WorldWideScience

Sample records for orally active inhibitor

  1. Novel orally active inhibitors of β-1,3-glucan synthesis derived from enfumafungin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apgar, James M; Wilkening, Robert R; Greenlee, Mark L; Balkovec, James M; Flattery, Amy M; Abruzzo, George K; Galgoci, Andrew M; Giacobbe, Robert A; Gill, Charles J; Hsu, Ming Jo; Liberator, Paul; Misura, Andrew S; Motyl, Mary; Nielsen Kahn, Jennifer; Powles, Maryann; Racine, Fred; Dragovic, Jasminka; Habulihaz, Bahanu; Fan, Weiming; Kirwan, Robin; Lee, Shu; Liu, Hao; Mamai, Ahmed; Nelson, Kingsley; Peel, Michael

    2015-12-15

    The clinical success of the echinocandins, which can only be administered parentally, has validated β-1,3-glucan synthase (GS) as an antifungal target. Semi-synthetic modification of enfumafungin, a triterpene glycoside natural product, was performed with the aim of producing a new class of orally active GS inhibitors. Replacement of the C2 acetoxy moiety with various heterocycles did not improve GS or antifungal potency. However, replacement of the C3 glycoside with an aminoether moiety dramatically improved oral pharmacokinetic (PK) properties while maintaining GS and antifungal potency. Installing an aminotetrazole at C2 in conjunction with an N-alkylated aminoether at C3 produced derivatives with significantly improved GS and antifungal potency that exhibited robust oral efficacy in a murine model of disseminated candidiasis.

  2. Orally Active and Selective Tubulin Inhibitors as Anti-Trypanosome Agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Nanavaty

    Full Text Available There is an urgent need to develop a safe, effective, orally active, and inexpensive therapy for African trypanosomiasis due to the drawbacks of current drugs. Selective tubulin inhibitors have the potential to be promising drug candidates for the treatment of this disease, which is based on the tubulin protein structural difference between mammalian and trypanosome cells. We propose to identify novel tubulin inhibitors from a compound library developed based on the lead compounds that selectively target trypanosomiasis.We used Trypanosoma brucei brucei as the parasite model, and human normal kidney cells and mouse microphage cells as the host model. Growth rates of both trypanosomes and mammalian cells were determined as a means to screen compounds that selectively inhibit the proliferation of parasites. Furthermore, we examined the cell cycle profile of the parasite and compared tubulin polymerization dynamics before and after the treatment using identified compounds. Last, in vivo anti-parasite activities of these compounds were determined in T. brucei-infected mice.Three compounds were selected that are 100 fold more effective against the growth of T. brucei cells than mammalian cells. These compounds caused cell cycle progression defects in T. brucei cells. Western analyses indicated that these compounds decreased tubulin polymerization in T. brucei cells. The in vivo investigation revealed that these compounds, when admitted orally, inhibited T. brucei cell proliferation in mouse blood. However, they were not potent enough to clear up the infection completely.These compounds are promising lead compounds as orally active agents for drug development of anti-trypanosome agents. A more detail structure activity relationship (SAR was summarized that will be used to guide future lead optimization to improve the selectivity and potency of the current compounds.

  3. ENMD-2076 is an orally active kinase inhibitor with antiangiogenic and antiproliferative mechanisms of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Graham C; Brokx, Richard D; Denny, Trisha A; Hembrough, Todd A; Plum, Stacy M; Fogler, William E; Sidor, Carolyn F; Bray, Mark R

    2011-01-01

    ENMD-2076 is a novel orally active, small molecule kinase inhibitor with a mechanism of action involving several pathways key to tumor growth and survival: angiogenesis, proliferation, and the cell cycle. ENMD-2076 has selective activity against the mitotic kinase Aurora A, as well as kinases involved in angiogenesis (VEGFRs, FGFRs). ENMD-2076 inhibited the growth in vitro of a wide range of human solid tumor and hematopoietic cancer cell lines with IC(50) values ranging from 0.025 to 0.7 μmol/L. ENMD-2076 was also shown to induce regression or complete inhibition of tumor growth in vivo at well-tolerated doses in tumor xenograft models derived from breast, colon, melanoma, leukemia, and multiple myeloma cell lines. Pharmacodynamic experiments in vivo showed that in addition to inhibiting Aurora A, single doses of ENMD-2076 had sustained inhibitory effects on the activation of Flt3 as well as the angiogenic tyrosine kinases, VEGFR2/KDR and FGFR1 and 2. ENMD-2076 was shown to prevent the formation of new blood vessels and regress formed vessels in vivo at doses equivalent to those that gave substantial activity in tumor xenograft models. These results indicate that ENMD-2076 is a well-tolerated, orally active multitarget kinase inhibitor with a unique antiangiogenic/antiproliferative profile and provides strong preclinical support for use as a therapeutic for human cancers. Several phase 1 studies involving ENMD-2076 have been recently completed, and the compound is currently being evaluated in a phase 2 clinical trial in patients with platinum-resistant ovarian cancer. ©2010 AACR.

  4. 3-Amido-3-aryl-piperidines: A Novel Class of Potent, Selective, and Orally Active GlyT1 Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinard, Emmanuel; Alberati, Daniela; Alvarez-Sanchez, Ruben; Brom, Virginie; Burner, Serge; Fischer, Holger; Hauser, Nicole; Kolczewski, Sabine; Lengyel, Judith; Mory, Roland; Saladin, Christian; Schulz-Gasch, Tanja; Stalder, Henri

    2014-04-10

    3-Amido-3-aryl-piperidines were discovered as a novel structural class of GlyT1 inhibitors. The structure-activity relationship, which was developed, led to the identification of highly potent compounds exhibiting excellent selectivity against the GlyT2 isoform, drug-like properties, and in vivo activity after oral administration.

  5. SC-535, a Novel Oral Multikinase Inhibitor, Showed Potent Antitumor Activity in Human Melanoma Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Chen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Melanoma is considered as one of the most aggressive and deadliest cancers and current targeted therapies of melanoma often suffer limited efficacy or drug resistance. Discovery of novel multikinase inhibitors as anti-melanoma drug candidates is still needed. Methods: In this investigation, we assessed the in vitro and in vivo anti-melanoma activities of SC-535, which is a novel small molecule multikinase inhibitor discovered by us recently. We analyzed inhibitory effects of SC-535 on various melanoma cell lines and human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC in vitro. Tumor xenografts in athymic mice were used to examine the in vivo activity of SC-535. Results: SC-535 could efficiently inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR 1/2/3, B-RAF, and C-RAF kinases. It showed significant antiangiogenic potencies both in vitro and in vivo and considerable anti-proliferative ability against several melanoma cell lines. Oral administration of SC-535 resulted in dose-dependent suppression of tumor growth in WM2664 and C32 xenograft mouse models. Studies of mechanisms of action indicated that SC-535 suppressed the tumor angiogenesis and induced G2/M phase cell cycle arrest in human melanoma cells. SC-535 possesses favorable pharmacokinetic properties. Conclusion: All of these results support SC-535 as a potential candidate for clinical studies in patients with melanoma.

  6. Design and synthesis of a novel, orally active, brain penetrant, tri-substituted thiophene based JNK inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowers, Simeon; Truong, Anh P.; Neitz, R. Jeffrey; Neitzel, Martin; Probst, Gary D.; Hom, Roy K.; Peterson, Brian; Galemmo, Jr., Robert A.; Konradi, Andrei W.; Sham, Hing L.; Tóth, Gergley; Pan, Hu; Yao, Nanhua; Artis, Dean R.; Brigham, Elizabeth F.; Quinn, Kevin P.; Sauer, John-Michael; Powell, Kyle; Ruslim, Lany; Ren, Zhao; Bard, Frédérique; Yednock, Ted A.; Griswold-Prenner, Irene (Elan)

    2012-02-28

    The SAR of a series of tri-substituted thiophene JNK3 inhibitors is described. By optimizing both the N-aryl acetamide region of the inhibitor and the 4-position of the thiophene we obtained single digit nanomolar compounds, such as 47, which demonstrated an in vivo effect on JNK activity when dosed orally in our kainic acid mouse model as measured by phospho-c-jun reduction.

  7. Computational Insights into the Inhibitory Mechanism of Human AKT1 by an Orally Active Inhibitor, MK-2206

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Rehan; Beg, Mohd A.; Shadma Parveen; Ghazi A Damanhouri; Galila F Zaher

    2014-01-01

    The AKT signaling pathway has been identified as an important target for cancer therapy. Among small-molecule inhibitors of AKT that have shown tremendous potential in inhibiting cancer, MK-2206 is a highly potent, selective and orally active allosteric inhibitor. Promising preclinical anticancer results have led to entry of MK-2206 into Phase I/II clinical trials. Despite such importance, the exact binding mechanism and the molecular interactions of MK-2206 with human AKT are not available. ...

  8. Antitumor Activity of IMC-038525, a Novel Oral Tubulin Polymerization Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuma, Maria Carolina; Malikzay, Asra; Ouyang, Xiaohu; Surguladze, David; Fleming, James; Mitelman, Stan; Camara, Margarita; Finnerty, Bridget; Doody, Jacqueline; Chekler, Eugene L P; Kussie, Paul; Tonra, James R

    2010-10-01

    Microtubules are a well-validated target for anticancer therapy. Molecules that bind tubulin affect dynamic instability of microtubules causing mitotic arrest of proliferating cells, leading to cell death and tumor growth inhibition. Natural antitubulin agents such as taxanes and Vinca alkaloids have been successful in the treatment of cancer; however, several limitations have encouraged the development of synthetic small molecule inhibitors of tubulin function. We have previously reported the discovery of two novel chemical series of tubulin polymerization inhibitors, triazoles (Ouyang et al. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of 1,2,4-triazoles as a novel class of potent tubulin polymerization inhibitors. Bioorg Med Chem Lett. 2005; 15:5154-5159) and oxadiazole derivatives (Ouyang et al. Oxadiazole derivatives as a novel class of antimitotic agents: synthesis, inhibition of tubulin polymerization, and activity in tumor cell lines. Bioorg Med Chem Lett. 2006; 16:1191-1196). Here, we report on the anticancer effects of a lead oxadiazole derivative in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, IMC-038525 caused mitotic arrest at nanomolar concentrations in epidermoid carcinoma and breast tumor cells, including multidrug-resistant cells. In vivo, IMC-038525 had a desirable pharmacokinetic profile with sustained plasma levels after oral dosing. IMC-038525 reduced subcutaneous xenograft tumor growth with significantly greater efficacy than the taxane paclitaxel. At efficacious doses, IMC-038525 did not cause substantial myelosuppression or peripheral neurotoxicity, as evaluated by neutrophil counts and changes in myelination of the sciatic nerve, respectively. These data indicate that IMC-038525 is a promising candidate for further development as a chemotherapeutic agent.

  9. Preclinical Metabolism and Disposition of SB939 (Pracinostat), an Orally Active Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, and Prediction of Human Pharmacokinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jayaraman, Ramesh; Reddy, Venkatesh Pilla; Pasha, Mohammed Khalid; Wang, Haishan; Sangthongpitag, Kanda; Yeo, Pauline; Hu, Chang Yong; Wu, Xiaofeng; Xin, Liu; Goh, Evelyn; New, Lee Sun; Ethirajulu, Kantharaj

    2011-01-01

    The preclinical absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) properties of Pracinostat [(2E)-3-[2-butyl-1-[2-(diethylamino)ethyl]-1H-benzimidazol-5-yl]-N-hydroxyarylamide hydrochloride; SB939], an orally active histone deacetylase inhibitor, were characterized and its human pharmacokin

  10. Antithrombotic properties of SSR182289A, a new, orally active thrombin inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorrain, J; Millet, L; Lechaire, I; Lochot, S; Ferrari, P; Visconte, C; Sainte-Marie, M; Lunven, C; Berry, C N; Schaeffer, P; Herbert, J-M; O'Connor, S E

    2003-02-01

    N-[3-[[[(1S)-4-(5-Amino-2-pyridinyl)-1-[[4-difluoromethylene)-1-piperidinyl]carbonyl]butyl]amino]sulfonyl][1,1'-biphenyl]-2-yl]acetamide hydrochloride (SSR182289A) is a novel, potent, and selective thrombin inhibitor. We have examined the antithrombotic properties of SSR182289A administered by i.v. and p.o. routes in several different animal thrombosis models in comparison with reference antithrombotic agents. Oral administration of SSR182289A produced dose-related antithrombotic effects in the following models; rat venous thrombosis (ED(50) 0.9 mg/kg p.o.), rat silk thread arterio-venous (AV) shunt (ED(50) 3.8 mg/kg p.o.), rat thromboplastin-induced AV shunt (ED(50) 3.1 mg/kg p.o.), rat carotid artery thrombosis (ED(200) 5.9 mg/kg p.o.), and rabbit venous thrombosis (ED(50) 7.5 mg/kg p.o.). Administered as an i.v. bolus, SSR182289A showed antithrombotic activity in the above models with ED(50)/ED(200) values in the range of 0.2 to 1.9 mg/kg i.v. SSR182289A increased rat tail transection bleeding time at doses > or =10 mg/kg p.o. In the rat thromboplastin-induced AV shunt model, SSR182289A 10 mg/kg p.o. produced marked antithrombotic effects at 30, 60, 120, and 240 min after administration. Hence, SSR182289A demonstrates potent oral antithrombotic properties in animal venous, AV-shunt, and arterial thrombosis models.

  11. Targeting kynurenine aminotransferase II in psychiatric diseases: promising effects of an orally active enzyme inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hui-Qiu; Okuyama, Masahiro; Kajii, Yasushi; Pocivavsek, Ana; Bruno, John P; Schwarcz, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Increased brain levels of the tryptophan metabolite kynurenic acid (KYNA) have been linked to cognitive dysfunctions in schizophrenia and other psychiatric diseases. In the rat, local inhibition of kynurenine aminotransferase II (KAT II), the enzyme responsible for the neosynthesis of readily mobilizable KYNA in the brain, leads to a prompt reduction in extracellular KYNA levels, and secondarily induces an increase in extracellular glutamate, dopamine, and acetylcholine levels in several brain areas. Using microdialysis in unanesthetized, adult rats, we now show that the novel, systemically active KAT II inhibitor BFF-816, applied orally at 30 mg/kg in all experiments, mimics the effects of local enzyme inhibition. No tolerance was seen when animals were treated daily for 5 consecutive days. Behaviorally, daily injections of BFF-816 significantly decreased escape latency in the Morris water maze, indicating improved performance in spatial and contextual memory. Thus, systemically applied BFF-816 constitutes an excellent tool for studying the neurobiology of KYNA and, in particular, for investigating the mechanisms linking KAT II inhibition to changes in glutamatergic, dopaminergic, and cholinergic function in brain physiology and pathology.

  12. Identification of a novel boronic acid as a potent, selective, and orally active hormone sensitive lipase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogiyama, Tomoko; Yamaguchi, Mitsuhiro; Kurikawa, Nobuya; Honzumi, Shoko; Yamamoto, Yuka; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Inoue, Shinichi

    2016-08-15

    Hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) is an attractive therapeutic target of dyslipidemia. We designed and synthesized several compounds as reversible HSL inhibitors with a focus on hydrophobic interactions, which was thought to be effective upon the HSL inhibitory activity. In these efforts, we identified boronated compound 12 showing a potent HSL inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 7nM and a high selectivity against cholinesterases. Furthermore, compound 12 is the first boron containing HSL inhibitor that has shown an antilipolytic effect in rats after oral administration at 3mg/kg. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Discovery of orally active pyrrolopyridine- and aminopyridine-based Met kinase inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Zhen-Wei; Wei, Donna; Schroeder, Gretchen M.; Cornelius, Lyndon A.M.; Kim, Kyoung; Chen, Xiao-Tao; Schmidt, Robert J.; Williams, David K.; Tokarski, John S.; An, Yongmi; Sack, John S.; Manne, Veeraswamy; Kamath, Amrita; Zhang, Yueping; Marathe, Punit; Hunt, John T.; Lombardo, Louis J.; Fargnoli, Joseph; Borzilleri, Robert M. (BMS)

    2008-09-10

    A series of acylurea analogs derived from pyrrolopyridine and aminopyridine scaffolds were identified as potent inhibitors of Met kinase activity. The SAR at various positions of the two kinase scaffolds was investigated. These studies led to the discovery of compounds 3b and 20b, which demonstrated favorable pharmacokinetic properties in mice and significant antitumor activity in a human gastric carcinoma xenograft model.

  14. Pharmacological profile of AW-814141, a novel, potent, selective and orally active inhibitor of p38 MAP kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chopra, Puneet; Kulkarni, Onkar; Gupta, Shashank

    2010-01-01

    -inflammatory activity of a p38 MAPK inhibitor, AW-814141. AW-814141 inhibited enzymatic activity of recombinant p38-alpha and beta isoforms with IC(50) value of 100nM and 158nM, respectively. AW-814141 also inhibited the release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treated human peripheral...... blood mononuclear cells with an IC(50) value of 212nM and demonstrated selectivity against a panel of few kinases. Oral administration of AW-814141 (10mpk) in LPS-injected mice resulted in a significant reduction in TNF-alpha production in the circulation. In a carrageenan-induced rat paw edema model...

  15. Potent quinoxaline-based inhibitors of PDGF receptor tyrosine kinase activity. Part 2: the synthesis and biological activities of RPR127963 an orally bioavailable inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Myers, Michael R; Hanney, Barbara; Spada, Alfred P; Bilder, Glenda; Galzcinski, Helen; Amin, Dilip; Needle, Saul; Page, Ken; Jayyosi, Zaid; Perrone, Mark H

    2003-09-15

    RPR127963 demonstrates an excellent pharmacokinetic profile in several species and was found to be efficacious in the prevention of restenosis in a Yucatan mini-pig model upon oral administration of 1-5 mg/kg. The in vitro selectivity profile and SAR of the highly optimized PDGF-R tyrosine kinase inhibitor are highlighted.

  16. A novel prothrombin time assay for assessing the anticoagulant activity of oral factor Xa inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Yu Chen; Wang, Zhaoqing; Knabb, Robert M

    2013-09-01

    Conventional prothrombin time (PT) assays have limited sensitivity and dynamic range in monitoring the anticoagulant activity of direct factor Xa inhibitors. Hence, new assays are needed. We modified a PT assay by adding calcium chloride (CaCl2) to the thromboplastin reagent to increase assay dynamic range and improve sensitivity. Effects of calcium and sodium ion concentrations, and sample handling, were evaluated to optimize assay performance. Increasing concentrations of calcium ions produced progressive increases in PT across the factor Xa inhibitor concentrations of 0 to 2500 nmol/L for razaxaban and apixaban. The greatest effect was seen when the thromboplastin reagent was diluted 1:2.25 with 100 mmol/L CaCl2 (thus selected for routine use). The optimized assay showed an interassay precision of 1.5 to 9.3 percentage coefficient of variation (%CV) for razaxaban and 3.1 to 4.6 %CV for apixaban. We conclude that the modified PT assay is likely to be suitable as a pharmacodynamic marker for activity at therapeutic concentrations of factor Xa inhibitors.

  17. Aliskiren – an orally active renin inhibitor. Review of pharmacology, pharmacodynamics, kinetics, and clinical potential in the treatment of hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Allikmets

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Kristina AllikmetsDepartment of Drug Development and Medical Affairs, Nycomed Group, Roskilde, DenmarkAbstract: The importance of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS in diseases such as hypertension, congestive heart failure and chronic renal failure has long ago been recognized. It has also been established that inhibition of RAAS, using inhibitors of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE or angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB, is an effective way to intervene with the pathogenesis of these disorders. Renin inhibitors block the RAAS at the highest level, at its origin, and might thus offer a new exciting approach for pharmacotherapy of arterial hypertension. Aliskiren is the first in a new class of orally active, non-peptide, low molecular weight renin inhibitors, and so far the only renin inhibitor that has progressed to phase III clinical trials. This review summarizes the available data on the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of aliskiren and its clinical development for treatment of arterial hypertension.Keywords: aliskiren, hypertension, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, renin inhibition, essential hypertension

  18. CGP 53437, an orally bioavailable inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease with potent antiviral activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alteri, E; Bold, G; Cozens, R; Faessler, A; Klimkait, T; Lang, M; Lazdins, J; Poncioni, B; Roesel, J L; Schneider, P

    1993-10-01

    CGP 53437 is a peptidomimetic inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease containing a hydroxyethylene isostere. The compound inhibited recombinant HIV-1 protease with a Ki of 0.2 nM. The inhibition constant versus human cathepsin D and human cathepsin E was 4 nM. Human pepsin and gastricsin were inhibited with Kis of 8 and 500 nM, respectively, and human renin was inhibited with a Ki of 190 microM. The replication of HIV-1/LAV, HIV-1/Z-84, and HIV-1/pLAI was inhibited with a 90% effective dose of 0.1 microM in acutely infected MT-2 cells. The 50% cytotoxic dose was 100 microM. Similar antiviral activity was observed when the compound was added up to 10 h after infection. At the effective concentration, processing of Gag precursor protein p55 was greatly reduced, confirming an action on the late stage of the virus life cycle, as expected. The efficacy of the inhibitor was also demonstrated by using primary human peripheral blood lymphocytes infected with the HIV-1/LAV strain, low-passage clinical isolates obtained from HIV-1-seropositive individuals (including a zidovudine-resistant strain), and HIV-2/ROD. In these cells, CGP 53437 delayed the onset of HIV replication in a dose-dependent fashion (substantial effects with concentrations of > or = 0.1 microM) as long as the inhibitor was maintained in the culture. CGP 53437 was orally bioavailable in mice. Concentrations in plasma 10-fold in excess of the in vitro antiviral 90% effective dose could be sustained for several hours after oral application of 120 mg/kg. Therefore, CGP 53437 has the potential to be a therapeutically useful anti-HIV agent for the treatment of AIDS.

  19. Antitumor activity of orally bioavailable farnesyltransferase inhibitor, ABT-100, is mediated by antiproliferative, proapoptotic, and antiangiogenic effects in xenograft models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Debra; Rodriguez, Luis E; Palma, Joann P; Refici, Marion; Jarvis, Kenneth; O'Connor, Jacqueline; Sullivan, Gerard M; Frost, David; Marsh, Kennan; Bauch, Joy; Zhang, Haiying; Lin, Nan-Horng; Rosenberg, Saul; Sham, Hing L; Joseph, Ingrid B J K

    2005-04-15

    To evaluate the preclinical pharmacokinetics, antitumor efficacy, and mechanism of action of a novel orally active farnesyltransferase inhibitor, ABT-100. In vitro sensitivity of a panel of human cell lines was determined using proliferation and clonogenic assays. In vivo efficacy of ABT-100 was evaluated in xenograft models (flank or orthotopic) by assessing angiogenesis, proliferation, and apoptosis in correlation with pharmacokinetics. Efficacy of the racemate of ABT-100 (A-367074) was also compared with R115777 (tipifarnib). ABT-100 inhibited proliferation of cells in vitro carrying oncogenic H-Ras (EJ-1 bladder; IC(50) 2.2 nmol/L), Ki-Ras (DLD-1 colon, MDA-MB-231 breast, HCT-116 colon, and MiaPaCa-2 pancreatic; IC(50) range, 3.8-9.2 nmol/L), and wild-type Ras (PC-3 and DU-145; IC(50), 70 and 818 nmol/L, respectively) as well as clonogenic potential. ABT-100 shows 70% to 80% oral bioavailability in mice. ABT-100 regressed EJ-1 tumors (2-12.5 mg/kg/d s.c., every day for 21 days) and showed significant efficacy in DLD-1, LX-1, MiaPaCa-2, or PC-3 tumor-bearing mice (6.25-50 mg/kg/d s.c. once daily or twice daily orally). A-367074 showed equivalent efficacy to R115777 given at approximately one-fourth the total dose of R115777 for a shorter duration (EJ-1 and LX-1). Antitumor activity was associated with decreased cell proliferation (Ki-67), increased apoptosis (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling), and decreased angiogenesis. A reduction in tumor angiogenic cytokine levels (vascular endothelial growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, and interleukin-8) correlated with a reduction in tumor vascularity (CD31). Overall, ABT-100 has an acceptable pharmacokinetic profile, is well tolerated, and possesses broad-spectrum antitumor activity against a series of xenograft models similar to farnesyltransferase inhibitors in clinical development; therefore, it is an attractive candidate for clinical evaluation.

  20. Pharmacological and behavioral characterization of D-473, an orally active triple reuptake inhibitor targeting dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine transporters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aloke K Dutta

    Full Text Available Major depressive disorder (MDD is a debilitating disease affecting a wide cross section of people around the world. The current therapy for depression is less than adequate and there is a considerable unmet need for more efficacious treatment. Dopamine has been shown to play a significant role in depression including production of anhedonia which has been one of the untreated symptoms in MDD. It has been hypothesized that drugs acting at all three monoamine transporters including dopamine transporter should provide more efficacious antidepressants activity. This has led to the development of triple reuptake inhibitor D-473 which is a novel pyran based molecule and interacts with all three monoamine transporters. The monoamine uptake inhibition activity in the cloned human transporters expressed in HEK-293 cells (70.4, 9.18 and 39.7 for DAT, SERT and NET, respectively indicates a serotonin preferring triple reuptake inhibition profile for this drug. The drug D-473 exhibited good brain penetration and produced efficacious activity in rat forced swim test under oral administration. The optimal efficacy dose did not produce any locomotor activation. Microdialysis experiment demonstrated that systemic administration of D-473 elevated extracellular level of the three monoamines DA, 5-HT, and NE efficaciously in the dorsal lateral striatum (DLS and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC area, indicating in vivo blockade of all three monoamine transporters by D-473. Thus, the current biological data from D-473 indicate potent antidepressant activity of the molecule.

  1. N-benzylimidazole carboxamides as potent, orally active stearoylCoA desaturase-1 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Karen A; Beretta, Elena E; Brown, Janice A; Castrodad, Mayda; Chen, Yue; Cosgrove, Judith M; Du, Ping; Litchfield, John; Makowski, Michael; Martin, Kelly; McLellan, Thomas J; Neagu, Constantin; Perry, David A; Piotrowski, David W; Steppan, Claire M; Trilles, Richard

    2011-03-15

    A potent, small molecule inhibitor with a favorable pharmacokinetic profile to allow for sustained SCD inhibition in vivo was identified. Starting from a low MW acyl guanidine (5a), identified with a RapidFire High-Throughput Mass Spectrometry (RF-MS) assay, iterative library design was used to rapidly probe the amide and tail regions of the molecule. Singleton synthesis was used to probe core changes. Biological evaluation of a SCD inhibitor (5b) included in vitro potency at SCD-1 and in vivo modulation of the plasma desaturation index (DI) in rats on a low essential fatty acid (LEFA) diet. In addition to dose-dependent decrease in DI, effects on rodent ocular tissue were noted. Therefore, in rat, these SCD inhibitors only recapitulate a portion of phenotype exhibited by the SCD-1 knockout mouse. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Therapeutic dosing of an orally active, selective cathepsin S inhibitor suppresses disease in models of autoimmunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baugh, Mark; Black, Darcey; Westwood, Paul; Kinghorn, Emma; McGregor, Kieran; Bruin, John; Hamilton, William; Dempster, Maureen; Claxton, Christopher; Cai, Jiaqiang; Bennett, Jonathan; Long, Clive; Mckinnon, Heather; Vink, Paul; den Hoed, Leontien; Gorecka, Monika; Vora, Kalpit; Grant, Ethan; Percival, M. David; Boots, A. Mieke H.; van Lierop, Marie-Jose; Boots, Annemieke

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the potential of inhibition of cathepsin S as a treatment for autoimmune diseases. A highly selective cathepsin S inhibitor, CSI-75, was shown to upregulate levels of the cathepsin S substrate, invariant chain Lip10, in vitro as well as in vivo in C57Bl/6 mice

  3. In Vitro and In Vivo Activities of E5700 and ER-119884, Two Novel Orally Active Squalene Synthase Inhibitors, against Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbina, Julio A.; Concepcion, Juan Luis; Caldera, Aura; Payares, Gilberto; Sanoja, Cristina; Otomo, Takeshi; Hiyoshi, Hironobu

    2004-01-01

    Chagas' disease is a serious public health problem in Latin America, and no treatment is available for the prevalent chronic stage. Its causative agent, Trypanosoma cruzi, requires specific endogenous sterols for survival, and we have recently demonstrated that squalene synthase (SQS) is a promising target for antiparasitic chemotherapy. E5700 and ER-119884 are quinuclidine-based inhibitors of mammalian SQS that are currently in development as cholesterol- and triglyceride-lowering agents in humans. These compounds were found to be potent noncompetitive or mixed-type inhibitors of T. cruzi SQS with Ki values in the low nanomolar to subnanomolar range in the absence or presence of 20 μM inorganic pyrophosphate. The antiproliferative 50% inhibitory concentrations of the compounds against extracellular epimastigotes and intracellular amastigotes were ca. 10 nM and 0.4 to 1.6 nM, respectively, with no effects on host cells. When treated with these compounds at the MIC, all of the parasite's sterols disappeared from the parasite cells. In vivo studies indicated that E5700 was able to provide full protection against death and completely arrested the development of parasitemia when given at a concentration of 50 mg/kg of body weight/day for 30 days, while ER-119884 provided only partial protection. This is the first report of an orally active SQS inhibitor that is capable of providing complete protection against fulminant, acute Chagas' disease. PMID:15215084

  4. Safety and Efficacy of an Oral Inhibitor of the Purinergic Receptor P2X7 in Adult Patients with Moderately to Severely Active Crohn's Disease: A Randomized Placebo-controlled, Double-blind, Phase IIa Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eser, Alexander; Colombel, Jean-Frederic; Rutgeerts, Paul; Vermeire, Severine; Vogelsang, Harald; Braddock, Martin; Persson, Tore; Reinisch, Walter

    2015-01-01

    AZD9056 is a selective orally active inhibitor of the purinergic receptor P2X7, which is a key player in the generation and secretion of several proinflammatory cytokines involved in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD...

  5. Design, synthesis, and pharmacological evaluation of N-acylhydrazones and novel conformationally constrained compounds as selective and potent orally active phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kümmerle, Arthur E; Schmitt, Martine; Cardozo, Suzana V S; Lugnier, Claire; Villa, Pascal; Lopes, Alexandra B; Romeiro, Nelilma C; Justiniano, Hélène; Martins, Marco A; Fraga, Carlos A M; Bourguignon, Jean-Jacques; Barreiro, Eliezer J

    2012-09-13

    Among a small series of tested N-acylhydrazones (NAHs), the compound 8a was selected as a selective submicromolar phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) inhibitor associated with anti-TNF-α properties measured both in vitro and in vivo. The recognition pattern of compound 8a was elucidated through molecular modeling studies based on the knowledge of the 3D-structure of zardaverine, a PDE4 inhibitor resembling the structure of 8a, cocrystallized with the PDE4. Based on further conformational analysis dealing with N-methyl-NAHs, a quinazoline derivative (19) was designed as a conformationally constrained NAH analogue and showed similar in vitro pharmacological profile, compared with 8a. In addition 19 was found active when tested orally in LPS-evoked airway hyperreactivity and fully confirmed the working hypothesis supporting this work.

  6. Pharmacological characterization of RS-1259, an orally active dual inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase and serotonin transporter, in rodents: possible treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Yasuyuki; Aoyagi, Atsushi; Hara, Takao; Abe, Kazumi; Yamazaki, Reina; Kumagae, Yoshihiro; Naruto, Shunji; Koyama, Kazuo; Marumoto, Shinji; Tago, Keiko; Toda, Narihiro; Takami, Kazuko; Yamada, Naho; Ori, Mayuko; Kogen, Hiroshi; Kaneko, Tsugio

    2003-09-01

    A dual inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and serotonin transporter (SERT), RS-1259 (4-[1S)-methylamino-3-(4-nitrophenoxy)]propylphenyl N,N-dimethylcarbamate (fumaric acid)(1/2)salt), was newly synthesized. RS-1259 simultaneously inhibited AChE and SERT in the brain following an oral administration in mice and rats. Actual simultaneous elevation of extracellular levels of 5-HT and ACh in the rat hippocampus was confirmed by microdialysis. The compound was as effective as SERT inhibitors such as fluoxetine and fluvoxamine in a 5-hydroxytryptophan-enhancing test in mice. Spatial memory deficits in the two-platform task of a water maze in aged rats were ameliorated by RS-1259 as well as donepezil. Both RS-1259 and donepezil increased the awake episodes in the daytime electroencephalogram of rats. Although RS-1259 was weaker than donepezil in enhancing central cholinergic transmission, as observed by ACh elevation in the hippocampus and memory enhancement in aged rats, the efficacy of RS-1259 on the consciousness level, which reflects the whole activity in the brain, was almost the same as that of donepezil. These results suggest that both cholinergic and serotonergic systems are involved in maintaining brain arousal and that a dual inhibitor of AChE and SERT may be useful for the treatment of cognitive disorders associated with reduced brain activity such as in Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Oral Cyclosporin A Inhibits CD4 T cell P-glycoprotein Activity in HIV-Infected Adults Initiating Treatment with Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulgan, Todd; Donahue, John P.; Smeaton, Laura; Pu, Minya; Wang, Hongying; Lederman, Michael M.; Smith, Kimberly; Valdez, Hernan; Pilcher, Christopher; Haas, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose P-glycoprotein limits tissue penetration of many antiretroviral drugs. We characterized effects of the P-glycoprotein substrate cyclosporin A on T cell P-glycoprotein activity in HIV-infected AIDS Clinical Trials Group study A5138 participants. Methods We studied P-glycoprotein activity on CD4 and CD8 T cells in 16 participants randomized to receive oral cyclosporin A (n=9) or not (n=7) during initiation antiretroviral therapy (ART) that did not include protease or non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Results CD4 T cell P-glycoprotein activity decreased by a median of 8 percentage points with cyclosporin A/ART (difference between cyclosporin A/ART versus ART only P=0.001). Plasma trough cyclosporin A concentrations correlated with change in P-glycoprotein activity in several T cell subsets. Conclusions Oral cyclosporin A can inhibit peripheral blood CD4 T cell P-glycoprotein activity. Targeted P-glycoprotein inhibition might enhance delivery of ART to T cells. PMID:19779705

  8. SKLB-287, a novel oral multikinase inhibitor of EGFR and VEGFR2, exhibits potent antitumor activity in LoVo colorectal tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X; Liu, Y; Yang, H-W; Zhou, S; Cheng, C; Zheng, M-W; Zhong, L; Fu, X-Y; Pan, Y-L; Ma, S; Tang, Y; Chen, Y-Z; Li, L-L; Yang, S-Y

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third common cancer and most of the chemotherapies of CRC currently used often suffer limited efficacy and large side effects. Targeted small-molecule by anti-tumor drugs are thought a promising strategy for improving the efficacy and reducing the side effects. In this investigation, we report a novel multikinase inhibitor, termed SKLB-287, which was discovered by us recently. SKLB-287 could efficiently inhibit the activation of endothelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2). It displayed very good anti-proliferative activity against LoVo CRC cells and considerable antiangiogenic potency in transgenic zebrafish embryos. Oral administration of SKLB-287 resulted in dose-dependent suppression of tumor growth in LoVo xenograft mouse model. Immunohistochemistry was adopted to examine the in vivo anti-tumor mechanism of action of SKLB-287.

  9. NMS-P937, an orally available, specific small-molecule polo-like kinase 1 inhibitor with antitumor activity in solid and hematologic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsasina, Barbara; Beria, Italo; Alli, Cristina; Alzani, Rachele; Avanzi, Nilla; Ballinari, Dario; Cappella, Paolo; Caruso, Michele; Casolaro, Alessia; Ciavolella, Antonella; Cucchi, Ulisse; De Ponti, Anna; Felder, Eduard; Fiorentini, Francesco; Galvani, Arturo; Gianellini, Laura M; Giorgini, Maria L; Isacchi, Antonella; Lansen, Jaqueline; Pesenti, Enrico; Rizzi, Simona; Rocchetti, Maurizio; Sola, Francesco; Moll, Jürgen

    2012-04-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is a serine/threonine protein kinase considered to be the master player of cell-cycle regulation during mitosis. It is indeed involved in centrosome maturation, bipolar spindle formation, chromosome separation, and cytokinesis. PLK1 is overexpressed in a variety of human tumors and its overexpression often correlates with poor prognosis. Although five different PLKs are described in humans, depletion or inhibition of kinase activity of PLK1 is sufficient to induce cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in cancer cell lines and in xenograft tumor models. NMS-P937 is a novel, orally available PLK1-specific inhibitor. The compound shows high potency in proliferation assays having low nanomolar activity on a large number of cell lines, both from solid and hematologic tumors. NMS-P937 potently causes a mitotic cell-cycle arrest followed by apoptosis in cancer cell lines and inhibits xenograft tumor growth with clear PLK1-related mechanism of action at well-tolerated doses in mice after oral administration. In addition, NMS-P937 shows potential for combination in clinical settings with approved cytotoxic drugs, causing tumor regression in HT29 human colon adenocarcinoma xenografts upon combination with irinotecan and prolonged survival of animals in a disseminated model of acute myelogenous leukemia in combination with cytarabine. NMS-P937, with its favorable pharmacologic parameters, good oral bioavailability in rodent and nonrodent species, and proven antitumor activity in different preclinical models using a variety of dosing regimens, potentially provides a high degree of flexibility in dosing schedules and warrants investigation in clinical settings.

  10. Inhibition of osteosarcoma-induced thermal hyperalgesia in mice by the orally active dual enkephalinase inhibitor PL37. Potentiation by gabapentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez, Luis; Hidalgo, Agustín; Meana, Alvaro; Poras, Hervé; Fournié-Zaluski, Marie-Claude; Roques, Bernard P; Baamonde, Ana

    2008-10-31

    We have previously shown that stimulation of peripheral opioid receptors by exogenous opiates counteracts the thermal hyperalgesia elicited by a tibial osteosarcoma due to intraosteal inoculation of NCTC 2472 cells to mice. Aiming to study whether pheripheral endogenous enkephalins could also counteract this painful symptom, we assayed in this model the effects of PL37, an orally active dual inhibitor of enkephalin inactivating enzymes. Oral administration of PL37 (25 mg/kg) completely supressed osteosarcoma-induced thermal hyperalgesia through the activation of micro-opioid receptors, since the administration of cyprodime (1 mg/kg) inhibited its antihyperalgesic effect. Neither naltrindole (0.1 mg/kg) nor nor-binaltorphimine (10 mg/kg) modified this PL37-induced antihyperalgesic effect. Moreover, the inhibition of the antihyperalgesic effect induced by PL37 after the administration of naloxone-methiodide (2 mg/kg), a non selective opioid antagonist that does not cross the blood-brain barrier, demonstrates the involvement of peripheral opioid receptors. In contrast, centrally mediated effects may be detected when assaying a higher dose of PL37 (50 mg/kg). Besides, the administration of gabapentin (6.25-25 mg/kg, i.p.) dose-dependently inhibited osteosarcoma-induced thermal hyperalgesia. Interestingly, the combined administration of subeffective doses of PL37 and gabapentin completely prevented this type of thermal hyperalgesia. An isobolographic analysis of this interaction demonstrated a synergistic interaction between both drugs.

  11. Orally-effective, long-acting sorbitol dehydrogenase inhibitors: synthesis, structure-activity relationships, and in vivo evaluations of novel heterocycle-substituted piperazino-pyrimidines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu-Moyer, Margaret Y; Ballinger, William E; Beebe, David A; Berger, Richard; Coutcher, James B; Day, Wesley W; Li, Jiancheng; Mylari, Banavara L; Oates, Peter J; Weekly, R Matthew

    2002-01-17

    Optimization of a previously disclosed sorbitol dehydrogenase inhibitor (SDI, II) for potency and duration of action was achieved by replacing the metabolically labile N,N-dimethylsulfamoyl group with a variety of heterocycles. Specifically, this effort led to a series of novel, in vitro potent SDIs with longer serum half-lives and acceptable in vivo activity in acutely diabetic rats (e.g., 62, 67, and 69). However, the desired in vivo potency in chronically diabetic rats, ED(90) < or = 5 mg/kg/day, was achieved only through further modification of the piperazine linker. Several members of this family, including 86, showed better than the targeted potency with ED(90) values of 1-2 mg/kg/day. Compound 86 was further profiled and found to be a selective inhibitor of sorbitol dehydrogenase, with excellent pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic properties, demonstrating normalization of sciatic nerve fructose in a chronically diabetic rat model for approximately 17 h, when administered orally at a single dose of 2 mg/kg/day.

  12. Oral administration of the pimelic diphenylamide HDAC inhibitor HDACi 4b is unsuitable for chronic inhibition of HDAC activity in the CNS in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Beconi

    Full Text Available Histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors have received considerable attention as potential therapeutics for a variety of cancers and neurological disorders. Recent publications on a class of pimelic diphenylamide HDAC inhibitors have highlighted their promise in the treatment of the neurodegenerative diseases Friedreich's ataxia and Huntington's disease, based on efficacy in cell and mouse models. These studies' authors have proposed that the unique action of these compounds compared to hydroxamic acid-based HDAC inhibitors results from their unusual slow-on/slow-off kinetics of binding, preferentially to HDAC3, resulting in a distinctive pharmacological profile and reduced toxicity. Here, we evaluate the HDAC subtype selectivity, cellular activity, absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME properties, as well as the central pharmacodynamic profile of one such compound, HDACi 4b, previously described to show efficacy in vivo in the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington's disease. Based on our data reported here, we conclude that while the in vitro selectivity and binding mode are largely in agreement with previous reports, the physicochemical properties, metabolic and p-glycoprotein (Pgp substrate liability of HDACi 4b render this compound suboptimal to investigate central Class I HDAC inhibition in vivo in mouse per oral administration. A drug administration regimen using HDACi 4b dissolved in drinking water was used in the previous proof of concept study, casting doubt on the validation of CNS HDAC3 inhibition as a target for the treatment of Huntington's disease. We highlight physicochemical stability and metabolic issues with 4b that are likely intrinsic liabilities of the benzamide chemotype in general.

  13. Inhibition of AKT with the orally active allosteric AKT inhibitor, MK-2206, sensitizes endometrial cancer cells to progestin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Pant

    Full Text Available Progestin resistance is a major obstacle to treating early stage, well-differentiated endometrial cancer as well as recurrent endometrial cancer. The mechanism behind the suboptimal response to progestin is not well understood. The PTEN tumor suppressor gene is frequently mutated in type I endometrial cancers and this mutation results in hyperactivation of the PI3K/AKT pathway. We hypothesized that increased activation of AKT promotes an inadequate response to progestins in endometrial cancer cells. Ishikawa cells stably transfected with progesterone receptor B (PRB23 cells were treated with the AKT inhibitor, MK-2206, which effectively decreased levels of p(Ser473-AKT in a dose-dependent (10 nM to 1 uM and time-dependent manner (0.5 h to 24 h. MK-2206 inhibited levels of p(Thr308-AKT and a downstream target, p(Thr246-PRAS40, but did not change levels of p(Thr202/Tyr204ERK or p(Thr13/Tyr185SAPK/JNK, demonstrating specificity of MK-2206 for AKT. Additionally, MK-2206 treatment of PRB23 cells resulted in a significant increase in levels of progesterone receptor B (PRB protein. Microarray analysis of PRB23 cells identified PDK4 as the most highly upregulated gene among 70 upregulated genes in response to R5020. Inhibition of AKT further upregulated progestin-mediated expression of PDK4 but did not affect another progestin-responsive gene, SGK1. Treatment of PRB23 cells with R5020 and MK-2206 independently decreased viability of cells while the combination of R5020 and MK-2206 caused the greatest decrease in cell viability. Furthermore, mice with xenografted tumors treated with MK-2206 alone or with progesterone alone exhibited modest reductions in their tumor volume. The largest decrease in tumor size was observed in the mice treated with both MK-2206 and progesterone; these tumors exhibited the least proliferation (Ki67 and the most apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3 of all the treatment groups. In summary, inhibition of AKT stabilizes the Progesterone

  14. Discovery of Brigatinib (AP26113), a Phosphine Oxide-Containing, Potent, Orally Active Inhibitor of Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei-Sheng; Liu, Shuangying; Zou, Dong; Thomas, Mathew; Wang, Yihan; Zhou, Tianjun; Romero, Jan; Kohlmann, Anna; Li, Feng; Qi, Jiwei; Cai, Lisi; Dwight, Timothy A; Xu, Yongjin; Xu, Rongsong; Dodd, Rory; Toms, Angela; Parillon, Lois; Lu, Xiaohui; Anjum, Rana; Zhang, Sen; Wang, Frank; Keats, Jeffrey; Wardwell, Scott D; Ning, Yaoyu; Xu, Qihong; Moran, Lauren E; Mohemmad, Qurish K; Jang, Hyun Gyung; Clackson, Tim; Narasimhan, Narayana I; Rivera, Victor M; Zhu, Xiaotian; Dalgarno, David; Shakespeare, William C

    2016-05-26

    In the treatment of echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase positive (ALK+) non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), secondary mutations within the ALK kinase domain have emerged as a major resistance mechanism to both first- and second-generation ALK inhibitors. This report describes the design and synthesis of a series of 2,4-diarylaminopyrimidine-based potent and selective ALK inhibitors culminating in identification of the investigational clinical candidate brigatinib. A unique structural feature of brigatinib is a phosphine oxide, an overlooked but novel hydrogen-bond acceptor that drives potency and selectivity in addition to favorable ADME properties. Brigatinib displayed low nanomolar IC50s against native ALK and all tested clinically relevant ALK mutants in both enzyme-based biochemical and cell-based viability assays and demonstrated efficacy in multiple ALK+ xenografts in mice, including Karpas-299 (anaplastic large-cell lymphomas [ALCL]) and H3122 (NSCLC). Brigatinib represents the most clinically advanced phosphine oxide-containing drug candidate to date and is currently being evaluated in a global phase 2 registration trial.

  15. Cediranib, an Oral Inhibitor of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor Kinases, Is an Active Drug in Recurrent Epithelial Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, and Peritoneal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matulonis, Ursula A.; Berlin, Suzanne; Ivy, Percy; Tyburski, Karin; Krasner, Carolyn; Zarwan, Corrine; Berkenblit, Anna; Campos, Susana; Horowitz, Neil; Cannistra, Stephen A.; Lee, Hang; Lee, Julie; Roche, Maria; Hill, Margaret; Whalen, Christin; Sullivan, Laura; Tran, Chau; Humphreys, Benjamin D.; Penson, Richard T.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Angiogenesis is important for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) growth, and blocking angiogenesis can lead to EOC regression. Cediranib is an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) -1, VEGFR-2, VEGFR-3, and c-kit. Patients and Methods We conducted a phase II study of cediranib for recurrent EOC or peritoneal or fallopian tube cancer; cediranib was administered as a daily oral dose, and the original dose was 45 mg daily. Because of toxicities observed in the first 11 patients, the dose was lowered to 30 mg. Eligibility included ≤ two lines of chemotherapy for recurrence. End points included response rate (via Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors [RECIST] or modified Gynecological Cancer Intergroup CA-125), toxicity, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Results Forty-seven patients were enrolled; 46 were treated. Clinical benefit rate (defined as complete response [CR] or partial response [PR], stable disease [SD] > 16 weeks, or CA-125 nonprogression > 16 weeks), which was the primary end point, was 30%; eight patients (17%; 95% CI, 7.6% to 30.8%) had a PR, six patients (13%; 95% CI, 4.8% to 25.7%) had SD, and there were no CRs. Eleven patients (23%) were removed from study because of toxicities before two cycles. Grade 3 toxicities (> 20% of patients) included hypertension (46%), fatigue (24%), and diarrhea (13%). Grade 2 hypothyroidism occurred in 43% of patients. Grade 4 toxicities included CNS hemorrhage (n = 1), hypertriglyceridemia/hypercholesterolemia/elevated lipase (n = 1), and dehydration/elevated creatinine (n = 1). No bowel perforations or fistulas occurred. Median PFS was 5.2 months, and median OS has not been reached; median follow-up time is 10.7 months. Conclusion Cediranib has activity in recurrent EOC, tubal cancer, and peritoneal cancer with predictable toxicities observed with other TKIs. PMID:19826113

  16. ASB14780, an Orally Active Inhibitor of Group IVA Phospholipase A2, Is a Pharmacotherapeutic Candidate for Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, Shiho; Ishihara, Keiichi; Kawashita, Eri; Tomoo, Toshiyuki; Nagahira, Kazuhiro; Hayashi, Yasuhiro; Akiba, Satoshi

    2016-03-01

    We have previously shown that high-fat cholesterol diet (HFCD)-induced fatty liver and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced hepatic fibrosis are reduced in mice deficient in group IVA phospholipase A2 (IVA-PLA2), which plays a role in inflammation. We herein demonstrate the beneficial effects of ASB14780 (3-[1-(4-phenoxyphenyl)-3-(2-phenylethyl)-1H-indol-5-yl]propanoic acid 2-amino-2-(hydroxymethyl)propane-1,3-diol salt), an orally active IVA-PLA2 inhibitor, on the development of fatty liver and hepatic fibrosis in mice. The daily coadministration of ASB14780 markedly ameliorated liver injury and hepatic fibrosis following 6 weeks of treatment with CCl4. ASB14780 markedly attenuated the CCl4-induced expression of smooth muscle α-actin (α-SMA) protein and the mRNA expression of collagen 1a2, α-SMA, and transforming growth factor-β1 in the liver, and inhibited the expression of monocyte/macrophage markers, CD11b and monocyte chemotactic protein-1, while preventing the recruitment of monocytes/macrophages to the liver. Importantly, ASB14780 also reduced the development of fibrosis even in matured hepatic fibrosis. Additionally, ASB14780 also reduced HFCD-induced lipid deposition not only in the liver, but also in already established fatty liver. Furthermore, treatment with ASB14780 suppressed the HFCD-induced expression of lipogenic mRNAs. The present findings suggest that an IVA-PLA2 inhibitor, such as ASB14780, could be useful for the treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases, including fatty liver and hepatic fibrosis. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  17. The epoxyketone-based proteasome inhibitors carfilzomib and orally bioavailable oprozomib have anti-resorptive and bone-anabolic activity in addition to anti-myeloma effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurchla, MA; Garcia-Gomez, A; Hornick, MC; Ocio, EM; Li, A; Blanco, JF; Collins, L; Kirk, CJ; Piwnica-Worms, D; Vij, R; Tomasson, MH; Pandiella, A; Miguel, JF San; Garayoa, M; Weilbaecher, KN

    2013-01-01

    Proteasome inhibitors (PIs), namely bortezomib, have become a cornerstone therapy for multiple myeloma (MM), potently reducing tumor burden and inhibiting pathologic bone destruction. In clinical trials, carfilzomib, a next generation epoxyketone-based irreversible PI, has exhibited potent anti-myeloma efficacy and decreased side effects compared with bortezomib. Carfilzomib and its orally bioavailable analog oprozomib, effectively decreased MM cell viability following continual or transient treatment mimicking in vivo pharmacokinetics. Interactions between myeloma cells and the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment augment the number and activity of bone-resorbing osteoclasts (OCs) while inhibiting bone-forming osteoblasts (OBs), resulting in increased tumor growth and osteolytic lesions. At clinically relevant concentrations, carfilzomib and oprozomib directly inhibited OC formation and bone resorption in vitro, while enhancing osteogenic differentiation and matrix mineralization. Accordingly, carfilzomib and oprozomib increased trabecular bone volume, decreased bone resorption and enhanced bone formation in non-tumor bearing mice. Finally, in mouse models of disseminated MM, the epoxyketone-based PIs decreased murine 5TGM1 and human RPMI-8226 tumor burden and prevented bone loss. These data demonstrate that, in addition to anti-myeloma properties, carfilzomib and oprozomib effectively shift the bone microenvironment from a catabolic to an anabolic state and, similar to bortezomib, may decrease skeletal complications of MM. PMID:22763387

  18. Orally active 7-substituted (4-benzylphthalazin-1-yl)-2-methylpiperazin-1-yl]nicotinonitriles as active-site inhibitors of sphingosine 1-phosphate lyase for the treatment of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Sven; Braendlin, Nadine; Beerli, Christian; Bergsdorf, Christian; Schubart, Anna; Srinivas, Honnappa; Oberhauser, Berndt; Billich, Andreas

    2014-06-26

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) lyase has recently been implicated as a therapeutic target for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS), based on studies in a genetic mouse model. Potent active site directed inhibitors of the enzyme are not known so far. Here we describe the discovery of (4-benzylphthalazin-1-yl)-2-methylpiperazin-1-yl]nicotinonitrile 5 in a high-throughput screen using a biochemical assay, and its further optimization. This class of compounds was found to inhibit catalytic activity of S1PL by binding to the active site of the enzyme, as seen in the cocrystal structure of derivative 31 with the homodimeric human S1P lyase. 31 induces profound reduction of peripheral T cell numbers after oral dosage and confers pronounced protection in a rat model of multiple sclerosis. In conclusion, this novel class of direct S1P lyase inhibitors provides excellent tools to further explore the therapeutic potential of T cell-targeted therapies in multiple sclerosis and other autoimmune and inflammatory diseases.

  19. Structure-based design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of irreversible human rhinovirus 3C protease inhibitors. 6. Structure-activity studies of orally bioavailable, 2-pyridone-containing peptidomimetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragovich, Peter S; Prins, Thomas J; Zhou, Ru; Brown, Edward L; Maldonado, Fausto C; Fuhrman, Shella A; Zalman, Leora S; Tuntland, Tove; Lee, Caroline A; Patick, Amy K; Matthews, David A; Hendrickson, Thomas F; Kosa, Maha B; Liu, Bo; Batugo, Minerva R; Gleeson, Jean-Paul R; Sakata, Sylvie K; Chen, Lijian; Guzman, Mark C; Meador, James W; Ferre, Rose Ann; Worland, Stephen T

    2002-04-11

    The structure-based design, chemical synthesis, and biological evaluation of various 2-pyridone-containing human rhinovirus (HRV) 3C protease (3CP) inhibitors are described. These compounds are comprised of a peptidomimetic binding determinant and a Michael acceptor moiety, which forms an irreversible covalent adduct with the active site cysteine residue of the 3C enzyme. The 2-pyridone-containing inhibitors typically display improved 3CP inhibition properties relative to related peptide-derived molecules along with more favorable antiviral properties. The cocrystal structure of one pyridone-derived 3CP inhibitor complexed with HRV-2 3CP is also described along with certain ab initio conformation analyses. Optimization of the 2-pyridone-containing compounds is shown to provide several highly active 3CP inhibitors (k(obs)/[I] > 500,00 M(-1) s(-1)) that function as potent antirhinoviral agents (EC(50) = <0.05 microM) against multiple virus serotypes in cell culture. One 2-pyridone-containing 3CP inhibitor is shown to be bioavailable in the dog after oral dosing (F = 48%).

  20. EBI-907, a novel BRAF(V600E) inhibitor, has potent oral anti-tumor activity and a broad kinase selectivity profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiayin; Lu, Biao; Liu, Dong; Shen, Ru; Yan, Yinfa; Yang, Liuqing; Zhang, Minsheng; Zhang, Lei; Cao, Guoqing; Cao, Hu; Fu, Beibei; Gong, Aishen; Sun, Qiming; Wan, Hong; Zhang, Lianshan; Tao, Weikang; Cao, Jingsong

    2016-01-01

    The oncogenic mutation of BRAF(V600E) has been found in approximately 8% of all human cancers, including more than 60% of melanoma and 10% of colorectal cancers. The clinical proof of concept in treating BRAF(V600E)-driving melanoma patients with the BRAF inhibitors has been well established. We have sought to identify and develop novel BRAF(V600E) inhibitors with more favorable profiles. Our chemistry effort has led to the discovery of EBI-907 as a novel BRAF(V600E) inhibitor with potent anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo. In a LanthaScreen BRAF(V600E) kinase assay, EBI-907 showed an IC50 of 4.8 nM, which is >10 -fold more potent than Vemurafenib (IC50 = 58.5 nM). In addition, EBI-907 showed a broader kinase selectivity profile, with potent activity against a number of important oncogenic kinases including FGFR1-3, RET, c-Kit, and PDGFRb. Concomitant with such properties, EBI-907 exhibits potent and selective cytotoxicity against a broader range of BRAF(V600E)-dependent cell lines including certain colorectal cancer cell lines with innate resistance to Vemurafenib. In BRAF(V600E)-dependent human Colo-205 and A375 tumor xenograft mouse models, EBI-907 caused a marked tumor regression in a dose-dependent manner, with superior efficacy to Vemurafenib. Our results also showed that combination with EGFR or MEK inhibitor enhanced the potency of EBI-907 in cell lines with innate or acquired resistance to BRAF inhibition alone. Our findings present EBI-907 as a potent and promising BRAF inhibitor, which might be useful in broader indications.

  1. [Oral fluid bacteriocidal activity in complex diagnostics of oral disbiosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovich, O F; Abramova, E S

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of examination of oral fluid bacteriocidal activity in complex diagnostics of oral mucosa disbiosis was evaluated. Thirty-seven patients were included in complex clinical and laboratory studies. The patients were divided in two groups: main group (30 patients exhibiting various grades of oral mucosa disbiosis) and control group (7 patients with no signs of oral disbiosis). The oral fluid bacteriocidal activity was examined by means of laser flow cytometry. Study results proved oral fluid bacteriocidal activity increase to correlate with the grade of oral mucosa disbiosis thus confirming the usefulness of the method in complex diagnostics of oral disbiosis.

  2. Preclinical Activity of VX-787, a First-in-Class, Orally Bioavailable Inhibitor of the Influenza Virus Polymerase PB2 Subunit

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    VX-787 is a novel inhibitor of influenza virus replication that blocks the PB2 cap-snatching activity of the influenza viral polymerase complex. Viral genetics and X-ray crystallography studies provide support for the idea that VX-787 occupies the 7-methyl GTP (m7GTP) cap-binding site of PB2. VX-787 binds the cap-binding domain of the PB2 subunit with a KD (dissociation constant) of 24 nM as determined by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The cell-based EC50 (the concentration of compou...

  3. The orally active and bioavailable ATR kinase inhibitor AZD6738 potentiates the anti-tumor effects of cisplatin to resolve ATM-deficient non-small cell lung cancer in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendetti, Frank P; Lau, Alan; Schamus, Sandra; Conrads, Thomas P; O'Connor, Mark J; Bakkenist, Christopher J

    2015-12-29

    ATR and ATM are DNA damage signaling kinases that phosphorylate several thousand substrates. ATR kinase activity is increased at damaged replication forks and resected DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). ATM kinase activity is increased at DSBs. ATM has been widely studied since ataxia telangiectasia individuals who express no ATM protein are the most radiosensitive patients identified. Since ATM is not an essential protein, it is widely believed that ATM kinase inhibitors will be well-tolerated in the clinic. ATR has been widely studied, but advances have been complicated by the finding that ATR is an essential protein and it is widely believed that ATR kinase inhibitors will be toxic in the clinic. We describe AZD6738, an orally active and bioavailable ATR kinase inhibitor. AZD6738 induces cell death and senescence in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. AZD6738 potentiates the cytotoxicity of cisplatin and gemcitabine in NSCLC cell lines with intact ATM kinase signaling, and potently synergizes with cisplatin in ATM-deficient NSCLC cells. In contrast to expectations, daily administration of AZD6738 and ATR kinase inhibition for 14 consecutive days is tolerated in mice and enhances the therapeutic efficacy of cisplatin in xenograft models. Remarkably, the combination of cisplatin and AZD6738 resolves ATM-deficient lung cancer xenografts.

  4. Preclinical activity of VX-787, a first-in-class, orally bioavailable inhibitor of the influenza virus polymerase PB2 subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrn, Randal A; Jones, Steven M; Bennett, Hamilton B; Bral, Chris; Clark, Michael P; Jacobs, Marc D; Kwong, Ann D; Ledeboer, Mark W; Leeman, Joshua R; McNeil, Colleen F; Murcko, Mark A; Nezami, Azin; Perola, Emanuele; Rijnbrand, Rene; Saxena, Kumkum; Tsai, Alice W; Zhou, Yi; Charifson, Paul S

    2015-03-01

    VX-787 is a novel inhibitor of influenza virus replication that blocks the PB2 cap-snatching activity of the influenza viral polymerase complex. Viral genetics and X-ray crystallography studies provide support for the idea that VX-787 occupies the 7-methyl GTP (m(7)GTP) cap-binding site of PB2. VX-787 binds the cap-binding domain of the PB2 subunit with a KD (dissociation constant) of 24 nM as determined by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The cell-based EC50 (the concentration of compound that ensures 50% cell viability of an uninfected control) for VX-787 is 1.6 nM in a cytopathic effect (CPE) assay, with a similar EC50 in a viral RNA replication assay. VX-787 is active against a diverse panel of influenza A virus strains, including H1N1pdm09 and H5N1 strains, as well as strains with reduced susceptibility to neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs). VX-787 was highly efficacious in both prophylaxis and treatment models of mouse influenza and was superior to the neuraminidase inhibitor, oseltamivir, including in delayed-start-to-treat experiments, with 100% survival at up to 96 h postinfection and partial survival in groups where the initiation of therapy was delayed up to 120 h postinfection. At different doses, VX-787 showed a 1-log to >5-log reduction in viral load (relative to vehicle controls) in mouse lungs. Overall, these favorable findings validate the PB2 subunit of the viral polymerase as a drug target for influenza therapy and support the continued development of VX-787 as a novel antiviral agent for the treatment of influenza infection.

  5. Novel, potent, selective, and orally bioavailable human betaII-tryptase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperandio, David; Tai, Vincent W-F; Lohman, Julia; Hirschbein, Bernie; Mendonca, Rohan; Lee, Chang-Sun; Spencer, Jeffrey R; Janc, James; Nguyen, Margaret; Beltman, Jerlyn; Sprengeler, Paul; Scheerens, Heleen; Lin, Tong; Liu, Liang; Gadre, Ashwini; Kellogg, Alisha; Green, Michael J; McGrath, Mary E

    2006-08-01

    The synthesis of novel [1,2,4]oxadiazoles and their structure-activity relationship (SAR) for the inhibition of tryptase and related serine proteases is presented. Elaboration of the P'-side afforded potent, selective, and orally bioavailable tryptase inhibitors.

  6. An Orally Available BACE1 Inhibitor That Affords Robust CNS Aβ Reduction without Cardiovascular Liabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuan; Brown, James; Judd, Ted C; Lopez, Patricia; Qian, Wenyuan; Powers, Timothy S; Chen, Jian Jeffrey; Bartberger, Michael D; Chen, Kui; Dunn, Robert T; Epstein, Oleg; Fremeau, Robert T; Harried, Scott; Hickman, Dean; Hitchcock, Stephen A; Luo, Yi; Minatti, Ana Elena; Patel, Vinod F; Vargas, Hugo M; Wahl, Robert C; Weiss, Matthew M; Wen, Paul H; White, Ryan D; Whittington, Douglas A; Zheng, Xiao Mei; Wood, Stephen

    2015-02-12

    BACE1 inhibition to prevent Aβ peptide formation is considered to be a potential route to a disease-modifying treatment for Alzheimer's disease. Previous efforts in our laboratory using a combined structure- and property-based approach have resulted in the identification of aminooxazoline xanthenes as potent BACE1 inhibitors. Herein, we report further optimization leading to the discovery of inhibitor 15 as an orally available and highly efficacious BACE1 inhibitor that robustly reduces CSF and brain Aβ levels in both rats and nonhuman primates. In addition, compound 15 exhibited low activity on the hERG ion channel and was well tolerated in an integrated cardiovascular safety model.

  7. Optimization of orally bioavailable alkyl amine renin inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhenrong; Cacatian, Salvacion; Yuan, Jing; Simpson, Robert D.; Jia, Lanqi; Zhao, Wei; Tice, Colin M.; Flaherty, Patrick T.; Guo, Joan; Ishchenko, Alexey; Singh, Suresh B.; Wu, Zhongren; McKeever, Brian M.; Scott, Boyd B.; Bukhtiyarov, Yuri; Berbaum, Jennifer; Mason, Jennifer; Panemangalore, Reshma; Cappiello, Maria Grazia; Bentley, Ross; Doe, Christopher P.; Harrison, Richard K.; McGeehan, Gerard M.; Dillard, Lawrence W.; Baldwin, John J.; Claremon, David A. (Vitae); (GSKPA)

    2010-09-17

    Structure-guided drug design led to new alkylamine renin inhibitors with improved in vitro and in vivo potency. Lead compound 21a, has an IC{sub 50} of 0.83 nM for the inhibition of human renin in plasma (PRA). Oral administration of 21a at 10 mg/kg resulted in >20 h reduction of blood pressure in a double transgenic rat model of hypertension.

  8. Oral candidiasis in HIV+ patients under treatment with protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzel, Andréa Lusvarghi; Silveira, Fernando Ricardo Xavier da; Pires, Maria de Fátima Costa; Lotufo, Mônica Andrade

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the influence of Protease Inhibitors (PI) on the occurrence of oral candidiasis in 111 HIV+ patients under PI therapy (Group A). The controls consisted of 56 patients that were not using PI drugs (Group B) and 26 patients that were not using any drugs for HIV therapy (Group C). The patient's cd4 cell counts were taken in account for the correlations. One hundred and ninety three patients were evaluated. The PI did not affect the prevalence of oral candidiasis (p = 0.158) or the frequency of C. albicans isolates (p = 0.133). Patients with lower cd4 cell counts showed a higher frequency of C. albicans isolates (p = 0.046) and a greater occurrence of oral candidiasis (p = 0.036).

  9. Antimalarial Activity of 4-Metoxychalcones: Docking Studies as Falcipain/Plasmepsin Inhibitors, ADMET and Lipophilic Efficiency Analysis to Identify a Putative Oral Lead Candidate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Eder de Oliveira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we report the antimalarial activity of nine 4-methoxychalcone derivatives 1a–i and an initial analysis of their ADMET properties. All compounds showed potent activity against the P. falciparum chloroquine-resistant clone W2, with IC50 values ranging from 1.96 µM to 10.99 µM, with moderate or low cytotoxicity against the HeLa cell line. The compound 1a (IC50 = 2.06 µM had the best selectivity index (9.0. All the sulfonamide 4-metychalcone derivatives synthesized had cLogP values between 2 and 5 (mean value 3.79 and molecular weights (MWs below 500. The substitution of the pyrrolidine group in 1i by a morpholine group in 1a reduced the cLogP value from 3.05 in compound 1i to 2.34 in compound 1a. Indeed, compound 1a had the highest LipE value. The binding free energy of compound 1a showed it to be the most optimal chalcone derivative for plasmepsin-2 (−7.3 Kcal/mol. The physicochemical properties and LipE analysis of the dataset allowed us to establish that compound 1a is the highest quality compound of the series and a potential oral lead candidate.

  10. Activity of MK-3118, a new oral glucan synthase inhibitor, tested against Candida spp. by two international methods (CLSI and EUCAST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaller, Michael A; Messer, Shawn A; Motyl, Mary R; Jones, Ronald N; Castanheira, Mariana

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the activity of the orally bioavailable enfumafungin derivative MK-3118 and comparator antifungal agents tested against a collection of 113 clinical isolates of Candida spp. using CLSI and EUCAST broth microdilution (BMD) methods. Candida spp. isolates (n=113) were tested by CLSI and EUCAST methods. The collection contained 29 Candida albicans, 29 Candida glabrata, 21 Candida tropicalis, 15 Candida parapsilosis and 19 Candida krusei, including azole- and echinocandin-resistant isolates. CLSI and EUCAST MIC endpoints of 50% and 100% inhibition were determined using visual reading at 24 and 48 h of incubation and spectrophotometric reading at 24 h of incubation, respectively. MK-3118 CLSI MIC results ranged from 0.06 to 16 mg/L depending on species, duration of incubation and endpoint criteria (EC) used. Comparison of CLSI and EUCAST following 24 h of incubation and either 50% or 100% inhibition revealed an essential agreement (EA; ± 2 doubling dilutions) of 99.1% using the 50% inhibition EC and 93.2% using the 100% inhibition EC. MK-3118 (24 h of incubation and 50% EC) was active against all the species tested and displayed similar potency to caspofungin (using CLSI BMD) against C. albicans (MIC90, 1 and 2 mg/L, respectively), C. tropicalis (1 and 1 mg/L, respectively), C. parapsilosis (0.5 and 0.5 mg/L, respectively) and C. krusei (2 and 1 mg/L, respectively), but was 8-fold more potent than caspofungin against C. glabrata strains (MIC90, 2 and 16 mg/L, respectively). MK-3118 was active against fluconazole-resistant strains as well as caspofungin-resistant strains with documented fks mutations. MK-3118 was documented to have potent in vitro activity against Candida spp. when tested by both CLSI and EUCAST BMD methods, with the highest overall EA (99.1%) obtained when MK-3118 MIC results were read after 24 h of incubation using a partial inhibition EC (50%).

  11. In vitro activity of a new oral glucan synthase inhibitor (MK-3118) tested against Aspergillus spp. by CLSI and EUCAST broth microdilution methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaller, Michael A; Messer, Shawn A; Motyl, Mary R; Jones, Ronald N; Castanheira, Mariana

    2013-02-01

    MK-3118, a glucan synthase inhibitor derived from enfumafungin, and comparator agents were tested against 71 Aspergillus spp., including itraconazole-resistant strains (MIC, ≥ 4 μg/ml), using CLSI and EUCAST reference broth microdilution methods. The CLSI 90% minimum effective concentration (MEC(90))/MIC(90) values (μg/ml) for MK-3118, amphotericin B, and caspofungin, respectively, were as follows: 0.12, 2, and 0.03 for Aspergillus flavus species complex (SC); 0.25, 2, and 0.06 for Aspergillus fumigatus SC; 0.12, 2, and 0.06 for Aspergillus terreus SC; and 0.06, 1, and 0.03 for Aspergillus niger SC. Essential agreement between the values found by CLSI and EUCAST (± 2 log(2) dilution steps) was 94.3%. MK-3118 was determined to be a potent agent regardless of the in vitro method applied, with excellent activity against contemporary wild-type and itraconazole-resistant strains of Aspergillus spp.

  12. Oral Hygiene. Learning Activity Package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hime, Kirsten

    This learning activity package on oral hygiene is one of a series of 12 titles developed for use in health occupations education programs. Materials in the package include objectives, a list of materials needed, a list of definitions, information sheets, reviews (self evaluations) of portions of the content, and answers to reviews. These topics…

  13. Effect of food on the pharmacokinetics of oral MMI270B (CGS 27023A), a novel matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.A.L.M. Eskens (Ferry); N.C. Levitt; A. Sparreboom (Alex); L. Choi; R. Mather; J. Verweij (Jaap); A.L. Harris

    2000-01-01

    textabstractMMI270B is a matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor (MMPI) with in vitro and in vivo activity. To exert optimal target inhibition, MMPI must be given chronically, and therefore, oral bioavailability is important. We analyzed the effect of food intake on AUC0-8

  14. Clinical utility of the oral JAK inhibitor tofacitinib in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cutolo M

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Maurizio Cutolo, Marianna Meroni Research Laboratories and Academic Division of Clinical Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genova, Genova, Italy Abstract: Immune/inflammatory cells act in rheumatoid arthritis (RA-affected patients by synthesizing several inflammatory mediators, including cytokines that initiate intracellular signaling. Recently, small molecule inhibitors of transduction and transcription signals that influence the intracellular pathways (such as the Janus kinase [JAK] family of tyrosine kinases have been tested for RA treatment. Four members of the JAK family are known: JAK1, JAK2, JAK3, and TyK2. JAK1/JAK3 constitutively binds to the cytoplasmic portion of the cytokine receptor – the common gamma chain – that represents a common subunit of several cytokines involved in T-cell and natural killer cell development, as well as in B-cell activation. Tofacitinib is an oral JAK inhibitor that is now available and effective in RA treatment, as shown in multiple Phase II and Phase III clinical trials. However, long-term safety data and comparisons with other disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and small molecule inhibitors are necessary to better determine the role of tofacitinib in RA. Keywords: Janus kinase inhibitors, tofacitinib, rheumatoid arthritis, kinases, small molecules inhibitors, intracellular signaling

  15. Design and synthesis of a novel family of triazine-based inhibitors of sorbitol dehydrogenase with oral activity: 1-[4-[3R,5S-dimethyl-4-(4-methyl-[1,3,5]triazin-2-yl)-piperazin-1-yl]-[1,3,5]triazin-2-yl]-(R) ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylari, Banavara L; Withbroe, Gregory J; Beebe, David A; Brackett, Nathaniel S; Conn, Edward L; Coutcher, James B; Oates, Peter J; Zembrowski, William J

    2003-09-15

    Two new templates, (R) 2-hydroxyethyl-pyridine and (R) 2-hydroxyethyl-triazine, were used to design novel sorbitol dehydrogenase inhibitors (SDIs). The design concept included spawning of these templates to function as effective ligands to the catalytic zinc within the enzyme through incorporation of optimally substituted piperazino-triazine side chains so as to accommodate the active site in the enzyme for efficient binding. This strategy resulted in orally active SDIs, which penetrate key tissues, for example, sciatic nerve of chronically diabetic rats. The latter template led to the design of the title inhibitor, 33, which normalized the elevated sciatic nerve fructose by 96% at an oral dose of 10mg/kg.

  16. Effective Oral English Activities for ESL Classroom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡波

    2014-01-01

    Oral English has always been a major problem for Chinese Eng-lish as Second Language (ESL) students. In fact, most Chinese students do not practice oral English very often, while their reading and writing abilities have gained rapid progress. However, language is a system that includes both words and sounds for communicative use, neither of which can be neglected. While there are hundred forms of classroom activities, the usage of most effective o-ral activities has become a serious issue that an ESL teacher should focuses on. The review is based on research results on effective oral ESL activities. The research results on the factors should be considered when selecting/plan-ning oral activities and applying oral activities ESL classes.

  17. Proteasome Inhibitors with Photocontrolled Activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansen, Mickel J.; Velema, Willem A.; de Bruin, Gerjan; Overkleeft, Herman S.; Szymanski, Wiktor; Feringa, Ben L.

    2014-01-01

    Proteasome inhibitors are widely used in cancer treatment as chemotherapeutic agents. However, their employment often results in severe side effects, due to their non-specific cytotoxicity towards healthy tissue. This problem might be overcome by using a photopharmacological approach, that is, by

  18. (2R)-4-Oxo-4[3-(Trifluoromethyl)-5,6-diihydro:1,2,4}triazolo[4,3-a}pyrazin-7(8H)-y1]-1-(2,4,5-trifluorophenyl)butan-2-amine: A Potent, Orally Active Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV Inhibitor for the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D.; Wang, L.; Beconi, M.; Eiermann, G.; Fisher, M.; He, H.; Hickey, G.; Kowalchick, Jennifer; Leiting, Barbara; Lyons, K.; Marsilio, F.; McCann, F.; Patel, R.; Petrov, A.; Scapin, G.; Patel, S.; Roy, R.; Wu, J.; Wyvratt, M.; Zhang, B.; Zhu, L.; Thornberry, N.; Weber, A. (Merck)

    2010-11-10

    A novel series of {beta}-amino amides incorporating fused heterocycles, i.e., triazolopiperazines, were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. (2R)-4-Oxo-4-[3-(trifluoromethyl)-5,6-dihydro[1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-a]pyrazin-7(8H)-yl]-1-(2,4,5-trifluorophenyl)butan-2-amine (1) is a potent, orally active DPP-IV inhibitor (IC{sub 50} = 18 nM) with excellent selectivity over other proline-selective peptidases, oral bioavailability in preclinical species, and in vivo efficacy in animal models. MK-0431, the phosphate salt of compound 1, was selected for development as a potential new treatment for type 2 diabetes.

  19. Antitumor activity of Papua’s Myrmecodia pendans in human oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma cell line through induction of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1 and suppression of cyclin E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriatno DRG

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC is one of the most common cancers encountered in Indonesia, due to the prevalent habits of tobacco chewing, alcohol drinking and smoking. Oral tongue cancer is characterized by a high degree of local invasion and a high rate of metastasis to the cervical lymph nodes. Interestingly, treatment options for this cancer are limited. The aim of this study was to examine the antitumor activity of Papua’s Myrmecodia pendans (ant nest plant in a human oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma cell line (B88 and to explore the possible mechanism in it. In the present study, B88 cells were treated with various concentration of ethanol extract of Papua’s M. pendans. The results revealed that B88 cells treated with Papua’s M. pendans were remarkable suppressed in cell growth and cell invasion, and had a significant induction of apoptosis characterized by an increase in activation of caspase-3 and -9. Furthermore, up-regulation of p27Kip1 and down-regulation of cyclin E protein was detected in B88 cells treated with Papua’s M. pendans. These results indicated that Papua’s M. pendans exhibited a high potential antitumor activity in human oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma through induction of p27Kip1 and suppression of cycline E.

  20. Application of the bicyclo[1.1.1]pentane motif as a nonclassical phenyl ring bioisostere in the design of a potent and orally active γ-secretase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepan, Antonia F; Subramanyam, Chakrapani; Efremov, Ivan V; Dutra, Jason K; O'Sullivan, Theresa J; DiRico, Kenneth J; McDonald, W Scott; Won, Annie; Dorff, Peter H; Nolan, Charles E; Becker, Stacey L; Pustilnik, Leslie R; Riddell, David R; Kauffman, Gregory W; Kormos, Bethany L; Zhang, Liming; Lu, Yasong; Capetta, Steven H; Green, Michael E; Karki, Kapil; Sibley, Evelyn; Atchison, Kevin P; Hallgren, Andrew J; Oborski, Christine E; Robshaw, Ashley E; Sneed, Blossom; O'Donnell, Christopher J

    2012-04-12

    Replacement of the central, para-substituted fluorophenyl ring in the γ-secretase inhibitor 1 (BMS-708,163) with the bicyclo[1.1.1]pentane motif led to the discovery of compound 3, an equipotent enzyme inhibitor with significant improvements in passive permeability and aqueous solubility. The modified biopharmaceutical properties of 3 translated into excellent oral absorption characteristics (~4-fold ↑ C(max) and AUC values relative to 1) in a mouse model of γ-secretase inhibition. In addition, SAR studies into other fluorophenyl replacements indicate the intrinsic advantages of the bicyclo[1.1.1]pentane moiety over conventional phenyl ring replacements with respect to achieving an optimal balance of properties (e.g., γ-secretase inhibition, aqueous solubility/permeability, in vitro metabolic stability). Overall, this work enhances the scope of the [1.1.1]-bicycle beyond that of a mere "spacer" unit and presents a compelling case for its broader application as a phenyl group replacement in scenarios where the aromatic ring count impacts physicochemical parameters and overall drug-likeness. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  1. Discovery of Novel Oral Protein Synthesis Inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis That Target Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palencia, Andrés; Li, Xianfeng; Bu, Wei; Choi, Wai; Ding, Charles Z.; Easom, Eric E.; Feng, Lisa; Hernandez, Vincent; Houston, Paul; Liu, Liang; Meewan, Maliwan; Mohan, Manisha; Rock, Fernando L.; Sexton, Holly; Zhang, Suoming; Zhou, Yasheen; Wan, Baojie; Wang, Yuehong; Franzblau, Scott G.; Woolhiser, Lisa; Gruppo, Veronica; Lenaerts, Anne J.; O'Malley, Theresa; Parish, Tanya; Cooper, Christopher B.; Waters, M. Gerard; Ma, Zhenkun; Ioerger, Thomas R.; Sacchettini, James C.; Rullas, Joaquín; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Pérez-Herrán, Esther; Mendoza, Alfonso; Barros, David; Cusack, Stephen; Plattner, Jacob J.

    2016-01-01

    The recent development and spread of extensively drug-resistant and totally drug-resistant resistant (TDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis highlight the need for new antitubercular drugs. Protein synthesis inhibitors have played an important role in the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) starting with the inclusion of streptomycin in the first combination therapies. Although parenteral aminoglycosides are a key component of therapy for multidrug-resistant TB, the oxazolidinone linezolid is the only orally available protein synthesis inhibitor that is effective against TB. Here, we show that small-molecule inhibitors of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs), which are known to be excellent antibacterial protein synthesis targets, are orally bioavailable and effective against M. tuberculosis in TB mouse infection models. We applied the oxaborole tRNA-trapping (OBORT) mechanism, which was first developed to target fungal cytoplasmic leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS), to M. tuberculosis LeuRS. X-ray crystallography was used to guide the design of LeuRS inhibitors that have good biochemical potency and excellent whole-cell activity against M. tuberculosis. Importantly, their good oral bioavailability translates into in vivo efficacy in both the acute and chronic mouse models of TB with potency comparable to that of the frontline drug isoniazid. PMID:27503647

  2. Protease Inhibitors from Plants with Antimicrobial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoonkyung Park

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial proteins (peptides are known to play important roles in the innate host defense mechanisms of most living organisms, including plants, insects, amphibians and mammals. They are also known to possess potent antibiotic activity against bacteria, fungi, and even certain viruses. Recently, the rapid emergence of microbial pathogens that are resistant to currently available antibiotics has triggered considerable interest in the isolation and investigation of the mode of action of antimicrobial proteins (peptides. Plants produce a variety of proteins (peptides that are involved in the defense against pathogens and invading organisms, including ribosome-inactivating proteins, lectins, protease inhibitors and antifungal peptides (proteins. Specially, the protease inhibitors can inhibit aspartic, serine and cysteine proteinases. Increased levels of trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitors correlated with the plants resistance to the pathogen. Usually, the purification of antimicrobial proteins (peptides with protease inhibitor activity was accomplished by salt-extraction, ultrafiltration and C18 reverse phase chromatography, successfully. We discuss the relation between antimicrobial and anti-protease activity in this review. Protease inhibitors from plants potently inhibited the growth of a variety of pathogenic bacterial and fungal strains and are therefore excellent candidates for use as the lead compounds for the development of novel antimicrobial agents.

  3. Combining oral contraceptives with a natural nuclear factor-kappa B inhibitor for the treatment of endometriosis-related pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Hugo; Haddad, Clarice; Casoy, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Endometriosis is a chronic disease in which a persistent state of heightened inflammation is maintained by nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation. The progestins present in oral contraceptives are potent inhibitors of NF-κB translocation to cell nuclei, while Pycnogenol® (Pinus pinaster) acts by blocking post-translational events. In this study, the effects of Pycnogenol on pain scores were investigated in patients with endometriosis using oral contraceptives containing either gestodene or drospirenone in extended regimens. Pain scores were determined using a visual analog scale before and after 3 months of treatment. Oral contraceptives, used alone (groups 1 and 3) or in association with Pycnogenol (groups 2 and 4), resulted in significant decreases in pain scores after 3 months of treatment; however, this reduction was significantly greater in the groups using oral contraceptives + Pycnogenol (groups 2 and 4) compared with those using oral contraceptives alone (groups 1 and 3). In the groups using oral contraceptives alone, 50% of patients became pain-free by the end of the third month of treatment. These results suggest that Pycnogenol increases the efficacy of oral contraceptives for the treatment of endometriosis-related pain. PMID:24379702

  4. A D-octapeptide drug efflux pump inhibitor acts synergistically with azoles in a murine oral candidiasis infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayama, Kazumi; Ishibashi, Hiroko; Ishijima, Sanae A; Niimi, Kyoko; Tansho, Shigeru; Ono, Yasuo; Monk, Brian C; Holmes, Ann R; Harding, David R K; Cannon, Richard D; Abe, Shigeru

    2012-03-01

    Clinical management of patients undergoing treatment of oropharyngeal candidiasis with azole antifungals can be impaired by azole resistance. High-level azole resistance is often caused by the overexpression of Candida albicans efflux pump Cdr1p. Inhibition of this pump therefore represents a target for combination therapies that reverse azole resistance. We assessed the therapeutic potential of the D-octapeptide derivative RC21v3, a Cdr1p inhibitor, in the treatment of murine oral candidiasis caused by either the azole-resistant C. albicans clinical isolate MML611 or its azole-susceptible parental strain MML610. RC21v3, fluconazole (FLC), or a combination of both drugs were administered orally to immunosuppressed ICR mice at 3, 24, and 27 h after oral inoculation with C. albicans. FLC protected the mice inoculated with MML610 from oral candidiasis, but was only partially effective in MML611-infected mice. The co-application of RC21v3 (0.02 μmol per dose) potentiated the therapeutic performance of FLC for mice infected with either strain. It caused a statistically significant decrease in C. albicans cfu isolated from the oral cavity of the infected mice and reduced oral lesions. RC21v3 also enhanced the therapeutic activity of itraconazole against MML611 infection. These results indicate that RC21v3 in combination with azoles has potential as a therapy against azole-resistant oral candidiasis.

  5. Discovering anti-platelet drug combinations with an integrated model of activator-inhibitor relationships, activator-activator synergies and inhibitor-inhibitor synergies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Lombardi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Identifying effective therapeutic drug combinations that modulate complex signaling pathways in platelets is central to the advancement of effective anti-thrombotic therapies. However, there is no systems model of the platelet that predicts responses to different inhibitor combinations. We developed an approach which goes beyond current inhibitor-inhibitor combination screening to efficiently consider other signaling aspects that may give insights into the behaviour of the platelet as a system. We investigated combinations of platelet inhibitors and activators. We evaluated three distinct strands of information, namely: activator-inhibitor combination screens (testing a panel of inhibitors against a panel of activators; inhibitor-inhibitor synergy screens; and activator-activator synergy screens. We demonstrated how these analyses may be efficiently performed, both experimentally and computationally, to identify particular combinations of most interest. Robust tests of activator-activator synergy and of inhibitor-inhibitor synergy required combinations to show significant excesses over the double doses of each component. Modeling identified multiple effects of an inhibitor of the P2Y12 ADP receptor, and complementarity between inhibitor-inhibitor synergy effects and activator-inhibitor combination effects. This approach accelerates the mapping of combination effects of compounds to develop combinations that may be therapeutically beneficial. We integrated the three information sources into a unified model that predicted the benefits of a triple drug combination targeting ADP, thromboxane and thrombin signaling.

  6. Roles of secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor amniotic membrane in oral wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elly Munadziroh

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Secretory Leukocyte Protease Inhibitor (SLPI is serine protease inhibitor. Secretory Leukocyte Protease Inhibitor is a protein found in secretions such as whole saliva, seminal fluid, cervical mucus, synovial fluid, breast milk, tears, and cerebral spinal fluid, as in secretions from the nose and bronchi, amniotic fluid and amniotic membrane etc. These findings demonstrate that SLPI function as a potent anti protease, anti inflammatory, bactericidal, antifungal, tissue repair, extra cellular synthesis. Impaired healing states are characterized by excessive proteolysis and often bacterial infection, leading to the hypothesis that SLPI may have a role in the process. The objectives of this article are to investigate the role of SLPI in oral inflammation and how it contributes to tissue repair in oral mucosa. The oral wound healing responses are impaired in the SLPI sufficient mice and matrix synthesis and collagen deposition are delayed. This study indicated that SLPI is a povital factor necessary for optimal wound healing.

  7. Discovery of novel (4-piperidinyl)-piperazines as potent and orally active acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1/2 non-selective inhibitors: F-Boc and triF-Boc groups are acid-stable bioisosteres for the Boc group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chonan, Tomomichi; Wakasugi, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Daisuke; Yashiro, Miyoko; Oi, Takahiro; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Ohoka-Sugita, Ayumi; Io, Fusayo; Koretsune, Hiroko; Hiratate, Akira

    2011-03-01

    Novel (4-piperidinyl)-piperazine derivatives were synthesized and evaluated as ACC1/2 non-selective inhibitors. Optimization of the substituents on the nitrogen of the piperidine ring led to the identification of the fluorine substituted tert-butoxycarbonyl group. Advanced analog, 1,1,1-trifluoro-2-methylpropan-2-yl 4-{4-[(2-amino-6-methyl-1-benzothiophen-3-yl)carbonyl]piperazin-1-yl}piperidine-1-carboxylate (12c) showed potent inhibitory activities in enzyme-assay and cell-based assays. Compound 12c also exhibited reduction of hepatic de novo fatty acid synthesis in rats after oral administration.

  8. The Glycosylation of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skottrup, Peter Durand; Pedersen, Katrine Egelund; Christensen, Anni

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) has three potential sites for N-linked glycosylation, including Asn209Tyr210Thr211, Asn265Met266Thr267, and Asn329Glu330Ser331. Using a HEK293 expression system, we have made mutants with Asp or Gln substitutions of the Asn residue in each of these s...

  9. Factors Influencing Adherence in Cancer Patients Taking Oral Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbrugghe, Mathieu; Duprez, Veerle; Beeckman, Dimitri; Grypdonck, Mieke; Quaghebeur, Marijke; Verschueren, Caroline; Verhaeghe, Sofie; Van Hecke, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Nonadherence in cancer patients taking oral anticancer drugs is common. Reasons for nonadherence are still not really understood as influencing factors are often complex, dynamic, and interrelated. A qualitative study was conducted to gain insight into (non-)adherence behavior in patients taking oral tyrosine kinase inhibitors by exploring (1) processes and factors influencing (non-)adherence and (2) their interrelatedness. Semistructured interviews were held with 30 patients of different ages and with different types of cancer. A grounded theory approach was used. Three foci were found when dealing with oral tyrosine kinase inhibitors: (1) a focus on survival, (2) a focus on quality of life, and (3) a balance between survival and quality of life. The process of adherence was determined by a set of complex and interrelated influencing factors: treatment-related side effects, hope, anxiety, trust, and feedback mechanisms. This qualitative study gives insight into processes and factors influencing (non-)adherence behavior in patients taking oral tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The results of this study can help healthcare professionals understand why patients taking oral tyrosine kinase inhibitors do not always adhere to their therapy. Conditions should be created by which patients get maximum opportunity to establish a balance between survival and quality of life. An open climate and a trust-based relationship should be established in which patients feel comfortable to openly discuss their therapy and the difficulties they experience.

  10. A novel and orally active poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor, KR-33889 [2-[methoxycarbonyl(4-methoxyphenyl) methylsulfanyl]-1H-benzimidazole-4-carboxylic acid amide], attenuates injury in in vitro model of cell death and in vivo model of cardiac ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Kwang-Seok; Lee, Sunkyung; Yi, Kyu Yang; Seo, Ho Won; Koo, Hyun-Na; Lee, Byung Ho

    2009-01-01

    Blocking of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 has been expected to protect the heart from ischemia-reperfusion injury. We have recently identified a novel and orally active PARP-1 inhibitor, KR-33889 [2-[methoxycarbonyl(4-methoxyphenyl)-methylsulfanyl]-1H-benzimidazole-4-carboxylic acid amide], and its major metabolite, KR-34285 [2-[carboxy(4-methoxyphenyl)methylsulfanyl]-1H-benzimidazole-4-carboxylic acid amide]. KR-33889 potently inhibited PARP-1 activity with an IC(50) value of 0.52 +/- 0.10 microM. In H9c2 myocardial cells, KR-33889 (0.03-30 microM) showed a resistance to hydrogen peroxide (2 mM)-mediated oxidative insult and significantly attenuated activation of intracellular PARP-1. In anesthetized rats subjected to 30 min of coronary occlusion and 3 h of reperfusion, KR-33889 (0.3-3 mg/kg i.v.) dose-dependently reduced myocardial infarct size. KR-34285, a major metabolite of KR-33889, exerted similar patterns to the parent compound with equi- or weaker potency in the same studies described above. In separate experiments for the therapeutic time window study, KR-33889 (3 mg/kg i.v.) given at preischemia, at reperfusion or in both, in rat models also significantly reduced the myocardial infarction compared with their respective vehicle-treated group. Furthermore, the oral administration of KR-33889 (1-10 mg/kg p.o.) at 1 h before occlusion significantly reduced myocardial injury. The ability of KR-33889 to inhibit PARP in the rat model of ischemic heart was confirmed by immunohistochemical detection of poly(ADP-ribose) activation. These results indicate that the novel PARP inhibitor KR-33889 exerts its cardioprotective effect in in vitro and in vivo studies of myocardial ischemia via potent PARP inhibition and also suggest that KR-33889 could be an attractive therapeutic candidate with oral activity for several cardiovascular disorders, including myocardial infarction.

  11. Use of the oral platelet inhibitors dipyridamole and acetylsalicylic acid is associated with increased risk of fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Peter; Steinberg, Thomas H; Schwarz, P

    2012-01-01

    ). Clopidogrel is the most widely used, and in combination with acetylsalicylic acid it is the standard of care for acute coronary syndromes and percutaneous coronary interventions. However, the modes of action involve pathways that are involved in the metabolic activity in bone cells and pharmacologic...... modulation of these pathways may therefore have effects on bone. METHODS: In the current study, we assessed the association between platelet inhibitor use and fracture incidence in a population-based epidemiological study performed within the Danish population consisting of approximately 5.3million...... is not associated with increased fracture risk. CONCLUSIONS: Use of some oral platelet inhibitors is associated with increased risk of fractures, and more studies are warranted to determine the potential effect of platelet inhibitors on bone metabolism in vivo....

  12. Ketorolac salt is a newly discovered DDX3 inhibitor to treat oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, Sabindra K; Routray, Samapika; Veeramachaneni, Ganesh Kumar; Dash, Rupesh; Botlagunta, Mahendran

    2015-04-28

    DDX3 belongs to DEAD box RNA helicase family and is involved in the progression of several types of cancer. In this work, we employed a High Throughput Virtual screening approach to identify bioactive compounds against DDX3 from ZINC natural database. Ketorolac salt was selected based on its binding free energy less than or equals to -5 Kcal/mol with reference to existing synthetic DDX3 inhibitors and strong hydrogen bond interactions as similar to crystallized DDX3 protein (2I4I). The anti-cancer activity of Ketorolac salt against DDX3 was tested using oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell lines. This compound significantly down regulated the expression of DDX3 in human OSCC line (H357) and the half maximal growth inhibitory concentration (IC50) of Ketorolac salt in H357 cell line is 2.6 µM. Ketorolac salt also inhibited the ATP hydrolysis by directly interacting with DDX3. More importantly, we observed decreased number of neoplastic tongue lesions and reduced lesion severity in Ketorolac salt treated groups in a carcinogen induced tongue tumor mouse model. Taken together, our result demonstrates that Ketorolac salt is a newly discovered bioactive compound against DDX3 and this compound can be used as an ideal drug candidate to treat DDX3 associated oral cancer.

  13. Oral Hygiene. Instructor's Packet. Learning Activity Package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hime, Kirsten

    This instructor's packet accompanies the learning activity package (LAP) on oral hygiene. Contents included in the packet are a time sheet, suggested uses for the LAP, an instruction sheet, final LAP reviews, a final LAP review answer key, suggested activities, additional resources (student handouts), student performance checklists for both…

  14. Functional Stability of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songul Yasar Yildiz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 is the main inhibitor of plasminogen activators, such as tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA, and a major regulator of the fibrinolytic system. PAI-1 plays a pivotal role in acute thrombotic events such as deep vein thrombosis (DVT and myocardial infarction (MI. The biological effects of PAI-1 extend far beyond thrombosis including its critical role in fibrotic disorders, atherosclerosis, renal and pulmonary fibrosis, type-2 diabetes, and cancer. The conversion of PAI-1 from the active to the latent conformation appears to be unique among serpins in that it occurs spontaneously at a relatively rapid rate. Latency transition is believed to represent a regulatory mechanism, reducing the risk of thrombosis from a prolonged antifibrinolytic action of PAI-1. Thus, relying solely on plasma concentrations of PAI-1 without assessing its function may be misleading in interpreting the role of PAI-1 in many complex diseases. Environmental conditions, interaction with other proteins, mutations, and glycosylation are the main factors that have a significant impact on the stability of the PAI-1 structure. This review provides an overview on the current knowledge on PAI-1 especially importance of PAI-1 level and stability and highlights the potential use of PAI-1 inhibitors for treating cardiovascular disease.

  15. Blood pressure lowering in essential hypertension with an oral renin inhibitor, aliskiren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Alice; Jensen, Chris; Nussberger, Juerg; O'Brien, Eoin

    2003-12-01

    Inhibition of the first and rate-limiting step of the renin-angiotensin system has long been an elusive therapeutic goal. Aliskiren, the first known representative of a new class of completely nonpeptide, orally active, renin inhibitors, has been shown to inhibit the production of angiotensin I and II in healthy volunteers and to reduce blood pressure (BP) in sodium-depleted marmosets. The aim of this randomized, double-blind, active comparator trial study was to assess the BP-lowering efficacy and safety of aliskiren. Two hundred twenty-six patients, 21 to 70 years of age, with mild to moderate hypertension, were randomly assigned to receive 37.5 mg, 75 mg, 150 mg, or 300 mg aliskiren or 100 mg losartan daily for 4 weeks. Dose-dependent reductions in daytime ambulatory systolic pressure (mean change, mm Hg [SD of change]; -0.4 [11.7], -5.3 [11.3], -8.0 [11.0], and -11.0 [11.0], P=0.0002) and in plasma renin activity (median change % [interquartile range]; -55 [-64, -11], -60 [-82, -46], -77 [-86, -72], and -83 [-92, -71], P=0.0008) were observed with 37.5, 75, 150, and 300 mg aliskiren. The change in daytime systolic pressure with 100 mg losartan (-10.9 [13.8]) was not significantly different from the changes seen with 75, 150, and 300 mg aliskiren. Aliskiren was well tolerated at all doses studied. This study demonstrates that aliskiren, through inhibition of renin, is an effective and safe orally active BP-lowering agent. Whether renin inhibition results in protection from heart attack, stroke, and nephropathy, similar to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition and angiotensin receptor blockade, needs to be researched.

  16. Structure-based design of novel guanidine/benzamidine mimics: potent and orally bioavailable factor Xa inhibitors as novel anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Patrick Y S; Clark, Charles G; Li, Renhua; Pinto, Donald J P; Orwat, Michael J; Galemmo, Robert A; Fevig, John M; Teleha, Christopher A; Alexander, Richard S; Smallwood, Angela M; Rossi, Karen A; Wright, Matthew R; Bai, Stephen A; He, Kan; Luettgen, Joseph M; Wong, Pancras C; Knabb, Robert M; Wexler, Ruth R

    2003-10-09

    As part of an ongoing effort to prepare orally active factor Xa inhibitors using structure-based drug design techniques and molecular recognition principles, a systematic study has been performed on the pharmacokinetic profile resulting from replacing the benzamidine in the P1 position with less basic benzamidine mimics or neutral residues. It is demonstrated that lowering the pK(a) of the P1 ligand resulted in compounds (3-benzylamine, 15a; 1-aminoisoquinoline, 24a; 3-aminobenzisoxazole, 23a; 3-phenylcarboxamide, 22b; and 4-methoxyphenyl, 22a) with improved pharmacokinetic features mainly as a result of decreased clearance, increased volume of distribution, and enhanced oral absorption. This work resulted in a series of potent and orally bioavailable factor Xa inhibitors that ultimately led to the discovery of SQ311, 24a. SQ311, which utilizes a 1-aminoisoquinoline as the P1 ligand, inhibits factor Xa with a K(i) of 0.33 nM and demonstrates both good in vivo antithrombotic efficacy and oral bioavailability.

  17. Inhibitors of p21-activated kinases (PAKs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Joachim; Crawford, James J; Hoeflich, Klaus P; Wang, Weiru

    2015-01-08

    The p21-activated kinase (PAK) family of serine/threonine protein kinases plays important roles in cytoskeletal organization, cellular morphogenesis, and survival, and members of this family have been implicated in many diseases including cancer, infectious diseases, and neurological disorders. Owing to their large and flexible ATP binding cleft, PAKs, particularly group I PAKs (PAK1, -2, and -3), are difficult to drug; hence, few PAK inhibitors with satisfactory kinase selectivity and druglike properties have been reported to date. Examples are a recently discovered group II PAK (PAK4, -5, -6) selective inhibitor series based on a benzimidazole core, a group I PAK selective series based on a pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine-7-one core, and an allosteric dibenzodiazepine PAK1 inhibitor series. Only one compound, an aminopyrazole based pan-PAK inhibitor, entered clinical trials but did not progress beyond phase I trials. Clinical proof of concept for pan-group I, pan-group II, or PAK isoform selective inhibition has yet to be demonstrated.

  18. Polyamine inhibitors for treatment of feline oral squamous cell carcinoma: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, John R; O'Brien, Thomas G; Skorupski, Katherine A; Krick, Erika L; Reiter, Alexander M; Jennings, Michael W; Jurney, Carrie H; Shofer, F S

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed proof-of-concept for use of polyamine inhibitor 2-diluoromethylornithine (DFMO) as a treatment for oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in client-owned cats. Polyamine levels in tumor tissue and normal oral mucosa were quantified before and after treatment. DFMO was administered orally to 14 client-owned cats with histologically confirmed oral SCC. Patients were monitored for gastrointestinal, dermatologic, auditory, hematological, and biochemical abnormalities. Total polyamine levels in tumor tissue decreased after treatment, as did the specific polyamine putrescine in both tumor tissue and normal mucosa. Ototoxicity was observed in 5 of 6 cats receiving pre- and post-treatment brainstem auditory evoked potential tests. Subclinical thrombocytopenia was observed in 6 of 14 cats. One cat showed mild post-anesthetic tremors that resolved without treatment. Oral administration of DFMO at doses used in this study resulted in significantly decreased tumor polyamine levels without life-threatening clinical or hematological toxicities. Further studies are warranted to explore pathophysiology of polyamine biochemistry and use of polyamine inhibitors in treatment of cats with oral SCC.

  19. Oral voclosporin: novel calcineurin inhibitor for treatment of noninfectious uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roesel M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Martin Roesel1, Christoph Tappeiner2, Arnd Heiligenhaus1,3, Carsten Heinz1,31Department of Ophthalmology, St Franziskus-Hospital, Muenster, Germany; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Inselspital, University of Bern, Switzerland; 3University Duisburg-Essen, GermanyAbstract: Voclosporin, a novel immunomodulatory drug inhibiting the calcineurin enzyme, was developed to prevent organ graft rejection and to treat autoimmune diseases. The chemical structure of voclosporin is similar to that of cyclosporine A, with a difference in one amino acid, leading to superior calcineurin inhibition and less variability in plasma concentration. Compared with placebo, voclosporin may significantly reduce inflammation and prevent recurrences of inflammation in patients with noninfectious uveitis. Future studies have to show if these advantages are accompanied by greater clinical efficacy and fewer side effects compared with the classic calcineurin inhibitors.Keywords: uveitis, immunosuppression, voclosporin

  20. Residual ovarian activity during oral contraception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. van Heusden

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe study objectives in this thesis focus on pituitary-ovarian activity in women using oral contraceptive steroids. Contraceptive steroids influence the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis in order to interfere with normal follicular development and ovulation. Additional effects on the e

  1. Residual ovarian activity during oral contraception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. van Heusden

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe study objectives in this thesis focus on pituitary-ovarian activity in women using oral contraceptive steroids. Contraceptive steroids influence the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis in order to interfere with normal follicular development and ovulation. Additional effects on the e

  2. Oral administration of FAK inhibitor TAE226 inhibits the progression of peritoneal dissemination of colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Hui-fang [Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, 2-5-1 Shikatacho, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Takaoka, Munenori [Department of General Surgery, Kawasaki Medical School, 2-1-80 Nakasange, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8505 (Japan); Bao, Xiao-hong [Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, 2-5-1 Shikatacho, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Wang, Zhi-gang [College of Life Science, Inner Mongolia University, The Key Laboratory of Mammal Reproductive Biology and Biotechnology, Ministry of Education, Hohhot 010021 (China); Tomono, Yasuko [Division of Molecular and Cell Biology, Shigei Medical Research Institute, 2117 Yamada, Okayama 700-0202 (Japan); Sakurama, Kazufumi; Ohara, Toshiaki [Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, 2-5-1 Shikatacho, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Fukazawa, Takuya; Yamatsuji, Tomoki [Department of General Surgery, Kawasaki Medical School, 2-1-80 Nakasange, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8505 (Japan); Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi [Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, 2-5-1 Shikatacho, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Naomoto, Yoshio, E-mail: ynaomoto@med.kawasaki-m.ac.jp [Department of General Surgery, Kawasaki Medical School, 2-1-80 Nakasange, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8505 (Japan)

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel FAK inhibitor TAE226 suppressed FAK activity in HCT116 colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TAE226 suppressed proliferation and migration, with a modest effect on adhesion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silencing of FAK by siRNA made no obvious difference on cancer cell attachment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TAE226 treatment suppressed the progression of peritoneal dissemination. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oral administration of TAE226 prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice. -- Abstract: Peritoneal dissemination is one of the most terrible types of colorectal cancer progression. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) plays a crucial role in the biological processes of cancer, such as cell attachment, migration, proliferation and survival, all of which are essential for the progression of peritoneal dissemination. Since we and other groups have reported that the inhibition of FAK activity exhibited a potent anticancer effect in several cancer models, we hypothesized that TAE226, a novel ATP-competitive tyrosine kinase inhibitor designed to target FAK, can prevent the occurrence and progression of peritoneal dissemination. In vitro, TAE226 greatly inhibited the proliferation and migration of HCT116 colon cancer cells, while their adhesion on the matrix surface was minimally inhibited when FAK activity and expression was suppressed by TAE226 and siRNA. In vivo, when HCT116 cells were intraperitoneally inoculated in mice, the cells could attach to the peritoneum and begin to grow within 24 h regardless of the pretreatment of cells with TAE226 or FAK-siRNA, suggesting that FAK is not essential, at least for the initial integrin-matrix contact. Interestingly, the treatment of mice before and after inoculation significantly suppressed cell attachment to the peritoneum. Furthermore, oral administration of TAE226 greatly reduced the size of disseminated tumors and prolonged survival in tumor-bearing mice. Taken

  3. Quantification of secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) in oral gargle specimens collected using mouthwash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce Campbell, Christine M.; Guan, Wei; Sprung, Robert; Koomen, John M.; O’Keefe, Michael T.; Ingles, Donna J.; Abrahamsen, Martha; Giuliano, Anna R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) is an innate immunity-associated protein known to inhibit HIV transmission, and is thought to inhibit a variety of infectious agents, including human papillomaviruses (HPVs). We aimed to optimize an established ELISA-based SLPI quantification assay for use with oral gargle specimens collected using mouthwash, and to assess preliminary associations with age, smoking status, and alcohol intake. Methods Oral gargle supernatants from 50 individuals were used to optimize the Human SLPI Quantikine ELISA Kit. Sample suitability was assessed and quality control analyses were conducted. Results Salivary SLPI was successfully recovered from oral gargles with low intra-assay and high inter-individual variability. Initial measurements showed that salivary SLPI varied considerably across individuals, and that SLPI was inversely associated with age. Conclusions This optimized assay can be used to examine the role of SLPI in the acquisition of oral HPV and other infections. PMID:24140751

  4. The discovery of Polo-like kinase 4 inhibitors: identification of (1R,2S).2-(3-((E).4-(((cis).2,6-dimethylmorpholino)methyl)styryl). 1H.indazol-6-yl)-5'-methoxyspiro[cyclopropane-1,3'-indolin]-2'-one (CFI-400945) as a potent, orally active antitumor agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Peter B; Liu, Yong; Forrest, Bryan; Cumming, Graham; Li, Sze-Wan; Patel, Narendra Kumar; Edwards, Louise; Laufer, Radoslaw; Feher, Miklos; Ban, Fuqiang; Awrey, Donald E; Mao, Guodong; Plotnikova, Olga; Hodgson, Richard; Beletskaya, Irina; Mason, Jacqueline M; Luo, Xunyi; Nadeem, Vincent; Wei, Xin; Kiarash, Reza; Madeira, Brian; Huang, Ping; Mak, Tak W; Pan, Guohua; Pauls, Henry W

    2015-01-08

    Previous publications from our laboratory have introduced novel inhibitors of Polo-like kinase 4 (PLK4), a mitotic kinase identified as a potential target for cancer therapy. The search for potent and selective PLK4 inhibitors yielded (E)-3-((1Hindazol-6-yl)methylene)indolin-2-ones, which were superseded by the bioisosteric 2-(1H-indazol-6-yl)spiro[cyclopropane-1,3'-indolin]-2'-ones, e.g., 3. The later scaffold confers improved drug-like properties and incorporates two stereogenic centers. This work reports the discovery of a novel one-pot double SN2 displacement reaction for the stereoselective installation of the desired asymmetric centers and confirms the stereochemistry of the most potent stereoisomer, e.g., 44. Subsequent work keys on the optimization of the oral exposure of nanomolar PLK4 inhibitors with potent cancer cell growth inhibitory activity. A short list of compounds with superior potency and pharmacokinetic properties in rodents and dogs was studied in mouse models of tumor growth. We conclude with the identification of compound 48 (designated CFI-400945) as a novel clinical candidate for cancer therapy.

  5. Combining oral contraceptives with a natural nuclear factor-kappa B inhibitor for the treatment of endometriosis-related pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia H Jr

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hugo Maia Jr,1–3 Clarice Haddad,3 Julio Casoy3 1Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, School of Medicine, Federal University of Bahia, 2Itaigara Memorial Day Hospital, 3Centro de Pesquisas e Assistência em Reprodução Humana (CEPARH, Salvador, Bahia, Brazil Abstract: Endometriosis is a chronic disease in which a persistent state of heightened inflammation is maintained by nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB activation. The progestins present in oral contraceptives are potent inhibitors of NF-κB translocation to cell nuclei, while Pycnogenol® (Pinus pinaster acts by blocking post-translational events. In this study, the effects of Pycnogenol on pain scores were investigated in patients with endometriosis using oral contraceptives containing either gestodene or drospirenone in extended regimens. Pain scores were determined using a visual analog scale before and after 3 months of treatment. Oral contraceptives, used alone (groups 1 and 3 or in association with Pycnogenol (groups 2 and 4, resulted in significant decreases in pain scores after 3 months of treatment; however, this reduction was significantly greater in the groups using oral contraceptives + Pycnogenol (groups 2 and 4 compared with those using oral contraceptives alone (groups 1 and 3. In the groups using oral contraceptives alone, 50% of patients became pain-free by the end of the third month of treatment. These results suggest that Pycnogenol increases the efficacy of oral contraceptives for the treatment of endometriosis-related pain. Keywords: Pycnogenol®, aromatase, endometriosis, nuclear factor-kappa B

  6. The INHIBITOR OF MERISTEM ACTIVITY (IMA) protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicard, Adrien; Hernould, Michel

    2008-01-01

    The INHIBITOR OF MERISTEM ACTIVITY (IMA) gene from tomato regulates the processes of flower and ovule development. 1 IMA encodes a Mini Zinc Finger (MIF) protein that is characterized by a very short sequence containing an unusual zinc-finger domain. IMA acts as a repressor of WUSCHEL expression which controls the meristem organizing centre and the determinacy of the nucellus during ovule development. IMA inhibits cell proliferation during floral termination, controls the number of carpels during floral development and participates in the initiation of ovule primordia by activating D-type gene expression. In addition IMA is involved in a multiple hormonal signalling pathway like its Arabidopsis homolog MIF1.2 We thus propose that IMA, as a representative of this new family of zinc finger proteins, is an important effector in the regulatory pathway controlling meristem activity linking cell division, differentiation and hormonal control of development. PMID:19704478

  7. Management of major bleedings during anticoagulant treatment with the oral direct thrombin inhibitor ximelagatran or warfarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernlöf, Gunilla; Sjöström, Britta M; Lindell, Klas M; Wall, Ulrika E

    2009-12-01

    Several new oral anticoagulants are currently investigated in phase III programmes, mainly with inhibition of factor Xa or thrombin as their pharmacological target. Advantages are expected with these new drugs compared with vitamin K antagonists, but one potential drawback is the lack of specific antidotes. During the clinical studies with ximelagatran, an oral direct thrombin inhibitor withdrawn due to hepatic side effects, investigators were instructed to manage bleedings with routine measures. We have retrospectively tried to assess whether this was sufficient or whether there was a need for reversal strategies. The study population consisted of patients with major bleedings in three long-term studies (104 ximelagatran, 155 warfarin). All individual patient narratives were reviewed with respect to management of the bleeding. Complementary data were retrieved from the data-based case report forms. Approximately, two of three of the patients in both groups were subject to some kind of treatment. One-third (1/3) in both groups had transfusions documented and/or received specific medication. Vitamin K was given more often to warfarin patients. Two ximelagatran patients received prothrombin complex (four-factor concentrate), but one was a patient with a severe hepatopathy suspected to be drug-induced. Overall, the case descriptions did not reveal any apparent differences in the course of events between groups. We found no indications that the lack of an antidote posed a clinical problem in patients treated with ximelagatran as compared with warfarin. The relatively short half-life of melagatran, the active metabolite of ximelagatran, may have contributed to these results.

  8. Implications of Dabigatran, a direct thrombin inhibitor, for oral surgery practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Clayton; Robertson, Chad; Shivakumar, Sudeep; Lee, Min

    2013-01-01

    Direct thrombin inhibitors, specifically orally administered dabigatran etexilate, are emerging as alternatives to warfarin for anticoagulation in the management of atrial fibrillation and venous thromboembolism. The risk associated with bleeding events while taking dabigatran has been documented in multiple randomized controlled trials, but to date, no studies have focused on the risk of bleeding after dental extraction. Extraction of teeth is one of the most common surgical procedures and may cause significant bleeding, so a thorough understanding of the pharmacology of anticoagulant medications is required to prevent complications. With the increasing use of direct thrombin inhibitors, the safe management of patients taking these anticoagulants must be delineated. This review compares dabigatran and warfarin, especially in terms of their effects on dental and oral surgery practice, and examines best management of these patients in light of the existing literature.

  9. Maraviroc (UK-427,857), a potent, orally bioavailable, and selective small-molecule inhibitor of chemokine receptor CCR5 with broad-spectrum anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorr, Patrick; Westby, Mike; Dobbs, Susan; Griffin, Paul; Irvine, Becky; Macartney, Malcolm; Mori, Julie; Rickett, Graham; Smith-Burchnell, Caroline; Napier, Carolyn; Webster, Rob; Armour, Duncan; Price, David; Stammen, Blanda; Wood, Anthony; Perros, Manos

    2005-11-01

    Maraviroc (UK-427,857) is a selective CCR5 antagonist with potent anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) activity and favorable pharmacological properties. Maraviroc is the product of a medicinal chemistry effort initiated following identification of an imidazopyridine CCR5 ligand from a high-throughput screen of the Pfizer compound file. Maraviroc demonstrated potent antiviral activity against all CCR5-tropic HIV-1 viruses tested, including 43 primary isolates from various clades and diverse geographic origin (geometric mean 90% inhibitory concentration of 2.0 nM). Maraviroc was active against 200 clinically derived HIV-1 envelope-recombinant pseudoviruses, 100 of which were derived from viruses resistant to existing drug classes. There was little difference in the sensitivity of the 200 viruses to maraviroc, as illustrated by the biological cutoff in this assay (= geometric mean plus two standard deviations [SD] of 1.7-fold). The mechanism of action of maraviroc was established using cell-based assays, where it blocked binding of viral envelope, gp120, to CCR5 to prevent the membrane fusion events necessary for viral entry. Maraviroc did not affect CCR5 cell surface levels or associated intracellular signaling, confirming it as a functional antagonist of CCR5. Maraviroc has no detectable in vitro cytotoxicity and is highly selective for CCR5, as confirmed against a wide range of receptors and enzymes, including the hERG ion channel (50% inhibitory concentration, >10 microM), indicating potential for an excellent clinical safety profile. Studies in preclinical in vitro and in vivo models predicted maraviroc to have human pharmacokinetics consistent with once- or twice-daily dosing following oral administration. Clinical trials are ongoing to further investigate the potential of using maraviroc for the treatment of HIV-1 infection and AIDS.

  10. The Glycosylation of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skottrup, Peter; Pedersen, Katrine Egelund; Christensen, Anni

    2002-01-01

    spectrometry and monosaccharide composition analysis and compared to that of natural and recombinant PAI-1 from other sources. These results contribute to a structural basis for previous observations of a different functional importance of the N-linked glycosylation at each of the 2 sequences.......Plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) has three potential sites for N-linked glycosylation, including Asn209Tyr210Thr211, Asn265Met266Thr267, and Asn329Glu330Ser331. Using a HEK293 expression system, we have made mutants with Asp or Gln substitutions of the Asn residue in each...... of these sequences. Analyses of these mutants for the content of N-acetyl glucosamine showed that Asn209 and Asn265, but not Asn329, are glycosylated, in agreement with previous suggestions made on the basis of X-ray crystal structure analysis of PAI-1 expressed in CHO cells (Xue et al. (1998) Structure 6, 627...

  11. The Glycosylation of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skottrup, Peter; Pedersen, Katrine Egelund; Christensen, Anni

    spectrometry and monosaccharide composition analysis and compared to that of natural and recombinant PAI-1 from other sources. These results contribute to a structural basis for previous observations of a different functional importance of the N-linked glycosylation at each of the 2 sequences.......Plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) has three potential sites for N-linked glycosylation, including Asn209Tyr210Thr211, Asn265Met266Thr267, and Asn329Glu330Ser331. Using a HEK293 expression system, we have made mutants with Asp or Gln substitutions of the Asn residue in each...... of these sequences. Analyses of these mutants for the content of N-acetyl glucosamine showed that Asn209 and Asn265, but not Asn329, are glycosylated, in agreement with previous suggestions made on the basis of X-ray crystal structure analysis of PAI-1 expressed in CHO cells (Xue et al. (1998) Structure 6, 627...

  12. The effects of residual platelets in plasma on plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1-related assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Sunelle A.; Loots, Du Toit; Rijken, Dingeman C.

    2017-01-01

    Due to controversial evidence in the literature pertaining to the activity of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in platelets, we examined the effects of residual platelets present in plasma (a potential pre-analytical variable) on various plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1-related assays. Blood samples were collected from 151 individuals and centrifuged at 352 and 1500 g to obtain plasma with varying numbers of platelet. In a follow-up study, blood samples were collected from an additional 23 individuals, from whom platelet-poor (2000 g), platelet-containing (352 g) and platelet-rich plasma (200 g) were prepared and analysed as fresh-frozen and after five defrost-refreeze cycles (to determine the contribution of in vitro platelet degradation). Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 antigen, tissue plasminogen activator/plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 complex, plasma clot lysis time, β-thromboglobulin and plasma platelet count were analysed. Platelet α-granule release (plasma β-thromboglobulin) showed a significant association with plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 antigen levels but weak associations with plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity and a functional marker of fibrinolysis, clot lysis time. Upon dividing the study population into quartiles based on β-thromboglobulin levels, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 antigen increased significantly across the quartiles while plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity and clot lysis time tended to increase in the 4th quartile only. In the follow-up study, plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 antigen was also significantly influenced by platelet count in a concentration-dependent manner. Plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 antigen levels increased further after complete platelet degradation. Residual platelets in plasma significantly influence plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 antigen levels mainly through release of

  13. Garcinia xanthones as orally active antitumor agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaojin; Li, Xiang; Sun, Haopeng; Wang, Xiaojian; Zhao, Li; Gao, Yuan; Liu, Xiaorong; Zhang, Shenglie; Wang, Yanyan; Yang, Yingrui; Zeng, Su; Guo, Qinglong; You, Qidong

    2013-01-10

    Using a newly developed strategy whose key step is the regioselective propargylation of hydroxyxanthone substrates, 99 structurally diverse Garcinia natural-product-like xanthones based on gambogic acid were designed and synthesized and their in vitro antitumor activity was evaluated. A set of 40 related compounds was chosen for determination of their physicochemical properties including polar surface area, log D₇.₄, aqueous solubility, and permeability at pH 7.4. In the light of the in vitro antitumor activity and the physicochemical properties, two compounds were advanced into in vivo efficacy experiments. The antitumor activity of compound 112, administered po, showed more potent in vivo oral antitumor activity than gambogic acid.

  14. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and oral bleeding complications after invasive dental treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napeñas, Joel J; Hong, Catherine H L; Kempter, Eric; Brennan, Michael T; Furney, Scott L; Lockhart, Peter B

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the frequency of oral bleeding complications after invasive dental procedures in patients taking selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) medications. In this retrospective cohort study, we included dental patients who had invasive dental treatment and were taking an SSRI medication. Data collected included demographics, medical history, dental visits and procedures, and use of adjunctive measures to control bleeding. Primary outcomes included documentation of return visits or phone calls to the dental clinic or emergency department (ED) for oral bleeding, and oral bleeding or use of blood products for inpatients. There were 92 patients taking SSRIs who had 145 invasive procedure visits, consisting of extractions, implant surgery, alveoloplasty, periodontal surgery, subgingival scaling and root planning, and biopsy. There were 110 extraction visits yielding a total of 167 extractions. Among all patients, there was 1 return visit to the clinic and 1 telephone call with a chief complaint of oral bleeding. The frequency of oral bleeding complications after invasive dental treatment is low to negligible in patients on SSRI medications. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Suppression of inhibitor formation against FVIII in a murine model of hemophilia A by oral delivery of antigens bioencapsulated in plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Alexandra; Su, Jin; Lin, Shina; Wang, Xiaomei; Herzog, Roland W; Daniell, Henry

    2014-09-04

    Hemophilia A is the X-linked bleeding disorder caused by deficiency of coagulation factor VIII (FVIII). To address serious complications of inhibitory antibody formation in current replacement therapy, we created tobacco transplastomic lines expressing FVIII antigens, heavy chain (HC) and C2, fused with the transmucosal carrier, cholera toxin B subunit. Cholera toxin B-HC and cholera toxin B-C2 fusion proteins expressed up to 80 or 370 µg/g in fresh leaves, assembled into pentameric forms, and bound to GM1 receptors. Protection of FVIII antigen through bioencapsulation in plant cells and oral delivery to the gut immune system was confirmed by immunostaining. Feeding of HC/C2 mixture substantially suppressed T helper cell responses and inhibitor formation against FVIII in mice of 2 different strain backgrounds with hemophilia A. Prolonged oral delivery was required to control inhibitor formation long-term. Substantial reduction of inhibitor titers in preimmune mice demonstrated that the protocol could also reverse inhibitor formation. Gene expression and flow cytometry analyses showed upregulation of immune suppressive cytokines (transforming growth factor β and interleukin 10). Adoptive transfer experiments confirmed an active suppression mechanism and revealed induction of CD4(+)CD25(+) and CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells that potently suppressed anti-FVIII formation. In sum, these data support plant cell-based oral tolerance for suppression of inhibitor formation against FVIII. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  16. Effect of famotidine on the pharmacokinetics of apixaban, an oral direct factor Xa inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upreti VV

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Vijay V Upreti,1 Yan Song,1 Jessie Wang,2 Wonkyung Byon,3 Rebecca A Boyd,3 Janice M Pursley,4 Frank LaCreta,1 Charles E Frost1 1Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacometrics, Discovery Medicine and Clinical Pharmacology, 2Exploratory Development Global Biometric Sciences, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ, 3Primary Care Clinical Pharmacology, Pfizer, Groton, CT, 4Analytical and Bioanalytical Department, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ, USA Background: Apixaban is an oral, selective, direct factor Xa inhibitor approved for thromboprophylaxis after orthopedic surgery and stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation, and under development for treatment of venous thromboembolism. This study investigated the effect of a gastric acid suppressant, famotidine (a histamine H2-receptor antagonist, on the pharmacokinetics of apixaban in healthy subjects. Methods: This two-period, two-treatment crossover study randomized 18 healthy subjects to receive a single oral dose of apixaban 10 mg with and without a single oral dose of famotidine 40 mg administered 3 hours before dosing with apixaban. Plasma apixaban concentrations were measured up to 60 hours post-dose and pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated. Results: Famotidine did not affect maximum apixaban plasma concentration (Cmax or area under the plasma concentration-time curve from zero to infinite time (AUC∞. Point estimates for ratios of geometric means with and without famotidine were close to unity for Cmax (0.978 and AUC∞ (1.007, and 90% confidence intervals were entirely contained within the 80%–125% no-effect interval. Administration of apixaban alone and with famotidine was well tolerated. Conclusion: Famotidine does not affect the pharmacokinetics of apixaban, consistent with the physicochemical properties of apixaban (lack of an ionizable group and pH-independent solubility. Apixaban pharmacokinetics would not be affected by an increase in gastrointestinal pH due to

  17. [Antiviral activity in vitro and pharmacokinetics of HCV entry inhibitor AVR560].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivashchenko, A V; Iamanushkin, P M; Mit'kin, O D; Ezhova, E V; Korzinov, O M; Bulanova, E A; Koriakova, A G; Vyshemirskaia, P V; Bychko, V V; Ivashchenko, A A

    2014-01-01

    Several novel compounds were found to be potent inhibitors of the HCV (JFH-1 isolate) infection in vitro. Human serum did not significantly reduce antiviral activity of the lead compound, AVR560 (New Guinea type 2) in in vitro infection experiments. AVR560 also did not inhibit any of the tested human CYP450 isozymes (3A4, 1A2, 2C19 and 2D6). In the pharmacokinetic studies in mice, rats and dogs, favorable pharmacokinetic profiles and good oral bioavailability were observed for AV560. Further pre-clinical studies with this novel HCV inhibitor are in progress.

  18. A novel protocol allowing oral delivery of a protein complement inhibitor that subsequently targets to inflamed colon mucosa and ameliorates murine colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvington, M; Blichmann, P; Qiao, F; Scheiber, M; Wadsworth, C; Luzinov, I; Lucero, J; Vertegel, A; Tomlinson, S

    2014-08-01

    While there is evidence of a pathogenic role for complement in inflammatory bowel disease, there is also evidence for a protective role that relates to host defence and protection from endotoxaemia. There is thus concern regarding the use of systemic complement inhibition as a therapeutic strategy. Local delivery of a complement inhibitor to the colon by oral administration would ameliorate such concerns, but while formulations exist for oral delivery of low molecular weight drugs to the colon, they have not been used successfully for oral delivery of proteins. We describe a novel pellet formulation consisting of cross-linked dextran coated with an acrylic co-polymer that protects the complement inhibitor CR2-Crry from destruction in the gastrointestinal tract. CR2-Crry containing pellets administered by gavage, were characterized using a therapeutic protocol in a mouse model of dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. Oral treatment of established colitis over a 5-day period significantly reduced mucosal inflammation and injury, with similar therapeutic benefit whether or not the proton pump inhibitor, omeprazole, was co-administered. Reduction in injury was associated with the targeting of CR2-Crry to the mucosal surface and reduced local complement activation. Treatment had no effect on systemic complement activity. This novel method for oral delivery of a targeted protein complement inhibitor will reduce systemic effects, thereby decreasing the risk of opportunistic infection, as well as lowering the required dose and treatment cost and improving patient compliance. Furthermore, the novel delivery system described here may provide similar benefits for administration of other protein-based drugs, such as anti-tumour necrosis factor-α antibodies.

  19. Effects of alpha-amylase and its inhibitors on acid production from cooked starch by oral streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizawa, S; Miyasawa-Hori, H; Nakajo, K; Washio, J; Mayanagi, H; Fukumoto, S; Takahashi, N

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated acid production from cooked starch by Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Streptococcus sanguinis and Streptococcus mitis, and the effects of alpha-amylase inhibitors (maltotriitol and acarbose) and xylitol on acid production. Streptococcal cell suspensions were anaerobically incubated with various carbohydrates that included cooked potato starch in the presence or absence of alpha-amylase. Subsequently, the fall in pH and the acid production rate at pH 7.0 were measured. In addition, the effects of adding alpha-amylase inhibitors and xylitol to the reaction mixture were evaluated. In the absence of alpha-amylase, both the fall in pH and the acid production rate from cooked starch were small. On the other hand, in the presence of alpha-amylase, the pH fell to 3.9-4.4 and the acid production rate was 0.61-0.92 micromol per optical density unit per min. These values were comparable to those for maltose. When using cooked starch, the fall in pH by S. sanguinis and S. mitis was similar to that by S. mutans and S. sobrinus. For all streptococci, alpha-amylase inhibitors caused a decrease in acid production from cooked starch, although xylitol only decreased acid production by S. mutans and S. sobrinus. These results suggest that cooked starch is potentially acidogenic in the presence of alpha-amylase, which occurs in the oral cavity. In terms of the acidogenic potential of cooked starch, S. sanguinis and S. mitis were comparable to S. mutans and S. sobrinus. Alpha-amylase inhibitors and xylitol might moderate this activity.

  20. Oral administration of GW788388, an inhibitor of TGF-beta type I and II receptor kinases, decreases renal fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, M; Thorikay, M; Deckers, M; van Dinther, M; Grygielko, E T; Gellibert, F; de Gouville, A C; Huet, S; ten Dijke, P; Laping, N J

    2008-03-01

    Progressive kidney fibrosis precedes end-stage renal failure in up to a third of patients with diabetes mellitus. Elevated intra-renal transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) is thought to underlie disease progression by promoting deposition of extracellular matrix and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. GW788388 is a new TGF-beta type I receptor inhibitor with a much improved pharmacokinetic profile compared with SB431542. We studied its effect in vitro and found that it inhibited both the TGF-beta type I and type II receptor kinase activities, but not that of the related bone morphogenic protein type II receptor. Further, it blocked TGF-beta-induced Smad activation and target gene expression, while decreasing epithelial-mesenchymal transitions and fibrogenesis. Using db/db mice, which develop diabetic nephropathy, we found that GW788388 given orally for 5 weeks significantly reduced renal fibrosis and decreased the mRNA levels of key mediators of extracellular matrix deposition in kidneys. Our study shows that GW788388 is a potent and selective inhibitor of TGF-beta signalling in vitro and renal fibrosis in vivo.

  1. Structure-based design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of irreversible human rhinovirus 3C protease inhibitors. 8. Pharmacological optimization of orally bioavailable 2-pyridone-containing peptidomimetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragovich, Peter S; Prins, Thomas J; Zhou, Ru; Johnson, Theodore O; Hua, Ye; Luu, Hiep T; Sakata, Sylvie K; Brown, Edward L; Maldonado, Fausto C; Tuntland, Tove; Lee, Caroline A; Fuhrman, Shella A; Zalman, Leora S; Patick, Amy K; Matthews, David A; Wu, Ellen Y; Guo, Ming; Borer, Bennett C; Nayyar, Naresh K; Moran, Terence; Chen, Lijian; Rejto, Paul A; Rose, Peter W; Guzman, Mark C; Dovalsantos, Elena Z; Lee, Steven; McGee, Kevin; Mohajeri, Michael; Liese, Andreas; Tao, Junhua; Kosa, Maha B; Liu, Bo; Batugo, Minerva R; Gleeson, Jean-Paul R; Wu, Zhen Ping; Liu, Jia; Meador, James W; Ferre, Rose Ann

    2003-10-09

    The optimization of the pharmacokinetic performance of various 2-pyridone-containing human rhinovirus (HRV) 3C protease (3CP) inhibitors following oral administration to either beagle dogs or CM-monkeys is described. The molecules described in this work are composed of a 2-pyridone-containing peptidomimetic binding determinant and an alpha,beta-unsaturated ester Michael acceptor moiety which forms an irreversible covalent adduct with the active site cysteine residue of the 3C enzyme. Modification of the ester contained within these compounds is detailed along with alteration of the P(2) substituent present in the peptidomimetic portion of the inhibitors. The pharmacokinetics of several inhibitors in both dogs and monkeys are described (7 h plasma concentrations after oral administration) along with their human plasma stabilities, stabilities in incubations with human, dog, and monkey microsomes and hepatocytes, Caco-2 permeabilities, and aqueous solubilities. Compounds containing an alpha,beta-unsaturated ethyl ester fragment and either an ethyl or propargyl P(2) moiety displayed the most promising combination of 3C enzyme inhibition (k(obs)/[I] 170 000-223 000 M(-1) s(-1)), antiviral activity (EC(50) = 0.047-0.058 microM, mean vs seven HRV serotypes), and pharmacokinetics following oral administration (7 h dog plasma levels = 0.248-0.682 microM; 7 h CM-monkey plasma levels = 0.057-0.896 microM).

  2. Inhibitors for Androgen Receptor Activation Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    mortality after heart attack (6), and RU486, which is used as emergency birth control (7). New NR inhibitors would most likely be useful for...mifepristone and levonorgestrel when used for emergency contraception. Hum Reprod Update 10:341-348 8. Webb P NN, Chiellini G, Yoshihara HA, Cunha Lima ST

  3. Flavonoids and polymer derivatives as CYP3A4 inhibitors for improved oral drug bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasinu, Pius; Choonara, Yahya E; Khan, Riaz A; Du Toit, Lisa C; Kumar, Pradeep; Ndesendo, Valence M K; Pillay, Viness

    2013-02-01

    Molecular modeling computations were utilized to generate pharmaceutical grade CYP3A4-enzyme inhibitors. In vitro metabolism of felodipine in human intestinal and liver microsomes (HLM and HIM) was optimized yielding a Michaelis-Menten plot from where the K(m) and V(max) values were estimated by nonlinear regression. The flavonoids, naringin, naringenin, and quercetin, were subsequently incubated with felodipine at the determined K(m) value in HLM. Comparing results obtained from a known CYP3A4 inhibitor, verapamil, the flavonoids inhibited felodipine metabolism. In-depth computational analysis of these flavonoids in terms of CYP3A4 binding, sequencing, and affinity, computational biomimetism was employed to validate the potential CYP3A4 inhibitors. The modeled compounds were comparatively evaluated by incubation with felodipine in both HLM and HIM. Results showed that the polymers 8-arm-PEG, o-(2-aminoethyl)-o-methyl-PEG, 4-arm-PEG (molecular weight = 10,000 g/mol and 20,000 g/mol, respectively), and poly(l-lysine) were able to inhibit the felodipine metabolism with the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) values ranging from 7.22 to 30.0 μM (HLM) and 5.78 to 41.03 μM (HIM). Molecular docking confirmed drug-enzyme interactions by computing the free energies of binding (ΔE) and inhibition constants (K(i)) of the docked compounds utilizing a Lamarckian Genetic Algorithm. Comparative correlations between the computed and experimental K(i) values were obtained. Computational modeling of CYP3A4 inhibitors provided a suitable strategy to screen pharmaceutical grade compounds that may potentially inhibit presystemic CYP3A4-dependent drug metabolism with the prospect of improving oral drug bioavailability. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Approaching the active conformation of 1,3-diaminopyrimidine based covalent inhibitors of Bruton's tyrosine kinase for treatment of Rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhenhua; Zhang, Qian; Yan, Lianzhong; Zhong, Guizhen; Zhang, Linqi; Tan, Xiaojuan; Wang, Yanli

    2016-04-15

    By applying conformational restrictions, we were able to discover highly potent 1,3-diaminopyrimidine based covalent inhibitors of BTK, such as 8a (IC50=3.76 nM), and providing useful information of its active conformation. We are developing these novel small molecule covalent inhibitors of BTK toward oral agents for Rheumatoid arthritis.

  5. Allosteric inhibitors of hepatitis C polymerase: discovery of potent and orally bioavailable carbon-linked dihydropyrones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Linton, Angelica; Tatlock, John; Gonzalez, Javier; Borchardt, Allen; Abreo, Mel; Jewell, Tanya; Patel, Leena; Drowns, Matthew; Ludlum, Sarah; Goble, Mike; Yang, Michele; Blazel, Julie; Rahavendran, Ravi; Skor, Heather; Shi, Stephanie; Lewis, Cristina; Fuhrman, Shella

    2007-08-23

    The discovery and optimization of a novel class of carbon-linked dihydropyrones as allosteric HCV NS5B polymerase inhibitors are presented. Replacement of the sulfur linker atom with carbon reduced compound acidity and greatly increased cell permeation. Further structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies led to the identification of compounds, exemplified by 23 and 24, with significantly improved antiviral activities in the cell-based replicon assay and favorable pharmacokinetic profiles.

  6. Hydroxyapatite microparticles as feedback-active reservoirs of corrosion inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snihirova, D; Lamaka, S V; Taryba, M; Salak, A N; Kallip, S; Zheludkevich, M L; Ferreira, M G S; Montemor, M F

    2010-11-01

    This work contributes to the development of new feedback-active anticorrosion systems. Inhibitor-doped hydroxyapatite microparticles (HAP) are used as reservoirs, storing corrosion inhibitor to be released on demand. Release of the entrapped inhibitor is triggered by redox reactions associated with the corrosion process. HAP were used as reservoirs for several inhibiting species: cerium(III), lanthanum(III), salicylaldoxime, and 8-hydroxyquinoline. These species are effective corrosion inhibitors for a 2024 aluminum alloy (AA2024), used here as a model metallic substrate. Dissolution of the microparticles and release of the inhibitor are triggered by local acidification resulting from the anodic half-reaction during corrosion of AA2024. Calculated values and experimentally measured local acidification over the aluminum anode (down to pH = 3.65) are presented. The anticorrosion properties of inhibitor-doped HAP were assessed using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The microparticles impregnated with the corrosion inhibitors were introduced into a hybrid silica-zirconia sol-gel film, acting as a thin protective coating for AA2024, an alloy used for aeronautical applications. The protective properties of the sol-gel films were improved by the addition of HAP, proving their applicability as submicrometer-sized reservoirs of corrosion inhibitors for active anticorrosion coatings.

  7. MPT0B098, a Microtubule Inhibitor, Suppresses JAK2/STAT3 Signaling Pathway through Modulation of SOCS3 Stability in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsuan-Yu Peng

    Full Text Available Microtubule inhibitors have been shown to inhibit Janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (JAK2/STAT3 signal transduction pathway in various cancer cells. However, little is known of the mechanism by which the microtubule inhibitors inhibit STAT3 activity. In the present study, we examined the effect of a novel small-molecule microtubule inhibitor, MPT0B098, on STAT3 signaling in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. Treatment of various OSCC cells with MPT0B098 induced growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, as well as increased the protein level of SOCS3. The accumulation of SOCS3 protein enhanced its binding to JAK2 and TYK2 which facilitated the ubiquitination and degradation of JAK2 and TYK2, resulting in a loss of STAT3 activity. The inhibition of STAT3 activity led to sensitization of OSCC cells to MPT0B098 cytotoxicity, indicating that STAT3 is a key mediator of drug resistance in oral carcinogenesis. Moreover, the combination of MPT0B098 with the clinical drug cisplatin or 5-FU significantly augmented growth inhibition and apoptosis in OSCC cells. Taken together, our results provide a novel mechanism for the action of MPT0B098 in which the JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway is suppressed through the modulation of SOCS3 protein level. The findings also provide a promising combinational therapy of MPT0B098 for OSCC.

  8. Long-Term Follow-Up of Desmoid Fibromatosis Treated with PF-03084014, an Oral Gamma Secretase Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, Victor Manuel; Hall, Francis; Jimeno, Antonio; Gore, Lia; Kern, Kenneth; Cesari, Rossano; Huang, Bo; Schowinsky, Jeffrey T; Blatchford, Patrick Judson; Hoffner, Brianna; Elias, Anthony; Messersmith, Wells

    2017-09-08

    Desmoid fibromatosis is a fibroblastic neoplasm driven by aberrations within the WNT pathway, exhibiting mutations in β-catenin or APC. We review the long-term follow-up of patients in a phase I study treated with an oral gamma secretase inhibitor, PF-03084014. PF-03084014 was administered orally at doses ranging from 20 to 330 mg twice daily. Tumor assessments were performed using computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (CT/MRI) within 4 weeks of study entry, and every other cycle through cycle 9. After cycle 9, patients were evaluated as clinically indicated. Seven patients with desmoid fibromatosis were treated between December 2009 and December 2016 at the University of Colorado. Five patients (71.4%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 29.0-96.3%) achieved a partial response (PR), with a mean time to achieving response of 11.9 months (95% CI 2.5-21.4 months). All patients who achieved a PR continue to maintain responses between 47.9 and 73+ months. Four patients stopped treatment yet remain free of progression between 11 and 53+ months. One patient had PFS of 42+ months, with a 17% decrease in the target lesion. A biopsy performed at the end of the study showed decreased tumoral cellularity compared with previous biopsies. Effective treatment doses ranged from 80 to 330 mg administered orally twice daily. PF-03084014 was effective in treating desmoid tumors, with an objective response rate of 71.4% (95% CI 29.0-96.3%) in this small cohort of patients. PF-03084014 exhibits promising activity, even at relatively low doses (80 mg twice daily), with high tolerability leading to prolonged disease control even after therapy discontinuation.

  9. Characterization of the Annonaceous acetogenin, annonacinone, a natural product inhibitor of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pautus, Stéphane; Alami, Mouad; Adam, Fréderic; Bernadat, Guillaume; Lawrence, Daniel A.; de Carvalho, Allan; Ferry, Gilles; Rupin, Alain; Hamze, Abdallah; Champy, Pierre; Bonneau, Natacha; Gloanec, Philippe; Peglion, Jean-Louis; Brion, Jean-Daniel; Bianchini, Elsa P.; Borgel, Delphine

    2016-11-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is the main inhibitor of the tissue type and urokinase type plasminogen activators. High levels of PAI-1 are correlated with an increased risk of thrombotic events and several other pathologies. Despite several compounds with in vitro activity being developed, none of them are currently in clinical use. In this study, we evaluated a novel PAI-1 inhibitor, annonacinone, a natural product from the Annonaceous acetogenins group. Annonacinone was identified in a chromogenic screening assay and was more potent than tiplaxtinin. Annonacinone showed high potency ex vivo on thromboelastography and was able to potentiate the thrombolytic effect of tPA in vivo in a murine model. SDS-PAGE showed that annonacinone inhibited formation of PAI-1/tPA complex via enhancement of the substrate pathway. Mutagenesis and molecular dynamics allowed us to identify annonacinone binding site close to helix D and E and β-sheets 2A.

  10. Cutaneous wound healing through paradoxical MAPK activation by BRAF inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escuin-Ordinas, Helena; Li, Shuoran; Xie, Michael W.; Sun, Lu; Hugo, Willy; Huang, Rong Rong; Jiao, Jing; de-Faria, Felipe Meira; Realegeno, Susan; Krystofinski, Paige; Azhdam, Ariel; Komenan, Sara Marie D.; Atefi, Mohammad; Comin-Anduix, Begoña; Pellegrini, Matteo; Cochran, Alistair J.; Modlin, Robert L.; Herschman, Harvey R.; Lo, Roger S.; McBride, William H.; Segura, Tatiana; Ribas, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    BRAF inhibitors are highly effective therapies for the treatment of BRAFV600-mutated melanoma, with the main toxicity being a variety of hyperproliferative skin conditions due to paradoxical activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in BRAF wild-type cells. Most of these hyperproliferative skin changes improve when a MEK inhibitor is co-administered, as it blocks paradoxical MAPK activation. Here we show how the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib accelerates skin wound healing by inducing the proliferation and migration of human keratinocytes through extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation and cell cycle progression. Topical treatment with vemurafenib in two wound-healing mice models accelerates cutaneous wound healing through paradoxical MAPK activation; addition of a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor reverses the benefit of vemurafenib-accelerated wound healing. The same dosing regimen of topical BRAF inhibitor does not increase the incidence of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas in mice. Therefore, topical BRAF inhibitors may have clinical applications in accelerating the healing of skin wounds. PMID:27476449

  11. Pharmacokinetics, safety and inducible cytokine responses during a phase 1 trial of the oral histone deacetylase inhibitor ITF2357 (givinostat).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Furlan, A.; Monzani, V.; Reznikov, L.L.; Leoni, F.; Fossati, G.; Modena, D.; Mascagni, P.; Dinarello, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    ITF2357 (givinostat) is a histone deacetylase inhibitor with antiinflammatory properties at low nanomolar concentrations. We report here a phase I safety and pharmacokinetics trial in healthy males administered 50, 100, 200, 400 or 600 mg orally. After 50 mg, mean maximal plasma concentrations reach

  12. The novel IκB kinase β inhibitor IMD-0560 prevents bone invasion by oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Yukiyo; Kokabu, Shoichiro; Sugiyama, Goro; Nakatomi, Chihiro; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Fukushima, Hidefumi; Osawa, Kenji; Sugamori, Yasutaka; Ohya, Keiichi; Okamoto, Masato; Fujikawa, Tomoyuki; Itai, Akiko; Matsuo, Kou; Watanabe, Seiji; Jimi, Eijiro

    2014-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells display significantly augmented nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activity, and inhibiting this activity suppresses malignant tumor characteristics. Thus, we evaluated the effect of IMD-0560, a novel inhibitor of IκB kinase (IKK) β that is under assessment in a clinical trial of rheumatoid arthritis, on bone invasion by the mouse OSCC cell line SCCVII. We examined the inhibitory effects of IMD-0560 on NF-κB activity and tumor invasion using human OSCC cell lines and SCCVII cells in vitro. Using a mouse model of jaw bone invasion by SCCVII cells, we assessed the inhibitory effect of IMD-0560 on jaw bone invasion, tumor growth, and matrix degradation in vivo. IMD-0560 suppressed the nuclear translocation of NF-κB and the degradation of IκBα in OSCC cells. IMD-0560 also inhibited invasion by suppressing matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) production in OSCC cells. IMD-0560 protected against zygoma and mandible destruction by SCCVII cells, reduced the number of osteoclasts by inhibiting receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) expression in osteoblastic cells and SCCVII cells, increased SCCVII cell death and suppressed cell proliferation and MMP-9 production in SCCVII cells. Based on these results, IMD-0560 may represent a new therapeutic agent for bone invasion by OSCC cells. PMID:25373602

  13. Unexpected Activity of a Novel Kunitz-type Inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David; Tikhonova, Irina G.; Jewhurst, Heather L.; Drysdale, Orla C.; Dvořák, Jan; Robinson, Mark W.; Cwiklinski, Krystyna; Dalton, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Kunitz-type (KT) protease inhibitors are low molecular weight proteins classically defined as serine protease inhibitors. We identified a novel secreted KT inhibitor associated with the gut and parenchymal tissues of the infective juvenile stage of Fasciola hepatica, a helminth parasite of medical and veterinary importance. Unexpectedly, recombinant KT inhibitor (rFhKT1) exhibited no inhibitory activity toward serine proteases but was a potent inhibitor of the major secreted cathepsin L cysteine proteases of F. hepatica, FhCL1 and FhCL2, and of human cathepsins L and K (Ki = 0.4-27 nm). FhKT1 prevented the auto-catalytic activation of FhCL1 and FhCL2 and formed stable complexes with the mature enzymes. Pulldown experiments from adult parasite culture medium showed that rFhKT1 interacts specifically with native secreted FhCL1, FhCL2, and FhCL5. Substitution of the unusual P1 Leu15 within the exposed reactive loop of FhKT1 for the more commonly found Arg (FhKT1Leu15/Arg15) had modest adverse effects on the cysteine protease inhibition but conferred potent activity against the serine protease trypsin (Ki = 1.5 nm). Computational docking and sequence analysis provided hypotheses for the exclusive binding of FhKT1 to cysteine proteases, the importance of the Leu15 in anchoring the inhibitor into the S2 active site pocket, and the inhibitor's selectivity toward FhCL1, FhCL2, and human cathepsins L and K. FhKT1 represents a novel evolutionary adaptation of KT protease inhibitors by F. hepatica, with its prime purpose likely in the regulation of the major parasite-secreted proteases and/or cathepsin L-like proteases of its host. PMID:27422822

  14. Modification of Monoaminergic Activity by MAO Inhibitors Influences Methamphetamine Actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junichi Kitanaka

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine (METH abuse is a serious health and social problem worldwide. At present, however, there are no effective medications for the treatment of METH abuse. Of the intracellular METH target proteins, monoamine oxidase (MAO is involved in the regulation of monoaminergic tone in the brain, resulting in the modulation of METHinduced behavioral abnormalities in mammals. The METH-induced expression of increased motor activity, stereotypy, and sensitization is closely associated with monoaminergic transmission in the brain. Modifi cation of MAO activity by MAO inhibitors can influence METH action. Of the MAO inhibitors, the propargylamine derivative clorgyline, an irreversible MAO-A inhibitor, effectively blocks METH-induced hyperlocomotion and behavioral sensitization in rodents. Analysis of the associated monoaminergic activity indicates an involvement of altered striatal serotonergic transmission as well as an increased dopaminergic tone. Some effects of MAO inhibitors on METH action appear to be independent of MAO, suggesting complex mechanisms of action of MAO inhibitors in METH abuse. This review describes current research to find effective treatment for METH abuse, using MAO inhibitors.

  15. Host immunity contributes to the anti-melanoma activity of BRAF inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Deborah A; Ngiow, Shin Foong; Li, Ming; Parmenter, Tiffany; Mok, Stephen; Cass, Ashley; Haynes, Nicole M; Kinross, Kathryn; Yagita, Hideo; Koya, Richard C; Graeber, Thomas G; Ribas, Antoni; McArthur, Grant A; Smyth, Mark J

    2013-03-01

    The BRAF mutant, BRAF(V600E), is expressed in nearly half of melanomas, and oral BRAF inhibitors induce substantial tumor regression in patients with BRAF(V600E) metastatic melanoma. The inhibitors are believed to work primarily by inhibiting BRAF(V600E)-induced oncogenic MAPK signaling; however, some patients treated with BRAF inhibitors exhibit increased tumor immune infiltration, suggesting that a combination of BRAF inhibitors and immunotherapy may be beneficial. We used two relatively resistant variants of Braf(V600E)-driven mouse melanoma (SM1 and SM1WT1) and melanoma-prone mice to determine the role of host immunity in type I BRAF inhibitor PLX4720 antitumor activity. We found that PLX4720 treatment downregulated tumor Ccl2 gene expression and decreased tumor CCL2 expression in both Braf(V600E) mouse melanoma transplants and in de novo melanomas in a manner that was coincident with reduced tumor growth. While PLX4720 did not directly increase tumor immunogenicity, analysis of SM1 tumor-infiltrating leukocytes in PLX4720-treated mice demonstrated a robust increase in CD8(+) T/FoxP3(+)CD4(+) T cell ratio and NK cells. Combination therapy with PLX4720 and anti-CCL2 or agonistic anti-CD137 antibodies demonstrated significant antitumor activity in mouse transplant and de novo tumorigenesis models. These data elucidate a role for host CCR2 in the mechanism of action of type I BRAF inhibitors and support the therapeutic potential of combining BRAF inhibitors with immunotherapy.

  16. Isolation of an orally active insecticidal toxin from the venom of an Australian tarantula.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret C Hardy

    Full Text Available Many insect pests have developed resistance to existing chemical insecticides and consequently there is much interest in the development of new insecticidal compounds with novel modes of action. Although spiders have deployed insecticidal toxins in their venoms for over 250 million years, there is no evolutionary selection pressure on these toxins to possess oral activity since they are injected into prey and predators via a hypodermic needle-like fang. Thus, it has been assumed that spider-venom peptides are not orally active and are therefore unlikely to be useful insecticides. Contrary to this dogma, we show that it is possible to isolate spider-venom peptides with high levels of oral insecticidal activity by directly screening for per os toxicity. Using this approach, we isolated a 34-residue orally active insecticidal peptide (OAIP-1 from venom of the Australian tarantula Selenotypus plumipes. The oral LD50 for OAIP-1 in the agronomically important cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera was 104.2±0.6 pmol/g, which is the highest per os activity reported to date for an insecticidal venom peptide. OAIP-1 is equipotent with synthetic pyrethroids and it acts synergistically with neonicotinoid insecticides. The three-dimensional structure of OAIP-1 determined using NMR spectroscopy revealed that the three disulfide bonds form an inhibitor cystine knot motif; this structural motif provides the peptide with a high level of biological stability that probably contributes to its oral activity. OAIP-1 is likely to be synergized by the gut-lytic activity of the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxin (Bt expressed in insect-resistant transgenic crops, and consequently it might be a good candidate for trait stacking with Bt.

  17. Changes in glucose-induced plasma active glucagon-like peptide-1 levels by co-administration of sodium–glucose cotransporter inhibitors with dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors in rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Oguma

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigated whether structurally different sodium–glucose cotransporter (SGLT 2 inhibitors, when co-administered with dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4 inhibitors, could enhance glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 secretion during oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs in rodents. Three different SGLT inhibitors—1-(β-d-Glucopyranosyl-4-chloro-3-[5-(6-fluoro-2-pyridyl-2-thienylmethyl]benzene (GTB, TA-1887, and canagliflozin—were examined to assess the effect of chemical structure. Oral treatment with GTB plus a DPP4 inhibitor enhanced glucose-induced plasma active GLP-1 (aGLP-1 elevation and suppressed glucose excursions in both normal and diabetic rodents. In DPP4-deficient rats, GTB enhanced glucose-induced aGLP-1 elevation without affecting the basal level, whereas metformin, previously reported to enhance GLP-1 secretion, increased both the basal level and glucose-induced elevation. Oral treatment with canagliflozin and TA-1887 also enhanced glucose-induced aGLP-1 elevation when co-administered with either teneligliptin or sitagliptin. These data suggest that structurally different SGLT2 inhibitors enhance plasma aGLP-1 elevation and suppress glucose excursions during OGTT when co-administered with DPP4 inhibitors, regardless of the difference in chemical structure. Combination treatment with DPP4 inhibitors and SGLT2 inhibitors having moderate SGLT1 inhibitory activity may be a promising therapeutic option for improving glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  18. Discovery of potent imidazole and cyanophenyl containing farnesyltransferase inhibitors with improved oral bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yunsong; Lin, Nan-Horng; Wang, Le; Hasvold, Lisa; Wang, Weibo; Leonard, Nicholas; Li, Tongmei; Li, Qun; Cohen, Jerry; Gu, Wen-Zhen; Zhang, Haiying; Stoll, Vincent; Bauch, Joy; Marsh, Kennan; Rosenberg, Saul H; Sham, Hing L

    2003-05-05

    A pyridyl moiety was introduced into a previously developed series of farnesyltransferase inhibitors containing imidazole and cyanophenyl (such as 4), resulting in potent inhibitors with improved pharmacokinetics.

  19. Antitumor Activity of Cytotoxic Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Md. Jashim; Crews, Brenda C.; Xu, Shu; Ghebreselasie, Kebreab; Daniel, Cristina K.; Kingsley, Philip J.; Banerjee, Surajit; Marnett, Lawrence J.

    2017-01-01

    Targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to tumors has been explored as a means to increase the selectivity and potency of cytotoxicity. Most efforts in this area have exploited the molecular recognition of proteins highly expressed on the surface of cancer cells followed by internalization. A related approach that has received less attention is the targeting of intracellular proteins by ligands conjugated to anti-cancer drugs. An attractive target for this approach is the enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), which is highly expressed in a range of malignant tumors. Herein, we describe the synthesis and evaluation of a series of chemotherapeutic agents targeted to COX-2 by conjugation to indomethacin. Detailed characterization of compound 12, a conjugate of indomethacin with podophyllotoxin, revealed highly potent and selective COX-2 inhibition in vitro and in intact cells. Kinetics and X-ray crystallographic studies demonstrated that compound 12 is a slow, tight-binding inhibitor that likely binds to COX-2’s allosteric site with its indomethacin moiety in a conformation similar to that of indomethacin. Compound 12 exhibited cytotoxicity in cell culture similar to that of podophyllotoxin with no evidence of COX-2-dependent selectivity. However, in vivo, compound 12 accumulated selectively in and more effectively inhibited the growth of a COX-2-expressing xenograft compared to a xenograft that did not express COX-2. Compound 12, which we have named chemocoxib A, provides proof-of-concept for the in vivo targeting of chemotherapeutic agents to COX-2, but suggests that COX-2-dependent selectivity may not be evident in cell culture-based assays. PMID:27588346

  20. The mechanism of action of tofacitinib - an oral Janus kinase inhibitor for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Jennifer A; Kawabata, Thomas T; Krishnaswami, Sriram; Clark, James D; Telliez, Jean-Baptiste; Dowty, Martin E; Menon, Sujatha; Lamba, Manisha; Zwillich, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease characterised by infiltration of immune cells into the affected synovium, release of inflammatory cytokines and degradative mediators, and subsequent joint damage. Both innate and adaptive arms of the immune response play a role, with activation of immune cells leading to dysregulated expression of inflammatory cytokines. Cytokines work within a complex regulatory network in RA, signalling through different intracellular kinase pathways to modulate recruitment, activation and function of immune cells and other leukocytes. As our understanding of RA has advanced, intracellular signalling pathways such as Janus kinase (JAK) pathways have emerged as key hubs in the cytokine network and, therefore, important as therapeutic targets. Tofacitinib is an oral JAK inhibitor for the treatment of RA. Tofacitinib is a targeted small molecule, and an innovative advance in RA therapy, which modulates cytokines critical to the progression of immune and inflammatory responses. Herein we describe the mechanism of action of tofacitinib and the impact of JAK inhibition on the immune and inflammatory responses in RA.

  1. Active inflammatory biomarkers in oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santarelli, Andrea; Mascitti, Marco; Rubini, Corrado; Bambini, Fabrizio; Zizzi, Antonio; Offidani, Annamaria; Ganzetti, Giulia; Laino, Luigi; Cicciù, Marco; Lo Muzio, Lorenzo

    2015-12-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic disease, with a central role to cell-mediated autoimmunity. Osteopontin promotes migration and recruitment of immune cells, CD44 is its receptor, and Survivin seems to be important in skin/mucosa homeostasis. The aim of this study was to investigate their expression in biopsy specimens of patients with different OLP clinical types and healthy controls.Biopsy specimens from 30 patients with OLP (15 atrophic and 15 hyperplastic) and 15 healthy controls were subjected to immune-histochemical analysis, to detect the expression of osteopontin, CD44, and Survivin in oral epithelia. The distributions of positively stained cells were evaluated with a quantitative method, while the inflammation degree was evaluated with a semi-quantitative one.Expression of osteopontin and CD44 was higher in OLP than controls, while Survivin expression was lower in OLP patients. There was a greater reduction of Survivin expression in atrophic OLP than hyperplastic OLP. A correlation between osteopontin expression and a high degree of inflammation was found. Furthermore, Survivin expression was higher in cases with low intensity of inflammation.Osteopontin, CD44, and Survivin seem to be involved in OLP pathogenesis, and further investigations are needed for clarifying their role in this oral disease.

  2. HDAC Inhibitors without an Active Site Zn2+-Binding Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vickers, Chris J.; Olsen, Christian Adam; Leman, Luke J.

    2012-01-01

    Natural and synthetic histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors generally derive their strong binding affinity and high potency from a key functional group that binds to the Zn2+ ion within the enzyme active site. However, this feature is also thought to carry the potential liability of undesirable off......-target interactions with other metalloenzymes. As a step toward mitigating this issue, here, we describe the design, synthesis, and structure−activity characterizations of cyclic α3β-tetrapeptide HDAC inhibitors that lack the presumed indispensable Zn2+-binding group. The lead compounds (e.g., 15 and 26) display good...

  3. A serine proteinase inhibitor from frog eggs with bacteriostatic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yaoping; Yu, Haining; Yang, Xinbo; Rees, Huw H; Liu, Jingze; Lai, Ren

    2008-01-01

    By Sephadex G-50 gel filtration, Resource Q anionic exchange and C4 reversed phase liquid high performance liquid chromatography, a proteinase inhibitor protein (Ranaserpin) was identified and purified from the eggs of the odour frog, Rana grahami. The protein displayed a single band adjacent to the molecular weight marker of 14.4 kDa analyzed by SDS-PAGE. The inhibitor protein homogeneity and its molecular weight were confirmed again by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis. The MALDI-TOF mass spectrum analysis gave this inhibitor protein an m/z of 14422.26 that was matched well with the result from SDS-PAGE. This protein is a serine proteinase inhibitor targeting multiple proteinases including trypsin, elastase, and subtilisin. Ranaserpin inhibited the proteolytic activities of trypsin, elastase, and subtilisin. It has an inhibitory constant (K(i)) of 6.2 x 10(-8) M, 2.7 x 10(-7) M and 2.2 x 10(-8) M for trypsin, elastase, and subtilisin, respectively. This serine proteinase inhibitor exhibited bacteriostatic effect on Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis (ATCC 6633). It was suggested that ranaserpin might act as a defensive role in resistance to invasion of pests or pathogens. This is the first report of serine proteinase inhibitor and its direct defensive role from amphibian eggs.

  4. ARQ 092, an orally-available, selective AKT inhibitor, attenuates neutrophil-platelet interactions in sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyungho; Li, Jing; Barazia, Andrew; Tseng, Alan; Youn, Seock-Won; Abbadessa, Giovanni; Yu, Yi; Schwartz, Brian; Andrews, Robert K; Gordeuk, Victor R; Cho, Jaehyung

    2017-02-01

    Previous studies identified the Ser/Thr protein kinase, AKT, as a therapeutic target in thrombo-inflammatory diseases. Here we report that specific inhibition of AKT with ARQ 092, an orally-available AKT inhibitor currently in phase Ib clinical trials as an anti-cancer drug, attenuates the adhesive function of neutrophils and platelets from sickle cell disease patients in vitro and cell-cell interactions in a mouse model of sickle cell disease. Studies using neutrophils and platelets isolated from sickle cell disease patients revealed that treatment with 50-500 nM ARQ 092 significantly blocks αMβ2 integrin function in neutrophils and reduces P-selectin exposure and glycoprotein Ib/IX/V-mediated agglutination in platelets. Treatment of isolated platelets and neutrophils with ARQ 092 inhibited heterotypic cell-cell aggregation under shear conditions. Intravital microscopic studies demonstrated that short-term oral administration of ARQ 092 or hydroxyurea, a major therapy for sickle cell disease, diminishes heterotypic cell-cell interactions in venules of sickle cell disease mice challenged with tumor necrosis factor-α. Co-administration of hydroxyurea and ARQ 092 further reduced the adhesive function of neutrophils in venules and neutrophil transmigration into alveoli, inhibited expression of E-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in cremaster vessels, and improved survival in these mice. Ex vivo studies in sickle cell disease mice suggested that co-administration of hydroxyurea and ARQ 092 efficiently blocks neutrophil and platelet activation and that the beneficial effect of hydroxyurea results from nitric oxide production. Our results provide important evidence that ARQ 092 could be a novel drug for the prevention and treatment of acute vaso-occlusive complications in patients with sickle cell disease.

  5. ARQ 092, an orally-available, selective AKT inhibitor, attenuates neutrophil-platelet interactions in sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyungho; Li, Jing; Barazia, Andrew; Tseng, Alan; Youn, Seock-Won; Abbadessa, Giovanni; Yu, Yi; Schwartz, Brian; Andrews, Robert K.; Gordeuk, Victor R.; Cho, Jaehyung

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies identified the Ser/Thr protein kinase, AKT, as a therapeutic target in thrombo-inflammatory diseases. Here we report that specific inhibition of AKT with ARQ 092, an orally-available AKT inhibitor currently in phase Ib clinical trials as an anti-cancer drug, attenuates the adhesive function of neutrophils and platelets from sickle cell disease patients in vitro and cell-cell interactions in a mouse model of sickle cell disease. Studies using neutrophils and platelets isolated from sickle cell disease patients revealed that treatment with 50–500 nM ARQ 092 significantly blocks αMβ2 integrin function in neutrophils and reduces P-selectin exposure and glycoprotein Ib/IX/V-mediated agglutination in platelets. Treatment of isolated platelets and neutrophils with ARQ 092 inhibited heterotypic cell-cell aggregation under shear conditions. Intravital microscopic studies demonstrated that short-term oral administration of ARQ 092 or hydroxyurea, a major therapy for sickle cell disease, diminishes heterotypic cell-cell interactions in venules of sickle cell disease mice challenged with tumor necrosis factor-α. Co-administration of hydroxyurea and ARQ 092 further reduced the adhesive function of neutrophils in venules and neutrophil transmigration into alveoli, inhibited expression of E-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in cremaster vessels, and improved survival in these mice. Ex vivo studies in sickle cell disease mice suggested that co-administration of hydroxyurea and ARQ 092 efficiently blocks neutrophil and platelet activation and that the beneficial effect of hydroxyurea results from nitric oxide production. Our results provide important evidence that ARQ 092 could be a novel drug for the prevention and treatment of acute vaso-occlusive complications in patients with sickle cell disease. PMID:27758820

  6. Influenza Neuraminidase Inhibitors: Synthetic Approaches, Derivatives and Biological Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Laborda

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite being a common viral disease, influenza has very negative consequences, causing the death of around half a million people each year. A neuraminidase located on the surface of the virus plays an important role in viral reproduction by contributing to the release of viruses from infected host cells. The treatment of influenza is mainly based on the administration of neuraminidase inhibitors. The neuraminidase inhibitors zanamivir, laninamivir, oseltamivir and peramivir have been commercialized and have been demonstrated to be potent influenza viral neuraminidase inhibitors against most influenza strains. In order to create more potent neuraminidase inhibitors and fight against the surge in resistance resulting from naturally-occurring mutations, these anti-influenza drugs have been used as templates for the development of new neuraminidase inhibitors through structure-activity relationship studies. Here, we review the synthetic routes to these commercial drugs, the modifications which have been performed on these structures and the effects of these modifications on their inhibitory activity.

  7. Characterization of inhibitor(s) of β-glucuronidase enzyme activity in GUS-transgenic wheat

    KAUST Repository

    Ramadan, Ahmed M Ali

    2011-06-26

    The uidA gene, encoding for β-glucuronidase (GUS), is the most frequently used reporter gene in plants. As a reporter enzyme, GUS can be assayed both qualitatively and quantitatively. In wheat, there are numerous reports of failure in detecting GUS enzyme activity in tissues of transgenic plants, while other reports have suggested presence of β-glucuronidase inhibitor(s) in wheat tissues. In the present study, we show that the β-glucuronidase enzyme activity is not only tissue-specific but also genotype-dependent. Our data demonstrate that the glucuronic acid could be the candidate inhibitor for β-glucuronidase enzyme activity in wheat leaves and roots. It should be noted that the assays to detect β-glucuronidase enzyme activity in wheat should be interpreted carefully. Based on the data of our present study, we recommend studying the chemical pathways, the unintended effects and the possible loss-of-function of any candidate transgene prior to transformation experiments. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  8. P3 optimization of functional potency, in vivo efficacy and oral bioavailability in 3-aminopyrazinone thrombin inhibitors bearing non-charged groups at the P1 position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, Richard C A; Newton, Christina L; Cutrona, Kellie J; Mercer, Swati P; Dorsey, Bruce D; McDonough, Colleen M; Cook, Jacquelynn J; Krueger, Julie A; Lewis, S Dale; Lucas, Bobby J; Lyle, Elizabeth A; Lynch, Joseph J; Miller-Stein, Cynthia; Michener, Maria T; Wallace, Audrey A; White, Rebecca B; Wong, Bradley K

    2011-03-01

    Although the S3 pocket of the thrombin active site is lined with lipophilic amino acid residues, the accommodation of polarity within the lipophilic P3 moiety of small molecule inhibitors is possible provided that the polar functionality is capable of pointing away from the binding pocket outwards toward solvent while simultaneously allowing the lipophilic portion of the P3 ligand to interact with the S3 amino acid residues. Manipulation of this motif provided the means to effect optimization of functional potency, in vivo antithrombotic efficacy and oral bioavailability in a series of 3-aminopyrazinone thrombin inhibitors which contained non-charged groups at the P1 position. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Antimicrobial activity of Uncaria tomentosa against oral human pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Renzo Alberto Ccahuana-Vasquez; Silvana Soléo Ferreira dos Santos; Cristiane Yumi Koga-Ito; Antonio Olavo Cardoso Jorge

    2007-01-01

    Uncaria tomentosa is considered a medicinal plant used over centuries by the peruvian population as an alternative treatment for several diseases. Many microorganisms usually inhabit the human oral cavity and under certain conditions can become etiologic agents of diseases. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of different concentrations of Uncaria tomentosa on different strains of microorganisms isolated from the human oral cavity. Micropulverized Uncaria t...

  10. Biosynthesis and Antimicrobial Activity of Semiconductor Nanoparticles against Oral Pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    C. Malarkodi; Rajeshkumar, S.; K. Paulkumar; Vanaja, M.; Gnanajobitha, G.; Annadurai, G.

    2014-01-01

    Dental care is an essential phenomenon in human health. Oral pathogens can cause severe break which may show the way to serious issues in human disease like blood circulation and coronary disease. In the current study, we demonstrated the synthesis and antimicrobial activity of cadmium sulphide and zinc sulphide nanoparticles against oral pathogens. The process for the synthesis of cadmium sulphide (CdS) and zinc sulphide (ZnS) nanoparticles is fast, novel, and ecofriendly. Formation of cadmi...

  11. Anti-diabetic activity of insulin-degrading enzyme inhibitors mediated by multiple hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maianti, Juan Pablo; McFedries, Amanda; Foda, Zachariah H; Kleiner, Ralph E; Du, Xiu Quan; Leissring, Malcolm A; Tang, Wei-Jen; Charron, Maureen J; Seeliger, Markus A; Saghatelian, Alan; Liu, David R

    2014-07-03

    Despite decades of speculation that inhibiting endogenous insulin degradation might treat type-2 diabetes, and the identification of IDE (insulin-degrading enzyme) as a diabetes susceptibility gene, the relationship between the activity of the zinc metalloprotein IDE and glucose homeostasis remains unclear. Although Ide(-/-) mice have elevated insulin levels, they exhibit impaired, rather than improved, glucose tolerance that may arise from compensatory insulin signalling dysfunction. IDE inhibitors that are active in vivo are therefore needed to elucidate IDE's physiological roles and to determine its potential to serve as a target for the treatment of diabetes. Here we report the discovery of a physiologically active IDE inhibitor identified from a DNA-templated macrocycle library. An X-ray structure of the macrocycle bound to IDE reveals that it engages a binding pocket away from the catalytic site, which explains its remarkable selectivity. Treatment of lean and obese mice with this inhibitor shows that IDE regulates the abundance and signalling of glucagon and amylin, in addition to that of insulin. Under physiological conditions that augment insulin and amylin levels, such as oral glucose administration, acute IDE inhibition leads to substantially improved glucose tolerance and slower gastric emptying. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of modulating IDE activity as a new therapeutic strategy to treat type-2 diabetes and expand our understanding of the roles of IDE in glucose and hormone regulation.

  12. Targeting PKC in multiple myeloma: in vitro and in vivo effects of the novel, orally available small-molecule inhibitor enzastaurin (LY317615.HCl).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podar, Klaus; Raab, Marc S; Zhang, Jing; McMillin, Douglas; Breitkreutz, Iris; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Lin, Boris K; Munshi, Nikhil; Hideshima, Teru; Chauhan, Dharminder; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2007-02-15

    In multiple myeloma (MM) protein kinase C (PKC) signaling pathways have been implicated in cell proliferation, survival, and migration. Here we investigated the novel, orally available PKC-inhibitor enzastaurin for its anti-MM activity. Enzastaurin specifically inhibits phorbol ester-induced activation of PKC isoforms, as well as phosphorylation of downstream signaling molecules MARCKS and PKCmu. Importantly, it also inhibits PKC activation triggered by growth factors and cytokines secreted by bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), costimulation with fibronectin, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), or interleukin-6 (IL-6), as well as MM patient serum. Consequently, enzastaurin inhibits proliferation, survival, and migration of MM cell lines and MM cells isolated from multidrug-resistant patients and overcomes MM-cell growth triggered by binding to BMSCs and endothelial cells. Importantly, strong synergistic cytotoxicity is observed when enzastaurin is combined with bortezomib and moderate synergistic or additive effects when combined with melphalan or lenalidomide. Finally, tumor growth, survival, and angiogenesis are abrogated by enzastaurin in an in vivo xenograft model of human MM. Our results therefore demonstrate in vitro and in vivo efficacy of the orally available PKC inhibitor enzastaurin in MM and strongly support its clinical evaluation, alone or in combination therapies, to improve outcome in patients with MM.

  13. RPR 107393, a potent squalene synthase inhibitor and orally effective cholesterol-lowering agent: comparison with inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, D; Rutledge, R Z; Needle, S N; Galczenski, H F; Neuenschwander, K; Scotese, A C; Maguire, M P; Bush, R C; Hele, D J; Bilder, G E; Perrone, M H

    1997-05-01

    Squalene synthase catalyzes the reductive dimerization of two molecules of farnesyl pyrophosphate to form squalene and is the first committed step in sterol synthesis. A specific inhibitor of squalene synthase would inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis but not prevent the formation of other products of the isoprenoid pathway, such as dolichol and ubiquinone. RPR 107393 [3-hydroxy-3-[4-(quinolin-6-yl)phenyl]-1-azabicyclo[2-2-2]octane dihydrochloride] and its R and S enantiomers are potent inhibitors of rat liver microsomal squalene synthase, with IC50 values of 0.6 to 0.9 nM. One hour after oral administration to rats, RPR 107393 inhibited de novo [14C]cholesterol biosynthesis from [14C]mevalonate in the liver with an ED50 value of 5 mg/kg. Diacid metabolites of [14C]farnesyl pyrophosphate were identified after acid treatment of the livers of these animals. These results support in vitro data demonstrating that these compounds are inhibitors of squalene synthase. In rats, RPR 107393 (30 mg/kg p.o. b.i.d. for 2 days) reduced total serum cholesterol by RPR 107393 (20 mg/kg b.i.d.) reduced plasma cholesterol concentration by 50% after 1 week of administration; this was greater than the reduction observed with lovastatin or pravastatin, neither of which produced > 31% reduction in plasma cholesterol when administered for 1 week at a dose of 50 mg/kg b.i.d. The R and S enantiomers of RPR 107393 (20 mg/kg p.o. q.d. for 7 days) reduced plasma low density lipoprotein cholesterol by 50% and 43%, respectively, whereas high density lipoprotein cholesterol was unchanged. In summary, RPR 107393 is a potent inhibitor of squalene synthase. It is an orally effective hypocholesterolemic agent in rats and marmosets that has greater efficacy than lovastatin or pravastatin in the marmoset.

  14. Meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials on risk of myocardial infarction from the use of oral direct thrombin inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artang, Ramin; Rome, Eric; Nielsen, Jørn Dalsgaard;

    2013-01-01

    . To address these questions, we systematically searched MEDLINE and performed a meta-analysis on randomized trials that compared oral DTIs with warfarin for any indication with end point of MIs after randomization. We furthermore performed a secondary meta-analysis on atrial fibrillation stroke prevention......Dabigatran has been associated with greater risk of myocardial infarction (MI) than warfarin. It is unknown whether the increased risk is unique to dabigatran, an adverse effect shared by other oral direct thrombin inhibitors (DTIs), or the result of a protective effect of warfarin against MI...... trials with alternative anticoagulants compared with warfarin with end point of MIs after randomization. A total of 11 trials (39,357 patients) that compared warfarin to DTIs (dabigatran, ximelagatran, and AZD0837) were identified. In these trials, patients treated with oral DTIs were more likely...

  15. A metal-based inhibitor of NEDD8-activating enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Jing Zhong

    Full Text Available A cyclometallated rhodium(III complex [Rh(ppy(2(dppz](+ (1 (where ppy=2-phenylpyridine and dppz=dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine dipyridophenazine has been prepared and identified as an inhibitor of NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE. The complex inhibited NAE activity in cell-free and cell-based assays, and suppressed the CRL-regulated substrate degradation and NF-κB activation in human cancer cells with potency comparable to known NAE inhibitor MLN4924. Molecular modeling analysis suggested that the overall binding mode of 1 within the binding pocket of the APPBP1/UBA3 heterodimer resembled that for MLN4924. Complex 1 is the first metal complex reported to suppress the NEDDylation pathway via inhibition of the NEDD8-activating enzyme.

  16. Bicyclic Peptide Inhibitor of Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roodbeen, Renée; Paaske, Berit; Jiang, Longguang;

    2013-01-01

    The development of protease inhibitors for pharmacological intervention has taken a new turn with the use of peptidebased inhibitors. Here, we report the rational design of bicyclic peptide inhibitors of the serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), based on the established...... monocyclic peptide, upain-2. It was successfully converted to a bicyclic peptide, without loss of inhibitory properties. The aim was to produce a peptide cyclised by an amide bond with an additional stabilising across-the-ring covalent bond. We expected this bicyclic peptide to exhibit a lower entropic...... burden upon binding. Two bicyclic peptides were synthesised with affinities similar to that of upain-2, and their binding energetics were evaluated by isothermal titration calorimetry. Indeed, compared to upain-2, the bicyclic peptides showed reduced loss of entropy upon binding to uPA. We also...

  17. Ponatinib (AP24534), a multitargeted pan-FGFR inhibitor with activity in multiple FGFR-amplified or mutated cancer models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozgit, Joseph M; Wong, Matthew J; Moran, Lauren; Wardwell, Scott; Mohemmad, Qurish K; Narasimhan, Narayana I; Shakespeare, William C; Wang, Frank; Clackson, Tim; Rivera, Victor M

    2012-03-01

    Members of the fibroblast growth factor receptor family of kinases (FGFR1-4) are dysregulated in multiple cancers. Ponatinib (AP24534) is an oral multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor being explored in a pivotal phase II trial in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia due to its potent activity against BCR-ABL. Ponatinib has also been shown to inhibit the in vitro kinase activity of all four FGFRs, prompting us to examine its potential as an FGFR inhibitor. In Ba/F3 cells engineered to express activated FGFR1-4, ponatinib potently inhibited FGFR-mediated signaling and viability with IC(50) values FGFR-mediated signaling with IC(50) values FGFR1-4 inhibition can be sustained in patients. These results show that ponatinib is a potent pan-FGFR inhibitor and provide strong rationale for its evaluation in patients with FGFR-driven cancers.

  18. Syntheses of potent, selective, and orally bioavailable indazole-pyridine series of protein kinase B/Akt inhibitors with reduced hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Gui-Dong; Gandhi, Viraj B; Gong, Jianchun; Thomas, Sheela; Woods, Keith W; Song, Xiaohong; Li, Tongmei; Diebold, R Bruce; Luo, Yan; Liu, Xuesong; Guan, Ran; Klinghofer, Vered; Johnson, Eric F; Bouska, Jennifer; Olson, Amanda; Marsh, Kennan C; Stoll, Vincent S; Mamo, Mulugeta; Polakowski, James; Campbell, Thomas J; Martin, Ruth L; Gintant, Gary A; Penning, Thomas D; Li, Qun; Rosenberg, Saul H; Giranda, Vincent L

    2007-06-28

    Compound 7 was identified as a potent (IC50 = 14 nM), selective, and orally bioavailable (F = 70% in mouse) inhibitor of protein kinase B/Akt. While promising efficacy was observed in vivo, this compound showed effects on depolarization of Purkinje fibers in an in vitro assay and CV hypotension in vivo. Guided by an X-ray structure of 7 bound to protein kinase A, which has 80% homology with Akt in the kinase domain, our efforts have focused on structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies of the phenyl moiety, in an attempt to address the cardiovascular liability and further improve the Akt potency. A novel and efficient synthetic route toward diversely substituted phenyl derivatives of 7 was developed utilizing a copper-mediated aziridine ring-opening reaction as the key step. To improve the selectivity of these Akt inhibitors over other protein kinases, a nitrogen atom was incorporated into selected phenyl analogues of 7 at the C-6 position of the methyl indazole scaffold. These modifications resulted in the discovery of inhibitor 37c with greater potency (IC50 = 0.6 nM vs Akt), selectivity, and improved cardiovascular safety profile. The SARs, pharmacokinetic profile, and CV safety of selected Akt inhibitors will be discussed.

  19. Design, synthesis, and biological activities of 1-aryl-1,4-diazepan-2-one derivatives as novel triple reuptake inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Eiji; Ishichi, Yuji; Kimura, Eiji; Yoshikawa, Masato; Kanzaki, Naoyuki; Nakagawa, Hideyuki; Terao, Yasuko; Suzuki, Atsuko; Kawai, Takayuki; Arakawa, Yuuichi; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Terauchi, Jun

    2014-08-15

    A novel series of triple reuptake inhibitors were explored by ligand-based drug design. A cyclic structure was designed from cyclopropane derivative 5 using the core structure of reported monoamine reuptake inhibitors, leading to the formation of the 1-aryl-1,4-diazepan-2-one derivative 23j-S. Compound 23j-S was shown to act as a potent TRI with an excellent ADME-Tox profile. Oral administration of 23j-S significantly enhanced norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin levels in the mouse prefrontal cortex and showed significant antidepressant-like activity in tail suspension tests in mouse.

  20. Phase I/II clinical trial of 2-Difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) and a novel polyamine transport inhibitor (MQT 1426) for feline oral squamous cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Skorupski, Katherine A.; O'Brien, Thomas G; Guerrero, Teri; Rodriguez, Carlos O.; Burns, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    Polyamines are essential for cell proliferation. Their production is dysregulated in many cancers and polyamine depletion leads to tumor regression in mouse models of SCC. The purpose of this study was to determine the maximally tolerated dose of the polyamine transport inhibitor, MQT 1426, when combined with the ornithine decarboxylase inhibitor, DFMO, and to determine whether this therapy results in reduction in tumor polyamine levels. Thirteen cats with oral SCC received both drugs orally ...

  1. Parathyroid hormone is not an inhibitor of lipoprotein lipase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnadottir, M; Nilsson-Ehle, P

    1994-01-01

    The reduced lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activities in uraemia are reflected by increased serum triglyceride concentrations and reduced HDL cholesterol concentrations. Both hyperparathyroidism and circulating inhibitor(s) of LPL have been associated with the disturbances of lipid metabolism in uraemia. The aim of the present study was to investigate if parathyroid hormone (PTH) had an inhibitory effect on LPL activity. Plasma post-heparin LPL activities, plasma LPL inhibitory activities, serum PTHintact and serum PTHC-terminal concentrations were analysed in 20 patients on haemodialysis and 20 healthy controls. The effects of purified, human PTHintact and a carboxyterminal fragment of PTH (PTH39-84) on LPL activities in post-heparin plasma from healthy individuals and on the enzyme activity of purified, bovine milk LPL, activated with apolipoprotein CII, were studied. Patients had significantly higher plasma LPL inhibitory activities than controls, but there was no correlation between plasma LPL inhibitory activities and serum PTH concentrations. Neither PTHintact nor PTH39-84 had a significant effect on LPL activities in vitro. Thus there was no evidence of a direct inhibition of LPL activity by PTH under the present in-vivo or in-vitro conditions.

  2. Recent developments centered on orally active iron chelators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Hider

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the past twenty years there has been a growing interest in the orally active iron chelators, deferiprone and deferasirox, both have been extensively studied. The ability of these compounds to mobilize iron from the heart and endocrine tissue has presented the clinician with some advantages over desferrioxamine, the first therapeutic iron chelator. Other orally active iron chelators are currently under development. The critical features necessary for the design of therapeutically useful orally active iron chelators are presented in this review, together with recent studies devoted to the design of such chelators. This newly emerging range of iron chelators will enable clinicians to apply iron chelation methodology to other disease states and to begin to design personalized chelation regimes.

  3. Antimalarial activity of HIV-1 protease inhibitor in chromone series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerdsirisuk, Pradith; Maicheen, Chirattikan; Ungwitayatorn, Jiraporn

    2014-12-01

    Increasing parasite resistance to nearly all available antimalarial drugs becomes a serious problem to human health and necessitates the need to continue the search for new effective drugs. Recent studies have shown that clinically utilized HIV-1 protease (HIV-1 PR) inhibitors can inhibit the in vitro and in vivo growth of Plasmodium falciparum. In this study, a series of chromone derivatives possessing HIV-1 PR inhibitory activity has been tested for antimalarial activity against P. falciparum (K1 multi-drug resistant strain). Chromone 15, the potent HIV-1 PR inhibitor (IC50=0.65μM), was found to be the most potent antimalarial compound with IC50=0.95μM while primaquine and tafenoquine showed IC50=2.41 and 1.95μM, respectively. Molecular docking study of chromone compounds against plasmepsin II, an aspartic protease enzyme important in hemoglobin degradation, revealed that chromone 15 exhibited the higher binding affinity (binding energy=-13.24kcal/mol) than the known PM II inhibitors. Thus, HIV-1 PR inhibitor in chromone series has the potential to be a new class of antimalarial agent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Plasminogen activator inhibitor (type-1) in rat adrenal medulla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, J; Kristensen, P; Pyke, C; Danø, K

    1989-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) was identified in extracts of rat adrenal medulla, and its immunohistochemical localization was studied together with that of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA). By staining of adjacent sections and by double-staining of the same section we demonstrate that the same cells of the adrenal medulla contain both PAI-1 and t-PA immunoreactivity in the cytoplasm. In addition a few ganglion cells of the adrenal medulla were found to contain PAI-1 but not t-PA. Neither of the components were found in the adrenal cortex. Analysis of extracts from isolated adrenal medulla using reverse zymography showed the presence of a plasminogen activator inhibitor with Mr approximately 46,000. The inhibitory activity disappeared when the extract was passed through a column with sepharose-coupled anti-PAI-1 IgG, while the run-through from a similar column coupled with preimmune IgG still contained the inhibitor. The present findings suggest that PAI-1 could play a role in the regulation of t-PA activity in the rat adrenal gland medullary cells.

  5. Zilascorb(2H), a new reversible protein synthesis inhibitor: clinical study of an oral preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semb, K A; Fodstad, O; Klem, B; Bibow, K; Osmundsen, K; Aamdal, S

    1997-03-01

    The new anti-cancer drug zilascorb(2H) has shown promising activity in preclinical models. Its putative mechanism of action is reversible protein synthesis inhibition and long-term treatment is required. As a clinical treatment modality, long-term daily zilascorb(2H) infusions, as used in previous studies, are not regarded feasible. Therefore, an oral formulation of the drug was developed, and pharmacokinetic profile, toxicity and antitumor activity of zilascorb(2H) tablets were studied. Thirteen patients with advanced solid cancer not amenable to established therapy, but with adequate performance status and organ functions, were included. The treatment was given as a daily i.v. zilascorb(2H) infusion for 5 days, followed by zilascorb(2H) tablets twice daily for 3 months. Blood and urine sampling was performed when estimated plasma steady-state level was reached for each formulation, respectively. Analyses of drug concentrations in plasma and urine were performed by high performance liquid chromatography. Zilascorb(2H) in tablet formulation had a bioavailability of 32%, was quickly absorbed and slowly eliminated. Concomitant use of the H2-blocker ranitidine possibly enhanced bioavailability. Zilascorb(2H) was well tolerated. Two patients experienced drug-related fever, disturbing the treatment schedule for one of them. Moderate nausea was reported. One objective response was obtained. The bioavailability of zilascorb(2H) tablets was satisfactory. The principle of oral administration of zilascorb(2H) is feasible for long-term treatment and the side effects are acceptable. The mechanisms of action and the very low toxicity of the drug makes it a candidate for combination with other anticancer agents.

  6. Activating PTEN by COX-2 inhibitors antagonizes radiation-induced AKT activation contributing to radiosensitization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Zhen [Central Laboratory, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, 22 Zhongguancun Avenue South, Haidian District, Beijing 100081 (China); Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, 22 Zhongguancun Avenue South, Haidian District, Beijing 100081 (China); Gan, Ye-Hua, E-mail: kqyehuagan@bjmu.edu.cn [Central Laboratory, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, 22 Zhongguancun Avenue South, Haidian District, Beijing 100081 (China); Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, 22 Zhongguancun Avenue South, Haidian District, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2015-05-01

    Radiotherapy is still one of the most effective nonsurgical treatments for many tumors. However, radioresistance remains a major impediment to radiotherapy. Although COX-2 inhibitors can induce radiosensitization, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, we showed that COX-2 selective inhibitor celecoxib enhanced the radiation-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis in HeLa and SACC-83 cells. Treatment with celecoxib alone dephosphorylated phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN), promoted PTEN membrane translocation or activation, and correspondingly dephosphorylated or inactivated protein kinase B (AKT). By contrast, treatment with radiation alone increased PTEN phosphorylation, inhibited PTEN membrane translocation and correspondingly activated AKT in the two cell lines. However, treatment with celecoxib or another COX-2 selective inhibitor (valdecoxib) completely blocked radiation-induced increase of PTEN phosphorylation, rescued radiation-induced decrease in PTEN membrane translocation, and correspondingly inactivated AKT. Moreover, celecoxib could also upregulate PTEN protein expression by downregulating Sp1 expression, thereby leading to the activation of PTEN transcription. Our results suggested that COX-2 inhibitors could enhance radiosensitization at least partially by activating PTEN to antagonize radiation-induced AKT activation. - Highlights: • COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, could enhance radiosensitization. • Radiation induced PTEN inactivation (phosphorylation) and AKT activation. • COX-2 inhibitor induced PTEN expression and activation, and inactivated AKT. • COX-2 inhibitor enhanced radiosensitization through activating PTEN.

  7. Oral insecticidal activity of plant-associated pseudomonads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffner, Beat; Péchy-Tarr, Maria; Ryffel, Florian; Hoegger, Patrik; Obrist, Christian; Rindlisbacher, Alfred; Keel, Christoph; Maurhofer, Monika

    2013-03-01

    Biocontrol pseudomonads are most known to protect plants from fungal diseases and to increase plant yield, while intriguing aspects on insecticidal activity have been discovered only recently. Here, we demonstrate that Fit toxin producing pseudomonads, in contrast to a naturally Fit-deficient strain, exhibit potent oral activity against larvae of Spodoptera littoralis, Heliothis virescens and Plutella xylostella, all major insect pests of agricultural crops. Spraying plant leaves with suspensions containing only 1000 Pseudomonas cells per ml was sufficient to kill 70-80% of Spodoptera and Heliothis larvae. Monitoring survival kinetics and bacterial titres in parallel, we demonstrate that Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0 and Pseudomonas chlororaphis PCL1391, two bacteria harbouring the Fit gene cluster colonize and kill insects via oral infection. Using Fit mutants of CHA0 and PCL1391, we show that production of the Fit toxin contributes substantially to oral insecticidal activity. Furthermore, the global regulator GacA is required for full insecticidal activity. Our findings demonstrate the lethal oral activity of two root-colonizing pseudomonads so far known as potent antagonists of fungal plant pathogens. This adds insecticidal activity to the existing biocontrol repertoire of these bacteria and opens new perspectives for applications in crop pest control and in research on their ecological behaviour.

  8. Sex hormone-binding globulin and antithrombin III activity in women with oral ultra-low-dose estradiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Sumika; Yasui, Toshiyuki; Kasai, Kana; Keyama, Kaoru; Yoshida, Kanako; Kato, Takeshi; Uemura, Hirokazu; Kuwahara, Akira; Matsuzaki, Toshiya; Irahara, Minoru

    2017-03-20

    Oral oestrogen increases the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and increases production of sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) in a dose-dependent manner. SHBG has been suggested to be involved in venous thromboembolism. We examined the effects of oral ultra-low-dose oestradiol on circulating levels of SHBG and coagulation parameters, and we compared the effects to those of transdermal oestradiol. Twenty women received oral oestradiol (500 μg) every day (oral ultra-low-dose group) and 20 women received a transdermal patch (50 μg) as a transdermal group. In addition, the women received dydrogesterone continuously (5 mg) except for women who underwent hysterectomy. Circulating SHBG, antithrombin III (ATIII) activity, d-dimer, thrombin-antithrombin complex and plasmin-α2 plasmin inhibitor complex were measured before and 3 months after the start of treatment. SHBG was significantly increased at 3 months in the oral ultra-low-dose group, but not in the transdermal group. However, percent changes in SHBG were not significantly different between the two groups. In both groups, ATIII was significantly decreased at 3 months. In conclusion, even ultra-low-dose oestradiol orally increases circulating SHBG level. However, the magnitude of change in SHBG caused by oral ultra-low-dose oestradiol is small and is comparable to that caused by transdermal oestradiol. Impact statement Oral oestrogen replacement therapy increases production of SHBG which may be related to increase in VTE risk. However, the effect of oral ultra-low-dose oestradiol on SHBG has not been clarified. Even ultra-low-dose oestradiol orally increases circulating SHBG levels, but the magnitude of change in SHBG caused by oral ultra-low-dose oestradiol is small and is comparable to that caused by transdermal oestradiol. VTE risk in women receiving oral ultra-low-dose oestradiol may be comparable to that in women receiving transdermal oestradiol.

  9. Antiretroviral activity of protease inhibitors against Toxoplasma gondii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianet Monzote

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has caused a marked reduction in the occurrence and severity of parasitic infections, including the toxoplasmic encephalitis (TE. These changes have been attributed to the restoration of cell-mediated immunity. This study was developed to examine the activity of six antiretroviral protease inhibitors (API on Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites. The six API showed anti-Toxoplasma activity, with IC50 value between 1.4 and 6.6 µg/mL. Further studies at the molecular level should be performed to clarify if the use of API could be beneficial or not for AIDS patients with TE.

  10. Oral administration of Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitors impairs GPVI-mediated platelet function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigg, Rachel A; Aslan, Joseph E; Healy, Laura D; Wallisch, Michael; Thierheimer, Marisa L D; Loren, Cassandra P; Pang, Jiaqing; Hinds, Monica T; Gruber, András; McCarty, Owen J T

    2016-03-01

    The Tec family kinase Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) plays an important signaling role downstream of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs in hematopoietic cells. Mutations in Btk are involved in impaired B-cell maturation in X-linked agammaglobulinemia, and Btk has been investigated for its role in platelet activation via activation of the effector protein phospholipase Cγ2 downstream of the platelet membrane glycoprotein VI (GPVI). Because of its role in hematopoietic cell signaling, Btk has become a target in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and mantle cell lymphoma; the covalent Btk inhibitor ibrutinib was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of these conditions. Antihemostatic events have been reported in some patients taking ibrutinib, although the mechanism of these events remains unknown. We sought to determine the effects of Btk inhibition on platelet function in a series of in vitro studies of platelet activation, spreading, and aggregation. Our results show that irreversible inhibition of Btk with two ibrutinib analogs in vitro decreased human platelet activation, phosphorylation of Btk, P-selectin exposure, spreading on fibrinogen, and aggregation under shear flow conditions. Short-term studies of ibrutinib analogs administered in vivo also showed abrogation of platelet aggregation in vitro, but without measurable effects on plasma clotting times or on bleeding in vivo. Taken together, our results suggest that inhibition of Btk significantly decreased GPVI-mediated platelet activation, spreading, and aggregation in vitro; however, prolonged bleeding was not observed in a model of bleeding. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  11. The Treatment of Errors in Oral Activities: Developing Instructional Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herron, Carol

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the changes in foreign language instructional strategies regarding error avoidance and correction that have emerged from the emphasis on communicative competence. Considering this trend away from audiolingualism and consistent oral accuracy, urges teachers to reevaluate procedures for conducting class activities and correcting students'…

  12. Discovery of a Selective Inhibitor of Oncogenic B-Raf Kinase With Potent Antimelanoma Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, J.; Lee, J.T.; Wang, W.; Zhang, J.; Cho, H.; Mamo, S.; Bremer, R.; Gillette, S.; Kong, J.; Haass, N.K.; Sproesser, K.; Li, L.; Smalley, K.S.M.; Fong, D.; Zhu, Y.-L.; Marimuthu, A.; Nguyen, H.; Lam, B.; Liu, J.; Cheung, I.; Rice, J.

    2009-05-26

    BRAF{sup V600E} is the most frequent oncogenic protein kinase mutation known. Furthermore, inhibitors targeting 'active' protein kinases have demonstrated significant utility in the therapeutic repertoire against cancer. Therefore, we pursued the development of specific kinase inhibitors targeting B-Raf, and the V600E allele in particular. By using a structure-guided discovery approach, a potent and selective inhibitor of active B-Raf has been discovered. PLX4720, a 7-azaindole derivative that inhibits B-Raf{sup V600E} with an IC{sub 50} of 13 nM, defines a class of kinase inhibitor with marked selectivity in both biochemical and cellular assays. PLX4720 preferentially inhibits the active B-Raf{sup V600E} kinase compared with a broad spectrum of other kinases, and potent cytotoxic effects are also exclusive to cells bearing the V600E allele. Consistent with the high degree of selectivity, ERK phosphorylation is potently inhibited by PLX4720 in B-Raf{sup V600E}-bearing tumor cell lines but not in cells lacking oncogenic B-Raf. In melanoma models, PLX4720 induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis exclusively in B-Raf{sup V600E}-positive cells. In B-Raf{sup V600E}-dependent tumor xenograft models, orally dosed PLX4720 causes significant tumor growth delays, including tumor regressions, without evidence of toxicity. The work described here represents the entire discovery process, from initial identification through structural and biological studies in animal models to a promising therapeutic for testing in cancer patients bearing B-Raf{sup V600E}-driven tumors.

  13. Creating novel activated factor XI inhibitors through fragment based lead generation and structure aided drug design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ola Fjellström

    Full Text Available Activated factor XI (FXIa inhibitors are anticipated to combine anticoagulant and profibrinolytic effects with a low bleeding risk. This motivated a structure aided fragment based lead generation campaign to create novel FXIa inhibitor leads. A virtual screen, based on docking experiments, was performed to generate a FXIa targeted fragment library for an NMR screen that resulted in the identification of fragments binding in the FXIa S1 binding pocket. The neutral 6-chloro-3,4-dihydro-1H-quinolin-2-one and the weakly basic quinolin-2-amine structures are novel FXIa P1 fragments. The expansion of these fragments towards the FXIa prime side binding sites was aided by solving the X-ray structures of reported FXIa inhibitors that we found to bind in the S1-S1'-S2' FXIa binding pockets. Combining the X-ray structure information from the identified S1 binding 6-chloro-3,4-dihydro-1H-quinolin-2-one fragment and the S1-S1'-S2' binding reference compounds enabled structure guided linking and expansion work to achieve one of the most potent and selective FXIa inhibitors reported to date, compound 13, with a FXIa IC50 of 1.0 nM. The hydrophilicity and large polar surface area of the potent S1-S1'-S2' binding FXIa inhibitors compromised permeability. Initial work to expand the 6-chloro-3,4-dihydro-1H-quinolin-2-one fragment towards the prime side to yield molecules with less hydrophilicity shows promise to afford potent, selective and orally bioavailable compounds.

  14. No significant effects of single intravenous, single oral and subchronic oral administration of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors on striatal [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT binding in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knol, R.J.J.; Booij, J. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Graduate School of Neurosciences, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bruin, K. de; Eck-Smit, B.L.F. van [University of Amsterdam, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2008-03-15

    [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT SPECT is a valuable diagnostic tool to discriminate Lewy body dementia from Alzheimer's dementia. To date, however, it is uncertain whether the frequently used acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs) by demented patients, have an effect on [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT binding to dopamine transporters (DATs). Earlier animal studies showed a decline of DAT availability after acute intravenous injection of AChEIs. The aim of this study was to investigate effects of single intravenous, single oral and subchronic oral administration of AChEIs on DAT availability in the rat brain as measured by [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT. Biodistribution studies were performed in Wistar rats (n = 5-16 per group). Before [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT injection, rats were injected intravenously with a single dose of the AChEI rivastigmine (2.5 mg/kg body weight) or donepezil (0.5 mg/kg), the DAT-blocker methylphenidate (10 mg/kg) or saline. A second group was orally treated with a single dose of rivastigmine or donepezil (2.5 mg/kg), methylphenidate (10 mg/kg) or saline before injection of [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT. Studies were also performed in rats that were orally treated during 14 consecutive days with either rivastigmine (1 mg/kg daily), donepezil (1.5 mg/kg daily), methylphenidate (2.5 mg/kg) or saline. Brain parts were assayed in a gamma counter, and specific striatum/cerebellum ratios were calculated for the [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT binding to DATs. No significant effects of either single intravenous, single oral or subchronic oral administration of AChEIs on striatal FP-CIT binding could be detected. Single pretreatment with methylphenidate resulted in an expected significantly lower striatal FP-CIT binding. We conclude that in rats, single intravenous and single or subchronic oral administration of the tested AChEIs does not lead to an important alteration of [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT binding to striatal DATs. Therefore, it is unlikely that these drugs will induce large effects on the interpretation of

  15. Changes in glucose-induced plasma active glucagon-like peptide-1 levels by co-administration of sodium-glucose cotransporter inhibitors with dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguma, Takahiro; Kuriyama, Chiaki; Nakayama, Keiko; Matsushita, Yasuaki; Hikida, Kumiko; Tsuda-Tsukimoto, Minoru; Saito, Akira; Arakawa, Kenji; Ueta, Kiichiro; Minami, Masabumi; Shiotani, Masaharu

    2016-12-01

    We investigated whether structurally different sodium-glucose cotransporter (SGLT) 2 inhibitors, when co-administered with dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) inhibitors, could enhance glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion during oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) in rodents. Three different SGLT inhibitors-1-(β-d-Glucopyranosyl)-4-chloro-3-[5-(6-fluoro-2-pyridyl)-2-thienylmethyl]benzene (GTB), TA-1887, and canagliflozin-were examined to assess the effect of chemical structure. Oral treatment with GTB plus a DPP4 inhibitor enhanced glucose-induced plasma active GLP-1 (aGLP-1) elevation and suppressed glucose excursions in both normal and diabetic rodents. In DPP4-deficient rats, GTB enhanced glucose-induced aGLP-1 elevation without affecting the basal level, whereas metformin, previously reported to enhance GLP-1 secretion, increased both the basal level and glucose-induced elevation. Oral treatment with canagliflozin and TA-1887 also enhanced glucose-induced aGLP-1 elevation when co-administered with either teneligliptin or sitagliptin. These data suggest that structurally different SGLT2 inhibitors enhance plasma aGLP-1 elevation and suppress glucose excursions during OGTT when co-administered with DPP4 inhibitors, regardless of the difference in chemical structure. Combination treatment with DPP4 inhibitors and SGLT2 inhibitors having moderate SGLT1 inhibitory activity may be a promising therapeutic option for improving glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Nigella sativa and its active constituent thymoquinone in oral health

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlAttas, Safia A.; Zahran, Fat’heya M.; Turkistany, Shereen A.

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we summarized published reports that investigated the role of Nigella sativa (NS) and its active constituent, thymoquinone (TQ) in oral health and disease management. The literature studies were preliminary and scanty, but the results revealed that black seed plants have a potential therapeutic effect for oral and dental diseases. Such results are encouraging for the incorporation of these plants in dental therapeutics and hygiene products. However, further detailed preclinical and clinical studies at the cellular and molecular levels are required to investigate the mechanisms of action of NS and its constituents, particularly TQ. PMID:26905343

  17. Treatment of psoriatic arthritis in a phase 3 randomised, placebo-controlled trial with apremilast, an oral phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanaugh, Arthur; Mease, Philip J; Gomez-Reino, Juan J; Adebajo, Adewale O; Wollenhaupt, Jürgen; Gladman, Dafna D; Lespessailles, Eric; Hall, Stephen; Hochfeld, Marla; Hu, ChiaChi; Hough, Douglas; Stevens, Randall M; Schett, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Apremilast, an oral phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor, regulates inflammatory mediators. Psoriatic Arthritis Long-term Assessment of Clinical Efficacy 1 (PALACE 1) compared apremilast with placebo in patients with active psoriatic arthritis despite prior traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) and/or biologic therapy. Methods In the 24-week, placebo-controlled phase of PALACE 1, patients (N=504) were randomised (1:1:1) to placebo, apremilast 20 mg twice a day (BID) or apremilast 30 mg BID. At week 16, patients without ≥20% reduction in swollen and tender joint counts were required to be re-randomised equally to either apremilast dose if initially randomised to placebo or remained on their initial apremilast dose. Patients on background concurrent DMARDs continued stable doses (methotrexate, leflunomide and/or sulfasalazine). Primary outcome was the proportion of patients achieving 20% improvement in modified American College of Rheumatology response criteria (ACR20) at week 16. Results At week 16, significantly more apremilast 20 mg BID (31%) and 30 mg BID (40%) patients achieved ACR20 versus placebo (19%) (p<0.001). Significant improvements in key secondary measures (physical function, psoriasis) were evident with both apremilast doses versus placebo. Across outcome measures, the 30-mg group generally had higher and more consistent response rates, although statistical comparison was not conducted. The most common adverse events were gastrointestinal and generally occurred early, were self-limiting and infrequently led to discontinuation. No imbalance in major adverse cardiac events, serious or opportunistic infections, malignancies or laboratory abnormalities was observed. Conclusions Apremilast was effective in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis, improving signs and symptoms and physical function. Apremilast demonstrated an acceptable safety profile and was generally well tolerated. Clinical trial registration number NCT

  18. Primed Activation of Macrophages by Oral Administration of Lipopolysaccharide Derived from Pantoea agglomerans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagawa, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Yutaro; Kohchi, Chie; Zhang, Ran; Shibasaki, Yasuhiro; Soma, Gen-Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is involved in the activation of the innate immune responses on monocytes/macrophages in vitro, and by intravenous injection. Although small quantities of LPS are usually found in traditional Chinese medicines, vegetables and fruits, the mode of action of orally administered LPS is still unclear. LPS derived from Pantoea agglomerans (LPSp) was orally administered to C3H/HeN or C3H/HeJ mice ad libitum. The LPSp treatment enhanced phagocytosis by resident peritoneal macrophages of C3H/HeN mice but not of C3H/HeJ mice. This activation can be defined as primed activation because no augmentation of inflammatory cytokines production was detected. LPSp in peritoneal fluid was detected and successfully quantified. Moreover, the LPSp reduced the expression of avian reticuloendotheliosis viral oncogene-related B (RelB) in the macrophages without degradation of nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cell inhibitor, alpha (IκBα). Orally administered LPSp can reach the peritoneum, and enhance phagocytosis via Toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathway in resident peritoneal macrophages. Copyright © 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  19. Gamma-secretase inhibitor activity of a Pterocarpus erinaceus extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hage, Salim; Marinangeli, Claudia; Stanga, Serena; Octave, Jean-Noël; Quetin-Leclercq, Joëlle; Kienlen-Campard, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of β-amyloid peptides (Aβ) and its progressive deposition into amyloid plaques are key events in the aetiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). To date, AD treatment is symptomatic and consists of drugs treating the cognitive decline. Identifying molecules specifically targeting Aβ production or aggregation represents a huge challenge in the development of specific AD treatments. Several molecules reported as γ-secretase inhibitors or modulators have been evaluated, but so far none of them have proven to be selective or fully efficient. We have previously investigated the potential interest of plant extracts and we reported that Pterocarpus erinaceus stem-bark extract was active on Aβ release. Our aim here was to characterize the mechanisms by which this extract reduces Aβ levels. We tested P. erinaceus extract at non-toxic concentrations on cells expressing the human amyloid precursor protein (APP695) or its amyloidogenic β-cleaved C-terminal fragment (C99), as well as on neuronal cell lines. P. erinaceus extract was found to inhibit Aβ release. We further showed that this extract inhibited γ-secretase activity in cell-free and in vitro assays, strongly suggesting that P. erinaceus extract is a natural γ-secretase inhibitor. Importantly, this extract did not inhibit γ-secretase-dependent Notch intracellular domain release. P. erinaceus extract appears as a new potent γ-secretase inhibitor selective towards APP processing. 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel

  20. Synthesis of a selective HDAC6 inhibitor active in neuroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwick, Vincent; Simões-Pires, Claudia A; Nurisso, Alessandra; Petit, Charlotte; Dos Santos Passos, Carolina; Randazzo, Giuseppe Marco; Martinet, Nadine; Bertrand, Philippe; Cuendet, Muriel

    2016-10-15

    In recent years, the role of HDAC6 in neurodegeneration has been partially elucidated, which led some authors to propose HDAC6 inhibitors as a therapeutic strategy to treat neurodegenerative diseases. In an effort to develop a selective HDAC6 inhibitor which can cross the blood brain barrier (BBB), a modified hydroxamate derivative (compound 3) was designed and synthetized. This compound was predicted to have potential for BBB penetration based on in silico and in vitro evaluation of passive permeability. When tested for its HDAC inhibitory activity, the IC50 value of compound 3 towards HDAC6 was in the nM range in both enzymatic and cell-based assays. Compound 3 showed a cell-based selectivity profile close to that of tubastatin A in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells, and a good BBB permeability profile.

  1. Pyrrolopyridine inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David R; Meyers, Marvin J; Vernier, William F; Mahoney, Matthew W; Kurumbail, Ravi G; Caspers, Nicole; Poda, Gennadiy I; Schindler, John F; Reitz, David B; Mourey, Robert J

    2007-05-31

    A new class of potent kinase inhibitors selective for mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MAPKAP-K2 or MK-2) for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis has been prepared and evaluated. These inhibitors have IC50 values as low as 10 nM against the target and have good selectivity profiles against a number of kinases including CDK2, ERK, JNK, and p38. These MK-2 inhibitors have been shown to suppress TNFalpha production in U397 cells and to be efficacious in an acute inflammation model. The structure-activity relationships of this series, the selectivity for MK-2 and their activity in both in vitro and in vivo models are discussed. The observed selectivity is discussed with the aid of an MK-2/inhibitor crystal structure.

  2. Antimalarial activity of phenylthiazolyl-bearing hydroxamate-based histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Geoffrey S; Chen, Yufeng; Andrews, Katherine T; Caridha, Diana; Gerena, Lucia; Gettayacamin, Montip; Johnson, Jacob; Li, Qigui; Melendez, Victor; Obaldia, Nicanor; Tran, Thanh N; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2008-10-01

    The antimalarial activity and pharmacology of a series of phenylthiazolyl-bearing hydroxamate-based histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) was evaluated. In in vitro growth inhibition assays approximately 50 analogs were evaluated against four drug resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum. The range of 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)s) was 0.0005 to >1 microM. Five analogs exhibited IC(50)s of 600. The most potent compound, WR301801 (YC-2-88) was shown to cause hyperacetylation of P. falciparum histones, which is a marker for HDAC inhibition in eukaryotic cells. The compound also inhibited malarial and mammalian HDAC activity in functional assays at low nanomolar concentrations. WR301801 did not exhibit cures in P. berghei-infected mice at oral doses as high as 640 mg/kg/day for 3 days or in P. falciparum-infected Aotus lemurinus lemurinus monkeys at oral doses of 32 mg/kg/day for 3 days, despite high relative bioavailability. The failure of monotherapy in mice may be due to a short half-life, since the compound was rapidly hydrolyzed to an inactive acid metabolite by loss of its hydroxamate group in vitro (half-life of 11 min in mouse microsomes) and in vivo (half-life in mice of 3.5 h after a single oral dose of 50 mg/kg). However, WR301801 exhibited cures in P. berghei-infected mice when combined at doses of 52 mg/kg/day orally with subcurative doses of chloroquine. Next-generation HDACIs with greater metabolic stability than WR301801 may be useful as antimalarials if combined appropriately with conventional antimalarial drugs.

  3. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor captopril prevents activation-induced apoptosis by interfering with T cell activation signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odaka, C; Mizuochi, T

    2000-01-01

    Captopril is an orally active inhibitor of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) which is widely used as an anti-hypertensive agent. In addition to its ability to reduce blood pressure, captopril has a number of other biological activities. Recently the drug was shown to inhibit Fas-induced apoptosis in human activated peripheral T cells and human lung epithelial cells. In this study, we investigated whether captopril blocks activation-induced apoptosis in murine T cell hybridomas, and found that captopril inhibited IL-2 synthesis and apoptotic cell death upon activation with anti-CD3 antibody. In addition, captopril inhibited an inducible caspase-3-like activity during activation-induced apoptosis. On the other hand, captopril did not interfere with Fas signalling, since anti-Fas antibody-induced apoptosis in Fas+ Jurkat cells was unaffected by the drug. Furthermore, we examined whether captopril blocks activation-induced apoptosis by interfering with expression of Fas, Fas ligand (FasL), or both on T cell hybridomas. FasL expression on activated T cells was significantly inhibited by captopril, whereas up-expression of Fas was partially inhibited, as assessed by cell surface staining. Taking all data together, we conclude that captopril prevents activation-induced apoptosis in T cell hybridomas by interfering with T cell activation signals. Captopril has been reported to induce systemic lupus erythematosus syndrome, and our findings may be useful for elucidating the mechanism of captopril-induced autoimmunity. PMID:10971519

  4. A Phase I-II Study of the Oral PARP Inhibitor Rucaparib in Patients with Germline BRCA1/2-Mutated Ovarian Carcinoma or Other Solid Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristeleit, Rebecca; Shapiro, Geoffrey I; Burris, Howard A; Oza, Amit M; LoRusso, Patricia; Patel, Manish R; Domchek, Susan M; Balmaña, Judith; Drew, Yvette; Chen, Lee-May; Safra, Tamar; Montes, Ana; Giordano, Heidi; Maloney, Lara; Goble, Sandra; Isaacson, Jeff; Xiao, Jim; Borrow, Jen; Rolfe, Lindsey; Shapira-Frommer, Ronnie

    2017-08-01

    Purpose: Rucaparib is a potent, oral, small-molecule PARP inhibitor. This phase I-II study was the first to evaluate single-agent oral rucaparib at multiple doses.Experimental Design: Part 1 (phase I) sought to determine the MTD, recommended phase II dose (RP2D), and pharmacokinetics of oral rucaparib administered in 21-day continuous cycles in patients with advanced solid tumors. Part 2A (phase II) enrolled patients with platinum-sensitive, high-grade ovarian carcinoma (HGOC) associated with a germline BRCA1/2 mutation who received two to four prior regimens and had a progression-free interval of 6 months or more following their most recent platinum therapy. The primary endpoint was investigator-assessed objective response rate (ORR) by RECIST version 1.1.Results: In part 1, 56 patients received oral rucaparib (40 to 500 mg once daily and 240 to 840 mg twice daily). No MTD was identified per protocol-defined criteria; 600 mg twice daily was selected as the RP2D based on manageable toxicity and clinical activity. Pharmacokinetics were approximately dose-proportional across all dose levels. In part 2A, 42 patients with germline BRCA1/2-mutated HGOC received rucaparib 600 mg twice daily. Investigator-assessed ORR was 59.5%. The most common treatment-emergent adverse events (all grades) were asthenia/fatigue (85.7%; 36/42), nausea (83.3%; 35/42), anemia (71.4%; 30/42), alanine transaminase and/or aspartate transaminase elevations (57.1%; 24/42), and vomiting (54.8%; 23/42). Among 98 patients, 5 (5.1%) discontinued because of an adverse event (excluding disease progression).Conclusions: Rucaparib was tolerable and had activity in patients with platinum-sensitive germline BRCA1/2-mutated HGOC. Clin Cancer Res; 23(15); 4095-106. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Regulation of the activity of protein kinases by endogenous heat stable protein inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmigielski, A

    1985-01-01

    Protein kinase activities are regulated by endogenous thermostable protein inhibitors. Type I inhibitor is a protein of MW 22,000-24,000 which inhibits specifically cyclic AMP-(cAMP) dependent protein kinase (APK) as a competitive inhibitor of catalytic subunits of the enzyme. Type I inhibitor activity changes inversely according to the activation of adenylate cyclase and the changes in cAMP content in tissues. It seems that type I inhibitor serves as a factor preventing spontaneous cAMP-dependent phosphorylation in unstimulated cell. The other thermostable protein which inhibits APK activity has been found in Sertoli cell-enriched testis (testis inhibitor). Physiological role of the testis inhibitor is unknown. Type II inhibitor is a protein of MW 15,000 which blocks phosphorylation mediated by cAMP and cyclic GMP (cGMP) dependent (APK and GPK) and cyclic nucleotide independent protein kinases as a competitive inhibitor of substrate proteins. Activity of this inhibitor specifically changes in reciprocal manner to the changes in cGMP content. It seems that type II inhibitor serves as a factor preventing the phosphorylation catalyzed by GPK when cGMP content is low. Stimulation of guanylate cyclase and activation of GPK is followed by a decrease of type II inhibitor activity. This change in relationship between activities of GPK and type II inhibitor allows for effective phosphorylation catalyzed by this enzyme when cGMP content is increased.

  6. The novel HDAC inhibitor AR-42-induced anti-colon cancer cell activity is associated with ceramide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Weihong; Xu, Bin; Yao, Yiting; Yu, Xiaoling [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Tongren Hospital, Shanghai (China); Shen, Jie, E-mail: tongrensj163@163.com [Department of Administrative, Tongren Hospital, No. 786 Yuyuan Road, Changning District, Shanghai (China)

    2015-08-07

    In the current study, we investigated the potential activity of AR-42, a novel histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, against colon cancer cells. Our in vitro results showed that AR-42 induced ceramide production, exerted potent anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities in established (SW-620 and HCT-116 lines) and primary human colon cancer cells. Exogenously-added sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) suppressed AR-42-induced activity, yet a cell-permeable ceramide (C4) facilitated AR-42-induced cytotoxicity against colon cancer cells. In addition, AR-42-induced ceramide production and anti-colon cancer cell activity were inhibited by the ceramide synthase inhibitor fumonisin B1, but were exacerbated by PDMP, which is a ceramide glucosylation inhibitor. In vivo, oral administration of a single dose of AR-42 dramatically inhibited SW-620 xenograft growth in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice, without inducing overt toxicities. Together, these results show that AR-42 dramatically inhibits colon cancer cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo, and ceramide production might be the key mechanism responsible for its actions. - Highlights: • AR-42 is anti-proliferative against primary/established colon cancer cells. • AR-42 induces significant apoptotic death in primary/established colon cancer cells. • Ceramide production mediates AR-42-induced cytotoxicity in colon cancer cells. • AR-42 oral administration potently inhibits SW-620 xenograft growth in SCID mice.

  7. Methylene bisphosphonates as the inhibitors of HIV RT phosphorolytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanvarev, D V; Korovina, A N; Usanov, N N; Khomich, O A; Vepsäläinen, J; Puljula, E; Kukhanova, M K; Kochetkov, S N

    2016-08-01

    The structure-function analysis of 36 methylenebisphosphonates (BPs) as inhibitors of the phosphorolytic activity of native and drug-resistant forms of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) was performed. It was shown that with the increase of the inhibitory potential of BPs towards the phosphorolytic activity raises their ability to inhibit the RT-catalyzed DNA elongation. Herein, we report the impact of the thymidine analog mutations (TAM) on the activity of bisphosphonates, as well as some structural features of the BPs, allowing them to maintain the inhibitory activity on the enzyme resistant to nucleoside analog therapy. We estimated the Mg(2+)-coordinating group structure, the linker and the aromatic pharmacophore influence on the inhibitory potential of the BPs. Based on the 31 BPs SAR, several BPs with improved inhibitory properties were designed and synthesized.

  8. Active E-rosette formation in women taking oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, P S; Fleming, W E; Johnston, K A; Ozmun, J M

    1977-01-06

    On the assumption that the number of E-rosettable lymphocytes (active T lymphocytes) is an index of cell-mediated immunity, rosette assays were performed at early cycle and at midcycle for 6 women taking oral contraceptives (OCs) for 1-4 years. OC subjects at midcycle had 21.4% active rosette-forming lymphocytes as compared with 14.1% in controls (p less than .05). The 2 youngest subjects had higher values during the early cycle. These results imply the possibility of hormonal regulation of human T-cell activity.

  9. Anti-leukaemic activity of the TYK2 selective inhibitor NDI-031301 in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akahane, Koshi; Li, Zhaodong; Etchin, Julia; Berezovskaya, Alla; Gjini, Evisa; Masse, Craig E; Miao, Wenyan; Rocnik, Jennifer; Kapeller, Rosana; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Tiv, Hong; Sanda, Takaomi; Weinstock, David M; Look, A Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Activation of tyrosine kinase 2 (TYK2) contributes to the aberrant survival of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL) cells. Here we demonstrate the anti-leukaemic activity of a novel TYK2 inhibitor, NDI-031301. NDI-031301 is a potent and selective inhibitor of TYK2 that induced robust growth inhibition of human T-ALL cell lines. NDI-031301 treatment of human T-ALL cell lines resulted in induction of apoptosis that was not observed with the JAK inhibitors tofacitinib and baricitinib. Further investigation revealed that NDI-031301 treatment uniquely leads to activation of three mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), resulting in phosphorylation of ERK, SAPK/JNK and p38 MAPK coincident with PARP cleavage. Activation of p38 MAPK occurred within 1 h of NDI-031301 treatment and was responsible for NDI-031301-induced T-ALL cell death, as pharmacological inhibition of p38 MAPK partially rescued apoptosis induced by TYK2 inhibitor. Finally, daily oral administration of NDI-031301 at 100 mg/kg bid to immunodeficient mice engrafted with KOPT-K1 T-ALL cells was well tolerated, and led to decreased tumour burden and a significant survival benefit. These results support selective inhibition of TYK2 as a promising potential therapeutic strategy for T-ALL.

  10. Abiraterone acetate: oral androgen biosynthesis inhibitor for treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenberg JE

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Yasser Rehman1, Jonathan E Rosenberg21Division of Hospital Medicine, UMass Memorial Healthcare, Worcester, MA, USA; 2Lank Center for Genitourinary Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in men in the US and Europe. The treatment of advanced-stage prostate cancer has been androgen deprivation. Medical castration leads to decreased production of testosterone and dihydrotestosterone by the testes, but adrenal glands and even prostate cancer tissue continue to produce androgens, which eventually leads to continued prostate cancer growth despite castrate level of androgens. This stage is known as castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC, which continues to be a challenge to treat. Addition of androgen antagonists to hormonal deprivation has been successful in lowering the prostate-specific antigen levels further, but has not actually translated into life-prolonging options. The results of several contemporary studies have continued to demonstrate activation of the androgen receptor as being the key factor in the continued growth of prostate cancer. Blockade of androgen production by nongonadal sources has led to clinical benefit in this setting. One such agent is abiraterone acetate, which significantly reduces androgen production by blocking the enzyme, cytochrome P450 17 alpha-hydroxylase (CYP17. This has provided physicians with another treatment option for patients with CRPC. The landscape for prostate cancer treatment has changed with the approval of cabazitaxel, sipuleucel-T and abiraterone. Here we provide an overview of abiraterone acetate, its mechanism of action, and its potential place for therapy in CRPC.Keywords: CRPC, abiraterone, CYP17, inhibitors, androgens, castration resistant prostate cancer

  11. The analgesic activity of Bestatin as a potent APN inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Rong Jia

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Bestatin, a small molecular weight dipeptide, is a potent inhibitor of various aminopeptidases as well as LTA4 hydrolase. Various physiological functions of Bestatin have been identified, viz.: (1 an immunomodifier for enhancing the proliferation of normal human bone marrow granulocyte–macrophage progenitor cells to form CFU-GM colonies; Bestatin exerts a direct stimulating effect on lymphocytes via its fixation on the cell surface and an indirect effect on monocytes via aminopeptidase B inhibition of tuftsin catabolism; (2 an immunorestorator and curative or preventive agent for spontaneous tumor; Bestatin alone or its combination with chemicals can prolongate the disease-free interval and survival period in adult acute or chronic leukemia, therefore, it was primarily marketed in 1987 in Japan as an anticancer drug and servers as the only marketed inhibitor of Aminopeptidase N (APN/CD13 to cure leukemia to date; (3 a pan-hematopoietic stimulator and restorator; Bestatin promotes granulocytopoiesis and thrombocytopoiesis in vitro and restores them in myelo-hypoplastic men; (4 an inhibitor of several natural opioid peptides. Based on the knowledge that APN can cleave several bioactive neuropeptides such as Met-enkaphalins, Leu-enkaphalins, β-Endorphin, and so on, the antiaminopeptidase action of Bestatin also allows it to protect endopeptides against their catabolism, exhibiting analgesic activity. Although many scientific studies and great accomplishments have been achieved in this field, a large amount of problems are unsolved. This article reviews the promising results obtained for future development of the analgesic activity of Bestatin that can be of vital interest in a number of severe and chronic pain syndromes.

  12. New oral antithrombotics: focus on dabigatran, an oral, reversible direct thrombin inhibitor for the prevention and treatment of venous and arterial thromboembolic disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahl OE

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ola E Dahl1,21Department of Orthopaedics, Innlandet Hospital Trust, Elverum Central Hospital, Elverum, Norway; 2Thrombosis Research Institute, London, UKAbstract: Venous thromboembolism, presenting as deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism, is a major challenge for health care systems. It is the third most common vascular disease after coronary heart disease and stroke, and many hospitalized patients have at least one risk factor. In particular, patients undergoing hip or knee replacement are at risk, with an incidence of asymptomatic deep vein thrombosis of 40%–60% without thromboprophylaxis. Venous thromboembolism is associated with significant mortality and morbidity, with patients being at risk of recurrence, post-thrombotic syndrome, and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Arterial thromboembolism is even more frequent, and atrial fibrillation, the most common embolic source (cardiac arrhythmia, is associated with a five-fold increase in the risk of stroke. Strokes due to atrial fibrillation tend to be more severe and disabling and are more often fatal than strokes due to other causes. Currently, recommended management of both venous and arterial thromboembolism involves the use of anticoagulants such as coumarin and heparin derivatives. These agents are effective, although have characteristics that prevent them from providing optimal anticoagulation and convenience. Hence, new improved oral anticoagulants are being investigated. Dabigatran is a reversible, direct thrombin inhibitor, which is administered as dabigatran etexilate, the oral prodrug. Because it is the first new oral anticoagulant that has been licensed in many countries worldwide for thromboprophylaxis following orthopedic surgery and for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation, this compound will be the main focus of this review. Dabigatran has been investigated for the treatment of established venous thromboembolism and prevention of

  13. Application and interpretation of current autophagy inhibitors and activators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-ping YANG; Li-fang HU; Hui-fen ZHENG; Cheng-jie MAO; Wei-dong HU; Kang-ping XIONG; Fen WANG

    2013-01-01

    Aut ophagy is the major intracellular degradation system,by which cytoplasmic materials are delivered to and degraded in the lysosome.As a quality control mechanism for cytoplasmic proteins and organelles,autophagy plays important roles in a variety of human diseases,including neurodegenerative diseases,cancer,cardiovascular disease,diabetes and infectious and inflammatory diseases.The discovery of ATG genes and the dissection of the signaling pathways involved in regulating autophagy have greatly enriched our knowledge on the occurrence and development of this lysosomal degradation pathway.In addition to its role in degradation,autophagy may also promote a type of programmed cell death that is different from apoptosis,termed type II programmed cell death.Owing to the dual roles of autophagy in cell death and the specificity of diseases,the exact mechanisms of autophagy in various diseases require more investigation.The application of autophagy inhibitors and activators will help us understand the regulation of autophagy in human diseases,and provide insight into the use of autophagy-targeted drugs.In this review,we summarize the latest research on autophagy inhibitors and activators and discuss the possibility of their application in human disease therapy.

  14. Physalis alkekengi carotenoidic extract inhibitor of soybean lipoxygenase-1 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chedea, Veronica Sanda; Pintea, Adela; Bunea, Andrea; Braicu, Cornelia; Stanila, Andreea; Socaciu, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the carotenoidic saponified extract of Physalis alkekengi sepals (PA) towards the lipoxygenase (LOX) oxidation of linoleic acid. Lipoxygenase activity in the presence of carotenoids, standard and from extract, was followed by its kinetic behaviour determining the changes in absorption at 234 nm. The standard carotenoids used were β-carotene (β-car), lutein (Lut), and zeaxanthin (Zea). The calculated enzymatic specific activity (ESA) after 600 s of reaction proves that PA carotenoidic extract has inhibitory effect on LOX oxidation of linoleic acid. A longer polyenic chain of carotenoid structure gives a higher ESA during the first reaction seconds. This situation is not available after 600 s of reaction and may be due to a destruction of this structure by cooxidation of carotenoids, besides the classical LOX reaction. The PA carotenoidic extract inhibiting the LOX-1 reaction can be considered a source of lipoxygenase inhibitors.

  15. Radical scavenging activity of ribonuclease inhibitor from cow placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuo; Li, Haiping

    2006-05-01

    Cow placenta ribonuclease inhibitor (CPRI) has been purified 5062-fold by affinity chromatography, the product being homogeneous by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis. The chemiluminescence technique was used to determine the radical scavenging activities of CPRI toward different reactive oxygen species (ROS) including superoxide anion (O2-*), hydroxyl radical (OH*), lipid-derived radicals (R*), and singlet oxygen (1O2). CPRI could effectively scavenge O2-*, OH*, R*, and 1O2 at EC50 of 0.12, 0.008, 0.009, and 0.006 mg/ml, respectively. In addition, the radical scavenging activities of CPRI were higher than those of tea polyphenols, indicating that CPRI is a powerful antioxidant.

  16. Antimicrobial activity of Uncaria tomentosa against oral human pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ccahuana-Vasquez, Renzo Alberto; Santos, Silvana Soléo Ferreira dos; Koga-Ito, Cristiane Yumi; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2007-01-01

    Uncaria tomentosa is considered a medicinal plant used over centuries by the peruvian population as an alternative treatment for several diseases. Many microorganisms usually inhabit the human oral cavity and under certain conditions can become etiologic agents of diseases. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of different concentrations of Uncaria tomentosa on different strains of microorganisms isolated from the human oral cavity. Micropulverized Uncaria tomentosa was tested in vitro to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) on selected microbial strains. The tested strains were oral clinical isolates of Streptococcus mutans, Staphylococcus spp., Candida albicans, Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The tested concentrations of Uncaria tomentosa ranged from 0.25-5% in Müeller-Hinton agar. Three percent Uncaria tomentosa inhibited 8% of Enterobacteriaceae isolates, 52% of S. mutans and 96% of Staphylococcus spp. The tested concentrations did not present inhibitory effect on P. aeruginosa and C. albicans. It could be concluded that micropulverized Uncaria tomentosa presented antimicrobial activity on Enterobacteriaceae, S. mutans and Staphylococcus spp. isolates.

  17. Hypoxic regulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 expression in human buccal mucosa fibroblasts stimulated with arecoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chung-Hung; Lee, Shiuan-Shinn; Chang, Yu-Chao

    2015-10-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) is regarded as a pre-cancerous condition with fibrosis in oral subepithelial connective tissue. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α regulates a wide variety of profibrogenic genes, which are closely associated with tissue fibrosis. The aim of this study was to compare HIF-1α expression in normal buccal mucosa tissues and OSF specimens and further explore the potential mechanisms that may lead to the induction of HIF-1α expression. Twenty-five OSF specimens and six normal buccal mucosa were examined by immunohistochemistry. The expression of HIF-1α from fibroblasts cultured from OSF and normal buccal mucosa was measured by Western blot. Arecoline, a major areca nut alkaloid, was challenged to normal buccal mucosa fibroblasts (BMFs) to elucidate whether HIF-1α expression could affect by arecoline. In addition, the effects of arecoline on plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 expression were evaluated in environmental hypoxia. HIF-1α expression was significantly higher in OSF specimens and expressed mainly by fibroblasts, epithelial cells, and inflammatory cells. Fibroblasts derived from OSF were found to exhibit higher HIF-1α protein expression than BMFs (P Arecoline was found to upregulate HIF-1α protein in a dose-dependent manner (P arecoline-induced PAI-1 protein expression than normoxic conditions (P < 0.05). These results suggest that HIF-1α expression is significantly upregulated in OSF tissues from areca quid chewers, implying a potential role as a biomarker for local tissue hypoxia. The activation of HIF-1α may promote fibrogenesis by an increase of PAI-1 expression and a subsequent elevation of extracellular matrix production in oral submucosa leading to fibrosis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 aids survival of neurites on neurons derived from pheochromocytoma (PC-12) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeda, Shinji; Imatoh, Takuya; Ochiai, Takashi; Koyanagi, Satoru; Shimeno, Hiroshi

    2004-04-09

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 is a serpin that regulates the activities of plasminogen activators. However, its physiological roles in the CNS are incompletely understood. We have found that plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 has a novel biological function in the CNS: the contribution to survival of neurites on neurons. PC-12 cells treated with nerve growth factor differentiated into neurons and formed a network of neurites. In a serum-free culture medium, these neurites disappeared within 24 h. The addition of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 prevented the disintegration of the neuronal networks, while the addition of the serpin inhibitors aprotinin and antipain did not. The plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 maintained or promoted the phosphorylated state of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), but not of protein kinase B (Akt). These results are the first evidence that plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in the CNS acts to maintain the morphology of neurites via activation of the ERK-related pathway in the neurons.

  19. Evolving uses of oral reverse transcriptase inhibitors in the HIV-1 epidemic: From treatment to prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.K. Gupta (Ravindra); D.A.M.C. van de Vijver (David); S. Manicklal (Sheetal); M.A. Wainberg (Mark)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe HIV epidemic continues unabated, with no highly effective vaccine and no cure. Each new infection has significant economic, social and human costs and prevention efforts are now as great a priority as global antiretroviral therapy (ART) scale up. Reverse transcriptase inhibitors, the

  20. Biomarker-driven trial in metastatic pancreas cancer: feasibility in a multicenter study of saracatinib, an oral Src inhibitor, in previously treated pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcaroli, John; Quackenbush, Kevin; Dasari, Arvind; Powell, Rebecca; McManus, Martine; Tan, Aik-Choon; Foster, Nathan R; Picus, Joel; Wright, John; Nallapareddy, Sujatha; Erlichman, Charles; Hidalgo, Manuel; Messersmith, Wells A

    2012-10-01

    Src tyrosine kinases are overexpressed in pancreatic cancers, and the oral Src inhibitor saracatinib has shown antitumor activity in preclinical models of pancreas cancer. We performed a CTEP-sponsored Phase II clinical trial of saracatinib in previously treated pancreas cancer patients, with a primary endpoint of 6-month survival. A Simon MinMax two-stage phase II design was used. Saracatinib (175 mg/day) was administered orally continuously in 28-day cycles. In the unselected portion of the study, 18 patients were evaluable. Only two (11%) patients survived for at least 6 months, and three 6-month survivors were required to move to second stage of study as originally designed. The study was amended as a biomarker-driven trial (leucine rich repeat containing protein 19 [LRRC19] > insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 2 [IGFBP2] "top scoring pairs" polymerase chain reaction [PCR] assay, and PIK3CA mutant) based on preclinical data in a human pancreas tumor explant model. In the biomarker study, archival tumor tissue or fresh tumor biopsies were tested. Biomarker-positive patients were eligible for the study. Only one patient was PIK3CA mutant in a 3' untranslated region (UTR) portion of the gene. This patient was enrolled in the study and failed to meet the 6-month survival endpoint. As the frequency of biomarker-positive patients was very low (pancreatic cancer patients treated with a Src inhibitor based on a biomarker would improve 6-month survival, we demonstrate that testing pancreatic tumor samples for a biomarker-driven, multicenter study in metastatic pancreas cancer is feasible.

  1. Once-daily oral administration of cyclosporine in a lung transplant patient with a history of renal toxicity of calcineurin inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Yuya; Chen, Fengshi; Miyata, Hitomi; Date, Hiroshi

    2014-07-01

    Cyclosporine is usually administered orally in two divided doses every 12 h in transplant patients. However, some patients have difficulty in achieving therapeutic levels after transplantation. In fact, cyclosporine is reportedly administered once daily in renal and liver transplantation cases, but not in lung transplantation cases. We report a patient with a history of calcineurin inhibitor-induced renal toxicity who successfully underwent living-donor lobar lung transplantation (LDLLT) with the novel immunosuppressive strategy of once-daily administration of cyclosporine. An 18-year old man with progressive respiratory insufficiency after bone marrow transplantation was referred to our hospital for lung transplantation. He had a history of renal toxicity due to calcineurin inhibitors. Based on his history of tacrolimus- and cyclosporine-induced renal toxicity, we decided to initiate basiliximab as induction therapy, followed by once-daily cyclosporine administration to obtain high enough blood cyclosporine concentrations at 2 h post-dose (C2) and lowered trough blood concentrations (C0) for protection of renal function as maintenance therapy. LDLLT was successfully performed, and the postoperative course was uneventful and free of rejection episodes. Cyclosporine dosing was adjusted with intensive therapeutic drug monitoring of blood cyclosporine levels. One year after LDLLT, the patient is alive and well with no problems with daily life activities. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  2. An analogy between optical turbulence and activator-inhibitor dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Spineanu, F

    2016-01-01

    The propagation of laser beams through madia with cubic nonlinear polarization is part of a wide range of practical applications. The processes that are involved are at the limit of extreme (cuasi-singular) concentration of intensity and the transversal modulational instability, the saturation and defocusing effect of the plasma generated through avalanche and multi-photon (MPI) ionization are competing leading to a complicated pattern of intensity in the transversal plane. This regime has been named \\textquotedblleft optical turbulence\\textquotedblright and it has been studied in experiments and numerical simulations. Led by the similarity of the portraits we have investigated the possibility that the mechanism that underlies the creation of the complex pattern of the intensity field is the manifestation of the dynamics \\textit{activator-inhibitor}. In a previous work we have considered a unique connection, the \\textit{complex Landau-Ginzburg equation}, a common ground for the nonlinear Schrodinger equation ...

  3. Increased oral availability and brain accumulation of the ALK inhibitor crizotinib by coadministration of the P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) and breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) inhibitor elacridar.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, S.C.; Nguyen, L.N.; Sparidans, R.W.; Wagenaar, E.; Beijnen, J.H.; Schinkel, A.H.

    2014-01-01

    Crizotinib is an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor approved for treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) containing an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement. We used knockout mice to study the roles of P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) and breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) in

  4. Toxicity of Nitrification Inhibitors on Dehydrogenase Activity in Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferisman Tindaon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to determine the effects of nitrification inhibitors (NIs such as 3,4-dimethylpyrazolephosphate=DMPP, 4-Chlor-methylpyrazole phosphate=ClMPP and dicyandiamide,DCD which might be expected to inhibit microbial activity, on dehydrogenase activity (DRA,in three different soils in laboratory conditions. Dehydrogenase activity were assessed via reduction of 2-p-Iodophenyl-3-p-nitrophenyl-5-phenyltetrazoliumchloride (INT. The toxicity and dose response curve of three NIs were quantified under laboratory conditions using a loamy clay, a sandy loam and a sandy soil. The quantitative determination of DHA was carried out spectrophotometrically. In all experiments, the influence of 5-1000 times the base concentration were examined. To evaluate the rate of inhibition with the increasing NI concentrations, dose reponse curves were presented and no observable effect level =NOEL, as well as effective dose ED10 and ED 50(10% and 50% inhibition were calculated. The NOEL for common microbial activity such as DHA was about 30–70 times higher than base concentration in all investigated soils. ClMPP exhibited the strongest influence on the non target microbial processes in the three soils if it compare to DMPP and DCD. The NOEL,ED10 and ED50 values higher in clay than in loamy or sandy soil. The NIs were generally most effective in sandy soils. The three NIs considered at the present state of knowledge as environmentally safe in use.

  5. Design, synthesis and in vivo anti-hyperglycemic activity of gem-dimethyl-bearing C-glucosides as SGLT2 inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Jing Zhao; Yong Heng Shi; Gui Long Zhao; Yu Li Wang; Hua Shao; Li Da Tang; Jian Wu Wang

    2011-01-01

    A series of gem-dimethyl-bearing C-glucosides were designed and synthesized as SGLT2 inhibitors, with anhydrous aluminum chloride-mediated Friedel-Crafts alkylation to construct the gem-dimethyl functionality being the key step. The in vivo anti-hyperglycemic activity was evaluated with mice oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), and all the synthesized compounds showed significant but less potent anti-hyperglycemic activity than the positive control dapagliflozin.

  6. Plasma levels of the tissue inhibitor matrix metalloproteinase-3 as a potential biomarker in oral cancer progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chun-Wen; Su, Bo-Feng; Chiang, Whei-Ling; Yang, Shun-Fa; Chen, Mu-Kuan; Lin, Chiao-Wen

    2017-01-01

    Oral cancer is the most common malignancy with poor prognosis and is the fourth most common cancer in men in Taiwan. The tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-3 (TIMP3) acts as a tumor suppressor gene by inhibiting the growth, angiogenesis, migration, and invasion of cancer cells. However, few studies have examined the association of plasma TIMP3 levels with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), and the role of plasma TIMP3 levels in OSCC progression is still unclear. We measured the plasma TIMP3 levels of 450 OSCC patients and 64 healthy controls by using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We also analyzed TIMP3 mRNA levels of 328 OSCC patients and 32 normal tissues from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset. Our results revealed that plasma TIMP3 levels were significantly lower in patients with OSCC than in healthy controls (p < 0.001). Moreover, plasma TIMP3 levels in patients with OSCC were significantly associated with the tumor stage and tumor status but not with the lymph node status, metastasis, and cell differentiation. To verify our findings, we also examined TCGA bioinformatics database and discovered similar results for the association with the pathological stage of OSCC. In conclusion, our results suggest that plasma TIMP3 is a potential biomarker for predicting the tumor stage and T status in patients with OSCC. PMID:28138307

  7. An orally available, small-molecule polymerase inhibitor shows efficacy against a lethal morbillivirus infection in a large animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumm, Stefanie A; Yan, Dan; Hovingh, Elise S; Evers, Taylor J; Enkirch, Theresa; Reddy, G Prabhakar; Sun, Aiming; Saindane, Manohar T; Arrendale, Richard F; Painter, George; Liotta, Dennis C; Natchus, Michael G; von Messling, Veronika; Plemper, Richard K

    2014-04-16

    Measles virus is a highly infectious morbillivirus responsible for major morbidity and mortality in unvaccinated humans. The related, zoonotic canine distemper virus (CDV) induces morbillivirus disease in ferrets with 100% lethality. We report an orally available, shelf-stable pan-morbillivirus inhibitor that targets the viral RNA polymerase. Prophylactic oral treatment of ferrets infected intranasally with a lethal CDV dose reduced viremia and prolonged survival. Ferrets infected with the same dose of virus that received post-infection treatment at the onset of viremia showed low-grade viral loads, remained asymptomatic, and recovered from infection, whereas control animals succumbed to the disease. Animals that recovered also mounted a robust immune response and were protected against rechallenge with a lethal CDV dose. Drug-resistant viral recombinants were generated and found to be attenuated and transmission-impaired compared to the genetic parent virus. These findings may pioneer a path toward an effective morbillivirus therapy that could aid measles eradication by synergizing with vaccination to close gaps in herd immunity due to vaccine refusal.

  8. Effect of single oral doses of sitagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, on incretin and plasma glucose levels after an oral glucose tolerance test in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herman, Gary A; Bergman, Arthur; Stevens, Catherine;

    2006-01-01

    CONTEXT: In response to a meal, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) are released and modulate glycemic control. Normally these incretins are rapidly degraded by dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4). DPP-4 inhibitors are a novel class of oral antihyperglyce...

  9. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 (PAI-2) in eosinophilic leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Jonathan M; Byström, Jonas; Dyer, Kimberly D; Nitto, Takeaki; Wynn, Thomas A; Rosenberg, Helene F

    2004-10-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 (PAI-2) as a potential eosinophil protein was inferred from our gene microarray study of mouse eosinophilopoiesis. Here, we detect 47 kDa intracellular and approximately 60 kDa secretory forms of PAI-2 in purified human eosinophil extracts. PAI-2 is present at variable concentrations in eosinophil lysates, ranging from 30 to 444 ng/10(6) cells, with a mean of 182 ng/10(6) cells from 10 normal donors, which is the highest per-cell concentration among all leukocyte subtypes evaluated. Enzymatic assay confirmed that eosinophil-derived PAI-2 is biologically active and inhibits activation of its preferred substrate, urokinase. Immunohistochemical and immunogold staining demonstrated PAI-2 localization in eosinophil-specific granules. Immunoreactive PAI-2 was detected in extracellular deposits in and around the eosinophil-enriched granuloma tissue encapsulating the parasitic egg in livers of wild-type mice infected with the helminthic parasite Schistosoma mansoni. Among the possibilities, we consider a role for eosinophil-derived PAI-2 in inflammation and remodeling associated with parasitic infection as well as allergic airways disease, respiratory virus infection, and host responses to tumors and metastasis in vivo.

  10. Value of Oral Proton Pump Inhibitors in Acute, Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Network Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Eduardo A; Donath, Elie; Waljee, Akbar K; Sussman, Daniel A

    2017-09-01

    Intravenous (IV) proton pump inhibitors (PPI) are the standard medical treatment in acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (ANVGIB). Optimal route of PPI delivery has been questioned. The aim was to perform a systematic review and network meta-analysis for the endpoints of risk of rebleeding, length of stay (LOS), surgery (ROS), mortality, and total units of blood transfused (UBT) among trials evaluating acid suppressive medications in ANVGIB. A total of 39 studies using IV PPI drip, IV scheduled PPI, oral PPI, H2-receptor antagonists, and placebo were identified. Network meta-analysis was used for indirect comparisons and Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods for calculation of probability superiority. No difference was observed between IV PPI drip and scheduled IV PPI for mortality (relative risk=1.11; 95% credibility interval, 0.56-2.21), LOS (0.04, -0.49 to 0.44), ROS (1.27, 0.64-2.35) and risk of rebleeding within 72 hours, 1 week, and 1 month [(0.98, 0.48-1.95), (0.59, 0.13-2.03), (0.82, 0.28-2.16)]. Oral PPIs were as effective as IV scheduled PPIs and IV PPI drip for LOS (0.22, -0.61 to 0.79 and 0.16, -0.56 to 0.80) and UBT (-0.25, -1.23 to 0.65 and -0.06, -0.71 to 0.65) and superior to IV PPI drip for ROS (0.30, 0.10 to 0.78). Scheduled IV PPIs were as effective as IV PPI drip for most outcomes. Oral PPIs were comparable to scheduled IV for LOS and UBT and superior to IV PPI drip for ROS. Conclusions should be tempered by low frequency endpoints such as ROS, but question the need for IV PPI drip in ANVGIB.

  11. A phase I pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic study of CHR-3996, an oral class I selective histone deacetylase inhibitor in refractory solid tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    U. Banerji (Udai); L. van Doorn (Leni); D. Papadatos-Pastos (Dionysis); R.S. Kristeleit (R.); P.M. Debnam (Phillip); A.R. Tall (Alan); A. Stewart (Alison); P. Raynaud (Philippe); J.M. Garrett; M. Toal (Martin); L. Hooftman (Leon); J.S. de Bono (Johann); J. Verweij (Jaap); F.A.L.M. Eskens (Ferry)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: This clinical trial investigated the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetic (PK), and pharmacodynamic (PD) profile of CHR-3996, a selective class I histone deacetylase inhibitor. Patients and Methods: CHR-3996 was administered orally once a day. This phase I trial used a 3+3

  12. Evolution of a Novel, Orally Bioavailable Series of PI3Kδ Inhibitors from an Inhaled Lead for the Treatment of Respiratory Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amour, Augustin; Barton, Nick; Cooper, Anthony W J; Inglis, Graham; Jamieson, Craig; Luscombe, Christopher N; Morrell, Josie; Peace, Simon; Perez, David; Rowland, Paul; Tame, Chris; Uddin, Sorif; Vitulli, Giovanni; Wellaway, Natalie

    2016-08-11

    A four-step process of high-quality modeling of existing data, deconstruction, identification of replacement cores, and an innovative synthetic regrowth strategy led to the rapid discovery of a novel oral series of PI3Kδ inhibitors with promising selectivity and excellent in vivo characteristics.

  13. [Anti-Candida activity of aroma candy and its protective activity against murine oral candidiasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayama, Kazumi; Takahashi, Miki; Suzuki, Motofumi; Ezawa, Kunio; Yamazaki, Masatoshi; Matsukawa, Taiji; Kishi, Akinobu; Sato, Nobuya; Abe, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    A daily eatable candy that has possible protective activity against oral candidiasis was experimentally produced. The candy was made from reduced-maltose as main constituent and from several natural products, such as oligonol (depolymerized polyphenols derived from lychee), cinnamon (cassia), citral, and capric acid, which are known to have anti-Candida activity in vitro and in vivo. The candy effectively inhibited the mycelial growth of C. albicans, even when it was diluted 1,000 times with culture media. We assessed the protective activity of the candy against murine candidiasis. When 50μl of candy dissolved and diluted 4 times with water was administered 3 times into the oral cavity of Candida infected mice, the score of lesions on the Candida-infected tongues improved on day 2. These findings suggest that this candy has potential as food that provides protective activity against oral candidiasis.

  14. Using ovality to predict nonmutagenic, orally efficacious pyridazine amides as cell specific spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Matthew C; Bhagirath, Niala; Chiao, Eric; Goldstein, David M; Hermann, Johannes C; Hsu, Pei-Yuan; Kirchner, Stephan; Kennedy-Smith, Joshua J; Kuglstatter, Andreas; Lukacs, Christine; Menke, John; Niu, Linghao; Padilla, Fernando; Peng, Ying; Polonchuk, Liudmila; Railkar, Aruna; Slade, Michelle; Soth, Michael; Xu, Daigen; Yadava, Preeti; Yee, Calvin; Zhou, Mingyan; Liao, Cheng

    2014-03-27

    Inhibition of spleen tyrosine kinase has attracted much attention as a mechanism for the treatment of cancers and autoimmune diseases such as asthma, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic lupus erythematous. We report the structure-guided optimization of pyridazine amide spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Early representatives of this scaffold were highly potent and selective but mutagenic in an Ames assay. An approach that led to the successful identification of nonmutagenic examples, as well as further optimization to compounds with reduced cardiovascular liabilities is described. Select pharmacokinetic and in vivo efficacy data are presented.

  15. Identification of Early Intermediates of Caspase Activation Using Selective Inhibitors and Activity-Based Probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, Alicia B.; Witte, Martin D.; Denault, Jean-Bernard; Sadaghiani, Amir Masoud; Sexton, Kelly M.B.; Salvesen, Guy S.; Bogyo, Matthew

    2006-01-01

    Caspases are cysteine proteases that are key effectors in apoptotic cell death. Currently, there is a lack of tools that can be used to monitor the regulation of specific caspases in the context of distinct apoptotic programs. We describe the development of highly selective inhibitors and active sit

  16. Bone mineral density changes in protease inhibitor-sparing vs. nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-sparing highly active antiretroviral therapy: data from a randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ann-Brit Eg; Obel, N; Nielsen, H

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare changes in bone mineral density (BMD) over 144 weeks in HIV-infected patients initiating nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)-sparing or protease inhibitor-sparing highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART).......The aim of the study was to compare changes in bone mineral density (BMD) over 144 weeks in HIV-infected patients initiating nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)-sparing or protease inhibitor-sparing highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)....

  17. Antimicrobial activity of medicinal plants against oral microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, G; Tshikalange, T E; Lall, N; Botha, F; Meyer, J J M

    2008-10-28

    Ethanol extracts of eight plant species used traditionally in South Africa for the treatment of oral diseases were investigated for in vitro antimicrobial activity against oral pathogens namely Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Actinomyces naeslundii, Actinomyces israelii, Candida albicans, Porphyromonus gingivalis, Privotella intermedia and Streptococcus mutans using the disk diffusion method. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of ethanol extracts were determined against these microorganisms using micro dilution. The cytotoxicity and therapeutic index (TI) of selected active extracts were also determined. Out of eight plants, six (Annona senegalensis, Englerophytum magalismontanum, Dicerocarym senecioides, Euclea divinorum, Euclea natalensis, Solanum panduriforme and Parinari curatellifolia) exhibited MIC values ranging from 25.0 mg/ml to 0.8 mg/ml. Gram negative bacteria were found to be more resistant to the plant extracts than Gram positive bacteria, except for Euclea natalensis which inhibited all three Gram negative bacteria tested in this study. All plant extracts showed moderate cytotoxicity on the Vero cell line. The fifty percent inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of all plants tested range from 92.3 to 285.1 microg/ml.

  18. In vitro Increased Respiratory Activity of Selected Oral Bacteria May Explain Competitive and Collaborative Interactions in the Oral Microbiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Hernandez-Sanabria

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the driving forces behind the shifts in the ecological balance of the oral microbiota will become essential for the future management and treatment of periodontitis. As the use of competitive approaches for modulating bacterial outgrowth is unexplored in the oral ecosystem, our study aimed to investigate both the associations among groups of functional compounds and the impact of individual substrates on selected members of the oral microbiome. We employed the Phenotype Microarray high-throughput technology to analyse the microbial cellular phenotypes of 15 oral bacteria. Multivariate statistical analysis was used to detect respiratory activity triggers and to assess similar metabolic activities. Carbon and nitrogen were relevant for the respiration of health-associated bacteria, explaining competitive interactions when grown in biofilms. Carbon, nitrogen, and peptides tended to decrease the respiratory activity of all pathobionts, but not significantly. None of the evaluated compounds significantly increased activity of pathobionts at both 24 and 48 h. Additionally, metabolite requirements of pathobionts were dissimilar, suggesting that collective modulation of their respiratory activity may be challenging. Flow cytometry indicated that the metabolic activity detected in the Biolog plates may not be a direct result of the number of bacterial cells. In addition, damage to the cell membrane may not influence overall respiratory activity. Our methodology confirmed previously reported competitive and collaborative interactions among bacterial groups, which could be used either as marker of health status or as targets for modulation of the oral environment.

  19. In vitro Increased Respiratory Activity of Selected Oral Bacteria May Explain Competitive and Collaborative Interactions in the Oral Microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Sanabria, Emma; Slomka, Vera; Herrero, Esteban R; Kerckhof, Frederiek-Maarten; Zaidel, Lynette; Teughels, Wim; Boon, Nico

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the driving forces behind the shifts in the ecological balance of the oral microbiota will become essential for the future management and treatment of periodontitis. As the use of competitive approaches for modulating bacterial outgrowth is unexplored in the oral ecosystem, our study aimed to investigate both the associations among groups of functional compounds and the impact of individual substrates on selected members of the oral microbiome. We employed the Phenotype Microarray high-throughput technology to analyse the microbial cellular phenotypes of 15 oral bacteria. Multivariate statistical analysis was used to detect respiratory activity triggers and to assess similar metabolic activities. Carbon and nitrogen were relevant for the respiration of health-associated bacteria, explaining competitive interactions when grown in biofilms. Carbon, nitrogen, and peptides tended to decrease the respiratory activity of all pathobionts, but not significantly. None of the evaluated compounds significantly increased activity of pathobionts at both 24 and 48 h. Additionally, metabolite requirements of pathobionts were dissimilar, suggesting that collective modulation of their respiratory activity may be challenging. Flow cytometry indicated that the metabolic activity detected in the Biolog plates may not be a direct result of the number of bacterial cells. In addition, damage to the cell membrane may not influence overall respiratory activity. Our methodology confirmed previously reported competitive and collaborative interactions among bacterial groups, which could be used either as marker of health status or as targets for modulation of the oral environment.

  20. Discovery of Aryl Aminoquinazoline Pyridones as Potent, Selective, and Orally Efficacious Inhibitors of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase c-Kit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Essa; Tasker, Andrew; White, Ryan D.; Kunz, Roxanne K.; Human, Jason; Chen, Ning; Bürli, Roland; Hungate, Randall; Novak, Perry; Itano, Andrea; Zhang, Xuxia; Yu, Violeta; Nguyen, Yen; Tudor, Yanyan; Plant, Matthew; Flynn, Shaun; Xu, Yang; Meagher, Kristin L.; Whittington, Douglas A.; Ng, Gordon Y. (Amgen)

    2008-12-09

    Inhibition of c-Kit has the potential to treat mast cell associated fibrotic diseases. We report the discovery of several aminoquinazoline pyridones that are potent inhibitors of c-Kit with greater than 200-fold selectivity against KDR, p38, Lck, and Src. In vivo efficacy of pyridone 16 by dose-dependent inhibition of histamine release was demonstrated in a rodent pharmacodynamic model of mast cell activation.

  1. Preclinical evaluation of the novel, orally bioavailable Selective Inhibitor of Nuclear Export (SINE KPT-335 in spontaneous canine cancer: results of a phase I study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl A London

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the activity of Selective Inhibitors of Nuclear Export (SINE compounds that inhibit the function of the nuclear export protein Exportin 1 (XPO1/CRM1 against canine tumor cell lines and perform a Phase I clinical trial of KPT-335 in dogs with spontaneous cancer to provide a preliminary assessment of biologic activity and tolerability. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Canine tumor cell lines derived from non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL, mast cell tumor, melanoma and osteosarcoma exhibited growth inhibition and apoptosis in response to nanomolar concentrations of SINE compounds; NHL cells were particularly sensitive with IC50 concentrations ranging from 2-42 nM. A Phase I clinical trial of KPT-335 was performed in 17 dogs with NHL (naive or relapsed, mast cell tumor or osteosarcoma. The maximum tolerated dose was 1.75 mg/kg given orally twice/week (Monday/Thursday although biologic activity was observed at 1 mg/kg. Clinical benefit (CB including partial response to therapy (PR, n = 2 and stable disease (SD, n = 7 was observed in 9/14 dogs with NHL with a median time to progression (TTP for responders of 66 days (range 35-256 days. A dose expansion study was performed in 6 dogs with NHL given 1.5 mg/kg KPT-335 Monday/Wednesday/Friday; CB was observed in 4/6 dogs with a median TTP for responders of 83 days (range 35-354 days. Toxicities were primarily gastrointestinal consisting of anorexia, weight loss, vomiting and diarrhea and were manageable with supportive care, dose modulation and administration of low dose prednisone; hepatotoxicity, anorexia and weight loss were the dose limiting toxicities. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides evidence that the novel orally bioavailable XPO1 inhibitor KPT-335 is safe and exhibits activity in a relevant, spontaneous large animal model of cancer. Data from this study provides critical new information that lays the groundwork for evaluation of SINE compounds in human cancer.

  2. Orally active insulin mimics: where do we stand now?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Balasubramanyam; V Mohan

    2001-09-01

    The war against diabetes through the development of new drugs is an ongoing continuous process to counter the alarming global increase in the prevalence of diabetes and its complications, particularly in developing countries like India. Unfortunately, the speed with which our knowledge of diabetes and its effects is expanding is not matched by the availability of new drugs. Following the identification of the insulin receptor (IR), its intrinsic kinase activity and molecular cloning, many studies have looked at IR as an ideal drug target. This review summarizes in brief the latest advancements in this field with particular reference to the current situation in respect of the development of orally active insulin mimetics in the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  3. Design and synthesis of orally bioavailable serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 (SGK1) inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammond, Marlys; Washburn, David G.; Hoang, Tram H.; Manns, Sharada; Frazee, James S.; Nakamura, Hiroko; Patterson, Jaclyn R.; Trizna, Walter; Wu, Charlene; Azzarano, Leonard M.; Nagilla, Rakesh; Nord, Melanie; Trejo, Rebecca; Head, Martha S.; Zhao, Baoguang; Smallwood, Angela M.; Hightower, Kendra; Laping, Nicholas J.; Schnackenberg, Christine G.; Thompson, Scott K.; (GSKPA)

    2010-09-27

    The lead serum and glucocorticoid-related kinase 1 (SGK1) inhibitors 4-(5-phenyl-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridin-3-yl)benzoic acid (1) and {l_brace}4-[5-(2-naphthalenyl)-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridin-3-yl]phenyl{r_brace}acetic acid (2) suffer from low DNAUC values in rat, due in part to formation and excretion of glucuronic acid conjugates. These PK/glucuronidation issues were addressed either by incorporating a substituent on the 3-phenyl ring ortho to the key carboxylate functionality of 1 or by substituting on the group in between the carboxylate and phenyl ring of 2. Three of these analogs have been identified as having good SGK1 inhibition potency and have DNAUC values suitable for in vivo testing.

  4. Design and synthesis of orally bioavailable serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 (SGK1) inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Marlys; Washburn, David G; Hoang, H Tram; Manns, Sharada; Frazee, James S; Nakamura, Hiroko; Patterson, Jaclyn R; Trizna, Walter; Wu, Charlene; Azzarano, Leonard M; Nagilla, Rakesh; Nord, Melanie; Trejo, Rebecca; Head, Martha S; Zhao, Baoguang; Smallwood, Angela M; Hightower, Kendra; Laping, Nicholas J; Schnackenberg, Christine G; Thompson, Scott K

    2009-08-01

    The lead serum and glucocorticoid-related kinase 1 (SGK1) inhibitors 4-(5-phenyl-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridin-3-yl)benzoic acid (1) and {4-[5-(2-naphthalenyl)-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridin-3-yl]phenyl}acetic acid (2) suffer from low DNAUC values in rat, due in part to formation and excretion of glucuronic acid conjugates. These PK/glucuronidation issues were addressed either by incorporating a substituent on the 3-phenyl ring ortho to the key carboxylate functionality of 1 or by substituting on the group in between the carboxylate and phenyl ring of 2. Three of these analogs have been identified as having good SGK1 inhibition potency and have DNAUC values suitable for in vivo testing.

  5. Study on Biopharmaceutics Classification and Oral Bioavailability of a Novel Multikinase Inhibitor NCE for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Fan, Chun-Mei; He, Xuan; Ren, Ke; Zhang, Jin-Kun; He, Ying-Ju; Yu, Luo-Ting; Zhao, Ying-Lan; Gong, Chang-Yang; Zheng, Yu; Song, Xiang-Rong; Zeng, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Specific biopharmaceutics classification investigation and study on phamacokinetic profile of a novel drug candidate (2-methylcarbamoyl-4-{4-[3- (trifluoromethyl) benzamido] phenoxy} pyridinium 4-methylbenzenesulfonate monohydrate, NCE) were carried out. Equilibrium solubility and intrinsic dissolution rate (IDR) of NCE were estimated in different phosphate buffers. Effective intestinal permeability (Peff) of NCE was determined using single-pass intestinal perfusion technique in rat duodenum, jejunum and ileum at three concentrations. Theophylline (high permeability) and ranitidine (low permeability) were also applied to access the permeability of NCE as reference compounds. The bioavailability after intragastrical and intravenous administration was measured in beagle dogs. The solubility of NCE in tested phosphate buffers was quite low with the maximum solubility of 81.73 μg/mL at pH 1.0. The intrinsic dissolution ratio of NCE was 1 × 10−4 mg·min−1·cm−2. The Peff value of NCE in all intestinal segments was more proximate to the high-permeability reference theophylline. Therefore, NCE was classified as class II drug according to Biopharmaceutics Classification System due to its low solubility and high intestinal permeability. In addition, concentration-dependent permeability was not observed in all the segments, indicating that there might be passive transportation for NCE. The absolute oral bioavailability of NCE in beagle dogs was 26.75%. Therefore, dissolution promotion will be crucial for oral formulation development and intravenous administration route will also be suggested for further NCE formulation development. All the data would provide a reference for biopharmaceutics classification research of other novel drug candidates. PMID:24776763

  6. Study on Biopharmaceutics Classification and Oral Bioavailability of a Novel Multikinase Inhibitor NCE for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Specific biopharmaceutics classification investigation and study on phamacokinetic profile of a novel drug candidate (2-methylcarbamoyl-4-{4-[3- (trifluoromethyl benzamido] phenoxy} pyridinium 4-methylbenzenesulfonate monohydrate, NCE were carried out. Equilibrium solubility and intrinsic dissolution rate (IDR of NCE were estimated in different phosphate buffers. Effective intestinal permeability (Peff of NCE was determined using single-pass intestinal perfusion technique in rat duodenum, jejunum and ileum at three concentrations. Theophylline (high permeability and ranitidine (low permeability were also applied to access the permeability of NCE as reference compounds. The bioavailability after intragastrical and intravenous administration was measured in beagle dogs. The solubility of NCE in tested phosphate buffers was quite low with the maximum solubility of 81.73 μg/mL at pH 1.0. The intrinsic dissolution ratio of NCE was 1 × 10−4 mg·min−1·cm−2. The Peff value of NCE in all intestinal segments was more proximate to the high-permeability reference theophylline. Therefore, NCE was classified as class II drug according to Biopharmaceutics Classification System due to its low solubility and high intestinal permeability. In addition, concentration-dependent permeability was not observed in all the segments, indicating that there might be passive transportation for NCE. The absolute oral bioavailability of NCE in beagle dogs was 26.75%. Therefore, dissolution promotion will be crucial for oral formulation development and intravenous administration route will also be suggested for further NCE formulation development. All the data would provide a reference for biopharmaceutics classification research of other novel drug candidates.

  7. Study on biopharmaceutics classification and oral bioavailability of a novel multikinase inhibitor NCE for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Fan, Chun-Mei; He, Xuan; Ren, Ke; Zhang, Jin-Kun; He, Ying-Ju; Yu, Luo-Ting; Zhao, Ying-Lan; Gong, Chang-Yang; Zheng, Yu; Song, Xiang-Rong; Zeng, Jun

    2014-04-25

    Specific biopharmaceutics classification investigation and study on phamacokinetic profile of a novel drug candidate (2-methylcarbamoyl-4-{4-[3- (trifluoromethyl) benzamido] phenoxy} pyridinium 4-methylbenzenesulfonate monohydrate, NCE) were carried out. Equilibrium solubility and intrinsic dissolution rate (IDR) of NCE were estimated in different phosphate buffers. Effective intestinal permeability (P(eff)) of NCE was determined using single-pass intestinal perfusion technique in rat duodenum, jejunum and ileum at three concentrations. Theophylline (high permeability) and ranitidine (low permeability) were also applied to access the permeability of NCE as reference compounds. The bioavailability after intragastrical and intravenous administration was measured in beagle dogs. The solubility of NCE in tested phosphate buffers was quite low with the maximum solubility of 81.73 μg/mL at pH 1.0. The intrinsic dissolution ratio of NCE was 1 × 10⁻⁴ mg·min⁻¹·cm⁻². The P(eff) value of NCE in all intestinal segments was more proximate to the high-permeability reference theophylline. Therefore, NCE was classified as class II drug according to Biopharmaceutics Classification System due to its low solubility and high intestinal permeability. In addition, concentration-dependent permeability was not observed in all the segments, indicating that there might be passive transportation for NCE. The absolute oral bioavailability of NCE in beagle dogs was 26.75%. Therefore, dissolution promotion will be crucial for oral formulation development and intravenous administration route will also be suggested for further NCE formulation development. All the data would provide a reference for biopharmaceutics classification research of other novel drug candidates.

  8. "Mixed inhibitor-prodrug" as a new approach toward systemically active inhibitors of enkephalin-degrading enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournié-Zaluski, M C; Coric, P; Turcaud, S; Lucas, E; Noble, F; Maldonado, R; Roques, B P

    1992-06-26

    In order to evaluate the possible advantages of potentiating the effects of the endogenous enkephalins, to obtain analgesia without the serious drawbacks of morphine, it was essential to design systemically active compounds which inhibit the two metabolizing enzymes, aminopeptidase N (APN) and neutral endopeptidase 24.11 (NEP). A new concept combining the idea of "prodrug" and "mixed inhibitor" was therefore developed. Given the high efficiency of beta-mercaptoalkylamines as APN inhibitors and of N-(mercaptoacyl) amino acids as NEP inhibitors, compounds associating these molecules through disulfide or thioester bonds, which are known to increase lipophilicity and to favor passage across the blood-brain barrier, have been synthesized. An HPLC study indicated that the disulfide bridge was resistant to serum enzymes but was cleaved by brain membrane homogenates, suggesting that the active inhibitors were released in the central nervous system. The validity of the approach was verified by the efficient antinociceptive responses obtained in the hot plate test in mice after iv administration of disulfide-containing inhibitors (ED50s of from 4 to 26 mg/kg on the jump latency time). The analgesic potencies of the "mixed inhibitor-prodrug" RB 101 [H2NCH(CH2CH2SCH3)CH2SSCH2CH(CH2Ph)CONHCH( CH2Ph)COOCH2Ph] after iv administration were three times greater than those of a similar combined dose of its two constitutive moieties. The separation of the two diastereoisomers constituting RB 101 showed that the analgesia has a stereochemical dependence, the (S,S,S)-isomer being more active than the (S,R,S)-isomer. Furthermore, in the tail flick test in the rat, RB 101 gave 38% analgesia at a dose of 80 mg/kg. Due to its high efficiency and its longer pharmacological effect, RB 101 was selected for a complete study of its analgesic properties.

  9. Control of DNA replication in a transformed lymphoid cell line: coexistence of activator and inhibitor activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, F D; Fresa, K L; Oglesby, I; Cohen, S

    1991-12-01

    Proliferating lymphocytes contain an intracellular factor, ADR (activator of DNA replication), which can initiate DNA synthesis in isolated quiescent nuclei. Resting lymphocytes lack ADR activity and contain an intracellular inhibitory factor that suppresses DNA synthesis in normal but not transformed nuclei. In this study we describe a MOLT-4 subline that produces both the activator and inhibitory activities which can be separated by ammonium sulfate fractionation. The inhibitor is heat stable and inhibits ADR-mediated DNA replication in a dose-dependent manner. It does not inhibit DNA polymerase alpha activity. The inhibitor must be present at the initiation of DNA replication to be effective, as it loses most of its effectiveness if it is added after replication has begun. The presence of inhibitory activity in proliferating MOLT-4 cells, taken with the previous observation that inhibitor derived from normal resting cells does not affect DNA synthesis by MOLT-4 nuclei, suggests that failure of a down-regulating signal may play an important role in proliferative disorder.

  10. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Active Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiunn-Yih; Lee, Meng-Tse Gabriel; Lee, Si-Huei; Lee, Shih-Hao; Tsai, Yi-Wen; Hsu, Shou-Chien; Chang, Shy-Shin; Lee, Chien-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Numerous epidemiological data suggest that the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEis) can improve the clinical outcomes of pneumonia. Tuberculosis (TB) is an airborne bacteria like pneumonia, and we aimed to find out whether the use of ACEis can decrease the risk of active TB. We conducted a nested case–control analysis by using a 1 million longitudinally followed cohort, from Taiwan national health insurance research database. The rate ratios (RRs) for TB were estimated by conditional logistic regression, and adjusted using a TB-specific disease risk score (DRS) with 71 TB-related covariates. From January, 1997 to December, 2011, a total of 75,536 users of ACEis, and 7720 cases of new active TB were identified. Current use (DRS adjusted RR, 0.87 [95% CI, 0.78–0.97]), but not recent and past use of ACEis, was associated with a decrease in risk of active TB. Interestingly, it was found that chronic use (>90 days) of ACEis was associated with a further decrease in the risk of TB (aRR, 0.74, [95% CI, 0.66–0.83]). There was also a duration response effect, correlating decrease in TB risk with longer duration of ACEis use. The decrease in TB risk was also consistent across all patient subgroups (age, sex, heart failure, cerebrovascular diseases, myocardial infraction, renal diseases, and diabetes) and patients receiving other cardiovascular medicine. In this large population-based study, we found that subjects with recent and chronic use of ACEis were associated with decrease in TB risk. PMID:27175655

  11. Heparanase procoagulant activity is elevated in women using oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matan, Moshe; Axelman, Elena; Brenner, Benjamin; Nadir, Yona

    2013-09-01

    What is the effect of estrogen on heparanase procogulant activity? Estrogen increases heparanase procoagulant activity. Estrogen therapy increases the risk of thrombosis and was previously found to up-regulate heparanase expression. Heparanase is involved in angiogenesis and metastasis, and has been shown to form a complex with tissue factor (TF) and also shown to enhance the generation of factor Xa. A case-control study. Thirty-four healthy women using oral contraceptives (OC) and 41 women not using hormonal therapy and not pregnant per history were enrolled, over a 5-month period, at the Rambam Medical Center, Haifa, Israel. In vitro, estrogen receptor-positive (MCF-7) and -negative (MDA-231) cell lines were incubated with estrogen, tamoxifen and ICI-182.780 a pure estrogen receptor antagonist. The cell medium was evaluated for TF/heparanase complex activity, TF activity and heparanase procoagulant activity by chromogenic substrate. Exclusion criteria included age set, the odds ratio was 131 (P tamoxifen increased heparanase procoagulant activity in the medium of estrogen receptor-positive (MCF-7) cells. The main limitation of the current study is that the two estrogens given to the women and cell cultures, ethinyl estradiol (EE) and 17-β-estradiol (E2), respectively, may have different effects on the coagulation system, although an increase in heparanase procoagulant activity was demonstrated in both of them. Although the sample size of the study group was limited, significant differences in the activation of the extrinsic coagulation pathway were demonstrated. The clinical relevance of the heparanase procoagulant activity assay as a screening tool in thrombophilia work-up should further be elucidated.

  12. Antiangiogenic and antitumor activities of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masferrer, J L; Leahy, K M; Koki, A T; Zweifel, B S; Settle, S L; Woerner, B M; Edwards, D A; Flickinger, A G; Moore, R J; Seibert, K

    2000-03-01

    We provide evidence that cyclooxygenase (COX)-2-derived prostaglandins contribute to tumor growth by inducing newly formed blood vessels (neoangiogenesis) that sustain tumor cell viability and growth. COX-2 is expressed within human tumor neovasculature as well as in neoplastic cells present in human colon, breast, prostate, and lung cancer biopsy tissue. COX-1 is broadly distributed in normal, as well as in neoplastic, tissues. The contribution of COX-2 to human tumor growth was indicated by the ability of celecoxib, an agent that inhibits the COX-2 enzyme, to suppress growth of lung and colon tumors implanted into recipient mice. Mechanistically, celecoxib demonstrated a potent antiangiogenic activity. In a rat model of angiogenesis, we observe that corneal blood vessel formation is suppressed by celecoxib, but not by a COX-1 inhibitor. These and other data indicate that COX-2 and COX-2-derived prostaglandins may play a major role in development of cancer through numerous biochemical mechanisms, including stimulation of tumor cell growth and neovascularization. The ability of celecoxib to block angiogenesis and suppress tumor growth suggests a novel application of this anti-inflammatory drug in the treatment of human cancer.

  13. Aggression behaviour induced by oral administration of the Janus-kinase inhibitor tofacitinib, but not oclacitinib, under stressful conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuyama, Tomoki; Tschernig, Thomas; Qi, Yulin; Volmer, Dietrich A; Bäumer, Wolfgang

    2015-10-05

    Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors have recently been developed for allergic diseases. We focused on the 2 different JAK inhibitors, tofacitinib (selective for JAK3) and oclacitinib (selective for JAK1 and 2), to clarify the mechanism of anti-inflammatory and anti-itching potency of these drugs. In the process of detecting anti-itching potency, we observed that tofacitinib treated mice showed aggression behaviour. The objective of the study reported here was to investigate the aggressive behaviour induced by tofacitinib by using a mouse model of allergic dermatitis and the resident-intruder test. For the allergic dermatitis model, female BALB/c mice were sensitised and challenged topically with toluene-2,4-diisocyanate (TDI). Vehicle, tofacitinib or oclacitinib, was administered orally 30 min before TDI challenge. Scratching, aggression and standing behaviours were monitored in the 60 min period immediately following challenge of TDI. Another group of male BALB/c mice treated with vehicle, tofacitinib or oclacitinib was evaluated in the resident-intruder test and brains were obtained to determine blood brain barrier penetration. In the allergic dermatitis model, a significant increase in aggression and standing behaviour was only obvious in the tofacitinib treatment group. There was no effect in non-sensitised mice, but similar aggression was also induced by tofacitinib in male resident-intruder test. Penetration of blood-brain barrier was observed both in tofacitinib and oclacitinib treated mice. These results suggest that aggression was induced by tofacitinib under some kind of stressful environment. This study indicates a possible role of the JAK-STAT pathway in modulation of aggression behaviour.

  14. Antimicrobial activity of Antrodia camphorata extracts against oral bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Hsiu-Man; Tseng, Chin-Jui; Huang, Chao-Lu; Lin, Yu-Ting; Chen, Chia-Chang; Lai, Ya-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Antrodia camphorata (A. camphorata) is a unique, endemic and extremely rare mushroom species native to Taiwan, and both crude extracts of and purified chemical compounds from A. camphorata have been reported to have a variety of significant beneficial effects, such as anti-tumor and anti-inflammatory activity. However, reports on the effects of A. camphorata against dental pathogens have been limited. Oral health is now recognized as important for overall general health, including conditions such as dental caries, periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis. Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) and Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) are the most common bacteria associated with dental plaque and periodontopathic diseases, respectively. Thus, our study examined the ability of five various crude extracts of A. camphorata to inhibit the growth of dental bacteria and anti-adherence in vitro. Among the extracts, the ethanol, ethyl acetate and chloroform extracts exhibited the lowest MICs against P. gingivalis and S. mutans (MIC = 4∼16 µg/mL). The MIC of the aqueous extract was greater than 2048 µg/mL against both P. gingivalis and S. mutans. In vitro adherence of S. mutans was significantly inhibited by the addition of either the ethyl acetate extract or chloroform extract (MIC = 16∼24 µg/mL), while the ethanol extract (MIC = 32∼64 µg/mL) exhibited moderate inhibitory activity. Based on the result of this study, the ethyl acetate and chloroform extracts of A. camphorata may be good candidates for oral hygiene agents to control dental caries and periodontopathic conditions.

  15. Antimicrobial activity of Antrodia camphorata extracts against oral bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-Man Lien

    Full Text Available Antrodia camphorata (A. camphorata is a unique, endemic and extremely rare mushroom species native to Taiwan, and both crude extracts of and purified chemical compounds from A. camphorata have been reported to have a variety of significant beneficial effects, such as anti-tumor and anti-inflammatory activity. However, reports on the effects of A. camphorata against dental pathogens have been limited. Oral health is now recognized as important for overall general health, including conditions such as dental caries, periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis. Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis are the most common bacteria associated with dental plaque and periodontopathic diseases, respectively. Thus, our study examined the ability of five various crude extracts of A. camphorata to inhibit the growth of dental bacteria and anti-adherence in vitro. Among the extracts, the ethanol, ethyl acetate and chloroform extracts exhibited the lowest MICs against P. gingivalis and S. mutans (MIC = 4∼16 µg/mL. The MIC of the aqueous extract was greater than 2048 µg/mL against both P. gingivalis and S. mutans. In vitro adherence of S. mutans was significantly inhibited by the addition of either the ethyl acetate extract or chloroform extract (MIC = 16∼24 µg/mL, while the ethanol extract (MIC = 32∼64 µg/mL exhibited moderate inhibitory activity. Based on the result of this study, the ethyl acetate and chloroform extracts of A. camphorata may be good candidates for oral hygiene agents to control dental caries and periodontopathic conditions.

  16. Early Pregnancy Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Levels in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-05-22

    May 22, 2017 ... mother and fetus, include changes in the expression of the coagulation ... inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in normal pregnancy and preeclampsia and determined its relationship .... The continuous variables (age, body mass index [BMI],.

  17. Discovery of a 1-isopropyltetrahydroisoquinoline derivative as an orally active N-type calcium channel blocker for neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogiyama, Takashi; Yonezawa, Koichi; Inoue, Makoto; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Sugano, Yukihito; Gotoh, Takayasu; Kiso, Tetsuo; Koakutsu, Akiko; Kakimoto, Shuichiro; Shishikura, Jun-Ichi

    2015-08-01

    N-type calcium channel blockade is a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Starting from lead compound (S)-1, we focused our optimization efforts on potency for N-type calcium channel inhibition and improvement of CYP inhibition profile. 2-{[(1-Hydroxycyclohexyl)methyl]amino}-(1R)-(1-isopropyl-6-methoxy-3,4-dihydroisoquinolin-2(1H)-yl)ethanone oxalate ((R)-5r) was identified as a novel orally active small-molecule N-type calcium channel inhibitor with reduced CYP inhibition liability. Oral administration of (R)-5r improved mechanical allodynia in a spinal nerve ligation model of neuropathic pain in rats with an ED50 value of 2.5 mg/kg. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. In vitro activity of cefdinir (FK 482, PD 134393, CI-983): a new orally active cephalosporin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qadri, S M; Ueno, Y; Saldin, H; Cunha, B A

    1993-01-01

    Cefdinir is a new orally active cephalosporin which is undergoing in vitro and in vivo evaluations. Using the standard agar dilution method we compared the in vitro activity of this drug with other beta-lactam antibiotics against clinical isolates or Enterobacteriaceae (625 strains), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (68 strains), Xanthomonas maltophilia (36 strains), Acinetobacter (52 strains), Aeromonas hydrophilia (47 strains), staphylococci (364 strains) and enterococci (50 strains). Against most members of Enterobacteriaceae, Acinetobacter and A. hydrophilia, cefdinir showed excellent activity, inhibiting 94% of these isolates at 32 micrograms/ml. Of the 50 isolates of enterococci tested, 94% were inhibited by < or = 16.0 micrograms/ml of cefdinir. Against Enterobacteriaceae, its activity was superior to any oral drug tested. With the exception of vancomycin, the in vitro activity of cefdinir was superior or comparable to other antibiotics tested against methicillin-susceptible S. aureus, coagulase-negative staphylococci and enterococci.

  19. COX-2 selective inhibitors: a literature review of analgesic efficacy and safety in oral-maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicconetti, Andrea; Bartoli, Adriano; Ripari, Francesca; Ripari, Andrea

    2004-02-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the most commonly prescribed analgesic agents in surgical outpatients. Major limitations of NSAIDs are their gastrointestinal (GI) adverse events (perforation, ulceration, and bleeding), impairment of hemostatic function, and renal failure (with long-term therapy). A new class of NSAIDs, the COX-2 selective inhibitors (CSIs or Coxibs), have been developed with the aim of reducing the GI adverse events of traditional NSAIDs while maintaining their effective anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. This is a narrative review of the literature aimed to discuss analgesic efficacy, clinical safety and cost-benefit ratio of CSIs in the treatment of post-oral surgery pain. Relevant drug and clinical studies of analgesic efficacy and safety of CSIs in the management of postoperative dental pain were identified through searches of MEDLINE/PubMed, in peer-reviewed journals of medicine and dentistry. The Food and Drug Administration Web site was searched for data of tolerability. Hand-searching included several dental journals and bibliographies of relevant studies. The last electronic search was conducted in April 2003. Data from well-designed, randomized, controlled trials of CSIs on the management of post-oral surgery pain indicate that these drugs are as well-effective analgesic agents as traditional NSAIDs and offer clinical advantages in terms of GI safety and unimpaired platelet function. CSIs do not offer advantages of renal safety over traditional NSAIDs. Although CSIs display analgesic efficacy similar to that of traditional NSAIDs in the treatment of acute, post-oral surgery pain, there is reasonable evidence that these new drugs are preferable in patients who are at an increased risk of developing serious upper-GI complications, in patients who take aspirin for cardiovascular comorbid conditions, and in those allergic to aspirin. Furthermore, CSIs may be given more safely than NSAIDs in perioperative settings

  20. Poor adherence with ACE inhibitors is a risk factor of CVA with oral hypoglycemic agents in diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aftab, Muhammad Tariq; Dharamshi, Hasnain Abbas; Faraz, Ahmed; Shakeel, Saba; Shakeel, Osama

    2017-03-01

    Poor adherence with medicine declines the clinical outcome of pharmacotherapy. It may carry serious sequelae especially in case of antihypertensive drugs like cerebrovascular accident (CVA). This study has been planned to find the association of poor adherence with anti-hypertensive with CVA in diabetic and non- diabetic patients. One hundred CVA patients who were admitted through Emergency in Abbasi Shaheed hospital, a tertiary care hospital in Karachi, were recruited from Jun 2013 till Dec 2013. The criteria of inclusion was, diagnosed case of CVA, with primary hypertension, availability of patient's therapeutic record, consent of the patient or legal successor/heir. The criteria of exclusion was, secondary hypertension, newly diagnosed primary hypertensive patients and complete adherence with medication. Morisky medication adherence scale was applied. Therapeutic record was accessed. The mean age was 62.15 years with 3:1 male to female ratio. Adherence to medicine was graded 0.05) was seen in any combination (p>0.05). Thus it is concluded that poor adherence with ACE inhibitors may be a risk factor of CVA in diabetic patients using oral hypoglycemic agents.

  1. Oral anticoagulation with vitamin K inhibitors and determinants of successful self-management in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo Aguirre, E; Galo-Anza, A; Dorronsoro-Barandiaran, O; Del Burgo, E Uranga-Saez; Ostiza Irigoyen, A; Garcia-Carro, A; Lopez-Fernandez, I; Colera, N; Saez-Garbayo, P; Tamayo-Uria, I

    2016-09-13

    Self-management may be an option to monitor oral anticoagulant therapy in health systems, but before recommending it, we need to assess patients' ability to take on this task. The purpose of the study was to describe patients' ability to self-manage and associated factors. This was a 3-year prospective quasi-experimental study with a control group. Overall, 333 patients on anticoagulant therapy from seven primary care health centres of the Basque Health Service were included in the intervention group and followed up for 6 months after the intervention, assessing their ability to self-test and self-manage. The intervention consisted of a patient training programme, providing detailed information on their condition and its treatment, and practical training in how to use a portable blood coagulation monitor and adjust their anticoagulant dose. Comparisons were made with a control group (333 patients receiving OAT under usual care from the same seven health centres). Outcome variables were ability to self-manage, quality of the outcome (in terms of time in therapeutic range), and quality of life in the intervention group, and general patient characteristics (age and sex), clinical variables (reason for OAT, INR range), and quality of the outcome (in terms of percentage of INR measurements in range and complications) in both groups. Overall, 26.13 % of patients invited to participate in the intervention agreed. Of these, 99 % successfully learned to self-manage their OAT. Just 4.2 % did not complete the follow-up, in all cases for reasons unrelated to self-management, and 4.5 % required additional learning support. Outcomes were better than under usual care in terms of percentage of INR measurements in range (12 %), rate of complications (4 %) and quality of life (9.2 %). Patients were only followed-up period for 6 months and the study was conducted in a single health organization. Though patients eligible to participate were selected randomly, they were not randomly

  2. Computer-Aided Design of Orally Bioavailable Pyrrolidine Carboxamide Inhibitors of Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with Favorable Pharmacokinetic Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouassi, Affiba Florance; Kone, Mawa; Keita, Melalie; Esmel, Akori; Megnassan, Eugene; N’Guessan, Yao Thomas; Frecer, Vladimir; Miertus, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    We have carried out a computational structure-based design of new potent pyrrolidine carboxamide (PCAMs) inhibitors of enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (InhA) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb). Three-dimensional (3D) models of InhA-PCAMx complexes were prepared by in situ modification of the crystal structure of InhA-PCAM1 (Protein Data Bank (PDB) entry code: 4U0J), the reference compound of a training set of 20 PCAMs with known experimental inhibitory potencies (IC50exp). First, we built a gas phase quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) model, linearly correlating the computed enthalpy of the InhA-PCAM complex formation and the IC50exp. Further, taking into account the solvent effect and loss of inhibitor entropy upon enzyme binding led to a QSAR model with a superior linear correlation between computed Gibbs free energies (ΔΔGcom) of InhA-PCAM complex formation and IC50exp (pIC50exp = −0.1552·ΔΔGcom + 5.0448, R2 = 0.94), which was further validated with a 3D-QSAR pharmacophore model generation (PH4). Structural information from the models guided us in designing of a virtual combinatorial library (VL) of more than 17 million PCAMs. The VL was adsorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) focused and reduced down to 1.6 million drug like orally bioavailable analogues and PH4 in silico screened to identify new potent PCAMs with predicted IC50pre reaching up to 5 nM. Combining molecular modeling and PH4 in silico screening of the VL resulted in the proposed novel potent antituberculotic agent candidates with favorable pharmacokinetic profiles. PMID:26703572

  3. Computer-Aided Design of Orally Bioavailable Pyrrolidine Carboxamide Inhibitors of Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with Favorable Pharmacokinetic Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Affiba Florance Kouassi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We have carried out a computational structure-based design of new potent pyrrolidine carboxamide (PCAMs inhibitors of enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (InhA of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb. Three-dimensional (3D models of InhA-PCAMx complexes were prepared by in situ modification of the crystal structure of InhA-PCAM1 (Protein Data Bank (PDB entry code: 4U0J, the reference compound of a training set of 20 PCAMs with known experimental inhibitory potencies (IC50exp. First, we built a gas phase quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR model, linearly correlating the computed enthalpy of the InhA-PCAM complex formation and the IC50exp. Further, taking into account the solvent effect and loss of inhibitor entropy upon enzyme binding led to a QSAR model with a superior linear correlation between computed Gibbs free energies (ΔΔGcom of InhA-PCAM complex formation and IC50exp (pIC50exp = −0.1552·ΔΔGcom + 5.0448, R2 = 0.94, which was further validated with a 3D-QSAR pharmacophore model generation (PH4. Structural information from the models guided us in designing of a virtual combinatorial library (VL of more than 17 million PCAMs. The VL was adsorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME focused and reduced down to 1.6 million drug like orally bioavailable analogues and PH4 in silico screened to identify new potent PCAMs with predicted IC50pre reaching up to 5 nM. Combining molecular modeling and PH4 in silico screening of the VL resulted in the proposed novel potent antituberculotic agent candidates with favorable pharmacokinetic profiles.

  4. Assessment of the antimicrobial activity of Casearia sylvestris extract against oral pathogenic microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. R. SANTOS

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available An ethanolic extract of leaves from the tree Casearia sylvestris, known as guaçatonga in Brazil, was tested for in vitro activity against oral pathogenic bacteria and fungi. The results showed susceptibility of all the microorganisms tested. This study suggests a potential use of ethanolic extract of C. sylvestris as a novel treatment of oral infectious conditions, such as denture stomatitis, periodontitis and dental caries. Keywords: Casearia sylvestris; guaçatonga; oral microorganisms; antimicrobial activity.

  5. Phase I/II clinical trial of 2-difluoromethyl-ornithine (DFMO) and a novel polyamine transport inhibitor (MQT 1426) for feline oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorupski, K A; O'Brien, T G; Guerrero, T; Rodriguez, C O; Burns, M R

    2011-12-01

    Polyamines are essential for cell proliferation. Their production is dysregulated in many cancers and polyamine depletion leads to tumour regression in mouse models of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The purpose of this study was to determine the maximally tolerated dose of the polyamine transport inhibitor, MQT 1426, when combined with the ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) inhibitor, DFMO, and to determine whether this therapy results in reduction in tumour polyamine levels. Thirteen cats with oral SCC received both drugs orally and serial tumour biopsies were obtained for polyamine measurement. Cats were monitored for response to therapy and toxicity. A maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of MQT 1426 when combined with DFMO was determined. Dose-limiting toxicity was vestibular in nature, but was fully reversible. Spermidine and total polyamine levels decreased significantly in tissues, two cats experienced objective tumour regression and six cats had stable disease. These results suggest that further study of polyamine depletion therapies is warranted.

  6. In vitro and in vivo models for the evaluation of new inhibitors of human steroid sulfatase, devoid of residual estrogenic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields-Botella, J; Bonnet, P; Duc, I; Duranti, E; Meschi, S; Cardinali, S; Prouheze, P; Chaigneau, A M; Duranti, V; Gribaudo, S; Rivière, A; Mengual, L; Carniato, D; Cecchet, L; Lafay, J; Rondot, B; Sandri, J; Pascal, J C; Delansorne, R

    2003-02-01

    The goal of our research project is to develop a new class of orally active drugs, estrone sulfatase inhibitors, for the treatment of estrogen-dependent (receptor positive) breast cancer. Several compounds were synthesized and their pharmacological potencies explored. Based on encouraging preliminary results, three of them, TX 1299, TX 1492 and TX 1506 were further studied in vitro as well as in vivo. They proved to be strong inhibitors of estrone sulfatase when measured on the whole human JEG-3 choriocarcinoma and MCF-7 breast cancer cells and their IC(50)s found to be in the range of known standard inhibitors. Their residual estrogenic activity was checked as negative in the test of induction of alkaline phosphatase (APase) activity in whole human endometrial adenocarcinoma Ishikawa cells. In addition, their effect on aromatase activity in JEG-3 cells was also examined, since the goal of inhibiting both sulfatase and aromatase activities appears very attractive. However, it has been unsuccessful so far. Then, in vivo potencies of TX 1299, the lead compound in our chemical series, were evaluated in comparison with 6,6,7-COUMATE, a non-steroidal standard, in two different rat models and by oral route. First, the absence of any residual estrogenic activity for these compounds was checked in the uterotrophic model in prepubescent female rats. Second, antiuterotrophic activity in adult ovariectomized rat supplemented with estrone sulfate (E(1)S), showed that both compounds were potent inhibitors, the power of TX 1299 relative to 6,6,7-COUMATE being around 80%. This assay was combined with uterine sulfatase level determination and confirmed the complete inhibition of this enzyme within the target organ. Preliminary studies indicated that other non-steroid compounds in the Théramex series were potent in vitro and in vivo inhibitors of estrone sulfatase in rats and further studies are in progress.

  7. Rhamnazin, a novel inhibitor of VEGFR2 signaling with potent antiangiogenic activity and antitumor efficacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Yao [Department of Ophthalmology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Jiangxi Province Clinical Ophthalmology Institute, No.17 Yongwaizheng Street, Donghu District, Nanchang 330006, Jiangxi Province (China); Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, The Third Hospital of Nanchang, Nanchang Key Laboratory of Diabetes, No.1 Qianjing Road, Xihu District, Nanchang 330009, Jiangxi Province (China); Cai, Wei [Department of Medical Genetics, College of Basic Medical Science of Nanchang University, No.461 Bayi Road, Donghu District, Nanchang 330006, Jiangxi Province (China); Pei, Chong-gang, E-mail: profchonggangpei@163.com [Department of Ophthalmology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Jiangxi Province Clinical Ophthalmology Institute, No.17 Yongwaizheng Street, Donghu District, Nanchang 330006, Jiangxi Province (China); Shao, Yi, E-mail: profyishao@163.com [Department of Ophthalmology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Jiangxi Province Clinical Ophthalmology Institute, No.17 Yongwaizheng Street, Donghu District, Nanchang 330006, Jiangxi Province (China)

    2015-03-20

    Anti-angiogenesis targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) has emerged as an important tool for cancer therapy. The identification of new drugs from natural products has a long and successful history. In this study, we described a novel VEGFR2 inhibitor, rhamnazin, which inhibits tumor angiogenesis and growth. Rhamnazin significantly inhibited proliferation, migration and tube formation of human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro as well as inhibited sprouts formation of rat aorta ring. In addition, it inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and its downstream signaling regulator in HUVECs. Moreover, rhamnazin could directly inhibit proliferation of breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 in vitro and in vivo. Oral administration of rhamnazin at a dose of 200 mg/kg/day could markedly inhibited human tumor xenograft growth and decreased microvessel densities (MVD) in tumor sections. Taken together, these preclinical evaluations suggest that rhamnazin inhibits angiogenesis and may be a promising anticancer drug candidate. - Highlights: • Rhamnazin inhibits the response of HUVECs to VEGF in vitro. • Rhamnazin inhibits VEGFR2 kinase activity and its downstream signaling. • Rhamnazin prevents the growth of MDA-MB-231 tumor and reduces micro-vessel density in vivo.

  8. Wheat amylase trypsin inhibitors drive intestinal inflammation via activation of toll-like receptor 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junker, Yvonne; Zeissig, Sebastian; Kim, Seong-Jun; Barisani, Donatella; Wieser, Herbert; Leffler, Daniel A; Zevallos, Victor; Libermann, Towia A; Dillon, Simon; Freitag, Tobias L; Kelly, Ciaran P; Schuppan, Detlef

    2012-12-17

    Ingestion of wheat, barley, or rye triggers small intestinal inflammation in patients with celiac disease. Specifically, the storage proteins of these cereals (gluten) elicit an adaptive Th1-mediated immune response in individuals carrying HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 as major genetic predisposition. This well-defined role of adaptive immunity contrasts with an ill-defined component of innate immunity in celiac disease. We identify the α-amylase/trypsin inhibitors (ATIs) CM3 and 0.19, pest resistance molecules in wheat, as strong activators of innate immune responses in monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. ATIs engage the TLR4-MD2-CD14 complex and lead to up-regulation of maturation markers and elicit release of proinflammatory cytokines in cells from celiac and nonceliac patients and in celiac patients' biopsies. Mice deficient in TLR4 or TLR4 signaling are protected from intestinal and systemic immune responses upon oral challenge with ATIs. These findings define cereal ATIs as novel contributors to celiac disease. Moreover, ATIs may fuel inflammation and immune reactions in other intestinal and nonintestinal immune disorders.

  9. Convergent Akt activation drives acquired EGFR inhibitor resistance in lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Kirstine; Bertran-Alamillo, Jordi; Molina, Miguel Angel

    2017-01-01

    phospho-Akt levels to therapeutically combat the heterogeneity of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance mechanisms.EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer are often resistant to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment. In this study, the authors show that resistant tumors display high Akt activation...

  10. A phase II trial of R115777, an oral farnesyl transferase inhibitor, in      patients with advanced urothelial tract transitional cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, Jonathan E.; Maase, Hans von der; Seigne, John D.;

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: R115777 is a potent farnesyl transferase inhibitor and has       significant antitumor effects in vitro and in vivo. METHODS: The objective       of the current study was to determine the objective response proportion in       patients with metastatic transitional cell carcinoma (TCC......) of the       urothelial tract who received treatment with R115777 at a dose of 300 mg       orally given twice daily for 21 days followed by 7 days of rest for every       4-week cycle. Thirty-four patients with TCC were enrolled in this Phase II       study. Patients were allowed to have received a maximum of one prior......       observed. CONCLUSIONS: The objective response rate of R115777 was not       sufficient to warrant future investigation in TCC as a single agent.       Preliminary evidence of the activity of R115777 in 2 chemotherapy-naive       patients may warrant further investigation in combination with first...

  11. A phase II trial of R115777, an oral farnesyl transferase inhibitor, in      patients with advanced urothelial tract transitional cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, Jonathan E.; Maase, Hans von der; Seigne, John D.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: R115777 is a potent farnesyl transferase inhibitor and has       significant antitumor effects in vitro and in vivo. METHODS: The objective       of the current study was to determine the objective response proportion in       patients with metastatic transitional cell carcinoma (TCC......) of the       urothelial tract who received treatment with R115777 at a dose of 300 mg       orally given twice daily for 21 days followed by 7 days of rest for every       4-week cycle. Thirty-four patients with TCC were enrolled in this Phase II       study. Patients were allowed to have received a maximum of one prior......       observed. CONCLUSIONS: The objective response rate of R115777 was not       sufficient to warrant future investigation in TCC as a single agent.       Preliminary evidence of the activity of R115777 in 2 chemotherapy-naive       patients may warrant further investigation in combination with first...

  12. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Antagonist TM5484 Attenuates Demyelination and Axonal Degeneration in a Mice Model of Multiple Sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Pelisch

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is characterized by inflammatory demyelination and deposition of fibrinogen in the central nervous system (CNS. Elevated levels of a critical inhibitor of the mammalian fibrinolitic system, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1 have been demonstrated in human and animal models of MS. In experimental studies that resemble neuroinflammatory disease, PAI-1 deficient mice display preserved neurological structure and function compared to wild type mice, suggesting a link between the fibrinolytic pathway and MS. We previously identified a series of PAI-1 inhibitors on the basis of the 3-dimensional structure of PAI-1 and on virtual screening. These compounds have been reported to provide a number of in vitro and in vivo benefits but none was tested in CNS disease models because of their limited capacity to penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB. The existing candidates were therefore optimized to obtain CNS-penetrant compounds. We performed an in vitro screening using a model of BBB and were able to identify a novel, low molecular PAI-1 inhibitor, TM5484, with the highest penetration ratio among all other candidates. Next, we tested the effects on inflammation and demyelination in an experimental allergic encephalomyelitis mice model. Results were compared to either fingolimod or 6α-methylprednisolone. Oral administration of TM5484 from the onset of signs, ameliorates paralysis, attenuated demyelination, and axonal degeneration in the spinal cord of mice. Furthermore, it modulated the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which plays a protective role in neurons against various pathological insults, and choline acetyltransferase, a marker of neuronal density. Taken together, these results demonstrate the potential benefits of a novel PAI-1 inhibitor, TM5484, in the treatment of MS.

  13. Inhibitor of Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase Sensitizes Glioblastoma Cells to Temozolomide via Activating ROS/JNK Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Feng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Overcoming temozolomide (TMZ resistance is a great challenge in glioblastoma (GBM treatment. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT is a rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and has a crucial role in cancer cell metabolism. In this study, we investigated whether FK866 and CHS828, two specific NAMPT inhibitors, could sensitize GBM cells to TMZ. Low doses of FK866 and CHS828 (5 nM and 10 nM, resp. alone did not significantly decrease cell viability in U251-MG and T98 GBM cells. However, they significantly increased the antitumor action of TMZ in these cells. In U251-MG cells, administration of NAMPT inhibitors increased the TMZ (100 μM-induced apoptosis and LDH release from GBM cells. NAMPT inhibitors remarkably enhanced the activities of caspase-1, caspase-3, and caspase-9. Moreover, NAMPT inhibitors increased reactive oxygen species (ROS production and superoxide anion level but reduced the SOD activity and total antioxidative capacity in GBM cells. Treatment of NAMPT inhibitors increased phosphorylation of c-Jun and JNK. Administration of JNK inhibitor SP600125 or ROS scavenger tocopherol with TMZ and NAMPT inhibitors substantially attenuated the sensitization of NAMPT inhibitor on TMZ antitumor action. Our data indicate a potential value of NAMPT inhibitors in combined use with TMZ for GBM treatment.

  14. Oral glucose intake inhibits hypothalamic neuronal activity more effectively than glucose infusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, P.A.M.; Vidarsdottir, S.; Graaf, C. de; Stafleu, A.; Osch, M.J.P. van; Viergever, M.A.; Pijl, H.; Grond, J. van der

    2007-01-01

    We previously showed that hypothalamic neuronal activity, as measured by the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional MRI signal, declines in response to oral glucose intake. To further explore the mechanism driving changes in hypothalamic neuronal activity in response to an oral glucose load,

  15. Modulation of C1-Inhibitor and Plasma Kallikrein Activities by Type IV Collagen

    OpenAIRE

    Sriram Ravindran; Marc Schapira; Patston, Philip A.

    2012-01-01

    The contact system of coagulation can be activated when in contact with biomaterials. As collagen is being tested in novel biomaterials in this study, we have investigated how type IV collagen affects plasma kallikrein and C1-inhibitor. Firstly, we showed C1-inhibitor binds to type IV collagen with a Kd of 0.86 μM. The effects of type IV collagen on plasma kallikrein, factor XIIa, and β-factor XIIa activity and on C1-inhibitor function were determined. Factor XIIa rapidly lost activity in the...

  16. EMMPRIN/CD147 up-regulates urokinase-type plasminogen activator: implications in oral tumor progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lescaille Géraldine

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backgrounds An elevated level of EMMPRIN in cancer tissues have been correlated with tumor invasion in numerous cancers including oral cavity and larynx. Although EMMPRIN's effect has been generally attributed to its MMP inducing activity, we have previously demonstrated in breast cancer model that EMMPRIN can also enhance invasion by upregulating uPA. In this study, the role of EMMPRIN in regulating uPA and invasion was investigated in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC progression. Methods Precancerous and invasive oral tumoral tissues were used as well as the corresponding cell lines, DOK and SCC-9 respectively. The paracrine regulation of uPA by EMMPRIN was investigated by treating culture cells with EMMPRIN-enriched membrane vesicles. UPA expression was analyzed by qPCR and immunostaining and the consequence on the invasion capacity was studied using modified Boyden chamber assay, in the presence or absence of EMMPRIN blocking antibody, the uPA inhibitor amiloride or the MMP inhibitor marimastat. Results OSCC tumors were shown to express more EMMPRIN and uPA compared to dysplastic lesions. The corresponding cell models, SCC-9 and DOK cells, displayed similar expression pattern. In both cell types EMMPRIN upregulated the expression of uPA as well as that of MMP-2 and MMP-9. EMMPRIN treatment led to a significant increase in cell invasion both in the invasive SCC-9 and in the less invasive dysplastic DOK cells, in an MMP and uPA dependent manner. Conclusions Our results suggest that the upregulation of uPA contributes to EMMPRIN's effect in promoting oral tumor invasion.

  17. Anacardic acid derived salicylates are inhibitors or activators of lipoxygenases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wisastra, Rosalina; Ghizzoni, Massimo; Boltjes, Andre; Haisma, Hidde J.; Dekker, Frank J.

    2012-01-01

    Lipoxygenases catalyze the oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids, such as linoleic acid, which play a crucial role in inflammatory responses. Selective inhibitors may provide a new therapeutic approach for inflammatory diseases. In this study, we describe the identification of a novel soybean lipoxyg

  18. Design, synthesis and biological activity of novel non-peptidyl endothelin converting enzyme inhibitors, 1-phenyl-tetrazole-formazan analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Kazuto; Hasegawa, Hirohiko; Umekawa, Kayo; Ueki, Yasuyuki; Ohashi, Naohito; Kanaoka, Masaharu

    2002-05-06

    A novel non-peptidyl endothelin converting enzyme inhibitor was obtained through a pharmacophore analysis of known inhibitors and three-dimensional structure database search. Analogues of the new inhibitor were designed using the structure-activity relationship of known inhibitors and synthesized. In anesthetized rats, intraperitoneal administration of the analogues suppressed the pressor responses induced by big endothelin-1.

  19. Molecular advances in plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 interaction with thrombin and tissue-type plasminogen activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoop, A; van Meijer, M; Horrevoets, A J; Pannekoek, H

    1997-02-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) is a glycoprotein that controls the activity of the key enzymes of the fibrinolytic system, the serine proteases tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA). Inhibition is accomplished by rapid formation of inactive, equimolar PAI-1/PA complexes. The physiological importance of PAI-1 for the fibrinolytic system has been underscored by the observation that in humans, a homozygous defect results in hemorrhagic episodes. In addition to its function in surveillance of the integrity of clots, PAI-1 efficiently inhibits the serine protease thrombin in vitro, provided that either the high molecular weight glycosaminoglycan heparin or the glycoprotein vitronectin is present. These cofactors accelerate the rate of thrombin inhibition by PAI-1 by more than two orders of magnitude. Inhibition of thrombin by PAI-1 proceeds according to a "suicide substrate mechanism," typified by a branched reaction pathway, leading either to stable PAI-1/thrombin complexes or to degradation of the inhibitor and recycling of enzyme. The cofactors heparin and vitronectin, although increasing inhibition through different mechanisms, essentially promote PAI-1 degradation by thrombin. In view of the multitude of functions attributed to thrombin, the authors propose that the relevance of thrombin inhibition by PAI-1 is to restrict its mitogenic activity, rather than to affect its coagulation function in plasma. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997;7:47-51). © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  20. Oral poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor olaparib in patients with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations and recurrent ovarian cancer: a proof-of-concept trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audeh, M William; Carmichael, James; Penson, Richard T; Friedlander, Michael; Powell, Bethan; Bell-McGuinn, Katherine M; Scott, Clare; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Oaknin, Ana; Loman, Niklas; Lu, Karen; Schmutzler, Rita K; Matulonis, Ursula; Wickens, Mark; Tutt, Andrew

    2010-07-24

    Olaparib is a novel, orally active poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor that induces synthetic lethality in homozygous BRCA-deficient cells. We aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of olaparib for treatment of advanced ovarian cancer in patients with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. In this international, multicentre, phase 2 study, we enrolled two sequential cohorts of women (aged >or=18 years) with confirmed genetic BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, and recurrent, measurable disease. The study was undertaken in 12 centres in Australia, Germany, Spain, Sweden, and the USA. The first cohort (n=33) was given continuous oral olaparib at the maximum tolerated dose of 400 mg twice daily, and the second cohort (n=24) was given continuous oral olaparib at 100 mg twice daily. The primary efficacy endpoint was objective response rate (ORR). This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00494442. Patients had been given a median of three (range 1-16) previous chemotherapy regimens. ORR was 11 (33%) of 33 patients (95% CI 20-51) in the cohort assigned to olaparib 400 mg twice daily, and three (13%) of 24 (4-31) in the cohort assigned to 100 mg twice daily. In patients given olaparib 400 mg twice daily, the most frequent causally related adverse events were nausea (grade 1 or 2, 14 [42%]; grade 3 or 4, two [6%]), fatigue (grade 1 or 2, ten [30%]; grade 3 or 4, one [3%]), and anaemia (grade 1 or two, five [15%]; grade 3 or 4, one [3%]). The most frequent causally related adverse events in the cohort given 100 mg twice daily were nausea (grade 1 or 2, seven [29%]; grade 3 or 4, two [8%]) and fatigue (grade 1 or 2, nine [38%]; none grade 3 or 4). Findings from this phase 2 study provide positive proof of concept of the efficacy and tolerability of genetically targeted treatment with olaparib in BRCA-mutated advanced ovarian cancer. AstraZeneca. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Highly Eribulin-resistant KBV20C Oral Cancer Cells Can Be Sensitized by Co-treatment with the Third-generation P-Glycoprotein Inhibitor, Elacridar, at a Low Dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yujin; Son, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Byung-Mu; Kim, Hyung Sik; Yoon, Sungpil

    2017-08-01

    Eribulin mesylate, also called Halaven® (HAL), was recently developed as a microtubule-targeting drug and is used in the clinic for resistant or metastatic cancer. Previously, we showed that P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-overexpressing KBV20C oral cancer cells are highly resistant to HAL compared to sensitive KB cells. This qualitative study was designed to identify specific P-gp inhibitors that increase the sensitivity of highly resistant cancer cells to HAL. In order to identify functional P-gp inhibitors, HAL-treated KBV20C cells were co-treated with P-gp inhibitors, verapamil, elacridar, cyclosporine A, mitotane, piperine, fumagillin, curcumin, indomethacin, probenecid, sulindac, tesmilifene, and C-4. We then evaluated which P-gp inhibitors required a low dose to sensitize KBV20C cells to HAL. We also determined whether a low dose of a P-gp inhibitor could inhibit P-gp efflux pumping. We found that cyclosporine A sensitized HAL-treated KBV20C cells at a low dose, whereas verapamil, another first-generation P-gp inhibitor, required a dose that was nearly 10-fold higher. We also found that the natural products, piperine and mitotane, sensitized KBV20C cells to HAL co-treatment. Interestingly, we found that elacridar, a third-generation P-gp inhibitor, sensitized HAL-treated cells at a low dose. Elacridar required approximately a 500-fold lower dose than that of verapamil to exert a similar effect. All inhibitors showed P-gp inhibitory activity that correlated with sensitivity to HAL. These results suggest that highly HAL-resistant cancer cells can be sensitized with cyclosporine A or elacridar, specific P-gp inhibitors that exert their effects at a low dose. These findings provide important information regarding the sensitization of highly HAL-resistant cells with selective P-gp inhibitors and indicate that elacridar may be used to treat such highly HAL-resistant cancer cells. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios

  2. Peptide-Based Selective Inhibitors of Matrix Metalloproteinase-Mediated Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret W. Ndinguri

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs exhibit a broad array of activities, some catalytic and some non-catalytic in nature. An overall lack of selectivity has rendered small molecule, active site targeted MMP inhibitors problematic in execution. Inhibitors that favor few or individual members of the MMP family often take advantage of interactions outside the enzyme active site. We presently focus on peptide-based MMP inhibitors and probes that do not incorporate conventional Zn2+ binding groups. In some cases, these inhibitors and probes function by binding only secondary binding sites (exosites, while others bind both exosites and the active site. A myriad of MMP mediated-activities beyond selective catalysis can be inhibited by peptides, particularly cell adhesion, proliferation, motility, and invasion. Selective MMP binding peptides comprise highly customizable, unique imaging agents. Areas of needed improvement for MMP targeting peptides include binding affinity and stability.

  3. Entrectinib, a Pan-TRK, ROS1, and ALK Inhibitor with Activity in Multiple Molecularly Defined Cancer Indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardini, Elena; Menichincheri, Maria; Banfi, Patrizia; Bosotti, Roberta; De Ponti, Cristina; Pulci, Romana; Ballinari, Dario; Ciomei, Marina; Texido, Gemma; Degrassi, Anna; Avanzi, Nilla; Amboldi, Nadia; Saccardo, Maria Beatrice; Casero, Daniele; Orsini, Paolo; Bandiera, Tiziano; Mologni, Luca; Anderson, David; Wei, Ge; Harris, Jason; Vernier, Jean-Michel; Li, Gang; Felder, Eduard; Donati, Daniele; Isacchi, Antonella; Pesenti, Enrico; Magnaghi, Paola; Galvani, Arturo

    2016-04-01

    Activated ALK and ROS1 tyrosine kinases, resulting from chromosomal rearrangements, occur in a subset of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) as well as other tumor types and their oncogenic relevance as actionable targets has been demonstrated by the efficacy of selective kinase inhibitors such as crizotinib, ceritinib, and alectinib. More recently, low-frequency rearrangements of TRK kinases have been described in NSCLC, colorectal carcinoma, glioblastoma, and Spitzoid melanoma. Entrectinib, whose discovery and preclinical characterization are reported herein, is a novel, potent inhibitor of ALK, ROS1, and, importantly, of TRK family kinases, which shows promise for therapy of tumors bearing oncogenic forms of these proteins. Proliferation profiling against over 200 human tumor cell lines revealed that entrectinib is exquisitely potent in vitro against lines that are dependent on the drug's pharmacologic targets. Oral administration of entrectinib to tumor-bearing mice induced regression in relevant human xenograft tumors, including the TRKA-dependent colorectal carcinoma KM12, ROS1-driven tumors, and several ALK-dependent models of different tissue origins, including a model of brain-localized lung cancer metastasis. Entrectinib is currently showing great promise in phase I/II clinical trials, including the first documented objective responses to a TRK inhibitor in colorectal carcinoma and in NSCLC. The drug is, thus, potentially suited to the therapy of several molecularly defined cancer settings, especially that of TRK-dependent tumors, for which no approved drugs are currently available. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(4); 628-39. ©2016 AACR.

  4. Genetic and cytological evidence that heterocyst patterning is regulated by inhibitor gradients that promote activator decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risser, Douglas D; Callahan, Sean M

    2009-11-24

    The formation of a pattern of differentiated cells from a group of seemingly equivalent, undifferentiated cells is a central paradigm of developmental biology. Several species of filamentous cyanobacteria differentiate nitrogen-fixing heterocysts at regular intervals along unbranched filaments to form a periodic pattern of two distinct cell types. This patterning has been used to exemplify application of the activator-inhibitor model to periodic patterns in biology. The activator-inhibitor model proposes that activators and inhibitors of differentiation diffuse from source cells to form concentration gradients that in turn mediate patterning, but direct visualization of concentration gradients of activators and inhibitors has been difficult. Here we show that the periodic pattern of heterocysts produced by cyanobacteria relies on two inhibitors of heterocyst differentiation, PatS and HetN, in a manner consistent with the predictions of the activator-inhibitor model. Concentration gradients of the activator, HetR, were observed adjacent to heterocysts, the natural source of PatS and HetN, as well as adjacent to vegetative cells that were manipulated to overexpress a gene encoding either of the inhibitors. Gradients of HetR relied on posttranslational decay of HetR. Deletion of both patS and hetN genes prevented the formation of gradients of HetR, and a derivative of the inhibitors was shown to promote decay of HetR in a concentration-dependent manner. Our results provide strong support for application of the activator-inhibitor model to heterocyst patterning and, more generally, the formation of periodic patterns in biological systems.

  5. RUBY-1: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of the safety and tolerability of the novel oral factor Xa inhibitor darexaban (YM150) following acute coronary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steg, Ph Gabriel; Mehta, Shamir R; Jukema, J Wouter

    2011-01-01

    To establish the safety, tolerability and most promising regimen of darexaban (YM150), a novel, oral, direct factor Xa inhibitor, for prevention of ischaemic events in acute coronary syndrome (ACS)....

  6. A Phase 1 Study of Oral ARRY-614, a p38 MAPK/Tie2 Dual Inhibitor, in Patients with Low or Intermediate-1 Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Khoury, Hanna J.; Jabbour, Elias; Lancet, Jeffrey; Winski, Shannon L.; Cable, LouAnn; Rush, Selena; Maloney, Lara; Hogeland, Grant; Ptaszynski, Mieke; Calvo, Monica Cabrero; Bohanan, Zach; List, Alan; Kantarjian, Hagop; Komrokji, Rami

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Data suggest that activity of p38 MAPK and Tie2 kinase are dysregulated in MDS and may be targets for novel therapies. A Phase 1 study of ARRY-614, an oral dual inhibitor of p38 MAPK and Tie2, was conducted in patients with low or intermediate-1 International Prognostic Scoring System risk MDS to evaluate safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), and preliminary responses by IWG 2006 criteria. Experimental Design Forty-five patients received ARRY-614 either QD or BID in dose escalation (400, 600, 900 or 1200 mg QD; 200 or 300 mg BID) or expansion cohorts. Results The 300 mg BID schedule was not tolerated, and a maximum tolerated dose was not reached for QD dosing. Treatment-related adverse events were primarily grade 1–2, with the most common being rash, diarrhea, dry skin, fatigue and anorexia. Inter-patient PK variability was high, although exposure was sufficient to achieve reduction in p38 MAPK activation in bone marrow and in the levels of circulating biomarkers. Disease responses were observed in 14 of 44 (32%) evaluable patients, 13 (93%) of whom had previously been treated with a hypomethylating agent. Responses were observed in all lineages, with 5 patients experiencing bilineage responses. Three of 25 RBC transfusion-dependent (TD) patients achieved transfusion independence (TI) and 5 of 7 platelet TD patients achieved TI. Conclusions ARRY-614 was well tolerated and has sufficient activity to warrant further evaluation in this patient population. We recommend 1200 mg QD as the optimal dose for further study. PMID:25480830

  7. Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 regulates microglial motility and phagocytic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeon Hyejin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1 is the primary inhibitor of urokinase type plasminogen activators (uPA and tissue type plasminogen activators (tPA, which mediate fibrinolysis. PAI-1 is also involved in the innate immunity by regulating cell migration and phagocytosis. However, little is known about the role of PAI-1 in the central nervous system. Methods In this study, we identified PAI-1 in the culture medium of mouse mixed glial cells by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. Secretion of PAI-1 from glial cultures was detected by ELISA and western blotting analysis. Cell migration was evaluated by in vitro scratch-wound healing assay or Boyden chamber assay and an in vivo stab wound injury model. Phagocytic activity was measured by uptake of zymosan particles. Results The levels of PAI-1 mRNA and protein expression were increased by lipopolysaccharide and interferon-γ stimulation in both microglia and astrocytes. PAI-1 promoted the migration of microglial cells in culture via the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP 1/Janus kinase (JAK/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT1 axis. PAI-1 also increased microglial migration in vivo when injected into mouse brain. PAI-1-mediated microglial migration was independent of protease inhibition, because an R346A mutant of PAI-1 with impaired PA inhibitory activity also promoted microglial migration. Moreover, PAI-1 was able to modulate microglial phagocytic activity. PAI-1 inhibited microglial engulfment of zymosan particles in a vitronectin- and Toll-like receptor 2/6-dependent manner. Conclusion Our results indicate that glia-derived PAI-1 may regulate microglial migration and phagocytosis in an autocrine or paracrine manner. This may have important implications in the regulation of brain microglial activities in health and disease.

  8. Effect of histone acetylate modification on the plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 gene regulation in mesangial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘念

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of histone acetylation change on the transforming growth factor β1(TGF-β1)-associated plasminogen activator inhibitor 1(PAI-1)regulation in mesangial cells(MCs). Methods MCs were

  9. Effects of infrared treatment on urease, trypsin inhibitor and lipoxygenase activities of soybean samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcin, Seda; Basman, Arzu

    2015-02-15

    In this study, infrared (IR) treatment at different powers (814W, 1003W, 1208W, 1342W) and times (10min, 15min) were applied to unsoaked and soaked (30min, 45min) soybeans (cvs. Adasoy, Nazlican). Effects of IR treatment on urease, trypsin inhibitor, lipoxygenase-1 and lipoxygenase-3 activities were investigated. Infrared treatment caused a substantial reduction in urease and trypsin inhibitor activities and considerable decrease was observed as the IR power increased. Urease inactivation in unsoaked samples was achieved at even lower power (1208W). In contrast to urease activity, IR treatment had a more pronounced effect on trypsin inhibitor and lipoxygenase activities of soaked soybeans as compared to unsoaked counterparts. Maximum trypsin inhibitor reduction in IR-treated samples was 95% for cv. Adasoy and 97% for cv. Nazlican. IR power of 1003W was sufficient for complete inactivation of lipoxygenase-1 and lipoxygenase-3, regardless of the moisture contents of the samples.

  10. Plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 predicts myocardial infarction in HIV-1-infected individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Andreas; Katzenstein, Terese L; Benfield, Thomas;

    2014-01-01

    of antiretroviral therapy, sex, smoking and no known cardiovascular disease. Levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, soluble endothelial selectin, soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule, matrix metalloprotease 9, myeloperoxidase, and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1...

  11. A Case of Angioedema Associated with Decreased C1 Inhibitor Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chizuko Yano

    2007-01-01

    Discussion: Based on the presence of the typical clinical features and the positive results on the complement tests, we diagnosed hereditary angioedema. A decrease in C1 inhibitor activity and an increase in specific protein concentrations indicated type 1.

  12. Design, synthesis and structure-activity relationships of novel biarylamine-based Met kinase inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, David K; Chen, Xiao-Tao; Tarby, Christine; Kaltenbach, Robert; Cai, Zhen-Wei; Tokarski, John S; An, Yongmi; Sack, John S; Wautlet, Barri; Gullo-Brown, Johnni; Henley, Benjamin J; Jeyaseelan, Robert; Kellar, Kristen; Manne, Veeraswamy; Trainor, George L; Lombardo, Louis J; Fargnoli, Joseph; Borzilleri, Robert M [BMS

    2010-09-03

    Biarylamine-based inhibitors of Met kinase have been identified. Lead compounds demonstrate nanomolar potency in Met kinase biochemical assays and significant activity in the Met-driven GTL-16 human gastric carcinoma cell line. X-ray crystallography revealed that these compounds adopt a bioactive conformation, in the kinase domain, consistent with that previously seen with 2-pyridone-based Met kinase inhibitors. Compound 9b demonstrated potent in vivo antitumor activity in the GTL-16 human tumor xenograft model.

  13. p53 Small Molecule Inhibitor Enhances Temozolomide Cytotoxic Activity against Intracranial Glioblastoma Xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinca, Eduard B.; Lu, Kan V.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Pieper, Russell O.; Prados, Michael D.; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.; VandenBerg, Scott R.; Berger, Mitchel S.; James, C. David

    2010-01-01

    In this study we investigated corresponding precursor and active forms of a p53 small molecule inhibitor for effect on temozolomide (TMZ) anti-tumor activity against glioblastoma (GBM), using both in vitro and in vivo experimental approaches. Results from in vitro cell viability analysis showed that the cytotoxic activity of TMZ was substantially increased when GBMs with wild-type p53 were co-treated with the active form of p53 inhibitor, and this heightened cytotoxic response was accompanied by increased PARP cleavage as well as elevated cellular phospho-H2AX. Analysis of the same series of GBMs, as intracranial xenografts in athymic mice, and administering corresponding p53 inhibitor precursor, that is converted to the active compound in vivo, yielded results consistent with the in vitro analyses: i.e., TMZ + p53 inhibitor precursor co-treatment, of three distinct wild-type p53 GBM xenografts, resulted in significant enhancement of TMZ anti-tumor effect relative to treatment with TMZ alone, as indicated by serial bioluminescence monitoring as well as survival analysis (p < 0.001 for co-treatment survival benefit in each case). Mice receiving intracranial injection with p53 null GBM showed similar survival benefit from TMZ treatment regardless of the presence or absence of p53 inhibitor precursor. In total, our results indicate that the p53 active and precursor inhibitor pair enhance TMZ cytotoxicity in vitro and in vivo, respectively, and do so in a p53-dependent manner. PMID:19074867

  14. Chrysin: a histone deacetylase 8 inhibitor with anticancer activity and a suitable candidate for the standardization of Chinese propolis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li-Ping; Chen, Ai-Ling; Hung, Hsiao-Chiao; Chien, Yin-Huan; Huang, Jing-Shi; Huang, Chung-Yang; Chen, Yue-Wen; Chen, Chia-Nan

    2012-11-28

    Chinese propolis (CP) is a natural product collected by honeybees and a health food raw material. Previous studies have shown that CP exhibits a broad spectrum of biological activities including anticancer, antioxidant, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and antiviral activities. The focuses of the present study were the standardization of CP and the possible mechanisms of its active anticancer ingredients. Nine samples of CP were collected from different locations in China. Analyses of the CP samples revealed that all 9 had similar chemical compositions. Parameters analyzed included the CP extract dry weight, total phenolic content, and DPPH free radical scavenging activities. The active anticancer ingredient was isolated, characterized against human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, and identified as chyrsin, a known potent anticancer compound. Chrysin is present at high levels in all 9 of the CP samples, constituting approximately 2.52% to 6.38% of the CP extracts. However, caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), another potent active ingredient is present in low levels in 9 samples of CP, constituting approximately 0.08% to 1.71% of the CP extracts. Results from analyses of enzymatic activity indicated that chrysin is a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) and that it markedly inhibited HDAC8 enzymatic activity (EC(50) = 40.2 μM). In vitro analyses demonstrated that chrysin significantly suppressed cell growth and induced differentiation in MDA-MB-231 cells. In a xenograft animal model (MDA-MB-231 cells), orally administered chrysin (90 mg/kg/day) significantly inhibited tumor growth. Despite the geographical diversity of the 9 samples' botanical origins, their chemical compositions and several analyzed parameters were similar, suggesting that CP is standardized, with chrysin being the major active ingredient. Overall, in vitro and in vivo data indicated that chrysin is an HDAC8 inhibitor, which can significantly inhibit tumor growth. Data also suggested that

  15. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor decreases abdominal aortic aneurysm formation through GLP-1-dependent monocytic activity in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin Ying Lu

    Full Text Available Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is a life-threatening situation affecting almost 10% of elders. There has been no effective medication for AAA other than surgical intervention. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4 inhibitors have been shown to have a protective effect on cardiovascular disease. Whether DPP-4 inhibitors may be beneficial in the treatment of AAA is unclear. We investigated the effects of DPP-4 inhibitor sitagliptin on the angiotensin II (Ang II-infused AAA formation in apoE-deficient (apoE-/- mice. Mice with induced AAA were treated with placebo or 2.5, 5 or 10 mg/kg/day sitagliptin. Ang II-infused apoE-/- mice exhibited a 55.6% incidence of AAA formation, but treatment with sitagliptin decreased AAA formation. Specifically, administered sitagliptin in Ang II-infused mice exhibited decreased expansion of the suprarenal aorta, reduced elastin lamina degradation of the aorta, and diminished vascular inflammation by macrophage infiltration. Treatment with sitagliptin decreased gelatinolytic activity and apoptotic cells in aorta tissues. Sitaglipitn, additionally, was associated with increased levels of plasma active glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1. In vitro studies, GLP-1 decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS production, cell migration, and MMP-2 as well as MMP-9 activity in Ang II-stimulated monocytic cells. The results conclude that oral administration of sitagliptin can prevent abdominal aortic aneurysm formation in Ang II-infused apoE-/-mice, at least in part, by increasing of GLP-1 activity, decreasing MMP-2 and MMP-9 production from macrophage infiltration. The results indicate that sitagliptin may have therapeutic potential in preventing the development of AAA.

  16. Protease inhibitor in scorpion (Mesobuthus eupeus) venom prolongs the biological activities of the crude venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hakim; Xiao-Peng, Tang; Yang, Shi-Long; Lu, Qiu-Min; Lai, Ren

    2016-08-01

    It is hypothesized that protease inhibitors play an essential role in survival of venomous animals through protecting peptide/protein toxins from degradation by proteases in their prey or predators. However, the biological function of protease inhibitors in scorpion venoms remains unknown. In the present study, a trypsin inhibitor was purified and characterized from the venom of scorpion Mesobuthus eupeus, which enhanced the biological activities of crude venom components in mice when injected in combination with crude venom. This protease inhibitor, named MeKTT-1, belonged to Kunitz-type toxins subfamily. Native MeKTT-1 selectively inhibited trypsin with a Kivalue of 130 nmol·L(-1). Furthermore, MeKTT-1 was shown to be a thermo-stable peptide. In animal behavioral tests, MeKTT-1 prolonged the pain behavior induced by scorpion crude venom, suggesting that protease inhibitors in scorpion venom inhibited proteases and protect the functionally important peptide/protein toxins from degradation, consequently keeping them active longer. In conclusion, this was the first experimental evidence about the natural existence of serine protease inhibitor in the venom of scorpion Mesobuthus eupeus, which preserved the activity of venom components, suggests that scorpions may use protease inhibitors for survival. Copyright © 2016 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Phase I and pharmacokinetic study of XR11576, an oral topoisomerase I and II inhibitor, administered on days 1-5 of a 3-weekly cycle in patients with advanced solid tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J.A. de Jonge (Maja); S.B. Kaye (Stan); J. Verweij (Jaap); C. Brock (C.); S. Reade (Sarah); M. Scurr (M.); L. van Doorn (Leni); C. Verheij (Coleta); W.J. Loos (Walter); C. Brindley (C.); H.D. Mistry; M. Cooper (Meghan); I.R. Judson (Ian)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractXR11576 is an oral topoisomerase I and II inhibitor. The objectives of this phase I study were to assess the dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs), to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and to describe the pharmacokinetics (PKs) of XR11576 when administered orally on days 1-5 every 3 w

  18. Phase I and pharmacokinetic study of XR11576, an oral topoisomerase I and II inhibitor, administered on days 1-5 of a 3-weekly cycle in patients with advanced solid tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J.A. de Jonge (Maja); S.B. Kaye (Stan); J. Verweij (Jaap); C. Brock (C.); S. Reade (Sarah); M. Scurr (M.); L. van Doorn (Leni); C. Verheij (Coleta); W.J. Loos (Walter); C. Brindley (C.); H.D. Mistry; M. Cooper (Meghan); I.R. Judson (Ian)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractXR11576 is an oral topoisomerase I and II inhibitor. The objectives of this phase I study were to assess the dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs), to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and to describe the pharmacokinetics (PKs) of XR11576 when administered orally on days 1-5 every 3 w

  19. Thrombin inhibitor design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, P E; Naylor-Olsen, A M

    1998-08-01

    Recently, iv formulated direct thrombin inhibitors have been shown to be safe and efficacious alternatives to heparin. These results have fueled the hopes for an orally active compound. Such a compound could be a significant advance over warfarin if it had predictable pharmacokinetics and a duration of action sufficient for once or twice a day dosing. In order to develop an orally active compound which meets these criteria, the deficiencies of the prototype inhibitor efegatran have had to be addressed. First, using a combination of structure based design and empirical structure optimization, more selective compounds have been identified by modifying the P1 group or by incorporating different peptidomimetic P2/P3 scaffolds. Secondly, this optimization has resulted in the development of potent and selective non-covalent inhibitors, thus bypassing the liabilities of the serine trap. Thirdly, oral bioavailability has been achieved while maintaining selectivity and efficacy through the incorporation of progressively less basic P1 groups. The duration of action of these compounds remains to be optimized. Other advances in thrombin inhibitor design have included the development of uncharged P1 groups and the discovery of two non-peptide templates.

  20. Proteinaceous inhibitors of carbohydrate-active enzymes in cereals: implication in agriculture, cereal processing and nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juge, N.; Svensson, Birte

    2006-01-01

    Enzymes that degrade, modify, or create glycosidic bonds are involved in carbohydrate biosynthesis and remodelling. Microbial carbohydrate-active enzymes form the basis of current green technology in the food, feed, starch, paper and pulp industries and the revolution in genomics may offer long......-term gains on the quality and quantity of the raw materials. Proteinaceous inhibitors of carbohydrate-active enzymes (alpha-amylase, limit-dextrinase, polygalacturonase, pectin lyase, pectin methylesterase, invertase and xyloglucan endoglucanase) naturally occur in plants where they are involved in various...... roles from plant defence to metabolism. Xylanase inhibitors represent the latest addition to this growing family. In this review, we will focus on the inhibitors of carbohydrate-active enzymes present in cereals, mostly represented by et-amylase and xylanase inhibitors, and summarise the existing...

  1. Modulation of C1-Inhibitor and Plasma Kallikrein Activities by Type IV Collagen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriram Ravindran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The contact system of coagulation can be activated when in contact with biomaterials. As collagen is being tested in novel biomaterials in this study, we have investigated how type IV collagen affects plasma kallikrein and C1-inhibitor. Firstly, we showed C1-inhibitor binds to type IV collagen with a Kd of 0.86 μM. The effects of type IV collagen on plasma kallikrein, factor XIIa, and β-factor XIIa activity and on C1-inhibitor function were determined. Factor XIIa rapidly lost activity in the presence of type IV collagen, whereas plasma kallikrein and β-factor XIIa were more stable. The rate of inhibition of plasma kallikrein by C1-inhibitor was decreased by type IV collagen in a dose-dependent manner. These studies could be relevant to the properties of biomaterials, which contain collagen, and should be considered in the testing for biocompatibility.

  2. Oral Administration of Sitagliptin Activates CREB and Is Neuroprotective in Murine Model of Brain Trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Brian Dellavalle; Gitte Stokvad Brix; Birgitte Brock; Michael Gejl; Jørgen Rungby; Agnete Larsen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Traumatic brain injury is a major cause of mortality and morbidity. We have previously shown that the injectable glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogue, liraglutide, significantly improved the outcome in mice after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). In this study we are interested in the effects of oral treatment of a different class of GLP-1 based therapy, dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibition on mice after TBI. DPP-IV inhibitors reduce the degradation of endogenous ...

  3. Uncharged isocoumarin-based inhibitors of urokinase-type plasminogen activator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deck Lorraine M

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA plays a major role in extracellular proteolytic events associated with tumor cell growth, migration and angiogenesis. Consequently, uPA is an attractive target for the development of small molecule active site inhibitors. Most of the recent drug development programs aimed at nonpeptidic inhibitors targeted at uPA have focused on arginino mimetics containing amidine or guanidine functional groups attached to aromatic or heterocyclic scaffolds. There is a general problem of limited bioavailability of these charged inhibitors. In the present study, uPA inhibitors were designed on an isocoumarin scaffold containing uncharged substituents. Results 4-Chloro-3-alkoxyisocoumarins were synthesized in which the 3-alkoxy group contained a terminal bromine; these were compared with similar inhibitors that contained a charged terminal functional group. Additional variations included functional groups attached to the seven position of the isocoumarin scaffold. N- [3-(3-Bromopropoxy-4-chloro-1-oxo-1H-isochromen-7-yl]benzamide was identified as an uncharged lead inhibitor of uPA, Ki = 0.034 μM. Molecular modeling of human uPA with these uncharged inhibitors suggests that the bromine occupies the same position as positively charged arginino mimetic groups. Conclusion This study demonstrates that potent uncharged inhibitors of uPA can be developed based upon the isocoumarin scaffold. A tethered bromine in the three position and an aromatic group in the seven position are important contributors to binding. Although the aim was to develop compounds that act as mechanism-based inactivators, these inhibitors are competitive reversible inhibitors.

  4. Insights into structure and activity of natural compound inhibitors of pneumolysin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongen; Zhao, Xiaoran; Deng, Xuming; Wang, Jianfeng; Song, Meng; Niu, Xiaodi; Peng, Liping

    2017-01-01

    Pneumolysin is the one of the major virulence factor of the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae. In previous report, it is shown that β-sitosterol, a natural compound without antimicrobial activity, is a potent antagonist of pneumolysin. Here, two new pneumolysin natural compound inhibitors, with differential activity, were discovered via haemolysis assay. To explore the key factor of the conformation for the inhibition activity, the interactions between five natural compound inhibitors with differential activity and pneumolysin were reported using molecular modelling, the potential of mean force profiles. Interestingly, it is found that incorporation of the single bond (C22-C23-C24-C25) to replace the double bond (hydrocarbon sidechain) improved the anti-haemolytic activity. In view of the molecular modelling, binding of the five inhibitors to the conserved loop region (Val372, Leu460, and Tyr461) of the cholesterol binding sites led to stable complex systems, which was consistent with the result of β-sitosterol. Owing to the single bond (C22-C23-C24-C25), campesterol and brassicasterol could form strong interactions with Val372 and show higher anti-haemolytic activity, which indicated that the single bond (C22-C23-C24-C25) in inhibitors was required for the anti-haemolytic activity. Overall, the current molecular modelling work provides a starting point for the development of rational design and higher activity pneumolysin inhibitors. PMID:28165051

  5. Proliferative activity in oral pyogenic granuloma: A comparative immunohistochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezvani Gita

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Context: Pyogenic granuloma (PG is one of the most common reactive vascular lesions in the oral mucosa, which has been divided into the lobular capillary hemangioma (LCH and the non lobular type (non-LCH as two distinct entities, on the basis of some investigations. Aims: This study aims to compare the proliferative and angiogenic activity of two histological types of PG to determine whether they have two distinct types of biological behavior. Settings and Design: In this retrospective cross-sectional study, immunostaining was performed on 10 cases of each type of PG. Materials and Methods: About 4μm sections were cut from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded blocks and each specimen was stained with both anti-CD31 and anti-Ki-67 antibodies simultaneously. Labeling index (LI was determined for both types by counting Ki-67 and CD31 positive cells separately and simultaneously in 1000 stromal and luminal cells. Micro vessel count (MVC, the mean number of micro vessels in five areas at Χ200 magnification, was also determined for both groups. Statistical Analysis: The results were statistically compared using the Mann-Whitney U-test. Results: Ki-67 LI in LCH (5.4 ± 2.4 was higher than non-LCH (3.9 ± 3.9. The percentage of CD31 positive cells in LCH (28.5 ± 22 was lower than non-LCH (37.1 ± 20.8 and simultaneously immunostaining for both markers in LCH type (2.4 ± 2.1 was higher than non-LCH (1.2 ± 1. The MVC was approximately 77.35 ± 34.6 and 82.6 ± 42.7 in the lobular areas of LCH and central areas of non-LCH PG, respectively. These differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: These results demonstrate a higher proliferation activity in endothelial cells of LCH PG than in non-LCH.

  6. [Treatment with inhibitors of new oral direct anticoagulants in patients with severe bleedings or urgent surgical procedures. The new dabigatran antidote: the place of idarucizumab in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boda, Zoltán

    2016-03-20

    Only vitamin K antagonists could be applied as oral anticoagulants over the past six decades. Coumarols have narrow therapeutic range, and unpredictable anticoagulant effects are resulted by multiple drug interactions. Therefore, regular routine monitoring of the international normalized ratio is necessary. There are two groups of factor-specific anticoagulants: molecules with anti-FIIa (dabigatran) and anti-FXa (rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban) effect. Author summarizes the most important clinical features of the new oral anticoagulants, their indications and the possibilities of laboratory controls. Bleedings are the most important side effects of anticoagulants. This review summarizes the current published evidences for new oral anticoagulants reversal (non-specific and specific) agents, especially in cases with severe acute bleedings or urgent surgery procedures. It reports on how to use inhibitors, the recommended doses and the most important clinical results. The review focuses on idarucizumab - already approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency - which has a key role as the first specific inhibitor of dabigatran.

  7. Structure-Activity Relationship and in Vivo Anti-Tumor Evaluations of Dictyoceratin-A and -C, Hypoxia-Selective Growth Inhibitors from Marine Sponge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Sumii

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Oral dictyoceratin-C (1 and A (2, hypoxia-selective growth inhibitors, showed potent in vivo antitumor effects in mice subcutaneously inoculated with sarcoma S180 cells. Structurally modified analogs were synthesized to assess the structure–activity relationship of the natural compounds 1 and 2 isolated from a marine sponge. Biological evaluation of these analogs showed that the exo-olefin and hydroxyl and methyl ester moieties were important for the hypoxia-selective growth inhibitory activities of 1 and 2. Thus far, only substitution of the methyl ester with propargyl amide in 1 was found to be effective for the synthesis of probe molecules for target identification.

  8. Present development concerning antimalarial activity of phospholipid metabolism inhibitors with special reference to in vivo activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie L. Ancelin

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available The systematic screening of more than 250 molecules against Plasmodium falciparum in vitro has previously shown that interfering with phospholipid metabolism is lethal to the malaria parasite. These compounds act by impairing choline transport in infected erythrocytes, resulting in phosphatidylcholine de novo biosynthesis inhibition. A thorough study was carried out with the leader compound G25, whose in vitro IC50 is 0.6 nM. It was very specific to mature parasites (trophozoïtes as determined in vitro with P. falciparum and in vivo with P. chabaudi -infected mice. This specificity corresponds to the most intense phase of phospholipid biosynthesis activity during the parasite cycle, thus corroborating the mechanism of action. The in vivo antimalarial activity (ED50 against P. chabaudi was 0.03 mg/kg, and a similar sensitivity was obtained with P. vinckei petteri, when the drug was intraperitoneally administered in a 4 day suppressive test. In contrast, P. berghei was revealed as less sensitive (3- to 20-fold, depending on the P. berghei-strain. This difference in activity could result either from the degree of synchronism of every strain, their invasion preference for mature or immature red blood cells or from an intrinsically lower sensitivity of the P. berghei strain to G25. Irrespective of the mode of administration, G25 had the same therapeutic index (lethal dose 50 (LD50/ED50 but the dose to obtain antimalarial activity after oral treatment was 100-fold higher than after intraperitoneal (or subcutaneous administration. This must be related to the low intestinal absorption of these kind of compounds. G25 succeeded to completely inhibiting parasitemia as high as 11.2% without any decrease in its therapeutic index when administered subcutaneously twice a day for at least 8 consecutive days to P. chabaudi -infected-rodent model. Transition to human preclinical investigations now requires a synthesis of molecules which would permit oral

  9. Bone mineral density changes in protease inhibitor-sparing vs. nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-sparing highly active antiretroviral therapy: data from a randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ab; Obel, N; Nielsen, Henrik Ib

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to compare changes in bone mineral density (BMD) over 144 weeks in HIV-infected patients initiating nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)-sparing or protease inhibitor-sparing highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Methods Sixty-three HAART...

  10. A straightforward ninhydrin-based method for collagenase activity and inhibitor screening of collagenase using spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanfang; Fu, Yun; Zhou, Sufeng; Kang, Lixia; Li, Changzheng

    2013-06-01

    Currently protease assay kits, requiring substrate that is either radiolabeled or fluorescence labeled and specialized instruments, are all expensive. A simple, reliable assay of protease activity and its inhibitor screening for general laboratory is rare. Here we demonstrated a straightforward ninhydrin-based method for assay of collagenase activity and its inhibitor screening using spectrophotometry. In the method, without multistep sample treatments and substrate labeling, the hydrolytic products were directly traced by ninhydrin. The method is expected to be suitable for not only the assay of collagenase activity but also the others matrix metalloproteinases activities, and can be used for kinetic study.

  11. Influence of Different Genotypes on Trypsin Inhibitor Levels and Activity in Soybeans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor A. Nedovic

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the relationship between the two major trypsin inhibitors (TI in soybean, i.e., the Kunitz (KTI and Bowman-Birk (BBI trypsin inhibitors, as well as between them and the corresponding trypsin inhibitor activity (TIA. Twelve investigated soybean genotypes showed significant differences in TI levels and TIA. A very strong positive correlation was found between the levels of KTI and total BBI (r = 0.94, P < 0.05. No relationship was found between KTI, BBI or total TI and TIA. Based on this data, it appears that the levels of major TI in soybean are related. Understanding the relationship between trypsin inhibitors and their activities could be useful for further improvement of the health impacts of soy proteins.

  12. Discovery of BMS-955176, a Second Generation HIV-1 Maturation Inhibitor with Broad Spectrum Antiviral Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regueiro-Ren, Alicia; Liu, Zheng; Chen, Yan; Sin, Ny; Sit, Sing-Yuen; Swidorski, Jacob J; Chen, Jie; Venables, Brian L; Zhu, Juliang; Nowicka-Sans, Beata; Protack, Tricia; Lin, Zeyu; Terry, Brian; Samanta, Himadri; Zhang, Sharon; Li, Zhufang; Beno, Brett R; Huang, Xiaohua S; Rahematpura, Sandhya; Parker, Dawn D; Haskell, Roy; Jenkins, Susan; Santone, Kenneth S; Cockett, Mark I; Krystal, Mark; Meanwell, Nicholas A; Hanumegowda, Umesh; Dicker, Ira B

    2016-06-09

    HIV-1 maturation inhibition (MI) has been clinically validated as an approach to the control of HIV-1 infection. However, identifying an MI with both broad polymorphic spectrum coverage and good oral exposure has been challenging. Herein, we describe the design, synthesis, and preclinical characterization of a potent, orally active, second generation HIV-1 MI, BMS-955176 (2), which is currently in Phase IIb clinical trials as part of a combination antiretroviral regimen.

  13. Effect of a novel oral chemotherapeutic agent containing a combination of trifluridine, tipiracil and the novel triple angiokinase inhibitor nintedanib, on human colorectal cancer xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Norihiko; Nakagawa, Fumio; Matsuoka, Kazuaki; Takechi, Teiji

    2016-12-01

    Trifluridine/tipiracil (TFTD) is a combination drug that is used for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer and was formerly known as TAS-102. It is a combination of two active pharmaceutical compounds, trifluridine, an antineoplastic thymidine-based nucleoside analog, and tipiracil, which enhances the bioavailability of trifluridine in vivo. TFTD is used for the treatment of patients with unresectable advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer that is resistant to standard therapies. In the present study, the anticancer effects of trifluridine in combination with nintedanib, an oral triple angiokinase inhibitor, on human colorectal cancer cell lines were investigated. The cytotoxicity against DLD-1, HT-29, and HCT116 cell lines was determined by the crystal violet staining method. The combination of trifluridine and nintedanib exerted an additive effect on the growth inhibition of DLD-1 and HT-29 cells and a sub-additive effect on HCT116 cells, as determined by isobologram analyses. Subsequently, the human colorectal cancer cell lines were implanted subcutaneously into nude mice to allow the evaluation of the in vivo tumor growth inhibitory effects of TFTD and nintedanib combination therapy. TFTD (150 mg/kg/day) and/or nintedanib (40 mg/kg/day) were orally administered to the mice twice daily from day 1 to day 14. The tumor growth inhibition with combination therapy was 61.5, 72.8, 67.6 and 67.5% for the DLD-1, DLD-1/5-FU, HT-29, and HCT116 xenografts, respectively. This was significantly (P<0.05) higher than the effects of monotherapy with either TFTD or nintedanib. These results demonstrated the effectiveness of the combination of TFTD and nintedanib in the treatment of colorectal cancer xenografts. The concentration of trifluridine incorporated into DNA in the HT-29 and HCT116 tumors was determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The incorporation levels following treatment with TFTD and nintedanib for 14 consecutive days were

  14. Structure-Based Discovery of 4-(6-Methoxy-2-methyl-4-(quinolin-4-yl)-9 H -pyrimido[4,5- b ]indol-7-yl)-3,5-dimethylisoxazole (CD161) as a Potent and Orally Bioavailable BET Bromodomain Inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yujun; Bai, Longchuan; Liu, Liu; McEachern, Donna; Stuckey, Jeanne A.; Meagher, Jennifer L.; Yang, Chao-Yie; Ran, Xu; Zhou, Bing; Hu, Yang; Li, Xiaoqin; Wen, Bo; Zhao, Ting; Li, Siwei; Sun, Duxin; Wang, Shaomeng (Michigan)

    2017-03-24

    We have designed and synthesized 9H-pyrimido[4,5-b]indole-containing compounds to obtain potent and orally bioavailable BET inhibitors. By incorporation of an indole or a quinoline moiety to the 9H-pyrimido[4,5-b]indole core, we identified a series of small molecules showing high binding affinities to BET proteins and low nanomolar potencies in inhibition of cell growth in acute leukemia cell lines. One such compound, 4-(6-methoxy-2-methyl-4-(quinolin-4-yl)-9H-pyrimido[4,5-b]indol-7-yl)-3,5-dimethylisoxazole (31) has excellent microsomal stability and good oral pharmacokinetics in rats and mice. Orally administered, 31 achieves significant antitumor activity in the MV4;11 leukemia and MDA-MB-231 triple-negative breast cancer xenograft models in mice. Determination of the cocrystal structure of 31 with BRD4 BD2 provides a structural basis for its high binding affinity to BET proteins. Testing its binding affinities against other bromodomain-containing proteins shows that 31 is a highly selective inhibitor of BET proteins. Our data show that 31 is a potent, selective, and orally active BET inhibitor.

  15. Activity of antimicrobial peptide mimetics in the oral cavity: I. Activity against biofilms of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, J; Yamarthy, R; Felsenstein, S; Scott, R W; Markowitz, K; Diamond, G

    2010-12-01

    Naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides hold promise as therapeutic agents against oral pathogens such as Candida albicans but numerous difficulties have slowed their development. Synthetic, non-peptidic analogs that mimic the properties of these peptides have many advantages and exhibit potent, selective antimicrobial activity. Several series of mimetics (with molecular weight oral Candida strains as a proof-of-principle for their antifungal properties. One phenylalkyne and several arylamide compounds with reduced mammalian cytotoxicities were found to be active against C. albicans. These compounds demonstrated rapid fungicidal activity in liquid culture even in the presence of saliva, and demonstrated synergy with standard antifungal agents. When assayed against biofilms grown on denture acrylic, the compounds exhibited potent fungicidal activity as measured by metabolic and fluorescent viability assays. Repeated passages in sub-minimum inhibitory concentration levels did not lead to resistant Candida, in contrast to fluconazole. Our results demonstrate the proof-of principle for the use of these compounds as anti-Candida agents, and their further testing is warranted as novel anti-Candida therapies.

  16. Improved antitumor activity of immunotherapy with BRAF and MEK inhibitors in BRAFV600E melanoma

    OpenAIRE

    Hu-Lieskovan, Siwen; Mok, Stephen; Moreno, Blanca Homet; Tsoi, Jennifer; Faja, Lidia Robert; Goedert, Lucas; Pinheiro, Elaine M.; Koya, Richard C; Graeber, Thomas; Comin-Anduix, Begoña; Ribas, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    Combining immunotherapy and BRAF targeted therapy may result in improved antitumor activity with the high response rates of targeted therapy and the durability of responses with immunotherapy. However, the first clinical trial testing the combination of the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib and the CTLA-4 antibody ipilimumab was terminated early due to substantial liver toxicities. MEK inhibitors can potentiate the MAPK inhibition in BRAF mutant cells, while potentially alleviating the unwanted para...

  17. Changes in glucose-induced plasma active glucagon-like peptide-1 levels by co-administration of sodium–glucose cotransporter inhibitors with dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors in rodents

    OpenAIRE

    Takahiro Oguma; Chiaki Kuriyama; Keiko Nakayama; Yasuaki Matsushita; Kumiko Hikida; Minoru Tsuda-Tsukimoto; Akira Saito; Kenji Arakawa; Kiichiro Ueta; Masabumi Minami; Masaharu Shiotani

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether structurally different sodium–glucose cotransporter (SGLT) 2 inhibitors, when co-administered with dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) inhibitors, could enhance glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion during oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) in rodents. Three different SGLT inhibitors—1-(β-d-Glucopyranosyl)-4-chloro-3-[5-(6-fluoro-2-pyridyl)-2-thienylmethyl]benzene (GTB), TA-1887, and canagliflozin—were examined to assess the effect of chemical structure. Oral treatment...

  18. Phase II study evaluating 2 dosing schedules of oral foretinib (GSK1363089, cMET/VEGFR2 inhibitor, in patients with metastatic gastric cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish A Shah

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The receptors for hepatocyte and vascular endothelial cell growth factors (MET and VEGFR2, respectively are critical oncogenic mediators in gastric adenocarcinoma. The purpose is to examine the safety and efficacy of foretinib, an oral multikinase inhibitor targeting MET, RON, AXL, TIE-2, and VEGFR2 receptors, for the treatment of metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Foretinib safety and tolerability, and objective response rate (ORR were evaluated in patients using intermittent (240 mg/day, for 5 days every 2 weeks or daily (80 mg/day dosing schedules. Thirty evaluable patients were required to achieve alpha = 0.10 and beta = 0.2 to test the alternative hypothesis that single-agent foretinib would result in an ORR of ≥ 25%. Up to 10 additional patients could be enrolled to ensure at least eight with MET amplification. Correlative studies included tumor MET amplification, MET signaling, pharmacokinetics and plasma biomarkers of foretinib activity. RESULTS: From March 2007 until October 2009, 74 patients were enrolled; 74% male; median age, 61 years (range, 25-88; 93% had received prior therapy. Best response was stable disease (SD in 10 (23% patients receiving intermittent dosing and five (20% receiving daily dosing; SD duration was 1.9-7.2 months (median 3.2 months. Of 67 patients with tumor samples, 3 had MET amplification, one of whom had SD. Treatment-related adverse events occurred in 91% of patients. Rates of hypertension (35% vs. 15% and elevated aspartate aminotransferase (23% vs. 8% were higher with intermittent dosing. In both patients with high baseline tumor phospho-MET (pMET, the pMET:total MET protein ratio decreased with foretinib treatment. CONCLUSION: These results indicate that few gastric carcinomas are driven solely by MET and VEGFR2, and underscore the diverse molecular oncogenesis of this disease. Despite evidence of MET inhibition by foretinib, single-agent foretinib lacked efficacy in

  19. Tofacitinib, an oral Janus kinase inhibitor, in patients from Mexico with rheumatoid arthritis: Pooled efficacy and safety analyses from Phase 3 and LTE studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos-Vargas, Ruben; Cardiel, Mario; Xibillé, Daniel; Pacheco-Tena, César; Pascual-Ramos, Virginia; Abud-Mendoza, Carlos; Mahgoub, Ehab; Rahman, Mahboob; Fan, Haiyun; Rojo, Ricardo; García, Erika; Santana, Karina

    2017-05-25

    Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We characterized efficacy and safety of tofacitinib in Mexican patients from RA Phase 3 and long-term extension (LTE) studies. Data from Mexican patients with RA and an inadequate response to disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) were taken from four Phase 3 studies (pooled across studies) and one open-label LTE study of tofacitinib. Patients received tofacitinib 5 or 10mg twice daily, adalimumab (one Phase 3 study) or placebo (four Phase 3 studies) as monotherapy or in combination with conventional synthetic DMARDs. Efficacy up to Month 12 (Phase 3) and Month 36 (LTE) was assessed by American College of Rheumatology 20/50/70 response rates, Disease Activity Score (erythrocyte sedimentation rate), and Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index. Safety, including incidence rates (IRs; patients with events/100 patient-years) for adverse events (AEs) of special interest, was assessed throughout the studies. 119 and 212 Mexican patients were included in the Phase 3 and LTE analyses, respectively. Tofacitinib-treated patients in Phase 3 had numerically greater improvements in efficacy responses versus placebo at Month 3. Efficacy was sustained in Phase 3 and LTE studies. IRs for AEs of special interest were similar to those with tofacitinib in the global and Latin American RA populations. In Mexican patients from the tofacitinib global RA program, tofacitinib efficacy was demonstrated up to Month 12 in Phase 3 studies and Month 36 in the LTE study, with a safety profile consistent with tofacitinib global population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  20. Low-volume multiplexed proteolytic activity assay and inhibitor analysis through a pico-injector array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Ee Xien; Miller, Miles A; Jing, Tengyang; Lauffenburger, Doug A; Chen, Chia-Hung

    2015-02-21

    Secreted active proteases, from families of enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloproteinases), participate in diverse pathological processes. To simultaneously measure multiple specific protease activities, a series of parallel enzyme reactions combined with a series of inhibitor analyses for proteolytic activity matrix analysis (PrAMA) are essential but limited due to the sample quantity requirements and the complexity of performing multiple reactions. To address these issues, we developed a pico-injector array to generate 72 different reactions in picoliter-volume droplets by controlling the sequence of combinational injections, which allowed simultaneous recording of a wide range of multiple enzyme reactions and measurement of inhibitor effects using small sample volumes (~10 μL). Multiple MMP activities were simultaneously determined by 9 different substrates and 2 inhibitors using injections from a pico-injector array. Due to the advantages of inhibitor analysis, the MMP/ADAM activities of MDA-MB-231, a breast cancer cell line, were characterized with high MMP-2, MMP-3 and ADAM-10 activity. This platform could be customized for a wide range of applications that also require multiple reactions with inhibitor analysis to enhance the sensitivity by encapsulating different chemical sensors.

  1. Design, synthesis and primary activity of thiomorpholine derivatives as DPP-IV inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bei Han; Jing Long Liu; Yi Huan; Peng Li; Qi Wu; ZiYun Lin; Zhu Fang Shen; Da Li Yin; Hai Hong Huang

    2012-01-01

    Thirteen thiomorpholine-bearing compounds were designed and synthesized as dipeptidyl peptidase Ⅳ (DPP-Ⅳ) inhibitors,with natural and non-natural L-amino acids as the starting materials.Their structures were characterized by 1H NMR,13C NMR and HR-MS.The target compounds were screened for the DPP-Ⅳ inhibition,and the preliminary SAR result was obtained.Particularly,compounds 4e,4d and 4f with good DPP-Ⅳ inhibition in vitro were further evaluated through a mouse oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT).The preliminary result showed the potential value for further studies on those thiomorpholine-bearing compounds as DPP-Ⅳ inhibitors.

  2. SGLT2 inhibitor lowers serum uric acid through alteration of uric acid transport activity in renal tubule by increased glycosuria

    OpenAIRE

    Chino, Yukihiro; Samukawa, Yoshishige; Sakai, Soichi; Nakai, Yasuhiro; Yamaguchi, Jun-ichi; Nakanishi, Takeo; Tamai, Ikumi

    2014-01-01

    Sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors have been reported to lower the serum uric acid (SUA) level. To elucidate the mechanism responsible for this reduction, SUA and the urinary excretion rate of uric acid (UEUA) were analysed after the oral administration of luseogliflozin, a SGLT2 inhibitor, to healthy subjects. After dosing, SUA decreased, and a negative correlation was observed between the SUA level and the UEUA, suggesting that SUA decreased as a result of the increase in the...

  3. Proteinase activity in human and murine saliva as a biomarker for proteinase inhibitor efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingleton, Barbara; Menon, Ramkumar; Carter, Kathy J; Overstreet, P Dawn; Hachey, David L; Matrisian, Lynn M; McIntyre, J Oliver

    2004-12-01

    As molecularly targeted agents reach the clinic, there is a need for assays to detect their presence and effectiveness against target molecules in vivo. Proteinase inhibitors are one example of a class of therapeutic agent for which satisfactory methods of identifying successful target modulation in vivo are lacking. This is of particular importance while these drugs are in clinical trials because standard maximum-tolerated dose-finding studies often are not suitable due to lack of toxicity. Saliva represents a readily accessible bodily fluid that can be repeatedly sampled and used for assaying in vivo effects of systemic drugs. Here we show the development of a simple assay that can be used to measure proteinase activity in saliva and proteinase inhibition after systemic treatment with three different proteinase inhibitors. A variety of gelatinolytic activities present in human and murine saliva have been assayed with a fluorescent dye-labeled substrate and assigned to different proteinase categories by inclusion of specific classes of inhibitors. Treatment of mice with either matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors or a urokinase inhibitor for a period as short as 48 hours results in levels of the drugs that can be detected in saliva by mass spectrometry and concomitant decreases in salivary proteinase activity, thus demonstrating that these inhibitors successfully modulate their targets in vivo.

  4. Discovery of an Orally Bioavailable Benzimidazole Diacylglycerol Acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) Inhibitor That Suppresses Body Weight Gain in Diet-Induced Obese Dogs and Postprandial Triglycerides in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Katsumasa; Chatelain, Ricardo; Clairmont, Kevin B; Commerford, Renee; Coppola, Gary M; Daniels, Thomas; Forster, Cornelia J; Gilmore, Thomas A; Gong, Yongjin; Jain, Monish; Kanter, Aaron; Kwak, Youngshin; Li, Jingzhou; Meyers, Charles D; Neubert, Alan D; Szklennik, Paul; Tedesco, Vivienne; Thompson, James; Truong, David; Yang, Qing; Hubbard, Brian K; Serrano-Wu, Michael H

    2017-06-08

    Modification of a gut restricted class of benzimidazole DGAT1 inhibitor 1 led to 9 with good oral bioavailability. The key structural changes to 1 include bioisosteric replacement of the amide with oxadiazole and α,α-dimethylation of the carboxylic acid, improving DGAT1 potency and gut permeability. Since DGAT1 is expressed in the small intestine, both 1 and 9 can suppress postprandial triglycerides during acute oral lipid challenges in rats and dogs. Interestingly, only 9 was found to be effective in suppressing body weight gain relative to control in a diet-induced obese dog model, suggesting the importance of systemic inhibition of DGAT1 for body weight control. 9 has advanced to clinical investigation and successfully suppressed postprandial triglycerides during an acute meal challenge in humans.

  5. A novel trypsin Kazal-type inhibitor from Aedes aegypti with thrombin coagulant inhibitory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Renata M O; Soares, Tatiane S; Morais-Zani, Karen; Tanaka-Azevedo, Anita M; Maciel, Ceres; Capurro, Margareth L; Torquato, Ricardo J S; Tanaka, Aparecida S

    2010-08-01

    Kazal-type inhibitors play several important roles in invertebrates, such as anticoagulant, vasodilator and antimicrobial activities. Putative Kazal-type inhibitors were described in several insect transcriptomes. In this paper we characterized for the first time a Kazal unique domain trypsin inhibitor from the Aedes aegypti mosquito. Previously, analyses of sialotranscriptome of A. aegypti showed the potential presence of a Kazal-type serine protease inhibitor, in female salivary glands, carcass and also in whole male, which we named AaTI (A. aegypti trypsin inhibitor). AaTI sequence showed amino acid sequence similarity with insect thrombin inhibitors, serine protease inhibitor from Litopenaeus vannamei hemocytes and tryptase inhibitor from leech Hirudo medicinalis (LDTI). In this work we expressed, purified and characterized the recombinant AaTI (rAaTI). Molecular weight of purified rAaTI was 7 kDa rAaTI presented dissociation constant (K(i)) of 0.15 and 3.8 nM toward trypsin and plasmin, respectively, and it weakly inhibited thrombin amidolytic activity. The rAaTI was also able to prolong prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time and thrombin time. AaTI transcription was confirmed in A. aegypti female salivary gland and gut 3 h and 24 h after blood feeding, suggesting that this molecule can act as anticoagulant during the feeding and digestive processes. Its transcription in larvae and pupae suggested that AaTI may also play other functions during the mosquito's development. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Designed Inhibitors of Insulin-Degrading Enzyme Regulate the Catabolism and Activity of Insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leissring, Malcolm A.; Malito, Enrico; Hedouin, Sabrine; Reinstatler, Lael; Sahara, Tomoko; Abdul-Hay, Samer O.; Choudhry, Shakeel; Maharvi, Ghulam M.; Fauq, Abdul H.; Huzarska, Malwina; May, Philip S.; Choi, Sungwoon; Logan, Todd P.; Turk, Benjamin E.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Manolopoulou, Marika; Tang, Wei-Jen; Stein, Ross L.; Cuny, Gregory D.; Selkoe, Dennis J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Insulin is a vital peptide hormone that is a central regulator of glucose homeostasis, and impairments in insulin signaling cause diabetes mellitus. In principle, it should be possible to enhance the activity of insulin by inhibiting its catabolism, which is mediated primarily by insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), a structurally and evolutionarily distinctive zinc-metalloprotease. Despite interest in pharmacological inhibition of IDE as an attractive anti-diabetic approach dating to the 1950s, potent and selective inhibitors of IDE have not yet emerged. Methodology/Principal Findings We used a rational design approach based on analysis of combinatorial peptide mixtures and focused compound libraries to develop novel peptide hydroxamic acid inhibitors of IDE. The resulting compounds are ∼106 times more potent than existing inhibitors, non-toxic, and surprisingly selective for IDE vis-à-vis conventional zinc-metalloproteases. Crystallographic analysis of an IDE-inhibitor complex reveals a novel mode of inhibition based on stabilization of IDE's “closed,” inactive conformation. We show further that pharmacological inhibition of IDE potentiates insulin signaling by a mechanism involving reduced catabolism of internalized insulin. Conclusions/Significance The inhibitors we describe are the first to potently and selectively inhibit IDE or indeed any member of this atypical zinc-metalloprotease superfamily. The distinctive structure of IDE's active site, and the mode of action of our inhibitors, suggests that it may be possible to develop inhibitors that cross-react minimally with conventional zinc-metalloproteases. Significantly, our results reveal that insulin signaling is normally regulated by IDE activity not only extracellularly but also within cells, supporting the longstanding view that IDE inhibitors could hold therapeutic value for the treatment of diabetes. PMID:20498699

  7. Designed Inhibitors of Insulin-Degrading Enzyme Regulate the Catabolism and Activity of Insulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leissring, Malcolm A.; Malito, Enrico; Hedouin, Sabrine; Reinstatler, Lael; Sahara, Tomoko; Abdul-Hay, Samer O.; Choudhry, Shakeel; Maharvi, Ghulam M.; Fauq, Abdul H.; Huzarska, Malwina; May, Philip S.; Choi, Sungwoon; Logan, Todd P.; Turk, Benjamin E.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Manolopoulou, Marika; Tang, Wei-Jen; Stein, Ross L.; Cuny, Gregory D.; Selkoe, Dennis J. (Harvard-Med); (BWH); (Yale-MED); (Scripps); (UC); (Mayo)

    2010-09-20

    Insulin is a vital peptide hormone that is a central regulator of glucose homeostasis, and impairments in insulin signaling cause diabetes mellitus. In principle, it should be possible to enhance the activity of insulin by inhibiting its catabolism, which is mediated primarily by insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), a structurally and evolutionarily distinctive zinc-metalloprotease. Despite interest in pharmacological inhibition of IDE as an attractive anti-diabetic approach dating to the 1950s, potent and selective inhibitors of IDE have not yet emerged. We used a rational design approach based on analysis of combinatorial peptide mixtures and focused compound libraries to develop novel peptide hydroxamic acid inhibitors of IDE. The resulting compounds are {approx} 10{sup 6} times more potent than existing inhibitors, non-toxic, and surprisingly selective for IDE vis-a-vis conventional zinc-metalloproteases. Crystallographic analysis of an IDE-inhibitor complex reveals a novel mode of inhibition based on stabilization of IDE's 'closed,' inactive conformation. We show further that pharmacological inhibition of IDE potentiates insulin signaling by a mechanism involving reduced catabolism of internalized insulin. Conclusions/Significance: The inhibitors we describe are the first to potently and selectively inhibit IDE or indeed any member of this atypical zinc-metalloprotease superfamily. The distinctive structure of IDE's active site, and the mode of action of our inhibitors, suggests that it may be possible to develop inhibitors that cross-react minimally with conventional zinc-metalloproteases. Significantly, our results reveal that insulin signaling is normally regulated by IDE activity not only extracellularly but also within cells, supporting the longstanding view that IDE inhibitors could hold therapeutic value for the treatment of diabetes.

  8. Designed inhibitors of insulin-degrading enzyme regulate the catabolism and activity of insulin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm A Leissring

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulin is a vital peptide hormone that is a central regulator of glucose homeostasis, and impairments in insulin signaling cause diabetes mellitus. In principle, it should be possible to enhance the activity of insulin by inhibiting its catabolism, which is mediated primarily by insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE, a structurally and evolutionarily distinctive zinc-metalloprotease. Despite interest in pharmacological inhibition of IDE as an attractive anti-diabetic approach dating to the 1950s, potent and selective inhibitors of IDE have not yet emerged. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a rational design approach based on analysis of combinatorial peptide mixtures and focused compound libraries to develop novel peptide hydroxamic acid inhibitors of IDE. The resulting compounds are approximately 10(6 times more potent than existing inhibitors, non-toxic, and surprisingly selective for IDE vis-à-vis conventional zinc-metalloproteases. Crystallographic analysis of an IDE-inhibitor complex reveals a novel mode of inhibition based on stabilization of IDE's "closed," inactive conformation. We show further that pharmacological inhibition of IDE potentiates insulin signaling by a mechanism involving reduced catabolism of internalized insulin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The inhibitors we describe are the first to potently and selectively inhibit IDE or indeed any member of this atypical zinc-metalloprotease superfamily. The distinctive structure of IDE's active site, and the mode of action of our inhibitors, suggests that it may be possible to develop inhibitors that cross-react minimally with conventional zinc-metalloproteases. Significantly, our results reveal that insulin signaling is normally regulated by IDE activity not only extracellularly but also within cells, supporting the longstanding view that IDE inhibitors could hold therapeutic value for the treatment of diabetes.

  9. Molecular design, synthesis and biological activities of amidines as new ketol-acid reductoisomerase inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao Lei Wang; Yong Hong Li; Jian Guo Wang; Yi Ma; Zheng Ming Li

    2008-01-01

    Diamidine (A) was identified in our in vitro bio-assay as a possible inhibitor of ketol-acid reductoisomerase (KARI) from the ACD database search based on the known three-dimensional crystal structure of KARI. An investigation on interaction of A on KARI active sites, led to the design and synthesis of 15 novel monoamidines. Some of those showed better biological activity than A on rice KARI (in vitro) and in greenhouse herbicidal tests (in vivo). The structure-biological activity relationship was investigated, which provides valuable information to further study of potential KARI inhibitors.

  10. Synthesis and extended activity of triazole-containing macrocyclic protease inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pehere, A.D.; Pietsch, M.; Gütschow, M.;

    2013-01-01

    Peptide-derived protease inhibitors are an important class of compounds with the potential to treat a wide range of diseases. Herein, we describe the synthesis of a series of triazole- containing macrocyclic protease inhibitors pre-organized into a b-strand conformation and an evaluation...... of their activity against a panel of proteases. Acyclic azidoalkyne-based aldehydes are also evaluated for comparison. The macrocyclic peptidomimetics showed considerable activity towards calpain II, cathepsin L and S, and the 20S proteasome chymotrypsin-like activity. Some of the first examples of highly potent...

  11. Overexpression of hepatic plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 mRNA in rabbits with fatty liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Gao Fan; Liang-Hua Chen; Zheng-Jie Xu; Min-De Zeng

    2001-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTION Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 ( PAI-I ), an approximately Mr 50000 glycoprotein, is the major physiological inhibitor of plasminogen activators. It is not only the priming factor for atherosclerosis and coronary thrombosis[1-3] , but also participates in the genesis of chronic hepatitis and liver fibrosis[4-11] . However, there has been no available report yet about the research of hepatic PAl-1 gene expression in hyperlipidemia and fatty liver. The present study aimed to explore the change of hepatic PAl-1 mRNA and its plasma activity by means of animal model.

  12. The human immunodeficiency virus protease inhibitor ritonavir is potentially active against urological malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sato A

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Akinori Sato Department of Urology, National Defense Medical College, Tokorozawa, Japan Abstract: The human immunodeficiency virus protease inhibitor ritonavir has recently been shown to have antineoplastic activity, and its use in urological malignancies is under investigation with an eye toward drug repositioning. Ritonavir is thought to exert its antineoplastic activity by inhibiting multiple signaling pathways, including the Akt and nuclear factor-kappaB pathways. It can increase the amount of unfolded proteins in the cell by inhibiting both the proteasome and heat shock protein 90. Combinations of ritonavir with agents that increase the amount of unfolded proteins, such as proteasome inhibitors, histone deacetylase inhibitors, or heat shock protein 90 inhibitors, therefore, induce endoplasmic reticulum stress cooperatively and thereby kill cancer cells effectively. Ritonavir is also a potent cytochrome P450 3A4 and P-glycoprotein inhibitor, increasing the intracellular concentration of combined drugs by inhibiting their degradation and efflux from cancer cells and thereby enhancing their antineoplastic activity. Furthermore, riotnavir’s antineoplastic activity includes modulation of immune system activity. Therapies using ritonavir are thus an attractive new approach to cancer treatment and, due to their novel mechanisms of action, are expected to be effective against malignancies that are refractory to current treatment strategies. Further investigations using ritonavir are expected to find new uses for clinically available drugs in the treatment of urological malignancies as well as many other types of cancer. Keywords: drug repositioning, novel treatment

  13. Modulation of enzymatic activity of human mast cell tryptase and chymase by protease inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HEShao-Heng; CHENPu; CHENHan-Qiu

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the actions of protease inhibitors on the enzymatic activities of tryptase and chymase in similarexperimental systems. METHODS: Human lung tryptase and human skin chymase were purified by a similarprocedure involving high salt extraction of tryptase, heparin agarose affinity chromatography, and S-200 Sephacrylgel filtration chromatography. Actions of protease inhibitors on tryptase and chymase activities were examined byenzyme assays. RESULTS: The specific activities of tryptase and chymase were 2.1 kU/g protein and 4.9 kU/g protein, respectively. Both preparations showed a single diffuse band on SDS-PAGE. Among non-native proteaseinhibitors, N-(1-hydroxy-2-naphthoyl)-L- arginyl-L-prolinamide hydrochloride (HNAP), leupeptin, antipain,benzamidine, and protamine inhibited more than 90 % enzymatic activity of tryptase, whereas soy bean trypsininhibitor (SBTI), Z-Ile-Glu-Pro-Phe-CO2Me (ZIGPPM) and chymostatin inhibited more than 95 % enzymaticactivity of chymase. Native protease inhibitors α-antitrypsin and secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI)inhibited more than 90 % enzymatic activity of chymase, but lactoferrin appeared to enhance chymase enzymaticactivity. All the 3 inhibitors had weak inhibitory actions on tryptase. CONCLUSION: The protease inhibitorstested had relatively good selectivity to either tryptase or chymase.

  14. PEGylated DX-1000: Pharmacokinetics and Antineoplastic Activity of a Specific Plasmin Inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia Devy

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Novel inhibitors of the urokinase-mediated plasminogen (plg activation system are potentially of great clinical benefit as anticancer treatments. Using phage display, we identified DX-1000 a tissue factor pathway inhibitor-derived Kunitz domain protein which is a specific high-affinity inhibitor of plasmin (pin (Ki = 99 pM. When tested in vitro, DX-1000 blocks plasminmediated pro-matrix metal loproteinase-9 (proMMP-9 activation on cells and dose-dependently inhibits tube formation, while not significantly affecting hemostasis and coagulation. However, this low-molecular weight protein inhibitor (~ 7 kDa exhibits rapid plasma clearance in mice and rabbits, limiting its potential clinical use in chronic diseases. After site-specific PEGylation, DX-1000 retains its activity and exhibits a decreased plasma clearance. This PEGylated derivative is effective in vitro, as well as potent in inhibiting tumor growth of green fluorescent protein (GFP-labeled MDA-MB-231 cells. 4PEG-DX-1000 treatment causes a significant reduction of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA and plasminogen expressions, a reduction of tumor proliferation, and vascularization. 4PEG-DX-1000 treatment significantly decreases the level of active mitogenactivated protein kinase (MAPK in the primary tumors and reduces metastasis incidence. Together, our results demonstrate the potential value of plasmin inhibitors as therapeutic agents for blocking breast cancer growth and metastasis.

  15. Histone deacetylase inhibitors upregulate Rap1GAP and inhibit Rap activity in thyroid tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaoyun; Korch, Christopher; Meinkoth, Judy L

    2011-06-01

    Increases in Rap activity have been associated with tumor progression. Although activating mutations in Rap have not been described, downregulation of Rap1GAP is frequent in human tumors including thyroid carcinomas. In this study, we explored whether endogenous Rap1GAP expression could be restored to thyroid tumor cells. The effects of deacetylase inhibitors and a demethylating agent, individually and in combination, were examined in four differentiated and six anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) cell lines. Treatment with the structurally distinct histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, sodium butyrate and trichostatin A, increased Rap1GAP expression in all the differentiated thyroid carcinoma cell lines and in four of the six ATC cell lines. The demethylating agent, 5-aza-deoxycytidine, restored Rap1GAP expression in one anaplastic cell line and enhanced the effects of HDAC inhibitors in a second anaplastic cell line. Western blotting indicated that Rap2 was highly expressed in human thyroid cancer cells. Importantly, treatment with HDAC inhibitors impaired Rap2 activity in both differentiated and anaplastic tumor cell lines. The mechanism through which Rap activity is repressed appears to entail effects on the expression of multiple Rap regulators, including RapGEFs and RapGAPs. These results suggest that HDAC inhibitors may provide a tractable approach to impair Rap activity in human tumor cells.

  16. Evaluation of an educational activity in the oral health of students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Vj de A; Costa, S M; Zanin, L; Flório, F M

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the influence of educational activity in the school environment based on prescriptive and subjective oral health indicators. Cross-sectional, comparative study involving students between 9 and 12 years of age, from schools that have educational activities and those that do not, designated schools A and B. The oral health indicators used were the Simplified Oral Hygiene Index (OHI-S) and the Community Periodontal Index (CPITN). Knowledge and attitudes with regard to oral health were evaluated using a structured questionnaire. A total of 289 schoolchildren took part, 50.5% from school A and 49.5% from school B, in the town of Montes Claros, in the Brazilian state of Minas Gerais. In school A, the schoolchildren's OHI-S was satisfactory for 9.6%, normal for 78.8% and deficient for 11.6%, while in school B, the respective percentages were 3.5%, 17.5% and 79% (chi-squared, P evaluated knowledge of oral health. The account of daily use of dental floss in school A was 21.7% and in B, 3.6% (chi-squared, P educational activity in the school environment had a positive effect on oral health conditions, the consolidation of knowledge and incorporation of oral hygiene habits. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. AZD6738, a novel oral inhibitor of ATR, induces synthetic lethality with ATM-deficiency in gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Ahrum; Im, Seock-Ah; Jang, Hyemin; Kim, Seongyeong; Lee, Miso; Kim, Debora Keunyoung; Yang, Yaewon; Kim, Hee-Jun; Lee, Kyung-Hun; Kim, Jin Won; Kim, Tae-Yong; Oh, Do-Youn; Brown, Jeff; Lau, Alan; O Connor, Mark J; Bang, Yung-Jue

    2017-01-30

    Ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) can be considered an attractive target for cancer treatment due to its deleterious effect on cancer cells harboring a homologous recombination defect (HRD). The aim of this study was to investigate the potential use of the ATR inhibitor, AZD6738, to treat gastric cancer. In SNU-601 cells with dysfunctional ATM, AZD6738 treatment led to an accumulation of DNA damage due to dysfunctional RAD51 foci formation, S phase arrest, and caspase 3-dependent apoptosis. In contrast, SNU-484 cells with functional ATM were not sensitive to AZD6738. Inhibition of ATM in SNU-484 cells enhanced AZD6738 sensitivity to a level comparable with that observed in SNU-601 cells, showing that activation of the ATM-Chk2 signaling pathway attenuates AZD6738 sensitivity. In addition, decreased HDAC1 expression was found to be associated with ATM inactivation in SNU-601 cells, demonstrating the interaction between HDAC1 and ATM can affect sensitivity to AZD6738. Furthermore, in an in vivo tumor xenograft mouse model, AZD6738 significantly suppressed tumor growth and increased apoptosis. These findings suggest synthetic lethality between ATR inhibition and ATM-deficiency in gastric cancer cells. Further clinical studies on the interaction between AZD 6738 and ATM-deficiency are warranted to develop novel treatment strategies for gastric cancer.

  18. P1-Substituted Symmetry-Based Human Immunodeficiency Virus Protease Inhibitors with Potent Antiviral Activity against Drug-Resistant Viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeGoey, David A.; Grampovnik, David J.; Chen, Hui-Ju; Flosi, William J.; Klein, Larry L.; Dekhtyar, Tatyana; Stoll, Vincent; Mamo, Mulugeta; Molla, Akhteruzzaman; Kempf, Dale J. (Abbott)

    2013-03-07

    Because there is currently no cure for HIV infection, patients must remain on long-term drug therapy, leading to concerns over potential drug side effects and the emergence of drug resistance. For this reason, new and safe antiretroviral agents with improved potency against drug-resistant strains of HIV are needed. A series of HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) with potent activity against both wild-type (WT) virus and drug-resistant strains of HIV was designed and synthesized. The incorporation of substituents with hydrogen bond donor and acceptor groups at the P1 position of our symmetry-based inhibitor series resulted in significant potency improvements against the resistant mutants. By this approach, several compounds, such as 13, 24, and 29, were identified that demonstrated similar or improved potencies compared to 1 against highly mutated strains of HIV derived from patients who previously failed HIV PI therapy. Overall, compound 13 demonstrated the best balance of potency against drug resistant strains of HIV and oral bioavailability in pharmacokinetic studies. X-ray analysis of an HIV PI with an improved resistance profile bound to WT HIV protease is also reported.

  19. From covalent glycosidase inhibitors to activity-based glycosidase probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, Lianne I.; Jiang, Jianbing; Li, Kah-Yee; Witte, Martin D.; Kallemeijn, Wouter W.; Beenakker, Thomas J. N.; Schroeder, Sybrin P.; Aerts, Johannes M. F. G.; van der Marel, Gijsbert A.; Codee, Jeroen D. C.; Overkleeft, Hermen S.

    2014-01-01

    Activity-based protein profiling has emerged as a powerful discovery tool in chemical biology and medicinal chemistry research. Success of activity-based protein profiling hinges on the presence of compounds that can covalently and irreversibly bind to enzymes, do so selectively in the context of co

  20. A trypsin inhibitor from snail medic seeds active against pest proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceciliani, F; Tava, A; Iori, R; Mortarino, M; Odoardi, M; Ronchi, S

    1997-02-01

    A protein trypsin inhibitor from seeds of snail medic (Medicago scutellata), MsTI, has been purified by ion-exchange chromatography, gel-filtration chromatography and reverse-phase HPLC. The protein inhibits the catalytic activity of bovine beta-trypsin, with an apparent Kd of 1.8 x 10(-9), but exhibits no activity towards bovine alpha-chymotrypsin. Moreover, MsTI inhibits the trypsin-like proteinase activity present in larvae of the crop pests Adoxophyes orana, Hyphantria cunea, Lobesia botrana and Ostrinia nubilalis. The complete amino acid sequence of MsTI consists of 62 residues corresponding to a M(r) of 6925. Sequence comparison shows that MsTI exhibits significant similarity to other proteins belonging to the Bowman-Birk trypsin inhibitor family, and the closest identity (81%) with the wound-induced trypsin inhibitor from Medicago sativa leaves.

  1. Exploring in vitro and in vivo Hsp90 inhibitors activity against human protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannini, Giuseppe; Battistuzzi, Gianfranco

    2015-02-01

    A set of compounds, previously selected as potent Hsp90α inhibitors, has been studied on a panel of human parasites. 5-Aryl-3,4-isoxazolediamide derivatives (1) were active against two protozoa, Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and Plasmodium falciparum, with a good tolerability toward cytotoxicity on non-malignant L6 rat myoblast cell line, unlike the 1,5-diaryl,4-carboxamides-1,2,3-triazole derivatives (2) which, while showing a single-digit nM range activity against the same protozoa, were also highly cytotoxic on L6 cells. In a subsequent in vivo study, two isoxazolediamide derivatives, 1a and 1b, were very efficacious on the sleeping sickness-causing agent with a clear parasitaemia during treatment. These data, however, showed that not all protozoa are sensitive to Hsp90 inhibitors, as well as not all Hsp90 inhibitors are equally active on parasites.

  2. Changes in blood levels of proteinase inhibitors, pregnancy zone protein, steroid carriers and complement factors induced by oral contraceptives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Poulsen, H K; Teisner, B

    1993-01-01

    Three low-dose oral contraceptives Trinordiol, Gynatrol, and Marvelon, containing ethinylestradiol (EE) in combination with triphasic levonorgestrel (LNg), monophasic levonorgestrel, and monophasic desogestrel (DGS), respectively, were given to 65 healthy women, n = 21-22 in each group. Blood...

  3. Triglyceride concentration and waist circumference influence alcohol-related plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity increase in black South Africans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, Marlien; de Lange, Zelda; Hoekstra, Tiny; Ellis, Suria M.; Kruger, Annamarie

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the association between alcohol consumption and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity (PAI-1(act)) and fibrinogen concentration in a black South African population presenting with lower PAI-1(act) and higher fibrinogen than what is typically observed in white populations. We, fu

  4. Gender-specific correlations of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and tissue plasminogen activator levels with cardiovascular disease-related traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asselbergs, F. W.; Williams, S. M.; Hebert, P. R.; Coffey, C. S.; Hillege, H. L.; Navis, G.; Vaughan, D. E.; Van Gilst, W. H.; Moore, J. H.

    Background: The purpose of this study was to examine the correlations between plasma levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) and cardiovascular disease-related traits in a general population and whether these correlations differed between females

  5. Gender-specific correlations of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and tissue plasminogen activator levels with cardiovascular disease-related traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asselbergs, F. W.; Williams, S. M.; Hebert, P. R.; Coffey, C. S.; Hillege, H. L.; Navis, G.; Vaughan, D. E.; Van Gilst, W. H.; Moore, J. H.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to examine the correlations between plasma levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) and cardiovascular disease-related traits in a general population and whether these correlations differed between females a

  6. Nano-microdelivery systems for oral delivery of an active ingredient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    A composition for oral delivery of one or more active ingredients in the form of a lipid nano-micro-delivery system comprising a lipid nano-micro-structure comprising at least one lipid and at least one active ingredient, said at least one active ingredient being immobilized in said lipid nano...

  7. Structure-activity relationship study of selective benzimidazole-based inhibitors of Cryptosporidium parvum IMPDH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirubakaran, Sivapriya; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Sharling, Lisa; Zhang, Minjia; Liu, Xiaoping; Ray, Soumya S.; MacPherson, Iain S.; Striepen, Boris; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Cuny, Gregory D.

    2012-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parasites are important waterborne pathogens of both humans and animals. The C. parvum and C. hominis genomes indicate that the only route to guanine nucleotides is via inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH). Thus the inhibition of the parasite IMPDH presents a potential strategy for treating Cryptosporidium infections. A selective benzimidazole-based inhibitor of C. parvum IMPDH (CpIMPDH) was previously identified in a high throughput screen. Here we report a structure-activity relationship study of benzimidazole-based compounds that resulted in potent and selective inhibitors of CpIMPDH. Several compounds display potent antiparasitic activity in vitro. PMID:22310229

  8. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of potent 4-fluoro-2-cyanopyrrolidine dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Hiroshi; Hiratate, Akira; Takahashi, Masato; Mikami, Ayako; Saito-Hori, Masako; Munetomo, Eiji; Kitano, Kiyokazu; Chonan, Sumi; Saito, Hidetaka; Suzuki, Akio; Takaoka, Yuji; Yamamoto, Koji

    2008-04-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibitors are promising antidiabetic drugs, and several drugs are in the developmental stage. We previously reported that the introduction of fluorine to the 4-position of 2-cyanopyrrolidine enhanced the DPP-IV inhibitory effect. In the present report, we examined the structure-activity relationship (SAR) of 2-cyano-4-fluoropyrrolidine with N-substituted glycine at the 1-position. We report the identification of a potent and stable DPP-IV inhibitor (TS-021) with a long-term persistent plasma drug concentration and a potent antihyperglycemic activity.

  9. Cellular Activity of New Small Molecule Protein Arginine Deiminase 3 (PAD3) Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamali, Haya; Khan, Hasan A; Tjin, Caroline C; Ellman, Jonathan A

    2016-09-08

    The protein arginine deiminases (PADs) catalyze the post-translational deimination of arginine side chains. Multiple PAD isozymes have been characterized, and abnormal PAD activity has been associated with several human disease states. PAD3 has been characterized as a modulator of cell growth via apoptosis inducing factor and has been implicated in the neurodegenerative response to spinal cord injury. Here, we describe the design, synthesis, and evaluation of conformationally constrained versions of the potent and selective PAD3 inhibitor 2. The cell activity of representative inhibitors in this series was also demonstrated for the first time by rescue of thapsigargin-induced cell death in PAD3-expressing HEK293T cells.

  10. Membrane-Permeable Calpain Inhibitors Promote Rat Oral Mucosal Epithelial Cell Proliferation by Inhibiting IL-1α Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Kondo

    Full Text Available To standardise regenerative medicine using cultured cells, the use of serum-free, chemically defined media will be necessary. We have reported that IL-1α inhibits the growth of epithelial cells in culture and that recombinant IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA significantly promotes epithelial cell growth in no feeder layer condition. In this study, we examined inhibitors of calpain, a cysteine proteinase that plays crucial roles in various cellular functions, including IL-1α maturation and secretion. The culturing of epithelial cells in serum-free media supplemented with a membrane-permeable calpain inhibitor significantly promoted growth while suppressing IL-1α maturation and secretion. By contrast, non-membrane-permeable calpain inhibitor treatment did not have these effects. Interestingly, immunoblotting analysis revealed that immature, untruncated, IL-1α expression was also downregulated by cell-permeable calpain inhibitor treatment, and the difference in IL-1α gene expression increased from day 2 to day 6. Although IL-1RA has been reported to promote epithelial cell growth, we detected no synergistic promotion of epithelial cell growth using a calpain inhibitor and IL-1RA. These findings indicate that calpain inhibitors promote epithelial cell proliferation by inhibiting IL-1α maturation at an early phase of epithelial cell culture and by suppressing the positive feedback-mediated amplification of IL-1α signalling.

  11. Inhibitors of VIM-2 by screening pharmacologically active and click-chemistry compound libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minond, Dmitriy; Saldanha, S Adrian; Subramaniam, Prem; Spaargaren, Michael; Spicer, Timothy; Fotsing, Joseph R; Weide, Timo; Fokin, Valery V; Sharpless, K Barry; Galleni, Moreno; Bebrone, Carine; Lassaux, Patricia; Hodder, Peter

    2009-07-15

    VIM-2 is an Ambler class B metallo-beta-lactamase (MBL) capable of hydrolyzing a broad-spectrum of beta-lactam antibiotics. Although the discovery and development of MBL inhibitors continue to be an area of active research, an array of potent, small molecule inhibitors is yet to be fully characterized for VIM-2. In the presented research, a compound library screening approach was used to identify and characterize VIM-2 inhibitors from a library of pharmacologically active compounds as well as a focused 'click' chemistry library. The four most potent VIM-2 inhibitors resulting from a VIM-2 screen were characterized by kinetic studies in order to determine K(i) and mechanism of enzyme inhibition. As a result, two previously described pharmacologic agents, mitoxantrone (1,4-dihydroxy-5,8-bis([2-([2-hydroxyethyl]amino)ethyl]amino)-9,10-anthracenedione) and 4-chloromercuribenzoic acid (pCMB) were found to be active, the former as a non-competitive inhibitor (K(i)=K(i)(')=1.5+/-0.2microM) and the latter as a slowly reversible or irreversible inhibitor. Additionally, two novel sulfonyl-triazole analogs from the click library were identified as potent, competitive VIM-2 inhibitors: N-((4-((but-3-ynyloxy)methyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-5-yl)methyl)-4-iodobenzenesulfonamide (1, K(i)=0.41+/-0.03microM) and 4-iodo-N-((4-(methoxymethyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-5-yl)methyl)benzenesulfonamide (2, K(i)=1.4+/-0.10microM). Mitoxantrone and pCMB were also found to potentiate imipenem efficacy in MIC and synergy assays employing Escherichia coli. Taken together, all four compounds represent useful chemical probes to further investigate mechanisms of VIM-2 inhibition in biochemical and microbiology-based assays.

  12. Improved antitumor activity of immunotherapy with BRAF and MEK inhibitors in BRAFV600E melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu-Lieskovan, Siwen; Mok, Stephen; Moreno, Blanca Homet; Tsoi, Jennifer; Faja, Lidia Robert; Goedert, Lucas; Pinheiro, Elaine M.; Koya, Richard C.; Graeber, Thomas; Comin-Anduix, Begoña; Ribas, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Combining immunotherapy and BRAF targeted therapy may result in improved antitumor activity with the high response rates of targeted therapy and the durability of responses with immunotherapy. However, the first clinical trial testing the combination of the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib and the CTLA-4 antibody ipilimumab was terminated early due to substantial liver toxicities. MEK inhibitors can potentiate the MAPK inhibition in BRAF mutant cells, while potentially alleviating the unwanted paradoxical MAPK activation in BRAF wild type cells that lead to side effects when using BRAF inhibitors alone. However, there is the concern of MEK inhibitors being detrimental to T cell functionality. Using a mouse model of syngeneic BRAFV600E driven melanoma, we tested whether addition of the MEK inhibitor trametinib would enhance the antitumor activity of combined immunotherapy with the BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib. Combination of dabrafenib and trametinib with pmel-1 adoptive cell transfer (ACT) showed complete tumor regression, increased T cell infiltration into tumors and improved in vivo cytotoxicity. Single agent dabrafenib increased tumor-associated macrophages and T regulatory cells (Tregs) in tumors, which decreased with the addition of trametinib. The triple combination therapy resulted in increased melanosomal antigen and MHC expression, and global immune-related gene up-regulation. Given the up-regulation of PD-L1 seen with dabrafenib and/or trametinib combined with antigen-specific ACT, we tested combination of dabrafenib, trametinib with anti-PD1 therapy in SM1 tumors, and observed superior anti-tumor effect. Our findings support the testing of triple combination therapy of BRAF and MEK inhibitors with immunotherapy in patients with BRAFV600E mutant metastatic melanoma. PMID:25787767

  13. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 4G/5G polymorphism is associated with metabolic syndrome parameters in Malaysian subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hamodi, Zaid H; Saif-Ali, Riyadh; Ismail, Ikram S; Ahmed, Khaled A; Muniandy, Sekaran

    2012-05-01

    The plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 4G/5G and tissue plasminogen activator Alu-repeat insertion/deletion polymorphisms might be genetic determinations of increased or decreased of their plasma activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 4G/5G and tissue plasminogen activator Alu-repeat I/D polymorphisms with metabolic syndrome parameters in normal Malaysian subjects and to assess the impact of these polymorphisms on their plasma activities and antigens. The genetic polymorphisms were genotyped in 130 normal subjects. In addition, the plasma activities and antigens of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and tissue plasminogen activator as well as levels of insulin, glucose, and lipid profile at fasting state were investigated. The subjects with homozygous 4G/4G showed association with an increased triglyceride (p = 0.007), body mass index (p = 0.01) and diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.03). In addition, the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 4G/5G polymorphism modulates plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity and antigen and tissue plasminogen activator activity (p = 0.002, 0.014, 0.003) respectively. These results showed that, the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 4G/5G polymorphism is associated with metabolic syndrome parameters, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and tissue plasminogen activator activities in Malaysian subjects, and may serve to increase the risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in Malaysian subjects.

  14. Quantitative Structure-activity Relationship of TIBO HIV-1 Inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-Hong; ZHANG Rui-Zhou; CHENG Xin-Lu; YANG Xiang-Dong

    2007-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) was used to calculate a set of molecular descriptors (properties) for 14 TIBO derivatives with anti-HIV activity. Principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) were employed in order to reduce dimensionality and investigate which subset of variables should be more effective for classifying TIBO derivatives according to their degree of anti-HIV activity. The PCA showed that the EHOMO, μ, LogP, QA, QB and MR variables are responsible for the separation between compounds with higher and lower anti-HIV activity. The HCA results are similar to those obtained with PCA. By using the chemometric results, four synthetic compounds were analyzed through PCA and HCA and three of them are proposed as active molecules against HIV, which is consistent with the results of clinic experiments. The methodologies of PCA and HCA provide a reliable rule for classifying new TIBO derivatives with anti-HIV activity. The model obtained showed not only statistical significance but also predictive ability.

  15. The potent Cdc7-Dbf4 (DDK) kinase inhibitor XL413 has limited activity in many cancer cell lines and discovery of potential new DDK inhibitor scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasi, Nanda Kumar; Tiwari, Kanchan; Soon, Fen-Fen; Bonte, Dorine; Wang, Tong; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H Eric; Weinreich, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Cdc7-Dbf4 kinase or DDK (Dbf4-dependent kinase) is required to initiate DNA replication by phosphorylating and activating the replicative Mcm2-7 DNA helicase. DDK is overexpressed in many tumor cells and is an emerging chemotherapeutic target since DDK inhibition causes apoptosis of diverse cancer cell types but not of normal cells. PHA-767491 and XL413 are among a number of potent DDK inhibitors with low nanomolar IC50 values against the purified kinase. Although XL413 is highly selective for DDK, its activity has not been extensively characterized on cell lines. We measured anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects of XL413 on a panel of tumor cell lines compared to PHA-767491, whose activity is well characterized. Both compounds were effective biochemical DDK inhibitors but surprisingly, their activities in cell lines were highly divergent. Unlike PHA-767491, XL413 had significant anti-proliferative activity against only one of the ten cell lines tested. Since XL413 did not effectively inhibit DDK in multiple cell lines, this compound likely has limited bioavailability. To identify potential leads for additional DDK inhibitors, we also tested the cross-reactivity of ∼400 known kinase inhibitors against DDK using a DDK thermal stability shift assay (TSA). We identified 11 compounds that significantly stabilized DDK. Several inhibited DDK with comparable potency to PHA-767491, including Chk1 and PKR kinase inhibitors, but had divergent chemical scaffolds from known DDK inhibitors. Taken together, these data show that several well-known kinase inhibitors cross-react with DDK and also highlight the opportunity to design additional specific, biologically active DDK inhibitors for use as chemotherapeutic agents.

  16. The potent Cdc7-Dbf4 (DDK kinase inhibitor XL413 has limited activity in many cancer cell lines and discovery of potential new DDK inhibitor scaffolds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanda Kumar Sasi

    Full Text Available Cdc7-Dbf4 kinase or DDK (Dbf4-dependent kinase is required to initiate DNA replication by phosphorylating and activating the replicative Mcm2-7 DNA helicase. DDK is overexpressed in many tumor cells and is an emerging chemotherapeutic target since DDK inhibition causes apoptosis of diverse cancer cell types but not of normal cells. PHA-767491 and XL413 are among a number of potent DDK inhibitors with low nanomolar IC50 values against the purified kinase. Although XL413 is highly selective for DDK, its activity has not been extensively characterized on cell lines. We measured anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects of XL413 on a panel of tumor cell lines compared to PHA-767491, whose activity is well characterized. Both compounds were effective biochemical DDK inhibitors but surprisingly, their activities in cell lines were highly divergent. Unlike PHA-767491, XL413 had significant anti-proliferative activity against only one of the ten cell lines tested. Since XL413 did not effectively inhibit DDK in multiple cell lines, this compound likely has limited bioavailability. To identify potential leads for additional DDK inhibitors, we also tested the cross-reactivity of ∼400 known kinase inhibitors against DDK using a DDK thermal stability shift assay (TSA. We identified 11 compounds that significantly stabilized DDK. Several inhibited DDK with comparable potency to PHA-767491, including Chk1 and PKR kinase inhibitors, but had divergent chemical scaffolds from known DDK inhibitors. Taken together, these data show that several well-known kinase inhibitors cross-react with DDK and also highlight the opportunity to design additional specific, biologically active DDK inhibitors for use as chemotherapeutic agents.

  17. Electron transport chain inhibitors induce microglia activation through enhancing mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Junli; Jiang, Zhongxin; Chen, Xuehong; Liu, Mengyang; Li, Jing; Liu, Na

    2016-01-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are believed to be mediators of excessive microglial activation, yet the resources and mechanism are not fully understood. Here we stimulated murine microglial BV-2 cells and primary microglial cells with different inhibitors of electron transport chain (ETC), rotenone, thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA), antimycin A, and NaN3 to induce mitochondrial ROS production and we observed the role of mitochondrial ROS in microglial activation. Our results showed that ETC inhibitors resulted in significant changes in cell viability, microglial morphology, cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial ROS production in a dose-dependent manner in both primary cultural microglia and BV-2 cell lines. Moreover, ETC inhibitors, especially rotenone and antimycin A stimulated secretion of interleukin 1β (IL-1β), interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 12 (IL-12) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) by microglia with marked activation of mitogen-activated proteinkinases (MAPKs) and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), which could be blocked by specific inhibitors of MAPK and NF-κB and mitochondrial antioxidants, Mito-TEMPO. Taken together, our results demonstrated that inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory chain in microglia led to production of mitochondrial ROS and therefore may activate MAPK/NF-кB dependent inflammatory cytokines release in microglia, which indicated that mitochondrial-derived ROS were contributed to microglial activation.

  18. Purification, characterization and evaluation of insecticidal activity of trypsin inhibitor from Albizia lebbeck seeds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pratima Sharma; Amarjit K Nath; Reena Kumari; SV Bhardwaj

    2012-01-01

    A Bowman-Birk inhibitor with activity against gut protcases of Helicoverpa armigera was extracted in 0.1 M sodium phosphate buffer from defatted seed flour of Albizia lebbeck.It was purified to 29.62 folds with 51.43% re,very using ammonium sulfate precipitation,gel filtration chromatography on Sephadex G-100 column and ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex A50.The purified protein had a molecular weight of 12,303 daltons as determined by SDS-PAGE.It was found to be heat stable up to 60℃ and had two pH optima of 7.5 and 9.0.The inhibitor exhibited non-competitive pattern of inhibition with a low Ki value of 0.2 μM.The inhibitor was found to be susceptible to varying concentrations of reducing agents like DTT and 2-mercaptoethanol,thereby indicating the role of disulphide bridges in maintaining its three dimensional structure and stability.The purified inhibitor caused mortality and suppressed larval growth of Pieris brassicae larvae.It was also found to be effective against gut trypsin extracted from Spodoptera littoralis.The sequence of the genes encoding for such inhibitors can be determined and the genes expressing protease inhibitors can be used in vegetable crops to confer resistance against insect pests and other plant pathogens.

  19. The Na+/Glucose Cotransporter Inhibitor Canagliflozin Activates AMPK by Inhibiting Mitochondrial Function and Increasing Cellular AMP Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Simon A; Ford, Rebecca J; Smith, Brennan K; Gowans, Graeme J; Mancini, Sarah J; Pitt, Ryan D; Day, Emily A; Salt, Ian P; Steinberg, Gregory R; Hardie, D Grahame

    2016-09-01

    Canagliflozin, dapagliflozin, and empagliflozin, all recently approved for treatment of type 2 diabetes, were derived from the natural product phlorizin. They reduce hyperglycemia by inhibiting glucose reuptake by sodium/glucose cotransporter (SGLT) 2 in the kidney, without affecting intestinal glucose uptake by SGLT1. We now report that canagliflozin also activates AMPK, an effect also seen with phloretin (the aglycone breakdown product of phlorizin), but not to any significant extent with dapagliflozin, empagliflozin, or phlorizin. AMPK activation occurred at canagliflozin concentrations measured in human plasma in clinical trials and was caused by inhibition of Complex I of the respiratory chain, leading to increases in cellular AMP or ADP. Although canagliflozin also inhibited cellular glucose uptake independently of SGLT2, this did not account for AMPK activation. Canagliflozin also inhibited lipid synthesis, an effect that was absent in AMPK knockout cells and that required phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) 1 and/or ACC2 at the AMPK sites. Oral administration of canagliflozin activated AMPK in mouse liver, although not in muscle, adipose tissue, or spleen. Because phosphorylation of ACC by AMPK is known to lower liver lipid content, these data suggest a potential additional benefit of canagliflozin therapy compared with other SGLT2 inhibitors. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association.

  20. A Kunitz proteinase inhibitor from corms of Xanthosoma blandum with bactericidal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Thaís B; Silva, Osmar N; Migliolo, Ludovico; Souza-Filho, Carlos R; Gonçalves, Eduardo G; Vasconcelos, Ilka M; Oliveira, José T A; Amaral, André C; Franco, Octávio L

    2011-05-27

    Bacterial infections directly affect the world's population, and this situation has been aggravated by indiscriminate use of antimicrobial agents, which can generate resistant microorganisms. In this report, an initial screening of proteins with antibacterial activity from corms of 15 species of the Xanthosoma genus was conducted. Since Xanthosoma blandum corms showed enhanced activity toward bacteria, a novel protein with bactericidal activity was isolated from this particular species. Edman degradation was used for protein N-termini determination; the primary structure showed similarities with Kunitz inhibitors, and this protein was named Xb-KTI. This protein was further challenged against serine proteinases from different sources, showing clear inhibitory activities. Otherwise, no hemolytic activity was observed for Xb-KTI. The results demonstrate the biotechnological potential of Xb-KTI, the first proteinase inhibitor with antimicrobial activity described in the Xanthosoma genus.

  1. Histone deacetylase inhibitors suppress immune activation in primary mouse microglia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kannan, Vishnu; Brouwer, Nieske; Hanisch, Uwe-Karsten; Regen, Tommy; Eggen, Bart J. L.; Boddeke, Hendrikus W. G. M.

    2013-01-01

    Neuroinflammation is required for tissue clearance and repair after infections or insults. To prevent excessive damage, it is crucial to limit the extent of neuroinflammation and thereby the activation of its principal effector cell, microglia. The two main major innate immune cell types in the CNS

  2. Phosphatase inhibitors activate normal and defective CFTR chloride channels

    OpenAIRE

    Becq, F; Jensen, T J; Chang, X B; Savoia, A.; Rommens, J M; Tsui, L C; Buchwald, M; Riordan, J R; Hanrahan, J W

    1994-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation at multiple sites. Although activation by protein kinases has been studied in some detail, the dephosphorylation step has received little attention. This report examines the mechanisms responsible for the dephosphorylation and spontaneous deactivation ("rundown") of CFTR chloride channels excised from transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and human airway epi...

  3. Structure activity relationship of selective GABA uptake inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogensen, Stine Byskov; Jørgensen, Lars; Madsen, Karsten K;

    2015-01-01

    A series of β-amino acids with lipophilic diaromatic side chain was synthesized and characterized pharmacologically on mouse γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) transporter subtypes mGAT1-4 in order to investigate structure activity relationships (SAR) for mGAT2 (corresponding to hBGT-1). Variation...

  4. Antimicrobial activity of tea catechin against canine oral bacteria and the functional mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Bai, Lanlan; Takagi, Shiaki; Ando, Tasuke; Yoneyama, Hiroshi; Ito, Kumiko; MIZUGAI, Hiroyuki; Isogai, Emiko

    2016-01-01

    Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) is the major polyphenolic compound of green tea. Polyphenolic compounds were extracted from the leaf of Camellia sinensis (Japanese green tea), and the minimum inhibitory concentration against canine oral bacteria was measured. Subsequently, we investigated the inhibitory effects of polyphenolic compounds and EGCG on the growth of canine oral bacteria. EGCG showed antimicrobial activity against a model bacterium, Streptococcus mutans. Our results indicate that ...

  5. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α in human endothelial cells increases plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶平; 胡晓晖; 刘永学; 赵亚力

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) activators on plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and elucidate a possible mechanism.Methods Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were obtained from normal fetus, and cultured conventionally. Then the HUVEC were exposed to fatty acids and prostaglandin J2 in varying concentrations with fresh media. RT-PCR and ELISA were used to determine the expression of PPAR and PAI-1 in HUVECs. Transient co-transfection of PAI-1 promoter and PPARα gene or PPARγ gene to ECV304 was performed.Results PPARα, PPARδ and PPARγ mRNA in HUVECs were detected by RT-PCR. Treatment of HUVECs with PPARα and PPARγ activators-linolenic acid, linoleic acid, oleic acid and prostaglandin J2, but not with stearic acid could augment PAI-I mRNA expression and protein secretion in a concentration-dependent manner. Proportional induction of PAI-1 promoter activity was observed through increasing amounts of PPARα DNA in HUVECs through a transient gene transfection assay, although the mRNA expression of the 3 subtypes of PPAR with their activators were not changed compared with controls.Conclusions HUVECs express PPARs. PPARs activators may increase PAI-1 expression in endothelial cells (EC). Although PPARs expression was not enhanced after being stimulated by their activators in EC, the functionally active PPARα is probably involved in regulating PAI-1 expression in EC.

  6. Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 interacts with alpha3 subunit of proteasome and modulates its activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boncela, Joanna; Przygodzka, Patrycja; Papiewska-Pajak, Izabela; Wyroba, Elzbieta; Osinska, Magdalena; Cierniewski, Czeslaw S

    2011-02-25

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1), a multifunctional protein, is an important physiological regulator of fibrinolysis, extracellular matrix homeostasis, and cell motility. Recent observations show that PAI-1 may also be implicated in maintaining integrity of cells, especially with respect to cellular proliferation or apoptosis. In the present study we provide evidence that PAI-1 interacts with proteasome and affects its activity. First, by using the yeast two-hybrid system, we found that the α3 subunit of proteasome directly interacts with PAI-1. Then, to ensure that the PAI-1-proteasome complex is formed in vivo, both proteins were coimmunoprecipitated from endothelial cells and identified with specific antibodies. The specificity of this interaction was evidenced after transfection of HeLa cells with pCMV-PAI-1 and coimmunoprecipitation of both proteins with anti-PAI-1 antibodies. Subsequently, cellular distribution of the PAI-1-proteasome complexes was established by immunogold staining and electron microscopy analyses. Both proteins appeared in a diffuse cytosolic pattern but also could be found in a dense perinuclear and nuclear location. Furthermore, PAI-1 induced formation of aggresomes freely located in endothelial cytoplasm. Increased PAI-1 expression abrogated degradation of degron analyzed after cotransfection of HeLa cells with pCMV-PAI-1 and pd2EGFP-N1 and prevented degradation of p53 as well as IκBα, as evidenced both by confocal microscopy and Western immunoblotting.

  7. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 1 Interacts with α3 Subunit of Proteasome and Modulates Its Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boncela, Joanna; Przygodzka, Patrycja; Papiewska-Pajak, Izabela; Wyroba, Elzbieta; Osinska, Magdalena; Cierniewski, Czeslaw S.

    2011-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1), a multifunctional protein, is an important physiological regulator of fibrinolysis, extracellular matrix homeostasis, and cell motility. Recent observations show that PAI-1 may also be implicated in maintaining integrity of cells, especially with respect to cellular proliferation or apoptosis. In the present study we provide evidence that PAI-1 interacts with proteasome and affects its activity. First, by using the yeast two-hybrid system, we found that the α3 subunit of proteasome directly interacts with PAI-1. Then, to ensure that the PAI-1-proteasome complex is formed in vivo, both proteins were coimmunoprecipitated from endothelial cells and identified with specific antibodies. The specificity of this interaction was evidenced after transfection of HeLa cells with pCMV-PAI-1 and coimmunoprecipitation of both proteins with anti-PAI-1 antibodies. Subsequently, cellular distribution of the PAI-1-proteasome complexes was established by immunogold staining and electron microscopy analyses. Both proteins appeared in a diffuse cytosolic pattern but also could be found in a dense perinuclear and nuclear location. Furthermore, PAI-1 induced formation of aggresomes freely located in endothelial cytoplasm. Increased PAI-1 expression abrogated degradation of degron analyzed after cotransfection of HeLa cells with pCMV-PAI-1 and pd2EGFP-N1 and prevented degradation of p53 as well as IκBα, as evidenced both by confocal microscopy and Western immunoblotting. PMID:21135093

  8. Oral administration of sitagliptin activates CREB and is neuroprotective in murine model of brain trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Dellavalle

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Traumatic brain injury is a major cause of mortality and morbidity. We have previously shown that the injectable glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 analogue, liraglutide, significantly improved the outcome in mice after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI. In this study we are interested in the effects of oral treatment of a different class of GLP-1 based therapy, dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV inhibition on mice after TBI. DPP-IV inhibitors reduce the degradation of endogenous GLP-1 and extend circulation of this protective peptide in the bloodstream. This class has yet to be investigated as a potential therapy for TBI. Methods: Mice were administrated once-daily 50 mg/kg of sitagliptin in a Nutella® ball or Nutella® alone throughout the study, beginning two days before severe trauma was induced with a stereotactic cryo-lesion. At two days post trauma, lesion size was determined. Brains were isolated for immunoblotting for assessment of selected biomarkers for pathology and protection.Results: Sitagliptin treatment reduced lesion size at day 2 post-injury by ~28% (p0.05. Conversely, apoptotic tone (alpha-spectrin fragmentation, Bcl-2 levels and the neuroinflammatory markers IL-6, and Iba-1 were not affected by treatment.Conclusions: This study shows, for the first time, that DPP-IV inhibition ameliorates both anatomical and biochemical consequences of TBI and activates CREB in the brain. Moreover, this work supports previous studies suggesting that the effect of GLP-1 analogues in models of brain damage relates to GLP-1 receptor stimulation in a dose-dependent manner.Keywords: GLP-1, Traumatic Brain Injury, TBI, sitagliptin, liraglutide, CREB, Oxidative Stress, GIP, DPP-IV, DPP-4

  9. Molecular Design, Synthesis and Trypanocidal Activity of Dipeptidyl Nitriles as Cruzain Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avelar, Leandro A. A.; Camilo, Cristian D.; de Albuquerque, Sérgio; Fernandes, William B.; Gonçalez, Cristiana; Kenny, Peter W.; Leitão, Andrei; McKerrow, James H.; Montanari, Carlos A.; Orozco, Erika V. Meñaca; Ribeiro, Jean F. R.; Rocha, Josmar R.; Rosini, Fabiana; Saidel, Marta E.

    2015-01-01

    A series of compounds based on the dipeptidyl nitrile scaffold were synthesized and assayed for their inhibitory activity against the T. cruzi cysteine protease cruzain. Structure activity relationships (SARs) were established using three, eleven and twelve variations respectively at the P1, P2 and P3 positions. A Ki value of 16 nM was observed for the most potent of these inhibitors which reflects a degree of non-additivity in the SAR. An X-ray crystal structure was determined for the ligand-protein complex for the structural prototype for the series. Twenty three inhibitors were also evaluated for their anti-trypanosomal effects and an EC50 value of 28 μM was observed for the most potent of these. Although there remains scope for further optimization, the knowledge gained from this study is also transferable to the design of cruzain inhibitors based on warheads other than nitrile as well as alternative scaffolds. PMID:26173110

  10. Molecular Design, Synthesis and Trypanocidal Activity of Dipeptidyl Nitriles as Cruzain Inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro A A Avelar

    Full Text Available A series of compounds based on the dipeptidyl nitrile scaffold were synthesized and assayed for their inhibitory activity against the T. cruzi cysteine protease cruzain. Structure activity relationships (SARs were established using three, eleven and twelve variations respectively at the P1, P2 and P3 positions. A Ki value of 16 nM was observed for the most potent of these inhibitors which reflects a degree of non-additivity in the SAR. An X-ray crystal structure was determined for the ligand-protein complex for the structural prototype for the series. Twenty three inhibitors were also evaluated for their anti-trypanosomal effects and an EC50 value of 28 μM was observed for the most potent of these. Although there remains scope for further optimization, the knowledge gained from this study is also transferable to the design of cruzain inhibitors based on warheads other than nitrile as well as alternative scaffolds.

  11. Molecular Design, Synthesis and Trypanocidal Activity of Dipeptidyl Nitriles as Cruzain Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avelar, Leandro A A; Camilo, Cristian D; de Albuquerque, Sérgio; Fernandes, William B; Gonçalez, Cristiana; Kenny, Peter W; Leitão, Andrei; McKerrow, James H; Montanari, Carlos A; Orozco, Erika V Meñaca; Ribeiro, Jean F R; Rocha, Josmar R; Rosini, Fabiana; Saidel, Marta E

    2015-01-01

    A series of compounds based on the dipeptidyl nitrile scaffold were synthesized and assayed for their inhibitory activity against the T. cruzi cysteine protease cruzain. Structure activity relationships (SARs) were established using three, eleven and twelve variations respectively at the P1, P2 and P3 positions. A Ki value of 16 nM was observed for the most potent of these inhibitors which reflects a degree of non-additivity in the SAR. An X-ray crystal structure was determined for the ligand-protein complex for the structural prototype for the series. Twenty three inhibitors were also evaluated for their anti-trypanosomal effects and an EC50 value of 28 μM was observed for the most potent of these. Although there remains scope for further optimization, the knowledge gained from this study is also transferable to the design of cruzain inhibitors based on warheads other than nitrile as well as alternative scaffolds.

  12. Benzothiophene inhibitors of MK2. Part 1: structure-activity relationships, assessments of selectivity and cellular potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David R; Meyers, Marvin J; Kurumbail, Ravi G; Caspers, Nicole; Poda, Gennadiy I; Long, Scott A; Pierce, Betsy S; Mahoney, Matthew W; Mourey, Robert J

    2009-08-15

    Identification of potent benzothiophene inhibitors of mitogen activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2), structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies, selectivity assessments against CDK2, cellular potency and mechanism of action are presented. Crystallographic data provide a rationale for the observed MK2 potency as well as selectivity over CDK2 for this class of inhibitors.

  13. Structurally unique recombinant Kazal-type proteinase inhibitor retains activity when terminally extended and glycosylated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kludkiewicz, Barbara; Kodrík, Dalibor; Grzelak, Krystyna; Nirmala, Xavier; Sehnal, Frantisek

    2005-10-01

    Recombinant derivatives of the Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor GmSPI2 (36 amino acid residues), which is a component of insect silk, were prepared in the expression vector Pichia pastoris. The rhSPI2 had a C-terminal hexahistidine tag attached to the GmSPI2 sequence, rtSPI2 was extended with GluAlaAla at the N-terminus, and rfSPI2 included this N-terminal extension and a C-terminal tail of 22 residues (myc epitope and hexahistidine). A portion of the secreted rfSI2 was O-glycosylated with a trimannosyl or hexamannosyl. The native inhibitor was active slightly on trypsin and highly on subtilisin and proteinase K. The extended C-terminus in rhSPI2 and rfSPI2 enhanced activity on the two latter enzymes and rendered rfSPI2 active on elastase and pronase, but abolished the inhibition of trypsin. The glycosylation of rfSPI2 reduced its inhibitory activity to a level comparable with the native inhibitor. The rtSPI2 with tripeptide extension at the N-terminus and no C-terminal modification was clearly less active than the native inhibitor. None of the tested compounds inhibited alpha-chymotrypsin and the non-serine proteinases.

  14. Gene expression and activity of digestive proteases in Daphnia: effects of cyanobacterial protease inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The frequency of cyanobacterial blooms has increased worldwide, and these blooms have been claimed to be a major factor leading to the decline of the most important freshwater herbivores, i.e. representatives of the genus Daphnia. This suppression of Daphnia is partly attributed to the presence of biologically active secondary metabolites in cyanobacteria. Among these metabolites, protease inhibitors are found in almost every natural cyanobacterial bloom and have been shown to specifically inhibit Daphnia's digestive proteases in vitro, but to date no physiological responses of these serine proteases to cyanobacterial protease inhibitors in Daphnia have been reported in situ at the protein and genetic levels. Results Nine digestive proteases were detected in D. magna using activity-stained SDS-PAGE. Subsequent analyses by LC-MS/MS and database search led to the identification of respective protease genes. D. magna responded to dietary protease inhibitors by up-regulation of the expression of these respective proteases at the RNA-level and by the induction of new and less sensitive protease isoforms at the protein level. The up-regulation in response to dietary trypsin- and chymotrypsin-inhibitors ranged from 1.4-fold to 25.6-fold. These physiological responses of Daphnia, i.e. up-regulation of protease expression and the induction of isoforms, took place even after feeding on 20% cyanobacterial food for only 24 h. These physiological responses proved to be independent from microcystin effects. Conclusion Here for the first time it was shown in situ that a D. magna clone responds physiologically to dietary cyanobacterial protease inhibitors by phenotypic plasticity of the targets of these specific inhibitors, i.e. Daphnia gut proteases. These regulatory responses are adaptive for D. magna, as they increase the capacity for protein digestion in the presence of dietary protease inhibitors. The type and extent of these responses in protease expression might

  15. Inhibitors of Testosterone Biosynthetic and Metabolic Activation Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leping Ye

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Leydig cells of the testis have the capacity to biosynthesize testosterone from cholesterol. Testosterone and its metabolically activated product dihydrotestosterone are critical for the development of male reproductive system and spermatogenesis. At least four steroidogenic enzymes are involved in testosterone biosynthesis: Cholesterol side chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11A1 for the conversion of cholesterol into pregnenolone within the mitochondria, 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD3B, for the conversion of pregnenolone into progesterone, 17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase (CYP17A1 for the conversion of progesterone into androstenedione and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD17B3 for the formation of testosterone from androstenedione. Testosterone is also metabolically activated into more potent androgen dihydrotestosterone by two isoforms 5α-reductase 1 (SRD5A1 and 2 (SRD5A2 in Leydig cells and peripheral tissues. Many endocrine disruptors act as antiandrogens via directly inhibiting one or more enzymes for testosterone biosynthesis and metabolic activation. These chemicals include industrial materials (perfluoroalkyl compounds, phthalates, bisphenol A and benzophenone and pesticides/biocides (methoxychlor, organotins, 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane and prochloraz and plant constituents (genistein and gossypol. This paper reviews these endocrine disruptors targeting steroidogenic enzymes.

  16. High antiangiogenic and low anticoagulant efficacy of orally active low molecular weight heparin derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Woo; Jeon, Ok Cheol; Kim, Sang Kyoon; Al-Hilal, Taslim Ahmed; Jin, Shun Ji; Moon, Hyun Tae; Yang, Victor C; Kim, Sang Yoon; Byun, Youngro

    2010-12-20

    Heparin, an anticoagulant that is widely used clinically, is also known to bind to several kinds of proteins through electrostatic interactions because of its polyanionic character. These interactions are mediated by the physicochemical properties of heparin such as sequence composition, sulfation patterns, charge distribution, overall charge density, and molecular size. Although this electrostatic character mediates its binding to many proteins related with tumor progression, thereby providing its antiangiogenic property, the administration of heparin for treating cancer is limited in clinical applications due to several drawbacks, such as its low oral absorption, unsatisfactory therapeutic effects, and strong anticoagulant activity which induces hemorrhaging. Here, we evaluated novel, orally active, low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) derivatives (LHD) conjugated with deoxycholic acid (DOCA) that show reduced anticoagulant activity and enhanced antiangiogenic activity. The chemical conjugate of LMWH and DOCA was synthesized by conjugating the amine group of N-deoxycholylethylamine (EtDOCA) with the carboxylic groups of heparin at various DOCA conjugation ratios. The LMWH-DOCA conjugate series (LHD1, LHD1.5, LHD2, and LHD4) were further formulated with poloxamer 407 as a solubilizer for oral administration. An in vitro endothelial tubular formation and in vivo Matrigel plug assay were performed to verify the antiangiogenic potential of LHD. Finally, we evaluated tumor growth inhibition of oral LHD administration in a SCC7 model as well as in A549 human cancer cell lines in a mouse xenograft model. Increasing DOCA conjugation ratios showed decreased anticoagulant activity, eventually to zero. LHD could block angiogenesis in the tubular formation assay and the Matrigel plug assay. In particular, oral administration of LHD4, which has 4 molecules of DOCA per mole of LMWH, inhibited tumor growth in SCC7 mice model as well as A549 mice xenograft model. LHD4 was orally

  17. Human 15-LOX-1 active site mutations alter inhibitor binding and decrease potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Michelle; van Hoorebeke, Christopher; Horn, Thomas; Deschamps, Joshua; Freedman, J Cody; Kalyanaraman, Chakrapani; Jacobson, Matthew P; Holman, Theodore

    2016-11-01

    Human 15-lipoxygenase-1 (h15-LOX-1 or h12/15-LOX) reacts with polyunsaturated fatty acids and produces bioactive lipid derivatives that are implicated in many important human diseases. One such disease is stroke, which is the fifth leading cause of death and the first leading cause of disability in America. The discovery of h15-LOX-1 inhibitors could potentially lead to novel therapeutics in the treatment of stroke, however, little is known about the inhibitor/active site interaction. This study utilizes site-directed mutagenesis, guided in part by molecular modeling, to gain a better structural understanding of inhibitor interactions within the active site. We have generated eight mutants (R402L, R404L, F414I, F414W, E356Q, Q547L, L407A, I417A) of h15-LOX-1 to determine whether these active site residues interact with two h15-LOX-1 inhibitors, ML351 and an ML094 derivative, compound 18. IC50 values and steady-state inhibition kinetics were determined for the eight mutants, with four of the mutants affecting inhibitor potency relative to wild type h15-LOX-1 (F414I, F414W, E356Q and L407A). The data indicate that ML351 and compound 18, bind in a similar manner in the active site to an aromatic pocket close to F414 but have subtle differences in their specific binding modes. This information establishes the binding mode for ML094 and ML351 and will be leveraged to develop next-generation inhibitors.

  18. PLA2-mediated catalytic activation of its inhibitor 25-acetyl-petrosaspongiolide M: serendipitous identification of a new PLA2 suicide inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, M C; Casapullo, A; Riccio, R; Gomez-Paloma, L

    2004-12-17

    25-Acetyl-petrosaspongiolide M (PMAc) (1), a mild non-covalent PLA(2) inhibitor, unexpectedly recovers, after incubation with bvPLA(2), the ability to covalently modify the enzyme target. This study demonstrates the catalytic effect of bvPLA(2) in converting 1 in its deacetylated congener petrosaspongiolide M (PM) (2), a strong covalent PLA(2) inhibitor whose molecular mechanism of inhibition has already been clarified. Moreover, our findings outline the potential role of PMAc as anti-inflammatory pro-drug, by virtue of its ability of delivering the active PM agent at the site of inflammation, functioning as a suicide inhibitor.

  19. Proteolytic and Trypsin Inhibitor Activity in Germinating Jojoba Seeds (Simmondsia chinensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samac, D; Storey, R

    1981-12-01

    Changes in proteolytic activity (aminopeptidase, carboxypeptidase, endopeptidase) were followed during germination (imbibition through seedling development) in extracts from cotyledons of jojoba seeds (Simmondsia chinensis). After imbibition, the cotyledons contained high levels of sulfhydryl aminopeptidase activity (APA) but low levels of serine carboxypeptidase activity (CPA). CPA increased with germination through the apparent loss of a CPA inhibitor substance in the seed. Curves showing changes in endopeptidase activity (EPA) assayed at pH 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 during germination were distinctly different. EPA at pH 4, 5, 6, and 7 showed characteristics of sulfhydryl enzymes while activity at pH 8 was probably due to a serine type enzyme. EPA at pH 6 was inhibited early in germination by one or more substances in the seed. Activities at pH 5 and later at pH 6 were the highest of all EPA throughout germination and increases in these activities were associated with a rapid loss of protein from the cotyledons of the developing seedling.Jojoba cotyledonary extracts were found to inhibit the enzymic activity of trypsin, chymotrypsin, and pepsin but not the protease from Aspergillus saotoi. The heat-labile trypsin inhibitor substance(s) was found in commercially processed jojoba seed meal and the albumin fraction of seed proteins. Trypsin inhibitor activity decreased with germination.

  20. Complement receptor 2-mediated targeting of complement inhibitors to sites of complement activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hongbin; He, Chun; Knaak, Christian; Guthridge, Joel M; Holers, V Michael; Tomlinson, Stephen

    2003-06-01

    In a strategy to specifically target complement inhibitors to sites of complement activation and disease, recombinant fusion proteins consisting of a complement inhibitor linked to a C3 binding region of complement receptor (CR) 2 were prepared and characterized. Natural ligands for CR2 are C3 breakdown products deposited at sites of complement activation. Fusion proteins were prepared consisting of a human CR2 fragment linked to either the N terminus or C terminus of soluble forms of the membrane complement inhibitors decay accelerating factor (DAF) or CD59. The targeted complement inhibitors bound to C3-opsonized cells, and all were significantly more effective (up to 20-fold) than corresponding untargeted inhibitors at protecting target cells from complement. CR2 fusion proteins also inhibited CR3-dependent adhesion of U937 cells to C3 opsonized erythrocytes, indicating a second potential anti-inflammatory mechanism of CR2 fusion proteins, since CR3 is involved in endothelial adhesion and diapedesis of leukocytes at inflammatory sites. Finally, the in vivo validity of the targeting strategy was confirmed by the demonstration that CR2-DAF, but not soluble DAF, targets to the kidney in mouse models of lupus nephritis that are associated with renal complement deposition.

  1. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor rosuvastatin improves abnormal brain electrical activity via mechanisms involving eNOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seker, F B; Kilic, U; Caglayan, B; Ethemoglu, M S; Caglayan, A B; Ekimci, N; Demirci, S; Dogan, A; Oztezcan, S; Sahin, F; Yilmaz, B; Kilic, E

    2015-01-22

    Apart from its repressing effect on plasma lipid levels, 3-hydroxy-3-methyl glutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors exert neuroprotective functions in animal models of neurodegenerative disorders. In view of these promising observations, we were interested in whether HMG-CoA reductase inhibition would affect epileptiform activity in the brain. To elucidate this issue, atorvastatin, simvastatin and rosuvastatin were administered orally at a dose of 20 mg/kg each for 3 days and their anti-epileptic activities were tested and compared in rats. Epileptiform activity in the brain was induced by an intracortical penicillin G injection. Among HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, simvastatin-treatment was less effective in terms of spike frequency as compared with atorvastatin- and rosuvastatin-treated animals. Atorvastatin treatment reduced spike frequencies and amplitudes significantly throughout the experiment. However, the most pronounced anti-epileptic effect was observed in rosuvastatin-treated animals, which was associated with improved blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity, increased expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mRNA and decreased expressions of pro-apoptotic p53, Bax and caspase-3 mRNAs. Inhibition of eNOS activity with L-NG-Nitroarginine Methyl Ester (L-NAME) reversed the anti-epileptic effect of rosuvastatin significantly. However, L-NAME did not alter the effect of rosuvastatin on the levels of p53, Bax and caspase-3 mRNA expression. Here, we provide evidence that among HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, rosuvastatin was the most effective statin on the reduction of epileptiform activity, which was associated with improved BBB permeability, increased expression of eNOS and decreased expressions of pro-apoptotic p53, Bax and caspase-3. Our observation also revealed that the anti-epileptic effect of rosuvastatin was dependent on the increased expression level of eNOS. The robust anti-epileptic effect encourages proof-of-concept studies with

  2. Protease inhibitors activity in lepromatous leprosy and lepra reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yemul, V L; Sengupta, S R; Dhole, T N

    1983-01-01

    Serum alpha one antitrypsin levels were measured in 50 healthy age and sex matched controls with 45 lepromatous leprosy cases and 5 cases of lepra reaction. It was noted that the mean level in healthy controls was 281.00 mg%, while the mean levels in LL patients was 421.00 mg% and in LR 570.00 mg%. The elevation of Alpha one antitrypsin was statistically significant in LL patients. It is possible that the rise is a reaction to release of proteases and or higher complement activity, which are the results of a high bacillary loading to formation of immune complexes.

  3. MULTIDENTATE TEREPHTHALAMIDATE AND HYDROXYPYRIDONATE LIGANDS: TOWARDS NEW ORALLY ACTIVE CHELATORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abergel, Rebecca J.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2011-07-13

    The limitations of current therapies for the treatment of iron overload or radioisotope contamination have stimulated efforts to develop new orally bioavailable iron and actinide chelators. Siderophore-inspired tetradentate, hexadentate and octadentate terephthalamidate and hydroxypyridonate ligands were evaluated in vivo as selective and efficacious iron or actinide chelating agents, with several metal loading and ligand assessment procedures, using {sup 59}Fe, {sup 238}Pu, and {sup 241}Am as radioactive tracers. The compounds presented in this study were compared to commercially available therapeutic sequestering agents [deferoxamine (DFO) for iron and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DPTA) for actinides] and are unrivaled in terms of affinity, selectivity and decorporation efficacy, which attests to the fact that high metal affinity may overcome the low bioavailability properties commonly associated to multidenticity.

  4. Structural basis of specific inhibition of tissue-type plasminogen activator by plasminogen activators inhibitor-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihu Gong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Thrombosis is a leading cause of death worldwide [1]. Recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA is the FDA-approved thrombolytic drug for ischemic strokes, myocardial infarction and pulmonary embolism. tPA is a multi-domain serine protease of the trypsin-family [2] and catalyses the critical step in fibrinolysis [3], converting the zymogen plasminogen to the active serine protease plasmin, which degrades the fibrin network of thrombi and blood clots. tPA is rapidly inactivated by endogenous plasminogen activators inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 [4] (Fig. 1. Engineering on tPA to reduce its inhibition by PAI-1 without compromising its thrombolytic effect is a continuous effort [5]. Tenecteplase (TNK-tPA is a newer generation of tPA variant showing slower inhibition by PAI-1 [6]. Extensive studies to understand the molecular interactions between tPA and PAI-1 have been carried out [7–18], however, the precise details at atomic resolution remain unknown. We report the crystal structure of tPA·PAI-1 complex here. The methods required to achieve these data include: (1 recombinant expression and purification of a PAI-1 variant (14-1B containing four mutations (N150H, K154T, Q319L, and M354I, and a tPA serine protease domain (tPA-SPD variant with three mutations (C122A, N173Q, and S195A, in the chymotrypsin numbering [19]; (2 formation of a tPA-SPD·PAI-1 Michaëlis complex in vitro [19]; and (3 solving the three-dimensional structure for this complex by X-ray crystallography [deposited in the PDB database as 5BRR]. The data explain the specificity of PAI-1 for tPA and uPA [19,20], and provide structural basis to design newer generation of PAI-1-resistant tPA variants as thrombolytic agents [19].

  5. The biological activity of a-mangostin, a larvicidal botanic mosquito sterol carrier protein-2 inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpha-mangostin derived from mangosteen was identified as a mosquito sterol carrier protein-2 inhibitor via high throughput insecticide screening. Alpha-mangostin was tested for its larvicidal activity against 3rd instar larvae of six mosquito species and the LC50 values range from 0.84 to 2.90 ppm....

  6. Novel Aza Peptide Inhibitors and Active-Site Probes of Papain-Family Cysteine Proteases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhelst, Steven H.L.; Witte, Martin D.; Arastu-Kapur, Shirin; Fonovic, Marko; Bogyo, Matthew

    2006-01-01

    Recent characterization of multiple classes of functionalized azapeptides as effective covalent inhibitors of cysteine proteases prompted us to investigate O-acyl hydroxamates and their azapeptide analogues for use as activity-based probes (ABPs). We report here a new class of azaglycine-containing

  7. Active Site Mapping of Human Cathepsin F with Dipeptide Nitrile Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Janina; Furtmann, Norbert; Ponert, Moritz; Frizler, Maxim; Löser, Reik; Bartz, Ulrike; Bajorath, Jürgen; Gütschow, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Cleavage of the invariant chain is the key event in the trafficking pathway of major histocompatibility complex class II. Cathepsin S is the major processing enzyme of the invariant chain, but cathepsin F acts in macrophages as its functional synergist which is as potent as cathepsin S in invariant chain cleavage. Dedicated low-molecular-weight inhibitors for cathepsin F have not yet been developed. An active site mapping with 52 dipeptide nitriles, reacting as covalent-reversible inhibitors, was performed to draw structure-activity relationships for the non-primed binding region of human cathepsin F. In a stepwise process, new compounds with optimized fragment combinations were designed and synthesized. These dipeptide nitriles were evaluated on human cysteine cathepsins F, B, L, K and S. Compounds 10 (N-(4-phenylbenzoyl)-leucylglycine nitrile) and 12 (N-(4-phenylbenzoyl)leucylmethionine nitrile) were found to be potent inhibitors of human cathepsin F, with Ki values nitriles from our study, a 3D activity landscape was generated to visualize structure-activity relationships for this series of cathepsin F inhibitors. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Relationship between plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1 gene polymorphisms and osteoporosis in Turkish women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merih Ozgen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The development of osteoporosis is associated with several risk factors, such as genetic structures that affect bone turnover and bone mass. The impact of genetic structures on osteoporosis is not known. Plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 regulates the bone matrix and bone balance. This study assessed the correlation between plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 gene 4G/5G polymorphisms and osteoporosis in a population of Turkish women. METHODS: A total of 195 postmenopausal female patients who were diagnosed with osteoporosis (Group I based on bone mineral density measurements via dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and 90 females with no osteoporosis (Group II were included in this study. Correlations between PAI-1 gene 4G/5G polymorphisms and osteoporosis were investigated through the identification of PAI-1 gene 4G/5G polymorphism genotypes using the polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: No significant differences in the genotype and allele frequency of 4G/5G plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 polymorphisms were observed between the two groups, and both groups exhibited the most frequently observed 4G5G genotype. CONCLUSION: No correlation between the development of osteoporosis in the female Turkish population and 4G/5G plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 gene polymorphisms was observed.

  9. Causal effect of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 on coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, Ci; Burgess, Stephen; Eicher, John D.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Huang, Jie; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Asselbergs, Folkert W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/270752137; Tregouet, David-Alexandre; Shin, So Youn; Ding, Jingzhong; Baumert, Jens; Oudot-Mellakh, Tiphaine; Folkersen, Lasse; Smith, Nicholas L.; Williams, Scott M; Ikram, Mohammad Arfan; Kleber, Marcus E.; Becker, Diane M.; Truong, Vinh; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C.; Tang, Weihong; Yang, Qiong; Sennblad, Bengt; Moore, Jason H; Williams, Frances M.K.; Dehghan, Abbas; Silbernagel, Günther; Schrijvers, Elisabeth M.C.; Smith, Shelly; Karakas, Mahir; Tofler, Geoffrey H.; Silveira, Angela; Navis, Gerjan J.; Lohman, Kurt; Chen, Ming Huei; Peters, Annette; Goel, Anuj; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Chambers, John C.; Saleheen, Danish; Lundmark, Per; Psaty, Bruce M.; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Carter, Angela M.; Meisinger, Christa; Peden, John F.; Bis, Joshua C.; McKnight, Barbara; Öhrvik, John; Taylor, Kent D.; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Seedorf, Udo; Collins, Rory; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Goodall, Alison H.; Yanek, Lisa R.; Cushman, Mary; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Folsom, Aaron R.; Basu, Saonli; Matijevic, Nena; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Danesh, John; Clarke, Robert; Meigs, James B; Kathiresan, Sekar; Reilly, Muredach P; Klopp, Norman; Harris, Tamara B.; Winkelmann, Bernhard R.; Grant, Peter J.; Hillege, Hans L.; Watkins, Hugh; Spector, Timothy D; Becker, Lewis C; Tracy, Russell P.; März, Winfried; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Eriksson, Per; Cambien, Francois; Morange, Pierre Emmanuel; Koenig, Wolfgang; Soranzo, Nicole; van der Harst, Pim; Liu, Yongmei; Hamsten, Anders; Ehret, Georg B.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Rice, Kenneth M.; Bochud, Murielle; Chasman, Daniel I.; Smith, Albert V.; Tobin, Martin D; Verwoert, Germaine C; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Pihur, Vasyl; Vollenweider, Peter; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Amin, Najaf; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Teumer, Alexander; Glazer, Nicole L.; Launer, Lenore J.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Heath, Simon; Sõber, Siim; Parsa, Afshin; Luan, Jian'an; Arora, Pankaj; Zhang, Feng; Lucas, Gavin; Hicks, Andrew A.; Jackson, Anne U.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Wild, Sarah H.; Rudan, Igor; Igl, Wilmar; Milaneschi, Yuri; Parker, Alex N.; Fava, Cristiano; Fox, Ervin R.; Kumari, Meena; Go, Min Jin; Linda Kao, Wen Hong; Sjögren, Marketa; Vinay, D. G.; Alexander, Myriam; Tabara, Yasuharu; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Whincup, Peter H.; Shi, Gang; Kuusisto, Johanna; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Seielstad, Mark; Sim, Xueling; Nguyen, Khanh Dung Hoang; Lehtimäki, Terho; Matullo, Giuseppe; Wu, Ying; Gaunt, Tom R.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/26504362X; Cooper, Matthew N.; Platou, Carl G P; Org, Elin; Hardy, Rebecca; Dahgam, Santosh; Palmen, Jutta; Vitart, Veronique; Braund, Peter S; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Uiterwaal, Cuno S.P.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/136603947; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Palmas, Walter R.; Campbell, Harry; Ludwig, Barbara; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Aspelund, Thor; Garcia, Melissa; Chang, Yen Pei C.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Steinle, Nanette I.; Grobbee, Diederick E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071889256; Arking, Dan E.; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Najjar, Samer; McArdle, Wendy L.; Hadley, David; Brown, Morris J; Connell, John M; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Day, Ian N M; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Beilby, John P.; Lawrence, Robert W.; Ongen, Halit; Dreisbach, Albert W; Li, Yali; Young, J. Hunter; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma S.; Adair, Linda S.; Lee, Nanette R.; Olden, Matthias; Pattaro, Cristian; Hoffman Bolton, Judith A.; Köttgen, Anna; Bergmann, Sven; Mooser, Vincent; Chaturvedi, Nish; Frayling, Timothy M.; Islam, Muhammad; Jafar, Tazeen H.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Kulkarni, Smita R.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Grässler, Jürgen; Groop, Leif C.; Voight, Benjamin F; Kettunen, Johannes; Howard, Philip; Taylor, Andrew; Guarrera, Simonetta; Ricceri, Fulvio; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew; Barroso, Inês; Khaw, Kay Tee; Weder, Alan B.; Hunt, Steven C.; Sun, Yan V.; Bergman, Richard N.; Collins, Francis S.; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Scott, Laura J; Stringham, Heather M.; Peltonen, Leena; Perola, Markus; Vartiainen, Erkki; Brand, Stefan Martin; Staessen, Jan A.; Wang, Thomas J.; Burton, Paul R.; Artigas, Maria Soler; Dong, Yanbin; Snieder, Harold; Wang, Xiaoling; Zhu, Haidong; Lohman, Kurt; Rudock, Megan E.; Heckbert, Susan R; Wiggins, Kerri L.; Doumatey, Ayo; Shriner, Daniel; Veldre, Gudrun; Viigimaa, Margus; Kinra, Sanjay; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Tripathy, Vikal; Langefeld, Carl D.; Rosengren, Annika; Thelle, Dag S.; Corsi, Anna Maria; Singleton, Andrew; Forrester, Terrence; Hilton, Gina; McKenzie, Colin A.; Salako, Tunde; Iwai, Naoharu; Kita, Yoshikuni; Ogihara, Toshio; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Okamura, Tomonori; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Umemura, Satoshi; Eyheramendy, Susana; Meitinger, Thomas; Wichmann, H-Erich; Cho, Yoon Shin; Kim, Hyung Lae; Lee, Jong-Young; Scott, James; Sehmi, Joban S.; Zhang, Weihua; Hedblad, Bo; Nilsson, Peter M.; Smith, George Davey; Wong, Andrew; Narisu, Narisu; Stančáková, Alena; Raffel, Leslie J.; Yao, Jie; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Arfan Ikram, M.; Longstreth, W.T. jr.; Mosley, Thomas H; Seshadri, Sudha; Shrine, Nick R.G.; Wain, Louise V.; Morken, Mario A.; Swift, Amy J.; Laitinen, Jaana; Prokopenko, Inga; Zitting, Paavo; Cooper, Jackie A.; Humphries, Steve E.; Rasheed, Asif; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Janipalli, Charles S.; Mani, K. Radha; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S.; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U.S.; Oostra, Ben A.; Demirkan, Ayse; Isaacs, Aaron; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Lakatta, Edward G; Orru, Marco; Scuteri, Angelo; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Kangas, Antti J.; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Soininen, Pasi; Tukiainen, Taru; Würtz, Peter; Ong, Rick Twee Hee; Dörr, Marcus; Kroemer, Heyo K; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Lathrop, Mark; Zelenika, Diana; Deloukas, Panos; Mangino, Massimo; Zhai, Guangju; Meschia, James F.; Nalls, Michael A.; Sharma, Pankaj; Terzic, Janos; Kumar, M. V.Kranthi; Denniff, Matthew; Zukowska-Szczechowska, Ewa; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Fowkes, F. Gerald R.; Charchar, Fadi J; Schwarz, Peter E. H.; Hayward, Caroline; Guo, Xiuqing; Rotimi, Charles N.; Bots, Michiel L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/110610032; Brand, Eva; Samani, Nilesh J.; Polasek, Ozren; Talmud, Philippa J.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Kuh, Diana; Laan, Maris; Hveem, Kristian; Palmer, Lyle J.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073449253; Casas, Juan P.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Vineis, Paolo; Raitakari, Olli T.; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Wong, Tien-Yin; Shyong Tai, E.; Cooper, Richard S.; Laakso, Markku; Rao, Dabeeru C.; Morris, Richard W.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Kivimaki, Mika; Marmot, Michael G.; Miki, Tetsuro; Chandak, Giriraj R.; Coresh, Josef; Navis, Gerjan J.; Salomaa, Veikko; Han, Bok-Ghee; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Melander, Olle; Ridker, Paul M.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Gyllensten, Ulf B.; Wright, Alan F.; Wilson, James F.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Farrall, Martin; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Elosua, Roberto; Sijbrands, Eric J. G.; Altshuler, David; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Gieger, Christian; Meneton, Pierre; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Rotter, Jerome I.; Rettig, Rainer; Uda, Manuela; Strachan, David P.; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Boehnke, Michael; Larson, Martin G.; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Elliott, Paul; Van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Caulfield, Mark J.; Johnson, Toby; van der Lugt, Aad; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Hofman, Albert; Kraja, Aldi T.; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Ziegler, Andreas; Newman, Anne B; Schillert, Arne; Oostra, Ben A.; Thorsson, Bolli; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Fox, Caroline S.; White, Charles C.; Ballantyne, Christie; Van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Herrington, David M.; O'Leary, Daniel H.; Siscovick, David S.; Couper, David J; Halperin, Eran; Stoegerer, Eva Maria; Ernst, Florian; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Homuth, Georg; Heiss, Gerardo; Usala, Gianluca; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Shen, Haiqing; Erich Wichmann, H.; Schmidt, Helena; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Markus, Hugh S.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.; Lüdemann, Jan; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Murabito, Joanne M.; Thiery, Joachim; Seissler, Jochen; Massaro, Joseph M.; Polak, Joseph F.; Cunningham, Julie; North, Kari E.; Petrovic, Katja E; Rice, Kenneth M.; Adrienne Cupples, L.; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Launer, Lenore J.; de Andrade, Mariza; Feitosa, Mary F.; Kavousi, Maryam; Sitzer, Matthias; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Province, Michael A.; Nalls, Michael A.; Franceschini, Nora; Peyser, Patricia A.; Wolf, Philip A.; Zhang, Qunyuan; Wild, Philipp S; Schnabel, Renate B.; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Chilukoti, Ravi Kumar; Schmidt, Reinhold; Sanna, Serena; Demissie, Serkalem; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Blankenberg, Stefan; Bevan, Steve; Elias-Smale, Suzette E.; Zeller, Tanja; Illig, Thomas; Münzel, Thomas; Howard, Timothy D.; Hoffmann, Udo; Schminke, Ulf; Nambi, Vijay; Post, Wendy S.; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Li, Xia; Cheng, Yu Ching

    2017-01-01

    Background--Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) plays an essential role in the fibrinolysis system and thrombosis. Population studies have reported that blood PAI-1 levels are associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). However, it is unclear whether the association

  10. Genetic and logic networks with the signal-inhibitor-activator structure are dynamically robust

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fangting; TAN Ning

    2006-01-01

    The proteins, DNA and RNA interaction networks govern various biological functions in living cells, these networks should be dynamically robust in the intracellular and environmental fluctuations. Here, we use Boolean network to study the robust structure of both genetic and logic networks. First, SOS network in bacteria E. coli, which regulates cell survival and repair after DNA damage, is shown to be dynamically robust. Comparing with cell cycle network in budding yeast and flagella network in E. coli, we find the signal-inhibitor-activator (SIA) structure in transcription regulatory networks. Second, under the dynamical rule that inhibition is much stronger than activation, we have searched 3-node non-self-loop logical networks that are dynamically robust, and that if the attractive basin of a final attractor is as large as seven, and the final attractor has only one active node, then the active node acts as inhibitor, and the SIA and signal-inhibitor (SI) structures are fundamental architectures of robust networks. SIA and SI networks with dynamic robustness against environment uncertainties may be selected and maintained over the course of evolution, rather than blind trial-error testing and be ing an accidental consequence of particular evolutionary history. SIA network can perform a more complex process than SI network, andSIA might be used to design robust artificial genetic network. Our results provide dynamical support for why the inhibitors and SIA/SI structures are frequently employed in cellular regulatory networks.

  11. Anti-tumor activity of cabozantinib by FAK down-regulation in human oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Lu Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cabozantinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor involved in inhibition of cell proliferation and colony formation. We studied anti-cancer properties of cabozantinib in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells. The viability of BHY and HSC-3 cells decreased with increase in cabozantinib concentration and time. The proliferation of cell lines was affected by increasing concentration of cabozantinib from 0.3 to 1.2 μM after 48 hours of treatment. The expression of MET and phosphorylated MET was not affected by cabozantinib treatment. Cabozantinib-treated cells when compared to control, showed concentration-dependent increase in BHY and HSC-3 cells during G2/M phase and decrease in S phase with increase in cabozantinib concentration. Annexin-V/propidium iodide double staining showed that cells with annexin-V increased with the increase in cabozantinib concentration. The expression of apoptosis related proteins cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved-PARP were increased with increase in cabozantinib concentration. It was also found that suppression of FAK activation and expression was dose dependent. The results from this study revealed that cabozantinib can be useful in developing a drug for effective treatment of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells.

  12. Tannerella forsythia invasion in oral epithelial cells requires phosphoinositide 3-kinase activation and clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishima, Elina; Sharma, Ashu

    2011-08-01

    Tannerella forsythia, a Gram-negative anaerobe implicated in periodontitis, has been detected within human buccal epithelial cells and shown to invade oral epithelial cells in vitro. We have previously shown that this bacterium triggers host tyrosine kinase-dependent phosphorylation and actin-dependent cytoskeleton reorganization for invasion. On the bacterial side, the leucine-rich repeat cell-surface BspA protein is important for entry. The present study was undertaken to identify host signalling molecules during T. forsythia entry into human oral and cervical epithelial cells. Specifically, the roles of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), Rho-family GTPases, cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains and the endocytic protein clathrin were investigated. For this purpose, cell lines were pretreated with chemical inhibitors or small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that target PI3Ks, Rho GTPases, clathrin and cholesterol (a critical component of 'lipid rafts'), and the resulting effects on T. forsythia uptake were determined. Our studies revealed that T. forsythia entry is dependent on host PI3K signalling, and that purified BspA protein causes activation of this lipid kinase. Bacterial entry also requires the cooperation of host Rac1 GTPase. Finally, our findings indicate an important role for clathrin and cholesterol-rich lipid microdomains in the internalization process.

  13. The anti-esophageal cancer cell activity by a novel tyrosine/phosphoinositide kinase inhibitor PP121

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Yi; Zhou, Yajuan [Department of Radiation and Medical Oncology, Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan 430071 (China); Cheng, Long [Department of Interventional Radiology, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Soochow University, Suzhou 215001 (China); Hu, Desheng; Zhou, Xiaoyi; Wang, Zhaohua [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan 430071 (China); Xie, Conghua, E-mail: chxie_65@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation and Medical Oncology, Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Zhou, Fuxiang, E-mail: ZhouFuxiangwuhan@126.com [Department of Radiation and Medical Oncology, Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2015-09-11

    Here we explored the potential effect of PP121, a novel dual inhibitor of tyrosine and phosphoinositide kinases, against human esophageal cancer cells. We showed that PP121 exerted potent cytotoxic effect in primary (patient-derived) and established (Eca-109, TE-1 and TE-3 lines) esophageal cancer cells, possibly through activating caspase-3-dependnent apoptosis. PP121 was, however, non-cytotoxic to the normal human esophageal epithelial cells (EECs). At the molecular level, we showed that PP121 blocked Akt-mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) activation in esophageal cancer cells, which was restored by introducing a constitutively-active Akt (CA-Akt). Yet, CA-Akt only partly inhibited cytotoxicity by PP121 in Eca-109 cells. Importantly, we showed that PP121 inhibited nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) signaling activation in esophageal cancer cells, which appeared independent of Akt-mTOR blockage. In vivo, oral administration of PP121 remarkably inhibited Eca-109 xenograft growth in nude mice, and significantly improved mice survival. Further, the immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western blot assays analyzing xenografted tumors showed that PP121 inhibited Akt-mTOR and NFκB activations in vivo. Together, we demonstrate that PP121 potently inhibits esophageal cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, possibly through concurrently inhibiting Akt-mTOR and NFκB signalings. - Highlights: • PP121 is cytotoxic against primary and established esophageal cancer cells. • PP121 induces caspase-3-dependnent apoptosis in esophageal cancer cells. • PP121 blocks Akt-mTOR activation in esophageal cancer cells. • PP121 inhibits NFκB activation, independent of Akt-mTOR blockage. • PP121 inhibits Eca-109 xenograft growth and Akt-mTOR/NFκB activation in vivo.

  14. Contribution of plasminogen activation towards the pathogenic potential of oral streptococci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Itzek

    Full Text Available Oral streptococci are a heterogeneous group of human commensals, with a potential to cause serious infections. Activation of plasminogen has been shown to increase the virulence of typical human pathogenic streptococci such as S. pneumoniae. One important factor for plasminogen activation is the streptococcal α-enolase. Here we report that plasminogen activation is also common in oral streptococci species involved in clinical infection and that it depends on the action of human plasminogen activators. The ability to activate plasminogen did not require full conservation of the internal plasminogen binding sequence motif FYDKERKVY of α-enolase that was previously described as crucial for increased plasminogen binding, activation and virulence. Instead, experiments with recombinant α-enolase variants indicate that the naturally occurring variations do not impair plasminogen binding. In spite of these variations in the internal plasminogen binding motif oral streptococci showed similar activation of plasminogen. We conclude that the pathomechanism of plasminogen activation is conserved in oral streptococci that cause infections in human. This may contribute to their opportunistic pathogenic character that is unfurled in certain niches.

  15. Effect of the hepatitis C virus protease inhibitor faldaprevir on the pharmacokinetics of an oral contraceptive containing ethinylestradiol and levonorgestrel in healthy female volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabo, John P; Lang, Benjamin; Elgadi, Mabrouk; Huang, Fenglei

    2015-01-01

    Faldaprevir is a potent hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3/4A protease inhibitor. Faldaprevir is known to inhibit P-glycoprotein, CYP3A4, and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1. This study evaluated the effect of steady-state 240 mg faldaprevir on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of an oral contraceptive containing ethinylestradiol (EE) and levonorgestrel (LNG) in healthy premenopausal women. In period 1, subjects received EE/LNG once daily (QD) for 14 days. Blood samples were taken on days 1, 11, and 12, with intensive PK blood sampling for EE and LNG on day 13. In period 2, subjects received EE-LNG QD and 240 mg faldaprevir QD on days 14 to 21 (240 mg faldaprevir twice daily on day 14). Blood samples were taken on days 14, 19, and 20, with PK profiling samples obtained for EE and LNG on day 21. A total of 15/16 subjects completed the study. Overall, EE and LNG exposure (assessed by the area under the curve) was approximately 1.4-fold higher when EE and LNG were coadministered with faldaprevir than when administered alone. Median t1/2 (terminal half-life in plasma at steady state) values were prolonged for both EE (2.4 h longer) and LNG (4.7 h longer) when EE and LNG were coadministered with faldaprevir. The mean oral clearance and apparent volume of distribution of both EE and LNG were lower (∼ 30%) when EE and LNG were coadministered with faldaprevir. Coadministration of faldaprevir and an oral contraceptive resulted in a moderate increase in exposure to both EE and LNG. However, this increase was not considered clinically meaningful, and no dose adjustment of oral contraceptives was deemed necessary. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration number NCT01570244.).

  16. Cytotoxicity and Antimicrobial Activity of Oral Rinses In Vitro

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Heinz-Dieter Müller; Sigrun Eick; Andreas Moritz; Adrian Lussi; Reinhard Gruber

    2017-01-01

    .... Antimicrobial activity was screened against five bacterial strains using disc diffusion. Cytotoxicity was determined by mitochondrial reductase activity with primary gingival fibroblasts, L929 cells, and HSC-2 epithelial cells...

  17. Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) and P-glycoprotein (P-GP/ABCB1) restrict oral availability and brain accumulation of the PARP inhibitor rucaparib (AG-014699).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmus, Selvi; Sparidans, Rolf W; van Esch, Anita; Wagenaar, Els; Beijnen, Jos H; Schinkel, Alfred H

    2015-01-01

    Rucaparib is a potent, orally available, small-molecule inhibitor of poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) 1 and 2. Ongoing clinical trials are assessing the efficacy of rucaparib alone or in combination with other cytotoxic drugs, mainly in breast and ovarian cancer patients with mutations in the breast cancer associated (BRCA) genes. We aimed to establish whether the multidrug efflux transporters ABCG2 (BCRP) and ABCB1 (P-gp, MDR1) affect the oral availability and brain penetration of rucaparib in mice. In vitro, rucaparib was efficiently transported by both human ABCB1 and ABCG2, and very efficiently by mouse Abcg2. Transport could be inhibited by the small-molecule ABCB1 and ABCG2 inhibitors zosuquidar and Ko143, respectively. In vivo, oral availability (plasma AUC0-1 and AUC0-24) and brain levels of rucaparib at 1 and 24 h were increased by the absence of both Abcg2 and Abcb1a/1b after oral administration of rucaparib at 10 mg/kg. Our data show to our knowledge for the first time that oral availability and brain accumulation of a PARP inhibitor are markedly and additively restricted by Abcg2 and Abcb1a/1b. This may have clinical relevance for improvement of rucaparib therapy in PARP inhibitor-resistant tumors with ABCB1 and/or ABCG2 expression and in patients with brain (micro)metastases positioned behind a functional blood-brain barrier.

  18. Spirocyclic ureas: orally bioavailable 11 beta-HSD1 inhibitors identified by computer-aided drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, Colin M; Zhao, Wei; Xu, Zhenrong; Cacatian, Salvacion T; Simpson, Robert D; Ye, Yuan-Jie; Singh, Suresh B; McKeever, Brian M; Lindblom, Peter; Guo, Joan; Krosky, Paula M; Kruk, Barbara A; Berbaum, Jennifer; Harrison, Richard K; Johnson, Judith J; Bukhtiyarov, Yuri; Panemangalore, Reshma; Scott, Boyd B; Zhao, Yi; Bruno, Joseph G; Zhuang, Linghang; McGeehan, Gerard M; He, Wei; Claremon, David A

    2010-02-01

    Structure-guided drug design led to the identification of a class of spirocyclic ureas which potently inhibit human 11beta-HSD1 in vitro. Lead compound 10j was shown to be orally bioavailable in three species, distributed into adipose tissue in the mouse, and its (R) isomer 10j2 was efficacious in a primate pharmacodynamic model.

  19. Changes in blood levels of proteinase inhibitors, pregnancy zone protein, steroid carriers and complement factors induced by oral contraceptives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Poulsen, Henning Kvist; Teisner, Børge

    1993-01-01

    Three low-dose oral contraceptives Trinordiol, Gynatrol, and Marvelon, containing ethinylestradiol (EE) in combination with triphasic levonorgestrel (LNg), monophasic levonorgestrel, and monophasic desogestrel (DGS), respectively, were given to 65 healthy women, n = 21-22 in each group. Blood...... presumably enhances fibrinolysis, and that LNg has higher anti-estrogenicity and androgenicity than DSG. Udgivelsesdato: 1993-Sep...

  20. Changes in blood levels of proteinase inhibitors, pregnancy zone protein, steroid carriers and complement factors induced by oral contraceptives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Poulsen, H K; Teisner, B

    1993-01-01

    Three low-dose oral contraceptives Trinordiol, Gynatrol, and Marvelon, containing ethinylestradiol (EE) in combination with triphasic levonorgestrel (LNg), monophasic levonorgestrel, and monophasic desogestrel (DGS), respectively, were given to 65 healthy women, n = 21-22 in each group. Blood...... presumably enhances fibrinolysis, and that LNg has higher anti-estrogenicity and androgenicity than DSG....

  1. Contraceptive Efficacy of Oral and Transdermal Hormones When Co-Administered With Protease Inhibitors in HIV-1–Infected Women: Pharmacokinetic Results of ACTG Trial A5188

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, Mary A.; Patterson, Kristine; Kamemoto, Lori; Park, Jeong-Gun; Watts, Heather; Aweeka, Francesca; Klingman, Karin L.; Cohn, Susan E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pharmacokinetic (PK) interactions between lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r) and transdermally delivered ethinyl estradiol (EE) and norelgestromin (NGMN) are unknown. Methods Using a standard noncompartmental PK analysis, we compared EE area under the time–concentration curve (AUC) and NGMN AUC during transdermal contraceptive patch administration in HIV-1–infected women on stable LPV/r to a control group of women not on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). In addition, EE AUC after a single dose of a combination oral contraceptive pill including EE and norethindrone was measured before patch placement and was compared with patch EE AUC in both groups. Contraceptive effects on LPV/r PKs were estimated by measuring LPV/r AUC at baseline and during week 3 of patch administration. Results Eight women on LPV/r, and 24 women in the control group were enrolled. Patch EE median AUC0–168 h was 45% lower at 6010.36 pg·h·mL−1 in those on LPV/r versus 10911.42 pg·h·mL−1 in those on no HAART (P = 0.064). Pill EE median AUC0–48 hours was similarly 55% lower at 344.67 pg·h·mL−1 in those on LPV/r versus 765.38 pg·h·mL−1 in those on no HAART (P = 0.003). Patch NGMN AUC0–168 h however, was 138.39 ng·h·mL−1, 83% higher in the LPV/r group compared with the control AUC of 75.63 ng·h·mL−1 (P = 0.036). After 3 weeks on the patch, LPVAUC0–8 h decreased by 19%, (P = 0.156). Conclusions Although PKs of contraceptive EE and NGMN are significantly altered with LPV/r, the contraceptive efficacy of the patch is likely to be maintained. Larger studies are indicated to fully assess contraceptive efficacy versus risks of the transdermal contraceptive patch when co-administered with protease inhibitors. PMID:20842042

  2. Identification of inhibitors against the potential ligandable sites in the active cholera toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangopadhyay, Aditi; Datta, Abhijit

    2015-04-01

    The active cholera toxin responsible for the massive loss of water and ions in cholera patients via its ADP ribosylation activity is a heterodimer of the A1 subunit of the bacterial holotoxin and the human cytosolic ARF6 (ADP Ribosylation Factor 6). The active toxin is a potential target for the design of inhibitors against cholera. In this study we identified the potential ligandable sites of the active cholera toxin which can serve as binding sites for drug-like molecules. By employing an energy-based approach to identify ligand binding sites, and comparison with the results of computational solvent mapping, we identified two potential ligandable sites in the active toxin which can be targeted during structure-based drug design against cholera. Based on the probe affinities of the identified ligandable regions, docking-based virtual screening was employed to identify probable inhibitors against these sites. Several indole-based alkaloids and phosphates showed strong interactions to the important residues of the ligandable region at the A1 active site. On the other hand, 26 top scoring hits were identified against the ligandable region at the A1 ARF6 interface which showed strong hydrogen bonding interactions, including guanidines, phosphates, Leucopterin and Aristolochic acid VIa. This study has important implications in the application of hybrid structure-based and ligand-based methods against the identified ligandable sites using the identified inhibitors as reference ligands, for drug design against the active cholera toxin.

  3. The oral histone deacetylase inhibitor ITF2357 reduces cytokines and protects islet ß cells in vivo and in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewis, Eli C; Blaabjerg, Lykke; Størling, Joachim;

    2011-01-01

    In type 1 diabetes, inflammatory and immunocompetent cells enter the islet and produce proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1ß (IL-1ß), IL-12, tumor necrosis factor-a (TNFa) and interferon-¿ (IFN¿); each contribute to ß-cell destruction, mediated in part by nitric oxide. Inhibitors...

  4. Oral administration of the NADPH-oxidase inhibitor apocynin partially restores diminished cartilage proteoglycan synthesis and reduces inflammation in mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hougee, S.; Hartog, A.; Sanders, A.; Graus, Y.M.; Hoijer, M.A.; Garssen, J.; Berg, W.B. van den; Beuningen, H.M. van; Smit, H.F.

    2006-01-01

    Apocynin, an inhibitor of NADPH-oxidase, is known to partially reverse the inflammation-mediated cartilage proteoglycan synthesis in chondrocytes. More recently, it was reported that apocynin prevents cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression in monocytes. The present study aimed to investigate whether thes

  5. Rationalization of Activity Cliffs of a Sulfonamide Inhibitor of DNA Methyltransferases with Induced-Fit Docking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Medina-Franco

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Inhibitors of human DNA methyltransferases (DNMT are of increasing interest to develop novel epi-drugs for the treatment of cancer and other diseases. As the number of compounds with reported DNMT inhibition is increasing, molecular docking is shedding light to elucidate their mechanism of action and further interpret structure–activity relationships. Herein, we present a structure-based rationalization of the activity of SW155246, a distinct sulfonamide compound recently reported as an inhibitor of human DNMT1 obtained from high-throughput screening. We used flexible and induce-fit docking to develop a binding model of SW155246 with a crystallographic structure of human DNMT1. Results were in excellent agreement with experimental information providing a three-dimensional structural interpretation of ‘activity cliffs’, e.g., analogues of SW155246 with a high structural similarity to the sulfonamide compound, but with no activity in the enzymatic assay.

  6. [Response of N transformation related soil enzyme activities to inhibitor applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lijun; Wu, Zhijie; Jiang, Yong; Zhou, Likai

    2002-09-01

    With an aerobic incubation test, this paper studied the response of soil urease, nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, and hydroxylamine reductase to urease inhibitor hydroquinone (HQ) applied in combination with nitrification inhibitor encapsulated calcium carbide (HQ + ECC) or dicyandiamide (HQ + DCD). The results showed that HQ + DCD could inhibit urease activity and increase activities of nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, and hydroxylamine reductase significantly in comparison with CK, HQ and HQ + ECC. Under the condition of our test, there existed a significant relationship between soil urease, nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, and hydroxylamine reductase activities and soil NH4+ and NO3- contents, NH3 volatilization and N2O emission rate, and regression analysis indicated that there were significantly positive relationships between soil urease, nitrite reductase and hydroxylamine reductase activities.

  7. Removal of the Fermentation Inhibitor, Furfural, Using Activated Carbon in Cellulosic-Ethanol Production

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Kuang

    2011-12-21

    Ethanol can be produced from lignocellulosic biomass through fermentation; however, some byproducts from lignocellulosics, such as furfural compounds, are highly inhibitory to the fermentation and can substantially reduce the efficiency of ethanol production. In this study, commercial and polymer-derived activated carbons were utilized to selectively remove the model fermentation inhibitor, furfural, from water solution during bioethanol production. The oxygen functional groups on the carbon surface were found to influence the selectivity of sorbents between inhibitors and sugars during the separation. After inhibitors were selectively removed from the broth, the cell growth and ethanol production efficiency was recovered noticeably in the fermentation. A sorption/desorption cycle was designed, and the sorbents were regenerated in a fixed-bed column system using ethanol-containing standard solution. Dynamic mass balance was obtained after running four or five cycles, and regeneration results were stable even after twenty cycles. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  8. Biotin analogues with antibacterial activity are potent inhibitors of biotin protein ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares da Costa, Tatiana P; Tieu, William; Yap, Min Y; Zvarec, Ondrej; Bell, Jan M; Turnidge, John D; Wallace, John C; Booker, Grant W; Wilce, Matthew C J; Abell, Andrew D; Polyak, Steven W

    2012-06-14

    There is a desperate need to develop new antibiotic agents to combat the rise of drug-resistant bacteria, such as clinically important Staphylococcus aureus. The essential multifunctional enzyme, biotin protein ligase (BPL), is one potential drug target for new antibiotics. We report the synthesis and characterization of a series of biotin analogues with activity against BPLs from S. aureus, Escherichia coli, and Homo sapiens. Two potent inhibitors with K i 20-fold selectivity between the isozymes were identified and characterized. The antibacterial mode of action was shown to be via inhibition of BPL. The bimolecular interactions between the BPL and the inhibitors were defined by surface plasmon resonance studies and X-ray crystallography. These findings pave the way for second-generation inhibitors and antibiotics with greater potency and selectivity.

  9. Structure and activity of NO synthase inhibitors specific to the L-arginine binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proskuryakov, S Ya; Konoplyannikov, A G; Skvortsov, V G; Mandrugin, A A; Fedoseev, V M

    2005-01-01

    Synthesis of compounds containing a fragment similar to the guanidine group of L-arginine, which is a substrate of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), is the main direction in creating NOS inhibitors. The inhibitory effect of such compounds is caused not only by their competition with the substrate for the L-arginine-binding site and/or oxidizing center of the enzyme (heme) but also by interaction with peptide motifs of the enzyme that influence its dimerization, affinity for cofactors, and interaction with associated proteins. Structures, activities, and relative in vitro and in vivo specificities of various NOS inhibitors (amino acid and non-amino acid) with linear or cyclic structure and containing guanidine, amidine, or isothiuronium group are considered. These properties are mainly analyzed by comparison with effects of the inhibitors on the inducible NOS.

  10. Targeting KIT on innate immune cells to enhance the antitumor activity of checkpoint inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Maximilian; Gedrich, Richard; Peck, Ronald; LaVallee, Theresa; Eder, Joseph Paul

    2016-06-01

    Innate immune cells such as mast cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells are key components of the tumor microenvironment. Recent evidence indicates that levels of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in melanoma patients are associated with poor survival to checkpoint inhibitors. This suggests that targeting both the innate and adaptive suppressive components of the immune system will maximize clinical benefit and elicit more durable responses in cancer patients. Preclinical data suggest that targeting signaling by the receptor tyrosine kinase KIT, particularly on mast cells, may modulate innate immune cell numbers and activity in tumors. Here, we review data highlighting the importance of the KIT signaling in regulating antitumor immune responses and the potential benefit of combining selective KIT inhibitors with immune checkpoint inhibitors.

  11. The MET/AXL/FGFR Inhibitor S49076 Impairs Aurora B Activity and Improves the Antitumor Efficacy of Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clémenson, Céline; Chargari, Cyrus; Liu, Winchygn; Mondini, Michele; Ferté, Charles; Burbridge, Mike F; Cattan, Valérie; Jacquet-Bescond, Anne; Deutsch, Eric

    2017-06-15

    Several therapeutic agents targeting HGF/MET signaling are under clinical development as single agents or in combination, notably with anti-EGFR therapies in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, despite increasing data supporting a link between MET, irradiation, and cancer progression, no data regarding the combination of MET-targeting agents and radiotherapy are available from the clinic. S49076 is an oral ATP-competitive inhibitor of MET, AXL, and FGFR1-3 receptors that is currently in phase I/II clinical trials in combination with gefitinib in NSCLC patients whose tumors show resistance to EGFR inhibitors. Here, we studied the impact of S49076 on MET signaling, cell proliferation, and clonogenic survival in MET-dependent (GTL16 and U87-MG) and MET-independent (H441, H460, and A549) cells. Our data show that S49076 exerts its cytotoxic activity at low doses on MET-dependent cells through MET inhibition, whereas it inhibits growth of MET-independent cells at higher but clinically relevant doses by targeting Aurora B. Furthermore, we found that S49076 improves the antitumor efficacy of radiotherapy in both MET-dependent and MET-independent cell lines in vitro and in subcutaneous and orthotopic tumor models in vivo In conclusion, our study demonstrates that S49076 has dual antitumor activity and can be used in combination with radiotherapy for the treatment of both MET-dependent and MET-independent tumors. These results support the evaluation of combined treatment of S49076 with radiation in clinical trials without patient selection based on the tumor MET dependency status. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(10); 1-13. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Small molecule inhibitors block Gas6-inducible TAM activation and tumorigenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimani, Stanley G.; Kumar, Sushil; Bansal, Nitu; Singh, Kamalendra; Kholodovych, Vladyslav; Comollo, Thomas; Peng, Youyi; Kotenko, Sergei V.; Sarafianos, Stefan G.; Bertino, Joseph R.; Welsh, William J.; Birge, Raymond B.

    2017-01-01

    TAM receptors (Tyro-3, Axl, and Mertk) are a family of three homologous type I receptor tyrosine kinases that are implicated in several human malignancies. Overexpression of TAMs and their major ligand Growth arrest-specific factor 6 (Gas6) is associated with more aggressive staging of cancers, poorer predicted patient survival, acquired drug resistance and metastasis. Here we describe small molecule inhibitors (RU-301 and RU-302) that target the extracellular domain of Axl at the interface of the Ig-1 ectodomain of Axl and the Lg-1 of Gas6. These inhibitors effectively block Gas6-inducible Axl receptor activation with low micromolar IC50s in cell-based reporter assays, inhibit Gas6-inducible motility in Axl-expressing cell lines, and suppress H1299 lung cancer tumor growth in a mouse xenograft NOD-SCIDγ model. Furthermore, using homology models and biochemical verifications, we show that RU301 and 302 also inhibit Gas6 inducible activation of Mertk and Tyro3 suggesting they can act as pan-TAM inhibitors that block the interface between the TAM Ig1 ectodomain and the Gas6 Lg domain. Together, these observations establish that small molecules that bind to the interface between TAM Ig1 domain and Gas6 Lg1 domain can inhibit TAM activation, and support the further development of small molecule Gas6-TAM interaction inhibitors as a novel class of cancer therapeutics. PMID:28272423

  13. Basis Tetrapeptides as Potent Intracellular Inhibitors of type A Botulinum Neurotoxin Protease Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, M.; Swaminathan, S.; Oyler, G.; Ahmed, S. A.

    2011-01-21

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are the most potent of all toxins that cause flaccid muscle paralysis leading to death. They are also potential biothreat agents. A systematic investigation of various short peptide inhibitors of the BoNT protease domain with a 17-residue peptide substrate led to arginine-arginine-glycine-cysteine having a basic tetrapeptide structure as the most potent inhibitor. When assayed in the presence of dithiothreitol (DTT), the inhibitory effect was drastically reduced. Replacing the terminal cysteine with one hydrophobic residue eliminated the DTT effect but with two hydrophobic residues made the pentapeptide a poor inhibitor. Replacing the first arginine with cysteine or adding an additional cysteine at the N terminus did not improve inhibition. When assessed using mouse brain lysates, the tetrapeptides also inhibited BoNT/A cleavage of the endogenous SNAP-25. The peptides penetrated the neuronal cell lines, N2A and BE(2)-M17, without adversely affecting metabolic functions as measured by ATP production and P-38 phosphorylation. Biological activity of the peptides persisted within cultured chick motor neurons and rat and mouse cerebellar neurons for more than 40 h and inhibited BoNT/A protease action inside the neurons in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Our results define a tetrapeptide as the smallest peptide inhibitor in the backdrop of a large substrate protein of 200+ amino acids having multiple interaction regions with its cognate enzyme. The inhibitors should also be valuable candidates for drug development.

  14. ESTABLISHMENT OF THE ANTIOXIDANT/ANTIRADICAL ACTIVITY OF THE INHIBITORS USING THE DPPH–RADICAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Gonta

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This research paper presents the results of the investigation of antioxidant activities of various inhibitors, which are constituents of winery products: quercitin, rezveratrol, dihydroxyfumaric acid. Also, the antioxidant activity of tartaric and dihydroxyfumaric (DFH4 acids derivatives has been determined: sodium dihydroxyfumarate, dimethylic ester of DFH4 and dimethylic ester of tartaric acid. The enotannin extracts obtained from grape seeds have been evaluated: the non-oxidized enotannin extract Eneox and the oxidized one -Enoxil.

  15. Discovery of orally active hepatoselective glucokinase activators for treatment of Type II Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiayi; Lin, Songnian; Myers, Robert W; Trujillo, Maria E; Pachanski, Michele J; Malkani, Sunita; Chen, Hsuan-Shen; Chen, Zhesheng; Campbell, Brian; Eiermann, George J; Elowe, Nadine; Farrer, Brian T; Feng, Wen; Fu, Qinghong; Kats-Kagan, Roman; Kavana, Michael; McMasters, Daniel R; Mitra, Kaushik; Tong, Xinchun; Xu, Libo; Zhang, Fengqi; Zhang, Rui; Addona, George H; Berger, Joel P; Zhang, Bei; Parmee, Emma R

    2017-05-01

    Systemically acting glucokinase activators (GKA) have been demonstrated in clinical trials to effectively lower blood glucose in patients with type II diabetes. However, mechanism-based hypoglycemia is a major adverse effect that limits the therapeutic potential of these agents. We hypothesized that the predominant mechanism leading to hypoglycemia is GKA-induced excessive insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells at (sub-)euglycemic levels. We further hypothesized that restricting GK activation to hepatocytes would maintain glucose-lowering efficacy while significantly reducing hypoglycemic risk. Here we report the discovery of a novel series of carboxylic acid substituted GKAs based on pyridine-2-carboxamide. These GKAs exhibit preferential distribution to the liver versus the pancreas in mice. SAR studies led to the identification of a potent and orally active hepatoselective GKA, compound 6. GKA 6 demonstrated robust glucose lowering efficacy in high fat diet-fed mice at doses ⩾10mpk, with ⩾70-fold liver:pancreas distribution, minimal effects on plasma insulin levels, and significantly reduced risk of hypoglycemia. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester Inhibits Oral Cancer Cell Metastasis by Regulating Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 and the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Yu Peng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE, an active component extracted from honeybee hives, exhibits anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities. However, the molecular mechanism by which CAPE affects oral cancer cell metastasis has yet to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the potential mechanisms underlying the effects of CAPE on the invasive ability of SCC-9 oral cancer cells. Results showed that CAPE attenuated SCC-9 cell migration and invasion at noncytotoxic concentrations (0 μM to 40 μM. Western blot and gelatin zymography analysis findings further indicated that CAPE downregulated matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 protein expression and inhibited its enzymatic activity. CAPE exerted its inhibitory effects on MMP-2 expression and activity by upregulating tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2 and potently decreased migration by reducing focal adhesion kinase (FAK phosphorylation and the activation of its downstream signaling molecules p38/MAPK and JNK. These data indicate that CAPE could potentially be used as a chemoagent to prevent oral cancer metastasis.

  17. Lovastatin inhibits VEGFR and AKT activation: synergistic cytotoxicity in combination with VEGFR inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong T Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In a recent study, we demonstrated the ability of lovastatin, a potent inhibitor of mevalonate synthesis, to inhibit the function of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. Lovastatin attenuated ligand-induced receptor activation and downstream signaling through the PI3K/AKT pathway. Combining lovastatin with gefitinib, a potent EGFR inhibitor, induced synergistic cytotoxicity in a variety of tumor derived cell lines. The vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR and EGFR share similar activation, internalization and downstream signaling characteristics. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The VEGFRs, particularly VEGFR-2 (KDR, Flt-1, play important roles in regulating tumor angiogenesis by promoting endothelial cell proliferation, survival and migration. Certain tumors, such as malignant mesothelioma (MM, also express both the VEGF ligand and VEGFRs that act in an autocrine loop to directly stimulate tumor cell growth and survival. In this study, we have shown that lovastatin inhibits ligand-induced VEGFR-2 activation through inhibition of receptor internalization and also inhibits VEGF activation of AKT in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC and H28 MM cells employing immunofluorescence and Western blotting. Combinations of lovastatin and a VEGFR-2 inhibitor showed more robust AKT inhibition than either agent alone in the H28 MM cell line. Furthermore, combining 5 µM lovastatin treatment, a therapeutically relevant dose, with two different VEGFR-2 inhibitors in HUVEC and the H28 and H2052 mesothelioma derived cell lines demonstrated synergistic cytotoxicity as demonstrated by MTT cell viability and flow cytometric analyses. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results highlight a novel mechanism by which lovastatin can regulate VEGFR-2 function and a potential therapeutic approach for MM through combining statins with VEGFR-2 inhibitors.

  18. Inhibitors of c-Jun phosphorylation impede ovine primordial follicle activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoldo, Michael J; Bernard, Jérémy; Duffard, Nicolas; Tsikis, Guillaume; Alves, Sabine; Calais, Laure; Uzbekova, Svetlana; Monniaux, Danielle; Mermillod, Pascal; Locatelli, Yann

    2016-05-01

    Is the c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway implicated in primordial follicle activation? Culture of ovine ovarian cortex in the presence of two different c-Jun phosphorylation inhibitors impeded pre-antral follicle activation. Despite its importance for fertility preservation therapies, the mechanisms of primordial follicle activation are poorly understood. Amongst different signalling pathways potentially involved, the JNK pathway has been previously shown to be essential for cell cycle progression and pre-antral follicle development in mice. Ovine ovarian cortex pieces were cultured with varying concentrations of SP600125, JNK inhibitor VIII or anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH) in the presence of FSH for 9 days. Follicular morphometry and immunohistochemistry for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), apoptosis and follicle activation (Foxo3a) were assessed. Inhibition of primordial follicle activation occurred in the presence of SP600125, JNK inhibitor VIII and AMH when compared with controls (all P primordial follicle development, we did not determine the cellular targets and mechanism of action of the inhibitors. These results are the first to implicate the JNK pathway in primordial follicle activation and could have significant consequences for the successful development of fertility preservation strategies and our understanding of primordial follicle activation. n/a. Dr Michael J. Bertoldo and the laboratories involved in the present study were supported by a grant from 'Région Centre' (CRYOVAIRE, Grant number #320000268). There are no conflicts of interest to declare. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Effect of fermentation inhibitors in the presence and absence of activated charcoal on the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Koo; Park, Don-Hee; Song, Se Hee; Wee, Young-Jung; Jeong, Gwi-Taek

    2013-06-01

    The acidic hydrolysis of biomass generates numerous inhibitors of fermentation, which adversely affect cell growth and metabolism. The goal of the present study was to determine the effects of fermentation inhibitors on growth and glucose consumption by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We also conducted in situ adsorption during cell cultivation in synthetic broth containing fermentation inhibitors. In order to evaluate the effect of in situ adsorption on cell growth, five inhibitors, namely 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, levulinic acid, furfural, formic acid, and acetic acid, were introduced into synthetic broth. The existence of fermentation inhibitors during cell culture adversely affects cell growth and sugar consumption. Furfural, formic acid, and acetic acid were the most potent inhibitors in our culture system. The in situ adsorption of inhibitors by the addition of activated charcoal to the synthetic broth increased cell growth and sugar consumption. Our results indicate that detoxification of fermentation media by in situ adsorption may be useful for enhancing biofuel production.

  20. Oral Electromyography Activation Patterns for Speech Are Similar in

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Bridget; Smith, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors determined whether basic patterns of muscle activation for speech were similar in preschool children who stutter and in their fluent peers. Method: Right and left lower lip muscle activity were recorded during conversational speech and sentence repetition in 64 preschool children diagnosed as stuttering (CWS)…

  1. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, free fatty acids, and insulin resistance in patients with myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruzdeva O

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Olga Gruzdeva, Evgenya Uchasova, Yulia Dyleva, Ekaterina Belik, Ekaterina Shurygina, Olga Barbarash Research Institute for Complex Issues of Cardiovascular Diseases under the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Kemerovo, Russian Federation Background: Insulin resistance is known to be a common feature of type 2 diabetes mellitus and is regarded as an important mechanism in the pathogenesis of this disease. The key pathogenetic mechanisms of insulin resistance progression are free fatty acids metabolism impairment and enhanced activity of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1. Both free fatty acids and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 are recognized as risk factors for coronary heart disease. Methods: The patients were divided into two groups: group 1 included 65 non-diabetic myocardial infarction patients and group 2 enrolled 60 diabetic myocardial infarction patients. The control group consisted of 30 sex- and age-matched volunteers. The concentration of serum free fatty acids, glucose, C-peptide, and insulin were measured on the 1st and 12th days of the study. All the patients had their postprandial glycemia, insulin, and C-peptide concentrations measured 2 hours after a standard carbohydrate breakfast containing 360 kcal (protein 20 g, carbohydrate 57 g, and fat 9 g. Results: Free fatty acids levels in group 1 and in group 2 exceeded the control group values by 7-fold and 11-fold, respectively. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 concentration was 2.5-fold higher in group 1 and 4.6-fold higher in group 2 compared to the control group on the 1st day from the myocardial infarction onset. In addition, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 concentration was significantly reduced in both groups on the 12th day from the myocardial infarction onset; however, it did not achieve the control group values. Conclusion: Increased postprandial glucose level, insulinemia, and elevated levels of free fatty acids and plasminogen activator

  2. A phase I dose-escalation study of MSC1992371A, an oral inhibitor of aurora and other kinases, in advanced hematologic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graux, Carlos; Sonet, Anne; Maertens, Johan; Duyster, Justus; Greiner, Jochen; Chalandon, Yves; Martinelli, Giovanni; Hess, Dagmar; Heim, Dominik; Giles, Francis J; Kelly, Kevin R; Gianella-Borradori, Athos; Longerey, Blandine; Asatiani, Ekaterine; Rejeb, Narmyn; Ottmann, Oliver G

    2013-09-01

    A phase I dose-escalation study of MSC1992371A, an oral aurora kinase inhibitor, was carried out in patients with hematologic malignancies. Patients received escalating doses either on days 1-3 and 8-10 (n=36) or on days 1-6 (n=39) of a 21-day cycle. The maximum tolerated doses were 37 and 28 mg/m(2)/day, respectively. Dose-limiting toxicities included severe neutropenia with infection and sepsis, mucositis/stomatitis, and diarrhea. Complete responses occurred in 3 patients. Four disease-specific expansion cohorts then received the dose and schedule dictated by the escalation phase but the study was prematurely discontinued due to hematologic and gastrointestinal toxicity at clinically effective doses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Enhancement of active corrosion protection via combination of inhibitor-loaded nanocontainers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedim, J; Poznyak, S K; Kuznetsova, A; Raps, D; Hack, T; Zheludkevich, M L; Ferreira, M G S

    2010-05-01

    The present work reports the synthesis of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) nanocontainers loaded with different corrosion inhibitors (vanadate, phosphate, and 2-mercaptobenzothiazolate) and the characterization of the resulting pigments by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The anticorrosion activity of these nanocontainers with respect to aluminum alloy AA2024 was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The bare metallic substrates were immersed in dispersions of nanocontainers in sodium chloride solution and tested to understand the inhibition mechanisms and efficiency. The nanocontainers were also incorporated into commercial coatings used for aeronautical applications to study the active corrosion protection properties in systems of industrial relevance. The results show that an enhancement of the active protection effect can be reached when nanocontainers loaded with different inhibitors are combined in the same protective coating system.

  4. Spiroimidazolidinone NPC1L1 inhibitors. Part 2: structure-activity studies and in vivo efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Kobporn L; DeVita, Robert J; Garcia-Calvo, Margarita; Meurer, Roger D; Lisnock, JeanMarie; Bull, Herbert G; McMasters, Daniel R; McCann, Margaret E; Mills, Sander G

    2010-12-01

    Ezetimibe (Zetia®), a cholesterol-absorption inhibitor (CAI) approved by the FDA for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia, is believed to target the intestine protein Niemann-Pick C1-Like 1 (NPC1L1) or its pathway. A spiroimidazolidinone NPC1L1 inhibitor identified by virtual screening showed moderate binding activity but was not efficacious in an in vivo rodent model of cholesterol absorption. Synthesis of analogs established the structure-activity relationships for binding activity, and resulted in compounds with in vivo efficacy, including 24, which inhibited plasma cholesterol absorption by 67% in the mouse, thereby providing proof-of-concept that non-β-lactams can be effective CAIs.

  5. CETSA screening identifies known and novel thymidylate synthase inhibitors and slow intracellular activation of 5-fluorouracil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almqvist, Helena; Axelsson, Hanna; Jafari, Rozbeh; Dan, Chen; Mateus, André; Haraldsson, Martin; Larsson, Andreas; Molina, Daniel Martinez; Artursson, Per; Lundbäck, Thomas; Nordlund, Pär

    2016-03-01

    Target engagement is a critical factor for therapeutic efficacy. Assessment of compound binding to native target proteins in live cells is therefore highly desirable in all stages of drug discovery. We report here the first compound library screen based on biophysical measurements of intracellular target binding, exemplified by human thymidylate synthase (TS). The screen selected accurately for all the tested known drugs acting on TS. We also identified TS inhibitors with novel chemistry and marketed drugs that were not previously known to target TS, including the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor decitabine. By following the cellular uptake and enzymatic conversion of known drugs we correlated the appearance of active metabolites over time with intracellular target engagement. These data distinguished a much slower activation of 5-fluorouracil when compared with nucleoside-based drugs. The approach establishes efficient means to associate drug uptake and activation with target binding during drug discovery.

  6. Jack bean urease: the effect of active-site binding inhibitors on the reactivity of enzyme thiol groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajewska, Barbara; Zaborska, Wiesława

    2007-10-01

    In view of the complexity of the role of the active site flap cysteine in the urease catalysis, in this work we studied how the presence of typical active-site binding inhibitors of urease, phenylphosphorodiamidate (PPD), acetohydroxamic acid (AHA), boric acid and fluoride, affects the reactivity of enzyme thiol groups, the active site flap thiol in particular. For that the inhibitor-urease complexes were prepared with excess inhibitors and had their thiol groups titrated with DTNB. The effects observed were analyzed in terms of the structures of the inhibitor-urease complexes reported in the literature. We found that the effectiveness in preventing the active site cysteine from the modification by disulfides, varied among the inhibitors studied, even though they all bind to the active site. The variations were accounted for by different extents of geometrical distortion in the active site that the inhibitors introduced upon binding, leaving the flap either open in AHA-, boric acid- and fluoride-inhibited urease, like in the native enzyme or closed in PPD-inhibited urease. Among the inhibitors, only PPD was found to be able to thoroughly protect the flap cysteines from the further reaction with disulfides, this apparently resulting from the closed conformation of the flap. Accordingly, in practical terms PPD may be regarded as the most suitable inhibitor for active-site protection experiments in inhibition studies of urease.

  7. Oral coinfection can stress peripheral lymphocyte to inflammatory activity in leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Fragoso Motta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This study evaluated the intracellular profile of interleukin-2 (IL-2, interleukin-4 (IL-4, interleukin-10 (IL-10 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from leprosy patients based on oral infections presence to determine whether these coinfections could be associated with pro-inflammatory activity in leprosy. METHODS: Leprosy patients regardless of clinical form and specific leprosy treatment (n=38 were divided into two groups: Group I - leprosy patients with oral infections (n=19, and Group II - leprosy patients without oral infections (n=19. Non-leprosy patients presenting oral infections were assigned to the control Group (n=10. Intracellular IL-2, IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-γ production was evaluated by flow cytometry (FACS before and 7 days after controlling the oral infection in the Group I, before and 7 days after dental prophylaxis in the Group II, and during oral infection process in control Group. RESULTS: Low percentages of CD3+ lymphocytes bearing IL-2, IL-10 and IFN-γ were observed in the Group I and Group II at baseline and 7 days after therapy or prophylaxis compared to controls. Group I showed reduced percentages of IL-4 at baseline and 7 days after therapy compared to controls, or at baseline of Group II, and the Group II showed reduced percentages of CD3+ cells bearing IL-4 compared to control. An increase of the percentages of CD3+cells bearing IL-4 was observed in the Group I after the oral infections treatment. CONCLUSIONS: The occurrence of oral infections favors the intracellular cytokines expression and, probably, the inflammatory reaction operating as a stimulatory signal triggering the leprosy reactions.

  8. Inhibition of dihydroceramide desaturase activity by the sphingosine kinase inhibitor SKI II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cingolani, Francesca; Casasampere, Mireia; Sanllehí, Pol; Casas, Josefina; Bujons, Jordi; Fabrias, Gemma

    2014-08-01

    Sphingosine kinase inhibitor (SKI) II has been reported as a dual inhibitor of sphingosine kinases (SKs) 1 and 2 and has been extensively used to prove the involvement of SKs and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in cellular processes. Dihydroceramide desaturase (Des1), the last enzyme in the de novo synthesis of ceramide (Cer), regulates the balance between dihydroceramides (dhCers) and Cers. Both SKs and Des1 have interest as therapeutic targets. Here we show that SKI II is a noncompetitive inhibitor (Ki = 0.3 μM) of Des1 activity with effect also in intact cells without modifying Des1 protein levels. Molecular modeling studies support that the SKI II-induced decrease in Des1 activity could result from inhibition of NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase. SKI II, but not the SK1-specific inhibitor PF-543, provoked a remarkable accumulation of dhCers and their metabolites, while both SKI II and PF-543 reduced S1P to almost undetectable levels. SKI II, but not PF543, reduced cell proliferation with accumulation of cells in the G0/G1 phase. SKI II, but not PF543, induced autophagy. These overall findings should be taken into account when using SKI II as a pharmacological tool, as some of the effects attributed to decreased S1P may actually be caused by augmented dhCers and/or their metabolites.

  9. Structural basis of specific inhibition of tissue-type plasminogen activator by plasminogen activators inhibitor-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Lihu; Liu, Min; Zeng, Tu; Shi, Xiaoli; Yuan, Cai; Andreasen, Peter A.; Huang, Mingdong

    2016-01-01

    Thrombosis is a leading cause of death worldwide [1]. Recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is the FDA-approved thrombolytic drug for ischemic strokes, myocardial infarction and pulmonary embolism. tPA is a multi-domain serine protease of the trypsin-family [2] and catalyses the critical step in fibrinolysis [3], converting the zymogen plasminogen to the active serine protease plasmin, which degrades the fibrin network of thrombi and blood clots. tPA is rapidly inactivated by endogenous plasminogen activators inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) [4] (Fig. 1). Engineering on tPA to reduce its inhibition by PAI-1 without compromising its thrombolytic effect is a continuous effort [5]. Tenecteplase (TNK-tPA) is a newer generation of tPA variant showing slower inhibition by PAI-1 [6]. Extensive studies to understand the molecular interactions between tPA and PAI-1 have been carried out [7], [8], [9], [10], [11], [12], [13], [14], [15], [16], [17], [18], however, the precise details at atomic resolution remain unknown. We report the crystal structure of tPA·PAI-1 complex here. The methods required to achieve these data include: (1) recombinant expression and purification of a PAI-1 variant (14-1B) containing four mutations (N150H, K154T, Q319L, and M354I), and a tPA serine protease domain (tPA-SPD) variant with three mutations (C122A, N173Q, and S195A, in the chymotrypsin numbering) [19]; (2) formation of a tPA-SPD·PAI-1 Michaëlis complex in vitro [19]; and (3) solving the three-dimensional structure for this complex by X-ray crystallography [deposited in the PDB database as 5BRR]. The data explain the specificity of PAI-1 for tPA and uPA [19], [20], and provide structural basis to design newer generation of PAI-1-resistant tPA variants as thrombolytic agents [19]. PMID:26909366

  10. Oral Administration of Sitagliptin Activates CREB and Is Neuroprotective in Murine Model of Brain Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaValle, Brian; Brix, Gitte S; Brock, Birgitte; Gejl, Michael; Rungby, Jørgen; Larsen, Agnete

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Traumatic brain injury is a major cause of mortality and morbidity. We have previously shown that the injectable glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analog, liraglutide, significantly improved the outcome in mice after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). In this study we are interested in the effects of oral treatment of a different class of GLP-1 based therapy, dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibition on mice after TBI. DPP-IV inhibitors reduce the degradation of endogenous GLP-1 and extend circulation of this protective peptide in the bloodstream. This class has yet to be investigated as a potential therapy for TBI. Methods: Mice were administrated once-daily 50 mg/kg of sitagliptin in a Nutella® ball or Nutella® alone throughout the study, beginning 2 days before severe trauma was induced with a stereotactic cryo-lesion. At 2 days post trauma, lesion size was determined. Brains were isolated for immunoblotting for assessment of selected biomarkers for pathology and protection. Results: Sitagliptin treatment reduced lesion size at day 2 post-injury by ~28% (p < 0.05). Calpain-driven necrotic tone was reduced ~2-fold in sitagliptin-treated brains (p < 0.001) and activation of the protective cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) system was significantly more pronounced (~1.5-fold, p < 0.05). The CREB-regulated, mitochondrial antioxidant protein manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) was increased in sitagliptin-treated mice (p < 0.05). Conversely, apoptotic tone (alpha-spectrin fragmentation, Bcl-2 levels) and the neuroinflammatory markers IL-6, and Iba-1 were not affected by treatment. Conclusions: This study shows, for the first time, that DPP-IV inhibition ameliorates both anatomical and biochemical consequences of TBI and activates CREB in the brain. Moreover, this work supports previous studies suggesting that the effect of GLP-1 analogs in models of brain damage relates to GLP-1 receptor stimulation in a dose-dependent manner.

  11. Acetylcholine-hydrolyzing activities in soluble brain fraction: Characterization with reversible and irreversible inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estévez, Jorge; Selva, Verónica; Benabent, Mónica; Mangas, Iris; Sogorb, Miguel Ángel; Vilanova, Eugenio

    2016-11-25

    Some effects of organophosphorus compounds (OPs) esters cannot be explained through actions on currently recognized targets acetylcholinesterase or neuropathy target esterase (NTE). In soluble chicken brain fraction, three components (Eα, Eβ and Eγ) of pheny lvalerate esterase activity (PVase) were kinetically discriminated and their relationship with acetylcholine-hydrolyzing activity (cholinesterase activity) were studied in previous works. In this work, four enzymatic components (CS1, CS2, CS3 and CS4) of cholinesterase activity have been discriminated in soluble fraction, according to their sensitivity to irreversible inhibitors mipafox, paraoxon, PMSF and iso-OMPA and to reversible inhibitors ethopropazine and BW284C51. Cholinesterase component CS1 can be related to the Eα component of PVase activity and identified as butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE). No association and similarities can be stablished among the other PVase component (Eβ and Eγ) with the other cholinesterase components (CS2, CS3, CS4). The kinetic analysis has allowed us to stablish a method for discriminating the enzymatic component based on a simple test with two inhibitors. It can be used as biomarker in toxicological studies and for monitoring these cholinesterase components during isolation and molecular identification processes, which will allow OP toxicity to be understood by a multi-target approach. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A comparative structure-function analysis of active-site inhibitors of Vibrio cholerae cholix toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo, Miguel R; Merrill, A Rod

    2015-09-01

    Cholix toxin from Vibrio cholerae is a novel mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase (mART) toxin that shares structural and functional properties with Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A and Corynebacterium diphtheriae diphtheria toxin. Herein, we have used the high-resolution X-ray structure of full-length cholix toxin in the apo form, NAD(+) bound, and 10 structures of the cholix catalytic domain (C-domain) complexed with several strong inhibitors of toxin enzyme activity (NAP, PJ34, and the P-series) to study the binding mode of the ligands. A pharmacophore model based on the active pose of NAD(+) was compared with the active conformation of the inhibitors, which revealed a cationic feature in the side chain of the inhibitors that may determine the active pose. Moreover, a conformational search was conducted for the missing coordinates of one of the main active-site loops (R-loop). The resulting structural models were used to evaluate the interaction energies and for 3D-QSAR modeling. Implications for a rational drug design approach for mART toxins were derived.

  13. Computational design of a PDZ domain peptide inhibitor that rescues CFTR activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle E Roberts

    Full Text Available The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR is an epithelial chloride channel mutated in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF. The most prevalent CFTR mutation, ΔF508, blocks folding in the endoplasmic reticulum. Recent work has shown that some ΔF508-CFTR channel activity can be recovered by pharmaceutical modulators ("potentiators" and "correctors", but ΔF508-CFTR can still be rapidly degraded via a lysosomal pathway involving the CFTR-associated ligand (CAL, which binds CFTR via a PDZ interaction domain. We present a study that goes from theory, to new structure-based computational design algorithms, to computational predictions, to biochemical testing and ultimately to epithelial-cell validation of novel, effective CAL PDZ inhibitors (called "stabilizers" that rescue ΔF508-CFTR activity. To design the "stabilizers", we extended our structural ensemble-based computational protein redesign algorithm K* to encompass protein-protein and protein-peptide interactions. The computational predictions achieved high accuracy: all of the top-predicted peptide inhibitors bound well to CAL. Furthermore, when compared to state-of-the-art CAL inhibitors, our design methodology achieved higher affinity and increased binding efficiency. The designed inhibitor with the highest affinity for CAL (kCAL01 binds six-fold more tightly than the previous best hexamer (iCAL35, and 170-fold more tightly than the CFTR C-terminus. We show that kCAL01 has physiological activity and can rescue chloride efflux in CF patient-derived airway epithelial cells. Since stabilizers address a different cellular CF defect from potentiators and correctors, our inhibitors provide an additional therapeutic pathway that can be used in conjunction with current methods.

  14. Hawaiian oral tradition describes 400 years of volcanic activity at Kīlauea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Donald A.

    2008-01-01

    Culturally significant oral tradition involving Pele, the Hawaiian volcano deity, and her youngest sister Hi'iaka may involve the two largest volcanic events to have taken place in Hawai'i since human settlement: the roughly 60-year-long ‘Ailā’au eruption during the 15th century and the following development of Kīlauea's caldera. In 1823, Rev. William Ellis and three others became the first Europeans to visit Kīlauea's summit and were told stories about Kīlauea's activity that are consistent with the Pele–Hi'iaka account and extend the oral tradition through the 18th century. Recent geologic studies confirm the essence of the oral traditions and illustrate the potential value of examining other Hawaiian chants and stories for more information about past volcanic activity in Hawai‘i.

  15. Amino Acid Composition, Urease Activity and Trypsin Inhibitor Activity after Toasting of Soybean in Thick and Thin Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tajana Krička

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine amino acid content, urease activity and trypsin inhibitor activity in soybean grain for polygastric animals’ feed aft er toasting with the aim to introduce thick layer in toasting technology. Hence, soybean was toasted both in thick and thin layer at 130 oC during 10 minutes. In order to properly monitor the technological process of soybean thermal processing, it was necessary to study crude protein content, urease activity, trypsin inhibitor activity and amino acid composition of soybean in natural and toasted samples. Results demonstrate that protein content in soybean toasted in thick and thin layer was found to be slightly increased while urease activity was reduced in relation to non-treated sample. Study also established a significant reduction of trypsin inhibitor activity aft er toasting, at higher extent in thin layer toasting. Amino acid content of soybean was slightly increased in relation to natural sample, as well as difference between amino acid content in samples toasted in thick and thin layers.

  16. Synthesis and evaluation of orally active small molecule HIV-1 Nef antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emert-Sedlak, Lori A; Loughran, H Marie; Shi, Haibin; Kulp, John L; Shu, Sherry T; Zhao, Jielu; Day, Billy W; Wrobel, Jay E; Reitz, Allen B; Smithgall, Thomas E

    2016-03-01

    The HIV-1 Nef accessory factor enhances viral replication and promotes immune system evasion of HIV-infected cells, making it an attractive target for drug discovery. Recently we described a novel class of diphenylpyrazolodiazene compounds that bind directly to Nef in vitro and inhibit Nef-dependent HIV-1 infectivity and replication in cell culture. However, these first-generation Nef antagonists have several structural liabilities, including an azo linkage that led to poor oral bioavailability. The azo group was therefore replaced with either a one- or two-carbon linker. The resulting set of non-azo analogs retained nanomolar binding affinity for Nef by surface plasmon resonance, while inhibiting HIV-1 replication with micromolar potency in cell-based assays without cytotoxicity. Computational docking studies show that these non-azo analogs occupy the same predicted binding site within the HIV-1 Nef dimer interface as the original azo compound. Computational methods also identified a hot spot for inhibitor binding within this site that is defined by conserved HIV-1 Nef residues Asp108, Leu112, and Pro122. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of the non-azo B9 analogs in mice showed that replacement of the azo linkage dramatically enhanced oral bioavailability without substantially affecting plasma half-life or clearance. The improved oral bioavailability of non-azo diphenylpyrazolo Nef antagonists provides a starting point for further drug lead optimization in support of future efficacy testing in animal models of HIV/AIDS.

  17. Novel Inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase with Anti-malarial Activity in the Mouse Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booker, Michael L.; Bastos, Cecilia M.; Kramer, Martin L.; Barker, Jr., Robert H.; Skerlj, Renato; Sidhu, Amar Bir; Deng, Xiaoyi; Celatka, Cassandra; Cortese, Joseph F.; Guerrero Bravo, Jose E.; Crespo Llado, Keila N.; Serrano, Adelfa E.; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Viera, Sara; Garuti, Helen; Wittlin, Sergio; Papastogiannidis, Petros; Lin, Jing-wen; Janse, Chris J.; Khan, Shahid M.; Duraisingh, Manoj; Coleman, Bradley; Goldsmith, Elizabeth J.; Phillips, Margaret A.; Munoz, Benito; Wirth, Dyann F.; Klinger, Jeffrey D.; Wiegand, Roger; Sybertz, Edmund (Leiden-MC); (Puerto Rico); (STPHI); (Harvard); (GSK); (Genzyme); (UTSMC)

    2010-11-22

    Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the most deadly form of human malaria, is unable to salvage pyrimidines and must rely on de novo biosynthesis for survival. Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway and represents a potential target for anti-malarial therapy. A high throughput screen and subsequent medicinal chemistry program identified a series of N-alkyl-5-(1H-benzimidazol-1-yl)thiophene-2-carboxamides with low nanomolar in vitro potency against DHODH from P. falciparum, P. vivax, and P. berghei. The compounds were selective for the parasite enzymes over human DHODH, and x-ray structural data on the analog Genz-667348, demonstrated that species selectivity could be attributed to amino acid differences in the inhibitor-binding site. Compounds from this series demonstrated in vitro potency against the 3D7 and Dd2 strains of P. falciparum, good tolerability and oral exposure in the mouse, and ED{sub 50} values in the 4-day murine P. berghei efficacy model of 13-21 mg/kg/day with oral twice-daily dosing. In particular, treatment with Genz-667348 at 100 mg/kg/day resulted in sterile cure. Two recent analogs of Genz-667348 are currently undergoing pilot toxicity testing to determine suitability as clinical development candidates.

  18. Aromatic inhibitors derived from ammonia-pretreated lignocellulose hinder bacterial ethanologenesis by activating regulatory circuits controlling inhibitor efflux and detoxification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David H. Keating

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Efficient microbial conversion of lignocellulosic hydrolysates to biofuels is a key barrier to the economically viable deployment of lignocellulosic biofuels. A chief contributor to this barrier is the impact on microbial processes and energy metabolism of lignocellulose-derived inhibitors, including phenolic carboxylates, phenolic amides (for ammonia-pretreated biomass, phenolic aldehydes, and furfurals. To understand the bacterial pathways induced by inhibitors present in ammonia-pretreated biomass hydrolysates, which are less well studied than acid-pretreated biomass hydrolysates, we developed and exploited synthetic mimics of ammonia-pretreated corn stover hydrolysate (ACSH. To determine regulatory responses to the inhibitors normally present in ACSH, we measured transcript and protein levels in an Escherichia coli ethanologen using RNA-seq and quantitative proteomics during fermentation to ethanol of synthetic hydrolysates containing or lacking the inhibitors. Our study identified four major regulators mediating these responses, the MarA/SoxS/Rob network, AaeR, FrmR, and YqhC. Induction of these regulons was correlated with a reduced rate of ethanol production, buildup of pyruvate, depletion of ATP and NAD(PH, and an inhibition of xylose conversion. The aromatic aldehyde inhibitor 5-hydroxymethylfurfural appeared to be reduced to its alcohol form by the ethanologen during fermentation whereas phenolic acid and amide inhibitors were not metabolized. Together, our findings establish that the major regulatory responses to lignocellulose-derived inhibitors are mediated by transcriptional rather than translational regulators, suggest that energy consumed for inhibitor efflux and detoxification may limit biofuel production, and identify a network of regulators for future synthetic biology efforts.

  19. Aromatic inhibitors derived from ammonia-pretreated lignocellulose hinder bacterial ethanologenesis by activating regulatory circuits controlling inhibitor efflux and detoxification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David H. Keating

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Efficient microbial conversion of lignocellulosic hydrolysates to biofuels is a key barrier to the economically viable deployment of lignocellulosic biofuels. A chief contributor to this barrier is the impact on microbial processes and energy metabolism of lignocellulose-derived inhibitors, including phenolic carboxylates, phenolic amides (for ammonia-pretreated biomass, phenolic aldehydes, and furfurals. To understand the bacterial pathways induced by inhibitors present in ammonia-pretreated biomass hydrolysates, which are less well studied than acid-pretreated biomass hydrolysates, we developed and exploited synthetic mimics of ammonia-pretreated corn stover hydrolysate (ACSH. To determine regulatory responses to the inhibitors normally present in ACSH, we measured transcript and protein levels in an Escherichia coli ethanologen using RNA-seq and quantitative proteomics during fermentation to ethanol of synthetic hydrolysates containing or lacking the inhibitors. Our study identified four major regulators mediating these responses, the MarA/SoxS/Rob network, AaeR, FrmR, and YqhC. Induction of these regulons was correlated with a reduced rate of ethanol production, buildup of pyruvate, depletion of ATP and NAD(PH, and an inhibition of xylose conversion. The aromatic aldehyde inhibitor 5-hydroxymethylfurfural appeared to be reduced to its alcohol form by the ethanologen during fermentation, whereas phenolic acid and amide inhibitors were not metabolized. Together, our findings establish that the major regulatory responses to lignocellulose-derived inhibitors are mediated by transcriptional rather than translational regulators, suggest that energy consumed for inhibitor efflux and detoxification may limit biofuel production, and identify a network of regulators for future synthetic biology efforts.

  20. Pinus densiflora leaf essential oil induces apoptosis via ROS generation and activation of caspases in YD-8 human oral cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Jeong-Rang; Park, Ju Sung; Park, Yu-Kyoung; Chae, Young Zoo; Lee, Gyu-Hee; Park, Gy-Young; Jang, Byeong-Churl

    2012-04-01

    The leaf of Pinus (P.) densiflora, a pine tree widely distributed in Asian countries, has been used as a traditional medicine. In the present study, we investigated the anticancer activity of essential oil, extracted by steam distillation, from the leaf of P. densiflora in YD-8 human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells. Treatment of YD-8 cells with P. densiflora leaf essential oil (PLEO) at 60 µg/ml for 8 h strongly inhibited proliferation and survival and induced apoptosis. Notably, treatment with PLEO led to generation of ROS, activation of caspase-9, PARP cleavage, down-regulation of Bcl-2, and phosphorylation of ERK-1/2 and JNK-1/2 in YD-8 cells. Treatment with PLEO, however, did not affect the expression of Bax, XIAP and GRP78. Importantly, pharmaco-logical inhibition studies demonstrated that treatment with vitamin E (an anti-oxidant) or z-VAD-fmk (a pan-caspase inhibitor), but not with PD98059 (an ERK-1/2 inhibitor) or SP600125 (a JNK-1/2 inhibitor), strongly suppressed PLEO-induced apoptosis in YD-8 cells and reduction of their survival. Vitamin E treatment further blocked activation of caspase-9 and Bcl-2 down-regulation induced by PLEO. Thus, these results demonstrate firstly that PLEO has anti-proliferative, anti-survival and pro-apoptotic effects on YD-8 cells and the effects are largely due to the ROS-dependent activation of caspases.

  1. [Proteinase activity in Candida albicans strains isolated from the oral cavity of immunocompromised patients, with oral candidiasis and in healthy subjects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Solís, Sandra E; Rueda-Gordillo, Florencio; Rojas-Herrera, Rafael A

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans has a variety of virulence factors, including secreted aspartyl proteases, which are determinant factors in the pathogenesis of this yeast in immunocompromised patients. Proteinase activity was identified in C. albicans strains isolated from the oral cavity of immunocompromised patients with cancer, diabetes and HIV+, with oral candidiasis and in healthy subjects. Two hundred and fifty C. albicans strains were analyzed, distributed in 5 different groups: patients with cancer, diabetes, HIV+, with oral candidiasis and healthy subjects. Proteolytic activity was identified in 46% of the strains from cancer patients, 54% from HIV+ patients, 60% from diabetics, 70% from oral candidiasis patients, and 42% from healthy subjects. Activity was higher in strains from immunocompromised and oral candidiasis patients than in healthy subjects. Differences were observed between the candidiasis-healthy, candidiasis-HIV+, and diabetic-healthy groups. No differences were observed between the oral candidiasis, diabetes and cancer patients, between the diabetes and HIV+ patients, or between the cancer patients, HIV+ patients and healthy subjects. The present results suggest that although secreted aspartyl proteases are important in the pathogenesis of C. albicans, their activity depends on host conditions. Copyright © 2012 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Incidence of Bacteriocins Produced by Food-Related Lactic Acid Bacteria Active towards Oral Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Papadimitriou

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we investigated the incidence of bacteriocins produced by 236 lactic acid bacteria (LAB food isolates against pathogenic or opportunistic pathogenic oral bacteria. This set of LAB contained several strains (≥17% producing bacteriocins active against food-related bacteria. Interestingly only Streptococcus macedonicus ACA-DC 198 was able to inhibit the growth of Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus sanguinis and Streptococcus gordonii, while Lactobacillus fermentum ACA-DC 179 and Lactobacillus plantarun ACA-DC 269 produced bacteriocins solely against Streptococcus oralis. Thus, the percentage of strains that were found to produce bacteriocins against oral bacteria was ~1.3%. The rarity of bacteriocins active against oral LAB pathogens produced by food-related LAB was unexpected given their close phylogenetic relationship. Nevertheless, when tested in inhibition assays, the potency of the bacteriocin(s of S. macedonicus ACA-DC 198 against the three oral streptococci was high. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy combined with principal component analysis revealed that exposure of the target cells to the antimicrobial compounds caused major alterations of key cellular constituents. Our findings indicate that bacteriocins produced by food-related LAB against oral LAB may be rare, but deserve further investigation since, when discovered, they can be effective antimicrobials.

  3. 口服质子泵抑制剂合理使用辨析%Analysis on Reasonable Application of Oral Proton Pump Inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马宗强; 安洪亮

    2014-01-01

    口服质子泵抑制剂(proton pump inhibitors, PPIs)在治疗消化道疾病中的地位日益重要,然而使用过程中存在多种问题,尤其是在长程使用和联合用药过程中,据相关研究表明可能有增加骨折、心血管疾病及感染的风险。本文旨在提示临床应用PPIs应注意适应证及不同PPIs的特点,关注合并用药的相互作用及长期用药的不良反应,加强合理用药。%The status of oral proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases has become increasingly important, however, there are several problems during the use, especially in the long-term use and combination process, related studies indicated that the use of these drugs may increase fractures, cardiovascular diseases and risk of infection. Great caution should be attached to the indications and characteristics of different PPIs, as well as their interactions with other drugs if used in combination and the adverse effects in their long term use, to achieve rational use.

  4. SGLT2 inhibitor lowers serum uric acid through alteration of uric acid transport activity in renal tubule by increased glycosuria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chino, Yukihiro; Samukawa, Yoshishige; Sakai, Soichi; Nakai, Yasuhiro; Yamaguchi, Jun-ichi; Nakanishi, Takeo; Tamai, Ikumi

    2014-01-01

    Sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors have been reported to lower the serum uric acid (SUA) level. To elucidate the mechanism responsible for this reduction, SUA and the urinary excretion rate of uric acid (UEUA) were analysed after the oral administration of luseogliflozin, a SGLT2 inhibitor, to healthy subjects. After dosing, SUA decreased, and a negative correlation was observed between the SUA level and the UEUA, suggesting that SUA decreased as a result of the increase in the UEUA. The increase in UEUA was correlated with an increase in urinary d-glucose excretion, but not with the plasma luseogliflozin concentration. Additionally, in vitro transport experiments showed that luseogliflozin had no direct effect on the transporters involved in renal UA reabsorption. To explain that the increase in UEUA is likely due to glycosuria, the study focused on the facilitative glucose transporter 9 isoform 2 (GLUT9ΔN, SLC2A9b), which is expressed at the apical membrane of the kidney tubular cells and transports both UA and d-glucose. It was observed that the efflux of [14C]UA in Xenopus oocytes expressing the GLUT9 isoform 2 was trans-stimulated by 10 mm d-glucose, a high concentration of glucose that existed under SGLT2 inhibition. On the other hand, the uptake of [14C]UA by oocytes was cis-inhibited by 100 mm d-glucose, a concentration assumed to exist in collecting ducts. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that the UEUA could potentially be increased by luseogliflozin-induced glycosuria, with alterations of UA transport activity because of urinary glucose. PMID:25044127

  5. Design, synthesis and structure-activity relationships of dual inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase and serotonin transporter as potential agents for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, Narihiro; Tago, Keiko; Marumoto, Shinji; Takami, Kazuko; Ori, Mayuko; Yamada, Naho; Koyama, Kazuo; Naruto, Shunji; Abe, Kazumi; Yamazaki, Reina; Hara, Takao; Aoyagi, Atsushi; Abe, Yasuyuki; Kaneko, Tsugio; Kogen, Hiroshi

    2003-05-01

    We have designed and synthesized a dual inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and serotonin transporter (SERT) as a novel class of treatment drugs for Alzheimer's disease on the basis of a hypothetical model of the AChE active site. Dual inhibitions of AChE and SERT would bring about greater therapeutic effects than AChE inhibition alone and avoid adverse peripheral effects caused by excessive AChE inhibition. Compound (S)-6j exhibited potent inhibitory activities against AChE (IC(50)=101 nM) and SERT (IC(50)=42 nM). Furthermore, (S)-6j showed inhibitory activities of both AChE and SERT in mice brain following oral administration.

  6. The protease inhibitor HAI-2, but not HAI-1, regulates matriptase activation and shedding through prostasin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friis, Stine; Sales, Katiuchia Uzzun; Schafer, Jeffrey Martin; Vogel, Lotte K; Kataoka, Hiroaki; Bugge, Thomas H

    2014-08-01

    The membrane-anchored serine proteases, matriptase and prostasin, and the membrane-anchored serine protease inhibitors, hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor (HAI)-1 and HAI-2, are critical effectors of epithelial development and postnatal epithelial homeostasis. Matriptase and prostasin form a reciprocal zymogen activation complex that results in the formation of active matriptase and prostasin that are targets for inhibition by HAI-1 and HAI-2. Conflicting data, however, have accumulated as to the existence of auxiliary functions for both HAI-1 and HAI-2 in regulating the intracellular trafficking and activation of matriptase. In this study, we, therefore, used genetically engineered mice to determine the effect of ablation of endogenous HAI-1 and endogenous HAI-2 on endogenous matriptase expression, subcellular localization, and activation in polarized intestinal epithelial cells. Whereas ablation of HAI-1 did not affect matriptase in epithelial cells of the small or large intestine, ablation of HAI-2 resulted in the loss of matriptase from both tissues. Gene silencing studies in intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers revealed that this loss of cell-associated matriptase was mechanistically linked to accelerated activation and shedding of the protease caused by loss of prostasin regulation by HAI-2. Taken together, these data indicate that HAI-1 regulates the activity of activated matriptase, whereas HAI-2 has an essential role in regulating prostasin-dependent matriptase zymogen activation.

  7. The synthesis, structure and activity evaluation of pyrogallol and catechol derivatives as Helicobacter pylori urease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhu-Ping; Ma, Tao-Wu; Fu, Wei-Chang; Peng, Xiao-Chun; Zhang, Ai-Hua; Zhu, Hai-Liang

    2010-11-01

    Some pyrogallol and catechol derivatives were synthesized, and their urease inhibitory activity was evaluated by using acetohydroxamic acid (AHA), a well known Helicobacter pylori urease inhibitor, as positive control. The assay results indicate that many compounds have showed potential inhibitory activity against H. pylori urease. 4-(4-Hydroxyphenethyl)phen-1,2-diol (2a) was found to be the most potent urease inhibitor with IC(50)s of 1.5±0.2 μM for extracted fraction and 4.2±0.3 μM for intact cell, at least 10 times and 20 times lower than those of AHA (IC(50) of 17.2±0.9 μM, 100.6±13 μM), respectively. This finding indicate that 2a would be a potential urease inhibitor deserves further research. Molecular dockings of 2a into H. pylori urease active site were performed for understanding the good activity observed.

  8. Actin remodeling confers BRAF inhibitor resistance to melanoma cells through YAP/TAZ activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Hwan; Kim, Jongshin; Hong, Hyowon; Lee, Si-Hyung; Lee, June-Koo; Jung, Eunji; Kim, Joon

    2016-03-01

    The activation of transcriptional coactivators YAP and its paralog TAZ has been shown to promote resistance to anti-cancer therapies. YAP/TAZ activity is tightly coupled to actin cytoskeleton architecture. However, the influence of actin remodeling on cancer drug resistance remains largely unexplored. Here, we report a pivotal role of actin remodeling in YAP/TAZ-dependent BRAF inhibitor resistance in BRAF V600E mutant melanoma cells. Melanoma cells resistant to the BRAF inhibitor PLX4032 exhibit an increase in actin stress fiber formation, which appears to promote the nuclear accumulation of YAP/TAZ. Knockdown of YAP/TAZ reduces the viability of resistant melanoma cells, whereas overexpression of constitutively active YAP induces resistance. Moreover, inhibition of actin polymerization and actomyosin tension in melanoma cells suppresses both YAP/TAZ activation and PLX4032 resistance. Our siRNA library screening identifies actin dynamics regulator TESK1 as a novel vulnerable point of the YAP/TAZ-dependent resistance pathway. These results suggest that inhibition of actin remodeling is a potential strategy to suppress resistance in BRAF inhibitor therapies.

  9. RecA Inhibitors Potentiate Antibiotic Activity and Block Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Md Kausar; Alhhazmi, Areej; DeCoteau, John F; Luo, Yu; Geyer, C Ronald

    2016-03-17

    Antibiotic resistance arises from the maintenance of resistance mutations or genes acquired from the acquisition of adaptive de novo mutations or the transfer of resistance genes. Antibiotic resistance is acquired in response to antibiotic therapy by activating SOS-mediated DNA repair and mutagenesis and horizontal gene transfer pathways. Initiation of the SOS pathway promotes activation of RecA, inactivation of LexA repressor, and induction of SOS genes. Here, we have identified and characterized phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid RecA inhibitors that block antibiotic-induced activation of the SOS response. These inhibitors potentiate the activity of bactericidal antibiotics, including members of the quinolone, β-lactam, and aminoglycoside families in both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. They reduce the ability of bacteria to acquire antibiotic resistance mutations and to transfer mobile genetic elements conferring resistance. This study highlights the advantage of including RecA inhibitors in bactericidal antibiotic therapies and provides a new strategy for prolonging antibiotic shelf life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity and 4G/5G polymorphism in hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimarchi, H; Duboscq, C; Genoud, V; Lombi, F; Muryan, A; Young, P; Schwab, M; Castanon, M; Rodriguez-Reimundes, E; Forrester, M; Pereyra, H; Campolo-Girard, V; Seminario, O; Alonso, M; Kordich, L

    2008-01-01

    Chronic insufficiency alters homeostasis, in part due to endothelial inflammation. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is increased in renal disease, contributing to vascular damage. We assessed PAI-1 activity and PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism in hemodialysis (HD) subjects and any association between thrombotic vascular access (VA) events and PAI-1 polymorphism. Prospective, observational study in 36 HD patients: mean age: 66.6 +/- 12.5 yr, males n=26 (72%), time on HD: 28.71 +/- 22.45 months. Vascular accesses: 10 polytetrafluoroethylene grafts (PTFEG), 22 arteriovenous fistulae (AVF), four dual lumen catheters (CAT). Control group (CG): 40 subjects; mean age: 60.0 +/- 15 yrs, males n=30 (75%). Group A (GA): thrombotic events (n=12), and group B (GB): No events (n=24). Groups were no different according to age (69.2 +/- 9.12 vs. 65.3 +/- 14.5 yrs), gender (males: 7; 58.3% vs. 18; 81.8%), time on HD (26.1 +/- 14.7 vs. 30.1 +/- 38.7 months), causes of renal failure. Time to follow-up for access thrombosis: 12 months. PAI-1 levels in HD: 7.21 +/- 2.13 vs. CG: 0.42 +/- 0.27 U/ml (p5G polymorphic variant distribution in HD: 5G/5G: 6 (17%), 4G/5G: 23 (64%); 4G/4G: 7 (19%) and in CG: 5G/5G: 14 (35%); 4G/5G: 18 (45%); 4G/4G: 8 (20%). C-reactive protein (CRP) in HD: 24.5 +/- 15.2 mg/L vs. in CG 2.3 +/- 0.2 mg/L (p5G variants: GA: 5G/5G: 3; 4G/5G: 8; 4G/4G: 1; GB: 5G/5G: 3; 4G/5G: 15; 4G/4G: 6. Thrombosis occurred in 8/10 patients (80%) with PTFEG, 3/22 (9%) in AVF, and 1/4 (25%) in CAT. Among the eight PTFEG patients with thrombosis, seven were PAI 4G/5G. PAI-1 levels were elevated in HD patients, independent of their polymorphic variants, 4G/5G being the most prevalent variant. Our data suggest that in patients with PTFEG the 4G/5G variant might be associated with an increased thrombosis risk.

  11. Renin inhibitor in hypertension treatment: from pharmacological point of view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Hudyono

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of drugs that inhibit the renin-angiotensin system is one of the effective way to intervene in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular and renal disorders, especially in hypertension treatment. The idea of blocking the renin system at its origin by renin inhibitor has existed for more than 30 years. Renin inhibitor supresses the covension of angiotensinogen into angiotensin, and further deacreases the generation of the active peptide angiotensin II. The first generation (enalkiren and second generation (remikiren of orally active renin inhibitors were never used clinically because of low bioavailability and weak blood pressure-lowering activity. At present, aliskiren is the first non-peptide orally active renin inhibitor of the third generation to progress to phase III clinical trials and was approved by U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA in March 2007. Aliskiren becomes the first renin inhibitor with indications for the treatment of hypertension in Indonesia, a compounds with improved oral bioavailability, specificity and efficacy. This review summarises the development of oral renin inhibitors, pharmacological aspects, with a focus on aliskiren. (Med J Indones 2011; 20:232-7Keywords: aliskiren, hypertension, renin inhibitor, renin-angiotensin

  12. Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP/ABCG2) and P-glycoprotein (P-GP/ABCB1) Restrict Oral Availability and Brain Accumulation of the PARP Inhibitor Rucaparib (AG-014699)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Durmus, Selvi; Sparidans, Rolf W|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075047144; van Esch, Anita; Wagenaar, Els; Beijnen, Jos H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071919570; Schinkel, Alfred H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rucaparib is a potent, orally available, small-molecule inhibitor of poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) 1 and 2. Ongoing clinical trials are assessing the efficacy of rucaparib alone or in combination with other cytotoxic drugs, mainly in breast and ovarian cancer patients with mutations

  13. Targeting the minor pocket of C5aR for the rational design of an oral allosteric inhibitor for inflammatory and neuropathic pain relief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriconi, Alessio; Cunha, Thiago M.; Souza, Guilherme R.; Lopes, Alexandre H.; Cunha, Fernando Q.; Carneiro, Victor L.; Pinto, Larissa G.; Brandolini, Laura; Aramini, Andrea; Bizzarri, Cinzia; Bianchini, Gianluca; Beccari, Andrea R.; Fanton, Marco; Bruno, Agostino; Costantino, Gabriele; Bertini, Riccardo; Galliera, Emanuela; Locati, Massimo; Ferreira, Sérgio H.; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Allegretti, Marcello

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain resulting from inflammatory and neuropathic disorders causes considerable economic and social burden. Pharmacological therapies currently available for certain types of pain are only partially effective and may cause severe adverse side effects. The C5a anaphylatoxin acting on its cognate G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), C5aR, is a potent pronociceptive mediator in several models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Although there has long been interest in the identification of C5aR inhibitors, their development has been complicated, as for many peptidomimetic drugs, mostly by poor drug-like properties. Herein, we report the de novo design of a potent and selective C5aR noncompetitive allosteric inhibitor, DF2593A, guided by the hypothesis that an allosteric site, the “minor pocket,” previously characterized in CXC chemokine receptors-1 and -2, is functionally conserved in the GPCR class. In vitro, DF2593A potently inhibited C5a-induced migration of human and rodent neutrophils. In vivo, oral administration of DF2593A effectively reduced mechanical hyperalgesia in several models of acute and chronic inflammatory and neuropathic pain, without any apparent side effects. Mechanical hyperalgesia after spared nerve injury was also reduced in C5aR−/− mice compared with WT mice. Furthermore, treatment of C5aR−/− mice with DF2593A did not produce any further antinociceptive effect compared with C5aR−/− mice treated with vehicle. The successful medicinal chemistry strategy confirms that a conserved minor pocket is amenable for the rational design of selective inhibitors and the pharmacological results support that the allosteric blockade of the C5aR represents a highly promising therapeutic approach to control chronic inflammatory and neuropathic pain. PMID:25385614

  14. Tivantinib (ARQ-197) exhibits anti-tumor activity with down-regulation of FAK in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, Wei-Hong [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330006 (China); Yang, Li-Yun [Department of Blood Transfusion, First Affiliated Hospital, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330006 (China); Cao, Zhong-Yi, E-mail: m18070383032@163.com [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330006 (China); Qian, Yong, E-mail: yfykqkqy@163.com [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330006 (China)

    2015-02-20

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide and the 5 years survival rate of the patients is about 60% in the USA, due to acquired chemotherapeutic resistance and metastasis of the disease. In this study, we found that tivantinib, a selective MET inhibitor, suppresses OCSS cell proliferation and colony formation, however, anti-tumor activities induced by tivantinib are independent of the inhibition of MET signaling pathway. In addition, tivantinib cause G2/M cell cycle arrest and caspases-dependent apoptosis in OSCC cell lines. We also found that tivantinib dose-dependently suppressed the activation and expression of FAK. In all, these data suggested that tivantinib may be developed as a chemotherapeutic agent to effectively treat certain cancers including OSCC. - Highlights: • Tivantinib suppresses OSCC cell growth independent of the inhibition of HGF/MET signaling pathway. • Tivantinib blocks cell cycle and induces caspases-mediated apoptosis. • Tivantinib elicits its anti-tumor activity with the inhibition of FAK signaling pathway.

  15. Elementary EFL Students' Practice of Peer Assessment of Oral Classroom Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yu-ju; Chen, Shu-cheng; Samuelson, Beth Lewis

    2016-01-01

    Role-play is an oral classroom activity that has been promoted to provide young learners with opportunities to practice English in meaningful contexts. To familiarize elementary students with this group task, to encourage them to pay attention to their peers' performances, and to replace traditional paper-and-pencil modes of evaluating speaking…

  16. Oral activity of a nature-derived cyclic peptide for the treatment of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thell, Kathrin; Hellinger, Roland; Sahin, Emine; Michenthaler, Paul; Gold-Binder, Markus; Haider, Thomas; Kuttke, Mario; Liutkevičiūtė, Zita; Göransson, Ulf; Gründemann, Carsten; Schabbauer, Gernot; Gruber, Christian W

    2016-04-12

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common autoimmune disease affecting the central nervous system. It is characterized by auto-reactive T cells that induce demyelination and neuronal degradation. Treatment options are still limited and several MS medications need to be administered by parenteral application but are modestly effective. Oral active drugs such as fingolimod have been weighed down by safety concerns. Consequently, there is a demand for novel, especially orally active therapeutics. Nature offers an abundance of compounds for drug discovery. Recently, the circular plant peptide kalata B1 was shown to silence T-cell proliferation in vitro in an IL-2-dependent mechanism. Owing to this promising effect, we aimed to determine in vivo activity of the cyclotide [T20K]kalata B1 using the MS mouse model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Treatment of mice with the cyclotide resulted in a significant delay and diminished symptoms of EAE by oral administration. Cyclotide application substantially impeded disease progression and did not exhibit adverse effects. Inhibition of lymphocyte proliferation and the reduction of proinflammatory cytokines, in particular IL-2, distinguish the cyclotide from other marketed drugs. Considering their stable structural topology and oral activity, cyclotides are candidates as peptide therapeutics for pharmaceutical drug development for treatment of T-cell-mediated disorders.

  17. Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule expression predicts lymph node metastasis in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, M. van den; Takes, R.P.; Blokpoel-deRuyter, M.; Slootweg, P.J.; Kempen, L.C.L.T. van

    2010-01-01

    Lymphatic metastasis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is important for prognosis and clinical decision making concerning the treatment of the neck but may be difficult to detect. Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM), has been shown to correlate with prognosis or tumor grade in dif

  18. Kinetics of nebivolol and its active metabolite after single dose oral administration of nebivolol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gheldiu, Ana Maria; Muntean, Dana Maria; Cristea, Ileana

    2016-01-01

    A pharmacokinetic study of nebivolol and its active metabolite (4-hydroxy-nebivolol) after single dose oral administration of nebivolol to 20 healthy volunteers was realized. The representative pharmacokinetic model involves first order absorption kinetics for nebivolol with pre-systemic metaboli...

  19. Elementary EFL Students' Practice of Peer Assessment of Oral Classroom Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yu-ju; Chen, Shu-cheng; Samuelson, Beth Lewis

    2016-01-01

    Role-play is an oral classroom activity that has been promoted to provide young learners with opportunities to practice English in meaningful contexts. To familiarize elementary students with this group task, to encourage them to pay attention to their peers' performances, and to replace traditional paper-and-pencil modes of evaluating speaking…

  20. Benzoxazolone carboxamides as potent acid ceramidase inhibitors: Synthesis and structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Anders

    2015-01-01

    be useful in the treatment of pathological conditions, such as cancer, in which ceramide levels are abnormally reduced. Here, we present a systematic SAR investigation of the benzoxazolone carboxamides, a recently described class of AC inhibitors that display high potency and systemic activity in mice. We...... examined a diverse series of substitutions on both benzoxazolone ring and carboxamide side chain. Several modifications enhanced potency and stability, and one key compound with a balanced activity-stability profile (14) was found to inhibit AC activity in mouse lungs and cerebral cortex after systemic...

  1. Insecticidal heterolignans--tubuline polymerization inhibitors with activity against chewing pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frackenpohl, Jens; Adelt, Isabelle; Antonicek, Horst; Arnold, Christian; Behrmann, Patricia; Blaha, Nicole; Böhmer, Jutta; Gutbrod, Oliver; Hanke, Roman; Hohmann, Sabine; van Houtdreve, Marc; Lösel, Peter; Malsam, Olga; Melchers, Martin; Neufert, Valentina; Peschel, Elisabeth; Reckmann, Udo; Schenke, Thomas; Thiesen, Hans-Peter; Velten, Robert; Vogelsang, Kathrin; Weiss, Hans-Christoph

    2009-06-15

    Starting from natural product podophyllotoxin 1 substituted heterolignans were identified with promising insecticidal in vivo activity. The impact of substitution in each segment of the core structure was investigated in a detailed SAR study, and variation of substituents in both aromatic moieties afforded derivatives 5 and 43 with broad insecticidal activity against lepidopteran and coleopteran species. In vitro measurements supported by modeling studies indicate that heterolignans 3-134 act as tubuline polymerization inhibitors interacting with the colchicine-binding site. Insect specific structure-activity effects were observed showing that the insecticidal SAR described herein differs from reported cytotoxicity studies.

  2. Structure-activity relationships of heteroaromatic esters as human rhinovirus 3C protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Isak; Lee, Eui Seung; Choi, Soo Jeong; Lee, Ju-Yeon; Kim, Yong-Chul

    2009-07-01

    Human rhinovirus 3C protease (HRV 3C(pro)) is known to be a promising target for development of therapeutic agents against the common cold because of the importance of the protease in viral replication as well as its expression in a large number of serotypes. To explore non-peptidic inhibitors of HRV 3C(pro), a series of novel heteroaromatic esters was synthesized and evaluated for inhibitory activity against HRV 3C(pro), to determine the structure-activity relationships. The most potent inhibitor, 7, with a 5-bromopyridinyl group, had an IC(50) value of 80nM. In addition, the binding mode of a novel analog, 19, with the 4-hydroxyquinolinone moiety, was explored by molecular docking, suggesting a new interaction in the S1 pocket.

  3. Epidermal growth factor receptor regulates β-catenin location, stability, and transcriptional activity in oral cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung Hsing-Wen

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many cancerous cells accumulate β-catenin in the nucleus. We examined the role of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR signaling in the accumulation of β-catenin in the nuclei of oral cancer cells. Results We used two strains of cultured oral cancer cells, one with reduced EGFR expression (OECM1 cells and one with elevated EGFR expression (SAS cells, and measured downstream effects, such as phosphorylation of β-catenin and GSK-3β, association of β-catenin with E-cadherin, and target gene regulation. We also studied the expression of EGFR, β-catenin, and cyclin D1 in 112 samples of oral cancer by immunostaining. Activation of EGFR signaling increased the amount of β-catenin in the nucleus and decreased the amount in the membranes. EGF treatment increased phosphorylation of β-catenin (tyrosine and GSK-3β(Ser-(9, resulting in a loss of β-catenin association with E-cadherin. TOP-FLASH and FOP-FLASH reporter assays demonstrated that the EGFR signal regulates β-catenin transcriptional activity and mediates cyclin D1 expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that the EGFR signal affects chromatin architecture at the regulatory element of cyclin D1, and that the CBP, HDAC1, and Suv39h1 histone/chromatin remodeling complex is involved in this process. Immunostaining showed a significant association between EGFR expression and aberrant accumulation of β-catenin in oral cancer. Conclusions EGFR signaling regulates β-catenin localization and stability, target gene expression, and tumor progression in oral cancer. Moreover, our data suggest that aberrant accumulation of β-catenin under EGFR activation is a malignancy marker of oral cancer.

  4. Evaluation of the antimicrobial activity of dentifrices on human oral bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraszthy, Violet I; Zambon, Joseph J; Sreenivasan, Prem K

    2010-01-01

    In vitro testing of antimicrobial agents is an important tool in the testing hierarchy, and may provide interesting insights into their potential clinical efficacy. Agents with demonstrable in vitro antimicrobial activity may be effective against the same microorganisms in vivo, whereas agents without demonstrable in vitro antimicrobial activity are unlikely to exhibit in vivo antimicrobial activity. In addition, these methods may also be useful in screening antimicrobial agents in product formulations because such agents with both in vitro and in vivo activity may have reduced antimicrobial effects when formulated into a dentifrice. Accordingly, this study examined the in vitro and ex vivo antimicrobial activity of three commercial dentifrices: one formulated with 0.243% sodium fluoride (Crest Cavity Protection Toothpaste-Regular); one with 0.454% stannous fluoride, sodium hexametaphosphate, and zinc lactate (Crest Pro-Health), and one with 0.3% triclosan, 2.0% PVM/MA copolymer, and 0.243% sodium fluoride (Colgate Total). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of each dentifrice was determined for resident oral bacterial species, including bacteria that are associated with dental caries; periodontitis, and oral halitosis. Evaluations were performed on individual laboratory strains, and on oral bacteria from supragingival plaque samples obtained from 10 adults and from oral rinse samples obtained from 18 adults. The lowest MICs against the oral strains and human samples, i.e., greatest antimicrobial activity, were seen for the triclosan/ copolymer dentifrice. There was, in general, a four-fold difference in MICs between the triclosan/copolymer dentifrice and the stannous fluoride/sodium hexametaphosphate/zinc lactate dentifrice. The triclosan/copolymer dentifrice significantly inhibited periodontal pathogens, such as Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Eikenella corrodens, and Fusobacterium nucleatum. In ex vivo tests measuring antimicrobial effects, the

  5. Structure-guided inhibitor design for human FAAH by interspecies active site conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mileni, Mauro; Johnson, Douglas S.; Wang, Zhigang; Everdeen, Daniel S.; Liimatta, Marya; Pabst, Brandon; Bhattacharya, Keshab; Nugent, Richard A.; Kamtekar, Satwik; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Ahn, Kay; Stevens, Raymond C. (Scripps); (Pfizer)

    2008-11-24

    The integral membrane enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) hydrolyzes the endocannabinoid anandamide and related amidated signaling lipids. Genetic or pharmacological inactivation of FAAH produces analgesic, anxiolytic, and antiinflammatory phenotypes but not the undesirable side effects of direct cannabinoid receptor agonists, indicating that FAAH may be a promising therapeutic target. Structure-based inhibitor design has, however, been hampered by difficulties in expressing the human FAAH enzyme. Here, we address this problem by interconverting the active sites of rat and human FAAH using site-directed mutagenesis. The resulting humanized rat (h/r) FAAH protein exhibits the inhibitor sensitivity profiles of human FAAH but maintains the high-expression yield of the rat enzyme. We report a 2.75-{angstrom} crystal structure of h/rFAAH complexed with an inhibitor, N-phenyl-4-(quinolin-3-ylmethyl)piperidine-1-carboxamide (PF-750), that shows strong preference for human FAAH. This structure offers compelling insights to explain the species selectivity of FAAH inhibitors, which should guide future drug design programs.

  6. Structure activity relationships of benzylproline-derived inhibitors of the glutamine transporter ASCT2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kurnvir; Tanui, Rose; Gameiro, Armanda; Eisenberg, Gilad; Colas, Claire; Schlessinger, Avner; Grewer, Christof

    2017-01-01

    The glutamine transporter ASCT2 has been identified as a promising target to inhibit rapid growth of cancer cells. However, ASCT2 pharmacology is not well established. In this report, we performed a systematic structure activity analysis of a series of substituted benzylproline derivatives. Substitutions on the phenyl ring resulted in compounds with characteristics of ASCT2 inhibitors. Apparent binding affinity increased with increasing hydrophobicity of the side chain. In contrast, interaction of the ASCT2 binding site with specific positions on the phenyl ring was not observed. The most potent compound inhibits the ASCT2 anion conductance with a Ki of 3 μM, which is in the same range as that of more bulky and higher molecular weight inhibitors recently reported by others. The experimental results are consistent with computational analysis based on docking of the inhibitors against an ASCT2 homology model. The benzylproline scaffold provides a valuable tool for further improving binding potency of future ASCT2 inhibitors. PMID:28057420

  7. Thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor activity in healthy and diseased dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Lisbeth Rem; Wiinberg, Bo; Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads

    2010-01-01

    Background: In people, increased thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) antigen has been associated with increased risk of thrombosis, and decreased TAFI may contribute to bleeding diathesis. TAFI activity in dogs has been described in experimental models, but not in dogs...... with spontaneous disease. Objective: The aim of this study was to compare TAFI activity in healthy dogs with TAFI activity in dogs with spontaneous disease. Methods: Plasma samples from 20 clinically healthy Beagles and from 35 dogs with various diseases were analyzed using a commercial chromogenic assay...... that measured TAFI activity relative to activity in standardized pooled human plasma. Results: Median TAFI activity for the 20 Beagles was 46.1% (range 32.2-70.8%) compared with 62.6% (29.1-250%) for the 35 diseased dogs, and 14/35 (40%) had TAFI activities >the upper limit for controls. The highest individual...

  8. Hepatocyte growth factor activator is a potential target proteinase for Kazal-type inhibitor in turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) seminal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słowińska, Mariola; Bukowska, Joanna; Hejmej, Anna; Bilińska, Barbara; Kozłowski, Krzysztof; Jankowski, Jan; Ciereszko, Andrzej

    2015-08-01

    A peculiar characteristic of turkey seminal plasma is the increased activity of serine proteinases. It is of interest if the single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor controls the activity of turkey seminal plasma proteinases. Pure preparations of the Kazal-type inhibitor and anti-Kazal-type inhibitor monospecific immunoglobulin Gs were used as ligands in affinity chromatography for proteinase isolation from turkey seminal plasma. Gene expression and the immunohistochemical detection of the single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor in the reproductive tract of turkey toms are described. The hepatocyte growth factor activator (HGFA) was identified in the binding fraction in affinity chromatography. Hepatocyte growth factor activator activity was inhibited by the Kazal-type inhibitor in a dose-dependent manner. This protease was a primary physiological target for the single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor. Numerous proteoforms of HGFA were present in turkey seminal plasma, and phosphorylation was the primary posttranslational modification of HGFA. In addition to HGFA, acrosin was a target proteinase for the single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor. In seminal plasma, acrosin was present only in complexes with the Kazal-type inhibitor and was not present as a free enzyme. The single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor was specific for the reproductive tract. The germ cell-specific expression of Kazal-type inhibitors in the testis indicated an important function in spermatogenesis; secretion by the epithelial cells of the epididymis and the ductus deferens indicated that the Kazal-type inhibitor was an important factor involved in the changes in sperm membranes during maturation and in the maintenance of the microenvironment in which sperm maturation occurred and sperm was stored. The role of HGFA in these processes remains to be established.

  9. ASYMPTOTIC SOLUTION OF ACTIVATOR INHIBITOR SYSTEMS FOR NONLINEAR REACTION DIFFUSION EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiaqi MO; Wantao LIN

    2008-01-01

    A nonlinear reaction diffusion equations for activator inhibitor systems is considered. Under suitable conditions, firstly, the outer solution of the original problem is obtained, secondly, using the variables of multiple scales and the expanding theory of power series the formal asymptotic expansions of the solution are constructed, and finally, using the theory of differential inequalities the uniform validity and asymptotic behavior of the solution are studied.

  10. Transformation of Inhibitor of Meristem Activity (IMA) Gene into Jatropha curcas L.

    OpenAIRE

    Asri Pirade Paserang; Aris Tjahjoleksono; Utut Widyastuti; Suharsono Suharsono

    2015-01-01

    Jatropha is one of the many biodiesel plants developed in tropical countries. Efforts to increase its productivity can be done using various methods of breeding. One of the breeding methods is the introduction of genes into the Jatropha plant. The aim of this study is to assess the success of genetic transformation using the Inhibitor of Meristem Activity (IMA) gene in Jatropha curcas. The research procedures included inoculation of explants with Agrobacterium tumefaciens, callus induction, s...

  11. The trypsin inhibitor panulirin regulates the prophenoloxidase-activating system in the spiny lobster Panulirus argus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdomo-Morales, Rolando; Montero-Alejo, Vivian; Corzo, Gerardo; Besada, Vladimir; Vega-Hurtado, Yamile; González-González, Yamile; Perera, Erick; Porto-Verdecia, Marlene

    2013-11-01

    The melanization reaction promoted by the prophenoloxidase-activating system is an essential defense response in invertebrates subjected to regulatory mechanisms that are still not fully understood. We report here the finding and characterization of a novel trypsin inhibitor, named panulirin, isolated from the hemocytes of the spiny lobster Panulirus argus with regulatory functions on the melanization cascade. Panulirin is a cationic peptide (pI 9.5) composed of 48 amino acid residues (5.3 kDa), with six cysteine residues forming disulfide bridges. Its primary sequence was determined by combining Edman degradation/N-terminal sequencing and electrospray ionization-MS/MS spectrometry. The low amino acid sequence similarity with known proteins indicates that it represents a new family of peptidase inhibitors. Panulirin is a competitive and reversible tight-binding inhibitor of trypsin (Ki = 8.6 nm) with a notable specificity because it does not inhibit serine peptidases such as subtilisin, elastase, chymotrypsin, thrombin, and plasmin. The removal of panulirin from the lobster hemocyte lysate leads to an increase in phenoloxidase response to LPS. Likewise, the addition of increasing concentrations of panulirin to a lobster hemocyte lysate, previously depleted of trypsin-inhibitory activity, decreased the phenoloxidase response to LPS in a concentration-dependent fashion. These results indicate that panulirin is implicated in the regulation of the melanization cascade in P. argus by inhibiting peptidase(s) in the pathway toward the activation of the prophenoloxidase enzyme.

  12. The effect of autoclaving on soluble protein composition and trypsin inhibitor activity of cracked soybeans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanojević Slađana P.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of autoclaving conditions (heating for 5, 10 and 15 minutes at 0.5 bars over pressure and oil-extracting temperatures (40°C, 60°C on protein content, composition, and inhibitor activity of cracked soybeans were investigated. The results obtained indicated that oil-extracting method and heat treatment had significant influence on soluble protein content and composition. Raw soybean samples defatted at lower temperature had better solubility (535.42±2.10 mg/g than those obtained by the Soxhlet procedure (345.53±2.80. The same results were obtained for nitrogen solubility index. Autoclaving combined with two oil-extraction methods decreased protein solubility to 180.32±1.50 -245.41±1.41 mg/g, while the dominant component of heat treated flours was 11S fraction. High content of glycinin fraction (44.59-41.10% implies the possible use of treated samples in food industry. Residual activity of treated samples was 43.40-84.26%. Kunitz inhibitor (KTI was responsible for residual inhibitor activity.

  13. Vegetative Storage Protein with Trypsin Inhibitor Activity Occurs in Sapindus mukorassi,a Sapindaceae Deciduous Tree

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-Biao Liu; Xu-Chu Wang; Min-Jing Shi; Yue-Yi Chen; Zheng-Hai Hu; Wei-Min Tian

    2009-01-01

    A vegetative storage protein (VSP) with trypsin inhibitor activity in a deciduous tree,Sapindus mukorassi,was characterized by means of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis,Western-blot,immuno-histochemical localization,light- and electro-microscopy,together with analysis of proteinase inhibitor activity of the purified VSP in vitro.There were two proteins with molecular masses of about 23 and 27 kDa in a relatively high content in the bark tissues of terminal branches of S.mukorassi in leafless periods.The proteins decreased markedly during young shoot development,indicating their role in seasonal nitrogen storage.Immuno-histochemical localization with the polyclonal antibodies raised against the 23 kDa protein demonstrated that the 23 kDa protein was the major component of protein inclusions in protein-storing cells.The protein inclusions were identified by protein-specific staining and should correspond to the electron-dense materials in different forms in the vacuoles of phloem parenchyma cells and phloem ray parenchyma cells under an electron microscope.So,the 23 kDa protein was a typical VSP in S.mukorassi.The 23 and 27 kDa proteins shared no immuno-relatedness,whereas the 23 kDa protein was immuno-related with the 22 kDa VSP in lychee and possessed trypsin inhibitor activity.The 23 kDa protein may confer dual functions:nitrogen storage and defense.

  14. Effect of wine inhibitors on the proteolytic activity of papain from Carica papaya L. latex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benucci, Ilaria; Esti, Marco; Liburdi, Katia

    2015-01-01

    The influence of potential inhibitors naturally present in wine on the proteolytic activity of papain from Carica papaya latex was investigated to evaluate its applicability in white wine protein haze stabilization. Enzymatic activity was tested against a synthetic tripeptide chromogenic substrate in wine-like acidic medium that consisted of tartaric buffer (pH 3.2) supplemented with ethanol, free sulfur dioxide (SO2 ), grape skin and seed tannins within the average ranges of concentrations that are typical in wine. The diagnosis of inhibition type, performed with the graphical method, demonstrated that all of tested wine constituents were reversible inhibitors of papain. The strongest inhibition was exerted by free SO2 , which acted as a mixed-type inhibitor, similar to grape skin and seed tannins. Finally, when tested in table white wines, the catalytic activity of papain, even when if it was ascribable to the hyperbolic behavior of Michaelis-Menten equation, was determined to be strongly affected by free SO2 and total phenol level.

  15. Purification, enzymatic activity and inhibitor discovery for recombinant human carbonic anhydrase XIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juozapaitienė, Vaida; Bartkutė, Brigita; Michailovienė, Vilma; Zakšauskas, Audrius; Baranauskienė, Lina; Satkūnė, Sandra; Matulis, Daumantas

    2016-12-20

    Human carbonic anhydrase XIV (CA XIV), a transmembrane protein, highly expressed in the central nervous system, is difficult to recombinantly express and purify in large scale for the measurements of inhibitor binding and drug design. CA XIV belongs to the family of twelve catalytically active CA isoforms in the human body. Disorders in the expression of CA XIV cause serious diseases and CA XIV has been described as a possible drug target for the treatment of epilepsy, some retinopathies, and skin tumors. In this study, the effect of different promoters, E. coli strains, and the length of recombinant CA XIV protein construct were analyzed for the production CA XIV in large scale by using affinity purification. Active site titration by inhibitors and the isothermal titration calorimery revealed over 96% purity of the protein. Enzymatic activity of the purified CA XIV was determined by following the CO2 hydration using the stopped-flow technique. Several inhibitors were discovered that exhibited selectivity towards CA XIV over other CA isoforms and could be developed as drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Growth kinetics, antigen profiling, and proteinase activity of Egyptian Trichomonas tenax isolates derived from patients having oral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sibaei, Mahmoud M; Abdel-Fattah, Nashwa S; Ahmed, Sabah A; Abou-Seri, Hanan M

    2012-04-01

    The role of Trichomonas tenax as a pathogen had been clearly implicated in various pathological processes that arise outside the boundaries of the mouth. Although a relationship between the increased occurrence of this protozoan and progression of periodontal disease has been demonstrated, the ability of T. tenax in causing oral infections and the precise mechanism of tissue damage is not well known. The present study aimed to investigate different isolates of T.tenax from individuals having oral infections. Plaques and/or calculi samples were collected from 70 individuals who were diagnosed as having periodontitis and/or gingivitis, then subjected to parasitological examination and culture on modified trypticase, yeast and iron medium (TYI-S-33). Isolates successfully maintained in culture were further subjected to analysis of protein profile of lysates by Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate-Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and analysis of proteinases by non-denaturing gelatin-SDS-PAGE. Comparison of growth kinetics of seven T. tenax isolates showed a wide variability in the growth characteristics. Protein profiles of the seven isolates revealed a total 53 bands ranged in molecular weight (MW) from 5 to 95kDa using 12% resolution gel. Also, T. tenax isolates were found to possess 19 proteinase bands ranged in MW from 14 to 66kDa. The proteolytic bands were intensified by a cysteine proteinase activator and totally disappeared by treatment with a cysteine proteinase inhibitor suggesting that the proteinases were of cysteine proteinases type. The high frequency of T. tenax detected (28.6%) along with the variability in protein profiling and proteolytic activity of the isolates supports the possible pathogenicity of T. tenax and clarifies a conclusion that different strains with possibility of variable pathogenic potential may exist. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Reversal of High dietary fructose-induced PPARα suppression by oral administration of lipoxygenase/cyclooxygenase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azhar Salman

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract High fructose feeding causes diet-induced alterations of lipid metabolism and decreased insulin sensitivity, hallmark of which is a rapid and profound hypertriglyceridemia. One of the mechanisms that contribute to serum hypertriglyceridemia in this model is suppression of hepatic PPARα. HMG-CoA inhibitors, which reduce serum triglycerides in these animals, also elevate/restore hepatic PPARα. Previously we demonstrated that two known lipoxygenase/cyclooxygenase inhibitors reversed diet-induced hypertriglyceridemia in this model and that reversal of certain inflammatory markers in the liver correlated with the metabolic benefit. In this paper we extended these studies by examining the impact of these compounds on expression of PPARα, both at the level of transcription and expression. Our data show that diet-induced suppression of hepaic PPARα is reversed upon treatment with lipoxygenase/cyclooxygenase compounds. We then tested one of these compounds, BW-755c, over a range of doses from 10 mg/kg to 100 mg/kg to establish a dose-response relationship with the reduction of serum hypertriglyceridemia in this model. These experiments support the concept of using anti-inflammatory medications as one method to correct metabolic dysfunction.

  18. Enhancement of oscillatory activity in the endopiriform nucleus of rats raised under abnormal oral conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Hiroshi; Hasumoto-Honjo, Miho; Sugai, Tokio; Segami, Natsuki; Kato, Nobuo

    2014-02-21

    Endopiriform nucleus (EPN) is located deep to the piriform cortex, and has neural connections with not only neighboring sensory areas but also subcortical areas where emotional and nociceptive information is processed. Well-balanced oral condition might play an important role in stability of brain activities. When the oral condition is impaired, several areas in the brain might be affected. In the present study, we investigated whether abnormal conditions of oral region influence neural activities in the EPN. Orthodontic appliance that generates continuous force and chronic pain-related stress was fixed to maxillary incisors of rats, and raised. Field potential recordings were made from the EPN of brain slices. We previously reported that the EPN has an ability to generate membrane potential oscillation. In the present study, we have applied the same methods to assess activities of neuron clusters in the EPN. In the case of normal rats, stable field potential oscillations were induced in the EPN by application of low-frequency electrical stimulation under the medium with caffeine. In the case of rats with the orthodontic appliance, stable field potential oscillations were also induced, but both duration of oscillatory activities and wavelet number were increased. The enhanced oscillations were depressed by blockade of NMDA receptors. Thus, impairment of oral health under application of continuous orthodontic force and chronic pain-related stress enhanced neural activities in the EPN, in which up-regulation of NMDA receptors may be concerned. These findings suggest that the EPN might be involved in information processing with regard to abnormal conditions of oral region.

  19. Synthesis and anti-HIV activity of some [Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor]-C5'-linker-[Integrase Inhibitor] heterodimers as inhibitors of HIV replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugeac, Elena; Fossey, Christine; Ladurée, Daniel; Schmidt, Sylvie; Laumond, Geraldine; Aubertin, Anne-Marie

    2004-12-01

    Selected for their expected ability to inhibit HIV replication, a series of eight heterodimers containing a Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor (NRTI) and an Integrase Inhibitor (INI), bound by a linker, were designed and synthesized. For the NRTIs, d4U, d2U and d4T were chosen. For the INIs, 4-[1-(4-fluorobenzyl)-1H-pyrrol-2-yl]-2,4-dioxobutyric acid (6) and 4-(3,5-dibenzyloxyphenyl)-2,4-dioxobutyric acid (9) (belonging to the beta-diketo acids class) were chosen. The conjugation of the two different inhibitors (NRTI and INI) was performed using an amino acid (glycine or beta-alanine) as a cleavable linker.

  20. Novel Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Modulates Cardiac Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors and Inflammatory Cytokines in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lkhagva, Baigalmaa; Lin, Yung-Kuo; Kao, Yu-Hsun; Chazo, Tze-Fan; Chung, Cheng-Chih; Chen, Shih-Ann; Chen, Yi-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) affects cardiac metabolism and inflammation. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) play a critical role in cardiac pathophysiology. This study investigated whether HDAC inhibition can regulate HF by modifying cardiac inflammation and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) isoforms. Echocardiography, electrocardiography, ELISA and Western blot were performed in rats with isoproterenol-induced HF, with and without orally administered MPT0E014 (a novel HDAC inhibitor, 50 mg/kg for 7 consecutive days). The left ventricles (LVs) of HF rats expressed significantly higher levels of HDAC1, HDAC2, HDAC3, HDAC4 and HDAC6 than the healthy LVs did. HF rats treated with MPT0E014 exhibited improved cardiac fraction shortening with reducing chamber size. The MPT0E014-treated HF LVs exhibited a smaller increase in the expression of interleukin (IL)-6, p22, SMAD2/3, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, PPAR isoforms and circulatory tumor growth factor-β1 than the untreated HF LVs did. Moreover, MPT0E014-treated HF LVs expressed less fibroblast growth factor receptor than untreated HF LVs did. HDAC inhibition can improve cardiac function and attenuate the effects of HF on cardiac metabolism and inflammation, which might contribute to the beneficial effects of HDAC inhibition in HF. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Oral leukoplakia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmstrup, Palle; Dabelsteen, Erik

    2016-01-01

    The idea of identifying oral lesions with a precancerous nature, i.e. in the sense of pertaining to a pathologic process with an increased risk for future malignant development, of course is to prevent frank malignancy to occur in the affected area. The most common oral lesion with a precancerous...... nature is oral leukoplakia, and for decades it has been discussed how to treat these lesions. Various treatment modalities, such as systemic therapies and surgical removal, have been suggested. The systemic therapies tested so far include retinoids, extracts of green tea, inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-2...

  2. Steroidal inhibitors as chemical probes of the active site of aromatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueggemeir, R W; Moh, P P; Ebrahimian, S; Darby, M V

    1993-03-01

    Androstenedione analogs containing 7 alpha-substituents have proven to be potent inhibitors of aromatase in human placental microsomes, in MCF-7 mammary cell cultures, and in JAr choriocarcinoma cells. Recent investigations have focused on the use of mechanism-based inhibitors, such as 7 alpha-substituted 1,4-androstadienediones, to biochemically probe the active site of aromatase. Inhibition kinetics were determined under initial velocity conditions using purified human placental cytochrome P450arom protein in a reconstituted system. Derivatives of 1,4-androstadiene-3,17-dione and 1,4,6-androstatriene-3,17-dione exhibited high affinity in the purified enzyme system. 7 alpha-(4'-Amino)phenylthio-1,4-androstadiene-3,17-dione, abbreviated 7 alpha-APTADD, demonstrated rapid time-dependent, first-order inactivation of reconstituted aromatase activity only in the presence of NADPH. The apparent Kinact for 7 alpha-APTADD is 11.8 nM, the first-order rate of inactivation is 2.72 x 10(-3) sec-1, and the half-time of inactivation at infinite inhibitor concentration is 4.25 min. The values for the rate constant and half-time of inactivation are similar to those observed in the placental microsomal assay system. Further studies were performed with radioiodinated 7 alpha-(4'-iodo)phenylthio-1,4-androstadienedione, 7 alpha-IPTADD, and the reconstituted aromatase system. Incubations with [125I] 7 alpha-IPTADD were followed by protein precipitation, solvent extraction, and column chromatography. Analysis of the isolated cytochrome P450arom by gel electrophoresis and autoradiography demonstrated the presence of only one radioactive band, which corresponded to the protein staining band for cytochrome P450arom. HPLC radiochromatographic analysis of the isolated cytochrome P450aroM confirmed the presence of only one radioactive peak coeluting with the u.v. peak for cytochrome P450arom. Peptide mapping analysis by reverse-phase HPLC of digested inhibitor-cytochrome P450arom complex

  3. Prevalence of oral candidiasis in HIV/AIDS children in highly active antiretroviral therapy era. A literature analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitán-Cepeda, Luis Alberto; Sánchez-Vargas, Octavio; Castillo, Nydia

    2015-08-01

    SummaryHighly active antiretroviral therapy has decreased the morbidity and mortality related to HIV infection, including oral opportunistic infections. This paper offers an analysis of the scientific literature on the epidemiological aspects of oral candidiasis in HIV-positive children in the combination antiretroviral therapy era. An electronic databases search was made covering the highly active antiretroviral therapy era (1998 onwards). The terms used were oral lesions, oral candidiasis and their combination with highly active antiretroviral therapy and HIV/AIDS children. The following data were collected from each paper: year and country in which the investigation was conducted, antiretroviral treatment, oral candidiasis prevalence and diagnostic parameters (clinical or microbiological). Prevalence of oral candidiasis varied from 2.9% in American HIV-positive children undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy to 88% in Chilean HIV-positive children without antiretroviral therapy. With respect to geographical location and antiretroviral treatment, higher oral candidiasis prevalence in HIV-positive children on combination antiretroviral therapy/antiretroviral therapy was reported in African children (79.1%) followed by 45.9% reported in Hindu children. In HIV-positive Chilean children on no antiretroviral therapy, high oral candidiasis prevalence was reported (88%) followed by Nigerian children (80%). Oral candidiasis is still frequent in HIV-positive children in the highly active antiretroviral therapy era irrespective of geographical location, race and use of antiretroviral therapy.

  4. Highly stable plasminogen activator inhibitor type one (VLHL PAI-1) protects fibrin clots from tissue plasminogen activator-mediated fibrinolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankun, Jerzy; Aleem, Ansari M; Selman, Steven H; Skrzypczak-Jankun, Ewa; Lysiak-Szydlowska, Wieslawa; Grafos, Nicholas; Fryer, Hugh J L; Greenfield, Robert S

    2007-11-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is the major specific inhibitor of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) which mediates fibrin clot lysis through activation of plasminogen. Wild-type-PAI-1 (wPAI-1) is rapidly converted to the latent form (half-life of approximately 2 h) and loses its ability to inhibit tPA. We developed a very long half-life PAI-1 (VLHL PAI-1), a recombinant protein with a half-life >700 h compared with wPAI-1. In this study, VLHL PAI-1 was assessed for its ability to inhibit clot lysis in vitro. Clot formation was initiated in normal plasma supplemented with tPA by the addition of either tissue factor or human recombinant FVIIa. Clot lysis time, monitored turbidimetrically in a microtiter plate reader, was determined at various concentrations of wPAI-1 and VLHL PAI-1. Both wPAI-1 and VLHL PAI-1 caused a significant increase in clot lysis time, although the latter was somewhat less effective at lower concentrations. The VLHL PAI-1, but not wPAI-1, maintained its anti-fibrinolytic activity after preincubation overnight at 37 degrees. These studies demonstrate that VLHL PAI-1 is an effective inhibitor of fibrin clot degradation. Due to the high stability of VLHL PAI-1 compared with wPAI-1, this novel inhibitor of tPA-mediated fibrinolysis may have therapeutic applications for treating surgical and trauma patients when used directly or in conjunction with the procoagulant recombinant FVIIa.

  5. Mini Review of Phytochemicals and Plant Taxa with Activity as Microbial Biofilm and Quorum Sensing Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chieu Anh Kim Ta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biofilms readily form on many surfaces in nature including plant surfaces. In order to coordinate the formation of these biofilms, microorganisms use a cell-to-cell communication system called quorum sensing (QS. As formation of biofilms on vascular plants may not be advantageous to the hosts, plants have developed inhibitors to interfere with these processes. In this mini review, research papers published on plant-derived molecules that have microbial biofilm or quorum sensing inhibition are reviewed with the objectives of determining the biosynthetic classes of active compounds, their biological activity in assays, and their families of occurrence and range. The main findings are the identification of plant phenolics, including benzoates, phenyl propanoids, stilbenes, flavonoids, gallotannins, proanthocyanidins and coumarins as important inhibitors with both activities. Some terpenes including monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, diterpenes and triterpenes also have anti-QS and anti-biofilm activities. Relatively few alkaloids were reported. Quinones and organosulfur compounds, especially from garlic, were also active. A common feature is the polar nature of these compounds. Phytochemicals with these activities are widespread in Angiosperms in temperate and tropical regions, but gymnosperms, bryophytes and pteridophytes were not represented.

  6. Anti-inflammatory activity of orpanoxin administered orally and topically to rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, R R; Bonk, K R; Decker, G E; Miller, K E

    1985-07-01

    Orpanoxin, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) lacking gastric ulcerogenic effects in the therapeutic dose range in rats, was compared with six reference NSAIDs for oral activity in the rat paw carrageenin-induced edema assay. Tested NSAIDs were ranked on the basis of oral mg/kg ED50 values: piroxicam, 0.55; orpanoxin, 35.6; diflunisal, 59.6; benoxaprofen, greater than 300; tolmetin sodium, greater than 300; and sulindac, greater than 300. Zomepirac sodium was inactive. Only the three most potent compounds produced greater than 60% inhibition of edema. Inhibition was generally greater at 4 h than at 6 h post carrageenin for all compounds. Oral activity of orpanoxin was also demonstrated in the guinea-pig u.v.-induced erythema model (ED50 = 24.2 mg/kg p.o. when given 1 h before irradiation) and in the mouse ear croton oil induced edema test (ED50 value = 131 mg/kg p.o.). Topical activity of orpanoxin was assessed in both the guinea-pig and mouse models. In the guinea-pig u.v.-induced erythema model, application (1 h after u.v.) of 1, 5, and 10% (w/v) orpanoxin creams (containing 10% urea) significantly inhibited erythema at 2, 3, and 4 h post-irradiation. Orpanoxin, mefenamic acid, and indomethacin as 1% creams inhibited total erythema scores 70, 92 and 74%, respectively. Evidence for topical activity in the mouse ear assay was also obtained for orpanoxin in diethyl ether or 10% urea cream, but not in dimethylsulfoxide. It was concluded that orpanoxin has anti-inflammatory activity comparable to reference NSAIDs in the rat paw edema test, is active orally in rat, mouse, and guinea-pig models, and shows topical activity in the guinea-pig and the mouse.

  7. Oral Administration of Sitagliptin Activates CREB and Is Neuroprotective in Murine Model of Brain Trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DellaValle, Brian; Brix, Gitte S; Brock, Birgitte

    2016-01-01

    for immunoblotting for assessment of selected biomarkers for pathology and protection. Results: Sitagliptin treatment reduced lesion size at day 2 post-injury by ~28% (p ... in the effects of oral treatment of a different class of GLP-1 based therapy, dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibition on mice after TBI. DPP-IV inhibitors reduce the degradation of endogenous GLP-1 and extend circulation of this protective peptide in the bloodstream. This class has yet to be investigated...... as a potential therapy for TBI. Methods: Mice were administrated once-daily 50 mg/kg of sitagliptin in a Nutella® ball or Nutella® alone throughout the study, beginning 2 days before severe trauma was induced with a stereotactic cryo-lesion. At 2 days post trauma, lesion size was determined. Brains were isolated...

  8. Synthesis and activity study of phosphonamidate dipeptides as potential inhibitors of VanX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ke-Wu; Cheng, Xu; Zhao, Chuan; Liu, Cheng-Cheng; Jia, Chao; Feng, Lei; Xiao, Jian-Min; Zhou, Li-Sheng; Gao, Hui-Zhou; Yang, Xia; Zhai, Le

    2011-12-01

    In an effort to develop inhibitors of VanX, the phosphonamidate analogs of D-Ala-D-Ala dipeptides, N-[(1-aminoethyl) hydroxyphosphinyl]-glycine (1a), -alanine (1b), -valine (1c), -leucine (1d) and -phenylalanine (1e) were synthesized, characterized and evaluated using recombinant VanX. The crystal structure of the intermediate 6d was obtained (Deposition number: CCDC 839134), and structural analysis revealed that it is orthorhombic with a space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), the bond length of P-N is 1.62Å and angle of C-N-P is 123.6°. Phosphonamidate 1(a-e) showed to be inhibitors of VanX with IC(50) values of 0.39, 0.70, 1.12, 2.82, and 4.13mM, respectively, which revealed that the inhibition activities of the phosphonamidates were dependent on the size of R-substituent of them, with the best inhibitor 1a having the smallest substituent. Also, 1a showed antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) with a MIC value of 0.25 μg/ml.

  9. Urokinase, urokinase receptor, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 expression on podocytes in immunoglobulin A glomerulonephritis

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Ji-Hye; Oh, Mee-Hye; Park, Jae-seok; Na, Gyoung-Jae; Gil, Hye-Wook; Yang, Jong-Oh; Lee, Eun-Young; Hong, Sae-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), uPA receptor (uPAR), and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 on podocytes in immunoglobulin A (IgA) glomerulonephritis (GN). Methods Renal biopsy specimens from 52 IgA GN patients were deparaffinized and subjected to immunohistochemical staining for uPA, PAI-1, and uPAR. The biopsies were classified into three groups according to the expression of uPA and uPAR on podo...

  10. Circadian fluctuations in circulating plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 are independent of feeding cycles in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Katsutaka; Ohkura, Naoki; Yasumoto, Yuki; Yamamoto, Saori

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the involvement of the day-night feeding cycle in the circadian regulation of circulating plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) concentrations, mice were fed with a diet for eight hours during either daytime (DF) or nighttime (NF) for one week. The reversed feeding cycle did not affect the circadian phases of plasma PAI-1 levels as well as the nocturnal wheel-running activity, although the phase of Pai-1 mRNA expression was significantly advanced for 8.6 hours in the livers of DF, compared with NF mice. The day-night feeding cycle is not a critical Zeitgeber for circadian rhythm of circulating PAI-1.

  11. Combining the pan-aurora kinase inhibitor AMG 900 with histone deacetylase inhibitors enhances antitumor activity in prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paller, C.J.; Wissing, M.D.; Mendonca, J.; Sharma, A.; Kim, E.; Kim, H.S.; Kortenhorst, M.S.Q.; Gerber, S.; Rosen, M.; Shaikh, F.; Zahurak, M.L.; Rudek, M.A.; Hammers, H.; Rudin, C.M.; Carducci, M.A.; Kachhap, S.K.

    2014-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) are being tested in clinical trials for the treatment of solid tumors. While most studies have focused on the reexpression of silenced tumor suppressor genes, a number of genes/pathways are downregulated by HDACIs. This provides opportunities for combination t

  12. The activity of non-specific esterase in the thyroid epithelial cells of the guinea pig as influenced by various inhibitors and activators. A histochemical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, S

    1976-01-01

    The action of various inhibitors and activators upon esterase activity in the thyroid epithelial cells is demonstrated. The agents used were triorthocresylphosphate (TOCP), parachloromercuribenzoate (PCMB), Arsanillic acid, p-nitrophenyl dimethyl carbamate and bis p-nitrophenyl phosphate. TOCP...

  13. Psc-AFP, an antifungal protein with trypsin inhibitor activity from Psoralea corylifolia seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xingyong; Li, Jun; Wang, Xiaowen; Fang, Weiguo; Bidochka, Michael J; She, Rong; Xiao, Yuehua; Pei, Yan

    2006-07-01

    An antifungal protein designated as Psc-AFP, with an apparent molecular mass of 18kDa, was isolated from a traditional Chinese herb, malaytea scurfpea (Psoralea corylifolia L.). The isolation procedure entailed extraction, cation exchange chromatography on CM FF, gel filtration chromatography on Superdex 75 and reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography on SOURCE 5RPC column. Automated Edman degradation determined the partial N-terminal sequence of Psc-AFP to be NH2-EWEPVQNGGSSYYMVPRIWA, which displayed homology with plant trypsin inhibitors. The protease inhibitor activity of Psc-AFP was then confirmed by the inhibition on trypsin. Psc-AFP at 10 microM inhibited the mycelial growth of Alternari brassicae, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporum and Rhizoctonia cerealis, suggesting that Psc-AFP has a role in the defense against pathogens.

  14. Discovery and antiplatelet activity of a selective PI3Kβ inhibitor (MIPS-9922).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhaohua; Pinson, Jo-Anne; Mountford, Simon J; Orive, Stephanie; Schoenwaelder, Simone M; Shackleford, David; Powell, Andrew; Nelson, Erin M; Hamilton, Justin R; Jackson, Shaun P; Jennings, Ian G; Thompson, Philip E

    2016-10-21

    A series of amino-substituted triazines were developed and examined for PI3Kβ inhibition and anti-platelet function. Structural adaptations of a morpholine ring of the prototype pan-PI3K inhibitor ZSTK474 yielded PI3Kβ selective compounds, where the selectivity largely derives from an interaction with the non-conserved Asp862 residue, as shown by site directed mutagenesis. The most PI3Kβ selective inhibitor from the series was studied in detail through a series of in vitro and in vivo functional studies. MIPS-9922, 10 potently inhibited ADP-induced washed platelet aggregation. It also inhibited integrin αIIbβ3 activation and αIIbβ3 dependent platelet adhesion to immobilized vWF under high shear. It prevented arterial thrombus formation in the in vivo electrolytic mouse model of thrombosis without inducing prolonged bleeding or excess blood loss.

  15. In vitro activity assays for MYST histone acetyltransferases and adaptation for high-throughput inhibitor screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Cheryl E.; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a post-translational modification that is carried out by acetyltransferases. The MYST proteins form the largest and most diverse family of acetyltransferases, which regulate gene expression, DNA repair, and cell cycle homeostasis, among other activities, by acetylating both histone and non-histone proteins. This chapter will describe methods for the preparation and biochemical characterization of MYST family acetyltransferases, including protocols for the preparation of recombinant protein, enzyme assays for measuring steady state parameters and binding assays to measure cofactor and inhibitor binding. We also provide details on adapting these assays for high throughput screening for small molecule MYST inhibitors. This chapter seeks to prepare researchers for some hurdles that they may encounter when studying the MYST proteins so that there may be better opportunity to plan appropriate controls and obtain high quality data. PMID:27372752

  16. Molecular mutagenesis of ppGpp: turning a RelA activator into an inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beljantseva, Jelena; Kudrin, Pavel; Jimmy, Steffi; Ehn, Marcel; Pohl, Radek; Varik, Vallo; Tozawa, Yuzuru; Shingler, Victoria; Tenson, Tanel; Rejman, Dominik; Hauryliuk, Vasili

    2017-01-01

    The alarmone nucleotide (p)ppGpp is a key regulator of bacterial metabolism, growth, stress tolerance and virulence, making (p)ppGpp-mediated signaling a promising target for development of antibacterials. Although ppGpp itself is an activator of the ribosome-associated ppGpp synthetase RelA, several ppGpp mimics have been developed as RelA inhibitors. However promising, the currently available ppGpp mimics are relatively inefficient, with IC50 in the sub-mM range. In an attempt to identify a potent and specific inhibitor of RelA capable of abrogating (p)ppGpp production in live bacterial cells, we have tested a targeted nucleotide library using a biochemical test system comprised of purified Escherichia coli components. While none of the compounds fulfilled this aim, the screen has yielded several potentially useful molecular tools for biochemical and structural work. PMID:28157202

  17. Blockade of TRPM7 channel activity and cell death by inhibitors of 5-lipoxygenase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiang-Chin Chen

    Full Text Available TRPM7 is a ubiquitous divalent-selective ion channel with its own kinase domain. Recent studies have shown that suppression of TRPM7 protein expression by RNA interference increases resistance to ischemia-induced neuronal cell death in vivo and in vitro, making the channel a potentially attractive pharmacological target for molecular intervention. Here, we report the identification of the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors, NDGA, AA861, and MK886, as potent blockers of the TRPM7 channel. Using a cell-based assay, application of these compounds prevented cell rounding caused by overexpression of TRPM7 in HEK-293 cells, whereas inhibitors of 12-lipoxygenase and 15-lipoxygenase did not prevent the change in cell morphology. Application of the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors blocked heterologously expressed TRPM7 whole-cell currents without affecting the protein's expression level or its cell surface concentration. All three inhibitors were also effective in blocking the native TRPM7 current in HEK-293 cells. However, two other 5-lipoxygenase specific inhibitors, 5,6-dehydro-arachidonic acid and zileuton, were ineffective in suppressing TRPM7 channel activity. Targeted knockdown of 5-lipoxygenase did not reduce TRPM7 whole-cell currents. In addition, application of 5-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HPETE, the product of 5-lipoxygenase, or 5-HPETE's downstream metabolites, leukotriene B4 and leukotriene D4, did not stimulate TRPM7 channel activity. These data suggested that NDGA, AA861, and MK886 reduced the TRPM7 channel activity independent of their effect on 5-lipoxygenase activity. Application of AA861 and NDGA reduced cell death for cells overexpressing TRPM7 cultured in low extracellular divalent cations. Moreover, treatment of HEK-293 cells with AA861 increased cell resistance to apoptotic stimuli to a level similar to that obtained for cells in which TRPM7 was knocked down by RNA interference. In conclusion, NDGA, AA861, and MK886 are potent blockers of

  18. MALT1 Inhibition of Oral Carcinoma Cell Invasion and ERK/MAPK Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, T; Soeno, Y; Shirako, Y; Sudo, H; Yagishita, H; Taya, Y; Kawashiri, S; Okada, Y; Imai, K

    2016-04-01

    The expression of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue 1 (MALT1) that activates nuclear factor (NF)-κB in lymphocyte lineages is rapidly inactivated in oral carcinoma cells at the invasive front and the patients with worst prognosis. However, its mechanism to accelerate carcinoma progression remains unknown, and this study was carried out to examine the role in invasion. HSC2 oral carcinoma cells stably expressing wild-type MALT1 (wtMALT1) reduced the invasion of basement membrane matrices and collagen gels, and the dominant-negative form (∆MALT1)-expressing cells aggressively invaded into collagen gels. MALT1 decelerated proliferation and migration of cells and downregulated expression of matrix metalloproteinase 2 and 9, which were confirmed by short interfering RNA transfections. Reporter assays and immunoblot analysis showed that MALT1 does not affect the NF-κB pathway but inhibits ERK/MAPK activation. This was confirmed by endogenous MALT1 expression in oral carcinoma cell lines. Orthotopic implantation of ∆MALT1-expressing HSC2 cells in mice grew rapid expansive and invasive tongue tumors in contrast to an absence of tumor formation by wtMALT1-expressing cells. These results demonstrate that MALT1 suppresses oral carcinoma invasion by inhibiting proliferation, migration, and extracellular matrix degradation and that the ERK/MAPK pathway is a target of MALT1 and further suggests a role as a suppressor of carcinoma progression.

  19. Caspase Inhibitors may Attenuate Opioid-induced Hyperalgesia and Tolerance via Inhibiting Microglial Activation and Neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiancheng Zhang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Prolonged exposure to an opioid induces hyperalgesia and tolerance, which negatively affect pain management in turn and significantly hamper the application of opioids. A growing body of evidence has demonstrated that glial activation contributes to the development of these two side effects. Recent studies have demonstrated that morphine, binding to an accessory protein of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4, activates microglia and produces neuroinflammation in amanner parallel to lipopolysaccharide. Meanwhile, lipopolysaccharide activates microglia through TLR4/caspase signalling. Therefore, we hypothesise that morphine may activate microglia throughTLR4/caspase signalling and that caspase inhibitors may attenuate opioid-induced hyperalgesia and tolerance via inhibiting microglial activation and neuroinflammation

  20. Activity of potent and selective host defense peptide mimetics in mouse models of oral candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Lisa K; Freeman, Katie B; Masso-Silva, Jorge A; Falkovsky, Klaudia; Aloyouny, Ashwag; Markowitz, Kenneth; Hise, Amy G; Fatahzadeh, Mahnaz; Scott, Richard W; Diamond, Gill

    2014-07-01

    There is a strong need for new broadly active antifungal agents for the treatment of oral candidiasis that not only are active against many species of Candida, including drug-resistant strains, but also evade microbial countermeasures which may lead to resistance. Host defense peptides (HDPs) can provide a foundation for the development of such agents. Toward this end, we have developed fully synthetic, small-molecule, nonpeptide mimetics of the HDPs that improve safety and other pharmaceutical properties. Here we describe the identification of several HDP mimetics that are broadly active against C. albicans and other species of Candida, rapidly fungicidal, and active against yeast and hyphal cultures and that exhibit low cytotoxicity for mammalian cells. Importantly, specificity for Candida over commensal bacteria was also evident, thereby minimizing potential damage to the endogenous microbiome which otherwise could favor fungal overgrowth. Three compounds were tested as topical agents in two different mouse models of oral candidiasis and were found to be highly active. Following single-dose administrations, total Candida burdens in tongues of infected animals were reduced up to three logs. These studies highlight the potential of HDP mimetics as a new tool in the antifungal arsenal for the treatment of oral candidiasis.

  1. In vitro activities of natural products against oral Candida isolates from denture wearers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos-Arias Cristina

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Candida-associated denture stomatitis is a frequent infectious disease. Treatment of this oral condition is difficult because failures and recurrences are common. The aim of this study was to test the in vitro antifungal activity of pure constituents of essentials oils. Methods Eight terpenic derivatives (carvacrol, farnesol, geraniol, linalool, menthol, menthone, terpinen-4-ol, and α-terpineol, a phenylpropanoid (eugenol, a phenethyl alcohol (tyrosol and fluconazole were evaluated against 38 Candida isolated from denture-wearers and 10 collection Candida strains by the CLSI M27-A3 broth microdilution method. Results Almost all the tested compounds showed antifungal activity with MIC ranges of 0.03-0.25% for eugenol and linalool, 0.03-0.12% for geraniol, 0.06-0.5% for menthol, α-terpineol and terpinen-4-ol, 0.03-0.5% for carvacrol, and 0.06-4% for menthone. These compounds, with the exception of farnesol, menthone and tyrosol, showed important in vitro activities against the fluconazole-resistant and susceptible-dose dependent Candida isolates. Conclusions Carvacrol, eugenol, geraniol, linalool and terpinen-4-ol were very active in vitro against oral Candida isolates. Their fungistatic and fungicidal activities might convert them into promising alternatives for the topic treatment of oral candidiasis and denture stomatitis.

  2. Changes in midgut endopeptidase activity of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) are responsible for adaptation to soybean proteinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulillo, L C; Lopes, A R; Cristofoletti, P T; Parra, J R; Terra, W R; Silva-Filho, M C

    2000-06-01

    The development of transgenic maize plants expressing soybean proteinase inhibitors could reduce the economic damage of one of the major maize pests in Brazil, the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith, 1797). We examined the influence of soybean proteinase inhibitors on digestive enzyme properties and development of S. frugiperda larvae. The inhibition of trypsin and chymotrypsin activities in vitro by soybean proteinase inhibitors suggested that either Kunitz (SBTI) or Bowman-Birk (SBBI) would have a potential antimetabolic effect when ingested by insect larvae. However, chronic ingestion of semipurified soybean inhibitors did not result in a significant reduction of growth and development of fall armyworm. Therefore, digestive serine proteinase activities (trypsin and chymotrypsin) of fall armyworm larvae were characterized. The results suggest that S. frugiperda was able to physiologically adapt to dietary proteinase inhibitors by altering the complement of proteolytic enzymes in the insect midguts.

  3. Discovery of Pyrrolopyridine−Pyridone Based Inhibitors of Met Kinase: Synthesis, X-ray Crystallographic Analysis, and Biological Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyoung Soon; Zhang, Liping; Schmidt, Robert; Cai, Zhen-Wei; Wei, Donna; Williams, David K.; Lombardo, Louis J.; Trainor, George L.; Xie, Dianlin; Zhang, Yaquan; An, Yongmi; Sack, John S.; Tokarski, John S.; Darienzo, Celia; Kamath, Amrita; Marathe, Punit; Zhang, Yueping; Lippy, Jonathan; Jeyaseelan, Sr., Robert; Wautlet, Barri; Henley, Benjamin; Gullo-Brown, Johnni; Manne, Veeraswamy; Hunt, John T.; Fargnoli, Joseph; Borzilleri, Robert M. (BMS)

    2008-10-02

    Conformationally constrained 2-pyridone analogue 2 is a potent Met kinase inhibitor with an IC50 value of 1.8 nM. Further SAR of the 2-pyridone based inhibitors of Met kinase led to potent 4-pyridone and pyridine N-oxide inhibitors such as 3 and 4. The X-ray crystallographic data of the inhibitor 2 bound to the ATP binding site of Met kinase protein provided insight into the binding modes of these inhibitors, and the SAR of this series of analogues was rationalized. Many of these analogues showed potent antiproliferative activities against the Met dependent GTL-16 gastric carcinoma cell line. Compound 2 also inhibited Flt-3 and VEGFR-2 kinases with IC{sub 50} values of 4 and 27 nM, respectively. It possesses a favorable pharmacokinetic profile in mice and demonstrates significant in vivo antitumor activity in the GTL-16 human gastric carcinoma xenograft model.

  4. Prediction of activity for nonnucleoside inhibitors with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase based on Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Robert C; Udier-Blagović, Marina; Wang, De-Ping; Watkins, Edward K; Kroeger Smith, Marilyn B; Smith, Richard H; Tirado-Rives, Julian; Jorgensen, William L

    2002-07-04

    Results of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for more than 200 nonnucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (NNRTIs) representing eight diverse chemotypes have been correlated with their anti-HIV activities in an effort to establish simulation protocols and methods that can be used in the development of more effective drugs. Each inhibitor was modeled in a complex with the protein and by itself in water, and potentially useful descriptors of binding affinity were collected during the MC simulations. A viable regression equation was obtained for each data set using an extended linear response approach, which yielded r(2) values between 0.54 and 0.85 and an average unsigned error of only 0.50 kcal/mol. The most common descriptors confirm that a good geometrical match between the inhibitor and the protein is important and that the net loss of hydrogen bonds with the inhibitor upon binding is unfavorable. Other physically reasonable descriptors of binding are needed on a chemotype case-by-case basis. By including descriptors in common from the individual fits, combination regressions that include multiple data sets were also developed. This procedure led to a refined "master" regression for 210 NNRTIs with an r(2) of 0.60 and a cross-validated q(2) of 0.55. The computed activities show an rms error of 0.86 kcal/mol in comparison with experiment and an average unsigned error of 0.69 kcal/mol. Encouraging results were obtained for the predictions of 27 NNRTIs, representing a new chemotype not included in the development of the regression model. Predictions for this test set using the master regression yielded a q(2) value of 0.51 and an average unsigned error of 0.67 kcal/mol. Finally, additional regression analysis reveals that use of ligand-only descriptors leads to models with much diminished predictive ability.

  5. A novel, potent, oral active and safe antinociceptive pyrazole targeting kappa opioid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Gabriela; Rossato, Mateus F; Walker, Cristiani I B; Oliveira, Sara M; Rosa, Fernanda; Tonello, Raquel; Silva, Cássia R; Machado, Pablo; Boligon, Aline A; Martins, Marcos A P; Zanatta, Nilo; Bonacorso, Hélio G; Athayde, Margareth L; Rubin, Maribel A; Calixto, João B; Ferreira, Juliano

    2013-10-01

    Pyrazole compounds are an intriguing class of compounds with potential analgesic activity; however, their mechanism of action remains unknown. Thus, the goal of this study was to explore the antinociceptive potential, safety and mechanism of action of novel 1-pyrazole methyl ester derivatives, which were designed by molecular simplification, using in vivo and in vitro methods in mice. First, tree 1-pyrazole methyl ester derivatives (DMPE, MPFE, and MPCIE) were tested in the capsaicin test and all presented antinociceptive effect; however the MPClE (methyl 5-trichloromethyl-3-methyl-1H-pyrazole-1-carboxylate) was the most effective. Thus, we selected this compound to assess the effects and mechanisms in subsequent pain models. MPCIE produced antinociception when administered by oral, intraperitoneal, intrathecal and intraplantar routes and was effective in the capsaicin and the acetic acid-induced nociception tests. Moreover, this compound reduced the hyperalgesia in diverse clinically-relevant pain models, including postoperative, inflammatory, and neuropathic nociception in mice. The antinociception produced by orally administered MPClE was mediated by κ-opioid receptors, since these effects were prevented by systemically pre-treatment with naloxone and the κ-opioid receptor antagonist nor-binaltorphimine. Moreover, MPCIE prevented binding of the κ-opioid ligand [(3)H]-CI-977 in vitro (IC₅₀ of 0.68 (0.32-1.4) μM), but not the TRPV1 ([(3)H]-resiniferatoxin) or the α₂-adrenoreceptor ([(3)H]-idazoxan) binding. Regarding the drug-induced side effects, oral administration of MPClE did not produce sedation, constipation or motor impairment at its active dose. In addition, MPCIE was readily absorbed after oral administration. Taken together, these results demonstrate that MPClE is a novel, potent, orally active and safe analgesic drug that targets κ-opioid receptors.

  6. Discovery and Early Clinical Evaluation of BMS-605339, a Potent and Orally Efficacious Tripeptidic Acylsulfonamide NS3 Protease Inhibitor for the Treatment of Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scola, Paul M.; Wang, Alan Xiangdong; Good, Andrew C.; Sun, Li-Qiang; Combrink, Keith D.; Campbell, Jeffrey A.; Chen, Jie; Tu, Yong; Sin, Ny; Venables, Brian L.; Sit, Sing-Yuen; Chen, Yan; Cocuzza, Anthony; Bilder, Donna M.; D’Andrea, Stanley; Zheng, Barbara; Hewawasam, Piyasena; Ding, Min; Thuring, Jan; Li, Jianqing; Hernandez, Dennis; Yu, Fei; Falk, Paul; Zhai, Guangzhi; Sheaffer, Amy K.; Chen, Chaoqun; Lee, Min S.; Barry, Diana; Knipe, Jay O.; Li, Wenying; Han, Yong-Hae; Jenkins, Susan; Gesenberg, Christoph; Gao, Qi; Sinz, Michael W.; Santone, Kenneth S.; Zvyaga, Tatyana; Rajamani, Ramkumar; Klei, Herbert E.; Colonno, Richard J.; Grasela, Dennis M.; Hughes, Eric; Chien, Caly; Adams, Stephen; Levesque, Paul C.; Li, Danshi; Zhu, Jialong; Meanwell, Nicholas A.; McPhee, Fiona

    2014-03-13

    The discovery of BMS-605339 (35), a tripeptidic inhibitor of the NS3/4A enzyme, is described. This compound incorporates a cyclopropylacylsulfonamide moiety that was designed to improve the potency of carboxylic acid prototypes through the introduction of favorable nonbonding interactions within the S1' site of the protease. The identification of 35 was enabled through the optimization and balance of critical properties including potency and pharmacokinetics (PK). This was achieved through modulation of the P2* subsite of the inhibitor which identified the isoquinoline ring system as a key template for improving PK properties with further optimization achieved through functionalization. A methoxy moiety at the C6 position of this isoquinoline ring system proved to be optimal with respect to potency and PK, thus providing the clinical compound 35 which demonstrated antiviral activity in HCV-infected patients.

  7. Role of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 1 in Pathologies of Female Reproductive Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Ye

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal pregnancy is a state of hypercoagulability with diminishing fibrinolytic activity, which is mainly caused by an increase of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1. PAI-1 is the main inhibitor of plasminogen activators, including tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA. In human placentas, PAI-1 is expressed in extravillous interstitial trophoblasts and vascular trophoblasts. During implantation and placentation, PAI-1 is responsible for inhibiting extra cellular matrix (ECM degradation, thereby causing an inhibition of trophoblasts invasion. In the present study, we have reviewed the literature of various reproductive diseases where PAI-1 plays a role. PAI-1 levels are increased in patients with recurrent pregnancy losses (RPL, preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR, gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM in the previous pregnancy, endometriosis and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS. In general, an increased expression of PAI-1 in the blood is associated with an increased risk for infertility and a worse pregnancy outcome. GDM and PCOS are related to the genetic role of the 4G/5G polymorphism of PAI-1. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of the role of PAI-1 in reproductive diseases. PAI-1 represents a promising monitoring biomarker for reproductive diseases and may be a treatment target in the near future.

  8. Role of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 1 in Pathologies of Female Reproductive Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yao; Vattai, Aurelia; Zhang, Xi; Zhu, Junyan; Thaler, Christian J; Mahner, Sven; Jeschke, Udo; von Schönfeldt, Viktoria

    2017-07-29

    Normal pregnancy is a state of hypercoagulability with diminishing fibrinolytic activity, which is mainly caused by an increase of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1). PAI-1 is the main inhibitor of plasminogen activators, including tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA). In human placentas, PAI-1 is expressed in extravillous interstitial trophoblasts and vascular trophoblasts. During implantation and placentation, PAI-1 is responsible for inhibiting extra cellular matrix (ECM) degradation, thereby causing an inhibition of trophoblasts invasion. In the present study, we have reviewed the literature of various reproductive diseases where PAI-1 plays a role. PAI-1 levels are increased in patients with recurrent pregnancy losses (RPL), preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in the previous pregnancy, endometriosis and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). In general, an increased expression of PAI-1 in the blood is associated with an increased risk for infertility and a worse pregnancy outcome. GDM and PCOS are related to the genetic role of the 4G/5G polymorphism of PAI-1. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of the role of PAI-1 in reproductive diseases. PAI-1 represents a promising monitoring biomarker for reproductive diseases and may be a treatment target in the near future.

  9. Activity of the kinesin spindle protein inhibitor ispinesib (SB-715992) in models of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purcell, James W; Davis, Jefferson; Reddy, Mamatha; Martin, Shamra; Samayoa, Kimberly; Vo, Hung; Thomsen, Karen; Bean, Peter; Kuo, Wen Lin; Ziyad, Safiyyah; Billig, Jessica; Feiler, Heidi S; Gray, Joe W; Wood, Kenneth W; Cases, Sylvaine

    2009-06-10

    Ispinesib (SB-715992) is a potent inhibitor of kinesin spindle protein (KSP), a kinesin motor protein essential for the formation of a bipolar mitotic spindle and cell cycle progression through mitosis. Clinical studies of ispinesib have demonstrated a 9% response rate in patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer, and a favorable safety profile without significant neurotoxicities, gastrointestinal toxicities or hair loss. To better understand the potential of ispinesib in the treatment of breast cancer we explored the activity of ispinesib alone and in combination several therapies approved for the treatment of breast cancer. We measured the ispinesib sensitivity and pharmacodynamic response of breast cancer cell lines representative of various subtypes in vitro and as xenografts in vivo, and tested the ability of ispinesib to enhance the anti-tumor activity of approved therapies. In vitro, ispinesib displayed broad anti-proliferative activity against a panel of 53 breast cell-lines. In vivo, ispinesib produced regressions in each of five breast cancer models, and tumor free survivors in three of these models. The effects of ispinesib treatment on pharmacodynamic markers of mitosis and apoptosis were examined in vitro and in vivo, revealing a greater increase in both mitotic and apoptotic markers in the MDA-MB-468 model than in the less sensitive BT-474 model. In vivo, ispinesib enhanced the anti-tumor activity of trastuzumab, lapatinib, doxorubicin, and capecitabine, and exhibited activity comparable to paclitaxel and ixabepilone. These findings support further clinical exploration of KSP inhibitors for the treatment of breast cancer.

  10. Boronic Acid Transition State Inhibitors Active against KPC and Other Class A β-Lactamases: Structure-Activity Relationships as a Guide to Inhibitor Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Laura J; Taracila, Magdalena A; Papp-Wallace, Krisztina M; Bethel, Christopher R; Caselli, Emilia; Romagnoli, Chiara; Winkler, Marisa L; Spellberg, Brad; Prati, Fabio; Bonomo, Robert A

    2016-01-04

    Boronic acid transition state inhibitors (BATSIs) are competitive, reversible β-lactamase inhibitors (BLIs). In this study, a series of BATSIs with selectively modified regions (R1, R2, and amide group) were strategically designed and tested against representative class A β-lactamases of Klebsiella pneumoniae, KPC-2 and SHV-1. Firstly, the R1 group of compounds 1a to 1c and 2a to 2e mimicked the side chain of cephalothin, whereas for compounds 3a to 3c, 4a, and 4b, the thiophene ring was replaced by a phenyl, typical of benzylpenicillin. Secondly, variations in the R2 groups which included substituted aryl side chains (compounds 1a, 1b, 1c, 3a, 3b, and 3c) and triazole groups (compounds 2a to 2e) were chosen to mimic the thiazolidine and dihydrothiazine ring of penicillins and cephalosporins, respectively. Thirdly, the amide backbone of the BATSI, which corresponds to the amide at C-6 or C-7 of β-lactams, was also changed to the following bioisosteric groups: urea (compound 3b), thiourea (compound 3c), and sulfonamide (compounds 4a and 4b). Among the compounds that inhibited KPC-2 and SHV-1 β-lactamases, nine possessed 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) of ≤ 600 nM. The most active compounds contained the thiopheneacetyl group at R1 and for the chiral BATSIs, a carboxy- or hydroxy-substituted aryl group at R2. The most active sulfonamido derivative, compound 4b, lacked an R2 group. Compound 2b (S02030) was the most active, with acylation rates (k2/K) of 1.2 ± 0.2 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) for KPC-2 and 4.7 ± 0.6 × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1) for SHV-1, and demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli DH10B carrying blaSHV variants and blaKPC-2 or b