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Sample records for orales linguales ulceronecrotizantes

  1. Changes in the oral environment after placement of lingual and labial orthodontic appliances.

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    Lombardo, Luca; Ortan, Yildiz Öztürk; Gorgun, Özge; Panza, Chiara; Scuzzo, Giuseppe; Siciliani, Giuseppe

    2013-09-11

    This study compared the oral hygiene and caries risk of patients treated with labial and lingual orthodontic appliances throughout a prospective evaluation of the status of the oral environment before and after bracket placement. A total of 20 orthodontic patients aged 19 to 23 years were included in the study and were divided into two groups: 10 patients wore Roth labial appliance (American Orthodontics, Sheboygan, WI, USA) and 10 patients wore STb lingual appliance (Ormco Corporation, Glendora, CA, USA). Plaque index (PI), gingival bleeding index (GBI), salivary flow rate, saliva buffer capacity, salivary pH, and Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus counts in saliva were determined at three time points: before orthodontic appliance placement (T0), 4 weeks after bonding (T1), and 8 weeks after bonding (T2). After appliance placement, all patients were periodically educated to the oral hygiene procedures. Wilcoxon rank and Mann-Whitney U tests were used to determine intragroup and intergroup differences as regards qualitative data. To compare quantitative data between the groups, chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were undertaken, while intragroup differences were tested with McNemar test. The level of statistical significance was set at pappliance. The GBI value increased significantly between T0 and T1 but decreased significantly between T1 and T2 (pappliance. S. mutans counts increased significantly between T0 and T2 in the saliva samples of patients treated with lingual appliance. No statistically significant differences were found between S. mutans and Lactobacillus counts at the three terms of saliva collection in patients treated with labial appliance. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups at the three time points as regards the salivary flow rate and saliva buffer capacity. Lingual and labial orthodontic appliances showed a different potential in modifying the investigated clinical parameters: patients wearing STb

  2. Lingual cysticercosis

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    A P Pichare

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cysticercosis is a disease caused by larval form of tapeworm. Cysticercus cellulose primarily develops in tissues of pigs. Infection of human tissues is unusual and affliction of the oral cavity is rare. We, herein, present a case of lingual cysticercosis without involvement of any other site. A 5-year-old male, non-vegetarian child presented with a painless, pearly white, solitary nodular swelling on posterior dorsal side of tongue since 3 months. Excision biopsy was done. Histopathology revealed cysticercous cellulose in tongue muscles.

  3. Lingual Thyroid & its Management

    OpenAIRE

    Thiagarajan, Balasubramanian

    2017-01-01

    This e book discusses the topic Lingual thyroid. Lingual thyroid is a rare disorders seen only in 1 in 1 lakh population. This is actually a coincidental finding in most of the cases. This book discusses the embryological aspects of lingual thyroid, clinical features and the current management trends of the same. This record was migrated from the OpenDepot repository service in June, 2017 before shutting down.

  4. Comparison of Preoperative Oral Ketorolac on Anesthetic Efficacy of Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block and Buccal and Lingual Infiltration with Articaine and Lidocaine in Patients with Irreversible Pulpitis: A Prospective, Randomized, Controlled, Double-blind Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Meetu; Grewal, Mandeep S; Grewal, Stutee; Deshwal, Parul

    2015-11-01

    Irreversible pulpitis (IP) commonly results in decreased anesthetic efficacy of the inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) for mandibular molar. It has been shown that supplementary buccal and/or lingual infiltration as well as premedication with ketorolac result in improved efficacy of the IANB. One hundred fifty emergency patients who had their lower first or/and second molar diagnosed with IP participated in the study. All patients were randomly divided into 2 major IANB groups: 1 group received 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine, and the other group received 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine. Each group was further divided into 3 subgroups of 25 each: (1) buccal and lingual infiltration with articaine and lidocaine, respectively; (2) preoperative oral medication of ketorolac; and (3) preoperative oral medication of ketorolac followed by buccal and lingual infiltration with articaine and lidocaine, respectively. Endodontic access was initiated 15 minutes after solution deposition, and all patients were required to have profound lip numbness. Success of the anesthetic was defined as none or mild pain on endodontic access and initial instrumentation. Statistical analysis was performed using multiple-comparison analysis of variance (Kruskal-Wallis) and t tests. Articaine IANB with infiltrations plus oral ketorolac premedication significantly increased the success rate to 76%. The success rate after the administration of an articaine IANB with infiltration injections was 64%, whereas with lidocaine it was 32% (P < .05). Premedication with ketorolac significantly increases the anesthetic efficacy of articaine IANB plus infiltration in mandibular molars with IP. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Angioleiomioma lingual: A propósito de un caso Lingual angioleiomyoma: A case report

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    I. Peña González

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. Los leiomiomas orales son tumores del músculo liso poco frecuentes debido a la escasez de este tejido en la boca. La forma más frecuente es el angioleiomioma. Son tumoraciones generalmente asintomáticas, que pueden malignizar, por lo que está indicada su extirpación. Su diagnóstico es anatomopatológico siendo importante diferenciarlas de su forma maligna. El tratamiento es quirúrgico y la recidiva inusual. Material y método. Se presenta un caso de angileiomioma lingual y sus características anatomopatológicas, relacionando los hallazgos con la literatura existente Discusión. Los angioleiomiomas linguales son tumoraciones poco frecuentes, generalmente asintomáticas y de fácil acceso quirúrgico. Los hallazgos anatomopatológicos consisten en una proliferación vascular rodeada de un estroma positivo a la actina músculo liso específica. Ha de tenerse en cuenta en el diagnóstico diferencial de masas linguales tales como abscesos, neuromas y tumores de glándulas salivales menores. El tratamiento de elección es quirúrgico y la recidiva inusual. Conclusiones. Los angioleiomiomas linguales son tumores benignos poco frecuentes pero que deben ser tenidos en cuenta en el diagnóstico diferencial de masas linguales. Es importante diferenciarlos de su forma maligna a través de su estudio anatomopatológico.Introduction. Oral leiomyomas are uncommon smooth muscle tumors due to the scant presence of this tissue in the oral cavity. The most common type is angioleiomyoma. Angioleiomyomas usually are asymptomatic tumors that can become malignant, so surgery is necessary. These tumors have a histopathologic diagnosis and the differential diagnosis from their malignant counterparts is important. Surgery is the treatment of choice and recurrence is rare. Material and method. We report a case of lingual angioleiomyoma, its histopathologic findings, and our literature review. Discussion. Lingual angioleiomyomas are tumors that are

  6. [A case of lingual agenesis].

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    Carinci, F; Felisatti, P; Curioni, C

    1996-01-01

    Lingual agenesis is a rare anomaly caused by failed morphogenesis of the lateral lingual swellings during embriogenesis. Most reported cases have been part of oromandibular limb hypogenesis syndrome (OLHS). A case of lingual agenesis associated with micrognathia and alteration of the hands is reported.

  7. Lingual Orthodontics simplified : Incognito -customization perfected

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    Haroutioun Dedeyan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Esthetic orthodontics is the need of the hour, fuelled by the increasing number of adult patients seeking orthodontic treatment. Alternatives to labial appliance include clear aligners and lingual appliance. Conventional lingual treatment is laborious in terms of laboratory setup and manual dexterity of the operator, coupled with less than optimum treatment results. Customization of the appliance to meet varied requirements of each patient due to highly variable lingual morphology within and amongst patients is the key to successful treatment in lingual orthodontics. Efforts at bracket base customization using intra-oral jigs and laboratory setups are fraught with unavoidable errors affecting treatment outcome. With the advent of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM technology the Eldorado of true customization is now a reality. This paper introduces the Incognito Appliance System based on custom-made brackets and custom-made series of pre-bent wires using state of art CAD/CAM manufacturing procedures.

  8. Lingual orthodontic education: An insight

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    Surya Kanta Das

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite increasing demand for lingual orthodontics, the technique is not very popular among the orthodontists in general. Lingual orthodontics differs from the conventional labial technique in all aspects. Lack of comprehensive training in this field is a major obstacle in popularizing this science of invisible orthodontics. At present, short-term courses and part-time degree programs are the means to learn this technique and the demand for more comprehensive lingual orthodontic education is on a rise among orthodontists. Lingual orthodontics as a super specialty discipline with full-time residency program can be a step forward. This will groom orthodontists to acquire the finest skills to finish lingual cases but also help to the science to grow with dedicated research work.

  9. A Simplified Lingual Bracket Positioner

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    Sharath Kumar Shetty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The indirect bonding system for lingual brackets may be broadly classified as; techniques using setup models and those using diagnostic models. The techniques using setup models are more accurate and many of them require the use of lingual bracket positioners for determining the correct position of brackets. We have devised a simpler yet reliable and effective bracket positioner ′Lingual Bracket Positioner′ in our department. Although many variants are available commercially, this design is easy to fabricate, cheap and ready to use.

  10. Lingual biomechanics, case selection and success

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    Sanjay Labh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Deeper understanding of lingual biomechanics is prerequisite for success with lingual appliance. The difference between labial and lingual force system must be understood and kept in mind during treatment planning, especially anchorage planning, and extraction decision-making. As point of application of force changes, it completely changes the force system in all planes. This article describes lingual biomechanics, anchorage planning, diagnostic considerations, treatment planning, and case selection criteria in lingual orthodontics.

  11. Clinical and microbiologic effects of lingual cervical coverage by removable partial dentures.

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    Ao, Aiichiro; Wakabayashi, Noriyuki; Nitta, Hiroshi; Igarashi, Yoshimasa

    2013-01-01

    The effect of gingival coverage by removable partial dentures (RPDs) on bacterial accumulation has not been sufficiently established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the periodontal and microbiologic reactions to mandibular major connectors. It was hypothesized that the use of a lingual plate increases the risk of periodontal disease. Fourteen subjects (mean age: 69.0 years) received oral hygiene instructions and ultrasonic debridement prior to examination. Each subject received an experimental RPD incorporating either a lingual bar or lingual plate for the first 8 weeks and was then switched to the other option for the next 8 weeks. Clinical parameters (Plaque Index, Gingival Index, probing depth, and tooth mobility) were recorded. Subgingival plaque samples were collected from the periodontal pocket in the test site to measure the colonization of periodontal pathogens after the use of each denture. The mean probing depth was significantly greater after use of the lingual plate compared to the lingual bar (P bacterial species showed smaller numbers of microorganisms at the second examination than at the first. The lingual cervical coverage did not precipitate the accumulation of anaerobic microorganisms, although it could potentially induce gingival inflammation. The results suggest that a lingual plate can be used as safely as a lingual bar if oral and denture hygiene are carefully monitored.

  12. Fabrication of universal esthetic lingual button

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    Ramkishore Ratre

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lingual buttons are used in many instances for labial, as well as lingual orthodontics. A simple method is demonstrated to fabricate the lingual buttons chair side. The buttons made are aesthetic as they are made from composite resin and can be successfully bonded anywhere on all tooth surfaces.

  13. Congenital Midline Tongue Base Mass in An Infant: Lingual Hamartoma

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    Fadzilah, Noraziana; Azman, Mawaddah; See, Goh Bee

    2016-01-01

    Lingual hamartoma is a rare finding of congenital midline posterior tongue mass. The lesion may be seen as a single anomaly or maybe associated with syndrome especially the Oral Facial Digital Syndrome (OFDS). Here, we report an otherwise normal and healthy two-month-old boy with a congenital midline base of tongue mass presented with snoring and episodic vomiting since the age of 1 month. Tumour excision from the area of foramen of caecum recovered a pinkish pedunculated tumour. Histopatholo...

  14. Mandibular lingual vascular canals (MLVC): Evaluation on dental CTs of a case series

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    Scaravilli, Maria Serena; Mariniello, Mauro [Department of Oral and Maxillo-Facial Sciences, Section of Oral and Implant Surgery, University of Naples ' Federico II' , Naples (Italy); Sammartino, Gilberto, E-mail: serena.scaravilli@gmail.com [Department of Oral and Maxillo-Facial Sciences, Section of Oral and Implant Surgery, University of Naples ' Federico II' , Naples (Italy)

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the anatomy of the mandibular lingual foramen (MLF) and its linked canals (mandibular lingual vascular canals - MLVC), describing their frequency, diameter, location, and course. Materials and methods: One hundred and fourteen computed tomography (CT) images of the mandible (57 male and 57 female; mean age 44.70 {+-} 12.53; age range 13-75 years, were evaluated. The CT sections were obtained on axial plane by using a bone reconstruction algorithm and then processed with dedicated software (Dentascan), with a standard protocol. Results: 103 patients (90.35%) had at least one lingual vascular canal and 52 (45.61%) had multiple (two or three) canals. The typical locations of MLVC were the midline of the mandible (median lingual canal [MLC]). The mean diameter of the lingual canals in the midline (MLC) was 0.8 mm {+-} 0. The direction of MLC progresses in an anterior and slightly caudal sense. Conclusions: Dental CT examination easily demonstrates the presence, position, direction and size of the lingual foramen and of the lingual vascular canals of the mandible. Radiologists and oral surgeons should be aware of these canals and their importance, in order to prevent bleeding complications during implants placement and other surgical procedures.

  15. Anatomical structure of lingual foramen in cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ki, Min Woo; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate whether cone beam computed tomography can depict the distribution, position, frequency, relative vertical dimension, and the diameter of the lingual foramen and direction of lingual bone canal. Cone beam computed tomography of mandible was performed on 25 males and 25 females with no history of any orthodontic treatments or any other dental surgeries. A statistical comparison was done on the mean values of males and females. In the location and distribution of lingual foramina, median lingual foramen was found in all subjects and lateral lingual foramen in 58%. In the lateral lingual foramen, bilateral type was found in 28% and unilateral type in 30%. In the number of lingual foramina, median lingual foramen had two foramina and lateral lingual foramen had one foramen, mostly. In the relative mean vertical dimension of lingual foramina, median lingual foramen was 0.03 ± 0.08, and both lateral lingual foramina was 0.20 ± 0.04. The mean diameter of lingual foramina, median lingual foramen was 0.9 mm ± 0.28, right lateral lingual foramen was 0.92 mm ± 0.23, and left lateral lingual foramen was 0.88 mm ± 0.27. The most frequent direction of the lingual bone canals, median lingual bone canal proceeded in anteroinferior direction and lateral lingual bone canal in anterosuperolateral direction. Cone beam computed tomography can be helpful for surgery and implantation on the mandibular area. Radiologist should be aware of this anatomical feature and its possible implications.

  16. Anatomical structure of lingual foramen in cone beam computed tomography

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    Ki, Min Woo; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae [Kyunghee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-15

    To evaluate whether cone beam computed tomography can depict the distribution, position, frequency, relative vertical dimension, and the diameter of the lingual foramen and direction of lingual bone canal. Cone beam computed tomography of mandible was performed on 25 males and 25 females with no history of any orthodontic treatments or any other dental surgeries. A statistical comparison was done on the mean values of males and females. In the location and distribution of lingual foramina, median lingual foramen was found in all subjects and lateral lingual foramen in 58%. In the lateral lingual foramen, bilateral type was found in 28% and unilateral type in 30%. In the number of lingual foramina, median lingual foramen had two foramina and lateral lingual foramen had one foramen, mostly. In the relative mean vertical dimension of lingual foramina, median lingual foramen was 0.03 {+-} 0.08, and both lateral lingual foramina was 0.20 {+-} 0.04. The mean diameter of lingual foramina, median lingual foramen was 0.9 mm {+-} 0.28, right lateral lingual foramen was 0.92 mm {+-} 0.23, and left lateral lingual foramen was 0.88 mm {+-} 0.27. The most frequent direction of the lingual bone canals, median lingual bone canal proceeded in anteroinferior direction and lateral lingual bone canal in anterosuperolateral direction. Cone beam computed tomography can be helpful for surgery and implantation on the mandibular area. Radiologist should be aware of this anatomical feature and its possible implications.

  17. The lingualized occlusion of complete denture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BEN Wei-hong; Eleni Roumanas

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the literatures dealing with the lingualized occlusion of complete denture including the origin,development and research. Lingualized occlusion is a valuable concept because many advantages of anatomic and nonanatomic occlusions are retained,satisfactory occlusion is easily obtained,balanced occlusion can be accomplished.

  18. Are there more adverse effects with lingual orthodontics?

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    Madurantakam, Parthasarathy; Kumar, Satish

    2017-12-22

    Data sourcesPubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library and LILACS database, review of references cited in included articles and a manual search of leading orthodontic journals. No language restrictions were imposed in the search. Study authors were contacted when necessary.Study selectionRandomised controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) in healthy patients that directly compared the adverse effects following treatment using buccal and lingual appliances. Studies involving single arch or dual arch appliances were considered. Studies on patients with systemic diseases, animal studies and in vitro studies were excluded. The primary outcomes of interest to the authors were a list of adverse effects: pain, caries, eating and speech difficulties and oral hygiene.Data extraction and synthesisTwo authors reviewed the titles and abstracts of all studies identified through the search without blinding to names of authors or publication dates. Selected articles from searches were evaluated independently by two authors against established inclusion criteria, disagreements were resolved by consensus or by consulting a third author. Two authors independently assessed the risk of bias using the Cochrane Collaboration's tool (randomised trials) and the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale for non-randomised studies. The level of agreement between the authors was assessed using the Cohen kappa statistic. A meta-analysis was performed to provide pooled effect estimate (expressed as odds ratio) as well as 95% confidence interval. The outcomes of interest were pain, caries, eating difficulties, speech difficulties and deficient oral hygiene. Heterogeneity was quantified using I2 statistic and potential causes explored. Publication bias was assessed using a funnel plot.ResultsEight articles were included; three RCTs and five CCTs. One RCT was considered to be at high risk of bias, one moderate risk and one low risk. Of the non-randomised studies, four were low risk and one was high risk

  19. Lingual vs. labial fixed orthodontic appliances: systematic review and meta-analysis of treatment effects.

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    Papageorgiou, Spyridon N; Gölz, Lina; Jäger, Andreas; Eliades, Theodore; Bourauel, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to compare the therapeutic and adverse effects of lingual and labial orthodontic fixed appliances from clinical trials on human patients in an evidence-based manner. Randomized and prospective non-randomized clinical trials comparing lingual and labial appliances were included. Risk of bias within and across studies was assessed using the Cochrane tool and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. Random-effects meta-analyses were conducted, followed by subgroup and sensitivity analyses. Six electronic databases were searched from inception to July 2015, without limitations. A total of 13 papers pertaining to 11 clinical trials were included with a total of 407 (34% male/66% female) patients. Compared with labial appliances, lingual appliances were associated with increased overall oral discomfort, increased speech impediment (measured using auditory analysis), worse speech performance assessed by laypersons, increased eating difficulty, and decreased intermolar width. On the other hand, lingual appliances were associated with increased intercanine width and significantly decreased anchorage loss of the maxillary first molar during space closure. Based on existing trials, there is insufficient evidence to make robust recommendations for lingual fixed orthodontic appliances regarding their therapeutic or adverse effects, as the quality of evidence was low. © 2016 Eur J Oral Sci.

  20. Lingual thyroid and its management II edition

    OpenAIRE

    Balasubramanian, Thiagarajan

    2012-01-01

    This e book discusses lingual thyroid, its etiopathogenesis and management with specific reference to different surgical approaches available. This record was migrated from the OpenDepot repository service in June, 2017 before shutting down.

  1. The anatomic basis of lingual nerve trauma associated with inferior alveolar block injections.

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    Morris, Christopher D; Rasmussen, Jared; Throckmorton, Gaylord S; Finn, Richard

    2010-11-01

    This study describes the anatomic variability in the position of the lingual nerve in the pterygomandibular space, the location of the inferior alveolar nerve block injection. Simulated standard landmark-based inferior alveolar nerve blocks were administered to 44 fixed sagitally bisected cadaver heads. Measurements were made of the diameter of the nerves and distances between the needle and selected anatomic landmarks and the nerves. Of 44 simulated injections, 42 (95.5%) passed lateral to the lingual nerve, 7 (16%) passed within 0.1 mm of the nerve, and 2 (4.5%) penetrated the nerve. The position of the lingual nerve relative to bony landmarks within the interpterygoid fascia was highly variable. Variation in the position of the lingual nerve is an important contributor to lingual nerve trauma during inferior alveolar block injections. This factor should be an important part of preoperative informed consent. Copyright © 2010 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Dental Hygiene and Orthodontics: Effect of Ultrasonic Instrumentation on Bonding Efficacy of Different Lingual Orthodontic Brackets.

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    Scribante, Andrea; Sfondrini, Maria Francesca; Collesano, Vittorio; Tovt, Gaia; Bernardinelli, Luisa; Gandini, Paola

    2017-01-01

    Dental hygienists are often faced with patients wearing lingual orthodontic therapy, as ultrasonic instrumentation (UI) is crucial for oral health. As the application of external forces can lead to premature bonding failure, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of UI on shear bond strength (SBS) and on adhesive remnant index (ARI) of different lingual orthodontic brackets. 200 bovine incisors were divided into 10 groups. Four different lingual (STB, Ormco; TTR, Rocky Mountain Orthodontics; Idea, Leone; 2D, Forestadent) and vestibular control (Victory, 3M) brackets were bonded. UI was performed in half of specimens, whereas the other half did not receive any treatment. All groups were tested with a universal testing machine. SBS and ARI values were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed (significance: P = 0.05). TTR, Idea, and 2D lingual brackets significantly lowered SBS after UI, whereas for other braces no effect was recorded. Appliances with lower mesh area significantly reduced their adhesion capacity after UI. Moreover groups subjected to UI showed higher ARI scores than controls. UI lowered SBS of lingual appliances of small dimensions so particular care should be posed avoiding prolonged instrumentation around bracket base during plaque removal. Moreover, UI influenced also ARI scores.

  3. Lingual infarction in Wegener's Granulomatosis: A case report and review of the literature

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    Brizman Eitan

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Wegener's granulomatosis (WG is a multi-system disease, characterised by the triad of necrotising granulomata affecting the upper and lower respiratory tracts, disseminated vasculitis and glomerulonephritis. Oral lesions are associated with up to 50% of cases, although are rare as a presenting feature. The most common oral lesions associated with WG are ulceration and strawberry gingivitis. We review the literature regarding oral manifestations of WG and present a case of lingual infarction, an extremely rare oral lesion associated with WG, in a severe, rapidly progressive and ultimately fatal form of the disease.

  4. Computed tomographic angiography study of the relationship between the lingual artery and lingual markers in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea

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    Hou, T.-N., E-mail: dr-htn@hotmail.co [Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Affiliated SIR RUN RUN SHAW Hospital, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310016 (China); Zhou, L.-N.; Hu, H.-J. [Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Affiliated SIR RUN RUN SHAW Hospital, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310016 (China)

    2011-06-15

    Aim: To determine the relationship between the lingual artery and lingual markers for preoperative evaluation of the lingual artery in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS). Methods: A 16-section computed tomographic angiography (CTA) of the lingual artery was performed in 87 inpatient cases with OSAHS, from December 2007 to May 2009. The course of the lingual artery and the anatomic relationship between the lingual artery and the lingual markers were analyzed using CTA imaging. Results: The course of the lingual artery with the tongue in a resting position was similar to that of the Big Dipper constellation (Plough) in the sagittal view of CTA imaging. The first segment of the lingual artery declined approximately 19.27 {+-} 5.24 mm, the middle segment of the lingual artery was forward approximately 19.30 {+-} 6.79 mm, and the ascending segment of the lingual artery rose approximately 52.49 {+-} 10.98 mm. The entry point where the lingual artery entered into the tongue was adjacent to the tip of the greater horn of the hyoid bone. The relationship between the second segment of the lingual artery and the greater horn of the hyoid bone was relatively steady with the tongue in whatever position. The interval between the bilateral greater horn of the hyoid bone equalled that between the bilateral lingual arteries. Conclusions: Recognizing some lingual markers in the patients with OSAHS, such as the greater horn of the hyoid bone, foramen cecum, circumvallate papilla, lingual vein and tongue midline, may facilitate the surgeon's ability to define the course of the lingual artery accurately in the treatment of OSAHS.

  5. Piezosurgery for the Lingual Split Technique in Lingual Positioned Impacted Mandibular Third Molar Removal

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    Ge, Jing; Yang, Chi; Zheng, Jiawei; Qian, Wentao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect and safety of lingual split technique using piezosurgery for the extraction of lingual positioned impacted mandibular 3rd molars with the goal of proposing a more minimally invasive choice for this common surgery. Eighty-nine consecutive patients with 110 lingual positioned impacted mandibular 3rd molars requiring extraction were performed the lingual split technique using piezosurgery. One sagittal osteotomy line and 2 transverse osteotomy line were designed for lingual and occlusal bone removal. The success rate, operative time, postoperative outcome, and major complications (including nerve injury, mandible fracture, severe hematoma or edema, and severe pyogenic infection) were documented and analyzed. All impacted mandibular 3rd molars were successfully removed (110/110). The average time of operation was 14.6 minutes (ranged from 7 to 28 minutes). One hundred and seven extraction sites (97.3%) were primary healing. Pain, mouth opening, swelling, and PoSSe scores on postoperative 7-day were 0.34 ± 0.63, 3.88 ± 0.66(cm), 2.4 ± 0.2(cm), and 23.7 ± 5.9, respectively. There were 6 cases (5.5%) had lingual nerve disturbance and 3 cases (2.7%) developed inferior alveolar nerve impairment, and achieved full recovery within 2 months by neurotrophic drug treatment. Our study suggested piezosurgery for lingual split technique provided an effective way for the extraction of lingual positioned and deeply impacted mandibular 3rd molar. PMID:27015214

  6. Comparison of the efficacy of tooth alignment among lingual and labial brackets: an in vitro study.

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    Alobeid, Ahmad; El-Bialy, Tarek; Reimann, Susanne; Keilig, Ludger; Cornelius, Dirk; Jäger, Andreas; Bourauel, Christoph

    2018-03-13

    commonly used ones in clinical orthodontics) and study did not consider saliva, periodontal ligament, mastication and other oral functions. The effectiveness of lingual brackets in correcting vertical and anteroposterior displacement achieved during the initial alignment phase of orthodontic treatment is lower than that of the effectiveness of labial brackets.

  7. Lingual thyroid - report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Ricardo Pires de; Abicalaf, Ricardo Souza; Pimentel, Claudia Andreia Rabay; Santos, Leynalze Ramos; Soares, Aldemir Humberto; Gois Filho, Jose Francisco de; Carvalho, Marcos Brasilino de; Rapoport, Abrao

    1997-01-01

    The authors report two cases of lingual thyroid, an uncommon developmental anomaly of embryogenesis characterized by a failure of the normal migration of thyroid tissue to the neck, with presence of the thyroid gland in the mid-line of the tongue base between circumvallate papillae and the epiglottis. The lesions may appear at nay time from birth to old age and have a predilection for females. The embryology, incidence, signs and symptoms, diagnostic methods and management are discussed. (author)

  8. Clinical Anatomy of the Lingual Nerve: A Review.

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    Sittitavornwong, Somsak; Babston, Michael; Denson, Douglas; Zehren, Steven; Friend, Jonathan

    2017-05-01

    Knowledge of lingual nerve anatomy is of paramount importance to dental practitioners and maxillofacial surgeons. The purpose of this article is to review lingual nerve anatomy from the cranial base to its insertion in the tongue and provide a more detailed explanation of its course to prevent procedural nerve injuries. Fifteen human cadavers from the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine's Anatomical Donor Program were reviewed. The anatomic structures and landmarks were identified and confirmed by anatomists. Lingual nerve dissection was carried out and reviewed on 15 halved human cadaver skulls (total specimens, 28). Cadaveric dissection provides a detailed examination of the lingual nerve from the cranial base to tongue insertion. The lingual nerve receives the chorda tympani nerve approximately 1 cm below the bifurcation of the lingual and inferior alveolar nerves. The pathway of the lingual nerve is in contact with the periosteum of the mandible just behind the internal oblique ridge. The lingual nerve crosses the submandibular duct at the interproximal space between the mandibular first and second molars. The submandibular ganglion is suspended from the lingual nerve at the distal area of the second mandibular molar. A zoning classification is another way to more accurately describe the lingual nerve based on close anatomic landmarks as seen in human cadaveric specimens. This system could identify particular areas of interest that might be at greater procedural risk. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Comparison of the initial orthodontic force systems produced by a new lingual bracket system and a straight-wire appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuck, Lars-Michael; Wiechmann, Dirk; Drescher, Dieter

    2005-09-01

    Over the last few years, lingual appliances have become an established orthodontic treatment technique. Many studies have concentrated on various esthetic aspects, on laboratory and clinical procedures, and on patient comfort and compliance. The orthodontic force systems of these appliances, however, have not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was thus to determine the forces and moments produced by a new lingual bracket system during the leveling phase of orthodontic treatment and to compare those with the corresponding force system of a labial straight-wire appliance. The intra-oral situation of ten patients undergoing orthodontic treatment was replicated in measurement casts fitted with lingual and labial brackets. Special care was taken to precisely reproduce each patient's interbracket geometry. We measured each tooth's force systems as generated by a leveling arch inserted into the lingual and labial brackets. The resulting force systems of both appliances were found to be quite similar with regard to the magnitude of most force and moment components. Only the first molars were subjected to considerably greater single forces with the lingual appliance. Tipping moments were found to be significantly smaller with the lingual technique, whereas the rotational moments were significantly smaller with the labial appliance. All in all we noted significant differences between the two techniques only in certain areas which upon closer examination were distributed over only a few tooth types. The initial force systems produced by the new lingual bracket system proved to be comparable with those delivered by a conventional straight-wire appliance. The actual levels of forces and moments, however, were found in certain cases to be too heavy with both techniques. We therefore recommend the development of leveling wires producing considerably lighter forces and moments.

  10. Tiroides lingual: un nuevo abordaje quirúrgico Lingual thyroid: a new surgical approach

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    I. Zubillaga Rodríguez

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available El tiroides lingual es una rara anomalía congénita del desarrollo tiroideo resultante de la ausencia de descenso del mismo desde el foramen caecum hasta la localización prelaríngea habitual. Presentamos el caso de una paciente en edad postmenopáusica con diagnóstico anatomopatológico de tiroides lingual de gran tamaño y localización profunda en la base de la lengua que producía disfagia y dificultad respiratoria crecientes. Asimismo, planteamos un nuevo abordaje quirúrgico para la resección combinando cervicotomía media, pull-through lingual y glosotomía media. Se discuten las distintas pruebas complementarias para llegar a su diagnóstico y se revisan las diferentes técnicas quirúrgicas habitualmente empleadas en su tratamiento concluyendo con las ventajas del abordaje empleado en este caso.Lingual thyroid is an uncommon congenital disorder of thyroid gland development, resulting in a lack of descend of the gland from the foramen caecum to his normal prelaringeal location. In this paper we present a case of a postmenopausic patient presenting with a big size lingual thyroid deeply located in the base of the tongue, suffering increasing disphagia and respiratory impairment. For tumor resection, we chose a surgical approach combining a cervical submental incision, lingual pull- through and midline glossotomy. We discuss the different image studies recommended for proper diagnosis also reviewing the most common surgical techniques used for treatment, as compared with the approach we have described in this case.

  11. A comparative assessment of torque generated by lingual and conventional brackets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sifakakis, I.; Pandis, N.; Makou, M.; Eliades, T.; Katsaros, C.; Bourauel, C.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of bracket type on the labiopalatal moments generated by lingual and conventional brackets. Incognito lingual brackets (3M Unitek), STb lingual brackets (Light Lingual System; ORMCO), In-Ovation L lingual brackets (DENTSPLY GAC), and conventional 0.018

  12. Microimplant in Lingual Tori to Correct Anterior Crossbite in Adult

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    Deepak Rai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterior crossbites are difficult to correct in adults. A case where microimplants were placed in the lingual tori of an adult patient along with a lingual appliance is reported. The use of the esthetic lingual appliance along with the stable anchorage provided by the microimplants, aids in decreasing the duration of treatment as well as making the same more acceptable to the patient.

  13. Targeted Treatment With Radio Frequency Ablation for Lingual Tonsil

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    Suvi Renkonen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Benign enlargement of the lingual tonsils due to various causes may cause symptoms that warrant treatment. Conventional lingual tonsillectomy remains a challenging procedure, and there is no established standard procedure. We aimed to review the patients receiving different methods of lingual tonsil surgery for various indications at our institute. Methods: Retrospective clinical data on all patients with an ablative operation of the tongue base during the 8-year period between 2007 and 2014 at the Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland, were reviewed. The larger cohort comprised 35 patients, of whom 26 were men (74%. Ten patients had undergone solely lingual tonsil radio frequency ablation (LTRFA. The minimum follow-up time for all patients was 2 years. Results: Of the 10 patients, 5 patients with LTRFA had been operated on because of symptomatic lingual tonsil hypertrophy and 5 because of periodic fever associated with possible lingual tonsil involvement. In 2 of the 5 patients with periodic fever, the fever cycles ended after the operation. Of the 5 patients, 3 patients with symptomatic lingual tonsil hypertrophy have been non-symptomatic after 1 to 3 treatment sessions. The last 2 patients continue to have persistent symptoms. There were no major complications. Conclusions: Development of new approaches for the management of various lingual tonsil conditions is warranted. Lingual tonsil volume reduction by LTRFA seems to be a treatment alternative with low morbidity but with limited curative effect only.

  14. Applied anatomy of the lingual nerve: relevance to dental anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Vui Leng; Andrawos, Alice; Ghabriel, Mounir N; Townsend, Grant C

    2014-03-01

    (1) to classify the external morphology of the lingual nerve and investigate any relationship between its external and internal morphology, (2) to explore the fascicular structure, nerve tissue density and capillary density of the lingual nerve, and (3) to provide an anatomical explanation as to why adverse clinical outcomes more commonly affect the lingual nerve following local dental anaesthesia. Where possible, comparisons were made between the lingual and inferior alveolar nerves. The lingual and inferior alveolar nerves were examined in 23 hemi-sectioned heads macroscopically and microscopically 2mm above the lingula. The lingual nerve was also examined in the regions of the third and second molars. Specimens underwent histological processing and staining with Haematoxylin & Eosin, Masson's Trichrome, anti-GLUT-1 and anti-CD 34. The lingual nerve became flatter as it traversed through the pterygomandibular space. There was an increase in the connective tissue and a decrease in nerve tissue density along the lingual nerve (p<0.001). At 2mm above the lingula, the lingual nerve was uni-fascicular in 39% of cases, whilst the inferior alveolar nerve consistently had more fascicles (p<0.001). The lingual nerve fascicles had thicker perineurium but the endoneurial vascular density was not significantly different in the two nerves. The greater susceptibility of lingual nerve dysfunction during inferior alveolar nerve blocks may be due to its uni-fascicular structure and the thicker perineurium, leading to increased endoneurial pressure and involvement of all axons if oedema or haemorrhage occurs due to trauma. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Evidence of an increased pathogenic footprint in the lingual microbiome of untreated HIV infected patients

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    Dang Angeline T

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Opportunistic oral infections can be found in over 80% of HIV + patients, often causing debilitating lesions that also contribute to deterioration in nutritional health. Although appreciation for the role that the microbiota is likely to play in the initiation and/or enhancement of oral infections has grown considerably in recent years, little is known about the impact of HIV infection on host-microbe interactions within the oral cavity. In the current study, we characterize modulations in the bacterial composition of the lingual microbiome in patients with treated and untreated HIV infection. Bacterial species profiles were elucidated by microarray assay and compared between untreated HIV infected patients, HIV infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy, and healthy HIV negative controls. The relationship between clinical parameters (viral burden and CD4+ T cell depletion and the loss or gain of bacterial species was evaluated in each HIV patient group. Results In untreated HIV infection, elevated viremia was associated with significantly higher proportions of potentially pathogenic Veillonella, Prevotella, Megasphaera, and Campylobacter species in the lingual microbiome than observed in healthy controls. The upsurge in the prevalence of potential pathogens was juxtaposed by diminished representation of commensal Streptococcus and Veillonella species. Colonization of Neisseria flavescens was lower in the lingual microbiome of HIV infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy than in uninfected controls. Conclusions Our findings provide novel insights into the potential impact of HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy on the community structure of the oral microbiome, and implicate potential mechanisms that may increase the capacity of non-commensal species to gain a stronger foothold.

  16. Lingual thyroid causing dysphonia: case report

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    Alfio José Tincani

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Lingual thyroid gland is a rare clinical entity that is caused by the failure of the thyroid gland to descend to a normal cervical location during embryogenesis. The occurrence of an ectopic thyroid gland located at the base of the tongue may cause problems for the patient, with symptoms of dysphagia, dysphonia, upper airway obstruction or even hemorrhage at any time from infancy through adulthood. CASE REPORT: We report on a case of lingual thyroid gland in a 41-year-old female patient. The embryology and diagnosis of ectopic thyroid are discussed and its management is outlined. Features of the diagnostic and therapeutic evaluation are described with attention to the clinical findings, laboratory tests, thyroid scan and computed tomography imaging studies employed in the confirmation of diagnosis and planning of appropriate treatment. The history of the condition is reviewed and a treatment strategy is outlined. Surgical excision of the gland is reserved for cases of gland enlargement that result in compromised airways (dysphagia or dysphonia or recurrent hemorrhage.

  17. Lingual Epithelial Stem Cells and Organoid Culture of Them

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    Hiroko Hisha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As tongue cancer is one of the major malignant cancers in the world, understanding the mechanism of maintenance of lingual epithelial tissue, which is known to be the origin of tongue cancer, is unquestionably important. However, the actual stem cells that are responsible for the long-term maintenance of the lingual epithelium have not been identified. Moreover, a simple and convenient culture method for lingual epithelial stem cells has not yet been established. Recently, we have shown that Bmi1-positive cells, residing at the second or third layer of the epithelial cell layer at the base of the interpapillary pit (IPP, were slow-cycling and could supply keratinized epithelial cells for over one year, indicating that Bmi1-positive cells are long-term lingual epithelial stem cells. In addition, we have developed a novel lingual epithelium organoid culture system using a three-dimensional matrix and growth factors. Here, we discuss current progress in the identification of lingual stem cells and future applications of the lingual culture system for studying the regulatory mechanisms of the lingual epithelium and for regenerative medicine.

  18. Lingual nerve injury following surgical removal of mandibular third molar

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    Abduljaleel Azad Samad

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: The close proximity of lingual nerve in relation to the lingual cortical bone of the posterior mandibular third molar is clinically important because lingual nerve may be subjected to trauma during surgical removal of the impacted lower third molar. This prospective study aimed to evaluate the incidence of lingual nerve paresthesia following surgical removal of mandibular third molar in College of Dentistry, Hawler Medical University. Methods: A total of 116 third molars surgery were carried out under local anesthesia for 116 patients for removal of lower mandibular teeth Using Terence Ward's incision made in all cases, and after that, the buccal flap was reflected, lingual tissues had been retracted during bone removal with a periosteal elevator. The sensory disturbance was evaluated on the 7th postoperative day by standard questioning the patients: “Do you have any unusual feeling in your tongue, lingual gingiva and mucosa of the floor of the mouth?" Results: One patient experienced sensory disturbance, the lingual nerve paresthesia incidence was 0.9% as a transient sensory disturbance, while no patient of permanent sensory disturbance. Conclusion: The incidence of injury to the lingual nerve can be minimized by careful clinical evaluation, surgeon’s experience, surgical approach and knowledge about anatomical landmarks during surgical removal of an impacted lower third molar tooth.

  19. Thyroglossal Duct Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma and Synchronous Lingual Thyroid Atypia

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    Timothy Yoo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroglossal duct and lingual thyroid ectopic lesions are exceedingly rare synchronous findings. Papillary thyroid carcinoma of these ectopic thyroid sites is well understood but still a rare finding. This case points to some management nuances in regard to ectopic thyroid screening with imaging and also shows the effectiveness of minimally invasive transoral robotic surgery for lingual thyroid.

  20. Extraction mechanics in lingual orthodontics: Challenges and solutions

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    Tushar M Hegde

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The 21st century has witnessed a slow but sure incorporation of lingual orthodontic protocols into the orthodontic mainstream. Extraction mechanics with lingual orthodontic appliance poses challenges to even the most experienced clinician. This article is a case series of three cases treated by extraction mechanics in a detailed and sequential manner.

  1. The lingual splint: an often forgotten method for fixating pediatric mandibular fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binahmed, Abdulaziz; Sansalone, Claudio; Garbedian, Justin; Sándor, George K B

    2007-01-01

    Maxillofacial fractures are uncommon in the pediatric population, and their treatment is unique due to the psychological, physiological, developmental and anatomical characteristics of children. We present the case of a boy who was treated in an outpatient dental clinic using a lingual splint for the reduction, stabilization and fixation of a mandibular body fracture. This technique is a reliable, noninvasive procedure that dentists may consider in selected cases by referral to an oral and maxillofacial surgeon. It also limits the discomfort and morbidity that can be associated with maxillomandibular fixation or open reduction and internal fixation in pediatric patients.

  2. Neural network pattern recognition of lingual-palatal pressure for automated detection of swallow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, Aaron J; Krival, Kate R; Ridgel, Angela L; Hahn, Elizabeth C; Tyler, Dustin J

    2015-04-01

    We describe a novel device and method for real-time measurement of lingual-palatal pressure and automatic identification of the oral transfer phase of deglutition. Clinical measurement of the oral transport phase of swallowing is a complicated process requiring either placement of obstructive sensors or sitting within a fluoroscope or articulograph for recording. Existing detection algorithms distinguish oral events with EMG, sound, and pressure signals from the head and neck, but are imprecise and frequently result in false detection. We placed seven pressure sensors on a molded mouthpiece fitting over the upper teeth and hard palate and recorded pressure during a variety of swallow and non-swallow activities. Pressure measures and swallow times from 12 healthy and 7 Parkinson's subjects provided training data for a time-delay artificial neural network to categorize the recordings as swallow or non-swallow events. User-specific neural networks properly categorized 96 % of swallow and non-swallow events, while a generalized population-trained network was able to properly categorize 93 % of swallow and non-swallow events across all recordings. Lingual-palatal pressure signals are sufficient to selectively and specifically recognize the initiation of swallowing in healthy and dysphagic patients.

  3. Transoral videolaryngoscopic surgery for papillary carcinoma arising in lingual thyroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogi, Chisato; Shinomiya, Hirotaka; Fujii, Natsumi; Tsuruta, Tomoyuki; Morita, Naruhiko; Furukawa, Tatsuya; Teshima, Masanori; Kanzawa, Maki; Hirokawa, Mitsuyoshi; Otsuki, Naoki; Nibu, Ken-Ichi

    2018-05-15

    Carcinoma arising in lingual thyroid is an extremely rare entity accounting for only 1% of all reported ectopic thyroids. Here, we report a case of carcinoma arising in lingual thyroid, which has been successfully managed by transoral resection and bilateral neck dissections. A lingual mass 4-cm in diameter with calcification was incidentally detected by computed tomography at medical check-up. No thyroid tissue was observed in normal position. Ultrasound examination showed bilateral multiple lymphadenopathies. Fine needle aspiration biopsy from lymph node in his right neck was diagnosed as Class III and thyroglobulin level of the specimen was 459ng/ml. Due to the difficulty in performing FNA of the lingual masses, right neck dissection was performed in advance for diagnostic purpose. Pathological examination showed existence of large and small follicular thyroid tissues in several lymph nodes, suggesting lymph node metastasis from thyroid carcinoma. Two months after the initial surgery, video-assisted transoral resection of lingual thyroid with simultaneous left neck dissection was performed. Postoperative course was uneventful. Papillary carcinoma was found in the lingual thyroid and thyroid tissues were also found in left cervical lymph nodes. Video-assisted transoral resection was useful for the treatment of thyroid cancer arising in lingual thyroid. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The current evidence and implications of lingual orthodontics

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    Pratap Saini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this review is to investigate the current evidence and implications of lingual orthodontics. The electronic database search was done on PubMed, Cochrane Library, Embase, EBSCOhost, Web of Knowledge, and Google Scholar reporting on appliance design, bonding, and laboratory setup, biomechanics, survey studies, case reports, and treatment outcomes to find the current evidence of lingual orthodontics. The evidence available on lingual orthodontics traces a very clear and predictable pattern. The 80′s was devoted to the limitation and progression of the concept; the 90′s to the comparison between labial and lingual and the evolution of laboratory technique and bracket system. The last decade focuses on innovations, the predictability of outcomes, the impact of white spot lesion, and the patient acceptability. This review also shows that biomechanical principles of lingual orthodontics are well understood and established today, any case that can be treated with labial orthodontic appliance, can also be treated effectively with lingual orthodontic appliance as the completely customized lingual appliance can provide predetermined treatment outcome.

  5. Substitution urethroplasty for anterior urethral strictures: buccal versus lingual mucosal graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Abhay; Das, Suren K; Trivedi, Sameer; Dwivedi, Udai S; Singh, Pratap B

    2010-01-01

    To compare the results of substitution urethroplasty and donor site morbidity between buccal mucosal graft (BMG) and lingual mucosal graft (LMG). Patients who underwent single-stage dorsal onlay free oral mucosal graft substitution urethroplasty by Barbagli's technique between January 2004 and August 2008 were included in this study. Patients who underwent buccal (cheek, lip) mucosal graft urethroplasty were included in group I and those who underwent LMG urethroplasty (tongue) were included in group II. All patients underwent complete evaluation of the stricture including inspection of the oral cavity. Exclusion criteria were stricture length speech complications was seen in group II, but not in group I. The long-term complications of persistent oral discomfort, perioral numbness and tightness of the mouth were seen only in group I. LMG urethroplasty is a good substitute for BMG urethroplasty with equally good results of urethroplasty with lower donor site morbidity. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Lingual rhetoric paradigm as integrative research prism in philological science

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    Аlexandra A. Vorozhbitova

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The article characterizes the lingual rhetoric paradigm as an integrative approach in philology based on three crossing categorical ranges: 1 the ideological aspects of a speech act (ethos, logos, pathos; 2 the phases of the universal ideospeech cycle «from a thought to a word» (invention, disposition (arrangement, elocution (style as the technology of discourse process; 3 the structural levels of a lingual identity (associative verbal network, thesaurus, pragmaticon as the producer of discourse, the carrier of ideology. Hence there are three groups of lingual rhetoric parameters: ethos motivational dispositive, logos thesaurus inventive, pathos verbal elocutive.

  7. The features of scientist’s lingual identity as representative of Russian cosmism discourse

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    Anita B. Tikhonova

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This article contains information about the lingual identity of the representative of the Russian cosmism. The analysis of the three levels of the structure of lingual identity is making: verbal and semantic level, lingual and cognitive level, motivational levels of lingual identity.

  8. Class II malocclusion with complex problems treated with a novel combination of lingual orthodontic appliances and lingual arches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagita, Takeshi; Nakamura, Masahiro; Kawanabe, Noriaki; Yamashiro, Takashi

    2014-07-01

    This case report describes a novel method of combining lingual appliances and lingual arches to control horizontal problems. The patient, who was 25 years of age at her first visit to our hospital with a chief complaint of crooked anterior teeth, was diagnosed with skeletal Class II and Angle Class II malocclusion with anterior deep bite, lateral open bite, premolar crossbite, and severe crowding in both arches. She was treated with premolar extractions and temporary anchorage devices. Conventionally, it is ideal to use labial brackets simultaneously with appliances, such as a lingual arch, a quad-helix, or a rapid expansion appliance, in patients with complex problems requiring horizontal, anteroposterior, and vertical control; however, this patient strongly requested orthodontic treatment with lingual appliances. A limitation of lingual appliances is that they cannot be used with other conventional appliances. In this report, we present the successful orthodontic treatment of a complex problem using modified lingual appliances that enabled combined use of a conventional lingual arch. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Morphology of the lingual papillae in the fishing cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emura, Shoichi; Okumura, Toshihiko; Chen, Huayue

    2014-01-01

    We examined the dorsal lingual surface of an adult fishing cat (Prionailurus viverrinus) by scanning electron microscopy. The filiform papillae on the lingual apex had several pointed processes. The connective tissue core of the filiform papillae resembleda a well in shape. The filiform papillae on the anterior part of the lingual body were large and cylindrical in shape. The connective tissue core of the filiform papillae consisted of a large conical papilla. The filiform papillae on the central part of the lingual body were large and conical. The connective tissue core of the filiform papillae consisted of a large main process and some secondary processes. The connective tissue core of the fungiform papillae did not have processes. The vallate papillae were surrounded by a groove and a pad. The top of the connective tissue core of the vallate papillae had a rough surface with no spines.

  10. Survey on the practice of lingual orthodontics in India

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    Sourabh Agrawal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Lingual orthodontics provides an esthetic option of orthodontic treatment, especially for the adults. Lingual orthodontics being an important treatment modality requires extensive training and expertise for honest outcomes. In this study, we have composed a questionnaire to obtain the trend in the practice of lingual orthodontics in India. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire was composed of several aspects of lingual orthodontics. The survey instrument was hosted electronically on a secure website, www.typeform.com . The survey was optimized for presentation on tablets, mobiles, and laptops, which were the platforms used by participants to take the survey. The survey data were received and saved by the same secure website. Pearson Chi-square test was done using SPSS 17.0 version software to determine the correlation between treatment outcome and the use of laboratory for the initial setup. Results: A total of 248 orthodontists responded to the survey, 70% orthodontists said that they practice lingual orthodontics. Among the orthodontists who practice lingual orthodontics, 71% orthodontists treat extraction and nonextraction cases and 29% treat only nonextraction cases. Forty percent orthodontists said their final finishing of case is good, 16% said that final finishing is average, 26.5% said that final finishing is very good, and only 17.5% said that it is excellent. Statistically significant correlation exists (P = 0.004 between the treatment outcome and use of laboratory for initial setup. Conclusion: Many orthodontists are taking up lingual cases in India. Survey indicates that there is still room for betterment in terms of the final treatment outcome, and many orthodontists feel that there is need of formal training for expertise in lingual orthodontics.

  11. Lingual thyroid: value of integrated imaging

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    Giovagnorio, F. [Sezione di Radiologia e Diagnostica per Immagini, Dipt. di Medicina Sperimentale e Patologia, Univ. `La Sapienza`, Rome (Italy); Cordier, A. [Ist. di Clinica Otorinolaringoiatrica, Univ. `La Sapienza`, Rome (Italy); Romeo, R. [Ist. di Clinica Otorinolaringoiatrica, Univ. `La Sapienza`, Rome (Italy)

    1996-02-01

    Lingual thyroid is an uncommon cause of oropharyngeal mass, due to a congential anomaly of thyroidal development and migration: It is defined precisely as the presence of thyroid tissue in the midline of the tongue base between circumvallatae papilae and the epiglottis. We report a case of lignual thyroid in which the integration of clinical data, sonography, color-duplex Doppler, MRI and scintigraphy was determinant in demonstrating the disease. A 22-year-old woman presented with a sensation of foreign body in the throat, dysphonia, dyspnoea and dysphagia; we performed sonography (7.5 MHz linear probe), color Doppler (7 MHz Doppler frequeny, PRF 3500 Hz) and MRI (1.5 T, spin-echo T1- and T2-weighted images with administration of Gd-DTPA); a scan with {sup 123}I demonstrated a relevant uptake at the base of the tongue, but no uptake at the typical thyroid location. The gland was removed and partially transplanted in the strap muscles of the neck. (orig.)

  12. Lingual thyroid: value of integrated imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giovagnorio, F.; Cordier, A.; Romeo, R.

    1996-01-01

    Lingual thyroid is an uncommon cause of oropharyngeal mass, due to a congential anomaly of thyroidal development and migration: It is defined precisely as the presence of thyroid tissue in the midline of the tongue base between circumvallatae papilae and the epiglottis. We report a case of lignual thyroid in which the integration of clinical data, sonography, color-duplex Doppler, MRI and scintigraphy was determinant in demonstrating the disease. A 22-year-old woman presented with a sensation of foreign body in the throat, dysphonia, dyspnoea and dysphagia; we performed sonography (7.5 MHz linear probe), color Doppler (7 MHz Doppler frequeny, PRF 3500 Hz) and MRI (1.5 T, spin-echo T1- and T2-weighted images with administration of Gd-DTPA); a scan with 123 I demonstrated a relevant uptake at the base of the tongue, but no uptake at the typical thyroid location. The gland was removed and partially transplanted in the strap muscles of the neck. (orig.)

  13. Lingual Thyroid Excision with Transoral Robotic Surgery

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    Elif Ersoy Callıoglu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic thyroid gland may be detected at any place between foramen caecaum and normal thyroid localization due to inadequacy of the embryological migration of the thyroid gland. It has a prevalence varying between 1/10.000 and 1/100000 in the community. Usually follow-up without treatment is preferred except for obstructive symptoms, bleeding, and suspicion of malignity. Main symptoms are dysphagia, dysphonia, bleeding, dyspnea, and obstructive sleep apnea. In symptomatic cases, the first described method in surgical treatment is open approach since it is a region difficult to have access to. However, this approach has an increased risk of morbidity and postoperative complications. Transoral robotic surgery, which is a minimally invasive surgical procedure, has advantages such as larger three-dimensional point of view and ease of manipulation due to robotic instruments. In this report, a case at the age of 49 who presented to our clinic with obstructive symptoms increasing within the last year and was found to have lingual thyroid and underwent excision of ectopic thyroid tissue by da Vinci surgical system is presented.

  14. Piezosurgery for the Lingual Split Technique in Lingual Positioned Impacted Mandibular Third Molar Removal: A Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jing; Yang, Chi; Zheng, Jiawei; Qian, Wentao

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect and safety of lingual split technique using piezosurgery for the extraction of lingual positioned impacted mandibular 3rd molars with the goal of proposing a more minimally invasive choice for this common surgery.Eighty-nine consecutive patients with 110 lingual positioned impacted mandibular 3rd molars requiring extraction were performed the lingual split technique using piezosurgery. One sagittal osteotomy line and 2 transverse osteotomy line were designed for lingual and occlusal bone removal. The success rate, operative time, postoperative outcome, and major complications (including nerve injury, mandible fracture, severe hematoma or edema, and severe pyogenic infection) were documented and analyzed.All impacted mandibular 3rd molars were successfully removed (110/110). The average time of operation was 14.6 minutes (ranged from 7 to 28 minutes). One hundred and seven extraction sites (97.3%) were primary healing. Pain, mouth opening, swelling, and PoSSe scores on postoperative 7-day were 0.34 ± 0.63, 3.88 ± 0.66(cm), 2.4 ± 0.2(cm), and 23.7 ± 5.9, respectively. There were 6 cases (5.5%) had lingual nerve disturbance and 3 cases (2.7%) developed inferior alveolar nerve impairment, and achieved full recovery within 2 months by neurotrophic drug treatment.Our study suggested piezosurgery for lingual split technique provided an effective way for the extraction of lingual positioned and deeply impacted mandibular 3rd molar.

  15. Transient isolated lingual nerve neuropraxia associated with general anaesthesia and laryngeal mask use: two case reports and a review of the literature.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Foley, E

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Transient, isolated lingual nerve neuropraxia is a rare complication following general anaesthesia. Reports implicate airway manipulation and we describe two new cases associated with laryngeal mask airway (LMA) and review the related English language literature. RESULTS: Unilateral numbness and loss of taste on the anterior tongue were the characteristic symptoms. Collation of literature data (median and range) with that from the new cases showed: patient age was 38 (20-61) years and female to male ratio was 1.2:1. Surgery time was 62.5 (20-150) min and symptom duration was 28 (7-120) days. CONCLUSION: Lingual neuropraxias reported have been transient and patients can be advised, despite disturbing symptoms, that recovery is anticipated in about 1 month. Lingual neuropraxia reports are becoming more frequent, perhaps associated with increasing LMA use. Research is recommended as modification to LMA cuff volume, pressure and\\/or position within the oral cavity might ameliorate the entity.

  16. Efficacy of Exclusive Lingual Nerve Block versus Conventional Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block in Achieving Lingual Soft-tissue Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Sasikala; Paneerselvam, Elavenil; Guruprasad, T; Pathumai, M; Abraham, Simin; Krishnakumar Raja, V B

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this randomized clinical trial was to assess the efficacy of exclusive lingual nerve block (LNB) in achieving selective lingual soft-tissue anesthesia in comparison with conventional inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB). A total of 200 patients indicated for the extraction of lower premolars were recruited for the study. The samples were allocated by randomization into control and study groups. Lingual soft-tissue anesthesia was achieved by IANB and exclusive LNB in the control and study group, respectively. The primary outcome variable studied was anesthesia of ipsilateral lingual mucoperiosteum, floor of mouth and tongue. The secondary variables assessed were (1) taste sensation immediately following administration of local anesthesia and (2) mouth opening and lingual nerve paresthesia on the first postoperative day. Data analysis for descriptive and inferential statistics was performed using SPSS (IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows, Version 22.0, Armonk, NY: IBM Corp. Released 2013) and a P nerve block in achieving selective anesthesia of lingual soft tissues. It is technically simple and associated with minimal complications as compared to IAN block.

  17. Results of surgical excision and evaluation of factors associated with survival time in dogs with lingual neoplasia: 97 cases (1995-2008).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culp, William T N; Ehrhart, Nicole; Withrow, Stephen J; Rebhun, Robert B; Boston, Sarah; Buracco, Paolo; Reiter, Alexander M; Schallberger, Sandra P; Aldridge, Charles F; Kent, Michael S; Mayhew, Philipp D; Brown, Dorothy C

    2013-05-15

    To describe the clinical characteristics, treatments, outcomes, and factors associated with survival time in a cohort of dogs with lingual neoplasia that underwent surgical excision. Retrospective case series. Animals-97 client-owned dogs. Medical records of dogs with a lingual tumor examined between 1995 and 2008 were reviewed. Records were included if a lingual tumor was confirmed by histologic examination and surgical excision of the mass was attempted. Data were recorded and analyzed to identify prognostic factors. Clinical signs were mostly related to the oral cavity. For 93 dogs, marginal excision, subtotal glossectomy, and near-total glossectomy were performed in 35 (38%), 55 (59%), and 3 (3%), respectively. Surgery-related complications were rare, but 27 (28%) dogs had tumor recurrence. The most common histopathologic diagnoses for the 97 dogs were squamous cell carcinoma (31 [32%]) and malignant melanoma (29 [30%]). Eighteen (19%) dogs developed metastatic disease, and the overall median survival time was 483 days. Median survival time was 216 days for dogs with squamous cell carcinoma and 241 days for dogs with malignant melanoma. Dogs with lingual tumors ≥ 2 cm in diameter at diagnosis had a significantly shorter survival time than did dogs with tumors melanoma predominate. A thorough physical examination to identify lingual tumors at an early stage and surgical treatment after tumor identification are recommended because tumor size significantly affected survival time.

  18. Acute dystonic reaction leading to lingual hematoma mimicking angioedema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezer, Özgür; Aydin, Ali Attila; Bilge, Sedat; Arslan, Fatih; Arslan, Hasan

    2017-01-01

    Lingual hematoma is a severe situation, which is rare and endangers the airway. It can develop due to trauma, vascular abnormalities, and coagulopathy. Due to its sudden development, it can be clinically confused with angioedema. In patients who applied to the doctor with complaints of a swollen tongue, lingual hematoma can be confused with angioedema, in particular, at the beginning if the symptoms occurred after drug use. It should especially be considered that dystonia in the jaw can present as drug-induced hyperkinetic movement disorder. Early recognition of this rare clinical condition and taking precautions for providing airway patency are essential. In this case report, we will discuss mimicking angioedema and caused by a bite due to dystonia and separation of the tongue from the base of the mouth developing concurrently with lingual hematoma. PMID:29326495

  19. Lingual Abscess in the Setting of Recent Periodontal Antibiotic Injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefler, Joshua E; Masullo, Lawrence N

    2016-10-01

    Lingual abscess is a rare clinical entity, with posterior involvement being much less common than anterior involvement. Typical inciting events include trauma or direct inoculation to the area. The clinical diagnosis can be difficult, and early imaging and specialist consultation should be pursued to make a definitive diagnosis and to prevent patient deterioration. We present a case of posterior lingual abscess in a 62-year-old man after he received antibiotic injections to the lower molars for periodontal disease. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Lingual abscess is a rare condition that is difficult to diagnose clinically. Misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis can lead to acute airway compromise and increased morbidity. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Involuntary craniofacial lingual movements in intensive care-acquired quadriplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartagena, A M; Jog, M; Young, G B

    2012-02-01

    The syndrome of involuntary craniofacial lingual movements in the setting of acute intensive care-acquired quadriplegia (critical illness neuromyopathy) following sepsis-associated encephalopathy has not been previously described. We suggest a localization and treatment for this disabling condition. Three patients (2 female) from our center were quadriplegic from critical illness neuromyopathy when they developed involuntary craniofacial lingual movements following sepsis-associated encephalopathy. Extensive investigations failed to identify an etiology for the abnormal movements. Movements were of large amplitude, of moderate speed, and semi-rhythmic in the jaw, tongue, and palate, persistent and extremely bothersome to all patients. Injection with Botulinum toxin type A was very beneficial. Involuntary craniofacial lingual movements in the setting of flaccid quadriplegia following sepsis-associated encephalopathy are consistent with focal craniofacial brainstem myoclonus and constitutes a new syndrome. Botulinum toxin type A treatment maybe helpful in treatment.

  1. Digital lingual orthodontics and temporary anchorage devices for efficient biomechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravin Shetty

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult patients seeking orthodontic treatment at all times present with an esthetic demand even during treatment. The lingual orthodontics, apart from its esthetic values, also presents several other advantages. Currently, it has become a complete system in itself, starting from an accurate diagnosis, treatment protocol, and laboratory procedure to placement of the appliance in the patient′s mouth. With the advent of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing system, the lingual orthodontics is more evolved and made ease operators in respect to more efficient mechanics and reduced archwire adjustments. The present article presents two cases to show the efficiency of lingual orthodontics with temporary anchorage devices and anterior retraction hook.

  2. Thyroid cancer in lingual thyroid and thyroglossal duct cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturniolo, Giacomo; Vermiglio, Francesco; Moleti, Mariacarla

    2017-01-01

    Ectopy is the most common embryogenetic defect of the thyroid gland, representing between 48 and 61% of all thyroid dysgeneses. Persistence of thyroid tissue in the context of a thyroglossal duct remnant and lingual thyroid tissue are the most common defects. Although most cases of ectopic thyroid are asymptomatic, any disease affecting the thyroid may potentially involve the ectopic tissue, including malignancies. The prevalence of differentiated thyroid carcinoma in lingual thyroid and thyroglossal duct cyst is around 1% of patients affected with the above thyroid ectopies. We here review the current literature concerning primary thyroid carcinomas originating from thyroid tissue on thyroglossal duct cysts and lingual thyroid. Copyright © 2016 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. A REVIEW OF ELECTRICAL STIMULATION AND ITS EFFECT ON LINGUAL, LABIAL AND BUCCAL MUSCLE STRENGTH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safi, Mohammed F; Wright-Harp, Wilhelmina; Lucker, Jay R; Payne, Joan C; Harris, Ovetta

    2014-11-01

    Lingual, labial and buccal weakness (LLBW) is a widespread consequence of several neurological insults. LLBW impact on oral motor functions such as speech production and swallowing is well documented in the literature. Therefore, it is important for the speech-language pathologists to have access to evidence-based approaches for treatment. Thus, it is imperative that the speech-language pathology field search for effective treatment approaches and explore new treatment modalities that can improve therapy outcomes. One relatively new modality in this field is neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES). The purpose of this paper is fivefold: (a) to provide an overview of the general effects of NMES on skeletal muscles; (b) to review the effect of NMES on orofacial musculature evaluating the potential appropriateness of NMES for use in strengthening lingual, labial and buccal muscles; (c) to identify future directions for research with consideration of its potential role in improving speech intelligibility and the oral preparatory phase of swallowing in patients with oral motor weakness; (d) to provide a brief anatomic and physiologic bases of LLBW; (e) to provide background information for orofacial myologists who may encounter individuals with LLBW. NMES is a modality that is commonly used in physical therapy and occupational therapy fields that assists in treating several motor and sensory muscular disorders including muscular weakness. The literature reviewed demonstrate that very limited data related to the use of NMES on orofacial muscles exist despite the fact that these muscles can be easily accessed by electrical stimulation from the surface. This review of the research using electrical stimulation of muscles highlights the need for experimental treatment studies that investigate the effect of NMES on orofacial weakness.

  4. Lingual orthodontics for children and adolescents: improvement of the indirect bonding protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Demineralization of the dental enamel is a finding associated with fixed orthodontic treatment. When an indirect bonding procedure is used in children and adolescents the area beneath the bracket base may be affected. Aim To evaluate if the addition of an extra layer of a hydrophilic resin, to a conventional indirect bonding protocol, can reduce the incidence of demineralization beneath the bracket base. Methods 40 patients under 18 years of age were treated with completely customized lingual appliances. Two different bonding protocols were used either with or without the application of an additional layer of hydrophilic resin. Demineralization beneath the bracket base, after de-bonding, was evaluated by standardized intra-oral photographs. Results The addition of an extra layer of a hydrophilic resin helps to reduce the number of demineralized areas beneath the bracket bases significantly (three times less). The severity of the few remaining defects were minor and without any clinical consequence. Conclusion When bonding a completely customized lingual appliance in children and adolescents, an extra layer of a hydrophilic resin should be added to the teeth. PMID:24025345

  5. Isolated lingual involvement in Wilson′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neera Choudhary

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lingual involvement can occur in a variety of neurological disorders including pyramidal, extrapyramidal and lower motor neuron disorders. It can be seen in the form of tremor, bradykinesia, dystonia, atrophy and weakness of tongue movements and can clinically present as difficulty in swallowing and dysarthria which can be a source of great discomfort to the patient. We describe a patient who presented with isolated lingual involvement and was diagnosed to have Wilsons′s disease. This case emphasizes the clinical variability in presentation of Wilson′s disease and importance of early clinical diagnosis.

  6. Ultrastructural study on the embryonic development of the orthokeratinized epithelium and its cornified layer (lingual nail) on the ventral surface of the lingual apex in the domestic duck (Anas platyrhynchos f. domestica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skieresz-Szewczyk, Kinga; Jackowiak, Hanna; Ratajczak, Marlena

    2018-02-01

    The lingual nail as the cornified layer of the orthokeratinized epithelium in birds is responsible for the collection of solid food by pecking. The aim of the present study is to determine the manner of orthokeratinized epithelium development and assess the degree of readiness of the epithelium to fulfill its mechanical function at hatching. Three developmental phases are distinguished, i.e. embryonic, transformation and pre-hatching stage. In the embryonic stage lasting until day 13 of incubation the epithelium is composed of several layers of undifferentiated cells. During the transformation stage, from day 14 to 20 of incubation, the epithelium becomes differentiated to form three layers. A characteristic feature is the formation of osmophilic granules in the superficial layer, referred to as periderm granules. Until the pre-hatching stage the fibrous cytoskeleton of epithelial cells and an impermeable epithelial barrier are gradually developed. In the pre-hatching stage, a cornified lingual nail is formed, while the periderm is exfoliated. At hatching the orthokeratinized epithelium and lingual nail are fully developed and ready to perform feeding activities. The presence of periderm, similarly as in the epidermis, indicates the ectodermal derivation of the oral cavity epithelium. Moreover, occurrence of osmophilic granules may be considered as evidence for the phylogenetic affinity of birds and reptiles. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Darkening of third molar roots on panoramic radiographs: is it really predominantly thinning of the lingual cortex?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalma, J; Vajta, L; Lempel, E; Jeges, S; Olasz, L

    2013-04-01

    This study investigated the exact intra-alveolar aetiology of a panoramic high-risk sign, darkening of the third molar roots. 83 mandibular third molar surgical removals demonstrating dark bands on the third molar roots in preoperative radiographs were included in this prospective study. Exposure of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN), the root morphology of the third molar (e.g. groove or hook) and the integrity of the mandibular canal or lingual cortical wall were observed. Differences between single (increased radiolucency alone) and multiple darkening cases (increased radiolucency with accompanying 'high risk' signs) and between IAN exposure and groove formation were analysed. In 38 cases (45.8%), the IAN was visible during the operation. Groove was present in 37.4% of cases. 26.5% of the cases showed lingual cortical thinning, while specious root conformation explained the formation of darkening on the radiographic images of an additional 9.6% of the cases. IAN exposure (Pformation (Pformation of the root than lingual cortical thinning. Copyright © 2012 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Three case reports demonstrating treatment of relatively complex orthodontic cases using a completely customised lingual appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, John

    2016-01-01

    It is a commonly held misconception among Irish dentists that only minor malocclusions can be treated with lingual appliances. This article demonstrates the use of contemporary completely customised lingual orthodontic appliances to treat a diverse range of malocclusions, to a satisfactory level, and thereby may disabuse clinicians of the belief that only minor malocclusions can be treated with lingual appliances.

  9. A comparative assessment of forces and moments generated by lingual and conventional brackets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sifakakis, I.; Pandis, N.; Makou, M.; Katsaros, C.; Eliades, T.; Bourauel, C.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of bracket type on the labiopalatal forces and moments generated in the sagittal plane. Incognito lingual brackets (3M Unitek), STb lingual brackets (Light Lingual System; ORMCO), and conventional 0.018 inch slot brackets (Gemini; 3M Unitek) were bonded

  10. Blueprint of a Cross-Lingual Web Retrieval Collection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sigurbjörnsson, B.; Kamps, J.; de Rijke, M.; van Zwol, R.

    2005-01-01

    The world wide web is a natural setting for cross-lingual information retrieval; web content is essentially multilingual, and web searchers are often polyglots. Even though English has emerged as the lingua franca of the web, planning for a business trip or holiday usually involves digesting pages

  11. Lingual Kinematics during Rapid Syllable Repetition in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Min Ney; Murdoch, Bruce E.; Whelan, Brooke-Mai

    2012-01-01

    Background: Rapid syllable repetition tasks are commonly used in the assessment of motor speech disorders. However, little is known about the articulatory kinematics during rapid syllable repetition in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). Aims: To investigate and compare lingual kinematics during rapid syllable repetition in dysarthric…

  12. A hazard of lingual orthodontic attachments: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Graham; Borumandi, Farzad

    2015-01-01

    A case is presented of an unusual trauma to the floor of mouth caused by an unused lingual orthodontic button. This resulted in a vein being stripped from the floor of mouth and was associated with severe pain and restricted tongue movement. Management was by ligation and excision of the loop of the vessel under local anaesthesia.

  13. A permeability barrier surrounds taste buds in lingual epithelia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, Robin; Pereira, Elizabeth; Kurian, Mani; Barro-Soria, Rene; Chaudhari, Nirupa

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial tissues are characterized by specialized cell-cell junctions, typically localized to the apical regions of cells. These junctions are formed by interacting membrane proteins and by cytoskeletal and extracellular matrix components. Within the lingual epithelium, tight junctions join the apical tips of the gustatory sensory cells in taste buds. These junctions constitute a selective barrier that limits penetration of chemosensory stimuli into taste buds (Michlig et al. J Comp Neurol 502: 1003–1011, 2007). We tested the ability of chemical compounds to permeate into sensory end organs in the lingual epithelium. Our findings reveal a robust barrier that surrounds the entire body of taste buds, not limited to the apical tight junctions. This barrier prevents penetration of many, but not all, compounds, whether they are applied topically, injected into the parenchyma of the tongue, or circulating in the blood supply, into taste buds. Enzymatic treatments indicate that this barrier likely includes glycosaminoglycans, as it was disrupted by chondroitinase but, less effectively, by proteases. The barrier surrounding taste buds could also be disrupted by brief treatment of lingual tissue samples with DMSO. Brief exposure of lingual slices to DMSO did not affect the ability of taste buds within the slice to respond to chemical stimulation. The existence of a highly impermeable barrier surrounding taste buds and methods to break through this barrier may be relevant to basic research and to clinical treatments of taste. PMID:25209263

  14. A permeability barrier surrounds taste buds in lingual epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, Robin; Pereira, Elizabeth; Kurian, Mani; Barro-Soria, Rene; Chaudhari, Nirupa; Roper, Stephen D

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial tissues are characterized by specialized cell-cell junctions, typically localized to the apical regions of cells. These junctions are formed by interacting membrane proteins and by cytoskeletal and extracellular matrix components. Within the lingual epithelium, tight junctions join the apical tips of the gustatory sensory cells in taste buds. These junctions constitute a selective barrier that limits penetration of chemosensory stimuli into taste buds (Michlig et al. J Comp Neurol 502: 1003-1011, 2007). We tested the ability of chemical compounds to permeate into sensory end organs in the lingual epithelium. Our findings reveal a robust barrier that surrounds the entire body of taste buds, not limited to the apical tight junctions. This barrier prevents penetration of many, but not all, compounds, whether they are applied topically, injected into the parenchyma of the tongue, or circulating in the blood supply, into taste buds. Enzymatic treatments indicate that this barrier likely includes glycosaminoglycans, as it was disrupted by chondroitinase but, less effectively, by proteases. The barrier surrounding taste buds could also be disrupted by brief treatment of lingual tissue samples with DMSO. Brief exposure of lingual slices to DMSO did not affect the ability of taste buds within the slice to respond to chemical stimulation. The existence of a highly impermeable barrier surrounding taste buds and methods to break through this barrier may be relevant to basic research and to clinical treatments of taste. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Swallowing Disorders in Parkinson's Disease: Impact of Lingual Pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argolo, Natalie; Sampaio, Marília; Pinho, Patrícia; Melo, Ailton; Nóbrega, Ana Caline

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lingual pumping (LP) is a repetitive, involuntary, anteroposterior movement of the tongue on the soft palate that is executed prior to transferring the food bolus to the pharynx, but we also observed LP when multiple swallows were taken. LP may be associated with rigidity and bradykinesia in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). This…

  16. Lingual structural pattern of juvenile Chameleon, Chameleo chameleon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. El Mansi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available It is belong to the order Squamata, family, Chamaeleonidae. They have characteristic features of tongue protrusion during capturing prey attracts many research works and assay its velocity during protrusion. Yet little studies touched the anatomical and histological feature of the juvenile tongue and especially the middle tongue region involved in the tongue elongation, the present study aimed to focus on the histological structure of the mid-tongue and clarify its role in projection of the tongue as well as the glandular structure, keratinization of lingual epithelium and proliferation capacity of the fore-tongue region in relation with their feeding habits during the juvenile age. Juvenile Chameleo chameleon are collected from Abu Rawash, north of Giza Governorate, Egypt during summer 2015. Three juvenile developmental stages are used in the present study and categorized according to the gross morphological criteria of head, abdomen and limb lengths. The tongue and hyoid apparatus were removed and photographed. Histological, immunohistochemistry of cytokeratin and stem cell factor and scanning electronic microscopic investigations were carried out on the fore-tongue region, meanwhile only histological studies were done for the median tongue region. Morphometric assessments of number and length of lingual papillae and grades of cytokeratin and stem cell expression were done. Histologically, the dorsal lingual mucosa of the fore-tongue possessed different pattern of lingual papillae including finger-like, club, cubical, biforked and multi-branched papillae. The finger-like papillae are more abundant compared to the other types. The lamina propria of anterior median tongue pad are more glandular and exhibited abundant distribution of PAS-positive tubular glands and moderate alcian blue staining affinity of both alveolar and branched alveolar glands. There is no detected keratinization of the lingual epithelium. Stem cell factor appeared denser on

  17. Frequency of lingual nerve injury in mandibular third molar extraction: A comparison of two surgical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shad, S.; Abbasi, M.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molar is associated with a number of complications including postoperative bleeding, dry socket, postoperative infection, and injury to regional nerves. Lingual nerve damage is one of the main complications. To prevent this complication different techniques had been used. Lingual flap reflection is one of these procedures in which lingual soft tissue is reflected and retracted deliberately, the nerve is identified and is kept out of the surgical field. The objective of this study was to evaluate a surgical technique for third molar removal which is associated with minimum frequency of lingual nerve damage. Method: A randomized controlled trial was performed. A total of 380 patients with impacted mandibular third molars were included in this study. Each patient was allotted randomly by blocked randomization to group A where procedure was performed by reflection and retraction of lingual flap in addition to buccal flap and group B where procedure was performed by retraction of buccal flap only. Results: Lingual nerve damage occurred in 8.94 percentage in Group A in which lingual flap retraction was performed but damage was reversible. In group B, 2.63 percentage lingual nerve damage was observed and nature of damage was permanent. The difference was statistically significant (p=0.008). Conclusions: Lingual flap retraction poses 3.4 times increased risk of lingual nerve damage during extraction of mandibular third molar when lingual flap is retracted but the nature of damage is reversible. (author)

  18. Four cases of MALT lymphoma arising in the lingual tonsil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogihara, Hitomi; Yuta, Atsushi; Yamaguchi, Motoko; Miyamoto, Yukiko; Hattori, Reiko; Imai, Hiroshi; Majima, Yuichi; Tanaka, Chikako

    2007-01-01

    We report four cases of lingual tonsillar MALT (mucosal associated lymphoid tissue) lymphoma. The cases consisted of a 68-year-old woman, a 60-year-old woman, a 55-year-old woman, and a 75-year-old man. The clinical stages of these cases were IIA, IA, IV (invasion to bone marrow) and IA, respectively. As some types of lingual tonsillar MALT lymphomas show hypertrophy of the lymphoid tissue but not a mass, it is not easy to make a diagnosis of MALT lymphoma only by fiberscopic findings. Furthermore, the small size of biopsy specimens or tissue damaged by forceps can show a false negative consult. Repeat biopsies are sometimes required for a definitive diagnosis. It is important to take large biopsy specimens with little damage, and to discuss well with pathologists. (author)

  19. Cross-lingual parser selection for low-resource languages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agic, Zeljko

    2017-01-01

    In multilingual dependency parsing, transferring delexicalized models provides unmatched language coverage and competitive scores, with minimal requirements. Still, selecting the single best parser for any target language poses a challenge. Here, we propose a lean method for parser selection. It ....... It offers top performance, and it does so without disadvantaging the truly low-resource languages. We consistently select appropriate source parsers for our target languages in a realistic cross-lingual parsing experiment....

  20. Cross-lingual tagger evaluation without test data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agic, Zeljko; Plank, Barbara; Søgaard, Anders

    2017-01-01

    We address the challenge of cross-lingual POS tagger evaluation in absence of manually annotated test data. We put forth and evaluate two dictionary-based metrics. On the tasks of accuracy prediction and system ranking, we reveal that these metrics are reliable enough to approximate test set-base......-based evaluation, and at the same time lean enough to support assessment for truly low-resource languages....

  1. Different Approaches to Cross-Lingual Focus Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maira Quintanilha

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Focus groups are a useful data-generation strategy in qualitative health research when it is important to understand how social contexts shape participants’ health. However, when cross-lingual focus groups are conducted across cultural groups, and in languages in which the researcher is not fluent, questions regarding the usefulness and rigor of the findings can be raised. In this article, we will discuss three different approaches to cross-lingual focus groups used in a community-based participatory research project with pregnant and postpartum, African immigrant women in Alberta, Canada. In two approaches, we moderated focus groups in women’s mother tongue with the support of real-time interpreters, but in the first approach, audio recording was used and in the second approach, audio recording was not used. In the third approach, a bilingual moderator facilitated focus groups in women’s mother tongue, with transcription and translation of audio-recorded data upon completion of data generation. We will describe each approach in detail, including their advantages and challenges, and recontextualize what we have learned within the known literature. We expect the lessons learned in this project may assist others in planning and implementing cross-lingual focus groups, especially in the context of community-based participatory research.

  2. Effect of lingual nerve block on burning mouth syndrome (stomatodynia): a randomized crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grémeau-Richard, Christelle; Dubray, Claude; Aublet-Cuvelier, Bruno; Ughetto, Sylvie; Woda, Alain

    2010-04-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (stomatodynia) is associated with changes of a neuropathic nature the main location of which, peripheral or central, remains unknown. A randomised, double-blind crossover design was used to investigate the effects of lingual nerve block on spontaneous burning pain and a possible correlation with the effects of topical clonazepam, the patient's response to a psychological questionnaire, and the taste and heat thresholds. The spontaneous burning was measured with a visual analogue scale (VAS) just before and 15 min after injection. The decreases in VAS score after lidocaine or saline injection were not significantly different (2.7+/-3.9 and 2.0+/-2.6, respectively; n=20). However, two groups of patients could be identified: in a "peripheral group" (n=10) the VAS decrease due to lingual nerve injection was 4.3+/-3.1cm after lidocaine and 0.9+/-0.3 cm after saline (p=0.02). In a "central group" (n=7), there were an increase in pain intensity score (-0.8+/-2.6 cm) after lidocaine and a decrease (1.5+/-3.0 cm) after saline (p=0.15). An increase in the hospital anxiety and depression (HAD) score and a decreased taste sensitivity and heat pain threshold of painful oral area were seen in patients compared with age-and-sex-matched controls (p<0.05). Topical clonazepam treatment tended to be more effective (p=0.07) and HAD score lower (p<0.03) in the peripheral than in the central group. These results suggest that the neuropathic disorder associated with stomatodynia may be predominantly peripheral, central or mixed depending on the individual. Topical application of clonazepam and HAD may serve as indicators of which mechanism is dominating. Copyright 2009 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Impacto da remoção de biofilme lingual em pacientes sob ventilação mecânica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Sérgio da Silva Santos

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a eficiência de limpador de língua para remoção do biofilme lingual em pacientes sob ventilação mecânica. MÉTODOS: Foram coletadas amostras de biofilme lingual e de secreção traqueal de 50 pacientes intubados ou traqueostomizados sob ventilação assistida em grupo de estudo (GE - uso de limpador lingual e grupo controle (GC - sem higienização da língua. Foi realizada cultura de secreção oral e traqueal do GE (inicialmente e após 5 dias e do GC (em momento único para avaliar as modificações na flora bacteriana. RESULTADOS: Os pacientes do GE tinham mediana de idade de 77 (45-99 anos, e os do GC de 79 (21-94 anos. O período de internação dos pacientes do GE oscilou entre 17 e 1.370 dias, com mediana de 425 dias, e do GC, entre 4 e 240 dias, com mediana de 120 dias. Na comparação do índice de placa bacteriana bucal entre os grupos de estudo e controle, não foram encontradas diferenças significantes. Não houve correlação entre esse índice e o tempo de internação. A mesma flora bacteriana foi encontrada na placa bacteriana bucal antes e após 5 dias de uso do raspador lingual no GE, somente em 9 dos 27 casos em relação ao encontrado no GC (p=0,683. Em 7 dos 27 pacientes do GE houve positividade de culturas bacterianas com as mesmas cepas tanto para biofilme lingual quanto para secreção traqueal (p=0,003 em relação ao GC. A similaridade na resistência e na sensibilidade das cepas dos micro-organismos encontrados, com o objetivo de associar a flora do biofilme lingual com a da secreção traqueal, mostrou significância em 6/23 casos somente no GC (p=0,006. CONCLUSÃO: O uso do limpador de língua é um mecanismo efetivo na redução do biofilme lingual em pacientes sob ventilação mecânica, além de facilitar a ação dos cuidadores para ações de higiene bucal.

  4. Screening of patients for cochlear implant through a questionnaire online. GroupProfile of patients pre-and peri lingual not summoned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leal, Aquiles Figueiredo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Facilitating access to specialized centers and properly screen patients seeking cochlear implants are critical steps for proper rehabilitation. Objective: To describe the group of patients pre-and peri-lingual is not called for in a service evaluation of cochlear implants. Method: A retrospective study analyzed 401 questionnaires of patients pre-and peri-lingual Web site registered in the Central Brazilian cochlear implant. For the failure to call these patients were used as criteria applied some variables: age, use of hearing aids, speech therapy, duration of deafness, type of progression of hearing loss and type of communication used by the patient. Results: The group of patients with pre-and peri-lingual deafness accounted for 34% of total questionnaires completed during the period. The distribution by age found that 54% of patients were over 17 years, 30% between 9 and 17 years, and remaining less than 9 years. The duration of deafness was higher than 20 years in 50% of patients, between 10 and 20 years by 32% between 5 and 10 years in 9% and between 0 and 5 years in 9%. Regarding the performance of voice rehabilitation 58% of patients had performed and 42% did not. Regarding the mode of communication 49% had global communication, 18% LIBRAS, 6% oral communication, 26% no communication. Conclusion: Advanced age, duration of deafness high, so mostly no oral communication and lack of voice rehabilitation were crucial to the failure to call these patients.

  5. Piezosurgery for the lingual split technique in mandibular third molar removal: a suggestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pippi, Roberto; Alvaro, Roberto

    2013-03-01

    The lingual split technique is a surgical procedure for extraction of impacted mandibular third molar throughout a lingual approach. The main disadvantage of this technique is the high rate of temporary lingual nerve injury mainly because of the trauma induced by the lingual flap retraction. The purpose of this paper is to suggest the use of piezosurgery in performing the lingual cortical plate osteotomy of the third molar alveolar process. Surgical procedure was performed under general anesthesia, and it lasted approximately 60 minutes. After the buccal and lingual full-thickness flaps were incised and elevated, a piezosurgical device was used for osteotomy. A well-defined bony window was then removed, and it allowed the entire tooth was extracted in a lingual direction. The patient did not show any neurological postoperative complication. Lingual and inferior alveolar nerve functionality was normal before as well as after surgery. The use of piezoelectric surgery seems to be a good option in removing lower third molars when a lingual access is clearly indicated. The only disadvantage of this technique can be represented by an operating time lengthening possibly because of a lower power cut of the piezoelectric device, to the high mineralization of the mandibular cortical bone and to the use of inserts with a low degree of sharpening.

  6. A Systematic Review of Isometric Lingual Strength-Training Programs in Adults With and Without Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Victoria S; Zhang, Bin; Haines, Morgan B; Kelchner, Lisa N

    2017-05-17

    This systematic review summarizes the effects of isometric lingual strength training on lingual strength and swallow function in adult populations. Furthermore, it evaluates the designs of the reviewed studies and identifies areas of future research in isometric lingual strength training for dysphagia remediation. A comprehensive literature search of 3 databases and additional backward citation search identified 10 studies for inclusion in the review. The review reports and discusses the isometric-exercise intervention protocols, pre- and postintervention lingual-pressure data (maximum peak pressures and lingual-palatal pressures during swallowing), and oropharyngeal swallowing measures such as penetration-aspiration scales, oropharyngeal residue and duration, lingual volumes, and quality-of-life assessments. Studies reported gains in maximum peak lingual pressures following isometric lingual strength training for both healthy adults and select groups of individuals with dysphagia. However, due to the variability in study designs, it remains unclear whether strength gains generalize to swallow function. Although isometric lingual strength training is a promising intervention for oropharyngeal dysphagia, the current literature is too variable to confidently report specific therapeutic benefits. Future investigations should target homogenous patient populations and use randomized controlled trials to determine the efficacy of this treatment for individuals with dysphagia.

  7. Lingual mandibular osteonecrosis after dental impressions for orthodontic study models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerruto, Carmen; Ugolini, Alessandro; Cozzani, Mauro

    2018-03-01

    A 43-year-old man sought orthodontic treatment to close anterior diastemas. During the impression procedure for routine documentation, the orthodontic assistant exerted excessive pressure on the metallic tray; 2 days later, the patient reported the detachment of a small piece of mucosa overlying the mylohyoid crest and was referred to a maxillofacial surgeon with a diagnosis of lingual mandibular osteonecrosis. The etiology of bony osteonecrosis is discussed, together with the anatomic variations that can be present in the basal bone and that must be carefully checked before an impression is taken. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Diagnostic evaluation of a case of lingual thyroid ectopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Fiaschetti

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid ectopia can occur when the process of thyroid embryogenesis fails. Here, we present the case of a 30-year-old woman with thyroid ectopia that was discovered during magnetic resonance imaging of cervical spine for referred neck pain. Imaging revealed the presence of an encapsulated mass at the base of her tongue. The patient was not symptomatic for any compression of the airways. Diagnosis of ectopic lingual thyroid was confirmed by 99mTC scintigraphy. Incidental diagnosis of thyroid ectopia in asymptomatic adult patients is rare, and it should be considered on diagnostic imaging in case of an anterior midline cervical mass.

  9. Transforce lingual appliances pre-adjusted invisible appliances simplify treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, William John

    2011-01-01

    Transforce lingual appliances are designed to be used in conjunction with conventional fixed appliances. Lingual arch development is normally followed by bonded fixed appliances to detail the occlusion. Alternatively Transforce appliance treatment is an efficient method of preparing complex malocclusions prior to a finishing stage with invisible appliances. This approach is ideal for adult treatment, using light continuous forces for arch development with appliances that are comfortable to wear. Sagittal and Transverse appliances are designed for arch development in a range of sizes for contracted arches. They can be used to treat all classes of malocclusion and are pre-adjusted fixed/removable devices for non-compliance treatment. Force modules with nickel titanium coil springs enclosed in a tube deliver a gentle, biocompatible continuous force with a long range of action. They are excellent for mixed dentition and ideal for adult arch development. There are multiple sizes for upper and lower arch development and a sizing chart may be placed over a study model for correct selection, eliminating the need for laboratory work.

  10. Long-term effectiveness of canine-to-canine bonded flexible spiral wire lingual retainers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renkema, Anne-Marie; Renkema, Alianne; Bronkhorst, Ewald; Katsaros, Christos

    Introduction: The flexible spiral wire (FSW) canine-to-canine lingual retainer bonded to all 6 anterior teeth is a frequently used type of mandibular fixed retainer. This study aimed to assess the long-term effectiveness of FSW canine-to-canine lingual retainers in maintaining the alignment of the

  11. Long-term effectiveness of canine-to-canine bonded flexible spiral wire lingual retainers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renkema, A.M.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Katsaros, C.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The flexible spiral wire (FSW) canine-to-canine lingual retainer bonded to all 6 anterior teeth is a frequently used type of mandibular fixed retainer. This study aimed to assess the long-term effectiveness of FSW canine-to-canine lingual retainers in maintaining the alignment of the

  12. The Mutual Symbiosis between Inclusive Bi-Lingual Education and Multicultural Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irby, Beverly J.; Tong, Fuhui; Lara-Alecio, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    In this article the authors postulate a mutual symbiosis between multicultural and inclusive bi-lingual education. Combining bi-lingual and multicultural education to create a symbiotic relationship can stimulate reform in schools and can promote inclusive educational systems, thereby keeping native languages and cultures alive for minority…

  13. Displacement pattern of the anterior segment using antero-posterior lingual retractor combined with a palatal plate

    OpenAIRE

    Seo, Kyung-Won; Kwon, Soon-Yong; Kim, Kyung A; Park, Ki-Ho; Kim, Seong-Hun; Ahn, Hyo-Won; Nelson, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate and compare the effects of two appliances on the en masse retraction of the anterior teeth anchored by temporary skeletal anchorage devices (TSADs). Methods The sample comprised 46 nongrowing hyperdivergent adult patients who planned to undergo upper first premolar extraction using lingual retractors. They were divided into three groups, based on the lingual appliance used: the C-lingual retractor (CLR) group (group 1, n = 16) and two antero-posterior lingual retractor (...

  14. Scanning electron microscopical study of the lingual epithelium of green iguana (Iguana iguana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbate, F; Latella, G; Montalbano, G; Guerrera, M C; Levanti, M B; Ciriaco, E

    2008-08-01

    During the last few years, green iguanas (Iguana iguana) have turned out to be one of the most popular pets. They are omnivorous. In their way of feeding, this crucial function is performed by capturing of the preys and mostly, this is carried out by the tongue. The role of the tongue is also fundamental during the intra-oral transport and during the swallowing of food. This has been reported in several studies about chameleons, agamids and iguanids, nevertheless published data about the mechanisms of capturing and swallowing the prey, and the morphological descriptions about the tongue epithelium, are scarce. Therefore, the aim of this present study was to analyse the morphology of the lingual epithelium in green iguanas by scanning electron microscopy. Three different areas were demonstrated on the tongue surface: the tongue tip, characterized by a smooth epithelium without papillae, a foretongue, completely covered by numerous closely packed cylindriform papillae, and a hindtongue with conical-like papillae. Some taste buds were recognized on the middle and the posterior parts of the tongue. Different functional roles could be hypothesized for the three tongue areas: the tongue tip could have a role related to the movements of the prey immediately after the capturing, while the middle papillae and the hindtongue could have an important role concerning the swallowing phase.

  15. Pharmacological Protection From Radiation ± Cisplatin-Induced Oral Mucositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotrim, Ana P.; Yoshikawa, Masanobu; Sunshine, Abraham N.; Zheng Changyu; Sowers, Anastasia L.; Thetford, Angela D.; Cook, John A.; Mitchell, James B.; Baum, Bruce J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate if two pharmacological agents, Tempol and D-methionine (D-met), are able to prevent oral mucositis in mice after exposure to ionizing radiation ± cisplatin. Methods and Materials: Female C3H mice, ∼8 weeks old, were irradiated with five fractionated doses ± cisplatin to induce oral mucositis (lingual ulcers). Just before irradiation and chemotherapy, mice were treated, either alone or in combination, with different doses of Tempol (by intraperitoneal [ip] injection or topically, as an oral gel) and D-met (by gavage). Thereafter, mice were sacrificed and tongues were harvested and stained with a solution of Toluidine Blue. Ulcer size and tongue epithelial thickness were measured. Results: Significant lingual ulcers resulted from 5 × 8 Gy radiation fractions, which were enhanced with cisplatin treatment. D-met provided stereospecific partial protection from lingual ulceration after radiation. Tempol, via both routes of administration, provided nearly complete protection from lingual ulceration. D-met plus a suboptimal ip dose of Tempol also provided complete protection. Conclusions: Two fairly simple pharmacological treatments were able to markedly reduce chemoradiation-induced oral mucositis in mice. This proof of concept study suggests that Tempol, alone or in combination with D-met, may be a useful and convenient way to prevent the severe oral mucositis that results from head-and-neck cancer therapy.

  16. Cáncer de lengua en un paciente con Alzheimer Lingual cancer in an Alzheimer patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Antunes Freitas

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available El cáncer bucal a nivel mundial se considera uno de los más incidentes en cabeza y cuello, y la lengua, la ubicación topográfica bucal más frecuente. Los principales factores de riesgo son: tabaquismo, alcoholismo, herencia y una higiene bucal inadecuada. Se reporta el caso de un hombre de 64 años de edad con hábitos tóxicos de tabaquismo y alcoholismo, y además deficiente higiene bucal. El paciente sufre enfermedad de Alzheimer y desarrolló en la lengua un carcinoma escamocelular con adenopatías cervicales metastásicas. El diagnóstico fue confirmado histopatológicamente. Se realizó glosectomía total y posterior radioterapia cervical. Se motivó a los familiares a mejorar la higiene bucal del paciente y actualmente se encuentra bajo control médico. Aunque no se puede asegurar que la aparición y desarrollo del cáncer bucal en este paciente fue debido al padecimiento de Alzheimer o a los demás factores de riesgo, si se contempló la posibilidad de convertirse este padecimiento neurológico en un factor predisponente para esta enfermedad.Oral cancer at world level is considered as one of the more incident in head and neck and the tongue is the more frequent topographical location. The main risk factors are the smoking, alcoholism, inheritance and a poor oral hygiene. The case of an Alzheimer male patient aged 64 with smoking, alcoholism and a poor oral hygiene and a lingual squamocellular carcinoma with metastatic cervical adenopathies. Diagnosis was confirmed by histology. A total glossectomy was carried out and later cervical radiotherapy was applied. Relate were instructed on a better oral hygiene of patient and nowadays is under medical control. Although it is impossible to assure that appearance and development of oral cancer in this patients were provoked by the Alzheimer' disease or to other risks factors if we take into account the possibility that this neurologic illness becomes a risk factor.

  17. Baselines and test data for cross-lingual inference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agic, Zeljko; Schluter, Natalie

    2018-01-01

    The recent years have seen a revival of interest in textual entailment, sparked by i) the emergence of powerful deep neural network learners for natural language processing and ii) the timely development of large-scale evaluation datasets such as SNLI. Recast as natural language inference......, the problem now amounts to detecting the relation between pairs of statements: they either contradict or entail one another, or they are mutually neutral. Current research in natural language inference is effectively exclusive to English. In this paper, we propose to advance the research in SNLI-style natural...... language inference toward multilingual evaluation. To that end, we provide test data for four major languages: Arabic, French, Spanish, and Russian. We experiment with a set of baselines. Our systems are based on cross-lingual word embeddings and machine translation. While our best system scores an average...

  18. Distribution of Y-receptors in murine lingual epithelia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria D Hurtado

    Full Text Available Peptide hormones and their cognate receptors belonging to neuropeptide Y (NPY family mediate diverse biological functions in a number of tissues. Recently, we discovered the presence of the gut satiation peptide YY (PYY in saliva of mice and humans and defined its role in the regulation of food intake and body weight maintenance. Here we report the systematic analysis of expression patterns of all NPY receptors (Rs, Y1R, Y2R, Y4R, and Y5R in lingual epithelia in mice. Using four independent assays, immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, immunocytochemistry and RT PCR, we show that the morphologically different layers of the keratinized stratified epithelium of the dorsal layer of the tongue express Y receptors in a very distinctive yet overlapping pattern. In particular, the monolayer of basal progenitor cells expresses both Y1 and Y2 receptors. Y1Rs are present in the parabasal prickle cell layer and the granular layer, while differentiated keratinocytes display abundant Y5Rs. Y4Rs are expressed substantially in the neuronal fibers innervating the lamina propria and mechanoreceptors. Basal epithelial cells positive for Y2Rs respond robustly to PYY(3-36 by increasing intracellular Ca(2+ suggesting their possible functional interaction with salivary PYY. In taste buds of the circumvallate papillae, some taste receptor cells (TRCs express YRs localized primarily at the apical domain, indicative of their potential role in taste perception. Some of the YR-positive TRCs are co-localized with neuronal cell adhesion molecule (NCAM, suggesting that these TRCs may have synaptic contacts with nerve terminals. In summary, we show that all YRs are abundantly expressed in multiple lingual cell types, including epithelial progenitors, keratinocytes, neuronal dendrites and TRCs. These results suggest that these receptors may be involved in the mediation of a wide variety of functions, including proliferation, differentiation, motility, taste perception

  19. A new approach to incisor retention--the lingual spur retainer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNamara, T G

    1996-08-01

    Late lower incisor crowding and incisor rotations remain a problem in orthodontics. We describe a new fixed retainer which is simple to use, allows physiological tooth movement, but prevents rotational and labio-lingual relapse.

  20. Lingual mucosal graft two-stage Bracka technique for redo hypospadias repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Sakr

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: Lingual mucosa is a reliable and versatile graft material in the armamentarium of two-stage Bracka hypospadias repair with the merits of easy harvesting and minor donor-site complications.

  1. Russian Perceptions of U.S. Lawyers as a Lingual-Cultural Type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenia Gulyaeva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces the reader to the theory of a lingual-cultural personality and lingual-cultural types in particular. A lingual-cultural type is a generalized image of personalities whose behavior and values significantly influ-ence the culture in general and is a representative of ethnic and social variety of the society. The type of an American Lawyer is being analyzed, because in the United States of America, unlike any other country, the role of a lawyer has a pervasive shared understanding. The author examines how lawyers are repre-sented in US popular culture, specifically exploring presentations in legal and crime fiction. She also analyzes results from a survey of 100 Russian students, exploring their perceptions of the lingual-cultural type of US lawyers

  2. Mapping wordnets from the perspective of inter-lingual equivalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Katarzyna Rudnicka

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Mapping wordnets from the perspective of inter-lingual equivalence This paper explores inter-lingual equivalence from the perspective of linking two large lexico-semantic databases, namely the Princeton WordNet of English and the plWordnet (pl. Słowosieć of Polish. Wordnets are built as networks of lexico-semantic relations between words and their meanings, and constitute a type of monolingual dictionary cum thesaurus. The development of wordnets for different languages has given rise to many wordnet linking projects (e.g. EuroWordNet, Vossen, 2002. Regardless of a linking method used, these projects require defining rules for establishing equivalence links between wordnet building blocks, known as synsets (sets of synonymous lexical units, i.e., lemma-sense pairs. In this paper an analysis is carried out of a set of inter-wordnet relations used in the mapping of the plWordNet onto the Princeton WordNet, and an attempt is made to relate them to equivalence taxonomies described in specialist literature on bilingual lexicography and translation.   Rzutowanie wordnetów w perspektywie ekwiwalencji międzyjęzykowej Artykuł przedstawia analizę zjawiska ekwiwalencji międzyjęzykowej z perspektywy powiązania dwóch wielkich wordnetów: polskiej Słowosieci i angielskiego WordNetu princetońskiego. Wordnety są relacyjnymi bazami danych leksykalno-semantycznych opisującymi sieć relacji leksykalno-semantycznych pomiędzy słowami i ich znaczeniami. Stanowią zatem rodzaj słownika jednojęzycznego połączonego z tezaurusem. Rozwój wordnetów dla wielu języków świata zaowocował następnie ich wzajemnymi powiązaniami. Wymagało to zdefiniowania metodologii dla ustalenia ekwiwalencji pomiędzy ich podstawowymi elementami tzn. synsetami, które są zbiorami synonimicznych jednostek leksykalnych tzn. par lemat numer znaczenia. W artykule analizujemy zbiór relacji międzywordnetowych używanych w rzutowaniu pomiędzy Słowosiecią a Word

  3. Hashimoto's Thyroiditis: Lingual and Labial Capillary Microcirculation in Patients Affected by Macroglossia

    OpenAIRE

    Scardina, G. A.; Messina, P.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to estudy lingual and labial microcirculation differences among healthy subjects and those with Hashimoto's thyroiditis affected by macroglossia. Twenty healthy patients and 20 patients suffering from Hashimoto's thyroiditis were examined. Labial and lingual capiUaroscopy were used to investigate the characteristics of microcirculation. For each patient we evaluated visibility, course, tortuosity and the possible presence of microhaemorrhages, average calibre of capil...

  4. Lingual and fusiform gyri in visual processing: a clinico-pathologic study of superior altitudinal hemianopia.

    OpenAIRE

    Bogousslavsky, J; Miklossy, J; Deruaz, J P; Assal, G; Regli, F

    1987-01-01

    A macular-sparing superior altitudinal hemianopia with no visuo-psychic disturbance, except impaired visual learning, was associated with bilateral ischaemic necrosis of the lingual gyrus and only partial involvement of the fusiform gyrus on the left side. It is suggested that bilateral destruction of the lingual gyrus alone is not sufficient to affect complex visual processing. The fusiform gyrus probably has a critical role in colour integration, visuo-spatial processing, facial recognition...

  5. Cross-Lingual Dependency Parsing with Late Decoding for Truly Low-Resource Languages

    OpenAIRE

    Schlichtkrull, Michael Sejr; Søgaard, Anders

    2017-01-01

    In cross-lingual dependency annotation projection, information is often lost during transfer because of early decoding. We present an end-to-end graph-based neural network dependency parser that can be trained to reproduce matrices of edge scores, which can be directly projected across word alignments. We show that our approach to cross-lingual dependency parsing is not only simpler, but also achieves an absolute improvement of 2.25% averaged across 10 languages compared to the previous state...

  6. Fat digestion in the stomach: stability of lingual lipase in the gastric environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, C S; Hamosh, P; Hamosh, M

    1984-03-01

    Digestion of dietary fat starts in the stomach, where lingual lipase hydrolyzes triglycerides to free fatty acids and partial glycerides at pH 3.0-6.0. Lingual lipase is secreted continuously from lingual serous glands and accumulates in the stomach between meals, when gastric pH is less than 3.0. We have, therefore, examined the resistance of lingual lipase to low pH and its possible protection by dietary components present in the stomach contents. Partially purified rat lingual lipase (7-15 micrograms enzyme protein) was preincubated at 37 degrees C for 10-60 min at pH 1.0-6.0 before incubation for assay of lipolytic activity, hydrolysis of tri-[3H]olein at pH 5.4. The data show that partially purified rat lingual lipase preparations are stable at 37 degrees C in the pH range of 2.5-6.0. Enzyme activity, however, is rapidly and irreversibly lost during preincubation at pH 1.0-2.4 for 10-30 min. Protein (gelatin 1% or albumin 1% or 2.5%) cannot prevent the inactivation of lingual lipase at low pH. The large molecular species (molecular weight greater than 500,000) of lingual lipase (thought to be an aggregate of enzyme with lipids) is slightly more resistant to inactivation than the 46,000 dalton preparation, suggesting that lipids might protect the enzyme from inactivation. Indeed, about 60% of the initial lipase activity is preserved during incubation at pH 2.0 in the presence of 50 mM lecithin or 10 mM triolein. The data indicate that triglycerides which are hydrolyzed by this enzyme as well as phospholipids that are not hydrolyzed can prevent the inactivation of the enzyme.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. MR imaging of the lingual thyroid. Comparison to other submucosal lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takashima, S.; Ueda, M.; Shibata, A.; Takayama, F.; Momose, M.; Yamashita, K.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To study MR findings for clues to the diagnosis of lingual thyroid. Material and methods: MR findings and clinical and scintigraphic data of 5 cases of lingual thyroid were reviewed and the MR findings were compared to those of 16 cases of other submucosal lesions in the base of the tongue. Results: Four of the 5 patients with lingual thyroid were women and all had hypothyroidism. MR imaging depicted lingual thyroid in the midline in the base of the tongue (n=5) and additional ectopic thyroid glands in the floor of the mouth (n=2) or between the right and left sternohyoid muscles (n=1). Ectopic thyroid glands appeared isointense or hyperintense relative to muscle tissue on T1-weighted images and showed slight or fair contrast enhancement. All glands had low to intermediate T2 signal, which was also seen in 1 case of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and 1 case of adenoid cystic carcinoma. All ectopic thyroid glands had well-defined margins, whereas malignant tumors tended to have ill-defined margins and to invade the surrounding structures. All but the 5 cases of lingual thyroid had an MR-demonstrable thyroid gland in the normal cervical position. Conclusion: A well-defined mass of low-intermediate T2 signal in the midline base of the tongue, neither with invasive tendency nor with a cervical thyroid gland in the normal site on MR imaging, may strongly indicate lingual thyroid

  8. MR imaging of the lingual thyroid. Comparison to other submucosal lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takashima, S.; Ueda, M.; Shibata, A.; Takayama, F.; Momose, M.; Yamashita, K. [Shinshu Univ. School of Medicine, Matsumoto (Japan). Dept. of Radiology

    2001-03-01

    Purpose: To study MR findings for clues to the diagnosis of lingual thyroid. Material and methods: MR findings and clinical and scintigraphic data of 5 cases of lingual thyroid were reviewed and the MR findings were compared to those of 16 cases of other submucosal lesions in the base of the tongue. Results: Four of the 5 patients with lingual thyroid were women and all had hypothyroidism. MR imaging depicted lingual thyroid in the midline in the base of the tongue (n=5) and additional ectopic thyroid glands in the floor of the mouth (n=2) or between the right and left sternohyoid muscles (n=1). Ectopic thyroid glands appeared isointense or hyperintense relative to muscle tissue on T1-weighted images and showed slight or fair contrast enhancement. All glands had low to intermediate T2 signal, which was also seen in 1 case of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and 1 case of adenoid cystic carcinoma. All ectopic thyroid glands had well-defined margins, whereas malignant tumors tended to have ill-defined margins and to invade the surrounding structures. All but the 5 cases of lingual thyroid had an MR-demonstrable thyroid gland in the normal cervical position. Conclusion: A well-defined mass of low-intermediate T2 signal in the midline base of the tongue, neither with invasive tendency nor with a cervical thyroid gland in the normal site on MR imaging, may strongly indicate lingual thyroid.

  9. Effect of intrusive and retraction forces in labial and lingual orthodontics: A finite element study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan Mascarenhas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Lingual orthodontics differs in biomechanics as compared to labial system and has biomechanical advantages. Although theoretical approaches have explained the differences between labial and lingual orthodontics, the finite element method (FEM may be better suited to analyze these differences. This study analyzes the effect of vertical and horizontal forces together on the tooth using FEM. Materials and Methods: An extracted right maxillary central incisor was radiographed and was used to create a solid model using ANSYS. The geometric model was converted into a finite element model with the help of ANSYS software. The model consists of 27,000 elements and 30,000 nodes. Two force vectors (vertical and horizontal were applied labially and lingually at 3 different heights- 4 mm, 5 mm and 6 mm from the incisal edge. Results: In the labial system, the net force vector passes through the center of resistance (CR and brings about intrusion. The net force vector in lingual orthodontics does not pass through the center of resistance and produces lingual tipping of the incisors. Conclusion: Intrusion and retraction forces bring about tipping of incisors in lingual orthodontics. The same amount of intrusion and retraction forces brings about intrusion of incisors in labial orthodontics. Therefore, direction and amount of forces should be carefully and judiciously applied after taking into consideration the resultant biomechanical differences.

  10. Prevention of lingual calculus formation with daily use of 6% H2O2/2% pyrophosphate whitening strips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, S; Barker, M L; Gerlach, R W; Putt, M S; Milleman, J L

    2009-01-01

    This randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted to evaluate whether daily use of a hydrogen peroxide/ pyrophosphate-containing antitartar whitening strip might safely yield clinical reductions in post-prophylaxis calculus accumulation. A three-month, randomized controlled trial was conducted to compare calculus accumulation with a daily 6% hydrogen peroxide/pyrophosphate strip versus regular brushing. After an eight-week run-in phase to identify calculus formers, a prophylaxis was administered, and 77 subjects were randomly assigned to daily strip or brushing only groups. All subjects received an anticavity dentifrice (Crest Cavity Protection) and manual brush for use throughout the three-month study; for subjects assigned to the experimental group, strip application was once daily for five minutes on the facial and lingual surfaces of the mandibular teeth. Efficacy was measured as mm calculus (VMI) before prophylaxis and after six and 12 weeks of treatment, while safety was assessed from examination and interview. Subjects ranged in age from 21-87 years, with groups balanced (p > 0.26) on pertinent demographic and behavioral parameters, and pre-prophylaxis calculus baseline mean scores (16.0 mm). At Week 6, calculus accumulation was lower in the strip group, with adjusted mean (SE) lingual VMI of 12.0 (0.87) for the strip group and 17.0 (0.88) for the brushing control. At Week 12, calculus accumulation was lower in the strip group, with adjusted mean (SE) lingual VMI of 14.3 (0.85) for the strip group and 17.2 (0.86) for the brushing control. Treatments differed significantly (p calculus accumulation at both time points. A total of three subjects (8%) in the strip group and two subjects (5%) in the brushing control had mild oral irritation or tooth sensitivity during treatment; no one discontinued early due to an adverse event. Daily use of hydrogen peroxide whitening strips with pyrophosphate reduced calculus formation by up to 29% versus regular brushing

  11. Reliability of the Hazelbaker Assessment Tool for Lingual Frenulum Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Jennifer P

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background About 3% of infants are born with a tongue-tie which may lead to breastfeeding problems such as ineffective latch, painful attachment or poor weight gain. The Hazelbaker Assessment Tool for Lingual Frenulum Function (HATLFF has been developed to give a quantitative assessment of the tongue-tie and recommendation about frenotomy (release of the frenulum. The aim of this study was to assess the inter-rater reliability of the HATLFF. Methods Fifty-eight infants referred to the Breastfeeding Education and Support Services (BESS at The Royal Women's Hospital for assessment of tongue-tie and 25 control infants were assessed by two clinicians independently. Results The Appearance items received kappas between about 0.4 to 0.6, which represents "moderate" reliability. The first three Function items (lateralization, lift and extension of tongue had kappa values over 0.65 which indicates "substantial" agreement. The four Function items relating to infant sucking (spread, cupping, peristalsis and snapback received low kappa values with insignificant p values. There was 96% agreement between the two assessors on the recommendation for frenotomy (kappa 0.92, excellent agreement. The study found that the Function Score can be more simply assessed using only the first three function items (ie not scoring the sucking items, with a cut-off of ≤4 for recommendation of frenotomy. Conclusion We found that the HATLFF has a high reliability in a study of infants with tongue-tie and control infants

  12. From the Problems of Dictionaries and Multi-lingual Corpora

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    Violetta Koseska-Toszewa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available From the Problems of Dictionaries and Multi-lingual Corpora The article describes the work on a number of dictionaries being developed by the Corpus Linguistics and Semantics Group of the Institute of Slavic PAS. They include “Contemporary Bulgarian-Polish Dictionary”, “Bulgarian-Polish Online Dictionary” and “Russian-Bulgarian-Polish Dictionary”. The dictionaries differ in the numbers of entries, as well as in the different degrees of their connection with parallel corpora being elaborated under the “Clarin” project. All the discussed dictionaries are similar with respect to their use of traditional, syntactic classifiers and of semantic classifiers, introduced for the first time in the existing lexicographical practice. Thanks to the “Polish-Bulgarian-Russian Corpus”, the Group has managed to verify the results of contrasting Polish and Bulgarian in the light of scope-based logical quantification. Thanks to the Russian material added to the trilingual corpus, the researchers have managed to confirm the fact that from the viewpoint of “incomplete quantification” Russian and Polish (synthetic languages behave similarly, and are opposed to the analytic Bulgarian.

  13. Towards cross-lingual alerting for bursty epidemic events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Nigel

    2011-10-06

    Online news reports are increasingly becoming a source for event-based early warning systems that detect natural disasters. Harnessing the massive volume of information available from multilingual newswire presents as many challanges as opportunities due to the patterns of reporting complex spatio-temporal events. In this article we study the problem of utilising correlated event reports across languages. We track the evolution of 16 disease outbreaks using 5 temporal aberration detection algorithms on text-mined events classified according to disease and outbreak country. Using ProMED reports as a silver standard, comparative analysis of news data for 13 languages over a 129 day trial period showed improved sensitivity, F1 and timeliness across most models using cross-lingual events. We report a detailed case study analysis for Cholera in Angola 2010 which highlights the challenges faced in correlating news events with the silver standard. The results show that automated health surveillance using multilingual text mining has the potential to turn low value news into high value alerts if informed choices are used to govern the selection of models and data sources. An implementation of the C2 alerting algorithm using multilingual news is available at the BioCaster portal http://born.nii.ac.jp/?page=globalroundup.

  14. Towards cross-lingual alerting for bursty epidemic events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collier Nigel

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Online news reports are increasingly becoming a source for event-based early warning systems that detect natural disasters. Harnessing the massive volume of information available from multilingual newswire presents as many challanges as opportunities due to the patterns of reporting complex spatio-temporal events. Results In this article we study the problem of utilising correlated event reports across languages. We track the evolution of 16 disease outbreaks using 5 temporal aberration detection algorithms on text-mined events classified according to disease and outbreak country. Using ProMED reports as a silver standard, comparative analysis of news data for 13 languages over a 129 day trial period showed improved sensitivity, F1 and timeliness across most models using cross-lingual events. We report a detailed case study analysis for Cholera in Angola 2010 which highlights the challenges faced in correlating news events with the silver standard. Conclusions The results show that automated health surveillance using multilingual text mining has the potential to turn low value news into high value alerts if informed choices are used to govern the selection of models and data sources. An implementation of the C2 alerting algorithm using multilingual news is available at the BioCaster portal http://born.nii.ac.jp/?page=globalroundup.

  15. One-stage dorsal lingual mucosal graft urethroplasty for the treatment of failed hypospadias repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Bin Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to retrospectively investigate the outcomes of patients who underwent one-stage onlay or inlay urethroplasty using a lingual mucosal graft (LMG after failed hypospadias repairs. Inclusion criteria included a history of failed hypospadias repair, insufficiency of the local skin that made a reoperation with skin flaps difficult, and necessity of an oral mucosal graft urethroplasty. Patients were excluded if they had undergone a failed hypospadias repair using the foreskin or a multistage repair urethroplasty. Between January 2008 and December 2012, 110 patients with failed hypospadias repairs were treated in our center. Of these patients, 56 underwent a one-stage onlay or inlay urethroplasty using LMG. The median age was 21.8 years (range: 4-45 years. Of the 56 patients, one-stage onlay LMG urethroplasty was performed in 42 patients (group 1, and a modified Snodgrass technique using one-stage inlay LMG urethroplasty was performed in 14 (group 2. The median LMG urethroplasty length was 5.6 ± 1.6 cm (range: 4-13 cm. The mean follow-up was 34.7 months (range: 10-58 months, and complications developed in 12 of 56 patients (21.4%, including urethrocutaneous fistulas in 7 (6 in group 1, 1 in group 2 and neourethral strictures in 5 (4 in group 1, 1 in group 2. The total success rate was 78.6%. Our survey suggests that one-stage onlay or inlay urethroplasty with LMG may be an effective option to treat the patients with less available skin after failed hypospadias repairs; LMG harvesting is easy and safe, irrespective of the patient′s age.

  16. Clinical and Phenomenological Characteristics of Patients with Task-Specific Lingual Dystonia: Possible Association with Occupation

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    Kazuya Yoshida

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundLingual dystonia is a subtype of oromandibular dystonia, which is a movement disorder characterized by involuntary sustained or intermittent contraction of the masticatory and/or tongue muscles. Lingual dystonia interferes with important daily activities, such as speaking, chewing, and swallowing, resulting in vocational and social disability.ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to investigate a possible relationship between occupation and the development of lingual dystonia.MethodsPhenomenological and clinical characteristics of 95 patients [53 females (55.8% and 42 males (44.2%, mean age 48.0 years] with task-specific, speech-induced lingual dystonia were analyzed. Structured interviews were carried out to obtain information regarding primary occupation, including overtime work and stress during work. The factors that might have influenced the development of lingual dystonia were estimated using multivariate logistic regression analysis of the 95 patients with lingual dystonia and 95 controls [68 females (71.6% and 27 males (28.4%, mean age 47.2 years] with temporomandibular disorders.ResultsOverall, 84.2% of the patients had regular occupations; 73.8% of the patients with regular occupations reported working overtime more than twice a week, and 63.8% of them experienced stress at the workplace. Furthermore, 82.1% of the patients had engaged in occupations that required them to talk to customers or other people under stressful situations over prolonged periods of time for many years (mean: 15.6 years. The most common occupation was sales representative (17.9%, followed by telephone operator (13.7%, customer service representative (10.5%, health care worker (9.5%, waiter or waitress (5.3%, receptionist (5.3%, and cashier (5.3%. Twenty-nine patients (30.5% had tardive lingual dystonia. Logistic regression analyses revealed that frequent requirements for professional speaking (p = 0.011, odds ratio: 5.66, high stress during work

  17. Fat digestion by lingual lipase: mechanism of lipolysis in the stomach and upper small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, T H; Hamosh, P; Hamosh, M

    1984-05-01

    Ten to 30% of dietary fat is hydrolyzed in the stomach by lingual lipase, an enzyme secreted from lingual serous glands. We investigated the substrate specificity of this enzyme as well as the potential of lingual lipase to act in the upper small intestine i.e., in the presence of bile salts and lecithin. The data presented show that partially purified preparations of rat lingual lipase and the lipase in gastric aspirates of newborn infants have identical substrate specificity: medium-chain triglycerides were hydrolyzed at rates 5-8-fold higher than long-chain triglycerides; the rat and human enzymes do not hydrolyze the ester bond of lecithin or cholesteryl-ester. In contrast to pancreatic lipase, the hydrolysis of triglycerides by lingual lipase is not inhibited by lecithin. But, similar to pancreatic lipase the activity of lingual lipase is inhibited by bile salts, the extent of inhibition varying with its nature and concentration. This inactivation is not prevented by colipase but is partially averted by lipids and protein, suggesting that lingual lipase can remain active in the duodenum. The pH optimum of the enzyme (2.2-6.5 in the rat and 3.5-6.0 in human gastric aspirates) is compatible with continued activity in the upper small intestine, especially during the neonatal period, when the luminal pH is under 6.5. The marked variation in lipase activity levels in gastric aspirates of newborn infants is probably due to individual variations in enzyme amounts. The characteristics of the lipase are however identical in infants with low, intermediate or high activity levels.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Comparison of speech performance in labial and lingual orthodontic patients: A prospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Ambesh Kumar; Rozario, Joe E.; Ganeshkar, Sanjay V.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The intensity and duration of speech difficulty inherently associated with lingual therapy is a significant issue of concern in orthodontics. This study was designed to evaluate and to compare the duration of changes in speech between labial and lingual orthodontics. Materials and Methods: A prospective longitudinal clinical study was designed to assess speech of 24 patients undergoing labial or lingual orthodontic treatment. An objective spectrographic evaluation of/s/sound was done using software PRAAT version 5.0.47, a semiobjective auditive evaluation of articulation was done by four speech pathologists and a subjective assessment of speech was done by four laypersons. The tests were performed before (T1), within 24 h (T2), after 1 week (T3) and after 1 month (T4) of the start of therapy. The Mann-Whitney U-test for independent samples was used to assess the significance difference between the labial and lingual appliances. A speech alteration with P appliance systems caused a comparable speech difficulty immediately after bonding (T2). Although the speech recovered within a week in the labial group (T3), the lingual group continued to experience discomfort even after a month (T4). PMID:25540661

  19. [Surgery of lower third molars and lesions of the lingual nerve].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiapasco, M; Pedrinazzi, M; Motta, J; Crescentini, M; Ramundo, G

    1996-11-01

    The authors describe a technical expedient applied during the removal of totally or partially impacted lower third molars, in order to prevent lingual nerve damage. EXPERIMENTAL ASSAY: Retrospective study. The sample includes 1835 extractions of totally or partially impacted lower third molars, performed on 1030 patients, 493 males and 537 females, aging between 12 and 72 years. All the operations were carried out under local anaesthesia with standardization of the surgical protocol. A mucoperiosteal paramarginal flap was used in case of germectomy, whereas a mucoperiosteal marginal flap with mesial releasing incision was used in case of fully mature teeth. Ostectomy and tooth sectioning were performed using a round and fissure bur respectively, assembled on a straight low-speed handpiece and under irrigation with sterile saline. The authors reported only one case of transient lingual nerve paresthesia (0.05%) which occurred in a 19-years old female presenting a totally impacted third molar mesial-lingual inclination. Symptoms disappeared spontaneously one week postoperatively. Therefore the overall incidence of permanent nerve damage was equal to 0%. The data reported in literature show a lingual nerve lesion incidence ranging between 0% and 22%. With this simple surgical expedient the incidence of permanent lingual damage was 0%. Thus, it is the authors' opinion that this simple expedient should be applied in all cases of impacted third molar removal.

  20. Increased Micronuclei Frequency in Oral and Lingual Epithelium of Treated Diabetes Mellitus Patients

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    Jesús Emilo Quintero Ojeda

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a metabolic disease characterized by persistent high levels of glucose in plasma. Chronic hyperglycemia is thought to increase oxidative stress and the formation of free radicals that in turn damage cells. Thus, we decided to determine the frequency of nuclear abnormalities in epithelial cells from cheek and tongue mucosa of DM patients with type 1 (DM1, treated only with insulin and type 2 (DM2, treated with metformin using the buccal micronucleus cytome (BMCyt assay. Micronuclei frequency in cheek epithelial cells was higher in both DM1 (0.75 ± 0.31, P<0.001 and DM2 (0.52 ± 0.27, P<0.001 patients, as compared to healthy controls (0.07  ±  0.06. Similarly, micronuclei frequency in tongue epithelium was increased in DM1 (0.81  ±  0.22, P<0.001 and DM2 (0.41  ±  0.21, P<0.001 groups, in comparison to controls (0.06  ±  0.05. Besides, we found a positive correlation between micronuclei frequency and the onset time of DM2 in both cheek (ρ = 0.69, P<0.001 and tongue epithelial cells (ρ = 0.71, P<0.001, but not with onset time of DM1 or age of the patients. Considering all this, we pose that BMCyt could serve as a fast and easily accessible test to assess genotoxic damage during dental visits of DM patients, helping to monitor their disease.

  1. Gray Matter Volume of the Lingual Gyrus Mediates the Relationship between Inhibition Function and Divergent Thinking

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    Lijie Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Although previous research provides converging evidence for the role of posterior regions of the brain (including temporal, occipital, and parietal regions involved in inhibition on creative thinking, it remains unclear as to how these regions influence individual differences in creative thinking. Thus, we explored the relationship between posterior regions (i.e., hippocampal, parahippocampal, lingual gyrus, precuneus, and cuneus , inhibition function, and divergent thinking in 128 healthy college students. The results revealed that lower inhibition was associated with larger gray matter volume (GMV in the lingual gyrus, which in turn was associated with higher divergent thinking. In addition, GMV in the lingual gyrus mediated the association between inhibition and divergent thinking. These results provide new evidence for the role of inhibition in creative thinking. Inhibition may affect the amount of information stored in long-term memory, which, in turn influences divergent thinking.

  2. Evaluation of 133Xe clearance curves in the study of lingual blood flow in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazekas, A.; Posch, E.; Harsing, L.

    1979-01-01

    Lingual blood flow was studied in dogs by the 133 Xe clearance technique under control conditions, during epinephrine infusion and in response to a combined treatment with regitin and epinephrine. The composite washout curves recorded during control conditions could be resolved into three monoexponential components. It is suggested that the steep initial slope (component I) is caused by the fraction of blood that perfuses the A-V anastomoses of the tongue. Components II and III appear to indicate the perfusion rate of lingual mucosa and musculature, respectively. The disappearance of component I due to the effect of epinephrine infusion might indicate the closure of arterio-venous anastomoses containing alpha receptors. Regitin pretreatment could prevent the closure of the arterio-venous anastomoses elicited by epinephrine infusion. The beta receptor stimulating activity of epinephrine might account for the augmentation of blood flow to lingual musculature. (orig.) 891 AJ/orig. 892 BRE [de

  3. Accelerated aging effects on surface hardness and roughness of lingual retainer adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramoglu, Sabri Ilhan; Usumez, Serdar; Buyukyilmaz, Tamer

    2008-01-01

    To test the null hypothesis that accelerated aging has no effect on the surface microhardness and roughness of two light-cured lingual retainer adhesives. Ten samples of light-cured materials, Transbond Lingual Retainer (3M Unitek) and Light Cure Retainer (Reliance) were cured with a halogen light for 40 seconds. Vickers hardness and surface roughness were measured before and after accelerated aging of 300 hours in a weathering tester. Differences between mean values were analyzed for statistical significance using a t-test. The level of statistical significance was set at P statistically significant (P statistically significant (P .05). Accelerated aging significantly increased the surface microhardness of both light-cured retainer adhesives tested. It also significantly increased the surface roughness of the Transbond Lingual Retainer.

  4. Morphology of the tongue and characteristics of lingual papillae in Cuniculus paca (Rodentia: Cuniculidae

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    André Luiz Quagliatto Santos

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the morphology of the tongue, its extrinsic muscles, and the characteristics of lingual papillae in Cuniculus paca. We used fifteen specimens from the Wild Animals Sector of Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP. In this species, the tongue is divided into three regions: root, body, and apex. The latter is delimited by the lingual frenum, which has the aspect of fibrous membrane. We also identified a median groove and a prominence on its dorsal surface. The extrinsic tongue muscles are the styloglossus, hyoglossus, genioglossus, geniohyoid, and milohyoid, the latter two are inserted into the hyoid apparatus. As for the presence of lingual papillae, we observed five papillae types in all specimens: filiform, fungiform, vallate, foliate, and conic. The filiform papillae are distributed throughout the apex surface and tongue body. They are caudally inclined throughout the body, until they are modified in the root region and form the conic papillae. The fungiform papillae are distributed in a large amount on the lingual apex, between the filiform papillae. This papilla type has a mushroom-like shape. Only two vallate papillae are located in the caudal portion of the lingual root, and they have an oval shape and are surrounded by a deep groove. The foliate papillae are observed in parallel grooves or slots located in the lateral portion of the tongue, between the vallate papillae and half of the intermolar prominence. In the tongue root, body, and apex we observed keratinized squamous stratified epithelium lining both the lingual papillae and the surface between them.

  5. Lingual fibrolipoma – a rare clinicopathological entity | Mungul ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lipoma is a relatively common benign tumour occurring at sites of the body which are rich in adipose tissue. Due to sparsity of adipose tissue within the oral cavity, lipoma rarely presents in this region. Fibrolipoma of the tongue is a rare lesion. There are only 14 cases reported in the literature. An 85-year-old patient ...

  6. Mini-screws, a viable adjunct along with Incognito lingual appliance: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Invisible orthodontics have been around for too long, and with the advent of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing technology appliances such as Incognito TM has made the whole treatment experience more pleasant and aesthetic. However, even in lingual orthodontics, biomechanics play the most important role, and the use of temporary anchorage devices (TADs has made the whole treatment more effective and efficient. This article focuses on cases where TADs in lingual appliances play a critical role in the treatment of various malocclusions.

  7. Short Lingual Osteotomy Using a Piezosurgery Ultrasonic Bone-Cutting Device During Sagittal Split Ramus Osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase-Koga, Yoko; Mori, Yoshiyuki; Kanno, Yuki; Hoshi, Kazuto; Takato, Tsuyoshi

    2015-10-01

    Short lingual osteotomy is a useful method for the performance of sagittal split ramus osteotomy involving interference between the proximal and distal bone fragments when lateral differences exist in the setback distance. However, this procedure occasionally results in abnormal fracture and nerve injury; expert surgical skill is thus required. We herein describe a novel technique involving the use of an ultrasonic bone-cutting device (Piezosurgery; Mectron Medical Technology, Carasco, Italy) for vertical osteotomy posterior to the mandibular foramen. Successful short lingual osteotomy was performed using this technique with avoidance of abnormal fracture and neurovascular bundle damage.

  8. Morphological, Histological and Histochemical Study of the Lingual Salivary Glands of the Little Egret, Egretta garzetta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almansour, Mansour I.; Jarrar, Bashir M.

    2007-01-01

    The present study aimed to study the morphological, histological and histochemical characterizations of the lingual salivary glands of the little egret, Egretta garzetta. The glands are composed of two posterior entities at the base of the tongue and one anterior entity on the dorsal surface of the free lingual part. These glands are made of mucoserous cells that elaborate sialomucins, sulfomucins and proteins, but they are devoid of glycogen and neutral mucosubstances. The findings of the present study were compared with those reported for other birds in correlation with their phylogeny and feeding habits. (author)

  9. Morphofunctional structure of the lingual papillae in three species of South American Camelids: Alpaca, guanaco, and llama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdoğan, Serkan; Villar Arias, Silvia; Pérez, William

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the anatomical and functional characteristics of the lingual papilla among the Camelidae. For this purpose, tongues of alpaca, guanaco, and llama were used. Numerous long and thin filiform papillae were located in the median groove and none were detected on the rest of the dorsal surface of the lingual apex in alpaca. Secondary papillae originated from the base of some filiform papillae on the ventral surface of alpaca tongue. The bases of some filiform papillae of the lateral surface of the lingual apex were inserted into conspicuous grooves in guanaco and tips of filiform papillae on the dorsal surface of the lingual body were ended by bifurcated apex. On the dorsal surface of the lingual apex of llama, there were no filiform papillae but there were numerous filiform papillae on both the lateral margins of the ventral surface of the lingual apex. Fungiform papillae were distributed randomly on dorsal lingual surface and ventral margins of the tongues of all camelid species. Lenticular papillae were located on the lingual torus and varied in size and topographical distribution for each species. Circumvallate papillae had irregular surfaces in llama and alpaca, and smooth surface in guanaco. In conclusion, llama and alpaca tongues were more similar to each other, and tongues of all camelid species displayed more similarities to those of Bactrian and dromedary camels in comparison with other herbivores and ruminants. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Survival of bonded lingual retainers with chemical or photo polymerization over a 2-year period: a single-center, randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandis, Nikolaos; Fleming, Padhraig S; Kloukos, Dimitrios; Polychronopoulou, Argy; Katsaros, Christos; Eliades, Theodore

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this trial was to compare the survival rates of mandibular lingual retainers bonded with either chemically cured or light-cured adhesive after orthodontic treatment. Patients having undergone orthodontic treatment at a private orthodontic office were randomly allocated to fixed retainers placed with chemically cured composite or light-cured composite. Eligibility criteria included no active caries, restorations, or fractures on the mandibular anterior teeth, and adequate oral hygiene. The main outcome was any type of first-time lingual retainer breakage; pattern of failure (adapted adhesive remnant index scores) was a secondary outcome. Randomization was accomplished with random permuted blocks of 20 patients with allocation concealed in sequentially numbered, opaque, sealed envelopes. Blinding was applicable for outcome assessment only. Patients were reviewed at 1, 3, and 6 months and then every 6 months after placement of the retainer until completion of the study. Data were analyzed using survival analysis including Cox regression; sensitivity analysis was carried out after data imputation for subjects lost to follow-up. Two hundred twenty patients (median age, 16 years; interquartile range, 2; range, 12-47 years) were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to either chemical or light curing. Baseline characteristics were similar between groups, the median follow-up period was 2.19 years (range, 0.003-3.64 years), and 16 patients were lost to follow-up. At a minimum follow-up of 2 years, 47 of 110 (42.7%) and 55 of 110 (50.0%) retainers had some type of failure with chemically cured and light-cured adhesive, respectively (log-rank test, P = 0.35). Data were analyzed on an intention-to-treat basis, and the hazard ratio (HR) was 1.15 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.88-1.70; P = 0.47). There was weak evidence that age is a significant predictor for lingual retainer failures (HR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.93-1.00; P = 0.08). Adhesive remnant index scoring was

  11. Analyses of anatomical relationship between mandibular third molar roots and variations in lingual undercut of mandible using cone-beam computed tomography

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    Sertac Aktop

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: The narrow angulation of the lingual balcony region and the relationship between roots and lingual soft tissues should be noted to avoid undesirable complication of displacement of a tooth or fragment into sublingual, submandibular, and pterygomandibular spaces. There was no relation in the floor of the mouth between the position of the impacted third molar roots and different lingual undercut angulation variations.

  12. Kinematic Investigation of Lingual Movement in Words of Increasing Length in Acquired Apraxia of Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartle-Meyer, Carly J.; Goozee, Justine V.; Murdoch, Bruce E.

    2009-01-01

    The current study aimed to use electromagnetic articulography (EMA) to investigate the effect of increasing word length on lingual kinematics in acquired apraxia of speech (AOS). Tongue-tip and tongue-back movement was recorded for five speakers with AOS and a concomitant aphasia (mean age = 53.6 years; SD = 12.60) during target consonant…

  13. Airway evaluation by indirect laryngoscopy in patients with lingual tonsillar hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Morillo, Jorge; Gómez-Diago, Lorena; Rodríguez-Gimillo, Pablo; Herrera-Collado, Raúl; Puchol-Castillo, Jorge; Mompó-Romero, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Prevalence of the lingual tonsillar hypertrophy is unknown but it is believed that its presence is associated with the difficult airway. To investigate this, indirect laryngoscopy was performed on patients in the preoperative evaluation and this pathology was diagnosed. The relationship with difficulty of viewing the larynx, intubation and ventilation, under general anaesthesia and using direct laryngoscopy, was then studied. We performed the demographic variable checks and tests for predicting difficult intubation (mouth opening, thyromental distance, cervical flexion-extension, neck thickness and Mallampati test), in the preoperative step on 300 patients who were going to be submitted to general anaesthesia. We then performed indirect laryngoscopy on them using a 70° rigid laryngoscope to ascertain the frequency of appearance of lingual tonsillar hypertrophy. Next, under general anaesthesia, we carried out direct laryngoscopy to verify whether there was difficulty in viewing the larynx and intubation and ventilation. We then investigated the association of demographic predictors of difficult intubation, including indirect laryngoscopy, with the presence of this condition. Prevalence of lingual tonsillar hypertrophy was 2%. No relationship between the appearance of this entity and the difficulty of viewing the larynx, intubation and ventilation was found. Only indirect laryngoscopy was linked to the appearance of this pathology. Lingual tonsillar hypertrophy is a relatively frequent disorder, whose presence is not usually associated with difficult airway. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  14. Survival of flexible, braided, bonded stainless steel lingual retainers : a historic cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foek, D. J. Lie Sam; Ozcan, M.; Verkerke, G. J.; Sandham, John; Dijkstra, P. U.

    The objectives of this study were to retrospectively evaluate the clinical survival rate of flexible, braided, rectangular bonded stainless steel lingual retainers, and to investigate the influence of gender, age of the patient, and operator experience on survival after orthodontic treatment at the

  15. Morphology of the dorsal lingual papillae in the newborn panther and Asian black bear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emura, S; Hayakawa, D; Chen, H; Shoumura, S

    2001-12-01

    The dorsal lingual surfaces of a newborn panther (Panthera pardus) and two newborn asian black bears (Selenarctos thibetanus) were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The tongues of the panther and asian black bear were about 40 mm in length and about 20 mm in width. Filiform, fungiform and vallate papillae were found. The filiform papillae were distributed over the entire dorsal surface of the tongue. In the panther, the filiform papillae on margin of the lingual apex were divided into two shapes which were horny or club-shaped papillae. The filiform papillae on the midportion were larger than those on the lateral region in size. The fungiform papillae also were divided into two shapes which were hemispherical or club-shaped papillae. In the asian black bear, the filiform papillae on the margin of the lingual apex were larger than those on margin of the panther tongue. The vallate papillae in the animals of two species were located on both sides of the posterior end of the lingual body. Each papilla was surrounded by a groove and crescent pad.

  16. Developing Bi-Lingual Skills for Translation through an Online Multimedia-Supported Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eser, Oktay; Saltan, Fatih; Ersanli, Ceylan Yangin; Erdem, Gamze

    2016-01-01

    Recent research shows that bi-lingual competence is one of the necessary skills that a translator needs in order to translate (PACTE, 2003). Apart from the mother tongue, a translator must have a command of other working languages. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the online multimedia-supported learning environment concerning…

  17. Computer tomography valorization of the vascular lingual channels in the jaw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costantino, Sebastian; Capiel, Carlos h; Bouzas, Carlos; Vuotto, Miguel; Ferrari, Daniela; Bazzano, Sebastian

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the frequency, location and position of vascular lingual channels of jaw by dental CT and classifying them based on its location. Material and methods: Dental CT of 100 consecutive patients were reevaluated as previous evaluation to the positioning of dental implants. They are classified by linking their location on the jaw with the number of tooth present or absent in that area. Results: All patients had at least one lingual vascular channel in the jaw; 36 patients presented two channels, eight patients presented three and a patient presented four. The more frequent location was between the sectors of the pieces 31 and 41. Sixteen patients showed two channels (superior and inferior) in that location. The second location by frequency was between pieces 32 and 33 (nine patients). The average distance between the lingual surface of the alveolar rim and the vascular channels was of 16 mm. Conclusion: the dental CT is an excellent method for the identification of the vascular lingual channels by its multiplanar capacity and appropriate image resolution. The characterization and classification of these conduits by a method of easy reading for the radiologists and the dentists assure a correct pre surgical valuation avoiding hemorrhages during the jaw perforation in the positioning of dental implants. (author) [es

  18. Lingual Pressure as a Clinical Indicator of Swallowing Function in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Laura L.; Morales, Sarah; Stierwalt, Julie A. G.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: Swallowing impairment, or dysphagia, is a known contributor to reduced quality of life, pneumonia, and mortality in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the contribution of tongue dysfunction, specifically inadequate pressure generation, to dysphagia in PD remains unclear. Our purpose was to determine whether lingual pressures in PD are (a)…

  19. Estimation of Cross-Lingual News Similarities Using Text-Mining Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhouhao Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, two estimation algorithms for extracting cross-lingual news pairs based on machine learning from financial news articles have been proposed. Every second, innumerable text data, including all kinds news, reports, messages, reviews, comments, and tweets are generated on the Internet, and these are written not only in English but also in other languages such as Chinese, Japanese, French, etc. By taking advantage of multi-lingual text resources provided by Thomson Reuters News, we developed two estimation algorithms for extracting cross-lingual news pairs from multilingual text resources. In our first method, we propose a novel structure that uses the word information and the machine learning method effectively in this task. Simultaneously, we developed a bidirectional Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM based method to calculate cross-lingual semantic text similarity for long text and short text, respectively. Thus, when an important news article is published, users can read similar news articles that are written in their native language using our method.

  20. One-stage lingual augmented urethroplasty in repair of distal penile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    E. Elsayed

    Abstract. Objectives: To evaluate the outcome of augmentation of shallow urethral plate by lingual graft in repair of distal penile hypospadias. Patients and methods: Between June 2008 and May 2011, the procedure was performed on 23 patients with mean age 2.3 years (range 1–3). All patients had distal penile ...

  1. Bi-Lingual Newspaper as an Expression of a Fake Multicultural Educational Policy in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratz, Lea; Reingold, Roni; Abuhatzira, Hannah

    2011-01-01

    The current paper analyzes a unique educational text that may be used to follow the educational policy of the State of Israel towards the community of Jewish immigrants from Ethiopia. The text which was analyzed was a bi-lingual newspaper called "Nugget News" which is published under the sponsorship of the Israeli Ministry of Education,…

  2. Caries outcomes after orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances: do lingual brackets make a difference?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, M.H.; Attin, R.; Schwestka-Polly, R.; Wiechmann, D.

    2010-01-01

    Orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances is considered a risk factor for the development of white spot caries lesions (WSL). Traditionally, brackets are bonded to the buccal surfaces. Lingual brackets are developing rapidly and have become more readily available. Buccal surfaces are considered to

  3. Lingual Thyroid Carcinoma: A Case Report and Review of Surgical Approaches in the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, William; Interval, Eric; Patel, Rusha

    2018-07-01

    Lingual thyroid cancer is a rare entity with a paucity of literature guiding methods of surgical treatment. Its location presents anatomic challenges with access and excision. We present a case of T4aN1b classical variant papillary thyroid carcinoma of the lingual thyroid that was removed without pharyngeal entry. We also present a review of the literature of this rare entity and propose a treatment algorithm to provide safe and oncologic outcomes. Our review of the literature found 28 case reports of lingual thyroid carcinoma that met search criteria. The trans-cervical/trans-hyoid approach was the most frequently used and provides safe oncologic outcomes. This was followed by the transoral approach and then lateral pharyngotomy. Complications reported across the series include 1 case of pharyngocutaneous fistula associated with mandibulotomy and postoperative respiratory distress requiring reintubation or emergent tracheostomy in 2 patients. The location of lingual thyroid carcinoma can be variable, and surgical management requires knowledge of adjacent involved structures to decrease the risk of dysphagia and airway compromise. In particular, for cases where there is extensive loss to swallowing mechanisms, laryngeal suspension can allow the patient to resume a normal diet after treatment.

  4. Scanning Electron Microscopic Structure of the Lingual Papillae of the Common Opossum (Didelphis marsupialis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Shigenori; Schraufnagel, Dean E.

    2005-08-01

    The mammalian tongue has evolved for specialized functions in different species. The structure of its papillae tells about the animal's diet, habit, and taxonomy. The opossum has four kinds of lingual papillae (filiform, conical, fungiform, vallate). Scanning electron microscopy of the external features, connective tissue cores, and corrosion casts of the microvasculature show the filiform papillae have a spearhead-like main process and spiny accessory processes around the apical part of the main process. The shape and number of both processes depend on their position on the tongue. On the apex, the main processes have shovel-like capillary networks and the accessory processes have small conical networks. On the lingual radix, the processes have small capillary loops. In the patch region, conical papillae have capillaries arranged as a full sail curving posteriorly. The fungiform papillae are scattered among the filiform papillae and have capillary baskets beneath each taste bud. Giant fungiform papillae on the tongue tip are three to four times larger than the ones on the lingual body. Capillaries of giant papillae form a fan-shaped network. The opossum has three vallate papillae arranged in a triangle. Their tops have secondary capillary loops but not their lateral surfaces. Mucosal folds on the posterolateral border have irregular, fingerlike projections with cylindrical capillary networks. These findings and the structure of the rest of the masticatory apparatus suggest the lingual papillae of opossum have kept their ancestral carnivorous features but also developed the herbivore characteristics of other marsupials.

  5. Lingual-Alveolar Contact Pressure during Speech in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Preliminary Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searl, Jeff; Knollhoff, Stephanie; Barohn, Richard J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This preliminary study on lingual-alveolar contact pressures (LACP) in people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) had several aims: (a) to evaluate whether the protocol induced fatigue, (b) to compare LACP during speech (LACP-Sp) and during maximum isometric pressing (LACP-Max) in people with ALS (PALS) versus healthy controls, (c)…

  6. Orthodontic Metallic Lingual Brackets: The Dark Side of the Moon of Bond Failures?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Francesca Sfondrini

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Lingual orthodontics, among both young and adult patients, increased in popularity during last years. The purposes of the present investigation were to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS values and Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI scores of different lingual brackets compared with a vestibular control bracket. One hundred bovine teeth were extracted and embedded in resin blocks. Four different lingual brackets (Idea, Leone; STB, Ormco; TTR, RMO; 2D, Forestadent and a vestibular control bracket (Victory, 3M were bonded to the bovine enamel surfaces and subsequently shear tested to failure utilizing a Universal Testing Machine. SBS values were measured. A microscopic evaluation was performed to obtain ARI scores. Statistical analysis was performed at a statistically significant level of p < 0.05 to determine significant differences in SBS values and ARI Scores. No statistically significant variations in SBS were reported among the different groups. Conversely, significant differences were shown in ARI scores among the various groups. Clinical relevance of the present study is that orthodontists can expect similar resistance to debonding forces from lingual appliances as with vestibular brackets.

  7. Influence of lingual bracket position on microbial and periodontal parameters in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Francesca Sfondrini

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Lingual orthodontics is becoming more popular in dental practice. The purpose of the present investigation was to compare plaque formation on teeth bonded with the same bracket onto buccal or lingual surface, with non-bonded control teeth, via an in vivo growth experiment over a 30-day period. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A randomized controlled trial with split-mouth design was set up enrolling 20 dental students. Within each subject sites with buccal and lingual brackets and control sites were followed. Clinical periodontal parameters (periodontal pocket depth: PPD; bleeding on probing: BOP were recorded at baseline and on days 1, 7 and 30. Microbiological samples were taken from the brackets and the teeth on days 1, 7 and 30 to detect colony-forming units (CFU. Total CFU, streptococci CFU and anaerobe CFU were measured. RESULTS: No significant differences (P>0.05 were found between buccal and lingual brackets in terms of clinical periodontal parameters and microbiological values. Conclusion: Bracket position does not have significant impact on bacterial load and on periodontal parameters.

  8. Modificaciones en la articulación de fones en pacientes con aparato ortodóncico fijo lingual Speech changes in lingual orthodontic appliances patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pía Villanueva

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: el presente trabajo pretende evaluar el efecto de los aparatos ortodóncicos fijos linguales en la articulación de los fones, en pacientes que hablen español chileno, y la adaptación a estos efectos dentro del primer mes de uso de los aparatos. MÉTODOS: la muestra consistió en 13 pacientes que acudieron para instalación de aparato ortodóncico fijo lingual. Se realizó un examen fonoarticulatorio en condiciones estandarizadas, en 5 momentos diferentes: previo a la instalación de los aparatos fijos (E0, inmediatamente después de realizada esta (E1, a las 24 horas posteriores (E2, a los 7 días (E3 y un mes después de la instalación (E4. Se determinaron los fones afectados en los distintos momentos de examen respecto a la línea base dada por el examen previo, y se analizó su resolución. RESULTADOS: se observaron cambios significativos en el punto de articulación de los fones [d], [s] y [r] Los fones [d] y [s] mostraron una resolución favorable dentro del primer mes de uso de los aparatos. El fone vibrante múltiple [r] no mostró una recuperación de la alteración una vez cumplido un mes de uso de los aparatos ortodóncicos. CONCLUSIONES: la instalación de aparato ortodóncico fijo lingual produce modificaciones en el punto de articulación de los fones consonánticos, las cuales tienden a mejorar dentro del primer mes de uso de los aparatos, con excepción del fone vibrante múltiple [r].PURPOSE: this study evaluated the effect of lingual orthodontics appliances on speech performance in native Chilean spanish speakers, and their adaptation to these effects during the first month. METHODS: phone production was recorded in a standardized test, in 13 patients with lingual orthodontic brackets, in 5 different times: before (E0, immediately after (E1, within 24 hours after (E2, within 7 days after (E3 and 1 month after (E4 the placement of fixed orthodontic lingual appliances, for assessment by speech professionals. RESULTS

  9. A comparison between two lingual orthodontic brackets in terms of speech performance and patients' acceptance in correcting Class II, Division 1 malocclusion: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samiha Haj-Younis

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To compare speech performance and levels of oral impairment between two types of lingual brackets. Methods: A parallel-group randomized controlled trial was carried out on patients with Class II, Division 1 malocclusion treated at the University of Hama School of Dentistry in Hama, Syria. A total of 46 participants (mean age: 22.3 ± 2.3 years with maxillary dentoalveolar protrusion were randomly distributed into two groups with 23 patients each (1:1 allocation ratio. Either STb (Ormco or 7th Generation (Ormco lingual brackets were applied. Fricative sound/s/ spectrograms were analyzed directly before intervention (T0, one week following premolar extraction prior to bracket placement (T1, within 24 hours of bracket bonding (T2, one month after (T3, and three months after (T4 bracket placement. Patients′ acceptance was assessed by means of standardized questionnaires. Results: After bracket placement, significant deterioration in articulation was recorded at all assessment times in the 7th Generation group, and up to T3 in the STb group. Significant intergroup differences were detected at T2 and T3. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups in reported tongue irritation levels, whereas chewing difficulty was significantly higher in the 7th Generation group one month after bracket placement. Conclusions: 7th Generation brackets have more interaction with sound production than STb ones. Although patients in both groups complained of some degree of oral impairment, STb appliances appeared to be more comfortable than the 7th Generation ones, particularly within the first month of treatment.

  10. A comparison between two lingual orthodontic brackets in terms of speech performance and patients' acceptance in correcting Class II, Division 1 malocclusion: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Younis, Samiha; Khattab, Tarek Z.; Hajeer, Mohammad Y.; Farah, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To compare speech performance and levels of oral impairment between two types of lingual brackets. Methods: A parallel-group randomized controlled trial was carried out on patients with Class II, Division 1 malocclusion treated at the University of Hama School of Dentistry in Hama, Syria. A total of 46 participants (mean age: 22.3 ± 2.3 years) with maxillary dentoalveolar protrusion were randomly distributed into two groups with 23 patients each (1:1 allocation ratio). Either STb (Ormco) or 7th Generation (Ormco) lingual brackets were applied. Fricative sound/s/ spectrograms were analyzed directly before intervention (T0), one week following premolar extraction prior to bracket placement (T1), within 24 hours of bracket bonding (T2), one month after (T3), and three months after (T4) bracket placement. Patients′ acceptance was assessed by means of standardized questionnaires. Results: After bracket placement, significant deterioration in articulation was recorded at all assessment times in the 7th Generation group, and up to T3 in the STb group. Significant intergroup differences were detected at T2 and T3. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups in reported tongue irritation levels, whereas chewing difficulty was significantly higher in the 7th Generation group one month after bracket placement. Conclusions: 7th Generation brackets have more interaction with sound production than STb ones. Although patients in both groups complained of some degree of oral impairment, STb appliances appeared to be more comfortable than the 7th Generation ones, particularly within the first month of treatment. PMID:27653268

  11. A comparison between two lingual orthodontic brackets in terms of speech performance and patients' acceptance in correcting Class II, Division 1 malocclusion: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Younis, Samiha; Khattab, Tarek Z; Hajeer, Mohammad Y; Farah, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    To compare speech performance and levels of oral impairment between two types of lingual brackets. A parallel-group randomized controlled trial was carried out on patients with Class II, Division 1 malocclusion treated at the University of Hama School of Dentistry in Hama, Syria. A total of 46 participants (mean age: 22.3 ± 2.3 years) with maxillary dentoalveolar protrusion were randomly distributed into two groups with 23 patients each (1:1 allocation ratio). Either STb (Ormco) or 7th Generation (Ormco) lingual brackets were applied. Fricative sound/s/ spectrograms were analyzed directly before intervention (T0), one week following premolar extraction prior to bracket placement (T1), within 24 hours of bracket bonding (T2), one month after (T3), and three months after (T4) bracket placement. Patients' acceptance was assessed by means of standardized questionnaires. After bracket placement, significant deterioration in articulation was recorded at all assessment times in the 7th Generation group, and up to T3 in the STb group. Significant intergroup differences were detected at T2 and T3. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups in reported tongue irritation levels, whereas chewing difficulty was significantly higher in the 7th Generation group one month after bracket placement. 7th Generation brackets have more interaction with sound production than STb ones. Although patients in both groups complained of some degree of oral impairment, STb appliances appeared to be more comfortable than the 7th Generation ones, particularly within the first month of treatment.

  12. A double blind randomized clinical trial comparing lingualized and fully bilateral balanced posterior occlusion for conventional complete dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Yasuhiko; Ikeguchi, Nobuyuki; Suzuki, Asako; Kuwashima, Azusa; Sakamoto, Ryuji; Matsumaru, Yuichi; Kimoto, Suguru; Iijima, Morio; Feine, Jocelyne Sylvia

    2017-04-01

    A lingualized occlusion (LO) for complete dentures reduces lateral inferences and occlusal force contacts and direction; thus, LO is theorized to be more suitable for patients with compromised ridges than fully bilateral balanced articulation (FBBA). However, no studies have yet provided evidence to support LO in edentate patients with compromised alveolar ridges. The purpose of this study was to compare LO and FBBA in edentulous individuals with compromised ridges. Sixty edentulous individuals were randomly allocated into groups and received dentures with either LO or FBBA. Following delivery, several denture-related satisfaction variables were measured using 100mm visual analogue scales; oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) was also assessed using the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP). Sub-group analyses of the effect of moderate and severe mandibular bone loss were also carried out. No significant differences were detected between LO and FBBA with the primary outcome. At 6 months, participants with severely atrophied mandibles and FBBA rated their satisfaction with retention of mandibular dentures significantly lower than those with LO (median LO: 86, FBBA: 58.5, p=0.03). They also had significantly lower OHRQoL for the domain of Pain (median LO: 4, FBBA: 5, p=0.02). General satisfaction and total OHIP scores significantly improved between baseline and 6 months only for the LO subjects with severely atrophied mandibles (satisfaction: p=0.003, OHIP total score: p=0.0007). The results indicate that the LO occlusal scheme with hard resin artificial teeth is more efficient for patients with severely resorbed mandibular ridges. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Eagle's syndrome associated with lingual nerve paresthesia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhiwei; Bao, Haihong; Zhang, Li; Hua, Zequan

    2014-05-01

    Eagle's syndrome is characterized by a variety of symptoms, including throat pain, sensation of a foreign body in the pharynx, dysphagia, referred otalgia, and neck and throat pain exacerbated by head rotation. Any styloid process longer than 25 mm should be considered elongated and will usually be responsible for Eagle's syndrome. Surgical resection of the elongated styloid is a routine treatment and can be accomplished using a transoral or an extraoral approach. We report a patient with a rare giant styloid process that was approximately 81.7 mm. He complained of a rare symptom: hemitongue paresthesia. After removal of the elongated styloid process using the extraoral approach, his symptoms, including the hemitongue paresthesia, were alleviated. We concluded that if the styloid process displays medium to severe elongation, the extraoral approach will be appropriate. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Treatment of lingual traumatic ulcer accompanied with fungal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sella Sella

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traumatic ulcer is a common form of ulceration occured in oral cavity caused by mechanical trauma, either acute or chronic, resulting in loss of the entire epithelium. Traumatic ulcer often occurs in children that are usually found on buccal mucosa, labial mucosa of upper and lower lip, lateral tongue, and a variety of areas that may be bitten. To properly diagnose the ulcer, dentists should evaluate the history and clinical description in detail. If the lesion is allegedly accompanied by other infections, such as fungal, bacterial or viral infections, microbiological or serological tests will be required. One of the initial therapy given for fungal infection is nystatin which aimed to support the recovery and repair processes of epithelial tissue in traumatic ulcer case. Purpose: This case report is aimed to emphasize the importance of microbiological examination in suspected cases of ulcer accompanied with traumatic fungal infection. Case: A 12-year-old girl came to the clinic of Pediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Indonesia on June 9, 2011 accompanied with her mother. The patient who had a history of geographic tongue came with complaints of injury found in the middle of the tongue. The main diagnosis was ulcer accompanied with traumatic fungal infection based on the results of swab examination. Case management: This traumatic ulcer case was treated with Dental Health Education, oral prophylaxis, as well as prescribing and usage instructions of nystatin. The recovery and repair processes of mucosal epithelium of the tongue then occured after the use of nystatin. Conclusion: It can be concluded that microbiological examination is important to diagnose suspected cases of ulcer accompanied with traumatic fungal infection. The appropriate treatment such as nystatin can be given for traumatic fungal infection.Latar belakang: Ulkus traumatic merupakan bentuk umum dari ulserasi rongga mulut yang terjadi akibat trauma

  15. A Method for Direct Fabrication of a Lingual Splint for Management of Pediatric Mandibular Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo P. Romeo, DDS, MD

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Pediatric mandibular fractures have successfully been managed in various ways. The use of a lingual splint is one such option. The typical indirect method for acrylic lingual splint fabrication involves obtaining dental impressions. Dental models are produced from those impressions so that model surgery may be performed. The splint is then made on those models using resin powder and liquid monomer in a wet laboratory and transferred to the patient. Obvious limitations to this technique exist for both patient and operator. We present a technique for direct, intraoperative, fabrication of a splint using commercially available light-cured material that avoids some of the shortcomings of the indirect method. Recommendations are made based on available material safety information.

  16. Customized lingual bracket system and skeletal anchorage system for open bite correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Inami

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We treated a female patient with open bite and high-angle Class II Division 2 malocclusion using fully customized lingual appliances, orthodontic anchor screws (OAS, and a skeletal anchorage system (SAS. By carefully controlling torque, anchorage, and vertical skeletal and dental factors, we were able to obtain proper anterior coupling. Even after the retention phase of treatment, the occlusion was maintained, indicating that we provided proper treatment according to the properly designed treatment plan. This also indicates that cases with an extremely high level of difficulty, as in the present case with high-angle retrognathic mandible and open bite, can be treated by combining the Incognito appliance (a fully customized lingual bracket appliance with a SAS and OAS.

  17. The nance lingual arch: an auxiliary device in solving lower anterior crowding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Renato Rodrigues de; Oltramari-Navarro, Paula Vanessa Pedron; Almeida, Marcio Rodrigues de; Conti, Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira; Navarro, Ricardo de Lima; Pacenko, Murilo Rizental

    2011-01-01

    After exfoliation of the primary incisors and eruption of the permanent incisors, the dentist has the opportunity of observing closely the beginning of occlusal changes. In several cases, alterations, such as lower anterior crowding, can be prevented and treated with proper follow-up. In the mixed dentition, one of the mechanisms for maintaining space and favoring dental alignment is to preserve leeway space before permanent second molar irruption. Among the devices with this function, the Nance lingual arch helps maintaining the position of the permanent mandibular molars and incisors after a premature loss of the primary canines. This paper describes the applicability of Nance lingual arch for preserving leeway space, thus contributing for correction of lower anterior crowding.

  18. Torque Control During Intrusion on Upper Central Incisor in Labial and Lingual bracket System - A 3D Finite Element Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pol, Tejas R; Vandekar, Meghna; Patil, Anuradha; Desai, Sanjana; Shetty, Vikram; Hazarika, Saptarshi

    2018-01-01

    The aim of present study was to investigate the difference of torque control during intrusive force on upper central incisors with normal, under and high torque in lingual and labial orthodontic systems through 3D finite element analysis. Six 3D models of an upper right central incisor with different torque were designed in Solid Works 2006. Software ANSYS Version 16.0 was used to evaluate intrusive force on upper central incisor model . An intrusive force of 0.15 N was applied to the bracket slot in different torque models and the displacements along a path of nodes in the upper central incisor was assessed. On application of Intrusive force on under torqued upper central incisor in Labial system produce labial crown movement but in Lingual system caused lingual movement in the apical and incisal parts. The same intrusive force in normal-torqued central incisor led to a palatal movement in apical and labial displacement of incisal edge in Lingual system and a palatal displacement in apical area and a labial movement in the incisal edge in Labial systemin. In overtorqued upper central incisor, the labial crown displacement in Labial system is more than Lingual system. In labial and lingual system on application of the same forces in upper central incisor with different inclinations showed different responses. The magnitudes of torque Loss during intrusive loads in incisors with normal, under and over-torque were higher in Labial system than Lingual orthodontic appliances. Key words: FEM, lingual orthodontics, intrusion, torque control, labial bracket systems.

  19. Comparative evaluation of sagittal anchorage loss in lingual and labial appliances during space closure: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivanand Venkatesh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this investigation was to assess and compare the anchorage loss between labial and lingual appliance systems during space closure. Materials and Methods: Twenty subjects were part of the study among which 10 subjects (mean age 21 ± 3.6 years were treated using lingual appliance system (0.018" slot-STb™ and 10 subjects (mean age 19 ± 6.1 years were treated using labial preadjusted edgewise appliance system (0.018" slot-MBT™ . First premolar extractions were performed to enable retraction of anterior teeth. Lateral cephalometric radiographs were taken at two intervals, before starting space closure and after space closure that were connoted as T0 and T1 and were analyzed using the method described by Pancherz to measure anchorage loss. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC was used to evaluate intraexaminer reliability of the measurements. Student′s t-test was performed to verify any statistical significant correlation between the labial and lingual appliance systems. Statistical differences were determined at the 95% confidence level (P < 0.05. Results: The results showed that all ICC for lingual and labial group were ≥0.90 showing good repeatability of the measurements. Mean anchorage loss of 1.238 ± 0.17 mm in lingual appliance system and an anchorage loss of 2.06 ± 0.39 mm occurred with the labial appliance system. On the comparison between the two appliance systems, lingual appliance demonstrated a significantly lesser anchorage loss than did the labial appliance. Interpretation and Conclusion: This prospective study concludes with the fact that lingual appliance provided better anchorage control than labial appliance during space closure. Use of lingual appliance could be considered in critical anchorage cases when compared with labial appliance.

  20. Precision multiloop (PM Design with space closing circles for lingual orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mugdha P Mankar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The proficiency of ancient orthodontics has been benefitted colossally and is being continually promoted over the present, by use of multiple loop wires designed for correction of dentoalveolar malocclusions. The presented discussion provides an insight into a simple, frictionless biomechanical concept of anterior space closure in lingual orthodontics by means of precision multiloop design with incorporated space closing circles. A multiple loop wire design has been demonstrated where the entire interbracket distance is used as loop area.

  1. Precision multiloop (PM Design) with space closing circles for lingual orthodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Mugdha P Mankar; Achint Chachada; Harish Atram; Avanti Kulkarni

    2016-01-01

    The proficiency of ancient orthodontics has been benefitted colossally and is being continually promoted over the present, by use of multiple loop wires designed for correction of dentoalveolar malocclusions. The presented discussion provides an insight into a simple, frictionless biomechanical concept of anterior space closure in lingual orthodontics by means of precision multiloop design with incorporated space closing circles. A multiple loop wire design has been demonstrated where the ent...

  2. Scanning Electron Microscopic Study of the Lingual Papillae in the Anatolian Water Buffalo

    OpenAIRE

    Can, M; Atalgin, S. H

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the surface structure of the lingual papillae in Anatolian Water Buffaloes using SEM. Six male Anatolian Water Buffaloes were used. Filiform, lentiform and conical papillae were determined three types as mechanical papillae. Fungiform and vallate papillae were observed two types as gustatory papillae on the tongue in Anatolian Water Buffalo. The filiform papillae were observed on the apex and body of the tongue, besides randomly identified lateral sur...

  3. Morphology of the Lingual Papillae in the Least Weasel (Mustela nivalis)

    OpenAIRE

    El Bakary, Neveen E. R; Emura, Shoichi

    2016-01-01

    The dorsal surface structure of the lingual papillae in the least weasel was compared with that of other carnivorous mammalian species. Two types of mechanical papillae (filiform and conical) and two types of gustatory papillae (fungiform and vallate) were observed. The filiform papillae had secondary processes. Rarely conical papillae were observed. A few taste buds were seen on the surfaces of the fungiform papillae. The four vallate papillae were located on both sides of the posterior end ...

  4. Readings on American Society. The Audio-Lingual Literary Series II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Shigeo; Ney, James W.

    This text contains 11 lessons based on an adaptation of the 1964 essay "Automation: Road to Lifetime Jobs" by A.H. Raskin and 14 lessons based on an adaptation of John Fischer's 1948 essay "Unwritten Rules of American Politics." The format of the book and the lessons is the same as that of the other volumes of "The Audio-Lingual Literary Series."…

  5. A comparison of pain experienced by patients treated with labial and lingual orthodontic appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Abby K Y; McGrath, Colman; Wong, Ricky W K; Wiechmann, D; Rabie, A Bakr M

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this prospective longitudinal study was to compare pain experiences among Chinese adult patients treated with labial and lingual orthodontic appliances. Sixty patients, 30 with labial appliances (18 females and 12 males, mean age 20.33 years, SD +/- 4.205) and 30 with lingual appliances (22 females and 8 males, mean age 21.63 years, SD +/- 2.236), rated their overall pain experience on a 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS) at three time points: 1 week (T(1)), 1 month (T(2)), and 3 months (T(3)) after bracket placement. In addition, on a separate 100 mm VAS, they rated their pain experience at the locations of the tongue, lips, cheeks, gums, face, and jaw at T(1), T(2), and T(3). Changes in pain VAS were conducted using Friedman analysis of variance, area under the curve (AUC) analysis and the data were compared using a t-test. There was no significant difference in global ratings of pain among those treated with labial or lingual appliances (P > 0.05). Among both groups, global ratings of pain decreased over the study period (P appliances reported higher ratings of tongue pain (P appliances reported higher ratings of lip (P appliances rate similarly the level of overall pain they experience during treatment. Ratings of overall pain experienced decreased for both treatment groups with time. However, ratings of pain differed at various sites with respect to the type of orthodontic appliance. These findings have implications in informing patients' treatment decision-making processes regarding labial and lingual appliances and in the management of discomfort associated with different treatment modalities.

  6. Mental foramen and lingual vascular canals of mandible on MDCT images: anatomical study and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Direk, Filiz; Uysal, Ismihan Ilknur; Kivrak, Ali Sami; Fazliogullari, Zeliha; Unver Dogan, Nadire; Karabulut, Ahmet Kagan

    2018-03-01

    The mental foramen and lingual vascular canals are related to vessels and nerves in the mandibular body. The aim of the present study was to determine the number and location of these structures and to make measurements of them. The archived Multidetector Computed Tomography images of 100 adult (15- to 70-year-old) patients were evaluated retrospectively. The diameters of the mental foramens and their distances from the front, back, upper and lower reference points were measured. The distribution of mental foramens with respect to the teeth was also researched. The presence of lingual vascular canals, and the number of median and lateral canals was determined, and the length of the median lingual vascular canals measured. All measurement parameters were analyzed by gender, side and age group. Eleven patients demonstrated a total of 15 accessory mental foramen. Median lingual vascular canals were observed in 100% of cases, with lateral lingual vascular canals determined in 32%. Significant differences were observed in the results of different gender groups (P mental foramen was determined mostly in males, and unilaterally on the right side; also, the distances of mental foramen, except the distance from the back border of the mandible (P mental foramen, as well as the presence, position and size of lingual vascular canals can be clearly investigated by multidetector computed tomography. A preoperative knowledge of the positions of neurovascular and bone structures is very important for preventing complications that may occur during or after operations.

  7. Induction of ectopic taste buds by SHH reveals the competency and plasticity of adult lingual epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, David; Seidel, Kerstin; Salcedo, Ernesto; Ahn, Christina; de Sauvage, Frederic J.; Klein, Ophir D.; Barlow, Linda A.

    2014-01-01

    Taste buds are assemblies of elongated epithelial cells, which are innervated by gustatory nerves that transmit taste information to the brain stem. Taste cells are continuously renewed throughout life via proliferation of epithelial progenitors, but the molecular regulation of this process remains unknown. During embryogenesis, sonic hedgehog (SHH) negatively regulates taste bud patterning, such that inhibition of SHH causes the formation of more and larger taste bud primordia, including in regions of the tongue normally devoid of taste buds. Here, using a Cre-lox system to drive constitutive expression of SHH, we identify the effects of SHH on the lingual epithelium of adult mice. We show that misexpression of SHH transforms lingual epithelial cell fate, such that daughter cells of lingual epithelial progenitors form cell type-replete, onion-shaped taste buds, rather than non-taste, pseudostratified epithelium. These SHH-induced ectopic taste buds are found in regions of the adult tongue previously thought incapable of generating taste organs. The ectopic buds are composed of all taste cell types, including support cells and detectors of sweet, bitter, umami, salt and sour, and recapitulate the molecular differentiation process of endogenous taste buds. In contrast to the well-established nerve dependence of endogenous taste buds, however, ectopic taste buds form independently of both gustatory and somatosensory innervation. As innervation is required for SHH expression by endogenous taste buds, our data suggest that SHH can replace the need for innervation to drive the entire program of taste bud differentiation. PMID:24993944

  8. Neurotrophins and their receptors in human lingual tonsil: an immunohistochemical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artico, Marco; Bronzetti, Elena; Felici, Laura M; Alicino, Valentina; Ionta, Brunella; Bronzetti, Benedetto; Magliulo, Giuseppe; Grande, Claudia; Zamai, Loris; Pasquantonio, Guido; De Vincentiis, Marco

    2008-11-01

    Lymphoid organs are supplied by many nerve endings associated with different kinds of cells and macrophages. The role of this innervation on the release of locally active molecules is still unclear. Lingual tonsils belong to Waldeyer's Ring, in close association with palatine tonsils and nasopharyngeal (adenoids) tonsils, thus constituting part of NALT (nasal-associated lymphoid tissue) together with the tubal tonsils and lateral pharyngeal bands. In this study, we focused our attention on the expression of some neurotrophins (NTs) and their high- and low-affinity receptors in human lingual tonsils. Light immunohistochemistry showed that human tonsillar samples were generally positive for all the NTs investigated (NGF, BDNF, NT-3, NT-4) and their receptors (TrKA, TrKB, TrKC and p75) with some different expression levels. NGF and TrKC were strongly expressed in macrophages, but weakly in lymphocytes. However, BDNF and TrKB was highly expressed in lymphocytes and weaker in macrophages. The low-affinity receptor for NGF, p75, was mainly moderately expressed in the analysed samples. These results suggest the presence of a pattern of neurotrophin innervation in the human lingual tonsil which may play a role in sustaining inflammatory conditions and in modulating a close interaction between the nervous system and the different immune cellular subtypes.

  9. Radioelectric asymmetric brain stimulation and lingual apex repositioning in patients with atypical deglutition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castagna A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Alessandro Castagna1, Salvatore Rinaldi1,2, Vania Fontani1, Piero Mannu11Rinaldi-Fontani Institute, 2School of Occupational Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, ItalyBackground: Atypical deglutition is exacerbated by stress and anxiety. Several therapeutic approaches have been employed to treat stress and anxiety disorders, ranging from typical psychopharmacological strategies to novel physical protocols, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation and radioelectric asymmetric conveyor (REAC stimulation. The purpose of the present study was to test the efficacy of REAC brain stimulation in atypical deglutition.Methods: The position of the lingual apex (Payne method, pattern of free deglutition, and subjective and objective impression of deglutition were evaluated in 128 outpatients suffering from atypical deglutition. Deglutition testing consisted of an operator holding down the lower lip, hence counteracting the strength exerted by the orbicularis muscle. All subjects were treated using two REAC brain stimulation protocols. Patients were assessed before treatment, immediately after treatment, and three months following the last cycle of REAC therapy.Results: REAC stimulation led to an improvement in positioning of the lingual apex and a significant decrease of muscle involvement in all patients immediately after REAC treatment, and the improvement was maintained at three-month follow-up.Conclusion: In the present study, the REAC therapeutic protocols led to normalization in lingual apex positioning and significant improvement in swallowing in all participants suffering from atypical deglutition.Keywords: atypical deglutition, stress, anxiety, radioelectric asymmetric brain stimulation

  10. Fast-flow lingual vascular anomalies in the young patient: is imaging diagnostic?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khong, Pek-Lan; Burrows, Patricia E.; Kozakewich, Harry P.; Mulliken, John B.

    2003-01-01

    To describe the imaging findings (MR imaging and angiography) of high-flow vascular anomalies of the tongue, hemangiomas and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), with emphasis on the discrepant imaging findings in lingual AVMs. Retrospective review of clinical records, histologic reports and imaging studies of five consecutive patients with high-flow lingual vascular anomalies. One patient had hemangioma (aged 1 month) and four patients had AVMs (aged 15 months, 6, 24, and 33 years). Diagnosis was made on the basis of histology in four lesions and was based on typical clinical history in one lesion. MR imaging and angiographic findings of the hemangioma were typical, but similar findings of focal hyperintense mass on T2-weighted images and angiographic stain were seen in three AVMs (patients aged 15 months, 6 and 33 years). On angiography, there was no nidus or direct arteriovenous (AV) shunting in one AVM (patient aged 15 months). The fourth AVM had typical MR imaging and angiographic findings. The imaging findings in lingual AVMs can be atypical or inconclusive and can mimic hemangiomas, especially in the young patient. Since treatment depends on accurate diagnosis, biopsy may be necessary for lesions with inconclusive imaging findings. (orig.)

  11. The study of comminution behavior of food on buccal and lingual side during mastication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Kumiko; Miura, Hiroyuki; Kato, Hitoshi; Yoshida, Keiichi; Tanaka, Yoshihiro

    2009-12-01

    In this study, we observed comminution behavior of food on buccal and lingual side by sieve method. Six dentate subjects participated in this study. Peanuts were used as the test food and chewed for 1-8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22 and 24 strokes on their preferred chewing side. Peanuts were gathered separately from buccal and lingual sides after varying number of chewing strokes. The crushed peanuts were sieved through a stack of eight level sieves (0.85 to 5.6mm). The comminution of coarse particles above 4.75 mm was almost finished within 10 strokes. The dynamic change in the median particle size also disappeared about 10 strokes. This suggested that we should pay attention to the initial phase of the chewing when we observed about mastication. As a result, comminution behavior of lingual coarse particles better conformed to fluctuation of median particle sizes of whole mouth, expressing masticatory performance precisely, than that of buccal coarse particles.

  12. Congenital choristomas of the oral cavity in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Raymond L; Ozolek, John A; Branstetter, Barton F; Mehta, Deepak K; Simons, Jeffrey P

    2011-10-01

    To review our institutional experience with oral cavity choristomas in children. Retrospective case series and medical record review. Medical records including clinic notes, operative reports, radiologic studies, and pathology specimens were reviewed. All imaging studies and pathology material were reviewed by a head and neck radiologist and pediatric pathologist, respectively. Sixteen patients (10 males and 6 females) with congenital oral cavity choristomas were identified. Mean age at diagnosis was 1.8 months. Location of the lesions included tongue (n = 9) and floor of mouth (n = 7). Preoperative imaging included magnetic resonance imaging (n = 6), computed tomography (n = 5), plain radiography (n = 1), and no imaging (n = 4). Radiographically, the lesions were consistently lobular with well-defined margins, but other imaging features often mimicked other masses that can arise in the tongue and floor of mouth. Symptoms were present in five of 16 patients and included difficulty feeding, swelling with upper respiratory infection, and partial airway obstruction. Complete surgical excision was performed in 15 of 16 patients; mean age at the time of surgery was 12.7 months. One patient underwent marsupialization. No complications were noted perioperatively. No recurrences of choristoma were seen. On histologic examination, the predominant component was cystic with cyst linings of respiratory epithelium (n = 5), gastric (foveolar) epithelium (n = 1), or both (n = 10). This study supports surgical excision as an effective intervention for children with oral cavity choristomas. Because the etiology of these cysts is unknown and diagnostic terminology is widely variable, we propose a more descriptive diagnosis based on the histology (i.e., lingual choristoma [or lingual developmental cyst] with respiratory epithelium or lingual choristoma [or lingual developmental cyst] with gastric epithelium). Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological

  13. Effectiveness of the bucco-lingual technique within a school-based supervised toothbrushing program on preventing caries: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frazão Paulo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Supervised toothbrushing programs using fluoride dentifrice have reduced caries increment. However there is no information about the effectiveness of the professional cross-brushing technique within a community intervention. The aim was to assess if the bucco-lingual technique can increase the effectiveness of a school-based supervised toothbrushing program on preventing caries. Methods A randomized double-blinded controlled community intervention trial to be analyzed at an individual level was conducted in a Brazilian low-income fluoridated area. Six preschools were randomly assigned to the test and control groups and 284 five-year-old children presenting at least one permanent molar with emerged/sound occlusal surface participated. In control group, oral health education and dental plaque dying followed by toothbrushing with fluoride dentifrice supervised directly by a dental assistant, was developed four times per year. At the remaining school days the children brushed their teeth under indirect supervising of the teachers. In test group, children also underwent a professional cross-brushing on surfaces of first permanent molar rendered by a specially trained dental assistant five times per year. Enamel and dentin caries were recorded on buccal, occlusal and lingual surfaces of permanent molars during 18-month follow-up. Exposure time of surfaces was calculated and incidence density ratio was estimated using Poisson regression model. Results Difference of 21.6 lesions per 1,000 children between control and test groups was observed. Among boys whose caries risk was higher compared to girls, incidence density was 50% lower in test group (p = 0.016. Conclusion Modified program was effective among the boys. It is licit to project a relevant effect in a larger period suggesting in a broader population substantial reduction of dental care needs. Trial registration ISRCTN18548869.

  14. Tensile test and interface retention forces between wires and composites in lingual fixed retainers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolone, Maria Giacinta; Kaitsas, Roberto; Obach, Patricia; Kaitsas, Vasilios; Benedicenti, Stefano; Sorrenti, Eugenio; Barberi, Fabrizio

    2015-06-01

    In daily orthodontic clinical practice retention is very important, and lingual retainers are part of this challenge. The failure of lingual retainers may be due to many factors. The aim of this study was to assess the retention forces and mechanical behavior of different types of wires matched with different kinds of composites in lingual retainers. A tensile test was performed on cylindrical composite test specimens bonded to orthodontic wires. The specimens were constructed using four different wires: a straight wire (Remanium .016×.022″ Dentaurum), two round twisted wires (Penta One .0215″ Masel, Gold Penta Twisted .0215″ Gold N'braces) and a rectangular braided wire (D-Rect .016×.022″ Ormco); and three composites: two micro-hybrids (Micro-Hybrid Enamel Plus HFO Micerium, and Micro-Hybrid SDR U Dentsply) and a micro-nano-filled composite (Micro-Nano-Filled Transbond LR 3M). The test was performed at a speed of 10mm/min on an Inström device. The wire was fixed with a clamp. The results showed that the bonding between wires and composites in lingual fixed retainers seemed to be lowest for rectangular smooth wires and increased in round twisted and rectangular twisted wires where the bonding was so strong that the maximum tension/bond strength was greater than the ultimate tensile strength of the wire. The highest values were in rectangular twisted wires. Concerning the composites, hybrid composites had the lowest interface bonding values and broke very quickly, while the nano- and micro-composites tolerated stronger forces and displayed higher bonding values. The best results were observed with the golden twisted wire and reached 21.46 MPa with the Transbond composite. With the rectangular braided wire the retention forces were so high that the Enamel Plus composite fractured when the load exceeded 154.6 N/MPa. When the same wire was combined with the Transbond LR either the wire or the composite broke when the force exceeded 240 N. The results of this

  15. Avaliação do pH da saliva e da saburra lingual antes e após a utilização de soluções enxaguantes orais e sua relação com parâmetros de halitose

    OpenAIRE

    Elen de Souza Tolentino

    2009-01-01

    A relação entre halitose, pH da saliva e da saburra lingual frente ao uso de enxaguantes orais ainda não é totalmente conhecido. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar o pH da saliva e da saburra lingual em pacientes com saúde oral íntegra e halitose fisiológica através de um pHmetro analógico e um digital e de fitas indicadoras de pH, antes e imediatamente após utilização de diferentes enxaguantes orais e 30 minutos após o bochecho; avaliar o pH dos diferentes anti-sépticos; avaliar se há difer...

  16. Three-dimensional computed tomographic evaluation of bilateral sagittal split osteotomy lingual fracture line and le fort I pterygomaxillary separation in orthognathic surgery using cadaver heads: ultrasonic osteotome versus conventional saw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammous, Sophie; Dupont, Quentin; Gilles, Roland

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe the quality of the fracture line on the lingual side of the mandible after sagittal split osteotomy and the quality of pterygomaxillary separation after Le Fort I osteotomy using the BoneScalpel ultrasonic osteotome. Bimaxillary procedures, according to the standard protocol, were performed using 10 fresh cadaver heads. The ultrasonic osteotome was used in the study group, and a reciprocating saw was used in the control group. Three-dimensional reconstructions of postoperative computed tomographic scans were obtained. The lingual ramus fracture pattern and the pterygomaxillary separation pattern were observed, classified, and compared. Postoperative dissections of the skulls were performed to assess the integrity of the infra-alveolar nerve and the descending palatine artery. No significant differences were found in the cutting time of bone between the BoneScalpel and the sagittal saw. Of the sagittal split osteotomies in the study group, 90% showed a good pattern (vertical pattern of fracture line extending to the inferior border of the mandible running behind the mandibular canal) compared with 50% of the sagittal split osteotomies in the control group. Ideal separation of the pterygoid plates without fractures was observed in 80% of the Le Fort I osteotomies in the study group compared with 50% of the osteotomies in the control group. High-level fractures occurred in 30% of cases in the control group compared with none in the study group. The integrities of the infra-alveolar nerve and the descending palatine artery were preserved in all cases. Use of the ultrasonic BoneScalpel did not require more time than the conventional method. An improved pattern of lingual fracture lines in mandibular sagittal split osteotomy procedures and the pattern of pterygomaxillary separation in Le Fort I osteotomy procedures were observed. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc

  17. Cell fate specification in the lingual epithelium is controlled by antagonistic activities of Sonic hedgehog and retinoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Shahawy, Maha; Reibring, Claes-Göran; Neben, Cynthia L; Hallberg, Kristina; Marangoni, Pauline; Harfe, Brian D; Klein, Ophir D; Linde, Anders; Gritli-Linde, Amel

    2017-07-01

    The interaction between signaling pathways is a central question in the study of organogenesis. Using the developing murine tongue as a model, we uncovered unknown relationships between Sonic hedgehog (SHH) and retinoic acid (RA) signaling. Genetic loss of SHH signaling leads to enhanced RA activity subsequent to loss of SHH-dependent expression of Cyp26a1 and Cyp26c1. This causes a cell identity switch, prompting the epithelium of the tongue to form heterotopic minor salivary glands and to overproduce oversized taste buds. At developmental stages during which Wnt10b expression normally ceases and Shh becomes confined to taste bud cells, loss of SHH inputs causes the lingual epithelium to undergo an ectopic and anachronic expression of Shh and Wnt10b in the basal layer, specifying de novo taste placode induction. Surprisingly, in the absence of SHH signaling, lingual epithelial cells adopted a Merkel cell fate, but this was not caused by enhanced RA signaling. We show that RA promotes, whereas SHH, acting strictly within the lingual epithelium, inhibits taste placode and lingual gland formation by thwarting RA activity. These findings reveal key functions for SHH and RA in cell fate specification in the lingual epithelium and aid in deciphering the molecular mechanisms that assign cell identity.

  18. Cell fate specification in the lingual epithelium is controlled by antagonistic activities of Sonic hedgehog and retinoic acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maha El Shahawy

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between signaling pathways is a central question in the study of organogenesis. Using the developing murine tongue as a model, we uncovered unknown relationships between Sonic hedgehog (SHH and retinoic acid (RA signaling. Genetic loss of SHH signaling leads to enhanced RA activity subsequent to loss of SHH-dependent expression of Cyp26a1 and Cyp26c1. This causes a cell identity switch, prompting the epithelium of the tongue to form heterotopic minor salivary glands and to overproduce oversized taste buds. At developmental stages during which Wnt10b expression normally ceases and Shh becomes confined to taste bud cells, loss of SHH inputs causes the lingual epithelium to undergo an ectopic and anachronic expression of Shh and Wnt10b in the basal layer, specifying de novo taste placode induction. Surprisingly, in the absence of SHH signaling, lingual epithelial cells adopted a Merkel cell fate, but this was not caused by enhanced RA signaling. We show that RA promotes, whereas SHH, acting strictly within the lingual epithelium, inhibits taste placode and lingual gland formation by thwarting RA activity. These findings reveal key functions for SHH and RA in cell fate specification in the lingual epithelium and aid in deciphering the molecular mechanisms that assign cell identity.

  19. Congenital hypothyroidism. The role of nuclear medicine in diagnosis: a case of lingual thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maggs, J.; Cotter, A.; Bartholomeusz, D.; Chatterton, B.

    2005-01-01

    Hypothyroidism present from birth is a devastating condition and causes cretinism, which results in delayed development and mental retardation unless treated very early. All neonates in Australia are screened by a blood test when about two days old to exclude hypothyroidism (and several other biochemical conditions). A non-invasive nuclear scan may be able to recognise the cause of neonatal hypothyroidism: 1. Thyroid dysgenesis, (anatomical anomalies) including aplasia or hypoplasia of the thyroid gland; and ectopy of the thyroid, often with hypoplasia, in which there is insufficient tissue to match the demands of the infant or growing child. The abnormal anatomy is seen on thyroid scanning. 2. Dyshormonogencsis, (organification defects) a serious error in thyroid hormone synthesis. In general, thyroid trapping of pertechnctate or iodine will be increased, and demonstrated on the radionuclide study. 3. Hypopituitarism (secondary hypothyroidism) due to pituitary aplasia or midline brain developmental defects. There may also be hypothalamic dysfunction (tertiary hypothyroidism). An anatomically normal thyroid will show reduced uptake. Lingual thyroid is a rare developmental anomaly caused by failure of migration of the thyroid gland to its normal position in the neck. The incidence is relatively rare and sex incidence is four or five to one in favour of females. If untreated, there are sequelae of hypothyroidism, or growth of the mass in base of the tongue to the mass of a normal thyroid gland, which may cause respiratory compression. Thyroid malignancies may also be more frequent. This poster reports a case of lingual thyroid in a 19-day-old baby girl with biochemically diagnosed hypothyroidism. T4 = 9 (N > 12), TSH = 80, (N < 5). Scanning with a pinhole collimator 20min after IV injection of 40 MBq of Pertechnetate showed the only uptake to be in the base of the tongue, a lingual thyroid. Uptake was estimated at 2%, (N not available in infants)

  20. Rat lingual lipase: partial purification, hydrolytic properties, and comparison with pancreatic lipase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, I M; Montgomery, R K; Carey, M C

    1984-10-01

    We have partially purified lingual lipase from the serous glands of rat tongue. With a combination of Triton X-100 extraction or Triton X-114 phase-separation techniques, Bio-Bead SM-2 treatment, dialysis, and gel filtration on Sephadex G-200 or Sephacryl S-300, we obtained a sparingly soluble lipid-free protein demonstrating hydrolytic activity against triglycerides and negligible phospholipase or cholesteryl esterase activities. Compared with homogenate, specific activities of the enzyme were enriched 3- to 5-fold prior to gel filtration and 10-fold after gel filtration. Analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and gel filtration under denaturing conditions (6 M guanidine X HCl or 0.1% sodium dodecyl sulfate) revealed one major glycoprotein band with Mr approximately 50,000. Gel filtration of the active enzyme in 0.1% Triton X-100 gave an Mr approximately 270,000-300,000, suggesting extensive self-aggregation. With both tributyrin and triolein, the pH optimum of the purified enzyme was 4.0 and activity extended from pH 2.0 to 8.0. In contrast to purified human pancreatic lipase, lingual lipase hydrolyzed triglyceride emulsions and mixed micelles stabilized with both short-chain (dihexanoyl) and long-chain (egg) lecithin and were inhibited only slightly (18-25%) by micellar concentrations of two common bile salts, taurodeoxycholate and taurocholate. Our results suggest that the hydrolysis of dietary fat by lingual lipase may extend from the pharynx through the esophagus and stomach and into the upper small intestine.

  1. Induction of ectopic taste buds by SHH reveals the competency and plasticity of adult lingual epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, David; Seidel, Kerstin; Salcedo, Ernesto; Ahn, Christina; de Sauvage, Frederic J; Klein, Ophir D; Barlow, Linda A

    2014-08-01

    Taste buds are assemblies of elongated epithelial cells, which are innervated by gustatory nerves that transmit taste information to the brain stem. Taste cells are continuously renewed throughout life via proliferation of epithelial progenitors, but the molecular regulation of this process remains unknown. During embryogenesis, sonic hedgehog (SHH) negatively regulates taste bud patterning, such that inhibition of SHH causes the formation of more and larger taste bud primordia, including in regions of the tongue normally devoid of taste buds. Here, using a Cre-lox system to drive constitutive expression of SHH, we identify the effects of SHH on the lingual epithelium of adult mice. We show that misexpression of SHH transforms lingual epithelial cell fate, such that daughter cells of lingual epithelial progenitors form cell type-replete, onion-shaped taste buds, rather than non-taste, pseudostratified epithelium. These SHH-induced ectopic taste buds are found in regions of the adult tongue previously thought incapable of generating taste organs. The ectopic buds are composed of all taste cell types, including support cells and detectors of sweet, bitter, umami, salt and sour, and recapitulate the molecular differentiation process of endogenous taste buds. In contrast to the well-established nerve dependence of endogenous taste buds, however, ectopic taste buds form independently of both gustatory and somatosensory innervation. As innervation is required for SHH expression by endogenous taste buds, our data suggest that SHH can replace the need for innervation to drive the entire program of taste bud differentiation. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. The prognostic value of histopathology on lingual nerve neurosensory recovery after micro-neurosurgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hørberg, Mette; Reibel, Jesper; Kragelund, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Micro-neurosurgical repair is considered in permanent nerve damage but the outcome is unpredictable. We examined if histopathologic parameters of traumatic neuromas have a prognostic value for recovery in relation to lingual nerve micro-neurosurgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Retrospective...... case study on neurosensory recovery after micro-neurosurgery. Outcome variables were as follows: pain perception, two-point discrimination, and sum score of perception, before and 12 months after micro-neurosurgery. Predictive histopathology variables included size, nerve tissue, and inflammation...

  3. Cross-lingual and cross-domain discourse segmentation of entire documents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braud, Chloé; Lacroix, Ophélie; Søgaard, Anders

    2017-01-01

    -quality syntactic parses and rich heuristics that are not generally available across languages and domains. In this paper, we propose statistical discourse segmenters for five languages and three domains that do not rely on gold pre-annotations. We also consider the problem of learning discourse segmenters when...... no labeled data is available for a language. Our fully supervised system obtains 89.5% F1 for English newswire, with slight drops in performance on other domains, and we report supervised and unsupervised (cross-lingual) results for five languages in total....

  4. Lingual nerve injury II. Observations on sensory recovery after micro-neurosurgical reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillerup, S; Stoltze, Kaj

    2007-01-01

    /dull discrimination, warm, cold, location of touch, and brush stroke direction, pain perception and two-point discrimination. The rate of recovery was highest during the first 6 months. Females were more often affected than males, but recovery was not influenced by gender. The distribution of neurogenic discomfort......The aim of this study was to report on neurosensory recovery after micro-surgical lingual nerve repair, and to evaluate the effect on recovery of age, delay in repair and gender of the patient. Seventy-four patients entered the study. The micro-surgical repair performed was direct nerve suture (n...

  5. Lingual nerve injury in third molar surgery I. Observations on recovery of sensation with spontaneous healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillerup, S; Stoltze, Kaj

    2007-01-01

    , thermal stimuli and location of stimulus, as well as two-point discrimination, pain and the presence of a neuroma at the lesion site. Neurogenic signs and symptoms related to the injury and their variation over time were registered. Females were more often referred than males. Most lingual nerve injuries...... exhibited a significant potential for recovery, but only a few patients made a full recovery with absence of neurogenic symptoms. The recovery rate was highest during the first 6 months. Recovery was not influenced by gender, and only slightly by age. The presence of a neuroma was associated with a more...

  6. Changes in sugar residues of glycoconjugates of chicken salivary lingual glands during development and growth

    OpenAIRE

    Samar, M. E.; Ávila, R. E.; Massone, Adriana R.; Olmedo, L.; Marino, F. P.

    2002-01-01

    En vista del escaso conocimiento sobre las secreciones de las glándulas salivales menores de las aves, el propósito del presente trabajo fue investigar la naturaleza y variaciones de la fracción hidrocarbonada en glándulas linguales del pollo durante su desarrollo embrionario y posnatal. Lenguas de embriones de 9 a 19 días, pollos recién nacidos y adultos se procesaron para PAS, Alcian blue y lectinhistoquímica. Los esbozos glandulares aparecieron en embriones de 9 días. Desde los 15 días apa...

  7. Multi-Lingual and Multi-Cultural Aspects of Post-Disaster Emergency Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selsøe Sørensen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    recent technological advances and the upcoming of social media as well as intelligent and instant big-data analyses since the reported research was carried out, it is suggested that the original ideas be revisited and re-engineered in view of improving efficiency in cross-frontier post-disaster emergency......LinguaNet® is a system for fast multi-lingual communications between police forces co-operating across frontiers. It has been in operation for more than two decades and proved its worth. From 1995 to 1998, CBS developed a number of add-ons to the system in the framework of an EU project in order...

  8. New horizons in orthodontics & dentofacial orthopedics: fixed Twin Blocks & TransForce lingual appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, William John

    2011-01-01

    During the 20th century functional appliances evolved from night time wear to more flexible appliances for increased day time wear to full time wear with Twin Block appliances. The current trend is towards fixed functional appliances and this paper introduces the Fixed Twin Block, bonded to the teeth to eliminate problems of compliance in functional therapy. TransForce lingual appliances are pre-activated and may be used in first phase treatment for sagittal and transverse arch development. Alternatively they may be integrated with fixed appliances at any stage of treatment.

  9. Multi-Paradigm and Multi-Lingual Information Extraction as Support for Medical Web Labelling Authorities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Labsky

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, quality labelling of medical web content has been a pre-dominantly manual activity. However, the advances in automated text processing opened the way to computerised support of this activity. The core enabling technology is information extraction (IE. However, the heterogeneity of websites offering medical content imposes particular requirements on the IE techniques to be applied. In the paper we discuss these requirements and describe a multi-paradigm approach to IE addressing them. Experiments on multi-lingual data are reported. The research has been carried out within the EU MedIEQ project.

  10. Modified precision lingual bonding technique: A step-wise approach with torque angulation device-bracket positioning device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosaline Tina Paul

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Contemporary preadjusted edgewise appliance is all about the precision in bracket design, prescription and positioning in addition to the orthodontist's skill and training. However, achieving it is a bigger challenge as the anatomy of the lingual surface of a tooth is uneven, dissimilar, and moreover the tooth alignment on the lingual surface is variant. Thus, the need for an accurate method of bracket positioning with predetermined torque and angulation incorporated in the brackets according to the patients' need is of key importance. Materials and Methods: A TAD-BPD machine used to enhance the accuracy of bracket positioning and bioplast accurate tray transfer technique was used. Results: A step-wise procedures in bracket positioning and fabricating an indirect bonding tray for lingual orthodontics using the torque angulation device-bracket positioning device. Conclusions: This technique facilitated unhindered bonding even in severely crowded cases and easy rebonding during mid-treatment stages.

  11. Oral Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oral cancer can form in any part of the mouth. Most oral cancers begin in the flat cells that cover the ... your mouth, tongue, and lips. Anyone can get oral cancer, but the risk is higher if you are ...

  12. Incidence and risk factors for postoperative lingual neuropraxia following airway instrumentation: A retrospective matched case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Kai Su

    Full Text Available Lingual nerve injury or neuropraxia is a rare but potentially serious perioperative complication following airway instrumentation during general anesthesia. This study explored the the incidence and perioperative risk factors for lingual nerve injury in patients receiving laryngeal mask (LMA or endotracheal (ETGA general anesthesia in a single center experience.All surgical patients in our hospital who received LMA or ETGA from 2009 to 2013 were included, and potential perioperative risk factors were compared. Matched controls were randomly selected (in 1:5 ratio from the same database in non-case patients. A total of 36 patients in the records had reported experiencing tongue numbness after anesthesia in this study. Compared with the non-case surgical population (n = 54314, patients with tongue numbness were significantly younger (52.2±19.5 vs 42.0±14.5; P = 0.002 and reported lower ASA physical statuses (2.3±0.7 vs 1.6±0.6; P<0.001. Patient gender, anesthesia technique used, and airway device type (LMA or ETGA did not differ significantly across the two groups. A significantly higher proportion of patients underwent operations of the head-and-neck region (38.9 vs 15.6%; P = 0.002 developed tongue numbness after anesthesia. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that head-and-neck operations remained the most significant independent risk factor for postoperative lingual nerve injury (AOR 7.63; 95% CI 2.03-28.70.The overall incidence rate of postoperative lingual neuropraxy was 0.066% in patients receiving general anesthesia with airway device in place. Young and generally healthy patients receiving head-and-neck operation are at higher risk in developing postoperative lingual neuropraxy. Attention should be particularly exercised to reduce the pressure of endotracheal tube or laryngeal mask on the tongue during head-and-neck operation to avert the occurrence of postoperative lingual neuropraxy.

  13. Lingual traction to facilitate fiber-optic intubation of difficult airways: a single-anesthesiologist randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Yiu-Hei; Karlnoski, Rachel A; Chen, Henian; Camporesi, Enrico M; Shah, Vimal V; Padhya, Tapan A; Mangar, Devanand

    2015-04-01

    Flexible fiber-optic bronchoscope-guided orotracheal intubation is a valuable technique with demonstrated benefits in the management of difficult airways. Despite its popularity with anesthesia providers, the technique is not fail-safe and airway-related complications secondary to failed intubation attempts remain an important problem. We sought to determine the effect of incorporating lingual traction on the success rate of fiber-optic bronchoscope-guided intubation in patients with anticipated difficult airways. In this prospective, randomized, cohort study, we enrolled 91 adult patients with anticipated difficult airways scheduled for elective surgery to undergo fiber-optic bronchoscope-guided orotracheal intubation alone or with lingual traction by an individual anesthesiologist after induction of general anesthesia and neuromuscular blockade. A total of 78 patients were randomized: 39 patients to the fiber-optic bronchoscope-guided intubation with lingual traction group and 39 patients to the fiber-optic bronchoscope-guided intubation alone group. The primary endpoint was the rate of successful first attempt intubations. The secondary outcome was sore throat grade on post-operative day 1. Fiber-optic intubation with lingual traction compared to fiber-optic intubation alone resulted in a higher success rate (92.3 vs. 74.4 %, χ (2) = 4.523, p = 0.033) and greater odds for successful first attempt intubation (OR 4.138, 95 % CI 1.041-16.444, p = 0.044). Sore throat severity on post-operative day 1 was not significantly different but trended towards worsening grades with lingual traction. In this study, lingual traction was shown to be a valuable maneuver for facilitating fiber-optic bronchoscope-guided intubation in the management of patients with anticipated difficult airways.

  14. A concept to transfer a therapeutic splint position into permanent occlusion with a customized lingual appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachse, Tina; Schwestka-Polly, Rainer; Flieger, Stefanie; Wiechmann, Dirk

    2012-05-21

    The role of occlusion concerning temporomandibular disorder is still unclear but seems to be the only component of the stomathognathic system dentists are able to change morphologically. The aim of the paper is to describe the orthodontist's approach for transferring and maintaining a therapeutic splint position into permanent occlusion using a fully customized lingual appliance. Fixed acrylic bite planes on lower molars were used to maintain a symptom-free condyle position prior to orthodontic treatment. Silicone impressions of the arches including the fixed bite planes were used for the Incognito laboratory procedure. Two digital setups were made. One setup represents the target occlusion. A second setup including the bite planes was used to fabricate an additional set of lower molar brackets. In the leveling stage all teeth except the lower molars were settled to maintain the therapeutic condyle position. Finally, the fixed bite planes were stepwise removed and molar brackets were replaced to establish the permanent occlusion planned with the first setup. The advantage of an individual lingual appliance consists in the high level of congruence between the fabricated setups and the final clinical result. Both the individual scope for design and the precision of the appliance were vitally important in the treatment of a patient with a functional disorder of the masticatory system.

  15. Galvanic coupling of steel and gold alloy lingual brackets with orthodontic wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polychronis, Georgios; Al Jabbari, Youssef S; Eliades, Theodore; Zinelis, Spiros

    2018-03-06

    The aim of this research was to assess galvanic behavior of lingual orthodontic brackets coupled with representative types of orthodontic wires. Three types of lingual brackets: Incognito (INC), In-Ovation L (IOV), and STb (STB) were combined with a stainless steel (SS) and a nickel-titanium (NiTi) orthodontic archwire. All materials were initially investigated by scanning electron microscopy / x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDX) while wires were also tested by x-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD). All bracket-wire combinations were immersed in acidic 0.1M NaCl 0.1M lactic acid and neutral NaF 0.3% (wt) electrolyte, and the potential differences were continuously recorded for 48 hours. The SEM/EDX analysis revealed that INC is a single-unit bracket made of a high gold (Au) alloy while IOV and STB are two-piece appliances in which the base and wing are made of SS alloys. The SS wire demonstrated austenite and martensite iron phase, while NiTi wire illustrated an intense austenite crystallographic structure with limited martensite. All bracket wire combinations showed potential differences below the threshold of galvanic corrosion (200 mV) except for INC and STB coupled with NiTi wire in NaF media. The electrochemical results indicate that all brackets tested demonstrated galvanic compatibility with SS wire, but fluoride treatment should be used cautiously with NiTi wires coupled with Au and SS brackets.

  16. A concept to transfer a therapeutic splint position into permanent occlusion with a customized lingual appliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachse Tina

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The role of occlusion concerning temporomandibular disorder is still unclear but seems to be the only component of the stomathognathic system dentists are able to change morphologically. The aim of the paper is to describe the orthodontist’s approach for transferring and maintaining a therapeutic splint position into permanent occlusion using a fully customized lingual appliance. Methods Fixed acrylic bite planes on lower molars were used to maintain a symptom-free condyle position prior to orthodontic treatment. Silicone impressions of the arches including the fixed bite planes were used for the Incognito laboratory procedure. Two digital setups were made. One setup represents the target occlusion. A second setup including the bite planes was used to fabricate an additional set of lower molar brackets. In the leveling stage all teeth except the lower molars were settled to maintain the therapeutic condyle position. Finally, the fixed bite planes were stepwise removed and molar brackets were replaced to establish the permanent occlusion planned with the first setup. Results and discussion The advantage of an individual lingual appliance consists in the high level of congruence between the fabricated setups and the final clinical result. Both the individual scope for design and the precision of the appliance were vitally important in the treatment of a patient with a functional disorder of the masticatory system.

  17. Effect of lingual gauze swab placement on pulse oximeter readings in anaesthetised dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, A; Martinez-Taboada, F; Nitzan, M

    2017-01-14

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of lingual gauze swab placement on pulse oximeter readings in anaesthetised dogs and cats. Following anaesthetic induction, the following pulse oximeter probe configurations were performed: no gauze swab (control), placement of a gauze swab between the tongue and the probe, placement of different thicknesses of gauze swab, placement of red cotton fabric, placement of a sheet of white paper and placement of the probe and gauze swab on different locations on the tongue. Oxygen saturation (SpO 2 ) and peripheral perfusion index (PI) were recorded. Placement of a gauze swab between the pulse oximeter probe and the tongue in anaesthetised dogs and cats resulted in significantly higher SpO 2 values compared with the control group. In dogs, PI values were significantly higher than the control in all groups except the quarter thickness swab group. In cats, PI was significantly higher in the double thickness swab and white paper groups compared with the control. Cats had significantly higher SpO 2 and lower PI values than dogs. The authors propose that increased contact pressure is responsible for significantly higher SpO 2 and PI readings with the use of a lingual gauze swab resulting from changes in transmural pressure and arterial compliance. British Veterinary Association.

  18. Is there a best side for cochlear implants in post-lingual patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Maria Stella Arantes do; Damico, Thiago A; Gonçales, Alina S; Reis, Ana C M B; Isaac, Myriam de Lima; Massuda, Eduardo T; Hyppolito, Miguel Angelo

    2017-07-29

    Cochlear Implant is a sensory prosthesis capable of restoring hearing in patients with severe or profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. To evaluate if there is a better side to be implanted in post-lingual patients. Retrospective longitudinal study. Participants were 40 subjects, of both sex, mean age of 47 years, with post-lingual hearing loss, users of unilateral cochlear implant for more than 12 months and less than 24 months, with asymmetric auditor reserve between the ears (difference of 10dBNA, In at least one of the frequencies with a response, between the ears), divided into two groups. Group A was composed of individuals with cochlear implant in the ear with better auditory reserve and Group B with auditory reserve lower in relation to the contralateral side. There was no statistical difference for the tonal auditory threshold before and after cochlear implant. A better speech perception in pre-cochlear implant tests was present in B (20%), but the final results are similar in both groups. The cochlear implant in the ear with the worst auditory residue favors a bimodal hearing, which would allow the binaural summation, without compromising the improvement of the audiometric threshold and the speech perception. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. [Effectiveness of the GlideScope video laryngoscope in a case of unexpected difficult airway due to lingual tonsil hypertrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, P; Alarcón, L; Del Castillo, T; Cabrerizo, P; Díaz, S

    2015-05-01

    Lingual tonsil hypertrophy can cause varying degrees of airway obstruction and is considered a risk factor for difficult mask ventilation and tracheal intubation. We report a case of unexpected difficult airway in a patient with unknown lingual tonsil hypertrophy that was solved with the use of the GlideScope video laryngoscope. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparison of the force levels among labial and lingual self-ligating and conventional brackets in simulated misaligned teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alobeid, Ahmad; El-Bialy, Tarek; Khawatmi, Said; Dirk, Cornelius; Jäger, Andreas; Bourauel, Christoph

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate force levels exerted by levelling arch wires with labial and lingual conventional and self-ligating brackets. The tested orthodontic brackets were of the 0.022-in slot size for labial and 0.018-in for lingual brackets and were as follows: 1. Labial brackets: (i) conventional bracket (GAC-Twin, Dentsply), (ii) passive self-ligating (SL) brackets (Damon-Q®, ORMCO; Ortho classic H4™, Orthoclassic; FLI®SL, Rocky Mountain Orthodontics) and (iii) active SL brackets (GAC In-Ovation®C, DENTSPLY and SPEED™, Strite). 2. Lingual brackets: (i) conventional brackets (Incognito, 3M and Joy™, Adenta); (ii) passive SL bracket (GAC In-Ovation®LM™, Dentsply and (iii) active SL bracket (Evolution SLT, Adenta). Thermalloy-NiTi 0.013-in and 0.014-in arch wires (Rocky Mountain Orthodontics) were used with all brackets. The simulated malocclusion represented a maxillary central incisor displaced 2 mm gingivally (x-axis) and 2 mm labially (z-axis). Lingual bracket systems showed higher force levels (2.4 ± 0.2 to 3.8 ± 0.2 N) compared to labial bracket systems (from 1.1 ± 0.1 to 2.2 ± 0.4 N). However, the differences between SL and conventional bracket systems were minor and not consistent (labial brackets: 1.2 ± 0.1 N for the GAC Twin and 1.1 ± 0.1 to 1.6 ± 0.1 N for the SL brackets with 0.013-in thermalloy; lingual brackets: 2.5 ± 0.2 to 3.5 ± 0.1 N for the conventional and 2.7 ± 0.3 to 3.4 ± 0.1 N for the SL brackets with 0.013-in Thermalloy). This is an in vitro study with different slot sizes in the labial and lingual bracket systems, results should be interpreted with caution. Lingual bracket systems showed higher forces compared to labial bracket systems that might be of clinical concern. We recommend highly flexible nickel titanium arch wires lower than 0.013-in for the initial levelling and alignment especially with lingual appliances. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European

  1. Is the Lingual Fracture Line Influenced by the Mandibular Canal or the Mylohyoid Groove During a Bilateral Sagittal Split Osteotomy? A Human Cadaveric Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mensink, Gertjan; Gooris, Peter J. J.; Bergsma, Eelco J.; Frank, Michael H.; van Gemert, Jan T. M.; van Merkesteyn, J. P. Richard

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Although the bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO) is a routinely performed procedure, exact control of the lingual fracture line remains problematic. The purpose of this study was to determine the various lingual splitting patterns in cadaveric human mandibles after a BSSO and the

  2. Comparison of lingual tonsil size as depicted on MR imaging between children with obstructive sleep apnea despite previous tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy and normal controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fricke, Bradley L. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Emory University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Donnelly, Lane F. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Shott, Sally R. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Otolaryngology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Kalra, Maninder; Poe, Stacy A.; Chini, Barbara A.; Amin, Raouf S. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2006-06-15

    Cine MRI has become a useful tool in the evaluation of patients with persistent obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) despite previous surgical intervention and in patients with underlying conditions that render them susceptible to multilevel airway obstruction. Findings on cine MRI studies have also increased our understanding of the mechanisms and anatomic causes of OSA in children. To compare lingual tonsil size between children with OSA and a group of normal controls. In addition, a subanalysis was made of the group of children with OSA comparing lingual tonsils between children with and without underlying Down syndrome. Children with persistent OSA despite previous palatine tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy and controls without OSA underwent MR imaging with sagittal fast spin echo inversion-recovery images, and lingual tonsils were categorized as nonperceptible at imaging or present and measurable. When present, lingual tonsils were measured in the maximum anterior-posterior diameter. If lingual tonsils were greater than 10 mm in diameter and abutting both the posterior border of the tongue and the posterior pharyngeal wall, they were considered markedly enlarged. There were statistically significant differences between the OSA and control groups for the presence vs. nonvisualization of lingual tonsils (OSA 33% vs. control 0%, P=0.0001) and mean diameter of the lingual tonsils (OSA 9.50 mm vs. control 0.0 mm, P=0.00001). Within the OSA group, there were statistically significant differences between children with and without Down syndrome for the three lingual tonsil width categories (P=0.0070) and occurrence of markedly enlarged lingual tonsils (with Down syndrome 35% vs. without Down syndrome 3%, P=0.0035). Enlargement of the lingual tonsils is relatively common in children with persistent obstructive sleep apnea after palatine tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy. This is particularly true in patients with Down syndrome. (orig.)

  3. Comparison of lingual tonsil size as depicted on MR imaging between children with obstructive sleep apnea despite previous tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy and normal controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fricke, Bradley L.; Donnelly, Lane F.; Shott, Sally R.; Kalra, Maninder; Poe, Stacy A.; Chini, Barbara A.; Amin, Raouf S.

    2006-01-01

    Cine MRI has become a useful tool in the evaluation of patients with persistent obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) despite previous surgical intervention and in patients with underlying conditions that render them susceptible to multilevel airway obstruction. Findings on cine MRI studies have also increased our understanding of the mechanisms and anatomic causes of OSA in children. To compare lingual tonsil size between children with OSA and a group of normal controls. In addition, a subanalysis was made of the group of children with OSA comparing lingual tonsils between children with and without underlying Down syndrome. Children with persistent OSA despite previous palatine tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy and controls without OSA underwent MR imaging with sagittal fast spin echo inversion-recovery images, and lingual tonsils were categorized as nonperceptible at imaging or present and measurable. When present, lingual tonsils were measured in the maximum anterior-posterior diameter. If lingual tonsils were greater than 10 mm in diameter and abutting both the posterior border of the tongue and the posterior pharyngeal wall, they were considered markedly enlarged. There were statistically significant differences between the OSA and control groups for the presence vs. nonvisualization of lingual tonsils (OSA 33% vs. control 0%, P=0.0001) and mean diameter of the lingual tonsils (OSA 9.50 mm vs. control 0.0 mm, P=0.00001). Within the OSA group, there were statistically significant differences between children with and without Down syndrome for the three lingual tonsil width categories (P=0.0070) and occurrence of markedly enlarged lingual tonsils (with Down syndrome 35% vs. without Down syndrome 3%, P=0.0035). Enlargement of the lingual tonsils is relatively common in children with persistent obstructive sleep apnea after palatine tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy. This is particularly true in patients with Down syndrome. (orig.)

  4. A Cross-Lingual Similarity Measure for Detecting Biomedical Term Translations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollegala, Danushka; Kontonatsios, Georgios; Ananiadou, Sophia

    2015-01-01

    Bilingual dictionaries for technical terms such as biomedical terms are an important resource for machine translation systems as well as for humans who would like to understand a concept described in a foreign language. Often a biomedical term is first proposed in English and later it is manually translated to other languages. Despite the fact that there are large monolingual lexicons of biomedical terms, only a fraction of those term lexicons are translated to other languages. Manually compiling large-scale bilingual dictionaries for technical domains is a challenging task because it is difficult to find a sufficiently large number of bilingual experts. We propose a cross-lingual similarity measure for detecting most similar translation candidates for a biomedical term specified in one language (source) from another language (target). Specifically, a biomedical term in a language is represented using two types of features: (a) intrinsic features that consist of character n-grams extracted from the term under consideration, and (b) extrinsic features that consist of unigrams and bigrams extracted from the contextual windows surrounding the term under consideration. We propose a cross-lingual similarity measure using each of those feature types. First, to reduce the dimensionality of the feature space in each language, we propose prototype vector projection (PVP)—a non-negative lower-dimensional vector projection method. Second, we propose a method to learn a mapping between the feature spaces in the source and target language using partial least squares regression (PLSR). The proposed method requires only a small number of training instances to learn a cross-lingual similarity measure. The proposed PVP method outperforms popular dimensionality reduction methods such as the singular value decomposition (SVD) and non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) in a nearest neighbor prediction task. Moreover, our experimental results covering several language pairs such as

  5. A cross-lingual similarity measure for detecting biomedical term translations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danushka Bollegala

    Full Text Available Bilingual dictionaries for technical terms such as biomedical terms are an important resource for machine translation systems as well as for humans who would like to understand a concept described in a foreign language. Often a biomedical term is first proposed in English and later it is manually translated to other languages. Despite the fact that there are large monolingual lexicons of biomedical terms, only a fraction of those term lexicons are translated to other languages. Manually compiling large-scale bilingual dictionaries for technical domains is a challenging task because it is difficult to find a sufficiently large number of bilingual experts. We propose a cross-lingual similarity measure for detecting most similar translation candidates for a biomedical term specified in one language (source from another language (target. Specifically, a biomedical term in a language is represented using two types of features: (a intrinsic features that consist of character n-grams extracted from the term under consideration, and (b extrinsic features that consist of unigrams and bigrams extracted from the contextual windows surrounding the term under consideration. We propose a cross-lingual similarity measure using each of those feature types. First, to reduce the dimensionality of the feature space in each language, we propose prototype vector projection (PVP--a non-negative lower-dimensional vector projection method. Second, we propose a method to learn a mapping between the feature spaces in the source and target language using partial least squares regression (PLSR. The proposed method requires only a small number of training instances to learn a cross-lingual similarity measure. The proposed PVP method outperforms popular dimensionality reduction methods such as the singular value decomposition (SVD and non-negative matrix factorization (NMF in a nearest neighbor prediction task. Moreover, our experimental results covering several language

  6. Application of CO II laser for removal of oral mucocele

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, J.; Moriya, K.; Hirai, Y.

    2006-02-01

    Mucocele is an oral soft tissue cyst caused by the disturbance of saliva flow. Mucocele is widely observed in child patients and recurrence is high. The objective of this study was to clarify the effect of CO II laser irradiation in the case of mucocele. A CO II laser was used on 45 subjects, aged between 0 to 15 years, having mucocele on lip, lingual, or buccal mucosa. Our procedure in using CO II laser was not to vaporize the mucocele but to remove the whole mucocele mass. The border of mucocele was firstly incised by laser following defocusly ablating the root or body of mucocele separating from sorrounding tissue. As a result, mucocele was easily and completely removed without breaking the wall of mucocele. None of the cases required suturing. The results were as follows. 1. The mucocele of lip or lingual mucosa with a rich blood supply, was efficiently removed, without bleeding, giving a clear operative field during the operation. 2. The surgery itself was simple and less time-consuming. 3. After two or three weeks the wound was completely healed without almost any discomfort in all patients 4. Wound contraction and scarring were decreased or eliminated. 5. The reoccurrence of mucocele was not seen, except only in one case of lingual mucocele. In conclusion the use of CO II laser proved to be a very safe and effective mode for the removal of mucocele, especially in small children.

  7. Control of lower incisor inclination with a completely customized lingual appliance for dentoalveolar compensation of class III malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lossdörfer, Stefan; Schwestka-Polly, Rainer; Wiechmann, Dirk

    2013-09-01

    Bracket slots and orthodontic archwires offering high dimensional precision are needed for fully customized lingual appliances. We aimed to investigate whether high-precision appliances of this type enable dentoalveolar compensation of class III malocclusion so that lower incisor inclination at the end of treatment will closely match the anticipated situation as defined in a pretreatment setup. This retrospective study included a total of 34 consecutive patients who had worn a fully customized lingual appliance to achieve dentoalveolar compensation for class III malocclusion by intermaxillary elastics, or proximal enamel reduction, or extraction of teeth in one or both jaws. Casts fabricated at different points in time were three-dimensionally scanned to analyze how precisely the lower incisor inclinations envisioned in the setup were implemented in clinical practice. Aside from minor deviations of ±3.75°, the lower incisor inclinations were clinically implemented as planned even in patients with major sagittal discrepancies. Treatment goals predefined in a setup of dentoalveolar compensation for class III malocclusion can be very precisely achieved via a customized lingual appliance. Correct planning can prevent undesirable lingual tipping of the lower incisors. This finding should not encourage a more liberal use of dentoalveolar compensation, but it should heighten clinicians' awareness of how essential it is to sufficiently consider the individual anatomy of the dentoalveolar complex during treatment planning.

  8. Determining shapes and dimensions of dental arches for the use of straight-wire arches in lingual technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kairalla, Silvana Allegrini; Scuzzo, Giuseppe; Triviño, Tarcila; Velasco, Leandro; Lombardo, Luca; Paranhos, Luiz Renato

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to determine the shape and dimension of dental arches from a lingual perspective, and determine shape and size of a straight archwire used for lingual Orthodontics. The study sample comprised 70 Caucasian Brazilian individuals with normal occlusion and at least four of Andrew's six keys. Maxillary and mandibular dental casts were digitized (3D) and the images were analyzed by Delcam Power SHAPET 2010 software. Landmarks on the lingual surface of teeth were selected and 14 measurements were calculated to determine the shape and size of dental arches. Shapiro-Wilk test determined small arch shape by means of 25th percentile (P25%)--an average percentile for the medium arch; and a large one determined by means of 75th percentile (P75%). T-test revealed differences between males and females in the size of 12 dental arches. The straight-wire arch shape used in the lingual straight wire technique is a parabolic-shaped arch, slightly flattened on its anterior portion. Due to similarity among dental arch sizes shown by males and females, a more simplified diagram chart was designed.

  9. Determining shapes and dimensions of dental arches for the use of straight-wire arches in lingual technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Allegrini Kairalla

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This study aims to determine the shape and dimension of dental arches from a lingual perspective, and determine shape and size of a straight archwire used for lingual Orthodontics. METHODS: The study sample comprised 70 Caucasian Brazilian individuals with normal occlusion and at least four of Andrew's six keys. Maxillary and mandibular dental casts were digitized (3D and the images were analyzed by Delcam Power SHAPET 2010 software. Landmarks on the lingual surface of teeth were selected and 14 measurements were calculated to determine the shape and size of dental arches. RESULTS: Shapiro-Wilk test determined small arch shape by means of 25th percentile (P25% - an average percentile for the medium arch; and a large one determined by means of 75th percentile (P75%. T-test revealed differences between males and females in the size of 12 dental arches. CONCLUSION: The straight-wire arch shape used in the lingual straight wire technique is a parabolic-shaped arch, slightly flattened on its anterior portion. Due to similarity among dental arch sizes shown by males and females, a more simplified diagram chart was designed.

  10. Establishment of a Novel Lingual Organoid Culture System: Generation of Organoids Having Mature Keratinized Epithelium from Adult Epithelial Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisha, Hiroko; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Kanno, Shohei; Tokuyama, Yoko; Komai, Yoshihiro; Ohe, Shuichi; Yanai, Hirotsugu; Omachi, Taichi; Ueno, Hiroo

    2013-11-01

    Despite the strong need for the establishment of a lingual epithelial cell culture system, a simple and convenient culture method has not yet been established. Here, we report the establishment of a novel lingual epithelium organoid culture system using a three-dimensional matrix and growth factors. Histological analyses showed that the generated organoids had both a stratified squamous epithelial cell layer and a stratum corneum. Very recently, we showed via a multicolor lineage tracing method that Bmi1-positive stem cells exist at the base of the epithelial basal layer in the interpapillary pit. Using our new culture system, we found that organoids could be generated by single Bmi1-positive stem cells and that in the established organoids, multiple Bmi1-positive stem cells were generated at the outermost layer. Moreover, we observed that organoids harvested at an early point in culture could be engrafted and maturate in the tongue of recipient mice and that the organoids generated from carcinogen-treated mice had an abnormal morphology. Thus, this culture system presents valuable settings for studying not only the regulatory mechanisms of lingual epithelium but also lingual regeneration and carcinogenesis.

  11. Characteristics of the Papua New Guinean dentition. I Shovel-shaped incisors and canines associated with lingual tubercles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, G A

    1977-10-01

    The prevalence of shovel-shaped and lingual tubercles in maxillary incisors and canines in four groups of people in Papua New Guinea is reported. The shovel shape was not common among the people of Highland New Guinea but its presence in Papuans was comparable with that in Mongoloid races.

  12. Wisdom tooth extraction causing lingual nerve and styloglossus muscle damage: a mimic of multiple cranial nerve palsies

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, A. S.; Evans, M.; Shah, S.; Catania, S.; Warren, J. D.; Gleeson, M. J.; Reilly, M. M.

    2017-01-01

    The combination of tongue hemianaesthesia, dysgeusia, dysarthria and dysphagia suggests the involvement of multiple cranial nerves. We present a case with sudden onset of these symptoms immediately following wisdom tooth extraction and highlight the clinical features that allowed localisation of the lesion to a focal, iatrogenic injury of the lingual nerve and adjacent styloglossus muscle.

  13. The Role of Music in Speech Intelligibility of Learners with Post Lingual Hearing Impairment in Selected Units in Lusaka District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katongo, Emily Mwamba; Ndhlovu, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to establish the role of music in speech intelligibility of learners with Post Lingual Hearing Impairment (PLHI) and strategies teachers used to enhance speech intelligibility in learners with PLHI in selected special units for the deaf in Lusaka district. The study used a descriptive research design. Qualitative and quantitative…

  14. Mandible vertical height correction using lingual bone-split pedicle onlay graft technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coen Pramono D

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available As edentulous mandible become atrophic, a denture bearing area will also be reduced. Difficulty in the removable prosthesis rehabilitation will be present as well. The purpose of this paper reports an innovative surgical technique to cope a problem of unstable complete lower denture due to bone atrophy and resulted of vertical height reduction of the anterior region of the mandible necessary for denture retention. Vertical advancement of the lower jaw using lingual bone split pedicle onlay graft technique in the anterior region of the mandible and followed by secondary epithelization vestibuloplasty in achieving the vertical height dimension. The surgery was achieved satisfactorily as the vertical dimension of the mandible anterior region had increased and the denture seated more stable comparing with the previous denture worn by the patient. It concluded that the surgery was achieved with a great result as the vertical height of the anterior region of the mandible had increased positively therefore lead the denture seated more stable.

  15. Glycerol restores the p53 function in human lingual cancer cells bearing mutant p53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ota, Ichiro; Yane, Katsunari; Yuki, Kazue; Kanata, Hirokazu; Hosoi, Hiroshi; Miyahara, Hiroshi

    2001-01-01

    Mutations in p53, tumor suppressor gene, have recently been shown to have an impact on the clinical course of several human tumors, including head and neck cancers. The genetic status of the p53 gene has been focused on as the most important candidate among various cancer-related genes for prognosis-predictive assays of cancer therapy. We examined the restoration of radiation- or cisplatin (CDDP)-induced p53-dependent apoptosis in human lingual cancer cells. The results suggest that glycerol is effective in inducing a conformational change of p53 and restoring normal function of mutant p53, leading to enhanced radiosensitivity or chemosensitivity through the induction of apoptosis. We have also represented the same results in vivo as in vitro. Thus, this novel tool for enhancement of radiosensitivity or chemosensitivity in cancer cells bearing m p53 may be applicable for p53-targeted cancer therapy. (author)

  16. Deutsch Durch Audio-Visuelle Methode: An Audio-Lingual-Oral Approach to the Teaching of German.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson Public Schools, ND. Instructional Media Center.

    This teaching guide, designed to accompany Chilton's "Deutsch Durch Audio-Visuelle Methode" for German 1 and 2 in a three-year secondary school program, focuses major attention on the operational plan of the program and a student orientation unit. A section on teaching a unit discusses four phases: (1) presentation, (2) explanation, (3)…

  17. Lingual Foramina and Canals of the Mandible: Anatomic Variations in a Lebanese Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Aoun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the mandibular lingual foramina (LF and canals and their anatomic variations using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT technology in a Lebanese population. Materials and Methods: In this study, we analyzed CBCT images of 90 adult Lebanese patients (41 males and 49 females. We assessed the number and location of the LF. In additional, we measured: (a The distance from both the alveolar crest and the inferior border of the mandible to the LF and (b the length of the lingual canals (LCs. The data obtained was analyzed statistically using Shapiro–Wilk normality test, t-test, Chi-square, and Fisher's exact tests. Statistical significance was set at 0.05. Results: In our sample, the LF and canals were present in 93.33% of the CBCT analyzed, and the majority (76.64% was located above the genial tubercles. The distance from the foramen of the superior and the inferior LCs to the alveolar crest was 16.24 ± 2.82 mm and 25.49 ± 2.43 mm, respectively. The distance from the foramen of the superior canal to the inferior border of the mandible was 14 ± 2.32 mm. The mean length of the superior canal was 5.81 ± 1.6 mm and 4.25 ± 1.2 mm for the inferior one. There were no gender-related differences in the anatomic characteristics of the LF and canals except for the distance measured from the superior canal foramina to the alveolar crest where the measurement was significantly greater in males compared to females. Neither the number of canals nor the positions of the foramina were different between males and females. Conclusion: Within the limits of this study, we concluded that in our sample of Lebanese adults, there was substantial variability in the LF and canals anatomy and location.

  18. Accuracy in tooth positioning with a fully customized lingual orthodontic appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauer, Dan; Proffit, William R

    2011-09-01

    To understand orthodontic tooth movement, a method of quantification of tooth position discrepancies in 3 dimensions is needed. Brackets and wires now can be fabricated by CAD/CAM technology on a setup made at the beginning of treatment, so that treatment should produce a reasonably precise duplicate of the setup. The extent of discrepancies between the planned and actual tooth movements can be quantified by registration of the setup and final models. The goal of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of a CAD/CAM lingual orthodontic technique. Dental casts of 94 consecutive patients from 1 practice, representing a broad range of orthodontic problems, were scanned to create digital models, and then the setup and final models for each patient were registered individually for the maxillary and mandibular dental arches. Individual tooth discrepancies between the setup and actual outcome were computed and expressed in terms of a six-degrees-of-freedom rectangular coordinate system. Discrepancies in position and rotation between the setup and outcome were small for all teeth (generally less than 1 mm and 4°) except for the second molars, where some larger discrepancies were observed. Faciolingual expansion in the posterior teeth was greater in the setup than in the final models, especially at the second molars. Linear mixed models showed that age, type of tooth, jaw, initial crowding, time in slot-filling wire, use of elastics, days in treatment, interproximal reduction, and rebonding, were all influences on the final differences, but, for most of these factors, the influence was small, explaining only a small amount of the discrepancy between the planned and the actual outcomes. These fully customized lingual orthodontic appliances were accurate in achieving the goals planned at the initial setup, except for the full amount of planned expansion and the inclination at the second molars. This methodology is the first step toward understanding and measuring tooth

  19. In vitro assessment of competency for different lingual brackets in sliding mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalithapriya, S; Kumaran, N Kurunji; Rajasigamani, K

    2015-01-01

    To determine the static frictional resistance of different lingual brackets at different second order angulations when coupled with stainless steel (SS) archwire in dry and wet conditions. Using a modified jig, frictional resistance was evaluated under different conditions for a total of 270 upper premolar lingual brackets (0.018″ × 0.025″ - conventional - 7(th) generation and STb, self-ligating - evolution) with no in-built tip or torque together with 0.016″ × 0.022″ straight length SS archwires. For conventional brackets, the archwire was secured with 0.008″ preformed SS short ligature ties. One way analysis of variance with Tukey HSD as post-hoc test was applied for degree wise and bracket wise comparison within dry condition and wet condition. For pair wise comparison Student's t-test was used. Under both conditions the static frictional resistance is significantly higher for self-ligating brackets at 0°, while at 5° and 10° it is higher for 7(th) generation brackets. Statistically, significant difference does not exist at 0° between conventional brackets and the same was found at 5° and 10° between STb and self-ligating brackets. With an increase in second order angulations, all the evaluated samples exhibited an increased frictional value. Wet condition samples obtained a higher value than their corresponding dry condition. The self-ligating bracket evaluated in this in vitro study is not beneficial in reducing friction during en-mass retraction due to its interactive clip type.

  20. Impacto da remoção de biofilme lingual em pacientes sob ventilação mecânica Impact of tongue biofilm removal on mechanically ventilated patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Sérgio da Silva Santos

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a eficiência de limpador de língua para remoção do biofilme lingual em pacientes sob ventilação mecânica. MÉTODOS: Foram coletadas amostras de biofilme lingual e de secreção traqueal de 50 pacientes intubados ou traqueostomizados sob ventilação assistida em grupo de estudo (GE - uso de limpador lingual e grupo controle (GC - sem higienização da língua. Foi realizada cultura de secreção oral e traqueal do GE (inicialmente e após 5 dias e do GC (em momento único para avaliar as modificações na flora bacteriana. RESULTADOS: Os pacientes do GE tinham mediana de idade de 77 (45-99 anos, e os do GC de 79 (21-94 anos. O período de internação dos pacientes do GE oscilou entre 17 e 1.370 dias, com mediana de 425 dias, e do GC, entre 4 e 240 dias, com mediana de 120 dias. Na comparação do índice de placa bacteriana bucal entre os grupos de estudo e controle, não foram encontradas diferenças significantes. Não houve correlação entre esse índice e o tempo de internação. A mesma flora bacteriana foi encontrada na placa bacteriana bucal antes e após 5 dias de uso do raspador lingual no GE, somente em 9 dos 27 casos em relação ao encontrado no GC (p=0,683. Em 7 dos 27 pacientes do GE houve positividade de culturas bacterianas com as mesmas cepas tanto para biofilme lingual quanto para secreção traqueal (p=0,003 em relação ao GC. A similaridade na resistência e na sensibilidade das cepas dos micro-organismos encontrados, com o objetivo de associar a flora do biofilme lingual com a da secreção traqueal, mostrou significância em 6/23 casos somente no GC (p=0,006. CONCLUSÃO: O uso do limpador de língua é um mecanismo efetivo na redução do biofilme lingual em pacientes sob ventilação mecânica, além de facilitar a ação dos cuidadores para ações de higiene bucal.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of a tongue cleaner in the removal of tongue biofilm in mechanically ventilated patients

  1. Outcome assessment of lingual and labial appliances compared with cephalometric analysis, peer assessment rating, and objective grading system in Angle Class II extraction cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguchi, Toru; Terao, Fumie; Aonuma, Tomo; Kataoka, Tomoki; Sugawara, Yasuyo; Yamashiro, Takashi; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko

    2015-05-01

    To validate our hypothesis that there would be significant differences in treatment outcomes, including cephalometric values, degree of root resorption, occlusal indices, and functional aspect, between cases treated with labial and lingual appliances. Twenty-four consecutively treated Class II cases with extractions and lingual appliance were compared with 25 matched cases treated with extraction and labial appliance. Orthodontic treatment outcomes were evaluated by cephalometric analysis, peer assessment rating, and an objective grading system (OGS). Additionally, functional analysis was also performed in both groups after orthodontic treatment. Statistical comparison was performed using the Wilcoxon signed rank test within the groups, and the Mann-Whitney U-test was used to compare between the labial and lingual groups. The only significant difference between the groups was that the interincisal angle was larger in the lingual group than in the labial group. OGS evaluation showed that control over root angulation was significantly worse in the lingual group than in the labial group. There was no significant difference between groups in the amount of root resorption or in functional evaluation. Generally, lingual appliances offer comparable treatment results to those obtained with labial appliances. However, care should be taken with lingual appliances because they are more prone to produce uprighted incisors and root angulation.

  2. Oral myiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thalaimalai Saravanan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myiasis is a pathologic condition in humans occurring because of parasitic infestation. Parasites causing myiasis belong to the order Diptera. Oral myiasis is seen secondary to oral wounds, suppurative lesions, and extraction wounds, especially in individuals with neurological deficit. In such cases, neglected oral hygiene and halitosis attracts the flies to lay eggs in oral wounds resulting in oral myiasis. We present a case of oral myiasis in 40-year-old male patient with mental disability and history of epilepsy.

  3. Oral cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - mouth; Mouth cancer; Head and neck cancer; Squamous cell cancer - mouth; Malignant neoplasm - oral ... National Cancer Institute. PDQ lip and oral cavity cancer ... September 25, 2015. www.cancer.gov/types/head-and-neck/hp/lip- ...

  4. Oral Ketamine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oral Ketamine: A Four-years Experience in ... Key words: Oral Ketamine, Premedication and Oncology. .... form of a letter published in 19835. .... Acta. Anaesthesiol Scandinavica, 1998; 42: 750-758. 4. Murray P. Substitution of another opioid ...

  5. [Correlation between the width of lingual vein and the changes of hemodynamics of portal system in patients with primary liver cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xiao-Qiang; Gao, Jing-Dong; Zhai, Xiao-Feng; Liu, Qing; Jiang, Dong; Ling, Chang-Quan

    2006-09-01

    To explore the correlation between the width of lingual varix and changes of hemodynamics of portal system in patients with primary liver cancer so as to supply the data for the forecast of portal hypertension by observing lingual varix. The diameter of lingual vein (Dlv) was measured by vernier caliper as dependent variable, and the diameters and indexes of hemodynamics of portal vessels were measured by Doppler as independent variables, then a multipe stepwise analysis was performed. The diameters of portal vein (Dpv) and splenic vein (Dsv) entered the formula Dlv (mm) = 0.185 + 0.311 Dsv (mm) + 0.236 Dpv (mm) when the entry and removal values were alpha(in)=0.10 and alpha(out)=0.15, respectively. The width of lingual vein is closely correlated with the diameters of portal vein and splenic vein in patients with primary liver cancer.

  6. Analysis of the torque capacity of a completely customized lingual appliance of the next generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In lingual orthodontic therapy, effective torque control of the incisors is crucial due to the biomechanical particularities associated with the point of force application and the tight link between third order deviations and vertical tooth position. Aim The aim of the present in vitro investigation was to analyze the torque capacity of a completely customized lingual appliance of the next generation (WIN) in combination with different finishing archwire dimensions. Methods Using a typodont of the upper arch carrying the WIN appliance, slot filling and undersized individualized β-titanium archwires were engaged. Horizontal forces ranging from 0 to 100 cN were applied at the central incisor by means of spring gauges. The resulting angular deviations were recorded and the corresponding torque moments were calculated. Results For fullsize archwires (0.018”×0.018” β-titanium and 0.018”×0.025” β-titanium), an initial torque play of 0-2° had to be overcome prior to the development of an effective torque moment. Thereafter, a linear correlation between torque angle and torque moment developed for both archwire dimensions with steeper slopes calculated for the specimens with the larger dimension. A torque moment of 2 Nmm required for effective torque correction was noted after a minimum of 2-3° of twist for the 0.018”×0.018” β-titanium wires as compared to 2-4° for the 0.018”×0.025” β-titanium study sample. When undersized archwires were analyzed (0.0175”×0.0175” β-titanium), the measured torque play ranged from 5-7°. After 8-12° of torque angle, the threshold of 2 Nmm was reached. A linear relationship between twist angle and torque moment in which the steepness of the slopes was generally flatter than the ones calculated for the slot filling archwires was noted. Conclusions Given the high precision of the bracket slot-archwire-combination provided with the WIN appliance, an effective torque control can be clinically

  7. Analysis and implementation of cross lingual short message service spam filtering using graph-based k-nearest neighbor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayu Cyntya Dewi, Dyah; Shaufiah; Asror, Ibnu

    2018-03-01

    SMS (Short Message Service) is on e of the communication services that still be the main choice, although now the phone grow with various applications. Along with the development of various other communication media, some countries lowered SMS rates to keep the interest of mobile users. It resulted in increased spam SMS that used by several parties, one of them for advertisement. Given the kind of multi-lingual documents in a message SMS, the Web, and others, necessary for effective multilingual or cross-lingual processing techniques is becoming increasingly important. The steps that performed in this research is data / messages first preprocessing then represented into a graph model. Then calculated using GKNN method. From this research we get the maximum accuracy is 98.86 with training data in Indonesian language and testing data in indonesian language with K 10 and threshold 0.001.

  8. Fungiform Taste Bud Degeneration in C57BL/6J Mice Following Chorda-Lingual Nerve Transection

    OpenAIRE

    Guagliardo, Nick A.; Hill, David L.

    2007-01-01

    Taste buds are dependent on innervation for normal morphology and function. Fungiform taste bud degeneration after chorda tympani nerve injury has been well documented in rats, hamsters, and gerbils. The current study examines fungiform taste bud distribution and structure in adult C57BL/6J mice from both intact taste systems and after unilateral chorda-lingual nerve transection. Fungiform taste buds were visualized and measured with the aid of cytokeratin 8. In control mice, taste buds were ...

  9. Control of anterior segment using an antero-posterior lingual sliding retraction system: a preliminary cone-beam CT study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Hwang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was performed to evaluate the treatment effects of the antero-posterior lingual retractor (APLR, focusing on the 3-dimensional (3D tooth movement of the maxillary anterior teeth and their alveolar bone levels. Methods En masse retraction was performed using either the C-lingual retractor (CLR, C-group, n = 9 or the antero-posterior lingual retractor (APLR, AP-group, n = 8. We evaluated 3D movement of the maxillary anterior teeth and alveolar bone levels, root length of the central incisors, long axes of the maxillary canines, and occlusal plane changes from CBCT images. Results After retraction, the central incisors were more significantly intruded and their root apex was more retracted in the AP-group. The long axis of the canine was well maintained in the AP-group. There were no differences in the steepness of occlusal plane and the incidence of alveolar bone loss or of root resorption during en masse retraction with the two retractors. Conclusions The clockwise bowing effect of the anterior segment was less with the APLR, which prevented unwanted canine movement.

  10. Failure Rates of Orthodontic Fixed Lingual Retainers bonded with Two Flowable Light-cured Adhesives: A Comparative Prospective Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talic, Nabeel F

    2016-08-01

    This comparative prospective randomized clinical trial examined the in vivo failure rates of fixed mandibular and maxillary lingual retainers bonded with two light-cured flowable composites over 6 months. Consecutive patients were divided into two groups on a 1:1 basis. Two hundred fixed lingual retainers were included, and their failures were followed for 6 months. One group (n = 50) received retainers bonded with a nano-hybrid composite based on nano-optimized technology (Tetric-N-Flow, Ivoclar Vivadent). Another group (n = 50) received retainers bonded with a low viscosity (LV) composite (Transbond Supreme LV, 3M Unitek). There was no significant difference between the overall failure rates of mandibular retainers bonded with Transbond (8%) and those bonded with Tetric-N-Flow (18%). However, the odds ratio for failure using Tetric-N-flow was 2.52-fold greater than that of Transbond. The failure rate of maxillary retainers bonded with Transbond was higher (14%), but not significantly different, than that of maxillary retainers bonded with Tetric-N-flow (10%). There was no significant difference in the estimated mean survival times of the maxillary and mandibular retainers bonded with the two composites. Both types of composites tested in the current study can be used to bond fixed maxillary and mandibular lingual retainers, with low failure rates.

  11. Single stage circumferential lingual mucosal graft urethroplasty in near obliterative bulbar urethra stricture: A novel technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Umesh; Yadav, Sher Singh; Tomar, Vinay; Garg, Amit

    2016-01-01

    This is a prospective study of the use and efficacy of a novel technique of circumferential tubularised lingual mucosal graft (LMG) in obliterative and near obliterative bulbar urethral stricture of >2 cm where excisional and augmented anastomotic urethroplasty are not feasible. The stenotic urethral segment was opened dorsally in midline and fibrosed urethra was excised taking care to preserve the healthy spongiosum tissue. LMG (av. Length 3 cm) was placed from one end of corporal body towards spongy tissue in a circumferential manner. Another LMG was placed in similar manner to deal with longer stricture. The urethra was tubularised over 14 Fr silicone catheter. A total of 12 men, of mean age 47 years underwent this procedure. The mean follow up period was 11 months starting from July 2014 till manuscript submission. Follow up included voiding cystourethrogram at 3 weeks, cystoscopy at 3 months (one patient didn't turned up) and subsequent follow up. Mean stricture length was 4.66 cm (range, 3-8.5 cm) and mean operative time was 195 min. (range, 160 to 200 min.). The technique was successful (normal voiding with no need for any post-operative procedure) in 11(91.6%) patients. One patient developed early recurrence at 4 month of surgery and had anastomotic stricture which was successfully managed by direct visual internal urethrotomy. Single stage circumferential tubularised graft urethroplasty is an excellent technique for strictures that include segments of obliterative and near obliterative diseased urethra. It provide a wider neourethra than patch graft urethroplasty.

  12. Dorsal onlay lingual mucosal graft urethroplasty for urethral strictures in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Girish K; Pandey, Ashwani; Bansal, Harbans; Swain, Sameer; Das, Suren K; Trivedi, Sameer; Dwivedi, Udai S; Singh, Pratap B

    2010-05-01

    To describe the technique and results of dorsal onlay lingual mucosal graft (LMG) urethroplasty for the definitive management of urethral strictures in women. In all, 15 women (mean age 42 years) with a history suggestive of urethral stricture who had undergone multiple urethral dilatations and/or urethrotomy were selected for dorsal onlay LMG urethroplasty after thorough evaluation, from October 2006 to March 2008. After a suprameatal inverted-U incision, the dorsal aspect of the urethra was dissected and urethrotomy was done at the 12 o'clock position across the strictured segment. Tailored LMG harvested from the ventrolateral aspect of the tongue was then sutured to the urethrotomy wound over an 18 F silicone catheter. The preoperative mean maximum urinary flow rate of 7.2 mL/s increased to 29.87 mL/s, 26.95 mL/s and 26.86 mL/s with a 'normal' flow rate curve at 3, 6 and 12 months follow-up, respectively. One patient at the 3-month follow-up had submeatal stenosis and required urethral dilatation thrice at monthly intervals. At the 1-year follow-up, none of the present patients had any neurosensory complications, urinary incontinence, or long-term functional/aesthetic complication at the donor site. LMG urethroplasty using the dorsal onlay technique should be offered for correction of persistent female urethral stricture as it provides a simple, safe and effective approach with durable results.

  13. Wire Roughness Assessment of 0.016'' × 0.022'' the Technique Lingual Orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchini, Fátima Mm; Filho, Mario Vedovello; Vedovello, Silvia As; Cotrim, Flávio A; Cotrim-Ferreira, Andrຟa; Tubel, Carlos Am

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the difference in surface roughness of stainless steel archwires of different commercial brands used in lingual orthodontics. Precontoured arches measuring 0.016'' × 0.022'' were selected of the following brands: Tecnident, Adenta, G&H, Highland Metals Inc., Ormco, Incognito, and Ebraces. Quantitative evaluation of the surface roughness of archwires was performed by means of an atomic force microscope in contact mode. Three surface readouts were taken of each sample, analyzing areas of 20 × 20 μm. Each scan of the samples produced a readout of 512 lines, generating three-dimensional images of the wires. The analysis of variance statistical test was applied to prove significant variables (p > 0.05), with H 0 being rejected and H 1 accepted. The Incognito brand showed the lowest surface roughness. The archwires of brands Adenta, Tecnident, Highland, and Ormco showed similar values among them, and all close to these obtained by the Incognito brand. The archwires of the Ebraces brand showed the highest surface roughness, with values being close to those of the G&H Brand. There was a statistical difference in surface roughness of orthodontic archwires among the brands studied. Companies should pay attention to the quality control of their materials, as these may directly affect the quality of orthodontic treatment.

  14. Evidence-based outcomes following inferior alveolar and lingual nerve injury and repair: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnerev, E; Yates, J M

    2015-10-01

    The inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) and lingual (LN) are susceptible to iatrogenic surgical damage. Systematically review recent clinical evidence regarding IAN/LN repair methods and to develop updated guidelines for managing injury. Recent publications on IAN/LN microsurgical repair from Medline, Embase and Cochrane Library databases were screened by title/abstract. Main texts were appraised for exclusion criteria: no treatment performed or results provided, poor/lacking procedural description, cohort nerve recovery occurred after direct apposition and suturing if nerve ending gaps were nerve grafting (sural/greater auricular nerve). Timing of microneurosurgical repair after injury remains debated. Most authors recommend surgery when neurosensory deficit shows no improvement 90 days post-diagnosis. Nerve transection diagnosed intra-operatively should be repaired in situ; minor nerve injury repair can be delayed. No consensus exists regarding optimal methods and timing for IAN/LN repair. We suggest a schematic guideline for treating IAN/LN injury, based on the most current evidence. We acknowledge that additional RCTs are required to provide definitive confirmation of optimal treatment approaches. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. An experimental study on radiation hazard to lingual papillae of dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomiyama, Motoya

    1986-01-01

    The dorsal membrane of the tongue was exposed to X-rays in a total dose of 30 Gy (10 Gy/day at intervals of 3 days) in 19 young dogs. Light microscopic (LM) and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observations were made on the first, 3rd, 5th, 9th, 15th, 35th, and 60th days. The animals had physical signs, including slow movement, loss of appetite, eye mucus or secretion, and weakness, on Days 5 and 9. On Day 15, their signs began to be recovered. On Day 9, the mucous membrane of the tongue closest to the irradiation tube turned to yellowish-brown, where erosion formation, without lingual papillae or epithelial layers, was seen on LM. The lamina propria of mucous membrane where inflammatory cells had infiltrated was exposed. On SEM, the erosive region contained mixed these inflammatory cells and debris of the epithelial layers. Irregularly arranged connective tissues and congested and dilated blood vessels were seen over the lamina propria of mucous membrane with extending atrophied and striated muscular fibers. Scanning electron microscopy of the normal colored mucous membrane showed some morphological changes in the filiform and fungiform papillae. The taste buds of fungiform papillae decreased in number, and showed atrophied and vacuolized cells. On Day 15, the repair of the epithelial layers was seen. However, cells remained atrophied and were arranged irregularly. On Day 35, some taste buds had still inflammatory cells. Complete recovery was attained 60 days after irradiation. (Namekawa, K.)

  16. Oral Hygiene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Marie Toftdahl; Villadsen, Dorte Buxbom

    The aim of the study was to explore how adults with schizo- phrenia describe their lived experiences with oral hygiene. 23 adults with schizophrenia were interviewed within a period of four months in late 2015. Transcriptions of the interviews were analysed using the Reflective Lifeworld Research...... health care professionals and adults with schizophrenia in order to improve oral health, well-being and recovery....

  17. Oral Hygiene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Dorte Buxbom; Sørensen, Marie Toftdahl

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study is to explore how adults with schizophrenia describe their lived experiences with oral hygiene. 23 adults with schizophrenia were interviewed within a period of four months in late 2015. Transcriptions of the interviews were analysed using the Reflective Lifeworld Research ph...... health care professionals and adults with schizophrenia in order to improve oral health, well-being and recovery....

  18. Basaloid Squamous Cell Carcinoma Involving the Alveolar Ridge, Buccal & Lingual Vestibule - A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriya Koshti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of oral mucosa is a rare and aggressive variant of squamous cell carcinoma. They can be differentiated from squamous cell carcinomas by their distinct clinical and histopathological features. Methods: 45 year old female patient presented with extra oral exophytic mass and intra-oral ulcerative lesion on right buccal mucosa and vestibule. The patient was referred for routine blood examination and radiography followed by incisional biopsy. The biopsy specimen was fixed, processed and stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin for further microscopic examination. Results: On microscopic examination basaloid cells were seen proliferating along with dysplastic squamous cells in the connective tissue stroma. Conclusion: Based on the histopathological findings a diagnosis of ′Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma′ was made. The patient was referred to department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery for excision of the lesion followed by radiotherapy.

  19. Single stage circumferential lingual mucosal graft urethroplasty in near obliterative bulbar urethra stricture: A novel technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This is a prospective study of the use and efficacy of a novel technique of circumferential tubularised lingual mucosal graft (LMG in obliterative and near obliterative bulbar urethral stricture of >2 cm where excisional and augmented anastomotic urethroplasty are not feasible. Materials and Methods: The stenotic urethral segment was opened dorsally in midline and fibrosed urethra was excised taking care to preserve the healthy spongiosum tissue. LMG (av. Length 3 cm was placed from one end of corporal body towards spongy tissue in a circumferential manner. Another LMG was placed in similar manner to deal with longer stricture. The urethra was tubularised over 14 Fr silicone catheter. Results: A total of 12 men, of mean age 47 years underwent this procedure. The mean follow up period was 11 months starting from July 2014 till manuscript submission. Follow up included voiding cystourethrogram at 3 weeks, cystoscopy at 3 months (one patient didn't turned up and subsequent follow up. Mean stricture length was 4.66 cm (range, 3–8.5 cm and mean operative time was 195 min. (range, 160 to 200 min.. The technique was successful (normal voiding with no need for any post-operative procedure in 11(91.6% patients. One patient developed early recurrence at 4 month of surgery and had anastomotic stricture which was successfully managed by direct visual internal urethrotomy. Conclusion: Single stage circumferential tubularised graft urethroplasty is an excellent technique for strictures that include segments of obliterative and near obliterative diseased urethra. It provide a wider neourethra than patch graft urethroplasty.

  20. Lingual metastasis from renal cell carcinoma: a case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camillo Porta

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC accounts for the 3% of all solid tumors. Despite continuous improvement in the therapy regimen, less has been achieved in terms of enabling an earlier diagnosis: the neoplasia usually reveals its presence at an advanced stage, obviously affecting prognosis. The most frequent sites of secondary disease are shown to be lungs (50-60%, bone (30-40%, liver (30-40% and brain (5%; while the head and neck district seems to account for less than 1% of patients with primary kidney lesion. We report here the case of a 70-year old man who presented with acute renal failure due to abdominal recurrence of RCC 18 years post nephrectomy. After a few months of follow up without any systemic therapy due to the renal impairment, the patient presented a vascularized tongue lesion that was demonstrated to be a secondary localization of the RCC. This lesion has, therefore, been treated with microsphere embolization to stop the frequent bleeding and to lessen the unbearable concomitant symptoms it caused, such as dysphagia and pain. A tongue lesion that appears in a RCC patient should always be considered suspect and a multidisciplinary study should be conducted both to assess whether it is a metastasis or a primary new lesion and to understand which method should be selected, if necessary, to treat it (surgery, radiation or embolization. Lingual metastasis should be examined accurately not only because they seem to implicate a poor prognosis, but also because they carry a burden of symptoms that not only threatens patients’ lives but also has a strong impact on their quality of life.

  1. Tongue-driven sonar beam steering by a lingual-echolocating fruit bat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu-Jung Lee

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Animals enhance sensory acquisition from a specific direction by movements of head, ears, or eyes. As active sensing animals, echolocating bats also aim their directional sonar beam to selectively "illuminate" a confined volume of space, facilitating efficient information processing by reducing echo interference and clutter. Such sonar beam control is generally achieved by head movements or shape changes of the sound-emitting mouth or nose. However, lingual-echolocating Egyptian fruit bats, Rousettus aegyptiacus, which produce sound by clicking their tongue, can dramatically change beam direction at very short temporal intervals without visible morphological changes. The mechanism supporting this capability has remained a mystery. Here, we measured signals from free-flying Egyptian fruit bats and discovered a systematic angular sweep of beam focus across increasing frequency. This unusual signal structure has not been observed in other animals and cannot be explained by the conventional and widely-used "piston model" that describes the emission pattern of other bat species. Through modeling, we show that the observed beam features can be captured by an array of tongue-driven sound sources located along the side of the mouth, and that the sonar beam direction can be steered parsimoniously by inducing changes to the pattern of phase differences through moving tongue location. The effects are broadly similar to those found in a phased array-an engineering design widely found in human-made sonar systems that enables beam direction changes without changes in the physical transducer assembly. Our study reveals an intriguing parallel between biology and human engineering in solving problems in fundamentally similar ways.

  2. Accessory neurovascular foramina on the lingual surface of mandible: Incidence, topography, and clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B V Murlimanju

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: It was suggested that the accessory neurovascular foramina of the mandible might be of significance in relation to the effectiveness of local anesthesia following the routine inferior alveolar nerve block. Aims: To investigate the incidence of neurovascular foramina over the lingual surface of the mandible in South Indian population. Settings and Design: The study was conducted at the department of anatomy. Materials and Methods: The study included 67 human adult dry mandibles, the exact ages and sexes of which were not known. The location and number of neurovascular foramina were topographically analyzed. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive statistics. Results: The foramina were observed in 64 mandibles (95.5% and were often multiple in most of the cases. They were located between the two medial incisors in 8 mandibles (1.9%, between the medial and lateral incisor in 34 mandibles (50.7%; 25-bilateral; 7-right; 2-left, between the lateral incisor and canine in 7 mandibles (10.4%; 2-bilateral; 3-right; 2-left, between the canine and first premolar in 6 cases (8.9%; 3 on each side. Foramina were also present around the genial tubercle in 56 mandibles (83.6%. Among them, 52 mandibles showed a single foramen just above the genial tubercle, 34 mandibles had foramina below the tubercles, 13 mandibles had foramina on the right side of genial tubercle and 17 were having on the left side. Conclusion: Since the anatomical details of these foramina are important to various fields of dentistry and oncology, the present investigation was undertaken. The clinical significance and implications are emphasized.

  3. Neural crest contribution to lingual mesenchyme, epithelium and developing taste papillae and taste buds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong-Xiang; Komatsu, Yoshihiro; Mishina, Yuji; Mistretta, Charlotte M

    2012-08-15

    The epithelium of mammalian tongue hosts most of the taste buds that transduce gustatory stimuli into neural signals. In the field of taste biology, taste bud cells have been described as arising from "local epithelium", in distinction from many other receptor organs that are derived from neurogenic ectoderm including neural crest (NC). In fact, contribution of NC to both epithelium and mesenchyme in the developing tongue is not fully understood. In the present study we used two independent, well-characterized mouse lines, Wnt1-Cre and P0-Cre that express Cre recombinase in a NC-specific manner, in combination with two Cre reporter mouse lines, R26R and ZEG, and demonstrate a contribution of NC-derived cells to both tongue mesenchyme and epithelium including taste papillae and taste buds. In tongue mesenchyme, distribution of NC-derived cells is in close association with taste papillae. In tongue epithelium, labeled cells are observed in an initial scattered distribution and progress to a clustered pattern between papillae, and within papillae and early taste buds. This provides evidence for a contribution of NC to lingual epithelium. Together with previous reports for the origin of taste bud cells from local epithelium in postnatal mouse, we propose that NC cells migrate into and reside in the epithelium of the tongue primordium at an early embryonic stage, acquire epithelial cell phenotypes, and undergo cell proliferation and differentiation that is involved in the development of taste papillae and taste buds. Our findings lead to a new concept about derivation of taste bud cells that include a NC origin. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Development and testing of novel bisphenol A-free adhesives for lingual fixed retainer bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliadi, Anna; Eliades, Theodore; Silikas, Nick; Eliades, George

    2017-02-01

    To comparatively evaluate the properties of two BPA-free experimental adhesives (EXA, EXB) for lingual fixed retainer bonding versus a commercially available reference material (Transbond LR-TLR) based on BPA-compound. The experimental materials were a flowable 60 per cent glass filler-filled UEDMA/TEGDMA flowable composite (EXB) and a 70 per cent glass filler-filled paste composite with PCDMA/UEDMA/TEGDMA co-monomers. The properties tested were degree of conversion (DC%), mechanical properties (Martens hardness-MH, elastic modulus-E IT , elastic index-n IT ), effect of prolonged (6 months) water storage (changes in Vickers microhardness-VHN) and pull-out strength employing a multi-stranded wire. EXB showed the highest DC% (63.6 per cent), followed by EXA (50.5 per cent) and TRL (44.1 per cent), with all means differences being statistically significant (P EXA (53MPa; 12.9GPa) > EXB (12.9MPa; 6.7GPa), whereas for n IT, EXB (40 per cent) > EXA (34.9 per cent), TLR (33.6 per cent). All materials were affected by prolonged water storage with significant differences among them in VHN. TLR was the most affected material (ΔVHN = -11 per cent), followed by EXA (ΔVHN = -6.8 per cent) and EXB (ΔVHN = -4.2 per cent). No statistically significant differences were found in the pull-out strength testing (24-24.2 N range) and failure mode (70-77 per cent mixed). Considering the differences between the two experimental materials, it may be concluded that the material containing the PCDMA/UEDMA/TEGDMA co-monomers may be used as an alternative to the control. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Oral leukoplakia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmstrup, Palle; Dabelsteen, Erik

    2016-01-01

    The idea of identifying oral lesions with a precancerous nature, i.e. in the sense of pertaining to a pathologic process with an increased risk for future malignant development, of course is to prevent frank malignancy to occur in the affected area. The most common oral lesion with a precancerous...... nature is oral leukoplakia, and for decades it has been discussed how to treat these lesions. Various treatment modalities, such as systemic therapies and surgical removal, have been suggested. The systemic therapies tested so far include retinoids, extracts of green tea, inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-2...

  6. Comparison of rate of En masse retraction and anchorage loss in conventional labial appliance with labial and lingual force: A clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilshad Quraishi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The rate of en masse retraction and anchorage loss were compared between labial appliance with lingual force and conventional labial appliance. Subjects and Methods: The sample consists of 14 patients and they were divided into two groups. In Group 1 – labial appliance with lingual force, elastomeric chain was placed from the palatal surface of the canines to the palatal surface of the molars. In Group 2 – labial appliance with labial force, elastomeric chain was placed from the crimpable hook distal to lateral incisor to the molar tube hooks. The rate of en masse retraction and anchorage loss was calculated for both the groups during retraction in dental casts (R0, initial; R1, 4 weeks; R2, 8 weeks; and R3, 12 weeks. Statistical Analysis Used: Student's paired t-test. Results: The rate of retraction was faster and anchorage loss was lower with labial appliance with lingual force, i.e., Group 1. The difference of anchorage loss in Group 1 and Group 2 shows t = 4.824 and P value= 0.000, which is statistically highly significant. The difference of rate of retraction in Group 1 and Group 2 shows t = 3.573 and P value = 0.004, which is statistically signifcant. Conclusions: The rate of retraction was faster and anchorage loss was lower with labial appliance with lingual force, thus indicating that this new technique of space closure utilizes biomechanical advantage of lingual force in conventional labial appliance.

  7. Influence of ligation method on friction resistance of lingual brackets with different second-order angulations: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Graziane Olímpio; Gimenez, Carla Maria Melleiro; Prieto, Lucas; Prieto, Marcos Gabriel do Lago; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate stainless steel archwire static friction in active and passive self-ligating lingual and conventional brackets with second-order angulations. Two conventional lingual brackets for canines (STb light/Ormco; PSWb/Tecnident), and two self-ligating brackets, one active (In-Ovation L/GAC) and the other passive (3D/ Forestadent), were evaluated. A stainless steel archwire was used at 0°, 3° and 5° angulations. Metal ligatures, conventional elastic ligatures, and low friction elastic ligatures were also tested. A universal testing machine applied friction between brackets and wires, simulating sliding mechanics, to produce 2-mm sliding at 3 mm/minute speed. Two-way analysis of variance demonstrated a significant effect of the interaction between brackets and angulations (p frictional resistance values were observed at 5° angulation for In-Ovation L, PSWb bracket with non conventional ligature, and STb bracket with metal ligature. As for 3D, PSWb with conventional or metal ligatures, and STb brackets with non conventional ligature, showed significantly lower static frictional resistance with 0° angulation. At 0° angulation, STb brackets with metal ties, In-Ovation L brackets and 3D brackets had the lowest frictional resistance. As the angulation increased from 0° to 3°, static friction resistance increased. When angulation increased from 3° to 5°, static friction resistance increased or remained the same. Self-ligating 3D and In-Ovation L brackets, as well as conventional STb brackets, seem to be the best option when sliding mechanics is used to perform lingual orthodontic treatment.

  8. Functional and comparative study of lingual papillae in four species of bear (Ursidae) by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, J F; Barbosa, M; de Paz, F J; García, M; Ferrero, E

    2011-10-01

    The eight current species of bear (Ursidae) are widely distributed throughout Europe, Asia, and America. They are mainly encountered in the northern hemisphere, except for the spectacled bear and the sun bear, which are also found in the south of the equator. Adaptations of the masticatory apparatus (teeth, tongue, and musculature) to diet are one of the factors that imply the greatest structural changes in the cranium. This diet may be carnivorous, herbivorous, melliferous, or insectivorous, with one type of food predominating according to the time of year. The way in which food is eaten determines the morphology of the lingual surface; generally speaking, all bears put their mouth to the food, which, initially, they lick or they let the food stick to their tongue, as occurs when insects are eaten. As in all mammals, a distinction can be made between mechanical and gustatory papillae and the development and distribution of which depend on the species and their eating habits. In this study of the complete tongues of four species of adult bears, we describe the morphology of the lingual surfaces, the different types of papillae, their characteristics, and topographic distribution. It was seen that there were five main types of lingual papillae: filiform, conical, fungiform, foliate, and vallate. Morphology of the microgrooves and pores was similar to that observed in other mammals. In general, there were no great differences among the four species of bears studied, perhaps due to the similarity in the kind of food they consume in captivity. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerson, S J

    1990-01-01

    In the U.S. oral cancer accounts for 2.1% of all cancers and 1% of cancer deaths. Two to three times as many males as females are affected. Blacks have more intra-oral cancer than whites, and their incidence and mortality rates have increased in recent years. The etiologic process very likely involves several factors. The major etiologic agents are tobacco (all types) and alcoholic beverages. Herpes simplex virus, human papilloma virus, and Candida have been implicated. Host factors include poor state of dentition, nutritional aberrations, cirrhosis of liver, lichen planus, and immunologic impairmant. Cellular changes include amplification of some oncogenes, alterations in antigen expression, production of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, and disturbance of keratin and involucrin production. Experimentally, cancer is readily produced on the hamster cheek pouch and rat oral mucosa. Unlike oral cancer in humans, most experimental lesions are exophytic, and they rarely metastasize.

  10. Urethral reconstruction with a 3D porous bacterial cellulose scaffold seeded with lingual keratinocytes in a rabbit model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Jian-Wen; Lv, Xiang-Guo; Song, Lu-Jie; Feng, Chao; Xie, Min-Kai; Li, Chao; Li, Hong-Bin; Wang, Ji-Hong; Zhu, Wei-Dong; Xu, Yue-Min; Li, Zhe; Chen, Shi-Yan; Wang, Hua-Ping

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of urethral reconstruction with a three-dimensional (3D) porous bacterial cellulose (BC) scaffold seeded with lingual keratinocytes in a rabbit model. A novel 3D porous BC scaffold was prepared by gelatin sponge interfering in the BC fermentation process. Rabbit lingual keratinocytes were isolated, expanded, and seeded onto 3D porous BC. BC alone (group 1, N  =  10), 3D porous BC alone (group 2, N  =  10), and 3D porous BC seeded with lingual keratinocytes (group 3, N  =  10) were used to repair rabbit ventral urethral defects (2.0   ×   0.8 cm). Scanning electron microscopy revealed that BC consisted of a compact laminate while 3D porous BC was composed of a porous sheet buttressed by a dense outer layer. The average pore diameter and porosity of the 3D porous BC were 4.23   ±   1.14 μm and 67.00   ±   6.80%, respectively. At 3 months postoperatively, macroscopic examinations and retrograde urethrograms of urethras revealed that all urethras maintained wide calibers in group 3. Strictures were found in all rabbits in groups 1 and 2. Histologically, at 1 month postoperatively, intact epithelium occurred in group 3, and discontinued epithelium was found in groups 1 and 2. However, groups 2 and 3 exhibited similar epithelial regeneration, which was superior to that of group 1 at 3 months (p  <  0.05). Comparisons of smooth muscle content and endothelia density among the three groups revealed a significant increase at each time point (p  <  0.05). Our results demonstrated that 3D porous BC seeded with lingual keratinocytes enhanced urethral tissue regeneration. 3D porous BC could potentially be used as an optimized scaffold for urethral reconstruction. (paper)

  11. Wisdom tooth extraction causing lingual nerve and styloglossus muscle damage: a mimic of multiple cranial nerve palsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Aisling S; Evans, Matthew; Shah, Sachit; Catania, Santi; Warren, Jason D; Gleeson, Michael J; Reilly, Mary M

    2017-06-01

    The combination of tongue hemianaesthesia, dysgeusia, dysarthria and dysphagia suggests the involvement of multiple cranial nerves. We present a case with sudden onset of these symptoms immediately following wisdom tooth extraction and highlight the clinical features that allowed localisation of the lesion to a focal, iatrogenic injury of the lingual nerve and adjacent styloglossus muscle. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Oral sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-04-05

    The Gay and Lesbian Medical Association urges HIV prevention specialists to regard male-to-male oral-genital sex as a low-risk activity and concentrate instead on the danger of unprotected anal intercourse. According to the association, the confusion and mixed messages surrounding oral sex are harming efforts to encourage gay men to make rational choices about truly risky behavior. The recommendations appear in the association's position paper issued March 19, 1996.

  13. Oral Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... decrease the risk of oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer. Oral cavity, pharyngeal, and laryngeal cancer are diseases in ... and treatment of oral cavity, pharyngeal, and laryngeal cancer: Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Prevention Lip and Oral ...

  14. Ribbon-wise customized lingual appliance and orthodontic anchor screw for the treatment of skeletal high-angle maxillary protrusion without bowing effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inami, Toru; Ito, Goshi; Miyazawa, Ken; Tabuchi, Masako; Goto, Shigemi

    2018-05-02

    This case report demonstrates the treatment of a skeletal Class II high-angle adult patient with bimaxillary protrusion, angle Class I occlusion, and crowded anterior teeth. A ribbon-wise arch wire and a customized lingual appliance with anterior vertical slots were used to achieve proper torque control of the maxillary anterior teeth. An orthodontic anchor screw and a palatal bar were used for vertical control to avoid increasing the Frankfort-mandibular plane angle (FMA) by maxillary molar extrusion. Through the combined use of the ribbon-wise customized lingual appliance, palatal bar, and orthodontic anchor screw, vertical control and an excellent treatment result were achieved without the vertical and horizontal bowing effects peculiar to conventional lingual treatment.

  15. [The supportive outcome of periodontal non-surgical therapy to severe chronic periodontitis accompanied with malformed lingual groove in lateral incisor for 6 years: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Kang, Jun

    2011-06-01

    To track the initiating and developing process of one case diagnosed as chronic periodontitis accompanied with malformed lingual groove in maxillary lateral incisor and report the long-term prognosis to the periodontal conservative and supportive therapy. The patient was diagnosed with mild chronic periodontitis 6 years ago and accepted routine periodontal scaling and root planning (SRP) plus supportive periodontal therapy (SPT) one time. Two years later the periodontal condition deteriorated by deep pockets in molars and severe bone destruction around the maxillary lateral incisor with malformed lingual groove. After SRP in sites which pocket depth more than 4mm plus root canal therapy and lingual groove plasty of maxillary right lateral incisor, the SPT regularly proceeded at 3rd, 6th and 12th month. At present the whole periodontal tissue was healthy, the bone lesion around maxillary lateral incisor recovered well, the tooth had no mobile, the cosmetic effect andtooth function was in good state, and the patient was very satisfied.

  16. Conditional expression of the dominant-negative TGF-β receptor type II elicits lingual epithelial hyperplasia in transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Zhou, Mingliang

    2013-05-01

    The transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling pathway is generally believed to be a potent inhibitor of proliferation. However, many epithelia lacking the essential Tgfbr2 gene still maintain normal tissue homeostasis. Here, transgenic mice expressing rtTA from the human keratin 14 (K14) promoter were used to generate an inducible dominant-negative TGF-β receptor type II (Tgfbr2) mutant model, which allowed us to distinguish between the primary and secondary effects of TGF-β signaling disruption by Doxycycline treatment in K14+ epithelial stem cells. We showed that in mice lacking TGF-β signaling in K14+ cells, invasive carcinomas developed on the ventral surface of the tip of the tongue, while filiform papillae on the dorsal surface showed different pathological changes from the tip to the posterior of the tongue. In addition, acetylation levels of histone H4 and histone H3 rapidly increased, while pMAPK activity was enhanced and Jagged2 inactivated in lingual epithelia after disruption of TGF-β signaling. Our results contribute to the understanding of TGF-β signaling in regulating homeostasis and carcinogenesis in lingual epithelia. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. β-Catenin Signaling Biases Multipotent Lingual Epithelial Progenitors to Differentiate and Acquire Specific Taste Cell Fates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dany Gaillard

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Continuous taste bud cell renewal is essential to maintain taste function in adults; however, the molecular mechanisms that regulate taste cell turnover are unknown. Using inducible Cre-lox technology, we show that activation of β-catenin signaling in multipotent lingual epithelial progenitors outside of taste buds diverts daughter cells from a general epithelial to a taste bud fate. Moreover, while taste buds comprise 3 morphological types, β-catenin activation drives overproduction of primarily glial-like Type I taste cells in both anterior fungiform (FF and posterior circumvallate (CV taste buds, with a small increase in Type II receptor cells for sweet, bitter and umami, but does not alter Type III sour detector cells. Beta-catenin activation in post-mitotic taste bud precursors likewise regulates cell differentiation; forced activation of β-catenin in these Shh+ cells promotes Type I cell fate in both FF and CV taste buds, but likely does so non-cell autonomously. Our data are consistent with a model where β-catenin signaling levels within lingual epithelial progenitors dictate cell fate prior to or during entry of new cells into taste buds; high signaling induces Type I cells, intermediate levels drive Type II cell differentiation, while low levels may drive differentiation of Type III cells.

  18. β-Catenin Signaling Biases Multipotent Lingual Epithelial Progenitors to Differentiate and Acquire Specific Taste Cell Fates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, Dany; Xu, Mingang; Liu, Fei; Millar, Sarah E; Barlow, Linda A

    2015-05-01

    Continuous taste bud cell renewal is essential to maintain taste function in adults; however, the molecular mechanisms that regulate taste cell turnover are unknown. Using inducible Cre-lox technology, we show that activation of β-catenin signaling in multipotent lingual epithelial progenitors outside of taste buds diverts daughter cells from a general epithelial to a taste bud fate. Moreover, while taste buds comprise 3 morphological types, β-catenin activation drives overproduction of primarily glial-like Type I taste cells in both anterior fungiform (FF) and posterior circumvallate (CV) taste buds, with a small increase in Type II receptor cells for sweet, bitter and umami, but does not alter Type III sour detector cells. Beta-catenin activation in post-mitotic taste bud precursors likewise regulates cell differentiation; forced activation of β-catenin in these Shh+ cells promotes Type I cell fate in both FF and CV taste buds, but likely does so non-cell autonomously. Our data are consistent with a model where β-catenin signaling levels within lingual epithelial progenitors dictate cell fate prior to or during entry of new cells into taste buds; high signaling induces Type I cells, intermediate levels drive Type II cell differentiation, while low levels may drive differentiation of Type III cells.

  19. Oral candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millsop, Jillian W; Fazel, Nasim

    2016-01-01

    Oral candidiasis (OC) is a common fungal disease encountered in dermatology, most commonly caused by an overgrowth of Candida albicans in the mouth. Although thrush is a well-recognized presentation of OC, it behooves clinicians to be aware of the many other presentations of this disease and how to accurately diagnose and manage these cases. The clinical presentations of OC can be broadly classified as white or erythematous candidiasis, with various subtypes in each category. The treatments include appropriate oral hygiene, topical agents, and systemic medications. This review focuses on the various clinical presentations of OC and treatment options. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Oral myiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Treville Pereira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Myiasis is a relatively rare condition arising from the invasion of body tissues or cavities of living animals or humans by maggots or larvae of certain species of flies. It is an uncommon clinical condition, being more frequent in underdeveloped countries and hot climate regions, and is associated with poor hygiene, suppurative oral lesions; alcoholism and senility. Its diagnosis is made basically by the presence of larvae. The present article reports a case of oral myiasis involving 20 larvae in a patient with neurological deficiency.

  1. Modulation of oral heat and cold pain by irritant chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albin, Kelly C; Carstens, Mirela Iodi; Carstens, E

    2008-01-01

    Common food irritants elicit oral heat or cool sensations via actions at thermosensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. We used a half-tongue, 2-alternative forced-choice procedure coupled with bilateral pain intensity ratings to investigate irritant effects on heat and cold pain. The method was validated in a bilateral thermal difference detection task. Capsaicin, mustard oil, and cinnamaldehyde enhanced lingual heat pain elicited by a 49 degrees C stimulus. Mustard oil and cinnamaldehyde weakly enhanced lingual cold pain (9.5 degrees C), whereas capsaicin had no effect. Menthol significantly enhanced cold pain and weakly reduced heat pain. To address if capsaicin's effect was due to summation of perceptually similar thermal and chemical sensations, one-half of the tongue was desensitized by application of capsaicin. Upon reapplication, capsaicin elicited little or no irritant sensation yet still significantly enhanced heat pain on the capsaicin-treated side, ruling out summation. In a third experiment, capsaicin significantly enhanced pain ratings to graded heat stimuli (47 degrees C to 50 degrees C) resulting in an upward shift of the stimulus-response function. Menthol may induce cold hyperalgesia via enhanced thermal gating of TRPM8 in peripheral fibers. Capsaicin, mustard oil, and cinnamaldehyde may induce heat hyperalgesia via enhanced thermal gating of TRPV1 that is coexpressed with TRPA1 in peripheral nociceptors.

  2. Comparison of anchorage reinforcement with temporary anchorage devices or a Herbst appliance during lingual orthodontic protraction of mandibular molars without maxillary counterbalance extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzner, Rebecca; Schwestka-Polly, Rainer; Helms, Hans-Joachim; Wiechmann, Dirk

    2015-06-20

    Orthodontic protraction of mandibular molars without maxillary counterbalance extraction in cases of aplasia or extraction requires stable anchorage. Reinforcement may be achieved by using either temporary anchorage devices (TAD) or a fixed, functional appliance. The objective was to compare the clinical effectiveness of both methods by testing the null-hypothesis of no significant difference in velocity of space closure (in mm/month) between them. In addition, we set out to describe the quality of posterior space management and treatment-related factors, such as loss of anchorage (assessed in terms of proportions of gap closure by posterior protraction or anterior retraction), frequencies of incomplete space closure, and potential improvement in the sagittal canine relationship. Twenty-seven subjects (15 male/12 female) with a total of 36 sites treated with a lingual multi-bracket appliance were available for retrospective evaluation of the effects of anchorage reinforcement achieved with either a Herbst appliance (n(subjects) = 15; 7 both-sided/8 single-sided Herbst appliances; n(sites) = 22) or TADs (n(subjects )= 12; 2 both-sided; 10 single-sided; n(sites) = 14). Descriptive analysis was based on measurements using intra-oral photographs which were individually scaled to corresponding plaster casts and taken on insertion of anchorage mechanics (T1), following removal of anchorage mechanics (T2), and at the end of multi-bracket treatment (T3). The null-hypothesis was rejected: The rate of mean molar protraction was significantly faster in the Herbst-reinforced group (0.51 mm/month) than in the TAD group (0.35). While complete space closure by sheer protraction of posterior teeth was achieved in all Herbst-treated cases, space closure in the TAD group was achieved in 76.9% of subjects by sheer protraction of molars, and it was incomplete in 50% of cases (mean gap residues: 1 mm). Whilst there was a deterioration in the canine relationship towards

  3. Oral calcitonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdy RC

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ronald C Hamdy,1,2 Dane N Daley11Osteoporosis Center, College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, 2Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Johnson City, TN, USAAbstract: Calcitonin is a hormone secreted by the C-cells of the thyroid gland in response to elevations of the plasma calcium level. It reduces bone resorption by inhibiting mature active osteoclasts and increases renal calcium excretion. It is used in the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis, Paget's disease of bone, and malignancy-associated hypercalcemia. Synthetic and recombinant calcitonin preparations are available; both have similar pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles. As calcitonin is a peptide, the traditional method of administration has been parenteral or intranasal. This hinders its clinical use: adherence with therapy is notoriously low, and withdrawal from clinical trials has been problematic. An oral formulation would be more attractive, practical, and convenient to patients. In addition to its effect on active osteoclasts and renal tubules, calcitonin has an analgesic action, possibly mediated through β-endorphins and the central modulation of pain perception. It also exerts a protective action on cartilage and may be useful in the management of osteoarthritis and possibly rheumatoid arthritis. Oral formulations of calcitonin have been developed using different techniques. The most studied involves drug-delivery carriers such as Eligen® 8-(N-2hydroxy-5-chloro-benzoyl-amino-caprylic acid (5-CNAC (Emisphere Technologies, Cedar Knolls, NJ. Several factors affect the bioavailability and efficacy of orally administered calcitonin, including amount of water used to take the tablet, time of day the tablet is taken, and proximity to intake of a meal. Preliminary results looked promising. Unfortunately, in two Phase III studies, oral calcitonin (0.8 mg with 200 mg 5-CNAC, once a day for postmenopausal osteoporosis and twice a day for osteoarthritis failed to

  4. Oral care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitz Lindenmüller, Irène; Lambrecht, J Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Adequate dental and oral hygiene may become a challenge for all users and especially for elderly people and young children because of their limited motor skills. The same holds true for patients undergoing/recovering from chemo-/radiotherapy with accompanying sensitive mucosal conditions. Poor dental hygiene can result in tooth decay, gingivitis, periodontitis, tooth loss, bad breath (halitosis), fungal infection and gum diseases. The use of a toothbrush is the most important measure for oral hygiene. Toothbrushes with soft bristles operated carefully by hand or via an electric device help to remove plaque and to avoid mucosal trauma. A handlebar with a grip cover can be helpful for manually disabled patients or for those with reduced motor skills. In case of oral hygiene at the bedside or of patients during/after chemo-/radiotherapy a gauze pad can be helpful for gently cleaning the teeth, gums and tongue. The use of fluoride toothpaste is imperative for the daily oral hygiene. Detergents such as sodium lauryl sulphate improve the cleaning action but may also dehydrate and irritate the mucous membrane. The use of products containing detergents and flavouring agents (peppermint, menthol, cinnamon) should therefore be avoided by bedridden patients or those with dry mouth and sensitive mucosa. Aids for suitable interdental cleaning, such as dental floss, interdental brushes or dental sticks, are often complicated to operate. Their correct use should be instructed by healthcare professionals. To support dental care, additional fluoridation with a fluoride gel or rinse can be useful. Products further containing antiseptics such as chlorhexidine or triclosan reduce the quantity of bacteria in the mouth. For patients undergoing or having undergone radio-/chemotherapy, a mouthwash that concomitantly moisturizes the oral mucosa is advisable. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Fatigue resistance, debonding force, and failure type of fiber-reinforced composite, polyethylene ribbon-reinforced, and braided stainless steel wire lingual retainers in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foek, Dave Lie Sam; Yetkiner, Enver; Ozcan, Mutlu

    Objective: To analyze the fatigue resistance, debonding force, and failure type of fiber-reinforced composite, polyethylene ribbon-reinforced, and braided stainless steel wire lingual retainers in vitro. Methods: Roots of human mandibular central incisors were covered with silicone, mimicking the

  6. Survival of bonded lingual retainers with chemical or photo polymerization over a 2-year period: a single-center, randomized controlled clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pandis, N.; Fleming, P.S.; Kloukos, D.; Polychronopoulou, A.; Katsaros, C.; Eliades, T.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The objective of this trial was to compare the survival rates of mandibular lingual retainers bonded with either chemically cured or light-cured adhesive after orthodontic treatment. METHODS: Patients having undergone orthodontic treatment at a private orthodontic office were randomly

  7. Colgajo lingual para cierre de fístula oronasal: aportación a la técnica Lingual Flap for Closure of Oronasal Fistula: Contribution to the technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Licéaga-Escalera

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available La fístula oronasal es la complicación más común posterior a una palatoplastía y frecuentemente requiere de una reparación secundaria. Se ha desarrollado una gran cantidad de técnicas quirúrgicas para su manejo, siendo una de las más populares el colgajo lingual. A pesar de la excelente vascularidad de la lengua, para asegurar la viabilidad del colgajo, éste debe ser manejado con extremo cuidado durante el procedimiento. Con este propósito sugerimos el uso de una platina acrílica en forma de herradura que aporta estabilidad e inmoviliza la lengua durante la cirugía, lo que facilita el procedimiento y ayuda a evitar errores durante el diseño y el levantamiento del colgajo.The oronasal fistula is the most common complication after a palatoplasty and it frequently needs a secondary repair. A great number of surgical techniques have been developed for the management of this condition. The lingual flap is one of the most popular treatments. In spite of the excellent vascularity of the tongue, it must be handled carefully during the procedure to assure the viability of the flap. For this reason we suggest the use of an acrylic slide in the shape of horse-shoe that improves the stability and immobilises the tongue during the surgery. This makes the procedure easier and helps to avoid mistakes during the design and the raising of the flap.

  8. Oral Health and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Oral Health and Aging Oral Health and Aging Past Issues / Summer 2016 Table of Contents Jerrold ... they may need. Read More "Oral Health and Aging" Articles Oral Health and Aging / 4 Myths About ...

  9. The Development of a Bi-Lingual Assessment Instrument to Measure Agentic and Communal Consumer Motives in English and French.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Mike; Bartier, Anne-Laure; Lown, Josh; Hopwood, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Consumer behavior is driven, in part, by the degree to which goods and services appeal to underlying motives for agency and communion. The purpose of this research was to develop a brief individual differences measure of these motivations for use in behavioral research and theoretical and applied consumer psychology and marketing studies. We employed a bi-lingual scale development procedure to create the 10-item Agentic and Communal Consumer Motivation Inventory (ACCMI) in English and French. Two studies show that the ACCMI is language invariant, demonstrates convergent and discriminant validity with consumer, motivational, and interpersonal constructs, and predicts evaluations of products described in agentic and communal terms, respectively, in both languages. The general conclusion of this research is that agency and communion provide a useful framework for understanding and studying consumer buying motivations. Discussion focuses on the relevance of motivational factors for studying human behavior and the applied utility of the ACCMI.

  10. The development of a bi-lingual assessment instrument to measure agentic and communal consumer motives in English and French

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Friedman

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Consumer behavior is driven, in part, by the degree to which goods and services appeal to underlying motives for agency and communion. The purpose of this research was to develop a brief individual differences measure of these motivations for use in behavioral research and theoretical and applied consumer psychology and marketing studies. We employed a bi-lingual scale development procedure to create the 10-item Agentic and Communal Consumer Motivation Inventory (ACCMI in English and French. Two studies show that the ACCMI is language invariant, demonstrates convergent and discriminant validity with consumer, motivational, and interpersonal constructs, and predicts evaluations of products described in agentic and communal terms, respectively, in both languages. The general conclusion of this research is that agency and communion provide a useful framework for understanding and studying consumer buying motivations. Discussion focuses on the relevance of motivational factors for studying human behavior and the applied utility of the ACCMI.

  11. Lingual flap an excellent alternative for the closure of oronasal fistulae: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Wiegering Cecchi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a female patient of 24 years old from the city of Cajamarca referred to us, whom we evaluated, prepared and made a surgery with a tongue flap along the previous base, irrigated by the lingual artery in the Plastic Surgery and Burns Section at the Archbishop Loayza National Hospital to achieve the closing two stages (day 0 and then day 22 of a large oronasal fistula that caused rinofonía and nasal reflux of liquids and food; due to previous dehiscence Palatoplasty carried out in his city at the age of 2 years in a free foreign campaign of cleft lip and palate.

  12. The Development of a Bi-Lingual Assessment Instrument to Measure Agentic and Communal Consumer Motives in English and French

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Mike; Bartier, Anne-Laure; Lown, Josh; Hopwood, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Consumer behavior is driven, in part, by the degree to which goods and services appeal to underlying motives for agency and communion. The purpose of this research was to develop a brief individual differences measure of these motivations for use in behavioral research and theoretical and applied consumer psychology and marketing studies. We employed a bi-lingual scale development procedure to create the 10-item Agentic and Communal Consumer Motivation Inventory (ACCMI) in English and French. Two studies show that the ACCMI is language invariant, demonstrates convergent and discriminant validity with consumer, motivational, and interpersonal constructs, and predicts evaluations of products described in agentic and communal terms, respectively, in both languages. The general conclusion of this research is that agency and communion provide a useful framework for understanding and studying consumer buying motivations. Discussion focuses on the relevance of motivational factors for studying human behavior and the applied utility of the ACCMI. PMID:27563295

  13. Occurrence and severity of enamel decalcification adjacent to bracket bases and sub-bracket lesions during orthodontic treatment with two different lingual appliances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klang, Elisabeth; Helms, Hans-Joachim; Wiechmann, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background: Using lingual enamel surfaces for bracket placement not only has esthetic advantages, but may also be suitable in terms of reducing frequencies of enamel decalcifications. Objective: To test the null-hypothesis that there is no significant difference in enamel decalcification or cavitation incidence adjacent to and beneath bracket bases between two lingual multi-bracket (MB) appliances that are different in terms of design, material composition, and manufacturing technology (group A: WIN, DW-LingualSystems; group B: Incognito, 3M-Unitek), taking into account patient- and treatment-related variables on white spot lesion (WSL) formation. Methods: Standardized, digital, top-view photographs of 630 consecutive subjects (16214 teeth; n Incognito = 237/6076 teeth; n WIN = 393/10138 teeth; mean age: 17.47±7.8; m/f 43.2/56.8%) with completed lingual MB treatment of the upper and lower permanent teeth 1–7 were screened for decalcification or cavitation adjacent to and beneath the bracket bases before and after treatment, scored from 0 to 7. Non-parametric ANOVA was used for main effects ‘appliance type’, ‘gender’, ‘treatment complexity’, ‘grouped age’ (≤16/>16 years), and ‘treatment duration’ as covariable, at an α-level of 5%. Results: About 2.57% [5.94%] of all teeth in group A [B] developed decalcifications. Subject-related incidence was 9.59% [16.17%] for upper incisors in group A [B], and 12.98% [25.74%] for all teeth 16–46. There were significant effects by gender, age, and treatment duration. Conclusion: The null-hypothesis was rejected: sub-bracket lesions were significantly less frequent in group A, while frequencies of WSL adjacent to brackets were not significantly affected by appliance type. In view of the overall low incidences of lingual post-orthodontic white-spot lesions, the use of lingual appliances is advocated as a valid strategy for a reduction of enamel decalcifications during orthodontic treatment. PMID

  14. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Oral and maxillofacial surgeons surgically treat the soft ... Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Oral and maxillofacial surgeons surgically treat the soft ...

  15. Chronic Oral Capsaicin Exposure During Development Leads to Adult Rats with Reduced Taste Bud Volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omelian, Jacquelyn M; Samson, Kaeli K; Sollars, Suzanne I

    2016-09-01

    Cross-sensory interaction between gustatory and trigeminal nerves occurs in the anterior tongue. Surgical manipulations have demonstrated that the strength of this relationship varies across development. Capsaicin is a neurotoxin that affects fibers of the somatosensory lingual nerve surrounding taste buds, but not fibers of the gustatory chorda tympani nerve which synapse with taste receptor cells. Since capsaicin is commonly consumed by many species, including humans, experimental use of this neurotoxin provides a naturalistic perturbation of the lingual trigeminal system. Neonatal or adults rats consumed oral capsaicin for 40 days and we examined the cross-sensory effect on the morphology of taste buds across development. Rats received moderate doses of oral capsaicin, with chronic treatments occurring either before or after taste system maturation. Tongue morphology was examined either 2 or 50 days after treatment cessation. Edema, which has been previously suggested as a cause of changes in capsaicin-related gustatory function, was also assessed. Reductions in taste bud volume occurred 50 days, but not 2 days post-treatment for rats treated as neonates. Adult rats at either time post-treatment were unaffected. Edema was not found to occur with the 5 ppm concentration of capsaicin we used. Results further elucidate the cooperative relationship between these discrete sensory systems and highlight the developmentally mediated aspect of this interaction. Chronic exposure to even moderate levels of noxious stimuli during development has the ability to impact the orosensory environment, and these changes may not be evident until long after exposure has ceased.

  16. Towards understanding oral health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaura, E.; ten Cate, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    During the last century, dental research has focused on unraveling the mechanisms behind various oral pathologies, while oral health was typically described as the mere absence of oral diseases. The term ‘oral microbial homeostasis' is used to describe the capacity of the oral ecosystem to maintain

  17. Oral traumatic ulcerative granuloma with stromal eosinophilia: A clinicopathological study of 34 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wei-Ren; Chang, Julia Yu-Fong; Wu, Yang-Che; Cheng, Shih-Jung; Chen, Hsin-Ming; Wang, Yi-Ping

    2015-09-01

    Traumatic ulcerative granuloma with stromal eosinophilia (TUGSE) is a special oral ulcerative lesion that shares many clinical features of an oral squamous cell carcinoma. This study reports the clinicopathological features of 34 oral TUGSE lesions in Taiwanese patients. Thirty-four TUGSE cases were retrieved from the files of the Department of Oral Pathology and Oral Diagnosis, National Taiwan University Hospital from 2003 to 2009. Their clinical data and histopathological features were examined, collected, and analyzed. The study group included 22 male and 12 female patients (64.7% and 35.3%, respectively) with oral TUGSE. The mean age of the patients was 49 years (range, 8 to 80 years). The most common site for oral TUGSE lesions was the tongue (23 cases, 67.6%), followed by the buccal mucosa (6 cases, 17.6%), retromolar area (2 cases, 5.9%), floor of the mouth and lingual sulcus (2 cases, 5.9%), and lip (1 case, 3.0%). For 23 tongue cases, 19 occurred on the dorsum and the tip (82.6%) and 4 on the ventral surface (17.4%). Of the 34 oral TUGSE lesions, 13 (38.2%) had a mild, 11 (32.4%) a moderate, and 10 (29.4%) a severe eosinophilic infiltrate. Oral TUGSE lesions occur more frequently on the dorsal surface and the tip of the tongue and in male patients between 41 and 60 years of age. The eosinophilic infiltrates in oral TUGSE lesions show a scattered or clustered pattern, and their density varies from case to case. Oral TUGSE is a self-limiting lesion, and aggressive surgical treatment is usually not required. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Natural chemopreventive alternatives in oral cancer chemoprevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrobota, I; Bolfa, P; Filip, A G; Catoi, C; Alb, C; Pop, O; Tatomir, C; Baciut, G

    2016-02-01

    We studied the effect of grape seed extract Burgund Mare (BM) on oral carcinogenesis and compared it with that of curcumin (CU). Wistar rats were divided into six groups (n = 10): 4-nitro-quinoline-1-oxide (4NQO) oral carcinogenesis was induced to groups 1 - 5; groups 2 and 3 received BM and CU respectively during initiation and groups 4 and 5 BM and CU during post-initiation of carcinogenesis; group 6 represented the negative control group. Total malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were assayed fluorometrically in oral tissue (gingival, jugal, palatal, lingual mucosa) and serum. Histopathological exam was performed and a dysplasia score given to each oral mucosal lesion. Ki67, cyclin D1, p63, Bcl2 and p53 were immunohistochemically evaluated. BM and CU reduced tissue MDA values elevated by 4NQO (P = 0.000). The difference between CU and BM effect was significant in the initiation (P = 0.02) but not in the post-initiation phase of carcinogenesis (P = 0.58). Tissue GSH levels decreased by 4NQO (P < 0.001) were not significantly modified by BM or CU. Serum MDA levels increased by 4NQO (P = 0.000) were significantly lowered by CU (P = 0.04) and BM (P = 0.04) during initiation and by CU during post-initiation of carcinogenesis (P = 0.01). CU was more potent than BM during post-initiation of carcinogenesis (P = 0.01). Serum GSH lowered by 4NQO (P = 0.55) was significantly decreased by BM and CU (P < 0.012), with no significant difference between groups receiving BM or CU. Moderate dysplasia was the most advanced dysplasia induced and gingival localization the most frequent. Both BM and CU lowered dysplasia scores, with BM being the most efficient during post-initiation of carcinogenesis (P = 0.001). Ki67, cyclin D1, p63, Bcl2 and p53 expression increased with dysplasia scores. BM showed chemopreventive properties during initiation and post-initiation of oral carcinogenesis, reducing local and general oxidative stress and the intensity of dysplasia

  19. Oral dirofilariasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahija Janardhanan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Filariasis affecting animals can rarely cause infections in human beings through the accidental bite of potential vectors. The resulting infection in man, known as zoonotic filariasis occur worldwide. Human dirofilariasis, the most common zoonotic filariasis, is caused by the filarial worm belonging to the genus Dirofilaria. Dirofilarial worms, which are recognized as pathogenic in man can cause nodular lesions in the lung, subcutaneous tissue, peritoneal cavity or eyes. Oral dirofilariasis is extremely rare and only a few cases have been documented. We report an interesting case of dirofilariasis due to Dirofilaria repens involving buccal mucosa in a patient who presented with a facial swelling. The clinical features, diagnostic issues and treatment aspects are discussed. This paper stresses the importance of considering dirofilariasis as differential diagnosis for subcutaneous swelling of the face, especially in areas where it is endemic.

  20. Oral dirofilariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janardhanan, Mahija; Rakesh, S; Savithri, Vindhya

    2014-01-01

    Filariasis affecting animals can rarely cause infections in human beings through the accidental bite of potential vectors. The resulting infection in man, known as zoonotic filariasis occur worldwide. Human dirofilariasis, the most common zoonotic filariasis, is caused by the filarial worm belonging to the genus Dirofilaria. Dirofilarial worms, which are recognized as pathogenic in man can cause nodular lesions in the lung, subcutaneous tissue, peritoneal cavity or eyes. Oral dirofilariasis is extremely rare and only a few cases have been documented. We report an interesting case of dirofilariasis due to Dirofilaria repens involving buccal mucosa in a patient who presented with a facial swelling. The clinical features, diagnostic issues and treatment aspects are discussed. This paper stresses the importance of considering dirofilariasis as differential diagnosis for subcutaneous swelling of the face, especially in areas where it is endemic.

  1. ON THE NECESSITY OF MINOR ORAL SURGERY PRETREATMENT ORTHODONTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgeta Zegan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to establish the frequency of some minor oral surgery performed on both teeth and on the soft tissues, before any orthodontic treatment. The sample group included 587 patients (240 boys and 347 girls, divided into 3 categories. The data base was created wtih patient records, the statistical analyses being performed with the SPSS 17.0 software for Windows. The frequency of malocclusions with minor oral surgery pretreatment orthodontics was of 24%, out of which the surgical interventions on teeth represented 85.41% (serial extractions – 21.87%, orthodontic extractions – 41.66%, enucleation of third molars – 18.75%, discovery of impacted teeth – 2.08% and teeth enucleation – 1.04% and the surgical interventions on the soft tissues represented 14.59% (labial frenectomy: 12.60%, lingual frenectomy: 1.04% and discovery of pericoronal tissues: 1.04% The minor oral surgery pretreatment orthodontics upon both teeth and soft tissues are not quite frequent, yet they are necessary for a partial preparation of the patient for orthodontic therapy.

  2. Oral sex, oral health and orogenital infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Saini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral sex is commonly practiced by sexually active male-female and same-gender couples of various ages, including adolescents. The various type of oral sex practices are fellatio, cunnilingus and analingus. Oral sex is infrequently examined in research on adolescents; oral sex can transmit oral, respiratory, and genital pathogens. Oral health has a direct impact on the transmission of infection; a cut in your mouth, bleeding gums, lip sores or broken skin increases chances of infection. Although oral sex is considered a low risk activity, it is important to use protection and safer sex precautions. There are various methods of preventing infection during oral sex such as physical barriers, health and medical issues, ethical issues and oral hygiene and dental issues. The lesions or unhealthy periodontal status of oral cavity accelerates the phenomenon of transmission of infections into the circulation. Thus consequences of unhealthy or painful oral cavity are significant and oral health should be given paramount importance for the practice of oral sex.

  3. Ectopic Oral Tonsillar Tissue: A Case Series with Bilateral and Solitary Presentations and a Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Kimura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An ectopic tonsil is defined as tonsillar tissue that develops in areas outside of the four major tonsil groups: the palatine, lingual, pharyngeal, and tubal tonsils. The occurrence of tonsillar tissue in the oral cavity in ectopic locations, its prevalence, and its developmental mechanisms that belong to its formation remain unclear. In this report, we describe a rare case of bilateral symmetric ectopic oral tonsillar tissue located at the ventral surface of the tongue along with two solitary cases arising from the floor of the mouth. The role of immune system and its aberrant response leading to ectopic deposits desires further studies. As an ectopic tonsil may simulate a benign soft tissue tumor, this case series highlights the importance of this entity in our clinical differential diagnosis of oral soft tissue masses.

  4. Diagnosis of cancer of the tongue and oral floor using plain CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ariji, Eiichiro; Kanda, Shigenobu

    1988-01-01

    CT images of 18 patients, diagnosed squamous cell carcinomas of the tongue or oral floor, were analyzed to assess the clinical importance of plain CT for primary sites. All cases were scanned on Somatom DR (Siemens) at the Department of Dental Radiology, Kyushu University Dental Hospital from 1985 to 1988. Results were as follows : 1, As descriptions of primary tumors mainly depended on their size in soft tissue, plain CT was useful only for advanced cases (T3, T4). 2, For cancer of the oral floor and advanced cases of cancer of the tongue, plain CT was useful to evaluate the bone invasion, especially in cases of lingual cortex of the anterior mandible. (author)

  5. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy using superselective intraarterial infusion via superficial temporal artery for stage III, IV oral cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tohnai, Iwai; Shigetomi, Toshio [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine; Hayashi, Yasushi [Nagoya Second Red Cross Hospital (Japan)] (and others)

    2002-03-01

    Thirty-eight patients with stage III, IV oral cancer were treated by preoperative chemoradiotherapy using superselective intraarterial infusion via the superficial temporal artery. Radiotherapy (total dose: 40 Gy) and chemotherapy using CBDCA (total dose: 460 mg/m{sup 2}) were performed daily, followed by surgery. Catheter-insertion of 34 patients was done successfully. Four catheter insertions were not done successfully because of the anomaly of the artery such as common trunk of the lingual artery and the facial artery. The clinical effects were CR in 9 patients (26.5%) and PR in 25 (73.5%), and histopathological effects after surgery were grade III, IV in 10 (29.4%), grade IIb in 23 (67.6%), and grade IIa in 2 (5.8%). The 5-year cumulative survival rate was 67.8%. This superselective intra arterial infusion method could be the technique of choice for the treatment of oral cancer. (author)

  6. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy using superselective intraarterial infusion via superficial temporal artery for stage III, IV oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohnai, Iwai; Shigetomi, Toshio

    2002-01-01

    Thirty-eight patients with stage III, IV oral cancer were treated by preoperative chemoradiotherapy using superselective intraarterial infusion via the superficial temporal artery. Radiotherapy (total dose: 40 Gy) and chemotherapy using CBDCA (total dose: 460 mg/m 2 ) were performed daily, followed by surgery. Catheter-insertion of 34 patients was done successfully. Four catheter insertions were not done successfully because of the anomaly of the artery such as common trunk of the lingual artery and the facial artery. The clinical effects were CR in 9 patients (26.5%) and PR in 25 (73.5%), and histopathological effects after surgery were grade III, IV in 10 (29.4%), grade IIb in 23 (67.6%), and grade IIa in 2 (5.8%). The 5-year cumulative survival rate was 67.8%. This superselective intra arterial infusion method could be the technique of choice for the treatment of oral cancer. (author)

  7. Geospatial Information Categories Mapping in a Cross-lingual Environment: A Case Study of “Surface Water” Categories in Chinese and American Topographic Maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Kuai

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The need for integrating geospatial information (GI data from various heterogeneous sources has seen increased importance for geographic information system (GIS interoperability. Using domain ontologies to clarify and integrate the semantics of data is considered as a crucial step for successful semantic integration in the GI domain. Nevertheless, mechanisms are still needed to facilitate semantic mapping between GI ontologies described in different natural languages. This research establishes a formal ontology model for cross-lingual geospatial information ontology mapping. By first extracting semantic primitives from a free-text definition of categories in two GI classification standards with different natural languages, an ontology-driven approach is used, and a formal ontology model is established to formally represent these semantic primitives into semantic statements, in which the spatial-related properties and relations are considered as crucial statements for the representation and identification of the semantics of the GI categories. Then, an algorithm is proposed to compare these semantic statements in a cross-lingual environment. We further design a similarity calculation algorithm based on the proposed formal ontology model to distance the semantic similarities and identify the mapping relationships between categories. In particular, we work with two GI classification standards for Chinese and American topographic maps. The experimental results demonstrate the feasibility and reliability of the proposed model for cross-lingual geospatial information ontology mapping.

  8. Correlation between blood glucose levels and salivary glucose levels with oral ulcer in diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fildzah Rahman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes Mellitus (DM is a syndrome in metabolism of carbohydrates which indicated by the increased level of blood glucose and also may increase salivary glucose levels. Oral ulcer has been frequently recognized in diabetic patients, which can be due to increased glucose in oral fluids and immune dysfunction. This study aimed to determine the correlation of blood glucose levels and salivary glucose levels with oral ulcer in diabetic patients. Analytic observational study was carried out through the determination of blood glucose levels just by way of strip using a glucometer and salivary glucose levels with the method "GOD-PAP test enzymatic colorimetric". Oral ulcer was determined in presenting ulcer on 30 patients with DM. The results showed r = 0.228, which is higher salivary glucose levels followed by high levels of blood glucose, and intraoral examination of oral ulcer found in the whole sample and the most location commonly found in buccal mucosa and lingual. It was concluded that there is a correlation between blood glucose levels and salivary glucose levels, and glucose levels affect the occurrence of oral ulcer in patients with DM

  9. The effect of prior sandblasting of the wire on the shear bond strength of two different types of lingual retainers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilinç, Delal Dara; Sayar, Gülşilay

    2018-04-07

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of total surface sandblasting on the shear bond strength of two different retainer wires. The null hypothesis was that there is no difference in the bond strength of the two types of lingual retainer wires when they are sandblasted. One hundred and sixty human premolar teeth were equally divided into four groups (n=40). A pair of teeth was embedded in self-curing acrylic resin and polished. Retainer wires were applied on the etched and rinsed surfaces of the teeth. Four retainers were used: group 1: braided retainer (0.010×0.028″, Ortho Technology); group 2: sandblasted braided retainer (0.010×0.028″, Ortho Technology); group 3: coaxial retainer (0.0215″ Coaxial, 3M) and group 4: sandblasted coaxial retainer (0.0215″ Coaxial, 3M). The specimens were tested using a universal test machine in shear mode with a crosshead speed of one mm/min. One-way analysis of variance (Anova) was used to determine the significant differences among the groups. There was no significant difference (P=0.117) among the groups according to this test. The null hypothesis was accepted. There was no statistically significant difference among the shear bond strength values of the four groups. Copyright © 2018 CEO. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Fungiform taste bud degeneration in C57BL/6J mice following chorda-lingual nerve transection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guagliardo, Nick A; Hill, David L

    2007-09-10

    Taste buds are dependent on innervation for normal morphology and function. Fungiform taste bud degeneration after chorda tympani nerve injury has been well documented in rats, hamsters, and gerbils. The current study examines fungiform taste bud distribution and structure in adult C57BL/6J mice from both intact taste systems and after unilateral chorda-lingual nerve transection. Fungiform taste buds were visualized and measured with the aid of cytokeratin 8. In control mice, taste buds were smaller and more abundant on the anterior tip (taste buds were smaller and fewer on the side of the tongue ipsilateral to the transection and continued to decrease in both size and number until 15 days posttransection. Degenerating fungiform taste buds were smaller due to a loss of taste bud cells rather than changes in taste bud morphology. While almost all taste buds disappeared in more posterior fungiform papillae by 15 days posttransection, the anterior tip of the tongue retained nearly half of its taste buds compared to intact mice. Surviving taste buds could not be explained by an apparent innervation from the remaining intact nerves. Contralateral effects of nerve transection were also observed; taste buds were larger due to an increase in the number of taste bud cells. These data are the first to characterize adult mouse fungiform taste buds and subsequent degeneration after unilateral nerve transection. They provide the basis for more mechanistic studies in which genetically engineered mice can be used. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Assessing the feasibility of yttria-stabilized zirconia in novel designs as mandibular anterior fixed lingual retention following orthodontic treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, Matthew

    The purpose of this study is to explore the feasibility of yttria-stabilized zirconia (Y-TZP) in fixed lingual retention as an alternative to stainless steel. Exploratory Y-TZP specimens were milled to establish design parameters. Next, specimens were milled according to ASTM standard C1161-13 and subjected to four-point flexural test to determine materials properties. Finite Element (FE) Analysis was employed to evaluate nine novel cross-sectional designs and compared to stainless steel wire. Each design was analyzed under the loading conditions to determine von Mises and bond stress. The most promising design was fabricated to assess accuracy and precision of current CAD/CAM milling technology. The superior design had a 1.0 x 0.5 mm semi-elliptical cross section and was shown to be fabricated reliably. Overall, the milling indicated a maximum percent standard deviation of 9.3 and maximum percent error of 13.5 with a cost of $30 per specimen. Y-TZP can be reliably milled to dimensions comparable to currently available metallic retainer wires. Further research is necessary to determine the success of bonding protocol and clinical longevity of Y-TZP fixed retainers. Advanced technology is necessary to connect the intraoral scan to an aesthetic and patient-specific Y-TZP fixed retainer.

  12. Comparison of apical centring ability between incisal-shifted access and traditional lingual access for maxillary anterior teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahata, Yoshio; Masuda, Yoshiko; Komabayashi, Takashi

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the apical centring ability of incisal-shifted access (ISA) with that of traditional lingual access (TLA). Fifteen three-dimensional printed resin models were prepared from the computed tomography data for a human maxillary central incisor and divided into ISA (n = 7), TLA (n = 7) and control (n = 1) groups. After access preparation, these models were shaped to the working length using K-files up to #40, followed by step-back procedures. An apical portion of the model was removed at 0.5 mm coronal to the working length. Microscopic images of each cutting surface were taken to measure the preparation area and the distance of transportation. TLA created a larger preparation area than ISA (P < 0.05). The distance of transportation (mean ± standard deviation) was 0.4 ± 0.1 mm for ISA and 0.7 ± 0.1 mm for TLA (P < 0.05). Access cavity preparation has a significant effect on apical centring ability. ISA is beneficial to maintaining apical configuration. © 2017 Australian Society of Endodontology Inc.

  13. Effects of labial and lingual retraction and intrusion force on maxillary central incisor with varying collum angles: A three-dimensional finite elemental analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandesh S Pai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This study aims to analyze the effects of intrusive force, retraction force, and torque control on the maxillary central incisors with varying degrees of collum angle in labial and lingual orthodontic treatment procedures using finite element analysis. Subjects and Methods: Four pairs of three-dimensional finite element models (FEMs representative of maxillary central incisor with periodontal ligament (PDL and alveolar bone were constructed using ANSYS software (version 5.4, ANSYS Inc., Canonsburg, PA, USA. The models with 0°, 5°, 10°, and 15° were created based on crown root angulation. Four models for labial and four models for lingual orthodontic procedure were constructed. Each model was subjected to three forces, i.e., retraction force of 1 N, lingual root torque of −5 × 10−3 N and intrusive force of 0.64 N on crown with labially and lingually positioned brackets. Principal stress and strain, center of rotation and root apex displacement were monitored. Statistical Analysis Used: Not required (FEM study. Results: With the increase in collum angle, the stress-strain distribution in PDL was increased in both labial orthodontics (LaO and lingual orthodontics (LiO. Stress-strain distribution in the PDL with LiO was more in all the models as compared to LaO. There was more of tipping movement as collum angle increased from 0° to 15° in both LaO and LiO. The amount of intrusion reduced as the collum angle increased in both the systems. However, more of intrusion was seen in LaO. With increase in collum angle, the center of rotation moved cervically in both the systems. Conclusions: From the present study, we conclude that as the collum angle increased, the stress-strain distribution increased in LaO and LiO. The center of rotation shifted cervically, and the intrusion decreased when collum angle increased. The values were more marked in LiO.

  14. Prevalência de alteração no frênulo lingual e suas implicações na fala de escolares Prevalence of change in frenulun lingual and its implications in speech of school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia Augusta dos Santos Braga

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: verificar a prevalência do frênulo lingual alterado e suas implicações na fala de escolares. MÉTODOS: foram avaliados por três fonoaudiólogas os frênulos de língua de 260 crianças com idades variando entre 6 e 12 anos. Os frênulos foram classificados por meio de inspeção visual, medidas empregando-se paquímetro e avaliação da tensão, mobilidade e posicionamento da língua. Foram consideradas crianças com alteração de frênulo aquelas que apresentaram alteração em todas etapas da avaliação. Nos casos de classificação de frênulo alterado, a fala foi avaliada. RESULTADOS: os dados encontrados revelaram que das 260 crianças avaliadas 47 (18%, apresentaram alteração de frênulo, sendo 28 (60%, classificados como curtos; 12 (25% como anteriorizados e 7 (15% como curtos e anteriorizados. Não houve diferença entre os sexos. Dos indivíduos com frênulo alterado, 34 (72 % apresentaram alteração de fala. A prevalência de alteração na fala foi maior no frênulo curto e anteriorizado (85%, seguido pelo curto (75% e pelo anteriorizado (58%. As implicações de fala mais encontradas foram distorção e articulação trancada. CONCLUSÃO: foi verificada uma prevalência de 18% de alteração no frênulo lingual dentre os escolares avaliados, sem diferença entre os sexos. O frênulo curto predomina sobre os demais tipos, porém o curto e anteriorizado apresenta maiores implicações na fala. As características de fala mais comuns nestes casos são distorção e articulação trancada.PURPOSE: to check the prevalence of altered tongue frenum and its implications on the scholar's speech. METHODS: tongue frenum of 260 children between 6 and 12 years old was evaluated by three speech therapists using visual inspection and caliper measurements. The children that showed changes in all stages of the evaluation were those considered to be with frenum alteration. The speech was evaluated in those children with altered

  15. Comparative morphometrical and histological study of lingual papillae in two different ages of the Iraqi buffalo (Bubalus bubalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Hasso

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Twenty two tongues of buffalo collected from the slaughter house of Mousl city (11 tongues for adult animals 3-4 years and11tongues for small ages 1 weake-2 monthes. Two groups were used in this study, twelve samples for anatomical study and ten samples for histological study, in each group of this study, the tongues were divided into four regions from apex to the end of the root. The tongue is a muscular organ which consists of dorsal and ventral surfaces, it is formed from three parts (apex, body and root. The lingual fossa and torus linguae both appear on the dorsal surface. The total average of the tongue length in adult animals (36.00±0.97 cm while the highest average of the length, width and thickness found in the third region. The total length in small ages was (16.92±0.98 cm and the highest average of length and thickness again it happens in third region and the highest width in this age group found in the second region. The investigation of the normal anatomical structures of the tongue distinguished four lingual papillae (filiform, fungiform, conical and circumvalate while the lenticuler papillae absent in both age groups. The filiform and fungiform papillae spread over the dorsal surface and ventro-lateral surface terminat abruptly at the ventro-lateral border forming a distinct straight line from apex to the torus linguae in both ages. The present work reveals that the highest average of filiform papillae in both surface (dorsal and ventro-lateral surface founds in second region in adult group, while in small group founds in first region. The highest average of fungiform papillae in both surface of both age groups are in the apex of tongue. The highest average of conical and circumvalate papillae in both age group (adult and young were on torus linguae. The histological study has been used the shape, diameter and the type of epithelium which covered the papillae in both groups. The filiform papillae are long fine projection beading

  16. Laser-assisted oral surgery in general practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Mark C.

    1995-04-01

    This presentation will demonstrate and discuss any surgical applications of the Argon dental laser. This presentation will also increase the awareness and basic understanding of the physical principals of the Argon laser. The wavelength of the Argon laser is specifically absorbed by red pigments such a hemoglobin which is abundant in oral soft tissue. The result is a sharp clean incision with minimal thermal damage to adjacent healthy tissue. Preprosthetic procedures such as full arch vestibuloplasty, labial and lingual frenectomy, and epulis fissuratum removal will be demonstrated. Other soft tissue management procedures such as minor periodontal pocket elimination surgery (gingivectomy), removal of hyperplastic granulation tissue from around poorly maintained implants, and the removal of granulation and/or cystic tissue from the apex of teeth undergoing endodontic (apicoec-tomy) surgery will also be demonstrated and discussed. Provided basic oral surgery protocol is followed, surgical procedures utilizing the Argon laser can be accomplished with minimal bleeding, minimal trauma and with minimal post-operative discomfort.

  17. Disfunção temporária do nervo lingual após uso de máscara laríngea: relato de caso Disfunción temporal del nervio lingual trás del uso de máscara laríngea: relato de caso Temporary lingual nerve dysfunction following the use of the laryngeal mask airway: report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Eckener Dantas de Pereira Cardoso

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: A máscara laríngea tem sido utilizada com freqüência em Anestesiologia. O emprego dessa técnica, embora esteja relacionado com um menor número de complicações quando comparado com a cânula traqueal, não é isento de morbidade, principalmente, nos casos de via aérea difícil. O objetivo desse relato foi apresentar um caso de lesão unilateral de nervo lingual após o uso da máscara laríngea. RELATO DO CASO: Paciente do sexo feminino foi submetida à intervenção cirúrgica para troca de prótese mamária bilateral, sob anestesia geral balanceada, com máscara laríngea de tamanho 3. O volume aplicado para insuflação do balonete foi de 30 mL de ar. Após a primeira hora do pós-operatório, iniciou quadro de dormência e dor na garganta e nos dois terços posteriores da língua que evoluiu em 24 horas com perda da percepção do sabor dos alimentos. A suspeita diagnóstica foi de neuropraxia do nervo lingual pelo uso de máscara laríngea. Esse quadro se manteve por três semanas, período em que se obteve resolução dos sintomas. CONCLUSÃO: Complicações após o uso de máscara laríngea, apesar de raras, podem ocorrer. A neuropraxia do nervo lingual é uma delas. O seu diagnóstico é clínico, e a sua evolução, favorável, com resolução dos sintomas em semanas ou meses.JUSTIFICATIVA Y OBJETIVOS: La máscara laríngea ha sido utilizada con frecuencia en Anestesiología. El empleo de esa técnica, aunque esté relacionada a un menor número de complicaciones cuando se le compara a la cánula traqueal, no está exento de morbidez, principalmente en los casos de vía aérea difícil. El objetivo de este relato fue presentar un caso de lesión unilateral de nervio lingual trás del uso de la máscara laríngea. RELATO DEL CASO: Paciente del sexo femenino, sometida a intervención quirúrgica para cambio de prótesis mamaria bilateral, bajo anestesia general balanceada, con máscara laríngea de tama

  18. Paresia transitória unilateral combinada do nervo hipoglosso e do nervo lingual após intubação para anestesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hulya Ulusoy

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Lesões de nervos podem ocorrer na região faringolaríngea durante a anestesia geral. Os nervos mais comumente lesionados são o hipoglosso, lingual e laríngeo recorrente. As lesões podem surgir em decorrência de vários fatores, como, por exemplo, durante a laringoscopia, intubação endotraqueal e inserção de tubo e por pressão do balão, ventilação com máscara, manobra aérea tripla, via aérea orofaríngea, modo de inserção do tubo, posição da cabeça e do pescoço e aspiração. As lesões nervosas nessa região podem acometer um único nervo isolado ou causar a paralisia de dois nervos em conjunto, como a do nervo laríngeo recorrente e hipoglosso (síndrome de Tapia. No entanto, a lesão combinada dos nervos lingual e hipoglosso após intubação para anestesia é uma condição muito mais rara. O risco dessa lesão pode ser reduzido por meio de medidas preventivas. Descrevemos um caso de paresia unilateral combinada dos nervos hipoglosso e lingual após intubação para anestesia.

  19. Localization of Alpha-Keratin and Beta-Keratin (Corneous Beta Protein) in the Epithelium on the Ventral Surface of the Lingual Apex and Its Lingual Nail in the Domestic Goose (Anser Anser f. domestica) by Using Immunohistochemistry and Raman Microspectroscopy Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skieresz-Szewczyk, Kinga; Jackowiak, Hanna; Buchwald, Tomasz; Szybowicz, Mirosław

    2017-08-01

    The epithelium of the ventral surface of the apex of the tongue in most birds is specified by the presence of the special superficial layer called lingual nail. The aim of the present study is to determine the localization of the alpha-keratin and beta-keratin (corneous beta protein) in this special epithelium in the domestic goose by using immunohistochemistry staining and the Raman spectroscopy analysis. Due to lack of commercially available antibodies to detect beta-keratin (corneous beta protein), the Raman spectroscopy was used as a specific tool to detect and describe the secondary structure of proteins. The immunohistochemical (IHC) detections reveal the presence of alpha-keratin in all layers of the epithelium, but significant differences in the distribution of the alpha-keratin in the epithelial layers appear. The staining reaction is stronger from the basal layer to the upper zone of the intermediate layer. The unique result is weak staining for the alpha-keratin in the lingual nail. Applications of the Raman spectroscopy as a complementary method not only confirmed results of IHC staining for alpha-keratin, but showed that this technique could be used to demonstrate the presence of beta-keratin (corneous beta protein). Functionally, the localization of alpha-keratin in the epithelium of the ventral surface of the lingual apex provides a proper scaffold for epithelial cells and promotes structural integrity, whereas the presence of beta-keratin (corneous beta protein) in the lingual nail, described also as exoskeleton of the ventral surface of the apex, endures mechanical stress. Anat Rec, 300:1361-1368, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Oral contraceptives induced hepatotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    B. Akshaya Srikanth; V. Manisree

    2013-01-01

    Oral Contraceptives are the pharmacological agents used to prevent pregnancy. These are divided as the combined and progestogen methods and are administered orally, transdermally, systemically and via vaginal route. All these methods contain both oestrogen and progestogen. Vigorous usage of oral contraceptives and anabolic steroids as associated with cholestasis, vascular lesions and hepatic neoplasm. Benign hepatic neoplasms are clearly associated with oral contraceptives. In this article we...

  1. Oral vaccination of fish

    OpenAIRE

    Embregts, Carmen W.E.; Forlenza, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The limited number of oral vaccines currently approved for use in humans and veterinary species clearly illustrates that development of efficacious and safe oral vaccines has been a challenge not only for fish immunologists. The insufficient efficacy of oral vaccines is partly due to antigen breakdown in the harsh gastric environment, but also to the high tolerogenic gut environment and to inadequate vaccine design. In this review we discuss current approaches used to develop oral vaccines fo...

  2. In vivo imaging of human oral hard and soft tissues by polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Julia; Golde, Jonas; Kirsten, Lars; Tetschke, Florian; Hempel, Franz; Rosenauer, Tobias; Hannig, Christian; Koch, Edmund

    2017-12-01

    Since optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides three-dimensional high-resolution images of biological tissue, the benefit of polarization contrast in the field of dentistry is highlighted in this study. Polarization-sensitive OCT (PS OCT) with phase-sensitive recording is used for imaging dental and mucosal tissues in the human oral cavity in vivo. An enhanced polarization contrast of oral structures is reached by analyzing the signals of the co- and crosspolarized channels of the swept source PS OCT system quantitatively with respect to reflectivity, retardation, optic axis orientation, and depolarization. The calculation of these polarization parameters enables a high tissue-specific contrast imaging for the detailed physical interpretation of human oral hard and soft tissues. For the proof-of-principle, imaging of composite restorations and mineralization defects at premolars as well as gingival, lingual, and labial oral mucosa was performed in vivo within the anterior oral cavity. The achieved contrast-enhanced results of the investigated human oral tissues by means of polarization-sensitive imaging are evaluated by the comparison with conventional intensity-based OCT.

  3. Oral vaccination of fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Embregts, Carmen W.E.; Forlenza, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The limited number of oral vaccines currently approved for use in humans and veterinary species clearly illustrates that development of efficacious and safe oral vaccines has been a challenge not only for fish immunologists. The insufficient efficacy of oral vaccines is partly due to antigen

  4. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to detect oral cancer during your routine dental examinations. Don't risk it. Perform an oral cancer ... oral cancer self-exam each month. An oral examination is performed using a bright light and a ...

  5. Ectopic lingual thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amani, Mohammed El Amine; Benabadji, Nadjia; Benzian, Zakaria; Amani, Souad

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid ectopy is characterized by the presence of thyroid tissue outside its normal position resulting from a defect of the thyroid diverticulum migration from the base of the tongue until its final pre-tracheal position. One case is presented in a 12-year-old girl patient who consults for a failure to thrive estimated at less than three standard deviations (SD). Bone age was estimated at 8 years late compared to chronological age. The hormonal assessment showed hypothyroidism with negative thyroid antibodies. Cervical ultrasound was revealed thyroid parenchyma pre-dominantly left in place while sweeping the area under chin showed a nodular formation of the base of the tongue. Thyroid scan with technetium 99 m showed a selective uptake of radiotracer in sublingual position. Cervical computed tomography revealed a posterior median sublingual mass spontaneously hyperdense and enhancing sharply after injection of contrast. Treatment with thyroxine allowed obtaining euthyroidism. This case asks us to be careful before aetiological diagnosis of hypothyroidism in children, because although this is rare, the presence of a thyroid parenchyma up to the cervical ultrasound does not eliminate the presence of ectopic tissue

  6. Computer-Aided Designing and Manufacturing of Lingual Fixed Orthodontic Appliance Using 2D/3D Registration Software and Rapid Prototyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Soon-Yong; Kim, Yong; Ahn, Hyo-Won; Kim, Ki-Beom; Chung, Kyu-Rhim; Kim Sunny, Seong-Hun

    2014-01-01

    The availability of 3D dental model scanning technology, combined with the ability to register CBCT data with digital models, has enabled the fabrication of orthognathic surgical CAD/CAM designed splints, customized brackets, and indirect bonding systems. In this study, custom lingual orthodontic appliances were virtually designed by merging 3D model images with lateral and posterior-anterior cephalograms. By exporting design information to 3D CAD software, we have produced a stereolithographic prototype and converted it into a cobalt-chrome alloy appliance as a way of combining traditional prosthetic investment and cast techniques. While the bonding procedure of the appliance could be reinforced, CAD technology simplified the fabrication process by eliminating the soldering phase. This report describes CAD/CAM fabrication of the complex anteroposterior lingual bonded retraction appliance for intrusive retraction of the maxillary anterior dentition. Furthermore, the CAD/CAM method eliminates the extra step of determining the lever arm on the lateral cephalograms and subsequent design modifications on the study model.

  7. Computer-Aided Designing and Manufacturing of Lingual Fixed Orthodontic Appliance Using 2D/3D Registration Software and Rapid Prototyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soon-Yong Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The availability of 3D dental model scanning technology, combined with the ability to register CBCT data with digital models, has enabled the fabrication of orthognathic surgical CAD/CAM designed splints, customized brackets, and indirect bonding systems. In this study, custom lingual orthodontic appliances were virtually designed by merging 3D model images with lateral and posterior-anterior cephalograms. By exporting design information to 3D CAD software, we have produced a stereolithographic prototype and converted it into a cobalt-chrome alloy appliance as a way of combining traditional prosthetic investment and cast techniques. While the bonding procedure of the appliance could be reinforced, CAD technology simplified the fabrication process by eliminating the soldering phase. This report describes CAD/CAM fabrication of the complex anteroposterior lingual bonded retraction appliance for intrusive retraction of the maxillary anterior dentition. Furthermore, the CAD/CAM method eliminates the extra step of determining the lever arm on the lateral cephalograms and subsequent design modifications on the study model.

  8. The effect of various adhesives, enamel etching, and base treatment on the failure frequency of customized lingual brackets: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavreas, Dimitrios; Cuzin, Jean-François; Boonen, Guillaume; Vande Vannet, Bart

    2018-05-25

    The aim of this paper was to compare failure differences in precious metal customized lingual brackets bonded with three adhesive systems. Also, differences in failure of non-precious metal brackets with and without a silicatized base layer bonded with the same adhesive, as well as the influence of enamel etching prior to using a self-etching dual cure resin were explored. Five different groups were defined in a semi-randomized approach. Group 1 (IME): Maxcem Elite with 378 Incognito brackets and etched teeth, Group 2 (IMNE): Maxcem Elite with 193 Incognito brackets on non-etched teeth, Group 3 (INE): Nexus+Excite with 385 Incognito brackets, Group 4 (IRE): Relyx with 162 Incognito brackets, Group 5 (HRME) and Group 6 (HNRME): Maxcem Elite with 182 Harmony brackets with silicatized and non-slicatized bases respectively. Bracket failures were recorded over a 12-month period. The number of failures during the observation period was small in the various adhesives types of groups, as well as in HRME and HNRME groups, and the comparisons among those groups were non-significant (P > 0.05). A statistically significant difference (P brackets failure frequencies (rates) are not different for the three adhesive materials tested. 2. Eliminating the etching stage when using self-etch/self-adhesive adhesives, may lead to a dramatic increase in the failure rates. 3. Silicoating of stainless steel customized lingual brackets does not seem to influence the failure of the bonds.

  9. Evaluation of the shear bond strength of lingual brackets manufactured by three different processes using two different adhesive primers: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrinivas Ashtekar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare and evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS of lingual brackets, manufactured by three different processes, that is, laser sintering, milling, and casting, bonded with two different adhesive primers. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty premolars were selected, and three types of lingual brackets were used, namely, STB (milling, 7th Generation (casting, and lingualmatrix (laser sintering. Forty brackets per system were used half of which were sandblasted while the other half were used as available. Further, these were subdivided and bonded with Transbond XT primer and adhesive and 3M ESPE Primer and Transbond XT adhesive. Customization of STB and 7th Generation was done by Torque Angulation Reference Guide, Lingualmatrix had bases customized by Computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing. SBS was tested with universal testing machine and evaluated for adhesive remnant index (ARI. Results: Statistical analysis showed that surface treatment, use of different primers, method of customization influenced the SBS, and ARI suggested that the fracture occurred between composite and bracket interface. Conclusion: Lingualmatrix bracket showed greater SBS as compared to STB and 7th Generation, sandblasting increased SBS. 3M ESPE primer group showed increased SBS as that bonded with Transbond XT primer. The fracture was between the composite bracket interface.

  10. Essentials of oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, César

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the 10 most common cancers in the world, with a delayed clinical detection, poor prognosis, without specific biomarkers for the disease and expensive therapeutic alternatives. This review aims to present the fundamental aspects of this cancer, focused on squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (OSCC), moving from its definition and epidemiological aspects, addressing the oral carcinogenesis, oral potentially malignant disorders, epithelial precursor lesions and experimental methods for its study, therapies and future challenges. Oral cancer is a preventable disease, risk factors and natural history is already being known, where biomedical sciences and dentistry in particular are likely to improve their poor clinical indicators.

  11. Screening for oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jitender, Solanki; Sarika, Gupta; Varada, Hiremath R; Omprakash, Yadav; Mohsin, Khan

    2016-11-01

    Oral cancer is considered as a serious health problem resulting in high morbidity and mortality. Early detection and prevention play a key role in controlling the burden of oral cancer worldwide. The five-year survival rate of oral cancer still remains low and delayed diagnosis is considered as one of the major reasons. This increases the demand for oral screening. Currently, screening of oral cancer is largely based on visual examination. Various evidence strongly suggest the validity of visual inspection in reducing mortality in patients at risk for oral cancer. Simple visual examination is accompanied with adjunctive techniques for subjective interpretation of dysplastic changes. These include toluidine blue staining, brush biopsy, chemiluminescence and tissue autofluorescence. This review highlights the efficacy of various diagnostic methods in screening of oral cancer. © 2016 Old City Publishing, Inc.

  12. A Clinicopathologic Study of Oral Changes in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease, Gastritis, and Ulcerative Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinesh, E; Masthan, Kmk; Kumar, M Sathish; Jeyapriya, S Marytresa; Babu, Aravindha; Thinakaran, Meera

    2016-11-01

    The aim and objectives of this study are to identify oral changes in certain gastrointestinal (GI) diseases, namely gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), ulcerative colitis, gastritis, and to evaluate these oral symptoms as indicators for assessing GI disorders. In this study, the oral manifestations of various GI disorders were assessed in a varying age group of 250 patients in Government Stanley Medical College and Hospital, Chennai. Out of 250 patients, 142 were affected by GERD, 99 were affected by gastritis, and 9 patients were affected by ulcerative colitis. Of these patients, 177 were males and 73 were females. Evaluation of patients with gastritis revealed that 66.7% affected with gingivitis, 19.2% with dental erosion on the palatal and lingual aspects of maxillary and mandibular teeth predominantly in the anterior region, 10.1% with periodontitis, 2% with gingival erythema. Among the patients with GERD, 44% of the cases showed dental erosion, 25.5% periodontitis, 9.9% gingivitis, 5.7% gingival erythema, 2.8% palatal erythema, 2.1% gingival ulcers, glossitis 2%, 1.4% floor of the mouth erythema, and 0.7% erythema of the tongue. Patients with ulcerative colitis showed 44.4% of gingival erythema, 33.3% of dental erosions, and 22.2% of gingival ulcers and periodontitis. In our study of 250 patients, oral manifestations were observed in 88% of the patients. Both soft tissue and hard tissue changes were evident. There was a high correlation between various GI disease and dental erosion, erythema at various sites of the oral cavity, oral ulcers, gingivitis, periodontitis, and glossitis. Careful evaluation of oral cavity may unveil many GI disorders and help the patient by providing early diagnosis, which further facilitates the prognosis.

  13. Oral biopsy: Oral pathologist′s perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K L Kumaraswamy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many oral lesions may need to be diagnosed by removing a sample of tissue from the oral cavity. Biopsy is widely used in the medical field, but the practice is not quite widespread in dental practice. As oral pathologists, we have found many artifacts in the tissue specimen because of poor biopsy technique or handling, which has led to diagnostic pitfalls and misery to both the patient and the clinician. This article aims at alerting the clinicians about the clinical faults arising preoperatively, intraoperatively and postoperatively while dealing with oral biopsy that may affect the histological assessment of the tissue and, therefore, the diagnosis. It also reviews the different techniques, precautions and special considerations necessary for specific lesions.

  14. Oral manifestations of lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, S; O'Shea, F; Galvin, S; Wynne, B

    2018-02-01

    Mucosal involvement is commonly seen in patients with lupus; however, oral examination is often forgotten. Squamous cell carcinoma arising within oral lupoid plaques has been described, emphasizing the importance of identifying and treating oral lupus. We undertook a retrospective single-centre study looking at oral findings in patients attending our multidisciplinary lupus clinic between January 2015 and April 2016. A total of 42 patients were included. The majority of patients were female (88%) and had a diagnosis of discoid lupus erythematosus (62%). Half of the patients had positive oral findings, 26% had no oral examination documented, and 24% had documented normal oral examinations. Our findings suggest that oral pathology is common in this cohort of patients. Regular oral examination is warranted to identify oral lupus and provide treatment. Associated diseases such as Sjogren's syndrome may also be identified. Patients should be encouraged to see their general dental practitioners on a regular basis for mucosal review. Any persistent ulcer that fails to respond to treatment or hard lump needs urgent histopathological evaluation to exclude malignant transformation to squamous cell carcinoma.

  15. Gastric secretion, proinflammatory cytokines and epidermal growth factor (EGF) in the delayed healing of lingual and gastric ulcerations by testosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machowska, A; Brzozowski, T; Sliwowski, Z; Pawlik, M; Konturek, P C; Pajdo, R; Szlachcic, A; Drozdowicz, D; Schwarz, M; Stachura, J; Konturek, S J; Pawlik, W W

    2008-02-01

    Hormonal fluctuations are known to predispose ulceration of the upper gastrointestinal tract, but to date no comparative study of their effects on the healing of pre-existing ulcers in the oral cavity and stomach has been made. We studied the effects of depletion of testosterone and of EGF on the healing of acetic acid-induced ulcers using rats having undergone bilateral orchidectomy and/or salivectomy respectively. We measured alterations in gastric acid secretion and blood flow at ulcer margins, as well as plasma levels of testosterone, gastrin and the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha. Testosterone (0.01-10 mg/kg/day i. m.) dose-dependently delayed oral and gastric ulcer healing. When applied in an optimal dose of 1 mg/kg/day, this hormone significantly raised gastric acid secretion and plasma IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha levels. Attenuation of plasma testosterone levels via bilateral orchidectomy inhibited gastric acid secretion and accelerated the healing of oral and gastric ulcers, while increasing plasma gastrin levels and these effects were reversed by testosterone. Salivectomy raised plasma testosterone levels, and delayed oral and gastric ulcer healing. Treatment of salivectomised animals with testosterone further inhibited ulcer healing, and this effect was counteracted by EGF. We propose that testosterone delays ulcer healing via a fall in blood flow at the ulcer margin, a rise in plasma levels of IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha and, in the case of gastric ulcers, an increase in gastric acid secretion. EGF released from the salivary glands plays an important role in limitation of the deleterious effects of testosterone on ulcer healing.

  16. Radiation induced oral mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P S Satheesh Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy will receive some degree of oral mucositis The incidence of oral mucositis was especially high in patients: (i With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concerned. The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care. The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy. The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene

  17. Endodontic-periodontal management of two rooted maxillary lateral incisor associated with complex radicular lingual groove by using spiral computed tomography as a diagnostic aid: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, A; Kathuria, A; Gandhi, T

    2011-06-01

    To present the successful endodontic and periodontal management of a two rooted maxillary lateral incisor tooth with a complex radicular lingual groove and severe periodontal destruction using spiral computed tomography as a diagnostic aid. A 30-year-old male patient presented with a chief complaint of mobility and discharge of pus in an upper front tooth. Clinical examination revealed a sinus tract on the labial gingival surface and a 10-mm-deep periodontal pocket associated with maxillary left lateral incisor tooth. On the lingual side, a groove emerging from cingulum, continuing mesioapically down the lingual aspect of tooth was found. Intraoral periapical radiographs demonstrated a lateral periodontal defect around the mesial aspect and a diffuse radiolucency at the apex of maxillary left lateral incisor tooth. The sinus tract was traced with gutta-percha to the maxillary left lateral incisor that showed an accessory root surrounded by a large radiolucent area. A spiral computed tomographic scan for better understanding of the complicated root canal morphology of the tooth was performed. Based on the clinical, radiographic and spiral computed tomographic findings, a diagnosis of an endo-perio lesion in tooth 22 was made. Management consisted of conventional root canal treatment, radiculoplasty, root resection of accessory root and surgical curettage of the periodontal defect. Follow-up with radiographic examination at 3 months and 1 year was performed. At 1-year recall, the patient was asymptomatic, there was no evidence of the sinus tract and a 3-mm nonbleeding pocket was present in relation to tooth 22. Progression of hard tissue healing was observed in the periapical radiograph taken 1 year postoperatively. The key to achieving favourable results in this particular type of developmental anomaly is accurate diagnosis and treatment planning. The health of the periapical osseous tissues appears to be the provital factor for tooth retention. A favourable outcome

  18. Satellite glial cell P2Y12 receptor in the trigeminal ganglion is involved in lingual neuropathic pain mechanisms in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katagiri Ayano

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been reported that the P2Y12 receptor (P2Y12R is involved in satellite glial cells (SGCs activation, indicating that P2Y12R expressed in SGCs may play functional roles in orofacial neuropathic pain mechanisms. However, the involvement of P2Y12R in orofacial neuropathic pain mechanisms is still unknown. We therefore studied the reflex to noxious mechanical or heat stimulation of the tongue, P2Y12R and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP immunohistochemistries in the trigeminal ganglion (TG in a rat model of unilateral lingual nerve crush (LNC to evaluate role of P2Y12R in SGC in lingual neuropathic pain. Results The head-withdrawal reflex thresholds to mechanical and heat stimulation of the lateral tongue were significantly decreased in LNC-rats compared to sham-rats. These nocifensive effects were apparent on day 1 after LNC and lasted for 17 days. On days 3, 9, 15 and 21 after LNC, the mean relative number of TG neurons encircled with GFAP-immunoreactive (IR cells significantly increased in the ophthalmic, maxillary and mandibular branch regions of TG. On day 3 after LNC, P2Y12R expression occurred in GFAP-IR cells but not neuronal nuclei (NeuN-IR cells (i.e. neurons in TG. After 3 days of successive administration of the P2Y12R antagonist MRS2395 into TG in LNC-rats, the mean relative number of TG neurons encircled with GFAP-IR cells was significantly decreased coincident with a significant reversal of the lowered head-withdrawal reflex thresholds to mechanical and heat stimulation of the tongue compared to vehicle-injected rats. Furthermore, after 3 days of successive administration of the P2YR agonist 2-MeSADP into the TG in naïve rats, the mean relative number of TG neurons encircled with GFAP-IR cells was significantly increased and head-withdrawal reflex thresholds to mechanical and heat stimulation of the tongue were significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner compared to vehicle-injected rats

  19. Oral microbiota and cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Meurman, Jukka H.

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation caused by infections may be the most important preventable cause of cancer in general. However, in the oral cavity the role of microbiota in carcinogenesis is not known. Microbial populations on mouth mucosa differ between healthy and malignant sites and certain oral bacterial species have been linked with malignancies but the evidence is still weak in this respect. Nevertheless, oral microorganisms inevitably up-regulate cytokines and other inflammatory mediators that affect the...

  20. Padronização de um método para mensuração das tábuas ósseas vestibular e lingual dos maxilares na Tomografia Computadorizada de Feixe Cônico (Cone Beam Methodology standardization for measuring buccal and lingual alveolar bone plates using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Cezar Ferreira

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: a espessura das tábuas ósseas que recobrem os dentes por vestibular e lingual constitui um dos fatores limitantes da movimentação dentária. O avanço tecnológico em Imaginologia permitiu avaliar detalhadamente essas regiões anatômicas por meio da utilização da tomografia computadorizada de feixe cônico (TCFC. OBJETIVO: descrever e padronizar, pormenorizadamente, um método para mensuração das tábuas ósseas vestibular e lingual dos maxilares nas imagens de tomografia computadorizada de feixe cônico. METODOLOGIA: a padronização digital da posição da imagem da face deve constituir o primeiro passo antes da seleção dos cortes de TCFC. Dois cortes axiais de cada maxilar foram empregados para a mensuração da espessura do osso alveolar vestibular e lingual. Utilizou-se como referência a junção cemento-esmalte dos primeiros molares permanentes, tanto na arcada superior quanto na inferior. RESULTADOS: cortes axiais paralelos ao plano palatino foram indicados para avaliação quantitativa do osso alveolar na maxila. Na arcada inferior, os cortes axiais devem ser paralelos ao plano oclusal funcional. CONCLUSÃO: o método descrito apresenta reprodutibilidade para utilização em pesquisas, assim como para a avaliação clínica das repercussões periodontais da movimentação dentária, ao permitir a comparação de imagens pré e pós-tratamento.INTRODUCTION: The thickness of the buccal and lingual bone plates constitutes one of the limiting factors of the orthodontic movement. The imaging technology has permitted the evaluation of this anatomical region, by means of cone beam computed tomography. PURPOSE: To describe and standardize, in details, a method for measuring the buccal and lingual bone plate thickness in CBCT images. METHODOLOGY: Digital standardization of face image should constitute the first step before the selection of CBCT slices. Two axial sections of each jaw were used for measuring the thickness

  1. Towards understanding oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaura, Egija; ten Cate, Jacob M

    2015-01-01

    During the last century, dental research has focused on unraveling the mechanisms behind various oral pathologies, while oral health was typically described as the mere absence of oral diseases. The term 'oral microbial homeostasis' is used to describe the capacity of the oral ecosystem to maintain microbial community stability in health. However, the oral ecosystem itself is not stable: throughout life an individual undergoes multiple physiological changes while progressing through infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood and old age. Recent discussions on the definition of general health have led to the proposal that health is the ability of the individual to adapt to physiological changes, a condition known as allostasis. In this paper the allostasis principle is applied to the oral ecosystem. The multidimensionality of the host factors contributing to allostasis in the oral cavity is illustrated with an example on changes occurring in puberty. The complex phenomenon of oral health and the processes that prevent the ecosystem from collapsing during allostatic changes in the entire body are far from being understood. As yet individual components (e.g. hard tissues, microbiome, saliva, host response) have been investigated, while only by consolidating these and assessing their multidimensional interactions should we be able to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the ecosystem, which in turn could serve to develop rational schemes to maintain health. Adapting such a 'system approach' comes with major practical challenges for the entire research field and will require vast resources and large-scale multidisciplinary collaborations. 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel

  2. Global Oral Health Inequalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, I.; Tabak, L.A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite impressive worldwide improvements in oral health, inequalities in oral health status among and within countries remain a daunting public health challenge. Oral health inequalities arise from a complex web of health determinants, including social, behavioral, economic, genetic, environmental, and health system factors. Eliminating these inequalities cannot be accomplished in isolation of oral health from overall health, or without recognizing that oral health is influenced at multiple individual, family, community, and health systems levels. For several reasons, this is an opportune time for global efforts targeted at reducing oral health inequalities. Global health is increasingly viewed not just as a humanitarian obligation, but also as a vehicle for health diplomacy and part of the broader mission to reduce poverty, build stronger economies, and strengthen global security. Despite the global economic recession, there are trends that portend well for support of global health efforts: increased globalization of research and development, growing investment from private philanthropy, an absolute growth of spending in research and innovation, and an enhanced interest in global health among young people. More systematic and far-reaching efforts will be required to address oral health inequalities through the engagement of oral health funders and sponsors of research, with partners from multiple public and private sectors. The oral health community must be “at the table” with other health disciplines and create opportunities for eliminating inequalities through collaborations that can harness both the intellectual and financial resources of multiple sectors and institutions. PMID:21490232

  3. Oral microbiota and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jukka H. Meurman

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation caused by infections may be the most important preventable cause of cancer in general. However, in the oral cavity the role of microbiota in carcinogenesis is not known. Microbial populations on mouth mucosa differ between healthy and malignant sites and certain oral bacterial species have been linked with malignancies but the evidence is still weak in this respect. Nevertheless, oral microorganisms inevitably up-regulate cytokines and other inflammatory mediators that affect the complex metabolic pathways and may thus be involved in carcinogenesis. Poor oral health associates statistically with prevalence of many types of cancer, such as pancreatic and gastrointestinal cancer. Furthermore, several oral micro-organisms are capable of converting alcohol to carcinogenic acetaldehyde which also may partly explain the known association between heavy drinking, smoking, poor oral health and the prevalence of oral and upper gastrointestinal cancer. A different problem is the cancer treatment-caused alterations in oral microbiota which may lead to the emergence of potential pathogens and subsequent other systemic health problems to the patients. Hence clinical guidelines and recommendations have been presented to control oral microbiota in patients with malignant disease, but also in this area the scientific evidence is weak. More controlled studies are needed for further conclusion.

  4. African Journal of Oral Health Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The African Journal of Oral Health Sciences is devoted to research into oral diseases and encourages a multidisciplinary approach. Emphasis is on oral pathology, oral microbiology, oral medicine, oral physiology and biochemistry and related clinical sciences.

  5. Oral candidosis in relation to oral immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, L; Khammissa, R A G; Chandran, R; Altini, M; Lemmer, J

    2014-09-01

    Symptomatic oral infection with Candida albicans is characterized by invasion of the oral epithelium by virulent hyphae that cause tissue damage releasing the inflammatory mediators that initiate and sustain local inflammation. Candida albicans triggers pattern-recognition receptors of keratinocytes, macrophages, monocytes and dendritic cells, stimulating the production of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-23. These cytokines induce the differentiation of Th17 cells and the generation of IL-17- and/or IL-22-mediated antifungal protective immuno-inflammatory responses in infected mucosa. Some immune cells including NKT cells, γδ T cells and lymphoid cells that are innate to the oral mucosa have the capacity to produce large quantities of IL-17 in response to C. albicans, sufficient to mediate effective protective immunity against C. albicans. On the other hand, molecular structures of commensal C. albicans blastoconidia, although detected by pattern-recognition receptors, are avirulent, do not invade the oral epithelium, do not elicit inflammatory responses in a healthy host, but induce regulatory immune responses that maintain tissue tolerance to the commensal fungi. The type, specificity and sensitivity of the protective immune response towards C. albicans is determined by the outcome of the integrated interactions between the intracellular signalling pathways of specific combinations of activated pattern-recognition receptors (TLR2, TLR4, Dectin-1 and Dectin-2). IL-17-mediated protective immune response is essential for oral mucosal immunity to C. albicans infection. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Class III malocclusion with complex problems of lateral open bite and severe crowding successfully treated with miniscrew anchorage and lingual orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagita, Takeshi; Kuroda, Shingo; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Yamashiro, Takashi

    2011-05-01

    In this article, we report the successful use of miniscrews in a patient with an Angle Class III malocclusion, lateral open bite, midline deviation, and severe crowding. Simultaneously resolving such problems with conventional Class III treatment is difficult. In this case, the treatment procedure was even more challenging because the patient preferred to have lingual brackets on the maxillary teeth. As a result, miniscrews were used to facilitate significant asymmetric tooth movement in the posterior and downward directions; this contributed to the camouflage of the skeletal mandibular protrusion together with complete resolution of the severe crowding and lateral open bite. Analysis of the jaw motion showed that irregularities in chewing movement were also resolved, and a stable occlusion was achieved. Improvements in the facial profile and dental arches remained stable at the 18-month follow-up. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Sarcoidosis: Oral and extra-oral manifestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease, which is usually associated with the formation of noncaseating granulomas in affected tissues and organs. It is mostly present with bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy, pulmonary infiltration, ocular, and cutaneous lesions. Oral manifestations of this disease are relatively rare. The present case report shows a 40-year-old male with lesions in the soft tissue of oral cavity (buccal mucosa, gingiva, and palate and a diagnosis of sarcoidosis was established following hematological, biochemical and pulmonary function tests, chest radiograph, and histopathological investigation.

  8. Anaesthetic efficacy of supplemental lingual infiltration of mandibular molars after inferior alveolar nerve block plus buccal infiltration in patients with irreversible pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, L; Luo, J; Yang, D

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the effect of supplemental lingual infiltration (LI) of mandibular molars following an inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) plus buccal infiltration (BI) in patients with irreversible pulpitis. Eighty adult patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis participated in this prospective study. All patients received standard IANB via injection of 4 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1 : 100,000 epinephrine. Ten minutes after the IANB, patients with numbness of the lower lip were randomly divided into two groups. In the BI group, 40 patients received supplemental BI of 0.9 mL of 4% articaine with 1 : 100,000 epinephrine. In the buccal plus lingual infiltration (BLI) group, 40 patients received supplemental BI of 0.9 mL of 4% articaine with 1 : 100,000 epinephrine and, subsequently, LIs with the same anaesthetic solution and dose. Endodontic access cavity preparation began 15 min after the IANB. Pain during treatment was recorded using a Heft-Parker visual analogue scale. Success was defined when pain was 'none' or 'mild' on endodontic access and initial instrumentation. The pain was estimated and statistically analysed by the chi-squared test (α = 0.05). The success rates for the BI and BLI groups were 70% and 62.5%, respectively. No statistical difference was found between the two groups (P = 0.478). Supplemental LIs are not recommended for administration in mandibular molars with irreversible pulpitis, because they do not improve the anaesthetic success after IANB plus BI. © 2012 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Oral cavity and jaw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solntsev, A.M.; Koval', G.Yu.

    1984-01-01

    Radioanatome of oral cavity and jaw is described. Diseases of the teeth, jaw, large salivary glands, temporo-mandibular articulation are considered. Roentgenograms of oral cacity and jaw of healthy people are presented and analyzed as well as roentgenograms in the above-mentioned diseases

  10. Oral Microbiology and Immunology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlén, Gunnar; Fiehn, Nils-Erik; Olsen, Ingar

    , dental assistants and trainees may find it a useful source of reference. The contents are based on general microbiology and immunology. Oral microbiology is given particular attention, with examples relevant to oral infectious diseases. Each chapter opens with a relatively short pre-reading section...

  11. Brachytherapy for oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monzen, Yoshio; Ajimu, Akira; Morikawa, Minoru; Hayashi, Nobuyuki; Yoshida, Shintarou; Ashizawa, Kazuto; Hayashi, Kuniaki; Ikenaga, Kouji; Sakamoto, Ichirou.

    1988-01-01

    13 cases with oral cancer were treated using brachytherapy at the Department of Radiology, Nagasaki University Hospital from September 1985 to February 1988. Among 11 cases of tongue cancer, T1 and T2 cases were well controlled by radiation therapy using 226 Ra needles. Cancer of oral floor and buccal mucosa were controlled by the use of 192 Au grains. (author)

  12. An overview of herbal supplement utilization with particular emphasis on possible interactions with dental drugs and oral manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abebe, Worku

    2003-01-01

    Herbal medication in the United States is a popular form of therapy. This paper provides an overview of the utilization of herbal supplements with particular emphasis on possible interactions with oral health drugs and oral manifestations. Herbal supplements are regulated by the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA), which limits their regulation by the U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A number of studies indicate that there is a progressive increase in the utilization of herbal supplements. The majority of consumers of these products are white, middle-aged women who have some college education. Many of the consumers use pharmaceutical drugs concurrently, but most do not inform their health-care providers about their use of herbal supplements. Various herbal supplements have been reported or are suspected to interact with certain oral health drugs, the most important one being 1) bromelain, cayenne, chamomile, feverfew, dong quai, eleuthro/Seberian ginseng, garlic, ginkgo, ginger, ginseng and licorice interacting with aspirin; 2) aloe latex, ephedra, ginseng, rhubarb, cascara sagrada, licorice, and senna interacting with corticosteriods; 3) kava, St. John's wort, chamomile, and valerian interacting with central nervous system (CNS) depressant drugs; and 4) herbs acting on the gastrointestinal system, altering the absorption of several orally administered drugs. Further, the use of some herbal supplements has been reported to be associated with oral manifestations, including aphthous ulcers, lip and tongue irritation, and swelling with feverfew; gingival bleeding with feverfew and ginkgo; tongue numbness with echinacea; xerostomia with St. John's wort; oral and lingual dyskinesia with kava; and salivation with yohimbe. These potential effects of herbal supplements in conjunction with factors related to regulation restrictions suggest that the use of these products may be associated with various adverse reactions that can affect oral health and

  13. White lesions in the oral cavity: A clinicopathological study from a tertiary care dermatology centre in Kerala, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S M Simi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: White lesions in the oral cavity may be benign, pre-malignant or malignant. There are no signs and symptoms which can reliably predict whether a leukoplakia will undergo malignant change or not. Many systemic conditions appear initially in the oral cavity and prompt diagnosis and management can help in minimizing disease progression and organ destruction. Aim : The aim of the paper was to study the clinical and histopathological patterns of white lesions in the oral cavity presented at the study setting and to study the factors associated with the histopathological patterns of the lesions. Settings and Design: A hospital based cross-sectional study of patients with white lesions in the oral cavity attending the Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Medical College, Thiruvananthapuram was done. Materials and Methods: After taking a detailed history, microscopic examination of Potassium hydroxide smear and an oral biopsy with histopathologial examination was done. Results : Out of the 50 patients in the study, clinically the diagnoses made were Lichen planus (32 patients; 64%, Frictional Keratosis (4;8%, Dysplasia (2;4%, Oral Hairy Leukoplakia (1;2%, Pemphigus Vulgaris (2;4%, Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus (1;2%, Oral Submucous fibrosis (3;6% and Oral Candidiasis alone (5;10%. Out of the 45 patients who had undergone biopsy, 25 (55.6% had Lichen planus, 9 (20% had Frictional Keratosis and mild Dysplasia was found in 4 (8.9% patients. Conclusion : The measure of agreement between the clinical and pathological diagnosis was only 32%. Older age, difficulty in opening the mouth, consumption of non-smoked tobacco, site of the lesion (gingival, floor of mouth or lingual vestibule and presence of tenderness on the lesion were significantly associated with Dysplasia.

  14. Osteo-odonto-keratoprosthesis surgery: a combined ocular-oral procedure for ocular blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, A B G; Tan, D T H; Lye, K W; Theng, J; Parthasarathy, A; Por, Y-M

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to describe the oral procedures used in osteo-odonto-keratoprosthesis (OOKP) surgery, and the demographics and oral findings of candidate patients in Singapore. The OOKP procedure utilizes an autologous tooth-bone complex to mount a poly-methylmethacrylate optical cylinder, as an artificial cornea, stabilized by an overlying autologous buccal mucosal graft. Consecutive patients referred over 3 years for dental evaluation prior to OOKP surgery were included. A total of 21 patients underwent oral clinical and radiographic evaluation. The aetiology of blindness included Stevens-Johnson's syndrome (11 cases), chemical burns (9 cases) and multiple failed corneal grafts (1 case). Evaluation revealed that 12 patients were suitable for OOKP surgery, 8 were at risk of complication or failure and 1 had no usable teeth. Fourteen patients have undergone unilateral OOKP Stage 1 surgery successfully. Complications included fracture of a tooth from its lingual bone necessitating the harvesting of a second tooth (1 case), oronasal perforation (1 case), exposure of adjacent roots (5 teeth), lower lip paresthesia (2 cases) and submucosal scar band formation in the buccal mucosal graft donor site (10 cases). Thirteen patients have completed Stage 2 surgery, with attainment of their best possible visual potential following OOKP surgery.

  15. Anaerobic oral flora in the North American black bear (Ursus americanus) in eastern North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Elsburgh O; Stoskopf, Michael K; Minter, Larry J; Stringer, Elizabeth M

    2012-06-01

    Microbial flora can provide insight into the ecology and natural history of wildlife in addition to improving understanding of health risks. This study examines the anaerobic oral flora of hunter killed black bears (Ursus americanus) in eastern North Carolina. Oral swabs from the buccal and lingual supragingival tooth surfaces of the first and second mandibular and maxillary molars of 22 black bears were inoculated onto Brucella Blood Agar plates supplemented with hemin and vitamin K after transport from the field using reduced oxoid nutrient broth. Sixteen anaerobic bacterial species, representing nine genera were identified using the RapID ANA II Micromethod Kit system and a number of organisms grown that could not be identified with the system. The most frequently identified anaerobes were Peptostreptococcus prevotii, Streptococcus constellatus, and Porphyromonas gingivalis. The diversity in the anaerobic oral flora of black bear in eastern North Carolina suggests the importance of including these organisms in basic health risk assessment protocols and suggests a potential tool for assessment of bear/habitat interactions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Causal relationship between malocclusion and oral muscles dysfunction: a model of approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccomanno, S; Antonini, G; D'Alatri, L; D'Angelantonio, M; Fiorita, A; Deli, R

    2012-12-01

    Bad habits result in altered functions which with time can cause anomalies of the orofacial morphology. To solve these problems, orthodontic treatment can be supported by myofunctional therapy in order to recover the normal functionality of the oral muscles. The aim of this study is to assess the need to treat patients with neuromuscular disorders, from both the occlusion and the muscles condition approach in order to obtain the balance needed for the stability of treatment. A sample of 23 patients with atypical swallowing was included in this study, some of them presented thumb sucking and oral breathing. After case history collection, in order to make a correct orthodontic and functional diagnosis, correction of anomalies was carried out since they could compromise the success of the therapy (maxillary contraction, oral breathing, and short lingual fraenum). Then a different therapeutic approach was applied on the basis of the specific dental features. Both from the diagnostic and therapeutic point of view, important results were achieved especially through muscle analysis with dynamometer and surface electromyography. Orthodontic therapy, in the presence of bad habits, is not enough to solve orthodontic issues, it must be combined with a myofunctional treatment. The success of the therapy is granted only when patients and their family comply with the treatment and all factors which can prevent success of the therapy are removed.

  17. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Oral Surgeries Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Injury / Trauma Surgery Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are ...

  18. American Academy of Oral Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Statements Newsletters AAOM: Representing the Discipline of Oral Medicine Oral Medicine is the discipline of dentistry concerned with the ... offers credentialing, resources and professional community for oral medicine practitioners. Our membership provides care to thousands. We ...

  19. What Is an Oral Piercing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to your desktop! more... What Is an Oral Piercing? Article Chapters What Is an Oral Piercing? print full article print this chapter email this article Oral piercing can cause pain, swelling, infection, drooling, taste loss, ...

  20. Literatura Oral Hispanica (Hispanic Oral Literature).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlpine, Dave

    As part of a class in Hispanic Oral Literature, students collected pieces of folklore from various Hispanic residents in the region known as "Siouxland" in Iowa. Consisting of some of the folklore recorded from the residents, this paper includes 18 "cuentos y leyendas" (tales and legends), 48 "refranes" (proverbs), 17…

  1. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Oral and maxillofacial surgeons surgically treat the soft tissues of the face, mouth ... involving skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral and maxillofacial ...

  2. Examining the association between oral health and oral HPV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Thanh Cong; Markham, Christine M; Ross, Michael Wallis; Mullen, Patricia Dolan

    2013-09-01

    Oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the cause of 40% to 80% of oropharyngeal cancers; yet, no published study has examined the role of oral health in oral HPV infection, either independently or in conjunction with other risk factors. This study examined the relation between oral health and oral HPV infection and the interactive effects of oral health, smoking, and oral sex on oral HPV infection. Our analyses comprised 3,439 participants ages 30 to 69 years for whom data on oral HPV and oral health were available from the nationally representative 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Results showed that higher unadjusted prevalence of oral HPV infection was associated with four measures of oral health, including self-rated oral health as poor-to-fair [prevalence ratio (PR) = 1.56; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.25-1.95], indicated the possibility of gum disease (PR = 1.51; 95% CI, 1.13-2.01), reported use of mouthwash to treat dental problems in the past week (PR = 1.28; 95% CI, 1.07-1.52), and higher number of teeth lost (Ptrend = 0.035). In multivariable logistic regression models, oral HPV infection had a statistically significant association with self-rated overall oral health (OR = 1.55; 95% CI, 1.15-2.09), independent of smoking and oral sex. In conclusion, poor oral health was an independent risk factor of oral HPV infection, irrespective of smoking and oral sex practices. Public health interventions may aim to promote oral hygiene and oral health as an additional measure to prevent HPV-related oral cancers.

  3. The broadening application of chemodenervation in X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism (Part II): an open-label experience with botulinum toxin-A (Dysport®) injections for oromandibular, lingual, and truncal-axial dystonias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Raymond L; Ng, Arlene R; Santos, Mary Mildred Delgado-Delos; Fernandez, Hubert H

    2011-01-01

    While the majority of chemodenervation clinics worldwide typically use botulinum toxins for the treatment of common conditions such as blepharopsams, cervical dystonia, limb dystonia, and spasticity, the unusually high concentration of X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism (XDP) has allowed us to collect and describe our experience in the use of botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) on rarer dystonic patterns. BoNT-A (Dysport®) was injected in a total 109 dystonias of XDP. Our cohort included: 50 cases in the oromandibular area (jaw opening: 32 cases, jaw closing: 12 cases, and jaw deviation: 6 cases); 35 cases in the lingual area (tongue protrusion: 27 cases and tongue curling: 8 cases); and, 24 cases in the truncal-axial area (flexor: 12 cases, extensor: 7 cases, and lateral-extensor: 5 cases). Interestingly, pain, often a nonprominent symptom of dystonias, was frequently reported in 40/50 XDP cases with oromandibular dystonia and 18/24 XDP cases with truncal-axial dystonia. All BoNT-A procedures were performed under electromyography guidance. A "high potency, low dilution" BoNT-A protocol was applied for oromandibular, lingual, cranial, cervical, and distal limb dystonias; whereas for dystonias of the abdominal, paraspinal, and proximal limb muscles, a "low potency, high dilution" BoNT-A injection protocol was applied. Outcomes measures included: the global dystonia rating scale (DRS) and pain visual analog scale (VAS) reduction at week 4; duration of BoNT-A effects; and, side effect profile. The median DRS score after 4 weeks was 3 ("substantial improvement") for oromandibular and lingual dystonias and 2 ("moderate improvement") for truncal-axial dystonias. Pain reduction was significantly reduced (75%-80% in oromandibular; 30%-80% in truncal-axial dystonias). The median duration of BoNT-A effect was 16 weeks for oromandibular, 12 weeks for lingual, and 11 weeks for truncal-axial dystonias. Compared to a generally safe and well-tolerated BoNT-A injections for truncal

  4. Prevention of gingival trauma : Oral hygiene devices and oral piercings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoenderdos, N.L.

    2017-01-01

    Maintaining healthy teeth and soft oral tissues for life is important. Oral hygiene devices and oral piercings can damage the soft oral tissues. This thesis investigates the safety of manual toothbrushes, interdental brushes and rubber bristles interdental cleaners by analysing the gingival abrasion

  5. Cromolyn Oral Inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your doctor.Cromolyn oral inhalation helps to prevent asthma attacks (sudden episodes of shortness of breath, wheezing, and coughing) but will not stop an asthma attack that has already started. Your doctor will prescribe ...

  6. Intravenous versus oral etoposide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Abir Salwa; Grönberg, Malin; Langer, Seppo W.

    2018-01-01

    High-grade gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (GEP-NENs, G3) are aggressive cancers of the digestive system with poor prognosis and survival. Platinum-based chemotherapy (cisplatin/carboplatin + etoposide) is considered the first-line palliative treatment. Etoposide is frequently...... administered intravenously; however, oral etoposide may be used as an alternative. Concerns for oral etoposide include decreased bioavailability, inter- and intra-patient variability and patient compliance. We aimed to evaluate possible differences in progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS......) in patients treated with oral etoposide compared to etoposide given as infusion. Patients (n = 236) from the Nordic NEC study were divided into three groups receiving etoposide as a long infusion (24 h, n = 170), short infusion (≤ 5 h, n = 33) or oral etoposide (n = 33) according to hospital tradition. PFS...

  7. Fostering oral presentation performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginkel, van Stan; Gulikers, Judith; Biemans, Harm; Mulder, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Previous research revealed significant differences in the effectiveness of various feedback sources for encouraging students’ oral presentation performance. While former studies emphasised the superiority of teacher feedback, it remains unclear whether the quality of feedback actually differs

  8. Oral Cancer Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Get involved Understanding Dental Research People Resources About Understanding Events Get involved Dental Research Resources Contact Sitemap The Oral Cancer Foundation admin 2017-11-12T16:49:25+ ...

  9. Oral dendritic cells mediate antigen-specific tolerance by stimulating TH1 and regulatory CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarell, Laurent; Lombardi, Vincent; Louise, Anne; Saint-Lu, Nathalie; Chabre, Henri; Moussu, Hélène; Betbeder, Didier; Balazuc, Anne-Marie; Van Overtvelt, Laurence; Moingeon, Philippe

    2008-09-01

    A detailed characterization of oral antigen-presenting cells is critical to improve second-generation sublingual allergy vaccines. To characterize oral dendritic cells (DCs) within lingual and buccal tissues from BALB/c mice with respect to their surface phenotype, distribution, and capacity to polarize CD4(+) T-cell responses. In situ analysis of oral DCs was performed by immunohistology. Purified DCs were tested in vitro for their capacity to capture, process, and present the ovalbumin antigen to naive CD4(+) T cells. In vivo priming of ovalbumin-specific T cells adoptively transferred to BALB/c mice was analyzed by cytofluorometry in cervical lymph nodes after sublingual administration of mucoadhesive ovalbumin. Three subsets of oral DCs with a distinct tissue distribution were identified: (1) a minor subset of CD207(+) Langerhans cells located in the mucosa itself, (2) a major subpopulation of CD11b(+)CD11c(-) and CD11b(+)CD11c(+) myeloid DCs at the mucosal/submucosal interface, and (3) B220(+)120G8(+) plasmacytoid DCs found in submucosal tissues. Purified myeloid and plasmacytoid oral DCs capture and process the antigen efficiently and are programmed to elicit IFN-gamma and/or IL-10 production together with a suppressive function in naive CD4(+) T cells. Targeting the ovalbumin antigen to oral DCs in vivo by using mucoadhesive particles establishes tolerance in the absence of cell depletion through the stimulation of IFN-gamma and IL-10-producing CD4(+) regulatory T cells in cervical lymph nodes. The oral immune system is composed of various subsets of tolerogenic DCs organized in a compartmentalized manner and programmed to induce T(H)1/regulatory T-cell responses.

  10. Maintaining women's oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, A L; Bonci, L

    2001-07-01

    Women must adopt health-promoting strategies for both general health and the oral cavity, because the health of a woman's body and oral cavity are bidirectional. For general health-maintenance strategies, dental practitioners should actively advise women to minimize alcohol use, abstain from or cease smoking, stay physically active, and choose the right foods to nourish both the body and mind. For oral health-maintenance strategies, dental practitioners should advise women on how to prevent or control oral infections, particularly dental caries and periodontal diseases. Specifically, women need to know how to remove plaque from the teeth mechanically, use appropriate chemotherapeutic agents and dentifrices, use oral irrigation, and control halitosis. Dental practitioners also need to stress the importance of regular maintenance visits for disease prevention. Adolescent women are more prone to gingivitis and aphthous ulcers when they begin their menstrual cycles and need advice about cessation of tobacco use, mouth protection during athletic activities, cleaning orthodontic appliances, developing good dietary habits, and avoiding eating disorders. Women in early to middle adulthood may be pregnant or using oral contraceptives with concomitant changes in oral tissues. Dental practitioners need to advise them how to take care of the oral cavity during these changes and how to promote the health of their infants, including good nutrition. Older women experience the onset of menopause and increased vulnerability to osteoporosis. They may also experience xerostomia and burning mouth syndrome. Dental practitioners need to help women alleviate these symptoms and encourage them to continue good infection control and diet practices.

  11. ON ORAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Svetitsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes a rise in the incidence of oral cancer in the Rostov Region since the 1990s. The study has indicated that this rise is associated with regional population growth due to the forced migrants after the collapse of the USSR. Financial problems, unbalanced nutrition, poor oral hygiene, and depression in this group of patients have contributed to the higher incidence of precancers and cancers.

  12. Oral vs. salivary diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Joana; Corby, Patricia M.; Barber, Cheryl A.; Abrams, William R.; Malamud, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    The field of "salivary diagnostics" includes studies utilizing samples obtained from a variety of sources within the oral cavity. These samples include; whole unstimulated saliva, stimulated whole saliva, duct saliva collected directly from the parotid, submandibular/sublingual glands or minor salivary glands, swabs of the buccal mucosa, tongue or tonsils, and gingival crevicular fluid. Many publications state "we collected saliva from subjects" without fully describing the process or source of the oral fluid. Factors that need to be documented in any study include the time of day of the collection, the method used to stimulate and collect the fluid, and how much fluid is being collected and for how long. The handling of the oral fluid during and post-collection is also critical and may include addition of protease or nuclease inhibitors, centrifugation, and cold or frozen storage prior to assay. In an effort to create a standard protocol for determining a biomarker's origin we carried out a pilot study collecting oral fluid from 5 different sites in the mouth and monitoring the concentrations of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines detected using MesoScaleDiscovery (MSD) electrochemiluminesence assays. Our data suggested that 3 of the cytokines are primarily derived from the submandibular gland, while 7 of the cytokines come from a source other than the major salivary glands such as the minor salivary glands or cells in the oral mucosae. Here we review the literature on monitoring biomarkers in oral samples and stress the need for determining the blood/saliva ratio when a quantitative determination is needed and suggest that the term oral diagnostic be used if the source of an analyte in the oral cavity is unknown.

  13. Immunologically mediated oral diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Jimson, Sudha; Balachader, N.; Anita, N.; Babu, R.

    2015-01-01

    Immune mediated diseases of oral cavity are uncommon. The lesions may be self-limiting and undergo remission spontaneously. Among the immune mediated oral lesions the most important are lichen planus, pemphigus, erythema multiformi, epidermolysis bullosa, systemic lupus erythematosis. Cellular and humoral mediated immunity play a major role directed against epithelial and connective tissue in chronic and recurrent patterns. Confirmatory diagnosis can be made by biopsy, direct and indirect imm...

  14. Determinants of Oral Health: Does Oral Health Literacy Matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Naghibi Sistani, Mohammad Mehdi; Yazdani, Reza; Virtanen, Jorma; Pakdaman, Afsaneh; Murtomaa, Heikki

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate oral health literacy, independent of other oral health determinants, as a risk indicator for self-reported oral health. Methods. A cross-sectional population-based survey conducted in Tehran, Iran. Multiple logistic regression analysis served to estimate the predictive effect of oral health literacy on self-reported oral health status (good versus poor) controlling for socioeconomic and demographic factors and tooth-brushing behavior. Results. In all, among 1031 partici...

  15. Oral Carcinogenesis and Oral Cancer Chemoprevention: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Takuji; Tanaka, Mayu; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2011-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the major global threats to public health. The development of oral cancer is a tobacco-related multistep and multifocal process involving field cancerization and carcinogenesis. The rationale for molecular-targeted prevention of oral cancer is promising. Biomarkers of genomic instability, including aneuploidy and allelic imbalance, are possible to measure the cancer risk of oral premalignancies. Understanding of the biology of oral carcinogenesis will yield important adv...

  16. Oral microbiome and oral and gastrointestinal cancer risk

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Jiyoung; Chen, Calvin Y.; Hayes, Richard B.

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of evidence implicates human oral bacteria in the etiology of oral and gastrointestinal cancers. Epidemiological studies consistently report increased risks of these cancers in men and women with periodontal disease or tooth loss, conditions caused by oral bacteria. More than 700 bacterial species inhabit the oral cavity, including at least 11 bacterial phyla and 70 genera. Oral bacteria may activate alcohol and smoking-related carcinogens locally or act systemically, through c...

  17. Ethnicity and oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, C; Bedi, R

    2000-09-01

    Oral squamous-cell carcinoma, the main type of oral cancer, is among the ten most common cancers in the world. The aims of this paper were first, to consider whether there was evidence of marked ethnic variations in the incidence, management, and survival of oral cancer, and then, to review possible explanations for these variations. Evidence from the literature suggests that there is marked, inter-country variation in both the incidence and mortality from oral cancer. There is also growing evidence of intracountry ethnic differences, mostly reported in the UK and USA. These variations among ethnic groups have been attributed mainly to specific risk factors, such as alcohol and tobacco (smoking and smokeless), but dietary factors and the existence of genetic predispositions may also play a part. Variations in access to care services are also an apparent factor. The extent of ethnic differences in oral cancer is masked by the scarcity of information available. Where such data are accessible, there are clear disparities in both incidence and mortality of oral cancer between ethnic groups.

  18. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... find out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ... find out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ...

  19. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... find out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ... find out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ...

  20. Impact of Partial-Mouth Periodontal Examination Protocols on the Association Between Gingival Bleeding and Oral Health-Related Quality of Life in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediani Machado, Michely; Tomazoni, Fernanda; Ruffo Ortiz, Fernanda; Ardenghi, Thiago Machado; Zanatta, Fabricio Batistin

    2017-07-01

    It is not clear how using partial-mouth periodontal examination (PMPE) protocols affects estimates of the association between gingival bleeding (GB) and oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL). The aim of the present study is to assess impact of different PMPEs on the association between GB and OHRQoL in 12-year-old adolescents. A total of 1,134 adolescents were evaluated for clinical and subjective variables. GB was determined by full-mouth examination (FME) of six sites (disto-buccal [DB], mid-buccal [B], mesio-buccal [MB], disto-lingual [DL], mid-lingual, and mesio-lingual [ML]) and different PMPEs were calculated using a 15% cut-off point: 1) full-mouth (MB-B-DB/MB-B-DL); 2) two diagonal quadrants (six sites/MB-B-DB/MB-B-DL); 3) two randomly selected half-mouth quadrants (six sites/MB-B-DB/ MB-B-DL/MB-DB-ML-DL); and 4) the community periodontal index. OHRQoL was assessed using the Child Perceptions Questionnaire (CPQ 11-14 ). Adjusted negative binomial regression models were used to calculate the rate ratio of CPQ 11-14 scores for each PMPE. Adolescents with GB showed significantly poorer OHRQoL than their counterparts when FME was used. In contrast, more than half of PMPE protocols did not detect significant associations between GB and CPQ 11-14 scores in the adjusted analysis. Using PMPE to assess GB in adolescents significantly affects associations with OHRQoL outcomes, depending on the protocol used. PMPEs that evaluated MB-B-DL sites of randomly selected half-mouth quadrants (1 or 2 and 3 or 4) achieved results closer to those obtained with FME.

  1. Strengthening of oral health systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik

    2014-01-01

    is either due to low availability and accessibility of oral health care or because oral health care is costly. In all countries, the poor and disadvantaged population groups are heavily affected by a high burden of oral disease compared to well-off people. Promotion of oral health and prevention of oral...... diseases must be provided through financially fair primary health care and public health intervention. Integrated approaches are the most cost-effective and realistic way to close the gap in oral health between rich and poor. The World Health Organization (WHO) Oral Health Programme will work......Around the globe many people are suffering from oral pain and other problems of the mouth or teeth. This public health problem is growing rapidly in developing countries where oral health services are limited. Significant proportions of people are underserved; insufficient oral health care...

  2. Assessment of the Speech Intelligibility Performance of Post Lingual Cochlear Implant Users at Different Signal-to-Noise Ratios Using the Turkish Matrix Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Polat

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spoken word recognition and speech perception tests in quiet are being used as a routine in assessment of the benefit which children and adult cochlear implant users receive from their devices. Cochlear implant users generally demonstrate high level performances in these test materials as they are able to achieve high level speech perception ability in quiet situations. Although these test materials provide valuable information regarding Cochlear Implant (CI users’ performances in optimal listening conditions, they do not give realistic information regarding performances in adverse listening conditions, which is the case in the everyday environment. Aims: The aim of this study was to assess the speech intelligibility performance of post lingual CI users in the presence of noise at different signal-to-noise ratio with the Matrix Test developed for Turkish language. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: The thirty post lingual implant user adult subjects, who had been using implants for a minimum of one year, were evaluated with Turkish Matrix test. Subjects’ speech intelligibility was measured using the adaptive and non-adaptive Matrix Test in quiet and noisy environments. Results: The results of the study show a correlation between Pure Tone Average (PTA values of the subjects and Matrix test Speech Reception Threshold (SRT values in the quiet. Hence, it is possible to asses PTA values of CI users using the Matrix Test also. However, no correlations were found between Matrix SRT values in the quiet and Matrix SRT values in noise. Similarly, the correlation between PTA values and intelligibility scores in noise was also not significant. Therefore, it may not be possible to assess the intelligibility performance of CI users using test batteries performed in quiet conditions. Conclusion: The Matrix Test can be used to assess the benefit of CI users from their systems in everyday life, since it is possible to perform

  3. ORAL MYIASIS CONVERTING TO ORAL SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshay

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Oral Myiasis, a condition of infestation of the body by fly larvae (maggots is a rare pathology in humans. It is associated with poor oral hygiene, alcoholism, senility, suppurating lesions, severe halitosis. It is seen frequently in tropical countries and hot climatic regions. The reported cases in literature of oral Myiasis associated with oral cancer are few. The treatment is a mechanical removal of the maggots but a systemic treatment with Ivermectin, a semi - synthetic macrolide antibiotic, has been used successfully for treatment for oral m yiasis. We present a case of 55 yr old male alcoholic patient with oral myiasis with extensive proliferative growth of oral cavity. Our patient was managed with manual debridement and administration of systemic ivermect in along with antibiotic coverage. Incisional biopsy of the proliferative lesion showed well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. Thus our patient showed presence of oral myiasis in association with oral squamous cell carcinoma.

  4. The prevalence of human papilloma virus (HPV) infections in oral squamous cell carcinomas: a retrospective analysis of 88 patients and literature overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, M; Pabst, A M; Walter, C; Sagheb, K; Günther, C; Blatt, S; Weise, K; Al-Nawas, B; Ziebart, T

    2014-10-01

    In addition to tobacco and alcohol consumption, the two main risk factors for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), recent studies have revealed infections with human papilloma virus (HPV) as an additional risk factor for OSCC development. In the field of head and neck malignancies, the prevalence of HPV infections in oropharyngeal cancer (OC) ranges in different studies up to 84%. While HPV infection is discussed as an independent risk factor in this region, its distinguished role in carcinogenesis of tumours localized to the oral cavity remains still uncertain. In this study, we analysed the HPV status in 88 consecutive patients with OSCCs localized anterior of the palatoglossal arch who were treated in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at the University Medical Center Mainz. The HPV status analysis was performed using DNA-PCR and immunostaining of p16 protein. The prevalence of HPV-positive OSCCs was about 6% (5 patients). In 3 patients the HPV subtypes 16/18 were found. No significant differences between the HPV positive and negative patients regarding age, gender, smoking and alcohol consumption, localization and TNM level could be detected. Contrary to other studies focussing on cancers of the lingual and palatine tonsil, the prevalence of HPV infections was much lower in the oral cavity. Therefore HPV infection might play a less important role in oral carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Communication among Oral Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolenbrander, Paul E.; Andersen, Roxanna N.; Blehert, David S.; Egland, Paul G.; Foster, Jamie S.; Palmer, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    Human oral bacteria interact with their environment by attaching to surfaces and establishing mixed-species communities. As each bacterial cell attaches, it forms a new surface to which other cells can adhere. Adherence and community development are spatiotemporal; such order requires communication. The discovery of soluble signals, such as autoinducer-2, that may be exchanged within multispecies communities to convey information between organisms has emerged as a new research direction. Direct-contact signals, such as adhesins and receptors, that elicit changes in gene expression after cell-cell contact and biofilm growth are also an active research area. Considering that the majority of oral bacteria are organized in dense three-dimensional biofilms on teeth, confocal microscopy and fluorescently labeled probes provide valuable approaches for investigating the architecture of these organized communities in situ. Oral biofilms are readily accessible to microbiologists and are excellent model systems for studies of microbial communication. One attractive model system is a saliva-coated flowcell with oral bacterial biofilms growing on saliva as the sole nutrient source; an intergeneric mutualism is discussed. Several oral bacterial species are amenable to genetic manipulation for molecular characterization of communication both among bacteria and between bacteria and the host. A successful search for genes critical for mixed-species community organization will be accomplished only when it is conducted with mixed-species communities. PMID:12209001

  6. [Oral health in pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagojević, Duska; Brkanić, Tatjana; Stojić, Sinisa

    2002-01-01

    Good oral health care during pregnancy is essential but often overlooked factor of dental growth as well as of other structures of oral cavity. Pregnancy is the time when conscious approach to preventive oral care should increase. Preventive measures during pregnancy mean usage of fluorides, special dietary measures and increased oral hygiene habits. Preventive measures in pregnant women have one goal: providing conditions for development of fetal teeth as well as preventing tooth decay in pregnant women. The optimal period for introducing preventive measures is the first trimester of pregnancy. Because of hormonal alterations there is an increased incidence of dental diseases: gingivitis and low salivary pH (inflammation and bleeding gums). Eating habits of pregnant women may lead to frequent snacking on candy or other decay-promoting foods, thereby increasing the risk of caries. However, very poor oral health, possible dental complications and their consequences to the health as well as emotional status represent very strong reasons for activation of dental health care in this period.

  7. The Oral Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arweiler, Nicole B; Netuschil, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    The oral microbiota represents an important part of the human microbiota, and includes several hundred to several thousand diverse species. It is a normal part of the oral cavity and has an important function to protect against colonization of extrinsic bacteria which could affect systemic health. On the other hand, the most common oral diseases caries, gingivitis and periodontitis are based on microorganisms. While (medical) research focused on the planktonic phase of bacteria over the last 100 years, it is nowadays generally known, that oral microorganisms are organised as biofilms. On any non-shedding surfaces of the oral cavity dental plaque starts to form, which meets all criteria for a microbial biofilm and is subject to the so-called succession. When the sensitive ecosystem turns out of balance - either by overload or weak immune system - it becomes a challenge for local or systemic health. Therefore, the most common strategy and the golden standard for the prevention of caries, gingivitis and periodontitis is the mechanical removal of this biofilms from teeth, restorations or dental prosthesis by regular toothbrushing.

  8. Oral health during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Hugh; Douglass, Alan B; Douglass, Joanna M; Silk, Laura

    2008-04-15

    Oral health care in pregnancy is often avoided and misunderstood by physicians, dentists, and patients. Evidence-based practice guidelines are still being developed. Research suggests that some prenatal oral conditions may have adverse consequences for the child. Periodontitis is associated with preterm birth and low birth weight, and high levels of cariogenic bacteria in mothers can lead to increased dental caries in the infant. Other oral lesions, such as gingivitis and pregnancy tumors, are benign and require only reassurance and monitoring. Every pregnant woman should be screened for oral risks, counseled on proper oral hygiene, and referred for dental treatment when necessary. Dental procedures such as diagnostic radiography, periodontal treatment, restorations, and extractions are safe and are best performed during the second trimester. Xylitol and chlorhexidine may be used as adjuvant therapy for high-risk mothers in the early postpartum period to reduce transmission of cariogenic bacteria to their infants. Appropriate dental care and prevention during pregnancy may reduce poor prenatal outcomes and decrease infant caries.

  9. Canine oral melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Philip J

    2007-05-01

    Melanoma is the most common oral malignancy in the dog. Oral and/or mucosal melanoma has been routinely considered an extremely malignant tumor with a high degree of local invasiveness and high metastatic propensity. Primary tumor size has been found to be extremely prognostic. The World Health Organization staging scheme for dogs with oral melanoma is based on size, with stage I = or = 4cm tumor and/or lymph node metastasis, and stage IV = distant metastasis. Median survival times for dogs with oral melanoma treated with surgery are approximately 17 to 18, 5 to 6, and 3 months with stage I, II, and III disease, respectively. Significant negative prognostic factors include stage, size, evidence of metastasis, and a variety of histologic criteria. Standardized treatments such as surgery, coarse-fractionation radiation therapy, and chemotherapy have afforded minimal to modest stage-dependent clinical benefits and death is usually due to systemic metastasis. Numerous immunotherapeutic strategies have been employed to date with limited clinical efficacy; however, the use of xenogeneic DNA vaccines may represent a leap forward in clinical efficacy. Oral melanoma is a spontaneous syngeneic cancer occurring in outbred, immunocompetent dogs and appears to be a more clinically faithful therapeutic model for human melanoma; further use of canine melanoma as a therapeutic model for human melanoma is strongly encouraged. In addition, the development of an expanded but clinically relevant staging system incorporating the aforementioned prognostic factors is also strongly encouraged.

  10. Sensory-motor relationships in speech production in post-lingually deaf cochlear-implanted adults and normal-hearing seniors: Evidence from phonetic convergence and speech imitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarbel, Lucie; Beautemps, Denis; Schwartz, Jean-Luc; Sato, Marc

    2017-07-01

    Speech communication can be viewed as an interactive process involving a functional coupling between sensory and motor systems. One striking example comes from phonetic convergence, when speakers automatically tend to mimic their interlocutor's speech during communicative interaction. The goal of this study was to investigate sensory-motor linkage in speech production in postlingually deaf cochlear implanted participants and normal hearing elderly adults through phonetic convergence and imitation. To this aim, two vowel production tasks, with or without instruction to imitate an acoustic vowel, were proposed to three groups of young adults with normal hearing, elderly adults with normal hearing and post-lingually deaf cochlear-implanted patients. Measure of the deviation of each participant's f 0 from their own mean f 0 was measured to evaluate the ability to converge to each acoustic target. showed that cochlear-implanted participants have the ability to converge to an acoustic target, both intentionally and unintentionally, albeit with a lower degree than young and elderly participants with normal hearing. By providing evidence for phonetic convergence and speech imitation, these results suggest that, as in young adults, perceptuo-motor relationships are efficient in elderly adults with normal hearing and that cochlear-implanted adults recovered significant perceptuo-motor abilities following cochlear implantation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Passive restriction of blood flow and counter-current heat exchange via lingual retia in the tongue of a neonatal gray whale Eschrichtius robustus (Cetacea, Mysticeti).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekdale, Eric G; Kienle, Sarah S

    2015-04-01

    Retia mirabilia play broad roles in cetacean physiology, including thermoregulation during feeding and pressure regulations during diving. Vascular bundles of lingual retia are described within the base of the tongue of a neonatal female gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus). Each rete consists of a central artery surrounded by four to six smaller veins. The retia and constituent vessels decrease in diameter as they extend anteriorly within the hyoglossus muscle from a position anterior to the basihyal cartilage toward the apex of the tongue. The position of the retia embedded in the hyoglossus and the anterior constriction of the vessels differs from reports of similar vascular bundles that were previously identified in gray whales. The retia likely serve as a counter-current heat exchange system to control body temperature during feeding. Cold blood flowing toward the body center within the periarterial veins would accept heat from warm blood in the central artery flowing toward the anterior end of the tongue. Although thermoregulatory systems have been identified within the mouths of a few mysticete species, the distribution of such vascular structures likely is more widespread among baleen whales than has previously been described. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Radioautographic analysis of changes in different phases of cell kinetics in murine oral mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chang Suck; You, Dong Soo

    1983-01-01

    The age related changes in the life cycle of the progenitor cell population of murine oral epithelia was studied. Using radioautographic methods which have been adopted in previous cell cycle studies, the age-related changes of different phases in renewing cells of the palatal, buccal and lingual mucosae were determined. The results confirm published findings on cell cycle changes of epithelia with aging and illustrated further that mitotic phases which has hither to been considered stationary, also changes with aging. The major parts revealed by this study are as follows: 1. The basal progenitor cells in different regions of oral mucosa have different generation times. 2. The basal cell cycle time increases as a function of aging and the region most affected by aging appears to be the epithelium of the cheek. 3. The phases of the cell cycle affected by the process of aging are in increasing order of magnitude: M-, S- and G1-phase. 4. The age related change in the number of DNA synthesizing basal progenitor cells occurs at two age periods. Between 1 and 12 months of life it decreases, while from 12 to 20 months it increases.

  13. Oral pregnancy tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh M Gondivkar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyogenic granuloma is one of the inflammatory hyperplasias seen in the oral cavity. This term is a misnomer because the lesion is unrelated to infection and in reality arises in response to various stimuli such as low-grade local irritation, traumatic injury, or hormonal factors. It predominantly occurs in the second decade of life in young females, possibly because of the vascular effects of female hormones. Clinically, oral pyogenic granuloma is a smooth or lobulated exophytic lesion manifesting as small, red erythematous growth on a pedunculated or sometimes sessile base, which is usually hemorrhagic. Although excisional surgery is the treatment of choice , some other treatment protocols such as the use of Nd:YAG laser, flash lamp pulsed dye laser, cryosurgery, intralesional injection of ethanol or corticosteroids, and sodium tetradecyl sulfate sclerotherapy have been proposed. We present the case of a 25-year-old pregnant woman with large oral pyogenic granuloma.

  14. Treatment of Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity, Oropharynx and Hypopharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luukkaa, Marjaana; Minn, Heikki; Aitasalo, Kalle; Kronqvist, Pauliina; Kulmala, Jarmo; Pyrhoenen, Seppo; Grenman, Reidar

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy and feasibility of full-dose preoperative radiation therapy (RT) in head and neck cancer presenting in the oral cavity, oro- and hypopharynx, within a single university hospital district. During a seven-year period, 1989 to 1995, 174 patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity (OC, 70% of all patients), oropharynx (OP, 15%) and hypopharynx (HP, 15%) were referred to Turku University Central Hospital. All patients were seen by a tumor board consisting of an ENT (ear-nose-throat) head and neck surgeon, a radiation oncologist and a dentist. Potentially curative treatment was given to 142 patients. Of these, 88 (62%) had preoperative RT, 6 (4%) postoperative RT, 34 (24%) definitive RT and 14 patients (10%) were treated with surgery only. The radiation dose was S50 Gy, averagely 64 Gy. The major endpoints of the study were local control, overall survival and major complications of the combined treatment. The 5-year relative survival rate (RSR) was 40% for all, and 43% for patients treated with curative intent. For these, the local control at 5 years was 60%; the disease-specific 5-year survival rate was 65% for the patients with lingual SCC, 45% for those with other oral tumor localizations, 64% for the oropharynx patients and 47% for those with tumor in their hypopharynx, while it was 55% for all patients. The preoperative radiotherapy was fairly well tolerated. Ten (7%) of the patients treated with curative intent suffered major complications, and four patients had evidence of osteoradionecrosis. With the exception of patients with early SCC the outcome remains rather poor in this group of cancer patients who often have marked co-morbidity. In our opinion, preoperative radiotherapy to a dose of 62-64 Gy can safely be given, and remains a feasible means to treat patients with oral, oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal cancer

  15. Treatment of Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity, Oropharynx and Hypopharynx

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luukkaa, Marjaana; Minn, Heikki; Aitasalo, Kalle; Kronqvist, Pauliina; Kulmala, Jarmo; Pyrhoenen, Seppo; Grenman, Reidar [Turku Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Depts. of Oncology and Radiotherapy

    2003-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy and feasibility of full-dose preoperative radiation therapy (RT) in head and neck cancer presenting in the oral cavity, oro- and hypopharynx, within a single university hospital district. During a seven-year period, 1989 to 1995, 174 patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity (OC, 70% of all patients), oropharynx (OP, 15%) and hypopharynx (HP, 15%) were referred to Turku University Central Hospital. All patients were seen by a tumor board consisting of an ENT (ear-nose-throat) head and neck surgeon, a radiation oncologist and a dentist. Potentially curative treatment was given to 142 patients. Of these, 88 (62%) had preoperative RT, 6 (4%) postoperative RT, 34 (24%) definitive RT and 14 patients (10%) were treated with surgery only. The radiation dose was S50 Gy, averagely 64 Gy. The major endpoints of the study were local control, overall survival and major complications of the combined treatment. The 5-year relative survival rate (RSR) was 40% for all, and 43% for patients treated with curative intent. For these, the local control at 5 years was 60%; the disease-specific 5-year survival rate was 65% for the patients with lingual SCC, 45% for those with other oral tumor localizations, 64% for the oropharynx patients and 47% for those with tumor in their hypopharynx, while it was 55% for all patients. The preoperative radiotherapy was fairly well tolerated. Ten (7%) of the patients treated with curative intent suffered major complications, and four patients had evidence of osteoradionecrosis. With the exception of patients with early SCC the outcome remains rather poor in this group of cancer patients who often have marked co-morbidity. In our opinion, preoperative radiotherapy to a dose of 62-64 Gy can safely be given, and remains a feasible means to treat patients with oral, oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal cancer.

  16. Shared Oral Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hede, Børge; Elmelund Poulsen,, Johan; Christophersen, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    Shared Oral Care - Forebyggelse af orale sygdomme på plejecentre Introduktion og formål: Mangelfuld mundhygiejne hos plejekrævende ældre er et alment og veldokumenteret sundhedsproblem, der kan føre til massiv udvikling af tandsygdomme, og som yderligere kan være medvirkende årsag til alvorlige...... ressourceanvendelse er muligt at skabe en betydeligt forbedret mundhygiejne hos plejekrævende ældre Key words: Geriatric dentistry, nursing home, community health services, prevention, situated learning...

  17. Oral lichen planus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasool, S.; Katpar, S.; Ali, A.

    2007-01-01

    Lichen planus is a mucocutaneous dermatological disorder, with intraoral manifestation. Skin lesions prevail with oral mucosal lesions. Prevalence of lichen planus, as an oral pre-malignant lesion, is 1-2 % population. Lateral border, dorsal tongue, gingiva, hard palate and vermilion border are common sites and lesions appear as reticular, plaque-like and papular intraoral types. Skin presents with pururitic, polygonal papules. Atrophic and erosive are the known intraoral pre-malignant types. A case report is presented, which responded well to steroid therapy. (author)

  18. Midwestern Latino caregivers' knowledge, attitudes and sense making of the oral health etiology, prevention and barriers that inhibit their children's oral health: a CBPR approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kimberly K; Martínez-Mier, E Angeles; Soto-Rojas, Armando E; Jackson, Richard D; Stelzner, Sarah M; Galvez, Lorena C; Smith, Gabriela J; Acevedo, Miriam; Dandelet, Laura; Vega, Dulce

    2017-03-02

    Using community-based participatory research, the Health Protection Model was used to understand the cultural experiences, attitudes, knowledge and behaviors surrounding caries etiology, its prevention and barriers to accessing oral health care for children of Latino parents residing in Central Indiana. A community reference group (CBPR) was established and bi-lingual community research associates were used to conduct focus groups comprised of Latino caregivers. Transcripts were analyzed for thematic content using inductive thematic analysis. Results indicated significant gaps in parental knowledge regarding caries etiology and prevention, with cultural underlays. Most parents believed the etiology of caries was related to the child's ingestion of certain foods containing high amounts of carbohydrates. Fewer parents believed either genetics/biological inheritance or bacteria was the primary causative factor. Fatalism negatively impacted preventive practices, and a clear separation existed concerning the perceived responsibilities of mothers and fathers to provide for the oral needs of their children. Females were more likely to report they were primarily responsible for brushing their children's teeth, overseeing the child's diet and seeking dental care for the child. Fathers believed they were primarily responsible for providing the means to pay for professional care. Perceived barriers to care were related to finances and communication difficulties, especially communicating with providers and completing insurance forms. The main study implication is the demonstration of how the CBPR model provided enhanced understanding of Latino caregivers' experiences to inform improvements in oral prevention and treatment of their children. Current efforts continue to employ CBPR to implement programs to address the needs of this vulnerable population.

  19. Inequalities in oral health and oral health promotion

    OpenAIRE

    Moysés, Samuel Jorge

    2012-01-01

    This article offers a critical review of the problem of inequalities in oral health and discusses strategies for disease prevention and oral health promotion. It shows that oral health is not merely a result of individual biological, psychological, and behavioral factors; rather, it is the sum of collective social conditions created when people interact with the social environment. Oral health status is directly related to socioeconomic position across the socioeconomic gradient in almost all...

  20. Probiotics as oral health biotherapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Shyamali; Tomaro-Duchesneau, Catherine; Tabrizian, Maryam; Prakash, Satya

    2012-09-01

    Oral health is affected by its resident microorganisms. Three prominent oral disorders are dental caries, gingivitis and periodontitis, with the oral microbiota playing a key role in the initiation/progression of all three. Understanding the microbiota and the diseases they may cause is critical to the development of new therapeutics. This review is focused on probiotics for the prevention and/or treatment of oral diseases. This review describes the oral ecosystem and its correlation with oral health/disease. The pathogenesis and current prevention/treatment strategies of periodontal diseases (PD) and dental caries (DC) are depicted. An introduction of probiotics is followed by an analysis of their role in PD and DC, and their potential role(s) in oral health. Finally, a discussion ensues on the future research directions and limitations of probiotics for oral health. An effective oral probiotic formulation should contribute to the prevention/treatment of microbial diseases of the oral cavity. Understanding the oral microbiota's role in oral disease is important for the development of a therapeutic to prevent/treat dental diseases. However, investigations into clinical efficacy, delivery/dose optimization, mechanism(s) of action and other related parameters are yet to be fully explored. Keeping this in mind, investigations into oral probiotic therapies are proving promising.

  1. Oral hygiene practices and risk of oral leukoplakia | Macigo | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the influence of oral hygiene habits and practices on the risk of developing oral leukoplakia. Design: Case control study. Setting: Githongo sublocation in Meru District. Subjects: Eighty five cases and 141 controls identified in a house-to-house screening. Results: The relative risk (RR) of oral ...

  2. Metabolomic Studies of Oral Biofilm, Oral Cancer, and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jumpei Washio

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Oral diseases are known to be closely associated with oral biofilm metabolism, while cancer tissue is reported to possess specific metabolism such as the ‘Warburg effect’. Metabolomics might be a useful method for clarifying the whole metabolic systems that operate in oral biofilm and oral cancer, however, technical limitations have hampered such research. Fortunately, metabolomics techniques have developed rapidly in the past decade, which has helped to solve these difficulties. In vivo metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm have produced various findings. Some of these findings agreed with the in vitro results obtained in conventional metabolic studies using representative oral bacteria, while others differed markedly from them. Metabolomic analyses of oral cancer tissue not only revealed differences between metabolomic profiles of cancer and normal tissue, but have also suggested a specific metabolic system operates in oral cancer tissue. Saliva contains a variety of metabolites, some of which might be associated with oral or systemic disease; therefore, metabolomics analysis of saliva could be useful for identifying disease-specific biomarkers. Metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm, oral cancer, and saliva could contribute to the development of accurate diagnostic, techniques, safe and effective treatments, and preventive strategies for oral and systemic diseases.

  3. Oral Hygiene and Oral Flora Evaluation in Psychiatric Patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions: The oral hygiene of most patients was insufficient. The presence of Gram‑negative Bacilli growth in the oral flora can be explained by poor hand hygiene. These findings suggest that it is useful to educate individuals about oral hygiene and hand hygiene and to inform the staff and families about this issue.

  4. The New Orality: Oral Characteristics of Computer-Mediated Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Sharmila Pixy; Montgomery, Maureen

    1996-01-01

    Considers the characteristics of orality and literacy developed in the work of scholars such as Walter Ong to consider computer-mediated communication (CMC) as the potential site of a "new orality" which is neither purely oral or literate. Notes that the medium of CMC is writing, which has traditionally represented the…

  5. Metabolomic Studies of Oral Biofilm, Oral Cancer, and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washio, Jumpei; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2016-06-02

    Oral diseases are known to be closely associated with oral biofilm metabolism, while cancer tissue is reported to possess specific metabolism such as the 'Warburg effect'. Metabolomics might be a useful method for clarifying the whole metabolic systems that operate in oral biofilm and oral cancer, however, technical limitations have hampered such research. Fortunately, metabolomics techniques have developed rapidly in the past decade, which has helped to solve these difficulties. In vivo metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm have produced various findings. Some of these findings agreed with the in vitro results obtained in conventional metabolic studies using representative oral bacteria, while others differed markedly from them. Metabolomic analyses of oral cancer tissue not only revealed differences between metabolomic profiles of cancer and normal tissue, but have also suggested a specific metabolic system operates in oral cancer tissue. Saliva contains a variety of metabolites, some of which might be associated with oral or systemic disease; therefore, metabolomics analysis of saliva could be useful for identifying disease-specific biomarkers. Metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm, oral cancer, and saliva could contribute to the development of accurate diagnostic, techniques, safe and effective treatments, and preventive strategies for oral and systemic diseases.

  6. Imaging in oral cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arya, Supreeta; Chaukar, Devendra; Pai, Prathamesh

    2012-01-01

    Oral cavity squamous cell cancers form a significant percentage of the cancers seen in India. While clinical examination allows direct visualization, it cannot evaluate deep extension of disease. Cross-sectional imaging has become the cornerstone in the pretreatment evaluation of these cancers and provides accurate information about the extent and depth of disease that can help decide the appropriate management strategy and indicate prognosis. Early cancers are treated with a single modality, either surgery or radiotherapy while advanced cancers are offered a combination of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Imaging can decide resectability, help plan the precise extent of resection, and indicate whether organ conservation therapy should be offered. Quality of life issues necessitate preservation of form and function and pretreatment imaging helps plan appropriate reconstruction and counsel patients regarding lifestyle changes. Oral cavity has several subsites and the focus of the review is squamous cancers of the gingivobuccal region, oral tongue and retromolar trigone as these are most frequently encountered in the subcontinent. References for this review were identified by searching Medline and PubMed databases. Only articles published in English language literature were selected. This review aims to familiarize the radiologist with the relevant anatomy of the oral cavity, discuss the specific issues that influence prognosis and management at the above subsites, the optimal imaging methods, the role of imaging in accurately staging these cancers and in influencing management. A checklist for reporting will emphasize the information to be conveyed by the radiologist

  7. IDEA: Stimulating Oral Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easley, Jacob J.

    1995-01-01

    Presents daily activities that facilitate complete sentence response, promote oral production, and aid the learning of vocabulary in foreign-language classes. Because speech is the primary form of communication in the foreign-language classroom, it is important to stimulate students to converse as soon as possible. (Author/CK)

  8. Fluoride and Oral Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Mullane, D M; Baez, R J; Jones, S

    2016-01-01

    and strategies is noteworthy. This updated version of ‘Fluoride and Oral Health’ has adopted an evidence-based approach to its commentary on the different fl uoride vehicles and strategies and also to its recommendations. In this regard, full account is taken of the many recent systematic reviews published...

  9. Oral Health and Women

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-05-12

    This women's health podcast focuses on the importance of maintaining good oral health during pregnancy.  Created: 5/12/2009 by Office of Women’s Health (OWH) and National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 5/12/2009.

  10. History of oral contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhont, Marc

    2010-12-01

    On the 50th birthday of the pill, it is appropriate to recall the milestones which have led to its development and evolution during the last five decades. The main contraceptive effect of the pill being inhibition of ovulation, it may be called a small miracle that this drug was developed long before the complex regulation of ovulation and the menstrual cycle was elucidated. Another stumbling block on its way was the hostile climate with regard to contraception that prevailed at the time. Animal experiments on the effect of sex steroids on ovulation, and the synthesis of sex steroids and orally active analogues were the necessary preliminaries. We owe the development of oral contraceptives to a handful of persons: two determined feminists, Margaret Sanger and Katherine McCormick; a biologist, Gregory Pincus; and a gynaecologist, John Rock. Soon after the introduction of the first pills, some nasty and life-threatening side effects emerged, which were due to the high doses of sex steroids. This led to the development of new preparations with reduced oestrogen content, progestins with more specific action, and alternative administration routes. Almost every decade we have witnessed a breakthrough in oral contraception. Social and moral objections to birth control have gradually disappeared and, notwithstanding some pill scares, oral contraceptives are now one of the most used methods of contraception. Finally, all's well that ends well: recent reports have substantiated the multiple noncontraceptive health benefits paving the way for a bright future for this 50-year-old product.

  11. Oral Lichen Planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ion, Daniela I; Setterfield, Jane F

    2016-02-01

    Lichen planus (LP) is a relatively common autoimmune T-cell-mediated disease of unknown aetiology affecting the mucous membranes, skin and nails. Its prevalence varies between 0.5 and 2.2% of the population in epidemiological studies with a peak incidence in the 30-60 years range and with a female predominance of 2:1. Mucosal lichen planus tends to follow a chronic course with acute exacerbations. Spontaneous remission of oral lichen planus (OLP) is uncommon, and indeed mucosal LP may become worse with time. In contrast, cutaneous lichen planus may follow a milder clinical course though some variants may be severe such as those affecting the palms and soles and the scalp and the genital tract in females (vulvovaginal gingival LP) where scarring leads to significant complications. It is important to identify those cases that may be drug induced or be associated with a contact allergic or irritant reaction (lichenoid reaction) or the rarer oral presentation of discoid lupus erythematosus. There is a very small risk of malignancy (approximately 1:200 patients/year) associated with oral lichen planus; thus patients should be informed that long term monitoring via their general dental practitioner is appropriate. This review will focus on the clinical presentation and management of oral lichen planus.

  12. Oral lichen planus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šehalić Meliha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 29 - year Lichen planus is a chronic, inflammatory, autoimmune skin disease, that is often manifested, except on the skin, in the oral cavity in a variety of clinical forms. The prevalence of the disease in the general population is about 1-2%. Etiopathogenesis is not still well understood. Histopathology, in addition to the basic methods, anamnesis and physical examination, is vital for proper diagnosis of oral lichen planus (OLP. Very diverse and loaded histological findings are common for all forms of oral lichen planus. We reported the case of oral lichen planus in a 49 years old male patient, who presented to the Dentistry clinic of Medical faculty of Priština with burning and itching symptoms and changes in the buccal mucosa. Histopathological analysis of biopsy tissue conformed clinical diagnosis of lichen planus. Due to the possibility for malignant transformation of lesions, the long-term follow-up of patients with this disease is of great importance.

  13. Antibiotics and oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRossi, Scott S; Hersh, Elliot V

    2002-10-01

    With the exception of rifampin-like drugs, there is a lack of scientific evidence supporting the ability of commonly prescribed antibiotics, including all those routinely employed in outpatient dentistry, to either reduce blood levels and/or the effectiveness of oral contraceptives. To date, all clinical trials studying the effects of concomitant antibiotic therapy (with the exception of rifampin and rifabutin) have failed to demonstrate an interaction. Like all drugs, oral contraceptives are not 100% effective with the failure rate in the typical United States population reported to be as high as 3%. It is thus possible that the case reports of unintended pregnancies during antibiotic therapy may simply represent the normal failure rate of these drugs. Considering that both drug classes are prescribed frequently to women of childbearing potential, one would expect a much higher rate of oral contraceptive failure in this group of patients if a true drug:drug interaction existed. On the other hand, if the interaction does exist but is a relatively rare event, occurring in, say, 1 in 5000 women, clinical studies such as those described in this article would not detect the interaction. The pharmacokinetic studies of simultaneous antibiotic and oral contraceptive ingestion, and the retrospective studies of pregnancy rates among oral contraceptive users exposed to antibiotics, all suffer from one potential common weakness, i.e., their relatively small sample size. Sample sizes in the pharmacokinetic trials ranged from 7 to 24 participants, whereas the largest retrospective study of pregnancy rates still evaluated less than 800 total contraceptive users. Still, the incidence of such a rare interaction would not differ from the accepted normal failure rate of oral contraceptive therapy. The medico-legal ramifications of what looks like at best a rare interaction remains somewhat "murky." On one hand, we have medico-legal experts advising the profession to exercise caution

  14. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Extensive education and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral ... Extensive education and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral ...

  15. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contact Find a Surgeon What We Do Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively trained to ... and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively trained to ...

  16. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... mouth and gums to improve function, appearance and oral health. Click here to find out more. Facial Cosmetic ... mouth and gums to improve function, appearance and oral health. Click here to find out more. Facial Cosmetic ...

  17. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Oral and maxillofacial surgeons. The experts in face, mouth and jaw surgery.™ What We Do Who We ... surgically treat the soft tissues of the face, mouth and gums to improve function, appearance and oral ...

  18. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this ... and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this ...

  19. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tissues of the face, mouth and gums to improve function, appearance and oral health. Click here to ... tissues of the face, mouth and gums to improve function, appearance and oral health. Click here to ...

  20. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral and maxillofacial ... and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral and maxillofacial ...

  1. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and gums to improve function, appearance and oral health. Click here to find out more. Facial Cosmetic ... and gums to improve function, appearance and oral health. Click here to find out more. Facial Cosmetic ...

  2. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral and maxillofacial surgeon to ... in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral and maxillofacial surgeon to ...

  3. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ... Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ...

  4. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for further information Your oral and maxillofacial surgeon (OMS) is the expert for diagnosing and surgically treating ... late in its development. Your family dentist or OMS is in the best position to detect oral ...

  5. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed with ... and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed with ...

  6. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... education and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral and ... education and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral and ...

  7. Dos casos de quiste de intestino anterior en cavidad oral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso Chuquisana-Mostacero

    Full Text Available Antecedentes y Objetivo: El quiste de intestino anterior es una entidad congénita poco frecuente. Cuando aparece, su localización más frecuente es el íleon y, aunque pueden aparecer a lo largo de todo el tracto digestivo, es rara su ubicación en la cavidad oral. A menudo se caracteriza por tres hallazgos principales: presencia de una capa de músculo liso bien desarrollada, una capa epitelial típica de alguna porción del tracto alimentario, y la unión íntima a alguna porción del tracto gastrointestinal. Las lesiones quísticas del suelo de boca en la edad infantil más frecuentes son los quistes salivares y las malformaciones linfáticas, ambas englobables en el término ránula. Sin embargo hay otras posibilidades, y la duplicación de intestino anterior, como aparece en los casos que presentamos, es una de ellas. Material y Método: Presentamos 2 pacientes en edad pediátrica con lesión lingual o de suelo de boca, que tras el estudio de imagen adecuado fueron operados por vía intraoral para la extirpación de la tumoración. En uno de los casos se usó abordaje cervical para extirpación de un segundo locus quístico. Resultados: El estudio anatomopatológico mostró en uno de los casos epitelio respiratorio, y en el segundo mucosa gástrica y epitelio respiratorio. Conclusiones: La importancia del diagnóstico y la extirpación completa en este tipo de lesiones viene dada por el riesgo de degeneración maligna en la edad adulta.

  8. Age-related oral changes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mckenna, Gerald

    2010-10-01

    Age-related oral changes are seen in the oral hard and soft tissues as well as in bone, the temporomandibular joints and the oral mucosa. As older patients retain their natural teeth for longer, the clinical picture consists of normal physiological age changes in combination with pathological and iatrogenic effects. Clinical Relevance: With an ageing population retaining more of its natural teeth for longer, dental professionals should expect to observe oral age changes more frequently.

  9. Oral yeast colonization throughout pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Rio, Rute; Sim?es-Silva, Liliana; Garro, Sofia; Silva, M?rio-Jorge; Azevedo, ?lvaro; Sampaio-Maia, Benedita

    2017-01-01

    Background Recent studies suggest that placenta may harbour a unique microbiome that may have origin in maternal oral microbiome. Although the major physiological and hormonal adjustments observed in pregnant women lead to biochemical and microbiological modifications of the oral environment, very few studies evaluated the changes suffered by the oral microbiota throughout pregnancy. So, the aim of our study was to evaluate oral yeast colonization throughout pregnancy and to compare it with n...

  10. Oral Lichen Planus in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Mohan Das, Usha; JP, Beena

    2009-01-01

    Oral lichen planus which is one of the most common oral mucosal diseases in adults, it has been rarely described in children. There are very reports in the literature regarding oral lichen planus in children, here we report a case of intraoral lesions of lichen planus. Lichen planus should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hyperkeratotic or erosive lesions of the oral mucosa in children.

  11. Oral Biopsy: A Dental Gawk

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sir,. Dermatologists are often confronted with neoplasms and diseases of the oral cavity. Although many may be reluctant to perform oral surgical procedures, a biopsy is often needed to establish a definitive diagnosis, and biopsy of the oral cavity is a safe and useful technique that can be easily employed by dermatologists.

  12. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cancer of the head, neck and mouth. The Oral Cancer Foundation estimates that close to 42,000 Americans ... diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this year. Oral cancer’s mortality is particularly high, not because it is ...

  13. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Americans will be diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this year. Oral cancer’s mortality is particularly high, not because it is ... OMS is in the best position to detect oral cancer during your routine dental examinations. Don't risk ...

  14. Oral health: equity and social determinants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwan, Stella; Petersen, Poul Erik

    2010-01-01

    This book chapter discusses the social determinants of oral health, and identifies interventions that have been, or can be, used in addressing oral health inequities (e.g. oral health promotion, education programmes, improving access to oral health care)....

  15. Scandinavian Fellowship for Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Camilla; Reibel, J; Hietanen, J

    2012-01-01

    as new approaches, treatments and diagnostic possibilities develop. Likewise, the role of the dentist in the community changes and may vary in different countries. As members of the Scandinavian Fellowship for Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine and subject representatives of oral pathology and oral......In Scandinavia, as in many European countries, most patients consult their general dentist once a year or more. This gives the dentist a unique opportunity and an obligation to make an early diagnosis of oral diseases, which is beneficial for both the patient and the society. Thus, the dentist must...... medicine, we feel obliged to contribute to the discussion of how the guidelines of the dental curriculum support the highest possible standards of dental education. This article is meant to delineate a reasonable standard of oral pathology and oral medicine in the European dental curriculum and to guide...

  16. Effect of Fixed Metallic Oral Appliances on Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnazzawi, Ahmad

    2018-01-01

    There is a substantial proportion of the population using fixed metallic oral appliances, such as crowns and bridges, which are composed of various dental alloys. These restorations may be associated with a number of effects on oral health with variable degrees of severity, to review potential effects of using fixed metallic oral appliances, fabricated from various alloys. The MEDLINE/PubMed database was searched using certain combinations of keywords related to the topic. The search revealed that burning mouth syndrome, oral pigmentation, hypersensitivity and lichenoid reactions, and genotoxic and cytotoxic effects are the major potential oral health changes associated with fixed prosthodontic appliances. Certain oral disorders are associated with the use of fixed metallic oral appliances. Patch test is the most reliable method that can be applied for identifying metal allergy, and the simultaneous use of different alloys in the mouth is discouraged.

  17. Evaluation of resting brain conditions measured by two different methods (i.v. and oral administration) with 18F-FDG-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masud, M.; Yamaguchi, Keiichiro; Rikimaru, Hisashi; Tashiro, Manabu; Ozaki, Kaoru; Watanuki, Shoichi; Miyake, Masayasu; Ido, Tatsuo; Itoh, Masatoshi

    2001-01-01

    Our aim was to evaluate regional differences between brain activity in two resting control conditions measured by 3D PET after administration of FDG through either the intravenous (i.v.) or the oral route. Ten healthy male volunteers engaged in the study as the i.v. group (mean age, 26±9.3 years, ±S.D.) who received FDG intravenously and another 10 volunteers as the oral group (mean age, 27.9±11.3 years, ±S.D.) who received FDG per os. A set of 3D-PET scans (emission and transmission scans) were performed in both groups. To explore possible functional differences between the brains of the two groups, the SPM-96 software was used for statistical analysis. The results revealed that glucose metabolism was significantly higher in the superior frontal gyrus, superior parietal lobule, lingual gyrus and left cerebellar hemisphere in the i.v. group than in the oral group. Metabolically active areas were found in the superior, middle and inferior temporal gyrus, parahippocampal gyrus, amygdaloid nucleus, pons and cerebellum in the oral group when compared with the i.v. group. These differences were presumably induced by differences between FDG kinetics and/or time-weighted behavioral effects in the two studies. This study suggests the need for extreme caution when selecting a pooled control population for designated activation studies. (author)

  18. Evaluation of resting brain conditions measured by two different methods (i.v. and oral administration) with {sup 18}F-FDG-PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masud, M.; Yamaguchi, Keiichiro; Rikimaru, Hisashi; Tashiro, Manabu; Ozaki, Kaoru; Watanuki, Shoichi; Miyake, Masayasu; Ido, Tatsuo; Itoh, Masatoshi [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center

    2001-02-01

    Our aim was to evaluate regional differences between brain activity in two resting control conditions measured by 3D PET after administration of FDG through either the intravenous (i.v.) or the oral route. Ten healthy male volunteers engaged in the study as the i.v. group (mean age, 26{+-}9.3 years, {+-}S.D.) who received FDG intravenously and another 10 volunteers as the oral group (mean age, 27.9{+-}11.3 years, {+-}S.D.) who received FDG per os. A set of 3D-PET scans (emission and transmission scans) were performed in both groups. To explore possible functional differences between the brains of the two groups, the SPM-96 software was used for statistical analysis. The results revealed that glucose metabolism was significantly higher in the superior frontal gyrus, superior parietal lobule, lingual gyrus and left cerebellar hemisphere in the i.v. group than in the oral group. Metabolically active areas were found in the superior, middle and inferior temporal gyrus, parahippocampal gyrus, amygdaloid nucleus, pons and cerebellum in the oral group when compared with the i.v. group. These differences were presumably induced by differences between FDG kinetics and/or time-weighted behavioral effects in the two studies. This study suggests the need for extreme caution when selecting a pooled control population for designated activation studies. (author)

  19. An orthodontic oral appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marklund, Marie; Legrell, Per Erik

    2010-11-01

    This pilot study was performed to test the hypothesis that an orthodontic oral appliance (OA) that is designed to work against the backwardly directed forces on the upper incisors may counteract the reduction in overjet from these devices. Thirty patients with normal bites, good oral health, and milder sleep apnea were randomized to treatment with either OAs or orthodontic OAs. Bite changes were evaluated on plaster casts and radiographs and by questionnaires after a mean of 2.4 years in 19 frequent users. Four of nine patients in the orthodontic OA group increased their overjet by > or =0.4 mm, while none of the 10 patients in the OA group experienced that effect. Only the orthodontic OA increases the overjet; this design may therefore be beneficial to patients at risk of negative effects on their bite during OA treatment.

  20. Immunologically mediated oral diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimson, Sudha; Balachader, N; Anita, N; Babu, R

    2015-04-01

    Immune mediated diseases of oral cavity are uncommon. The lesions may be self-limiting and undergo remission spontaneously. Among the immune mediated oral lesions the most important are lichen planus, pemphigus, erythema multiformi, epidermolysis bullosa, systemic lupus erythematosis. Cellular and humoral mediated immunity play a major role directed against epithelial and connective tissue in chronic and recurrent patterns. Confirmatory diagnosis can be made by biopsy, direct and indirect immunoflouresence, immune precipitation and immunoblotting. Therapeutic agents should be selected after thorough evaluation of immune status through a variety of tests and after determining any aggravating or provoking factors. Early and appropriate diagnosis is important for proper treatment planning contributing to better prognosis and better quality of life of patient.

  1. Immunologically mediated oral diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha Jimson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune mediated diseases of oral cavity are uncommon. The lesions may be self-limiting and undergo remission spontaneously. Among the immune mediated oral lesions the most important are lichen planus, pemphigus, erythema multiformi, epidermolysis bullosa, systemic lupus erythematosis. Cellular and humoral mediated immunity play a major role directed against epithelial and connective tissue in chronic and recurrent patterns. Confirmatory diagnosis can be made by biopsy, direct and indirect immunoflouresence, immune precipitation and immunoblotting. Therapeutic agents should be selected after thorough evaluation of immune status through a variety of tests and after determining any aggravating or provoking factors. Early and appropriate diagnosis is important for proper treatment planning contributing to better prognosis and better quality of life of patient.

  2. Fluoride and Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mullane, D M; Baez, R J; Jones, S; Lennon, M A; Petersen, P E; Rugg-Gunn, A J; Whelton, H; Whitford, G M

    2016-06-01

    The discovery during the first half of the 20th century of the link between natural fluoride, adjusted fluoride levels in drinking water and reduced dental caries prevalence proved to be a stimulus for worldwide on-going research into the role of fluoride in improving oral health. Epidemiological studies of fluoridation programmes have confirmed their safety and their effectiveness in controlling dental caries. Major advances in our knowledge of how fluoride impacts the caries process have led to the development, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of other fluoride vehicles including salt, milk, tablets, toothpaste, gels and varnishes. In 1993, the World Health Organization convened an Expert Committee to provide authoritative information on the role of fluorides in the promotion of oral health throughout the world (WHO TRS 846, 1994). This present publication is a revision of the original 1994 document, again using the expertise of researchers from the extensive fields of knowledge required to successfully implement complex interventions such as the use of fluorides to improve dental and oral health. Financial support for research into the development of these new fluoride strategies has come from many sources including government health departments as well as international and national grant agencies. In addition, the unique role which industry has played in the development, formulation, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of the various fluoride vehicles and strategies is noteworthy. This updated version of 'Fluoride and Oral Health' has adopted an evidence-based approach to its commentary on the different fluoride vehicles and strategies and also to its recommendations. In this regard, full account is taken of the many recent systematic reviews published in peer reviewed literature.

  3. Per-oral cholangioscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Monga, Amitabh; Ramchandani, Mohan; Reddy, D Nageshwar

    2011-01-01

    Direct endoscopic views of bile duct have been described in literature since the 1970s. Since then rapid strides have been made with the advent of technologically advanced systems with better image quality and maneuverability. The single operator semi-disposable per-oral cholangioscope and other novel methods such as the cholangioscopy access balloon are likely to revolutionize this field. Even though cholangioscopy is currently used primarily for characterization of indeterminate strictures ...

  4. Challenges in Comparative Oral Epic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Miles Foley

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Originally written in 2001 and subsequently published in China, this collaborative essay explores five questions central to comparative oral epic with regard to Mongolian, South Slavic, ancient Greek, and Old English traditions: “What is a poem in oral epic tradition?” “What is a typical scene or theme in oral epic tradition?” “What is a poetic line in oral epic tradition?” “What is a formula in an oral epic tradition?” “What is the register in oral epic poetry?” Now available for the first time in English, this essay reflects a foundational stage of what has become a productive and long-term collaboration between the Center for Studies in Oral Tradition and the Institute of Ethnic Literature of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences.

  5. Fractal analysis in oral leukoplakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Bhai Pandey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fractal analysis (FA quantifies complex geometric structures by generating a fractal dimension (FD, which can measure the complexity of mucosa. FA is a quantitative tool used to measure the complexity of self-similar or semi-self-similar structures. Aim and Objective: The study was done to perform the FA of oral mucosa with keratotic changes, as it is also made up of self-similar tissues, and thus, its FD can be calculated. Results: In oral leukoplakia, keratinization increases the complexity of mucosa, which denotes fractal geometry. We evaluated and compared pretreated and post-treated oral leukoplakia in 50 patients with clinically proven oral leukoplakia and analyzed the normal oral mucosa and lesional or keratinized mucosa in oral leukoplakia patients through FA using box counting method. Conclusion: FA using the fractal geometry is an efficient, noninvasive prediction tool for early detection of oral leukoplakia and other premalignant conditions in patients.

  6. Oral cancer screening practices of oral health professionals in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariño, Rodrigo; Haresaku, Satoru; McGrath, Roisin; Bailey, Denise; Mccullough, Michael; Musolino, Ross; Kim, Boaz; Chinnassamy, Alagesan; Morgan, Michael

    2017-12-15

    To evaluate oral cancer-related screening practices of Oral Health Professionals (OHPs - dentists, dental hygienists, dental therapists, and oral health therapists) practising in Victoria, Australia. A 36-item survey was distributed to 3343 OHPs. Items included socio-demographic and work-related characteristics; self-assessed knowledge of oral cancer; perceived level of confidence in discussing oral health behaviors with patients; oral cancer screening practices; and self-evaluated need for additional training on screening procedures for oral cancer. A total of 380 OHPs responded this survey, achieving an overall response rate of 9.4%. Forty-five were excluded from further analysis. Of these 335 OHP, 72% were dentists; (n = 241); either GDP or Dental Specialists; 13.7% (n = 46) were dental hygienists; 12.2% (n = 41) were oral health therapists, and the remaining 2.1% (n = 7) were dental therapists. While the majority (95.2%) agreed that oral cancer screening should be routinely performed, in actual practice around half (51.4%) screened all their patients. Another 12.8% "Very rarely" conducted screening examinations. The probability of routinely conducting an oral cancer screening was explored utilising Logistic Regression Analysis. Four variables remained statistically significant (p oral cancer screening rose with increasing levels of OHPs' confidence in oral cancer-related knowledge (OR = 1.35; 95% CI: 1.09-1.67) and with higher levels of confidence in discussing oral hygiene practices with patients (OR = 1.25; 95% CI: 1.03-1.52). Results also showed that dental specialists were less likely to perform oral cancer screening examinations compared with other OHPs (OR = 0.18; 95% CI: 0.07-0.52) and the likelihood of performing an oral cancer screening decreased when the "patient complained of a problem" (OR = 0.21; 95% CI: 0.10-0.44). Only half the study sample performed oral cancer screening examinations for all of their patients

  7. Revisión sistemática del schwannoma localizado en el suelo oral. A propósito de un caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Espinosa-Fariñas

    2016-04-01

    Conclusiones: Los schwannomas localizados en el suelo de la boca son infrecuentes. Se presentan en torno a los 40 años, con leve predominancia por el sexo masculino y del lado izquierdo del suelo oral. El tiempo de evolución se encuentra próximo a los 9 meses. Usualmente asintomático. Los nervios hipogloso y lingual se afectan por igual. En proporción similar, el nervio de origen no puede ser identificado. La punción aspiración con aguja fina no es efectiva. El tratamiento de elección consiste en la enucleación del tumor una vez diagnosticado. No se documentaron recidivas.

  8. Substitution urethroplasty using oral mucosa graft for male anterior urethral stricture disease: Current topics and reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiguchi, Akio

    2017-07-01

    Male anterior urethral stricture is scarring of the subepithelial tissue of the corpus spongiosum that constricts the urethral lumen, decreasing the urinary stream. Its surgical management is a challenging problem, and has changed dramatically in the past several decades. Open surgical repair using grafts or flaps, called substitution urethroplasty, has become the gold standard procedure for anterior urethral strictures that are not amenable to excision and primary anastomosis. Oral mucosa harvested from the inner cheek (buccal mucosa) is an ideal material, and is most commonly used for substitution urethroplasty, and lingual mucosa harvested from the underside of the tongue has recently emerged as an alternative material with equivalent outcome. Onlay augmentation of oral mucosa graft on the ventral side (ventral onlay) or dorsal side (dorsal onlay, Barbagli procedure) has been widely used for bulbar urethral stricture with comparable success rates. In bulbar urethral strictures containing obliterative or nearly obliterative segments, either a two-sided dorsal plus ventral onlay (Palminteri technique) or a combination of excision and primary anastomosis and onlay augmentation (augmented anastomotic urethroplasty) are the procedures of choice. Most penile urethral strictures can be repaired in a one-stage procedure either by dorsal inlay with ventral sagittal urethrotomy (Asopa technique) or dorsolateral onlay with one-sided urethral dissection (Kulkarni technique); however, staged urethroplasty remains the procedure of choice for complex strictures, including strictures associated with genital lichen sclerosus or failed hypospadias. This article presents an overview of substitution urethroplasty using oral mucosa graft, and reviews current topics. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  9. Report a possible correlation between necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis and mononucleosis Reporte de una posible correlación entre la gingivitis ulceronecrotizante y la mononucleosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Francinne Miranda

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis is a relatively uncommon periodontal disease, characterized by ulceration, necrosis, pain and gingival bleeding. Factors often related to its occurrence include stress and systemic viral infections, such as those caused by cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus type 1, the latter being also considered the causative agent of infectious mononucleosis. This article aims to describe a clinical case of a female patient who presented with necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis associated with a clinical picture of infectious mononucleosis, as well as to review the literature concerning a possible correlation between these pathologies. This patient presented to our health care facility with necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis accompanied by lymphadenopathy, fever and prostration, after laboratory tests, Epstein-Barr virus type 1 infection was confirmed, as well as the co-occurrence of pathologies: necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis and infectious mononucleosis. Symptom remission in both disorders also occurred concomitantly, after instruction in plaque control measures and palliative medication for control of systemic symptoms. Therefore, although there is no scientific validation of an association between these two pathologies, it is imperative that all diagnostic alternatives be considered and investigated, in order to establish the therapeutic approach most appropriate to the patient.La gingivitis ulcerativa necrótica es una enfermedad periodontal no común caracterizada por ulceración, necrosis, dolor y sangrado gingival. Los factores a menudo relacionados con su ocurrencia incluyen el estrés y las infecciones virales sistémicas como aquellas causadas por Cytomegalovirus y el virus Epstein-Barr tipo 1, donde este último es el agente causal de la mononuclerosis infecciosa. El objetivo de este trabajo fue describir el caso clínico de una mujer con gingivitis ulcerativa necrótica asociada a un cuadro clínico de mononucleosis infecciosa, así como hacer una revisión de la literatura concerniente a una posible correlación entre estas enfermedades. Esta paciente se presentó con una gingivitis ulcerativa necrótica acompañada de linfadenopatía, fiebre y postración después de las pruebas de laboratorio, donde se confirmó una infección por Epstein-Barr tipo 1 así como la ocurrencia conjunta de gingivitis ulcerativa necrótica y mononucleosis infecciosa. También se produjo una remisión concomitante de los síntomas en ambos trastornos después de la instrucción en medidas para el control de placas y una medicación paliativa para el control de los síntomas sistémicos. Por lo tanto, aunque no existió una validación científica de una asociación entre estas dos entidades, es imperativo que se consideren e investiguen todas las alternativas diagnósticas para establecer el enfoque terapéutico más apropiado para el paciente.

  10. Betel nut chewing, oral premalignant lesions, and the oral microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Brenda Y; Zhu, Xuemei; Goodman, Marc T; Gatewood, Robert; Mendiola, Paul; Quinata, Katrina; Paulino, Yvette C

    2017-01-01

    Oral cancers are attributed to a number of causal agents including tobacco, alcohol, human papillomavirus (HPV), and areca (betel) nut. Although betel nut chewing has been established as an independent cause of oral cancer, the mechanisms of carcinogenesis are poorly understood. An investigation was undertaken to evaluate the influence of betel nut chewing on the oral microbiome and oral premalignant lesions. Study participants were recruited from a dental clinic in Guam. Structured interviews and oral examinations were performed. Oral swabbing and saliva samples were evaluated by 454 pyrosequencing of the V3- V5 region of the 16S rRNA bacterial gene and genotyped for HPV. One hundred twenty-two adults were enrolled including 64 current betel nut chewers, 37 former chewers, and 21 with no history of betel nut use. Oral premalignant lesions, including leukoplakia and submucous fibrosis, were observed in 10 chewers. Within-sample bacterial diversity was significantly lower in long-term (≥10 years) chewers vs. never chewers and in current chewers with oral lesions vs. individuals without lesions. Between-sample bacterial diversity based on Unifrac distances significantly differed by chewing status and oral lesion status. Current chewers had significantly elevated levels of Streptococcus infantis and higher and lower levels of distinct taxa of the Actinomyces and Streptococcus genera. Long-term chewers had reduced levels of Parascardovia and Streptococcus. Chewers with oral lesions had significantly elevated levels of Oribacterium, Actinomyces, and Streptococcus, including Streptococcus anginosus. In multivariate analyses, controlling for smoking, oral HPV, S.anginosus, and S. infantis levels, current betel nut chewing remained the only predictor of oral premalignant lesions. Our study provides evidence that betel nut chewing alters the oral bacterial microbiome including that of chewers who develop oral premalignant lesions. Nonetheless, whether microbial changes

  11. Irradiation mucositis and oral flora

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spijkervet, F.K.L.

    1989-01-01

    This study, which is motivated by the substantial morbidity of local signs of mucositis and generalized symptoms that result from mucositis induced by therapeutic irradiation, has the following objectives: To investigate if it is possible to prevent irradiation mucositis via oral flora elimination, and, if it is true that flora plays a role in irradiation mucositis, what fraction of the oral flora may be involved; to evaluate oral Gram-negative bacillary carriage; to investigate the possibility to eradicate Gram-negative bacilli from the oral cavity; to evaluate oral yeast carriage; to investigate the possibility to eradicate yeasts stomatitis and the 'selectivity' of elimination of flora. Two methods are described for monitoring alterations of mucositis of the oral cavity and changes in oral flora. Chlorhexidine has been tested as the commonly used prophylaxis. The effect of chlorhexidine 0.1% rinses on oral flora and mucositis has been studied in a prospective placebo controlled double blind randomized programme. The results of the influence of saliva on the antimicrobial activity of chlorhexidine and the results of selective elimination of oral flora in irradiated patients who have head and neck cancer are reported. Salivary inactivation of the topical antimicrobials used for selective elimination of oral flora has been studied and the results are reported. Finally, the objectives that have been achieved (or not) are delineated. The significance of the results of the study are discussed in terms of published information and further lines of research are suggested. (author). 559 refs.; 29 figs.; 20 tabs

  12. [New oral anticoagulant drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovits, Alejandro; Aizman, Andrés; Zúñiga, Pamela; Pereira, Jaime; Mezzano, Diego

    2011-10-01

    Thromboembolic disease (TED) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The hallmark of oral long-term anticoagulant therapy has been the use of vitamin K antagonists, whose anticoagulant effect is exerted inhibiting vitamin K epoxide reductase. Warfarin and acenocoumarol are the most commonly used. In the last five years several new drugs for long term anticoagulation have been developed, which can inhibit single clotting factors with the purpose of improving drug therapeutic range and, ideally, minimizing bleeding risks. This review addresses the state of the art on the clinical use of inhibitors of activated factor X and thrombin.

  13. Analysis of normal anatomy of oral cavity in open-mouth view with CT and MRI; comparison with closed-mouth view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chan Ho; Kim, Seong Min; Cheon, Bont Jin; Huh, Jin Do; Joh, Young Duk

    2001-01-01

    When MRI and CT of the oral cavity utilize the traditional closed-mouth approach, direct contact between the tongue and surrounding structures may give rise to difficulty in recognizing the anatomy involved and demonstrating the possible presence of pathologic features. We describe a more appropriate scan technique, involving open-mouthed imaging, which may be used to demonstrate the anatomy of the oral cavity in detail. Axial and coronal MR imaging and axial CT scanning were performed in 14 healthy volunteers, using both the closed and open-mouth approach. For the latter, a mouth-piece was put in place prior to examination. In all volunteers, open-mouth MR and CT examinations involved the same parameters as the corresponding closed-mouth procedures. The CT and MR images obtained by each method were compared, particular attention being paid to the presence and symmetry of motion artifact of the tongue and the extent of air space in the oral cavity. Comparative imaging analysis was based on the recognition of 13 structures around the boundaries of the mouth. For statistical analysis, student's test was used and a p value<0.05 was considered significant. Due to symmetry of the tongue, a less severe motion artifact, and increased air space in the oral cavity, the open-mouth method produced excellent images. The axial and coronal MR images thus obtained were superior in terms of demarcation of the inferior surface and dortsum of the tongue, gingiva, buccal surface and buccal vestivule to those obtained with the mouth closed (p<0.05). In addition, axial MR images obtained with the mouth open showed better demarcation of structures at the lingual margin and anterior belly of the digastric muscle (p<0.05), while coronal MR images of the base of the tongue, surface of the hard palate, soft palate, and uvula, were also superior (p<0.05). Open-mouth CT provided better images at the lingual margin, dorsum of the tongue and buccal surface than the closed-mouth approach (p<0

  14. Oral complications in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carl, W.

    1983-01-01

    Ionizing radiation used in treating the head and neck area produces oral side effects such as mucositis, salivary changes, trismus and radiation caries. Sequelae of cancer chemotherapy often include oral stomatitis, myelosuppression and immunosuppression. Infections of dental origin in compromised patients are potentially lethal. Specific programs to eliminate dental pathology before radiation and chemotherapy, and to maintain oral hygiene during and after therapy, will minimize these complications

  15. Drug Reactions in Oral Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Derviş

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Both immunologic and nonimmunologic drug reactions can be seen in oral mucosa. Since considerable number of these reactions heals spontaneously without being noticed by the patients, exact frequency of the lesions is unknown. Most common lesions are xerostomia, taste disorders, mucosal ulcerations and edema. In this article, oral lesions resulting from drug intake similar to those from oral lesions of local and systemic diseases, and diagnostic problems caused by these similarities, have been reviewed.

  16. Oral cancer: A multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanuthai, K; Rojanawatsirivej, S; Thosaporn, W; Kintarak, S; Subarnbhesaj, A; Darling, M; Kryshtalskyj, E; Chiang, C-P; Shin, H-I; Choi, S-Y; Lee, S-S; Aminishakib, P

    2018-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and clinicopathologic features of the oral cancer patients. Biopsy records of the participating institutions were reviewed for oral cancer cases diagnosed from 2005 to 2014. Demographic data and site of the lesions were collected. Sites of the lesion were subdivided into lip, tongue, floor of the mouth, gingiva, alveolar mucosa, palate, buccal/labial mucosa, maxilla and mandible. Oral cancer was subdivided into 7 categories: epithelial tumors, salivary gland tumors, hematologic tumors, bone tumors, mesenchymal tumors, odontogenic tumors, and others. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics using SPSS software version 17.0. Of the 474,851 accessioned cases, 6,151 cases (1.30%) were diagnosed in the category of oral cancer. The mean age of the patients was 58.37±15.77 years. A total of 4,238 cases (68.90%) were diagnosed in males, whereas 1911 cases (31.07%) were diagnosed in females. The male-to-female ratio was 2.22:1. The sites of predilection for oral cancer were tongue, labial/buccal mucosa, gingiva, palate, and alveolar mucosa, respectively. The three most common oral cancer in the descending order of frequency were squamous cell carcinoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma and mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Although the prevalence of oral cancer is not high compared to other entities, oral cancer pose significant mortality and morbidity in the patients, especially when discovered late in the course of the disease. This study highlights some anatomical locations where oral cancers are frequently encountered. As a result, clinicians should pay attention to not only teeth, but oral mucosa especially in the high prevalence area as well since early detection of precancerous lesions or cancers in the early stage increase the chance of patient being cured and greatly reduce the mortality and morbidity. This study also shows some differences between pediatric and elderly oral cancer patients as well as between Asian and non-Asian oral cancer patients.

  17. Pathogenesis of oral FIV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Miller

    Full Text Available Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV is the feline analogue of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and features many hallmarks of HIV infection and pathogenesis, including the development of concurrent oral lesions. While HIV is typically transmitted via parenteral transmucosal contact, recent studies prove that oral transmission can occur, and that saliva from infected individuals contains significant amounts of HIV RNA and DNA. While it is accepted that FIV is primarily transmitted by biting, few studies have evaluated FIV oral infection kinetics and transmission mechanisms over the last 20 years. Modern quantitative analyses applied to natural FIV oral infection could significantly further our understanding of lentiviral oral disease and transmission. We therefore characterized FIV salivary viral kinetics and antibody secretions to more fully document oral viral pathogenesis. Our results demonstrate that: (i saliva of FIV-infected cats contains infectious virus particles, FIV viral RNA at levels equivalent to circulation, and lower but significant amounts of FIV proviral DNA; (ii the ratio of FIV RNA to DNA is significantly higher in saliva than in circulation; (iii FIV viral load in oral lymphoid tissues (tonsil, lymph nodes is significantly higher than mucosal tissues (buccal mucosa, salivary gland, tongue; (iv salivary IgG antibodies increase significantly over time in FIV-infected cats, while salivary IgA levels remain static; and, (v saliva from naïve Specific Pathogen Free cats inhibits FIV growth in vitro. Collectively, these results suggest that oral lymphoid tissues serve as a site for enhanced FIV replication, resulting in accumulation of FIV particles and FIV-infected cells in saliva. Failure to induce a virus-specific oral mucosal antibody response, and/or viral capability to overcome inhibitory components in saliva may perpetuate chronic oral cavity infection. Based upon these findings, we propose a model of oral FIV pathogenesis

  18. Oral yeast colonization throughout pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rio, R; Simões-Silva, L; Garro, S; Silva, M-J; Azevedo, Á; Sampaio-Maia, B

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies suggest that placenta may harbour a unique microbiome that may have origin in maternal oral microbiome. Although the major physiological and hormonal adjustments observed in pregnant women lead to biochemical and microbiological modifications of the oral environment, very few studies evaluated the changes suffered by the oral microbiota throughout pregnancy. So, the aim of our study was to evaluate oral yeast colonization throughout pregnancy and to compare it with non-pregnant women. The oral yeast colonization was assessed in saliva of 30 pregnant and non-pregnant women longitudinally over a 6-months period. Demographic information was collected, a non-invasive intra-oral examination was performed and saliva flow and pH were determined. Pregnant and non-pregnant groups were similar regarding age and level of education. Saliva flow rate did not differ, but saliva pH was lower in pregnant than in non-pregnant women. Oral yeast prevalence was higher in pregnant than in non-pregnant women, either in the first or in the third trimester, but did not attain statistical significance. In individuals colonized with yeast, the total yeast quantification (Log10CFU/mL) increase from the 1st to the 3rd trimester in pregnant women, but not in non-pregnant women. Pregnancy may favour oral yeast growth that may be associated with an acidic oral environment.

  19. Association between Oral Anticoagulation Knowledge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Association between Oral Anticoagulation Knowledge, Anticoagulation Control, and Demographic Characteristics of Patients Attending an Anticoagulation Clinic in Saudi Arabia: A Cross-Sectional Prospective Evaluation.

  20. ORAL ALLERGY SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Sergeev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Oral allergy syndrome (OAS is defined as a set of clinical manifestations caused by IgE-mediated allergic  reactions  that  occur  at  oral  and  pharyngeal  mucosae  in  the  patients  with  pollen  sensitization  after ingestion of certain fruits, vegetables, nuts and spices. OAS arises from cross-reactivity between specific pollen and food allergens, due to similarity of a configuration and amino acid sequence of allergenic molecules. OAS is considered as class II food allergy, being caused by thermo- and chemolabile allergens, and it is rarely combined with generalized manifestations of food allergy. Prevalence and spectrum of the causal allergens depend on a kind of pollen sensitization. In Moscow region, as well as in Northern Europe, allergic sensitization most commonly occurs to the pollen of leaf trees, whereas OAS is mostly connected with ingestion of fruits from Rosaceae family and nuts. Since last years, a newly developed technique of component-resolved molecular diagnosis (CR diagnostics allows of more precise detection of OAS-causing allergen molecules. These data are of extreme importance for administration of adequate nutritional therapy and prediction of SIT efficiency. (Med. Immunol., 2011, vol. 13, N 1, pp 17-28

  1. [Comparison of clinical effects of Co-Cr alloy cast post-core and everStick fiber post in restoration of labially or lingually inclined maxillary central incisor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yu-Mei; Zhong, Qun; Chen, Shuang

    2017-02-01

    To compare the clinical effect of Co-Cr alloy cast post-core and everStick fiber post in restoration of maxillary central incisor with labial or lingual inclination, and provide theoretical basis for clinical application. Ninety-seven labially or lingually inclined maxillary central incisors were treated in our hospital from March 2012 to March 2014. The patients were randomly divided into group A (n=49) and group B (n=48), and received post -core and crown restoration. Patients in group A underwent Co-Cr alloy cast post and core restoration and patients in group B underwent everStick fiber post and core restoration. After two-year of follow-up, root fracture, post break, crown or post dislodgment and gingival marginal discoloration were recorded and analyzed using SPSS 19.0 software package. Chi-square test showed that the success rate of restoration was significantly different between 2 groups (P<0.05). The incidence of root fracture and gingival marginal discoloration of Co-Cr alloy cast post-core was higher than that of everStick fiber post, but there was no significant difference in the incidence of post break, crown or post dislodgment. EverStick fiber post is better than Co-Cr alloy cast post and core to prevent root fracture and gingival marginal discoloration. Its fracture pattern is repairable and favorable for preserving tooth.

  2. Role of oral microbiome on oral cancers, a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholizadeh, Pourya; Eslami, Hosein; Yousefi, Mehdi; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Aghazadeh, Mohammad; Kafil, Hossein Samadi

    2016-12-01

    The oral cavity is inhibited by many of the bacterial species. Some of them have a key role in the development of oral disease. Interrelationships between oral microbiome and systemic conditions such as head-and-neck cancer have become increasingly appreciated in recent years. Emerging evidence also suggests a link between periodontal disease and oral cancer, and the explanation being that chronic inflammation could be a major factor in both diseases. Squamous cell carcinoma is that the most frequently occurring malignancy of the oral cavity and adjacent sites, representing over 90% of all cancers. The incidence of oral cancer is increasing, significantly among young people and women. Worldwide there are 350,000-400,000 new cases diagnosed every year. Bacteria, viruses, and fungi are strongly implicated as etiological factors in certain cancers. In this review we will discuss the association between the development of oral cancer in potentially malignant oral lesions with chronic periodontitis, chronic Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, candida, other microbes and described mechanisms which may be involved in these carcinoma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Oral Insulin – Fact or Fiction? - Possibilities of Achieving Oral ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 5. Oral Insulin – Fact or Fiction? - Possibilities of Achieving Oral Delivery of Insulin. K Gowthamarajan Giriraj T Kulkarni. General Article Volume 8 Issue 5 May 2003 pp 38-46 ...

  4. Can the oral microflora affect oral ulcerative mucositis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laheij, A.M.G.A.; de Soet, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review: Oral mucositis is one of the most prevalent toxicities after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Mucositis is initiated by the chemotherapy or radiotherapy preceding the transplantation. It is commonly accepted that microorganisms play a role in the process of oral mucositis.

  5. Assessing Oral Hygiene in Hospitalized Older Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Poor oral health for all older adults can result in higher risk for heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and oral cancer. Findings from this study indicated older veterans needed to improve their oral hygiene habits but barriers to oral hygiene performance prevented them from receiving and performing oral hygiene measures.

  6. Oral health in frail elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksema, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Ageing points towards increasing health problems and rising costs for the society. One of these health problems is the deteriorating oral health in care dependent elderly. The latter is related to the high need for care on many levels in these elderly. The lack of attention for oral care can be

  7. Oral health problems and mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Ki Kim

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion: Individual oral health conditions—tooth loss, root caries, and periodontal disease—were not related to mortality when sociodemographic, health, and/or health behavioral factors were considered, and there was no differential pattern between the three conditions. Multiple oral health problems were associated with a higher risk of dying.

  8. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this year. Here’s what you need to know. Click here ... be diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this year. Here’s what you need to know. Click here ...

  9. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... will be diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this year. Here’s what you need to know. Click here ... will be diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this year. Here’s what you need to know. Click here ...

  10. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the cancer is often discovered late in its development. Your family dentist or OMS is in the best position to detect oral cancer during your routine dental examinations. Don't risk it. Perform an oral cancer self-exam each month. Perform a Self-Exam Monthly ...

  11. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Americans will be diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this year. Here’s what you need to know. ... Americans will be diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this year. Here’s what you need to know. ...

  12. BETTER ORAL HEALTH TO ALL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heikki Murtomaa

    2016-12-01

    The behavioral science experts are of opinion that only comprehensive and integrated common-risk-factor-based health promotion activities can enhance oral health and its equity as a part of general health. Are health professionals ready to assume their responsibility for promoting better oral health?

  13. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are ... more. TMJ and Facial Pain TMJ and Facial ... Teeth Management Wisdom Teeth Management An impacted wisdom tooth can ...

  14. Scandinavian Fellowship for Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine: statement on oral pathology and oral medicine in the European Dental Curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, C; Reibel, J; Hadler-Olsen, E S

    2010-01-01

    source in revisions of dental curricula throughout Europe converging towards a European Dental Curriculum. In order to render the best conditions for future curriculum revisions providing the best quality dentist we feel obliged to analyse and comment the outlines of oral pathology and oral medicine...

  15. [Drug-induced oral ulcerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madinier, I; Berry, N; Chichmanian, R M

    2000-06-01

    Different side effects of drugs have been described in the oral cavity, including oral ulcerations. Direct contact between drugs and oral mucosa may induce chemical burn or local hypersensitivity. Less frequently, these drug-induced oral ulcerations are part of a complex reaction with cutaneous or systemic manifestations. Sometimes, one or more oral ulcerations appear as the main side-effect of a drug, or exceptionally as solitary lesions. Solitary oral ulcerations usually appear after few weeks of treatment. In most of cases, these lesions resist to conventional treatments, with a rapid healing following the suppression of the responsible drug. This diagnosis is usually difficult, particularly with patients receiving multiple drug therapy. Besides, special attention must be paid to new drugs. Oral ulcerations following symptoms of burning mouth, metallic taste, dysgueusia or agueusia are strongly suggestive of a pharmacological origin. Most of the molecules able to induce solitary oral ulcerations are commonly prescribed in a) rheumatology: NSAI (diclofenac, flurbiprofen, indomethacin, naproxen), long-term rheumatoid arthritis therapy (azathioprine, methotrexate, penicillamine, gold compounds, tiopronin); b) cardiology: angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (captopril, enalapril), angiotensin 2-receptor antagonist (losartan), anti-angorous (nicorandil), c) psychiatry: antidepressants (fluoxetine, lithium), d) AIDS therapy (foscarnet, zalcitabine).

  16. The Oral Paradigm and Snapchat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oren Soffer

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this short essay, I argue that the ephemeral nature of emerging instant-messaging applications, such as Snapchat, applies an oral paradigm. While online discourse of computer-mediated communication shares many qualities with oral communication, the case of ephemeral applications is unique, as the oral features are already integrated in the application technology design and as orality is often implemented on highly visual products. Snapchat applies technology that fades visual contents as if they were spoken words fading in the air after utterance. Moreover, Snapchat’s promise to delete all messages from its database after they are viewed echoes a key characteristic of primary oral culture: that is, the inability (and in our case, the obligation not to store knowledge. In this, Snapchat demonstrates counter-logic to the contemporary grammar of new media, which is based on information aggregation.

  17. Direct oral anticoagulants: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco Moreno, Ana Isabel; Martín Díaz, Rosa María; García Navarro, María José

    2017-12-30

    Vitamin K antagonists were the only choice for chronic oral anticoagulation for more than half a century. Over the past few years, direct oral anticoagulants have emerged, including one direct thrombin inhibitor (dabigatran etexilate) and three factor Xa inhibitors (apixaban, edoxaban and rivaroxaban). In randomised controlled trials comparing direct oral anticoagulants with traditional vitamin K antagonists, the direct oral anticoagulants all showed a favourable benefit-risk balance in their safety and efficacy profile, in prevention of thromboembolic events in patients with atrial fibrillation and in the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism and acute coronary syndrome. In 2008, dabigatran was the first direct oral anticoagulant approved by the European Medicine Agency. Subsequently, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban were also authorised. This article reviews the evidence related to the use of these drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Oral candidiasis and angular cheilitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Victoria; Fazel, Nasim

    2010-01-01

    Candidiasis, an often encountered oral disease, has been increasing in frequency. Most commonly caused by the overgrowth of Candida albicans, oral candidiasis can be divided into several categories including acute and chronic forms, and angular cheilitis. Risk factors for the development of oral candidiasis include immunosuppression, wearing of dentures, pharmacotherapeutics, smoking, infancy and old age, endocrine dysfunction, and decreased salivation. Oral candidiasis may be asymptomatic. More frequently, however, it is physically uncomfortable, and the patient may complain of burning mouth, dysgeusia, dysphagia, anorexia, and weight loss, leading to nutritional deficiency and impaired quality of life. A plethora of antifungal treatments are available. The overall prognosis of oral candidiasis is good, and rarely is the condition life threatening with invasive or recalcitrant disease.

  19. Oral epithelial dysplasia classification systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warnakulasuriya, S; Reibel, J; Bouquot, J

    2008-01-01

    At a workshop coordinated by the WHO Collaborating Centre for Oral Cancer and Precancer in the United Kingdom issues related to potentially malignant disorders of the oral cavity were discussed by an expert group. The consensus views of the Working Group are presented in a series of papers....... In this report, we review the oral epithelial dysplasia classification systems. The three classification schemes [oral epithelial dysplasia scoring system, squamous intraepithelial neoplasia and Ljubljana classification] were presented and the Working Group recommended epithelial dysplasia grading for routine...... use. Although most oral pathologists possibly recognize and accept the criteria for grading epithelial dysplasia, firstly based on architectural features and then of cytology, there is great variability in their interpretation of the presence, degree and significance of the individual criteria...

  20. Oral Pathology in Forensic Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamim, Thorakkal

    2018-01-01

    Forensic odontology is the subdiscipline of dentistry which analyses dental evidence in the interest of justice. Oral pathology is the subdiscipline of dentistry that deals with the pathology affecting the oral and maxillofacial regions. This subdiscipline is utilized for identification through oral and maxillofacial pathologies with associated syndromes, enamel rod patterns, sex determination using exfoliative cytology, identification from occlusal morphology of teeth, and deoxyribonucleic acid profiling from teeth. This subdiscipline is also utilized for age estimation studies which include Gustafson's method, incremental lines of Retzius, perikymata, natal line formation in teeth, neonatal line, racemization of collagen in dentin, cemental incremental lines, thickness of the cementum, and translucency of dentin. Even though the expertise of an oral pathologist is not taken in forensic investigations, this paper aims to discuss the role of oral pathology in forensic investigation.

  1. Oral lichen planus: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Jayasri Krupaa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lichen planus is an immunologically mediated mucocutaneous disease that is triggered by varied etiological agents. The oral lichenoid reaction is considered a variant of the disease that needs to be clearly diagnosed as a separate entity from oral lichen planus and treated. They follow a strict cause-effector relationship, protocols that suggest the differentiation. Lichen planus has varied clinical forms in the oral mucosa and cutaneously that has different prognosis. This condition also arises in association with various other systemic conditions such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus. There have been cases reported in the esophagus, larynx, scalp, nail, cutaneous areas, especially arms and wrists, trunk. There is reported malignant transformation that essentiates careful examination, treatment protocol and regular follow-up sessions. This article throws light on the disease condition of oral lichen planus and oral lichenoid reaction that is essential for the differentiation and treatment.

  2. Oral lichen planus: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupaa, R. Jayasri; Sankari, S. Leena; Masthan, K. M. K.; Rajesh, E.

    2015-01-01

    Lichen planus is an immunologically mediated mucocutaneous disease that is triggered by varied etiological agents. The oral lichenoid reaction is considered a variant of the disease that needs to be clearly diagnosed as a separate entity from oral lichen planus and treated. They follow a strict cause-effector relationship, protocols that suggest the differentiation. Lichen planus has varied clinical forms in the oral mucosa and cutaneously that has different prognosis. This condition also arises in association with various other systemic conditions such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus. There have been cases reported in the esophagus, larynx, scalp, nail, cutaneous areas, especially arms and wrists, trunk. There is reported malignant transformation that essentiates careful examination, treatment protocol and regular follow-up sessions. This article throws light on the disease condition of oral lichen planus and oral lichenoid reaction that is essential for the differentiation and treatment. PMID:26015696

  3. ORIGIN OF THE FACIAL ARTERY FROM THE LINGUAL-FACIAL TRUNK AND ITS COURSE THROUGH THE SUBMANDIBULAR SALIVARY GLAND: A CASE REPORT. Origen de la arteria facial desde el tronco lingual-facial y su curso a través de la glándula salival submandibular: informe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasa Rao Sirasanagandla

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available La disección cuidadosa del tercio posterior de la parte superficial de la glándula salival submandibular es uno de los pasos quirúrgicos esenciales en la extirpación endoscópica glandular, evitando daños en la arteria facial. Un buen conocimiento de la poco común relación entre la arteria facial y la glándula salival submandibular es de vital importancia para llevar a cabo de forma eficiente y segura la extirpación de la glándula submandibular. Las variaciones del patrón de ramificación de la arteria facial son bien conocidas y han sido expuestas en el pasado. Sin embargo, las variaciones en su origen y trayectoria son poco frecuentes. Durante una rutinaria disección de cabeza y cuello para los estudiantes universitarios de Medicina, observamos la inusual trayectoria de la arteria facial en el triángulo digástrico derecho en un cadáver de un varón de origen indio de aproximadamente 60 años. La arteria facial derecha se originó de la común lingual-facial del tronco por encima del nivel del asta mayor del hueso hioides, y luego atravesar a través de la sustancia de la parte superficial de la glándula submandibular, sin la formación de un bucle. Después la arteria entraba en la cara por el ángulo anteroinferior del masetero. A continuación, en su trayectoria intraglandular, esta arteria mostraba pequeñas ramificaciones glandulares.  Careful dissection of the posterior one third of the superficial part of the submandibular salivary gland is one of the essential surgical steps in endoscopic glandular excision, to avoid injury to the facial artery. A sound knowledge of unusual relationship of the facial artery with the submandibular salivary gland is essentially important to perform the safe and efficient submandibular gland excision. Different types of variations in the branching pattern of the facial artery have been reported in the past. However, variations in the origin and course of the facial artery are very rare

  4. Why Is Oral Health Important for Women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2018 About | Contact InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Oral Health and Overal Health Gum Disease and Cardiovascular Health ... delivered directly to your desktop! more... Why Is Oral Health Important for Women? Article Chapters Why Is Oral ...

  5. Pregnancy Cravings Can Harm Your Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2018 About | Contact InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Oral Health and Overal Health Gum Disease and Cardiovascular Health ... your desktop! more... Pregnancy Cravings Can Harm Your Oral Health Article Chapters Pregnancy Cravings Can Harm Your Oral ...

  6. The Fungal Biome of the Oral Cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Jyotsna; Retuerto, Mauricio; Mukherjee, Pranab K; Ghannoum, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Organisms residing in the oral cavity (oral microbiota) contribute to health and disease, and influence diseases like gingivitis, periodontitis, and oral candidiasis (the most common oral complication of HIV-infection). These organisms are also associated with cancer and other systemic diseases including upper respiratory infections. There is limited knowledge regarding how oral microbes interact together and influence the host immune system. Characterizing the oral microbial community (oral microbiota) in health and disease represents a critical step in gaining insight into various members of this community. While most of the studies characterizing oral microbiota have focused on bacterial community, there are few encouraging studies characterizing the oral mycobiome (the fungal component of the oral microbiota). Our group recently characterized the oral mycobiome in health and disease focusing on HIV. In this chapter we will describe the methods used by our group for characterization of the oral mycobiome.

  7. Need for Oral Health Policy in India

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    implementation of National Oral Health Policy in India in order to expand the oral health care to ... Professional dental organizations can also support government programs to .... who can play effective role in providing oral health care services.

  8. Oral candidiasis following steroid therapy for oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marable, D R; Bowers, L M; Stout, T L; Stewart, C M; Berg, K M; Sankar, V; DeRossi, S S; Thoppay, J R; Brennan, M T

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this multicentre study was to determine the incidence of oral candidiasis in patients treated with topical steroids for oral lichen planus (OLP) and to determine whether the application of a concurrent antifungal therapy prevented the development of an oral candidiasis in these patients. Records of 315 patients with OLP seen at four Oral Medicine practices treated for at least 2 weeks with steroids with and without the use of an antifungal regimen were retrospectively reviewed. The overall incidence of oral fungal infection in those treated with steroid therapy for OLP was 13.6%. There was no statistically significant difference in the rate of oral candidiasis development in those treated with an antifungal regimen vs those not treated prophylactically (14.3% vs 12.6%) (P = 0.68). Despite the use of various regimens, none of the preventive antifungal strategies used in this study resulted in a significant difference in the rate of development of an oral candidiasis in patients with OLP treated with steroids. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Nutrition and Oral Health: Experiences in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Zohre Sadat Sangsefidi; Amin Salehi-Abargouei

    2017-01-01

    Background: Oral health is a crucial factor for overall well-being and there is a mutual relationship between nutrition and oral health. The aim of this study was to review the publications which have examined the association between nutrition or diet and oral health status or oral disease in Iran. Methods: The electronic databases of PubMed, Scopus, Google scholar, scientific information database (SID), and Magiran were searched using key words of diet, nutrition, oral health, oral disease, ...

  10. The oral microbiome - an update for oral healthcare professionals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilian, M; Chapple, I L C; Hannig, M

    2016-01-01

    disease-promoting bacteria to manifest and cause conditions such as caries, gingivitis and periodontitis. For practitioners and patients alike, promoting a balanced microbiome is therefore important to effectively maintain or restore oral health. This article aims to give an update on our current...... and health. The mouth houses the second most diverse microbial community in the body, harbouring over 700 species of bacteria that colonise the hard surfaces of teeth and the soft tissues of the oral mucosa. Through recent advances in technology, we have started to unravel the complexities of the oral...

  11. Neurofibromatosis tipo I con manifestaciones en el periodonto y lengua: presentación de un caso Type I neurofibromatosis with periodontal and lingual manifestations: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Negreiros Lyrio

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available La enfermedad de Von Recklinghausen o Neurofibromatosis Tipo I (NF1 es una condición autosómica dominante que presenta una variada expresión clínica, con manifestaciones que van desde manchas tipo café con leche en piel a severas complicaciones estéticas y funcionales afectando los tejidos óseos y nerviosos. Las manifestaciones orales de la NF1 son comunes, afectando aproximadamente al 72% de los pacientes. Presentamos un caso de NF1 con lesiones neurofibromatosas afectando al reborde alveolar inferior y lengua, con indicación de excisión quirúrgica debido a la dificultad de higiene local.Von Recklinghausen’s disease, or type I neurofibromatosis (NF-1, is an autosomal dominant condition with a varied clinical expression. Disease manifestations may range from café au lait spots of the skin to severe cosmetic and functional complications that affect bone and nervous tissues. Oral manifestations of NF-1 are common, affecting approximately 72% of patients. We report a case of NF-1 with neurofibromatous lesions of the lower alveolar bridge and tongue. Resection was indicated due to the difficulty of maintaining oral hygiene.

  12. Oral cancer: A multicenter study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojanawatsirivej, Somsri; Thosaporn, Watcharaporn; Kintarak, Sompid; Subarnbhesaj, Ajiravudh; Darling, Mark; Kryshtalskyj, Eugene; Chiang, Chun-Pin; Shin, Hong-In; Choi, So-Young; Lee, Sang-shin; Shakib, Pouyan-Amini

    2018-01-01

    Background To determine the prevalence and clinicopathologic features of the oral cancer patients. Material and Methods Biopsy records of the participating institutions were reviewed for oral cancer cases diagnosed from 2005 to 2014. Demographic data and site of the lesions were collected. Sites of the lesion were subdivided into lip, tongue, floor of the mouth, gingiva, alveolar mucosa, palate, buccal/labial mucosa, maxilla and mandible. Oral cancer was subdivided into 7 categories: epithelial tumors, salivary gland tumors, hematologic tumors, bone tumors, mesenchymal tumors, odontogenic tumors, and others. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics using SPSS software version 17.0. Results Of the 474,851 accessioned cases, 6,151 cases (1.30%) were diagnosed in the category of oral cancer. The mean age of the patients was 58.37±15.77 years. A total of 4,238 cases (68.90%) were diagnosed in males, whereas 1911 cases (31.07%) were diagnosed in females. The male-to-female ratio was 2.22:1. The sites of predilection for oral cancer were tongue, labial/buccal mucosa, gingiva, palate, and alveolar mucosa, respectively. The three most common oral cancer in the descending order of frequency were squamous cell carcinoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma and mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Conclusions Although the prevalence of oral cancer is not high compared to other entities, oral cancer pose significant mortality and morbidity in the patients, especially when discovered late in the course of the disease. This study highlights some anatomical locations where oral cancers are frequently encountered. As a result, clinicians should pay attention to not only teeth, but oral mucosa especially in the high prevalence area as well since early detection of precancerous lesions or cancers in the early stage increase the chance of patient being cured and greatly reduce the mortality and morbidity. This study also shows some differences between pediatric and elderly oral cancer patients as well as

  13. Oral symptoms and salivary findings in oral lichen planus, oral lichenoid lesions and stomatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kristine Roen; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Reibel, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To examine if patients with oral lichen planus, oral lichenoid lesions and generalised stomatitis and concomitant contact allergy have more frequent and severe xerostomia, lower unstimulated and chewing-stimulated saliva and citric-acid-stimulated parotid saliva flow rates, and higher...... of xerostomia, clinical examination, sialometry, mucosal biopsy and contact allergy testing. RESULTS: Nineteen patients had oral lichen planus, 19 patients had oral lichenoid lesions and 11 patients had generalised stomatitis. 38.8% had contact allergy. Xerostomia was significantly more common and severe...... in the chewing stimulated saliva samples from patients when compared to healthy controls. The differences were not significant and they were irrespective of the presence of contact allergy. CONCLUSION: Xerostomia is prevalent in patients with oral lichen planus, lichenoid lesions and generalised stomatitis...

  14. Amiloidosis bucal Oral amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Lima Arrais Ribeiro

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A amiloidose é uma doença complexa rara de difícil diagnóstico que ocorre devido à deposição de substância amilóide no meio extracelular. Ao ser diagnosticado na cavidade bucal, deve-se monitorar o paciente a fim de avaliar possíveis complicações sistêmicas da doença. Diante disso, o objetivo do presente estudo é relatar um caso de amiloidose oral em uma paciente do gênero feminino de 72 anos de idade. Baseado nos sinais clínicos observados, a hipótese diagnóstica foi de fibroma traumático. Após realização de biópsia e exame histopatológico, o diagnóstico foi de amiloidose oral, o que foi confirmado com a coloração do espécime com o reagente vermelho congo. Depósitos de amilóide foram encontrados no tecido conjuntivo, na avaliação através da luz polarizada, que apresentou birrefringência. Tal achado foi preocupante, já que a amiloidose geralmente acomete diversos tecidos levando a comprometimentos sistêmicos. Por essa razão a paciente foi encaminhada a procurar atendimento médico. No entanto, houve abandono do tratamento e a mesma veio a óbito 6 meses após o diagnóstico da doença. Lesões orais aparentemente simples podem revelar doenças raras e de difícil tratamento. O diagnóstico preciso e acompanhamentos médicos são fundamentais na sobrevida do paciente.La amiloidosis es una enfermedad compleja, rara, de difícil diagnóstico, que ocurre debido al depósito de sustancia amiloidea en medio extracelular. Al ser diagnosticada en la cavidad bucal, el paciente debe tener supervisión médica para evaluar las posibles complicaciones sistémicas de la enfermedad. El objetivo del presente estudio fue presentar un caso de amiloidosis bucal en un paciente del género femenino de 72 años de edad. Basados en las señales clínicas observadas, la hipótesis diagnóstica fue de un fibroma traumático. Después de la realización de una biopsia y del examen histopatológico, el diagnóstico fue de amiloidosis

  15. Criteria for Evaluating Oral History Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonsino, Frank J.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the rationale for establishing criteria for evaluating oral history interviews. Presents seven evaluation categories relating to oral history tapes and three categories relating to typescripts. (CK)

  16. Genetic etiology of oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Johar; Sabiha, Bibi; Jan, Hanif Ullah; Haider, Syed Adnan; Khan, Abid Ali; Ali, Saima S

    2017-07-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common cancer worldwide. It accounts for 2.5% of all new cancer cases and 1.9% of all cancer deaths annually. More than 90% of oral cancers (occurring in the mouth, lip, and tongue) are oral squamous cell carcinoma. The incidence rate of oral cancer varies widely throughout the world, with an evident prevalence in South Asian countries. This high incidence occurs in correlation with oral cancer-associated behaviors such as alcohol, tobacco use. Researchers have reported that these behaviors lead to genetic variations in tumor suppressor genes (APC, p53), proto-oncogenes (Myc), oncogene (Ras) and genes controlling normal cellular processes (EIF3E, GSTM1). Processes such as segregation of chromosomes, genomic copy number, loss of heterozygosity, telomere stabilities, regulations of cell-cycle checkpoints, DNA damage repairs and defects in notch signaling pathways are involved in causing oral cancer. In order to develop preventive and therapeutic options, it is necessary to comprehend the basic molecular mechanisms forcing oral tumorigenesis. This review examines, in detail, the mechanisms of genetic alteration which are considered to be responsible for the initiation of oral cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Oral fibrolipoma: A rare histological variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Treville Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipomas are benign soft tissue mesenchymal neoplasms. Fibrolipoma is a histological variant of lipoma that mostly affects the buccal mucosa and causes functional and cosmetic disabilities. The diagnosis and differentiation of fibrolipoma with clinically similar lesions such as fibroma and pleomorphic adenoma is very essential for a correct treatment plan and complete follow-up. This article presents a case of a 35-year-old female with a fibrolipoma on the lingual marginal gingiva of the mandibular left third molar.

  18. ORAL HYGIENE PRACTICES AND RISK OF ORAL LEUKOPLAKIA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-04-01

    Apr 1, 2006 ... EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL ... Faculty of Dental Sciences, University of Nairobi, P.O. Box 19676 - 00202, Nairobi, ... Poor oral hygiene is a product of plaque and ..... University of Nairobi and Kenya Medical Research.

  19. Oral hygiene and oral flora evaluation in psychiatric patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-03-02

    Mar 2, 2015 ... Key words: Bacteria types, oral and dental illnesses, psychiatric patients. Date of Acceptance: .... patients, and difficulties such as insufficient sedation.[7]. This study .... Despite the general notion that stress triggers bruxism ...

  20. Oral lichen planus to oral lichenoid lesions: Evolution or revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudhia, Bhavin B; Dudhia, Sonal B; Patel, Purv S; Jani, Yesha V

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis between different diseases may be impaired by clinical and histopathologic similarities, as observed in the oral lichen planus (OLP) and oral lichenoid lesion (OLL). Inspite of similar clinicopathological features; etiology, diagnosis and prognosis differ which mandates separation of OLL from OLP. Hence, it is essential for the oral physician and oral pathologist to be familiarized with the individual variations among clinicopathological features of OLP and OLL as well as to obtain a thorough history and perform a complete mucocutaneous examination in addition to specific diagnostic testing. The difficulties faced to establish the diagnosis between these two pathologies are widely investigated in the literature with a lack of definite conclusion. This review is an attempt to throw some light on these clinicopathologic entities with the aim to resolve the diagnostic dilemma. PMID:26980966

  1. Recurrent oral angioleiomyoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V G Mahima

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Angioleiomyomas are vascular variant of leiomyomas which are benign tumors of smooth muscle. They are exceedingly rare in the oral cavity. Malignant transformation of these tumors has also been reported occasionally which warrants knowledge of this soft tissue tumor. A 57 year old male patient reported with a 15 day history of an asymptomatic growth that had started insidiously in his lower left back tooth region. Clinical examination revealed a solitary, oval, sessile growth in the mandibular left retro molar region. Excisional biopsy was suggestive of Angioleiomyoma. A recurrence of the same was noted two months later which was also histopathologically reported as Angioleiomyoma. The same was confirmed using special stains. This case reports an unusual presentation of Angioleiomyoma with regards to both recurrence as well as rapid growth. It is important to be well aware of this uncommon entity as these tumors often can mimic or transform into malignancy. Precise clinicopathological examinations are therefore invaluable in establishing an accurate diagnosis and delivering suitable treatment.

  2. Oral contraception following abortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Yan; Liu, Xiaoting; Zhang, Bin; Cheng, Linan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Oral contraceptives (OCs) following induced abortion offer a reliable method to avoid repeated abortion. However, limited data exist supporting the effective use of OCs postabortion. We conducted this systematic review and meta-analysis in the present study reported immediate administration of OCs or combined OCs postabortion may reduce vaginal bleeding time and amount, shorten the menstruation recovery period, increase endometrial thickness 2 to 3 weeks after abortion, and reduce the risk of complications and unintended pregnancies. A total of 8 major authorized Chinese and English databases were screened from January 1960 to November 2014. Randomized controlled trials in which patients had undergone medical or surgical abortions were included. Chinese studies that met the inclusion criteria were divided into 3 groups: administration of OC postmedical abortion (group I; n = 1712), administration of OC postsurgical abortion (group II; n = 8788), and administration of OC in combination with traditional Chinese medicine postsurgical abortion (group III; n = 19,707). In total, 119 of 6160 publications were included in this analysis. Significant difference was observed in group I for vaginal bleeding time (P = 0.0001), the amount of vaginal bleeding (P = 0.03), and menstruation recovery period (P abortion (P abortion, and reduce the risk of complications and unintended pregnancies. PMID:27399060

  3. Oral sensations and secretions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Running, Cordelia A

    2018-04-10

    Sensations experienced in the mouth influence food choices, both immediately and in the long term. Such sensations are themselves influenced by experience with flavors, the chemical environment of the mouth, genetics of receptors for flavors, and individual behavior in the chewing of food. Gustation, the sense of taste, yields information about nutrients, influences palatability, and feeds into the human body's preparation to receive those nutrients. Olfaction, the sense of smell, contributes enormously to defining and identifying food flavors (and is experienced even after placing food inside the mouth). Another vital component of food flavor is texture, which contributes to palatability, especially if a food's texture violates a person's expectations. Next, chemesthesis is the sense of chemically induced irritancy and temperature, for example spiciness and stinging. All of these sensations are potentially modified by saliva, the chemical and physical media of the mouth. As a person experiences the culmination of these oral sensations, modified through an individual's own unique saliva, the flavors in turn influence both what and how a person eats. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Oral cavity eumycetoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Alborghetti Nai

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Mycetoma is a pathological process in which eumycotic (fungal or actinomycotic causative agents from exogenous source produce grains. It is a localized chronic and deforming infectious disease of subcutaneous tissue, skin and bones. We report the first case of eumycetoma of the oral cavity in world literature. CASE REPORT: A 43-year-old male patient, complaining of swelling and fistula in the hard palate. On examination, swelling of the anterior and middle hard palate, with fistula draining a dark liquid was observed. The panoramic radiograph showed extensive radiolucent area involving the region of teeth 21-26 and the computerized tomography showed communication with the nasal cavity, suggesting the diagnosis of periapical cyst. Surgery was performed to remove the lesion. Histopathological examination revealed purulent material with characteristic grain. Gram staining for bacteria was negative and Grocott-Gomori staining for the detection of fungi was positive, concluding the diagnosis of eumycetoma. The patient was treated with ketoconazole for nine months, and was considered cured at the end of treatment. CONCLUSION: Histopathological examination, using histochemical staining, and direct microscopic grains examination can provide the distinction between eumycetoma and actinomycetoma accurately.

  5. Loggerhead oral cavity morphometry study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard external morphometrics and internal oral cavity morphometrics data were collected on wild and captive reared loggerhead sea turtles in size classes ranging...

  6. Oral candidosis in lichen planus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Camilla; Kieffer-Kristensen, L; Reibel, J

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Candida albicans is the most common fungal pathogen in humans, but other Candida species cause candidosis. Candida species display significant differences in their susceptibility to antimycotic drugs. Patients with symptomatic or erythematous oral lichen planus (OLP) commonly have...

  7. Hydroxyurea-induced oral ulceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, Maha; Almazrooa, Soulafa; Azher, Fatima; Alsayes, Fatin

    2015-12-01

    Hydroxyurea is an antimetabolite that is widely used in the treatment of many benign and malignant conditions. This drug is usually well tolerated but has a number of side effects that vary in incidence. In cases of clinically significant adverse events, hydroxyurea is usually discontinued either temporarily or permanently, depending on treatment need versus harm caused by side effects. Here, we report a case of oral ulceration associated with hydroxyurea treatment in a patient who had chronic myelogenous leukemia. The patient rapidly developed an oral ulcer 12 days after administration of the drug. Hydroxyurea was discontinued, and the oral lesion appreciably decreased in size and severity. Physicians and dentists should be aware of the association between hydroxyurea and oral lesions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the face, mouth and gums to improve function, appearance and oral health. Click here to find ... the need for harmony between facial appearance and function. As a result, OMSs are uniqely qualified to ...

  9. Oral delivery of anticancer drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thanki, Kaushik; Gangwal, Rahul P; Sangamwar, Abhay T

    2013-01-01

    The present report focuses on the various aspects of oral delivery of anticancer drugs. The significance of oral delivery in cancer therapeutics has been highlighted which principally includes improvement in quality of life of patients and reduced health care costs. Subsequently, the challenges...... incurred in the oral delivery of anticancer agents have been especially emphasized. Sincere efforts have been made to compile the various physicochemical properties of anticancer drugs from either literature or predicted in silico via GastroPlus™. The later section of the paper reviews various emerging...... trends to tackle the challenges associated with oral delivery of anticancer drugs. These invariably include efflux transporter based-, functional excipient- and nanocarrier based-approaches. The role of drug nanocrystals and various others such as polymer based- and lipid based...

  10. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in face, mouth and jaw surgery.™ What We Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find a Surgeon What We Do Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively ...

  11. Diabetes mellitus and oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević N.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common non-communicable chronic diseases, which is the combined action of genetic factors, environmental factors and lifestyle. Specific conditions occur in the oral cavity in the course of diabetes that cause changes in all oral tissues with different symptoms and signs. Increased salivary glucose level is followed by increased accumulation of dental plaque and decreased resistance to noxious agents. The most common oral manifestations in diabetic patients include higher prevalence of periodontal desease, burning mouth syndrome, disruption in salivary flow, opportunistic infections, higher prevalence of denture stomatitis, oral lichen planus, fissured tongue, angular cheilitis etc. Dental interventions in patients with well-controlled diabetes are not different from those applied to nondiabetic patients. Regular monitoring of these patients is required because of the complications that can occur.

  12. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... one of your body's most important early warning systems. Don't ignore any suspicious lumps or sores. ... and maxillofacial surgeon. Oral and maxillofacial surgeons: The experts in face, mouth and jaw surgery Contact Us ...

  13. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... It can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Who We ... It can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Oral, Head ...

  14. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... We Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find a Surgeon What We Do Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral ... of sedation and general anesthesia. Click here to find out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery ...

  15. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Neck Pathology Download Download the ebook for further information Your oral and maxillofacial surgeon (OMS) is the ... well be the key to complete recovery. The information provided here is not intended as a substitute ...

  16. Oncofetal fibronectins in oral carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandel, U; Gaggero, B; Reibel, J

    1994-01-01

    -B-containing isoform and the oncofetal FN isoform derived by O-glycosylation, in oral squamous cell carcinomas, premalignant lesions, and normal oral mucosa. A selective expression of the ED-B-containing isoform was demonstrated in close relation to the invading carcinoma (38/38), whereas there was virtually...... no staining in submucosa underlying premalignant lesions (1/11) and normal epithelium (0/5). The ED-B-containing FN showed close co-distribution and staining pattern with the oncofetal isoform derived by O-glycosylation. These results demonstrate that accumulation of FN adjacent to oral carcinomas includes...... in breast and oral tumors. Another oncofetal FN isoform containing the ED-B sequence is derived by alternative splicing, and FN containing ED-B has been found to be a stromal marker of malignancies in various tissues. Here we report a comparative study by immunohistology of the distribution of the ED...

  17. Oral contraceptives and neuroactive steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapkin, Andrea J; Biggio, Giovanni; Concas, Alessandra

    2006-08-01

    A deregulation in the peripheral and brain concentrations of neuroactive steroids has been found in certain pathological conditions characterized by emotional or affective disturbances, including major depression and anxiety disorders. In this article we summarize data pertaining to the modulatory effects of oral contraceptive treatment on neuroactive steroids in women and rats. Given that the neuroactive steroids concentrations are reduced by oral contraceptives, together with the evidence that a subset of women taking oral contraceptives experience negative mood symptoms, we propose the use of this pharmacological treatment as a putative model to study the role of neuroactive steroids in the etiopathology of mood disorders. Moreover, since neuroactive steroids are potent modulators of GABA(A) receptor function and plasticity, the treatment with oral contraceptives might also represent a useful experimental model to further investigate the physiological role of these steroids in the modulation of GABAergic transmission.

  18. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... teeth or become infected. It can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out ... and surgically treating cancer of the head, neck and mouth. The Oral Cancer Foundation estimates that close to ...

  19. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... attune the oral and maxillofacial surgeon to the need for harmony between facial appearance and function. As ... or pharyngeal cancer this year. Here’s what you need to know. Click here to find out more. ...

  20. Oral Insulin - Fact or Fiction?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    attempts have explored the following options, either singly, or together: • Protecting ... derivative of insulin has been seen to maintain its biological activity and also have .... that in the short future any oral preparation that can achieve consistent ...