies, such as polymeric nanoparticles, solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid carriers, gold nanoparticles, hydrogels, cyclodextrin complexes, and liquid crystals, are promising tools for diagnostic probes and therapeutic devices. The objective of this study is to present a systematic review of nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems for oral cancers.

  8. European Guidelines for Workplace Drug Testing in Oral Fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brcak, Michaela; Beck, Olof; Bosch, Tessa; Carmichael, Duncan; Fucci, Nadia; George, Claire; Piper, Mark; Salomone, Alberto; Schielen, Wim; Steinmeyer, Stefan; Taskinen, Sanna; Weinmann, Wolfgang

    2017-06-28

    These guidelines for Legally Defensible Workplace Drug Testing have been prepared and updated by the European Workplace Drug Testing Society (EWDTS). The European Guidelines are designed to establish best practice procedures whilst allowing individual countries to operate within the requirements of national customs and legislation. The EWDTS recommends that all European laboratories that undertake legally defensible workplace drug testing should use these guidelines as a template for accreditation. These guidelines are relevant to laboratory-based testing only. These guidelines follow current best practices and are constantly under review. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Targeting Receptors, Transporters and Site of Absorption to Improve Oral Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.H. Hamman

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the oral route of drug administration is the most acceptable way of self-medication with a high degree of patient compliance, the intestinal absorption of many drugs is severely hampered by different biological barriers. These barriers comprise of biochemical and physical components. The biochemical barrier includes enzymatic degradation in the gastrointestinal lumen, brush border and in the cytoplasm of the epithelial cells as well as efflux transporters that pump drug molecules from inside the epithelial cell back to the gastrointestinal lumen. The physical barrier consists of the epithelial cell membranes, tight junctions and mucus layer. Different strategies have been applied to improve the absorption of drugs after oral administration, which range from chemical modification of drug molecules and formulation technologies to the targeting of receptors, transporters and specialized cells such as the gut-associated lymphoid tissues. This review focuses specifically on the targeting of receptor-mediated endocytosis, transporters and the absorption-site as methods of optimizing intestinal drug absorption. Intestinal epithelial cells express several nutrient transporters that can be targeted by modifying the drug molecule in such a way that it is recognized as a substrate. Receptor-mediated endocytosis is a transport mechanism that can be targeted for instance by linking a receptor substrate to the drug molecule of interest. Many formulation strategies exist for enhancing drug absorption of which one is to deliver drugs at a specific site in the gastrointestinal tract where optimum drug absorption takes place.

  10. Targeting receptors, transporters and site of absorption to improve oral drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamman, J H; Demana, P H; Olivier, E I

    2007-01-01

    Although the oral route of drug administration is the most acceptable way of self-medication with a high degree of patient compliance, the intestinal absorption of many drugs is severely hampered by different biological barriers. These barriers comprise of biochemical and physical components. The biochemical barrier includes enzymatic degradation in the gastrointestinal lumen, brush border and in the cytoplasm of the epithelial cells as well as efflux transporters that pump drug molecules from inside the epithelial cell back to the gastrointestinal lumen. The physical barrier consists of the epithelial cell membranes, tight junctions and mucus layer. Different strategies have been applied to improve the absorption of drugs after oral administration, which range from chemical modification of drug molecules and formulation technologies to the targeting of receptors, transporters and specialized cells such as the gut-associated lymphoid tissues. This review focuses specifically on the targeting of receptor-mediated endocytosis, transporters and the absorption-site as methods of optimizing intestinal drug absorption. Intestinal epithelial cells express several nutrient transporters that can be targeted by modifying the drug molecule in such a way that it is recognized as a substrate. Receptor-mediated endocytosis is a transport mechanism that can be targeted for instance by linking a receptor substrate to the drug molecule of interest. Many formulation strategies exist for enhancing drug absorption of which one is to deliver drugs at a specific site in the gastrointestinal tract where optimum drug absorption takes place.

  11. Comparison of oral psoralen-UV-A with a portable tanning unit at home vs hospital-administered bath psoralen-UV-A in patients with chronic hand eczema - An open-label randomized controlled trial of efficacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Coevorden, AM; Kamphof, WG; van Sonderen, E; Bruynzeel, DP; Coenraads, PJ

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study whether oral psoralen-UV-A (PUVA) with a portable tanning unit at home is as effective as hospital-administered bath PUVA in patients with chronic hand eczema. Design: Open-label randomized controlled trial, with a 10-week treatment period and an 8-week follow-up period. Setting:

  12. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems for treatment of oral cancer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calixto G

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Giovana Calixto, Jéssica Bernegossi, Bruno Fonseca-Santos, Marlus Chorilli School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Drugs and Pharmaceuticals, São Paulo State University (UNESP, São Paulo, Brazil Abstract: Oral cancer (oral cavity and oropharynx is a common and aggressive cancer that invades local tissue, can cause metastasis, and has a high mortality rate. Conventional treatment strategies, such as surgery and chemoradiotherapy, have improved over the past few decades; however, they remain far from optimal. Currently, cancer research is focused on improving cancer diagnosis and treatment methods (oral cavity and oropharynx nanotechnology, which involves the design, characterization, production, and application of nanoscale drug delivery systems. In medicine, nanotechnologies, such as polymeric nanoparticles, solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid carriers, gold nanoparticles, hydrogels, cyclodextrin complexes, and liquid crystals, are promising tools for diagnostic probes and therapeutic devices. The objective of this study is to present a systematic review of nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems for oral cancers. Keywords: targeted delivery, oral squamous cell carcinoma, oral cancer treatment

  13. Patient adherence to oral anticancer drugs: an emerging issue in modern oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulon, V; Schöffski, P; Wolter, P

    2011-01-01

    The steady increase in the use of oral anticancer drugs in modern oncology has created a paradigm shift, challenging traditional attitudes towards cancer care and requiring new concepts of organization of oncology services. Important issues are the prolonged treatment period, management of toxicity, treatment adherence, reimbursement conditions and patient and family education. Although most patients generally prefer oral therapy over intravenous treatment for reasons of convenience, the daily use of oral anticancer drugs can be a challenging commitment for many patients. Reports on adherence and persistence among patients with cancer show that adherence ranges from 16% to 100%, depending on the type of therapy and the measurement/definition of adherence. Apart from demographic, disease and therapy related factors, the determinants that mostly influence (non-)adherence are the satisfaction with care activities performed at the initiation of the drug treatment, and the perceived necessity of treatment. Therefore, patient education addressing these issues is considered the cornerstone of successful oral anticancer treatment. Studies examining the role of different health care providers in the pharmacotherapeutic care of patients with cancer, treated with oral anti-cancer drugs, support the need for a multidisciplinary approach to achieve a maximum benefit for the individual patient and consequently for the whole health system. Limiting adverse events and developing appropriate supportive care are only some aspects that need to be considered in this.

  14. Validation of a self-administered instrument to measure adherence to anticholinergic drugs in women with overactive bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andy, UU; Harvie, HS; Smith, AL; Propert, KJ; Bogner, HR; Arya, LA

    2015-01-01

    Aim To validate a self-administered instrument, the Medication Adherence Self-Report Inventory (MASRI) for measuring adherence to anti-cholinergic medication for overactive bladder (OAB). Methods Prospective study in 131 women with OAB treated with fesoterodine. Adherence was measured at 8 and 12 weeks using an interviewer administered Brief Medication Questionnaire (BMQ) that assesses barriers to adherence (criterion standard), the MASRI, and pill count. Construct, concurrent and discriminant validity of the MASRI was assessed. We hypothesized that women who were non-adherent as measured by the MASRI would be more likely to have a belief barrier than women who were adherent to medication. Results Women diagnosed as non-adherent by the MASRI were more likely to report a belief barrier to taking medication as compared to adherent women at 8weeks (80 v 38%, p<0.001) and at 12 weeks (70% v. 40%, p=0.003). Significant correlations were noted between adherence rates measured by the MASRI and the BMQ at 8 weeks (r=0.87, p<0.001) and 12 weeks (r=0.90, p<0.001). Moderate correlation was noted between the adherence rate as measured by the MASRI and pill count at 8 weeks (r=0.49, p=0.02) but not at 12 weeks (r=0.05, p=0.87). The MASRI correctly identified 93% and 96% of non-adherent women at 8 and 12 weeks, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity and positive likelihood ratio of the MASRI for predicting non-adherence was 91%, 82%, and 5.1 at 8 weeks and 90%, 85% and 6.1 at 12 weeks. Conclusions The MASRI is a valid self-administered tool for measuring adherence to anti-cholinergic medication in women with OAB. PMID:24719232

  15. Oral and transdermal drug delivery systems: role of lipid-based lyotropic liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabalaya, Rajan; Musa, Muhammad Nuh; Kifli, Nurolaini; David, Sheba R

    2017-01-01

    Liquid crystal (LC) dosage forms, particularly those using lipid-based lyotropic LCs (LLCs), have generated considerable interest as potential drug delivery systems. LCs have the physical properties of liquids but retain some of the structural characteristics of crystalline solids. They are compatible with hydrophobic and hydrophilic compounds of many different classes and can protect even biologicals and nucleic acids from degradation. This review, focused on research conducted over the past 5 years, discusses the structural evaluation of LCs and their effects in drug formulations. The structural classification of LLCs into lamellar, hexagonal and micellar cubic phases is described. The structures of these phases are influenced by the addition of surfactants, which include a variety of nontoxic, biodegradable lipids; these also enhance drug solubility. LLC structure influences drug localization, particle size and viscosity, which, in turn, determine drug delivery properties. Through several specific examples, we describe the applications of LLCs in oral and topical drug formulations, the latter including transdermal and ocular delivery. In oral LLC formulations, micelle compositions and the resulting LLC structures can determine drug solubilization and stability as well as intestinal transport and absorption. Similarly, in topical LLC formulations, composition can influence whether the drug is retained in the skin or delivered transdermally. Owing to their enhancement of drug stability and promotion of controlled drug delivery, LLCs are becoming increasingly popular in pharmaceutical formulations.

  16. Oral and transdermal drug delivery systems: role of lipid-based lyotropic liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabalaya, Rajan; Musa, Muhammad Nuh; Kifli, Nurolaini; David, Sheba R

    2017-01-01

    Liquid crystal (LC) dosage forms, particularly those using lipid-based lyotropic LCs (LLCs), have generated considerable interest as potential drug delivery systems. LCs have the physical properties of liquids but retain some of the structural characteristics of crystalline solids. They are compatible with hydrophobic and hydrophilic compounds of many different classes and can protect even biologicals and nucleic acids from degradation. This review, focused on research conducted over the past 5 years, discusses the structural evaluation of LCs and their effects in drug formulations. The structural classification of LLCs into lamellar, hexagonal and micellar cubic phases is described. The structures of these phases are influenced by the addition of surfactants, which include a variety of nontoxic, biodegradable lipids; these also enhance drug solubility. LLC structure influences drug localization, particle size and viscosity, which, in turn, determine drug delivery properties. Through several specific examples, we describe the applications of LLCs in oral and topical drug formulations, the latter including transdermal and ocular delivery. In oral LLC formulations, micelle compositions and the resulting LLC structures can determine drug solubilization and stability as well as intestinal transport and absorption. Similarly, in topical LLC formulations, composition can influence whether the drug is retained in the skin or delivered transdermally. Owing to their enhancement of drug stability and promotion of controlled drug delivery, LLCs are becoming increasingly popular in pharmaceutical formulations. PMID:28243062

  17. Soft-Template-Synthesized Mesoporous Carbon for Oral Drug Delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Dipendu [ORNL; Warren, Kaitlyn E [ORNL; Naskar, Amit K [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Template-synthesized mesoporous carbons were successfully used in in vitro investigations of controlled delivery of three model drugs, captopril, furosemide, and ranitidine hydrochloride. Captopril and furosemide exhibited desorption kinetics over 30 40 h, and ranitidine HCl had a complete release time of 5 10 h. As evident from the slow release kinetics, we contend that our mesoporous carbon is an improved drug-delivery medium compared to state-of-the-art porous silica-based substrates. The mesoporous carbons, synthesized from phloroglucinol and lignin, a synthetic and a sustainable precursor, respectively, exhibit BET surface area of 200 400 m2 g-1 and pore volume of 0.2 0.6 cm3 g-1. The phloroglucinol-based carbon has narrower pore widths and higher pore volume than the lignin-derived counterpart and maintains a longer release time. Numerical modeling of the release kinetics data reveals that the diffusivities of all the drugs from lignin-based carbon media are of equivalent magnitude (10-22 to 10-24 m2 s-1). However, a tailored reduction of pore width in the sorbent reduces the diffusivity of smaller drug molecules (captopril) by an order of magnitude. Thus, engineered pore morphology in our synthesized carbon sorbent, along with its potential to tailor the chemistry of its interaction with sorbet, can be exploited for optimal delivery system of a preferred drug within its therapeutic level and below the level of toxicity.

  18. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of orally administered acetylenic tricyclic bis(cyanoenone), a highly potent Nrf2 activator with a reversible covalent mode of action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostov, Rumen V.; Knatko, Elena V.; McLaughlin, Lesley A.; Henderson, Colin J. [Jacqui Wood Cancer Centre, Division of Cancer Research, Medical Research Institute, University of Dundee, Dundee, DD1 9SY, Scotland (United Kingdom); Zheng, Suqing [Department of Chemistry and Institute of Chemical Biology & Drug Discovery, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, 11794 (United States); Huang, Jeffrey T.-J. [Jacqui Wood Cancer Centre, Division of Cancer Research, Medical Research Institute, University of Dundee, Dundee, DD1 9SY, Scotland (United Kingdom); Honda, Tadashi [Department of Chemistry and Institute of Chemical Biology & Drug Discovery, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, 11794 (United States); Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T., E-mail: a.dinkovakostova@dundee.ac.uk [Jacqui Wood Cancer Centre, Division of Cancer Research, Medical Research Institute, University of Dundee, Dundee, DD1 9SY, Scotland (United Kingdom); Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21205 (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21205 (United States)

    2015-09-25

    The acetylenic tricyclic bis(cyanoenone) TBE-31 is a highly potent cysteine targeting compound with a reversible covalent mode of action; its best-characterized target being Kelch-like ECH-associated protein-1 (Keap1), the cellular sensor for oxidants and electrophiles. TBE-31 reacts with cysteines of Keap1, impairing its ability to target nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2) for degradation. Consequently, Nrf2 accumulates and orchestrates cytoprotective gene expression. In this study we investigated the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of TBE-31 in C57BL/6 mice. After a single oral dose of 10 μmol/kg (∼200 nmol/animal), the concentration of TBE-31 in blood exhibited two peaks, at 22.3 nM and at 15.5 nM, 40 min and 4 h after dosing, respectively, as determined by a quantitative stable isotope dilution LC-MS/MS method. The AUC{sub 0–24h} was 195.5 h/nmol/l, the terminal elimination half-life was 10.2 h, and the k{sub el} was 0.068 h{sup −1}. To assess the pharmacodynamics of Nrf2 activation by TBE-31, we determined the enzyme activity of its prototypic target, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and found it elevated by 2.4- and 1.5-fold in liver and heart, respectively. Continuous feeding for 18 days with diet delivering the same daily doses of TBE-31 under conditions of concurrent treatment with the immunosuppressive agent azathioprine had a similar effect on Nrf2 activation without any indications of toxicity. Together with previous reports showing the cytoprotective effects of TBE-31 in animal models of carcinogenesis, our results demonstrate the high potency, efficacy and suitability for chronic administration of cysteine targeting reversible covalent drugs. - Highlights: • TBE-31 is a cysteine targeting compound with a reversible covalent mode of action. • After a single oral dose, the blood concentration of TBE-31 exhibits two peaks. • Oral TBE-31 is a potent activator of Nrf2-dependent enzymes in

  19. The mucoadhesive and gastroretentive properties of hydrophobin-coated porous silicon nanoparticle oral drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarparanta, Mirkka P; Bimbo, Luis M; Mäkilä, Ermei M; Salonen, Jarno J; Laaksonen, Päivi H; Helariutta, A M Kerttuli; Linder, Markus B; Hirvonen, Jouni T; Laaksonen, Timo J; Santos, Hélder A; Airaksinen, Anu J

    2012-04-01

    Impediments to intestinal absorption, such as poor solubility and instability in the variable conditions of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract plague many of the current drugs restricting their oral bioavailability. Particulate drug delivery systems hold great promise in solving these problems, but their effectiveness might be limited by their often rapid transit through the GI tract. Here we describe a bioadhesive oral drug delivery system based on thermally-hydrocarbonized porous silicon (THCPSi) functionalized with a self-assembled amphiphilic protein coating consisting of a class II hydrophobin (HFBII) from Trichoderma reesei. The HFBII-THCPSi nanoparticles were found to be non-cytotoxic and mucoadhesive in AGS cells, prompting their use in a biodistribution study in rats after oral administration. The passage of HFBII-THCPSi nanoparticles in the rat GI tract was significantly slower than that of uncoated THCPSi, and the nanoparticles were retained in stomach by gastric mucoadhesion up to 3 h after administration. Upon entry to the small intestine, the mucoadhesive properties were lost, resulting in the rapid transit of the nanoparticles through the remainder of the GI tract. The gastroretentive drug delivery system with a dual function presented here is a viable alternative for improving drug bioavailability in the oral route.

  20. Sex-differential effect on infant mortality of oral polio vaccine administered with BCG at birth in Guinea-Bissau. A natural experiment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Stabell Benn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The policy to provide oral polio vaccine (OPV at birth was introduced in low-income countries to increase coverage. The effect of OPV at birth on overall child mortality was never studied. During a trial of vitamin A supplementation (VAS at birth in Guinea-Bissau, OPV was not available during several periods. We took advantage of this "natural experiment" to test the effect on mortality of receiving OPV at birth. METHODOLOGY: Between 2002 and 2004, the VAS trial randomised normal-birth-weight infants to 50,000 IU VAS or placebo administered with BCG. Provision of OPV at birth was not part of the trial, but we noted whether the infants received OPV or not. OPV was missing during several periods in 2004. We used Cox proportional hazards models to compute mortality rate ratios (MRR of children who had received or not received OPV at birth. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 962 (22.1% of the 4345 enrolled children did not receive OPV at birth; 179 children died within the first year of life. Missing OPV at birth was associated with a tendency for decreased mortality (adjusted MRR = 0.69 (95% CI = 0.46-1.03, the effect being similar among recipients of VAS and placebo. There was a highly significant interaction between OPV at birth and sex (p = 0.006. Not receiving OPV at birth was associated with a weak tendency for increased mortality in girls (1.14 (0.70-1.89 but significantly decreased mortality in boys (0.35 (0.18-0.71. CONCLUSIONS: In our study OPV at birth had a sex-differential effect on mortality. Poliovirus is almost eradicated and OPV at birth contributes little to herd immunity. A randomised study of the effect of OPV at birth on overall mortality in both sexes is warranted.

  1. Orally administered fructose increases the numbers of peripheral lymphocytes reduced by exposure of mice to gamma or SPE-like proton radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Weaver, A. L.; Ni, J.; Lin, L.; Kennedy, A. R.

    2014-07-01

    Exposure of the whole body or a major portion of the body to ionizing radiation can result in Acute Radiation Sickness (ARS), which can cause symptoms that range from mild to severe, and include death. One of the syndromes that can occur during ARS is the hematopoietic syndrome, which is characterized by a reduction in bone marrow cells as well as the number of circulating blood cells. Doses capable of causing this syndrome can result from conventional radiation therapy and accidental exposure to ionizing radiation. It is of concern that this syndrome could also occur during space exploration class missions in which astronauts could be exposed to significant doses of solar particle event (SPE) radiation. Of particular concern is the reduction of lymphocytes and granulocytes, which are major components of the immune system. A significant reduction in their numbers can compromise the immune system, causing a higher risk for the development of infections which could jeopardize the success of the mission. Although there are no specific countermeasures utilized for the ARS resulting from exposure to space radiation(s), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been proposed as a countermeasure for the low number of neutrophils caused by SPE radiation, but so far no countermeasure exists for a reduced number of circulating lymphocytes. The present study demonstrates that orally administered fructose significantly increases the number of peripheral lymphocytes reduced by exposure of mice to 2 Gy of gamma- or SPE-like proton radiation, making it a potential countermeasure for this biological end-point.

  2. Evaluation of commercial multi-drug oral fluid devices to identify 39 new amphetamine-designer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieddu, Maria; Burrai, Lucia; Trignano, Claudia; Boatto, Gianpiero

    2014-03-01

    Recently, the diffusion on the black market of new psychoactive substances not controlled and often sold as 'legal highs', is exponentially increasing in Europe. Generally, the first analysis for these drugs involves an immunoassay screening in urine or plasma. Actually, there is growing interest in the use of oral fluid (OF) as alternative specimen over conventional biological fluids for drug testing, because of the significant advantages, as a non-invasive collection under direct observation without undue embarrassment or invasion of privacy, and a good correlation with plasma analytical data. Few assays have been developed for detection of new psychoactive compounds in biological samples, so it is important to investigate how they may or may not react in pre-existing commercial immunoassays. In this paper, two different multi-drugs oral fluid screen devices (OFDs) (Screen® Multi-Drug OFD and GIMA One Step Multi-Line Screen Test OFD) were evaluated to determine the cross-reactivity of thirty-nine new amphetamine designer drugs, including twelve substances officially recognized as illicit by italian legislation. Cross-reactivity towards most drugs analyzed was <1 in assays targeting amphetamine (AMP) or methamphetamine (MET). Only two (p-methoxyamphetamine and p-methoxymethamphetamine) of all tested amphetamines gave a positive result.

  3. 75 FR 67031 - Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Domperidone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    ... drug application (NADA) filed by Dechra, Ltd. The NADA provides for the veterinary prescription use of... Pits, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, ST7 1XW, United Kingdom, filed NADA 141-314 that provides for... periparturient mares. The NADA is approved as of September 9, 2010, and the regulations in 21 CFR part 520 are...

  4. Comparison of drug delivery with autoinjector versus manual prefilled syringe and between three different autoinjector devices administered in pig thigh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Robert L; Wilmot, John G; Belluscio, Beth A; Cleary, Kevin; Lindisch, David; Tucker, Robin; Wilson, Emmanuel; Shukla, Rajesh B

    2016-01-01

    Parenteral routes of drug administration are often selected to optimize actual dose of drug delivered, assure high bioavailability, bypass first-pass metabolism or harsh gastrointestinal environments, as well as maximize the speed of onset. Intramuscular (IM) delivery can be preferred to intravenous delivery when initiating intravenous access is difficult or impossible. Drugs can be injected intramuscularly using a syringe or an automated delivery device (autoinjector). Investigation into the IM delivery dynamics of these methods may guide further improvements in the performance of injection technologies. Two porcine model studies were conducted to compare differences in dispersion of injectate volume for different methods of IM drug administration. The first study compared the differences in the degree of dispersion and uptake of injectate following the use of a manual syringe and an autoinjector. The second study compared the spatial spread of the injected formulation, or dispersion volume, and uptake of injectate following the use of five different autoinjectors (EpiPen(®) [0.3 mL], EpiPen(®) Jr [0.3 mL], Twinject(®) [0.15 mL, 0.3 mL], and Anapen(®) 300 [0.3 mL]) with varying needle length, needle gauge, and force applied to the plunger. In the first study, the autoinjector provided higher peak volumes of injectate, indicating a greater degree of dispersion, compared with manual syringe delivery. In the second study, EpiPen autoinjectors resulted in larger dispersion volumes and higher initial dispersion ratios, which decreased rapidly over time, suggesting a greater rate of uptake of injectate than the other autoinjectors. The differences in dispersion and uptake of injectate are likely the result of different functional characteristics of the delivery systems. Both studies demonstrate that the functional characteristics of the method for delivering IM injections impact the dispersion and uptake of the material injected, which could significantly affect the

  5. Polymeric particulate technologies for oral drug delivery and targeting: A pathophysiological perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hunter, A. Christy; Elsom, Jacqueline; Wibroe, Peter Popp;

    2012-01-01

    to optimize drug targeting and bioavailability. Frequently the carrier systems used are either constructed from or contain polymeric materials. Examples of these nanocarriers include polymeric nanoparticles, solid lipid nanocarriers, self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems and nanocrystals......Publication year: 2012 Source:Maturitas, Volume 73, Issue 1 A. Christy Hunter, Jacqueline Elsom, Peter P. Wibroe, S. Moein Moghimi The oral route for delivery of pharmaceuticals is the most widely used and accepted. Nanoparticles and microparticles are increasingly being applied within this arena...

  6. Comparison of drug delivery with autoinjector versus manual prefilled syringe and between three different autoinjector devices administered in pig thigh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill RL

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Robert L Hill,1,* John G Wilmot,1,* Beth A Belluscio,1 Kevin Cleary,2 David Lindisch,3 Robin Tucker,4 Emmanuel Wilson,2 Rajesh B Shukla11Meridian Medical Technologies Inc., Columbia, MD, 2Children’s National Medical Center, 3Washington DC VA Medical Center, 4Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA *These authors have contributed equally to this work Abstract: Parenteral routes of drug administration are often selected to optimize actual dose of drug delivered, assure high bioavailability, bypass first-pass metabolism or harsh gastrointestinal environments, as well as maximize the speed of onset. Intramuscular (IM delivery can be preferred to intravenous delivery when initiating intravenous access is difficult or impossible. Drugs can be injected intramuscularly using a syringe or an automated delivery device (autoinjector. Investigation into the IM delivery dynamics of these methods may guide further improvements in the performance of injection technologies. Two porcine model studies were conducted to compare differences in dispersion of injectate volume for different methods of IM drug administration. The first study compared the differences in the degree of dispersion and uptake of injectate following the use of a manual syringe and an autoinjector. The second study compared the spatial spread of the injected formulation, or dispersion volume, and uptake of injectate following the use of five different autoinjectors (EpiPen® [0.3 mL], EpiPen® Jr [0.3 mL], Twinject® [0.15 mL, 0.3 mL], and Anapen® 300 [0.3 mL] with varying needle length, needle gauge, and force applied to the plunger. In the first study, the autoinjector provided higher peak volumes of injectate, indicating a greater degree of dispersion, compared with manual syringe delivery. In the second study, EpiPen autoinjectors resulted in larger dispersion volumes and higher initial dispersion ratios, which decreased rapidly over time, suggesting a greater

  7. Review of pharmacological interactions of oral anticancer drugs provided at pharmacy department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Sánchez Gómez

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Objective: To identify the pharmacologic interactions of oral anti-cancer drugs provided at an outpatient clinic. Material and methods: Anti-cancer drugs included in the Phamacotherapeutic Guideline of the Hospital were identified. A literature search was carried out on the pharmacologic interactions in MEDLINE® and EMBASE® (with the filer language English or Spanish, and the descriptors: “name of the anti-cancer drug” AND (“drug interactions” OR “pharmacokinetic”, Up-to-date®, MICROMEDEX® and the drug information sheet for the EMA and the FDA. Information was also gathered from the abstract presented to European and Spanish scientific meetings for the last 4 years. When an interaction was analyzed and had clinical relevance, the best pharmacotherapeutic interaction-free alternative was sought. Results: Twenty-three drugs were identified, of which Chlorambucil, Fludarabine, Lenalidomide, Melphalan, and Thalidomide were the active compounds with the lowest likelihood of producing a pharmacologic interaction. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (particularly Erlotinib, Imatinib, Lapatinib, and Pazopanib are the drugs with highest number of pharmacologic interactions described, many of them with severe clinical consequences, with increases and decreases of the plasma levels of anti-cancer drugs. The active compounds identified that may have pharmacologic interactions with anticancer drugs were mainly: Allopurinol, Amiodarone, Carbamazepine, Dabigatran, Digoxin, Spironolactone, Phenytoin, Itraconazol, Repaglinide, Silodosin, Tamoxifen, Verapamil, and Warfarin. Pharmacologic interactions through the cytochrome P450 1A2, 2D6, 2C8, 2C9, 3A4 were the most important for tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Other non-pharmacologic compounds, with an important potential of producing relevant pharmacologic interaction were immunomodulators (Echinacea extracts and Hypericum perforatum. Conclusions: Oral anticancer drugs have numerous pharmacologic

  8. Effect of Adherence on Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Relationships of Oral Targeted Anticancer Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Evelina; Csajka, Chantal; Schneider, Marie P; Widmer, Nicolas

    2017-06-20

    The emergence of oral targeted anticancer agents transformed several cancers into chronic conditions with a need for long-term oral treatment. Although cancer is a life-threatening condition, oncology medication adherence-the extent to which a patient follows the drug regimen that is intended by the prescriber-can be suboptimal in the long term, as in any other chronic disease. Poor adherence can impact negatively on clinical outcomes, notably because most of these drugs are given as a standard non-individualized dosage despite marked inter-individual variabilities that can lead to toxic or inefficacious drug concentrations. This has been especially studied with the prototypal drug imatinib. In the context of therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM), increasingly advocated for oral anticancer treatment optimization, unreported suboptimal adherence affecting drug intake history may lead to significant bias in the concentration interpretation and inappropriate dosage adjustments. In the same way, suboptimal adherence may also bias the results of pharmacokinetic modeling studies, which will affect in turn Bayesian TDM interpretation that relies on such population models. Detailed knowledge of the influence of adherence on plasma concentrations in pharmacokinetic studies or in routine TDM programs is however presently missing in the oncology field. Studies on this topic are therefore eagerly awaited to better pilot the treatment of cancer with the new targeted agents and to find their optimal dosage regimen. Hence, the development and assessment of effective medication adherence programs are warranted for these treatments.

  9. Adding liraglutide to oral antidiabetic drug therapy: onset of treatment effects over time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallwitz, B; Vaag, A; Falahati, A;

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the onset of treatment effects over time observed for liraglutide in combination with oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs). METHODS: This analysis included patients from three phase 3, 26-week, randomised, double-blind, parallel-group trials. Prior to randomisation, patients underwent...

  10. A facile nanoaggregation strategy for oral delivery of hydrophobic drugs by utilizing acid base neutralization reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huabing; Wan, Jiangling; Wang, Yirui; Mou, Dongsheng; Liu, Hongbin; Xu, Huibi; Yang, Xiangliang

    2008-09-01

    Nanonization strategies have been used to enhance the oral availability of numerous drugs that are poorly soluble in water. Exploring a facile nanonization strategy with highly practical potential is an attractive focus. Here, we report a novel facile nanoaggregation strategy for constructing drug nanoparticles of poorly soluble drugs with pH-dependent solubility by utilizing acid-base neutralization in aqueous solution, thus facilitating the exploration of nanonization in oral delivery for general applicability. We demonstrate that hydrophobic itraconazole dissolved in acid solution formed a growing core and aggregated into nanoparticles in the presence of stabilizers. The nanoparticles, with an average diameter of 279.3 nm and polydispersity index of 0.116, showed a higher dissolution rate when compared with the marketed formulation; the average dissolution was about 91.3%. The in vivo pharmacokinetic studies revealed that the nanoparticles had a rapid absorption and enhanced oral availability. The diet state also showed insignificant impact on the absorption of itraconazole from nanoparticles. This nanoaggregation strategy is a promising nanonization method with a facile process and avoidance of toxic organic solvents for oral delivery of poorly soluble drugs with pH-dependent solubility and reveals a highly practical potential in the pharmaceutical and chemical industries.

  11. Silica-based systems for oral delivery of drugs, macromolecules and cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diab, Roudayna; Canilho, Nadia; Pavel, Ileana A; Haffner, Fernanda B; Girardon, Maxime; Pasc, Andreea

    2017-04-20

    According to the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Food Safety Authority, amorphous forms of silica and silicates are generally recognized to be safe as oral delivery ingredients in amounts up to 1500mg per day. Silica is used in the formulation of solid dosage forms, e.g. tablets, as glidant or lubricant. The synthesis of silica-based materials depends on the payload nature, drug, macromolecule or cell, and on the target release (active or passive). In the literature, most of the examples deal with the encapsulation of drugs in mesoporous silica nanoparticles. Still to date limited reports concerning the delivery of encapsulated macromolecules and cells have been reported in the field of oral delivery, despite the multiple promising examples demonstrating the compatibility of the sol-gel route with biological entities, likewise the interest of silica as an oral carrier. Silica diatoms appear as an elegant, cost-effective and promising alternative to synthetic sol-gel-based materials. This review reports the latest advances silica-based systems and discusses the potential benefits and drawbacks of using silica for oral delivery of drugs, macromolecules or cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Hot embossing and mechanical punching of biodegradable microcontainers for oral drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ritika Singh; Mahshid, Rasoul; Andersen, Nis Korsgaard

    2015-01-01

    A process has been developed to fabricate discrete three-dimensional microcontainers for oral drug delivery application in Poly-L-Lactic Acid (PLLA) polymer. The method combines hot embossing for the definition of holes in a PLLA film and mechanical punching to penetrate the polymer layer around ...

  13. Lack of nephrotoxicity of new oral platinum drug JM216 in lung cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkema, E; de Vries, EGE; Meijer, S; Groen, HJM

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess renal function in patients treated with the oral platinum drug JM216 [bisacetato-ammine-dichloro-cyclohexylamine-platinum (IV)I, since the effects of JM216 on renal function have only partly been investigated using serum parameters or Cr-51-EDTA

  14. THE PRINCIPLES OF TASTE MASKING OF ORAL GELS WITH SYNTHETIC DRUGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Anurova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an experimental study of choice of flavorings and sweeteners for taste correction of oral gels. We have shown the possibility of changing of organoleptic properties for drugs with weak and strong unpleasant odor and taste. 

  15. Structural specificity of mucosal-cell transport and metabolism of peptide drugs: implication for oral peptide drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, J. P.; Amidon, G. L.

    1992-01-01

    The brush border membrane of intestinal mucosal cells contains a peptide carrier system with rather broad substrate specificity and various endo- and exopeptidase activities. Small peptide (di-/tripeptide)-type drugs with or without an N-terminal alpha-amino group, including beta-lactam antibiotics and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, are transported by the peptide transporter. Polypeptide drugs are hydrolyzed by brush border membrane proteolytic enzymes to di-/tripeptides and amino acids. Therefore, while the intestinal brush border membrane has a carrier system facilitating the absorption of di-/tripeptide drugs, it is a major barrier limiting oral availability of polypeptide drugs. In this paper, the specificity of peptide transport and metabolism in the intestinal brush border membrane is reviewed.

  16. Structural specificity of mucosal-cell transport and metabolism of peptide drugs: implication for oral peptide drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, J. P.; Amidon, G. L.

    1992-01-01

    The brush border membrane of intestinal mucosal cells contains a peptide carrier system with rather broad substrate specificity and various endo- and exopeptidase activities. Small peptide (di-/tripeptide)-type drugs with or without an N-terminal alpha-amino group, including beta-lactam antibiotics and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, are transported by the peptide transporter. Polypeptide drugs are hydrolyzed by brush border membrane proteolytic enzymes to di-/tripeptides and amino acids. Therefore, while the intestinal brush border membrane has a carrier system facilitating the absorption of di-/tripeptide drugs, it is a major barrier limiting oral availability of polypeptide drugs. In this paper, the specificity of peptide transport and metabolism in the intestinal brush border membrane is reviewed.

  17. Properties and formulation of oral drug delivery systems of protein and peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semalty A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Although most protein pharmaceuticals are usually formulated as a solution or suspension and delivered by invasive routes such as subcutaneous injections, major efforts in both academic and industrial laboratories have been directed towards developing effective oral formulations and increasing the oral absorption of intact protein through the use of formulations that protect the macromolecule and/or enhance it′s uptake into the intestinal mucosa. However, in spite of these major attempts, relatively little progress has been made. For the efficient delivery of peptides and proteins by non-parenteral route, in particular via the gastrointestinal tract, novel concepts are needed to overcome significant enzymatic and diffusion barriers. The properties of protein and peptides, which are of major interest in oral delivery, are highlighted in the article. This article reviews the various problems associated and novel approaches for formulation and development of oral protein and peptide drug delivery systems.

  18. Correlation of in vitro and in vivo models for the oral absorption of peptide drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Föger, F; Kopf, A; Loretz, B; Albrecht, K; Bernkop-Schnürch, A

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate two in vitro models, Caco-2 monolayer and rat intestinal mucosa, regarding their linear correlation with in vivo bioavailability data of therapeutic peptide drugs after oral administration in rat and human. Furthermore the impact of molecular mass (Mm) of the according peptides on their permeability was evaluated. Transport experiments with commercially available water soluble peptide drugs were conducted using Caco-2 cell monolayer grown on transwell filter membranes and with freshly excised rat intestinal mucosa mounted in Using type chambers. Apparent permeability coefficients (P (app)) were calculated and compared with in vivo data derived from the literature. It was shown that, besides a few exceptions, the Mm of peptides linearly correlates with permeability across rat intestinal mucosa (R (2) = 0.86; y = -196.22x + 1354.24), with rat oral bioavailability (R (2) = 0.64; y = -401.90x + 1268.86) as well as with human oral bioavailability (R (2) = 0.91; y = -359.43x + 1103.83). Furthermore it was shown that P (app) values of investigated hydrophilic peptides across Caco-2 monolayer displayed lower permeability than across rat intestinal mucosa. A correlation between P (app) values across rat intestinal mucosa and in vivo oral bioavailability in human (R (2) = 0.98; y = 2.11x + 0.34) attests the rat in vitro model to be a very useful prediction model for human oral bioavailability of hydrophilic peptide drugs. Presented correlations encourage the use of the rat in vitro model for the prediction of human oral bioavailabilities of hydrophilic peptide drugs.

  19. Microdialysis sampling for investigations of bioavailability and bioequivalence of topically administered drugs: current state and future perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmgaard, R; Nielsen, J B; Benfeldt, E

    2010-01-01

    by skin disease or barrier perturbation. A comparison between MD and other tissue sampling techniques reveals the advantages and limitations of the method. Subsequently, an in-depth discussion of the application of MD for the evaluation of bioavailability and bioequivalence of topical formulations...... is concluded by the current regulatory point of view. The future perspective includes further expansion and validation of the use of MD in the experimental and clinical setting as well as in the optimization of the method for regulatory purposes, i.e. the commercialization of bioequivalent, generic drug...

  20. Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction between ethinyl estradiol and gestodene, administered as a transdermal fertility control patch, and two CYP3A4 inhibitors and a CYP3A4 substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Julia; Goldammer, Mark; Ludwig, Matthias; Rohde, Beate; Zurth, Christian

    2015-12-01

    Pharmacokinetic (PK) interactions between the cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) pathway and transdermally administered ethinyl estradiol (EE) and gestodene (GSD) were investigated. This paper reports the findings of three open-label, intra-individual, one-way crossover, Phase I trials. In two studies, women used a novel contraceptive patch for 3 weeks during two 4-week study periods; in the second period, the CYP3A4 inhibitors erythromycin (Study 1) or ketoconazole (Study 2) were administered concurrently. In a third study, women received single doses of the CYP3A4 model substrate midazolam, alone and after 3 weeks of concurrent patch application. In each period, the EE/GSD patch (delivering low EE and GSD doses resulting in the same systemic exposure as a combined oral contraceptive containing 0.02 mg EE and 0.06 mg GSD) was applied once weekly for 3 weeks, with one patch-free week. Erythromycin, ketoconazole, and midazolam were administered orally. Main outcome measures were area under the curves (AUCs) and maximum plasma concentration (C max) of EE, and total and unbound GSD (Studies 1 and 2). AUC and C max of midazolam (Study 3). Co-administration of CYP3A4 inhibitors did not affect EE metabolism, and had only weak effects on the PK of total and unbound GSD. The patch had no clinically relevant effect on metabolism of the CYP3A4 substrate midazolam.

  1. COST ANALYSIS OF LONG ESTABLISHED AND NEWER ORAL ANTIEPILEPTIC DRUGS AVAILABLE IN THE INDIAN MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phatak Abhishek M, Hotwani Jitendra H, Deshmukhkiran R, Panchal Sagar S, Naik Madhura S

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Large number of pharmaceutical companies manufactures antiepileptic drugs in India. The price variations among the marketed drugs are wide. Aims: The present study was aimed to find the cost of different oral antiepileptic drugs available in Indian market as monotherapy, combination therapy and number of manufacturing companies for each, to evaluate difference in cost of different brands of same dosage of same active drug by calculating percentage variation of cost. Methods and Materials: Cost of a drug being manufactured by different companies, in the same strength and dosage forms was obtained from “Indian Drug Review” Vol. XXI, Issue No.4, 2014 and “Current Index of Medical Specialties” July-October 2014. The difference in the maximum and minimum price of the same drug manufactured by different pharmaceutical companies and percentage variation in price was calculated. Results: The percentage price variation noted of long-established drugs was – Phenytoin (50mg: 140%, Carbamazepine (100mg: 1033%, Phenobarbital (30mg : 730%, Valproic acid (300mg : 420%. Newer drugs –Levetiracetam (250mg: 75%, Lamotrigine (25mg: 66%, Topiramate (50mg: 108%, Zonisamide (100mg: 19%. Combination drugs – Phenobarbital + Phenytoin (30+100 mg: 354.55%. Conclusion: The percentage price variation of different brands of the same commonly used long-established oral antiepileptic drug manufactured in India is very wide. The formulation or brand of Antiepileptic drugs (AED’s should preferably not be changed since variations in bioavailability or different pharmacokinetic profiles may increase the potential for reduced effect or excessive side effects. Hence, manufacturing companies should aim to decrease the price variation while maintaining the therapeutic efficacy.

  2. Fexinidazole--a new oral nitroimidazole drug candidate entering clinical development for the treatment of sleeping sickness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Els Torreele

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT, also known as sleeping sickness, is a fatal parasitic disease caused by trypanosomes. Current treatment options for HAT are scarce, toxic, no longer effective, or very difficult to administer, in particular for the advanced, fatal stage of the disease (stage 2, chronic HAT. New safe, effective and easy-to-use treatments are urgently needed. Here it is shown that fexinidazole, a 2-substituted 5-nitroimidazole rediscovered by the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi after extensive compound mining efforts of more than 700 new and existing nitroheterocycles, could be a short-course, safe and effective oral treatment curing both acute and chronic HAT and that could be implemented at the primary health care level. To complete the preclinical development and meet the regulatory requirements before initiating human trials, the anti-parasitic properties and the pharmacokinetic, metabolic and toxicological profile of fexinidazole have been assessed. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Standard in vitro and in vivo anti-parasitic activity assays were conducted to assess drug efficacy in experimental models for HAT. In parallel, a full range of preclinical pharmacology and safety studies, as required by international regulatory guidelines before initiating human studies, have been conducted. Fexinidazole is moderately active in vitro against African trypanosomes (IC₅₀ against laboratory strains and recent clinical isolates ranged between 0.16 and 0.93 µg/mL and oral administration of fexinidazole at doses of 100 mg/kg/day for 4 days or 200 mg/kg/day for 5 days cured mice with acute and chronic infection respectively, the latter being a model for the advanced and fatal stage of the disease when parasites have disseminated into the brain. In laboratory animals, fexinidazole is well absorbed after oral administration and readily distributes throughout the body, including the brain. The absolute bioavailability

  3. Advanced progress of microencapsulation technologies: in vivo and in vitro models for studying oral and transdermal drug deliveries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, P L; Gambari, R

    2014-03-28

    This review provides an overall discussion of microencapsulation systems for both oral and transdermal drug deliveries. Clinically, many drugs, especially proteins and peptides, are susceptible to the gastrointestinal tract and the first-pass metabolism after oral administration while some drugs exhibit low skin permeability through transdermal delivery route. Medicated microcapsules as oral and transdermal drug delivery vehicles are believed to offer an extended drug effect at a relatively low dose and provide a better patient compliance. The polymeric microcapsules can be produced by different microencapsulation methods and the drug microencapsulation technology provides the quality preservation for drug stabilization. The release of the entrapped drug is controlled and prolonged for specific usages. Some recent studies have focused on the evaluation of drug containing microcapsules on potential biological and therapeutic applications. For the oral delivery, in vivo animal models were used for evaluating possible treatment effects of drug containing microcapsules. For the transdermal drug delivery, skin delivery models were introduced to investigate the potential skin delivery of medicated microcapsules. Finally, the challenges and limitations of drug microencapsulation in real life are discussed and the commercially available drug formulations using microencapsulation technology for oral and transdermal applications are shown.

  4. Comparative in vitro and in vivo pharmacological investigation of platinum(IV) complexes as novel anticancer drug candidates for oral application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theiner, Sarah; Varbanov, Hristo P; Galanski, Markus; Egger, Alexander E; Berger, Walter; Heffeter, Petra; Keppler, Bernhard K

    2015-01-01

    Platinum(IV) complexes are promising candidates as prodrugs for oral application in anticancer chemotherapy. However, only a few Pt(IV) compounds entered (pre)clinical trials, e.g. satraplatin, while most of the others were only tested in vitro. Aim of the study was investigation of the in vivo pharmacological behavior as well as the anticancer activity of two novel platinum(IV) complexes vs. satraplatin. The drugs were selected due to significantly different in vitro cytotoxicity while sharing some physicochemical properties (e.g. lipophilicity). Initial experiments indicated that the highly in vitro cytotoxic compound 1 ((OC-6-33)-dichloridobis((4-ethoxy)-4-oxobutanoato)-bis(ethylamine)platinum(IV)) was also characterized by high drug absorption and tissue platinum levels after oral application. Interestingly, analysis of serum samples using SEC-ICP-MS revealed that the administered drugs have completely been metabolized and/or bound to proteins in serum within 2 h after treatment. With regard to the activity in vivo, the outcomes were rather unexpected: although potent anticancer effect of 1 was observed in cell culture, the effects in vivo were rather minor. Nevertheless, 1 was superior to 2 ((OC-6-33)-diammine(cyclobutane-1,1-dicarboxylato)-bis((4-cyclopentylamino)-4-oxobutanoato)platinum(IV)) after i.p. administration, which was, at least to some extent, in accordance to the cell culture experiments. After oral gavage, both compounds exhibited comparable activity. This is remarkable considering the distinctly lower activity of 2 in cell culture as well as the low platinum levels detected both in serum and tissues after oral application. Consequently, our data indicate that the prediction of in vivo anticancer activity by cell culture experiments is not trivial, especially for orally applied drugs.

  5. Influence of food on the absorption of metoprolol administered as an Oros drug delivery system to man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecaillon, J B; Massias, P; Schoeller, J P; Abadie, F

    1985-01-01

    The influence of food on the release, absorption and metabolism of metoprolol has been studied after single administration of a 19/190 Oros system to eight healthy volunteers on four occasions, once after an overnight fast, and just before each of three daily meals (breakfast, lunch and dinner). The plasma concentration-time profiles under the four test conditions were virtually identical, and no statistically significant differences in mean areas under the curves between 0 and 32 h, peak concentrations, or times to peak, were detected. The absorption of metoprolol was unaffected by food intake, with 80-90% of the amount absorbed reaching the systemic circulation within 10 h. The ratios of areas under the curve for alpha-hydroxymetoprolol to its parent drug were in the same range for the four treatments, and similar to those reported after conventional tablets. The in vivo release and absorption of drug from the Oros system and its systemic availability, were not influenced by concomitant ingestion of food.

  6. Orally administered Lactobacillus rhamnosus modulates the respiratory immune response triggered by the viral pathogen-associated molecular pattern poly(I:C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villena Julio

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some studies have shown that probiotics, including Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL1505, had the potential to beneficially modulate the outcome of certain bacterial and viral respiratory infections. However, these studies did not determine the mechanism(s by which probiotics contribute to host defense against respiratory viruses. Results In this work we demonstrated that orally administered Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL1505 (Lr1505 was able to increase the levels of IFN-γ, IL-10 and IL-6 in the respiratory tract and the number of lung CD3+CD4+IFN-γ+ T cells. To mimic the pro-inflammatory and physiopathological consecuences of RNA viral infections in the lung, we used an experimental model of lung inflammation based on the administration of the artificial viral pathogen-associated molecular pattern poly(I:C. Nasal administration of poly(I:C to mice induced a marked impairment of lung function that was accompanied by the production of pro-inflammatory mediators and inflammatory cell recruitment into the airways. The preventive administration of Lr1505 reduced lung injuries and the production of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8 and MCP-1 in the respiratory tract after the challenge with poly(I:C. Moreover, Lr1505 induced a significant increase in lung and serum IL-10. We also observed that Lr1505 was able to increase respiratory IFN-γ levels and the number of lung CD3+CD4+IFN-γ+ T cells after poly(I:C challenge. Moreover, higher numbers of both CD103+ and CD11bhigh dendritic cells and increased expression of MHC-II, IL-12 and IFN-γ in these cell populations were found in lungs of Lr1505-treated mice. Therefore, Lr1505 treatment would beneficially regulate the balance between pro-inflammatory mediators and IL-10, allowing an effective inflammatory response against infection and avoiding tissue damage. Conclusions Results showed that Lr1505 would induce a mobilization of cells from intestine and changes in cytokine profile that would be able to

  7. Contraceptive Efficacy of Oral and Transdermal Hormones When Co-Administered With Protease Inhibitors in HIV-1–Infected Women: Pharmacokinetic Results of ACTG Trial A5188

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, Mary A.; Patterson, Kristine; Kamemoto, Lori; Park, Jeong-Gun; Watts, Heather; Aweeka, Francesca; Klingman, Karin L.; Cohn, Susan E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pharmacokinetic (PK) interactions between lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r) and transdermally delivered ethinyl estradiol (EE) and norelgestromin (NGMN) are unknown. Methods Using a standard noncompartmental PK analysis, we compared EE area under the time–concentration curve (AUC) and NGMN AUC during transdermal contraceptive patch administration in HIV-1–infected women on stable LPV/r to a control group of women not on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). In addition, EE AUC after a single dose of a combination oral contraceptive pill including EE and norethindrone was measured before patch placement and was compared with patch EE AUC in both groups. Contraceptive effects on LPV/r PKs were estimated by measuring LPV/r AUC at baseline and during week 3 of patch administration. Results Eight women on LPV/r, and 24 women in the control group were enrolled. Patch EE median AUC0–168 h was 45% lower at 6010.36 pg·h·mL−1 in those on LPV/r versus 10911.42 pg·h·mL−1 in those on no HAART (P = 0.064). Pill EE median AUC0–48 hours was similarly 55% lower at 344.67 pg·h·mL−1 in those on LPV/r versus 765.38 pg·h·mL−1 in those on no HAART (P = 0.003). Patch NGMN AUC0–168 h however, was 138.39 ng·h·mL−1, 83% higher in the LPV/r group compared with the control AUC of 75.63 ng·h·mL−1 (P = 0.036). After 3 weeks on the patch, LPVAUC0–8 h decreased by 19%, (P = 0.156). Conclusions Although PKs of contraceptive EE and NGMN are significantly altered with LPV/r, the contraceptive efficacy of the patch is likely to be maintained. Larger studies are indicated to fully assess contraceptive efficacy versus risks of the transdermal contraceptive patch when co-administered with protease inhibitors. PMID:20842042

  8. Orally administered fatty acids enhance anorectic potential but do not activate central fatty acid sensing in Senegalese sole post-larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Cristina; Bonacic, Kruno; Soengas, José L; Morais, Sofia

    2017-02-15

    Studies in fish have reported the presence and function of fatty acid (FA)-sensing systems comparable in many aspects to those known in mammals. Such studies were carried out in juvenile and adult fish, but the presence of FA-sensing systems and control of food intake have never been evaluated in early life stages, despite the importance of establishing when appetite regulation becomes functional in larval fish. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the possible effects of different specific FAs on neural FA-sensing systems and neuropeptides involved in the control of food intake in Senegalese sole post-larvae. To achieve this, we orally administered post-larvae with different solutions containing pure FA - oleate (OA), linoleate (LA), α-linolenate (ALA) or eicosapentaenoate (EPA) - and evaluated changes in mRNA abundance of neuropeptides involved in the control of food intake and of transcripts related to putative FA-sensing systems, 3 and 6 h post-administration. The changes in neuropeptide gene expression were relatively consistent with the activation of anorectic pathways (enhanced cart4 and pomcb) and a decrease in orexigenic factors (npy) following intake of FA. Even though there were a few differences depending on the nature of the FA, the observed changes appear to suggest the existence of a putative anorectic response in post-larvae fish to the ingestion of all four tested FAs. However, changes in neuropeptides cannot be explained by the integration of metabolic information regarding FAs in circulation through FA-sensing mechanisms in the brain. Only the reduction in mRNA levels of the FA metabolism gene acc in OA-treated (6 h), ALA-treated (3 h) and EPA-treated (3 and 6 h) post-larvae could be indicative of the presence of a FA-sensing system, but most genes either were not significantly regulated (fat/cd36-lmp2, acly, kir6.x, srebp1c) or were affected in a way that was inconsistent with FA-sensing mechanisms (fat/cd36-pg4l, fas, cpt1.1, cpt1

  9. Multilayer encapsulated mesoporous silica nanospheres as an oral sustained drug delivery system for the poorly water-soluble drug felodipine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Liang [Department of Pharmaceutics, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, P.O. Box 32, Liaoning Province, Shenyang 110016 (China); Sun, Hongrui [English Teaching Department, School of Basic Courses, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Wenhua Road 103, Shenyang 110016 (China); Zhao, Qinfu; Han, Ning; Bai, Ling; Wang, Ying; Jiang, Tongying [Department of Pharmaceutics, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, P.O. Box 32, Liaoning Province, Shenyang 110016 (China); Wang, Siling, E-mail: silingwang@syphu.edu.cn [Department of Pharmaceutics, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, P.O. Box 32, Liaoning Province, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2015-02-01

    We used a combination of mesoporous silica nanospheres (MSN) and layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly technology to establish a new oral sustained drug delivery system for the poorly water-soluble drug felodipine. Firstly, the model drug was loaded into MSN, and then the loaded MSN were repeatedly encapsulated by chitosan (CHI) and acacia (ACA) via LBL self-assembly method. The structural features of the samples were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and nitrogen adsorption. The encapsulating process was monitored by zeta-potential and surface tension measurements. The physical state of the drug in the samples was characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). The influence of the multilayer with different number of layers on the drug release rate was studied using thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and surface tension measurement. The swelling effect and the structure changes of the multilayer were investigated to explore the relationship between the drug release behavior and the state of the multilayer under different pH conditions. The stability and mucosa adhesive ability of the prepared nanoparticles were also explored. After multilayer coating, the drug release rate was effectively controlled. The differences in drug release behavior under different pH conditions could be attributed to the different states of the multilayer. And the nanoparticles possessed good stability and strong mucosa adhesive ability. We believe that this combination offers a simple strategy for regulating the release rate of poorly water-soluble drugs and extends the pharmaceutical applications of inorganic materials and polymers. - Highlights: • A combination of inorganic and organic materials was applied. • Mesoporous silica nanospheres (MSN) were used as drug carriers. • Chitosan and acacia were encapsulated through layer-by-layer self-assembly. • The release rate of the poorly

  10. Indirect competitive assays on DVD for direct multiplex detection of drugs of abuse in oral fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lingling; Li, Xiaochun; Li, Yunchao; Shi, Xiaoli; Yu, Hua-Zhong

    2015-02-03

    On-site oral fluid testing for drugs of abuse has become prominent in order to take immediate administrative action in an enforcement process. Herein, we report a DVD technology-based indirect competitive immunoassay platform for the quantitative detection of drugs of abuse. A microfluidic approach was adapted to prepare multiplex immunoassays on a standard DVD-R, an unmodified multimode DVD/Blu-Ray drive to read signal, and a free disc-quality analysis software program to process the data. The DVD assay platform was successfully demonstrated for the simultaneous, quantitative detection of drug candidates (morphine and cocaine) in oral fluids with high selectivity. The detection limit achieved was as low as 1.0 ppb for morphine and 5.0 ppb for cocaine, comparable with that of standard mass spectrometry and ELISA methods.

  11. GLC determination of plasma drug levels after oral administration of clorazepate potassium salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, D J; Chun, A H

    1975-10-01

    Plasma nordiazepam levels resulting from the oral administration of clorazepate potassium salts were determined by a sensitive GLC assay. Nordiazepam and the internal standard (diazepam) were selectively extracted into ether at pH 9.2, hydrolyzed to their respective benzophenones, and quantified by electron-capture detection. The assay was used in a comparative bioavailability study of single equimolar oral doses of monopotassium and dipotassium salts of clorazepate in dogs. Both clorazepate salts were rapidly absorbed and exhibited mean peak total drug levels after 1 hr. Clorazepate levels accounted for about 50% of the total drug levels present. No statistical difference in the plasma drug levels of clorazepate mono- and dipotassium salts and the metabolite was found in dogs.

  12. Modified-chitosan nanoparticles: Novel drug delivery systems improve oral bioavailability of doxorubicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khdair, Ayman; Hamad, Islam; Alkhatib, Hatim; Bustanji, Yasser; Mohammad, Mohammad; Tayem, Rabab; Aiedeh, Khaled

    2016-10-10

    The efficacy of most anticancer drugs is highly limited in vivo due mainly to poor pharmacokinetics behavior including poor bioavailability after extravascular administration. We have developed novel chitosan-modified polymeric nanoparticles for oral as well as i.v. administration. Nanoparticles were developed utilizing the double emulsion solvent evaporation technique for sustained delivery of various anticancer drugs. Chitosan diacetate (CDA) and chitosan triacetate (CTA) polymers were previously modified in our laboratory and used as novel matrix. Nanoparticles, loaded with various anticancer drugs, were characterized for particle size using dynamic light scattering as well as transmission electron microscopy and net surface charge using dynamic light scattering. Particles size was below 100nm in diameter and zeta potential ranged - (25-30). Encapsulation efficiency of anticancer drugs varied considerably and was dependent on the physicochemical characteristics of the encapsulated drug. However, chitosan triacetate nanoparticles showed relatively higher encapsulation efficiency than chitosan diacetate nanoparticles. In vitro release of encapsulated drugs was sustained over a period of 14days. Nanoparticles enhanced cellular accumulation of encapsulated drugs, compared to the free drugs, in vitro in MCF-7 and Caco-II tumor cell lines. In conclusion, diacetate and triacetate chitosan are novel polymers that can be used to formulate nanoparticles which efficiently encapsulated anticancer drugs, and sustained the release and enhanced tumor cellular uptake of these drugs. Further, chitosan triacetate nanoparticles enhanced oral bioavailability of doxorubicin. CDA and CTA nanoparticles can be used to efficiently deliver anticancer drugs and improve their in vivo profile. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. In vitro antimicrobial activity and MIC quality control guidelines of RPR 106972 (RPR 112808/RPR106950): a novel orally administered streptogramin combination. The Quality Control Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, S D; Jones, R N; Johnson, D M

    1997-07-01

    RPR 106972 is a novel oral streptogramin combination with reported therapeutic potency against Gram-positive and certain respiratory tract pathogens. MICs for RPR 106972, quinupristin/dalfopristin, and seven comparison drugs were determined by the reference methods against 337 strains selected to define spectrum and potency. RPR 106972 demonstrated antimicrobial activity against oxacillin-susceptible and -resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MIC ranges of 0.12 to 2 micrograms/ml and 0.5 to 2 micrograms/ml, respectively), and coagulase-negative staphylococci were also inhibited by RPR 106972 (MIC90, RPR 106972 was highly active with MIC results at RPR 106972 inhibited Corynebacterium jeikeium (MIC90, 0.5 microgram/ml). Moraxella catarrhalis (MIC90, 0.25 microgram/ml), and some Haemophilus influenzae (MIC50, 2 micrograms/ml). RPR 106972 and quinupristin/dalfopristin demonstrated little activity against Enterococcus faecalis (MIC90s, 4 to 32 micrograms/ml) as compared to Enterococcus faecium (MIC90s, 0.5 to 1 microgram/ml) and other Enterococcus ssp. (MIC90s, 1 microgram/ml). Studies to establish MIC quality-control guidelines indicated the following ranges: for E. faecalis ATCC 29212, 0.5 to 4 micrograms/ml; for S. aureus ATCC 29213, 0.25 to 1 microgram/ml; and for Streptococcus pneumoniae ATCC 49619, 0.06 to 0.5 microgram/ml. The results of this study indicate that the in vitro activity of RPR 106972 against Gram-positive bacteria and selected Gram-negative respiratory organisms is promising and warrants additional studies of pharmacokinetics, and in vivo infection model dynamics.

  14. Driving under the influence of drugs -- evaluation of analytical data of drugs in oral fluid, serum and urine, and correlation with impairment symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toennes, Stefan W; Kauert, Gerold F; Steinmeyer, Stefan; Moeller, Manfred R

    2005-09-10

    A study was performed to acquire urine, serum and oral fluid samples in cases of suspected driving under the influence of drugs of abuse. Oral fluid was collected using a novel sampling/testing device (Dräger DrugTest System). The aim of the study was to evaluate oral fluid and urine as a predictor of blood samples positive for drugs and impairment symptoms. Analysis for cannabinoids, amphetamine and its derivatives, opiates and cocaine was performed in urine using the Mahsan Kombi/DOA4-test, in serum using immunoassay and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) confirmation and in oral fluid by GC-MS. Police and medical officer observations of impairment symptoms were rated and evaluated using a threshold value for the classification of driving inability. Accuracy in correlating drug detection in oral fluid and serum were >90% for all substances and also >90% in urine and serum except for THC (71.0%). Of the cases with oral fluid positive for any drug 97.1% of corresponding serum samples were also positive for at least one drug; of drug-positive urine samples this were only 82.4%. In 119 of 146 cases, impairment symptoms above threshold were observed (81.5%). Of the cases with drugs detected in serum, 19.1% appeared not impaired which were the same with drug-positive oral fluid while more persons with drug-positive urine samples appeared uninfluenced (32.7%). The data demonstrate that oral fluid is superior to urine in correlating with serum analytical data and impairment symptoms of drivers under the influence of drugs of abuse.

  15. 3D Printing of Medicines: Engineering Novel Oral Devices with Unique Design and Drug Release Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyanes, Alvaro; Wang, Jie; Buanz, Asma; Martínez-Pacheco, Ramón; Telford, Richard; Gaisford, Simon; Basit, Abdul W

    2015-11-02

    Three dimensional printing (3D printing) was used to fabricate novel oral drug delivery devices with specialized design configurations. Each device was loaded with multiple actives, with the intent of applying this process to the production of personalized medicines tailored at the point of dispensing or use. A filament extruder was used to obtain drug-loaded--paracetamol (acetaminophen) or caffeine--filaments of poly(vinyl alcohol) with characteristics suitable for use in fused-deposition modeling 3D printing. A multinozzle 3D printer enabled fabrication of capsule-shaped solid devices containing the drug with different internal structures. The design configurations included a multilayer device, with each layer containing drug, whose identity was different to the drug in the adjacent layers, and a two-compartment device comprising a caplet embedded within a larger caplet (DuoCaplet), with each compartment containing a different drug. Raman spectroscopy was used to collect 2-dimensional hyper spectral arrays across the entire surface of the devices. Processing of the arrays using direct classical least-squares component matching to produce false color representations of distribution of the drugs was used. This clearly showed a definitive separation between the drug layers of paracetamol and caffeine. Drug release tests in biorelevant bicarbonate media showed unique drug release profiles dependent on the macrostructure of the devices. In the case of the multilayer devices, release of both paracetamol and caffeine was simultaneous and independent of drug solubility. With the DuoCaplet design, it was possible to engineer either rapid drug release or delayed release by selecting the site of incorporation of the drug in the device; the lag-time for release from the internal compartment was dependent on the characteristics of the external layer. The study confirms the potential of 3D printing to fabricate multiple-drug containing devices with specialized design

  16. Orally dissolving strips: A new approach to oral drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, Rajni; Pawar, Pravin; Khanna, Sushil; Arora, Sandeep

    2013-04-01

    Recently, fast dissolving films are gaining interest as an alternative of fast dissolving tablets. The films are designed to dissolve upon contact with a wet surface, such as the tongue, within a few seconds, meaning the consumer can take the product without need for additional liquid. This convenience provides both a marketing advantage and increased patient compliance. As the drug is directly absorbed into systemic circulation, degradation in gastrointestinal tract and first pass effect can be avoided. These points make this formulation most popular and acceptable among pediatric and geriatric patients and patients with fear of choking. Over-the-counter films for pain management and motion sickness are commercialized in the US markets. Many companies are utilizing transdermal drug delivery technology to develop thin film formats. In the present review, recent advancements regarding fast dissolving buccal film formulation and their evaluation parameters are compiled.

  17. Increasing the oral bioavailability of the poorly water soluble drug itraconazole with ordered mesoporous silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellaerts, Randy; Mols, Raf; Jammaer, Jasper A G; Aerts, Caroline A; Annaert, Pieter; Van Humbeeck, Jan; Van den Mooter, Guy; Augustijns, Patrick; Martens, Johan A

    2008-05-01

    This study aims to evaluate the in vivo performance of ordered mesoporous silica (OMS) as a carrier for poorly water soluble drugs. Itraconazole was selected as model compound. Physicochemical characterization was carried out by SEM, TEM, nitrogen adsorption, DSC, TGA and in vitro dissolution. After loading itraconazole into OMS, its oral bioavailability was compared with the crystalline drug and the marketed product Sporanox in rabbits and dogs. Plasma concentrations of itraconazole and OH-itraconazole were determined by HPLC-UV. After administration of crystalline itraconazole in dogs (20mg), no systemic itraconazole could be detected. Using OMS as a carrier, the AUC0-8 was boosted to 681+/-566 nM h. In rabbits, the AUC0-24 increased significantly from 521+/-159 nM h after oral administration of crystalline itraconazole (8 mg) to 1069+/-278 nM h when this dose was loaded into OMS. Tmax decreased from 9.8+/-1.8 to 4.2+/-1.8h. No significant differences (AUC, Cmax, and Tmax) could be determined when comparing OMS with Sporanox in both species. The oral bioavailability of itraconazole formulated with OMS as a carrier compares well with the marketed product Sporanox, in rabbits as well as in dogs. OMS can therefore be considered as a promising carrier to achieve enhanced oral bioavailability for drugs with extremely low water solubility.

  18. Cost analysis study of oral antidiabetic drugs available in Indian market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisharani B Jadhav, Manisha S Bhosale, Charles V Adhav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There exists a wide range of variation in the prices of drugs marketed in India and other countries of the world. Very few studies have been conducted to reveal such price variations in the open market. Aim & Objectives: To evaluate the cost of oral anti-diabetics of different generic classes and different brand names of one compound, To evaluate the difference in cost of different brands for the same active drug by calculating percentage variation of cost. Methods: Cost of a particular drug being manufactured by different companies, in the same strength, number and dosage form was compared. The difference in the maximum and minimum price of the same drug manufactured by different pharmaceutical companies and the percentage variation in price was calculated. Results: In Single drug therapy, among sulfonylurea group of drugs, Glimepiride (1 mg shows maximum price variation of 655.38%, while Glipizide (10mg shows variation of 38.88%. In Biguanides & Thizolidinediones groups of drugs, Metformin (500 mg & Pioglitazone (15 mg show maximum price variation of 308.33% & 542% respectively. In α-glucosidases inhibitor group of drugs, Miglitol shows maximum price variation of 135.50 %. In combination therapies, Glipizide & Metformin combination shows the maximum variation up to 399.04 %. Conclusion: The average percentage price variation of different brands of the same drug manufactured in India is very wide and the appraisal and management of marketing drugs should be directed toward maximizing the benefits of therapy and minimizing negative personal and economic consequences

  19. Racial differences in long-term adherence to oral antidiabetic drug therapy: a longitudinal cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meigs James B

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adherence to oral antidiabetic medications is often suboptimal. Adherence differences may contribute to health disparities for black diabetes patients, including higher microvascular event rates, greater complication-related disability, and earlier mortality. Methods In this longitudinal retrospective cohort study, we used 10 years of patient-level claims and electronic medical record data (1/1/1992–12/31/2001 to assess differences in short- and long-term adherence to oral antidiabetic medication among 1906 newly diagnosed adults with diabetes (26% black, 74% white in a managed care setting in which all members have prescription drug coverage. Four main outcome measures included: (1 time from diabetes diagnosis until first prescription of oral antidiabetic medication; (2 primary adherence (time from first prescription to prescription fill; (3 time until discontinuation of oral antidiabetic medication from first prescription; and (4 long-term adherence (amount dispensed versus amount prescribed over a 24-month follow-up from first oral antidiabetic medication prescription. Results Black patients were as likely as whites to initiate oral therapy and fill their first prescription, but experienced higher rates of medication discontinuation (HR: 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2, 2.7 and were less adherent over time. These black-white differences increased over the first six months of therapy but stabilized thereafter for patients who initiated on sulfonylureas. Significant black-white differences in adherence levels were constant throughout follow-up for patients initiated on metformin therapy. Conclusion Racial differences in adherence to oral antidiabetic drug therapy persist even with equal access to medication. Early and continued emphasis on adherence from initiation of therapy may reduce persistent racial differences in medication use and clinical outcomes.

  20. A comparative study of oral and intravenous drug-dependent patients on three dimensions of personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossop, M R

    1978-01-01

    In an investigation of personality differences between oral and intravenous drug addicts, 59 subjects attending a London clinic were given the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire. Both groups scored highly on the neuroticism and psychoticism dimensions, though oral users were found to have significantly higher scores on both of these scales. High P scorers have been found to be cold, unfriendly, hostile, etc., and it is suggested that the lower P scores of the intravenous users may be partly due to possible hostility-reducing effects of the narcotics used by this group. Other implications of these findings are also discussed.

  1. Efficacy and safety of oral citicoline in acute ischemic stroke: drug surveillance study in 4,191 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, H-J; Kim, Y J

    2009-04-01

    Citicoline is an essential precursor in the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine, a key cell membrane phospholipid, and is known to have neuroprotective effects in acute ischemic stroke. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy and safety of oral citicoline in Korean patients with acute ischemic stroke. A drug surveillance study was carried out in 4,191 patients with a diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke. Oral citicoline (500-4000 mg/day) was administered within less than 24 h after acute ischemic stroke in 3,736 patients (early group) and later than 24 h after acute ischemic stroke in 455 patients (late group) for at least 6 weeks. For efficacy assessment, primary outcomes were patients' scores obtained with a short form of the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (s-NIHSS), a short form of the Barthel Index of activities of daily living (s-BI) and a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at enrollment, after 6 weeks and at the end of therapy for those patients with extended treatment. All adverse reactions were monitored during the study period for safety assessment. All measured outcomes, including s-NIHSS, s-BI and mRS, were improved after 6 weeks of therapy (P citicoline therapy for more than 12 weeks when compared with those who ended therapy at week 6. Improvements were more significant in the higher dose group (> or = 2000 mg/day) (P Citicoline safety was excellent; 37 side effects were observed in 31 patients (0.73%). The most frequent findings were nervous system-related symptoms (8 of 37, 21.62%), followed by gastrointestinal symptoms (5 of 37, 13.5%). Oral citicoline improved neurological, functional and global outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke without significant safety concerns.

  2. Loading of Drug-Polymer Matrices in Microreservoirs for Oral Drug Delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ritika Singh; Keller, Stephan Sylvest; Boisen, Anja

    2016-01-01

    For major advances in microfabricated drug delivery systems (DDS), fabrication methods with high throughput using biocompatible polymers are required. Once these DDS are fabricated, loading of drug poses a significant challenge. Here, hot punching is presented as an innovative method for drug...... loading in microfabricated DDS. The microfabricated DDS are microcontainers fabricated in photoresist SU-8 and biopolymer poly-L-lactic-acid (PLLA). Furosemide (F) drug is embedded in poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) polymer matrix. This F-PCL drug polymer matrix is loaded in SU-8 and PLLA microcontainers using...... hot punching with >99% yield. Thus, it is illustrated that hot punching allows high-throughput, parallel loading of 3D polymer microcontainers with drug-polymer matrices in a single process step....

  3. A ceramic drug delivery vehicle for oral administration of highly potent opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsgren, Johan; Jämstorp, Erik; Bredenberg, Susanne; Engqvist, Håkan; Strømme, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Pellets composed of the ceramic material Halloysite and microcrystalline cellulose were synthesized with the aim of producing a drug delivery vehicle for sustained release of the opioid Fentanyl with low risk for dose dumping at oral intake of the highly potent drug. Drug release profiles of intact and crushed pellets, to simulate swallowing without or with chewing, in pH 6.8, pH 1, and in 48% ethanol were recorded in order to replicate the conditions in the small intestines, in the stomach, as well as cointake of the drug with alcohol. The drug release was analyzed by employing the Weibull equation, which showed that the release profiles were either governed by fickian diffusion (intact pellets in pH 6.8 and in ethanol) or by diffusion in a fractal or disordered pore network (intact pellets in pH 1 and crushed pellets in all solutions). A sustained release for approximately 3-4 h was obtained in all studied solutions from intact pellets, whereas crushed pellets released the drug content during approximately 2-3 h. The finding that a sustained release profile could be obtained both in alcohol and after crushing of the pellets, shows that the ceramic carrier under investigation, at least to some extent, hampers dose dumping, and may thus be a promising material in future developments of new opioid containing oral dosage forms.

  4. Evaluation of human pharmacokinetics, therapeutic dose and exposure predictions using marketed oral drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinnity, D F; Collington, J; Austin, R P; Riley, R J

    2007-06-01

    In this article approaches to predict human pharmacokinetics (PK) are discussed and the capability of the exemplified methodologies to estimate individual PK parameters and therapeutic dose for a set of marketed oral drugs has been assessed. For a set of 63 drugs where the minimum efficacious concentration (MEC) and human PK were known, the clinical dose was shown to be well predicted or in some cases over-estimated using a simple one-compartment oral PK model. For a subset of these drugs, in vitro potency against the primary human targets was gathered, and compared to the observed MEC. When corrected for plasma protein binding, the MEC of the majority of compounds was GFR. For approximately 90% of compounds studied, the predicted CL using in vitro-in vivo (IVIV) extrapolation together with a CL(renal) estimate, where appropriate, was within 2-fold of that observed clinically. Encouragingly volume of distribution at steady state (V(ss)) estimated in preclinical species (rat and dog) when corrected for plasma protein binding, predicted human V(ss) successfully on the majority of occasions--73% of compounds within 2-fold. In this laboratory, absorption estimated from oral rat PK studies was lower than the observed human absorption for most drugs, even when solubility and permeability appeared not to be limiting. Preliminary data indicate absorption in the dog may be more representative of human for compounds absorbed via the transcellular pathway. Using predicted PK and MEC values estimated from in vitro potency assays there was a good correlation between predicted and observed dose. This analysis suggests that for oral therapies, human PK parameters and clinical dose can be estimated from a consideration of data obtained from in vitro screens using human derived material and in vivo animal studies. The benefits and limitations of this holistic approach to PK and dose prediction within the drug discovery process are exemplified and discussed.

  5. Enhancement of oral bioavailability of cyclosporine A: comparison of various nanoscale drug-delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Qi, Jianping; Weng, Tengfei; Tian, Zhiqiang; Lu, Yi; Hu, Kaili; Yin, Zongning; Wu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    A variety of nanoscale delivery systems have been shown to enhance the oral absorption of poorly water-soluble and poorly permeable drugs. However, the performance of these systems has seldom been evaluated simultaneously. The aim of this study was to compare the bioavailability enhancement effect of lipid-based nanocarriers with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) to highlight the importance of the lipid composition, with cyclosporine A (CyA) as a model drug. CyA-loaded PLGA NPs, nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs), and self-microemulsifying drug-delivery systems (SMEDDS) were prepared. The particle size of PLGA NPs (182.2 ± 12.8 nm) was larger than that of NLCs (89.7 ± 9.0 nm) and SMEDDS (26.9 ± 1.9 nm). All vehicles are charged negatively. The entrapment efficiency of PLGA NPs and NLCs was 87.6%± 1.6% and 80.3%± 0.6%, respectively. In vitro release tests indicated that the cumulative release of CyA was lower than 4% from all vehicles, including Sandimmun Neoral(®), according to the dialysis method. Both NLCs and SMEDDS showed high relative oral bioavailability, 111.8% and 73.6%, respectively, after oral gavage administration to beagle dogs, which was not statistically different from commercial Sandimmun Neoral(®). However, PLGA NPs failed to achieve efficient absorption, with relative bioavailability of about 22.7%. It is concluded that lipid-based nanoscale drug-delivery systems are superior to polymeric NPs in enhancing oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble and poorly permeable drugs.

  6. Feed-drug interaction of orally applied butyrate and phenobarbital on hepatic cytochrome P450 activity in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mátis, G; Kulcsár, A; Petrilla, J; Hermándy-Berencz, K; Neogrády, Zs

    2016-08-01

    The expression of hepatic drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes may be affected by several nutrition-derived compounds, such as by the commonly applied feed additive butyrate, possibly leading to feed-drug interactions. The aim of this study was to provide some evidence if butyrate can alter the activity of hepatic CYPs in chickens exposed to CYP-inducing xenobiotics, monitoring for the first time the possibility of such interaction. Ross 308 chickens in the grower phase were treated with daily intracoelomal phenobarbital (PB) injection (80 mg/kg BW), applied as a non-specific CYP-inducer, simultaneously with two different doses of intra-ingluvial sodium butyrate boluses (0.25 and 1.25 g/kg BW) for 5 days. Activity of CYP2H and CYP3A subfamilies was assessed by specific enzyme assays from isolated liver microsomes. According to our results, the lower dose of orally administered butyrate significantly attenuated the PB-triggered elevation of both hepatic CYP2H and CYP3A activities, which might be in association with the partly common signalling pathways of butyrate and CYP-inducing drugs, such as that of PB. Based on these data, butyrate may take part in pharmacoepigenetic interactions with simultaneously applied drugs or other CYP-inducing xenobiotics, with possible consequences for food safety and pharmacotherapy. Butyrate was found to be capable to maintain physiological CYP activity by attenuating CYP induction, underlining the safety of butyrate application in poultry nutrition. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  7. Multilayer encapsulated mesoporous silica nanospheres as an oral sustained drug delivery system for the poorly water-soluble drug felodipine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Liang; Sun, Hongrui; Zhao, Qinfu; Han, Ning; Bai, Ling; Wang, Ying; Jiang, Tongying; Wang, Siling

    2015-02-01

    We used a combination of mesoporous silica nanospheres (MSN) and layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly technology to establish a new oral sustained drug delivery system for the poorly water-soluble drug felodipine. Firstly, the model drug was loaded into MSN, and then the loaded MSN were repeatedly encapsulated by chitosan (CHI) and acacia (ACA) via LBL self-assembly method. The structural features of the samples were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and nitrogen adsorption. The encapsulating process was monitored by zeta-potential and surface tension measurements. The physical state of the drug in the samples was characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). The influence of the multilayer with different number of layers on the drug release rate was studied using thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and surface tension measurement. The swelling effect and the structure changes of the multilayer were investigated to explore the relationship between the drug release behavior and the state of the multilayer under different pH conditions. The stability and mucosa adhesive ability of the prepared nanoparticles were also explored. After multilayer coating, the drug release rate was effectively controlled. The differences in drug release behavior under different pH conditions could be attributed to the different states of the multilayer. And the nanoparticles possessed good stability and strong mucosa adhesive ability. We believe that this combination offers a simple strategy for regulating the release rate of poorly water-soluble drugs and extends the pharmaceutical applications of inorganic materials and polymers.

  8. An introduction to fast dissolving oral thin film drug delivery systems: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathpalia, Harsha; Gupte, Aasavari

    2013-12-01

    Many pharmaceutical companies are switching their products from tablets to fast dissolving oral thin films (OTFs). Films have all the advantages of tablets (precise dosage, easy administration) and those of liquid dosage forms (easy swallowing, rapid bioavailability). Statistics have shown that four out of five patients prefer orally disintegrating dosage forms over conventional solid oral dosages forms. Pediatric, geriatric, bedridden, emetic patients and those with Central Nervous System disorders, have difficulty in swallowing or chewing solid dosage forms. Many of these patients are non-compliant in administering solid dosage forms due to fear of choking. OTFs when placed on the tip or the floor of the tongue are instantly wet by saliva. As a result, OTFs rapidly hydrate and then disintegrate and/or dissolve to release the medication for local and/or systemic absorption. This technology provides a good platform for patent non- infringing product development and for increasing the patent life-cycle of the existing products. The application of fast dissolving oral thin films is not only limited to buccal fast dissolving system, but also expands to other applications like gastroretentive, sublingual delivery systems. This review highlights the composition including the details of various types of polymers both natural and synthetic, the different types of manufacturing techniques, packaging materials and evaluation tests for the OTFs.

  9. Impact of gastrointestinal lipolysis on oral lipid-based formulations and bioavailability of lipophilic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrière, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    Oil-in-water emulsions are common vehicles for lipids as nutrients and for the delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs. Enhancing oral bioavailability of these drugs using lipid-based formulations (LBF) or self-emulsifying drug delivery systems is one of the current challenges in pharmaceutical industry. Many of the compounds found in LBF (acylglycerols, surfactants with esterified fatty acids, …) are however potential substrates for digestive enzymes. Their digestion (or lipolysis) in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is critical for drug dissolution and absorption: it can be beneficial (drug solubilization/dispersion) or deleterous (drug precipitation) depending on the drug-LBF association. A better understanding of the fate of LBF in the GI tract is therefore required to engineer efficient lipid-based drug delivery systems. In vitro models for testing simultaneously LBF digestion and drug dispersion are in development to predict drug solubilization and bioavailability, select the best drug-LBF association and obtain better in vitro-in vivo correlations. So far, research in this area has focused on LBF lipolysis under intestinal conditions because the small intestine is the main target for drug delivery and absorption, as well as the main site of digestion by pancreatic enzymes. Lipolysis however starts within the stomach through the action of gastric lipase, the first enzyme involved in fat digestion in humans. In vitro digestion experiments show that most LBFs are submitted to gastric lipolysis, and therefore, both intragastric and intestinal digestions are critical for the fate of LBF and drug solubility.

  10. Supercritical impregnation of polymer matrices spatially confined in microcontainers for oral drug delivery: Effect of temperature, pressure and time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marizza, Paolo; Pontoni, L.; Rindzevicius, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    parameters(temperature, pressure, time, drug concentration in the supercritical phase) was elucidated with respectto the loading capacity. The microcontainer filling was observed by means of optical macroimaging, X-ray microtomography and scanning electron microscopy. The physical state of the drug...... described. The drug loading can be controlled with high accuracy and reproducibility andthe impregnated drug is in amorphous state. These results demonstrate that SCI can be used as a highthroughput loading technique for microfabricated devices for oral drug delivery....

  11. Pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and biodistribution following oral administration of nanocarriers containing peptide and protein drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Brendan T; Guo, Jianfeng; Presas, Elena; Donovan, Maria D; Alonso, María J; O'Driscoll, Caitriona M

    2016-11-15

    The influence of nanoparticle (NP) formulations on the pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and biodistribution profiles of peptide- and protein-like drugs following oral administration is critically reviewed. The possible mechanisms of absorption enhancement and the effects of the physicochemical properties of the NP are examined. The potential advantages and challenges of physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modelling to help predict efficacy in man are discussed. The importance of developing and expanding the regulatory framework to help translate the technology into the clinic and accelerate the availability of oral nanoparticulate formulations is emphasized. In conclusion, opportunities for future work to improve the state of the art of oral nanomedicines are identified. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Antiretroviral Drug-Associated Oral Lichenoid Reaction in HIV Patient: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratanporn Arirachakaran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiretroviral therapy has changed the course of HIV disease and improved quality of life in HIV patients. Incidence of an oral lichenoid drug reaction induced by zidovudine is not common. Once it occurs, it affects a patient's well being, in particular their oral functions. Here we report the first case of a 34-year-old Thai man with painful erosive lesions involving the lip and buccal mucosa. Treatment with topical fluocinolone acetonide 0.1% alleviated the patient's oral pain, but it was not until the subsequent withdrawal of zidovudine that the patient showed improvement and resolution of the lesions. Long-term follow-up was useful in the management of this patient, and no recurrence of the lesion was found during 21-month follow-up in this patient.

  13. Uterotrophic assay of two concentrations of migrates from each of 23 polystyrenes administered orally (by gavage) to immature female Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, S; Hellwig, J; Jäckh, R; Christian, M S

    1998-01-01

    The Styrene Steering Committee (SSC) of the European Chemical Industry Council (CEFIC) sponsored this work to address any concern that styrene dimers and trimers that might migrate from polystyrene containers into food could possess some estrogenic activity and thus possibly affect human health. All phases of the study were conducted in conformance with GLP regulations and without knowledge of the oligomer migrates tested. All activities were managed and audited under a third-party contract between the SSC and Argus International. Low and high doses of the styrene oligomer migrates of 23 polystyrene samples [i.e. 9 general purpose polystyrenes (GPPS), 8 high impact polystyrenes (HIPS) and 6 expandable polystyrenes (EPS)] were tested for estrogenicity in an in vivo uterotrophic assay (immature female rat model). This model is considered to be the "gold standard" for use in screening for estrogenic effects because it evaluates both direct and indirect potential effects. The two concentrations of migrates of each of the 23 polystyrenes tested were selected to simulate daily human consumption of a low and high amount of food. Representative dimer and trimer concentrations were obtained in conformance with EEC Council Directives and calculated to be at levels simulating human consumption of 0.5 or 5 kg of food for the GPPS and the HIPS samples and of 0.5 or 3.15 kg of food for the EPS samples, respectively. The study was conducted in a series of three blocks. Each block included concurrent untreated control (negative control), vehicle control (25% ethanol, 20 ml/kg/day) and positive control (diethylstilbestrol-dipropionate, DES-DP, 5 micrograms/kg/day) groups, and low and high doses of each of 7 (1 block) or 8 (2 blocks) polystyrene oligomer migrates. Each group in each block consisted of 10 immature Wistar (Chbb: THOM-SPF) female rats. Beginning when the rats were 22 +/- 1 days of age, each rat was appropriately handled (untreated control group) or administered twice

  14. Oral Drug Delivery Systems Comprising Altered Geometric Configurations for Controlled Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Bawa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent pharmaceutical research has focused on controlled drug delivery having an advantage over conventional methods. Adequate controlled plasma drug levels, reduced side effects as well as improved patient compliance are some of the benefits that these systems may offer. Controlled delivery systems that can provide zero-order drug delivery have the potential for maximizing efficacy while minimizing dose frequency and toxicity. Thus, zero-order drug release is ideal in a large area of drug delivery which has therefore led to the development of various technologies with such drug release patterns. Systems such as multilayered tablets and other geometrically altered devices have been created to perform this function. One of the principles of multilayered tablets involves creating a constant surface area for release. Polymeric materials play an important role in the functioning of these systems. Technologies developed to date include among others: Geomatrix® multilayered tablets, which utilizes specific polymers that may act as barriers to control drug release; Procise®, which has a core with an aperture that can be modified to achieve various types of drug release; core-in-cup tablets, where the core matrix is coated on one surface while the circumference forms a cup around it; donut-shaped devices, which possess a centrally-placed aperture hole and Dome Matrix® as well as “release modules assemblage”, which can offer alternating drug release patterns. This review discusses the novel altered geometric system technologies that have been developed to provide controlled drug release, also focusing on polymers that have been employed in such developments.

  15. REVIEW ON FLOATING DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS: AN APPROACH TO ORAL CONTROLLED DRUG DELIVERY VIA GASTRIC RETENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadam Shashikant M

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Controlled release (CR dosage forms have been extensively used to improve therapy with many important drugs. Several approaches are currently utilized in prolongation of gastric residence time, including floating drug delivery system, swelling and expanding system, polymeric bioadhesive system, modified shape system, high density system and other delayed gastric emptying devices. However, the development processes are faced with several physiological difficulties such as the inability to restrain and localize the system within the desired region of the gastrointestinal tract and the highly variable nature of the gastric emptying process. On the other hand, incorporation of the drug in a controlled release gastroretentive dosage forms (CR-GRDF which can remain in the gastric region for several hours would significantly prolong the gastric residence time of drugs and improve bioavailability, reduce drug waste, and enhance the solubility of drugs that are less soluble in high pH environment. Gastroretention would also facilitate local drug delivery to the stomach and proximal small intestine. Thus, gastroretention could help to provide greater availability of new products and consequently improved therapeutic activity and substantial benefits to patients. The purpose of this paper is to review the recent literature and current technology used in the development of gastroretentive dosage forms.

  16. Preparation of drug nanoparticle-containing microparticles using a 4-fluid nozzle spray drier for oral, pulmonary, and injection dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizoe, Takuto; Ozeki, Tetsuya; Okada, Hiroaki

    2007-09-11

    We prepared microparticles containing nanoparticles of water-insoluble pranlukast hemihydrate (PLH) using a 4-fluid nozzle spray drier. These particles were designed to improve the absorption of PLH and to allow delivery by oral, pulmonary, and injection routes. Mannitol (MAN) was used as a water-soluble carrier for the microparticles. We orally administered suspensions of PLH powder and PLH-MAN microparticles to rats. We also compared the in vitro aerosol performance of the PLH powder and PLH-MAN microparticles using a cascade impactor, and we compared the delivery of PLH by oral administration of PLH powder and pulmonary delivery of PLH-MAN microparticles at PLH/MAN ratios of 1:4 and 1:10. The absorption of PLH was markedly enhanced by pulmonary deliver of PLH-MAN composite microparticles. The area under the plasma concentration-time curve per dose for pulmonary administration of the 1:4 and 1:10 PLH-MAN microparticles was approximately 85- and 100-fold higher, respectively, than for oral administration of PLH powder. Also, we found that PLH rapidly disappeared from the plasma following injection of PLH aqueous solution or PLH-MAN microparticles dissolved in water. The PLH particles remaining after dissolution of MAN from the 1:10 PLH-MAN microparticles were 200 nm in diameter. Therefore, PLH particles may be captured immediately after injection by reticuloendothelial tissues such as the liver and spleen. This study demonstrated that it is possible to use the 4-fluid spray drier to prepare microparticles containing PLH nanoparticles that that improve drug absorption and can be administered by oral, pulmonary, and injection routes.

  17. Fast Dissolving Oral Film: A Novel and Innovative Drug Delivery system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankita Keshari

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The oral route is more suitable than other route of administration of therapeutic agents due to low cost of therapy and ease of administration and of patient compliance. This is noninvasive method and produce less side effect. There are some oral solid dosage forms like capsules and tablets. In geriatric, pediatric and dysphagia like patients find it difficult to swallow capsules and tablets and cannot take their medicines as prescribed manner. In some condition such as, sudden allergic attack, coughing, motion sickness, fear of choking and an unavailability of water, the swallowing of capsules or tablet or may become difficult. To overcome from these types of problem, the pharmaceutical industries are design and develop the new type of drug delivery system such as fast dissolving drug delivery systems. This innovative Oral fast dissolving film is a new dosage form in which a thin film is prepared by using hydrophilic polymers with suitable excipients. The film dissolved quickly in mouth without taking of water. The oral films are prepared by the solvent casting method or hot melt extrusion.

  18. International Guidelines for Bioequivalence of Locally Acting Orally Inhaled Drug Products: Similarities and Differences

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Dongmei; Lee, Sau L.; Lionberger, Robert A.; Choi, Stephanie; Adams, Wallace; Caramenico, Hoainhon N.; Chowdhury, Badrul A.; Conner, Dale P.; Katial, Rohit; Limb, Susan; Peters, John R.; Yu, Lawrence; Seymour, Sally; Li, Bing V.

    2015-01-01

    International regulatory agencies have developed recommendations and guidances for bioequivalence approaches of orally inhaled drug products (OIDPs) for local action. The objective of this article is to discuss the similarities and differences among these approaches used by international regulatory authorities when applications of generic and/or subsequent entry locally acting OIDPs are evaluated. We focused on four jurisdictions that currently have published related guidances for generic and...

  19. Oral health behavior of in-treatment female drug addicts in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Ghane

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The aim of this study was to assess the oral health behaviors in women with addiction history. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out in women drug treatment centers under the supervision of Welfare Organization of Tehran province in Iran. Data collection process was conducted in three centers including a questionnaire with an interview format, clinical examination, and Chi-Square test and MANOVA for statistical analysis. Results: The mean age of 95 women participating in this study was less than forty, whereas the age of starting drugs was twenty two. A majority of the patients were unemployed (71% and more than that of two-third did not have a diploma education. Almost half of dentate participants had never or rarely brushed their teeth. Most of them had never used dental floss, while more than half had three or more times snacks or sweet drinks and more than three-fourth were daily smokers. The MANOVA analysis showed that the type of clinic to be visited, age, used stimulant, drug dependency length, the last time a dentist being visited and the brushing period had a statistically significant relationship with Decayed Teeth (DT, Missing Teeth (MT and Filled Teeth (FT (P<0.05. Conclusion: Women with the prior drug addiction history had an unpromising oral health status which was obvious in their self-perceived oral health. Taking the appropriate preventive and therapeutic actions aiming for promoting oral health status of them seems to be necessary.

  20. A new drug nanocrystal self-stabilized Pickering emulsion for oral delivery of silybin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Tao; Liu, Chuan; Zhang, Jiao; Wang, Fan; Wang, Jirui; Zhang, Jifen

    2017-01-01

    A new silybin nanocrystal self-stabilized Pickering emulsion (SN-SSPE) has been developed using a high pressure homogenization method to improve the oral bioavailability of silybin. Influences of homogenization pressure and drug content on the formation of SN-SSPE were studied. The morphology, structure and size of Pickering emulsion droplets were characterized using a scanning electron micrograph, confocal laser scanning microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The stability, in vitro release and in vivo oral bioavailability of SN-SSPE were investigated. Results indicated that the particle size of silybin nanocrystals (SN-NC) decreased when homogenization pressure increased until 100MPa. When the content of silybin reached 300mg or above, a stable Pickering emulsion of silybin could be formed by sufficient SN-NC covering surfaces of oil droplets completely and thus self-stabilizing the Pickering emulsion. The emulsion droplet of SN-SSPE with the size of 27.3±3.1μm showed a core-shell structure consisting of a core of oil and a shell of SN-NC. SN-SSPE has shown high stability over 40days. The in vitro release rate of SN-SSPE was faster than silybin coarse powder and similar to silybin nanocrystalline suspension (SN-NCS). The peak concentration of silybin of SN-SSPE following intragastric administration in rats was increased by 2.5-fold and 3.6-fold compared with SN-NCS and silybin coarse powder, respectively. The AUC of SN-SSPE was increased by 1.6-fold and 4.0-fold compared with SN-NCS and silybin coarse powder, respectively. All these results showed that the Pickering emulsion of silybin could be stabilized by nanocrystals of silybin itself and increased the oral bioavailability of silybin. The drug nanocrystalline self-stabilized Pickering emulsion was a promising oral drug delivery system for poorly soluble drugs.

  1. Production of dosage forms for oral drug delivery by laminar extrusion of wet masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müllers, Katrin C; Wahl, Martin A; Pinto, João F

    2013-08-01

    Laminar extrusion of wet masses was studied as a novel technology for the production of dosage forms for oral drug delivery. Extrusion was carried out with a ram extruder. Formulations contained either microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) or dicalcium phosphate (DCP) as diluent, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), lactose, and water. Extrudates were characterized for their tensile strength, Young's modulus of elasticity, water absorption, gel forming capacity, and release of two model drugs, coumarin (COU) and propranolol hydrochloride (PRO). Cohesive extrudates could be produced with both filling materials (MCC and DCP) when HPMC was included as a binder at low amounts (3.3-4.5% w/w dry weight). Employing more HPMC, the elasticity of the wet masses increased which resulted in distinct surface defects. For MCC, the maximum HPMC amount that could be included in the formulations (15% w/w dry weight) did not affect the mechanical properties or decrease the drug release significantly. For DCP extrudates, the maximally effective HPMC amount was 30% (w/w dry weight) with influence on both the mechanical properties and drug release. This study suggests that laminar extrusion of wet masses is a feasible technique for the production of dosage forms for oral drug delivery.

  2. Molecular and pharmacokinetic properties of 222 commercially available oral drugs in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaeda, T; Okamura, N; Nagata, S; Yagami, T; Horinouchi, M; Okumura, K; Yamashita, F; Hashida, M

    2001-08-01

    This study was performed to determine the exclusion criteria that differentiate poorly absorbed drugs from good drug candidates, and to accelerate drug development by exclusion of unnecessary assessment. The molecular and pharmacokinetic properties of 222 commercially available oral drugs were tabulated and their correlations were analyzed. The exclusion criteria obtained were 1) a molecular weight of more than 500, and 2) a ClogP value of more than 5. Exceptions to molecular weight criteria were compounds with a sugar moiety, high atomic weight, and large cyclic structure. It was also suggested that being a substrate for MDRI (P-glycoprotein) does not always result in poor bioavailability, and that drug development by chemical modification of a seed or lead compound with quantitative structure activity relationship analysis can result in lower bioavailability, higher bound fraction and lower urinary excretion, which would hamper later development processes and might result in considerable drug-drug interaction. The criteria should be adjusted according to the pharmacological profiles of the agents in question and depending on the estimated profit, but ignoring these criteria may result in a significant waste of time and money during drug development.

  3. The drug efficacy and adverse reactions in a mouse model of oral squamous cell carcinoma treated with oxaliplatin at different time points during a day

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang K

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Kai Yang,1,2 Ningbo Zhao,1 Dan Zhao,1,2 Dan Chen,1 Yadong Li1 1Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 2Chongqing Key Laboratory for Oral Diseases and Biomedical Sciences, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China Background: Recent studies have shown that the growth and proliferation of cancer cells in vivo exhibit circadian rhythm, and the efficacy and adverse reactions of platinum-based anticancer drugs administered at different times of the day vary significantly on colon cancer. However, since the circadian rhythms of growth and proliferation of various cancer cells often differ, the question of whether the administration of platinum anticancer drugs at different times of the day exerts significantly different efficacy and adverse effects on oral cancers remains to be elucidated. This study has compared the efficacy and adverse effects of oxaliplatin (L-OHP administration at different times during a day on oral squamous cell carcinoma in mice and has analyzed cellular circadian rhythms. Methods: The mouse model for oral squamous cell carcinoma was established in 75 nude mice, housed in a 12 hour light/12 hour dark cycle environment. The mice were randomly divided into five groups; four experimental groups were intravenously injected with L-OHP at four time points within a 24-hour period (4, 10, 16, and 22 hours after lights on [HALO]. The control group was intravenously injected with the same volume of saline. Treatment efficacy and adverse reactions were compared on the seventh day after the injection, at 22 HALO. The existence of circadian rhythms was determined by cosine analysis. Results: Only injections of L-OHP at 16 and 22 HALO significantly prolonged animal survival time. The adverse reactions in mice injected with L-OHP at 16 and 22 HALO were significantly less than those observed in mice administered L-OHP at 4 and 10 HALO

  4. Physicians' preferences for prescribing oral and intravenous anticancer drugs: a Discrete Choice Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Laure; Cotté, François-Emery; Philippe, Caroline; Mercier, Florence; Bachelot, Thomas; Vidal-Trécan, Gwenaëlle

    2012-04-01

    Although efficacy and tolerability are classical criteria for treatment choice, patient adherence and tariff issues related to novel oral anticancer drugs may also influence therapeutic decisions. We estimated the relative influence of efficacy, tolerability, expected adherence and route of administration of a chemotherapy treatment on 203 French physicians' preferences who participated in a Discrete Choice Experiment (DCE), a quantitative method used to elicit preferences. From a questionnaire with six scenarii, respondents had to choose between two treatments which differed with respect to these four attributes. Scenarii were first presented in a curative setting then in a palliative setting. Efficacy, tolerability and expected adherence had two modalities (good versus moderate) and route of administration had three modalities (intravenous (€286-379/session), oral with the current tariff (€28/consultation), oral with a hypothetical tariff (€114)). Efficacy was the reference criterion in choosing a treatment whatever the therapeutic goal (β: 2.114, padherence (β: 1.223, p=0.0001) were influent in curative setting while the route of administration was still predominant in palliative setting (β: 0.431, p<0.0001). Results suggest that economic considerations as well as therapeutic efficacy play a significant role in choosing a treatment. Preference for oral chemotherapy with a hypothetical tariff for a patient support programme should be considered for the development of therapeutic education and healthcare coordination, currently not taken into account in the tariff of oral chemotherapy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Employment-based reinforcement of adherence to oral naltrexone treatment in unemployed injection drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Kelly E; Defulio, Anthony; Everly, Jeffrey J; Donlin, Wendy D; Aklin, Will M; Nuzzo, Paul A; Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie S; Umbricht, Annie; Fingerhood, Michael; Bigelow, George E; Silverman, Kenneth

    2013-02-01

    Oral naltrexone has high potential for use as a relapse prevention pharmacotherapy for opiate dependence yet suffers from notoriously poor adherence. This study evaluated whether entry to a therapeutic workplace could reinforce adherence with oral naltrexone. Opiate-dependent and cocaine-using injection drug users were detoxified, inducted onto oral naltrexone, and randomly assigned to a contingency (n = 35) or prescription (n = 32) group for a 26-week period. Contingency participants were required to ingest naltrexone under staff observation to gain access to the therapeutic workplace. Prescription participants received a take-home supply of naltrexone and could access the workplace independent of naltrexone ingestion. Primary outcome measures were percent of urine samples positive for naltrexone at 30-day assessments and negative for opiates and cocaine at 30-day assessments. Contingency participants provided significantly more urine samples that were positive for naltrexone compared with prescription participants (72% vs. 21%, p negative (71% vs. 60%, p = .19.) or cocaine-negative (56% vs. 53%, p = .82) samples in the contingency and prescription groups, respectively. Opiate-positive samples were significantly more likely to occur in conjunction with cocaine (p workplace significantly promoted adherence to oral naltrexone, and that the majority of opiate use occurred in conjunction with cocaine use, suggesting that untreated cocaine use may limit the effectiveness of oral naltrexone in promoting opiate abstinence.

  6. Administración de medicamentos por vía oral: Interacciones medicamento - alimento Oral drug administration: drug-food interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nélida Barrueco

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: la vía oral de administración de medicamentos es la vía más cómoda, segura y económica. Sin embargo, pueden existir interacciones con otros fármacos o con alimentos que alteren la eficacia y seguridad de los mismos. Objetivo: desarrollar un programa de información dirigido a enfermeros y enfermeras sobre la administración de medicamentos por vía oral. Método: se seleccionan los medicamentos más utilizados en el área de cardiología pediátrica, revisándose para cada principio activo la administración en relación con alimentos o productos medicinales y otros aspectos relacionados con la administración por vía oral. Resultados: se elabora una tabla informativa sobre un total de 28 principios activos. Discusión: Los farmacéuticos de hospital se han integrado recientemente en los equipos multidisciplinares y desde esta posición tienen la oportunidad de desarrollar diferentes programas de atención farmacéutica, educación sanitaria e información encaminadas a prevenir problemas relacionados con los medicamentos, aumentar su uso seguro y disminuir los riesgos asociados a cualquier tratamiento farmacológico. Las prescripciones médicas generalmente no indican el horario y la forma de administración de los medicamentos, dejando a enfermeros y enfermeras la responsabilidad de su organización. Por esto deben estar informados de cómo y cuándo se deben administrar los medicamentos, lo que permite garantizar su uso seguro y disminuir los riesgos asociados al tratamiento.Background: The easiest, safest and cheapest way to administrate drugs is by mouth (PO. Nevertheless, there may be interactions, either with other drugs or with food, which can modify efficacy and security of the drug itself. Objective: the development of a nursing information program about the administration of drugs PO. Method: we selected the most used drugs corresponding to the pediatric cardiology area, looking for the best administration

  7. Enhancement of oral bioavailability of cyclosporine A: comparison of various nanoscale drug-delivery systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang K

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Kai Wang,1–3 Jianping Qi,1 Tengfei Weng,1,2 Zhiqiang Tian,1 Yi Lu,1 Kaili Hu,4 Zongning Yin,2 Wei Wu1 1School of Pharmacy, Fudan University, Key Laboratory of Smart Drug Delivery of Ministry of Education, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2West China School of Pharmacy, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People’s Republic of China; 3Tropical Crops Genetic Resources Institute, Hainan Provincial Engineering Research Center for Blumea Balsamifera, Chinese Academy of Tropical Agricultural Sciences, Danzhou, Hainan, People’s Republic of China; 4Murad Research Center for Modernized Chinese Medicine, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: A variety of nanoscale delivery systems have been shown to enhance the oral absorption of poorly water-soluble and poorly permeable drugs. However, the performance of these systems has seldom been evaluated simultaneously. The aim of this study was to compare the bioavailability enhancement effect of lipid-based nanocarriers with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticles (NPs to highlight the importance of the lipid composition, with cyclosporine A (CyA as a model drug. CyA-loaded PLGA NPs, nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs, and self-microemulsifying drug-delivery systems (SMEDDS were prepared. The particle size of PLGA NPs (182.2±12.8 nm was larger than that of NLCs (89.7±9.0 nm and SMEDDS (26.9±1.9 nm. All vehicles are charged negatively. The entrapment efficiency of PLGA NPs and NLCs was 87.6%±1.6% and 80.3%±0.6%, respectively. In vitro release tests indicated that the cumulative release of CyA was lower than 4% from all vehicles, including Sandimmun Neoral®, according to the dialysis method. Both NLCs and SMEDDS showed high relative oral bioavailability, 111.8% and 73.6%, respectively, after oral gavage administration to beagle dogs, which was not statistically different from commercial Sandimmun Neoral®. However, PLGA NPs

  8. Role of Self-Association and Supersaturation in Oral Absorption of a Poorly Soluble Weakly Basic Drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Ajit S; Badawy, Sherif; Ye, Qingmei; Patel, Dhaval; Vincent, Maria; Raghavan, Krishnaswamy; Huang, Yande; Yamniuk, Aaron; Vig, Balvinder; Crison, John; Derbin, George; Xu, Yan; Ramirez, Antonio; Galella, Michael; Rinaldi, Frank A

    2015-08-01

    Precipitation of weakly basic drugs in intestinal fluids can affect oral drug absorption. In this study, the implications of self-association of brivanib alaninate in acidic aqueous solution, leading to supersaturation at basic pH condition, on its solubility and oral absorption were investigated. Self-association of brivanib alaninate was investigated by proton NMR spectroscopy, surface tension measurement, dynamic light scattering, isothermal titration calorimetry, and molecular modeling. Drug solubility was determined in various pH media, and its tendency to supersaturate upon pH shift was investigated in buffered and biorelevant aqueous solutions. Pharmacokinetic modeling of human oral drug absorption was utilized for parameter sensitivity analyses of input variables. Brivanib alaninate exhibited continuous, and pH- and concentration-dependent self-association. This phenomenon resulted in positive deviation of drug solubility at acidic pH and the formation of a stable supersaturated drug solution in pH-shift assays. Consistent with the supersaturation phenomenon observed in vitro, oral absorption simulations necessitated invoking long precipitation time in the intestine to successfully predict in vivo data. Self-association of a weakly basic drug in acidic aqueous solution can increase its oral absorption by supersaturation and precipitation resistance at the intestinal pH. This consideration is important to the selection of parameters for oral absorption simulation.

  9. Enhancing the Solubility and Oral Bioavailability of Poorly Water-Soluble Drugs Using Monoolein Cubosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Md Ashraf; Kataoka, Noriko; Ranneh, Abdul-Hackam; Iwao, Yasunori; Noguchi, Shuji; Oka, Toshihiko; Itai, Shigeru

    2017-01-01

    Monoolein cubosomes containing either spironolactone (SPI) or nifedipine (NI) were prepared using a high-pressure homogenization technique and characterized in terms of their solubility and oral bioavailability. The mean particle size, polydispersity index (PDI), zeta potential, solubility and encapsulation efficiency (EE) values of the SPI- and NI-loaded cubosomes were determined to be 90.4 nm, 0.187, -13.4 mV, 163 µg/mL and 90.2%, and 91.3 nm, 0.168, -12.8 mV, 189 µg/mL and 93.0%, respectively, which were almost identical to those of the blank cubosome. Small-angle X-ray scattering analyses confirmed that the SPI-loaded, NI-loaded and blank cubosomes existed in the cubic space group Im3̄m. The lattice parameters of the SPI- and NI-loaded cubosomes were 147.6 and 151.6 Å, respectively, making them almost identical to that of blank cubosome (151.0 Å). The in vitro release profiles of the SPI- and NI-loaded cubosomes showed that they released less than 5% of the drugs into various media over 12-48 h, indicating that most of the drug remained encapsulated within the cubic phase of their lipid bilayer. Furthermore, the in vivo pharmacokinetic results suggested that these cubosomes led to a considerable increase in the systemic oral bioavailability of the drugs compared with pure dispersions of the same materials. Notably, the stability results indicated that the mean particle size and PDI values of these cubosomes were stable for at least 4 weeks. Taken together, these results demonstrate that monoolein cubosomes represent promising drug carriers for enhancing the solubility and oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs.

  10. Exemption from registration for persons authorized under U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission or agreement state medical use licenses or permits and administering the drug product DaTscan(TM). Interim final rule with request for comment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-25

    The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is amending its regulations to waive the requirement of registration for persons who are authorized under United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission or Agreement State medical use licenses or permits and administer the drug product DaTscan(TM).

  11. Evaluation of an In Silico PBPK Post-Bariatric Surgery Model through Simulating Oral Drug Bioavailability of Atorvastatin and Cyclosporine

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    An increasing prevalence of morbid obesity has led to dramatic increases in the number of bariatric surgeries performed. Altered gastrointestinal physiology following surgery can be associated with modified oral drug bioavailability (F oral). In the absence of clinical data, an indication of changes to F oral via systems pharmacology models would be of value in adjusting dose levels after surgery. A previously developed virtual “post-bariatric surgery” population was evaluated through mimicki...

  12. Drug repurposing: a systematic approach to evaluate candidate oral neuroprotective interventions for secondary progressive multiple sclerosis.

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    Hanna M Vesterinen

    Full Text Available To develop and implement an evidence based framework to select, from drugs already licenced, candidate oral neuroprotective drugs to be tested in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis.Systematic review of clinical studies of oral putative neuroprotective therapies in MS and four other neurodegenerative diseases with shared pathological features, followed by systematic review and meta-analyses of the in vivo experimental data for those interventions. We presented summary data to an international multi-disciplinary committee, which assessed each drug in turn using pre-specified criteria including consideration of mechanism of action.We identified a short list of fifty-two candidate interventions. After review of all clinical and pre-clinical evidence we identified ibudilast, riluzole, amiloride, pirfenidone, fluoxetine, oxcarbazepine, and the polyunsaturated fatty-acid class (Linoleic Acid, Lipoic acid; Omega-3 fatty acid, Max EPA oil as lead candidates for clinical evaluation.We demonstrate a standardised and systematic approach to candidate identification for drug rescue and repurposing trials that can be applied widely to neurodegenerative disorders.

  13. Oral drug therapy in elderly with dysphagia: between a rock and a hard place!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logrippo, Serena; Ricci, Giovanna; Sestili, Matteo; Cespi, Marco; Ferrara, Letizia; Palmieri, Giovanni F; Ganzetti, Roberta; Bonacucina, Giulia; Blasi, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Demographic indicators forecast that by 2050, the elderly will account for about one-third of the global population. Geriatric patients require a large number of medicines, and in most cases, these products are administered as solid oral solid dosage forms, as they are by far the most common formulations on the market. However, this population tends to suffer difficulties with swallowing. Caregivers in hospital geriatric units routinely compound in solid oral dosage forms for dysphagic patients by crushing the tablets or opening the capsules to facilitate administration. The manipulation of a tablet or a capsule, if not clearly indicated in the product labeling, is an off-label use of the medicine, and must be supported by documented scientific evidence and requires the patient's informed consent. Compounding of marketed products has been recognized as being responsible for an increased number of adverse events and medical errors. Since extemporaneous compounding is the rule and not the exception in geriatrics departments, the seriousness and scope of issues caused by this daily practice are probably underestimated. In this article, the potential problems associated with the manipulation of authorized solid oral dosage forms are discussed.

  14. Novel Nanostructured Solid Materials for Modulating Oral Drug Delivery from Solid-State Lipid-Based Drug Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dening, Tahnee J; Rao, Shasha; Thomas, Nicky; Prestidge, Clive A

    2016-01-01

    Lipid-based drug delivery systems (LBDDS) have gained significant attention in recent times, owing to their ability to overcome the challenges limiting the oral delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs. Despite the successful commercialization of several LBDDS products over the years, a large discrepancy exists between the number of poorly water-soluble drugs displaying suboptimal in vivo performances and the application of LBDDS to mitigate their various delivery challenges. Conventional LBDDS, including lipid solutions and suspensions, emulsions, and self-emulsifying formulations, suffer from various drawbacks limiting their widespread use and commercialization. Accordingly, solid-state LBDDS, fabricated by adsorbing LBDDS onto a chemically inert solid carrier material, have attracted substantial interest as a viable means of stabilizing LBDDS whilst eliminating some of the various limitations. This review describes the impact of solid carrier choice on LBDDS performance and highlights the importance of appropriate solid carrier material selection when designing hybrid solid-state LBDDS. Specifically, emphasis is placed on discussing the ability of the specific solid carrier to modulate drug release, control lipase action and lipid digestion, and enhance biopharmaceutical performance above the original liquid-state LBDDS. To encourage the interested reader to consider their solid carrier choice on a higher level, various novel materials with the potential for future use as solid carriers for LBDDS are described. This review is highly significant in guiding future research directions in the solid-state LBDDS field and fostering the translation of these delivery systems to the pharmaceutical marketplace.

  15. Cellulose nanofiber aerogel as a promising biomaterial for customized oral drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhandari J

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Jyoti Bhandari,1 Harshita Mishra,1 Pawan Kumar Mishra,2 Rupert Wimmer,2,3 Farhan J Ahmad,1 Sushama Talegaonkar1 1Department of Pharmaceutics, Jamia Hamdard, New Delhi, India; 2Department of Wood Science, Mendel University in Brno, Brno, Czech Republic; 3Institute for Natural Materials Technology, Department of Agrobiotechnology, IFA-Tulln, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Austria Abstract: Cellulose nanofiber (CNF aerogels with favorable floatability and mucoadhesive properties prepared by the freeze-drying method have been introduced as new possible carriers for oral controlled drug delivery system. Bendamustine hydrochloride is considered as the model drug. Drug loading was carried out by the physical adsorption method, and optimization of drug-loaded formulation was done using central composite design. A very lightweight-aerogel-with-matrix system was produced with drug loading of 18.98%±1.57%. The produced aerogel was characterized for morphology, tensile strength, swelling tendency in media with different pH values, floating behavior, mucoadhesive detachment force and drug release profiles under different pH conditions. The results showed that the type of matrix was porous and woven with excellent mechanical properties. The drug release was assessed by dialysis, which was fitted with suitable mathematical models. Approximately 69.205%±2.5% of the drug was released in 24 hours in medium of pH 1.2, whereas ~78%±2.28% of drug was released in medium of pH 7.4, with floating behavior for ~7.5 hours. The results of in vivo study showed a 3.25-fold increase in bioavailability. Thus, we concluded that CNF aerogels offer a great possibility for a gastroretentive drug delivery system with improved bioavailability. Keywords: cellulose nanofiber, aerogel, controlled release, gastroretentive, floating behavior, swelling behavior, mucoadhesion, bioavailability

  16. Optimal designs for population pharmacokinetic studies of the partner drugs co-administered with artemisinin derivatives in patients with uncomplicated falciparum malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamsen Kris M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT is currently recommended as first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria, but of concern, it has been observed that the effectiveness of the main artemisinin derivative, artesunate, has been diminished due to parasite resistance. This reduction in effect highlights the importance of the partner drugs in ACT and provides motivation to gain more knowledge of their pharmacokinetic (PK properties via population PK studies. Optimal design methodology has been developed for population PK studies, which analytically determines a sampling schedule that is clinically feasible and yields precise estimation of model parameters. In this work, optimal design methodology was used to determine sampling designs for typical future population PK studies of the partner drugs (mefloquine, lumefantrine, piperaquine and amodiaquine co-administered with artemisinin derivatives. Methods The optimal designs were determined using freely available software and were based on structural PK models from the literature and the key specifications of 100 patients with five samples per patient, with one sample taken on the seventh day of treatment. The derived optimal designs were then evaluated via a simulation-estimation procedure. Results For all partner drugs, designs consisting of two sampling schedules (50 patients per schedule with five samples per patient resulted in acceptable precision of the model parameter estimates. Conclusions The sampling schedules proposed in this paper should be considered in future population pharmacokinetic studies where intensive sampling over many days or weeks of follow-up is not possible due to either ethical, logistic or economical reasons.

  17. Oral administration of drugs with hypersensitivity potential induces germinal center hyperplasia in secondary lymphoid organ/tissue in Brown Norway rats, and this histological lesion is a promising candidate as a predictive biomarker for drug hypersensitivity occurrence in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Akitoshi; Miyawaki, Izuru; Yamada, Toru; Kimura, Juki; Funabashi, Hitoshi

    2013-08-15

    It is important to evaluate the potential of drug hypersensitivity as well as other adverse effects during the preclinical stage of the drug development process, but validated methods are not available yet. In the present study we examined whether it would be possible to develop a new predictive model of drug hypersensitivity using Brown Norway (BN) rats. As representative drugs with hypersensitivity potential in humans, phenytoin (PHT), carbamazepine (CBZ), amoxicillin (AMX), and sulfamethoxazole (SMX) were orally administered to BN rats for 28days to investigate their effects on these animals by examinations including observation of clinical signs, hematology, determination of serum IgE levels, histology, and flow cytometric analysis. Skin rashes were not observed in any animals treated with these drugs. Increases in the number of circulating inflammatory cells and serum IgE level did not necessarily occur in the animals treated with these drugs. However, histological examination revealed that germinal center hyperplasia was commonly induced in secondary lymphoid organs/tissues in the animals treated with these drugs. In cytometric analysis, changes in proportions of lymphocyte subsets were noted in the spleen of the animals treated with PHT or CBZ during the early period of administration. The results indicated that the potential of drug hypersensitivity was identified in BN rat by performing histological examination of secondary lymphoid organs/tissues. Data obtained herein suggested that drugs with hypersensitivity potential in humans gained immune reactivity in BN rat, and the germinal center hyperplasia induced by administration of these drugs may serve as a predictive biomarker for drug hypersensitivity occurrence.

  18. Oral hygiene products, medications and drugs - hidden aetiological factors for dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellwig, Elmar; Lussi, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Acidic or EDTA-containing oral hygiene products and acidic medicines have the potential to soften dental hard tissues. The low pH of oral care products increases the chemical stability of some fluoride compounds and favours the incorporation of fluoride ions in the lattice of hydroxyapatite and the precipitation of calcium fluoride on the tooth surface. This layer has some protective effect against an erosive attack. However, when the pH is too low or when no fluoride is present these protecting effects are replaced by direct softening of the tooth surface. Oral dryness can occur as a consequence of medication such as tranquilizers, antihistamines, antiemetics and antiparkinsonian medicaments or of salivary gland dysfunction. Above all, patients should be aware of the potential demineralization effects of oral hygiene products with low pH. Acetyl salicylic acid taken regularly in the form of multiple chewable tablets or in the form of headache powder, as well as chewing hydrochloric acids tablets for the treatment of stomach disorders, can cause erosion. There is most probably no direct association between asthmatic drugs and erosion on the population level. Consumers and health professionals should be aware of the potential of tooth damage not only by oral hygiene products and salivary substitutes but also by chewable and effervescent tablets. Several paediatric medications show a direct erosive potential in vitro. Clinical proof of the occurrence of erosion after use of these medicaments is still lacking. However, regular and prolonged use of these medicaments might bear the risk of causing erosion. Additionally, it can be assumed that patients suffering from xerostomia should be aware of the potential effects of oral hygiene products with low pH and high titratable acidity.

  19. Provisional in-silico biopharmaceutics classification (BCS) to guide oral drug product development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolk, Omri; Agbaria, Riad; Dahan, Arik

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to investigate in-silico predictions of physicochemical properties, in order to guide oral drug development by provisional biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS). Four in-silico methods were used to estimate LogP: group contribution (CLogP) using two different software programs, atom contribution (ALogP), and element contribution (KLogP). The correlations (r(2)) of CLogP, ALogP and KLogP versus measured LogP data were 0.97, 0.82, and 0.71, respectively. The classification of drugs with reported intestinal permeability in humans was correct for 64.3%-72.4% of the 29 drugs on the dataset, and for 81.82%-90.91% of the 22 drugs that are passively absorbed using the different in-silico algorithms. Similar permeability classification was obtained with the various in-silico methods. The in-silico calculations, along with experimental melting points, were then incorporated into a thermodynamic equation for solubility estimations that largely matched the reference solubility values. It was revealed that the effect of melting point on the solubility is minor compared to the partition coefficient, and an average melting point (162.7 °C) could replace the experimental values, with similar results. The in-silico methods classified 20.76% (± 3.07%) as Class 1, 41.51% (± 3.32%) as Class 2, 30.49% (± 4.47%) as Class 3, and 6.27% (± 4.39%) as Class 4. In conclusion, in-silico methods can be used for BCS classification of drugs in early development, from merely their molecular formula and without foreknowledge of their chemical structure, which will allow for the improved selection, engineering, and developability of candidates. These in-silico methods could enhance success rates, reduce costs, and accelerate oral drug products development.

  20. The reliability of sensitive information provided by injecting drug users in a clinical setting: clinician-administered versus audio computer-assisted self-interviewing (ACASI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M Mofizul; Topp, Libby; Conigrave, Katherine M; van Beek, Ingrid; Maher, Lisa; White, Ann; Rodgers, Craig; Day, Carolyn A

    2012-01-01

    Research with injecting drug users (IDUs) suggests greater willingness to report sensitive and stigmatised behaviour via audio computer-assisted self-interviewing (ACASI) methods than during face-to-face interviews (FFIs); however, previous studies were limited in verifying this within the same individuals at the same time point. This study examines the relative willingness of IDUs to report sensitive information via ACASI and during a face-to-face clinical assessment administered in health services for IDUs. During recruitment for a randomised controlled trial undertaken at two IDU-targeted health services, assessments were undertaken as per clinical protocols, followed by referral of eligible clients to the trial, in which baseline self-report data were collected via ACASI. Five questions about sensitive injecting and sexual risk behaviours were administered to participants during both clinical interviews and baseline research data collection. "Percentage agreement" determined the magnitude of concordance/discordance in responses across interview methods, while tests appropriate to data format assessed the statistical significance of this variation. Results for all five variables suggest that, relative to ACASI, FFI elicited responses that may be perceived as more socially desirable. Discordance was statistically significant for four of the five variables examined. Participants who reported a history of sex work were more likely to provide discordant responses to at least one socially sensitive item. In health services for IDUs, information collection via ACASI may elicit more reliable and valid responses than FFI. Adoption of a universal precautionary approach to complement individually tailored assessment of and advice regarding health risk behaviours for IDUs may address this issue.

  1. Recent developments in the use of bioadhesive systems for delivery of drugs to the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, John D

    2004-01-01

    The delivery of therapeutic agents to, or via, the oral cavity is limited by the efficient removal mechanisms that exist in this area. Bioadhesive formulations have been developed to allow prolonged localized therapy and enhanced systemic delivery. The oral mucosa however, while avoiding first-pass effects, is a formidable barrier to drug absorption, especially for "biopharmaceutical" products arising from the recent innovations in genomics and proteomics. Bioadhesive polymers are typically hydrophilic macromolecules containing numerous hydrogen-bonding groups. Second-generation bioadhesives include modified or new polymers that allow enhanced adhesion and/or drug delivery, along with site-specific ligands such as lectins. Over the last 20 years, a range of bioadhesive formulations have been developed for the oral cavity, but only comparatively few have found their way onto the market. This review will consider some recent developments in the use of bioadhesive buccal systems, notably the development of new polymers, advanced delivery systems, and the exploitation of the multifunctional properties of some bioadhesives.

  2. Non-Oral Drug Delivery Strategies: From Early Diagnosis to Advanced Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Trenkwalder

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This educational symposium, sponsored by Britannia Pharmaceuticals Limited, was held during the 1st Congress of the European Academy of Neurology (EAN, which took place from 20th-23rd June 2015 in Berlin, Germany. The symposium reviewed the role of non-oral drug delivery strategies in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD and how they can overcome problems that occur with the gastrointestinal (GI route of administration in many patients. GI dysfunction is recognised as a common problem in PD and may in fact be a preclinical marker of the disease. It can affect the absorption of oral medication resulting in OFF periods and unreliable control of motor symptoms, which in turn can have a negative impact on quality of life (QoL. Delayed time-to-ON (TTO after an oral levodopa dose and dose failures are known to be significant contributors to total OFF time. Results of the recently completed AM-IMPAKT trial in patients with morning akinesia due to a delay in the onset of oral levodopa effect demonstrate that apomorphine intermittent injection (penject is able to provide rapid and effective resolution of such complications, restoring patients to the ON state quickly and allowing them to get on with their daily activities.

  3. Analytical evaluation of four on-site oral fluid drug testing devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanstechelman, Sylvie; Isalberti, Cristina; Van der Linden, Trudy; Pil, Kristof; Legrand, Sara-Ann; Verstraete, Alain G

    2012-03-01

    The use of oral fluid (OF) as an alternative matrix for the detection of drugs of abuse has increased over the last decade, leading to the need for a rapid, simple, and reliable on-site OF testing device. Four on-site OF drug testing devices (Dräger DrugTest 5000, Cozart DDS, Mavand Rapid STAT, and Innovacon OrAlert) were evaluated on 408 volunteers at drug treatment centers. UPLC-MS-MS results were used as reference to determine sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for each device, applying Belgian legal confirmation cutoffs for benzoylecgonine, cocaine, and THC (10 ng/mL); morphine and 6-acetylmorphine (5 ng/mL); and amphetamine and 3,4-methylenedioxymethylamphetamine (25 ng/mL). Sensitivity for cocaine was 50%, 50%, 27%, and 11% for DrugTest, OrAlert, Rapid STAT, and DDS 806, respectively. For opiates, sensitivities were 84%, 73%, 77%, and 65%, respectively. For THC, the sensitivities were 81%, 23%, 43%, and 28%, respectively. For amphetamines, the sensitivities were 75%, 33%, 17%, and 67%, respectively. Specificity was >88% for opiates and THC, > 90% for amphetamines, and > 97% for cocaine. All tests showed good specificity. DrugTest had the highest sensitivity, although it was still low for some analytes.

  4. Influence of nutritional state on the disposal of orally and intramuscularly administered iodized oil to iodine repleted older children and adult women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierro-Benitez, R; Sandoval-Valencia, H; Sevilla-Munoz, B; Rodriguez, E; Gualotuna, E; Fierro-Carrion, G; Pacheco-Bastides, V; Andrade, J; Wang, P H; Stanbury, J B

    1989-06-01

    Iodinated oil (Ethiodol, 1 or 2 ml) was administered po or by im administration to adult women and older children in rural highland Ecuador who were either well nourished or malnourished to determine the effect of nutritional status on the disposal rate of iodine. These subjects resides in a region previously severely deficient in iodine, but this had been corrected in these subjects by prior administration of iodinated oil or by use of iodized salt or both. Malnutrition as determined by the conventional standards of height for age was associated with a significantly shortened retention time of the administered iodine, whether given po or im. The half life of retention was approximately half in the malourished of that in the well nourished. If these findings can be extrapolated to chronically iodine deficient subjects, then malnourished populations in need of iodine supplementation should either receive higher dosages than those conventionally employed or more frequent dosage.

  5. [Tissue and cell interactions in the oral mucosa after cytostatic drugs administration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykov, V L; Leont'eva, I V

    2011-01-01

    In the preceding work ("Morphology", 2011, issue 2), the regularities of oral mucosal (OM) epithelium injury after the cytostatic drug (CSD) treatment and its further regeneration, were reviewed. This paper presents the systematized summary of current literature data and the authors' own findings on the regularities of CSD effect on non-epithelial OM cell populations and their interactions with each other and the epithelium. The changes of intraepithelial tissue homeostasis, associated with CSD effect on intraepithelial lymphocytes, granulocytes, dendritic antigen presenting cells and melanocytes, interacting with epitheliocytes, are described. The data are presented, indicating that along with the epithelium, the cell populations of lamina propria and submucosal connective tissue, as well as the small blood vessels, are important targets of CSD in the OM tissues. The concept of a unifying model, describing tissue, cellular and molecular mechanisms of the oral mucositis development after CSD treatment, is reviewed.

  6. Comparative effect of orally administered sodium butyrate before or after weaning on growth and several indices of gastrointestinal biology of piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Gall, Maud; Gallois, Mélanie; Sève, Bernard;

    2009-01-01

    Sodium butyrate (SB) provided orally favours body growth and maturation of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) in milk-fed pigs. In weaned pigs, conflicting results have been obtained. Therefore, we hypothesised that the effects of SB (3 g/kg DM intake) depend on the period (before v. after weaning......) of its oral administration. From the age of 5 d, thirty-two pigs, blocked in quadruplicates within litters, were assigned to one of four treatments: no SB (control), SB before (for 24 d), or after (for 11-12 d) weaning and SB before and after weaning (for 35-36 d). Growth performance, feed intake...... and various end-point indices of GIT anatomy and physiology were investigated at slaughter. The pigs supplemented with SB before weaning grew faster after weaning than the controls (P intake was higher in pigs supplemented with SB before or after weaning (P

  7. The oral health of street-recruited injecting drug users: prevalence and correlates of problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laslett, Anne-Marie; Dietze, Paul; Dwyer, Robyn

    2008-11-01

    To examine the effects of a series of injecting drug users' (IDU) characteristics and drug use behaviours upon the self-reported oral health of a sample of IDU. Cross-sectional survey. Melbourne, Australia. A total of 285 IDU recruited through needle and syringe programmes, snowballing and outreach across six sites. Structured survey that collected information on current drug use patterns, self-reported blood-borne virus status and general health factors, including open-ended questions on past-year dental health problems. Sixty-eight per cent of the sample reported dental problems that were commonly severe and caused dental pain. Despite these reported problems, almost half the sample had not visited the dentist in the 12 months prior to the survey. Participants who were older, and reported homelessness, not eating every day and more common injection of amphetamines rather than heroin in the previous month, were more likely to report having a past-year dental problem. Dental problems in IDUs are common but few receive treatment. Further, those using amphetamines, with poor housing, hygiene and poor nutrition, are most at risk. Programmes designed to improve the oral health of IDU need to be developed and implemented in a manner amenable to the varying social circumstances of this marginalized group in the community.

  8. Size-exclusive effect of nanostructured lipid carriers on oral drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huipeng; Chen, Minglei; Su, Zhigui; Sun, Minjie; Ping, Qineng

    2016-09-10

    Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) are generally recognized as safe (GRAS) to form a controlled nanostructure are a new generation of lipid nanoparticles. In addition to formulation and particle surface properties, particle size had great influence for overcoming gastrointestinal (GI) barriers on the oral drug delivery of lipid based nanoparticles. In the present study, we investigated the effect of size on oral drug delivery for NLCs. The NLCs with different particle sizes (NLCs100nm, NLCs200nm and NLCs300nm) were prepared by using solvent evaporation method and the coumarin-6 (C6) or DiO/DiI was loaded in the nanoparticles as the fluorescence probe. The MTT assay indicated that both blank NLCs and C6-loaded NLCs displayed relatively low toxicity towards Caco-2 cells. Cellular uptake mechanisms of NLCs with different sizes were found to be similar and governed by active endocytosis, clathrin- and caveolae-mediated process. However, the smaller nanoparticle (NLC-100nm) showed higher uptake efficiency in Caco-2 cell (Poral administration. NLC-100nm exhibited the most stability according to the most stable FRET signal. In situ rat intestinal absorption experiments and in vitro ligated rat intestinal loops model demonstrated that all NLCs could rapidly penetrate duodenum versus jejunum, ileum and colon (Poral drug delivery of lipid based nanoparticles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Amphotericin B cochleates: a vehicle for oral delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlin, David S

    2004-02-01

    Cochleates are a novel lipid-based delivery vehicle consisting of crystalline phospholipid-cation structures that form spiral lipid sheets. They represent a new technology platform for oral delivery of clinically important drugs that possess poor oral bioavailability. Orally administered cochleates containing amphotericin B (CAMB) showed broad-spectrum activity in murine infection models of candidiasis, aspergillosis and cryptococcosis. Initial biodistribution studies of CAMB administered orally in mice demonstrated that cochleates delivered significant levels of AMB to target organs. The lipid particulate nature of cochleates also imparted reduced toxicity that mimics other lipid-amphotericin B complexes. Cochleates are a promising new vehicle for oral delivery of amphotericin B at therapeutic levels.

  10. Effects of PEGylated lipid nanoparticles on the oral absorption of one BCS II drug: a mechanistic investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xingwang; Chen, Guijiang; Zhang, Tianpeng; Ma, Zhiguo; Wu, Baojian

    2014-01-01

    Lipid nanocarriers are becoming a versatile platform for oral delivery of lipophilic drugs. In this article, we aimed to explore the gastrointestinal behaviors of lipid nanoparticles and the effect of PEGylation on oral absorption of fenofibrate (FN), a Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) II model drug. FN-loaded PEGylated lipid nanoparticles (FN-PLNs) were prepared by the solvent-diffusion method and characterized by particle size distribution, morphology, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and drug release. Lipolytic experiments were performed to assess the resistance of lipid nanoparticles against pancreatic lipase. Pharmacokinetics was evaluated in rats after oral administration of FN preparations. The obtained FN-PLNs were 186.7 nm in size with an entrapment efficiency of >95%. Compared to conventional lipid nanoparticles, PLNs exhibited slower drug release in the lipase-containing medium, strikingly reduced mucin binding, and suppressed lipolysis in vitro. Further, oral absorption of FN was significantly enhanced using PLNs with relative bioavailability of 123.9% and 157.0% to conventional lipid nanoparticles and a commercial formulation (Lipanthyl(®)), respectively. It was demonstrated that reduced mucin trapping, suppressed lipolysis, and/or improved mucosal permeability were responsible for increased oral absorption. These results facilitated a better understanding of the in vivo fate of lipid nanoparticles, and suggested the potential of PLNs as oral carriers of BCS II drugs.

  11. Highly sensitive LC-MS/MS methods for the determination of seven human CYP450 activities using small oral doses of probe-drugs in human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grangeon, Alexia; Gravel, Sophie; Gaudette, Fleur; Turgeon, Jacques; Michaud, Veronique

    2017-01-01

    Cocktails composed of several Cytochrome P450 (CYP450)-selective probe drugs have been shown of value to characterize in vivo drug-metabolism activities. Our objective was to develop and validate highly sensitive and selective LC-MS/MS assays allowing the determination of seven major human CYP450 isoenzyme activities following administration of low oral doses of a modified CYP450 probe-drug cocktail in patients. The seven-drug cocktail was composed of caffeine, bupropion, tolbutamide, omeprazole, dextromethorphan, midazolam (all administered concomitantly) and chlorzoxazone (administered separately) to phenotype for CYP1A2, 2B6, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, 3A4/5 and 2E1, respectively. Serial plasma and urine samples were collected over an 8h period. The probe-drugs and their respective metabolites were measured in both human plasma and urine, except for omeprazole (plasma only) and chlorzoxazone (urine only). Samples were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography with heated electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-HESI-MS/MS) using a Phenomenex Luna PFP (2) analytical column (3μm PFP(2) 150×3mm) for chromatographic separation. Optimal detection was achieved based on 3 different analytical methods; (1) isocratic elution with a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile and water both fortified with 0.01% formic acid for the analysis of bupropion, tolbutamide, chlorzoxazone and their respective metabolites; (2) isocratic elution with a mobile phase composed of acetonitrile and ammonium formate (pH 3; 10mM) for omeprazole, dextromethorphan, midazolam and their metabolites; (3) for caffeine and paraxanthine, gradient elution using acetonitrile and 0.01% formic acid in water was used. All calibration functions were linear for all probe drugs and metabolites in both matrices over wide analytical ranges. The main advantages of our methods are the use of specific probe drugs available in most countries, the administration of small doses of probe drugs, small

  12. Drug-polymer filled micro-containers for oral delivery loaded using supercritical CO2 aided-impregnation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marizza, Paolo; Keller, Stephan Sylvest; Rades, T.

    2013-01-01

    In this work we present an effective loading technique of micro-containers for oral drug delivery of a poorly water soluble drug in a solid dispersion with polymer. By combining inkjet printing and supercritical CO2 impregnation we load ketoprofen in a solid dispersion with poly...

  13. Risk of Non-melanoma Skin Cancer in Patients with Atopic Dermatitis Treated with Oral Immunosuppressive Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garritsen, Floor M.; Van der Schaft, Jorien; Van den Reek, Juul M.; Politiek, Klaziena; Van Osmedendorp, Harmieke; Van Dijk, Marijke; Hijnen, Dirk J.; De Graaf, Marlies; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla A.; De Jong, Elke M.; Schuttelaar, Marie-Louise A.; De Bruin-Weller, Marjolein S.

    There is uncertainty about the risk of developing non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), including basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) treated with oral immunosuppressive drugs. A total of 557 patients with AD treated with these drugs in the

  14. [Gynecological use of a phlebokinetic drug with special reference to its combination with oral contraceptives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzola, D

    1975-09-30

    Controlled experiments confirmed the therapeutic usefulness in gynecology of a phlebokinetic drug, in which EPL (polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholine) was combined with escine and rutine. The drug is particularly recommended for the prophylaxis and treatment of vein disorders caused by oral contraceptives. A total of 75 patients were treated with the drug (Essaven), in addition to the usual treatment (such as anticoagulants), while 75 controls received the usual treatment only. Results were excellent in cases of varicose veins, where the symptoms were eliminated in almost all cases. In cases of phlebitis and thrombophlebitis, the response was less univocal, but a definite improvement was evident in a good number of cases treated with Essaven; the drug also favored the return to normal conditions after thrombophlebitis attacks, reducing the duration of their painful aftereffects. The drug can be used daily for very long periods without side effects. It can also be used safely during pregnancy, without adverse effects on the fetus and on delivery. It is regarded as ideal to avoid the side effects of contraceptives on the venous system.

  15. Functionalized carbon nanomaterials: exploring the interactions with Caco-2 cells for potential oral drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coyuco JC

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Jurja C Coyuco, Yuanjie Liu, Bee-Jen Tan, Gigi NC ChiuDepartment of Pharmacy, Faculty of Science, National University of Singapore, SingaporeAbstract: Although carbon nanomaterials (CNMs have been increasingly studied for their biomedical applications, there is limited research on these novel materials for oral drug delivery. As such, this study aimed to explore the potential of CNMs in oral drug delivery, and the objectives were to evaluate CNM cytotoxicity and their abilities to modulate paracellular transport and the P-glycoprotein (P-gp efflux pump. Three types of functionalized CNMs were studied, including polyhydroxy small-gap fullerenes (OH-fullerenes, carboxylic acid functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (fSWCNT-COOH and poly(ethylene glycol functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (fSWCNT-PEG, using the well-established Caco-2 cell monolayer to represent the intestinal epithelium. All three CNMs had minimum cytotoxicity on Caco-2 cells, as demonstrated through lactose dehydrogenase release and 3-(4,5-dimethyliazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assays. Of the three CNMs, fSWCNT-COOH significantly reduced transepithelial electrical resistance and enhanced transport of Lucifer Yellow across the Caco-2 monolayer. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that fSWCNT-COOH treated cells had the highest perturbation in the distribution of ZO-1, a protein marker of tight junction, suggesting that fSWCNT-COOH could enhance paracellular permeability via disruption of tight junctions. This modulating effect of fSWCNT-COOH can be reversed over time. Furthermore, cellular accumulation of the P-gp substrate, rhodamine-123, was significantly increased in cells treated with fSWCNT-COOH, suggestive of P-gp inhibition. Of note, fSWCNT-PEG could increase rhodamine-123 accumulation without modifying the tight junction. Collectively, these results suggest that the functionalized CNMs could be useful as modulators for oral drug

  16. Emerging integrated nanohybrid drug delivery systems to facilitate the intravenous-to-oral switch in cancer chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Cong; Sun, Jin; Du, Yuqian; He, Zhonggui

    2014-02-28

    Nanohybrid drug delivery systems have presented lots of characteristic advantages as an efficient strategy to facilitate oral drug delivery. Nonetheless, oral administration of chemotherapy agents by nanoparticulate delivery technology still faces great challenges owing to the multiple biobarriers ranging from poorly physicochemical properties of drugs, to complex gastrointestinal disposition and to presystemic metabolism. This review briefly analyzes a series of biobarriers hindering oral absorption and describes the multiple aspects for facilitating the intravenous-to-oral switch in cancer therapy. Moreover, the developed nanoparticulate drug delivery strategies to overcome the above obstacles are provided, including metabolic enzyme inhibition, enteric-coated nanocarriers, bioadhesive and mucus-penetrating strategies, P-gp inhibition and active targeting. On these foundations, the emerging trends of integrated hybrid nanosystems in response to the present low-efficiency drug delivery of any single approach are summarized, such as mixed polymeric micelles and nanocomposite particulate systems. Finally, the recent advances of high-efficiency hybrid nanoparticles in oral chemotherapy are highlighted, with special attention on integrated approach to design drug delivery nanosystems.

  17. Oral administration of drugs with hypersensitivity potential induces germinal center hyperplasia in secondary lymphoid organ/tissue in Brown Norway rats, and this histological lesion is a promising candidate as a predictive biomarker for drug hypersensitivity occurrence in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Akitoshi, E-mail: akitoshi-tamura@ds-pharma.co.jp; Miyawaki, Izuru; Yamada, Toru; Kimura, Juki; Funabashi, Hitoshi

    2013-08-15

    It is important to evaluate the potential of drug hypersensitivity as well as other adverse effects during the preclinical stage of the drug development process, but validated methods are not available yet. In the present study we examined whether it would be possible to develop a new predictive model of drug hypersensitivity using Brown Norway (BN) rats. As representative drugs with hypersensitivity potential in humans, phenytoin (PHT), carbamazepine (CBZ), amoxicillin (AMX), and sulfamethoxazole (SMX) were orally administered to BN rats for 28 days to investigate their effects on these animals by examinations including observation of clinical signs, hematology, determination of serum IgE levels, histology, and flow cytometric analysis. Skin rashes were not observed in any animals treated with these drugs. Increases in the number of circulating inflammatory cells and serum IgE level did not necessarily occur in the animals treated with these drugs. However, histological examination revealed that germinal center hyperplasia was commonly induced in secondary lymphoid organs/tissues in the animals treated with these drugs. In cytometric analysis, changes in proportions of lymphocyte subsets were noted in the spleen of the animals treated with PHT or CBZ during the early period of administration. The results indicated that the potential of drug hypersensitivity was identified in BN rat by performing histological examination of secondary lymphoid organs/tissues. Data obtained herein suggested that drugs with hypersensitivity potential in humans gained immune reactivity in BN rat, and the germinal center hyperplasia induced by administration of these drugs may serve as a predictive biomarker for drug hypersensitivity occurrence. - Highlights: • We tested Brown Norway rats as a candidate model for predicting drug hypersensitivity. • The allergic drugs did not induce skin rash, whereas D-penicillamine did so in the rats. • Some of allergic drugs increased

  18. Scientific and Regulatory Considerations in Solid Oral Modified Release Drug Product Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Sander, Sanna; Duan, John; Rosencrance, Susan; Miksinski, Sarah Pope; Yu, Lawrence; Seo, Paul; Rege, Bhagwant

    2016-11-01

    This review presents scientific and regulatory considerations for the development of solid oral modified release (MR) drug products. It includes a rationale for patient-focused development based on Quality-by-Design (QbD) principles. Product and process understanding of MR products includes identification and risk-based evaluation of critical material attributes (CMAs), critical process parameters (CPPs), and their impact on critical quality attributes (CQAs) that affect the clinical performance. The use of various biopharmaceutics tools that link the CQAs to a predictable and reproducible clinical performance for patient benefit is emphasized. Product and process understanding lead to a more comprehensive control strategy that can maintain product quality through the shelf life and the lifecycle of the drug product. The overall goal is to develop MR products that consistently meet the clinical objectives while mitigating the risks to patients by reducing the probability and increasing the detectability of CQA failures.

  19. Antiepileptic drugs: are women aware of interactions with oral contraceptives and potential teratogenicity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pack, Alison M; Davis, Anne R; Kritzer, Jordana; Yoon, Ava; Camus, Adela

    2009-04-01

    Women with epilepsy (WWE)'s knowledge of the interaction between antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and oral contraceptives (OCs) and the potential teratogenicity of AEDs has received limited study. We conducted a cross-sectional questionnaire study (English or Spanish) among young WWE (18-44 years) to assess demographic characteristics, current AED use, and knowledge of AED interactions with OCs and teratogenicity. We used the Food and Drug Administration's classification system to categorize each AED's teratogenic potential. Participants (n=148) had a mean age of 32 years (SD 8); 32% spoke Spanish and described themselves as Hispanic. Among women prescribed a cytochrome p450-inducing AED, 65% were unaware of decreased OC efficacy. Forty percent of those prescribed Category D AEDs were unaware of potential teratogenic effects. WWE have limited knowledge of the potential interaction between AEDs and OCs and the teratogenic effects of AEDs. Educational efforts should highlight the reproductive health effects of AEDs in WWE.

  20. Oral suspensions of morphine hydrochloride for controlled release: rheological properties and drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, M E; López, G; Gallardo, V; Ruiz, M A

    2011-04-04

    Recent developments in pharmaceutical technology have facilitated the design and production of modified release formulas for drugs whose physical, chemical or biological properties impede release and thus might compromise their efficacy or safety. One such drug is morphine, whose short half-life requires repeated doses at short intervals. The use of biocompatible polymers such as ethylcellulose has made it possible to develop microencapsulated formulations which facilitate liquid, sustained-release pharmaceutical formulas for oral administration. We developed a stable final formulation of morphine with an acceptable release profile by comparing the rheological properties and stability of formulations with different thickeners (xanthan gum, Carbopol, and carboxymethylcellulose with microcrystalline cellulose) at different concentrations from 0.25% to 1.0%. Release assays in a Franz-type cell were done to determine the most suitable release profile for the formulation.

  1. Oral heparin: status review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomez-Orellana Isabel

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Unfractionated heparin and low molecular weight heparin are the most commonly used antithrombotic and thromboprophylactic agents in hospital practice. Extended out-of-hospital treatment is inconvenient in that these agents must be administered parenterally. Current research is directed at development of a safe and effective oral antithrombotic agent as an alternative for the effective, yet difficult to use vitamin K antagonists. A novel drug delivery technology that facilitates transport of drugs across the gastrointestinal epithelium has been harnessed to develop an oral dosage form of unfractionated heparin. Combining unfractionated heparin with the carrier molecule, sodium N-(8 [2-hydroxybenzoyl]amino caprylate, or SNAC has markedly increased the gastrointestinal absorption of this drug. Preclinical and clinical studies to-date suggests that oral heparin-SNAC can confer a clinical efficacious effect; further confirmation is sought in planned clinical trials.

  2. A Quantitative Review and Meta-models of the Variability and Factors Affecting Oral Drug Absorption-Part II: Gastrointestinal Transit Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuhelwa, Ahmad Y; Foster, David J R; Upton, Richard N

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to conduct a quantitative meta-analysis for the values of, and variability in, gastrointestinal (GI) transit times of non-disintegrating single-unit ("tablet") and multiple-unit ("pellets/multi-unit tablet") solid dosage forms, characterize the effect of food on the values and variability in these parameters and present quantitative meta-models of the distributions of GI transit times in the respective GI regions to help inform models of oral drug absorption. The literature was systemically reviewed for the values of, and the variability in, gastric, small intestinal and colonic transit times under fed and fasted conditions. Meta-analysis used the "metafor" package of the R language. Meta-models of GI transit were assumed to be log-normally distributed between the studied populations. Twenty-nine studies including 125 reported means and standard deviations were used in the meta-analysis. Caloric content of administered food increased variability and delayed the gastric transit of both pellets and tablets. Conversely, food caloric content reduced the variability but had no significant influence on the mean small intestinal transit time (SITT). Food had no significant effect on the transit time through the colon. The transit of pellets through the colon was significantly slower than that of single-unit tablets which is most likely related to their smaller size. GI transit times may influence the dissolution and absorption of oral drugs. The meta-models of GI transit times may be used as part of semi-physiological absorption models to characterize the influence of transit time on the dissolution, absorption and in vivo pharmacokinetic profiles of oral drugs.

  3. Orally administered lactoperoxidase increases expression of the FK506 binding protein 5 gene in epithelial cells of the small intestine of mice: a DNA microarray study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Hiroyuki; Miyauchi, Hirofumi; Shin, Kouichirou; Yamauchi, Koji; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Abe, Keiko; Takase, Mitsunori

    2007-09-01

    Lactoperoxidase (LPO) is a component of milk and other external secretions. To study the influence of ingested LPO on the digestive tract, we performed DNA microarray analysis of the small intestine of mice administered LPO. LPO administration upregulated 78 genes, including genes involved in metabolism, immunity, apoptosis, and the cell cycle, and downregulated nine genes, including immunity-related genes. The most upregulated gene was FK506 binding protein 5 (FKBP5), a glucocorticoid regulating immunophilin. The upregulation of this gene was confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR in other samples. In situ hybridization revealed that expression of the FKBP5 gene in the crypt epithelial cells of the small intestine was enhanced by LPO. These results suggest that ingested LPO modulates gene expression in the small intestine and especially increases FKBP5 gene expression in the epithelial cells of the intestine.

  4. Development of mannosylated liposomes for bioadhesive oral drug delivery via M cells of Peyer's patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukanud, Pongthep; Peungvicha, Penchom; Sarisuta, Narong

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to develop mannosylated liposomes as bioadhesive carriers for oral drug delivery. Two kinds of acyclovir (ACV)-entrapped mannosylated liposomes, i.e. ManN-ACV-lip and PAM-ACV-lip, were prepared by the use of mannosamine HCl (ManN) and p-aminophenyl-alpha-D-mannopyranoside (PAM), respectively. The mean sizes, drug entrapment efficiency, and loading capacity values of all liposomal formulations were in the ranges of 233-371 nm, 82-95%, and 42-47%, respectively. The mean size of PAM-ACV-lip was significantly smaller than those of conventional ACV liposomes and ManN-ACV-lip due to the more conical packing parameter of mannose-conjugated phospholipid. The mannosylating group grafted into bilayer membrane resulted in a decrease in drug entrapment, owing to competitive binding. The in vitro drug absorptions through everted sacs of mice ileum of both mannosylated ACV liposomes were significantly higher than those of conventional ACV liposomes or suspension.

  5. Performance evaluation of on-site oral fluid drug screening devices in normal police procedure in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musshoff, Frank; Hokamp, Eva Große; Bott, Ulrich; Madea, Burkhard

    2014-05-01

    There is a need for quick and reliable methods for rapid screening of drug-influenced drivers on the roadside by police. Because the window of detection in oral fluid is more similar to blood than to urine, this matrix should therefore be appropriate for screening procedures. The performance of the Rapid STAT(®) (Mavand Solution GmbH, Mössingen, Germany), DrugWipe5/5+(®) (Securetec Detektions-Systeme AG, Brunnthal, Germany) and Dräger DrugTest(®) 5000 (Draeger Safety AG & Co. KGaA, Luebeck, Germany) on-site oral fluid devices was evaluated with random oral fluid specimens from car drivers in North Rhine-Westphalia (Germany). Additionally, some drivers were checked using an on-site urine device (DrugScreen(®), NAL von Minden, Regensburg, Germany). During a 11-month period, 1.212 drivers were tested. Both OF and urine on-site tests were compared to serum results. The following sensitivities were obtained by the oral fluid devices: THC 71% (DrugWipe(®)), 87% (Dräger), 91% (RapidSTAT); opiates 95% (Dräger), 100% (DrugWipe(®), RapidSTAT(®)); amphetamine 84% (DrugTest(®) 5000), 90% (RapidSTAT(®)), 100% (DrugTest(®) 5000); methamphetamine 50% (DrugTest(®) 5000), 100% (RapidSTAT(®)); cocaine 76% (DrugTest(®) 5000), 100% (DrugWipe(®), RapidSTAT(®)); methadone 33-63%, and benzodiazepines 0-33% (both with a low number of positives). THC specificity was especially low (29% [DrugWipe(®)] and 47% [DrugTest(®) 5000]) due to low cut-off concentrations. These data were similar to those obtained from the literature (e.g., DRUID project). The urine screening device showed a good sensitivity (THC 93%, opiate 94%, amphetamine 94%, methamphetamine 75% (low number of positives), cocaine 100%) and also an acceptable specificity (39%, 86%, 63%, 77%, 47%, respectively). Although oral fluid may be a useful matrix for on-site testing of drugged drivers, it is evident that oral fluid devices still show a lack of sensitivity (methamphetamine, benzodiazepines) and

  6. The challenges and future of oral drug delivery: An interview with David Brayden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brayden, David J

    2016-12-01

    David Brayden speaks to Hannah Makin, Commissioning Editor: David Brayden is a Full Professor (Advanced Drug Delivery) at the School of Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin (UCD) and also a Fellow of the UCD Conway Institute. Following a PhD in Pharmacology at the University of Cambridge, UK (1989), and a postdoctoral research fellowship at Stanford University, CA, USA, he set up Elan Biotechnology Research's in vitro pharmacology laboratory in Dublin (1991). At Elan, he became a senior scientist and project manager of several of Elan's joint-venture drug delivery research collaborations with US biotech companies. In 2001, he joined UCD as a lecturer in veterinary pharmacology and was appointed Associate Professor in 2006 and Full Professor in 2014. He was a Director of the Science Foundation Ireland Research Cluster (The Irish Drug Delivery Research Network) from 2007 to 2013, is a Deputy Coordinator of an FP7 Consortium on oral peptides in nanoparticles ('TRANS-INT', 2012-2017), and is a Co-Principal Investigator in 'CURAM', Science Foundation Ireland's new Centre for Medical Devices (2014-2020 [ 1 ]). He was made a Fellow of the Controlled Release Society in 2012. He is the author or co-author of >200 research publications and patents. D Brayden serves on the Editorial Advisory Boards of Drug Discovery Today, European Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews and the Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, and is an Associate Editor of Therapeutic Delivery. D Brayden works as an independent consultant for drug delivery companies.

  7. Second generation lipid nanoparticles (NLC) as an oral drug carrier for delivery of lercanidipine hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranpise, Nisharani S; Korabu, Swati S; Ghodake, Vinod N

    2014-04-01

    Lercanidipine hydrochloride is a calcium channel blocker used in the treatment of hypertension. It is a poor water soluble drug with absolute bioavailability of 10%. The aim of this study was to design lercanidipine hydrochloride-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers to investigate whether the bioavailability of the same can be improved by oral delivery. Lercanidipine hydrochloride nanostructured lipid carriers were prepared by the method of solvent evaporation at a high temperature and solidification by freeze drying. The nanostructured lipid carriers were evaluated for particle size analysis, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency, in vitro drug diffusion, ex vivo permeation studies and pharmacodynamic study. The resultant nanostructured lipid carriers had a mean size of 214.97 nm and a zeta potential of -31.6 ± 1.5 mV. More than 70% lercanidipine hydrochloride was entrapped in the NLCs. The SEM studies indicated the formation of type 2 nanostructured lipid carriers. The in vitro release studies demonstrated 19.36% release in acidic buffer pH 1.2 indicating that the drug entrapped in the nanostructured lipid carriers remains entrapped at acidic pH. The ex vivo studies indicated that the drug release was enhanced from 10% to 60.54% at blood pH in 24h. The in vivo pharmacodynamic study showed that NLCs released lercanidipine hydrochloride in a controlled manner for a prolonged period of time as compared to plain drug. These results clearly indicate that nanostructured lipid carriers are a potential controlled release formulation for lercanidipine hydrochloride and may be a promising drug delivery system for the treatment of hypertension. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Complexation as an approach to entrap cationic drugs into cationic nanoparticles administered intranasally for Alzheimer's disease management: preparation and detection in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanafy, Amira S; Farid, Ragwa M; ElGamal, Safaa S

    2015-01-01

    Complexation was investigated as an approach to enhance the entrapment of the cationic neurotherapeutic drug, galantamine hydrobromide (GH) into cationic chitosan nanoparticles (CS-NPs) for Alzheimer's disease management intranasally. Biodegradable CS-NPs were selected due to their low production cost and simple preparation. The effects of complexation on CS-NPs physicochemical properties and uptake in rat brain were examined. Placebo CS-NPs were prepared by ionic gelation, and the parameters affecting their physicochemical properties were screened. The complex formed between GH and chitosan was detected by the FT-IR study. GH/chitosan complex nanoparticles (GH-CX-NPs) were prepared by ionic gelation, and characterized in terms of particle size, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency, in vitro release and stability for 4 and 25 °C for 3 months. Both placebo CS-NPs and GH-CX-NPs were visualized by transmission electron microscopy. Rhodamine-labeled GH-CX-NPs were prepared, administered to male Wistar rats intranasally, and their delivery to different brain regions was detected 1 h after administration using fluorescence microscopy and software-aided image processing. Optimized placebo CS-NPs and GH-CX-NPs had a diameter 182 and 190 nm, and a zeta potential of +40.4 and +31.6 mV, respectively. GH encapsulation efficiency and loading capacity were 23.34 and 9.86%, respectively. GH/chitosan complexation prolonged GH release (58.07% ± 6.67 after 72 h), improved formulation stability at 4 °C in terms of drug leakage and particle size, and showed insignificant effects on the physicochemical properties of the optimized placebo CS-NPs (p > 0.05). Rhodamine-labeled GH-CX-NPs were detected in the olfactory bulb, hippocampus, orbitofrontal and parietal cortices. Complexation is a promising approach to enhance the entrapment of cationic GH into the CS-NPs. It has insignificant effect on the physicochemical properties of CS-NPs. GH-CX-NPs were successfully

  9. Oral fluoroquinolone therapy results in drug adsorption on ureteral stents and prevention of biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, G; Habash, M; Vachon, D; Denstedt, J; Riddell, J; Beheshti, M

    2001-04-01

    The oral administration of ciprofloxacin (250mg bid) and ofloxacin (300mg bid) in 40 patients with ureteral stents, led to drug levels on all the device surfaces that were higher than the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of Escherichia coli (0.004--0.015 mg/l), the most common uropathogen. The drug levels in the film were higher than the MIC of other common pathogens, namely Pseudomonas aeruginosa (0.25--1.0 mg/l), Enterococcus faecalis (0.25--2.0 mg/l) and Staphylococcus aureus (0.12--0.5 mg/l) in a few cases (six, three and 14 cases out of 40, respectively). For both antibiotics, the concentrations were greater than the MIC of many uropathogens on the film surrounding the devices (0.89 vs 0.31 mg/l respectively, P=0.05), and on the devices themselves (0.22 vs. 0.12 mg/l, P=0.207). Adsorption of the antibiotics was higher to the film than to the stent (PCiprofloxacin concentration on the film surrounding the stents was significantly higher than that of ofloxacin (P=0.05), while there was no statistical concentration difference between the two antibiotics adsorbed onto the actual devices (P=0.207). No bacteria were found in patients' urine and no biofilms were detected. This is the first report of an oral antibiotic being adsorbed onto medical devices. It potentially provides a new approach of preventing infection, and avoids the need to pre-coat devices with agents whose use will be restricted once bacteria develop resistance to them. If biomaterial properties can be enhanced to increase further the adsorptive concentration of drug, the risk of infections and recalcitrant biofilm formation could be significantly reduced in a highly susceptible patient population.

  10. 21 CFR 310.534 - Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for human use as oral...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for human use as oral wound healing agents. 310.534 Section 310.534 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR...

  11. Pharmacokinetics of guaifenesin, pseudoephedrine and hydrocodone in a combination oral liquid formulation, administered as single and multiple doses in healthy Chinese volunteers, and comparison with data for individual compounds formulated as Antuss®.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shuhua; Huang, Wencan; Ni, Xiaojia; Zhang, Ming; Lu, Haoyang; Wang, Zhanzhang; Hu, Jinqing; Zhu, Xiuqing; Qiu, Chang; Shang, Dewei; Zhang, Yuefeng; Xiong, Linghui; Wen, Yuguan

    2017-10-01

    1. A new oral liquid formulation combining guaifenesin, pseudoephedrine and hydrocodone is effective in improving the symptoms of common cold. The pharmacokinetic properties of the individual components were evaluated in a randomized, open-label, four-period study in 12 healthy Chinese volunteers following single and multiple doses. The data were compared with data for the individual ingredients in Antuss®. 2. In the single-dose period, exposure levels (AUC and Cmax) for guaifenesin, pseudoephedrine and hydrocodone increased directly as the dose of the oral liquid formulation increased from 5 to 15 mL. Only minor amounts of guaifenesin and hydrocodone were excreted in urine (∼0.10% and 4.66%, respectively). Pseudoephedrine was mainly excreted unchanged, with 44.95% of the dose excreted in urine within 24 h. After multiple dosing, there was no obvious accumulation of any drug, as assessed by AUC. When considering Cmax, there was a trend toward accumulation of hydrocodone and pseudoephedrine. The pharmacokinetic profiles of guaifenesin and pseudoephedrine in the oral liquid formulation were similar to those in the branded preparation, Antuss®. 3. The newly developed oral liquid formulation combining guaifenesin, pseudoephedrine and hydrocodone was safe and well tolerated and might provide a reliable alternative to the branded formulation for patients with common colds.

  12. Effects of PEGylated lipid nanoparticles on the oral absorption of one BCS II drug: a mechanistic investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang XW

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Xingwang Zhang,* Guijiang Chen,* Tianpeng Zhang, Zhiguo Ma, Baojian WuDivision of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Lipid nanocarriers are becoming a versatile platform for oral delivery of lipophilic drugs. In this article, we aimed to explore the gastrointestinal behaviors of lipid nanoparticles and the effect of PEGylation on oral absorption of fenofibrate (FN, a Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS II model drug. FN-loaded PEGylated lipid nanoparticles (FN-PLNs were prepared by the solvent-diffusion method and characterized by particle size distribution, morphology, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and drug release. Lipolytic experiments were performed to assess the resistance of lipid nanoparticles against pancreatic lipase. Pharmacokinetics was evaluated in rats after oral administration of FN preparations. The obtained FN-PLNs were 186.7 nm in size with an entrapment efficiency of >95%. Compared to conventional lipid nanoparticles, PLNs exhibited slower drug release in the lipase-containing medium, strikingly reduced mucin binding, and suppressed lipolysis in vitro. Further, oral absorption of FN was significantly enhanced using PLNs with relative bioavailability of 123.9% and 157.0% to conventional lipid nanoparticles and a commercial formulation (Lipanthyl®, respectively. It was demonstrated that reduced mucin trapping, suppressed lipolysis, and/or improved mucosal permeability were responsible for increased oral absorption. These results facilitated a better understanding of the in vivo fate of lipid nanoparticles, and suggested the potential of PLNs as oral carriers of BCS II drugs.Keywords: fenofibrate, lipid nanoparticles, PEGylation, oral bioavailability, absorption mechanism

  13. Factors that Influence the Immunological Adjuvant Effect of Lactobacillus fermentum PC1 on Specific Immune Responses in Mice to Orally Administered Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meera Esvaran

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the influences of the dosage of the adjuvant, the nature of the antigen and the host genetics on the capacity of L. fermentum PC1 (PC1 to function as an oral adjuvant. BALB/c and DBA/1 mice were vaccinated with either ovalbumin (OVA or Salmonella Typhimurium on days 0 and 14, Mice were also dosed with the PC1 (108 CFU or 1011 CFU per dose per mouse with the antigens (days 0 and 14 and alone (days −1 and 13. The higher PC1 dose elicited a greater specific serum IgG2a response than IgG1 for both antigens and mice strains, indicating a Th1-biased humoral immune response. The Th1 bias was also observed at the cellular level with greater specific IFN-γ levels than IL-4 and IL-10 with both antigen types and mouse strains. With the particulate antigen, the lower dose of PC1 elicited a Th1 bias at the cellular level, but a balanced Th1/Th2 response at the systemic humoral level. With the soluble antigen, a strong Th1-biased response occurred at the cellular level while the systemic humoral response was Th2-biased. In conclusion, PC1 at the higher dose was an excellent Th1 adjuvant, which was unaffected by the nature of the antigen or the host’s genetic background.

  14. Response of intestinal cells and macrophages to an orally administered cellulose-PEG based polymer as a potential treatment for intractable edemas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Annaclaudia; Sannino, Alessandro; Cozzolino, Anna; Quintiliano, Sergio Nappo; Lamberti, Monica; Ambrosio, Luigi; Nicolais, Luigi

    2005-07-01

    The elimination of water from the body represents a fundamental therapeutic goal in those diseases in which oedemas occur. Aim of this work is the design of a material able to absorb large amount of water to be used, by oral administration, in those cases in which resistance to diuretics appears. Sorption and mechanical properties of the cellulose based superabsorbent hydrogel acting as a water elimination system have been modulated through the insertion of molecular spacers between the crosslinks. Starting polymers are the sodium salt of carboxymethylcellulose (CMCNa), a polyelectrolyte cellulose derivative, and the hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC), a non-polyelectrolyte derivative. Polyethyleneglycol (PEG) with various molecular weights, has been linked by its free ends at two divinylsulfone (DVS) crosslinker molecules, in order to increase the average distance between two crosslinking sites and thus acting as spacer. Both the effect of concentration and molecular weight of the spacer resulted to significantly affect the hydrogel final sorption properties and thus the efficiency of the body water elimination system. Biocompatibility studies have been performed to test the hydrogel compatibility with respect to intestinal and macrophages cell lines. To investigate the effects of intestinal cells conditioned media after the contact with the gel on macrophages nitric oxide release tests have been carried out.

  15. Protective effects of green tea polyphenols administered by oral intubation against chemical carcinogen-induced forestomach and pulmonary neoplasia in A/J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katiyar, S K; Agarwal, R; Mukhtar, H

    1993-09-30

    Our studies and others have shown the cancer chemopreventive effects of chronic administration of green tea in several animal tumor models. In this study, the administration of a polyphenolic fraction isolated from green tea (GTP) by oral intubation at a dose of 5 mg in 0.2 ml water 30 min prior to challenge with carcinogen, afforded significant protection against both diethylnitrosamine (DEN)- and benzo(a)pyrene (BP)-induced forestomach and lung tumorigenesis in A/J mice. The protective effects were evident by a decrease in numbers of tumors/mouse in GTP-fed groups compared to non GTP-fed controls. In the forestomach tumorigenesis protocol, GTP afforded 71 and 66% protection against, respectively DEN- and BP-induced tumor multiplicity. In the case of lung tumorigenesis protocol, however, the protective effects of GTP were 41 and 39%, respectively. Histological examination of forestomach tumors showed significantly lesser number of squamous cell carcinoma formation in GTP-fed groups of mice compared to carcinogen alone-treated controls. When pulmonary tumors were examined histologically, no adenocarcinomas were observed in GTP-fed groups compared to 15% mice with adenocarcinomas in DEN and BP alone-treated controls. The results of this study suggest that limited doses of GTP administration by gavage 30 min prior to carcinogen challenge may afford protection against carcinogen-induced tumorigenesis in internal body organs.

  16. Orally administered H-Dmt-Tic-Lys-NH-CH2-Ph (MZ-2), a potent mu/delta-opioid receptor antagonist, regulates obese-related factors in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marczak, Ewa D; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Myers, Page H; Blankenship, Terry; Wilson, Ralph; Balboni, Gianfranco; Salvadori, Severo; Lazarus, Lawrence H

    2009-08-15

    Orally active dual mu-/delta-opioid receptor antagonist, H-Dmt-Tic-Lys-NH-CH(2)-Ph (MZ-2) was applied to study body weight gain, fat content, bone mineral density, serum insulin, cholesterol and glucose levels in female ob/ob (B6.V-Lep/J homozygous) and lean wild mice with or without voluntary exercise on wheels for three weeks, and during a two week post-treatment period under the same conditions. MZ-2 (10mg/kg/day, p.o.) exhibited the following actions: (1) reduced body weight gain in sedentary obese mice that persisted beyond the treatment period without effect on lean mice; (2) stimulated voluntary running on exercise wheels of both groups of mice; (3) decreased fat content, enhanced bone mineral density (BMD), and decreased serum insulin and glucose levels in obese mice; and (4) MZ-2 (30 microM) increased BMD in human osteoblast cells (MG-63) comparable to naltrexone, while morphine inhibited mineral nodule formation. Thus, MZ-2 has potential application in the clinical management of obesity, insulin and glucose levels, and the amelioration of osteoporosis.

  17. Orally administered lycopene attenuates diethylnitrosamine-induced hepatocarcinogenesis in rats by modulating Nrf-2/HO-1 and Akt/mTOR pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Kazim; Orhan, Cemal; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Sahin, Nurhan; Ali, Shakir; Bahcecioglu, Ibrahim H; Guler, Osman; Ozercan, Ibrahim; Ilhan, Necip; Kucuk, Omer

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocarcinogenesis is one of the most prevalent and lethal cancers. We studied the mechanisms underlying the inhibition of diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-induced hepatocarcinogenesis by lycopene in rats. Hepatocarcinogenesis was induced by an intraperitoneal injection of DEN followed by promotion with phenobarbital for 24 successive wk. The rats were given lycopene (20 mg/kg body weight) 3 times a week orally for 4 wk prior to initiation, and the treatment was continued for 24 consecutive wk. Lycopene reduced incidence, number, size, and volume of hepatic nodules. Serum alanine transaminase, aspartate aminotransferase, total bilirubin, and malondialdehyde (MDA) considerably increased and hepatic antioxidant enzymes (catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase) and glutathione decreased in DEN-treated rats when compared with the control group. Lycopene significantly reversed these biochemical changes and increased the expression of NF-E-2-related factor-2)/heme oxygenase-1, and it decreased NF-κB/cyclooxygenase-2, inhibiting the inflammatory cascade and activating antioxidant signaling (P B (P < 0.05). Lycopene is an active chemopreventive agent that offers protection against DEN-induced hepatocarcinogenesis by inhibiting NF-κB and mTOR pathways.

  18. An alternative approach to determine oral bioavailability of drugs that follow Michaelis-Menten elimination: a case study with voriconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verlindo de Araujo, Bibiana; Farias da Silva, Cristófer; Costa, Teresa Dalla

    2010-01-01

    the determination of oral bioavailability of drugs which follow nonlinear pharmacokinetics is difficult and few methods are available. In this work, an alternative approach to determine oral bioavailability of voriconazole (VRC), used as a model drug, is presented. VRC pharmacokinetics was investigated in Wistar rats after p.o. (40 mg/kg) and i.v. administration (2.5, 5 and 10 mg/kg). VRC elimination showed saturation in all doses investigated, except the lower i.v. dose in which case a 3-compartment model with linear elimination adequately fitted the data. Data for the 2 higher i.v. doses were best described by a 3-compartment model with Michaelis-Menten elimination. A 1-compartment disposition with a saturable metabolic elimination model described the oral profile. VRC absolute oral bioavailability was determined by simultaneous fitting of the i.v. and oral profiles. the Michaelis constant and the maximum velocity estimated after 5 and 10 mg/kg i.v. dosing were 0.54 +/- 0.25 microg/ml and 2.53 +/- 0.54 microg/h, and 0.62 +/- 0.12 microg/ml and 2.74 +/- 0.84 microg/h, respectively. VRC oral bioavailability was determined to be 82.8%. the approach presented is an alternative for determining the bioavailability of drugs with similar nonlinear behavior. 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Demonstrating Bioequivalence of Locally Acting Orally Inhaled Drug Products (OIPs): Workshop Summary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Wallace P; Ahrens, Richard C; Chen, Mei-Ling; Christopher, David; Chowdhury, Badrul A; Conner, Dale P; Dalby, Richard; Fitzgerald, Kevin; Hendeles, Leslie; Hickey, Anthony J; Hochhaus, Günther; Laube, Beth L; Lucas, Paul; Lee, Sau L; Lyapustina, Svetlana; Li, Bing; O'Connor, Dennis; Parikh, Neil; Parkins, David A; Peri, Prasad; Pitcairn, Gary R; Riebe, Michael; Roy, Partha; Shah, Tushar; Singh, Gur Jai Pal; Sharp, Sandra Suarez; Suman, Julie D; Weda, Marjolein; Woodcock, Janet; Yu, Lawrence

    2010-02-01

    This March 2009 Workshop Summary Report was sponsored by Product Quality Research Institute (PQRI) based on a proposal by the Inhalation and Nasal Technology Focus Group (INTFG) of the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS). Participants from the pharmaceutical industry, academia and regulatory bodies from the United States, Europe, India, and Brazil attended the workshop with the objective of presenting, reviewing, and discussing recommendations for demonstrating bioequivalence (BE) that may be considered in the development of orally inhaled drug products and regulatory guidances for new drug applications (NDAs), abbreviated NDAs (ANDAs), and postapproval changes. The workshop addressed areas related to in vitro approaches to demonstrating BE, biomarker strategies, imaging techniques, in vivo approaches to establishing local delivery equivalence and device design similarity. The workshop presented material that provided a baseline for the current understanding of orally inhaled drug products (OIPs) and identified gaps in knowledge and consensus that, if answered, might allow the design of a robust, streamlined method for the BE assessment of locally acting inhalation drugs. These included the following: (1) cascade impactor (CI) studies are not a good 2 predictor of the pulmonary dose; more detailed studies on in vitro/in vivo correlations (e.g., suitability of CI studies for assessing differences in the regional deposition) are needed; (2) there is a lack of consensus on the appropriate statistical methods for assessing in vitro results; (3) fully validated and standardized imaging methods, while capable of providing information on pulmonary dose and regional deposition, might not be applicable to the BE of inhaled products mainly due to the problems of having access to radiolabeled innovator product; (4) if alternatives to current methods for establishing local delivery BE of OIPs cannot be established, biomarkers (pharmacodynamic or clinical

  20. Tumorigenic effects in Wistar rats orally administered benzo[a] pyrene for two years (gavage studies). Implications for human cancer risks associated with oral exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroese ED; Muller JJA; Mohn GR; Dortant PM; Wester PW; LEO; LPI; CSR

    2002-01-01

    Humans are exposed via the environment and via food to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH), mixtures considered carcinogenic by IARC. A quantitative cancer risk assessment for oral exposure is hampered by the absence of adequate data. The need for experimental data is substantiated by the fact th

  1. Immobilization of coacervate microcapsules in multilayer sodium alginate beads for efficient oral anticancer drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chao; Song, Ruixi; Sun, Guohui; Kong, Ming; Bao, Zixian; Li, Yang; Cheng, Xiaojie; Cha, Dongsu; Park, Hyunjin; Chen, Xiguang

    2014-03-10

    We have designed and evaluated coacervate microcapsules-immobilized multilayer sodium alginate beads (CMs-M-ALG-Beads) for oral drug delivery. The CMs-M-ALG-Beads were prepared by immobilization of doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) loaded chitosan/carboxymethyl coacervate microcapsules (DOX:CS/CMCS-CMs) in the core and layers of the multilayer sodium alginate beads. The obtained CMs-M-ALG-beads exhibited layer-by-layer structure and rough surface with many nanoscale particles. The swelling characteristic and drug release results indicated that 4-layer CMs-M-ALG-Beads possessed favorable gastric acid tolerance (the swelling rate <5%, the cumulative drug release rate <3.8%). In small intestine, the intact DOX:CS/CMCS-CMs were able to rapidly release from CMs-M-ALG-Beads with the dissolution of ALG matrix. Ex vivo intestinal mucoadhesive and permeation showed that CMs-M-ALG-Beads exhibited continued growth for P(app) values of DOX, which was 1.07-1.15 folds and 1.28-1.38 folds higher than DOX:CS:CMCS-CMs in rat jejunum and ileum, respectively, demonstrating that CMs-M-ALG-Beads were able to enhance the absorption of DOX by controlled releasing DOX:CS/CMCS-CMs and prolonging the contact time between the DOX:CS/CMCS-CMs and small intestinal mucosa.

  2. The Novel Oral Drug Subetta Exerts an Antidiabetic Effect in the Diabetic Goto-Kakizaki Rat: Comparison with Rosiglitazone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailbé, Danielle; Portha, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the potential antidiabetic effects of two-component drug Subetta and its components (release-active dilutions of antibodies to β-subunit insulin receptor (RAD of Abs to β-InsR) and to endothelial nitric oxide synthase (RAD of Abs to eNOS)) in Goto-Kakizaki (Paris colony) (GK/Par) diabetic rats. Subetta was administered orally for 28 days once daily (5 mL/kg) and compared to its two components (2.5 mL/kg), Rosiglitazone (5 mg/kg), and vehicle (5 mL water/kg). At day 28, fasting plasma glucose levels were significantly decreased only in Subetta and Rosiglitazone groups as compared to vehicle (P < 0.01): 147 ± 4 mg/dL and 145 ± 4 mg/dL and 165 ± 4 mg/dL, respectively. The data of glucose tolerance test showed that Subetta and RAD of Abs to β-InsR (similar to Rosiglitazone) prevented significantly (P < 0.01) the age-related spontaneous deterioration of glucose tolerance as seen in the control group. Subetta and RAD of Abs to β-InsR did not significantly modify the glucose-induced insulin secretion. Chronic administration of Subetta and RAD of Abs to β-InsR improves glucose control, to an extent similar to that of Rosiglitazone. We hypothesize that Subetta and RAD of Abs to β-InsR mostly act via an insulin-sensitizing effect upon target tissues. PMID:23762875

  3. Self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems ameliorate the oral delivery of silymarin in rats with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen CH

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chun-Han Chen,1,2 Cheng-Chih Chang,1 Tsung-Hsien Shih,2 Ibrahim A Aljuffali,3 Ta-Sen Yeh,4,5 Jia-You Fang6–8 1Division of General Surgery, Department of Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chiayi, 2Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Kweishan, Taoyuan, Taiwan; 3Department of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 4Department of Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, 5School of Medicine, College of Medicine, 6Pharmaceutics Laboratory, Graduate Institute of Natural Products, 7Chinese Herbal Medicine Research Team, Healthy Aging Research Center, Chang Gung University, 8Research Center for Industry of Human Ecology, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Kweishan, Taoyuan, Taiwan Abstract: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB is a popular surgery to reduce the body weight of obese patients. Although food intake is restricted by RYGB, drug absorption is also decreased. The purpose of this study was to develop novel self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (SNEDDS for enhancing the oral delivery of silymarin, which has poor water solubility. The SNEDDS were characterized by size, zeta potential, droplet number, and morphology. A technique of RYGB was performed in Sprague-Dawley rats. SNEDDS were administered at a silymarin dose of 600 mg/kg in normal and RYGB rats for comparison with silymarin aqueous suspension and polyethylene glycol (PEG 400 solution. Plasma silibinin, the main active ingredient in silymarin, was chosen for estimating the pharmacokinetic parameters. SNEDDS diluted in simulated gastric fluid exhibited a droplet size of 190 nm with a spherical shape. The nanocarriers promoted silibinin availability via oral ingestion in RYGB rats by 2.5-fold and 1.5-fold compared to the suspension and PEG 400 solution, respectively. A significant double-peak concentration of silibinin was detected for RYGB rats receiving SNEDDS. Fluorescence

  4. Imipramine is an orally active drug against both antimony sensitive and resistant Leishmania donovani clinical isolates in experimental infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandip Mukherjee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In an endeavor to find an orally active and affordable antileishmanial drug, we tested the efficacy of a cationic amphiphilic drug, imipramine, commonly used for the treatment of depression in humans. The only available orally active antileishmanial drug is miltefosine with long half life and teratogenic potential limits patient compliance. Thus there is a genuine need for an orally active antileishmanial drug. Previously it was shown that imipramine, a tricyclic antidepressant alters the protonmotive force in promastigotes, but its in vivo efficacy was not reported. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that the drug is highly active against antimony sensitive and resistant Leishmania donovani in both promastigotes and intracellular amastigotes and in LD infected hamster model. The drug was found to decrease the mitochondrial transmembrane potential of Leishmania donovani (LD promastigotes and purified amastigotes after 8 h of treatment, whereas miltefosine effected only a marginal change even after 24 h. The drug restores defective antigen presenting ability of the parasitized macrophages. The status of the host protective factors TNF α, IFN γ and iNOS activity increased with the concomitant decrease in IL 10 and TGF β level in imipramine treated infected hamsters and evolution of matured sterile hepatic granuloma. The 10-day therapeutic window as a monotherapy, showing about 90% clearance of organ parasites in infected hamsters regardless of their SSG sensitivity. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that imipramine possibly qualifies for a new use of an old drug and can be used as an effective orally active drug for the treatment of Kala-azar.

  5. Urinary recovery of orally administered chromium 51-labeled EDTA, lactulose, rhamnose, d-xylose, 3-O-methyl-d-glucose, and sucrose in healthy adult male Beagles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frias, Rafael; Steiner, Jörg M; Williams, David A; Sankari, Satu; Westermarck, Elias

    2012-05-01

    Objective-To provide values for gastrointestinal permeability and absorptive function tests (GIPFTs) with chromium 51 ((51)Cr)-labeled EDTA, lactulose, rhamnose, d-xylose, 3-O-methyl-d-glucose, and sucrose in Beagles and to evaluate potential correlations between markers. Animals-19 healthy adult male Beagles. Procedures-A test solution containing 3.7 MBq of (51)Cr-labeled EDTA, 2 g of lactulose, 2 g of rhamnose, 2 g of d-xylose, 1 g of 3-O-methyl-d-glucose, and 8 g of sucrose was administered intragastrically to each dog. Urinary recovery of each probe was determined 6 hours after administration. Results-Mean ± SD (range) percentage urinary recovery was 6.3 ± 1.6% (4.3% to 9.7%) for (51)Cr-labeled EDTA, 3.3 ± 1.1% (1.7% to 5.3%) for lactulose, 25.5 ± 5.0% (16.7% to 36.9%) for rhamnose, and 58.8% ± 11.0% (40.1% to 87.8%) for 3-O-methyl-d-glucose. Mean (range) recovery ratio was 0.25 ± 0.06 (0.17 to 0.37) for (51)Cr-labeled EDTA to rhamnose, 0.13 ± 0.04 (0.08 to 0.23) for lactulose to rhamnose, and 0.73 ± 0.09 (0.60 to 0.90) for d-xylose to 3-O-methyl-d-glucose. Median (range) percentage urinary recovery was 40.3% (31.6% to 62.7%) for d-xylose and 0% (0% to 0.8%) for sucrose. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Reference values in healthy adult male Beagles for 6 of the most commonly used GIPFT markers were determined. The correlation between results for (51)Cr-labeled EDTA and lactulose was not as prominent as that reported for humans and cats; thus, investigators should be cautious in the use and interpretation of GIPFTs performed with sugar probes in dogs with suspected intestinal dysbiosis.

  6. Receptor residence time trumps drug-likeness and oral bioavailability in determining efficacy of complement C5a antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seow, Vernon; Lim, Junxian; Cotterell, Adam J.; Yau, Mei-Kwan; Xu, Weijun; Lohman, Rink-Jan; Kok, W. Mei; Stoermer, Martin J.; Sweet, Matthew J.; Reid, Robert C.; Suen, Jacky Y.; Fairlie, David P.

    2016-04-01

    Drug discovery and translation are normally based on optimizing efficacy by increasing receptor affinity, functional potency, drug-likeness (rule-of-five compliance) and oral bioavailability. Here we demonstrate that residence time of a compound on its receptor has an overriding influence on efficacy, exemplified for antagonists of inflammatory protein complement C5a that activates immune cells and promotes disease. Three equipotent antagonists (3D53, W54011, JJ47) of inflammatory responses to C5a (3nM) were compared for drug-likeness, receptor affinity and antagonist potency in human macrophages, and anti-inflammatory efficacy in rats. Only the least drug-like antagonist (3D53) maintained potency in cells against higher C5a concentrations and had a much longer duration of action (t1/2 ~ 20 h) than W54011 or JJ47 (t1/2 ~ 1-3 h) in inhibiting macrophage responses. The unusually long residence time of 3D53 on its receptor was mechanistically probed by molecular dynamics simulations, which revealed long-lasting interactions that trap the antagonist within the receptor. Despite negligible oral bioavailability, 3D53 was much more orally efficacious than W54011 or JJ47 in preventing repeated agonist insults to induce rat paw oedema over 24 h. Thus, residence time on a receptor can trump drug-likeness in determining efficacy, even oral efficacy, of pharmacological agents.

  7. ORAL OPIOIDS IN THE TREATMENT OF CANCER PAIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ZYLICZ, Z; TWYCROSS, RG

    1991-01-01

    Persistent severe cancer pain should be treated with opioid drugs, principally morphine. It can be administered orally, rectally and parenterally. Morphine is metabolised in the liver mainly to glucuronides, of which morphine-6-glucuronide is a powerful analgesic. Oral morphine should be administere

  8. The immuno-regulatory impact of orally-administered Hypericum perforatum extract on Balb/C mice inoculated with H1n1 influenza A virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Huang

    Full Text Available Hypericumperforatum (H. perforatum ethanol extract has been found to inhibit lipopolysaccharide-induced production of inflammatory mediators and cytokines in cultured macrophages. Therefore, it may be able to protect the host from excessive inflammation during viral infection. In the current study, the immune-regulatory effect of H. perforatum extract was evaluated in A549 lung epithelial cells and BALB/c mice exposed to Influenza A/PR/8/34 H1N1 virus. In A549 cells, the extract (30 µg/mL significantly inhibited influenza virus induced monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP-1 and interferon-γ induced protein 10 kD (IP-10, but dramatically increased interleukin-6 (IL-6. In mice inoculated intranasally with 10(7.9 EID50 of Influenza A/PR/8/34 H1N1 (high dose, daily oral treatment of H. perforatum extract at a rate of 110 mg/kg of body weight increased lung viral titer, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine levels, and the infiltration of pro-inflammatory cells in the lung 5 days post-inoculation, as compared to ethanol vehicle treated mice. Transcription of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3 was increased by H. perforatum extract both in A549 cells and BALB/c mice, which could have interrupted anti-viral immune response and thus led to the inefficient viral clearance and increased lung inflammation. H. perforatum treatment resulted in minor reduction in viral titer without affecting body weight when mice were inoculated with a lower dose (~10(5.0 EID50 and H. perforatum was applied in the later phase of infection. Mice challenged intranasally with high dose of influenza virus (10(7.9 EID50 suffered from a higher mortality rate when dosed with H. perforatum extract. In conclusion, the current study showed that SOCS3 elevation by H. perforatum may cause impaired immune defense against influenza virus infection and lead to higher mortality.

  9. Nanocrystals for enhancement of oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varaporn Buraphacheep Junyaprasert

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystals, a carrier-free colloidal delivery system in nano-sized range, is an interesting approach for poorly soluble drugs. Nanocrystals provide special features including enhancement of saturation solubility, dissolution velocity and adhesiveness to surface/cell membranes. Several strategies are applied for nanocrystals production including precipitation, milling, high pressure homogenization and combination methods such as NanoEdge™, SmartCrystal and Precipitation-lyophilization-homogenization (PLH technology. For oral administration, many publications reported useful advantages of nanocrystals to improve in vivo performances i.e. pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, safety and targeted delivery which were discussed in this review. Additionally, transformation of nanocrystals to final formulations and future trends of nanocrystals were also described.

  10. [Pharmacogenetics of oral anticoagulants: individualized drug treatment for more efficacy and safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loriot, Marie-Anne; Beaune, Philippe

    2007-06-30

    Oral anti-vitamin K (AVK) anticoagulants constitute the first cause of iatrogenic accidents in France because of narrow therapeutic index and bleeding risk. The wide interindividual variation in AVK response is partly genetically determined. The main enzyme responsible for the metabolism of AVK is the hepatic cytochrome P450 2C9 (CYP2C9). Vitamine K epoxide reductase complex subunit I (VKORC1) is a key enzyme in the vitamin K cycle, cofactor required for the activation of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors, and is the target enzyme of AVK inhibition. Genetic variations affecting both CYP2C9 and VKORC1 are associated with variability in drug response and may explain differences in dose requirements. Genotyping for CYP2C9 and VKORC1 variants before initiation of treatment may allow clinicians to develop dosing protocols and identify the patients at a higher risk for bleeding complications.

  11. Stabilisation of amorphous furosemide increases the oral drug bioavailability in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Line Hagner; Rades, Thomas; Müllertz, Anette

    2015-01-01

    solution after oral dosing to rats. The glass solution had a glass transition temperature of 121.3 +/- 0.5 degrees C, which was significantly higher than that of the pure drug (101.2 degrees C). ASSF in the glass solution was stable for at least 168 days when stored at 20 degrees C and 0% relative humidity....... The glass solution exhibited fast dissolution in simulated intestinal medium, pH 6.5; the intrinsic dissolution rate was found to be 10.1 +/- 0.6 mg/cm(2)/min, which was significantly faster than the pure ASSF. When investigating the stability during dissolution in stimulated intestinal medium at pH 6...

  12. Deciding oral drugs after metformin in type 2 diabetes: An evidence-based approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awadhesh Kumar Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The most commonly used oral drug in treating type 2 diabetes (T2DM after metformin are sufonylureas (SUs based on the confidence gained over the several decades and because of its cheaper cost. Unfortunately, SUs are associated with secondary failure and sometimes associated with therapy related severe hypoglycaemia limiting its compliance and wider utility in current clinical practice. Although large randomised trials could not associate SUs with any obvious increase in cardiovascular (CV mortality, some recent larger databases showing divergent results suggesting increasingly CV signals and this might put SUs in difficulty given the availability of other safer alternatives. In recent years, incretin-based therapies like dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP-4I and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 agonist (GLP-1A are gaining popularity primarily because of their advantage of weight reduction/neutrality and minimal hypoglycemia along with the perception of possible pleiotropic CV benefit mainly derived from pooled CV data of their trials. Sodium glucose transporter 2 inhibitors (SGLT-2I are another new promising molecule currently looking for its space in the management of T2DM. Insulin could be utilized at any place when required and in this regard outcomes reduction with an initial glargine intervention (ORIGIN study also suggested that basal insulin glargine could be safely used even in early stage. This review will discuss what could be possibly be the best option as a second line oral agent, once metformin monotherapy becomes ineffective.

  13. Lipid nanoparticles with no surfactant improve oral absorption rate of poorly water-soluble drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funakoshi, Yuka; Iwao, Yasunori; Noguchi, Shuji; Itai, Shigeru

    2013-07-15

    A pharmacokinetic study was performed in rats to evaluate the oral absorption ratios of nanoparticle suspensions containing the poorly water-soluble compound nifedipine (NI) and two different types of lipids, including hydrogenated soybean phosphatidylcholine and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol. NI-lipid nanoparticle (LN) suspensions with a mean particle size of 48.0 nm and a zeta potential of -57.2 mV were prepared by co-grinding combined with a high-pressure homogenization process. The oral administration of NI-LN suspensions to rats led to a significant increase in the NI plasma concentration, and the area under the curve (AUC) value was found to be 108 min μg mL⁻¹, indicating a 4-fold increase relative to the NI suspensions. A comparison of the pharmacokinetic parameters of the NI-LN suspensions with those of the NI solution prepared using only the surfactant polysorbate 80 revealed that although the AUC and bioavailability (59%) values were almost identical, a rapid absorption rate was still observed in the NI-LN suspensions. These results therefore indicated that lipid nanoparticles prepared using only two types of phospholipid with a mean particle size of less than 50 nm could improve the absorption of the poorly water-soluble drug. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Selumetinib, an Oral Anti-Neoplastic Drug, May Attenuate Cardiac Hypertrophy via Targeting the ERK Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen; Chen, Zhongxiu; Yang, Hao; Luo, Fangbo; Chen, Lihong; Cai, Huawei; Li, Yajiao; You, Guiying; Long, Dan; Li, Shengfu; Zhang, Qiuping; Rao, Li

    2016-01-01

    Although extracellular-regulated kinases (ERK) are a well-known central mediator in cardiac hypertrophy, no clinically available ERK antagonist has been tested for preventing cardiac hypertrophy. Selumetinib is a novel oral MEK inhibitor that is currently under Phase II and Phase III clinical investigation for advanced solid tumors. In this study, we investigated whether Selumetinib could inhibit the aberrant ERK activation of the heart in response to stress as well as prevent cardiac hypertrophy. In an in vitro model of PE-induced cardiac hypertrophy, Selumetinib significantly inhibited the ERK activation and prevented enlargement of cardiomyocytes or reactivation of certain fetal genes. In the pathologic cardiac hypertrophy model of ascending aortic constriction, Selumetinib provided significant ERK inhibition in the stressed heart but not in the other organs. This selective ERK inhibition prevented left ventricular (LV) wall thickening, LV mass increase, fetal gene reactivation and cardiac fibrosis. In another distinct physiologic cardiac hypertrophy model of a swimming rat, Selumetinib provided a similar anti-hypertrophy effect, except that no significant fetal gene reactivation or cardiac fibrosis was observed. Selumetinib, a novel oral anti-cancer drug with good safety records in a number of Phase II clinical trials, can inhibit ERK activity in the heart and prevent cardiac hypertrophy. These promising results indicate that Selumetinib could potentially be used to treat cardiac hypertrophy. However, this hypothesis needs to be validated in human clinical trials.

  15. Selumetinib, an Oral Anti-Neoplastic Drug, May Attenuate Cardiac Hypertrophy via Targeting the ERK Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Li

    Full Text Available Although extracellular-regulated kinases (ERK are a well-known central mediator in cardiac hypertrophy, no clinically available ERK antagonist has been tested for preventing cardiac hypertrophy. Selumetinib is a novel oral MEK inhibitor that is currently under Phase II and Phase III clinical investigation for advanced solid tumors. In this study, we investigated whether Selumetinib could inhibit the aberrant ERK activation of the heart in response to stress as well as prevent cardiac hypertrophy.In an in vitro model of PE-induced cardiac hypertrophy, Selumetinib significantly inhibited the ERK activation and prevented enlargement of cardiomyocytes or reactivation of certain fetal genes. In the pathologic cardiac hypertrophy model of ascending aortic constriction, Selumetinib provided significant ERK inhibition in the stressed heart but not in the other organs. This selective ERK inhibition prevented left ventricular (LV wall thickening, LV mass increase, fetal gene reactivation and cardiac fibrosis. In another distinct physiologic cardiac hypertrophy model of a swimming rat, Selumetinib provided a similar anti-hypertrophy effect, except that no significant fetal gene reactivation or cardiac fibrosis was observed.Selumetinib, a novel oral anti-cancer drug with good safety records in a number of Phase II clinical trials, can inhibit ERK activity in the heart and prevent cardiac hypertrophy. These promising results indicate that Selumetinib could potentially be used to treat cardiac hypertrophy. However, this hypothesis needs to be validated in human clinical trials.

  16. Selumetinib, an Oral Anti-Neoplastic Drug, May Attenuate Cardiac Hypertrophy via Targeting the ERK Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hao; Luo, Fangbo; Chen, Lihong; Cai, Huawei; Li, Yajiao; You, Guiying; Long, Dan; Li, Shengfu; Zhang, Qiuping; Rao, Li

    2016-01-01

    Aims Although extracellular-regulated kinases (ERK) are a well-known central mediator in cardiac hypertrophy, no clinically available ERK antagonist has been tested for preventing cardiac hypertrophy. Selumetinib is a novel oral MEK inhibitor that is currently under Phase II and Phase III clinical investigation for advanced solid tumors. In this study, we investigated whether Selumetinib could inhibit the aberrant ERK activation of the heart in response to stress as well as prevent cardiac hypertrophy. Methods and Results In an in vitro model of PE-induced cardiac hypertrophy, Selumetinib significantly inhibited the ERK activation and prevented enlargement of cardiomyocytes or reactivation of certain fetal genes. In the pathologic cardiac hypertrophy model of ascending aortic constriction, Selumetinib provided significant ERK inhibition in the stressed heart but not in the other organs. This selective ERK inhibition prevented left ventricular (LV) wall thickening, LV mass increase, fetal gene reactivation and cardiac fibrosis. In another distinct physiologic cardiac hypertrophy model of a swimming rat, Selumetinib provided a similar anti-hypertrophy effect, except that no significant fetal gene reactivation or cardiac fibrosis was observed. Conclusions Selumetinib, a novel oral anti-cancer drug with good safety records in a number of Phase II clinical trials, can inhibit ERK activity in the heart and prevent cardiac hypertrophy. These promising results indicate that Selumetinib could potentially be used to treat cardiac hypertrophy. However, this hypothesis needs to be validated in human clinical trials. PMID:27438013

  17. Analysis of Intra- and Intersubject Variability in Oral Drug Absorption in Human Bioequivalence Studies of 113 Generic Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugihara, Masahisa; Takeuchi, Susumu; Sugita, Masaru; Higaki, Kazutaka; Kataoka, Makoto; Yamashita, Shinji

    2015-12-07

    In this study, the data of 113 human bioequivalence (BE) studies of immediate release (IR) formulations of 74 active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) conducted at Sawai Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., was analyzed to understand the factors affecting intra- and intersubject variabilities in oral drug absorption. The ANOVA CV (%) calculated from area under the time-concentration curve (AUC) in each BE study was used as an index of intrasubject variability (Vintra), and the relative standard deviation (%) in AUC was used as that of intersubject variability (Vinter). Although no significant correlation was observed between Vintra and Vinter of all drugs, Vintra of class 3 drugs was found to increase in association with a decrease in drug permeability (P(eff)). Since the absorption of class 3 drugs was rate-limited by the permeability, it was suggested that, for such drugs, the low P(eff) might be a risk factor to cause a large intrasubject variability. To consider the impact of poor water solubility on the variability in BE study, a parameter of P(eff)/Do (Do; dose number) was defined to discriminate the solubility-limited and dissolution-rate-limited absorption of class 2 drugs. It was found that the class 2 drugs with a solubility-limited absorption (P(eff)/Do < 0.149 × 10(-4) cm/s) showed high intrasubject variability. Furthermore, as a reason for high intra- or intersubject variability in AUC for class 1 drugs, effects of drug metabolizing enzymes were investigated. It was demonstrated that intrasubject variability was high for drugs metabolized by CYP3A4 while intersubject variability was high for drugs metabolized by CYP2D6. For CYP3A4 substrate drugs, the Km value showed the significant relation with Vintra, indicating that the affinity to the enzyme can be a parameter to predict the risk of high intrasubject variability. In conclusion, by analyzing the in house data of human BE study, low permeability, solubility-limited absorption, and high affinity to CYP3A4 are

  18. Drug-induced QT-interval shortening following antiepileptic treatment with oral rufinamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimpf, Rainer; Veltmann, Christian; Papavassiliu, Theano; Rudic, Boris; Göksu, Turgay; Kuschyk, Jürgen; Wolpert, Christian; Antzelevitch, Charles; Ebner, Alois; Borggrefe, Martin; Brandt, Christian

    2012-05-01

    The arrhythmogenic potential of short QT intervals has recently been highlighted in patients with a short QT syndrome. Drug-induced QT-interval prolongation is a known risk factor for ventricular tachyarrhythmias. However, reports on drug-induced QT-interval shortening are rare and proarrhythmic effects remain unclear. Recently, rufinamide, a new antiepileptic drug for the add-on treatment of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, was approved in the European Union and the United States. Initial trials showed drug-induced QT-interval shortening. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of rufinamide on QT intervals in patients with difficult-to-treat epilepsies. Nineteen consecutive patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and other epilepsy syndromes were included (n = 12 men; mean age 41 ± 12 years). QRS, QT, and T(peak)-T(end) intervals were analyzed before and during rufinamide treatment. The mean QT interval shortened significantly following rufinamide administration (QT interval 349 ± 23 ms vs 327 ± 17 ms; corrected QT interval 402 ± 22 ms vs 382 ± 16 ms; P = .002). T(peak)-T(end) intervals were 79 ± 17 ms before and 70 ± 20 ms on treatment (P = .07). The mean reduction of the corrected QT interval was 20 ± 18 ms. During follow-up (3.04 ± 1.09 years), no adverse events including symptomatic cardiac arrhythmias or sudden cardiac deaths were observed. QTc-interval shortening following oral rufinamide administration in a small patient group was not associated with significant clinical adverse effects. These observations notwithstanding, the ability of rufinamide to significantly shorten the QT interval portends a potential arrhythmogenic risk that may best be guarded against by periodic electrocardiographic recordings. Copyright © 2012 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular pharmacodynamics of new oral drugs used in the treatment of multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    di Nuzzo L

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Luigi di Nuzzo,1 Rosamaria Orlando,2 Carla Nasca,1 Ferdinando Nicoletti1,31Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Sapienza University of Rome, 2IRCCS Associazione Oasi Maria S.S., Institute for Research on Mental Retardation and Brain Aging, Troina, Enna, 3IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli, ItalyAbstract: New oral drugs have considerably enriched the therapeutic armamentarium for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. This review focuses on the molecular pharmacodynamics of fingolimod, dimethyl fumarate (BG-12, laquinimod, and teriflunomide. We specifically comment on the action of these drugs at three levels: 1 the regulation of the immune system; 2 the permeability of the blood–brain barrier; and 3 the central nervous system. Fingolimod phosphate (the active metabolite of fingolimod has a unique mechanism of action and represents the first ligand of G-protein-coupled receptors (sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors active in the treatment of multiple sclerosis. Dimethyl fumarate activates the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2-related factor 2 pathway of cell defense as a result of an initial depletion of reduced glutathione. We discuss how this mechanism lies on the border between cell protection and toxicity. Laquinimod has multiple (but less defined mechanisms of action, which make the drug slightly more effective on disability progression than on annualized relapse rate in clinical studies. Teriflunomide acts as a specific inhibitor of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis. We also discuss new unexpected mechanisms of these drugs, such as the induction of brain-derived neurotrophic factor by fingolimod and the possibility that laquinimod and teriflunomide regulate the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism.Keywords: demyelinating diseases, pharmacotherapy, fingolimod, dimethyl fumarate, laquinimod, teriflunomide

  20. [Impact of slow-release oral morphine on drug abusing habits in Austria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Beate; Rabl, Walter; Libiseller, Kathrin; Giacomuzzi, Salvatore; Riemer, Yvonne; Pavlic, Marion

    2010-01-01

    A well-established possibility to treat opiate addiction is the participation in opiate maintenance treatment programmes. For this purpose the opioids methadone and buprenorphine have been evaluated and are used nowadays in many countries. However, since 1998 also the use of slow-release oral morphine (SROM) has been legally permitted in Austria. Our data show that these morphine preparations are frequently abused and are dominating the black market in the meantime. Especially the intravenous consumption of SROM goes along with highly dangerous side effects that exceed the risks of needle sharing alone. Special galenics are supposed to ensure a 24 h effect of the otherwise quickly metabolised morphine. If dissolved and injected, insoluble contents such as talcum cause microembolisms, leading to severe damages of the inner organs. Furthermore, SROM, i.e. a drug prescribed by physicians, has been proved to be the main responsible substance in most drug related deaths since its permission and has nearly replaced heroin. Forensic physicians play a major role in the profound examination of these cases, including extensive toxicological analyses and interpretation of results. For instance, a differentiation between a recent morphine and heroin consumption is certainly possible, provided appropriate methods are used. A reliable estimation of the current situation of drug abusing habits is a premise for adequate therapeutic offers and preventive measures. Thus, well-founded and comparable data have to be collected. To facilitate data report a standardized report form has been developed that includes an obligatory statement regarding morphine or heroin consumption. This should help to enlighten the ongoing discussion on the role of SRM in drug abuse cases. Our results indicate that the prescription of SROM in opiate maintenance therapy has to be handled very strictly and should be reserved for special patients only. A slackening of the Austrian law concerning SROM is

  1. MARKETING STUDIES OF LOCAL MARKET OF DRUGS WHICH ARE APPLIED FOR PREVENTION AND TREATMENT OF ORAL CAVITY DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Tsarakhov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stomatological market has actively developed recent years. Domestic experts received an access to contemporary technologies of dental diseases treatment in the world. This conditioned the appearance of new drugs and parapharmaceutical products applied in dental practice on the pharmaceutical market. In this connection, study of these drugs market, their price policy, demand and supply. Assortment of parapharmaceutical products applied in dental practice for oral cavity hygiene is represented mainly by liquid forms, such as mouth rinse, balms, elixirs, and a special place is occupied by toothpastes. Their assortment amounts to more than 700 types. Drugs, applied in dental practice are represented by the following groups: anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antiallergenic, anesthetics, drugs which stimulate tissues regeneration, fluoric drugs. The purpose of this study was the analysis of regional pharmaceutical market assortment, which offers parapharmaceutical goods and drugs for prevention and treatment of oral cavity diseases to the stomatological establishments. Pharmaceutical market of the Republic of North Ossetia – Alania is represented by a wide range of drugs for dental diseases treatment. This group is represented in the assortment of practically all distributors. The drugs for dental diseases treatment is not only supplied by domestic producers but also go from pharmaceutical companies of 29 foreign countries, which influences positively on the state of drug therapy of paradontum in the region.

  2. Taste Masked Orally Disintegrating Pellets of Antihistaminic and Mucolytic Drug: Formulation, Characterization, and In Vivo Studies in Human

    OpenAIRE

    Taj, Yasmeen; Pai, Roopa S.; V. Kusum Devi; Singh, Gurinder

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of the present study was to evaluate the potential of orally disintegrating pellets (ODPs) as an approach for taste masking of bitter drugs, namely, Ambroxol hydrochloride (A-HCl) and Cetirizine dihydrochloride (C-DHCl). Pellets were prepared by extrusion/spheronization with Eudragit EPO, kyron T-134, Kyron T-314, mannitol, sorbitol, MCC (Avicel PH-101), sucralose, chocolate flavor, and 5% xanthum gum. The prepared pellets were characterized for percentage yield, drug content, pa...

  3. Taste Masked Orally Disintegrating Pellets of Antihistaminic and Mucolytic Drug: Formulation, Characterization, and In Vivo Studies in Human

    OpenAIRE

    Taj, Yasmeen; Pai,Roopa S.; V Kusum Devi; Singh,Gurinder

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of the present study was to evaluate the potential of orally disintegrating pellets (ODPs) as an approach for taste masking of bitter drugs, namely, Ambroxol hydrochloride (A-HCl) and Cetirizine dihydrochloride (C-DHCl). Pellets were prepared by extrusion/spheronization with Eudragit EPO, kyron T-134, Kyron T-314, mannitol, sorbitol, MCC (Avicel PH-101), sucralose, chocolate flavor, and 5% xanthum gum. The prepared pellets were characterized for percentage yield, drug content, pa...

  4. Bioavailability Enhancement of Paclitaxel via a Novel Oral Drug Delivery System: Paclitaxel-Loaded Glycyrrhizic Acid Micelles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Heng Yang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Paclitaxel (PTX, taxol, a classical antitumor drug against a wide range of tumors, shows poor oral bioavailability. In order to improve the oral bioavailability of PTX, glycyrrhizic acid (GA was used as the carrier in this study. This was the first report on the preparation, characterization and the pharmacokinetic study in rats of PTX-loaded GA micelles The PTX-loaded micelles, prepared with ultrasonic dispersion method, displayed small particle sizes and spherical shapes. Differential scanning calorimeter (DSC thermograms indicated that PTX was entrapped in the GA micelles and existed as an amorphous state. The encapsulation efficiency was about 90%, and the drug loading rate could reach up to 7.90%. PTX-loaded GA micelles displayed a delayed drug release compared to Taxol in the in vitro release experiment. In pharmacokinetic study via oral administration, the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0→24 h of PTX-loaded GA micelles was about six times higher than that of Taxol (p < 0.05. The significant oral absorption enhancement of PTX from PTX-loaded GA micelles could be largely due to the increased absorption in jejunum and colon intestine. All these results suggested that GA would be a promising carrier for the oral delivery of PTX.

  5. Interacción de los antineoplásicos orales con los alimentos: revisión sistemática Antineoplastic oral agents and drug-nutrient interactions: a sistematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Jiménez Torres

    2009-06-01

    , 40 studies remained (5.2% of the initial ones for full-text critical appraisal, to which four studies were added not indexed in Medline. From the critical appraisal of the 44 final articles, 25 were excluded (20 original articles, 4 short communications, and 1 meta-analysis because they did not include as an outcome measure the bioequivalence dictamen. The 19 (2.2% remaining articles provided information on 19 oral anti-tumor drugs in 210 patients and 146 healthy volunteers. Of these 19 drugs, 63% did not present drugfood interactions, with the possibility of administering them either with or without food; 21% have to be administered with foods and only 16% present drug-food interactions, so they have to be administered without foods. Discussion: Currently, the clinical importance of drugfood interactions with oral anti-tumor drugs is identified more directly with the patient's safety than with the efficacy of the therapy. Given the development of these oral agents, their incorporation into the oncologic strategy displacing parenteral therapy, with monthly costs of thousands of Euros, it is necessary to perform well-designed studies on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Their goal has to be comparing their bioavailability in the presence or absence of foods with the clinical response. In the meanwhile, to establish recommendations for their administration in relation to foods is inconsistent for some of these drugs and their results is uncertain given the lack of studies based on the FDAbioequivalence dictamen.

  6. A Study on the Reliability of an On-Site Oral Fluid Drug Test in a Recreational Context